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UNITS O KINODOM 



Official catalogue 



srnational exhibi 
, Germany, Paris 



n, 1865, 
Exposition 




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KINGDOM OF ITALY 

ILLUSTRATED 

OFFICIAL CATALOGUE 

SECOND EDITION 



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DUBUN INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION, 1865 



KINGDOM OF ITALY 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE 



ILLUSTRATED AND ENGRAVINGS 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE 



ROYAL ITALIAN COMMISSION 



TO BE HAD AT THE ITALIAN OFFICE IN THE EXHIBITION 



l>niCK «8. ed. — Bypost Ss. 



SECOND EDITION 




TURIN 

f ■ 
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING UNION 

Via Carlo Alberto 

1865. 



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PREFACE 



In publishing the present work the Royal Italian Commission have had 
a double end in view ; while oflfering to the intelligent visitor to the Exhi- 
bition a guide containing suflScient description of the most important and 
novel objects to render it more interesting than a simple inventory , such 
as catalogues generally are, they felt that their first duty was essentially to 
promote the development of commercial relations between Italy and other 
countries, affording all possible facilities to merchants, and inserting the 
prices of the articles sent , a large class of which must be considered as 
sampl3s, suggested as suited for establishing increased trade with Italy. 

the wines, oils, preserved meats, dried fruits ; the raw cotton, silks, 
straw-work, and gloves, no less than the cameos, coral and lava work, 
ornamental articles in serpentine , terra-cotta manufactures , carved furni- 
ture , brass musical instruments , and other objects , might all be more 
largely exported with advantage. Although the number of contributors is 
small, great care was taken in selecting them to^admit only such as would 
do honor to the country, and Jurors of formet: jBternational Exhibitions 
will see with pleasure the reappearance of a lafge proportion of those to 
whom they have already awarded prizes. ; 

The Italian Department, however incomplete it may be, from diflSculties 
which it would be useless to enumerate here, has a special importance and 
interest, as marking a progress in the economic condition of the kingdom, 
having been got up, without pecuniary aid from the Government, by the 
force of individual efforts, seconded by the principal Chambers of Commerce 
and Municipal authorities. The enlightened cooperation afforded Ly the 
Sub-Committees, especially those of Milan, Florence and Naples, have 
tended greatly to promote the success of the undertaking. If this Court be 
found wanting in the richness of decoration visible in other parts of the 
building, the imperfection must be attributed to the causes sp^ified , but 
such as it is, it will prove the willingness of Italians to contribute to the 
Dublin International Exhibition. 

Turin, 1865. 



FOR THE ROYAL ITALIAN COMMISSION 

The President The Secretary 

HATTEIJ€€I« JERTIS. 



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Explanation of signs employed in (his Catalogue. 



An Asterisk, * signifies that the Exhibitor obtained a prize medal at the Exhibition , 

held in the City and during the year mentioned. 
A Cross, t signifies that the received an honorable mention. 
Weights and Measures have been uniformly reduced to the English standard, as well 

as the prices of the objects exhibited. 



PAPER PRESENTED BY THE MANUFACTURES, MAGUA, PIGNA, AND CO., 
OF MILAN. — See page 66. 



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DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION, 1865 




ROYAL ITALIAN COMMISSION 

TUFillV 

INSTITUTED BY THE 

MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE 

26th December, 1864. 



Matteucci Gomm. Prof. Carlo, Senator, 
President 

Agodino Chev. Aw. Pio, Director of the 
City Fine Arts gallery, Vice-President. 

Arezzo Despuches Chev. Corrado, Baron 
of Donnafugata, Member of the Ita- 
lian Parliament. 

Corioni Comm. Giulio, Secretary of the 
Royal Lombard Institute of Science, 
Letters, and Arts. 

Devincenzi Gomm. Giuseppe, Member of 
the Italian Parliament, Director of 
the Royal Italian Industrial Museum 
at Turin. 



Elliot Hon. Henry, Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenepotentiary of H. M. 
the Queen of Great Britain and Ire- 
land at the Court of H. M. the 'King 
of Italy. 

Jervis Chev. W. P., Curator of the 
Royal Industrial Museum, Turin, Se- 
cretary. 

Manna Comm. Prof. Giovanni, Senator. 

Rey Chev. Luigi, Manufacturer. 

Tasca Chev. Dr. Giovanni Battista^ Pre- 
sident of the Chamber of Commerce 
and Arts. 



srjB.oo:M::M:iTTE:E]s 



ANCONA 
Office: — Chamber of CommerGe and Arts. 



Almagi& David di M. F. 
Baldantoni Natale. 
Beretta Chev. Daniele. 



Colonelli Chev. Luigi. 
Dinner Baldassarre , Vice-President of 
the Chamber of Commerce. 



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VUI 



DUBLIN INTERNAZIONAL EXHIBITION 



Euzeby Lnigi. 

Farsetti Chev. Pietro , President of the 

Chamber of Commerce, President 
Ferrari Carlo, Secretary of the Chamber 

of Commerce, Secretary. 
Gradmann Gian Giacomo. 



MoroUet Luigl. 
Morichi Gio. Battista. 
Penacchietti AntODio. 
Temi Gioachino. 
Vignini Innocenso. 



BARI 
Office : — Chaiaber of Gommeree and Arts. 



Forges Davanzati Alessandro, Prpyin- 

cial Deputy, President 
Gallo Canon Nicola. 
Lenzi Filippo, Secretary, 



Pantaleo Nicola. 

Pellerano Stefano, Administrator of the 
NatioDal Bank. 



BERGAMO 
Office : — Chftfliker of CojBHuerce aod Arts, 



Beriszi Stefano, Secretary of the Natio- 
nal Bank. 
Roncalli Count Antonio, Member of the 



Academy of Fine Arts. 
Rossi Aw. Filippo , Secretary of the 
Chamber of Commerce, Secretary. 



Office 



BOLOGNA 
Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Arienti Comm. Prof. Carlo , Director of 
the Acadeniy of Fine Arts. 

Bean Carlo. 

Buratti Pietro C. E., Secretary, • 

Gnidelli Count Chev. Angeio, President 
of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Lagorio. Chev. Antonio, Administrator of 
the National Bank, President. 



Maaini Prof. Gosare , Secretary of tiie 
Academy of Fine Arts. 

Putti Massimiliano , Prof, at the Aca- 
demy of Fine Arts. 

RiiBOli Cber. Haffaele, Administrator of 
the National Baak. * 

Sacci Dr. Efidio Franceaco. 



Office: 



CA^GLIAM. 
Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Fomara Simone. 
Fevrier Camillo. 
Massoni Marcello. 
Palomba Giuseppe, 



Secretary of the 



Chamber of Commerce, Secretary' 
Rossi Dona Gaetan^. 
Serpieri Chev. Enrico, President of the 

Chamber of Commerce, President 



Office : — 



Gnccaro Rafifaele. 
De-Rnggiero Stefano. 
Galloszi (Hacomo. 



CABERTA 
ChtMlar of CeaMrco afid Ark. 

I Jeniziani Franc. 
Leonetti Chev. Wchrte. 



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nAUAN SUB-GOIIIfITTES& 



iX 



Oflee: 



CATAMA 
ChiBber of CwMMrce ant Arts. 



Difgb Edoardo, Secretary of the National 

Bank. 
Di-Benedetto Fk'ancesco, Vice President 

of the Chamber of Commerce and 

Arts. 
Jones John, Eisq. British Yice-Consnl. 



Motta Orazio. 

Majorana Baron Giuseppe, President of 

the Chamber of Commerce^ Ptesident 
Sacchero Giacomo. 
Tomabene Francesco , Prof, of Botany 

and Materia Medica, SecreUvry^ 



COMO 
•ffiee : -^ Ckamber •! eomoMnrse and Arts. 



BarberiHi Lnigi , Tiee-President of the 
Chamber of Conuneree and- Arts. 

Mondelli Chev. Giuseppe , President of 
the Chamber of Cemmerce, President 



ITobili Luigi 

Rezzonico Giovanni , Secretary of the 
Chamber of Commerce, Sectekury, 



FLORENCE 
Office : — Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Barbetti Chev. Angelo, Manufacturer of 
carved furniture. 

BarzeUotti Aw. Pier Luigi , Secretary 
of the Chamber of Commerce , Secre- 
ta/ry. 

Bianchini Gaetano, Manufacturer of mo- 
saics. 



Conti Chev. Cesare , President of the 
Chamber of Commerce, President 

Du Fresne Luigi. 

Fedi Chev. Pio, Prof, of Sculpture. 

Lami Carlo, Prof, of painting. 

Lever Charles, Esq. British Vice-Consul 
at Spezia. 



GENOA 
Office : — Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Galenzoli Chev. Giuseppe , Royal Com- 
missioner at the National Bank. 

GasareUo llichele , President of the 
Chamb^i of Conuneree and Arts, 
President. 



Ferrari Aw. Carlo Felice, Sub-Prefect 

of Savona. 
MiUo Giacomo, Yice^Preddent of the 

Chamber of Commerce^ and Arts. 
Romaneugo. — Sceruo Enrico. 



LEGHORN 
Office: — Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 
Tosfizia Baron leodovo, Fsesident of the Chamber of Commerce and* Arts. 



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DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION 



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LUCCA 
Offlee : — Chamber of Gommerte and Arts. 



Bertacchi Angelo, C. E. 

Buck Dr Tommaso. 

GaBiberini Carlo, 

Gninifi Ghev. Count Nicola, President 

of the Academy of Fine Arts. 
Michelnccini Dr Raffaele, President of 

the Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Onestini Chev. Sebastiano, Professor of 

painting, President 
Ridolfi Prof. Enrico, Secretarif, 
Santini Aw. Giuseppe* 
Sari Baldaasarre, Vice-President of the 

Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Office: 



MACERATA 
Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Baldini Vincenzo, President of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce and Arts. 

Belardini Aw. Ernesto , Prof, of penal 
procedure and administrative right. 
President 

Bocci Pietro. 

Cerquetti Dr Giorgio , Secretary of the 
Chamber of Commerce, Secretary. 

Fabioli Tommaso, Vice-President of the 



Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 
Martinelli Annibale. 
Montini Vincenzo. 
Paoletti Raffaele. 
Perfetti Francesco. 
Ripari Gesare. 
Senesi Teodoro, C. E. 
Tambroni Armaroli Count EmestOv 



MESSINA 
Office : — Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Ainis Gaetano. 
Costarelli Mariano. 
Loteta Giacomo. 

Natoli Loigi. Government Commissary at 
the National Bank. 



Panebianco Michele, Prof, of drawing 

and painting. 
Preve Gio. Battista, President of the 

Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 
Rew Enrico. 



MIUN 

Offices : — Raw Prodacts and Industry : Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 
Fine Arts : Royal Academy of Fine Arts. 

Caimi Chev. Antonio , Secretary of the I Pisani Chev. Dr Giovanni, Secretary of 
Royal Academy of Fine Arts. | the Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



MODENA 
: — Chamber of Commerei and Arts. 



Agazzotti Aw. Trancescd. 

Amici Ignazio AgosHno. 

Borsari Francesco , Secretary of the 



Chamber of Commerce and Arts, Se- 
creta/ry. 
Bortolani Vincenzo, President of the 



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ITALIAN SUB-COMMITTEES 



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Chamber of Commerce and Arts, Pre- 

sident 
Gapelli Geminiano. 
Camelli Federico. 
Gattaneo Gelso. 
Gloetta Antonio. 



Diana Moise, 6. Administrator of the 

National Bank. 
Sandri Giovanni Battista. 
Taglizncchi Lorenzo 
Urbino Moise , Vice-President of the 

Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



NAPLES 

Office : — Royal Institution for the Eoconragement of Arts 
and Hannfactnres. 



Avitabile Marquis Michele, President. 

Bonham Walter, British Consul. 

De-Lnca Chev. Sebastiano, Prof, of Che- 
mistry at the University. 

Del Giudice Chev. Francesco, Secretary 
of the Istituto d'incoraggiamento, Pre- 
sident of the Istituto Tecnico. 



Fiorelli Chev. Giuseppe, Director general 
of the excavations at Pompeii, etc.; 
Director of the National Museum. 

Incagnoli Chev. Angelo. 

NoYi Chev. Francesco. 

Salyi Chev. Gesare, Government Commis- 
sary at the National Bank, Secretary. 



PALERMO 
Office: — Town HaU. 



Anca Baron Francesco. 

Benso Giulio, Duke della Verdura, Se- 
nator. 

Gannizzaro Chev. Stanislao, Pdofessor of 
Chemistry. 

Goppon Francesco, Government Com- 
missary at the National Bank. 



Goodwin Alexander, British Consul. 

Lancia Federico, Duke of Brolo, Secre- 
tary. 

Rndini Marquis Antonio , Mayor of Pa- 
lermo, President 

Trigona Romualdo, Prince of S. Elia, 
Senator. 



PARMA 
Office: — Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Armani Chev. Bvaristo , Civil Engineer, 
Bertocchi Giacomo, Merchant and leather 

manufacturer. 
Gavezzali Lnigi. 

Lombardini Prof. Garl \ Secretary. 
Marchelli Sante, Iron Founder. 



Scaramuzza Chev. Francesco, Frofl of 

painting and Director of the Academy 

of Fine Arts. 
Varanini Giuseppe , Vice-President of 

the Chamber of Commerce and Arts, 

President 



REGGIO D'EMILIA 
Office : — Chamber of Commerce and Arts. 



Ferrarini Dr Attilio, President 
Pelizzi Prof. Domenico. 
Raya Aristide, Secretary. 



Seidenari Gontardo. 
Terracchini Prof. Garlo. 



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XII 



DUBLIN mrCRNBTIONAL EXUBITION 



TURIN 

(Fiae Arts Bub-Gommittee). 
Office : -- Royal Alberane Academy of Fine Arts. 



Arborlo dl Breme Marqids Ferdhtando, 

Senator, President 
Biscarra Chev. Carlo Felice, Secretary. 
Ferri Ghey. Gaetano , Prof, of paintiiig, 

Vice-Presideivi. 
Oamba Chev. Enrico , Prof, of drawing. 



Gamba Baron Francesco, Prof, of pant- 
ing. 
Gastaldi Chev. Andrea, Prof, of (^ting. 
Gori Chev. Guido, Artist. 
^Vela Comm. Vincenzd, Prof, of Sculptor* 
Yolpato Chev. Giovanni, Engraver. 



. GOVERiNMENT DELEGATES 

»l^l»«teted te receive the eases at tlie several Parts. 

, (Instituted by Ministerial decree, 30th January 1865). 

Genoa. — For Northern Italy. 
Galenzoli Ghev. Giuseppe, Gommissary at the National Bank, 

Leghorn. — For Gentral Italy. 
— — The President of the Ghamber of Gommerce and Arts. 

Messina. — For the Provinces of Messina and Gatania. 
Nat<4i Loigi, Government Gommissary at the National Bank. 

Naples. For the Southern mainland Provinces. 
Saliri Ghev. Gesare, Government Gommissary at the National Bank. 

Palermo. — For the Provinces of Palermo, Trapani and Island of Sardinia. 
Goppon Francesco. — Government Gommissary at the National Bank. 

Intermediate port* 

Gauarl — For the Island of Sardinia. 
Serpitfl Qbof. EnrkOi President ei the Ghamber of Gommeree aad Arts. 



JR4[>yal Italiaxi. Oonnxnlsslonex* ixk I>u.1>lixi.* 

Arezso Despaches Gorrado , Baron of Dnnnafugata , Heuibclr of the Italian Far-' 
liament 

Commissary Inspector of the Italian Department. 
Marani Angnsto Gesare, Italian Gonsul in Dublin. 



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DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION, 1865 



LISTS OF JURY AWARDS 



SECTION I. Med.1. 

1 . Barbagallo S. — For excellent quality of sulphur, v 

3. Directors of the Mont Cenis railway Tunnel through the Alps. — For the 
collections of rocks met with in piercing the tunnel, and as a mark of the in- 
terest felt in the success of the great undertaking of the company. 
11. RoMAGNA Sulphur Mines. — For excellence and skill in manufacture. 

14. Santini Aw. G. — For specimens of Seravezza marhle. 

Honourable Mention. 

5. Lancia F. Duke of Brolo. — For exhibition of sulphur, crystallized sulphur, and 

interesting minerals. 

6. Mascolo G. — For fine specimens of steel. 

7. MORET, Pedrone and Co. — For collections of copper, nickel, and lead ores. 

8. Novi Prof. G. — For his industrial mineral collection. 

15. Sardinian Salt Works Company. — For fine collection of table salt. 

18. Lentini R. — For exhibition of bituminous marl, sulphur, and manganese. 

ii. Medal. 

15. Sardinun Salt Works Company. — For common and other salts prepared from 

sea water. 
22. Antonino Baron C. — For essential oils. 

26. Canduni and Co. — For chemical products. 

27. Catania Sub-Committee for the Dublin International Exhibition. — For li- 

quorice and certain chemical products. 

28. CiARANFi G., and Convent of the Servite Friars. —For bicarbonates, prepared 

from the carbonic acid of the mineral springs of Cmciano. 

30. CoNSANi E. — For collections of pigments. 

32. De Luca Prof. S. — For mannite extracted from different parts of the olive tree 

at different stages of its growth. 

34. Kernot G. - For pharmaceutical products and essences. 

35. Melissari F. S, and Co. — For various essences. 

36. Messedaglia D, — For mineralized anatomical preparations. 

39. Parenti G. — For rare chemicals 

41 . Eanieri Prof. A. — For best and common sea salt, prepared by the aid of vol- 
canic heat. 
206. Serventi S. (Heirs of). — For wax candles and crude wax. 

Honourable Mention. 

29. Compagna Baron L. — For liquorice. 

31. CoRSiNi L. (Heirs of). — For collection of pigments. 

33. Garofoletti F. — For ink, and a crystallizzable fluid used in its preparation. 

37. MiRALTA Brot. — For glue. 

40. PiERiNi B. — For inodorous matches, made without sulphur or phosphorus. 

IIL Medal. 

54. Bazzicher L. and Co. — For excellent quality of liqueurs. 

55. Bellentani G. — For excellent quality of vinegar, 65 years old. 

59. Biffi p. — For excellent quality of « crema d'ananas «, and of pastry and chocolate. 
62. Bonamici F. — For excellent quality of olive oil. 

64. BoTTAMiNi B. — For excellent quality of honey. 

65. BuLLi Brot. — For excellent quality of paste for soup. 

69. Cabbone S. — For excellent quality of maccaroni, paste, and wheat. 
76. CiOPPi L. AND S. — For excellent quality x)f paste for soup. 
79. Cora Brot. G. and L. — For excellent quality of liqueurs. 
402. GuELFi G. — For excellent quality of English biscuits. 



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2 LISTS OF JURY AWARDS 



104. IsNARD P. — For excellent quality of refined Tuscan olive oil. 

109. Lancia Brot. — For excellent quality of preserved meat. 

114. Marchi a. — For excellent quality of forage seeds and Parmesan cheese. 

118. Marinelli E. — For excellent quality of paste for soup, and com and rice flour. 

119. Martini, Sola and Co. — For excellent quality of liqueurs. 
.123. Merenda Count. C. — For excellent quafity of « Chartreuse ». 

127. Nasi G. — For excellent balsamic vinegar, 104 years old; and Honourable Men- 
tion for good quality of ordinary vinegar. 
133. Paoletti F. —For excellent quality of paste, com and rice flour. 

145. Royal (Enological Commission. — For collection of wines, especially Florio's 

Marsala, Morando's Asti, Tarditi's La Morra, and Nemcci's Montale. 

146. Royal Tobacco Manufactory. —For excellent quality of cigars and tobacco. 

147. Royal Tobacco Manufactory. — For excellent quality of cigars and tobacco. 
163. BOTTI A. — For excellent quality of olive oil. 

169. Ricasoli Baron B. — For excellent quality of « Brolio-Malmsy and Vermouth ». 

1 70. Racagni B. — For collection of specimens of Lidian com. 

Honourable Mention. 

49. AONZO G. — For good quality of paste for soups. 

50. Ballarini G. — For good quality of ham. 

51 . Ballor G. — For good quality of Vermuth. 
58. Berrutti Brot. — For good quality of wmes. 
60. BoccARDi Brot. — For good quality of cheese. 

70. Carpano G. B. — For good quality of « China-china liqueur. 

75. Cinzano F. — For good quality of dry punch, and collection in general 

79. Cora Brot. — For good quality of their wines. 

83. D'Albero a. — For good quality of candied fruit and vegetable marrow. 

84. Danieli Dr. D. — For good quality of olive oil. 
93. Franciosi p. — For good quality of olive oil. 

95. Gallucci M. — For good quality of ordinary vinegar. 
97. Gancia Brot. — For good quality of vermuth. 
100. Grazzini p. — For good quality of olive oil. 

105. Jacono a. — For good quality of cigars and tobacco. 

110. Majorana Brot. — For collection. 
139. Prati G. — For good quality of elixir. 

142. Ricasoli Baron V. — For good quality of dry wine and olive oil. 

151. Scisci M. — For good quality of almonds. 

156. ToRO B. and Sons. — For good quality of centerba. 

section IV. Medal. 

186. Catania Sub-Committee for the Dublin International Exhibition. — For fine 

collection of cottons. 
191. DONNAFUGATA Baron. — For cotton. 
194. Hallaire E. — For cottons. 

196. Majorana Brot. Barons of Nicchiara. — For collection of cotton. 
204. Royal Industiual Museum. — For collection of cotton. 
207. Tornabene Prof. F. — For large and well arranged collection of cottons. 

Honourable Mention. 
183. Bacini G. — For brooms. 

IX. Honourable Mention. 

243. Zappa It. — For his fire-engine. 

X. Medal. 

277. Pelitti G. — For his contrafagottone, and other inventions in military instruments 

278. RuFiNi A. -^ For violin strmgs. 

Honourable Mention. 
276. Mure Brot. — For a half-hectolitre for measuring wine ; on account of its 
simplicity and pratical utility. 

279. Decanini C. — For good workmanship in his Tacheometer. 

XIII. Medal. 

201. Pizzetti F. — For raw silks. 
290. Abbati p. — For raw silks. 



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LISTS Of jury awards 



291. Bancalari E. — For raw sUks. 

292. Ceresa Brot. — • For raw silks. 

293. CiMBARDi A. — For excellence in spinning of sewing silk. 

295^ De Ferrari T. G. B. — For excellence of quality and manufacture in black 
and coloured silk velvet. 

296. De Vecchi P. and Co. — For raw silks. 

297. Delprino Chev. Dr. M. — For raw silks. 

298. GiovANBLLi A. — For raw sill^. 
300. Keller Chev. A. — For raw silks. 

302. Lazzaroni P. — For raw silks. 

303. Modena Brot. — For raw silks. 

305. RoNCHETTi Brot. — For raw silk. 

306. Rota A. — For raw silks. 
308. Vecchi-Jodi. — For raw silks. 

Honourable Mention. 

304. Lanzani Luigi and Brot. — For spinnin from waste silk. 

307. SicCARDi L. — For raw silk. 

SECTION XVI. Medd. 

351. Pellerano G. B. — For superior dressing of kid and lamb skins for gloves. 
. . . Loforte and Siniscalco. — For superior dressing of kid and lamb skins for gloves. 

Honourable Mention. 

350. Melegari N. — For good dressing of waxed calf skins. 

XVII. Medal. 

356. Cambugi Chev. F. — For printing and bookbinding. 

363. Maglia, Pigna et Co. — For excellent and well-finished printing and writing papers. 

364. Ministry of Public Instruction. — For collection of oljects for the instruction 

of the deaf and dumb. 

365. Paravu G. — For collection of educational works — globes and school apparatus 

published by them. 

366. Re G. — Postage stamps. 

368. Ricco F. — For nature printing. 

Honourable Mention. 
355. Cordova N. — For ornamental designs. 

359. FaA di Bruno Chev. F. — For, his writing apparatus for the blind. 
361. Franco S. and Sons. — For the educational works published by them. 

XVIII. Medd. 

375. Bruni F. and Son. — For excellent black dye on skein silk. 

376. FoLETTi, Weiss and Co. — For cotton yam dyed Turkey red. 

Honourable Mention. 

377. HuTH. P. — For mineral blach silk dye. 

aIX. Medal. 

383. Biella a. — For alto-relievo embroidery on gold and silk ground. 

385. Fratti R. — For an embroidered portfolio. 

888. Martini L. — For gold and silver brocade and embroidery. 

Honourable Mention. 

387. Levera Brot. — For fringes for ftimiture. 

XX. Medal. 

396. Bossi £. — For gloves and kid skins. 

397. CoNTi C. — For excellent strav plait hats, etc. 

Honourable Mention. 
399. Ponzone a. — For hats. 

XXI. Medal. 

410. Sella L. and Brot. — For collection of cutlery. 

XXII. Medal. 

414. BoLZANi S. — For his metallic wire gauze. 



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LISTS OF JURY AWARDS 



Honourable Mention. 

il3. Abundo G. — For his safety-lock. 

SECTION XXIll. Medal. 

436. Stella G. — Engravings on lava from Vesuvius ; good execution. 

Honourable Mention. 

424. Becucci G. — For large collection of serpentine work. 

425. BiLLOTTi Dr P. — For good workman-ship in water-colour miniature paintings 

on marble. 

428. Ceriani and Brot. Barzaghi. — For bronzes ; good workmanship. 

429. Ercolani E. — For good workmanship in repou8s6 metal work. 

432. Laudicina G. — For good workmanship in cameos engraved on Indian shells. 
435. MussoLiNO S. — For good workmanship in sculptured wooden vases, ornamented 
with figures. 

XXV. Medal. 

442. Boni a. — For grand examples in terra cotta. A Faun and Bacchante are re- 
markable for their large proportions and exemplary modelling. 
446. GiusTiNiANi A. — For Majolica vases in the Urbino stile, of high merit. 

Honourable Mention. 
449. MOLLiCA G. — For terra cotta ware. 
454. Spreafico Rrot. -- For. decorated earthenware. 

XXVI. Medal. 

459. Bazzanti P. and Son. — For mosaic Pietre dure table. — Distinguished merit. 
461. Cantieri F. and V. — For lady's woric table, inlaid with mother-o'-pearl, ivory, 

and metal. 

463. Fontana D. — For ebony cabinet inlaid with ivory, with a copy of the Dance 

of Cupids, painted by Albani. 

464. Frullini L. — For carved walnut wood chest, ornamented with infants and group 

representing a boar hunt, cinque-cento stile ; two ornamental gilt consoles, mo- 
dem style. 

465. Gajani E. — For sculptured walnut wood frame , Florentine cinque-cento style. 

467. Gatti G. B. — For high excellence of design and execution in inlaid furniture. 

468. Lancetti F. — For excellence of design and finish in his ebony table top inlaid with 

various woods, mother-o'-pearl, ivory, and metal, in the style of the 15th century. 
471. Monteneri A. — For excellence of execution in his twelve pieces representing 
the principal monuments of Italy. , 

474. Seveso V. — For ebony table inlaid with ivory ; ebony cabinet ; box of Indian 

and other woods, richly carved and inlaid. 
477. ToRRiNi G. and Co. — For Florentine mosaic table ; collection of mosaics and or- 
namental objects. 

Honourable Mention. 

460. Calvi a. — For carved wood and ornamented composition frames. 

466. Gargiulo A. — For inlaid mosaic tables in wood. 
470. LuBASCHi A. — For slate billiard table in ebony. 
473. RovELLi C. — For wooden blinds. 

475. Stikler B. — For morocco writing and dressing cases, case of petrified wood, etc. 

476. ToMAGNiNi Brot. — For marble tables. 

XXYIII. Honourable Mention. 

480. Ambrogio G. — For landscape in cork. 
781. Capasso, Prof. — For straw mosaic work. 

AAA. Honourable Mention. 

. . . Barbi and Cinottl — For their interesting application of photography of the re- 
production of old inscriptions. 
. . . DuRONi, LoNGONi and'Dell'Acqua. — For theu" skilful enlargement. 



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SECTION L 
HiDiog, Qaarryiog, HeUllargical OperatioDs,aDd NiDiDg ProdacU. 



Number of Exhibitors 19. 

Of these 3 obtained prke medals at the Italian Exhibition at Florence in 4861; 3 re- 
ceived medals and 1 an honorable mention at the London International Exhibition 
in 1862. 



f. Barbagallo Salvadore, Catania. 

1. Ground sulphur from the exhibitors ma- 

nufactory at S. Giorgio near Catania, 
price per cwt ..... 6s. 6^. 

2. Sublimed sulphur, prepared 

at the same manufactory . 11. 75. 6^. 
' Florence, 1861. 

It. Corbi-Zocchi Carlo, Sienna, 

Per cwt in 
Leghorn 

Sienna earths: — €. s. d. 

1. Dark raw Sienna in lumps . 0. 15. 

2. Ditto, in fragments. . , .0. 6. 9 

3. Dark burnt Sienna in lumps .1. 0. 

4. Ditto, in fragments. . . .0.12.0 

5. Common light raw Sienna. .0. 3. 

6. Selected bright yellow raw 

Sienna 2. 10. 

7. Selected bright yellow burnt 

Sienna 3. 10. 

8. Waghed yellow Sienna. . .0. 8. 

9. Selected orange raw Sienna . 2. 10. 
10. Burnt dark Sienna . . . . 0. 15. 

♦Florence, 1861; t London, 1862. 

The sale of these earths which come 
from the exhibitor's mines on the Monte 
Amiata and are prepared and burnt by 
him at Sienna has v fallen off very conside- 
rably since the commencement of the Ame- 
rican civil war, as the greater part of the 
exportation used to be to the United States, 
France, and Holland, only a small quantity 
being sent to Englaud. 

•8. Directors of the Mont Cenis Sub- 
Alpine Railway tunnel, 2, via S. Secondo 
(Turin), 

Series of speeunens of the rock met with 

i 



in the Mont-Cenis tunnel , taken at equal 
distances apart, both on the Bardonneche 
and Modane sides, together with several 
special specimens from different interme- 
diate points, serving to illustrate the in- 
ternal geological structure of the Alps: — 

Black schist from the Italian sid^ of the 
tunnel, taken at various distances. 

Quartzite from the French side of the 
tuimel, taken at various distances. 

Special specimens; — Pure anthracite ; 
quartzose conglomerate ; schist with py- 
rites; Slaty schist; quartz veins in tlte 
schist; veins of massive quartz; crystallized 
quartz in the sandstone or quartzite. 

Table, shewing the progress of the work 
of piercing the Mont Cenis tunnel from the 
commencement of the operations up to 
May 15th 1865. 





BirdAOBtche, or 


lodaae, or 




Tear. 


lUlian entraace. 


Fieneh entraace. 


TOTIL 




Feet, 


Feet. 


Feet. 


1857 


89 


35 


124 


1858 


845 


663 


1,508 


1859 


775 


436 


1,211 


1860 


669 


458 


1,127 


1861^ 


558 


633 


1,191 


1862 


i,247 


797 


2,044 


1863 


1,397 


1,234 


2,631 


1864 


2,037 


1,532 


3,569 


1865 I 


918 


792 


1,709 


t«Hjj4Sth) 








Yearly lolals 8,535 


6,579 


15,114 



Total length of the tunnel 40,093 feet. 
Length completed, June 
281^1865 ....... 15,610 » 

Length still to be bored, 
same date 24,482 » 

Probable time required for completing 
the tunnel, 5 1/2 years. 



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SECTION I. 



. The tunnel was pierced at the com- 
mencement by hand, the bore-holes are 
now made by machinery; the machines 
were placed on the Italian side in i 861 , 
and on the French side in 1863. 

5 
It consists of two gradients of |q^^ 

ai^d ," .^r> on the Italian and French 

sides respectively : the absolute heights 
are: French entrance, 3944 feet; Italian 
entrance, 4378 feet; height of the Mont 
Cenis at this point, 9669 feet. 

In the year 1864, which may be taken 
as a mean, both from the skill of the work- 
men and the present worn out condition of 
the machinery, 3569 feet were bored, if 
matters were to proceed at this rate, 7 years 
would be necessary to complete the tunnel. 
Such is the theoretical calculation , but 
practical men, who foresee that many diffi- 
culties still existing may be overcome, 
consider that the tunnel will be finished 
before that time. . 

The greater part of the miners are Pied- 
montese: they are energetic and instanca- 
ble in their labours , and both miners and 
captains are 'inspired with a desire to do 
the greatest amount of work possible.. 

On the Modane side of the mountain 
sandstone or quartzite has been met with 
of such hardness that even with the aid of 
the machinery it is impossible to advance 
more than 20 inches in 24 hours, but even 
this is a great achievement, since by h^nd 
it would have been difficulty to bore more 
than 9 inches in the same time. Geologists 
had foreseen the existence of this rock in 
the tunnel, and determined its stratification 
and position, presuming its thickness to be 
from 900 to 1250 feet. Previous to meeting 
^ with the quartzite about 13 feet were bored 
daily. 

On the Bardonn^che side geologists con- 
sider that no harder rock than the present 
will be met with, on the contrary there is 
every reason to suppose that it may become 
softer. 

Arguing from the present resuUs, that 
is 8 feet on the Bardonn^lie side and 20 



inches on the Modane side, the tunnel would 
require 7 years for its completion. The di- 
rectors however, by no means intend to be 
satisfied with only 20 inches progress per 
diem through the quartzite. In undertaking 
the management of the works they de- 
termined to overcome all obstacles, and as 
such has always been the case hitherto they 
hope that in the present instance they may 
have similar success with regard to the 
quartzite, and if the difficulty be not wholly 
overcome the delay occasioned can only 
last as long the machines wre working in 
that rock. Judging from the constant im- 
provements which are made in the machi- 
nery and the experience acquired, it is 
reasonable to hope that the tunnel may be 
opened at the close of 1870. — Ger. Som- 
MEiLLER, Director. 

4. Italian Coal Company (Limited). 

Frederick Place, Old Jewry, (London), re- 
presented by William Miller, Leghorn. 

Lignite from Lama mine in Val di Cecina, 
near Pomarance (Pisa). 

This basin was discovered at the begin- 
ning of the year 1864. The mine is already 
able to yield 30 tons of Ugnite per diem. 

ft. Lancia Federico, Duke of Brolo, 

Palermo, 

1. Crystallized native Sulphur on marl, 

from the Solfatara of Arcara (Caltani" 
setta), 

2. Stalactitical native Sulphur the same 

locality. 

3. Sulphur in cakes, price 65. per cwt. 
4.- Native Sulphur on lava, from Etna. 

5. Rock salt in violet cubic crystals, from 
Castrogiovanni {CaltaniseUa).- 

e. Mascolo Gennaro, Ponte delta Mad- 
dalena, Naples, * 

Cemented, fagotted, and cast steel; best 
cast steel. 

t. Moret, Pedrone and Co. , 11 , via di 
Brera, MUdn^ and Lecco (Como), 

Lead ores from Crandola and Bindo, near 
Introbbio (Como). 

Copper ores from Vimogno, near Introb- 
bio (Como), Fondra, near Piazza (BergamO)^ 
and Malonno, near Edolo (Bergamo). 

Copper and nickel ore from Antrona- 
pkHo near Domodossola (ifotJ^im), Issiglio 



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MINING, QUARRYING, METALLURGICAL OPSBATIONS, AND MINING PRODUCTS 



near Yistrorio (Turin\ and Mezzenile, near 
Ceres (Turin). 

Copper ores from Valprato , near Pont 
(Turin). 



Copper ores from Yaltorta, near Piazza 
(Bergamo). 

Ores* of copper and lead, from Tava- 
gnasco , near Ivrea (Turin). 



§. Novi Chey. Prof. Giuseppe, 84, Mergdlina^ Naples. 

Samples of eartlis, clays, marls, ochres, sand, for the manufacture of alum, colours, 
stoyes and esu^elB ; moulding bronze and iron, making crucibles for casting steel, etc. 

PRICE 

USE PER TON. 

£ 8. d. 

In manufacture of earthenware 2. 0. 

» majolica 1. 12. 

» glass, earthenware, enamels 1. 4. 
» muffles and bricks, and for 

lining ovens 1. 12. 

» glass and enamels .... i. 4. 

» earthenware and enamels . i, 8. 

» enamels — 

» imitation Etruscan vases . 2. 0. 

» porcelain, paper .... 3. 8. 

» ditto 2. 16. 

» Costelli vases 2. 0. 

» enamels and imitation Etrus- 
can vases 2. " 0. 

» enamels, and as a pigment . 1. 17. 
» ornamental terra cotta work, 

statuettes, etc » 6. 6 

» bricks and common earthen- 
ware n 6. 

» terra cotta » 6. 

For casting bronze cannons » 8. 

» iron cannons » 9. 6 

» ditto » 9. 6 

For making crudbles for melting cast iron . » 16. 

» » cast steel . 3. 4. 

For mixing with fresh clay in manufacture of 

crucibles . . . ; — 

In making enamels, bricks and porcelain . . 3. 4. 

For lining blast furnaces and making bricks . 2. 0. 

For extracting alum — 

For making whitewash, stucco, and alum . . — 

For extracting alum — 

For ornamental work — 



NATURE OF PRODUCT 

1. Carbonate of lime . . 

2. Siliciferous carbonate . 

3. Siliceous sand . . . 

4. Soft sand 

5. Soft sand 

6. Hard sand 

7. Garnets 

8. Refractory clay ... . 

9. Kaolin 

10. Ditto 

11. Grey sand 

12. Red clay 

13. Yellow ochre . . . . 
li. Roman clay . .. . . 

15. Formian clay . . . . 

16. Argillaceous marl . . 

17. Clay 

18. Siliceous clay . . . . 

19. Ditto 

20. Refractory clay . . . 

21. Ditto 

22. Fragments of broken cru- 

cibles 

23. Quartz 

24. Steatite 

25. Argillolite 

26. Ditto, washed . . ^ . 

27. Volcanic detritus . . . 

28. Natural asphalt . . . 



9. Paganini GioTanni Battista, Oe^ 

noa. 

i . Oval Slab of red broccatello marble, from 

Carro near Matarana. 
2. Rectangular slab of serpentine from 

the same locality. 

These slabs come from newly opened 
quarries situated half way between Spezia 
and Chiavari, on the coast of Li-guria. 

to. Peratoner Antonio and Sons, 
Catania, 

Sfilpkur. Price 5^. 3d. per cwt. 



It. Romagna sulphur mining Com- 
pany , Bologna. 

Refined sulphur produced by the distil- 
lation of melted sulphur; average price Is. 
3d. per cwt. 

Refined sulphur in sticks ; 9s. id. per cwt. 

Ground sulphur; 95. per cwt. 
* Florence, 1861; * London, 1862. 

The sulphur is met with in these mines 
as in Sicily in the native state. The com- 
pany possesses several extensive mines, 4 
oi which, Formignano, Fosso, Luzzena and 



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SECTION I. 



Montemauro are in the province of Forli, 
and 2, those of Marazzano, and Perticara in 
the province of Pesaro, producing together 
ahout 5,900 tons of refined sulphur, of 
which 800 are ground and sold for the sul- 
phurization of wines. The mines are worked 
by galleries and shafts, which have already 
attained in some instances a depth of 125 
fathoms, and as the profits are very consi- 
derable they may be ranked among the 
most important mines of the Italian Con- 
tinent. 

19. Royal Italian Commission, Tu- 

rin. 

Specimens of the stones employed in 
building the new Central Railway terminus 
at Turin, and for completing the Carignan 
Palace : — 

Price per 
tabic metre. 

£ 8. d. 

1 . Red granite from the quarries 

of Baveno, near Pallanza, on 

the Lago Maggiore (Novara) 9. 16 

2. WJiite granite from the quar- 

ries of Montorfano, near Pal- 
lanza 9. 4. 

3. "White granite from Alzo, Lago 

d'Orta (Nomra) .... 9. 4. 
kt. Dark grey granite from the 
quarries of Raima, valley of 
Andomo, near Biella (^o- 

mra) 8. 16. 

5. Gneiss, from Malenaggio, near 
' Finestrelle, Waldensian val- 
leys, near Pignerol. . . .8. 0. 

14. SantiniAvv. Giuseppe, Sei^avezza 
[Lucca). 

Statuary marble from the quarries of 
Ami, Seravezza. 

* London, 1862. 

It is a popular opinion that the best sta- 
tuary marble comes exclusively from Car- 
rara. The quality of the marble found there 
is indeed excellent: that from the quarry of 
Crestola, about a mile above the town has 
the most beautiful and homogeneous crys- 
talline structure and exquisite warm tint, 
so that it has been much sought after by 
sculptors for many centuries. Numerous 
other quarries at Carrara also furnish first- 
rate marble ; in other instances they are of a 



more or less dead white , which imparts a 
heavy stony appearance to a statue. 

Seravezza statuary marbles have a finer 
grain than those of Carrara , and are ex- 
tremely beautiful : they were largely em- 
ployed by Michel Angelo, who was the first 
to discover and open the quarries on the 
hitherto inaccessible summit of the Monte 
Altissimo, though these quarries were ne- 
glected until late years. After the lapse of 
three centuries the late M. Henraux explo- 
red the continuation of the Altissimo south- 
ward at a spot called the Giardino, and 
Chev. Simi the cavern on Monte Corchia. 
Both succeeded at length in opening up 
extensive quarries of the best statuary 
marble, but not before they had each spent 
a fortune in making roads and inclined 
planes for the conveyance of the produce 
down to the valley. 

About 35 years ago Count Guerra , and 
subsequently several other gentlemen at 
Massa, explored the mountains above that 
town, between Carrara and Seravezza, and 
many quarries have since sprung up there 
to compete with those of Carrara. All these 
are on the rugged slopes of the Appuan 
Alps facing the sea, and easiest of access 
from the coast. 

Nothing serious has been yet done on the 
inland flanks of the Appuan Alps , known 
as the Garfagnana, although the mountains 
are there not less rich in the finest marble 
of the most varied kinds , both for archi- 
tectural and statuary purposes. A careful 
examination of tffese unfrequented moun- 
tains which extend for many a mile in length, 
and are well worthy the visit of the mere 
lover of scenery, presenting as they do an 
infinity of the most picturesque points of 
view, proves that little is wanted but 
energy, roads, and capital, well directed, 
in order to be able to excavate from them 
an unlimited supply of marble. 

Among those who have sought to open 
quarries in this part is the exhibitoi* , who 
sends a specimen of statuary marble from the 
quarry of Arni, close to those of the Altis- 
simo and Giardino, and, as mentioned above, 
on the inland slope on the mountains. Many 



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MINING, QUARRYING, METALLURGICAL OPERATIONS, A?JD MINING PRODUCTS 



blocks lie on the spot whence they were 
blasted, and in colour and crystalline struc- 
ture are almost identical with the mar- 
ble obtained from the two last mentioned 
quarries, but they cannot be removed from 
want of roads. It is to be hoped that the at- 
tention of capitalists may be turned in this 
direction, and aided by the formation of 
roads communicating as it maybe with Sar- 
zana and Seravezza they would find ample 
scope for their exertions. — Jervis. 



i 5. Sardinian Saltworks Company, 
Genoa. 

Price per ton. 

£ 8. d. 

^, Table salt 0. 6. 5 

2. Impure sulphate of magnesia, 

containing about equal parts 
of chloride of sodium and sid- 
I)hate of magnesia . . . .0. 6. 5 

3. Impure sulphate of potassa , 

containing about 50 per cent 
of sulphate of magnesia and 
50 per cent of sulphate* of 
potassa and chloride of po- 
tassium 1. 5. 

to 1. 12. 
* London, 1862. 



The Sardiniam salt works are situated 
at two points on that island, at Cagliari, and 
Carloforte. They belong to the Government, 
but were leased for 30 years to the pre- 
sent company in 1 852. 

The number of persons employed all the 
year round is about 530, who are increased 
during the season of collecting the salt to 
775, including boys, peasants, free labour- 
ers, galley prisoners, and inspectors. At 
Cagliari the season for collecting salt lasts 
from July 20 to October 15, while at Carlo- 



forte it is much shorter, but the works are 
insignificant. 

Annual produce of table salt in 1852, 
30,000 tons; actual produce 140,000 tons , 
of which the Government purchase 52,000 
at a fixed price , the rest being exported to 
Norway ,^ Sweden , Kussia and the United 
States of Americd; besides from 6000 to 
8000 tons of crude sulphate of magnesia 
and 2000 or 3090 tons of crude sulphate 
of potassa. These two last products are ob- 
tained from the mother liquor after the 
deposition of the table salt. The prices are 
those on board at Cagliari. 

16. Vecchi Colonel Augusto, Castel- 
lammare {Naples), 

Nugget of native gold found near Sestri 
Levante (Genoa) in a fault in the Serpen- 
tine, and of the Tertiary period. 

tH. Vergottini Nazzaro, Bdlano (Co- 
mo). 

Galena from Yalmarcia, near Introbbio 
(Como), 

IS. Lentini Rosario, Palermo. 

1 . Bituminous marl from Checco (Girgenti). 

2. Native sulphur from the solfatara of 

Cinti (Girgenti). 

3. Manganese ore from the neighbourhood 

of Castelvetrano (Trapani). 

in. Adragna Baron Girolamo, Tra- 
pani. 

Refined bay salt, from the salt works at 
Trapani. 

90. Catania Sub-Committee for the 
Dublin International Exhibition. 

Sulphur. 



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SECTION IL 
Chemical aod Pharmaceutical Processes aod Producls. 



Number of ExhibUors 20. 

Of these 1 obtained a prize medal at the Paris Universal Exibition in 1855, 3 at the 
Italian Exhibition at Florence in 18G1, and 3 at tlie London International Exhi- 
bition in 1862. 

99. Antonino Baron Gri8toforo,5car- I Cosmetic vinegar, useful in contagious 
dia (Catania), disorders, per bottle 25. Qd, 



1. Essential oil of lemons. 

2. Essential oil of oranges. 

3. Essential oil of orange flowers, 

98. Bandiera Dr Giuseppe, Palermo. 
Haemostatic water, price is. per bottle. 

94. Berncastel Ernesto, 7, Largo 

S. Francesco di Paola, Naples, 



Syrop for coughs and sore throats, per 
bottle is. Sd. 

Pectoral lichen and liquorice pastiles, 
per bottle is, 3d, 



95. Gampisi Alfio, MUiteHo (Catania), 
Citric acid. Price per lb. iil, iis. 



96. Gandiani and Go., manufacturers, 3052, Borgo S. Vincemoin Prato, Milan, 

€ 8, d, € s. 

1. Crystallizable acetic acid. . . . Price per lb. from 0. 1. 

2. Pure phosphoric acid » 0. 1 . 

3. Commercial hydrochloric acid per cwt 0. 5. 

L Pure hydrochloric acid » 1. 4. 

5. Commercial nitric acid, iO** » 1. C. 

6. Ditto, 42o » 1. 8. 

7. Pure nitric acid, 40« . » 2. 13. 

8. Ditto, 42» » 2. 17. 

9. Ditto, 52" » 3. 10. 

10. Pure sulphuric acid, G^"" » 1. 4. 

11. Commercial sulphuric acid, G6° » 0. 8. 

12. Peroxyde of iron 0. 8. 

13. Protoxyde of iron » 0. H. 

14. Silicate of potassa » 1. 12. 

15. Silicate of soda » 1. 0. 

16. Nitrobenzine (essence of mirbane) per lb. 0. 2. 

17. Sulphate of soda » » » 

18. Crystallized sulphate of zinc » 0. 7. 

19. Fused sulphate of zinc . » 0. 3. 

20. Sulphate of mercury » 0. 2. 

21. Sulphate of manganese » 0. 1. 

22. Hypophosphite of potassa ...» 0. 1 . 

23. Hypophosphite of soda per cwt 1. 0. 

24. Crystallized nitrate of ammonia per lb. 0. 1. 

25. Pure oxalic acid » n. 1. 

26. Magistery of bismuth » 0. 10. 

27. Fused cyanide of potassium . • . • » 0.^ 2. 



6 


to a 1. 


10 


6 


0. 1. 


10 


4 


0. 7. 


2 





1. 12. 


3 


10 


1. 8. 


8 


8 


i. lo: 


6 





2. 17. 


4 


4. 


3. 5. 


6 


9 


4. 1. 


6 





1. 10. 








0. 9. 








0. 9. 


10 


7 


0. 13. 


6 


3 


2. 0. 


3 


7 


1. 8. 


8 


10 


0. 3. 


7 


» 


» » 


» 


3 


It V 


» 


8 


0. 4. 





6 


0. 3. 


3 


5 


0. 2. 


6 




0. 1. 


5 




1. 1. 


5 




» » 


» 




0. 1. 


5 


11 


0. 12. 


8 




0. 3. 


3 



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CHEMICAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL PROCESSES AND PRODUCTS 



£ S. d. 

28. Sulphite of lime per lb. » 0. 0. 9 

29. Sulphite of potassa >» 0. 0. 9 

30. Sulphite of soda percwt 1. 0. 7 

31. Sulphite of magnesia m tablets per lb. 0. 1. 1 

32. Crystallized sulphite of magnesia » 0. 3. 7 

33. Borate of manganese » 0. 3. 7 

34. Arsenite of copper » 0. 1. 1 

35. Baltimore chrome yellow, N*» 7 » 0. 1. 1 

36. Ditto, N- 3 » 0. d. 1 

37. Ditto, NO 5 ... ...» 0. 1. 1 

Experiments for the manufacture of paper from woody fibre: — 

38. First operation : Separation of the fibres. 

39. Second operation: Formation of pulp. 

40. Third operation: Bleaching. 



£ 


8. 


d. 


0. 




1 


0. 




1 


1. 




1 


0. 




10 


» 




» 


0. 




4 


0. 




7 


0. 




5 


0. 




5 


0. 




5 



Not many years ago there were in the 
province of Milad only a few laboratories 
belonging to the principal chemists, where 
pharmaceutical products were alonfe pre- 
pared, while those employed in the Arts 
were almost exclusively obtained from a- 
broad. 

In 1838, through the generosity of cer- 
tain persons, aided by the Chamber of 
Commerce, and numerous paying members, 
the Society for the Encouragement of Arts 
and Manufactures was founded in Milan, 
to which was annexed a public school of 
chemistry and a laboratory, other schools 
being likewise opened for manufacturers 
and artisans. 

This Institution has been eminently suc- 
cessful and obtained increasing favour with 
the Public. The schools are very much fre- 
quented , and chemistry applied specially 
to the Arts, being taught theoretically and 
practically, love of study has been generally 
diffused, and some of the students have tur- 
ned to good account the knowledge they 
have there acquired. 

In fact there are already in Milan and 
the environs 6 manufactories of chemical 
product^ employed in the Arts, among 
which that of Candiani and Co. holds an 
honorable position, and obtained a silver 
medal 1863 from the Royal Lombard In- 
sUtution of Science, Letters, and Arts. This 
house employs 32 men, of whom 20 by day 
and 12 by night; these have the benefit of 
a mutual aid fund formed from a part of 
their pay for over-time work. 

The principal products manufactured 
consist in adds and dyes, which have been 
hitherto ezclmwrely coniuHied in Italy. 



Candiani and Co. employ the best and most 
approved apparatus, and have introduced 
such improvements and modifications as 
are essential to enable them to obtain good 
products at a low price and with due re- 
gard to safety. J)"* Giov. Pisani. 

199. Catania Suh-Gommittee for the 
Dublin International Exhibition. 

Price per «wt 
€ s, d, 

1. Liquorice roots {Glycirhiza 

glabra L.) grown at Caltagi- 

rone (Catania) » 2. 2 

2. Stick liquorice, manufactured 

by Marietta » » i» 

3. Stick liquorice, manufactured 

at Catania 2. 12. 

Raw soda, obtained from the 
Skshes of the 8od<i salsola . . . » 14. 

Crude tartaric acid, manufac- 
tured by Giuseppe Emanuele at 
Misterbianco, near Catania . .4. 0. 

Tartaric acid, manufactured by 
Giuseppe Emanuele at Mister- 
bianco 5. 4. 

les. Ciaranfi Ginseppe, Florence, and 
Convent of the Seryite Friars, Sienna, 

1. Crystallized bicarbonate of potassa. 

Price per lb. 10 i/2d, 

2. Bicarbonate of soda, per lb. 4 d. \ 

* Florence, 1861 ; * London, 1862. 

Obtained by submitting , in the former 
case a solution of commercial potassa, and 
in the latter of crude soda to the action of 
the carbonic acid evolved spontaneously 
and in great abundance from the mineral 
spring of Cinciano, near Poggibonsi {Sien- 
na), belongmg to the convent of the Servite 
friars at Sienna, 



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SECTION II. 



3. Pure protocarbonate of iron, price per 
lb. lis. 

Obtained by the double decomposition 
of solutions of sulphate of iron and an al- 
caline carbonate , subsequently washed 
with distilled water and dried in an atmo- 
sphere of the pure dry carbonic acid gas 
evolved from the spring of Cinciano — a 
process which could not be followed in an 
ordinary manufactoiy. 

29. Compagna Baron Luigi, manu- 
facturer, Corigliano {Calabria Citeriore), 

Stick liquorice made at Cassano. — Large 
and small ditto made at Corigliano. 

The liquorice plant grows perfectly wild 
in Calabria, and spreading its roots as it 
does at a considerable depth under ground, 
does not in the least degree interfere with 
surface vegetation, so that it is customary 
to sow wheat, Indian corn, cotton, or other 
seeds in the fields in which the liquorice 
flourishes, the roots of which are dug up 
once in three years. 

The exhibitor has two manufactories; 
one at Corigliano, the other at Cassano. He 
employs 4 hydraulic presses, 12 iron pres- 
ses, and 32 pumps, made by Macry of Na- 
ples, and annually digs up 1500 tons of 
roots, from wliich he obtains 200 tons of li- 
quorice, which after being separated into 
three kinds, stamped, « Duca Cassano », 
and « Duca Corigliano », is shipped to Na- 
ples in the exhibitor's own vessels, whence 
it is exported to England, Scotland, the 
United States , etc., being sold at about 
SOI. per ton. 

30. Consani Ermolao di R , Leglwrn. 
Pigments: — 

Italian green JL, manufactured in theEn- 
glish manner. 

Italian green JB, manufactured in the 
English manner. 

Italian green (7, manufactured in the 
English manner. 

Baltimore Chrome yellow A^ made in the 
American manner. 

Baltimore Chrome yellow 5, made in the 
American manner. 

Common Chrome yellow in cakes. 

81. Corsini Heirs of Luigi, Florence, 

1. Shoe blacking. 

2. Grease for wheels and machinery. 

3. Polish for harness. 

4. Varnish for leather, etc. 

* Paris, 1855; * Florence, 1861. 



3«. De Luca Prof. Sebastiano, Boy- 
al University^ Naples. 

1 . Mannite extracted from the green leaves 

of the olive tree. 

2. Ditto extracted from the leaves of the 

olive tree just commencing to turn 
yellow. 

3. Ditto extracted from the flowers of the 

olive tree, 
i. Ditto extracted from the unripe olive. 
5. Ditto extracted from the olive just com- 

cing to ripen. 

« Hesearclies on the extraction of man- 
nite from the leaves of the olive tree. — 
Mannite exists in different proportions in 
every part of the olive tree : the leaves , 
flowers, and fruit containing the greatest 
quantity, the root, wood, bark, and bran- 
ches rather less. This saccharine principle 
is not always found in the same quantity 
at all stages of vegetation; at the period 
of blossoming it accumulates in the flowers 
and diminishes in the leaves: the fallen 
flowers having once completed the pheno- 
menon of fecundation no longer contain 
any mannite; it has likewise been found 
impossible to obtain the slightest traces of 
it in the yellow fallen leaves. Mannite exists 
in the fruit as long as it continues green , 
diminishing in proportion as it ripens, and 
disappearing entirely when it becomes per- 
fectly ripe and contains the greatest quan- 
tity of oil. 

The leaves, with which the olive tree is 
always covered, and which it is reasonable 
to suppose must fulfil some important func- 
tion, are never devoid of more on less 
mannite as long as they continue green , 
and as soon as they begin to turn yellow 
others have already taken their place and 
would appear to accumulate , so to speak , 
the materials elaborated by their predeces- 
sors, and assume their functions. Many 
other substances are found in the leaves of 
the olive tree besides mannite : there are co- 
loring matters and especially the chlorophyl 
which accompanies the mannite and under- 
goes similar changes ; saccharine principles 
which have the property of facilitating fer- 
mentation in contact with yeast, as also of 
reducing tartrate of potassa and copper ; 
organic acids, and other matters not well 
defined. The leaves of the olive tree, which 
have the property of accumulating mineral 
substances, contain a large quantity of wa- 
ter, varying according to the period of ve- 



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CHEMICAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL PROCESSES AND PRODUCTS 



getation , and sometimes amounting to 50 
per cent (^) ». 

The following table shews the result of 



experiments made weekly on leaves of olive 
trees growing in the Botanical Garden at 
Naples. 



Table, shewing the qoaDtity of water, ashes, and maDoite furnished 
by the leaves of the olive tree. 







WEIGHT 






WEIGHT 


1 


DATE OF GATHKRING 


OF THE LEAVES 


WATER 


ASHES 


OF THE LEAVES 


WATER 


MAXMTE 


THE LEAVES 


green 


dry 


elimi- 
nated 


green 


dry 


elimi- 
nated 


obUined 


1861 




Grammes 


Grammes 


Grammes 


Grammes 


Grammes 


Grammes 


Grammes 


Gsammes 


February 


10 


0. 880 


0. 431 


0. 449 


0. 038 


37. 


18. 5 


18. 5 


0. 298 


» 


15 


0. 900| 0. M2 


0. 458 


0. 032 


63. 


32. 5 


30. 5 


0. 772 


» 


20 


0. 838 


0. 398 


0. 440 


0. 032 


114. 


58. 


56. 


0. 712 


)) 


25 


0. 884 


0. 4i3 


0. 441 


0. 028 


80. 


41. 


39. 


0. 565 


March 


1 


0. 782 


0. 373 


0. 409 


0. 0^z2 


95. 


47. 


48. 


0. 237 


)> 


6 


8. 808 


0. 415 


0. 393 


0. 034 


84. 


47. 


37. 


0. 220 


» 


11 


1. 023 


0. 507 


0. 516 


0. 038 


89. 


45. 


44. 


0. 492 


» 


16 


1. 102 


0. 538 


0. 564 


0. 035 


* 89. 


45. 


44. 


0. 456 


» 


21 


1. 017 


0. 505 


0. 512 


0. 032 


85. 


43. 


42. 


0. 390 


» 


29 


0. 830 


0. 409 


0. 421 


0. 016 


96. 


46. 


50. 


» 


April 


3 


0. 627 


0. 328 


•0. 299 


0. 022 


89. 


49. 


40. 


0. 378 


» 


8 


0. 668 


0. 312 


0. 356 


0. 018 


90. 


42. 


48. 


0. 663 


» 


13 


1. 165 


0. 581 


0. 584 


0. 045 


83. 


44. O' 


39. 


0. 605 


» 


18, 


0. 744 


0. 416 


0. 328 


0. 029 


78. 


43. 


35. 


0. 423 


» 


25 


0. 603 


0. 325 


0. 278 


0. 024 


88. 


48. 


40. 


0. 581 


» 


30 


0. 730 


0. 345 


0. 385 


0. 033 


50. 


31. 


19. 


0. 480 


May 


7 


0. 855 


0. 415 


0. 440 


0. 021 


52. 


34. 


18. 


0. 581 


» 


U 


0. 760 


0. 335 


0. 425 


0. 023 


46. 


25. 


21. 


0. 192 


» 


21 


1. 756 


0. 920 


0. 836 


0. 059 


44. 


23. 


21. 


0. 190 


» 


30 


0. 847 


0. 366 


0. 481 


0. 019 


61. 


29. 


42. 


0. 275 


June 


9 


0. 640 


0. 342 


0. 298 


0. 015 


» 


» 


» 


» 


» 


20 


0. 694 


0. 310 


0. 384 


0. 015 


89. 


43. 


46. 


0. 360 


» 


28 


0. 675 


0. 340 


0. 335 


0. 016 


56. 


29. 


27. 


0. 201 


July 


11. 


0. 770 


0. 381 


0. 389 


0. 022 


89. 


41. 


48. 


0. 345 


» 


22 


0. 768 


0. 318 


0. 450 


0. 022 


81. a 


36. 


45. 


0. 307 



*) RendicoDto della Rcgia Accademia delle scienze fisiche e matematiche di Napoli. Febbraio 486^. 



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10 



SECTION n. 



SS. Garofoletti Ferdinando, chemist, 
28, via Sta Maria, MUan. 

Black ink. 
Crystallizable fluid, used in the formation 
of the ink. 
The same crystallized. 

Various as are the modes of preparation 
and the materials employed in the manu- 
facture of black ink obtained from different 
sources it is to be confessed that, though 
the consumption of this indispensable ar- 
ticle is considerable, it is not easy to pro- 
cure it of a kind fulfilling sufficiently the 
desiderata of being intensely black, flowing, 
and unalterable after a lapse of time. 

The exhibitor has made many experi- 
ments on black ink and carefully studied 
its preparation , and he concieves that he 
has finally succeded in obtaining a fluid 
free from the inconveniences inseparable 
from the majority of black inks hitherto 
known, having reduced it from a mere em- 
pyrical compound to a true chemical pro- 
duct, possessing the above mentioned re- 
quisites and at a price placing it witliin the 
reach of all. 

34. Keriiot Giuseppe, U strada San 
Carlo, Naples, 

1 . Cold drawn castor oil. 

2. Oil of sweet almonds. 

3. Oil of nuts. 

4. Purified cod-liver oil. 

5. Ced liver oil with iodide of iron. 

6. Oil of bergamot 

7. Oil of lemons. 

8. Olive oil. 

9. Eesublimed muriate of ammonia. 

10. Amraonio chloride of iron. 

11. Acetate of potassa. 

1 2. Soluble potassio tartrate of iron. 

13. Bitartrate of potassa. 

U. Tartrate of potassa (Neutral) 

15. Manufactured boracic acid. 

16. Castor oil seeds. 

17. Antifebrile elixir. 

S5. Melisfiari Francesco Saverio and 

Co., Beggio di Calabria, 

Essential oil of bergamotte , and other 
oranges. 
Essential oil of lemons. 
* London, 1862. 



••. KotMdaglia Domenico, Brescia. - 

Mineralized anatomical preparations , 
preserved without spirits, Messedaglia's 
process. 

Human hand dissected, shewmg part of 
the muscular and the whole of the osseous 
systems, and preserving the natural colour 
of the skin, of which a small portion is pur- 
posely left. 

Goat's kidney bisected, preserving its na- 
tural colour and freshness of appearance , 
the fat adhering. 

Calf's windpipe. 

A piece of brain , as an experiment. 

A snail, preserved and subsequently bro- 
ken in pieces , to prove that the process 
imparts to animal substances an almost mi- 
neral character. 

A lizard. 

UK: Miralta Brothers, manufacturers, 
Savona (Genoa). 

Glue. — Cream of tartar. -- Tartaric 
acid. 

* Florence, 1861 ; * London, 1862. 

3S. Oreti Demetrio , manufacturer, 
Arezjso, 

Carbonate of lead. 

S». ParentiGalgano, chemist, /Sienna 

£. s. d, 

1. Asparagine . Price per lb. 2. 14. 6 

Annual produce 4 cwt. 

2. Caffeine » 18. 3. 3 * 

3. Citrate of caffeine ...» 20. 0. 

4. Biniodide of mercury . . » 0. 11. 

to • . . » 0. 14. 

40. Pierlni Baldassare, Florence, 

Inodorous matches made without phos- 
phorus or sulphur, in wax and wood. — 
(New manufacture). 

41. Ranieri Prof. Angelo, 19, strada 
della Pace, a CJiiaja, Naples, 

\, Common bay salt evaporated from sea 
water by volcanic heat. Per ton iOs, 
6d. 

2. Refined table salt obtained from the 
preceding. Per ton 7/. Ss, 

42. Mundo Gennaro, 44, dtrada At^ 
cangdo a Baiano, Naples, 

Hcemostatic water. 



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SECTION III. 
Substances Used as Food. 



Numbers of Exhibitars 118; sicb-Exhihitors 49. 

Of these 46 obtained prize medals at the Italian Exhibition at Florence in 1861, 25 ob- 
tained prize medals and 10 honorable mentions at tlie International Exiiibition of 
1862, and 28 obtained prize medals at the Turin National wine Exhibition in 
1864. 



46. Agricnltnral Association, Lucca. 
Agricultural produce of the Proviuce of Lucca. 

Olives: — 

1 . Corregidla olives. 

2. Ditto, variety. 

3. Ditto, from seeds. 
4> Mortdlina olives. 

5. Long MortelUna olives. 

6. Cluster MortelUna olives. 

7. Baola MortelUna olives. 

8. Long Frantojana olives. 

9. Round Frantojana olives. 

10. Mezza Cucca olives. 

1 1 . Colombina olives. 

12. Cluster Colombina olives. 

1 3. Common long olives. 

14. Common round olives. 

Best Lucca oil, known as « from the 
six-mile circuit »: - 

15. PoUera Corrado, VUla Basilica. 

Highest zone of the Pisan hills 
which is adapted to the culti- 
vation of the oliv€ — eastern 
aspect. 

16. Mazzarosa, Marquis, S. Pietro a 

Marciliano. 
Highest zone of the Pisan hills 
which is adapted to the culti- 
vation of the olive — southern 
aspect. 

17. Sardini Count Giacomo, Pozzmlo. 

Higher part of the hills— northern 
aspect. 

18. Bernardini Countess Isabella, Aqui- 

lea. 
Higher part of the hills— southern 
aspect. 

19. Bernardini, Counts— and — , Segro- 

migno* 



Half way up the hills — southern 
aspect. 

20. Mansi, Marquises Lulgi and Gero- 

lamo, Monsagrati. 
Lower part of the hills — western 
aspect. 

21. Guerra — , Veneri. 

Half way up the hills — western 
aspect, 

22. Minutoli Tegrimi Count Eugenio, 

Vorno. 
Lower part of the hill — western . 
aspect. 

23. Guerra — -, Buota, 

Southern aspect. 

24. Pagnucci — , Buota. 

Hill district — southern aspect. 

25. Lucchesini, Marquis, S. Pancrazio. 

Lower part of the hill — southern 
aspect. 

26. Mansi, Marqiilses Luigi and Gero- 

1am 0, Moriano. 
Lower part of the hill — eastern 
aspect. 

27. Guidi Stefano, Moriano. 

Lower part of the hill — eastern 
a.spect. 

Best Lucca olive oil known as ef from 
the Coast »: — 

28. Gittadella Marquis Enrico , Stiava. 

' High up the hill — western aspect. 

29. Talenti — , Bozzano. 

Half way up the hill — southern 
aspect. 

30. Minutoli Tegrimi Count Eugenie, 

Massaciticcoli. 
Lower part of the hill — western 

aspect. 
Common-oil extracted from the 
pulp after obtaining the best oil. 



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i2 



SECTION III. 



31. Gittadena Marquis Enrico, Stiava. 
Common washed olive oil: — 

32. Sardini Count Giacomo, Pieve S, Ste- 

fano. 

33. Bernardini, Gounts — and — , ScU- 

tocchio. 
3i. Pagnucci — , Buota. 
35. Gittadella Marquis Enrico, Stiava. 

Olive oil cake : — 

3G. Bernardini, Gounts, Sdltocchio. 

Commonest olive oil, made from 
waste. 

37. Gittadella Marquis Enrico, Stiava. 

Wine: — 

38. Mugnani Marquis Antonio, S. Gen- 

naro. ■' 

Choice wine, vintage of 1853. 

39. —wine of 1863. 

40. Giorgi Prof. Luigi, Tofori. 

Orzese wine of 1 846. 

* Turin, 1864. 

41. — Aleatico wine of 1863. , 

42. — Common table wine of 1 863. 

43. Mazzarosa , Marquis , San Pietro a 

Marciliano. 
White Muscat of 1861. 
4i. — Occhio di Pernice of 1863. 

* Turin, 1864. 

45. Guerra — , Veneri. 

Choice wine of 1861. 

46. Bernardini Countess Isabella, Aqui- 

lea. 
Common table wine of 1864. 

47. Lucchesini Marquis, S. Pancrazio. 

Common wine of 1^63. 

48. — Muscat of 1847. 

49. Pisani, Chev. — , S. Concordio di Mo- 

riano. 
Common wine of 1 863. 

50. Pierantoni Brothers, S. Concordio dt 

Moriano. 
Common wine of 1863. 
NB. Samples 30 to 42 , and 45 were grown 
on clayey soils 43 and 44 on schistose 
clay; 46, 49, 50 on calcareous clay; 
47 and 48 on gravelly clay. 

Chestnuts: — 

51. Fresh chestnuts. 



52. Dried ditto. 

53. Chestnut flour. 

Agricultural seeds grown in the Pro" 
vince of Lucca: — 
51. White wheat, grano gentile. 
55. Bianchetto wheat. 
50. Tosetto wheat. 

57. Spring wheat, gra}io marzuolo, 

58. Martdlino wheat. 

59. Barley. 

60. Naked wheat {Triticum dicoccum). 

61. ScandeUa wheat (T. dicoccum). 

62. Rye. 

63. Millet. 

64. Panicum. 

65. Saggina pratense. 

66. Saggina of the Maremme. 

67. Spargola Saggina. 

68. Indian corn. 

69. Indian corn. 

70. Red kidney beans. 

71. White kidney beans. 

72. Black-eyed kidney beans, faggioli dal- 

Voccliio. 

73. Small kidney beans. 

74. Chick peas. 

75. Broad beans. 

76. Vetches. 

77. Lupins. 

78. Aiherican rice, grown at Massaciuc- 

coU by Marquis Eugenio Minutoli 
Tegrimi. 

79. Chinese rice, grown at Massaciuccoli 

by Marquis Eugenio Minutoli Te- 
grimi. 

(See Sections IV and IX). 

41 kndinoTelice.viaVanchiglia, Tu- 
rin. Grissini (bread) of three kinds. 

The word grissini owes its origin to the 
inventor, D^ Grissini, who sought to offer 
the most digestive form of bread, in which 
he has admirably succeeded. Grissini is 
commonly eaten at dinner in Turin and the 
principal towns in Piedmont. In outward 
appearance it resembles maccaroni, but it 
is not hollow. It is made in lengths of about 
2 1/2 feet, is crisp and sweet, and has a 
delicious taste, requiring no butter (*). 



(*) Statistical notices of the Tarioas kinds of bread made in Turin, 
famished by the Sanitary Inspector, D^ Rizzetti. 

A) Best while bread. — Made from pure flour of red wheat, conlaiDing not less Ihan \0 per 
cent of gluten, and leaving \o per cent of ashes on incineration. It is made into four principal 
shapes: V^ grissini, of two dimensions, finest and household; 2*"* Small roils or cakes of various 
forms, containing on incineration \. 70 per cent of ashes*, 3"^ Bread for soup , almost cylindri- 
cal; 4**' Semola bread, the most expensive of ali, containing 15 per cent of albumen and gluten. 

B) Common houselK)Id bread. — Not so white as the former , being made from white wheat 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



13 



49. Alonzo GheT. Antonino, Catania, 
Wine grown on the exhibitors' estate at 
Fontana, near Catania. 

* Florence, 1861 : * London, 1862. 

49. Aonzo Giuseppe, manufacturer, 
Savona {Genoa). 

Alimentary paste for soup. Price 2 i/2d 
per lb. 

50. Ballarini Giuseppe, Boccabianca 
(Parma), 

Ham made in 1865, fit to eat raw or cook- 
ed. — Ham made in 1863, ditto. Culatello, 
made in 1865, fit to keep for two years. — 
Sausages. — Price, iid. per lb. 

Annual produce from 20 to 30 tons. 

51. Bailor Giuseppe and Co., manu- 
facturers, CanMano(Turin)\ office in TuriUy 
35, via deUa Frowidenza. 

Turin Vermouth. Price, iSd. per bottle, 
or 4 ?. 12 s. per barrel of 22 1/5 gallons. 

* Florence 1861; t London 1862. 

Annual produce about 20,000 gallons. 

59* B andini Prince Sigismondo. Fia- 
stra {Macerata). 

Hard wheat. 



58. Ban Francesco , Fasano (Terra 
di Ba/ri), ^ 

Figs, price 2 d, per lb. 
Fine olive oil. 
Common olive oil. 

This oil is obtained from the same olives 
as those used for making lamp oil, the only 
difference being in the care with which the 
fruit is selected and prepared. The olives 
are plucked before they are over ripe, and 
the utmost cleanliness is observed in bruis- 
ing them, as well as in filtering the oil 
through several layers of clean cotton wool, 
whereas the lamp oil is made from the per- 
fectly ripe olives which have fallen ifrom the 
trees, and are placed in large heaps, from 
which a certain quantity is taken at any 
time during the winter season in order to 
be pressed. The consequence of such treat- 
ment is that the olives undergo incipient 
fermentation and yield strong oil. The lat- 
ter system of manufacture prevails prin- 
cipally in the adjoining province of Lecce, 
the oil being mostly exported from Galli- 
poli for the use of machinery. The more 
refined quality is manufactured in the pro- 
vince of Bari and shipped from the ports of 
Bari , Monopoli, and Mola for Leghorn and 



flour, from which the whole of the fine bran has nol been removed, w ilh the addition of the 
remains of the best flour, the semolu of the preceding kind, and a small quantity of rye flour. It 
is both wholesome and nourishing. 

C) Brown bread. — Made from white wheat flour, retaining almost ail the bran, mixed with a 
little rye flour. Conlainiig as it does less gluten than tlie above kinds it is not so nutritious. 

D) Military bread. — The wheat flour is deprived of 15 per cent of the bran. It contains ID per 
cent of gluten and albumon^. A soldier^s ration is 26 ounces. 

£) Ship biscuits. — Deprived of 20 per cent of the bran. A sailor^s ration is 19 ounces. 

Mean price of bread in> Tti/rin per lb Avoirdupois from 1859 to 1864 (ofiicial)^ 



KIND OF BREAD 


i8S9 


1860 


1861 


1862 


1863 


1864 


186S 


GrUsini^ best bread. 


2 i|4 d. 


2 1(4 d. 


2 Ii2 d. 


2 ii4 d. 


2 Ii4 d. 


2 i|4 d. 


2 Ii4 d. 


Small loaves, rolls, 
bread for soup . 


4 ii2 . 


\ 3i4 » 


2 » 


1 3(4 » 


4 3i4 » 


1 3i4 • 


1 oil » 


Household or « Se- 
conds » bread. . 


1 ill » 


i ii2- 


i Il2 » 


4 i.2. 


4 il2 » 


1 4(2 » 


4 i|2» 



Dr RlZZITTI. 



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14 



SECTION iir. 



Genoa, where it is sold to foreign pur- 
chaseis as oil of Lucca or Nice, with which 
it may well compete in taste and perfection. 
The olive trees in this province attain thirty 
feet in height, the trunks being frequently 
3 feet in diameter; the branches are spread- 
ing and the fruit excellent. A full sized 
tree yields about two hundredweight of oil. 
The whole sea board from Bari to Brin- 
disi, a distance of 75 miles, for a breadth 
of 7 miles is a continuation of luxuriant 
oliveyards. The railway from Turin to Bari 
and Brindisi was completed only a few 
days ago, and ere lonjg this will become the 
main line of communication between Eu- 
rope an& India. 

541. Bazzigher Lucio and Co., Sas- 
suolo (Modena), 

Modena Binfresco^ 

* London, 1862. 

55. Bellentani Giuseppe, Modem. 

Preserved pork: — Coppa. — S. Secondo 
shoulder ham — MortadeUa sausages. — 
Zampone, — Cappelletto. — Florentine 
sausages. 

Balsamic vinegar of 1800, sixty five years 
old. 

* Florence, 1861. 

50. Beltrani Giuseppe, Irani (Terra 

di Bari). ^ 

Olive oil. — Muscat wine. — Raisins. — 
Figs. 

5 v. Bernard! brothers, manufactu- 
rers, Borgo a Buggiano (Lucca). 

Biscuits called Cantucci. 

* Florence; t London, 1862. 

59. Berruti brothers Giuseppe and 
Carlo, Grinzano d'Alba (Coni). 

8. d. 

1. Red Pineau wine, vintage 1864. 1. 3 

2. White Pineau wine » 1864. 1. 3 

3. Nehhiolo .... » 1862. 1. 6 

4. Ditto » 1863. 1. 3 

5fl. Biffi Paolo, confectioner to the 
Royal Household, 1022. Corsia del Duomo, 
MUan. 

1. Panatone (pastry). 



Various kinds of liqueurs; — 

2. Melange. 

3. Banana. 

4. Caprera. 

5. Different kinds of chocolate. 

6. Confectionery. 

* Florence, 1861 ; * London, 1862. 

•0. Boccardi brothers, Candda (Ca- 
pitanata). 

Olive oil. — Muscat wine , vintage of 
1861. — Aleatico Santo wine, 1861. — 
Cow's milk cheese (letter 0), made in Oc- 
tober 1863. - Ditto (letter N), made in 
November 1864. 

* London, 1862. 

• i. Bonaccorsi Count FlaTio, Po- 

tenza Picena (Macerata). 

Olive oil. 

«2. Buonamici Ferdinando, Vico Pi- 

sano (Pisa). 

Olive oil, expressed cold, 1864 and 1865. 
Price, SI. "Is. per cwt. 

« Green paste * washed oil from the 
skins of the olive, expressed cold; for dying 
and manufacture of white soap. Price 2/. 
per cwt. 

" Yellow paste » ditto, expressed hot, 
for manufacture of mottled soaps. Price, 
1?. 19s 3d. per cwt. 

* Florence, 1861. 

68. Bosco Pietro and sons, Bra 

(Coni). 

Wine: Price, is. per bottle. 

1. Sweet Barolo. . . ". vmtage of 1 863 

2. Bitter Barolo . ... » 1863 

3. Sweet Barolo. ... » 1864 

4. Bitter Barolo . ... » 1864 

«4. Bottamlni Bartolomeo, Bormio 
(Sondrio). 

Honeycomb. 

Honey. Price, is. iOd. per lb. 

* Florence, 1861. 

Method of rearing hees foUoiced by the 
exhibitor in the Alpine valleys ofJBormio, 

The bees are placed in wooden hives 
about a foot wide arid rather more than 
three feet long , perfectly closed in front 
and rear, except that in the former case a 
small aperture is left at the bottom , three 
inches long and 1/3 in height. 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



15 



Great care is necessary at tlie commence- 
ment of the spring to provide sufficient 
food for the insects, and if they cannot pro- 
cure it for themselves 2 or 3 ounces of ho- 
ney are placed in each hive. 

As soon as the mountains become cover- 
ed with flowers the bees are smoked out 
of the hives, by burning a roll of linen rags 
at the back part, so as to drive them to- 
wards the front aperture. The old honey, 
being invariably of inferior quality, is then 
removed, taking care not to interrupt the 
workers , which have begun to make the 
pure new honey, and even after this ope- 
ration the bees should not be deprived of 
honey in case of bad weather intervening , 
when they must be artificially fed as men- 
tioned above. 

The plan followed during the period of 
swarming offers nothing worthy of re- 
mark, beyond the observation that the 
hives should be well filled, so that when the 
swarms are small two should be placed in 
the same hive. These latter are always 
washed with honey and wine before making 
use of them. Even at this period it is essen- 
tial to feed the bees artificially whenever 
the weather is unfavorable. 

About the middle of July the honey is 
taken from the hives in the same manner 
as already described. The white combs are 
separated from the darker ones, as they 
furnish honey of superior quality. It is ne- 
cessary to extract the virgin honey without 
the use of any pressure. The honeycombs 
are placed in boxes divided by a perforated 
tin plate , through which the fine honey 
drains , provided the room be kept suffi- 
ciently warm. That which remains is of a 
commoner kind and is pressed out mechani- 
cally. A third of the honey is always left in 
the hives for the sustenance of the inmates 
in case of inclement weather intervening. 

The neighbourhood of Bormio being very 
elevated, all plants have ceased to flower 
at the beginning of August', so that it is 
necessary to take the bees down to the 
lower part of to valley , where they may 
feed on the buck-wheat planted there in 
the middle of July, this being a plant which 



continues flowering for a long time, though 
the honey which it produces is of an inferior 
description and rarely serves for anything 
beyond the use of the bees themselves du- 
ring the winter months. 

The hives are removed at night on spring 
carts, in order to prevent the honeycombs 
from falling or being in the least degree 
shaken. During the journey the front co- 
vering of the hives is likewise removed and 
substituted by throwing over them a light 
piece of linen to allow the bees to breathe 
freely, otherwise they would become over- 
heated and suffocated, especially in very 
full hives. 

During the last two months of the year 
the bees are placed in their winter quar- 
ters, that is to say in a dark comer of an 
inhabited room, where the cold never des- 
cends to the freezing point. Each hive 
should contain 41/2 lbs of honey, which is 
otherwise added, taking it from one of the 
others which happens to be fuller. The 
combs should be close together, and the 
apartment be kept perfectly quiet and dry. 

The hives are also left in the open air 
during winter , but in such cases at least 
20 lbs. of honey must be placed in each 
one , instead of the quantity mentioned 
above. It is not safe to leave the smaller 
hives out of doors as the bees generally die. 

The bees begin to come out in March , 
provided the weather is fine, but otherwise 
it is essential to keep them in by covering 
the hives, lest they should be injured in 
their excursions by the cold or be destroyed 
by a fall of snow. 

G5. BuUi Brothers , manufacturers , 
Florence. 

Italian paste of various forms , for soup. 

611. Burri Ayy. Bernardino, Cinigiano 
{Grosseto). 

Olive oil. 

67. Calderai Angiolo, Florence, 
Sausages, Price 15 i/M, per lb. 

* Florence, 1861 j * Londoa, 1862. 



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€9. Camajori Giovanni, Sienna. 
Fine olive oil. Price per gallon, is, 10 d. 
Choice wine. Price per bottle, is, id. 
Common wine, » Is. 2d, 

•». Carbone Salvadore, manufactu- 
rer, Catania. 

. Italian alimentary paste for soup: — 

d. 

i. Catania maccaroni. Price per lb. 3 

2. Small maccaroni . ...» 3 

3. Long spaghetto . ...» 3 

4. Smooth maccaroni ...» 3 

5. Fluted maccaroni ...» 3 

6. Anelletti » 3 i/2 

7. Tagliatella » 3 1/2 

8. Savoy cross » 3 1/2 

9. Pepper corns » 3 1/2 

10. LenticeUa » 3 1/2 

li. Cannellina » 3 1/2 

12. Best red Farro wheat (Triticum du- 

rum), grown in the plain of Catania 
and used for the manufacture of mac- 
caroni. Price, 10s. bd, per cwt. 

13. Common red Farro wheat of 1864, 

grown in the plain of Catania and 
used as above. Price, 9s. Id, per cwt. 

VO. Carpano Giusoppe Bernardino, 

18, Piazza CasteUo (Turin). 

i . Turin Vermouth. Price per gallon — is; 
per barrel of 22 1/5 gallons, il, i6s. 

2. Quintine to be drunk with the ver- 
mouth. Price per bottle, 2s. 6d,; per 
barrel of 22 1/5 gallons, 4L 16s. 

VI. Carpi Telesforo, manufacturer, 
Parma. 

2 Hams, cured in 1864. — 4 Shoulder 
hams, cured in 1865. Price 151/2 per lb. 

W. Catania Sub-Committee for the 
Dublin International Exhibition. 

1. Wine grown on the estate of Cipollata. 

2. Wine grown at Cardillo. 

3. S. Agostino wine grown at Cardillo. 

4. Wine grown at Motta. 

5. Wine grown at the Terre forti. 

6. S. Agata wine. 

7. S. Benedetto wine. 

8. Sta Chiara wine. 

9. Bosco wine, grown on the flanks of 

Mount Etna. 
10. S. Placido wine. 

With the exception of sample N® 9 all 
these wines were grown in the immediate 
neighbourhood of Catania. 



Olive oil from the province of Noto. Price 
per cwt, 21 3s. 3d. 

1. Tobacco leaves in bundles, grown at 

Catania. 

2. Snuff made from S. Antonmo native to- 

bacco. 

3. Snuff made from verdesino native to- 

bacco. 

4. Montagna roll tobacco from native 

plants. 

5. Dutch roll tobacco. 

The specunens numbered 2, 3, 4, 5, were 
manufactured in Catania by Natale Grasso 
Balsamo. 

* Florence, 1861, 

Price per ewl 

€ 8. d. 

i. Mustard seed grown in the 

plain of Catania . . . . 1 . 4. 6 

2. Linseed, grown in the plain of 

Catania » 16. 

3. Almonds, grown at Patemd 2. 14. 

4. Almonds grown at Avola(^ofo) » ^ » 

5. Carob beans, grown at Avola » 4. 2 

^9. Cerchi brothers Filippo and Pie- 

tro, MonteCdtini di Vol di Nievole {Lucca). 
Olive oil of 1865. 
Aleatico wine of 1862. 

94. Ciccolini S lenzi Marchioness 
Ortensia, Civitanova (Macerata). 

Olive oil. 

95. Cinzano Francesco (late Nicola 
Baracco and Co.), via Doragrossa^ Turin. 

\. Turin vermouth. Price per barrel 
(22 1/5gallons),4Z. 16s. 

2. Extract of punch, ditto, 16s. per gall. 

3. Desert wine, hrule, Is. per gallon. 

4. Candid fruit. Is. M. per lb. 

5. Confectionery Is. M. per lb. • 

6. Fondants and best bonbons, 3s. Sd. p. lb. 

7. Boxes of bonbons, 3s. Gd. per lb. 

8. Boxes of bonbons of various kinds. 

9. Bouquet of flowers ; flowers. 

10. Barber a wine. Price per barrel of 
. 22 1/5 gallons, 31. is. 

This house was established in 1 814 by 
the father of the exhibitor and conducted 
until 1850 by Francesco Cinzano, when 
another person of the name of Nicola Ba- 
racco, having become partner, the business 
was carried on under the name of Nicola 
Baracco and Company, until 1 863, when the 
exhibitor entered into full possession of it- 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



17 



Baracco and Co. obtained medals at the 
Italian Exhibition in 1861, and at the In- 
ternational Exhibition of 1862. 

96. Cioppi Lorenzo and Settimo, ma* 

nufacturers, Pontedera (Pisa), 

Italian paste, 
t London, 1862. 

9 9. Gompagna Baron Luigi, manu- 
facturer, Corigliano {Calabria Citeriore), 

Red wine. Price, 5s. 6d. per gallon. 
Olive oil. 

The olive tree is extensively cultivated 
in this province: the exhibitor annually 
expresses about 200 tons of oil, shipping it 
in his own vessels to Naples , where it is 
purchased for exportation at about 3Z. per 
cwt. The works contains a portable steam 
engine, which likewise serves for thrashing 
com , water wheels, 6 hydraulic presses , 
and 1 8 iron presses — all manufactured by 
Macry of Naples. 

Provolone and Caciocavallo, cow's milk 
cheeses. 

Annual produce 200 cwt of cheese, sent to 
Naples, where it sells for about U. per cwt. 

VS. Coppini Ginlio, Chiusdino (Sienna), 
Alkhermes. Price, 2s. 6^. per bottle. 

99. Cora brothers Giuseppe and Lai- 

gi, manufacturers of wine and liqueurs, via 
S, Teresa J Turin ^ and CostigUole d'Asti, 
(Alexandria), 

Liqueurs manufactured at Turin. Price 
per bottle, is. iOd.: — 

Alkhermes. — Vanilla chocolate. — Sam- 
hayon. — Banana. — Double Curasao. — 
Maraschino. — Hortmglor. — Double Ani- 
sette. — Turkey coffee. — Punch cream. 

— Cr^me de Noyaux. — Peppermint cream. 

— Truffle cream. — Cinnamon cream. — 

— Balsam of Jerusalem elixir. — Cherry 
ratafia. — Garus elixir. — Sweet quinine, 
elexir. — Stockton elixir. — Chartreuse. 

Wines grown at Costigliole ; vintage of 
1861 : Grignolino. — Tokay. — Sweet and 
dry Nebhiolo, — Barolo, Price p. bottle \Qd. 

Vintage of \Se2 :. Grignolino. — To- 
kay. — Sweet and dry Nebbiolo, — Brac- 
chetto, — Barhera, — Price per bottle, 
iCjd. 

Vintage of 1864i Grignolino, — Sweet 



und dry^ Nebhiolo, — Barolo.— Barolo Neb- 
biolo. — Barber a, — Dolcetto, — Tokay. — 
— Malmsey (Malvasia). — Price, \M. per 
bottle Strevi Muscat.— Val Tinella Muscat. . 
-— Dry Muscat. — Passaretta. — Price per 
bottle, 17 d, 

Turin vermouth. Price per bottle, is, 
iOd. 

Vermouth with quinine or Garus, Price 
per bottle, 2 s, 

* Florence, 1861. 

The engraving represents the manufac- 
tory of Costigliole, s^n from the direction 
of the railway, with which it is connected 
by a special branch. This establishment 
was, so to speak, commenced in 1860 by 
the present proprietors , who found it in 
the state of a common farm house. The 
arrangements necessary for the manufac- 
ture of wine on a large scale are only just 
completed. 

157,000 gallons of wine were made last 
October, which, during the process of fer- 
mentation, as will be understqod by those 
acquainted with this subject, required the 
employment of recipients capable of con- 
taining 225,000 gallons. 

A manufactory of this extent is highly 
important and interesting in the present 
condition of Italy, the more so from the 
rapidity with which it has been erected and 
from the fact that the capital has been 
entirely the result of the exertions of the 
proprietors, who state that they were the 
first in Piedmont to establish a commerce 
of wine with foreign countries. 

Up to 1 860 the reputation of Messrs Cora 
was entirely founded upon their vermouth 
and liqueurs, manufactured in Turin, where 
it was impossible to make ordinary wine , 
owing to the municipal taxes levied on the 
entrance of grapes into the city. The first 
wines were made at Costigliole in 1861, of 
which some samples are exhibited at Dub- 
lin. Those of 1862 were bad, so that it 
was not considered advisable to send them. 
The vintages of 1863 and 1864, on the 
other hand, were so abundant and the pro- 
duce so excellent that after filling all the 
cellars the exhibitors were obliged to erect 
a temporary roof over the court yard. — 



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SECTION m. 



Such are some of the difficulties, which have 
had to be overcome by the exhibitors. 

Messrs Cora do not employ travellers , 
* like most other houses, to push their pro- 
ducts, but rely entirely on the credit which 
these acquire with the public. The wines 
are guaranteed not to contain any alcoholic 
additions, as is too frequently the case with 
those sold in commerce ; in this manner not 
only is it possible for the fermentation to 
proceed without interruption but the wines 
are far more wholesome. The deposit in the 
samples exhibited is a natural consequence 
of the newness of the wines, which were 
bottled before the cessation of the chemical 
changes, during which the coloring matter 
separates more or less according to the 
quality of the wine, whether sparkling or 
otherwise , its age, and the nature of the 
grapes employed. 

67,000 gallons of vermouth are kept in 
the stores for shipment to South America , 
whither three quarters of the quantity 
manufactured are exported after having 
acquired sufficient age. 

The grape disease has now so consider- 
ably diminished that it is to be hoped that 
the wines of Italy may soon become an im- 
portant article of export, expecially those 
of the Piedmontese provinces, where the 
process of manufacture is being consider- 
ably improved and the prices are falling to 
their original level. 

90. Cosentino Stefano, Catania. 

Fine olive oil, grown at Francofonte (Noto), 
Price, 21. i6s. per cwt. 

91. Costarelli Martino; Catania, 
Wines grown at Nesima near Catania: — 

1. Granatino wine. 

2. JRosa wine. 

* Florence, 1861; * London, 1862. 

9«. Curtarelli Gaetano, Cremona, 

1. Almond cake and torrone sweetmeat. 

2. Cremona mostarda, or fruit pickles. 

3. Mustard jalap for manufacturing the 

fruit pickles. 

98. D'Albero Antonio, manufacturer, 
218 and 219, strada Toledo (Naples), 



Candid fruit. — Candid chestnuts. — 
Candid vegetable marrow. Price, is. Qd. 
per lb. 

Fruit preserves. Price , is. 8d. per pot. 

94. Danielli Dr. Domenico and Bro- 
thers, Buti (Pisa). 

1. Olives preserved in spirits. 

2. Dried olives. 

3. Strong olive oil, 1865. 

4. Sweet olive oil, 1865. 

5. Yellow oHve oil, 1862. 

6. White olive oil for perfumery, 1862. 

1. Yellow olive oil. 

2. Common dark yellow olive oil. 

3. Common green olive oil. 

4. Common white olive oil. 

5. Common dark yellow olive oil. 

6. Common green olive oil. 

7. Olive oil. 

8. Olive skins pressed in order to extract 

the residual oil with sulphide of car- 
bon. 

9. Olive kernel oil, for burning. 

10. Flour of olive kernels, for fattening 
pigs. 
* Florence, 1861 ; * London, 1862. 

95. Be Filippi Paolo, Savona (Genoa), 

Wine of several kinds. Price is. 8d. per 
bottle. 

SG. Del Toscano, Marquis, Catania, 

Wines grown on the estate of Porticato 
near Catania, vintage of 1864: — 

1. Muscat. 

2. Calabrian wine. 

3. Amarepa of Marasso wine. 

4. White wine. 

♦ Florence, 1861; * London 1862. 

99 . Di Rignano, Marquis, Foggia (Ca- 
pitanata). 

^est and common olive oil. 

* London, 1862. 

S9. Economical Society, Savona (Ge- 
noa), 

Chestnuts. Price 9 s, per cwt. 

9fl. Fasciotti and Co., growers, Bor- 
gomasino (Turin), 

Bonardu wine of 1863. Price per bot- 
tle, 25. 

Erhaluce wine of 1863. Price per bot- 
tle, 25. 

The grapes of which these wines are 



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SUBSTANXES USED AS FOOD i9 









c«1 

o 



I 

e 



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20 



SECTION in. 



made are produced from old stocks, grown 
in poor soil on the hill slopes. After gather- 
ing the perfectly ripe bunches they are 
laid out to dry on matting, carefully remo- 
ving the defective fruit. 

It is found preferable to place the grapes 
in lofty and well ventilated rooms, exposed 
to the sun. The windows are kept open as 
long as there is any wind and the weather 
is dry, but they are shut Vlb soon as the at- 
mosphere becomes damp , and a fire lit 
to preserve the fruit from mildew. The 
grapes being left thus spread out until they 
become quite dry, the operation sometimes 
lasts until the end of March. 

As the vines are sulphurized it is neces- 
sary to stone the grapes with the greatest 
care before pressing them, picking out the 
defective ones by hand. The juice is allowed 
to stand 24 hours and is then poured into 
casks or very large bottles : the former being 
sealed up after several days, the latter 
being simply covered over with paper to 
preserve the contents from the dust , and 
placed in dry warm rooms, but not exposed 
to the sun. As soon as the fermentation has 
somewhat diminished the bottles are par- 
tially corked up, completing the operation 
when it has entirely subsided. In September 
Dr October the wine is bottled, choosing the 
finest days. 

•O. Fenzi Emanuele Orazio, Flo- 
rence, 

Agricultural products from the estate of 
the Exhibitor at S. Casciano (Florence), 

1. Dry white wine of 1861; Is. Sd, per 
bottle. 

The grapes are slightly pressed as soon 
as gathered, and the juice passed through 
a wickerwork basket, and poured into bar- 
rels which are hermetically closed and al- 
lowed to stand for three yeara in a well- 
ventilated apartment, after which the wine 
is fit for bottling. 

2. Ked wine of 1863; 'Ss. to Zs, Id, per 
gallon. 

This wine is made in a different manner; 
the grapes are slightly trodden and put 
into a second vessel where they are agfliin 



trodden and allowed to stand for 36 hours, 
when the juice is collected by an aperture 
in the bottom. After this the remaining pulp 
is put under a press and the juice mixed 
with the former kind. During the process 
of fermentation the bung-hole is left open 
to prevent danger, and wine is constantly 
added to keep the barrel quite full. Fer- 
mentation has completely subsided at the 
end of a month, when the wine is changed, 
throwing away the dregs and filling up the 
barrel with the juice of the same grapes 
set aside in flasks for the purpose. The 
process of filling up the barrel from the 
flasks is repeated several times until Sep- 
tember when the process of vinificatian is 
completed and the wine fitter bottling. 

3. Common red wine of 1864. 

Made by the common Tuscan plan , the 
grapes being first trodden in the tubs a^d 
then placed in vessels wkere they are again 
trodden several times : at a certain period 
of the fermentation the vessels are covered 
over with a cloth and the wine allowed to 
stand for a month, after which time it is ba- 
relled, bemg fit to drink at the end of De- 
cember. The residual pulp is pressed apart 
and the juice obtained mixed with the rest. 

4. Olive oil in flasks, 1863. 

5. Ditto 1864. 

The season for gathering the olives 
begins in November. The quantity of oil 
obtained from the fruit increases as the 
seas#n advances though the superfine oil 
is obtained from the oliyes gathered earliest 
in the season. The olives are spread out in 
a ventilated apartment where they are left 
for several days to dry, they are then bruis- 
ed under a vertical mill-stone turned by an 
ox, and reduced to the state of a coarse 
paste, which is put into hempen bags or 
network called gobble or bmcole, and sub- 
jected to slow pressure under a screw 
press. The oil thus expressed is allowed to 
clarify for several days in large earthenware 
vessels called conche^ glazed inside, and 
finally transferred to orei or cojjpi, likewise 
of glazed earthenware. The term virgin oil 
is applied to that pressed out during the 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



21' 



first operation, and is the most esteemed. 
The residuum still contains oil though of 
an inferior kind. 

Agricultural seeds: — 

1. Lupins. 

Used as a forage either alone or accom- 
panied hy other plants. The seeds when 
salted are eaten throughout Tuscany hy the 
poorer classes; lastly lupins are often sown 
along with wheat simply for manure, heing 
placed for a short tune m an oven to destroy 
the power of germination. — Sown in 
autumn, ripen in spring. 

2. Beans. 

Generally given as food to horses, though 
in some parts of Central Italy flour is made 
of them, which when mixed with that of 
wheat forms an economical ^d not indi- 
gestible bread. They are also employed for 
manuring land to be sown with wheat, bu- 
rying the entire plant while still in flower. 
— Sown in October, ripen in May. 

3. Indian corn. 

In this part of Italy Indian com is of for 
less importance than in the north and in 
the Appennines where it forms the principal 
basis of the food of the peasantry. It flour- 
ishes best in the plains or in irrigable 
ground. Bread or cakes made of Indian 
com are called polenta. The green leaves 
are given to cattle, while the dried glumes 
serve to fill mattrasses. — Sown in April , 
ripens in September or October. 

4. Vetches. 

Largely employed as fresh forage at the 
begmning of spring. Flour is sometimes 
made of vetches, but it produces an indi- 
gestible kind of bread. — Sown in autumn, 
gathered in spring. 

5. White kidney beans. 

When young they are eaten m the pod, 
indeed this is a favorite dish with the Flo- 
rentines: when ripe they are largely used 
by the middle classes. — Sown in spring , 
fit to eat during the summer. 

6. Barley. 



This cereal, so largely cultivated in 
Korthem Europe, is grown in Central Italy 
almost exclusively for fresh forage to be 
used at the end of winter or beginning of 
spring. 

7. Sorgho. 

Sown along with Indian com, and serving 
for green forage during the whole of the 
autumn. The seeds are also given to fowls 
in winter. 

8. Chick peas. 

Planted rather in kitchen gardens than 
in fields. The seeds are eaten in soup. — 
Sown in April gathered in June. 

9. Lentils. 

Planted and eaten like chick peas. 

10. Oats. 

Generally given to horses when ripe, 
though the plant is also used as green forage 
in winter and spring. — Sown in autumn, 
cut in spring. 

11. Clover. 

Excellent forage, but requiring good 
soil. Under favorable curcumstances the 
plants lasts 7 or 8 years, yielding 3 or 4 
crops yearly. 

12. Lupinella {Hedysarum eoronarium). 
Excellent for forage or making hay. It 

is extremely valuable , as it will grow on 
poor soil, but it only lasts for 3 or 4 years, 
yielding one crop annually. 

1 3. Medicago sativa. 

Probably the best forage cultivated in 
Tuscany. Though it grows on all soils it 
prefers the deeper, where its long roots can 
penetrate sufiiciently to defy the droughts 
of summer. — Lasts from 3 to 8 years, being 
cut 4 or 5 times a year. 

14-15. Eaw and cleaned Siamese cotton. 

This province is strictly speaking beyond 
the region for the economical cultivation of 
cotton, though the pods ripen perfectly. 

16. Red wheat (Triticum hylernum, 
spica rafa). 



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SECTION m. 



Grows best on the hills. Together with 
the following is the kind most prized for 
making tread. — Sown in October cut at 
the end of June. 

17. White wheat (T. hyhernum, spica 
alba. 

Like the preceding variety. 

18. Hard wheat (T. turgidum). 

Grows best in the hills. It is almost 
exclusively employed for making Italian 
paste for soups. — Sown like N** 1 G. 

19. Civitella wheat (T. cestivum). 

Grows best in the plains, and is earlier 
than the preceding. It suffers from the 
mist. It is excellent for making bread. 

20. Mixed wheat, grano mistio. 

. Consisting of a mixture of several va- 
rieties, suited for poor soils and in loca- 
laties where the climate is so unfavourable 
as to render the harvest uncertain. — Sown 
as N*> 16. 

21-22. Pine seeds {Pinl pinccB fructus). 

These have very much the shape and 
taste of little almonds; the cones containing 
them are gathered at the beginning of winter 
and dried in the sun or in an oven to make 
them burst. In some places tliey are also 
used for the extraction of oil, but in Tus- 
cany they are generally eaten at dessert, 
or in cakes called Pinoccluate. 

23. Jimiper berries. 

No use has hitherto been made of these 
berries in Italy though they are exported 
in small quantities to the north of Europe. 
They might be procured to any extent 
in the woods of Tuscany where the plant 
grows wild in great abundance. 

2i. Iris (Iris florentina). 

The pulverized roots of this plant furnish 
the cosmetic so well known all over the 
world as rice powder or Florence iris pow- 
der. The plant is indiginous in the neigh- 
bourhood of Florence and is extensively 
cultivated in some parts of the province. 



•i. Forges Dayanzati Alessandro, 

Palo del CoUe (Terra di Bart). 

Fine olive oil. 

Wine. 

Beans. 

Almonds. 

Hemp seed. 

Linseed. 

•2. Forni Alessandro, Bologna. 

d. 

Two sausages . . Price per lb. 17 1/2 

Tv,'0 C(q)icoUl » 15 i/2 

Bolo^rna sausage » 12 

i Boxes of shced Bologna sausages, exhi- 
bited as a new mode of preparation. 

* London, 1862. 

OS. Franciosi Pietro, Terricuola, near 

Pcccioli (Pisa). 

Superfine oUve oil ; 3/. 5s. 6d. per cwt. 

* Florence, 1861. 

»4. Frigieri Giuseppe, Modena. 

Florentine sausages. — Zampone and Ca- 
pello. — Balsamic vinegar. 

* Florence, 1861. 

95. Gallucci Michelangiolo , Pdlmi 
(Calabria Ultra prima). 

Wines grown in territory of Palnii, price, 
ild. per bottle: — 

^Vhite and red Calabrian wine. — Mus- 
cat. — Greco. — Red Palmi. Aspromonte. 
— Prato. 

Vinegar. 

»6. Galvagno Giuseppe, chemist, 8, 
via Doragrossa, Turin. 

Galvagno's cough mixture. 

Price, large bottle, 3s. 3d.; small bottle, 2s. 

•9 . Gancia brothers , manufacturers, 
CJiivasso (Turin). 

Vermouth, made in 1 862. 
Ditto » 1863. 

Barolo wine, grown and made at Chera- 
sco, near Br^ (Coni). 

•9. Giancola Leonardo , Modagno 
(Terra di Bari). 

Mustard seed. Price, I65. per cwt. 

09. Gioeni Trigona Yincenzo, Ca- 
tania, 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



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Wines grown atPalmi, near Catania: — 

Price per galloa 

£ S. d. 

i. White Guarnaccla of iS(}2 \ » 1-9. 2 

2. A?6aneRo of 1860. . . . . » 17. 8 

3. Gi/ic^'o of 1864 » » » 

4. Marsala of 1861 1. 1. 6 

* Florence, 1861 ; * London, 1862. 

iOO. Grazzini Pellegrino , Bailiff of 
the estate of CoUeoU, near Pontedera(Pisa). 

1.- Best olive oil, made without water; 
31 i6s. dd. percwt. 

2. Common olive oil , expressed . with 
water; 3?. 3s. 3d per cwt. 

3. Vermouth; 5s 6d. per gallon. 

4. Red wine , made with dried grapes ; 
4s. 4cf. per gallon. 

lOi. Grisaldi Taj Carlo, Sienna, 
Aleatko wine. Price per bottle, Is. iOd. 

* Florence, 1861; i London, 1862. 
Fine olive oil. Price per gallon, 4s. lOd. 

* Florence, 1861; * London, 1862. 

tOS. Guelfi Gaetano, manufacturer, 
Navacdiio (Pisa). 

English biscuits. 

* Florence, 1864; * London, 1862. 

The Exhibitor introduced the manu- 
facture of English biscuits into Italy in 
1 856, and was the only maker of them up 
to 1860, since which time oth^r persons 
have ;,Ukewise imitated the same biscuits. 

to J. Isnard Pietro, oil refiner, Leg- 
horn. 

Pale yellow Tuscan olive oil made from 
olives gathered last January refined by ex- 
hibitor; in bottles and flasks. 

Ditto, made last March. 

i05. Jacono Antonino, tobacco ma- 
nufacturer, Messina. 

Cigars : — 

1. Imperial regalia. 

2. Double regalia. 

3. Regalia. y 

4. Half Havannah. 

5. Havannah. 

6. Medium regalia. 

7. Aurora. 

8. Gibertarino. 

9. Favorite. 

10. Double ManilU. 



11. Manilla. 

12. Long Vevey. 

13. Maltese. 

14. Spilla. 

15. Dama. , 

16. Java. 

17. London. 

18. Dama Levantino. 

19. Carubba. 

i06.* Jannelli Baron Enrico, grower, 
Termini Imerese (Palermo). 

Best oUve oil, grown at Bragone , Ter- 
mini Imerese. 

* Florence, 1861. 

The hills in the neighbourhood of Bra- 
gone have an eastern and southern aspect, 
and are situated close to the sea shore. The 
ground is covered with pebbles and gravel, 
but the subsoil is deep and in some places 
marly. The method of preparing the oil is 
simple. At the end of October, when the 
olives become yellowish and tinged with 
red spots the peasants proceed on dry days 
to gather the fruit, putting it in baskets 
lined with linen. It is then spread out in a 
thin stratum on the wooden floor of a well- 
ventilated apartment, taking out all the 
over-ripe or defective ones. After being 
dried in this manner for three days it is 
bruised and then put in the press. The li- 
quid is placed in covered vessels for 24 
hours, and before fermentation has set in 
it is filtered through linen in earthenware 
pans. In a weeks' time it is filtered again 
through cotton wool to separate the resi- 
dual pulp, which contains the coloring 
matter, and deteriorates the oil. In these 
operations the utmost care is necessary to 
keep all the vessels and matter with which 
the oil comes in contact extremely clean 
and dry, as it easily becomes rancid under- 
going a chemical change. 

i09. Labriola Francesco, JL^^amura 
(Terra di Bari). 

Lmseed; price 8 s. 10 c?. per cwt. 

109. Lambertini Giuseppe Emidio, 

Bologna. 

Round Bologna sausage (morta- d. 
della) Price per lb. 15 1/2 



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SECTION III. 



Old triangular Bologna sausage d. 

(mortaddla) » 15 i/2 

OhXong (cop]pa d' estate) , , >» 12 

Long soft sausage ...» 11 
i London, 1862. 

too. Lancia brothers, manufacturers 
of preserved provisions to H. M. the king 
of Italy and the Forces, Piazza del Pa- 
lazzo di Cittd, Turin, 

Tin cases of preserved provisions for 
military stores : 

Weight of 
tin ease at per lb. Price 

Kilogr. s, ' d. s. d. 

1. Boiled beef . 6. 6 » 7 1/4 to 8. 9 

2. Mortadella 

sausages . 4. » 14 1/4 

3. Fowl in ge- 



atme. 

4. Cooked sau- 

sages. . . 2. 5 

5. Ox tongue . » » 

6. Calf 's tongue. » » 

7. Loin of beef. 3. 3 

8. Galantine of 

fowl|. . . 3. 4 

9. Shoulder of 

pork . . . 1. » 

10. Fowl in gela- 

tine . . , » » ' 

11. White truffles » 7 



10. 
8. 



13 



8 3/4 

7 1/4 

81/4 

» 
3 



8. 10 

2. 10 

5. 10 
11. 3 



* Florence, 1861. 



The exhibitors first came into notice in 
1855 during the Crimean war in when they 
largely supplied the allied forces with 
preserved provisions, chiefly beef, as they 
did again in 1859 to the FreAch and Ita- 
lian troops in the war of Independence. 
Lastly in the brief period of three months 
in 1864 they consigned to the Government 
700 tons of preserved provisions. 

tiO. Majorana brothers Salvadore 
and Giuseppe, Barons of Nicchiara, 

Catania, 

Agricultural products from the estates 
of the exhibitors: — 

£ 8. d, 

1. Vinegar, from the estate of 

Militello. Price per gallon • » 0. 11 
* Florence, 1861. 

2. Wine, from the estate of 

Troldo . * 2. 9 

♦Florence, 1861; ♦Lon- 
don, 1862. 

1 . Olive oil, from the estate of 

Nicchiara. Price per cwt 2. 16. 



€ 8. d. 

2. Olive oil, flavoured with es- 

sential oil of oranges, from 

the same estate . . . . 2. 16 

3. Olive oil, from the estate of 

Magnini 2. Id 

♦ Florence, 1861. 

1. Snuff, made from tobacco 

grown at Militello. Per lb. » 9. 

2. Snuff; ditto » 9. 

3. Snuff; ditto ». 9. 

4. Lecce snuff; ditto ...» 9. 

* Florence, 1861. 

1. Rice, grown in the plains of 

Catania . Price per cwt. » 1 4. 

2. Rice, grown as above. . . » 7. 9 

3. Hemp seed, from the estate 

of Rapis. Price per gallon » » 7 

4. Canary seed (P?kiZans Cana- 

riensis), grown at Gallice . » » 11 

5. Maltese mustard seed, grown 

at Troldo » 1. 4 

6. Mustard seed, grown at Mo- ^ 

sea ........'» 1. 4 

7. Sesamum {Sesamum orierir 

tale), grown on the estate 

of Rapis » 2. 9 

8. White lentils; ditto . . , » » 9 

9. Black lentils , grown on the 

estate of Moscarino. 

10. Castor oil seed {Eicintis U- 

vidus), grown on the estate 
of Troldo. 

1 1 . Linseed, grown on the estate 

of Rapis ....... » 11 

12. Peas; ditto » » 9 

13. Broad beans; ditto . . . » » 5 

14. Chick peas , grown on the 

estate of Troldo. 

15. Red kidney beans, grown on 

the estate of Rapis . . . » » 9 

16. Kidney beans; ditto. ' 

17. White kidney beans; ditto . » » 9 

18. Mascdlesi kidney beans; 

ditto ; » » 9 

19. Chick beans {Lathy tm sati- 

vns var. Macrospermus ah 
hidus, Dp.), ditto . . . » » 6 
♦Florence, 1861; ♦.Lon- 
don, 1862. 

20. Carub beans (Ceratonia sili" 

qua), from the estate of 
Nicchiara . Price per cwt » 4. 

21. Walnuts; ditto. Pr. per gall. » » 10 

1. Pickled olives, from the es* 
tate of Nicchiara. Price 

Ser cwt , 1. 4. 10 
ves prepared in oil . .1. 4. 10 

3. Salted black olives ; ditto . • » » 

4. Honey 3. 5. 

* Florence, 1861 j * LQnd<my 1 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



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III. Malatesta Augusto, Modem. 

Lambrmco wine, of 1863. 
Ditto 1864. 

119. Mancusa Matteo, Catania, 

Wine of 1864, grown on the estate of Ter- 
rebianclie near Catania. 
* Florence, 1861. 

113. Maranesi Gaetano, Bologna. 
Muscat wine of 1863; 10s. \0d. per gallon. 

-This wine was made with raisins of the 
vintage of 1862 , grown at Gaibola. It was 
decanted after 15 days to separate the 
tartar, this operation was repeated in March 
and August 1862, when the wine was bot- 
tled, since which time it has formed no 
deposit. 



114. March! Antonio, Parma. 

Forage seed : Medicago (Medicago sativa). 

— Ray grass. — Vetches (Hedysarum 

onohrychis). 
Parmesan Cheese. Price 17 1/2 cl. per lb. 



115. Marcialis Giuseppe, Cagliari. 

Price per bottle 

s. d. 

Malmsey wine . . . of 1861 1. 9 

Ditto » 1864 1. 9 

Giro » 1860 1. 9 

Muscat. ..... » 1864 1. 9 

Vernaccia » 1863 1. 9 

Ditto ...*... » 1864 1. 9 
Red table wine ...» 1862 0. 8 1/2 

Ditto » 1864 0. 8 1/2 

116. Margret Giovanni, aoA^ona (Ge- 
noa), 

Liqueurs and effervescing drinks. 

♦ Florence, 1861 ; i London, 1862. 

119. Marinelli Emilio, manufacturer, 
Parma. 

Best and common Italian paste, corn and 
rice flour. 

* London, 1862. 

118. Marini Giro, manufacturer, Bo- 
logna, 

Liqueurs ^ Rosolio of the following 



kinds : — Bitter alrapnds. — Anisette. — 
Alkhermes. — Cedro, — Coffee. —Juniper. 
— Perfetto amore. — Olio di Venere. — 
Cummin. — Peppermint. — Cinnamon. — 
Rose, 9s. per gallon. 

Binfresco di PortogdUo, 3s. ^d. per gall. 

Venetian Arack, hs. per gallon. 

Dutch Curasao. — Zara Maraschino^ 
9s. id. per gallon. 

119. Martini, Sola apd Co., manu- 
facturers, Qiieri (Turin)', Office, 34, via 
Carlo Alberto, Turin. 

Turin vermouth. Price per barrel of 
22 1/5 gallons, U. 8s. 

Collection of liqueurs. Price, 2s. per bot- 
tle: Alkermes; White yellow and green 
Chartreuse; Vanilla chocolate; Strawberry; 
Elixir with quinine; Genesis desAlpes: Gla- 
cial peppermint; Mocha coffee; Cherry Ra- 
tafia; Sambayon] Hortusglor; Fernet; IVap- 
'pestine. 

This house carries on a considerable bu- 
siness both in Italy and abroad, especially 
with vermouth. The exhibitor states that 
he exported 20,000 cases of vermouth to 
South America during the past year. 

190. Masoero Lorenzo, manufactu- 
rer, 15, via deUa Provvidenza, Turin, 

Vermouth. Price per bottle, idd, 

191. Masselli Antonio, Sansevero 
(Capitanata), 

Olive oil. 

t London, 1862. 
Hard wheat. 

193. Merenda Count Gesare, Mo- 
dena. 

Green Cliartreuse. — Yellow ditto. — 
White ditto. — Dutch curagao. — Dutch 
anisette. — Bordeaux anisette. Price per 
gallon, 18s. 

Modenese rinfresco, 14s. 6d, per gallon 

194. MineiDr. Francesco Candido, 

Gioia del CoUe (Abruzzo Citeriore). 

Mustard seed. 

195. Moncada Andreai Catania. 
Wine from the Terre fort! near Catania. 

* Florence, 1861. 



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26 



SECTION in. 



, 196. Mossa Federico, Cagliari, 
Wines grown itt Pizzi {Cagliari): — 



Canonao .... 

Nasco 

Malvasia or malmsey 
Kdlamathias . . 

Ditto 

White wine vinegar 
Red wine vinegar . 



Frice per bottle 

8. d, 

of 1861 2. 6 
» 1862 2. 
» 1862 2. 6 
» 1861 1. 8 
» 1862 1. 3 
» 1857 1. 3 
» 1860 0. 7 1/2 



199. Nasi Guglielmo, Modena. 

Lambrusco wine of 1 864. 
Lambnisco wine of 1 863 (green label). 
Lamhrusco wine of 1863 (blue label); rather 

bitter. 
Lamhfvsco wine .of 1860. 
Balsamic vmegar of 1761, one hundred and 

four years old. 
Vinegar of 1812, fifty three years old. 



199. Nobile 

(Capitanata). 

Olive oil. 



Carloantonio , Vieste 



190. Oreggia Dr. Marco , Savona 
Genoa). 

Olive oil. Price 1 id. per lb. 

ISO. Orsi Rafifaele and Co., Bologna. 

Bologna sausages (mortadeUa). Price per 

lb., 15 1/2(1. 
Soft sausages. Price per lb., lie?, 
t London, 1862. 

131. Ottolini Guglielmo, Lucca. 
Olive oil. 

133. Paoletti Ferdinando, manufac- 
turer, Pontedera (Pisa). 

Superfine wheat flour. — White and co- 
loured Italian paste of various kinds and 
forms, manufactured with red wheat. — 
Biscuits of various kinds. 

* Florence, 1861 ; * London, 1862. 

134. Parent! Giro, Massa di Cozzile, 
Peseta (Lucca). 

Santo or raisin wine of 1864. 

* Turin, 1864. 
OUve oil of 1865. 



185. Parent! Glovann!, manufactu- 
rer, Sienna. 

Best Sienna Panforte, sweetmeat. 

* Florence, 1861. 

186. Pazzon! Cesare, wine grower 
Traversetolo (Parma). 

Red wine, from Mqntelugolo, Commune 
of Guardasone. Price per bottle, ibd. 
White wine, from same locality. Price, 2«. 

* Turin, 1864. 

137. Pepi*Natale, manufacturer, 
Sienna. 

Panforte sweetmeat. -Price, 3^. id. 
Wholesale price, from 6». to Ss, per cwt. 

This house as been estabUshed for half 
a century; the exhibitor states that he makes 
18 tons of panforte annually. 

t3§. Peratoner and Co., merchants, 
Catania. 

Linseed. Price, 16s. per cwt. 

139. Prat! Giuseppe, manufacturer, 
Alexatidria. 

Elixir of the Great St Bernard, invented 
by exhibitor. Price per bottle, 2s. 9d. 
Annual sale, 6000 bottles, 
t London, 1862. 

141. Ravaldon! Francesco, Bologna. 

Bologna sausages (mortaddla). Price per 

lb., 15 i/M. 
Soft sausages. Price per lb. iid. 
Copjpa d' estate. » i2d. 

149. Ricasol! Baron Colonel Vin- 
cen2o , grcfWer, Florence. 

Mild and dry Eiminese wine, grown at 
Port Ercole , on Mont' Argentale (Crros- 
seto), vintage 1863. Price, 2s. bd. per bottle. 

* Turin, 1864. 

This wine partakes of the nature of Ma- 
deira and Sherry. It is supposed to have 
been introduced by the Spaniards while 
they occupied the Presidii. 

148. Rizza Giuseppe, Chiaramonte 
(Noto). 

1. Olive oil. Price, 2i. 2s. 6d. per cwt. 

2. Fine olive oil. Price, 21 16s.aper cwt. 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



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144. Ronff J., grower, 145, strada 
Chiaja, Naples, 

Price 
per bottte 

8. d. 

"White Capri wine , grown in the 

province of Terra di Lavoro . . 0.10 
Red Capri wine from the province 

of Naples 0. 10 

"White Lacrima grown on the island 

oflschia 1. 5 

"White and red Falemian wine, 

grown at Pozzuoli (Naples) .,1.5 

145. Royal (Enological Commis- 
sion (Turin), 

Large collection of choice Italian wines. 
Collective exhibition on behalf of the fol- 
lowing growers and manufacturers: — 

1. Benzo Ayy. Giuseppe, Cassine (A- 
lexa}idria. 

Price 
per bottle 

8, d. 

Claret .... vintage of 1859 1. 6 
"White muscat, made in . » 1865 1. 6 
* Turin, 1864. 

%' Costa Brothers ABtonio 
and Benedetto, Alghero (Sas- 
sari). . 

Tarhato . . . vinUge of 1863 2. 5 

3. De Beuedetti (heirs of) 
late Salvadore, Acqm(Meoi>' 
and/ria. 



Barhera . . . vintage 
Rather bitter Barhera 
Sweet Barhera . 
Common Dolcetto 
Ditto .... 
Ditto .... 
Grignolino . . 
Dry Barolo . . 
Sparkling Nehhidlo, 
Sparkling muscat 
G<)lden muscat . 
Rather bitter white wine 
♦ Turin, 1864. 



of 1863 1. 
1864 1. 
1864 1. 
1864 1. 
1864 1. 
1861 1. 6 
1864 1. 6 
1864 1. 6 
1864 1. 6 
1864 1. 6 
1845 2. 6 
1854 1. 6 



4. Cigala* Fulgosi Count 
Pietro, Nibhi^no (Placenza), 

Choice white wine, vintage of 1844 3. 

Ditto » 1858 2. 6 

Ditto ^ 1860 2. 



8, d. 

Ditto of 1861 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1. 

Choice red wine ...» 1863 1. 0- 

* Turin, 1864. 

5. Delia Torre Count Carlo, 

Orio Caluso (Turiri). 

Dry white Orio wine, vmt. of 1845 4. 

Orio Pelleverde . . . . » 1847 4. 

Dry white Orio wine . . » 1849 4. 

UixedNeretto&ndNebbwloM 1849 3. 

Mixed Burgundy . . . » 1852 3. 

Claret » 1839 5. 

Sweet white wine ...» 1839 5. 

Dry white wine . . .^ » 1863 2. 6 

Sweet white wine . . . » 1860 2. 6 

* Turin, 1864. 

6. Genta Aw. Paolo, Ca- 
luso (Turin), 

White Caluso . vintage of 1853 3. 6 

Ditto »'1858 3. 

Choice red Caluso . . . » 1859 2. 6 

* Florence, 1861; * London, 1862. 

7. Zauli Naldi Count Fran- 
cesco, Faenza (Eavenna). 

Choice white San Mamante . . 3. 

Choice santo or raisin wine. . . 3. 

Muscat 3. 

Piccolit 3. 

White Zamone 3. 

* Turin, 1864. 

8. Ivaldi Dr. Domenico, 

Morsasco (Alexandria), 

Choice red wine, vintage of 1863 1. 6 

Ditto » 1864 1. 

Choice red Dolcetto , ♦ » 1861 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1. 

Choice Bordeaux ...» 1863 i, 6 

White muscat . ...» 1863 2. 
t London, 1862; ♦ Turin, 1364. 

9. Di San Germane Mar- 
quis Casimiro, Maggh Cana- 
vese (Turin), 

Dry white wine, vintage of 1840 4. 
Claret » 1858 3. 

* Turin, 1864. 

10. Colomiatti Aw. Mel- 
chiorre and Brothers, Chieri 
(Turin), 

Barharossa . . vmtage of 1856 2. 



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SECTION m. 



Bitter Tokay 
Bonarda , . 
Muscat . . 



8. d, 
• 1861 2. 6 
» 1860 1. 6 
» 1863 2. 



Turin, 1864. 



11. Fulcheri Alessandro , 
Mondom Breo (Conij. 

White muscat , vintage of 1861 2. 

Ditto , • 1862 2. 

Ditto w 1863 1. 6 

Ditto » 1864 1. 6 

Barolo » 1861 1. 6 

Dolcetto » 1863 1. 

Barhera » 1863 1. 

Bracchetto » 1864 I. 6 

Common DolceUo . . . » 1862 1. 

Nebhiolo » 1861 1. 6 

* Turin, 1864. 



12. Vitiello Vincenso, Torre 
del Greco (Naples). 

Red Vesuvian Zacrima . . 
White Vesuvian Lacrima . 



3. 
3. 



13. Gabaldoni Vincenso, 

Varese lAgure (Genoa), 

Red wine . . . vintage of 1857 2. 

Ditto • 1859 1. 6 

White wine ..'...• 1863 1. 
Red wine » 1863 1. 

* Turin, 1864. 



14. Ottria Giovanni, Co- 
priata ^Orha (Alexandria). 

Fine Nebibiolo . vintage of 1863 1. 
Best Nebbiolo . . . . » 1863 1. 6 
Choice Nebhiolo. . . , • 1864 1. 
Best selected Nebbiolo . » 1864 1. 6 

Ditto » 1864 1. 6 

Superfine choice NebUdo » 1864 -2. 
JPaglierino Cortese . . . » 1863 2. 
Baglierino mahnsey . . jo 1864 1. 6 
Choice Paglierino mahnsey » 1864 2. 

* Turin, 1864. 



15. Alberici Francesco, Car. 
stana (Paoia). 

Italian blood . . vintage of 1863 1. 6 

Ditto » 1864 i; 6 

Fme Barhera . . . . » 1864 1. 6 

Malakoff » 1864 1. 6 

Aleatico » 1864 1. 6 

Santo or raisin wine . . » 1849 3. 
♦ Florence, 1861 ; * Turin, 1864. 



16. De Blasiis Gomm. Gia- 
como, 8, Angdo Penne (Ahruz- 
zo Ulteriore I). 

Dry white Abruzzo wine, vin- 
tage of 

* Turin, 1864. 



8. d. 
1865 1. 6 



17. BuelliEsuperanzo, Bob- 
hio (Pavia). 

White Alicante 1. 6 

White Champagne 3. 

Frontignan 1. 6 

Madeira ......... 1. 6 

Malaga 1. 6 

Marsala t. 6 

Tokay 2. 

Rhine wine 2. 

Red Almtico 2. 

Red Alicante 1. 6 

Bordeaux 1. 6 

Burgundy 1. 6 

Catalonian wine 1.6 

Isabella . : 1. 6 

Sardinian wine 1. 6 

Barhera 1. 6 

* Florence, 1861 ; * Turin, 1864. 

18. Bertone di Sambuy 
Chev. Manfredo, Valmagray 
Castd Ceriolo (Alexandria). 

Dry red wines: 

Valmagra. . . vintage of 1858 2. 

Ditto » 1861 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1. 

Marengo Neretto . . . » 1863 1. 6 

GriffnoUno » 1863 1. 

Barhera » 1863 1. 

Montepulciano . . . . ■ 1863 1. 6 

Castel Ceriolo . . . . » 1861 1. 

Marengo » 1857 2. 

Marengo » 1863 1. 

Dry white wines : — 

Marengo • 1863 1. 6 

Castel Ceriolo . ...» 1863 1. 6 

Mahnsey ...... 1863 1. 6 

Vermouth ...... 1863 1. 6 

Sweet red wines: — 

Marengo Aleatico . . » 1848 2.0 

Ditto » 1859 2. 

Ditto J» 1861 2. 

Ditto • 1863 1. 6 

Castel Ceriolo . . . . » 1861 2. 

Sweet white vines : — 

Marengo Cortese . . . • 1863 1. 6 
Muscat » 1863 1. 6 

♦ Turin, 1864, 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



29 



19. Raggi Marquis Giovanni 
Battista, Molara (Alexcmdria), 

White Villa Campale mus- ' s. df, 

cat ... . vintage of 1863 3. 

Common red ditto / . . » 1863 1. Q- 

Ditto ......... 1863 1. 

20. Varvello Francesco , 
wine manufacturer Asti {Alex" 
andria. 

Bed Natalino . vintage of 1820 5. 

Barber a .» 1840 4. 

B^edNataliho . . . . » 1847 4. 
Mild white iVataZino . . » 1859 1 6 
Bitter white Natalino . • 1859 2. 

Barhera » 1859 1. 9 

Barhera » 1861 1. 6 

Dry Barhera . . . . » 1861 1. 6 

Barhera » 1863 1. 6 

GrignoUno » 1861 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1. 6 

Pale GrignoUno ...» 1863 1. 6 

Nehhiolo » 1859 1. 9 

Ditto » 1862 1. 9 

Ditto » 1863 1. 6 

Ditto ....-...)) 1864 1. 6 

Barolo » 1861 1. 6 

Barolo » 1861 1. 6 

Tolcay » 1861 1. 6 

Bracchetto » 1861 1. 6 

White Strevi muscat . . » 1861 1. 6 
Bitter muscat . . . . » 1863 1. 6 
White muscat . . . . » 1864 1. 6 
White malmsey . . . » 1864 1. 6 

Passaretta » 1864 1. 6 

• * Florence, 1861 ; * Lon- 
don, 1862; * Turin 1864. 

21. Oudart Luigi, wine grow- 
er and. merchant, Neive (Coni) 
and Genoa, 

Bed wines : 

Neive .... vintage of 1863 1. 

Barolo » 1862 1. 6 

Barhera » 1861 1. 6 

Dry Neive » 1861 1. 6 

Nehhiolo » 1859 2. 

Ditto » 1858 2. 6 

Nehhiolo and Pollenzo . j» 1844 » » 

Pignolo » 1861 1. 6 

GrignoUno » 1863 1. 6 

Nerano » 1863 2. 

White wines: 

Dry Neive »» 1862 1. 

Dry Nehhiolo . . . . » 1862 2. 

Cortese » 1861 2. 

Sweet Nehhiolo . . . . » 1861 2. 6 

Barhera » 1861 2. 

Malmsey » 1861 2. 

Nercmo » 1847 3. 



Malmsey .... 
Grinzane Cortese . 
Grmzane Nehhiolo . 

Sparkling win^s: 
Sparkling Barhera 
Sparkling Cortese , 
Sparkling Nehhiolo 
Sparkling Pignolo . 
* Florence, 1861 ; 
don, 1862. 



8, d. 
1847 3. 
1847 • » 
1847 • » 

1861 3. 

1862 3. 

1863 3. 
1863 3. 



Lon- 



22. Nerucci Gherardo, wine 
grower, Montale (Florence). 

White wine, known as Acqua 

della Setola . . . . of 1862 2. 6 
Bed Angelico . . . .» 1861 2. 6 

* Florence, 1861. 

23. (Enological Society of 
Savigliano (Conv), 

Barhera of 1864 1. 9 

Light Caluso » 1864 1. 9 

Asti Claret » 1864 1. 9 

Barolo » 1864 1. 9 

Asti Mahnsey . . . . » 1864 1. 9 

24. Blasi Giovanni, wine 
merchant, VeUetri {Borne). 

Common white wine . . of 1864 1. 6 
Common red wine ...» 1864 1. 6 

25. Poggioli Ludovico, Grot- 
taf errata (Borne), 

Common red wine ... of 1864 i. 6 

26. Galassini Pio , Marino 
(Borne), 

Sparkling white wme . . of 1862 3. 

Muscat » 1864 2. 

Common wine . . . . » 1868 2. 

27. Graziosi Ghev. Giovan- 
ni, VeUetri (Borne), 

Wine from Spanish grapes of 1864 1. 6 
Cesena wine » 1864 1. 6 

28. Frulani Carlo, Grotta-^ 
ferrata (Borne), 

Aleatico of 1864 » » 

29. Astorri Giacomo, Bor^ 
gonuovo (Placenza), 



Common white wine 
Common red wine . 



of 1864 1. 
» 1864 1. 



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30 



SECTION III. 



30. Veglio Luigi, Serralun' 

ga (Coni). s. d. 

"RedNebbiolo .... of 1863 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1. 6 

Ditto » d864 i. 6 

31. Greco Cassia Ghev. Lui- 
gi, Syracuse (Noto). 

Dry white AlbaneUo wine of 1863 1. 6 
Sweet wliite ^accareWa, wine 1863 1. 6 
^♦Florence, 1861:* Turin, 
1864. 

32. Floriol. E.V. and Co., 

wine manufacturers [Palermo). 

London Marsala. 
Superior old Marsala. 
* Florence, 1861. 

33. Tarditi and Son, wine 
merchants, La Morra (Coni). 

White Nascette wine . . of 1864 1. 

Ditto » 1863 1. 

Bitter red JVe6&io?o . . * 1864 1. 

Vermouth ..... 1. 6 

34. Morando Giovanni, Asti 
{Alexandria). 

Barhera of 1862 1. 

Ditto » 1863 1. 

Bracchetto » 1861 1. 6 

Ditto » 1862 1. 3 

Ditto » 1863 1. 3 

White muscat . . . . » 1859 1. 6 

Ditto » 1862 1. 3 

Ditto » 1863 1. 3 

Red muscat » 1858 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1.^3 

Tokay » 1860 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1. 6 

Nebhiolo » 1861 1. 6 

Dijto . . » 1862 1. 6 

DTYNehhiolo . . . . » 1863 1. 6 

Grignolino » 1862 1. 3 

Dry ditto » 1863 1. 3 

Malmsey ....... 1863 1. 3 

Barolo » 1863 1. 3 

Passaretta . . . . . » 1862 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1. 6 

35. Chiaramello Liiigi, ma- 
nufacturers of liqueurs, Savi- 
gliano (Coni). 

Stomachic elixir 2. 



36. Gnocchi Cesare, ForVi 
(Bavenna). 



s. d. 
B.ed Sangiovese . . . . of 1860 1. 9 

Ditto » 1861 1. 9 

Ditto » 1862 1. 9 

Ditto ....•...» 1863 1. 9 

37. Guarnaschelli G., Broni 
(Pavia). 

Red wine of 1863 \. 3 

Dry red wine . . . . » 1863 1. 3 

Redwme » 1864 1. 3 

Aleatico » 1858 2. 6 

Muscat » 1863 2. 

5aw«o or raisin wine . . » 1862 2. 6 

Bordeaux » 1862 2. 6 

38. Rocca Carlo, Alba (Com). 

Dry Nehhioh . . . . of 1863 1. 

Ditto 

Sweet Nebhiolo . . 
White Barber a . . 
White Barbaresco 
♦Florence, 1861; * Turin, 
1864. 



» 1864 1. 6 
1864 1. G 
1858 2. 6 
1860 2. 6 



39. Lanza D' Lorenzo, Sil- 
vano d'Orba (Alexandria). 

Dry hitter Dolcetto . . of 1861 1. 3 

Ditto » 1863 1. 

Dry Cyprus » 1859 2. 6 

White muscat . . . . » 1860 2. 

40. Di Pasquale Filippo, Li- 

pari (Messina). 

Malmsey . . . . . . of 1860 2. 

Ditto » 1861 2. 

Ditto » 1863 1. 6 

White wine ...... 1860 1. 6 

Ditto » 1861 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1. 3 

Red wine » 1860 1. 6 

Ditto » 1863 1. 3 

♦Florence, 1861;* Turin, 
1864. 

41. Pa sella Giuseppe, Ca- 
gliari. 

Red wine of 1857 1. 6 

42. Vicount di Flumini, Ca- 
gliari. 

Nasco 1. 6 

43. Piglia Giuseppe Anto- 
nio, Bosa (Cagliari). 

White Torbato .... of 1864 1. 6 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



31 



8, d. 

Red Giro » 1864 1. 6 

White Malmsey . . . » 1864 2. 

44. Coppa Etnidio, Santan- 
gelo (Ahruzzo Ultra I). 

White wine of 1864 1. 9 

45. Scalera Giuseppe, Ter- 
lizzi (Terra di Bari). 

Sostrato of 1864 2. 

46. De Savio Giuseppe, Ter- 
lizzi (Terra di Bari). 

Zagarese of 1855 2. 

Aleatico j» 1858 2. 

* Turin, 1864. 

47. Guastamacchia Gioa- 
chino, Terlizei (Terra di Bari), 

Redwme of 1862 1. 9 

Zagarese » 1862 1. 9 

Aleatico * 1857 2. 

* Florence, 1861;* Turin, 
1864. 



48. Spalazzi Francesco, 
Loreto (Ancona), 



Sweet Balsamino . 
Common dry ditto . 
Dry Balsamino 
Best Lacrima . . 



of 1863 2. 
» 1863 1. 6 
» 1863 2. 
» 1863 2. 



♦Florence, 1861; * Turin, 
1864. 



49. Oggero Giuseppe, Pior 
nosa (Livorno). 

Aleatico of 1863 1. 

Biancone » 1863 1. 

Red wine » 1863 1. 

Biminese » 1863 1. 

* Turin, 1864. 

The Royal (Enological Commission exhi- 
bits collectively wine manufactured by 49 
proprietors, thus distributed by Provin- 
ces: — 

PROVINCE N» of samples. 

Abruzzo Ultra I . . . . 2 

Alexandria 102 

Ancona 4 

Cagliari 6 



PROVINCE N» of samples. 

Coni 53 

ForH 4 

Florence ...... 2 

Genoa 4 

Leghorn 4 

Messina 8 

Naples 2 

Noto 2 

Palermo. • 2 

Pavia 30 

Placenza 8 

Ravenna 5 

Rome • . . 9 

Terra di Bari 6 

Turin 18 

Although only 18 Provinces out of 59 
are represented, the collection contains a 
type of the principal wines drunk at the 
table of the wealthy and the homely board 
of their less opulent neighbours, dry white 
wines, red table wines, full bodied red wine, 
white and red sweet and sparkling varie- 
ties: each sample being labled with the 
price at which it is obtainable on the spot. 

Some of the most important of these 
exhibitors are the following: — 

Count Delia Torre was awarded the prize 
and gained much commendation at the Na- 
tional Exhibition of wine held in Turin in 
1864, as oiFering the best of those made at 
Caluso. The wines of this exhibitor are made 
of erhaltu^ and peUeverde grapes. They are 
somewhat analogous to Frontignan and Lu- 
nel , but have more body and a diflferent 
aroma. At present they are sold at a very 
high price but there is reason to believe 
that shortly the proprietors , profiting by 
the increasing favor which they find, will 
cultivate them on a more extensive scale, so 
that the prices will fall proportionably. 

Esuperanzo Buelli, of Bobbio, a district 
which belonged to the late Kingdom of Sar- 
dinia but was annexed in 1859 to the Pro- 
vinceof Pavia, exhibits a variety of wines 
made from vines cultivated by himself, the 
greater part of which are foreign , as the 
very names themselves will shew. He sells 



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32 



SECTION III. 



annually about 12,000 bottles of wine, car- 
ying on his business with increasing dili- 
gence, and success; his white wines, how- 
ever, are more highly thought of than the 
red. 

Count Manfredo Bertone di Sambuy is 
extending his vineyards yearly more and 
more in the vast champaign in which the 
battle of Marengo was fought 65 years ago, 
and where both climate and soil combine 
favorably to the production of excellent 
wines of various kinds. The vines have been 
brought partly from France and partly 
from the Rhine, others are indigenous. The 
exhibitor is turning his attention to the 
study of the particular variety of vines for 
which the soil is best adapted. The Ma- 
rengo wine made with Bordeaux vines, the 
Neretto , Cortese and Malmsey were most 
approved of at the Turin exhibition of 1 864. 

Francesco Varvello purchases grapes 
grown in the Province of Alexandria , as 
well as in the Langhe in that of Coni. He 
stands first in importance of all manufactu- 
rers in the Kingdom as regards quantity 
produced, his wine has received prizes at 
nearly all the exhibitions lately held. 

Chev. Luigi Oudart has large stores in 
Genoa, though he makes his wine at Neive 
in the Langhe {Coni\ where he purchases 
the grapes. The collection of this manu- 
facturer was considered equal to that of any 
other represented at the Turin exhibition 
of 1864. The grapes he employs for the red 
wines are NebUolo, Nerano and Ba/rhera, 
and for the white Malvasia, Cortese and 
Pignolo , all indigenous. With these he 
manufactures numerous kinds of excellent 
wine. 

The wines of several other manufacturers 
were also much approved of at the Turin 
wine exhibition , both for their taste and 
wholesomehess. Some of these may be re- 
garded as types of special cultivation and 
could they once be made known would find 
general favour abroad, especially the white 
Muscat from Cassine, the Vesuvian Lacri- 
ma, and the. Nehbiolo from various loca- 
lities. Those of Lipari, Terlizzi and Mes- 
sina are also not less unportant. 



146. Royal Tobacco Manufactory, 

Bologna, 

Best 2nd and 3d. quality rapi. 

Superior mild trinciato. 

Best nuld and strong trinciato. 

Tobacco: — 
Common and ghisato trinciato. 
Superior and selected Havannah cigars. 
. Common Moro and Virginia cigars. 
Pressed and long Vevey cigars. 

♦ london, 1862. 

This establishment gives employment to 
at least 1800 persons, but the quantity of 
snuff and cigars manufactured has consider- 
ably decreased since Christmas, owing to 
the greatly augmented prices affixed by the 
government. 

149. Royal Tobacco Manufactory, 

Lucca, 

Snuff: — 
Best Paris rap6. 
Common Albania. 
Common NohUe, 
Common Pizzichino. 
Common Maciibino, 

Tobacco : -- 
Best strong and mild trinciato. 
Common trinciato. 
Imitation Havannah cigars. 
Common strong fermented cigars. 
Long and pressed Vevey cigars. 

* Florence, 1861; t London, 1882. 

Tobacco in the most important article 
of manufacture at Lucca, and its prepa- 
ration gives occupation to the most nu- 
merous and poorest part of the population 
especially to females. 

During the rule of the Bourbons this 
manufactory, providing solely for the wants 
of a miniature duchy, was naturally of se- 
condary importance, and it only began to 
grow under the Lorraine dynasty after the 
annexation of Lucca to the grand duchy of 
Tuscany, when it was farmed by the prior 
Emanuele Fenzi of Florence. This esta- 
bishment then began to improve as it has 
ever since continued to do, although smug- 
ling wais carried on to a considerable extent 
under the late government. The following 
table will shew the recent development of 



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SUBSTANCES USED AS FOOD 



33 



the production compared with that under i in 1859, the last years of their respective 

I reig 



the Bourbons in 1847 and the ^and duke I reigns. 



Men and women at fixed wages 

Ditto paid by the day 

Females paid by contract . . . 

Total mimber .... 


1847 


18S9 


18«1 


. 


1863 


I«U1 


malM 


reiuln 


18 
30 

,82 


35 

87 
6i2 


47 

95 

652 


36 
51 


11 
112 
890 


47 
163 
890 


130 


764 


794 


87 


1013 


1100 



Mean monthly wages; men and hoys, 3?., 
females, IL 16«.; wages of day labourers, 
men and boys, Is. Sd., females 10^. Fe- 



males working by contract earn a mean of 
iOd. in 9 hours. 



Quantity of tobacco amd cigars manufaetured. 



Tobacco, rapi, . . . 

» trinciato . 

Cigars 

Total 


i847 

tons 


i8S9 
tons 


1863 
tons 


Ck)nsi.sting of Paris, Pizzichino. Albania, NobUe 
and Macubino rap6. 

Best and Common. 

The most esteemed being the long and pressed 
Veveys. 


20 
10 

150 


100. 

70 
280 


180 

80 

600 


180 


450 


860 



18S9 



1863 



Produce of sale £ 174,480 

Cost of manufacture » 95,016 



Net profits € 79,464 



£ 288,280 
» 128,000 

€ 160,280 



The net profits of this manufacture being 
so considerable, the Chamber of Commerce 
are about requesting the government to 
permit its extension, in order to be able 
to satisfy the constant demands from all 
parts of the.kingdom, which it is impossible 
to do at present, on account of the small 
number of hands employed. 
3 



149. Ruggieri Canon Giovanni, grow- 
er, Terlizzi (Terra di Bar%), 

Malmsey or Mdlvasia wine. 
Common wine. 

149. Savorini Francesco and Son, 

manufacturers, Persiceto (Bologna). 

Bordeaux Anisetite rosolio. Price, 1 5. 10^. 
per bottle. 



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31 



ftECTIO^ m. 



Bosolio; is. iOd. per bottle. 
White rum; I5. Id. per bottle. 

i50. Scalese Pasquale, 1, Strada 
BartolomeOy Naples. 

1 . Ked Procida wine. Price per bottle , 
Is. 3^. 

2. Sicilian Muscat; is. Sd. 

1 51 . Scisci Michele, Oiovlnazzo (Ter- 
ra di Bari). 

Almonds. Price, 2?. 16s. per cwt. - 

1551. Scocchera Savino, grower and 
manufacturer, Canosa {Terra di Bari). 

■Olive oil, of 1863 and 1864, produced at 
Canosa. 

* London, 1862. 

153. Scuderi Francesco Maria and 

Son, Catania. 

Wine grown at Mezzo Campo , Terre 
forti, near Catanik, vintages of 1860, 1861, 
1862, 1863. 

* Florence, 1861. 

154. Sirigu Giuseppe, OrtrjZiVin'. 
Vermouth. Price, 2s. Gd. per bottle. 

155. Sylos Labini Ghev. Vincenzo, 

Senator, producer, Bitonto (Terra di Bari). 





Price 
per bottle 

s. d. 


Sweet Zagarese wine . 
Sweet Muscat wine , 
Common red wine . . 
Common red wine . . 


. of 1863 4. 
. » 1863 4. 
. » 186i 
. » 1864 




9 
9 


* London, 1862. 
Baisins. 

Almonds; 10 different varieties. Price, 
2?. 16s. per cwt. 



150. Tore Beniamino e figli, manu- 
facturers , Tocco di Casauria (Abruzzo Ci- 
ierioye). 

Strong and mild Centerha, 

The strong Centerha is an excellent sto- 
machic, and besides its medicinal properties 
when taken inwardly is very useful applied 
externally for cuts and wounds. The mild 
kind is a delicious liqueur. Both are distilled 
rom aromatic herbs growing on the Majella 



mountains, a spur of the Appennines facing 
the Adriatic, and in the province of Abruzzo 
Citeriore. — Annual production several 
thousand bottles, 

15S. Turchiarelli Michele, Candela 

(Capitanata), 

Olive oil. 

1 5». Vannucci Vannuccio, Florence. 

Best and common oil of the year 1 864 , 
from the farm of Varna, Montajone, in the 
Val d'Elsa (^Zorewce). Price, iOd. per bottle. 

1«0. Zanetti Guide, manufacturer, 
Bologna. 

Bologna sausages (mortadeUa). Price, 
15 1/2J. perlb. ^ 
Soft sausages; 1 lei. per lb. 

101. Zirilli Giuseppe and Son, Mi- 

lazzo (Messina), 

Price 
/ porbettlt 

W^ine : — s. d. 

Port .s 11 

Bordeaux . 9 

Mamertino 1.0 

Milazzo of 1856 1. 5 

Ditto » 1832 2. 1 

White Milazzo , * . ... 9 
S. Domenico . . . . of 1828 3. 5 

Amarena 1. 

Calabrese 1.0 

Malmsey^ of 1862 1. 1 

DittQ. ....... 1856 1. 7 

Marsala » 1860 11 

Sweet Milazzo 1.0 

The Exhibitor's vineyards are situated 
close to Milazzo, either in the plain or in 
gently undulating ground. The wines are 
made with the greatest care, well bottled 
and corked, with the addition of a metallic 
capsule, and stored for years with every 
precaution. The prices are reasonable, but 
the bottles^ are rather small. 

These wines are stated to be perfectly 
pure, very digestive, improving by a sea 
voyage and by time, the colouring matter 
separating and sinking to the bottom. Thus, 
the wines which at first were dark red in 
process of time become white. This will 
become evident on examination of the sam- 
ple of S. Domenico of 1828, the Milazzo of 



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SUfiSTANCIS USED AS FOOD 



35 



f 832, as well as tlie Mamertino, Calabrese, 
Amarena and Marsala, all of which hate 
become more or less white. 

The process of clarification proceeds 
more rapidly in bottles than in casks, and 
is most perfect in small bottles. In order to 
expedite it they should be hermetically 
closed , and constantly exposed to a cur- 
rent of fresh air. 

taie. Bonanno Francesco, Patermo, 
Olive oil from Termini tnerese. 

tas. Botti Alessandro, Chiavari {Cre- 
noa). 

Olive oil. 

* London, 1862.' 

ta4. Gafisi Marquis Stefano, Fa- 
vara (Oirgenti). 

Wines of 1861, 1863 and 1864. 
Oranges and lemons. 

105. Favara Verdirame, Vito, Maz- 
Kara del VaUo {Trapani), 

Common wines. 

Amarena, 

Port 



Cedrato. 
Malaga, etc. 

* Florence, 1861 ; i London, 1862. 
Annual production about 50,000 gallons. 

1G6. Foresi Jacopo, Portoferrajo 
{Leghorn). 

Wine. 

* Turin, 1864. 

169. Minlnni Ignazio, PabdelCoUe 
{Terra di Bari). 

Common red wine. 
Common sparkling wine. 

IGS. Mastrogiacomo Saverio, Noi- 
cattaro {Terra di Bari). 

Fme olive oil. 

IGO. Ricasoli Baron Bettino, JFV 
rence. 

Olive oil. ^ 

Cheese. 
' Wine. 

* London, 1862; * Turin, 1864. 

190. Racagni Bernardo, Brescia, 

Large collection of samples of Indian 
com , classified and named. 



FOOD PRODUCTS EXHIBITED FROM THE PROVINCE OF MODENA 



Wine. — The province of Modena furnishes a considerable quantity of grapes. Of 
late years, diltog the prevalence of the wine disease in Lombardy and Tuscany, Mo- 
denese wines, although common, were largely sent to those provinces, but for the last 
two years, since the disease has abated, it' has been found more difficult to sell common 
wines, which ha^^ resulled in an improvement of the system of manufacture. Experience 
has proved that wine can be made very economically from the grapes grown in this 
province, fit to bear a sea voyage and possessing excellent stomachic properties. In 
many of the large cities of the kingdom Modenese Larnhrmco has begun to find 
favour, a considerable quantity of it being sold in barrels and bottles at from 3s. 6<i. 
to Is, per gallon. Modenese wines were- well represented at the Italian Exhibition in 
1861 and at the International Exhibition of 1862, on both which occasions they gained 
several prizes. 

Liqueurs. — The manufacture of rectified spirits has assumed considerable impor- 
tance throughout Europe, every country having its own particular varieties, known 



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36 SECTION in. 



in commerce and by connaissenrs by the name of the town from whence they come. 
Fortunately the taste for intoxicating dnnks is losing ground, to be more and more 
replaced by the use of liqueurs , which are agreable to the palate and harmless to 
the stomach. The Modenese Einfreseo precisely combines these qualities. It is made in 
several parts of the province and is much reputed in the neighbouring part of Italy. 
The spirit employed comes from Ehenish Prussia, as this appears to be the cheapest 
and most adapted to the purpose. The Bmfresco costs from 5«. 9d» to 6«. 9d. per 
gallon, thus it is much cheaper than Bordeaux anisette, a liqueur to which it bears 
a close resemblance. 

Vinegar, — Two kinds of vinegar have been represented at the Dublin Exhibition* 
the common and the balsamic. Both are made from the boiled must of grapes, sub- 
sequently placed in vessels which have already served for that purpose. 

Those who manufacture vinegar on a large scale possess well-ventilated sunny apart- 
ments in which there is a series of vessels of vinegar arranged chronologically. The 
contents of these Vessels diminishes about 1/3 every year, by which time the deficiency 
is made up from the adjoining one of the following season, begining at the oldest 
vinegar and preceding regularly to the newest. At the end of ^ee, seven, or even 
ten years the common vinegar is fit to drink, and is sold at an average price of 18s. 
per gallon. 

When the vinegar is of a certain age it acquires a high value from the expense 
and care necessary in its preparation. The vessels contaming the old vinegar become 
sufficiently porous to allow a certain quantity to pass through their substance, ren- 
dering it necessary to enclose them in a second outer vessel, which in process of time 
has likewise to be surrounded by a third one still larger. 

Some families who have carried on this process of manufacture for a long time have 
vinegar of more than 150 years old. Of course they cannot sell much of this age , 
nor would it serve for domestic purposes , on account of its great thickness , it is 
however used to give fragrance to vinegar of more recent manufacture , constituting 
the Modenese balsamic vinegar of commerce, which sells for 36s. per gallon. 

Sausages, — These form an important article of manufacture and commerce with 
neighbouring provinces , and even of exportation. They range in price from 9d, to 
Is. per lb. —^Francesco Borsari. 



*-p>»«V=a*<'««0«*^ 



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SECTION IV. 
Vegetable and Animal substances used in Hanuractures. 



Numbers of Exhibitors 35; siib-Exhihitoi's 35. 

Of these 5 obtained prize med<ils at the Italian Exhibition at Florence in '1861, 2 ob- 
tained prize medals and 1 an honorable mention at tlie International Exhibition in 
" 4862, and iO obtained prize medals at the Turin National cotton Exhibition in 1864. 



190. Alonzo Xlhey. Antonino, Ca- 
tania, 

i . Raw Siamese cotton {G, hirsuttim L.\ 
grown on the estate of Finoccliiara, atBel- 
passo (Catania) crop of 1864. Price, U l/2d. 
per lb. 

2. The same cotton, cleaned with the 
manganello and subsequently'bowed. Price, 
35. per lb. 

* Turin, 1864. 

191. Astengo Brothers, late Luigi, 

manufacturers, Savona (Genoa). 

Soap. Price, 4 l/2d. per lb. 

199. Astengo Brothers, late Vin- 
cenzo, Savona (Genoa). 

Manufactured wax. Price, 2«. 6d. per lb. 
♦Florence, 1861; 

198. Baccini Gioyanni, broom ma- 
nufacturer, Lastra a Signa, and Florence. 

Lengtk , 

Inches S. a. 

1 . Rush carpet broom . 15 Price 1. 8 

2. Rush broom for stone 

pavements .... 15 » 1. 8 

3. Rush carpet broom .18 » 1. 9 

4. Double rush carpet 

broom 10 » 1. 9 

5. Two bundles of rush 

whisks, containing 

each 4 dozen . . 15 each 7. 7 

6. Whisk top .... 6Pr.pcrlb. 10 

7. Ditto » » » 11 

8. Ditto ...... > » 1. 

9. Ditto » i» 1. 1 

The prices include deHvery on board at 

Leghorn. 

t London, 1862. 



194. Beltrani Giuseppe, producer, 
Trani (Terra di Bart). 

Cotton grown at Trani, crop of 1864. 

i 95. Bologna hemp spinning works, 
Raffaele Rizzoli, director, Bologna. 

Raw, combed and spun Bolognese hemp. ' 

Six bundles of spun hemp of various 
kinds. . » 

Bundles of spun hemp, numbers 40, 35, 
30, 25, 20 and 16. 
* Florence, 1861. 

This company was founded in 1851, but 
did not assume its present extent until 
1858. It consists of 212 shares of 200L 
each, forming a capital of 44,440L The ma- 
nufactory is situated at Casalecchio di Re- 
no, two miles out of the city, and is ma- 
naged by M"^ Sutton, an Englishman of 
much experience. 

There are 4256 spindles: 800 tons of raw 
hemp, worth about 27,000Z. are annually 
spim, producing 300 tons of best yam, 
numbers 10 to 20, sold from 18 to 22(?. 
per lb., and 360 tons of common yarn, sell- 
ing from 13 to 18d. The manufactory gives 
employment to 370 persons of both sexes, 
including 300 adults, and 70 children from 
10 to 14 years of age. There are 3 turbines, 
set in motion by a fall of water 15 feet 
high, and havmg a power of 250 horses. As 
water is scarce m summer time there are 
two auxilliary steam engines, having an ag- 
gregate power of 180 horses. 



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38 



SECTION IV. 



f tl6. Catania Sub-Committee for the 
Dublin International Exhibition. 

1. Raw herbaceous cotton (Gossypktm 
herhaceum), crop of 18GI, grown at Dorillo 

(JSfoto), 

The same cotton as above , comparative 
samples ginned by various machines : — 

2. 3. Cotton, cleaned in Scuderi's works 
with Dobson and Barlow's Macarthy gins, 
and seeds of ditto. 

i. 5. Cotton, cleaned in Scuderi's works 
with Fairman arid Go's (sic) Macarthy gins, 
and seeds of ditto. 

6. 7. Cotton, cleaned in Scuderi's works 
with R. H. Allen's gin, and seeds of ditto. 

J . 2. B. Cotton cleaned at Dilg and Go's 
works at Comiso with the Sicilian wooden 
tnanganello or churka, and seeds of ditto. 

1. 2. C. Cotton cleaned at Barbagallo's 
works at Catania with Piatt and Co's Mac- 
arthy gin, and seeds of ditto. 

3. 4. C. Cotton cleaned in Messrs Vitale 
and Manganaro's works at Catania with 
Piatt and Femival Schmidt's (sic) Macarthy 
gins, and seeds of ditto. 

5. 6. C. Cotton cleaned in Messrs Pera- 
toner and Sons' works at Catania with 
Messrs Piatt and Co's Macarthy gin, and 
seeds of same. 

Maximum prices obtained for the above 
samples: — 
Raw cotton. Price per lb., M. 
Cleaned cotton; is.S i/^d. 

' Price at the beginning^f April 1865: — 

Raw cotton. Price per lb., M, 
Cleaned cotton; M d. 
Seeds. Price per cwt. is, 3d, 

1. Six half tanned lamb's skins, prepared 
in the German manner with bran and salt. 
Price per 1000 skins, 46/. 

2. Black lamb-skins prepared with alum; 
mi. per 1000 skins. 

3. Two dried wild cat 6kins , native of 
Sicily; 62. per 100. 

4. Two native Sicilian fox skins dried ; 
8?. 10s. per 100. 

5. Six raw native white goat's skins; 
88?. per 1000. 

6. Three dried raw black lamb skins; 
m. per 1000. 

7. Two dried white lamb skms; 451 per 
1000. 

199. Chicca Raffaele and Co., Lucca. 

Castor oil. 

Raw and boiled linseed oil. 

Ditto for vftmish* 



f §9. Compagna Baron Luigi, Cori- 

gliano (Calabria Citeriore). 

Raw Siamese Cotton, crop of 1864. 
The same cleaned with Piatt's gin. 

♦Turin, 1864. 

Cotton has long been acclimated fa Ca- 
labria. The ground is let out to the pea- 
sants as in Tuscany by the plan known as 
Mezzadria, that is to say, the tenant sup- 
plies the labour, the landowner the rest, 
and these divide the profits at the end of 
the season. 

In the middle of Aprfl 1864 the Exhibitor 
sowed 24 acres of Siamese cotton at a place 
called Sanso, on the banks of the Crati, 
about 1 4 miles from the coast , in an ar- 
gillaceovis soil covered with alluvium; 48 
acres in the farm of Vallon dei Ranci, near 
the sea; 24 acres at Temparossa, 10 miles 
from the sea in irrigable sandy soil; lastly 
24 acres at Apollinara, on the left bank of 
the Crati, in moist argillaceous ground. 
After a fortnight the plants came up, flour- 
ished and flowered, and the pods began to 
swell, but never came to maturity, owing 
to the incessant rains, so that after being 
gathered in December they had to be sub- 
jected to artificial heat. 

The Royal Commission for the cultivation 
of cotton, having forwarded from Turin nu» 
merous small samples of seeds of New Or- 
leans, Sea Island, Egyptian and Indism cot- 
ton to experiment on, these were sown on 
the 20t'» May at S. Francesco, about 7 miles 
from the coast, in a argillaceous sandy soil, 
capable of irrigation. It was unfortunately 
too late in the season: the plants were fully 
above ground at the end of a week , but 
rain came on, followed by dense fog, which 
favoured the growth of insects, by which 
every vestige of the cotton plants was at 
once devoured. 

At the close of last year about 1 00 acres 
were set apart for sowing with cotton in 
the spring; the ground was four tiines 
ploughed, and as often hoed, and irrigated 
according to the nature of the soil. 

Baron Compagna has set up 4 of Piatt's 
Macarthy gins for cleaning bis cotton in an 



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VEGETABLE AND ANIMAL SUBSTANCES USED IN MANUFACTURES 



39. 



improved manner and an hydraulic press 
lor packing it. 

1^9. Di Benedetto Francesco and 
Motta, Catania, 

1. Green seeded or Siamese cotton (G. 
hirsutum) crop of 1864, grown by the exhi- 
bitor at S. Alessio,near Catania, and cleaned 
in Messrs Di Benedetto and Motta's works 
with Piatt's gin. 

2. Another sample of green seeded or 
. Siamese cotton grown at Riesi {Caltani- 

setta), and cleaned in the works of Messrs 
Di Benedetto and Motta with the manga- 
nello. 
Price of the samples, 2s. 1 i/2^. per lb. 

190. DilgEdoardo and Co., Comiso 
{Catania), 

1. White seeded or herbaceous cotton 
(G, herhaceum L.\ commercially known as 
« Terranova cotton », cleaned in the exhi- 
bitors' works at Comiso with Dobson and 
Barlow's Macarthy gin. 

2. Seeds obtained by ginning the above 
sample. 

Price of the cotton, 9 i/id. per lb. 
Price of the seeds, is. Id. per cwt. 

191. Donnafugata Baron Francesco 
Maria Arezzo , Bagusa (Noto). 

Seven kinds of cotton grown on the estate 
of Passolato at Ragusa : a sample of each 
in the pod and raw cotton taken from the 
pod. 

1. Egyptian cotton. 

2. Louisiana cotton. 

3. Egyptian cotton. 

4. New Orleans cotton. 

5. White hirsute cotton. 

6. New Orleans cotton. 

7. New Orleans cotton. 

19!9. Dutto Giuseppe, manufactuiej, 
Coni. 

Wax tapers. Price, ds. per lb. 
* Florence, 1861. 

These tapers are manufactured with 
Turkey wax, bleached and worked by 
steam. There are 2 boilers working up to 
a pressure of 9 atmospheres and serving to 
heat these recipients, six double pans, a 
large bath, two round baths, etc. There are 
12 workmen employed in the manufactory. 
Annual produce 70 tons of wax tapers. 

i99. Fenzi Emanuele Orazio, Flo- 
rence. 

Straw for planting. 



194. Hallaire Eugenic, Bailiff of the 
Estate of H. M. the Emperor Napo- 
leon III, at Civitanova (Macerata). 

Samples of cotton, crop of 186-i. 

Cultivation carried on on a large scale : — 

1. Sea Island cotton; from seeds of last 

crop grown at Civitanuova. 

2. Louisiana cotton ; ditto. 

3. Georgia cotton; seeds obtained from 

Africa. 

4. Jumel cotton ; seeds obtained - from 

Egypt. 

Experimental cultivation: — 

5. Georgia cotton; from seeds of last crop 

grown at Civitanuova. 

6. Upland cotton; seeds obtained from 

America. 

7. Louisiana cotton; seeds obtained from 

the Royal Commission for the cultii 
vation of cotton in Italy. 

8. New Orleans cotton; ^eeds presented 

by the Manchester Cotton Supply As- 
sociation. 

9. American cotton; ditto. 
10. American cotton ; ditto. 

An experimental cultivation carried on 
at Civitanova of late years, close to the sea 
coast , the exhibitor having been the first 
to introduce cotton farming into this pro- 
vince. 

* Turin, 1864. 

Madder roots, 3rd season of cultivation: 
roots procured from France in 1862. 

193. Lagorio Chev. Antonio, Bo- 

logna. 

Raw hemp, grown at Viadagola {Bo- 
logna). 

Hemp is the staple produce of the Bolo- 
gnese plains, not less than 8000 tons being 
produced annually. The sample sent to Dub- 
lin represents the mean quality. Most of 
it is exported in the raw state and sells at 
from 3L 125. to U, per cwt. A small quan- 
tity is also dressed, spun and woven at 
Bologna. 

196. Majorana Brothers Salvadore 
and Giuseppe, Barons of Nicchiara, 

Catania. 

1. Raw Green seed or Siamese cotton 
{Gossypium hirsutmn^ L. var. lana alba) , 
grown on the exhibitors' estate of Troldo 
at LentinL 



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40 



SECTION IV. 



The same cotton cleaned by various 
gins, as below : — 

2. 3. Cotton cleaned by the use of B. H. 
Allen s gin in Scuderi*s works, at Catania, 
and seeds of ditto. 

i, 5. Cotton cleaned in Scuderi's works 
by the use of Fairman and Co's Macarthy 
. gin (sic), and seeds of ditto. 

6. 7. Cotton cleaned in Scuderi's works 
with Dobson and Barlow's Macarthy gin , 
and seeds of ditto. 

1. 2. Cotton cleaned in Peratoner and 
sons' works by the use of Piatt and Co's 
Macarthy gin, and seeds of ditto. 

3. 4. Cotton cleaned in Messrs Vitale 
and Manganaro's works, at Catania, by the 
use of Piatt's and Femival Schmidt's Mac- 
arthy gins, and seeds of ditto. 

Present falue of the raw 8, (I. 

cotton per lb. » 6 3/4 

Ditto, cleaned cottoa . . • 2 1 

Ditto, seeds . . per cwt. 4 

1. 2. Cotton obtained in Messrs Majo- 

ana's own works by the use of the Sicilian 

Churka or Manganello, and seeds of ditto. 

3. 4. Cotton cleaned in Messrs Majo- 
rana's own works by the use of Piatt's Mac- 
arthy gin, and seeds of ditto. 

1 . Cotton ginned with the Sicilian wooden 
churka or manganello and subsequently 
bowed. 

2. Cotton cleaned in Messrs Peratoner 
and sons' works, at Catania, with Piatt's 
Macarthy gins. 

3. Cotton cleaned in Messrs Vitale and 
Maganaro's works by the use of Piatt's Mac- 
arthy gins, and subsequently bowed. 

4. Cotton cleaned fn Messrs Vitale and 
Manganaro's works by the use of Femival 
Schmidt's Macarthy gins (sic), and subse- 
quently bowed. 

Present price of above samples 2s. 
id, per lb. 

1. Buff-coloured cotton (G. hirsutum 
land rufd), grown on the exhibitors' estate 
of Troldo. 

The same cotton cleaned by various 
gins. 

2. 3. Buff-coloured cotton, obtained in 
Messrs Majorana's works in Catania by 
the use of Piatt's Macarthy gm, and seeds 
of ditto. 

4. Buff-coloured cotton, cleaned in Messrs 
Majorana's works in Catania by the use of 
the manganello. 

5. Buff-coloured cotton, cleaned by the 
manganello and subsequently bowed. , 

6. Cotton cleaned in Messrs Msgorana's 
works , at Catania , by the use of Piatt's 
Macarthy gins, and subsequently bowed. 



Present value of the raw cotton, per lb 
6 3/id, 

Ditto, cleaned, 2$ Ad, 

Ditto, seeds; price per cwt 3«. Id. 

* Florence , 1861 ; * London, 186'2 ; 
♦ Turin, 18G4. 

Frkf ftr ewt 
£ 8.d. 
7. Flax, grown in 18Gi on the 
estate of Troldo 3. 5. 6 

1. Shumac leaves (Bhus Corior 
ria) from the estate of Nicchiara, 
territory of Mineo (Catania), 186 i » 4. 4 

2. Ground shumac (same as 
N** 1), known as ocdiio di per nice 

or pheasant's eye shumac ... * 6. 
3.. Superfine ground shumac 

fromtheestateof Nicchiara, 1864 » 8. 8 
4. Superfine ground shumac 

known as macina fina^ or finely 

ground shumac » 7. 8 

* Florence, 1861 ; * London, 

1862. 

Cork, two samples, grown bn 
estate of Rigolo, territory of Buc- 
cheri » 13. 

Virgin wax, produced on the 
estate of Nicchiara . . . . . 11. 15. 

* Florence, 1861. 

199. Modena Brothers Gesare and 
Isaia, brush manufacturers Beggio in the 
Emilia), 

Roots of the Chysopogon griHuSj for mak- 
ing brushes; price is, per lb. 

199. Mando Giosue, Bari, 

Louisiana cotton. 
New Orleans cotton. 
African cotton. 
Egyptian cotton. 

i99. Padolecchia Nicola, Ban. 
Raw cotton. 

too. Peratoner and Co., merchants, 
Catania, 

1. White seeded or herbaceous cotton 
(G. herbaceum L.) grown at Terranova 
(Caltanisetta), crop of 1864, cleaned in the 
works of the exlubitors with Piatt's Ma- 
carthy gins. Price iOd. per lb. 

2. Green seeded or Siamese cotton (G, 
hirsutum), grown at Biancayilla (Catania), 
crop of 1864 , and gmned in the exhibitors 
works; iid, per lb. 

3. Raw Green seeded or Siamese cotton, 
grown at Biancavilla, crop of 186i; ds, 
per lb. 



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VEGETABLE AND ANIMAL SUBSTANCES USED IN MANUFACTURES 



41 



4. Baw white seeded or herbaceous cot- 
ton, grown at Terranova, crop of 1864; 
25. 1 1/M per lb. 

5. Green seeded or Siamese cotton, 
grown at AgoSta {Noto)^ cleaned in the 
works of the exhibitors with the common 
wooden manganello; iid. per lb. 

* Turin, 1861. 

Ground shumac, growth of the province 
of Catania, season 1864; 65. 9d, per cwt. 

to I, Pizzetti Ferdinando , Parma. 

Parmesan silkworm cocoons. 
Macedonia and Bukharest cocoons reared 
in the province of Parma. 
Eggs and moths of the above silkworms. 

tot. RicasoH Cher. Colonel Vin- 
cenzo, grower, Florence, 

Haw Siamese cotton grown at Cala Sga- 
lera, near Port Ercole, on the Mont'Ar- 
gentale (Grosseto), 

* Turin, 1864. 

Extent of ground cultivated in 1864, 37 
acres. 

903. Royal Economical Society, 

Foggia (Capita)iata), 

1. Wild madder roots. 

2. Luisiana cotton in pods, grown at Fog- 
gia in the Botanical Gardens of the Royal 
Economical Society. 

904. Royal Industrial Museum 
(Gomm. Devincenzi, Director of the), 
Turin, 

Collections of samples of Italian cotton 
crop of 1863, exhibited at the first Cotton 
Exhibition, held m the Industrial Museum 
in 1864. 

NORTHERN REGION 

The cotton plant has flowered and even 
produced ripe cotton in the provinces of 
Turin, Milan, and Venice, within sight of 
the snow-clad Alps , but though the sum- 
mer heat is mtense, it commences late and 
the total amount during the season is in^ 
sufficient for the plant, which is too|delicate 
to stand the least frost, and this comes on 
before the cotton has ripened. The climate 
of the plains of the Emilia between Pla- 
cenza, Ferrara and Bologna is nearly the 
same as in those of Piedmont and Lom- 
bardy, though the winters are less severe.: 



The western slopes of the Appennines, 
known as Liguria, and embracing the de- 
lightful tract commencing near Nice, and 
extending towards Chiavari and Spezia, 
has a climate which would be perfectly 
mild enough for the cotton plant in winter, 
but there is scarcely an acre of level or ir- 
rigable land^ as the sea bathes the foot of 
the mountains. From what precedes we 
perceive that the cultivation of cotton, 
however interesting to botanists or country 
gentlemen, ought not to be encouraged 
here as a speculation. This wijl explam why 
no samples were sent to Dublin on the 
present occasion. 

CENTRAL MAINLAND REGION 

In this region the cotton plant comes to 
perfection , though it is an open question 
how far it can be now grown profitably. 
Frosts come on much later here than in 
the north, and owing to the entire absence 
of lofty chains of mountains the winters are 
milder, while the rivers, rising in the region 
itself, supply water of a higher temperature 
for irrigatory purposes than the Alpine 
feeders of the Po, and the Mediterranean, 
which may be described as an enormous 
evaporating pan is so charged with saline 
particles that these are carried up by the 
wind and deposited in a moist form on the 
leaves for miles from the coast, which is 
doubtless a very favorable condition to the 
growth of the cotton plant. 

Adriatic side of the Appennines. 

PROVINCE OF MACERATA 

Lat. 42« 57' to 43«> 32' N. 
Long. 12° 46' to 13<> 45' E. 

1. Hallaire Eugenic, Bailiff of the pri- 
vate Estate of H. M. the Emperor Na- 
poleon III, at CivitaniMva Marche (32). 

Sea^ Island cotton. 

Louisiana cotton. 

Mak6 cotton. 

. Mediterranean side of the Appennines. 

PROVINCE OF SIENNA 

Lat. 42° 48'. to 43° 35' N. 
Long.l0«55' to 11^58 E. 



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A% 



SECTION IV. 



2. De Gori Panniliui Count Agottino, 

Sienna (25). 

Siamese cotton. 

PROVINCE OF GROSSETO 

Lat. 40« 42' to 43« 14' N. 
Long. 10«28' to 11° 50' E. 

3. Ricasoli Baron Bettino, Grosseto 
(27). 

Siamese cotton. 

4. Ricasoli Chev. Colonel Yincenzo, 

Grosseto (28). 

Siamese cotton. 

CENTRAL INSULAR REGION — 
SARDINU 

The plains in the south of Island of Sar- 
dinia seem excellently adapted to the growth 
of cotton, especially the long stapje kinds. 
The peasantry, however, are very tena- 
cious of the traditional customs of their 
ancestors, and extremely jealous of any 
labourers coming to work in the Island , 
although they themselves are far from 
active, so that up to the present time the 
price of labour has been kept up efxcessively 
high. In summer time the plains, where 
alone the cotton plant can grow , are so 
unhealthy that it is not safe for a stranger 
to remain there. 

PROVINCE OF SASSARI 

Lat. 40O5' to41M8'N. 
Long. 8° 8' to 9° 50' E. 

5. De Bernardi and Nathan Brothers, 

Sassari (203). 

Sea Island cotton. 
Louisiana cotton. 

6. Negri and Co., Sassari (202). 
Siamese cotton. 

Louisiana cotton. 
Sea Island cotton. 
Mak6 cotton. 

PROVINCE OF CAGLIARI 

Lat. 38o 52' to 40° 25' N. 
Long. 8° 22' to 9° 42' E. 

7. Piccaluga Chev. Giuseppe , Ca- 
gliari(\%), 

' Sea Island cotton. 
Louisiana cotton. 
Siamese cotton. 
Egyptian cotton. 
Tree cotton? 



SOUTHERN MAINLAND REGION 

Cotton has been cultived with success 
in the Napolitan provinces for upwards of 
50 years, if not more. The chief centres of 
its growth may be taken as Castellammare, 
Salerno, Bari, Rossano, Corigliano, etc., all 
in plains bordering on the coast. The only 
two species sown up to lately were the her- 
baceous and both white and buff varieties 
of Siamese cotton. 

During the time that France was at 
war with England and unable to receive 
her supplies from America the quantity 
became sufficient to render it an article 
of export to Marseilles, but this fell off im- 
mediately after the peace, and has only 
resumed its importance during the last two 
years, through the labours of the Royal 
Commission for the cultivation of cotton. 
The quahty of the staple is such as to 
have generally excited the admiration of 
the Manchester Cotton Supply Association, 
who pronounce that it should by all means 
become a steady article of production in 
normal times. 

Adriatic coast. 

PROVINXE OF TERRA DI BARI 

Lat. 40° 41' to41«42'N. 
Long. 15« 50' to 17° 27' E. 

8. Royal Economical Society, Bari(Sb), 
Sea Island cotton. 

Louisiana cotton. 

Hediterranean coast. 

PROVINCE OF NAPLES 

9. Royal Institution for the encon- 
ragement of Public Economy (73). * 

Siamese cotton. 
Louisiana cotton. 
Sea Island cotton. 
North Carolina cotton. 
Egyptian cotton. 

PROVINCE OF PRINCIPATO CITERIORE 

Lat. 40° C to 40° 50' N. 
Long. 14° 22' to 15° 42' E. 

10. Atenolfi Pasquale, Marquis of Ca- 
stelnuovo, Castelnuovo (216). 

Siamese cotton. 

* The Exbibitordoet not specify whether the samplef 
were grown ia the proyince of liaples or in tliat of 
T«R» di LaTor». 



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VEGETABLE AND ANIMAL SUBSTANCES USED IN MANUFACTURES 



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It. BeUella Gomm. Enrico, Capaccio 
(246). 

Siamese cotton. 

11 Colonna Chev. Andrea, EboU (78). 
Siamese cotton. 

13. Granozio Damenico, Salerno (219). 
Siamese cotton. 

14. Pacifico Ginseppe, Salerno (220). 
Siamese cotton. 

Sea Island cotton. 

15. Rinaldi Raffaele, Salerno (221). 
Siamese cotton. ^ 

PROVINCE OF PRINCIPATO ULTERIORE 

Lat. 40° 46' to4iMl'N. 
Long. 14° 35' to 15° 34' E. 

16. Clemente Donate, Montoro. 
Siamese cotton. 

PROVINCE OF BASILICATA 

Lat. 39*53' to 4I<» 8' N. 
Long. 150 22' to 16° 53' E. 

17. Lanria Egidio, Lagonegro (260). 
Siamese cotton. 

. Herbaceous cotton. 
Sea Island cotton. 

PROVINCE OF CALABRIA ULTERIORE la 

Lat. 37° 57' to 3S° 38' N. 
Long. 15° 39' to 16° 37' E. 

18. Barbalace Pasqaale, Eossano(i03). 
Siamese cotton. 

18. Royal Economical Society, Beg- 
9io[%). 

Sea Island cotton. 
Mak6 cotton. 
Louisiana cotton. 

SOUTHERN INSULAR REGION — 
• SICILY 

The chief seats of cotton farming in Si- 
cily are on the east and south coast, in the 
provinces of Catania, Caltanissetta and No- 
lo, and the towns of Biancavilla, Terranuo- 
va, Comiso and Fachino may be taken as 
centres of cultivation. Several rich fainilies 
having grown cotton for many years for 
local consumption, the plant is thoroughly 
known to the peasants, but up to the last 
year or two the method of cleaning the 
cotton was of so primitive a character that 
the staple was broken and the seeds were 
frequently crushed during the operation, 



so that the oil they contained stained and 
deteriorated the fibre. Two important points 
urgently demanded the interference of the 
Royal Commission for the cultivation of 
cotton : to recommend the use of good seed, 
especially American, and to shew the neces- 
sity of employing proper machinery. Both 
these have considerably improved , as may 
he judged by a comparison of the samples 
at the Dublin International Exhibition with 
those sent to the International Exhibition of 
1862. Whereas Comm. Devincenzi, Royal 
Commissioner for Italy on the latter occa- 
sion, states that many of the samples lost 
from a fourth to a third of their value by 
bad cleaning, this loss of value has probably 
already fallen in many cases to 5 per cent, 
at least with the produce of the most in- 
telligent planters — a loss to be accounted 
for from the want of skill and ignorance of 
peasants. There is eve»y reason to believe 
that cotton could be grown in the plains of 
Sicily — the southern part of which has 
nearly the same climate as Algeria — even 
after the internal animosities of the Ame- 
rican people shall have sufficiently calmed 
down to permit them to turn their attention 
once more to planting cotton. 

PROVINCE OF PALERMO 



Lat. 37° 34' 
Long. 13° 2' 



to 38° 
to 13° 



U'N. 
25' E. 



20. Tasca Count Lncio, Palermo^ {iSi). 
Herbaceous cotton. 

Hybrid cotton. 

Hirsute cotton (G. hirsutum). 

Sea Island cotton. 

Mak6 cotton. 

Egyptian cotton. 

Louisiana cotton. 

PROVINCE OF TRAPANI 

Lat. 37° 34' to 38° 14' N. 
Long. 12° 23' to 13° 7' E. 

21. Favara Verderame Ghev. Vito, 

Mazzara del VaUo (180), 
Siamese cotton. 
Herbaceous cotton. 
Sea Island cotton. 
Louisiana cotton. 
Egyptian cotton. 
New Orleans cotton. 



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SECTION IV. 



PROVINCE OF CATANU 

Lat. 37° 4' to 37" 52' N. 
Long. 14° 2' to 15M5' E. 

22. Caruso Onofrio , Mayor of Pa- 
terno, Paterno (\iS). 

Siamese cotton. 
Sea Island cotton. 
' Egyptian cotton. 

23. Majorana Brothers, Barons cf 
Nicchiara, Catania (267, 268). 

Herbaceous cotton, grown at Licidia. 
Louisiana cotton, grown at Militello. 

PROVINCE OF CALTANISETTA 

Lat. 37° 3' to 37° W N. 
Long. 13° 40' to 14° 30' E. 

24. Bondi Santi, Saverio, Terranmva 

(159). 

Herbaceous cotton. 

25. Camerata Scovazzo, Carmelo, Ter- 
ranuova (162). 

Herbaceous cotton. 

26. Gagliano Pardo, Giuseppe, Terra- 
nuova (165). 

Makd cotton. 

27. Malambri Paolo, Terranuova (160). 
fierbaceous cotton. 

28. Malia Alessandro , Terranuova 
(166). 

Mak5 cotton 

29. Navarra Navarra, Carlo, Terra- 
nuova (m), 

^ Herbaceous cotton. 

30. Nocera Giovanni, Terranuova (i6\). 
Siamese cotton. 

31. Paiano Giuseppe, Terranuova ([61). 
Herbaceous cotton. 

PROVINCE OF NOTO 

Lat. 36° 40' to 37° 24' N. 
Long. 14° 18' to 15<> 18' E. 

32. GioncardiSalvatore, Comi^o (139). 
Herbaceous cotton. 

33. Majorana Brothers, Barons of Nic- 
chiara, Caiania (270, 274, 278). 

Siamese cotton , grown at Carlentina. 

Herbaceous cotton, grown at Franco- 
forte. 

Sea Island cotton, grown at Franco- 
fprte. 

Siamese cotton, grown at Comiso. 

Herbaceous cotton, grown at Comiso. 

34. Rudini Marquis Antonio, Falermo 
(157). 

Siamese cotton, grown at Pachino. . 
Louisiana cotton, grown at Pachino. 



35. Secolo Santoro, Caniso, 
Herbaceous cotton. 

NB, All these producers obtained a prize 
medal in 1864 at the Turin National Cot- 
ton Exhibition and several of them at 
the International Exhibition of 1862. 

The Royal Commission for the cultiva- 
tion of cotton, of which Comm. Devincenzi 
is President, was formed in Turin shortly 
after the close of the International Exhi- 
bition of 1862, for the purpose of proving 
to the farmers and proprietors of the 
Southern provinces that climate, soil, and 
other circumstances all combined to favour 
the extensive growth of cotton , and that 
the high prices then existing were a suffi- 
cient guarantee that the experiment could 
be carried on without fear of loss. Sub-Com- 
mittees were formed in the principal Agri- 
cultural centres, to which seed was sent and 
all kinds of information afforded. The great 
proprietors and most intelligent farmers 
took up the question and it is to them we owe 
the development of the cultivation of this 
plant up to the present time. The Cotton 
Supply Association at Manchester afforded 
most material help in this arduous under- 
taking, ^s indeed it has dope everywhere, 
and on the occasion of the first exhibition 
of cotton which was held in the Royal In- 
dustrial Museum at Turin at the commence- 
ment of the year 1864, the Association 
was represented by the President, Mr John 
Cheetham, whose presence eloquently pro- 
ved how the labours of the Commission were 
appreciated in England. — Jervis. 

t05« Rndini Marquis Antonio , Pa- 
lermo, 
Siamese cotton. 
* Turin, 1864. 

The cotton of this exhibitor was grown 
at Pachino {Noto), It is the variety gene- 
rally known as Siamese cotton, the seeds 
of which originally came from Malta at the 
beginning of the present century , since 
which tune the plant as been acclimated 
in Sicily. The Marquis Rudini is probably 
the most extensive cotton grower in the 
whole of Italy, having devoted last year no 
less ihm 930 acres to its' cultivation. 



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VEGETABLE AND ANIMAL SUBSTANCES USED IN MANUFACTURES 



45 



The soil at Pachino is volcank and clayey, 
partly calcareous and partly alluvial. 

The exhibitor planted his cotton in two 
different ways, of which it may be inte- 
resting to append a short accounts one cal- 
led the « trench ■ system, the other the 
« plough » system. 

As. soon as the autumnal rains begin to 
set in the ground is ploughed two or three 
times, according to circumstances, but be- 
fore the soil as become too moist ; this ope- 
ration is repeated several times until the 
month of March, taking advantage of the 
drier days , so that all the weeds may be 
thoroughly destroyed, which is rendered 
more certain by finally hoeing the ploughed 
surface. 

No change has been made in the form 
of the plough used in Sicily since the time 
of the Romans; the depth reached by which 
is about a foot. The exhibitor has, however, 
introduced on his estates the plough with 
a « voltorecchio » share, and also the har- 
row, and reports that he has found them , 
very serviceable. 

Having prepared the ground in the 
manner described, the cotton is sown about 
the middle of April. A third part of the 
seed is placed in water and subsequently 
rubbed lightly with a mixture of pulverized 
sheep's dung and -ashes in order to strip it 
of the down still adhering after the opera- 
tion of ginning. Two parallel furrows are 
made j between which the sower throws the 
cotton seed broadcast, as is practised for 
com. Meanwhile a boy who walks between 
the two ploughs throws into the furrows at 
intervals of three feet ten or a dozen dry 
seeds in addition to the former ones. The 
furrows are at once covered up by the 
ploughs which follow the sower. The expense 
of sowing comes to about 8 shillings and 6 
pence per acre, 136 lbs of seed being em- 
ployed for the purpose. Such is the method 
adopted in soil sufficiently tenacious to 
preserve the humidity essential to the ger- 
mination of the seeds. 

In the drier and more porous volcanic 
soil a different course is followed. At the 
end of April farrows are made, distant 



abont 20 inches apart, and 7 inches deep. 
The labourers having mad^ the furrows, 
each provided with an earthen pot of water, 
containing the seed, first water the fur- 
rows and then throw in the middle about 
15 seeds, fixing them firmly in the ground 
by pressing them down with the back of 
the hand, and then covering them up with 
loose and moist earth. This method of 
sowing is more expensive than the former, ' 
costuig 18 shillings per acre , but it only 
requires 120 lbs of seed. 

When once the plants have come up 
fresh seeds are sown wherever these are 
deficient, in all cases adopting the plan of 
making furrows, even in the fields sown in 
the first instance with the plough. 

By the time the little plants have ^ot 
four or six leaves they are thinned, leaving 
the strongest ones at proper intervals in 
the fields sowed by the plough method, and 
in the other case groups of three or four 
plants, and rooting out all the rest. 

The cost of performing this work is about 
2 shillings per acre , the plants are then 
hoed up three times at equal intervals until 
August, at a cost of 7 shillings and 2 pence 
per acre. 

The cotton begins to ripen in September, 
and on account of the frequency of the rains 
is not entirely gathered in before January. 
The cost of gathermg is 2 shillmgs per cwt. 

Irrigation has not hitherto been practised 
at Pachino, from the want of perennial 
springs, though now the Marquis Rudini 
has canalized the little river Bandeci, and 
brought the water into his estate of Bime- 
sca, so that he will in ftiture be able to ir- 
rigate a large extent of land. 

The produce of raw cotton per acre in 
1864, following the plan just described, was 
about 175 lbs. 

Ginning is usually performed at iPachino 
by the use of a rough wooden apparatus 
introduced by the Maltese colonists. As it 
naturally crushes many of the seeds, thus 
injuring the cotton, the proprietor has 
purchased improved ginning machinery, 
manufactured by Dobson and Barlow, Du- 
rand, and Piatt and Co. 



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46 



gjscnoN vf. 



Formerly the groand now planted with 

otton was sown with com, grass, and le- 

gnminous plants , but although admirably 

adapted for this kind of cultivation, cotton, 

at the preset prices, is far more profitable; 

Last year the plants suffered very consi- 
derably from the ravages of an insect which 
in some districts entirely destroyed the 
crop. Various plans were resorted to in or- 
der to exterminate them. The plants were 
sprinkled with quick lime, sulphur, and to- 
bacco, but to no effect, the insect being in 
no way injured, but continuing its ravages 
as before. 

Having ascertained that Louisiana cotton 
is the variety best adapted for the climate 
and soil at Pachino the exhibitor obtained 
a quantity* of seed last spring from the 
Govcfmment, but this being old and bad did 
not germinate. Other seeds furnished from 
^ the Eoyal Industrial Museum at Turin by 
Comm. Devincenzi, President of the Royal 
Commission for the Cultivation of Cotton 
came up, but unfortunately the plants were 
completely devoured by the. insect spoken 
of above. 

ie06. Servant! Santa (hairs of), ma- 
nufacturers, Borgo S. Giacomo, Parma. 

1. Wax.* 

2. Wax candles. Price, is. Sd, to 25. per lb. 

3. Black and red sealing wax. Price,25. 9ei. 

per lb. 
♦ London, 1862. 

Manufactory established in 1810 and 
furnishing employment for 10 workmen at 
i5i. a day. The wax is drawn out into 
very long thin strips which can be readily 
bleached in the mpst uniform manner by 
the rays of the sun. It is melted in water 
baths and manufactured into candles and 
tapers for churches. 

909. Tomabene Prof. Francesco, 
Director of the Botanical Gardens, Catania* 

One hundred and fifty seven different 
samples of cotton grown in 1864 in the Bo- 
tanical Gardens at Catania, each labelled. 
Pods, and dry plants, together with a spe- 
cification the country from which the seeds 



v^eref obtained, the Botanical names and 
synonyms. 

* Turin, 1864. 

Most of these seeds were procured from 
the Boyal Commission for the cultivation 
of cotton in Italy, at Turin, being a part of 
these collected by the Royal Italian Com- 
mission at the International Exhibition of 
1862, the rest were procured from other 
places. The collection embraces samples 
from Russia, Greece, Turkey, Malta, Italy, 
Portugal, Egypt, Algeria, India, North 
Carolina, Virginia, New Orleans, Jamaica, 
British Guyenna, Brazil, New South Wales, 
etc. All these samples flowered in the Bo- 
tanical Gardens at Catania , so that they 
have been named botanically, adopting in 
preference the Italian nomenclature in the 
clj^ssification of the species and varieties. 

ton. Vonwiller David and Co., ma- 
nufacturers , Castellammare (Naples)^ and 
69 Strada Guantaj nuovi, Naples. 

£ s. 
Best garancine . . . . per cwt. 4.10 

2nd kmd ditto ' . » 3. 13 

Common ditto » 2. 6 

Madder. 

* Florence, l861. 

itlO. ChoTal F. and Rossi (2. , Ca- 

glia/ri. 

Raw^ cotton. 

tit. Morm Antonio, Cagliari. 
Raw cotton. 

tit. Pantaleo Nicolo, .Bart. 

Raw Siamese cotton. 

tiS. PonteChev. Gaetano, Palago- 

nia {Catania). 

Raw cotton. 

ti4. Console Miphelangalo, PdUrmo. 

26 varieties of cotton seed placed on 
cardboard , to shew the relative and ab- 
solute length of the staple. 

* Turin, 1864. 

t i 5. LofOrte Gioranni. 41 , Strada dei 
Sette Dolori, Naples. 

Kid skins for gloves. Price,. M. ids. 
6d, per dozen. 



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SECTION VIL 
Ciyil EngiDeeriDg, Arcbilecloral and Boilding Cootriyaoces. 



Number of Exhibitors 5. 



S39. Directors of the MontrCenis 
Sub- Alpine Tunnel, 2, via San Secondo, 
Turin. 

Topographical plan and vertical section 
of the Mont-Cenis, shewing the course of 
the tunnel. Photographed by Chiapella, 
Turin, without enlargement. 
[See also Section I, N« 3]. 

240. General Company of the Italian 
Irrigatory Canals (Gavour Canal), 38, 

via deUa Bocca, Turin. 

Eleven Photographic views, executed by 

Vialardi, of Turin, representing the state of 

the principal works on the Cavour Canal 

in November 1864: — 

i , Great flood-gate for the supply of water 

from the Po, near Chivasso (Turin). 

2. Sluice gate. 

3. Portion of the caiial, completed. 

4. Acqueduct over the river Dora Baltea. 

5. Draining operation in order to obtain 

a foundation for the Syphon under 
the Naviglio dlvrea. 

6. Tunnel under the torrent Elvo. 

7. Acqueduct over the torrent Cervo. 

8. Curved acqueduct and bridge over the 

torrent Marchiazza. 

9. Tunnel under the river Sesia. 
10. Tunnel under the Sesia. 

Bird's eye view of the course of the 
Cavour Canal, in chromolitjiography. 
Longitudinal Section of the Canal. 

The construction of the Cavour Canal, 
one of the finest public works in Northern 
Italy, and well worthy of bearing the name 
of the statesman, was planned by Carlo 
N^o^, C. E. of Turin, and conceded in 1862 
to an English Company. Its object is the 
irrigation of the eastern portion of the an- 



cient kingdom of Piedmont, embracing the 
territory of Novara, Vercelli and the Lo- 
mellina, a fertile district famous for its rice 
fields. The supply of water is derived from 
the Po, near Chivasso, a few miles below 
Turin. 

The concession is granted for 50 years , 
commencing from the 15^^ April imme- 
diately following the opening the canal for 
irrigatory purposes , and at the expiration 
of that period the whole property reverts 
to the government, without any compensa- 
tion to the company. The irrigatory year, 
is to be reckoned from one spring equinox 
to another. M. Oscar Poli has recently 
written an excellent memoir on this subject, 
which appeared in the 251^ volume of the 
Politecnicp of Milan, from which we obtain 
the following data: — 

The total length of the canal will be 52 
miles, and the height of the bed at the en- 
trance gate at Chivasso 568 feet 6 inches 
above the level of the sea, while the waters 
will be discharged into the Tessin at the 
level of 497 feet 6 inches, taking in like 
manner the bed of the works. If from the 
total length of the canal we deduct 1275 
feet, consisting of the horizontal tunnels, 
we have a mean fall of 2.64 in 10,000 or 
1 in 3,780, although of course this is by no 
means constant, but on the contrary increa- 
ses to 1 in 2,000 at the upper entrance 
and diminishes to 1 in 5,000 at the exit: 
the fall before reaching the acqueducts also 
exceeds the mean« 



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4^ 



SECTION VII. 



The canal bed at the entrance and for the 
first 2,280 ft. is 131 feet in width, diminish- 
ing first to 98 ft. and at a distance of 27,870 
ft. to 65 ft. in width, which dimension it 
preserves to 38 miles from the entrance, 
when it is once more narrowed to 41 ft. 



and finally to 24 1/2. The normal width 
and fall are modified in passing through 
the syphons, in order to permit the easy flow 
of the waiter, after which they again resume 
their ordinary character. 



The four principal acquedncts over water courses present the following dimensions: — 



DKTAILS OF CONSTRUCTIO?! 


— . — 

NAMK or WATia COURSI SPA^IHU 




Dora Baltea 


Cerro 


RMseida 


Marekiaua 


Number of arches 


9 


7 


3 


3 


Chord of each arch 


m,ft. 6m. 


4^. 2m. 


29/lt. 6m. 


\hft. 9in. 


Depth at key stone 


2 » 6 > 


2 » 4 » 


2 » 2 » 


2 » 2 » 


Depth of water iii acqueduct . 


11 » 2 1. 


10 » 6 » 


10 » 6 » 


10 • 6 » 


Length of acqueduct 


631 » 


492 » 


17/ » 


102 » 


Ditto upper approach 


745 » 


669 » 


262 » 


230 » 


Ditto lower embankment . , . 


6146 » 


8256 . 


1882 » 


105 » 



The four principal 
details: — 



passages under the water courses crossed offer the following 



DITAILS OF GOHSTaUCTlON 


NAll or WATKR COVRSK €ROSSBR 


BiTO 


Setia 


Agogaa 


Terioppto 


Number of arches of 15/lt. 6in- 
<^8 span . -, 


8 

Wfl, 2m. 
8 » 2 » 
582 » 


3 

10/lt. 6m. 
8 » 6 » 
8i0 » 


3 

ii)ft, 6m. 
8 » 10 )) 
161 » 


2 
^fL 10m. 
9 m 2» 
142 » 


Depth of water in canaJ at en- 
trance 

Depth of water in canal at exit. 

Length of acqueduct along the 

water course 



The works are being pushed on with 
great activity, so that m a short time the 
canal will be opened. In the most favorable 



season of the year 14,000 day's work is 
performed in 24 hours, and the monthly 
eiq>enses range from 100,000 1, to 120,000 1. 



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CIVIL KNGINEERINGt ARCHITECTimAL AND BUILDING CONTRIVANCES 



49 



It At ff Upper Italy Railway Company, 

via Cemaia^ Turin. 

jk. Lombard lines. 

Collection of photographic views of the 
principal engineering and architectural 
works on the lines belonging to this com- 
pany , taken by Messrs Deroche and Hey- 
fiwa, photographers, 16, Corso Yittorio 
Emanuele, W]&n. 

The Central Railway station, Milan: — 

i. General view. 

% Exterior view of the Central Hall. 

3. The King's pavillion. 

4. Exterior view of the iron roof. 

5. Interior view of the iron roof. 

Span, 122 feet; length 701 feet. 

6. Interior of the Grand Hall. 

7. Iron bridge, connecting different parts 

of the station. 

2 arches span 60 feet; curvature 5 
feet: and 1 arch span 75 feet ; curva- 
ture 5 feet. 

8. View of the largest arch mentioned in 

last number. 

9. Iron bridge over the Loreto road, 

Milan. 
Span 35 feet, depth at centre 3 feet. 

10. Viaduct of the Lazaret. Milan. 

65 arches; span 14 feet. 
Total length, 1246 feet. 

Various points on the line : — 

1 1 . Viaduct of the Soma, between Bergamo 

and Lecco. 

Length 372 feet; greatest height 
83 feet 6 inches. 

12. Bridge over the Tessin, at Pavia. 

5 elliptical arches: span 108 feet; 
height 30 feet 6 inches; depth at key 
stone 3 feet 7 inches. 

13. View of a single arch of the bridge over 

the Tessin. 

14. Bridge over the Lambro, Milan and 

Pl^enza railway. 

Span 84 feet:*height 21 feet 9 in- 
ches ; depth 01 key stone 3 feet 7 
inches. 

1 5. Temporary wooden bridge at Placenza. 

16. General view of the temporary wooden 

bridge over the Po at Placenza. 

17. Permanent bridge over the Po at Pla- 

cenza now opened : state of the works 
in September 1863. 



B. Line from Bologna to Pistou. 
Photographs made by 0. Galli. 

18. ViewofSasso. 

19. Panico bridge over the Reno. ' 

20. Tunnel of Calvenzano; southern en- 

trance. 

21. Vergato bridge over the Beno. 

22. Malpasso bridge over the Reno. 

23. Tunnel of Riola; southern entrance. 

24. The Cassette bridge over the Reno. . 

25. Porretta station. 

26. Tunnel of the Madonna della Porretta; 

southern entrance. 

27. Tunnel of the Capanne; southern en- 

trance. 

28. Viaduct of Granaglione. 

29. Bridge of the Plan di Reno. 

30. Viaduct of Ombrone at S. Momm^. 

3 1 . Viaduct of Pitecchio. 

Length 550 feet ; height 141 feet. 

32. Bridges over the sailway at Corsini 

and Selvaccia. 

33. Viaduct of the Grazzini. 

34. Panorama. * 

35. Bridge of the Gualchiera. 

36. View of the bridge of Plan di Reno. 

94t. Municipality of Turin. 

1. The new Central Railway Terminus in 
Turin , designed and built by Chev. Maz- 
zucchetti, from the Architect's drawing. — 
Photographed by Chiapella, Turin, without 
enlargement (albumen process). 

2. Photograph of the new front of the Pa- 
lazzo Carignano, Turin, the present Cham- 
ber of Deputies. 

948. Zappa Luigi, mannfistcturer of 
hydraulic machinenr, 10, ViccHo San Gio- 
vanni siA muro^ Milan. 

1. Fire engine easily taken to pieces and 
put together again. Price 602. 

This engine conttuns 66 gallons of water' 
which it is capable of projecting 100 feet 
at the rate of 40 gallons per minute, and 
requires 8 men to work it. It is provided 
with 6 hempen buckets, 31 yards of hempen 
hose, and a brass jet The pattern is that 
adopted by the city of Milan. 

2. Two improved brass valve taps for 
baths, not liable to leak (invented by exhi- 
bitor). Price, 122. 



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SECTION VIII. 
NiVil ArebitaetBre 9 military EDsfneering, and Ordnance* 



Number of Exhibitors 7. 

df these 1 dbtained g, jpris^ fneddl at tU Jtalian Exhibition »t Flermce in 1861, 



1949 . Casini Ambrogio, pietr^isanta 
(Lucca), 

Damasked gun barej. Price, Hh 

!e50. Lombard Fir0 Arm ManQfacr 
tory (Fftbbrica d'Armi Lombarda), CtiWoT 
gio\ near Lecco {Coma). Office in Milan, 24, 
via S, Antonio, 

Pig iron from Bondione, jBcbilpaifio and 
Pisogne, Jiombardy. • 

Two rods of malleable fron. 

lufantry musfeet, Italian model, I860, 
complete. Price ih 

Pitto, barrel only; 15«. dd* 

BIfle, Italian model, 1 860, as used by the 
Bersaglieri; 21, 125. 

Swiss Federal Rifle; il, ifys, 

Reyelver; M ils, 6d. 

Target pistol. 
All manufactured with the above pig 
iron, 

Froip a very remote period tl^e mountain 
villages in the Province of Brescia have 
been the seat of manufacture of arms, prin- 
cipally gun barrels of excellent quality, for 
which the pj*oducq of the neighbouring iron 
mines is admirably adapted. 

These manufactories were considerably 
improved and obtained a large amount of 
work un^er the first khigdom of Italy , 
furnishing the government 40,000 mtjgj^eti 
annually, but they soon fell off and their 
prosperity ceased from the want of large 
commissions for the army. 

The vast improvements which havebee» 
introduced of late years into the make of 
military fire arms, and the necessity for the 



country to provide for a general armament 
resulted in the formation of ft company, 
called the Lombard manufactory of arms, 
which erected a splendid building at Ca- 
riggio near tecoo (Como\ where tjiey com- 
mand several important falls of water and 
have at hand abundance of wood fbr mak- 
ing the gunstQcks, The works cover an area 
of 10,000 square metres, and contain the 
best and most recent machinery, set in mo- 
tion by a water power of 50 horses, and em- 
ploying about 800 workmen ftt wages of 15 
to i6d, daily. 

The iron employed comes from the 
mines of Bondione, Schilpario and Pisogne 
{Brescia), and undergoes eve^ operation 
in tbO works up to tte finished arms. The 
Coipipany consider thftt they could fbumish 
10 or 12 thousand nlusketg yearly and 
almost as many revolvers. They also met- 
nuf^cture rifies and fowling pioqei bQth of 
cast steel and richly d^masl^ed, 

t At • MartiaoHl Lnigi^ 9, vim Barhor 
roux, Twin, 

1. Portable flying bridge, adapted!for mi- 
litary naval ana eivjl ppposes, fpt loading 
vessels on a fiat beach m the absence c^ 
tfjers, etc. 

2f. Apparatus suited for ^ look-qnt tower, 
fire escape, instantaneous scaffolding, etc. 

3. Fire escape or instantaneous ladder. 

The above appliances of the exhibitor are 
placed on wheels for facility of transport 
They are represented by models one tenth 
of the actual size, and merit attention from 



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NAVAL ARCHITECTURE, MILITARY ENGINEERINGj AND ORDNANCE 



51 



the great compactness and strength which 
they offer, combined with Kghtness, being 
all constructed on the same principle of 
diagonal bracing, and can be drawn out or 
folded together in a few mmutes with the 
greatestfacility by means of the wheelwork. 
The fire escape can be raised in the middle 
of a street without leaning against any 
building, so that a plank can be thrown 
across to the windows without in the least 
degree endangenng the apparatus. 

9 5lt • Pellizza Gustavo, manufacturer, 
vie PrivatCy Turin. 

Walnut wood gunstooks rf Yarious siaes. 

i . For infantry muskets. Pr. 1 , 8 

2. For rifles ...^1.3 

3. For muskets . . » i. 

4. For horse pistols . $ %. % 
5» Fpr pistols , . . i 0. 5 

This manufactory, situated in the out- 
ridrts of the city, employs 20 workmen, and 
is provided with steam power. It can turn 
out 700 rough stocks daily. 

999. Priora Brothers Giuseppf $nd 

Carlo , manufacturers, vig, S, Vmor^ al 
Teatroy 7, Mikm. 

Revolvers: — 

£ 8. 

i8-Shot revolver 9. 12 

10-Shot ditto 4. 15 



£ 8, 

6-Shot ditto 2. 12 

Lafaucheux 6-Shot ditto . . . 2. 
Pugn6's ditto, with ornamental 

Stock 2. 

Eevolver ^ . 1. 12 

* Florence, 1861. 

the manuflaotory of Messrs Priora Bro- 
thers is situated in the city of Milan. They 
dedicate themselves exclusively to making 
revolvers, in which they have obtained con- 
siderable success, having introduced nume- 
rous ihodffications, by simplifying the form 
and rendering them lighter and more easy 
to bandle^ as well as securing the utmost 
precision, the whole combined with a cer- 
tain degree of elegance and taste , though 
the prices are moderate. Some of these re» 
volvers are of 18 consecutive shots. 32 
workmen are employed by the exhibitors. 

954. Zanoboni Persio, Emboli {Flo* 
rmce), 

14-Shot double barrelled revolver, one 
with a diameter of 9 millimetres the other 
of 7 millimetres. Price, 8^, 

tftA. Mnndo Gennarp, U,BtradaSette 
Dohriy Naples. 

1. Specimens illustrating a process of 
preserving wood from decay. 

2. Sheet iron and copper rendered un- 
oxydizable under water. 



■» > i > r>rayu i 4>< '* ■■ 



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SECTION IX. 
Agricaltaral ind Horticaltaral NachiDes aod ImplemeDts. 



NunibeT of ExMntoTB 4. 



9IIO. Agricaltaral Association, 
Liicca, 

Agricultural implements used in the pro- 
vince of Lucca. 

[See also Sections 3 and 4]. 

9at. Braccio Pietro, VaUeggio (Par 
via). 

Iron plough with modifications by exhi- 
bitor. Price, 32. is. 

ISat. Ferrari Bartolomeo, Fa/tma, 

Tinned iron apparatus for hatching silk- 
worms eggs. Price, U, 85. 



This apparatus is filled with hot water, 
the temperature being maintained by a 
spirit lamp placed underneath, and regu- 
lated with a thermometer put in the same 
compartment as the eggs, which are kept 
moist by a gentle jet of steam rising from the 
reservoir below through a minute aperture. 

The exhibitor states that with an insig- 
nificant consumption of spirit the eggs are 
hatched quicker and more efficaciously than 
by ^he ordinary method.. 

••8. Lamberti Giovanni, Tarma, 
Corking machine; Price, 62. 



4 ■i> i»o4^*/4>' * ^ 



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SECTION X. 

Pliilosophicsl InstramentSy and Processes depeDdiog apoo (heir ase; 
Photographic apparatus; Musical, Horological, and Surgical Islrnmenls. 



Nuniber of Exhibitors 15. 

Of these 1 obtained a prize nieddl at the Great Exhibition in 1851, 1 at the Universdl 

Exhibition in 1855, i at the Italian Exhibition in 1861, la medal and i an ho^ 

nor able mention at the IntemationaH Exhibition in 1862. 



lies. Briziano Dr. Anselmo , 1, ua 
dd CriardinOy MUan. 

Models in wax: — 

Two feet affected with caries of the great 
toe ; two others cured by the use of Bri- 
ziano's compressive sticking plaster. — An 
arm, shewing the method of applying Bri- 
ziano's plaster after bleedmg. — An eye, 
shewing the mode of closing the eyelid 
with the same piaster. 

Briziano's sticking and com plaster. 

Flexible bandages, apparatus for deform- 
ed feet, and 'improved surgical instruments 
for the feet. 

909. Carena Nicola, clock maker, 17) 
Piazza S, Giovamiiy Turin. 

1 4-day escapement clock, with improved 
aUirum, only requiring to be wound up once 
in 12 days, and to be stopped at will at 
any time, for ships. 

This clock, having been made by hand, 
is not shewn as a specimen of workmanship 
but only for the improved arrangement. 
The lever on the right hand side serves to 
set the alarum at any hour of the day or 
night , that on the left for stoppmg the 
alarum when no longer required. Having a 
spring escapement it is suited for ships. 

990. Cassani Emilio, manufacturer, 
5, via 8. VitoaH Pasquirolo^ Milan, 

50 pairs of spectacles of different kinds. 
* Florence, 1861. 

991. Fummo GhOT. Antonio, 178, 
strada Toledo^ Naples. 

Piano-Melodium, to be played with a 



single row of notes; improvement introdu- 
ced by exhibitor. Price, 160^. 

Key board with row of notes for portable 
musical bands. 

999. Giosi Francesco, manufacturer, 
U, vico Figurariy Naples. 

Mathematical instrument case for archi- 
tects, with secret fastening. Price it. 

998. Iiongoni, Dnroni, and Del- 
FAcqua, manufacturers, 12, via Foppone^ 
MUan. 

Philosophical and telegraphic appa* 
ratua: — 

Morse's telegraph with Digney and Ma- 
roni's latest improvements. 

Tasto and pulsator, galvanometer, light- 
ning conductor, translator for the above. 

August's double psicrometer with double 
ventilator. 

Surveying level. 

Surveying level adapted for level ground. 

German silver mathematical instrument 
case, complete. 

Brass mathematical instrument case. 

Hypsometer. 

Anemometer. 

The manufactory of the Exhibitors, 
known as the Technomasio Italiano , w^ 
founded in 1863, and is the only one of the 
kind in the kingdom on so large a scale, 
employing 60 workmen, and being carried 
on with division of labour for the several 
branches of Physics, Chemistry, Mechanics, 
Photography, Engineering and Horological 
Instruments, Telegtaphic and Electrical 
apparatus, etc. 

Previous to entering into partnership the 



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54 



SECTION X. 



proprietors received separately 4 gold me- 
dals from the Lombard Institute of Science, 
Letters, and Arts; six silver medals, in- 
cluding that of Paris in 1855, and several 
bronze medals. They still indefatigably 
study to improve the manufacture of every 
species of instruments relating to Physics. 

'tHA, Mamzoni Lorenzo, 58, horgo 
Oa/ribaMi, Milcm, 

Two violins with modified form of attach- 
ment of the handles, and varnished with a 
new kind of varnish. Price, il. each. 

«9&. Monti Elvira, fabbrica Cen- 
trale Tokcana, Florence, 

per doxeii 
£ S. d. 

i. Common single bandage . 12. 

2. Common double bandage 

with one arm .... 16. 10 

3. Ditto, entire 1. 1. 7 

4. Ditto, divided 1, 1. 7 

5. Stitched smgle bandage . 16. 10 

6. Double ditto ..... 1. 6. 6 

7. Bandage with elastic cu- 

shion ,....« 1. 4. 

8. Black India rubber bandage 1. 4. 

9. Bandage with damasked 

cushion 1. 8. 10 

10. Bandage with damasked 

fastening ..... 1. 13. 8 

11. Divided bandage, with da- 

masked cushion ... 2. 8. 

12. Ditto, with damasked fast- 

ening ...... 2. 12. 8 

13. Bandage, with moveable cu- 

shion .«..•• 1. 18. 4 

14. Bandage for scrotal hernia 2. 3. 4 

15. Ditto, with moveable da- 

masked cushion ... 2. 3. 4 

16. Bandage with ebony cushion 1. 18. 4 

17. Ditto, with air cushion . 2. 8. 

18. Stitched children's bandage 12. 

19. Ditto^ with moveable cu- 

shion < 1. 4. 

20. Ditto, ditto ..... 1. 4. 

21 . Double ditto, whh moveable 

cushion. 8. 7. 2 

22. Bandage, with mOTeablecu** 

shion 3. 7. 2 

23. Bandage with spiral move- 

able neck 2. 8. 

24. Ditto, with moveable neek 

and ebony cushion < • 2. 17. 6 

25. Bandage with screw regu- 

lator 3. 16. 9 

26. PoHshed spring for a double 

bandage, with moveable 

QUdAOQ. •••<.« 3« i& 9 



1. 8. 
1. 4. 



19. 3 

19. 3 

1 8. 

7. 4. 



27. Double herniary bandage 

without spring . . . 

28. Sunple ditto 

29. Children's India rubber her- 

niary bandage . . .. 

30. India rubber umbillical 

ditto 

31. Chamda leather stocking » 

32. Stocking with silk knee 

spiral 

33. Ventral support with silk 

spiral .... 

34. Portable urinal . . 

35. Ditto 

36. Pessary with air reservoir. 

37. Ditto filled vith afar . 

38. Converse pessary • 

39. Vaginal speculum # 

40. Vaginal injector . . 

* Florence 1861. 



976 Mure Brothers, manufacturers 
of Weights and Measures, 33, via Nizza^ 
Turin, 

1. Patent apparatus, for meastiring the 
height of recruits. Price, 4/. 



. 6. 0. 





. 1. 18. 


6 


. 1. 18. 


6 


16. 





8. 





i. 





12. 





1. 


9 



Tkt mutm^ ttsitf canrirtii to % friuiie^ 



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PHILOSOPHICAL, MUSICAL, HOROLOOICAL AND SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 



6S 



work sttpportliig a tabulair brass rod, gra- 
duated to half centimetres, and ierminatiiig 
in a brass knob which is brought down till 
it impinges on the head of the recruit, wHose 
height is at once read off on tlie rod. 

2« Half hectolitre of extreme precision 
ifor measuring wine^ Price, 21. 12«. 



This vessel is of invariable capacity, and 
while it preserves the shape prescribed by 
law is very convenient for pouring out from 
one recipient the another. It stands on feet, 
two of which are supplied with micrometer 
screws, and is provided with a lip for pour- 
ing out the liquid and surrounded with a 
canal for drawing off any waste by means 
of a tap. Inside is a scale divided to 5 litres. 

3. Half decalitre of great accuracy, for 
dry measure. Price, 4«. 



This is an improvement mtroduced by the 
exhibitor. The vessel consists of a wrought 
iron cylinder with a wooden bottom, 
which cannot be fraudulently stove m, and 
strengthened by axial and diametral iron 
rods. 

{L^* dermaa ailyer bala,nce for chemical 



laboratories, turning With i/2 miUigramm^i 
Price, lOL 

* Florence, 186L 

999. Pftlitti Giuseppe, manufacturer 
of musical instruments toH. M. the King of 
Italy, 1077, via Peacheria vecMa, MUan, 

Collection of brass wind instruments: — 

Price 

£ s. d. 



8. 0. 
6. 16. 



9. 


4. 


8 


7. 


4. 





8. 


0. 





6. 


8. 





5. 


12. 





4. 


16. 





4. 


8. 





4. 


0. 





4. 


0. 





3. 


12. 





% 


12. 





2. 


16. 





2. 


12. 





6. 


4. 





2. 


12. 





2. 


8. 






1. Patent curved Pelittone in 

B flat with 3 stops . . 

2. Pelittone in B flat with 3 

stops ..... I i 

3. Pelittone in E flat, with 4 

tubes 

4. Straight Pelittone in E flat 

5. Straight Pelittone in B flat 

6. Bombardone in F • . . 

7. Straight Bombardone in E 

8. Cavour Bombardine in B 

flat ....... . 

9. Barytone in B flat . . . 

10. Trombone in B flat . . . 

11. Ditto 

12. Tenor in E, with 3 cylinders 

13. Trumpet in G .... 

14. Contralto or-Flicorn in B ^ 

15. Trumpet in G, with, 3 cy- 

linders 

16. Horn 

17. Comet in B 

I84 Soprano in E ^ » . . * 

19. German silver Contrafa- 

gottone, with i2 keys . 

20. Pelitti duplex in E flat, 

embracing tenor trumpet 
and English horn . . . 

Kiflemen's instruments 
adopted in the Italian, 
Spanish , Portuguese 
and Turkish armies : — 

21. Counterbass in F and E, 

with 3 stops .... 3. 16. 

22. Bass in C and B, with 3 

stops c. 4. 

23. Barytone, with stops . . 2.16. 

24. Trombone in F and B, with 

stops 2. 8. 

25. Tenor in F and E, with 

stops 2. 4. 

26. Trumpet with stops . . 2. 4. 

27. Contralto with stops . . 2. 4. 

28. Comet k piston .... 1. 16. 

29. Soprano k piston . . . 1. 16. 
* London, 1851 ; * Paris, 1855 ; * Flo- 
rence, 1861; t London, 1862. 

House founded in 1750. 

The manufacture of brass musical instru- 
ments was for a long time carried on in 



10. 0. 



5. 12. 



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56 



SECTION X. 



Milan as throtigliout Italy without the in- 
troduction of any improvement. To the 
enterprize and intelligence of the late Giu- 
seppe Pelitti, who died while these sheets 
were going through the press, is due a par- 
ticular finish and precision in the make of 
instruments already known, as well as the 
introduction of several improvements into 
them, and the invention of entirely new 
ones. He deservedly obtained several pri- 
zes from the Royal Lombard Institute of 
(Science, Letters and Arts, and at various 
Exhibitions in which he took part. 

The example of Pelitti served as a stimu- 
lus; other manufacturers began to turn out 
more carefully executed work, and new 
manufactories rose , though on a small 
scale. Milan provides the greater part of 
the musical bands in the kingdom with 
brass instruments, and Pelitti, having se- 
cured his inventions by patents carried on 
a most extensive trade at home and abroad, 
supplying the military bands of numerous 
countries, where his instruments are much 
sought after and enjoy considerable ^-epu- 
tation. 

The number of brass musical instruments 
annually manufactured in Milan may be 



assumed at 4000, worth 64002.; this trade 
giving employment to ^ or 60 workmen. 
Since the death of Pelitti tlie manufactory 
has been carried on by his widow and his 
son Giuseppe. — • Dr Giov. Pisani. 

999. Ruffini Andrea, manufacturer , 
i 3. Vice Cardari a Buoncammino cU Porto ^ 
Naples, 

Collection of harmonic strings made in 
Naples with lamb'sgut. 

999. Decaniai Costante, Florence, 

Gold watch with two enamelled dials, 
one indicating the time , the other, on the 
back, shewing the distance performed by 
a person on foot, a carriage^ railway train, 
ship or steam vessel, and giving the velo- 
city by the combination of the works. 
* London, 1862. 

990. Bosio Michelangelo^ Turin. 
Improved Escapement clock. Price, 61, 

This escapement was subjected to the 
inspection of the watchmaker's Society at 
Paris in 1864, and in his report to the 
Council M. Redier stated that it was new 
as a whole and in the details; that the ap- 
plicability of the contrivance was very va- 
ried and the execution excellent. 



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SECTION XIL 
Woollen and Worsted. 



Nuniber of ExhibUors 2. 



tr94. Loforte GioTanni, 44, strada 
Sette Dohri, Naples. 
Woollen yarn. 

•9ft. Mazza and Co., manufacturers, 
Bettano {Comoyj office in MiUm, 2, via deda 
Sola. 

Wool prepared by^ machinery from rags 
and cuttings, and employed in certain pro- 
portions with fresh wool for making shoddy 
goods, for the use of the poorer classes. 

Price List and description of the sam- 
ples: — 

Price 
per Ik. 

Knitting wool : — d, 

1. Carded white, 4 O.C. ... 9 

2. Ditto, N«3 ...*.. 11 1/4 

3. Ditto, N^ 2 12 

4. Ditto, NM 14 1/2 

5. Mixed, O.P 5 1/2 

6. Ditto, N« 3 carded .... 6 i/% 

7. Fine carded mixed .... 7 

8. Carded chestnut, N« 3 . . 6 1/2 

9. Ditto, N" 2 9 

10. Ditto, NM 10 1/2 

11. Carded black, O.P. ... 9 

12. Ditto, fine 11 

13. Fine carded chestnut ... 11 

14. Ditto, crimson 12 

15. Ditto, wine red 12 

16. Ditto, garnet red .... 12 

17. Ditto, pensee 12 

18. Ditto, agate 11 

19. Ditto, pearl grey .... 11 

20. Ditto, golden yellow ... 12 

21. Ditto, woad yellow .... 12 

22. Ditto,. fustic yellow. ... 12 

23. Ditto, orange 12 

24. Ditto, indigo blue . . \ . 14 1/4 

25. Ditto military dleue^ . . . li i/4 



Cachenez: — d. 

26. Cachenez, N« 2 . .* . . . 9 3/4 

27. Ditto, N" 1 12 

Flannels: — 

28. White, NM ...... 15 1/2 

Swanskins: — 

29. White, N" 2 ...... 12 

30. Ditto, N« 3 11 

31. Amaranth 11 1/4 

32. Fuchsine 111/4 

33. Dark violet 11 1/4 

34. Femee .* . . 12 

35. Saxon green ...... 12 

Flannels : — 

36. Victoria blue 111/4 

37. Chestnut It 1/4 

38. Buret 11 1/4 

39. Violet 11 1/4 

40. AnUlie 12 

41. French blue 14 1/2 

42. MiUefleurs 10 1/2 

43. Light ditto 13 

44. Very light ditto 14 1/2 

45. Black 93/4 

Nouveautes: — 

46. Common miUefleurs . ... 51/2 

47. Common chestnut .... 61/2 

48. Common light 9 1/2 

49. Fine dark miOeflewra ... 12 

50. Black 7 3/4 

Swanskin: — 

51. Mtaefleur8,m 12 1/4 

52. Ditto, n 10-1/2 

53. Chestnut, m 111/4 

Cloths: — 

54. Common mixed, m . . . . 3 l/i 

55. Fine mixed, II 4 J/2 

56. Superfine mixed, I . . . . 5 1/i 

57. Green 12 



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58 



SECTION XIIT. 



d. 

58. Madder 9 3/4 

59. Marengo ....... 11 1/4 

60. Superfine chestnut .... 12 1/4 

61. Light blue 13 

62. Bright blue^ ...... 13 

63. Fine military blue . < . . 12 

64. Common military blue . . 12 

65. Military Umte . . . . . 12 

66. Military tcmrnon . . . « IS 

Carded Muslins : — 

67. MiOeflmrs 11 1/4 

68. Violet 12 1/4 

69. Chestnut 12 1/4 

Merinos: — 

70. Black IS 1/4 

Extract wool: — 

71. Carded. . 6 1/2 

72* Carded chestnut . . i , 7 3/4 

Mixed : — * 

73. Common, n ..... . 6 

74. Chestnut 7 3/4 

75. Black 5 1/2 

76. Light black 12 1/4 

77. Fine miUeflewrs . . . • . 10 1/2 

78. Amelie ......... 11 

Flannel and notwcatt^i — 
79'. Miaeflewrs .... . : 10 1/2 

Cotton and wool : — 
80. Mixed . 13/4 

The art of working up woollen rags so 
as to produce yam from them i» of recent 
introduction in Lombardy. At first such 
rags were considered as useless, or sold 
at extremely low prices for manuring the 
fields* In 1858 it was attempted, almost as 
an experiment, to subject them to the pro- 
cesses already followed elsewhere in a ma- 
nufactory situated at BeUano on the Iske 
of Como, and the ei^ceUence of tl^ ye^uit 



was made known on the occasion of the 
Italian Exhibition at Florence In 1861. 

This mill subsequently passed into the 
hands of the Exhibitors, who having the ne- 
cessary capital, combined with the energy, 
mechafiical skill, and extensive commercial 
relations of M. Mazza, opened a large ma- 
nufactory provided with all the best and 
most recent machinery, set in motion by the 
perennnial waters of the torrent Piovema. 

The yams produced in this mill and dyed 
different colours, find easy sale in foreign 
markets , where they serve to make eco- 
nomical shoddy goods when mixed with 
certain proportions of fresh yams. 

800 petdons, chiefly women, ard employed 
in this establishment, which innii^ out at 
least 250 tons of wool annually. 

Another mill was opened in 1 862 at Me- 
naggio, on the lake of Como, oppofite Bel- 
lano, by Biraghi and Co., of Milan. Here 
also will be found the best machinery, set 
in motion by the torrent Senegro* 200 per- 
sons are daily employed, who work up 160 
tons of wool. 

Thus, through the activity and enterprize 
of these firms whose mills are the most 
extensive of the kind in Italy, a waste 
substance gives work to numerous families, 
and supplies spinning mills and cloth manu- 
factories with the raw material at a price 
sufficiently low to enable them to offer to 
the less opulent part of the eoinmoidty an 
article adapted to thek wants and pro- 
portionate to their means. — fir 6iav. 

Pi6ANI. 



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SECTION XIIL 
Silk and Vehet. 



Nufi^er iff ExMMofi S0< 

Of ihm 2 Mtm^ ^e fMM$ al Ifte Vmow9QA ExhiUtion in 1855, 9 at the Italian 

Exhibition at Florence in 1861, and 4 obtained, prige wwM$ and 8 honorable 

inenUone at ihe Intematioml XkchibiHon in 1862. 



iieJnuot^o Eerardengo {Simna)» 

Baw silk, t|ie produce of siUcwonnfl fed 
entirely on the leaves of the Madura au- 
rantiaca, an experiment carried on by the 
exliibitor for several years past at his 
estate of S. Giovanni. 

••0« AbbitI rietfo, silk splnnefi 

Haw yellow sflkj title 7 denari. 

Baw yellow silk, spun by a new procen, 
offering sufficient strength to serve directlv 
for the warp or weft of any Idnd of stuff. 
♦ Florence, 1861 ; * London, 1862. 

Manufactory founded ha 1856, and em- 
j^oying 150 jpersons, whose wages vary 
mm iod. to &. 6<?. per diem. 

Mil. Banoalarl Etiore, silk spfamer, 
Chiavari {Genoa)* 

White and yellow raw silk. 
^ Florence, 1861 ; 1 London 1862. 

••t. 6$fu Brothers, silk sphmers, 
Tiaeenza, 

BawsOk. 



I. Glmbai'dl Alossandro, manufac- 
turer! 9, PioHa del Carminey MUm* 

Sewing sUk, produced from twin ooeooiuu 

••4. C<mi#rritorio deUalliMrie«f- 
dla, Savona {Genoa), 

Specimens of velvet. 

«•&. De Ferrari T. S. B<, late Fran- 
cesco, manufacturers, Genoa, 

24 pieces of black and coloured silk 
velvet. \ 

1 Lond^Mi, 186^. 



tiMI. Do Vecohl Pasqtiila tnd Co., 

manufacturers, 2, via Monte IHetd^ Milan. 

Italian and Asiatic raw silk, organzine 
andtrame. - 

••9. Del]»riiiO Ohot. Br Michelo, silk 
spinner, Veeime (Alexandria)* 

Baw yellow silk. 
♦ Florence, 1861} * London, 1862. 

Portion of a patent eellular apparatus, 
invented and employed by exhibitor, for 
preserving each worm apart while spinning. 

The same containing the cocoons. 

Pamphlets describing the merits of the 
improved process and we results obtamed. 

♦Florence, 1861. 

The advantages of Delprino's system of 
isolating the silkworms while forming the 
cocoon have been this year subjected to 
the examination of a Commission appointed 
by the Minister of Agriculture, Industry, 
and Commerce, and by others, in a series 
of experiments carried on at Turin and in 
the neighbotirhooci. 

They may be thus summed up: — 

i, A greater produce of silk from the 
cocoons, tcstma parUme, 

% Better venulatioii, and greater clean- 
liness and ease hi takmg care of the worms. 

3. Qreater ease afforded to the less active 
varieties of worms in the formation of the 
cocoon. 

4. A considerable diminution in the num- 
ber of twin cocoons (which are of less va- 
lue): thus Japanese and Portuguese silk- 
worms by the common plan of rearing pro- 
duce 23 per cent of twins, and with Del- 
prifio's appimtttB ofily 2 pet cent. 



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60 SECTION XIII. 



NIPRINO'S APPiRATUS F«R IS0UTIN6 SaKWORMS WHILE FORMING THE COCOON 



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SILK AND VEIVET 



61 



5. The entire obviation of the stamed 
cocoons , which amount to 30 per cent by 
the ordinary plan of rearing. 

6. A greater quantity and better qua- 
lity of s3k. 

7. Economy of time and money in attend- 
ing to the worms. — G. B. Panizzardi. 

999. GioTanelli Amato, Pesaro, 

Raw silk, title 9 to 11, with some of the 
cocoons from which it was produced, 
t London, 4862. 

The manufactory contams 54 basins. 

999. Grilli Raffaele, Ancona, , 
Eaw silk. 

800 Keller Chev. Alberto, manufac- 
turer, ViUanovetta near Saluzzo; Office in 
Milan, 933, via S. Faolo, 

Raw silk and organzine of various titles, 
spun from the cocoon and reeled directly by 
an improved process invented by exhibitor. 

* Paris, 1855; * Florence, 1861 ; * Lon- 
don, 1862. 

sot. Lanzani Luigi and Brothers, 

manufacturers, 9, via del Bovello, MUan. 

Hand and machine-carded silk waste , 
made from waste of various kinds. 

* Florence, 1861 ; i London, 1862. 

802. Lazzaroni Pietro, producer, 8, 
Piazza di S- Sepolcro, Milan, 

Chinese, Japanese aiid Bengal silk. 
Italian silk, produced by exhibitor and 
spun with 1, 2 and 3 threads for weaving, 
f London, 1862. 



Principal market in France, Switzerland 
and the Rhine district; annual sale about 
15 tons. " 

308. Modena Brothers Gesare and 
Isaia, silk spinners, Eeggio in the Emilia, 

Raw silk. Price, 2L 2^. per lb. 
i London, 1862. 

804L Moschetti Angelo, Bove$(C<mi), 
Raw silk. 

* London, 1862. 

305. Ronchetti Brothers, manufac- 
turers, Sala and Civate (Como)', office in Mi- 
lan, 2 via S. Griovanni quattro facde. 

Raw silk, organzine, and trame. 

* Paris, 1855; * Florence, 1861; * Lon- 
don, 1862. 

800. Rota Antonio, silk spinner, 
Chiari (Brescia), 

Raw white silk, from Chinese silkworms. 

Raw yellow silk, frojn Albanian and Bu- 
kharest silkworms. 

Twin cocoons, Albanian and Bukharest 
races. 

* Florence, 1861; t London, 1862. 

807. Siccardi Lorenzo, Ceva(C(mi), 
Raw silk. 
' * Florence, 1861. 

80d. Vecchi Jodi, Eeggio d^EmiUa, 
Yellow and white raw silk. 

* Florence, 1861. 



THE SILK MANUFACTURE OF THE PROVINCE OF MILAN . 



« Milan, besides holding incohtestably the first 'rank among the cities of Italy for its 
silk trade, contains within its walls numerous important commercial houses, which 
likewise reel and spin the silk they sell. The province of Milan is, moreover, one of 
the first for the production of cocoons, both aiS regards quantity and quality; those 
of the upper part of the province , and known as Brianza cocoons , being the best. 
Previous to the ravages produced by the silkworm disease, which has been so ge- 
neral of late years, the jft-oduction of cocoons in this province varied from 3500 to 
4000 tons, according to the season, representing at the lower prices at which they 
were then sold, a value of from 420,000Z. to 480,000Z. 



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BICnON XIU. 



i 1!h% HIliiiMia lilfc maavfiMsturtn, howey«r^ adl only ponen and superintend nu- 
mercmB milli for reeling and spinning trame and organzlne within the province , but 
carry on a great many others in the neighbouring provinoes, especially in that of Como. 
Not to speak of the vast number of small silk reelers who have only from S to il 
basins, there are In the proyince of Milan 140 reeling mills (fUi%nde)j containing from 
12 to 140 basins, 28 of which are heated with steam, the rest by water. These are 
in operation for about 2 months annually, giving occupation during that time to no less 
than 12,000 persons, half of whom are women^ the rest girls; the former earning about 
9 l/Sd. per diem, the latter half that sum. The spinning or twisting mills (fUaiM or 
tordtoi), amount to 95, containing a total of 18,968 spindles, and giving daily employ- 
ment to about 1100 men, wmen) md children, wboSQ wages may to taken respectively 
at is. 6d, 8d, and id, 

f Since the introduction of the silkworm disease into Lombardy the produce has 
fallen to half, a third, a quarter, and even to a fifth of that previously obtahied, 
varying according to the province, the locality, and the year itself. Incalculably great 
as this loss may be to the country, but especially to the silkworm rearers and landed 
proprietors, the reeling and spinning mills have not suffered by such a deplorable mis^ 
fortune, through the intelligence and activity of the manufocturers. The Milanese 
houses, in feet, procure work for their reeling mills by purchasing largely Asiatic co- 
coons at Venice, whither they likewise resort for the Asiatic raw silk which they spin 
with the most admirable success into trame and organzine. 

t Silk reeling and spinning is an art which has existed in Lombardy from very 
remote times, and it has become, so to speak, a kind of heir loom in some familiesy 
passing for generations from father to son, so that it is by no means uncommon for such 
houses to date back for centuries. It can easily be understood how this circumstance 
enobles the occupation, producing a love for the art, a skill which increases with time, 
a feeling of emulation tending to produce the best result with the least expense, and 
an enter.priz]ng spirit which encourages to study and carry out modifications adapted 
to every kind of silk , and thus tending to attain the highest decree of perfection. 
It may be safely said, without any fear of exageratipn, that the Milanese reeling and 
spinning mills have reached this point, and the assertion is fully confirmed by suclr 
facts the esteem in which they are held by the manufacturers on the Rhine , in 
Switzerland, and even in France, where silk is likewise spun in the most admirable 
manner; the medals awarded to nearly all the Milanese silk spinners and reelers at 
the Italian Exhibition in 1861 and the International Exhibition of 1862; and lastly 
the great gold medal conferred on. the Milan Chamber of Commerce at the Paris Uni- 
versal Exhibition in 185B, as representing the genei^al silk interest of the province. 

« Although exceptional circumstances have prevented that concurrence of Milanese 
manufacturers at the Dublin International Exhibition which was at first anticipated, 
three of them, Keller, De Yecchi, and Bonchetti are houses of the most important class^ 
and the samples of raw and spun silk which they have sent will shew the perfl^ction 
they have attained in winding, spinning, and throwing this precious fibre, The first 
mentioned of .these manufacturers likewise exhibits silk obtained by a process of his 
own which he states to be more expeditious, economioal and useful, combining ai it 
does two operations in one« Another exhibitor has sent sewing silk, which having been 
prepared from silk made by twin cocoons, cannot beitwisted uniformely so as to prf- 
•ent the various degrees of sixe without accurate study md careful exandnation to 
ensure the smoothness of the thread and regularity of the work in the several opera- 
tions, as well as a judicous choice of the silk itself. This exhibitor antiuallj;iianttfae- 



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SILK AND VELVET 63 



tures about 10 tons of sewing silk, for the most part sold in France and Germany 
for making fringes. ' 

f Another exhibitor shews with what success he is able to card silk waste by hand 
ajid power, and what progress has been made in this art during the past few years. 
This waste has little intrinsic vftlae, but when carded with intelligence and accuracy 
and spun very equally, serves either alone or mixed with other silk, wool, or cotton, 
for the manufacture of goods of ^u^h beauty ai to appear entirely made of silk. Silk 
carding is carried on by 10 manufacturers, large and small together, and employs 
about 2000 men, women, and children. The total annual production may be taken at 
200 tons. 

a In the 12 silk dyeing works existing within the walls of Milsm upwards of 240 
men are employed, who dye annually not less than 220 tons of silk. Without pre- 
tending for a moment to assert that the Milanese silk dyers can compete with the 
French, especially in new colours and half tints, it is but just to say that great Im- 
provements have recently taken place, while, on the other hand, Milanese dyers are 
celebrated for their mineral black, which they seU in great quantities to Swiss and 
Jthenish manufacturers. 

f Bruni*s dyeing works are very ancient, having been founded about a century ago. 
The exhibitor assumed possession of it in 1821, and has directed his attention with 
'diligence and care to his own art. Aided by the progress of chemistry he has been 
enabled to introduce great improvements, heating by steam, and having in the works 
steam engines and all the most improved kinds of machinery. He has been awarded 
several medals at different exhibitions, and dyes for fbreign sale alone upwards of 
30 tons of silk annually. 

f As far as regards" the consumption of dyed silk for the Lombard silk manufactories, 
which are confined tq the two prpyinces of Milan and Como, the dyeing works receivi 
fewer commissions than formerly, owing to the severe blow the weavers have sustained 
by the Government having suddenly taken off the import duty on such goods since 
the late treaty of commerce, rendering it extremely difficult for them to compete with 
French manufacturers, even for plain silks, which would not have been case had 
sufficient time been allowed for adopting measures necessary in order for them to keep 
their ground ». — D' Giovanni Pisani. 



-M<SltS:^>^ 



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SECTION XVL 

Leather, Indading Saddlery and Harness, Skins, Fnrs, 
Feathers, and Hair. 



Number of Exhibitars 2. 

Of these 1 obtained a prize medal at the International Exhifntion in 1862. 



8ftO« Melegari Natale, foreman of 
the manufactory of Felice Endrich, 
Parma. 

6 Skins of white waxed calf leather, for 
men's boots. Price per lb., 3». M, 

8 Skins of black waxed calf leather, for 
boots; 3«. Sd. 

This manufactory was established in 
1825 and employs 12 workmen, who re- 
ceiye from 16 to 2(ki. per diem. 

The leather is prepared with the English 
knife and waxed with tunny oil and digras. 



Sftl. Pellerano GiOTanni Battista, 

manufacturer, 193, etrada Chiaja^ NapUs. 



PreparM glove skins : 



Kid skins . . , 
Lamb skins , . . 
Sheep skins . . 
Small lamb skins 



Friea 
per4M€i 

£ s. d. 
7. 10. 8 
» 18. 9 
* 18. 
» U. 



* London, 1862. 



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SECTION XVIL 

Paper and Stationery, Printing and Bookbinding: 
Edncalional appliances. 



Number of ExhibitorSf 17. — fyub-ExMntws^ 5. 

Of these 2 obtained prke meddle at the Italian Exhibition in 1861, and 4 at the In* 
ternational Exhibition in 1862. 



81(5. Cordova Nicola, Palermo. 
Ornamental designs. 

85e. Gambiagi Ghev. Francesco, Di- 
rector of the Royal Printing office, Flo- 
rence, 

1. Copy of the SjpecHegium Liberianum, 
by Francesco Liverani, eidiibited as a spe- 
cimen of printing. 

2. The same work, bound in morocco, with 
German silver mounting and clasps. 

. 3. Copy of certain documents relating to 
the Boyal houses of Savoy and Braganza, 
bound m morocco, and ornamented with 
mosaics. 

859. Castelli Prof. Giacomo, viaS 
TOy Turin. 

Specimen of ornament and penmanship 
executed on geometricalprinciples(improve- 
ment introduced by the exhibitor), with 
ornament in relief executed by the pen (in- 
vention of the above), for the use of techno- 
logical schools. — Series of copy books 
illustrating the geometrical principle of 
teaching writing adopted by Prof. Castelli 
in technological schools in Turin. 

859. Dalmazzo Enrico, printer, ma 
S. Domenicoy Turin. 

Dictionnaire Polyglotte en pnze langueSj 
par le Colonel Louis CdUigaris, istpart. 
— Exhibited as a specimen of printing. 

859. Faa di Bruno Ghev. France- 
sco, 21, J5or^o S, Donato, Turin. 

Writhig apparatus for the blind. 

5 



By this simple apparatus persons who 
have lost their sight since they have learn- 
ed to write can write straight and with the 
greatest ease both small and capital letters. 
The inventor received a medal from the 
Sodeti d' Encouragement in Paris, and the 
approbation of numerous competent per* 
sons interested in the welfare of the blind. 

Seo. ForzaniFiorenzo Giuseppe, 16, 

viu S. JdassmOj Twrin. 

Writing copy-books for Elementary and 
other schools, comprising 7 books of English 
hand, 2 of French hand, and 2 of German 
capitals. Price of each book, \d,\ the series, 
iid. 

861. Franco Sebastiano and Sons, 
publishers, 17, iHa Oow?owr, Twrin. 

Series of schools books, beginning with 
spelling books and preceding up to the 
higher class books used in Technological 
schools, and Gymnasia. 

FIRST LOWER ELEHEi\TARY GLASS 
Wholesale priee, stitehed, wiOioat eoTer. 8, d, 

1. Scavia, Sillabario ...» » 3/4 

2. — Prune letture ...» 11/2 

FIRST UPPER ELEMENTARY CLASS 

3. Scavia, Letture pei Bam- 

bini » 3 

L — Letture pei Bambini . » 3 
5. — Prime nozioni di Gram- 

matica ....... 1 1/2 



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SECTION XVU. 



SCCOND UEIENTARY CUSS 

6. Scaviay Cento racconti di s. d. 

Storia sacra » 3 

7. — LettoreperleFanciulle » 3 

8. — I^tture pei FanciuUi . • 3 3/4 

9. — Nozioni di Grammatica » 3 

niRD ELBHENTMIT CUSS 

10. SdUapardU, Element! di 

Geografia fidca ...» 41/2 

11. ScacuijNozionidiFisicapo- 

polare » 4 1/2 

12. — Libro del Popolo , . • 4 1/2 

13. — LUomo e lUniverso . • 4 1/2 

FOURTH UEIEnARY aiSS 

14. Scavia, Cento racconti ilr 

lustrati • 4 1/2 

15. — Principii di composi- 

zione • 9 

16. — LUomo e i mm doveri » 4 1/2 

17. SMapardUy Elementi di 

Uranografia . . . . • 7 1/2 

18. Seavia^ Prime nozioni di 

Geografia • 4 1/2 

FOR THE SPECIAL USE OF GIRLS 

19. Lanza^ Florilegio per le 

alunne ......> 6 

20. — Antologia italiana . . 1. 6 

21. Seaoia, Manoale del Mae- 

stro di prima classe ele- 
mentare > 6 

22. — di seconda . ...» 11 

23. GiuUani^ Sul virente lin- 

goaggio della Toscana . 1. 2 1/2 

24. FrancesdU, Del leggere e 

delporgere 1. 2 1/2 

25. MaUeucd, Teoria dinami- 

ca del calore . ...» 11 1/2 

26. — Baccolta di alcone pro- 

postedileggi . ...» 11 1/2 

CUSS ROOiS FOR GTHNASIAL SCHOOLS 

27.Boccar(io,Geografiae Storia 

antica. For the Ist year » 5 

28. — » 2nd » » 5 

29. — » 3rd » » 4 1/2 

30. — » 4th t 1. » 

31. — » 5th » 1. » 

FOR NORMAL AlfD TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

32. La Farina y Storia nazio- 

nale 1. 2 1/2 

33. BoccardOj Medio Eyo. 1st 

year » 11/2 

34. — 2nd year 1. 6 

35.— Storia inodei:na,3r(l year 1, 6 



36. S(^iapardU, Lltalia in par- 

ticolare. Ist year Tech- 
nological course . . . 

37. — Storia romana . . . 

38. BoccardOy Mannale di di- 

ritto commerciale. 2nd . 

39. 5b^pare0i, Storia del Me- 

dio £to. 2nd .... 

40. — Storia modema. 3rd . 

41. Boccardo^ Diritti e doveri 

dei cittadmi 1st . . . 



1/2 
1/2 



9 

7 1/2 

7 1/2 



TECHNOLOGICAL, NORMAL, AND MAGISTRAL 

SCHOOLS 

42. £l^iapare2Z», Manoale com- 

pleto di Geografia e Sta- 
tistica 2. 1 

43. Boccardo^ Manoale di di- 

ritto amministrativo . . 1. 2 1/2 

44. — Trattato di economia 

politica, 3 vols ... 3. • 

45. — Laterraeroomo,2vols 3. • 

46. Bmde^ Manoale di disegno 

lineare, 2nd year Techno- 
logical coorse .... 2. 1 

47. — Corso compioto di di- 

segno geometrico indo- 
striale, with Atlas, part I 36. • 

48. — Corso compioto di di- 

segno geometrico indo- 
striale, ossia il Yignola 
degli stodentiy with Atlas, 
partn 10. 10 

49. — Le cinqoe tavole per lo 

insegnamento del sistema 
decimale, pesi, misore e 
monete 5. » 

50. 3farta, Trattato d'aritme- 

tica per gFistitoti mill- 

tari 20. » 

51. Bighini, Trattato di topo- 

grafia con atlante per 
istitoti militari . . . 5. » 

52. Martinif Carta morale del- 

ritalia, in 16 sheets . . 6. « 

53. — Id. deU'Eoropa, in 16 

sheets 6. » 

54. — Planisfero in 16 sheets 6. • 

55. 3fatt6ucc», LapiladiVolta • 6 

56. Lessona, La scienza popolare : 1** solle 

fermentazioni; 2*» il mare ; 3*» L'oc- 
chio; 4» Solla peste; 5*» L'aria;6« Gli 
acqoari; 7*» Le colonic e lltalia. 

8^9. Maglia and Mosso, via Barba- 
rouxj Turin. 

Copy books. 

888. Maglia, Pigna and Co., Papw 
mannfacturerSi Vaprio (Miian\ MasHa- 



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mco {Como)j and AJzano Magaiore (Ber- 
gamo):, Office in MUan^ 5, via adC Unione, 
Collection of samples of paper : — 

• Prieeperlb. 



i 



Very thin cylindered letter 
paper, ^hite and blue . . 

ll^Hiite, blue, and coloured vel- 
lum and verg6 letter paper. 

Superfine satined white and 
blue letter paper .... 

Superfine satined office paper. 

Fine office paper .... 

Common office paper . . . 

Ledger and drawing paper, 
satined and sized .... 

Superfine half sized printing 
paper 

Fme half sized printing paper 

Ccnnmon printing paper . . 

lithogn^hic and copper plate 
paper 

12. Yarious samples of coloured 

paper, for making flowers . 

1 3. Chamois drawing cardboard . 

14. Boll of endless drawing paper 

15. Yery fine unsized tissue paper 
for copying presses . . . 

Tracing paper 

Paper for telegrams ... 
Cards for pliotography . • 

* Florence, 1861 ; * London, 



3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 



16, 
17. 
18. 



d. 

7 1/2 
6 1/4 

4 3/4 
4 

6 3/4 

5 3/4 
4 1/2 
3 1/2 

6 1/2 

8 3/4 
7 

6 3/4 

8 
11 

6 3/4 
8 

1862. 



NB. The paper upon which the present 
edition of the catalogue is printed was ma- 
nufactured by Messrs Maglia, Pigna and 
Co., and'presented by them to the Royal 
Itidian Commission. 

Numerous paper manufactories exist in 
the province of Milan; 8 for hand made 
kinds, and 3 for machine piqter. In the 
former are produced common unsized paper 
and pasteboard, in the latter a great va- 
riety of hoih, wjiite and coloured paper is 
manufactured, as well as letter, office, 
printing; drawing and endless paper. 

The aggregate daily produce of hand- 
made paper may be taken at 1 ton, occupy- 
ing 50 men, women, and children; that of 
machine paper at 4 tons, occupying 360 
persons. The wages are: men, 16^.,'women 
7 ifid., children 5d. to 6i. 

The common hand-made paper is used 
in the Province , the machine made kinds 
are chiefly sold in Northern and Central 
Italy, only a small quantit^r going to the 
southern munland provinces and Sicily. 



Assuming that there are 300 worldng 
days in the year these mills will turn out 
about 15 tons of paper, and judging from 
the different quantities manufactured of 
each kind and the several wholesale prices 
we get a mean price of M, per lb., or a 
total annual value of 72,0001. for the paper 
manufactured in the Province, while it is . 
calculated that the total produce of the 
whole of Lombardy is 3,360 tons , worth 
161,280?. 

Maglia, Pigna and Co. have two mills for 
machine made paper, the former, at Yaprio 
(Milan) containing two hydraulic machines 
moved by the waters of the Martesana Na- 
viglio, the other at Alzano Maggiore (Ber- 
gamOy with one hydraulic machine, besides 
some small mills for hand papers. — Doctor 

GlOV. PiSANI. 

8«4. Ministry of Public Instruction, 
Twrin. 

Yarious works executed in Blind and 
Deaf and Dumb Asylums, to shew the na- 
ture of the employment of the inmates: — 



A. Royal 

tion, Genoa. 



Deaf and Dumb Institu- 



Administrator, C. B. Boselli. 

Section 17. —Bookbinding and Printing. 
Collection of educational and other 
books: — 
Section 20. — Shoe making. 

Tirone and Companions, Pair of 
men's boots; 16*. 

— Pair of ladies' boots; 12«. 
Section 23. — Engraving on precious stones 

and cameos. 

Massone Pasquale , Pair of cameo 
earings, subject: Hebe; iSs, 

— Ditto ditto, subject: Justice; 18a. 

— Cameo representing Diana and En- 
dymion; IL Bs. 

— Child crying, engraved on onyx; 2J. 

— Head of . Dante , engraved on 
onyx; U. 

Section 30. — Oil painting and drawing 
(Not for sale). 

B. Deaf and Dumb Institution, Pa- 

lertno, •■ 

Director, Abbot Cfro Manalio. 

Section 17. — Marzullo, Grammar for the 
Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb. 

— Catechism of Science, Letters and 



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SECTION XVII. 



Arts, for the higher classes of Instruction, 
volume 3. 

— Pratical method of teaching the 
Deaf and Dumb to speak. 

— Kegulations of the Deaf and Dumb 
Institution, Palermo. 

— Two programmes of the course of 
studies followed by the Deaf and Dumb, 
with the present system and that propos- 
ed to be adopted. 

Section 19. — - Marchese Rosalia, Inmate 
of the Asylum. 

A dog, embroidered in Berlin wool, 
for a curiiion. Bunch of flowers in worsted 
work, for a cushion. 
Section 28. — Rufflno Giuseppe, Inmate 
of the Asylum. 

Palm tree, vine loaded with grapes, 
artichoke plants and com. symbolic of 
the Italian victories in 1860 — modelled 
in wax. 

Pizznto-Coco Vincenzo , Inmate of 
'the Asylum. 

Alabaster fruit: — Grapes, cherries, 
pomgranates, peaches, oranges, lemons, 
apples, pears, apricots, plums, green al- 
monds, azzeruola, beans. 
Section 30. — La Leta Giuseppe, Inmate 
of the Asylum. 

Stump drawing, representing Moses, 
after Michel Angelo. 

— Stump drawing, representing the 
most celebrated Italian artists. 

Ammiratii Giovanni Battista , In- 
mate of the Asylum. 

Stump drawing, representing the 
Madonna della Seggiola, after Eaffael. 

The Deaf and Dumb Institution at Pa- 
lermo contams 30 boarders, mcluding 17 
boys and 13 girls; some other day pupils 
also attend the schools. The prumotor of 
this establishment was the Abbot Dixit Do- 
minus who, in 1834, introduced into Pa- 
lermo, the art of speaking by signs. This 
art, first used in Italy by Cardano of Pavia, 
in the xvith century has made considerable 
progress through the labours of Assarotti, 
Provolo, Pendola, Lana, and San Vitale, so 
as to give to the deaf and dumb great faci- 
lities of communicating with their fellpw- 
creatures. 

Though there are, as we shall see, 1868 
deaf and dumb persons in Sicily, this is the 
only Institution for them. The number of 
blind persons is still greater, but up to 
the present moment they are entirely im- 
provided with an Asylum. 



Population of Sicily on the 31 December 
1862.— 2,393,414 inhabitants; of thesel868 
or 1 in 1281 were deaf and dumb; that is 
to say: Males. . * . . 1076 
Females .... 792 

Total . . . 1868 

Of whom we find under 20 years of 
age 794 

— from 20 to 40 years of age . . 774 

— above 40 years of age ... 300 

The number unmarried was . • 1696 
— married. .... 172 

In a social point of view there are 213 
who have some property and 1655 who are 
obliged to get their own living. 

In general terms we may assume the 
following distribution by occupations: — 

Agriculturists, peasants, farm labour- 
ers, etc 640 

Cleks in the custom house , re- 
venues service, etc 50 

Artists, painters, and draughts- 
men . 50 

Students 40 

Master workmen, carpenters, and 

artisans generally .... 430 
Women-spinners, weavers, semp- 

strices, etc 230 

Sailors and fishermen .... 50 

Servants, porters, carters, etc. . 100 

Indigent persons and beggars . 60 

In certain communes the proportion of 
deaf and dumb to the entire population so 
far exceeds the mean as ta become a fear- 
ful calamity; thus in the following towiis 
it is: — 

InhabiUBls 

Santa Domenica (Messina) . 1 in 1 10 

Terranova (CdltanisseUa . . 1 in 274 

Carlentini (Note) 1 in 314 

Motta d' Affermo (Cata/nia) . 1 in 354 

Pietraperzia (Caltanissetta) . 1 in 390 

With a population of 1 1/2 million in 
1843 there was in Tuscany one Deaf and 
Dumb person in 2,172 so that the mean in 
Sicily is net^rly double that quantity. 



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Congenital deafness has heen ascribed to 
many causes, amongst others to intermar- 
riages among near relatives , which is de- 
cidedly a physiological cause of degenera- 
cy, and contrary to the spirit of civil and 
canonical law, though hitherto it has been 
too frequently practiced in Sicily. Other 
causes are to be found in jsudden frights, 
violent commotions, and bodily pam during 
the period of gestation, which exercise such 
dangerous influence of the foetus. 

Deafiiess and dumbness after birth, more 
common in Sicily then the preceding and 
than is generally supposed, are to be ascrib- 
ed to eruptive diseases among children, 
such as scarlatina, small pox and scrofula^ 
for which there is often a want ot proper 
care. — Federico Lancia di Brolo. 

C Deaf and Dnmb Institution, Milan- 

Director, P. Ghislandi. 

Sections 19, 20. — Work executed by the 
girla. 

1 . Embroidered shift. 

2. Embroidered handkerchief. 

3. Lace worked on net. 
4-. Two antimaccassars. 

5. Collection of specimens of darning and 

mending in various materials. 

6. Embroidered cushion in worsted, with 

flowers in relief. 

7. Embroidery in gold, silver, and silk, on 

white velvet ground. 

Section 30. — Drawings executed by the 
girls. 
1 to 5. Foliage and ornamental drawing, 
chiefly copied from prints. 
Drawings executed by the boys. 
6. 7. Acanthus leaves, copied from a print. 

8. 9. Acanthus leaves and vases, ditto. 

10. Part of a candelabrum. 

11. Part of a frieze. 

12. Head of a girl, praying. 

13. Study of an angel. 
U. A hand. 

15. Head of a baccanalian. 

16. Female head. 

17. Head with wreath of ears of corn. 

18. Two heads of boys reading. 

19. Eagle with dece of laurel crown. 

20. Study of a dog. 

21. Wounded lion. 

Numbers 12 to 21 are copies of prints, 

22. Cow tied to a post. 

23. Head of the Famese Hercules. 

24. Head of a horse. 



Piece of the leg of an ancient statue. 
Gladiator's foot. 
Head of Venus. 
Horse's head. 
Head of Venus. 
Numbers 22 to 29 are copied from 

plaster casts: they were invariably 

executed on a different scale to the 

originals. 
Painting: — 
Copy of an ancient painting. 
Copy of a study of a nude figure. 
Study of drapery. 
Study of drapery. 

Wood carving: — 
Large picture frame, bramantesque 

style, with acanthus leaves and laurel 

wreath. 
Specimen of carving. 
Bunch of grapes. 
Piece of ornament. 



Wood engraving: — 
1 to A. Specunens of tinting, ornament, 
and figures. 

The boy's painting class was only opened 
in November 1863, that for wood engraving 
in April of the same year. The girl's draw- 
ing class was likewise commenced during 
the year 1863. The lessons are given daily 
and last .an hour and a half. 

D. Deaf and Dumb Institntion, Sien- 
na, 

Director, P. Tommaso Pendola. 

Section 17. — 3 volumes, printed and bound 
by the Deaf and Dumb immates. Album 
bound by the immates of the Institution. 
Section 19. — Embroidery. 
' f 26. — Inlaid table. 
» 29l — Ornamental leather work. 
» 30. — Pen and ink drawing. 

E. Blind Asylum, 2, Borgo di 5. An^ 
gelo^ Milan. 

' Director, Cher. Itfichele Barozzl. 

Section 17. — A table containing specimens 
of writing by the pupils, executed by the 
different systems in use in the Institution. 
Works printed in relief by the pu- 
pils, for the use of the establishment: — 

Grammatichetta italiana, deU'Abbate 
Fontana, 1 vol. 

Compendio della Grammaticafrancese, 
del Prof. Asti, vol. 1. 

Principii elementari di Geografia , di 



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SECTION XVII. 



Giacomo Antoine, oontaining a map of 

Europe, vol. i . 
Choix de morceaux en prose, voL 1. 
Section 19. — Worsted-work carpet with 
the pattern in relief. 
* Florence, 4861. 
Secthn 28. — Ornamental basket of artifi- 
cial flowers made in paper, wool and 
beads. 

Saccinet Aeeoant of the Blind Asylam 
at Milan. 

The Blind asylam at Milan originated 
with its present director, Ghev. Michel Ba- 
rozzi, who began his labours in 1840, as a 



mere experiment, In the Pia Qua Slndnh 
stria, or Work-house of S. Vincenzo, with 
one male and one female inmate. Subse- 
quently they were transfered to the work- 
house of S. Marco, where M. Barozzi con- 
tinued to be Director, and where, by help 
of the fund provided by the citizens, the In- 
stitution attained larger proportions. After 
a personal study of the principal establish- 
ments of this kind elsewhere all (hose ap- 
pliances which seemed the most suitable 
were introduced, in order to render the 
children of the less wealthy classes useful 
to themselves and to Society. 



VnW OF THE BUND kn\m AT ULAN. 



At length in 1855, the space at the dispo- 
sition of the Asylum in this new building , 
being inadequate to its growing wants, and 
with the help of a donation of 60,000 francs 
bequeathed by M. Sebastiano Mondolfo, 
the Institution was transfered to its present 
position, a comodious house with a garden, 
situated in the Stradone S. Angelo, where 
the number of boarders is 68, mcluding 42 
males and 26 females^ besides 2 out-door 
pupils. 

The course of study embraces the 
following subjects: — 

Religion and Sacred History. 
Reading Italian with raised letters. 
Reading and transiting French. 
Writing from dictation by various methods. 
Italian grammar and composition. 



Arithmetic with the use of raised letters. 

Mental arithmetic 

Elements of Geography, History, and 
French. 

Music: — the pianoforte, organ, etc. 

Various kinds of work. 

The knowledge of colours of substances 

* employed in the works executed by the 
inmates. 

Notions of objects of prime necessity. 

The discrimination between all monies hav- 
ing legal or tolerated circulation, and 
of their relative value. 

The method of communicating by signs 
with the blind and deaf and dumb. 

As a rule the course of instruction last 8 
years. 

The requisites for free admission are: to 



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have been born of poor parents, to be be- 
tween the «ges of 10 and 15,'of which 10 at 
least spent in Milan. Children of the same 
age, not bom of poor parents, are likewise 
admitted, even though they do not belong to 
Milan, on payment of an annual sum of 260 
francs or lOi. 8s. for their board and clo- 
thing, all other expenses of lodging, atten- 
dance, instruction, etc., being borne by the 
Institution. The government assigns a sum 
of money for nominating on similar terms 10 
indigent pupils from any town in the king- 
dom , and sig. Mondolfo has bequeathed a 
similar account for the same purpose. 

The Institution is managed by a Director 
and Inspector , both honorary, assisted by 
a paid steward and ragioniere. 

For the instruction of the boys there is 
a master for the elementary branches of 
knowledge, a French master, and three 
teachers of trades who are at the same 
time guardians. Two mistresses attend to 
the instruction of the girls in the classes of 
elementary knowledge and French, a third 
superintends the work. Religion and Sacred 
History are taugltt to the boys and girls by 
a priest, and music by 8 principal masters 
chosen among those held in most reputation 
in Milan, who give their lessons at stated 
hours, and are paid so much for every time 
they attend. 

In addition to the above there are 3 blmd 
pupil teachers who have completed their 
course of instruction in the Institution; two 
for elementary instruction and one for 
French, all assisting in teaching music. One 
of the female pupils likewise assists in 
teaching French, the Piano, and the Harp. 

These , besides having the same privi- 
ledges as the other immates receive pay- 
ment for their services. Mutual instruction 
is generally adopted in every branch. 

The text books employed are those in 
general use in the public schools in Milan, 
reprinted in relief by the pupils themselves. 
Composition in ordinary printing types, 
principally for the use of the Institution 
itself, is also executed by the boys. 

Several methods of writing are employed, 
especially with the pencil or a steel point 



tracing on blackened paper, placed over a 
sheet of white paper, in either case enclos- 
ed in a simple wooden frame with a cross 
bar fitting into equidistant notches at either 
side, serving to regulate the space between 
the lines. Other kinds of apparatus are also 
made use of, such as that of Foucauld, who 
was himself blind, although it is somewhat 
complicated, lastly the apparatus of the 
Director Barozzi himself, a simplification 
of the latter , and made in the shape of a 
fan, but provided with 48 stamps, each 
terminating in a capital or ordinary letter, 
instead of only 10 stamps, as in the former 
case, in which the letter is traced with a 
point. Barozzi's apparatus does not, howe- 
ver, produce such elegant writing as that 
of Foucauld. 

The work executed by the boys is con- 
fined to the manufacture o^cordeUe, various 
kinds of nets, brushes, baskets, and in a 
few instances composing in printer's types, 
and weaving swaddling bands for babies , 
music being in most cases the principal 
emplojTuent. The girls, on the other hand, 
perform almost every kind of needlework 
taught in ordinary schools. 

At the Universal Exhibition of 1855 the 
establishment, and several of the girls 
obtained an honorable mention for a wor- 
sted-work carpet in different colours dedica- 
ted to their sisters in misfortune at the Paris 
Blind Asylum. A medal was likewise award- 
ed at the Florence exhibition in 1861 for 
another worsted-work carpet. 

In order to execute such work the pat- 
tern in relief is placed on paper divided 
into minute squares, corresponding with 
the holes in the canvass , accompanied by 
all the necessary explanations for the use 
of the girls. 

It is obligatory for the boys to learn the 
piano forte and organ — by playing the 
latter they generally get their living in 
after life — and a third instrument of their 
own choice, for which they shew most apti- 
tude. To this is added musical composition 
and the art of tuning i)ianos. Once a year 
the government gives the Institution a Be- 
nefit night at the theatre of the Scala, on 



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SECTION XVII. 



which occasion the most advanced pnpils 
perform pieces of their own composition 
daring the intervals between the acts. 

Musical mstruction for the girls is limited 
to the pianoforte and in a few instances the 
harp. Two of them, however, having fine 
voices are taught the higher class of sing- 
ing. Both boys and girls are trained to sing 
sacred music in chorus. 

Music is taught by the ordinary methods 
especially those of Azioli and Czemy, but 
printed in relief. The Institution is provided 
with the requisite instnunents and books, 
and in general with relievo editions, be- 
longing to the various branches of Imow- 
ledge taught. 

The pupils wear a stated dress, though 
this has no peculiarity in it. When the wea- 
ther permits they are taken out for a walk 
or play in the court yard and garden at- 
tached to the building; in inclement wea- 
ther they amuse themselves with music 
or games ; occasionally and during the car- 
nival they are taken by turns in batches to 
the Opera, to cultivate their taste for music. 
Twice a week they attend the chapel adjoi- 
ning the Asylum. 

When slightly indisposed a medical man, 
whose services are gratuitous, attends the 
children. In more serious cases the boys are 
if possible confided to the Fate-bene friars, 
and the girls to the Fate-bene nuns : those 
who can afford it are either transfered 
to the neighbouring hospital or otherwise 
provided for by their parents. In general 
they enjoy good health and with the ex- 
ception of three sickly girls it rarely liap- 
pens that they have to be cured out of the 
establishment. The feelings of compassion 
expressed by visitors or those coming 
across them elsewhere are often thrown 
away upon them, and as a general rule 
their spirits are good, except such as have 
been deprived of the use of their sight since 
they have grown up , and who naturally 
feel most keenly the privation of so precious 
a boon. Their disposition is in most cases 
gentle, and they evince gratitude for the 
care bestowed on them, while they are 
tractable, respectful, and submissive in 



their ideas and demands. They are inspired 
with a love of liberty and of their country, 
of which their compositions give frequent 
evidences, are firm in their loyalty to the 
king, and have deep religious feelings, which 
contribute powerfully to soften the tremen- 
dous privation it is their lot to endure. 

It is a matter of pride for the pupils to 
distinguish themselves in their studies and 
to shew oflf to advantage in public examina- 
tions the knowledge they have acquired ; 
attaching great importance to obtaining 
prizes at their final examination on leaving 
the Institution, and which in the case of 
poor pupils consist generally of some mu- 
sical instrument, which may be usehil to 
them in after life. 

The education thus given to the blind 
aflTords them a great consolation under their 
heavy affliction. Those who belong to fa- 
milies able to provide for them can occupy 
themselves agreably, while others, who 
have to procure their own living, are assist- 
ed before leaving the Asylum in finding 
some situation as organigts in the vicinity 
of their native village, by which , together 
with lessons on the piano, and tuning pia- 
nos , and the excercise of the trade they 
have been taught, they manage to provide 
a modest living. It sometimes happens that 
they acquire sufficient musical skill to ena- 
ble them to perform at theatres. The young 
women are able to attend to domestic oc- 
cupations and sometimes procure a slender 
sustenance as sorters of raw silk. 

The Director does not lose sight of the 
young persons after they have entered the 
world , keeping himself informed of their 
condition in case they need his help. 

The expenses of this Asylum In 1863 
were 42,793 francs (17122.) including taxes. 
During the same year the income derived 
from property, bequests, and donations 
amounted to 24,655 fr.; 13,282 fr. were 
furnished as fees by the pupils themselves 
and by the government quota of 2600 fr., 
the remaining 1736 fr, were provided by 
subscriptions, grants, and various sources, 
including the profits of the Benefit night 
at the Scala theatre. 



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Tlie Director annually draws up a report 
of the requirements of the Asylum, and 
at the close, of the year presents to the 
trustees a report giving all information re- 
garding the progress and moral condition 
of the Institution. •— MiCHELE Barozzi , 
Director. 

865« ParaTia 6io. Battista and d 

publishers, 23, via Doragrossa, Turin, 

Collection of educational works, 104 vo- 
lumes< 

School books, adopted in the Elementary, 
Teclmological, Gymnasial, Liceal and Nor- 
mal schools of Italy. 

8. d. 

1. Troy a Vincenzo, Nuovo Sil- 

labario graduato ...» 91/2 

2. Volentieri cav, Angelo, La re- 

ligione studiata nella sto- 

ria 1. 2 1/2 

3. Berti Domenico, Del me- 

todo applicato all'insegna- 

mento elementare . . .1, 2 1/2 

5. JReG^it*ZM),Nomenclaturaco8- 

mologica dei corpi in ge- 

nerale, i860 » 9 1/2 

6. SchiaparelliLuigi,M.samsAe 

di ^toria e Geografia an- 

tica 2. » 

7. Donini Pier Luigi, Delle an- 

tichitli. romane, 5 books .4. 2 1/2 

8. Bichetti Carlo Em.', Metodo 

per insegnare la lingua la* 

tina. 1851, vol ^ ... 1. 3 1/2 

9. Vol. 2 1. 7 

10. Vol. 3 ....... 2. 1 

11. Guida del maestro. 

12. Bayneri G. A., Primi prin- 

cipii di metodica . . . i. » 

13. SchiapareUi Luigi^ Corso 

generale di storia a'ntica .1. 9 1/2 

14. Bonco^tvpaqni cav., Saggio 

di lezioni per Tinfanzia, 
1851 2. 3 

15. Corneliilfepotis^YiitiQ excel- 

lentium £nperatorum cum 
adnotationibus, A. Lace, 
1853 » 9 1/2 

16. Fava dott. Angdo, Nozioni 

fondamentali di economia 
sociale e scienza del com- 
mercio » 8 

17. Crirard^ Abbozzi per com* 

posizione, traduzione del 
prof. Agostino Lace, 1 851 . 

19. Troy a Vincenzo, Antologia 

di prose e poesie itaUane, 

VOL 1, 4862 1. 7 

20. Te^^ni Zeone, Sunto di sto* 



ria antica, e di storia mo- 8, d, 
dema italiana .... 2. 5 

23. Bayneri G. A., Lezioni di 
nomenclatura geometrica 
Parte 1* » 9 1/2 

2i. Parte 2* » 9 1/2 

25. Biclietti Carlo Em., Modelli 

di analisi logica. ...» 91/2 

28. Raccoriti morali scritti da 

un maestruccio di scuola. 1. 9 1/2 

29. Blair Ugone^ Istituzioni di 

rettorica e belle lettere, 
1853 ^ . 1. » 

30. Qirard P. Gregorio, Dell'in- 

segnamento regolare della 
lingua matema, tradotta 
dal prof. A. Lace, 2* ediz., 

1854 1. 7 

31-32. PlautoM. A.j Commedie 
volgarizzate da Pier Luigi 
Donini, col festo, vol. I, 
parte 1% 2* 4. 10 

35. Esercizio ragionato suUe de- 

clinazioni e cdniugazioni 
conforme alle nozioni del- 
ristradamento al quale va 
unite, 1854 » 8 

36. CapeUina Dom^nico^ Anto- 

logia poetica latina. 

37. Bellardi Luigi, Nozioni ele- 

mentari di Storia naturale 
applicata.— Parte i\ Cor- 
pi inorganici, Mineralogia, 
1854 1. 9 1/2 

38. Parte 2*, Corpi organici, 

libro 1°, Botanica ... 1. 9 1/2 

39. Parte 2*, Corpi organici, 

libro 2°, Zoologia ... 1. 9 1/2 

40. Corte P. A., Anthologia ex 

M. T. Cicerone et L. An- 
naeo Seneca, editio tertia, 
1855 2. » 

41 . Nuovo Istradamento alio stu- 

dio della lingua latina .1. » 

42. CapeUina Domenico, Nozioni 

di letteratura generale. 

43. Istradamento alia lingua la- • 

tina, 12» edizione . . .1. 4 

44. Selmi, Chimica elementaris- 

sima ....... 2. 5 

45. SchiapareUi, Compendio di 

storia orientale antica .4. 3 1/2 

46. Mandoj'Albanese , Corso di 

Geometria elementare .3. 2 1/2 

47. Girard P. Gregorio, Prime 

nozioni di religione, ver- 

sione libera dal francese, 

del prof. G. A. Rayneri , 

4836 1. 2 1/2 

Jl i^olo Discorso ...» 8 
La sola Catechetica . » 8 

48. Bianchardi DotU Stanislao^ 



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SECTION XVII. 



8, d, 
Lettere original! e tra- 

dotte 1. 5 

49-50. Tommmeo Niccolo, Del- 
Feducazione , desiderii e 
saggi pratici, vol. 1** and 2° ^i. 10 

51. Gamier J. J., Elementi di 

contabilit^ commerciale . 2. 5 

52. Tettoni L. e Bubino E.^ 

Aritmetica applicata al si* 

sterna Metrico-decimale . » 7 1/2 

53. ScfUojpareUi L., Compendio 

di Storia dalk caduta del- 
llmpero romano ai tempi 
nostri. 
Parte 1% Medio evo .1. 9 1/2 

54. Parte 2% Storia moderna .1. 9 1/2 

55. B^do/rdi Luigi, Principii di 

scienze natural! . . . .1. 9 1/2 

56. Donini Fier-Luigi, Del mo- 

do di scrivere bene . . » 9 1/2 

57. Marengo L A.^ Epitome 

istoriae sacrae perpetua . » il 

58. Mottura Faolo^ Istituzioni 

elementari d! letteratura. • 9 1/2 

59. Berrini OswcUdo, Brevi ris- 

poste ai quesiti di Storia 
antica, media e moderna, 
e di geografia . . . . 2. » 

60. Parmetler^ Elementi di com- 

putisteria e di tenuta del 
libri in partita semplice . 2. 9 

61. Gardll, Delia logicao teo- 

rica della scienza, libri tre 1. 7 

62. Ddfino Fadlo, Storia dltalia 

dai prim! tempi sino ai 
giomi nostri 2. 10 

63. Donini Pier-Luigi, Dei di- 

ritti e dei doveri del cit- 
tadino. 

64. Bichetti T, Carlo Em,, Guida 

del maestro elementare . » 9 1/2 

65. Schiapardli Luigi, La Sto- 

ria romana di Oliviero 
Goldsmith , intieramente 
rifatta e riordinata. . .4. 9 1/2 

66. Battioni Felice, Nozioni di 

gra^matica italiana . . » 5 

67. Botta Scipione, Grammatica 

francese comparata coUe 
forme della lingua italiana 2. » 

68. Fasmii A., Libro di Let- 

ture italiane .• . . . . 2. 10 

69. Danini Pier-Xwt^, Elemen- 

ti di Geografia universale, 
parte 1* 4. » 

70. Bichetti T. Carlo Em., Gram- 

matica latina 4. 2 1/2 

71. Volentieri Angdo^ Sunt! di 

morale » 11 4/2 

72. SchiapardU Luigi, Breve sto- 
^ ria popolare dltalia dal* 



73. 



77. 
78. 



d. 

9 \ft 

6 

7 
2 1/2 

7 
6 

2 1/2 




82. 
83. 



I'anno 476 al 1861 ... 1. 

- Sommario di storia an- 
tica, brientale e greca, col- 
rin^icazione dei font! . . » 

74. GMplione Ant, Saggio di 

Filosofia morale . . .1. 

75. Nozioni compendiose di me- 

tafisica. .1, 

76. Donini Pier-Luigi, Elemen- 
ti di Geografia universale, 
parte 2* 1. 

Busconi Carlo, Elementi di 
Economia politica . . .4. 

Troy a Vincenzo, Antologia 
di prose e poesie italiane, 
parte 2* ...... 2. 

79. SUvin Maurizio, Manuale 

di Stenografia . . . .4. 

80. Castrogtovawni G., Aritme- 

tica per le scnole elemen- 
tari superiori . . . . » 7 

81 . Sismonda Etigenio, Elementi 
di Storia naturale gene- 
rale. — Mneralogia . .4. 7 

- Id., Fisica terrestre . .1. 7 
Carbonati Domenico, Silla- 

bario e primo libro di let- 
tura . » 3 

84. Donini Fier-Lm^, Antolo- 

gia storica italiana, par- 
te 1% Medio Evo ... 2. 5 

85. Veechia Faoh, Corso di Pe- 

dagogia pei maestri di 
grado inferiore . . . .1. » 

86. Castrogiovanni G,, Trattato 

diAntmeticaperle scuole 
tecniche e ginnasiali . . » 7 

87. Pormetfer Filippo, Elemen- 

ti di computisteria e di te- 
nuta dei libri in partita 
doppia 4. » 

88. Castrogiova/nni G., Manuale 

dei maestri della 1^ classe 
elementare ...... 91/2 

89. Bichetti T. Carlo Em., Con- 

sigli d'un Ispettore ad un 
maestro elementare . . » 

90. Gagliolo Dom^nico,l^oziom 

elementari di Logica . . 2. 

91. Carbonati Domenico, Gram- 

matica popolare ...» 

92. Bdmonte N. e Isnardi L.j 

Problem! graduati di Arit- 
metica 1. 

93. Lambrtischini BaffaeUo, Del- 

ia educazione . . . .2. 

94. Vigna CamiUo, Guida dello 

studente nelle scuole se- 
condarie classiche ... 0. 

95. — Guida nelle scuole tecni- 

che e negli istituti tecnici. 1. 



9 1/2 


1 


8 


9 1/2 





9 1/2 


2 1/2 



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96. Sismonda Eugento^ Elementi 8. d. 

di Storia naturale gene- 
rale, Botanica .... 2. 

97. — Id. Zoologia .... 2. 

98. Cbstro^fiovanm 6r., Mannale 

del maestri della 2^ classe 
elementare . . . . • 1. 7 

99. Berrint Oswdldo^ Compen- 

dio di Grammatica latina. 1. 7 
400. Cmno Andrea^ Elementi 

di Geografia 2. 5 

101. VerceUi Virffinio, Elementi 

di Geometria .... 2. 5 

102. Berrini Osvdldo^ Corso gra- 

duate di versionldal latino 
nell'italiano, edairitaliano 

nel latino 1.7 

104. Fassini A, Libro di let- 
tnre italiane con osserva- 
zioni intorno ai principali 
generi di componimenti . 2. 5 

1. Bidietti Carlo Em,, 'SuoYis- 

simo Sillabario graduato, 
fascicolol** 0. 2 

2. Castrogiavanni 6r., Storia 

Sacra 0. 5 

3. Taverna L,, Prime letture 

per la sezione superiore 

della 1* classe elementare 0. 3 1/2 

4. Castrogiovanni G.^ Sillaba- 

rio per la sezione inferiore 
della 1* classe elementare 0. 3 
- 5. — Letture ed Esercizj per 
la sezione superiore della 
1* classe elementare . . 0. 5 

6. — Letture ed esercizj per 

la 2» classe elementare . 0. 9 

7. BichettiCarhEm.j^VLOYh- 

simo Sillabario g^uato , 
fascicolo 2« ..... 0. 4 

8. (Jastrogiovanni (?.. Letture 

per U 3» e 4* classe ele- 
mentare 0. 9 1/2 

9. Ta/oema Lorenzo Luigi, Li" 

bro di teste per le nozioni 
vane che vogliono essere 
studiate dagli alunni della 
2» classe elementare . . 0. 3 1/2 

10. Grctglia J, Desire, Premier 

livrede Lectures gradu^es 0. 6 

1 1 . Castrogiovanni 6r., Precetti 

ed Esercisg dicomposizio- 
neiUUana 0. 11 1/2 

12. DoniniPier-Luigi, Precetti 

ed Esempj di stUe episto- 

lare 0.11 1/2 

Maps and globes. 

\ Terrestrial globe, diameter 
30 centimetres, with metal 
equator and meridian, on £ s. d. 
pedistal 1. 12. 

2. Terrestrial globe, diameter 



22 centimetres, with metal £ s. d, 
equator, on pedistal . .1. 5. 8 
4. Terrestrial globe, diameter 
22 centimetres, inclined at * 
45», on pedistal .... 0. 12. 10 

6. Celestial globe, diameter 30 

centimetres, with metal 
equator and meridian, cm 
pedistal 2. 0. 

7. Celestial glq^e, diameter 22 

centimetres, with metal 
equator and meridian, on 
pedistal 1. 5. 8 

8. Armillary sphere, diameter 

30 centimetres, entirely in 

metal, on pedistal . . . 4. 12. 

9. Planetary sphere, diameter 

25 centimetres, entirely in 

metal, on pedistal . . . 1. 12. 

10. Solar system, diameter 30 

centimetres, entirely in 

meUl 2. 4. 

11. Solar system, diameter 23 

centimetres, entirely in 

metal 1. 16. 

12. Copemican solar system, dia- 

meter 22 centimetres . . 1. 16. 

1 8. Wall diagram of the conven- 

tional signs used for maps, 
mounted on cloth . . .0. 8. 10 

19. Wall map of Asia, mounted 

on cloth 0. 13. 8 

20. Wall map of Roman empire, 

mounted on doth . . . 0. 13. 8 

21. JSe22ar({»,Iconographic plates 

of botany ...... 2. 8. 8 

22. — Iconographic plates of 

, zoology ...... 2. 8. 

23. Vigliardi, Wall diagram of 

geometrical nomenclature, 
mounted on cloth . . • 0. 9. 6 

24. Tettoni, Genealogical and 

chronological table of the 
house of Savoy, mounted 
on cloth 0. 5. 8 

25. Vonini, Geographical atlas 

of 23 plates 0. 3. 

26. Series of geometrical solids, 

by prof. Reyneri (medium 

size) . <. 0. 14. 5 

27. Series of drawing squares 

(see catalogue). 

28. Wooden compass to be used 

with slates 0. 2. 

29. Small school slate .... 0. 0. 8 

30. Three flat drawing rulers 

(see catalogue). 

31. Small abacus in varnished 

wood 0. 12. 2 

The collection of school books consists 
of 104 volumes, of which n large number 



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76 



• SECTION xvir. 



have been sold witliin the last few years 
throughout the kmgdom. 

Of the smaller series of school hooks , 
recently issued, 12 volumes have been very 
favorably received and several thousand 
copies been disposed of in every part of 
Italy. 

Various bther little books, no less useful 
and important are exhibited, and these 
like the preceding find easy sale. 

Globes were until lately imported from 
France and Germany, but they were very 
expensive. Seeing the importance of furnish- 
ing these to schools the exibitors determin- 
ed to manufacture them on their own pre- 
mises, so that, as will be seen by the cata- 
logue, they are able to exhibit a complete 
series of terrestrial and celestial globes, 
armillary spheres, planetary, and solar 
systems, etc. 

The want of wall diagrams of Natural 
History was greatly felt in Italy , as they 
have been elsewhere found so eminently 
useful in helping the masters in carrying 
out their lessons on this subject, especial- 
ly in the higher classes. The exhibitors 
fearlessly embarked in the expense of 
providing well executed and scientifically 
arranged lithographs illustrating the se- 
veral kingdoms of nature , which would 
bear inspection and please the eye of the 
lover of the Creator's works , be jhe a 
youthful or adult student. Two series are 
already published, comprising Zoology and 
Botany. 

Wall maps are expensive in their pre- 
paration and difficult of sale, so that few 
publishers in Italy have ventured on the 
speculation. 

The table of geotnetrical nomenclature 
offers nothing remarkable, beyond the fact 
of its being made in Italy, whereas until 
lately they used to be imported from 
abroad. 

The geographical atlas has been com- 
piled from the most recent documents, and 
shews the present political divisions and 
the new lines of railway, and is constantly 
corrected up to . the time of issue. 

The fractional abacus is an indispensable 



apparatus for primary schools . and has 
been prescribed in the government pro- 
gramme as essential for teaching mental 
arithmetic to children. 

The series of the principal geometrical 
figures is one of the most usefuls things in 
schools for impartmg a knowledge of geo- 
metrical nomenclature. 

Trossi and Delpino's method of teaching 
writing has been adopted by the Ministry 
of Public Instruction tor the Primary 
schools of the Kingdom on account of its 
simplicity and efficacity. Each' copy-book 
costs only 5 centimes or a half penny. 
The exhibitors state that they have sold 
2,000,000 copies within the last few years ; 
and on the whole their labours aid to pro- 
duce, in however humble a manner, a po- 
werful revolution in the intellectual con- 
dition of the country. 

86e. Re Giuseppe , engraver and 
printer, 4, via Bourdm^ Turin. 

Specunens of Encopo — Chromography, 
or embossed printing in colours, and pro- 
posed application to the production of 
postage and receipt stamps, envellope ca- 
meos, etc., which cannot be counterfeited: — 

1. Stamp with National arms for unpaid 

or insufficiently paid letters. 

2. Postage stamp for printed matter, with 

the National arms and head of the 
king, 

3. Postage stamp for letters; various de- 

signs and values, with microscopic fi- 
ligree work. 
L Postage stamp embossed to resemble 
lace (plain white). 

5. Telegraph stamps of three different 

kinds in on^ and two colours, with 
the National arms, 

6. White telegraphic stamps in relief, to 

imitate lace. 

7. Money order stamps. 

8. Cameos for envelopes for public offi- 
. ces, etc. 

9. Passport stamps. 

The postage stamps would cost about 
1 franc per thousand, or a quarter less than 
the price now paid by the Government. 

The extensive use of paper money, if 
such a term may be applied to postage , 
receipt, and bill stamps, sufficiently proves 
its utility, though there is the utmost dan- 



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ger in this system, unless Governments 
take the greatest precaution to guard 
against falsification. The exhibitor, seeing 
the- importance which would result from 
sucli an improvement, turned his attention 
to manufacturing stamps which it would 
be extremely difficult or impossible to copy. 
He came to the conclusion that of the two 
kinds of stamps, the first simply printed in 
colours, the other embossed, the latter was 
preferable, being infinitely more difficult to 
imitate, and requiring as it does far greater 
skill in the execution. 

The samples exhibited should be examin- 
ed with a strong lense in order to percieve 
the minuteness of the engraving and the 
details added for the purpose of prevent- 
ing forgery, instead of using watered paper, 
a precaution adopted by many Govern- 
ments, though it may be easily pointed 
out how imperfect a guarantee it offers, 
being no longer visible when once the 
stamp is fastened on the paper, so that 
in fact paper without any watering at all 
would answer just the same purpose. Sdch 
being the case, the exhibitor studied how 
to substitute for the watering, only visible 
at^the back of the stamps, microscopic 
markings engraved on the embossed sur- 
face. 

It should be added that the exhibitor, 
who shews a great variety of engravings 
which he suggests for postage, receipt, bill, 
telegraph, and passport stamps, designed, 
engraved, and printed the whole on his 
premises, and that he his ready to under- 
take the execution of such stamps at an 
extremely low price, stating that it is able 
to compete with those now in use, notwith- 
standing the incontestable artistic superio- 
rity of some of his designs. 

SG9. Restelli Angelo, engraver, 20, 
via di Fo, Turin, 

Frame containing stamps. 
Frame containing seals. 
Frame containing stamps printed in co- 
lours. 



8G9. Ricco Felice, Modem. 

Atlas of 72 specunens of nature printing 
on different metals. 

The process of Nature printing, improv- 
ed by the exhibitor, has been many years 
before the public. It consists simply in plac- 
ing the substance which it is desidered to 
copy between two sheets of metal, and then 
subjecting them to pressure between rol- 
lers. It will be observed by inspection of 
the album that the exhibitor has succeeded 
admirably in copying objects presenting an 
almost flat surface, such as drawings, crys- 
tallizations, leaves, cloth, ribbands, etc. 

M. Auer, of Vienna, some years ago 
found out a process for printing on sheets 
of lead, but was obliged to recur to electro- 
types in order to obtain many copies. By 
Ricc5's method, on the other hand, the im- 
pressions are taken directly from the plate 
itself, either with ink or colourr : the metal 
surface bemg still clear and accurate after 
having printed several thousand cojaes. 

8G9. Serra Ghey. Bartolomeo, Turin. 

Programme of the professional and in- 
dustrial instruction adopted in the teck- 
nological and special schools dependent 
on the Mmistry of Agriculture, Industry 
and Commerce. 

890. Lancia Federico, Duke of Bro- 
lo, Palermo. 

Publication of the exhibitor: — 

Statistics of the Communal Schools in 
Palermo in 1854. 

Statistics of the Public Instruction in 
Palermo in 1859. 

Statistics of the Deaf and Dumb in Si- 
cily, 1863. 

Statistics of the Communal Schools in 
Palermo, 1863. 

Statistics of the Infant Asylum in Pa* 
lermo in 1862. 

Sfi. Rolla Lnigi, Turin. 

Statistical military diagram of Central 
Europe and other specimens of autography. 



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SECTION XVIII. 

W0?eB, spoB, and h\i fabrics » shtwn as specineBS 
of PriBling or Dyeiig. 



Number of ExhUntors 3. 

Of these 3 obtained j^ize meddla at the Italian EaMntion in 1861, and 2 at the Inter" 
national Exhibition in 1862. 



Sifft. Bmni Francesco, dyers, 4229, 
via di PugabeHa, Milan, 

Organzine and trame dyed various kinds 
of black. 

* Florence, 1861 ; i London, 1862. 

S9f6. FoleitI, Weift and Co., dyers, 
8, via 8. Nazearo oMa Pietramnta, MHan. 

Cotton vater yam, dyed Turkey red. 

* Florence, 1861; * London, 1862. 

S99f. Hath Pietro, silk dyer, Como. 
Silk dyed black. 

* Florence, 186! ; * London 1862. 
This manufactory, which dates from 1854, 

has been considerably enlarged and impro- 
ved, and all the machinery changed. At the 
present time there is a boiler of 25 horse- 
power made expressely, a steam piimp and 
two machines for lustering the silk, of 
which one is moved by power. 
The continualy increasingproduce, which 



may be taken on an average at 18 tom^ of 
black dyed silk annually, involves an ex- 
pense d 640 I paid in wages al^e to 25 
workmen. The exhibitor's untiring exer- 
tions with a view to improve this art and his 
constant application to this special branch 
of dyeing have been crowned with complete 
success, and he it was who first succeeded 
in finding a process for dyeing in black with 
increase in weight, so that now he obtains 
an increase of 50 per cent with once boiled 
and lustered silk and as much as 100 per 
cent on those twice boiled. 

Besides this improvement may be men- 
tioned the brilliancy of the colour , the 
permanency of the lustre of the stuffs, and 
the excellence of the thread, points which 
attracted the attention of the Jury, both 
in the Italian Exhibition of 1861 , and the 
London International Exhibition of the fol- 
lowing year. 



* ii' ^rMi r o i ai i ' 



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SECTION xix: 

Tapestry, Includibg Carpels mi Floor Cloths, Lace and 
Embroidery, Fancy and Industrial works. 



Number of Exhibitors 7. 

Of these 1 obtained a prize medaH at the Italian Exhibition tn 1861 , 1 a medal and 1 
an honorable mention a^ the International Exhibition in 1862. 



,S^t. Ballauri Marina, born Casa- 
reggio, Savona (Genoa), 

Embroidered cambric handkerchief. 
Price ih 

SSS. Biella Antonio » manufacturer, 
i,viadei Bastrdli, MUan, 

Alto relievo embroidery in gold, on silk 
ground ; — 

An Infant — A candlestick. 

The exhibitor obtained medals from the 
Lombard institute of Science, Letters and 
Arts in 1857 and 1861, as well as from the 
Fine Arts Academy. 

594. Bnonini Marianna, Lucca. 

Pincushion, Scollop, Square piece, in 
imitation of ancient lace. 
* Florence, 1861. 

Lace made with a common needle; an 
art supposed to have been lost since the 
15th century: — 

Lace handkerchief. Price, % i6s. 
Lisertion lace, 1 Is. per yard. 
Specimens of Paris and Botella points, 

595. Fratti Rosina, Beggio (Emilia). 

Portfolio with embroidered designs, exe- 
cuted by a little girl of U years of asre 
Price, 12?. 

SSe. Fummo Maria, 178, strada To^ 
ledo^ Naples. 

Embroidered Cambric handkerchief, 
representing various Chinese costumes. 
— (Purchased by the Baroness de Rosa). I 
Embroidered handkerchief, representing | 



the four quarters of the world (purchased 
by sig. Raffaele de Martini). 

S99f. Leyera Brothers, manufactu- 
rers, via Fo, Turin. 

Fringes for furniture. 

S99. 4iartini Lnigi, late Ginaeppe, 
4014., via Speronari, MUan. 

Gold and silver silk broccadeand embroi- 
dery. 

♦ Florence, 1861; * London, 1862. 

Cases 5 and 9 contain broccades of fine 
gold aud silver: the subject of the two em- 
broidered pictures are the Last Supper and 
the Supper at Emmaus, both remarkable 
for their precision and the exquisite needle- 
work, as well as on account of the difficulty 
overcome in harmonizing the various tints 
of the silk with the chiaro-scuro gold and 
silver, so as to produce proper gradation of 
colours. Cases 6 and 8 contam embroidery 
suited for Roman catholic churches, and two 
pictures of two doctors of the law in chiaro- 
scoro gold to imitate relievo. 

Case 7 contains two basso-relievos re- 
presenting a candlestick and various or- 
naments in gold in imitation of engraving, 
finally several costly priestly robes. 

y 

%%%. Tacchini Maria Teresa, Mo- 
dena. 

Cambric handkerchief embroidered with 
refe. 

t London, 1862. 



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SECTION XX. 
Articles of Clolbiog for imme^iale personal or Domestic Use. 



Number ofExMntors 7. 

Of l^e 5 obtained prize meddle at tfhe Italian Ea^nbition in i^Qi^ and 3 at the Inter- 
national Exhibition of 1862. 



SUA. Amaldi Giorgio, Mondovi-Breo 
(Coni). 

Patterns for tailors. 

* Florence, 1861. 

S90. Boss! Edoardo, glove manufac- 
turer, 179, strada Toledo, Naple^. 

Price 
per doMtt 

£ s. d, 

i. Sheep skin gloves. . . . 0. 8. 6 
2. Machine made Neapolitan 

lamh skin, ditto .' . . . 0. 12. 9 
3' Machine made Sicilian lamb 

skin, ditto 0. 15. 3 

4. Dou)ble buttoned, ditto . . 0. 19. 3 

5. Embroidered, ditto, ditto .1. 4. 

6. Machine made children's 

lamb skin, ditto . . . . 0. 10. 7 

7. Machine made embroidered 

ladies gauntlets . . . .1. 1. 10 

8. Stitched Sicilian lamb skin 

gloves 1. 0. 

9. Fancy, ditto, ditto. . . .1. 1. 9 

10. Embroidered, ditto, ditto .1. 6. 

11. Embroidered stitched Sici- 

lian lamb skm, ditto . . 1. 15. 2 

12. Machine made Sicilian kid 

gloves 1. 

13. Double buttoned, ditto . .1. 

14. Embroidered, ditto, ditto, 

with gauntlets .... 2. 

15. Stitched and embroidered 

Sicilian kid gloves . . . 1. 14. 

16. Stitched and embroidered 

dyed kid gloves . . . .1.14. 

17. Dyed lamb skin, ditto . . 0. 16. 
* Florence, 1861 ; t London, 1862. 



8. 
12. 



0. 



399. Conti Gesare, late M., straw 
plait manufacturer, S. Jacopino, Florence. 



Collection of Tuscan straw, straw ptait 
and other manufactures in straw. 

Pried 

€ s. d. 

1. 2. Straw hats ... at 0. 8. 

3. Ditto 0. 6. 4 

4. Ditto 0. 8. 

5. Ditto 0. 12. 

6. Ditto 0. H. 2 

7. Ditto 0. 8. 

8. 9. Ditto at 0. 9. 7 

10. Ditto 0. 8. 

11. Ditto 0. 9. 7 

12. Ditto 0. 4. 9 

13. Ditto 0. 6. 4 

14. Ditto 0. 12. 

15. Ditto 0. 8. 

16. 17. 18. Ditto. ... at 0. 9. 7 

19. 20. Ditto » 0. 6. 4 

21. 22. Ditto » 0. 8. 

23. Ditto 20. 0. 

24. Ditto 14. 8. 

25. Trimmings, pointe and pe- 

dak 24 pieces ... at 

26. Ditto, 24 pieces ...» 

27. Ditto, 6 pieces ...» 

28. Ditto, 9 pieces ...» 

29. Ditto, peddle 21 pieces » 

30. Ditto, 6 pieces . . . » 

31. Ditto, 6 pieces ...» 

32. Ditto, 6 pieces . . . » 

33. Trimmings embroidered 

with silk and straw, 6 

pieces » 0. 6. 4 

34. Fancy trimmings of diffe- 

rent patterns, 25 pieces » 0. 4. 9 

35. 1 dozen fine cord. Per dozerf 0. 19. 4 

36. 8 coloured cigar cases at 0. 4. 

37. Plain ditto 0. 9. 7 

38. Bundle of straw . . •. . 0. 4. 

* Florence, 1861 ; * London, 1862. 



0. 


8. 





0. 


9 


8 


0. 


16. 





0. 


3.. 


8 


0. 


4. 





0. 


8. 





0. 


4. 





0. 


12. 






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ARTICLES OF CLOTHING FOR IMMEDIATE PERSONAL OR DOMESTIC USE 



81 



999. Lurini Antonio, manu&cturer, 
Sienna. 
Felt hat made with hares' far. Price, Ss. 
Felt hat3 Is. Zd. 
* Florence, l861. 

This nianufactory was founded in 1820; 
about 3000 hats are turned out yearly, 
tliose exhibited being of average quality. 

SOU. Ponzone Antonio, manufacturer, 
via Santa Ma/rgherita, MUan. 

Stiff and flexible silk and felt hats. 
Military hat. 

A9B. Tavema Veronica, manufact- 
urer, Fiagza CJasUMo^ Turin. 

Priee 
per doMB 

£ 8, d. 
1. Ladies gloves with two but- 
tons 1. 4. 



2. Ladies cloves with bracelets 

(goatskin) 1 

3. Ladies gloves with two but- 

tons scolopped edges . . 

4. Ladies gloves with scolopped 

edges and elastic . . . 

^5. Ladies gloves with turned 

down scolopped edges . . 

6. Ladies gloves common . . 

7. Ladies gloves embroidered . 0, 

8. Gentlemen's gloves stitched 

backs 1. 

9. Genilemens gloves embroi- 

dered ....*... 0. 

10. Gentlemens gloves common 0. 

11. Common leather mittens . 0. 

12. Stitched leather mittens . 0. 
13-14-15. Leather mittens with 

buttons * 0. 



7. 2 

4. 

4. 

4. 
13. T 
16. 10 



6. 6 



19. 2 

15. 2 

11. 6 

12. 10 



14. 6 



40t. Pellerano GioTanni Battista, 

193, a CMaja. Naplei. 

Gloves. 



itK fiamf ** 



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SECTION XXL 
Cutlery aud Edge Tools. 



Number of Exhibitors 1. 

Frize medals at the Italian Exhibition of 1861 and the Intematumai ExMMon of 
1862. 



410. Sella Lndovlco and Brbthers, 

manufacturers, Masserano (Novara), 



Collection of cutlery: — 



Price 
£ S, d. 



1 . Three-bladed bleeding lancet 

with ivory handle for ve- 
terinary surgeons ... 0. 6. 

2. Three-bladed bleeding lan- 

cet with horn handle . .0. 4. 10 

3. Four-bladed bleeding lancet 

with ivory handle . . .0. 6. 10 

4. Four-bladed bleeding lancet 

with German silver handle 0. 5. 2 

5. Clasp-knife with ivory handle 

and German silver mount- 
ing 0. 2. 10 

6. Ditto, with horn handle and 

German silver mounting ,0. 2. 10 

7. Ditto, with three blades and 

tortoiseshell handle * .0. 3. 3 

8. Ditto, with single blade and 

tortoiseshell handle . .0. 1. 6 

9. Ditto, with single blade, saw, 

corkscrew and penknife, 
staghorn handle . . . .0. 6. 

10. Single-bladed buddmg, knife, 

handle mounted m German 
silver 0. 

1 1 . Three-bladedknife withivory 

handle 0. 

12. Four-bladedknife and cork- 

screw, with horn handle . 0, 

13. Clasp-knife, penknife, file 

for the nails, and hook for 
buttoning gloves; tortoise- 
sheU handle 0. 3. 3 

14. Clasp-knife and penknife: 

tortoiseshell handle. . . 0. 2. 5 

15. Three-bladedknife; German ^ 

alver handle 0. 3. 6 

16. Ditto, ivory handle . . . 0. 2. 9 



3. 6 

2. 10 

3. 3 



17. Clasp-knife, pei^cnife, cork- € s. rf. 

screw, and pricker to clean 

pipes 0. 2. 9 

18. Clasp-knife single blade : 

mother o'pearl handle . .0. 2. 

19. Three-bladed knife; ivory 

handle, mounted in Ger- 
man silver 0. 3. 3 

20. Single-bladed knife, with 

tortoiseshell handle. . .0. 1. 8 

21. Three-bladed knife; horn 

handle 0. 3. 3 

22. Clasp-knife, penknife, and 

corkscrew, with horn han- 
dle mounted in steel . .0. 3. 3 

23. Double-bladed penknife with 

ivory handle 0. 1. 3 

24. Ditto, with mother o'pearl 

handle 0. 0. 8 

25. Clasp-knife and penknife 

with ivory handle mounted 

in steel 0. 2. 3 

26. Single-bladed knife with 

horn handle, steel mount- 
ing 0. 1. 

27. Dentists pincers with three 

points, moveable in every 
direction 0. 7. 6 

28. Lancet with mother o'pearl 

handle ....... 0. 2. 

29. Scissors for flowers and trees, 

mother o'pearl handle , 
mounted in German silver, 
with every requisite for 
budding 0. 9. 9 

30. Double-bladed gardemng 

knife, with saw and ivory 

handle ....... 0. 4. 

31. Clasp-knife and penknives, 

with ivory handle, mount- 
ed in German silver . .0. 3. 3 



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CUTLERY AND EDGE TOOLS 



83 



32. Clasp-knife and penkinfe; £ s, d, 

German silver handle .0. 1. 8 

33. Single-bladed knife with tor- 

toiseshell and ivory handle, 
mounted in German silver 0. 3. 3 

34. Grafting knife with saw, and 

horn handle, mounted in 

steel 0. 5. 3 

35. Gardener's knife . . . , 0. ^. 3 

36. Kitchen knife, ebony handle 0. 3. 15 

37. Ditto, ditto 0. 2. 

38. Hunting knife, mother 

o'pearl, ivory and tortoise- 
shell handle, mounted in 
steel . 2. 8. 

39. Pair of ivory-handled razors 0. 9. 6 
4& Haior Df )ft feew j)»ttetti . . 0. 8. ^ 



6 
3 

10 



41. Seven-bladed knife for watch £ s. d. 

chain ornament .... 0. 4. 

42. Very small scissors for watch 

chain ornament . ... .0. 1 . 

43. Pair of ivory-handled razors 0. 11. 

44. Smaller pair of ivory-handled 

razors 0. 4. 

45. Stag-horn handle suitable for 

any blade ; invention of 
exhibitors ; accompanied 
by 5 blades m proof . . 0. H . 3 

46. Clasp-knife for personal de- 

fence, opening with a > 

catch; horn handle . . 1. 18. 6 

47. Saw for trees, with ebony 

handle, mounted hi steel. 0. 5. 8 
♦ f'lor^wje, 1861; * London, 1862. 



I »i *n/tarvA 4tf<4»^- 



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SECTION XXII. 
Iron and general Hardware. 



Number of EccMntars 6. 

Of these 1 obtamed an honorable mention at the International EocMntion of 1862. 



4tS. Abundo Gioyanni, SaHerno (Prin- 
cipato' Citeriore). 

Safety Lock. Price, 60L 

414. Bolzani Sayerio, manufacturer, 
28, Borgo di dttadeOa, MUm. 

Metallic wire gauze, 
i London, 1862. 

4ttt. Grazioli Fortnnato, 3, via dei 
Vetraschi, MUan, 

Improved bit for riding horses. 

419. Ottino Giacinto, manufeicturer. 
Piazza Ca/rignano, Turin, 

Zinc work: — 
Eoyal arms of Italy hammered in zinc. 
Price, Zl is. 
Ditto, ditto coloured and gilt; 61. 
Various ornamental objects in zinc. 
Ornamental zinc castings. 



419. Sajno Francesco, 3217, via dei 
Profumieri^ Milan, 

Improved coffee pot acting by steam 
pressure for coffee houses. Price, 72. 16^. 

Ditto for family use; IZ. iOs. 

Ditto ditto; IZ. 4s. 

CoM>er coffee pot coated with improved 
semimetallic enamel invented by exhibitor; 
il, i6s. 

The exhibitor obtained two medals for 
these inventions from the Royal Lombard 
Institute of Science, Letters^ and Arts. 

449. Salyi Pasquale (late Nicola), 
manufacturer, 8. Potito (PHndpato Ulte- 
riore\ and Teano {Terra di Laooro); Office 
in Naples, 25 and 26, Strada Ntma Ma- 
rina. 

Casting of agricultural implements. 
Plates for forming gun banrels. 



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SECTION XXIIL 

Works in Precious Hetals, and tbeir Imitation ; Jewellery 
and all Articles of Vertn and Lniury, not included in other classes. 



Numb9r of EaMntara 16. 

Of these 2 obtained medals at the Italian EaMntum in 1861. 



4^98. Bassi BenedBtto, Paustda (Ma- 
cerata). 

1. Baccanalian engraved on cornelian. 162. 

2. Flora, engraved on a pink stone; SI, 

♦Florence, 1861. 

494 Becncci Ginseppe, manufactu- 
rer, Florence, 

Statuettes and ornamental work in ser- 
pentine from Prato (Florence): 

Prlee 

£ s. 

1. Large oval tazza with handles 

supported on a column, from 

the antique ...... 32. 

2. Tazza with vine branches, small- 

er than the above . . . .15. 

3. Round tazza with bells . . .10. 

4. Pair of lions, from the antique 9. 

5. Wild boar, from an ancient ori- 

ginal in the Florence gallery 10. 

6. Wild boar, same as N. 5, small- 

ler size. . 8. 

7. Pair of dogs from an ancient 

original in the Florence gal- 
lery 10. 

8. FamesebuU 6. 10 

9. Lion, from the* antique ... 5. 

10. Large pair of lions, after Ca- 

nova 10. 

1 1 . The knife grinder, reduced from 

the statue in the Galleria de- 

gli Uffizi, at Florence . . .10. 

12. Pair of basins on pedistal, from 

the antique 30. 

13. Piranese tazza, supported on a 

column, from the antique. . 8. 

14. Venus, after Canova (this sta- 

tuette is in marble). ... 30. 



15. Infant, after Donatello (this sta- £ s. 

tuette is in marble . . . .12. 

16. Wild boar, same as N. 5, small- 

er size i. 

17. Tomb of Scipio, from the an- 

tique 10. 

18. Pair of dogs, from the antique, 

same as N. 7, smaller size . 3. 

19. Ditto 3. 

20. Ditto 3. 

21. Ditto 3. 

22. Pair of lions with ball, from the 

antique 2. 10 

23. Ditto 2. 10 

24. Ditto, smaller size . . . . 1. 10 

25. Ditto 1. 10 

26. Tazza with three swans on feet, 

from the antique 5. 

27. Pair of basins, from the^ anti- 

tique, same as N. 12, smaller 

size 15. 

28. Two pair of dogs, from the an- 

tique, same as N. 7 , smaller 

size, per pair 1. 

29. Three pair of lions with ball, 

same as N. 22, smaller size, 

per pair 0. 10 

30. Wild boar, same as N. 5, small- 

er size . . 1. 

31 . Oval tazza with serpent handles, 

supported on column, from the 
antique 25. 

32. Tazza with three curves , from 

the antique, existing in the 
Florence Gallery .... 0. 10 

33. Pair of oval tazze, from the an- 

tique 1. 10 

34. Oval tazza, with sboffe, from 

the antique 1. 10 

35. Pair of oval tazze, from the an- 

tique 0. 10 



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86 



SECTlOiN XXlll. 



36. Pair of vases, Mediceair form, 

with head, from the antique . 5. 

37. Tazza with three curves,, same 

as N. 32, smaller size . . . 0. 10 

38. Large bath, with head, from 

the antique 2. 10 

39. Ink stand, with dog . . . . 0. 10 

40. Round inkstand, from the an- 

tique 0. 10 

41. Eape of the Sabines, after Gian 

Bologna's group existing in 
the Loggia dei Lanzi , Flo- 
rence, on pedistal . . . .12. 
4 2: .The Centaur, from the group by 

Gian Bologna, on pedistal . 8. 

43. Small bath, Etruscan form. . 0. 10 

44. The Swiss Lion at Lucem, after 

Thorwaldsen 3. 10 

45. Pair of Piranese vases , with 

cover 2. 

46. Four pair of small tazze with 

lizards, after Benvenuto Cel- 

Mni ...... . each 0. 5 

47. Pair of small fluted tazze and a 

niochiellina 0. 10 

48. Three nicchiellinefrom the an- 

tique 0. 10 

49. Tj'hree lizards, from the antique 0. 10 

495. Billotti Dr. Pietro , 1 , 

vicoh del Gianduja^ Turin, 

Water colour miniature paint- 
ings executed en marble: — 

1. Mary Magdelene washing the 

feet of our Saviour, from the 
painting by Paolo Veronese . 40. 

2. Pietro Micca in the act of blow- 

ing up the citadel of Turin, at 
the period of the siege by the 
French, in 1 706, from the paint- 
ing by Gastaldi in the City gal- 
lery, Turin 12. 

3. Lucia, waiting for Renzo, sug- 

gested by Manzoni's novel of 

the Bromessi ^vosi .... 12. 

4. The family of Charles I, King 

of England, after Vandyke . 20. 

49G. Carletti Domenico, Florence 
Ebony casket^with carvings in pear wood. 

49Y. Gastaldi Vincenzo, manufactu- 
rer, H, $Prada Giganie^ Naples. 

Lava and coral work. Price II. each. 
Jupiter. 
Garibaldi. 
'' Baccanalian. 
Bacchus. 

499. Geriani and Brothers Barza- 
ghi, founders, 6, t»a dfXUk Moscova^ MUan, 



Bronzes cast by the process of cire 
perdue: — 
The Reading girl, reduced from Magmas 
statue; Not for sale. ^ 
Pailte. flfofli Prof. Vincenzo Vela's bust ; 

m. ' 

A hand with flowers, modelled from na- 
ture; 12L 

Engraved and ^t bronze oup and sau- 
cer; 60; ' 

The Exhibitors received a silver medal 
from the Lombard Institute of Science, Lit- 
terature and Arts in 1863, for having re- 
vived in Milan the art of casting by the 
process of cire pe/rdm. 

4^99. Ercolani Emilio, Florence. 

St-John after Donatello; repouss^ metal 
wwfe Price, 201 
* Florence, 1861. 

480. Giiida Leonardo, IVap^ni 
Cameos: — £ f. 

1. The Charriot of Alexander . . 9. 

2. Galileo 8. 

3. Pithagoras and Flavio Gioia, two 

cameos for earrings .... 2. 0^ 
Coral ornaments: 

4. Jupiter and Ganimede ... 5. 

5. Infant under a tree .... 3. 3 

48t« Jeans, John G., British Vice 
Consul, Catania. 

Amber necklace , consisting of 21 large 
flattened beads and 22 small ones. 

This ornament olfers considerable mlne- 
ralogical interest, the amber being found 
on the banks of tibte Simeto,, a tittle river 
watering the plain of Cataniik The speci- 
men shews various colours ei this rare 
substance; bright red, wine red, reddidi 
yellow, and blueish. It was manufactured 
at Catania, and is the property of the 
exhibitor. . 

48te. Landicina Giuseppe, 268, Bi- 
viera di Chiaja^ Naples. 

Collection of cameos on Indian shells : — 

£ f. 

1. Night and day 3. 

2. The virgin and child, after Carlo 

Dolce 4. 

3. Flora (original design) ... 2. 8 

4. Flora from the antique . . 2. 8 



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WORKS IN PRFCISIOUS METALS, AND THEiR IMITATION 



87 



5. Marriage of St. Catherine, after 

Correggio 

6. Bacchanalian (original design). 

7. Bacchanalian from a fresco 

found at Pompeii 

8. Peace. . . 

9. Bacchanalian 

10. Medusa . . 

11. Aurora . . 

12. Ceres . . . 



2. 
2. 
1. 12 



484. Martucci Gin&eppe, manufactu- 
rer, Strada CHgante, Naples, 

Arabesque Coral handle for a parasol, 
dagger, Imife, etc., 8 inches long, carved in 
reUef out of a single piece, with fruit, ani- 
mals, leaves, etc. Price, Izh 

485. Mnssolino Salvatore, 19, rtco 
Colonna a P&ntenuovOj Naples, 

Carved wooden vase, with figures, 81. 
Two vases^- 12?. 

48G. Stella GioYanni, 12, vico V 
Montecdlvario, Naples, 

Engravings on lava from Vesuvius, re- 
presenting: — 

£ s. 
The Famese bull ..... 6. 



The goat Amalthea from a Pom- 
peian fresco in the National Mu- 
seum 2. 8 

Head of Jupiter, crowned with 
laurels 2. 8 

Cftge of Cupi4s from a fresco in 
the National Museum . . . . 2. 8 

Medusa 3. 4 

Head of Jupiter Capitolinus . 2. 

48Y. Menici Angelo, Leghorn. 

Hammed plate of German silver, with 
open work and ornaments, including basso 
relievos of Dante and Ariosto, entirely 
beaten ou^ of a single plate of metal. 

489. Jodi Gasimiro, Beggio d^EmUia, 

Large eoUeetion of antiquities of various 
epochs: Eoman medals; has reliefiB; seals; 
lamps; bronze statuettes, etc. 

489. Tari Ginseppe, 21, Figtm^, 
Montecdlvario, Naples. 

Cameos: 
St Paul; 21 10s. 
St Peter; 2Z. 10s. 
Michel Angelo; 2/. 10s. 
Galileo; 2/. 10s. 



ie^)«^ 



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SECTION XXIV. 
Glass. 



Number of ExhibUors 1. 



440. Mirope, ^anesi anid Son, ma- 

factnrers, Pescia {Lucca), 

i. Covered glass vase and saucer in imi- 
tation chalcedony. 



2. Cap, same kind as aboye. . 

3. Blue glass cup and saucer. ' 

4. Imitations of antique vases in coloured 



5. Glass for the manu&cture of heads. 



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SECTION XXV. 
Ceramic manofactores, China, Porcelain, Earthenware, etc. 



Number of EccMbitars iB. > 

Of these 3 obtained prize medals at the Italian EaMdtion in 1861, and i at the Inter- 
natianai EaMntion in 1862. 



41419. Boni Andrea , manufacturer , 
8, fuori Porta Garibaldi, Milan. 

Terra cotta work: — 

1. Tombstone. 

2. Chimney piece. 

3. PedistaL 

4. Cornice. 

5. Satyr. 

6. Bacchanalian (atatue). 

7. Agriculture, ditto. 

8. Garibaldi (statuette). 

9. Italy (bust). 

10. Galileo, ditto. 

11. Volta, ditto. 

4148. Catania Snb-Committee for the 
Dublin International Exhibition. 

Six coloured figures, manufactured by 
Nunzio Giuf&ida and Angelo Leone at Ca- 
tania, and representing the costumes of 
the country. Price: larger size, 5^. each, 
small size Ss, each. 

♦ Florence, 1861. 

444. Ginelli Dr. Giuseppe, Certaldo 
(Florence), 

Basso relievo, imitation Luca della Bob- 
biaware. Price 12L 

The Exhibitor, a medical man in practice, 
never studied the Fine Arts, but takes much 
pleasure in making these imitations, which 
he sells at a very reasonable price. 

445. Colonneae Gaetano, manufactu- 
rer, 20, strada MarineOa, Naples. 

Enamelled tiles of various patterns for 
pavements. Price, from. 1?. 128. to il per 
1000. 



44G. Ginstiniani Angelo,. 20, sfroia 
CHgante^ Naples. 

Pottery vase, Caltagirone style, Price, 

Pottery vase, Abruzzo style; 8Z. 
Saucer representing Pompeian mosaic: 
21. 12«. ' 

449. Jodi Casimiro, Beggio ctEmtlia. 
Large collection of antiquities. 

449. Majnrino Vincenzo, 7, 8, 12, 
and 17, strada MarineUi, Naples. 

Earthenware seat, Egyptian style; 2L 

449. MoUica Giovanni, manufacturer, 
27, strada Santa Lucia a mare, Naples. 

1. Two imitation Abruzzo vases; SI. 

2. Two imitation Etruscan vases. 

3. Twenty Terra cotta figures from ori- 

ginals in the National Museum. 

4. Four imitation Etruscan vessels. 

5. Design painted on tiles, from Pompeian 

frescoes. 

450. Municipality of Cortona, A- 

rezgo. 

Two engravings of an Etruscan lamp. 

Engravings of two Etruscan statuettes. 

Photograph of theMuse PoUinia, a Greek 
painting executed on slate. 

— From the originals existing in the 
Etruscan Academy at Cortona. 

Lithograph of a Greco-Roman sarcopha- 
gus: now placed in]the cathedral of Cortona. 
— Notforsak. 

45 1 . Olivier Perri, manufacturer, 8a- 
vona (Genoa). 

Plaster of Paris pipes. 



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110 



SECTION XXV. 



45te. Pazzoni Gesare, manufacturer, 
Traoersetoh {Pcmna). 

Pavement in tilep of various colours. 

458. Pep! Bernardino, Sienna. 

Table top in terra cotta, j^^d anc^ 
painl^d in the style of the xviith century. 
♦ Florence, 1861. 

454. Spreafico Brothers, late 6ia- 
como, manufacturers, 12, CordiusiOy Milan. 

21 Samples of decoration on Italian earth- 
enware. 

455. Vaccaro BongiOYanni, (Mtor 
girqn^ {(Jatania). 

Terra cotta figures. 

45G. Richard Ginlio and Co., manu- 
facturers, /Sf. Cristoforo^ MHan. 
Specimens of decorated porcelain. 



1. Large Stoneware vase, with serpent 

handle; metallic glaze. 

2. Ditto, ditto. 

3. 4. Garden vase and saucer. 
5. Vase; goat's head pattern. 

Q. Cfup i,i^ saucer richly ornamented; si- 
mkr to a set made for H. M. Maria 
Pia, queen of Portugal. 

7 to 24. Different patterns of cups; half 
de(OoratioD. 

25. Plate, Martinet and wild rose. 

26. Plate, with grapes. 

27 to 30. Richly ornamented porcelain 

plates. 
31 to 43. Common plates, fillet borders. 

44. Two transparonei^. 

45. Eidit Stoiieware plates, deeoirat^ m 

cnromo-Kthography. 
* Florence, 1861 ; » London, 1862. 

NP, The obJecU of tbU Exhibitor arri? ed after 
the Jurors had concluded thoir wor^. 



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Hi 

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SECTION XXVL 



Pe^tticWf Paroitare, and Upbol^^tery, Inclndjog Paper 
Pi^r Ibdie^ mi JFapaaMHl gaoib. 



Number of Eix^^tors 19. 

Of l^e 1 received aprige medal ait the Pc^ris Universal EaMntion m 1855, i at Ihe 
Itdliem EochiMthn in 1861, and 4 at the IntematHmal Exihibition in 186^. 



4&9. Qazzanti Pietro and son, ma- 
ira&cturers, Florence. 

Mosaic Pietre dure tftWe, with rococo 
border, representing fruit and shells; in 
the oeatre the Adrian tazza with four 
dores; on |iUald and giH legs. Price, 3202. 

4CO. Calvi Antonio, manufacturer, 
39, Cereoy Vittorio Emamide, MUan, 

C^urved wood and ornamental coraposi- 
tioa firapes. 

S^ps of carved wood and .composition 
for maldng frames, colored so as to re- 
semble gold by a process invented by the 
exhflyitor. 

. 461. Cantieri Francesco and Virgi- 
lio, manufacturers, Xwcca. 

Lady's work-table, inlaid with ivory, mo- 
ther o'ipearl and metal. 

4419. DeM^lzi Giaointo, ChmvarHQe" 
noa). 

Chiavari Chairs. 

498. Fontana Domenico^ cabinet ma- 
ker, 9, Borgo di Porta VenegMy Milan. 

Ebony cabinet, inlaid with ivory, with a 
copy of the Dance of Cupids, after Albani; 

4G4. Frnllini Lnigi, Sculptor in wood, 
Florence. 

Carved walnut wood chest, ornamented 
with infants and group representing a boar 
hunt einquecento style (original design). 
Price, 24?. ' ^ '^ 

Two omamental gilt consoles, modern 
style (original design). Price, each SI. 



. 405. Qajano Egisto, Florence. 

Sculptured walnut wood frame, Floren- 
tine, einquecento style. Price, 691. 

4CiG, Garginlo AlmencQi Sorrenta 
(Naples). 

£ 

1. Inlaid mosaic table in wood . . 40 

2. Inlaid book shelves ..... 10 

3. Inlaid mosaic box 10 

4. Inlaid and ornamented box. . . 10 

5. Four sn^all inlaid boxes .... 4 

* London, 1862. 

4G9. datti GioTanni Battiaia, Eome. 

1. !&ilaid ebony cabinet: styl^of the 15di 

century, with arabesques en^aved on 
ivoryr200Z. 

2. Inlaid ebony table top with arabesques 
^ and medallions engraved on ivory. 

3. Carved ebony frame; 16?. 

. ♦ FlOTonce, 186l; * Londpn 1^2. 

4G9. Lancetti Federi^O, cabinet ma- 
nufacturer, Perugia {Unibria). 

Ebony table top, inlaid with various 
kinds of woods , mother o'pearl, ivorj^ , 
and metal. — Style of the xvth century. 

* Florence, 1861; * London, 1862. ' 

Hanufacto^ established la 1845, em- 
ploying about 20 workmen, besides the 
inlayer and upholsterer, who work out of 
doors. 

4IIO. Lerera Brothers, manufacturers, 
via TwinQ, J}urin. 
Carved walnut wood fomiture : — 



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92 



SKOTIOM XlVi, 



1. Expanding solid walnut wood dining ta- 

leb for 35 persons, with richly carved 
foot and improved arrangement for 
drawing in and out. 

2. Carved walnut wood chandelier for 40 

Ughts. 

3. Kichly carved walnut wood sideboard, 

witiibas reliefs represenling, hunting 
trophies, and mirrors in the panels. 

4. Gilt chair, covered with silk. 

5. Carved walnut wood chair, with ebony 

ground, and covered with silk. 

6. Carved walnut wood sofa, with ebony 

ground, and covered with silk. 

7. Richly ornamented entrance door com- 

plete; with plate glass centre panel, 
and side panels carved in has relief. — 
Exhibited as a specimen of architectu- 
ral decoration. 
* Paris, 4855; * Florence, 1861; 
* London, 1862. 
The Exhibitors set up in Turin on a 
very small scale in 1859, and by their 
energy and economy acquired sufficient ca- 
pital to extend their operations, until they 
have founded an establishment unequalled 
in Italy by anything of the kind in point 
of size and efficiency. They already com- 
peted at the Piedmontese Exhibition, held 
in Turin in 1854, and in 1861 they made 
a most brilliant display at Florence , from 
whence many articles were sent to the In- 
ternational Exhibition of the following year, 
and on all these occasions they obtained 
prize medals. The principal piece of fur- 
niture sent to London was a grand book- 
case, unfortunately destroyed by a fire 
which took place in the manufactory in 
1863. Nine of Messrs Levera's workmen 
received prizeii at the Florence Exhibition, 
finally this house obtained the gold medal 
instituted by Chev. Genero, to be awarded 
to such persons as should have made most 
improvements in their establishments dur- 
ing the two preceding years by enlarging 
the field of their exertions and introducing 
more economical processes of mitnufacture. 
On all these occasions Messrs Levera 
were highly commended for the good exe- 
cution, accurate design, taste, and elegance 
of their furniture. They have sent some 
articles to Dublin which will undoubtedly 
contribute to uphold the credit of Italy as 
well as of Turin. 



The manufactory is situated in the quar- 
ter of Yanchiglia, and consists of a large 
block of buildings and yards. In which are 
carried on aU the varied branches of their 
industry, which besides embracing every 
kind of furniture and fringes and tassels, 
contains a model room and foundry for 
making ornamental bronzes, such as lamps, 
candlesticks, chimney ornaments, etc., like 
those of Paris. The works are provided 
with a steam engine, setting in motion the 
machinery for cutting veneer, sawing, plan- 
ing, moulding, etc., and a school of design 
is attached to the workshops, in which the 
carvers copy casts of classical subjects, so 
as to facilitate them in producing objects 
in harmony with the rules of art. 

One of the brothers superintends the ma- 
nufactory, another undertakes the charge 
of the machinery and the buildings them- 
selves, while the third attends to the deco- 
ration and out-door business. Messrs Le- 
vera are provided with the following master 
workmen : inlayers in wood, carvers, mo- 
dellers, brassfounders, engravers in metal, 
blacksmiths, tur;iers in iron, brass and 
wood, gilders in wood and bronze, uphol- 
sterers, decorators, painters, paper hang- 
ers, etc. In ordinary times 380 men, women, 
and children are employed on the premises, 
besides the clerk, warehouseman and ma- 
nagers. The value- of the materials em- 
ployed is stated by the exhibitors to be 
3O,0O0Z. per annum, which after having 
been worked up into furniture represents 
a value of no less than 120,000Z. It is now 
proposed to add fresh machinery to that 
already existing, in order to be better able 
to execute all the fresh orders coming in. 

The principal sale is in Central Italy in 
the provinces stretching along the Adriatic 
coast of the Appennines, in Turin, and the 
Italian Settlements at Cairo, Alexandria > 
Tripoli, Tunis, Montevideo, etc. Since the 
capital has been transferred the exhibitors, 
have opened an extensive shop in Florence, 
still, however, keeping up that at Turin , 
indeed this change has been a great spur 
to them bringing in constant orders from 
a fresh part of the country. 



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DECORATION, FURNITURE, AND UPHDLSTERY, INCLUDING PAPER 



9S 



490. Luraschi Antonio, manufactu- 
rer, 40 , Borgo di Porta Bomana, MUan. 

State billiard table, in ebony, inlaid with 
rosewood and ornamented witn brass. Mar- 
king board and sticks , complete , 120L 
The legs are provided with screws for 
levelling it without taking it to pieces. 

* Florence 1861. 

^91. Monteneri Alessandro, Perugia 
( Umbria), 

12 pieces of wood, 9 of which in mosaic, 
the other 3 inlaid, intended to form part 
of a piece of furniture representing the 
principal monuments of Italy, with ancient 
and modern emblems, to be entitled the 
« National triumphs ». 

3 statues representing Power, Justice, 
and Genius, crowned by Virtue, to form 
part of the same. 

^9te. 

Turin, 



Royal Italian Commission, 



The Ponte Nomentano, at Rome , me- 
dallion in mosaic, executed by Achille Te- 
sti of Rome. — Belonging to the Ministry 
of War. — Not for sale, 

498. Rovelli Carlo, manufacturer, 29, 
via dd Monte Napoleone, Milan, 



Blinds. 

Iron and wooden chairs. 
Flower stands. 
Bamboo and cane cages. 

494. SevesoVincenzo.mannfacturer, 

29, via S. Pietrfi alTOrto^ MUan, 
Ebony table inlaid with ivory. Price 40L 



EBONY TABLE WITH ARAHESQIES IN IVORY, BY SEVESO , MILAN. 



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%l 



SBCTIOI^ XXVI. 



Ebony cabinet inlaid with iyoiv^ v^e- 
senting Middle A«e cofituffies; im. Ss.. 

Box of Indian and otiMr iN>odB, tieUy 
carved and inla^ wHh (Mi^Ted ivory; SOI. 

Alftt. StikldrBartoloiiieo. manufactu- 
rer, 432« stfoda IbMi, Naples, 

Morocco writing and dressing case lined 
with velvet and silk. Price, 401. 

Case of petrified wood, ornamented with 
oxydized i^ver, with various divisioite: Cin- 
quecento style; 16!. 

41^G. TomagnUd BroUiBts , l^ro- 
santa {Lucca).^ 

Sienna marble table , with marbte ^oot. 
Marble table, made of misdhio M Le- 
vtmte, 

49 Y. Tonifii Giocendo and GH.^ ma- 

nafikcturers, Fhrence, 

iriM 

£ s. 
1. Flor^ice mosaic isMt wkh 

gilt foot 3M. » 



S. Mosaic table, mfeide of vaiidus 

IdadB of stones . v . . ai » 

3. Ditto, representing flowers | 

' ribbands and pearls ... 32. » 

4. Ditto, representing flowers ahd 

shells 20. » 

5. Malachite and gilt bronze vase 12. 10 

6. Box, same style 12. 10 

7. Vase, same style .... 4. » 

8. Ditto 4. » 

9. Box of hil^d wood, bronze and 

mosaic ; 14. )> 

10. 11. 11 Boxes of gilt brcrnze 

and mosaic, each. ... 8. ^ 

13. 14. Boxes same style, eacii . 10. » 

15. Ditto «. » 

16. B)x>nee Mid taiossie box . . 8. » 

17. Ditto ..»».... 10. » 

18. Id. Ditto, each ..... 3. » 
99. Ditto 3. 1?0 

21. Ditto Jk » 

22. 23. Ditto, each 3. 10 

24. 25. 26. Ditto, each ... 4. 10 

27. Gup, same style 4. ■ 

28. lidcBtand) m^ style . . v 8. i^ 



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SECTION XXVIII. 

Hanofaclores from Animal and Vegetable sobsUnces not beiDg woyen or felled, 
or incloded in other sections. 



Number of Exhibitors 2. 



490. Ambrogio Giuseppe, Brescia. 

1. Landscape carved in cork. 
% Hat and slipper made in cork. 

3. Specimen of cork pavement. 

4. Pendulum for a clock, in cork. 

491. Gapasso Prof. Gennaro, 33, via 
Madddlena ai TribunaH^ Naples, 



Straw mosaic work. Price, 682. 

This object which by turning a little 
mechanism alternately represents the Roy- 
al Palace fit Naples and the interior of a 
fencing room, received a medal from the 
Royal Institution for the encouragement 
of Arts and ManufACtures at Naples. 



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SECTION XXX. 



FINE ARTS 



Number of Ecchibitors y 101. 

A. OH paintinga^ 40. 

B. Water cohur painHngs , 7. 

C. Engravings y 3. 

D. Photographs J 7 ; of these 2 received prizes medals at the Italian ExMbitiori in 1861 , 

and 1 an honorable mention at the internoHondl EaMntion in 1862. 
£. Sculpture, 40. 



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SECTION XXX. A 
Oil paintings. 



Ashton Luigi. 

Landscape painter^ 6, piazza Borromeo, Milan, 

Born at Milan in 1825; studied under Bisi. 

1. GRAOTTE QUARRIES AND STRUNA CANAL, NEAR BAVENO, ON 

THE LAGO-MAGGIORE 48 Z. 

2. ISOLA BELLA, TAKEN FROM STRESA, BORROMEAN ISLANDS, 

ON THE LAGO-MAGGIORE 32 L 

3. VALLE MAGIA {Canton of Tessin), SWITZERLAND 34 Z. 

4. ISOLA DEI PESCATORI, TAKEN FROM ISOLA BELLA, BORRO- 

MEAN ISLANDS 20 1. 

Beccaria Chev. Cesare. 

Turin. 

5. HAY MAKING IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD OF TURIN. Exhibited by 

the City Fine Arts Gallery, Turin (*). 

Bianchi Mois^. 

Strada San Girolamo , Milan. 

Bom at Monza in 1840. 

6. CHURCH OF S. GIOVANNI, AT MONZA 240 L 



(*) The City Fine Arts Gallery, a new Museum, already possesses some aucient paintiDgs of 
merit, among wtiicb may be mentioned one by Jan Victoors, entitled Eliezar presenting the 
gifts of Isaac to Kebecca. This Museum is specially intended for the reception of paintings of 
living Italian artists, and although only opened in June 1865, under the most modest auspices, 
it contains several valuable modern paintings, among which may be mentioned, Pietro Micca, by 
Gastaldi; A landscape, by Perolti; Interiors by Marchesi ; all obtained from the International 
Exhibition in 4862; Dlisses and Nausicaa by Massimo d'Azeglio; The Parisienne, by Giuliano; 
Female heads by Zona and Mussina, etc. ; which serve as copies for young artists. The imme- 
diate direction of this Gallery, in which are also preserved numerous antiquities dug up in the 
Deighbourhood of Turin, and other objects which awaken interesnt and cultivate the minds of 
Ibe people, is in the hands of Aw. Pio Agodino, municipal assessor; the choice of the objecls 
is made by a Jury annually nominated by the Committee. 



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100 S|:cTiois XXX. a) 



Biscarra Chev. Carlo Felice. 

Secretary of the Royal Mbertine Fine Arts Academy^ Twin, 
2, via delVAccademia Atberlina^ Turin. 

Born at Turin in 1823. 

7. OTHELLO AND DESDEMONA 40 I. 

Othello, — « I have a salt and sorry rheum ofifends me. 

Lencl me thy handkerchief ». 
Des, — « Here, my Lord ». 

Othello, Act. HI, Scene IV. 

Bisi Chev. Michele. 

Professor of Petspective, 2 ^ via de' Bossi ^ Vilan. 

Born at Milan in 181 i. 

8. INTERIOR OF THE CHURCH OF BROU , NEAR BOURG (Am) 

FRANCE . . . ' 20 L 

Borgia Cumbo Chev. iBttore. 

Messina. 

9. LANDSCAPE IN THE CAMPAGNA ROMANA. 

Capocci Euriso. 

5, vico Sjiczznno , Maples. 

Born at Naples in 1832. 

10. HAMILCAR MAKING HANNIBAL SWEAR PERPETUAL HATE TO 

THE ROMANS 30 I. 

a Pater, inquit, meus Amilcar, puerulo me , utpote non amplius novem annos 
nato, in Hispaniam imperator proficiscens Carthagine, Jovi optimo ma- 
ximo hostias immolavit. Quee divina res dum conficiebatur , qusesivit a me 
vellemne secum in castris profuisci. Id cum libenter accepissem, atque ab 
eo petere coepissem ne dubitaret ducere; turn ille: faciam, inquit, si fidem 
mihi quam postulo dederis. Sjmul me ad aram adduxit, apud quam sacrifi- 
care institueret, eamque ceteris remotis, tenentem jurare jussit nunquam 
me in amicitia cum Romanis fore ». Cornelh Nepotis Annibal. 

Camino Chev. Giuseppe. 

lurin. 

11. THE LAKE OF CANDIA, NEAR lYREA (Turin). Belonging to the Ministry of 

Public Works. (Exhibited by the Royal Italian Commission). 

Carignano Scipione. 

Turin. 

12. LANDSCAPE NEAR OLIVETO IN TUSCANY. Belonging to the Ministry of 

Foreign Affairs. (Exhibited by the Royal Italian Commission). 



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OIL PAINTINGS 101 

Castoldi Guglielmo. 

10, via degJi Andegnrf ^ Mian. 

Bom at Milan in 1823; studied under Induno. 

i3. AN EPISODE IN THE ITALIAN WAR IN 1859, AT PALESTRO. Belonging 
to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. (Exhibited by the Royal Italian Commission). 

Chierici Alfonso. 

Prof, ofpn'nling R^mr. 

Bom at Reggio d'Emilia in 181G. 

15. A STORM 20 Z. 

16. A CAPPUCINE FRIAR AT THE CONVENT 20 L 

17. THF MONK'S FIRE PLACE 20 l. 

Chierici Oaetano, 

Beggio in the Emilia. 
Bomj^t Reggio d'Emilia in 1838, 

18. BATHER 24 I 

19. INTERIOR OF A KITCHEN . 32 L 

Corsi di Bosnasco Count Giacinto. 

35, rio Po , Turin. 

Bom at Turin 

20. THE FIRST FOG. — (Exhibited by the proprietor, Baron Weil Weiss). 

« Spuntava il di si limpido e sereno 
Che parea proprio che ridesse il Cielo; 
Quando un'invida nebbia il sito ameno 
E il bosco avTolse nel sottil suo velo, 
Pari al dolor che le gioie appanna 
Sul mattin della vita e il cuor affanna ». 

Cortese Feclerico. 

National Maseum. Naples. 
Bom at Naples in 1829. 

21. THE AQUEDUCT OF CLAUDIUS, OUTSmE THE GATE OF St. JOHN 

AT ROME 52 I 

Gamba Baron Francesco. 

7, Piazza ViUorio Emanuele^ Turin. . 
Born at Turin. 

22. RISING TIDE AT SCHEVENINGEN , NEAR THE HAGUE, ON THE DUTCH 

COAST. Belonging to the Ministry of Agriculture, Industry and Commerce. — 
(Exhibited by the Royal Italian Commission). 



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402 SECTION XXX. a) 



Oasser Leonardo. 

Florence, 

23. THE BELLE OF CINO OF PISTOJA. Belonging to the Ministry of the Interior. 

— (Exhibited by the Roya] Italian Commission). 

Gastaldi Chev. Andrea. 

Professor of painting. Turin. 

24. ATALA. — (Exhibited by, and belonging to the City Fine Arts gallery, Turin. 

« Le religieux ne cessa de prier toute la nuit. J'etais assis en silence au chevet du 
lit fun^bre de mon Atala. Que de fois durant son sommeil j'avais supports sur 
mes genoux cette tete charmante! Que de fois je m'^tais pench6 sur elle, pour 
entendre et pour respirer son souffle ! Mais k present aucun bruit ne sortait de 
ce sein immobile, et c'etait en vain que j'attendais le r6veil de la beaut6! 

« La lune preta son p41e flambeau k cette veiUee funebre. Elle se leva au milieu de 
la nuit, comme une blanche vestale qui vient pleurer sur le cercueil d'une com- 
pagne. Bientdt elle r^pandit dans ces hois ce grand secret de m^lancolie, qu'elle 
aime a raconter aux vieux chenes et aux rivages antiques jdes mers. De temps 
en temps le religieux plongeait un rameau fleuri dans une eau consacr^e: 
puis, secouant la branche humide, il parfumait la nuit des beaumes du cieL 
tarfois il r^petait sur un air antique quelques vers d'un vieux poete, nomm6 
Job; il disait: « J'ai passe comme une fleur, j'ai s^che comme Therbe des 
champs. Pourquoi la lumi^re a-t-elle 6t6 donn6e k un miserable, et la vie k 
ceux qui sont dans I'amertume du cceur? » Chateaubriand. 

Gelati Lorenzo. 

Florence. 

Bom at Florence in 1824. 

25. PANORAMIC VIEW OF FLORENCE . 20 Z. 

26. CHURCH OF S. MINIATO NEAR FLORENCE 20 Z. 

Genovese Raffaele. 

Palermo. 

27. HEAD OF AN OLD WOMAN IN VENETLIN COSTUME 12 1. 

Giani Giuseppe. 

8 , via delV Accademia Alberlina , Turin, 

Born at Cerano (Otymo) in 1829. 

28. CRAZY LINDA OF CHAMOUNIX .* . 4-0 

« No, non h ver, mentirono, 

« Tradir tu non mi puoi, 

« E solo p6r me palpita 

« Fedele il tuo bel cuor ». — Donizz£TTI» 



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OIL PAINTINGS 103 



GJuliMio BarloImliM. 

Profetior of painting at the Royal Aceademy of Fine Arts , Milan, 
Born at Susa {Turin) in 1825. 

29. FAUST AND MARGARET. Belonj^ing to the Ministry of A^culture, Industry 

and Commerce. — (Exhibited by the Royal Italian Commission). 

« Yago fior, che 1 volgo chiama 
fl MiAo onaeata d'«nor, 
■ Dimmi tu se m'odia o m'ama 
« Ei che solo h scritto in cor ». 

G<niiii Chev. G11U41. 

' Turin, 

30. THE SECRET DOOR. The property of the Marquis Giuseppe Arconati Vis- 

eonti, Turin. 

44, Piazza Fitt^rio Emanuele, Turin,. 
Bom at Turin. 

31. THE TRAIN OF BACCHUS J 240 i. 

fUndf^oek, Barah Butler. 

Pita^ 

Bom at Dublin. 

32. THE GARIBALDINA OF MILAZZO. 

33. MARY MAGDALEN AT THE SEPULOHRE. 

Induno Chev. Girolamo. 

Historical painter^ 26, Corso yiiiorio Emanuele, Milan, 
Bom at Milan in 1827. 

34. THE GARIBALDIAN SENTINili (Q^RIMBAK WAR). Belonging to the Ministry 

of the Interior. — (ExhiWted by the Royal Italian Commission). 

Lanza Giordano Giovanni. 

Royal National Museum^ Naples, 

Bora 9A V^^B ia 1807. 

35. THE MONUMENT OF KING LADISLAS IN THE CHURCH OF 

S. GIOVANNI A CARBONARA AT NAPLES AO I, 

Bliola Camillo. 

Bom at Naples in 1833 

37. PLAUTUS AS A MILLER, READING ONE OF HIS COMEDIES.— (Exhibited 
by the City and Corporation of Naples). 



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104 SECTION XXX. a) 

Pasiai Okev. Alberto. 

Landscape painter, Rue de Douai, ae, Parit, 

Bom at Busseto (Parma), 

37. HAWKING IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD OF LAKE URUMIAH , ARMENIA. 

Belonging to the Ministry of Agriculture, Industry and Commerce. — (Exhibited 
by the Royal Italian Commission). 

Pastoris di Oasalrosso Count Federigo. 

9, PiaTza Carlo Emanuele II, Turin. 

Bom at Asti. 

38. RUSTIC LIFE IN PIEDMONT 40 f 

Perotti Edoardo. 

Piazza Madama Cristina, TVrfn. 
Bom at Turin. 

39. LANDSCAPE SCENERY IN THE HILLS OF TURIN ...... 40 I. 

Prampolini Alessandro. 

Prof, of painting at Reggio in the Emilia, 

Bom at Reggio in the Emilia in 19S7; died in 1865. 

40. RUINS OF THE ROMAN ACQUEDUCTIN THE VALLEY OF TI- 

VOLI, NEAR ROME 80 Z. 

41. CASCADE AT THE 6R0TTA OF NEPTUNE, TIVOLI 14 I. 

42. ENTRANCE TO THE VILLA D'ESTE, TIVOLI 14 I 

Raimondi Ludovico. 

Turin. 
Bom at Turin. 

43. THE CLOISTERS OF S. MARIA NOVELLA, AT FLORENCE. . . 20 I. 

Russo Domenico. 

National Museum, Naples 

Bom at Naples in 1831. 

44. GARIBALDI IN ROME 400 Z. 

Stark William. 

Florence. 

45. VENUS APPROACHING THE CITY OF TROY 700 1. 

Toma Gioachino. 

Bom at Naples in 1841. 

47. A RIGOROUS EXAMINATION: SCENE DURING THE INQUISITION. — 
(Exhibited by the City and Corporation of Naples). 



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OIL PAINTING 105 



Toro Luigi. 

22, ^ia Concezione a Toledo, ISaples. 

48. OUTPOST OF THE FIRST 200 GARIBALDIANS IN CALABRIA. . 120 I 

49. TWO GARIBALDIAN GUIDES IN CALABRIA. ........ 120 ?. 

Treftzini Angelo. 

Studied under Induno; 35, Piazza S, Giovanni in era^ Milan. 
Bom at Mflan in 1827. 

50. BATTLE OF S. FERMO, NEAR COMO, UNDER GARIBALDI, 29tli. MAY, 

1859. Belonging to tte Ministry of Public Works. — (Exhibited by the Royal 
Italian Commission). 

Alfand Vinbensd. 

3, Carrifra^rande 4i Capuana , Naples. 

Born at Naples in 1829. 
61, AFFLICTING NEWS \ . . 32 Z. 

The widow of Bechi, receiving from her brother the letter, medal and other 
obj€icts gent by her husband ia few hours before he was shot by the Russians 
in Poland. 

Del R<^ GiovHimi. 

249, Slrada Borgo di Loreto , Naples. 
Bom at Naples in 1829. 

52. FLOWERS AND TFJIRS . ; . . , . , v . ....... 160 I. 

PianeH Enrico. 

Palazzo Cellammare fi Chiaja , Naples. 

Bom at Palermo in 1821. 

53. CAPRI, FROM THE HEIGHTS OF BIASSA ;. . Ul 

54. VIEW, FROM LA CAVA Ul 



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SECTION XXX. B 
Water coloor and Goache paintings. 



Bisi Chev. Michele. 

3, via de^ Bom, Milan. 
Born at Genoa in 1790. 

55. STUDY 20 I. 

Bossoli Chev. Carlo. 

Turin. 

Bom at Lugano (Canton of Tessin), Switzerland. 

56. PAYING OUT THE SUBMARINE TELEGRAPHIC CABLE AT THE GULF 

OF SPEZIA, 24 JULY 1854 (Exhibited by the City Fine Arts Gallery, Turin). 

Guache. 

Celentano Bernardo. 

Bom at Naples in 1835, died in 

(Celentano Luigi exhibitor). 

81 , Strada Nuova Capodimonle , ISaples. 

U. TWO STUDIES OF FIGURES. (Water colours). 40 Z. 

Gatti Federico, and Dura Gaetano. 

18 and \9ySlrada Gigante^ Naples, 

Gatti, bom at Naples in 1815. — Dura, bom at Naples in 1812. 

58. THE PIAZZA DI PORTO AT NAPLES. (Water colours) ... 17 L 

59. RETURN OF THE MADONNA DELL'ARCO; NeapoUtan cos- 

tumes. (Water colours) 6 [. 

60. FOUR GROUPS OF NEAPOLITAN COSTUMES. (Water colours):(each) 2 L 8 ». 

Malfatti Passerini Emilia. 

Lucca. 

36. ADMISSION OF A BABY INTO THE INFANT ASYLUM. (Water 

colours . 16 Z. 

Rosati Panfilo. 

66, Strada Sette doloii^ Naples. 
Bora at Sora {Terra di Lavoro) in 1833 

62. ARCHITECTURAL FRAGMENTS AND MONUMENTS OF POMPEH. 

Water colours. 48 1. 

Stockdale William Colebrooke. 

Florence. 

46. THE ROMAN FORUM. — (Water colours) 100 ?. 



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SECTION XXX. C 
RngraYings. 



c 

Pisanti Francesco, 

i4y strada Mater dei ^ Naplet, 
Born at Naples in 1804. 



63. LEO X, after Baffael. 



Society for the Promotion of the Fine Arts. 

25, via delta Zecra{ Turin. 

64. Engravings from the Society 's Album : — 

a) De Breme Marquis Arborio Gattinara , President of the Albertine Aca- 

demy of Fine Arts, Turin ; 
FRONTISPIECE; from an original drawing. 
A QUIET HOUR; from a painting by count Corsi. 
THE FOUNTAIN; from an original drawing. 

b) GiUi A; 

PORTRAIT OF COUNT BENEVELLO, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE 

SOCIETY; from an original drawing. 
THE PRISONER OF CHILLON; from a painting by Gastaldi. 
WERTHER from a painting by Facconti. 

c) Lauro A ; 

THE TORRENT; from an original drawing. 

d) Fontanese Ghey, A. ; 

FISHING; from an original drawing. — Not for sale, 

« Dalla diuma sua carriera asceso 
fi al punto meridian Tastro del giomo; 
Non 6 Torecchio da romore oflfeso 
Cbe tace ogni opra di campagna intomo, 
Tranquillo un pescator presso alle sponde 
Attende alcuno abitator deU'onde ». 

Suppini Pietro. 

Bologna, 

65. SANTA CECILIA , after Raffael's painting in the gallery at Bologna. — Copper 

plate Engraving; bl ibs. 6d. 



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SECTION XXX. ft 
Pbolograpby. 



Cubblo {(Jm6ria). 

66. THE GUBBIO TABLES, DISCO VEREI> IN THE 15tk CENTURY, NEAE THE 

RUINS OF THE TEMPLE OF JUPITER APPENINUS, AT SCHEGGIA. 

67. THE HOUSE OF THE CONSULS AT GUBBIO, DESIGNED BY GATAPONE, 

IN THE XlVth. CENTURy. 

• « 

Chiappella Francesco ttaria (l^iQitograpIlier). 

9, f>la S. Massimo y Turin. 

68. THE NEW RAILWAY TERMINUS, TtIRIN.(geft sefction 7). 

69. TRIGONOMETRICAL NETWORK OF THE COMMUNE OF TURIN. 

70. PLAN OF THE CITY OF TURIN. , 

7i. TRIGONOMETRICAL NETWORK OF THE COMMUNE OF LANZO. 
From the ofiBcial plans. 

72. PLAN OF THE MONT CENIS TUNNEL (see section 7). 

73. APOLLO AND THE MUSES. 

From an engraving by Morghen. 

74. CHRIST IN TflE HOUSE OF SMON THE PHARISEE. 

From an engraving of Pado Vei^neseli paintiiig'. 

75. COUNTRY BALl! 

From an engraving. 

76. CHARGE OF ARTILLERY A^ yOLTA. 

Froni a pamting by 'Cerrttti in the City Fme Arts Gallery, Turin. 

77. THE MADONNA DELLA SCODELLA. 

After Coreggio, from an engraving. 

78. tM MADONNA OF TITIAN^ 

From an engraving. 

79. THE WIDOW AT THE TOMB OF HER HUSBAND. 

From an English engraving. 

80. THE MADONNA OF SAN SISTO. — Executed with the electric Ught. 

81. THE MADONNA D'ALBA. DHto. 

82. MAHOMET'S PARADISE. Photographed oh silk, 

The whole of these photographs were executed by the albumen process 
direct from the camera obscura, without enlargement. 



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PHOTOGRAPHS 109 



Longoni, Buroni, DelFAoqua (Photographers). 

88, via delta Pace, Milan. 

83. PRINCE HUMBERT, HEIR APPARENT. 

84. ALESSANDRO MANZONI. 

* Florence, 1861. (Enlarged photographs) 

Incorpora Giuseppe. 

Palermo. 

85. CARTE DE VISITE PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Roncalli count Antonio (Amatenr photographer). 

Bergamo. 

86. PHOTOGRAPHS OF MICROSCOPIC OBJECTS, EXECUTED FROM NATURE 

AND ENLARGED IN DIFFERENT PROPORTIONS. 

* Florence, 1861 ; i London, 1862. — Not touched. 

Sommer and BeUes (Photographers). 

Rome, and 4, slrada Pizzofalrone, , Naples. 

90. VIEWS OF ROME, NAPLES, MESSINA, etc. 

Tuminello Ludovico 

(of Rome). 

14, via S. Lazzaro^ Turin. 

110. THE CATHEDRAL OF COMO. 

111. THE CATHEDRAL OF MONZA. 

412. THE CHURCH OF THE GRAZIE, AT MILAN. 

113. THE VALENTINO PALACE, TURIN. 
- a) THE GRAN MADRE DI DIO AND THE STONE 

BRIDGE. 
) h) THE CAPPUCINE CONVENT AND THE IRON 

114. VIEWS OF TURIN { BRIDGE. 
I c) THE VALENTINO PALACE, FROM THE PO. 

d) THE VALENTINO PALACE, FROM THE PUBLIC 
GARDENS. 

115. THE CAPPUCINE CONVENT AND BORGO PO, TURIN. 

117. FACSIMILE OF A LETTER OF THE ROMAN SECRET POLICE, IN THE 
TRIAL OF FAUSTI AND VENANZI. (Negatives Executed directly on paper). 



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SECTION XXX. K 
Seiiiptiire. 



Albertoni Chev. Giovanni. 

Professor of sculpture ^ via della Zecca^ Turin. 

Bom at Yarallo. 
iil.JN^OCtSCK — MarhU statuette 60 i. 

Argenti Wotiii^. 

9, via di Chiovasso ^ Milan, 
Bpni at Viggift (C(mo) in 1819. 

118. EVE AFTER THE FALL. — Marble statue 180 I. 

119. THE SURPRIZED BATHERS. — Qroup 140 I. 

120. MEDITATION. — Bust 30 L 

121. CHILD ASLEEP. — 3farWe «taiicft 180 L 

« Dream on, dream on, sweet girl ». — Margaret Colson. 
(The last mentioned is exhibited by Domenico Morelli of Naples). 

Benzoni Giuseppe Daniele. 

10, Terraggio di Porta RomafULf MUan, 

Bom at Pongaxaszo (Bergamo) in 1827. 

122. THE INFANT SAVIOUR. — Mmble statue, . .* 60 I. 

Bernardi Bernardo. 

Bologna. 

123. GENIUS IN BAS-RELIEF, FOR A MONUMENT. — Scaglwla . . U I, 

124. BUST OF PIUS IX. (Executed by Petmcci of Rome) 80 L 

Bemasooni Pietro. 

Studied under Finctnzo FelOy 5, via Santa Agnese^ Milan, 
Bom at Morbio Superiore in 1826. 

125. THE WOMAN TAKEN IN ADULTERY. — iJforftZe sfa^wc . ... 180 L 

Biella Angelo. 

2 , via Santa Jgnese , Milan. 

Bom at Milan in 1829. 

126. THE SULKY CHILD. — Marble statue 60 /. 

127. BACCHANALIAN. — Marble bust 28 J. 



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SCULPTimB Hi 

Bottindii Antonio. 

44, Terraggio di Porta fercelUna, Milan, 
Born at Viggiii (Qomo) in 1827. 

128. THE SON OF THE PEOPLE. — MaMe statue . UO I. 

129. BEATRICE CENCI. — ^ar6ies«aiMe 60 Z. 

130. YOUNG BACCHANTE. — Marble bust 30 ?. 

131. LAURA. — itforWc 6t«« 25 L 

Bucciai OlmfriOk 

Naples. 

Born at Marcianisi (Terra cU Lavoro) in 1827. 

132. THE SULLAMTTE. — Piaster of Pen-is statuette. 

SpNQ OF Salomon, Chap. 6. — JNfat fof etHJt. 

Cocchi tmuf^m 

41, Piazza Sta Eufemitf Hilan. 
Born at "Vlggiu (Como) in 1815. 

133. READING. — Ma/rhle statuette 35 I. 

iZL OFBELIA. — MarhUhust 25 2. 

Colombo Ambrofio. 

42, via o^ Dazio di Porta Nttova,, Milan. 
Bom at Milan in 1821. 

135. SIMPLICITY. — Marble bust 30 /. 

136. YOUTH. — Ma/rble bust ' . . 20 J. 

Corbellini Quintilio. 

42, S. nto alPasquirolo, Milan. 
Born at Crema (MUan) in 1823. 

137. MODESTY. — Marble statue 120 7. 

138. DEVOTION. — Marble statue 25 ^ 

Corti Costantino. 

6, via S. Gerolamo y Milan. 
Born at Belluno (Milan) in 1824. 

139. MAZEPPA. — Marble group ICO /. 

Bal Negro Pietro. 

8, Ponte Nuovo S. Marco^ MUan. 
Bom at Verona (Venetia) in 1822. 

UO. ITALY. — Marble bust Ul 



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113 SECTION XXX. e) 

Delia Vedova Pietro. 

Turin, 

Bom at Rima in Valsesia (Turin) in 1831. 
Ui. CHRISTOPHIER COLUMBUS. — Colossal marble bust 100 L 

142. CHRIST IN THE GARDEN. ~ Plaster of Pa/ris status 120 2. 

Dini CheT. Giuseppe. 

23, Piazza yntorio Emanuele, Turin. 

Born at Novara in 1822. 

143. BARON PLANA. — Cohssdl marble bust 80 I. 

Fraccaroli Chev. Innocenzo. 

Profeesor of sculpture^ 8, rifl Montt hello ^ Milan. 

Born at Castelbrotto (Verona), Venetia, in 1809. 

144. ATALA AND CHACTAS. — ilfarftlegfrowp, 2i/c«t2r« 200 1. 

145. THE REDEEMER. — Colossal marble bust 80 i. 

146. THE Vmam MARY. — 3far6Ze6wsi 60 1. 

Galli Rizzardo. 

9 , via di Chiovasso , Milan. 
Born at Milan in 1839. 

147. THE BEGGARS. — MarbU group 1/3 size of life 200 I. 

Giani Vincenzo. 

\ , via Pescatori , Turin, 

Bom at Cerano (Novara) in 1831. 

148. CAVOUR. — MarbU bust , , 60 2. 

ii9. QAULEO, — Colossal marble bust 100 Z. 

La Barbera Rosolino. 

Palermo. 
\hO. DIOGENES. — Marble statue . 204 Z. 

Lazzarini Giuseppe. 

Carrara. 

151. THE TEACHER. — MarftZe^froMp 1000/. 

152. NYMPH GOING TO BATHE. — 3farWes*a<t«c 500?. 

153. VANITY. — Ditto 500 Z. 

— The property of Casentino Mariano, Lucca. 

Magni Pietro (*) 

Professor of sctdpturey 5, Piazza Covour^ Milan. 
Bom at Milan in 1816. 

154. DAVID. — MarbU statue 1000 I. 

(*) In the first edition of ttils catalogue an error occurred in stating the prices of this sculptor's 
>vork8. 



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SCULPTURE 113 



155. ART. — DiUo 1000 I 

156. THE READING GIRL. — Ditto {Not for sale) — 

157. THE CORPORAL'S FAMILY. — Group 500 L 

158. AN INFANT. — Margie s«a<w6 200 L 

159. SWINGING GIRL. — DiUo 1000 I 

159» HARMONY. — Di«o 400 1. 

1592 THE DANCE. — DiUo 400 L 

1593 CHILD PLAYING WITH A SPANIEL. — Ditto 400 I. 

159^ THE FIRST STEPS. — Statuette . .* 250 ?. 

Menconi Domenico. 

Florence, 

Born at Avenza (Massa Carrara) in 1821. 

1 60. FRANKLIN ASPIRING TO MORAL PERFECTION. - MarhU statuette 32 I 

Micotti Ignazio. 

8, via Montebello^ Milan. 
Born at Milan in 1821. 

161. THE GENIUS OF WAR. — Marble statuette 80 L 

Motelli Gaetano. 

8, via Montebello, Milan. 

Born at Milan in 1805. 

162. IMPRISONED CUPIDS. — Mixrhle group 60 I. 

PandiaAi Costantino. 

10, via delCOlmello Sanf^lessandro , Milan. 

Bom at Milan in 1837. 

163. THE VIRGIN CAMILLA. — itfarftZe 5«a<wc . ......... 3001. 

« Hoc super advenit Volsca de gente Camilla, 
Agmen agens equitum, et florentis sere catervas, 
Bellatrix: non ilia colo, colathisve Minerv® 
Femineas adsueta manus; sed prselia virgo 
Dura pati, cursuque pedum prsevertere ventos.^ 
Ilia vel intactse segetis per summa volaret 
Gramina, nee teneras cursu Isesisset aristas; 
Vel mare per medium, fluctij suspenssi tumenti, 
Ferret iter, celeris nee tingueret aequore plahtas. 
niam omnis tectis agrisque effusa juventus 
Turbaque miratur matrum; et prospectat euntem, 
Adtonitis inhians animis; ut regius ostro 
Velet honos levis numeros, ut fibula crinem 
Auro intemectat, Lyciam. ut gerat ipsa pharetram, 
Et pastoralem prgenxa cuspide myrtum •. 

ViHGiL, jSJn,, lib. VII, V. 803-817. 

Pereda Raimondo. 

5, Piazza Cavour Milan. 

Bom at Lugano {Canton of Tessin)^ Switzerland, in 1840. 

164. THE BETROTHED. - Marble bust 40 J. 



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114 SECTION XXX e) 

Pier^tti Giuseppe. 

21 , via Ifttntn, Milan, 

Born at Turin in 1829. 

16& BATHER. — Marble statue . . . . • 250 L 

Ricoa Prof. Pasquale. 

8^ rUiO dhrto S.ta Anna del Palazzo^ Naples. 

Born at Santa Maria Maggiore (Terra di La/oOro) in 1803. 

166. LOVE AND FOLLY. — Piaster group 68 Z. 

167. TIME AND PROGRESS. — Terra cotta ffrot^ 8 1. 

168. TWO ANGELS BEARING UP THE ARMS OF ST. FRANCIS. — Ditto 8 h 

169. PIER DELLE VIGNE. — DiUo 8 Z. 

Rigamonti Francesco. 

8, via MenMelld^ Milan. 

Born at Varese (Cbwo) in 1821. 

170. THE MISTRESS AND HER DOVE. — Statuette. 160 I. 

171. SHEPHERD'S BOY PLAYING UPON A REED. — iHUo .... 80 Z. 

172. THE GARDENER. — Bitto . . . . • 100 Z. 

173. THE SLAVE. — Ditto 40 J. 

Romatio f*rance6co. 

12, Fia al Dazht di Porta Pfuova, Jfffem. 
Bom at Milan in 1833. 

174. BATHER SURPRIZED. — Marble statue 80 Z. 

175. THE COQUETTE. — Marble bust • 36 Z, 

Somajni Giuseppe, 

^, Borgo Magmla^ Milan. 
Bon at Bi8S«e ((%Mi<(m 0^ r«am) SwiUedand, in 1^ 

iSLEGEBlA^-- Marble statuette 40 Z. 

182. TAMAR. — Marble bust 20 Z. 

Spartini Oiovamu, 

44, 0>Mo GariBatdi^ Milan, 
BomatPavia^ 1824. 

183. MATfiB SALVATORIS. — Ot^ nuirZ4e ineciaB^ 100 Z. 

Stella Oiovanni. 

12, vico 2<* Montecalvario ^ Naples. 

184. NARCISSUS LISTEMNG TO ECHO 32 Z. 

Copied fir#i» t^ ^Hrigioal found ait Pompeii in 1863L and now j^taced 
in the National Museum at Naples. — Modelled by the Exhibitor, 
and cast by Sabatini di AngeliB. 



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SCULPTURE 115 

Stmsli •i«¥mtiiii. 

Professor tf sculplvre^ 12 t^to Moscova, Milan. - 
BomstMikninlSl?. 

i85. ISHMAEL. - Statue 280 Z. 

186. COURA.GE. — Ditto 200 I. 

187. TAMAR. — Ditto 60 J. 

188. VEUiED VIRGIN. - Btist ^0 1. 

TantaitUiii Aotonio* 

8, via Montebdlo^ Ponte Nuovo^ MHiom. 
Born at Milan in 1829. 

189. STUDY. — MarhU statue 200 L 

190. DANTE'S BEATRICE. ^ Mmtm bui^ 32 L 

Uboldi Carlo. 

30, Borgo di Porta Romnna^ Milan. 

Bom at Milan in l82i. 

191. THE MUSICIAN. — itfflrWe «<(3t«we 62 1. 

V«Mlli Odrl^ 

6, via S, Gtrolamo, iStlah. 

Born ^ Ga^ggu^ {Omo) m 1837. 

192. BACCHANTE. — MarUe greup • • • • 1^0 ^ 

Vela Prof. Viacenzo. 

Professor of sctUptttre at ths Accadsmia ^^Iberiina di Belle Arii^ Turin, 

Bom at Lifometto {Canton of Tessin) Switzerland, 1829; 
first studied under X/acciatore. 

i9Z. SVBJNG. — Ma/rhk statue 180 L 

194. PRAYER. - Ma/rm statuette 160 L 

ZaBBoni Ugo. 

Af via dei Fiori oscuri^ Milan. 

Bom at Verona, Venetia in 1836. 

195. BATHER. — Marble statue .'...,,.....,... 80 I. 

Zocchi Emilio. 

Florence. 
Bom in 1835. 

196. MICHEL ANGELO WHEN A BOY, SCULPTURING THE HEAD OF 

FAUN, HIS FIRST WORK. — Mar6Ze5«a«we 320 «. 

197. FIDELITY ^ . . 120 ?, 



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♦ ^ 116 SECTION XXX. e) — SCULPTURE 

Boni Andrea. 

8, fnori Porta Garibaldi, Milan. 

Born at Gampione (Gamo) in 1816. 

Terra cotta works: — 

201. AN EAGLE KILLING AN ANTELOPE. — Ghroup 10 I- 

202. GENIUS OF ITALY. — Statue 8 1, 

203. ITALY. — DiUo 11 is. 

204. THE BEGGAR - DiUo 11 is, 

205. CHIMNEY PIECE BYZANTINE STYLE 105 I. 

206. MODEL OF CIANI PALACE AT MILAN 6 1. 

207. TERRA COTTA FRAMES, CONTAINING A COLLECTION OF PHO- 

TOGRAPHS OF THE EXHIBITOR'S WORKS 11 

Buzzi Giberto Luigi. 

20, via Moscova^ Milan. 
Born at Viggiti (Como) in 1839. 

208. RICHLY ORNAMENTED STONE SEAT 16 Z. 

209. TWO STONE CHAIRS each 6 1 

210. MARBLE BUST — 

Ottaiano Luigi. 

Hoyal ISational Museum , Naples. 

Bom at Naples in 1828. 

213. ELIEZAR AMD REBECCA. — Wood sculpture iOO L 

Carletti Domenico. 

Florence. 
Bom at Pienza {Sienna) in 1841. 

214. FILIAL PIETY. — Oval hasso relievo U. 12 «. 

215. PORTRAIT OF H. M. THE KING OF ITALY \6s. 

216. IVORY BASSO RELIEVO ON EBONY GROUND 16 «. 



FINIS 



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DUBLIN 

INTEENATIONAL EXHIBITION 



OP 



^rt0 anJr illanufactures, 

1865. 



ma>ER THE SPECIAL PATBONAGE OF 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE. 



PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



FOURTH EDITION 



DUBLIN: 

PRINTED FOR THE COMMITTEE, V,//- 

BY JOHN FALCONER, 53, UPPER SACKVILLE-ST. 

1865. 




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'^ 



Thb Department of Agricultural and Horticurtural Imptements anct 'Slmhmef 
(Section IX., pages 12, 13, 14) ib, hy the liberal permission of the Rojaf 
Dublin Society, exhibited in the Agrictdtural Hall and l^dbume Hall, in 
Eoldare-street; where also may be seen many contributions in other elasses^ 
for which space could not be provided in the Exhibition Falace. 

There is no diarge for admission to thiis portion of the Exhibition*^ 



An Exhibition of Friiits, Vegetables, &c., open to all the world, will take- 
place in the Palace on the 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th October next. For particulara, 
see page 34 of the Advertisements. 



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OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. 



■,M 






I. Exhibition Committee. 

The Lord Chancellor of Ireland 

The Duke of Leinster 

The Earl of Meath 

The Earl of Charlemont 

The Earl of Howth 

The Earl of Rosse, F.R.S. 

The Marquis of Drogheda 

The Earl of Clancarty 

The Earl of Lucan 

Field-Marshal Viscount Gougb 

Viscount Powersconrt 

Lord Talhot de Malahide, F.R.S. 

Lord Anally 

The Marquis of KiWare 

Sir Ro/hert Shaw, Bart. 

Gilbert Sanders, Esq., M.R.I.A. 

Francis W. Brady, Esq., Q.C., D.L. 

Sir Edward Grogan, Bart. 

Sir Percy Nugent, Bart. 

Sir J. J. Coghill, Bart ^ ^ ,, 

The Right Hon. John Barrington, Lord Mayor 

P. P. MacSwiney, Esq., Ex-Lord'Mayor 

Sir Thomas Deane 

Sir J. Bernard Burke 

Hon. Judge Berwick 

Hon. St. John Butler 

•Hon. J. P. Vereker 

The Right Hon. Alexander MacDonnell 

Major-General Colomb 

Right Hon. the Attorney-General, M.P. 

Right Hon. Mr. Justice O'Hagan 

J. E. Vernon, Esq., D.L 

B L. Guinness, Esq., D.L., M.P. 

Henry Andrews, Esq. 

William M'Kay, Esq. 

Catterson Smith, Esq., P.R.n.A. 

G. F. Mulvany, Esq. ^ ^ ^ 

Major-General Sir Thomas Larcom, K.C,Bw 

Sir Ralph Howard, Bart. 

Maurice Brooks, Esq. 

William Dargan, Esq., D.L. 

David Drummond, Esq. 

William Foot, Esq., J.P. 

John Fry, Esq. 

Sir Richard Griffith, Bart. 

Sir George F. J. Hodson, Bart, D.U 

Sir Robert Kane, F.R.S. 

William R. Le Fanu, Esq., C.E. 

J. Lentaigne, Esq., J.P. 

Thomas Pim, Esq. 

Willian: R. Stephens, Esq. 

John W. Switzer, Esq. 

Thomas Vance, Esq., J.P. 



HONOBA.RT MEMBESS. ^ 

Mens. Geo. Livio, French Consul 
Signor Aug. C. Marani, Italian Consul 
WiUiam Gardner, Esq. 
Hercules MacDonnell, Esq. 

Henbt Parkinson, Esq., A.B., Secretary 
to the ExhiMion Committee. 



^I. ExecutiTe Committee. 

Gilbert Sitoders, Esq., M.R.LA., ChairmmK 
Francis W. Brady, Esq., Q.C., D.L. 
Mauriee Brobks, Esq. 
William Dargan, Esq., D.L. 
David Drummond, Esq. ♦ 

WilUam Foot, Esq., J.P. 
John Fry, Esq, 
Sir Richard Griffith, Bart 
Sir George Hodson, Bart. 
Sir Robert Kane, F.R.S. 
William R. Le Fanu, Esq., C.E. 
J. Lentaigne, Esq., J.P. 
Thomas Pim, Esq. 
William R. Stephens, Esq. 
John W. Switzer, Esq. 
.Thomas Vance, Esq., J.P. 

HONORARY UEHBER& 

Mens. Geo. Livio, French Consul 
Sig. Aug. C. Harani, Italian Consul 
William Gaiidner, Esq. 
Hercules MacDonnell, Esq. 
William Malcomson, Esq. 
William Mulvany, Esq. 
S. Wilfred Haughton, Esq. 
Edward Fottrell, Esq., J.P. 
Henry Andrews, Esq. 
F. R. Trevor, Esq. 
Viscount Southwell 
William M'Kay, Esq. 
Sir J. Bernard Burke 
Colonel Buchanan, R.A. 

Charles E. BAgots, Esq., Seeretarjt t* 
tike Executive Committee. 

HI. Finance Committee. 

Edward Fottiell, Esq., J.P., Chairvicm 

His Grace the Duke of Leinster 

Benjamin Lee Guinness, Esq., D.L., M.P. 

Henry Andrews, Esq. 

Maurice Brooks, Esq. 

Alderman Campbell, J.P. 

Alexander James Ferrier, Esq. 

John Fry, Esq. 

WUliam Russell, Esq., J.P. 

Gilbert Sanders, Esq. 

J. W. Switzer, Esq. 

Thomas Vance, Esq., J.P. 

Hon. J. P. Vereker 

IV. Building Committee 

His Grace the Duke of Leinster 

Benjamin Lee Guinness, Esq., D.L., M.P. 

William Dargan, Esq., D.L. 

F. W. Brady, Esq., Q.C., D.L. 

Maurice Brooks, Esq. 

David Dnunmond, Esq. 

William Foot, Esq., J.P. 

Edward Fottrell, Esq., J.P. 

John Fry, Esq. 

Thomas M. Gresham, Esq. 

Gilbert Sanders, Esq. 

William R. Stephens, Esq. 

JohnW. Switzer, Esq. 

Thomas Vance, Esq., J.P 



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OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. 



COMMITTEES OF ADVICE, 



House of the 
J. Anderson, Esq. 
Professor Bentley, F.L.S. 
R. K. Bowley. Esq. 
E. A. Bowring, Esq., C.B. 
Antonio Brady, Esq., F.G.S. 
Sir David Brewster, F.R.a 
Earl of Caithness. 

A. Claudet, Esq., F.R.S. 
H. Cole, Esq., C.B. 

J. G. Grace, Esq. 
The Duke of Deronshire, K.G. 
H. Diamond, Esq., M.D. 
Sir C. W. Dilke, Bart. 
Lord Dufferin, K.C.B. 
Thomas Fairbaim, Esq. 

?• y-Jf^^ol*' ^«q-» F.S.A. 
J. H. Foley, Esq., R.A. 
Captain Fowke, R.E. 

B. T. Brandreth Gibbs, Esq. 
George Godwin, Esq., F.R.S. 
Peter Graham, Esq. 

G. Grove, Esq. 

S. C. HaU, Esq., F.S.A. 

W. Hawes, Esq. 



V. London Committee. 

Society of Arts, John-street^ Adelphi, W.O. 

R. Hudson, Esq., F.R.S. 

John Hunt, Esq. 

Owen Jones, Esq. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A- 

Alderman Lawrence 

Lord Henry Lennox, M.P. 

C. Mauby Esq., F.aS. 

The Lord Mayor 

P. C. Owen, Esq. 

Dr. Lyon Playfair, C.B., F.R.S. 

Hon. B. F. Primrose 

S. Redgrave, Esq. 

Sir C. P. Roney 

Alderman Rose, M.P. 

Sir F. R. Sandf ord 

R. A. Thompson, Esq. 

J. B. Waring, Esq. 

E. Waterton, Esq. 

H, S. Way, Esq. 

G..F. Wilson, Esq., F.R.S. 

T. Winkworth, Esq. 

M. Digby Wyatt, Esq. 



P. Lb Nbve Fosteb, Esq., M.A., ff<m. Sec. 



VI. Class A— Eaw Materials. 

2 n!Sm w?!S?T!?^' Metallurgical Operations, and Mineral Products. 

2. Chemical and Pharmaceutical Processes and Products generally. 

3. Substances used as Food. 

4 Vegetable and Animal Substances chiefly used In Manufacture as Implements or for Ornament 
sS^R^an J F p Q Charles William Hamilton, Esq., J.P. 

sir Edward Grogan, Bak A. H Baeo^E»'n 

^ 1 J5fv^*°^ ^'^*®«^*«' ^P- J. T. Wlgham, Esq. 



Vn. Class B— Machinery. 

5. Machines for direct use, including Carriages and Railway and Naval Mechanism. 

6. Manufacturing Machines and Tools. 

7. Civil Engineering, Architectural, and Building contrivances. 

8. Naval Architecture and Military Engineering, Ordnance, Armour, and Accoutrements 

9. Agricultural and Horticultural Machines and Implements. 

10. PhUosophical Instruments and Processes depending upon their use; Photographic Apparatus 
Musical, Horological, and Surgical Instruments ; Machinery employed in Spinning and Weaving 
and In the Manufacture of Wood and Metal ; Machinery in general 
Earl of Rosse, F.R.S. 



Earl of Clancarty 

Earl of Lucan 

Lord Otho Fitzgerald, M.P. 

Sir R. Griffith, Bart. 

Major Gen. Sir Thomas Larcom, K.C.B. 

Sir Robert Shaw, Bart, D.L. 

Vice-Provost Lloyd, F.R.a 

Rev. T. Romney Robinson, F.R.S. 

William R. Le Fanu, Esq., C.E. 

J. Tufnell, Esq., M.D., F.R.C.S.I. 

Richard Butcher, Esq., M.D., F.R.C.S.I 

George W. HatchelU Esq., M.D., F.R C.S.L 

B. B. Stoney, Esq., C.E. 

R. C. Wade, Esq. 

Professor Downing, T.C.D 

Captain Needham 

Francis ^Robinson Esq., Mus. Doc. 



J. F. Elrington, Esq., LL.D. 

Sir Percy Nugent, Bart 

Captain Esmonde, M.P. 

Captain Thomhill, J.P. 

Captain Pollock 

The Knight of Kerry 

P. Rlall, Esq., J.P. 

Rev. J. H. Jellett, F.T.C.D. 

Thomas Grubb, Esq. 

George Alexander Stephens, Esq. 

Fielding Scovell, Esq. 

Charles P. Cotton, Esq., C.E. 

R. Galloway, Esq. 

Joseph Maguire, Esq. 

Parke Neville, Esq. 

T. Maxwell Hutton, Esq. 

S. Wilfred Hauj^ton, Esq. 








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COMMITTEES OF ADVICE. 



4« 



Abmt— Section No. 8. 

Field-Marshal Lord Viscormt Goagh 
The Deputy Adjutant-General 
The Deputy Quartermaster-General 
The MiUtary Secretary 
Colonel Dumford, R.E. 
Colonel M'Eerlie, R.E. 
Colonel M'Causland, R.E. 
Colonel Buchanan, U.A. 



Navy— Sectioit No. S, 

Sir James Dombrain 

Captain De Courcey, R.N. 

Captain Wilcox, R.N. 

Captain Roherts, R.N. 

J. Laird, Esq., M.P. 

J. Good. Esq. 

W. H. Wehb, Esq. 

E. H. Harland, Esq. 

John A. Walker, Esq., ) „^ - _ 
Thomas Mabtiw, Esq., J^on5e«. 



Sub-Committee— Class B, Section 9. 

AGRICULTURAL AND HORTICULTURAL MACHINES AND IMPLEMENTS 

This Department of the Exhibition occupies the Premises of the Royal Dublin Society. 

Sir Richard Griffith, Bart William Edward Steele, Esq., M.D. 

" " ~ " Park NeviUe, Esq., C.E. 



Lord Dunio 

George Woods Maunsell, Esq., J.P. 

P. Riall, Esq., J.P. 

Captain Thomhill, J.P. 

Dayid Drummond, Esq. 



Robert Collins, Esq., M.D. 
C. C. Vesey, Esq. 

Mr. Andrew Coebigav, Superintendent. 



Vin. Class C— Textile Fabrics. 

11. Cotton. 13. Woollen and Worsted. 13. Silk and Velvet. '14. Manufactures from Flax and Hemp. 

15. Mixed Fabrics, including Shawls, but exclusiTe of Worsted Goods (Class 12). 

16. Leather, including Saddlery and Harness, Skins, Furs, Feathers, and Hatr. 

17. Paper and Stationery, Printing and Bookbinding. 

18 Woven, Spun, Felted, and Laid Fabrics, when shown as specimens of Printing or Dyeing. 

19. Tapestry, including Carpets and Floor-cloths, Laces and Embroidery, Fancy and Industrial Works. 

20. Articles of Clothing for immediate Personal or Domestic Use. 



William Aitkin, Esq. 

lliomas C. Scott, Esq. 

Orlando Beater, Esq. 

Alexander Parker, Esq., J.P. 

W. Jury, Esq. 

E. Purdon, Esq., T.C. 

W. Graham, Esq., T.C. 

George Alexander Stephens, Esq. 

John Fry, Esq. 

Peter Paul M'Swiney, Esq., Ex-Lord Mayor. 



George Delany, Esq. 
R. G. CoUis, Esq. 
Alderman Atkinson, J.P. 
Thomas Pim, Esq. 
Captain C. Vesey 
Maziere Brady, Esq. 
Thomas K. Austin, Esq. 
J. W. Switzer, Esq. 



John A. Walkeb, Esq., Hon. See. 



IX. Class D— MetaUic, Vitreous, and Ceramic Manufactures. 

21. Cutlery and Edge Tools. 22. Iron and General Hardware. 

23. Working in Precious Metal^, and in their imitation : Jewellery, and all other articles of Vertv 

and Luxury not included in other classes. ' 

24. Glass. 25. Ceramic Manufacture, China, Porcelain, Earthenware, Ac 

^5.* Antiquities- Relics of Ancient Art in Stone, Woods, Metals, and other substances, with Rubbings 
from Monuments. 



The Earl of Howth 



Charles E. Bagot, Esq. 

Lord James Wandesf ord Butler 

J. West, Esq., J.P. 

J. E. Vernon, Esq., D.L. 

Anthony Lefroy, Esq., M.P. 

Right Hon. Justice O'Hagan 

R. J. T. Macrory, Esq. 

The Hon. St. John Butler, } rr^ «^^, 
Percy Fitzgerald, Esq., J ^^' ^''' 



X. Class E— Miscellaneous Manufactures. 

26. Decoration, Furniture, Upholstery, including Paper Hangings, Papier Machie, and Japanned Goods 

27. Manufactures in Mineral Substances used for Building or Decoration, as in Marble, Slate, 

Porphyries, Cements, Artificial Stones, &c. 

28. Manufactures from Animal and Vegetable Substances, not Woven or Felted, or included in other 

sections. 29. Miscellaneous Manufactures and Small Wares* 



Viscount Southwell 

Sir Robert Kane. F.R.S. 

James Forrest, Esq. 

Sir R. Griffith, Bart. 

A. H. Bagot, Esq. 

R. G. Collis, Esq., J.P. 

Alderman Atkinson, J.P. 

Arthur Edward Guinness, Esq 

Samuel Law, Esq. 

Hugh Brown, Esq. 



Sir Robert Shaw, Bart. 
Walter Lindesay, Esq., J.P. 
John Hatchell, Esq. 
The Attorney-General, M.P. 
John Henry Richards, Esq. 
Arthur Usher, Esq., J.P. 
Jonathan Pim, Esq., M.P. 
H. T. Vickers, Esq. 



Hekrt L. Fbt, Esq., ffom. See. 



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OFFICIAL STAFF. 



\ 



XI. Class P— Pine Arts. 

30. Paintings in Oil and Water-<;oloar8, Drawings and Photographs, Architecture, Scnlptore, Mod^ 
and Plastic Art, Die-Sinking and Intaglios, Engravings and Etchings, Enam^ and Frescoea. 



Viseonnt Powerscoort, Chairman 

The Ris^t Hon. the Lord Cliancellor 

Marqnis of Drogheda 

Marquis of EUdare 

Earl of Charlemont 

Vlscoont Southwell 

Lord Talbot de Malahide, F.R.S. 

Sir George F. J. Hodson, Bart, D.L. 

The Right Hon. Sir Robert Peel, Bart., M.P. 

Hon. Judge Berwick 

Sir J, Bernard Burke 

Sir J.J. Goghill, Bart 

J. E. V. Vernon, Esq., D.L. 

Sir Charles Eastlake, P.R.A. 

Catterson S^iith, Esq., P.R.H.A. 

G. F. Mulvany, Esq., R.ELA., Director of the 

National Gallery, Ireland 
Thomas A. Jones, Esq., R.H.A. 
J. R. Kirk, Esq., R.H.A. 
M. Angelo Hayes, Esq., R.HJI. 
Kajor-General Colomb 
Walter Creyke, Esq. 
Jacob Owen, Esq. 
Francis R. Davies, Esq., M.R.I.A. 
S. C. Hall, Esq. « 



Right Hon. Alexander MacDonneU 

Sir Thomas Deane, R.H.A. 

Sir John Benson 

Richard Redgrave, £sq., R.A. 

Daniel Maclise, Esq., R.A. 

William Cotter Kyle, Esq., LL.D. 

John H. Foley, Esq., R.A. 

P. MacDowell, Esq., R.A. 

F. W. Burton, Esq., R.H.A.. 

Thomas Agnew, Jun., Esq. 

President of the Society of British Artists 

President of the Society of Painters in Water- 
colours 

President of the Institute of Painters in Water- 
colours 

President of the Royal Scottish Academy 

Wm. B. Johnstone, Esq., R.S.A., National Gallery 
of Scotland 

President of the Institute of Architects, England 

President of the Institute of Architects, Ireland 
WiLLiAK M'Ka't, Esq., Mon. Sec 

Sir J. J. Coghill, Bart, Honorary Director of the 

Photographic Department 
Captain Close 



»J 



OFFICIAL 

Secretary of the Exhibition Committee, and 
Comptroller, 
Henry Parkinscm, Esq., 
Superintendent British D^iartment, . 
Ck>lonial Superintendent, . . . . 

Art Superintendent, . . . . 

Superintendent of Sales— Fine Arts, . 
Superintendent of the Machinery Department, . . 
Superintendent of the Agricultural Implement Department, 
Cashier, . . . . . 

Official Photographers to the Exhibition, 



STAFF. 

General Superintendent and Superintendent 

of the Foreign Department, 

J. F. Iselin, Esq. 

. T. A. Wright Esq. 

. P. L. Simmonds, Esq. 

^ . . Henry E. Doyle, Esq. 

. PhllipW. Kennedy, Esq. 
. John Sturgeon, Esq. 
. Mr. Andrew Corrigan 
. V Mr. George Walker 
. The London Stereoscopic and 
Photographic Company 



/Mr. Joseph Green, 14, Charles-st, Middlesex Hospital, 

Packing and Forwarding Agents-Fine Art8,^jj^3^°^^^ ^^^^^^S^^ j.xchange-st,Manchester; 

( Liverpool and London Chambers, Liverpool 

Goods Carrying Agents, British Department, . Messrs. Fishbourne, Bachelor's-walk, Dublin. 
C!ontractor for Cases and Fittings, . . Mr. James Beckett, 124, Stephen's-green, West 

Ck>ntract6rs for the Refreshment Department, Messrs. Douglas. 
Contractors for Hire of Opera Glasses, . Messrs. Chancellor A Son. 

, CUSTOMS. 

Wm. P. Tomlins, Esq., Surveyor. I G. KScrivenor, Esq., OJlcer in Charge, 
Mr. Robert Gelling, Mr. John E. Irwhi, Mr. William C. Eggans, Out-Docr Officer*. 
Patrick Downs, Meuenger. 



LOCAL COMMITTEES. 



ABERDEEN. 
Messrs. D. Wylie and Sons, 111, Union-street 

BELFAST COMMITTEE. 

The Mayor of Belfast, John B. Lytle, Esq. 

John Charley, Esq. 

William Ewart Jnn., Esq. 

William GirdwoodfEsq. 

M. Jaff^ Esq. 

E. H. Harland, Esq. 

John Hind, Esq. 

William Jury, Jun., Esq. 

Hugh M'Clelland, Esq. 

James Kennedy, Esq. 

J. W.M*Ma8ter,Esq. 

Robert L. Patterson, Esq. 



John Rowan, Esq. 
Thomas Sinclata*, Esq. 
E. Spotten, Esq. 
Ellas H. Thompson, Esq. 
J. J. Weinberg, Esq. 

W. B. Caughst, Jun., Esq., Eon. See. 

BLACKBURNE COMMITTEE. 

Joseph Harrison, Esq., Chairman 
John Baynes, Esq. 
Eccles Shorrock, Esq. 
Nathaniel Walsh, Esq. 
Lieut-Colonel Lund 
David Nicol, Esq. 
James Dickenson, Esq. 
Abraham Haworth, Esq. 
James Cmmingbam, Esq. 




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LOCAL COMMITTEES. 
L 



John Sparrow, Esq. 
William Stonea, Esq. (Mayor) 
W. D. Coddlngton, Esq. 
John Fish, Esq. 
Gteorge Walmesley, Esq. 
Robert Watson, Esq. 
Thomas Lewis, Esq. 

Messrs. Ainsworth &. So2i3, Secr^U^iei^ 
Exchange- street. 



CORK COMMITTEE. 
The Mayor 

Henry L. Young, Esq., Alderman 
Thomas Jameson, E^., Alderman 
George Penrose, Esq., Alderman 
William Hegarty, Esq., Alderman 
Sir John Arnott, Alderman. 
Edward S. Casey, Esq., T.C. 

John Fbakklin, Esq., Town Clerk, Hon, Sec. 

CHESTER COMMITTEE, 

FOB NOBTH WALES AND CHESHIRE. 

The Mayor of Chester, Chairman 
Alderman John Trevor, J P. 
Thomas Bowers, Esq., T.C. 
WilUam Failsh, Esq., T.C. 
John Morris, Esq., T.C. 
Thomas Truss, Esq., T.C 
Edward Claudius Walker, Esq., J.P. and T.C. 
Francis Arthur Dickson, Esq., T.C. 
Rev. Arthur Rigg 
James Rigg, Esq. 
Henry Wood, Esq. 
Albert Wood, Esq. 
W. L. Ryland, Esq. 
E. W Femie, Esq. 
Bryan Johnson, Esq. 
Henry Bowers, Esq. 
William Brown, Esq 
William Collinson, Esq. 
James B. Mowle, Esq. 
Richard Boll and, Esq. 
Joseph Beckett, Esq. 

William Maysmor Williams, Esq., T.C., Deputy 
Chair mcui. 

— Hancock, Esq. 
Thomas R. P. Tloyle,'Esq. 
Edward Parry, Esq. 

J. C. Edwards, Esq. 

— Davidson, Esq 
Messrs. Palni and Gamon 

— Ashton. ii.sq. 
George Chivas, Esq. 
James Dickson, Esq. 
Frederick John Hill, Esq. 
John Dodd, Esq., T.C. 
George F. Wjmne, Esq. 

T Bostock, Esq. 
Alfred 0. Walker, Esq. 
James Gerrard, Esq. 

John Walker, Town Clerk, Sec. 

DUNDEE, 
Chamber of commerce. 

Robert Sturroce, Esq., Sec. 



EDINBURGH COMMITTEE, 

CITY CHAMBERS, HIGH-STREET 

The Right Hon. the Lord Provost 

The Provost of Leith 

BaUie Cassells 

Bailie Alexander 

Bailie Hill 

Bailie Handyside 

Bailie Falshaw 

Bailie Miller 

Treasurer Callender 

Bailie Watt 

Bailie Steedman 

BaUie Maclnlay 



BalUe Dishington 

George Lorlmer, Esq. 

The Master of the Merchant Company 

The Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce 

The Dean of the Faculty of Advocates 

The Deputy Keeper of the Signet 

The President of the Society of S. S. C. 

Tho President of the Society of Chartered 

Accountants 
The President of the Royal Scottish Academy 
The President of the Royal Scottish Society of 

Arts 
The President of the Royal College of Physicians 
The President of the Royal College of burgeons 
The President of the Chamber of Commerce at 

Lelth 

Professor Thos. C. Archer, Hon. Sec. 
Henry Callender, Esq., Hon. Treasurer 



GLASGOW. 

The Right Hon. the Lord Provost 
William W. Watson, Esq., City Chamberlain, 
•Chamberlain's Office 



HAWICK. 
The Chambeb of Commerce. 

^ U L L. 

TOWN COMMITTEE. 

The Mayior (H. J. Atkinson, Esq.) 

J. Lumsden, Esq. 

J. Gresham, Esq. 

A. Bannister, Esq. 

W. H. Moss, Esq. 

T. Witty, Esq. 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COMMITTEE. 

H. J. Atkinson, Esq., Mayor, president. 
E. P. Maxsted, Esq. 
J. Lumsden, Esq. 
Clements Good, Esq. 

P. B. Bruce, Esq., See. 

LEEDS. 
Chamber OF Commerce. 

William Thrip, Esq., Sec. 



LIVERPOOL. 

Chakbee of Commerce. 

William Blood, Esq., Sec. 

WATERFORD COMMITTEE. 
office, chambeb of commercb 
The Mayor of Waterf ord 
James Delahunty, Esq., T.C. 
Patrick KeUy, Esq., T.C. 
James Kent, Esq. 
Patrick R. Kent, Esq., T.C. 
John A. Tobln, Esq. 
Patrick P. Brenan, Esq. 
Hugh H. Nevlns, Esq. 

George Gibson, Esq., Hon. Sec. 



YORK COMMITTEE. 
Edwin Thompson, Esq. 
Mr. Alderman Evers 
Mr. Alderman Cabry 
Mr. Alderman Richardson 
Edward Steward, Esq. 
Samuel William North, Esq. 
John Delghton, Esq. 
William Walker, Esq. 
John Pearson, Esq. 
Ralph Weatherley, Esq. 

The Town Clebk, Sec. 



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FOREIGN COMMITTEES. 



^ 



KINGDOM OF ITALY. 

ROYAL ITALIAN COMMISSION, TURIN. 

OJke^ Royai Industrial Muteum, 

Comm. G. Matteued, Senator of tlie Kingdom, 

Prendmt 
Cav. Aw. PIo Agodino, Deputy Procnreur-Gfoeral' 

du Roi, and Monicipal Assessor, Vicc-Pretident 
Hon. H. 6. Elliott, British Minister at the Court 

of H.M. the King of Italy 
Baron Corrado Arezzo Despnches di Donnafu- 

gata,M.P. 
Comm. G.Curionl, Secretary of the Royal Lombard 

Institute of Science and Letters, Milan 
Comm. G.Devincenzi, M.P., Director of the Royal 

Italian Industrial Museum 
Cav. W. P. Jervis, Assistant Curator of the Royal 

Italian Industrial Museum, Secretary 
Comm. G. Manna, Senator of the Kingdom 
Cav. Luigi Rey, Manufacturer 
Cay. G. B. Tasca, President of the Chamber of 

Commerce 

ITALIAN aUB-COMMITTEEa, 

ANCONA. 
Cav. Pietro Farsetti, President. 
David diAlmagia,M.P. 
Natale Baldantonj 
Cav. Daniele Beretta 
Cav. Luigi Colonelll 
Baldassare Dinner, Vice-President 
Carlo Ferrari, Secretary 
Luigi Euzeby 
Gio. Giacomo Gradmann 
Luigi Morellet 
Oio Battista Morichi 
Antonio Pennacchietti 
Gioachino Temi 
Innocenzo Vignini 

B A R I. 
Alessandro Forges Davanzati, President. 
Canon. Nicola Gallo 
Filippo Lenzi, Secretary 
Nicola Pantaleo 
Stefano Pallerano 

BERGAMO. 
Stefano Berizzl 
Cav. Antonio Roncalli 
Aw. Filippo Rossi 

BOLOGNA. 
Cav. Antonio Lagorio, President 
Comm. Prof. Carlo Arienti 
Carlo Beau 

Pietro Buratti, C.E., Secretary 
Count Angelo Guidelli 
Prof. Cesare Masini 
Prof. Massimiliano Putti 
Cav. Raffaele Rizzoli 
Dr. Egidio Francesco Sued 

CAGLIARL 
Cav. Enrico Serpieii, President 
Simone Fomara ^ 
Camillo Fevrier 
Marcello Massoni 
Giuseppe Palomba, Secretary 
Gaetano Rossi Doria 

CASERTA. 
Raffaele Cuccaro 
Stefano de Ruggiero 
Giacomo Galozzi 
Francesco Jeniziani 
Car. Miohele Leonetti ^ 



CATANL^. 

Baron Giuseppe Majorana, President 

Edoardo Dilgh 

Francesco Di- Benedetto 

John Jeans, Esq., British Vice-Conanl 

Onudo Motta 

Giacomo Sacchero 

Prof. Francesco Tomabene, Secretary 

C O M O. 
Car. Giuseppe Mondelll, President 
Luigi Barberini 
Luigi NobiU 
Giovanni Rezzonico, Secretary 



FLORENCE. 

Cav. Cesare Conti, President 

Cav. Angelo Barbetti 

Aw. Pier Luigi BarzeUottl, Secretary 

Gaetano Bianchini 

Luigi Du Fr^sne 

Cav. Pio Fed! 

Carlo Lami 

Charles Lever, Elq., British Vice-Consnl at Speiii 

GENOA. 

Michele Casaretto, President 
Cav. Giuseppe Calenzoli 
Aw. Carlo Felice Ferrari 
Giacomo Millo 
Romanengo 
Enrico S^mo 

LEGHORN. 
Baron TeodoroTossizza President 



LUCCA. 

Cav. Sebastiano Onestini, President 
Angelo Bertacchi, C.E. 
Dr. Tommaso Buck 
Carlo Gamberini 
Count Nicola Guinigi 
Dr. Raffade Michelucdni 
Prof. Enrico Ridolfl, Secretary 
Aw. Giuseppe Santini 
Baldassare Sari 

MACERATA. 

Aw. Prof. Ernesto Bdardini, President' 

Vincenzo Baldini 

Pietro Bocd 

Dr. Giorgio Cerquetti, Secretary 

Tommaso Fabioli 

Annibale Martinelli 

Vincenzo Montini 

Raffade Paoletti 

Francesco Perf etti 

Cesare Ripari 

Teodoro SenesI, C.E. 

Count Emesti Armaioli Tambroni 



MESSINA. 
Gaetano Alnis 
Mariano Costardli 
Giacomo Loteta 
Luigi Natoli 
Michele Panebianco 
Giovanni Battista Prove 
Enrico Rew 

M I L A N. 
Cav. Antonio Caimi, Fine Arts Section 
Cav. Giovanni Pisani, Industrial Section 



i 



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FOREIGN COMMITTEES. 



« 4 



Comm. Niccola CaraUeri S. Beitolo 

Cav. Prof. Benedetto Viale PrelA 

Prof. Francseeco Pfatti 

Cav. Valerio Trocchi, President of the Chamber of 

Commerce 
Prof. Clemeuti Lnigi Jacobinl 
Cav. Prof. Guiseppe Ponzi 

Robert Macpherson, Esq., Corresponding Com- 
missioner at Ropie 

Roman Commissioner in Dublin —Lord Talbot de 
Halahide 

Deputy— Dr. Lcntalgne J.P. 



SPAIN, MADRID 
BOTAL OOMMI88ZON. 

His ExceUency Don Agustin di Peralea, PreHdent 
M. Narciso Pascual Calomer 
M. Benito Toriano Murillo 
M. Augostin Monreal 
M. Carlos Ochon 
M. Enrico de Ainz 

M. Teodoro Ponte de la Hoy, Secretary 
H. C. Atkinson, Esq., Correspoading Commis- 
sioner 



RUSSIA. 

Imperial Commissioner— M. Gabriel Eamensky 



SAXONY. 

Edward R. Whitfield, Esq., English Club, Dresden, 
and Commissioner in Dublin 



SWEDEN, STOCKHOLM. 

T. C. Hunt, Esq., H.B.M. Consul 
Count Rosen 



SWITZERLAND, BERN. 

Commissioner— Professor Vogt 

TURKEY, CONSTANTINOPLE. 
Edward F. Ede, Esq. 



FOREIGN COMMISSIONERS AND AGENTS ATTENDING 
THE EXHIBITION. 



AUSTRIA, . M. Bruno Breslauer 

M. Charles Berger 
BELGIUM, . Charles Palgrave, Esq., Belgian 

Consul 
FRANCE, . . M. Carron 

M. Livio, Consul for Prance 
ITALY, . . Baron CorradoArezzoDespuches 
di Donnafugata, M.P. (Royal 
Commissioner) 
A. C. Marani, Italian Consul 

(Inspector) 
G. P. Jervis (Delegate) 



NETHERLANDS, M. CJharles Boissevain 



PRUSSIA, . 


. Herr Alexander von Sybel 


ROME, . 


. Lord Talbot de Malahide 




John Lentaigne, Esq., J.P. 




(Deputy) 


RUSSIA, . 


. J. Gabriel Kamensky 


SAXONY, . 


. Edward R. Whitfield, Esq. 


SPAIN, . 


. Don Benito Toriano Murillo 




Don Enrico de Ainz 




Don Narciso Pascual Calomer 




Commander Ponte de la Hov 



COLONIAL COMMISSIONERS ATTENDING THE 
EXHIBITION. 



BAHAMAS, . J. Farringdon, Esq. 1NDL\, . . Dr. Forbes Wataon 

CANADA, . . Hon. Thomas D*Arcy M'Gtee MAURITIUS, . J. Morris, Esq. 

Rev. W. Agar Adamson, D.C.L. NOVA SCOTIA, Rev. Dr. Honeyman 

Thomas Devine, Esq., F.R.G.S. SIERRA LEONE, Brig.-General O'Connor. 

Captain St. George Cuffe VICTORLA, . l^dall Bright, Eaq. 
CAKADA EAST, William Jonmeauz, Esq. 



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REPORT 

OP THB 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 

PBBQItNTBD TO 

lis il. f . % f rinti of mdtB, 

OS THK 

OCCASION OF THE OPENING OF THE EXHIBITION 
On the 9th MAY, 1865. 



The building in which we are now assembled owes its origin to the desire 
to supply a want which long existed in thia City, that is, of a structure where 
the Citizens might enjoy rational recreation combined with the elevating 
influence of the Arts. 

A Company was formed for the purpose of providing an Exhibition Palace 
and Winter Garden, after the model of the Crystal Palace of Sydenham ; but 
on a scale suitable to the population of the City, and yet not discreditable to the 
capital of Ireland. 

A tract of about seventeen acres in extent, formerly known as the "Coburg 
Gardens," lying within a few minutes' walk from the busiest centre of the City, 
having passed into the possession of Mr. Benjamin Lee Guinness, that gentlef- 
man, with his characteristic liberality in the promotion of all that can add to the . j 

comfort and happiness of his fellow-citizens, placed the land at the disposal of 
, the newly-formed Company, at the price for which he had purchased it ; and it 

was chosen as the site for the proposed Buildings and Garden. 
I The design of Mr. Alfred Jones was selected as the one best calculated to 

! meet the requirements of the Company. The first stone of the Building was laid 

\ in March, 1863, by the then Viceroy, the lamented Earl of Carlisle, whose 

zeal in the encouragement of every undertaking for the benefit of Ireland, can 
never be too gratefully remembered by the people of this country. As the 
Buildings advanced, their suitability for the purpose soon suggested the idea of 
inaugurating the new institution by holding an International Exhibition. And as 
nothing of that kind, on a large scale, had been attempted in Ireland since the 
Exhibition of 1853, the origin of which was due to the noble public spirit of 
William Dargan, and which had been honoured by the august presence of Her 
Majesty, the project of an Exhibition in the present year was favourably received ; 
but it soon became apparent that difiiculties would be encountered by a Company 
in accomplishing an enterprise, the success of which must so largely depend on 
the spontaneous aupport of. those whose sole aim is the advancement of the 
people in skill, knowledge, and refinement. 




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*4 



FLAGS AND BANNERS DISPLAYED. 



OUTSIDE THE BHILDINa. 



^ 



1 The Royal Standard of Great Britain 

and Ireland 

2 French Ensign 

3 British Ensign 

4 Royal Italian Enmgn 

5 Papal States 

6 Austrian Ensign 

7 Royal Standa^ of Prussia 

8 Spanish Ensign 

9 Prussian Enngn 



10 Sweden 

11 America 

12 Belgium 

13 Denmark 

14 Holland 

15 Ireland 

16 Union Jack 

17 Norwegian Jhuign 

18 Russia 



WITHIN THE BUU-DINa. 

British Department. 
(Lent by the kindnen of the respective Mayors, Provosts, and Cozpcntioni.) 



19 Wolverhampton 

20 Yannouth 

21 Bristol 

22 Stirling 

23 Manchester 

24 Limerick 

25 Belfast 

26 Dumfries 

27 Aberdeen 

28 Blackburn 

29, 80 Glasgow City, River Clyde Conser- 
vators 
SI Lincoln 



32 Northampton 

33 Edinburgh 

34 Sheffield 

35 Stockton-on-Tees 

36 Kingston-npon-HuU 

37 Southampton 

38 Worcester 

39 Dublin 

40 Shrewsbniy 

41 Oxford 

42 Bradford 

43 Birmingham 

44 Berwick-npon-TwMd 



45 Maiiritlns 

46 Canad* 



Two not known ; no address furnished. 

Colonial Department. 

I 47 YictoriA 

In the Transept and Foreign Department. 



48 Holland 

49 Italy 

50 France 

61 Lubeck 

62 Hayti 

63 French Colonies, W. Indi«t 

64 Egypt 

66 Switzerland 
66 Japan 

57 Spanish Merchant flag 

58 Russian Man-of-war flag 
69 Danish Merchant flag 

60 Austrian Merchant &ig 

61 Tunis 

62 Bremen 
68 Yenezula 

64 Russian Merchant flag 
66 China 
66 Algiers 



67 Red Ensign 

68 Sandwich Islandi 

69 America 

70 Union Jack 

71 Royal Standacd 

72 French flag 

73 Royalltalian 

74 Bannerets 

75 Spain 

76 Prussia 

77 Sweden 

78 America 

79 Belgium 

80 Papal Statw 

81 HoUand 

82 Denmark 

83 Rome 

84 Austria 
86 Ireland 



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Proceeding along the gallery towards the north, and entering the Central 
Picture Gallery, we may pass by a door on the left into the MedisBval Court, 
where church furniture, antiquities, stained glass, and metal work, claim atten- 
tion. We pass through, and enter b]r a door on the right hand of the corridor 
the Great ricture Gallery. This is a fine lofty room, with sofas, and is 
devoted to pictn?^ of tlje B|4tish School. Roun(> the walls will be recogmsed, 
by those conversant with good pictures, many gems of art from the National 
Gallery, the Vernon Collection, the Kensbgton Museum, and other public and 
private collections. 

After making the circuit of this room the visitor may pass through the east 
dpor on to the passage, wheiie, in a window recess, aire 86me fine specimens of 
chromo-lithog?:aphs by various exhibitors, and, opposite, specimens of woodcuts. 
Then proceed due west down a passage, the walls of which are lined with maps, 
school-books, panoramic views, &c., to a door on the right hand, which admits 
to the Small ricture Gallery, a long room devoted to the works of the Ancient 
iVIasters. This completes the tour of the Fine Arts Collection, with the excep- 
tion of the three Photographic rooms which are situated in the basement, on the 
extreme south, near the First Class Kefreshment Boom, and must be reserved for 
a future visit 

Leaving the room of Ancient Masters by the east door we may enter upon an in- 
spection of the British Industrial Department, commencing with the collection in 
the galleries. Entering the inner passage on your left and proceeding due west we 
pass cases of linens, hats, clothing, basket work, ropes and fish nets, cottons and 
thread, blankets, kerseymeres and broad cloths, printed felts, woollen shirtings 
and flannels, Paisley shawls and tartans, laces, fancy hair work, silks, gold em- 
broidery, silk scarfs, sewed and embroidered muslins, &c Turning round to 
the right, for the outer passage, we may pause for a few moments to take a 
general glance of the nave and transept and opposite galleries devoted to India 
and the Colonies. Then we come in succession, on the right hand, upon cases of 
cotton and thread, down quilts, feathers, furs, and other applications of feathers, 
down, &c., to dress, upholsterers' and coaclimakers' trimmings, hosiery, boots 
and shoes, buttons, court costumes and liveries. Proceeding round the cross 
gallery we next come upon handsome show cases of minerals, chemicals, colours, 
products of seaweed, perfumery, confectioneiy, 8,tarches, candles, and soap, fre^ 
preserved provisions, isinglass, cigars, whiskey, wax flowers, stationery, book- 
binding and printing, paper maSjng, guns and fishing tackle, toys, croquet, 
racquet, archery, and other games, bog oak ornaments, brushes, tortoise-shell 
work. India-rubber and gutta percha. This completes the gallery display of 
British Industries. 

Then we arrive at the beautiful Indian collection, contributed by the India 
Board, and arranged by Dr. J. Forbes Watson, which occupies a large space, 
and is most attractive, embracing most of the choicest articles of the India 
Museum, London, many rare and valuable articles lent by the Queen, by 
Lord Gough and other exhibitors. There are, first, three very large casAS ex- 
tending across the gallery filled with rich articles of gold and silver work, 
jewellery, embroidery and fabrics. There are two smaller cases of silver and 
bidri, or inlaid metal work, and further xm two cases neatly arranged and 
labelled of agricultural produce and raw materials generally, including substances 
used in manufactures. A cabinet containing seventeen bound volumes of speci- 
mens^ illustrative of the textile fabrics of India, .with coloured photographs, 
showing the costumes of the people of India, should rot be overlooked. Then 
there are three wall cases of arms and armowr, and ornamented, carved, and other 
work in metal, jade, papier mache, saiidal wood, horn, and ivory. Rich carpets 
and mats of Oriental design decorate tlie wails, mid a raised map of Lidia, 
showing the mountain ranges, rivers, railways, <&c., hangs on the stairs, "wliere 
there also stand some state unibrellas. There are also suspended on screens twenty 
or more frames, with photographs of the tribes and castes into which the native 
populatioi^ of India and the adjace^jb coimtries is divided. 



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GXJIDE FOB TDTE VISITOR. 



The next tour of inspection may be taken as follow 
building turn down the passage on the right band, past 
ordnance exhibited, and enter the Carriage Court, whic 
to the main building. Here the visitor passes in the cor 
and illustrations of Naval Architecture, with some PL 
objects. Passing round the Carriage Court we come^ u; 
in the east, devoted to Sewing Machines in operatioi 
several manufacturing processes in operation are seen 
eluding pearl button making, steel pen making, pip 
printing, &c. We then enter the Machinery-at-rest Co 
Machiiiery-in-motion Court. Here axe spinning mul 
hammers, cask-washing machines, and others in attive o 
At the end of this Court we leave this noisy region, a 
more to the quiet of the main building, and find ourselvc 
British department of the north transept, looking directly d 
the south. Aftet inspecting the stands of beautiful 
visitor should enter the inner line of Furniture Courts, i 
the east, inspect at leisure the many elegant objects exj 
cipal London and Provincial manufacturers. He may 
the large central show cases on each side of the mail 
chiefly of shawls, poplins, minerals, jewellery, perfum 
Benson's great clock. 

To complete the circuit of the products of the Bril 

should ascend the staircase on the right, and inspect the 

running from India along the western gallery to the 

trophy of horns, skins, and objects of the chase, &c., fro: 

head and adjoining wall, will iSurst command attention. 

Canada, which fills three comts with its various produ< 

tural, and manufacturing. Then Nova Scotia, another N 

fills a large court with attractive objects, especially an ing 

Returning from this, and proceeding due south alouj 

passes, in succession, Mauritius, the West India Colo 

various woods of the west front of the Koyal Exchange, 

pause and going out by a door on the balconies, take a 

and the Harcourt-street enti'ance, Mr. Guinness's house 

ceeding in this circuit we pass the collections contril 

Australia, New South Wales, Queensland, New Zealai 

latter colony, which is the only Australian province which 1 

occupies a very large space with most attractive objects ; 

especially interesting. Then the curious native produc 

Lagos, the Grold Coast, and Sierra Leone, are shown, a 

Bahamas completes the Colonial collections. Here are 

from China and Japan, especially porcelains, bronzes, 

Chinese state bedstead, with a group of female Japanes 

toilet. The visitor may now commence here his ins 

exhibits, although it is an unfavourable point to begin h 

his tour of the galleries, and save fatigue. Proceedir 

reach a number of French works in bronze, and othe: 

•various industrial products. We then pass the Aust 

Prussia, and other states of the Zollverein ; then on the 

in succession collections from Belgium, Holland, Russia, 

The best course now to pursue is to descend by the sti 

Central Picture Gallery to the Sculpture Hall, and enter 

complete the inspection of the Foreign collections. 1 

may first enter the Music Hall, and t^e a survey of pi 

then pass to the Belgian Court, and bearing round oi 

reach the products of the German Confederation and Av 

ThQ diu^i irntb its cwQP7i iaWnded for thQ r«9U o| J 






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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE. 



BRITISH DEPARTMENT. 



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SECTION' I. 

MIKINa, QUABBTING, METALLUBaiOAL OPERATIONS, AND 
HINEEAL FBODUGTS. 

East Gallery of Nave. 

1 AUSTINE & Co. 20 Diocon tt, Glasgow, —Block coal. — {In West Verandah.) 

2 Cabrick, R. Pimie Colliery and Chemical WorkSf Methill, Fife, N.B. — Cannel 
coal ; oil and grease manufactured from the above coal. — ( West Verandah.) 

3 CoNNORBEB MINING Co. LIMITED, Ovoca, CO. WicJclow.—Na.iWe copper; 
oxide of- copper; sulphuret of copper; copper precipitate; silver lead ore; sulphur 
ore; iron pyrites; sulphur smalls; ochre. 

4 General Mining Co. for Ireland (Limited), 29 Westmoreland st 
Dvhlin. — Raw and dressed calamine ; arsenical pyrites ; fire-clay ; ochre ; oxide of 
zinc ; lead and copper ores from the Company's mines. 

6 LiSABE, F. C.E. 19 Westmordand st. Dvhlin. — Slates, slabs, flags from 
Gooladoo quarry, co. Cork; ores of copper, lead, iron baryta; fluor spar; sulphur; 
quartz containing gold, from mines in Cork and Clare. 

6 Mining Company op Ireland, 30 Lower Ormond quay, Dublin. — Copper 
ore from Knockmahon, co. Waterford, showing the different forms in which it is 
found in the rock, and the various stages it passes through in dressing and preparing 
for market ; lead ore in like manner ; coal and strata illustrative of the geologic^ 
formation of the coal fields of the Company in the co. Tipperary ; silver and lead in 
pig , sheet, pipe, shot, red lead, &c. manufactured from Irish ores at the Company's 
T7orks, Ballycorus — (Nave.) 

7 Bandon, Earl op. — ^Roofing Slates from the works of the Rossmore Slate 
Company (Limited), Carrigbue, near Bantry, co. Cork. — (/ik West Verandah.) 

8 Carysport Mining Co. (Limited), 65 Dame st. Dublin, — Copper and other 
ores ; native gold. 

9 Kelly, J. C.E. — Compressed peat, and iron manufactured therewith. — 
{West Verandah.) 

10 Grippith, Sir R. Bart. — (A) Geological map of Ireland, on a scale of four 
miles to an inch ; (B) Section from the eastern to the western coast of Ireland, show- 
ing the succession of the Silurian, Devonian, and caii)oniferous rocks of the country ; 
(0> Geological section, showing the unconformable succession of the primary and^ 
Suurian rocks of Comiemara ; (D) Section showing th^ coal series of the county of' 
Antrim, res^g onoonformably on xnicft slate, luooeeded by new reel sandstone, UaS| 
|tl^delMd|i;iiwP|i9^t9db7bMMaiiio1)e^ (E) SeQtlmE^iai9W%tbQ8«olQgioi||troQl«ro 




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CHEMICAL AND PHABMACEUTICAL 
East Gallery of Nave. 



Section IL 



of the Boutk-east of Ireland ; (F) Vertical section showing the tabular arrangement 
of the columnar and amorphous basalt, and intercalated bedis of red lithomarga of the 
Causeway range of the north coast of Antrim ; (G) Sectional view accurately repre- 
senting the several columns, as well as general arrangement of the basaltic series, 
extending from the Giant's Causeway, for a distance of four miles, by the Loom and 
Organ to the Chinmey-tops, and thence by Point Plaiskin and Bengore Head as far as 
'Dunsevrick Castle, looking southward ; (H) Sectional view of granite veins traversing 
Homblendic syenite at Pass of Bamavave, near Carlingford Mountain, county of 
Louth. (I) Sectional views of M'Gillicuddy's Beeks, Killamey, showing the undula- 
ting schistose strata at their southern extension. — {North Corridor.) 

S2X Patent Peat Company (LiiiitED), 84 Middle Abbey st i>M6K7i.— COTipressed 
peat fuel — {JloyeU Dublin Society.) 

822 Patent Plumbago Crucible Co. Battersea Works, London, 5. IF.— Patent 
plumbago crucibles ; clay crucible ; furnaces ; roasting dishes. — {Agricultural Ball.) 

823 The GrOULADOO Slats Quabbt, Bantry Bay, co, Cork (Lord Henry Lofbtu, 
owner). — Slates. — ( West Verandah). 

824 The Holtford Copper Mining Co. (Limited), 22 Nassau st. JMlin,-- 
Copper ore from the ne^y diK»vered lode in this mine, oo. Tipperary. 

825 LouGHREA Slate Quarry Co., near Zi/ZaZoe.— Slates.— (/» West Verandah.) 

826 The Killaloe Slate Co. (Limited).— Slates. — ( West Verandah.) 

827 Smith, W, 7 Lower Baggot st, Dublin, — Coal, ironstone, gypsum. 



SECTION ZI. 

aHEmOAI AND FHABUACEUTICAL PROCESSES, AND FBODUOTS 
GENEfiALLY. 

North Gallery of Nave. 

11 Barrington, J. & Sons, Great Britain st. Dublin. — Soap, candles, tallow, 
&e., and articles nsed in the manufacture of soap. 

12 Bbwlbt & Draper, 23 Mary st. Dublin. — Perfumery ; mineral waters ; 
British wines ; pharmaceutical products. 

13 British Seaweed Compant (Limited), Whitecrook Chemical Works, Dal- 
muir, Dumbartonshire, N.B.— Series illustrating Stanford's patent method of treating 
seaweed. 

14 Bryant & Mat, Fairfield Works, Boio, London, ^.—Patent safety matches, 
vestas, and cigar lights, which ignite only on the box ; instantaneous lights, &c. 

16 CooNET, C. & Co. 57 to 60 Back lane, Dublin. — Starch; dextrine; laundry 
blues, with samples of the raw materials ; blacking, liquid and paste. 

17 Field, J. C. & J. 36 Upj)ci' Marsh, Lambeth, London. — Soap ; paraffin candles; 
patent self-fitting candles for chamber use ; altar candles ; sealing wax, &c. 

18 GouLDiNO, W. & H. M. 108 Patrick st. Cork, and 22 Westmoreland st. 
Dublin. — Manufactured and artificial manures, with the raw materials used in manu- 
facturing same. 

19 Hare, J. & Co. Temple Gate, Bristol.— V&inteTa* colours— greens, chromes, 
blues, reds, &c. • . -j 

20 Hirst, Brooke, & Tomlinson, Bishopgate st. Leeds, Yorkshire. — Acetic acid 
and acetates; wood naphtha; artificial fruit essences; chemical and pharmaceutical 
preparations, varnishes; fancy soap, perfumery, &c. 

21 Johnson, Matthet, & Co. HaJtton Garden, London, E.C. — Platinum appa- 
jitus; boilers, crucibles, capsules, tubes, dishes; lunar caustic; nitrate of silver and 
chloride of gold for photography ; magnesium wire. — {East Gallery of Nave.) 

22 Johnson & Sons, 18a Basinghall st, London. — Nitrates of silver and uranium ; 
chloride of gold prepared for photography ; nitrate of silver^ sticks and points for 
Btirgeons; crucibles, dishes, &c. of platinum and silver; magnesium wire for iJlunUB' 
iti]^f.pW(9B^i V^fo^d antimony, bismuth, cadmium^ an^ tin, .i. 



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Ufir th G al lg r y of Ifftive, 



23 Kane, W. J. & Son, H North ^tpaU ^ff, p^ft^ 
phnric and other acids, &c. 

24 Lewis, F. 6 Fleet st. j^wJim. — Ferftnttery, and ai 
and mar)ci9g inks. — (Nave.) 

25 Magkby, J. W. 40 W«8«mor^fe«cl««. DvbUn, — Ma 
the maniifacture ^^jsreof. — (il^ru>u^t»ra2 iETa^, Kildare st.) 

26 M'Masteb & Hodgson, Ashtown Oil MillSf Ph 
cake and meid ; lineeed oils; linseed cake and meal; Ijris] 
which they are manu&otnred. 

27 Mawson & Swan, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. — Photoj 
cimens. 

28 The Marine Salts Co. op Ibelanp (Laiv 
JMUn. — ^Kelp ; muriate and sulphate of potash ; soda salt! 
seaweed. 

29 PiESSB & liUBiN, 2 New Bond st. London. — Odori 
and plants ; perfumery and articles for the toilet. — (Ajopro 

80 PULFORD, G. 0. 4 Bowgatc kill, Oa/rmon st. Lend 
31 Price's Patent Candle Company, Limited, 

London. — ^Belmont sperm, Belmontine, paraffin, and other c 

night lights; glycerin; oils and soap. — (Nave.) 

82 Reckitt, I. & Sons, Suffolk lane, London, E.C— 
33 Simon, L. Nottingham. — Bronze powders. 
84 Taylor, W. & Co. Leith — Composite, stearic a 
35 Tudor, S. & W. 17 College hill, London, E.G. 

White and red lead ; litharge and orange lead. — {East Gal 
38 Hutchinson, J. & Co. Widnes, Lancashire, 

Products of alkali manufacture. 

87 Patent Plumbago Crucible Co. Battersea Wo7'h 
black-lead, graphite, both in natural and manufactured sta 

88 RiMMEL, E. Strand, and Regent at. London. — Pei 
riage Court.) 

89 CoLMAN, J. & J. 16 Cannon st. London, E.C. 
and Indigo blue. 

40 Bewley, Hamilton, & Co. SacTcville st. IkMin.— 

41 Young, J. Bathgate, N.B. — Paraffin, and paraffi! 

42 Boileau & Boyd, Bride st. Dublin. — Pharmaceu 

828 Patent Peat Co. (Limited), 84 Middle Abbey si 
fuel. — {Under Verandah.) 

829 Phospho-Guano Co. 22 Bachdors' walk, Duhli 
cultural Hall, Kildare st.) 

830 GossAGE, W. & Sons, Widnes Soai^ery, near Warn 
soaps. 

831 Rathbobne, J. G. 44 Essex st, Dublin. — ^Unbleac 
candies, &c. ; sperm oil ; spermaceti crude and refined ; 
sahie ; paraffin, crude and refined ; sealing-wax, &c. 

832 BiCKFOBD, Smith, & Co. Tucking st. Mill, Carribqi'i 
fuses. — (Agricultural Mall, Kildare st.) 

833 Seagbave, G. & Co. ITargreave^ Buildings, 
JSeacombe, near Birkenhead. — Phospho-guano. {Agricultu^ 

834 Bbitish & Fobeign Safety Fuse Co. Redruth^ 
safety fuse for blasting. — (Agricultural Mall, Kildare st.) 

835 Patent Wax-Soap Factoby, 8 Belle-Isle, York r 
IBars of soap ; patent wax soap ; samples of wax ; ran 
employed in the manufacture. 

836 Rumsey, W. S. 3 Cla^ham row, Londou.-^Iiet&rQ 
paste ; furniture polish, &c. 

837 Pabbjeb, J. W. & Co. Chester, Liverpool, Londqr, 
Iiead ore, and products therefrom, viz. : white lead; redUtb? 
paint ; sheet, shot, pipe ; silver ; block tin ; mode! of «^ot 



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SUBSTAKOES VSEST ASrifOOJh 



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8ES0T101T III. 

';t SUBSTAl^GES USED AS FOOD. 

^jK^*^-'^- 'viOi^ n^ North Gallery of Kaye. 
4^ Ewf, GoTTLB & Go. CecUta st, IhibUn. — ^British wines, KquenrSi spiitts 

44 Baoots^ Hutton, & Co. 28 WiUiam st. Dublin. — ^Irish whiskey. 

45 Bakbb, Simfbon, & Co. 40 Patrick; st, Cori, and 98 Ca^ tt, i)tt&2t».— Bis* 
onitB in 60 Tarieties. **-^ 

46 Bbown & PoLSON, JZo^oZ Starch WorJes, PaUley, and 98 Capdtt Dublm,^ 
Patent com flour; si^o; powder starch ; ciystal com starch; maize gluten, for feeding 
cattle. 

47 Cox, J. & G. Oorgie MUUf Murrayfield, Edinburgh. — Gelatin and glue. 

48 EvAKS & Staffobd, Campbdl tt, Leicester. — Cigars. 

49 Fbt, J. S. & Sons, 12 Union it. Bristol, and 262 City road, London, E.C," 
Series illustrating the preparation of chocolate ana cocoa from the native plants. 

50 Gamblb, J. H. & Co. 6 Morrieaon's Quay, Cork, amd 78 itcnc^urd tt. 
L<mdon, E.G. — Preserred meats, fruits, soups, fish, &c. ; pickles, jams, &c. 

51 Globnet, B. & Co. Mardyhe MUU, Cha^eUzOd, Dublin,— MnsUiirdB; mostaid 
oil and cake ; blues ; ginger and starch. 

52 RoGEBS, E. 3 Winchester Duildings, London, ^.C— Turkish tobacco and 
cigarettes. 

53 Habt, J.W. 60 St. Mary Axe, London^ £(7.— Isinglass from various coim- 
tries, in raw and manufactured states. 

54 Maobobt, B. Ardmore MiUs, Netotovmlimavaddy. — Oats, oatmeal, groats, and 
shelling ; Irish wheat and flour; flax seed; flax straw and scutched fibre. 

55 Mitchell, S. 10 Grafton st. Dublin. — Bride cake ornamented. 

56 Peek, Fbban, & Co. Dockhead, Londor^ S,E. — Steam-made biscuits. 
67 Kinahan & Sons, Carlisle Buildings, Dublin. — Irish whiskey. 

58 PoLSON, W. & Co. Abercom st. Paisley, Scotland. — Patent com flour and 
starch ; starch produced from maize, the residue serving as food for cattle. 

59 Wabbinbb, G. The Cedars, Daitersea, London, S.W. — Concentrated soups 
and preserved meats. • 

60 Hallett, F. F. The Manor House, Brighton, Sussex. — Pedigree cereal* 
from a single grain. — (Agricultural Hall, Kildare st.) 

61 Jacob, W. & R. & Co. 6 and 6 Peter's row, Dublin. — Biscuits. 

62 CoLMAN, J. & J. 26 Cannon st. London^ B.C. — Mustard. 

63 HoQO & Bobebtson, 22 Mary st. Dublin. — Cereals. 

64 Maoeay, J. 119 George st. Ediniburgh. — Quintessences and other condi* 
ments used for flavouring food. 

65 Andbews & Co. Dame st. Dublin. — Preserved fruits, pickles, &c. 

66 Maoket, J, WestunorelaTid st. Dublin. — Seeds, roots, cQTQ3As.^{Agriculturai 
Hall, Kildare st.) 

67 Fawoett & Co. 18, 19, avid 20 Henry st. Dublin.— WhisiLey. 

68 Keen, Robinson, Bellvillb, & Co. Garlick hill, London, E.G. — Mustard, 
indigo blue, chicoiy, patent barley, groats, prepared com. 

69 MCKban, W. St. MirrevCs, Paisley, N.B. — Starch ; com flour. — {AgricMikrd 
HaU, Kildare st.) 

70 Mazzini^ B. 14 Union-court, Old Bondst. London, ^.(7.— Turkish tobacco and 
cigarettes. 

838 Ejeith, B. R. 1 Ingram court, Fenchwtch st. London, E.G. — '* Maizefarina," a 
breadstuff from maize and wheat ; " cerealina" (article of diet). — (Agrricultural Hall) 

839 Patohett, K C. Ilkeston road, NottinghoM. — ^Nottinghamshire sauce. — (-Agri- 
cultural Hall, Kildare st.) 

840 Bybne, J. J. 24 D'OlieT ««.—Model of a pig in \sx^.^{AgriculturaZ Hall.) 
. 841 Pbbbt, BseiHEBS & Co. i>u&^m.— Biscuits. 



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i 



MACHlNERy AT REST. 



Jit^&xm%^A:} 



180 Debino, G. E. ZoclUyh Welwfi^ 17^/»«|*f»l«.--Improvodpennaiieiit-way 
of railways ; spring clip fish joints; spring keys; spring treenails. 

181 SiJiiibir, 3. 13 Pa/nmage, MaTichesUf^.^Vtmiing, nnnili^ng, Mk^- 
forating, paper cutting iriacbineB; nipping aiid eerew, hydrauBo, copying presses; 
photographic rolling machine. 

183 Bacon & Wayman, 43z Barbican, London.-^Wire and dandy roll for paper 
1atbiiah€ ; paper liionld for hand-made paper ; i^oven wite for bKndiJ, «e. 

184 Booth, Beotheb8,63 Upper Stephen st. Dublin. — ^Turning lathe* ; slider^, 
iaohi and apparatns for turning; portaWe forges, anvils, vices, forgfe bellows; Wes- 
fon'8 patent diffe^ntial ptdley ; mitre machine ; diilling apparatus ; grindstofles; §a1v8; 
planes;. sawing machine, &c. , « . #. ^ 

185 Booth, H. & Co. lady Day Spindle TforJb.-^Spindles and Hys, «e., for cot- 
idtij flAx, &c. ; Spindle collars and footsteps. 

186 The Brouqhton Copper Co. (Limited), Btonghton Copper Works^ Mm' 
Chester. — ^Bra^ and copper printing and embossing rollers ; tubes ; screw steam valves; 
taps ; water guages ; mountings ; headings ; locomotive whistle. 

187 Hackikg & PaHKIkson, Moorside W&rJcs, Bury, Xttticttjrfer.— Spindles and 
flyers for flax and cotton. 

188 Ibtin & Sellers, Peel Hall Wm^lcs, Pm^on.— Boxwobd in logs, bosses, 
flhuttles, pickers, bobbins, reels, perns, spools, &c. 

189 ScELAFFES & BuDENBERO, 96 George st. Manchester.— Steam gauge ; engine 
counters, &c. . 

190 Moore & Manbt, Dudley^ and 3 BUliter sq. London, jET.a— Specimens of 
rolled malleable and cold blast pig iron ; puddled and cast steel, kc. &c. 

191 London India Rubber Co. Limited.— India rubber belting, pipmg, 
rings, &c. 

844 Freeman & Grundy, Manchester.— Patent portable silent fan, for sanitary 
and ventilating purposes ; patent portable forge, for boiler makers and contractors. 

845 1)eas, J. Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway. — Patent switch box. 

846 Carr, T. ^mtoZ.— Patent disintegrator.— (^^rncwZ^wraZ Hall, KUdure st.) 

847 Chatwood, S. J5o?«07i.— Wedgeproof fastenings for safes; valve screws, 
springs, and cylinders ; steel plates, &c. 

S4:S Walker & Son, Bii-mingham. — Beer and water meters; harpoon ship log; 
harpoon sounding machine. 

849 Ibbotson, W. 8 DicJcinson st, Manchester. — Steam engine ; California pulnp; 
patent pulley blocks. 

850 Nutman, I., 2)if6Zi»i.— Several Models. 



FOREIGN DEPARTMENT. 

851 BiNNENDAHL, R. W. Huttrop, near Steele, i?.P.— Centrifugal mine ventilator 
for moving by hand. 

862 Dreslbr, J. H. Si^gcnj Westi^halia.—'Rmg of rolled iron wire. 

853 BocHUMER Iron Foundries, Bochum, Westphalia. — Mine ventilator for 
moving by hands, system Rittinger. 

854 HoRDER Bebqwerks und Hutten Verein, Horde, Westphalia. — ^Railway 
wheels, showing the various stages in the development of the plate wheel system ; 
large steel plate ; rails ; specimens of iron, &c. 

855 Martinotti, Luigi, 9 via Barbaroux, Turin. — Portable flying bridge ; look 
out tower ; fire escape. 

850 Kbupp, "P. Essen, Rhenish Prussia, and 11 New Broad it. London, B.C.— 
Steel 110-pounder gun, with improved breach-loading apparatus ; small breach-loading 
^un ; steel rail bent in three ; steel plate wheels ; photographic view of Elrupp's cast- 
steel works at Essen. 

857 Cail, J. F., Halot, A. & Co. Brussels. — Radial boring machine ; three slide- 
lathes ; transverse planing machine. 

~ ^ evenbroich, near Dusseldorf, R. P. — Card for weaving. 
itan. — Fire engine. — (Agricultural Hall, Kildare si.) 
^w York. — ^Working models and drawings of the self-centering 
ad other turn tables ; bullet compressing machine; interna* 
3, &c. 
Co. Hamburgh. — Patent bitumenized paper pipes. 



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GABBIAGES. 



Section V.-^C.) 



861 Penn, J. & SoNSy Oreenwich. — ^Model of a pair of patent trunk marme 
engines of 360 horse-power, as fitted to H.M. ships "Arrogant" and "Encounter;" 
specimens of machine work : connecting rod, link, &c. 

862 Sturgeon, J. BurUy, near Leeds. — Model of self-acting coal-cutting machine, 
adapted for smallest coal seams. 

863 Tatham, J. Moss lane Works, and MUerow road WorTcSf Rockdale, Man- 
chester. — Cai*ding machines, viz.— Scribbler, intermediate, and condenser, with cylin- 
ders, dofiFers, brest, licker-in, strippers, &c., constructed of iron ; self-acting mules 
(patented) ; improved power loom. Card clothing exhibited on these machines by 

864 Law, S. & Sons, Cleckkeaton, Yorkshire. — Manufacturers of cai-ds for, all 
kinds of fibrous materials. 

865 Ryan, W. Fishanible st. Dublin. — Martin's patent wood turning lathe. 

866 Siemens, Brothers, 3 Great George st. London, S. W. — Electrical signal 
between engine and boiler room. 

86 7 Grendon, T. Drogheda. — Locomotive engines. — {Agricultural Hall.) 
-.868 Mitchell, S. J. Portmakon House, Dublin, — Portable flax scutching ma- 
. chine. — (Agi'icultural Hall, Kildwre st.) 

869 Powis, C. & Co. Cyclops Works, Millwall Pier, London E. — "Wood-working 
machinery, comprising band saw, circular saw, xmiversal joiner, mortising machines. 

870 Edmundson & Co. Capel st, Dublin. — Patent portable gas apparatus; 
Lenoir's gas engine, " a new nlotive power ;" Anderson's patent gas exhauster and 
engine combined ; patent concentric governor. 

871 Powis, C. & Co. Cyclops PFoa^, Millwall pier, and 51 Gracechurch st. 
London, E, — Mortising, planing, boring, and tenoning machines; band sawing ma- 
chine ; joiner's saw bench. 

872 Hughes & Kimber, West Harding st. Fetter lane, London. — Printing and 
paper cutting machine, for steam power ; newspaper addressing machine, worked hy 
Forster <Ss Co., Crow street, Dublin, and by the Projyrietors of tlie Dublin. Medical Press. 

873 Greenmount Spinning Co. Dublin. — ^Two power-looms. . 



SECTION V— (C.)' 
CAEEIAGES. 



120 Browne, J. 167 Great Brunswick st. Dublin. — Outside jaunting car. 

121 Buchanan, J. & Co. 339 St. Vincent st, Glasgow. — Four wheel cai-riage. 

122 Evans, J. Patent Carriage Manufactwy, 32 & 34 TarUon st. Church st, 
Liverpool. — Improved cab and drag (registered). 

123 Grady, R. E. 38 Dawson st, Dublin. — New miniature brougham, with 
improved fore carria^. 

124 Hawkins, J. 68 Capel st, Dublin, — Carriage lamps of various kinds; stable 
and yacht lamps. 

125 Holmes, H. & A. London road, Derby, Bird st. Lichfield, and 38 Margaret 
st. Cavendish sq. London, W. — Doctor's miniature brougham. 

126 Hooper & Co. 28 Haymarket, London, S.W.^Light Sefton landau and 
Sutherland barouche ; drawings of carriages and harness. 

127 HuTTON, J, & Sons, Summer hill, Dublin.^Broughaja with circular front, 
and park sociable. 

128 Kbnnbpt, J. & Son, 3 Montgomery st, £elfast,-^Ca.noe landau, with hind 
rumble. 

129 Kesterton, E. 93 & 94 Long acre, London, TF.C— "Elcho Amempton" 
sociable, forming two parriages in one. 

130 Killing ER, C. 20 Westlandrow, 2)tt6/m.— Landau. 

131 Lbdwidcie, Baggot, & Co. 55 Talbot st. Dublin Perambulator. 

132 Macneb., J. & Co. 106 Prince's st, Edinburgh, — Circular front brougham. 

133 M*DowE[iL, J. 46a St, Anne st, Liverpool. — Patent drag. 
184 M*Naught& Smith, Worcester, — Light landau. 

135 Martin, C. C.E. 106 Cheapside, London, ^.C— Patent apparatus for opening 
and olosing heads of landaus, &o. ; patent carriage steps. 

136 AwDREWiu, P. 42 Great Brunswick st. Dublin, — Waggonette. 

137 Morgan, E. & G. 90 & 91 Edgetoareroad, London, W, —Landau sociable, with 
patent for opening and closing the head. 

9 WtUla st, Ovfwd st, London, — Double seated brougham. 



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10 NAVAL ARCHITECTURK Section VUL— (A.) 

SECTION VIZ. 

GPfUi JSmTSEEBJlSiQ, ASCHITEOTUBAL AND BUn^ma COKTBIVAKOEa 
South Side of Nave. 

191b The Butterlt Company, Alfreton, Derbyshire. — Solid wronght iron beams 
and girders. 

102 Clayton, W. 40 Waterloo road, Dublin. — Designs for Italian villas, and 
Gothic church ; models of Lissadell Court, co. Sligo, and of park entrance to same. 

193 Gorman, W. A. 5 Denmark st. SohOf London, W.C, — Siebe's patent diving 
apparatus. 

194 Heeley, J. C. 59 Wellington st. Dublin. — Model of wrought-iron lattice 
bridge on the Dublin, Wicklow, and Wexford Railway over the river Ovoca. 

195 Siemens, Brothers, 3 Gt. George st. Westminster, S.W. — Improved telegraph 
recording instrument ;• magneto-alphabetical telegraph, with alarm ,* railway alarm ; 
electrical testing instrument ; resistance coils ; galvanometers ; induction coil ; tubular 
iron telegraph posts and insulators ; submarine cables, &c. 

196 HiPPius, A. 37 Russell sq. London, W.C. — Drawings and description of 
Russian brick stoves ; models of the same. 

197 Beard & Dent, 21 Neiccastle st. Strand, London. — Cast lead traps. 

87.4 Jennings, G. Palace Wliarf, Westminster Bridge road, London, S. — Lavatories 
and sanatory appliances. 

875 Central Cottage Improvement Societt, 37 Arundel st. Strand, London, 
W.C. — Model of Exhibition cottages of 1862, copied by artist's pupil, Earlswood 
Asylum ; model and plans of a single cottage ; model of a double cottage. 

875a Merry, J. Cliestnut place, Dublin. — Models of churches, &c, 

876b Edwards, H. E. Albert place, Dublin. — Patent window sash. 



SECTION VIII.-(A.) 

NAVAL AECHITECTUEE. 
Corridor at West End of Carriage Court. 

198 Henwood, C. H. — Model of a steamship, and diagrams illustrating its con- 
struction. 

199 The Millwall Ironworks and Shipbuilding Company (Limited).— 
Model of H.M.S. Northumberland. 

200 Clifford, C. 3 East India avenue, Leadenhall st. London, E.C. — Working 
model of patent system of unlashing and lowering ships' boats, adopted by the 
Admiralty, &c. &c. 

201 CoNLAN, W. J. Dalton villa, Merton road, Liverpool. — Model of schooner 
yacht. 

202 GiSBORNB, F. N. 445 West Strand, London, TF. (7. —Patent electric signals for 
ship-steering, mining, &c. 

203 LuMLEY, H. 18 Leadenhall st. London, E.C. — Models of the Lumley rudder. 

204 NuNN, W. 179 St. George st. East, London, ^.—Patent ship and boat lamps ; 
Admiral Fitzroy's warning night signal lamps and lenses ; Commander Colomb's patent 
flashing day and night signal apparatus ; Lieut. Key's patent fog horn. 

205 Oliver, G. & J. 286 Wapping, London, E.— 'Record buoy ; masthead and side 
lanterns ; model of "Irene," Trinity steam yacht, with lanterns attached; oil-filler, &c. 

206 SCALLAN, M. Ringsend, Dublin. — Models of trawlers, yachts, &c. 

207 Walpolb, Webb, & Bewley, Port of Dublin Yard, North Wall, Dublin - — 
Models of ships, and of new patent boiler. 

208 Warnock, W. H., ^Z Queen's sq. Dtd)Un. — Model of a mevpliant vessel. 

209 Laird, Brothers, £{rJcenhead.—Mode\ of the City of Dublin Steam Packet 
Company's mail packet "Connaught." 

876 Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co. 132 Leadenhall st. London, 
E.C. — Model of steam ship "Golconda." 



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12 AGRICULTURAL MACHINES, &c. iSection IX. 

Exhibited on the Fremises of the Ro3ral Dnblin Society, Eildare-etreet 



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SSCTZON ZZ. 

AOBIOULTUBAL AND HOBTIGULTUBAL MACHINES AND XMPLEUENTS. 
Exhibited on the Premises of the Boyal Dublin Society, Eildare-street 

222 KEBffP, MuBRAT & NiCHOLSOBT, Stirling^ N,B. — Mowing machines, drills, &c. 

223 130BT, 'R.St. Andrew's WorJcs, Bury St. EdmundSf ^wJfoZA;.— Beard's new patent 
glass-house ; patent com screening and dressing machine ; self-cleaning com screens ; 
barley huramiller ; hay-making machine. 

224 Bbadford, T. Manchester, Fleet st. London, aitd 23 Daicson st Dvblin 

Patent washing, wringing, and mangling machines ; patent bntter making, cleaning, 
and salting machine ; patent chum. 

225 Wood, W. A. 77 Upper Thames st. London. — London prize patent one-horse 
reaping machine. 

226 Hatthornb, J. W. 20 Clumber st. Nottingham. — Hexagon garden nets, 
Chiswick garden net, for protecting trees, shading vineries, &c. 

227 DuFFiELD, J. 12 Great Chapel st. Oxford st, W. London. — Churns, butter 
prints, moulds, tablets ; dairy and culinary utensils. 

228 Enniskillkn, Earl of, Morencecourt, EnnisJcillen. — Draining pipes ; flooring 
tiles ; flower pots. 

229 Edmundson, J. & Co. Capel st. ZhiUin. — Patent stable fittings ; patent gas 
apparatus ; patent washing machinery. 

230 Egan, p. 16 Webber St. Lambeth, Xo??,'7();?.— Self-acting ventilator. 

231 GoucHEB, J. Church Walk Iron Works^ Worksop, Nottin^ham.—SQU of six 
patent beater plates for thrashing com ; patent drum. 

232 Greenslade, E. A. & \V. Thomas st. Bristol. — Smiths or forge bellows. 

' 233 Ibwin, a. Ballmwre, Boyle, co. Roscommon. — Black oats grown upon re- 
claimed moor bog ii\ 1864. 

234 Kendall, J. Lincoln's Inn, London, and Derryginla, Clifden, Connemarcu — 
Shell Rand (lime) from coast of Connemara. 

235 Riches & Watts', Duke's Palace Iron Woi'ks, Norwich, England. — Patent 
Bclf- sharpening portable American gvbt mill. 

236 M'Faslane, W.'39 Stocku-cU st. (?Za,«?702r.— Mangles for table linens, &c. 

237 Hose, W. 53 Grass market Edlvhurgh. — Cart harness. 

237 Jensen.; Brothers, Faahorg, Denmark. — ChaiF cutting machines. 

238 Messenger, T. G. Loughborough, Leicestershire. — Patent triangular tubular 
boiler for heating b\:ildings with hot water ; patent double and single valves for hot or 
cold water, or gas. 

239 Nagle, E. p. 6 Loit'cr Dominick st. DuUin. — Ground plan and isometrical 
elevation of a farmery for a farm of 300 acres ; also of a farmei'v for a farm of 20 acres. 

240 Norman, R. & N. St. John's Common, Burgess Hill, Hurdpcrpoint, Sussex, — 
Plain and ornamental bricks, &;c. ; ridging and other tiles. 

241 IjRown, R. Paisley, Scotland, and 56 North wall quay Dublin. — Glazed sewer 
pipes ; plain and ornamental chimney cans ; garden vases and pedestals ; cattle feeding 
troughs ; field drainage pipes, &c. 

242 Rkf.d, B. & Co. Union st. Aberdeen, N.B. — Corn drills. 

243 Eawltngs, J. & J. S. Moor End Iron Works, Mdbourn, Eoyston, Cambridge- 
shire. — 'Improved horse rake for cleaning and gathering all kinds of grain crops. 

244 liiDDEL & Co. Donegal I place and Fountain st. Belfast. — Patent iron fittings 
for cow-houses, stables, and loose boxes ; vitrified pavement ; improved halter, &c. 

245 RowsELL, S. Buckland St. Mary, near Chard, Somej-set. — Entrance gate of 
English oak and wrought iron. 

248 Sheridan, J. 162 Church st. Dublin Flax breaking machine ; flax scutching 

machine ; stable fittings for stalls and loose boxes. 

9.4.7 Thomas. F. 72-74. Bishopsgate st. Within, London. — Steaming apparatus for 

)r working ditto. 

rwARD, Lincoln. — Tin cases of Simpson's cattle spice ; 

butter powder. 

Newport, Salop. — Portable steam engine ; patent finishing 

ierhill's patent elevator; wrought iron cultivator; fanning 

eese press; fences. 



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« ♦ 1 L 1« 8UKGICAL INSTRUMENTS. Section X-P) 



829 Booth, J. k Soir, 4 StephaCt greeny DvhUn, — Clock for a public I 
with spring remontoir, dischargiDg by half mintites. — {Transept, opposite the A^st,) ' 

330 AUBKBT & LiNTOir, 252 ReQent tt, london, W, — Clocks and watches; 
piping bullfinch. — (Nave). 

331 BENSOjr, J. W. 33 lAtdgatehUl, London, ^.C— Clocks and watches^A^ortA 
Side of Tramept). 

332 White, 20 Cockspur st. London, S.W.; Topham & White, 33 Grafton tt. 
Dublin. — Chronometers, watches, and clocks. 

333 M'Kat, J. 41 Oeoryes street, Edinburgh. — Model of improved watch re- 
lator. 



SECTION X.-(D.) 

SUEGICAL INSTEUMENTS. 

South Side of Nave. 



351 Gbossicith, W. R. 175 Fleet st. London, E,C. — ^Artificial fiyes ; patent artificial 
arms and hands, &c. 

362 MoBisoir, J. D. 8 Weiiryss place, Edinburgh. — New dental appliances for 
painless extraction, &c. 

363 Pbatt, J. F. 420 Oxford st. London, W. — Patent auricle for dea&iess ; trusses; 
surgical instruments, &c. 

354 Salt, T. P. 21 Bull st. Birminfjham. — Patent trusses, belts, &c. 

355 Thompson, J. 9 Nassau st. Dublin. — Surgical instrumentA. 

356 ToFNELL, J. 58 Lower Mount st. Dublin. — ^Tubular bougies, 

357 Thompson & 0*2s'eill, 7 Henry st. Dublin, — Surgical and deformity instru- 
ments. 

358 Ash, S. 59 Great Brunswick st. Dublin. — Mineral te^th ; dental implements 
and appliances. 

359 £iGO,H.56 Wimpolest. Careiulishsq. London, W. — Orthopcedic appliances and 
mechanical apparatus for deformities, &c. 

330 liAHN. — Patent dentiscope. 



SECTION XZ. 

COTTON. 
South Gallery of Nave. 

371 Brook, J. & Brothers, Mcltham Mills, Euddersjteld.—T&ieiit glac^ thread ; 
sewing cotton ; crochet and embroidering cotton. 

372 Evans, W. & Co. Derby.— Sowing, crochet, knitting, and embroidering 
cottons ; patent glacd thread ; cotton for sewing machines. 

373 Clark, J. & K. & Co. Bumsidc Thread Works, Pais/ev.— Thread. 

374 Shanks, W. & Sons, Bridge of Weir, near Paisley, iV. 5. —Thread and 
twisted yarns. 

SECTION XIZ. 

WOOLLEN AND WOESTED. 
South Gallery of Nave. 

380 Ganly, Sons, & Parker, 18, 19, and 20 Usher's quay. — Irish grown wools.— 
(Agricultural Hall, Eildare street.) 

381 Clibborn, T. & J. Newtown Factory, Moate, — Broadcloth; kerseymeres; 
Meltons, doeskins, fancy Tweeds, Tweeds, and* flannels. 



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SdotionXIL WOOLEN AND WOKSTBD .17 



884 Gbbehwood, Hanson, A; Co. BaUway tU Euddenfidd.—¥vncy woollena. 

385 Hayes, E. ArcJierstownf Thurles. — Friezes, Tweeds, Blankets, flannels. 

386 Hill & HuaHBS, Blw BeU^ Inchicore, i)udZi».— Friezes, Meltons, Tweeds. 

387 Loo AN, J. 19 New row, StnUhy Dublin, — Irish friezes and Tweeds. 

388 M'Ceaokbn, k Sons, Clane Mills, co, KUdare.—'Fnezea, blankets. Tweeds. 

389 NiooLLS, A. Browi st. CorA?.— Blankets, swanskins, flannels. Tweeds, friezes, 
cloths, &C. 

390 Read, J. &, J. Edinondstovmy It(ahfarnham.—-VTooXLeTi manufactures. 

391 Scott, F. & R. & Co. Island-bridge MiUs, Z)tt6W».— Irish friezes. Tweeds, 
and Meltons. 

392 Wise & Leonabd, NaUsworth and Jlolcontbe Mills, nsar Stroudy Gloucester- 
»hire. — Clothe, doeskins, beavers, and Meltons. 

> 393 Harrison, G. & Co, 31 North Bridge, Edinhurgh.^ScoichTweeda. 

394 Irwin, E. 30 Albion st. Zee^fe.— Cloths, Meltons, beavers, doeskins, &c. 

395 Grundy, E. & Sons, 26 High st. ifanc^es^cr.—Flannels, swanskins, 
ilaidings, blankets, printed felts and druggets, &c., &c. 

896 Mahont, M. & Brothers, 3 Camden quay, CorTc. — Irish Tweeds. 

398 Lajno & Irvine, Hawick, N,B. — Sdotch Tweeds. 

399 Wall, S. Blue Bell Mills Co. i>w6/in.— -Woollen cloths. 

400 Hunt & Winterbotiom, Cam a^id Bursley MiUs, Oloucestershtre.^Weat of 
England broad cloths, &c. 

401 Bland, J. H. — ^Wool. — (Agricultural Hall. Kildare st.) 

402 Roberts, Jowlings, & Co. Lig'htjfdll Mills, Stroud, Otoucestershirc-^Clo^u 
and doeaklns. 



SECTION XIII. 

SILK AND VELVET. 

South Gallery of Nave. 



403 Tatlor S. & Stokes, 45 Friday st. London, B.C. — ^Moires antiques, velvetfl^ 
And satins. 

404 Chadwick, J. 12a. Moseley st, Manchester, and West Houghton, Zajtcashire.^^ 
Broad silks. 

405 Slateb, BncKiNaHAH, & Co. 85 Wood st. Zon(2o}>,£.(7.— Silk scarfs, craTats* 
liandkerchie£B, &o. &o. 



SECTZOMT XIV. 

UANUFACTUBES FBOM FLAX AND HEMP. 
South Gallery of Kave. 

411 Austin, J. 8 & 9 Princess st, Finshwy, London, B.C. — ^Imperial patent sash, 
blind, curtain, picture, and clock lines. 

412 FiNLATSON, BousFiELD, & Co. Johnstonc Flax Mills, Olasgow.—Tlaji in 
different stages of manufacture ; shoe and tailor's threads coloured and bleached; 
gilling twines, &c, 

413 Flbhino, W. & J. & Co. Baltic and Clyde Linen Works, Cfkugow.— Jute 
yams, sacking, pocketing, Hessians, tarpaulin, sacks, wool packs, g^ano bags, &c. 

414 Jafpb, Brothers, DonegaU sq. South, Belfast, and Banfcyrd Bleach Work Co, 
QUford, CO, Down. — Fine and domestic linens ; linen and cambric handkerchiefe ; 
turbans manufactured for the Moslems of Africa and Asia ; damask table linen. 

415 Johnston & Carlisle, Brookfield Mills, Belfast.^lrisYi flax ; linen yarns ; 
hand -loom and power-loom linens ; cambric handkerchie& ; plain cambric ; lawns, 
diapers, damasks, huckaback, &c. 

416 Salmond, W. & Sons, Arbroath, Scotland.— "Nsavy canvas, and flax canvas of 
▼arious kinds; tow-milled canyas; flax seaming and roping twine. 





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18 



MANUFACTURES FROM FLAX AND HEMP. Sec. SfV. 



417 Vkbdon, Maoui&s, k Co. 2 Burgh quay, DMin. — Ropes, sail cloth, ships' 
flags, and nets. 

418 Wilson, Brothers, 29 Lmether 9t, Whitehaven. — Sail cloth with strong 
centre bands, from Irish flax. 

410 Dunbar, Dioksons, & Co., Dunbar, M'Master, & Co. GiJford & BeJfaxt. — 
Flax dressed and undressed ; linen yarns and threads ; yams ; damasks and drills ; 
cambric handkerchiefs. 

420 Frnton, Son, & Co. Linen Hall, Belfast. — Flax in the raw state and in its 
different processes ; yarns ; damask table cloths ; handkerchiefs ; lawn ; Indian 
scarfs, &c. 

421 SwALB, F. 9 Jffunter'Street, BrunswicJc-square, London. — Flax, Irish and 
foreign, in every state of preparation. — {Agricultural Hall, Kildare 8t.) 

422 Hull, H. & Co. Brogheda. — Sheetings, Drogheda linen, diapers, huckabacks, 
glass clotlis ; bed-ticks ; farmer's drills, &c. 

423 MooBB & Weinbbrg, Belfast. — Linens, linen yarns, damask table linen. 

424 Stuart, J. & W. Musselburgh^ Scotland. — Patent mackerel, herring, and 
other fishing nets, and twines in cotton and hemp. 

425 Walpolb & GrEoaHEGAN, 8 and 9 Suffolh sf. Dublin^ and 48a Pall Mall, 
London. — Irish damask, table linen, sheetings, towellings, &c. &c. ' 

426 EwART, W. & Sons, Belfast and Manchester. — ^Yarns, linens, shirtings. 

427 Owen, W. & Sons, Brogheda. — Linens, sheetings, diapers. 

428 Richardson, J. Sons, & Owden, Belfast. — Linens and damasks. 

429 Oldham & Sons, Westmoreland at. Dublin. — ^Linens, damasks, sheetings. 

430 Brown & Liddell, Belfast. — Damasks and linens. 

431 Moss, S. S. Mill St. Balbriggan, co. Dublin. — Dowlas; checks; gingham; 
glass cloths; hollands. 



SECTION XV. 

MIXED FABRICS AND SHAWLS. 
South Gallery of Nave. 

807 AkbOTD & Son, Halifax. — Orleans lastings worsted ; damask stufis.— (AavCr) 

432 Smith, R. & Son, Park Vale and Hay ford Mills, Stirling^—WlnoejB, fancy 
dresses, and petticoatings. 

433 Smith, G. & A. 108 South Bridge st. Edinburgh. — Filled shawls and plaids ; 
tartans, woollens, mixed fabrics. 

434 Kerr, Scott, &Kilner, 58 Cannon st. West, London, E.C.ShAVfla. — (Nave.) 

435 Fry & Co. 31 Westmoreland st. Dublin. — Irish poplins, &c. ; silk figured 
Terry s, and borders for upholstery. — (Nave.) 

438 PiM, Brothers, & Co. South Great George's st. Dublin. — Irish poplins; 
brocatelle curtains ; shawls, &c. — (Nave.) 

437 Craven, J. & Co. (Limited), 23 Leeds road, Bradford, ror^sAtr«.— Cashmere, 
Llama, Indiana shawls, &c. ; shawl cloakings, reps, merinoes, and other woollen 
fabrics ; dress goods. 



SSCTION XVI.-(A.) 
LEATHEB, SADDLEET AND HABNl^S. 



Carriage Court 

440 Mtbbs, M. 27 Wigmore st. Cavendish square, London. — Patent waterproof 
dress baskets, trunks, portmanteaus. — (North Gallery and AgricuUurl Hail.) 

441 Blaokwell, S. 259 Oxford st. London. — Gutta percha jockies; anti-crib- 
biting strap ; patent springs, and vulcanized rubber apparatus for horses* legs, &c, ; 
boots, bridles, reins, chains, whips, &c. ; patent appliances for saddlery. 

443 Gbat, W. & Son, 18 South St. David st, JSdinbwgh.—'ELixnimg and 9i<^ 
saddles; single horse gig or car hnmess. 



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^ ^ 1 1 20 PEINTING AND BOOKBINDING Section XVn.^-(B.) 



i 



Kortti Corridor. 



8SCTZON 2:VZZ.>-(B.) 

FBIKTINO AND BOOEBINDINO. 

North Gorridor. 

485 ASHBT & Co. 7d King William tt. Lcndonj E,C. — Specimens of engraTing 
for bank-notes, &c. 

486 BuBT, J. Ar 16 Charles tt. Clarendon sq, London, — Facsimiles, by hand, of 
earlj printing and manuscripts. — (North Gallery of Nave.) 

487 Brooks, V. 1 Chandoitt. Charing Cross, London, W.C. — Specimens of litho- 
graphy. — (Ecut Corridor.) 

488 Oabbell, Petteb, & Galpin, La Belle Sawoage yard, Ludgate hill, London 
E.C. — Printed books, and electrotypes of illustrations. — {North Gall&ry.) 

489 Day & Son, Gate st. Lincoln' s-irm fields, London, W.C. — Lithography, 
chromo-lithographs, &c. — {East Corridor.) 

490 Dic^KS, W. 5 Old Fish st. Doctors' Commons, and Farringdon road, London, 
E.C. — Colour printing from letter-press and machine, by the chromographic process; 
same in combination with steel-plate printing. — {East Corridor.) 

491 Gut, Brothers, 26 and 27 Aca£smf^ st. CorA;.— Stationery, bookbinding, 
printing, and lithography. 

492 Hailes, a. C. & Co. Peterborough court, Fleet st, London, E.C. — Chemico- 
graphic engraving and printing ; colour printing for showboards, &c. ; reproductions 
of exhibition prize medals ; bank-note engraving and printing. — {North Gallery.) 

493 Hanhart, M. & N. 64 Charlotte st, Fitzroy sq. London, W.C. — Specimens of 
chromo-lithography. — {East Corridor.) 

494 Johnson, J. M. & Son, 3, 5, gtkZIO Ca^lest. Holbom, London, E.C. and 
64 Rue R6awmur, Paris. — Chromo-fulgent show cards and crystal tablets. 

/ 496 Knipb, J. A. Moorville, Carlisle. — Geological msq>3.~~ {North Corridor.) 

497 Latton, C. & E. 150 Fleet st. London, ^.C— Specimens of engraving and 
stationery ; proofs from engraved plates of every description ; impressions from dies 
in wax and on paper ; ornamental stationery and envelopes — {North Corridor.) 

498 Martin, T. Newton Abbot, Devon. — Impressions of seals engraved by 
machinery. — {North Corridor.) 

499 Oliver & Boyd, Edinburgh.^-'Educs.tion&l works. — (North Gallery.) 
,500 Philip, G. & Son, 32 Fleet st. London, E.C. and Caxton Buildings, Liverpool.-^ 

Philip's popular atlases ; series of large school-room maps ; smaller school-room maps.* 
maps for tourists, class books, &c. ; scripture prints ; copy-books. — {North Corridor.) 

501 Stanford, E. 6 Charing cross, London, S. W. — Maps. — {North Corridor.) 

502 Zaehnsdorp, J. 30 Brydges st. C^vent garden, London, W-C. — Specimens of 
bookbinding in the monastic, Colier, Maioli, and modem styles. — {North Gallery.) 

503 Borschitzky, J. F. 32 Tavistock place, London, W.C. — Educational music. — 
(North Corridor.) 

504 Johnston, W. & A. K. 4 St. Andrew sq. Edinburgh. — Geological and other 
maps. 

505 Ward, M. & Co. 5 Davison st. Dublin, and 13 Donegall place, Belfast. — 
Illuminated addresses presented to H.H.H. the Prince of Wales, exhibited by permis- 
sion ; illuminated diploma ; bookbinding ; account-books ; heraldic engraving and die- 
sinking ; arms, crests, monograms, residences, &c. &c. — (North Gallery.) 

506 Williamson, T. T. 18 Crow st. Dublin. — Cards engraved or lithographed ; 
coats of arms, crests, and monograms in wax, &c. — (North Gallery.) 

507 Worn, A. 4 Molesworth st. Dublin. — Die engraving, embossing, and illu- 
mination. — (North Gallery.) 

508 FoRSTER & Co. 2 Crow st, Dublin. — Chromo -lithographs — '^Clonmacnoise," 
"Road and River Side," " Soldier Tired," " Church (Rutland squaie)," &c. ; copy of 
Chinese picture ; almanacs, show-labels, &c. 

509 Illustrated London News, 198 Strand, London, W.C, — Copy of Christmas 
supplement of 1863, and wood-blocks from which illustrations printed ; fine-art and 
new illustrations, and coloured supplements. — (Ea,st Corridor.) 

510 Gray, B. 83 JRichniond-place, Edi/nburgh,-^Map of Ireland, for use of blind, 
raised by needle-work. 



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22 LACE AND EMBROIDBBY. Section XIX.-<(B.) 



SECTION 2:ZX.-(B.) 
I LACE AND E^CBBOIDEBT. 

South Gallery of Nave. 

548 Alibw, C. 108 Qraflem, ti, DtLbHn,—lnah. point, gnipnra^ and applique Uce; 
Brussels point lace; Honiton lace; and Irish embroidery. — (Nave.) 

644 CoMMisaiONEBa oi* NATioJiAL Eduoatiok FOB Ikelano.— Specimens of work 
by pupils of model schools. 

644a Beale, Mrs., manager of the Hefomatory School fop Juvenile Offenders, 
established under the Act 21 k 22 Vict., ch. 103, at Spark's Lake, Monaghan. — 
jj) Specimens of work by the inmates. 



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24 



IRON AND GENERAL HARDWARE. 



Section XXn« 



SECTION XXII. 

IRON AND GENERAL HARDWARE. 
South Side of Nave. 

606 HoDOSS & SOKB, 16 Westmoreland <f.— Kitchen h^panAfja^Agrieukwral 
HaUj Kildare st.) 

607 BBOWN& Gbkek, George a, Luton, Bedfordshire.— Tatent and close fire self- 
actiDg kitchen ranges ; improved cottage mage.--{Agricultural Hall, Kildare «t.) 

608 M'Sheebt, M. 10 Bank place, Limericki — ^A newly invented kitchen range.— 
(Agricultural Hall, Kildare st.) 

609 Ejdgell, F. 103 Gt. Hampton st. Birmingham. — ^Fonnders' models, brass 
and metal letters, fancy letters, stencil plates, pattern name plates. — (Agricultural Halt.) 

610 Smith & Wellstood, 7 Capel st. and 74 Great Strand st. — Portable kitchen 
ranges ; cooking and heating stoves ; portable farm, laundry, and kitchen boilers 
stove grates ; hot water heating apparatus. — (Agricultural Hall.) 

611 AsKiNS, J. D. 64 Middle Abbey st. Dublin. — Patent galvanized, corro- 
gated roofing iron. — (Agricultural Hall, Kildare st.) 

612 Chubb k Son, 57 St. PavVs churchyard, Zo7i(2(m.-»Chubb's patent locks and 
keys ; Chnbb's patent safes. 

613 Clabkk, D. & Co. Canada Works, Floodgate st. Birmingham.— VaioiA 
corrugated metallic Venetian blind ; cornices, and actions connected therewith. 

»• 614 Cbiohlbt, H. k Co. Sheffield Stove-grate WorkSy BirmingJuim Stove-grates 

hall stands ; air-warmer ; fenders ; fire-irons ; iron chimney-pieces. 

615 DoLLAE, T. A. 56 New Bond st. London. — ^Horse-shoes for sound and 
diseased feet. 

616 Edblstbn & Williams, Neio Hall Works, George st. Birmingham.— -ToM 
hair pins ; wire, copper, spelter, &c. showing the process of pin manufacture. 

617 Edmundson, J. & Co. 83, 34, 35, & 36 Capel st. DMin. — Carrara marble 
chimney-piece ; Italian marble mantel-piece ; chimney-glasses ; baronial stove ; 
ornamental brass scroll-work, &c. 

618 Edwabds, F. & Son, 49 Great Marlborough st. London Drawing-room, 

dining-room, and library grates ; fenders and fire irons. 

619 Haggie, Bbothers, Gateshead-on-Tyne. — Silver, gilt, copper, and galvanised 
cord, for hanging pictures, sashes, and for lightning conductors. 

620 Fbancis E. 1 Camden pla^e, Dublin. — Horse-shoes. 

621 Gatchell, R. G. 7 Dawson st. Dublin. — Beams and scales, with patent agate 
bushings ; fine scales for analytical purposes ; decimal and bankers' weights. 

622 Gas Meteb Company (Limited), Irish Meter Manufactory, Hanover St., 
i)u&Ziii.— Patent dry and wet gas-meters, Sanders and Donovan's patent. 

623 Gloveb, T. Suffolk st. Clerkenwell green, London. — Patent dry-gas meters 
testing gas-holders. 

624 HoET, T. & Co. 25 New row. West, Dublin. — Pins ; hair-pins ; copper and 
brass music-wire. 

625 Hood, W. 201 Upper Thames st. London. — Lamp posts, brackets for gas, 
and fountain, in bronzed iron ; lamps for gas, in copper. 

626 Lambert, T. & Son, Sh(yrt st. Lambeth, London, S. — High-pressure watf r 
valves, pumps, and steam fittings. 

627 Lloyd, M. Charles Henry st. Birmingham. — Malleable nails. 

628 Maguibe, J. & Son, 10 Dawson st. Dublin. — Bronzed ornamental metal 
work ; garden chairs, &c. ; fancy japanned ware ; ornamental vases ; safes, &c. 

629 Peyton & Peyton, Bordesley Works, Birmingham. — Metallic bedsteads. 

630 Salter, G. & Co. West Bromwich. — Dynamometei*s, weighing machines, 
steam pressure gauges, and spring balances, &c. 

631 Sloane & S6ns, 2 Stephen* s green, DMin. — ^Altar and pulpit rails ; alms 
plates and basins ; mediaeval church lights, coronas, pillar lights, Gothic church doors. 

632 Chatwood's Patent Safe and Lock Co. Limited, Lancashire Safe and 
Lock Works, Bolton. — Fire-proof and burglar-proof safes ; locks, &c. 

633 Cdbtis, W. & Sons, Chancery lane, amd 99 Middle Abbey st. Dublin.— W&ier 
cocks ; gas fittings ; and railway carriage furniture. 

634 Fletcheb, A. 10 Lower JSaggot st, Dublin, — Shower and other baths ; japanned 
toilet sets ; fancy wire work, 

636 Kbnt, a 199 Hiah Holhom, IiOnd<m, TF.(7.— Patent kniff 'd9f«}ftj mi^««; 
«fkrp«t ow«9por ; ct^ump, itrmnerii mi ot)i«r pfttopt utensili, 



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GLASS. 



Section ttiV. 



StiCTIOIT XXIV. 

GLASS. 

North End of Trantepl 

V 670 Dublin Glass Bottle Cq. Upper Sheriff si. JDublia. — Wine and porter bot- 
tles ; claret and hock botties ; imperial quarts, pints, and half pints ; soda-wate? and 
seltzer bottles, &c. — (AgricuUural Mally Kilda/re-st.) 

671 Chance, Bbothbbs & Co. Qlaxs WorJa, near Bvrminghami, — Crown, dieet, 
Chance's patent, coloured and ornamental glass ; lenses ; ship signal lights ; baths, &c. 



for photography ; propagating glasses, &c. ; ecclesiastical window, 

672 CoPELAND, W. T. 160 New Bond st. London, and Sioke-aponrTreKt, 



-GhM, 



richly cut and engraved, for table service and general decoration. 

673 Gbeen, J. 35 Upper Thames st. St, PaiU% London, j&.(7.— Chandeliers, cande- 
labra, lustres ; cut and engraved table glass. 

675 Phillips, W. P. & G. 359 Oxford st. and 155 New Bond st. Lond4m,—CvA 
glass I engraved ditto ; plain ditto ; flower vases. 

676 Powell, J. & Sons> Whitefriar*8 Olass WorJca, London, -^.C^Chand^er tod 
candelabra ; engraved, cut, jewelled, and plain glass ; glass and porcelain for photo- 
graphy, &c. 

677 Worcesteb Koyal Pobcelain Co. Limited, Worcester.— Cut glass dessert 
service ; gaseliers ; chimney lights ; and ornamental table glass. 

678 Lavebs & Babbaud, Endell st. London, W.C, — East window of Clogher 
cathedral. — (South end of Gallery, over the staircase.) 

679 FoBBEST, J. A. &Co. 58 Limest. Liverpool. — Ecclesiastical window*-^(<S^pi^ 
end of Gallery.) 



SISCTION XXV. 



OEBAMIO MANUFACTUBE, CHINA, POBCELAIN, EABTHENWABE, fto. 
North End of Transept. 

691 CoPELAND, W. T. 160 New Bond st. London^ and StoJee-upon'Trent—PoTOO' 
lain vases ; dessert, dinner, and other services ; ceramic statuary, &c. 

692 HiGGiNBOTHAM & Callinan, 102 Grafton st. DMin. — Porcelain dessert 
service ; china ornaments ; vases ; table glass. 

693 Hill Potteby Company, Limited, Burslem, Staffordshire. — ^Dinner ware, 
china and earthenware ; dessert, breakfast, and tea ware ; Parian and majolica ware. 

694 Kebb, J. 114 Capel st. Dvhlvn. — ^Worcester porcelain ; vitrified stone china; 
Parian statuary ; Stourbridge table glass. 

695 IjEETCH, T. 26 Dame st. Dublin. — Finest Coalport porcelain centre pieces 
for dessert table ; Staffordshire china ; Irish manufactured glass. 

696 Phillips, W.^P. & G. 359 Oxfwd st. and 155 New Bond st. Zow^on.— China 
and earthenware services ; china ornaments. 

697 West, T.& Co. 16 Dawson st. — China, statuary, lamps, &c. 

698 Cliff, J. & Co. Imperial Potteries, Laxnheth, L(yndon, S. — Stoneware for 
chemical and other purposes ; porous jars, batteries, drain pipes, &c. 

699 Thomas, A. 11 and 12 Wellington quay, Dublin.— Wedgvrood & Son's has 
relief ornaments and china. 

701 M'BiBNEY & ^BMSTBONQ, Bdlcck, CO. Fermanagh. — ^Table and toilet ware 
in stone china ; stone ware, mortars, &c. for chemical purposes ; Parian china figures, 
statuettes, &c. ; earthenware. 

702 Gbbgg & Son, 18 Sachville st DttJZiw.— China and glass. 

703 GooDE, T. & Co. 19 Smth Audley st. Gi^osvenor sq. London, TT.— China. 

704 M'CuLLocH, D.— Pottery.— (-iflrncttZ^wmi Mall, Kildare at^ 



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Sectlcm :Kyi. DECORATION^ FUBNlTUi« 



SECTIPS^ XXVJI 

DECOJIATIOIJ, FUENTEJJJUE;, ^^ITD WHOIiSTi;^^ 
HANGINGS, PAPJSS MAOB^, ANB JAF^ 

710 Ralph, J. 61 Clanhrassil st. Lower. — Circular 
inlaid with different kinds of fancy wood. — {Agricultural L 

711 Arrowsmith, A.X a Ho. ao N4W Bond M. Lond 
parquet floors ; altar floors, &c. ; borders ; panelling of do 

712 Bkaket, p. 39 Stafford st Dublin. — Gothic c 
chairs; dinner table; gotl^c caxv^d oak pedesAal library t 
carved and gilt pier table. 

713 Bettridge, J. & Co. ^trww^^AaiOuTj-Papwr »*e 
tables, chairs, writing de^s, ink stands, tea caddies, photc 

714 Dyer, & Watts, 1 Northaircpton st. Lower 
Lady's wardrobe of pine, stained by Dyer's patent proce 
tables, and E-mail tables \rx patent pine. 

716 Egan, J. 10 Ualn st. KiUaA^ney. — Cabinet «j)d 
wood inlaid. 

716 GiLLOw & Co. 176 Oxford st. London, — Walnut 
with marbles ; carved walnujt cabinet ; cabinet inlaid ^!n»rqi 
richly inlaid console cabiptet ; carpets and silks ; drawing 

717 Kane, G. 6S Dame st. Dublin. — Camp Furnitui 
at N. W, entrance to Gardens.) 

718 Howard & Sons, 26 & 27 Dernsrs at. Oxford ^t. 
style of Lo.ijiis !XVI. ; duchess writing table ; princasjB tahl 
gilt ; easy chairs, &c. 

719* Ross &"Co. 8 Ellis' ^uay, DuhUn. — C«^p ion 
at N. W. Entrance to Gardens,) 

720 Jones, A. & Son, 135 St. SlepJwi's green, Ihtll 
foahogany ; curtains ; chairs ; Saxe Xjrotba, A yywjiwtor, ai 

721 McDowell, BL 52 Moi-y st. Duhlm.— Gilt pier 
mahogany sideboard ; walnut ottoman and easy arm chaii 

722 Sedlet, A. .^ Co. BurlingtQji FurnU^^ Gcileines, 
Patent equilibrium cjjiairs; silver j)ljjited, brass, an4 iroi^ < 

72^ Steinhofer, Miss F. 84e ffaamver st. Edir/b 
marble, painted from nature (JVJosaic work) ; «lab ditto. 

724 Strahan, ;R. & Co. 24 Bewry si. and 5 i^em. 
Italian style ; console table in the style of Loais XV. 

725 Taylor, J. & Son, 109 Prince's st. Edinbwgk^— 

726 Trollope, G. & Sons, Ealhin et. West, Belgrat 
JLondon. — Ebony /c.abiB^t. — {Nave.) 

727 TupsB-ORT, B. & Sons, Edzdnslawe, near (Mfirtovb, 
from nature in limewood ; carved bra>ckej^ ^A tabiee in I 

*728 Woo^LAMS, W. & Go. 110 High, ^. nt(w Mmsiit. 
val and other paper hangings. 

729 Alexander, S. 121 Gewgc st. Lir^erUh^-Vurui 

730 Annoot, C. 16 Old Bond st. Londoii.-'^Mhl ca 
Xiy. ; bronze and Qnnolu candelabra ; t^es, and other 

731 Dearen, T. F. 13 Soho sq. London, PT.— Consol 
top, supported by busts of angeis, si^uounted by carvetl a 

732 Jackson & Graham, 29, 33, U, 35, 37, and 8£ 
decoration ; cabinet furniture and bronzes. — ( Wt^d side of 

734 Brunswick, Brothers, VZNewinanst. Oxford st. 
style of Louis XVI. ; pair of Bonheur de jour, in satir 
XVI. ; portefeuiUe bureau ; chairs ; flower stands. 

735 Fry, W. & Co. 31 Wedmoreland st, Dublin 
furniture and interior decorations ; gilt bronze lamps and 



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88 Ar4Tl(jUrriJCSy MiSUJUXJYALi JiUitJNrrOKJfi, AC. Dec. iULVl.* 

^ ^ 11;.} 736 HiTWOODy HioanrBOTTOir^ Smttb, & Co. (Ldoied), 15 ParUamtai st» 

*') JhXiin, — Paper-hangings. 

737 PuBDiE, &NNAB, A Cabfbax, 77 Oeorge tt. Edinburgh, — ^Wall decoration 
in the Italian style. 
, 738 BowLET, 0. Sond st. New cross, Manchater.^^Movldings, &c.; picture 

\ frames, and imitation ormola miniature frames. 

, 789 Whttook, R. & Co. 9 (md 11 Qearge tt. Edinburgh Engraved and iUu- 

i . minated ash bedroom furniture (registered and trade marked). 

I 740 Btbnb, J. J. & Sons, 6 Henry st. DuftZin.— Furniture. 

741 Boyle, R. B. Jun, Marlborough st. Dublin. — Wood carving. 

742 CsAOBy J. G. 14 Wigmore st. London, W. — Furniture and decoration* 



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80 MISOELLAl^EOUS MANXTFACTtJEES, &0. bet. tXXX. 



sxroTioN xztaL 

imofitiiAirtious manWaoixjees and small wabes. 

Korth Gallery of Nave. 

783 M'C0BMI0K,H. 5 C(t8tle J^uUdingSf Mfaxt. — Bog oak jewellery. 

784 Truss, T. ». 53 Gtaeeek^ch «t. London, i&. C— Elastic pipe jottrtiv *<5- 

785 GoNKsibii^ D. 3S Pfici'JoM^ 8t. Duhlmj^—Bog oak <«nanient». — (AffricuUwrai 
jffally KUda/re »t.) 

786 6o(}OiKy J. Grafton st. Dvhlin^ — "Bog oak earvings, ornaments, &c. 

7o7 Hbatlb¥, J. 112 Middle Abbey ^.— Bog oak cartings'. — (AgrxGuHurat BattJ) 

789 Kenan, W. 2 Lower Pembrohs sU — Gothic caryed oratory; antiqiSie (^mnney- 
piece. — Affncyl^wraZ HtbLl. 

790 Smith, W. & A. MaticJdme, Ayr^ire, and 61 Charlotte tt. Bi^nnmf^kmttr^ 
Scotch tartan wood work. 

791 Ferguson & Co. 105 Chafttm st. Dubli/fb. — India rubber articles. 

792 HooANy Mis» M. 11 Wuietavem. st. Dublin. — Wax flowery 

793 Moore, J. 3 South Cumberland place. — Models of Irish ruins ; table oma-- 
ments, ^, — {AgHcnUwraJ, Hall, KUdare st.) 

795 Nathan, E. 5Q Great Strand at. — Billiard markers ; cues ; tnmks atnd 
portmanteaus. — (Agricultural Hally KUdare st.) 

796^ 1)0DGB, G. P. 79 Upper Thomas st. aiid Bermctndsey Rubber WorJce, London. — 
Vulcanized India^nbber valves ; washers ; steam packings, &c. 

801 Als^bsd, T. 126 Oxford st, London, W» — Bows, arrows, and arc^ry accoutre- 
ments ; fishiDg rods and tackle. 

8Q2. BimoN & WiLsov, 391 Strand, Londonr^Animnla dMM and mottoted. 

803 Farlow, C. 191 Strand, London, W,C, — Fishing rods, tackle, &c. 

804 Flin7| J. 17 Essex quay^ i>t^Zm.— Fishing tackle, &c. 

805 Gebrard, E. jun. 31 College place, Camden Town, London. — Osteologrcal 
specimens illaatrative of mammalia, birds, reptiles, and fish. 

806 Hadgbaft, R. 12 Great Russell st. Bloomxhvryi London.^-^MefKieaitt hhdi. 

807 JEFFEB2BS & Malings, Wood 9t. Woolwich, Kefnt. — Backet bsta and balls •; 
vulcanized India rubber soled racket shoes ^ racked pres8)ai!B. 

808 Lawrence, J. 39 Grafton st. Dublin. — Cricketing and archery equipments ; 
rackets, boxing-gloves, &c. 

809 Lawbsnob & Son, 7 Uppet' SachvUle 8t» Dublin.— Tojb, rocking horse, and 
perambulator. 

810 Falser & Mansfield, 39 OaMey st. Lambeth, London. — ^Rocking horses, 
with guard to rocker ; model of horse carved in wood. 

811 SouTHOBN, E. ^roae%, Shropthire. — ^Patent Bromley grazed tobacco pipes, 
and Narghile ; pipes of various kinds. 

812 Wattebs, T. John's lane Racket C<ywrt, IHt&^m— Backets and racket balls 
shoes, presses, ^. 

813 Bblos, W. L. E<me place, Coldstream. — Fishing rods^ tackle, &e. 

814 Wbskes & Son, Essex-quay, Dublin, — ^Fishing rods, tackle, &c. 

815 St. Mabt*s Blind Asylum, PortobeHo, DaSKw.— Basket and worsted work. — 
{8emth Gallery of Nave.) 

816 Molyneux Asylum fob the Blind, Upp^ L^mn et, JhihUn,^^a^lLe% aad 
'wotiitod'Work.TASouthGalleryofNave.) ' 



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COLONIAL POSSESSIONS. 



(qeneiuxxt ,in the north and west OALLSBISS). 



BAHAMAS. 

West Gallery. 

^ 1 COlLECnOS CONTI^UTED CHIEFLY HT HIS ExqKUUBirOT 9OV3a^0^»vEUtR|OV,P^ 
EUghteen specimens of indigenous woods, viz. : — Horseflesli lAahogany ; nake^ wood ; 
ebony ; prince wood ; cassada wood ; dog wood ; Madeira wood ; wHte iron, blaok 
iron, wmte torch, crab, mastic, satin or yellow wood ; lance wood ; atopper, oedar^ 
lignum vitae, and palmetto. Turpentine and resin — two new island products ; fibre 
of the Pita plant and Ma^la hen^p (plantain) ; .palm«tto rope and hats ; myrtle wax 
from the berries of Myrica cerifera; Abnts jyrecatorius ; ^etk island ootton; Kankin 
cotton ; knitted socks and mittens, from Harbour Island ; salt^ (largely produced m 
the islands) ; pink pearls from the conch shell (Strombus gigas) ; ambergris ; caacarltla 
,and wild cinnamon bark ; walking-sticks of Hercules* club ; cirab .wood, kfi. 

2 Robertson, Mrs. S. — White Shell-work basket, made by the exhibitor. 

3 Gabneb, Mrs. — Shell-work basket of coloured shells, nutde by iheeKhibitor.'^ 

4 Love, Mrs. — Mimosa bean reticules, made by the exhibitor. 

^5 CLUTaA.M, Miss. — Mimosa bean bracelets, dyed black, made by tb& «Kh]}>itor« 

6 MabsH; Miss^— -Mimosa bean bracelets, natural colour, xnad^ \>J tl^O 0S« 

hibitor. ' ''■'■:. ^' ' 



CANADA. 

Korth«weBt Gallery. 
Section I. 

MININa, QUABBTINa, MBTALLUBaiOAL, OPEBAnONS, AND lONSBAL PBODUOTS* 

1 Cbown Lands Depabtmeijt oi' Canada. — Copper ores; ^i^^^yBts; 
fossils, &c. 

2 BoABD OF Abts op CANADA, Montreal. — Lron, lead, copper, nickel ores, Ac. ; 
minerals applicable to chemical manufactures ; refractory minerals ; minerals appUoabla 
to conmion and decorative construction ; gypsum ; Quneral fugnients ; lithograpbio 
stone ; jasper conglomerate ; gold spar ; sandstone ; amethysts; fossil% ^. 

4 Co^MITTEB OF THE EaBTEBN ToWNSHIPS OF LoWSB CANADA.-r^Ql}ection ol 

minerab, &c. i 

4a Rickvan, S. LwerpooL — Canadian apatite, cotxtaining 90 per p^^ 9f p]|f9ll; 
phttteoflime. '^i ' 

, p^:^ 4» tfONTBiAii Um^Q GoxrAKi.— Sp«9imexui of i^yo ^pp«r« 




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CANADA. 



HOTul- 



Gallery. 



! I 



SionoN II. 

CHSMIGAL AND FHABMA0IT7TI0AL FB0CES8B8 AND FB0DUGT8 6ENIBALLT. 

6 BooARTy B. G<upei. — Petroleum oil. 

6 Linseed Oil Co. of Toronto. — Linseed oil cake ; Unseed oil ; coloars, kc 
6a Millar, J. Montreal. — Concentrated essence of hemlock bark, for tanuiug 
purpoBCR. 

6b Ltman, Clare & Co. Montreal. — Linseed oil cake ; oils ; flax seed, &c. 



SeCHON III. — SUBSTANCES USED AS POOD. 

7 Committee of the Eastebx Townships of Lower Canada. — Wheat, oats, 
beans; barley; maple sugar ; flour ; gums ; woo<l, &c. 

8 Board of Aguiculture of UrrER Canada. — Oats; wheat; buck wheat; 
beans ; grass seed ; barley; Indian com ; tobacco leaf; flax (;ceds', Alc. 
Board op Agriculture, Loicer Canada. — Specimens of wheat, oats, buck 

wheat, barley, rye, peas, beans, Indian com, grass seed, flax seed, tobatjco leaf. 

10 M'Collum, J. JJo7card. — Tobacco leaf and stalks; maple bugar. 

11 Pktre, Stronger & Co. lioslin Glen. — Starch. 



peas ; 
peas ; 



Section IV. — ^vegetable and animal substances. 

12 Brunet, L* Abbe, Lava lUnu'eriity, Quebec, — Forty-eight specimens of woods, 
polished and unpolished. 

Section V.— (A.) — maohinert fob direct use, and machinery in obnebal. 

13 Mitchell, R. Montreal, — Sollen pnmps ; valves, &c. 

13a Tully, Captain K. Toronto.— A propeller.— (/» Machinery Court, No. 880.) 

Section V. — (C.) — carriages. 

14 M*KiNLEY & Co. St. Catherine's, Canada. — Carriage nobs, felloes, spokes, 
shafts, &c. 



Section VIII. — military, engineering, ordnance, armour, and accoutrements. 
16 Marstin, W. Toronto. — Rifle gun. 



Section IX. — agricultural and horticultural machines and implements. 

16 Whitney, A. S. Oatland. — Agricultural implements. 

17 Nelson & Wood, Montreal. — Cgrn brooms, pails, &c. 

18 Committee op the Eastern Townships op Lower Canada. — Canadian 
grass scythes ; axes; implements used in manufacture of sugar. 

18a Noiseaux, J. Montreal. — Manilla dusters. 



Section X. — (A.) — philosophical instruments. 

19 Educational Department op Upper Canada. — Educational apparatus. 
> 20 Potter, C. Toronto. — Ophthalmoscope. 

Section XII. — ^woollen and worsted* 

21 Barber, Brothers, ^Sfrec^viZZc.— Canadian cloth. 
♦l^ 22 Crane, J. B. Ancaster. — Blankets ; articles of clotliing. 
.^ 23 Robertson & Co. Montreal.— Tweeda, 



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34 CANADA— CEYLON— DUMXyiCA— FALKLAND ISIiAND3. 

66 Committee of the Eastbbn Townships of LowfOi GAK^A^««iArtifidaI 
flowers; confectionery; photographs. --— 

67 Board of Public Wobks. — Photographs. 

68 Armstrong, W. Toronto. — Water-colour drawiiigs. 

69 DuNCAKSON, B. Montreal.— Two oil pcuntings. 

70 NoTMAN, J. Montreal. — ^Photographs. 

71 Ellison & Co. Qmhec. — Coloured photographs. 

72 Henderson, A. Montreal. — Photographs. 

73 HoLLiNQSWOBTH, J. Toronto. — Stereoscopic views. 
74. Armstrong, "W,. Toronto. — Stereoscopic views. 

75 Orb, M. Toronto. — Specimens of penmanship. 

76 Butler, W. B. Toronto. — Map of Upper Canada. 

77 Tahourhenche (Huron chief). — Collection of I^^um niiaiifactnres inludri 
bark, and skins ; fsuicy embroidery. 

78 LiVEBNOis, J. B. Qiie6ec.— Photographs, 



CEYLON. 

North-tweBt^Gallery. 

1 Power, E. R. ^twn%,wmri>ow'^£?,^€n«.--Apairof lyrtrtoblwof variciB 
woods of Ceylon. 

2 Simmonds, p. L. 8 Winchester at. PirrdicOy London^ 5.T7.— Hide ropes, fibres, 
oils, basket work, rope of skin, of spotted deer (Ajds anaculata) ; Eoccella tinctoria ; 
Nigella sativa ; Panicum colonum ; cassia bark ; fine cinnamon ; Cong frait ; lovy- 
lovy (Flacourtia inerma) ; Jaffna moss (Plocaria Candida) ; nutmeg fruit ; Paspalran 
scrobiculatum ; samples of paddy or unhusked rice ; chay root ; pine-apple fibre ; 
kittool fibre (Caryota urens) ; coir and yarn ; weaver bird's nest ; pearl-oyster shells ; 
window oyster shell (Anomia). 



DOBOlSrXCA. 

Korth-west GaJIery. 

Simmonds, P. L. 8 WincTiester-st S.W. Zonc^oTi.— Collection of woods ; cnrions 
wooden lock used by the peasantry ; carved bracket ; calabash rattle ; razor strop ol 
agave pith ; collection of sticks and supple jacks ; flambeau or torch ; cassia fistula 
pods ; globe fish ; fiying fish ; nutmegs in arillus ; seed of Adenanthera pavonina ; 
Job's tears (Coix lachryma) ; cloves ; Cassada meal ; bread fruit meal ; Mocha coflFe* 
from Bonavista ; pea berry coffee ; cocoa ; black pepper ; small tortoise-shell articlet 
of native manufafiture ; ropes of Mahaut cochon, vad of palmrleaf ; oiyttals i>f sulphm 



North GftUery. 

1 Falkland Islands Comfant, Oracechtirch tt. ZotuZon.—^Fiir ^«eal skis 
icmhau:ed. and dved for for : hair seal skin enamelled for imtent laailier : seal oil 



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INDIA. 



HbrihGtDfiiy. 



12a SwOfd«--I)amMGaiUade^w»teMnirked;bfltaiidcr^^ 
enameQad and set with diamonds ; ponmiel of hilt f onned hj nead of paioqaet, 
enanwllad, with eyes of raUes ; scabbard, leather, emboswd and gilt ; belt, gold koe, 
with mountings of gold and enamels ; olaBp of waist-belt also enamelled, with fine xoee 
diamond in centre. 

18a Sword, Pertaabgmh.^Bright blade ; hilt of enamel, inlaid with gold ; 
pommel, cross-guard, and goard of timer's head design in gold and set with nSues ; 
scabbard of gold perforated and chased, with moontings of nne enamels in colours. 

14a SwonL — ^Very fine Rhorasian blade, black watered steel ; hilt of -gold, richly 
enamelled and thickly set with "table" diamonds ; cross-guard set with fine brillianti^ 
scabbard of yelvet, mounted in gold and enamels, and stodded with "table" diunonds 

16^ Sword. — Fine Khorassan ringing blade; hiltof white jade, set with emeralds 
and rubies ; ecabbard of arabesque design in chased silver, *and studded with rubies 
and emeralds of large size. 

16a Sword^Blade shorty broad, and of scimitar ahi^; hilt of massive silver 
gilt; tiger's head pommel and cross-guard; scabbard, massive silver gilt, chased 
throughout. This Weapon was taken Som the body of lippoo Sultan, at the fall of 
Seiingapatam, A.D. 1799. 

17a Sword (Puttah), — Gauntlet sword; blade, plain, polished; gauntlet gUi and 
set with precious stones ; front fiAce of gauntlet of elephant's head design. 

18a Sword, Bhotanese. — Grip covered with shark's skin, with silver gilt mounts; 
scabbard of leather, mounted with silver, richly chased. 



;^ DAGGERS. 

19a Korah, Nepal.— -Burnished blade; hilt of wrought design^ gilt; scabbard, 
erimfion velvet, mounted with richly chased gold work. 

20a Bagger (Kunja), Nepal — ^Damascus blade, double-edged; hilt of agate and 
jasper ; scabbturd, green velvet mounted in gold finely dhased. 

21a Dagger {Kunja), NepaL — ^Damascus blade, double-edged; hilt of jade, 
finely carved in f eliage design ; scabbard covered with red silk, with chased and gilt 
mounts. 

22a Dagger (PeUhJeubz), Lahore. — ^Damascus blade, double-edged ; hilt and guard 
carved in jade ; scabbard covered with crimson velvet, and mounted in jade^ with inlaid 
flowers of lapis lazuli. 

28a Dagger {PeiMubz), Lahore. — ^Damascus blade ; hilt of ivory, to -whidi is 
Impended a tassel of pearls ; scabbard of gold, beautifully enamelled in colours. 

24a Dagger (f «n^), N.W. India. — ^Bright steel blade, curved and double-edged ; 
grip of jado— form, a horse's head, with bridle of ^Id, inlaid, and eyes of rubies ; 
scai>bard, red leather, with mounts of embossed gold. 

25a Dagger {Bu^v)a\ Kutch. — Double-bladed, curved; guard engraved and gili 

26a Dagger (Biehtoa), Kutch. — ^Double-bladed, curved; guard engraved and gilt. 

27a Dagger {PeishJntbz), Central India. — ^Damascus blade ; hilt of silver, with 
birds, flowers, ftc, engraved, and inlaid with enamels; scabbard with mounts of silver, 
similarly engraved and enamelled. 

28a Dagger, Hyderabad, Deccan. — ^Plain blade, polish^ deeply curved ; hilt of 
horn, mounted with gold and medallions ; scabbard of crimson leather on one side, the 
reverse being of silver, richly chased and embossed. 

29a Dagger, Malabar. — ^Blade elaborately mounted with chased silver , hilt finely 
carved in horn, with silver mounts ; scabbard also of horn, mounted in silver. 

SOa Battle-axe (Tiibbur), Scinde. — Blade finely wrought and perforated, and 
studded with diamonds, emeralds, rubies, &c. ; the back of axe containing a large cut 
emerald ; shaft of gold, finely enamelled and set with diamonds, emeralds, and rubies; 
point of shaft set with fine emerald, surrounded by eight large pearls. 

31a Battle-axe (Tuibbw), used on State occasions. — Blade finely wrought and 
engraved, leaf and cone design ; border pattern of inlaid gold ; spiral shaft <^ iulver. 

SPEABS. 

^ 32a Spear, Kuteh.^— Mountings of metal, emboss^ and gilt. 
' 38a Spear, Central India.— Shaft covered with velvet, studded with gold-headed 
nails; spear-head of fine steel ; octagonal base, &o., inlaid with silver. 



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64a, 65a Pair of clKrwrefiB sd itCM^kcS fencers, set in a handle carved to 
represent the body of ;the hird. — N^pal. 

66a, 67a Pair of chowrees ; handle of carved ivoiy, motmted ^with ^old and 
pearls ; the whisp of thin stripes of ivory. 

METAL WAKE, INLAID, &c. 

i68a •Heokahy of jsil^er, and i^paratus .complete, omfuiMNited Rdibh^flQiraQB in blue 
imaA^jgrmeD. ^enamels. « 

A set of six vessels in embossed silver, with blue and green enamels, from I^ihffie. : — 

69a Large water vessel or tea-pot. HOa Goblet, with cover attached to silver 
.Cl3bain. 7J.A Vessel, with spout and cover. r72A Drinking cup. 73a Plate, with cover. 

,74a Spittoon, with perforated silver topMtached to massive silver chain. 

^A .iirge silver vase,; base engraved . and perforated ; edjge df, basin richly 
'.ejnbpssed an4 gilt. 

^6a Vase, with tripod stand and cover of metal/iillaid with silver (bidti woA)— 
^;^yderabad, Deccan. 

'77a Vase, of metal, inlaid with silver (bidri work).— ^HyderAbad, Deccan. 

,78a Spittoon, with perforated cover of metal, inlaid with silver (bidri work).— 
^Hyderabad, Deccan. 

79a Writing case, with three small inner boxes; exterior ibrmed of tablets of 
green enamel, with figures in goid. — Pertaljgurh. 

PQTXERY, .&c. 
80a Lotaf in black glazed pottery .-^^Pafcna. 
81a Lota, in black ware, ribbed design. — Patna. 
82a Lota, Painted in colours. — Kotah. 

rSQj^ Vase mid cover, black w^re, with rudely shaped %ih:?s in,reiief.-^BengaL 
CI^A J5'lo^wer;va8e, carved in cross agate. — Cambay, Guzerat. 

CARVINGS, IN WOOD, HORN, &c. 
*8©a *Walking-stick, of carved sandalwood ; embossed gold momitings, set with 
^ijunond ^d rubies. — Mysore. 

86a Walking-stick, of oarved sandalwood; gold mountings, Ac. — ^Mysore. 
Wa' Chess-board, of sandalwood and ivory, enclosing chess and draughtsmen in 
sandalwood and ivory, and two dice boxes. 

^ 88a Pair of trays, carved in horn, and supported by recumbent figures of 
imimals.— ^Madras. 

89a Basket of buffiilo horn and porcupine quilk. — Viaianagarum. 
90a Cigar-case, cylindrical, carved in -horn. — JRutnagherry. 
91a Horn of buffalo, engraved, and end carved to resemble a reclining 
jtki)lMmt.-T4Mftdras. . 

MATS, ^Q, 
92a Mat of fine texture, coloured borders and ends. — Midni^ore. 
03a ^Mat 6f^Cypeni8 terfttum, black and white*— Cochin. 
i04^A JMat-df Oi/p€rus tegetum, red, white, black, and yellow.— Godhin. 
95a One piece of cloth, cotton and fibre interwoven. 
^96A'0ne' piece of fibrous cloth, fringed, red «nd blue spots. 
97a State palanquin, elaborately ornamented with oarved work, gilt, and painted. 
««o1^r,<5«i!pot, and cushions of rich gold embroidery on velvet and silk; massive gold 
tassels; ornaments and fittings of gold, and silver gilt. Presented to her Majestythe 
Queen by H. H. the Mahaaiajah of Mysore, 18Q2. 

EXHIBITED .BY F. M. VISCOUNT GOUQH, K^P., G.CjB,, = and , K.S.I. 
98a Baton of Field Marshal Viscount Gough, K.P., G.C.B., and K.«.L. 

) 99a Collar And Badge of the Order of the Star of India. 

100a Sword — Scabbard covered with green velvet, and mounted with gold, set 
>with: rubies and emeralds ; gold bosses of waist belt inlaid with diamonds, rubies, 
and emeralds ; sword knot and tassels decorated with pearls. Presented to Viaconnt 
iQoogh, byiElaJAh^Shere fiSngh, iPunjab. 

101a Dagger — Damascus blade, sheath elaborately enamelled in eolom?- >Fre- 
iOMnted to Visoonnt ( Gough, by • Bajah Bhere Biogh, ^Punjab. 

102a Model, in marble and mosaic, of f-'arcophagus of Noor Mahal, iWife- of ^Shah 
.Jehan, i£mperor of Delhi. From original in the Taj Mahal^ Agia. 

103a Model, in silver, of the Kootab Minar, Delhi. 



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Horth Gallery. INDIA: 



FEOM THE INDIAN MUSEUM, LONDON— EXHIBITED BY AUTSOEIT 
SECBETAET Or STATE POB. INDIA. 



CLASS I.— Section I. 

MAPS AND PLANS. 

Topographioal Model of India, constructed by R. Mont^ompry Martin, 
tinctive colouring indicates the varied fluvial drainage ; each shade of coloui 
extent of country drained by the main river, wliich flows throufrh it and dii 
waters into the sea. Horizontal scale 1 inch to 1 5 miles. Vertical scale abn 
3,000 feet. For the lesser heights of the Himalaya range the horizontal sc 
differs. The white ridge on the culminating parts of the Himalaya represent 
perpetual snow. The sandy tract near the Indus shows the great desert, t^ 
which are very imperfectly known. The lines of railways are coloured 



SEonoir IL—MINERALS AND MINING. 

1, 2 Saltpetre (nitrate of potash), Nellore, and Salem. 

3, 4 Blaek salt, Bengal and Madras. 5 Pungah salt, Ontt&ck. 

Q Sal ammoniac (chloride of ammonumi). 

7 Crude carbonate of soda, Orissa. 8 Carbonate of soda, Calcutta. 

9 Tincal or borax (hiborate of soda). 
10, 11 Green copperas (sulphate of iron), and Blue stone (sidpJtate 
Calcutta. 

12 Alum. 13 Sulphur, Rangoon. 14 Petroleum, Pegu. 

15 Peat, near Calcutta. 16 Ball coal, Dumarkhunda. 

17 Coal, Burdwan. 18 Steam coal, Bancoorah. 

19, 20» 21 Plumbago, or graphite, Travancore, Trerandrum, and S. 

22 Fuller's earth, Scinde. 23 Pipe clay, Eaepore. 24 Fire clay, M 

25, 26 Porcelain clay, Mangalore, and Canara. 

27, 28,' 29 Kaolin, red, and yellow ochre, Madras. 

30 Ball clay, Mangalore. 31 Mica, Salem. 32 White soapstone, G 

33, 34, 35 Corundum, Salem, and Madras, 

36 Crude arsenic, Madras. 37 Orpiment, Pegu. 

38 Antimony ore, Kandahar. 39 Galena (stdpknret of lead). 

40 Tin ore, Kuhun. 41 Copper ore {green carbonate) Singboom. 

42, 43, 44 Iron sand, Nepal, and Shenkotah. 

45, 46 Magnetic iron ore, Salem, and Madras. 

47-51 Iron ore, Madras, Kumaon, Shahabad, and Assam. 

52 Chrome iron ore, S. Arcot. 



CLASS IIL— AGRICULTURAL PRODUCE. 

63, 54 Cholum {Sorghum vulgare) ; Spiked millet (PeniciUaria spicat 
65, 56 Italian inillet {Setaria Italica) ; Little millet {Panicum miliar 
67, 58. 59 Millet {Paspahim scrobicnlatufn, Eleusine strictay coracana 
60 to 69 Paddy (Oryza sativa), Mangalore, viz. : — Kalame, jeersali, 
black paddy, red kalame, white maskatty, somasale, chokambally, kinni b: 
70 Paddy, muJbta kar (Oryza sativa), Madras. 
71, 72, 73 Wheat (Triticum vulgare). Bangalore, &c. 
74, 75 Barley (Eordeum vulgare), N.W. Provinces, and NBpal. 
76 Oats {Avena sativa), Monghyr. 
77f 78 Maize (Zea mays), Madras, and Midnapore. 
79^2 Great millet, white (Sorghum vulgare), Madras, &c., yellow; 
83, 84 Spiked millet {PenioiUaria spicaia), Bengal and Madras. 
85, 86J 87' Italian millet {Setaria lialica), Madras, Bellary, aifd Lud 
88 Quail*8-eye millet (Panicum miliaceum), Madras. 
89, 90 Millet (Panicum miliaceum), Madras, &c. 
91, 92 Millet (Panicum mUiare), Madras and Travancore. 
93, 94 Millet (Panicum frum^ntaceum), Almorah and Bawulpore. 
95 Millet (Pagpalmi scrobiculatum), Madras. 






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INDIA, 



Norih Galleiy. 



96, 97 Millet {EUusine wraeana), Madns and Cattack. 

98» 99 Millet {Amarunthus gangeticus), and bnckwheat {Polygonum tartaricum)^ 
Gvahwal 

100 Bamboo grain (Bambuaa arundinacea)f India. 

101-105 Paddy {Oryza tatira), wallaj snmba, bussja, tonng byan, goa-monk- 
way, Madras, Lncknow, Asam, Moulmein, Arracan. 

106 Table rice {Oryza aativa), Madras. 

107-110 ^ce {Chyza tativa), iinnsraj, rouk mwaj, Beerbhoom, AUaliabad, 
Bangoon^ Arracan. 

111-114 Chick 'pe&\€ficer arietinum), Madras, Cuttack, Bangoon, and Sindh. 

115-118 Pigeon pea (Cajanm Indicwt), Madras, Lncknow, and Baepore. 

119 White pea (Pimim saiivum), Madras. 120 Field pea {P, arvensis), Lncknow. 

121, 122 Lentils (Ermmi lens), Sagor, Central India, and Siriniiggara, Kahmir. 

123 Vetch (Latkyrus sativus), Sindh. 

124, 125 f^ptian bean (Lablah vulgaris), Bombay and Madras. 

126-129 China bean (Dolichos sinensis), India and Bangoon. 

130, 131 Madras horse bean (Dolichos unifiarus), Madras. 

132 Soy bean (Soja hispida). 

133 — 136 Kidney bean {Phaseolus Boxburghii), Bangoon, and (yar. aureus) 
Calcutta, and hnsked, Hooghly. 

137, 138 Kidney bean {Phaseolus mungo), Cuttack and Bangoon. 

139, 140 French bean {P. vulgaris). Little kidney bean {P. tux>nitifolius), Madras. 

141, 142 Arrowroot {Maranta arundinacea), Calcutta^ and {Curcuma angusti- 
folia). 

143 Tapioca {Jatropha mamhot), Allepore. 144 Sago floor {raphia rumphii), 
Sarawak. 

145, 146 Brown and pearl sago, Singapore. 

147 Imitation sago {Tacca pinnatifida), Mergui. 

148 Beychnndie (source unknown), Jubbulpore. 

149 Mooslee (Mwdcmnia scapiflora), Bombay. 150 Salep {Eulophia sp.), Punjab. 
151-154 Coffee, Mangalore, BurmdJi, Aden, Travancore. 

155 Pea Berry, Mysore. 156, 157, 158 Cannon's Mysore, and Coffee, Mysore. 

159-166 Coffee, Animalay Bills, Coimbatore, Chota Nagpore, Chittagong, and 
Penang. 

167-215 Teas from Assam, Cachar, Sylhet, Darjeeling, and Dehra Doon. 

216-218 Souchong from Gurhwal. 

219-246 Teas from Kumaon and Kangra. 

247-252 Sugar (Scxcharum officinarum), Lucknow, Astagram, Shahjehanpore. 

253, 254 Bate sugar (i&/a^e^Z2;e«^m),!Bengal. 255 ^sXmB,xxgdi{Nipafruticans), 

256 Sugar candy {Saccharum officinarum), Madras. 

257, 258 Ginger {Zingiber officinalis), Bengal, and Malabar. 

259, 860 Turmeric (Curcuma longa), Bengal and Malabar. 

261, 267 Cloves {Caryophyllus aromatums), nutmegs {Myristica moschaici), mace, 
and pepper (Piper nigrum), from Penang. 

268 Long pepper (Chamca Boxburghii), W. India. 

269 Cubeb pepper (Piper Cubeba), Bengal. 

270 Star anise {Illicium anisatum), Calcutta. 

271 Poppy seed (Papaver somniferum), Bengal. 

272 Poodma (Mentha satvva), Bengal. 

273 Tejpat leaves (Cinnamomum sp.) Calcutta. 

274 Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), Malabar. 
276 Cassia (Cinnamomum sp.) Bengal. 

276 Cassia buds (Cinnamomum LourierU), Travancore. 

276a B c Tobacco (Nicotiana rustica), Bangoon, Ahmedabad, Mysore. 

277-280 Betel nuts (Areca catechu), Bengal and Travancore. 

281 Bhang ((7anna&M«aetm), Himalayas. 282 Dhatura (Da^z^ra 7/tefeQ, Bengal. 

283 Poppy petals for packing opium (Papaver somniferum), 

284-286 Opium (Papaver somniferum), Candeish, Punjab, and Bengal 



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NorfR 6dleJ7. 



887 Huniinghar (Nyctantkes arbor tristh\ Bombay. 

888 'Ksso flowers {Butea frondom), Bombay. 
880 Green dye {Jatropha sp.), Malda. 

390^ Moocheros {Areca Catechu), extidation), Bombay. 

391 Dye lichen, orchil {Rocrella faciformis\ Travancore. 

392 Tnrwar bark {Cassia avriculata), Chingleput. 

393, 394 Tengah bark (Rhizophora sp.), and Mangrove bark (IL mavgle\ 
Singapore. 395 Babool bark {Acacia Arahica), Bengal. 
396 Cassio Latvia. hATk{CatkartocarpusJistula), Madras. 
397, 398 Chebulic myrabolans {Terminalia chehula), Bengal, and Bomba> . 
399 Beleric myrabolans {Terminalia belerica). 400 Aomla {Phyllanthus embfic^. 
401 Galls {Quercus infectoriu), and Tamarisk galls {Tamarix Indica), Bombay. 
403-405 Catechu {Acacia catechu, and Areca caUchu), Pegu. 
406 Gambir {Nauclea gambir)^ Singapore. 



Materia Medica. 

407> 408 Bish {Aconitum ferox), and Atees {A. heterophyllum), Himalayas. 
409 Teeta {Copts teeta), A«?8am. 410 Black cummin (Nigella sativa), Calcutta. 
441 tStar anise (Illicium, anisatum), ±>omoay. 

412 Gooluncha {Tinospora cordifolia), N.W. ProYiQcMv 

413 Cocculus Indicus {Anamirta coeculus), Bombay. 

414 Tamala {Nelumbium speciosum), Calcutta. 

415 Post (Papaver somniferum), Bengal. 

416 Screw pine {Helicteres Isora), Madras. 

417 Bael {jEgle marmelos). 418 Neem bark {Azedirachta Indiea)^ Bengal. 

419 Gookhroo {Tribufus terrestris), Bombay. 

420 Marking nuts {Semecarpus anacardium), Madras. 

421 Babool bark (^cf/aa -4 7^'m). 422 YenugTeek{TrigonellafoenHmf;r(Vcum). 
423 Bonduc nuts {Ouilandina Bonduc), Calcutta. 

424, 425 Senna {Cassia lanceolata), Tinnevelly and Bombay. 

426 Chaulmoogra {Chaulmoogra odorata), Chittagong. 

427 Colocynth {Citnill-us pseudo-colorynthis) . 
426 Indian pennyworth ( Hydrocot f/le Asiatica). 

42d Sowa {Anethum smca), Calcutta. 430 Ajwan {Pfychotis ajmtav), Bombj^y. 
431 Cumin {Cuminum cyminum). 432 Coriander {Coriavdrum sativum), Bombay. 
433 Carraway (Carwm TiiVjrrwm), Bombay. 434 Chuy Toot{Ofd€nlandianwbc^hta). 
435 Pieraloo {Randia ditmetorum). 436 Root of Notonia grandijtora, Bombay. 

437 Chicot^ seeds {Cickonnm intybus), Bombay. 

438 White beh^n (Centavrea hfhen), Punjaub. 

439 Pellitory {Pyrethrum Indicum), 

440 Baiberung {Embelia ribes), N.W. Provinoea. 

441 Anta moole {HemideamuB Indicus), 

(442 Indrawan ( Wrightia antidysenterica), 443 Sktween (Al^&nia sChoJatis). 
444 iSirycAwos wM:r t'omica, Malabar. 445 Clearing nuts (5. j>df<3rfor«m), Bombay. 
446 Chiretta (Agathotes chrretta). 447 Gookhroo {Pedalrurn mttrej*}, Bon5bay. 
448 Turbith {Ipomea turpetkum), Bombay. 449 Kala danfe {Pkcprhitis 'Ail), 

450 Kahtee karee {Solannm Jacquimii), Bombay. 

451 Dhatoora {Datura metel), Calcutta. 452 Chitra {Plumbag6 roeed), Bengal. 
453 Isabghool {Plantago ispagkula), 

454, 455 Rhubarb {Rh6um emodi). Outer Himalayas, arid {R, sp.), MM B^malayas. 

4S6 Beleric myrabolans {Terminalia beUricct). 

•457, 458 Chebulic myrabolans {Terminalia chebula), Ben^l, and Calcutta. 

a159 Kamala {Jtottlera tinctoria), Madras. 

4^60 Castor oil seeds {Ricimia communis), Bomba7% 

4 61 Croton seeds (Croton tiglium), Madras. 

4 82 Pepper {Piper nigrum), Travancore. 

463 Pepper root {Ckavica Roxburghii), Madiioft 

4t »4, 465 Cubebs {Piper cubeba), and Aloes {Alot Indida), Bombay. 

46 6, 467 Suffaid mooslie {Murdannia scapiflora), aaid Ot^Js to6t {IH6 Fl&r^ntina), 

468 Costus {Aucklandia costus},!^. W. Pi*ovimjes. 

46! ?• 470 Turmeric iCurcwm lon^\ Bea^, and (mmift^&i^X WiKt Miacl«»r 



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44 INDIA. North Gallery. 

674 Cotton counterpane, elaborately quilted — Hyderabad, Deccan. 

675 Cotton piece, printed with gold— Jeypore. 
676-678 Circular cotton pieces, printed with silver — Bengal. 
679-681 Jamdauee muslin and scarfs, plain and coloured — Dacc». 
682 Fine plain muslin piece — Dacca. 

683, 684 Plain muslin piece, and yellow muslin rmnal or kerchief— Hyderabad. 

686, 686 Muhnul Khass and Sircar Ally plain muslin — Dacca. 

687, 688 Muslin piece and check muslin piece — Chundarie, Bengal. 
689, 690 Saree striped and plain muslin — Santipore, Calcutta. 

691 Kashmere shawl of the finest quality — Kashmere. 

692 Kashmere scarf, woven with gold and silver border and ends — S. India. 

693 Kashmere scarf piece, embroidered with gold and silver comers — Umritsur. 

694 Kashmere waist-ban4 sent from Delhi. 

696 Crimson Kashmere shawl #loth, embroidered with gold at Madras. 

696 Black Kashmere scarf, embroidered with gold — Delhi. 

697 Crimson Kashmere scarf, embro'.dered with gold and silver— Delhi. 

698 Blue Kashmere scarf, embroidered with white floss silk — Delhi. 

699 Crimson Kashmere scarf, embroidered with gold and silver — Delhi. 

700 Kashmere choga, embroidered with gold and silver-*-Laliore. 

701 Blue Kashmere scarf^ embroidered with silver — Dacca. 

fl. Orange Kashmere shawl, finest quahty — Kashmere. 
II. Black Kashmere scarf, embroidered with orange floss silk — Delhi. 
A-i III. Black Kashmere scarf, embroidered with white floss silk — Delhi. 
IV. White Kashmere choga, embroidered with crimson silk — ^Kashmere. 
L Contributed by Captain Meadows Taylor, Oldcourt, Harold's cross, Dublin. 

702 Burmese silk cloth, worn by men round the waist. 

703 One piece of Mushroo (ailk and cotton) — Hyderabad, Deccan. 
704-708 Lace manufactured by the native girls in the Mission School, 

Edyengoody, Tinnevelly. 

709-738 La^e manufactured at Travancore, Mangalore, and Hyderabad, Deccan. 

739-750 Net scarfs, worked with silks of various colours and embroi<lered, from 
Delhi. 751-753 White net scarfs, richly embroidered — Madras. 

764 White net collar, embroidered — Madras. 

755 Black net scarf, embroidered with gold — Madras. 

756 White net dress sldrt, embroidered with gold and beetle-wings — Hyderabad. 

757 Superior worked lace, Honiton pattern, manufactured at Madras. 

758, 759 White muslin head-cloths, richly embroidered with gold — Madras. 
760, 761 White muslin dress piece and skirt, richly embroidered — Madras. 
762 White muslin piece, embroidered with gold — Dacca. 
763, 764 Muslin dress pieces, called Booteah — Dacca. 

765 Crimson muslin scarf, embroidered with gold — Kotah. 

766 Black muslin scarf, embroidered with gold — Bhurtpore. 

767, 768 Crimson mualin scarfs, worked witli silver and gold stripes and 
border — Bhurtpore. 

769 Doria muslin scarf, worked with massive gold — Chundarie. 

770-772 Embroidered muslms — Dacca. 

773 Dress piece, embroidered at Madras. 

774-778 Boddice pieces, worked with gold — Surat and Ahmedabad. 

779 Slipper fronts, embroidered with silk thread on English cloth — Scinde. 

780-785 Bottle stands, chair covers &c., embroidered with floss silk and gold 
on English broad-cloth — Scinde. 

786 Black satin apron, einbroiilered with coloured silk thread — Scinde. 

787 Ilichly gold-embroidered shawl end, worked with pearls — Triplicane, Madras. 

788 iSiiver and gold lace band — Madras. » 

789 Silver lace band, embroidered with silk — Madi-as. 

790 Waist bands (three) embroidered with gold — Madras. 
791, 792 Sdk carriage lace, white, embroidered. 

- 793-796 Massive gold and silver lace. 
797, 798 Gold tassels and cord— Madras. 

799-801 Purses, embroidered with gold and set with stones and pearls — ^Delhi. 
802 Velvet breast ornament (placed on idols during festivals), embroidered with 
l^old and set with stones and pearls — Madras. ' 

803| 804 Velvet purses, embroidered — Benares. 



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46 miPJA. .y<»»<a^Jiery. 

888 Silver gilt embossed plate — M^ft. 
, 889, 890 Silver embossed .aiji^ eBamelled vi^es — "KjmgJ^ 

I 391-89^ Silver filigree c»rd baskets, «md casket — Cuttack. 

' ^ ??^ Carved jade dish — Hyderabad. 

t o§6-?899 Clips and saucers of blood stoije, mo^ la^^e, and agatei-Cambay. 

j 900 Vase, cover, and plate of jade — Bengal. ' 

• 'l ,901-904* Crystal vases and covers, crystal cup, and jasper bangle — jUi^ore. 

; I S05 Necklace omaipient of jade, set with rubies and tur^uois. 

906 Necklaqe of i^ed rock crystal — Ahmedabad. 

907 Mosaic table top— Agra. 303> 909 Carved aqap-stone cU^l^as — ^4gra. 
^10-9 JJ2 Water bottle of black and red pottery— Patna^ Kotah,^uid Benares. 
918 Basin and cover of painted pottery — Allahabad. 

i 914 Two ^azed tiles — Hy4eraba(( Sind. 

* '§16, 916 Elephants and howdahs, carved in ivory — ^Berbampore. 

917 Vase aud .covejr, carved in ivory — Travancore. ^ 

"918, 91^9 Carved ivory oombs a^d back-scratcher — ^Aasam. 

920 Ivory paper kiiife — ^Umritsur. 921^25 Carvings in bom — ^Viziadroog. 

926 WoA-box of porcupine quills — ^Vizianagram. 

927, 928 Papier machJ pen-trays, &c. — Lahore. 

929, 930 3oxes of carved sandal-wood, ivory, and inlaid work— Bombay. 

931, 932 Boxes of fluted ivory — Bombay, and of stag's-hom — Madras. 

933 Portfolio of inlaid work--^mbay. 934 Papier ,mach^ box — Lahore. 
T 935 Pahn-leaf fan, with papier mach^ handles — Madras. 

936-939 Spoons, fork, plates, of carved wood — ^Saharunpore. 

940-941 Hand chowries of seetulputti fibre — ^Assam. 

942, 943 Matchlocks, Tcnradars, ornamented — Bareilly. 
' 944 Walking-stick of cane, with massive gold top, enclomng a watoh, writing 

\ implements, and snuff box ; the opposite end of embossed gold^ iiirith compartments for 

holding money — Madras. 

• 945 Tippoo Sahib's gold-headed walking-stick. 

946 Gold-headed stick, with carved characters formix^g an almanac, dated 1264. 
I 947 Carved wood wallung-stick — Madras. 

I ' 948 Khuskhus tray, ornamented with beetle-wings — Poona. 

f 949-951 Baskets of cane — Monghyr, Tinnevelly, and Silhet, 

952 Ornamented box of catjan material — Silhet. 
963, 954 Tom-toms — Benares. 955-957 Violins — ^Pacca and Benares. 

958 Scarlet cloth, Dharry cover — Nepal. 

959 The gold state chair of Kunjeet Singh. 



, PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE PJX)PLE OF INDLA.. 

Selection from a series of photographs, representing a number of the tribes and castes 
I into which the native population of India and the adjacent countries is divided ; 

t executed in the several districts, under the authority of the Supreme Govem- 

j xnent. Reproduced under the direction of the Reporter on Indian Products, 

1 at -the India Museum, London, by William Griggs. 

1 

\ 960 Faamb No. 1.— ^Thirty-two photographs of native Princes or Chiefs. 

, 961 ^BAMB No. 2. — ^Bengal (Chota Nagpcnre, &c.) : — ^Bhaugulpore, 2 subjects ; 

! , Behar, 6 ; Shahabad, 1 ; Chota Nagpore, 14. 

;962 Fbahs No. S. — ^Assam and Eastern Himalayas : — ^Assam, 5 subjects ; 
Cachar, 3 ; Muneepore, 2 ; Koch Behar, 1 ; Sikkim, 8 ; Bhotan, 3 ; Thibet, 3. 

963 Frame No. 4. — North-Western Provinces : — ^Benares, 8 subjects ; AUahabad, 
I 16 subjects ; AUygurh, 9. 

^964 Frame No. 5. — North-Westem Provinces : — ^Benares, 8 subjeots ; Allahabad, 
5 ; Agra, 2 ; Allygurii, 16. 

965 Frame No. 6.— N.W. Provinces : — Meerut, 4 subjects ; Delhi, 18. 

966 Frame No. 7. — N.W. Provinces : — Delhi, 16 subjeots. 

967 Fbame No. 8. — ^N. W. Provinces and Oude : Groruckpwe, 4 subjects ; Oude, 
4 ; Sht^ijehanpore, 6 ; Bareilly, 18. 

968 Frame No. 9.— N.W. Provinces and Oude :— Ooruckpore, 2siibjed»; Oude, 
8 ; ShahjehaofiQBe, 2; Baardlly, 6. 




NortlrGdleifyi INDIA. 47 j ^ 

. — - . ^ 

969 Frame No. 10. — N.W. Provinces : — Moradabad, 6 subjects ; SahanBipore,r 
14 ; Dehra Doon, 5. 

970 Frame No. 11. — ^Western Himalayas and Nepal: — Simla, 11 subjects; 

Kmnaon, 3 ; Nepal, 12. . / 

971 Frame No. 12. — ^The Pmijab : — Labore, 23 subjects. . 

972 Frame No. 13. — ^The Punjab : — Labore, 10 subjects ; Hissar, 5 ; Googairt^ 9. 

973 Frame No. 14. — ^Punjab and Western Himalayas : — Ferozepore, 4 subjects 
Goojranwalla, 2 ; Jbelmn, 3 ; Kangra Hills, 7 ; Kobat, 7 ; Huzara, 6 ; G-undapoor, 1- 
Cabul« 2 ; Kandahar, 1. 

974 Frame No. 16. — Sind, 15 subjects. 
976 Frame No. 16.— Sind, 30 subjects. 

976 Frame No. 17. — Smd, 34 subjects. • * 

977 Frame No. 18. — Central Provinces : — Bhurtpore, 11 subjects; Kajpootana^ 2» 

978 Frame No. 19. — Central Provinces : — ^Berar, 30 subjects ; Indore, Sillana, 

&c., 19. • 

979 Frame No. 20. — Central Provinces: — Nursingpore, 3 subjects; Suigor, 9^^; 
Jubbulpore, 6 ; Seonee, 6. 

980 Frame No. 21. — Madras and Northern Circars : — Northern Circars, 1^ 

lubjects ; Kumool, 2 ; Ooimbatore, 10 ; Coorg, 11. * 

981 Frame No. 22. — ^Madras and Mysore : — Chingleput, 1 subject ; Mysore, 29 
Travancore, 8. 

982 Frame No. 23. — ^Burmab and the Himalayan l^eninsula. — Ak]^b, 1 subjeet ; i 
Burmah, 6 ; Prince of Waler Island, 2 ; Singapore, 9. ; 



Etaw Prodncts, from the Lahore Central Museum, Exhibited by Mr. Baden PowbUI 

^ 983-987 Rock salt, crystals of salt, red salt (Kheura), and granular salt, !EheiiTa^ 
nine, Lahore. 988-995 Specimens of salt, Lahore. 

996 Crystals of pure salt, Jhelum. 997 Salt from .streams in the Salt Range. 

998 Inferio/ earthy salt, "^ooma loon," fiiom Ate.ng jxnne, Lower Himalayas. 

999 Evaporated salt, Gurgoon. 

1000 Alum, as crystallized from the pans, Kalabagh. 

1001 Alum from the Bazaars, Lahore. 

1002, 1003 Sal ammoniac (Na/nsJutder), a&d saltpetre (Shora), Lahore. 

1004 Purified borax (SohofTa), Lahore. 

1005) 1006 Crude soda (Sajji sigah), and refined soda {Sajji lota), Lahore. 

1007 Kahre earth, containing photosulphate of iron, Sidt Range. 

1008 Kahre sated {Anhydrous protosulphate of iron). Salt Range. 

1009 Mooltanee mittee earth, containitag peroxide of iron, Saesulmeer. 
1010» 1011 Hurmuzi, Indian red, and pounded talc, ^abrak," Lahore. 

1012 Quartz, ^* Kalabagh diamonds," Lahore. 

1013 Coal, or lignite, Baghanwalla. 

1014 Turquoises, as brought from Persia by Affghan merchants. 

1015-1017 Iron sand, micaceous rook with iron sand, and hammered iron^ 
>hurmsala. 1018 Haematite, Ghirgoon. 
1019 Asbestos ^'sanghi Ree^adar," Bunnow. 
1020, 1021 Lime concrete, '^kunkur," Lahore. 
1022 Ekalbir (Datisca cannabina) Lahore. 
1023i 1024 Indigfo, European and native make {hvSAgofwa Unctoria), MooltaiL 

1025 Mimjeet (Ruhia cordifi>lia\ Afighanistan. 

1026 Kesu flowers (Butea frondosa), Lahore. 
101^ Safflower (Carthcmius tinctorius), Lahore. 

1028i 1029 Toon flowers (Gedrela toona), and henna (Lawsonia aZ6a), Lahore; 
1030 Nettle fibre {Urtica heterophylla)^ Lahore. 

1031) 1032 Dhumnun {Grewia opposUifoUa), and Sunkokra (j?i»6ucu« oannaJ^MMi^), 
jahore. 
1033, 1034 Sunn (Crotalaria juncea)t and ropeihade therefrom, Laboveb 
1035-1037 Mudar fibre and floss (Calotropis procera), Lahore. 
1038 Himalayan hemp {Cannabis sativa), Himalayas. 
1039) 1040 Malun {Bauhinia racemosa), and rope made thei«from. 
IO4I9 1042 String and rope of moong {SaccJiar^vM rrritnja), iLabore. 
1043 Niggee {Daphne papyracea). 1^4 Putta^ {^Mnxm'c^i J^/^m^j PMhir#M 



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48 INDIA. Nortfi GaUery. 



1045 Bazaar rope {AndAropogon sp,). 

1046 Cotton from American seed, grown experimentally at Mozaffergarh. 

1047 Native cotton, Goojeruwella. 

' 1048 Lotus fibre {Nymphcea lottts), Lahore. 

j 1049 Kuffee, tinder {Onoseris lanuffmosa)^ Lahore. 

,t 1050 Date palm fibre {Elate sylvestris), Punjab. 

t 1051 Shoes or sandals made of grass and straw, Himalayas. 

1052-1058 Hice (Oryza sativa), Kangra, Peshawar, and Punjab. 
I 1059 Common red wheat (Trittcum cestivum). 

I 1060 Vandanak wheat. 1061 Paighambri wheat, hnskless whe^t. 

i 1062 White Ghoni wheat, opaque white hnskless. 

I 1063 Common barley (ffordeum hexastichon). 

1064 Paighambri, or hnskless barley (ffordeum vulgare). 

1065, 1066 Maize (Zea mays). The Plains, and The Hills. 

1067-1077 Specimens of millet from Lahore, The Hills, &c. 

1078-1097 Pulse and peas, firom Lahore and Kangra. 

11098, 1099 Linseed (Linum luntatmimum), and Sesame {Sesamum orierUale), Lahore. 
1100 B&khara silk, Bokhara. 
1101 Silk, reeled in the Punjab by Jaffeer All, of Goordaspore. 
. ^ From the Government of the Punjab. 

1 ' 1102 One piece of silk, purple and yellow, Bhawulpore. 

I 1103-1105 Three Cashmere shawls, of the finest quality, Cashmere. (Presented 

I by the Maharajah of Cashmere to the Viceroy of India.) 

I 1106 Shawl musnud, or cover. Cashmere. 

1107-1109 Soosees (mixed silk and cotton material), Bhawulpore. 
1110 CameFs hair cloth„Punjab. 
I 1111 Three saddle cloths, scarlet, with gold and silver embroidery, Lahore. 

1112 Posteen, or coat of goat's skin, lined with sheep's wool, Peshawur. 
' 1113> 1114 Embroidered leather trousers, and riding boots of g^een leather, Kokan. 

From the Fui^ab Central Gommittde, Li^ore. 
1115 Ghati cloth, four pieces, Hooshyarpore. 
i 1116, 1117 Cotton checks, Loodiana. 

1118 Turban piece, gold and white, Loodiana Jail. 

1119 Khes, or cotton covering, Pak Puttan, Googaira. 

1120> 1121 Loongees, Peshsiwur ; used as a turban or waist-band. 

1122 Six pugcrrees or turbans, muslin, Delhi. 

1123, 1124 Chogas or gowns, Peshawur, and Huzara. 

1125 Mullida Puttoo, one piece, Huzara. 

1126 Choga, embroidered Pushmeena, Loodiana. 
J 1127-1130 Rampore Chudders, Loodiana. 

1131, 1132 Flannel shirt, and smoking cap, Loodiana. 
1133, 1134 Six scarfs, and waist-band or cummerbund, grey, Loodiana. 
1135 Three silk scarfs, of colours, Mooltan. 

1136, 1137 Silk (Ooolbuddun), red and white check, and (Salacedar), striped, 
Mooltan. 1138 Flax cloth, seven yards, Googaira Jail. 
1139, 1140 Two scarfe, or doputtas, and four caps, tinsel worked, Delhi. 
1141 Gold lace, Delhi. 1142, 1143 Smoking caps, Loodiana. 

1144 Two pairs leather trousers. 

1145 A coat, trousers, cap and waist-rope, worn by the Guddees, Kangra. 
I 1146-1167 Silver ornaments from Delhi and Kangra. 

, ^ 1168 A casket of steel, inlaid with gold (Koftgari work), Sealkote. 

1169-1172 An urn, or vase, inkstand, candlestick, paper knife, (Koftgari) Sealkote. 
1173-1187 Specimens of lacquered turnery from Pak Puttan, Googaira, including 
chess table and men (1182), &c., &c. 

1188 Spice box, studded with ivory, Dera Ismael Khan. 
1189-1195 Articles of ivory and sandalwood from Umritsur. 

1196 Paper-cutters, ivory, from Delhi. 

From the Central Museum, Lahore. 

1197 TmI of the yak, "Boa Grunnieng," of Thibet ; used as a fly whisp. 

1198 Model of an oil mill, Lahore. 

1199 Chnrkai or cotton cleaning machine, Lahore. 




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50 



JAMAICA— LAGOS— MALTA. 



[• 



JAMAICA. 

West Gallery. 

1 Jamaica Ootton Company, 55 Charing cr'oss, London — Samples of cotton 
grown on tneir estates at Greenwood, Muirton, and Orange Hill, and cotton fabrics ; 
collection of fibres adapted for spinning and paper making. 

2 Roberts, E. B. 239 Regent st London, — Orange, pimento, snpple jack, 
American briar. West India myrtle, Jamaica thorn, Arundo tabicaria, and other sticks, 
from Jamaica, in rongh and finished state, for umbrellas and walking-sticks ; also a 
selection of others from the island of Dominica. 

3 Roberts, G. 4 Fenchurck st. London, — Large specimetis of the following 
woods : — 1. Podocarpus coriacea (local name yacca) ; 2. Amyris sp. (local name satin 
candlewood) ; 3. Amyris sp. (local name mountain torchwood) ; 4. Dipholis sp. (local 
name black bullet) ; 6. Psidium pomiferum (local name guava) ; 6. Hogberry 
locust ; 7. Cocos nucifera (local name cocoa nut) ; collection of land and firesh-water 
shells of Jamaica; lace bark, and seeds applicable to ornamental purposes. 

4 SiMMONDS, P. L. 8 Winchester st. S. W. London. — Various Jamaica woods. 
6 Willis, Rev, J. T. Bepton Rectory y Midhurst, Sussex. — ^Table of native woodft 
6 Wilson, N. Island Botanist. — A collection of eighty samples of fibres, 

bMtsy cotton, &c., prepared at the Botanic Gardens, Bath, by the exhibitor. 



ULOQS. 

West Gallery. 
SiMMONDS, E. J. L. Xagro*.— 'Collection of woods ; ce or shea butter fi*otti the 
fruit of Bassia Parkii ; sections of ivory ; African baskets ; native weapons ; Aehatina 
shell ; African mats ; oil-palm fruit and nuts ; Egusi oil ; cottons ; TalUcooiiah oil 
(Carapa Tallicoona) ; country rope of bark ; African dagger in sheath ; hide fan ; 
carved calabash ; ground nuts on the haulm ; pods of monkey pepper (Habzelia 
Ethiopica) ; Piper Afzelium ; Bene or Gingelie oil (Sesamum orientale) ; Nankeen 
cotton ; shell money (Cyprea meneta) ; three palm-leaf trays ; cane strainer and rush 
strainer; five grass hats, various, and four caps ; five native-carved figures; native- 
carved looking-glass ; piece of blue country cloth ; piece of grass cloth ; two travelUng 
gags, for holding cowries, fine and coarse; two bamboo mats^ two rush mats; one 
brass mat ; one piece of grass rope ; five baskets of various kinds ; two drums and 
drum-sticks ; native chopper ; small tusk from the Niger ; whip of the tail of a skftte; 
two rhinoceros-hide whips ; three walking-sticks ; nine specimens of woods ; calabadi 
bottles, and five carved and plain calabashes ; bees' wax ; four native rings ; crocodile's 
eggs; paddle; Kroo fiddle; model of a canoe; specimens of pottery; two pipes; 
three wooden combs ; three fetisch masks ; cane-wood ; do. pounded ; grass used for 
washing; for baskets; for lashing for country brooms ; grass and palm leaf for mats ; 
chew-stick ; bottles of ground-nut oil ; bird peppers ; chillies ; farina ; maize ; ginger; 
guavas ; fruit of oil-pahn ; cotton ; honey ; Indian-corn meal ; rice; ground nuts. 



MALTA. 

North-west Gallery. 

1 Malta Committee. — Maltese lace ; silver filagree work. 

2 MiOALLBP, Salvatobe, 82 Strada Piatro. — Black lace shawl ; black sldrt-; 
black parasol covers ; black head dresses ; mittens ; set of cu£& and collar ; l^k 
jackets ; black camagon ; white cotton counterpanes. 

3 MUNKBO, V. — White lace cape ; black lace cape. 

4 Muscat, P. 30 Strada lleaU. — Gold and silver filagsree work;, ibmuucs; 
jewellery. 

9 MAii, G. — Samples of leather ; gilt and black wood framesi 

6 Fabri, v.. Ladies' Boots. 

7 AzzEPEBBo, M. — Paste jewellery ; paper figures, &c. 

8 PoLiTi, F. L. — ^Velvet cushions ; artificial flowers. 

A "PrtTTfTT A T. ^T.ooo* /IrkTim +.irk-no+. 



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t|IIKe8t<€ka}«7. MA^URfECUS. 



. West Gallery. 

1 -WiBBXfS^.^!^* Jjo^owdoimaiB ^tate^-^BngfOBi 
i^^e J^ithottt.. a^imfj oharopaL 

f^ ;BQi]j5'ojf, Professqr.-^A cpllection of medicinB 
mfV^ **rIiesP]Ajjt(es3 M«4ici»ales de i^aurice." 

,3 B»ou^^, N. xPampl^wfivss^, — YanUla. 

4 KoGUET, DjJ jBsi4LW€3iiT, $1. S^hosn/eld. — Sugar a 

,5 JtoGHJfiT, J)^ BBLLoauiiT, .JJ. »SfcA<»*/«W.-^Cofifoe. 

f^OPvpT, M. Ppr^ XoM^^.--^ilEe^^^v^ ; pates de , 
cfewwa) j-d'ftniwae (pipe,a^l§).; :pi«>ay^ eristallis^es (paj 
;;^W9^ at Majiiritiu^, at Seychelles, and at Madagjwcar. 

7 Thjj OoiWiUMp:.— JUentils ;^beaiis (Harioots bla 
>^opi ^dri^es J.slands ; pu^se* 

8 L/LNaLOis, Madame E. B. — Maee and nutTn^g^s. 

9 Gbjs^s, B. — A set of, photographs of, the asceni 
jlO PouyiNBi^, 'D» Valanqb, X.,F.— tLiqueurs: no 

ravensara simple ; ravensara prix moyen ; parfaite amoni 
1,1 fB.OD^??'?* M. ^ort j^o^.^-JeUies : gel^ d'ananas^ 

de goyaves, pommes d'amour. 

12 MoBCT, Madame, yi?or^ ZoM^'^.-rPipyes : acbarc 

18 Bouy^iT, M. Port Zouis, — " ChiUies" preserved 

14 .Mqbqx, Madame. — ITainarinds.in. syrup. 

15 jLJCCUiXBinBC, M. Bocke iJois.—rHoney. 

16 BouTON, Prol^iFiWes oullavated at Mauritius 
.J^r.. j. Dunoan. 

JL.7 Iq*RY, E. .J4ff> GaM^ JSmk.^Sug&r, 

18 Lkvikux, p. J.— Vanilla. 

JL9 PuALHABD, M.^iMamoc root ,powdered. 

.80 Fdeoy, J)» CH4a]5L, M. — Down or hairy coveiii 
culia foetida." 

2 1 Lebeun, E.— Besin ; caQutQhouc gum from Bale 
jQQast of ^Madagascar. 

2 1 A CAUNONYii^ia:, Missus. J. — ^Vanilla. 

2^ ,PiTOT, Hon. J^. St. Avim. Estate.— ^ug&r, 

28 CoNSTAifTiN & Co. Bma/r,es -Estate. — Sugar. 

j24 .HsftCQ^BODBB, M. E.^— Leather. 

^6 DiORE, M. J. — ^Various kinds of tHseuits. 

36 Bbbgicodrt, M. — Tobacco. 

27 .Desjabdins, M.— Tobacco. 

28 D'U^iBNvii^LB, M.— Tobacco. 

29 BEBGicoujiTjiM.— Cigars. 

30 Sapany, M.— Cigars. 

S^l Specimens of vacoa bags (Pandanns utlUs), fro 
.J^^liu^a^ascar. 

I352 Indian Obphans, -Governnient Asylrnn, Ma^j 
^manufactured by the Orphans. 

33 Indian Orphans, Government Asylum, Mau 
■.work, baskets, &c., manufiictured by them. 

34 Nageon, Mdlle. — Box made from the leaves oi 
'JS^chelles. 

.85 li^DiAjT.QBPBANS, Qovernment Asylum. — Eibi 
86 DESJAJipiNS, M. E. — Various kinds of cotton. 

37 PiTOT, M. — ^Various kinds of cottPn- 
.38 PiTOT, Hon. H. — ^Arrowroot. 

8.9 BD3ANGE, M. — Powder prepared from the roQt 
40 Avon, M. — Powder prepared from the root of 1 
.4J..jP9m«E, jyi.-^y^ous;kinds of pickl^ and chutj 



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54 NOVA ^COmA-^VEV^BbMOi 

28 Gk>VEBijrMENT.— Gold nuggets. 

29 Grant, W.— aoth. 

30 Hamilton, Dr. — ^Maize and wheai^ 
^1, HASDiNa, C. E. — " Priaoners of Giflons," pen-and-ink drawing, 

32 Hbnbt, Mrs. E* — ^fitome-made cloth. 

33 Hill, Misses C. & S. — Home-made oai^et ; cone, beitd, an(i*BtnBw work. 

34 Hill, SherriflE". — ^Maple sugar and wood. 

35 HoNETMAN, Dr. — Geological collection ; maps and sectionB. 

36 HuTTON, J. — ^Garden seeds. 

37 How, Dr. — Collection of minerals for scientific use. 

38 Jennings, Miss. — Cone work. 

39 JoNTBS, T.— Hematite ; iron, bar and pig^ Acadia mines.v 
4Q Kaiser. — Black fox skin. 

41 Lang, Gi — Collection of building stone^ mafcrbles^ and slates; 

42 Lequillh Mills; — Cloth* 

43 Lyttlbton, Capt^-^Painting»: — ^Halifiax, from York Bedbnbl^ and HaUIWE 
from Dartmouth Lakes. 

44 MaoDonald, Miss.— Scarf, 

45 MaoDonnell, Lady. — Case of cutlery made of Acadia steel. 

46 MaoDonnell, Sir R. — Carriboo skin and furtt 

47 MaoDougall, Miss. — Painted fancy work and wax flowers. 

48 MaokaY, J. — Garden seeds. 

49 M*Millab, Miss. — Scarfe. 

50 M'Nab, J. — Cereals. 

51 MoiB, T. — Biscuit, from Steam Bakery, Halifax. 

52 MotLE, H. M. — Flax, flax seed, and cereals, 
r 53 MoTT, G. — Broma; chocolate and cocoa. 

I 54' Murdoch, W. — Cereals. 

I 55 l^ASH, J. D.— Ma^s of manganese. 

♦ 56 O'DoNNBL. — Squaw— photograph. 

57 Parish. — ^Marquis and Marchioness of Normanby — ^photographs. 
I 58 Pryor, Dr. H.— Maize. 

59 Robinson, A. — Galvanized topsail clew, with patent thimbles and jib banks. 
t 60 Scott, George. — Column of coal from Albion Mines, height 35 feet 6 inches, 

representing the thickness of the main seam. {In tke Ga/pdm)*^ 

61 Starr, D. & Sons. — Patent skates. 
I 62 Symonds, W. S. & Co.— Stoves of Acadia iron. 

( 63 Symonds, Kay, & Ross. — Coal, Schooner Pond, C.B; 

64 Thompson, J. — Com brooms and brushes. 
I 65 Turner, Miss. — Straw work — ^native product. 

66 Watson, Miss. — ^Micmacs. 
, 67 Watt, J. — ^Tobacco. 

68 Wavbbley, Germain Gold Mining Co.— Bar of gble^ weij^ 4^ lbs,,, and 
auriferous quartz. 

69 Willis, J, K,— Case of N, S. edible mollu^ta. 



North-west GaUery. 

1 CbaTBW, J. 23 Leeds road, Bradford, Tor/wAire.— Colonial wools and yams ; 
merinoes, caahmw'es d'Ecoese, llama, and reps ; ooburgs, paramattas,, and bava&eaSy 
made of Australian wools. ■ ^ ■ 

Downs2 MoRT, W. 155 Fenchurch st. XoncZon.— Slab of malachite from the Peak 

Copper Mines. 
AraucaS Silver, S. W. 2 JBishopsgate st. London, — Bunya-bunya^ or large cone of 

ria Bidwelli, seeds eaten by the aborigines. 

4 fiiMMONDS, P. L. 8 Winchester st. S.W, London, — ^Australian maima; Du^ng 
oil, a substitute for cod-liver oil ; photogri^h of native. 

6 Emery, W. F. 7 Upper Weymowthst, JP(»'i^cwu?i)ia<»^-*OilpaintiDg*-t^ew 



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56 



VICTORIA. iTortli-weBt Gallery. 



VICTOBJA. 

1 Tbnnakt, J. 149 Strandy Londom—Gili model of the "Welcome Nugget," 
the largest gold nugget discovered, found June 11, 1858, at Bakery Hill, Ballaarat, at a 
depth of 180 feet, weight 2,166 oz., value of the gold £8,376 lOs. 

2 Jaoomb, Son, & Co. Ba»inghall st. Zoncicw.— Fleeces from the flocka of J. L* 
Cuirie, Larra, Geelong, and of Francis Ormond, Bomyalloak, Geelong. 

3 Hood & Co. Melbourne. — ^Phannaceutical preparations. 

4 Clabkb, a. Melbourne. — Samples of grain. 

5 Bank of Australasia. — ^A collection of gold selected and prepared by the 
bank assayer, Mr. Paterson, and bullion clerk, Mr. William Stronach, viz. :— Ballaarat, 
Bullarook, Creswick, Smythesdale, and Happy Valley, Beechworth, Chiltern, Yackan- 
A^r^A^h Mnrflft'fl Greek. Castlemaihe, Talbot, Blackwood, Sandhurst, Bendigo Flat 



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^58 VtOTOBlA. MffffJ^imt^Ms^ , 

-913 GmnaNOSAM aifc Maokedib, Melbaffime»-^^Eweinty4ojjr samples of wool. 
99 Acclimatisation Society of YiovosiA.r— Alpaoaaj^d Axigoragoate'iuiir. 
ilOO TBfBBflLL, A.^^^Spiin silk ^nd oocoons, with a- txeMiaae on ^e culture of the 
Bilkworm in Australia ; sheepsldn.imstation-wwiek^r .basket and ^w«r stand. 

101 Alcock & Co. Melbourne.— ^o^ahod slab of Aoacia -melanoxylon, or 
ililAOkwood ; sUb of myiiie ^wood {Aemene d&ori])iuida) ; tuxno^ rin myall wood, &c. 

102 Abnold, C. Melbourne, — Soented- myall ^ood -pipes. 

108 Andbbson & Wbioht, Me^>oume. — Sample planks ef -rod gum, blackwoo^ 
stringy bark, and boxwood timber. 

104 M.USLLBB, £|B. iF.^S. — ^A sBudl ooUeclion of ooloniid woods. 

105 RoBEBTS & FoBD, Melbourne. — ^Tumed myall wood Qandlesticks ; ladies' 
thread stand. 

106 SwiNBOUBN, J. itf e^5(>ume.-^Maohine*wrought mouldings. 

107 'J^EBfLY, J. Melbourne. — Colonial bent woods. 

108 CoBAiN, J. Sale, — Flax. 

109 Champ, Colonel, Prntm^c-^Cabbage tree hats ; blankets and rugi. 

110 Davis, riNLAYSON,^HcTOHE80N,il/cZ6ottm€. — ^Woollen 4ocks. 

111 Read, J. C. Wahgunyah, — Nativefiax, roughly prepared. 
>1.12 Tbonson & Mill, if c^6owr7ie.-^Woollen flocks. 

113 Zbvbnbboom, J. A/e/6oMr/ie.^Colonial-made bruflhware. 

114 liENNON, >H. ifc^owwe.-^Model of an improyed plough. 

115 CiiABK >& Son, Meiboume.—ljQeMiet. 

116 M'Fablanb &vSon, Melbourne. — Stockrider's whip, made of kAQgwoo akin, 
and pair of saddle girths. 

117 Billon, J. Footscray. — Native cat skins prepared fpr-fturriers' *^^e. 

118 Bobebtson, J. Melbourne. — -Dyed emu feathers. 

119 Galvin, J. Melbourne. — Light hats, of colonial pc^anofacture. 
1^ JMealy, Miss E. CoHmgwood. — Straw plaiting. 

121 Abbot, E. Tasmania. — The Australian cookery book. 
1^ Ebbbes, J. Melbawrne. — Specimens of Bookbinding. 

123 Aecheb, W. H., Registrar- General of 'Victoria. — statistical summary of the 
■ prpgress of the Colony of Vicxtoria to the year 1865 ; statistical ta\)les. 

124 Lethebt, Mbs. jPootacray.— Colonial leather work, and sea weed. 

125 MuBPHY, M. J/6/6(mrw€. — Colonial-made portn^anteau. 

120 Cobnell, E. Melbourne. — Photographic views. 

127 LiGAB> C. W. Victoria. — Specimens of Osborne'6 process of photoilithography ; 
model maps of Victoria. 

128 Nettleton, C. ill/eZ6<mr7ie.—iTwenty photographic views of Melbourne. 

129 Selwyn, a. R. C. Government Geologist, — Progress geological ;nap of Vic- 
toria. — (In passage near Water Colour Room.) 

130 CuTOLO, S. Melbou/me.—MxiSio composed by exhibitor. 

131 Sands and M'Dodgall, Mdbour7he.-—^ooks published in Victoria. ' 

132 Cole, B.— White peas. 

133 Grant, C. & J. Mount Bechwith. — Short potato oa^. 
' 134 Kinnebsley, D. Learmonth. — 'Purple straw wheat. 

135 Stewabt, Ueothebs, Learmonth. — Tartarian oats. 

136 Vallance, W. — Sandy oats. 

137 Dick, W. B. Lochgelry, Fifeshire^ Scotland. — Grain grown in' VictoHa- 

138 RowB, J. P. Terrick, Terrick.—lCwo bales of wool. 

139 Cheeslby, Jos. Surry Fa/rm, Indigo County, Ovens district.— QoU^ onui^ 
wheat, 62^1bs. per bushel. 

140 Andebson, Bbothfbs.— White a?usgan wheat, 67£ lbs. per bushel. 

141 Cbaig, J. — Sample of flax and flax-seed. 

142 Cox, W. Zancc^e^rf.— ^Malting barley, 584 lbs. per bu^el. 

143 Hall, — . WiUiamstovm. — Indian corn and bean pods. 

144 Irving, J. L. Elizabeth st. Melbourne. — Samples of oats. 

145 Law, Somneb & Co. Melbourne, — Golden tares ; peas ; soft grass-seed ; Call* 
ifomian prairie grass. 

•146 Oblbbab, Me. Allansford, Warrambool district. — Red straw wheat; cheese. 

147 Teabmgnth, T. Ercildown.—U.oy8 grown in 1864 and 1866. 

148 TuBNEB, J. H. i»fei6ow^.— Washed wools. 



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60 AUSTRIA. Sonth-weet of Tiangept. 

Section XIV — manupaotubes peom plax and hemp. 
21 Pick, J. D. Nachodj Bohemia, — Linen. 



Section XVI. — leather. 

22 Ubban, M. Vienna, — Fancy Articles in Leather. 

23 Neibeb & Bbeiteb, Vienna^ Lindertfjai»e 14. — Fancy articles in leather. 

24 Janesch, E. Klagenfurty Carinthia. — Tanned leather. 

24a Klein, A. Vienna, AndretisgasH. — Articles in leather, wood, and bronze. 



Section XVII. — fafeb and stationeet, prtntino and bookbinding. 
26 Knbppeb, W. & Co. Vienna, Wiedner, ITauptstrasse 51. — Stained and cigarette 
paper. 

26 Bachrach, J. J. Vienna, Fleischmannsgasse. — Sealing stamps. 

27 Habtinger, a. & Son, Vienna, Mariahilferstrasee Up.— Lithographs, oil 
colour prints, and chromo-lithographs. 

28 Lechner, Rodolphb, Vienna, Grabengasse. — Educational works, books for 
children. 

29 Reippenstein & Roesoh, Vienna, Circusr/asse 3. — Lithographs, chromo-litho 
graphs, and illustrated publications. 

29a Winternitz, C. Vienna, 163 Ilauptstraase. — Gaines for youth. 



Section XX. — articles op clothing for immediate personal or domestic use. 

30 Jaquemar, G. Viennxi, Herrengasse. — Leather gloves. 

31 GiANi, J. & C. Vienna, DreUaufergaese 3. — Embroidered and woven stuflFs 
for ritual garments. 

32 Hahn, L. Vienna, Kollnerhofgasse 1. — Fancy shoes. 

33 KuMPP, Pius, Scklttckenau, -Bohemia.— Plait work, table coverings, hats, caps, 
bonnets, waistcoats. 

33 A. Brand & Co. Vienna. — ^Woven and Embroidered Buttons. 



Section XXII. — iron and general hardware. 
34 Bode, F, M. Vienna, Franzenagasse 7. — Coffee roasters, chums, egg-beaters. 
36 Kolbenheteb, E. Vienna, Mittersteig 16. — Britannia-metal wares. 

36 Millbb, M. & Son, Vienna, Webgasse 26.— Pianoforte wire, cast-steel rollers 
and tools. 

37 Wbbtheim, F. & Co. Vienna, Tuchlauhen 11. —Fire-proof safes. 



Section XX TIT — working in precious metals, and in their imitation; 

JEWEIXEBT, AND ALL, ARTICLES OP VERTU AND LUXURY, NOT INCLUDED IN 
OTHER CUIlSSES. 

38 Kbesfach, a. Vienna, Kandlgasae 9. — Clocks and clock cases. 

39 Nedstadtl, M. H. Prague, 403 /. — Articles m gold and silver and jewellery. 

40 Schonbbrger, W. Vienna, Franz Josef Quai.— Clocks, 

Section XXIV glass. 

41 Braun, H. Qtieen*8 Head Passage, F. 1 <& 2 Newgate st. London. — Bohemian 
glass. 

42 Franke, J. Vienna, Langegasse 17. — Spun glass brooches, hair-pins, &c. 

43 Reich, S. & Co. Langenav>, near Haida, Bohemia. — Glass. 



Section XXV. — ceramic manufactures, porcelain, earthenware, etc. 

44 Jaburek, F. Vienna, Gumjyendorfergasse 41. — Meerschaum articles. 
46 Bruenner, Brothers, Vienna, Magdalenensirasse 10. — Petroleum lamps. 

46 Fischer, M. Herend, Veszprim, Hunga/ry. — Porcelain services. 

47 Trebitsch, a. Vienna, ffundstkurmerstrasse 7. — Meerschaum articles, 

48 GoLDMANN, M. Vienna, Welgassc 3,— Meerschaum j^cleg. 



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BELGltTM. Sonth-east ci Tranaepi 



Section IL^-chemical aio) phabmaceutical fbocesses, and products 

GENEBAIiLY. 

13 Bbassbub, E. Ohent^-^'White lead and ultramarine blue. 

14 Bbunbel & Co. Ghent, — Chemical products derived from tbe oarbooizatioQ 
of wood : acids, acetates ; vinegar, oil, and alcohol jfrom wood. 

15 Bb Cabtibb, a. Auderghem, near Brussels, — " Minium de fer d'Auderghem," 
a preservative paint for iron and wood. 

16 Dblmottb-Hoobeman, C. MaridkerJce, near Ghent — White lead. 

17 Depbez-Hbnin, ChdteUtj near Charleroi. — ^Pure wheat starch. 

] 8 Hoo^iCKX & GOBBISSEN, Brussels. — Minium of iron ; various kinds of ochro. 

19 Mebtens, B. & Co. Lessines, Prov, of ffainatdt. — ^Lucifer matches. 

20 Mebtbns, G. OverhoekLere, near Grammont, — ^Lucifer matehee; blacking. 

21 Rbmt & Co. Louvain. — Rice starch. 

22 Seghebs, B. Ghent. — Bone black; 

23 Smaelen, p. Brussels. — Copal varnish. 

24 Van Geeteeuten-Evebabbt, J. O. & Sistie, ffammct near Termondc-r 
Starch made from damaged Wheat. 



Section ni.<-->BUBSTANCE8 used as food. 

25 Blaess, C. B., Borgerhout, ne^/r Antwerp. — ^Vinegar. 

26 Blondiau, V. Alost. — Glucose, syrups, and isinglass. 

27 Bobtie^, p. Qh^telles, West Flanders,^l^olj]^Q limestone exhibited as a 
fertiliziDg agent. 

28 De Biseau, T, EntremontSy nearBinche. — ^Wheat; oats. 

29 DeGbyse-Quaghebueb, Poperinghe.—'S.o^e. 

30 Be Man, J. Antwerp. — Cigars in boxes. 

31 Detmann-Dbuaet, C^arZeroi.—" Deymann bitter," a stomachic liqueur. 

32 Dubez, J. B. D. Brussels.— "l^eQtQx du Brabant," a liqueur. 

33 Ihmdahl, C. Brussels. — ^^ Elixir des Ardennes," a liqueur 

34 Lepebvbb, Ww. & Son, Braine-le-Comte. — Liqueurs. 
S5 liEBON, 7. AlNE, Brussels.'-JAcuciQ^rs, 

36 Lesappbe, a. Gheluwe, West Flanders. — Leaf tobacco* 

37 Masqublieb-Hobta, A. Ghent.^JAqiiexiiB, 
36 MiBiiAND & Co. Fram&ies, — ^Apple paste. 

39 Peebs, Baron, Oostcamp, West Flanders. — Rye grown in newly cj^^red land. 

40 RoBiLLABD, J. B. Mensies, Prov. of Hainault — Hops, wheals and beer. 

41 SCHALTIN, PlEBBT & Co. /SJpa.— LiqueuTs. 

42 Steens, H. Schooten, Prov. of Antwerp. — Cereals; kidney beans. 

43 "Van Butsele, G. NuJcerke, near Oudenarde. — Cereals. 

44 Van Butsele, Ww. NuJcerJce. — Beer. 

45 Vanden Bebgh & Co. Antwerp.— Qm ; alcohol; bitters. 

46 Vande Vblde, N. (?Am?.— Liqueurs ; champagne beer. 



SsCTIOIf IV.-r-YEQETABIiE AND ANIMAL SUBSTANCES CHIEFLT USIJP IN MAKU* 
{"ACTUBES AS IMPLEMENTS, OB AS OBNAMENT. 



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69 "MASCESLEUf, AfOhsltme^near Ccmrtrai.-^] 

60 Mbohant, H. ffamme. — Flax. 

61 Pbkbs, Babon E. Obited/flvpi nea/r Bru^.-^'. 
Aealhy soil. 

62 Taulez-Bottelier, C. Bruges. — Peeled flax 

63 Vebbessem, C. Ghent. — Glue and gelatine. 

64 VebcbuyssE-I^bacq, F. DeerlyJc, mar Courtr 

Section V.---^icAesiNEs fob dis 

6^ Oj^, J. l?i, Ha£6t», a. & Co. MolffiihechSt 



Section VI manufacturing maci 

06 AEfexS, BROTHERS & Co. Brussels. — Ventilal 

67 Cail, J. F., Halot, A. & Co. Molenbeck 

boriiig maohm« ; thifee slide-lathes ; transverse plaarin 

Section VIL — givil bnginebring, archf 
conte1vangk8. 

70 Beernaert, a. Audtrghem, near Brusseh.— 

71 Delperdange V. Brussels.— V^ titer arid gas 

72 Leclbroq, a. J. Brussels, — Two marble chi 



Section ViJJL — navaii architecture ani 
ordnance, armour, and acc< 

7.3 Batet, Brothers, LUge. — Ornamented fi] 
7^ Bits, A. J. St, GiMes, near Brussels, — Cop 
bushes for Lefaucheux guns. 

75 DualouiiiN-LAMBiNOi?, Liege. — Ornamented 
bert's principle ; pistols and revolvers. 

76 Jansen, a. Brussels, — Fowling pieces arid" < 



Section IX AGmcuLTUBAii and horticultur 

{At the Agricultural BaM, Kil* 

77 Berckmans, J. F. Blaesvelt near Mechlin.- 

78 Cail, Halot & Co. Molenbeck-St.-Jean, 
Valgni^re's principle. 

7d Delstaitche, p. ifflrSazs.— Agricultural'mi 

80 Lebceup, F. Bassily. — Reaping implements 

81 Lecomte, p. J. Pont-dt' (kites. — ItbA plbugl 

82 WouterSj J. F. Nivelles. — Double-acting fj 



SisCTION X. — PHILOSOPHICAli INSTRUJAENTS ANI 

83 Carette-Dobbels, D. Meulebel-e, West Fid 

85 SociETE Anontme Pour la Fabrioatio] 
BLISHMENT OP Merklin-Schutz, IxelUs, — ^Organs, h 

86 Sternberg, L. Brussels. — Two pianofortes, 

87 Vanden-Hende, R, Steenhuyzen Wynhwyu 
giennes.'* 

88 VuiLLAUME, N. F. Brussels. — Violinaj Viol 
9trumeat3 are in the Great Conggrt IlalL 



Section XI — cott^ 
89 i^icoux & Co. €ureghm*-^^QYnn^i^xte$Ai 



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if ' 

U ? «4 BELGIUM. Scmfh-etttoflhttiiMpi; 

1 1 r Section XII — woollen and worsted 

I 90 Gabot, J. Verviers. — ^Woollen stufiiB for troiuers. 



t 
I 

! 



I 



Section XIV. — manufactures from flA3C and asMP. 

91 De Brandt, J. Alost, East Flanders, — Damask table linen. 

94 Steenackers, C. Turnhowt, — Linens. 

95 Van Damme, Brothers, Routers, — Blue linens. 

96 Van db Wtnckele, Brothers, & Alsbebob, 6%en;.— Bleached lindntbtdiidc 

97 Van Kaeeen, J. A. Zele, East Flanders, — Hemp rope, huid-made. 



Section XVI. — leather, saddlery and harness, skins, furs, haib, &c 

98 Abbetz-Wutts, G. Aerschot, Prov, of Brdbant,'-lje&tlieTf vamps, &c. 

99 Declebcq, Van Havebbbke, Iseghem, — Strong sole and varnished leather. 

100 EvERAERTS, C. Wavre. — Upper leathers, &c. 

101 Fetu & Co. Brussels, — Engine straps; leather tubes ; water-proof cloth tills. 

102 HJESNAULT A. & Son, Ghent. — Babbit skin, finished ; hare and rabbit for. 

103 Lbmaistre & Co. Brussels. — Engine straps and leather ropes. 

104 ScHOVAEBS & Collet, Cureghem^ near Brussels, — Varnished leather. 

105 Vanden Bos-Poelman, Ghent. — Boots. 

106 Watrioant, a. Brussels. — Boots and shoes. 



Section XVli — ^paper and stationery, printing and bookbinding. 

107 Asselbebqhs-Lequime, Brussels. — Letter paper. 

108 Bbepols & DiEBCKX, Son, Tumhout, — ^Playing cards; fancy paper; bound 
books. " , 

109 Callewaebt, Bbothebs, Brussels. — ^Atlases ; method of writing. 1 

110 Claesen, Ch. Xic^'c. — Illustrated works. I 

111 GABBiEhjCBraineVAllmd. — Pasteboard. 1 

112 Magneb, F. Brussels. — Specimens of calligraphy. i 

113 Blanche, V. Brussels. — Ink. 

.. 114 Van Doosselaebe, J. S. G'Aewf.— Typography. 

116 Weissbnbbdch, M. jBn««cZs. — Books. i 

116 XVynants, C. St, Josse-ten-Noode, near Brussels, — Copying press. 

Suction XVlll. — ^woten, spun, felted, and laid fabrics, when SKoynr as 
specimens of printing or dyeing. 

117 Idibrs, E. Auderghem.—'Djed cotton yams. 



I Section XDL-^tapestrt, including carpets and floor cloths, IiA'ce jam 

I embroidery, fancy and industrial works. 

118 Bbels, D. & Sister, (?^e?i«.— Brussels lace. 

119 jyissiaf J, Brussels, — Gold embroidery. 

120 Ghys-Bbuyneel, P. F. Grammmt. — Black lace. 

121 Ghysels & Co. Brussels. — Brussels lace. 

122 HooBiCKX & Co. Brussels. — Brussels lace. 

123 HouTMANS, A. J. Brussels. — Designs for lace. 

124 HoUTMANS, C. C. Brussels, — Designs for lace. 

125 Ray, Mrs. S. Brussels. — Lace. 

i 126 Stocquabt, Bbothebs, Grammont. — Black lace. 

127 Van deb Dubbbn-d'Habbeee, Brwsds, — Designs for lace. 



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66 CHINA— DENMARfc. 



I 



Wesir Gfecffeiy. 

Hewetv ft' €^ W. tB dnd 19p€i^JM¥eh tf. £ondm, K(^. and^3mp Mottg :— 

1. Chinese state bedstead, elaborately carved, and ornamented with raised 
fignres and devices in rich gilt work, taken from a citj ia the north of China daring 
the late war. 

2. Nests of esculent swallaw ; ofHrna pipe; modela of a GMiiese- hidyV ftet; 
embroidered shoes and slippers ; chopstick ; mandariu V ne<skliice ; fishkig-ISies ; 
powerful gong, used as a fog signal ; mother-o'-pearl card'couatars; carved pea^^sfielL 

' 3. Books of rice-paper paintings ; carvings in bamboo ; manuscript bookr 
looted from the empress's apartment at the paiaoe- of tbe Yuese^^iling^YiWii^ by 
a French oflBcer. 

4. Chinese matting for floor-elotbs ; carved table, with marble top ; hand- 
screens ; ivory carved large racing cup and cover ; card baskets and cases ; match pots. 

5. Chessmen, draughtsmen, puxses> concentric balls ; fans and glove stretcliera 

6. Paper knives, and carvings in sandal- wood, consisting of card haeketJB and 
racks, jewel and work-boxes, cribbage boards, &c. 

7. Fans in lacquered ware, ivory, and sandal wood, ornamented with isoddt 
of Chinese figures in silk, with ivory faces. 

8. Silver filagree card cases and bouqnet-holders. 

9. Ancient red lac, from Soo-Chow ; lacquered ware in gloyr boxesy oard 
boxes, tea-caddies, trays, &c. 

10. Modem Chinese painted porcelain of tbe finest quality, mannfactrbed at 
King-te-Chin, consisting of vases of ail sizes ; garden "seats ; plates, dishes, bowls, 
cups, covers, and saucers ; spill vases ; toilet-pots, flower-pots,- trays, S^., &c. 

11. Rare ancient Cloisonne enamel, the ai-t of manufacturing whieh ha» been 
lost for centuries, supposed to be 800 years old, Qonsisting of a font, smafi: vasfts, and 
bowls. 

12. Ancient Chinese bronze vases, incense burner, and a pair of curious griffins. 

13. Carvings in agate, crystal, and jade ; vase of pure white jade, most elaborately 
embellished. 

14. Ancient porcelain ; turquoise, crimson, cream-odour, mrottled$ and pBdted 
mandarin porcelalrt; balloon lanterns. 

1^. TAT LOB, Mbs. Billhroolc, Castleknock. — f*air of enaaieUed tf^les, breught 
from the Emperor of China's summer palace, Pekin, by J. Ml Tayloiv F.BiCiS'.I, 
^yal Artillery. 

16. Scott, Chables M. Swatow. — ^Ten pieces blue grass cloth, fifteen pieces 
white grass cloth, and eight pieces blue cotfon shirtings, fine and inferior ; six pewter 
tea canisters; five muskets and accouti?ement8 ; three bows and twenty-five arrows; 
inre pairs of swords ; five spears, heads, and handles ; six tea-cups and saucers ; two 
Water-pipes, brass ; twenty-three bundles cigar cases ; box, containing tobacco ioi 
water pipes ; thirty pieces of crock^f^ ; three shielder ; one Jstp^aoeae cabhiet. 



DENMARK. 

East Gallery, over l^raxzaept 

SlOnON VH. — CIVIL ENGINEEBING, ABCHIl'ECTDItAX/j ASD BtlLryRfG' C'OiJTElf A»to 



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68 PEANCE. Apse of Transepi 

• Section VII. — civil engineering architectueal, and building contrtvances. 

36 Grenet, E. Paris. — Electric bells for domestic use. 

37 MossELMANN & Co. Paris, — Sanitary appliances. — {AgricuUural EaM^ KU- 
dare street.) 

Section VIII. — ordnance, armour, etc. 

38 Tbonchon, a. p. Paris. — Guns and fowling-pieces; cartridges invented by 
the exhibitor. 



Section IX. — agricultural and horticultural machines and ihplemekts. 

39 Metzounial, Brothers, Sarlat, (Do7'dogne.) — Boiler for farms, annies in 
the field, &c. — (Agricultural Hall, Kildare street.) 

Section X.— musical and horological instruments. 
39a Lbroy & Son, Paris and London. — Clocks and watches. 

40 Alexandre, Paris. — Organs , harmoniums. — {Great Music EalV), 

41 Gehkling, C. Pai^. — Musical instruments. — (Great Music Halt). 

44 BuziN, J. B. & Co. Paris. — Guide-accord ; phonoptique, insti'ument for 
tuning pianos. — (Great Music Hall). 

Section XI. — cotton. 
46 Thierry-Mieg, Mulhouse. — Chintzes and cretonnes. London house, Carl* 
hian and Corbibre. 



, Section XII. — woollen and worsted. 

46 Arbeckx-Collette, Tourcoing, (Nord.) Woollen j-am. 

♦ , 

Section XIII. — silk and velvet. 

I 47 Bonnet, Lyons. — ^Plain glacis silks. Dublin house, J. Manning. 

k 48 Brunet-Lecomte, Lyons. — Fancy silks. Dublin house, J. ManniDg, 

49 Blache, Lyons. — ^Velvets. Dublin house, J. Manning. 
! 60 Berteaux, Radou, & Co. Paris. — Silks, silk robes, &c. 

i 51 Cocheteux, Templeuve. — Silk and wool damask. London house, Carlhiau 

i and Corbiere. 

52 Million, Lyons. — Plain gkcos silks. Dublin house, J. Manning. 

) 53 Pillet-Meauzb, Toitrs. — Silks for furniture. London house, Carlhian and 

Corbiere. 

55 Bouillet, J. B. Paris. — Silks ; embroidery. Dublin house, Maison 
[ Meyer. 

53 Yemeniz, Lyons. — Silks for furniture. 

57 Beauuepaire, E. Paris. — Siiks for furniture. London house, F. Caille. 
I 58 JossERAND, Eevrol & Co. Z7/o?i5.— Silks. Dublin house, J. Manning. 

Section XIV. — manufactures from flax and hemp. 

' 69 GuYNET, H. & Co. Paris and Belfast. — Printed linens. 

60 LussiONY, Brothers, Camhray. — Cambric. Dublin house, Maison Meyer. 

;. , 

I 1 Section XV. — mixed fabrics, i>'cludino shawls, and exclusive op worsted 

j , goods. 

01 Chanel, Lyons. — Rich filled shawls. Dublin house, J. Manning. 
64 Tuvee & Co. Paris. — Tissues for millinery. Dublin house, Maison Meyer. 
66 Gaussen, ain^, & Co. Paris. — (Calange L'honnemr I'rangoise & Co. sue- 
cessors.) Cashmere shawls. 

66 Imbs, Paris. — ^Tissu Indien (a new fabric). London house, Carlhian and 
Corbiere. 

67 Lacassagne, Deschamps, Salaville, & Co. Paris. — Cashmere shawls, &c 

ftR RoniKR. Paris. — "Fannv iiRsiies. Dublin hniiRe. .1. ManTiinor- 



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SECJTION XVI. — LEATHER, ETC. 

71 Cheillet, Jnb & Co., Pam. — Gloves; skins, for manufacture of glove** 

72 Legros, ain^, Paris. — Leather and varnished skins. 

73 PoiROTTE, F. Parvi. — Boots. 

74 Trefousse & Co. Chaumont. — Gloves. 



, Section XVII. — printing, etc. 
54 Nissou, G. Paris. — Labels and tickets printed in chromo-lithography. 



Section XIX. — tapkstrt, including carpkts and floor cloths, lace and 
emRroidery, fancy and industrial works. 

62 DOQNIN & Co. Paris. — Shawls, lace, &c. 

63 Imperial Manufactories of Gobelins and Beauvais. — Tapestry. 
63a Braquenie, Bros. Aubusson., (Creuse.) — Tapestry for hangings. 

74a Flipo, Flipo J". F. Tourcoinr/, {Nord.) Reps for hangings, curtains, damask 
table cloths, silken and woollen stuflfe. 

75 Bodssart-Florin, Tourcoin,g. — Curtains ; table-covers. 
75a Ferguson, fils, 40 Rue des Jeunews, Paris. — Lace. 

76 Arnaud-Gaidan, Ntsmes. — Tapestry, portiferes, &c. London house, Carl- 
bian and Corbifere. 

77 Delcambre, a. ChantUly. — Lace. Dublin house, Maison Meyer. 

78 Gros, S. & Son, Lyons and Dublin. — Embroidered vestments. 

79 Lapond & Dupont, Paris. — Tapestry and designs ; reps ; damask ; table 
clotbs, &c. 

80 Lefebure & Son, Paris. — Lace. Dublin house, J. Manning. 

81 MouRCEAU, Paris. — ^Tapestry, portiJires, &c. London house, Carlhian and 
Corbifere. 

82 Vayson, Abbeville. — Carpets, tapestry, &c. 

83 Walmez, Duboux, & Daoer, Paris. — Tapestry and table covers. 



Section XX. — articles of clothing. 
84 Meyer, M™® • Paris and Dublin. — French corsets. 



86 Poirotte, M""» 
86 Bagriot, F. a. 
sporting suits^ &c. 



Pa/ris — Coi^pets. 

Paris. — Buttons for liveries, military and court xmiforms, 



Section XXII. — hardware. 



87 Dupont, Ph. Cherbourg. — Metal varnish ; coffee and pepper mills. 

88 Trocard, T. Paris, — Improved coffee pot. 



Section XXIII. — working in precious metals and in their imitations; jewellery, 

AND ALL articles OF VERTU AND LUXURY NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CLASSES. 

89 Blot & Drouard, Paris, — Ornamental articles in zinc, imitating bronze, 
liondon house, Carlhian and Corbi^re. 

90 Carlhian & CorbiJ;rb, Paris and London. — Lamps ; clocks ; bronzes, &c. » 

91 HoTTOT, Paris. — Ornamental articles in zinc, imitating bronze. London 
House, Carlhian and Corbifere. 

92 MiROY, Bros., Paris and London. — Bronzes. 

94 Sutton & Charbonn^, Paris. — Clocks : gilt, bronze, and marble ; compo- 
bronze statuettes, &c. 

95 Thenard, F., Paris. — Plated and oxydized bronze medallion, representing 
Liord Palmerston. 

96 Sutton & Co. Paris. — Bronzes. Dublin house, T. Brunker. ' 

97 Boy, Paris. — Bronzes. Dublin house, T. Brunker. 

98 DuPRi, Paris. — Bronzes. Dublin house, T. Brunker. 

99 Barb^diennb, F., Paris — Bronzes. 

100 Barbezat, Val d'Osne, — Cast iron statues, yswes^ ^c. ; two foi ntaina in 
garden. Xiondon House, Carlhian and Corbifere. 



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72 KINGDOM OF ITALY. Eaat.GaJleiy. 

66 Beltbani G. Trani (Terra di Bart). — Olive oil; Muscat wine ; raisins ; figs. 
57 Bkrnardi, .Brothers, Borgo a Buggiano (Lucca), — Biscuits called Cantucci. 

68 Berbutti, Brothers Giuseppe, & Carlo, Grimano D*Alba (Coni), — ^Wine. 

69 BiFFi Paolo, 1022 Cor^ del Zhwmo, Milan. — Panattone (pastry) ; various 
kinds of liqueurs ; chocolate, and confectionary. 

60 BocoABDi, Brothers, Candda (CapUanata), — Olive oil; Muscat wine ; ilZeo- 
tico Santo wine ; cow's milk cheese. 

61 BoNACOORSi Count Flavio, Potenza Piceria (Macerata), — Olive oil. 

62 BoNAMici Ferdinand©, Vico Pisano (Pisa). — Olive oil, expressed cold ; oil 
extracted firom the skin of the olive, expressed cold, for dyeing and manu£BU)ture of 
white soap ; expressed hot, for manufacture of mottled soaps. 

63 Bosco PiETRO & Sons, Brd (Coni). — ^Barolo wine. 

64 BoTTAMiNi Bartolomeo, Bormio (Sondrio). — Honeycomb ; honey. 

65 Bulli Brothers, Florence. — Italian paste of various forms, for soup. 

66 BuRRi Aw. Bernardino, Ginigiano (GrosseLo). —Olive oil. 

67 Calderai Angiolo, Florence. — Sausages. 

- 68 Camajori Giovanni, Sienna. — Wine ; fine olive oil. 

69 Carbone S. Catania. — Maccaroni, Italian paste for soups ; red wheat. 

70 Carpano G. Bernardino, 18 Piazza Castello, Turin. —Turin Vermouth. 

71 Carpi Telesporo, Parma. — Ham ; shoulder ham. 

72 Catania Sub-Committee for the Dublin International Exhibition.— 
Wine ; snufiF ; tobacco. 

73 Cerchi Brothers Filippo & Pietro, Monte Catini di Vol di Nievokf 
Lucca. — Olive oil ; Aleatico wine. 

74 CiccoLiNi SiLENzi, Marchesa Ortensia, Civitanova (Macerata) Olive oil. 

75 Cinzano Francesco (late Baracco Nicola & Co.) via Doragrossa, Turin.— 
Turin Vermouth ; extract of punch j desert wine, vin brul^ ; candied fruit ; bonbons; 
bouquets in sugar. 

76 CiOPPi Lorenzo & Settimo, Pontedera (Pisa). — Italian paste for soups. 

77 COMPAGNA Baron Luigi, Corigliano (Calabria Citeriore). — Red wine; olive 
oil; Provolone and Caciocavallo cow's milk cheese. 

78 CoPPlNl GlULlo, Chiusdino (Sienna). — Alkhermes. 

79 Cora, Brothers Giuseppe & Luigi, via S. Teresa, Turin, and Costiglide 
d^Asti (Alexandria). — Liqueurs: Alkhermes; Vanilla chocolAie \ Sambayon ; Banana; 
double Cura9ao ; Maraschino ; Hortusglor ; double Anisette ; Turkey coffee ; punch 
cream ; crime de Noyaux ; peppermint cream ; trufiie cream ; cianamon cream ; bal- 
sam of Jerusalem elixir ; cherry ratafia ; Garus elixir ; sweet quinine elixir ; Stockton 
elixir; Chartreuse. — Wines: Orignolino ; -Tokay; sweet and dry Nehiolo ; Barolo; 
Brachetto ; Barbera; Barolo Nebiolo ; Dolcetto ; Malmsy (Malvasia) ; Muscat; 
Passaretta ; Turin Vermouth ; Vermouth with quinine or Garus. 

80 CoSENTiNi, Stefano, Catania. — Olive oil. 

81 CosTARELLi, Martini, Catania. — Wine. 

82 Curtarelli Gaetano, Crejnona.— Cremona fruit pickles. 

83 D'Albero Antonio, 218 and 219 strada Toledo, Naples. — Candied fruit, 
chestnuts, and vegetable marrow. 

84 Danielli, Dr. Domenico, Btiti (Pisa). — Olive Oil. 

85 De Filippi Paolo, Savona (Genoa). — ^Wine. 

86 Del Tosoano, Marquis, Catania. — Wine. 

87 Di Rignano Marquis, Foggia (Capitanata). — Best and common olive oil. 

88 Economical Society, Savona (Genoa). — Chestnuts. 

89 Fasoiotti G. & Co. Burgoniasino (T'tt/m).— Bonarda and Erbaluce wines. 

90 Fenzi E. 0. Floi*ence.~Wine ; olive oil in flasks ; alimentary substances. 

91 Forges Davanzati Alessandro, Palo del Colle (Teira di Bari).— Olive oil; 
•^yine ; beans. 

92 FoRNi Alessandro, Bologna. — Sausages ; capicoUi ; Bologna sausage (mor- 
tadella) ; boxes of sliced Bologna sausages, exhibited as a new mode of exporting. 

93 Franciosi Pietro, Terricuola, neai^ Peccioli (Pisa). — Olive oil. 

94 Frigieri Giuseppe, Modena. — Florentine sausages; Zampone and Capelletti; 
balsamic vinegar. 

95 Gallucci Michelangiolo, Palmi; (Calabria Ultra prima). — White and red 
Calabrian wine ; Aspromonte ; Prato ; Muscat ; Greco Vinegar. 

fi8 Galqvano Giuseppe. 8 via Doi-aarossa. Turin. — Galvae-no's couffh mixture. 



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74 KTNGJIOM DI ITALY, East ^eiy. 

JS^tl^t^ l^olovrfiL J Vwrvello Fr^ancesco, 4-^^h (Alexandria); T)e ^laai^s Comin. 
Giacomo, S. Angela, Penm (Ahruzzo Ulteriore I.); Oudart Luigi, Neive ; iPoccardi 
LeoDardp, Cftndela {Capitanatg,) ; Fulcheri Alessandro, Mondovi Breo ^' GEnological 
Society, Savigliano ; VegUo Luigi, ^erralunga ; Tarditi and Son, JUt Morra ; X]!hiar- 
amello Luigi, Serralungfi (Qoni) ; Nerucci Gheraido, Montale {JFlw*ence) ; GAbaldoni 
Viflcen^, Vare^e Ligure (Genoa); Vitiello Vincenzo, 2'orre del Greco (Naples); 
Greco Cassia Luigi, Syracuse (Noto) ; Alberici Francesco, Caatana; Florio g,nd Co. 
Palertno ; Buelli Esuperanzo, Bobkio (Puvia) ; Zauli-Naldi Count Francesco, Faenza ; 
Grocchi Cevarcj Forli (Ravenna) ; CicaU Fulgosi Count Pietro, Nibhiano ; Astorri 
Giaccmo, Borgonuovo (Placenza); Costa Antonio and Benedetto, AlgJuiro (SasMn); 
Delia Torre Count Carlo, Orlo Caluso; Genta Aw. Paolo, Caly^o; Pi S. Germano 
3^arqiU8 Casimiro, Mazze Canavcse; Colomiatti Aw. MelcUiorre and Brothers, Chieri 
(^unn) ; Blasi Giovanni, Rome; Poggioli Ludovico, Rome; Galascini Pio, Rjom; 
^^f^sipsi .Giovai;uii, Rome ; Frullani, Rome. 

14S Royal 3^obacco Manufactory, Bologna. — Tobacco and cigars. 

147 BoYAL Tobacco Manufactory, Lucca. — ^Tobacco and cigars. 

148 RuGGiEEi Canon Giovanni, Tcrlizzi {Terra di Bari). — Malmsey or Mai- 
vasia wine ; common wine. 

149 Savorini Francesco ^ Sons, Perm-eto (Bologna). —Bordeaux Anisette rosog- 
lio ; rosoglio ; white rum. 

150 ScALESE Pasquale, 1 Stroda Bartolomeo (Naj^les). — Bed Procida wine ; Sici- 
lian Muscat. 

151 Scisci, MiCHELE, Baii. — Almonds. 

153 ScoccHERA Savino, Cauosa {Terra di Ban).—OYiyQ oil of 1863 and 1864. 
153 SouDERi, Francesco Maria & Son, Catania. — Wine. 
164 SiRiGU, Giuseppe, Cagliari. — Vermouth. 

1§6 Sylos Labini, Vincenzo, Senator of the Kingdom, Bitonto (Terra di Bari).^ 
Zagarese, Muscat, and common wines ; ten varieties of almonds ; Cargb beans. 
156 ToBO B. & Sons, Tocco {Ahruzzo Citci-iore). — Strong and mild centerba. 
153 TuRCHiARELLi MiCHELE, Candela (Capitanaia), — Olive oil. 
159 Vannucci Vannuccio, i^^areyit-e.— Olive oil. 
J. 60 Zanetti Guido, Bologna. — Bologna sausages. 

161 ZiRiLLi, Giuseppe & Son, Milazzo (Messina). — Wine. 

162 BoNANNO, Francesco, Palermo. — Olive oil from Termini Imerese. 

163 BoTTi, Alessandro, Chiavari (Genoa). — Olive oil. 

164 Cafisi, Stefano, Favara (Girgenti). — Wine. 

165 Favara, Verdebame Vito, Mazzara del Vallo (Trepani). — Wine. 

166 Foresi, Portoferrajo, Blba (Leghorn). — Wine. 

167 MiNiNNi, Ignazio, Palo del Colic (Terra di Bari). — ^Wine. 

163 Mastroqiacomo, Saverio, NoiccUtai-o (Terra di Barri).—(>]i\e oil. 

169 RiCASOLi, Baron Bettini, Florence.— Olive oil ; wine ; cheese. 

170 Racagni, Bernardo, Brescia. — Samples of Indian corn. 



I ' Section IV, — vegetable and animal substances cHiEFLr used in ma«u- 

I factures as implements on fob obnament. 

180 Alonzo, Chev. Antonino, Catania. — Siamese cotton. 
\ - 181 Astengo Brothers, late Luigi, Savona (Genoa). — Soap. 

182 Astengo Brothers, late Vincenzo, Sarona (6'eHoc().— Manufactured wax. 

183 Bacini, Giovanni, Lastra a Signa, and Florence. — Carpet brooms ; whisks. 

184 Beltrani G. Trani (Ta-^-a di Bari). — Cotton grown at Trani, crop of 1864. 

185 Bologna Hemp Spinning Works, Hizzoli Kaffaele, Director, Bologna.-- 
Kaw, combed, and spun Bolognese hemp ; spun hemp of various kinds. 

186 Catania ISub-Co»imittee eor the Dublin iNi^RNATiONAii Exhibition.— 
Kaw and ginned cotton ; skins of various kinds. 

187 Chicca Raff able & Co. Lucca. — Castor oil ; raw and boiled linseed oil 
ditto for varnish. 

188 Co^PAGNA Baron Luigi, Corigliano (Calabria Citeriore). — Siamese cotton, 
crop of 1864. 

189 Di Benedetto, F. & M. Catania. — Raw and ginned Siamese cotton. 
IQO DiLG. EdOARDO & Co. Comiso (Catania).— lia.w and crinned cotton. 



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KINGDOM 0:^ ITALY. 



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192 BuTTO Giuseppe, Cont. — Wax tapers. 

193 Fenzi Emanuele Orazio, Florence. — Straw for plaiting. 

194 Hallaire Eugenio, Bailiff of the private estate of H. M. the EmWCROB 
Napoleon III. at Oivitanora (Macerata).— Two samples of Barbadoes cotton (GoBsp- 
pium harhadense\ and eight of G. hirsutvm, crop of 1864 ; madder roots. 

195 Lagorio Antonio, Bologna. — Baw hemp. 

196 Majorana, Brothers Salv adore & Giuseppe, Barons of Kiccliiaray 
Catania. — Raw and ginned cotton ; flax ; shumac ; cork ; wax ; castor-oil seeds. 

197 MoDENA Brothers Cesarb & Ibaia, Beggio in the JSmilia,— "Roots of the 
Ckysopoffon grilhis, for making brushes. 

198 MuNDO, GiosuE, ^ari.— Cotton. 

199 Padolecchia, Nicola, j9an.— Cotton. 

200 Peratoner & Son, Catania. — Row and cleaned cotton. 

201 PizzETTi F. Parma. — Parmesan silk-worm cocoons ; Macedonia and 
Bnkharest cocoons reared in the province of Parma; eggs and moths of the silk-worms. 

202 RiCASOLi Cav. Colonel Vinoenzo, Florence, — Raw Siamese cotton grown 
on the Mont* Argentale {Grosseto). 

203 Royal Economical Society, Fogg la (Capftanata), — Cotton grown in the 
Botanical Gardens at Foggia ; wild madder roots. 

204 Royal Industrial Museum (Director op the), Turin. — Collection of 
cotton grown in 1863 by numerous cultivators. 

206 RuDiNi, Marquis Antonio, Palermo. — Cotton. 

206 Serventi, Santb, heirs of, Parma. — ^Wax ; wax candles ; sealing wax. 

207 ToRNABBNB, Prof. Francesco, Catania. — 157 samples of cotton grown in 
the Botanical Gardens at Catania, chiefly from seeds obtained from the Royal Indus- 
trial Museum at Turin ; dried plants corresponding to the above samples. 

209 VoNWiLLER David & Co. Castellammare {Naples), and 69 Strada Quantag* 
ntiovi, Naples. — Garancine ; madder. 

210 Cheval, F. & Rossi, G. Cagliari. — Raw cotton. 

211 MuRRi, Antonio, Cagliari.^-B,SLW cotton. 

212 Pantaleo, Pari. — ^Raw cotton. 

218 PoNTE, Gaetano, Palagonia {Catania), — Raw>cotton. 

214 Console, Michel Angelo, Palermo. — ^Twenty six varieties of cotton-seed, 
"with the cotton, showing the length of the staple. 

215 Loforte, Giovanni, 41 Strada dei 7 Dolori, Naples, — Kidskins for gloves. 

Section VII. — civil engineering, etc. 
289 The Directors of the Mont Cenis SubalpInb Tunnel, 2 Via S. Secondo, 
Turin. — Topographical plan and section of tlie works, and of the mountain. 

240 General Company of the Italian Irrigatory Canals (Cavour Canal), 
via della Rocca, Turin. — Photographs, represent^'ng the state of the works in 1863. 

241 Upper Italy Railway Company, via Cemaja^ Turin. — Photographs of 
the principal works on the lines belonging to the Company. 

242 Municipality op Turin. — Photographs of the new railway terminus, and 
front of the Carignan palace. 

248 Zappa Luigi, 10 vicolo S. Giovanni sid Muro^ Milan. — Fire engine easily 
taken asunder and put together again ; improved valve taps for baths, not liable to 
leak. — {No. 859a. Agricultural Hall, Kildare-st.) 

244 Martinotti, Luigi, 9 via Parharovx, Turin. — Portable flying bridge ; look 
out tower ; fire escape. — {Machinery Court. No, 855.) 

Section VIII naval architecture and mulmary en6in:eerin6, orbnancb, 

ARMOUR, and accoutrements. 

249 Casini, Ambrogio, Pietrasanta {Lucca). — Gun barrel with improved damask. 
260 Lombard Fire Arm Manufactory (Fabbrica d'Armi Lombarda), Cariggio, 

fieaf Lecco {Como) ; OJflce in Milan, 24 via S. Antonio. — Pig iron from Bondione, Schil- 
paiio, and Pisogne, Lombardy ; rods of malleable iron ; infantry musket, Itidian 
model,'1860, complete ; ditto, taken to pieces; rifle, Italian model, 1860, as used by 
the Bersaglieri; Swiss Federal rifle ; revolver. 

252 Pelizza, Gustavo, vie private, Turin — Rough walnut-^ood gunstocks of 
rsrkms sizes, fbr rifles, muskets, horse and common pistols. 

253 Pbiosa, Brothers G. kCvia S. Ytttore ai IFetOro^ 7 liUi<m^'^1^6V€ireatB, 



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Ye KINaDOM OF ITALY. East Gallery. 

254 Zanoboni, Pbrsio, Empoli (Florence). — Fourteen shot revolver, seven with a 
diameter of nioe milliraetres, and seven of seven millimetres. 

255 MuNDo, Gexnarr, 14 Strada dei 7 Dolor i, Naples. — Specimens illustrating 
a process for preserving wood from decay, and metals from oxydising in contact with 
water. 

Section IX — agricultural and horticultural machines and implements. 

260 Agricultural Association, Z/Mrcrt. — Agricultural implements of Lucca. 

261 Braccio Pietro, Valleggio (Patia).— Iron plough with modifications by 
exhibitor. ( — Agricultural Hall, KUdare st. A^o. 881.) 

262 Ferrari Bartolommeo, Parma — Apparatus for hatching silk-worm's eggs. 

263 Lamberti Giovanni, Parwi a. ^Corking machine. 

Section X. — philosophical, musical, horological, and surgical instruments. 

268 Briziano Dr. Anselmo, 1 ria del giardino Milan. — Models in wax ; sticking 
and corn plaster ; flexible bandaixes, and improved surgical instruments. for the feet. 

269 Carena Nicola, 17, Piazza S. Giovanni, Turin. — Fourteen day escapement 
clock, with improved alarum, to be wound up once in 12 days, and which may be 
stopped at will ; suitable for ships. 

270 Cassani E. 5 via S. Vito al Pasguirolo, Milan. — Mountings for spectacles. 

272 Giosi Francesco, 14 vico Figurari, Naples. — Instrument case for architects, 
with secret fastening. 

273 LoNGONi, DuRONi & Dei;«l'Acqua, 88 via della Pace^ Milan. — Philosophical 
and telegraphic apparatus : — Morse's telegraph with Digney and Maroni's latest 
improvements ; August's double psicrometer, with double ventilator ; surveying levels ; 
instrument case, complete ; hypsometer ; anemometer. 

274 Manzoni Lorenzo, 58 horgo Garibaldi, Milan. — ^Two violins, with modified 
form of attachment of the handles, varnished with a new kind of varnish. 

275 Monti, Elvira, Florence. — Twenty different herniary bandages ; twenty 
surgical appliances in common and galvanized Indian rubber and ela.stic cloth. 

276 Mure Brothers, 33 via Nizza, Turin. — Patent apparatus for measuring the 
height of recruits ; half hectolitre, of extreme precision, for measuring wine ; half 
decalitre, for ' dry measure ; German silver balance for chemical laboratories, turmng 
with 4 milligramme. 

277 Pelitti Giuseppe, 1,077 via PeicJieria vecchia, Milan. — Large collection of 
brass wind instruments. — {Great Music Hall.) 

278 RupiNi A. 13 vico Cordari a Buoncammino di Porto, Naples. — Lamb's gut 
strings. 

279 Decanini, Florence. — Tacheometer. 

280 Bosio, Michel Angelo, TuHn. — Improved escapement clock. 



Section XII woollens and w'orsted. 

284 Loforte, Giovanni, 44 Strada dei 7 Holori, Naples. — Woollen yams. 

285 Mazza & Co., Bellano . {Como), office in Milan, 2 via della <SaZa.— "Wool 
prepared by machinery from rags and cuttings, and employed for making shoddy goods. 

Section XIII silk and velvet. 

289 Bernardi, Francesco, Castelnuovo, Per ardenga {Sienna), — Raw silk produced 
from worms fed entirely on the leaves of the Madura aurantiaca. 

290 Abbati Pietro, Parma. — Raw yellow silk, spun by a new process, adapted 
for the warp or weft of any kind of stuff. 

291 Bancalari Ettore, Chiavari {Genoa). — ^White and yellow raw silk. 

292 Ceresa Brothers, Placenza. — Raw silk. 

293 CiMBARDi Alessandbo, Piazza del Carmine, Milan. — Sewing silk, produced 
from twin cocoonsr 

294 CoNSERVATORio Della Misericordia, Savona (Genoa). — Specimens of velvet. 

295 De Ferrari T. G. B., late Francesco.— Twenty-four pieces of black and 
coloured silk velvet. 

296 De Vecohi Pasquale & Co., 2 via Monte Pietd, Milan.— lisMin and Asiatic 
raw silk, organzine and trame. 

297 Delprino Michelb,- Vesime (Alexandria). — ^Raw yellow silk; patent cellular 

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KINGDOM OF ITALY. 



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298 GioVANELLi Amato, Pesaro. — ^Raw silk, with some of the cocoons from which 
it was produced. 

299 Gbtlli Rappaele, Ancona—'R&w silk. 

300 Kelleb, Alberto, Villanovettay near Saluzzo — Office in MilaUf 933 via S. 
Paolo. — Raw silk and organzine, spun from the cocoon, and reeled directly by process 
invented by exhibitor. 

301 Lanzani, Luigi & Bbothers, 9 via del Morello, Milan, — Hand and machine- 
carded silk waste, made from waste of various kinds. 

302 Lazzaboni, Pietbo, Piazza di S. Sepolcro, Milan. — Italian, Chinese, Japanese 
and Bengal silk. 

303 MoDENA, Bbothees Cesabe and Isaia. — Modena. — Raw silk. 
804 MoscHETTi, Angelo, Boves (Coni).—'Rsi,w silk. 

305 Ronchetti, Brothebs, Sala and Civate (Como) — Office in Milan, 2 via S, 
Giovanni (j'uxittro faccie. — Raw silk, organzine and trame. 

308 Rota, Antonio, Chiariy Brescia. — Raw white silk, from Chinese silk worms ; 
from Albanian and Bukharest silkworms ; double Albanian and Bukharest cocoons. 

307 SrccABDi, Lorenzo, Ceva (Coni). — ^Raw silk. 

308 Veccht, Jodi, Reggio in the Emilia, — White and yellow raw silk. 



Section XVI — leather, skins, etc. 

350 Melegabi Natale, Parma, — Skins of black and white waxed calf leather. 

351 Pellebano Giovanni Battista, 193, strada Chiaja, Naples. — Prepared 
skins for gloves, kid, sheep, lamb, and young lamb skins. 



Section XYII. — paper and stationery, printing and bookbinding. 

355 Cordova, Nicolo, Palermo. — Ornamental designs. 

356 Cambiagi, Francesco, Director of the Royal Printing Office, Florence. — 
Copy of the Spicilegium Liberianumj by Francesco Liverani and others, exhibited 
as a specimen of printing and binding. 

357 Castelli, Prop. Giacomo, via di Po, Turin. — Specimen of ornamental 
penmanship, executed on geometrical principles, with ornament in relief executed by 
the pen ; copy-books illustrating the geometrical principle of xteaching writing. 

358 Dalmazzo, Enrico, via S. Domenico, Turin. — Didionnaire Polyghtte en onze 
langues, par le Colonel Louis CalliganSf 1st part ; exhibited as a specimen of printing. 

359 Faa di Bruno, Chev. Francesco, 21 Borgo S, DonMo, Turin. — Writing 
apparatus for the blind. 

360 Forzani, Fiorenzo, 15 via S, Massimo, Turin. — Writing copy-books for 
schools, comprising English#and French hand, and German capitals. 

361 Franco, Sebastiano & Sons, 27 via Cavour, Turin. — School and class books. 

362 Maglia & Musso, 3 via Barharoux, Turin. — Copy books, 

363 Maglia, Pigna & Co., Vaprio and Alzano — Office in Milan. — Paper. 

365 Paravia, Giovanni Battista, 2d, via Doragrossa, Turin. — Collection of 
educationxil works, 107 volumes ; school books adopted in the various schools of 
Italy ; globes ; natm-al history diagrams ; school apparatus. 

368 Ricco, Felice, Modena. — ^Atlas of specimens of nature printing. 

369 Serra, Chev. Bartolomeo, Turin. — Volume containing the programme 
adopted in the technological and special schools dependent on the Ministry of 
Agriculture, Industry, and Commerce. 

370 Lancia, Federico, Duke op Brolo, Palermo. — Statistics of the schools in 
Palermo ; statistics .of the deaf and dumb in Sicily, by the exhibitor. 

371 Ministry op Public Instruction, Turin. — Objects from the Deaf and 
Dumb Institutions and Blind Asylums of Italy. Deaf and Dumb Institution^ 
Genoa. — Printing, book-binding, embroidery, shoe-making, engraving on precious 
stones, painting in oils. Deaf and Dumb institution^ Palermo. — Embroidery ; wax 
flowers ; alabaster fruit ; stump drawings ; Marzullo on the education of the deaf 
and dumb, and method of teaching them to speak. Deaf and Dumb Institution, 
Sienna. — Printing; book-binding; ornamental feather- work ; inlaid table; painting in 
oils. Blind Asylum, Milan. — Specimens of writing by the blind ; worsted- work carpet ; 
aitificial flowers. Deaf and Dumb Institution, Milan, — Embroidery; painting in 
oila ; wood carving ; wood engraving. 





^» .* '. ifr 



Sbctiotc XVJLil — woyiss and spun pabrics, as specimens op dyeing, etc., 

375 Bruni, Francesco & Son, Milan. — Organzine and trame, dyed black, 
( 376 FoLETTi, Weiss & Co., Milan. — Cotton yarn, dyed Turkey red. 

377 HuTH, PiETRO, Como. — Mineral black silk. 

378 Deaf and Dumb Institute, Milan.— Cotton fabrics by tbe ptipils. 



Section XIX. — tapestry, iNciuDiNa carpets and Ptooti cloths^ Lk6s and 
embroidery, fancy and industrial works. 

382 Ballauri Marina, Savana {Genoa). — Embroidered cambfTd handkeychief. 

383 BiBLLA Antonio, 1 via dci RastrelU, Milan, — Alto-relievo embroidery on 
gold and silk ground. 

384 BuoNiNi Marianna, Lucca. — Lace made with the needle. 

385 Fratti Rossina, Reggio, Emilia. — Portfolio of embroidered designs, made by 
a little girl 14 years of age. 

386 FuMMO Maria, 178, strada Toleclg, Naples. — Emhroidered cambric hand- 
kerchiefs. 

388 Martini Luigi, Milan. — Gold and silver brocade and embroidery. 

389 Tacchini Maria Teresa, Modena. — Embroidered cambric handkerchief. 
390.CAL0NI, ML^RiA, Deaf and Dumb Institution, iJ//ZAw.— Embroidered cambric 

handkerchief, &c. 

891 Salvati, Giuditta, Deaf and Dtmh Institution, ifiZaw.— Embroidered 
collar and cuffs. 

392 BiANCHi, GiusEPPA, Deaf and Dumh Institution, Milan. — Crochet work. 

393 ViOLiNi, Adelaide, Deaf and Dumb Institution, iJfi^».— Pincushion, 
embroidOTed in wool and beads. 



Section XX articles of clothing for immediate ob domestic use 

396 Bossi Edoardo, 179 strada Toledo, Naples.—Glove skin?; gteves. 
i^, SQf7 Co^Tl Cesare late M., S. Jacopino, Florence. — Tuscan Straw ; plait, a^d 

other ntlanuffwjtnr^s in straw ; straw hats ; cigar oases in straw plait ; straw cord. 
[ 39^ PoNzoNB Antonio, via Santa Margherita, Milan. — Silk and felt stiff and 

ffdiible hats ; military hat. 
I 400' TaveRHa Veronica, Piazza Castello, Turin. — Kid gloves. 



SECTION XXI. — cutler:^ and eUgS tools. 
4^0 Sbi^la IrTJBOViOO & Brother^ Masserano (Novaror). — Collection of cutlery. 



SECTiOir XXn.^^IBOlJT Am> ©El^EttAl. ha Ad WARE. 

41gi Abundo Giovanni, SaXerno {Principato Citeriore).^SB.fety lock. 

414 Bolzani Saverio, 28 Borgo dl Cittadella, Milan.— Ket^Mic wire gauze. 

41S| Grazioli i'oRTUNATO, 3 Via dei Vetraschi, Milan. — Bit for riding horses. 

4iS Sajno ^. 3,217, via dei Profumieri, .M'ilan. —Coftee pots acting by steam 
prfessure ; coffee pots covered with improved semi-metallic enamel ihVented byexhibitor. 

419 Salvi Pasquale (late Nicola), S. Potito {Principato Ulteriore), andTeaw) 
{fet^a di Lavoro) Office in Naples-, 25 and 26 Strada Nuova ilfariw^.— Castings ot 
agricultural instruments ; bars for forming gun barrels. 



Section XXIII. — working in precious metals, and. in thbib imitatioks; 

JEWELLERY, AND ARTICLES OF VERT0 AND LUXURY. 

423 BassI B. Pausula (ilfaccmto).— Bacchanalian ; Flora^ engraved on stone. 

^24l BeOUCCI. GiU'SEPPE. PlryrAr}.rj> — TjarorA P-nllertinTi nf Rftmpnf.infi WOrk. 



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if. 



Norih-east of Transept. KI^PG-BQM W I^F^Y. 



(» 



The rea^ng girl, reduced from Magni's statue ; Dante, ^<>m Y^Ws^V^^i ^ ^¥U^ ^93iti^ 
4ow^iV?, ip^^ile^ from uptigire ; ^ngraared jmd gilt ojip and sanoer. 

429 Ercoi^^nj i|E, Ft<msnce—^, John, after Poaatello ; repofnaii^ metri wodc 

480 G:mDAj I<f}Q»fcUJipo, ^r«pam.-^GaDaft€M8. 

431 J^A^B, Jomf G. i7xito^.-7T-Ne(2kljweaaaftde of amber found on the banks of 
the river Simeto, near Catania. 

432 LA^JD►IC!tNI GripsEJEPj:, 268 Jtmera di dhwuja, JViop^.^Gollectioii of ciMneoa 
engraved on Indian shells. 

434 Mabtuoci Giusbpjpb,, 15 ^(?»(ia GigavU, JSTa^Zcs.-Tr-AiabaBqiiB xioral handle, 
for a parasol, dagger, knife, etc. 

435 MussoLiNO, SAJ4V^oaE, 19 Vieo Colonna.a Fontemuyvo, JlTopto.-r-ScuIp.tured 
wooden va»ep, oi^amented Jvith figures. 

436 ST^atiLA Qi0V4^^i, 12 tico 2^ Monmhario, iVia^^es.— Engravings on lava&oin 
Vesuvius. 

437 Menioi Angiolo, Leghorn. — Hammered frame of German silver, with open 
Wf>xk ornanients, and basso relievos, entirely made out of a single plate of metal. 

438 JoDi, Casjmibo, jReggio in the ^Tmlia.-^IjBscge collection of antiquities of 
yfi(rio\is d^^tee ; i?(^ane<a medals, bas-reliefs, seals, lamps ; bronze statuettes ; Vennt and 
Qupids ; Luooa della Robbia wa»e ; vases ; pharmaceutical vessels ; Virgin, in mf ible.^r- 
(/» tke Mediceval Court.) 



Section XXIV. — glass. 

440 MiKOPE, Sanesi & Son, Pescia {Lucca). — Glass vase, cup and saucer, iii imi- 
1»tion chalcedony ; blue cup and saucer, imitation of antique vases in coloured glass. 



SeCJTION XXV. — OERAMIO MANUFACTURE, CHINA, PORCELAIN, EARTH^TWABE, ETC. 

442 BoNi Andrea, 8 /tto?*iPor^a Garibaldi^ Milan. — Terracotta work : tombstone ; 
chimney piece; pedestal; cornice; satyr; Bacchanalian; AgriciUture; Garibaldi; 
Italy; Galileo; Volta. 

443 Catania Sub-Committee for the International Exhibition. — Six little 
terra-cotta groups made by Giuffrida Nimzio and Angelo Leone, at Catania. 

444 Cinhlli Dr. Giuseppe, CcrUddo. — Basso relievo, imitation Luca della 
Robbia ware. 

445 CoLONNESE Gaetano, 20 strada Marinella, Naples. — Enamelled tiles of 
various patterns, for pavements. 

446 GiusTiNiANi Angelo, 2t) strada Gigante, Naples. — Pottery vases, Oaltagirone 
and Abruzzo styles ; saucer representing Pompeian mosaic. 

447 JoDi, Casimiro, Reg^io delV^mUia. — ^jCollection of antiquities, in bronze, 
delf, and ivory. — {In the Medioeval Court.) 

448 Majurino Vincenzo, 7, 8, 12 and lY strada Marinclli, Naples. — Earthenware 
garden seat, Egyptian style. 

449 Mollica Giovanni, 27 strada Sta Lnuda a mare, Naples, — Imitation Abruzzo 
and Etruscan vases ; terra cotta figures from originals in the National Museum ; 
imitation Etruscan vessels ; designs an tiles, £rom Pompeian fi-esco^s, 

450 Municipality ofGobtona {Arezzo). — Engravings, /and pjiotogr^ph of Etrus- 
can and Greek antiquities in the Cortona museum. 

491 Olivier I^r]jii, ^vona {Genoa). ^-Fl-dster of Paris pipes. 

452 Pazzoni Cesabe, TraverMolo (Parnia). — Pavement in tiles of vaiious colours. 

453 Pepi Bernaedino, Skmui. — Table top in terra cotta, glazed and painted in 
the style of the 17th century. 

454 Spreafico Brothers, 12 Cordusw, Milan. — Twenty -four samples of deco- 
ration on Italian earthenware. 

,45|8 Vaccabo JBoNGiavANNi, CA-yiAQiBONE {Cotanio). — ^Terra-cotta figures. 



Section XXVI. — decoration, furniture, and upholstery, including fafeb 

HANGINGS, paper MACHE, AND JAPANNED €KK>D8. 

459 Bazzanti Pietro & Son, Florence. — Mosaic Pietre dure table. 

460 Calvi Antonio, 39 Corso Vittorio Emanuele, Milan. — Carved wood and 
ornamental composition frames ; strips of carved wood and composition for making 
frames, coloured in imitation of gold by a process invented by the exhibitor. 




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': ^. 80 ITALY— JAPAN. 

461 Cantdbbi Francesco & ViEaiLio, Lucca, — Lady's work-table, inlaid with 
mother-o'-pearl, ivory, and metal. 
( 463 FoNTANA DoMENico, 9 B(yrgo di Porta Venezia, Mikm,—Bhonj cabinet in- 

laid with ivory, with a copy of the Dance of Cupids, painted by Albani. 

464 Frullini Luigi, FlorcTice, — Carved walnut wood chest, ornamented with 
infants and group representing a boar hunt, cinque-cento style ; two ornamental gilt 
consoles, modem style. 

466 Gajano EaiSTO, Florence, — Sculptured walnut wood frame, Florentine 



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West Gallery* 



JAPAN— LIBERIA. 



81 



11. One book of cotton patterns (cotton fabrics) ; roll of coloured woodcuts — 
burning of Miako by Prince of Nagato^s men in 1864 ; attack in a mountain pass by 
the Tycoon's contingent on the insurgent Konius of Mito ; caricature of the T^coon^ 
and Prince of Nagato's conflicts, the frogs representing the Tycoon's soldiers. 

12. A rolling blind of '^rice glass," said to be made of pounded glass, silez 
and potash. 

13. Small sword of one of the assassins ; left in the Legation at Yedo on the night 
of the attack. 

14. Leather purse, money, and seal ; hanging lamp of bronze from Osaca ; finely 
tempered blade for a two-headed sword, with silver case ; circular rice bowl and cover ; 
large tazza. 

1 5. Large lacquered box ; writing box ; gold lacquered box, with pheasants on 
lid ; despatch box, large ; leather do. ; leather despatch box, small. 

16. Small bronze vase, with loose handles ; bronze inlaid water can (antique); 
candlestick ; water bottle (melon shape). 

17. Pen -rest leaves ; do. serpent ; two pipe-stems: bronze circular saucer. 

1 8. Several studs or brooches of metal work ; square lacquer tray ; small oblong 
gilt lacquer tray ; small nest of boxes ; small tobacco-box ; sundry small boxes, &c. 

2 DuGAN, C. W. St. John's, Enniscorthy, co Wexford. — Cyclopaedia illustrated 
and bound ; P61yglot lexicon, Japanese, French, English, and Low German; scientific 
work, comprising treatises on anatomy, botany, zoology, physics, illustrated ; telescope 
in paper case ; eggshell porcelain ; cups, saucers, and bowls, turned out of wood, almost 
as thin as porcelain ; Japanned spill vases of bamboo cane ; Chinese and Japanese 
locks ; slippers ; tooth brush and pick ; blue cr^pe embroidered in gold and colours for 
a screen ; curiosities formed of pith, which, when placed in water, assume various 
beautiful forms, such as flowers, birds, fishes, boats ; map of Yeddo in colours, paper 
case ; a Chinese map of Canton ; yellow silk robe embroidered in gold and colours ; 
pith hat on cane frame ; Chinese gong and hammer ; Chinese calculating frame in 
ebony and boxwood ; small copper box or vase in charcoal, with figures of birds in 
relief, cover in open work ; portfolio of paintings on rice paper, from Foochoo-Foo. 

3 Hay, Lord John, R.N. C.B. London. — Case with large collection of raw 
silks, accompanied by statistics of the silk trade of Japan. 

4 SiMMONDS,. P. L. Xonc^oTi.— Curious cable of human hair, very strong; 
embroidered siliis ; Japanese lady's head-dress; paper pocket handkerchiefs, and other 
samples of Japanese papers. 

6 Hewett, W. & Co. 18 and 19 Fcnchurch st. London, E.C. and Hong Konrj 

Articles manufactured from paper in imitation of leather ; a pair of curious models of 
Japanese warriors ; ancient carvings in ivory ; 'group of female figures, life-size, 
representing a princess at her toilette, and attendants ; vases with raised dragons and 
ornaments ; ancient bronze representing a^priest riding on a buffalo ; pair of Japanese 
■ swords ; curious shell with figures of foxes ; Japanese cups, covered with the finest 
wicker-work ; valuable specimens of ancient lac ; porcelain ; a large model of joss- 
house ; table decorated with raised gold lacquer work ; hand-screens. 

6 Meares, Majob. — ^Two Swords ; shield ; fan ; purse ; box of China ; paper 
string; cloths; glass. 



IiIBERIi 

West Gallery. 

1 African Aid Society, 8 Adelphi tei 
robe of an African chief ; African sandal ; carvec 
2 dinner mats ; gum copal ; 17 specimens of indi 
Guineensis) ; ground nut oil ; ground nuts ; cass 
the berry and pulp, 3 varietie ; sugar ; molasses ; 
kinds of leaves used by natives for dyeing ; Calaba 

? Ralston, G. Consul-General for Liber 
A bag of pea nuts (Arachis hypogoea) ; large con 
prints by the ladies of Monrovia ; one of the large 
natives in the interior frpm indigenous cotton ; 4 c 



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Easrt; tJallery. 

SflOTION n.^--efflSfiIICAL itKD FHABMACEUTIOAIi BBeCIBSSES ANB «tQZ>ir^rfi «fi2ffl&ALLT. 

X jAKasKJT, Epqu^bd, IFiper^, Jdmhirg.—B.^'ri and flpft eeap^ 

2 Sandebs & Co. Leyden. — Hard soaps. 

3 &Mn3Sr& Zoojr, Wed. P. 77<rc(V^.— Sulphate <^f wninonia. 

4 SP»uyT 4c Co. RoUfrdffm, — ^WiatiBg, <iopy, and .gaU-nuta ink ; h^rteboHij 
preparative against bugs ; Dutch insect powder ; cartridges for extinguishiftg fine. 

5 YBijiaBJNpoBP & ZooN, i>o?^6cA^.-T-Vftnii«hea, jstaod oil, &c. 

6 Bax, G. jK/?We?'daw.-^Oil. 



Section III.— substance^ used as pood. 

6a Apkew & ZooN, Purmerend. — ^Etagbre with durable sweet meats. 

7 BoQAAED, J.Y.O.& Co. Germepj Limbm'g.^'Whesit and flour in various stages 
of manufacture ; flour of rye, &c, 

8 BoLS, Ebven L. Set Locftsfe, Amsterdam. — Liquors, spirits, and Hollands. 

9 BooTZ, H. AmMe^'dam, — Liquors, spirits, and Hollands. 

10 Catz & ZooN, Pekel-A. — Liquors, spirits, and Hollands. 

11 Chts & ZooN, Wed. J. van deb, Delft— Butter, cheese, tea, &c. 

12 Dbaisma van Valkenbubg, S. Leeuward&tu — Cod liver oil. ^ 

13 DuTVis, Jacob, Koog a/d. Zaxin. — Urling's patent starch. 

14 Ebebson, H. p. Amhem. — Liquors, spirits, and Hollands. 
16 Egbebts & Co. B. H. i)ai[/sm.— Succory. 

16 FocKiNK, Wynand, Amsterdam. — Liquors, spirits, and Hollands 
leA Gendbingen, G. van, ^a?7ipe?i.— Tobacco. 

16p Gobteb, G. E. i)oc^wm.— Succory. 

16g Gabancine & Maddeb Manufactobt, ^icf.—Garancine and other products 
of madder. 

16h Baan & SoHiPPEBS, DE, Vlaardingen. — Garancine. 
16i Beukeb & HuLSHOFF, Amsterdam. — Samples of refined sugar. 
16k Mackenstein & Zoon, A. F. Amsterdam. — Twisted tobacco. 
16l Oppen, Ki Van, Harlingen. — Cigars made of Havannah tobacco. 

17 RuiTEB, R. Ryp, near Pur menend. — Conservable rusks, biscuits, cracknells. 

18 G BOOTES, Gebrs. D. & M. Westzaan, — Blues, cocoa, and chocolates. 

19 Hooghwinkel, J. Gorinchem. — Buck wheat in various stages of manufacture. 
80 HoPPE, P. Amsterdam. — Alcohol ; liquors made of madder ; potatoes ; beet- 
roots ; washing-water of sugar and grain manufactories. 

21 HuNCK, H. P. Amsterdam. — Chocolate-powder. 

22 Immink, J, ZwoUe.—¥ioviT. 

23 KOPPEN, H. T. Zeerc?aw. —Cigars. 

24 KOBFP & Co. F.^m6'^cr£^a?7i.-— Chocolate-powder ; chocolate in slices ; cocoaf 
butter, &c. 

25 Lans & ZoON, H. Haarlem, — Lans beer ; East India beer. 

26 Levebt & Co. Amsterdam, — Liquors, spirits, and Hollands. 

27 MoUTON, Fl. Hillegersberg, near Rotterdam. — Ship-bread and rusks. 

28 OoLGAABD & ZooN, D. Harlingen, — Liquors, spirits, Hollands. 

29 Patebs, p. L. Lei/den,— Buck wheat. 

30 Reynvaan, a. J. Amsterdam. — Cigars, tobacco, snuff. 

31 Rontgen, J. E. Deventer, — Liquors, spirits, Hollands. 

'82 Spbutt & Co. Rotterdam, — Prepared liver oil, conservable gooseberry sap. 

83 Stibbe, G^bbs. Kampen. — Liquors, spirits, Hollands. 

84 Ulbioh, J. S. & C. Rotterdam. — Ship-bread, rusks, and dessert-biscuits. 

85 Vebwet, Jzn. a. J. Deventer, — Cigars. 

36 Zuylekom, Levebt, & Co. Van, ^msicrrfcwu.— Purified and rectified alcohol, 
gin, brandy, fine and ordinary liquors, elixir, &c. 



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£ast GaUery. NETHERLANDS. SS ' '^ 

Section XI. — cotton. 
38 HooG, J. A. DB, Amsterdam. — Knitted stockings of cotton No. 80. 

Section XII woollen and wobsted. 

89 Zaalberg & ZoON, J. C, Ley den. — Woollen Blankets and rugs. 

40 Scheltema, J. JzN. Leyden. — Woollen blankets and mgs. 

Section XIV. — manufactures peom flax and hemp. 
IGb Gorter, H. S. Dochum. — Friesland flax and clover-seed. 

16c Gorter, S. Bochum. — Friesland flax and codilla. i 

IGd Gorter, L. H. & Co. Bochum. — Friesland flax and codilla. 
16b Gorter, Hzn. A. i)oc^m. —Friesland flax. 
16j Meulen, N. H.Van der, Leeuwarden. — Friesland flax. 

41 Catz & ZooN, J. B. Van, Oouda. — Fine cords, fishing-yarn, rein 

42 Stoop & Rootakkers, Eindhoven. — Linen, damask, &c. 



Section XVI. — leather, saddlery and harness, skins, furs, feathers, and hair. 

43 Deventer, J. S. Van, Zwolle. — Furred cloak from inland skins, skins 
of foxes, hares, otters, squirrels, ermines, cats, fitchews, swans, &c., in 25 varieties. 

44 GoMPERTZ, W. J. J. Amsterdam. — Varnished leather. 

45 PiLGER, LoDEWTK, Amsterdam — Trunks for ladies and gentlemen. • 
45a Thtssen & ZooN, W. Tiel. — Brushwork. 

46 HoLSBOER, A. B. Arnhem. — High shoes for sportsmen, and half boots. 

Section XVII.— paper and stationery, printing and bookbinding. 

46a Buffa & ZoNEN, F. AmMerdam. — Illustrated works — Costumes of the 
Netherlands, East India, West India, Netherlands' antiquities, Java, &c. 

46b Sythoff, a. W. Leyden. — Books in the Japanese, Chinese, and otiier 
languages. 

46c Simons, P. The Hague. — Silken and cotton bands used by bookbinders, 

46d Wolters, J. B. Groningen. — 'Illustrated books and engravings. 



Section XIX. — carpets and floor-cloths, etc. 
47 Prins, Wed. L. J. Amsterdam, Arnhem, Deventer, — Woollen and cow-hair 
carpets. 



Section XXIL— iron and general hardware. 

48 Stelling, J. C. ATnsterdam. — Bronzed, varnished, and* white tin- work ; 
copper, new silver, wrought iron, and iron gaze ware. 

49 Western, Gebrs. Van, JIaarlem. — Magnet, weighing 61bs., bearing SSlhe, 



Section XXV. — ceramic manufacture, earthenware, etc. 
60 Prince, Jan, & Co. Gouda, — Clay tobacco pipes. 

51 Want, AzN. P. J. Van der, Gouda. — Tobacco pipes (Irish milk maids). 

Section XXVI. — decoration, furniture, japanned goods, etc. 

52 Bruyns, p. a. ZwoZZg.— Boor-handle 

53 NooYEN, L. J. Rotterdam. — Japanned 
mother of peari, illuminated with fine Views. 

54 ZeEgers & ZooN, Wed. J.T.Amsterda 

55 TiBOUT, C. Zwolle. — Antique canned cu" 
!r9 LoUMAN, J. Zwolle. — FoWing-screen w 
67 Drilling, A. Amst^dam.-^laAiea* wo: 



Section XXVIL— ^manufactures in 
68 Heukelum, N, Van, Erlecom, nea/r 1 
and pebbles. 



Section XXIX.— miscellane 
59 Kacks, H. T. Amsterdam,— ThiQQ pict 



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S4 HOME. Eafit Centre of Transept 

ROME. 

East Centre of Transept. 
Section I — mining, quarrying, metallurgical operations, and mineral products. 

1 Altieri, Cardinal Ludovico, Arch- Chancellor of the Roman University, from 
the Geological and Mineralogical Cabinet of the University, directed by Prof. Giuseppe 
Ponzi. — Geological map of the Tufa Mountains and alum mines, made by Prof Ponzi. 
A series of 110 specimens illustrating the geological formation of the district, viz., 38 
of the aqueous, igneous, and metamorphic rocks ; 1 9 of the metals, viz., iron, lead, zinc, 
antimony, and mercury ; 5 of the refractory rocks ; 11 of the salts ; 16 of the clays 
and earths ; 15 of marbles ; 4 of sulphur j'and 1 of combustible, 

2 Mami, Countess Angela. — Roccia sulfurea from the Salfatara at Canale ; 
sulphur extracted from same. 

3 Roman Company op Iron Mines and Iron Manufactories.— Specimens 
of semi-wrought iron, and of iron wire ; minerals from the Tolfa Mountain. 

4 Martimori, Pietro. — Disc of Egyptian alabaster — ^price £33 ; disc of 
antique specimens composed of 193 kinds of marble, in geometrical shapes, defined 
by lines of Nero Antico — price £42 ; two tables of Egyptian alabaster. 

6 Rossi, Cav. Michele Stefano De. — Plan of the celebrated subterranean 
cemetery of Callixtus, excavated near the Appian Way, about two miles out of Rome ; 
scale -jp^ obtained by the iconographic machine. Geological and architectural section' 
taken lirom the heart of the hill, showing the strata; the levels, and the proportions in 
which the cuniculi are excavated ; specimens of Tufa from the strata. 



{Section II. — chemical and pharmaceutical processes, and products generally. 

6 The Board of Commerce, Fine Arts, and Public Works. — A candle 
painted in arabesques, surrounding an image of St. Peter, and under this the aims of 
Pius IX., by Signer Michele Kizia — ^price £6. 

7 Castrali, Giovanni Battista. — Wax candles. 

8 The Savorelli Patrimony.— Stearine candles. 



Section III. — substances used as food. 
9 Nazzarri, Pietro. — Liqueurs (Rosolios), viz., Curagoa, Maraschino, char- 
treuse ; Alchermes ; cherry brandy ; aniseed ; Mandarin oranges ; simple chocolate ; 
chocolate k la Vanille ; chocolate Sante ; comfits. 

10 Tucci, Benedetto. — Olive oil from the Zancali estate, Pagliano. 

Section VII. — civil engineering, etc. 

11 Angelis, Bernardino de.— Model exhibiting improvements on railways.— 
In Machinery Cowrt.) 



Section VIII. — ordnance, armour, and accoutrements, &c. 
12 ToNi, Tommaso.— A gun (revolver) with bayonet and accompaniments 
double-barrelled gun, of a new design, with accompaniments. — Prices £35 and £40. 



Section XVII. — stationery, bookbinding, etc. 
12a Villa, G. — Large ledger, bound in brass Roman work. 

Section XIX. — ^tapestry, carpets and floor cloths, lace and embroidery, fanct. 
and industrial works. 

13 Ferrari, Monsignor D. Civiaco, President of the Hospital of San Michele.-- 
Tapestry carpet (alto liccio), after an antique Mosaic in the Lateran Museum, of the 
supper described by Pliny, size 256 square Roman palms — price £165 ; carpet in 
imitation of the Persian, never before made in Rome — ^price £5. 

14 Administration of Roman Prisons. — Lace worked by the prisoners in the 
Penitentiary at the Baths of Diocletian, a 1 'antique, in "application deBruxelles; 
guipure in black silk ; antique lace made with the needle ; piece of linen, showing 
various work in embroidery, cross-stitch, net-work, flowers in point d'Angleterre »b<* 
point d'Alen^on. 



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tost of Transept. 



ROMi). 



65 



SiOTION XXIII.— WORKING IN PRECIOUS METALS, AND IN THEIR iMltATIONS, JEWELLERY, 
AND ALL ARTICLES OP "VERTU AND LUXURY, NOT INCLUDED IN THE OTHER CLASSES. 

16 Dies, Giovanni. — Tables in Mosaic: — 1. Views of Rome — price -£60 ; 2 
Doves of the Capitol — price £40 ; 3. Same, smaller — ^price £28 ; 4. Same, witji 
peasant girl in centre — ^price £22 ; 5. Birds and flowers — prioe £18. 

16 Saulini, Cav. Luigi. — Eighteen shell cameos ; two cameos in Pietra D\ira. — 
The prices will be found in the case. Head of Pio IX. in Smalto Bianco. 

17 Pozzi, ViTTORiA. — Roman pearl necklace of twelve rows, and necklace of 
four rows, of imitation rose-coral. 

18 RiNALDi, CoSTANTiNO. — ^Mosaic representing a stag hunt — ^price £100. 

19 Barberi, Commcndatore M. A. — Mosaic representing Alexander I. Em- 
peror of Russia — ^price £200 ; tables in Mosaic : — 1. Red ground with flowers — ^price^ 
£25 ; 2. Same with lion in centre ; 3. Same with panther ; 4. Italy ; 5. Cathedral 
of Milan ; 6. Ducal Palace — £15 each ; Nine paper weights in Mosaic ; box con- 
taining five subjects thrice repeated, to show three qualities of workmanship — artistic, 
second-rate, and ordinary ; box containing miniatures in Mosaic, artistic work only. — 
The prices of these are marked in the case. 

20 Vespignani, Raffaello. — Bas relief in ivory representing the Immaculate 
Conception ; the frame of ebony and ivory — ^price £100. 

21 Ricoardi, Luigi. — ^Two Mosaic tables, one having flowers in the centre, 
encircled by birds and leaves, the other flowers and ornaments on a white ground.—- 
Prices £45 and £55. 

22 GiRAUD, His Excellency Domenico, Steward and Secretary of the building 
of St. Peter, President of the Mosaic Works of the Vatican, — Mosaic, St. Peter, after 
Guide — Price £531 5s. ; Do. the Madonna, after Sassaferrato — ^price £637 10s. 

23 Paoletti, Francesco. — Mosaic, the Roman Forum — price £17. 

24 Barzetti, Biagro. — ^Mosaic, the Roman Forum — ^price £22 5s.; Do. the 
Pantheon — ^price £22 ; small oval Mosaic, the Roman Forum ; do. the Temple of Vesta 
— £8 each. 

25 Ferrari, his Excellency Monsignor Giuseppe, Treasurer- General and 
Minister of Finance to his Holiness Pius IX. — A collection of twenty-five bronze 
medals, coined in the Pontifical mint, under the direction of Commcndatore Giuseppe 
Mazio, from the Pontificate of Pope Pius yil., for the eighteenth year of the reign of 
the present Pope, and bearing on the obvei-se the following portraits, viz. : — 1, 2, 3, 
and 4, of Pope Pius VII. ; 5 and 6, of the sculptor Canova ; 7 and 8, of Leo XII. ; 
9, of Pius VIII. ; 10, 11, and 12, of Gregory XVI. ; 19, of the celebrated painter 
Pietro Perugino ; and the rest of the collection, of the reigning Pontiff. 

26 The Savorelli Patrimont.— Slab of Carrara marble for a table, inlaid with 
engravings executed in a novel and secret manner on lithographic stone without a 
graver — price £20. 

27 Saulini, Cav. Luigi. — Mosaic picture (Holy Family), after Sassaferrato, in 
the Dorian Gallery — price £127 10s. 

28 Antonelli, his Excellency Cardinal Giacomo. — Cameo in white pietra 
dura on a dark ground, St. George and the Dragon, by Lanzi. 

29 Pinet, Ernest. — Collection of cameos, intaglios, &c., by Girometti, 
Martini, and other eminent artists, and jewellerv after the antique, Etruscan, and 
Roman, contained in four frames. — ^The prices of these are marked on the cases. 

30 Pdtagna, Michele. — Album containing portraits of all the Popes from St. 
Peter to the present Pontifi", Pius IX., from the series in the Basilica of St. Paul's, 
beyond the walls, price 34s. ; another album, smaller, nrice ITs. r nhotoorpfl.nh nf +.li« 
Panorama of Rome taken from Tasso's Oak, in 

Sculpture," album containing 55 photographs, ^^ 
E. Visconte, price £2. 

31 Luswergh, Giacomo.— Nine photog 
photographic views ; five photographic porti^ii 

32 Olivieri, Leonardo. — Volume of p 
Lateran Museum, with description, by Father 
parchments by the exhibitor), price £10 ; volu 
and Art under the Pontificate of Pius IX," pri 

33 Ferbari, Monsignor Giuseffs, Min 
of his Holiness, Government Engraving Establish 
of the beet engravings executed by tiie ohief I 
B»pbael, Giuuo Aomsoo, Beuymuto CrarofiEjo, 



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37 liuk Buah—Stfedi^ of tH& water-lily, or sacred bean (Kelmnbinm speciosmn), 
used for preparing a kind of flour, and likewise eaten like chesnuts. The flowers not 
yet opened are used in curries. 

38 Kaison Buah — the filaments and stamens of the water-lily, used in curries. • r 
The root, or creeping stem, is used for food in China. 

39 Nomai, stamens of the flowers of a Dipteracese, used in curries. 

40 Munnack, used as a stomachic. 41 Lookraban seed (Chaulm oogra sp.) 
42 Thua-rat— white beans. 43 JSrarvato^-true Cardamoms. 

44 Luk Bheu — Ba»tard Cardasaoihsi Both spe^Mi^of GaidibnomvibrflLn6t only 
an article of export, principally to China, but are used for culinary purposes, and as a 
stomachic. Seeds used in headache* 

45 Manglack. Basil seeds (Ocymumsp.) iThe seeds placed in water, swell to > 

a large size, and form a^ mticilaige kke 1*te Bt»tig*eafl«i' s^^s, which, inrlsed with cocoa- ^ 

nut water and sugar, roidBe^ a refrefedi^^g hevefsbgff, 

46> Kamyan. Gtim BettjaiMa (Benijoin), is plaeed in hc^-'water, aiid when cooled 
used as a drink for inward pains. It ia likewise employed in rheumatic pains. The 
yam is sometimes mixed with Leeplee (49), and Prick thai (black pfepper), to increase 
its efficacy in rheumatic complaints. 

47 Ngah- met. Till seed (Sesrtmum orientale, Lin.) The seeds yield a fine bland I 

oil, which is a good substitute for olive ofl. It is used in curries, aiid also bm-ned in ,^ 

lamps, and eihployed in- ulcerations of the bead. 

48 Luk Makan Liqui (soap nuts). The seeds are burned, or rather roasted, and 
aftl isifuMon made of it, employed as a cooling drink. 

49 Leeplee, an in&t«ion ; used in colds and catarrhs; '. 

50 Prickthai, black pepper (Piper officinarum) ; exported amf Used at home. 

51 Long pepper, the fruit spikes of Ghavica officinarum. I 
5"2 Bungtalai seeds (Sapindos rubiginosa), immersed in Witter they form a gela- 1 

tinous mass ; which, sweetened with sugar and lime-juice, forms an agreeable beverage^ 1 

It is considered abroad as an excellent remedy in diarrhoea and dysentery. | 

&Sf 5'4 Zaropi and Pihkoon, used as stomachics. 

55 Prickhang; infusions, after the seeds have been pounded^ are uteed iiiwardiy 
against headaches and fevers. 

56 Bilang Karta ; a decoction of the seeds pounded is used against vomiting. 

57 Prickhom ^Xanthoxylon sp.) ; pounded and placed in cold water, the^ infusion 
is used against eructations. 

58 Luk Hang tshikat ; an infusion of it is used as a strengthening remedy after 
child-birth. 

59, 60 Betel-nuts, fruit of Areca Catechu, used as sk matsticHtory ; sanle, sliced. 
61 Sipziet ; the enjoyment of the betel-nut chewing is increased- by ptabakiBsgi 
of the Sipziet at the same time. 

63 Pun ; prepared lime coloured pink with tunflerio. 

64 Luet nangret — coagulated blood of the rhinoceros, used as medicine in cases 
of inwaid hurts. 

65 Nankaben — ray skin. 66 Lim — armadillo skin. 

67 Nang Xangr-^ephant skin. 

68 Enn'ana— deer sinews ; ^e boofe gfeatdd are used^fbr tkd ddf^'of #t^ffi(£K' ^ 

69 Flying bat, eaten in the East. 

70 Hang Nok Yong— peacock tails, exported to China, worth about 7s. each. 

71 Kon' noka* dong — heron feathers, exported to China. 

72 Pik* noka' ten— kingfisher's feathew^- exported ta dhifta. 

_. 7^3 Pik' noka' dong — pelican feathers, exported to Chinaj and used likewM» itt 



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\ SWEDEN AND NORWAY— SWITZERLAND. East Gallery. 

SWEDEN AND NORWAY. 

East Gallery. 
Section T. 
1 Heffebmehl, L. Drammen, — A cariole ; a sledge. 



Section X. 
2 Bbehmbb, E. T. Stockholm. — ^A tellurium for the use of schools. 



Section XYII. 

7 Dalman, C. E. — ^Map of the district of Carlstad, Sweden. 

8 Erddeaun, Axel, Prop. — Geological maps of Sweden. 

9 Economic Chart Works, Stockholm. — Royal economic maps of the kingdom 
of Sweden. ' 

10 Hunt, T. C. British Consul, Stockholm,. — Poriifolio of photographic landscapes 
from paintings by the King of Sweden. 

11 Htdrographic Office, Stockholm. — Swedish sea maps. 

12 Kierkegaard, Gothenburg. — Works on ship-building. 

13 Ljungrbn, G. Stockholm. — Economical and statistical maps of different dia- 
tricts in Sweden. 

14 Meter & Co. Stocklwlm. — Portrait of King Charies XV. of Sweden (oil print). 

15 SwanstroM & Co. Stockholm. — One year in Sweden, lithographic prints of the 
customs in Sweden. 

16 RoTAL Railway Office, Stockholm. — ^Railway map of Sweden. 

17 Smith, A. — Lithographic prints, representing the eatable and the poisonous 
mushrooms. 

18 Ttpographic Corps. — Ordnance typographical maps. 

10 Rosen, Count, Stockholm. — Svenska Sigiller frau Medeltiden ; seals from the 
middle ages, by Emil Hildebrand. 

Section XXVI. 
3 Meijerberg, C.G., Stockholm. — Furniture for schools ; a globe. 



Section XXVI.* 

4 Bonnier, A. Stockholm. — Swedish and Norwegian uniforms ; the different 
races of Sweden. 

6 Mandelgren, N. M. — Scandinavian monuments of the olden times, with the 
paintings and other ornaments belonging to them. 



Section XXIX. 

e Manilla Institute for the Blind, Deaf, and Dumb, St9ckholm,—ym.oTa 
apparatus for the blind ; articles manufactured by them. 



SlVITZERIiAND. 

East Crallery of Transept, opposite Apee. 
Section II. — chemical and pharmaceutical processes xsd products genebillt. 

1 Henner & Co., Wyly St. Oall.—QSh&mcdX products. 

2 LoTSCHER, Brothers, Marbach, Lucerne. — Sugar of milk. 

3 Oppliger-Geiser, LangenthaL — Essence of coffee. 



Section III. — substances used as food. 

4 BOUVEBB, Neufchatel. — Sparkling wines. 

5 Cailler, F. L. Veveyy Vand. — Chocolate. 

6 Chervaz, le Chevalier, V^troz, near Sion, Fafeis.— Wines from the Valais. 

7 Ormond & Co., Vevey and Geneva. — Cigars. * 

8 Tavbrnbt, H. Vevey. — Cigars. 



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TURKEY— tJNITJlD STATES— ZOLLYEREIN. 89 Jf . 

: u 

Section X. — Hobologioal Instbuments, btc. 
10 Lehmann, Ch. Bienne, — Patent remontoir for watches. i 



Section XV. — mixed pabbics and shawls. 
11 Hbss-Bbuggeb a. Amriswyly Thurgovie. — Knitted artieles. 

Section XXVI. — decobation, pubnitubb, and upholbtbbt. 

11 Klaus, P. Wyl, St. Gall. — Case carved in oak. 

12 Wbingabt, J. Ammerswyl, Berne. — Small barrels of oak. 



TURKEY. 

Macbopodabi, a. S. Merchaniy Smyrna, — Figs and raisins.— (TTesf Gallery.) 



UNITED STATES. 

Sonth-west Comer, Machinery at Rest CJonrt. 

1 Wabd, W. H. New ForA;.— Pomade.— [Section II.] 

2 Model of a first-class American railway carriage, with fresh and foul air 
ventilators, self-acting breaks ; working models and drawings of railway carriage and 
engine turn-tables. — {Section V.] 

3 Bay signal flags ; fog signals, and the means for effecting the permutations ; 
night signals and alphabet, &c. ; signal telegraph instrument ; steering signal 
telegraph and lantern ; signal books and illustrative plates ; signal and other lanterns. 
4 Machine for making bullets. — [Section VIII.] 

5 Maps of the United and Southern States, and books. — [Section XVII. (B).] 

6 Self-adapting box and trunk handles. — [Section XXII.] 



ZOI.I.VEREIN-PRUSSIA. 

South-west Transept and South Grallery of Transept. 
Section I. — mining, quabbtino, metallubgical opebations, and minebal pboducts^ 

1 Mining Co. Sicilia, & Count op Landsbebg Velen, Alten Munden, an 
der Lenne, Westphalia, — Iron Pyrites. 

2 BoEBNEB, Mabtin, Skgen, Westphalia. — Iron, copper, and lead ores, &c. 

3 DuEKEB, Babon von, £rnsthausen, near Bochxcm, Westphalia. — Geognostical 
outlines and profiles. 

4 Meubeb, W. Cologne f R. P. — Mineral products ; iron. 

5 Dinnendahl, R. W. Buttrop^ near Steele^ R. P. — Centrifugal mine ventilator, 
for moving by hands. 

6 D'Ablain, J. Tbobebg, & De Wildt, ffermannshiitte, Neuwied, R, P. — 
Minerals ; iron. 

7 Rocholl, Bbothebs, Remscheid, R. P, — ^Minerals ; manganese ; crystals. 

8 Hilp, May, & Co. Limhurg, Nassau. — Minerals ; magmese and iron. 

9 Dbesleb, J. H. Siegen, Westphalia. — ^Rin 

11 BocHUMEB Ibon Foundbies, Bochvm, 
moving by hands, system Rittinger. 

12 GovEBNMENT BoABD OP MiNES, in Bon\ 
Prussian State, by Herr von Dechen ; map of the c 

13 GovEBNMENT BoABD OP MiNES, Dortmu 

THE Pbomotion OP MiNiNG Intebests.— Geognost 
Westphalia, and illustrative specimens of minei 
collieries ; a new safety lamp ; elevations of the cos 

14 GovEBNMENT BOABD OP MiNES, in JSTi 

i^aps and elevations of the provinces Saxony and I 

15 GOVEBNMENT BoABD OP MiNES, in Bresla 
of the province Silesia. 



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Sonth-weef Kaiuiept and Son1& Gallery of TrianBept. 



"-•"'J \tn -^TTit' 



Section II. — cHiufioitL Asrd FEcaonmoEtTncrAir PBoossftESi Asra mnow^ciitt 

GKNEBALLT. 

16 ScHUCHABDT)' TSi Mw^u^ jSeJem.-^MetaUTi^ and cirefDa&jal preparations con- 
cerning the glass and china manufiEbcture. 

17 FuNCKB, 1Lis:tL, Andemdc% RP.-^Boap and perfumeries. 

18 Moras, A. & Co. Cologne^ R.P. — Hair water ; Eau de Cologne philocome. 

19 CuNTZB, B. CdhgM, i2.A— Oilfor^sltdll^s. 

20 Rbmme and Friedmann^ 23, Aleaarhd&r st. 5e7*Zm.— iEtheffeal oilsy &<f. 

21 CuNTZE, H. Widow, Acbckeny RP.—Oil for w»t<Aes. 

22 Farina, J. M. XVidow, opposite the A ItmarJct^ Cologne^ R.P. — Eau de Cologne. 

23 Marie Clementine Martin, Klosterprau, Cologne, R.P. — Eau de Cologne. 

24 Farina, J. M. opposite the Jesepkeplatef Oologne, R. P. — Eau de Cologne. 



Section III'. — sUBsf ances usisu as pood. 

25 JoDOCDS Bobertz, Cologne, iZ.P.— Liqueurs. 

26 Falk, a. Berlin. — Liqueurs, and old sherry punch extract. 

27 Baums, p. Dahlen, near Wickrath — Liqueurs. 



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Z0LLVEREIN. 91 

Sonthriraflt Transept and Sonth Gailety of TjwBsapt, 

SSOTION X.— PHOIOO&AFHIO AFFABATDS ; SDBGIGAL IKfiT^UHfiNTB ; HACHINBB7 JX 

GBNEUAL. 

49 LiESEGANG) E. Blberfeld. — ^Photographic apparatus. 

50 GoLDSCHMiDT, S. 20 Dorothea, St., Berlin. — Surgical and orthopBdlc izifitnL* 
luents. 

51 Uhlhorn, D. Grevenhroich, near Dusscldorfy R. P. — Card for weaving. — {In 
Machinery Court. No. 850.) 

98 DoMEiER & Haupf, Hanover and London. — Aletoscope, for enlarging 
photographs, systfeme Ponti. 

# 

52 Lauezzari, C. Barmen^ R. P. — ^Turkish red cotton yam. 

53 Martin & Kuhleb, Rheydt, R. P. — Cotton fabrics, lama, biber. 

54 BoRNEFELD, W. Glad/bach, R.P. — Cotton and woollen canvas. 

55 Knabe, E. B. Plauen. — Window curtains, mulles^ and gauzes, 

99 DoMEiER & Hauff, Hanover and London.-~T^,T^e trimioings and flouncings. ^ 



&E0TION XII. — WOOLLKK AND WORSTED. 

100 LocHNER, T. Fr. Aachen, R.P. — ^Tricots and doths. 

101 Roy & BoDENSTAB, Berlin. — Woollen knitted and fancy goods. 



Section XIII.— silk and velvet. 

56 Klkmme & Co. Crefeld, R. P. — Velv^ ribbons ; trimmingsof velvet; galloons; 
velvet laces, &c. ' 

57 DiERGARDT, F. Vierscn, R. P. — ^Velvet, ribbons, etc. 



Section XIV. — manufactures prom flax. 
58 Stoltenburg, E. Stralsundj Prussia. — Table cloths, etc. 



Section XV. — mixed fabrics, etc. 
69 MoRiTZ, A. Nordhaasctif Saxony. — Mixed textile goods. 



Section XVI. — leather, etc. 

60 OttkB, a. Chrisiburg, Prussia.— K.id and calf leather. 

61 Aug. fcJPiTTA & Sons, Bramieriburg on the Mavel, Prussia. — Leather fiibric.s 
horse leather. 



Section XVII. — paper and stationery, printing and bookbinding. 

62 Lamberts, W. Gladbach, R.P. — Accoun 

63 Lamberts, J. H. Gladhach^ R.P. — Accoi 

64 Nathanson, W. i/a7/i6itr^/t.— Samples o 
cal diagrams. 

66 Cramer, C. A. Cologne, R.P. — ^Architeci 
and photographs of ornamental castings. 

67 Schweitzer, Soehne, Odenkirchen, R.P 

68 ScHoTT & Leendebtz, Rheydty R.P.— 
papers, and decorated and fancy papers. 

69 Meyer, H. C. Jun. Hamburg.— Alhun 
of hard vulcanized India-rubber. 

70 Matz & Co. Berlin, — Photographic albui 

71 Babdbkeb, T. £98cnf i?.P.— Work on \ 
lithography, 



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92 ZOLLVEREIN. 

Soufh-wast Transept and Sonth Gallery of Transept 

SKOTION XVIII. — WOVEN, SPUN, PKLTKD, AND LAID PABBIOS, WHEN SHOWN AS SPBCI. 
MENS OF FRINTINO OB DYEING. 

72 WoLPP, ScHLAPHOBST, & Bbuel, Olodboch, jB.P.— Woven cotton stnfe, 
Llamas, and beavers, dyed and printed. 

73 Rittebhaus, J. P. Bilk, near Ihiesseldorfy R.P, — ^Turkey red and rose- 
ooloured cotton yams. 

74 BooKHACKEB, T. & SoN, Hueckeswagen, RP.— Dyed woollen yams for cloth 



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ZOLLVEBEiy. 98 

Sonth-west Transept and South Galler^ of Transept 

SlOnON XXYIU. — ^KANUTAClTUBBS FBOX ANIMAL AND VEOETABLK SUBSTANOBS. 

94 Fbbtwbll, John, Lippstadt, Prusaia, and Mark lane, London, — Jewellery 
and pipes made from hard vulcanized India rubber. 

95 Hebbst, a. Bonn, JKJ'.— Wicker chair. 

96 MsTSB, H. C. JuN. Hambwrg. — ^Walking canes ; sword canes ; India mbher 
telegraphic insulator ; India robber comb plates ; statuary group, cast in India rubber ; 
canes and cane handles of India rubber ; split rattans ; whalebone, &c. 

97 Hanovbb Gumm Kamm Compant. — India rubber combs. 



OTHER STATES OF THE ZOIiZaVEREIK. 

SEOTION II. — OHBMIOAL AND PHABMAOEUTIOAL PBOOEBSEB, AND PBODUOTB OBNBBALLT 

107 EOKIBT, W. kt Co. FranJcfort-onrthe-Mainc^CigSktB impregnated with 
iodinm. 



Section III.— substances used as pood. 

108 Ehbskbaoheb, T. F. & Co. Lteda and Numherg. — Bavarian hops and teazles. 
— (jBavoria). 

Section V. — machinery. 
8690 FuEsa, Karl, & Co. Hambwrg, — Bitumenised paper pipes. — {MachUury 
eourt,) 

SEOnOK X.— HUSIOAL, HOBOLOGICAL, AND SUBOIOAL INBTBUMENTS ; MAOHINEBT IN 

GENEBAL. 

109 DiLOEB, O. Tryherg (Black Forest),— ¥asioj clocks.--(J?acfcn). 

110 Wehblb, F. X. Purtwangen {Black Porest), — ^Musical instrument; solo 
melodium to be placed under a pianoforte. — (Baden), 

111 Wehblb, B. Pwtwangen (Black Porest), — Trumpet-clock, grand musical 
work, performing different pieces. — (Baden). 

112 Hablwandeb, J. 1 vorm Itarthor, Munich — Mtisical instruments; A manual 
for zither-players. — (Bavaria). 

lis Hbnckbl & Seck, Mv/nich. — ^A husking machine to take off the outer skin 
of grains ; and specimens of husked grains* — (Bavaria), 

114 SOHWENNINOEH (ToWN OF) CLOCK AND WaTOH MaNUFACTOBT.— Burk's 

Qnyentor) portable control watch, with control bulletins and book. — (Wurtenibwrg.) 



Section XYI. — ^leatheb, etc. 
116 LIVSB & Co. CraiUheim, — Polished leather for carriages; polished horse 



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BcmOhW^tk TviAMjpt and S^nth OaUittry €f tmmf$^ 
SiOTiQN ZZIIL^womuira in piuecious uwsaja anb in niienfc iiasmoK; 

JEWjILLEBT A1{D ALL ABTIQL^S OIT YEBTU OB LUXUBT NOT INCLUDED IN QIHSB 
eiiASSBS. 

122 WuNBOH, J. B. Nuremberg.— ^<M «id wIvjPt enabroiderifis fo; 94<Aeamiical 

X23 ^OQBKiBHATBtt J. Cr. MvmcJiy Manii|iEvcturer.-«<-€llvii»dQliesB of broiute4 voa; 
ornamental article for i^<^\x^-^{Bavqa^. 



Section XXIY. — glass. 

125 BiLUtt, Xm % Ailuere JBirhenau, Munich,'— ^UAneii fiaMj a Made&na after 
Fpmpejo Battani; stained glass, a Cliiist head after ]P<»npejo Balttani; t^tmi 
gU8B| crowning of Christ, after Quercino. — {£a/va/ria.) 



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100 SCULFTUBB. (MnXJbSL 

EOfiMEB^ Wm H. (Borne). £ 

16 SLBFOra Faum, avd Sattb— Statue in inarble, 1,000 
MAOHI. P. (MOan). 

16 TBI BlADnra doiXr-^Marble statne, • • The Sterwicopie Comptimy. 

8TEBBINS, mm E. (Borne). 

17 TBI Patbuboh Jobiph— Statae in marble, - 870 

ICAOHI. P. (Milan). 

18 ''HuBHy Doh't Waki mt Babt"— Oronp in inaxble^ 600 

LA BABBKRA, B. (Palenno). 

19 DiOOlHis— Marble, • ' • 

OBICt O. (Borne). 

20 TBatOTM LnroGuroB— Statue in marble, • • 400 

FBAIEIK, a (Belgium). 



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(MttimlHall. 



SOULPTUEB. 



105 



PEOVINOIALI, r. (Rome). 

lie A HUUTBEBS, 

UUIXEB, E. (Borne). 

117 A CiooiABA (Girl from the MountidnB)— Bust in marble, 

HALSE (London). 

118 ^VB— Marble, • • • ' 

BEKZOia, Cav. 0. M. (Rome). 

119 Matbb Amabius, . . • • 

STEAZZA, G. (Milan). 

120 IsHKASL— Statue in marble, 

DINI, G. (Turin). 

121 Bust o» Babon Plaha— Marble— (T»«8®P*)» - 

IttAGNI, P. (Milan). 

122 Thb Dahob— Marble statue, 

123 Musio— Marble statue, - • • • 

BOTTINELLI, A. (Milan). 

124 Thb Son of thb Pboplb— Marble statue, 

126 BATHnro Gmir— Plaster, 

HOOBE (London). ' 

127 BUBT, in marble, - • • ' 

PONTANA, G. (London). 

128 "Innoobnob" (marble), • • - * 

BOUBnUAO. 

129 Bust of Bdwabd VI. • 

HOGAN, J. (Dublin). 
ISO Bust of Fathbb Mathbw— Marble, • 

fTBT.T.T, Prof. €. (Rome). 

181 Thb Immaoulatb Cobcjbptioh— Marble, - 

BBOBIB (London). 

182 A BoMiif Pbabakt— Marble, 

BEKZOKI, Oav. G. M. (Rome). 

183 HALF-LBBOTH BBFBBBBBTIHa THB MATBB DOLOBOSA-Marble, 

184 HOPB IH God— Marble Statuette, 

MOBGAK, MisB J. (Cork). 

185 Child akd Bibd— Marble, . - • 

JAOOMETTI, Oav. I. (Rome). 
180 STATUBiTBOFTHBBAyiouB-Marbld-frransept), 

TKSSHUJSHSi. BOM A. (Rome). 
187' LISTLB Nbllt, . - • - • 

LOIIBABBI, G. B. (Rome). 
1.S8 A YvaXD CppiD Slbkpino— Marble, •» 



Zady Fawny Colt. 



£ 

107 

100 

168 

26 

80 

500 
500 



lor 

70 
180 

35 
150 

95 



> • 



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112 SCULPTUBE. 

In Water Ooloiir Boom. 
POWELL, Major (London). 

268 Pbaibix Ltdiah Huhtdio the Bisosr — ^Plaster, • 

269 Combat betweebt British Dbaoooh and Kaffib — ^Plastor, 

270 LrciDEHT nr the Huhoabiak Wab — ^Plaster, • 

HOLIN, Prat (Sweden). 

271 Thx Wsbstlibs— Gionp in plaster.— ( Water Colour Soom), 

SOEILLLSQ. (Sax;ony). 

272 Venus and Jopiter— Two bassi-relievi In plaster, 

(In West Gallery qf Tramept), • 

DAVIS, E. 

273 Statui or Jobiah Widowood, erected at Stoke-npon-lVent 

in 1863, plaster {In Patsage to Carriage Court), - 

In the Traoaept. 
HAHNEL. (Sazonj). £ 

274 RafhaiTi, from the ori^^nal in the Rojal Dresden GaUeiy— €ast» ^00 

8GEWENB, W. (Saxonj). 
276 Chbist AHD THX BKFBHTAHTMAODAUDr— Poster, 

276 BsTUBH or thx Pbodigal Son— Plaster, 

BICCA, Prot P. (Naples). 

277 LofVi AND FoLLT— Plaster gronp, 

278 PBOGBSSS—Teira-cotta gronp, - • ~ 

280 Two AN0XL8 BBABiNo UP THB ABK8 or St. Fbanos— Terra-cotta» 

281 Phtbo Dilu Yion— Tena-cotta gronp, 

FOLEY, J. H. (London). 

279 A Pabsxi Mibcbanv— Plaster, . - - 

BIGAHONTI, F. (Milan). 

282 TsB MiSTSUS-^tatnette, ... 160 

80KAJNI O. (Milan). 
283 Bust— in marble, • . . . • 

GIAOOMINI, 0. (Rome). 

284 BtrsT or tbi Addolobata— Marble, 50 

285 Bust— in marble, . . . . • 

WILEIKSOK, B. 

286 Bust or ▲ Child— Marble, • • • E.E. ffime, Fsq. 

WOOD, MARSHALL (London). 

287 H. B. H. THX Pbingx or WiLXS—Colossal bust in plaster, 

288 Danax— Plaster, - • • - • 

289 BucRT or H. B. H. thx Pbingx or Walxs^ 

290 Bubt or H. B. H. thx Pbinoiss or Walxb^ - 

DINL O. (Turin). 



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114 SCULPTURE. TnusMpi 

Price. 
£ 

336 Thi Immaculate Yiboin, ...... 60 

337 Madonna, after Bapbael, ...... XXQ 

338 Reading Gibl, ....... ^ 

339 The Death of Fbanoo Febbuoci, . . , . . 5Q 

340 Pio IX.— Bust, - - 12 

341 Bathing Gibl — Casentini, ...... 500 

342 Vanity — Caqentini, ------- §00 

343 Education — Casentini, ...... 600 

Btaiam to tbe HaU or Oiurdeii. 

344 CsBES, from the antique, ...... 50 

345 Psyche, after Ganora, ...... §0 

346 Nemesis, - - - - • - - - s» 
347, 348 Bacchante, and Pendant, - . - - • Each, 45 

349 Innocence, -..-..-- 40 

350 Venus, after Canova, - - - - - . - 45 

351 Psyche, after Thorwaldsden, ..... 45 

352 Venus of Nebo, - - -^- - - - 40 

353 A Collection of Vases, Tazzi, and otheb Obnamental Wobiis, in 

Alabaster of Volterra. {In the passcLge to Jtifitahmmt Boom, qf 
South Corridor, and in the Transept), 

• CdAJM[EOS.— (Roman Gonrt). 

GIROMETTI, (Shm, P. (Rome). 
364 Ptolemy II. and his Queen, Absinois— Oriental onyx, 

GIROMETTI, P. JiUL (Rome). 

355 Achilles — cameo of oriental onyx. The othtr b^If 
of this stone is in the Museum of the Vatican, 

956 Baochantb with Gbapes— cameo in sardonyx, 



VENETIAN ENAMEIi MOSAICS^ 

At Head of Soufh-eaBtem Staircase. 

SALVIATI, p. 

1 The Savioub, from the original in St. Mark's, Venice, jM) 

2 St. Ezekiel, from St Mark's, ... 30 

3 St. Nicholas, from St. Sojjhia's, Constantinople, ^ 

4 A Lamb, ..... 20 
6, 9 Specimen of Mosak^ for a Reredos, • ^10 «nd 8 
7 Specimen of Mosaic, for floor, per square foot^ - 8 
9 X&b VxBanr, from the church of Mpmio^ • |^ 



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PAINTINGKI IK OIL— ANOUffiSH? MASTERS. 



115 



PAINTlHChS IN OIIi. 



ANCIENT MASTERS. 

INCLUDING THE EARLY BRITISH SCHOOL. 

North CWleiy, off Forth Corridor. 
[The Numbers commence over South-Eastem Door.] 

SNYDUBS. 

1 Wolf Hunt, ----- TheMa^guUofDrogheda. 

TENIEBS (the Elder). 

2 Landscape and Fioubes, - - 'Sir Charles Coote, BwrU 

8ALVAT0B BOSA. 

3 RooKT Landsoapb, - - - John d t/yonsy Esq, 

WdtTVE&MAN. 

4 HAWKlNa PAfitT, - • '^ TKt Lord Cfuinceltoi*, 

FETfiB HEEFS. 
6 Iimmto* o* a CHUioH, . - - - Skeffington Smyth, Msq, 

FABIS BOBDONE. 

6 The PiODiOAt's Ebtubn, - - - Jehn O. LifOM, JBSq. f 

BITBENS. 

7 PoBTBAiT, - - - - ■ Earl of Leicester, 

TENIEBS. 

8 Intebiob of a Guabd Boom, - - - The Earl of Warmck, 

HACKAEBT. 

9 WooDT Landboafe, . - - . The Lord Chancellor, 

STEENWYCK. 

10 OUB LOBD IN THE HOUSB Of MaRTHA AND 

Maby, - - - - - " The Earl yfPorktrli^ffton, 



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116 PAINTINGS IN OIL. KorOi GaUety. 

£E DTTO. 

16 A MU8XGIAV» Si/r Charles CooU, Btiiri, 

DENNEB. 

17 Ah Old SIan -vitb Glass or Liquob zv hib 

Hand, ..... LordAnaUy. 

JAH STEEK. 

18 IKTBSI0B» • - - • Sir OharUi OooU, Bart. 

SPANISH SCHOOL. 

19 Gboup ov PiASAHTB, • - - » Sir Charla OootCf Bwi. 

CUTP. 

20 Bivia Soura, Dobt, - - • - ThtLord ChanceUcr. 

^ PALAMEDES. 

21 A GoKOEBT, - • - 'The Lord ChanceUor, 

DENNEB. 

22 HiAD or AV Old Woican, - - - The Viscount PowerteovH. 

MOnCHESON. 

23 Plxasubs Gbouitds, .... John O, Lyons, Bsq, 

UAES. 

24 HsAD ov AV Old WoiCAif, • • "Sir Charles Coote, Bart, 

BEMBBANDT. 

25 BlBlOOA AND ISAAO, • • • . - E. CoU, Esq. 

SNTDEBS. 

26 Fbtjit PiEON, ..... The Earl of PortarlingUm. 

VANLEB VELDE. 

27 SlA Pnoiy J.S. Maeguay, Esq. 

UNKNOWN. 

28 Ten Esottbxai^ .... Shslvngton Smyth, Esq. 

BBAUWEB. 

29 iNnuoBy BoOBB Dbinxino, • • "I.E. Beid, Esq. 

BBEUGHEL. 

30 Adosation or tab Maoi, • • - John C. Lyons, Esq. 

BEBGHEM. 

31 Hbad or A Cow, .... The Earl of Wanoicls. 



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Korth OaCtoiT' 



ANCIENT MASTERS. 



117 



. The Earl of Warwick, 



BTIBENS. 

S4 ThohiBi Eabl c» Abukdil, 
35PoBTBiiTOiTHBDinao»ALVA,OKHoiisBBA0E. Thc Eorl of Portorl^ngton. 

GBEUZE. 

- Sir Chmrla Coote, BarU 



TENIEBS. 



36 Sadhxbb, • 

37 VxLLAoa FBsnvAL, 

VANDTOK. 

38 POBTBATT 0» RTOKHABBT THH PaINTBB, 

30 Thb Babl oi" Nkwpobt, 

40 Holt Familt, . - • • 

UNKNOWN^ 

41 Battlb Pibcob, . • - - 

UOSLAND. ~ 

42 Pios, 

BBEUGHEL. 

43 Lavdboiafb, with Fioubbs, 

ET7YSDAEL, S. 

44 RiVBB SOBNB, . - - - 

wnMN. 

46 VniA 01 MBoaHAB, 

HOOABTH. 

46 POBTBAIT 07 LAVIBU FBHTOK, DUCHBSS OF ^^^ ^^j^ ^^, 
SOLTOKy * 



. J.&JIfaeguaytSsq. 

• The Earl of Warwick. 
' The Earl of PortarUngton. 
. TUMar^rfDrogh^da. 

• Skeffington Sm/ifth, Etq. 

• J.ff.EHd^Esq. 

• Sir CharUi CooU, BarU 

• National GaUery^ London. 



47 KIVBB SOBHBt 

48 HBAD Of ▲ CHILDy 

49 Lahdsoapb, 



VANGOTEN. 

GBEUZE. 

LAWBENCE, Sir T. 



. J. E. Iteid, Esq. 

• Sir €fharUBCooie, Baft 

• Lord dt TahUy. 



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if 



64MM. JoBius, Jr.CSwH»«»ftj, 

66 Tn Ladt's Last Stake, . . The Earl of Ohatknmt. 

GAINSBOBOUGH. 

6eLANDB0AMi, 8wChafrU»0wte.BwfU 

BETNOLDS, Sir J. 

67 Emily DuoHisss OF LmNSTEB, - , . The Duke of L^/n^ 
6a Tm Swuwuw GiBi, - . , . j.gi^^^^ 

FETEitS. 
69 KiTTT FrsHBB, . . IT. aw»in», Jft}, 

LAWBSirGi; fiHr T. 

60GW«YG«^ EoydiAe^^dm^lmUm. 

KAOTFIIAJ^, A. 
ei PoRT^AW or I^Airr Cabolhtb Damsb, - . ne-SbWo/Porjofiwi^. 

9AB9SX7. 

68 RiVlB SCRNB WITH CaTTLB— MOBNINO, - 

LELT, Ki P. 
64 PoBTEAiT OF TUB CouNTEBS OP Newpoet, - ThtMuHef Pflfigr ft ^i 

66 Ladt JEdvabp Fii^^oBBAia), - . . jMy C^m^heU. 

66FAH9PFLgpoj|B,(CuMBBBLAKD,) . . Soyal fftbemicM 4cadmy. 

BETllOiaS, 6ir J. 

68La5PMA9^ . . . . . Sir CharktQwi^ Sort. 

68 PORjrBAEC 0? liOW) Stbappobd, . . ;srmley Marlay, Jfy^, 

I^BTHCOTS. 

70 liAYAinrmi nr Pi«soir, - - . . ig^ ^ To^^y* 

SEGHESSi G. 

71 Chbw APHUBljro to MabI Maodalbk, - F, ^2, jj^ 

BETNOIiDS, 8ir J. 
78 {*aw»Ai? OF 9BI Hoir. Mas. Sbthoub Daiobi Th^Morl^portmUmikm* 
LOUZEKKBOIJBG. 

iO Wmh ttJKmt Sir (Jht^l^ O^i^ S^rL. 



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120 



PAINTINGS IN OIL. 



KordiGiaiery. 



aiOBGIOHI!. 
94 PoBTBAiT OF ▲ Youira Man, - 

DEL 8ABT0, A. 
96 Holt Familt, .... 

YEBOWESE, P. 
98 ''L'AxouB Hbusiuz/' • 

LOBBAINE, CLAUDE. 

97 Thi Lakoino ot St. Paula, - 

(UnJcnovm), 

98 An Apobtlb, .... 

GHIBLANDAJO. 

99 St. Gbobob, .... 

TIKTOBETTO. 

100 PoBTBAiT ov John Paul Gontabikb, • 

101 St. Mask Pbbaohiko at Ybnioe, 

102 Thb Ektombmbnt, 

LIPPI, F., F.B.A 

103 Cbownino or thb Yiboik, 

COBBEOaiO. 

104 Obbibt'b Aoont ih thb Gabdbn, 

TITIAN. 

106 Pobtbait of a Monk, - 

VEB0NE8E, P. 

108 "LlNFIDBLITB," - 

OANALETTO. 

107 Thb Duoal Palaob, Yenice, 

DOLGI, GAELO. 

108 Thb Flight into Eotft, 

SASSO FEBSATO. 

109 Madonna, .... 

DOLGI, CABLO. 

110 Madonna and Ohild, • 

CABAVAOOIO 

111 Hbad of thb Cbnoi, 

BASSANO. 

112 Noah Building thb Abe, 

VEBONESE, P. 
118 "La Ebspbot," .... 

TITIAN. 

114 FOBTBAITy 8AI0 TO BB CjBSAB BOBOIA, • 

DUTCH SGEOOb 



The Earl of P(yrtarlingtm 
Tht Earl of PortarlingUm. 
The Earl of I>amley. 

The Earl of PortarlhgUm. 

Skejjinffton Smyth, Esq. 

MarqaU of LotKiwn,. 

The Viswumt PoioerswuH, 
The Viscotmt Potoerseovrt. 
The Earl of PortarlinffUm, 

Marquis of Lothian, 

Pratt, Esq, 

The Earl of Portarlington. 
The Earl of DamUy. 

The Earl of Portarlingion. 
Sir CharUe Coote, Bart, 
Sir Charles Coote, BarU 
Tht Earl of PortarlingUm. 
Sir W. JHUce, Bart. 
The Earl of Partarlington, 
TheEarlofJ)amley. 
The Earl cfCharhnmi, 



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KorfliCkaiery. ANCIENT MASTERS. . 121^ 

BASSANO. 

lie CHMSt Beabiko HIS Cross, - • • The Earl of P<yrtarlingt^ 

OAEAVAGGIO. 

117 Thb Apothbosis oi- St. Fbancis, - - ne Marquis qf Drosfieda. 

BASSO FBSEATO. 

118 Holt Familt, m Earl of PartarUngKm. 

MOBONI. 

119 POBTBAIT, ^^^f ^^'•*^- 

OANALETTO. 

120 ViHW OF PoHTi S'Ahoblo, Rome, - • CaUerton Smithy Esq. 

SAS80 FEBBATO. 

121 Tobias and the Angbl, - • - The Earl of PortarlingUm. 

OANALETTO. ' 

122 ViBW IN Vbkioi, . . . - 

DOSSO DOSSL 

123 DUKB OF Fbbbaba, . - . • EarlofWarwich 

WATTEAXr. 

124 Hbnby rV. AHD La Bbllb Gabbibllb, • Earl of PortarUn{fton, 

GABOrALO. 
126 Globipication of thb ViBaiw, • ^ SirW. DUhe, Bart. 

8ALVAT0B BOSA 

126 Landscape, Mancfuater ImtiUUum. 

POBBUS. 

127 POBTBAIT, EarlofWarmci. 

VAN EYOE. 

128 PoBTBAiT, WITH Patbon Saint, - • ffenry E. J)oyU, Esq. 

129 ViBQiN AND Child, - • • • Sir W. Dilke, Bart. 

CEANAOH, L. 

130 The Bmbatal of oub Lobd. - - -The Viscouni Powerseourt. 

. POUSSIN, G. 

131 Landscape, The EaH of PortarlingUm. 

DUTCH SCHOOL. 

132 liANDBOAPB, - • • - • Skeffington Smyih, Esq. 

GTJIDO. 
132A ViBOiN, Infant Jesus, and Joseph, - 

UNKNOWN. 
138 "Iwo Heads, . . - ^ SW W. Dilke, Bart. 

GUIDO. 
184 St. SsBASTtAN, ... * Sir Charla Coote, BarL 

BIBALTA. 
186 D«ATH of St. Joseph, • • - * ^. LafiiU. 

186 Poutbait of Kara Hinby VIH. • TkcSwi of PwiaHington, 

SABUtBUJAlBIir, 



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lU PAINTINGS IN On^BSmSH SCHOOL. 

\} Luge Upper GaQeiy, oif East Oonidor and NorOi Ooiridor. 

; ;] ' I ■ 

OOOFEB, T. a 

17 Shup xh SvoWi • • • . • C^arla La/ngton, Btg, 

lATHAM, 0. X. £ 

18 Old Whb Bsidgi, Killabmet, • • 20 

LANDSEEB, Sir E. 
I 19 Ths SHiFHiBD'a CBm MouBviB, • - S(rtah KmiinffUm Mvmm, 

I DILLON, P. 

20 Philjb, Nubia, firoxn the East, • 

HUGHES, J. J. £ 

21 On TBI Dbbwint at Gbamob Babbowdalx, • 10 
{^ LESLIE, C. B. 

22 TJvoLB Tobt ahd thx Widow Wadmav, • NtUi&nal QMery. 
j SAKT, 0. 

i 23 PoBTBAiT OF TBI DxTKS D'AuMALX, Fronces, CounUit of WdldegravL 

I DEFFELL, Uifls J. £ 

24 PoFFixa AND Caktxbbubt Bells, - - IS 

EUCENEB. 
' 25 Id Saltabxllo, ..... 

PABBOTT. 

26 Thb Pobt of Bbxst, Prance, 

j.^ PBOST, W. E. 

27 Chastitt, ..... 
I COOKE, E. W« 

28 HxB Majistt's Ship ^Tibbob" in thb Iob, • S. Qwmty, JStq, 

BBEtJGENEB, H 

29 BooxB Williams' Fibst Intb b v i ew with thx 

Indians, • • * * • /. ffauBer, St%. IM 

CCONKOB, J. 
80 Thx Cadi's Coubt, Aloixrs, ... 2 

WTTiTiTAMfl, 0. A. 
31 Sgbbx oh thx Thahxs^ .... 

I BACON, J. P. £ M. 

' > 32 Low Watxb—Sxabam in thx Distanob, • 31 lo 

LEBAS. 
33 Lanssgafx, . . . - . /. ^mMiU»^ JEig^ 6 10 

I LESUE. 

84 QtTxxN Yictobu's Cobovation— Bxoxivino thx 

Saobamxnt, EerMc^'eityihiQ^teem. 

SMITH, OATTEESON, PB.HA. 

85 HlH EZOXLLXHOT THX LOBD LiXUTXNAHT, . Zofci TTbckAoiMi. 



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128 PAINTINGS IN OIL— BRITISH SCHOOL. 

Large Upper Gallery; off East (Corridor and North Corridor. 

LANBSEEB, SIB E. 
67 Thb Sleeping Bloodhound, - - - National Gallery, 

LUCY, C. 

58 The Parting Interview between Charles I. 

AND HIS Children, . - - . 

HUGHES, J. J. i B. 

59 A Little Gipst, - • • - 6 

ELMOSE, A. 

60 SOBNB 7B0M THE Two GENTLEMEN ov Yerona, Royal Aeodmy. 

MULVANT, T. J. 

61 Irish Bog Hut, - - - - - G. F. Muhany, Esq. 

HATES, G. 

62 A Mountain Girl, - - - - 8 8 

DUFFY, T. 

63 Boss Castle, Killarnet — ^Moonlight, - - JS. Welsh, Esq, 

HAYES, G. 

64 A Country Nurse, ... - 66 

MACLISE, B. 
66 Malvolio and the Countess, - - - National Gallery, 

"LEE, F. E. and COOPEB, T. S. 

66 River Scene with Cattle, - - , - National Gallery, 

MORRIS, R. C. 

67 The First Shot, . . . . 

ARMTAGE, E. 

68 Portrait op J. Leighton, Esq., 

MORRIS, R. 0. 

69 Beer on the Mountain, ... 

BUNBAS, Miss. 

70 Domestic Friendship, - - . . 15 

LAWRENCE, Sir T. 
' 71 Ladt Rossmork— a Sketch, - - - Lord Rossmore. 

PICKERSGILL, F. R. 

72 "The Bribe," ..... R/yyal Academy, 

BENNETT, R. 

73 On the Surrey Hills, .... 



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130 I^AINTINGS IN OIL— BRITISH SCHOOL. 

Large Upper Gallery^ off East Corridor and; North Corridor. 

THOMAS. & 

132 Distribution op the Crimean Medals, - JETcr Majesty the Queen. 

W IN TEEHALTER. 

133 Portrait op H. R. H. the Prince Consort, - Ber Majesty the, Queen. 

HTTGHES, J. J. 

134 Mill at Rosthwaite, Barrowdale, Cumberland, 15 

CALLCOTT, Sir A. 

135 River Scene, 

DOBSON, W. C. J. 

136 The Nativity, • - - - 

HUGHES, J. J. 

137 Hampstead Mill, Stafford, 

YOUNG. 

138 KiLLINET BT MoONLIGHT, 

HUGHES, J. J. £ 

139 Kicii Yard at Hampstead, ... 3 

LATHAM, 0. M. 

140 Eagle's Nest, Killarnyy, ... 20 



Sir C. Coote, Bart. 
W. Bovmian, Esq. 

3 
/. Simoittpn, Esq. 5 5 



WALLIS, E. 
141 ilEN'RY Marten in Chepstow Gaol, - 



Viscount Powersconrt. 



' PHILLIP, J. 

142 Marriage op H. R. H. the Princess Royal, Her Majesty the Queen. 

LEIGHTON, P. 

143 Dante, - - . - 

BAREEB. 

144 The Allied Generals before Sbbabtopol, - Gwrde Brow^ St^. 

HUNT, A. A. 



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PAINTINGS IN OIL— BRITISH SCEQOL. 
In Hecess, off East Ck>rridor. 



13 



FAULKNEE, J. 

226 LooH Sheil, - - . - 

ALMET, M. M 

227 View op Island Bbidgb, Dublin, 



^ENNY, Mifls. 



228 Bbat Head, from Killinej, 



SHEIL, £. 



229 Jacob's Dbeam, 



CEOWLEY, H. 
830 View fbom Dalkey Island, looking towards KIUumj, 



231 ViBGiN AND Child, 

KAISCHER, C. C. 

232 Coast Scen«s, . - . - 

KENNY, Miss. 

233 Old Mill on the Doddeb, 

HOWIS, W. 

234 Gleanebs Eetubning, - 

LEBAS, H. 

♦ 

235 A Woodland Study, 

LAWEENCE, Sir T. 

236 PoBTBAiT OP Miss Mabia Siddons, 

MAEQUIS, Miss. 

237 View op Howth, 

HOWIS, W. 

238 Scene in Connemaba, 

AITKEN, A. 

239 Fishing Boat in a Bbeeze, 

GABE, E. 

240 The Lovebs Subpbised, 

HAEWOOD. 

241 Desdemona, - - - - 

ALLEN, Miss. 

242 The Village Hdmobist, 

CEOWLEY, H. 

243 Meditation, . - - - 

244 Bbay, and the Sugablo^vp Mountains, 

FAULKNEE, J. 

245 By the Roadside, Glenties, Donegal, 



£ 8. 

7 7 
a 3 

^ 

12 



4 


4 


26 


5 


5 10 




£ 




5 




7 


£ 


8. 


3 


3 




£ 









50 




75 




15 



♦ -• 



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136 PAINTINGS IN OIL— BRITISH SCHOOL. 

In Becess, off East Ck>rridor. 

GODBOLD, S. B. £ 

246 Bt thb Sea-bide, .... 34 

BUTLEB, S H. 

247 MaBT MAGDiLLEN, .... 

MAYNE, A. J. 

248 Going to Mabebt, .... 20 

IBONSIBE, Miss A. E. 

249 Adoration of the Magi, ... 315 

MAYNE, A. J. 

250 Glen Lbadeb, Scotland, ... 20 



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i m PAlNTISrOS IN OIL. Upper Central HalL 



IP 






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• I 



Ml 



140 



PAINTINGS IN OIL, Upper Central H»ll 



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Upper Central Hall. 



ROMAN SCHOOL. 1^^ 



GTTDE (Norway). ^ 

113 Lledb Valley— North Wales, - - - 

TIDEMAND, A. (Norway). 

114 Grandmothbb's Bbidal Ceown, 

FAGEBUN (Sweden). 

115 Help Youbselp, . - . - 

JEBNBEEG, A. (Sweden). 

116 Maebiaqk OrPEB, - - - 

On Screen. 
EBTJSfiHAN VAN BLTBN, H. D. {HoUwid). 

117 Dutch Landscape, . - - 

LEVIN (HoUand). 

118 Inteeiob op a Gebman Kubsaal, 

VAN EVBRDINGEN, A. (Holland). 

119 On the Biveb Veoht — ^near Amsterdam, 

GRinrrEE, W. Jnn. (Holland). 

120 View oh the Heldeb— Calm, - 

DESTREE, J. J. (Holland) 

121 View neab the Hague, 

VAN ELVEN, P. T. (Holland). 

122 Faib (Holland), 



90 
400 

60 
65 

66 
70 
85 



ROMAN SCHOOL- 

(In tfpper Central Hall.) 
DE aOHDEN, F. 

123 The Savioub with poub of the ' Apostles, to whom He 

peesents a Child as an Example, 

STRTJTT, A. 

124 Teeading out the Coen in the Campagna, - Nathaniel Barton, Esq. 600 

DE ROHDEN, F. 

125 Madonna and Child, - - - - 

BARTOLOMEI, E. 

126 The Holy Family, 

mTLLER, G. 

60 

127 Head op a Cociaba, 

DE ROSSI, C. 

128 The Gbaces Making the Toilet 'op Cupid, - 70 

PODESTI, Cav. F. 

129 The Globy op the Savioub, - " ". 

BOBJPIANI, Cav. R. ^ 

130 Dante in the Studio op Giotto, 

PODESTI Cav. F. 

131 Madonna and Child, - - - - 



200 
100 
180 



I ^ 



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144 



PAINTINGS IN OIL— ROMAN SCHOOL. 



BOMAEE, A. £ 

132 PlEASANTS DaNOING IS A YiNETABD, - - 60 

BOMPIANI Cav. F. 

133 Thb Immaculate Conception, ... 40 

BEETAOCINI, A. 

134 Aqueduct op Claudius, neae th* New Afpian Wat, 25 

SEntMUNT, S. 

135 Death op Lady Jane Gbet, ... 70 

In the Soman Court — Centre of Transept, East Side. 
POECELLI, A. 

136 BoTs AT Spobt on the Shore op the Mekqellina, neab 

Naples, - - - - - . Marchese Ricci. 65 

BABTOLOMEI, E. 

137 Peasant Woman enqaqed in the Vintage, - 43 

BOMPIANI, Cav. B. 

138 Landscape, with Bacchantes, - - 50 

B^GGIO, 0. 

139 Landscape, with Cattle, ... go 

BE EOSSI, C. 

140 The Vocation op Cablo Goldoni to Comedy, - lOO 

6UEBBA, A. 

141 The Cardinals op Sobbento and Voltebra sent by Pope Julius 

II. AS Legates to CjBsab Borgia, when in Retirement at 

OsTiA, apter thb Death op Alexander VI., - - 128 

BE BOSSI, C. 

142 Cupid Avenging the Death op Adonis, - 50 

vebtumi, a. 

143 Italian Landscape, with Figures, - - go 

WIDER, G. 

144 The Vestiture op a Nun in a Church at Rome, 280 

VERTUMI, A. 
146 Ruins op the Tomb op Vibgil at Posilipo, . 40 

146 The Toweb op Astuba and Fishponds op Lucullus (Sunset), 70 

PORCELLI, A. 

147 Falls op the Velino, near Terni, 

148 Landscape, with Figubbs, 

BE SANCTIS, G. 

149 Woman with Floweb, half length, 

150 Bbigand Chief, - - . . 

FARRELL, G. 

161 Fbuit, ^ 

PORCELLI, A. 

162 Men Dbineing in a Cellab, - 

BORZETTI, B. 
162a PIAZ7A OF St. Petsb's, at Rome, • - 20 



Marchese Micci, 
Marchese Ricci. 



&ir George ffodson, Bart. 



Marchese Riccu 



30 

5 
44 



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Upper Central Hall.] ITALIAN SCHOOL. 145 

ITALIAN SCHOOL. 

' Upper Central Hall. 

CHTERICI, G. £ 

163 Bathbb, .-.-.-- 24 

COETESB, F. (Naples.) 

164 Aqueduct of Claudius, outside the Gate of St. John, Borne, - 62 

GUILIANO, B. 

155 Faust and Mabguebite, - - ^ The Ministry of Agricultwre, 

iTidvMry, and Commerce. 

BOEGIA GUMBO, Cav. E. (Messina). 

156 Landscape in the Campagna Komana, 

PEEOTTI, E. (Turin). 

157 Landscape Scenery in the Hills of Turin, 40 

PEAMPOLINI, Prof. A. 

158 Ruins of a Roman Aqueduct in the Valley of Tivoli, near Rome, 80 

GONIN, Cav. F. 

159 The Train of Bacchus, - - - 240 

TOMO, G. 

160 A Rigorous Examination — Scene during the 

Inquisition, - - - . City and Corporation of Naples. 

TORO, L. 

161 Outpost op the first 200 Garibaldians in Calabbia, 120 

LANZA, G. (Naples). 

162 Monument of King Stanislaus in the Church of S. Giovanni, 40 

PEAMPOLINI, Prof. A. 

163 Entrance to the Villa d'Este, Tivoli, - 14 

GENOVESE, E. (Palermo). 

164 Head of an Old Woman in Venetian Costume, 

EUSSO, D. ^Naples). 

165 Gabibaldi in Rome, . - - - 400 

MIOLA, C. 

166 Plautus as a Milleb, Reading one of his 

Comedies, . - - City and C(yrporation of Naples, 

167 Gabibaldian Guides in Calabbia, - - 120 

BISCAEEA, Cav. C. F. (Turin). 

168 Othello and Dbsdemona, ... 40 

PIEEOTTI, E. 

169 SCENBBY IN THE HiLLS OF TUBIN, - - 40 

CHIEEICI, Prof. A. 

170 The Monk's Fibk-plaob, ... 20 ' 

171 Thb Stobm, 20 



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146 PAINTINGS IN OIL. Upp§f Centrsa Ha]L 



SPANISH SCHOOL. 

Upper Oentzal Hall. 

mSPALETO, M. G. £ 

171a The Orphan's Sorbow, ... 126 

BEKITO 8QBXAK0, If. 

172 The Sobbento Woman, ... 60 

VALES, L. 

173 The Body op Beatmcb Cbnoi Exposed on 

THE Bridge of San Angelo (Manuscript in 

the Vatican), ----- National Museum of Madrid. 

ASHTON, LUIGI (Italy). 
173a Isola DEI PescatobIj, from Isola Bella, 

ROCA, M. BE LA. 
173b The Coasts of Spain and Aebica, from the Bay of GihraUar, 

ESTBABA, J. 
173o Still Life, - - - - - 

MIBABENT, J. 
173d Still Life, - - - - 

LAMACOIS, 0. 

173e Mendicant Monks, - - - - 

BANBE, J. G. 
173f a Musician, - - - - - 

BOCA, M. BE LA. 

173g A Neapolitan, 

ROSALES, E. 

174 Isabel the Catholic Dictating her Will, National Museum of Madrid. 

She died at Medina del Campo, 26th Nor., 1504. — 
Prescott, History of Ferdinand and Isabella, 

RICO, M. £ 

175 Landscape, - - , - - 40 

riEBROB, B. 

170 A Beggar AND Child, - - . . 80 

GONZALVO, P. 

177 Ancient Hall op the Cortes op the King- 

dom OP Valencia, - - - - The Duk$ of Feman Nvna. 

MABRAZO, L. 

178 Funeral OP St. Cecilia, - - - Natumal MvMum of Madrid. 

SERBA, J. 

179 Hare, with Duck and other Birds, - J^ational Museum of MaM, 



D i g i t i zed b-^<^^gle 



Upper Central HaU. SPANISH SCHOOL. ^ 



PIZAERO, C. 

180 Yestebday AND To-day, - - • National Museum of Madrid. 

MAZANO, V. £ 

181 The Confession, . - - - 60 

FEEEAN, M. 

182 Philip III. of Fbance Blessing his Childben 

ON HIS Deathbed (Catalan Chronicle of j, j 'j 

Roman Montanero), - - - - NaUoruU Museum of Madrid. 

MIEABENT, J. 

183 Flowebs, . ' - - - " National Museum of Madrid, 

OTAOLA, C. ^ 

184 A Stbeet IN Toledo, - - - • 40 

JAKMOT, L. (Paris, French School). 

185 Madonna, - - - - - 

EICO, M. 

186 Landscape, ----- National Museum of Madrid, 

MA HEEEEE, J. ^ £ 

187 Neapolitan Woman, - - - - 40 

TOME, F. S. 

188 Intebiob op San Isidobo, Madrid^ - - National Museum of Madrid. 

VALDIVIESO, D. 
188a The Descent feom the Cboss, - - National Museum of MaMd, 

MEECADE, B. 

188b The Last Moments of Feiar Cablo 

Climaque, - . - - - - National Museum of Madrid. 

LOZAITO, I. 

189 Isabel the Catholic Pbesiding oveb the 

Education op heb Sons, - - - National Museum of Mad/rid. 

DEGEAIN, A. M. 

190 The Sieba of the Agbyos fbom the Side op 

Caball-vebnat, Valencia, - - - National Museum of Madrid. 

MATJEETA, G. 

191 ToBQUATO Tasso Retibing to the Convent op 

St. Onopbio on Mount Janiculabius, - National Museum of Madrid, 

HAES, C. 

192 SouvENiBS OF Andalusia, - - - National Museum of Madrid. 

AGEASOT, J. 

193 "Washwoman op the Scabpa, Papal States, • National Museum of Madrid. 

HEEBEE, J. £ 

194 The Lettee op Recommendation - - 60 

FIEEEOS, D. 

195 Embassy op the Magistbatb op a Gallician 

BuEGH, - - - - - National MvMvm of Madrid, 



f ^ 



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148 



PAINTINGS IN OIL. 



Upper Central Hftll 



GONZALVO, P. 
196 Chapel and Sepulohbe of Don Alvabo de 



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'■ »fl 



I -IJ 



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ff ' 'il 



152 



PAINTINGS IN OIL. 



m^ .. 



VERLAT, C. 

258 The South, .... 

IIABGETTE, H. 

259 Thb Fish-pond of Polleub (April), - 

IINNIG, W. 

260 Mblodt of thb Evenino, 

IIGNT. 0. 

261 Haiclst, - - - . . 

PLUMOT. A. 

262 Flemish Intebiob, 

VAN BEaEMOBTEB, J. 

263 Shoemakee Wobkiwo m his Shop, 

LAlilBBICHS, E. 

264 Pbepabino, - - . . 

VAN SEVEEDONCZ, F. 

265 Landscape, with Sheep, 



BELLEMANS. J. 

266 Study at ^-he Fountain, 

STOOQUAET, JLD. 

267 Herd Besting in the Shade, 

VANDEBVIN, P. 

268 Bemovino on the Bhine, 

BOFFIAEN. J. P. 



£ 
40 

20 

40 



50 
16 
10 
80 
60 
60 



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BELGIAN SCHOOL. 



103 



HOEBENHOUT, J. 

278 Bacob Coubsb, with Obstacles, - 

VAN HOEE, B. 

279 The Piazzbtta, Venice, 

MELZEB, F. 

280 The Pets, . - . . 

VAN DYCKB, L. 

281 -Village Univebsitt, 

VAN SEVEEDONOK, J. 

282 The Pebiloub Descent, 

STEVENS, J. 

283 The Awaking of the Lion, 

80DAB, A. 

284 In the Wood, .... 

GLEYNHENS, 0. 
284a The Vibgin and Infant Christ, 

DEVOS, V. 

285 Dog and Flt, - 



BILLOIN, 0. 
EEELHOFF, P. 
GEEPS, Mad. P. 
DEWINNE, L. 
TATHANS, L. 
EATHEUN, E. 

OABOLUS, 
WAGNEB, J. 



286 At the Wood, - 

287 Hut, 

288 Maternal Education, 

289 POBTBAIT, 

290 The Gleaners, - 

291 Convalescent, - 

292 COQUETTEBDE, 

293 The Lesson, 

EINDEBHANS, J. 

294 Effect of the Sun on the Heatheb at Abdennes, 

BOSSITET, P. 

295 Chubch of St. Pominick at Calatatnd, near Saragossa, 

BELLEMANS, J. 

296 The Angel Pbotbctob, .... 

JANSSENS, V. 

297 Smnura or Aooounts^ 



H, P. T. Barron, 



£ 
90 

140 
22 
50 
44 
60 
40 

12 
40 

32 

50 

28 

28 

56 
S2 
60 
120 
80 
92 



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BELGIAN BUHUUJL. 



TAXMANS, L. 

317 The Fruit Sellee, . - .- - 

KEEMEB, P. 

318 Chablbs I. King op England and his Family Visiting 

THE Studio. OF Vandtok, - . - - 

319 Pbatbb betobb Meat, 

320 The Fibst Rbvbbib, 

321 The Magdalen, - 

322 The Message, 

323 Genbb PictUbb, 



DEBLOCK, E. 

HOUZE, F. 

BILLOIN, C. 
TAYMANS, L. 
PLTJMOT, A. 



DE SGHABIPHLEEB, E. 

324 Habvest— Stobmt Wbathbb, - 

PAEFONEY, F. 

325 The Musical Pabtt, . - - - 

VAN T'VELT, J. 
826 Gabde-Boubgboise, - - - - 

STOCQUART, JLD. 

327 Hebd Pastubing at the Appboaoh of Stobm, 

HUYSMANS, J. R 

328 Eastbbn Toilet in the House of the Daughtebs of Mahomet, 

GOYEBS, A. 

329 Solitude, - - - '" 

DEBLOCK, E. 
^ 330 L'Angelus, - . - - - 

VAN SEVEEDONCK, J. 

331 Pbateb, • • ■ 

DE SENEZCOUET, Mad. A. 

332 Pobtbait of H. R. H. the Pbincess of Wales in Wedding 



Costume, - 



BOSSUET, F. 



333 Ruins of the Palace of the Caliphs at the Old Aeabian 
Town Zahba, --•••" 
VANDENBEOEOK, Mdlle. 
984 Tan MuwoiAN'fl EaaoB, , • ' " 



82 



80 
120 
25 
50 
18 

50 

7 

32 

70 
100 

24 

40 

7 

12 






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FORBiaN SCHOOLS. 



157 



DILLSNS, Ad. 

S56 SOBJBriS 7B0H THB RELIGIOUS WaBS IV THB 16TH CiVTUBT, 

BOVZk, B. P. 

857 Gbbtbt FBESBNTiNa BouiLLT TO Mabib Antointettx, 

MASWEINS, J. 

858 IVTEBIOB OF LaXGB CHAPEL of THB OaTHEDBAL AT TOLEDO, 

JOLLY, Lieiit.-G6ii. 

859 Youiro Laot KETiBU^a fbok the Wobld, 

OHitUVIN, A. 

860 Eemobbb of Cain, .... 

YEEHAS, J. 

861 Monk Pbatino, . - - - . 

VBETIN, P. G. (Holland). 

862 The Old Chvboh at Delft, 

WALLAYS, B. 
868 Ibtsbiob of St. Anne's Chuboh, Bruges, 

EOFFIAEN, J. W. 
864 Looh Lohond and Ben Lomond, Scotland,' 
^ ^ STOCQUAET, JLD. 

365 Pbaibie (effect of Evening), 

DE PSATEBE, E. 

366 Bull and Heifebs, .... 

VANDEN KERCKHOVE, A. 
366a The BBUNETTE—MedaUion, 
366b The Blonde— Medallion, - - - 



' 140 
80 
60 
60 
120 
45 

32 

140 

70 
20 



20 
20^ 



In the Gnat Mmdo HaIL 

[The Numbers begin over Door of Sonth Corridor.] 
WHITTU8EN, Miss L. (Denmark). 

367 ISOHIAN GiBL, .--... • 12 

RORSHOLBT, SliflB E. (Denmark). 

368 POBTBAIT OF A DOO, - - - - 15 

BRUNNXiB LAGOSTE, H. (Paris, Frtnch sohool). 
3^ Dead Gamx, ...... 20 

8CHBJBIBEB, Mrs. (Norway). 
a70 Meditation, ...---- 55 

WHTTlrUSEN, Miss L. (Denmark). 
371 Gbandmotheb's Fbuitlbss LBsaoN, - ' TO 

BJOQARDT, P. (Denmark). 
Qigj Wood Lahdboaw wJgTLAND, « . - ^ M 



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-'• i : 



' BAADSK^, f ^ii|Oju-k). £ 

^7d JPATura TAzy^ . . . . ^ n 

S0HEIN9, i:^. (P»8^dorf). 

374 PiNi FoBEST— Winjbj?^ landjEicap^ : - f^ 

BICHAED!)? F. (D^moArk). 

375 Ynsw of thb L4JCII Gnss, wir^ the Buu^js) 0]r pi^TLB j6 & 
'*■' GuBB IN THE FoBEOBOUND — ^Zealand, 21 ItO 

HOBSHOLDT, IObb E., (Denmark). £ 

376 Doo's HEADy ----- 15 

TTDEMAND, A. (Koi^ay). 

377 Gonro to Chuboh, - - , - - $0 

378 Coicnra tboh Chxtboh, . . - . 20 

ASHTON, LUIGI gtaly). 

379 Gbanite Quabbies, Aim Stbuita Ganai^ nearlBareno, Lago 

Maggiore, - - - - - 7 j^ 

HAHN, W. (pto^l4orf). 
J380 Hat Habvest, - . . , ^ ^ 

EIEBSCHOW, PZof. F. G. (I>^iiinark). 
qpl The "Bbavik''— Eastern Coast of SwedjBfl, .,- jg 

382 jEOEBSBOBa IN THE Pabk— Zealand, - - 12 

DESCHAYES (Hollajid), ' 

383 Sea Piece, - - . - . ^q 

LUND, F. 0. (Denmarl^). 

384 Judith, .-.-.. - 90 

WJllTTUSEN, Miss L. (D^^pi^i^]^}^ 

^§5 A LiTTLB GiBL in THE FOBEST, - - ...... S£ 

BIGHABDT, F. (Denmark). 
386 WiNTEB Laitosoape— Oresmid, - . . 2 

HAySEK^€OT«^)w ' 
387 NoBWioiA^ Jl^ffipi qfjf]^^mteT, - f SO 

WSf^lX^f 4 a (DoBibark) 
Qg8 Danish Beech FosEST^-Smmner, - - M 

8Q3QQIT, A. ^Depmaxk). 
389 Gbnbe Piotube, - - - . ,. 

GBraSfiOQiW; Jkof. F. G. (Deuaail^ 

SAD Coast or Blbeino in Sweden, - - - ■ ■ ■ • - M 

PAT.H Prol a W. <a«»dai^ 
38il EuiNS— Wisby, - - - - - - f^ 

BAABfiia, E (Dienmai^, - 
89fi A PoAOHXB BEVOBB THE Judge. - « • . m 



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OmilfaibBAlL 



SGJOmmJiiVlAIf SDSOOL. 



m 



394 YouNQ DsBB, ... - - 26 

USLBBTTF, A. 0. (Denmark). 

395 Danish Buoh FoBi^sT-^pping, . . ^ 

JEBICHAU, Madame K (Denmark). 

* 396 Little Karen refuses the Crown offered to her by the King 
of Sweden, and'aaks hini to leave it toliis Queen, and to 
spare her honour, ... - - 200 

EXNEE, P*of. (Denmark). 
397 A Bride of the Island ov Abhac, - - 

BOBSHOLDT, Miss £. (DenmaSrk). 
398 aA Basket of Fbuit, - - - . 20 

SCmoTT, A. (Denmark), 
, 399 A GeNbe Piotube, .... 

GEBTITEIE, Prof. (Denmark). 
400 Pobtbait of Thobwaldsbn, - . - 70 

FBI9GH, J. D. (Denmark). 
*401 Hen and Ducklings, . - - - 25 

BEOEEIC, A. (Dtlsseldorf). 

402 EVENINQ ON THE BeBNESE MOUNTAINS, - SOO 

SOEENSEN F, (Denmark). 

403 Sound of Elsinobe, . - - . 125 

BICHABBT, F. (Denmark). 

404 Kbonbobg Castle at Elsinobe — where Prince Hamlet was buried, 68 

SOlEffiNSEN, F. (Sweden). ^ 
406 The Battle of Swinemunde, 17th March, 1864, 70 

KOLLE, G. A. (Denmark); 

406 View of the Obesund fbom Zealand, - • . 60 

6EBTNEB, Prof. (Denmark)^ 

407 Pbincess Albxandba of Wales, taken in 1862, 75 

BILLING J. (Swedefn). 

408 ViBw of Ulbicksdal, ... - 25 

SOBENSEN, F. (Denmark). * 

409 Bell Rock— Scotland, . ; . . • * 80 

WSLLTfSSESr Mte Im (Denmai^k); 

410 Basbust with Flowebs, • . • • 50 

EXB£DM^, a. C. (Denmark). 

411 Danish Beech FosasiH-^ntuMXi, * SO 

JSBIQBAU, SbKUuBOQ (l)Qninaz'&), 
41d BsiSAVJriit • < • • • 121 



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Oteai ICasie HiJl. 



FOREIGN SCHOOLS. 



161 



KOSEHULL, Banm, A. Q. (Sweden). £ 

433 Public Wobship — Sweden, - - - 58 

STALLAEBT, J. (Belgium). 

434 The Kecoonition of rLYSsss bt his Nubsb, 120 

ECKESSBEBQ (Norway). 

435 Bbddal Pabtt, - . - - - 

ANKAEOBONA, Captain (Sweden). 

436 Frbnoh Tboops in Algiers, - - • 200 

Von BEUCEEjH. (Berlin)! 
487 BoHULUs AKD Eemus, . . . • 120 

LOEOK, 0. (Norway). 

438 The Pedlar Jew on Board Ship, • 60 

BILLING, J. (Sweden). 

439 Cabtlb of Gbtfsholm — Sweden, * - 25 

BILLOIN, C. (Belgium). 

440 The Ehfebob Chables Y. YidtTi^a fiis Motheb, JsAffKE- 

la-folle, - - - • • * 100 

^ SCBANOHE (Norway) 

441 Landsoafe, BokdhmisbbiEn (Hardanger, Norway), 90 

BEEQH, E. Fiof. (Sweden). 

442 SUKSET— 'Swedish Coast, . • • . 53 

ANCAECBOKA, Captain (Sweden). 

443 Ababs Reposing* . - - . - 26 

ESEILSSON pi (Sweden) 

444 Daleoablian Evening Soene, . / . . 85 

Van SEBEN, H. (Belgium). 

445 Effect of Snow, - ^ . • • 12 

ICABOEIIE (Belgium). 

446 Fabh House, ..... 1<2 

TOUSSAINT, F. J. (Belgium). 

447 The Soapegbaob, .... 12 

EAaELSIEIN, F, (Belgium). 

448 The HuauEiiroTB^ .... 88B 

BOSSUET, F« (Bel£^um). 

449 CoBDovA, Sari ^ Pmiitrlinffkn^^ 

SEBESi P. E. (Dutch School). 

450 Came of Obbsb, iO 

VBBBOBCKHOVBK, E. (Belc^uxn). 
461 ShbiPj •••••• 

USWn pusiddorl). 



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Tffl 



162 



PAINTINGS m OIL. ' Gl«ai ITiIbU HilL 



'!■ 



S ' 



VAN 8EVEBD0K0K, F. (Belgium). 
458 Cock AND Hens, - - - - * 

BOUTIBONKE (Switzerland). 
454 Hatmakkes EBPOsiN<a — Switeerland, - ^ 

L0P3PE, 0. (Geneva). 
456 View in thb Nbiohboubhood ov Erlachen— Canton Berne, 

MARTIN (France). 

456 Gbnbe Piotube, - - 

1X)PPE, G. (Geneva). 

457 The Glaoieb j)u TalAfbe and Mont Blanc, 

WAHLBBEO, (Sweden). 
457a Swedish Landscape, - - - . 

ANDEESON, 0. (Sweden.) 
457b a Skibmish, . - - - - 

TEAVERS, W. K. F. (Dutch). 
4570 The FiBST Happiness, •-. - - - 

TOESLOW H. (Sweden). 
45 7d Landscape in Lapland, 

ALFANO, V. (Naples). 

458 Sad News ; Episode of the Polish war of 1863. Madame Bechi 

receives from her brother the letter, medal, &c., sent her 
by her husband a few moments before he was shot by the 
Russians. ------- 

PEAMPOLINI (Italy). 

459 Cascade neabTivoli, - - - - 

KOBHEK (Berlin). 

460 Genbe Pictubb, - - - - - 

FOET, EUZA, 

461 Italian Landscape, - - - - 

OHIEEICI, Prof. A. (Roine). 

462 A Capuchin Fbla.b at the Convent, 

OHIEBIOI, 0. (Italy). 

463 iNiaaioB oi- a Kitchen, 

BUENIEE, B* (Belgium). 

464 MoBNiNft, ...... 

XAZZOLINI (Italy). 

465 An Italian Motheb, - 

JAI^iOT, L. (Pane). 

466 Gbaziblla, • • • • • 

AflgTON, IXmi (Milan). 
4(67 TaI'IA M^qiik (Qantou of Touin), g^tM<iMtd| 



£ 
10 

210 
60 





70 
60 

400 
110 



£ B. 

1212 

£ 
20 

S2 

6i 

10 

86 



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GMfttlfiifllaHaU. 



FOREIGN SCHOOLS. 



1«3 



C4B000I, B. (Itaiy). £ 

468 Hakiloab UAKiNa Hannibal sweab pebfetual hatbio) to thx Bokans, 40 

DTTNTZfi, P. (Dtisseldorf). 

469 Dutch Wintsb Landsoapb, ... ^ 

POST, B. (Dtisseldorf). 
^7Q SHOBB of SjOHWINOBir, - . • • - 50 

HAKDCOGK, SABAH S. (Pisa). . 
471 The Gabibaldina o^ "M^xlax^q, - - - 

PIANELU, E. (Naples). 
472, 473 Tv70 Views of Capbi, from the sea, 

CHOITLANT, (Saxony). 

474 Island in tiis Tibeb, ..... g3 

PASTORIS DI CASALEOSSO, Count P. (Italy). 

475 Rustic Life in Piedmont, . - - 40 

DILLENS, Ad. (Belgium). 

476 The Tboubadoue, . - - /. Simonton, Esq. 



GASTALDI, Chev. A. (Italy). 
BIANCm, M. (Itaay). 



ITALIAN SCHOOL. 



477 "Atala,"- 

478 Interior of a Church, 

479 The Widow, .-'.-- 

OAMBA, Baron P. (Italy). i 

^80 Rising Tide at Schwingen, near tl^e Hague, on t^ Dutch 

Coast, - - - The Ministry of A gncultiia^, Industry and Commerce, 

.BECCAEIA Chev. CESARE (Italy). 

481 Haymaking in the Neighbourhood of Turin, - Gallery of FUUArts, Turin, 

' ASHTON, LTJIGI (Italy). £ 

482 Granite Quarries, and Struna Canal, near Baveno, in 

the Lago Maggiore, ..... ^^ 

EAIMDNDI, I4. (Italy). 

483 The Cloistebs of S. Maria Novella, at Florence, ^ 

GELATI, L. (Italy). 
4^ Chubch of S. Miniato, near Florence, - 20 

BOILIiY, E. (France). 
485 Rbvbbib, ------ 

WnXEJIS (Belgium). £ g; 

4§||4 The Love Letter, - - - J, J^mmto^ Mti* 9 XQ 

MARTINEZ, J. a. (Spain), 
^6 The LoviiBS of Tebnel, - - National J^u^am t^ ^f ^j^MSL 

OORSI SI SOSKTAfiOQi t^xoA fi. (Italy). 
467 Th« F»sx Tog, ^ • r - ^ BmnWiaWda. 



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16* PAINTmGS m OIL. Groat MnricHalL 



, 488 GXKBB PiCTUBS, 



GBELL, A. (Berlin). 



I'"' SEBES, P. H. (Dutch). 

^ 489 SlOK CHAMBEBy ..... i^ 

CANO, B. (Spain). 
^. 490 Chbistophbb Columbus in thb Convent of 

"^ '^ THB Nativity, - . - National Mtiseum of Madrid. 

r^ LLANOS, Y. (Spain). 

\ 491 Funebal Convoy of Feiab Felix Lope db Vega Caepio, 
'^ passing before the Convent of Nuns of the Trinity at 

~X Madrid, wherein was his daughter, - National Museum of Madrid 

FEISCHE, L. (Dusseldorf). £ 

X 492 Thb Wbttebhobn in Switzerland,^ - - 30 

*•■- ^ - '* TETAB VAN ELVEN, J. B. (Holland). 

498 Chubch in Bomb, .... 13 

D'ANDBIMONT, C. (Belgium). 

494 Landscape, ..... 

HEBNANBEZ, 0. (Spain). 

495 Journey of the Virgin and St John to Ephesus 

afteb the Death op Chbist, - National Museum ofMadrvL 

VERA, A. (Spain). 

496 Funeral of Saint Lobbnzo in the Catacombs 

OF Bomb, .... National Museum of MadrL 

DEVOS, V. (Belgium). 

497 Dog and Monkey, - - , . 

BAFFALT, J. G. (Austria). £ 

498 HuNGABiAN Peasant Waggon, - - 35 

NAKKEN, W. C. (Holland). 

499 Fabm-yabd near Antwerp, - - - 19 

SCHMIDT, Prof. (Saxony). 

500 The Temptation, .... 

KEUSEMAN VAN ELTEN, H. D. (Dutch). 

501 The Well on the Heath, ... 80 

VAN EVUEDDIGEN, A. (Dutch). 

502 Farm-house, ..... 45 

THIOLLET (France). 
603 Gbnbb Pictubb, - - . - - 

WAINWEIGHT, P. £ i 

504 Landscipe, . . * . - 10 10 

NETJGEBAUEB (Austria). £ 

505 Dead Bibds, ..... 50 

MOLLINGEE, A. (Dutch). 

506 Duwa LAiffiftOAM, WITH Cattlb— Sunset, - ^^ 



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166 FOREIGN SGHOOLS^OABTOONS. 

DE KT.M.Ki Wj (Dutch). £ 

524 On the Main (Bavaria)— Summer, - - .28 

PLEYSIEE, A. (Dutch). 

525 Pbinob and Pbinoijss Wi;i.liam of Pbussia Abhivino, on 

THBiB Wbddinq Toub, AT Antwebp, 4th Febbuab^^ 1858, • 65 

SCHMIDT, Prof. (Saacony). 

526 Pobtbait of Pbofessob Schmidt, 

HAZEU, A. 0. (Dutch). 

527 On the High Veluwe (Gueldbbs), - - 17 

LAN&E, J. (Mmiich). 

528 ViBw of the Watzuann Mountain from the NsioHBOum- 

HOOD OP Bebchtesoaden (Bavaria), - . . 40 

BIJKTjTy, t. 

529 Sheep, ...... 8 

ttbBBIG, W. (Berlin). 

530 The Little Fishes Gibl, ... 20 



CARTOONS. 

Music Hall. 



MUTTEKTHALEB, A. (Munich). 

531 Caftubb OF Fbedebick the Handsome, and his Bbotbeb 
Duke Heinbich of Loweb Austria, in the Battle of 
Ampfing, .----- 



WAGNER, A. (Munich). 
tho IV., Empebob o: 

IB, 

HESS, H. (Mmiich). 



532 The Mareiagb of Otho IV., Empebob of Gebmant, i 

SUBNAMED THE SUPEBB, .... 46 



1^33 One of the Pbophets, 

534 Cabtoon peom the RotAl Chapel — "All Saints," 

535 One of the Six Pbophets, 

PmS, T. (Munich). 

538 Chables X. of Sweden Victorious over the Danes iit a ^t. 

Battle fought on the Fbozen Little Belt, 1658, 79 16 

MAftTIN, P. (Munich). £ 

537 Death of Count Akco in the Tteol, 1703, 50 

HESS, H. (Munich). 

538 FouB OF THE Pbophets, - - . ., 

FRANK, J* (Munich). 

539 Chbibtianitt Pbeached in Bayabia bt St. Sebyico, 30 



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Great Mnsio Hall. FQRBiaN SCHOOLS-€ABTOONS. 167 

PILOTY, F. (Munich). £ 8. 

* 640 Loyal Peasants of Ramsbach Captukino Rbbkl Prisoneks, 17 • 17 

KAULBACH (Berlin). 

641 DSSTBUOVION OV SHE TOWEB OF BaBEL, 

EOCKEET, J. (Munich). £ 

642 Duke Albebt V. of Bavaria, - - - SO 

PIXI3, T. (Munich). £ a. 

543 Chables XI. of Sweden at the Battle of Land, . 79 16 

SCHWIND (Munich). £ 

644 Contest of the Minnesingers, in the Castle of Wartbebo, 7$ 

(In the Water Colour Gallery). 

ECHTEB, M. (Mnnich). 

115$ 176f 177 The Task of the Tbleoea?h, Th^ LogoMO- ' H s. 

TiVE, AND Steam Poweb, ----- 67 10 

SOLAE (Spain). 
1^8 Chbist and his Apostles, 

SCHWIND, M. VON (Mimich). £ 

179 Fourteen oartoona illustrating The Passion of oub Lobdi, 130 

SOHEANDOLPH, J. (Munich). 
IgQ Chbi»t in Globt, surrounded by angels, St. Jqseph £ s. 

AND St. Helena beneath, - - - - 34 Ifi 

181 The Virgin in Glory, with angels, St. Barbara- and St. 

JppN ^^o^uc bene^tp, - - - .' ^ 34 16 

PALME, A. (Munich). 

182 BlJJLDING OF THE ChURCH AT ViERFREHNHEILEGEN, A 

placjb of Pilgbimage in Fbanoonia, 



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168 



VICTORIA. CROSS GALLERY. 



M • ^ 



ii» 



^ 



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VICTORIA CROSS GALLERY. 

East Room, off South Corridor. 



169 



'I 



27 Colonel Tombs, y.C-, and Lieutenant HiLLS, V.C., Bengal Artillery 
engaged with the enemy's cavalry, 9th July, 1857. 

28 Private Palmer, V.C, 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards, cliarging singly at 
Inkerman. x 

29 Lieutenant Butler, Y.C, '1st Bengal Fusiliers, climbing the parapet at 
Lucknow. 

30 Lieutenant- Colonel Sir C. Rdssell, Bart., V.C, 3rd Grenadier Guards, 
dislodging a party of Russians from the sand-bag battery. 

31 Sergeant Ablett, V.C, 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards, throwing an 
ignited shell out of a trench at Sebastopol. 

32 Lieutenant OiTbitt, V.C, 13th Bengal N.I., saving the lives of three of the 
32nd Regiment on the retreat from Chinhut. 

33 Colonel the Hon. H. Perot, V.C, Legion d'BLonneur (A.D.C. to the 
Queen), Grenadier Guards, dislodging the enemy from the sand-bag battery at Inker- 
man. 

34 Lieutenant Young, V.C, William Hall, A.B., V.C, and Lieutenant 
Newell Salmon, V.C, at Lucknow. 

35 T. H. Kava;i^aoh, Esq., V.C, passing through Lucknow on a mission to Sir 
Colin Campbell. 

36 Corporal Shields, V.C, Legion d'Honneur, 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers, 
bringing in Lieutenant Dyneley mortally wounded at the Redan. 

37 Brevet-Major Goodlake, V.C., Colstream Guards, holding the Windmill 
Ravine at Sebastopol, against a much larger foroe of the enemy. 

38 Commander DAT, V.C, R N., making a reconnaisance at Genitchi. 

39 Major Elphinstone, V.C, Royal Engineers, recovering scaling ladders at 
the repulse of the Redan, on the 18th June, 1855. 

40 Captain Henry, V.C, late Royal Artillery, defending his guns at Inkerman. 

41 Colonel Dickson, CB., V.C , Aide-de-Camp to the Queen, R.A., bringing 
in powder to the battery before Sebastopol. 

42 Dr. Jeb, V.C, Surgeon, Assistant -Surgeon M*M aster, V.C., and Lieu- 
tenant and Adjutant MACPttERSON, V.C, 78th Highlanders, attending to the 
wounded at Lucknow. 

43 Captain Commebell, R.N., V.C, destroying forage on the Sivash, in the Sea 
of Azoff. 

44 Captain Watson, V.C, 1st Puiyaub IiTegular Horse, gallantry of. 

45 Liirutenant Baker, V.C, Bengal Police Battalion, attacking rebels at 
Suhejnee, nea» Peroo, 27th September, 1858. 

46 Serjeant SMITH, V.C, Bengal Sappers and Miners, blowing in the Cashmere 
gate of Delhi. 

47 Bugler Hawthorne, V.C, 52nd Regiment, binding up the wounds of Ueu- 
tenant Salkeld, under fire. 

48 Lieutenant R. M. Rogers, V.C, 44th Regiment, and Private M'Dougall, 
V.C, 67th Regiment, and Lieutenant Lenon, V C, storming the North Takn fort in 
China. ^ 

49. Lieutenant Burslen, V.C, 67th Regiment, and Private Lake, V.C, opening 
a breach in the wall of the North Taku fort. 

50 Captain Crowe, V.C, 78th Regiment, first to enter the redoubt at Bourzeker 
Chowker, 12th August, 1857. 

51 Lieutenant Brown, V.C, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers, r^seuing a womidied 
soldier at Narrivoul, 16th November, 1867» 

52 T^E Battle of Inkb^han, 






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m 



PAINTW03 m WATBJk COIaOIJES. 



PAINTINGS IN WATER COLOURS. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN. 
^ Room off South Ck>rridor. 



OOLLINGWOOD. W. 
1 Lkvxn's Hall, Wbbimobkland, 




£ 


FAI7IiE37ER, J. 
8 Tepi jAnET, near Woodlands, - 
8 Thi Suoab Loat Mountain, Co. Wioklow, - 
BTm^WEGEN. P. (Municli). 
8a. Studxes of Still Ld-b, (in three frames), 


B. Wakh, Esq, 
E. WaU\ Eiq. 

Each, 3 


NICHOLS. 0. W. 
8» A Soroa, 


. 


7 


DILLON, W. 

3q CO^BT SOINB, HOWTH, - . - - 




6 


8TANM0RE, H. 
4 7^ Cabbaba Mountain, from Spezi% - 




£ 8. 
3 3 


HAYES, M. ANGEIiO. 
p 'PBfl Bold ^oldibb Bot, 

ANSDELL, B. 

P jSPAJII^ AND PlGBON^ - - * - 


Jo8^h White, E9%. 




BURTON, P. W. 
7 Study— The Bbidb op Cobinth, 






NAPTEL. P. J. 
8 Pobtelet Habboub, Guebnset, 


Captain Hartky 




L5IGHT0N, P. 
9 Teb Sxvbn Acuftt Qv Man, 






HUNT, W. HOW^N. 
10, 1^ '^B^ ^tudob (in dialk), • - - 




' 


BHAJftPS, m» E. 

11 Chbtbi RAisnra thb Widow's Son, 






PALIVTER, S. 
18 -Thb Gampa€Wa, - 






HERWEGEN. P. (M«iioh) 
13a Studies oi- Still Life (m three frames), 
burton, p. w. 
14 Study of a Peasant of the Cahfaona, 






ANSDELL, R. 
i 15 Sbtteb and Black Cook, 




• 


RAYNOB» 8. 







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m 



17 Thb Gk>LX»rir A4]|u^Deftigni of ptAni^ em to^a ^ QHii 

Gallery, Kilkenny Caatie), 



f^AlTLMElt, J. 

18 Ted Sbvew Chubohes, Glbndalouoh, - 

19 KiLLoriBT Bat, Co. Dublin, 

jto Blaok Gastijb, . . . - 

KllflitlKCF, G. b: 
21 ESQUDIALT, Vancouver's Island, - 

iiA^^otroflfi'. & c. B. 

SIa Lasdsoapb, - - / " , " 

BTiATTR, W. 
2lB Queen CAXHEBim'a Vision, - 

BUBA, G. (Naples). 
21c Neapolitan GostuUbs (four studies), - 

BOSSOLI, 0. (Turin). 



JONBB, T. A. 
TUBN£B» J. U. W. 
COLUNGWOOB, W. 

BUETON, P. W. 
JONES, T. A. 



21i> Sea Fieoe, 

22 The Letteb, 

23 liA BtSUbS^ 

24 Gn tmb Bhinb, 

25 IlfTBBi«B, 

26 The Widow of Wohlm, 
26a Buds of Pbomisb, 

27 Pont Abbbolasltn, North "^aies, 

MULBENIN, B. 
27a Molly Asthobb, - - - 

TIBEY. 

28 Chbist Blbssinq Little Childbbw, 

OOIiLINGWOOB, W. 

29 LiVBBPOOL, - - - • 

JONES, T. A 

80 Maboubrite in the Cathbdbal/ 

80a Good Evenin<»^ " " ' * 

VAEIiEY, J. 

81 Punstanbobough Castle/, 

BU KOYEB^ €b Vr 
32 Vuwr PitoH Baiar Head, - 



6. WcM, J^. 



^r T\^eniworih ikOU, iart. 



Each 2 10 



15 



— TiU, Esg^ 
MidsRMMon. 



30 



£ tu 

10 10 



167 10 
£ 
25 
30 



Tf . F. E. MiUi, Esq^, 



10 



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178 



PAINTINGS IN WATBE OOLOtTBB. 

Boom oft South Comiloir. 



^^ 



POLLEN, J. H, 

33 RBADiNa GiBL— (Study for wall pamtiog, Kilkenny Custlo), 

GELDES, J. ' £ 

34 On THi Whabfe, Yobkbhirx, - - 8 

HEEWEGEN, P. (Munick). 

34a Poub Spscimins of Illuminatino ok Pabohmsnt, Each 3 

PITZPATBICE, E. 

36 Studies of Ibibh Pbasantbt, - - 10 

COLUNGWOOD, W. , £ >. 

36 Nblson at Yarmouth, .... 167 10 

BAYNOB, S. 

37 The Lenten Meal, - - ,, ., 

HABDING, P. D. / '' 

38 Bbtwts-t-Coed Mill, . - - . Antmio Brady, Esq, 

BBENNAN, M. G. (Rome.) £ 

39 Vine Abboue at Capbi ... 30 

FEILBING, 0. 

40 Loch Etive, .--.-. 

PETBIE, G., LL.d; 

41 In the Island of Sktb, - - - 

GAUTHOBP, Miss H. 

42 Nbab Tbefbibw, No'rth Wales, 

VAELEY, J. 

43 Holt Island, - • 

HAYES, G. £ s. 

44 At Gapel Cubig, .... 55 

NASH, J. 

45 Intebiob of the Bodleun Libbabt, Oxfobd, Mr. Alderman Spiers, 31 10 

PBOUT, S. 
^ 46 NuBEMBEBOy - - - - ^ ' T. Agnew ^ Sons, 

^ HABDING, P. D. 

47 Bolton Abbet and Woods, - - - Antonio Brady, Esq, 

BISI, L. (ItaUan). £ 

48 Intebiobs of the Chubch at Bbou, Ain, Fbance, 20 

BAETHOLOMEW, V. 
48 Flowebs, • • - . - . Joseph White, Esq, 

LEAB, E. 

50 Flobence, Villa Petraja, • • - Cfountess of Wdld^a^. 

51 Thebmopylae, - - ► - - Countess of Waldegrave* 

PAULKNEB, J. 

52 Poul-a-Nass Watebfabl, Glendalough, • - E, Walsh, Esq, 
68 Tn NoBi OF Ho^^TH, • • - • - i?. WMhi Etq. 



W, Stakes, M,J), 



W, F, R, Mills, Esq, 



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1»AINTINGS m WATER COLOUBS. 

Koom off South Corridor. 



173 



williams, 0. p. 
64 Tbawlebs at Besb, Dsvon, 

BUETON, F. W. 
66 Thb Msstino ok thb Tubbet Staibs, - 

GILLIES, M. 
67 A Wounded Page beought Home to his 



Fatheb's Hall, 

CALLOW, W. 

68 Falls of the Bhinb at Sohaffhausen, 

BABTHOLOMEW, lira. V. 

69 AuTXJMH Fbuit, . . - - - Joseph WJiUe, Haq. 

NEWTON, A. 

60 Mountaie Gloom— Pass of Glenooe, - 

STOCEDALE, W. C. (Florence). 

61 FOBO BOMAKO, - 

FAULKNEB, J. 

62 BivEB Scene, Dabole, - - - - E. Walsh, Esq. 

MEADOWS, J. E. 
62a The Ghost, 

BABTOLOZZI, P. 

63 Two Chalk Drawings of Summeb and Spbino, - Robert Boyle, Esq. 

HEEWEGEN, P. (Munich) 
63a Specimen of Illuminating, - 

FOSTEB, B. 

64 GiBL AT A Stile, - ^ - 

TUBNEB, J. W. M. 
66 Lanoastbb, 

PHILLIP, H. W. 

66 A Chief of Aiaideh Tbibe, 

SETMOUB, B. G. 

67 Loch Venachab, Pebthshibe, - 

HEBBEBT, J. B. 

68 Dandolo, - - - - - 

THOMPSON,. C. 
68 On the Debwent, Bebbtshibe, 

OAKLEY. 

70 Italian Boy, .... - Captain Hartley, 

WHITIAEEB, J. W. 

71 Landscape, . - - - ' W. J, Conlan, Esq, 

HAYES, E. 

72 Ar Fbesh Bbeeze, - - - - W,J, Conlan, Esq. 

WILLIAMSON, F. 

73 Sfbiho, i • • - - . - W, /. CofUan, Esq, 



/. W. Knight, Esq, 
C, Prater, Esq, 



£ B 
262 10 

£ 
90 



- 10 
250 

14 



£ B. 

12 12 



£ 

5 



Digitized by 



Google 



H • 



174 



^5 

4 



PAINTINGS IN WATEB C0I-0UE8. 

Hoom off ^outh Corridor. 





BIOHABDSON, T. M. 




74 Italian Lake, - 


LEWIS, J. ^ 


Captain Hardey, 


76 Camels ts thi Dssebt^ - 


' Cfharlea LomgUm, Etq. 




BiSl, M!. (Milan)'. 


£ 


76 Landsoafb and Fioubbs, 


20 




TtLOvmm, c. 




77 Edwinstowb, ifOTTS, 


OAKtiTlY. 


5 


78 Savotabd, 


vmnTSiXEii 3. W. 


Cfdpiain MHhy, 


79 liAnm^Ays, 


DlTNVTAir. 


W.I^Cml4n,'E8i. 


80 Sba Piece, 


- • ^ « 
EILBUBNE, 0. 0« 


W. J. Cwikm, &i. 


81 Baby's Fibst Fbock, 


EOBEKTS, D, 


' W.J.Conkin^Efq. 


82 Island ov Pehke, 


PHILLIP, H. W. 




83 Shebifi, an Abysiniaxiy 


. 






COLUNGWOOI), W. 


£ 8. 


84 Eably &bsson£v 


■ - - • 
HAYES. G. 


47 15 


84a Capbl Cabig Bbidge, North Wales, 


5 




CBESWETJ,, G. . 


t 


85 LouoH Ebnb, 


PEOUT^ S. 


4 i 


86 Antwebp, 


• « • 
NOWLAN, P. 


. J.N.C.ThrelfalhSsi. 


87 The Young Mothbb, 


- - - 


- NiUson ffandcock, LL.R 




MEADOWS, J. E. 


£ 


88 Thb Coast, near Folkestone, 


10 


\ 


HAYES. JS. 




89 Babbt, thb Painteb, 


IN HIS Studio, - 


M, Angdo Hayes. 30 




DOY^E, H. E. 


1 


90 Pobtbait of the Late Cabdinal Wiseman, 






STANMOBE, H. 


£ t. 


91 Evening on thb Wti 


c, 

JONES, T. A. 


7 10 


92 A LiMBBIOK I/ASS, 


. 








^ • 



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T^kmrnSOS 3CN WATER £10L0UBS. 
Boom oii; Sooth Coarridor. 



17« 



95 MoRNiKa^ 



lAYixm, A ^. 



$6 FOXOLOYM IN A Woop, - 

BUETGN, F. W. 

97 I03TBPHANK, - - - - 

98 A Flowbe, . - - - 

EOWBOTHAM, T. Ii. 

99 Italian Lake, . - - - 
99a The Novice, . . - - 

HAYES, M. ANGELO. 

100 The Late Eael op Caklisle, 
100a The BiIlet, . - - - 
100b Landscape and Cattle, 

WALKER, P. 

101 Scene prom Thackebat's "PgiLip," - 

TAYLOE, A H. 

102 Evening, - - - - - 

BURTON, F W. 

103 PoRTBAiT OP Miss Meadows Taylob, - 

DHiLOK, W. 
103a In the Long Range, K-ILLabnby, 
]L03b View on the Lippbt, ixear Palmerston, 
1030 Ross Castle, Killamey, 

PHILLIP, H. W. 

104 GiBGiz Fanous— A Copt, 

STAKMOBE, H. 

105 Redbbook on the Wte, 

GBESSW^ILq, 6. 

106 TJpPEB Lough Ebne, 

ROBERTS, B. 

107 Mechlin, 

BURTON, F. W. 
106 Yelitza, , . - - 

MBABQWS, J. E. 
109 Shbimpebs, 

DURA, a. (NaplQs), 
^P9f Piazza da Pobto, Neapolitan Costtunes, 

GRESWE^i, 0. 
J.1Q LowEB Lough Ebne, . 

LEROEA V. <NorwegiMi) 
111 InTKBIOB OV TEX OaTBIEDBAL OJt DBONTSBZir, 



E. W. Field, Esq. 

Antonio Brady, Esq. 
— ffoQ/rCf Esq, 



Q. DcUziel, Esq, 



Ca^t. M. Taylor. 



W. Leaf, Esq. 



£ 
20 
^15 



15 

15 

5 



£ B. 

710 
4 4 



10 ID 
17 

e s 



Digitized by 



Google 



[FT ' • Tl 



i I 



l 






I 



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17e ABOHITECTURAL DRAWIKG6. 

Boom off SouUi CJorridor. 



ARCHITECTXJRAIi DRAWINGS. 

Water Colour Koom. 
TTJRNEE, E. 
140 Prize Design for Carlisle Bridge, Four Drawings, 

DEAKE, T. N. 
J41 The Picture Gallery, Kilkenny Castle, 

M'CAETHY, J. J. 

142 Monaghan Cathedral, - - - . 

GOLDEE, G. 

143 St. Patrick's Church, Bandon. 

144 St. Wilfred's Church, York, - ^ - ' - 

BAEEE, W. J. 

145 ROXBOROUGH, - - , - . 

SLATEB, W. 

146 KiLMORE Cathedral, - . . . 

147 Sherborne Abbey, - - . . 

CAEROLL, J. R. 

148 Designs for Churches, 

POLLEN, J. H. 

149 Design for a Timber and Plaster Ceiling, - 

<;^OLDIE, G. 

150 Interior of St, Peter's Church, Phibs^orough, Dublin, 

151 Church of St. Mary, Greenock, - . - 

152 Design for the Church of SS. Peter and Paul, Berne, 

Switzerland, ---... 

BASES, W. J. 

153 Drumglass — Dungannon, 

154 Provincial Bank of Ireland, Belfast, 

155 Whitworth Hall, Drogheda, - 

156 Cbozber Memorial, Banbridge, - - 

SOUTTAE, J. i 

157 New English Church at Stockholm (two drawings in one frame), 5 

M*CAr.THY, J. J. 

158 Design for the Catholic University, 

GEOGHEGAN, C. 

159 Spire to the Chapel at Blanchardstown, - 

GOLPIE, G. 

160 Choib op St. Vincent's Church, Cork, 

CQLDEZir, 0. 

161 Chjuvoil dv Chubcec B.V.M.^ Lanark, Scoilaxu], 



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AECHITEOTURAL DRAWINGS. 



179 



CAEPENTEK, W. S. K. H. 

162 New Chuboh, Crumlin Itoad, :^elfast, - 

163 Bbat X)hubCh, ..... 

PUQIN and ASHLIil. 

164 Desiqn fob the O'Connell Monument, Two Drawings 

JONES, A. G. 

165 Design fob pbofobed Methodist Collsiqe, Belfast, 

StiATllE, W. 

166 IncEBioK Cathedbal^ .... 

"ttTHtAitt and REDFOBD. 

167 Female Dobmitobt ov the Scnooti ifOB i)Eja and DtrMB, 

Old Trafibtd, Mandhester, - . ^ 

168 EiTEBiOB Op Same - . . . 

M'CARTHYi J. J. 

169 KiLBUSH CONyENT, .... 

CARBOUJ, J. B. 

170 Design fob Town Hall, Sligo, • 

GEOGHEGAlir, C. 

171 1)esign fob the O'Connell Monument, - 

LAVERGNJI, (Paris). 

172 Chapel of St. Joseph, Church of St. Martin de Rouhaix, 

GOLDiE, G. 

173 Extebiob of St. P^teb's, Phibsboro, Dnblin, - 

TURNER, T. 

174 Design fob New Town Hall, at Bolton, - 



BRONZES, &c. 

(In Watet Colotir Gallery). 

KISS, G. (Berlin). 

191 ^HE Amazon, group ih bronze and silver, 

WILKE, H. (Berlin). 

192 Bavaria, statuette in bronze, ... 

HABENSGHABEN, 8. (Hnnich). 
193, 194, Herons, in bronze, 
195 Stobk, in bronze, 
1^6 Fox Sitting on the Stump of a T^ee, 

HIRT, T. (Munich). 

197 A Reaper (in iyory), . - - - 

NEUSTATTER (Mnnich). 

198 Batabia, after Schwanthaler (in silyer gUt), 



£ 
54 



25 



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180 



ENGRAVINGS. 



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PHOTOGRAPHY. 181 



PHOTOQRAPHT. 

South BoQms, near Befreshment Department. 

[The Foreign contributions are incorporated with the British, but they are distinguished 
by the name of the country or city being annexed.] 

1 to 59 in West room. 

1 NoBTH, T. 71 Grafim at, DttWiw.— Enlarged photograph, finished in oil 
colours; enlarged photograph on artists' canvas, ready for painting (untouched); 
photoirraphs, portraits, cartes-de-visite, vignettes, &c. , . , t , 

2 Chancellor, J. 65 Lower SachviUe s<.— Photographs, plam and coloured. 

3 Brothebs; a. 14 St. Ann's sq. Manchester.— Phoiogr&phs taken with the 

matmesium light. » « , j ,^ . i 

4 Beau, A. 283 Regent st. Jjyndon.—ThreB frames of enlarged photographs ; 
two do. of cartes-de-visite ; four do. studies from life ; passepartout. (See No. 57.) 

5 WoBTLBT, Col. S. Bosslyn House, Orove End road, Zowdow.— Specimens of 
photographic printing by the Wothlytype process, in two frames. ^ ^^ „ ^ 

6 The United Association op Photogbapht (Limited), 213 Jlegent st, 
ioTwZon.— Photographs on paper, ivory, and wood, printed by the Wothlytype process, 
in six frames. 

7 Bedfobd, p. London. — Portraits and studies. 

8 Halpobd, 0. a. D. 14 Chapel st. Grosvenor sq, London^ TF.— Stereoscopic 
^ewsat Dytchley, Oxon, the seat of Viscount DiUon, and at Ventnor, Isle of Wight— 
the latter instantaneous. ^.w,i^ -,. 

9 Bailey, W. R. D.D. the Jtectonj, ilfowaflrAaw.— Eight photographic views, 

and six portraits from life. ^ _. ,.„ ^ , ttt -n _j. -x j ^ j 

10 Matjll & Poltblank, 187a PiccadtUy, London, IT.— Portraits and cartes-de- 

viEdte, in six frames. ^ , «... » , , , 

11 Claudet, a. P.R S. 107 Regent st. London.— Portraits enlarged by solar 
camer-a, and developed by gallic acid ; portraits developed by Mr. H. Claudet's instan- 
taneous formic acid process ; medallion portraits ; fi^me containing twenty-four 
carte-de-visite portraits. ^ , .„ ^ ,,. o. . i. i 

12 Nelson & Mabshall, 11 Upper Sachville st. Ihihhn.—^^ecamejia of solar 

photography; cajtes-de-visite. _ ,,. ^.^ , , , , . v 

13 Robebtson & Co. 3 Qraftm st. 2)ttW*«.— Fifteen untouched photographic 
portndts ; sixteen untouched brooch and locket photographic portraits. 

14 The London Stebeoscopio and Photoqbaphio Co.— Photographs in three 

frames. (See No. 86.) v • *i. t,. 

15 SiMONTON, J. 69 Grafton st. DulUn. — Photographs m three frames. 

16 Joubebt, F. 86 Porchester terrace, W, London.— Portrsits, cartes-de-visite, 
and views, done with wet collodion. ,„ , , « i ^ ± t. x-xi j 

17 SiLVT, C. 38 Porchester terrace, W. London.— Twelve photographs entitled, 
"Album of the F6te Champ^tre at Orieans House;" portraits; photographs on 
enamel by the Lafon de Camarsac process. ^ . . . , 

18 Clabk W. 27 Pa/rk st, Bristol, — Cartes-de-visite and portraits, m six frames. 

19 SoHBOBDEB, G. 28 Grafton st, Dublin.— Yovjc pictures in water colours; one 
fiwme of plain photographs. ^ ,,. ^, ,. . 

20 MiLLABD & Robinson, 89 Lower Sachvdle st. Dubhn.—Fhotogr&phic views, 
&c. ; specimens of photo-printing in carbon, and on enamel. (See No. 97.) 

21 Beaupobd & Bbuce, ^ii^CTini/.— Photographic views of Ireland. 

22 Sebgeant, Miss, 88 Cheapside, London, JS.C, — Coloured portraits. 

23 Matall, J. E. 224 and 226 Regent st. Zowdow.— Photographic portraits of 

eminen^p^^^^.^^ Fi^a^ Byeres, Var, i^mwcc— Untouched photographs " enlarged." 
25 Robinson, J. 65 Grafton st j^wft^m,— Portraits, coloured and plain ; Siamese 



cartes. 



26 Boas, J. E. -Fdin^wrflr^i,— Photographs, plain and coloured, by the collodion 
process. (See No. 68.) 



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182 



PHOTOGBAPHY. , 

SoTith Booms, near Eefreshineiit Department. 



I * 



27 Cbanfikld, T. Orafton at i)M&K».— Photographs coloured in oib 
^ . ^^?. HoBSBUBOH, J. 17 PHnces at Edinbwrgh,-^BuBta enlarged to life-size, and 
finished in water-colour and crayons j portraits ; photographs ; cartes-de-visite ; ZtAbr 
from paintings and engravings. ' ^ 

29 Wabxbb, W.^. ^aa, fffr^(yrdakire.-^^h(^m§i» mjfiwframes, consisting 
of enlarged photograph coloured in oils. (See No. 65.) * 

Txr ®^ n^^S™^? IMBTITOM IfQB Tfll TBAIl«|lft AKD EmPLOTMEWP 4>W MdTJQASSB 
Women, 25 MoHsaworik at. Dublin. — Coloured portraits. 

. ^^^ Hbnnah & KeUt, 108 King's road, Brighton, >S'ws«ea;.— One frame of ptfrtraitg 
of officers of the 9th Lancers. (Sed'l^o. 110.) ^ *«Miie 01 ponraus 

32 Cambboi^, Mrs. Isle of TFigr^e.— Portrait^. (See l^o. B8 ) ' 
^3 MabeSj F. 79 (Trc^ficm at. Dublin.— JJntovLclied photographs (See No 7fi \ 

34 Johnson, & Co. Xeom%^fm.— Portraits: (See !N"os SSiiJd 98 ) - ' 

35 Coopp, H. JUN. 5 ^Sercie^ pari, Highbury, Zonc?<m.— Photpiraphic por- 
traits and studies (vet collodion process) ; cartes-de-visite. in four frames ^ 

in onf LSiTrm ^tL^'^ST. ?7? ^^'^^ ^-^-Twent/phptP^p^ 

inone^Lt^.TseTNo^^^^^ 

38 Wane, M. Project hill, Douglas, /f?«-o/-ifa^.^Phptogwp}iip portraitg 
cartes de-visite^ and vignettes, in one frame. ^''^pr*^ i'"**^^***^, 

^ v,^^ TwTMAN, J. C. 87 High st. Ramsgate, Kent.—V^rix^i^' ^^^ coHodion. 
double printing ; portrait and study, wet collodion. + Vf ♦'iiw , yr&T^ co^i^c^ 

hoto*^Ts^^°™^^^* Photographic Society, ^4 Midgefid^^ MancTmte^^Y^'^^^ 

4X WiNPow & Bridge, 63a Baler st. London, PT.— One frame of "Diflmoml 
cameo" portraits. ^-™t-^ m* ^t^i^^t^m 

42 Lawrence, J. 39 6^a/to7i st. i>t^6?m.-Carte:de-Tisite'pertraita • lawre-siM 
photographs m oil colours ; diamond cameo portraits. * *«>fKo-Biiw 

43 M'Lean & Habs, 7 HayTmrket, Lond/m, iS.^.— pntouched porlraita. 

44 Hanson, W. Xee^fo.— Vignetted portraits. (See No. 105 ) ^ "^^^^ » 

45 Cpx, A. W. & H. 11 St. Jams at. Notti^ham.^Ono fr9m^ pf portraits, 
cartes-de-visite, 4cc., fakep by wet coUodion process, iron development rSee No Toi 

48 Mawson & Swan, 9 and 13 Moaley at. NewcaaOe-v^qn-Tin^i-Jr^fZ^ 
opal glass, by the Simpsontype process; portrait and three landscapes, bv &i^ 
patent carbon process. (See No. 114). ^'^VY'^i W fPfttmJk 

47 Lo<j & WmTPiELD 178 R^ent st. Zondon.-^riY^ photographic mimaiwaiL 

J^f^^=g^lr^^^^^^^^ 

cartesldl^X"^'' ^' ^' ^^ C^»^cm6^.ry i^ar^, ^oz^^A, l<^ndcm, i^.^P^^g^aphg and 
60 Close, A. p. — Coloured photograph. 

60 Poster, P. Le Neve, London.— Twelve portraits in cme ^«me. 
On Table in Wes|; ;rooxn. 

r.y^ ^^ iNTlffiNATIONAL PhoTOSOULPTUBE CoVPANT (LimITBP). WiiUikegt^ Wn,,^ 

p~f ptot^^^^^ ^^-^^^^^^^ ^^i ^^^^^':T^fz 

patenf Jro^ctT"^"''''^" ^' ^^ ^"''^ """*'' i^>nc^.-^ix minHtuina, Swan'a 

63 Helsbt, W. G. 34 CWc^^. -^*««rP^Z.-Thirty newJy iny«niedhflKoaristo. 
typia miniatures, m one case. v ♦«'»«•«* uaiiowisiK)- 

|4 SCHAUEB, Gdstav, Berlin.^Two books of photqgi»phfi. 
55 La Tour de Mabne.— Book of photographs 

i^dapted for making double copies of engraving! ^^^^ '^"'^ «BpeciaUy 



i 




PHOTOGRAPHY. 183 

Bonth Booms, near Refireshment Department. 

61 to 114 in Central room. 

61 Good, F. M. Western road, Hovey .^ri^Atoik-^Photogn^hs and rtereogmpbio 
yiews, in t6n frames. 

62 Bbownrioo, T. M. Constabulary Office, Castle, i>M6/i7i. —Photographs by 
the collodion process ; twenty -five frames. 

63 MoBOANi J. H. Parklands, Clifton^ near Bristol, — Eighteen i^otographs. / 

64 JocELYN, Viscountess. — Groups and landscapes. 

65 Wahner, W. H. Ross, Merrfordshire, — ^Photographs nntonohed, by the wet 
collodion process. (See No. 29.) 

66 Sanderson, W. D. 2 Mulberry st. Manchester. — Photogr^hio and stereo- 
scopic views — all by the collodio-albumen process. (See No. 143.) 

67 M*Lban & Haes, 7 HaymarJcet, London, S.W. — Untouched portraits, and 
stereograms of wild animals. (See No. 43.) 

68 Ross, J. 90 Princes st, Edinburgh. — Two frames of photographs taken from 
life, by the collodion process. (See No. 26.) 

69 Fall, J. W. Ironbridge, Shropshire, — Twenty-four photographs, being a series 
of views near CoalbrookdaJe, Shropshire, in two frames. 

70 Wilson, Sib T. M. Babt. Charlion House, London, iS^.^.— Landscapes, por- 
traits, &c. in one frame. 

71 Gbioqs, W. India Museum, London. — Photographs. 

72 Cox, A. W. and H. St, James^ st. Nottingham — Views of English scenery, by 
the wet collodion process, in two frames. (See No." 45.) 

73 Vebsohotlb, H. W. Lieut. -Col. Grenadier Guards, 23 Chapel st. £dgrav6sq. 
Zondon.^—** Studies from Nature," , coUodio-albumen, printed by the Wothlytype 
process ; Views of the Alhambra, collodio-albnmen., 

74 PiPEB, J. D., 24 Silent st. /pwwcA.— Landscapes, &o. by the wet collodion 
process, in one frame. 

75 Lowe, E. J. F.R.A.S. F.L.S. &c. Observatory, Beeston, near Nottingham^*-' 
Frame of stereoscopic pictures, from dry plates of collodio-albumeo. 

76 Maebs, F. 79 Qrafton st. Jjiublin. — UntoHched photographs, consisting of 
cabinet and stereoscopic landscapes, views of Irish scenery, in seven frames. (See 
No. 33.) 

77 Rijlandbb,, O. G. Maldonroad, London»^-Two frames of i^otographs from 
nature. (See No. 36.) 

78 GiLLis, T. 10 Bue d'Etigny, Paw.— Ten photographic views in the Pyrenees ; 
four of them executed by " Major Russell's tannin process." 

79 Amatbub Photogbafhio Asbooiaiion, 12 Ywrh place, London, IF.— Seventeen 
frames of prize pictures. 

80 WiNOFiBiiD, Hon. L. 87 Groavener square, London.— Yiews in England and 
Ireland. 

81 Caithness, Earl. of, 17 BiU st, London^ — ^Photographic views of Winter 
scenes ; a road locomotive. 

82 Bullock, Beothebs, 20 Lower pa/rade, Leami'Mtton, Warwickshire, — Photo* 
graphs fromlife, *' Good Tidings," and "Nearing Home. 

83 Heath, V. 43 Piccadilly, London. — ^Nine frames containing twenty-seven 
photographs of landscapes, &c. 

84 Sedoeield, W. R. Park road Norbiton, Kingston-on-Thames. — Eight views at 
Killamey, by the wet collodion process. (See No. 139.) 

86 Penny, G. S. liRodney-ierrace, Cheltenham. — Four photographic landscapes, 
by the tannin and malt preservative process. (See No. 138.) 

86 L0ND02T Stebeoscopio and Photographic Company. — ^Twelve frames of 
prize pictures. (See No. 14.) 

87 Cubbie, F. E. Lismore Castle, Liimore, — Eight photographic views. 

88 Oambbow, Mb8. Freshwater Bay, Isle of Wight-^rou^ps ; portraits, &c., in 
four frames. (See No. 32.) 

89 HsMFHiLL, W. D. M.D. CUmmel, co, IV^perory.^-Twenty photographs from 
nature* 

90 Haines, H. 82 Cfrwid pwrade, CbrX;.— Untouohed pbotographio vioWB of 
Iriah loenery, taken by the wet coUodioti proQeMu uritfa^ ^XQ^ iffH^QJ^vm^ 9i^i PTTq* 



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184 PHOTOGRAPHY. 

South Rooms, near Refreshment Department. 

91 Wabdlkt, G. 10 8t Ann's sq, Manchester, — Six photographa by the coUodio- 
albmuen process. 

92 How, J. 2 Foster lane, London, — Photographs of microscopio objects, hm. 
negatives by Dr. Maddox, in three frames. 

93 Howie, W. Scmthport, Lancashire, — Photographs of the Lancashire Huasars, 
in two frames. 

94 RoucH, 180 Strand, London, W.C, — Landscapes, statnary, &c., insixframeB. 
96 Abkbobombik, J. M.D.and Wilson, E. T. M.B. — Photomicrographs in two 

fitimes (taken by artificial light). 

96 M*CoMAS, W. Melbowme. — Five photographs, in frames, 

97 Millard A Robinson, 39 Lower Sackville st, Dublin, — Views, specimenaof 
photo-printing in carbon and on enameL (See No. 20.) 

98 Johnson k Company, Leamington. — ^Three frames of views in Devonshire. 
(See Nob. 34 and bQ.) 

99 Bkasley, F. 30 Upper JffarrdUon terrace, St. John's fooody Z<m(^.-Sii 
photographic views taken by the Fothergill dry process. 

100 Jones, B. Selhirh villa, Cheltenftam. — Six photographs by the tannm and 
malt process. 

101 CooHiLL, SiB J. J. Babt. Glen Barrahane, Castletownsend, Shihherm.^ 
Twelve views in the neighbourhood of Castletownsend in three frames. 

102 CoLLis, J. 2 Richmond terrace, Bamsbury road, London, N. — ^Tbe Descent 
from the Cross, a copy of a bas-relief in stone by Josd Bellver, untouched photograpli 
by the wet collodion process. 

103 Fbith, F. Jun. Brightlamds, Reigate, Surrey,— -Twentj-f our pictures of 
English landscape, architecture, &c., in six frames. 

104 Hill & Saunders, Oxford, Eton, and London. — Photographs, in two frames. 

105 Hanson, W. Greai George st, Leeds^Yignetted portraits, and Bolton Abbey, 
Yorkshire, in two frames. (See No. 44.) 

106 Bedfobd, F. 326 Camden road, London, N, — ^Twenty photographs in twenty 
frames. 

107 England, W. 7 St. Jameses sq. Notting hill, London, TT.— Cabinet d 
stereoscopic photographs of Switzerland and Savoy, taken by the wet collodioi 
process, in four fi-ames. 

108 Robinson, H. P. Leamington. — Photographs from nature, in eleven frames. 
lt)9 Annan, T. Glasgow, — ^Ravenscraig Castle, by the wet collodion procesg. 

(See No. 37). 

110 Hennah & Kent, 108 King's rd. Brighton, — Enlarged portraits of dogs, in 
four frames. (See No. 31.) 

111 MUDD, J. 10 St. Ann's sq, Manchester, — Photographs, in twenty frames, by 
the collodion-albumen process. 

112 Mabion, a. Son, & Co. 23 Soho square, London, — ^Nine photographs by 
Thurston Thompson, from Turner pictures in the National Gallery ; three photograph 
from Turner pictures, coloured in water colours. 

113 Bbebse, C. S. Acock's green, near Birmingham. — Instantaneous stereoscopic 
transparencies on glass, of ^clouds, waves, moonlight effects, &c. 

114 Mawson & Swan, 9 Mosley st, iVetoccwtS-on- jTywc.— Specimens of enamelling, 
with enamel collodion. (See No. 46). 

121 to 167 in £aat room. ^ 

121 PaNHABD, Bbothbbs, Paris. — Four photographs in frames. 

122 Duvbttb, a. Paris, — Photograph of flea, ma«iified ; views, three fraqjes. 

123 JouBBBT, F. Porches^ terrace, Baystvater, London, W. — Six photognpk 
(See No. 16.) 

124 Blanch ABD, V. Camden Cottage, London, — Seven photographs* 

125 RoussBTT, J. near Paris. — Fifteen photographs. 

126 Thompson, C.T., Campdenhill, Kensington, London, W. — Seven photograplis. 

127 Bebbkgbb, Mabquis se, Pam.^Photographa from engravings ; views IrofD 
naivre* 

128 Albkbt, J. Jlfwrnc^.—Twenty-three photographs from pictureB, 
las ViSBJM'S^ £, j&mse^^.— Twenty-eight phoV%r8fp)Mi pM, piG^mii 



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PHOTOGRAPHY— FOEEIGN. 185 

So«th Booms, near Befreahment D^>arfcment. 

180 KoBN, W. & Co.— Two photographs. 

131 DoMMEiSB & 'Hmjvf, London, — ^Two views on the Bhine ; one of the cathe« 
dml of Cologne. 

132 Three coloured photographic views in Venice. 

133 Albebt, J. Afwnic^.— Photograph from design for an altar-piece, by Knabl. 

134 BoTTGEB, G. Munich, — ^Threq photographs from designs for altar-pieces, by 
J. Knabl. 

136 Adams, B. Munich, — Thirty photographs, copies from paintings, in eight 
frames. 

186 "ViALABDi, Turin. — Photographs of the Canale Cavour, in eleven frames. 

137 Wabdlow, a. H. MoterU at London, — ^Three photographs by the collodio- 
albmnen process. 

138 Penny, G. S. Cheltenham, — Photograph, by the tannin and malt process, 
one frame. (See No. 85.) 

139 Sedgfikld, B. Park road, Norbiton. — ^Two photographs, by the wet collodion 
process. (See No. 84.) 

140 Baven, Bev. T. M. Scruton Rectory, j^edale, Yorkshire, — ^Twelve photo- 
graphs, waxed paper and collodion process. 

141 Bull, J. Anglesey villUf Painswick road, Cheltenham, — Eight photographs 
in two frames. 

142 BossB, Countess of. — Eight photographs, waxed paper and collodion. 

143 Sandebson, W.D. Manchester, — Four photographs in one frame. (See 
N"o. 66.) 

144 Watkins, H. Regent st. London, W, — Five photographs of winners of rifle 
niatche9, by the collodion process. 

146 Bbookmann, F. O. Dresden, — ^Ten photographs in frames, from original 
pictures in the Dresden Gallery. 

146 Hanfstaenol, H. Dresden. — ^Ten photographs in frames, from pictures by 
Murillo, at Seville, and from pictures in the Dresden Gallery. 

147 Hon. St, V. Ainiens. — Six photographs in one frame. 

148 BussELL, Major. — Fifteen photographs in one frame. 

149 Hawabdbn, Viscountess. — Five photographic studies. 

150 Babbi & Cinotti, Gubhio (Umbria), Italy. — Thirteen copies of old inscrip- 
tions, by the dry collodion process. 

161 BoNOALLi, Count A. Bergamo, Italy. -^Three photographs of microscopic 
objects, enlarged. 

162 Sommeb jb Behlbs, iVopZe*.— Ten photographs. 

163 DUBONI, Lonooni Dbll'Aoqua, Milan, — Enlarged photographs. 

164 Inoobpoba, G. Palermo, — Four frames of cartes-de-visite. 
166 Pbtaona, M. Romje, — ^Panorama of Bome, from Tasso's oak. 

166 Lusweboh, G. Rome, — Sixteen photographs. 

167 Tanmot, L. Zyorw.— Four photographs. 

168 CuBENiUB, W. A. and Quibt, P. L. Stockholm. — Eight photographs. 

169 Lite, F. W. Bagneres de Bigorre, Hautes Pyrenees, Aoticc— Sixteen pho- 
tographic landscapes in the Pyrenees, wet collodion — phosphate of soda. 

160 Bbown, — . — ^Nine photographs in landscapes, collodion process. 

161 Smith, J. S. — Photographs from paper negatives. 

162 Austbian Museum of Industbt. — Photographs in albums of mediaeval 
clerical robes.— (On Stamd) 

163 Chiafslla, F. M. Tmn.— Seven photographs of pictures, executed by the 
albumen process, wiUiout enlargement ; two views of railway stations ; three maps. 

164 TUMINILLO, L. Ti{rm.-^Photographs, in seven frumes. 

166 DsBOCHB & Hetlavd, iftton.— Seventeen photographs of the railways of 
Lombardy. 

166 Galli, 0. Jfitofi.- Twenty-one photographic views of the railways of Central 
Italy.— (On Stamd) 

167 Villa, Ionazio, -P/orenoe.— Bight photographs.—^ Stamd,) 

168 Pbtaona, M. i2om€«— Photographa.— (/n RmoM ihwrt^ No, 80.) 

169 Oliviebi, L. i2ome.»Photoffrapbaw — {R^jmkn Courts No. 82.) 

X70 LlviBHOji» J. B, Qit9Ue,^&9XoTiQ9Xi!hoiognyhM,^{C(midi(in Chwt^ No, 78.) 
171 SOWUir, *rw<wif»-Albwn of jmotogriftphiQ viewSf-^iOaWflrftot C(mrt^ 



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OmcIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISES. 



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ESTABLISHED yPWARDS QF SEVENTY YEAR?, 

J. SOaWEPPE ft Co., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

MINERAL WAT1CSRS, 

BY SPECIAL APPOINTM]P^, 

London, Liverpool, Derby, Bristol, and Glasgow. 

Eapb ^ott)^ ui jpi^pjioc^ i)7 a L^bel with the N^e of theur fvpo^, ^^kni( 
which none is genuine. 



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WHOT.KflATiTC AGENTS FOR IREZiAND. 



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Andrews A Co., .Wine Merchants 

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Bray. 



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Daly k De^n, Wine Merchant* 
Backhouse A Bkckham, Wine Ifeichanto 

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Snnis (Clare). 
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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVEBTISEE. 



NOSOTTrS LOOKING GLASSES, 

398, 399, &399a, OXFOBD STREET, W., LONDON. 

MOSOTXrS CARVING AND GILDING OF 
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XAISITORS to LONDON are respectfully invited to inspect 
• this Manufactory, which is worthy of notice. The LOOKING 
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The DECORATIVE DEPARTMENT contains some choice speci- 
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Warehouses, 398, 399, & 399a, Oxford St., 

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OS'SiCtAL tJATALOGUB ADVERTISER. 



WHEELER & WILSON'S 



CELEBRATED 

RIZE MEDAL 
LOCK-STITCH 




Hems, 

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HIGHEST PRIZES AWARDED AT THE 

|]vti:rmatioi%al exhibitiojv, Lojvi^oiir, xsazt 

INDU3TRIAL- EXROS I T" I ON^, RARie^ 1861 
AMEBIOAN INSTITUTE, NEW YOBK, 1865 and 1863^ 
PRUSSIAN EXHIBITIONS: DANTZIC, 1864; KONIGSBERG^ 1864; 
AUSTRIAN EXHIBITIOIVS I UNZ, 1803; AGRAin, 1864 1 KREIMS, I8fl4| 

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ROYAL CORNWALL POLYTECHNIC SOCIETY, 1861; 

LIVERPOOL AND MANCHESTER A6RICULTURAL SOCIETY SHOW, ASHTON, 1861; BIRKENHEAD, 1863; 

ROYAL NORTH LANCASHIRE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY SHOW AUGUST. 1863; 
And at 99 of the Principal Shows in the United l^^tates* 

This Machine claims its superiority over all others from Its range of work, beaatj of finish, nicetl 
and ease of operation, inability to get oat of order, simplicity of construction, and du^rahility of work when 
done; sewing exquisitely the Finest Book or Swiss Muslin, Silk, Linen, Calico, Flannel, or the Thickest 
Cloth. Besides ordinary Sewing, it will Hem (turning its own hem as it stitches). Fell, Quilt Tack. 
Bind, Gather, Cord, Braid Ac The Work of a Dot can be accomplished in One or TWo Houi^ ^^ 

It makes the LOCK STITCH by means of a rotating hook, which is the perfection of stitches 
made by machinery. The stitching has the same appearance on both sides uf the material, and. will not 
"run or ravel;" the stitching is also sufficiently drawn into the work, so that it will not be essIlT 
worn off or cut in ironing. It also makes the stitch with economy ot thread oi ulk, the saxiD« being 
immense when the machines are much used. When required, the stitch can roadsly be adjusted so that 
the work can be easily undone. The success and popularity of this Machine va^ without a parallel in 
the history of inventions, nearly 200,000 having been made and sold. It is WARRIlNTCD 
to be the best Sewing Machine made for Families and all ordinary purposes ; and such is the testimonr 
of the public. Price from £9. ^' 

N.B.— The London Timet of September 19th says:— "The Wheeler and Wilson Machine is the on«} 
best calculated for household work; it makes the lock-stitch by means of a rotating hook whichii 
Interlaces the thread on the under side, and does away with the necesstty ol the shuttle whichi i» 
mmeoessarily noisy in the drawing-room or the boudoir." ' 

Offloes— 130, Begent-street, London. 73, Bold-street, Id verpool;. 

F. BAPTT. 80, Grafton-street, Agent fSr Dublin and Violn/^ty. 
AUKaoMinmwwrranUi, ImirucUan graii$, trotpe$^fmu 

a 



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OFFICIAL CATAliOGUE ADVEETISBK, 



ABOVE 1,000' GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES 

ALWAYS READY FOR SELECTION FROM 

CENTRAL MANUFACTORY, 

Persons who forward their Money may rely oa the best possible Watch by RetMiL 

CHURCH, TURRET, RAILWAY. HOUSE. & DRAWING-ROOM CLOCB. 

?=3 ^ » M CD 

1 "=' ^Ss 

V) 

A R q; 
• 8 M 



S 



Tjunr 



G-entlemen's 

(Supenor London Made") 
( Lever Watches, } 

Ditto Swiss, 



Ml\ i.lC 


GOLD 


QUALITY 


QDALITT 


A 


B 


c 


A 


B 


c 


(?«. 


OS. 


(?«. 


Gs. 


G^a. 


Gs. 


15 


10 


5 


20 


15 


10 


10 


7 


5 


15 


12 


9 


6 


4 


3 


12 


9 


5 



Iiadies' 



<■ Superior London Made") 

t Lever Watches ) 

Ditto Swiss 

Horizontal {^'.«S>U*} 



t»lLVE& 

QUALITT 



BENNETT'S WORKMAN'S SELVER WATOS, S3 3b.; 

Free and safe hy post. 



JOHN BENNETT, 

Maker to the Queen ; to the British and several Foreign Governments; to W 
Admiralty, and to the principal Railway Companies. 

e« una 04, OlDBikPSiQS, LONDON^ %«, 



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GPFrCIAL CATALOGTJE A1>VERTISBR. 



PATENT REfIgE^ING MACHINE, 

IN USE 

FOIJ THE MANUFACTUEE OF ICE, 
EXTRACTION OP PARAFFIN FROM OIL, *o. 

^e Cold ia; produced by the Expansion of Atmospheric Aiy ti-ffOQt THe 

Machine may l?e worked with safety in any situation. 

The Ice produced is quite transparent and solid. 
SOLE MAKERS, 

JOHN NORMAN & CO., 

PUUTENEY^STRE^T. BROOMHjUL, 

JOHN FLINtT 17, ESSEX-QUAYf DUBLIN. 

BY SPECIAL APP01NTMEI(T 

Fishing Tactile Slaniifactiirer to His EsLccllency Lord Wodeh^nse, 

Be^ respectfuliy to refer to his Case in the Exhibition, in Section 29, No. 704, in yrbkih will b« fttind 
Specimens of his Manufactures generally, and also of his latest Improvements. 

THE ONLY "?HIZE IffiEDA-L" 00^:^ FLOUR. 



"M A," 



INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION, l$62. 

(Vide Jurors Report); 

Also First awards at HAMBURG, 1863, N.T., &c., &c. 

MAIZENA wan the article from which the famous Puddings 
Creams, Blanc-manges, &c., of the Great Exhibition were made; 
it is now used in the Dublin Exhibition in the same way, where 
it can be Daily tasted. 



Sold irt Packets^ with full directions for «s^, 6y Grocers^ jDHiggisUf 
ConfeoUonera, Oorn- Chandlers ^ ^c. 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADYEBTISEB. |1 



WASHING MACHINERY. 



''{iomer I2?aj5l)ing Hlacl)inerg. 

As adopted in thb largest Public Establlsliments in London with the most 
eminent Success. 

For Private Families the most useful combined Wasliing, Wringing, 
and Mangling Machines, are — Vowel E, £8 8s. Od., and No. 2, 
£8 8s. Od., which have received upwards of 50 Silver Medals, and 
other First Prizes, including the Liternational (1862) Prize MedaL — 
See Catalogued, pages 10 and 14. 

For Family Mansions, Schools, or Hotels, Vowel 0, £12 12s. Od., 
or No. 4, £12 12s. Od., combined Machines are highly recommended.— 
See Catalogue, pages 11 and 15. 

For Public or Large Private Establishments employing Hand Labour 
only. Vowel W, £15 15s. Od. ; No. 6, £15 15s. Od. ; or Vowel 
Arrangement for Hand, not Steam Power, as above, are speciallj 
adapted. — See Cataloguey Free hy Post, 



ThePatentee Contracts for and can he consulted upon Steam Laundries, 

T&OMAS BEADFOR-D, Patentee, 

MANCKESTER-Cathedral Steps. 
]:A2n)QN^-63« Fl^et-street. DUBUN— 289 DawifOBHrtrM*. 



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^^M., 



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emouL eAXALoaira ASYiBims. 



PRIZE MEDAI 

LONDON INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITM, 

1862. 



BROWN & GREEN'S PATENT RANGE 

Has long been pre-eminent as the most perfect Cooking Apparatus, combining 
as it does a i.arge saving or fuei, with the greatest efficiency, ventilation 
Q 3 THE KITCHEN, great clcanliness, roasting in front Of the fire, or in the 
ovens, and a certain cure for smc^y chimneys. 

These Ridges, which obtained such high commendations from the Jurors, the 
Press, and the Public, at the London International Exhibition, 1862, have since 
then been rendered still more valuable by various important improvements, 
some qf which have been Patented. 

BROWN & GREEN'S NEW PATENT CLOSE FIRE SELF-ACTING 
KITCHEN RANGE requires no flues roxmd the Ovens, which roast and 
bake admirably. It will cure Smoky Chimney, which may be left perfeotlt 
open, it can therefore be used in the smallest kitchen without over heating 
it, or causing the least annoyance in any respect. It is the most compact 
Range hitherto introduced, and capable of domg a large amount of work in 
a small space with ubss than one-haxf the usual quantity of fuel — although the 
front of the F|RB is very narrow, tjie radiation of heat from it is vebt 
coN8iD9RA9^ auite sufficient to roast a good si^ed joint before it 

BROWN & GREEN'S IMPROVED COTTAGE RANGE is a valuable 
little ^laAge for the Cottager, it is useful, economical, and warranted to bake 
well. 

BPOWN & GREEN'S PATENT VENTILATING STOVE is simple in 
construction, powerful in action, highly economical, free from explosive gases, 
ventilates t)xe apartment, bums with great regularity, is very durable (being 
lined with fire-brick^, perfectly safe, and afiords every fapiUty fo^ lighti^ SAA 
supplying tiie fire with fresh fuel 

The aboyc^ Articles may be seen at the ROYAL DUBLIN SOCTBTTS 
PREMISES, Kildarb-street, where Illustrated Prospectuses a^d Priijes may 
be obtained. 



BROWN & GREEN, 

;ES & iMO: 

LUTON, BEDFORDSHIRE, 
E.N GLAND. 

SOLD IN LONDON 

BY FREDERICK THOMAS, 



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OFFiciAt CATALOGUE ADVERTISEii. 1^ 



DAY & MARTIN'S 

REAL JAPAN BLACKING 



97, HIGH HOLBORN, 



LONDON. 



Sold by all Dealers throughout the World: ^ 

In Bottles at \s. 6d., Is., and 6d. each. 



This invaluable Composition, after having stood th«» 
lest of Competition for upwards of Half a Centuiy, is 
still without a riyal for excellence of Qoalitj. 



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14 OFFICIAL CATALOGtTE ADVERTISBB. 

Adopted Very Largely by Her Majesty's Gjvemmeiit 

|)atent ^spjjalk ltl00finjg Mi 

Price Id. per Square Foot. 

INODROUS FELT, for Damp Walls and for Damp Floors, under CarpeUd 
Floor Cloths ; also for Lining Iron Houses to equalize the temperature. 

Price Id. per Square Foot. 

PATENT FELTED SHEATING, for Covering Ships' Bottoms, k 
DRY HAIR FELT, for Deadening Sound, and Covering Steam Boilers, Pipes. 
&c., Preventing the Radiation of Heat, thereby Saving 25 per cent, in fie. 

CROGGON & CO., 
GALVANIZED IRON MANUFACTURERS. 

Galvanized Iron Buckets, Bowls, Scoops, Basins, etc 

Galvanized Wrought Iron Cisterns, and Tanks. 

Estimates given for all Descriptions of Iron Work, Buildings, Roofs, &c, 

CROGGON & Co., 

2, DOWaATE-HILL, LONDON; 2. QOREE PIAZZAS, LIYEfiPK 
and 59, GEORaE-SQUAEE. GLASGOW. 

CROGGON'S Garden Engine is by 
far the most powerful and Cheapest 
of its kind; it will throw wdter 45 
feet with the jet, and when used as a 
Syringe, is most effective, throwing a 
continuous shower over an area of 
40 feet. 




CROGGON & Co.'s 

GAME, POULTRY. AND AVIARY NETTING: 



2, DOWGATE-HILL, LONDON; 
a, OoTM l^auas, XJTVlSlFOOIi; and 59, Oeorffe-ffquare, GLASM 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. l5 



CLARK & CO., 

; SOLE PATENTEES OP SELP-COILING 



FOB PRIVATE HOUSES AND SHOP FRONTS. 

* ONE SHEET OF STEEL, 

At 2s. 6d., 3s., and 3s. 6d. per Foot. 

No Machinery required. Cannot get out of order. Fire and thief proof. The only means of 
Becurely clobinjs; every description of opening with cheapness and facility. Prospectuses, estimates, 
and everv information forwarded free. 

These Shutters are fixed to all the principal Noblemen's and Gentlemen's Mansions, Banlcs, 
and Public Offices in the Kingdom. The ONLY Shutters that received a Prize at the Exhibition, 1862, 

CLARK & COMPANY, 

SOLE PATENTEES. 

ZiONDON— CShief Office— Rathbone-place, Oxford-street; 

„ G-ate-street, ZdncoIn's-Inn-A^dSy VT.O.; 

PilXlIS--Rue Kotre Dame Des Victoires, 42; 

BIAN'OSESTZiXt-^, Market-street ; 

GtlaASOOW— 67, Buchanan-street; 

* AND 

25| WSSTMOKEIiAND-STBSET, DUBZJN, 



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l^ - ^ OITICIAL CATAI.QGUE ADV^TJSEI^. 




Exjiibited at Dublin International Exbibitiofi. 

SECTION 3, No. 68. 



ISIN'S INDIGO BLUI!, 

MADE fram the finest Bengal Indigo and Pure Starch, is the best blue tk 
can be made for laundry purposes. Keen's Indigo Blue being free froin 
finy cheipicf^l or mineral admixture, wiU impart, without staining, a beautiful 
and lasting colour to liuep, for which latter quality the Manufacturers claim k 
it ^ supeviority oyer the ipany cheap substitutes for Indigo Blue now sold. 

JCp^N, HQBINSON, BELLVILLE, <fc CO., liONDOt.. 

HOSIHSOrS PATENT UUl 

Letters Patent, 1823. Prize Medal, 1862. 

IS the most v$iluable preparation for making pure and delicate Gme. 
Modern chemistry has shown that this food is easy of digestiq^i aftd ridiia 
nutiijttfiutt 

ROBINSON'S PATENT BARLET 

Letters Patent, 1823. Prize Medal, 1862. 

MAKES a delicious Custard Pudding — directions for which have beengivei 
by Mons. C. JJ. Franpatelli. It is appreciated as a non-inflammatoii 
drink : is excellent for mothers nursing, and has long been used with grest 
success for rearing children by hand. 

KEEN, BOEINSON, BE?:.LVILLE, & CO., London. 

Keen's Grennine Chicory. 

CHICORY upon the Continent is invariably mixed with Coffee; and in Gi« 
Britain, since the duty upon Chicory has been raised to that upon Cone* 
Chicory has increased in public favour and estimation. Keen^s Chicory, soldi 
packets ready for the consumer's use, is guaranteed to be pure and made fr« 
the finest foreign root. 

KEEN, ROBINSON, BELLVILLE, ^ QO., London. 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADTERTISBB* 



17 



Exhibited at Dublin International Exhibition. 

SECTION 3, No. 68. . 



The 
annexed 




First 

Manufactured 

A.D. 1742, 

or more than 

One Hundred 

and 
Twenty Years.j 

/ Can he 

obtained from 

aU 
Family Grocers 

throughout 

Great Britain. 



WE have adopted for our Trade Mark a Scallop Shell, which is placed 
upon all packages containing goods of our manufacture. We cautiof 
all persons against imitating same. In buying Mustard ask for "Keen's" 
which, for more than one hundred and twenty years has been favourable 
known to the trade of Great Britain. 

KEEN, ROBINSON, BELLVILLE, & CO., London. 

osw£@o mEmmti eoRN, 

For Puddings, Custards, Blanc-mange, &c., 

MANUFACTURED AT OSWEGO, STATE OF NEW YORK, U.S. 

THIS is the original preparation of Maize for human food: it closely 
resembles arrowroot, in comparison with which it is more nutritious, and 
is more suitable as an article of daily diet. 

The Oswego is stronger than many of the imitations which its great success 
and moderate price has brought before the public. It has also a natural golden 
tinge, and not the white artificial appearance produced by chemical process. 

AGENTS FOR GREAT BRITAIN- 



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rt OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVEKTISER. 

The Singer Manufacturing Comphts 

UNRIVALLED PRIZE MEDAL 



FAMILY SEWING MACHINES, 

^2 l^ogal ^dttxB |!atof. 

Highest Premium awarded at Eighteen Industrial Exhibitions 
in the United States and Europe, 

INCLUDING THE 

Gold Medal at the "Exposition Universelle," in Paris, 1855, 
Over 130,000 sold in all parts of the world. 



^mixntimi €btx]2 ^at^E' 

(gratis ia Whxx'dniti 

(&btxii'^nxd^uBtx. &\xt ^m. 

Price £8 10s. and upwards. i 

The cheapest and most reliable Machine in the market ; combining the greatest 
simpUcity, convenience, and elegance, with all improvements that have bees 
invented expressly for general Family Sewing. 



BRANCH CRRICBBz 



LIVERPOOL 30, Bold-street. 

MANCHESTER... 103, Market-street. 
NEWCASTLE 6, Northumberland-st. 
NORTHAMPTON 4, Mercers'-row. 



GLASGOW 6.5, Buchanan-sti«t 

DUNDEE 28, Reform-street. 

DUBLIN 69, Grafton-street 

BELFAST 7, Donegal-square. 



Illustrated Cntalogiies sent gratis and post free. 

CHIEF OFFICE IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 1'47, CHEAPSIDE 

XjiCD3NrX3<D3Nr. 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 1» 

LONDON & LANCASHIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



"^omt anir Jf0nign Jfirje Kxtb fife ^mmmtt 

CAPITAIf— FIRE, £1,000,000. XiZFE, £100,000. 

LONDON-73 and 74, KING ^WTIiLIAM-STREET, E.C. 
lilYERFOOIi-BBOT^TN'S BniLDZNaS. EXCHANGE. 



DBoAXTds of XDlxreotloao.. 

LONDON: 

Chairfnan—F. W. Bussbll, Esq., M.P., Chairman of the National Discount Company. 

Deputy- ") PiBB— ♦Mr. Aldbbmak and Shbbxvf Daxik, Abchurch-lane. 

Chairmen, SLivjt— J. H. Makbnzie, Esq., Greshan House, Old Broad-street^ 

Thb Biokt HoKovBABUi Thb Lobd Matob. 

Abbl Chapmak, Esq., ... ... ... ... 79, Old Broad-street. 

C. B. CoLCHBBTBB, £sq ... ... ... Messfs. Colchesters and ' 

JoHK GusTAYDS BussBLL, Esq., ... ... ... 61, Moor^te-street. 

Lightly Siupsov, Esq ... ... ^ ... Gower street^ Bedford-iqiurt. 

Thohas Stbithoubb, Esq., ... ... ... ' ... Merchant. 

LIVERPOOL: 

OUitrfiian— Fbaitcis Bbavn, Esq ... ... Messrs. Blessig, Braun, & Co. 

Deputy-Chairman—^, B. Guioir, Esq., ... ... Messrs. Guion & Co. 

G. M. Bowbb^, Esq., ... ... ... , ... Messrs. Manning & Co. 

D. N. OiAKNAcopuLO, Esq., ... ... ... ... Messrs. Giannacopulo and Cochilanl 

•E. H. Uabbisoit, Esq., ... ... ... ... Messrs. Whitaker, WhitehMd, ft Co« 

Damibl Jahbs, Esq., ... ... ... ... Messrs. Phelps, James, ft Co. 

^BOBQB Kbkdall, Esq., ... ... ... ... Messrs. Kendall, Brothers. 

^EnoAB MusGBOTB, Esq ... ... ... Messrs. E. Musgrove ft Co. 

*Jambs G. BoBiirsoK, Esq.^ ... ... ... ... ' Merchant. 

•Chablbs Wigs, Esq., ... ... ... ... Messrs. J. ft T. Johnson. 

• Directors of Fire Company only. 

^ XI. 13 1 1 XX Xj O O A* 1 13 O A XT d. . 

OFFIOE-22, WEfiTMORELAITD-STKEET and D'OIiIEB-STBEET. 
Thb Bight Hoitoubable Thb Lobd Matob. 
AiTOBBw H. Baoot, Esq., ... ... ... ... Bagots, Button, ft Co., 20, Willi«m.«t. 

E. M. HoDGSOir, Esq., ... ... ... ... McMai>ter ft Co., 121,Capel-street 

EnwABD FoTiBBLL, Esq., J.P., ... ... ... Director of the Hibernian Bank, and 

of the Alliance Gas Company. 

9<»i«— Messrs. W. ft H. M. GOULDING. Inspector and Surveyor— JOSEPR S. SMITHSON. 

. ' AgenUfor Fire Company only jii^ 

LUCIUS H. DEEEING, 52, Dame-street. WILLIAM WILSON, 16, College-green. 

The Companies are also Bepresentcd by Influential LOCAL BOABDS at Manchester, Leeds, Birmhigliam 

Bristol, x^ewca&tle, Southampton, Glasgow, Edinburgh, as wtll as at Melbourne, Sydney, and MontreaL 



At the ANNUAL MEETINGS held on the 8th April, at Liverpool it was stated, as tha 

RESULT OF OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR 1864, THAT THEr- 

FIBE PREMIUMS amounted to ... £108,597 

T> . T ^ ^««-. S the year 1863 of 43,547 

Bemg an Increase over I ^^ i8g2of 83,360 

LIFE ASSURANCES, nnder 502 Policies, were effected for 340,699 

Producing in New Premiums ... 9,697 

Cenetal iWaiugcr axCti actuarg: 

WXIiLIASS PAXilN CLZBEHUGHp LondOII. 



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\ 20. OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISEB. 

TOPHAM & WHITE, 

GRAFTON ST., DUBLIN, 

MANUFACTURING 

Wittl MB UMtt ISMItS, 

{Establkhed 1826), 
EXHIBITORS, CLASS !23. 

Ha.ving large workshops and a staff of efficient workmen on the 
premises, T. & W. can execute all orders for DiiEimond Wotk, Gein 
Setting, Mounting, and General Kepairs with skill, punotnaHty^ and 
at Moderate Charges. 

EDWAED WHITE, 

\FEOM DENTS,) 
TO THE SULTAN AND TURKISH AMIRAITY, 

20, COCKSPUR STRfiffiT, 

LONDON, 
j?ri£e Medallist, International Exhibition, 1862. 



HorrtepoiidmU in JhihUn—M.eBBis. TOPHAM ft WHITl. 
See Specimens of Work in Clftss 23k 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 21 



mw^JiTiiiiB^ d^ ipn Hi in: OB IB S3 J 

MANUFACTURERS 



OF THE 



Celebrated Reading Biscuits 



These Biscuits are sold by nearly all Family 
Grocers in the United Kingdom, and are well 
kno^n in all Foreign Markets, where they aj'e 
esteemed for their good and keeping properties. 

The Eeading Mixed Biscuits, Ginger Wafer, 
and Orange and Lemon Dessert are specialities. 

These and all yarieties of both plain and rich 
Biscuits are packed in soldered Tins of all gizes 
for Exportation. 



laONPON OFFICSE- 



9, ROOD-LANE. 

MANUFACTORY-- 

READING, BERKSHIRE. 



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22 ^ OFFiaAL CATALOGUE ADVEKTISEB. 



DOBSON AND BAKLOW, 

KAY-STREET WORKS, 

BOLTON-LE-MOOES, 

Mancliester Office, 7, St. Ann's Place, 

Holders of the Silver Medal of Paris, 1855 ; Bronze Medal, 
London, 1862; Silver Medal, Turin, 1864. 



For Cleaning, Preparing, and Spinning Fine and Coarse Yarns; 
Cotton Gins, including Saw,Macartliy, and others ; various Cleaninj, 
Opening, and Scutching or Lap Machines ; Carding Engines, with 
Wellman's Self Stripper, and additional motion; also Improved 
Cards for Coarse, Medium, or Fine Spinning. 

LAP OR RE-UNITING MACHINES; 

DRAWING, SLUBBING, ROVING, AND FINE 
FRAMES ; 

Self-acting &* Hand Mules, for Wool, Worsted^ 
Merino, or Cotton, Coarse &* Fine JVos. ; 

THROSTLES, OOUSLERS, 

and' 

1 

"X'wlrLlrLS Bfi:ciol3.1rLes* 

Power Looms for Weaving Cotton and Linen; 

ALSO MANT OTHEB 

MA CHINES AND TO OLS. 

EttmaUs and dU other informadon suppUed en appUcaHon ai Kay^si. IFarh. 



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S4 OFFICIAL 0ATAL00T7B ADVBfiTISBB. 



msp LACES. BRITISH LACES, FOREIGN UQEi. 

JAMES FORREST & SONS, 

100 & 101, GRAFTON-STREBT, DUBLIN, 

HAVE innch pleasure in inviting Ladies to inspect their stock in these departments. Having for 
many years devoted much attention to the Manufacture of Lace Goods, they are confident that in 
Irish Laces the articles of their manufacture cannot be surpassed, having been awarded Prize Medakat 
the Gre^t Exhibitons of 

bonbon, guWiit, |paris, auir p«i» |rorh. 

The Siod^ comprises Squares, Tunics, Flouncings, Handkerchiefs, Lappets, Coiffures, ColUri, 
,Sleevet«, Bridal Suits, &c. 

RoTAL Irish Guipurb Lace. | Irish Antique Crotchet. 
Royal Iri^h Appliqu? Lace. | Lassett Point, & Limbrick Lia. 

A beautifuUs«ortmentor British and Forei.^ Laces, carefully selected from the leading msMiufstctureQof 

LONDON, PARIS, BRUSSELS, BELGIUM, AND SAXONY. 
Beat avd Imitaiion £rus$eU, Valenciennes^ Maltese^ Yak, and other Laces, adoipUd jvt 
morning and evening wear* 

BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT, 

Lace Haunractarers to Her llajesty the <|neen, 

^htix ilaijal ^iq^nesscs i\it ^rittce anir princess of ©lalw, 

THE LORP LIEUTENANT, AND THE IRISH COURT. 

ZiaQea as Exhibited by J. F. & Sons, may be purchased at 

100 & 101, QRAFTON-ST.,DUBLm, & 34, PATRICK-SI 

CORK. 

JAMES FORREST AND SONS, 

Silk Mercers and Lace Manufacturers to Her Majesty the Queen, the PuinGt 
and Princess of Wales, and the Irish Court, 

KBSPBCTPULLY call attention to their Stork, which is at all timeu replete with the latest noveltiei 
in every Department; and from their coin inand of the best markets in the world, they are confid«ut 
t their Stock will bear comparison with that of any house in the trade, {^od lecominenditVitllf 
inspection of Ladies before pnrchasinisr. ^ 

It is unnecessary to do more than enumerate the Departments, which^re principilly— 

FOREIGN AND BRITISH SILKS AND VELVETS OE EVERY DESCRIPTION. 
MerlnoSf Orapes, Paramattas, Aipaeas. mamas, Serfires, Winoles, FqplUittttes 

Qhaml^rays, aud Fancy Dresses of all li^inds. 

Made-up Skirts and Trimmed Suits. 

Linens, Flannels, Muslins, Skirtings, Tarlatans. 
cashmere: QMANA/l-S- 

Paisley, Norwich, and French Wove Longs, New Alleghany, Himalayan, and Queensland Sh^wl«. 

FOREIGN, BRITISH, AND IRISH LACES, AND SEWED IfUSLINS, 
Forei£^ Flowers, Feathers, RiliiliQiiSf &o. 

f^ui* in Sahle^ Ermine, Or«be, Ac 

Parasols, Umbrellas, Haberdashery, and Trimmings, Hosiery, Gloves, Ties. 

Ladles* Underclothing, Baby Linen, and Outfltting. 

Paris Millinery and Dress^making. Irish Bog Oak, Jewellery, Albums, 

Portemonnais, Leather Bag;«, and Fancy Goods of all kind*. 

^btx^ %x\v\^ guxtabh for J^irst anb Jamilg ^ourninj ai tb« J^tft Jfabri^i}. 
Agents for the " Alexand/ra^* Sewing Machine, the cheapest and best yet invented, 

100 & 101, GRAFTON-ST., DUBLIN ; & 34, PATRIQK-ST., COBK. 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADYERTTTEB. 25 




BEWLET, HAMILTON, AND CO., 

(LATE BEWLEY AND EVANS), 

CHEMISTS TO THE QUEEN, 

3 & 4, LOWER SACKYILLE^STREET, 



MINERAL WATERS, 

Natural and Manufactured, 



LAKES OF KILLARNEY. 



Bg Heir Most Gracious Majesty's Special Permistion. 

THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOTEL, 

Patronized by H.R.H. the PRINCE OF WALES, 
The feoyal Family of Belgium, &c. 

THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOTEL is situated on the Lower Lake, close 
to the Uater's edj^H, withiii ten minutes' drive of the Railway Station, and ia short diistance from 
the far-famed '* Gnp of Diinloe." 

This Hotel, which is lighte(^ \KH\\ i^s nirlnnfarfnred on the ptemises, has been much 6nl argued; a 
magnificent Coffee Room, a Public Drawinyj Room for Lndies and Families, Billiard and Smoking 
Rooms, and several suites of Private Apartments facing the LaUe, having beeri recefntly added. 

TABLE D HOTE DURING THE SEASON. 

HOT AND COLD BATHS. 

Carriages, Cars, Boats, Ponies, ^c, at fixed charges. 

The tar Drivfer^, Boatmen, and Gilid^*; are it^id by the Pioprietor, and not allowed to solicit jgratuiiies. 
The Hotel omnibus attends tli<j Trains > 

J8".fe it is necessary to inform Tourists, that the tlail^ay Company, ptt)- 

prietors of the Railway Hotel in the town, send upon the platform, as Tout^rtf^t 
their Hotel, the Porters, Boatmen, Car Drivers, and Grades, in their employ- 
ment, and exclude the servants of the Hotels on the Lakes ; who will, however, 
be found in waiting at th^ [Station ddo^; 

JOHN O'LBARY, Proprietor 



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U OFPIOIAL CATALOaUB ADVERTISElt, 



TAYLOR PRIZES 

FOR THE PROMOTION OP THB 

FIWE ARTSJJJMRELAWO. 

The Sum of £2,000, bequeathed by the late George Archibald Taylor, 
Esq., of Dublin, for the Promotion of Art in Ireland, has been applied 
to the Establishment of a perpetual endowment for the encouragement 
of Art Students. The management is entrusted to the Royal Dublin 
Society, in conjunction with the Trustees of the Will. 

Out of the dividends are paid the Prizes, which are open to all 
Students of Art who shall have attended for two years at least a school 
of Art in Ireland, or who, being of Irish birth*, shall have attended for a 
like period a school of Art elsewhere, and who shall produce Works of 
Art displaying conspicuous merit or high promise of future excellence, 
at an Exhibition to be held annually in Dublin. 

The Endowment h^ been in operation five years, and Prizes have 
been awarded amounting to £133. 

Communications may be addressed to Ralph B. Brunker, Esq., 
Solicitor to the Executors, 31, York-street, Dublin; or to William 
Edward Steele, Esq., M.D., Assistant Secretary to the Royal Dublin 
Society. 

-- I 

FOE THE YEAR 1865. ; 

The Trustees offer the following Prizes, open to Art Students of Irish 
birth, or attending a School of Art in Ireland, to be awarded at an 
Exhibition to be held on the 13th 'November, 1865, at the house of the 
Royal Dublin Society. 

1. For the best composition of Figures in Outline, in size 

not less than 36X28, . . . . < . £10 

[77ig Subject to he selected by the Student,"] 

2. For the best finished Drawing from the Nude Figure, in 
Chalk, the same size. The subjects : "Narcissus at the 
Fountain ;" " Venus Rising from the Sea," each . £10 

3. For the best study from Nature of a Group of Trees, 

in Oils, size 24X20, . . . . . £10 

4. For the best study from Nature, of a Group of Trees, 

in Water Colours, same size, . . . . £10 

To be increased or lowered in amount, or wholly withheld, according 
to the merit of the works. 

All works must be delivered before two o'clock on Saturday, 11th 
November, 1865, at the house of the Royal Dublin Society, Kildare- 
street, Dublin, where the conditions and other particulars may be ascer- 
tained. 

On behalf of the Trustees, 

WILLIAM EDWARD STEELE, M.D., 
2nd January^ 1865. Assist, Sec. Royal Dublin Society 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVEETISER. 27 

IRISH BELL FOUNDRY AND COPPER WORKS, 
14, THOMAS-STREET, DUBLIN. 

JOHN MURPHY 

HAD the honour of supplying with Bells, about forty Bishops, and some 
hundreds of clergy all over the civilized world, of all rehgious persuasions. 
He supplied the following Bishops, who are amongst those whose testimonials 

appeared in former advertisements The Most Rev. Dr. MacHale, Archbishop 

of Tuam ; Right Rev. Dr. Derry, Bishop of Clonfert ; the Dean and Chapter of 
Christ Church Cathedral*, the Right Rev. Dr. Cantwell, Bishop of Meath; 
late Right Rev. Dr. Cohen, Clonfert ; the late Right Rev. Dr. Ryan, Mount 
Melleray; Right Rev. Dr. Murphy, fciecunderabad ; Right Rev. Dr. Gould, 
Melbourne, a peal of eight Bells, four tons weight ; Right Rev. Dr. Davis, 
Maitland, Sydney, a peal of six Bells ; late Right Rev. Dr. Fleming, St. John's ; 
Right Rev. Dr. ConoUy, New Brunswick ; Right Rev, Dr. Mullock, St. John's, 
Newfoundland, with about thirty Bells, from forty cwt. weight downwards ; late 
Right Rev. Dr. Keating, Enniscorthy ; Right Rev. Dr. Browne, Kilmore ; the 
Right Rev. Dr. Moriarty, Kerry ; Right Rev. Dr. Denvir, Belfast ; the Right 
Rev. Dr. Keating, Bathurst ; the Right Rev. Dr. M^Kinnon, Arachat, Nova 
Scotia ; Right Rev. Dr. Moran, Graham's Town, Cape of Good Hope ; Right 
Rev. Dr. Feeny, Bjllala ; Right Rev. Dr. Dalton, Carbineer ; Right Dr. Allard, 
Port Natal, Cape of Good Hope. The great Bells for Maynooth College and 
and Catholic Church. 

His great Bell at tEe London Exhibition, was selected by Mr. Dent, her Ma- 
jesty's Clock Maker, to strike the hours of his great clock in the grand hall 
during the Exhibition. It was afterwards purchased by the Great Northern 
Railway Company of England, for their terminus clock at King's Cross, London. 

J. M. begs leave to say that any order received by him always has his own 
practical attention, both m the moulding and the amalgam of the metals, as he is 
the only practical employer in the Bell Founding Trade in Ireland. 

He has now exhibiting at the north side of the Exhibition Gardens, a Peal of 
eight Joy Bells, weighing over 5 tons weight, in the Key of D. They are the 
largest and most perfect Peal in Ireland. He has restored the Joy Bells of St. 
Patrick's Cathedral, for Benjamin Lee Guinness, Esq., by casting three new 
Bells in place of defective ones, what is technically termed Splicing a Peal; he 
did the same in Christ Church Cathedral, and also in Limerick Cathedral, all to 
their proper musical notes. He had the honour of receiving the following letter 
from the late Bishop of Kildare. 

" Glasnevin House, near Dublin, Deo. '20th, 1845. 

" *5lR.— The Dean and Chapter of Christ's Church Cathedral, in thig City, were not aware, when they 
employed yon at different times to re-cast two of their Church Bells, and to adwpt them to the tones of 
Eight in the DiKtouic Scale, that jiuch an attempt hnd ever before been made in Ireland am happy 
to say that iu both eases, you have thoroughly succeeded ; and I remain your obedient servant, 

"Charles Kildare. 
** Dean of the Cathedral, Chrisc Cbnrch, Dablin. 
" Mr. John Murphy, Bell-Founder.* 

EXHIBITION OP THE WORKS OF INDUSTRY OF ALL NATIONS, 1851.- 

"I hereby certify that HER MAJESTY'S COMMISSIONERS, upon the award of the Jurors, havepra- 
aented the PRIZE MEDAL to JOHN MURPHY, lor BELLS shovvn in the Exhibition. 

(Sijined) "ALBERT. 
*' President of the Royal Commisaion. 
"Hyde Park, London, 15th Oct., 1851." 

" The Larfje Bell of very fine tone. 

** The Larpe Bell in Eaj't Nnve, connected with the Great Clock, of very fine tone." 

P.S.— This Bell was purchased by the Great Northern Railway Company of King's Cross, London, 
27 cwt. 

He had also the honour of receiving the first-class Prize at the Exhibitton of Paris for Bells exhibited 
there. 



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■ i'f 

i ^ 

i ' ■• 



28 



OFFIOMSi OATAIiOaUB ADYEBnOra. 



i l! 



» 1 i 



gublitt Internatienal ^^^bition, 1865. 

Class i), Section 22. 

THE GAS METER COMPANY, 

LI MITED, 

A. ANGUS CKOLL, C.E., aairman. 

George rait, Managing Direddr, 

T. G. BARLOW) C.E., ConsuUin^ Engine^, 

ifiMGrLAl^I), Factory-^Canal Bridge^ Kingsland-wad, 

Londo;!, N.E. 

Depot — Feniiell-street, Manchester. 
SCOTLAND— Lothian-road, Edinburgh. • 

IRELAND— The Irish Meter Manufactory^ 

HANOVER-STREET, DUBLIN^ 
W. W. ANDREWS, Manager. 

Wet and Dry Gas Meters ; Station Meters and Govembrs ; 
Test Gas Holders, and other Apparatus. 

Apply as ctbove for partkulars and prices, 

Dublin International Exhibition^ 1865. 



Class D, Section 22, 

THE IRISH METER MANUFACTORY, 

Hanover-street, Dublin, 

W. W. ANDREWS, Manager. 

THE Proprietors of the above Establishment invite particular attention to their exhibition 
Of &aM Meters and Apparatus, especially tQ The TJnvaxynng Water 
Ziine Gas Meter, invented and patented by Messrs. Sanders and Donovan, of 
Dublin ; itaftbrds the greatest security for accurate measurement to both Consumers and Gas 
Company. The Directors of the present Dublin International Exhibition selected this 
Meter fpr the purpose of ascertaining the quantity of Gas consumed by them. There are 
Four Meters or 600 Liights each, now in use in the Exhibition Buildings. They 
also call attention to 

THB DRY nAm MElTER, Patented and Improved by 
A. ANGX7S CIlO£ii:i, Esq., C.E. 

The establishment of this manufactory in Dublin offers great advantages to Ireland 
in the employment of labour, and affords peculiar facilities for the repair of Gas Meters, bjr 
aYOiditig the expense and risk of carriage to and from England or Scotland. 



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GFFieUI* qjLTiXOGUB ABYBBTJOTB. 9| 



28, W^ILLIAM-STREET, DUBLIN. 

We beg le^ve to claim attention to our CEI^EBBATED 



> 

/ 
i 



Specially Bonded by ourselves for the English and Foreign Markets. 

IT IS OF 

GREAT AGE AND PURITY, 

And will favourably contrast with any 

ixmt^ itEittrg, 0r Gi\n ^mtx^xt Spirit, 

However excellent, and is much Lower in Price, We have it, 
Duty paid, in Casks of all sizes, and in Cases containing Q^O, 
Twq, and Three Dozen Bottles each. The same 

Is also held largely, in Bond, for Shipment to Foeeign 
CoTJNTRiJJS, and for 

The Supply of the Iloyal Navy. 

It can be Exported in Casks of not less th?in Twenty Galloi^, 
and in Cases of One, Two, and Three Dozen Bottles each. These 
are securely 

Capsuled, and bear the Trade Label. 



BAGOTS, HIJITON, & COMPAH, 

27 and 88, WH-t-IAM-STRBET, 
PUBLIN. 



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IBO OFFICIAL CATAXOGUE ADVERTISER. 

*-- - 

gubim ^nttxnnixonnl (S^^^tbttbit, Class B, S^tdxm 9, 

ENTRANCE, KILDARE-STREET. 
XaxxpoxTt Aixxt to XjAid-T* Vxr A^'^^-ellers. 

NO MORE ORUShTnG^R DRESSES- 

For India and Continental Travelling. The lightest, the cheapest, and the strongest Trunks in the World. 
NO CHARGE FOR RAII^WAY CARRIAGE. 

M. Myers's Royal Eugenie cdebrated 30s. Railway Travelling Dress Baskets. 

IlL Myers's Newly Invented Eoyal Alexandra Light Self-Acting Expanding 
"Waterproof Travelling £,i 2s. DRESS BASKET TRUNKS. 

Fitted with comparttnents for Bonnets, Jewellery, Umbrcllan, and otlier fancy artlclcB. suitable for a short journey or alon^ 
tour, beine self-expandiii)^, are adapted for cithor a smali or lar^iru quantity of LadlcH' Dre»»eH, coti8tracted to increase in 
slxe accordlMK to the quantity of Dresws required to be travelled with, from one Press to u whole Trousseau, may be carried 
without creasiug or injury from du^t or dawp, and ai'ti onc-tliird liie weight of aviy utlicr box 



By ] 



COLLAPSSD OPKN EMPTY, WITH DRAWKB. 



P 
I 



COLLAPSED CLOSED PACKED. 

EXPANDED CLOSED PACKED. 

M, MYERS, CAVENDISH HOUSE, Wigmore-street, Cavendish-square. 

CORNER OF MARYLEBONE-LANE, E.OIVDOIV, KV. 

N.B.— M. MTER9 respectfully cautions the Nobility and the Public generally against lInltatioIU^ he being the 
larentor and Patentee. None genume unless stampted " M. MYERS'S PATENT.'^ 

ALL INFRINCEMENTS WILL BE PROCEEDED AGAINST. 



OPINIONS OP THE PRESS. 

The New Alexaitdra Patent Self-Expandino Dress Basket. — This very unique and commo^oos oompat^on, 
en voyage, tot either a lady or a gentleman's wardrobe, invented by Mr. M- Myer's, of Wljrmore-street, Cavendish- square, 
poasemes an entirely novel, and. at the same time, useful characteristic, as yet unattempted in any clitss of portmanteau or 
travelllng-hox inventions. The basinet itself supplies all the purposes of a chest of drawers, without the risk of crease or 
mishM) to the shape of ladles' dresses by too compact a pressure. The upper portion, being self-acting, expands or coIlapMa 
according to the exigency of space required. If the tronssoanx to accompany the traveller or %-isitor bo on rather an exteo- 
■ive scale, want of room will be the last cause of complaint in the Alexandra Basket ; if the allotment of dress be simply 
anffldent for a short visit, the basket collapses of itself, and, therefore, presents no gigantic representation of a baggil^ 
accompaniment. As many as a doeen or more dresses can be packed without the slightest Inconvenitmce, In addition to all . 
other articles of costume wliicli are indispensable to comfort abroad as well as at home. A separate partition for parasols, 
mnbrellaa. hat or bonnet. Jewellery, writing materials, and such like paraphernalia makes the Alexandra Basket as perfect 
a receptacle for articles of dress as the present fashion could suggest, and modem convenience require; whilst for ll^tness 
and durability it excels all other trunks. The Alexandra Basket is, therefore, to be recommended as one of those nord and 
oonvenient necessaries which all travellers should avail themselves ot.— Morning Post, June 17th. 

The New Alexaitdra Patent Self-Coli.apsino and Expanding Dress Basket, invented by Mr. M. My«n. 
of Carendlsh House, Wigmore-street, Cavendish-square, has entirely superseded the use of those cufnbrous and old-fashioned 
boxes, skin-corered trunks, leather portmanteaus, and other rude luggage receptacles with which travellers in the old 
coaching days were proverbially well ftu-nished. This basket comprises every convenience which the requirements of 
modem travellers can suggest. It is made to expand or collapse as occasion may demand, and is, therefore, suited for the 
puiposes of a short visit, a periodical totir, or a lengthened voyage, and is, in consequence, most eft>eoially patronised by 
ladies as the ne pltu ultra of perfection for their wants. Although portentous in size, the fn^me o f the basket being oon- 
Btmcted of wicker, it is as durable in wear as it is light in material A black strong waterpioo fca e envelopes the whole, 
and renders the appearance as dittinrue as a portable wardrobe can be made. The interior is ntted with light movable 
wicker trays, literally constituting cnambers of room for bridal robes, for morning costume, or ball, concert, dinner, and 
evening dresses, with oonvenient drawers for jewellery, umbrellas, writing materials, and all the thousand and one artides 
which ladies must and will have with them when th^ travel. The popularity, therefore, of this new basket is no matter of 
surprise, and the extensive patronage with which its inrentor is f aTOored is allowed to be no more than he dee ar rea 
Ceurt Journal, May 28th. 
IBiutrttod CataJsfiMt with —try U mip tion tf Trunkt, Portmanteaus, Jltted oimI vm/Mtd TrmeOktg Bmit^ ft to% 
$Btth Primtf sent Free en appkeiaioi^ 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



81 



INNS''- QUAY, DUBLIN. 

■ qQQQQ QQO Hg i i i 

This Hotel is First Class in all its Appointments, having the Modem Improve- 
ments to be found m the Continental Hotels, 

Oraad Table D'Hote Room, 

ZiadieB' and G^entlemen's Coffee Hooms, 

Private Drawings Hooms, 

Commercial, Smoking, and Billiard Hooms, 

Iiadies' and Gentlemens' Bath Hooms, 

Iiavatory and Sleeping^ Apartments for 120 Persons. 



In the Grand Table D'Hote Hoom, Dinner at Two and Five o^ clock 

each Day. 

^* A Night Porter Always in attendance. 



D. J. BERGIN, Proprietor. 

SILK MERCERS, 

LIKEN AND WOOLLEN DRAPERS, CLOTHIERS, 

Haberdashers, &c., &c. 

OOzrLzrLeirola.1 XZa.11^ 

91, 92, and 93, GRAFTON-STREET, 

AND 

43 AND 44, WICKLOW-STREET, DUBLIN. 



^ist 0f ^ti^uximzxih. 



Silks and Crapes, 
Fancy Dresses, 
Merinoes and Stuffs, 
Shawls and Mantles, 
Bonnets and Millinery, 
Ribbons and Parasols, 
Flowers and Feathers, 
Laced and Sewed Muslins, 



Children's Dresses, 
Ladies' Boots and Shoes, 
Trimming and Haberdashery, 
Woollen Cloths, 
Ready Made Clothing, 
Tailoring and Order, 
Gents. Hats and Caps, 
Gents. Boots and Shoes, 



Gents. Shirts & Handkerchiefs 
Portmanteaus and Hat Cases, 
JewelleryCabinet&Perfumery 
Ladies' Outfitting, 
Hosiery and Gloves, 
Calicoes and Muslins, 
Linens and Damasks, 
Flannels and Blankets 



will JtnaEwitg^ 



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89 OFPIOlAi:. CATALOGUE ADVERHSBR. 



HUDSON'S - 

Imjtoiit)) Safetj Stirrtij for J^j' babbits 

HAS been pronounced superior to all others for instantly disengaging the 
lady's foot in case of being thrown from her horse ; this Safety Stirrup 
was the only one that obtained an award of merit at the Great Londen 
Exhibition. It aflfords perfect security from such a dreadful casualty as that of 
a lady being dragged along the ground with her foot sticking fast in the stirrup 
which renders this highly useful article an indispensable adjunct to a side-saddle 
while its comparatively moderate price places it within the reach of alL ' 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

SAMUEL HUDSON, 
65, DAWSON-STREET, DUBLIN. 

(Opposite Morrison's Hotd.) 

S. HUDSON 

Respectfully directs attention to his varied stock of Ladies' and Gentlemen's 
Saddles, Double and Single Harness, and every article connected with the trade 
in general use, rated at the most moderate prices for first-class goods. 

*^* S. Hudson obtained three Prize Medals, and four Honorary Certificates 
at the Exhibitions in Dublin, Paris, and London. 



Garden and Agricultural Seed Es tablishment. 
JOSEPH BEREY & SONS 

Are conf^tantly supplied with large and carefully selected Stocks of 
Vegetable, Floral, and Agricultural Seeds, from the most eminent 
and careful Growers in England, Scotland, and the Continent and 
are always prepared to execute Orders on advantageous terms. 

Grass Seeds and Clovers, suitably mixed for permanent and 
alternate culture. 

Fruit Trees, Vines, &c., trained and standard of the best bearing 
qualities. 

Dwarf and Standard Eoses, Bedding Plants, Dahlias Holly- 
hocks, &c. Stove and Greenhouse Plants in great variety, Catalogues 
•of which will be forwarded on application. 

Steel FoAs, Spades, Syringes, Knives, Metallic Labels, and all 
Garden Eequisit es in variety from the bes t Manufacturers. 

J. B. and SONS 'are holders of Genuine Peruvian Guano, Linseed 
CJake and Meal, Fresh Ground. 

Agents for MESSRS. BURNARD, LACK, & CO.'S, « Concent 
seated Manure," and " Superphosphate op Lime," which are highly 
recommended as very efficient Fertilisers. 

Testimonials, ^c, to be had. 

S, Arran-qiiay, Dublin, 



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ei^ieiAL eA^ALOG^rai AD¥MlTfSBB. 8S 



QUEENS ARMS HOTEIi, 

BELFAST. 

A Firsfc-daas Family and Commercial Hotel, central ; charges moderate. 5u* atiendi al^ Tifaini av^ BoaU, 



THOMAS DUNNILL, 
WOQL BROKER, 

151, 152, a»d 1935 TBOnSAB-ATRSST, DTTBIiZN. 



KENNY AND OWENS, 

AND THE 

SIXTEEN SHILLING TROUSERS 

IRISH TWSSD THOROUOHIi? SHRUNK, 

54, DAME-STREET, 



H_ BOOTM AND OO-^ 
LADY-DAV WOB^S, PR«;STpM, LANCASHIRE, 

MULE Spindle and Spindle and Fly Makers, for Cotton, Flax, Silk, and Woollen ; Spindle Collars 
and Steps. Paris Exhibition Prize Medal, 1855, and Makers of all the Mule Spindles (excepting 
one Mole) spinning in the Exhibition of 1851. 

By all the Great London Makers, 

Qft most moderate t&pm^ 9^% 
PiaQ5vp8, 112, GKAPTON-STREBT, DUBLIN. 



^W^ «ENN?DY ^ SOW 

ARE exhibiting a Canoe Landau, which possesses every reauisite of a ropmy light baronche ; the 
head, wUeS opea, falling no horizoAitally as to he on a level w^tk the tap of back raU; has 
Offord's patent self-actiog door-slens, an'i is mounted on noisples? and easy springy. 

,u r . . « trister Ooacli Factory, Belfost. 



CHEMI CAL MANUFACT URES. 
CHEMICAL WORKS, 

Snlphate of Soda (Salt Cake), for Glass. Soda, and Soap, Jlpufac- 
ture. Chloride of Lime (BleacliiBg Powder). 

The greatest fa<^ity for Expvrtatwn in quantity, at very Low Freighti, to ali partt of 
* ' England .and the CoMinent. 

ROBERT G* GATCHEXtli, 

7, DAWSON-STREET, DUBLIN, 

ReflDectfally invites attention to his Glass Case, Glass D, Section 22, fai which wiU b« 
fo^^Ldid assortment ol Sealea, suitable for Bankew, Chmiste, Tea Dealew, arocew, 
Italiaa Warehoosemen, &c. 



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U OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADYEBTISKS. 



ises. 

: GREAT INTERNATIONAL SHOW OF FRUITS, GOURDS, 
ROOTS, VEGETABLES, AND CEREALS; 

OPEN TO ALL THE WORLD. 



TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, anb FRIDAY, 
OCTOBER 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th. 



Keeping Fruits, Gourds, Boots, and Cereals will remain 
on Exhibition until October 17th. 



The Executive Committee have made arrangements to hold an 
International Fruit and Vegetable Show, in the Palace and Gardens 
of the Dublin International Exhibition, in October, 1865, when 
Prizes will be awarded for Fruits, Agricultural and Garden Roots 
and Vegetables, Cereals, Dried and Preserved Fruits, Illustrated 
"Works on Floriculture and Horticulture, and for Table Decorations. 



SPECIAL REGULATIONS. 

1. Exhibitors must give to the Comptroller at least three 
CLEAR DATS notice, in writing^ of the articles they intend to 
exhibit, and the area in square feet of table-room required; and 
all roots must be sent washed and ready for exhibition. No 
application will be attended to after Friday, the 29th op 
September. 

2. All articles must be delivered free at the Gardens not later 
than 5 o'clock on Monday, the 2nd of October. 

N,B, — ^Table Decorations and very Perishable Fruits will be admitted up 
8*30, A.M., October 3rd. 

3. All arrangements must be completed before 10 a.m. on 
Tuesday, October 3rd. 

4. Cards corresponding vrith the entries will be furnished to 
Exhibitors on the morning of Exhibition ; and the Exhibitors 
will be responsible for the proper placing of these cards. 

6. All articles exhibited must be correctly named. No Exhibitor 
can take more than one Prize in the same class 



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OFnCIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



S5 



6. Tickets of admission will be furnished to Exhibitors as 
follows :— 

In 8 Classes and upwards, 2 passes. 
In 1 Class and upwards, 1 pass. 

7. The Exhibition of perishable Fruits and Vegetables will close 
on the 6th, and of Keeping Fruits, Roots, Gourds, and Cereals, 
on the 17th of October, at 6 p.m., after which all specimens will 
be given up to their owners, if required. 



LIST OF PRIZES. 

1. A large Silver Medal for the best collection of Fruits and 
Vegetables grown by any Botanic or Horticultural Society in any 
part of the world. 

2. A large Silver Medal for the best and most complete 
representative collection of . Fruits and Vegetables from any of 
the Colonies. ' ^ 

3. A large Silver Medal for the best and most complete 
representative collection from the Presidencies of India. 



NOTK.- 



-A dish of Apples, Pears, Oranges, Lemons, and the like, 6 fruits of j 
each ; of smaller fruits, an ordinary dish. 



FRITZTS. 

y^ae of 
CLASS 

A Collection of f^ruits. (Fruiterers only.) - 
^ B. Collection of Fruits. Grown by Exhibitor, 

C. Collection of Fruits. Exhibited by any person not a Fruiterer, 

and without restriction as to grower, - 

D. Pine Apple, - . 

E. Grapes, White Muscat. 6 bunches, 

F. Grapes, White Muscat. 3 bunches, 

G. Grapes. Any other white kind. 3 bunches, 
H. Grapes, Black Hambro'. 6 bunches, 

I. Grapes, Black Hambro'. 3 bunches, 
I. Grapes. Any other black kind. 3 bunches, 
K. Pears, dessert, 12 dishes, distinct kinds, - 
L. Pears, dessert, 6 dishes, distinct kinds, 
M. Pears, dessert, 3 dishes, distinct kinds, 
N. Pears, dessert. Single dish, any kind, 
O. Pears, kitchen. Single dish, any kind, 
P. Pears. Heaviest 5 fruits, dessert, 
Q. Apples, dessert, 12 dishes, distinct kinds, 
B. Apples, dessert, 6 dishes, distinct kinds, • 
S. Apples, dessert, 3 dishes, distinct kinds, • 
T. Apples, dessert. Single dish, any kind, - 
XT. Apples, kitchen, 12 dishes, distinct kinds, 
v. Apples, kitchen, 6 dishes, distinct kinds, - 
W. Apples, kitchen, 3, dishes, distinct kinds, - 
X, Apples, kitchen. Single dish, - 
Y. Apples, kitchen. Heaviest 5, - 

Z. Oranges, Lemons, or other Citrus frrut, collection of, 1 dish of 
each, - - 

AA. Orange-tree, bearing fruit, tn pot or box, 
BB. Melons. Single fruit, any kind, 
CC. Plums. Single dish, any kind - 

NoTs.— Fruits specified in the aiove Classes ynH be excluded from 6Q. 
GG. Miscellaneoufl^ * - - 



- 60 


30 


- 60 


30 


- 60 


30 


- 20 


10 


- 30 


15 


- 20 


10 


- 20 


10 


- 30 


15 


. 20 


10 


- 20 


10 


- 30 


15 


- 20 


10 


- 15 


10 


- 10 


5 


- 10 


5 


- 20 


10 


- 20 


10 


- 15 


10 


- 10 


5 


- 10 


5 


- 20 


10 


- 15 


10 


- 10 


5 


- 10 


5 


- 10 


5 


- 30 


15 


- 15 


10 


-. 10 


5 


- 20 


5 
10 



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88 OI^CIAL CATALOGtJfi ADVERTISER. 

f """ 

Commercial and Family Hotel and Posting Establishnent, 

GREEN TREE, WICKI.OW. 

B BYRNE, Proprietor, respectfully informs Tourists And others they will find thin a mos eom* 
• fortal>le house, with tirst-daps accommodation on reasonable terms. Cars meet every tTtin to 
and from Wicklow, by which visitors are conveyed to the Hotel free of charge. Every iDformatioi 
given to Tourists about places of interest in the vicinity. 




BY SPECIAL JMrnfflge. APPOINTMENT. 

IX)RD LIEUTENANT OP IRELAND. 

J. EDMUNDSoSr & CO., 

Are prepared to tend gratis, and post free, their Illattrated Catalogue, containing nnmeroai 
Engraringt, with prices and descriptions of the various articles displayed in their many tpaciou 
Show Rooms. 
They enimierate the following as a few of their leading articles, viz ;— 

Grates, Stoves, Marble and Iron Chimney-pieces, Fenders and Fire Irons; Cooking apparatoa, 
Kitchen Ranges; all sorts of Cooking Utensils; Brass and Iron Bedsteads with Bedding; Cait 
Iron Stable Fittings; Electro Silver wares of all descriptions, comprising Spoons, Forks, Tea and 
Coffee Sets, Cruet Stands, Dish Covers, &c ; Table Cutlery of Warranted quality • Tea Urns and 
Kettles (best London bronzed) ; Fapier-Mache and Japanned Tea Trayk ; Dish Covert (Tin and 
Britannia Metal) ; Lamps (Moderateur and ParafiSn) ; Washing Machines and Mangles; Saddloj, 
Whips, Bits, &c ; Oas Chandeliers (in Crystal, Ormolu, and Bronze for Hall Lamps, Bracket!, 
Lobbby Lighto, die). 

J. E. & Co. are Sole Agents for 
Wigham's Patent Portable Gas Apparatus, for Lighting Country Residences, &c. Gas Woito 
for Towns. 

Steven's Patent Bread machines. The Waterfall Washing and Wringing Machines. Hilner*! 
Fire-proof Safes. Ratclyffe's Leamington Prize Kitchener ibc, dec Prices very moderate. 
GAS "WOBKS FOR COUNTRY RESIDENCES. 

Dublin has now become famous for the production of these Machines ; this is chiefly owing to 
the great attention bestowed by J. EDMUNDSON and CO. upon the Manufacture of their Imprbred, 
Compact, and Easily Managed GAS WORKS, for Noblemen's and Gentlemen's Country Residencei, 
Public Institutions, Aic, &c. 

J. EDMUNDSON and CO. have rendered their Establishment in tliis city a recognised marketftr 
this description of Gas Works, and would call particular attention to the Apparatus which they 
have in use on their premises in CAPEL-STREET and in the #)umerous places already lighted; 
also to their small Gas W orks in the Exhibition. Their Apparatus is cheap and Simple, and the 
Gas made is of the purest quality. The light produced is much cheaper than that made from «1 
or candles. J. E. and CO. have lighted by zheans of their Gas Apparatus the residences of very 
many of the Nobility and Gentry of this country, and also a ntmiber of colleges, mills, coontiy 
towns, &c. 

Thry are prepared to furnish a Prospectus and all particulars on application, and to give 
estimates for all parts of the United Kingdom, Free of Expense. 

Iron Poundry, (ks Apparatus, (jas Pitting, and Ironmongery Establislmieiit, 
33, 34, 35, 36, Capel-street, Dublin. 

MME MOT f « (& S(DHg, 

Coachbuilders to Her Majesty the Queen, His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant^ 

and the Commander of the Forces, 

X X S, StxaMLnxOxr-lxlll, XDulsXlxi.. 

A Large Stock of Carnages of every Descrvptvon aZvxiys •» ffancL 

Any Carrriage can be Hired with option of Purchase at the end of the First Tear.- 

MESSRS. BUTTON, have also introduced the system of Purchase by Fixed Annual 
Payments, extending over Three or Four Tears, after which the Carriage beoomM (b« 
Property of the Hirer without any further Payment whatever. 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISEK. 



Sd 



W. MILLINGTON & SON'S 
CELEBRATED NEEDLES, 

MANUFACTURED FOR AND 
SOLD BY MESSRS. 

M'SWINEY, DBLANY, & CO., 

DUBLIN. 



H. GUYNET & CO., 

CAWBRIC & LINEN MANUFACrURERS, 

Prize Medal of the Exhibition at 
Paris, 1839, and at London, 185L 

PARIS— 33, Rue du Sentier. 

CAM BK A 1—6, Rue de I'Epge. 

* BELFAST— 10, Chlcliester-street. 



RENNIE & FRIEDMAN, 
BERLI N, 

MANUFACTURERS :0F 

J (rial is requested. 

Agent at Hamburgh, 

Christopber Nicbolas Meyer. 

WHOLESALE 

Optical and Photographic Warehouse, 
J. SOLOMON, 

22, Red Uon-square, London. 

The Trade and Shippara supplied at the shortest notice from 
the largest stock of Photographic requisites in Europe. 

Grant's Patent Lamp, for burning Magnesium 
Wire, price, 36*. Magnesium Wire supplied. 
Illustrated Catalogue gratis, on application. 



all other xaeans have failed. 
Cases, 448 penny packets, S4s. 

Half Cases, 224 17s. 

Quarter Cases, 112 8s. 6d. 

Only to be had in Four-ounce Packets, 

ONE PENNY EACH. 

Sold by all Corn chandlers, Grocers, and 

Druggists. 

Spice Mills, Tliornhill Bridge, 

King's Cross London, 
City Depot., 145, Fleet Street. 



IRISH BOG OAK 

OHMMENTSo 

S. SAMUEL, 

29 NASSAU-STREET. 29 

^ixii Class Cartings, &t. 



PATRICK BEAKEyS 

Cabinet Making, Upholstery, & General 

Furnishing Warerooms, 

Staftord-atreet, Dublin. 

P. Bbakkt, in announcing the Opsirnraofhis 
New Establishment, availg himself of the 
opportunity to return sincere thanks to the 
Nobility and Gentbt, and the numerous kind 
Friends and Patrons, for the distiniruished support 
he has received during the last f )rty years. 

The Funeral Department engasres special 
attention, and will be found in all its arrangements 
to combine a principal of respectabili|;y and 
economy hitherto unattempte«i 
Valuations and Auctions Conducted and Closed 
in the moat sati^actory manner. 



DO not proceed with New Bnildings before you 
have seen the RUSSIA.N BRICK STOVE, 

17, Great Portland-st., W, London. 

75 percent. Economy of FueL 

Powerful Heat. 

Perfect Sa fe ty from Fl R E . 

Impossibility for Smoke to enter the room. 
It IS not portable, Hnd must be built on the spot. 
being part of the building. 

J.p M., & H. CRONMZRE, 

MANUFACTURERS of tirsf da-s Mathemnfical 
and Drawing Instruments, 10, Bromehead- 
street. Commercial road. East, London, E Prize 
Medal, 1862: Society of Arts Silver Medal, 185.1. 
Crtt«logue of Prices forwarded on application. 
Specimens of Articles can be seen in 

Class B, Section 10 A, 

DUBLlUr EXHIBITIO IV, 1865. 

ARCHERY AND FISHING TACKLE. 

THOMAS ALDRED, 

MANUFACTURER to the Prince and Princess 
of Wales, &c^., and Holder of the 1851, 1853, 
and 1862 Prize Medals, begs to state his goods are 
of first-rate 4uality, at the most moderate prices. 
Manufactory, 126, Oxford^treet, London, W. 
Catalogues gratis. Agents in Dublin, T. and G. 
Austin, 39, Westmoreland-street. 



JOHIV HcIVElL, 

glilitarg gtnsical Instrument ®anafad»r«r, 
140, CAPEL-STREET, 

DUBLIN. 

MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S 

UNRIVALLED 

"LOCK-STITCH" ^ 

Jlmuiran Sttoing ilar ferns, 

Office — 69, Grapton-stkeet, 

DUBLIN, 

AND CAKRLAGE DEPABTMENT, 

Ittteruatlonal fixhibUioii, 

I 



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49 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVEETISBB. 



I • 



PATIiNT ms^^ 

NUNN'S CASE, 

No, 204, Near Artillery Courts Exhibition. 

This system is equally applicable to signalling under all circumstances in daylight, darkfieas, 
or fogs; and, notwithstanding this extraordinary peculiarity, its simplicity is so great tiiat 
eyen an uneducated man can both read and make signals by its means after an hour's 
ui^ruction, whilst to those conversant with signalling, a glance at the system is sufficient. 
One White Light only is used; colour having hitherto retarded the progress of signalling. 

The Kight Signal Apparatus is only here displayed as illustrating most fhlly the principlet 
of the whole system. Simplicity, independence of individual skill, and increased range. 

The ^stem b in course of adoption by Her Majesty's Navy, the Inventor, a Commander 
in that service, being at present attached to the Channel Fleet, to complete the necessary 
arrangements. It is in use by the Governments of France, Kussia, Austria, Prussia, Italy, 
Sweden, Denmark, Turkey, and America. 

It is, in conjunction with the similar system of Captain Bolton, adopted as the Signal 
System of the British Army. Messages have been exchanged between a vessel at sea, and 
a Station on shore, 30 miles apart, in a few minutes, by this system; whilst no signals were 
ever exchanged more than 7 miles with any other system under similar circumstances. 

Further information can be obtained Arom Mr. 1NUMN of 179, 
St. Oeorge's-street, East, Iiondon, Sole Agent and Manufacturer, who is 
himself the Inventor and Patentee of the Portable Sic^nal Irfonp, 
peculiai^y adapted for Taclits, Boats, or small Steamers; and at whose 
•ase can also be seen I>r. EDMONDS' Patent Safiaty ParafiBn Xaamp 
Feeder; and Iiieutenant Key's Signal Fog Bellows. 

' WILLIAM SAOlOHiD and SDKS, Canvas MansAiotiirera, ArbrMrfh. 

BV SRECIAL- ARROINTMENT- 




WILLIAM LENNAN, 
TO THE C^UEEH, 

THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE, THE LORD LIEUTENANT 
OF IRELAND, 

THE COSIMANBER OF THE FORCES IN IRELAND, &C.» AC, 

29, DAWSON-STREET, DUBLIN, 

BEGS to pall the attention of the nobility and f^entry, the racing world, and the public, to bw DI8» 
PLAY of SADDLERY, HARKESS, &c., for which he bus attained the Prize Aledals at th« 
Exhibitions in EaKland, Ireland, France, and America. He is the Inventor and Sole Proprietor of 
Lennan's new celebrated Safety Stirrups for Ladies and Gentlemen, for which be has obtained Royal 
Letters Patent. Upwards of 4,000 of these Stirrups have been disposed of since their first iniroduction 
at the International Exhibition, 186*2. They may be obtained from the Patentee and all re«p«cl«bla 
Saddlers throughout the Kingdom. Books containing prioe-lists and opinions of the leading £ncli»h, 
Irish, and ContinentalJournals on the excellence of his work at the sereral ExhibitloAf* tent nit to 
port Ofdift'^ WtMr for IlMiift, AtetraUao, and MiUtaiy Oatflti promptly atteud«4 to. 



B 




OFHCIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 41 

■ ■ ~^ — ■ ■ . - JJ.^ — iJ t .n u 

Honorable Mention for Printing Materials, Glass 1^8, No. 5291, Inttrnational 
Exhibition, 1862. 

(Snxilatinz ^aper (Kuttiitg pax^ines. 
ESTABLISHED 1835. 



FREDK. ULLMEK, 

MAWUPACTURBB OP THB 

ALBION AND COLUMBIAN PRESSES, 

Cutting Machines, &c., &c., 

15, OLD BAILEY, LONDON, E.G. 

IKttstratcir fist 0f i«to ITatmdB 

For PrUitersh Book«-1}ta^9r8, «n<l S^tloners, 

A New and Revised List, containing 76 pages, with Engravings, sent Free upon applicatiop. 

FOOLSCAP BROADSIDE PRr^^TING IVIACHINES, 

For Hand Power. THIRTY GUINEAS NET CASH. 

TYPE CATALOGUES containing a Large Assortment of Founts, with the Latest 
Designs, and Prices and Weights affixed. Forwarded Free. 

„ : — . — - — _ 1 . . . 

Fry's ChQCQlate and Cocoa. 

PRIZE MEDAXiis: 

WERE AWARDED TO 

J. S. FRY MD SONS, 

Manufacturers to thg Queen mnd Prtnet 9f Walet^ 
AT THB BXHJBITIPNS, 

LONDON, 1851; NEW YORK, 1853 ; PARIS, 1855; LONDON, 1862. 
FKY'S CHOCOLATE FOR BATING, 

in Sticks and Drops, and in Fancy Boxes, is rapidly increasing in public favour. 

Being perfectly pure and wholesome, it is strongly recommended fcr 

children, with whom it is a universal favourite. 

FRY'S CHOCOLATE CREAMS, 

are a very delicious sweetmeat. 



FRY'S HOMCEOPATHIO COCOA. 

The purity, delicacy of flavour, and nutritious propertieg of this C©cor>, ns well m the gT«at fftil||y 
uilh uhich it it> mad*), have reu<lered it a staudard article of general consumption, 

J. S. FRY & SONS, BRIsfoiTAJND^ LONDON, 

Sole Manufftetureffi of the celebrated 

CHOCOLAT LAFONT. 

Sxht^torti OUm A, Section 3^ Dublin Exhibition. 



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43 I OFFICIAL CATALOGXJl! ADVERTISBB. 



JOHN W. HAOKWORTH, 

DARLINGTON ENGINE WORKS, 
DARLINGTON, ENGLAND, 

Manufacturer of every description of Steam Engine 
and Boiler. 



( % JfT. H's Patent Engines are noted for their 
durability and economy of fuel.) 

Fixed and Portable Com Mills. 

Irrigation Pumps, Cotton-gins. 

Hydraulic Presses, Oil Machinery, &c., &c. 
The materials are warranted of the best description, the workmanship 
unsurpassed, and the several Machines, from their compactness and simplidty, 
are admirably suited for exportation. 

CHINA AND JAPA 



VISITORS to the EXHIBITION are requested to inspect the CHINESE 
COURT, in the Northern Transept Gallery, where can be seen a very large 
assortment of beautiful 

ds o.y ds o.y 

MANUFACTURED IN CANTON EXPRESSLY FOR 

W, HEUTETT and Co., 

Under the Personal Superintendence of their Special Buyer ; also a rare 

Collection of 

Ancient Oloisonne Enamel, choice carvings in Jade Stone, and a 
magnificent State Bedstead taken during the late War. 

W. HEWETT X CO., 

WAXUCHOt7SE&-18 and 19, FENCBXTRCH-STREET 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISTIE. 43 

DEinWKFORD'S FI^OO IdAGMESIA. 

For Thirty years the Medical Profession have approved this pure 
solution as a remedy for 

A0ZBIT7 OF STOMACH, HEADACHE, (K>XrT, & ZNDZOZSTZOK; 

The most delicate Ladies and Children use it as a gentle and 
pleasant aperient when>combined with their 

ACIDULATED LEMON SYRUP. 

In hot seasons and hot climates, the regular use of this simple remedy 
has been found highly beneficial. 

It is prepared (in a state of perfect purity and of uniform strength), by 

BiNNEFORB ANB Co., 

CHEMISTS, &c., 
17 2, NEW BOND-STREET, LONDON. 

Sold by an respectable chemists throughout the World. 

CAUTION.— See that "Dinneford & Co." is on each bottle and red 

label over the cork. 

%axi^axt mis ^mi\ Mtst^rit ^Slailfaag Cnrnpfang. 
IMPROVED SERVICE 

BETWEEN 

ENGLAND & IRELAND, 

Vid 



EXPKESS MAIL TRAINS AND VESSELS 

TWICE EACH WAY DAILT, 

i^ea Passage, 3| Jwurs.) 



Available for One Month, exclusive of the date of issue. 

THE Steam Vessels of the Company also Sail Twice Daily, from North-wall, Dublin, and 
from Holyhead, weather peniiittmg — Sundays excepted — ^in connexion with the Train 
ServioB (Sea Passage 6^ hours). Return Tickets available for 14 days, exclusive of the day 
of issue. 

Carriages, Horses, and Parcels, conveyed at moderate Through Rates by Passenger Trains. 
Goods and Cattle conveyed at Throufrh Rates 

Time Booi^s, Time Bills, and all information may be obtained at tlx.e Company's Stations, 
and at their Offices, Westland-row liailway Station, and 49 and 60, North wall, Dublin. 

By Order, 

W. CAWKWELL, 

Oefieral Manager 



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OFFIOIAli ^ATA^O&U^B! AJ>Ym:TISaSR. 45 



TOURISTS' TAT^BftlTE 



THROUGH EXTRAOBDINAY DIVISION OF LABOUR, 

Distinctly shows Small Windows 10 Miles off, 

L(mdsG€^ a* 30 Milesj Jupiter's Moons^ Sfc. 

r[£ Marquis op Carmarthen : *' Tne Eeconnoiterer is veryvgood." — ^R«v. Lo3tD'8cM»»- 
DALE "approves of it." — ^Lord Gifford, of Ampney: "Most useful." — LordGar^c^qh: 
"JfiemarkAbly good."-^ir Digby Cayley, of Brompton: *' It gives me complete satis&c- 
tion, and is wonderfully good." — ^Major Starkey, of Wrenbury Hall, Nantwich : " Quite as 
powerful as that for whidh I gave £5 5s." — Caft. Sendey, Royal Small Arms Factory, 
Enfieldjjiock, "Presents his compliments to Messrs. Salom & Co., and begs to enclose 
168. il€a; for a Eeconnoiterer Glass, having just tried that sent to Lieut. Hopkins, .and 
found it effective at the 1,000 yards range."— F. H. Fawkes, of Famley Hall, Esq. : "I 
never before met an article that so completely answered the recommendation of itsmah^, 
nor, although I have tried many a Glass, combiliing so much power for its size with acxmuch 
clearness." — The Field: "We have carefully tried it at an 800 yard rifle range against 4^11 
the Glasses possessed by Members of the Corps, and found it fully equal to any of ;those 
present, although they had cost more than four times its price." — lioies and Queries: "What 
-intfinding Tourist will now start without such an indispensable companion to a ,plei)«t|re 
trip ?" A " Reconnoiterer" will be delivered at any village (having a Post Offic^ in Great 
Britain or Ireland, within a few hours after receipt of Order. The celebrated "»H>YTHE " 
GLASS shows Bullet Marks at 1,200 Yards, and Men at 8J Miles. Price 31s. 6d. All the 
above Glasses, respectively bearing the Registered Trade Marks, "Salom," "Reconnoiterer," 
and " Hythe," are only to be had direct from, and by written application to, 

SALOM S CO., 

98, PRINCE'S-STREET, EDINBURGH. 

No Agents of any kind anytokere, 

ALEXANDER THOMSON & S^ 

GUN AND RIFLE MAKERa 

16, UNION-PLACE, 



AND 

Class B.y Section 8 B., 

DUBLIN EXHIBITION 



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46 OFFICIAL CATALOGtJE ADVERTlSElt. 

INSTANT RELIEF AND A RAPID CURE OP 

g^fit^ma, €onstrmptiorr, Coughs, (Kolbs, anb all glisorbws 0f t^e $wal|[, 
E^roat, unb 3^angs, 

ARE INSrKKD BY 



The extraordinnry poweri* of Jhin in^nlimble ine<Hcine are now proved by h mass of evidenoc and 
teotiinoniHlti, which iiiiist runvinre the inoKt t>ce|jtiCHl that for dll disorderf of tbe breath and lungrUu 
the iii«»M ettei'timl reined) evfr discovered. 

The following 'Vesiintoinul hns jNst heen reoeinerf by Ihp Proprtelor; small Books conlaininguuuj 
hundreds oj well attested cures may he had from evert/ Agent m the king out. 

CURE OF COUGHS AND COLDS. 

The following is from Mr. R Rich.«rdsoii, 21, < orn-iiiMrkef, Dul)lin : 

** Ainongi't the main most snrpr^^il)f: j«tH»eiiient> of the good rcKult? of Dr. LOCOCK'S Wj»FEIS 
which 1 have heard, one p«rNm ^tated thai io"^ 17 years the) have kept her alive; an.1 nhe would nollwl 
Mfe to po to bed without taking ti.em. 1 need hardly say that I recommend the Waleis, and iiuarialjly 
obi^erve a beneficial result." - 

They pive instant relief, and a rapid cure oT asthma, consumption, coughs, and all disordensofthe 
breath and litnf;s. 

All throat affections are immediately relieved by allow'ne: a Wafer to dissolve in the month. 

To SinK^'fand Public Speakers they are invaluable for clearing and strengthening the voice. 

They have a pleatant ta.-te. Price— Is l^d., 2^. 9d., 48. tid., and lU. per Box. S.)ldbyall 
Medicine Vendors. 

Caution— Kvery Box of the GENUINE medicine has the words " Dr Locock's Wafers" in 
kite letltrs on a red ground in the Government Stamp, without which words all abe c0U2iT£SFBB. 

®nber goDsl |lalrcnnge. 

DR. LOCOCK'S POWDERS 

FOR ALL DISORDERS OF CHILDREN, 

PBOM BIKTH TO TWELVE YEABS OF AGE. 

Children Cutting their Teeth are speedily relieved by these Powders. 

Full Directions for all the Disoiders of Children are given with every packet, also Rale to 
Management and Diet in Sickness and in Health. 

Ho Family ^h<)uld be without them in ca.«e of sudden illness at nis;ht or day. 

Sold by all Druggists at Is. IJd., 2s. 9d., and 4s. 6d. per packet. 

Or sent free by post for Is. 3d.. 3s., or 4s 10<i., by the Proprietors' Agents, Da SilVA k Co., 
26, Bride-lane, Fleet-street, London, E.C. 

NOTI CE OF REI VIOVAL, 

GEORGE NELSON, DALE, & Co., 

Patentees S; Manufacturers of 

(^tMmt, Isinglass, imtr (Si^ktmje fn^tnges. 

REMOVED FROM 

14, BUCKLERSBURY 

TO 43, LITTLE BRITAIN, 

LONDON, E.C . 

WORKS, EM8C0TE MILL8, 
WARWICK. 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVEBTISER. 



47 



DAT A MLtRTI.V*§i REAL JAPAN BLAGKIIVO, see Advertisement, page 13. 



HEATING BY HOT WATER. 




HOT WATEB 

APPARATUS, 

Brected 
Complete 

in any part of 

the 

c(hj™ 

Estimates Free. 



BOILERS, 

OF ALL KINDS 
PIPES, 

and 
Connections 

DELIYEBED FSBB 

To any Station in 

ENGLMD. 

Catalogues Gratis, 






Adolf Moritz^ of Nordhausen^ Prussia^ Jfanu/acturer of Wool and Misullaneotu Stuffs, 

PICKLES, SAUCES, JAMS, &c., 

(FREE FROM ADULTERATION), 
MANUFACTURED BY 

CROSSE & BLiACKWELiLi, 

PURVETOBS TO THE tVCTEEtX, 

SOHO-SQUARE, LONDON. 
CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S, 

Renowned first-class Manufactures are obtainable from every respectable Provision Dealer 
in the World. 

Purchasers desirous of being supplied with C. and B's. goods, which are all of the best quality, 
and of a thoroughly wholesome character, should be careful to see that inferior articles are 
not substituted. Their genuine preparations bear their names and address upon the labels. 

Their Pickles are all prepared in Pure Malt Vinejrar, boiled in Oak VaU, by means of 
Platinum Stkam Coils thus avoiding all pussibility of contact with Copper or any other 
injurious metal; and they are precisely similar in quality to those supplied by them for use at 
ZZoxr JVC A»J ost^'s "J? A*l3lO. 

Oxford Sausages, Patent Pre.««erve<l Hams, Cheese and Bacon, Yorkshire Game and 
Pork Pat^s, Fresh Oysters in Tins, Salmon Cutlets, Whitebait, Fillets of Soles, Bologna 
Sausages, Herrings a la Sardines, Soups, Meats and Vegetables in Tins, Fruits in Syrup, 
also in Noyeau and Brandy, Crystallized Fruits, all of which, as well as many other articles 
too numerous to include in an advertisement, they can stron-ly recommend Their Salad 
Oil is the finest imported. 

C. & B. are AGFXTS for LEA & PERRINS* CELEBRATED WORrESTK'^HTRE 
SAUCE, (varslairs' Sir Robert Peel's Sauce, M. Soyer's Sames, Relish and Aromatic Mustard, 



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OFFfCIAL OATAL06UB ABVBBTISER. 



IRISH SCENERY. 



HE MALVERN GLASSES. 

(Eye-piecee stamped "W. & J. Bubbow, Malvern."— No others geimiM.). 

BURROW'S MALVERN GLASSES 

Are tbe most cHarming' Tourists' Binoculars for viewing Scenery, &c. Tliajf 
are ligHt and handy, exquisitely clear, very powerful, and do not fatigue tic 
sight. 

Price - £S 13s. 6d. in sling Case, complete. 

Laarger size £6 6s. Od. „ », 

SENT ON RECEIPT OP POST-OFFICE OBDEB. 

. AixDKESS— W. & J. BUEEOW, Malvekn. 

]f3l— .An Illustrated Catalogue of Binoculars and Telescopes Post Free on 

Application. 



GAS WOEKS, 

leferenees- to^ CitiesrTowEB. Vitee^ Pi^ie 4 
Private Establishments, lighted % Mr. Bower, m 
aU parts of the world* 

Oa» Ap9«v»ta» in detail— Retorts, condensers, scrubbers, waBhewr, purifiers, 

gasholders, centre^ by-^ass, and stop valves, statiom Hieters, goveaow, 

exhausters, &c, of all descriptions. 
Ghw Conflumews' MMen^ both wet aiid dry, on the- most approved principles 
Oas Cookinir and heating stoves. , 

Oas Pittings of every variety, regulators, carburators, main pipes, service pipes, 

aaid fittings, lamp columns, lanterns with cast-iron, tin, and copper frames, 

&c., &c. 
not Water ApparattMr—Sole manufacturer and proprietor of Marriott'^ pat^t 

self -regulating boQer,^^ which requires no brickwork, and maintain tte 

ye^nived d^ree of hteat for any length of time. 

Estimates and Prices given on application to — 



WT. I«E€WP», HlJWTlW«WOM»lllItB^ 

OlTiCBS— LONDON, 222, Great; Portknd-fitreet. 

PARIS, 25, Avenue ITAntin (C. J. A. Diet). 
ST. PETERSBUUGH, Vassiffi Qdbroff (H. B. 
Froom and Co.) 
LfXters to Be addressed to St, J^eots. 



nioii+i^/^^ K, 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE APVEETISEE. 49 



OOOXi MMD RSFICBBHntG- VonUJBV KSQilStBITSi. 



OLDRIDGE'S BALM OF COLUMBIA. 

ESTABLISHED DPWABDS OP POETT YEAES. 

22, WELLINGTON-STREET, STRAND, W.C 

Among t]tie saany luxfuriee of the present age none can be (>bt!uned possessing 
the manifold virtues of OLDRIDGE'S BALM OF COLUMBIA. If applied 
to the roots And body of the hair it imparts the most delightful fiOolnfiSB, vnth an 
agreeable fragrance of perfume. It also at this period of the season prevents 
t£e hair from falling off; or if already too thin, or turning grey, will prreeot its 
furtber progress, aSid soon restore it again. Those who reaUv desire to have 
beautiful hair, either with wave or curl, should use it daily. Xt is ako oefabimted 
for strengthening the hair, freeing it from scurf, and producing new bair, 
whiskers, and moustac^he. For the Nursery it is invaluable. 

Price 3s. 6d., 6s., and Us. only.— C. and A. OLDBIDGE, 22, WeUington- 
street, StJ»nd, W.C. 

JAMES LYNCH, 

DEALER EXCLUSIVELY IN TEA, 

70, SOUTH GKEAT GEORGE'S-STBEET, 

^\t |«ttrrmtioiiaI €%\xMmn f ri^c P^bal. ^fayarltrtlr, 1862. 

ESTABLISHED, 1774. 

JMPERmL PATENT SASH & BUND-UNE. 



To Builders, Carpenters, and Blindmakers. " 

J, ACBTTN, Manufacturer of the above Articles, particularly wishes to &ect 
^iifOittfiiUien of the tnade to his 

Of -wt^di h^ is now making four qualities ; and he strongly reeoHamends that in 
«ll -easee they s hould be ^purchased in preference to the Patent Lines, made 
from Jute, which article has neither the strengtfi nor liie durability of Flax, 
consequently cannot give so m^uch satisfaction to the Consumer. He also parti - 
cularly invites the attention of Upholster^ers and Blindmakers to his Improvea 
Patent Linen Blind Lines, which are very mfudi superior to anytiiing yet offered 
to the trade. They can be obtained of all Ropemakers, Ironmongers, Merchants, 
Factors, and Wholesale Houses, in town or coxmtry. 

NiOW ExhtbUing in Class C — Seoii^n 14. 



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50 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER 

BAOINE TVatohes, 33, Nassau-streot, coroner of Orafton-fltreet 

BACINE and Co., Geneva 'Watoh Manufacturers, 33, Nassau-street. 

"RAOUSTEi and Co.'s Keyless ^Watches, 33, Nassau-street. 

BOBWICK'S BAKING FOWfiER 

IS SKCOMMENDED BT 

The Queen's Private Baker, and Patronized by the Army and Navy. 

With BORWICK'S BAKING POWDER you can make Bread without Yeast. 
BORWICK'S BAKING POWDER Saves Eggs and Butter. 

BORWICK'S BAKING POWDER Prevents Indigestion. 
BORWICK'S BAKING POWDER is Warranted Wholesome. 



In Buying BORWICK'S BAKING POWDER take Care that You Gfetit 

Jt thert are several spurious and injurious Unitationsy see that the words <* GEORGE BORIFJCP 

are on every Packet. 
To be had of all respectable Chemists, Grocer:*, and Cnrnchandlerw, in Id., 2d., 4d., and 6d. packets; 
and in patent boxes, iid.y Is., 2s. 6d., and 6s. each. Wiiolesale of 6. BORWICE, Chiswell-itmt 
(late Little Moorfieids), London. 

ImporteTB and Distillers of all kinds of 
ESSENCES AND ESSENTIAIi OII.S FOR CHEMISni 

'§ttfmm, €Dvitttimm, Cjmjffuntos, h, 

MANUFACTUAERS OF SPIRIT COLOURING CAPILLAIRE, 

LIQUID KEFINED SUGAR, 

i:SSENCE OF TURKEY COFFEE, ^c. 



30, UTERPpOIi-KTRliET. laOlVDOST. E.C. 
WORKS— ASH GROVE, HACENET. 



PATENT WATERPROOF PERCUSSION CAPS, 
C^iemically prepared GUN WADDINGS, CARTRIDGES 
for Breech and Muzzle Loading? Guns, and every description 
of SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

JSold by all Respectable Gun Makers throughout the Kingdom. 
P. JOYCE & Co., 

Contractors to the ^Var Department, 

57, UPPER T HAMES-STRE ET, LONDON. 

IVbolesale only.— EstabllBbed JjiSO. 

W^ILLIAM TAYLOR AND COMPANY 

WEKS AWAKDED, AT THE 

Xxa.tox*XLAtloxxAl 3ES^li.JLl3ltlo3a^ X80S. 

The only Prize Medal in the United Kingdom for 
COMPOSITE CANDLES. 



Sole Ageiits for Ireland— llessrs. John Barrlnston And Sons, Ooblbi* 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISEB.! 51 

BAGINS 'Watches, 33, Nassau-street, coroner of Qrafton-street. 

"BJlCINE and Co., G-eneva WatoH Manufacturers, 33, Nassau-street. 

BACINE and Oo.'s Keyless "Watches, 33, N^assau-street. 

ANTRIM. ABMS HOTBIj, PQBTBUSH.. 

r WARDS of 100 apartments, including a noble Coffee Room, Saloon, Billiard, and Smoke Roomi, 
(principally facing the sea.) Table U'Hute daily. Vebicies to Giant's Causeway and Back daily. 
Posting in all its branches. The ** Antrim Arms Hotel Omnibus" attends til Trains and Steamers to 
oonvey viHitors there free. French spoken ; fixed charge for servants. 

Wm. L. Beloe, Bod & Fishing Tackle Maker, Home-place, Coldstream, London. 

Morson's Pepsine Wine; Morson's Pepsine Lozenges. 

Are perfectly palatable forms for administering this popular remedy 

for Weak Digestion. 

JMANUFACTUREJO BY 

T. MORSON AND SON, 

31, 33, and 124, Southampton-row, Ruasell-square, Iiondon, IXT.O. 

P^SMe Wine in bottles at 3^., 5«., cmd lOs. each. Lozenges in boxes at 2s. 6d, and 4s. Sd. each* 

STETTINEB DAM PFMtJHLEN ACTIEN -aESELLSCHAfT. 

STETTIN STEAM MILLS COMPANY. 



ATTENTION it requested to the verv superior Fiour exliibit«cl by the above Company, manttfactured 
from tde first uuHlitie» of selected M-heat, and now being introduced to this count^'. 
The mark **UOU Isixtra White," for colour, strengih, and dressing, it is confidently beiiered, will be 
found preferable to anything imported. 
The second duty, marlc '^ 00," is a good and useful Flour, of excellent flavour. 
Prices will be found considerably under that of any superfine Flour which at all approaches the 
qoality. 

REPRESENTED BY 



2, DRURY-LANE, LIVERp'oOL> 

\r%/ ^^xrxxoir's O^^xxxoxr^^ Sta»3a.dy 

{Hee Class B, Hection LO). 
GEORGE HARE, 1, Lower €althorpe-8treet, Gray*8-Inn-road, London. 

GEORGE SALTER AND CO., 
WEST BROMWICH, LONDON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

IMPROVED SPRING BALANCES, 

STEAM GAUGES, 

BAYONETS, STEEL SPRINGS, 

AND 

DYNAMOMETERS 

For Testing Strength of Wire, Rope^ Cotton^ Yaruy 8fc. 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER.. 



PRICB 3d., VO&T*TKES. 

PAfttPHLRT on " Mnsf cal Education." A suggestion that vocal mntic «honld berome a regular, 
and in-trnmental A hichet* branch of education, instead of being treated as a mere accomplish, 
ment- wHh a brirf account of the International System for that purpose. By J. F. Borschitzky. 
" Mr Borschitzky** very ingenious theotiea."— i4r/ Journal. " His views and plan are sagacion* and 
clear."— JoAn Bull, "His work abounds in aphorisms, some of them strikingly original."— Ero. 
•* TMere is a gbod sense in the little threepenny hook.'*— New* of the World. 

London : J. T. Boir8Chlt2*Ly, 32, Tavistock-place, W.a 



r BUYERS OP WOODS, IVORY, &o., Wholesale and Retail.— ROBERT FAUNTLEITOT and 
CO Foreren Hardwood Merchants, Importers of Boxwood, Ve.^etable Ivory Nuts, ConUactorsto 
Her Mfti^y's Governm^mt, 90 and 100, BunhiH-row, Finsbpry. Londpn Depots-Jnmes^et, Old- 
street and Old Swan Wharf, Upper Thames.street. Robert Fauntleroy, Juror International Exhibition, 
186^ 'and Exhibitor in the Dublin International Exhibition, 1865, of a large Model of the London 
"' . . - .- Catalogues on application. Museums or Amatetirs supplied 



1862, . , J 

Royal Exchange, constructed of woods, 
with specimens at low prices. 



iiSS- FbB HATTHORN'S OABDEIT NETS, 

or Patterns, Prices and Testimonials free by post, please direct— 

^p^_ HAVTHORN^ NOT-TINOHAM^ ENQLAND, 



KBVI1¥ & SELLERS, Peel HaH Works, Preston, Iiiiporters of Boxwood. 
and Merchants, Manufacturers of Bosses, Shuttles, Pickers, and Bobbins of 

every description used la the Spinning and Weaving of Flax, CoUon, Wool, and Silk. Having the 
largest estHblishment of the kind in the United Kingdom, of 60 years' standing, with their unproTed 
inathi!ioty,iiT« prepared to execute extensive orders in any of the above articles, and can gtiarantw to 
their friends well-seasoned materials and superior workmanship, with the lowest remunerative pnce^ 
Class B., Section 6th, No. 18, 



WOOLLAMS & CO., 
near Mattcbester-square, London, W., 



WM. 

INVITE the attention of the Trade, Ac, to their specimens of Mediarval and other Paper Hangings. 
Claw B, Section 26. 



EDUCATIONAL WOfeKS BY 

W. & A. K. JOHNSTON, Geographers to the Queen, Edinburgh. 

1.— A complete set of W*ll Maps, of General, Physical, and Classical Geography, fully colonied, 
Uree aize, 66X42 inches, each 10s. plain, 128. varnished. 

3;_A series of Reven illustrations of Natural Philosophy, uniform in size with the large WallMtf, 

2.— Smaller size (General Geography ) coloured, 58. and 6s. each, 
price 10s. and 12s. each. For these a Prixe Medal was awarded at the London Exhibition of 1862. 

Detailed Catalogues free from Messrs. M'Glashan and Gill, Dublin. _ , 

TO Printbks, PtrBLisHBBs, BooKSELLEBS, Statiokebs, Manupactubbbs, and Tbadim.- 
WlLLIAM J. WELCH begs to call particular attention to his Establishment for the execution 
of ereiy d«feci1ption of Drawing and Engraving on Wood, including Pictorial, Architectural, Mechani(al, 
antl Sclentltlc Iltnstrations. Books, Catalogues, Ac, Illustrated in a most superior manner. Blocks wr 
every description of ColourPrintirg executed in the finest style of the art. 

Offloes-25, WEIililNGTON-STBEET, STRAND, IiOU-DOir, •W.C. 

Class £., Section 26, No. 47. 

THE Exhibitor is prepared to receive orders for painting in mosaic any articleof marble or slate. A» 
this is a most charming occupation for ladies, terms for giving instruction in the same may be 
learned by applyinic to 

Miss S finhofor, 34 e, Hanovei>8treet, Edinburgh. 

JOHN HARE and Co., Temple-gate, Bristol, 

ESTABLISHED 1782, 

MANUFACTURERS of White Lead, Painters Colours of every description, VaTnishes 
of the finest quality, Purified Quick and Hard Diying Linseed Oil; also Importen 
of Olive and all other Oils; Distillers of Coal-Tar, and Manufacturers of Cresote, Pitch, 
Napthas, &c. 



-W. IVIIiIiIAMS 8l son, 

MANUFACTUKEBS OF 

Tobacco, Snuff, Bright Bird's Eye, and 

The Oxford Smohing Mixtwre, 

And other Fancy Tobaccos. 

liaporters of Foreign Cigars, Fancy Snuflfe, 

itfimdy Foot & Co.'b Genuiiie High ToaBt; 

BBU>a£-STB££IT> CHESTEB. 



THOMAS WESTT & CO., 



(LATE PORTER'S), 



Lamps, ChandeUers, Oil, etOi 

CM IN A HAl_L-, 

IS, DAWSOJM»STa£ET» DinUAT* 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVEB.TISEE." 



S^ 



. B. Mulrenin, E.H. A., Miniature & Portrait Painter, 23, Gt. Bninswick-st., Dublicu 



''MAIZE FARINA 



jj 



By Hep Majesty's 



Eoyal Letters Patent. 



A new and most useful article of diet of American importation. Delicious, nutritiouB) aad 
healthy ; for Puddings, Custards, Blancmanges, Cakes, Gruels, Soups, &c., &c. Excellent 
for Children and Invalids. 

Dr. Hassall, in his Report on the Analysis of Clarke's Maizefarina, says: — "It is 
valuable in its nourishing properties, containing proportions of nitrogenous substances so 
essential to the forming ot muscle, and contributing to the growth and support of the 
nitrogenous tissues of the body, therefore very superior to the various non-nitrogenous 
articles of diet now so largely consumed ; it is also light, and easy of digestibility." 

Price— 8d. per Pound Packets. 
Sold by tke principle Grocers^ Chemists^ and Corn- Chandlers througliotjt the Kingdcm, 

Sole Agent for the United Kingdom and Europe. 
g|o. 1, Ingram-court, Fenchurch-street, Iiondon, E.C, 

W. J. BUSH & COMPANY, 

ORANUIiATED CITRATE OF MAGNESIA, 

Recommended by the Faculty as an excellent remedy for Heartburn, 
Indigestion, Acidity, Sour Bdchings of the Stomach, ^c. It is a mild aperient, 
and far more efficacions than ordinary Fluid Magnesia, and from its 
palatable flavour is eminently suited for children. 

PREPARED ONLY BY ' 

Vi% J- BUSH AND GO., Manufkcturing Chemists, 
ASH GROVE, HACKNEY, LONDON, N.E. 

Sold Betail in Bottles Hi is. eaeUn »v every re^^etalfU Chemist 
throughwtt the Kingdom. 
*♦* To prevent disappointment, asle for ** Bush's Citrate Magnesin^''^ and 
don'^% he persuaded to have any other. ^ 

"P UMSEY'S DETERGENT POWDERS for removing DIRT and TARNISH from dull Gold, Electro-Gilt, 
-*^ Silver (Frosted) Articles, Jewellery, Silver Thimbles, Movements of Watches, <fcc. 

RUMSEY'S IMPROVED NON-MERCURIAL PLATE POWDER and Silversmith's ROUGE for 
POLISHING all kinds of Plate, <fcc. One trial of either wiU suflRce. Sold Everywhere, in Boxes 
and Tin Canisters, at 6d., Is., 39. 6d., 3s. 6d., and 4s. 6d., each. Descriptive Bills and 
Specimen% ^y Post, on receipt of two Stamps. Address— Mr. W. S. RUMSIlir. Manafactniv 
f OK ChemM, 3, Claphani Rise, S., London ; or may be obtained of Mr. THOMAS 
BBUXKEB, l^orthAVestern Transept, ExhtMtlott Paiaee, Bgblin. 

ZSxxXA^XTfi^oxia.ozi.'ts. 

' For Terms Apply (with Stamp Enclosed) to 
W. H. WARMER, Photographer, Ross, Herefordshire. 

CHINA, GLASS, LAMP, AND EABTHBK-WABE ESTABLISHMENT. 

A. THOMAS, 

11 AND 12, WELLINGTON-QUAY. DUBLIN, 

Has on hand a large yariety of the aboye Goods of the newest and most approved patterns, in Breakfast, 

Dinner, DesseTt. ToUet, and Tea Sepicsa of the very best qjanlity, and at extreBl•^y Low Prieea; and has 

also the Largest Stock m Town of Table Glass, beautifWly cut and engraved in vanous patterns, taw 1 1 



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54 



OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



SNA/AINE ao ADENEV, 

®t*F Samrfwtttrera io t^t ^rxun, t\^ Jriiue Htib Jrinass of HHbIm, anb l^t Si^al i^amilj^ 

185p PXCCADXZ.Z.y, LONDON, W. 

Wholesale, Rctnil, and for Exportation. Claw C, Section 16 a. 

M'CORMICK'S FIRST-CLASS 

ROYAL VIC TORtA HOT EL, CORK. 

It contains 150 Bedrooms, lO SSnites of Apartments, &e. 

Carriages start from this Hotel for Killamey, via "Prince of Wales' Eoute." 

Charge* Moderate. 

THE QUEEN'S INSTITUTE, 

Jfor i^t SJrammg anir (gmplognuitt of Cirural^ir Moimn, 

Under the Patronage of Her Majesty the Queen, and 

Her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales, 

8 6, SS^oles^v^oxTtlx-stxrooty X3ixl3lJLxx. 



Visitors admitted between the hours of Twelve and Five, 



I 

i 



Donationa Received at the Office. 

A. B. CORLETT, Hor^. Sec. 

THE GENUINE and ORIGINAL 

EAIJ D£ COIiOGIVi: 

OF 

JOHN MARIA FARINA'S WIDOW, 

Opposite the Old Market^ No. 11, 

COLOGNE ON EHINE, PEUSSIA; 
London Branch, 13, Walbrook, City, 
» Manager, Mr. F. W. Heintz. 





PMn Labtk Signatw^ and B$al, attacML to everf Bottle qf my gmuine Mau d§ Cologn$, 



',yuy 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



65 



GROVER AND BAKER'S 



CELEBRATED 



ELASTIC-STITCH 



» ARE OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC 

AS PREFERABLE TO ALL OTHERS, 

For the following Reasons:— 

1. They are more simple and durable, and less liable to derangement. 

2. They sew from ordinary reels, and no rewinding of thread is necessary: 

3. They sew with equal' facility all fabrics, the mi)st delicate ^and the heaviest, and with 

all kinds of thread, silk, cotton, or linen. 

4. They stitch, hem, fell, cord, bind, tuck, gather, quilt, braid, and embroider with equal 

facility. 
6. They fasten both ends of the seam by their own operation, and the seam is so strong 
and elastic that it never breaks, even on the bias. 

6. The seam is more plump and beautiful, retaining its plumpness and beai|ty after washing 

better than any other; and though cut at every sixth stitch remains firm, and 
neither runs nor ravels in wear. 

7. The seam can be removed in altering garments after proper instructions without 

picking or cutting them. 

8. These Machmes are more easily kept in order than any other, and need not be taken 

apart to be oiled. 
9 Watching and varying the tensions upon the thread, necessary in other machines, is 
• unnecessary in these. The tension being once adjusted on the Grovkb and B^vker 
Machine, any amount of sewing may be done without change. 

10. Thejr make ^beautiful EMBifoiDERY without any change of arrangement, simply by 

inserting threads of suitable sizes and colours for this purpose. They are the only 
Machines that both embroider and sew perfectly. 

11. The work done by these Machines cannot possibly be equalled by any other, and it has 

always received the firat premium over all competitors wherever exhibited. 

12. Every Machine guaranteed, and instruction to purchasers gratis. 

B9* Upwards of 100,000 of these Machlnea are now in uae In all parts of the ixrorld, 

JUustrated Prospectus and Samples of Work sent po»t free on application. 

The Grover and Baker Sewing Machine Company are the only makers of Machines in the world which 
have been patronised by Koyal Families. Besides supplying them to the Empress of liussia and the 
Queen of liavaria, they hold appointments to the Reigning Sovereigns of France, Spain, and Brazil, 
cities of which may be seen at any of their own Establishments and Agencies. 

aaOVER & BAKER SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 

59, Bold-street, Liverpool ; 150, Begent-street, W., London, 

Sole Agents for Dublin and vicinity— 
BATLIS BVBKITT A Co., 85, GnOlon-street. 




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56 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 



IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT. 



JOSEPH GILLOTT, 

METAIililC FEN MAKER TO THE QUEEN, 



VICTORIA WORKS, BM^MINGHAM, 

BEGS to inform the Commercial World, Scholastic Institutions,, and the 
PubHc generally, that, by a novel application of his unrivalled Machinery 
for making Steel Pens, he has introduced a new series of his useful productions, 
which, for exceixence of temper, quaxity of MATEBiAii, and, above all 
c&EAPNEss IN PRICE, must cnsurc universal approbation, and defy competition. 

Each Pen bears the impre^ of his name as a guarantee of quality ; they are 
put up^ in boxes containing one gross each, with label outside, and the fac-simile 
of his signature. 



fe^ ' *^ ' 




At the requert of numerous persons engaged in tuition, J. G. has introduced 
his WARRANTED SCHOOL and PUBLIC PENS, which are especially adapted to their 
use, being of dif erent decrees of flexibility, and with fine, medium, aQ(l broftd 
points, suitable for the various kinds of Writing taught in Schools. 

Sold Retail by all Stati<Mi«rs aBd Booksellers. Merchants and Wholesale 
Dealers can be guppliad at the Woafks> Gi^haw-abr«et, i^irmingham ; at 91, 
John-street, New York ; and at 37, Gracechurch-street, London. 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 57 

CHATWOOD'S 

IttMt latent ^^Chmpowder t^actupeoMit^ XiitefMcH^d Ateel 
Fire and Bargtat iPrqof Aankers^ Safes 

. Should alone be trusted voith the custody of valuables* 



5 

H 

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CO CD 

CO O 

CD % 

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TEeT I MON I Al 

^^tirHKREAS CHATWOOD'S PATENT ?AFK AND LOCK COMPANY, Limittd, of the LAN- 
W CASHIRK SAFE AND LOCK WORKS, BOLTON, haviug, on th« 13th February, 186.5, 
submitted to be publicly tested with gunpowder, or any kind of burglars' tools, induding * tteel wedges y* 
nnd the ^ratchet lever drills* one of CHATWOOD'S double patent 'gunpowder escapemoDt' safes, 
fitted with his patent * hematite intersected' door and invincible lock, the same being a Safe made for 
the Bank of Bolton, it was unanimously resolved by those present to witness the test, that his Worship 
the Mayor of Bolton, -and John Hick, Esq., Engineer, be desired to act a« referees. Now we, the 
undersigned, Richard Stockdale, Esq., Mayor of Bolton, and John Hick, Esq., of Bolton, Engineer, do 
hereby certify that every facility was offered by the patentee to all nereons present to have the above- 
mentioned Safe tested in any way they might deem fit, and that sucn Safe was thereupon fairly tested 
in our presence, the result proving perfectly satisfactory. And we further hereby certify that, in our 
opinion, no burglar can open Chatwood's double patent 'gunpowder escapement,' * hematite inter- 
sected' safe with the facilities and time that can be at his command: and also that the same, as we 
believe, is the bestta/e in the market, and we would strongly urge its adoption by all permns desiring 
immunitv from the depredations of scientific burglars. ** RiCHARD StOCKDALE, Mayor. 

** 14/A FtfirMary, 18(55. *' JOHN MiCKjC.E., Bolton" 

/m. vnr <Jtp rfm 'vmr ins* j/ir •» « a 



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68 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISEB. 

The Cheapest Lock Stitch Sewing Macliiiie 
in the World,! ! 

AND 

£7 7 O 



'^ 



COMRl-ETE, 
Willi Improved 

Automatlo Tension. 



^. 



'^A 



ae, ^"^^/s 

olseless, ^^4^ <^ ^ ^^ 

Compaot, !r 

Effective. 

her pad or brush is dispensed "with, which ii 
ice and trouble; there is no friction upon tk 
■ necessary. 

The work done by the " Alexandra," is exactly alilie 
on both sides. It has neither cord nor ridge, and will 
not unravel. 

Its consiruprion is extremely simple. Hence it is not 
likely to jEjetout of order. Its u»e is easily learned, and 
it Is very durable. 

It will perform al^varietie8of sewings — »uch as stitchiDf, 
jcniliering:, hemming, binding, Ac. An exuerienced ope- 
rator can finish an entire garment by the Machine, fuch 
»>f a sj)irt or roat, usinjj hand labour only to work the but. 
ton -holes* and sew on the buttons. 

Its price is «o very low, that every family of modewte 
nu■an^ in Great Britain can atford to buy one. It* neat* 
ness, coinpactne>s, and elegance of model and finiwh 
ri^nder it an ornamental article of household furniture. 
No family can hny for the same amount of money and 
aiticleso interesting and so useful. It makes sewiuea 
pleasant pastiine. iiKtead of being a wearisome task. lt» 
jntn diiction will confer a great boon upon women, and 
esptMially upon those who are now engaged inthedrudpery 
of liari(li*evving. Ttgi\i^hincrea8edemplp\ment to Tailor*, 
nre>sniakers, >hirjimakers. Capmakers, Stay makers, 4c 
Bv its use 1 hey will save, in a few weeks, more than double 
the urice of a Machine. 

The '* Alexandra" excels any Family Machine at preseitt 
in the market. 
The *' Alexnndia," us applied to the " Victoria Folding Cabinet" (Pilbeam's Patent), forms th« 
only complete Portable Sewing Machine, size, 18 in. X \'^ in. 

The British Sewing Machine Company (Ziimited), 

BRITANNIA WORKS— 62, North Frederick-street, 

GLASGOW. 

LONDON DEPOT— 71, Oxford-street, nearly opposite the Pantheon. 

N.B. — J liberal dttcount allowed to per»on$ detirou* of trading in iht Machine, 

SoLB Agents pob Dublin — 

USessrs. Jas. Forrest and Sons, lOO and lOli Grafton-it 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISER. 59 , | 



CRmOLINE IN THE DRAWING ROOM, 1865. 

THOMSON'S "PEIZE MEDAL" SKIRTS^ 

Begistered 
OF THE SAME QUALITY AS SUPPLIED TO L 



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60 OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADYEETISEB. 



OriiMriiiie Ui the Drawlns-coom, iOtf^ 

THOMSOH'S "PBIZTMEBir SIORTS 

Of the same quality as supplied to Ladies of the principal European 
Courts, are sold by best Dra^rs everywhere, always «t ^ 

Rei^stered 

^^EteBiiwrvV wi^Bi the G«;>wn Trade Mark, thus— 




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OroiCIAI. CATALOGtHE ADTERTISER. 



61 



MERRYWEATBER AND SONS, 
LONG ACRll & LAMBETH, LONDON. 



STEAM & HANI>POWEB FIRE-ENGINES & PUMPS, 

Ftre-'EscapeSy Hose of aE descriptions^ Buckets^ Fire-Cocks^ Firemen's HebfMts^ 
Mdts andSatchets^, J-c, cmd aU Apparatus connected wkh Fire ExtvngyMiing. 

Tiio PBIZJB MEDAXi awarded to MSKRITT^HATHISB; and S01S8, 

X"ox* tiro fizssa:' z*xz=i.x: xs3^c;>X97mBs jwt "^^ 

Gkreat Exliibition, .... 1861 \ International Bxhibition, . 1862 
P&ris ExMbition, .... 1855 I Netherlalids Exhibitian, . 1864 

••MRST (JRAND PBIZB" 

VOR THE 

BEST AND MOST POWERFITIi STEAM FIRE-ENGINE, 

At the Great International Competition of Steam Fire Engines, Crystal Palace, July, 1864. The Cele- 
brated "Sutherland" Engine raising steam quicker and discharging 75 per cent, more water than any 
other Engine, and waff tae only BngfiiFthofe completed the most severe trial, and" styled by the Committee, 
of which His Grace th« Dnlce of Sutherland was ehainnan, "worked satisfaetorily to every respect." 

Merryweather & Sons' Steanv Firo-BngiBeB-are the mosi simple and durable, work at half the 
speed of all other Steam Fire-Engines and- with much less steam-pressure, and indicate a considerably 
more horse-pOwer per cwt. 

At the last competitive triaL held at Rotterdam their Engine was decided- to be the best, and con- 
sequently purchased by the city. 

Practical Mechanics* JoumaZ. Sej>tembee, 1863. — ^No. 186, Vol. XVI. 

STEAM FIRE- EMChlNE eO MPETITIOIV, 

>te. J/ri^* to haa>e hfui lomc necial emerience in thu dep€u4namtt^ »tokttni»«iSngitMfeim§,h^r<f<i!*fi^ 
idteft<(M» to tug ottanl' «r jSMO', the Fhrsf Prize in tlie large dass of Ei)glne4i.t6 tfiaiof MESSSs. 
;yad-toaflann tbat^ ▼**T be«f Eagiae axblblt«<k te either lwv»' <w>» P!^ Bmall, was that of 



MkrrtwxXtheb " " 



thattthft ▼«» bMt Eagiae axblblt«<k in either kuw b ^ , 

aboveaUtmeff to. ^ etfrnbtne* tevercd of the teryfirH requisitet if a perfect Steam Fire Engine.^ 
ILLUSTRATED PRICE LISTS ON APPLICATION. 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVERTISEIL 



Bees Worki ng in Neighbour's Glass Hives. 

BKC: HIVES AXl^ FERM CJLSEf^ 
Are Exhibited under Balcony in Exhibition Oarden, by 
EDMOKPSON, BROTHERS, Seedamen, lO, Pame-atreet, DnbliiL 



iSmgi)^ 



GOODAUAS ROYAl IRISH PIAYBG CARDS, 

To he had of all Stationers and Dealers in Playing Cards, 

Charles GoxyoxLij and Son, London, solicit the attention of the Irish Public 
to their remarkably elegant Playing Cards, which they have brought out in 
honour of the Dublin Exhibition. The design being at onCe graceful and 
simple, comprising as it does: — The Irish Harp and Crown surrounded by a 
wreath of Shamrock ; with the motto *' Erin go Bragh," beautifully printed in 
gold and colours — forms a pleasing souvenir for all who visit the Exhibition. x 
C. GOODALL & SON, CAMDEN TOWN LONDON, N.W. 

PURDIE, BONNER, & GARFRAE, 

PAIIiTEBS, 
DENIOIVERS & ART DECORATORS, 

77, GEORGE-STREET, 

EDINBURGH. 

OFFICES FOR 

IRISH, BRITISH, AND-FOREIGN PATENTS, 

^nir ibe ^eofbtrattoiT of BtziQns. 
4, LOWER 'ORMOND-QUAY, DUBLIN. 

All Business relating to British and Foreign Letters Patent may be transacted at 

these Offices. 

Provisional Protection and Patents obtained. Searches made for Specifications, and 
Abstracts or C(»pies supplied. SpecificationR Drawn or Revised. Mechanism 
Designed, and Drawings made by competent Draughtsmen. Prolongations and 
Confirmations solicited. Disclaimers entered. Advice on the Patent Laws. 
Opinions on Infringements. The Novelty of Inventions ascertained. Ornamental 
Designs, Devices, and Patterns, and the Configuration of Articles of Utility, 
protected completely or provisionally. 

BYRNE & LAMBERT, Patent Agents. 

Pamphlet containinq partieulnrs may he obtained on application. 



ROBERT E. GRADY, 

COACH BUILDER, 

3 8, DA WSON-STREET, 

{Opposite the Mansion House Gardens), 

DUBL.IN- : 

Carriages bought and sold on Commission Carriages to Let, with Option of 
Purchase. Kepairs, Painting, &c., on moderate Terms, 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ADVEETISfiR. 



DUBLIN EZHIBrnON, CLASS A, 8ECII0K 2. 

Co an's 

No. 1 

Indigo Blue. 

WARRANTED PURE. 

Special attention is invited to the Specimens in their Case, 

: ^ 

J. & J. COLMAN beg to call the special attention 
of Irish Families and Laundresses to the quality of 
their No. 1 INDIGO BLUE. It contains a greater 
amount of colour, and will be found purer and more 
lasting than any other Blue, and one fair trial will 
always secure the preference. Ultramarine and other 
Blues, however attractive they may seem in appear- 
ance, will be found to waste very speedily, and when 
in use on linen the colour flies more quickly than the 
beautiful tint imparted by the Indigo Blue, which 
retains its freshness much longer. Laundresses who 
have been induced to try Ultramarine, in consequence 
of its Jowness of price, have found it to waste so much 
that in many instances they have been glad to return 
to the use of the Indigo Blue, which experience teaches 
them is in reality the cheapest and best. 



J, & J. COLMAJJ, 26, Caimoii Street, London, E.C. 




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64 OiPnClAt CATALOGUE ADTERTISEE. 

SIXTH YEAR. 

ART UNION OF DUBLIN, 

Sanctioned by the Lords of the Privy Council for Trade. 



^atrmt: 
HIS EXCELLENCY THE LORD LIEUTENANT. 

The Most Noble the Marquis of Drogheda. 

The Right Hon. the Earl of Enniskillen. 
The Rigl\t Hon. the Earl of Geanard. I The Right Hon. the Earl of Bective, EP. 

The Right Hon. Lord Cloncurry. Lord Otho Fitzgerald. 

The Rev. the Provost of Trinity College. | The Right Hon. the Earl of MouuTCiSHit 

Chairman — The Right Hon. the Lord Mayor. 



Sir A. Crosdin Weldon, Bart., D.L. [ William M'Kay, Esq., L.I/D. 



John Vance, Esq., M.P. 
C. Bianconi, Esq., J. P. 
Hon. Hely Hutchinson. 
Captain Lidwill. 
J. J. M'Carthy, Esq., R.H.A. 
Alderman R. Carroll. 



Sir Joscelyn Coghill, Bart. 
Alderman Rd. Atkinson. 
Hon. J. P. Vereker. 
R. J. T. Maerory, Esq., M.A. 
Joseph R. Kirk, Esq., R.H.A. 
Alderman P. P. MacSwiney. 
Trustees — Alderman P. P. MacSwiney, R. J. T. Maorory, and C. Bianconi, Eaqn. 
Bankers — The Royal Bank op Ireland. Secretary — M. Angelo Hayes, Esq. 



Sir Edward Grogan, *art., It? 

Thomas John White, Esq. 

Joseph Robinson, Esq. 

Sir Thomas Deane, R.H.A. 

Dr. Sayers. 

L. Waldron, Esq., M,P. 

M. Angelo Hayes, Esq., R.EA. 



The objects of the Society are to promote the advancement of Art ib 
Ireland by the purchase of works of Painting and Sculpture from Artists, 
and their diffusion amongst its Subscribers for the necessary ej^enses. 
THE EMTIRE FUIVD^ EXPENDED IIV PRIZES, 

Deducting only the Expenses of Management. 

MONEY PRIZE SYSTEM. 

Right of Selection by Prizeholders from the Dublin International ExhiWdon. 

Prkeholders may delegate the power of Selection to a friend^ or the Committee will 
select for such Prizeholders as may desire it. 

Last Day for Tickets, SATURDAY, 30th SEPT, 
Drawing of Prizes, WEDNESDAY, 10th OCTOBEB. 

M. ANG-EIiO HAirSS, Secretary, 4, Salem-place, DuUSn. 

ALL LETTERS OF INQUIRY MUST ENCLOSE A STAMP. 

Tickets may be had from all respectable Printsdlers and Stathmers: AND AT TEE 
DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION 

A XM ^i NumberSi drawn Frizes, will be forwarded, after the Prswing on receipt 
of a atampad and directed Envelope* 



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OFFICIAL CATALOGUE ABYEBTISEB. 



DUBLIN INTEEMTIOML EXHIBITION, 

X 8 e o. 



Itnber Ifee i5pmal ^atrnnase of Itr Psjestg the (gtteen. 



T 



i 



WILL CLOSE 



ABOUT THE 



EXHIBITORS 
Will please make Arrangements to REMOVS their 
Property from the Building immediately after that 
date. 



In the MEANTIME, the Exhibition will be open EVERY 
WEEK-DAY, from Ten o'clock, a.m., to Five o'clock, p.m., 
and on two or three EVENINGS in each week, also, from 
hi^fpast Seyen o'clock to Ten o'clock, when the Building will 
be brilliantly illuminated. 



mUSICAL. PEElFORIilAIVCfiSi 

By Military Bands, on the Organ, and by eminent Instrumentalists, 
take place every Day, and in the Evenings. 



18th September, 1865. 



HENRY PARKINSON, 

Comptroller. 



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OFFIOIAIi CATALOGUE ADTia!Cn»lSK. 



DUBLIN EXHIBITION PALAC 

AND 

WINTER GARDEN COMPANY 

(LIMITED). 



FOR 

OPENING OF THE PALACE 

AFTER THE 

CLOSE OF THE EXHIBITION. 



SHORTLY after the Close of the Exhibition, the .iPaJaoe 
be -available for CONCERTS and other PUBL 
ENTERTAINMENTS. 

The Galleries •will be appropriated to Permanent Exhibit 
<rf Sculpture, Pictures, and other objects of interest. 

Pull particulars will be announced hereafter. 

The ccmstruotion of the Winter Garden (for which large Biiip\ 
of Plants have already been obtained) will be commenced as ( 
as possible. 

The Directors will be prepared to receive commirnicaaioiK i 
parties who desire to exhibit or to deposit Works of Art on i 
also for the Hire of Rooms, and Exhibitors' Stan^. 

By Order, 

HENRY PARKlNSi 
Seoreiarjf, 






■ 'T*^^' 



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