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Full text of "Official gazette of the United States Patent Office. [microform]"




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Eiplrmtion of patenU. The patents wlthlD the ra.nge d( nuna;>«rs ;ndlc»t«d t>«io-w expire during \; rL ijT'i, t-i ept f,os« which rnav ' av.- 
expired ?ar;ter due to shortene'd tern-j under the provisions of Public Law »0 "ttth ' ngreas approved August h IMS 80 8tat Ho and F' ib.l" Law 
919, S3rd Congress, approved August 23. 1964 58 .~t4t "M , or which may have had their t«rms curtailed by dUdalmer under the provLslons of 
35 V $ C 253. Other patentj, issued a'ter the datea o' the range f numben Indicated tjelow rM7 have expired be/ore the fui: term .)' 17 years '.'ir 
the saoie reasons, or ':ave .apae ; unler the ir viji ns r 35 r S i ' :51. 

Patents .. . . Nomban 2,'0', 3-'J to .' "a: .'"• inciualv' 

P. ant Patents . - Namben 1 S"4 to I 3--^ incluslv- 



6 



I'L.ANT r.\TENT: 



\/ \l t \ f'l \N ! 

Htnrv V\ \1f)tykau, Whitewater, VS iv. assitni 
Brothers, Ini... Barherton, Ohio 
nied Aug. 2*. I'i'O, >er N.. ^' >^ 
Int. (I \()lh 
Pit. — -<" 



I '^ ( 1 

1 \ 



.^,144 
KOSF PI \N 1 

^^l^la^l \ VSamner, Pustin, ( alif.. avsignur i- 
&. Perkins ( 'impan>. Medford. Oret 
nied Stpt ^. I'J^n. Ser, No "0 ^4^ 
Int (1 \01h ' 
I s. ( I. Pit. — 2H 

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\FK1( \N MOl Fl 

H.rmani! Hoitkamp. V^ ertber stra.s^ '^ " l'..stfach 1^ 
4243 K^elburg. (.errnan) 

Onuinul applKarion Oct. ", 1%8. ."ser. Ni> "6«,"(K), no« 
Patent No. .^.05.'. Divided and this application Vpt. 
14. ly'O. "Ner No. "2.246 

Int. (1. XOlh .' '" 

( > (1 Pit. — 6^ 1 C lajm 

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3.145 

NFC TARINF TRFF 

John U. Fnns. 39572 Road 64, Dinuba. (alif. 

Filed Sept. 10. 1970. .Ser. No. "1.282 

Int. (1. AOlh ' .' 

I .S. (1. PH.— 41 

\ i.itk'c .,L;("in,^ -preaJ.r.i; - a^c : vrrviev; 
Nr,n<.' Tee >^.'".ivN - r.ard'* .ind .-. regiii.ir .::'.,: p'..'^:.,..: '■ c 
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3.148 
AF-RICAN VIOLET 

Hermann Holtkamp. Werther Stras.se 5-'. Postfach 1'^. 

4243 Isselburg. German> 
Original application Oct. ". 1968. Ser. No. "65, "00. now 
Patent No. 3.053. Divided and this application Sept. 
14, 19-'0. Ser. No. 72.247 

Int. CI. AOlh ,^ nn 
I .S. (I. Pit. — 69 1 Claim 






de^.end,: 



-H." .>. ee: 



";.;':,";i. and Si2:'::puU,.i: f ';ii "k 'i^, • -pe^.e^ 
.".hi^h h.i^ perrp.i'inent nev. ^■h.-.r.i,;'e'.^tu"^ ,n^.il.dl^.l; 
s'-cncth of '-tem. fast .'.nd ^.gorou^ c'v"^v.th. pro:..ve 
•F».^er:r,k;. iiniforn: houquet. prolorced "loor-Nrc pe'NV. 
:e-i-;an^e to disease, rehabilitv ;r ;n;;ia;.;"£: rc^^ piantietv 
x'tentN r, ot ♦lov-.er^ p.-.-t rp.at;i';t\ or. their re^pe^t.^e 
stc""^. :e':.;bih;\ ;r r;ev. p!an;^ ret.iiniri: .h.ifaJteri'-t,^^ ct 
the p.-.rert .:rd pronoanecd ..nitormit;* t.tro. .gno.;' t.ne l.te 
. V . ! e 



3.146 
AFRICAN VIOLET 

Hermann Holtkamp. Werther Strasse 5-7. Po^ach 19. 
4243 Isselburg. Germans 
OriRinal application Oct. 7. 1968, Ser. No. 765.700. now 
Patent No. 3.053. Divided and this application Sept. 
14. 19T0. Ser. No. 72.245 

Int. CI. AOlh !^ UK 
I .S. CI. Pit. — 69 1 Claim 

.A hybrid violet of a descendant of a crcvs betueen the 
Sainlpaulia ionantha and SainipauUa ^humensis species 
which has permanent new characteri'^tics including strength 
of stem, fast and vigorous growth, profuse flowering, uni- 
form bouquet, frolonged blooming period, resistance to 
disease, reliability in iniuating new plantlets. retention of 
flowers past maturity on their respective stems, reliability 



3.149 
KALANCHOE PLANT 
James T. Irwin. Canyon. Tex., assignor to Irwin 
Greenhouses, Inc.. Can>on. Tex. 
Filed Sept 15. 1970. Ser. No. 72.557 
Int. CI. AOlh -^ 00 
r.s. CI. PH.— 68 1 Claim 

1 ,-\ new and di^^tinct \ariety of kalanchoe plant, '-ub- 
-lantially as herein shown and described, characterized 
particularh as to novelty b> the unique combination of 
a highh branched, but sturdy and upright plant habit, 
a consistent plant height ranging between aKiut 12 inche>- 
and \^ inches tall, medium sized foliage of an attractive 
Moss Cireen to Fern Green color, a profuse blooming 
habit, a substantialh uniform blooming date, but with 
an ability to respond to ^hort day treatment making it 
capable of vear-round blooming, an unusual, attractive 
and distinctive soft orange flower color, long-lasting qual- 
ltle•^ as a potted plant, and an abililv to initiate and de- 
velop flower buds under high night temperatures of sum- 
mer when other varieties fail. 



OFFICIAL CtAZETTE 



Ma\ 2, rj72 



3,150 

NE>^ AND DISTINCT VARIETY OF 

BLLEGRASS PLANT 

Gerard William Pepin, North Brunswick, and C yril Reed 
Funk, Jr., Milltown, NJ.. assignors to Rutgers I ni- 
versity'. New Brunswick, NJ. 

FUed Sept. 17, 1970. Ser. No. 73.270 
Int. CI. AOlh 5 00 
L\S. CI. Pit.— 88 1 Claim 

A Kentucky bluegra-ss plant which exhibits excellent 
seed producing properties and a rich dark green color. The 
turf is quite leafy and of high quality, with gtX)d densitv 
and vigor. The plant has good resistance to common g^a^^ 
diseases, particularly stripe smut, leaf spot and leaf rust 



3,151 

NEW AND DISTINCT VARIETY OF 

BLLEGRASS PLANT 

Cyril Reed Funk, Jr., Milltown, N J., a.ssignor to Rutgers 

L'niversit>, New Brunswick. N.J. 

Filed Sept."l7, 1970, Ser. No. 73.271 

Int. CI. AOlh 5. '00 

L.S. CI. Pit.— «8 1 Claim 

A Kentucky bluegrass plant which exhibit-, a rich, dark 

green color, a moderately fine leaf texture, good rhizome 



and tiller dcvelopmen;. ,; ^h>>rt likiule uithout hair, and 
Tioderatelv small panuics and spikclctv v.ith three florets 
per spikelet The pLint has ',cr\ k;oiKl turT densitv and 
^on/i-nta; spreadin;; abi!;t'> and is hik;hl\ resistant to com- 
mon grass diseases, parti^.ilarK strips.' snui', pni'Aderv 
nuldev^ . and Icat .--Ust 



3.152 

NEW AND DISTINCT VARIET\ OK 

BLl EGRASS PLANT 

CJerard William Pepin. North Brunswick, and Cyril Reed 
Funk. Jr.. Milltown. NJ.. assignors to Rntgers Ini- 
>ersity. New Brunswick, N J. 

nied Sept. 17. 1970. Ser. No. 73.272 

Int. CI. AOlh 5 00 

I .S. CI. Pit.— 88 1 Claim 

A Kentuckv bluegrass plant having a wide plant spread 
and a dark, bluish-preen ^oior which is maintained from 
early spring to late fall The plant is aggressive, highly 
apomicti.. and exhibits gcxxl resistance tc) stripe smut 
disease 



PATENTS 

GRANTED MAY 2. 1972 

GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



3,659,294 
ADJUSTABLE LINK FOR PROSTHETIC LIMB 
Rkhard Glablsiewskl, Duderstadt/Han, Germany, assignor to 
Otto Bock. Orthopadbcbe Industrie KG, Industrlestrasse. 
DudersUdt, Germany 

Filed May 1. 1970. Ser. No. 33.793 
Claims priority, application Germany, May 3, 1969. P 19 22 

619.8 

Int. CI. A61( li08 

L.S. CI. 3-21 4 Claims 



against a penpheraJ sill or set of posts sunk into the soil at a 
distance from the basin The space between the sidewaJls of 
the basin and the penpheral support means is largely empty 




A link between members of a prosthetic limb, such as a 
connector between a knee joint and an artificial shank, has a 
frustopyramidai four-sided boss divergingly projecting from a 
spherically convex base which slidably engages a cor- 
respondingly concave annular socket surrounding the boss 
Two pairs of setscrews. lodged 90° apart in the annular 
socket, bear upon the sides of the frustopyramidai boss to 
enable iu adjustment, within a limited swing angle, in two 
mutually orthogonal planes 



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and accommodates water supply ducts as well as troughs to 
catch the overflow spilling across the platform; when pro- 
vided with a fluidtight bottom lining, this space can also serve 
for the temporary storage of excess pool water. 



3,659^95 
SWIMMING POOL 
Josef Linecker, Roscngassc 5, A5230 Mattigbofen, Austria 

Filed Jan. 20. 1970. Ser. No- 4.290 

Claims priority, application Austria, Jan ?1, 196Q. A 631/69; 

Mar. 25,1 %9, A 2940/69 

Int. CLE04hi//6,i/75 

U.S.CL 4-172.19 8 Claims 



A swimming pool is constructed firom a tank having 
sidewalls supported against tfie outwardly acting water pres- 
sure only by engagement along their upper edges with a sur- 
rounding platform braced along its outer ciitumference 



3,659^96 
TOILET SEAT 
Robin Harry Stamper, 1891 Westboume Rd., Bryanston, 
Transvaal Province, Republic of South Alrica 

FUed June 16, 1970, Ser. No. 46,655 
Claims prioritv, appbcatioa South Africa, June 24, 1969, 

69/4489 

Int. CL A47k 13130 

L.S.CL 4—217 8 Claims 



2i 




i^ SI ii« I 



A toilet seat embodying a fan and a deodorizing element. 
The toilet seat has a cavity to accommodate the fan and the 
deodorizing element. Conveniently the fan and the said ele- 
ment are mounted on a cover member adapted to seat over 
the cavity. The toilet seat fiirther includes a seal on its under- 
side to enable the seat to seat sealingly on the rim of a toilet, 
bowl. 



3,659^97 
BABY DRESSING TABLE PAD REPLACEMENT 
Bernard Schutz, 40 East 78th St., New York« N.Y. 
Filed July 22, 1970, Ser. No. 57,042 
Int. CL A47c 27100, 7100 
U A CL 5—35" 5 Oalms 

A baby dressing table pad replacement that can universally 
replace the original pad of a baby dressing table in a remova- 
ble manner by means of a {kx;ket provided by stitching on 
the underside of the pad or in the form of a flap hingedly 
connected by stitching to the beading of the imderside of the 
pad at one side thereof and made into a pocket by the 
securement of laterally extending snap fastener straps 
secured to the opposite sides of the pad and adiqrted so that 



/ 



10 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



the pocket can either by extended over an extending lip of devices controlling the supply and vent valves in sequence 
the ubie top or can be wrapped about a tubular open top either to regulate ascent velocity or to suspend a load at 
type of baby dressing uble. The pad may have a stiffening 
member when being used with an open top table and is 
further secured to the Uble top by straps extending from the 
bottom side of the pad. The second pad is hingedly con- 




32-^ 



-34 



V36 



nected at its top to the top edge of the first pad and itself has 
its own stiffening board for support when opened from the 
first pad and extended over an open table. Where the uble 
has a top. this pad takes advanuge of an extending lip that 
remains on the old dressing uble top since the pad has the 
pocket which slips over the extending lip. 



West 



I 3,659^98 

INFLATABLE BOAT 
David V. Edwards, Godalmlnc, EagUnd, aHlgnor to 
Pr«dacts Corp^ Newark, N J. 

Filed May 28, 1970, Ser. No. 41,248 

Int. CL B63b 7108 

U.S. CI. 9-2 A 8 Claims 




I 




depth An outer container is provided for packing all com- 
ponents and for atuchment of loads. 



3,659300 
FIN ATTACHMENT STRUCTURE FOR SURFBOARDS 
Robert Kari Johnson, Ventura, Calif., assignor to W. A. V. E. 
Corporation 

FUcd July 25. 1969, Ser. No. 844,902 

Int. CI. A63c 15/00 

U.S. CI. 9-310 E 7 Claims 




An inflatable boat is provided made up of inflauble side 
tubes, a connecting fabric floor, inflaUble aft, midship and 
forward thwarts between and connecting the side tubes 
above the fabric floor and below the uppermost level of the 
inflated tubes, the thwarts when inflated constituting occu- 
pant seats, a fabric bow and member fabric stem member 
and optionally a removable hinged floorboard including stem 
and forward portions curved in a fore and aft direction 
together with a rigid transom connected to the stem floor- 
board. There are keel-like skegs provided for the stem and 
forward floorboard portion. 

In place of the side tubes, a single U-shaped inflaUble tube 
can be utiliied. 



3,659,299 
VARIABLE DISPLACEMENT RECOVERY DEVICES 
William M. Davidson, and Howard W. Cole, Jr., both of 
Mountain Lal(es, N J., assignors to Proteus, Inc, Mountain 
Lakes, N J. 

Filed Dec. 29, 1969, Ser. No. 888^45 
Int.Cl. B63c 11100,7100 

\iS. CI. 9-8 R } C>«|J!»« 

This invention provides controlled buoyancy at depth dis- 
placement of water. The apparatus includes an expansible lift 
bag, a gas source, with a gas delivery device connecting the 
gas source with the lift bag. A valve controls the supply of 
gas from the source, while another valve vents gas from the 
lift bag. Both valves are controlled by ascent velocity sensing 



A means for securing a fin to a surfboard in a desired ad- 
justed longitudinal position is provided in the form of a 
mountuTg box imbedded on the under rear surface of the 
surfboard for cooperation with a fin base structure on the fin. 
The box defines an elongated channel having a series of en- 
largements in the form of cavities for cooperation with a se- 
ries of flanges formed on a longitudinal rib on the fin base. 
The cavities each include undercut portions for reception of 
the flanges so that the rib may be inserted in the channel and 
the entire fin base then urged longitudinally to cause the 
flanges to engage within the undercut portions of the cavities. 
By providing converging walls in each of the cavities, a 
wedging action takes place with respect to the flanges to 
secure in a very tight position the fin to the surfboard. The 
desired longitudinal position of the fin relative to the surf- 
board can be preselected by preselecting portions of the se- 
ries of the cavities with which the flanges arc to cooperate. 



3,659,301 
FOOTWEAR WTTH METHOD AND DEVICE FOR ITS ^ 
MANUFACTURE V 

Horace R. Auberry, and Anton Liebscher, both of 
Wayncsville, N.C., assignors to Ro-Search, Incorporated, 
Wayncsville, N.C. 

Filed May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,003 
Int CL A43d 3100 
U.S. CL 12-133 R 1 Claim 

The invention refers to the manufacture of shoes with up- 
pers lasted by pulling a string secured to the lasting margin of 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



11 



the upper. Improvements are presented which reduce costs retracted, folded position, in which it b contained in the 
of manufacture especiaUy if the sole is molded directly to the recess, and an unfolded position, in which a scraper blade or 




upper. The method of manufacture includes use of a last 
deformed to obtain preselected location of the lasting margin 
and to prevent the formation of undesirable spew. 




\ 



3 659 J02 cleaning element is disposed below and spaced from the bot- 
CLEANING APPARATUS ^^^ ^^ **** ^°°'^' gene^Uy parallel to the plane thereof. 
Raymond K. Egnaciak, WiWamaoii, N.Y., assignor to Xerw ^ ' 



Corporation, Rochester, N.Y 

Ficd Nov. 14, 1969, Ser. No. 876,975 
InL CI. G03g 15100, 17/00, 19/00 
UA CI. 15-1.5 



3,659,304 < 

SHOE CLEANER AND POLISHER 

15 Claims ^^^^ ^- L«<™^' ^^^'' ^""^ ^*^ ^*^^ Sherman Oaks, 
CaUf. 

Filed Aug. 12, 1970, Ser. No. 63,082 

Int. CL A47I 23/02 

VS. CL 15-36 4 Claims 





A modular cleaning unit for cleaning relatively smooth sur- 
faces of conuminants. The unit has one or more belts that 
conUct the surface and scrub it. The belts contain fluids to 
help remove the particles and are electrically biased to at- 
tract the particles loosened from the surftice. Optionally, 
lamps radiate the particles to ease removal from the surface. 
The continuous belts are driven through cleaning fluids and 
over belt cleaning and wringing devices before passing in 
conUct with the surface to be cleaned. 



3,65933 ! 

COMBINED DIRT SCRAPER AND BRUSH FOR SHOES 
Hermann Schroder, Langcnberg, Rhtaidand, and Ralf 
Biedron, Bochnm-Lfaiden, both of Germany, assignors to 
Cobmaa ft Kbschner, Eaacn-Kupferdrch, Germany 
ContlnnatkNi of appllcatloB Ser. No. 796^06, Jan. 30, 1969, 
now abandoned. This appttcathm Sept 14, 1970, Ser. Ne. 

72,063 
Claims priority, application Germany, Feb. 1 , 1968, ;, 
P 16 80 002.5 II 

Int. CL B60r 27/00 / 

U.S.CL 15-112 ' 16ClaliiBS 

Shoe scraper which can be mounted in an open recess in 
the bottom of a car door. The scraper is movable between a 



A shoe cleaner and polisher comprising a pair of m*tor 
driven rotary brushes ofbet from each other and of such 
heights as to permit the placing of one's shod shoe beneath 
one brush to brush and polish the lop of the shoe and on the 
top of the other brush to permit cleaning of the bottoms and 
sides of the soles of the shoe, the brushes having a common 
power source and being drivingly connected for rototion in 
opposite directions. 

. ^ 

3,659,305 
FLEXIBLE PIPELINE PIGS i 

Marvin D. Powers, 6060 Skyttnc Drive, Apt 14, Houston, 
Tex. a 

FDed Apr. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 25,998 " 

Int CL B08b 9/04 
UA CL 15-104.06 R . ,. '.Claims 

A flexible pipeline pig adapted for removmg liquids and 
debris from pipelines. The pig includes at least one plug hav- 
ing a deformable peripheral wall formed of resilient material. 
The wall defines a peripheral surface which establishes a 
movable seal with the adjacently surrounding portion of the 
inner cylindrical wall of the pipe. An arctiate chaimel defined 



12 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



by the pipe's inner cylindrical wall, on one side, and a spiral 
groove in the outer peripheral wall of the plug, on the other 
side, establishes fluid communication between the upstream 
and downstream sections of the pipeline. Through the fluid 
communication channel is controllably routed a fraction of 



headlamp and substantially prevents dirt from contacting the 
headlamp The transparent shield is cleaned automatically by 



\ 



■i 




the pig-propelling fluid which sweeps the pipes inner wall 
between the ends of the pig as it moves through the pipeline. 
The liquids and debris which exist in said channel or on said 
portion of the pipe's inner cylindrical wall are cleared 
through said channel and discharged downstream in front of 
the pig. . 

- Is 

3(659,306 Ik 

WIPER FOR MACHINED SURFACES 
Leon Stoitze, East Hartford, and Fred David Laun, Granby, 
both of CoBn., asslgiiors to The United States of America as 
represented by the Secretary of the Navy 

Filed June 22, 1970, Ser. No. 48,250 

Int CI. F16j /5/i2 

U.S. CI. 15-246 11 2 Claims 




:^^^''^';-^$- 



^^^:^^^^^^--\^^^^^^S:^^^^x. 



A wiper ring for cleaning the inside wall of the operating 
cylinder of a hydromatic variable pitch aircraft propeller. 
The ring has a debris collecting wiper edge and incorporates 
a plurality of permanent magnets spaced at intervals along its 
length to attract and hold ferrous particles collected by the 
wiper edge and prevent them from being abraded into the in- 
side wall of the operating cylinder. 



3,659307 
AUTOMOBILE HEADLIGHT CLEANING SYSTEM 
CoBStantine K. Vitou, 2101 Graham Blvd. West, Montreal, 
16 Quebec, Canada 

FOed Ang. 22, 1969, Ser. No. 852,174 

Claims priority, appHcation Canada, July 22, 1969, 57,720 

InL CI. A471 1 100 

MS. CL 1 5-250.0 1 1 1 Claims 

An automobile headlamp cleaning system which comprises 

a continuous transparent shield which is mounted about the 




rotating it about the headlamp and bringing it into contact 
with a spray of cleaning fluid and a brush. 



3,659308 
COMBINED FINGER PUMP AND VALVE CONTROL FOR 

A TAILGATE WINDOW CLEANING SYSTEM 
Loren R. Gute, Dayton, Ohio, assignor to General Motors 
Corporatioa, Detroit, Mich. 

Filed Dec. 7, 1970, Ser. No. 95,693 

Int. CI. B60s 1148 

U.S. CI. 15-250.02 4 Claims 




.',7 ./ «• 



In a preferred form, this disclosure relates to a combined 
manually actuatable washer pump and control means for 
controlling operation of a washer and wiper unit of a tailgate 
wmdow cleaning system for a station wagon vehicle. The 
combined washer pump and control means comprises a 
depressible pumping element and a manually manipulatable 
actuating means including a pair of serially arranged plungers 
for controlling communication between a pressure source 
and a fluid motor of the wiper unit and for depressing the 
pump to initiate washer unit operation. The actuating means 
is constructed and arranged such that partial depression 
thereof will cause the plungers to move relative to each other 
to effect wiper unit operation alone and full depression 
thereof will cause conjoint energization of the wiper and 
washer units. 



3,659309 

MEANS FOR ATTACHING THE ARM OF A 

WINDSHIELD WIPER TO THE BLADE SUPPORT 

THEREOF 

Marcel Besnard, RooiainviOe, France, assignor to Sodete 

Anonyme Pour L'Equlpement Electrique des Vehicules 

S.E.V. Maichal 

Original application Jan. 30, 1969, Ser. No. 795,261, now 

Patent No. 3396,044, dated Apr. 27, 1971. Divided and this 

application Sept 8, 1970, Ser. No. 70,079 

Int CL A471 1100 

VS. CL 15—250.32 4 Claims 

Means for attaching a windshield wiper arm to a wiper 

blade support, said means comprising a male member pro- 



/ 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



18 



vided with a cylindrical element having two diametrically op- 
posed flattened surface areas, and a female member having a 
slot therein equal in width to the diametral distance between 




said flattened areas which terminates in a circular seat having 
a radius equal to that of said cylindrical member, jcine of said 
members being made of a plastic material and fastened to 
said blade support. 



3,659310 
SPINE PIECE FOR SQUEEGEE BLADES 
Ian K. Roaen, North Muskegon, Mich., assigDor to The Wypco 
Corporation, Muskegon, Mich. 

Filed June 3, 1970, Ser. No. 42,977 

Int CL B60s 1138 

MS. CL 15-250.42 6 Claims 



the drum to the surface of a nonmagnetic tube positioned 
parallel to the drum, which has contained therein a rotatable 
set of adjacent bar magnets. The rotation of the magnets 
causes, via the bar magnets' divergent magnetic flux field, the 
attracted powder to work its way around the surface of the 
tube in opposite direction to the magnet rotation and onto a 
ledge extension of the tube surface. The powder eventually is 
moved sufficiently distant from the field to enable it to &11 
into a collector trough. 



3,659312 
MULTI-PURPOSE VACUUM CLEANER NOZZLE 
Bo Gunnar MattsMo, Upplands Vasby, Sweden, aasigBor to 
Aktiebolaget Electrohix, Stockholm, Sweden 

Filed Nov. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 92,695 
Claims priority, application Sweden, Nov. 28, 1969, 16382/69 

Int a. A471 9102 
MS. CL 15—319 6 Claims 




--«« 








A bifurcated spine piece for securing squeegee blades 
against bending in one plane while allowing controlled bend- 
ing to conform to the surface plane to which the squeegee is 
to be applied. The squeegee is secured between the bifurca- 
tions in a selected compression thereby preventing longitu- 
dinal shifting of the squeegee or blade. The spine piece is 
grippable at both ends by typical claw elements found on 
wiper blade holder assemblies and the spine piece includes a 
cam grip surface engageable with the squeegee. 



A multi-purpose vacuum cleaner nozzle has a suction iniet 
which is movable over a porous object like a rug to remove 
dirt therefrom. A brush is mounted on the nozzle at the 
vicinity of the suction inlet for movement between upper and 
lower positions. The brush in its lower position is below the 
suction inlet and functions to remove dirt from a non-porous 
object like a floor. The suction inlet functions to remove dirt 
from a porous object when the brush is in its upper position 
above the suction inlet The brush is moved to its upper and 
lower positions by a variable pneumatic force which acts up- 
ward or downward depending upon the rate at which air at a 
partial vacuum flows per unit interval of time in a path of 
flow from the suction inlet to an air outlet socket. The varia- 
ble pneumatic force is produced by mechanism which is 
characterized by the absence of any springs or spring biasing 
means. 



3,659311 3 659313 • ' 

MAGNETIC POWDER SCAVENGING ARRANGEMENT VACUUM CLEANER NOZZLE 

Frank Arthur Oakley Waren, Hove. England, assignor to ^uBam E. Ferris, Stamfortl, Conn., assignor to Consolidated 

Creed & Company, Sussex, England Foods Corporation, Old Greenwich, Conn. 

Filed Apr. 22, 1970, Ser. No. 30,730 Filed Dec 9, 1968, Ser. No. 782348 

Claims priority, application Great Britain, May 30, 1969, i^^i^ q ^^^^ gjQ^ 

27,474/69 y^ ^L 15—402 1 Claim 
Int CL A47I 13141; G03g 19100 
U.S.CL 15-256.5 4 Claims 





A device for scavenging magnetizable powder from e. g. a 
drum in a printing apparatus. The powdar is attracted from 



A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner in which a rod hav- 
ing a knurled surface is provided in a rug cleaning surface for 
loosening lint, hair, thread and such litter on the rug surface 



<^ 



14 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



so that this litter is entrained in the airflow through the noz- 
zle opening. 



'I 



3,659^14 
HINGE STRUCTURE 
Frank E. Rom, Newton, Iowa, airigDor to The Maytag Com- 
pany, Newton, Iowa 

Filed July 22, 1969, Ser. No. 843^80 

Int. CI. A47g 27/04 

U.S.CL 16-168 2 Claims 



by a signal from the photocell generated by the presence of a 
joining segment, the roUtion of the kniife being timed to 
sever each successive joining segment, and a pair of spaced 
apart, power dnven, contra-rotating discharge wheels on the 
emergent side of the cutting station mutually cngageable with 




A hinge structure includes a pivpt pin element having an 
elongated pivot portion and is teially insertable into a hinge 
pin hole formed in one of a pair of hinged members. The 
pivot pin element further includes a radially larger head por- 
tion that is engageable with one of the hinged members upon 
rotation of the pivot pin element for preventing axial move- 
ment of the pivot pin element from the operative position. 



3,659,315 
PROCESS OF CLAM EVISCERATION 
Ronald K. Flnley, Towaon; Donald J. Langlois, Pasadena, 
both of Md., and Robert H. Nichobon, Lewes, Dd., as- 
signors to HCA Food Corporation, BaMmorc, Md. 
Filed Nov. 5, 1970, Ser. No. 87,293 
Int. CI. BO Id 43100 
VS. CI. 146-222 7 Claims 

A method for effecting the separation of visceral material 
from shucked clams is disclosed. Clean clam meat in essen- 
tially viscera-free form is obtained by subjecting shucked 
unevtscerated clam pieces to agitation in a hot aqueous medi- 
um for a controlled period of time. As a result of this step, 
the visceral material is transferred to the liquid medium and 
remains as a fully liquid body which can be separated from 
the pieces of clam meat. The recovered clam pieces may 
then be washed to remove any residual liquid or small frag- 
ments which remain on the surfaces of the pieces. 




each severed frankfurter, the discharge wheel on the side of 
each frankfurter opposite the direction of movement of the 
knife being resiliently deflecuble generally normal to the 
path of movement of the frankfurters, the other discharge 
wheel being undeflectable. 



3,659,317 
STUFFING APPARATUS 
VyUutas Kupdkevidus, Chicago, 01., 
bide Corporation, New Yorii, N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 23,934 
Int. CI. A22c 77/06 
U.S. CI. 17-35 



to Union Car- 



8 Claims 




3,659,316 

LINK SEPARATOR 

Gerald C. Berendt, 32 Dale Drive, Chatham Tsp., Morris 

Connty, and Leslie B. Mdanson, Bay Isle Drive, Point 

Pleasant, both of N J. 

Conthiaation-in-part of application Ser. No. 846,042, July 30, 

1969. This application Dec. 1, 1970, Ser. No. 93,991 

Int. CI. A22c 77/00 

U.S.CL17-1F 10 Claims 

A link separator for severing a continuous link or chain of 
frankfurters or similar articles at successive joining segments 
comprising a pair of opposed, spaced-apart, contra-rotating 
driven feed wheels engageable with and defining a generally 
axial path along which the chain is fed, the feed wheels each 
being resiliently deflectable ttormal to the path of movement 
of the chain, a photocell and opposed light source on the 
emergent side of the feed wheels, the chain passing 
therebetween, a cutting station proximal to the photocell, a 
relatively thin knife rotatable in a plane generally perpen- 
dicular to and extending through the longitudinal axis of each 
successive joining segment, drive and control means for the 
knife whereby the knife rotates thsough a fixed arc only once 
for each joining segment, the control means being governed 



Apparatus is disclosed for stuffing a conglomerate meat 
mass into a flexible container which comprises a stuffing 
means, shut-off and/or severing means mounted on the outlet 
end of said stuffing means comprising a member mounted on 
the outlet end of the stuffing means and a cooperating mov- 
ing member adjacent to and aligned with said mounted 
member and means for advancing and retracting said 
cooperating moving member into and out of positive engage- 
ment with said mounted member wherein such engagement 
seals said outlet end of the stuffing means, severs product 
protuding therefrom and stops passage of product therefrom. 



3,659318 
^STRAPPING TIE 
Eberhard TimmcrbcU, and Haraki TImmerbeil, both of 
Schwctan, Germany, avignors to Titan Vcr- 

packungssysteme GmbH, Schwelm, Germany 
Filed Nov. 24, 1970, Ser. No. 92,438 
Int. CI. B65d 63/02 
VS. CI. 24-20 EE 13 Claims 

A metal tape has spaced end portions each of which is 
formed with a plurality of locking catches with those of one 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



15 



end portion bemg adapted for engaging those of the other radially projecting protuberances which are resiliently 
end portion in overlapping relationship of the end portions, deformable upon insertion of the grommet through the panel 
Each locking catch comprises an elongated strip portion 
deformed out of the general plane of the tape and bounded 



^o 



13 



29 *3^-^ 




at opposite sides of the longitudinal plane of the tape by a 
pair of lateral edges each of which has a pair of projections 
extending transversely of the tape and outwardly away fi-om 
the longitudinal axis of the latter. j 




aperture, and serve to retain the grommet therein prior to as- 
sembly of the emblem or medallion. 



3,659,319 

ADHESIVE WIRE ROUTING CLIP 

Lloyd A. EricfcsMi, 8501 West Higglns Road, Chicago, DL 

Filed Nov. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 93,599 

Int CI. A44b 27/00, F16I 3108 

MS. C\. 24-73 AP 5 Claims 

I 



' 3,659^21 

MULTIPLE WEDGE ANCHORAGE DEVICE FOR 
PRESTRESSING TENDONS 
Michd Laurent, Bapiolet, France, aMigiior to Sodete 
Technique Pour LUtiiBation Dc La Precoatmintc, Bou- 
logne, Hants de Seine, France 

Filed June 12, 1970, Ser. No. 45,643 
Claims priortty, application France, June 24, 1969, 6921 121 

Int. CLF16g 77/04, 77/70 
U.S. CL 24—122.6 3 CUms 




A routing clip for mounting conduits, electrical conduc- 
tors, tubing and similar workpicce elements, and having a 
base with outwardly extending posts terminating in inwardly 
directed hook-like extensions with the fi«e ends thereof rela- 
tively underlying one another with respect to the base and in 
spaced relationship to form a relatively narrow entrance 
throat to trap included workpiece element; the base being 
somewhat flexible for attachment thereof, as by adhesive 
means, to other than perfectly flat surfaces, such as surfaces 
curved on a relatively large radius, and without substantially 
changing the size of the entrance throat. 



The units of a prestressing cable made of multiple parallel 
tendon units are individually clamped between two wedges of 
a crown of wedges clamping ail the units being itself located 
in a frusto-conical hole of a bearing part of which the apex 
angle is greater than 1 5°. 



\ 



3,659320 \ 

FASTENER ASSEMBLY 
Engclbert A. Meyer, Union Lake, Mich., assignor to USM 
Corporation, Warren Division, Mount Clemens, Mich. 
Filed Jnly 9, 1971, Ser. No. 161,142 
Int. CI. F16b 5112, 13/04 
VS. CL 24-73 HS 5 Claims 

A fastener assembly for securing an emblem, medallion or 
the like provided with a plurality of projecting pins to a panel 
member having a plurality of apertures therethrough cor- 
responding in number and spacing to said pins, with a plastic 
grommet disposed in each aperture, each grommet having a 
reduced internal diameter portion, whereby upon insertion of 
the pin, the grommet walls will expand into sealing engage- 
ment about the panel aperture and also tightly frictionally en- 
gage the pin surface to retain the emblem against the panel. 
The grommet may be additionally provided with a pair of 



3,659322 

LOCKING DEVICE FOR RELEASABLE STRAP 
CONNECTORS 
John A. Gaylord, Grecnbrae, Calif., aarignor to A. Koch & 
Sons, Inc., a ^vslon of Global Systems, Certc Madera, 
; CaHf. 

Filed Aug. 21, 1970, Ser. No. 65,908 
Int. CL A44b 79/00 

U.S. CI. 24 230 7 Claims 

In a releasable strap connector wherein the male member 
has at least one prong insertable into a socket in the female 
member, which socket is intei^ected by a transverse oscillat- 
ing bar cut away at the intersection so as to leave the socket 
unobstructed for the insertion of the prong before being 
resiliently urged into an obstructing position into engagement 
with a notch in the prong to hold the prong connected, and 
wherein levers are employed for oscittating the bar from an 
obstructing to an unobstructing position for the release of the 
prong; the improvement of a safety lock for directiy locking 
the oscillating bar against accidental osciHation which in- 
cludes a ball in the female connector spaced from said socket 



\ 



16 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



but engaging a keeper recess in the oscillating bar and being 
held there by a plunger which plunger is held in a guide by a 
spring in such locking position; a part of a lever in the 
manipulating device for the oscillating bar is engageable with 
the plunger about when the bar is to be oscillated to push the 
plunger down and bring a releasing recess in the plunger in 



pressing die a plurality of grooves corresponding to the ridges 
between the grooves in the bearing part, grinding the die face 




registry with the ball thereby to release the lock. A spring 
pressed ejector associated with the plunger guide and slidea- 
ble in the female member urges the unobstructed prong out 
of the socket and continues to hold the plunger in the un- 
locking position until the prong is again inserted so as to push 
the guide and the plunger up into the locking position. 



3,659^23 . 
A METHOD OF PRODUCING COMPOUND CAST ROLLS 
Mfldo Hachisa; Chikanori Saito; Osamu Sttamuni, and Yasuo 
Nanba, all of Katsnta-shi, Japan, assignors to HHachi, Ltd., 
Tokyo, Japan 

Filed July 23, 1969, Ser. No. 844,038 

Claims priority, application Japan, Jan. 20, 1%9, 44/3432; 

Julv 26. 1 %9, 44/52442 

Int. CLMld 5i//2. B21II 7/72 

US. CL 29- 148.4 D » > Claims 




J u>27 



A compound cast roll comprising a shell made of a steel 
having excellent rolling properties, an arbor having a body 
portion made of a steel or iron having high toughness and a 
cylindrical partition member interposed between said shell 
and said core, said three members being metallurgically con- 
nected together into an integral body and subjected to a heat 
treatment to impart desired properties to said shell and said 
core. 




smoothly and thereafter pressing the die face in the bearing 
part to form the spiral grooves. 



3,659,325 
CONTROL VALVE METHOD OF MANUFACTURE 
Robert D. Krehbiel, and Warren E. McCammond, both of 
Hutchinson, Kans., assignors to The Cessna Aircraft Com- 
pany, Wkhlta, Kans. 
Original appttcatkm Nov. 1, 1968, Ser. No. 772,668,. Divided 
and thk appUcadon June 3, 1970, Ser. No. 54,033 
Int a. B21d 53100; B21k 29/00; B23p 75/26 
U.S. a. 29—157.1 R 4 Claims 




'NCVmM. 



^^^- 



A fluid control valve including a spool whose end exposa- 
ble to corrosion environment is tapered to a reduced diame- 
ter and coated with corrosion resistant material. The reduced 
diameter faciliutes fast, economical final machining and siz- 
ing of the spool without damaging the protective coating, for 
selective fitting within a fluid control valve body bore. 



3,659326 

PROCESS FOR PREPARING HEAT EXCHANGE 

COMPONENT 

Norval A. Keith, East Alton, Dl., aarignor to OUn Corporation 

ContlnnatkHHin-part of application Ser. No. 708,463, Dec. 7, 

1967, now abandoned , and a continuation-in-part of 

774,577, Nov. 1, 1968, now Patent No. 3,495,657, whkh b a 

division of appUcatkw Ser. No. 630,376, Apr. 12, 1967, now 

abandoned. Thk application Feb. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 7,729 

Int. CI. B21d 53100; B21k 29/00; B23p 75/26 

U.S. CI. 29- 1 57 J V 28 Claims 



3,659,324 
METHOD FOR MANUFACTURING AN AXIAL BEARING 
Hans E. H. Murray, Lcrum, Sweden, assignor to Aktiebolagct 
Svenska KuUagerfabrlken, Goteborg, Sweden 

Filed Feb. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 12,934 
Claims priority, appUcation Netherlands, Feb. 24, 1969, 

6902851 
Int a. B21d 5J/70, B23p 13/04 
VS. a. 29—149.5 PM 8 Claims 

A method of manufacturing an axial bearing part made of 
a sintered metal powder having a. carbon content of less than 
0. 1 percent and having a plurality of spiral grooves in at least 
one face thereof consisting of the steps of forming in a 



s-i 




JSc^ 



M4 



A process of producing continuous strip having at least one 
fluid passageway with integrally formed fin members, which 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



17 



comprises forming a pattern of weld inhibiting material on a 
first strip or sheet with a portion of the pattern defining the 
fluid passageway, and a further portion of the pattern extend- 
ing along the edge of the strip or sheet defining a fin surface. 
A second strip or sheet of metal is pressure welded to the 
fint strip or sheet in substontially all areas not containing the 
weld inhibiting material and the fin surface is formed into a 
plurality of fin members. The fin members may be formed by 
cutting, or by a combination of cutting, bending and twisting. 
Additional fin surface is obtained by separating the strip or 
sheet at their edge corresponding to the further portion of 
the pattern of weld inhibiting material. The strip or sheet, in 
accordance with the invention, may be formed into heat 
exchangers of any desired shape including a helix, spiral or 
serpentine. 



stripping zone and the crimping zone. Terminal feed means 
comprising a channel-like terminal guide member and a 
reciprocating, resilicntly mounted pawl is provided to inter- 
mittently advance a plurality of conductor terminating con- 
nectors selectively disposed on a tape carrier towards and 
into the crimping zone. 



3,659,329 
FEED MECHANISM OVERLOAD RELEASE 
Robert G. Walker, Brighton, Mich., aasignor to Industra 
Products, Inc., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Filed Aug. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 61,681 

Int CL H02k 15/00 

U.S. CL 29-205 £ « Claims 



3,659,327 

METHOD OF MAKING CAST PICTORUL 

REPRODUCTION 

James J. Beverick, 1202 North 5th Street Sandusky, Ohio, 

and David P. Winters, 1300 1/2 Croghan Street, Fremont, 

Ohk> 

Filed Mar. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 19,475 
Int CL B21f 43/00; B23p 73/00 
U.S. CI. 29- 160.6 7 Claims 

A reproduction in castable material of a photo or other 
form of picture and a method of producing the cast picture. 
A photo or other desired form of scene is reproduced as a 
black and white negative with shading eliminated, and the 
negative is processed to produce a likeness thereof in the 
castable material with the dark lines standing in relief and the 
light areas recessed. The recessed areas are filled with pow- 
dered enamel to a level somewhat below the top of the relief 
features, and the object is baked to fuse the eiiamel and bond 
it to the casting. / 



3,659328 
STRIPPING AND CRIMPING APPARATUS 
Avtgdor KMn, fUghland Park, NJ., asignor to Thomas & 
Bctts Corporation, Elizabeth, N J. 

Filed Aug. 17, 1970, Ser. No. 64^16 j 
Int a. HOlr 43/04 
MS. CL 29—203 D 23 Claims 




A connecting link for transmitting linear motion along its 
axis to feed bore wedges of insulating material and having an 
overload release mechanism is disclosed. The connecting link 
consists of an outer link, and an inner link slidable relative to 
the outer link in the direction of transmission of the force. 
The inner link is provided with a recess and tlie outer link is 
provided with a spring loaded plimger arrangement which en- 
gages the recess and which yiekls allowing the relative sliding 
of the inner and outer links when the force being transmitted 
by the connecting link exceeds a predetermined value. 



\' 



3,659330 

BINDING STRIP MEASURING AND ASSEMBLY 

MACHINE 

Frank Dc VOllcr, 9930 Avcs Street, Houston, Tex., and Brown 

Isaacs, 702 "B" Avenue, South Houston, Tex. 

Filed May 12, 1970, Ser. No. 36,572 

Int CL B23p 19/04; B23a 7/70 

U.S. CL 29-208 C 1 1 Claims 



'" „"* 




The invention is directed to an improved, compact, pneu- 
matically actuated semi-automatic stripping and crimping ap- 
paratus having means for transferring a stripped conductor in 
a single, direct linear path from a stripping zone to a crimp- 
ing zone. Adjustable crimping means comprising a pair of 
releasable die members is disposed in direct linear alignment 
forward of the stripping zone. Wire holding and transfer 
means, disposed adjacent stripping means which is planarly 
rotatable away from the stripping zone, is recijwocatingly dis- 
placeable in a direct linear unobstructed path between the 




A machine for automatically assembling a binding clip to 
one extremity of a strip of metal material, measuring a 
desired length of the strip material and severing the desirwl 
length of strip material from a storage roll. The machine is 
provided with a strip guide bar having a strip guide groove 
formed therein. A brake mechanism, a strip drive 
mechanism, and a strip extremity immobilizing mechanism, 
are disposed adjacent the strip guide groove to control move- 
ment of the strip material. A strip cutter, a strip binding ap- 
paratus, and a clip fastening device are provided adjacent tl»e 
strip guide groove to perform cutting, bending, and fastening 
operations on the strip material. A clip orienting and feed 
device is provided to orient binding clips so that a clip may 
be connected to the free extremity of the strip material. Con- 
trol of the entire mechanism is achieved by an adjustable 
sequence timing control device which is responsive to linear 
movement of the strip material being driven. 



18 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659^31 

CLAMPING APPARATUS 

Jack W. Drake, and Roger L. Case, both of lodianola, Iowa, 

asrigBors to Conmcrcial Affiliates, Inc.,, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 21,270 

iBt CI. A47g 27104; B25b 7100 

U.S. CL 29-268 7 Claims 



covered by surfacing material, they are not accessible for 
welding, so a welder and pressure device, both mounted on 
the same support, are positioned to place the welder inside 
the perimeter beam opposite a stud and the pressure device 
on the outer side of the wall fnmt next to the surfacing 
material. The welder may be aligned with a stud by aiming 





A clamping apparatus having two members pivotally joined 
together to form a squeeze handle means on one side of the 
point of juncture and a pair of leg portions on the other side. 
Each leg is attached to a contact member which has a plurali- 
ty of pin nnembers on its lower surface and a flat clamping 
side surface facing the other contact member. A spring urges 
the contact members towards one another when the handle is 
released from a squeezed position. 



the pressure device relative to a reference which may be 
fasteners in the surfacing material. The pressure device is 
operated to apply force to the wall frame and thus press the 
welder against the perimeter beam. The welder is operated to 
make the weld, and the sequence is repeated to make further 
welds. The method and the apparatus are claimed. 



I 3,659332 

METHOD OF PREPARING ELECTRICAL CABLES FOR 
SOLDERING 
Ross F. Morrooc, Trenton, N J., aadgnor to Spectra Instru- 
ments, Inc., Trenton, N J. 

FOed May 5, 1969, Ser. No. 821334 

Int. CLB23p 79/0; 

U.S.a.29— 427 "- 4 Claims 

[ 



3,659334 
HIGH POWER HIGH FREQUENCY DEVICE 
Haas W. Bccke, Morriftown; Eric F. Cave, SoncrviUe, and 
Danid Stalnltz, Raritan, all of N J., aasigiiors to RCA Cor- 
poratioB 

Original appUcatioB June 19, 1968, Ser. No. 738343, now 
abandoned. Divided and tkis application Oct 13, 1970, Ser. 

No. 80,415 

IBL CI. BOIJ 17100; HOll 5100 

U.S.CL 29-580 ^ 3 Claims 




The disclosure relates to a method for using infra-red, 
ultra-sonic and mechanical energy in certain desired com- 
binations for the purpose of removing insulating plastic from 
flat, flexible electrical cables. 




W 



W 



3,659333 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF 
MODULAR BUILDINGS 
John A. Johnson; Nkhofatt F. Alberti, and Joseph E. Schuctte, 
all of Fori Lauderdale, Fb., aaslgDors to Bchring Corpora- 
tion, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 

Filed Kpr. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 26,953 
y InLCLB23kiy/02 
UACL 29-471.1 9 Claims 

In constructing a modular building, a floor frame and a 
wall frame are assembled at a right angle, with a perimeter 
beam of the floor frame next to the inner faces of vertical 
studs of the wall frame. Since the outer faces of the studs are 



A high power frequency device such as a thyristor or 
transistor comprises a monolithic body consistiirg of an 
emitter assemblage laminated to a base-collector assemblage. 
The emitter assemblage is a semiconductive wafer of given 
conductivity type having a plurality of mesas adjacent one 
surface; a high resistivity ballast layer in each mesa; an insu- 
lating film on said one surface and around each mesa; and a 
layer of high conductivity material, such as heavily doped 
semiconductive material of opposite conductivity type, on 
said insulating film over said one surface and surrounding 
said mesas, the surface of said high conductivity layer being 
co-planar with the top of said mesas. The base-collector as- 
semblage is a semiconductive wafer which includes at least 
two layers of mutually opposite conductivity types, the sur- 
face of one layer being planar and constituting a major sur- 
face of said body. 



May 2, 1972 



> 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



19 



3,659335 

COMBINED GEAR SHAVING AND ROLLING MACHINE 

Benjamin F. Brvgi, Gro«c Pointc Shores; Cari H. Motz, 

Harper Woods, and Arthur B. BasMrff, Oak Park, aO of 

Mich., assignors to Lear Sicgler, Inc., Santa Monica, Calif. 

Filed Sept. 29, 1969, Ser. No. 861,594 

IntCLB23f 79/06 



U.S. CI. 29-560 



15 Claims 



3,659337 • •' 

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR TYING COILS 

Roy E. Gawthrop, and Lowdl M. Maaon, both of Fort Waym, 

Ind., aasignors to General Electric Company 

Continuation of appHcadon Ser. No. 812,631, Apr. 2, 1969, 

now abandoned. Tbk application Feb. 9, 1971, Ser. No. 

114,085 

Inta.H01f47/02 

U.S. CL 29—606 25 Claims 




A machine which can be used selectively for croHed axes 
gear shaving employing a gear-like shaving cutter having 
cutting edges in the sides of its teeth, and as a gear rolling 
machine employing a die in the form of a hardened gear. 
Provision is made for relative traverse while shaving in a 
direction occupying a plane parallel to the axes of the gear 
and tool, and for incremental infeed during shaving and con^ 
tinuous infeed during gear n^ing. i 



3,659336 

METHOD OF MANUFACTURING AN INDUCTIVE 

DEVICE 

Arthur P. Home, Portland, Oreg., asrignor to Ekctrovk 

Divcrrillcd, Inc Portland, Orcg. 

FDcd Jan. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 7,039 

Int. CL HOlf 7/06 

U.S. CL 29-605 1* Claims 





Apparatus and method for concurrently tying cord about 
two sets of end turn portions of coils projecting beyond each 
side surface of a magnetic core. The core having coils is sup- 
ported in a holder assembly and periodically indexed through 
an angular path of travel by an assembly having adjusUble 
arms. Each set of end turn portions is tied with cord in a 
stitch pattern having double loops in each stitch interval by a 
tying unit having a cord feeder member, mounted for com- 
bined longitudinally swinging and turning motion, which 
passes over the associated set of end turn portions and 
cooperates with an elongated hook member, mounted for 
combined rectilinear and oscillatory motion. One tying unit is 
carried for preselected movenwnt by a movable platform, 
and a core-surface and tying unit position-sensing and con- 
trolling unit automatically determines the relative positions 
of the one tying unit with respect to an adjacent region of an 
associated core surface. Thus, desirable stitch patterns are 
simultaneously, quickly, and efficiently provided for the two 
sets of end turn portions. Also, dimensional variations in 
cores of a given size as well as different sized and types of 
cores arc compensated for in an effective and economical 
manner. 



1 3,659338 

METHODS OF MAKING ELECTRIC RESISTANCE 
HEATING MATS 
William McFarlanc, Mnrfrccsboro, Tcnn., aaaignpr to Emer- 
son Electric Co. 
Original application Aug. 23, 1967, Ser. No. 662,796. Divided 
and this application June 29, 1970, Sen No. 60,165 
I Int. CL H06b i/00 

U.S.CK 29-611 



9Claims 



An inductive choke coil comprises a multi-layer toroidal 
coil enclosing a core formed from powdered iron and a 
binder. The coil is first wound in linear fashion, afler which a 
flexible tubular member is inserted therewithin and filled 
with the core material. The coil is then formed into a toroid, 
and the binder material is activated for forming a substan- 
tially continuous core. 



Ns 




The method of making an electric heating mat including 
disposing laterally spaced portions of electric resistance wire 



20 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



on a support, disposing a plastic extrusion head over the sufH 
port and extruding a strand of plastic downwardly toward the 
wire portions, and relatively moving the support and extru- 
sion head to lay the downwardly extruded strand cross-wise 
of and over the wire portions, the strand adhering to the por- 
tions at the places of crossing to form a dielectric strand con- 
nection between the wire portions. 



t 3,659^39 

METHOD OF MAKING A FILM RESISTOR 
Isao Yamaguchi, Kodaira^shi, Japan, assignor to Hitachi, 
Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filed Sept. 24, 1969, Ser. No. 860,523 
Claims priority, appUcatioa Japan, Oct. 11, 1968, 43/73529 

Int CLHOlc 7/00. / 7/00 
VS. CI. 29-620 8 Claims 




^iV 



A method of making a resistor comprising the steps of 
depositing resistor materials onto a substrate in the form of a 
film and connecting conductors to the two ends thereof, 
wherein the said resistor film is formed so that it includes a 
first part where the current path between the $aid conductors 
is long and a second part where the current path is short, and 
first and second ditches are provided in the said fust and 
second parts of the resistor fUm in a direction crossing the 
direction of the current so as to adjust the resistance between 
the said two conductors to the desired values. [ 



3,659340 
METHOD OF FABRICATING COAXIAL WIRES IN BACK 

PANELS 

Gary R. Giedd, and Meriyn H. Peridns, both of Wappingers 

Falls, N.Y., assignors to International Business Machines 

Corponrtioa, Armonli, N.Y. 

Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 606,129, Dec. 30, 

1966, now abandoned. This application Dec 16, 1969, Ser. 

No. 885,639 

InL a. B41m 3/08; HOlb 13/00 

U.S. CL 29—627 8 Claims 




36 « 46 48 50 ^ 



The plastic insulated cross-connection wires on the 
backside of an electrical panel are coaxed by momentarily 
applying a mass of molten, low melting temperature metal to 
tlie backside of the panel with the major portion then 
removed. The adhering portion solidifies and the shielded 
cross-connections are potted in a plastic mass to maintain the 
wires in position and to protect the same against mechanical 
impact. 



3,659341 
TOOL FOR OPENING CONTAINERS HAVING A BEADED 

TOP 
Karl Kapplcr, Hauptstrasse 5, Pflnzweiler, Wurttemberg, 
Germany 

Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 661,106, Aug. 

16, 1967, now Patent No. 3314383. This application Mar. 

30, 1970, Ser. No. 23382 

Int CI. B67b 7/30 

U3. CI. 30— 14 3 Claims 




A tool for cutting open the tops of containers having 
beaded tops has first and second levers pivotally connected 
near one end with a first spring holding ends of the levers 
apart. A knife with curved and straight opposite sides is car- 
ried on the first lever which has two pivotally attached sec- 
tions. The second lever has a fixed first jaw and carries a 
spring biased pivotable lever formed with a second jaw hav- 
ing a projecting tooth, which engages under the bead of a 
container and holds the second lever stationary, while the 
first lever draws the knife along the top of the container 
cutting the top and forming a peripheral turned up lip in the 
cut top. 



3,659342 

MECHANICAL RAZORS 

Paul KoMer, 81 Fcnlmorc Street, Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Filed Oct 21, 1969, Ser. No. 868,052 

Int. CI. B26b 79/00 

U3. CI. 30-43.1 




5 Claims 



A dry shaver having a plurality of shearheads one of them 
moving with its cutting surface sideways through friction with 
the skin. 



3,659343 
SUTURE CUTTER 
Albert E. Straus, 5844 Georgetown Drive, Erie, Pa. 
Filed Apr. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 25,983 
Int. CI. B26b; 7/04 
U3. CI. 30-124 2 Claims 

This specification discloses a cutter for use by physicians 
to cut and remove sutures. The suture cutter has a handle 
made of resilient material having two arms resiliently and in- 
tegrally connected together. The arms have the cutting ele- 
ments supported on the distal ends. The cutting elements are 
a sharp blade connected to one arm and an aiivil surface on a 
probe on the other arm. The elongated resilient probe may 
be inserted under a suture during cutting. To lift the suture a 



May 2, 1972 



i 



21 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 
.,i. ,.,cr.„y ««nd.„, i.w Is .n-ched ^e^. .d. of .ach >.. b.a^ «op, -a;ece^«. .. h^d_a.^a --._„d^« 



arm which close together when the cutter is closed and act as 
tweezers. Thus the combination cutter and tweezers actually 




from the rails, drive motors are provided for automatically 
adjusting the vertical position of each beam transmitter inde- 
pendently. The drive motors are operated in response to any 
deviation of the track from the horizontal, taking into ac- 
count the different between the actual and the desired su- 
perelevation. 



form two tools in one and eliminate the need of two separate 
instruments. The tool is shaped for hand comfort and am- 
bidexterity. . I 



3,659346 
POSITION DISPLAY METHOD AND DEVICE 
Gerrit HendrIk Te Krwuile; Kwd Hero Voikm, bottiol Van 
Brcestraat 171, Amterdun, and Poul Albert PoolMn, B«- 
uldenbontaewcg 74, Wa«e>Mr, aB ol Nfjfrtand. 

FOed May 13, 1969, Ser. No. 824,193 
ClafaiU priority, appUcatioa Netherlands, May 16, 1968, 

6806926 

lBt,CLG01c2i/22 

U.S. CI. 33-65 \ 4Clatais 



3,659344 
METHOD OF MAKING A DENTAL PROSTHESIS 
Leo Gavazii, Via Italia 13, BlcOa, Italy 

FDed Dec. 7, 1970, Ser. No. 95,780 
Claims priority, application Italy, Dec 15, 1969, 54390 A/69 

Int CI. A61c 13/00 
U.S. CI. 32— 2 5 Claims 




A denture is formed by a rigid acrylic resin tooth-bearing 
support element and an underiying cushion elfement of soft 
thermoplastics material. The cushion element and the sup- 
port element arc interlocked by the process of the invention, 
which entails sticking irregularly shaped thermoplastics 
granules on the outer surface of the preformed cushion ele- 
ment, and then pressing the latter into the preformed support 
element, before the latter is polymerized. The subsequent ap- 
plication of heat melts the granules to form integral undercut 
appendages on the cushion element, and also polymerizes the 
acrylic resin, hardening the support elepient and thereby in- 
terlocking the two elements. , . 



3,659345 
MOBILE TRACK SURFACING APPARATUS 
Franz Plasser, and Joaef Theurer, both of Johnannesgasse 3, 
Vienna, Austria 

Filed Nov. 5, 1970, Ser. No. 87,166 

Clatans priority, appNntioa Austria, Dec. 19, 1969, 11907 

Int CLEOlb 29/04 

U.S. CI. 33-60 7 Claims 





A method and device for displaying on a chart the position 
and orientation of a relatively large moving vehicle, such as a 
ship, in which the chart is moved so as to bring three selected 
points thereof on the lines of sight from an observation sta- 
tion on the vehicle to three remote objects corresponding to 
such selected points, and in which an outline projection of 
the vehicle at the scale of the chart is made visible on the 
chart, said projection having a fixed orientation with respect 
to the vehicle itself. 



3 659347 

METHOD AND MEANS FOR DRYING MOIST 

MATERIAL, SUCH AS PAPER. CELLULOSE, OTHER 

FIBRES OR THE LIKE 

Hans I. WaBsten, Salfle, Sweden, aasignor-Aa^AB Inventing, 

Saffle, Sweden ^ 

Filed Aug. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 62^428 

Clainu priority, appliartioa Sweden, Aug. 13, 1969, 

11294/69 

Int CL F26b 3/00 

VS. CI. 34-9 1<> Clahns 




\ 



In a track grading machine, which operates with two 
reference beams associated with respective rails and wherein 



A method and means for drying moist material in which 
heat from a source of heat is supplied at least partially to one 
side of a porous layer, the pores of which are capable of con- 
ducting vapor. The moist material is in contact with the op- 
posite side of the porous layer, so that due to the heat from 
the source of heat the moisture in said moist material is 
vaporized to vapor which thus is generated as a result of 



22 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



evaporatioo of moisture in said moist material and is at least 
partially forced into and through said porous layer in a 
direction opposite to that of the temperature gradient caused 
by heat supplied mainly by means of thermal conductivity 
from the source of heat to the porous layer through a 
homogeneous, heat-conducting wall. The wall is arranged in 
at least partial heat-conducting contact with the porous layer 
and defines a partition between the porous layer and the 
source of heat, blocking the passage of steam through said 
porous layer. The generated vapor is discharged in direction 
mainly perpendicular to said temperature gradient. 



3,659348 
APPARATUS FOR FUSING XEROGRAPHIC TONERS 
Lcc F. Frank, Rodmter, N.Y., — tgnor to Eartman Kodak 
Company, Rochester, N.Y. 

I Filed May 27, 1970, Scr. No. 40341 { 

Int. a. F26b 77/(72 ' 

U,S. CI. 34—122 6 Claims 



fr^' 




A device for thermofusing an electroscopic toner image to 
the surface of a support by moving the support through a 
passageway formed by a pair of platens, at least one of which 
b heated. The heated platen is connected to an air supply, 
the air being discharged under pressure through a slot in the 
heated platen and directed toward the image-bearing surface. 
The air is heated as it is discharged and attains a temperature 
sufficient to fuse the toner image. The air pressure is suffi- 
cient to hold the support in a spaced relation with respect to 
the heated platen. In another embodiment, a vacuum platen 
is arranged adjacent the other surface of the support, the ap- 
pUed vacuum or suction drawing the thin layer of air on the 
image-bearing surface through the support to increase the ef- 
ficfency of the device by utilizing the heated air more effec- 
tively. 



3,659349 
DRYING CYLINDER 
Erik A. Nykopp, Tampere, Finland, 
Ab, Tampere, Finland 

Filed Nov. 26, 1969, Ser. No. 880345 
i IntCLF26b 77/02 

U.S.CI.34— 124 CX 



to Oy-TampcOa 



3 Claims 




A drying cylinder in which the inside of the mantle or at 
least its end portions have circumferential grooves for col- 
lecting condensate. The inlet of a condensate drain pipe is 
placed in each groove and the pipes have been joined to a 
common condensate collecting pipe having adjustment 



means for regulating the alnount of condensate from the 
drain pipes. The condensate collecting pipe is further con- 
nected to a condensate draining system of the cylinder. 



3,659350 
YARN HEATING JET 
James D. McCnlongh, Newark, DeL, aarignor to E. 1. du Pont 
dc Ncmoort and Company, WHrnlngton, DcL 

Filed Mar. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 22307 

Int. CI. D06c 7/06 

U.S. CI. 34-155 5 Claims 




Improvements are disclosed in apparatus for fluid heat- 
treatment of continuous multifilament yam. These include 
90° impingement jets for initiating treatment, 30° impingment 
jets for completing the treatment, and means for redirecting 
fluid against the yam. Hot fluid passages in a manifold block 
are arranged to heat the block uniformly and dead air spaces 
in a cap member reduce heat loss. 



3,659351 
CLEAN-OUT MEANS FOR GRAIN DRYER 
Erhard E. Alms, Banington, and Jama E. MttcheU, Cary, 
botk of ni., aadgnors to AFE Induatrics, Inc., Lake Zurkh, 

ni. 

Filed May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,027 

Int. CI. F26b 77/72 

U.S. CI. 34-174 . 3 Claims 




An improved means for cleaning out the grain that makes 
its way into the plenum chamber of a grain dryer. The hinged 
or flexible sheets normally used at the bottom of the chamber 
are held up in closed position by spring-biased clips which, 
although readily released by hand, nevertheless hold the 
sheets in such manner that they are able to support the 
weight of a man walking on the said sheets. 



\ 



/ 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



23 



3.6S9J52 3,659354 

riRCULATTOG AIR DRYER BRAILLE DISPLAY DEVICE 

Amodate. Inc., Portland, Oreg. ^'•''P****^\irS!r^i fSn w No. 82.564 

Hkd May 18, 1970, Ser. No. 38*451 F0«» Ort. fl. 1970^. No. 82364 

IntCLF26b 27/06 Int. Cl. G09b 27/00 -- ^ .^ 

U.S.CL 34-191 9 Claim. U.S. Cl. 35-35 A llOalm. 




A circulating air dryer including a chamber for holding ar- 
ticles to be dried, and a reversible, power-operated air mover 
for selectively moving air through the chamber in of^xxite 
directions. With the air mover operating in cither of opposite 
directions, the dryer also includes means within the chamber 
for exhausting a portion of the air circulated upstream from 
the air mover, means for introducing heat to the air being cir- 
culated downstream from where the air is exhausted, and 
means for introducing make up air into the chamber between 
the exhaust means and the heating means. 



3,659353 
MODULAR LAYOUT METHOD 
Rosario D'Agrasa, Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., assignor to J. C. Penny 
Company, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Filed Apr. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 29,133 

Int a. G09b 25/04 

U.S.C1. 35-16 10 Claims 




In the Braille display system disclosed herein a plurality of 
identical cells are arranged in a row and each cell is adapted 
to display a single Braille character. Each ceU employs a plu- 
rality of pins which can be selectively raised to projecting 
positions by pneumatic signals which are common to all of 
the cells in a given row. Further, each cell includes an electri- 
cally actuable inlerposer member which can be selectively 
operated to either lock the pins in that cell in their existing 
positions or to free them and thereby enable them to respond 
to the common pneumatic signals. 




3,659355 

WALL MOUNTED COMBINATION CHALKBOARD, 

PROJECTOR SCREEN AND INFORMATION DISPLAY 

APPARATUS 

Addard L. Anbin, Jr., 14 Lakeshore Drive, South Bd- 

lingkam, Mass. 

Filed Nov.-l, 1970, Ser. No. 86326 

Int. Cl. B43I 

U.S.CI. 35-62 ' 11 Claims 




A method and system for planning the layout of commer- 
cial space comprising forming a moduly layout of the space 
by selectively arranging a plurality of thin modules represent- 
ing objects to be placed within the space over a planning sur- 
face to which the modules are magnetically attracted, said 
modules having indicia contrasting with the planning surface 
and making a clear and distinct shadow free photographic 
reproduction of the layout at any desired scale. 



An upright wall supported receptacle having a compound 
back wall including a chalkboard, an oppositely disposed 
open front side, a projector screen supported on the recepta- 
cle and being selectively movable into and out of confronting 
juxuposition relative to the chalkboard, and wing extensions 
comprising tack boards pivotally connected on the receptacle 
for swinging movement toward one another to close the open 
side of the receptacle. 



24 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659356 

ELEMENT MATCHING DEVICE 

Roy A. Ndsoo, 25 Oakwood RomI, Acton, Mmb. 

FUed June 30, 1970, Ser. No. 51,177 

Int a. G09b 5/02 

UA CI. 35-35 D 



14 Claims 



^ *^J^ 




Element unit having coded aperture array and visible ele- 
ment indicia is matched to control unit having compatibly 
coded aperture array and visible control indicia by placing 
element unit and control unit in fixed mutual spatial relation- 
ship in which apertures of compatibly coded arrays 
cooperate to form one or more continuous paths for a signal. 
An indicator is actuated in response to a signal received after 
traversing continuous paths, and element and control indicia 
remain visible while units are matched. 



3,659,357 
AUDIO-VISUAL APPARATUS 
Dfanltri Marlincsco, 51 Residence du Clos, Verrlercs-le-Buis- 
son, 91, and Charles L. Marsot, 3 Avenue Foch, Paris, 16, 
iioch of France 

FHed Dec. 11, 1969, Ser. No. 884,241 

Cldms priority, application France, Dec. 12, 1968, 177825 

InL a. G09b 5106; Glib 5100 

U.S. CL 35-35 C 5 Claims 



the magnetic tape reading head between adjacent lines as 
well as a drive for returning the magnetic tape reading head 
to its starting position at a high speed. 



3,659,358 
BRICK DISPLAY UNIT 
Jack S. Brown, P.O. Box 583, Eastland, Tex. 

Filed Mar. 24, 1970, Ser. No. 22,257 
Int. CI. G09b 25100 
UJS. CI. 35—53 



12 Claims 




Brick samples are displayed by insertion into recesses of a 
molded panel, the recesses being separated by mortar simu- 
lating surfaces. Side flaps hinged to the panel unfold from the 
back to support it in an upright position. A roof section is 
mounted on the top edge of the panel for color comparison 
purposes. 



3,659359 

MULTISENSORY LEARNING AID DEVICE 

PriscUla Laubensteia, 15 Half MOc Road, Barrington, R.I. . 

Filed Nov. 3, 1970, Ser. No. 86^46 

Int. CI. G09b 23102 

U.S. CI. 35-70 10 Claims 





An audio-visual device adapted for instance for teaching 
foreign languages is provided with a substrate on which is 
dispensed alternating rows of written matter and sound 
recorded tracks, adjacent rows being logically related to one 
another, for example,^ a recorded track may contain a transla- 
tion of the adjacent written matter. Several embodiments are 
shown including one in which a sound track reading head 
disposed in a reading arm is driven along a sound track 
wherein the reading arm is removed from above one line 
when it has been read and put into position above the next 
line. In another embodiment, the substrate is formed as 
sheets in a loose-leaf binder which are turned after a side has 
been read and listened to. In a final embodiment, means are 
provided for automatically displacing the reading arm and 



A multisensory learning aid device comprising a series of 
three-dimensional blocks representing the numerals one 
through nine and zero, each block having a compartment 
therein for each combination of numbers that may be added 
to arrive at the numeral represented by the block, each com- 
partment having a pair of rows of recesses therein with the 
number of recesses in each row corresponding to the num- 
bers which may be added to arrive at the numeral 
represented by the block, an article removably positioned in 
each recess with all of the articles in each block being of the 
same color and significance but being of a different color and 
significance from all of the articles in each other block, and 
closure means for each compartment. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



25 



3,659360 

REGULAR AND SEMI-REGULAR POLYHEDRONS 

CONSTRUCTED FROM POLYHEDRAL COMPONENTS 

Walter Zdschegg, Ncu-Utan, Germany, assignor to Han- 

sfriedrich HefcndeU, Lcrchenweg, Kierspc, Germany 

Filed June 2. 1969. Ser. No. 829,252 

Claims priority, application Germany, June 4, 1968, 

P 17 72 572.3 

Int a. A63h 33114 

MS. CL 35-72 10 Ctaims 



the implement. The plates are aligned and held together by a 
peg which protrudes from one plate and through a tube at- 
tached to the other. A latch lever holds the peg in the tube. 
Guide blocks on one plate mate with notches on the other to 




A construction set, for building structures assembled from 
geometric parts having plane surfaces, comprises a plurality 
of geometric parts including at least one group of equal 
pyramids each having three, four, or five equal side faces and 
at least one part in the form of a semi-regular or regular 
polyhedron having at least one plane of symmetry. This latter 
part can be assembled from partial bodies, such as base- 
abutted pyramids, or may be a single unitary body. Adhesive 
means are provided to interconnect the geometrical parts 
selectively in either face-abutting or articulated edge- 
abutting relation. 



3,659361 
SKATE BOOT 
Thomas Paul White, Sr., 109 GObert Street, Saint John, New 
Brunswick, Canada 

Flkd Dec. 19, 1969, Ser. No. 886,704 

Int CL A43b 00100 

U.S. CL 36-2.5 AL 6 Claims 



\l 




The present invention relates to skate boots and in particu- 
lar the present invention relates to an improved skate boot in 
which the high top shoe quarters thereof fit in a snug or 
glove-like fashion around the ankles of the wearer. 



\ 3,659362 

IMPLEMENT HITCH 
Charles GUbert BeU, Sknix City, Iowa, assigDor to City of 
Sioux City, Iowa 

FOed May 14, 1970, Ser. No. 37,261 
Int CL AOlb 51100 

U.S. CL 37^42 R 6 Claims 

A hitch for implements of the pushed type including first 

and second plates, one mounted on a truck and the other on 




I 



limit relative roUtion of the plates. A hydraulic or pneumatic 
cylinder operates between the hitch and the truck to move 
the hitch about pivots by which the hitch is connected to the 
truck. 



3,659363 

ADJUSTABLE WING PLOW WTTH MEANS TO 

POSITIVELY MAINTAIN ADJUSTMENT 

Roderick C. Snyder, Wansau, Wis., assifnor to Wausau Iron 

Works, Wausau, Wis. 

Filed June 15, 1970, Ser. No. 46,044 

Int CL EOlh 5m 

U.S. CL 37-50 7 Clafans 



r- ite" — ^^*»W- — 




A wing plow attachable to the side of a vehicle such as a 
truck. A horizontal mounting bar is shaped to fit across the 
frame, in place of the conventionld front bumper. An up- 
standing post is supported at one end of the post ahead of the 
front wheels. A slide member is movable up and down on the 
post, and is movable up and down by a first power cylinder 
within the post. A pivot member and a hinge member are 
supported, at upper and lower positions, respectively, on the 
slide member, for horizontal swinging movement A plow 
blade is tiltable up and down on the hinge member. A second 
power cylinder is connected between the pivot member and 
the plow blade. A resilient compression member extends 
between the back of the plow blade and the truck frame. The 
second power cylinder adjusts the slope angle of the blade 
and moves the blade between and upper, out-of-the-way 
position folded against the side of the truck, and a lower 
operating position. The compression member is variaUe in 
length to adjust the sweep angle of the plow blade. The first 
power cylinder can elevate the plow blade without changing 
its slope or sweep angles. 



26 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,364 
TRENCH CXTTER USING ENDLESS CUTTER CHAIN 
Leslie Peter Stuart WOnm Nawiu, BiJiainas, Mrigiior to 
Gimda Inc., Naasau, N.P., Bahamas 

Filed June 24, 1969, Ser. No. 836,1 1 1 

Claims priority, appttcation Great Britain, June 25, 1968, 

30,276/68; July 25, 1968, 35,671/68: Feb. 24. 1%9. 9330/69 

Int. a. E02f 5100 

VS. CI. 37-83 1^ Claims 



to Dow Jones & 



3,659366 
DISPLAY APPARATUS 
Robert L. Woolfolk, Dallas, T«u, assignor 

Company, Inc., New York, N.Y. 
Continaation-in-paft of appli ca tion Ser. No. 645,022, June 9, 
1967, now Patent No. 3,487^68. This application Jan. 5, 
1970. Ser. No. 674 - , 

int.ci.G09f ;;/;2 

U.S. CL 40-28 C 17 Claims 




Trench cutting apparatus particularly for cutting deep nar- 
row trenches has a power-driven endless cutter chain on an 
elongated chain support which is linearly movable in a carri- 
er mounted on a vehicle. In operation the carrier is vertical 
(or inclined to the vertical if a sloping trench is required) and 
is held in position by adjustable rams which permit the cutter 
to be positioned across the width of the vehicle as required 
and serve to maintain the carrier in the required plane. 



Jr' 



3,659,365 

ADVERTISING DISPLAY STRUCTURES 
Robert A. Eaton, Hingham, Mass., assignor to Norman-^uf- 
fett Display Industries, Inc., Boston, Mass. 

Filed July 15, 1970, Ser. No. 55,005 - 
Int.CI.G09fi//5 
U.S. CI. 40—16 1 Claim 








\/ 



Display apparatus for presenting data in visual form having 
panels provided with passages in which display elements, 
such as balls, are movably positioned and means for selec- 
tively moving the balls in their passages between their opera- 
tive visible positions and their inoperative positions to cause 
the balls to form or delinate characters. The display ap- 
paratus may include a plurality of such panels connected in 
an endless belt and movable before an opening or window so 
that the data on more than one panel may be visible at a sin- 
gle time. The means for moving the balls may be jets of air 
delivered by nozzles mounted on a carriage movable relative 
to a panel when it is in a predetermined position. 



3,659367 
FEATURE VARIABLE PICTURE AND BOOK 
HIrokazu Ynmoto, Tokyo, Japan, assignor to Sumida Shiko 
Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filed June 15, 1970, Ser. No. 46,161 

Int.CI.G09f ///JO 

U.S. CI. 40-65 4 Claims 




A display structure is made up of a multiplicity of modules A feature variable picture embodying a stationary picture 

in the form of rigid plastic foam frames which are grooved assembly and a sliding picture assembly of different feature 

and slotted to receive one or more interchangeable display from the sutionary picture assembly which are slideably in- 

panels so that the frames of the module are reusable with dif- corporated one another to present ^o different features of 



ferent panels. 



picture alternately. 



? 






May 2, 1972 



s 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



27. 



3,659368 ' 

CHART HOLDER 

Isabella J. Colbert, 425 Weal 63rd St., Los Angeles, CaUL 

FOcd Aug. 29, 1969, Ser. No. 854311 

Int. CLG09(/ 7/06 

U.S. a. 40-104.01 6Ctalim 



member for accommodating the portion of the rod forwardly 
of the reel. % 




An index charge holder in which a pimality of indexed 
cards are clamped to a supporting base and a cover is pro- 
vided pivotally connected to the clamping means. The cards 
have keyed cutaway edges and a slider is disposed on the 
cover having an inwardly extending portion beneath the 
cover adapted for selective coaction with the cuuway card 
edges, so that when the cover is raised, a selected quantity of 
the cards are lifted therewith. The upper portions of the 
cards are secured to the base independent of the clamping 
means and a plurality of sheets are disposed between the in- 
dexed cards secured "by the clamping means, but otherwise 
unsecured so that they may be removed upon opening of the 
clamping means. The cover is formed to pivotally swing onto 
the clamping means for levered opening thereof. 



3^9369 
FISH POLE HOLDER 
Evcrct T. Hcrmanson, 2318 Mannheim Rd., Melrose Park, 
DL 

FDed Dec. 17, 1969, Ser. No. 885,903 

Int. a. AOlk 97110 

U.S. CI. 43-21.2 / 8 Claims 




-aoa. 



A device for supporting a fishing rod in an inclined posi- 
tion alongside a container such as a minnow container or the 
like. The device comprises a frame engaging the container 
wall and a pair of bracket arms secuired to and extending out- 
wardly from the frame providing support means for the rod. 
The bracket arms are laterally spat^ ftom each other and 
include a lower support member for accommodating the por- 
tion of the rod rearwardly of the reel and an upper support 



3,659370 

TROLLING DEVICE AND SYSTEM 

Charles P. Ritter, 704 E. Prairie Ronde, Dowagiac, Mich. 

Filed Sept. 10, 1969, Ser. No. 856354 

Int. CI. AOlk 91100, 95/00 

VS. CI. 43—43.12 5 Claims 







( 



A trolling system in which a weight suspended by a line is 
used to hold a fishing line at the desired depth in the water. 
A control device releasably connects the fishing line to the 
weight line and includes a pair of jaws and means for varying 
the spacing of the jaws to vary the force required to disen- 
gage the line from the jaws whm a fish is caught. The fishing 
line, upon being released from the control device, gives the 
fisherman full control over reehng in and landing the fish. 



3,659371 
FLY TYING PROCESS 
Wayne O. Daescher, 951 West County Rd. C-2, St. Paul, 
Mian. 

Filed Apr. 29, 1970, Ser. No. 32^62 

Int. CI. AOlk 85108 

VS. CL 43-42.25 9 Claims 




/2. '/<i 



A fly tying process in which hairs or fibers are precut to 
length and a bundle or bundles of hair are placed uniformly 
about and along the shank of a fishhook or lure. The bundle 
of hair and shank are encompassed by two continuous ad- 
jacent loops with a slip knot connecting an iimer loop to an 
outer loop and an outer slip knot in the outer loop having 
free ends extending in opposite directions from the shank. 
Where the loops are formed fit>m wire, the knots will not 
hold until reduced to a small diameter and deformed past the 
yield point of the wire. The reduction in size of the loops by 
drawing on the free ends of the wire, produces a rotating mo- 
tion of the hair relative to the shank which uniformly spreads 



28 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



the hair before flaring of the hair as the wire is finaUy 
tightened. The wire loop is then covered with epoxy cement 
or plastic. The hair may be animal hair or synthetic fibers. As 
an alternate form of the disclosure, the loops are formed 
from thread and a split metal ring is crimped to the thread to 
hold the thread to the hair and shank. 



3,659374 

INSECT CATCHER ASSEMBLY 

Leon F. Steve«, 1181 Mead Lime, FU«staff, Ariz. 

Filed Jan. 11, 1971, Ser. No. 105^62 

Int. CU AOlm 3100 

U.S.CL 43—134 



3,659372 

SINKER RELEASE METHOD AND APPARATUS 

Robert E. Cullen, 15806 PreaBwfck Lane, Bowie, Md. 

FUed Jan. 29, 1971, Ser. No. 1 1 1,056 

Int. CL AOlk 95100 

U.S. CL 43-44.88 »3 Claims 



25, 

23 21 22 J 



6.32 




A fishing apparatus attachable to and moveable along a 
fishing line so as to provide a recoverable sinker release that 
is operative when retrieving a catch. A fishing line with a 
swivel connecting a leader and bait or lure is threaded 
through two concentric, interlocking, cylindrically shaped 
members, the inner one of which is provided with an at- 
taching means for carrying various sized sinkers. The concen- 
tric members are locked together in use by a spring extend- 
ing through an opening in the inner member to rest against 
said swivel. As a catch is retrieved, the outer concentric 
member contacts the tip of a fishing rod or pole and disen- 
gages said spring from contact with the swivel, thereby per- 
mitting said catch to be retrieved. v 



Sodete 



3,659373 
RECEPTACLE FOR INSECTICIDE PLATE 
Jean Daeninckx, Saint-Denis, France, assignor to 
anoayme dite: LOreal 

Filed Feb. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 8315 

Claims priority, application France, Feb. 5, 1969, 6902574 

InL CL AOlm 13100 

U.S. CL 43—125 5 Claims 




3Claims 




A hand-held insect catcher assembly for entrapping and 
dispatching an insect located upon a surface. The assembly 
has a box-like trap which is open on the underside and an 
elongate handle extending rearwardly therefrom. When the 
assembly is positioned over an insect, and upon striking the 
surface, a bias loaded slide bar within the trap is triggered 
and released to travel rearwardly to dispatch the insect and 
deposit same into the hollow handle. An end cap on the han- 
dle facilitates removal of the collected insects. 



3,659375 

TOY WITH PSEUDO AUTOMOBILE CONTROLS AND 

PSEUDO AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELD AND 

WINDSHIELD WIPER MECHANISM 

Albert Stubbnann, Franklin Lakes, N J., assignor to Kobncr 

Bros.r4nc., East Patcrson, N J. 

Filed May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,066 

Int. CI. A63h 33100 

U.S. CI. 46-lB 11 Claims 




The receptacle includes two identical covers provided with 
grilles for circulation of air and snaps for holding the two 
covers together with the insecticide plate enclosed between 
them and held spaced from the grilles by spacer elements 
formed on the insides of the covers. 



A toy which enables a child to simulate to some extend the 
motions required in driving an automobile. The toy includes 
a frame and a number of parts in operative relation 
therewith, the parts simulating some of the controls of an au- 
tomobile and an automobile windshield and windshield 
wiper. One of the parts is a lever that is pivotally fixed to the 
frame and which simulates the automobile transmission shift 
lever. A plastic shield which simulates the automobile 
windshield is fixed to the frame and a pair of arms that simu- 
late a windshield wiper fiank both sides of the plastic shield. 
A kinematic linkage connects the lever and arms so that 
manipulation of the lever results in the arms sweeping across 
the opposite sides of the plastic shield to simulate the action 
.of a windshield wiper. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



29 



3,659376 
CONNECTING ARRANGEMENT FOR USE IN A TOY 
ASSEMBLY KIT 
Artur Fischer, Ahbcfancr Str. 219, Tumttngen, Germany 

Filed May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,474 

Claims priority, appttntlon Germany, May 30, 1969, P 19 27 

626.7: June 24, 1%9, G 69 24 984.9; June 28. 1969, G 69 25 750; 

Oct.22, 1%9,G69 41000.0 

Int. a. A63h 33110 



disengaged from the turntable. The motor rotates the screw 
in a direction that urges the frame towards the disengaged 
position, so that there is automatic disengagement without 
the use of a spring, whenever a child is not pushing the frame 
towards the engaged position. 



^ \.i 



U.S. a. 46—31 




3,659378 

MOTOR DRIVEN TOY VEHICLES 

ttr\ tm» Duncan Tong, No. 23 C Robtataon Road, Victoria, Hong Kong 
12 ciarais j^jj^ j^ 23 ^^^ g^ j^^ j^^ 

Int.CLA63bii/26 
U.S. CL 46-244 R 20 Claims 



In a toy assembly kit two elements are to be connected 
with one another. They are superimposed and have jux- 
taposed first surfaces and second surfaces which face away 
from one another. Registering apertures are provided in both 
elements. An elongated connecting member extends through 
both of the apertures and is tumable therein. It has a head 
portion which engages the second surface of one of elements 
and a free end portion provided with projections which are 
receivable in response to turning of the connecting member 
in corresponding recesses provided in the inner circum- 
ferential surface of the aperture in the other element or in 
the second surface of the other element. Thereby, the ele- 
ments are connected against separation but can be turned 
with reference to one another. 



3,659377 
CHECKOUT STAND TOY WITH TURNTABLE DRIVE 
Larry D. Workman, Fountain Valley; Ralph R. Laing, Her- 
moaa Beach; J. Stephen Lewis, Pacific Palisades, and Emfl 
H. VonWInckctanaui, Van Nuys, aU of CaUf., assignors to 
Mattel, Inc., Hawthorne, CaUf. 

Filed Apr. 1, 1970, Ser. No. 130388 

Int CL A63h 33130 

U.S. CI. 46—40 9 Claims 





Motor driven toy vehicles which may assume the form of 
different vehicle bodies, each having a chassis with a base- 
plate at the bottom thereof provided with a generally rectan- 
gular opening into which may be inserted different and in- 
terchangeable module casings containing drive mechanisms 
for the vehicles. These mechanisms may assume different 
forms although they are composed essentially of a small 
direct-current motor, a dry cell for energizing the motor and 
a switch mechanism for controlling the connections 
therebetween. One embodiment of module makes possible 
the movement of the vehicle in forward and backward 
directions from a position of rest. Another embodiment per- 
mits energization of the motor in a single direction orUy 
which compels movement of the vehicle in diverse and 
haphazard directions by combining the steering control for 
the vehicle with the traction drive therefor. 



3,659379 
TOY ROBOTS 
Katero Sada, No. 41-1, 4<hoae Higashi>MiikoJima, Somida- 
kB, T^yo, Japan 

Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 23,923 

lBt.CLA63Hii/26 

U A CL 46-247 « Clahns 



A toy sui>ermarket checkout stand with a rotatable turnta- 
ble for holding goods and a constantly rotating sign over it, 
which uses a simple self-disengaging drive for the turntable. 
A drive roller for rotating the turntable, is fixed to a worm 
wheel that is rotated by a screw. The worm wheel is mounted 
on a frame that slides parallel to the axis of the screw so that 
the worm wheel is always engaged with the screw, the frame 
sliding between an engaged position wherein the drive roller 
engages the turntable and a disengaged position wherein it is 




Improvements of toy robots characterized in that the torso 
of a robot is swimg left and right alternatively with suitaUe 



yi- 



3Q 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



time intervals and angles maintained and, at the same lime, 
both arms are moved up and down at a suitable angle of 
inclination with respect to each other. 



3 659380 
PLATE FOR CONTROLLING THE FILLING DENSITY IN 

PLANT CONTAINERS BEFORE OR DURING AN 
AUTOMATIC MAKING OF HOLES FOR PLANTS IN THE 

FILLING COMPOUND 
Gcorg Mayer, BoOidiB, Gtrmany, airipor to Flrma Mayer 
KG, HefcknhefaB- Mti utoutt t n , Germany 

Flkd ScpL 19, 1969, Ser. No. 859,538 
Claims priority, appttcalioii Germany, Sept. 20, 1968, P 17 
I 82 587.5 

Int a. AOlg 9/0« 
U.S.CL47— 1 4 Claims 



to provide a ventilation exhaust opening. During the travel of 
the smaller panel section into the body structure, the larger 
panel section remains locked in a fully raised position by a 
latch mechanism that is a component of the window regula- 
tor mechanism When the smaller panel section reaches a 
predetermined down position, the latch mechanism is 
released allowing the larger panel section to travel to a full 
down position. Upon movement of the window panel section 
from ito lowered position to a raised position, a reverse 
sequence occurs during which the larger panel section again 
becomes locked in a fiiUy raised position as the smaller panel 
section continues to move out of the body structure into fully 
raised position. 




3,659382 
SEALS 
Bernard Dixon, Harpcndcn, England, awlgnor to Scatanaster 
Limited, London, England 

FOcd Mar. 17, 1971, Ser. No. 125347 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, June 16, 1967, 

27,950/67 

Int. CI. E06b 7/76 

U.S. CI. 49-481 6 Claims 



A plate having an upwardly projecting offiset for shaping 
soil inserted into a plant-receiving pot. The plate stacks the 
soil around the plant-receiving opening to make same availa- 
ble for filling same. 



3,659381 

VENT WINDOW SYSTEM FOR VEHICLE BODY 

STRUCTURE 

Stnart M. Frey, Birmlnciiam; HaroW C. Gebhard, Uvonia, 

and Julius Rado, Birmingbam, all of Mich., assignors to 

Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Mich. 

Flkd Sept. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 75392 

Int.a.E05f5/70 

U.S,CL49— 103 16 Claims 








A door seal having a channel-shaped rigid member in 
which is conuined a sealing member. A resilient member is 
located between the sealing member and the channel 
member and a longitudinal ridge, which forms part of either 
the sealing member of the channel member, is arranged so as 
to deform the resilient member when the sealing member is 
depressed in use. 



3,659383 
WRIST WATCH STRAP CONNECTIONS 
Gerard Cachelin, and Etienne Jeannottat, both of Le Lode, 
Switzerland, assignoffs to Fabriqne dlmrlogeric Chas. Tissot 
& Fib SA, Le Lock, Switzerland 

Flkd Apr. 15, 1971, Ser. No. 134357 
Claims priority, application Switzerland, Apr. 22, 1970, 

5991/70 

Int. CLG04b J 7/00 

U.S. CI. 58-88 SC 2 Claims 



A vehicle body structure having a window opening fitted 
with a window panel divided vertically into two sections, one 
of which is substantially smaller than the other. A single win- 
dow regulator mechanism, which may be manually or power 
operated, raises and lowers both panel sections in controlled 
sequence. With the window panel in raised condition, actua- 
tion of the window regulator mechanism results in the 
smaller panel section being lowered into the body structure 




A wristwatch case has a side Mni\ over which an outer ring 
is removably engaged and held by two spring members each 
having a middle part forming a bracelet loop and curved ex- 
tremities engaging in facing grooves of the case and wall. An 
outer terminal part of each extremity normally engages in the 
groove of the ring but, for fitting or removal of the ring, can 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



tt 



be compressed into a groove of the case by an inclined sur- 
face on the ring. 



3,659384 

MACHINE FOR PARALLELLY LAPPING OPPOSITE 

SURFACES OF A WORKPIECE 

Uwrencc Day, Chicago, U., amlgnor to Spitfire Tool & 

Machine Co., Inc., Chicafo, OL 

Flkd Mar. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 19,967 

Int. CL B24b 37100 

UJS.CL51— 131 2Ctaims 



mower intermediate the front and rear ends of the treadle 
with the front section extending beneath the mower reel and 
the rear section accessible for foot operation. By starting the 
mower engine and exerting pressure on the rear section of 
the ueadle, the front section sharpens the reel. Ad- 
vantageously a unitary sheet of stiffly flexible material is em- 
ployed so that by moving the foot along the rear section dif- 
ferent sections of the reel are sharpened. 




An improvement in a machine for paralleUy lapping op- 
posite surfaces of a workpiece by a rotatable lapping plate on 
which the work is positioned within a base or workholding 
ring beneath a pressure plate keyed to the ring for rotation 
therewith about a fixed vertical axis common to both the ring 
and the pressure plate and with the pressure plate self-ad- 
justable vertically relative to such axis by engagement of the 
pressure plate with the work being lapped. 



3,659385 
DETACHABLE SHARPENER FOR A CROSS-FLOW 
MOWER 
Hugo S. Ferguson, Averfll Parli, N.Y., assignor to Red Vor- 
tex, Inc., PDcstcnkffl, N.Y. 

FBed May 15, 1970, Ser. No. 37,774 

Int. CL B24b 19100; AOld 75108 

VS. CL 51-250 6 Claims 




' /^ f f^^/z^f^^f^^/^^^f r 



The sbtfrp^er comprises a treadle having a front section 
of stifny /flexible material with an abrasive surface on the 
upper side thereof adapted to extend across the width of the 
reel of the mower. The treadle is hingeably attached to the 



3,659386 
A METHOD FOR PROVIDING A FINISHED SURFACE ON 

WORKPIECES 
Fred E. Goetz, Wappfaign* YIiMki, Perry R. Dmzba, Jr., 
Ponghkeqpak; JaiMS R. Haasc, La Grangevile, and G^ard 
Sceky, Wappintm FaBs, afl of N.Y., Msignors to Intema- 
tiowd Bnsfairss Maddnes Corponrtlon, Armonk, N.Y. 
Original application Mar. 22, 1968, Ser. No. 715350, now 
Patent No. 3350325, dated Dec 29, 1970. Divided and this 
appttcatlon Mar. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 20,006 
Int CL B24b IIOO 
U.S. CL 51-318 3 Clafans 




This patent discloses a method of preparing the surface of 
a workpiece. The disclosed method teaches the provision of a 
novel workpiece carrier for engaging the workpiece, and 
oscillating the workpiece holder relative to a finishing surface 
while simultaneously providing relative linear movement 
between the workpiece holder and the finishing surface. The 
apparatus, by which the method is performed, includes a car- 
rier having drive means for moving the carrier along a linear 
path of travel. A rotatable mount which is carried by the car- 
rier includes a depending workpiece receiver which is 
rouubly connected to the mount, the receiver being 
mounted eccentrically with respect to the carrier. Means are 
provided for imparting rotation to the mount and separate 
means such as springs are connect between the receiver 
and the carrier so as to inhibit rotation of the receiver while 
permitting oscillation thereof. In this manner, an article being 
held by the receiver may be engaged and oscillated against 
the finishing surface in substantially coplanar relationdiip 
therewith. In addition, as herein disclosed, the finishing table 
upon which the carriers ride may be provided widi a plurality 
of finishing surfaces, each adapted for different finishing 
operations with intermediate cleaning surfaces to dean the 
workpifece of any residue adhering thereto from a previous 
finishing surface. 



32 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



I 



3,659387 tenor surfaces of the frame to complete a building construc- 

BUILDING STRUCTURE WITH ELEVATORS Uon. 

Clyde C. PwBwm, Jr^ 503 Collter Rd., N.W., AtlMito, Ga. j 

Filed Apr. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 26,031 , «o i»«o L 

Int. CL B66b 9100 ...o«, . J ^™^^ 

3 Claims DISPLAY DEVICE 



UA CL 52—30 



jtff- 



-^^■f^^^ff 



•fW)*/^^ ^^*in- 



^^yt^d. 




~S¥ 



•__ r— 'f - -^ ''■^ 



■S^ 






Charles Forberg, 1 15 State Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Filed Apr. 24, 1970, Ser. No. 31,545 
Int CI. E04b 7/40. 2/74 
U.S. CI. 52-285 9 Claims 



■^ 



A building structure is described in which the core walls 
are used as principally horizontal load bearing structures, 
said walls being capable of receiving and transferring to the 
ground substantially horizontal forces from any direction. 
The service elements on each level are placed so that they 
are directly above the service elements on preceding levels. 
Banks of elevators serving the various levels are placed out- 
side the core walls with the front or entry portions thereof 
facing the outer walls of the building." The elevator banks are 
in front to rear relationship rather than facing each other. 



3,659388 

STEEL SHELL FOR USE IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

Donald M. SIrfanni, 530 N.W. 189 Terrace, Miami, Fla. 

Filed Nov. 18, 1969, Ser. No. 877,624 

Into. E04b//4 7,7/45 

UA CI. 52—91 6 Claims 




A metal frame is provided for reinforcing a unitary 
concrete building having side and end walls and a gabled 
roof. Wall studs and a center ridge beam are first erected. 
The studs and beam are initially plumbed to be sure they are 
in proper vertical aligimient. Then, roof joists are extended 
between the beam and the studs without distiubing aligiunent 
of the studs. A latticework is provided around the entire 
frame structure for supporting concrete. The interior of the 
frame is siufaced with a concrete supporting lath-like layer 
and then concrete is sprayed onto both the interior and ex- 




A display device includes vertical rectangular panels hav- 
ing vertical grooves along their side borders and vertically 
slotted tubes extending along the panel vertical edges with 
the edges of the tubes bordering the slots engaging the panel 
grooves. Connectors intercouple the panels at predetermined 
angles and include body members with two or more vertical 
bores having angularly related side openings, the bores 
snuggly engaging corresponding tubes, the respective panels 
borders registering with the connector side openings. A plu- 
rality of vertically spaced connectors may intercouple ad- 
jacent panels and the lower and upper connectors may be 
elongated and project below and above the panels to func- 
tion as legs and connectors between upper and lower panels 
respectively. 



3,659390 
EXPANSION JOINT COVER ASSEMBLY 
Claade P. Balzer; Edward M. Corman; Aimer A. Reiff, and 
WUbcr E. Kirkwood, aU of Wichita, Kans., assignors to Bal- 
CO, Inc., WichiU, Kans. 

Filed Nov. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 85,899 

Int. CI. E04b 1168; EOlc 1 1102 

U.S. CI. 52-464 14 Claims 




t N 



An expansion joint cover assembly for structural sections 
disposed in spaced relationship and defining an elongated 
joint therebetween includes an elongated rigid base and/or 
support member mounted on at least one of the structural 
sections adjacent a margin thereof and an elongated rigid 
plate member having a width greater than that of the joint 
between the structural sections and positioned to overlie 
same. The expansion joint cover assembly includes a member 
hingedly connecting the plate member and base and/or sup- 
port member to permit relative movement therebetween and 
spaced resilient members engaging the connecting ^d the 
support member to hold the plate member in position overly- 
ing the joint during the relative movement between the plate 
member and the base and/or support member. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



33 



ERRATUM 

For Class 52 — 537 see: 
Patent No. 3,660,482 

3,659391 ' 

METHOD OF AND MEANS FOR CONSTRUCTING AND 

ERECTING BUILDING STRUCTURES FORMED OF 

BRICKS, OR THE LIKE 

Roy A. NicholB, Route 5, Box 1070, Bcatm, Ark. 

Continuatk»-ln-1MVt of appHcatku Ser. No. 646,831 June 

19, 1967, now Patent No. 3303,174. TUi applkatkin Mar. 

24, 1970, Ser. No. 22330 

Int CL E04g 27/76 

U.S. CI. 52—747 5 ClalniB 



head has a pair of intersecting alignment faces against which 
the bricks are aligned before^being clamped. The clamp head 





is displaceable from a loading position to an unloading or 
brick laying position. The clamp head also has a vibrator for 
bedding the bricks onto a layer of mortar by vibration. 



A method of and means for constructing and erecting 
building structures formed of block-like elements, such as 
bricks in which the elements are formed into assemblies or 
sections made up of a plurality of courses cemented together 
with the end elements of alternate ones of the courses along 
one side of the assembly extending beyond the ends of the 
elements of the others of the courses, and the end elements 
of the other courses along the opposite side of the assembly 
extending beyond the ends of the end elements of said al- 
ternate courses along said opposite side. The method in- 
cludes the positioning of the assemblies so formed in upright 
positions for movement toward each other to extend the end 
elements of the alternate courses of one assembly between 
the end elements of the other courses of another assembly to 
permit the joining of the assemblies to complete a building 
structure. The method also includes the positioning of addi- 
tional assemblies above a lower portion of a building struc- 
ture made in accordance with the method of the invention, 
and supporting such additional assemblies on such lower por- 
tion and joining the additional assemblies to form upper por- 
tion of the building structure. The invention includes ap- 
paratus for holding the assemblies one on top of another in 
vertically spaced relation for the introduction of mortar 
therebetween whereby an upper portion of a buOding struc* 
ture may be erected on a lower portion thereof. 

3.659392 
BRICK-LAYING MACHINE 
Andrles Johannes Stohz, Pretoria, Republic of South AfHca, 
assignor to Monrcs (Proprietary) Limited, Braamfontein, 
Johannesburg, Transvaal Province, Republic of South 
Afkica 

Fied Sept. 3, 1970, Ser. No. 69390 
Claims priority, appttcatkm South Africa, Sept. 9, 1969, 

69/6412 
Int CL E04g 27/22 

U.S. CL 52—749 8 Cfadnw 

A method of building in which a number of bricks are laid 

simultaneously in a single course on a previously laid layer of 
mortar. The bricks may be vibrated to bed them down onto 
the motor. 

A machine having a clamp head adapted to receive a 
number of bricks in series and to clamp them. The clamp 

898 O.G.— 2 



3,659393 

APPARATUS FOR AND METHOD OF FORMING 

VACUUM PACKAGES 

Joseph Richter, Fair Lawn, N J., assignor to Royal Packaging 

Equipaicnt, Inc., Maywood, N J. 

Filed May 28, 1970, Ser. No. 41304 

Int.CLB65bi7/02 

U.S. CL 53-22 A 19 Claims 







This disclosure relates to apparatus for forming vacuum 
packages and includes means defining a cavity adapted to 
receive a package having aperture means in a periphery 
thereof, means for temporarily sealing a flexible cover to the 
package periphery outboard of the aperture means, vacuum 
means for drawing a portion of the flexible cover overiying 
the aperture means away from the aperture means to form an 
access opening opening into the package between the flexible 
cover and the package periphery, means for withdrawing air 
from the package through the access opening and the aper- 
ture means incident to permanently sealing the flexible cover 
to the package periphery, and means for permanently sealing 
the flexible cover to the package periphery inboard of the 
aperture means. 



34 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



METHOD OF AND MACHINES FOR WRAPPING 
ARTICLES 
Fraiu Hartkib, Funtcnau, and Herbert WinddlMuidt, 
Aadicn, both at Germany, imignitn to Ffatna MaicMncn- 
bau Aacfaen-Funtcnau GcMlbdiaft mlt bcachrankcter Haf- 
tung, Rckbawcg, Germany 

FHed Nov^ 12, 1969, Ser. No. 875,754 
Claims priority, application Germany, Nov. 16, 1968, P 18 09 
^ , 270.1; Oct 4, 1%9,P 19 50 226.2 

Int CL B65b / 1/0, 49/16; B65c 9/00 
VS. CL 53—33 31 Claims 




d A method and machine for wrapping articles with sheet 
material involves withdrawing the sheet material from a 
supply reel and leading it into engagement with the article 
and thereafter setting the article into rotation so as to entrain 
the sheet material and wrap the material about the article. 
The method and machine is useful for packaging and 
labelling articles. 



3,659,395 
METHOD FOR FILLING A CONTAINER WITH A FLUID 

UNDERPRESSURE 
Bruno Morane, Paris; Cluurlcs Paoletti, Antaiay Sous Bois; 
Louis Menien, Fontenay Sous Bois; Robert Sathicq, Vtt- 
lepinte, and Manlio Maurdli, Vai^ours, all of France, as- 
s^nors to L'Oreai, Paris, France 

Filed Mar. 17. 1970, Ser. No. 20,214 

Claims priority, application France, Dec. 31, 1%9, 6945717 

Int CLB65b 37/04. i;//0 

U.S. CI. 53—36 9 Claims 






64 



6t 



' Method and apparatus for storing and dispensing a fluid 
under pressure which utilizes a container holding a mass of 
closed-cell foam material. The fluid to be dispensed is in- 
troduced under pressure, thereby compressing the foam 
material, whkh expands to expel the fluid when a dispensing 
valve is opened. The foam material may be impregnated with 
a propellant gas before the fluid to be dispensed is in- 



troduced, and in that case the pressure applied when the 
liquid to be dispensed is introduced may liquefy the propel- 
lant gas trapped in the ceils of the foam material. 



3,659^96 
SEED SHEETS 
Eric William Baker, BoarM HU Noracry, Worthing Road, 
Horsham, SuaMx, England 

Filed May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,427 

Int CL B65b 9/02 

U.S.CL 53-180 3Clafan 




Two overlying sheets of porous material, with seeds con- 
uined therebetween, are adhered to each other in a manner 
defining a plurality of pockets that are arranged in parallel 
equi-spaced columns and rows, there being at least one seed 
in each pocket. 

The seed sheets are made by causing the seeds to be held 
in a plurality of positions defining equi-spaced parallel rows 
and columns on a surface of a first one of said sheets, cover- 
ing the seeds with the second one of said sheets, and adher- 
ing the sheets to each other around said plurality of positions 
whereby to form said pockets. The seeds may be held against 
the first sheet by suction. The sheets may be caused to ad- 
here together by passing them between roOers that press the 
sheets together at locations where they are intended to ad- 
here to each other. 

An apparatus for making these seed sheets comprises a 
rotatable suction drum that is provided in its surface with a 
plurality of perforations arranged in equi-spaced parallel 
rows and columns, the drum being positioned above a tray 
for the seeds. A line of spaced-apart rods, that are vertically 
reciprocable in unison, extend upwardly through the seed 
tray. The movement of the rods is so synchronized with the 
rotation of the perforated drum that when the rods reach the 
limit of their upward stroke, each rod will have its upper end 
aligned with, and in close proximity to, an associated one of 
the perforations of a column in said drum, there being one 
rod for each of the perforations in a column. 

Parallel with the perforated drum is a shaft carrying a plu- 
rality of rotatable rollers, there being one roller for each of 
the rows of perforations in the drum. The rollers define with 
said drum a plurality of nips in the region of the rows of per- 
forations. 

In operation seeds are poured into the tray, and the first 
sheet of porous material is fed from a first supply source to 
the underface of the suction drum and thence around the 
drum to pass between the drum and the plurality of rotatable 
rollers. The second sheet of porous material is fed from a 
second supply source to the nip between the rollers and the 
drum. The reciprocating rods at their lowermost setting dip 
below the level of the upper surface of the seeds in the tray. 
On their upward stroke, each of the rods lift one or more 
seeds from the tray and presents said seed or seeds to the 
first porous sheet where Uiey are held by the suction in the 
drum. As the drum rotates the seeds on the first sheet are 
eventually covered by the second sheet, the two sheets being 
bonded together around the seeds by the pressure between 
the nip rollers and the drum. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



W 



3,659^97 
HAND CRIMPER 
B. Mifc, Richmond, Ind., msignn 
pany o( America, Ptttaburfh, Pa. 

Filed Apr. 30, 1970, Ser. Na 33^21 
Int CL B65b 7/28, 67/00 
1}JS. a. 53—329 



to Ahuniaum Com- 



the wrapping conveyor while the cutter is operating and then 
speed up the film feed to a frut speed to advance a sufficient 
length of the film to provide a complete wrapper before the 
next actuation of the cutter bar. 

The drive to the cutter bar operates the bar at a f)enpheral 

speed that is slightly greater than the slow lineal speed of the 

3 Clafna film feed to prevent the film fit>m piling up behind the cutter. 




3,659399 
; FRACTIONATION BY ADSORPTION 
George C. Kancr, Jr^ Pfadariew, LX, and Lovls E. Brooks, 
Great Neck, both of N.Y., amignnri to Air Techniques In- 
corporatsd 

Filed June 29, 1970, Ser. No. 50^92 

Int CL BOld 53/04 

US, CL 55-33 12 Claims 



A tool is provided for affixing a closure to a bottle mouth 
which includes two pivotably connected jaws and a center 
cap between the jaws, with a pair of integral downwardly 
directed ears on opposite sides of the center cap to engage 
the jaws and hold the center cap between the jaws, whereby 
after affixation of a closure to a container mouth, spreading 
the jaws of the tool will center the center cap and the closure 
seated in the cap between the jaws and strip the jaws from 
the closure. 



3,659398 
FILM FEED AND CUTTER FOR FOLD-OVER WRAPPING 

MACHINE 

Ronald Holt, Battle Crwk, Mi<h., assignor to Battle Creek 

Packagfaig Machine*, Inc., Battle Creek, Mich. 

FBcd Nov. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 86,075 

Int a. B65b 41/12 

UACL53— 389 lOCIafans 





Duel adsorptioBi tower fractionation of a compressed gase- 
ous mixture; in particular dehydration of air, wherein one 
tower effects adsorption while the other tower is regenerated 
by a minor portion of the unabsorbed gas while the major 
portion is passed to a storage .tank. The compressor is ac- 
tivated and deactivated in response to predetermined 
minimum and maximum pressures, respectively, in the 
storage tank, and the flow path is changed in response to 
deactivation of the compressor, whereby upon reactivation of 
the compressor, the functions ^ected in the towers are 
reversed. In a preferred embodiment, the flow path is con- 
trolled by a pilot operated valve which is pneumatically 
operated to change the flow paths. 



3,659,400 
CARBON DIOXIDE REMOVAL FROM BREATHABLE 
ATMOSraERES 
Frank L. Kcster, West Granby, Cout, assignor to United Air- 
craft Corporatioa, East Hartford, Conn. 

FUcd July 21, 1970, Ser. No. 56,794 

Int CL BOld 53/02 

UACL 55-33 t 1 Clahn 



A wrapping machine has an article feeding conveyor 
delivering to a wrapping conveyor driven at the same speed 
and having a fold-over bar arranged to fold the trailing end of 
a wrapper sheet forwardly over the article as the article con- 
tinues to advance. A film feed conveyor delivers the leading 
end of a wrapper film to the inlet end of thd wrapper con- 
veyor to be trapped under and advanced with the article. A 
rotary cutter bar located at the inlet end of the film feeding 
conveyor cuts an iiKiividual wrapper fit>m the film as the 
leading end of the wrapper is trapped by the article. Drive 
connections to the film feed wrapper and the cutter bar and 
continuously operating film feed rollers operate the film feed 
and cutter at a slow speed approximating the lineal speed of 






' — /i p^jeaeii/r a£o 



\taaai^ ^_^sssaaiLa(e£/:ae 



In the purificaticHD oX. breadiaMe atmotfrfieres, carbon diox- 
ide is selectively removed therefirom and concentrated in a 



86 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



process wherein the contaminated gas stream is passed 
through a porous bed comprising beads of a sohd porous 
fXDlymer of divinylbenzene coated with polyethylenimine 
wherein the carbon dioxide is sorbed, the carbon dioxide 
subsequently being removed from the bed by vacuum desorp- 
tion at low temperature in a bed regeneration sequence. 



3,659,401 
GAS PURfflCATION PROCESS 
Giuseppe Gbunmarco, Venice, Italy, anignor to Vctrocoke 
Cokapuania S.pJi., Venaia Porto MarglMra, Italy 

Filed Oct 13, 1969, Ser. No. 865,849 

Claims priority, appUcatloii Italy, Oct 12, 1968, 53475-A 

Int. a. BOld 19100 

U.S.a.55— 43 9 Claims 



X 



s 



m\ 



3,659,403 
FLOATING FEEDER BEATER 
Robert S. Reaves, Bhic Sprinct, Mo., and Madd A. Bordelon, 
Cedar RapMs, Iowa, aarignon to ADb-Chataners Manofac- 
turlng Company, MUwaukcc, Wh. 

Filed June 1, 1970, Ser. No. 42,198 

Int. CI. AOld 47/02 

U.S. CI. 56-10.2 7 Claims 




u 



In removing jaseous impurities from a gas mixture under 
pressure with an absorption liquid which is regenerated in a 
low pressure zone an improvement comprises taking used ab- 
sorption liquid from the pressurized absorption zone, expand- 
ing it in an ejector whereby a sub-atmospheric pressure is 
created, freeing contained gaseous impurities. Separation of 
gaseous impurities and liquid occurs, and separated liquid is 
subjected to the subatmospheric pressure of the ejector 
whereby further gaseous impurities are evolved, and returned 
to the absorption zone. 



'S^^^^SSSS^ 




A power driven feeder beater for a combine and wherein 
the feeder beater is pivotally mounted in slots in the header 
of the combine so that the feeder beater can be raised up in 
said slots by an excess of material being handled without in- 
terfering with the drive of the beater. <^ 



3,659,402 

MULTIPLE SCREEN CONSTRUCTION 

Howard ABiger, 10 Ponderosa Drive, MdvlBe, N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 23,91 1 

Int. a. BOld 47106 

MS. CI. 55—233 2 Claims 



Jbf 



A screen network construction for air pollution control ap- 
paratus comprising a plurality of screens arranged in abutting 
relationship. The screens are secured tightly together to 
prevent clogging and to form countless tortuous paths for 
water and air to mix. I I 



3,659,404 

SUGAR CANE HARVESTERS 

Roberto Hcndcrton Kerhan, 309 lOth Street, Marianao, Cuba 

Flkd Nov. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 92,794 

Claims priority, application Cuba, Dec. 13, 1969, 210717 

Int. CL AOld 45102 

U.S. CI. 56-13.9 3 Claims 




A sugar cane harvester for mounting on a prime mover and 
for actuation thereby wherein a supporting frame has a for- 
ward structure to position the cane for cutting and lias a ver- 
tically actuated side knife to demarcate a line of cut. Rotary 
horizontal blades sever the cane at its base, and drum 
mounted cross blades cut the severed cane into appropriate 
lengths and deposit the same on a conveyor system. 



/ ~ 



3,659,405 

QUICK DETACHABLE BRACE RODS FOR COMBINE 
Ronald D. MBler, Shawnee, Katts., aarignor to AOb^hafancrs 
Mannfactnring Company, Milwaukee, Wb. 

Filed July 31, 1970, Ser. No. 59,929 

Int. CI. AOld 41102 

U.S.CL 56—15.6 1 Claim 

Thk invention relates to quick detachable brace rods posi- 

tionable between a header and a main body of a combine 



/ 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



37 



harvester and wherein the rods can be easily adjusted as to nitude than effected by the intact ends of yams for re-setting 
length and readily locked into position and when detached at the electrical circuit and thereby controlling proper cyclic 




/ 



/ 



one end, such brace rods can be readily carried on the 
header parallel thereto. 



3,659,406 

STRANDED CABLE OPEN STRAND DETECTOR 

Pafancr Klpperbcrg, c/o Wibon, King and Company, 390,444 

Victoria Street, Prince George, Brftkh Columbia, Canada 

Filed July 27, 1970, Ser. No. 58,633 
Claims priority, appHcatkin Canada, Aug. 1, 1969, 058,497 

InLa.G01r37/0« 
UA CI. 57-19 6 Claims 



/ . 




Cable inspection means comprise a probe arranged to 
move along the periphery of the cable and, upon encounter- 
ing a gap in the strands, to move inwardly and thus provide 
an indication of a fault in the cable. The inward movement of 
the probe can be used to stop the operation of an associated 
cable winding machine, and/or to illuminate a relevant point 
on a mimic diagram of an installation including the inspec- 
tion means. 




operation thereof as the ends down detector apparatiis moves 
along the series of yams. j 



3,659,408 
STRANDING APPARATUS 
Harvey Barr, Bronxvflic, N.Y., assignor to Anaconda Wire 
and Cable Company 

Filed Mar. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 19^62 

InL CI. DOlb 7192; D02g 1102 

U.S. CI. 57-34 AT . 19 Claims 




A strand is twisted by passing it between the facing sur- 
faces of two or more pairs of parallel endless bands that are 
mounted at an acute angle to each other. The band 
mountings are pivoted periodicaUy to reverse the direction of 
twist, the period being equal to the time it takes a point on 
the strand to pass through all the pairs of bands. 



3,659,409 
ELECTRIC CIRCUIT MEANS FOR TEXTILE STRAND 
ENDS DOWN DETECTING APPARATUS 
David W. Saunders, Fitchburg, Mats., assignor to Parks- 
Cramer Company, Charlotte, N.C. 
Contlnnatk>n-tn-part of application Ser. No. 866,265, Oct. 14, 
1969, now abandoned. This applicati<AB Oct 1, 1970, Ser. No. 

77,101 
Int. CI. DOlh 73/26, 7J/76, 7 J/J2 . ^ 

U.S. CI. 57-34 R I 18 Claims 



3,659,407 
ENDS DOWN DETECTOR APPARATUS 
DavM W. Saunders, Fitchburg, Mass., aarignor to Parks- 
Cramer Company, FHchburg, Mass. 

Filed June 3, 1970, Ser. No. 43,036 
Int CL DOIh 7J/76 

U.S. CI. 57—34 R 9 Claims 

An ends down detector apparatus for detecting the 

absence of any ends in a series of yams on a textile machine, 
such as a spinning frame, and wherein the apparatus includes 
means for generating electrical pulse signals of varying mag- 
nitudes, the intact running ends of yams cooperating with the 
generating means to effect electrical pulse signals of a 
predetermined magnitude denoting the presence of ends of 
yams and wherein means are positioned in advance of the se- 
ries of yams to effect electrical pulse signals of a higher mag- 




Improved electric circuitry for use in an apparatus which 
travels a detector along textile strand processing machines 



1 



38 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



such as spinning frames for determining the absence of ends 
of yam from locations therealong at which such ends nor- 
mally are present and for thereby locating ends down on the 
textile strand processing machines. The electrical circuitry 
disclosed herein incorporates detectors generally pulse elec- 




trical signals, pulse shaping circuits receiving pulse signals 
from the detectors and shaping the characteristics thereof, 
and logic circuits receiving shaped pulse signals and generat- 
ing an output pulse on a determination that in end is absent 
from a location at which the same normally is present. 



! 3,659,410 

SPINNING MACHINE AND METHOD 
Antooin Barodiovsky; Ladislav Horacck; Zdcnek Knilik; 
Mflodav SiritUy, •■ of Usd nad Orttd; Franttaek SUnd, 
DkNiha TrcbdVa, and MUos WiUert, Usti nad Oriki, aU of 
Cwchoalovakia, assignors to Vyzkumny Ustav Banlnarsky, 
Usti nad Oriici, Czccbodovalda 

FUed Jan. 18, 1971, Scr. No. 107^61 
Claims priority, appUc^n Czechoslovakia, Mar. 9, 1970, 

1541/70 

Int. CL DOlh 7/72 

VS. CI. 57-58.89 1 1 Claims 




primarily to exert drag on the fibers as the yam is withdrawn, 
and may only secondarily be a treating agent. 



3,659,411 

RING ASSEMBLY FOR SPINNING AND TWISTING 

FRAMES 

Kard Jagcr; Janwiava Schiotzka, and Zdcnek Kobr, aU of 

Libcrcc, Cxcckodovakia, aaritnors to Statni vyrkumny 

osUv tcxtilni, Ubcrec, Csccliodovakia 

FUed Joly 16, 1969, Scr. No. 842^23 
Claims priority, application Czccboclovakia, Aug. 1, 1968, 

5586-68 

Int CL DOlh 7/62 

U.S. CI. 57-120 8 Claims 




A ring spinner in which a traveller slides along the inner 
periphery of a plastic ring. The ring is carried by a metallic 
body which has a lower annular surface portion also slidably 
engaged by the routing traveller. The metallic body has an 
inner peripheral region where the plastic ring is located to be 
supported by the metallic body, and at this inner peripheral 
region the metallic body is formed with a circumferential 
cavity communicating with a source of lubrication. The 
metallic body is also formed with a plurality of ducts commu- 
nicating with this circumferential cavity and leading 
therefrom to an exterior surface of the metallic body, so that 
part of the lubricant will discharge onto the latter exterior 
surface to form a film which will lubricate the contact 
between the traveller and the lower annular surface of the 
metallic body. 



3,659,412 

POSITIONER FOR CALENDAR DIAL IN TIMEPIECE 

Keaji Miyasaka, and Yasuaki Nakayama, both of Tokyo, 

Japan, assignors to Citiaen Watch Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filed June 25, 1970, Scr. No. 49,722 

Claims priority, application Japan, June 26, 1%9, 44/60012: 

Feb. 6. 1970, 45/12288 

Int. CI. G04b 19124 

U.S.CI.58-4 1 1 Claim 



A spinning machine has a rotary spinning chamber whose 
inner circumferential surface annularly surrounds its axis of 
rotation and diverges from an open side of the spinning 
chamber towards a transverse surface extending transversely 
to the axis and provided with an axial recess into which air- 
escape channels open. A liquid is admitted into the open side 
of the chamber so that it becomes deposited as a liquid layer 
on the inner surface of the chamber and the transverse sur- 
face is provided with a plurality of liquid-escape apertures for 
the escape of excess liquid, these apertures surrounding the 
axis of rotation. Fibers are admitted into the chamber for 
deposition on the inner circumferential surface of the 
chamber and in the liquid of the layer, to thereupon become 
converted into a yam which is then withdrawn from the 
chamber. The liquid may be a dye, a yam-treating agent, a 
yam-sizing agent, an antistatic agent or the like, but serves 




The positioner for the claendar dial fitted in a calendar 
timepiece is adapted to keep the dial in its working position 
in a highly stabilized manner. Since the idle distance between 
the dial plate and the star wheel of the timepiece varies on 
account of unfavorable deflections or deformations of the 
dial plate, the stabilizing positioner comprises a resilient ring 
made from a plate the inner periphery of which abutts upon a 
first mounting shoulder formed on the cannon wheel of the 
timepiece and the outer periphery of which abutts on a 
second mounting shoulder formed on the star wheel. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



3,659,413 
SINGLE POSITION DATE OR DAY CORRECTOR WITH 

GRAVITY CONTROLLED CLUTCH 
Kmvo Taaaka, 3-105, ScklHnadil, Ncrima-kn; Toabihiko 
Kanayama, 2-217, HIgMhi-oliknbo, Sbi^)ak«.kn: Tctnya 
Yanida, 5-16-4, HJgadriJkHmknro, Toditma-ku; Hidetaka 
Ttttiya, 1101, FukuMam-tha, AkUUam-abi; Yoahio 
Kikuclii, 2-22-17, HigMhiyntingj, Katsaaidka.kn, and 
Takco Muto, A- 143, 4-13-20, Nakamcgnro, Mcguro-ku, aO 
of Japan, assignors to Citizen Match Company Limited, 
Tokyo, Japan 

FBed Mar. 16, 1971, Scr. No. 124,695 
Claims priority, application Japan, Mar. 16, 1970, 45/21490 

bA.CLG04b 19/24 
VS. CL 58—58 1 Claim 




In a calendar correction mechanism for a timepiece a dou- 
ble pawl member is freely mounted on a movable pin for 
pivotal movement under the influence of gravity for selective 
engagement with a day star wheel or a date calendar dial. A 
mechanical motion transmitting train is arranged between an 
elongated operating stem and the movable pin to shift the 
pawl member for transmitting step motion to either the day 
star wheel or the date calendar dial. 



ERRATUM i 

For Class 58 — 88 SC see: 
Patent No. 3,659,383 



3,659,414 

HYDRODYNAMIC UNIT FOR POWER TRANSMISSION 

GBbert K. Hansc, Blooaifidd Hilb, Mich., asrignor to GcMral 

Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mkh. 

Original appttcatioo Mar. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 805,745, now 

Patent No. 3,590,966. Divided and thk appttcation Nov. 23, 

1970, Scr. No. 91^12 

iBt CL F16d 31/06, 33/00 

VS. CL 60—54 7 Clafan 



trol power flow through the unit Controls associated with a 
gear selector mechanism for forward and reverse gearing ef- 
fect the momentary disconnection of the input rotor and the 
transmission input when shifting gears. Disc brakes selective- 
ly engageable with the differential input provide vehicle ser- 
vice brakes. The housing of the torque-transmitting unit is 
rigidly connected to the transmission input by deforming a 
portion of the housing into appropriate openings formed in 
the transmission input. 

3^9^15 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR REDUCING EXHAUST 

EMISSIONS DURING ACCELERATION 
Artbnr M. Brcmwkc, New Cartlc, ImL, malgniii to TRW Inc., 
Cleveland, OUo 

FUed Ang. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 64,403 

Int. CL F02b 41/00 

U.S.CL 60-13 ICtafan 




a mMf i'.r iar 






A device for incieastng the performance of diesel engines 
and reducing exhaust emissions during acceleration by port- 
ing high-pressure air directly to the cylinders (A the engine' 
independently of the normal air supply during the compres- 
sion stroke when accelerating the engine. The air is sui^lied 
to. the cylinders until such a time as the normal air intake is 
sufficient to adequately combust the increased fuel flow. 

3,659,416 

VAPOR DRIVEN MOTORS 

Harold Brown, 2709 S. Jackaon Street, Dcavcr, Colo. 

FBed July 14, 1970, Scr. No. 54,776 

Int. CL P03g 7/06, 3/02 

VS. a. 60—25 7 



«U^ 




Power transmission in which the input rotor of a 
hydrodynamic torque-transmitting unit and a rotatable trans- 
mission input are selectively clutched and unclutched to con- 




A rotatable wheel through which a plurality of similar, axi- 
ally spaced, tubular fluid-containing spokes diametrically ex- 
tend, each spoke terminating at each of its extremities in a 
fluid chamber, the fluid chambers of each spoke being 
directed in circumferential directi<»is exteriorally tA said 
wheel. 

An individual electrical heating element positicHied in each 
fluid chamber, the elements being electricaUy and in- 
dividually connected to contacts arranged in a concentric se- 



40 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



ries on said wheel so as to be individually, successively and 
electrically contacted to energize the elements on the rising 
side of said wheel to force the liquid through each spoke to 
the descending side of said wheel to gravitationally impart 
rotation to the latter. 



3,659,417 
GAS TURBINE UNIT FOR GENERATING MECHANICAL 

ENERGY AND COMPRESSED AIR 
Hubert J. Giieb, Stnttgart-Botnang, Gernumy, aasisiior to 
Daiiiiler-Baiz AktiensadlKhaft, Stuttgart-Untcrturkbdni, 
Gcnnany 

FDed Aug. 8, 1969, Ser. No. 848,461 
Claims priority, appHcatlon Gcmumy, Aug. 8, 1968, P 17 51 

851.3 

Int. CL P02c 7/02; B64d 13102 

U.S. CL 60—39.07 1 1 Claims 



3,659,419 
HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT OF HYDRAULICALLY DRIVEN 

VEHICLE 

TmUbIcIiI Ikcda, Il>araU-kca, Japao, aarignor to Httachi 

CoostnictkM Madiiiiery Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filed Oct. 12, 1970, Ser. No. 79,865 

Claims priority, appHcatlOB Japan, Oct. 13, 1969, 44/96729 

Int. CI. F15b 15118 
MS. CL 60-53 R 12 Claims 



a~;M 



■X 



•CH 



r' 



^^j^ 



<\ 



i^-. 



• \ 




I 



A gas turbine aggregate, especially an auxiliary unit for air- 
crafts which is intended to produce both mechanical energy 
and compressed air for loads, and in which a line branching 
off from the compressed air line that is supplied with com- 
pressed air from the compressor, leads to an air turbine 
which, in its turn, is connected with th©. output shaft of the 



A hydraulic pump driven by an engine and a hydraulic 
motor to drive running wheels are connected with each other 
by a conduit to form a closed circuit for the circulation of 
hydraulic oil therethrough, and the hydraulic oil is supplied 
into said closed circuit from an oil tank through a hydraulic 
oil supply circuit including a booster pump and excess oil in 
said closed circuit is discharged through a hydraulic oil 
discharge circuit. An auxiliary hydraulic motor having a fan 
on the drive shaft thereof is provided at one point of either 
the hydraulic oil supply circuit or the hydraulic oil discharge 



gas turbine either directly or indirectly, the branch line from circuit, so as to be driven by the hydraulic oil passing 
the compressed air line to the air turbine is provided with a therethrough. Further, a hydraulic oil cooling radiator is pro- 
valve to enable selective opening and closing of the branA^vided in the hydraulic oil discharge circuit in opposed rela- 
ling ^^^ion to said fan to be cooled by the latter. Therefore, the 

position of the hydraulic oil cooling radiator can be freely 



> ! 3,659,418 

VARLABLE GAS TURBINE ENGINE AIR INTAKE 
Michael Poadwr, Duffldd, and Michad Roy WlUiams, FUton, 
both of England, assignors to Rolls-Royce Limited, Derby, 
England 

Filed July 13, 1970, Ser. No. 54,124 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, July 30, 1969, 

38,150/69 

Int CI. F02c 7104 

MS. CI. 60—39.29 7 Claims 



selected and a sufficient cooling capacity can be obtained. 



3,659,420 
BRAKE SYSTEM FOR VEHICLES 
Erich Rclncckc, Hannover, Germany, assignor to 
Westinghousc Brcmsen-und Apparatebau G.m.l>.H., Han- 
nover, Gcnnany 

Filed Aug. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 65,030 

Int. CI. F15b 7/00, B60t 13100; F04b 17100, 35/00 

MS. CI. 60-54.5 HA 7 Claims 




A vortex air flow is set up around the outer fringe of an air 
flow through a duct, the internal diameter of which increases 
in a downstream direction. The vortex picks up the outer 
fringe of the air flow in the duct and causes it to diffuse more 
rapidly onto the increased diameter portion of the duct, than 
would normally occur. 




A fluid pressure brake system having a common master 
cylinder for providing control braking pressure for brake 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



41 



cylinders on both the front and rear axles of a vehicle, said 
brake system being characterized by a fluid pressure regxila- 
tor effective, subsequently to initiation of supply thereto of 
control pressure from the master brake cylinder and during 
low range braking up to a certain degree of said control pres- 
sure, for effecting delivery of respective braking pressures to 
the front and rear axle cylinders at one proportion such that 
the braking pressure at the front axle cylinders increases 
responsively to increasing control pressure at a lesser rate 
than the rate of increase at the rear axle cylinders, said fluid 
pressure regulator being operative responsively to said con- 
trol pressure in excess of said certain degree during high 
range braking for effecting delivery of braking pressures to 
the front and rear axle brake cylinders at a different propor- 
tion such tliat the increase in said delivered pressure to tlie 
front axle cylinders, during progressive increase in control 
pressure occurs at a rate greater than that at the rear axle 
cylinders to compensate for inertially induced axle load dis- 
placement as the vehicle retardation increases. 



means being driven by said main gas generator; means for 
directing the output air of «aid compressor means to the inlet 
of said main gas generator, said air bypass duct and said aux- 
iliary gas generator; said main gas generator, bypass duct and 
auxiliary engine each having a separate exhaust nozde 







Z<3 



^^^^T7m&^//A'^^////^ 



ty../.'^jII^J2^.^^/,'y^^y/M:^ 



>//////M >>w^w> yr\,■.y,....^} 



777: 



3,659,421 
HYDRAULIC BRAKING SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES 
Alexander J. WOkm, and Stuari B. Dawson, both of War- 
wickshire, England, assignors to Girling Limited, Bir- 
mingham, England 
Continuation of application Ser. No. 833329, June 16, 1969, 
now abandoned. This appttcatlon Oct. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 

77,708 
Claims priority, application threat Britain, June 14. 1968, 

28,296/68; 28,299/68; Apr. 1, 1%9, 16,888/69 

int. CI. F15b 7/00 

U.S. CL 60-54.5 P 18 Claims 



means; and nteans for selectively and alternatively governing 
the airflow in said bypass duct and said auxiliary engine, said 
last named means including means for varying the area of at 
least said bypass duct and auxiliary gas generator exhaust 
nozzle means. 




3,659,423 

MOVEABLE ROCKET 

Robert C. Lair; JuUa H. Paknrar, both of Akron, ami Edward 

G. Strieker, North Canton, al of OMo, aarigDon to 

Goodyear Aerospace CorporatloB, Akron, OMo 

FUed Sept 17, 1964, Ser. No. 397,136 

Int CL F02k 1124 

MS. CL 60—232 9 Claims 



A power-operated tandem master cylinder includes first 
and second pressure spaced located respectively between a 
main piston and f secondary piston, and between the secon- 
dary piston and a closed end of a cylinder bore in which the 
piston work. A pair of axially spaced spring loaded tilting 
valves are adapted to be actuated upon movement of a rod 
associated with the main piston to cut off communication 
between a reservoir and permit fluid under pressure to enter 
the first pressure space. The pressure fluid in the first pres- 
sure space is then delivered to the brakes of one brake circuit 
and acts on the secondary piston to pressurize fluid in the 
second pressure space for delivery to the brakes of another 
brake circuit. 




3,659,422 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR AIRCRAFT 

PROPULSION 

Jack I. Hope, Pahis Verdes Peninsula, CaUf., assignor to 

North American Rockwell Corporation, El Scgundo, Calif. 

Filed Nov. 4, 1966, Ser. No. 592,086 

Int CL F02k 3il2 

MS. CL 60-224 18 Claims 

1. An aircraft propulsion system comprising a main gas 

generator, an air bypass duct associated with said main gas 

generator for passing air around said main gas generator; at 

least one auxiliary gas generator located adjacent to said 

main gas generator; means for compressing inlet air, said 



^ 



I. In a rocket motor exhaust nozzle the combination of 
a nozzle body defining a venturi throat, 

an insert wear ring to protect the venturi throat of the 
nozzle body, 

a fixed annular mounting base iemovably receiving the 
nozzle body, 

a flexible seal membrane effecting a sealed relationship 
between the mounting base and the nozzle body, and 
allowing controlled relative movement therebetween, 

a concentric ring operatively mounted by said seal mem- 
brane between the nozzle body and the mounting base, 

first means pivotaliy mounting said nozzle body to said 
concentric ring, 

second means pivotaliy mounting said mounting base to 
said concentric ring at 90° relation to said first pivotal 
mounting means to achieve a gimbal effect between said 
nozzle body and said mounting base, and 

means to controllably and selectively apply pressure to 
the nozzle body to effect pivoting thereof to a desired 
relation with respect to the mounting base. 



\ 



42 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



] 



3,659,424 

I STOW ABLE AIR SCOOP 

Albert S. VoBl, Jr., BaMmotc, M<L, Mdsnor to The United 
States of America as re p resen ted by tlie Secretary of Uw 

Navy 
I I Filed Oct 7, 1970, Ser. No. 78,771 

Int. a. ¥02k 9/06 
U.S. CL 60—269 10 Clabns 




A foldable ram air scoop for gathering and channeling ex- 
ternal air into a secondary thrust chamber, or afterburner, of 
an air-augmented thrust propelled missile is provided. The 
scoop is deployabie prior to launch, being foldable against 
the missile body while stowed within a volume restricted 
storage magazine. The present air scoop essentially com- 
prises a two-stage folding mechanism which compactly holds 
the scoop body against the missile, controllably deploys the 
scoop to a desired configuration, and positively locks the 
scoop in the proper position. 



3,659^25 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR BURYING PIPELINE 
Pietcr J. Dc Gectcr. R^K^Uk, Nctheriands, aadcKV to SImU 
Oil Compaay, New Yorii, N.Y. 

H Filed May 25, 1970, Ser. No. 40,407 
Claims priority, appttcatioB Great Britain, May 23, 1969, 

26^92/69 

Int. CI. F161 1/00; E02f 5/02 

U.S.CL 61-72.4 3 Claims 



relative to the sod as the plow slices therethrough. The lower 
edge portion for forming a trench is integral with and 




disposed rearwardly of the upper sod cutting edge portion 
and inclined in the opposite direction. 



3,659.427 

REFUSE DISPOSING UNIT 

Richard D. Hana, 400 West MadiMa St^ CMcafo, DL 

Cootinuatioii-tn-part of appMmHnii Ser. Na 677^06, Oct 23, 

1967, DOW Patent No. 3.514,969. Thb appMcartoa Apr. 20, 

1970, Ser. No. 29^05 

Int. CL F25d 25/00 

VS. a. 62—63 I 51 Claims 





A pipeline is buried in the bottom of a body of water by 
fluidizing sediments which compose the bottom adjacent the 
pipeline so that the pipeline sinks by its own weight into the 
fluidized sediments. 



A garbage and refuse disposing unit is disclosed herem. 
The unit includes a housing for receiving refuse of all types, a 
compressor mechanism for compressing the refuse and freez- 
ing means for freezing the compressed refuse into dense or 
solid pellet-like units. 



3,659,426 
CABLE LAYING PLOW 
Robert H. CaldweU, P. O. Box 403, Jacksonville, ID. 

Filed Mar. 26, 1970, Ser. No. 29,337 
I Int. CI. B63b 35/04; AOlb 13/08 

U.S.CL 61-72.6 2 Claims 

A plow for laying service cable underground beneath a 
sodded surface. The plow includes a leading cutting edge 
which is contoured along its height so that the upper cutting 
portion edge for cutting sod is inclined at an obtuse angle 



3,659,428 
METHOD FOR COOLING STEEL MATERIALS 
Kazoo Knnioka;'SMgcnar1 Shimisu, both of Kawasaki, and 
Masaru Hirata, Fnkooka Machi, all of Japan, aasignon to 
Nippon Kokan KaboaUki Kakha 

Filed Aug. 14, 1970, Ser. No. 63336 

Clafans priority, appHcatkm Japan, Dec. 1, 1969, 44/95896 

Int. CLF25d 7 7/06 

U.S. CL 62—64 3 Claims 




A method for spray cooling hot metal products in which a 
small amount of water is atomized in a large air flow passing 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



through a throttling nozzle so that a two phase high speed jet 
is directed against the hot metal. The water is injected into 
the air stream between a compressed air reservoir and the 
throttling portion of the node. 



3,659,429 

REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER WITH FAST CHILL 

ARRANGEMENT 

John A. McLean, CohnnbM, Ohto, amlfBor to Wesdngbouae 

Electric Corporatkm, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Filed Mar. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 22,499 

Int.CLF25dy7/00 

U.S.CL 62-157 7 Claims 



perature condition, such as during start-up of the apparat\is, 
to prevent the ice maker dumping unfrozen water into the 
freezer compartment of the apparatus. 



3,659,431 
DRUM SHAPED VESSEL ASSEMBLY 
ScUiro IwMawa, Yokohama; MaMbmni lahfamira, Kokab«iiUi, 
and KcnsUchfaw Morkhlla, Yokohama, aD of Japm^ as- 
signors to Tokyo Shfbam DeaU KabusUki Kaidm, (a/k/a 
Tokyo Shibanra Electrk Co., Ltd.), KawanU-dii, Japan 
Filed Feb. 18, 1971, Ser. No. 116,577 
Claims priority, appikattea Japmi, Feb. 27, 1970, 45/16846 

Int a. F25b 15/04; F28f 7/00 
U A a. 62-476 4 Claims 



"jt 


• «< 




'JLf 


3^ 




*0- 

ti 

\ 

1 i 
1 1 
1 1 


fo 


- 








1 ■ 


<M - 


T=f< 


■^ 



The titled apparatus in which a fast chill space is provided 
in the upper portion of the refrigerator compartment by 
providing an auxiliary fan in communication mainly with the 
refrigerator space and to a substantially lesser degree with 
the passage through which chilled air is received from the 
cooling means of the freezer compartment. The auxiliary fan 
is energized independently of the cooling means for a time 
period corresponding to the time typically required to chill 
the particular articles undergoing chilling. 



3,659,430 
DEFROST BIMETAL FOR INTERRUPTING TIME CYCLE 

ICE MAKER DURING DEFROST-SINGLE TIMER 

Dnanc C. Nichok. and WUiam J. Ltastrombcri, both of 

EvansTlIc, Ind., Mslgnors to Whirlpool Corporation 

Filed Jnne 18, 1970, Ser. No. 47,520 

Int. CL F25c 1/10 

VS. CL 62-233 10 Clahns 




49t^ •ft»«e«T Ma«r»« , 



A refiigerator-ftrczer apparatus normally operating 
through freezing and defrosting portions of an operating cy- 
cle. The apparatus includes an ice maker and a timer motor 
that preferably also comprises the drive motor of the ice 
maker. A single temperature responsive switch in heat 
exchange relationship with the evaporator of the apparatus 
opens at an above freezing temperature condition of the 
evaporator so as to terminate operation of the defixMt heater 
during the defrosting portion of the operation cycle and 
prevents cycling of the ice maker in the event of a high tem- 




A drum shaped vessel assembly suitable for use in an ab- 
sorption refrigerator comprises two elongated vessels which 
when assembled provide a circular cross-sectional configura- 
tion and joints disposed in the air gap defined between con- 
fronting inner surfaces of the vessels, said joints rigidly inter- 
connecting the vessels in a direction perpendicular to the 
inner surfaces of the vesseb but penritting relative move- 
ment thereof in the longitudinal direction. 



? 



3,659,432 
DAMPER ASSEMBLY FOR AIR CONDITIONING UNIT 
Dale L. Sdhost, Mottne, DL, asslgDor to American Ak Filter 
Company, Inc., Lo^svlDe, Ky. 

FOed July 23, 1970, Ser. No. 57,560 

Int CLF25d/ 7/06 

VS. CL 62-427 8 Claims 



,f!^ :iL^i 



in 




An air ventilating arrangement for conditioning air for a 
served space wherein a damper assembly is provided to regu- 
late the flow of fresh air to a served space. 



3,659,433 

REFRIGERATI ON SYS TEM INCLUDING A FLOW 

METERING IttVICE 

David N. Shaw, Lircrpool, N.Y., awlgnnr to Canier Corpora- 

tioB, Syracaae, N.Y. 

FVed Jan. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 88 
Int. CL F25b 47/06 
U.S.CL 62—511 2 

A refrigerant flow metering device for use in a ref 
tion system comprising a housing having an inlet and an 4^t- 
let and defining a bore disposed within its confines, the ends 
of which communicate with the inlet and outlet, said bore 




\ 



44 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



being of a variable cross section to form a variable passage. 
A valve element positioned within the bore is capable of 
movement therein in response to changes in pressure in the 




refrigeration system. A spring associated with the valve ele- 
ment provides a force to move the element toward the inlet 
of said housing. 



f 3,659,434 

METHOD FOR BALANCING TUBULAR SHAFTING 
Robert A. Wolfe, Ro^cstcr, Pa., aadgMM- to Pfttsbtirgli TuIni- 
lar SkaMiif , faK., Rochester, Pa. 

FBcd Job. 15, 1971, Scr. No. 106,656 

iBt. CI. F16c 1/00 

U.S.CL64— IR 9 Claims 





Tubular shafting having a metallic outer tubular member 
and a cellular resinous core is both kineti<Udly and dynami- 
cally balanced by drilling holes in the outer metallic tubular 
member at locations where additional weight is required to 
balance the shafting. A predetermined amount of molten 
metal is poured through the drilled holes into the internal 
portion of the tubular shafting. The molten metal flows 
through passageways in the cellular resin core and solidifies 
against the inner wall of the outer metallic tubular member. 
The passageways formed in the cellular resin are filled with a 
similar cellular resin and the holes in the outer metallic tubu- 
lar member are suitably plugged. 



3,659,435 
TORQUE TRANSFERRING DEVICE 
Svca Walter NOaoa, Savedakn, Sweden, aasisnor to SKF In- 
daatrlal Tradiog and Dcvetopmcat Company N.V., Amster- 
dam, NcthcrfauMb 

Filed May 7, 1970, Scr. No. 35,456 

Claims priority, application Sweden, May 9, 1969, 6573/69 

Int. CL F16d 3/06 

VS. CL 64—23.7 2 Claims 




A device for transferring a torque may comprise an outer 
tubular component enclosing a shaft, the diameter of which 

( 



is only slightly less than the cylindrical, internal surface of 
the outer component. These two components cooperate 
through the intermediation of balls operating in parallel, 
matching grooves in the two components. 

To ensure a recirculation of the balls in unloaded condi- 
tion and to ensure a smooth running of the balls, the grooves 
are arranged in at least three pairs in which two grooves on 
opposite sides of a ridge in the inner component will 
cooperate with two grooves arranged at opposite sides of a 
groove in the outer member to form two runways, which are 
each connected to a return passage in the outer component. 



3,659,436 
PATTERN ATTACHMENT FOR CIRCULAR KNITTING 

MACHINES 
Emst-Dletcr Plath, Taflfingcn, Germany, amignor to Mayer & 
Cle, Taflflngcn, Germany 

FBcd Nov. 21, 1969, Scr. No. 878,642 
Claims priority, application Germany, Dec 4, 1968, 18 12 

611.9 

Int. CL D04b 15/78 

VS. CL 66—50 R / 14 ClainH 




Pattern controlling mechanism for circular knitting 
machines having a rotating needle carrier and setting mem- 
bers which act upon control jacks for the needles, said con- 
trol jaclu being vertically displaceable and being swingable 
according to a desired pattern. The mechanism is provided 
with pattern levers which act upon the butts of the control 
jacks, the pattern levers, which control the positioning of 
butts, being selectively moved into terminal rest and working 
positions by electromagnetic driving means. The driving link- 
age between each driving means and its respective pattern 
lever is such that the levers are held stably in either of their 
terminal positions, with a consequent reduction of power 
required and heat generated by the driving means. 



3,659,437 

KNITTING MACHINE DEFECTIVE NEEMJ: DETECTOR 
CoUn S. McArtbvr, and Benny L. Hester, both of Winston- 
Salem, N.C., aarignors to R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, 
Wimton-Salem, N.C. 

med July 25, 1969, Scr. No. 844,808 
Int. CL D04b 35/18 
VS. CL 66—157 1 1 ClainM 

A circular knitting machine, comprising a device for de- 
tecting defective needles by detecting the absence of a nee- 
dle hook from its proper place. The device is placed at a lo- 
cality adjacent the circular path of needle travel, and the 
needles are raised by a cam so that the hook of every good 
and properly positioned needle intercepts a coUimated bead 
of radiant energy. The beam is not intercepted properly by a 
needle which has a broken, bent or otherwise defective hook 
or which, because of broken butt or other causes, has not 
been raised properly. The detector is connected to an alarm 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



46 



to Coor* 



and may also be connected to a conventional stop motion 3,659,439 

device. YARN TREATMENT APPARATUS 

Alternatively, a small magnet mounted on a piezoelectric Jolm Raymond TIndall, GtdMley, Fngimirl 
crystal or magnetic pickup is positioned in the proximity of tauMs Limited, L^mdon, England 

Filed Nov. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 89,991 
Claims priority, application Great Brtein, No«. 19, 1969, 

56,628/69 

InL CL D06c 1/06 

VS. CL 68—5 D 8 Claims 



« s» St 



li I* 





B O 



AX *■ 




the hooks of the needles which have been raised by the cam 
referred to above. The magnet will be deflected by each 
passing needle of proper constitution and attitude in substan- 
tially the same manner, but will be deflected differently by a 
defective needle. 



'k_^ 



i' "4^ '^^ 



3,659,438 
APPARATUS FOR TREATMENT OF A FABRIC 
Matsnbci Chiba; Kiyohani Kito, both of Nagoya; Hfa-odii 
Mizataai, Kuwana-gun, and Masayaso Kachi, Niwa-gun, aU 
of Japan, assignors to NIhon Scnshoku Kiiiai Kaboshiki 
Kaisha, Ama-gun, Aichi Prcfcctnre, Japan 

Filed Oct. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 77,401 
Claims priority, application Japan, Aug. 10, 1970, 45/69270 

Int CL B05c 3/02 
U.S.CL 68-177 2 Claims 



Apparatus for treating a textile yam comprbes an endless 
flexible support member mounted for movement around a 
closed path, means for laying a textile yam onto a surface of 
said support member, a treatment vessel to engage with and 
completely enclose successive yam-receiving portions of said 
surface, means for moving said portions stepwise into and out 
of said treatment vessel, and a yam take-off apparatus opera- 
ble to withdraw treated yam from said portions. The endless 
flexible support member may be mounted for intermittent 
stepwise movement or for continuous movement around a 
closed path. 




3,659,440 

LIQUID DRAIN STRUCTURE FOR HIDE PROCESSING 

APPARATUS 

Lcc R. Lyon, 800 North Atlantic St., Mission HOIs, Kans. 

Filed Feb. 16, 1971, Scr. No. 1 15322 

Int. CL C14c 15/00 

VS. CL 69—30 8 Claims 



A method for liquid treatment of a fabric, in which the 
fabric to be treated in a rope form or web form is circulated 
in a predetermined direction within a treatment bath in a 
treatment tank, is disclosed. The subject method comprises 
the steps of providing outside of said treatment bath in said 
treatment tank, a treatment chamber consisting of a shower 
section provided with a fabric inlet, and a treatment section 
communicated with said shower section and having at least 
one constricted portion in the midway thereof, and surround- 
ing said fabric so as to pass said fabric therethrough; provid- 
ing a treatment conduit extended from said treatment 
chamber to within said treatment bath in said treatment tank; 
supplying a treatment liquid to within said chower section of 
said treatment chamber to seal said fabric inlet with said 
liquid during the circulating process of the fabric; then jetting 
said treatment liquid in the direction of travelling of the 
fabric within said treatment section to cause the treatment 
liquid to spout through the clearance between the fabric and 
said constricted portion when the fabric is passing through 
said constricted portion, and thereby to cause said fabric to 
carry out a shaking motion positively; and further leading 
said fabric from the outlet of said treatment chamber through 
said treatment conduit to within said treatment both while 
maintaining said fabric to be immersed in said treatment 
liquid. An apparatus for carrying out the above method is 
also disclosed. 







A liquid drain structure is disclosed for apparatus for 
processing animal hides and comprises an elongated conduit 
in a spiral within a treatment zone of a rotated inclined drum 
and a perforated wall defining a lower chamber within the 
drum for receiving liquid from the conduit and a pump for 
removing liquid from the lower chamber. 



' 3,659,441 
APPARATUS FOR BATCH DYEING 
Manfred Schnicrer, Erbnch/Odenwald, Gcrmnny, amigvor to 
Bmdtncr-Appuratcbau Michdrtndt GmbH, Erbnch/Ode- 
wald, Germany 

Filed Dec 15, 1970, Scr. No. 98^15 

Cbitas priority, appttcntion Germany, Dec 23, 1969, G 69 49 

681.7; Oct 21, 1970, G 70 38 866.8 

Int. CL B05c 8/02 

U.S.CL68-4 11 Claims 

A dyeing chamber has a fluid-tight cover in its front wall, 

and has a drive shaft extending through a fluid-tight seal in its 



\ 



e 



46 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



rear wall. A fitting on the end of the drive shaft is adapted to 



thereof. The blocking section prevents movement of a steer- 
ing shaf^ locking lever assembly into a locking position. The 




be coupled selectively with any one of a variety of goods-car- 
rying members, for rotating such member in the chamber. 



3,659,442 
LOCKING DEVICE INCLUDING CAMMING KEY FOR 
RELEASING SPRING CATCH MEMBERS 
Vito Ceiiiid, aad RmmM J. Casak, both of Bronx, N.Y., as- 
tigBon to said Casak, by said Ccflini 
, Flkd Jan. 18, 1971, Scr. No. 106,983 

' IbL CL E05b 65152 ; EOSc 1 9106 

VS. CL 70-63 9 Claims 




A locking device includes a lock base, hinged cover and 
key. The lock base has a key hole extending inwardly of one 
end parallel to the top of the lock base, and one or more 
holes in the top opening into the keyhole. The cover has one 
or more pairs of slightly spaced spring prongs insertable into 
the holes in the lock base. Shoulders on tips of the prongs en- 
gage underneath rims of the holes to keep the cover closed. 
The key has camming portions defining circumferential 
grooves with flaring faces for engaging the prongs, squeezing 
them together and lifting them clear of the bottom rims of 
the holes in the lock base when the key is rotated. The lock 
base may have recesses at the underside of its top for receiv- 
ing and concealing the tips of the prongs. The camming por- 
tions may be radially extending camming members engagea- 
ble with the tips of the prongs in the recesses when the key is 
turned in the keyhole. 



> 3,659,443 ' 

STEERING COLUMN LOCK INHIBITOR 
Jeremy T. Ball, Blrmliigiiam, Mich^ aarignor to Chrysler Cor- 
poration, iOsidaBd Park, Mich. 

Filed ScpC 30, 1970, Scr. No. 76,916 

Int. CL B60r 25102 

U.S. CL 70—186 8 OaiiiM 

Steering shaft lock inhibitor including a rotatable generally 

bowl-shaped member having a blocking section on the inside 




blocking section can be manually rotated out of the path of 
the lever assembly to permit locking of the steering shaft. 



3,659,444 

LOCKS 

John F. WeilekeiH, 51 East 42Bd St., New York, N.Y. 

Filed Apr. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 33,228 

Int. CL E05b 1 7/04 

VS. CL 70—360 7 Claims 




A lock having an outer tubular casing within which an 
inner housing or sleeve is axially and routably movable, the 
sleeve containing a lock mechanism provided with a latch 
projecting laterally through an opening in the wall of the 
sleeve. The sleeve is spring-biased in a manner to enable it to 
be partially projected or advanced out of the casing while the 
latch is in a retracted position. When the latch is extended it 
engages against a shoulder provided on the wall of the casing 
and this holds the sleeve retracted within the casing. The cas- 
ing is closed at its rear end by a cup which can be coimected 
to bolt-actuating means or to other closure controlling 
means. The sleeve has a projection for coupling it to the cup 
only when the sleeve is disposed partially out of the casing. 
When the sleeve is retracted or is wholly located within the 
casing and is held in that position by the engagement of the 
extended latch against the shoulder, the coupling projection 
will be detached from the cup whereby the sleeve can then 
be freely rotated without causing rotation of the cup. 
Locking means is provided for holding the cup against rota- 
tion while the sleeve is retracted into the casing. 



> I 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



#T 



3,659,445 

LOCK MOUNTING CUP AND PLACEMENT TOOL 

THEREFOR 

Charles L. Eads, Pahn Springs, and BiUic G. NaB, La 

CrcMcnta, both of CaHf., aalgnor* to Adams Rite Manafac- 

taring Company, Glcndate, CaHf. 

Piled A«g. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 63,766 
Int a. E05b 9f08 



3,659,447 
PLUNGER AND ACCUMULATOR 
Richard E. Naber, and WBHam D. Hamilton, both of 
Middletown, Ohio, assigBors to Arraoo Stcd Corporation, 
Middktown, Ohio 

FOed Aog. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 66,674 

Int.a. B21bi//20,5//J2 

U.S. CL 72-240 5 Oahns 



U.S. CL 70-451 



11 Claims 








Lock mounting means for securing a lock frame structure 
edgewise in a receiving opening provided in a wall of a hol- 
low narrow stile door frame by means of a clip assembly ar- 
ranged to be positioned by means of a placement tool and 
thereafter secured in a mounted position by means of an ap- 
propriate tool, such as a screw-driver, at the opposite ends of 
the opening, each clip assembly having a rigid body of 
generally H-shape configuration constructed from a generally 
flat plate material to provide an integral bridging portion 
with side legs at its ends, in which a tongue extends from the 
bridging portion and has an opening for receiving a lock 
anchoring member such as a screw. The side legs have 
diverging end portions for supporting associated wedging 
screws thereon in angular diverging relation, and with their 
head portions in the mounting position of the clip assembly, 
being accessible for actuation by a screwdriver inserted 
through the lock receiving opening. The placement tool is 
releasably engageable with the clip assembly by means of a 
spring detent, and is easily detached from the clip assembly 
after it is anchored in its mounting position. 



3 659 446 " 

METHOD AND DEVICE FOR FEEDING OF COLD 
PILGER MILLS 
Josef Gcrrctz, Sncchtetai; WHU Hagcdom, and Kart-Hdnz 
KcmmcrllBg, both of Mocndwngladbnch, aU of Germany, 
assignors to Wean Indnstries, Inc., Youngstown, Ohio 
Filed Oct 21, 1970, Scr. No. 82,739 
Int CL B21b 21/04 
U.S.CL 72-14 I 6 Claims 





A work roH balance plunger and accumulator for the mill 
stands of a rolling mill which is positioned in at least two of 
the work roll chocks so as to support the upper work roll 
chocks to substantially reduce hydraulic shock pressure 
drops or peaks during the expansion or compression of the 
mill stand as rolling strip enters or leaves, re^>ectively. 



3,659,448 

GAS METER DLU»HRAGM HAVING INTERMEDUTE 

STABILIZING AND TENSIONING RING 

Kari L. Scham, 224 East 6th Street, Tempc, Ariz. 

FBcd July 22, 1970, Scr. No. 57,141 

Int CL GOH 15/16; F16I 3/00 

VS. CL 73-279 1 Chlm 




/. 



The invention refers to a method and apparatus for feeding 
shells of variable lengths in a pilger mill to effect optimum ef- 
ficiency. When the entry pusher of the mill starts moving the 
length of newly fed shell is measured and this measurement is 
transmitted to a memory counter, and by means of a program 
control the distance travelled by the feed carriage is regu- 
lated to the length of the newly fed shell, «^reby the feed 
carriage moves only far enough so that on its return to a 
starting position a space is left which is equal to the length of 
the newly fed shell. 



A gas meter diaphragm characterized by a rigid teriinoning 
and stabilizing ring secured to the flexible diafrfiragm body 
intermediate a ri^, outer mounting rim and a centrally 
disposed rigid center pan for the purpose of eliminating wrin- 
kles in the flexing portion of the diaji^iragm, and im>viding an 
intermediate, slightly yieidable, annular area of flexible 
material under tension around the center pan portion of the 
diaphragm assembly. The diaphragm being further charac- 
terized by a comparatively lighter weight, self-supporting 
central piMtion which eliminates the need for the usinl carri- 
er wire assembly employed to movably support the center 
pan portion of prior art diaphragms. 

i 



48 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,449 

COMBINATION RIVET INSTALLATION APPARATUS 

AND SELF-DRILLING RIVET 

Robert G. Aberaatliy, Rkhmood, LmL, aasigiior to Avco Cor- 

poratkHi, Rkhmond, Ind. 

Filed Mar. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 19,216 

Int. CI. B21d 9105 

U.S. CL 72-391 7 Claims 




A rivet installation apparatus for use in cooperation with 
self-drilling rivets is disclosed. The disclosure provides for the 
installation of a rivet through two or more sheets of material, 
said installation being accomplished from one side. With this 
apparatus and rivet combination, an operator may place two 
or more sheets of material together, drill a hole through the 
sheets and upset the rivet while operating from one side of 
the material in one operation with a single tool. 



3,659,450 

■ ROLLING MILL OR CALENDAR WITH CROWN 

CONTROL OF THE ROLLS FOR ROLLING FLAT 

MATERIAL 

Haas Siegfried Mctzgcr, St. Ingbert-Saar, Germany, assignor 

to Moellcr & Neamann GmbH, Ingbert/Saar, Germany 

Filed Nov. 19, 1969, Ser. No. 878,034 

Claims priority, application Germany, Nov. 20, 1968, P 18 09 

975.7 

Int.CI.B21bi//i2 

U.S. CI. 72-237 5 Claims 



»^-o 



<^>L^:o--rHic^<^ 




In a rolling mill or calender for flat material, such as sheets 
or strips, a bridge member is disposed transversely across the 
rolling mill frames and is supported by the upper end faces of 
the screwdown pressure screws and is secured thereto so as 
to follow the screwdown movement while hydraulic pressure 
units attached to the bridge member and neck extensions of 
one of the rolls exert roll bending pressure thereon for the 
purpose of crown control. 



3,659,451 

SCREWDOWN DEVICE FOR ROLLING MILL FRAMES 

AND CALENDERS 

Hans Siegfried Mctzger, St. Ingbert-Saar, and Fred GUgcs, 

Gersweiler^Saar, both of Germany, aasigDors to Moellcr & 

Newmann GmbH, Ingbert am Saar, Germany 

Filed July 24, 1969, Ser. No. 844,369 
Claims priority, appHcadoa Germany, Aug. 1, 1968, P 17 52 

900.9 
Int. CLB21bi 7/24 



U.S. CI. 72-248 



SCIalms 




A shrink connection is used between a round pin and a 
bushing which may be moved relative to each other during 
screwdown movements of the rolls. The shrink connection 
permits a rigid and threadless transmission of the rolling 
force directly to the frame and not through the screwdown 
device of a rolling mill, said shrink connection may be 
hydraulically cancelled or released. 



3,6 59,452 
LASER EXCFTED SPECTROPHONE 
John G. Atwood, West Redding, and Edwin L. Kerr, 
Ridgcfidd, both oi Conn., assignors to The Perkin-Elmcr 
Corporation, Norwalk, Conn. 

Filed Apr. 22, 1969, Ser. No. 818^28 

InLa.G01n2//00 

U.S. CI. 73—23 5 Claims 




A system for measuring the radiant energy absorptivity of 
gaseous samples. There is provided a laser source, a cell for 
containing the sample gas in the path of the radiation and a 
low frequency differential pressure transducer coupled to the 
sample cell. The laser beam is partially absorbed producing a 
pressure rise in the gas which is then measured. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



49 



3,659,453 

FLUID SYSTEM LEAK DETECTOR 

Doagall C. Martin, Jr., 313 Ellcr Avennc, Englcwood, Ohio 

Filed June 26, 1970, Ser. No. 50,1 1 1 

Int. CI. GOlm 3106, 3/26 

U.S. CI. 73-40 6 Claims 



force-deflection behavior of the specimen under test. 
The foregoing abstract is neither intended to define the in- 





A fluid system leak detector comprising concentric inner 
and outer annular liquid chambers joined by an interconnect- 
ing conduit, the outer chamber being communicable with the 
fluid system to be checked and the inner chamber being iq 
vented communication with an overlying test pressure 
chamber, a transparent tube horizontally disposed within said 
outer chamber and in fluid transmitting communication with 
the opening of said interconnecting conduit into said outer 
chamber and a liquid conflned within said annular chambers 
movable in response to a pressure differential between the 
fluid system and the test pressure chamber wherein the quan- 
tity of the liquid is such that, when it is in either of said aimu- 
lar chambers it will not fill the same, either to the point of 
communication with the fluid system in the case of the outer 
chamber or to the vent to the test pressure chamber in the 
case of the inner chamber. Upon association of the detector 
with a fluid system having a pressure differential from am- 
bient pressure the liquid will move from one annular 
chamber to the other and the transfer of all of the liquid to 
the chamber toward which it so moves is completed by tem- 
porarily opening the valve connecting the test pressure 
chamber with the atmosphere. Upon the closing of this valve, 
any loss of pressure in the fluid system will create a pressure 
differential between it and the test pressure chamber in 
response to which the liquid will move in the direction of the 
lower pressure indicating a leak in four distinct phases; viz., 
movement of the liquid through the horizontally disposed 
tube, a rising of the liquid in the annular chamber in the 
direction of the lower pressure, a further reading of the last 
of the liquid passing through the horizontally disposed tube, 
and Anally bubbling of gas through the liquid after it is en- 
tirely transferred to the annular chamber in the direction of 
the lower pressure. 



vention disclosed in the specification, nor is it intended to be 
limiting as to the scope of the invention in any way. 



3,659,454 

FABRIC STIFFNESS TESTING APPARATUS 
Jack R. Stevenson, Wlnnsboro, S.C., aadgnor to Unlroyal, 
Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Filed May 1, 1970, Scr. No. 33,600 
Int CL GOln 3/00 
VS. CL 73— 103 7 Claims 

An apparatus for testing the stiffness of fabrics, comprising 
a testing machine fltted wdth a pair of linked, mutually 
orthogonal jaw members which support and load a fabric 
specimen therein, the machine providing a record of the 



3,659,455 

POWER STOPPER 

Billy K. Watkins, RR # 1 , Lovington, IIL 

CoBtfainalion^n-part of appttcatkm Scr. No. 723,772, Apr. 

24, 1968, now Patent No. 3,491,590, dated Jan. 27, 1970. 

Tids appttcatkm Jan. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 5^22 

Int. CL GO 11 5/13 

VS. CL 73—141 R 14 Claims 




Increasing frictional resistance to forward movement is 
provided by a self-propeUed power stopper weight transfer 
apparatus comprising a four-wheeled vehicle chassis on 
which there is positioned an elongated mass guide upon 
which a gear-driven mass of up to ten tons may be moved 
from a position over a rearward, relatively frictionless means 
to a forward position over a high friction sled means. A 
motor power means at the front end of the vehicle chassis 
not only allows the apparatus t o be driven on a hi^way and 
acts as a return means during a contest, but also eliminates 
the need for a separate dead weight on the sled means. 
Movement of the mass on the mass guide a produced by a 
direct gear drive connected in the power transmission 
system. A cab which may be provided on the chassis also 
adds dead weight. A fifth wheel arrangement on the sled, the 
attachment of which to the chassis may be controlled fix>m 
the cab, allows rapid coupling and uncoupling oi the ap- 
paratus and the sled means for simple, quick and efficient 
operation. 



50 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,456 

SHOCK SPECTRUM ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS 

METHOD AND APPARATUS 

PldUp ManhaH, Lexington, and William C. Stevens, Jr., 

Cbetansford, both of Man., asdgnon to Marshall Research 

and Deveiopment Corporation, BurUncton, Mass. 

Filed Mar. 22, 1968, Ser. No. 715,399 

Int. CI. GO In 3/38 

U.S. CI. 73-71.6 7 Claims 



*^^5i^ . , .*5L_pr^ 











ERRATUM 

For Class 73—279 see: 
Patent No. 3.659.448 



3,659,458 

SIGHT GAUGE 

William A. Bice, and Mkfaad W. Riddle, both of Lubbock, 

1. Tex., assignors to Clark Equipment Company 

Filed Oct 28, 1970, Ser. No. 84,689 

Int CL GOlf 23/02, 23/06 

VS. CI. 73—306 5 Claims 



A shock spectrum analysis and synthesis method and ap- 
paratus which includes the use of a shock spectrum analyzer 
and a shock spectrum synthesizer. The analyzer is a special 
purpose analog computer which provides an automatic shock 
spectrum analysis of both the primary and residual spectrum 
by solving the equation of motion for a single degree of 
ft^eedom. mass-spring-damping system and displaying the out- 
put signals on an oscilloscope or X-Y recorder. The synthes- 
izer generates a variable transient electrical input to a vibra- 
tion shaker system by generating a plurality of steady-state 
signals each having a different frequency and gating and 
summing'Uie signals. 



3,659,457 
REGISTER BOX AND LID FOR METERS 
Anthony C. OstrowsU, Feastcrrfik, Pa., assignor to Hersey 
Products Inc., Dedham, Mass. 

Filed Nov. 17, 1970, Ser. No. 90351 

Int. CI. GOlp 1/02; GOlf 15/14; G04b 39/00 

U.S. CL 73-273 6 Claims 





r^ 


\ 



A si^t gauge assembly for vertically superimposed tanlcs 
in communication with each other including a transparent 
sight tube communicating with the tanks and disposed along- 
side of the upper tank to indicate liquid level therein and a 
float member movable in the sight tube and extending into 
the lower tank for indicating the lever of liquid in the lower 
tank when observing the position of the float member in the 
sight tube. 



3,659,459 
DEVICE FOR MEASURING THE PRESSURE OF A FLUID 

FLOWING IN A PIPE 
Bernard Moreau, Nantes, France, assignor to Creusot-Loire, 
Paris, France 

Filed June 2, 1970, Ser. No. 42,673 

Claims priority, application France, July 4, 1969, 6922716 

InL CL GOll 7/00 

U.S. CL 73-388 R 3 Claims 



9. " 



10 



,9 



T 



^ 



3 EZ 



J 



12 



A register box for a meter formed of a clear plastic which 
has a recessed face portion into which a glass plate is placed 
upon seating means in said recess, and affixed therein by a 
resilient adhesive which provides a floating support for the 
glass plate, whereby the surface of the register box throu^ 
which readings are taken is protected and rendered scratch 
resistant. 



A measuring device comprising an auxiliary pipeline for 
coupling between a main pipe whose pressure is to be deter- 
mined and a second pressure source, the auxiliary pipeline 
including a pressure gauge and a calibrated orifice, the 
former nearest the main pipe. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



61 



3,659,460 

APPARATUS FOR SAMPLING ORE AND THE LIKE 

John A. CahU, CP2C 00 966, Rio Dc Janeiro, BrazH 

Filed June 24, 1970, Ser. No. 49,424 

Int CL GOlh 1/20 



the valve seat to seal the chamber from the interior of the 
supply line. Purge and flush lines are provided to clean the 
sampling chamber and to remove product therefrom and 
safety means are included to assure that the chamber is 
sealed from the purge and flush lines when open to the 



U.S.CL 73-421 R 



3 Claims product line. 




3^9^2 
ARRESTING DEVICE FOR HEAVY OBJECTS THROWN 

WITH GREAT FORCE 

Clyde C. Cole, 5298 Hmrard, Ventura, CaHL 

Filed Feb. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 8^67 

Int CL GOlm 19/00 

US. CL 73—432 ^ 2 Claims 



An elongate sample collector or container having a lon- 
gitudinal dimension corresponding to the useable (between 
guides) width of the conveyor belt is moved while empty 
onto the conveyor belt in such manner as to extend across 
the same at a position where it receives, from above, that 
portion of the particulate material which otherwise would 
have fallen onto the conveyor beh; a carriage which is mova- 
ble longitudinally of the conveyor beh removes the sample 
collector from the conveyor belt; and then another carriage 
moves the first mentioned carriage and the sample collector 
in an angular direction away from the conveyor belt prepara- 
tory to obtaining the desired analysis. 



3,659,461 
LINE SAMPLING DEVICE 
Albion J. Tkompeon, Margate, Fla., assignor to Great 
Northern Nekoosa Corp. 

Filed June 18, 1970, Ser. No. 47^75 
Int CL GOln 1/20 



VS. CL 73-422 TC 



5 Claims 




An energy absorbing arresting device for thrown objects of 
substantial weight, said device employing an assembly of 
spaced formed pads of deformable cushion material into 
which the object is forcefully ejected. Control of trapped air 
flow from and return of such air to the assembly, aids in 
preventing destructive rebound of the thrown object. In a 
mobile embodiment it includes a spring supported platform 
mounted on a vehicle whereby the entire device may be 
transported from place to place. 



3,659,463 

BALANCER 

Alvin J. Karrek, Route 1, Port Washington, Wis. 

Filed Dec. 26, 1967, Ser. No. 693^64 

Int a. GOlm 1/12 

VS. CL 73-480 



ICIafan 





A line sampling device for obtaining product samples from 
a pressurized product line where the device has a chamber 
means having a valve seat on one end adapted to be inserted 
into the side of the supply line. A plunger having a poppet 
valve on one end is movable in the chamber and has a ba£Be 
means thereon whereby when the plunger is extended, the A balancer for balancing lawn mower blades having a fiiis- 
baflle means will be moved into the flow of product in the tro-conical blade receiver on which the opening in a blade is 
supply line to divert flow of product into the chamber, and placed, magnetic means surrounding the receiver for holding 
when the plunger is retracted, the poppet valve will seat on the blade on the receiver. 



I — 



52 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



An adjustable tracking device mounted on the base of the 
balancer with the tip disposable adjacent the position of a 
blade mounted on the balancer. 



3,659,464 
MECHANICAL VIBRATOR 
Andre Jeaa-Marie Pnyo, and Pierre Andre Habib, both of 
Paris, France, aaipiors to James L. Sberard, Berkeley, 
CaKf. 

Filed Apr. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 30,541 

Int CI. F16I1 3il00 

U.S.CL 74-61 10 Claims 



power output capacity of the apparatus is increased, and 
manufacture of a vibrating-type conveyer having a desired 
length can be made possible by cormecting a plurality of unit 
conveyers. 



3,659,466 
WINDOW REGULATOR MECHANISM 
Joseph Pickles, Birmingham, Mkh., assignor to Ferro Manu- 
facturing Corportfkm, UtinkL, NOch. 

FUcd May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,423 

Int CLF16h 27/02 

U.S. CI. 74—89.18 10 Claims 





9 3 IB 



3 K) 



<o-~' ** w 






A vibrator apparatus with rotating components, comprising 
rolling elements in the shape of cones of revolution dis- 
tributed around a construction axis with their vertices 
directed toward this axis and their own geometrical axes 
meeting this construction axis. The cones are in contact with 
at least one conical surface whose vertex coincides with the 
common point at which the vertices of the roller axes meets 
and centered around this construction axis. The roller cones 
are made to roll in contact with this conical surface to 
produce a rolling movement that engenders the planetary 
rotation of the cones and a periodic displacement of the mass 
of the cones parallel to the construction axis. 




3,659,465 
VIBRATING APPARATUS UTIUZING A PLURALITY OF 

VIBRATING SOURCES 
Goro Oshima, and Shigckl Nlshitake, both of Kitakyushu-shi, 
Japan, aarignors to Kaboshlki Kaisha Yaskawa Dcnki 
Scisakosko, Kttakynshn-shl, Japan 
^ Filed Nov. 7, 1969, Ser. No. 874,914 

ClAlms priority, application Japan, Nov. 9, 1968, 43/82198 
Int. CI. F16h 33100 



U.S. CI. 74—61 



■? ^ i _ ^ _ 

4 7 i, 3 M54>63745476374 



-^ ' ^v^v : i\L; ^ ^ 



3 Claims 




A window regulator particularly for the rear window of sta- 
tion wagons, comprising a mounting plate having an enlarged 
toothed opening forming the internal gear of a planetary gear 
set. A regulator arm has at one end a drive plate fixed to the 
arm in spaced relation. Planet gears are provided between 
the drive plate and arm and are rotatable thereon about fixed 
axes. The planet gears mesh with the internal gear and are 
driven by an input sun gear. Preferably, a second arm is 
pivoted to the mounting plate and the two arms have mesh- 
ing gear sectors formed thereon. 



3,659,467 

ORBITING ROLLER MECHANICAL VIBRATION 

GENERATOR 

Peter V. H. Serrell, Solana Beach, Calif., assignor to Shell Oil 
Company, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Oct 29, 1969, Ser. No. 872,127 

IntCLF01bi//00 

U.S. a. 74—87 3 Claims 



r 



-/ 




A vibrating apparatus utilizing a plurality of vibrating 
sources, in which confronting massive bodies each including 
a rotary-type vibration-applying machine are distributed, 
through respective resonant resilient members such as 
springs, onto such a vibrating body to be vibrated as a con- 
veyer, and said machines are operated in synchronous and in 
{biased relation, whereby an extremely long vibrating-type 
conveyer which has not been possible has become practical. 



The roller of an orbiting roller vibration generator is radi- 
ally retained within an internal raceway formed in the oscilla- 
tor body member, and driven in rolling engagement with the 
raceway by a crank having four hydrodynamic bearings: two 
trunnion bearings concentric with the raceway and two 
crankpin bearings concentric with the roller; the clearances 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



58 



in said bearings providing the radial compliance necessary to 
accommodate the radial motions, due to deflections and 
manufacturing imperfections of the roUer relative to the trun- 
nion bearing centerline, without transferring a significant 
part of the roller radial load from the race to the crank 
bearings. 



two bevel wheels and is in frictional contact on one side with 
the input-side bevel wheel and on the other side with the out- 
put-side bevel wheel. ^i< i. 



3,659,468 

SLOTTED WAVEGUIDE CARRIAGE MOVEMENT 

APPARATUS 

Andrew Alford, Wiachcatcr, and Pasquale BarbagaUo, 

Bedford, botk of MaM^ amifDors to saM Alford, by saM 

Barbagallo 

Filed Dec. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 883,822 
Int CI. F16ii 27/02 



U.S. CL 74-89.22 



10 Claims 




A high frequency slotted measuring waveguide has a probe 
carriage that is moved, by a dual-cable, pulley arrangement, 
along calibrated ways of the waveguide. The apparatus in- 
cludes a supported lever-fulcrum arrangement adapted to 
equalize the tensions in both cables, thereby substantially 
eliminating any twisting of the carriage during its transla- 
tional movement. 



3,659,469 

INFINITELY VARUBLE FRICTION GEARING 

Kari Malchen, 12, ThalackcrstraMe, Latrtcradi, Austria 

Filed Nov. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 93,707 

Claims priority, application Austria, Apr. 1 , 1970, A 2988; 

Nov. 5, 1970, A 9%1 

Int CL F16h 75/76 

UACL 74-192 ^iCIalins 




An input shaft and an output shaft carry each at least one 
bevel wheel. At least one of said bevel wheeb is axially ad- 
justaUe. A power-transmitting ring is disposed between the 



3,659,470 

VARIABLE DIAMETER CENTRIFUGAL PULLEY WFTH 

MEANS TO VARY THE MASS OF CENTRIFUGAL 

WEIGHTS 

Leon Bcaudoin, 158 Marcfaand Street, Dmmmondvfle, 

Province of Quebec, Canada 

Filed Sept 29, 1970, Scr. No. 76,426 . 
Int CL F16h 5^/52 
U.S. CL 74—230.17 14 Claims 

\ 




a' ri i 



A variable diameter centrifugal pulley for use as a drive 
pulley in a variable speed belt and pulley transmission for 
snowmobiles and other vehicles, of for any machuiery requir- 
ing a variable speed transmission, wherein the centrifugal 
weights consist of Mocks provided with a cavity, closure 
means for said cavity, and calibrating elements removably in- 
serted within said cavity, in order to vary the mass of the cen- 
trifugal weights, and thus adjust the rotation speed at which 
clutching takes place and the variation of the belt diameter 
on the pulley with change in the rotational speed of the pul- 
ley. The pulley also has a spring in which the increase of its 
resisting force is a non-linear function of the amount of its 
shortening so as to obtain belt declutching during engine 
deceleration at substantially the same rotational speed as 
during engine acceleration. 



3,659,471 
METAL PULLEY WITH DETACHABLE PLASTIC FAN 
Kari MarKl^ BurferoMiiler-Slcglcr-StnMK 9,6842, Bnntadt, 
Germany 

FBcd Dec. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 94,885 
Claims priority, q>pifcMion Germany, Dec. 6, 1969, P 19 61 

299.8 
Int CL F16II 55136; POlp 7/02, 7/70 
\i&. CL 74— 230 J 9 < 




A belt pulley assembly comprises a metal pulley element 
which is detachably combined with a plastic fan that contains 
an embedded metal disk having an inner exposed rim that is 
slotted along with the hub of the pulley element to receive a 
drive key. 



54 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



I 3^9,472 

TIMING BELT ASSEMBLY 
Waiter EafclB, New York, N.Y., aaslgiior to Iii(. C 
C, S.p.A., lyre*, Italy 

Filed Sept. 14, 1970, Ser. No. 72,060 
Int. CL F16f 1/28, 13102 
U.S. CL 74-231 C 



worms meshing with a worm rack and driven by a common 

shaft. Each worm is separately mounted so that is is radially 

Olivetti & and axially stationary and the worms are each driven by a 



9Claims 




This application sets forth a timing belt assembly having an 
attachment fitted to the timing belt to transmit the timing 
belt displacement to any piece of equipment coacting with 
the timing belt. The displacement transmitting attachment 
can be used to index, actuate switches, move slides or 
sleeves, or any of a wide variety of other operations, in ac- 
cordance with the displacement of the timing belt. The pul- 
leys on which the timing belt is mounted include special 
recesses which accommodate the displacement transmitting 
attachment of the timing belt to assure proper seating of the 
attachment when that portion of the timing belt, with the at- 
tachment thereon, engages the pulleys. 



^ 3,659,473 

LEAD SCREW SHAFT WITH ADJUSTABLE PITCH 

Lctf RoBfvcd, Sommit, NJ., SMigBor to Bdi TdeplMNic 

LalM>ratories lacorporatcd, Murray Hfll, NJ. 

FBed Dec. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 102,42 1 

IBL CI. F16II 1118, 35/08, 55/18 

\}S. CL 74-424 J R 1 2 Claims 




A lead screw apparatus is disclosed tliat permits fine ad- 
justments to be made in the screw pitch. A lead screw shaft 
having A^ threads, an initial length L, and a 8|xing constant Kx 
is coaxially connecting to a spring having a spring constant 
^1 substantially smaller than K^- By deforming the spring by a 
distance £i, a force equal to fijXt is generated. This force is 
transmitted to the lead screw, producing a change in length 
of the screw of 5i where 5, is equal to StKJKi. Since Kt is 
substantially smaller than Xi, 6i will be substantially smaller 
than 5i by the same order of magnitude. Thus a large change 
6s in the length of the spring will change the pitch of the lead 
screw from N/L to N/ZJ=fc6i. 



3,659,474 
WORM GEAR FOR DRIVING MACHINE-TOOL SLIDES, 

IN PARTICULAR IN MILLING MACHINES 
Heinz NcucclMHier, Wcidadi, Gcnnany, wrignor to Werk- 
tciignMwriiiiienfalwik Adolf Waldridi Coburg, Coburg 
Bagcm, Gcnnany 

FUcd July 6, 1970, Ser. No. 52,605 
Claims priority, appUcatioa Gcnnany, July 11, 1969, P 19 35 

428.0 

Int. CL F16II 1/18, 55/18 

U.S. a. 74—424.6 10 Claims 

Worm gear for driving machine-tool slides, in particular in 

milling machines, and consisting of two coaxially arranged 




e II I B 21 . n °2* 



20 H i2 19 



common axially movable compensating shaft in each case 
through a like pair of helical-toothed gear wheels with an 
equal-sized, but oppositely directed, lead angle. 



3,659,475 
REMOTE THROTTLE AND STEERING CONTROL UNIT 
Paul E. NidMlB, Sunnyvale, CaUf., aasicnor to Leisure 
Products Corporation, Mcnio Park, Calif. 

FDed May 28, 1970, Ser. No. 41,285 

InL a. G05g 13/00 

U.S. a. 74—480 B 2 Claims 



5*-t 




A remote control unit for an outboard motor or the like in- 
corporating in a single control bar the combined functions of 
steering and throttle control. 



3,659,476 
SAFETY STEERING WHEEL 
Kari WOfcrt, GcrHqen-Waidsladt, awl Bda Barenyi, Stutt- 
gart-Vaihingcn, botli of Germany, am^iBors to Daimler- 
Benz AkticttgcaclKluifl, Stnttgart-Unterturkheim, Ger- 
many 

OrlgiiMl appUc^ioB Sept 18, 1968, Scr. No. 760^99, now 

Patent No. 3,567^46. Divided and this application Oct. 2, 

1970, Ser. No, 77^20 

Int CL B62d 1/18 

U.S. CL 74-492 13 Claims 

A safety steering wheel for motor vehicles, particularly for 

passenger motor vehicles, in which the system "steering 

wheel-steering wheel spokes" is constructed relatively form- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



56 



rigid and is arranged at the upper end of a steering column block having formed therein an open-ended tubular 
by the interposition of a yielding intermediate structure passageway receptive of a frame leg, and an open-face open- 
which is constituted by an elastically yielding transmission ended channel slidingly receptive of a reflector element, said 





44^^ 42 



member yielding in the direction of the steering column, and 
an energy-dissipating element is associated with this transmis- 
sion member. 



channel and said leg including simple detent means for ob- 
structing shifting of the reflector element lengthwise of the 
channel. 



3,659,477 

REMOTE CONTROL MIRROR AND CONTROL 

MECHANISM THEREFORE 

William C. Wehncr, 14891 Graadville, Detroit, Mich. 

Filed Apr. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 29,195 

Int CL F16c 1/12 

U.S. CL 74-501 M 12 Claims 



3,659,479 
POSITIVE CONTINUOUSLY CONSTANT GEAR-MESH 
. SPEED CHANGE SYSTEM FOR PLANETARY DRIVE 

SYSTEMS AND THE LIKE 
Latzlo J. Kim, 7044 Paige, Warren, Mich. 

FDed Jmi. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 1^23 

Int CL F16h 37/04, 3/78 

MS. CL 74—681 47 Claims 




A remotely controlled mirror, such as a vehicle rear view 
mirror, including a pivotally supported mirror member, a 
rotatable linkage system and a drive mechanism. The linliage 
system includes at least two pivotally connected link mem- 
bers; the first link member operably connected to the mirror 
member at a fixed acute an^e relative to the reflective sur- 
foce, and the second link member drivably connected to the 
first link member at a variable angle. The drive mechanism is 
adapted to rotate the linlcage system, adjusting the position of 
the mirror relative to the vertical and horizontal axes, and 
shift the distal end of the second link member toward the 
mirror, adjusting the angle ot inclination of the mirror rela- 
tive to the axis perpendicular to the mirror. 



3,659,478 
REFLECTOR PEDAL FOR CYCLES 
Carlton P. Pawsal, and Robert F. Humloag, both of Maysvflie, 
Ky., assigDors to WaM Mamtfacturing Coopany, Inc., 
MaysviUe, Ky. 

FUed Mar. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 21,656 

Int CL G05g 7/74 

U.S. CL 74—594.4 6 Claims 

The pedal frame comprises a pair of spaced parallel legs 

onto each of which is telescoped an elongate extruded pedal 




A planetary gear speed change system including a ratio al- 
temater system and an automatic mechanical shifter system 
operable to shift ratio altemater elements into driving en- 
gagement with the planetary reaction member, vary its rela- 
tive routional value and then disengage, in automatic 
synchronous timed relation to the ratio ahemate^ system 
functional cycles, with continuous drive during aitch shifting, 
to thereby vary the planetary driving ratios with continuous 
torque delivery throughout its operation, and including con- 
stant speed and/or fixed members synchronously engageable 
with the reaction member to nuuntain same at selected rota- 
tional values. Modifications include single, multiple and 
other combinations of planetary drive systems. Various novel 
synchronized shifter and ratio altemater systems are dis- 
closed, as are novel combinations for effecting many varieties 
of driving conditions and speed change applications. 



3,659,480 
VEHICLE POWER TRAIN 
ErkU A. KohruMB, Livonia, Mklt, aarignor to General Mo- 
tors Corporation, Detroit, Mich. 

FUcd July 6, 1970, Scr. No. 52,544 
Int a. F16h 37/Q8, 47/08, 57/04 
VS. CL 74-695 3 Claims 

A vehicle power train having an engine, a transmisskm in- 
cluding a torque converter driven by the engine, differential 



.!• 



56 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



gearing connecting the transmission to the vehicle's drive 
axle shafts, a brake connected to brake the input to the dif- 




3,659,482 
METHOD OF REAMING A ROTATING PIPE 
Donald E. Blake, 761 Chestnut Rldce RomI, Morgantown, W. 
Va. 

Oiigiiial appUcatkm Sept. 3, 1967, Scr. No. 627,694, now 

Patent No. 3,445,871, dated May 27, 1969. Divided and this 

appUcatioa Feb. 18, 1969, Scr. No. 840,550 

Int Cl. B26b 5//6 

U.S. CI. 408-1 1 Claim 




ferential gearing to brake the drive axle shafts and a fan 
driven by the input of the transmission circulating air to cool 
the brake, the torque converter and the engine. 



3,659,481 
ELECTRO-HYDRAULIC DRIVE WITH REGULATED 
PRESSURE 
Hdnat Espenachicd, LudwigslMirf ; Gcorg RoChfuaa, Dltzin- 
gCB, and Gerhard WHl, BcatdilMcfa, all of Germany, as- 
signors to Robert Boach GmbH, Stottf art, Germany 
Filed Jane 25, 1970, Scr. No. 49^44 
Claiau priority, application Germany, June 28, 1969, P 19 32 

986J 

Int. CI. F16h 47100 

U.S. CL 74-731 10 Claims 



A method is provided for the reaming of pipes wherein a 
portable rotary power source such as a power vise may be 
employed to rotatably drive the pipe. The method involves 
establishing a universal driving connection between a pipe to 
be worked and a rotary power source, rotatably securing the 
pipe in a vise means supported for rotation about multiple 
axes, and then rotatably driving the pipe and applying a 
reaming tool to the portion thereof to be worked. 



3,659,483 
JACKET STRIPPING TOOL 
James J. Matthews, c/o Utility Tool Corp., P.O. Drawer B, 
Town Street (Rt. 82), East Haddam, Conn. 

Filed May 25, 1970, Scr. No. 40,039 
Claims priority, application Great Britahi, Jan. 15, 1970, 

2,081/70 

Jnt a. H02g 1112 

U.S. CL 8 1 -9.5 C 4 Claims 




A planetary hydraulic transmission is shifted between dif- 
ferent stages by hydraulic operating means which receive 
pressure fluid whose pressure is adjusted by pressure regulat- 
ing means which respond to control signals transmitted by an 
electronic control apparatus. The control signals represent a 
desired drive torque determined by the electronic control ap- 
paratus from si^ials received firom means sensing various 
operational conditions of the drive motor of a car driven by 
the drive motor through the transmission. Since the regulated 
pressure is proportional to the drive torque, load peaks are 
prevented during shifting of the transmission. 




ze 12 16 



46 32' 1 



^_'\t_J_ inwt\ — ' Fn)^^^^^^ 



56 26 ^^ jg ?6 



:5 

94 



A cable jacket stripping tool including a cutting member 
liaving a cutting edge ind lifting ramp so arranged that, dur- 
ing a cutting interval, the cutting edge functions in a 
clearance position from the cable core to initiate cutting 
removal of the major portion of the jacket surrounding the 
core and the lifting ramp completes this removal by causing 
rupture of the remaining uncut jacket portion. Thus, 
complete jacket removal is achieved with a cutting edge suf- 
ficiently spaced from the cable core to obviate inadvertent 
nicking thereof. 



3,659,484 

REVERSIBLE RATCHET WRENCH WITH 

INTERLOCKED ASSEMBLY 

Gino L. ScodcOer, 5518 VaBcfo Street, Oakland, Calif. 

Filed June 18, 1970, Scr. No. 47,374 

Int CL B25b 13146 

VS. CL 81—63 20 ClaioK 

A reversible wrench with a ratchet and pawl mounted in 

respective apertures of a one-piece head and held in the head 
by a common retaining member. In one form, the head has a 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



57 



movable handle attached to it, the position of the handle 
relative to the head determining the ratchet drive direction. 




the handle being provided with an extension which acts as 
the common retaining member and holds the ratchet and 
pawl within the head regardless of handle position. 

3,659,485 

ADJUSTABLE OPEN END RATCHET WRENCH 

Albert Roth, 6248 Rockhurst Drive, San Diego, Calif. 

Filed Sept. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 69,021 

Int CL B25b 13/28, 13/12, 13/18 

U.S.CL 81-98 9 Claims 



the article flash portions projecting laterally beyond the 
plates. The articles are cammed into and out of the retention 
pockets, and a cam actuated locking mechanism is utilized to 
retain the articles in the pockets against movement relative 
to the plates. An individual flash-severing mechanism ad- 
vances into contact with the flash of each article and rotates 
relative to the flash to sever it from the article. In the event 
that the article is a bottle or the like having a flash which 
completely closes the neck or finish of the bottle, an initial 
flash severing is accomplished to open the end of the fini^ 
prior to advancement of the individual flash-severing 
mechanism. The mechanism is entirely mechanically actu- 
ated by cams and the like, and no limit switches or other 
sequence-controlling mechanism are necessary. 




'"rf-^ 



"^'W^ 



75^19 



An adjustable open end ratchet wrench having one jaw 
member pivotally attached to a handle and a second jaw 
member slidably received by the handle juxtaposed the 
pivotal jaw member; the sliding jaw member being spring- 
biased out of the handle and into a closing relationship with 
the fixed jaw member; an incremental adjusting mechanism 
coupled between the handle and the sliding jaw whereby 
when the handle is rotated in one direction, the adjusting 
mechanism latches and locks the slidable jaw with respect to 
the fixed jaw and when rotated in another direction, releases 
allowing the slidable jaw to be forced inward against the 
spring biasing means for ratcheting around a nut being 
tightened or loosened. 

3,659,486 
HIGH SPEED TRIM MACHINE FOR BLOWN PLASTIC 

ARTICLES 
DonaM H. Crte, and Robert F. Kontz, both of Toledo, Ohk», 
amignors to Owcna-DlinolB, Inc. 

FOed Mar. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 17^24 

Int. a. B23b 5/14, 1/00 

VS. a. 82—82 18 Claims 




3,659,487 
PORTABLE MANUALLY OPERABLE CUTTING • 
MACHINE FOR ROLLED SHEET MATERIAL 
Charles A. Henderson, Appleton, Wb., assignor to Kimberly- 
Clark Corporatkm, Nccnah, Wis. 

Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 23,606 

Int CL B26d 1/20 

VS. CI. 83-447 . 9 C&^ 




A portable, manually operable, cutting machine for rolled 
sheet material includes a frame having a pair of horizontally 
spaced parallel inclined ramps which aid in loading a roll of 
material into the machine. Material is fed from the roll over a 
shelf having a cutter backing bar, and is held in position by 
friction brushes. A cutting carriage, with a rotatable disk 
cutter, is rocked downward into contact with the backing bar 
to cut the material when the carriage is moved across the 
shelf. 



3,659,488 

CAPTURE COMBINATION SYSTEM 

Ralph Dcutsch, Sherman Oaks, CaUf., assignor to North 

American Rockwell Corporation, Anaheim, CaUf. . 

Filed Oct 9, 1970, Scr. No. 79,614 

IntCLGlObi/70 

U.S. CL 84-345 16 Claims 




This disclosure proposes a method and apparatus for 
removing integral flash from a blown plastic article. The arti- 
cles are serially fed to and retained in pocV^ets formed at the A capture combination system for use in an electronic 
peripheries of continuously rotating, axially spaced plates, organ provides rapid reprogramming of the entire combina- 



^u 



58 



') - OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



tion memory while permitting manual selection of desired 
stop combinations at any time. Desired stop combinations 
are selected for each piston and set into the working memory 
of the system. These combinations, upon command, arc 
transferred from the working memory to a storage or exter- 
nal memory. A full combination of stop settings may be 
stored on the external memory by transfer from the internal 
memory, and a number of such external memories cor- 
responding to a number of different full combinations of stop 
settings thus may be prepared and, subsequently, selectively 
presented to the system as desired. The combination settings 
from the external memory are transferred upon command 
into the internal working memory for esubliahing the desired 
combination of stop settings therein. Transfer into or out of 
the external memory requires but a few seconds. Whenever 
desired, the working memory may be altered to modify one 
or more stop combinations, whether set manually, or entered 
therein from the external memory and, in the latter case, 
while reuining the combinations recorded in the external 
memory. 



and the pin removably mounted in the aligned bore to 
prevent movement of one section relative to the other sec- 
tion. 



3,659,491 
ROTATABLE NUT AND WASHER ASSEMBLY 
WilUam B. Duffy, Bcrtdey Hdglitt, and Ckurlet K. FUwr, 
Bdforti, both of NJ., aaalgnon to TRW Inc., Clevdand, 
Ohio 

Filed Mar. 8, 1971, Scr. No. 121,636 

iBt. CL F16b 37m, 43100 

\}S. CL 85—32 14 Cblmi 




3,659,489 

BRASS-INSTRUMENT-PRACnCE DEVICE 

Raynoad J. Vale, 6006 Forest Ledge, San Antonio, Tex. 

Filed Sept. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 71,157 

Int CI. G09b 15106 

DS. CL 84-465 1 Claim 




y 



1 



A resonator chamber attachable to a brass instrument 
mouthpiece so as to buffer the buzzing sound produced by 
the brass instrument mouthpiece, the device comprising a 
barrel which is a singular part of generally bowl-shape with a 
central chamber that opens out upon one end of the barrel, 
the inner end of the chamber communicating with the ter- 
minal end of the brass instrument mouthpiece. 



3,659,490 

FASTENING DEVICE 

Harold G. Buck, 2302 Dawes St., Ashland, Ncbr. 

FBed Aug. 27, 1969, Scr. No. 85331 

int. CLF16h 35/00 

U.S. CL 85—1 R 



4ClalmB 



30 28 



A fastener assembly wherein a sheet metal nut is rotatably 
coupled to a frusto-conical washer. The nut has an inner 
threaded barrel portion for engaging a cooperating male 
fastener element and an outer barrel portion which is par- 
ticularly shaped for engagement by a tool for rotating the 
nut. The inner barrel portion is spacedly nested within the 
outer barrel portion and the respective barrel portions are 
joined at the upper end of the nut. The lower end of the 
inner barrel portion extends through a central aperture in the 
washer and is loosely curled under the edge of the aperture 
to provide a retaining collar. Adjacent the lower end of the 
inner barrel portion and the retaining collar, the inner barrel 
portion carries a peripheral bearing ring having a smooth un- 
dersurface lying at a selected acute angle to the longitudinal 
axis of the nut. The bearing ring is formed from metal skived 
from the outer wall of the inner barrel portion and com- 
pacted into the said ring config\iration. The washer embodies 
a cylindrical lip projecting fTX)m its upper surface adjacent 
the aperture therein, and said lip has a smooth inboard sur- 
face which is complementary to and confronts the undersur- 
face of the bearing ring on the nut. The outer barrel portion 
of the nut also includes a peripheral skirt at its lower end 
which rouubly bears on the adjacent convex face of the 
washer. The nut and washer components are free spinning 
with respect to each other and the said fastener assembly 
provides for a markedly improved torque-tensile relationship 
when the nut is turned onto a male fastener element and the 
washer is tightened against the confronting surface of an 
apertured member through which the male element 
protrudes. 




A fastening device for detachably sectuing two members 
together, the device comprising a pair of mateable sections, 
each section being secured to one or the other of the mem- 
bers, and a pin disposed in aligned bores formed in the sec- 
tions to maintain the sections in the mated position. The sec- 
tions having mateable faces which coact in a manner wherein 
when in a locked position they cannot be separated except by 
moving one of them away from the other in a plane normal 
to the plane in which the sUesses or impacts under use occur. 



3,659,492 
CASING OR SHELL FEEDER ATTACHMENT FOR 
LOADING MACHINES 
Rofcr W. Falhner, Rockford, DL, avignor to Glen L. Du- 
■ahoo, Lindcnwood, DL; Nathan Adkr, SonthOdd, Mich. 
and Roger Fnltancr, Rockiord, DL, put tartercst to each 
Filed Fch. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 9,805 
Int. CL F42b 33/14; G07I 11/28; B23g 7/02 
VS. CL 86-46 4 Clatans 

An inclined stationary hopper of circular form has a large 
discharge opening in the bottom thereof at the high end 
through which bullet casings (or shotgun shells) are dropped 
one by one open end up from holes provided in circum- 
ferentially spaced relation in the marginal portion of a rotary 
plate disposed in parallel spaced relation to the hopper bot- 
tom. The casings or shells drop open end up into the holes in 
the plate from a supply piled on top of the rotary plate in the 
low end of the hopper and are carried around to the 
discharge opening to be dropped, the open end up dispost- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



59 



tion of the casings or shells in the holes being assured 
because their closed flanged ends are appreciably heavier. 
Stirring of the casings or shells in the pile by an upwardly 
projecting flnger on the rotary plate helps to jostle and tum- 
ble the same so they drop more quickly into the holes in the 
rotary plate. A funnel, disposed under the hopper's discharge 
opening, guides the casings or shells open end up into a sub- 
stantially vertical feeder tube that extends down to the load- 
ing machine. The electric motor that transmits drive to the 



-0«. 




3 659 494 * 

FIRE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR USE IN CONJUNCTION 
WITH ELECTRONIC IMAGE MOTKM*4 STABILIZATION 

SYSTEMS 
Richard W. PMlbricfc, Coocord, Hid Efrafan R. ArazL Cam- 
brMfe, both of Mas., nssignnri to Itck Corporation, Lex- 
lB|ton,MaK. 

OrlffaMi applicatton June 8, 1965, Ser. No. 462,322, now 

Patent No. 3,515^81, dated Jnne 2, 1970. DMdcd and tUi 

appHcatioB Jaly 31, 1969. Ser. No. 848,763 

InL CL F41c 19/12; F41f 13/08 

VS. a. 89—28 12 



rotary plate tlirough suiuble reduction gearing is controlled 
by a switch operated by a feeler finger that extends throu^ a 
slot in one side of the feeder tube near its upper end and is 
sprirvg pressed normally upwardly to ckssed circuit position 
but arranged to be held down in open circuit position but ar- 
ranged to be held down in open circuit position by one or 
more casings or shells to stop the motor when a pileup occun 
in the tube due to the casings or shells not being processed as 
fast as they are being dropped into the feeder tubie. 



3,659,493 
ROCKET RETAINING MECHANISM FOR LAUNCHER 

TUBES 
Irvh« E. Wtancr, Santa Monica, CaBL, asdgnor to Hitoo, 
Los Angcki, CaHf . 

Ficd Jan. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 3,346 

InLa.F41fi/04 

VS. CL 89—1.807 8 CUdms 




OCULARM^ 



sccnoN] 



TEU scone 

OtJECTIVtM 




CIKUIT 
00CXt«JHN$31 



otFUcnoN SYsriM 

HOUSMC 2t 



^uniKm 



An image motion stabilization system for eliminating mo- 
tion of an image being^viewed from an unstable support. The 
image is viewed through an image converter tube. X and Y 
rate gyroscopes are mounted on the unstable support to 
sense motions of the supptut, and the outputs from the 
gyroscopes are applied to the deflection coUs of the con- 
verter tube to compensate for movements of the support 
Panning control means are provided to prevent image deflec- 
tion in the converter tube to allow panning when the support 
is moved at a slow rate. Embodiments of the invention are 
disclosed wherein the image motion stabilization system is 
utilized with a camera or in a fire control system. In the fire 
control system embodiment a circuit is provided to sense 
when the weapon is correctly aimed, and to automatically 
fire the Weapon in the correctly aimed position. 



3,659,495 '- 

GEAR MAKING 
Panl Maker, Marten, Mass., assigBor to Bird Island, Inc^ 
Bostoi|, Maas. 

Filed Aag. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 66,739 
Int. CL B23f 5/20 
VS. CL 90-3 7 1 



Rocket launcher-tube rocket retaining mechanism of the 
detent type for rockets with a latching rim having a circum- 
ferential groove and foldable stabilizing fins. A latching arm 
is rotatably mounted at one of its ends to a mounting plate 
secured over an opening in the tube sidewall, spring means 
urging the free end of the arm into the tube. The arm defines 
an inwardly extending latching tab spaced forward of a rear 
stop projection on the mounting plate, this space accom- 
modating the rocket latching rim with the latching tab pro- 
jecting into the rocket circumferential groove. The free end 
of the latching arm is oriented such that the blast issuing 
from an ignited rocket will impinge against it and rotate it 
radially outward to withdraw the latching tab from the rocket 
circumferential groove and free the rocket for forward flight 
The shape of the latching tab provides positive latching, a 
forward movement tendency of the rocket causing an in- 
crease in the latching force due to an over-center action. 




Apparatus for making gears of hyperboloidal form, com- 
prising a cutter having profile generating cutting edges 
mounted for movement about a common axis, and a suf^wrt 
for a work piece rotatable about a workpiece axis; the support 
and the cutter being mounted for relative pivotal movement 



60 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



about a feed axis nonparallcl to the workpiece axis; the sup- 
port and the cutter having basic rates of simultaneous move- 
ment about the workpiece and cutter axes, respectively, in 
the absence of the pivot^ movement, in ratio dependent 
upon the number of cutting edges to the number of teeth in 
the gear, to cause continuous indexing of the workpiece as 
the cutting edges make successive cuts adjacent the profiles; 
the support and the cutter being mounted so that one of the 
basic rates is increased or decreased, upon occurrence of the 
pivotal movement, by a differential rate dependent upon the 
angular rate of the pivotal movement, so that successive cuts 
adjacent each tooth profile will follow the desired contour 
thereof. 



an endless chain supported for cooperation with an end of a 
foil for effecting longitudinal movement thereof through the 



3,659,496 
MACHINE FOR SHAPING GEARS 
Wcner E. Bcrgcmami; Emt J. Hnnkder, and Harry Pedcr' 
sen, aU of Rochester, N.Y., aarifnors to The Glcana Works, 
Rochester, N.Y. 

Flkd Mar. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 19^46 

Int, a. B23t 5/14 

VS. CL 90—8 20 Claims 




guide fixture, and a cutter head supported in overlying rela- 
tion to the guide fixture and adjustable to selectively engage 
the upper surface of a foil during a resurfacing operation. 




u - 



EH 






-?-^ 






791 




3,659,498 

RAM ATTITUDE CONTROL SYSTEM AND VALVE 

ASSEMBLY THER£iX)R 

RoUaad A. Rkhanbon, Afauneda, Caltf., asdgnor to Padfk 

Press A Shear Corp. 

FUcd Aug. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 63,530 

InL CL FOlb 25104; F15b 1 1122 

U.S.CL 91-171 5Claiiii8 



A gear shaping machine for cutting gears with generation 
effected by a rotatable work holder and a tool holder carry- 
ing a cutting tool adapted to be reciprocated. The tool holder 
is mounted to a translauble supporting structure, the rate or 
speed of such translational movement during generation 
being selectively variable to produce variable ratio gears. 
Sei>arate and independent power sources are provided for 
the generating train, for actuating the cutting tool, and for a 
servo mechanism which controls the reversing operation of 
the generating train. The tool holder is slidably mounted in a 
cradle housing for movement in a direction along its own axis 
(and at right angles to said translational movement) to per- 
mit production of an oversized tooth or teeth in the gear or 
gear sector being cut. Means are also provided to effect in- 
sertion and withdrawal of the cutting tool relative to the 
work for each individual cutting stroke. A counterweight 
mechanism is provided in operative connection to the struc- 
ture for reciprocating the cutting too! to provide a smoother 
and faster cutting stroke. 




The ram attitude system of U.S. Pat No. 3,349,669 of Oct. 
31, 1967 is made less critical as to adjustments by incor- 
porating a novel valve assembly for each of the two pumps, 
the valve assembly associated with the pump supplying the 
leading hydraulic motor, causing a continuously increasing 
by-pass of said hydraulic motor with deviation of the ram of a 
machine, to set up corresponding corrective forces in a non- 
proportional manner but with no sharp changes in such cor- 
rective forces. 



3,659,497 
DRAINAGE FOIL RESURFACING MACHINE 
Bruce W. Stevens, Appicton, Wis., assignor to Menasha Cor- 
poration, Nccnah, Wis. 

FUcd May 14, 1970, Ser. No. 37,151 
Int a. B23c 1/12, 9/00, 3/00 
U.S. CL 90—17 11 Claims 

Apparatus for resurfacing upper surface portions of 
drainage foils which have lower longitudinally extending 
dovetail configurations or the like, including a support table 
having a guide fixture thereon adapted to cooperate with the 
lower dovetail portion of a foil in guiding relation therewith. 



3,659,499 

VACUUM MOTOR ADAPTED FOR USE IN A VEHICLE 

SPEED CONTROL MECHANISM 

Gary F. Woodward, Ann Arbor, Mich., assignor to Ford 

Motor Company, Dearborn, Mich. 

Origfaial application Dec. 4, 1968, Scr. No. 781,170, now 

Patent No. 3,572,214. Divided and this application Oct 2, 

1970, Scr. No. 77,501 

Int CL F15b 13/044, 13/16 

US. CL 91-454 2 Claims 

A vacuum motor which is especially adapted for use in a 

speed control mechanism for an automotive vehicle in which 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



61 



a flexible diaphragm is positioned in the housing of the motor niARH^STACUUM SERVO 

and cooperates with the housing to form a chamber. Means i*^";?^^r!'?^'^J^i£l!rS^ r 

are provided communicating with the chamber and the flexi- Garry E. Beard, Uvonla, Mich., assignor to Ford Motor Com- 

ble diaphragm for applying a varying pressure to the chamber P«>y. Deartorn, \Dch. 

and hence the diaphragm so that the diaphragm u> nrioved as f^ ^'^n^oJ^iS^ ]i04 

a function of the pressure applied thereto. The diaphragm » ,, ^ ^, o^^o ^ O rwm. 

adapted to be connected to a movable controller means for U.S. CL 92—49 , » K,mum 





controlling the speed of the vehicle in accordance with the 
position of the diaphragm. Movable means are coupled to the 
diaphragm and are positioned within the chamber. The 
vacuum motor includes electrical circuit means and said 
movable means cooperates with the electrical circuit means 
for varying the value of a parameter of the electrical circuit 
means as a function of the position of the diaphragm and the 
movable means. 



3,659,500 
DUAL DLU>HRAGM VACUUM SERVO 
Ahmet Reisi Akman, Dearborn, Mich., 
Motor Company, Dearborn, Mich. 

Filed Feb. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 7,491 
Int CL FOlb 19/02 
US. CL 92—49 



to Ford 



A vacuum controlled servo has two axiaily spaced flexible 
diaphragms each defining separate vacuum chambers, one 
diaphragm being coimected to an actuator; the diaphragms 
are spring biased with the springs in parallel arrangement and 
one operatively located between the two; a number of ad- 
justable stops permit varying actions of the diaphragms to 
vary and modiUate the movement of the actuator as a func- 
tion of the changes in pressure in the separate chambers. 




! 3,659,502 

RECIPROCATING ENGINES 
2 Claims MBton L Friedaum, 2120 HUhohn St, and Theodore Kordd, 
RD. 4, Box 180-D, both of Johnstown, Pa. 
I Filed Ang. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 67,952 

I Int CL F16J 1/14 

US. CL 92—84 8 Clafans 




A vacuum servo construction having two flexible 
diaphragms in a single housing, with one connected to the 
other for a limited relative movement between the two, and 
the movement of one being modulated by changes in the 
vacuum levels. One of the diai^iragms supports a carrier 
which houses the second diaphragm and, of which the follow- 
ing is a specification. 



A reciprocating engine is provided having a hollow 
cylinder and spaced crankshaft with an eccentric cam, a 
piston slidable in said cylinder with radial clearance, a plu- 
rality of spaced annular grooves around the piston circum- 
ference, a ring of resin having a low coefficient of fiiction in 
each said groove between the piston and cylinder, a coimect- 
ing rod connected at one. end to said crankshaft through a 
prelubricated anti-friction bearing and at the other end to the 
piston by a deflectable member capable of angular deflec- 
tion. 



62 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



I 3 659,503 ' ^ 

HYDRAULIC ROTARYBLADE PIVOT DRIVE FOR 
HYDRO-STABILIZERS AND RUDDER SYSTEMS 
Hctei-Gaater EUaa, Tomcach, and Erkb Wesid, Hamiwrt, 
both of Gtrmmtj, MsigBon to HowaMtiwcrke-Deatscbe 
Werfl AkticBfcadbchaft Hambw| umI Kefl, Hamborg, 
{Gcraaay 

ftM May 8, 1970, Scr. No. 35,709 
ClalBS priority, appUcatloa Germany, July 4, 1969, P 19 33 

963.0 

lat a. rOlc 9/00; F16J 15138 

U.S.CL 92-125 4 Claims 



* J 



gas escaping between the piston and cylinder from the com- 
pression chamber. The grooves are formed near the piston 
rod so as to obtain a uniform heating of the piston rod rather 
than an unbalanced heating which could cause the piston to 
scrape against the cylinder wall during reciprocation. 





3,659,505 
APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ERECTING 
CONTAINERS 
Paul Waiyhrica, and CHntoB E. Zotanan, both of St Louk, 
Mo., aadgBon to Crown ZcUerbach Corporation, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Fled Mar. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 23,654 

Int CL B31b 1/30, 1/44, 49/02 

U.S. CI. 93-5 1 M 10 Claims 



A hydraulic rotary-blade pivot drive for hydro-stabilizers 
and rudder systems, particularly on ships, with receiving ' 
grooves on the external sides of the rotor blades and/or the 
inside of the stator blades, and with sealing strips and elastic 
elements which are radiaUy displaceable in said receivuig 
grooves. Slave blades are provided between the sealing strips 
and the elastic elements over the entire length of the rotor. 
The slave blades are held in the receiving grooves with 
clearance so as to be radially displaceable and project 
beyond the outsides of the rotor blades and the insides of the 
stator blades and are designed to ensure hermeticity on all 
sides. The sealing strips together with the slave blades and 
the elastic element form one single sealing unit 

3,659,504 

MEANS FOR SPACING A PISTON FROM A CYLINDER 

DURING OPERATION 

Alfred Zordicr, WMcrthor, Switaerland, airignor to Sulicr 

Brothers, Ltd., Wtatcttbur, Swltierland 

FDed Apr. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 30,416 
Claims priority, appBcatkm Switxriand, Apr. 24, 1969, 

^ 6228/69 

Int.a.F16bii/70 
U.S.CL 92-162 6Clata»s 




Apparatus and method wherein a three-piece container is 
erected by carrying separate end panels with a mandrel into 
contact with a main body blank and moving the blank and 
end panels with the mandrel through a container-erecting 
station where end panel-engaging flaps along opposite end 
edges of the bottom and side walls of the blank are brought 
into contact with the outer surface of the end panels. Comer- 
strengthening flaps are also provided along opposite side 
edges of the end panels, and means are provided suijacent the 
path of mandrel travel to fold the latter flaps simultaneously 
inwardly prior to contact of the end panels with the body 
blank to permit such end panel flaps to engage the inner sur- 
face of the side walls of the container. Means are provided to 
permit the end panels to be moved in two stages by the man- 
drel from their initial positioning station first to an initial rest 
position, then to their Anally erected position in the con- 
tainer. 



The piston is provided with helical grooves in a surface 
facing the cylinder wall so as to impart a swirl to the heated 



3,659,506 
MACHINE FOR FORMING STRAWS 
Jastln M. Schmitt, Pompano Bcacb, Fla., aaslgnor to Jeno's, 
Inc., Dahith, Minn. 

FVcd Nov. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 93,081 

Int. CL B31d 5/04; B31c U/02; B31b 45/00 

U.S. CL 93-84 TW 9 Claims 

A machine for folding straws to temporarily alter a straw's 

configuration, shorten it and form a liquid-tight seal in the 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



63 



straw. The straw is positioned against an anvil and a hammer 3,659,508 

creases it on a crease line oblique to the straw's axis. A pair FLASH-SYNCHRONIZING ASSEMBLY FOR CAMERAS 
of die elements moving transversely of the straw folds an Fomio Urano, Tokyo, Japan, — I gnw to AsaM Kogaka Koffyo 

KabvaUkl Kakhn, Tokyo-to, Japan 

Fled May 13, 1970, Scr. No. 
Claims priority, appHmllnn Japan, Jnne 10, 1969, 44/53769 

Int. CL G03b 9/70 
U.S.CL 95-11.5 R 

-10 4«L 





upper section about this crease line and a second crease line 
into perpendicular relationship with a lower straw section 
while forming a liquid-tight seal at the folds. 



3,659,507 
MACHINE FOR FORMING STRAWS 
Robert D. Cudimaii, Fort Lawterdafe, fin., aarifnor to Jeno's, 
Inc^ Duiuth, Minn. 

Flkd Nov. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 93,082 

Int. CL B31d 5/04; B31c 1 1/02; B31b 45/00 

MS. CL 93—84 TW 13 Claims 




A flash-synchronizing assembly for cameras, enabling the 
instant of flash ignition to be selected according to the type 
of flash and the shutter speed. A pair of coaxial cams are 
provided to be selectively positioned angulariy respectively 
according to positions corresponding to the type of flash and 
to the shutter speed. A cam follower is swingaUe on a rod 
carried by a swin|-lever which turns about a given axis. This 
cam follower engages both of the cams to determine from the 
latter the angular position of the swing-lever, so that this 
latter position will be in accordance with the selected com- 
bination of flash type and shutter speed. A normaUy stationa- 
ry contact of a flash circuit is carried by the swing-lever to be 
positioned as a location determined by the combined posi- 
tions of the cams. A movable contact is released, upon initia- 
tion of an exposure, for movement into engagment with the 
normally stationary contact so as to bring about ckxtng of 
the flash circuit at an instant which will be best for the par- 
ticular type of flash and shutter speed which have been 
selected. 



3,659,509 

EXPOSURE CONTROL SYSTEM WITH AUTOMATIC 

ADJUSTMENT FOR FLASH SYNCHRONIZATION 

Joba P. Borgarda, Sndbnry, Mam., amignor to PolaroU Cor^ 

poratian, Cambridge, Mass. 

FDed July 24, 1969, Scr. No. 844,501 
Int. CL G03b 9/70 
U.S.CL 95-11.5 R 14 1 



A machine for folding straws to temporarily alter a straw's 
configuration, shorten it and form a liquid-tight seal in the 
straw. A rotating chuck folds the straw over anvil surfaces to 
form two crease lines in the straw. The chuck folds an upper 
straw sectkm on these crease lines into perpendicular rela- 
tionihip with a lower straw section while forming a liquid 
ti^t seal at the folds. 




An exposure control system incorporating an imfwoved 
flash synchronization arrangement The timing of the initia- 
tion of flash illumination relative to an exposure interval is 



64 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



controlled to substantially equate the quantity of scene light 
entering the aperture of a photographic apparatus during an 
exposure interval initiating period with the quantity of light 
entering the aperture during the corresponding period 
required for terminating an exposure interval. In a preferred 
embodiment the dynamic characteristics of a flash lamp are 
adjusted by foUow-focus means to normalize the amount of 
light reaching the film plane of a camera. 



3^9^10 
APPARATUS AND METHOD UTHIZABLE IN FORMING 

METAL GRIDS 
Hugh L. Garvin, Malibu; Elvtai E. Hcrmaii; Rundl R. Law, 
both of Padflc PaHsadet, and Roger R. Turk, Woodland 
Hffls, aU of CaUL, Miignnn to Hughes Ahrcraft Company, 
Culver City, Calif. 
, Filed May 1, 1969, Scr. No. 820,737 

^ Int. CL G03b 29/00 

VS. CL 95—12 6 Claims 




_J '"«»> » X) - 



Apparatus and method for forming metal grids. The ap- 
paratus includes a support, carriage, photomask, photolamp, 
and interferometer. A photographic plate is positioned on the 
support and the photomask is attached to the carriage which 
is translated to thereby carry the photomask across the 
photographic plate. The interferometer allows repetitive ex- 
posure of the plate by the photolamp via the photomask by 
measuring the position of the carriage and by controlling a 
photolamp trigger circuit for flashing the photolamp when 
predetermined carriage positions are sensed by the inter- 
ferometer. The photomask contains a single slit through 
which light rays from the photolamp pass whereby the suc- 
cessive flashing of the photolamp is operative to form a pat- 
tern of parallel, closely spaced image patterns in the photo- 
graphic plate. The thus exposed photographic plate is 
developed and the resultant photographic master is 
replicated in a sequence of steps resulting in the formation of 
a metal grid on a target substrate. Salient features of the ap- 
paratus and method contribute to the successful provision of 
metal grids characterized by substantially uniform spacing 
between parallel adjacent grid lines which increases the 
range of applications in which the grids can be utilized. 



3,659,511 

ASSEMBLAGE AND PACK OF SELF-PROCESSING 

PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM UNITS 

Hubert Ncrwfai, Rocfaestor, N.Y., aaeignor to FiMtman Kodak 

Company, Rochester, N.Y. 

FBcd July 2, 1970, Scr. No. 52,026 
IntCLG03b 77/50 
U.S.CL 95-13 UOafans 

A film -assemblage and pack containing a plurality of self- 
processing film units adapted to be ex]x»ed and processed in 
sequence. Each film unit includes a first or photosensitive 
sheet and a second or process sheet, which sheets are 



separated during exposure and are brought into superposition 
for removal from the camera and for processing. The film 
units are connected within the assemblage or pack by an ar- 
rangement of leaders, only one of which is accessible from 
the camera exterior after each exposure. Superpositioning, 
processing and withdrawal of the sheets is effected through a 



h «• «• s. 




"lost-motion" type of connector that first permits and then 
prevents relative movement between the sheets as a respec- 
tive leader is withdrawn from the camera. Simultaneously 
with such withdrawal, the leader associated with the next 
successive film unit automatically is brought into the position 
where it will be accessible from the camera exterior for the 
next exposure and processing sequence. 



3,659,512 

PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS AND PROCESS 

EMPLOYING POROUS HLTER 

MiltoB S. Dietz, Lcxlagtoa, and Walter G. Lchamann, Somcr- 

ville, both of Mass., amignors to Polaroid Corporation, 

Cambridge, Mam. 

Filed Jan. 5, 1971, Ser. No. 104,062 

Int. CI. G03b 7 7/50 

U.S. CI. 95-13 29Clabns 




Photographic apparatus employing a gas-excluding filter 
interposed between a source of processing liquid and a 
processing chamber for providing a flow of gas-free 
processing liquid to exposed photographic material disposed 
within the processing chamber. Preferably, the source of 
liquid is provided within a disposable, variable-volume con- 
tainer or container-filter combination adapted for coupling to 
a processing chamber of a camera which includes a force 
supplying member for varying the volume of the reservoir- 
container so as to selectively vary the pressure differential 
across the filter and thereby direct gas-Cree processing liquid 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



65 



to or fix)m the processing chamber. A transport element is in- 
cluded in the camera for positioning the exposed photo- 
graphic material in the processing chamber pripr to 
dispensing of the liquid thereto and for removal of the liquid- 
treated photographic material subsequent to extraction of ex- 
cess liquid from the chamber. 



reel looeely mounted on the shaft for rotation therewith when 
the reel is hekl against the shaft by fihn ^spaaed therearound 
under tension. A sutionary brake is amociated with the rack 
for braking the fihn reel into a sutionary position with 
respect to the shaft independent of the rotation of the shaft 
when film tension is released from the film reel. 



3,659*513 3,659,515 

SELF-COCKING PHOTOGRAPHIC SHUTTER APPARATUS FOR DELIVERING MOVING AIR 

Brvcc K. JolMMi, Andovcr, Mms^ mriganr to Polaroid Coi^ Alexander H. Galmrfnk, SoirtkOdd, MMu, aaslgiior to Ford 

Cambridge, Mam. Motor Compoy, Dearborn, Mkh. 

FBed Jane 29, 1970, Scr. No. 50378 . Fled Sept. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 70,253 

IbL CL G03b 9/70 \ Int CL B60h 7/24 

UACL 95—59 29 Claims U5.CL98-2 4 Claims 





An exposure mechanism which is formed having a singular 
spring loaded shutter Made. This blade has a rest positicMi 
normally wholly blocking the passage of light through an as- 
sociated aperture. An actuator assembly mounts co- 
pivotaUy with the shutter blade is operative to engage and 
displace the blade fix)m its bkx:king rest position to a wholly 
unblocking spring loaded position. Following an appropriate 
interval of exposure, the actuator assembly releases the 
shutter blade for return movement to its blocking rest posi- 
tion to terminate an exposure. 



An apparatus for delivering moving air from a supply 
system to one of a plurality of spaced positions within a vehi- 
cle includes a stationary tube and a rotatabie tube mounted 
within the sutionary tube. The sutionary tube has a plurality 
of apertures therethrough which are angularly spaced about 
the circumference of the tube for delivering moving air to the 
various positions. The movable tube has a limited number of 
apertures and depending upon its position within the sta- 
tionary tube, the moving air is delivered frx>m the assemUed 
tubes through selected apertures of the sutionary tube. 



3,659,516 
WINDOW VENTILATORS 
Alastair Rlgg MacDonald, 39 CIcach Gardens, Clarkston, 
Rcnfrewsyrc, Scottend 

Fikd Oct. 8, 1969, Scr. No. 864,753 

Int CL B60h 1/24 

VS. CL 98-2.12 1 Claim 



3^59,514 
FILM TRANSPORT RACK 
Rriph E. StcMay, Rcdiands, CaUf., assignor to Phetolroa Co., 
RIalto, CaHf . 

FBed Oct 23, 1970, Scr. No. 83,464 

Int CL G03d 3/12 

VS. CL 95—94 R 10 Clafans 



\ 



\ 





V I 

A window ventilator for a vehicle such as an automobile, 
comprises a sheet of transparent material such as glass or a 
plastics material, said sheet having formed therein a plurality 
of ventilation holes preferably by a moulding operation. The 
axes of the holes rise from the outside to the inside of the 
sheet relative to the fitment of the sheet in a window frame, 
the angle of inclination of said axes preferably being of the 
order of 45" to SS*. 



.\ 



Apparatus for developing film including a shaft roUUUy 
mounted in a film transport rack. The rack includes a film 



3^59,517 
FRYING APPARATUS FOR FOODSTUFFS WHICH ARE 
TO BE FRIED ON BOTH SIDES . v 

Koibdn Halen, Gasoid 5, 6000 Aksmsd, Norway \ 

FBod Oct. 22, 1970, Scr. Ntt. 83,107 \ 

Int. CLA47J 57700 
VS. CL 99—355 2 Chlms 

Frying apparatus for foodstufib «^iich are to be fried on 
both sides, ccnnprising a {rfurality of endkn frying bands 



898 O.Q.— 8 



66 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



disposed one above the other and fwssing over rollers, 
wherein the bands consist of a webbing which is coated on 
both sides with polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) or other 
substance having similar properties, and the underside of the 




bands are in direct contact with a heated base having a plane 
central portion and upwardly curved edge portions in the 
longitudinal direction of the band, and wherein the foodstu£Es 
are turned at the transition from one band to the band lying 
therebeneath. 



3^9^18 
' KEATING APPARATUS 
Henry Roberts Porter, ScottsvOc, Natal Province, 
Republic of South AfHca, assignor to Ernest Henry Roberts 
Porter and Doris Lydia May Porter Porter, Scottsville, 
Pietermaritzburg, Natal Province, Republic of South Africa 

FDcd Jan. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 2411 
Qainv priority, mppMaikm South Africa, Jan. 22, 1969, 

69/0505 
Int. CLA47Ji 7/05 ^ 
VS. CL 99—386 2 Claims 



.1 1 1 , 1 1 



• »■(* 



1u 



M tif 2 . 




3,659,519 
APPARATUS FOR DEPOSTTING AERATED FOOD ' 
PRODUCTS 
Jokn MacManns, 143-16-Twtnty-«Mond Rond, Whitcitonc 

N.Y. 

Filed Feb. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 9,666 

Clainu priority, application Great Britain, Feb. 13, 1969, 

7,981/69; Sept. 5, 1%9, 44,031/69 

InL CL A21b 5/00; A21d 15/00 

VS. CL 99—450.1 12 Clalnv 




A machine, utilizing static whipping discs, aerates a 
whippable food product. The aerated product is fed through 
a hose to a forcing bag. Venting apparatus is provided at the 
junction of the hose and bag to eliminate air voids. The 
method includes pumping the aerated product through a 
hose to a forcing bag, alternately compressing the bag to ex- 
trude the product and releasing the compression to interrupt 
the extrusion without interrupting the supply to the bag, and 
venting any air voids from the bag before the product 
reaches the tip of the bag. 



3,659,520 
BEVERAGE CAN COMPRESSOR 
Jimmy D. Garrett, and Charles E. Brown, both of 215 Ellk 
Ave., Maryvflie, Tenn. 

Filed Mar. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 21,066 

Int CL B30b 15/30 

VS. CL 100-216 6 Clainu 




This invention relates to a heating apparatus for the heat- 
treatment of individual items, particularly for toasting slices 
of bread, cooking portions of meat such as chicken, ham- 
burger, steak and sausages, and for curing individual items. 
The apparatus comprises a pair of spaced-apart elongated 
sources of heat energy, displacement means adapted to be 
displaced past the sources of heat energy and maintaining 
means provided on the displacement means for mounting a 
plurality of individual items. 



An upstanding abutment wall outwardly from a first side of 
which a horizontal support extends. A vertical slot extends 
along the wall and projects at least slightly outwardly from 
the first side thereof for downwardly receiving therethrough 
a can extending lengthwise along the first side of the wall and 
flattened thereagainst. A pressure plate generally paralleling 
and opposing the first side of the wall is provided and 
guidingly supported for reciprocation toward and away fix)m 
the wall for flattening a can thereagainst and the horizontal 
support includes a pair of bowed leaf springs disposed 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



er 



generally normal to and outwardly of the first side of the 
wall, supported at their ends remote from the wall and curv- 
ing upwardly at their ends adjacent the wall for support of an 
unflattened can therefrom in elevated position relative to the 
slot, outwardly of which slot the ends of the springs adjacent 
the slot terminate. 



is compressed transversely during the printing operation in 
order to stiffen the face to be printed. 



3,659321 

APPARATUS FOR MARKING MOVING OBJECTS 

Jan Lnny, Oitrava, Czechoriovalda, airignor to VMkovlcke 

Micnmy Klemcnta Gottwalda, narodnl podnlk, Ortrava, 

Ciecfaoalovakia V 

Filed July 16, 1969, Scr. No. 842,406 

IntCLB41f77/20 

VS. CL 101-4 8 Claims 




Apparatus for marking a succession of objects moving past 
a marking station along a conveyor. A pendulum mounted 
marking head which when not in use is suspended in a first, 
horizontal position out of the path of the objects, is provided. 
A sensor is energized when an object begins to approach the 
marking sution i^ve the marking head into a second, verti- 
cal, position spaced fix>m but closer to the path of the object. 
As the object more closely approaches the marking station 
the marking head, still in vertical position, is moved into the 
path of the object to mark it, following which the marking 
head is retracted into iu first position. 



3,659423 
SCREEN PRINTING MACHINE FOR ROUND AND FLAT 

ARTICLES 



Thomas W. Oba, Wayne, N J. 



to Modem Dccornt< 



ing Company, Pamaic County, N J. 
Substltnte for application Scr. No. 700^56, Jan. 26, 1968, 
now abandoned. Thk application Nov. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 

90 000 

Int CL B41f 17/18, 17/24, 17/28 

UACL 101-38 R i llCIalma 



3,659,522 
AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SILK-SCREEN PRINTING 
ON FILLED BOTTLES OF FLEXIBLE MATERIAL WITH 

FLAT FACES 

Louk Gibcrt Dubult, 60 Rue VHruvc, Paris 20c, France 

FVed ScpC 19, 1969, Scr. No. 859,444 

Claims priority, application France, Oct. 31, 1968, 172134 

Int. CLB41f 77/24 

VS. CL 101-35 9 Claims 




A screen printing machine for decorating bottles or Uke ar- 
ticles of various shapes which has interchangeable parts for 
component mechanisms such as screen, squeegee and article 
holder. It facilitates the decorating of articles of substantially 
round section by the use of a reciprocatingly moving screen 
and a sutionary squeegee and the decorating of articles with 
at least one flat surface by the use of a sutionary screen and 
a reciprocatingly moving squeegee. 



3,659,524 
PRINTER CONTROL SYSTEM 
Jack Beery, Farmlnton, and Wffllam B. Templcton, HowcB, 
both of Mkh., amignors to Burrougbs Corporation, Detroit, 
Micb. 

Filed Oct. 15, 1970, Scr. No. 80,959 

Int. CL B41J 9/10; B41f 13/24 

VS. CL 101-93 MN 1 1 Claims 





In a document printing nuichiiie comprising a plurality of 

/ interconnected modular sectimis, there is diacloaed herein a 

Improvements in machines for silk-screen printing on fiUed printer module having a self contamer control syitan.Doa^ 

. bottles of flexible material with flat feces, in which the bottk roents, to be printed upon, are sequentially pamed througb 



68 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



the printer module under the control and drive of either one 
of two different speed drive units. The aecond drive unit ini- 
tially functions as a control gate to control the feeding of 
documents into the printer module. When the printing opera- 
tion is to begin, the second drive unit moves the documents 
through the printer module at a positively controOed printing 
speed. After the printing operation, the first drive unit moves 
the documents out of the printer module at a high speed. 

In order to maintain the correct character pitch between 
adjacent serially printed characters, a timing unit is opera- 
tively connected to the first drive unit This timing unit is 
responsive to drive variaticMis and accurately divides each 
character pitch into a plurality of intervab. Each interval 
controls one or more printer operation fimctions including 
the actual print operation. In order to maintain the 
synchronism between the movement of the documents and 
the character pitch, the second drive unit is clutched fix>m 
the first drive unit. 



ly magnetizable to form a weak magnetic field and attract the 




3,659^25 
FLEXDLE PMNTING PLATE CLAMPING DEVICE 

Woffr. nyrtawB; Jack Brycr, PMraoiM, botk of 
NJ^ and Domiiric Maxfo, BtlkroK. N.Y., MrigMin to 
Wood IndMbicSi loc^ Ptaiiiflcld« N J. 

FDed Oct 28, 1969, Scr. No. 870,027 

lUL CL B41f J/30, 13/16, 27/06 

U.S. CL 101-415.1 4Claiim 



unwanted magnetic particles. The attract particles are then 
removed by the air pressure and exhaust means. 



3,659,527 
HIGH TEMPERATURE DETONATOR 
MeroBl Taylor Abca. •»! WMan B. Lcatte, both of Al- 
Imqacrqoc, N. Mcx., awlf on to Tbc United States of 
AaMffca as r e p Ttsc a ted by the Uaitcd States Atoadc Eacrfy 
CoBiaUMioa 

Filed Oct. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 85,072 
lat CL F42c 19/12; F42b 3/12 
MS. CL 102-28 EB 




""n/jtS^M 



'\ 



A plate cylinder of a printing machine has two separate 
fastening devices for thin flexible printing plates for various 
page sizes. One of the fastening devices is constructed for ad- 
justing of both the circiunferential and the lateral register of 
plates for various page arrangements in such a manner that 
the registering fastening device has a shaft comprises several 
individual parts which can be coupled and uncoupled for 
various page combinations whereby the shaft portions can be 
separately adjusted for circumferentia] and lateral register. 




A high temperature or radiation resistant exploding bridge 
wire detonator having an azo-bishexanitrobipbenyl explosive 
charge positioned adjacent the exploding bridge wire. 



lastm- 



3,659,528 
COMPOSITE METAL CARTRIDGE CASE 
Tcave Saattfa, Attieboro, Mav., aalgBor to Tcxm 
■scats lacoriNMatcd, Dalas, Tex. 

FHed Dec 24, 1969, Scr. No. 887,956 

lat. CL F42b 5/28, 9/28 

MS. CL 102-43 F 9 OaiiBS 



3,659,526 
MAGNETIC AND VACUUM CLEANING DEVICE FOR 

PRINTER 
Kard J. Strikr, Rntiierford, N J., — Ignnr to 
Tdephone and Tdcfraph CorporatkiB, Natley, N J. 
FDed Dec 8, 1969, Ser. No. 882,983 
Int.CLB41fi5/02 
MS, CL 101-425 1 

Means are provided to remove particles from unwanted 
portions of a recorded surface which has been powdered for 
printing. The means include a slotted tube which is selective- 




An ammunition cartridge cause is shown to comprise a 
deep, open-ended cup having a base of substantial thickness. 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



May 2, 1972 

having a relatively thin, generaUy cylindrical waU upstanding 
fit>m the base and having an annular, peripheral, extraction 
groove formed in the base, the base having a recess which 
opens oppositely of the open cup end for receiving a primer 
cup therein. The cartridge case if formed of a composite 
metal laminate material having a core metal layer sand- 
wiched between and metallurgicaUy bonded to outer layers 
of other metal materials. The core metal layer of the 
laminate material extends as a core throughout the wall of 
the cup and the base of the cup and is disposed within the 
cup base to surround the bottom and lateral walls of the 
primer cup recess to provide adequate case strength in the 
primer cup area. The core material is arranged within the 
cup base so that the core material is comjrfetely covered by 
the outer layer material of the laminate at the location of the 
cartridge extraction groove. 



the conveyor. A front bumper is movably mounted on the 
truck body and operatively connected with the conveyor en- 
gaging means so that when the front bumper is moved rear- 
wardly by contact with an obstacle, the conveyor engaging 
means is moved out of engagement with the conveyor. A rear 
bumper is movably mounted on the truck body and opera- 
tively connected with the front bumper so that the rear 
bumper is moved into position for engagement with the fix)nt 



3,659,529 
IMPROVED TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM 
jBstto M. Jacobs, Jr., 500 S— o mr St^ Saitc 501. Saa 
cteco, CaHL, and Ncfl S. Stafbrd, Route 3, Box 355, Saa 

Jose, Calif. 

FBed Sept 29, 1969, Scr. No. 861^43 , 
lBta.B61bi/02 
U.S.CL 104-88 , 44 Claims 






bumper of a successive truck when the frovX bumper of the 
truck engages an obstacle. Each truck further includes means 
operable by engagement of the truck with a preceding truck 
that has encountered an obstacle to engage \bs front bumper 
of the truck and prevent forward movement of the front 
bumper when the rear bumper of a preceding truck in ad- 
vance of said truck moves forwardly due to the removal of 
the obsucle in the path of the front bumper of the preceding 
truck. 



The disclosure is of a transportation system which includes 
an elongated guidebeam having three spaced apart running 
surfaces. Two of the running surfaces are substantially verti- 
cal to accommodate wheels rotating about vertical axes and 
the third running surface is substantially horizontal to accom- 
modate wheels rotating on horizontal axes. Wheels which 
rotate on a vertical axis and wheels which rotate on a 
horizontal axis are connected to a rack which is adapted to 
move along the running surfaces of the guide-beam. The 
wheels connect the rack on the side of the guidebeam in can- 
tilever fashion. Connecting switch sections are provided at 
desired locations on the elongated guidebeam to connect two 
or more guidebeams. The switch sections have no moving 
parts and cooperate with movable means, such as extendable 
and retractable wheels, of the rack to provide for selective 
high speed switching both in horixcxital and vertical modes of 
a rack between an upline guidebeam and one or more spaced 
apart downline guidebeams and between two or more spaced 
apart upline guidebeams and a single downline guidegeam. 



3,659,531 
DRAWING MACHINE FOR RODS AND TUBING 
Alfoas Gockc, SoHagca, Gerauay, aisl|Bor to Th. Kkserliag 
A Aibrccht, Soliagcn, Gcrauiy 

Filed Sept. 4, 1969, Scr. No. 855,135 
Claims priority, appllcatkm Gcnaaay, Sept. 7, 1968, P 17 77 

110.7 
lat CL B23q 5/22 
MS. CL 105-30 10 




\ 



3,659,530 
TX>W TRUCK CONVEYOR SYSTEM 
Paul iOamp, St. Clair Shores, Mkh., aaslpMr to Amcrkaa 
Chaia & Cable Company, Inc, New York, N.Y. 
Fled Sept 21, 1965, Ser. No. 488,922 
IntCLB65g 77/42 
UA CL 104-172 BT 12 Claims 

The tow truck conveyor system disclosed herein comprises 
a conveyor mounted for movement along a slot and a plurali- 
ty of trucks. Each truck has a truck body and means thereon 
movable through the slot into and out of engagen»ent with 



An arrangement 'by which elongated articles arc drawn 
through a carriage rolling on guide tracks extending along 
the drawing path. Rollers mounted on the carriage are 
pressed against the guide tracks throu^ hydraulic cylinders 
to develop the friction required to move the carriage along 
the guide tracks. Hydraulic motors on the carriage are 
mechanicaUy linked to Ae rollers for the purpose of supply- 
ing the necessary driving power of the carriage. The traction 
or driving force required to move the carriage for the draw- 
ing operation is developed entirely through friction between 
the rollers and the guide tracks. 



70 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659432 

PALLET AND RAIL MATEIUAL HANDLING 

APPARATUS 

Necati KanaUiz, Spring Vafflcy, and Floyd E. Davk, San 

Dicfo, both of Calif . 
CootiDuatkMi of appUcadoo Scr. No. 783,021, Dec 1 1, 1968, 
now aba n do ned . Tlik applkadon Apr. 12, 1971, Scr. No. 
i 133,408 

lot. a. B6U 1 1 100 ;B6li 1/10 
U.S. CL 105—177 5 Oaims 



i ■• 




Conveying apparatus comprising tracks which form a main 
line, a plurality of spur tracks which intersect the main line 
tracks and extend laterally therefrom, and one or more pal- 
lets provided with rotatable ball supports which roll on said 
main line and $pur tracks and which permit pallets to be 
transferred therebetween. The pallets are provided with 
rotatable support members at their upper surfaces to 
facilitate loading and unloading of materials thereon and to 
enable the apparatus to be used as a conventional conveyor 
when a plurality of the pallets are placed in end-to-end rela- 
tion along the aforesaid tracks. 



3,659,533 
DEVICE FOR SECURING VEHICLE TO TRANSPORTER 

DOOR 
Aothony Venditty, Warm, Mich., assignor to General Mo- 
tors Corporatioa, Detroit, Mich. 

FOed Nov. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 89,71 1 

Int CL B60p 7/08; B61d 45/00; B65J 1/22 

US. CI. 105—368 R 3 Claims 




A securement device for maintaining a vehicle in a secured 
position on an upright transporter door and having a first sec- 
tion adapted to be located in an oblong slot formed in the un- 



derbody of the vehicle and a second section for automatic 
locking engagement with a projecting member rigidly 
mounted on the transporter door when the vehicle is driven 
onto the door. 



3,659,534 

FORK LIFT TRUCK PALLET 

Mari[ Glcndowcr Hyde Chffldt, Corrtegham, Enex, England, 

assignor to Lever Brothers Company, New York, N.Y. 

FOed Sept 17, 1969, Scr. No. 858,834 

Int. CI. B65d 19/18 



VS. CL 108-56 



j 



3ChyaM 




I 

A fork lift truck pallet folded from blanks of board materi- 
al and having identical top and bottom wall panels each with 
box-like structures folded from opposite marginal edge por- 
tions. Wall members of the box-like structures normal to the 
top and bottom wall panels provide compressive strength, 
and resistance to lateral collapse is provided by spacing 
members of rectangular tube-like section disposed at right 
angles between the box-like structures. The spacing members 
also provide a measure of compressive strength. 



3,659,535 
CARD HOLDER AND DISPENSER 
Flo|4aa B. Ccmcy, and Tina M. Ccmcy, both of 1405 1/4 
North Havenhnrst Drive, Los Angdct, Calif. 

Filed Dec. 4, 1969, Ser. No. 881,958 
Int CL A47h 9/02 



U.S.CL 108-136 



2 Claims 




A device for holding and dispensing playing cards one at a 
time and providing ready access to the top card of the stack, 
which includes a container having a base, four walls, and an 
open top; a movable platform for supporting the card stack 
which is mounted within the container; biasing means urging 
the movable platform and the cards stacked thereon in an 
upward direction whereby the top card will be in proper posi- 
tion relative to the open top; and means for restricting and 
guiding the vertical movement of the movable platform 
within the container. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



71 



3,659,536 

ROOT FEEDER DEVICE 

Robert B. White, 13 County Chib Drive, Larchmont, N.Y. 

FDcd Oct 1, 1970, Scr. No. 77,144 

Int CL AOlc 23/02 



UA a. 111-7.1 




1 




' 


y. 



■■ / 








H 




^^. 

\-'* 




- ;: 




>". 




/ / 




(.' 




> 




^iet> 












\ 


1 





6Clalms 



\. 



^;o« 



predetermined rate, and conveying members for which drive 
is derived from sewing machine transmitter in an arrange- 
ment in which the ironing mechanism operates only during 
sewing. Includes an adjustable speed transmission and addi- 
tional mechanism by which operator can reduce speed or 
suspend operation of conveying members while contihumg 
sewing to provide slack in fabric between sewing machine 
and ironing mechanism to permit negotiation of certain 
curved portions of garments. Ironing mechanism includes a 
floating buck with fabric pressing taking place between float- 
ing buck and moving heat transfer belt. Two layered bridging 
member connecto outlet of sewing machine with inlet of iron- 
ing mechanism which permits longitudinal movement of 
sandwiched leadon portions of the buck and a fabric plies 
separator without dhrupting connection. Ironing mechanism 
includes prepuller using feed discs magnetically coupled to 
drive members but mounted for vertical displacement. Feed 
discs have partially tapered perimeters which produce lateral 
skewing of rearwardly moving fabric for spreading free ply 
edges of fabric during ironing. ^ 



A root feeding device is disclosed, the device comprising a 
hoUow pipe adapted to be connected to a liquid source and 
having a generally pointed central rod suq)ended past the 
lower end thereof. A valve core is slidably disposed in the 
pipe concentrically about the central rod, the valve core ex- 
tending beyond the pipe and defining a leading tip therefor. 
The central rod and the vaWe core provide axial fluid flow ^^ cL 112—219 A 
when the valve core is retracted into the pipe, thus aiding im- 
mersion of the pipe into the ground. When the pipe is im- 
mersed, the valve core is partiaUy slidably retracted 
therefrom to thus provide radial fluid flow. Importantly, the 
construction is such as to obviate clogging of the apparatus 
by soil, pebbles and the like. i 



3,659,538 
SEWING MACHINE HAVING CONTACTLESS POSITION 

CONTROL MEANS 
Hugo F. Bodten, and Alfred K. Heidt, both of Schwetzingai, 
Germany, amignon to Flrma Franfcl & Kirdmcr Fabrfli 
For Elektromotoren Und Ekktrtehc Appmvtc, Schwctzin- 
gcn Baden, Germany 

FOed May 15, 1970, Ser. No. 37,542 
Claims priority, application Germany, May 17, 1969, P 19 25 

301.1 
Int CL D05b 69/22 



7ClainM 



I u 



3,659,537 
SEAM FINISHING APPARATUS 
Victor J. SIgoda, Grert Nedi, N.Y., amignor to Man^w Cor- 
poration, New Yorlt, N.Y. 

Original appHcatkm Jmie 5, 1967, Ser. No. 643,458, now 
Patent No. 3,478^*51, Continnation-in-part of application Scr. 

No. 481,522, Aug. 23, 1965, now Patent No. 3,372,497. 
Divided and thb application July 18, 1969, Ser. No. 853,575 

Int CL D05b 27/00, 27/10, 27/06 
U.S.CL 112-217 10 Claims 







<<> 




Sewing machine having contactless position control means 
operating with one or more routing shield blades where the 
control means for operating a thread cutter has an additional 
displaced phase shield blade sector that is effective to deter- 
mine the stopping of the sewing ^achine in relation to the 
position determined by the control means. 



Tandem arrangement of sewing machine and ironing 
mechanism in which the latter has a positively driven, thin, 
heat transfer belt heated by retractable heat pod(8) brought 
into engagement with belt only when belt speed «cceeds 



i 



3.659,539 
MECHANISM FOR FORMING A CORNER JOINT 
FLANGE 
F. Sdmcppcr, BoonviBe, Ind^ amigiior to Whirlpool 
Corpomtian 

Original application Jnly 30. 1969, Scr. No. 846,194, now 

Patent No. 3.584.371. Divided and this appHcatloo Feb. 16, 

1971. Scr. No. 115.272 

Int CLB21d 57/02 

U.S.CL113 IG 6 Cialma 

A method <rf forming a reinforced sheet metal comer joint 
wherein a flange is formed across a welded joint in such a 
way as to gather the metal toward the joint and eflfectively 



^ 



72 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



preclude splitting of the joint in the formation of the rein- or as a precaution against, a "maximum credible accident," 

forcing flange. The metal b gathered toward the welded joint thus avoiding the need for a permanent shield outside the 

by means of a V-shaped concave die whereby the edge of the reactor containment vessel. Coffer dams in the ship can be 
metal sheets is progressively turned as the die surfaces move 




along the metal edge progressively toward the apex of die. 
The sheet metal is firmly held adjacent the edge by suitable 
clamp means permitting the edge to be turned by the die into 
accurate perpendicular relationship to the comer joint. 



3^9,540 

MONounnc floating wharves 

KcmwUi L. Toby, 1551 Mount Do^Im X Road, aad Rodney 
W. S. Wdi, 1329 Stanley Street, both ol Victoria, Britkh 
Cohunbia, Canada 

FUed Mar. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 20,198 

Int. CL B63b 35100 

U.S.CL1 14-^.5 F SCIafam 





similarly treated to give protection to the ship's crew. The 
means for filling the barriers may be a ring main pipe with 
access fore and aft of the ship or the ship's ballast system 
may be adapted to provide the filling water for the barriers. 



3,659,542 
AIR-CUSHION MARITIME CRAFT 
Vitaly iTaaoTicii Pctrov, alitM Frame, <a, kv. 147; 
Nikolacvicb Ivanov, Baaseinaya uUtsa, 31, kv. 29; Jury 
LconMoTfch Oksln, Modumkoc iIiqwi, 20, korpm 5, kv. 
5; Arnold Oskarorkh Elcr, V.O., 6 Uaia, 49, kv. 19; 
Anatoly Akinovkh Bntvaov, Kr ant nopt R oirrftaya aMtn, 
19, kv. 22; Abrani Mobccrich Barin, nBta Lcalaa, 48, kv. 
7; Vladimir BoriMvich StaroMmky, nHtsa ProfcMora 
Kochaieva, 6, kv. 3; Elfan Ralalovich Ratncr, ProqMkt 
Stachek 132 kv. 78, and Olcg Fedorovich Potapov, Nevsky 
protpckt, 23, kv. 10, al of Leningrad, U.S.SJt. 
FOcd Aaf. 14, 1969, Scr. No. 850,038 
IbL CL B63b 1134 



U.S.CL 114-67 A 



y 



Monolithic reinforced concrete flotation units constructed 
to be assembled as single or multiple wharves with provision 
for the safe carnage of power, fuel and communication ser- 
vices and with provision for storage lockers. Such units are 
designed specifically for boat moorage but with modification 
in arrangement and assembly of the units or modification in 
size or shape, the units may be used for a variety of other 
purposes such as floating walkways or causeways, diving plat- 
forms, breakwaters, flotation units for boat moorage sheds 
and marine refueling stations. 



X 



3,659341 
NUCLEAR POWERED SHIPS 
Shefihard RIb, Warringtoa, England, ^Mgwnr to Unttcd 
Kingdom Atomic Energy Anthority, London, Fjigland 

FBcd Ang. 18, 1969, Scr. No. 850^98 
Claims priority, appttcatioa Great Britain, Ang. 26, 1968, 

40,789/68 

IntCLB63bi5/00 

U.S.CL 114—05 5ClaiBH 

A nuclear powered ship has its collision barriers made 

water tight and means are provided for filling the barriers 

with water to act as a shield against radiation in the event of. 



> ^^rVfcw^ 



A craft in which the bottom between the board keels is 
provided with steps located at a definite distance one from 
another and forming a stable air-cushion under the bottom of 
the craft. 



3,659,543 
SHIP FOR TRANSPORTING CRYOGENIC MATERIAL 
Nennan K. Basic, Hanppongc, L. I., aad Jooeph J. Cnnco, 
Scaradalc, both of N.Y., mrignors to John J. McMnlcn Aa- 
sodatci. Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Flkd Apr. 4, 1969, Scr. No. 813,669 
Int. CL B63b 25108; B65d 25100 
U.S. CL 1 14—74 1 1 CWm 

A ship oi simplified construction is adapted for the marine 
transportation of cryogenic material. At least one single bar- 
rier contaiimient tank is located within the hull of the ship. 
On the inboard side of the inner hull and transverse bulk- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



78 



heads of the ship is provided a thermal insulating system, and connected to a quay, bridge or similar, and a boom 

covering the inner surface of this insulating system is a gas 

and liquid impervious liner. A space is provided between the 

\\ntt and the wall of each containment tank and a cofferdam - ' ^ ^ 

is provided outboard of the inner hull, outboard of the inner ^ 



\' 



I 



O' 





bottom and between the transverse bulkheads. Two circula- 
tion systems are provided, the first being provided in the detachably secured to said device and possibly also to the 
space intermediate the liner and the tank, and the second quay. 

being provided in the space defined by the cofferdam. Means ^ 

for the detection of leaks in the containment system are also 

provided. 3,659,546 

MOTOR BOAT PROPELLED PONTOON BOAT 

r Loais F. Mikios, 6151 Delaware Street, Lake County, Ind. 

3,659,544 I Fifed Apr. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 25,738 

BOAT ANCHOR InL CL B63b 21100, 35/44 

Rndo^ A. Goeplrich, 1109 North Clevcfauid Avenue, South us. CL 114—235 R .8 dafans 

Bead, Ind. 

FDed Dec 12, 1969, Scr. No. 884,496 | 

Int. CL B63b 2i/2-# - 

U.S.CL114— 206R 2 Clainis 





An improved anchor is of conical construction, and has at 
iu larger diameter end a groove which is adapted to receive 
therein an annular "O" ring which protrudes beyond the 
outer surface of the anchor to provide a bumper which pro- 
tects the sides of the boat against damage as the anchor 
swings against the sides of the boat 



This invention relates to pontoon boats which normally 
carries a dingy for transporting the passengers to and fit>m 
the pontoon boat The stem end of the pontoon boat is pro- 
vided with a novel structure for incapsulating a motor boat 
which provides the motive means to pppel the pcmtoon boat. 
This invention combines the motor boat and pontoon boat to 
form an integral structure for purposes of propulsion of both 
crafts. Both crafts are separable when it is desired to use the 
motor boat as a tender craft. 



3,659,545 
OUTRIGGER FOR MOORING A WATER VEHICLE 
John Gnanar Hcdman, Pltca, Sweden, amlgnor to Klas O. 
Tcflbcrg AB, Sail^DnTnaa, Sweden 

Fled Feb. 12, 1970, Scr. Na 10^62 
ClafaH priority, a ppM cthm Sweden, Nov. 27, 1969, 16306/69 

InL CL B63b 21/00 
U.S.CL114— 230 6aaims 

An outrigger for mooring water vehicles consisting of a 
device being pivotaMe or tumable in a vertical plane and 



3,659,547 » : 

EXHAUST SYSTEM FOR TUNNEL STERN BOAT 



to 



Yan 



Robert B. Staart, Pcaa Yaa, N.Y. 
tea Yaa, N.Y. 
FBcd Jaac 1, 1970, Scr. No. 42,134 
IatCLB63h27/J2 
U.S. CL 115—34 R 12 

In a tunnel stem boat having a propeUer in the tunnel and 
a spray plate and rudder aft of the tttnnel, the exhaust firom 



74 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



an inboard engine is piped to a transom opening from which 



J 




it is guided downward and directed under the spray plate into 
the high speed stream of water thrust aft from the propeller. 



* 3^9,548 

HYDRAUUC PADDLE WHEEL BOAT 
John Fabkk, Fcntoo, Mo^ aarifnor to John Fabkk Tractor 
Company, St. Loids, Mo. 

Filed Aug. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 65,178 

Int. CL B63h 1/04 

UACL 115-49 3aairaa 




3,659,549 

LOCK ALARM DEVICE 

William Wagner, 1800 Wcat 4di Avenue, Hialwih. Fla. 

FDcd Oct. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 78,048 

Int. CL E05b 45/00 

VS. CL 1 16—8 9 Clabu 



A paddle wheel boat, hydraulically operated by oil under 
pressure supplied to a reciprocatory drive cylfnder, driving 
the paddle wheel by a Pitman connection. The boat is 
powered by a diesel engine driving a hydraulic pump, which 
supplies oil under pressure on alternate sides of a piston in 
the drive cylinder. A thrust rod is connected to the piston 
and also at an opposite end to the paddle wheel, and by 
reciprocatory action of the drive cylinder controlled by a 
sequencing rod to control the alternate admission of oil to 
one side or the other side of the piston, the paddle wheel is 
driven. Provision is made for reversing the paddle wheel 
operation by means of a reversing or directional control 
valve which reverses the flow of oil. By means of surge cham- 
bers and accumulators, shock in the system is easily con- 
trolled. A pilot system for operating the directional control 
valve is provided through a pilot pump also driven by the 
diesel engine. 




A lock alarm mechanism for vending machines and the 
like is described, including a key-operated latch member 
secureable to a hinged housing door or panel member and 
lockingly interengageable with a latch bar member resiliently 
supported with respect to the associated housing member 
and operative, only during intervals of attempted forcing of 
the lock such as by prying between the door or panel 
member and the housii\g member, to yieldingly move the 
latch bar member and thereby actuate a self-contained alarm 
in the housing structure protected. 



3,659,550 
FLUID OPERATED COATING AND DRYING MACHINE 
Wayne F. Fnlton, Moorcpark, Midu, amignor to Spring Tools 
Corporation, Schoolcraft, Mkh. 

FBed Nov. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 87,926 

Int.CLB05c/;//2 

U.S.CL 118-6 6 Claims 




An apparatus is provided for painting or otherwise treating 
solid articles or jojXs with a liquid and subsequently remov- 
ing excess liquid, comprising a container for the articles or 
parts, a tank for containing the liquid, means for dipping the 
container and articles to immerse the articles in the liquid, 
and means for retracting the container from the liquid and 
spinning the container to remove excess liquid and drying 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



75 



fluid means and controlled by valves actuated by an aur- , - 

operated fluidic circuit, and in the complete absence of any 

electrical circuits, thereby avoiding any danger of explosion 

by ignition of the liquid which might be caused by an electn- ^ 

cal spark. ' 



3,659,551 
GLASS TREATING TUNNEL 
Richard G. MdUmtry, LaMHtcr, Ohio, 
Hocldng Corporation, LancMtcr, Ohio 

Filed Aug. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 62,489 
Int.a.C23cii/00 

U.S.CL118— 48 . , "^ 



to Anchor 




A glan treating tunnel or furnace particularly adapted to 
expose glass articles to treating vapors. The tunnel com- 
prises, in order fix>m inlet end to outlet end, an inlet air door, 
an inlet dead zone, a treating chamber, an outlet dead rone, 
and an outlet air door. PreferaWy, an open mesh beh traver- 
ses the glass treating tunnel from one end to the other, the 
belt being adapted to carry thereon the glass articles to be 
treated. 

The inlet and outlet dead zones are not provided with at- 
mosphere circulation means, and the atmosphere within 
them is quiescent. The treating chamber is provided with ap- 
paratus for supplying the vapor with which the glass articles 
are to be treated, and apparatus for circulating the vapor 
containing atmosphere within the treating chamber. Heating 
elements control the temperature of each air door's airstream 
of the circulating atmosphere to a desired level. This struc- 
tural combination unexpectedly promotes maintenance of 
the treating vapors within the treating chamber. 

Vapor drift may tend to occur toward one end or the other 
of the treating chamber through one or the other of the inlet 
and outlet air doors, the direction of the drift being mainly 
dependent on atmospheric conditions outside the glass treat- 
ing tunnel. Drift controlling means are provided in the inlet 
and/or outlet dead zones, which counteract such vapor drift, 
thereby promoting maintenance of treating vapors within the 
treating chamber. 




retaining force on substrates so supported. Inductive heating 
means is provided. / 



3,659,553 

ADJUSTING DOCTOR BLADE ARRANGEMENT FOR 

USE WITH A DRUM APPUCATOR 

Philip E. ToMns, 1872 Wataon Rd., AMngton, Pa. 

Fikd Oct. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 79,087 

Int. CL B05c 1/08 

U.S.CL 118-261 




3,659,552 I 

VAPOR DEPOSITION APPARATUS 
Thomas F. Briody, Bcthkhem, Pa., aarignor to Wcatem Elec- 
tric Company, Incorporatad, New Yorii, N.Y. 
FHcd Dec 15, 1966, Scr. No. 601^85 

Int CL C23c /3/0« '" 

VS. CL 1 18—49.5 8 Ctaims 

A vapor deposition apparatus inchides a susceptor formed 
as an annulus about a vertical axis and having pockets on the 



The present device inchides a doctor blade mounted on a 
holder, which holder is further mmuited on a pair of dideable 
rods. In addition, mounted on the holder are two threaded 
pivot members made of material which will not score nor 
scratch the drum, with which the doctor blade is used. The 
pivot members are adjusUbly disposed to come to rest 
against the drum. Further in addition, there is an eccentric 
cam disposed to abut one of said slideable rods and said last 
mentioned slideable rod is spring loaded to be held against 
said cam. Accordingly, as said cam is routed it determines 
the "at rest" location of said engaged slideable rod and thus 
said holder. This last mentioned action causes the doctor 
blade to pivot or be partially rotated around the ends of sakl 
pivot members. In response to this action the doctor blade is 
located at a chosen distance from the drum (thereby deter- 
mining the thickness of the material transported by the drum 
for application to a sheet of paper or the like). Because Ac 
holder is "floating" on the slideable rods, the holder will be 
moved toward and away from said drum, in response to any 
eccentricities or irregular surfaces of the drum, so that Ae 
layer of material that is being transported by the drum for ap- 
plication win have a constant thickness. 



/ 



76 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



♦ 

r 



3,659^54 3,659^56 

POURING PLANT, ESPECIALLY FOR LACQUERS, PROGRAMMABLE TONER DISPENSER 

VARNISHES, ENAMELS, AND THE LIKE Edward Chaita Mnladiter, Flttrford, N.Y., MrigBor to Xerox 

Hctaat A. Friz, Stattgart, smI Alfred Dcttdtad^ Stuttgart- Corporatioa, Stanford, Con. 
SoMBcrraia, both of Germany, aaifBon to Adolf Frfa Filed Aog. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 65,052 

GeaeflKhall mk tteeriiranirter Haftvag, Stuttgart-Bad Int. CL G03g /i/OO 

Caaartatt, Geraaay ^ U^O. 118— 637 6 ClaiBH 

FHcd Sept 1 1, 1969, Scr. No. 856,987 
Claiau priority, appHcatkM GcnnaBy, Sept. 11, 1968, P 17 

77 132J 

lat. CL B05c 5/00 

U.S. CL 1 18—314 TJOmbaa 



» « 




A « n 



A pouring installation with at least one pouring station for 
pouring liquids, in which work pieces to be processed are 
conveyed by conveying means past a pouring head and a col- 
lecting trough which latter together with said pouring bead is 
movable selectively fix>m a first position in the path of said 
conveying means into a second podtion out of said path and 
vice versa, while storage means for storing the liquid to be 
conveyed to the pouring head are provided fit>m which the 
liquid is pumped to the pouring head and while said pump 
and said storage means and said collecting trough form a 
closed circuit in the first as well as in the second position of 
the pouring head and the pertaining collecting trough. 




A dispenser for replenishing the toner portion of a mixture 
of toner and carrier, the mixture developing a latent image 
formed on an image-bearing surface. A container including 
spaced-apart side walls is positioned adjacent a rotatable 
member, the bottom of the side walls being shaped to fit the 
curvature of the member. The timer is introduced into the 
container and is dispensed as the member is rotated and at a 
rate proportional to its speed. In a specific embodiment, the 
amount of toner dispensed is dependent cwi the density ot the 
developed image and/or the image printing rate. 



3,659,555 
MACHINE FOR COATING CIUNDRICAL OBJECTS 
Roger Marcd MaMvolr, Poat-A-Mo«nm Fraacc, aoslgMM- to 
Centre Dc RedicreiMi De Poat-A-MoMMm, P«wt-A-Moas- DaiM O. 
son, France 

FBed Sept. 15, 1970, Scr. No. 72y«36 



3,659,557 
TEAT CUP INFLATION 

, 5707 Noftii Bond, FrMno, CaHf. 
Mar. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 21,812 

Int. CL AOg 05/04 



ClalnH priority, application Ftmcc Oct 2, 1969, 6933671 U.S. CL 119-14J6 
Int. CL B09b 13/04 
U.S. CL 1 18—320 5 Claims 



10 



X-" 



^ 



St 



'^—--tE 



4» ♦til 



*^ 



^1^ 






^ 



Af-^ 









*. 






__»!h 



'////' V////////// V '///.'. '///'/' 



»^', 



" M^ 




A machine for externally coating a pipe. The pipe is made 
to rotate and travel lengthwise through a coating cabin hav- 
ing openings allowing the passage of the pipe. At least one 
coating gun extends into the cabin for coating the pipe as it 
moves throu^ the cabin. A duct commtmicates with the in- 
terior of the cabin for discharging harmful gases and particles 
produced in the course of coating. 



A teat cup assembly for an automatic milking machine in- 
cluding an inflation assembly having a retaining diaphragm 
integrally formed with the cup liner for engaging the teat of a 
cow to retain the cup against falling off while venting the 
space between the teat and liner at the end point of milking. 
The inflation is formed by initially molding the liner and 
diaphragm firom a single mass of resilient elastic material, 
with the diaphragm having vent means integrally formed 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



77 



thereon to permit the egrets of air into the liner at the end 
point of the milking operation. The configuration of the vent 
means faciliutes molding the liner and diaphragm as a unita- 
ry structure. 



3,6593S8 

TEAT CUP INFLATION 

Danid O. Nooriandcr, 5707 Nortk Bond, Frcae, CaHf. 

FHcd Mar. 23, 1970, Scr. Ho. 21,813 

Int. CL AOIJ 05/04 

UACL 119-14.52 9 




operation of such burners in response to varying heat outputs 
so as to meet steam load demands. Accorc^ng to the inven- 
tion this control is achieved by providing an overflow take- 
off for the bed particles which is adjustable in relation to the 
height to the bed so that the height and accordingly volume 
of the bed can be adjusted. According to a preferred feature 
of the invention the cross-sectional area of the bed increases 
with increasing bed height This provides the advantages that 
a relatively fine adjitstment of the output of the bed is possi- 
ble a low load, and the velocity of the fluidising gases at the 
top of the bed are relatively slow and so relatively fed parti- 
cles are entrained and removed firom the bed. 



3,659,560 
WATER HEATER 
Wilfred G. Carter, 37 RoaslWd CIrcnIt, Thomhffi, Ontario, 
Canada 

FBed Mar. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 21^17 

Int.CLF22b57/J6 

VS. CL 122-494 2 Claims 



Provided is a teat cup inflation which prevents mastitis by 
eliminating contaminated milk forced backwash which 
usually occurs during the rest cycle of automatic millung 
operations and at the same time {HX>vides for unifonn and 
adequate massage of the teat This is accomplished by 
providing in combination ( 1 ) a rigid air-vent plug in the wall 
of the inflation located just below the pulsating vacuum 
chamber shell and (2) an inflaticm having a cross-sectional 
area of lon^tudinally reinforced portions and longitudinal 
unreinforced portions along that section of the inflation 
which is enclosed within the shell, such that when the infla- 
tion collapses, there is effected along the entire length of the 
teat a massaging action and at the same time there is insured, 
upon maximum collapse and even as the inflation begins to 
wear out, a remaining orifice of fit>m about 0.012 square 
inches to about 0.028 square inches connecting the milking 
vacuum to the inflation cavity immediately below the end of 
the teat | 

3,659,559 
FLUIDISED BED BURNER CONTROL 
Gabrid F. FoMss, BanUcnd; Peter W. Neve, Biggin HiD, and 
Peter J. CorbrMgc, London, aB of England, assignors to 
Foster Wheckr Corporation 

FDcd Jane 22, 1970, Scr. No. 48,221 

Int CL F22b 1/02 

U.S.CL 122-4 D 11 Claims 




A water heater comprising a cylindrical water tank having 
a gas burner below it and a flue pipe )>assing through the tank 
for heating the water. The tank is enclosed in a square sec- 
tioned housing having an air inlet to which air from outside 
the building can be fed. An air intake duct (which leads to 
the outside of the building) is connected to the air inlet of 
the heater and is of sufficiently large diameter to allow the 
flue pipe to pass coaxially through it with sufficieat space 
between the flue pipe and the air intake duct for 0m supply 
of combustion air to the burner. '^ 




3,659,561 
FRAMELESS WATER PIPE BOILER 
WUibold Krans, Grcbcnddn, Gcraumy, asrignor to 
stahl HcnadMl AkticngcsellKkafI, Kamcl, Germany 
FHcd Jane 22, 1970, Scr. No. 48,312 
CUnu priority, appUcatioa Germany,, June 23. 1969, P 19 31 
. 717.0 

Int CLF22b 37/24 ( 

VS. CL 122-510 lOCWnii 

Sdf-supporting water pipe boiler with two or naoro co-«xi- 
ally arranged cage heating surfiKCS each of which coioptm* 
vertical pipes and upper and lower headers or reversing 
bends while the indivichial cage heating surfaces are dif- 
There is described herein a fluidiaed bed burner for a ferently designed as ev|4x>rator. supeiiieater, or feed water 
steam boiler. It has been found to be difficult to control the preheater or hot water" generator or one and the same cage 



^ 



78 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



ti 



comprises different heating surfaces, in which the inner cage 
defining the fire box and, if provided, other cages of the same 
temperature have their lower end resting on a foundation 
while to the upper end of said cage or cages there are con- 




3,659,563 
INDIVIDUAL CORRECTING SYSTEM FOR THE 

ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED 

ELECTROMAGNETIC INJECTORS IN INTERNAL 

COMBUSTION ENGINES 

Lovls A. Moapctlt, L'Etaag-LiKVfflc, France, aaignor to 

Sodcte dct Proccdca ModcnMS d'bOecdoa Sopromi 

FiM July 9, 1970, Ser. No. 53,342 

Claims priority, appMcirtiiM France, Aug. 1, 1969, 6926492 

Int. CL F02iB 52100 

\iJ&. CL 123-32 EA 2 Clain 



nectable the remaining cage heating surfaces of said boiler as 
well as the flue chamber mantle with insulation, the water- 
steam separating vessel and a walk-on platform with accesso- 
ries thereon including the burner system. 



3,659,562 

AIR COOLING SYSTEM FOR ROTARY INTERNAL 

COMBUSTION ENGINE 

Charles Jones, HOlBdale, N J., aHignor to Cuitiw-Wriglit Corw 

poratfcMi 

Filed Jan. 27, 1971, Ser. No. 110,104 

Int. CI. POlp 7110, 1100 

U.S. CL 123— 8.01 10 Claims 



K-/ 





.^6 



The invention provides an individual correction of the du- 
ration of the injection of fuel into any one of the injectors of 
an internal combustion engine. To this end the signals 
generated by electronic control means and fed into the sole- 
noid controlling injectors are diverted into a circuit con- 
nected across the terminals of the solenoid and including in 
series an adjustable impedance such as a resistance which 
may be in parallel with an adjustable capacitance and at least 
one diode the direction of which defines whether the lag is 
obtained for the opening or for the closing of the injector. A 
preferred embodiment of said circuit includes a resistance 
connected with the slider of a potentiometer the ends of 
which are connected with diodes connected in opposite 
directions and in parallel in the circuit so that according to 
the position of the slider the lag-producing action is predomi- 
nantly that of one or the other diode. 



3,659,3o4 
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE WITH SUB- 
COMBUSTION CHAMBER 
Todiie Sonld, Nagoya; Y^JIro Oihlma, Idtinomiya, and 
Masae Kataoka, Nagoya, aU of Japan, ■■rigiion to 
Kabndiiiii Kaidui Toyota Cimo Kcnkywho, Hiaaknta, 
SlHma-lia, Nagoya-aU, Alckl-licn, Japan 
Original application Nov. 1, 1968, Ser. No. 772,732, now 
Patent No. 3,543,736. Divided and this application Mar. 20, 
1970, Ser. No. 21,357 
Int CL F02b 3100: F02m 13104, 23/04 
U.S.CL 123-32 SP 2 Claims 



The air cooling system for a rotary piston, internal com- 
bustion engine, having a liquid cooled rotor and means defin- 
ing a divided circumferential external cooling air flow path 
for flowing air in a first path adjacent the combustion and ex- 
pansion sectors of the engine and cooling air in the second 
path adjacent the uitake sector of the engine, comprises a 
liquid heat exchanger secured adjacent the intake sector of 
the engine and in the second external cooling air flow path so 
that heated liquid from the engine rotor is passed in indirect 
heat exchange relation to cooling air flowing through the 
second path. The heat exchanger is constructed and arranged 
to provide a pressure drop in the cooling air flow, 
downstream from the point of divergence of the cooling air 
flow, to automatically meter a smaller quantity of the cooling 
air flow in the second flow path than throu^ the first flow 
path. 




An internal combustion engine having a cylinder, including 
a main combustion chamber, in combination with a sub-com- 
bustion chamber provided with an ignition plug and commu- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



19 



nicating with the nuun combustion chamber through a small 
hole in a cylinder wall for jetting out the flame of air-fuel 
mixture ignited in the sub-combustion chamber to the main 
combustion chamber, the air-fiiel mixture being supfriied to 
the sub-combustion chamber through a suction tube from the 
same carburetor which feeds the main combustion chamber. 
The carburetor inlet of said suction tube is positioned up- 
stream of a throttle valve and downstream oi a venturi por- 
tion of the carburetor. A valve is placed at the outlet of the 
suction tube to the sub-combustion chamber and tha valve 
may be interconnected with a main valve in the suction 
manifold leading from the carburetor to the main combustion 
chamber to move in synchronism therewith and with a piston 
in the cylinder, or it may be arranged to operate automati- 
cally in response to the difference of pressure within the sub- 
combustion chamber and the suction tube. 



members of a running direction order and of a speed order 
issued from one of a plurality of remote-control stations. Said 
system provides for proper positioning of the engine cam- 



Wmn mm 






il 



3,659,565 

FUEL INJECTION CONTROLLING SYSTEM FOR 

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE 

Ryoji KMama, and ScUl Soda, botk of Hllacki-dii, Japnn, aa- 

slnors to Hltacid, Ltd^ Tokyo, Japan 

FBed May 2, 1969, Ser. No. 821,180 

Claims priority, application Japan, May 6, 1968, 43/29871 

Int. CLF02d 5/00 

US. CL 123—32 EA * Claims 



ii 



Tirni--Jr 



'.e,^. 




OfCWT 



« t*« 




^V' 



-43 



shaft, for successive attempts to pneumatically start the 
motor and for control of idling and nmning speed of the en- 
gine. Alarm circuits are also provided. 



^^ 



3,659,567 
DRIVE MEANS FOR THE COOLING FAN OF.AN 
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE 
Frederick R. Mnrray, Nantwkh, England, asrignor to 
Roycc Limited, Derby, England 

FBed Jnly 13, 1970, Ser. No. 54,123 
Claims priority, appHortlon Grent Britdn, July 15, 1969, 

35,551/69 

Int. a. FOlp 7102, 7114, 7/16 

U.S. CL 123-41.12 , 2 Claims 



r<^.... 



A fuel injection controlling system wherein fuel injectors 
each thereof associated with each one of cylinders are 
grouped in correspondence with each two of the cylinders, 
each group of the fuel injection controUing valves are opened 
only when it U desired that fiiel be injected with respect to 
one of each corresponding group of cylinders, and at the 
starting point of the engine all the valves belonging to one 
group are opened when it is desired that fiiel injection be ef- 
fected with respect to any one of the two cylinders belonging 
to the corresponding group. j 







A hydraulic drive for the £ui of an internal combustion en- 
gine in which an existing constant flow supply of hydraulic 
fluid is used to actuate a hydraulic motor to drive the &n. A 
system of valves is provided to safeguard the operation of the 
primary location of use of the hydraulic fluid 



3,659,566 
PNEUMATIC DEVICE FOR REMOTE CONTROL AND 
MONTTORING OF A VARIABLE«»EED, REVERSIBLE 
DIESEL ENGINE -~ 
Mate Edovard Zncca, La Clotnt, F^vnoe, aarfgnor to Cban- 
tien Navab dc la Clotat, La Clotnt (Boncbet-do-Rbone), 
France, a part InAcreit. 

nkd ScpL 10, 1969, Ser. No. 856,598 
dafans priority, appHcatten France, Sept 10, 1968, 165629 

Int CL FOll 13/02 

US. CL 123—41 R ^ Claims 

A reversible, variable-speed engine for the propulsion of a 

diip is controlled by a pneumatic logic system providing 

selective transmission to the actuators of the engine control 



3,659,568 
CYLINDERS FOR AIR-COOLED RECIPROCABLE 
PISTON INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 
Hana-Uirkb Howe, B s M b erg F^an k in fn 
sIgnM- tn Klockncr-HHmboldi.Dcnti 
ColoEne-Deutz, Germany 

Flad Doc 8, 1970, Ser. No. 96^12 
dates priority, appHcation Germany. Doc 10, 1969. P 19 61 

803J 

Int CL ¥91X1106; F02f 1130 

UA CL 123-41.69 ^ . 3Ctaln« 

In an air-cooled redprocaUe piston engme having at least 

two adjacent cyluiders with parallel longitudinal axn and 

transverse fins, in which adjacent fin portions <rf two adtjacent 



80 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



cylinders are provided with straight substantiaily parallel 
edge$ defining therebetween a narrow gap while the ends of 
said straight edges merge by curved portions curved in the 



centrifugal force of governor weights, and an oscillating lever 
opposes the thrust of the interlocking rod and is subjected to 
the force of a spring. An auxiliary lever has as a supporting 
point an engaging point with a stopper bolt disposed in the 
oscillating lever and as acting points first and second pins 
pivotally connecting the oscillating lever to said interlocking 




direction toward the axis of the pertaining cylinder with the 
segment-shaped remainder of the pertaining fins, tie rod 
means being located between adjacent curved portions of 
respectively pertaining fins of two adjacent cylinders. 



I 



3,659^9 
UQUm COOLED CYLINDER SLEEVE, PARTICULARLY 

FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 
Stcphu Mayer, and Rolf Eagcl, both of Angrtmrg, Germany, 
aaigiMNn to MaachiiMiifiybrik AngriMirg-Nunbcrg AG, 
Aagsbarg, Gcnnany 

FDed Nov. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 86,179 
Claims priority, appMortloii Germany, Nov. 3, 1969, P 19 55 

140.7 

tot CL P02f ///O, ///4 

U A CL 123— 41.79 11 dalms 




r-H 



Cooling tubes, preferably semicircular, and matching in 
the aggregate approximately the contour of the cylinder 
sleeve (13), are cast into the sleeve; the tubes (16) are 
formed with radially extending connecting stubs and with 
locating means to place them close to the inner wall surface 
of the liner, and in a region free from axial stresses imposed 
on the complete cylinder liner-tube casting. Preferably, a 
group of superimposed tubes are used, interconnected by 
short riser tubelets. The semi-circular tube sections can have 
connecting stubs, plugged during casting and, if desired, 
remaining plugged, extend at the diametrical region of the 
separation of mold sections used to cast \ht cylinder sleeve. 



to 



3,659,570 
CENTRIFUGAL GOVERNOR FOR INJECTION 
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 
MMao Yoditao, HltMlii-Matsiiyanm, Japam 
DkMl KU Kabuahfld KahAa, Tokyo, Japan 
FDed Ang. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 60^22 
tot CL F02d 1104 
UA CL 123—98 2 

A centriftigal governor for an injection internal com- 
bustion engines of the supercharging type. A lever is con- 
nected to an interlocking rod to be axially thrusted by the 




17 



rod. A follower lever displaces a control rod and a spring 
stretched between the first mentioned lever and the auxiliary 
lever so that in the supercharged rotation limilB of an engine, 
the control rod b displaceable through the follower lever by 
means of the thrust of the interiocking rod and the oacillatiOT 
of the auxiliary lever with respect to the force of the spring 
acting on the second pin. 



3,659,571 

ELECTRONIC SPEED REGULATING ARRANGEMENT 

FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 

Herbert Lang, BImlngiB, Germany, amlgnnr to Robert BoKh 

GmbH, Stirttgart, Germany 

Filed Mar. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 22,743 
Claims priority, application Germany, Mar. 8, 1969, P 19 11 

826.6 

IntCI.F02dy///0 

U.S.CL 123-102 13Claimt 

1 



•tPsSsSw' 



m n 




riEEpaco 









An electronic arrangement for regulating the speed of in- 
ternal combustion engines, particularty diesel engines. A 
valve is controlled for regulating the quantity of fuel to be in- 
jected into the engine. A bisubte multivibrator has its output 
connected to the valve for controlling the opening therectf. A 
comparator is connected to the input of the bistable mul- 
tivibrator and receives output pulses from a first monoctaUe 
multivibrator. These pulses from the first monostable mul- 
tivibrator have a duration which is a fiinction of the state or 
position of the valve. A second monoctable multivibrator ap- 
plies input pulses to the other input of the comparator. These 
input pulses from the second monostable multivibrator have 
a duration which is a function of the speed of the engine. The 
input pulses have a duration which is made variable cor- 
responding to a predetermined speed-load characteristics <A 
the engine. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



81 



3,659,572 3,659,574 

VARIABLE VENTURI CARBURETORS NATURAL GAS POWERED ENGINE 

WlBtoa J. Pdiooirf, H ag c iito w u , Md., aarignor to Mack Albert H. Rcachkc, Ckagrin Fals; Jamca E. Dick, 

Tmcki, toe, AlCBtown, Pa. ai^ Orrin E. Boac, North Canton, ai of Ohio, 

Fied Jan. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 6,773 The Eart Ohio Gaa Company, Cleveland, Ohio 

tat CL F02d / 1102; F02n 910% ™^ Apr. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 27,781 

UACL123— 119 4Clatan tot CL F02m 7i/0« 

U.S. CL 123-121 12 




A carburetor having a venturi formed between intake and 
outlet passages by a pair of rotatable cylinders with aligned, 
cooperating channels of varying cross section. At the outlet 
passage, the channels terminate in channel ends conforming 
to the adjacent passage end. The channels slope gradually to 
meet the outlet passage when the venturi opening is greatest. 
The channel bottoms slope toward the central venturi open- 
ing, returning deposited ftiel to the flow path. The venturi's 
variable opening serves as a throttle, eliminating the conven- 
tional throttle plate. A single jet opens into the venturi and 
supplies fiiel mixtiire for all throttle conditions, including 
idle. Idle mixture is controlled either by adjustment of the 
fiiel supply rate or by adjustment of air bled from a premix- 
ing vent. Several fuel supply control systems are employable 
alternatively to vary the Kiel supply rate with the venturi 
opening. A mixture enriching valve is opened for cold start- 
ing to enrich the air-fud mixture without choking. An engine 
speed controlled governor may limit the venturi opening to 
set the venturi for its optimum opening according to the en- 
gine speed and load. 





A dual fuel feed apparatus and control for an internal com- 
bustion engine adapted to be powered by both natural gas 
and gasoline. A pair of carburetors are mounted in fwrallel at 
the intake manifold. A single throttle control is provided with 
a switch such that operation of the engine on either natural 
gas or gasoline may be selected by the operator at his option. 



3,659,573 
CRANKCASE VENTILATING VALVE 
Raymond G. Bennett, Olympla Flddi, OL, aasignor to United 
Fltradon Corporation, CWcago, DL 

Filed Mar. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 21,081 

Int CL F02f 9102; F16k 15102 

U.S. CL 123—119 B 5 Claims 



A valve for controDing the crankcaae ventilation for an in- 
ternal combustion engine constructed to be much lea expen- 
sive than prior valves but to have better p er fo rmance charac- 
teristics due to a unique flow contrtd. 



3,659,575 

VACUUM BREAKER FOR AUTOMOBILE ENGINES 

Lett Lokka, Hacrland, Mysen, Norway 

Centlnnation^-part of application Scr. No. 792,971, Jan. 22, 

1969, now abandoned. This appBcation Nov. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 

87,686 
Claims priority, appUcatioa Norway, Aug. 3, 1968, 3060/68 
tot CL F02m 23104 
U.S.CL 123-124 R 10 < 




A device for reducing the vacuum in the inducticw 
manifold of an engine and supplying additional air to said en- 
gine, having a spring-loaded, normally closed, one-way valve 
adapted to be controOed by the vacuum in die maniftM, and 
a tubing leading from said valve to the manifold of die en- 



I 

82 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



gine, said valve being substantially loaded by a constant 
couilterforce means and to a smaller extent by spring force, 
said valve aixl tubing being arranged to pass air through the 
valve and tubing to the manifold when the valve is open. In a 
prefer^d embodiment, the valve is damped against vibra- 
tions. "^ . 




«t— 



A projectile throwing machine exemplified herein as a 
baseball pitching machine. A throwing arm is driven by a tor- 
sion spring which is wound up by a motor and which is auto- 
matically triggered for releasing the throwing arm. The 
trigger is automatically released by actuating levers which are 
remotely controllable to control the amount of power, that is, 
torsion in the spring at the time of release to thereby control 
the speed of pitch. The balls are fed automatically. The 
machine is adjustable in elevation and azimuth to control the 
height and lateral position of the pitch and all adjustments 
are remotely controllable from a console and subject to pro- 
gramming. The machine after being started will repeatedly 
cycle automatically under remote control. Means are pro- 
vided to indicate to a batter when a pitch is about to be made 
and also there are indicator means to indicate the position of 
the pitched ball relative to the plate. 



3,659^77 
LAMINATED ARCHERY BOW 
James R. Richardaoa, and Robert E. Ridiardaon, both of R. 
R. 3, Rccds Spring, Mo. 

FUed Jmw 15, 1970, Scr. No. 46387 
Claims priority, appHcatioa Great Britain, July 21, 1969, 

36449/69 

Int. CL F41b 5100 

U.S. CL 124—24 5 CiainM 

A composite bow having a metallic central handle portion 

for increased accuracy, and strength, and laminated wood and 



fiber glass limb portions. The two laminated limbs are joined 
to the handle by a transition member which absorbs the dif- 



3,659,576 
CENTRIFUGAL SPRING TYPE PROJECTILE 
THROWING DEVICE 
Glen G. Eade, 2329 El Scgundo Blvd., WHowbrook, CaHf., 
and Ronald E. Eade, 10414 WaiUngton Ave., South Gate, 
CaUf. 
I FUed July 1 1, 1969, Scr. No. 841,031 

'■ Int. a. F41b 3102, 7/00 

VS. CL 124-7 17 Clalmi 




ference in the modulus of elasticity between the relative rigid 
handle and the flexible limb portions. 



3,659,578 
VENT FOR A SELF-CLEANING OVEN 
JaMs E. Davis, and Harold L. Frick, both of Marion, Ohio, 
asrifnors to Whirlpool Corporation 

Filed Dec. 15, 1970, Scr. No. 98,290 

Int. CL F24c 15/32 

VS. CL 126-21 R 10 Clafam 



32 3P 




A vent structure for venting an air space around the cavity 
of a self-cleaning oven in which food is cooked with the vent 
structure including a movable damper movable between a 
relatively closed first position for restricting air flow through 
the air space during the cooking and an open second position 
to facilitate flow of cooling air through the space during the 
high temperature self-cleaning bum off of the food soil 
deposits. 



3,659,579 

COMBINED BAKING AND BROILING GAS OVEN 

Wayne L. Henderson, and Raymond L. Dills, both of 

Lonisvlllc, Ky., amignors to General Electric Company 

Filed Dec. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 100,952 

Int. CL F23d 13/14, F24c 3/04, 15/32 

VS. CL 126-21 A 14 Claims 

A single cavity gas cooking oven with a combined baking 

and broiling gas burner mounted adjacent the top wall of the 

oven liner. The burner has a top baking zone aixi a bottom 

broiling zone and an adjustable valve for supplying gas either 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



83 



to the top zone or the bottom zone. Air channels are formed 
above the oven liner, down the back of the oven liner as well 
as beneath the oven liner. A fan in the air channels draws air 
in the top front and discharges it out the bottom front of the 
oven. An air inlet opening is formed in the top wall of the 
oven liner to communicate with the top air channel and 




3,659,581 
HUMIDIFIER ASSEMBLY 
RoawU W. Gdricr, Bloomfleld Hlls, and John W. Wbenton, 
Birmingham, both of Mkh., assignors to G & W Products 
Company, Madison Heights, Mich. 

Filed June 18, 1970, Scr. No. 47^44 

Int.CLF24f J//4 

U.S.CL 126—113 11 Claims 



je»- 



supply a flow of secondary air over the burner. An oven ex- 
haust vent is formed adjacent the bottom wall of the oven 
liner. A duct connects with the exhaust vent and extends 
across the floor of the oven liner, up the back wall and 
through the top wall to discharge the oven gases into the top 
air channel due to a venturi effect where they mix and are 
eventually discharged from the oven. 



^ 3,659,580 

COOKING STOVE 
Lamberto Mazza, Pordcnon c , Italy, assignor to Bccchi S.p.A., 
Forii, Italy 

FUed Nov. 25, 1969, Scr. No. 879,819 
Clafans priority, application It^, Nov. 28, 1969, 24318 A/68 

Int. CL F24c 15/00 
VS, CL 126—37 R 4 Claims 




A cooking stove with an oven is iHX>vkled wherein an 
upper working plane of the stove, to which the control taps 
and/or svritches are affixed, is separated, at least in the front 
part, from an oven below, so as to leave cooking space 
therebetween open at least on three sides and communicat- 
ing with the outside and wherein a free air circulation can 
taken place. The provision of the cooling space provides a 
very effective and economical method of heat dissipation 
from the oven top and insulating the oven top from the cook- 
ing range or the working top where the ovens are of self- 
cleaning type in which very high operating temperatures and 
associated hig)^ heat occur in the self-cleaning cycle. 




eo^ 



A humidifier assembly for use with a related hot air heat- 
ing system has separate end suppori members individually 
mountable, in spaced relation, to a portion of the heating 
system; the end supports in turn support a separate lower 
water pan, a water carrying rotatable drum assembly which is 
also removable as a subassembly and a detachable cover as- 
sembly for enclosing the operating components of the hu- 
midifier including a water inlet assembly which, in one form 
of the invention is separately secured to the related heating 
system and in another form of the invention is detachably 
secured to the separate lower water pan. 



' 3,659,582 ^ 

OVEN CABINET CONSTRUCTION 
Harold R. Morgan, Dohon, ID., assignor to Dearborn Glass 
Company 

Filed June 10, 1970, Scr. No. 45,094 

Ini. CL F23m 7/00 

U.S.CL 126-198 19ClaimB 




An oven cabinet construction having a door provided widi 
a window structure having a fit)nt light. An auxiliary light is 



84 



\ 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



mounted on the front light of the window structure and is 
spaced forwardly thereof to provide an air flow panage 
therebetween thereby maintaining the auxiliary light at a low 
temperature notwithstanding the existence at a high tempera- 
ture within the oven to prevent injury to a person ac- 
cidentally engaging the same. The auxiliary light may be at- 
tached or mounted to the oven window structxire by a 
number of different mounting means. The oven window 
structure is secured in the door by an improved mounting 
frame wherein the glass is retained by a combination sealing 
and adhesive means. 



munication. A lid and a portion of the inner chamber are 
pierced after the removal of an adhesive tape fix)m the lid 
which is reapplied to cover the pierced opening of the lid. 
Upon application of heat to the container steam emitted 
from the water enters the interior chamber but is precluded 
fit)m exiting to atmosphere by the reapplied adhesive upe 
which, however, will release to perform a valving f^mction 
upon pressure build-up in the product and/or liquid chamber. 



3,659,583 
BIN HEATER SYSTEM 
Charles K. Martin, Booatoa, NJ., 
Tbcrm CorporadMi, Keyport, N J. 

FBed Feb. 25, 1970, Ser. N«. 13,995 
IbL CL EOlc 79/45 
VS. CL 126— 343J A 



to Infem-O 



5Claku 



3,659,585 

TWO-PART ROASTING PAN 

Edoard Bay, HuMsUmsi 26, Baaslwrh, BaiimbM:h, Germany 

FBed May 4, 1970, Scr. No. 34,241 
Clafans prtority, applkatlMi GcraMny, Jan. 17, 1970, G 70 01 

434.5 
IntCLA47JJ7/00 
VS. CL 126-390 2 




A bin heater system for aggregate bins and the like having 
inclined wall hoppers comprising a closed, recirculating hot 
air system for passage through jackets on the hoppers in 
which the heated, working air is mainUined separate from 
flue gas eminating from an oil burning primary fire tube, the 
primary fire tube having a plurality of axially extending, radi- 
al fins projecting into a concentric, working air heating tube 
connected to the hopper jackets through manifolds; and a 
flue gas conduit passing through each bin discharging flue 
gases to the atmosphere outside of the bins. 



3,659,584 
STOVE TOP HEATING CONTAINERS 
Mhw J. Doyle, Wotarn Springs, and Hanr A. Peyser, Olym- 
pta, both of DL, MrivBors to Continental Can Company, 
Inc., New York, N.Y. 

FBed Feb. 11, 1970, Scr. No. 10,340 

InLCLF24d7/00 

VS. CL 126-369 , 13 Clabm 




-iF^i 




A two-part roasting pan made of unglazed porous earthen- 
ware has the inner surface of its lower part, namely the bot- 
tom and the side walls thereof, provided with integral spaced 
parallel ribs which engage and support a roast placed in the 
roasting pan. 



3,6594M 

PERCUTANEOUS CARBON DIOXIDE SENSOR AND 

PROCESS FOR MEASURING PULMONARY EFHCIENCY 

Richard J. Johns; Rkhard H. Sbepard, both of Baltimore, and 

WardcU J. Lindsay, Cohimbia, a of Md., assignors to The 

Johns Hopkins University 

FBed May 20, 1969, Scr. No. 826,189 

Int CL A61b 5/00 

U.S.CL 128-2 E 8 Claims 



\ 




This disclosure relates to a container of the "double- 
boiler" type in which ad edible product is packaged within an 
inner chamber and water is packaged within an outer 
chamber with the chambers initially not being in fluid com- 



A sensing device including a receiving and measuring ves- 
sel for determining tissue carbon dioxide of a living body is 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



disclosed. The skin-permeating CO» gas is dfaectly introduced 
to a liquid filled cup. A gas-permeaMe, membrane-faced, pH 
sensing electrode is in communication with this liquid and in- 
dicates continuously the concentration of COi on a meter to 
give a ftinction of ^ective alveolar ventilation. A lead plate 
mount adapts to body member contour and functions as a 
thermal filter mass to reduce fluctuations in the readings. 
Also, a process is discloeed for measuring pulmonary effi- 
ciency through ionic measurement proximate the human 
sldn. 



3,659489 

SPIROGRAFH MOUTHPIECE 

Jack R. Lambert, 42 The Grant Read, Bedfard, Mnik 

Contln —t lan In p n rt of appMction Scr. No. 861439, Ai«. 

21, 1969. This appBcnrtan Sept. IS, 1969, Str. No. 857^76 

IntCLA61b5/0« 
U.S. CL 128-2.08 10 < 



3,659487 
VALVED CONNECTOR ARRANGEMENT 
Brian E. Baldwin, WBnwttc, DL, — I gnnr to 
Hospital Prodncts, Inc., St Lmria, Mo. 

FBed Jnne 30, 1970, Scr. No. 51,047 
Int. CL A61m 05/00; A61b 05/10 
VS. CL 128-2 F 13 




tU M tS tl t9k tTa 




»* » 



SI »s » u 



A valved connector arrangement having a pair of tubes 
and a slitted transverse dastic disk partition normally 
separating and disconnecting the interior of the two tubes, 
one of the two tubes being slidable toward and away from the 
slitted disk partition to effect mechanical opening and permit 
setf-reclosing of the slitted partition. In the embodiment, the 
other tube is fixed, and ttie two tubes are pointed at their 
outer ends to enable their use in a multiple sample blood col- 
lecting needle arrangement, including a removable vacuum 
collecting container with a rubber stopper engageable by one 
of the pointed tubes. 



3,659488 
CATHETER APPARATUS 
Alan R. Kahn, Momalown, and Florence A. Strocbd, Maple 
Shade, both of NJ., assignors to Medtronic, Inc., Min- 
Minn 
FBed Apr. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 26,697 
Int. CL A61b 05/02; A61m 25/00 
VS. CL 128—2 R 7 




A disposable mouthpiece for use with a spirometer and 
like instruments having an air conduit containing an impeller, 
which is supported within the conduit by a cap that also func- 
tions to antisepticaOy seal one end of the air conduit. The air 
conduit is adapted to be inserted into a spirometer for en- 
gagement of a drive shaft of the spirometer with the impeller. 
The impeller is designed to rotate the shaft when the cap is 
removed and air is blown through the conduit. * 



3459490 
RESPIRATION TESTING SYSTEM 
Wflttam C. Jones, Etanbn^ DL, and Joseph Msi 
Dnrham, N.C., assignors to Jones Medical 
pany, Oakbrook, DcL 

FBed Oct 13, 1969, Scr. No. 865,754 
Int CL A61b 5/08 
U.S.CL 128-2.08 



tCoas- 



8Claims 




In a system for measuring the various desired parameters 
of a person's respiratory system, the person breathes into a 
closed volume of gas having a known concentration of heli- 
um until the concentration of helium in the enclosure and his 
lungs reaches an equilibrhun. A helium analyzer is included 
in the system; and when the subject's breathing reaches the 
end of a resting expiration, a valve is turned to switch his 
breathmg out of the closed system. A solenoid is also ener- 
gized to maintain the voltmie <tf gu in the analyzer at a con- 
stant value; and computation circuitry receives tiie analyzer 
A catheter having walls of which at least a portion is elec- signal which is representative of the new helium concentra- 
tri<^dly conductive and has an electrical resistivity approxi- tion in tlic closed system to compute dM various desired 
mately equal to the electrical resistivity <rf Wood. respiratory parameters of tlie subject's respfeatory system in- 



86 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



eluding Functiona] Residua] Capacity, Total Lung Capacity, 
or Residual Volume as called for by the operator. Further, 
the circuitry will compute the percentage of any of these 
parameters relative to a norm value for that parameter, and 
all compuution results are preferably displayed on a digital 
voltmeter for facility of reading and recording. 




the device without requiring disconnection of said com- 
ponents. When not in use the device may be formed into a 



3,659491 
ELECTROMAGNETIC FLOWMETER 
Henri GcoTfCs Dol, New yoriu and Ham J. BrtNier, Glendak, 
both of N.Y., mmiwuon to DoU Rtscarch I n corpor a t e d, New 
York, N.Y. 

Fifed Aug. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 66040 

Int. CLA61b J/02 

VS. CL 128—2.05 F 15 Claims 




compact roll. Complemental fastening means are provided 
on the arm-wrapping member for securing the latter in either 
an arm-wrapping position or in the compact roll position. 



3,659393 

CARDIOVASCULAR ASSIST DEVICE 

Edwia G. VaO, 20 Whltcoab Drive, Slmsbory, Conn. 

Fifed Apr. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 30,136 

Int. CL A61b 7/00 

VS. CL 1 28-64 23 Claims 



A noninvasive electromagnetic flowmeter particularly 
adapted to measure arterial blood flow in human beings is 
provided. A homogenous magnetic field is produced in the 
region of the artery under measurement by means of at least 
one large coil remote from the skin. Blood flow induced 
signals are sensed by electrodes placed on the skin adjacent 
the artery and fed to a measurement and control circuit. 
Electrocardiogram signals sensed by a second pair of elec- 
trodes placed on the body near the heart synchronize the 
operation of this system. 

A preferred embodiment of control and measurement 
system comprises a pair of auxOiary electrodes located where 
a strong and sharp cardiogram pulse can be repeatedly ob- 
tained to be used as a synchronizing signal and as a clock, at 
least one coil of large enough size having enough turns of 
wire to be adequate for the production of a strong and 
homogeneous magnetic field in the region of the artery under 
study, a source of DC current to feed that coil, means to 
reverse that DC current after a given number of heart cycles 
in accordance with a program controlled by the synchroniz- 
ing signal, a pair of measuring electrodes placed on the skin 
adjacent the artery, an amplifier to amplify the signal appear- 
ing between said measuring electrodes, with filtering means 
to eliminate the DC unbalance of the electrodes and the high 
frequency noise, means to paralyze the amplifier and to 
reverse its output during each current reversal, and means 
synchronized by the synchronizing signal to average the pul- 
satile signal measured between the measuring electrodes dur- 
ing successive heart cycles so as to extract the repetitive 
wave shape of the blood flow pulses from the large random 
noise in which it is otherwise buried. 



I 3,659,592 

BLOOD PRESSURE MEASURING DEVICE 
Zygmnnt Natkansld, 6609 W. Mdroae Street, Chicago, m. 

FBed Sept. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 69,627 

I Int. CL A61b 5/02 

. VS. CL 128-2.05 C 8 Claina 

A blood pressure measuring device is provided which is 

self-contained uid includes an arm-wrapping member having 

a pouch formed therein for storage of various components of 




A cardiovascular assist device for producing an inwardly 
orienting pulsating pressure circumferentially to the entire 
length of each extremity of a patient, including a main body 
portion surrounding the extremity and a lateral body portion 
being inflaUble to tightly constrict the main body portion 
about the extremity before pulsation. The lateral body por- 
tion includes a single inflaUble tube having connecting tapes 
extending substantially entirely circumferentially 
therearound and oppositely circumferentially at least par- 
tially around said main body portion to terminal ends secured 
to the main body portion. The main body portion includes an 
outer restraint material reinforced by a plurality of circum- 
ferentially extending and a plurality of longitudinally extend- 
ing restraint Upes, two sheets of resilient material circum- 
ferentially bonded together at longitudinal intervals and lon- 
gitudinally along seams to produce a plurality of overlapping 
circumferentially extending inflatable bladders, which are 
longitudinally spaced from each other, an inner pouch 
material and a plurality of fluid couplings communicating 
with each bladder and inflatable tube. Mittens are provided 
to close one end of each main body portion and similarly 
constructed to provide an inwardly pulsating pressure to the 
respective hand or foot of the patient. The main body por- 
ticos and mittens may be donned and doffed by means of 
respective longitudinally extending fasteners, and thereafter 
manually c&x:umferentially constricted by means of longitu- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



87 



dinally extending lacings prior to the pressure constriction 
caused by inflating the lateral body portion. 



3,659,594 ' 

APPARATUS FOR MANIPULATING THE VERTEBRAL 
COLUMN OF HUMAN PATIENTS 
Raymond Schwab, Frdhe tin w eg 13, 43 EiMn, Gcnnany 

FDed June 15, 1970, Scr. No. 45,978 
Claims priority, ^ipUcMion Germany, Feb. 4, 1970, P 20 04 

932J 

Int. CL A61f 5100 

VS. a. 128—69 7 Claims 




pieces and fragments and providing for locking the botte 
fragmenu in increasingly closer relationship as healing oc- 
curs. When two plates are used they operate in the same 
general functional manner, but the lower plate is provided 
with elongated openings on one side of the fracture site and 
the upper plate is provided with elongated openings on the 
other side of the fracture site and one plate, preferably the 
lower plate, is provided with a serrated jaw for the reception 
of a serrated tongue of the other plate which is bent into the 
same plane. The double plate arrangement may have one of 
the plates channelled for the slidable reception of the other 
plate. Use of tlie plates aids and promotes knitting of the 
bone fragments and enables the patients to be rapidly ambu- 
latory. 



An apparatus for facilitating manipulation of the body of a 
human patien| for the treatment of vertebral disorders com- 
prises an ufHi^t support from which a pivotal arm is cantil- 
evered and haiat its ends a suspended traverse. The traverse 
is provided with knee-supporting shells or saddles from which 
the patient inay be suspended head downward to permit 
manipulation. The traverse may also carry a roll or dnmi 
adapted to carry the patient in a bent-over condition to per- 
mit manipulation of the spine. 



3,659,595 

COMPENSATING PLATES FOR BONE FRACTURES 

Edward J. Haboush, 238 Hilon Avenue, HempatcMl, N.Y. 

Fifed Oct 22, 1969, Scr. No. 868,451 

Int. a. A61f 5/04 

VS. CL 1 28—92 D 3 Claims 




3,659,596 

INTRAUTERINE ELEMENT 

Ralph R. Robinson, P.O. Box 668, Mlddkiboro, Ky. 

FDed Nov. 6, 1969, Scr. No. 874,51 1 

Int. CL A61f 5/46; A61m 31/00 

U.S.CL 128-130 



4 Claims 




An intrauterine contraceptive device has a continuous loop 
as a part thereof which is closed by a membrane of thin, plia- 
ble material. By use of a double layer and by selection of a 
permeable material for the membrane, it serves also to sup- 
port a capsule containing a biological agent and a substance 
for slowly releasing the agent into the uterus. 



3,659,597 

INTRA-UTERINE CONTRACEPTIVE 
David Wollen, London, Eimland, atrignor to National 
Research DcvdopnMnt Corporation, London, England 

Fifed Dec 9, 1969, Scr. No. 883,449 
Claims priority, application Grcnt Britain, Dec. 1 1, 1968, 

58,969/68 

InLCLA61f5/-«6 

U.S. CL 128- 130 13 daims 



Single or double plates are provided for application across 
the fracture site of fractured bones and wherein the single or 
double plates are constructed to allow for compressional and 
tensional forces acting on the fractured bone. When a single 
plate is used it is rigidly secured at one end on one side of the 
fracture site and at the other end by means of elongated 
apertures for fastening the plate on the other side of the frac- 
ture site while allowing for relative movement of the bone 




An intra-uterine contraceptive device is |xx>vided to fit the 
parturient uterus and gradually accommodate the involu- 
tionary process in a predetermined manner. The device is 



88 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



contractable in self-tracking manner by longitudinally 
progressive sliding engagement of one end of an elongate 
flexible member in the other end thereof More particularly 
such a device is formed by a suitably dimensioned tapered 
tube. 



RESPIRATOR WITH FLUID AMPLOdERS WITH FLUID 

TIMER 
JoKph C. Peters, East Hartford, and Hctimmb Zienun, 
ChoMre, both of Comi^ aMlfoii to GcMrri Medical Cor- 



with an integral novel retaining band at the open end thereof 
The band comprises a plurality of ribs intersecting to form a 
series of pockets or suction cups. The dressing is rolled or 
drawn over the dressed wound, for example an injured finger, 
and is held in position by the suctionlike effect of the pockets 
against the finger. The ribs provide in effect a series of dam- 
like ridges which aid in rendering the dretnng airtight. No 
additional tape or other means is required to hold the 
dressing in position covering the infected area. 



Filed Jime 17, 1969, Scr. No. 834,004 
IbL CL A62b 7/04 
VS. CL 128—145.8 




3,659,600 

MAGNETICALLY OPERATED CAPSULE FOR 

ADMINISTERING DRUGS 

Edward W. Mcrrii, CaabtMgc, Masa., MrigMM- to HaM H. 

8 Claims Esda, LcoMrd W. CrwUiUte, Jr. utd VfUtam W. Wolteck, 

Tnutecs of tlw Charks River Foudatfoa, Boatoa, Mmb. 

Filed Feb. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 13,278 

lat CI. A61b 31/00 

U.S.CL 128-172 3 Claims 








An on-off inhalation valve of a respirator for admitting 

fluid to the lungs of a patient is controlled by a flip-flop fluid 

^amplifier driven by a fluid amplifier during the exhalation 

\, cycle and by another fluid amplifier during the inhalation 

cycle and including a fluid timer for controlling the length of 

time of the pause between exhalation and inhalation. 



An implantable capsule for delivering drugs when sub- 
jected to a magnetic force outside the body and controlled by 
the patient. The capsule has a means movable under a mag- 
netic force to effect contact of the medicament in the cap- 
sule with a drug-permeable wall. When contacted, the drug 
diffuses through the wall into the body. When it is desired to 
cease drug administration, the capsule is subjected to an op- 
posite magnetic force to seal the permeable wall from con- 
tact with the drug. 



3,659,599 j ^^ ^j 

r\.A^ M MM .2SS'*^?^-2?f?^I!5- , ._ «-._ VAPORIZERS FOR 'medical RESPIRATORS 

tSL McLaughlin, 8 Westerly Street, J^n^a Plain, jota A^iiew B»i««m Ca-brldr. Ei^l-d, assipwr to Pye 

LiBlted, Caabridfc, EnglaMi 

Filed Jan. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 6,195 
Claim priority, appHcatioa Great Britain, Feb. 5, 1969, 

6,171/69 

Int. a. A61ni 15/00 

U.S.CL 128— 188 V 9ClainH 



Mass. 

Filed Sept 30, 1969, Scr. No. 862^95 

Int. CL A61f 13/10 

U.S. CL 128—157 3 Claims 



jta 



-jta 




HI 



KM * [-—78 



B8 



M M 



««+ 



The present occlusive dressing is particularly adapted to 
provide an airtight waterproof dressing for use in covering 
so-called "wet soak" bandages and other dressings which in- 
clude salves and ointments used in the treatment of various 
skin diseases wherein it is important that air be excluded 
from the dressed area and moisture and heat retained. The 
dressing comprises a relatively thin, one-piece latex tube 
closed at one end and open at the other end and provided 



A vaporizer for use in a medical respirator for supplying a 
mixture of patient gas and vapor to a patient during an in- 
spiratory pCTiod <A the respirator, fhe vaporizer has a source 
of patient gas connected thereto and a pair of sealed vessels, 
each having a connection to the source of gas. When the gas 
is fed to the vessel containing the liquid, the gas therein 
becomes saturated. A changeover switch is provided in the 
connection to the vessels so that alternately the supply of gas 
is fed to the vessels and to a patient via a patient supply con- 



r 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



nection. Each vessel is provided with means for adjusting the 
volume therein so as to control the percentage of saturation 
of the gas which is passed to the patient from the vessels and 
so as to control the total volume of gas passed to the patient 
during each inspiratory period. 



3,659,602 
TWO COMPONENT SYRINGE 
Harold S. Cloyd, Erie, Pa., anrignnr to Noico Ptastics, Incor- 
porated, Eric, Pa. 

ContinoatioB of application Scr. No. 848,446, Aug. 8, 1969, 
now abandoned. This application Dec 30, 1970, Scr. No. 

94 942 

InL CL A61m 05/18 

U.S. CL 128—220 6 ClalnM 



connecting structure provides for flow of a given quantity of 
blood from the arteriid system to the venous system whereu- 
pon the cycle is repeated. The only force relied upon to 
move the blood between the beings is the pressure of the 
blood itself in the arterial systems, so that the use of pumps 
or other flow-producing devices is not required. 



3,659,604 
HUMIDIFYING MEANS 
Alfred W. MchrBe; DavM H. O'Hare, and CbrMophcr 
BriduD, al of AncUand, New Zcainnd, Mslgnors to 
A Paykd Limited, AncUand, New Zealand 

Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 23,770 

Int. CL A61m 15/00 

U.S. CL 128—212 ' 9 CWms 




A two component syringe having two vials each containing 
a single component. A needle is mounted in the syringe and 
is arranged to interconnect the vials prior to mixing the con- 
tents thereof One vial is mounted on a holder having a nee- 
dle hub. The other vial is mounted on an adapter sleeve 
removaUy mounted on the needle hub. The adapter sleeve 
and the other vial are removed after the ingredients have 
been mixed, leaving the first vial with the associated needle 
in readiness for injection. 



3,659,603 
PARABIOSIS ASSEMBLY 
Pladdo R. Oma, Fahcy Mcdkal Center, 581 Golf Rond, Dec 
DL 

! ol appBcation Scr. No. 608,190, Jan. 9, 

1967, now abnndanrd, This a p p M ca t fcw Jnly 16, 1969, Scr. 

No. 842,155 

Int CL A61m 05/00 

U.S. CL 128— 214 B 5 ClainH 




A parabiosis assembly for bringing about exchange of 
blood between a pair of beings. The arterial system of one 
being is interconnected with the venous system of the other 
being while the arterial system of this other being is mtercon- 




A humidifying means has a container for water which is 
removable firom a source of heat, with the container being 
provided with a cover defining an air space with an inlet for 
gases and an outlet for gases and water stipox, the whole 
being removable for sterilization or other purposes. Tem- 
perature control means are provided externally of the con- 
tainer to control the temperature of the water in the con- 
tainer. A hose connects the outlet for gases and water vapor 
to a patient undergoing assisted or artificial req>iration and 
this hose has a heating element therein arranged longitu- 
dinally to reduce or obviate condensation in the hose. 



3,659,605 
PNEUMATIC SUCTION SYSTEM 
Utaich Sidafl, McFarland, Wis., assignor to Airco, Inc.,, New 
York, N.Y. 

Filed Apr. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 26y480 / 

Int CL A61m l\00 
MS. CL 128-276 6 CWnM 



^ 



W 



\y NO , 



■30 



-4 






L^-"^ 



■e 




A pneumatic suction system having extreme reliability 



nected with the venous system of the one being. The inter- comprising a plurality of interconnected, vacuum actuated 



90 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



modular switches adapted to be connected to a vacuum Latching elements on the two anns hold them cocked with 

source to provide an intennittent vacuum source having con- their front ends close together, and are releasable to allow 

troUable timed intervals for withdrawing fluids from a pa- the spring to snap the end of the lower arm downward, carry- 

jjgni^ ing the blade downward to lance the skin. A stop carried on 



3^9,606 
I VEIN STRIPWNG INSTRUMENT 

Harry G. Rcteda, Bn^itrec Mav., aHifiiar to Codman ft 
Skortlclf, Iac« RaMMpii, Mih. 

FBed Feb. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 12,795 

Iirt.Cl.A61b 77/00 

VS. CL 128—303 R 1 CWm 



U 



/ 



/S6 



/a 



A 



! 



// 



/£ 



//' 



^ 






1 



H2- 



A surgical vein stripping instrument is made by providing a 
length of cable formed from a monofilament of axially 
oriented synthetic thermoplastic material and ultrasonically 
welding a tubular plastic cap to each end of the cable. Each 
cap is smoothly rounded on its end to permit free passage of 
the cable through a vein and each cap is adapted to be 
secured to both an auxiliary bullet-shaped tip and a handle 
for aiding the doctor in the removal of the vein. 



3,659,607 
METHOD FOR PERFORMING SURGICAL PROCEDURES 

ON THE EYE 
AMOB Buko, BrooUyn, N.Y., aMigMir to Suikal DcrifB 
Corporadoii, L<Mg Uaod, N.Y. 

Orlftaal appMciHoii Sept. 16, 1968, Scr. No. 762^86, iww 

PMcirt No. 3,528^425. DMded aMi tUa appMcatloa Apr. 6, 

1970, Scr. No. 25,669 

Iirt.CLA61b77/i2 

UACL128— 305 WCtalma 




^ » 



The method relates to performing surgical procedures <mi 
the eye in vivo, including forming cS. an opening therein to 
pennh the insertion of instrumentation within the eye for 
various procedures. 




one arm engages the other arm to limit this snap-apart travel 
of the arm ends. A single piece of spring material is readily 
formed to provide all of the foregoing structure, thereby 
providing a one-piece lancet. 



3,659,609 
HEMOSTATIC APPARATUS FOR OPERATIONS ON THE 

HEAD OF HUMAN BEINGS 
Jcaa Aro«ctc, 67 Baldfaig Laacs, Pails 160, FraiMC 

Fled JuM 4, 1970, Scr. No. 43,544 
elates priority, appHcadoa Fnwcc, July 29, 1969, 6925939 

bit. CLA61b/ 7//2 
U.S. CL 128-325 13 CiafaBC 




Hemostatic apparatus is disclosed for operations on the 
head of a human being, more particularly for scalp grafts. 
The apparatus includes a fiwne of plate form provided with a 
strap fastener for atuchment on the head of a patient, the 
I^te being rectangular with an opening tberem. Mounted on 
the plate is a flexible tube <A loap form encircling the open- 
ing and adapted for being prewurized to exert the neceisary 
preaure on the patient's head to render it free of blood in 
the region of the opening in the plate whereby scalp grafts or 
the like can be performed within the field ctf the opening in 
the plate without bleeding. 



3,659,610 

ASPIRATOR NEEDLE INJECTOR 

Hugo S. Cfmbcr, 22 Seven GiMca Rowi, Stirtcn 

Filed Apr. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 28335 

Iirt.CLA61b;7/i4 

UA CL 128—347 



N.Y. 



5CldiH 



3,659,608 
SNAP-ACTING SURGICAL LANCET 
Wcriey G. Perry, Waytaad, Mas., asrigMV to Duboo Cor- 
Nudhai nrlghti Mbm 
FVed Dec 15, 1969, Scr. No. 884^6 1 
tat CLA61bi7/i2, 77/34 
UA CL 128-314 , 15 OataiB 

A new snap-acting surgical lancet has a spring urging the 
forward ends of two opposed arms apart. A lower of the two 
arms carries a downwardly protruding lancing blade. 




^ 



^ 



'" \\^ 



i 



A diq)osable sterilizable aspirator needle and operating 
mechanism therefor in which a hoUow diqxMable needle is 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



•I 



supported in a hollow barrel for controDed spring loaded in- 
jection into the body for a predetermined distance. The bar- 
rel is secured to a pistol grip and the hollow needle is secured 
to a plunger in the pistol grip which is spring biased toward 
the injecting position and retained against movement under 
the spring bias by a latch mechanism which may be manually 
released. The needle is fiiUy recessed in the barrel so that the 
barrel end may be placed against the body at the appropriate 
location and is extruded under the spring bias from the barrel 
end on release of the latch. The hollow needle may, as 
required, receive a catheter and a catheter stiffening wire. 
More specifically, the needle barrel and the pistol grip 
operating mechanism including the latch mechanism are 
separable. 



matic seal between the two cannulas, the tracheostomy tube 
also including a rotatable coimector which allows attachment 
to respiration support equipment in a variety of angular posi- 
tions. The portion of the tracheostomy tube which extends 
outside of the patient is hinged to a swivel neck flange which 
makes the tube adapuble to various anatomies. The tube 
leading to the sealing balloon is controlled by an isolation 
valve outside of the patient which allows quick sealing and 
releasing of the pressure within the sealing balloon. 



3,659,611 
TRACHEAL TUBE SEAL 
Doo R. Mfller, Kaims City, Kaas., asslgDor to Dow Coming 
Corporation, Midland, Mich. 

Filed Dec. 15, 1969, Scr. No. 884,869 

tat CL A61m 25102, 3100 

U.S. CL 128—351 ^ 5 Claims 



3,659,613 
LASER ACCESSORY FOR SURGICAL APPUCATION 
HcrlMrt C BrcocnMser, Sncrbom, Mav., asngnor to Amer- 
icaa Opticai Corpor ati on, Son th bii dg c, Mass. 

FBed Jnnc 30, 1969, Scr. No. 837,690 

tat CL A61n 5100 

VS. CL 1 28—395 5 Claims 




. \ 




Improvement in tradheoctomy and endotracheal tubes for 
effecting a substantial air seal between the tube and the 
trachea. There is provided on the periphery of the indwelling 
portion of the device a series of thin resilient, circular 
flanges, of silicone rubber, for example. The flanges bend for 
insertion and withdrawal and engage the wall of the trachea 
to form an air seal therewith. 



3,659,612 

TRACHEOSTOMY TUBE 

Donald P. ShOcy, Santa Ana, and Bmcc E. Fcttd, Diamond 

Bar, both of Calf., —Igiioii to Domrid P. SUey, Santa 

Aaa,Calif. 

Continnation<4n-pan of application Scr. No. 863,229, Oct 2, 

1969. This appHcation Nov. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 88,591 

tat CL A61m 25102; A61b 17124 

VS. CL 128—351 15 Clafaiw 



A surgical laser accessory construction comprising an elon- 
gated tubular member defining an unobstructed path fcH- con- 
ducting optical energy to a relatively inaccessible location 
within a body cavity and optical means for di recting the 
infiv-red radiation of a CO| pulsed laser to a location within 
said body cavity while providing visible light to be directed to 
said body cavity location and for allowing an operator of die 
device at such times to continuoualy monitor said locatioa 
within the body cavity during treatment by die laser radia- 
tion, said optical means including a rotatable <tisc for 
enabling the laser energy at substantially fitll strength to be 
directed to said body locatitxi and said location simultane- 
ously viewed in visiUe li^t by the operator of the device. 
The construction also includes means for changing the body 
cavity location being treated as weQ as pressurized housing 
means for enabling air to be directed under pressure into said 
body cavity. 




3,659,614 

ADJUSTABLE HEADBAND CARRYING ELECTRODES 

FOR ELECTRICALLY STIMULATD<K; THE FACIAL AND 

MA?«n>IBULAR NERVES 
Bernard Jankdwrn, Mcdkal-DcBtai BnBdi^ Seattle, Wash. 
FBed Dec. 29, 1969, Scr. No. 888^72 
tat CL A61n 1118, 1/04 
VS. CL 128—410 4 



A tracheostomy tube for insertion into the trachea to sup- 
port breathing having a concave sealing balloon which, when 
inflated, assumes a cylindrical shape and therefore forms a 
seal between the cannula and the trachea over an extended 
axial length, the tracheostomy tube also incorporating an 
inner cannula which is disposed within and throughout the 
entire length of the outer caimula and is connected to the 
outer cannula by a removable fitting which assures a pneu- 




Electrodes capable of conforming to irregular surfaces in- 
clude a cup-shaped housing having an open end, a pad of 
electrically conductive coiled metallic wire in the housing, a 



92 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



feh of porous material over the metallic wire pad. and a 
mounting ring contacting the wire pad and felt around their 
circumference to hoW the pad and felt in place in the hous- 
ing. Three electrodes, two input electrodes and a dispersal 
electrode, of the type described are attached through electri- 
cally conductive support members to an adjusUble head- 
band. The two input electrodes are pivotally attached to the 
headband. Lead wires from the output of a pulse generator 
connect with the electrodes. The lead wires to the input elec- 
trodes are run along the surface of the headband and covered 
with an insulating material. 



planted heart stimulator through an induction coil to provide 
cither externally synchronized pulse pair stimulation or ac- 
celeration of the stimulator dependent on the frequency of a 
signal from the external generator. A relay is provided to 
control the flow of energy through the coil. A capacitive 
charging network is provided which discharges through the 
coil to create an electromagnetic field when the relay is 
operated. The relay is operated by a triggering circuit, which, 
in turn, operates the relay in synchronization with the emis- 
sion of the signal from the external generator. 



f 



3^59,615 

ENCAPSULATED NON-PERME ABLE PIE ZOELECTRIC 

POWERED PACESETTER 

Cari C. EBfcr, 12700 Lake Avcaae, Lakcwood, Ohio 

FBed Jane 8, 1970, Scr. No. 44,406 

iBt CL A6lD //id . 

UACL128— 419P SCtatas 



3,659,617 
CORSELET BELTS 
JokawMS RcBbo, Havaem BofCMC, Dcwnark 

Filed JoM 19, 1969, Ser. No. 834,773 

ClalM priority, appllcadoa Dcuuuii, June 21, 1968, 2950 

iBt CL A41c 1100 

U.S.CL 128-546 * 5Ctalms 




la-Wn *»IE20€LECrRIC 



An encapsulated non-permeable piezoelectric self-powered 
pacesetter for implantation in an in vivo, or living, system in 
which the pacesetter is sealed and enclosed in an envelope 
formed of medical grade silicone rubber and preferably natu- 
ral or synthetic animal, plant or insect wax, in which a 
piezoelectric polyncrystalline ceramic is completely em- 
bedded, enclosed or housed to function as a mechanical to 
electrical energy converter, when implanted near moving 
muscle in a living system, and without connection with a 
separate source of electrical energy either within or without 
the living system. 




A stomach flattening abdominal belt for ladies comprising 
a vertical steel in either side, interconnected by a resSient 
rear belt piece having an upwardly curved lower edge and a 
resilient front piece constituted by two intercrossing resilient 
bands to the middle portions of which there is fastened a sub- 
stantially non-stretchaWe circular or elliptic fabric pie piece. 



3,659,616 

METHOD OF SYNCHRONIZATION AND STIMULATION 

BY MEANS OF PULSE PAIRS AT IMPLANTED HEART 

STIMULATORS WITH CONSTANT RHYTHM AND THE 

CIRCUIT FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THIS METHOD 

Bokdaa A. BakowtecU, oL L. Stalfa 12/14 M 23, and 

Marim Stopoyk, aL J. DabrowaUegv 86 m 71, both of 

Warsaw, Pokuid 

Fled Aag. 28, 1969, Scr. No. 853^83 
Ctefau priority, appMcatkMi PolaMi, Aot. 31, 1968, 128848 

Int. CL A6lB 1136 
MS. CL 128-419 P 8 ClaliM 



3,659,618 
CONTROL SYSTEM FOR LIMITING THE LOADING OF 

BRANCHED DRIVES 
Walter KotaM, Stattgart-FaicriMdi, mmI Pad Bowrk, Lud- 
wi^burg, botk of Gcnaaay, a srig a ors to Robert BomJi 
GmbH, Stuttgart, Gcrauuiy 

Filed Oct. 29, 1969, Scr. No. 872,280 
CWns priority, appHcatioa GcraHuiy, Nov. 2, 1968, P 18 06 

677.8 

iBt CL AOlf 12128 

\iJ&. CL 130-27 R 15 Clatais 



eo- 




r^- 




1^ 




An external rhythm frequency generator is magneticaUy 
coupled to a constant rhythm frequency generator of an im- 



A control system for the main drive and auxiliary drives of 
a combine in which the main drive propels the vehicle, and 
the auxiliary drive operates a threshing drum and its con- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



93 



veyor. An engine drives the threshing drum directly, and the 
conveyor through a coupling, and also drives the pump of a 
hydroBUtic transmission whose hydraulic motor propels the 
vehicle. A transducer pump, driven frxnn the engine, and a 
throttle provide hydraulic signals controlling a valve to effect 
regulation of the transmission pump of the main drive, and to 
disengage the coupling to reduce the load on the engine. 
Setting means are provided for limiting the drive torque ci 
the engine to a selected desired value, causing speed reduc- 
tion and actuation of the control valve. 



3,659, 619 

GREEN PEA SHELLER 

Charfes L. Wcatbrook, 715 WmI^^hb Avcnae, Aydea, N.C. 

CoMinaatioii-faHpart of ■ppBcaHwi Scr. No. 836,759, Jnne 

26, 1969, BOW a b aodo— d . Tkis ap p Hc alfcit i Jan. 28, 1971, 

Scr. No. 110.737 

latCLAOld 

U.S. CL 130-30 R 10 < 




I 



A pair of opposing pea pod aligning members supported 
for relative movement toward and away from each other and 
biased toward minimum spaced positions. One of the aligning 
members includes an adjustably retained cutter blade pro- 
jecting outwardly therefrom toward the opposing member for 
slitting a pea pod advanced longitudinally between the mem- 
bers, and a curved tapered tongue is supported in position for 
spreading the split pod and raking the peas from vrithin the 
pod. 



3,659,620 

PROCESS AND DEVICE FOR CUTTING TOBACCO 

LEAVES 

Aadrc PktnMd, and Pierre Imbcrt, both of Fkury-Lc*. 

Aabrah, France, assignors to Scrvkc DTxptoltntloa Indns- 

tricUe DCS Tabao Et Des ADwncttcs, Par^ France 

Filed Dec 31, 1969, Scr. No. 889,668 
Clakns priority, app H ca t ton France, Dec 31, 1968, 182372 
Int CL A24b 0J//6, 07106, 07/12 
U.S.CL 131-146 9 




In a process for obtaining from tobacco leaves fragments 
of substantially constant ritape and more particulariy the 
shape of a quadrilateral having paraDel opposite sides. 



wherein the leaves are subjected to a cutting operation along 
parallel and equidistant cutting lines, the fragments obtained 
are subjected to an orienution operaticHi so that the cutting 
lines shouM assume a first giv«i direction and the fragments 
which are thus oriented are caused to undergo a recutting 
operation along equidistant recutting lines which are parallel 
to a second given direction, the step of separating from all 
the oriented fragments which are caused to undergo the 
recutting operation all those fragments whose projection oa a 
line at right angles to said second direction is smaller in 
length than the distance between said recutting lines. 



3,659,621 
AIR-FLO HAIR TEMPLET 

382 West Street, Harrtaon, N.Y. 
Martin Gcantk, 119 Irma Drtvc, OrraMlilf, N.Y. 
Filed Jane 18, 1970, Scr. No. 47,212 
Int CL A41g 15/00 
VS, CL 132-53 4 CWw 




A hair templet is constructed of a plurality of wefts of hair 
strands sewn to a base. The base is releasably anchored to 
the wearer's scalp by a phirality of snap fasteners. The 
sockets of the snap fasteners are secured in place to the 
user's natural hair. The base includes an oval band of fribric. 
A first plurality of parallel straps of fabric extend between 
discrete areas of the band and a second phirality <^ parallel 
straps perpendiculariy intersecting the first str^x extend 
between further discrete areas of the band. A portion of the 
base includes a layer of netting encompassing the area of the 
wearer's part The wefts are sewn to the netting to prevent 
detection of the hair piece at the part line. 



3,659,622 

ORNAMENTAL HEADDRESS 

Harry O. MccTMai, 11 roatc dc la Cde Sdtal^loiid, Bongivai 

(Yvdncs), France 
ContinaathMi-faHpart of appMraHon Scr. No. 801,967, Feb. 25, 
1969, now abandon ed . This appilcatkn Nov. 12, 1970, Scr. 

No. 88,697 
UtL a. AAlg 3/00 



VS. CL 132—53 



6Ckiais 




An ornamental headdress comprises a frameworic in the 
form of a fitted skull cap and at least one fringe including a 



\ 



94 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



t 



plurality of thread-like or filamentary elements secured to 
the framevvork. The free ends of the filamentary elements are 
gathered to at least one region and secured one another to 
form a solid mass secured in turn to said fi-amework. Orna- 
ments may be provided with elements for securing the same 
to the gathered portion of the filamentary elements. The or- 
naments may carry hooking elements engageable with hook- 
ing elements on a fastener on the headdress, so that the orna- 
ments may be readily interchanged. 



3,659,625 
DRAIN VALVE DEVICE 
RouM W. ColMr, Irwin, awl Norman Vnti, Veropa, both of 
Pbm aaifMrs to WcfdagiMue Air Brake CooiiaBy, WB- 
■crding. Pa. 

Filed Feb. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 1 1,728 
lnLCl¥l6t 1/14 



VS. CL 137-204 



ICtaim 



3,659,623 
WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM 



FPOM 

COMPnCSSOR 

i 



Thomas F. Fadns, Baltimore, M<L, 
cofl Company, Inc., BaMimorc, Md. 



VS. CL 137-255 



to Baltimore Alr- 



Scr. No. 425,783, Jan. 15, 1965, 
Tlrii application Dec 2, 1969, Scr. No. 

881,619 
Int CL F16k 51/00 

4CMam 




t t 










A drain valve in which a diaphragm separates a supply 
chamber from an exhaust chamber, both chambers being 
connected in conunon with a reservoir, and including a Bell- 
ville spring normally biasing the diaphragm in a preselected 
one of an open or closed position relative to an exhaust port. 
In one embodiment the diaphragm is biased to the closed 
position and the exhaust chamber is connected with the 
reservoir by way of a check valve f<x passing fluid from the 
reservoir to the exhaust chamber. In another embodiment the 
diaphragm is biased to the open position and the exhaust 
chamber is cotmected with the reservoir by way of a choke 
and a check valve connected in series, and a reservoir is con- 
nected with the outlet of the check valve. 



3,659,626 
FLUID CONTROL ASSEMBLIES 

This invention relates to evaporative heat exchangers and Dennta Clmrka Ariion, Chdtcnkam, 
in particular to improved apparatiis for the distribution of WaUur, CrocwcOcr A Company iJ— »*-«i_ 
water over a heat exchange nirface. gland 

~ . Filed July 13, 1970, Ser. No. 54^41 

InL CL F16k 79/00 
3, 659,6 24 jj^ q^ 137—329.1 

FIRE SAFETY VALVE 
Warner M. KcOy, Honiton, and John V. Frcdd, DaBas, both 
of Tex., mrignan to Otis EngtaMMrhig Co r poration, DaOns, 
Tea. 

FBed Apr. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 25,976 
' Int.CLF16k;7/J« 

VS. CL 137-75 



8f>9S 



to 



7Clalmt 





:-*2 



r729tB 463627 



A fluid flow control assembly comprising a tap and a 
mounting block for connection to the fluid supply. The 
mounting block includes a valve means which is closed to 
prevent fluid flow from the block when the tap is removed 
from, or not mounted on the block, and which is opened 
when the tap is connected to the block. 



, A heat responsive safety valve having a fusible material 
holding the valve at an open position. In one form the fusible 
material mechanically locks the valve open. In another form, 
the fusible material holds fluid pressure within a closed 
cylinder biasing a valve to its open position. In each form of 
the valve, the fusible material melts or otherwise weakens at 
a predetermined temperature releasing the valve to close 
shutting off flow through the conductor controlled by the 
valve as a fire-preventing measure. 



3,659,627 
COLLECTOR RING FOR IRRIGATION PIPE SYSTEMS 
Arthur L. Zimmcrer; Bernard J. Zfanmerer, and Paul B. Zim- 
mercr, aD of Lindsay, Ncbr., assignors to Lindsay Manufac- 
turing Co., Lindsay, Ncbr. 

Hfed Dec. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 100,157 

Int. CL B05b 9102 , EO Ih 3102 

VS. CL 137—344 10 Clafans 

A collector ring assembly for irrigation pipe systems which 

permits electrical power to be supplied from the center pivot 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



assembly to the electrical motors on the self-propelled towers 
which support the pipe and propel the pipe around the pivot 
assembly in a predetermined path. The collector ring as- 
sembly comprises a plurality of horizontally disposed, verti- 
cally spaced electrical contacts which are fixed against rota- 
tion and which are electrically connected to a source of elec- 





trical energy, 
mounted with 



brush 



A brush or wiper assembly is rotatably 
respect to the electrical contacts and wipe 
upon the contacts as the irrigation pipe is moved around the 
center pivot assembly. The brushes are electrically connected 
to the electrical motors on the towers to provide electrical 
energy thereto. 

\ 



3,659,628 
DISTRIBUTOR FOR CONTINUOUSLY OPERATING 
FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS 
Walter Booch, Romrndshanaen: Rdnhard Schwartx, Stutt- 
gart-Sttenbnch, and Gerhard Stwnpp, Stuttgart, al of Ger- 
many, airignors to Robert Booch GmbH, Stuttgart, Gcr* 
■umy 

Filed Oct 1, 1969, Scr. No. 862,875 
Ckhns priority, application Germany, Oct 15, 1968, P 18 03 

066^ 

Int CL F16k 21100 

VS. CL 137—501 8 ClaluM 




In a fuel distributor • in which the fuel to be delivered to a 
cylinder of an internal combustion engine is dosed by a me- 
tering valve - in order to maintain at a constant value the dif- 
ference between the fiiel pressure upstream of and 
downstream of the metering valve, there is provided a plu- 
rality of control valves (one for each cylinder) having a flat 
seat whose flow passage section is directly variable by a 
movable membrane. One side of said membrane is exposed 
to the downstream fuel pressure urging said membrane into a 
control valve opening direction, the other side of said mem- 
brane is exposed to the upstream fuel pressure urging said 
membrane into a control valve closing direction. 



3,659,629 
LIQUID FLOW REGULATOR AND MONITOR FOR 
CORPOREAL INFUSION SYSTEM AND METHOD OF 
USING THE SAME 
Darid W. Dcaton, DaUas, Tex., amignor to Ahldca Corpora- 
tion, DaBas, Tex. 

Filed May 4, 1970, Scr. No. 34,121 
IntCLFI6kJ7/00 
U.S. CL 137-551 12 CWms 

The specification is directed to a device for regulating and 
visually indicating the rate of fluid flow fixnn a corporeal in- 
fusion system such as an intravenous infusion syrtem. One 
embodiment of the disclosed invention includes the detecticm 



of the rate of flow of air into the container of sterile liquid to 
be infused into the patient. The flow rate of the liquid to the 
patient is then visually indicated in response to the detected 
rate of flow of air into the container. In another embodiment 
of the invention, a housing is attachable to the air inlet of a 
conventional corporeal infusion system and includes a valve 
therein for regulation of the flow of air into the liquid con- 
tainer of the infusion system. Regulation of the amount of air 




\ . ■ • 

into the container directly regulates the flow rate of liquid 
from the container to the patient An indicator scale on the 
housing vBually indicates the flow rate of the liquid from the 
container in response to the measurement of the flow rate <A 
air into the container. Other embodiments of the invention 
include utilizing a timer to contnri the length of inftision and 
utilizing an alarm system in order to maintain the liquid infu- 
sion to the patient at a predetermined level. 



3,659,630 

TRANSMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM 

Robert G. Ho ac y agcr , Oak Creek, and Jamm C. 

Rndne, both of Wis., aarignnri to J. L Cam Company 

Orlgfaud application June 30, 1969, Scr. No. 837,547, now 

Patent No. 3,608,397. Divided and thb applcation July 20, 

1970, Scr. No. 63,969 

IntCLF16k;;/;0 

U.S. CL 137—596 19 Claims 




A hydraulic control system for controlling actuation of a 
plurality of fluid operated friction devices forming part of a 
transmission for a vehicle with the system including speed 
and direction valves and a range valve engaged at all ^>eed8. 
The system further inchides a modulator valve which tediKxs 
the pressure of fluid supplied to the range valve to selectivdy 
control engagement of fluid coufriings associated therewith. 
The modulating valve is designed for automatic operation 



96 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



during normal shifting of the speed and direcuon valves 
between neutral and engaged positions and alternatively 
manually operable at the discretion of the operator. 



3,659,631 
CONTROLXJJt FOR A PULSED SERVOVALVE 
Jota Peter Rakotfcf, Dover, N JI., Mrignor to Moore BwtncM 
Foraa, Im^ Nfa«ara Pali, N.Y. 

Filed Aog. S, 1970, Scr. No. 61^86 

ImLCLFiek 31/06. 11/10 

VS. CL 137-596.17 7 Claimi 



3,659,633 

METHOD OF MAKING PARALLEL WIRE STRAND 

Jackaoa L. Dvkec, BcChMMm; Artkor F. Miiyey, WBImi. 

sport, botk of Pa., and DomM E. Dulap, Js cww d. late of 

' MoMowBvfle, Pb. (by Mary E. Dwriap, Mtauyrtniteti), ae- 

dgDon to BctMchem SiMl Corporatkm 

Division of application Ser. No. 575,038, Aug. 25. 1%6, 

now Patent No. 3,526,570. This application June 4, 

1970, Scr. No. 43^463 

iBt CL B21f 15/06 

U.S.CL 140—111 5 




/ 



An exhaust and pressure solenoid is operated by a circuit 
which generates a repetitive sawtooth signal wiveform upon 
which is superimposed an input representing a desired con- 
trol signal for regulating the flow of an operating fluid to a 
device such as a tension controller or brake. The orifices of 
the exhaust and pressure solenoids are duty cycle modulated 
at the repetitive frequency of the sawtooth signal and their 
respective orifice sizes are varied in accordance with the 
input signal. 



3,659,632 
FAUCET CONTROL HAVING AN AUXILIARY OUTLET 
Bcagt Harald Jommm, Schhtnlilialdc 33, CH-6000 Luicra, 
Switicrland 

Filed Mar. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 21,299 
Claims priority, appHcatkm Sweden, Mar. 20, 1970, 3880/69 

IbL CL F16k 1/04, 5/06. 11/10 
VS. CL 137-610 2 Claims 




A faucet control mountable on a faucet duct housing, 
capable of controlling the flow through said duct and also 
providing an auxiliary outlet from said control even when 
said faucet duct is closed by said control. 




A stabilized parallel wire strand is made by drawing a plu- 
rality of wires through a forming die from a plurality of 
rotatable pay-ofb each of which is arranged to rotate in a 
direction opposite to at least one other pay-off while clamp- 
ing the wires at their leading ends to fvevent rotation of the 
wires about their axes and finally binding the wires together 
with a resilient binding at intervals along the length of the 
strand. After binding the strand can be immediately reeled by 
actively or passively rotating the strand periodically about its 
longitudinal axis in ahemate clockwise and counterclockwise 
directions as it passes onto a reel. 



3,659,634 

DEVICE FOR FILLING INDIVIDUAL RECEPTACLES 

WITH A METERED QUANTITV OF A FLOWABLE 

MATERIAL 

LoCliar Ohrlng, Pfarrg— > 6, Schweliifiirt, Germany 

Filed Jan. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 7,158 
Clainis priority, appllcadon Germany, Jan. 30, 1969, P 19 04 

514.8 

Int CL B65b 43/50 

U.S.CL 141-163 12 Claims 



/ 




^^ZZ 



A device for fiUing individual receptacles with a metered 
quantity of a flowable material which may be of viscous or 
granular consistency from a supply of such material com- 
prises a metering wheel including a rotatable hollow hub on 
which are radially mounted a plurality of metering con- 
tainers, open at both ends. The containers are successively 
filled with the material by feeding the material into the hol- 
low hub frx)m which it passes by gravity into the containers as 
the wheel turns. Each filled container discharges its contents 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



97 



into a bag or other receptacle fitted upon the open outer end 
of the container. The thus filled bags are successively 
removed fit>m the wheel for transfer to a point of utilization. 



3,659,635 

APPARATUS FOR FELLING AND BUNDLING TREES 

Per Gmlaf Mclgrcn, Sodcrkmsn, Sweden, nmigBor to 

Kocknm Sodcrluunn Air th holm. Sodcrhamn, Sweden 

Filed Apr. 24, 1970. Scr. No. 3M93 

Claims priority, appHcatlon Sweden, Apr. 24, 1969, 5843/69 

Int CL AOlg 23/02 . 
VS. CL 143-43 N \ 8 < 




A feller buncher apparatus including in combination a 
cutter device, an elongated collected trough for severed 
trees, means to support the weight of a tree, and means to 
apply a force against the lower end of a severed tree so that it 
will topple into said elongated collecting trough. 



3,659,636 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR GRIPPING AND 
DEBRANCHING FELLED TREES 
Erik Hdmcr ErikksMn, Sodcrlmmn: OM Edvin Frkk, Om- 
skoMsrik; Lars-Gnnnar Hogbcri, OmskoMsvik; Sdg-Gun- 
nar Lo^pm, OnHkoMsrik, and Svcn Panl Jamstrom, 
Janred, al af Sweden, aasifnors to Mo Ocb Dom^ Ak- 
tlcbolag, OmskoMsvO^ Sweden 

FVed Oct. 8, 1969, Scr. No. 864,712 
Clakns priority, application Sweden, Oct 1 1, 1968, 13777/68 

Int CL AOlg 23/02 
VS. CL 144-2 Z 15 Claims 




A method is provided for gripping and debranching felled 
trees, in which the tree is gripped by a gripping member and 
lifted thereby f^m the sur^e of the ground to a higher 
plane, in which it is moved in its longitudinal (firection 
ttirough or beyond a detvanching means, the gripping 
member and the detwancfaing member being brought simul- 
taneously into contact with the fielled tree fai the plane of the 
ground, and the branches and knots of the tree are then 
severed from the tree trunk by the debranching member. 

An apparatus is provided including a frame structure for 
horizontal and vertical movement on a support structure, a 
feed means capable of being moved along tiie fnmt and a 
gripping member and a debranching member which are 
securely attached to the frame. The debranching member 
comprises an upper and a lower tool, which are separated 
from each other, and comprise an elongated chain of mem- 
bers provided with cutting edges, and are pivotally connected 



to each other and with respect to the longitudinal extensicxi 
of the tool. The members are rotatable in relation to each 
other between a position in which the tool is substantially 
straight and a second- position in which the tool is curved at a 
certain radius, and form a continuous edge facing the con- 
veying direction, irrespective at their mutual position. 



\ 

3,659,637 

PB4CIL LEAD POINTER 

Robert S. Condon, 1 12 Cindy Lane, Bcrifai, Conn. 

C«atinnntlon-ln-f«rt of npidlmrton Scr. No. 806412, Mar. 

12, 1969, now idnrndoa e d. TWs mpBrntion Jan. 11, 1971, 

Scr. Na 105,155 

bd.CLh4M23/0S 

VS. CL 145— 3J1 2 1 




A pocket size lead pointer has a hollow housing bottom 
and a telescoping ci^ having a central pencil entering.hole in 
its top. Finger tip depressions at either end of the housing 
bottom are offiKt laterally fit>m the pencil hole so that the 
pointer may be rotated about a finger tip as pivot by 
manually moving the pencil in a circular path. A pencil guide 
bushing in the top hole secures a blade and its support to the 
cap interiorly of the houang. A lead guide passage axially 
aligned with the entrance and contiguous to the blade- is 
spaced from the pencil guide more than half the heighth of 
the housing. 



3,659,638 

HEAVY DUTY MACHINE FOR PRODUCTION OF 

COMMINUTED MEAT AND OTHER FOODS 

SteplMn A. PmH, 520 SbOk Street, Rockford, OL 

ContfainaHon-ln-pnrt of appBcatton Scr. No. 859,717, Sept 

22, 1969, now abandoned. TMs appHciHon Mar. 24, 1970, 

Scr. No. 22,151 

Int CL A22c / 7/00, 25/16; B02c 18/00 

VS. CL 146—76 R 15 < 



f^^T^'^'-^^^^— r ^^rf^T^^F^^'^j r^^^^ 




An improved separator machine tot producing b(»eless 
comminuted meat and other smooth conuninuted food 



898 O.O.- 



98 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



products from a coane agglomeration of fragmented hard 
and soft tissues which are separated automatically and con- 
tinuously and discharged separately. The machine incor- 
porates an improved mechanical separator utilizing a 
revocable separator member reinforced structurally by 
cutting elements. The laner may also have external teeth. 
The machine is adapted to process raw material in a frozen, 
partially frozen or unfrozen state and is particularly«uiuble 
for processing red meat as well as poultry and fish. 



tioning a first blank including the front and rear panels, a 
plurality of preformed scond blanks including the second 



3^9,639 
SKINNING MACHINE HAVING A RECIPROCATING FAT 

REMOVING KNIFE MECHANISM THEREOF 

Oscar H. Lfaiditraa, and Nathaa A. Ftehcr, both of Aasdii, 

Mtaa., asrigMin to Geo. A. Honnd & Co., Aostla, Mlui. 

Filed May 20, 1970, Scr. No. 39,110 

bit. CLA22c; 7/72 

VS. CL 146—130 3 Claims 




V^ -» « «iS*/'^ 




panels, and a preformed third blank including said first and 
backing panels, and simultaneously heat-sealing and severing 
the blanks to form and join the various panels. 



ERRATUM 

For Class 146 — 222 see: 
Patent No. 3,659,315 



3,659,641 

CARGO CONTAINER 

Frank J. Martoo, 8802 Foitcr Avcnnc, Brooklyn, N.V. 

FUcd Oct 3, 1969, Ser. No. 863,500 

Int. CL B65b 65/02 

VS. CL 150-52 6 Claims 



A skinning machine for removing skin from hams includes 
a frame having a driven roll mounted thereon, the roll includ- 
ing a plurality of axially spaced apart serrated blades thereon 
which revolve in close proximity to a pressure shoe. The 
pressure shoe has an elongate skinning blade fixedly mounted 
thereon which is positioned closely adjacent the driven roll. 
An elongate fat removing blade is mounted closely adjacent 
the pressure shoe and is longitudinally reciprocable relative 
to the pressure shoe and is operable during its reciprocating 
movement to facilitate removal of excess fat from the ham 
prior to the skin removing operation. 



t . * 3,659,640 
CREDIT CARD WALLET AND METHOD OF MAKING 

SAME 
Natkaa Feastcr, 1709 Ocean Avcaae, Brooklyn, N.Y., and 
ThcodoR H. ScUftmaa, 124 BroMhray, Lawrence, N.Y. 
FBed Oct 24, 1969, Scr. No. 869,139 
lat CL A45c 1/00 
VS. CL 150-35 9 Claims 

A multicompartment waDet includes a pair of transversely 
spaced first panels superimposed on and integrally formed 
with a backing panel and having depending medial tongues. 
A set of longitudinally oOact superimposed second panels 
having transverse slits, proximate their lower edgM is su- 
perimposed on each first panel with the corresponding ton- 
gue engaging each slit. The panels have oveiiapping side tabs 
heat-sealed to each other. A rear panel underlies the backing 
panel and is provided with integrally formed frxmt panels 
overlying the lowermost of the second panels, and side flaps 
overlying and heat-sealed to the outer side edges of the first, 
second and front panels. The wallet is produced by jig-posi- 

i 




Cargo containers including a rigid pallet and a flexible 
covering detachably connected to the pallet for enclosing 
cargo carried by the pallet; the covering closely conforming 
to the contours of the cargo. 

3,659,642 
APPARATUS FOR COMPACTING A MOULDING 
MIXTURE 
Lev Fedorovkh VadkovAy, Donctikot obiaiti, uHtaa 
Koraleva, 25, kv. 52, SfaivyaMk; Vladfanlr Eflaaovkh 
S^ja^Jok, niksa Shkadinova, 29, kv. 23, Knmmtaak; Mkoki 
Nikitovkh Abrorimov, aMaa V uim a fB s km o, 19, kv. 60, 
Kramnlorri^ Gooriy Andraevkh GckkbrcklMv. nMn Sot- 
sialistichcskaya, 72, kv. 9, Kramatorsk; Vsevolod An- 
drecvicfa Lyaslicnko, ulitsa Bogdana Khmelnitskogo, 16, kv. 
9, Kramatorsk, and Vladimir Ivanovich Podmogilny, 
poselok Krasnogorka, ulitsa Deputatskaya, 120, Krama- 
torsk, aU of U.S.S.R. 

FBed Dm. 22, 1969, Ser. No. 887,223 
Int CL B22c 15/00 

U.S.CL 164-169 ^S^^ 

A device for compacting a moulding muture m which the 
latter is subjected to the action of compressed air by supply- 
ing the air into a reservoir under a pressure exceeding 20 
kg/cm' in such an amount that 3 to 40 volumes of air under a 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



99 



normal pressure are provided per unit or volume of the mix- and sensing meaiu inside the mold pnxhtces a signal in 

ture being densified. Then the reservoir is discharged during response to the level of the molten metal in the mold for end- 

a time interval not exceeding 0.15 sec. by directing the flow ing the pouring operation from the ladle. When the pouring 
of air into the mixture in a moulding box. The reservoir is 



n !t 




U>*..«ii.*^.«'.«i»i«SK.'«Jl'.*iS».S.W 



^^^«■w^w^^^^^.u^^^^^■■^«■■.■■■■^^■■.^^^^^^^^^^^^^^■g 



formed by a chamber of a housing and at the external side of 
this housing under a discharge opening closed by a valve 
there is mounted a plate forming an additional chamber. The 
plate has holes for a uniform distribution of the air over the 
surface of the mixture being compacted. 



to 



3,659,643 

APPARATUS FOR THE CONTINUOUS CASTING OF 

METAL STRIP 

Hdnricfc Pands, D n r m s ldir f -Le k a niin , Gcmuniy, mripinr 

ScUocmana AktifngmBwhaft, Dnmaidorf, Germany 

Fled Aag. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 61,118 

Claims priority, appBcatkm Germany, Ang. 16, 1969, P 19 41 

729.9 

Int CL B22d 27/08 

VS. CL 164-260 SClaims 



%VcL'-->-S<j ^--< 







«r r^W%-w 




operation for a particular mold has terminated, the casting 
wheel is automatically rotated to bring the next mold into 
proper position for receiving the molten metal. 



3,659,645 

MEANS FOR SUPPORTING CORE IN OPEN ENDED 

SHELL MOLD 

John A. Rose, Clevdand Heights, Ohio, amignoi to TRW Inc., 

Cleveland, Ohio 

FOed Ang. 9, 1965, Scr. No. 478,080 ' 
Int CL B22c 9/10 
VS. CL 164—353 < 





In an apparatus for the continuous casting of metal strip a 
casting cavity is formed between a rotating casting drum and 
an oscillating casting shoe, both of which are supported on a 
common shaft. 



3,659,644 
APPARATUS FOR THE CASTING OF METAL ANODES 
Edouard De Bie, Aatwcrp, BilglMiii. amlgnnr to 
Hobokcn, Bmmdi, Bflgluin 

Fled M«y 5, 1969, Scr. No. 821,866 

Cfadms priority, a p pMcntJon Bdghmv May 15, 1968, 58412 

lot CLB22d 5/02 

U.S. CL 164—326 5 Oatai 

An apparatus and procem for casting o( metal, such as 

copper anodes. The apparatus includes an oven for melting 

the metal and a roUtaUe casting wheel which carries a series 

of molds. A tiltaUe ladle pours the molten metal into a mold. 



An open ended refiwnory shell mold having a casting cavi- 
ty therein, a chill block positicwed to close off the <^>en end 
of said mold and a ceramic core having one end received 
within said mold and having a free end extending into said 
molding cavity. The free end of said core is restrained from 
lateral movement within said mokling cavity by engaged pin 
means having opposed ends ancbwed in the mold walls. 



3,659,646 
HEAT EXCHANGER CONSTRUCTION 
Bohdan Hurko, and Raymmd L. DOi, both of LontavlBc Ky., 
amlgnnn to General Electric Company 

FOed Jane 15, 1970, Scr. No. 46,1 14 
Int CL F28d 9/00 
VS. CL 165—164 9 




A heat exchanger for use in the flue gas exhaust system of 
self-cleaaing gas coolcing oven in the form at a large 



100 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



square-cornered corrugated panel that is collapsed from the 
sides in the plane of the panel to create two tntermeshed se- 
ries of triangular shaped pipes where one series of alternate 
pipes carry hot flue gases while the opposite series of al- 
ternate pipes carry inlet air for transferring some of the heat 
of the flue gases to the ambient air. The front face of the heat 
exchanger that is turned toward the oven operates hot, while 
the back face of the heat exchanger operates relatively cool 
to reduce heat losses to the outside. Sealing means close both 
the top and bottom ends of the pipes. Inlet and outlet 
openings are formed in the front and back faces of the unit 
near the top and bottom. 



hold-down linkage is an outwardly biased annular ring having 
internal grooves adapted to mate with external grooves 
formed on the mandrel. The ring is moved toward the man- 
drel by axially movable, tapered wedging means driven by 
hydraulic pressure. 



3,659,647 
WELL PACKER 
Joe R. BrowB, P. O. Box 19236, HoMton, Tex. 
Filed Mar. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 16,327 

ImLClEIlb 23106, 3311 29 
U.S.CL 166-120 

J 



12Claiim 




A single piece, tubular mandrel extends centraOy through a 
closely surrounding composite outer body. The outer body 
includes metal anchoring slips and resilient packers to 
respectively anchor the outer body and supporting central 
mandrel to a surrounding well pipe and to seal the annular 
space formed between the mandrel and the surrounding well 
pipe. The outer body includes setting components which are 
moved axiaOy by hydraulic setting pressure introduced 
through the mandrel into expandable chamber means formed 
in the outer body. The setting components wedge under the 
anchoring slips and axially foreshorten the packer, forcing 
the slips and packer radially outwardly into engagement with 
the surrounding well conduit Reverse axial movement of the 
setting components is prevented by a one-way acting friction 
lock which retains the anchoring slips and packer in engage- 
ment with the well (xmduit even after reduction of the 
hydraulic setting pressure. The anchcning sltpa and packers 
are released from their set position by moving the mandrel 
axially with respect to the expanded slips and packer in tht 
outer body. Undesired relative nwvement ai the mandrel is 
prevented by a pressure expanded, normally retracted 
mechanical hold-down linkage extending between the man- 
drel and the set outer body. In the absence of a presure dif- 
ferential across the set packer, the medumical linkage 
returns to a normaOy retracted position which provides no 
obstacle to relative movement between the mandrel and 
outer body. 

In the preferred form of the invention, the hold-down link- 
age includes a series of radially movable pistons acting 
against a resilient snap ring to retain the snap ring in engage- 
ment with a groove in the outer body. In a modified form, the 



3,659,648 

MULTI-ELEMENT PACKER 

H. Cobbs, 5144 Soirtii New Hava^ Tolsa, Okla. 

FBcd Dec 10, 1970, Scr. No. 96,786 

LM.CLE21b2i/aO 



VS. CL 166—120 



5Clala» 




•.'^ ^«» 



A multi-element packer for closing a borehole including a 
tubular inner mandrel, a cylindrical member at one end of 
the mandrel and a coupling plate at the other end, an outer 
mandrel coaxially positioned over the inner mandrel provid- 
ing an annular passageway between the two, an annular 
piston positioned in the cylinder member displaced by fluid 
pressure applied to the cylinder member, and a plurality of 
tubular elaMomer elements positioned on the outer mandrel 
between the piston and the coupling plate, the elastomer ele- 
ments being expanded by force of the piston. 



/ 



3,659,649 
METHOD OF STIMULATING OIL OR GAS RESERVOIRS 

BY A SUBSURFACE NUCLEAR EXPLOSION 
Henry F. Donlap, Drib^ Tex., aasigiior to AHaadc Rkhfidd 
Company, PhflMMpMa, Pa. 

FHed May 27, 1968, Scr. No. 732,401 
Int. CL E21b 43/00 
VS, CL 166-247 12 




^ /^^V^v'y ^ \y^/^■\'i'^■'^ ' ^■ ' ■'■ '' ^'>■ ' '' ^ 



A nuctear explosive device for subsurface use is assembled 
and detonated through a small diameter borehole by enlarg- 
ing a section of the borehole to a sufficient size, lowering a 
triggering device into the enlarged section and placing 
nuclear explosive friel material around the trigger. The 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



101 



nuclear tutl material is surrounded by a second material 
which may be of higher density and may also be a fUel 
material. Heavy water may be injected into or with the 
nuclear ftiel material. The nuclear fitel material may contain 
the deuteride of an active metal substance and be slurriet* 
with an anhydrous liquid; or it may contain the heavy 
hydrogen isotope of the hydroxide of the active metal sulv 
stance and be slurried with heavy water. Concentric collapsi- 
ble, expansible containers are used to form the nuclear ex- 
plosive. 



to Pllilli|IS 



3,659,650 
OIL RECOVERY PROCESS 
Ckarles A. Stratton, BarttcsvOe, OUa^ 
Pc tfo k a i Company 

Fled Jnne IS, 1970, Scr. No. 46,552 
Int CL E21b 43/22 
VS. CL 166-275 8 Clafam 

An oil recovery process which employs, as an additive to 
the aqueous material used for waterflooding, at least one of 
the reaction product of sulfamic acid and a polyethoxy al- 
cohol or, the ammonium sulfate slat of a polyethoxylated al- 
kylphenol is disclosed. 



3,659,651 
HYDRAULIC FRACTURING USING REINFORCED RESIN 

PELLETS 
John W. Graham, Honston, Tex., assignor to Esso Production 
Research Company, Honston, Tex. 

Filed Ang. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 64,339 

Int.CLE21b4i/26 

U.S. CL 166-280 12 Clainis 




« It It 

cuMuMi rriwu, rti<io-> 



Fractures in a subterranean fbnnaticHi are propped with 
propping agent particles composed of a synthetic restn sub- 
stantially inert to formation fluids and containing reinforcing 
materials dispersed therein. 



3,659,652 
LIQUID EXPLOSIVE FOR WELL FRACTURING 
Lcoiutfd N. Roberts, Scottsdale, Ariz., aasiiBor to TaieyFrac 
t^oi pui^noH I nyotf vmub* 

Coirtlnuation of appMcation Scr. No. 765,1 13, Oct 4, 1968, 
now abandoned, TUs appMcntkm Jan. 27, 1971, Scr. No. 

110,315 
Int CL E21b 43/26 
VS. CL 166—299 10 Claims 

A cap insensitive liquid explosive is described which is par- 
ticularly usefbl for fiwrturing a formation containing a net- 
woilc of narrow fissures adjacent a well bore in order to bring 
in a weO or to increase its productivity, which includes a 
nitroparaffin compound, preferably nitromethane, capable of 
dissolving substantial amounts of high explosive compounds. 



and one or more of certain high explosive compounds dis- 
solved therein. The high explosive compounds are of a kind 
and are present in an amount capable of rendering the liquid 
explosive sufficiently diameter insensitive to permit propaga- 
tion of an explosion throughout a substantial portion of such 
netwoilc of narrow fissures when the liquid explosive is 
placed therein or in such other environment as it is to be 
used. Preferred hig^ explosives are RDX, HMX and mixtures 
thereof TNT, PETN or any other high exi^osive organic 
nitro compound may be included in an amount sufficient to 
render the liquid explosive lev sensitive to detonaticm, such 
that it is not cap detonaUe, at the same time enhmcing its 
explosive power and reliability. For certain applicatioiu, am- 
monium nitrate may be added to achieve desired explosive 
effects, as well as fiitdy divided reactive metal to increase the 
brisance of the explosive. A gelling agent such as nitrocellu- 
lose is included to maintain the resulting uniform dispersion 




^■'^v-, 



for long periods of time. A method of pressure-transferring a 
liquid explosive into the weO bore and pressuring it back into 
the productive formation is described in which the explosive 
is injected through a tube into the well bore directly adjacent 
the formation to be fitictured, the tube having first been 
cleared of air, by placing the liquid explosive in one or more 
tanks connected to the injection tube at the well surface and 
which are subjected to air pressure to force the explosive into 
the well. Further, a well fracturing method which is self 
cleaning, rendering unnecessary the usual cleaning step 
which follows fracturing, is disclosed in which the well bore 
is restricted above the level of the exi^osion and is closed 
above the restriction with sand or the like such that sufiBcient 
back pressure is maintained in the well for satisfactory frac- 
turing, while the resultant gases are subsequently vented 
through the restriction. Mowing the sand or other ballast as 
well as the rubble generated by the explosion out of the weD 
bore. 



3,659,653 

STOCK FOR SHOEING ANIMALS 

OMvcr L. Aisnp, P. O. Box 274, Hi|h ReRs, N. Mcz. 

FHed Oct 7, 1970, Scr. No. 78323 

Int CL AOli 07/00 

U.S.CL 168-44 14 < 

A stock for shoeing animals including on a tripod base a 
channel for receiving a leg of the animal, the channel having 
adjacent thereto means for adjustably constraining the hoof. 



102 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



A foot lever is provided to control the constraining means 
against a normally applied bias away from the constraining 




position to rapidly release the animal from the constraining 
means when the foot lever is released so as not to endanger 
the animal if it bolts. 



3,659,654 
ADJUSTABLE RIPPER TIP 
Janes M. Davks„ Ortada, Calif.; Larry G. Hackmaim, 
Peoria, DL; Robert A. Pctown, San Leandro, CaUf.; Roger 
M. Smltli, and Lcoa A. Wfart, both of Jottet, III., aaslgiiors to 
Caterpillar Tractor Co., Peoria, Dl. 
Oriffaul appUcatioa Nov. 29, 1967, Scr. No. 686,501, now 
Pateat No. 3,550,691. DiirUed and this application Apr. 10, 

1970, Scr. No. 31,449 
. Int. CL AOlb 13108, 35/20 

VS. CL 172-699 3 Claims 




A ripper in which the ground engaging tip can be advanced 
in its holder to accommodate for wear of the ripper tip. The 
tip may be advanced manually or hydraulically dependiing on 
the mechanism used and is held in place by firiction and/or a 
pinning means. 



lines supplying and evacuating hydraulic fluid to and from 
the piston have gauges connected thereto to signal pressure 
conditions, in psi, at the piston. Scales calibrated in pounds 
are mounted adjacent to the gauges to signal, per machine 
and drill string and their characteristics, as well as the 
characteristics of the material being drilled, a proper cor- 
respondence between actual bit weight and an optimum feed 
pressure of fluid pressure assistance or restraint. A valve con- 
trols the hydraulic fluid supply and evacuation, selectively, to 
effect a holding back of the drill string, when its dead weight 
less the system's internal resistance would produce excessive 
bit weight, a pulling down of the drill string when its dead 
weight less the system's internal resistance would yield in- 
adequate bit weight or pressure monitoring on a level just to 




ofbet the system's internal resistance when the drill string 
weight alone would produce the optimum bit weight (i.e., 
zero hold-back). The gauges and scale advise the operator of 
the operational feed status that he might determine the 
requirements for holding back or pulling down the drill 
string. Valving at a fluid reservoir insures maintenance of a 
constant compensating pressure to one side of the pbton at 
all times. This constant pressure, when minimum hold-back 
pressure is applied, provides a low pressure pull-down force 
to counteract the system's internal resistance so zero hold- 
back can exist. (The system's internal resistance is the sum of 
various stationary mechanical frictions and the minimum ob- 
tainable hold-back pressure all acting agairat the develop- 
ment of a down motion of the drill string. ) The compensating 
pressure also prevents possible cavitation. 



3,659,656 
ARRANGEMENT FOR SLIDE-TRACKING OF A BORING 

MACHINE IN MINES WFTH A LIMITED PROFILE 
VladlHsir Marca, Pribraai^ C a tch odovakia, aarif or to 
Ccikodovcaai(y wanovy pnimyri, oborovy podnik, 
Pribrani, CiedMMlovakia 

FUcd Nov. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 89^95 
Chdms priority, appttcatioa CMchodovakia, Nov. 18, 1969, 

7601-69 

IntCLE21c;;/02 

VJS. CL 173—23 4 Claims 



3«659,655 
FEED CONTROLLING METHOD AND SYSTEM 
Lanio Gyoaorori, Clariubarg, W. Va., asrignor to IntcnoO- 
Rand Company, New Yorit, N.Y. 

FUcd Jane 2, 1970, Scr. No. 42,627 

Int CL E21c 5/10 

VS. CL 173—1 14 ClaiBM 

A drilling head and drill string is fed, or the feed is 

restrained, by a hydraulic-fluid-actuated piston. Hydraulic 




A truck adapted to move on tracks in mine galleries, sup- 
porting at least one boring set is provided with a vertical 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



103 



frame rotatably mounted on the truck frame around its verti- 
cal axis, which vertical frame supports on one side at least 
one boring set, on the other side a horizontal beam pivoubiy 
around a vertical axis, the other end of said beam fixed to the 
jacket of an extensible prop, with hydraulic cylinders con- 
trolling mutual position between the vertical frame and the 
horizontal beam, between the truck frame and the vertical 
frame and the position of the arms with wheels supporting 
the truck. 



ported therein by the opposed carrier walls. A container is 
secured in each pair of the openinp and a detonating cord is 
passed through the interior of the carrier and successively 
looped outwardly around the rear of each container within 
detonating proximity of each shaped charge. In this manner, 
the new and improved apparatus can be employed for per- 
forating operations without leaving debris in the well bore or 
damaging the casing. 



3,659,657 
INDEPENDENTLY ROTATED PNEUMATIC ROCK 

DRILL 
Erik Johaa Victor Ahlbcrg; Goda Bcnuvd Ekwall, both of 
Nacka, and Rotf Arthw RonaM Lindqviit, Tunba, all of 
Sweden, assignors to Atlas Copco Akticbolag, Nacka, 
Sweden 

FDcd Oct. 1, 1970, Scr. No. 77033 

Int CL B25d 9/00 

U.S.CL 173-105 4ClalmB 



n^ 




An independently rotated, muffled pneumatic rock drill 
comprising an impact mechanism housing in which an impact 
mechanism and a rotation motor are located and in which 
housing also is enclosed an air volume into which the exhaust 
air from both the impact mechanism and the rotation motor 
is discharged. The roution motor has an exhaust pipe of a 
tuned length. 



3,659,658 
WELL PERFORATING APPARATUS 
Emmet F. Briefer, Ikw a t o B , Tcx^ — I g inr to 
Technology Corporatkm, New York, N.Y. 

FUcd Sept. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 75357 
lBl.CLE21b4J/7;7 
VS. CL 175—4.6 13 




As an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, an 
elongated thick-wall tubular perforating carrier is provided 
with one or more pairs of aligned openings formed at spaced 
intervals along the opposed walls of the carrier. Typical 
shaped explosive charges are respectively endoaed within 
fluid-ti^t thick-wall containers which are complementally 
shaped for reception in the openings and adapted to be sup- 



3,659,659 
LARGE DIAMETER BIT WITH A REPLACEABLE STEM 
Cari L. Licbic Daliaa, Tcs^ ■■Jgnnr to DnMcr Indaitrlci, 
Inc., DalaSj'Tcx. 

Filed Feb. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 8^2 

Int. CL E21c 23/00 

VS. CL 175-53 8 ClafaBS 




A bit for drilling a large diameter hole has a replaceable 
stem. The body of the bit includes a multiplicity of stages 
around a central axis. The Mt is attached to the (hill column 
by a replaceable stem connected to the main body of the bit 
and the body of the bit includes a series of i^tes separated 
by a series of hoUow support elements. 



3^659,660 
LARGE DIAMETER BIT FOR SHALLOW ANGLE HOLES 
WUBam M. Conn, DalJM, Teu, mrignnr to Dwc 
Inc^ Dallas, Tex. 

FUcd Apr. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 27^281 
Int CL E2Ic 23/00; E21d 3/00 
VS. CL 175-53 6 < 




A bit for enlarging a pilot hole into a large diameter hole 
includes a plurality of drilling stages surrounding a central 
shaft. Integral stabilization sections are included after each 
drilling stage. 



\ 



104 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,661 
EARTH BORING MACHINE 
Janes W. YovBf, Irving; Gcorfe A. CasoB, Dalas, both of 
Tex., aod Eracst O. Kunkd, Nevada, Mo., assigiion to 
Dresser Industries, Inc., Dallas, Tex. 
I Filed Feb. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 7,923 

iBL CI. E21b 7/00, 79/00 
U.S.CL 175-85 aClainis 



chambers in communication with the oil bath and the other 
of its chambers in communication with the borehole. An oil 
pressure control spring is located in the chamber in commu- 
nication with the borehole and acts on the piston. The upper 
sealing joint forms the lower end of a second chamber in 
communication with the borehole and closed at its upper end 
by a leak limiting joint, such as one of the labyrinth type. 




3,659,663 / 

BOREHOLE REAMER-STABILIZER WTTH IMPROVED 
FLUID CIRCULATION 
Theodore R. DjrMft, IMhs, Tex., — ignor to DrcMer Indw- 
trict, Inc, DnUas, Tex. 

Fied Doc 28, 1970, Scr. No. 101,696 

brt. CL E21b 9108, 9/24; E21c 23/00 

VS. CL 175—325 1 1 Clalnis 



An apparattis for boring large diameter holes. A drilling 
mechanism is pivotally mounted on a base and arranged so 
that it may drill at any an^e from the horizontal, either up or 
down. Means are provided to divert the drilling residue and 
loose rock and a drill pipe positioning system installs and 
removes sections of the drill pipe. 



3,659,662 
THRUST BEARINGS FOR UNIKRGROUND DRILLING 

ENGINES 
Leoirfde Dicky, Grenoble, France, iMlgnnr to SockteGfamIe 
de CoMtmctioaa Electriqoci eC Mocnnlqaei (ALSTHOM), 
Grenoble, France 

FUed Apr. 22, 1970, Scr. No. 30^03 
CUms priority, appHcalioD France, Apr. 25, 1969, 691 1838 

lBLCLE21bi//2 
UACL175— 107 5 I 




The oil bath layout for the lower thrust bearing in an un- 
derground drilling machine comprises an upper sealing joint 
below which means are provided for maintaining the oil pres- 
sure at a level which is at least equal to that of the surround- 
ing pressure of the mud in the borehole. Such means may in- 
clude a cylinder fitted with a piston and having one of its 




A plurality of passages transmit fluid end to end in the 
reamer-stabilizer body. Individual cutters are mounted on 
hollow shafts affixed to the rearoer-itabilizer body. A circular 
passage transmits fluid to the center ot the hoUow shafts. 
Holes connect the outside of each shaft with the hoUow cen- 
tral portion. Spiral grooves are located longitudinally on the 
inside diameter of the cutter. 



3,659,664 

WEIGHING APPARATUS 

Erich EmB Kari Knothc, GneHngin Gianar, and Eckhard 

Otto Walter BBIn, GiiOhigin Tffliolansberg, both of Gcr^ 

■any, aarignors to Sartorhv-Wcrfcc GniUi (and vormals 

Gottlnger PraiWonswaagen GmbH), Gottingen, Germany 

Filed Jnne 8, 1971, Scr. No. 151,102 

Cbdau priority, application Germany, Jane 16, 1970, P 20 29 

735J 
InL CI. G06f 15/20: GOlg 23/37, 23/42 
VS. CL 177—25 11 Clalnis 

A weighing apparatus has a scale with code tracks which 
can be read by reading means. The scale is a tolerance scale 
and gives the possibility of achieving a predetermined or a 
selecttble percentage accuracy of the tolerance part values 
which are covered by one code each. This is achieved by giv- 
ing the codes in different ranges of the tolerance scale dif- 
ferent lengths. The weighing apparatus may have several 
tolerance scales with different tolerance part values, the 
tolerance scales being centered at different weights, e.g., S or 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



105 



10 or 20 g. In order to weigh a load with a certain desved 3,659,666 

percentoge accuracy, the weighing apparatus is brought, f.i. ARTICULATED VEHICLE "" 

John P. Forsyth, and Robert W. Forsyth, both of 1517 North 
3rd Avenue, San BemnrdiBO, CaHf. 

Filed Oct. 2, 1969, Ser. No. 870,438 

Int. CLB62d 77/02 

U.S. a. 180—6.2 7 Clatau 



iumn 




by an additional load, to the range of the selected tolerance 
scale. 



ELECTRICAL WEIGHING SYSTEMS Wmi MULTIPLE 

INCREMENTAL READOUTS 

Glbert Alan Godwin, OnUand, N J., mat Chapln A. Pratt, 

Rutland, Vt., tmAgnnn to Howe Rk hnr dMn Sc^e Company 

FBed July 27, 1970, Scr. No. 58,259 

IntCLGOlgi/74 

U.S. CL 177—1 26 Oafam 




^•-^-t^EI 



1 






A weighing apparatus and method wherein an electrical 
analog signal, having a level representative of the weight of a 
load, is converted into a digital pube train by an analog-to- 
digital converter. A counter for counting the converter- 
produced pulses is connected to one or more devices that 
provide a readout of the wei^t in visual and/or printed form. 
A program circuit is operativdy connected to ^e converter 
and the counter, and selected circuit connections are made 
in the program for providing a selected one or more of the 
following conditions: ( 1 ) the division of the pulse train by a 
pre-selected divisor to count in only the quotient at the 
counter (2) the transfer of selected information from the 
counter to the readout devices to cause the weight to be read 
out by coimting in any of a plurality of different increments 
such as ones, twos, or fives. Additional features pertain to 
tare circuits for taring the wei^t-representing signal. 



r^ 




An articulated wheeled vehicle is disclosed herein having a 
front and a rear body porticm pivotaUy joined together by a 
central axle rotatabiy mounted on opposing projections car- 
ried on the body portions. Axles are rotataMy carried on 
each of the fix>nt and rear body portions so that a six- 
wheeled, three-axle vehicle is produced. Each axle comfnises 
a pair of coextensive segments mounted in suitable bearings 
and each segment is separately powered via a drive train and 
transmission by a power plant so that directional control and 
speed of the vehicle can be attained since the axle segments 
may be rotated individually at different speeds and 
directions. 



3,659,667 
VEHICLE FRONT WHEEL DRIVE ASSEMBLY 
John A. Rogers, and Fredrick R. Boasard, both of Fort Dodge, 
Iowa, aarignors to Standard En gin e ering Co^ Inc^ Fort 
Dodge, Iowa 

Filed Dmu 19, 1969, Ser. No. 886,472 

Int. CLB62d 77/09 

U.S. CL 180— 6J< 4 aafav 




A drive assembly for a front wheel drive vehicle wherein a 
gear box is connected by a drive shaft and in turn provides 
driven shafts extending in opposite directions for connection 
with separate clutches which in turn are connected to the 
respective front wheels. Each of the clutches includes a pair 
of jaw portions semicylindrical in shape when in engagement 
with each other form a cylindrical drive member. Each of the 
jaw members are key^ to separate shafts for rotatitm 
therewith and an actuating lever is connected to a yoke in 
turn connected to one of the jaw members for sliding it along 
its shaft into and out of engagement with the other axially 
stationary jaw. 






106 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,668 

STEERING CLUTCH AND ENGINE CLUTCH 

HYDRAUUC CIRCUIT 

Roy C. Ron, aad Larry L. Bandy, both of SpringfMd, DL, as- 

slfBors to AUb-ChafaBcrs Maaufacturiiif Company, Mil- 

waakcc. Wis. 

Filed Nov. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 88,007 

Int. CI. B62d 77/05 

U.S. CL 180-6.7 6 Claims 



. ! 



^M 




having a central web portion and a pair of flanges secured to 
the opposed longitudinal edges of the web portions to form 
an I-shaped cross-section for the equalizer bar over a major 
portion of its length. The flanges converge towards the ends 
of the bat and merge in end portions, and the web portion is 
flared in a horizontal direction adjacent the opposite end 
portions of the bar to provide further reinforcement. A 
strengthening column is provided at the central portion of 
the bar for further strengthening the bar. Wear plates are 
secured on the under side of the opposite end portions of the 
bar for forming the surfaces of the bar in contact with the op- 
posed, track carrying trucks of the vehicle. 



3,659,671 
TAG WHEEL LIFT 
Ahrte L. Hdnic, Wdd County, Colo., aadgnor to H & L Ti« 
Lift CorporatioB, Denver, Colo. 

FOcd Jan. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 5,263 

Int CL B62d 67/72, B60g 5/00 

U.S. CL 180-24.02 U Clalim 



A hydraulic system in a crawler tractor having a single 
pump which supplies high pressure fluid for operating the 
steering clutches and low pressure fluid for lubricating the 
engine dutch and change-speed transmiaaion. The engine 
clutch flywheel acts as an impositive dispUcement centrifugal 
pump for conveying fluid firom the engine clutch housing to 
the low pressure side of the hydraulic system. 



3,659,669 
SUSPENSION SYSTEM FOR CRAWLER TRACTOR 
Jaaii ManartDB, Macedonia, Ohio, — ignor to General Mo- 
tors Corporation, Detroll, ^flch. 

Filed Oct. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 81,473 
Int. CL B62d 55/14 
VS. CL 180—9.5 6 < 




A suspension system for a crawler tractor having a wheel 
carrier located on each side of the tractor. Each wheel carri- 
er is supported by the tractor frame for independent oscilla- 
tion about an axis extending transversely to the longitudinal 
axis of the tractor and carries a pair of large diameter wheels. 



3,659,670 

EQUALIZER BAR FOR USE IN TRACKED VEHICLES 

Cindy J. Roycr, P.O. Box 75181, OUahoma City, Okla. 

FDcd Dec. 1 1, 1969, Scr. No. 884,192 

Int. CL B62d 55/05 

U.S. CL 180—9.5 2 Claims 



r-« 




I— ^ 



I— ^ 



k— » 



An equalizer bar for supporting the body and engine struc 
ture of tracked vehicles on a pair of horizontally spaced, lon- 
gitudinally extending trucks. The bar is an elongated element 




A spring seat is mounted on each end of a pivot shaft 
which is mounted transversely of the truck frame between 
the drive wheels and tag wheels and is pivoted by a rocker 
arm pivotally connected to the piston rod of a hydraulic 
cylinder. A roller for engaging the rear end of the cor- 
responding drive wheel leaf spring is mounted at the front 
upper comer of the spring seat, while a pivot pin for the front 
end of the corresponding tag wheel leaf spring is mounted at 
the lower rear comer of the spring seat. The rear end of each 
tag wheel leaf spring extends into a rear seat attached to the 
frame, engaging a roller in the rear seat. Lift of the tag 
wheels is produced when the spring seat is pivoted hydrauli- 
cally, while the spring seats permit equalization of the load 
between the drive wheels and the tag wheels. The hydraulic 
cylinder may be single acting or double acting, but if the 
latter, a lost motion link is pivoted between the piston rod 
and the rocker arm. 



3,659,672 

CONTROL SYSTEM 

Charles J. Jacobus, C/O Charles Equipment Co. 17W601 

North Avenue, VUa Park, ni. 

Origfaial application July 3, 1969, Ser. No. 839,037, whkh is 

a continuation-in-part of application Scr. No. 801,644, Feb. 

24, 1969, now Patent No. 3,558,901, dated Jan. 26, 1971. 

Divided and thb application Jan. 1 1, 1971, Scr. No. 105,306 

Int. CLB60I 77/05 
U.S. CL 180-65 R 3 Claims 

A control system using a motive source and connected 
hydrostatic transmisBion to drive a load at a speed deter- 
mined by the volume of fluid flowing in the transmission. A 
comparator and actuator change the volume of fluid flow in 
proportion to the deviation between a feedback signal and a 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



107 



control signal. The feedback signal is generated by a sensor shaft and a tubular casing therefor. Oil sucked up said bore is 
responsive to the output of the transmission. The control atomized by passing through said openings. Atomized oil 



Z9D 



/A5-, 






i3C 



^' 



fOOT WOM. 
i^ tlAt 



r^ 



TMPOTTLt . L— I 






*s 



3a 



tUJ 

L ■WIL.iiili 



AC 
■OTCM 



CM«W 



Wl 



f"- -so 



V . 

■as 



lO '<^ ^34 



^^ ' [— '— 1 

— '^^ mnm* 



tae 



iS3i- 



M^a 



' ffttlillli 



j/r 



3,659,673 

PORTABLE REFEREE STAND 

Harold J. Ennckii«, P. O. Box 789, Hastings, Ncbr. 

Filed Dec. 31, 1970, Scr. No. 103,207 

Int CL E04f 1134 

U.S.CL 182—115 



6Clalma 




A portable platform apparatus adapted for the vertical sup- 
port of a volleyball referee, the apparatus having a vertical 
front frame; a pair of vertical end frames, a top horizontal 
frame; and a ladder; the combination providing an elevated 
horizontal support platform which is hingedly collapsible Into 
a compact unit that is easily carried. 



3,659,674 

ATOMIZED OIL LUBRICATING DEVICE FOR 

BEARINGS AND/OR JOURNALS OF VERTICAL SHAFTS 

ROTATING AT HIGH SPEEDS 
Lulgi Fcrrnrio, MandcMo dd Larlo, Cono, Italy, amignor to 
Fcrrario Andrea A flfll Di Fcrrarlo, Evan^lita c Figll, 
Cono, Italy 

FVed Dec 16, 1969, Scr. No. 885,655 
Clahns priority, application Italy, Sept. 10, 1969, 21835 A/69 

Int CL F16n 7/J2 
U.S. CL 184—6.16 10 Claims 

A vertical shaft rotatable at high speeds and provided with 
bearings and/or journals has an axial bore at its lower end im- 
mersable into lubricating oil in a tank. Openings in said shaft 
communicate the bore with a housing defined between the 




lubricates the journals and/or bearings and condensed oil 
flows back to the tank. 



signal has a value dependent upon the type of load connected 
to the transmission. 



3,659,675 

LUBRICATION SYSTEM AND RESERVOIR THEREFOR 
HaroM P. EdilaHln, Bczky, and Roy B. Smith, WMttngton 
Court House, both of Ohio, amignnri to TraniponalfaM 
Specialists, Inc. Cohnbot, Ohh> 

FBcd July 7, 1969, Scr. No. 839,572 | 

Int CLF16n 77/00 
U.S. CL 184—39 8 Claims 




A lubrication system consisting of a metering valve for 
providing a measured quantity of lubricant to parts to be 
lubricated, a pump for moving lubricant to the metering 
valve through distribution lines, and a reservoir dispenser of 
novel design from which the pump draws lubricant. The 
reservoir dispenser is formed of ( 1 ) a bag of flexible im- 
permeable plastic, and (2) a rigid flat bottom plate to which 
the open end of the bag is fastened and sealed. The top of the 
bag is opposite to the open end, is relatively rigid, and is pro- 
vided with a check valve which allows egress of fluid from 
the bag but not ingress. A pair of crossed ribs are formed on 
the underside of the top to prevent undesired sealing of 
openings in the flat bottom plate. The side walls of the bag 
are relatively thick for the lower approximately one half por- 
tion and are relatively rigid throughout such portion. The 
upper slightly more than one half portion of the side walls is 
thinner, relatively flexible, and tapers to the portion adjacent 
the top. The portion adjacent the top b thinnest so that 
under atmospheric or higher pressure the upper portion oi 
the side walls folds down into the interior of the bag as the 
top descends into the bag. The flat bottom plate is provided 
with two automatic valves, one being an outlet check valve 
allowing egress from the bag but not ingress. This outlet 
valve is connected to the pump for supplying lubricant to the 
meter valves. Lubricant is supplied to the reservoir as needed 
through an inlet valve in the bottom plate, but except when 
lubricant is being supplied to the reservoir, the inlet valve is 
sealed. A quick-connect lubricant fitting is secured to the 
inlet valve. 



108 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,676 

SPRING MOTOR MECHANISM 

Fcawkk L. Witt, 630 VirgUa Avcane, Bowlder Crtck, Calif. 

Flkd Jaa. 25, 1971, Scr. No. 109,131 

lat. CL F03g 1 100 

U.S. CL 185—40 R 6 ClaiuH 




L'^Pi: ^ ;r-<^ 



A spring motor mechanisni which is provided with a coil 
spring having one end attached to a power shaft and having 
the other end attached to an electric motor that is supported 
so as to describe an orbit around the spring dviring the wind- 
ing of the spring when the motor is energized. 



to A.C.E. 



3,659,677 
CAGE GATE LOCK MECHANISMS 
Alan John Shaidcn, Tohroftli, Entlnd, ■■ignm 
MadUDory Limited, Londoii, Englsiid 

Filed Nov. 26, 1969, Scr. No. 880,124 

CUms priority, appHrarton Great Britain, Dec. 9, 1968, 

58,406/68 

InL CL B66b 13100 

MS. CL 187—61 4 Claims 



rangement being such that when the cage is not opposite a 
landing and the operating member is actuated, the second 
lever is engageabie with a stop to prevent further movement 
of said operating member and ensure that the latch member 
remains in a position in which it prevents the gate from being 
opened. 



3,659,678 
PORTABLE FLOOR ANCHOR 
Bertie Forrci« Hal, Jr., Berkley, MklL, asripMN* 
P. Woliart, Cknvaom Mkh. 

Fled Nov. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 86,776 
Int CL B60t 1114 
\iS. CL 188—5 



to Raymond 




A portable floor anchor which is designed for use in au- 
tomobile body repair shops. The anchor can be moved about 
a garage floor on retractable wheels to a job where it is to be 
used. When the wheeb are retracted, a special seal is brought 
into contact with the floor to create a vacuum chamber. This 
chamber is evacuated to hold the anchor in place by dif- 
ferential air pressure. A clevis, a pivoted pulling post or other 
pulling or attaching means are mounted on the anchor. 



3,659,679 

RUBBER TRACK BRAKE 

Franz H. Prdnfalk, Langcnfeid, Germany, amlgnor to August 

Tkysscn-Hattc AG, Dnisbttrg-Hambom, Germany 

Filed Oct. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 81,233 

Int. CL B61k 7102 

U.S. CL 188—62 2 Clainv 




A gate lock mechanism for the cage of a hoist, said 
mechanism comprising a latch member arranged to normally 
engage a gate of the cage to prevent opening of said gate and 
pivotally mounted on a fixed axis, an operating member also 
mounted on said axis and arranged to move said latch 
member into and out of engagement with the gate and means 
for preventing the latch member firom being moved out of 
engagement with the gate when a cage on which said 
mechanism is mounted is not opposite a landing of the hoist, 
said preventing means comprising a first lever pivotally 
mounted at one end on said fixed axis and a second lever 
pivotally mounted at the other end of the first lever, the ar- 




A rubber track brake for braliing rolling rail vehicles such 
as freight can and the like, having parallel rails of a rubber 
material laid in longitudinal section of track in place of the 
normal rails, guiding rails are disposed alone side the rubber 
rails and have a ctAitact surface for the flanges of car wheels. 
The rubber rails are securely fixed to a foundation and the 
guiding rails are capable of being vertically displaced to en- 
gage and disengage the track brake of the invention. 



3,659,680 
BRAKE MECHANISM FOR MINUTURE TOY VEHICLES 
George Sonlnkis, Los Angekt, and WBiam A. Staate, Tor- 
rance, koCh of Cam., Miignnii to Mattel, Inc., Hawtkorac, 
CaMf. 

Filed Oct 30, 1969, Ser. No. 872,496 

Int. CL B61k 7108 

MS. CL 188—62 1 1 dafam 

A brake mechanism toy for use with powered or un- 

powered miniature toy vehicles that travel along a track or 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



t 



109 



/ roadway whereby a braking or decelerating action is exter- constant drivable connection at its ends with the coupling 
naUy applied to these vehicles. The mechanism inchides a membeis. A switching means is connected to an input shaft 
controlled braking portion which causes the engagement of to be routed by the latter and to an ou^t shaft to route the 
selected ones of these vehicles between itself and one side latter. The switching means k in routive engagement with 
wall of the roadway. The extent of the engagement and each of the coupling members to transmit roution in one 

direction to one coupling member and in the opposite 
direction to the other coupling member so that roution is 





therefore the degree of deceleration action provided is con- 
trolled by the user. 

In conjunction with the braking mechanism, or useo 
separately, a starting mechanism may be provided which in- 
cludes a starting post which movably extends above the road- 
way surface to raise the rear end of the toy vehicle until it is 
desired that the vehicle accelerate along the roadway. 



3,659,681 

LEVER ACTUATED DISK BRAKE 

Dennis G. Harvey, Ancastcr, Ontario, Canada, assignor to 

Ams-Chafaners Manufacturing Company, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Filed Apr. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 29,140 

Int CL F16d 551224 

MS. CL 188—72.9 7 Claims 



transmitted through the spring in a direction tending to un- 
coil the spring in both directions of roution of the input 
shaft. The coil spring is preloaded to a predetermined torque 
load value so that the coils expand at the predetermined 
torque value and engage the housing braking surface and 
thereby cease traimnission of roution from the input shaft to 
the output shaft. 



3,659,683 
ELECTROMECHANICAL SHIFTING DEVICE 
Radolf Betiing, Altendorier StrasM 166a, 427o Alteadori-Ulf. 
kottc, Germany 

Filed Apr. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 30,110 
Clafans priority, application Germany, Apr. 25, 1969, F 19 21 

252J 

Int CL F16d 65134 

U.S.CL 188-162 , 8ClainH 




^^UJ[^ 



A compact di^ brake having a pair of brake shoes 
floatingly mounted on a pair of pins and a brake operating 
lever which is operative to move the shoes into engagement 
with opposite sides of a brake disk. One of the shoes is U- 
shaped and presents two pairs of openings duough which the 
pins extend. 



3,659,682 

BI-DIRECTIONAL TORQUE LIMITING BRAKE 

MECHANISM 

Marvin Meyer, Wot CaMwd; Sirivatore Avcaa, Newark, and 

Robert L. Lcincr, Pompton Lakes, all of NJ., asrignon to 

Curtiai-Wrigkt Corpomtkm 

Filed Nov. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 89,168 i 
Int CL B60t 7112 
MS. CL 188—134 16 n»h— 

The bi-directional torque limiting brake mechanism com- 
prises two coupling members coaxially supported for relative 
roution within a housing and in closed spaced relationship to 
a braking surface formed on the housing. A coil spring is 
disposed in the space adjacent the braking surface and in 




/ 



3gr 



\ 



A plunger is adapted to transmit external work to a shifting 
member. A transmission comprises a screw having male 
screw threads, a nut which is formed with female screw 
threads which surround said male screw threads and define a 
helical guide path therewith, revolving elements disposed in 
said guide path between and guided by and coupling said 
male and female screw threads, means for continuously mov- 
ing said revolving elements in and along said guide p«th and 
through the same and back into said guide path, anid means 
holding said nut against rotatitm. Said transmission is adapted 
to transform a rotational drive movement of a motor shah of 
an electric stop motor into a linear worldng movement of 
said plunger. A fivewbeel clutch is disposed between said 



110 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



motor shaft and said screw and adapted to rigidly couple said juiter mechanisin automatically operative to compensate for 
motor shaft and screw for rototion in one direction and to wear of a braking clement. The hydraulic-type slack adjuster 
uncouple said motor shaft and screw for relative roUtion in mechanism comprises a variable volume accumulator into 



the opposite direction. Shock-absorbing means are disposed 
between a holder for the device and the shifting member. 
The periphery of the freewheel clutch substantially coincides 
with the periphery erf an imaginary cylinder which is con- 
tiguous with said crests of said male screw threads. 



3,659,684 
HYDRAUUC LOCK REFILL VALVE 
Percy L. Porter, Los Anfcks, CaMfM aaiinor to P. 
Co., Los Aaieln, CaW . 

Filed Nov. 25, 1969, Scr. No. 879,806 
Int. CL F16f 9/43 
VS. CL 188—322 



L. Porter 



6Claiins 




« '■M '« 



3=3^ 



A refill valve for use in an hydraulic locking device such as 
that utilized in a chair to control the angle between the 
backrest and the seat. The refUl valve comprisies a fluid 
passageway for refilling the hydraulic locking device, a check 
valve being mounted within the passageway, having an exten- 
sion thereon for cooperation with an oil can or other delivery 
means to open the check valve during refilling and also to 
allow relief of any over-pressure which may occur during the 
refiUing. Additionally, the refill valve is adjustable within the 
hydraulic locking device so as to control the override func- 
tion of the locking valve in the device. 



to 



3,659,685 

SLACK ADJUSTER FOR DISC BRAKE 

Joseph G. Stipanovic, McKccsport, Pa., asaigiior 

Wcsdnghouse Air Brake Company, WDmcrding, Pa. 

Filed Oct 28, 1970, Scr. No. 84,725 

Int CL F16d 55/228, 65/74 

U.S. CL 188—72.5 12 Claims 




A pneumatically controlled hydraulically actuated disc- 
type brake mechanism for use on a wheel and axle assembly 
of a railway vehicle truck includes a hydraulic-type slack ad- 



which a hydraulic medium or fluid is forced upon the occur- 
rence of wear of a braking element while a brake application 
is in effect and from which hydraulic fluid subsequently flows 
to two pair of hydraulic brake applying cylinders upon initiat- 
ing a brake release to increase the volume thereof thereby to 
compensate for brake element wear. Prior to completion of 
the brake release, hydraulic fluid flows from a storage reser- 
voir to the accumulator to replace that previously supplied 
from the accumulator to the hydraulic brake applying cylin- 
ders. 



3,659,686 
BRAKE MEANS FOR ELECTRIC MOTORS 
Jowpii M. Markky, Sovtkington, Conn., aadgnor to Robbfaia 
& Myers, Inc., Springfield, Oiiki 

Filed Jan. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 3,676 

Int. CI. F16d 67/00 

U.S. CI. 192-2 3 Claims 



\ 




A brake means for electric motors to stop rotation of the 
drive shaft immediately when the motor is de-energized. The 
motor shaft frictionally carries a brake plate and the brake 
plate bears frictionally against a surface of the rotor. The 
brake plate carries a stop-lug which is engageable by means 
of a solenoid operated plunger to stop the brake plate 
abruptly whereupon the rotor assembly is stopped fric- 
tionally. The plunger is actuated when the motor is de-ener- 
gized and is retracted when the motor is energized. 



3,659,687 
FLUID DRIVE TRANSMISSION WFTH RETARDER AND 

CONTROLS 
John O. Edmonds, IndJanapolis, Ind., aarignor to General 
Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich. 

Filed Sept. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 73,782 
Int CI. F16d 67/00, 33/00 
U.S. CL 192-4 B 3 Claims 

A transmission having a torque converter and a 
hydrodyiuunic retarder and a three gear dual pump feed 
system. One pump supplies fluid through a filter to the main 
line and the main line regulator valve which regulates main 
line pressure at a high value and supplies the excess fluid to 
the lubrication line. The lubrication regulator valve regulates 
lubrication line pressure at a lower value and supplies the ex- 
cess fluid to the converter line, suppleinenting the fluid 
supply from the other pump to the converter inlet. The con- 
verter inlet pressure is regulated at a further lower value by a 
converter bypass valve and the excess fluid supplied to a 
bypass line. The converter outlet line and the retarder outlet 
line regulated at a still lower pressure is connected tlirough 
the cooler to the bypass line which is connected by a retarder 
valve in the retarder on position to the retarder inlet. A con- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



111 



verter regiilator valve limits the pressure in the bypass line to and its drive member form a channel therebetween and each 
a low value so that the retarder is supplied by all available has a plurality of spaced annular grooves formed on a surface 

thereof, with the grooves on the rotary member adapted to 
register with the grooves on the drive member to form axially 




fluid, both the full flow of the converter and retarder outlet 
and any excess flow fi'om the main line and lubrication 
system. 



3,659,688 
CENTRIFUGALLY OPERATED CLUTCH IN A TWO- 
SPEED BICYCLE HUB 
Hont Scfauh, Schwdnfint, Germany, assignor to Fichtd A 
Sachs AG, Schwdnfurt, Germany 

Filed Aug. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 6736 
Claims priority, application Germany, Sept 1 1, 1969, P 19 

45 972.4 

Int CL F16d 43/24 

VS. CL 192-105 CE 14 Claims 



,3;.r"r 




One of the two pawl-and-ratchet clutches which connect 
the hub shell with the planet carrier and the ring gear in a 
two-speed bicycle hub is controlled by a centrifugal governor 
whose two flyweights are pivotally mounted on a comnxHi 
carrier with the pawl of the controlled clutch. A coupling 
disc is mounted on the carrier by means of a bearing pin 
whose axis is spacedly parallel to the hub axis. The disc is 
tilted by engagement vrith connecting pins on the flyweights, 
thereby coupling the flyweights for joint swinging movement 
about the respective pivot axes in the same direction, and 
preventing malfunctioning of the clutch by movement of the 
flyweights under the influence of forces other than centrifu- 
gal forces. A cam on the coupling disc holds the controlled 
pawl disengaged when the flyweights are near the axis of 
rotation. 



to The Singer Com- 



3,659,689 
SEAL DEVICE 
Arnold Schlndd, Fairiawn, N J., 
pany. New Yorl^ N.Y. 

Filed Oct 8, 1970, Scr. No. 79,025 ! 

Int CL F16d 13/74 
U.S.CL 192-112 9 Claims 

A seal device for restricting flow of a fluid, such as a mix- 
ture of air and vapor, between two pressure areas established 
with respect to a rotary member, wherein the rotary member 




spaced annular chambers extending between the pressure 
areas. A sealing fluid is disposed in the grooves and in the 
channel to provide the seal. The device may be incorporated 
in a clutch assembly whereby actuation of the clutch pres- 
surizes the sealing fluid. 



3,659,690 
TRANSMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM FOR VEHICLES 
Shia KiUno, and Yntaka Momoae, hoth of Kariya, Japan, as- 
signors to Aisfai Sdki Kabnshild Kaisha, Kariya-shi, Japan 
Filed Sept 1, 1970, Scr. No. 68,607 
Claims priority, application Japan, Sept 3, 1969, 44/83844; 
Nov. 12,1969,44/90701 
Int CL F16d 25/12, 33/12, 33/02 
VS. CL 192-3 J3 10 < 




A transmission control system for vehicle having a trai»- 
mission fluid actuated clutch means connected to a torque 
converter and a hydraulic brake means for arresting move- 
ment of the vehicle, comprising a source of pressurized fluid, 
first fluid passageway means connecting said fluid source 
with said clutch means, a regulator valve means ^BpoMd 
within said first passageway means and automatically ooo- 
troUing hydraulic pressure for said clutch means in response 
to the prime engine revohition rate, manual means to selec- 
tively regulate the passage ai pressurized fluid to said dutch 
means, a second passageway means communicatively con- 
necting said pressure fluid source with said torque converter 
disposed therein, a relirf valve means interposed within said 
second passageway means and regulating output hydraulic 
pressure fix>m said torque conveiter, and a control valve 
means to make said regulator valve means inoperative in 
response to activation of the Inrake pedal of the vehicle. 



112 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,691 3,659,693 

MATERIAL SUPPLY CHUTE LOADING DEVICE FOR PROCESSING MACHINES 

Hdmut Levtdt, IniMbnick, Auitiia, MdgDor to Haaemag kt\ Mailer, Thcodoraufr. 6-8, 6200 WIctlMdeii, Gcrmaoy 
HartzerkMncniiiss-Uiid Zement-Maschiiicnbau-GcseU- FUcd Nov. 3, 1969, Scr. No. 873,364 

achaft ni.b.li., ^oenster, Gemiany Claims priority, appttcatioa Gcmumy, Mar. 13, 1969, P 19 

FUed Dec. 31, 1969, S«r. No. 889490 12 659.1 

dafans priority, appttcatkm Austria, Jan. 3. 1969, A 41/69 Iat.CLB65t 47/00 

Int. CLB65g 77/50 U.S. CL 198-20 SCialna 

UACL 193-2 C , 20 Claims 



i 




A plurality of discrete bar elements are arranged in side- 
by-side relationship and together constitute a material supply 
chute having a general plane. Means are provided for in- 
dividually displacing the bar elements with reference to this 
general plane so that individual bar elements can be disposed 
upwardly or downwardly with reference to the others. 



' 3,659,692 

COIN LOCK HAVING DISC TO INDICATE READINESS 

OF LOCK 
* Heinz Ten Eickcn, Vdbcrt, Germany, amtgnor to Firma 
Schloasfabrik Schulte«dilacboam A.G., Tooishddc Ger- 
many 

Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 23,799 
Claims priority, application Germany, Apr. 5, 1969, P 19 17 
. ; 516.7 



Int. CLG07f 77/74 



U.S. CL 194—59 





A mechanism for feeding workpieces to a machine in- 
cludes a conveyor system for moving workpiece receptacle to 
a machine at a constant speed and reciprocating loading 
means for transferring workpieces to the receptacles from a 
fixed station, the loading means being synchronized with the 
movement of the receptacles when moving in the direction to 
feed a workpiece. 



3,659.694 

PACKING OR WRAPPING MACHINE OF THE MOULD 

WHEEL TYPE 

Richard William Harris, London, England, aarignor to MoUm 

Macklac Compuiy Limited, London, England 

Filed Ang. 28, 1970, Ser. No. 67^80 

Claims priority, application Great Britain, ScpC 5, 1969, 

44,089/69 

InL CI. B65g 29/00, 47/04 

U.S. CL 198-25 4 Claims 



4Claima 




A coin lock, particularly for baggage storing boxes, includ- 
ing means for controlling the time period of use of said box, 
which comprises a lock box having a lock bottom and a lock 
cover, and a cylinder lock is secured to the lock cover. The 
cylinder lock includes a key-operated cylinder core and a 
locking bolt has a driving slot receiving a driving pin con- 
trolled by the cylinder core. A stepwise operated switching 
work, operable from the outside and controlled by an in- 
dicating disc, is coupled with the locking bolt. The stepwise 
operated switching work has a locking cam movable from a 
locking-readiness position from the outside into a position 
bloclung the return closing movement of the bolt, and is dis- 
placeable by the return closing movement of the bolt into its 
original, starting position. 



Apparatus for transferring unwrapped cigarette packets 
from a wheel conveyor into the pockets of a mould wheel 
wrapping machine. The apparatus comprises a rotary four- 
armed spider between the two wheels with a carrier pivoted 
from the end of each arm d the spider. Each carrier has a 
cam foUov^r to move it radially, a cam follower to pivot it 
bodily, and a cam follower to open and close iprippers 
pivotally mounted on the carrier. Each cam follower coacts 
with a stationary cam. 



to Chevron 



3,659,695 
PAIL STACKER 
Donald H. Reese, Orinda, CaHf., 
Research Company, San Frandsco, CaHf. 

Filed Jan. 11, 1971, Ser. No. 105,200 
Int. a. B65g 57/JO 
U.S.CL 198-35 . 13 

Pail engaging means are mounted on opposmg sides of a 
vertical frame means which straddles a moving conveyor. A 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



113 



first gate means stops pail from proceeding through the verti- 
cal frame means until a stack of pails is formed and then 
releases the completed stack to the conveyor. A lift means 
enables pails engaged by the pail engaging means to be raised 
off the conveyor upwardly within the vertical fttune means, 
permitting additional pails to be added to the bottom of an 



each other to form a chain and for pivotal movement about 
an axis subsuntially perpendicular to the plane of the plat- 
form. Means is provided to one side of the platform to coact 
with other like parts of like links when the links arc joined 




\ 



\ 



uncompleted stack when the pails engaged by the pail engag- 
ing means are lowered to rest on an incoming pail. A second 
gate means permits additional pails to pass into the vertical 
frame means when the conveyor pathway is not obstructed 
and prevents pails frt>m passing into the vertical frame means 
when a paO is stopped on the conveyor by said first gate 
means. 



3,659,696 ' 

LIVE ROLLER CONVEYOR 

Ccd S. Denton, Loabvffle, Ky., and Frank D. Dernier, Jcffer^ 

sonvUe, Ind., anrignors to General Electric Company 

Fled Sept 9, 1970, Scr. No. 70,683 

Int. CL B65g 13/02 

VJS, CL 198—127 5 Claims 




A beh-driven live roller conveyor in which the drive area is 
separated from the conveyor area by a longitudinally extend- 
ing guide member. A drive belt is disposed above the rollers 
with its lower drive pass engaging the upper surface of the 
rollers in the drive area. Spaced pressure members are 
removably positioned on the belt in the drive area, these 
members comprising a pair of spaced rolls riding on the drive 
belt pass and a frame supporting the rolls in spaced relation- 
ship so that they bridge at least one conveyor roller. Means 
are also provided for preventing the pressure members from 
traveling with the belt. 



3,659,697 ' 

CONVEYOR LINK 
Warren A. Brackmann, Cooksvffle, Ontario, and Daniel 
DHanni, Toronto, Ontario, bodi of Canada, asrignnn to 
of P^ Mai Canada Lioalted, Toronto, Ontario, 




together to form a chain to space the platforms of the links 
apart from each other when the chain is formed into a helix. 
A conveyor chain capable of formation into a self-supporting 
helix is provided from a plurality of such links articulated 
together. 



3,659,698 
CHAIN CONVEYOR 
Werner Helmat Riegcr, 7084 Unterkochcn/Wnerttembcii, 
Hans Hnesdback, Gcnnany 

FOed Ang. 12, 1969, Scr. No. 849,390 

Int.CLB65g77/72 

U.S. CL 198- 140 7 Claims 




A round-steel chain having links in parallel planes and con- 
nected by crosspins, the pins having rings which support the 
chain in the region of driving or supporting sprocket wheels, 
there being at least four links between every two inter- 
mediate rings on crosspins connected to preceding and toi- 
lowing crosspins. 



Filed Apr. 14, 1970, Scr. Nc. 28^3 
Claims priority, application Grent Britain, Sept. 30, 1969, 

48,090/69 
Int. CL B65g 75/00 
U.S. CL 198—136 9 OaimB 

A rigid link for a conveyor chain includes a rigid platform 
to support a load and means to pivotally connect links to 



3,659,699 
CONVEYOR MECHANISM 
Leo O. Donakne, and Roy E. B i hr i n i, both of 
CaHf., asrignors to Graphic Engtawcrs, lac^ Snn 
dfaio,CaliL 

Filed Jnly 17, 1970, Scr. No. 55,722 
Int. CL B65g 75/74 
VS. CL 198—165 5 

Overlapping signatures are transported between upper and 
lower belts, wherein the upper belt passes around three pul- 
leys, the fiist of which is suf^xnted at the five end of a voti- 
cally swingable first arm extending generally horizontally 
fit>m its pivot The second pulley is carried on a second, ver- 



114 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



ticaOy swingable arm. Springs pull downwardly on the free 
end of the second arm to tension the belts. The third pulley is 
joumaled on the pivot axis of the second arm. The belts pass 
over the third pulley, under the second and over the first. 
The line of pull of the belts extends from the top of the 
second pulley to the top of the first pulley at an angle to the 
horizontal such that a downward component of force is ex- 
erted on the first pulley, urging it downwardly against the 



tinuous conveyor surface. One or more individual sections 
may be moved to make the overall length of the conveyor 
shorter than the length of a line of molds on the conveyor so 
that a mold may be dropped frx>m the end of the shortened 




1^ '' ^ ^n^S?r^\ 



signatures. The first pulley rises and falls with the first arm to 
accommodate variations in thickness of the line of signattires. 
The second pulley rises and falls approximately the same 
distance as the first to accommodate the length of the upper 
belt to the increased bulk of bunched-up signatures traveling 
on the conveyor, while maintaining the same angle of pull on 
the first pulley, with respect to the horizontal, so that the 
downward component of force remains the same. 



> 



V 



to Dccre & Com- 



3,659,700 > 
AUGER CO^^VEYOR 
WflUam Tunderman, Barstow, DL, aaigiM 
pany, MoHnc, DL 

Filed Sept. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 75,122 

lot CL B65g 33124 

U.S.CL 198—213 • 15 Claims 





conveyor. The movable section or sections may be moved to 
lengthen the conveyor so that a newly formed mold may be 
added to the line of molds by pushing the line of molds along 
the conveyor and by moving the movable conveyor section 
or sections together with molds located thereon. 



3,659,702 
CONVEYOR, PARTICULARLY FOR CHIPS 
Hcteath AanuMr, Wappcrtal-Elbcrfeld, Gcnnaay, aarignor to 
Ftraia Kobo KoUcr A Bovcnkamp GjB.iUl., Wuppcrtal- 
Banaea, GcnBaay 

FHed Jbm 19, 1970, Scr. No. 47,652 
CbJns priority, applkatioB Gcrmaay, Jane 21, 1969, P 19 31 

549.2 

lat. CL B65g 25108 

U.S. CL 198-221 2 Claln 







S^^2^2SZ3 



An auger conveyor including a cylindrical core tube com- 
posed of a spiral-wound strip and having a raised spiral seam 
on its external surface, and spiral flighting connecting exter- 
nally to the core tube, the flighting having a spiral inner edge 
parallel with and abutting the seam of the tube. The core 
tube and flighting assembly is rotatable relative to a housing 
to advance material therealong, the housing consisting of a 
spiral-wound cylindrical tube having an internal raised seam 
extending in close proximity to the outer edge of the flighting 
and acting as a stripper therefor. \ \ 




3,659,701 
COOLING CONVEYOR 
RasMU W. Taccooe, 1960 Lakeside Drive, Erie, Pa. 
, Filed May 4, 1970, Scr. No. 34,470 

Int. CL B65g 25108 
U.S. CL 198—221 18 Claims 

A cooling conveyor is disclosed for receiving a line of 
molds from a mold forming machine. The conveyor includes 
a plurality of conveyor sections having adjacent end portions 
which interfit so the conveyor sections together define a con- 



w<v/ // /Mv// // /; ^ 



Improvement in a conveyor, particuJariy for chips, com- 
prising hollow conveyor rods movable back and forth ad- 
jacent the bottom of a conveyor trough, said conveyor rods 
being guided on posts, extending fit)ii the bottom of the con- 
veyor trough through openingji into the inside of the con- 
veyor rods, said conveyor rods having conveying elements in- 
cluding barb-shaped pushing blades which occupy only a 
fractional portion of the cross section of the conveyor 
trough, the improvement comprising slide bars associated 
with the latersil edges of the conveyor rod opening for 
minimizing wear of the post. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



115 



3,659,703 3,659,705 

COMPACT FILE FOR STORING PAPERS TRANSPARENT PACKAGE 

Loutee Ina OHvcr, 538 W. 79th Street, Los Angdcs, Calif. Abrahaa J. FalUa, 33 RemacB Street, Valley Stream, N.Y. 



Filed Jan. 16, 1970, Scr. Nio. 3,456 
Int. CL A45c 3i02 
U.S. CL 206—1 A 



Conttanation-iB-part of appHcatloD Scr. No. 826,573, May 21, 
1969, BOW abandoned. This application June 29, 1970, Scr. 
1 Clafan No. 50,486 

Int. CL B65d 5158, 85130 
U.S. CL 206-4534 18 Claims 




S6-2 



The compact file includes an outside case with an accor- 
dion back portion pivoted by sockets to an accordion front 
portion for movement between open and closed positions; a 
releasable catch mechanism which selectively holds the por- 
tions in the closed position; a plurality of separators, each 
separator having upper and lower flexible pockets on both 
sides for receiving papers, a rod means with a ^ring therein 
fixed to the separators and extending between the sockets of 
the portions to removably locate the separators and any 
papers in the separator pockets in the outside case to be pro- 
tected thereby. 



3,659,704 

DISPLAY CARTON HAVING STRUCTURE FOR 

PRODUCT SUPPORT THEREIN 

Peter C. Colnra, Stamford, Com., and WIDtom P. PfaHsak, 

Oasiatat* N.Y^ aaslpiora to Container Corporation of 

America, Chlcato, DL 

FOed Oct 2, 1969, Scr. No. 863,065 
Int CL B65d 5150, 25/00 ' \ 

US. CL 206—45.14 1 Claim 



1 




A carton for display of merchandise and having structure 
for support therein of soft goods such as hosiery or the like. 
The carton is formed fitim a cut and scored blank and a sup- 
port arm is cut out ftom a ftonx panel thereof, or from a front 
and side panel thereof, such support arm being folded inward 
to provide support for an article of merchandise. An aperture 
is thereby formed for viewing of such merchandise. The con- 
tainer blank is integrally formed with a hanger to suspend the 
completed carton for display. 



v 




82-* 



A package device is vacuum formed from a thermoplastic 
sheet and includes at least three self-hinged outwardly open 
sector shaped sections closed to form a polyhedral body with 
the section side walls in juxtaposition and the end sections 
being joined by fastening means. Cavity delineating inner 
walls are formed in the inner parts of the sections and joir 
the side walls. The sections may include end waDs which 
delineate the cavity end walls or the inner walls may include 
cavity end walls joined to the section si<k and end walls 
which latter may be curved. Vertical ribs or protuberances 
may be formed on the end walls or on intermediate shoulders 
on the cavity walls and outwardly projecting ribs may be 
formed on vertically extending cavity walls. 



3,659,706 

PHARMACAL PACKAGE CONSTRUCTION 

John J. ScrrcU, Havcrford, Pa., amignnr to Paricc, Davis & 

Company, Detroit, Mich. 
Continnadon-ln-part of application Scr. No. 831,557, June 9, 

1969, now Patent No. 3,603,453, Continnntion-hi-pnrt of 

application Scr. No. 877,075, Nov. 17, 1969. Thb application 

Apr. 24, 1970, Scr. Na 31,534 

Int. CL B65d 21102, 75136, 83/04, 85/56 

US. CL 206—56 AB 6 < 



^s^ Sf 




^'¥ ^£ 



A pharmacal package construction wherein a jjair of 
blister sheets are closed by respective backing sheets and ar- 
ranged with the blisters in proximate relation so that the 
backing sheets are outermost, the blister sheets being pro- 
vided with detachably interfitting formations, to releasably 
retain the blister sheets and their backing sheets in position 
defining a package effectively protected by the backing 
sheets. 

3,659,707 
DIVISIBLE TRANSPORT PACKAGE 
Lars Olov NOsson, Farsta; Nils Leo Liyegren, Ekero, and 
Robert VIctorin, Stocksnnd, afl of Sweden, assignors to 
^ob AB Svensk Indnstris KonstnikUons Odi Bcraknlg- 
skoDtor, Sdna, Sweden 

FDed Dec 4, 1969, Scr. No. 882,079 
Claims priority, application Sweden, Dec 4, 1968, 16396/68 

Int. CL B65d 1 7/00, 71/00 
VS. CL 206—65 B 6 Clafans 

A divisible transport package comprising at least two con- 
tainers suppcnted by arid retaining side-by-side on opposite 



116 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



sides of a vertical partition plane upon a tray having a bottom wrapping. Any number of preselected lengths may be 

portion, suitably supported by feet and having a slot in the grouped but the extremes in stem length are selected first, 

plane, and upwardly projecting runs around the periphery of e.g. the longest, proceeding to the opposite extreme so that 

I ■ the stem length detectors operate like a sieve. 




3,659,708 
SEPARATION OF DISCOLORANTS FROM CLAY 
Hortoa H. Morrb; Jama P. OlMcr, both oT Macoa, Ga., and 
SydMj RtM, Troy, N.Y^ ■ wifor i to Freeport Sulphar 
Coaipoay, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Nov. 4, 1968, Scr. No. 773,335 
tet CL B03b 1104; COlb 35/00 
VS. CL 209-5 6 Clafani 

A process for beneficiating a dispersed kaolin clay mass by 
removing from a dispersed clay mass the contaminant which 
causes the formation of a thin, dull layer of yellow or 
brownish-yellow material, commonly referred to as "scum," 
on surfaces of dried material containing the dispersed clay. 
The process comprises raising the pH of an aqueous disper- 
sion of the clay to at least 1 2 and at that pH separating the 
insoluble clay from the solubilized discoloring contaminant. 



! 3,659,709 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR SORTING FLOWERS 
David S. Bartktt, Jr.; Rapcrt M. PnrccB; DavM W. Osborne, 
aad Troy F. SmUky Jr., aB of San Jose, CaHf., atrignors to 
Floral GradlBg Inc., Sonarvalc, CaHf. 

FUcd Mar. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 21,771 
i. Int. CL B07c 1114 

VS. CL 209-82 21 Claims 




3,659,710 

ARTICLE EXTRACTING DEVICE 

JoMph Ticc, 210 Yorkshire Drive, GrecavOlc, S.C. 

FUcd Aag. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 61,609 

luL CL B07c 7/00 

U.S.CL 209-125 



the bottom portion, which tray is adapted to be divided, for 
instance by cutting, into two parts along the lines of intersec- 
tion between the tray and the vertical plane. 



The invention is a method and apparatus for sorting 
flowers on the basis of stem length. Flowers of random stem 
lengths are arranged on a first conveyor with their stems 
aligned in substantially vertical parallel relation. A series of 
stem length detectors sense various stem lengths whereupon 
all flowers of similar length are transferred to a correspond- 
ing one of a series of storage conveyors. When a desired 
quantity of similar sized flowers are stored in the storage con- 
veyor, they arc transferred by a transfer conveyor to a ter- 
minal conveyor where they are grouped for tying and 



2 Claims 




An apparatus for extracting defective articles from a row 
of articles moving on a conveyor. The apparatus includes a 
vibrating plate which transfers the articles from the conveyor 
to a trap door. When the trap door is open the articles are al- 
lowed to drop therethrough. When the trap door is closed the 
articles move thereover to a receiving station. Divider plates 
are provided for maintaining the articles in rows. 



3,659,711 

DEVICE FOR GRAVIMETRIC SEPARATION OF 

GRANULAR OR PULVERULENT MATERIALS 

Richard Cohen-AOoro, OriraM, and Jean Gramud, Boo- 

logM-BOiaBooitrt, both of FrMcc, aailtanri to Bwcau de 

KCdwrciMs oe oi o jw|xs ci Mimerca, nana, Frmcc 

Coatinuation of application Scr. Na 784,158, Dec. 16, 1968, 

abandoned, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. Na 

621 JOG, Mar. 7, 1%7, abandoned. 

This application Mar. 23, 1970, Scr. Na 20,445 

Claims priority, application France, Mar. 26, 1966, 55139 

Int. CL B03b 3/22 

VS. CL 209—457 4 Clalmt 




A device for gravimetric separation of granular or pulveru- 
lent materials includes a means for creating a series of 
reciprocating pulsations in a fluid, either air, water or a dense 
liquid. This pulsating fluid passes through a porous bottom 
which has pores sufficiently small to retain the dense parti- 
cles, and means allowing the retention of the dense products. 
The porous bottom includes a regulatable flow aperture 
system for the continuous evacuation of the dense products. 
The products to be treated are poured into a feed channel 
loading to the porous bottom. A regulatable feed plate above 
the porous bottom allovk^s regularizing flow of the raw materi- 
als. A pouring siU for the li^t materials is replacable by 
others which vary in height. The amplitude of the pulsations 
are system regulatable. A trap is situated in the lower part of 
the tank. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



117 



3,659,712 

REMOVING DEEP SILT AND MUCK DEPOSITS 

Merle P. Chaplin, 609 Drive Avenue, Winter Park, Fla. 

CoothiaatioB of appBratfciB Scr. No. 832,125, June 1 1, 1969, 

now abandoned. This application Oct 16, 1970, Scr. Na 

82318 
Int. CL BOld 27/00 ^ 

VS. CL 210—73 




eludes a vessel having a pair of elongated booms which are 
adapted to extend forwardly and outwardly of the motion of 
the vessel. Each boom extends above the water and carries 
nozzles which are adapted for form a substantially continu- 
ous elongated gaseous stream for impinging upon the water 

; between the booms to thereby concentrate floating impuri- 

ties between the booms. In addition, the vessel is provided 

17 Claims with impurity inlet means between the booms for collecting 
the concentrated impurities from the water. 



3,659,713 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR RECOVERING 

IMPURITIES FROM THE SURFACE OF A UQUID 

Fraderick N. Mndkr, Dalaa, Tex., aarignor to Tetradyne 

Corporatian, DaBaa, Tex. 

FDcd Jan. 16, 1970, Scr. Na 3,351 

Int CL E02b 15/04 

U.S.CL 210-83 10 Claims 




Impurities are removed from the surface of a liquid by 
impinging an elongated fluid stream, preferably a gaseous 
stream, along a length of the surface and moving the imping- 
ing stream relative to the surface causing the impurities to 
move and concentrate in advance of the impinging action of 
the stream, and thereafter isolating the concentrated mass of 
impurities. An apparatus is also provided suitable for 
traversing a body of water and recovering impurities, such as 
oil and the like from its surface. A preferred apparatus in- 



3^9,714 
UQUID WASTE TREATMENT APPARATUS 
Joaeph M. VaUmftaa, Sidto E 3609 OU Winter 
Road, Oraafe Couty, Hn. 

Fled M«y 1, 1970, Scr. No. 33422 
Int CL BOld 33/02 
UACL 210—107 11 







A method and apparatus for removing silt, muck and other 
deposits from a water covered basin wboae bottom has been 
covered with a relatively thick deposit, involving the use of a 
submerged bousing unit supported from the surface in a con- 
trolled relationship to the deposits on the bottom of the 
basin. The submerged unit is provided with a gate at its for- 
ward end so as only to permit the entry of silt into the hous- 
ing at the forward end as it is moved along the bottom, vrith 
the arrangement being such that a pressurized jet can be in- 
jected into the entering material to enable a workable mix- 
ture of water and silt to be achieved. Means are provided for 
then drawing the mixture to the surface so that the silt can be 
dispoced of at a location outside the basin. Other facets of 
the invention include the use of automatic means for main- 
taining the submerged housing unit in a desirable relationship 
to the sih deposits; the use of a selectively operable gate at 
each end of the device so as to enable operation in either 
direction; and automatic means for injecting additional jets 
of water as needed to maintain proper consistency of the 
material being discharged. I 




A sewage treatment apparatus having an input tank with 
mixing and screen filtering means for receiving liquid waste 
such as raw sewage. The level of liquid waste in the input 
tank controls a timer which activates a valve to release the 
screened sewage into a filter centrifuge for rapidly separating 
liquids and solids in the liquid waste. The sobds separated are 
burned and vacuumed from the filter centrifuge following fil- 
tering of the liquid through a fiher medium located in the 
centrifuge. A high speed perforated drum centrifuge is lined 
with a filter material such as sand and the drum may have 
vanes on its periphery to form an impeller to act in conjunc- 
tion with a diffuser casing to form a centrifugal pump integral 
with the filter. 



3,659,715 
APPARATUS FOR REMOVING OIL FLOATING ON 
WATER 
Amos J. S^kr, Stale CoBcge, and WWam E. Clancy, St 
Marys, both of Pa., — Ignori to Stadqpole Carbon Com- 
pany, St Mwya, Pa. 

Fled Jnly 22, 1969, Scr. Na 843,713 
Int CL C02b 9/02 
U.S. CL 210— 242 11 




An elongated porous member is inapregnated with a com- 



!• 

bustible fluid and then floated in a generally upright position 
in a layer of combustible fluid on a body of water, with the 
lower portion of the porous member extending down in the 
water and with its upper portion projecting above the fluid 
layer. The fluid carried by the upper end of the porous 
member is ignited to produce a flame that is thereafter fed by 
combustible fluid moving up through that member by capilla- 
ry action from the fluid layer, whereby to remove the fluid 
from the water and bum it. 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,716 
FILTER ASSEMBLY WITH FILTRATE FLOW CONTROL 

AND CONTROL COMPONENTS 
C. Lyan Peterson, aad Cfaurcncc John Peterson, both of Sah 
Lake City, Utah, Mrigno n to Peterson FUtcrs & Engineer- 
ing Company, Sak Lake City, Utah 

Filed Oct 6, 1969, Ser. No. 863,947 

Int. CL BOld 33/40, 33/26 

U.S. CL 210— 247 12 Claims 



'!p 




tilting the container to an inclined position so that the fluid 
will drain from the container in the inclined position, and a 
food restraining device which moves therewith. Apparatus is 
provided for initially lowering the food restraining device to a 
position adjacent the food so that the device will retain the 
food in the container during the tilting operation. 



Disc filter assembly in which a plurality of filter discs are 
mounted on common shaft for rotation to selectively dispose 
disc surfaces under vacuum in a confined body of slurry 
through a portion of said rotation and to discharge formed 
cake from said surfaces by "blow" action through another 
portion of rotation. Each disc has plurality of sectors in 
sequential arrangement circumferentially of shaft mounted 
on a hollow center shaft fabricated from standard industrial 
components, inclusive of steel pipe forming shaft exterior 
and plurality of tubular members of oblong section in welded 
circumferentially spaced arrangement interiorly of pipe 
providing a conductive passage in communicating relation to 
at least one sector for applying vacuum and blow thereto 
under control of filter valve. 



3,659,717 
APPARATUS FOR REMOVING FLUID FROM A FOOD 
CONTAINER 
Gerald W. Boarblna, Saginaw, Mkh., asdgnor to Baker Per- 
kins Inc., Saginaw, Mich. 

Filed June 9, 1 969, Ser . No. 83 1 ,443 

InL CL BOld 35/08 

U.S. CL 210-329 . 14 Claims 



3,659,718 
FILTER ELEMENTS 
Ronald Eric Brodner; WIBImb Moon, and Raymond CoBlns, 
aB of ComwaB, England, asrignnrs to EngHdi Clays Lovcr- 
ing PocMn and Company Limited, Cornwall, England 

FDed Sept 23, 1969, Ser. No. 860,366 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Sept 27, 1968, 

46,159/68 

Int CL BOld 29/14 

VS. CL 2 10— 333 3 Clafam 






\\i>' 



r 



A filter thickener incorporating a filter element which is 
formed frt}m a bag of filter material substantially filled with a 
packing material through which liquid can permeate. The 
filter element is advantageously in the form of a filter leaf 
which comprises a flat bag of filter material containing 
packing material in the form of a flexible mat or mesh made 
from a natural or synthetic polymeric material, and opposing 
sides of the flat bag of filter material are preferably joined 
together in a manner which divides the bag of filter material 
into a plurality of strips or annuli. 



3,659,719 
FILTER FRAME CONSTRUCTION 
Kari L. Wcsttln, and Wilson A. Welch, both of Louisville, Ky., 
assignors to American Air Filter Company, Inc., LoulsvlBc, 
Ky. 

FUed Dec. 7, 1970, Ser. No, 95,508 

Int CL BOld 46/52 

U.S. a. 2 10-483 4 Claims 





A filter assembly including a filter frame with filter medi- 
um disposed therein and a border flange arranged to engage 
the edge of the filter frame, the border flange being clamped 
Apparatus for removing fluid, such as grease, from a food to the frame by resilient means inserted between the filter 
container in which food is cooked including mechanism for frame and the flange. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



119 



3,659,720 - wires welded to a plurality of vertical plastic coated wires to 

SEDIMENTATION SYSTEM support a plurality of suspension members projecting for- 

Lars G. Mahn, Undvagen, Sweden, Msignor to AB Pnmc, wardly of the frame each suspension member comprising a 

Land, Sweden substantially U-shaped member with hooked ends to engage 

Filed Oct 27, 1970, Ser. No. 84388 

Clafans priority, application Sweden, Oct 31, 1969, 14985/69 

Int CL BOld 2//74 
U.S. CL 210-525 - 6 Claims 




A system for purifying water and sewage by forcing a 
liquid that is to be sedimented flow from the lower portion of 
a basin and upwards while sedimented matter in the liquid 
sinks downwardly in the basin. Concentrically positioned ele- 
ments are located at the surface of the liquid for draining off 
purified liquid through fall pipes that interconnect the ele- 
ments with discharge pipes at the bottom of the basin. 



3,659,721 ' 

LOCK RACK 
Vhicent PariUo, Highland Park, N J., assignor to Bond Stores, 
Incorporated, New York, N.Y. 

FUed Aug. 7, 1970, Ser. No. 62,101 

Int CI. E05b 73/00 

U.S.CL 211-7 2 Claims 




The application discloses a clothes rack which provides 
means for locking clothes hangers onto the hanger rod of the 
rack. These means include a spring pressed channel bar 
mounted over the hanger rod and adapted to partially em- 
brace the rod and the hangers supported thereon when in its 
lowermost position. The channel bar has pivoted tfiereon a 
rocket arm which provides a cam surface and a shoulder un- 
derneath at one end which causes a spring boh of a lock 
mounted atop the bar to withdraw so that the arm can pass 
the boh whereupon the boh springs outwardly against the 
shoulder of the arm to securely lock the channel bar against 
the hanger rod. A key is then required to withdraw the spring 
bolt to permit the channel bar to spring into open position. 



3,659,722 
SHELVES AND HOOKS FOR SUPPORTING ARTICLES 
Aubrey G. CarroB, Famham, Fai^nd, assignor to AurM 
(Guildford) Limited, Famham, England 

FOed Dec 4, 1969, Ser. No. 882,214 
Clafam priority, a ppH c attow Great Britafa^ Dec 8, 1968, 
60,070/68 , 

lULCLAATt 5/08 ' 

U.S.CL211— 106 7Clafani 

A substantiaUy vertical rectangular frame formed of a plu- 
rality of pairs of parallel horizontal plastic coated rails or 




over the upper rail of a pair and with a member welded to 
the base of the U-shaped member to engage under the 
second rail of a pair to extend at right angles to the frame to 
support articles suspended thereon or to support a wire shelf 
welded to the suspension members. 



DL, 



3,659,723 
STORAGE RACKS 
Anthony N. Konrtant, Mt Proqtect, 
Spcedrack Inc., Skokk, m. 

Filed Aug. 26, 1970, Ser. No. 67,124 
Int CLA47f 5/00 
U.S.CL 211—151 



to 



7 Clafans 




'''i'-'W^'i'M' 



Storage racks which include fore-and-aft aligned upright 
trusses extending upward from the floor, having a pair ctf 
parallel vertical meinbers and a phirality of spacers extending 
therebetween. The rear vertical truss member extends to the 
floor and a bottom member located adjacent the floor ex- 
tends forward frt>m the lower end of the rear vertical 
member. The fit>nt vertical truss member terminates short cX. 
the floor and a diagonal member extends between the lower 
end of the front vertical member and the bottom member. 
Parallel vertical columns spaced lateraUy of the truss define a 
storage bay therebetween. The recessing at the frxMit of the 
truss provides maneuvering room for lift trucks and thereby 
reduces the widdi requirements for service aisles. 



120 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



BlAY 2, 1972 



3,659,724 3,659,726 

RAILROAD FLAT CAR PALLETIZING APPARATUS 

Roy W. MUkr, ilitUawl; Marvte Stark, Michlfui City, and John T. Andcnoo, Ckorchvfle, Pa^ a ai p inr to Crown Cort 

WUHan R. Shaver, Mnnstcr, al of ImL, aMifsors to PuH- & Seal Company, Inc., Phladdphia, Pa. 

■an Incorporated, ChicafO, 01. FUed Apr. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 32.908 

FUcd May 20, 1970, Scr. No. 39,683 Int. CL B65| S7I24 

Int. CL B61| 9112; B61d / 7100 MS. CI. 214—6 P 16 ClaiaM 
U.S.C1. 213-8 12 Claims 




In a cushioned underframe railroad flat deck car, a bobter 
and crossbearcr construction of cross elements extending 
between each side sill and the fixed center sill and having 
vertical truss means on the sides of the fixed sill tying the 
cross elements to the fixed sill, a center plate under Uie fixed 
sill tying the bolster cross elements together and a transverse 
transfer channel member forming a shear box with Ac deck 
and tying the bolster cross elements together, sub-cross 
means under the fixed sill tying the outboard bolster cross 
elements together, reinforcement about the fixed sill at the 
fish belly transition section of the fixed sill, and fixed longitu- 
dinally vertical cushion key stops on the top and bottom in- 
side portions of the fixed sill and sliding key stop means in 
the form of horizontal crosshead means on the sliding insert 
sill acting as cushion stop means at the cushion pocket. 



3,659,725 

ELECTROMAGNETIC UNCOUPLER FOR MODEL 

TRAINS 

Peter J. Paaaiacqna, 2808 E. Lewis Drive, Ftafitaff, Ariz. 

FUed Ang. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 65,408 

Int. CL B61g 5100 

UA CL 213-75 TC 5 Claims 




An uncoupler lever is pivotally attached to the truck of a 
model railroad car, with one end so attached to the resiliently 
mounted coupler bar of the car that upon movement of the 
opposite end of the lever, as by an electromagnet, the cou- 
pler bar will be deflected to an uncoupled position. 




A palletizer for accumulating layers of cans in patterns of 
staggered rows. Initially, the rows of cans are individually and 
sequentially accumulated on an infeed conveyor at two al- 
ternate positions along the conveyor. The rows of cans are 
then individually and sequentially moved to a layer pattern 
makeup plate where a layer of cans in a pattern of staggered 
rows accumulates. The makeup plate is then returned to the 
position adjacent the conveyor while the layer of cans is 
stripped from the makeup plate and dropped to a pallet or 
another layer of cans on the plate. 



3,659,727 
TABLES FOR STACKING FLEXIBLE WORK 
Ralph E. PearsaU, Gloucester, Mmb., Mrignor to USM Cor- 
poratioa, Boston, Mass. 

FUed Aut. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 63^18 
Int. a. B65f 5 7/Oi 
U.S.CL214— 6H 9 




A table has its top fitted with two pivotal work supporting 
members arranged to be tilted into steeper V-relation in 
response to the accumulation of flexible work pieces thereon. 
The Uble is especially adapted to enable fabric pieces of 
non-imiform mass, for instapce hemmed sleeves, to tend to 
be self-leveling during stacking. 



3,659,728 ' 

APPARATUS FOR COLLECTING AND PILING OF DISC- 
SHAPED OBJECTS 
Gantcr Rcincdtc, Wnppcrtal-Elbcrieid, Gannany, a«lgnor to 
Bcnz * Hflfcrs GmbH, DusMMorf, Germany 
FUed Nov. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 91^46 
Claims priority, application Germany, Nov. 29, 1969, P 19 60 

118.4 
Int. CL B65g 57/03 / 

U.S. CL 214-6 H 7 Claims 

An apparatus for collecting and piling ot disc-shaped ob- 
jects, as sausage slices and cheese slices, chocolate bars, bak- 
ing goods and the like comprising a conveyor device, and a 



May 2, 1972 



/ 
GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



121 



collecting plate and a runway slide. The conveyor device 
feeds objects to the collecting plate by means of a run shde, 
means for stepwise lowering the collecting plate are provided 
in dependency upon the cutting thickness of the objects. A 
stripping device removing the piled objects, and a receiving 
plate is arranged for receiving the objects from the collecting 
plate. The collecting plate, the stripping device and the 
receiving plate the latter capable of being lifted and lowered. 



^--v > 


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Hi ■' ^ ' 


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^*-^ >l 


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■»"— iIb 


B 


L-U 


f*.-^ 




^I3ya»te=^ J 


iJ2 SE . 


,-^ r , ^ 


5 \''\ !?, .5^ 




a \\ yf^ 


( -yK ' 




5ZB -•* 


1 1 iA"-4^« 


-""k - 




-=4^ 1 ^Sa 


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f^^^=K?^. 




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„ ■ " 4cD "^ - .Ht'f 


L^n 


y '— \Ttr> -^■. i 0/ fc 


J 


i^f^atofitp 


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L \. ^^^ 1 'r 1 ^ 


' e»kr^ 


f^l 


>v '^■^^ ' v / * 


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■ ~*^^hl7 


^' LU^^>T-T^h^ 




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are connected with cam controOed driving units disposed in- 
dependently from each other. Locking discs C9pable of being 
driven by a joint switching drive and alternately moving, are 
coordinated to the driving units, and the locking discs make 
possible a freeing of the driving units for lifting the collecting 
plate and receiving plate and operation of the stripping 
device only upon termination of a predetermined number of 
switching steps identical with ihe number of disc sh^>ed ob- 
jects of a disc package. 



3,659,729 
DEVICE FOR CHARGING FURNACES WFTH MOULDS 
Klaas Lamfccmcycr, 70 Hndsbrodicrstraasc, D4830, Guctcr- 
sloh, Germany 

FUcd Mar. 31, 1970, Scr. No. 24^43 
InL CL F27b 9136 
MS, CL 214—25 7 



3,659,730 

SELF-DUMPING BACKHOE BUCKET 

Ddbert M. Butler, P. O. Box 314, Warner, OUa. 

FQed June 8, 1970, Scr. No. 44,328 

InLCLE02fi/60 

U.S. CL 214—146 E 



SClaims 




i 



A small width for backhoe type tractors is adaptable for 
digging small trenches in relatively moist clay or compact 
materials. The rear closure portion of (he bucket is pivotal 
and spring biased so as to normally force the material from 
between the tapered sides <A the bucket by the combination 
of the spring force and gravity. Provision is made to latch the 
pivotal rear portion in a fixed position when digging loose or 
drier material. 



3,659,731 
SLAG POT TIPPING STAND 
Robert C. Carson, West Sanbury, Pa., 
Corporation, Harrisbar^ Pa. 

FBed Nov. 6, 1969, Scr. No. 874^73 
InL CL B65b 69100 
UACL214— 314 



to Harsco 



2Clalms 




Fnii 




A stand for supporting and tipping a slag poL The stand 
has a pair of arms normally disposed in a horizontal direction 
and rotatable about a horizontal axis. A slag pot is lowered 
onto the arms with its center of gravity offiet fit)m the axis of 
rotation oS. the arms. The arms are provided at their outer 
ends v^ith hook-like projections which engage the side por- 
tions of the slag pot supporting lugs to prevent the pot from 
sliding as the arms rotate downwardly from the horizontal 
position. Counterbalaiices are provided to return the anus to 
a horizontal position when the ladle is lifted off the stand. 



A device for charging ftumaces whh moulds comprising a 
plurality of frames, each frame provided with a support axle 
for supporting an individual mould, forwarding means for 
sequentially transporting each said frame in a timed sequence 
and feed means sequentially collecting said frames from said 
forwarding means and fiutiier transporting said frames into 
and out of said furnace. 



3,659,732 
FORK FRAME FOR AN INDUSTRIAL TRUCK 
P. Downey, PortlHid, Orcg., — Ignnr to HyUer Cob- 
pany, Portland, Orcg. 

FBcd Sept 18, 1969, Scr. No. 859,104 
Int. CL 86619/72 
U.S. CL 214—621 8 QUam 

A detachable fork frame for an industrial lift truck is dis- 



122 



/ 
OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



closed. The fork frame has two legs, each with a folding foot 
structure which allows it to stand freely when detached from 



the tilt jack is operated. A biased proximity switch and ac- 
tuating magnet are positioned respectively upon the cylinder 




the truck. The structure is designed for rapid mounting and 
demounting and is self storing. 



I 3,659,733 

NARROW AISLE ATTACHMENT 
Staart W. Siadair, aod Moaroc J. Dcaait, both of HouitoB, 

Tex., assigBon to Aadcnon Claytoa & Co., Houston, Tex. 
I Filed Dec. 1 1, 1970, Ser. No. 97,225 

lat CI. B66f 9114 
UA CL 214-730 7 Claims 




An attachment for conventional industrial lift trucks to 
enable the truck to work in narrow aisles and manipulate pal- 
lets in front of and to both sides of the truck, utilizing a 
crossed six-bar linkage and side shifter mechanism. ^' 




and rod of the tilt jack for disengaging the control value from 
a detented position as the bucket approaches its load posi- 
tion. . 



3,659,734 
BUCKET POSITIONING DEVICE UTILIZING A BIASED 

PROXIMITY SWITCH 
Joe E. Fundi, Peoria, DL, Mrignor to CatcrpiBar Tractor 
Co., Peoria, DL 

Origtiial appttcadon Apr. 2, 1969, Scr. No. 812^29, now 

abandoned. Divided and tUi appiicadon June 9, 1971, Scr. 

No. 151,591 

Int. CL E02f 5/74, J/70. J/2« 

US. CL 214—764 5 CtaJmB 

In a loader having a bucket pivotably supported upon a lift 
frame, tilt jacks interconnected between the lift arms and 
bucket by tilt linkage and a detented control valve by which 



3,659,735 
SAFETY CLOSURE 
WiUani James Landen, Cbcddre, Conn., 
Specialty Company, WaBingford, Conn. 

FUed May 25, 1970, Ser. No. 40,947 
Int a. B65d 55102 
U.S. CL 215—9 



to EydH 



10 Claims 




The invention contemplates selectively openable closure 
means that is tamper-proof, in the sense that a correct 
sequence of two deliberate and independent movements of 
lockable closure elements is necessary in order to achieve ac- 
cess to the contents of the bottie or the like which is pro- 
tected by the closure. 

The specific construction that is described involves a 
necked bottled member and a closure-cap member. The 
latter has axial and angular bayonet-type engagement with 
the neck. A resilient skirt carried by one of the members is in 
resilient axially interfering relation with the other member, to 
normally deny access to the bottle merely by attempted 
unthreading or other purely rotary actuation of the cap. The 
cap must b« axially shifted to deform the skirt in order to 
free the parts for limited angular motion, before freeing the 
cap for axial removal from the neck. 



3,659,736 
CONVENIENCE OPENING BOTTLE CLOSURE 
Darius Orley Wn^ Ottawa Lake, Midk, asdgnor to 
DHnoiSflnc. 

FUed Nov. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 91,292 

Int. CL B65d 23100 

U.S.CL 215-40 ' 11 Claims 

The invention disclosed is a convenience opening closure 

for a glass bottie having an outwardly flared neck and bead at 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



128 



the finish of the bottie. This is often called a "cruet" finish. A 
plastic inner closure snaps over the finish and has an out- 
wardly and downwardly tapering circular skirt. A metal cap 
fits over the plastic closure and the skirt of the cap has a 
lesser taper to force the plastic skirt to seal the finish of the 
bottie. The inner skirt wall of the outer cap has threads or 
projections which cooperate with the skirt of the plastic do- 



withdrawn, such device being insertable into a hole formed in 
the top of the container and there pressed into place wbereu- 




/ 3,659,737 
COLLAPSIBLE CONTAINERS 
HcnnaBB K. Garbe, 115 d Hohnerkamp, c/o 200 Hamburg, 
Gcrnaay 

Filed Jan. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 1,357 

Int CL B65d 9112 

U.S.CL 217-12 R 13 Claims 




An improved collapsible or disnumtiaUe container with a 
pallet-shaped base, edgewise insertable, overlapping, side 
walls and a cover, which is easier to assemble and to disman- 
tie than hitherto known containers, without thereby impair- 
ing its stability, wherein the improvement comprises 
cooperating fixing elements of which one part is arranged on 
the edges of the base and a second part on the lower edges of 
the side walls, and locking dements are provided on the top 
comers, comprising clamping means overlaying these cor- 
ners. Additionally or alternatively, damping means may be 
provided in the form of plug-in connections. 



3,659,738 
CAN CLOSURE STRUCTURE 
David A. Frfadmana, 10777 SpmoeldB Drive, SpringllcU 
Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, and Marvin L. Eisen- 
prcaMT, 245 E. 63rd Street, New York, N.Y. 

FUed June 15, 1970, Scr. No. 46^398 

Int CL B65d 41100 

MS. CL 220-42 B 7 ClalnM 

A device is provided which sealingly preserves the contents 

of a container of liquid after a portion of such contents are 




sure. The plastic skirt may have pre-formed threads engaging 
the threads of the metal cap. In another form, the plastic 
skirt has a plain outer surface and the interference fit of the 
threaded metal cap skirt compresses the plastic skirt sealing 
the inner cap on the bottie and pressing threads in the 
plastic. Cap removal b by unscrewing the outer cap from the 
plastic cap and unsnapping the plastic cap from the bottie 
finish. 



pon ribs formed in appropriate tapering surfaces of the 
device will engage with the edges about the hole to retain the 
device within the hole. 



3,659,739 

EASY^PEN PULL-TAB CONSTRUCTION FOR A 

CONTAINER 

John Joaeph Luviano, Rydal, Pa., and Vinson S. Potts, Cherry 

HiD, NJ., aarignori to Crown Cork & Scd Company, lac, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

FUed Nov. 19, 1969, Scr. No. 878,074 

Int. CLB65d 7 7/24 

U.S. CL 220—53 17 Claims 




A container end of the easy-opening type iiKluding a pull- 
tab construction comprising a first strip oS adhesive tape ad- 
hering to and di^xjsed over an opening in the outer surface 
of the end, and a second strip of adhesive tape adhering to 
the inner surface of the end and having an at least partially 
preformed aperture in substantial aligmnent with the open- 
ing. 



3,659,740 
TABELEMEFH' 
Haas H. DIekkaff, Grccasburg, and Howard D. Schreckcr, 
Hyde Park, both of Pa., ■■Jgnnri to Aluminum Compmiy of 
America, Plttrinurgk, Pa. 

FUed Mar. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 20,705 

Int. CLB15d 77/24 

U.S. CL 220—54 4 ClaiuH 




Apparatus for fabricating a tab element having an opening 
for joinder to a container wall including a female die having 
an elongated recess and an outwardly disposed aimular tab 
engaging surface. A male die having an upwardly directed 
boss and a surrounding aimular tab supporting surface. The 
male die having a concave transverse wall connecting the die 
boss with the annular tab supporting surface. Aligning the tab 
opening with the die elements and establishing relative dos- 



< 



124 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



ing movement between the dies produces compressive 
reforming of the opening defining portion of the tab element 
to provide a convexly curved portion corresponding in curva- 
ture to the maJe die concave transverse wall. 

A method of reforming an opening defining wall in a tab 
element to provide a continuous wall which diverges from 
the upper tab surface to the lower tab surface by compres- 
sively reforming the continuous wall. 

A container wall having a removable sector with a tab ele- 
ment secured thereto by means of an integral rivet including 
a wall panel having a hollow integral rivet provided with a 
transverse end wall and a peripheral wall. A tab element hav- 
ing an attachment opening defined by a continuous wall and 
the rivet extending through the tab element with the continu- 
ous opening defining wall in contact with the peripheral rivet 
wall. The opening defining wall having a lower inwardly con- 
vexly curved portion in surface to surface contact with a por- 
tion of the peripheral rivet wall having an outwardly concave 
configuration. 



3,659,741 
CONTAINERS 

Amaad Dadley Coralli, 306 Jarvfa Street, Toronto, Ontario, 
Canada 

flM Feb. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 12,991 
I. Int. CL B65d 25114 

jV.S. CL 220—63 R 10 Claims 




/-. 



13 



^•m^m^umut^,^^k^m 



/♦ 




A leak-proof stackable container for shipping ice cooled 
foodstuff has a bottom provided with a centrally located well. 
Between the upstanding walls of the container and the up- 
standing walk of the well there is a peripheral bottom portion 
uniting these walls and providing support for wooden fillet 
boxes or perforated plates on which perishable food mixed 
with ice is deposited. The container is covered with a lid hav- 
ing a centrally located recess of a size to receive the well of a 
second container stacked thereon. The lid is provided with 
flanges engaging the upper lip of the container to seal the 
contents in the container. The lid and container may be insu- 
lated with a foamed plastic. Fore greater strength the walls 
are strengthened with ribs. 



3,659,742 
LIQUEFIED FUEL GAS CONTAINER 
Katuhiro Tagmra, Tokyo, Japnn, asdgDor to Ntann Molor 
Company, Limtod, Yokohnma City, Japan 

Filed Dec 22, 1970, Scr. No. 100,601 
Clainis priority, appifcadon Japan, Dec 30, 1969, 44/105501 

InL CL B67c 3106 
MS. CL 220—86 R 7 




prevented from being filled with excess liquefied fiiel gas 
which would otherwise lead to unexpected blasting due to 
thermal expansion of the stored liquefied fuel gas, the con- 
tainer having main and auxiliary compartments which are 
completely isolated when the liquefied fuel gas is fed into the 
main compartment and which are permitted to communicate 
with each other so as to provide an unoccupied space in the 
main compartment. 



3,659,743 
PLASTIC NESTING AND STACKING CASE 
Theodor Box, 1 108 Aicae RokI, BricOc, N j. 

Filed July 29, 1970, Ser. No. 59,252 
Int.CLB65d2//06 



MS. CL 220-97 E 



4CiainK 




A plastic nesting and stacking case in the form of an open- 
topped integrally molded rectangular unit having a pair of 
first opposed side walls, a pair of second opposed side walls 
and a bottom wall, comprises an upper part with its walls 
normal to said bottom wall, an intermediate part slightly 
tapering inwardly and having a height equal to a substantial 
fraction of the height of said upper part, and a lower part 
having a height equal to said upper part and tapering slightly 
inwardly towards the bottom wall of the case. The upper 
edge of the lower part has an outwardly projecting flange, 
whereby to enable partial nesting of a first case in a second 
similar case by the flange of the former resting upon the top 
edge of the latter. A pair of retractible supporting frames 
rotatively mounted upon the top of the cases serve to enable 
stacking of a number of cases with the bottom wall of one 
case resting upon the supporting frames of the case below in 
the stack. 



A container for a liquefied fuel gas, constructed to be 



3,659,744 

PROCESS AND APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING AND 

FILLING CONTAINERS 

Cari Byrd, CIdcafo, and Martin Mnder, Glcavfew, botii of 

DL, BMignnri to Owcna-Olinois, Inc 

FDed May 18, 1970, Scr. No. 38,245 

Int. CL B65g 59100 

U.S.CL 221-1 19CUbnB 

A method and apparatus for dispensing containers, and 
filling the containers with a liquid or semi-solid food product. 
The container dispensing assembly is adapted to simultane- 
ously dispense the lowermost container from a plurality of 
stacks of containers in a magazine assembly; and to insure 
positive dislodgment of the lowermost containers, a stripping 
plate is positioned above the lowermost containers during the 
container dispensing step, while lifting plates simultaneously 
move the containers remaining in the stacks upwardly to 
positively separate the lowermost containers frt>m the 
remaining containers. The apparatus includes a conveyor for 
moving the containers to a filling station, and a suction actu- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



125 



ated carrier means positively transports the dispensed lower- 
most containers to the conveyor and deposits them in a row 
thereon. A positive displacement piston type pumping means 
is provided at the container filling station for discharging 
product into each container in the row, and each pumping 
means includes a shiftable spool type valve for accurately 
controlling the amount of product that is dispensed into each 



r 3,659,746 

SEED RANTER 

James C. Wlnstow, 599 Elm Street, Skrra Mndrc, CaHL 

FDed FciK 9, 1970, Scr. No. 9^24 

InL CL AOlc 7104 

MS. CL 221-185 . 10 Claims 




container. The pumping means each include a product 
di^MHsing nozzle, and the spool valve is arranged to create a 
suction on each nozde during movement of each row of con- 
tainers to the filling station to prevent dripping and wastage 
of product. The volumetric output cX the pumping means is 
accurately controlled by a means for adjusting die length ctf 
the stroke of the piston means. ., 



3,659,745 

MANUALLY OPERATED FOOD PACKAGE DISPENSER 

WITH AUTOMAIIC SLOW DOOR CLOSING 

ocof|c kNiHg^ iTMOoix, iMi ixto immi, apcBOCTiBe, ooin oi 
OBtnrlo, Canndn, amlfMin to Otto 
Irv^ RklMr mid Lcoavi 
MiUhonrd AdmtWnf Rcfd.* MonlrMi, Qwbcc, 
FBcd Apr. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 30,521 
IML CL A47r 1106 
MS. CL 221—12 6 




A food paclcage dispenser, more particularly of sugar bags, 
and for use on restaurant tables. This dispenser forms an 
open top receptacle for receiving the food packages. A nor- 
mally closed cover for said receptacle opens upon operation 
of a lever and closes slowly upon release of the lever to give 
sufficient time for the operator to move his hand fit>m the 
lever to the receptacle to grasp a package therein. Automatic 
closing of the cover keeps the paclcages in sanitary condition. 
The dispenser also displays advertising messages which are 
replaced by other such messages each time the lever is 
operated to open the cover. 




A seed planter for planting seeds in a row at uniform spac- 
ing. A rotating seed carrier and qectCH^ ring is provided and 
has in its interim- cj^indric surfiice slots which fill with seed 
supplied thereto, and which have filler portions and ejectioo 
portions laterally ofEMt to intersect a groove cut into the 
inner surface of the ring. The ejection pwtions of the slots 
have open bottoms. As die ring rotates, the seeds in the ejec- 
tion portions are intercepted by an ejector finger which 
knocks them out the open bottoms of the slots and throu^ 
apertures leading them to a distribution wheel which drops 
them at spaced intervals. A flexiUe vibratray dia|rfuagm is 
provided to maintain the seed in free motion, and has an 
aperture for passing the seeds directly onto the lower porticxi 
of the rim of the slotted filler and ejector rim, such that they 
do not pile too high thereon. 



3,659,747 

AUTOMATIC FEEDER 

James A. Tcfehgracbcr, P.O. Box 632, Emporia, Kans. 

FBcd Mar. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 16,464 

Int CL B67d 5130 

MS. CL 222-14 



3ClidnM 




/ 

This invention is an automatic feeder mountable on a 
movable vehicle. It has a frame mounting a hopper, and an 
auger with a discharge spout extended from the vehicle, and 
is operable by a control system and powering means. The au- 
tomatic feeder is mountable on a vehicle, poweraUe 
therefrom and operable to deliver automaticaDy a substan- 
tially certain amount of material from the hopper. 



» 



If 

t 



126 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



I 



' 3,659,748 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAINTAINING 

CONSTANT THE LEVEL OF FILLING IN A CHARGING 

CONTAINER ARRANGED BEFORE A CONSUMING 

DEVICE FOR POURABLE MATERUL, ESPECIALLY 

PLASTIC GRANULATE 

Erich Beck, WorBS-WciMMn, Gcnnany, asdgiior to In- U& CL 222— 153 

fcaicariMircaa Dr. Brdun AG, Zurich, Swttieriaiid 

Filed Ju. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 5,457 

IbL CL B67d 5108 



3,659,750 
DISPENSING CLOSURE WITH BONDED SPOUT SEAL 
DooaM H. La Vangc, Uxbridge, Mms., airigiior to Polytop 
Corporatlaii, Slatertvfle, RJ. 

FVed Jane 22, 1970, Ser. No. 48,094 
lot CL B65d 47110 



\}JS. CL 222-56 



MClalim 




There is disclosed an apparatus and method for maintain- 
ing substantially constant the level of filling of pourable 
material, especially plastic granulate, into a charging con- 
tainer arranged in front of a consuming device. Thus, there is 
provided a charging container having at its top region a suc- 
tion pipe directed away from the charging container and 
therebelow a conveying conduit entering into said charging 
container. Operatively communicating with the suction pipe 
and the conveying conduit is a blower or suction device. The 
suction conveying installation is operated at a feeding capaci- 
ty which is above the material requirements of the consuming 
device, and the pressure at the inlet region of the consuming 
device is maintained such that it does not exceed the pres- 
sure in the charging container. 



3,659,749 

INTERMIXING SYRINGE 

Boris Schwartz, 400 Paris Avenue, Palcnon, N J. 

FUed Apr. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 32,695 

InL CL B67d 5112 

U.S. CL 222—145 13 





The disclosed invention pertains to dispensing closures 
having a closure body and a spout rotatably mounted on the 
body. In such a structure the spout is capable of being 
routed between a closed position in which its base engages 
the closure body around an opening leading through the 
body so as to close off the opening and an open position in 
which a passage leading through the spout is aligned with the 
opening in the closure body. In a closure as disclosed a physi- 
cal bond or seal connects the base of the spout and the clo- 
sure body around the opening when the spout is in an initial 
closed position. When the spout is first moved to an open 
position this bond or seal is dkrupted or broken. 



3,659,751 

APPARATUS FOR DELIVERING METERED 

QUANTITIES OF POWDERED MATERIAL TOWARDS A 

POINT OF USE 
Albert Edward Jackson, GhrcmafHeM Mold, Wcndovcr, and 
Robert Gordon RoHdl, 72 Nont Pare, Protalyn, both of 
England 

Origteal appllcatfon Dec 11, 1968, Scr. No. 782,897. Divided 
and this appHcadon Jnly 15, 1970, Scr. No. 55,077 
Int. CL B05b 5100 
U.S.CL 222-194 9< 




An intermixing syringe provides means for the isolated 
storage of two components prior to their being mixed which 
is usually just before injection of the product. This syringe 
has an outer barrel and a hollow plunger slidable therein with 
the barrel portion forward of the piston providing one 
chamber and the plunger providing the other chamber. The 
plunger is provided with a piston having spaced, ring-like 
sealing surfoces and a fluid passageway extending from the 
interior of the plimger to the outer piston surface. The barrel 
of this syringe is formed with a stiaight-bored inner surface 
and includes no undercuts. The forward most sealing siufaces 
or end of the plunger piston is disposed to be moved from a 
sealing conditk>n into a fluid flow or conducting condition to 
permit flow into the forward portion of the barrel. 



The invention concerns apparatus for delivering metered 
quantities of powdered iQaterial towards a point of use, the 
said apparatus comprising a rotor having an outer perforated 
shell whose perforations are adapted to receive the powdered 
material, the rotor also having an inner perforated shell 
which is mounted within the outer perforated shell, means 
comprising a porous filling which spaces the inner shell from 
the outer shell, the said means closely contacting the outer 
perforated shell, powder sufi^ly means arranged to supply the 
powdered material as the rotor rotates to the perforations in 
successive portions of the outer perforated shell, and a fluid 
conduit which is disposed within the inner perforated shell 
and which is, at any moment, sealed to a portion thereof 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



127 



which is angularly spaced from the portion of the outer per- 
forated shell which is being supplied with powdered material 
firom the powder supply means, means to supply the fluid 
conduit with a fluid which will pass through the inner per- 
forated shell and the porous filling, the powdered material 
being ejected from the perforations in the outer perforated 
shell and delivered in metered quantities towards the point of 
use. 



/ 3,659,752 

EASILY REMOVABLE FLUID PERMEABLE STRUCTURE 

FOR AERATED HOPPER DISCHARGE OUTLETS 
John L. Carney, Jr., St. Lonli County, and Dennis J. 
ScUpper, St. Charles, both of Mo., aasignorB to ADF Indus- 
tries, Incorporated, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 21,127 

Int CI. B65g 3112 

MS. CL 222-195 4 Clainii 



to be scattered or strewn which possesses a cross-sectional 
configuration which narrows towards the bottom end thereof, 
said container incorporating a forward wall and a rearward 
wall. A base plate which serves to close the major portion of 
the lower opening of the container is mounted via oscillating 
support elements to the rear wall of the container. An oscil- 
lating or vibration drive mechanism disposed behind the rear 
container wall serves to place the base plate into oscillatory 
movement. As a result of this oscillatory or vibratory motion 
imparted to the base plate, the marginal edge thereto which, 
together with the forward waU of the ctmtainer forms a 
throughpassage slit for the material to be strewn, is primarily 
moved up and down, whereby the upward movement, at least 
at the start thereof, occurs in jericy fashion. Furthermore, ad- 
ditional means are provided for independently adjusting the 
basic width of the aforementioned throughpassage slot or slit 



#»^ 




3,659,753 

STREWING APPARATUS, ESPECIALLY FOR BAKING 

INSTALLATIONS 

Haw-Jonchia Jafcr, Buiidorf, Sw Uj ahnd, assignor to 

Guitavc A. Scewcr, Burgdorf Canton of Berne, Switaerinnd 

Filed Mnr. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 22,604 

Cbims priority, application Switaeriand, Apr. 9, 1969, 

5363/69 

Int. CL A21c 1100 

VS. CL 222-199 



2t,2b 




3,659,754 

PELLETIZED ANIMAL FEED DISPENSER 

Michael Baront, 10250 Wcat 78th Avenue, Anmda, Colo., 

and Frank BaroM, Jr., 2561 Sooth Wolff, Denver, Colo. 

Filed May 1 1, 1970, Ser. No. 36,337 

Int. CLGOlf 77/00 

U.S. CL 222-368 2 Claims 



A fluid permeable member for an aerated hopper 
discharge outlet which may be easily inserted within and 
removed frt>m the hopper discharge outlet. The fluid permea- 
ble member comprises a one-piece inner insert having a cen- 
tral discharge opening in vertical alignment with the 
discharge opening of the bottom discharge outlet and is easi- - 
ly secured in spaced relation to the outer lower housing or 
body of the discharge outlet by releasable securing means, 
such as threaded bolts. The inner fluid permeable insert is 
preferably formed of a stainless steel wire mesh material. The 
outer housing of the discharge outlet has an upper peripheral 
flange mating with a lower peripheral flange on the bottom of 
the hopper, and the fluid permeable member has a peripheral 
flange positioned and gripped between the mating flanges of 
the outer housing and the superjacent hopper. 




This invention relates to a dispenser for pelletized animal 
feeds characterized by an overhead open-topped feed storage 
hopper opening into a hollow cylindrical bucket mounted for 
rotation about a horizontal axis above a discharge chute. The 
bucket has an elongate inlet opening in the top thereof hav- 
ing an inclined trailing edge that cooperates with an adjacent 
edge of the hopper wall to produce a scissor-like shearing ac- 
tion adapted to easily cut through any pellets trapped 
therebetween. The lower edge of the opposite hopper wall 
bordering the bucket is foreshortened to provide a gap which 
is bridged by a brush wiper. 



3,659,755 

AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RELIEVING AEROSOL 

PRODUCT 

Samuel Benjamin Prussin, and Howard Clyde Tracy, Jr., both 

of Los Angeles, CaHf., assignors to Dart Industries, Inc 

Los Angdcs, CaHf. 

FOed Mar. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 15,480 

InL CL B05b 3100 

MS. CL 222-397 5 Clafans 



202322407 4 jS 27 




A strewing apparatus, especially for baking installations, 
which is of the type embodying a container for the material 



An automatic pressure relieving aerosol prpduct and con- 
tainer having an actuator member held fixedly against oiit- 



/ 



128 

f 

Ward movement with respect to the can, and a valve carrying 
member that will move the valve stem against the actuator in 
response to excess pressure. When such pressure is present in 
the can, the valve carrying member moves upwardly whereu- 
pon the valve is opened thereby relieving the pressure. The 
actuator is of the type that will normally be moved with hand 
pressure to open the valve, thereby permitting the aerosol 
container to be operated in the usual manner under normal 
'conditions. / 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,7S6 

CONTAINER COVER 

John Keaiwth Lancaster, 630 Eagk Lane, Paladnc, DL 

FBed Jane 24, 1969, Scr. No. 836,090 

Int CL B65d 47/08, 47/10 



VS, CL 222—531 



TClafav 




A one piece cover for a container with a hand actuatabie 
tearstrip {wrtion to provide a pour opening and to form a clo- 
sure for the opening. The cover is adapted to be semi-per- 
manently attached to and thus ordinarily difficult to remove 
from the container. The tear sectiotis which define the pour 
opening and the tearstrip portion seal the contents of the 
container and make it possible to ascertain that the container 
had not been previou^y opened, and the closure forms the 
means for re-closing the container when not in use. In addi- 
tion, the closure and the cover are provided with a spout for 
dripless pour flow. 



3,659,757 
CLOSURE DEVICE FOR GENERAL CONTAINERS 
Francesco TIni, Via Lambro 82/84, Roaano-Quiato Stampi, 
Italy 

Filed Apr. 15, 1970, Scr. No. 28,619 
Cbims priority, application Italy, Apr. 23, 1969, 15933 A/69 

Int CL B65d 47/10; B67d 3/00 
U.S. CL 222-541 7 OalnH 



^/r , 




3,659,758 

SLIDING TOP INTERNAL POURER BOTTLE CAP 

Nca S. WateraMn, Stamford, Conn., asrignor to Atlantic 

Design A DcvslopBBcnt Corporation, Stamford, Conn. 

FVed Dec. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 883^11 

Int CLB65d<^ 7/20 

U^CL 222-561 1 




A two piece molded plastic bottle cap has a slidable clo- 
sure member inserted into a top cavity of a screw cap body, 
with corresponding surfaces of the two parts mating in closed 
position to effect an airtight leakproof seal, and space 
between corresponding surfaces of the two parts when 
slidably moved to an open position forming a liquid pouring 
spout and an air vent channel enabling continuous pouring of 
liquids. 



3.659,759 

CLIP SUSPENSION DEVICE FOR KEYS AND THE LIKE 

Carey E. Walton, Opdonsas, La., assignor to Leopold A. 

Castik and Stephen J. Lcdct, Jr., part Interest to cnch 

FUcd Jan. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 3,698 

lat CL A45f 5/02 

VS. CL 224-5 R 1 Claim 




A clip for keys, "pocket" watches and the like for suspend- 
ing the items from the waist band of an article of clothing on 
the inside of the article of clothing out of sight between it 
and the human body in a particular region of the human 
anatomy, viz. at or near the boundary between the iliac and 
the hypogastric regions of the lower abdomen directly 
between the anterior superior iliac spines wherein the body 
forms a natural, elongated hollow. Such positioning prevents 
any discomfort to the user and creates no unsightly bulge. 
The lower extension (S) of the cbp angles down and away 
from the plane of the clip portion (2,4) and assists the natu- 
ral contours of the human body in positioning the items in 
the desired location. 



A closure device for general containers, comprising a body 
member adapted to be sealingly secured within a performed 
bore of a container, an opened-end hollow cylindrical ele- 
ment screwing in said body member between re-entered and 
extracted positions for allowing the material within the con- 
tainer to exit and a plug which can be seidingly screwed in 
said cylindrical element. The plug is coiuiected to said body 
member by a tear off removable strip and the closure device 
is abo provided with means for clamping the hollow cylindri- 
cal element at its extracted position and means for prevent- 
ing said c^indrical element from completely exiting. 



3,659,760 
SLING AND BOARD FOR CARRYING CANOES, SMALL 

BOATS AND OUTBOARD MOTORS 
Lcwb H. Blood, P.O. Box 141, Leonardo, N J. 

FUcd Feb. 11, 1970, Scr. No. 10,561 

IntCLA45ti/00 

U.S. CL 224—25 A 5 Claims 

This invention relates to shoulder carriers or slings and to a 

type that is adapted for the transport particulaiiy of canoes, 

sinall boats or outboard motors. It involves shoulder straps in 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



129 



the form of loops, connected at both ends, and a board in 
which the straps are attached and adjustable and said board 



S 

\ 




the rear bumper of the automobile or the lip of the trunk 
opening. Tightening of the hook element draws the spaced 
arms forwardly into engaging abutment with another portion 
of the rear of the automobile, such as the bumper surface, a 
body panel or the lip of the trunk lid opening. A pair of such 
wheel wells are mounted on the rear of an automobile and 
serve in combination as a bicycle or cycle carrier for con- 
venient transport of such two-wheeled vehicles. 



provided with means to hold a boat, canoe or outboard mo- 
tor. 



3,659,763 

HYDRAUUC CYLINDER SUPPORT FOR TRACTORS 

Doyle A. Jolmson, RJl. 3 Box 52, PaaMIng, Ohio 

Filed June 29, 1970, Scr. No. 50.865 

Int CL B60r 9/06 

VS. CL 224—42.45 R 2 Chdom 



3,659,761 ^ \ 

BICYCLE SIDE RACK FOR SURFBOARD 
Bobby Dean WcsMm, Santa Barbara, CaHf., assignor to 
Jeffrey Douglas White, Santa Barbara, CaHf., a part in- 
terest 

FBed Oct 13, 1970, Scr. No. 79,723 

Int CLB6^ 77/00 ^ 

U.S. CL 224— 39 R / 6 Clatais 





An inclined bracket having a hooked end is secured to a 
tractor chassis and provides a means for supporting an aiu- 
iliary hydraulic motor during periods when the motor is not 
in use. The bracket includes an abutment which engages the 
hydraulic motor. This abutment serves as a mechanical stop 
restraining the motor from unwanted motion when the trac- 
tor is moving. 



A surfboard carrier rack has fore and aft brackets extend- 
ing from one side of a bicycle. The brackets coact with cor- 
responding adjustable braces which are looped at least par- 
tially around the surfboard forward and rearward sections to 
resiliently suspend the surfboard while holding it generally in 
a vertical plane. 



/ 



lO 






Ml 



^^ — I 



¥lrl 



t 



IS 



^ 



-12. 



y 



A wheel well is provided having horizontally extending 
spaced arms inter-coimected by a cross-member. An adjusta- 
ble length swivel hook element is secured to the cross- 
member and is adapted to engage either the upper edge of 



\ 3,659,764 ^ 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR SEVERING 
CYLINDRICAL STOCK 
Kasimir JanbiewsU, 5426 W. Andover Road, Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

Filed Mar. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 19,918 

IntCLB26fi/00 

U.S. CL 225-2 5 Clafans 



3,659,762 

BICYCLE WHEEL CARRIER FOR AUTOMOBILE 
MOUNTING 
Harlcy A. Kravitz, Pepper Pike, Ohio, assignor to Acar Indus- 
tries, Inc., WOloughby. Ohio 
/ Filed Nov. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 88^27 

^ Int CL B62d 43/00 

U.S. CL 224— 42.03 B llChdms 




\ 

The bar ox tube stock to be severed is peripherally scored 
and routed while deflecting the l^gth to be severed and 
thereby angling its axis to that of the unsevered stock, the 
angle between the axes having its apex in the plane of the 
scoring. - \ 

3,659,765 \ 

METHOD FOR FIBRILLATING A TRANSVERSELY \ 
ORIENTED PLASnC MATERIAL ^ 

Frank Kahrytcs, Somcrvfle, NJ.. amlpMr to John w m & 



OrigfamI application Mar. 5, 1968, Scr. No. 710,611, now 
Patent No. 3,515,325. DIvhM and this appHcation Aug. 1 1, 
1969, Scr. No. 870,877 
IntCl.B26fi/02 
U A CL 225-4 1 Clahn 

Method fcM- fibrillating transversely oriented plastic materi- 
al by moving the material in the directicxi of its length at a 



898 O.G.— 5 



130 

! 

given speed and instantaneously and simultaneously applying 
compressive forces and longitudinal forces to the material 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 




another region of the web. An assembly which is movable 
translationally and rotationally by a force applied by a 
change in web tension at one of two engagement lines 
between the assembly and the web, has masses which are so 
distributed that a change in force applied at one of the lines 
produces substantially no acceleration of the assembly at the 
other engagement line. 



3,659.768 
FASTENER DRIVING TOOL 
Lawrence J. BrvMUc, East Haven, Conn., 
CorporatloB 

Filed Jnac 1 2, 1 970, Ser. No. 45,65 1 
InL CI. B25c 1/14 
while maintaining the speed at which it is moving to split the U.S. CL227— 10 
material into a web of interconnected fibers. 



to OHb 



3,659,766 

MATTRESS PANEL CUTTER 
Edward Alago, 1347 Hancock Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
FDcd Dec. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 96,021 
Int. CL B26d 9/00; B65h 35/10 
VS. CL 225—94 



3 Claims 




A spool c^ fabric is fed through a series of rollers where it 
is exposed to cutters which trim it to a predetermined width, 
shear cusp-shaped indentations at regular intervals on oppos- 
ing edges of the fabric and form perforations between the 
apices of the cusp-shaped indentations. After the perfora- 
tions are formed, the fabric is burst in the vicinity thereof, 
thereby forming a mattress panel which is then disposed 
upon a second spool. Ehiring the foregoing operations, the 
fabric is maintained in an unwrinkled position by means of 
angular grooves formed upon gripping rollers in contact with 
the fabric. 



3,659,767 

TENSION REGULATION APPARATUS 

Jokn R. Martin, 2516 Hartan Boulevard, Rockford, OL 

Filed Dec 29, 1969, Scr. No. 888,588 

Int. CL B651I 23/18 

VS. CL 226-195 9 Clalmi 




Apparatus for preventing a change in the tension in one re- 
gion of a moving web from causing a change in the tension in 




A tool for firing fasteners into a supporting surface, which 
tool utilizes compacted pellets of ignitable material as a 
source of power. A compound firing chamber is provided to 
facilitate loading with a pellet magazine, a pellet feed being 
positioned in the handle of the tool. The tool b cocked for 
firing by pushing the barrel against the supporting surface, 
and cannot be otherwise fired. The tool preferably includes a 
fastener-driving member in the form of a piston and the 
piston can be automatically returned to a plurality of driving 
or firing positions to vary the power of the tool for a given 
propellant load. 



3,659,769 
FASTENER ATTACHMENT SYSTEMS 
Amokl R. Bom, NoedhMn, Mam., artgnnr to 
Manafactnring Company, F^rnmiBgimm, Mam. 
FBed Apr. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 29,564 
Int CL B65c 7/00 
U.S. CL 227-68 23 




A machine for inserting an attachment member having a 
filament and heads on either end through an opening in an 
article, said machine including a holder for the article, a tube 
for receiving a head of the attachment member, a device for 
feeding the attachment member into an end of the tube, said 
tube adapted to first enter the opening in the article, then 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



131 



proceed to pick up the attachment member from device for 
feeding an then carry a portion of the attachment member 
back throu^ the article opening. The device for feeding the 
atuchments includes a fluid powered piston shaped to feed 
attachment members into the device, said piston carrying a 
rod to push the attachment members into the tube, needle or 
the like and the device also including a valve to cause fluid 
under pressure to move the piston. 



operatively interconnected with the two fluid motors so that 
both motors drive the welder spindle during the eariy portion 
of the acceleration cycle and only one of the motors drives 



3,659,770 
CIRCUIT BONDING MEANS 
Charles Fredrick MHIcr, 843 Sooth State CoOege Bonlevard, 
Anahdm, Calif. 

FBed Dec. 13, 1968, Scr. No. 783,571 

Int. a. B23k 1/06, 5/20 

VS. CL 228—1 « Clahns 




This disclosure relates to improvements in methods and in 
means for accomplishing electrical wiring. The method 
makes use of a bonding toed which is capable of furnishing 
energy sufficient to bond a conductor to a circuit point The 
conductor is positioned over that point in the line of action 
of the tool. Bonding energy is applied to complete the bond. 
The standing part of the conductor is grasped at a point 
along its length adjacent to but removed from the bond and it 
is pulled sufficiently to break the conductor adjacent the 
bond. Grasp of the conductor is maintained and its broken 
end b then positioned to lie in the line of action of the bond- 
ing tool so that the two can be moved together to another 
circuit point. Advantageously, these are made the end steps, 
those applicable to completion of a second bond, in a process 
which includes additional steps by which a first bond is 
completed. The means envisioned by the disclosure includes 
a bonding tool and a clamp mounted for movement with, the 
bonding tool but capable of independent movement so that it 
can break the standing part of a length of conductor wire 
after completion of a circuit run and so that it can position 
the broken end properly to initiate another circuit nm. In ad- 
dition to the bonding tool and the clamp and the means to 
move them together, apparatus is disclosed by which the 
proper coordination between these several elements is as- 
sured. . 




the spindle after the speed of the two motors approaches the 
maximum output of the pump. Replaceable change gears are 
provided for the drive train of the wekler to provide ac- 
celeration and total speed flexibility for the drive system. 



3,659,772 
WATER RESISTANT CORRUGATED ARTICLES HAVING 

IMPROVED FOLD FLEXDIUTY 
WHbm Smith Doracy, Fnicrton; Thomm HaHs, Jr., Bren, 
and Edward A. PnBca, FnBcrton, al of CalC., aasii iinn to 
Union OH Compnny of CaMomln, Los Angdcs, CaHC. 
Oflghml appMcnllon Apr. 4, 1966, Scr. No. 539,749, now 
Patent No. 3,529,516, dated ScpL 22, 1970. Dirided and this 
application June 5, 1970, Scr. No. 43,829 
Int. CL B65d 25/14 
VS. CL 229-3.1 10 ( 



^^^^Ty^^m^ttm n mt * u^ 



3,659,771 
RAPID ACCELERATION MECHANISM FOR FRICTION 

WELDER 
Joicf KhraBe, and Ira H. Sage, both of Peoria, ID., aasigBors 
to CatcrpOar Tractor Co., Peoria, DL 

FBed Nov. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 85354 

Int. CL B23k 27/00 

VS. CL 228-2 4 Claims 

A rapid acceleration mechanism is provided for a friction 

welder having a fixed displacement fluid pump. The piunp is 



A method for forming a flexiUe fold in ccwru^ted paper- 
board rendered water resistant by impregnation with a 
solidifiable water proofing agent that imparts rigidity to the 
paperboard in which the fold is first treated with a non-rigid 
polymer pretreating agent prior to impregnation and a water 
resistant corrugated article having fcdds rendered flexiMe by 
this method. The method is paitkrulariy useful in manufactur- 
ing water resistant corrugated paperboard boxes having im- 
proved fold flexibility. 



182 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,773 
CARTON 
Gadfb A. Manizza, Blauvdt, N.Y. 
Can Compuiy, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Filed Nov. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 89,201 
Int a. B65d 5122, 5/36 
VS. CL 229—33 



to said gussets, one of which end seals in closed before the 
filling of the pouch and the other end seal being closed 
to Condncntal thereafter providing a pouch which will stand upright without 
support using the larger gusset as the base therefore and a 
method of making such a pouch from web material. 



12Claiins 




This disclosure relates to an improvement in a collapsible 
and erectable carton of the type having at opposite ends a 
depending eixl wall inboard and adjacent an upstanding end 
wall, and means between adjacent upstanding and depending 
end walls for automatically moving the upstanding end wall 
from a flat coUafised condition to its upstanding condition by 
moving the depending end walls from like generally flat col- 
lapsed conditions to the depending conditions thereof. The 
automatic means includes a hingeable panel joined between 
each adjacent pair of upstanding and depending end walls. 



3,659,774 
COMPOSITE CARRYING CASE 
Robert H. MMke, Ckkago, DL, aaigiior to Coataincr Cor- 
ponitkM of Anorka, Chkafo, H. 

FIM Aag. 7, 1970, Ser. No. 61,979 

Int. CL B65d 5/46, 15/12 

VS. CL 229-52 B 2 ClainH 



iSai 




A composite carrying case comprising a paperboard tray 
and a plastic rim adapted to fit over the upper edge of the 
tray in interlocking engagement therewith. 



f 



3,659,775 

« UPSTANDING POUCH OF FLEXIBLE MATERIAL 
George W. Tranuui, Irving, Tex., a«ignor to Dixko, Inc., Dal- 

lat,Tcx. 
• I Filed Apr. 17, 1970, Ser. No. 29386 

Int. CL B65d 33/00 
VS. CL 229-53 7 Claims 



\ 




A pouch of one-piece of flexible material having two side 
gussets of different dimensions and end seals perpendicular 



3,659,776 

BAG HANDLE 

Heikki S. Soonincn, VHunalncn, Tampere, Finland 

Filed Oct 19, 1970, Ser. No. 81,796 

Int CL B65d 33/06, 33/16 

VS. CL 229-54 R 



9Claima 




A plastic bag and handle therefor having a closure means 
for holding two handle parts together wherein two handle 
grip members are attached to respective elongated strip 
members which in turn are respectively attached to opposite 
sides of the top of the bag. Each of the elongated strip mem- 
bers has arranged thereon an outwardly facing track along 
which a closure member is arranged to slide to hold the 
mouth of the bag closed. Each closure member has internal 
walls which define grooves through which the tracks pass. 



3,659,777 
REINFORCED PACKAGE 
Takashi Kanada, No. 28 Shinsaku i Chome. and Toshio 
Tanaka, No. 128 Yotsuyakamichi, both of Kawasaki-shi, 
Kanagawa-ken, Japan 

Fled June 30, 1969, Ser. No. 837,728 

Int a. B65d 33/02, 75/58 

VS. CL 229-55 5 Claims 




An apparatus for continuously forming packages. Each 
package comprises a pocket and a flexible container therein 
with packaged materia] in the container. An endless tube of 
flexible material is formed from a continuous web at a tube 
forming station. Opposed areas of the tube are secured 
together in a sealing station to form a pouch with the opening 
of the pouch in the tube forming station. The p>ouch is sup- 
plied with a measured amount of packaging material and is 
moved through the sealing station to form a bottom for a suc- 
cessive pouch. The closed containers are divided into 
separate segments and are separated in a pair of cutting sta- 
tions. A pocket like container is formed around the con- 
tainers at the sealing and dividing stations. A protective an- 
tiseptic film may be marginally secured on each outer side of 
the pocket at its closed end. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



133 



3,659,778 
RECEPTACLE 
Robert H. Soultz, Porapano Beach, and JuHas A. Crane, 
Oakland Park, both of Fla., amignora to Atlantic Coaat 
Precast, Inc., Ft Lauderdale, Fla. 

FDed July 20, 1970, Ser. No. 56,472 > 
Int a. B65d 97/00 
VS. CL 232-43.1 * CWma 



mechanism. The interposer* are redprocably disposed in 
slots in a guide block, being pivoted therein by virtue of end 
walls of the slots acting on the edges of the interposers. A 
pneumatic piston is provided for moving each of the inter- 
posei* into alignment with the drive mechanism to cause a 
punching action, and permanent magnets are provided for 
moving and hokling the interposers in their inactive posi- 
tions. 




3,659,779 
PUNCH MECHANISM 
John W. Bcriunan, Orowico, and Lawrence R. GravcB, 
Rockcatcr, both of Minn., aarignors to Intcrnatioaal Buai- 
ncM Machines Corporation, Armoidi, N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 26, 1970, Ser. No. 22,961 
Int CL G06k 1/02 
UACL234-114 14 




3,659,780 
ELECTRIC ODOMETER DRIVE 
Gary Floyd Woodward, Ann Arbor, Micb.^ 
Matmr Company, Dearborn, Mich. 

Fled Nov. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 93,598 
Int CL GOlc 22/00 
VS. CL 235-95 R 



to Ford 



A receptocle comprising a box-like structure having a bot- 
tom portion and a circumferential sidewall extending up- 
wardly therefrom; an opening is provided in the sidewall 
adapted to be normally closed by a door member and which 
is attached to the sidewall by means of hinges having portions 
thereof embedded in the sidewall. The top is provided with a 
cover member hinged to the upper portion of the sidewall 
and sections of the hinges are likewise embedded in the 
sidewall; the cover has a circumferential flange which over- 
lies the upper edges of the sklewall and of the door when the 
door and the cover are in a dosed position to seal the recep- 
Ucle to protect the contents of the recepta$;le. The door 
member and the cover member of the receptacle are made of 
a lightweight material dissimilar fit)m the relatively heavier 
material of which the body of the receptace is made. 



u <- 



J* /^4 



*r-« 


® 

q 

- -rt- 




-y— n — T-» — r- 


C4- 






7 ^'f \ - 



/ 

€0 



An electrically operated odometer indtiding an electric 
motor, a plurality of odometer rolls and reduction gearing 
preferably in the form of series connected worm and worm 
gear sets coupling the electric motor to the odometer rolls. A 
plastic housing completely encloses the electric motor and 
the reducticHi gears with the housing being positioned in 
spaced relationship to the electric motor. The electric motor 
is alternately energized and de-energized by suitable 
switching arrangements to drive the odometer rolls, and the 
reduction gearing provides high torque and minimum over- 
nm on the odometer rtdls. 



3,659,781 

MONFTORING APPARATUS HAVING AUXILIARY 

SWrrCHING MEANS 

Marvin M. Graham, Seal Bcmdi, ud WWam W. Chambers, 

Anaheim, both of CaUL, amigDors to Robertsbaw Controls 

Company, Richmond, Va. 

FDed Nov. 12, 1969, Ser. No. 875,977 . 
IntCLG05d2i/00 
U.S.CL236— 11 SClatais 




t^^mkr- 



J ^:j]^ ^!r^^*^ — 







A punch mechanism including a line of punches each hav- 
ing an interposer disposed between it and reciprocating drive 



Monitoring apparatus for controlling a circulating means 
which circulates a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a 
temperature change unit. Condition sensiitg means is pro- 
vided for actuating the temperature change unit when a 
predetermined condition is sensed. Monitoring means in- 
cludes a housing which mounts a current sensing means 



IM 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



which is responsive to current flow in the temperature 
change unit to produce an electrical signal. An automatic ac- 
tuator is mounted in the housing and is connected in circuit 
with the current sensing means and is responsive to such 
electrical signal to actuate the circulating means. An auxilia- 
ry actuator is connected in circuit with the automatic actua- 
tor and is actuabie to produce an electric signal to actuate 
the circulating means independently of the temperature 
change unit whereby the circulating means can be actuated 
by the auxiliary actuator independently of the temperature 
change unit. 



with the cup contains a fitsibie thermally responsive material. 
The bellows is closed at its outer end and has abutting en- 
gagement with the end of the housing. As the temperature of 
the evaporator reaches a point that condensed water vapor 



•I 



to 



3,659,782 

LATCH-ON TEMFERATURE CONTROL SYSTEM 

WObMi W. OuMilNn, AMhdm, Calit., avigiior 

RobcmlMw C«Mtrok Compuy, Richmond, Va. 

FDed Ang. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 65,218 

iBt. CL G05d 23124 

MS. CL 236-68 B 6 Claims 









on the evaporator coils tends to freeze, the bellows will con- 
tract and allow the valve to reduce the flow of as from the 
evaporator to the condenser, and thereby avoid uncontrolled 
freeze-up of the evaporator coils and the blocking of the flow 
of air through said coils. 



3,659,784 
CLAMPING STRUCTURE FX)R ELEVATED RAILROAD 

TIES 
Lawrence KhMk, 120 Gale PkKC, Brau, N.Y. 

Filed Jan. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 5,596 
- iBt CL EOld 191 12i EOlb 9166 

\3S. CL 238—349 22 



/ 



A latch-on temperature control system including a load for 
operating a heating unit to heat a media. A gate controlled 
conduction device is provided for controlling current flow 
through the load. A sensor is provided for sensing the tem- 
perature of the media and is connected in circuit with the 
load and with the gate of the conduction device. A feedback 
heater is connected in circuit with the conduction device and 
is disposed in heat exchange relationship with the sensor. A 
mechanical heat shield is interposed between the sensor and 
the feedback heater for delaying heat transfer from the 
heater to the sensor whereby when the temperature of the 
media drops below a predetermined temperature a triggering 
signal will be imposed on the gate of the conduction device 
to initiate current flow through the load and through the 
feedback heater thereby actuating the heating unit and, con- 
currently, decreasing the rate of current flow in the sensor 
resulting in a decrease in its self-heating to enhance the trig- 
gering signal and latch the conduction device in its conduc- 
tive state. After a selected period of time the heat shield will 
be heated sufficiently to conduct sufflcient heat to the sensor 
to heat such sensor sufficiently to substantially compensate 
for its decrease in self-heating resulting from energization of 
the load. 




A bracket for use with a clamp and screw spike adapted to 
clamp elevated railroad ties to a support structure comprises 
a U-shaped member having a base portion and vertically ex- 
tending wing portions. The base portion is provided with an 
elongated slot and a washer received therein for registering 
with the nut-shaped head portion of the screw spike. The ver- 
tically extending wing portions are adapted to be secured to 
the tie, the bracket preventing the screw spike and clamp 
from disengaging and falling trom said tie. 



3,659,783 

TEMPERATURE REGULATED FLOW CONTROL 

ELEMENT FOR AUTOMOTIVE AIR-CONDITIONERS 

SaniMl H. Schwartz, Deerfichl, DL, assignor to Eaton Yale & 

Townc, Inc., Cleveland, OUo 

FOed Oct 24, 1969, Ser. No. 869,052 
Int. CL F25b 41104 
UA CL 236-93 1 Ctatai 

Thermally responsive control element in the suction side of 
the compressor of an air-conditioning system. The control 
element is in the form of a housing having an integral valve 
seat formed on the iimer wall. A poppet valve is carried by 
the cup of a thermally resp<nisive element, and is biased into 
engagement with the seat by a spring. A bellows forms a con- 
tinuati<Hi of the cup and has conmiunication therewith, and 



3,659,785 

WEATHER MODDFICATION UTILIZING 

MICROENCAPSULATED MATERIAL 

Lorcn D. Nchon, Lowcfl, and Bcnard A. SBverman, Natkfc, 

both of Mml, — ignnm to The United Stntcs of America as 

represented by the Secretary of the Ah- Force 

FBcd Dec 8, 1970, Ser. No. 96,147 

Int. CL AOlg 15100 

MS, CL 239—2 R 4 Clahns 

A fog and cloud seeding method and agent utilizing 

microencapsulation techniques whereby controlled seeding 

particle size for both dry Initial particles and particles 

dispensed as solution droplets provides for the production 

and maintenance of a predetermined particle spectrum when 

using hygroscopic chemical compounds which are fitigile, 

brittle or friable in crystalline structure. A hygroscopic 



Ma/ 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



185 



chemical agent to be utilized in cloud or fog seeding is pro- 
vided with a liquid permeable capsule shell such that op- 




dudes a body and a passageway in the body. A forward por- 
tion of the passageway has converging side waDs. An open- 
ing, formed in the body, conununicates with the passageway 
to provide an orifice for the coating material. A step is pro- 
vided in the passageway. The passageway, the opening and 
the step in the passageway of the nozzle cooperate to inovide 
a pattern of deposited coating material having feathered 
edges. 



~~^ 'a 4t f ft U* M* Jf m* . 



timization of particle size for improved seeding results is ob- 
tained. 



3,659,786 ' 

PROCESS AND INSTALLATION FOR BURNING 
COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES 
Fritz Vicr, and Bcmhard WtaUicicr, both of Salzbcrgcn, Ger- 
many, assignots to WintcrshaB AktlengcseUschaft, Knssel, 
Germany 

FBcd Dec. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 100,968 
Int a. F02d 1\06 
MS. CL 239-5 10 ' 




A process and burner installation for burning ^ombustible 
waste product sludges containing solid particulate contami- 
nants, including a nozzle chamber adapted to mix the waste 
sludge with pressurized air. The static air pressure in the noz- 
zle chamber is maintained at a predetermined pressure head 
in order to regulate the inlet of sludge to the chamber, so as 
to thereby effect control over the ratio of sludge to air in the 
mixture formed for burning. 



3,659,788 
JET NOZZLE ASSEMBLY 
Harry OMfldd, Covortry: Gordoa Tcrty HwJr y, Stavci1o% 
Nr. DavcBtry, wmA John Anthony Rldgw«y, HlMidey, al of 
Engtand, nmlgnnn to Rois-Rvyoe UmUcd, Dnrlv, Englnnd 

FBed Oct 14, 1970, Scr. No. 80,738 
OafaiH priority. appHcntlM Grsnt Britain, Oct 23, 1969, 

52,044/69 
Int CL B64d 33\04; B64c 15104 
MS, CL 239—127.1 10 ( 




A jet nozzle assembly comprises a housing having a curved 
bearing surface which provides a seating for a complementa- 
ry surface of a universally swivellable nozzle member through 
which in operation a propulsive jet may flow, an actuator for 
causing swivelling of the noole member relative to the hous- 
ing, a conduit for supplying a cooling and/or lubricating^ fluid 
to the surfaces, a flange member secured to the nozzle 
member, and pressure responsive assembly for applying, in 
operation, hydrostatic pressure to the flange member so as to 
reduce or eliminate frictional opposition to its swivelling 
movement due to said propulsive jet. 



3,659,789 
THRUST NOZZLE FOR ROCKETS 
Stephen D. Schnltz, Bri^iam City, Utah, assignoi 
Corporation, Bristol, Fa. 

FDed Nov. 4, 1966, Scr. No. 592,209 
Int CL B63h ll\lO, B64c 15100 
MS. CL 239-265.19 



toTUokol 



to Ransborg Elcctro- 



3,659,787 
NOZZLE 
Sko Ito, Kawasaki, Japan, assIgM 
Coating Corp., IndlanapoMs, Ind. 

Filed Mar. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 22,492 
Clahns priority, appttcatioa Japan, Apr. 16, 1969, 44/29575 

Int CL B05b 5\00 
UACL 239-15 15 Clahns 





I 



A fixed, convergent-divergent, rocket noz^ having a 
movable throat section seated in s{rfierical relationship to ad- 
A spray nozzle for an apparatus which hydraulicaUy jacent surfaces; so that the rocket may be steered by noting 
atomizes and sprays coating material. The spray nozzle in- the throat section. 



136 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,790 ' 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR APPLYING COATING 

MATERIAL 
Robert J. Gdin, Newark, Ohio, mmlvtor to OweiM-Coniiiig 

FIbcrglM CuToratkMi 
I Flkd Apr. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 31,709 

I IbL CL B05b 7/14 

VS. CL 239-336 




jBJ^, ,-^^ 



/'^i^. 



3,659,792 
METHOD OF PROCESSING EFFLUENT SLUDGE 
Eucen Voo Conrad, Fricscnrlng; Kurt RooMr, and Ludwif 
Meyer, both of Munster, Westphalia, all of Germany, as- 
signors to Hazemag Hartzerkleinerungs-und Zement- 
maschin^nbau-Gesellschaft mbH, Munster, Germany 
Filed Aug. 21, 1969, Ser. No. 851,970 
llClaimi Clafans priority, appUcatkm Germany, Aug. 23, 1968, P 17 84 

605.8 

InL CI BOlcl 3/09, 2 1/00 

U.S.CL 241-21 8ClalnM 













A method and apparatus are provided for spraying rein- 
forced resinous coating material on a surface. Resin and an 
accelerator are sprayed from one spray device and resin and 
catalyst are sprayed from a second spray device, each spray 
being shaped as a horizontally disposed ellipse, as viewed in 
cross section. The two sprays are directed in converging 
paths and a flat spray of reinforcing fibers is directed from 
above in a converging path with the other two sprays. In a 
preferred form, the resin and accelerator are mixed upstream 
of one spray device and the resin and catalyst are mixed in a 
mixing head adjacent the other spray device. 



I 



3,659,791 

SPRAY GUN ADAPTOR FOR AEROSAL CANS 

WilHani O. Clark, Rt 4, Box 401, Fori Myers, Fla. 

FDed Nov. 17. 1969, Ser. No. 877,210 

Int. CI. A47J 45/07 

U.S. CI. 239-375 4 Claims 




I 

An adaptor device for detachable support to an aerosal 
tpray can having a finger-operative spray knob adapted to be 
depressed in releasing the spray and aerosal contents of the 
can. The adaptor device includes convergingly acting base 
and head sections adapted to lengthwise embrace an aerosal 
can and includes a handle-like stock projection adapted to be 
hand-gripped in manipulating the spray can and in spraying 
the aerosal contents. The adaptor device includes a ful- 
cnuned lever having one end thereof engaging the spray 
knob of the spray can and having the other end extending 
along the stock projection. A user of the device sprays the 
contents of the aerosal can by squeezing the lever and stock 
elements together. 




Effluent sludge obtained upon clarification of waste ef- 
fluent, is admixed with solid refuse either before or sub- 
sequent to reduction of the solid refuse to particulate state in 
an impact grinder. 



3,659,793 
CAGE MILL 
Earie W. Stephenson, Latrobe, Pa.; James G. Newberry, 
Lakeland, Fla., and Robert C. Hazzard, Mt Vernon, Ind., 
assignors to International Mfascrals & Chemfcal Corpora- 
tfam, by said Newberry and said Hazzard and Kennametal 
Inc., Latrobe, Pa., by said Stepiiesson 

Filed Aug. 6, 1969, Ser. No. 847,929 
Int. CL B02c 7/04 



UACL 241-187 



13ClainH 



■i-g ».j 







The present invention relates to a cage mill for comminut- 
ing material and is particularly concerned with a cage miU 
having a plurality of counter-rotating cages with the cages 
widening in the radially outward direction and having hard 
facing applied to the leading faces of the impact bars and to 
the axially inner faces of the support rings at the ends of the 
impact bars. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



187 



3,659,794 
COMMINUTING DEVICE 
Gerhard Himiiath, Mnaiter, Wcitphalla, Germany, 
to Haacmag HartmililniiHngi -Und ZcaMnt-Masddnen- 
baa -GeseiKhaft nubH., Mnniter, Germany 

FDed June 26, 1970, Scr. No. 50,094 - ' ■ 
Claims priority, application Germany, Jnly 8, 1969, P 19 34 

545.0 

Int CL B02c 13/06, 18/08 

U.S. CL 241-189 R 9 Claims 



with the end of the coil at which the first convolution of the 
next wire layer is applied, to be gripped between the then ou- 
termost wire layer and the wire forming said first convolution 
of the next layer and drawn about said existing layer while 
the trailing portion of the strip is held against edgewise dis- 
placement by a spring clip ^i^iich grasps the strip and traveb 
with the strip and is constrained to straig^ line linear motic»i 
normal to the axis of the coQ. 




A rotor is mounted in a housing and has circumferentially 
distributed contact members. Spaced from the rotor are 
breaker members against which material to be comminuted 
and admitted into the housing, is flung by the contact mem- 
bers with resulting break-up of such material. The lower por- 
tion of the rotor circumference is surrounded by an arcuately 
curved shell defining with the rotor a channel for com- 
minuted material which tapers in direction towards an outlet 
of the housing. The shell is composed of supports which 
mount a plurality of parallel rods extending lengthwise of the 
rotor axis. Each rod has associated with it a comminuting bar 
of polygonal cross-section, formed with a longitudinal slot in 
which the respective rod is lodged. The bars are connected in 
abutting relationship so that no material can fall through 
between them. 



3,659.795 

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR INDIVIDUALLY 

WINDING COILS WITH PAPER SEPARATING ITS 

SUCCESSIVE WIRE LAYERS 

Robert W. Bachi, Itaaca, and John R. MItebel, GlcMlale 

Heights, both «f DL, aii%nors to Bachi, Inc. Itasca, DL 

FBcd Jan. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 150 

Int. CL H02k 15/085; B26d 5/20, 7/06 

VS. CL 242-7.03 14 Claims 




Paper strips are successively severed fix>m strip stock by a 
guillotine knife v/tach cuts oUiquely across the strip stock 
with the angle of the cut being alteniatdy towards the right 
and the left; the strqps so severed from the stock are fed to a 
coil being wound with the foremost comer of the leading 
edge of the strip at the side edge of the strip which is in line 



3,659,796 
YARN WINDING APPARATUS 
Erkfa Bochcr, and Alfred Maidener, both of Goppingcn, Ger- 
many, saslgnors to Zinser^Teztibnascidncn GmbH, Ebcr- 
sbach, Germany 

FBed July 22, 1970, Ser. No. 57,220 
Claims priority, application Germany, July 22, 1969, P 19 37 

178.9 

Int. CI. B65h 54/28, 54/38 

VS. CL 242—18.1 12 Claims 




^Pf 



In a yam winding apparatus the yam, to effect its deposi- 
tion on a cross-coil type yam package, is caused to 
reciprocate transversally to its direction of feed by means of 
rotating contour discs. In order to eliminate the formation of 
circumferential beads adjacent the edges of the yam 
package, the winding apparatus comprises means for cycli- 
cally displacing said contour discs in a direction normal to 
their axis of rotation for periodically reducing the amplitude 
of the transversal reciprocation of the yam during the wind- 
ing operation. 



3,659,797 
TAPE DRIVE ROLLER 
Don R. Coy, Palatine, DL, assignor to Ampex Corporation, 
Redwood City, Cam. 

FBed Nov. 26, 1969, Scr. No. 880^06 

Int. CLB65b 7 7/4^.7 7/20 

U.S. CL 242—55.19 A 10 Clatans 




A pressure or pinch member for cooperating with a cap- 
stan to transport a tape is formed with a deflectaUe tape en- 
gaging surface to drive the tape at a substantially constant 
speed without differential slippage which results in "wow," 
flutter or tape wear. The preferred embodiment of the pres- 
sure member is a one piece, plastic pressure roUer which has 
a deflectable section intermediate an outer tape engaging 



\ 



138 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



cylindrical wtll ind «i inner cylindrical waU for mounting on m^^mAcrnm 

a pott to repUce a conventional elaitomeric turfaced pres- ^^_ir\L^_fiu£!fc 

mre roller of the kind uaed in magnetic upecartridgea. Bartfcold F. Mejrtr, ML aM«^l»Bcfcn 

Molon Corpontiin, Detroit, nOch. 

nM JmK 29, 1970, Scr. No. 50,564 

3,659,798 Iirt.CLA62bi5/00 

COIL SPRING SUP CLUTCH VS. CL 242—107.4 8 



inCmtnt 



jPRdrk A. Mindlcr, and Cluurks E. Pkkcrii«. htA id 
r, N.Y., airffMn to EaataMs Kodak Compuiy, 
r, N.Y. 
Ffed Juc 5, 1970, Sw. No. 43,898 
I lBt.CLG03k7//0 

VS. CL 242-71 J * 



/— }- 





A coil spring ilip clutch adapted for uae in a roll film 
camera for advancing a film strip within the camera. The 
clutch comprises a rouubly mounted cylindrical drive shaft 
, having a smooth surface portion around which the coils of a 
coil spring are tightiy wrapped. One end of the coil spring is 
bent outwardly so as to drivingly engage a fibn advancing 
mechanism when tiie shaft is routed. The contacting surfaces 
of the coil spring and drive shaft are selected from materials 
which remain in frictional engagement sufficient to cause the 
coil spring to drive the film advancing mechanism until the 
' retarding force exerted by such mechanism exceeds a critical 
frictional force characteristic of one of the materials, at 
which time the coil spring stipa relative to the drive thaSt 



3,659,799 
REEL FOR WINIHNG TAPE 
Giovaul Ccnrtti; AkMMdra CortoM, aad Araaado Corta, 
al of Ivrca, Italy, Mrigaors to lag. C. Olivetti & C. S.p.Am 
Italy 

FBcd Jaac 9, 1970, Scr. No. 44,712 
daiau priority, aypMcatlaa Italy, Jaae 9, 1969, 52153 Ay69 

lat. CL B65ii 75/18, 75/14 
VS. CL 242-71.9 7 



A seat belt retractor includes a U-shaped support having 
generally vertically dispoMd ckMed end slots in the side walls 
thereof. A reel having ratchet toothed end plates and a shaft 
mounu a seat belt The ends of the shaft are received within 
the slots and torsion springs bias the shaft ends into engage- 
ment with the lower ends of the slots. The reel is spring 
biased in a beh retracting direction. A pawl is movable 
mounted on the side waDs of the frame and normally located 
against movement by a cohmmar spring. Cooperating cam 
surfaces on the pawl and side waUs move the pawl Uterally of 
and mto engagement with the ratchet plates of the reel when 
the pawl moves laterally (^ the side walls or kmgitudinaUy of 
the reel. When belt acceleration or movement of the beh in 
an extending direction exceeds a predetermined rate, the reel 
moves bodily upwardly with respect to the frame as the shaft 
ends move within the slots, and the ratchet plates of the reel 
engage cooperating teeth on the side walls of the frame to 
block fiiTther rotation of the reel in a belt extendmg 
direction. When the pawl is subjected to an accelention 
pulse of predetermined amplitiide and time longitudinally 
thereof and generally normal to the direction of bodily move- 
ment of the reel, the pawl moves laterally of the side walls 
and into engafement with the ratchet plates of the reel to 
provide a ftikrum for movement of the reel bodily upwardly 
so that the ratchet plates ctf the reel again engage the 
cooperating teeth on the side walls of the frame. When the 
pulse is laterally of the pawl, it also moves into engagement 
with the ratchet plates to provide the same fulcrum. 




3,659,801 
SEAT BELT RETRACTOR COVER 
LoalB RoMaail, Jr., MUford, MIdL, atrf ganr to Irvta 
tries lac^ I > ril Bt > oa. Ky. 

CoirtiBaatio»4Hpart of appHcatlMi Scr. No. 3,087, Jaik 15, 
1970. Thb applkartBa Oct. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 82,770 
lBt.CLA62bi5/00 
UACL 242-107 SB 4 



A take-up reel having a pair of flanges is described. One of 
the flanges is removable and is biased toward the fixed 
flange. The spacing between the flanges is slightly less than 
theCVidth of the tape so that the tape is firmly hdd by the 
reel. The means which biases the removable flange inchides a 
ring which is nonrotatoble with respect to the hub of the reel 
but which is axially movable relative to the hub. 




A seat beh retractor cover which may be attached to the 
retractor to form a unitary assemUage prior to instaUation in 
a vehicle. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



189 



3,659302 
COIL PAY OFF 
Hcary A. Agaals, Staarford, Cobb^ 
Wire Cable Coaipaay 

FBcd Mar. 11, 1970, Ser. No. 18,438 
lat CL B65II 49/00 
U.S.CL 242-128 



then guides the film end to a core portion of the reel as the 
reel continues to rotate. The film is released smoothly during 



SClafam 





In a pay-off apparatus for wire, coUi are laid upon a plat- 
form that is driven to rotate on a vertical axis while the wire 
is pulled off through an oveiiiead guide. A delivery tube, 
freely rouuble around the platform axis, directs the wire 
(torn the coil to the overhead guide. 



rotation of the reel in an unwinding direction. The device 
may be completely seIf-c(Hitained, i.e., it can be added or 
removed fitrni the associated apparatus as a unit. 



3,659305 

MOTOR-DRIVEN DEVICE FOR FILM WINDING OR 

REWINDING 

Kaoni Umcda, Sakai, Osaka, Japan, assignor to Minolta 



3359303 
CONE HOLDER 
Terrace. !?addiibroolr. N J. 
I Jaae 8, 1970, Ser. No. 44,1 17 
lat. CL B651I 49/02; D03J 5/08 
U3.CL 242-130.1 7 



Jakkr Barskl, 9 W< 



FBed Ai«. 19, 1969, Scr. No. 851^66 
I priority, ly p B rart cs i JapM, Sept. 27, 1968, 43/84885 
lot CL Bllb 15/32; G03b 1/04 
VS. CL 242—201 7 < 





A device for simple and firmly positi(ming a yarn cone in a 
knitting nuchine, allowing rapid removal therefrom. A i^u- 
ratity of leaf S|nings are anchored around the head ct a boh- 
shaped member. The threaded porticm of the neck carrier ax- 
iaOy adjustable means receiving the free ends of the springs 
to change the comprewve forces on them and vary the 
amount Ot bowing. This allows the device to accommodate a 
large number of different internal shapes and diameters oi 
yam cones. 



r 
\ 



A motor-driven device for winding or rewinding a film in a 
camera comprises first and second rewiiKling dutches pro- 
vided respectively at the initial and terminal portiom of a 
fibn rewinding drive system and a lever mechanism. Upon 
the actuation of an operating member the rewinding clutches 
are simultaneously brou^ into engagement while a winding 
clutch and a chitch in a sprocket gear are disengaged, and 
upon the release ai the member the rewinding clutches are 
disengaged while tiie latter chitcbes are brought into engage- 
ment. Thus, the rewinding action transmitting system can be 
left independent oi the film winding drive system during fibn 
winding operation. 



Roben J. 



3359304 
WEB TAKE-UP DEVICE 

N.Y., 
, N.Y. 



to 



26, 1970, Scr. No. 50,274 
lat CL G03k 1/04; GUk 15/32, 23/04 
U3.CL 242-195 9 

An automatic web take-up device for apparatus, such as a 
motion picture i»ojector, indudes a film take-up red with an 
arm attached to one flange of the fifan take-up reel. As film 
(or other wd> material) is fed to the device, the reel is 
rotated in a t^e-up direction and a hook^end portion of the 
arm i iigagrc the leading end porticm of the film. The arm 



33593O6 
REVERSIBLE INCREMENTAL RECORDING 

APPARATUS 
L. Crafts, Talsa, OUa., iiilgiiir to Tke Telex C«^ 
TalM,OUa. 
FBed Doc 14, 1970, Ser. No. 97,712 
lat. CL Bllb 15/32; G03b 1/04 
VS. CL 242—201 8 OaiaH 

A reversible incremental recording apparatus for moving 
tape incrementaDy past a recording head induding a rotating 
capstan, a continuously rotated flywheel suRxnted about die 
capstan, a drive collar rotatably supported about the capstan, 
a coil spring coaxiaOy received about a portion of the rotat- 
ing flywheel aad the drive collar normaDy tending to wind 



/ 



140 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



about both elements to rotote the drive coUar with the 
flywheel, the spring having a radial extending Ung at one end 
thereof, a tubular ratchet member received about the spring 
and receiving the tang, the ratchet member serving to 
prevent the roution of the spring and thereby the drive collar 
when held in a nonroUting position and permitting such rota- 
tion when not held, a solenoid device selectively holding oi 



drive disk and the brake shoe whereby upon actuation of the 
star wheel the frictional engagement of the brake shoe and 
brake disk may be adjusted to provide the desired drag. 




3 659 808 

ONE WAY DRIVE FOR FISHING REELS 

Oscar FldKher, dcccsMd, late o( 2610 S. W. 21st Strtct, 

Miami, Fla. (by Hden Krolm FMKher, executrix) 

FBed Oct 27, 1969, Ser. No. 869,489 

iBt CL AOlk 89102; F16d 63100 

MJ&. CL 242-219 3 Oaiiiis 



permitting the ratchet member to rotate, a clutch having a 
driven portion affixed to the capstan shaft, a forward drive 
portion affixed to the drive collar, and a rearward rotating 
drive portion rotated by gear means coupling the rearward 
drive portion to the drive collar, and a coil assembly for 
selectively coupling the clutch driven portion to one of the 
forward and reverse drive portions. 




3,659307 

BRAKE ATTACHMENT FOR STAR DRAG TYPE 

FKHING REELS 

fldKlMr, iliiiiMfil. late of 2610 Sooth Wot 21ft 

Street, MiMri, fla. (by Hdaa Krohn ndxter, executrix) 

Fled May 1, 1970, Scr. No. 33336 

Into. AOlk ^/02 

MS, CL 242—219 * Clalim 



A one way drive for fishing reels to prevent the inadvertent 
reverse rotation of the spool operating handle having an ar- 
cuate gear section with teeth normally in engagement with 
the spool routing gear which permits the roUtion of the 
latter in the direction to wind the fishing line on the spool but 
preventt the reverse roution of the operating handle. 



3,659309 

PUSH.PULL PNEUMATIC TUBE SYSTEM 

Ron Cook, 85 Eaitlidd Drive RoMai Hyb, Calif. 

Filed ABf . 5, 1970, Scr. No. 61^59 

lBt.CLB65g5;/i2 



U.S.CL243— 19 



UClainH 





An improved brake attachment for conventional star drag 
type fishing reels wherein the attachment may be incor- 
porated in the original assembly thereof or as a replacement 
of a greater number of parts forming the conventional brake 
mechanism, the attachment consisting of four parts, namely, 
a drive disk to be rouubly mounted on tlie conventional 
drive shaft and poaitioned within the recess of the conven- 
tional driving gear so as to rotote in unison with the driving 
gear, a brake disk rototoWy mounted on the drive shaft and 
secwed to also rotote in unison with the driving gear, and a 
brake shoe slidably mounted on the drive shaft adjacent the 
brake disk with a brake member interposed between the 



The push-puU pneumatic tube system includes two ter- 
minals connected together by a single tube. One termmal is 
selectively subjected to a positive or negative pressure m 
order to push the carrier to the remote terminal or to pull the 
carrier to the near terminal. A simple spring gravity or fric- 
tion held door may be used on the receiver part of the near 
terminal without danger of its being blown open, by provid- 
ing a bypass operative in response to the existence of positive 
air pressure. 



\ 



May 2, 1972 



/ 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



141 



/ 3 659310 ' 3359312 

INHERENTLY STABLE TAPERED WING FLAPERON PATH HAVING VARIABLE RESISTANCE TO VEHICLES 

AIRPLANE MOVING ON IT 

Jaaws L. RobertaoB, 15400 Suaaet Hwy., BeBeyne Airflekl, Sixtw Elnar CariwNorrtopliifc Swwkn, aarignor to Boris 

Bclevac, WmIu Fabriks AB, NorriKoplag, Sweden 

Orifiaal appBcatioa May 20, 1968, Ser. No. 730316, now Filed S«pt 24, i ^O.^Ser . No. 75,168 

Patent No. 3339,133, dated Nov. 10, 1970. DIvkM and tlds Claimt priority, applcatlon Sweden, Itoc 1, 1969, 16482/69 

appHcatioB Mar. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 23.113 Int. CL B64f 7/02 

InLCLB64c7J/04 UACL 244-114 R » 

U3. CL 244-76 R 9 Claims 

3 9 




' " / .. 



yjSM.ryX^MM/l'iMMM/i-.iK^ 



— 'L. 



-r: 






^ 



A runway or landing surface f<x vehicles and particulariy 
aircraft, such surface including a casing or enclosure contain- 
ing granular material, the casing being connected to means 
for producing a vacuum witliin it to an extent to cause com- 
paction of die granular material in order to produce a hard 
landing surface, and means for breaking or reducing die 
vacuum or its effiect when a soft surface is desired to thereby 
result in resistance to forward movement of the aircraft or 
other vehicle. 



Flaperon-actuating linkage is moved by flap-actuating 
means to coocxlinate fUqperon droop with flap deflection so 
that initially tlie flaperon droop increases with flap deflection 
and. subsequently, the flapeson droop decreases as flap 
deflection continues to increase. The wing panels ahead of 
the flapeitms are tapered in planform and their leading edges 
are more Munt and rounded than the leading edge portions 
of the wing inboard from sudi panels, such outboard leading 
edge portions provide hi^Uft and postpone stall at thehi^ 
an^ of attack oi the outboard «^ pands resulting from 
downward deflection of a flaperon from its maximum 
drooped position. Jaw cranks connect flaperon push rods to 
both the flap-controlled flaperon droop setting means and 
the flaperon differential deflection cratrol means. To lighten 
nose-up control forces when the flaps and flaperons are 
deflected, flap deflection stresses springs opposing down- 
springing loading on the elevators. A fence is aligned with the 
inboard end of each flaperon. 



3359313 

APPARATUS FOR DOCKING A HEUCOPTER 
DoBinlqnc Firancals Gerard McsMt, London, 
RayMnd Lonis U Gnennrr, Lorfant, and Goorfes 
Edonard Lonli Leon Dadon, KrtaMa Bkctrc, both of 
France, assignors to Etat Francak, Paris, Itnce 
FBed Apr. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 32356 
dates priority, appicatlon Franee, Apr. 28, 1969, 6913376 

Int CL B64f H12 
U.S.CL244— 116 10 < 



r £■ 



\ 



3,659311 
SAFETY DEVICE FOR AIRCRAFT BARRIERS 
Ldf MatMns Borehag, Norrkoptaic. Sweden, oMignor to 
Fabriks AB, Norrkoplng, Sweden 

FBed Oct. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 83337 

Clafans prtarlty, appHcnttei Sweden, Dec 22, 1969, 17715 

Int. CL B64f 1/02 

U.S.CL244— HOC 4Clalnis 





A helicopter is attached, at its center of rotation on its 
wheels, to a tumable coupling of a trolley. The trolley is dis- 
placeable along a worm gear mounted in a cross strut and the 
cross strut is driven in a linear path by a drive mechanism 
located beneath Ae surfru;e on which the helicopter rests. 
The trolley is displaceable on the worm gear along a line 
which is angulariy ofGKt frt>m the linear path of travel oi the 
cross strut and preferaWy perpendiculariy thereto. The 
helicopter may then be moved along any path of travel by 
selective combination of the rates of drive of the cross strut 
and the trolley thereon. 



An aircraft arresting system comprising a wire arranged in 
the path of a landing aircraft and adapted to be engaged by a 
hook on the aircraft. The ends of the wire are coimected to 
brakes. A barrier net is located behind the wire and is spaced 
therefix)m. Means is provided for raising the barrier net to 
position it in the path of the aircraft whenever an aircraft 
fails to engage the wire, with means provided for permitting 
the barrier net to remain lowered and out of the path of the 
aircraft when the aircraft successfully engages with the wire. 



3,659314 

LOAD RESPONSIVE DEVICE AND METHOD OF 

MAKING 

John E. Rode, Uganler, Pa^ a s sign or to Temper Carporatton, 

Ugonier, Pa. 

FBed May 18. 1970, Ser. No. 37358 
Int. CL F16b 3/00 
VS, CL 248-23 ^ 21 Oates 

The specification discloses a load responsive device, par- 
ticularly in the form of a support cell The support cell is par- 



142 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



ticularly useful in the proce« of imtalling heavy machinery wire-formed loop, which ertend oransver^ly to one another 

uwuiaiigr u9<^iui « »/ .„..•.. . ii_ : _i»^*.l Y.liV* mUrinnshm The midet of One of the WITC 



and the like. In making such an installation, the support cells 
are distributed between the machinery and the foundation 
therefor and support the machinery during the adjustment 
thereof to the proper, usually level, position. The support 
cells are partknilariy characterized in yielding at a substan- 



in a pivotal X-like relationship. The sides of one of the wire 
loops have respective intermediate S-shaped portions therein. 





tiaDy constant load over a substantial range of movement and 
are selected as to load bearing capacity so that the total 
number of support cells beneath the machinery will support 
more than the wei^t of the machinery while a smaller 
number of the cells wiD not support the weight of the 
machinery without yielding. 



and the sides of the other loop having respective U-shaped 
portions therein and intersecting the aforesaid S-shaped por- 
tions of the first wire loop to form a stop for the loops and 
limit the angular movement therebetween. 



j 3A5M17 

I 3,659315 TANK FOR UQUID CARGO 

nSHING ROD HOLDER wflka P. Hcudal, AaMtcrdan, NcdMriaiidk, and Uamd R. 

AlKit J. SteiaDOwltx, aMi Katkkoi E. StcfaDOwlta, both of p,^, Farakaai, EaglaMl, asstgaors to ShcO Ol Coapany, 

1S6S6 S. E. DMsioB, Space 1 1. P ia tl aai l. Oreg- NewYork^N.Y. 



Fled Oct 9, 1970, Ser. No. 79,537 
lot CL AOlk 97/10 
.S.CL 248-42 




FHod Mar. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 21,688 
Clatau priority, appfcatloa Great Brilaim Mar. 31, 1969, 

16,619/69 
lat CL F16a 1 100 
VS, CL 248—317 17 




-2 



•-ol 



A fishing rod holder has an upwardly opening, U-shaped 
trough holder member for supporting a fishing rod and a ring 
member pivotaUy mounted rearwardly of the holder member 
and having an internal diameter sufficient to permit the end 
of the fishing rod to pass therethrough. The ring member is 
pivotal between a first position in which its longitudinal axis 
is colinear with the longitudiiud axis of the holder member 
when the fishing rod is supp(»ted thereby, and a second poM- 
lion in which the longitudiiud axis oi the ring member is 
generaUy vertical. In this latter position, the ring member 
permits the end of the fishing rod to pass further through it 
and contact the gunwale, the reel on the fishing rod being 
retained by the ring member when in this second position. 



Means are disclosed for storing and transporting liquid car- 
go, which meant include a substantiaUy cylindrical tank and 
means for supporting such tank from an overhead load-bear- 
ing structure with the cylindrical axis of the tank normally 
horizonul and in which the means for supporting the tank 
give rise to tensfle stresses in the tank waD and reduced bend- 
ing stresses, whereby the tank waU may be made thinner for a 
given cargo. Various embodiments of such means are 
described, aU of which include at least two circular arrays 
each of at least four load-bearing elements, which elements 
of each array extend upwardly and tangentially firom the 
cylindrical tank wall in a common vertical plane perpendicu- 
lar to the cylindrical axis of the tank and are attached 
between the load-bearing structure and the tank waU under 
tension. Preferred features of such embodiments are dis- 
closed. 



to 



3,659316 
COLLAPSIBLE STAND 
JaoMi D. WfaoB, Long Beach, CaHf., 
Mctak, loc^ ConptoB, CaML 

Filed Oct. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 85,359 
iBt. CL B65b 67/72 
VS. CL 248—97 .1 

An improved self-supporting collapsible stand is provided 
for plastic trash bags, laundry bag», or the like. The stand ai 
the invention is formed of a pair of essentially rectangular 



335931s 
UNnARY VACUUM HOLD DOWN APPARATUS FOR 
LARGE AND SMALL RECORD SHEETS^ 
Stcphca H. Daacaa, Deaver, Colo., assigMir to 
tac^ Mla a sa pnfc, Mtaa. 

F1M Aag. 21, 1970, Ser. No. 66,023 
lBt.CLG03b 27/60 

U3.CL248-363 1® 

A noiseless unitary apparatus to retain small and large size 
record sheets in selected fixed positions on different parts of 



\ 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



148 



a perforated surface of a vacuum chamber by providing a 
wall within the chamber that No. 1 divides the chamber into 
two vacuum areas and that No. 2 has a restricted air 



3359320 



BOOK HOLDING BRACKET AND RACK 
Robert D. rMhlili, 6 DwBsy LaM, DIx mis, N.Y., 
Bernard Blalnr, 139 Fonst Drive, Jcrkho, N.Y. 

Fled JM. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 3330 \ 

bt.CLA47b6J/06 
U.S. CL 248-447 11 




passageway formed therein to reduce the flow of air between 
one vacuum area and the other while it is being drawn by a 
vacuum impeller through any of the perforated surfaces that 
are not covered by one of saiid record sheets. 



3359319 
CHAIR IRON 
Rkhvd H. WoMcn, Eaii Grawl Rapids, Midu, 
StwIcMS lac^ Gnmd R^Ms, Mkk. 

Fled Jww 8, 1970, Scr. No. 43,995 
Lrt.CLA47ci/00 
U3. CL 248-373 



to 



38Clalim 



i-^at m 



\ 



•*\ - 



-'-C 



zr^E* 




r 



.^t-^T 

8* '•' 



in3= 



"=r 



■^■^;;r 




A book holding bracket, adjustiMe to books of varying 
back lengths, for suq>endiiig books by their backs with their 
free page edges downward when not in use, and provided 
with meaiu for swinging or rotating the books upwards about 
180* in a vertical fdane to permit opening the books and 
turning the pages ndeways right to left in the usual manner, 
and also provided with means for rotating or swivelling the 
upturned hookt in a horizontal plane, for example about 90", 
to permit opening and viewing of books required to be read 
or viewed with the free edge of the page dooest to, and the 
bound edge of the page frirthest from, the viewer, Le. the 
printing, intelligence or other matter to be viewed is paraDd 
to the bound edge of the page; and a rack, stationary or 
movable, for holding one or a plurality of such brackets. 



3359321 

STRUCTURE FOR PLASTIC ENCAPSULATION OF 

SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES 

Yazabare SalraasBto, ami Krin OlsaU, boCh of Tokyo, Japai^ 

assifBors to Hkacki, Lid., Tokyo, JapoB 

Fled Jaly 10, 1969, Scr. No. 840,634 
ClaiBU priority, appBcaHoa JapMi, iwij 10, 1968, 43/47752 

Iirt. CL B29r 1/06 
VS. CL 249-84 10 < 




The preferred embodiment of the chair iron includes a seat 
platform pivotally mounted to a frame which in turn is sup- 
portable by a cluur base. A torsion rod is mounted on Ae 
frame with one end fixed and one end free to rotate. A 
second torsion rod is similarly mounted on the platform, 
parallel to the first A pair ci levers are sbdably mounted on 
the rods and are maintained in alignment by a bracket as- 
sembly. This assembly also includes a cam and pin arrange- 
ment whereby a pretension f(xx;e can be applied to the levers 
and thereby to the torsion rods. 




An improvement in a plastic encapsulating procett for 
semi-conductor devices, wherein parts of a sheet4ike thin in- 
sert are embedded in plastic mat^ial injected into cavities in 
a two-part mold, said insert being loaded or positioned on the 
cavity part of said moid, characterized in that at least either a 
projected or recesses portion, and correspondingly either a 
recessed or projected portion, have been in advance con- 
structed respectively on each side edge of said insert and on 
said cavity part of the mold near the injection gate therein 
contacting each other so as to |»event an outflow at plastic 
material from said injection gate along a perifrfieral gap 
created between said side edge of the insert and the cavity 
part of the mold any ftuther than their conticting point 
which acts as a stopper in said gap, producing an undesbabte 
channel for plastic material to flow. 



1 : 

144 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



i 3,659,822 

' NON-SEIZING SLIDE VALVES 

JoMpk G. Nagy, Box 126, YariM, Swkatchewui, Canada 

j Filed Jaa. 22, 1971, S«r. No. 107,750 

! bt. CL F16k 1116 

U.S. CI. 251-178 4ClalaM 



3,659,824 

AIRPLANE JACK 

Philip L. Johnson, 9710 Ocean Gate, Inglewood, CallL 

Filed Dec 15, 1%9, Ser. No. 885^44 

Int a. B66f 3100 

VS. CI. 254— 1 24 6 dafana 




1 A non-seizing slide valve is disclosed including a valve 
body having first and second halves between which a lever 
actuated valve plate is pivoted for sliding between open and 
closed positions. First and second gaskets are disposed 
between the sliding valve plate and first and second valve 
body halves. Formed of flexible and resilient material, the 
two gaskets include inner and outer annidar flanges that are 
reinforced by rigid rings embedded in the gasket flanges. The 
valve parts are held m assembled relationship by two through 
bolts having shanks encircled by compression coil springs 
that press the gaskets against the valve plate. 





Basic unit includes first variable length column and second 
preferably fixed-length column pivoted together at upper 
ends, with load contact member at the top of one column. 
Bases on each column maintain the unit in upright plane. 
Bases pushed toward each other to initially engage load. 
Variable length chain holds bases at desired spacing. At least 
one base frictionally engages grouiKl to prevent undesired 
movement. First column is extended to swing second column 
toward vertical and raise load. To lift airplane struts located 
below load contact member, cable unit is attached to load 
conuct member and extends down to strut to lift in tension. 
Two basic units are connected in laterally spaced relation for 
two-point lifting. Third support arm may be added to provide 
for three-point parallelogram-type lifting of entire airplane. 



3,659,823 

DEVICE FOR MOVING LARGE AND HEAVY 

APPARATUS 

Kenneth H. Griflln, Unloadak, Ind., aMigner to G & L Cor- 
poration, Fort Wayne, bd. 

Filed Apr. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 26,542 

Int. CLB66f J/24 

MS. CL 254-93 8 Claims 



3,659325 

DISH FOR MIXING DENTURE REPAIR MATERIALS 

Gabriel Reitcr, 8204 Vcntncr Ave, Margate City, N J. 

FUed June 24, 1970, Scr. No. 49^85 

Int CL BOlf 13100 

VS. CL 259-60 6 Claims 




A dish including a heavy walled cylindrical holder and a 
relatively light walled receptacle removably disposed within 
said holder. 



A device for moving large and heavy apparatus comprising 
an elongated support member secured to a frame, a load 
shoe is carried by the support member for movement longitu- 
dinally of the support member. In a specific embodiment, 
two such devices are positioned side by side and a large and 
heavy load, for example, a transformer, is positioned on th^ 
load shoes of the two devices. The elongated support mem- 
bers of the devices are generally parallel to each other. A 
fluid actuated cylinder is connected to each load shoe, the 
cylinders being connected to a common pressurized fluid 
source and control. 



3.659,826 

DEVICE FOR TREATING ONE OR MORE SUBSTANCES 

IN A VESSEL PROVIDED WITH AT LEAST ONE 

ROTATABLE STIRRING MEMBER 

Constant Joluin Naota, Ovcrvccn, NctlMrlands, avignor to 

Nantaaix Patent A.G., Zng, SwitMriand 

Filed Dec. 22, 1970, Scr. No. 100,575 
Claims priority, appllntion Netherlands, Dec. 30, 1969, 

6919610 
Int. CL BOlf 7100 
UACL 259-102 lOCtotaa 

The present apparatus includes a vessel provided with a 



May 2, 1972 

pair of agitators mounted to stir and mix substances in both 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



146 




shaft by means <rf a coupler in such a way that the axis of the 
motor shaft is concentric with the axis of the coupler and the 
axis of the kneading member shaft is angulariy ofEset from 
the axis of the mot<» shaft. The kneading member is pro- 
vided with an "O" ring about its periiAery for sealaUe en- 
gagement with the sidewalls of the pan. both the pan and the 
kneading member being fixed against rotation. The angular 



^ 



!_ 




P 






■ tt 



vertical and horizontal directiora. 



I '^—-s^ff^. 



■igrs'stuvz^ — 



--^-m- 



M 

40 



3,659337 

STORAGE RECEPTACLE AND AGITATOR FOR 

REFRIGERATOR ICE MAKING MACHINES 

H. Fogt, Wci* CantilltOB, Olrfo, aarignor to C 

Motors CorporatloB, Detroit, Midi. 

FBed Jan. 14, 1971, Scr. No. 106,430 

Int. CL BOlf 7110; F25c 5100 

U&CL 259-110 4Clalnii 



ofbet of the kneading member shaft with respect to the 
motor shaft and the joumaled connection between the 
kneading member shaft and the kneading member are such 
that rotational movement of the kneading member shaft is 
translated into a non-rotating undulatory movement of the 
kneading member within the pan. In consequence, the dou^ 
is kneaded into the form of a pastry sheU. 




3,659329 

METHOD FOR ADJUSTMENT OF THE HEAT 

GENERATING PROCESS IN A ROTARY KILN WITH A 

HEAT EXCHANGER ETC. 

Jarodav rnapM, and Joicf PiMk, both of Dvomicova, 

CuchailaTakfai. nwigao rs to Prerovskc drojiray, nvodni 

podnik, Prcrov, Caechodevakla 

Contlnaatlon-ln-pait of appMcatten Scr. No. 810^44, Mar. 

26, 1969, now abandoned. This application Sept. 28, 1970, 

Scr. No. 75336 

Claims priority, application Czechoslovakia, Mar. 27, 1968, 

2370-68 
InL CL F27b 7/02 
VS. CL 263-32 < 



A refrigerator ice piece storage receptacle for use with an 
automatic ice making nMchine having a rouuble agitating 
means to continuously move the ice pieces in the container 
to prevent their sticking together when stored at temperature 
below or above freezing. The agitating means comprise a plu- 
rality of canted discs continuously revolving on a common 
agitator rod within the container. Coupling means are pro- 
vided wherein the agitator rod is separably drivingly con- 
nected to a refrigerator drive shaft when the receptacle is 
located in a compartment of a refrigerator. Drain valve 
means are provided in the bottom of the receptacle to drain 
the same of melting ice water wherein said valve automati- 
cally closes when the receptacle is removed from the 
refrigerator for placement on a countertop surface. 



4^»i' 



3359,828 

DOUGH KNEADING APPARATUS FOR FORMING 

PASTRY SHELLS 

Harold G. Valentine, 117 Manacn, Brockton, Maas. 

Fled Oct. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 78,759 

Int CL A21c 1100 

VS. CL 259-190 ,^\L , 

A kneading member havmg a shaft joumaled thereto is 
positioned within a pan having a charge of dou^ therein. 
The shaft of a drive motor is fixed to the kneading member 




A rotary kiln system employing a pre-heater for feeding 
material to the kite. A temperature sensing device is placed 
in the gas oudet of the rotaiV kiln and control means are pro- 
vided to regulate the rate of feed of raw material to the pre- 
heater in response to variations in $en8ed temperature from a 
predetermined level. , 



146 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,830 
DESCALING COPPER RODS 
C k nu o rt J. Saydcr. imI Jack P. Moore, botk of 
HadMB, N.Ym OMljonfi to AMcoada Wire aad Cable Com- 

Origtaal appMcati— Jaly 31, 1968, Scr. No. 749,013, bow 

Palcat No. 3,546,029. DirMed ami tUi appHcatloa Apr. 16, AUra 

1970. S«r. No. 33,128 Arata, Tokyo, 

fat. CL C21d 9/56 
U.S.CL 266-3 R 4Clafanf 



into the funuKX and onto the unloading platfonn through a 
hydraulic motor driven chain and sprocket arrangement. 



3^59,832 
CUPOLAS 




3,659331 I 
INTEGRAL QUENCH FURNACE AND TRANSFER 
MECHANISM 
RoHdi H. Rcbcr, OrMgr. and HvoU E. McKhcr, Pico 
Rivera, botk at CaHf ^ Mdgnnri to Padflc SdortUk Coa- 
pany, Oty of CoamcRC, Cidtf. 

FVed Aag. 25, 1969, Scr. No. 852,671 

lot CL C21d 1/66 

VS. CL 266-4 A 22 ClaiBH 




An integral quench fiimace system and transfer 
meclianism for removing a heat treated charge from the fur- 
nace chamber into the quench media and cmto an unloading 
platform. The transfer mechanism includes a forked loading 
cart mounted on the quench chamber A-frame for movement 



d Yflridod Okawara, Kawasaki sW, al of 
to MMM iroa Works Co., Ud^ Tokyo, 



Fled Oct. 22, 1969, Scr. No. 868^63 

VplhadkNi JapoB, Jaw 4, 1969, 44/4421 1 
IM. CL F27d 7/00 
VS. CL 266—30 2 1 



Scale is removed fitxn a copper rod by continuously in- 
troducing the copper rod at a temperature below 1,000* F. 
into a descaling zone wherein the rod is exposed to a reduc- 
ing atmo8{rfiere and is heated in such atmosphere to a tem- 
perature above 1.100° F. (preferably between 1.200* F. and 
1.400* F.) to effect substantially complete reduction to 
metaUic copper of the oxide scale. Immediately thereafter 
the rod is quenched in a liquid (preferably aqueous) coolant 
to a temperature below that at which any substantial reoxida- 
tion can occur before exposing the rod to an oxidizing en- 
vironment. Apparatus for carrying out such descaling opera- 
tion comprises a tubular descaling chamber through which 
the rod is passed, burners positioned to direct a reducing 
flame into the interior of the chamber, and a coolant vessel 
containing a liquid coolant in which the rod exit end oi the 
descaling chamber is immersed. 




Combustion gases are generated in the liquid ftiel com- 
bustion chambers provided on the middle shell of a cupola 
and blasted on the red-hot coke which is supjrfied automati- 
cally below said combustion chambers, to generate gas mix- 
tures consisting of CO. Hi and Nt by water gas reacticm and 
reducing reaction. These gas mixtures can be used as usefid 
heat sources. By this process, the steam which has been so 
fsr regarded as a taboo in cupola operations can ad- 
vantageously be utilized as hot gas to that cast iron at si4>eri- 
or quality may be produced with better yields. 



to Loois A. Graat 



3359333 
LADLE SKIMMER 
Look A. Graat, PtCtsbargh, Pa., asslgan 
lac 

Piled Jaa. 19, 1971, Scr. No. 107,676 
fat CL F27d 23/00 
VS. CL 266—37 6 




The specification discloses a skimmer mechanism compris- 
ing a supporting platform or structure, a turntable rotataUy 
mounted on said supporting platform, a power operated 
means for imparting a rotary movement to the turntable, a 
boom assembly pivotaOy mounted on said turntable and in- 
cluding an extensible and retractable boom section on said 
boom assembly, a pivotable skimmer Made or paddle 
mounted at the outer end of said boom section, power 
operated means for pivotally moving said bo<nn assembly 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



147 



relative to said tumuble, power operated means for extend- 
ing and retracting said boom section with respect to ,the 
boom assembly, and power operated means for pivotally ac- 
tuating the skimmer blade. 



3,659334 

SPRING SUPPORT DEVICE 

LcoMTd S. Sooaae, 366 Mapk HB Drive, Hackcasack, N J 

Filed Jaac 10, 1970, Scr. No. 44,976 

Iat.CLF16C7/06 

U3.CL 267-70 . "^ 




plunger with an enlarged head through plastic material within 
a cylinder under pressure bdow the yield point of the plastic 
material so that said plastic material is in solid form and 
which has a resilient means operatively arranged between 
said plunger and said cylinder suflBciently loaded 
therebetween to force said phmgcr with enlarged head back 
through said fAattic material in toM form to reset said im- 
pact absorber after impact and to absorb some kinetic energy 
on impact in addition to that abaorbed by forcing said 
plunger throu^ said plastic material. 

3359336 «• 

FOLD-OVER DEVICE FOR RADIAL PLY BREAKER 

MATERIAL 

OaMfo Ncri, Royal Oak. aad Ckarka E. Todd, Detroit, both 

of Mkh., MBipMn to Ualroyal, lac New York, N.Y. 

FBed Jaa. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 6351 

Iat.CLB45h 45/22 

VS. CL 270-86 1* 




/ 
A spring support device including a housing having a lower 
wall and an upper wall, a helical compression spring within 
the housing and bearing at its lower end against the lower 
wall, a spring backing plate withm the housing and bearing 
against the upper end of the spring, and a load-carrying unit 
extending through the spring and the lower wall and engaging 
the backing plate. In one embodiment, the load-carrying unit 
includes a tlveaded rod extending through the upper wall. In 
another embodiment, a pair of spaced threaded rods, which 
are parallel to the path of movement of the load-carrymg 
unit, are secured to the backing plate and extend through the 
upper wall. In both embodiments, the rods are provided with 
nuts that are operaMe from the exterior of the housing for 
adjusubly limiting downward travel of the backing plate and 
the load-carrying unit and. therefore, the force applied to the 
spring by a load. , 



'i_."^r-^_i 



A fold-over device for continuously folding over ply stock 
or like material, e.g., rubberized tire cord fabric, is disclosed 
the device being characterized by Ae presence of a series of 
rollers arranged in an oblique line along a conveyor and 
which progressively direct the free edge of the folded-oyer 
portion of the stock material into a predetermined overtying 
relationship with the free edge of the remaining portion oi 
said stock material with edge control means being provided 
to align the edges of the folded over material with each other 
in superposed or stepped off rdation just prior to the time 
the layers are adhered together, thereby to provide precisely 
and uniformly folded over stock material. 



3,659335 

IMPACT KINETIC ENERGY ABSORBER WITH 

AUTOMATIC RESET 

GcraU H. PMcraoa, 520 Ross BMg., Saa Frmadaco, Caltf. 

FBed Oct 12, 1970, Scr. No. 79,722 

lat CL F16I 9/30 

U3.CL 267-136 4ClalBia 



3,659337 
AUTOMATIC ORIGINAL FORM FEEDING DEVICE FOR 

THE USE OF A COPYING MACHINE 
MfaMira Uaahashi, Higashi, Japaa, assigaor to KaboshiU 
Kaisha Rkok, Tokyo, Japaa 

CoatiaBirtkia-ia-part of appBcattoa Scr. No. 720,286, Apr. 
10. 1968, aow abaadoacd. Thk appBcattoa May 7, 1970, Scr. 

No. 35339 

lot CL B65k 1/08 

VS. CL 271-9 2 Claiais 




\ > 




In impact kinetic energy absorber with automatic reset in 
which the kinetic energy on impact is absOTbed by forcing a 



A device for automatically and successively feeding 
original forms of varying sizes and thicknesses to a copying 

i 



148 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



machine. Each original form is individually supported by one 
of a plurality of vertically spaced, horizontally reciprocable 
tables which are housed in a vertically movable cabinet to 
permit automatic and successive feeding of each individual 
original form to a copying machine. 



3^9338 
MATERIAL HANDLING DEVICE 

L. Davii, Rid Mu -dMU. Tcx^ aMJa to J. W. 

Jfm IMIm County, Tex. 

Filed June 12, 1970, Scr. No. 45^52 
Int. a. 1M51I 3108, 5/08 



3,659340 

VACUUM GATE 

Bernard W. Rock, Rockvttc, Coan., Mrignor to The ComMC> 

tknt Bank and Tnitt Company, Hartford, Conn. 

Filed Jane IS, 1970, Scr. No. 46,024 

Int CL B65h 29/60 

U.S. CI. 271-64 7 



UACL 271-11 



SClataM 





-■*> 



A pneumatic card pick-up member is moved between first 
and second poutions. In the first position the member picks 
up a card. In the second position the card is removed from 
the member by two rollers that tilt the card as it travels 
through them. The card pick-up member is stopped long 
enough in the first position for it to pick up a card. It is abo 
flopped long enou^ in the second position for the card to be 
engaged between the two rollers and removed from the pick- 
up member. In between these positions, the pick-up member 
is moved rapidly. 



Sheets of material can be selectively transported along 
either of two alternative flow-paths each of which is followed 
by a continuous perforated belt constrained by guides. A 
vacuum chamber is disposed along each flow-path adjacent 
to the belt. The vacuum chambers are connected to a valve 
which is responsive to a control signal to selectively actuate 
either or both of the chambers. Sheets of material which 
enter the apparatus follow the flow-path adjacent to the 
vacuum chamber which has been actuated. The apparatus 
can be constructed using four perforated belts, two of which 
run parallel to each other along each of the flow-paths. 



3,659,839 
APPARATUS FOR BRAKING AND OVERLAPPING OF 
j SHEETS MADE OF PAPER OR THE LIKE TO BE 

DEPOSITED ON A STACK 
Horst Baockc, SoHngeo-Ohiics, Germany, amlgnor to Jafcn- 
bcrg-Wcrke AG, DusMldorf, Germany 



Flkd Mar. 27, 1970, Ser. No. 23,420 ^^ ^ 271-M 

Claims priority, appUcatioa Germany, Apr. 5, 1969, P 19 17 
I 616.0 

Int. CL B65b 29/68 
VS, CL 271—46 5 ClainH 



3,659,841 i 

STACKER FOR DOCUMENT CARDS 

James M. Rigotti, Rockcster, Minn., amignor to International 

Business MacUncs Corporatioa, Armonk, N.Y. 

Filed Nov. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 86,781 

Int. CL B65h 31/14 



7Claims 




An apparatus for braldng the advance of and effecting 
overlapping of sheets of paper, cardboard or the like material 
that are to be deposited on a stack in which advancing sheets 
are fed over a suction brake installation including a suction 
box having a fwrforated top through which a periodically ap- 
plied suction is effected and a perforated control belt means 
movably arranged over the perforated top of the suction box 
or chamber to align the perforations of the control beh 
means with the perforations in the top of the suction box or 
chamber by moving the control beh means in accordance 
with tlie rythm of tlie fed sheet sequence. 

•I 




A stacker for document cards having a card receiving 
pocket, a rotataUe roller yieldably disposed at the top of the 
pocket by means of a cantilever spring, and a supporting 
plate for the cards in the pocket and yieldably held from 
downward movement in the pocket by means of a spring of 
the constant tension type, that is, a coiled ^>ring so con- 
structed as to provide a return force that is constant per unit 
of width as the spring is unwound flrom the coil. The spring 
applied to the supporting plate has a relatively narrow ter- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



149 



minal portion which is effective for providing a certain force 
on the supporting jriate for the first portion of the stack of 
cards formed in the pocket and has a relatively wide portion 
providing a somewhat higher force on the supporting plate 
for later cards being stacked in the pocket As the cards 
enter the pocket, they deflect the cantilever spring while 
malcing contact with the roller, and the spring and rcrfler 
move the cards and the supporting plate downwardly in the 
card pocket, with the spring preventing a jamming of the 
cards initially as they enter the pocket and also preventing a 
subsequent movement of the card stack away from the roller 
as the card stack increases in height so that the roller con- 
tinues to control the cards as they enter the pocket. 



eludes spring members having arranged therein movable balls 
which cooperate with the ^ring members and associated 
parts. 



3,659344 

EXERCISES PROPELLED AND BODY SUPPORTING 

SPRING BIASED PLATFORM 

Alfred B. Cunmins, 401 Miles Road, Chagrin FaBs, Ohio 

Filed Aag. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 64,500 

Int. CLA63b 27/22. 27/00 

VS. CL 272-58 14 Claims 



3,659342 

DRY LAND SKI TRAINING DEVICE HAVING A PAIR 

OF CANTILEVERED ARMS PIVOTALLY MOUNTED 

ADJACENT THEIR FORWARD ENDS 

Sulo A. AUida,Atticboro, Mass., a mignor to Intricate Machine 

& Engineering Inc. 

Fled Jan. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 2,052 

Int. CL A63b 69/18 

VS, CL 272—57 B 6 Claims 




A dry land ski training device having a pair of pivotaDy 
mounted cantilever arms, each with adjustable foot support 
brackets mounted thereon, the cantilever arms having a 
semi-circular section at their forward ends with a hole at the 
pivot point, tlie flat bottom surface of the semi-circular sec- 
tion bearing upon the sloped surface of a support post, and 
the cantilever arms being bent upwardly at a slight angle to 
extend outwardly from the support post and give the foot 
brackets a forward slope. AdjusUble brakes are attached to 
the forward end of the cantilever arms to vary the amount of 
resistance tiie user of the device will encounter while pivot- 
ing the arms back and forth. Means are also provided for ad- 
justing the lateral distance between the forward ends of the 
arms. 





A machine for exercising the human body muscle system 
has a platform on which the user rests and which is mounted 
to swivel about a vertical pivot and at the same time to rock 
or "see-saw" about a central horizontal pivot. The swiveling 
friction is controlled to some extent by bearing collars. The 
rocking action is resisted by springs. The rocking load may 
be increased by attaching weights to the platform. A handle- 
bar support is provided in position to be grasped by a user 
standing on the platform. Parallel handrails on opposite sides 
of the platform are adjustable to various positions. 



3,659345 

EXERCISE TREADMILL AND BELT SUPPORT 

APPARATUS 

Wayne E. Qninton, Seattle, Wash., aasignor to Quinton In- 

stramcnt Company, Seattle, Wash. 

FOed Apr. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 27,287 

Int CL A63b 23/06 

UACL 272-69 11 Claims 



3,659343 

EXERCISING BELT 

John Kojifian, Jr., 3120 East Townscnd, Fresno, CaUf. 

FHcd Oct i7, 1970, Ser. No. 84,419 

Int CL A63b 27/26 

VS. CL 272—57 R 2 Claims 




// '*• 



A simplified treadmill and beh support used for ezerciM 

purposes arxl fcH' use as part of an ergometric system. An 

endless belt is driven over a support surface composed of a 

A beh to be worn around the waist of the user for use as a fabric such as canvas which is impregnated with wax. A suha- 

weight-reducing device and exercising device. The belt in- ble drive assembly causes continuous movement of the beh. 



150 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



151 



Mo. 



3,659348 
MOBILE TACKLING IH^MMY 
N. DePcw, 10 N. S««BlB|rlrti Driiv, St Look CwMty, 



3,659346 
ELASTIC TYPE EXERCISNG DEVICE 
Walter J. Kanldd, 201 1 Third SL, Bay City, Nfich. 
FDed Oct 29, 1970, Scr. No. 85,1 17 

laiLCLA63b23/04,21/00 FVadJaM 11. 1969, Sv. No. 832,199 

113.0.272-80 llOaiiM lat. CL A63b 67/00 

I U3. CL 273-55 R 




A modality construction comprising a pad having a core 
formed of yieldable material enclosed within an envelope or 
cover to one side of which is secured a pair of parallel, 
spaced apart, elastic mounting straps to enable the pad to be 
secured to any desired portion of a person's body. Between 
the mounting straps, and parallel thereto, is secured a non- 
elastic force transmitting strap having means at its opposite 
ends for connection to an anchor device which may be 
secured directly to an immovable object or, if preferred, 
secured to the immovable object throu^ the intermediary of 
a spring. 



• I 



3359347 

FOOTBALL TACiOJNG AND BLOCKING TRAINING 

APPARATUS 

Gordon James Gow, Banrie, Ontario, Canada, asrignnr to The 

Raymond Lee Orfanfaatfoo, Inc., New York, N.Y., a port 



Fled Oct. 1, 1970, Scr. No. 77,098 
Int. CL A63b 67/00 
VS. CL 273—55 R 4 




Apparatus for improving and training footbaU players in 
blocking and tackling employing an elevated horizontal 
member rotatable in a horizontal plane about a point inter- 
mediate its ends. One end of the member is spring loaded 
and a counterbalanced tackling dummy hangs on pulleys 
below the oppoote end of the member. 




A mobile tackling dummy comprising an elongated over- 
head support for a track, a trolley adapted for reciprocal 
movement along said track, a tackling diunmy suspended 
from said trolley for movement therewith, means fot effect- 
ing detachment of said dummy from said trolley upon en- 
gagement of the dummy by an individual during usage, and 
means for controUing the movement of said trolley to allow 
for reciprocal travel of said dummy and for optional starting 
and stopping thereof during its course of movement 



3359349 

BATON AND RING GAME 

WBIIam D. Scymow, 1100 N.E. 160th St^ Miami, Fia. 

FHed Dec 19, 1969, Scr. No. 886,653 

Int CL A63b 67/00 

U3. CL 273—96 B 3 




Y- 



A game, employing a baton and a ring, wherein one end of 
the baton is held firmly in one hand and the ring is placed 
over the baton adjacent the outwardly extending end and 
spun thereon by a rotary movement of the baton. By means 
of the proper manipulation of the baton, the ring can be 
launched up into the air and caught on the baton after being 
permitted to bounce on the floor, sidewalk, etc., or ahema- 
tively it may be caught directly out of the air. The nOTmaOy 
outwardly extending position of the baton is preferably di- 
vided into a plurality of delineated portions having different 
number values and the ring may likewise be divided into a 
phuiOity of sections having different number vahies or 
distinctive colors. 



3359350 3359352 

TABLE TENNIS PRACHCE OR GAME BOARD BOARD GAME^APPARATUS 

JoaenhA.Picnka,4797S«OMM|k.Blooi^kidlias,Mlch. Donald E. Rcdkt, 9433 Sonth Chanqilain, CMarK B- 
^i;£rr.pS«^^ "5316. Fah. 13. 1967. FBed J-y M.*^*. »-;«•. 60,041 

now ahondoaeTnta appicntion Apr. 9, 1970. Scr. No. InL CL A63f i/00 

nowaomwuMu. mp^^^^ U3.CL 273-134 AD « 

Int CL B63b 61/00 
U3.CL 273-102.2 R 6Clnims 



32 

Cj'oOOQ 



30- 



00000 



^=n=^ 



^31 







'9^yy/yyyAvyyyyy/m//////////////////A 




A game board for use on a taUe such as a table tenius ta- 
ble, the board being angulariy adjustaMe to control the angle 
of bounce of a ball batted against the board. The board is 
also provided with indicia, openings for switch actuating 
devices to permit ctmipetitive games or games of skill in 
which a single player attempts to control the ball so as to hit 
indicia, pass through openings, or operate a switch. In the 
embodiments wherein the board has openings for passage of 
balls, a chute is provided for returning balls to the player. 



A game of chance incorporating a game board and a 
number of playing pieces, the game also including a set of 
dice, a plurality of defense cards and offense cards as well as 
36 playing blocks, the defense cards being supportaUe upcm 
card holders. The game board has mounted thereon at the 
center thereof a dice display container which is vertically 
movable to shake the dice. Push buttons are provided on the 
game board at each of the players' locations for shaking the 
container. 



3'*59351 3.659353 

BOARD GAlVffi APPARATUS ELECTRONIC DICE GAME 

Jamca W. Lang, and Emma P. Lang, both of P.O. Box 224, ^^^^^^ ^ Church, Richmond, Ind., asrignor to Avco Cor- 

Monnd, ftton. c_ w« *it a^ poration. Richmond, Ind. 

FUedAng. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 66346 »^ FBcd Feb. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 7391 

Int CL A63I 3/00 ^^ ^^ ^^3, ^^q^ 



U3.CL 273-130 B 



2Claims 



U3. CL 273-138 A 



4Claims 




A mathematical game board apparatus comprising game 
board means having horizontally and verticaBy disposed lines 
defining a playing area with a plurality <rf rows and cohunns 
of squares defined by said Unes. Indicia means are provided 
in alignment with the rows and columns with each indicia 
representing a certain mathematical factor or addend, the 
square at each intersection of a row and a column containing 
a numeral which represents a result in which each cor- 
responding mathematical facttv or addend is an input ftmc- 
tion. A generally transparent Mock is provided, this Mock 
being adapted to cover an area three squares wide and three 
squares long, and a plurality of generally opaque tokens are 
provided, the individual tokens being adapted to be 
removably placed on the surface of the generally transparent 
block to conceal the indicia disf^yed upon the square 
disposed beneath the respective token. In use, the generally 
transparent block provides a playing field tot tic-tac-toe. 




H © ® 
® ® ® 
® ® 



A dice game simulated by means of two banks of seven 
electric lamps each wiU w^ien activated, by means oS. a power 
switch, show present numbers. Four of the lamps are posi- 
tioned in the comers of a square phis two in the middle of 
of^xMte sides and one in dke center. The lamps are con- 
nected in logic circuitry vdiich when operated ramdomly illu- 
minates the lamps in such a manner as to s im u l a t e, with 
equal probability, the six sides of a die. The circuitry includes 
a free-running unijuncticxi oscillator having an output cou- 
pled to a six-positi(Mi rmg counter. 



162 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3 659 854 

PUZZLE WITH CHANGEABLE INDICATOR WHEELS 

ARRANGED IN INTERRELATED GROUPS 

Frank W. Sinden, 106 Maple Street, Smnnit, N J. 

Filed Jan. 8, 1970, Scr. No. Mil 

Int. CL A63f 9108 

UACL273— 155 t lOCtalma 




members are provided on the body member and face plate so 
that the face plate may be founded by sliding it onto the body 
member. To prevent movement therebetween when in posi- 
tion, a plastic insert phig is inserted in channels provided in 
both the body member and fisce plate in mutual registry. One 
or more plugs and complementary channels may be utilized. 
The plugs may be of any desired cross-section. However, 
when only one plug is utilized, it should preferably have a 
non-circular cross-section such as rectangular to prevent 
rotational movement of the face plate. Where two or more 
' plugs are utilized, they may be of any cross-section. A screw 
is inserted through the body member and engaged in a 
threaded means provided either in the insert plug or in the 
body member. The structure permits ready changing of the 
face plate to provide the club head with various striking con- 
tours and angles. The iitsert plugs are preferably of the same 
cross-section as the entry ducts of the mold used for molding 
of the plastic heads, so that the "trees" from molding of the 
heads may be used for insert plugs. 



A mechanical puzzle employing interrelated, actuator con- 
trolled indicators. The puzzle is solved when the indicators 
have been nraved to prescribed positions by the selective 
operaticm of the various actuators. 

Each indicator is a kind of ratchet wheel, and each actua- 
tor is a slidable. multipawled ratchet bar that is associated 
with a group of ratchet wheels. A floating, *pring-loaded de- 
tent bar is common to all of the indicator wheels. 

As each ratchet bar is moved translationally, its pawl por- 
tions engage the ratchet wheels of the associated group, and 
each wheel of the group is rotated a prescribed amount. The 
different rotational positions represent different states or 
settings of the ratchet wheels. The ratchet bars are operated 
individually or severally until all of the ratchet wheels have 
desired settings, and the puzzle is solved. 



to 



3,659,855 

GOLF CLUB HEAD AND NOVEL METHOD OF 

PRODUCING SAME 

Bogamln T. Hardesty, FaMawn Village, Ohio, 

Shakespeare Company, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Original application June 15, 1967, Scr. No. 667,991, now 

Patent No. 3,547,445. Divkled and this appMcatkin Nov. 13, 

1969, Scr. Na 871,291 

Int. CL A63b 53104 

UA CL 273—173 7 Claims 





3,659356 

GOLF PUTTING PRACTICE DEVICE AND PUTTING AID 

James I. Fatnr, 6300 West 78th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Filed Jan. 13, 1971, Ser. No. 106,055 

Int. CL A63b 57100 

U.S. CL 273-177 R 12 Claims 




A golf hole simulator includes a central portion with a pair 
of similar arm portions extending therefrom to form an open 
arcuate wall which simulates the cup of the hole. The wall 
formed by the arm and central portions is shaped so that 
when a ball is putted thereagainst at the right position and at 
the right speed, it will be retained in the simulated "hole", 
while putts made at too high a speed or striking the wall at 
the wrong position will not be retained. A slope indicator is 
provided to indicate the slope of the surface on which the 
device is placed for indoor or outdoor use. A gage is pro- 
vided to be utilized in conjunction with the slope indicator to 
set the device at an angulated position ^th respect to the k>- 
cation of the ball to be putted, this position being indicative 
of the proper putting line to be used to c(»npensate for the 
measured slope. 



3.659357 
CASSETTE LOWERING AND RELEASE MECHANISM 
Donald W. Mardnkns, Arlington HilglHi, DL, ss rignnr to 
Ampcx Corporatioa, Redwood City, CaHL 
' FOed Nov. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 875,045 

Int. CL Glib 2 J/72 

I U&CL 274-4 F 4 Claims 

Cassettes are transported from a magazine to an operative 

A plastic golf club head is formed in two major parts, a position for playback or recording by a movable chassis 

body member and a face plate. Complementary dove-tail which is smoothly and evenly driven by means including a 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



168 



small motor to the operative position. The cassette is also ing a sound transducer head and tape drive components to 
held at the operative position, released for movement from and from an operative position with the tape and a pause 

position in which the sound transducer head and tape drive 





i 

/ 

components are spaced ftom the tape. The carrier will be in 
the operative position and returned to the magazine without the pause position unless a playback or recording operation 
jarring. is in process. 



3,659,858 
AUTOMATIC TERMINATION OF OPERATION OF A 
CASSETTE CHANGER 
Glenn E. Stcriy, Carol Stream, HI., assignor to Ampcx Cor- 
poration, Redwood City, CaHf. 

fBcd Nov. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 875,046 
Int. CLGl lb 2i/;2 
MS. CL 274—4 F 



— -C^ 




3,659360 
BARRIER SEAL WITH SELF REGULATING BUFFER 
Hdaz K. Maler, Nenstadt, Germany, assignor to Scalol, Inc., 
Warwick, R.I. 

Original appHcatioa May 14, 1968, Scr. No. 728,950, now 
Patent No. 3356,538, dated Jan. 19, 1971. Divkled ami tUs 
appUcatkm Jane 8, 1970, Scr. No. 43,998 
7 Claims Claims priority, application Germany, June 3, 1969, M 74257 

Int. CL F16J 15140 
MJ&. CL 277-59 9 < 




After the playing of a cassette stored in the last one of a se- 
ries of storage compartments of a cassette changer apparatus, 
the operation thereof is automatically terminated and 
operated manual controls or selectors are returned from on 
positions to off positions. The preferred selectors are push 
buttons which remain depressed in an on position until the 
playback or recording of the last cassette is terminated so 
that during the playing of the last cassette the actual mode of 
operation of the cassette recorder is correctly indicated to 
the user. 



This specification discloses a barrier seal in which the (nes- 
sure of the fluid is being sealed is opposed by the flow rate of 
a buffer flukl with a movable ring interposed between the 
two. This ring is movable axially under the influence of the 
differential which obtains between the pressures of the seal- 
ing fluid and buffer fluid. Appropriate passages are provided 
for the buffer fluid and seals are provided between the mova- 
ble ring and the shaft and housing in which the barrier seal is 
installed. 



3359359 
CASSETTE CHANGER WITH A PAUSE MODE 
W. Maidnkas, Arilagton HdglMs, II., asrignor to 
Ampcx Corporation, Redwood Oty, CaHf. 

Filed Nov. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 875^59 

Int. CL Glib 75/29 

U.S. CL 274—4 F 5 OainH 

By operating a pause selector for a cassette changer ap- 
paratus, the user may interrupt a playback ftom or recording 
onto a tape of a cassette and, after the interruption, resume 
playback or recording by return of the pause selects. The 
mechanism for achieving a pause includes a carrier for carry- 



335936I 
PARTICULATE COATING FOR THE RUBBING SEAL OF 

A GAS TURBINE REGENERATOR 
Vcmnlapali D. Rao, WoodimvcB, and Ycshwant P. Tsiai^ 
Groase De, both «f Mkh., asslgiinri to Ford Motor Cooi- 
pany, Dcaiuura, Afflck. 

Fled Jvly 6, 1970, Scr. No. 52309 
Int. CL F16jJ 15154; C23c 77/76 
MS. CL 277—96 4 < 



Particles having a core of a glazing material such as calci- 
um fluoride surrounded by a shell of a metal that oxidizes at 
operating temperature are sprayed on a substrate to form a 



\ 



154 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



rubbing seal for a ceramic regenerator. The oxide of the Upered outer surface which cooperates with a tapered sur- 
metal forming these shells is non abradable to the ceramic face on the coUet engaging means. Each of these collet por- 
tions has a radially outwardly extending flange at the mner 
end thereof which fits within the annular groove in the drive 
means for retaining the segmented coUet in position. A 
generally cylindrical longitudinally split inner collet fits 
snugly within the segmented collet. A locating ring can also 
be disposed within the segmented coUet, this locating ring 
having a central threaded hole formed therein. Pin means 





regenerator. During engine operation the shell oxidizes and 
wears to expose appropriate amounts of the glazing material. 



3.659362 
ROTATING SHAFT STUFFING BOX 
ABtoa Scbodan, Albttiy, N.Y^ awignor to GAF Corpora- 
f tkm. New York, N.Y. 

. j FVcd July 29, 1970, Ser. No. 59,1 18 

I Int. CL F16J 15/18 

U.S. CL 277- 106 2 aaims 





may also be provided between the coUet portions for main- 
taining them in operative spaced relationship to one another. 
These pins can be carried by the drive means or the locating 
ring. A modified form of chuck includes a pair of pistons one 
of which is slidable upon the other, the pistons being mova- 
ble in opposite directions to operate an associated collet. 
Fluid is introduced around the pistons to form a fluid bearing 
for the pistons and further to urge the pistons away from one 
another. 



3,659,864 

CHUCK FOR MACHINE TOOLS 

Jokau Bbttry, Baderich, Gcnauiy, aaigMMr to Paul For- 

kardt KoMaaa dttgead ta ck all, D mam ld n rt, Gcrmuiy 

FDcd Aag. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 61,740 

CbkM priority, applicatlaB Germany, Aug. 9, 1969, P 19 40 

609.8 

Int.CLB23bi///6 

VS. CL 279-121 6 Claiins 



The rotary shaft of a vacuum and pressure pump is pro- 
vided with an annular flat shoulder located between sections 
of different diameters. A stationary cylinder contains the 
shaft, semi-solid packing material, and the cylin(Mcal part of 
a spring-loaded gland which is also stationary. The cylindrical 
part of such gland presses the packing material at its inner 
annular end toward die flat shoulder on the rotary shaft to 
fcmn a superior vacuum seal. The shoulder on the shaft is 
simply formed either by a machining operation, or by weld- 
ing a collar on the shaft. 



\ 



3,659363 
AUTOMATIC DRILL CHUCK AND SPLIT COLLET 
Horace J. BiritMr, 1501 pyos Vcrdc* Dr., North, Harbor 
City. Cam. 

Fled Oct. 7, 1969. Ser. No. 864.395 

Int.Cl.B23bJ7/iO 

U A CL 279-4 24 Oaiins 

A fluid operated chuck includes drive means having an an- A chuck for mounting on the ^>indle of a machine tool 

nular groove formed therein. A fluid actuated coUet engaging comprises a plurality of jaws movable radiaUy by an axiaOy 

means engages an associated collet A novel segmented collet movable plunger. The connexion between the jaws and the 

includes a plurality of separate spaced portions having a plunger can be disengaged so that the jaws can be moved 




May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



(i 



155 



30^im 



outwardly under the action of centrifu^ force and inwardly il'^'JJL,-, .vrxt i v 

under the action of a program-controUed thnist roller. FOLDABLE TOW-WHEELDOLLY 

Waiter Join Cwty, 337 Roberta Street, Winnipeg 15, 

I Manitol»a, Canada 

3.659365 ' Fled Oct. 1, 1970, Ser. No. 77,099 

SAFETY SEAT FOR CHILDREN InL CL B02b 11/00 

Siegfried Notiiackcr, Wuppcrtal-Elbcrfdd, Germany, Mrignor U3.CL280— 36C 
to Gcbr. Happidi Gjn.bJi., Wuppertal-Elbcrlekl. Ger- 
many 

FOed Apr. 21, 1970, Ser. No. 30.489 
Claims priority, appikatloa Germany, June 18, 1969, P 19 30 

891.9 
Int. CL B62b 7/12 
U3.CL 280-7.1 7 



J" 



i 


3 






/ 


\ 


w 




■ • 


1 


"■^^w,^ 




ib 


1 


\ \ ' w ^Js 
\\ \ % 


^^ 


^i^^ 


H^ 




SSi^ 


^^ 




^7/' 


*<J 




lit 






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^2^ 



The handles are turned out and the wheels move from the 
stored position to the wheeling or operating position and vice 
versa. A bar is depressed which lowers the load plate and the 
bar also engaged studs on the wheel forks to lock the wheels 
open and the plate down. 



A child's safety seat including a trough like shell with an 
upholstered interior and a safety padding spanning the width 
of the shell to be struck by the head of a child if he falls for- 
ward; fastening means on the base of the shell permit at- 
tachment to carrying straps and belts, transport wheels, sled 
rtmners and the like. 



3.659368 
DETACHABLE WHEELS FOR BOATS 
Enra Tacker, Santa Ana, Caiif., asrignor to Dean Sandford, 
Orange, Califs ■ purt intcrmt 

FDcd May 11, 1970, Ser. No. 36.319 
Int CL B62b 1/10 
VS. CL 280-47 J2 H 



3,659366 
HEEL BINDING 
Paul S. PMcrsen, Minnctonka, Minn., 
Technoiocy, Inc., Edina, Minn. 

Filed Nov. 14, 1969, Ser. No. 876,788 | 
InL CL A63c 9/00 
U3.CL280— 11J5T 15 



to Sports 





A wheel assembly and mounting brackets for removably 
^atuching the assembly to a boat is ditckteed. An upper and a 
k>wer mounting bracket are permanently attached in verti- 
cally spaced relationship at each side of the boat A wheel an- 
sembly is removably attached to each of tlie sets of brackets 
to provide mobile support for the boat on land. The wheel aa- 
semblies are normaUy detached whfle die boot is in the 
water. 



A release heel binding for use with slcis and ski boots 
which utilizes a torsion bar type means for restraining the 
boot, permitting some upward movement of the heel, and 
means for positively releasing the ski boot after tlie heel has 
lifted a predetermined amount The unit is adjustable so that 
the necessary force required to release tlie boot can be 
changed to make the binding usable across a wide range of 
operating conditions. The torsion bars provide for high ener- 
gy storage to return the binding when lower than release 
loads have been encountered. The unit can be reset either by 
stepping into the binding, or by a manual reset movement of 
a lever. 



3359369 
CONSTRUCTION OF A STEERING KNUCKLE BEARING 
FOR THE LUBRICATION BY MEANS OF LUBRICATING 

OIL 

Hdmut Hasc, and Egliut ShHk. iMitli of 
GcrmaBy, nmiinon to 



nfed Nov. 26. 1969, Ser. No. 880,150 
priority, appBcatloa GcnnMqr, Nov. 27, 1968, P 18 11 
092^ 
IbL CL B62d 7/18 
VS. CL 280—96.1 19 < 



An axle spindle bearing assembly which includes a kmer 
and an upper bearing connected vrith each other by a bore 



. I ■ 



156 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



system provided in the axle spindle bolt while a reservoir located therebetween. The operator stands on the pedals an<' 
space connected to the bore system is arranged in the axle powers the vehicle with a jogging motion, 
spindle bolt within the area of the upper bearing which is in In one embodiment the pedals are mounted on lever arms 

pivoted forwardly of the rear wheels and drive both the rear 
wheels with a minimum of lost motion through one-way 




communication with the section of the bore system leading to 
the lower bearing, for example, by way of a return checking 
device. 




LEVELLING VALVE ASSEMBLY 
Teiji Okuyama, Kariya, Japan, assignor to Aisin Seiki 
Kabushiki Kaisha, Kariya, Japan 

FDed Sept. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 75^17 
CfaUms priority, appHcatloii Japu, Sept. 26, 1969, 44/77252 

InLCLB60g/7/00 
UA CL 280—124 F 5 CtobM 



clutches. In another embodiment the pedab are mounted on 
a crank located between the rear wheels. The three-wheeled 
vehicles may be made primarily from standard bicycle parts. 
A seat may be mounted on a post between the front and rear 
wheels for movement about a generally vertical axis from a 
usable position to an out-of-the-way position. 




3,659,872 
FOLDABLE COVER STRUCTURE FOR MOTORCYCLE 
Lcroy Wancr, Box 109, iBdependencc, Mo. 

Filed Joae 26, 1970, Scr. No. 50,107 

iBt CL B62J 19100 

U.S. CL 280-289 4 Claims 



The levelling valve assembly controls the supply and 
dischafge of air to and from a pneumatic spring by providing 
a valve operating lever supporting shaft separate from the 
drive shaft for converting the sensed variations of chassis 
height into a corresponding rotational movement with a 
damper device resiliently connected therebetween. 




3,659371 
PEDAL OPERATED VEHICLE 
Ion V. K. Hott, DaytoB, Oliio, asrifnor to Tke Joycc-CrkUand 
Conpaay, Daytoa, OUo 

Filed Mar. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 21^66 

Int. CL B62m U06 

U.S. CL 280—221 18 Claims 

The two rear wheels of a three-wheeled vehicle are 
mounted on spaced axles with foot pedal operated drives 



A protective cover for a two-wheeled cycle having a pair 
of handlebars includes a pair of flexible panels which sur- 
round and overiic the cycle. An opening in <Mie of the panels 
receives the handlebars, and a third flexible panel closes this 
opening. The third panel has first and second sections which 
present slits for receiving the individual bars of the pair of 
handlebars, and means on each section is provided for secur- 
ing each section in close surrounding relationship to a 
respective handlebar. A plurality of ferteners around the 
periphery of the third panel secure the latter to the first and 
second panels and additional fastenere are provided at the 
front and rear of the cycle for securing the vertical side por- 
tions of that panel which surrounds the cycle. 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



167 



3,659373 
LIFTING AND TOWING BAR FOR KING PIN EQUIPPED 

VEHICLES 
Rlciiard W. Gcwak, Route 2, Box 267, Attala, Ala. i 
FDed jcpC 9, 1970, Scr. No. 70,685 I 

' Int. CL B60d 1114 
VS. CL 280—415 A 3 daims 



where they are contiguous with each other such that said op- 
posite portions may reciprocate with each other and always 
be very close to axial alignment with each other as they ex- 
tend in opposite directions to said idler pulleys. Said idler 
pulleys are positioned on a mounting bar or brackets so as to 
be in close vertical alignment with the cables as they extend 
outwardly at the point where they are contiguous. 




A lifting and towing bar for lung pin equipped vehicles 
comprising a bar long enough to project from the king pin 
outwardly of the forward end of the vehicle, together with a 
king pin connector at the rear of the bar so designed that the 
same may be slipped over the lung pin, and with seats to 
receive the lower end of the king pin, so that when in place 
and the front end of the bar is raised the bar is locked against 
horizontal and vertical movement relative to the king pin, 
permitting the vehicle to be raised and towed by attaching a 
lifting hook to the forward end of the bar 



3,659374 

SWAY CONTROL FOR TRAILER HITCH 

WHUhd L. Rcndcsiy, 1839 East Mordand, Phoenix, Ariz. 

Coatinuatkm-in-part of application Scr. No. 638,412, May 15, 

1967, now abandoned , and a continuatian4n-part of 

763343, Sept. 30, 1968, now abuidoncd. This application 

Jan. 16, 1969, Scr. No. 805,924 

Inta.B60d 7/00 

U3. CL 280—446 13 Claims 




3359375 

PINTLE ASSEMBLY 

Joseph M. Masar, Boonton Avcnnc, Boonton-Taylortown, N J. 

Filed Anf. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 62^53 

lnt.CLB62dJi/00 

U3. CL 280-477 7 Clainis 

Pf?IOR ART 



PRIME MOVER 
/ PINTLE ASSEMBLY 




For a trailer coupling hitch, this assembly, in combination 
with a wheeled prime mover, presents a pivotal platform 
from which the pintle extends. The pivotability of the plat- 
form facilitates incident rising and lowering <rf the prime 
mover, as it traverses uneven ground, without causing a 
trailer coupled thereto to follow every excursion in elevation, 
and thus avoids the introduction of inordinate tensional and 
shear forces on the coupling pintle. 



3359376 
TRAILER HITCH 
Johnnie D. Mdton, Route 1, Barry, Tex. 

FBed Dec. 1 1, 1970, Scr. No. 97,247 
Int CL B60c 1106 
U3.CL 280-511 



lOCbdms 




A sway control for a trailer motinted on trailer tongue 
between the trailer and the towing vehicle utilizing cable 
means and a drum friction clutch utilizing pivotal means for 
interconnection between the vehicles. In combination with 
the clutch, the invention comprises idler pulleys spaced from 
said clutch and over which cables of the invention project, 
and means for releasably pivoting at least one of the pulleys 
to slack the cable in order to permit detachment of the ends 
of the cable from added structure to the towing vehicle; said 
invention also comprising novel details of the drum and the 
manner in which the opposite portions of the caUes are sub- 
stantially contiguous widi each other at the periphery of the 
drum and extending in opposite directions toward the idler 
pulleys; said opposite portions of said cable wound helically 
around said drum in opposite directions and toward opposite 
ends of said drum from a location of said cable portions 



A trailer socket assemUy for coufrfing to an upstanding 
shank mounted ball of a towing vehicle incltides an upstand- 
ing cylindrical socket body having a downward opening 
cylindrical recess for receiving the ball and shank. The body 
is provided with slots in a transverse {rfane adjacent to the 
lower end «Mch open to the socket recess from opposite 
sides of the body. A pair of elongated locking arms pivotally 
mounted on the body are svtingable into the slots to define a 
restriction of the socket opening to retain the ball therein. A 
spring biased locking bar movable transverse to the plane of 
the locking arms includes recesses for confining the arms 
against lateral outward movement to release the ball. The 
socket body is adapted to define a (kiwnward extenskm of a 
vertical tubular member of a gooseneck drawbar. 



S 



158 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3 659 877 3,659,879 

BREAKAWAY PIPE COUPLING DUCT POSITIONER FOR THE CONTROL OF THERMAL 

Jama W KobMta. Metalrfe, La~ avisBor to SImO Ofl Com- EXP ANSON 

~ riJw^NT^ G-««r J. StUp^ Wtadjjr Co«. .iripK^ U> Co-bo-lo. 

FBed Sept. 11, 1970, Ser. No. 71,528 E«ftoeertaf , tac, Wtadwr, Com. 

^Ikt CL Fli 35100 raed J-ly 16. l^JJ S«. N^. 55,464 

II S.CL 285-3 9Ctaliiii lBtCLF16l5//02 

U.S.CL2S5 i U.S.CL 285-114 6Cl«lmi 




A breakaway pipe coupling for coupling a pipeline 
together comprising a pair of telescopingly engaged upper 
and lower tubular coupling members adapted to be con- 
nected to a pipeline and including a pair of flanges surround- 
ing the members for holding them in fixed relationship, one 
flange being secured to the upper coupling member and a 
split flange surrounding but not secured to the lower 
coupling member. Frangible bolts secure the upper flange 
portion to the split flange with the split flange adapted to 
separate when undue stress is placed on the coupling mem- 
bers and breaks the frangible bolts. 



3,659378 
ELEVATED CYCLE VEHICLE UTILIZING A 
CONVENTIONAL BICYCLE FRAME 
EdwanI T. Carter, 1227 OHvc St., PhBadeipMa, Pa. 
Filed May 25, 1970, Scr. No. 40,051 < 
lot CL B62k 3102 
VS. CL 280—7.15 



4Claliii8 





Described herein is a duct system for conducting heated 
fluids such as, for example, combustion gases from the interi- 
or of a vapor generator furnace, or the like. The duct system 
includes a toggle section connected to adjacent parts of the 
system by means of expansion joints thereby to accom- 
modate relative displacements that will occur between the 
parts. Supporting structure for the toggle section is disclosed 
including lever mechanism so arranged as to control the ex- 
tend of flexure in the respective expansion jointe. 



3,659,880 
CONNECTOR FOR FLEXIBLE CONDUIT 
Nonua GoMMbd, 28 Bcthal LaM, CowMCk, N.Y. 
CoatlButioa of applcatloa Scr. No. 833,502, June 16, 1969, 

■ow aboB^OMd , wUck is a coBtlBuatkia-lB-part of 

appHcatioa Scr. No. 692,467, Dec 21, 1967, dow abttidoMd. 

ThiB applcatloa Nov. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 87,308 

lot. CL F161 33122 

VS. CL 285- 161 10 Clafaos 



An elevated cycle vehicle is formed fit>m a conventioiud 
bicycle frame, inverted ttom its normal position so that the 
center post previously used to support the bicycle seat ex- 
tends downwardly from the sprocket bearing assembly. The 
contractable clamping means at the lower end of the center 
post receives a projection which is attached to horizontally 
oriented step means which assist a rider in boarding the vehi- 
cle. An elongated seat has a forward socket which receives a 
post extending upwardly from frame elements lying forwardly 
of the center post, while the rear portion of the seat is sup- 
ported by posts connected to the frame elemehts lying rear- 
wardly of the center post ^ 

i 




An electrical connector assembly is provided to connect 
flexible plastic conduit to an electrical fixture, such as an 
outlet box. The connector body includes a bottom tubular 
portion which protrudes through a hcAc in the fixture, a 
flange porticMi, and an upper portion. The upper portion in- 
cludes a ferrule, an outer tubular extension which is castel- 
lated at its top and formed fixmi a flexible elaitic plastic 
resin. A compression nut forces the castellated top portion 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



159 



against the conduit which bulges out between consecutive 
segments of the castellated portion and locks the connector 
on the conduit. 



3,659,881 I 

COUPLING CONNECTOR 
Clecre B. Tiaricy, aad Edward K. Grahaoi, Jr., both of 
Houstoa, Tex., asriiann to Seaiiek Products, Ibcm Houstoa, 
Tex. I 

Filed Mar. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 15^23 
Iut.CLF16liJ/00 
U.S. CL 285—249 6 Claims 




A coupling connector between a tube and a coupling body 
wherein an annular recess is formed in the coufrfing body to 
receive the tube, and wherein the tube is frictionally engaged 
and forced longitudinally against an annular seal located in 
the annular recess in the coupling body to form an efifective 
pressure seal between the tube and the coupling body. 



3,659382 

NONMAGNETIC CORROSION-RESISTANT DRILL 

STRING MEMBERS 

HeriMTt Sourcaay, Teraits, Austria, aMlgBor to Sdioclcr- 

Blcckman Stahlwerke AktiengeseUschafl, Vienna, Austria 

Filed Dec 1, 1969, Scr. No. 881,154 

ClaiBM priority, appllcatloB Austria, Dec 2, 1968, A11685/68 

lBt.CLF16i 25/00 
U.S. CL 285—333 2 Claims 



U* M a.OT> c 

u» m leot SI 
a0O >• t,ooi Ma 
tODM tt.oot Cr 

■OOI.»0«lll , 

am* ojOB * 







their central zones worked (hot/cold working) to a yield 
point up to 70 kp/mm' (0.2 percent elongation) while the 
threaded end portions are hoVcold worked to a yield point 
above the minimum of (0.2 percent elongation) 70 kp/mm*. 



3^59,883 

COUPLING CONSTRUCTION AND IMPROVED 

PACKING RING THEREFOR 

NoriatsB Kojfaaa, YaaagtaUau-GlM 5-ckoMC No. 31, 

Nakagawa-ka, Nageva, Japaa 

FDed Nov. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 88,695 
Claiau priority, appHcatioB Japaa, May 26, 1970, 45/45043 

IatCLF161 77/00 
U.S. CL 285-348 1 



I 7 1 i 




A coupling construction includes a coupling sleeve fitted 
over two pipe ends wluch are to be joined together and 
which includes a widened end portion at each end for accom- 
modating a packing between the sleeve and a associated pipe 
and an intermediate portion which is of substantially the 
same diameter as the diameter <^ the pipe to be connected. 
The coupling joint is formed by a packing ring placed within 
the widened diameter sleeve portion and which is stressed 
and tightened by a ring member having a surface which bears 
against a concave surfrice of the packing ring when a 
threaded nut is tightened to the coupling sleeve and is dis- 
placed axially by the tightening. The packing ring includes an 
interior surface having an internal gro6ve and includes a con- 
cave shoulder at each end on its exterior. One external con- 
cave shoulder presses against a ccMivex interior portion of the 
coupling sleeve and the other shoulder on the opposite end is 
engaged by a ring member which is displaced axially during 
tightening. When the joint is fuOy tightened the packing ring 
is deformed so that the groove area is reduced to force out 
the air in the groove and to effect a tight engagement of the 
ring with the associated pipe. 



3,659,884 

LATCH FOR DETACHABLY CONNECTING 

STRUCTURAL PARTS 

Eric Gustav OkMa, SaHle, Sweden, ■iiijinr to 



Ak- 



FBed May 7, 1970, Scr. No. 35^11 
OaiBBs priority, appBcatloB Sweden, May 9, 1969, 6595/69 

lBLCLF16b J/00. 7/22 
U.S. CL 287-189.36R 5 



-re«»/ 

It •laafatlM) 



•4l-i«rlii« Inflt 



A drill string for deep-well drilling, coring and the like is 
composed of lengths unitarily formed of a nonmagnetic, 
high-nitrogen, chromium-nickel austenitic aOoy steel and has 
a pair of threaded ends matingly engageable with the comple- 
mentary ends of adjoining lengths and an intermediate or 
central portion between these ends. The drill-string members 
are composed of alloy steel containing fit>m trace amounts to 
0.07 per cent by weight carbon, trace amounts to 1 .00 per 
cent by weight silicon, O.SO to 2.00 per cent by wei^t man- 
ganese, 20.0 to 2S.0 per cent by weight chromiimi, 10.0 to 
IS.O per cent by weight nickel, O.OS to O.SO per cent by 
weight nitrogen and the balance iron and the usual impurities 
present in chromium-nickel alloy steeb. The drill-string 
members are resistant to stress corrosion cracking and have 

\ 



1 



23 







— 1 


.f/ 










36. 

II- 

Z5^ 


\^ 


^ 






" 


'I 


\^ 


^ 


c 


\ 







3 



A pair of structural parts having walls formed with elon- 
gated slots of generally similar shape are detachably con- 



\ 



160 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



nected by a latch including a body and a catch separated 
therefrom by a connecting neck portion. When the walls of 
the parts overlie one another and the openings therethrough 
are in alignment and coincide, the latch is in an operative 
position after the catch has been moved through both of the 
openings in the parts and a projecting wall section of the 
body has been moved into the opening of one part. When in 
such operative position the latch functions to detochably 
connect the parts after they have been moved relative to one 
another through an angle of 90°. 



3,659385 
MAXIMUM SECURITY LOCK BOLT 
B«lk G. Nan, La Creaccnta, CaUf^ aasigiior to Adams Rtte 
MannfBctuiing Company, Glendak, CaHf. 

Filed Aug. 31, 1970, Ser. No. 68314 

Int CL EOSb 15/16 

VJS. CL 292—2 9 Claims 



3,659,887 

DETACHABLE PROTECTOR FOR STEEL BODIES 

RuskU C. Marquette, 2423 East 15th St Apt A, Tuba, OUa. 

FUcd Nov. 5, 1969, Scr. No. 874,1 15 

lat CI. B60r 19/08 

U.S.CL 293-1 2 Claims 








A maximum security lock bolt of composite construction 
which captivates an insert of a material which is substantially 
impervious to machining operations, such as a ceramic 
material, the insert being of a size sufficient to spai!U)r bridge 
the gap between the locked door and strike plate (Counted on 
the associated door jamb. 



A detachable side protector comprises a base having 
slidably received on the upper surface thereof and magneti- 
cally held thereto two extension strips projecting horizontally 
therefrom in opposite directions. The protector is magneti- 
cally held on the exterior surface of a steel body to prevent 
damage thereto during the opening of doors on neighboring 
vehicles. 



3,659386 

AIRCRAFT PANELS WITH PRECISELY ADJUSTABLE 

AND EASY ACTION SPRING TOGGLE LATCH 

WeUoa R. Andrews, Seattle, Wadi., airiinor to ScaMi Aero 

Marine Company, Seattle, WariL 

FBed May 1, 1970, Scr. No. 33,958 

IntCLE05c 79/02 

VS. CL 292—78 2 Clatam 



3,659,888 
FEED BUNK SHOVEL 
Mdvte E. Drdcr, Dumoat, Iowa 

FUcd Oct 3, 1969, Scr. No. 863,528 
Int CL AOlb 1/02 
VS. CL 294-49 



6Clainis 





An aircraft interior panel, either removable or pivotally 
mounted in aircraft fixed structure having a new spring tog- 
gle latch comprising ( 1 ) accurate and precise spring tension, 
shim adjusting means for varying the compression of the 
spring for varying the supporting capabilities or forces of the 
panel latch so that a slightly increased downward, outward, 
or upward force releases the panel allowing it to swing out 
for accessibility thereto and (2) a spherical bearing means on 
the end of a toggle arm of the spring latch for ensuring a reli- 
able, constant resistance, and an easy action in both locking 
and unlocking of the spring toggle latch. 



A shovel to remove spoiled silage and other material from 
cattle feed bunks. Includes a flat bottom with vertical sides. 
The front end of the shovel is open and the rear end is pro- 
vided vidthan inwardly swinging gate so that the shovel can 
scoop material in either a forward or rearward movement 
The gate svmgs closed when the shovel is lifted for unloading 
to keep the material from sliding off of the rear. A suitable 
handle is attached to an arched support between the sides so 
as to be sufficiently elevated for manipulation from a point 
outside of the sideboards of the feed bunk. 



3,659389 

RACK 

Andrew Whitley, Route 2, Bos 72, ZcbuloB, N.C. 

Filed Jmw 25, 1970, Scr. No. 49,600 

Int CL A24b 1/06 

VS. CL 294—5.5 

In abstract, a preferred embodiment of this invention is an 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



161 



improved rack for supporting tobacco during the curing refuse such as animal leavings and the like. The refuse is col- 
process thereof, including a plurality of mesh separating par- lected in a disposable bag removably mounted on the tubular 

element in an improved manner for positive association with 




titions which fold for easy loading and unloading. 




the tubular element during use while yet providing for 
faciliuted withdrawal of the bagged matter in a sanitary 
manner. 



3,659392 

3359390 MISSILE RACK ADAPTER 

LIFTING CLAMP Robert F. Briggs, Camarfllo, CaM., asrignor to The United 

RaymoMlL.RcnfrocPnacolt,Ariu, assignor to J. CRcnfroc States of Anwrlca ai represented by the Swwtary of the 

& SoM, Inc., Jacksonville, Fla. 1 ^*^7 

FVcd Aug. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 61,074 I «« J«m« 29, 1970, Scr. No. 50,773 

Int CL B66c 1/48 !■*• CL B60p 3/00 

U3.CL 294-104 2Clafans U.S. CL 296-3 8 Clafans 





An adapter member for rendering a chster-type miasOe 
rack supportable on storage brackets or on missile tranqxHt 
vehicles having a variety of differently arranged load bearing 
surfaces. Each adapter has on its undersurfiace at least two 
spaced support contacting surfaces, and inchides means to 
lock ihe adapter to its support Shock absorbing vibraticni 
isolators are incorporated into the design. 



A lifting clamp comprising a body having a slot to receive 
an article to be lifted, a pair of gripping jaws one of which is 
movable, a linkage connected to tlie movable jaw which in- 
cludes a shackle and a bell crank lever pivotally mounted in 
the body, and a locking mechanism for resiliently retaining 
the jaws in a closed position, the lock being operated by 9 
handle lever located outside of the clamp body and movable 
downwardly toward the slot to a locked position and up- 
wardly and outwardly away frx>m the slot to an unlocked 
position. 



3359393 

CAMPER VEHICLE 

Byron D. Stedc, 1119 TUtfamy Rd^ SIKcr Spring, Md. 

FUcd June 22, 1970, Scr. No. 48,207 

IntCLB60pi/i4 

VS. CL 296—23 R 5 



3,659391 
REFUSE COLLECTING DEVICE 
Armando U. Pcttcnon, 12635 Sondi Egglcston Ave, Chicago, 
OL, and Edward M. Gorsid, 15257 Ingksidc Avc^ Chicago, 
DL 

FOed Dec 11, 1970, Scr. No. 97,135 
Int CL A47f 13/06 
VS. CL 294— 19 R 10 Claimi 

A refuse collecting device having an improved tubular bag- 
mounting member at the lower end of a handle for collecting 




A vehicle of the camper type having a vertically extendible 
top and a sleeping compartment with extensions to receive 



898 O.O.- 



162 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2. 1972 



beds when the top is raised, thus providing standing room 
within the vehicle. Pneumatic jacks, supplied fixim an on- 
board air storage tank, are used for raising the top, and sim- 
ple latches retain it in elevated position when the sleeping 
compartment is in use. 



i^ 3,659,894 

VEHICLE MOUKTED CAMPER COACH 
John N. Dodien, Hnmboldl, and Han7 L. Taylor, IMLota 
City, bolli of Iowa, —rigiiort to Do^rn Industries, Inc^ 
Humboldt, Iowa 

FDcd May 4, 1970, Scr. No. 34,491 

Int CL B60p 3/32 

UACL296— 23MC 11 Claims 




movement with respect to the vehicle. A pair of floor pan 
mounted longitudinally extending rails sbdably mount a carri- 
er on the floor pan for longitudinal movement with the seat. 
A locking mechanism includes a locking member pivoted to 
the carrier and spring biased to a locked position in which 
first and second arcuate arm portions of the locking member 
respectively engage one of the rails and the seat to hold the 
seat against both the rotational and the longitudinal move- 
ment. An actuating handle is secured to the locking member 
and actuation thereof in one direction rotates the locking 
member from locked position to a first released position in 
which the first arm portion is moved out of engagement with 
the one rail to allow longitudinal movement of the seat. Ac- 
tuation of the handle in the other direction rotates the 
locking member from locked position to a second released 
position in which the second arm portion is moved out of en- 
gagement with the seat to allow rotational movement of the 
seat. 



A trailer coach mounted on a pickup truck, the floor of the 
coach supported on the bed of the truck and the coach hav- 
ing an elevated floor over a compartment assessible through 
outwardly pivotable doors concealed in their closed position 
by a carpet covering. One of the doors supports the posts of a 
table which is foldable unto itself when not used or extended 
by being pivoted to an open position, the outer half being 
supported on a pair of pivotal arms carried on the half 
secured to the posts. The table may be disassembled and 
stored in the compartment and oppositely disposed ledges 
over the walls of the truck bed may be extended over the 
elevated (ktor and provide double sleeping area «diile leaving 
space to pass therebetween. The water lines for the ap- 
pliances in the camper may extend through the onnpartnient 
which functions as an insulating chamber protecting the 
water lines firom the freezing outside temperatures. 



3,659395 
SWIVEL SEAT LOCKING MECHANISM 
D« Wayne D. Dresden, BtrmlagluHB, Mich., 

General Motors Cotpo wti on, Detroit^ Mich. 

FVed Ang. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 62,296 
IML CL B60a 1/08 
VS. CL 296—65 R 



to 



4 Claims 




3,659396 

ADHESIVE SEMI-CURED SEALING STRIP FOR 

AUTOMONLE WINDSHIELD 

Daaid J. Smith, WasUagtMi Crnmlng, Pa.; Eari H. Serf, 

Tfvntoa. N J.; Elmer V. Otirady, Yardlcy, and Fred Wal- 

tws, LcvlttowB, both of Pa., mdgMn to TUokol Choycal 

Corporation, Brtrtol, Pa. 

FRed Mar. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 20,206 

1M. CL COSg 51/10, 51/08; B60q 1/02 

U3. CL 296—93 12 Claims 

An automobile windshield mounting and sealing means is 
provided by means of a preformed, adhesive, curable sealing 
strip comprising a thiol terminated synthetic polymer, par- 
ticularly a liquid polysulfide polymer, which has been made 
or modified, e.g. partiaUy aired or blended to increase its 
molecular weight to at least about 1 3,000 and its viscosity at 
2S*C. to at least about 6,000 poises and which has been com- 
pounded with a mixture of fibrous and non-fibrous fillers, ex- 
tenders, curing agent and other ingredients to form an ex- 
trudabie, semi-ctired, cturable resilient polymeric sealing 
composition which is extruded to sealing strip form, which is 
substantially immediately fiinctional as a windshield glam and 
the windshield receiving franne on an automobile body, and 
which fiirther cures in the presence of atmospheric moisture 
under ambient room temperature and weather conditions in 
the windshield fiame of an automobile to a moderately hard, 
strongly cohesive, resilient, strongly adhered sealing strip. 



3A59397 

SEAT CONSTRUCTION 

John Dale Wright, 717 Torth Ate, Rochele, DL 

Filed Sept. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 73,945 

Int CL A47c 3/32 

U A CL 297—337 




A vehicle seat is mounted on a vehicle floor pan for both 
rotational movement about a vertical axis and longitudinal 



A seat member is hinged to a base member and a plurality 
of springs are located between the members to resiliently 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



168 



urge them apart. Each spring is made of two counterposed 3,6594MI0 

leaf portions joined together at one end and secured to one SCRAPER CONVEYOR GUIDING LONGWALL 

of the members at the other end. The springs are arranged so MACHINE 

that the spring force increases as the seat member moves Otto Renxiag, Bochmn, Germany, amIgMir to Gcbr. EkldMiff, 



downwardly, and vice versa. 



3,659398 

CHAIR 

Yeliln, 5252 S. Kehmm Ave, Chki«o, DL 

FRed Dm^ 9, 1970, Sor. No. 96^16 

IbL CL A47c 7100, 3/00 

\}S, CL 297-445 



Maschincnfabrik and Elseagiemcrei mhH, 



Gcr- 



FBed Feb. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 8,283 
Claims priority, appHcntton Germany, Feb. 4, 1969, G 69 04 

184 
IM.CLE21C 55/74 
UA CL 299—43 9 i 




A chair characterized by a seat portion integrally molded 
of a plastic material and a bock rest portion integrally 
molded of a plastic material, each readily attachaMe req;>ec- 
lively to a seat frame and to a back frame of a chair. 



3,659399 
DUMP SYSTEM 
L. PhWps, 226 Em« 3rd Smrth, Apt #32, Salt Lake 
City, Utah, and John L. Baiom 5891 Soirth 75 West, SA 
Lahc City, Utah 

Fled Mar. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 18,935 
Int CL B60p 7/76 
U3.CL298-22R 10< 



•-» 




A dumping system wlierein a pneumatic bag pivotally Ufis 
a bed and the bag expansion results from use <^ veliicle ex- 
haust In a preferred form, a dumping unit is adapted to be 
placed on and removed frxMn an existing truck bed to provide 
a dumping vehicle and in another preferred form the dump- 
ing bed pivot can be raised and lowered whereby items can 
be slid into or out of the dumping bed. | 




A scraper conveyor in which the entraining means, such as 
buckets or scrapers, are connected to endlem circulating 
pulling means and move in grooves or trou^ for conveying 
the material while the conveying trough and the trou^ for 
guiding the return secti(» of the conveyor are located ad- 
jacent to each otlier and symmetrically with r^ard to a parti- 
tion between said trough. 



3,659301 

WHEEL FMt AUTOMOTIVE VEHICLES 



mmd Akamdcr PttndK, DoOk^ 


|CB,bolhof Ge 




<y. ••• 


signors to FIrma Dr.-I^. hxJ. 1 


>«rKheKG,Sla 


UfH 


i.z««> 


fcnhanaw, Gcrmiy 








FRcd Sept 9, 1969, Scr. No. 856381 






^^ 2983 


«y, Oct 10, 1968, P 18 02 


IntCLB60bi/06 






U3. CL 301-65 


- 


5< 


!3aiBB 




A wheel for automotive vehicles has a flanged hub and a 
rim connected by at least eight webs which are exclusively Y- 
shaped in cross-section. The vertical or upri^t flanges of the 
webs extend at the fitmt face of the wheel and tgrmiiuite at 
an annular disk provided on the frxmt face of the flange, and 
the bifurcated sections are joined to the outer circumference 
of an annular body provided on the inner side of the annular 
disk. The Y-aiiaped webs extend in planes disposed between 
the bc»es, and the bifurcated sections of die Y-shaped webs 
diverge in tlie zone of the annular disk in a V-like manner 
toward each adjacent bore provided in the flanged hub. Ad- 
ditionally, the wheel is cast integr^y from a li^t alloy. 



164 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659,902 

PROPORTIONING VALVE 

Gcorfe R. Kish, Owomo, and Eihrard L. Volker, Swartz 

Craek, botk of Mkh., aMtgnon to Midlaiid-Ro« Corpon- 

tteB, Clevctaiid, OMo 

CoDtinttatkNi-iii-part o( appttcation Ser. No. 874,483, Nov. 6, 

1969, now abandooMl. This appttcadon July IS, 1970, Ser. 

No. 55,117 

biLCl.B6lk 8/26, 11/34 

V& CL 303—6 C * 14 Clatan 





I aumt 

TOSRAHESa — I coma. 
i cancuT 



L^ 



^^ 



selector circuitry responsive to variation of fluid pressure in 
each signal pipe segment selects the segment in which the in- 
coming signal is being received as the "controlling" segment 
and esublishes the other segment as the "contrc^ed" seg- 
ment via which the outgoing signal is propagated irrespective 
of the direction from which the signal is received. The inter- 
lock valve device is positioned in accordance with digital 
pilot signals provided by the sigiul selector circuit to direct 
fluid pressure in the "controlling" signal pipe segment to a 
proportional amplifier means which reinforces the control 
signal locally for control of a brake control circuit on each 
car and for connection by the interlock valve to the "control- 
led" signal pipe segment for transmission to the next car. A 
timing control circuit is included to momentarily disable the 
portion of the signal selector circuit responsive to fluid pres- 
sure variation in the "controlled" signal pipe segment to a»- 
sure that the transmitted signal is not falsely sensed as a 
signal being received. 



A proportioning valve for use in hydraulic brake systems of 
automotive vehicles, the proportioning valve being inter- 
posed between the master cylinder and the actuators of the 
rear brakes of the vehicle and incorporating improved means 
effective to establish a fluid preMure differential between the 
front and rear brake actuators in the higher ranges of fluid 
prenure applied by the master cylinder and to increase the 
pressure differential at a linear rate as the matter cylinder 
pressure increases in such higher range. 



3,659,903 

POWER AND BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEM UTILIZING 

FLU1DIC LOGIC ELEMENTS 

Rauld A. SariMch, Cohunbos, Ohio, assign i>r to 

WcftlivlMMse Air Brake Cooipaay, WOmcrdiiig. Pa. 

Filed Sept. 29, 1970, Ser. No. 76,538 

Int CL B60t 13/70, 17/06, 11/26 

VS, CL 303-20 19 Claiiiia 



A fluidic signal control system is provided on each car of a 
railway train for controlling braking thereof in accordance 
with variation of fluid pressure in a signal pipe extending 
through the train. An interlock valve device intermediately 
positioned in the signal pipe separates the signal pipe into 
segments terminating at opposite ends of the car. Signal 



3,659,904 

NON-SKID BRAKING SYSTEM FOR VEHICLES 

Fred C. Stevens, 1 Garrett Place, BraurfBc, N.Y. 

Filed Jue 23, 1970, Ser. No. 49,100 

Int CL B60t 8/12 

VS. CL 303-21 CG 7 



rlP^^T. 7^14=; "I 




(FOOM 

•MtTM CfklMBI* 



A series of electrical impulses is generated by a set <^ tu- 
tionary coils and magnets rotating with the vehicle wheel and 
is fed to a differential amplifier in such a manner that the 
output is proportional to variations in amplitude of succes- 
sive pulses. This output signal is used to interrupt the supply 
of brake fluid pressure to the wheel brake cylinder and thus 
prevent further build up of brake pressure when the pulse 
variation indicates incipient skid conditions. Also the fluid 
pressure is reduced by being bled off into an accumulator 
cylinder when the pulse amplitude indicates that the wheel 
has substantially ceased routing. 



3,659,905 

MODULATED HYDRAULIC ANTI-LOCK BRAKE 

BOOSTER 

Joseph N. GoaUsh, Fenton, NOcfa., aarignnr to General Motors 

Corporation, Detroit, Mich. 

FDed Nov. 23, 1970, Ser. No. 91^1 1 

Int. CL B60t 8/06 

VS. CL 303—21 F 3 Ciainu 

An integrally housed open-center hydraulic brake booster 
and anti-lock modulator wherein a flow restriction induced 
back-pressure resulting firom movement of a reaction piston 
into proximity with a manual piston forcibly moves a power 
piston to actuate the master cylinder. A control valve is 
shifted upon impending wheel lock to channel the back-pres- 
siiie to the other side of the power piston to release the brake 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



165 



pressure. The reaction piston, manual piston, and power 
piston are abuttingly engageable upon over-travel of the 







3 659 907 

ARRANGEMENT FOR DETECTING SLIPPAGE OF 

WHEELS OF VEHICLES 

Peter Gnnsaer, and Richard ZcchnaB, both of Stottgart, aa- 

signon to Klans Christ, Stnttfart-Dsrriewand, aH of, Gcr- 

■aay and Robert Boach GmbH, Stuttgart, Gcnnany 

FDed Dec 4, 1969, Ser. No. 882,101 

Clainis priority, appttcation Gcmumy, Dec 9, 1968, P 18 13 

509.6 
Int. CL B60t 8/08 
VS. CL 303-21 CF 7 



5* —-^ f&fNtSArOK. 




TO tunpcirien 
' r3 



operator actuable pedal push rod to actuate the master 
cylinder independently of hydraulic booster fluid flow. 



3,659,906 I 

WHEEL LOCK CONTROL SYSTEM AND METHOD 
HAVING HIGH AND LOW MODE SELECTION 
Rohcrt A. Honrath, Dayton, Ohhs aa rig i iir to General Motors 
Corporation, Detroit, Mich. 

Fllsd Feb. 18, 1970, Ser. No. 12,199 

Int. CLB60t 5/04 

U.S. CL 303-21 A 6 Oalnis 



»~1^ 




A slippage detecting system for use in conjuncticm with 
motor vehicles. Each wheel of the vehicle is provided with a 
transducer w^iich supplies a voltage depoKient upon the 
speed of the wheel. The transducer output is applied to a 
Schmitt-trigger circuit which becomes actuated when the 
voltage exceeds a precktermined value. Upon actuation of 
the Schmitt-trigger circuit, the braking system of the motor 
vehicle is operated through an amplifier, so that tlw bralcing 
force b regulated to prevent locking of the wiieels. The trana- 
ducer is in the form of a voltage generator with regulated ex- 
citation voltage. The vintage regulator inchides an integrator 
and is connected between the output of the generator and 
the exciution winding thereof. 



3,659,908 
TRACK-ENGAGING ASSEMBLY 
Edouard Martfai ComdiM, 154 dn Golf Street, Loretlcvile, 
Province of Quebec, Canada 

FDed Feb. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 12,766 
Int. CL B62d 55/22 
UACL 305-38 11 



A vehicle wheel lock control system in which the front left 
and right wheels are provided with separate sensors. The sen- 
sors generate signals indicating the changes in wheel velocity 
during braking and the signals are transmitted to a controller, 
which, in turn, controls a modulator for the brakes of both 
front wheels. Due to sli^t differences in friction coefficient, 
brake operation, tire and road surfaces, one front wheel will 
usuaUy have a larger instantaneous wheel slip than the other 
front wheel and will tend to lock more quickly than the 
other. Thus, one wheel will have signals generated indicating 
an incipient wheel lock condition earlier than the other 
wheel. In normal operation, the frtmt wheel control system 
wiU actuate the modulator when both sensors have generated 
signals indicating the existence of a greater wheel slip ttian 
desired for optimum braking, but will not operate when only 
one wheel causes such a signal to be generated. Under some 
conditions of vehicle operation, and particulariy when left- 
ward or rightward steering is being attempted, the system is 
modified to cause the modulator to be operated when either 
of the front wheels causes such a signal to be generated, 
without also requiring a similar signal from the other wheeL 
The brake control system for the entire vehicle is also^is- 
closed as including a rear wheel lock control system. 



i- ' 



'^\-l^ 



tzl 



' »,/;^4-^„ 



A track-engaging assembly more particularly used as a 
driving sprocket for an endless track of a caterpillar vehicle, 
comprising a plurality of parallel square elements mounted 
on a shaft or tubing with the side edges of the elements ar- 
ranged at 4S° with respect to the side edges of adjacent ele- 
ments to engage an endless track made of a plurality of rows 
of interconnected substantially rigid elongated blocks with 
the blocks of one row displaced half a length of a block rela- 
tive to the blocks of adjacent rows and wherein the plates are 
spaced from one another on the shaft or tubing, so tliat 
foreign material which may adhere to the track will not clog 
the sprocket, as it is free to fall between the elements. 

The elements can be of amilar or of diffovnt sizes in the 
latter case to engage and drive each block of each row when 
^he blocks have different thicknesses, so as to obtain uniform 
pulling on the endless track across the width thereof. 



166 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



When the endless track system comprises vehicle support- 
ing wheels rtmning on the lower nm of the track, said wheels 
preferably have a rim entirely made of metal in direct 
running engagement with the endless track blocks. 



3,659,909 
BEARING CX>NSTRUCnONS 
James Egbert, Vcntand Et^mttrta^ Inc. 32371 Deqntiidre, 
MmUbob Hdgbfta, Mich. 

Fled Oct 26, 1970, Scr. No. 83,781 

Int. CL F16c 19100 

UA CL 308—6 R __ ICtatai 




An anti friction bearing construction comprising a sleeve 
in which is telescoped a flat sided polygonal cross-section 
shaft; with longitudinally spaced rollers frictionlesaly 
mounted in the sleeve and engaging the flat sides of the shaft 



3,659,910 *^ 

RETAINER FOR SPHERICAL ADAPTER ^ 
DavM A. Foster, Saadwky, OUo, — ignnr to Gawral Moton 
Corporatioa, Detroit, Mkh. 

Fikd May 6, 1970, Scr. No. 35,167 

tat CLF16C 77/76, 2i/(M 

MS, CL 308-9 1 Chilli 



3,659,911 
HYDROSTATIC PLAIN BEARINGS 
Frau KesBkr, and Kari Braad, both <rf Ebeni, Gcrmuy, •■- 
sIfBors to Kogdflachcr George Schafer & Co., Schwdafwl, 
Geraaay 

Fflcd July 6, 1970, Scr. No. 52,666 
Claims priority, applicatloo Gcrmaay, July 7, 1969, P 19 34 

361.4 

tat CLF16C 77/76 

U.S.CL308— 122 3CI«l0is 



r-^Z 




I 



•////./ 






Vs^^=^.=^ '' ■' : •: ' 'v//// ////-, 




^"Z 



An arrangement of plain hydrotutic bearing* for rotauMy 
mounting a spindle in which the spindle is provided with a 
pair of tapered bearing surfaces symmetric to a plane perpen- 
dicular to the spindle's axis. Front and rear bearing boxes, 
each formed by several aegments having lubricating oil 
pockets, are formed about the tapered bearing surfaces with 
the front box being rotatably and axially fixed and the rear 
box being rotatably fixed but axially movable to compensate 
for heat expansion. 



3^59,912 

A CAGE AND ROLLER UNIT 

HmkoB B. SchdMc 30651 Poads View RomI, Fraaklta, 

FDed Nov. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 90,636 
tat CL F16c 33m 
MS, CL 308—217 




A self-aligning externally pressurized fluid film bearing is 
provided with a relatively deep grooved self-aligning seat. 
Critical dimensioning of portions of the seating groove and 
its cooperating partispherical bearing surface provide a 
means to insure centering of the bearing surface on the seat 
after assembly in order to provide adequate sealing of a fluid 
passage through the self-aligning elements, smooth self-align- 
ment and resilient mounting of the fluid film bearing. 




An annular sheet-metal roller-riding cage has a tubular 
portion with a multiplicity of circumferentially-spaced 
openings providing pockets for the rollers. Each opening or 
pocket has opposite cage-support surfaces disposed tangen- 
tial to the roller mounted therein. The rollers are held in as- 
sembly by a correqwnding number of L-«haped tabs, two for 
each roller, with arms extending radially from the tabular 
portion of the cage and located at the opposite ends of the 
roller. The free ends of the L-shaped tabs form tongues ex- 
tending axially toward one another frt>m the opposite sides of 
the tubular portion and are disposed at the opposite side of 
the pitch circle of the set of rollers fix>m the tubular portion 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



167 



of the cage, thereby effecting retention of the rollers in the 
cage. The opposite sides of the tongues have surfaces con- 
verging toward the tubular portion. The tubular portion of 
the cage is positioned inward of the pitch circle of rollers 
seated in a two-flanged inner race, or outward of the pitch 
circle of rollers seated in a two-flanged outer race. Before as- 
sembly, the L-shaped tobs are disposed at obtuse angles to 
the tubular portion of the cage. Upon inserting the rollers in 
the pockett and seating them in a roller bearing race having 
fixed flanges on both sides, the opposite sets of roller-retain- 
ing ubs are bent axially toward one another to place their 
free ends or tongues between the roUers for retention and 
spacing thereof. This assembly is then mounted in a race with 
a fixed flange on one end and with a flangeless opposite end. 
The invention thus provides a roller-riding cage with a 
minimum clearance between it and the lowermost rollers yet 
accurately located in a radial direction. This is done by caus- 
ing the normal flat surfaces of the cage support portion on 
the roller pockets to come into contact with the body of the 
rollers adjacent the periphery of the tubular portion of the 
cage which is closest to the pitch circle ctf the set of rollers so 
as to minimize the clearance between the cage support sur- 
face and the rollers for a given radial movement of the cage. 



range at discrete angles. The scene beam passes a periodic 
grating structure, such as a wire mesh screen, a phase grat- 
ing, or an amplitude grating for breaking up the scene beam 
into a number of discrete beams corresponding to different 
orders. The subject is interposed between the grating struc- 
ture and the hologram. A lens may be arranged between the 
subject and the hologram for focusing the various discrete 
scene beams so that a desired number may be selected by an 
aperture plate. Ahematively, a pair of mirrors may be used 
for bringing together the discrete scene beams created by the 
grating structure. A further refinement consisu of a second 



3,659,913 
LOCK-DOWN MECHANISM 
Uawood J. Waldrois, Dovsr, Md WBtan J. 
Rochester, both ol N.H., Mrigasn to Spwridtag Fibre Cooi- 
paay, tac^ North Rochcstor, N.H. 

FBed Aog. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 62,103 

tat CL A47f 1100 

UACL 312-71 4CtahiiB 





periodic grating structure diqx>sed between the lens and the 
subject; again, the discrete wotxvt beams may be focused by a 
lens. The two diffraction gratings preferaMy have different 
grating omstants. Abo, each of the discrete scene beams 
may be recorded on a separate hologram on which a 
reference beam is also directed. This may be effected by an 
additional periodic grating structure for also diffracting a dis- 
crete reference beam into die fdane of each of the various 
holograms. 



3^59,915 

FUSED SnJCA OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE 

Robert D. Maurcr, and PMer C Schidtz, both fl( Patatcd Post, 

N.Ym MsiiiMn to CondBg Gtas Works. Condi«, N.Y. 

FVed May 11, 1970, Scr. No. 36,109 

tat CL G02b 5114; HOlp 3100 ^ 

MS, CL 350—96 WG 10 



A lock-down mechanism for a floating platform for use in 
doff trucks and the like. The lock-down mechanism is carried 
adjacent the upper ends of a pair of lazy tongs so that its 
operation is not effected by lint and other foreign matter ac- 
cumulated in the bottom of the doff truck. The lock-down 
mechanism includes a pivotal arm that is spring biased in an 
initial position. As the floating platform is lowered the pivotal 
arm is moved towards a keeper and engages an inclined 
noteh therein. By lowering the floating platform further the 
pivotal arm passes around the keeper to its initial position al- 
lowing the platform to be raised. 





An optical waveguide having a hi^ purity fused silica 
cladding layer, and a core of hi^ plurality fused silica doped 
with a sufficient amount of a multivalent metal oxide so as to 
increase the index of refraction of the owe above that of the 
cladding layer. 



3,659,914 
HOLOGRAPHIC SYSTEM WITHOUT LASER SPECiOLE 
Robert E. Brooks, Redoado Beach, CaMf., aaslgaor to TRW 
lac, Redoado Beach, CaHf. 

FDed Dec 17, 1970, Scr. No. 98,978 

tat CLG02b 27/22 

MS. CL 350-3 J 20 Clalins 

A holographic system particularly for hoiografduc inter- 
ferometry which minimizes the effect of laser qieckle yet 
permits viewing of the holographic image over a wide angular 



to 
HB, 



3,659,916 
SINGLE-MODE DIELECTRIC WAVEGUIDE 
Eariqae Aibvdo Jose MarcatU, Romoi^ NJ^ 
BcH Tdepbone Laboratories, bcorporatcd, Marray 
NJ. 
CondnaatioB-te-part of appBraHoa Scr. No. 730,192, Mqr 17, 
1968, BOW abandoaed. This appBcadoa Jaly 28, 1970, Scr. 

No. 59,014 

iBt CL HOlp 3100; G02b 5114 

UACL 350-96 WG 5 Ctahae 

This api^ication describes a single-mode dielectric 
waveguide for guiding electroma^ietic wave energy. The 
guide comprises a low-loss dielec&ic substrate in which a 
thin, low-loss, dielectric strip of hi^ier refractive index is em- 



168 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



bedded. In general, such a guide is capable of supporting a 
plurality of modes of two orthogonally-polarized families of 
modes. To limit the waveguide to single-mode operation, the 
cross-sectional dimensions are limited so that the guide is in- 
capable of supporting modes higher than the fundamental 
mode of each of the two families of modes. One of two fun- 




a*.^ 



L I ^ 



damental modes is then supported by either placing a lossy 
material along one surface of the guiding strip, thereby mak- 
ing the guide much lossier to one of the two fundamental 
modes or, alternatively, by placing a higher refractive index 
material along the strip, thereby destroying the guiding capa- 
bility of the waveguide with respect to one of the nii^o funda- 
mental modes. 



3,659,917 
POCKELS CELLS 
Jcaa^Louis Bootliieaa, Antoay, France, anignor to Compag* 
■k Gencralc D'Ekctridte, Park, France 

FDcd Mar. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 22,831 
Clalau priority, appttcatioo France, Mar. 28, 1969, 6909472 

Int. CL G02f 1/34 
U.S. CL 350—160 3 ClainH 



renders the response times of the three channels more equal 
to one another and to the lowest response time by providing 




at least one partially reflecting layer in the prism system in an 
airgap adjoining a dichroic layer. 



3,659,919 
TRI-LEVEL INTERFEROMETER 
Charles Sumner WHama, Halaa, Tcz^ Mrignnr to T 
stiuucnts Inoofpontod, Dalaa, Tn. 

FVed Dae 12, 1968, Scr. No. 783337 
Int CL G02b 1110; GOlb 9f02 
U.S. CL 350—166 2 



In- 




An electro-optical cell, comprising an insulating case, hav- 
ing two windows arranged opposite to each other; a crystal in 
said insulating case; two insulating counterchecks, supported 
on the extreme faces of said crystal, by means of metallic 
electrodes, said counterchecks covering said windows in said 
insulating case, said electrodes and counterchecks having 
openings to allow the passage of light traversing the crystal;, 
and further characterized in that a sleeve, consisting of an in- 
sulating substance, is arranged around a lateral surface of 
said crystal and is in contact with said lateral surface and the 
interior surface of said case opposite said lateral surface, so 
as to insulate electrically said electrodes from each other is 
disclosed. 




'e ■-« ^u 'M ^x 



a ^30 



Disclosed is an interferometer having three mutually paral- 
lel levels, each having a plurality of reflective stripes which 
divide light entering the interferometer into two groups of 
parallel beams to permit the phase difference between the 
beams to be determined by the position of the center level 
relative to the outer levels. 



3,659,918 
COLOR SEPARATING PRISM SYSTEM 
Slag Lkmf Tan, Emmasingel, Eindhoven, Netherlands, as- 
signor to VS. Philips Corporation, New York, N.Y. 
Filed Mar. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 22,178 
Int CL G02b 5/28 
VJS. CL 350-166 6 Claims 

A color separating prism system for a television camera in- 
cluding several dichroic layers arranged at angles of less than 
30" to a plane normal to the optical axis, which layers are 
successively struck by'^the light rays which traverse the prism 
system, light within a given wavelength range being reflected 
at each respective layer. Such a color separating prism 
system increases the efificiency of the incident light and 



3,659,920 
WIDE ANGLE INFINITY IMAGE VISUAL DISPLAY 
Frank William McGhMMU, Windsor, N.Y., aasigner to The 
Singer Company, New York, N.Y. 

Fikd Aug. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 67^85 

Int CL G02b / 7/06, 27/14 

U.S. CL 350— 174 13Clainis 

A method of arranging a plurality of infinity image displays 
to form a wide angle display. Displays are shaped in the form 
of spherical wedges and butted together to form tiers having 
the desired horizontal field of view and the tiers arranged 
vertically to form a continuous vertical field of view. To 
avoid mechanical interference tiers may be segments of 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



169 



spheres of different sizes and may still, if arranged so that the 
centers of all spheres of which tiers are segments are cen- 



the light rays passing through the system thus simulating a 
conventional symmetrical Split-Dagor system. 




3,659,923 
SIX COMPONENT lOOX MICROSCOPE OBJECTIVE 
Afthnr H. Shoemaker, East Aurora, N.Y., assignor to Amer- 
icaa Optical Corporation, Soothbridgc, Man. 

FBcd Mar. 17, 1971, Scr. No. 125,080 
Int CLG02b 27/02 
VS. CL 350-215 2 



•1 



tered at the observer's eyepoint, provide a continuous display 
as seen by the observer. 



3,659,921 
ZOOM LENS CAPABLE OF EXTREME CLOSEll* 
PHOTOGRAPHY 
Rynsho Hkaac, and EikM Takano, hoth of Tokyo, Japan, as- 
signors to Canon Kahodifld iUUm, Tokyo, Japan 
FBcd July 23, 1970, Scr. No. 57,520 
dates priority, appBcation Japan, July 26, 1969, 44/58743 

Int CL G02b 15/18 
U.S.CL350— 186 5 OaimB 





R22 



Rl 



A six component achromatic oil immersion microscope ob- 
jective having a magnification of lOOX and a numerical aper- 
ture of 1.2S. 



3AS9,924 
Zoom lens of this invention is capable of extreme doseup poUR MEMBER lOOX MICROSC(H>E OBJECTIVE 

photography. The zoom lens has a positive power focusing j^g^^gg^ h. Shocmdur, Erie, N.Y., msinnnr to American Opd- 
lens, a negative power variator, a negative power compensa- 
tor and a relay lens consisting of a movable front and a fixed 
rear positive power lens groups. In zooming operation, the 
variator is one-way shifted while the compensator is 
reciprocatingly shifted. In focusing, the focusing lens is 
shifted for an object from an infinity to a usual distance. For 
close-up photography the focusing lens is shifted to its ex- 
treme foremost end and the fitant group of the relay lens is 
shifted toward the image plane. , 



cal Corporation, Southhridgc Mam. 

FBcd Mar. 18, 1971, Scr. No. 125,623 
ktCLG02h 27/02 
VS. CL 350—224 



3 659 922 
SYMMETRICAL HALF-LENS OPTICAL SYSTEM 
George L. McCroMc, Rochester, N.Y., assignor to Xerox Cor- 
poration, Stamford, Conn. 

FUed Feb. 25, 1971, Scr. No. 1 18,745 
IntCLG02b77/00 
VS. CL 350-202 




ICIahn 



/ 





< A four member achromatic oil immersion microacope ob- 

A two component Split-Dagor type lens is herein disclosed jcctive haviiig a numerical aperture of substantially 1 .25 and 
utilizing a reflecting surface at the stop position to reverse a magnification of substantially lOOX. 



170 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659^25 
THREE COMPONENT 2.5X MICROSCOPE OBJECTIVE 
ArtlHir H. ShiMmakcr, Erie, N.Y^ Mii innr to AnMrican Opti- 
cal CorponlioB, Soathbridfc, Mav. 

Fled Mar. 24, 1971, Scr. No. 127371 
lBt.CLG02b2//02 
UACL350— 225 2 




•7 h 



rCl 



A three component achromatic microscope objective hav- 
ing a magnification of 2.SX and a numerical aperture of 0.07. 



3,659,926 

BEAM DiSPLACER 

Marcd L. Ckarboucaa, 890 & P oadere aa , Oraafe, CaHf . 

FIM May 15, 1970, Scr. No. 37^26 

IiU. CL G02f 1134 

VS. CL 350-285 7 




provided for opening the clampa a fixed amount to unlock 
the structure and allow one movable part to be rotated with 
respect to another while maintaining the required friction 
force for the structure to be self-supporting, thereby prevent- 
ing accidental damage caused by the structure moving under 
its own weight. 



An apparatus for di^)lacing an optical beam to a selected 
point anywhere within a circular area, providing extensive 
linear di^lacement of the beam, includes a plurality of pairs 
of parallel reflective surfaces. Each pair is arranged to 
receive an incoming beam and provide an exiting beam that 
is precisely parallel to the incoming beam. One of the pairs is 
mounted for rotation substantially about the axis of the in- 
coming beam. At least another of the pairs is mounted to the 
first pair for rotation about the axis of the exiting beam of the 
first pairs. The two are relatively positioned so that the exit- 
ing beam of the first pair is the incoming beam of the second 
pair and the two are mounted for linear and rotational mo- 
tion together along and about a vertical axis. The arrange- 
ment receives a light beam directed substantially horizontally 
to a first reflective surface of the first prism whereby the exit- 
ing beam from the second prism can biie selectively positioned 
at any point within a circle lying in a substantially vertical 
plane. The various relatively movable parts are provided with 
clamped joints to maintain them in a selected relative posi- 
tion. The clamps normaUy provide a substantial friction force 
to lock one movable part with respect to another. A device is 



3,659,927 

REAR VIEW OPTICAL TRAIN AND DOVE PRISM 

Charies W. Mevkrte, 1543 East 85tli Street, Ckkago, DL 

Ficd Apr. 1, 1970, Scr. No. 24,486 

lat. CL G02b 5/04 

U.S. CL 350-286 11 



/t '^'* 




Dove prism particularly adapted for the optical trains of 
rear view vision devices. The prism is relatively large, to pro- 
vide an adequate image in a rear view vision optical train and 
is in the form <^ an isosceles triangular prism filled with opti- 
cal liquid. A prismatic fnme forms a support for two trans- 
parent refractory plates of equal length and extending at 
equal angles with respect to the base of the prismatic frame. 
A mirror extends along the base between the transparent 
plates. The sides of the prismatic fnme are opaque, to 
prevent beams of lig^t &t>m entering the prism. The optical 
liquid may be a distilled water containing alcohol or any 
other clear anti-fivexe which will not settle out of the liquid 
or change color upon changes in te m perature. The plates of 
the prism, refnct beams of light to the mirror and in turn 
project the beams of light to a lens or mirror for viewing 
through a screen, which may be in the frarm of a ground glass 
screen. 



3,659,928 
REFLECTION APPARATUS FOR SIMULATING THE 
EFFECT OF USE BY A PERSON OF A COSMETIC OR 

ARTICLE 

Georr MadMiaM, Chatswood, Aaatrala, aarffeaor to Joka 

Alaa Davk, North Sydaey, New Soolk Wales, AastrailB 

Fled May 11, 1970, Scr. No. 36,086 

Claiaga priority, appB ca tioa Australia, May 12, 1969, 

54887/69 

Let. CL G02b 5/08 

UACL 350-291 4( 




An interioriy illuminated enclosure houses a changeable 
disc selectively movable to present one ai a (rfurality of 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



171 



May 2, 1972 

colors or shapes before an apcrtured chamber withm the en- ^i^c InniCTlOl 

closure. UpoTlooking into the chamber through a see- EYE GLASS LE NS ADJUSTER 

through mirror a user views the selected color or shape su- PUIp J. AUca, 6 Ndeoa Sti^ Fredcrkkal>^ 
perimposed upon th eir image. | ~ ^"L^cVcli^^JS^ '''''^ 

I U.S.CL 351-41 

3,659,929 
BACK-MIRROR AND Sn>E-MIRROR COMBINATION 

DEVICE 
Maaakam Yuawa, 10-23, 2<taaM K a miifcH ial. Tokyo, 

Japaa 

Fled im. 25, 1971, Scr. No. 109^65 
CWns priority, appBcatkai Jiyaa, Feb. 28, 1970, 45/19294 

im.CLC02h5/08 
UACL350— 307 2 



An eye ^av fhune is provided widi mamially adjustable 
means for individually moving each leiu toward or away frtrni 
the eyeball to vary the lens-eye separatioa for maximum 
comfort and optimum focus. 





The device comprises a back mirror rotationally installed 
within a cover body and a side-mirror of prism reflection 
type pivoubly supported in a square box provided beneath 
said back-mirror cover body and having colored glass win- 
dow thereon to reflect a colored image of the sideward sight 
whereby the driver can distinguish therethrou^ between 
both sideward and backward sights without mistake. 



3,659,932 
MOTION PICTURE CAMERA WITH 
COUNTERBALANCING MEANS 
L Bach, 1771 North Crcsccat Hdikto Boakvard, Los 

lagflre. rrilf 

FBed Oct 5, 1970, Scr. No. 78,132 
lat CLG03b/ 7/02 
U.S. CL 352-242 7 



3,659,930 

SEGMENTED DEFLECTDLE SCREEN SURFACE FOR 

TESTING EYES BY LASER REFRACTION 

Horst E. GroMhcri, Rochester, aad Kcaacth A. Saow, 

Greece, both of N.Y., asslgann to Baasch & Lomb lacor- 

■^ek^riar N Y 

FBed Sept. 28i 1970, Scr. No. 76,046 

lat CL A61b 3/02; G02b 5/02 

UACL 351-36 I 4ClalBis 





A camera having an elongated hcrflow case with a lens 
mount resiliently sealed in its from wall and supporting a 
zoom lens assembly. The lens mount is fastened to the fixmt 
of a center plate supported in the front portioa of the case on 
resilient mounts, and a counter-balaa^g Jens stabilizer bar 
projects rearwardly fix>m the center plate into a cushioned 
socket on the rear wall of the case. 



A deflectible generally circular screen for testing eyes by 
laser refraction includes a plurality of thin flexible generally 
triangularly shaped segments each having a nonspec\ilar sur- 
frice. The segments are affixed to a base and disposed to have 
corresponding apexes of the triangularly shaped segments 
defining s central area of the screen. The surface of each seg- 
ment opposite the nonspecular surfikce is disposed to engage 
an inflauble rubber diaphragm to deflect the triangular seg- 
ments from a generally concave disposition to a generally 
planar disposition. After the dia|4iragm is inflated to engage 
aad cooperatively move the screen, the diaphragm is deflated 
at a relatively sknr contrcdiod rate and a visual pattern 
formed on the nonspecular sur&ces of the segments of the 
screen by a laser beam appears to move to an observer hav- 
ing abnormal eyesight. 



3,659,933 
ANNOTATOR FOR MICROFILM READER 
Harry Wdtx, New Hyde Park, N.Y., ssi i g aBr to 
LKm BrooUya, N.Y. 

FBed Aat. 11, 1970, Scr. No. 62,789 
lat CLG03b 27/00 
U.S.CL 353-44 « 

An annotator adapted to erase any selected line of text or 
a part of the line appearing oo a rethiced image formed on a 
microfilm strip <rfthermoidastic material which is xnatpottod 
within a micr^Dm reader for projection on a screen. The an- 
noutor inchides a retractable carriage suppMting a pair of 
electrodes whose ends are bridged by a resistance wire actioi 
as a stylus. The carriage is movaUe by a step|»ng motor at 
odier means to cause the styhis, whose length corresponds to 
the widdi of tibe fraiae, to advance incrementaBy acro« the 
film strip and in engagement therewith in a direction normal 



172 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



Hay 2, 1972 



to the direction of film travel. The stylus is arrested at a posi- film together with copying material past one end of the fiber 
tion in registration with a line of text to be erased, the stylus optic, and means for moving an opticaUy dear spacing film 





together with a master past the other end of the fiber optic 
and in a direction opposite to that of the copying material. 



and text being viewable on the screen whereby the registra- 
tion may be readily checked. By electrically energizing the 
arrested stylus, the selected line is fused and erased. 



3,659,934 
SLIDE TRANSPORT DEVICE 
Cari C. Cottaua, Ckkago; Walter W. Wcbcr, Dcs Ptaincs; 
Fnuk W. Bcliejewski, Chicago, and Richard FryHal^ i>arl( 
Ridge, an of OL, aMigBors to BcO & Howd Company, 
Chicago, DL 

Filed Sept. 23, 1969, Scr. No. 860384 

Int. CI. G03b 23/00, 23/02 

U.S.CL 353-103 4 Claims 



3,659,936 
APPARATUS FOR ELECTROSTATIC PRINTING 
Peter H. Kloae, Troy, and Stanford R. Ovridmky, ■!««— *Mif. 
both of ^flch., Bs riffi oii to Energy Conversion Devlcca, Inc., 
Troy, AfldL 

Filed Jan. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 1,265 
Int CL G03g 15/00 
VJS, CL 355—3 17 ( 



(iy^'-f'^^T 





A device for transporting slides in a horizontal plane to be 
projected by a slide projector. 



3,659,935 

COPYING METHOD AND APPARATUS 

Roland Moraw, Wiesbaden-Biebrich, Germany, asrignor to 

Kale Akt iengudb chaft, Wicsbaden-Biebrich, Germany 

FDed Dec 22, 1969, Scr. No. 886^89 

Claiau priority, application Germany, Dec 23, 1968, P 18 16 

591.8 

Int a. G03b 27/50, 27/54 

U.S.CL 355-1 9Clafans 

This invention relates to a copying apparatus comprising a 
housing having therein a reflex exposure means, a bridge-like 
glass fiber optic, means for moving an optically clear spacing 



An electrostatic printer employs a metallic drum coated 
with a semiconductor film. The resistance of the film is 
varied fit>m its high resistance or insulating state to its low re- 
sistance or conducting state in response to a scanning laser 
beam. A DC voltage source is connected to the metallic 
drum. The voltage is conducted through the semiconductor 
and appears at the surface in those regions where the laser 
beam impinges on the semiconductor. The semiconductor is 
then dusted with ink particles which cling to the regions 
where the voltage appears. Printing is accomplished by trans- 
ferring the ink particles to a document. Multiple copies may 
be made by employing a semiconductor material exhibiting a 
memory characteristic. 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



\ 



May 2, 1972 

3,659,937 3,659,939 

SMALL SIZED ELECTRONIC DUPUCATOR AUTOMATIC ORTHOPHOTO PRINTER 

Yorto Yammiol, Toyokawa, Japan, assignor to Mtaioka GIbcrt L. Hobrongh, Vanconvcr, B.C., Canada, 

Camera KabnshiUK^faa, Osaka, Japan Hobrongh Limited, VanconTcr, B.C., Canada 

FDcd Apr. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 32,654 Filed Sept 18, 1968, Scr. No. 760^5 

aaimspftelty,applicntk» Japan, Apr. 29, 1969, 44/39226 Int. CLGOlc 77/72 

Int CL G03g 75/00 UA CL 356-2 1^ 
UACL 355-3 _ 3 Claims 



173 



to 



Wo K) tS* 74 17 la 4c 21 




^f 4tl. 



A cover body hinged to the housing of an electronic 
duplicator is roUUMe between a first and second position so 
that in the first position a plurality of driven rollers within the 
cover body are aligned and in contact with a like plurality of 
driving roUeii along an original document carrier path so 
that thin originals can be transpcvted thereby and in the 
second position the driven roUen are located on the same 
level as the driving rollers and form an extension thereof so 
that thick originals can be transported along the carrier path. 

I 
3A59,938 
INFORMATION RECORDING DEVICE 
Sakac F^Jfanoto, Tokyo, Japan, assignor to KabnsMU Kalriia 
Ricoh, Tokyo, Japan 

FBcd Apr. 28, 1969, Scr. No. 819,587 

Claims priority, appticaUon Japan, Apr. 30, 1968, 43/29280; 

43/29281; 43/35620; 43/35621; 43/35622; May 24, 1968, 

43/35105 I 

Int CL G03g 75/00 

U.S. CL 355-3 3 Claims 





This application discloses an improved system which 
operates automatically to provide an orthopbotograph fipom 
one or more pairs of stereo aerial pbotografdis. The system 
disclosed includes first and second photo-scanning devices 
which are operated in synchronism to provide data signals for 
each spot of the two photographs maldng up a stereo pair. In 
addition to the usual correlation networit which operates on 
the data signals to determine the amount of parallax error, 
the system includes image transformation circuitry and raster 
shaping circuits controlled thereby for altering the scan prt- 
tems of the two photo-scanning devices. EfBciency <rf the 
correlator is thereby improved, and the problems associated 
with changes in the elevation of the terrain being mapped are 
overcome to an extent such that patch printing of a large 
area is accomplished without the umial discrepancies in align- 
ment of detail in adjacent patches. Details of the raster shap- 
ing system, the signal correlator providing the input signals 
for the raster shapers, and the signal analyzer of the correla- 
tor are provided along wiA a detailed description of the 
overall system. * 



An electrostatic-photographic information recording 
device wherein a recording sheet is fed through an electro- 
statically charging section, an exposure section (photogra- 
phing and recording section), a devek>ping section and a dry- 
ing section. The presmre rollers disposed in said sections and 
feed rollers are displaced by operation of one lever from the 
exterior of the device to the positions so as to open the path 
of feed of said recording sheet for loading the same in the 
device. 



3 659 940 
METHOD AND APFARaWfOR EXAMINING LIQUID 

FILLED CONTAINERS 
Knut Sonde Hansen, Mntams and John Som Petcnson, 
SodertaUe, both of Sweden, assigymrs to Akti e bo la gct Astra, 
SodertaUc, Sweden 

Filed June 11, 1969, Scr. No. 832,187 
Cfadms priority, application Sweden, June 11, 1969, 7825/68 

Int CL GOln 7/00. 75/02, 21/04 
MS. CL 356—36 H Claims 

A container which is at least partially filled witii a liquid is 
centrifuged while its longitudinal axis is maintained substan- 
tially perpendiciilar to its axis of rotation thereby causing im- 
purities which may be present in the liquid to move to the 
end of the container farthest fsoax the axis of rotation «iule 
the air Iwbbles in the liquid collect at the end <A the con- 
tainer nearest to the axis of rotation. The container is then 
moved diametrically past the axis of rotation causing the air 
to move to the opposite end of the container. The centrifiig- 
ing of the contanier continues causing any impurities whidi 



174 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



may be present to be tramferred from the end of the con- one or more chopper* having transparent and mirrored sec- 
tainer in which they have been collected to the opposite end. tors). It has been found that when the size of the area of cer- 
tain types of detectors receiving the radiation vary (caused, 
for example, by varying the entrance and exit slits ot a 
monochromator in a spectrophotcMneter), the time lag in the 




The presence or absence of these impurities is sensed by a 
photoelectric device during this transfer. 



3,659^1 

INFRA'RED SPECTROMETERS 
Matklas Toaf« Cowbcvofe, Fraaoe, aaigBar to 
D'AiipMraHnas MecaaiqMS A L'EbctroiriqM, Aa 
Et A L'AtaadrtiqM (CJl.Mf.CA.) 

Fled Jaly 9, 1970, Scr. No. 53,516 
ClafaM prtorily. appMcalioa Ftmcc, July 21, 1969, 6924739 

lat CL GOIJ 3/42 
VS. CL 356—51 5 ' 



UMTOI 

KMKE d ^ 



UBiSft 



d-S-j.:^ 



J. r 'J tM<^Tt' 







40+ TB 



In a two-channel spectrometer, the output signal of the op- 
tico-electrical detector is integrated, while one of the two 
channels is illuminated, for a duration T, at the end of which 
the integrated signals reaches a value E, one of the two 
values T, and E being predetermined; the output signal of the 
detector is thereafter integrated, while the other channel is il- 
luminated, for a duration T, at the end of which the in- 
tegrated signal reaches the aforesaid value E; Ti/T, is the 
transmission coefficient of the first channel relatively to the 
other one. and a signal function of Ti/T, is applied to the 
recorder. 



3,659,942 

DETECTOR CIRCUITS FOR PHASE COMPENSATION 
Jescph A. Vcrgalo, Moarac, Coaa., a srignor to The Parkin- 

Etaacr Corporatioa, Norwalk, Cou. 

Filed Nov. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 89,166 

bit. CL GOIJ 3/42 

VS. CL 356—51 12 CUrims 

In double-beam optical testing instruments (e.g., spec- 
trophotometers) in which a single radiation detector al- 
ternately receives radiation that has passed through two dif- 
ferent optical paths, a separator or demodulator is utilized to 
separate the radiation detector electrical signal components 
into those representing the intensities of the radiation passing 
through each of the paths. The demodulator typically 
receives a synchronizing signal from the means causing the 
altemation of the two beams seen by the detector (typically 




m ^uir mjmr r^^l — 



electrical output of the detector varies. The present device 
provides means for co m pen s ating the phase of the 
synchronizing demodulator signal with such variation in the 
radiation detector time lag. as by utilizing a signal representa- 
tive of the existing slit width to introduce a variable phase 
shift in the synchronizing demodulator signal 



3,659,943 
FLOATING UQUD MONITOR 
AMb D. GoQlsby, Mon^a, CaRL, iiilfiii to Sksfl Ol 
paay. New York, N.Y. 

FRed Jaa. 15, 1970, Scr. No. 3,161 
lat CL GOla 33/28, 21/48, 21/06 
U^CL 356-70 11 



CI 









Apparatus for detecting the presence of a reflective liquid 
of lesser dennty floating on a more dense liquid of different 
reflectivity wherein the intensity of a beam of reflected light 
is measured to detect the presence of less dense liquid. 



3,659,944^ 
APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS SPECTRAL ANALYSIS 

OF MOLTEN SUBSTANCES 

Mflaa Bojic, Mctz, F^aacc, aasigBor to lastitat dc Re ch sr ch c s 

dc la Sktervrgic FraaooiM, Saiat G«nnato<CB-Layc Fraacc 

Filed Feb. 24, 1971, Scr. No. 11M03 

OaiBH priority, lypM ca t toa Fkawx, Feb. 27, 1970, 7007139 

laL CL GOIJ 3/30, 3/00; GOla I/IO 
U.S.CL 356-86 IOCWbh 

Apparatus for direct and continuous spectrometric analysis 
of molten metals has a riser which draws a continuous stream 
fA molten metal from a fiimace in response to actuation of an 
electromagnetic pump. The stream flows throu^ a spark 
chamber which contains a sill or barrier over which the metal 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



175 



must flow to rise to a predetermined level at a desired 
distance from a first electrode which b connected with one 
pole of a spark generator. The other pcrfe of the spark 
generator is connected with a second electrode which dips 
into the stream of molten metal in the chamber with atten- 
dant generation of a spark between the exposed surface of 



control signals and a signal indicating the operative grating 
provklc a readout of the wavenumber, directly usable by daU 
processing apparatus. The ckieed loop digital nature of the 
control signals are free of any non-systematic entMi, and 
allow the instrument to be "indexed" to any desired 
wavenumber (and then "instructed" to scan to any other 
wavenumber auto m a t i ca lly). 



^ 





H 


7 1 






V'''' 


m 


■/ '. 


-— ^^ 


'/'. 




'/■ 


- 


//y 


- 


/ y / 


- 


(^ ' 




I X, 




Y'' 


i 


LuJ 


< 




wy~ 




the stream and the first electrode. The light or radiation 
which is generated by the spark is directed into a spectrome- 
ter by way of a horizontal or vertical tube. Such tube further 
serves to admit into the spark chamber a stream of inert gas 
which evacuates metallic vapors developing in the chamber 
in response to generation of the spark. 



3,659,945 
SCANNING MONOCHROMATORS 
Joha M. Roche, West Roddlig, aad Rcac C. Sawyer. Jr., Shd- 
tea, hotholCoaa.,asrigpTi to The Pcrtda-Elascr Corpora- 

tfaa Norwalh. Cobb. 

FRcd No?. 19, 1969, Scr. No. 878,102 
lat CLGOIJ J/06. i//« 
U.S.CL 356-100 6 



3,65 9,946 

AUTOMATED UGHT SCATTERING PHOTOMETER 
ckkhHMl Konwa. and HMsU Ya w i B i iUn. both ol Kyoto 
aty, Japaa, airigBon lo fi hai itia g iisi lrM i hn Ltd., 
Nakakyo-ka, Kyot»«U, Kyolo^ Japaa 

FRod Doc 9, 1970, Scr. No. 96,508 

ippRcathMi Jivaa, Doc. 10, 1969, 44/117890 
iat. CL GOla 21/00, 21/06, 21/26 
VS. CL 356-104 12 < 



A scanning monochromator includes a plurality of diffrac- 
tion gratings mounted on a rotatable turret, so that each grat- 
ing may be moved and precisely indexed into operative posi- 
tion. Each grating so positioned is angularly rotated about its 
axis by the same scanning arm, driven by a cam having two 
similar (but different) contours for producing one of two 
similar scanning fkmctions for the various gratings- Preferably 
more interchangeable order-separating filters than gratings 
are included to insure complete and efficient filtering (e.g.. 
14 filters for 7 gratinp). Both the stepping of die grating tur- 
ret and of the filters (e.g.. on a filter wheel) are ccmtroUed by 
(digital) signals, derived from the actual wavenumber being 
separated, as precisely read by (coarse and fine) digital en- 
coder discs on the wavenumber scanning driving shafts (be- 
fore and after a large-ratio rediiction system). The digital 




T^r ^T 



An automated light scattering i^wtometer characterized in 
that a photoelectric unit used to measure the intensity of 
light scattered from the sample container at different an^es 
relative to the optical axis of the instrument can be intermit- 
tently rotated This can be achieved by the provision of a pair 
of switching means, one of which behig adapted to be actu- 
ated by a pin vertically <fispooed on the upper surface of a ro- 
tary member mounted with said photoelectric unit and the 
other of which being adapted to be actuated by an actuator 
means rigidly mounted on a shaft fofr transmitting the rota- 
tional force fixMn a motor to the rotary member. When these 
switches are ckMcd at the same time, the rotation of the ro- 
tary member can be stopped by means of a clutch means, in 
addition, this photometer of the present invention can be 
utilized in connection with a commercially availaUe comput- 
ing machine. To this end, means for integrating the output of 
the photoelectric unit and that of another photoelectric unit 
is provided, the output of said integrating means being 
adapted to be ap{riied to the computing machhie. 



3,659,947 

HOLOGRAPmC APPARATUS WITH AUTOMATIC 

CONTROL SYSTTEM FOR MAINTA INING CONSTANT 

PHASE RELATION BETWEEN REFERENCE AND 

OBJECT BEAMS 

Dob B. NrnBMWB, Abb Arbor, Mkh., assfcBor to GCO, lac. 

Abb Arbor, Mkh. 

FRcd Jum 18, 1970, Scr. No. 47,291 
IbL CL G02b 27/00; GOIJ 1/20 
U.S. CL 356— 106 llCtabBa 

Apparatus for making holograms is discloaed v^uch in- 
cludes an arrai^ement for maintaining a constant phase rda- 
tionship betwoM the object and reference beams so that tlie 
fringe pattern remains stationary during the recording period. 
The apparatus includes means Ibr detecting spurious motion 
of the object or elements oi the apparatus by means re^Kxw 
gtve to the intensity oi a portion of die wavefront inter- 
ference pattern. The detectioo signal which is taken as being 



176 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



indicative of a phase shift between the reference and object 
waves is applied to an automatic control system including 
amplifying means and a transducer disposed in one of the 
beam paths for producing a corrective phase shift thereof 
relative to the other beam. The quiescent operating point for 
the automatic control system is established by an automatic 
bias system which includes means for producing a signal cor> 



LASER BEAM SYSTEMS AND APPARATUS FOR 

DETECTING AND MEASURING PARAMETRIC 

DEVUTIONS BETWEEN SURFACES AND THE LIKE 

R. WaM^ a^ Martte A. Apoatolico, boCli of Wiliiyi«. 
toB, DeL, aM lfw i to TeckaUyBc, Im^ WteingUw, DaL 
FDed Apr. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 30,174 
Int. CL GO lb 77/0(7 
U.S.CL 356-156 15 



fc:;5=^ 





responding to the average value of the intensity of the 
wavefront interference pattern. In one preferred embodiment 
a bias signal corresponding to the average value of intensity 
is developed by a detector with means forming a portion of 
the mterference pattern thereon with the fringe lines being 
spaced such that the detector responds to an area including 
both constructive and destructive regions of the interference 
pattern. . . 



3.659,948 

OPTICAL DEVICE FOR AUGNING AN OBJECT 

LOCATED AT AN ARBITRARY DISTANCE FROM THE 

DEVICE 
Hcadiik De Lang, Emmasiiigd, Eiadhovai, Nctbcriaiidi, ta- 
sigMT to U.S. PbUps Corporatfoa, New York, N.Y. 

FDcd Apr. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 27,894 
Claims priority, applicatioa Netherlands, Apr. 23. 1969. 

6906306 

lBt.a.G01b77/26 

U.S. CL 356- 110 4 Claims 





A deviation detection and measuring system and apparatus 
are provided for determininft the proper generation of 
roadbed surfiaces and the lilce in which a laser beam is pro- 
jected from each side of an ambulatory road grader' onto 
retro-reflective targets of predetermined configuration ad- 
jacent to the roadbed, said targeu having a Icnown orienta- 
tion with respect to the ultimately desired dimensions and 
orientation of the roadbed. Detection devices on the grader 
detect the laser beams reflected from the target configura- 
tions and effectuate a readout such that the current dimen- 
sional parameters of the roadbed are determined and com- 
pared with the yltimately desired dimensional parameters 
thereof. 



3,659,950 

LASER APPARATUS FOR DETECTING THE SIZE AND 

FORM OF FILAMENTARY MATERIAL BY MEASURING 

MFFRACTED LIGHT 
John Trol, RIdgdkhL and Cok Baker, Stratford, both of 
Conn., as ii j n ors to Iris Corporathm 

Fifed July 14, 1969, Scr. No. 841,213 

IBL CL GOln 21fl8. 21/30, 21/16 

VS. a. 356-199 5 Claims 



ri#^ 




ii,i,-i,„i„ i»mvr 

\emtv/r 



An improvement of an optical device for aligning an object 
located at an arbitrary distance from the device is described 
in which the device includes two identical or substantially 
identical concave mirrors the reflecting concave surfaces of 
which face each other and which each contain the center of 
curvature of the other mirror, and at least one • */4^1ate. 

It is shown that by successively including a beam i:hopper 
and a beam splitter in the light paths of the beams which 
emeif e from the optical system the device can be adapted to 
I^to-electric alignment without a spatial separation 
between the observed object and its image. 



A device for measuring moving filaments includes a laser 
whose beam is split and the split beams not blocked directed 
upon distinct filament portions; the light di£Gracting past the 
filaments falls upon respective optical sensors. The filament 
portions may be either longitudinally spaced along tlie same 
filament, angularly spaced about the same kjngitudinal fila- 
ment position or include the moving filament and a standard. 
The outputs of the optical sensing means are compared and a 
signal is produced represenUttve of such a comparison. An 
arrangement is also disclosed which employs selected energy 
levels within the diffraction pattern of an un^lit beam to 
precisely measure a moving filament 



; 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



177 



3,659,951 3,659,953 

CARTRIDGE FOR A WRTITNG IMPLEMENT PLUG AND BARREL ASSEMBLY FOR MARKING 

Wcnwr Gcnumi, YIibmBo, La^mo. SwRicrtend, ■■rignnr DEVKE 

to Iwiiada EattrpriMS, bKorporatcd, Chariottc Amatte Guy A. Tajior, Batavia, DL, art g no r to Saaford 
St ThoaMB, VX Compaay 

Fifed Mar. 11, 1970, S«r. No. 18^44 FDed Apr. 21, 1970. Scr. No. 30,518 

Claimt priority, appBcadoaSwHaarlaBd, Apr. 23, 1969, hA.CLBA3k8/00 

6381/64 UACL 401-198 13 

lat CL B43k 7/70; C09d 77/7« 
U.S. CL 401-190 10 





A writing implement cartridge containing a writing medi- 
um under pressure, which cartridge has therein a mixture of 
a highly viscous substance and a chemically reactive sub- 
stance and a second chemically reactive substance which, 
when placed in contact with each other, generate a gas so as 
to maintain the writing medium in said cartridge under pres- 
sure, said writing medium comprint a mixture of a highly 
volatfle solvent and a low volatility solvent, thickenii^ 
agents, and pigments. In addition, the invention is directed to 
the method of producing the cartridge and the writing medi- 
um contained therein. 



3,659,952 

BRUSH FOR CLEANING GRAMOPHONE RECORDS 
Chartei Moraniaii, La Bdme, France, asrigaor to Zaflra 
Fraacc, La B sim i , Ahi, France 

Fled Jaac 17, 1970, Scr. No. 46 J73 
CtahM priority, appBcatioB France, Jane 19, 1969, 6920280 

IntCLB43m 77/06 
U.S.CL 401-196 7 



A writing instnunenf is provided with a combined decora- 
tive and functional ring or band at the juncture between the 
plug and the barsel of the reservoir section oi the instrument 
The ring or band cooperates with means on tiie plug to effect 
a lockmg and a sealing relationship between the plug and the 
barrel. 



3^59,954 ' i 

FOUNTAIN PEN 
Hchn Ganther Hcrmring. Hambarf-Fuhlfbuttcl, Germany, 
to Montfai— c-Sh^>to GasM, Hambarg, Gcrmaay 
of appHcalloa Scr. Na 839,228, July 7, 1969, 
BOW shaadnairi. This a ppM ca tlo B Mar. 16, 1971, Scr. No. 

124,990 

Cfelns priority, application Germany, July 10, 1968, 

P 17 61 812.1 

Int CL B43k 5/02 

U.S. CL 401-223 4 Clahns 





A brush specially intended for cleaning gramo|rfione 
records comprises a thick plate of moulded plastic material 
associated with a piece of velvet fabric, the plate being pro- 
vided with a reservoir of liquid closed by a cover plate and 
capaMe of being supplied with a liquid suitable for moisturiz- 
ing the tufts of velvet fabric. 



A fountain pen and method of making same according to 
which liquid ink is from an ink container ctmveyed through a 
capillary section to a gap leading to the writing tip of the pea 
whife the foO forming the writing pen is covered and capillary 
passages lead mto the pen gap, wMch passages have their op- 
posite ends conununicating whh the ink container. 



c. 



178 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



ERRATUM 

For Class 408 — 1 see: 
Patent No. 3.659,482 



DEVICE FOR AUTOMATICALLY STOPPING DELIVERY 
OF LIQUID BY A CENTRIFUG AL PUM P DURING 
REVERSE OPERATION THEREOF 
Siegfried SchMwyd, Bad N t M f dt , SmIb, Gcnuay, M riginr 
to SicBMSt AkticBfcwiKlMA, BcnlBf GcraMDy 
FVed Jaly 14, 1969, Scr. No. 841,299 
dafau priority, appHcatioa Gcraaay, Jnly 13, 196S, P 17 03 
815.2; G 66 00 523 
I^ CL F04b 19100; F04d 1100 
U.S.CL 415-116 12 




Device for automatically stopping delivery of liquid by a 
centrifugal pump operating in reverse nmning condition 
through the introduction of air into the pump chamber of the 
pump includes means defining a bore formed in the housing 
of the pump for connecting the pump chamber to at- 
mosphere, and means cooperating with the bore-defining 
means for adjusting the pressure in the pump chamber to 
positive pressure in forward running condition of the pump 
rotor and to negative pressure in reverse running condition 
thereof whereby in the latter condition air is sucked fit>m the 
atmosphere into the pump chamber to stop delivery of liquid 
by the pump. 



3,659,956 
WELDED INLET PIPE AND NOZZLE BOX 
CONSTRUCTION FOR STEAM TURBINES 
Eari H. BrinkiuB, SdwMctady, N.Y., —Ifiir to 
Electric Com paay 

FBcd Dec. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 97,560 
bt CI. FOld 1 100; F04d IIOS 



VS. CL 415-219 



4ClaiiiH 



I 




A welded inlet pipe and nozzle box construction for a 
steam turbine which provides flexible support for the nozzle 
box. The flexing portions of the construction subject to high 
stress are in a weld-firee location, while the main weld con- 
necting the nozzle box to the turbine shell is located to 
prevent leakage into the power station should a defect occur. 



3,659,957 

APPARATUS FOR ATOMIZING LIQUID MATERIALS 

Vmib Ymh, 2809 LMd PHk Drive, SKrvMBlB, CdM. 

F1M Oct 27, 1969, Scr. Now 869,665 

IM. CL BOlf 7124 

UACL416— 179 4 




An apparatus for atomizing liquid materials comprises a 
solid cylindrical body having a rotation means attached to 
one end and a chamber formed in the other end thereof. 
Passageways extending through the cylindrical body to the 
chamber are so arranged that their vertical axes are parallel 
to and adjacent the sides of the body. An opening is provided 
into the chamber which has oompiernentary ribs formed in its 
top and bottom. The apparatus can be employed in a variety 
of mixing and liquid contacting operations, but it is particu- 
larly useftil for effecting contact between mercury and agents 
used in its purification. 



3^59,958 
BUILT UP ROTOR ASSEMBLIES FOR VACUUM PUMPS 
Ckarki A. Sckalle, diciMiil, late of 1 1 ilaglim, Mate, (by 
Grace Sckdte, cncatrti) 

Fled Oct 27, 1969, Scr. No. 869,968 
Ite. CL FOld 5106 
U.S.CL 416-199 6 




A composite impeller awem bly for use in a high vacuum 
pump operating in the firee-molecule flow pressure range. 
The impeller assembly comprises left and right hand impeller 
units each made from a plurality of rotor assemblies held in 
closely abutting relationship by the cooperating relation 
between at least one fisstener and a central core shitft extend- 
ing through each of the rotors. Each rotor includes a row of 
blades and a hub portion with frcmt and rear annular contact 
surfaces thereon, and a center portion extending inwardly 
and terminating adjacent a centrid opening for receiving the 
shaft The effect of the buih-up constructimi is that the con- 
tact surfaces (vovide a large effective impeOer hub diameter 
for maximum stiffoess against deflection, and the relativdy 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



m 



•maU diameter center openings induce stresses which would mittod by a selection of a volatile mixture of fluid com- 
be present with an openmg of an order equal to the diameter ponents in such proportions as to create desired presnire dif- 



of the hubs just insi(te the contact surfacte. 



ferentials and rates at transmission. 



I 



3,659,959 
AOt FAN MPELLER BLADE ASSEMBLY 
lolrtiote. Rockteter, N.Y^ atelfMr to Fate 
iM^Rockteter.N.Y. 

FScd Jaly 15, 1970, Sv. No. 55,168 
Ite.CLF04d29/J4 
U.S. CL 416-212 



5Cltens 



3,659,9 61 
GAS LIFT SYSTEM 

Pari Lamb; WWhb A. Dadky, boCh of Dalai, To.; 

Gcorte S. Kiivley, Vcatara, CaHL, md Edwvd E. 
DcMoas, Gariatel, Tol, asrignnw ta Tdcdync, lac, Los A» 



11 



Fled Ai«. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 61,943 
laL CL F04f 1118 
U&CL417— 114 




This impeller is constructed from two, identical, preformed 
metal blanks, which have raised center or hub sections which 
are secured to one another by riveting or the like. Opposite 
ends of each blade are laterally offKt from one another 
slightly. Oppositely extending tabs are strudc up frx}m op- 
posite sides of each blade at opposite sides of the hub section 
to provide slots by which the blades are interconnected to ex- 
tend at right angles to one another. The tabs of one Made are 
secured to the hub section of the other blade to lend rigidity 
to the hub sections. A separate bearing may be secured in re- 
gistering central openinp in the hubs ot the two blades to ac- 
commodate the armature shaft of a drive motor. 



3,659,960 
TRANSMISSION OF FLUIDS THROUGH A PIPELD4E 
DoaaM D. Daalop, Fairfax, Va^ aaslganr to Creative Eater- 
pritec lateraaHwal, Nonaaa, OUa. 

Fled Nov. 13, 1969, Scr. No. 876,353 
lat. CL F04b 19124; F04f 1118 
VS. CL 417-53 3 




1 1 


■F^' 




y-' 


a. 


'4\' 


if ' 


' fi 




Ej 


%-r^- 


i^- 


i'-:=1 


^1 


" -^ 


7 





An apparatus and system for alternately venting and lifting 
fluid from an accumulteor in which the alternate connection 
of the accumulator with a vent and a gte source is controlled 
by the differential in pressure between two tubes, one of 
which contains well fluids and the other of which contains 
well fluids and into which a smaU quantity of gas is bled. 



3,659,962 
ASPIRATOR 
John Snlth Zlak; Hersbd Goodnight, and Robert D. Reed, a8 
of Tnka, OUa., teriganw to John Ziak Conpaay, Tnlsa, 
OUa. 

FBcd Jme 2, 1970, Scr. No. 42,775 
iBt a. F04f 5146; B05b 7106; ¥2M 13/40 
VS. CL 417—179 3 



A volatile fluid is transmitted through a pipeline containing 
a series of check valves by differential heating along con- 
tiguous sections of the pipeline to create a decreasing tem- 
perature gradient and a consequent decreasing pressure 
gradient in the direction of desired transmission to thereby 
cause fluid flow in a desired direction, the check valves 
preventing tiie reversal of fluid transmission upon reversal or 
discontinuance oi the temperature gradient In long 
p^idines. the differential heating is supplied by the sun mov- 
ing along the pipeline. Multicomponent fluids can be trans- 




■ ^ 



An aspirator assembly for drawing air into the presence of 
gas and mixii^ the gte witii the air wdierein the gas under 
l»essure is released throu^ a phirality of orifica <x nozzla 
with the flow of tlie gM from the multitude of orifices serving 
to provide energy for the inspiration of air into the g» 
streams and for mixture of the air with tiie gte in the aspira- 
tor assembly. 



180 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,659363 
PRESSURE OVERRIDE FOR SERVO CONTROLLED 

PUMPS 
LystoB C. JcBBtiifs, Watertown, N.Y., ndgnor to G«ncrml 
Signal CorporatkH) 

Filed Mwr. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 20^92 

Int. CL F04b 49100 

MS, CL 417-213 7 dafam 



3,659,965 
FUEL PUMP MOUNTING ARRANGEMENT 
Jurgcn Ebcrt, Gcriinfem Mid Hcmuuin Noho-, Aaptrg, botk 
of Gcnnany, MdgBon to Robert BoKh GmbH, Stirttfarl, 
Germany 

FUed Aug. 17, 1970, Scr. Na 64,370 
Clafam priority, appilcadon Germany, S«|it. 19, 1969, P 19 

47 505.9 
Int. CL F04b 1 7100, 35100, 35/04; B67d 5/42 
VS. CL 417-363 9 




A pressure override for servo controlled pumping ap- 
paratus which reduces pump delivery rate as needed to limit 
discharge pressure by overpowering the servomechanism, in 
contrast to disabling this device by interrupting its input 
signal circuits or its supply of motive power. 




[^ 



3,659,964 
SELF^OUPUNG PUMP UNIT 
Jcas Kari Adotf DaUgrcn, Stockholm, Sweden, 
Steabcrg-Flygt AB, Sofaia, Sweden 

Filed Ang. 27, 1970, Ser. No. 67329 
Claims priority, appttcation Sweden, Ang. 29, 
12019/69 
Int. CL F04b / 7/00. 35/00; B67d 5/40 
VS. CL 417-360 




An electrically operable fuel pump it accommodated in the 
interior of a tue\ tank so as to be at least partly immersed in 
to fuel fluid contained in the tank. The bottom wall of the tank 
is provided with an opening through which the outlet of the 
pump communicates with the exterior of the tank and a 
1969, spring arrangement it located in this opening and mounts the 

pump on the bottom wall over the opening with freedom of 
displacement relative to the tank so as to preclude or at least 
7 Claimt reduce the transmission of vibratory motions between the 
tank and the pump. A diaphragm seals the opening with 
reference to the exterior of the tank and at the same time 
acts to limit the displacement of the spring arrangement and 
thereby of the pump in direction normal to the general plane 
of the opening. 



3,659,966 

PUMPING APPARATUS FOR FLOWABLE CONCRETE 

OR THE LIKE 

Peter Fabcr, 14 Bothard G«mc, Andtland, New Zealand 

FUcd Apr. 24, 1970, Ser. No. 31,663 

Int. a. P04b 43/06, 45/00, 15/02 

VS. CL 417-395 6 Claimt 



An immersible pump unit comprising a liquidti^t motor 
and a pump with a lateral connection and guiding means 
which, on lowering of the pump unit, guides the pump con- 
nection to the vicinity of a coupling unit, the pump unit being 
suspended so that the central axis of the pump runs slightly 
obliquely downwards, there being close to the coupling unit a 
support for the pump unit in its lowered position. There is in 
the extension of the coupling unit beymid the support, at 
least one stop with an inclined plane facing the coupling unit, 
the point of contact between the pump unit and the inclined 
plane of the stop lying a distance beiorw an imaginary line of 
operation for the force of reaction generated at the connec- 
tion and coupling unit by the pump pressure. 




A pumping apparatus for flowaUe concrete or the like, the 
apparatus including at least one driving chamber separated 
from at least one driven chamber by at least one flexible 
diaphragm which it movable between predetermined poti- 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



181 



tions by the flow of pressurized liquid into and out of the or 
each driving chamber, a pumping unit having its inlet 
adapted for connection to a liquid supply source and its out- 
let connected to the inlet of the or eiK^ driving chamber and 
outlet of the driven chamber for connection to a controlled 
discharge, the construction and arrangement being such that 
on flowable concrete being allowed to flow into the or each 
driven chamber onto its diaphragm, differential pressure is 
applied to the or each diaphragm to cause the concrete to be 
pumped through the outlet of the or each driven chamber. 



3^9,967 

HYDRAULIC INTENSDIER 

Ralph F. McArthnr, HnndBfloB Park; Max T. Kardoct, Glen- 

dora, and McBe F. Gcnrti, Loa Angelti, al of Calif., as- 

lignon to Kobe, Inc., Hnntingtan Park, Caltf. 

Filed May 27, 1970, Scr. No. 40^60 

int. CL F04b 77/00. 35/00, 21/02, 39/10; POlb 11/02 

VS. CL 417—397 13 CIninH 



■M -^.S.f 




of osciUation syntonized with the natural period of oscillation 
of the resonant eiectrodynamical device. In the preferred em- 
bodiment, the resonant electrodyiuunical device is a swing 
motor connected with a cotni^essor load, and power for driv- 
ing the swing motor is supplied by the syntonic oscillator. A 
feedback from the swing motor nuuntains the oscillator in 
syntonization vtrith the natural period of oscillation of the 
swing motor. 



3,659,969 
CONTROL DEVICE FOR METERING PUMPS 
Lev NIkolaerich Brilrin, attn Dybcnko, 12, kv. 51; Vltiiy 
Andreevkfa Sergeev, oHtM ScmcDovriuqm, 3/1, koipas 1, 
kv. 24; KomlB i iftn Semmorich Spnmky, VarriMTrirac 
shoaae, 176 "a", korpot 8, kv. 69; Igor ^Bkolncrich Sralrw 
nov, Tdcgminy pcradok, 15, kv. 20; Gcaandy Mfli- 
haflovkh Scheglov, nliln Ghmiaya, 7 kv. 4; Akxandr Alex- 
androvlch Sitrimnkh, Aatakhovricy pcreidok, 1/2, kv. 123; 
Boris Motaeevkfa Pmdovsky, ultea Dybcnko, 4, kv. 10; 
Vladfanir Karpovfch Karakhanian, nUtsa Stromynka, 23, 
kv. 132; Viktor Vasiilevkh Ivanov, idhH Krasnopnidnaya, 
26, kv. 26, and NOkfaal Ivanovkh ScmcBov, Pnkrovsky bul- 
var, 8, kv. 13, aB of Moscow, U.S.SJL 

FUed Oct 27, 1969, Scr. No. 869,475 

InL CL F04b 23/00, 41/00 

U.S. CL 417-440 18 Claims 



A hydraulic intensifier operable by a fluid, such as oil, at 
relatively low pressures to deliver a fluid, such as water, at 
very high pressures for any desired purpose. The intensifier 
includes a fluid operated, double acting, reciprocating engine 
and two single acting, reciprocating pumps respectively 
located at opposite ends of and in alignment with the engine 
and connected to the engine for actuation thereby, the dis- 
placement of the pumps being small as compared to that of 
the engine so as to produce a discharge pressure many times 
the operating fluid pressure. 

The intensifier is capable of producing discharge pressures 
of the order of 30.000 to 70,000 psi, or higher, with operat- 
ing fluid pressures of the order of 2.000 to 5,000 psi. Further, 
the intensifier is capable of transmitting power of the order 
of SO horsepower, or more, in a relatively lightweight unit 
which is portable and relatively maneuverable. 



3,659,968 
INVERTER SYSTEM WITH RESONANT ELECTRO- 
DYNAMICAL DEVICE 
John A. Thomas, Jr., and Gerhard D. Spa ngcn bc rg , both of 
Boenton, N J., assiipKirs to J. P. Indusdics, Inc., Stanhope, 
NJ. 

Filed Mar. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 19,223 

Int. CL F04b 35/04, 17/04; H02b 3/00 

VS. CL 417—417 13 Claims 



-4!i. w *L 



iNVERTtB 



14J l-(5 



iS. 



Ta7 ^^ 4 



-L 



UOTDB 



Ar^" 



30 



S5 

,7^ 



This invention combines a resonant eiectrodynamical 
device with an electromagnetic oscillator that has its period 



I 



W^'/M 







^I^^^^S^ 



:^SSSS2S2i 



% 



A control device for metering pumps is provided with a 
setter connected via at least one intermediate element with 
the pump delivery control mechanism, which latter ensures a 
directly proporticmal relation between the pump delivery and 
the movement of said intermediate element The connection 
of the intermediate element with the setter is effected by 
means of a pivoted element installed at an angle to the inter- 
mediate element, the pivoted element interacting with the 
setter and provided with provision for adjusting the distance 
between the axis of its hhige and the point of its kinematic 
connection with the intermediate element. The angle of turn- 
ing of the pivoted element is set by an additional setter. 



3,659,970 

CONCRETE PUMP 

PMMp W. McElroy, 2300 Dohircs Cowt, PfaMle, CaHL 

ContlMHitkNi-faHpart of aimBfariw i Scr. No. 750^32, Ang. 5, 

1968, now abandoned. TMsapplkattaa Ang. 14, 1969, Scr. 

No. 859433 

InL CL F04b 7/00 

VS. CL 417—516 2 Clatait 

A pump for conveying fluid aggregate-containing concrete 
from a hopper to the location desired including an improved 



182 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



valve that allows for sequentially advancing concrete from a 




fixed to one another in a poiitive nuuuier, such as by internal 
screw threads. The hollow hemispherical bodies, which may 
be of brcHize or other relatively soft material, are suspended 
such as by nylon string, within a hoUow plaatic shell. An ex- 
plosive material is positioned about the exterior surfiice of 
the shell in an even and uniform manner with a plurality of 
detonators operatively connected to the explosive at ap- 



pair of chambers by extension and withdrawal of respective 
pistons. 



3,659^1 

FLUID transdix:er 

Hcvy Schottkr, North Rhtrsidc DL, 
Ltd., Zof , Swkacriaad 

Fifed Apr. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 31314 
Int. CL F04b 23/06 
U.S. CL 417— 538 5 



toRoarrGMT 




A cam drive mechanism for reciprocating a plurality of 
pistons in a fluid transducer comprising (^posed annular 
lobed cam surfaces and flat reaction tracks for each piston; a 
plurality of rolling members positioned between each of said 
opposed cam surfaces and tracks; and a common retainer 
spacing said rolling means uniformly around said cam sur- 
faces; with said retainer and tracks adapted so that said 
rolling means roll between each of said opposed surfaces and 
tracks with substantially the same angular movement and 
speed. 




propriately spaced positions. An ignition harness is con- 
nected to the detonators so that they may all be actuated in a 
simultaneous manner. The material which is to be trans- 
formed, such as graphite or other carbonaceous matter, is 
disposed in the cavity of the bodies and upon detonation of 
the explosive there is created extreme inwardly directed pres- 
sures and temperatures which transform the carbonaceous 
material into stable diamond. 



3,659.973 
CENTER MECHANISMS FOR PRESSES TO SHAPE AND 

CURE TIRES 
SboMki Yadrida; AinaU Iwmm; TakaiM Okada, aad Tame 
Sada, ■■ of Kobe, Japm, ■■%anri l» Kobe Stad, Ltd., 
Kobe, Japan 

Fled Oct. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 78,019 
Oataa priarity, appMcatioa Japan, Oct. 6, 1969, 44/S0069 
lBLa.B29h5/02 
DS. CL 425-29 3 < 



3,659,972 
DUMOND IMPLOSION APPARATUS 
DomM R. Garrett, 1113 Watovcr. Colcge StatkM, Tex. 
CoBtiaaatioa of appHcatfoa Scr. No. 708^31, Feb. 26, 1968, 
Mw Patcat No. 3,499,732. Thk appHcatkM Feb. 17, 1970, 
Scr. No. 870,323 
Int. CL B29c 13/00 
U.S.CL 425-1 2 date 

A device for artificially producing diamonds Or other arti- 
cles of substantial hardness by utilization of heat apd pres- 
sure over an instantaneous time period. The device, which is 
designed to achieve the requkite heat and pressure by 
detonation in an implosive manner, consists of two mating 
hemispheric bodies having a centrally interior cavity d 
spherical configuration. The two bodies are adapted to be af- 




A center mechanism for a press for shaping and curiitg 
tires having a bladder nnember including, a vertical power 
cylinder of non-magnetic material, a piston in the power 
cylimter attached to the bladder to selectively erect and col- 
lapae it and constructed at least partially of magnetic materi- 
al, and a magnetic sensor positioned exteriorty of the power 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



I 



188 



cylinder and controlling movement of the piston responsive 
to a detected position of the piston. 



3,659,974 

TIRE CURING APPARATUS MONITORING AND 

CONTROL 

EnMt J. Ncvgroocbl, Akroa, Oblo, asrigBor to The Goodyear 

Tbrc A Rabbcr CoaipMjr, Akroa, Ohio 

FBad Aif. 6, 1968, Scr. No. 750,512 
fart. CLB29h 5/00, 77/00 
U.S.CL 425-29 2 




require an air-ti^ bead seal. In contra-distinction to prior 
art apfwoaches, the bead-sealing function is carried out by a 
pair of resilient annular ring» each having one edge which is 
clamped in place and another edge which is fireely defbrma- 
ble by suitable camming elements which are responsive to 
various nested fluid-ojperated jack mechanisms. This 
camming action distends the sealing rings radially outwardly 
against the beads (tf a tire or carcaM to perform the sealing 
fimcticMi during vulcanization or any other operation requir- 
ing an air-tight seal. 

3,659,976 
APPARATUS FOR MOLDING AND VULCANIZATION OF 

ANNULAR RUBBER ARTICLES 
Antaty VariiMlrh Yamrrigr, aBln TapM^mn, 14v, kv. 70, 
Kfev; Grigory Lvovkh Farbcr, aHtM Kntnova, 33a, kv.66. 
Tola, aad Grifory ABdreevkh Gavrifeako, uMtm 
■khcakava, 31t, kv.4, Kfev, al of U.S.SJL 

Fled Aof. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 66,032 
fart. CL B29h 5/00, 7/22; B29d 29100 
U.S. CL 425-42 1 



\ 



In the process of molding and curing pneumatic tires, this 
invention senses certain selected quantities (e.g., cure cycle 
tength) in the tire press and, in some applications, a post cure 
inflator, and feeds the sensed signals to a digital computer. 
The computer scans the input and compares it with pre- 
stored ideal values. If the sensed data differs from the stored 
values by too great a degree, the computer provides an ap- 
propriate output Further, the computer may control a tire 
marker to mark those tires which fail the comparison. In ad- 
dition, by feeding information to the computer from a plu- 
rality of presses, accurate inventory counu, production 
requirements, production and press break-down history, and 
so forth, may be maintained automatically. 



3,659,975 
BAGLESS TIRE PRESS 
Jcaa Lchfead, Ofec, FraKC, as^anr to Uniroyal Engfebcrt 
France SJi., NcaOy-cW'SdBe, FraMC 

Fifed Aag. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 64,414 
Int. CL B29h 5/02 
VS. CL 425-36 15 





An apparatus for molding and vulcanization of annular 
rubber articles comprising a drum ada p ted to receive and 
support thereabout the articles to be treated and a 
mechanism for external pressing of the articles received 
about the drum. The mechanism fcx^ external pressing of the 
articles inchides individual selectively beatable segments ar- 
ranged concentrically about the drum and associated with 
drive means for displacing these segments radially of the ap- 
paratus, this drive means including an annular frame 
pivotally coimected dirough pivc^ed arms with the segments 
of the mechanism for external pressing of the articles, the 
frame being associated with power means for effecting axial 
reciprocation ct the frame along guiding columns. 



3,659,977 

APPARATUS FOR ERECTING POURED CONCRETE 

STRUCTURES 

John F. Haws, c/o StoMror and Haws, 2207 Chssft Street, 

Fled Aag. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 62,007 
fart. CL B28b 7/08 
U.S. CL 425-62 18 < 




An inflation press for use with tubeless tires, having utility Apparatus is disclosed wherein movaUe pouring forms are 
in vulcanization equipment and all other mechanisms which mounted on a chassis, such as the chassis of a roadable vehi- 



184 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



de. Movement of the forms between respective selectable 
positions facilitates pouring of vertical and horizontal struc- 
tural members, respectively. The ];>ourtng forms may be 
elevated with respect to the chassis to position them for 
pouring the upper portions of high votical walls, or highly 
placed horizontal walls. The apparatus also includes means 
whereby the chassis itself may climb with respect to the 
lower portions of poured vertical members, to facilitate pour- 
ing of the upper portions of such members. In another of its 
aspects, the invention is a method of erecting poured 
concrete structures by first pouring vertically oriented mem- 
bers, such as walb, and permitting the waUs to set; pouring 
the uppermost horizontal member, such as the roof, and per- 
mitting such member to set; and then pouring successively 
lower interior horizontal members to complete the structure. 



which both are provided with means for loading or unloading 
from a carrier vehicle. The hardening station is formed by a 
steam treatment ttinnel consisting of two sections which are 



3,659.978 

FLEXIBLE SCAFFOLD FOR SUPPORTING SLIDING 

MOLDS OR CLIMBING MOLDS USED FOR THE 

ERECTION OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES 

Svcn-Eiik Vilbdm Svenana, Norrbyvacen 39, 141-43 

HiHMiagc, Swedca, tmd Emo Jonf Thoma, Koszta J.O.I., 

Budapest XII, Haagary 

FiM Sept 3, 1970, Ser. No. 69^79 
elates priority, appHcatioa Swcdco, ScpL 8, 1969, 12380/69 

lat. CL B28b 7/04 
VS. CI. 425-63 12 daims 



•^fJlJ^t!,'^ 



, ■»'^«>;« 




3,659,979 
PLANT FOR MANUFACTURING SMALL STRUCTURAL 

ELEMENTS 
Wottgang Schneider, and KlaiM Sdmcidcr, both of Mmbmr- 
dfveg 8, 2150 Buxtchnde, Gcnnany 

FOed July 7, 1969, Scr. No. 839,722 
Claims priority, appttcadon Germany, July 13, 1968, P 17 71 

807.9 
Int. CL B28b 15/00 
VS. CL 425-62 3 Claims 

A plant for manufacturing small structural concrete ele- 
ments comprises a production station and a hardening station 




_ ODD 
*'' OODD 
OQOD 
0000 

ODD 



rr jTriti- A - 



connected by hinge meara in that way that for transport of 
the hardening station, one section is swung in pocition paral- 
lel to, and alongside of the other section. Duiing operation, 
both sections together form a straight elongated tunnel. 



i 3,659,980 
APPARATUS FOR ^iELT SPINNING OF SYNTHETIC 
FILAMENTS 
Mlgud A. Femandei, GreemrlUe, S.C., aarignor to PhOlipi 
Fibers Corporation 

FIM May 11, 1970, Scr. No. 36,031 
Int. CL DOld 3/00, 5/OS 
UACL425— 72 , 11 



A sliding or climbing mold for the erection of concrete 
structures the horizontal cross-section of which varies verti- 
cally comprises a scaffold system composed by a plurality of 
flexible scaffold units. Each such unit consists of two 
pivotably interconnected and intersecting rods or the like 
separated by yokes sup(K)rting the mold. First and second 
hydraulic jacks acting in the vertical and horizontal 
directions, respectively, accomplish the vertical movement of 
the scaffold system and contribute to the change of the 
horizontal size thereof. A spoke assembly connected to the 
scaffold system and comprising substantially radially and 
horizontally located spoke wires is used for variation of the 
horizontal shape of the scaffold system. A nimiber of 
replaceable templets are designed for variation of the 
horizontal shape of the scaffold system and oi the effective 
length of the spoke wire so as to synchronize the movements 
in vertical and horizontal direction. 




Apparatus ccnnprising an improved quench chamber 
wherein the side panels of said chamber are constructed so as 
to eliminate undesirable air currents. The side panels are 
adapted to be moved vertically, either individually or collec- 
tively, into and out of engagement with a spinning block. 



to Tenncoo 



3,659,981 
WEB TRANSFER SYSTEM 
Charka Fcrstcnbcrg, Paramna, NJ^ 
Chemkab, Inc. 

Original appHcatlon Jan. 5, 1968, Scr. No. 696,070, now 
abandoned. Divided and this appBcatton June 1, 1970, Ser. 

No. 54,048 

IntCLB29d 27/04 

VS. CL 425-89 13 daina 

Contouring of flexible webs to the interior of an elongated 

moving molding channel by the provision of specially located 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



185 



and specially shaped guiding devices, by the provision of spe- trafiltration, etc. is disclosed. The spinnerette combines a 

unique molten polymer passageway and gas passageway to 




cial internal mold supports and by the selective overlapping 
of separate web sheets. 



3,659,982 

EXTENSIBLE LOCKING SYSTEMS FOR FORMWORK 

FOR THE CASTING OF CONCRETE CONSTRUCTIONS 

Sven-Erik ViilMlni Svcmmo, Norrbyvagen 39, 141 43 

Hnddinfe, Sweden, and Emo Jonf Tboaaa, Koszta J.n.1, 

Badapest XII, Hnngary 

FUed Jane 3, 1968, Ser. No. 734,079 
Clates priority, application Sweden, June 2, 1967, 7785/67 

Int.CLE04gi//22 
U.S. CL 425-63 4 Clitet 




supply an inert gas to the center of the hoUow fiber as it it 
extruded firom the orifice. 



3,659,984 

RECIPROCAL FLUID NOZZLE FOR COOLING PARISON 

Antboay J. KrrtoHc, Kanns City, Kans., aaignor to PkUps 

P ft T ftt w im Company . 

Fled Dec. 5, 1969, Scr. No. 882,606 

InL a. B29d 23/03 

VS. CL 425-72 4 Claims 




The present invention relates to apparatus for casting 
concrete structures having a varying cross-section and in- 
cludes a plurality of intercont\ected units. Each of the units 
includes at least two rods of equal length which are pivotaUy 
interconnected to one another at their mid points, the ends 
of adjacent units being pivotally connected at an angle to one 
another such that upon pivoting of the two rods of each of 
the units, the ends are all moved in parallel relatioaship to 
one another. A rigid yoke carries the framework and includes 
a pair of legs, each of the units being pivotally. coimected to a 
stationary point on one yoke leg and pivotally coimected to a 
member movable along a yoke leg. 



3,659,9«3 
SPINNERETTE FOR THE PRODUCTION OF HOLLOW 

FIBERS 
Eari A. McLain, md Henry L Maiioa, both of WalMrt Creek, 
Oritf., amlpinra to The Dow Chcarical Company, MIdteid, 
IVOch. 

FBed Feb. 19, 1969, Scr. No. 800,504 

Int. CL DOld 3/00 

VS. CL 425—72 5 Oafani 

A spinnerette for producing hollow fibers and particulariy 

for imxhicing fine bore, uniform permeable hollow fibers 

useful as the separaticni membrane in reverie osmosis, ul- 




In a blow molding machine, a nozzle for directing a stream 
of fluid such as air is attached to each mold half. On closing 
the molds, the nozzles move into position adjacent the 
parison and air is impinged on the porticm of the pariscxi 
betwoNi the top at the mold and the die. Thereafter, the air 
is discontinued and the air nozzles retracted with the moid 
halves to allow a stripper mechanism to tear the finished arti- 
cle tree fixmi the die. 



3,659,985 
PRESSES 
Akc Franli MarriMi, SoMinB, and Hngh Gordon Tajlor, 
both «C EMfamd, aalBMn to The 



FBed Dec 9, 1969, Ser. No. 883,404 

CWbm priority, appBcadon Great Brtlah^ Dec 13, 1968, 

059302/68; Mar. 15, 1969, 13,723/69 

Int. CLBSOb 77/02 

U.S. CL 425-78 5 ClahM 

A machine for compacting metal powder comprises a 

static frame, a die having a bore, a lower punch defining a 

receiving die cavity in the bore, an upper punch, an u|;^)er 

punch downwardly movable to enter the die cavity, and a 

reaction frame to which the lower punch is fixed slidably 

mounted on the static fiimie, the reaction frame and the 

lower punch being moved upwardly by a reaction force 

generated when the upper punch is moved downwardly. The 

die is moved upwardly aftier the die cavity has been filled 



180 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



with powder a distance at least equal to the upward move- 
ment of the lower punch completed before the upper punch 




with means including a cure die in the form of an elongated 
tube having an entrance end and an exit end and a cron-«ec- 
tion similar in shape to the desired shape and greater in area 
than the croas-sectiona] area of the desired strip, said cure 
die including heating means, an extrusion die spaced from 
the entrance end of said tube and having a croas-sectioiud 




enters the die cavity, and the die is moved downwardly after 
the upper punch has entered the die cavity. 



> 3,659,986 

APPAIUTUS FOR MAKING CONCRETE PRODUCTS 
Nathaa L. Gdbum 17201 NJL Fowth Avomc, North 
Miami Prarli, Fla 

Filed Mar. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 19,638 
tet. CL B28b 15100 
VS. CL 425—88 12 




An apparatus for mass producing large concrete products, 
in aaaembly line manner, on a floor mounted conveyor 
system, with which various operations are performed at dif- 
fierent stations along the conveyor. A sectional mold, for 
casting purpooea, is prepared at a first station and then 
moved forward. At a second station on the conveyor, the 
mold is vibrated and flDed with concrete, and then moved 
forward. At a third station, the concrete is completely sealed 
within the mold, and the mold is elevated, removed from the 
conveyor, rotated 180". returned to te conveyor, and 
stripped from the casting. The casting is then moved akng on 
the conveyor for storage. 



3,659,987 
APPARATUS FOR FORMING AND CURING 

CCWTINUOUS ELASTOMERIC STRIP 
G. Mbdl, Mode, bd., aisd Daryi D. Ccnqr, 

I to Bdi Corparaliom MMcte, lad. 
I Nov. 23, 1966, Scr. No. 596,582, 
: No. 3,517,097. DMded oMl tUs appMcadoa Dec 24, 
1969, Scr. No. 889^28 
IaLCLB29CJ/M 
UACL425— 97 4CWtaM 

Continuously molding heat curabk thermoplastic material 
into a strip of definite desired cross s ec tion shape and area 



Pim» *N0 ffCOULAn)*! 






area less than the croa»4ectional area of said cure die but 
greater than or equal to the desired cross-oectional area of 
the strip, a lubricating die inchiding means for dispensing 
lubricant upon said strip, said hibricating die connecting said 
forming die with said entrance end of said cure die and hav- 
ing a passageway defined therein with a cross-sectional area 
greater than the cross-sectional area of said cure die. 



3,659,988 
MCOMPONENT DISTRIBUTION PLATE OF A 
SPINNERET ASSEMBLY 
K. Wakak, BvHesvUc, Okla., asslg iinr to 



Fled Feb. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 123S9 
lit CLDOld J/00 
U.S. CL 425—131 




A spinneret distribution plate having a phirality ot grooves 
and associated openings for concentrically distributing 
separate rings of two different fluids. 



3,659309 
APPARATUS FOR IMPROVING SPINNABIUTY AND 
PROPERTY OF COMPOSITE FILAMENT 
Tom Uraya, Kobe City, and Shaoidtc 
of JapM^ a^i f i rt to KangaA 
Kalsha, Tokyo, Japaa 

cl applrartsa Scr. No. 568,016, Jaiy 26, 1966, 
No. 3,536,802, dated OcL 27, 1970. TUB 
JBM 19, 1970, Scr. No. 47^62 
Claims priority. appUcatioa Japan, Aug. 2, 1965, 40/47078; 
July 15, 1966,41/46271 
IbL CL DOld 3/00 
VS. CL 425- 131 7 OaiaM 

Method and apparatus for spinning a composite filament 
wherein two polymers having different meh viscosities are 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



187 



mehed separately and the temperature of each maintained so 
that the melt viscosity ratio of the molten polymers is 0.4 to 
2.5 until extrusion. The apparatus includes means for con- 



portion of the surface of at least one of the clamping mem- 
bers is coated with a heat ab8ori}ing material such that its 




trolling the temperatures of the two spinning melts separately 
and retarding transmission of heat between the melts until 
they are extruded together. 



3,659,990 

APPARATUS FOR CASTING A FILM 

Rased L. Cato, Jr., Raldgh, N.C; Percy D. LcoMrd, Jr., U. 

S. Ak Forco, and Robert D. Sadtb, Raidgh, N.C, acsigBon 

to Coralag GlaM Works, ConUHg, N.Y. 

Origtoal appHmliaa Mar. 28, 1967, Scr. No. 626,560, now 

abaadoasd, Divided a^ tbis appHcatloB Nov. 7, 1969, Scr. 

No. 874,951 

lat CL B29d 7/02 

U.S.CL 425-141 3ClaiiBS 




ga-> 




temperature rises to a hi^ier level than would otherwise be 
the case. 



3,659, 992 

EXTRUMNG FITTINGS 

Bernard A. Crist, Grqr, Ga., acriganr to AMSTED 
trift i B rnmnrB t nl- Ci ilrMO . 111 

FUed Oct 7, 1968, Scr. No. 765,378 
lBt.CLB28b27/J2 
VS. CL 425-192 5 







The apparatus for containing the pool of coating material 
is mounted on a pivoted badung plate which is arranged for 
a pivotal movement between two side plates. A slot is pro- 
vided at die bottom of the pool to allow a strip of material to 
enter the bottom of the pool and travel upwardly along the 
backing plato and over considerable guide means adjacent 
the pivot point for die backing plato. Adjustable stops are 
provided tcx holding the baddng plato at various an^es rela- 
tive to the vertica] so that as the strip of material paina 
through the pocri along the backing plate die amount <rf coat- 
ing material picked up by the strip of material will vary de- 
pending upon the an^e <^the backing plate. 



3,659,991 
CLAMPING FRAME FOR PLASTIC VACUUM FORMING 

MACHINE 

Harvey J. DbuBMid, CSMriottc, N.C., atoigBcr to PiaslrVac, 

laCn Cbwtotte, N.C. 

FBed Apr. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 25^49 

Iirt.CLB29c/7/04 

U.S. CL 425—174 5 CWbh 

A clamping frame for a plastic vacuum forming machine 
which includes upper and lower clamping members con- 
nected by hinges for s up por tin g a {dastic sheet during the 
heating and forming operations and which are constructed to 
facilitate the clamping ct the plastic sheet Also, a substantial 



A die, engageable with a clay extruding machine, has a 
given interior configuration corresponding to the out-side 
configuration of a pipe fitting. A pair of spaced mandrels are 
inserted through (^>enings in the die and define a branch 
opening and a main opening therein. A centrifugal cutting 
blade is rototably mounted proximate to the main mandrel 
and is usable to sever the day in the die fixxn the extruding 
machine. A circular cutter is aiso mounted fvoximate the die 
to cut away extruded clay left in the space between the 
branch opening and the main opening. 



3,659,993 
APPARATUS FOR FORMING CONTAINERS 
Fred P. Brown, Jr., CcaiervBc, MacBi, acsli^cr to 
ladasbrlsa, Ibc^ Hyaaais, Maas. 

Fled Oct 24, 1969, Scr. No. 869^49 
lat. CL B29c i 7/02 
U.S. CL 425-214 ' 5 

Apparatus for forming containers firom webs of plastic 
material is disclosed as induding a forming machine and a 
web tensioning and fieoding apparatus. The web tensioning 
and feeding apparatus feeds the plastic matnial to the form- 
ing machine in accordance with the consumption of plastic 
material by the forming machine and maintains a relatively 
constant tension in the plastic fed to the forming machine. 
The forming machine forms containers firom the i^astic 
material and includes printing apparatus for inintmg on the 
formed containers. The printing apparatus includes a platen 



^ 



188 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



with a roUer adapted to be rolled on the platen to ink the 
platen so it can subsequently print on the container. Means 
are provided for disengaging the forming, blanking and print- 



of the blown parison before it is removed from the blow 
mould cavity. The coining step is achieved by cooperating 




ing devices firom the main power drive and bringing these 
devices to a complete and instantaneous halt even while the 
motor is running. 



3,659,994 
APPARATUS FOR INJECTION MOLDING 
J«Mf Ehrlkh, Padfk Pdindei, Calif., aarigMir to WtaiiMvwk 
CkiM, Imc^ Sairta Moaka, CaML 

Flkd July 1, 1969, Scr. No. 838,229 

lat CL B29b U26, 7/16 

U.S. CL 425-242 4 Claims 




«»f' 



Injection molding apparatus for molding articles, particu- 
larly ceramic articles. The injection molding takes place at 
hi^ pressure. Particular clamping means are provided to 
clamp the cover or top on the mold while injecting at hi^ 
pressure. Particular means are provided for handling the 
molds and for removing the top or cover of the carrier and 
for removing the finished piece. The mechanism facilitates 
handling of the molds and makes possible rapid and repeated 
use of the molds and thereby greatly augments their utility 



3,659,995 
COINING STRUCTURES FOR INJECTION-BLOW 
MOULDING APPARATUS 
A. La Gnitta, Wcit Ciridwdi, N J., iHigiior to Coii> 
taincr Corpontkia of America, CMcago, DL 

FBcd Dec 17, 1969, Scr. No. 885,721 

IbL CL B29d 23/03 

VJS, CL 425— HI 1 Claim 

An injection-blow moulding apparatus characterized by 

structure at the blow moulding station for coining a surface 




cam members, one being fixed to the moving stack of the ap- 
paratus, and the other cam member being movable relative 
to such stack. 



3,659,996 
DEVICE FOR THE INJECTION MOLDING OF 
EXPANDABLE PLASTIC MASSES 
EnMt Sckwarx, P ottec hoch , and Pgttr Schtw, KottlMli, botk 
of Avtrio, amlgnnn to SEMPERTT O ateiidchtoc b- 
AmerfluidKlic Gtimmhrcritc Aktknfcadbdiaft, Wles, 
Austria 

FBcd Feb. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 12,669 

Clalmf priority, appBcatloa Austria, Feb. 20, 1969, A 

1739/69 

Int CL B29f 1/03 

MS. CL 425—245 6 < 




\ 

A device for the injection molding of expandable plastic 
masses, such as foamable synthetic substances through an in- 
jection conduit having a v^ve seat into an injection mold. A 
valve body is exchangeably inserted into the injection con- 
duit after which the mold is filled therethrough, the plastic 
mass then flows past the valve body where, upon the termina- 
tion of the molding process, the vidve body is pressed into a 
closed position against the valve seat by the internal pressure 
of the mold thereby effectively sealing said conduit against 
outflow of any of said injection material. 



3,659,997 
INJECTION-MOLDING MACHINE WITH TRANSVERSE 

FEED 
Herbert Rcct, Toronto WBowdak, Ontario, Canada, assignor 
to HUSKY Manufacturing & Tool Woriu Limited, Toronto, 
Ontario, Canada 

FBcd Mar. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 16,442 
Int. CL B29f 1/00 
U.S. CL 425— 247 4 Clatms 

An injection-molding machine with a set of stacked mold 
plates, defining several aj^ially spaced mold cavities 
therebetween, includes an injection unit with one or more 
nozzles movable perpendicularly to the stack for contact with 
respective inlets, leading to the several cavities, which are 



May 2, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



1- 



189 



aligned with these nozzles in the closed position of the multi- parts and compression molded interfitting hinge parts formed 
pie mold. The mold plates may be interconnected by a 





lazytong linkage or by lost-motion couplings for proper rela- .^^^ therewith providing hinge pin bearing sections of 
tive spacmg m the open mold position. double-wall thickness. A latch also is provided. 



3,659,998 
BLOW.MOLDING MACHINES 
Ronald G. Saffron, London, England, assignor 
Manufacturing Company, Slwboygan, Wis. 

FBcd May 25, 1970, Scr. No. 41,135 
Int CLB29C 77/07 
UJS. CL 425-326 

( 




3,660,000 
APPARATUS FOR THE CONTINUOUS MANUFACTURE 
to HaysMn oF CORRUGATED PLASTIC PIPES BY EXTRUDING 

Tsaaoni Yoriddn, Tokyo; Kokhi Udkawa; Masntorid Ando, 
both of Yokolmma City; Yosiiflriko Ucno, Kawagoc City, 
and Kunio Arisawa, Yokohama City, aH of Japan, assi g n ocs 
to Tlw FumlLawa Electric Company LimHed, Tokyo, Japnn 
Original appBcatfon Mar. 20, 1967, Scr. No. 624,584, now 
Pnicat No. 3,529,047. Divided and tUs appBcatlon Sept 9, 
1969, Scr. Na 871,107 
Int CL B29d 23/04 
MS. CL 425-327 5 daiuH 



4ClainH 




A machine for blow-molding hollow articles has an ex- 
truder and a blowing mandrel spaced along the direction of 
feed of blown moldings, and a track for Mown bottles also 
spaced in the same direction from the blowing mandrel. An 
assembly of openaUe die halves and gri ppe rs are reciproca- 
Me in unison along the feed path between a first station m 
which they are aligned respectively with the extruder and 
blowing mandrel, and a second station in which they arc 
aligned r e s pe cti vely with the Mowing mandrel and the track. 
During eadi cycle ci movement of the die halves and grip- 
pers, (i) a parison is moved from the extruder to the blowing 
mandrel, (ii) a blown molding is moved from the blowing 
mandrel to the track, and (iii) the previous blown molding is 
shifted along the track. A device is included to exhaust the 
blown molding more rapidly, and/or to retain it on the blow- 
ing mandrel temporarily by suction. 



3,659,999 
APPARATUS FOR MOLDING CONTAINER PARTS 

T. Scknrmnn, Woodbridje, Corns., nmigpor to The 
Plastic Formkag Company, Inc^ Woodbriiie, Conn. 
Filed Feb. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 9,529 
lBtCLB29d2J/0i 
U.S. CL 425—326 5 Claini 

A plastic container having blow-molded cover and body 



An apparatus for continuous manufacture of helically cor- 
rugated plastic pipe fit>m extruded tubing utilizing dif- 
ferential pressure. Thermoplastic material is extruded in a 
molten stato in the form of a tube and the tube is passed over 
a helicaUy corrugated surface of either an internal mandrd 
or an external mandrel. A vacuum is supplied between tihe 
surface of the cylindrical body and tlie inssde surface of the 
tube to conform the tube to the surface of the body. A pres- 
sure differential is maintained inside the formed pipe, a 
vacuum being used with the internal mandrel and a pressure 
with the external mandrel. The cylindrical body is rotated to 
advance the extruded tube fmned thereabout and a cooling 
fluid is circulated through die cylindrical body to cool the 
tube as it it formed against the body. 



3,660,001 
MOLDING APPARATUS WITH POSITIVE COLLAPSE 

CORE 

George L. Rockr, 225 Crescent Street, Uncok^ Mass. 

Fled Nov. 6, 1968, Scr. No. 773,817 

Int CL B29f 1/14 

MS. CL 425—396 7 OaiH 

Apparatus for molding plastic articles having an undercut, 

rib, thread, or the like deformation comprises a core divided 



190 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



longitudinally into sections having molding ends that are 
radiaUy shiftable to and from an expanded article-molding 
position and a contracted article-release position. A center 
pin holds the sections expanded. The core may be shifted axi- 
ally resulting in the center pin being withdrawn from support 



al fix>m which the pipe is to be formed and means for relating 
these two variable rates in a manner such that the pipes 





X 



of the molding ends of the sections. This causes a cam ring 
that encircles the sections to urge the sections radiaUy in- 
wardly by the engagement of cam-follower lugs on the sec- 
ticHtt to collapse positively the sections without interference 
from the pin. 



3.M0,002 
APPARATUS FOR MOLDING OPEN CONTAINERS 
Peter J. Morrmd, c/o OnnUeM PiMlk Co^ HorcBcc Stract, 
LcMdMter.MaM. 

FBed Sept 25, 1969, Ser. No. 861,083 
iBt CL B29f 1114: B29c 7100 
U.S. CL 425—405 




formed thereby are uniformly packed to the optimum density 
throughout their length. 



3,660,004 
PALLET CLAMP 

MlCB«, i 



Robert J. Wocft, AlpeM, Mkk, ssslg^nr to 

FBed Apr. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 33^48 
lat. CL B28b 7/00 
\3& CL 25^41 R 



Conpoay, 



13 



e 16 




In the ejection of mokled open-top containers from a 
plastic injectioa molding die, that improvement which com- 
prises holding the just molded container in the cavity as the 
mold opens and blowing air onto the exterior c| the bottom 
dl the mokled container in a direction to forc^the container 
out <tf the cavity. 



3,660,003 

APPARATIS FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF HOLLOW 

FRANGIBLE PIPES 

Phflip Waddingtoii, 839 Provoat Drive, Ottawa 10, Ontario, 



Filed Apr. 28, 1970, Ser. No. 32,693 
I priority, iwlcatiQB CaMMia, May 8,,1969, 050^91 . 
lot. CL B28b 21132 
MS. CL 425—427 6 CWm 

The invention is concerned with the manu£Bcture of houow 
frangible pipes and contemplates the provision of an auto- 
matic pipe-making apparatus of the packer head or roller 
head type, includtQ^joMns for adjusting the rate of lift of the 
packer shaft means forvaiying the rate of feed of the materi- 



Concrete block molding machinery having apparatus for 
moving a block receiving pallet against a mold a s sem bly 
wfiich is used in forming building Mocks. The apparatus in- 
cludes rotatable damp arms and clamp receiving BBcmb ei a 
having cooperating wedging surfaces, the clamp anns being 
movable into and out oi engagement with the clamp receiv- 
ing members to move the pallet supporting members toward 
and away from the mold assembly to clamp and undamp the 
pallet to and fit>m the mold. 




3,660,005 
FAIL-SAFE ELECTRIC IGNITION SYSTEMS 
R. WBbom Gardes Growc, CalL, 

Jnc 12, 1970, Ser. No. 45,645 
Iirt. CL F23b 5100 
\}S. CL 431-66 37 < 

Electric ignition systems utilizing a holding coil in parallel 
with an electric igniter having a temperature responsive re- 
sistance, a heat expansible wire in series with the igniter, first 
and second switches controlled by the coil and the wire, 
respectively, to control the operation of a fUel valve, a 
dropping resistor to maintain the igniter at least partially 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



191 



energized at all times, and a flame proving network for par- 
tially deenergizing the igniter after ignition whereby the 



t:i;7*=QZ>»— 




system assumes a fail-safe state in response to burner flame 
outage or any electrical or mechanical failure. 



3,660,006 

POLLUTION PREVENTIVE BURNER SYSTEM 

David Crosta, 16 Woodfand Aveaae, Ponptoo PWm, NJ. 

Filed Dec. 14, 1970, Ser. No. 97,629 

faiLCLF23d 77/04 

U.S.CL 431-168 12 Claims 




Disclosed herein is a burner system for use with boilers and 
fiimaces, including a rotary cup burner having a combustion 
chamber and means for igniting a fUel oil and air mixture 
discharged into the chamber by a rotary cup nozzle. The Aid 
oil is supplied to the burner under pressure, and its flow rate 
is controlled by an automatically operated valve. Actuation 
of the valve is effected by a modulating motor, which, in 
turn, is controlled by a thermostat coupled to the fbmace or 



boiler. The valve comprises a housing having inlet and outiet 
ports, and includes a vahre chamber therewitfain having trian- 
gularly shaped openings communicating with the inlet and 
outlet ports. A valve member is rotatabiy disposed within the 
chamber and linked for movement to the modulating motor. 
The valve member takes the form ci a c^inder having a cu- 
tout portkm extending angulariy thereto for imparting a 
shearing action at the triangularly shaped openings in the 
valve chamber, thereby MaH^A^g any sediment v^ich may 
ctdlect at the openings, while also providing an accurately 
controlled flow of ofl due to the adjustable position of die an- 
gular edge of the valve member widi respect to the converg- 
ing edges oS the triangulariy shaped chamber openings. 



3,660,007 
PROFILE PLATES FOR BURNER 
E. AkM, B«n^|ioil^ aad Jsmcs E. 
both el PL, asilgjinn to AFE Iilastiiis, It^ 
nL, by srid MkclMl 

FBed May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,487 
bL CL F23d 75/00 
U.S. CL 431—351 



MMcfecB, Cary, 




2U 



A flame ccmtrol device for a cylindrical furnace having a 
T-shaped gas burner unit and a frm-driven supply of air, the 
device comprising a pair of plates blodung die air supply to 
the burner except for a uniform area inunediately adjacent 
the perimeter <k the gas burner, whereby to ensure an 
adequate supfriy of air at the burner fbr complete combustion 
of the gas. 



CHEMICAL 



3,660,006 

DYEING SULFONATED ANIONIC POLYMERIC FIBERS 

WITH AN AQUEOUS DISPERSION OF A SALT OF A 

CATIONIC DYE AND AN ARYLSULFONATE 

Erik Ktasa, WBnds^na, DcL, Mslpinr to E. I. dii PoM de 

NeiMNurs aad Coospany, WlHlngloB, DeL 

FBed Apr. 25, 1968, Ser. No. 724»239 
Iirt.CLD06pi/«2 
U.S. CL 8—21 A 13 ClaiBH 

An aqueous dispersion of ( 1 ) a water-insohible sak of a ca- 
tionic dye and a selected anion oi an arylsulfonic acid with 
(2) an anionic dispersing agent selected from hgnin sulfcmate 
or a salt of a sulfonated naphthalene-fomuddehyde conden- 
sate has been found useftil in the hi^i-tempentture dyeing ct 
acid noodified acrylic, polyamide, or polyester fibers, either 
alone or in Mend by continuous dyeing operations. 

The salts can be represented by the formulas D® Ar'SO»® 
and K® ArSOs® where D® is a cationic dye having a reso- 
nating or delocalized positive charge and Ar' is an aryl group 
substituted with substituents such that the summation of the 
pKa increments for the substituents is equal to or less than 



—0.9; and K® is a cationic dye having a localized positive 
charge and Ar is an aryl group substituted with substituents 
such that the summation at the pKa increments for the 
substituents is equal to or less than — 0.6. 



3,660,009 

METHOD OF MANUFACTURING READY-TO-WEAR 

CREASB-RESISTIVE GARMENTS 

Frederick H. «?i ■■■llh, Erie, Pa^ MriMin <» MHteaalar Oayx 

CorporaoeM, New York, N«Y« 

Cetl i o liM h pa rt o( appMcirteB Ser. No. 491/N»9, Sept. 
28, 1965. Mw ahsBiBBiJ. TMs a p pB ctlen Feb. 2, 1969, Ser. 

No. 821412 

bL CL D06ai 75/70, 15144 

U.S.CL8— 116 SClatas 

Crease-resistant pro pe r ties are imparted to wash-and-wear 
garments by impregnating ceDulosic textile fabrics widi a 
solution of a polymeric acetal obtained by reactii^ formid- 
dehyde and a polyol, together with an add catalyst, and 
thereafter drying and forming a garment frtxn the fiUffic, and 



192 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



pressing the same, the pressed finished garment then being 
subjected to a prolonged cure which imparts crease re- 
sistance to the garment. 



3,660,010 
TREATING TEXTILES WITH SOIL RELEASE AGENTS 
Paal C. GcergosdiB, DwmIcb, aad DIlip K. Ray-Chaudhori, 
Soacnct, boCk of NJ^ airigiion to Natkmal Starch and 
Cboakal C f pa c aHwi, New York, N.Y. 

FBcd Dec 17, 1969, Scr. No. 886,031 
IBL CL 00601 15/12; l»32b 27/40 
U.S.CL 8-115.6 2 Claims 

A process of treating textiles with soil release agents to im- 
part soil release properties thereto, said soil release agents 
being water soluble, hydroxyl terminated polyurethanes. 



3,660,011 

DIMETHYL SULFOXIDE USED AS A SOLVENT FOR 

TEXTILE TREATING COMPOSITIONS 

Frad B. Shippcc, and Domcakk Dosaid Gagliardl, both of 

East Grccawick, R.I., assigBors to GagUardi Rts carch Cor 

poratioB, East Greenwich, R J. 

Contiaution of application Scr. No. 332,799, Dec. 23, 1963, 

■ow abandoned. This application May 3, 1967, Scr. No. 

635,924 
Int. CL D06in 13/40; C08g 51/46 
U.S.CL8-116J 8 Claims 

The crease resistant properties of cellulosic fabrics is im- 
proved by rendering the fabrics highly resistant to both wet 
and dry wrinkling without serious detriment to fabric tensile 
strength, tear strength and flex abrasion resistance. This is 
accomplished by including dimethyl sulfoxide as an essential 
ingredient in the aqueous solution used to treat a cellulosic 
fabric with a nitrogen-containing water-soluble organic 
crease-proofing material. 



3,660,012 
SELECTIVE ETHYLATION OF THE CELLULOSE 
MOLECULE 
Jckn G. Roberts, Cheadk Hnlmc, England, assignor to The 
UnMcd Smtci of Amcrfca m rcprcacntcd by the Secretary of 
Agrfenlmrc 
— FBed ScpC 4, 1970. Ser. No. 69,865 

Int. CL D06m 15/58, 11/04, 13/02 
U.S.CL8-116J lOnfan 

This invention relates to a process for the selective ethyla- 
tion of cellulosic fibers. More particularly, this invention re- 
lates to a process for the selective ethylation of cellulosic 
fibers and a subsequent crosslinking of said fabrics to 
produce fabrics with improved crease recovery and abrasion 
resistance. 



3,660,013 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING A 
DURABLE PRESS IN GARMENTS CONTAINING 
CELLULOSE OR CELLULOSIC DERIVATIVES 
George Looii PaycC, and John H. Forg, botli of Ondnnnti, 
OMo, —igpnn to McGraw-Edino Conupmiy, Elgin, DL 
FVed Ang. 1, 1969, Scr. No. 846^84 
Int CL D06m 1/16, 13/14, 13/54 
U.S.CL8— 116.4 9CWms 

A novel treating method and commercial apparatus for 
carrying out this method have been developed for reacting 
prepressed cellulosic and cellulocic-Uend garments with 
cross-linking agents in a gaseous phase to impart a durable 
press thereto. The durable press finish is imparted by placing 
the garments in a closed cluanber typically at room tempera- 
ture from 70°F to 80°F or, if preheated, at a temperature not 
in excess of lS(fF, adding formaldehyde gas and sulphur 
dioxide gas and steam for several minutea. causing the tem- 
perature in the chamber to rise due to the steam, cutting off 
the steam and allowing the temperatiue to drop to saturate 



the atmosphere and cause greater coiKlensation of steam 
through the garments, and then heating the chamber to a 
temperature of the order of 250^ to complete the crosslink- 
ing operation. Next, the garments may be freed of residual 
odors by flushing the chamber with f^esh air and/or steam. 
The apparatus comprises an openable treating chamber 
adapted to be heated as by steam ducts and having therein a 
heated tray for receiving paraformaldehyde and vaporizing 
the same. Abo. means are |»x>vided for introducing con- 
trolled amounts of steam and of sulphur dioxide as the cata- 
lyzing agent The chamber has suitable ports enabling it to be 
flushed by fi^sh air and by steam. 



3,660,014 

CONTINUOUS STEAM-HEATING METHOD AND 

APPARATUS FOR CONTINUO USLY T REATING OR 

DYEING COTTON AND OTHER FIBERS 

Shoichi Ohya, Sakai, Japan, assignor to Kabushiki Kaisha 
Yamadakuma Scnkojo, Osaka, Japan 

Fled Oct 29, 1970, Scr. No. 85,033 

Clafans priority, application JapM, Jan. 10, 1970, 45/3035 

InL CL D06p 5/02, 7/00 

U.S.CL8— 149.1 3ClainM 




A method of continuously treating or dyeing cotton and 
other fibers and an apparatus therefor, comprising a 
mechanism whereby cotton and other fibers are saturated 
uniformly with a dye liquor or a treating liquor and are fed to 
a fiber-receiving pipe having a steeply sloped inner nixfacc, a 
pressing mechanism whereby cotton and other fibers are 
pressed into the cotton-receiving pipe intermittently in the 
state of layers, a cylindrical steam-heater i»ovided below the 
fiber-receiving pipe, a mechanism whereby a sealing force is 
imparted to the lower end of said steam-heater, and a 
horizontal steam-heater for the secondary steam-heating. 



3,660,015 

PROCESS FOR THE DYEING OF MODIFIED 

POLYESTER FIBERS WITH BASIC DYES IN THE 

PRESENCE OF AROMATIC CARBOXYUC ACIDS 

Mtaon Osntsnisi: Kamo Knwakand, and Snnilo UdnU, al 

of Tokyo, Japan, ssrignnrs le Hodogaya Kacaku Kogyo 

KabnsUU Kaiiha, Tokyo, Japan 

FHcd Jan. 24, 1969, Scr. No. 793.755 

Int. CL D06p 5/04 

UACL 8-173 4ClainH 

This invention provides a novel process for the dyeing of 

fibrous materials such as yam, filaments and textile fabrics 

made of modified synthetic polyesters which contain a sul- 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



193 



fonate radical, or blended yam fabrics or union cloths con- 
taining said fibrous materials of modified polyester with basic 




TKC TOO C«»IS f MMUTtS) 



dyestuffs in a dye bath containing at least one of the aromatic 
carboxylic acids represented by the general formula 

COOH 

1 



v 



wherein R denotes a hydrogen atom or radical selected from 
the group consisting of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups serving 
as dyeing accelerator. 

The dyeing process according to the present invention is 
advantageously carried out with a rapid adsorption of the 
dyestuff from dye bath resulting in a deep shade of coloration 
on the materials having an outstanding fastness properties 
especially light-fastness. 



3,660,016 
REMOVAL OF CARBON DIOXIDE AND/OR HYDROGEN 
SULFIDE FROM GASES CONTAINING OLEFINES AND 
ACETYLENES 
HaraM Jokn; Rolf Lnchdcnunn, botk of Lndwigshafen; Wl- 
hckn Rittingcr, Schitfentadt; Artnr SHwka, Krichhctan. and 
Walter Sanni, Lndwigshafen. al of GcrMny, aaslgnors to 
Badtachc AnUn. A Soda-Fabrik AktiengeaelBclMft, -Lnd- 
wigshalcn/Rbdn, Germany 

Ficd Dec. 16, 1968. Scr. No. 783.907 
ClainM priority, application Gcraany, Dec 15, 1967, P 16 43 

715J 

Int CL BOld 53/34, 53/16 

VS. CL 2|-2 R 6 Claims 




da 



3,660,017 
ABSORPTION AND HYDROLYSIS OF CARBON 
OXYSULFIDE 
Wolfgang Homberg, WIminglon, Dd., assignor to E. I 
Pont de Ncmoors and Company, Wilmington, DcL 
Ficd Apr. 28, 1969, Scr. No. 819,959 
Int. CL BOld 53/34 
U.S. CL 23—2 R 8 

Carbon oxysulfide is hydrc^yzed with water at a tempera- 
ture of at least 1 00° C. in the presence of an N-substituted al- 
kanolamine or ether of the formula 

R-NH(CH,),-OR, 

where R is a saturated alkyl or cydoalkyl radical of 1 to 20 
carbon atoms; R| is hydrogen or a saturated alkyl radical of 1 
to 4 carbon atoms; and n is an integer of 2-4. The process 
can be carried out in a continuous maimer, water being in- 
troduced into the system at about the same rate as carbon 
oxysulfide is decomposed. 



3,660,018 
METHOD OF MANUFACTURING CARBON FIBRE 
PUIp George Roae, Burton-on-Trcnt, England, a rtgnn r to 
Rob Royce Limhcd, Derby, England 

FHcd Jaly 31, 1970, Ser. No. 60,103 
Clafans prhNfity, appHcatfam Great Brltafai, Aug. 4, 1969, 
38,868/69 
IntCLC01bi//07 
VS, CL 23—209.4 5 Clafans 

The invention relates to a method of manufacturing in>- 
proved carbon fibre from polyacrylonitrile in which the 
polyacrylonitrile is heated to a temperature between 150° C. 
and 300° C. in an oxygen containing atmosphere to stabilize 
its structure, then pyrolysed at between 700° and 1 ,500° C. in 
an atmosphere containing between 5 and 500 parts per mil- 
lion of oxygen and being otherwise inert. 



3,660,019 
PROCESS FOR PURIFYING INDUSTRIAL WASTE GASES 

CONTAINING FLUORINE VALUES 

Ham H. Prcidikant, Haiier; Henunui Bctz, NencnhnMan, and 

Johann Schaffer, Mcuh e h , al of Germany, nalgnors to 

Universal Ol Products Con^wny, Dct Platoci, m. 

Fled Jan. 29. 1970, Scr. No. 6,791 

Clafans priority, applcation Gcrmnny, Feb. 1, 1969, P 19 05 

080.7 
Int a. COld 3/02 
VS. CL 23—88 6 < 



A process for the rentoval of COj and/or HtS fix>m gases 
containing olefins and acetylenes by absorption in an aque- 
ous solution of an alkali metal salt of amino acid and desorp- 
tion by decompressing and heating the solvent, which com- 
prises treating the solvent, before or after desorption, with a 
hydrocarbon mixture substantially consisting of benzene for 
the purpose of removing impurities and, after said treatment, 
se[>arating the hydrocarbon mixture fix>m the aqueous solu- 
tion. 




Fluorine values are recovered from industrial waste gases 
containing fluorine and/or hydrogen fluoride, notably fix>m 



89» O.Q.— 7 



194 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



gases evolved in the manufacture of aluminum through elec- 
trolysis of alumina in the presence of cryolite, by scrubbing 
with a highly acidic aqueous solution containing hydrogen 
fluoride in a first washing zone and then with an aqueous 
sodium hydroxide solution with formation of sodium fluoride 
in solution without precipitation in a second washing zone, 
splitting the stream of solution ft'om each washing zone into a 
recycle stream for return to the zone wherein it was formed, 
and into a precipitation stream, and the two precipitation 
streams are combined to precipitate sodium fluoride, which 
is recovered with recirculation of resultant mother liquor to 
the first washing zone. 



3,660,020 

PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF IMPURITIES 

FROM NICKEL CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS 

Loab GaBdoo; Christiaii Bomc, and PhiUppc LcaoMc, all of 

Lc Havre, France, assignors to Lc Nkkd, Paris, France 

Filed Aug. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 62,190 

Claims priority, application France, Aug. 12, 1969, 6922701 

IBL CL COlg 53108 
VS. CL 23-87 R 8 Claims 

A process for the separation of metallic impurities, from 
aqueous nickel chloride solutions by selective liquid/liquid 
extraction between said aqueous phase containing the said 
metallic impurities in chloride form and an organic phase 
containing a trialkyi sulfonium chloride in the form of a solu- 
tion in an organic diluent substantially immiscible with water, 
such that at least one of the said metallic valuables is selec- 
tively transferred from the aqueous phase to the organic 
phase, characterized by the fact that the said aqueous phase 
is substantially neutral and that it presents a total concentra- 
tion in chloride ions equal at least to 7 gram equivalents/liter. 



3,660,021 
PREPARATION OF FINELY DIVIDED CALCIUM 
SILICATE 
Lester E. Olmsted, Affton; Eekmrd J. Puctz, Lcmay; Warren 
Rodgcrs, St. Loois, and Charles R. Trampier, Jr., Webster 
Groves, all of Mo., asdgnors to N L Industries, Inc., New 
York, N.Y. 

Filed Sept. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 76,584 
Int. CL COlb 33/24; COld 5/00 
VS. CL 23— 1 10 R 5 Claims 

A new type of finely divided calcium silicate has been 
produced by reacting calcium sulfate with sodium silicate an 
amounts to form theoretically a composition containing from 
about 0.7 to about 4.0 moles of SiOj for each mole of CaO. 
The by-product sodium sulfate is removed from the calcium 
silicate by washing. 



3,660,023 
PROCESS FOR RECOVERING CARBON DIOXIDE FROM 

STACK GAS 
Ludo K. Frevd, Midland, and Leonard J. Krcssley, Saginaw, 

both of Mich., assignors to The Dow Chemical Company, 

Midland, Mkh. 

Filed Feb. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 8,036 

Int. a. COlb 31/20; BOld 53/34 

VS. CL 23-150 8 Claims 

E>isclosed is a process for recovering pure CO| from stack 
gases produced by the combustion of carbonaceous material. 
The process involves contacting the stack gas with porous 
sodium carbonate having a high surface area, i.e., greater 
than 0.3 mVgm. at a temperatiu-e of from about 40° to 75° C. 
Interaction between moist COs and sodium carbonate forms 
3NaHCOs NatCOj which upon heating to a temperature of 
from 150° to 250° C. decomposes into CO,. H,0 and 
Na,COs. The liberated CO, is readily recovered and the 
regenerated Na,COj can be used to recover additional CO, 
thus permitting a cyclic process. 



3,660,022 
RECOVERY OF COPPER 
Waiter L. Stakcr; Kari C. Dcu, and Cari J. Chindgrcn, aU of 
Sak Lake City, Utah, amlgnon to The United States of 
America as rcpreaeirtcd by the Secretary of the Interior 
Filed Mar. 2, 1971, Scr. No. 120360 
Int. a. C22b 15/10, 15/14 
VS. CL 23—135 3 Oairas 

Copper is recovered from copper-containing materials, 
such as scrap or ores, by leaching with cupric ammonium 
carbonate solution, followed by addition of elemental sulfiir 
to precipitate copper sulfide and regenerate the cupric am- 
monium carbonate leach solution. 



3,660,024 
PROCESS FOR AMMONU OXIDATION 
George Richard Gillespie, New York, N.Y., wslgnor to Engel- 
hard Minerals & Chemfcals Corporation 
Continttation-in-part of appUcatioo Ser. No. 2,255, Jan. 12, 
1970, now abandoned. This appttcation Sept. 1 1, 1970, Ser. 

No. 71360 
InLCL COlb 27/26 
U.S. CL 23—162 5 Claims 

In an ammonia oxidation process wherein ammonia and an 
oxidizing gas are contacted with a multilayer pad of platinum 
metal catalyst, a method is provided for reducing the amount 
of platinum metal catalyst required. The optimum amount of 
catalyst needed for a 95 percent anunonia conversion is 
reduced by replacement of a significant fraction of the gauze 
with a non-precious metal corrosion resistant foraminous 
structure which simulates the flow resistance of the fittction 
of catalyst gauze removed from the optimum pad. The result- 
ing catalyst pack comprising platinum metal gauze and 
foraminous structtire is equivalent in ammonia conversion to 
the optimum pad and the volatilization of the platinum metal 
gauze is materially reduced. 



3,660,025 
MANUFACTURE OF PIGMENTARY SILICA 
Richard E. DrlscoU, Monroe, La., assigDor to CMcs Scrvkc 
Company, New York, N.Y. . 

Filed July 1, 1970, Scr. No. 51,632 

Int. CL COlb 33/18, 33/14 

VS. CL 23—182 V 9 Claims 




A mixture of fluid fuel and oxygen is burned at a substan- 
tially constant rate to produce hot flame gases. Silicon 
tetrafluoride is commingled with these hot gases and is thus 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



195 



hydrolyzed. The concentration of silicon tetrafluoride in the 
hydrolysis mixture is esublished at a selected value which 
corresponds in direct proportion to the surface area desired 
of the silica product, i.e., the surface area of the silica is in- 
creased by raising the concentration of silicon tetrafluoride 
in the hydrolysis mixture, and vice versa. 



hot pressed boron nitride articles with a suitable solvent to 
lower their boron oxide (B,0,) content, and then sintering 
the treated material in an inert atmoyhere at a temperature 
of from 1 ,600° C. to 2,100° C. in the absence of pressure or 
mechanical restraint. 



3,660,026 
METHOD OF REMOVING IRON AND COBALT FROM A 

PARTIALLY REFINED NICKEL MATTE 
Francis Michel, Mendon Bellevue; Louis Gandon; Roger Jean, 
both of Le Havre, and Pierre Fer, Le Havre-Caucriauville, 
all of France, assignors to LeNlckel, Paris, France 

Filed May 9, 1969, Scr. No. 823385 

Int. CL COlg 51/04; C22b 9/12; COlg 53/04; C22b 23/00 

UACL 23-183 9 Claims 




A partially refined fused nickel matte is energetically and 
thoroughly washed with a chloridizing substance such as 
nickel chloride. The use of a chloridizing substance, which is 
preferred to an oxidizing agent as in the case of the usual 
treatment in a Bessemer converter, leads to a considerably 
improved selectivity in the refining of nickel mattes. 



3,660,027 
HIGH PURITY HOT PRESSED BORON NITRIDE 
Victor Mandorf, Jr., Ofanstcd FaBs, and Lionel C. Mont- 
gomery, North Otanated, both of Ohfa>, assignors to Union 
Carbide Corporation, New York, N.Y. 

Filed May 6, 1969, Ser. No. 822314 

Int. CL COlb 21/06 

U.S.CL 23-191 12 Claims 




High purity boron nitride articles of manufacture having a 
high density and improved properties. The improved boron 
nitride articles have a unique acicular crystal structure, an 
oxygen content of less than O.S percent by weight, a density 
of at least 1.9 grams/cc. excellent hot strength, low and sub- 
stantially isotropic coefficients of thermal expansion with no 
irreversible thermal expansion, excellent thermal shock re- 
sistance, moisture insensitivity and improved dielectric pro- 
perties. These articles are produced by treating conventional 



3,660,028 
AMMONIA SYNTHESIS CATALYST 
Kenzi Tamam; Takahun Onishi, both of Kanagawa; Mit- 
suyuki Soma, and Mizuo Sudo, both of Tokyo, aU of Japan, 
assignors to Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan 

Filed Feb. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 9,426 
Oafans priority, appttcation Japui, Feb. 6, 1969, 44/8940 
Int. CL COlc 1/04 
VS. CL 23—198 10 Claims 

The present invention provides a novel catalyst and im- 
proved process for direct synthesis of ammonia from nitrogen 
and hydrogen which comprises employing a complex of alkali 
metal or organo-alkali metal with graphite, said organo-alkali 
metal being an alkali metal benzophenone ketyl or an alludi 
metal salt of an aromatic hydrocarbon. 



3,660,029 

PROCESS FOR BENEHCUTING ILMENFTE 

Ahmed G. E. NaguOi, Jacksonville, Fla., assignor to Edith W. 

Carpenter, Jacksonville, Ffau 

Continuation-in-part of appttcation Scr. No. 62,612, Aug. 10, 

1970. Thk appttcation Apr. 9, 1971, Scr. No. 132,899 

InL CL COlg 23/04 

VS. CL 23—202 R 20 Claims 

A process for treating ilmenite to obtain a beneficiated 
product having a relatively high titanium dioxide content 
Particulate ilmenite is first heated in the presence of a reduc- 
ing agent to reduce the iron compounds in the ilmenite to 
ferrous oxide and/or metallic iron. The resulting product is 
then leached with a dilute inorganic acid to solubilize the 
reduced iron values. The liquor produced during leaching is 
then filtered from the unsolubilized residue, and the latter is 
subjected to a combination of process steps. Such steps in- 
clude magnetic separation to remove essentially all of the 
iron valves remaining in the residue, and electrical separation 
to remove essentially all of the silicon values therein. Also, 
the residue is roasted at a relatively high temperature to drive 
off the water of crystallization which associates therewith 
during leaching. The final product contains up to 98 percent 
titanium dioxide by weight. 



3,660,030 
METHOD OF PREPARING NFTROSYL CHLORIDE 
NeviOc Coleboume, and Phittp Richard Edwards, both of 
Runcorn, England, a ssign o rs to Imperial Chemical Indus- 
tries Lfanited, London, EM^aaA 

Filed Apr. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 26,156 
Claims priority, appHcatloB Great Britain, Apr. 21, 1969, 

20386/69 

Int. CL COlb 21/52 

VS. CL 23-203 N 9 Claims 

A process for the preparation of nitrosyl chloride which 

comprises reacting together hydrogen chloride and nitrogen 

dioxide in the presence of nitric acid. 



3,660,031 
METHOD FOR PREPARING BORON SUBOXIDE 
Crvasic E. HoicoBbe, Jr^ ud Ottls J. Home, Jr., both of Oak 
Ridge, Tenn^ assigMirs to The United States of America as 
represented by the United States Atomic Energy Commis- 



FUed Mar. 9, 1971, Scr. No. 122306 

Int. CL COlb i5/00 

U.S. CL 23—204 R 3 Claims 

Boron suboxide (BtO) is prepared by the reduction of zinc 
oxide with boron in an inert atmo^here at a temperature of 
I,200°-1.500C. 



196 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660,032 

PROCESS FOR REGENERATION OF SULFURIC ACID 

LADEN ACTIVATED CARBON 

Saoiacl L. Torrencc, CharlcitMi, S.C., wrfgnor to WcaTvaco 

Corporatioa, New York, N.Y. 
CoBtfaoatioB-ia-part of appHcafdoo Scr. No. 18^53, Mar. 10, 

1970, BOW abaadoBcd. TUi appHcatioB July 10, 1970, Scr. 

No. 53,979 

lat CL COlb 17104; BO Id 15106 

U.S. CL 23—225 5 Oaims 

A process for regenerating a sulfuric acid laden activated 
carbonaceous adsorbent by contacting the activated car- 
bonaceous adsorbent at a temperature below about 350° F. 
with hydrogen sulfide in an amount of at least 3: 1 mole ratio 
of hydrogen sulfide to adsorbed sulfuric acid to reduce the 
adsorbed sulfuric acid to elemental sulfur which remains ad- 
sorbed on the adsorbent, steam stripping at least 1 mole of 
elemental sulfur per 3 moles of hydrogen sulfide from the ac- 
tivated carbonaceous adsorbent and recovering the steam 
stripped elemental sulfur. When it is desired to strip less than 
all of the elemental sulfur from the activated carbonaceous 
adsorbent the remaining sulfur may be reduced with 
hydrogen to produce hydrogen sulfide for use in reducing the 
adsorbed sulfuric acid. 



3,660,034 
INSTRUMENTAL METHOD AND EQUIPMENT FOR THE 
DETERMINATION OF THE DEGREE OF MATURITY IN 

FRUIT, PARTICULARLY IN POMACEOUS FRUFT 

Joacf Baranyi, Mcaotur, and Lunio Ijiktoi, Torokocnt* 

mlklos, both of Hungary, ■■ignori to Lkcnda Talal* 

manyokat Ertckerito VaOalBt, Bodapat, Hungary 

FDed Dk. 2, 1969, Scr. No. 881,441 

Claims priority, appttcatloa Hungary, Dec 2, 1968, BA2137 

IBL CL GOlm 27100; GOln 31106, 33/02 
VS. CL 23—230 R 7 Oaims 




II J ,,.,..,.. IX,: 



3,660,033 
DISPOSABLE SPECIMEN COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS 

BAG 
La«y L. Sckwartx, 3486 RicfcBNmd Avenue, EttingvOe, 
StatcB Uaad, N.Y. 

FVed Sept 29, 1969, Scr. No. 861,728 

Int. CL GOln 1118, 21124; B65d 75112 

U.S. CL 23-230 R 13 Claims 



*H; 




A flexible sealed bag for containing and analyzing a 
specimen, comprising: an entrance; a first reservoir, commu- 
nicating with the entrance, which receives specimen throu^ 
the entrance; manually actuatable sealing means between the 
entrance and the reservoir, with a solid specimen, a liquid 
solvent in the reservoir into which the specimen becomes 
mixed; a narrow channel connecting the reservoir with an 
aiudysis chamber for permitting liquid in the reservoir to pass 
into the analysis chamber; the channel firom reservoir to anal- 
ysis chamber including manually actuatable sealing means for 
closing off the channel after adequate liquid has passed from 
the reservoir into the analysis chamber, the analysis chamber 
already holding a substance for reacting with the liquid trans- 
ferred thereto; whereby a liquid specimen is divided into two 
parts, the part in the reservoir and the part in the analysis 
chamber. 



A process and apparatus for determining the degree of 
maturity in fruit by determining the amount of carbon diox- 
ide developed by the fruit. The carbon dioxide formed by the 
fruit is absorbed in a suitable alkaline solution and the 
amount of developed carbon dioxide is determined by mea- 
suring the electrical conductivity of the solution. 



3,660,035 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINATION OF 

HYDROGEN SULFIDE IN HYDROGEN SULFTOE 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 

Robin S. Marsh, Box 1363 c/o Aramco, Dhahran, Saudi 

Arabia 

FBod Mar. 26, 1969, Scr. No. 810,604 

Int. CL BOlk 3100; GOla 31116 

U.S. CL 23— 230 R 11 ClainM 




A method for the rapid and accurate determination of the 
hydrogen sulfide content of a liquid petroleum hydrocarbon. 
The hydrogen sulfide in a known quantity of said hydrocar- 
bon is dispersed into an ionic state and titrated with a stan- 
dard cadmium salt solution to determine the hydrogen sulfide 
content of the hydrocarbon. A hydrogen sulfide analyzer for 
carrying out the method is also disclosed. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL' 



197 



3,660,036 
ANALYTICAL METHOD AND APPARATUS 
Royal H. Benson, Texas Cky, Tex., asrignor to Monsanto 
Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

FOed Dec. 22, 1969, Scr. No. 886,953 
' lBt.CLG0lB2J/72;G21h 5/00 I 

U.S. CL 23-230 R 1' C»«ta» 



20 



n 



>^^^ Vl 1 N ■■ -.X xX ^\ ■■ . ^ , J 

21 n 



a 

X 



>5 



r 



VENT 



An improvement in a method for analyzing labile- 
hydrogen-containing compounds present in mixtures wherein 
the mixture is passed over a labile-tritium-containing sub- 
strate to effect exchange of the labile hydrogen with the la- 
bile tritium and the resulting tritium-containing compound is 
detected and measured, the radioactivity measurement being 
used to determine the amount of the labile-hydrogen-con- 
taining compound in the mixture, which comprises passing 
the effluent from the detecting means through a high capaci- 
ty "tritium trap" containing a substance having labile- 
hydrogen atoms to prevent the venting of dangerous amounts 
of radioactive tritium-containing compounds into the at- 
mosphere. The invention also provides the combination of a 
suiuble "tritium trap" with an analytical system for carrying 
out the above method comprised of a column connected to 
the outlet of the detecting means and which contains a sub- 
stance having labile-hydrogen atoms. 



3,660,037 
DEVICE FOR MEASURING BLOOD SEDIMENTATION 

RATE 
Kurt Rudolf Sokol, Schwachhauser Hccrrtr. 295, 28 Bremen, 
Germany 

Filed Aug. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 62,256 

Int. CL BOll 3100; GOln 15104, 33/16 

VS. CL 23-253 R 8 Claims 




./ 



products. Suiuble means are preferably incorporated for 
separating metals from the refuse and for processing the 
same into commercially deliverable metal products such as 
ingots. In a preferred form of the invention the system or 





method is used in conjunction with a munidpa] sewage treat- 
ment plant wherein the liquid and sludge phases thereof are 
utilized in the system and method for milling and also for en- 
riching the slurry devek}ped in the system and method, for 
ultimate processing as a useable fertilizer product. 



3,660,039 
CARBON BLACK REACTOR WITH POSITIONABLE 

CHOKE 
Eulas W. HcnderMW, Toledo, Oldo, aarignor to PUBips 

PctroleuB CompaBy 
ConttnnirtioB4i-part of appBcatton Scr. No. 769»283, Oct 21, 
1968, BOW abandoBcd. TUi appHcatkm Sept 1 1, 1970, Scr. 

No. 71,471 

iBt CL C09c 1/48: F23d 15/00 

VS. CL 23-259.5 5 Claims 



A unitary device comprising a cannula and a syringe barrel 
of rather large diameter for withdrawing Wood, combined 
with one or more telescoping cylinders of relatively smaller 
diameter in which the sedimentation rate is measured. 




3,660,038 

INTEGRATED GARBAGE PROCESSING SYSTEM 

Johfl C. Brewer, Salt Lake Oty, Utah, BHignor to GarbaltKr 

Corporatfon of America, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Original apptfcation Feb. 5, 1968, Scr. No. 707,910, now 

abandoned. Divfcicd and this appttcatkin Aug. 7, 1970, Scr. 

No. 61,992 
Int CL B65g 67/24 Apparatus for producing carbon black in which a plug 

U.S. CL 23— 259.1 4 Claims choke is variably positionable along the length of the first 

The present invention provides a system and method for reaction section to vary its length or, at the extreme position 
processing municipal refuse or garbage into useable fertilizer of the choke, to eliminate the first section. 



198 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660,040 
GASEOUS OXIDE RECOVERY 
Charks I. Hardinf; Lamar V. Russdl; W. Makolm Steevcs, 
all of P.O. Box 4850, Jacksoovflle, Fla., and Irwin R. Wg- 
gins, P.O. Box 549, Oak Ridfc, Tenn. 

Fikd Apr. 10, 1969, Ser. No. 814,936 

Int. CI. COlb 17/60; BOld 53/14, 53/34 

U.S. CI. 23-260 11 Claims 




3,660,042 

APPARATUS FOR EXTRACTING WITH A LIQUID, 

PRODUCTS WIflCH ARE PART OF SOLIDS 

Georges Francois Duchateau, Tiencn, and Ferdinand Joaeph 

Van h c m ycge n , Opiintcr, both of Bdgium, assignors to Raf- 

fincric Tlriemootoise, Brusads, Belgium 

Filed Feb. 20, 1969, Ser. No. 801,018 
Claims priority, application BelKium, Feb. 23, 1968, 711,219; 
Feb. 14,1 %9,PV 70,061 
Into. BOld/ 7/02 
UA CL 23-269 * 8 Claims 



1 



I ,ZT Ts-,i^n ri-' ; \ to 



An apparatus for removal of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide 
from gases which may comprise a plurality of scrubbers and 
an ion exchange resin bed successively receiving gas conuin- 
ing SOt and nitrogen oxides and contacting the same with ab- 
sorbing liquor and the resin bed, means receiving the absorb- 
ing liquor from at least one of said scrubbers for removing 
and concentrating SOi from at least a portion of said absorb- 
ing liquor, and means for concentrating SOj and nitrogen ox- 
ides directly in said resin bed. desorbing means receiving the 
concentrated SOt and nitrogen oxides and placing it in gase- 
ous condition and recovery means for gaseous SO, connected 
to said desorbing means and receiving gaseous SO, 
therefrom, recovering nitrogen oxides in soluble nitrate form. 



3,660,041 

BURNER-FLAME ARRESTER FOR BURNING OFF-GAS 

FROM A BOILING WATER REACTOR POWER PLANT 

George E. Moor«, Scoda, and Lee H. TomUnson, Schenectady, 

both of N.Y., assignors to General Ekctrk Company 

Filed Oct 29, 1968, Ser. No. 771,467 

Int. a. BOlj 1/14; F23d 13/16; G21f 9/02 

UA a. 23-262 5 Claims 




This invention relates to an apparatus for extracting with a 
liquid, products which arc part of solids, by advancing in 
counterourrent liquid and solids through a drum which com- 
prises at least one screw conveyor with an upstream end and 
a downsueam end. part at least of the conveyor turns defin- 
ing compartments which are provided with elements for rais- 
ing the solids and for separating the solids from the liquid, 
the solids falling from the raising elements back into the 
drum bottom each time in a different liquid fraction. 



3,660,043 
METHOD AND DEVICE FOR FEEDING CRYSTALS AND 

MELTS 

Herman Schildknccht, WUcken Str. 5, and Klaus Maas, 

Quiake Str. 44, both of Heidelberg, Germany 

Filed Jan. 31, 1969, Ser. No. 796321 

Clafans priority, application Germany, Jan. 31, 1968, P 17 19 

468.2 

Int CI. BOld 9/04 

U.S. CI. 23-273 F 2 Claims 




A cooled porous plug device in combination with a con- 
tinuous ignition source is used for burning off explosive mix- 
tures of contaminated radiolytic hydrogen-oxygen gas flow 
discharged from the steam turbine cycle of a boiling water 
nuclear power reactor. Optional use of a second cooled 
porous plug is shown, the second porous plug being located 
downstream of the burner to function as a heat exchanger to 
cool the combustion products for controlled condensation of 
the water vapor. 




Apparatus for feeding crystals and melts in a crystallization 
column comprising a rigid strip freely rotatably mounted in 
the column, the edges of said strip bearing against the inside 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



199 



of the column and the strip being twisted spirally in one direction of smoke movement entrain particulate maienal m 

direction about its longitudinal axis, at least one end of the the smoke and carry it away. The sprays may cooperate with 

strip being connected to a driving means adapted to rotate a baffle which aids precipitation of particles and creates tur- 
the strip about its longitudinal axis. 



3 660 044 ' 

APPARATUS FOR CRUCIBLE-FREE ZONE MELTING OF 

CRYSTALLINE RODS 
WoKgang Kdlcr, Pretifeld, Germany, airignor to Siemens 
AkticBgcadhchaft, Bcrlin-SiemcBMtadt, Germany 
ContlBBatioB of applicatioB Ser. No. 556,157, June 8, 1966. 

This appHcatioB June 25, 1969, Ser. No. 845,599 
Claims priority, application Germany. June 10, l%5, S 97543 

Int CI. BOIJ 77/70 
U.S. CL 23-273 SP 1 1 Claims 




v^ 



Apparatus for crucible-free zone melting a rod of crystal- 
line material includes a melting chamber, axiaily displaceable 
and rotatable holders for supporting a stock rod to be 
recrystallized and a recrystallized rod mounted in the melting 
chamber, the holders having axes extending inclined or trans- 
versely to one another, and means for heating the stock rod 
so as to form a melting zone therein connecting the stock rod 
with the recrystallized rod. 



3,660,045 
SMOKE CLARDIER 
Norman D. Giadu, Langley, British Columbia, Canada, as- 
signor to Intercontinental Environmental Controls Ltd., 
Vancouver, British Cohuihla, Canada 

FUcd Feb. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 13,004 

Int a. F23g 7/06; BOld 47/06 

U.S. CL 23—277 C 1 1 Claims 




u 



Water sprays projected in the form of a curtain through 
smoke rising through a smokestack transversely of the 



•Hif^ii 




bulence to facilitate such separation further. Additionally, 
combustible impurities may be burned by flame jets preced- 
ing the spray washing operation, and supplemental air may 
be mixed with the smoke preceding the flame zone. 



3,660,046 

QUENCHING APPARATUS FOR A HIGH PRESSURE 

SYNTHESIS GAS PROCESS 

Randlow Smith, Houston, Tex., amignor to Texaco Inc., New 

York, N.Y. 

Filed Feb. 5, 1970, Ser. No. 8,791 

Int. CI. BOld 47/02 

U.S. CL 23-284 8 Claims 




A combined quenching and scrubbing structure for use in 
a synthesis gas process that employs high pressure and tem- 
perature. There is a thin walled quenching vessel that is con- 
structed of high alloy steel to withstand the corrosive effects. 
It is contained inside of a low alloy steel spherical container 
that is thick walled to withstand the high pressure. An outlet 
from the quenching vessel has an orifice scrubber therein and 
both are located inside the spherical container. 



200 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660,047 

PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM FORMATE AND 

PLUTONIUM DIOXIDE 

Larry R. Crisler, Arvada, Colo., aaslciior to The United SUtcs 

of America as represented by the United SUtes Atomk 

Energy Comminion 

Filed Mar. 18, 1970, Ser. No. 20,779 

Int. CL coil 56/00 

VJS. CL 23-344 2 Claims 



:i, 4ae ci>,w 



3,660,049 
DISPERSION STRENGTHENED ELECTRICAL HEATING 

ALLOYS BY POWDER METALLURGY 
John Stanwood Bci^amin, Suffem, N.Y., aaalgnor to The In- 
ternational NIckd Company, Inc., New York, N.Y. 
FOed Auf. 27, 1969, Ser. No. 853327 
InL a. B22f 1 100 
U.S. a. 29-182.5 « Claims 

This invention relates to the powder metallurgy of 
wrought, dispersion strengthened, electrical heating elements 
characterized metallographicaUy by a uniform distribution of 
dispersoids in both the longitudinal and transverse directions, 
and also to a powder metallurgy method for producing the 
same. 



iH 



OftMuirm 



p«' Muinoa 



] M f iLTmc 



riLTMcrxw 



1^ 



1 



•ucrioa 



Ml40M> 



••torn] 



I ,.,.,„^ [ -'- ^"'•^as' h -7-| 



L 



i 

TU 



ntTIUTC 



I 



HCATNM 



' ► ^Ot 



X-.:-' 



Production of plutonixim dioxide by forming the novel 
compound plutonium formate and heating the plutonium for- 
mate, at temperature from about 250" C to about 350* C. ■ 
described. 



3,660,048 

PRELIMINARY FREQUENCY REGULATING METHOD 

FOR REGULATORS OF WATCH MECHANISMS 

Miliuo Ob-Oka, Tokoroawa, Japu, aarignor to Citiien 

Watch Co^ Ltd., Tokyo, Japm 

Filed Apr. 21, 1970, Ser. No. 30,539 
dalmfl priority, appllcatioa Japan, Sept 5, 1969, 44/70440 

Int. CL B23p 13/00 
VS. CL 29—178 3 Claims 



3,660,050 

HETEROGENEOUS COBALT-BONDED TUNGSTEN 

CARBIDE 

Ralph K. Der, and Eugene G. Rigby, both of WHmfaigton, 

Del., aHignon to E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, 

WUmingtoo, DcL 

FVcd June 23, 1969, Ser. No. 835^17 
Int. a. C22c 29/00 
U.S. a. 29-182.8 8 Claims 

Strong, hard, impact-resistant bodies comprising tungsten 
carbide bonded with from 3 to 25% by weight of heterogene- 
ous cobalt-tungsten solid-solution alloy, useful as cutting 
tools, are prepared by heating an intimately mixed 
cobalt/tungsten carbide powder to a temperature above 
1000" C and consolidating the powder to a density of at least 
98% of its theoretical density, having either. 

1. mixed a carbon-rich and a carbon-deficient powder 
together prior to consolidation to produce a non-homogene- 
ous binder; 

2. added free carbon to a carbon-deficient powder to 
produce local areas where tungsten is removed from the 
binder alloy as tungsten carbide; or 

3. allowed a portion of the carbon in the tungsten carbide 
to oxidize during consolidation to produce areas in the 
binder phase which are then carbon deficient and high in 
tungsten. 



to 




3,660,051 
CONTACT BODY 
Harvld William Lee, Poynton, Engluid, 

Scraa * Sow Umttcd, Macckrfiekl, CheaUre. 
Continoatioa of appttcation Ser. No. 625,910, Mar. 22, 1967, 
BOW abandoMd. Tkk application Dec. 1 1, 1969, Ser. No. 

884387 
Claims priority, application (ireat Britain, Mar. 22, l%6, 

44305/66 

Int. CL D02J 13100 

U.S. CI. 29— 1 9 1 .6 6 Claims 




A flange is provided on the rim of a balance so that the 
preliminary frequency regulation may be attained by cutting 
said flange, with a balance spring mounted on the balance. 
At least three markings arc provided on the peripheral sur- 
face of the rim so that a true frequency may be detected 
witlKMit being influenced by an amplitude change. 



A conuct body for contacting traveling materials treated 
with lubricating subsunce, such body comprising a thermally 
conductive base member having a surface adjacent to the 
path of travel of the materials and consisting of a first materi- 
al subject to atuck by the lubricating substance, and a coat- 
ing applied to the surface and consisting at least in part of a 
second material which is impermeable to the lubricating sub- 
stance and which is not subject to attack by the same. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



201 



3,660,052 
COMPOUND BODIES OF ALUMINIUM PLATED STEEL 

STOCKS 

Hkleaki Takamatsu, Kodaira-shi; AUra Miyirta, Kawasaki- 

shi, and Yutaka Toyabe, Tokyo, all of Japan, assignors to 

Nippon Kokan Kabushiki Kaisha, by said AUra Miyata 

Filed Jane 3, 1969, Ser. No. 829,917 

Int. CL B32p 3/20; B32b 5/02, 15/06 

U.S.CL 29-195 6 Claims 




Steel stocks in the form of the wire, plate, rod, tube, etc., 
having thin aluminium plated films are bonded to rubber or 
synthetic resin having durable bonding and good mechanical 
properties. Aluminium films prevent diffusion of deleterious 
elements in rubber into steel. 



3,660,053 
PLATINUM-CONTAINING X-RAY TARGET 

Rudolf Palme, Reutte, Tirol, Austria, assignor to Schwarzkopf 
DevdopracBl Corporadon, New York, N.Y. 

Fled Nov. 18, 1969, Ser. No. 877^74 
Claiini priority, apptfcatkm Auatrin, Dec 2, 1968, A 
11682/68 
Int CL B32b 15/04; HOIJ 35/08 
VS. CL 29—195 9 ClafaM 

This invention relates to alloys useful in X-ray targets com- 
prising tungsten and platinum. 



to Atlantic 



3,660,054 
COAL UPGRADING 

Robert W. Rieve, Springfield, Pa., 

Rkhfldd Compmiy, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Sept 29, 1970, Ser. No. 76,601 

InL CL CIOI 9/00 

VS. a. 44—1 R 4 Claims 

A method for upgrading coal to a higher quality fuel or 
feed stock by mixing coal with water and heating the mixture 
in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a temperature near the 
critical temperature of water and under a pressure sufficient 
to maintain substantially all of the water in the liquid state. 
By this process at least the sulfur and/or ash content of the 
coal is reduced. 



3,660,055 
SCENTED FIREPLACE FUEL 
James GBbcrt Haler, 50 S. Prince St., Lancaster, Pa. 
Continuation-in-part of applicatioa Ser. No. 810,121, Mar. 
25, 1969, now abandoned. TUs appttcatkm June 18, 1970, 
Ser. No. 47,628 
Int a. CIOI 9/00 
VS. CL 44—6 2 Claims 

This invention relates to scented wooden fireplace fuel 
comprising logs of predetermined length upon which a dura- 
ble coating is applied in which an essential oil is encapulated 
which has a pleaisant scent. The coating may be a lacquer or 
similar organic vehicle which is capable of minimizing dis- 
sipation of the scent of said essential oil while being stored or 
while the log is being burned. If desired, the logs may also be 



impregnated with certain pyrotechnic chemicals to impart at- 
tractive visual colors to the flames of the- burning logs, as well 
as also being treated with a fungicide and insecticide solution 
to neutralize the logs from vermin while being stored. 



3,660,056 
FUEL COMPOSmON 
Erwin A. Donch, Fox River Grove, DL, assignor to Union Oil 
Company of CaHfomia, Los Angeles, Calif. 

FUed Feb. 17, 1969, Ser. No. 802,739 

Int CL CIOI 1/18, 1/30 I 

VS. CL 44—58 12 Claims 

A gasoline composition containing, as an anti-wear addi- 
tive, an aliphatic diether of diethylene glycol, or a combina- 
tion of the glycol and a dialkyl ester of phthalic acid. 



3,660,057 
INCREASING LOW TEMPERATURE FLOWABILITY OF 

MIIN>LE DISTILLATE FUEL 
Stcphan DnyckyJ, Islinglon, Ontario, Canada, assignor to Eamt 
Research and Engineering Company 

FBed Mar. 17, 1969, Ser. No. 807,952 
InLCI.C10l///5 
U.S. CL 44—62 4 CUms 

The low temperature flowability a( a middle distillate 
petroleum fuel oil, boiling within the range of about 250" to 
about 700" F. at atmosf^eric pressure is improved by adding 
to the fuel oil from about O.OOI to about 1 .0 wt. % of a flow 
improving additive such as a copolymer of ethylene with 
another ethylenically unsaturated monomer such as an un- 
saturated ester or an alpha olefin, along with from about 0.01 
to about 0.099 wt. % of an essentially saturated hydrocarbon 
fraction which is substantially free of normal paraffinic 
hydrocarbons and which has a number average molecular 
weight in the range of about 600 to about 3000. 



3,660,058 
INCREASING LOW TEMPERATURE FLOWABILITY OF 

MIDDLE DISTILLATE FUEL 
Nicholas Feldmaa, Woodbridge, and Wladimir PhiUnMil, 
Craaford, both of N J., amignnri to Easo Rcacarch and En- 
gineering Company 

FUed Mar. 17, 1969, Ser. No. 807,953 
Int CL CIOI i/04 
U.S. CI. 44-80 6 Claims 

The low temperature flowability of a middle distillate 
petroleum fuel oil, boiling in the range of about 250" to 
about 700" F. is improved and its pour point is lowered by 
adding to the fuel oil from about 0.0 1 to about 3 wt. % of an 
essentially saturated hydrocarbon frttction which is substan- 
tially free of normal-paraffinic hydrocarbons, and which has 
a number average molecular weight in the range of about 
600 to about 3.000. 



3,660,059 
FUEL GAS COMPOSITION 
Robert A. HoOeauum; Robert F. Hnston, and Cyril A. Bar- 
rios, aO of Baton Rooge, La., assignors to The Dow Cbemi- 
cal Compaay, Midland, Mich. 

FUed Apr. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 28,078 
Int CL BOIJ 1/16; ClOc 3/06 
VS. CL 48-197 FM 10 Claims 

Disclosed is a composition of matter useful as a fuel gas. 
The composition comprises a first component selected fit>m 
methylacetylene. propodiene and mixtures thereof in admix- 
ture with dimethyl ether as a second component. The 
dimethyl ether preferably comprises at least about 25 mole 
percent of the composition. The composition is safely stora- 
ble under pressure due to the stability against spontaneous 
decomposition of the unsaturated hydrocarbons afforded by 
the dimethyl ether. Additionally, the composition maintains 
an essentially constant composition upon withdrawal from 
storage. .^ 



b02 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660,060 
PROCESS OF MAKING GLASS LASERS OF INCREASED 

HEAT DISSIPATION CAPABILITY 
Loais Spaaoudis, Toledo, Ohio, anignor to Owens-Dliiiois, 

Ibc. 

No Drawing. Filed Dec. 1 1, 1969, Scr. No. 884^59 
« lBtCLC03c2//00 

U.S.CL 65-30 11 Claims 

Glass lasers containing at least 1 mole percent of lithium 
oxide based on the total glass composition expressed in oxide 
content and compound are treated by immersing or 
otherwise contacting the glass laser in a molten bath contain- 
ing a mixture of sodium and lithium salts at an elevated tem- 
perature, preferably below the strain point of the glass laser. 
Optionally, the ion exchange immersion in the molten bath 
may be followed by washing with acid such as hydrofluoric to 
produce an acid polish. Glass laser rods so treated develop a 
compressive stress surface layer and exhibit high modulus of 
rupture. 



3,660,061 
COATED GLASS SHEET AND METHOD FOR MAKING 

THE SAME 

Harold E. Donley, Monrocvflie; Raymond G. Ricwr, New 

KcMiagton, and William E. Wagner, Verona, all of Pa., aa- 

rignprs to PPG Indurtrlca, Inc., Plttibiirgh, Pa. 

Condnualion-in-itart of application Scr. No. 68^,131, Nov. 

20, 1967, now abmidoned. Tliii application Mar. 5, 1970, 

Scr. No. 16,670 

Int. CL C03c 15/00; C03b 18/00 

UA CL 65—32 9 Claims 




3,660,062 

METHOD FOR CRUCIBLE-FREE FLOATING ZONE 

MELTING A CRYSTALLINE ROD, ESPECIALLY OF 

SEMI-CRYSTALLINE MATERIAL 

Wolfgang Kdlcr, PrcCzfeM, Germany, aasignor to Siemens 

Aittiengcuibciiaft, Berlin, Germany 

Filed Feb. 26, 1969, Scr. No. 802,467 

Claims priority, appliartion Swltacrland, Feb. 29, 1968, 

2585/68; May 30. 1968, 8043/68 

Int.CLH01J/7/0« 

U.S.CI.65— 32 lOClainH 




In method of floating zone melting a crystalline rod, espe- 
cially of semiconductor material, disposed in a sealed recep- 
tacle wherein an induction heating coil surrounds the rod and 
forms a molten zone therein, the rod and heating coil being 
relatively movable so as to pass the molten zone through the 
rod, the improvement is provided which comprises passing 
hydrogen gas of at least 99.9 percent purity into the recepta- 
cle so as to form a protective atmosphere therein, and adjust- 
ing the pressure of the atmosphere in the receptacle to a 
value below atmospheric pressure; and device for carrying 
out the foregoing method. 



3,660,063 
METHOD OF FORMING SEALED CONTAINER FOR 
ELEMENTAL SODIUM 
Harold A. Chrlstopiier, Scotia, N.Y., asrignor to General Elec- 
tric Company 

Original appttcation Mar. 27, 1969, Scr. No. 811,014, now 

Patent No. 3,579,382, dated May 18, 1971. Divided and tills 

appUcatioo July 15, 1970, Scr. No. 62,754 

Int CI. HOlm 21/14; C03b 23/20 

U.S. CL 65-36 2 Claims 



Applying a solution of a metal oxide film forming composi- 
tion in an oxidizing atmosphere to a surface of a newly 
formed glass sheet to which oxidizing atmosphere and sheet 
has been exposed for at least approximately 3 seconds after 
removing the sheet from a reducing atmosphere containing 
molten tin and its vapor while the glass suriface is at a tem- 
perature sufficiently high to pyrolize said composition to 
form a metal oxide coating thereon of suflRcient thickness to 
provide the coated glass with desired properties, such as 
reducing the transmission of certain wave lengths of light in 
one or more desired wavelength bands through the coated 
sheet or making the coated sheet electroconductive. Care is 
taken to insure that the carrier for said composition does not 
evaporate completely en route to the glass surface to avoid a 
mottled appearance. A particularly desirable operation is to 
produce a continuous ribbon of a substantially homogeneous 
float glass composition and periodically apjrfy a metal oxide 
film forming composition to provide the glass with an ap- 
pearance and color similar to those of glass compositions 
containing coloring ingredients homogenously dispersed 
throughout the glass. 




r- 



An evacuated, sealed container for pure elemental sodium 
is disclosed which has an open-ended casing of tu\ ionic con- 
ducting material sealed at one end with a high temperature 
ceramic plug by means of a high melting point sodium re- 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



203 



sistant glass, an electronic conductor in contact with the in- 
terior surface of the ionic conducting material and extending 
outwardly from the casing, and a seal at the other end of the 
casing. Such a container provides a suitable device for stor- 
ing and dispensing pure elemental sodium, or provides a sodi- 
um electrode with an associated ionic conducting electrolyte. 
Methods are also described for forming evacuated, sealed 
containers for pure elemental sodium. 



comprises a reciprocating pump submerged in a reservoir of 
the thermoplastic material in plastic condition, the inlet side 
of the pump being arranged to take in plastic material 
directly from the reservoir and the pump outlet being con- 
nected directly to an extrusion die in a wall of the reservoir. 



3,660,064 

METHOD OF SEALING REED SWITCHES USING 

INFRARED ENERGY 

Terry L. Rohdc, ScfaOcr Pttk, DL, —ipinr to C. P. Clare Si 

Compnny, ddcago, DL 

Orighml appMcnHon Jnn. 17, 1968, Scr. Na 698,471, now 

Pntcnt No. 3,518,411. Divided and this npplicntion Jan. 29, 

1970, Scr. No. 6,778 

Int CL C03c 29/00; COlc 27/02 

VJS, CL 65—59 3 Claims 






A method of sealing a magnetic reed in the open end of a 
tube of infrared absorbing glass uses an elliptical reflector 
with an infrared energy source at one focal point. The open 
end of the tube is disposed at the second focal point of the el- 
liptical reflector with the axis of the tube extending along an 
extension of the line connecting the two focal points. The 
end of the tube to be sealed is also received within a conical 
reflector with the tube axis aligned with the axis of the cone 
of reflection. The conical reflector is moved along the axis of 
the tube as the glass softens to form the seal so as to concen- 
trate the infi'ared energy on the top of the seal. 



3,660,065 
METHOD OF MANUFACTURING EXTRUDATES 
Frederick James Edwards, Northumboiand, England, as- 
signor to Thermal Syndicate Limited, WaDsend, Northum- 
berland, England 

FUcd Aug. 11, 1970, Scr. No. 62,949 
Chdms priority, application Great Britain, Aug. 12, 1969, 

40.178/69 

Int. CL C03b 9/00, 1 7/00 

MS. CL 65-66 4 Claims 










^\^J 



:v.;->^ 







PROCESS AND APPARATUS FOR THE CONTINUOUS 
MANUFACTURE OF PROFILED GLASS BARS 
Rudolf Pfhiflcr, Baden, Arntria, amignnr to Rubo Vcrtricb- 
sgcsdtechaft M.BJI., WIen, AMtrIa 

Flkd Oct 30, 1962, Scr. No. 872,513 • 
Int CL C03b 13/06 
MS. CL 65—94 6 Claims 



3- 6* 



rr 3" 




A process for rolling profiled glass bars and an apparatus 
for this purpose whereby a horizontal roller arrangement 
with at least one cylindrical roll surface and a pair of lateral 
roller arrangements, each with a respective roll surface con- 
uct the glass ribbon to deform the latter into the desire 
profile. Means is provided for driving the outer roll arrange- 
ments at O.S to 1 .5 percent higher peripheral speeds than the 
central roll arrangement. 



3,660,067 : 
GLASS-FORMING APPARATUS 
LcyshoB W. Towasend, Jr., WortMntton, and Warren E. WD- 
bum, Columbus, both of Ohio, asrignors to Owcns-DIinois, 
Inc. 

Filed Jan. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 5,745 

IatCLC03b7//06 

U.S. CL 65—302 4 Claims 




This invention relates to a method of and apparatus for 
manufactxiring an extnidate of high temperature ther- 
moplastic material (e.g. vitreous silica). In simplest form the 
method comprises delivering the thermoplastic material in 
plastic state to an extrusion die by means of a pump, the 
pump output and the dimensions of the die being chosen so 
that the die contains and supports the thermoplastic material 
throughout its plastic range. Conveniently the apparatus 



In the operation of a plunger to form the yoke area of an 
article centrifugally formed in a mold, a ball and socket as- 
sembly is provided between the plunger and its associated 
spindle which permits the plunger to fireely float fiY>m the 
formed glass article upon withdrawal of the plunger, thus ob- 
viating the production of crizzles and checks due to lateral 
pressure of the plunger on the side walls of the formed glass 
article. 



204 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660,068 
SOIL AMNTIVES 
JoMpIt F. WUmii, BMlksvflle, Oktau, ■■% nnr to 
INl iyrff M W Company 

FBed Dk. 29, 1969, Scr. No. 888,868 
Int. CL COSb 7100; COSd 3100 
UA CL 71—34 3 Clidmi 

A method of preparing a granulated soil additive of calci- 
um sulfate and a soluble salt, preferably a fertilizer, which in- 
volves granulating the calcium sulfate employing the soluble 
salt, incorporated with the calcium sulfate in solution form, 
as the granulating agent. 

i 



3,660,069 
MANGANESE NUTRIENT SOLUTION 
Fetcr Stanley Baddund, An^ieira, CaHf., asrignor 
OO Company of CaHfornia, Los Angdes, CaMf. 
FBed Nov. 12, 1969, Ser. No. 875,738 
Into. COSb 77/02 
UA CL 71-33 ^ 



3,660,071 
WATER SOLUBLE ENTRAPPING OF A PESTICIDE 
Fnmds E. Gwiid, PriMXtoa, and Thomas H. Shepherd, 
HopcwcM, both of NJ^ a wi g nnri to National Pataat 
DcvdopmcBt Corporation, New York, N.Y. 
Original appHcaHon June 13, 1969, Scr. No. 833,182, now 
Patent No. 3^76,760, and a conthina ti on-tai-part of 567^56, 
Joly 26, 1966, now Patent No. 3,520,949, and a coathiuation- 
in-part of 650,259, Jnnc 30, 1967, now abandoned , and a 
coodnaation-in.part of 654,044, Joly 5, 1967. Divided and 
this appHotion Sept 9, 1970, Scr. No. 70,940 
Int. a. AOln 17100; A61k 9100 
UACL 71-65 9CtalmB 

Materials are entrapped in water soluble hydroxyalliyl 
acrylate or methacrylate polymers to provide ready sources 
of the material by the deletion of water. Thus, there can be 
entrapped drugs, pesticides, flavoring agents and fragrances. 




to Union 3,660,072 

RIPENING OF SUGARCANE BY USE OF CERTAIN 
QUATERNARY AMMONIUM HALIDES 
Lonis G. Nickel, Honolnlu, Hawaii, amifnor to Hawaiian 
8 Claims Sagar Planters AsMciation, Honohihi, Hawaii 
Filed May 22, 1970, Scr. No. 39.925 
int. CL AOln 9120 \ 
U.S.CL 71-121 6 Claims 

Sucrose yield of sugarcane is increased by treating sugar- 
cane a few weeks prior to harvest with a quaternary ammoni- 
um salt such as a higher alkyltrimethylammonium bromide or 
chloride wherein the higher alkyl group contaii^ between 
about 8 and 20 carbon atoms. 



*« 



A solution suitable for application to plants and soil to cor- 
rect manganese deficiencies is described which comprises an 
aqueous solution of manganese sulfate and mono-potassium 
or mono-ammonium hydrogen orthophosphate having an 
acidic pH value from about l.S to about 4 and a novel eutec- 
tic composition. 



3,660,073 

ORE PELLETIZING AID 

Roger W. Yonags, Hhudale, and Joaepb M. Sandri, Floinnor, 

both of ni., asdgnors to Nako Cheralcai Company, Cl^ia^(o, 

n. 

FHcd May 21, 1969, Ser. No. 826,547 '\ 

Int CL C21b 1122, 1126 
VS. CL 75-3 8 Clafans 

The invention relates to an organic ore pelletizing aid, to a 
method for making it, and to a method for pelletizing ore 
using the pelletizing aid. The pelletizing aid comprises coal 
which has been treated with an alkali metal hydroxide. A 
particular advantage is the provision of good ore "ballabili- 
ty," even at relatively high moisture content. The pelletizing 
aid may be coated with a high molecular weight, water 
dispersible organic polymer to further improve its per- 
formance. 



3,660,070 

PROCESS OF PREVENTING AGGLOMERATION OF 

FERTIUZERS 

Iwao Manita; Hanihiko Aral, mid Moriyasu MuraU, all of 

Chiba, Japan, assignors to Kao Soap Co., Ud., Tokyo, 

Japan 

Filed Apr. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 33,520 

Claims priority, appUcatkm Japan, Jan. 20, 1970, 45/5555 

Int. CL C05g 3/00 

U.S.CL71— 64E 3aaim8 

A granular fertilizer is treated with an anti-caking agent 
consisting of an aqueous solution of ( 1 ) a substantially water- 
insoluble polymer of polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl acetals, par- 
tially saponified polyvinyl acetate, partially acetylated polyvi- 
nyl alcohol, esters of polyacrylic acid wnd an aliphatic al- 
cohol, or copolymers thereof with another copolymerizable 
monomer, dissolved in (2) an aqueous solution of alkyl 
sulfates, a-olefin sulfonates or alkylsulfonates containing six 
to 10 carbon atoms or alkylbenzenesulfonates in which the 
alkyl radical contains four to eight carbon atoms. The treated 
fertilizer product can be packed in polyethylene bags without 
causing tearing or the bags during storage. 



3 660 074 
METHOD FOR TREATING TITANIUM SCRAP 
RosscU C. BachL Beaver, Pa., asrignor to Crucible Inc., Pttt- 
sborgh. Pa. 

FUed May 7, 1969, Scr. No. 822,522 

Int. CL C22d 7/02; C22b 33/00, 53/00 

U.S.CL 75-10 II Claims 




This is a process for melting titanium scrap to provide a 
material free from dense inclusions. This is accomplished by 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



205 



melting a quantity of titanium scrap in a crucible, maintain- 
ing the same molten for a period sufficient to either naeh 
dense inclusions or have them in uranelted form sink to the 
bottom of the melt, discontinuing heating to form a solidified 
skull adjacent to the bottom of the melt to entrap the inclu- 
sions and then removing the inclusion-free metal from the 
crucible. 



contenu of other components comprising leaching a 
titaniferous material with a mineral acid in the presence of a 
■eed material capable of accelerating the hydrolysis of titani- 
um salts. 



3,660,075 
CRUCIBLE COATING FOR PREPARATION OF U AND P 

ALLOYS CONTAINING ZR OR HF 
Ddbcrt R. Harbor; John W. Andcnon, both of Los 
and Richard K. Money, Esponola, al of N. Mcx., 
to The Unkcd Stntci of Aomrica m rtpreac nt c d by the 
United Stam Atomic Energy Commlarion 

FBed Oct 16. 1969, Ser. No. 867,096 
Int a. C22b 7/00; C22d 7/06; C22b 7/00 
MS. CL 75-65 1 Chi« 

A method of limiting adverse oxygen contamination in the 
preparation of uranium and plutortium alloys containing zir- 
conium or hafriium, in which the metals are melted and al- 
loyed in a graphite crucible coated with niobium carbide or 
yttrium oxide. 



3,660,076 

TREATMENT OF MATERIAL REMOVED FROM 

MOLTEN ALUMINUM 

Merlyn M. WiUfamH, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, assignor to 

Alcan Raaearvh and Dcvctopmcnt Limited, Montreal, 

Quebec, Canada 

FBed Sqit 17, 1970, Scr. No. 73.261 
Int CL C22b 7/00, 27/00, COM 7/02 
DS. CL 75—68 R 18 Chdam 

Material such as is skimmed from the surtsce of molten 
aluminum in a casting ftimace, which usually contains con- 
siderable aluminum metal along with chemical compounds 
such as alumina, is crushed and treated with dry steam at a 
moderately elevated temperature, so that unwanted carbides 
and nitrides are eliminated and the treated skim or the like is 
conditioned for recovery of useful values, advantageously by 
classification thereafter into a coarse fraction providing alu- 
minum metal suitable for remdting and a fine fraction in 
which chemical material is reclaimed, that may include 
values suitable for use in the fused bath of an aluminum 
reduction ceU. 



3,660,077 
PROCESS FOR DETINNING TINNED 9IEET IRON 
Erich Ruf, Emcn, Germany, amignor to Th. GoMschmMt A.> 
G., Essra, Germany 

FBed Feb. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 11,290 
Clafans prkirity, appttcation Germany, Feb. 20, 1969, P 19 08 

503.1 

int CLC22b 25/06 

VS. CL 75—98 3 Claims 

This invention relates to a process of detinning tin-plated 

sheet iron with soda lye in the presence of sodium chlorite as 

an oxidizing agent. 



3,660,079 
PRECIOUS METALS RECOVERY METHOD 
Hargerind L. Govani. West Nyack, N.Y., asrignor to Midlnnd 
Processfaig Inc., North White Plafa», N.Y. 

FBed Jan. 28, 1971, Scr. No. 110,593 
Int CLC22b 77/04, 77/06 
U.S.CL 75-109 17 Claims 

Photographic emulsion scrap is broken down into a liquki 
dispersion in a hot solution of an acid such as hydrochloric 
acid. A finely divided metal powder, such as zinc powder, is 
added to the liquid dispersion causing a chemical displace- 
ment of the silver and other precious metal combined in ha- 
lide salts within the photographic emulsion scrap to cause the 
metals to precipitate for mechanical separation frxjm the 
remaining liquid. 



3 660 080 

AUSTENFHc'aLLOY and WELD 

Espy, Ronald H., Randallstown, and Elbert E. Denhard, Jr., 

Towson, both of Md., assignors to Armco Steel Corporation, 

Middlctown, Ohio 

FBed Jan. 31, 1969, Ser. No. 795,683 

Int CL C22c 39/20 

U.S.CL 75-128 A 9Clatam 

Sound, ductile austenitic alloy and weld of hi^ strength in 
the as-welded condition. The alloy essentially consists of an 
iron-chromium-nickel-manganese austenitic matrix with a.* 
second phase comprising a columbium compound, the 
columbium-rich phase serving to host non-metallic impurities 
such as phosphides, sulphkles, silidUes and borides and 
preclude their depositing in the austenitic grain bcnindaries. 
The alloy conuins about 12* to 30% chromium, about 10% 
to 55% nickel, about 5% to 15% manganese, up to 3% 
molybdenum, carbon about 0.03% to .20%, nitrogen about 
0.03% to 0.30%, with 0.5% to 4.5% columbium and/or 1% to 
7% tungsten, and remainder iron, this amounting to at least 
about 22%. > 



3,660,081 i 
METHOD MAKING FERROSiUCON ALLOY 
John W. FarreB, North Tonawanda, and WBBam D. Forfcag. 
Niagara FaBs, both of N.Y., assignors to Unfaw Carbide 
Corporation, New York, N.Y. 
Contfainatlon4n-part of appBcation Scr. No. 652,884, July 12. 
1967, now abandoned. This appttcation Jan. 26, 1970, Scr. 

No. 5,766 

IntCLC22ci9/44,i9/54 

UACL 75-129 4Clahn8 



3.660,078 

PROCESS FOR THE PREPARATION OF TITANIUM 

DIOXIDE CONCENTRATES 

Shifcki Yamada, Kyoto; KokicM Miyaawa. Shiga; HIdcaU 

Naka. Shiga, and Yorido Yoddda, Shiga. aB of Japan, as- 

signon to IshBmra Sangyo Kaliha. Ltd.. Oaaka. Japan 

FBed Feb. 9. 1970. Scr. No. 10,048 
Cbdms priority. appBcation Japan. Feb. 8. 1969, 44/9012 
IntCLC22b5i/00 
U.S.CL 75-101 19Clahns 

A proceu for the production of a titanium dioxide concen- 
trate highly enriched with titanium dioxide and having low 




gn?|^^?^HHt^:nrrTf^-H 



UtJMM COOIMG MTC-'C KR IMUTC 

H lUMU or «M'c TO Toe'c 



Method foi producing tough non-friable, non-disintegrat- 
ing ferrosilicon by the addition of copper to the ferrosilicoa 
in the molten sute and contrcdling the cooling rate of the 
resultant casting in accordance with the cof^i content and 
the calcium and aluminum contents of the casting. 



206 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660,082 ^ 

CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT NICKEL ALLOY 
Akin NcgisU; Kiyoshi Takayanagi, and Maaani Ikeda, aU of 
Tokyo, Japan, aarignors to The Furukawa Electric Com- 
pany Limited, Tokyo, Japan 

Filed Dec. 27, 1968, Scr. No. 787,435 

Int. a. C22cl 5/00, J9I00 

VS. CL 75—134 16 Cbims 



Mixtur* of on* or mort tt^n 
oo^ of F«,Co,Mo ond Cr 




IOO>*0«%TI 
♦ 0-lO*»Zr 



Corrosion and wear resistant nickel alloys are disclosed 
wherein 1-50 at. % of the Ni atoms is substituted by one or 
more of Fe, Mo, Co and Cr and 0-10 at. % of Ti atoms is 
substituted by Zr. The Ni atoms and Ti atoms are contained 
in an alloy consisting of 45-53 at. % of Ti and the remainder 
ofNi. 



3,660,083 
POLYARYLALKANE-TERMINATED, SOLVENT- 
RESISTANT POLYCARBONATE RESINS AS 
PHOTOCONDUCTORS 
Mclvin S. BhKHn, and Stewart H. Mcrrfll, Iwtli of RodMster, 
N.Y., aarignors to Eastman Kodak Company, Rochatcr, 
N.Y. 

Filed June 25, 1970, Scr. No. 49,953 
Int a. G03s 5/02 
VS. a. 96—1.5 2 Claims 

Polyarylalkane-terminated polycarbonate resins are dis- 
closed which when utilized in photoconductive layers and 
elements show superior stability and resistance to lixiviation 
by the carrier liquid of liquid xerographic developers. 



3,660,085 
SPECTRAL SENSITIZATION OF PHOTOCONDUCTIVE 
COMPOSITIONS WITH PYRROL OR INDOLIZINYL 
CYANINE DYES 
Henri Dcpoortcr, Mortad; Guy Alfred ROIacn, Kontkh; 
Karel Eafccn VeridUe, Moriad, and Tbeofld Hubert Ghys, 
Kontick, aH of Bdgiam, aaignors to Gcvaert-AGFA N.V., 
Mortad, Bdginm 

Filed Dec. 2, 1969, Scr. No. 881,597 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Dec. 16, 1968, 

59304/68 
Int. CI. G03s 5/08 
U.S.CI.96-1.7 10 Claims 

An inorganic recording material is described comprising a 
photoconductive substance, the light-sensitivity of which is 
increased by a monomethine, trimethine or pentamethine 
dye salt or betaine dye wherein the methine group or chain is 
terminated at each end either by 1 H-pyrrol-2-yl or IH-pyr- 
rol-3-yl groups including such groups with fused aromatic 
rings or by 1 - or 3-indolizinyl groups including substituted in- 
dolizinyl groups and wherein, the case of terminating pyrrole 
nuclei the said dyes contain in their molecule at least one 
carboxyiic acid or sulphonic acid group in acid or salt form 
when both nitrogen atoms of the heterocyclic pyrrole nuclei 
carry substituents. The recording material has good spectral 
sensitizing effects in an aqueous as well as in an organic 
medium and has a high fastness to light. 



3,660,086 

ELECTROPHOTOGRAPHIC PLATE AND PROCESS 

EMPLOYING INORGANIC PHOTOCONDUCTIVE 

MATERIAL WITH A PHOTOCHROMIC SENSITIZING 

AGENT 
YaMM Tamai; Chiaki Otada; Hisatake Ono, and Satom Hon- 
Jo, afl of Aaaka-ahi, Japan, aadgnors to Xerox Corporation, 
Rockcstcr, N.Y. 

FBed Jan. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 394 
Claims priority, appUcatioa Japan, Jan. 17, 1969, 44/3261 
Int CI. G03g 5/00, 7/00 
U.S.CL 96-1.7 14 Claims 

An electrophotographic plate which comprises a 
photoconductive layer comprising a photoconductive materi- 
al, a binder material, and a photochromic sensitizing agent 
selected from the group consisting of: 



3,660,084 
RECORDING PROCESS USING QUINOLIN-2-ONE OR 
QUINOLIN-4-ONE ORGANIC PHOTOCONDUCTIVE 
SUBSTANCES 
Johannes Joaeph Vanlwertum, Halle-Zandhoven; Alhcrt Lu- 
den Poot, Kontich; Jonf Frans WUIcms, WUr^k, and Wil- 
bdmos Janascns, Aarachot, aU of Belgium, amignon to 
Gevacrt-AGFA N.V., Mortad, Bdghmi 

FDcd Mar. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 22,376 
Cbdms priority, application Great Britain, Mar. 24, 1969, 
I5J33/69; Aug. 22, 1969,42,061/69 
Int CL G03g 5/06 
VS. CL 96- 1 .6 33 Claims 

Electrophotographic recording process wherein a pattern 
of increased conductivity is produced image-wise in a 
photoconductive insulating recording layer using as the es- 
sential photoconductive compound guinolin-2-one, quinolin- 
4-one, certain analogs and structural derivatives thereof, as 
well as the bis forms thereof, dispersed in an insulating 
binder. At least about 10 percent by weight of the recording 
element is constituted by the photoconductive compound 
and a spectral sensitizing agent for the photoconductor can 
be included. This class of photoconductors is also useful in 
the production of phosphor patterns on cathode-ray tube 
screens. 




NOi 



wherein: R, = H, a halogen, R or OR where R is an alkyl 
group having one to seven carbon atoms, Rj and Ra=an 
alkyl group having one to seven carbon atoms, and K*= 
(CH,), SO3H or (CH 2), GOGH, where n= 1 to 7; 
Ri Ri 




wherein: Ri = R, a halogen, R or OR where R is an alkyl 
group having one to seven carbon atoms, Ri and R3=an 
alkyl group having one to seven carbon atoms, R4=(CH»), 
SOsHor (CH,),COOH where n=l to 7, and Rj and R. = 
H, NO,, a halogen, CN, OR, or COOR where R is an 
alkyl group having one to seven carbon atoms, providing 
Rs and R« do not represent H atoms simultaneously; 

and mixtures thereof, is disclose. Electrophotographic 
processes employing these plates are also disclosed. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



2or 



3,660,087 

NUCLEATION IN RECORDING AND DEVELOPMENT 
Alfred F. Kaqtaui, and Erika E. KMpaul, both of MaUbu, 
CaUf., aasignon to Hughes Aircraft Company, Culver City, 
CaUf. 

Coatfaiuation-in.part of appUcatkm Ser. No. 582,079, Sept 
26, 1966, now abmidoned. This appttcatfon July 7, 1969, Scr. 

No. 839,271 

Int CL G03g 13/22, 5/06 

VS. CL 96—1.8 13 Oafans 



I 
I 

••4- 



ff 



I Btoiw iOMfCt lom.Photowi.EHctro nt 



Vapor Mure* 



Od 







l*C0rtfin9 
m«tfium 



I LaiMil Inwft J 



The image-recording medium comprises an actinic ray sen- 
sitive material and a metallic compound which acts as a 
nudeation-inducing medium dispersed in a film-forming 
vehicle and preferably coated on a substrate. The actinic ray 
sensitive material is preferably zinc oxide, while the nuclea- 
tion-inducing medium is preferably a copfwr-containing com- 
pound. 

The process is directed to forming and using the medium 
and comprises dispersing the sensitive material in the vehicle 
with the aid of a vehicle solvent and dispersing the metallic 
compound in the mixture with the aid of a solvent compati- 
ble with the vehicle solvent, followed by forming the mixture 
into a film. The medium is imagewise exposed, followed by 
development by imagewise disposition of metal from metal 
vapor, in accordance with nucleation sites produced by expo- 
sure. 



3,660,088 

PHOTO-RESIST PROCESS 

Christian B. Lundngcr, Aahton, Md., assignor to W. R. 

Grace & Co. 

Filed Sept. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 72,776 

Int CL G03c 5/00; G03f 7/00; G03c 1 1/12 

VS. CL 96—36 6 Cbdms 

This invention relates to etching metal by a photo-resist 
process which comprises coating a metal or metal clad, e.g., 
copper, substrate with a photocurable composition consisting 
essentially of ( 1 ) a polyene containing at least 2 reactive un- 
saturated carbon to carbon bonds per molecule, (2) a 
polythiol containing at least two thiol groups per molecule, 
the total combined functionality of (a) the reactive unsatu- 
rated carbon to carbon bonds per molecule in the polyene 
and (b) the thiol groups per molecule in the polythiol being 
greater than 4, and (3) O.OOOS to SO percent by weight of 
said composition of a photosensitizer, covering said composi- 
tion with a UV transparent film adherable to the composition 
I in its cured state, exposing said composition through said film 
and an image bearing transparency or mask to a free radical 
generator such as electromagnetic radiation having a wave- 
length of about 2,000-7,000 A. or high energy ionizing radia- 
tion to selectivdy cure and insolubilize the exposed portion 
of the composition and adhere same to the UV transparent 
film, removing the image bearing transparency and the UV 
transparent film with substantially all the cured portion of the 
composition adhering thereto, thus baring the metal beneath 
the removed cured portion of the composition, exposing the 
composition remaining on the metal or the metal clad sub- 
strate directly to a free radical generator to cure and insolu- 
bilize same, removing the exposed metal from the substrate 
and thereafter removing the cured composition thus leaving 
defined metal segments on the substrate. 



3,660,089 
PRINTING PLATE PROCESSING METHOD 
John E. PIckard, Sdma, Ind., assignor to Ball Brothers Com- 
pany Incorporated, Mnnde, Ind. 

Origteal application Apr. 19, 1966, Ser. No. 543,675, now 

Patent No. 3,528^58, dated Sept 15, 1970. DIrided and this 

application Dec. 24, 1969, Scr. No. 889,827 

Int CL G03c 5/24 

VS. CL 96-48 R 14 Cbdms 




Method for developing and desensitizing lithographic 
plates having latent images in the form of a polymer coating 
of varying solubilities in differing areas by dispersing a sol- 
vent or desensitizer onto the plate, drying the plate, removing 
dissolved impurities from the solvent in situ, preferably by 
distilling the solvent, and returning the purified solvent to a 
reservoir for re-use. 




3,660,090 

TECHNIQUE FOR INCREASING THE SPEED OF 

DICHROMATED GELATIN 

Robert Kryan Cniran, Stirling, and Lfllian Ann Rankd, 

North Plafatfidd, both of NJ., assignors to Bell Tdephooe 

Laboratories, Incorporated, Murray HHI, N J. 

Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 23,575 ^ 



U.S. CL 96-49 



Int a. G03c 5/22, 5/04 



6Claims 




H Ifi 1.2 U II u u 







A technique for increasing the photographic speed of 
dichromated gelatin destined for use in holographic system 
involves subjecting the gelatin to an ammonia-water vapor 
ambient subsequent to exposure and prior to development. 



208 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660,091 
PASSIVATION OF DICHROMATED GELATIN 
HOLOGRAMS TO HIGH RELATIVE HUMIDITY 
AMBIENTS 
TiModow Artiiar Shaokolf, Mcndluuii, and Coaftancc 
Vcnwica Stanioiils, PiKataway, both of NJ., aoigiion to 
BcU TekphoBC Laboratories, Incorporated, Murray HOI, 
NJ. 

nied Apr. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 28,136 
Int. CI. G03c 5122, 5104 
\}S. CI. 96—49 3 Clafans 

A method of passivating dichromated gelatin holograms to 
high relative humidity ambients is disclosed. The method in- 
volves a developing process whereby a dichromated gelatin 
hologram, which has been exposed to a laser light, is initially 
treated with a first solvent which both swells and photo- 
graphically fixes the exposed hologram and also introduces a 
high relative humidity passivating species into the photo- 
graphically fixed holographic film. The swollen and fixed 
hologram is then treated with a second solvent which both 
removes the first solvent and develops the hologram. A sub- 
sequent baking of the developed hologram passivates it to 
hi{^ relative humidity conditions. 



containing an organic azido compound is heated to transfer 
the azido compound from the unexposed areas to a reception 
layer and subsequent reaction to a visible positive image. 



3,660,092 

COLORPHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIAL 

Karl Frank, Lcverkusen, Germany, and Jan Jaekcn, Hove, 

Bdchim, Msignors to AGFA-G«vacrt AktiengcsdlKhaft, 

Lcverirasen, Germany 

FDed Dec. 13, 1967, Ser. No. 690,105 
Claims priority, appUotiaa Germany, Dec 20, 1966, A 

54426 

InL a. G03c 7/00 

VS. a. 96-54 6 Claims 

Photographic color images having extremely good light- 
fastness are formed by converting a silver halide image to an 
image of a salt of a heavy metal that complexes with an or- 
ganic complexing agent to make a strongly colored diffusion- 
resistant complex more light-fast than color coupler dyes. 
The heavy metal can be copper, chronuum, numganesc, iron, 
cobalt, nickel, palladium or platinum, or the like, and the or- 
ganic complexing agent can have two different locations in 
its molecule for coordination with the metal. The silver ha- 
lide is converted to the salt of the complexing heavy metal by 
applying to the silver halide image a differently colored or 
uncolored reactive complex of that metal having a disassocia- 
tion constant larger than the corresponding complex of 
silver, so that the silver of the silver halide becomes bound by 
the reactive complex and liberates the heavy metal. It is also 
possible to go through two such reactive complex treatments 
to first convert the silver halide image to a mercury salt 
image, for example, and then convert the mercury salt image 
to an iron salt image, before the strongly colored light-fast 
final complex is formed. The organic complexing agent can 
be uniformly distributed in a light-sensitive silver halide 
emulsion, or it can be uniformly distributed in a layer ad- 
jacent that emulsion. After light-fast complex is formed, the 
unused complexing agent in such a layer can be complexed 
with a different metal ion to form a different color suitable 
for masking. 

3 660 093 
DRY AZIDO THERMAL DIFFIJSION COPYING PROCESS 
Erwin Ranz, Leverkusen; Helmut Kampfer, Cologne-Stamm- 
heim; Harald Von lUnteien, Leverirasen; Hcinz-Dleter 
Sdiatz, LcverliBaen; Dietmar Mayer, Leverkusen, and 
Klaus Sasse, Coiogne-Stammheim, all of Gemuny, assignors 
to AGFA-Gcvacrt AktieagcsellKhaft, Leverkusen, Germany 
FUcd July 2, 1969, Ser. No. 838,637 
Claims priortty, applkation Germany, July 8, 1968, P 17 72 
. 813.1 

* Int. CL G03c 5154, 5156, 5118 

U.S. CL 96—29 D 2 Claims 

Positive copies are produced by a dry heat transfer 
process, whereby an imagewise exposed light-sensitive layer 



3,660,094 

STABILIZATION OF PHOTOGRAPHIC SPIROPYRAN 

COMPOUNDS 

Albert Laden Poot, Kontich, Belgium, assignor to Gcvaert- 

AGFA N.V., Mortsel, Belgium 

Filed June 22, 1970, Ser. No. 48,540 
Claims priority, appHcatkm Great Britain, July 8, 1969, 
34,430/69 
Int CI. G03c 5124, 1172 
U.S. CL 96-48 8 Claims 

Photographic images formed in a layer of photochromic 
material upon exposure to actinic light are stabilized so that a 
more permanent image is obtained by intimately mixing the 
photochromic material with a stabilizing agent of the formu- 
la: 

Rt 

Ri H Ri 
wherein: 
R, represents hydrogen, phenyl or phenyl substituted by at 
least one substituent taken from hydroxyl. carboxyl. 
halogen, amino, nilro, methoxy. aryloxy. pyridyl and 
quinone diazide groups, or wherein Ri represents a 
substituent of the formula: 






>=o 



wherein: 

X stands in ortho. meta or para-position with respect to the 
free bond of the phenyl group and represents — O • SOj — . 
— NH— SO..— . — O— CO— or — NH— CO— and 

Y is nitro or methoxy; 

K. and R, represent a phenyl or naphthyl group carrying 
at least one hydroxyl. methylamine. naphthoquinone- 
diazidesulphonyloxy or -2-methyl-indolyl group; or 

R.. and R, together with the common carbon atom form a 
di- or tri-phenylmethane compound with ring closure 
over an oxygen atom, a sulphur atom, a sulphodioxide 
group or a substituted or unsubstituted nitrogen atom. 



3,660,095 

PHOTOGRAPHIC SILVER HALIDE COLOR MATERIAL 

UTILIZING BENZOYLACETAMIDE COLOR COUPLERS 

Maitd Hcadrik Vcttrvohe, WlkrUk, and Arthur Hcwl De 

Cat, Mortsel, both of Belgium, asrignon to Gcvacrt-AGFA 

N.V., MortseL Betghmi 

FHed June 27, 1969, Ser. No. 837,299 
Claims priority, appMcatlon Great Britatai, July 18, 1968, 

34341/68 
Int CL G03c 7/00. 1140 
UA CL 96—55 « Ofam 

Photographic materials are described comprising a light- 
sensitive silver halide emulsion layer and a benzoylacetamide 
color coupler capable of forming a yellow azomethine dye by 
reaction with an oxidized aromatic primary amino developing 
agent in which the benzoyl part of the color coupler contains 
at least one substituent of the formula: 

RCFzQ— 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



209 



wherein: 

R is hydrogen, fluorine or polyhaloalkyi, and 

Q is oxygen, sulphur or sulphonyl. 

These color couplers in light-sensitive silver halide emul- 
sions provide photographic materials having improved light 
stability. ,. 



3,660,096 
SPEED INCREASING AMMTIVES FOR NON-SILVER 
LIGHT SENSITIVE SYSTEMS 
Eugene Wafaier, Shaker Heighfis; Victor P. Pctro, BrecksviUe; 
Robert D. Fox, Ualvenlty Heights; John E. Shfarey, 
Wicklific, and John A. SmerOlo, Cleveland, aU of Ohfc>, as- 
signon to Horiaons Incorporated 

Filed July 19, 1968, Ser. No. 746,008 
Int CL G03c 1152 
VS. CL 96—90 9 Claims 

Non-silver photographic compositions of the type 
described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,481,739 issued Dec. 2. 1969, are 
increased in photographic speed by the addition of one or 
more compounds from the group consisting of merocyanine 
dyes, polyphenylmethane carbinol bases and N-methyl 
diphenyl amines. 



3,660,097 
DIAZO-POLYURETHANE UGHT-SENSTTIVE 
COMPOSITIONS 
Shaahi B. Mafaithia, New Rochdle, N.Y., assignor to 
Poiydirome Corpor^ion, on the Hudson, Yonlwrs, N.Y. 
Fled Nov. 28, 1969, Ser. No. 880,918 
Int CL G03c 1152, 1/64 
VS. CL 96—91 34 Claims 

Compositions comprising solvent-soluble, negative-acting 
and positive-acting light-sensitive diazonium compounds and 
synthetic, film-forming, solvent-soluble essentially linear 
polyurethane resins, which compositions can be coated onto 
suitable base sheet materials to form presensitized litho- 
graphic printing plates, proofs for multi-color printing, visual 
aids, printed circuits and the like. 



ERRATUM 

For Class 96—91 see: 
Patent No. 3,660,581 



3,660,099 
LIGHT-SENSITIVE SUPERSENSITIZED SILVER HALIDE 

PHOTOGRAPHIC EMULSIONS 
Shul Sato, Hachioji-shi; Eilchi Sakamoto, Hanno-shi; Shizuo 
Saito, aad Kalchfav Sakanune, both of Tokyo, afl of Japan, 
asrignors to Konishiroku Photo Industry Co., Ltd., Chno- 
kn, Tokyo, Japan 

FBed Jwse 9, 1969, Ser. No. 831,714 
Chdms priority, application Japan, June 10, 1968, 43/39449 

Int CL G03c 1/14 
U.S.CL 96-100 6aafans 

A supersensitized light-sensitive silver halide photographic 
emulsion is obtained by incorporating in the emulsion a com- 
bination of two specific dyes having the general formulas I 
and II as indicated below. 



(X-)^t 




(CHi).80»- 



11 



3,660,100 
DIRECT-PRINT LIGHT-DEVELOPABLE EMULSION 
Robert E. Heeks, PenfleM, aad Donrid P. SoAlvan, Rochester, 
both of N.Y., assignors to Xerox Corporation, Rochester, 

N.Y. 

Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 641,135, May 25, 1%7 and 

Ser. No. 707^483, Feb. 23, 1968, abandoned. 

FDed Dec. 4, 1968, Ser. No. 782,789 

Int CL G03c 1/28 

U.S.CL 96-108 4ClafaH 



M 




fOlfy.OOLD 


.as 




Tirr*<3a.0i,^^' 


-,-' 




.11 


V-'" 


l-lfT MO OOLO 


« 


naff NOOOLC^ ■ 


on 






* 


i 


-I i J 4 1 



MMuns iCLO 



3,660,098 
PRODUCTION OF BINDER-FREE SILVER HALIDE 
ELEMENTS UTILIZING ELEMENTAL HALOGEN OR 
PLATINUM HALIDE 
Rnascil P. Cook, WeBeriey, Mass., arlgnor to PolaroM Cor- 
poration, Cambridge, Mass. 
ContfaiuatkMi-in-part of applkation Ser. No. 615,962, Feb. 14, 
1967, now abandoned, This appHcadon Jan. 7, 1969, Ser. No. 

789,588 
Int CL G03c 1/02 
VS. CL 96—94 12 Cfadms 

Binder-free silver halide photosensitive strata are prepared 
by solution halogenation of binder-free silver strata. Mixed 
silver halides may be prepared by contacting the binder-free 
silver strata successively with different solutions of 
halogenating agents. 



A photographic emulsion of the silver chlorobromide 
direct-print light-developable type containing lead and thalli- 
um salts. Optimum results may be obtained by addition of 
gold and iodide salts and certain spectral sensitizing dyes. 



3,660,101 
PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIALS AND PROCESSES 
James M. Owens; James L. Graham, both of Rochester, N4.. 
and Edward A. PBsworth, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, as- 
signers to Eastaun Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y. 
Orighml applkation June 21, 1965, Ser. No. 465,736, now 
Patent No. 3,469,987. Dlrided and this appicatlon Apr. 30, 
1969, Ser. No. 840^74 
Int CL G03c 1/08; G03g 5/00; C09h 1 1/00 
U.S.CL 96-120 Sdahns 

Dispersions useful in spectraUy sensitizing photographic 
materials are provided which comprise spectral sensitizing 



210 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



dyes dissolved in a hydrophilic colloid. Methods for the 
preparation of such dispersions are also provided which fea- 
ture dissolving the dye in an organic solvent, and adding the 
dye solution to the hydrophilic colloid. 



nels, partially defatted seed kernels, seed meal in combina- 
tion with citrus seed oil or other fats, and combining these 



3,660,102 

SILVER HALIDE EMULSIONS SENSITIZED WITH 

METHINE DYES CONTAINING A TlflOSULFATOALKYL 

GROUP 

Oikar Riester, Levcrkusen, Germany, ■urijnnr to A«f>- 

Gcvaert Aktknscadlscliaft, LevcrkuKo, Germany 

Filed Apr. 1, 1970, Ser. No. 24,867 

aafans priority, appttcadon Germany, Apr. 2, 1969, P 19 16 

845.7 
Int. a. G03c 1110, 1118 
U.S. CL 96—127 1 Claim 

Light-sensitive photographic silver halide emulsions can be 
spectrally sensitized by new monomethine or polymethine 
dyes which are hydrophilized by at least one thiosulfatoalkyl 
group of the formula 

— <CH,)„— S— SO.H withn= I to 6. 
These new dyes are prepared by reacting suitable hetero- 
cyclic bases with an excess of a,o»-dihalogenalkanes to form 
the 1 : 1 addition products from which are formed the hetero- 
cyclic ci>-thiosulfatoalkyI quaternary salts the latter being a 
suitable intermediate product for condensation reactions to 
form the new dyes according to known methods. 



3,660,103 

SPECTRAL SENSITIZATION BY POLYMETHINE DYES 

WHICH CONTAIN AN UNSATURATED ALKYL 

SULFONIC ACID GROUP 

Helmut Kampfer, CoioKne-StammheJm; Oskar Riester, Lever- 
kuaen, and Johannes Gotze, BcrgiMiHNeuklrdicn, all d 
Germany, assignors to AGFA-Gevaert Aktienccsdbcliaft, 
Leverkusen, Germany 
Continuation-in.port of appdcatkm Ser. No. 446,095, Apr. 6, 
1965, now abandoned. This appttcation Aug. 30, 1968, Ser. 
No. 756,368 
Claims priority, application (Germany, Apr. 21, 1964, A 45821 

Int. a. G03c 1108 
U.S. CI. 96— 1 37 6 Claims 

The invention relates to photographic materials which are 
optically sensitized with cyanine dyes containing at least 1 
nitrogen-containing heterocyclic grouping, the nitrogen of 
which is substituted with an olefmically unsaturated alkyl sul- 
fonic acid grouping. Such dyes provide more sensitization 
than corresponding dyes in which the alkyl is saturated. 



3,660,104 
GAME FEED 
Roy Herman Godbold, Marfa, Tex., assignor to GodboM, Inc., 
Marfa,Tex. 

Filed Mar. 14, 1969, Ser. No. 807,424 

Int a. A23k 1114, 1/02 

VS. CI. 99-4 1 Claim 

A food block has been prepared for quail. Although this 

bird thrives on the block, said block is relatively unattractive 

to other birds and to animals. 



3,660,105 
CITRUS SEED CLOUDING AGENT FOR BEVERAGE 
BASES AND FOOD PRODUCTS 
James W. Kcsterson, Whiter Haven, Fla.; Rudolph Hen- 
drickaon, deceased, late of Lake Alfred, Ha. (by RosaUnd A. 
HendrkksoB, hefar), and Ccdric D. Atkins, Whiter Haven, 
Fla., assignors to State of Florida, Department of Cknis 
FUed July 25, 1969, Ser. No. 844,984 
Int. CL A23I 1/00; BOIJ 13/00 
UACL99— 28 11 Clahns 

Clouding agents are prepared from the whole seed kernels 
of citrus fruits by preparing a paste from the whole seed ker- 




C P 0«ANOE OIL 

• -CITRUS SEED MEAL 

• -75TI DEFATTED SEED KERNELS 
a-50» DEFATTED SEED KERNELS 
■ -WHOLE CITRUS SEED KERNELS 
A— BROMINATED SESAME OIL 
A-GLYCERATED ROSIN EMULSION 



2 4 6 S 10 12 

STORAGE TIMEATROOM TEMPERATURE - WE E KS 



agenu with water, gum acacia and the flavor oil from the 
citrus fruit to form an emulsion. 



3,660,106 
METHOD OF MAKING FLAKED ROAST AND GROUND 

COFFEE 
Joseph R. McSwiggfai, and Charles H. Brandt, both of Chidn- 
nati, Ohio, assignors to The Procter & Gamble Company, 
Cincfainati, Ohto 

Filed May 12, 1969, Ser. No. 823,942 
Int CL A23f 1/00 
VS. CL 99—65 4 Claims 

A method of making flakes of roast and ground coffee 
wherein said flakes have a flake bulk density of from 0.38 
grams/cc to O.SO grams/cc, a flake thickness of from 0.008 
inches to 0.02S inches and a flake moisture content of from 
2.S to 7.0 percent. The method comprises passing roast and 
ground coffee having a moisture content of from 2.5 to 7.0 
percent through a roll mill having a roll diameter of from 6.0 
inches to 30.0 inches, at a roll pressure of from 1,500 
Ibs./inch of nip to 5,000 lbs. /inch of nip, at a roll surface tem- 
perature of from 50° F. to 200° F. and at a roll peripheral 
surface speed of from 100 ft./min. to 1,500 ft./min. 



3,660,107 
EFFERVESCENT BEVERAGE POWDER AND TABLETED 

BEVERAGE COMPOSITIONS 
Frederick S. Mayer, San Rafael, Calif., assignor to Meyer 
Laboratories, Inc. 

Filed Jan. 23, 1970, Ser. No. 5,376 
Int. CL A23f 1/12; A23I 1/00 
VS. CL 99—66 7 Claims 

A food mixture of an effervescent couple tartaric acid, 
citric acid plus sodium bicarbonate having the relative pro- 
portions 2:1:4 respectively and solid flavorant of coffee, 
decaffeinated coffee, tea or chocolate which upon the addi- 
tion of water yields a beverage. 



3,660,108 ^ 

AGGLOMERATING GRANULAR MATERIAL 
Edmar J. Medals, Woodside, N.Y., assignor to General Foods 
Corporatioa, White Pfadas, N.Y. 

Filed Feb. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 12,855 
Int. CL A23f 1/08 
VS. CL 99-71 5 OafaM 

An agglomerating technique in which a formulation con- 
taining a major amount of granular material and a minor 
amount of powdered material is throughly blended and fed 
through an agglomerator. This method provides a means for 
adjusting and controlling the bulk density of agglomerated 
products over ranges not readily obtained when agglomera- 
tion is performed with all powdered material. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



211 



3,660,109 
PRODUCTION OF PARBOILED RICE 
William A. Lay, Houston, Tex., s a s ignnr to Cams Chemkal 
Compuiy, Inc., LaSaDe, DL | 

FDed Dec. 11, 1969, Ser.^o. 884^82 
Int. CL A23I 1/10 
VS. a. 99-80 PS 5 Chiras 

Treating of rice grain, while still covered by its hull, with 
aqueous potassium permanganate prior to steaming of the 
rice in processes for producing parboiled rice. The perman- 
ganate treatment has the effect of fixing or destroying color 
bodies in the hull to prevent their migration onto the surface 
of the starchy endosperm in the subsequent steaming and 
drying steps and thus prevent color imparUtion to the par- 
boiled rice. 



ing freezing raw sliced pouioes followed immediately 
thereafter by thawing said slices in warm water and frying the 
thus treated slices. 



3,660,110 
METHOD FOR PRODUCING AN IMPROVED PUFFED 

CEREAL 
William E. Holtz, Jr., Chh^o, and Robert R. Rdnhart, Des 
PtafaMs, both of DL, assipiors to The Quaker Oals Com- 
pany, Chicago, DL 

FDed Sept. 15, 1969, Ser. No. 858,100 
Int a. A23I 1/18 
VS. CL 99—81 10 CWn» 

A process for improving whole grain puffed cereal 
products by reducing the moisture content of the whole grain 
puffed cereal product to a level of from 0.5 to 1 .5 percent by 
weight based on the weight of the puffed whole grain and 
then allowing the moisture content to rise to packaging 
levels. 



3,660,114 

POULTRY FLAVOR COMPRISING AMINO ACIDS, 

SUGARS, VEGETABLE PROTEIN HYDROLYSATE AND 

5'-RIBONUCLEOTIDES 
Paul D. Thomas, Groton, Conn., assignor to Ptl»r, Inc., New 

York, N.Y. 

Filed Apr. 12, 1967, Ser. No. 630,188 

Int CL A23I 1/26 

UACL 99-140 N 5 Claims 

A method for preparing a synthetic chicken-flavored corn- 
position conuining amino acids, sugars, vegeUble protein 
hydrolysate, monosodium glutamate, edible fat and 5'- 
ribonudeotides. 



3,660,111 
PROCESS FOR AFFECTING TASTE AND ODOR IN 
LEGUMINOSAE AND IN PARTICULAR PEANUTS AND 
SOYA BEANS 
Karl-Heilmut Koch, 4 HaUbergstraase, Dusscldorf, Germany 
Contlnuatkm-in-part of appUcatkn Ser. No. 477,316, Aug. 4, 
1965, now abandoned. This appttcation Dec 18, 1969, Ser. 
No. 886,394 
Int CL A23I 1/20 
VS. CL 99-98 9 Claims 

The method for improving the taste and smell of legumins 
wherein the legumins are treated with an aqueous solution of 
a mixture of at least two acids selected from a group consist- 
ing of malic, lactic, tartaric, and citric acids in order to pro- 
vide the improved taste and smell. 



3 660 115 

SOLID PARTICULATE AROMATIC MATERIALS AND 

PROCESS FOR PREPARING SAME 

GUbert N. Revte, Ctaidnnati, Ohio, assignor to Fries & Frks 

Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Filed May 9, 1969, Ser. No. 823,530 
Int CL A23I 1/26 
VS. CL 99-140 R 9 Claims 

An aqueous mixture containing water soluble or dispersi- 
ble solids is freeze dried to form porous solids particles. The 
particles are impregnated with liquid aromatic materials such 
as essential oils, flavoring oils, or perfumes. The impregnated 
particles are coated with a film-forming material to seal the 
liquid within the interstices of the solid particles. Flavor con- 
taining particles can be incorporated within dry beverage or 
gelatin mixes and perfume containing particles can be added 
to detergents. 



3,660,116 
VENTILATED STACKABLE CONTAINER 
Frank E. Clark, Orinda, Calif., assignor to Container Cor- 
poratk>n of America, Chicago, Dl. 

FUed Sept 15, 1969, Ser. No. 857,835 

Int CL B65d 85/30, 5/08 

U.S.CL 99-171 R 4 Claims 



3 660 112 
2-ALKYLTHIAZOLES AS TOMATO PRODUCT FLAVOR 

ENHANCERS 
Stanley J. Kaicnlac, Narberth, Pa., and Robert M. HaD, Had- 
dottfleld, N J., asrignors to CampbeU Soup Company, Cam- 
den, N J. 

Filed Nov. 7, 1969, Ser. No. 870,462 

Int CL A23i 1/00 

VS. CL 99—100 18 Claims 

2-alkylthiazoles, and in particular, 2-isobutylthiazole, and 

their use as food additives for improving the aroma and 

flavor of tomato products. 




3,660,113 

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING POTATO CHIPS 

Keng Chock Ng, 1020 Merced Street Berkeley, CaUf. 

FBed Jan. 26, 1970, Ser. No. 5,966 

Int CL A23I 1/12; A23b 7/04 

VS. CL 99—100 P 2 Claims 

Fried pouto particles, frequently identified as potato chips 

or French fries, are prepared having an acceptable color, one 

from Color 4 through 7 of the Cok)r Reference Standard of 

the International Potato Chip Institute by a method compris- 



i 



A container fo formed from a unitary cut and scored sheet 
of corrugated or other paperboard. The blank is folded along 
score lines and connected at a manufacturer's joint to pro- 
vide top. bottom and opposed end panels. The top panel has 
side flaps extending therefrom folded upon themselves to 
provide tapered cellular structures giving good beam strength 
to a top panel. The bottom panel likewise has flaps extending 
therefrom and folded upon themselves to provide stiffening 



212 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



of the bottom. The upper and lower stiffening structures are 
spaced to provide open sides of the container for ventilation 
of the contents. The sides of the end panels have flaps ex- 
tending therefrom, and folded upon themselves to provide 
vertical stiffeners and good stacking strength. 

By reason of the tapered ceUuiar structures the internal 
transverse cross-section of the container is essentially trape- 
zoidal, making the container essentiaOy suitable for tapered 
bundles of stalk vegetables, such as asparagus. 



3,660,117 
BEVERAGE BREWING APPARTUS 
Raymond J. Ncdy, Mo ntg omeryvflie, Pa., 
rrnnrtar CompaBy, WamiBBtcr, Pa. 

fled Dec 4, 1970, Scr. No. 95,270 
lBt.CLA47ji7/<X) 
VS. CL 99—289 



caramel. The caramel-coated apples are then moved to a 
fifth work sution where whey are lowered into and routed in 
a first receptacle or tray for ground nuts so as to coat the 
caramel-coated apples with an outer coating of layer of 
ground nuts. The caramel-coated and ground nut-coated ap- 
ples are then moved to a sixth work station at which the 
completed coated apple confections, with attached handle 
sticks, are discharged into a second receptacle or tray where 
they are given a further coating of ground nuts. The caramel 
container has a heating unit therebelow and the caramel con- 
tainer and .its heating unit are automatically raised in sniall 



to The 



6ClalBis 




Apparatus for use in brewing single cup quantities of a 
beverage from freshly ground charges of beverage material. 
A simplified apparatus is provided wherein the number of 
structural elements is gready reduced and the expense of the 
entire apparatus is substantially less than that encountered 
with respect to prior apparatus. A series of cams is provided 
for operating the component parts of the apparatus and a 
motor for driving the cam shaft is provided. The profiles of 
the various cams are interrelated to reduce the load on the 
motor. 



3,660,118 

COATED APPLE CONFECTION MAKING MACHINE 
Vito O. Rabnondi, Ctakago, and WBliaBi V. Raimondi, 

Ckcro, both of m., aas^nors to Beatrice Caramel Apple 

Co., Inc., CUcago, DL 

Filed June 25, 1970, Scr. No. 49^88 

lot CL A23g 3112 

U.S. CL 99—450.7 62 Claims 

A cyclically operated coated apple cohfection making 
machine includes a handle stick storage hopper from which 
handle sticks are discharged one at a time at a first work sta- 
tion and are inserted automatically into handle stick-gripping 
and apple-holding devices, carried by a main movable 
endless or rotary ttmitable carrier, by which the handle sticks 
are automatically inserted into apples carried by a movable 
endless or rotary turntable apple carrier at a second apple 
pick-up work station. If an apple is not picked up at the 
second and apple pick-up work station the handle stick is au- 
tomatically ejected from the handle stick-gripping and apple- 
holding device at a third work station. The handle sticks and 
attached apples are then moved through a caramel container 
in which they are rotated to coat the apples with a coating of 




increments relative to the handle stick-gripping and apple- 
holding devices as the rotational cycle of the main movable 
endless or rotary turntable carrier embodied in the machine 
progresses so as to assure an adequate coating of caramel on 
the apples as the supply of caramel in the caramel container 
is consumed in use. A nut storage hopper has a nut-grinding 
mechanism therein and ground nut level-responsive means in 
the first ground nut recepucle or tray, which is responsive to 
the level of ground nuts therein, controls the operation of the 
nut-grinding mechanism in such a manner as to assure an 
adequate supply of ground nuts in the first ground nut recep- 
tacle or tray at all times. 



3,660,119 
SILICATE BINDERS FOR ZINC-RICH PAINTS 
Aaron Oken, R.D. #2, Sills Milb Road, Kennctt Square, Pa. 
ConUaaatkw-lB-part of appHcatioB Scr. No. 736,948, Jane 
14, 1968, now aboMloncd. This application Apr. 14, 1970, 
Scr. No. 28,551 
Int CL C09d 5/10 
U.S.CL 106-1 7 Claims 

New compositions of matter are made available which con- 
tain silicate esters and an alkaline material, the mixtures 
being kept anhydrous until their use. The compositions are 
zinc-rich paints, a silicate ester and an alkaline material mix- 
ture being mixed with zinc dust. Upon use, the blend is 
spread out as a coating. Upon exposure to the moisture in 
air, drying occurs rapidly with the formation of very hard 
finishes that greatly resist cutting by sharp edges. 



3,660,120 
FRICTION MATERIALS 
Eric Clnrk, Stockport, and Roger Adrian Summcrllng, Leek, 
both of Ri ^iMJ, amignorn to Fcrodo limited, Manchcrtcr, 



FDcd May 14, 1968, Scr. No. 728^92 
Claims priority, applkstion Great Britain, May 15, 1967, 

22*463/67 

Int CL C09k 3/14 

VS. CL 106-36 5 Oalmi 

A friction material comprising an iixx-ganic fiber, such as 

asbestos, and a binder wholly or substantially wholly com- 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



218 



posed of metallic sulphide formed in situ, the metallic sul- 
phide consisting of iron sul{rfiide formed by the reaction of 
sulphur with iron powder or with lower iron sulphide, with or 
without copper sulphide formed by reaction of sulphur with 
copper powder or with cuprous sulphide. Additional materi- 
als such as metallic powders, fillers, antioxidants and friction 
modifiers may be included in the friction material. The 
material may be formed by a method which comprises com- 
pacting and curing a mixture of ingredientt which c<»tains 
sulphur with iron powder or lower iron sulfide, optionally 
with copper powder or cuprous sulphide. Curing may be car- 
ried out under a pressure of from 2 to 20 tons per square 
inch in the temperature range of 80" C to 600" C depending 
on the proportions of the sulphictes in the binder. 



3,660,121 

HOT TOP LINER AND REFRACTORY RING 

COMBINATION FOR USE WITH METAL HOT TOP 

CASING 

James F. McCarthy, Mars, Pa^ asrignor to The Susquehanna 

Corporation, Fafarte, Va. 

Filed Feb. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 9,063 
Int CL B28b 7/36 
VS, CL 106-38.25 1 1 Claims 

A combination of an exothermic insulting fiber and refrac- 
tory ring for use in a metal hot top casing. The liner composi- 
tion comprises by weight from 7-10 percent asbestos, from 
7-12 percent wood flour, from 41-51 percent sand, from 
26-32 percent silica flour and from 5-8 percent resin binder, 
and the refractory ring composition comprises by weight 
from 4.5-5.5 percent low water content asbestos, from 
4.5-5.5 percent high water content asbestos, from 84-87 per- 
cent sand and from 4.5-6 percent resin binder. 



3,660,122 

HOT TOP LINER AND REFRACTORY RING 

COMBINATION FOR USE WITH METAL CASING THAT 

IS HOT 
James F. McCarthy, Man, Pa., assignor to The Susquehanna 
Corporathm, FaMax, Va. 

FBed Feb. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 9,064 
InL CL B28b 7/36 
VS, CL 106-38.25 10 Claims 

A combination of an exothermic insulating liner and 
refractory ring for use in a metal hot top casing that is hot 
The liner composition comprises by wei^t from 4-6% low 
water content asbestos, from 4-6% high water content 
asbestos, from 65 - 75% sand, from 12 - 16% silica flour and 
from 3-6% resin binder; and the refractory ring composi- 
tion comprises by weight from 6-9% asbestos, from 87 - 
90% sand and from 3 - 4.5% resin binder. 



3,660,124 
CERAMIC DIELECTRIC COMPOSITIONS COMPRISING 

CALCIUM, LANTHANUM AND LEAD TITANATES 
Tsanchlfco Yoahloka; Hluahi Saton, both of Hkasawa, 
Nlkahe-machL Yarifna, Aldta-kcn, ami NaoU Soda, 
KIsafata-macM, Ynri-fnn, AkMm4um, wM of Japan, aa- 
riBMrt to TDK Electronic Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 
FBad Jnnc 13, 1969. Scr. No. 832,988 
Claims priority, application Japan, June 25, 1%9, 43/43659; 

43/43660 
IntCLC04bii/00 { 

VS. CL 106—39 R »Clata» 

A ceramic dielectric composition consisting essei^iaUy of 
45 to 95 mol percent of calchim titanate, I to 40 moi percent 
of lead titanate and 1 to 20 mol percent of lanthanum 
titanate is advantageous for use in temperature-compensating 
capacitors. Addition to the basic composition of 0. 1 to 5 per- 
cent by weight of Ta,0„ WO, or CdO has the effect of 
broadening the temperature range for maturation, thus 
facilitating control of the firing conditions in the manufacture 
of the ceramic body. 



3,660,125 
BRIGHTENING PLASTICS WITH 2-ARYL-5- 
CYANONAPHTHOXAZOLE BRIGHTENERS 
Bennett George BacH, Bonad Brook, N J., aarigaor to 
kaa CyanamM Company, Stamford, Conn. 

Filed Apr. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 28,146 
Int. CL C08b 27/68; C08f 45/67 
U.S.CL 106-176 3 

Translucent plastics, particularly polyvinyl chloride, cellu- 
lose aceute, and polyolefins such as polyethylene are 
brightened by distributing uniformly therethrough about 0.01 
to 0.5 percent by weight of a 2-aryl-5-cyanonaphthoxa2ole 
wherein the 2-aryI moiety is naphthyl, styryl|*enyl, 
anisoylaminophenyl, carboxybenzoylaminophenjd, phenyhi- 
reidophenyl or acylaminophenyl in which the acyl group is 
the residue of a higher fetty acid. 



3,660,126 

ASHPHALT COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING 

POLYAMIDE 

Charles E. Moran, Pfamle, CaW., msl ganr to Chevron 

Rcoearch Company, San FrandKo, CaHf. 

FBed Jan. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 3,530 
Int CL C08h 13/00, 17/22; C08J 1/46 
VS. CL 106-279 4 Claims 

A composition comprised of from about 70 to about 95 
percent by weight asphalt and from about 30 to about 5 per- 
cent by weight of N,N'-diKtearyl-eth^nediamide, preferably 
from about 85 to about 92 percent, and from about 15 to 
about 8 percent, reipectively. has desirable properties with 
regard to softening point, viscosity, and penetraticni. 



3,660,123 

PRODUCTION OF ALPHA-QUARTZ-CRISTOBALITE 

SnJCA FOR POTTERY 

Albert Richard Smith, RcdhH, Eaghmd, assignor to BrMrii 

Industrial Sand UmRcd, Surrey, England 

Filed Feb. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 8,613 
Cfadms priority, appBcation Great Britain, Feb. 5, 1969, 

6441/69 
Int.CLC04bJJ/00 
U.S. CL 106-39 R 7 Claims 

There is described a process for the production of silica for 
use as pottery body from silica sand. A mixture of the silica 
sand and from 0.3 to 2 percent by wei^t of the mixture of a 
calchim compound, calculated as calcium oxide, is calcinated 
at a temperature of from 1,200° to I,550» C. for 5 to 60 
minutes. 



3,660,127 

FLUX FOR USE IN SOLDERING OF STAINLESS STEELS 
Lcatcr Aroabert, Chkago, DL, asri ganr to Lake 
Co., Chlcaio, DL 

Fied Aug. 11, 1969, Scr. No. 849,174 
lot CL C09d 1/00 
VS. CL 106—286 12 

Fluxes for use in soldering stainless steels compriung com- 
positions containing a major proportion of orthophoq;>horic 
acid and a minor proptMTtion of a m<mo- or diammonium 
phosphate, or an amine mono- or diorthophosphate, ad- 
vantageously in the presence of water, and desirably in ad- 
mixture with various supplemental materials. 



214 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660,128 
WAX-IN- WATER EMULSIONS 
DavM B. Shddahl, GrtfBth, Ind., Mrignor to Atkutk 
Rldifldd Company 

Filed Nov. 29, 1967, Scr. No. 686,686 
Int. CL C08II 9108 
U.S. CL 106—271 7 Cfadms 

This invention relates to the composition of an emulsion 
and a method of producing a stable, wax semi-solid by aera- 
tion of the emulsion. The emulsion contains wax, water, a 
primary mono or secondary dialkanolamine, and an aliphatic 
monocarboxylic acid in the proportions of about 25 to 75 
weight percent water, about 20 to 65 weight percent of a 
normally solid hydrocarbon wax, about 1 to 15 weight per- 
cent of the alkanolamine. and about 3.5 to 15 weight percent 
of the acid. The aeration can be accomplished with a rela- 
tively inert gas. 



3,660,129 
PROCESS FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF A FREE- 
FLOWING TITANIUM DIOXIDE PIGMENT 
Hans Hcnnann Luglnsland, Opladcn, Germany, asdcnor to 
TitangcsellKliaft mbH, Levcrkusen, Germany 
Filed May 15, 1970, Scr. No. 37359 
Claims priority, appttcatkm Germany, May 27, 1969, P 19 26 

905.7 
Int CL C09c 1136 
MS. CL 106—300 4 Claims 

A free-flowing titanium dioxide pigment is pre{>ared by 
employing the following process steps: 

1. coating the titanium dioxide pigment with hydrous ox- 
ides; 

2. sand milling the coated pigment ; and 

3. drying the sand milled pigment in a spray drier. 



3,660,130 
CHROME PIGMENTS 
Charles HaraM Buddey; Geoffrey Uond Collier, and John 
Mitchell, all of Manrhwtrr, Eaglaad, aoitnors to Imperial 
Chemical Industries Limited, London, England 
Filed May 1 1, 1970, Ser. No. 36,472 
Claims priority, appUcatioa Great Britain, Sept. 3, 1969, 
43484/69 
Int CL C09c 1120; C08h 1 7/04 
VS. CL 106—302 7 Claims 

Chrome pigments of improved durability, especially to at- 
mospheric sulphurous acid, are obtained by adding to a 
stirred aqueous suspension of ^^^hrome pigment at an initial 
pH between 1.8 and 8.0 a sourcedfstlicate ions, a source of 
trivalent antimony ions, and oxalic acid, and adjusting the pH 
to between 5 and 10.5 by addition of a water-soluble basic 
compound. 



3,660,131 
SATIN WHITE PROCESS AND PRODUCT 
MaifarH H. Morray, Stamford, and Earl E. Brodhag, Wett- 
port, both off Conn., aMJgn ors to Time, Incorporated, New 
York, N.Y. 

Filed Nov. 10, 1969, Ser. No. 875,531 
InL CL C09c 1/02 
VS. CL 106—306 3 Claims 

Satin white coating pigment of improved uniformity which 
gives paper coatings having improved physical properties can 
be prepared by slowly adding an aqueous solution of alum or 
aluminum sulfate to a stirred aqueous dispersion containing 
slaked lime or calcium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide. 



,130 

25, 1969, P 19 



3,660,132 
PROCESS OF MAKING A HIGHLY DISPERSED 
MIXTURE OF CARBON BLACK AND SIUCIC ACID 
Alfred nUfcn, Heerbrug, Switnrland, and Waiter Ncu- 
gebauer, Constance/ Bodensee, (lermany, assignors to 
Dcotscbc GoM-iiad SU^n■•SchcideaIMtalt Vormals Rocaier, 
Fraakfnrt, Germany ^~^ 

FUcd Sept. 24, 1970, Scr. h 
ClafaM priority, application Germany, 

48 443.6 
Int CL C09c 1/48 
VS. CL 106-307 

A highly dispersed homogeneous 
bon black and activated silicic acid 
gaseous silicon monoxide or a mixtu^ 
meul oxide to the action of a ga 
passing substantially simultaneously\ 
carbon black upon decomposition ini 
into the stream of gas right above the < 




3,660,133 

PROCESS FOR THE MODinCATION OF CARBON 

BLACK 

Abraham Van Ocr Schuyt, Hihrcrsum, and Komdis GcrrH 

Wolthais, Amsterdam, both off Netherlands, amignors to 

KoafaiklUke Zwaveliuarfabriekca v/h Kc^Jen N.V. 

FDed May 26, 1969, Scr. No. 827,896 
Claims priority, appHcatkM Netherlands, May 30, 1968, 

6807617 
Int CL C09c 1/44 
VS. CL 106-307 8 claims 

Carbon black, in the dry state, is reacted with gaseous 
sulphur trioxide to increase the ability of the resulting 
modified carbon black to impart long flow characteristics to 
printing inks in which it is employed as pigment without in- 
creasing the content of volatile substances and without af- 
fecting the other pigment properties of the carbon black. 



3,660,134 
INORGANIC MATERIALS SURFACE REACTED WITH 
ORGANO TITANIUM COMPOUNDS 
Horton H. Morris, and James P. Olivier, both of Macon, Ga., 
aadgnors to Freeport Suiphar Company, New York, N.Y. 
Filed Oct 30, 1969, Scr. No. 872,730 
Int CL C09c 3/00 
VS. CL 106-308 Q 8 Claims 

Inorganic materials in particulate or fibrous form the sur- 
faces of which have been reacted with an organo titanium 
compound are described. The products are particularly suita- 
ble as fillers in solvent coating compositions and as settling 
aids for oik 



3,660,135 

LININGS FOR INGOT MOLDS AND FOUNDRY MOLDS 
Henry Nouvcau, Corbcfi-Emonncs, France, ■arignnr to Dolt- 

tou Produits Mctyhirgle Sodcte a RcqMnnbflltc Umitce, 

CorbcB-Emonnei, France 

FDed July 9, 1969, Scr. No. 840,480 

Claims priority, applkation France, Aug. 1, 1968, 161564 

Int CL B29c 1/04 

VS. CL 1 17—5.1 2 ClainK 

An exothermic ingot mold lining is water insoluble and can 
be formed by filtration, but at the same time has high reac- 
tivity, and comprises by weight refi^K;tory material 35 to 60 
percent, asbestos 3 to 7 percent, wood flour 4 to 10 percent, 
manganese dioxide II to 21 percent, cryolite 0.5 to 7 per- 
cent, fluorspar 0.5 to 6 percent, binder 4 to 7 percent, and 
powdered aluminum 10 to 32 percent, the aluminum sub- 
stantially all passing a No. 45 screen and including 10 to 70 
percent that passes a No. 250 screen. The aluminum is thus a 
mixture of fine and coarse powder. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



215 



ERRATUM 

For Class 117 — 8 sec: 
Patent No. 3,660,347 



3,660, 1 36 
METHOD OF COATING SLOTTED ARTICLES 
Lawrence J. GuMbauh, Akron, Ohto, and DavM G. 
Schwenkcr, Cohmbia, S.C., airignon to General Electric 
Company 

Continuation of application Scr. No. 765,807, Oct 8, 1967, 
now abandoned, This appttcatkm Nov. 23, 19^0, Scr. No. 

92486 

Int CL B44d J/095 

UACL 117—17 3 Claims 



"^S 



r^ 



r^ 



l^rJ. 



fTV l^Q) 



^o 



r 



ts" 



A method of applying a powdered coating composition to 
solid slotted articles comprising the steps of: preheating the 
article to the sintering temperature of the composition, coat- 
ing the article in a conventional fluidized bed of the coating 
composition, cooling the article to ambient temperature, and 
coating the article in an electrostatic fluidized bed of the 
coating composition. The method may advantageously be 
utilized to apply an integral insulation to the deep, narrow 
winding slots of a dynamoelectric machine armature or sta- 
tor. 



3,660,137 

HEAT-REFLECTING GLASS AND METHOD FOR 

MANUFACTURING THE SAME 

Shigemasa Funinchi, and Katsuaki Aikawa, both of 

Kanagawa-ken, Japan 

Filed June 13, 1969, Ser. No. 832,991 
Claims priority, appUcation Japan, June 25, 1968, 43/43597 

Int CLC03C 77/70 
UA a. 117-33 J 6 Claims 



3,660,138 
METALLIZED ARTICLE 
John H. GorrcU, BOIerlca, Mass., assignor to King Sedey 
Thermos Co., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Filed Feb. 5, 1969, Scr. No. 796,930 
I Int CL B44d 7/72, 1/02 

U.S. a. 117-35 V 2Clatai8 

Fibrous article with heat-and-light reflecting quality pro- 
vided by a metal coating. The metal coating is overcoated 
with a mixed resin system. The article thus produced has 
enhanced stability of the fibrous substrate due to the heat 
and light protection provided by the coatings and also has 
enhanced strength due to the coatings consistent with sub- 
stantially retaining hand and softness of the fibrous article. 
The metal coating is uniquely abrasion and mar resistant, 
water repellent and launderable and dry deanable consistent 
with high moisture vapor transmission of the article (breatha- 
bility). 

3,660,139 

PROCESS FOR TITLING POSITIVE OR NEGATIVE 

PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM 

James S. Gerhantt, Rochester, N.Y., assignor to Eastman 

Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y. 
Continuation-in-part of appttcatkm Scr. No. 678,196, Oct 26, 
1967, now abandoned. This appttcatkm June 15, 1970, Scr. 

No. 46,449 

Int CLB41c7/0«, 7/00 

U.S.CL 117—38 9 Claims 

A method for titling negative or positive photographic film 

with a minimum of film base embossing comprising the steps 

of: 

a. providing a titling element comprising a polymeric sup- 
port having first and second support surfaces and coated 
upon said first support surface, to provide a printing surface, 
a layer comprising prolamine, film forming promoter, 
plasticizer and pigment; 

b. juxtaposing the photographic film and the titling ele- 
ment, the printing surface of the titling element being ad- 
jacent the photographic film; 

c. striking the second support surface of the titling element 
with heated type to bring the printing surface of the titling 
element into contact with the photographic film for a period 
of time sufficient to transfer selective portions of the printing 
surface having the configuration of the heated type to the 
photographic film without transfer of any portion of the 
polymeric support; and 

d. withdrawing the printing surface of the titling element 
fi-om the photographic film to leave the selective portions of 
the printing surface on the photographic film. 



£80 
t 60 



40 




! 3,660,140 

TREATMENT OF CARBON FIBERS 
DHild A. Scote, GlaMoBbury, and HOton A. Roth, Chcdiire, 
both of Conn^ awrignnn to United Aircraft CorporatioB, 
EMt Hartford, Conn. 

Filed June 18, 1970, Scr. Na 47,490 

Int CL COlb 31/07: B44d 7/092 

VS. CL 117—47 R 8 Clatani 



xx) 500 too 'wo hoc 1300 600 

wavelEnoih in percent 



Si 



^1 



On the surface of a glass substrate is formed by hydrolysis 
or thermal decomposition a light-transmissive fihn of a metal- 
lic oxide having a refractive index higher than that of glass 
and colloidal particles of metallic palladium or of metallic 
palladium and metallic gold, said particles being uniformly 
dispersed in said metaUic oxide. The film has the transmis- 
sion color of bluish gray, neutral gray or yellowish gray and is 
capable of reflecting about 30 to 40 percent of solar energy 
radiation. The film also has superior mechanical strength and 
chemical stability, so that glass having such a film can be suc- 
cessfully used as a heat-reflecting glass in single-pane installa- 
tions. 



s 

i 



SI 



900i)r 



aooo 



7aao 



J2WC7 ■ 




y£' /«e 



A method of treating high modulus, high strength carbon 
fiber to improve its bonding characteristics in a resin matrix 



216 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



comprising immersing the fiber in concentrated nitric acid 
for 4-S hours at refluxing temperature. 



3,660,141 

PRODUCTION OF FILMS HAVING EXCELLENT 

ADHESIVENESS TO GELATINS 

Mksuo Yoshiyasu; SaOao Sirito, aad YosUo Miyabe, aU of 

YokkaidiMd, Japui, aarignon to Mitsubishi Petrochemical 

Compaay Limited, Tokyo-to, Japan 

FHcd Dec 3, 1969, Ser. No. 881,861 
Claims priority, application Japan, Dec 10, 1968, 43/89932 

Int. CL B44d 1/14; B32h 27/08 
U.S.CL117— 76F 8 Claims 

A filler-blended polyolefin film is treated with a solution of 
acrylic ester polymer in a positive solvent which can at least 
swell the polyolefin, and the film in contact with the solvent 
in the solution is heated to the temperature of at least 50° C. 
After removal of the solvent, a film to which gelatins are ad- 
hesive is obtained, which film comprises the polyolefin film 
substrate and a layer of acrylic ester polymer adhering to the 
substrate. 



film-forming dispersion to the surface of a substrate and 
cured thereon by ionizing radiation, e.g., an electron beam. 
This application is further directed to articles of manufacture 
coated with this paint using this process of curing. 



3,660,142 

METHOD OF MAKING A PHOTOGRAPHIC BASE 

MATERIAL 

Tsuneo Kasufal, SUzuoka, and Walani Ucno, Kanagawa, 

both of Japan, assignors to Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., 

AsUgara-Kamlgun, Kanagawa, Japan 

FBcd June 9, 1970, Ser. No. 44^72 

Clafans priority, application Japan, June 9, 1969, 44/45271 

Int. CL B44d 1/44 

VS, CL 117-93.1 CD 9 ClaiiH 

Improving the wettability of photographic base material by 

incorporating therein a small amount of a compound having 

the formula 



; 



CHR'CHR'0)pH 



R-N 

HO (CHR'CHR'O)qH 

CHjCOO 



My 



3,660,145 

EPOXY RESIN AND ACRYLIC RUBBER-URETHANE- 

ACRYLATE PAINT AND PAINTING PROCESS 

Ottn B. Johnson, Livonia, and Santokh S. Labana, Dearborn 

Heights, both of Mich., asslgnon to Ford Motor Company, 

Dearborn, Mich. 

FHcd Dec. 21, 1970, Ser. No. 100,493 
Int CI. C08g 45/04. 41/04 
U.S.CL 117-93.31 10 Claims 

A radiation-curable paint binder dispersion comprises vinyl 
monomers, an alpha-beta olefinically unsaturated epoxy resin 
having molecular weight in excess of about 370, and an addi- 
tion product of a hydroxy-fiinctional acrylic rubber particle, 
a diisocyanate and a hydroxyalkyl acrylate. The dispersion is 
applied to substrates and cured thereon by exposure to ioniz- 
ing radiation, e.g., an electron beam. 



3,660,146 

METHOD OF COATING STIFF MATERIALS ONTO 

FRAGILE, HEAT VULNERABLE SUBSTRATE WEBS 

Earl E. Chndsey, Jr., Sudbury, and Frank Fcakcs, Lexington, 

both of Mass., assignors to National Rcacarch Corporation 

FVcd Sept. 29, 1969, Ser. No. 861,585 

Int. CL C23e 11/00, 13/00, 13/10 

U.S.CL 117-106 R 3 I 








3,660,143 
ACRYLIC RUBBER-URETHANE-ACRYLATE PAINT AND 

PAINTING PROCESS 
Olln B. Johnson, Lhrohig, and Santokh S. Labana, Dearborn 
Heights, both of Mich., 'Assignors to Ford Motor Company, 
Dearborn, Mkh. 

FUcd Dec 21, 1970, Ser. No. 100,477 
Int. CL C08g 41/04, 22/00 
MS. CL 1 17-93J1 12 Claims 

A radiation-curable paint binder dispersion comprises the 
addition product of a hydroxy-fimctional acrylic rubber parti- 
cle, a diisocyanate and a hydroxyalkyl acrylate and vinyl 
monomers. The dispersion is applied to a substrate as a paint 
film and cured thereon by exposure to an electron beam. 



3,660,144 

UNSATURATED ACRYLIC RUBBER AND VINYL 

MONOMER PAINT 

Ottn B. Johnson, Livonia, and Santokh S. Labana, Dearborn 

Heights, both of Mich., assignors to Ford Motor Company, 

Dearborn, Mich. 

Filed Dec 21, 1970, Ser. No. 100,478 
Int a. C08g 45/04; C08f 15/00 
MS. CL 117-93.31 12 Clafans 

A radiation-curable paint which on a pigment and particu- 
late filler-free basis consists essentially of vinyl monomers 
and an alpha-beta olefinically unsaturated, elastomeric parti- 
cle of crosslinked acrylic polymer. The coating is applied as a 



Sti£f materials such as boron and boron carbide are coated 
onto a polymeric or thin metal heated substrate web, backed 
by a screen carrier web and passing over an evaporant source 
of the coating material. The screen is transparent to radia- 
tion. 

The present invention relates to coating of continuous sub- 
strate webs with stiff materials. 



3,660,147 
ADHESIVE TAPE 
Albert EmM Van Hoof, B er ch e m , and Georges Arthur Hoi- 
voct, MortseL both of Belgium, assignors to Gcvaert-AGFA 
N.V., Mortacl, Belgium 

Filed Apr. 12, 1967, Ser. No. 630,224 
Clafans priority, application Great Brltafai, Apr. 12, 1966, 

16,078/66 
Int. CL C09J 7/02, 7/04; D21h 1/38 
VS. a. 1 17-122 PA 4 Clafans 

An adhesive tape carrying a layer of a water-soluble adhe- 
sive composed of a homogeneous mixture of at least one 
water-soluble polymer and as an elasticizing agent a deriva- 
tive of a polyol having at least three hydroxyl groups at least 
one of which is replaced by a hydroxyalkylene ether group, 
all of the hydroxyl groups of such derivative either remaining 
as free hydroxyl groups or being replaced by inert alkoxy 
groups. Preferably, the amount of the polyol derivative 
elasticizing agent is 25-100 percent by weight of the water- 
soluble polymer. The tape is characterized by tenacious ad- 
herence to surfaces of film or paper and removal with water. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



217 



3,660,148 
TREATMENT OF ASBESTOS 
Gordon F. Heron, Rochdale, England, assignor to Turner 
Brothers Asbestos Company Limited, Manchester, England 

Filed Jan. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 1,665 
CkOms priority, application Great Britafai, Jan. 10, 1969, 

1,579/69 

VaLC\.^i2b 19/02, 19/08 

U.S.CL 117-126 AB 6 Clafans 




The invention comprises treating asbestos cloth and other 
asbestos products to reduce the dust emitted by them during 
handling and use. This is done by distributing a small amount 
of polymeric particles throughout the product to bond the 
fibers to one another, while leaving the properties except the 
dustiness essentially unchanged. The preferred method con- 
sists in impregnating asbestos cloth wiUi an aqueous emulsion 
or suspension of the polymeric material and removing the 
water 



3 660 149 
COATED FOAMED ALUMINUM BODY 
Mkhad E. Kncsma, and WaDacc W. Parker, both of Baton 
Rouge, La., aasignors to Ethyl Corporation, New. York, 

N.Y. 

Filed Oct 24, 1969, Ser. No. 869,344 

Int CL B32b 5/18, 15/08 

U.S.CL 117-132 C 8 Clafans 

Foamed aluminum bodies are coated with a polyvinyl 
chloride composition, the composition being a mixture of 
polyvinyl chloride made by a suspension process and that 
made by an emulsion process. Pigments, stabilisers and 
plasticizers may be added. 



ERRATUM 

Foi aass 117— 136 see: 
Patent No. 3,660,582 



3,660,150 
COATED WOVEN MATERIALS 
Mkhad Lakin Cooper, Wchryn Garden Oty, EngfauML a»- 
slgnor to Imperial Chemical Industries limited, London, 
England 

FUcd May 21, 1970, Ser. No. 39,550 

Cfadau priority, application Great Brltafai, June 2, 1969, 

27,720/69; 27,721/69 

Int CL B44d 1/00; D03d 1/04 

U.S.CL 117- 138.8 E 5 Clafav 

A web of woven tapes of crystalline polyolefines coated 

with a blend containing at least 10 percent by weight of a 

crystalline polyolefine. 



3,660,151 
POLYESTER YARNS FOR REINFORCING RUBBER 
ARTICLES 
Richard David Wefanar, Jr., Grlfton, N.C., assignor to E. I. du 
PoBt d« Nemours and Company, Wttmington, Dd. 
Contiouation-bi-part of appttcadon Ser. No. 819,470, Apr. 
25, 1969, now abandoned. This appttcatlon Mar. 16, 1970, 
Ser. No. 20,147 
Int CL B32b 27/02; E32p 27/36; B44d 1/14 
U.S.CL 117- 138.8 F 5 Clafans 

An improvement is disclosed in high-strength polyester 
yam for use in reinforced rubber articles such as tires. When 
drawn filaments of polyethylene terephthalate having a rela- 
tive viscosity of 40 or more are heated in contact with 
rubber, degradation is caused by amine-producing accelera- 
tors commonly used in rubber compounds. This degradation 
is prevented by a durable surface coating on the polyester of 
a salt of a metal having a atomic number of 22-30 or 40-48, 
such as zinc sulfate or ferric amntonium sulfate. 



3,660,152 
COATED WOVEN MATERIALS 
Mkhad LaUn Cooper, Wdwyn Garden City, England, m- 
signor to Imperial Chemkal Industries Limited, London, 
England 

FUed May 21, 1970, Ser. No. 39,551 
Claims priority, application Great Britafai, June 2, 1969, 
27,719/69 
Int CL B44d 1/00; D03d 1/04 
VS. CL 1 17-138.8 E 5 Clafans 

A woven web of tapes made from a blend of fitjm 50 to 90 
percent of a crystalline polyolefine and from 10 to SO per- 
cent of another polyolefine coated with a polyolefine based 
coating composition. 



3,660,153 

LIGHT>INTERCEPTING COMPOSITION FOR 

PHOTOGRAPHIC UGHT-SENSTITVE FILM 

Yoshlhlro SctOi, Aahlgam-Kamigim, Kanagawa, Ji^Mn, aa- 

signor to Fuji Photo FUm Co., Ltd^ Aafalgara-Kamlgnn, 

Kanagawa, Japan 

FUed Jan. 27, 1969, Ser. No. 794,010 

Oafans priority, appttcatkm Japan, Jan. 26, 1968, 43/4696 

Int CL D21h 1/28; G03c 1/86 

U.S.CL 117-155 UA 7 Oafam 




Light-intercepting composition consisting of an ethylene- 
vinyl acetate copolymer having dispersed therein carbon 
black. In film form, the composition is laminated to a paper 
to provide a light-intercepting paper for use in photographic 
light-sensitive roD film. 



ERRATUM 

For Class 117 — 161 see: 
Patent No. 3,660,371 



3,660,154 

METHOD FOR PRODUCING IMPROVED 

SEMICONDUCnVE DIODES 

John A. Scott-Moock, Rcdowlo BcmA, CaHL, and Arthur J. 

Learn, West Concord, Mam., asrignnni to TRW Inc., Re- 

dondo Beach, Calif . 

FUed Aug. 15, 1968, Ser. No. 752,756 

Int a. B44d 1/18; HOll 7/00 

U.S.CL117— 200 llOafans 

This invention relates to a method for producing improved 

polycrystalline semiconductive thin film diodes having an in- 



218 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



creased interfacial barrier height and an increased rectifica- 
tion ratio. The improved diodes are obtained by treating the 
surface of the polycrystalline semiconductive sulfur com- 
pound with an excess of elemental sulfur. 



3,660,155 
METHOD FOR PREPARING SOLID FILMS 
John D. Mackenzie, Los Angeles, CaUf., aasignor to The 
United States of America as represented by the Secretary of 
the Navy 

Filed Apr. 15, 1970, Ser. No. 28^41 

Int. CL C23c 13100, 15/00; C23f 17/00; C23b 5/50 

VS. CL 1 17—201 4 Claims 



;* 







The electrical discontinuity which appears in the tempera- 
ture response of certain materials when they are in crystalline 
form and are at characteristic transitional temperatures is 
suppressed by depositing the material on a substrate which is 
mainuined at a temperature low enough to cause the result- 
ing film to be amorphous. Also, by utilizing temperatures on 
either side of the transitional temperature, for example, new 
and different resistivity versus temperature responses may be 
realized which do not inhibit the semiconductor-metal transi- 
tion. 



vocontrolled mask-to-wafer aligners. The target has a line 
border which differs sharply in its light reflecting charac- 
teristic from the surrounding surface of the semiconductor 
wafer. Within the target area defined by the line border are a 
plurality of light reflecting and light removing areas arranged. 



3,660,156 
SEMICONDUCTOR DOPING COMPOSITIONS 
John George Schmidt, St. Louis, Mo., assignor to Monsanto 
Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

FUcd Aug. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 65,358 
Int. CL HOll 3/00 
VS. CL 1 17-201 19 Claims 

The disclosure herein relates to semiconductor doping 
compositions and to methods for their preparation and use. 
More particularly, the disclosure relates to liquid silica-based 
doping compositions which may be applied to a surface of a 
semiconductor substrate and, upon heating, an impurity is 
diffused from a film of the doping composition into the sub- 
strate to form a region therein having the desired electrical 
properties. 




preferably, in ahemating sequence to form a checkerboard 
or parallel line pattern. For semiconductor wafers in which 
the target cannot be formed in an overlying, electrically insu- 
lative layer because of the subsequent removal of the layer, 
the target is etched directly into the semiconductor materials. 



3,660,157 
ENHANCED CONTRAST SEMICONDUCTOR WAFER 
ALIGNMENT TARGET 
Philippe VUlers, Concord; Martin A. Allen, Sudbury, and 
James M. Mulvancy, Southboro, aU of Mass., assignors to 
Compntenision Corporation, WaHham, Mass. 
Filed Aug. 18, 1969, Ser. No. 850,883 
Int. CI. HOll 7/00 
U.S.CL 117— 212 5 Claims 

An enhanced contrast semiconductor wafer alignment tar- 
get for use in automatic, light balanced, null seeking, ser- 



^ 3,660,158 

THIN HLM NICKEL TEMPERATURE SENSOR AND 
METHOD OF FORMING 
Arthur C. M. Chen, and Jama M. LommeL both of Schenec- 
tady, N.Y., asstgDon to General Ekctrk Company 
Filed Dec. 30, 1968, Ser. No. 787,685 
Int. CL B44d 1/18 
VS. CL 117—217 5 Claims 




Thin film nickel temperature sensors having a temperature 
coefficient of resistance of above -K).2 percent/" C and a re- 
sistance above 0.35 ohms per square are formed by electron 
beam evaporation of a high purity nickel source at pressures 
below 8 X 10~* torr and deposition of the evaporated nickel 
atop a dielectric substrate, e.g. a polyimide film, heated 
above 60° C. The nickel film preferably is deposited to a 
thickness between 250 A and 3.000 A and masking is em- 
ployed to produce a desired configuration in the dep>osited 
nickel film. To stabilize the resistance of the deposited nickel 
film, a dielectric encapsulant such as alumina, silica, a polyi- 
mide or a fluorocarbon then is overlayed upon the film by 
conventional vacuum deposition or bonding techniques. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



219 



3,660,159 

METHOD FOR METERING A CLEANING SOLUTION 

FOR A VEHICLE WHEEL 

Clyde F. LarUn, Jr., 285 Taytor Drive, Lcxhigton, Ky. 

Original application Sept 27, 1968, Ser. No. 763,067, now 

Patent No. 3,602,236, dated Aug. 31, 1971. DivMed and this 

application Nov. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 93,523 

Int. CL B08b 3/04 

VS. CL 134—32 10 Claims 



3,660,162 
GALVANIC CELL 
Morris Eisenberg, Pak> AKo, CaHf., assignor to Elec- 
trocbemica Corporation, Menio Park, CaHf. 

Filed Mar. 27, 1970, Ser. No. 23,463 
Intel. HOlm 7 7/00 
U.S. CL 136-83 R 25 Claims 

A galvanic cell is disclosed comprising spaced cathodic 
and anodic electrodes and an electrolyte having an organic 
aprotic solvent and a soluble solute such as a Lewis acid. At 
least one of the electrodes has a conductive support member 
comprising a metal selected ft^om the group consisting of alu- 
minum, magnesium and beryllium. 



li 

li 




m-- ■ 



[/ 



\ 
». Jj 



Linearly spaced spray nozzles are disposed on opposite 
sides of a vehicle path for spraying a cleaning solution on the 
wheels of a vehicle. As the vehicle wheel engages a trip 
mechanism for each pair of aligned nozzles, a portion of the 
area of the wheel is sprayed with the cleaning solution. A 
predetermined quantity of the cleaning solution is metered 
through each of the spray nozdes irrespective of the time 
that the wheel remains in engagement with the trip 
mechanism. 



3,660,160 
DISSOLUTION OF POLYMERS 
Kenneth W. Powers, Berkeley Hd^ils, and George E. Ser- 
nhik, Roseile, both of N J., assignors to Emo Research and 
Engineering Company 

Filed Dec 31, 1969, Ser. No. 889,697 
Int. a. B08b 7/00, 9/00; C23g 5/00 
VS. CL 134-22 14 Claims 

Dissolution of cross-linked polymer gels is efTected by use 
of Lewis acids plus Lewis salts. 



3,660,163 
SOLID STATE LITHIUM-IODINE PRIMARY BATTERY 
James R. Moser, Shrewsbury, Pa., assignor to Catalyst 
Research Corporation, Baltimore, Md. 

Filed June 1, 1970, Ser. No. 41^01 
Int. CL HOlm 21/00 
VS. CL 136-83 R 21 Claims 

A substantially anhydrous solid sute battery has a lithium 
anode, a solid lithium iodide electrolyte and an electronically 
conductive cathode containing iodine, such as organic iodine 
charge transfer complexes. 



I 3,660,164 

PRIMARY CELL UTILIZING HALOGEN-ORGANIC 

CHARGE TRANFER COMPLEX 

Allen M. Hermann, La Canada, CaHf.; Fcilx Gutmann, W. 

Pennant Iflib, New South Wales, Australia, and Alan 

Rcmbanm, Ahadcna, CiilL, aarignon to Cattfomia Instltale 

Research Fouadatloii, PMadcna, CattL 
CootLBuatloB of appikathw Ser. No. 643,883, June 6, 1967, 

Contlnnatloii-in-iwrt of appBcatloi i Ser. No. 556,900, June 
13, 1966, DOW abandoMd. HiIb appHcalioo July 2, 1969, Ser. 

No. 845,616 

Int. a. HOlm 15/00 

VS. CL 136—83 R 6 ClaiaH 

Primary cells capable of operating essentially in the solid 
state and utilizing reaction of a halogen with a metallic anode 
employ as cathode a charge transfer com|riex in which the 
acceptor component is the halogen and the donor cona- 
ponent is an organic compound, typically aroinatic or hetero- 
cychc. Preferred anode materials include magnesium, calci- 
um and barium. 

The maximum current produced by such cells can be in- 
creased by surrounding them with an atmosphere containing 
more than the normal partial pressure of water vapor, or con- 
taining vapor of an organic liiquid such alcohol, acetone and 
acetonitrile, having a high dielectric constant. 

The physical properties of the charge transfer complex is 
improved by incorporating a polymeric matrix, which may or 
may not act also as the donor component of the complex. 



3,660,161 
METHOD FOR INSERTING MATERIAL INTO THE 
APERTURES OF AN APERTURED WORKPIECE 
Helmut EmH Durr, Chatham Township, Morris County, and 
Albert Hefau HaUer, Cfaurk, both of NJ., assignors to 
Western Electrk Company, Incorporated, New York, N.Y. 
Filed June 6, 1969, Ser. No. 831,001 
Int. CL HOlm 35/26, 7/00 
VS. CL 136-67 9 Claims 

This disclosure is directed to methods of and apparatus for 
inserting a material, e.g., the reactive paste used in secondary 
batteries, into the apertures of an apertured workpiece, e.g., 
the plate or grid element of a secondary battery, wherein the 
material to be inserted is deposited on the workpiece, an in- 
sertion means, e.g., a roller, is advanced toward the work- 
piece against the material, and the insertion means is dis- 
placed over the surface of the workpiece against the material 
concurrently with the advancement of the insertion means. 



3,660,165 

ELECTRODES COMPRISING FLUORINATED 

PHOSPHONITRILE POLYMER AND FUEL CELL IN 

COMBINATION THEREWITH 

Nigd I. Pafaner, Port Washington, N.Y., assignor to Leesona 

Corporation, Warwick, RJ. 

Hied Apr. 22, 1970, Ser. No. 30,948 
Int. CL HOlm 27/04, 13/00 
VS. a. 136—86 D 31 Clafans 

Lightweight electrodes for use in an electrochemical 
device are described. In one embodiment the lightweight 
electrodes comprise a catalyst layer including an admixture 
of catalyst and a fluorinated phosphonitrile polymer. In 
another embodiment the hydrophobic backing layer is a con- 
tinuous film of fluorinated phosphonitrile polymer with a 
contiguous layer of catalyst thereon. The catalyst can also be 
admixed and bound with particles comprising the same 



220 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



fluorinated phosphonitrile polymer used as the backing layer, 
derivatives of the polymeric material or other hydrophobic 
polymers such as polytetrafluoroethylene. The electrode is 
adapted to be disposed in an electrochemical cell with the 
catalytic layer in contact with the cell electrolyte. 



3,660,166 
GAS DIFFUSION ELECTRODE 
August Wfand, Kdkhrim, Germany, aMifiior to Sleniciis Ak- 
tknccadbciiaft, Berlin, Germany and Varta Aktien- 
geselbchafl, Frankftirt am Main, Germany 

FDed Mar. 14, 1967, Ser. No. 623,109 
Clafans priority, a ppB caHon Germany, Mar. 17, 1966, S 

102563 

Int a. HOlm 27/04, 13100 

\}JS. CL 136-86 D 12 Claims 



tional function of closing the usual separator, with no inter- 
vening structure between it and the separator, to assure 
greater confining control of he electrolyte by said separator. 
The plastic disc top also constructed unitarily of full can 
diameter, and has an annular border disposed to provide a 
tight seating fit in the can at the bead as a seat, and is held in 
place by crimped edge rim of the can to assure a substantially 
hermetic seal between the disc border and the can. An exter- 
nal metal jacket surrounds and is insulated from the can, and 
serves as an additional element for impressing an additional 
pressure force on the metal crimped onto the plastic disc, to 
assure a hermetic seal under continuous pressure between 
those engaging surfaces of said disc border and of the 
crimped metal. 

The anode collector is constructed of two hollow semi- 
cylindrical parts held to resist radial relative displacement, 
and to thereby maintain uniform ionic spacing between 
cathode and anode collector facing surfaces. 




3,660,169 
BATTERY PACKAGING DEVICE 
Rkhartl R. Chine, AnUcy, and Gordon E. Kaye, Sooth 
Salem, both of N.Y., Mslcnon to P. R. MaBory A Co., Inc., 
IndianapoBi. Ind. 

FBed Apr. 22, 1970. Ser. No. 30,744 

Int. a. HOlm 1102 

UACL 136-111 12Clalmi 



T^^ 



Catalytic electrode having improved heat dinipating 
means. The electrode embodies a foraminous metallic web 
having deposited over major portions of its surfaces porous 
catalytic material framed within gasket material and essen- 
tially having sufficient web surface exposed to effectively 
remove heat from the electrode during its operation in a fuel 
cell or other exothermic catalytic processes. 



3,660,167 
ALKALINE DRY CELL 
Cho Kin Chhig, 599 West 190th Street, New York, N.Y.; 
Wytcr Cohen, 13 Fktcher Drive, MorganviUe, NJ., and 
Stanley Tseng, 945 West End Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
Filed Nov. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 86,799 
Int.CI.H01m2//00 
U.S.CL 136-107 8 Claims 

An alkaline dry cell of high energy density in which a 
cathode of powdered manganese dioxide, carbon, and gra- 
phite has dispersed throughout it, short filaments of stainless 
steel, long filaments of stainless steel, and stainless steel 
powder. 




A two-part molded cartridge utilizes one part as an as- 
sembly tray or shell for assembling three electric cells in posi- 
tion to permit electrical interconnections between the cells, 
and to support conuct termiiud surfaces for connection to 
external circuit contact terminals, and then utilizes the 
second molded part as a cover, and the two parts are then 
sealed to constitute a housing for the cells as a battery unit. 



3,660,168 \ 
LEAK-PROOF PRIMARY CELL 
Robert E. Rabtoa, Spring VaBey, and Yung Ling Ko, Peek- 
skifl, both of N.Y., assignors to P. R. MaBory & Co. Inc., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Filed Apr. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 26,91 1 
Int. CI. HOlm 27/00 
U.S.CL 136-107 18 Claims 

A leak-proof electrochemical cell having a cylindrical can 
closed on its bottom end, and open at its top end, with an in- 
ternal peripheral bead as a seat for a plastic disc to be seated 
on the bead to cover the elements within the cell, and to 
receive the crimped end of the can for closure, and con- 
structed to have a central co-axial bore and co-axial hub 
around the bore to hold a rivet to support an anode collector 
from the bonom side of the plastic disc and to support one of 
the terminals of the cell, here specifically the negative cap or 
terminal, from the top of the rivet, and to perform the addi- 



3 660 170 

DENDRITE-INHIBmNG ADDITIVE FOR BATTERY 

CELL HAVING ZINC ELECTRODE 

Guy Rampd, GafaiesvlBe, Fla., assignor to General Electric 

Company 

FDed Apr. 8, 1970, Ser. No. 26,607 
Int. a. HOlm 43106 
U.S.CL 136-154 12 Claims 

To inhibit the formation of overgrowth of excessive 
dendritic zinc, for example during recharging of a rechargea- 
ble electrolytic battery cell, or in electroplating, the elec- 
trolyte contains an additive consisting essentially of a ca- 
tionic high molecular weight organic linear polymer which 
has a positive ion radical of substituted ammoiuum which 
may be one of a large number of related ammonium 
polymers, preferably quaternary. The quaternary nitrogen in 
the molecule can be part of a ring which may include the ad- 
jacent carbon atom for any two of the nitrogen's four sub- 
stituent radicals, and the ring may also include ether link- 



^ 

•^ 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



SSI 



ages. The polymer compound is water soluble and is soluble thereby enhancing the corrosion resistance and bonding pro- 
in the electrolyte of the cell to the extent required to be ef- 
fective for proper charge and discharge operation of the cell. 
The additive may be dissolved in the electrolyte directly, or 




may be added as a coating on the separator film, or be an in- 
gredient of the paste-type anode. A preferred embodiment of 
the invention comprises, as the additive, diallyldimethylam- 
mohium hydroxide polymer. 



3,660,171 
METHOD FOR PRODUCING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE 

UTIUZING ION IMPLANTATION 
Takashi TsnchhMto, Kodakn-sU; Takashi Tokuyama, Hoya- 
shi, and KBcy Komatsnbnra, Tokoroiawa-shi, aB of Japan, 
assignors to Hitachi, Ltd^ Tokyo, Japan 

FBed Dec 24, 1969, Ser. No. 887,936 
Clafans priority, appBcatkw Japan, Dec 27, 1968, 43/95458 

Int CL HOll 7154 
U.S.CL 148-1.5 3 Clafans 




temperature 
emitter region 



m 



the range of 400' to 600° C. to form an 






4-U-U^. 



M. 




*-t.4%f ~^;:Hf H-rt^ -r 



i^'-»^'*^v,i.4^i^'^^^K^^ 



iiiiii ^ kk Mu l i i i in<! t <i Jitmi i ii ii 



perties of the substrate when a paint or similar siccative or- 
ganic finish is thereafter applied. 



3,660,173 
METHOD OF PREPARING CORROSION RESISTANT 
METALUC ARTICLES 
AUra Malsuno; Takao Sasame; Ikmo SMmin; Hnmlo Kim, 
and ffiroyuU K^awa, aB of HlnMhhmhken, Jap«i, as- 
signors to Toyo Kqpro Co., Ltd., HiinsMiiiBlrfn and Tokyo 
ShOMura Electrk Co., Ltd., KawasahMd, Japan 
FBed Jane 23, 1970, Ser. No. 49,052 
Oafans priority, appBcatioa Japan, June 25, 1969, 44/505|M 

Int CL C23f 7104 
U.S. a. 148—6.35 6 ' 



AiaOs'TJOa 




<jLAl203*Zr02 



A method for producing a transistor structure utilizing ion 
implantation, comprising the steps of implanting ions of base- 
forming impurity into a predetermined portion of a surface of 
a semiconductor body serving as a collector and heated to a 
temperature above 600* C. but below the melting point of 
the semiconductor to form a base region, and thereafter im- 
planting ions of emitter-forming impurity into a predeter- 
mined portion of the surface of said base region heated to a 



3,660,172 
PREPAINT TREATMENT FOR ZINCIFEROUS SURFACES 
George Freed Otto, Orefamd, Pa., assignor to Amchem 
Products, Inc., Ambler, Pa. 

Filed Aug. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 65,071 
Int CL C23f 7126 
U.S. CL 148-6.2 3 Clafans 

A conversion coating is applied to zinciferous surfeces. 



A method of furnishing the surface of ferroalloys with re- 
sistance to hot corrosive gases containing halogens or com- 
pounds thereof or to general oxidation which comprises the 
steps of heating in an oxidizing atmosphere at a temperature 
of 1 ,000° to 1 ,400° C for a suitable number of hours articles 
prepared from a metal consisting of 10 to 25 percent of 
chromium, 2 to 5 percent <rf aliuninum, less than 0.04 per- 
cent of carbon. 0.005 to 0.05 percent of nitrogen, 0. 1 to 0.6 
percent of titanium, 0.01 to 0.5 percent of zirconium, iron as 
the remainder and further containing ordinary impurities, in 
which constitution ratio of Vfk -t- Zr% to N% ranges firom 10 
to 60, so as to diffuse by migration in the surface layer of the 
base body of the article part of oxidizable elements contained 
therein, thereby forming an oxide layer mainly consisting of 
aAljOi on said surface. 



222 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660,174 

METHOD IN THE MANUFACTURE OF STAINLESS, 

HARDENABLE CHROMIUM-STEEL STRIP AND SHEET 

Klas-Erik Jakenbcrg, Hagfors, Sweden, anignor to Ud- 

ddMlins Aktiebolag, Hagfon, Sweden 

Filed May 23, 1969, Scr. No. 827^55 
Claims priority, appHcatlon Sweden, May 31, 1968, 7333/68 

Int. CL C21d 9118; C22c 39/14 
VS. CI. 148—12 6 Claims 

There is provided a method of producing stainless, chromi- 
um-steel sheet or strip having a high resistance to corrosion 
and an improved hardness, and which has a relatively high 
yield point / ultimate strength ratio in an unhardened state, 
the starting material used in the method being one of sub- 
stantially a peariite structure and in which the material is 
heated and worked at specific temperatures so as to break 
down the peariite structure and transform said structure to 
one comprising finely-divided spheroidized carbides in a fer- 
ritic matrix. 



Waspaloy, are significantly improved by a thermomechanical 
processing technique involving the generation of an inter- 
metallic pinning phase, such as a spheriodal eta phase or an 



3,660,175 
METHOD OF MANUFACTURING A MAGNETICALLY 
ANISOTROPIC MAGNET BODY 
Theodoras Henricus Carohis Van McUb; Pletcr Aart 
Nautepad, and Kr^n Jacobus de Vos, aU of Emmw i ng ei, 
Eindhoven, Nctheriands, aaignon to U.S. Philips Corpora- 
tion, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Sept. 11, 1970, Scr. No. 71,526 
Claims priority, application Ncthcrlandt, Sept. 18, 1969, 

6914126 
Int a. HOlf 1104 
VS, CL 148- 103 4 Claims 

A method of manufacturing anisotropic permanent mag- 
nets having a composition 28 - 42 percent Co, 10-20 per- 
cent Ni. 6 - 10 percent Al, 2 - 8 percent Cu, 4 - 10 percent 
Ti, remainder mainly Fe. The anisotropy is induced in the al- 
loy, possibly together with the treatment in a magnetic field, 
by means of an elastic deformation of the alloy below the 
segregation temperature T,. The result, at feast when T, is at 
least 25* C higher than T„ is a higher energy product of the 
magnet than could be achieved so far. 



3,660,176 

PRECIPITATION-HARDENABLE STAINLESS STEEL 

METHOD AND PRODUCT 

Elbert E. Dcnhard, Jr., Towaon, Md., avignor to Armco Stcd 

Corporation, MhMlctown, Ohio 

Filed Feb. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 10,272 
Int CL C21d 1140, 1142 
MS. CL 148- 142 5 Claims 

Method for developing great strength, along with ductility, 
in the martensitic precipitation-hardenable stainless steels, 
particularly bar, rod and wire products, such as the 17-4 PH 
grade (about 17 percent chromium, 4 percent nickel, 3 per- 
cent copper, 0.07 percent max. carbon, and remainder iron), 
wherein the product, moving at significant speed, is subjected 
to high electrical energy heating to quickly Uk6 the harden- 
ing ingredients (copper, carbon, etc.) into solution; then 
quenched to transform the metal and preclude excessive 
grain growth, and finally reheated to effect hardening and 
strengtiiening. 




overaged gamma prime phase, with subsequent recrystalliza- 
tion to provide a uniform microstructtire having a grain size 
of ASTM 10-1 3 or finer. 



3,660,178 

METHOD OF DIFFUSING AN IMPURITY INTO A 

COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTOR SUBSTRATE 

Susumu Takahashi, Kokubi^Ji; HIno Nakaddma, Hachioji, 

and ManKMhl MigHaka, Kodaira, al of Japan, Mi linnn to 

Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filed Aug. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 63^46 
Claims priority, application Japan, Aug. 18, 1969, 44/65205 

Int. CL HOll 7144 
UACL148— 189 8Clafans 

A semiconductor substrate of Group III-V compound such 
as GaAs or GaP covered uniformly with powder of the same 
kind of semiconductor with grain diameters of 20-500^ is 
placed in a quartz tube and a small piece of zinc is also 
placed in the tube at a place separated from the substrate, 
the zinc is heated above 700°C to evaporate it by a heating 
coil placed around the zinc, the substrate is also heated by a 
coil around it independently of the zinc, and a zinc gas is 
flowed by being carried by an argon gas over the heated sub- 
strate to diffuse zinc into the substrate from the vapor phase 
through the cover. 



3,660,179 

GASEOUS DIFFUSION TECHNIQUE 

Tfanothy J. Desmond, Greensburg, and Bcrton P. Kni- 

manackcr, ConndbvUle, both of Pa., assignors to 

Wcstinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Filed Aug. 17, 1970, Ser. No. 64^81 

Int. a. HOll 7144 

UA CL 148—189 8 Claims 



3,660,177 
PROCESSING OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS FOR 
IMPROVED FATIGUE PROPERTIES 
Edgar E. Browa, Glastonbury, and Raymond C. Bocttacr, 
Windsor, both of Conn., assignors to United Aircraft Cor- 
poration, East Hartford, Conn. 

Filed May 18, 1970, Scr. No. 38,227 

Int CL C22f IIIO 

VS. CL 148- 1 1.5 R 11 Claims 

The fatigue properties of the precipitation-hardened, 

nickel-base alloys, such as Inconel 718, Incoloy 901 and 




tSHtzzji" 



l ^gy) n o o 07 . ±^ 



Ecmo 



SEO 
SnCAM 



A counter-flow of an inert, or a predominantly inert, gas is 
provided in a diffusion furnace to provide means for creating 
twhulence within the diffusion system thereby improving the 
uniformity of dopant along the length of the diffusion carrier 
contained therein. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



223 



3,660,180 
CONSTRAINMENT OF AUTODOPING IN EPTTAXUL 
DEPOSITION 
Edward S. W^Jda, Poughkeepsic, N.Y., assignor to Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corpor a tion, Armonk, N.Y. 
Filed Feb. 27, 1969, Scr. No. 802,810 
Int a. HOll 7136; C23c 11100; HOll 5100 
VS. a. 148-175 6 Claims 




i 



I) 3 



•i- 



^m<{ 



_;;^,^^ 



Autodoping is minimized during epitaxial deposition by 
sputtering a primary or initial film on a doped semiconductor 
substrate prior to epitaxial deposition. 



insoluble organic or inorganic powder, 0.2 to 3.0 percent 
vehicle-insoluble microfibers and a Inuid vehicle which is 
either a liquid hydrocarbon or a hydrocarbon soluble polar 
hydrocarbon derivative such as an amine, amide, ketone, al- 
cohol, etc. The microfibers are either inorganic microfibers 
having an average particle between 0.01 and 2.0 microns or 
organic microfibers having an average fiber diameter 
between 1 and 20 microns. A typical stable suspension com- 
prises 68.72 percent aluminum powder, 1.43 percent diethyl 
stearyl amide, 0.7S percent glass microfibers having an 
average fiber diameter of O.OS to 0.2 microns and 29. 1 per- 
cent kerosene. This stable suspension useful as a propellant 
was prepared by blending glass microfibers into the kerosene 
fraction to form a soft gel and separately blending the alu- 
minum powder with distearyl amide; the aluminum-amide 
mixture is then slowly added to the gbss fiber-kerosene gel 
until a buttery suspension is formed. ^ 

. I 



3,660,181 

BLASTING SLURRY COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING 

CALCIUM NITRATE AND METHOD OF PREPARATION 

Robert B. Cbiy, Bounttfnl; McMn A. Cook, and Lex L. Udy, 

both of Salt Lake City, aB of Utah, assignors to Intcrmoun- 

tala Research & Engineering Company, Inc. 

FUcd May 1, 1969, Scr. No. 821,095 
Int a. C06b 1104, 19/00 
VS. CL 149—2 9 Claims 

Slurry blasting compositions of low water content and high 
density, including substantial proportions of calcium nitrate 
as an oxidizer component, can be sensitized in various ways 
to produce economical explosive compositions. Sensitizers 
may include aluminum powder, granular explosives such as 
smokeless powder, TNT, etc.; a particularly preferred sen- 
sitizer or fiiel is ethylene glycol. Solid carbonaceous fuels and 
conventional thickeners may be added. The calcium nitrate 
may be produced directly from burned lime with nitric acid 
and/or other nitrates. 



3,660,183 
STABLE SUSPENSIONS 
Edwin C. Knowlcs, Ponghkecpsle; Frederic C. McCoy, 
BcacoB, and Norman R. Oddl, Wappingers Falls, all of 
N.Y., assignors to Texaco Inc., New York, N.Y. 
Conthmation-in-part of appHcatfcm Scr. No. 39,426, June 29, 
1960. This applicathMi Dec. 27, 1961, Scr. No. 162,549 
Int CLC06d 5/70 
U.S. CL 149-21 16 Claims 

Stable suspensions useful as high energy propellant and 
agricultural compositions comprising a finely-divided vehide- 



3,660,184 
PROCESS FOR MANUFACTURING TIGHT SEALS, AND 

SEALS OBTAINED BY THIS HIOCESS 

Plem Burelk, Le Vcsinet, and Jean Alfred Enfdhardt Lyon, 

both of France, aastgnors to Sodele anooymc dltc CcOlac, 

Paris, France 

ContinuatkMi<4n-port of application Scr. No. 565,754, July 18, 

1966, now abandoned. This appBcatlon May 18, 1970, Scr. 

No. 38^21 
Claims priority, application France, July 29, 1965, 26541 
Int CL B29J 5/02 
VS. CL 156—62.2 16 Claims 

Method of forming gaskets by projecting a layer compris- 
ing 70-90% of a fibrous material and 10-30% of a settable 
binder onto a supporting sheet, causing the binder to set, and 
there compressing the layer. An adhesive may be used to 
secure the layer to the sheet, or the sheet may be treated to 
prevent adhesion of the layer and removed after the com- 
pression step. 



3,660,182 

EXPLOSIVE COMPOSITIONS AND METHOD OF 

PREPARATION 

Mdvin A. Cook, and Frederick K. BaUi, both of Salt Lake 

City, Utoh, assignors to Intermountain Research and En- 

gfaMcring Co., Inc. 

Filed Aug. 15, 1969, Scr. No. 850,648 
Int CL C06b 1/04, 7/00, 21/00 
VS. CL 149-46 12 Claims 

An explosive composition in slurry or semi-solid form and 
containing calcium nitrate is made up by reacting calcium 
oxide with formaldehyde, preferably in the form of parafor- 
maldehyde, in the presence of ammonium nitrate. The water 
generated in the reaction serves as a vehicle for the slurry. A 
thickener of gum or preferably ^tarch is added, and gassing 
agents may be incorporated to control or reduce composition 
density. The presence of ammonium nitrate prevents run- 
away reactions and the hexamethylene-tetramine which is 
produced in the reaction serves as a fiiel tending to give ox- 
ygen balance to the composition. * 



3,660,185 

METHOD OF PRODUCING A HAIRPIECE 

David C. Bonham, 1227 Wihnington Avenue, Salt Lake City, 

Utah 
, , Filed Oct 25, 1968, Scr. No. 770,767 

' Int CLB32b 5/00 

VS. CL 156—72 8 Claims 

A method of manufacturing hairpieces which aUows them 
to be rapidly produced but provides a product that is dura- 
ble, easy to care for and natural in appearance. Hairs are 
temponurily positioned with a holding means, a base material 
is positioned around the hairs to permanently secure them in 
place and the holding means for temporarily positioning the 



hairs is removed. 



/ 



/ 

3,660,186 

METHOD FOR BONDING WEBS EMPLOYING 

ULTRASONIC ENERGY 

Kari E. Sager, Applcton, and Howard N. Nelson, Necnah, 

both of Wis., assignors to Kfanbcrly-Clark Corporation, 

Necnah, Wb. 

Fikd Apr. 8, 1969, Scr. No. 814383 
Int CLB32b 57/76 
VS. a. 156—73 9 Claims 

A continuous method for bonding or seaming running 
webs wherein a moving arcuate surface serves as an anvil 
against which a sonic horn can work while at the same time 
supplying a bonding medium to the webs as they pass under 



224: 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



the horn and to apparatus for carrying out such a method. In ship, the overlapping portions of said parts being secured 
'^'^ together in liquid tight relation by an adhesive substance 

which when subjected to heat or an appropriate dissolving 
agent disintegrates so that said parts may be disassembled to 



jC\ 




A'^) 




one embodiment, the arcuate surface is designed to provide a 
scam which simulates a series of stitches. 



3 660 187 
WEAR RESISTANT, TEXTURED RESINOUS 
COMPOSITIONS 
Harry A. Sbortway, Gka Rock; Alan A. Graham, Mercer- 
vHle; Robert D. MaMoMBo, Btooafldd, afl of NJ., and 
JoMph F. Dobry, Laaghorac Manor, Pa., avignors to Con- 
golcaai ladttstrfet, inc., Kearney, N J. 

FOcd Mar. 14, 1969, Scr. No. 807,269 

Int. CL B32b 5/75 

U.S.CL 156-79 20Clateia 



TRAIOLUCCNT 
WEAR LWCM 




\ ^z- 




make the container interior fully accessible for recondition- 
ing. The adhesive substance is disintegraUe and completely 
removable from the container parts without deforming the 
container parts or affecting the metallurgical properties of 
the parts. 



3,660,189 

CLOSED CELL STRUCTURE AND METHODS AND 

APPARATUS FOR ITS MANUFACTURE 

CooBlantfaie T. Troy, 1330 Ctevdand Avcnac, WyomMng, 

Pa. 

FHed Apr. 28, 1969, Scr. No. 819,719 
Inta.B32bi//02.i//00 
UAa. 156— 145 6« 



2^^ ) ,Z0O 



"i^iSbl^ 



MITtp SUMTAMTUUXY 



Wear resistant resinous compositions having textured or 
embossed surfaces resulting from the process which com- 
prises selectively conUcting a resinous polymer containing a 
blowing agent dispersed therein with an inhibitor for said 
agent, applying thereto a self-supporting layer of a translu- 
cent, decorative, resinous wear layer, and, thereafter heating 
the resulting assembly so as to effect the decomposition of 
the blowing agent and the resultant expansion on the surface 
of the resinous composition as well as to fuse the wear layer 
which has conformed to the surface embossings. 




i59» 

/58 



Cellular cushioning material is prepared by scaling an 
elastic substance within cells that are formed between two 
flexible fihns. When the elastic material is a gas. means may 
be provided to charge the cells at superatmospheric pressure 
to achieve full inflation of the cells and maximum efficiency 
of the cushioning material. 



3 660 188 
A METHOD OF RECYCLING AND RECONDITIONING A 

METAL SHIPPING CONTAINER 
Oscar J. Vaa Leer, North HoBaad, Netherlands, assignor to 
Inland Stcd Company, Chicago, 111. 
Continoation-in-part of appUcadoa Scr. No. 648,647, June 
26, 1967, BOW abandoned. This application Oct. 24, 1969, 
Scr. No. 869,245 
Int. CL B32b 35100 
U.S. CL 156-94 6 Claims 

A method of recycling a drum shaped metal shipping con- 
tainer which has at least two parts in overlapping relation- 



's (jfA 190 
PROCESS FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF A COMPOSITE 

MATERIAL HAVING A METAL LAYER 

Joachim Strtisiynskl, Wiesbaden, Germany, aarignor to KaOe 

Akticngenlhchafl, WIedMden-lUebrkh, Germany 

Flkd Dec. 27, 1968, Scr. No. 787,438 

Claims priority, applicatioo Germany, Dec 30, 1%7, P 17 04 

785.7 
Int. CL C23b 5100 
U.S. CL 156-150 6 Claims 

This invention relates to a process for the manufacture of a 
composite material including a supporting film or foil and a 
metal layer bonded thereto, which comprises depositing the 
metal layer on an intermediate support having an endless 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



225 



rotatable surface, pressing the supporting film or foil onto the 
metal layer while an adhesive layer is interposed between 
them and while the film or foil is supported by a cylindrical 
conveyor roller, and removing the bonded composite materi- 
al from the surface of the latter roller. 



3,660,191 
METHOD OF CARPET SEAMING 
Robert E. Sbimota, Fox River Grove, and Harry J. Dritt, 
Wiieaton, both o( DL, amtgnors to The Kendal Company, 
Bflgtffn, Mam. 

FBcd Dec 8, 1969, Scr. No. 882,985 

Int. CL D06b 5100 

UA CL 156—152 14 Claims 



amount of solvent at a temperature below the curing tem- 
perature of said uncured aromatic polytrimellitamide 
polymer, leaving said polymer uniformly deposited on the 
surface of said fibers, (3) winding said fibers on a mandrel, 
and (4) curing the polymer leaving essentially no uncon* 
verted imide forming groups, thus preparing said polymer 
laminates. 




3,660,192 

METHOD OF MAKING SEALING RING WFTH 

RESILIENT CORE 

Robert D. Smith, Wftinii^lon, and RonaM L. Hcrron, 

Newark, both of DcL, amignnri to E. L dn Pont cte Nemoors 

and Company, Wlmtaigtom DcL 

FBcd Jane 19, 1968, Scr. No. 738^14 

Int. CL B65d 53102 

UACL 156-155 8Clnhns 




The invention deals with a method of making endless seal- 
ing ring members by forming a sleeve element of a solid high 
molecular weight copolymer of hexafluoropropylene and 
tetrafluoroethylene into a loop. The ends are butt-welded to 
form a smooth toroidal ring. A hole is punched in the side 
through which entrapped fluid is removed and a liquid sil- 
icone rubber composition is injected to form a core. The 
point of injection is sealed and the core material is solidified. 

3,660,193 
A-I POLYMER LAMINATES PREPARED BY FILAMENT 

WINDING 
Bc^Jamfai A. Bolton, Winfldd, DL, assignor to Standard OU 

Company, Cbkago, OL 

ContiaBation-ln.part of appttcatkw Scr. No. 748,954, July 31, 

1968, now aban d oned. Tkk appHcatkm Mar. 5, 1971, Scr. 

No. 121,522 

Int. CL B65h %li00 

M&. CL 156-169 13 Claims 

A continuous process for preparing a heat resistant 

polymer laminate, said process comprising: ( 1 ) coating glass 

fibers with a solution comprising an uncured aromatic 

polytrimellitamide polymer, having imide forming groups, 

dissolved in a suiuble solvent, (2) flashing off a limited 

89S O.Q.— 8 



3,660,194 

METHOD OF FABRICATING FLUlD-TlGIiT 

CONTAINERS 

Arthur W. IIiiffiiMwi. Hmribach; Pkrre Locnty, ami Waller 

BvMnMmn, both of Thmi, al «( SwUaeriand, am lgniiw to 

Gcbr. Hoffanan AG, Thm, S w Uj ei lan d 

CoBthraalhm-to-pwt of a pp M ct h m Sv. No. 708,070, Feb. 26, 

1968, now nbandonwl. TMi a p pB ct twi Dec 21, 1970, Scr. 

No. 100,196 
Claims priority, application Sweden, Feb. 24, 1967, 2784/67 
Int. CL B65h 8U00 
UA CL 156—191 14 I 



Adjacent sections of carpeting are joined in a seam 
between abutting edges of the carpet sections by a strip of 
heat activauble adhesive tape applied to the back sides (A 
the carpet sections with the carpet sections lying face-up on a 
surface while heating the tape from its non-adhesive back 
side. •! 




There is disclosed a method of producing gas-tight and 
liquid-tight containers, especially collapsible tubes wherein a 
strip of pldstic coated carrier foil is bent or wound into the 
shape of a substantially cylindrical tube, the longitudirud 
edges of the strip being arranged in overlapping relationship. 
These longitudinal edges are then heat-sealed and the tube is 
coated with a sheath of plastic for covering the overlapping 
seams and providing a snKwth continuous outer stuface 
capable of receiving an imprint. Further, according to the in- 
vention the amount of plastic material and application 
thereof to the surface of the tube is controUed such that the 
outside surface of such tube when covered with the plastic 
sheathing possesses a shape and dimension substantially cor- 
responding to the internal receiving wall of a mold cavity for 
heading the tube. The tube, typically after having been cut 
into finite tube sections, is then inserted at one end into a 
mold cavity, the outside surface of such tube section snugly 
fitting in good sealing relationship against the internal receiv- 
ing wall of the mold cavity. The inner wall of the tube sec- 
tion, at least at the end region thereof received in the mold 
cavity is freely exposed, so that when moldaUe material is in- 
troduced into the mold cavity it contacts such exposed irmer 
w{^, thereby producing a substantially radially directed force 
applied outwardly against the irmer exposed wall of the tube, 
urging the outer wall thereof into extreme sealing contact 
with the internal receiving wall of the mold cavity so that an 
extremely effective seal appears at the location where the 
tube section has been inserted into the molding cavity. 



3 660 195 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FORMING CELLULAR 

CORES 
Edwfai R. Hoyt, Cord GaMes, Fla., mrignnr to Core Cell Cor- 
poration, Bayamon, P JL 

FHed June 2, 1969, Scr. No. 829,167 
fait CLB31d J/02 
UACL156— 197 16 Claims 

A method and apparatus for forming cellular C(m«s fixHn 
sheet stock of paper, metal or plastic for use in the sub- 
sequent formation of laminated cellular panels, or for use in- 



226 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



dependently to provide sound and thermal insulation. The 
process comprises the steps of feeding two or more webs of 
sheet material to be formed into the core; joining the webs by 
applying spaced lines of adhesive or the like between the 
webs along their direction of feed, bringing the webs into 
contact so as to cause them to join along said first applied 
lines of adhesive; applying spaced lines of adhesive or the 
like, spaced to lie between the previously applied adhesive 
lines on an outer face of the joined webs; simultaneously 
cutting a group-strip equal in length as measured along the 
web to the thickness of two or more layers of the final core 
product from the adhered webs transverse to their direction 
of movement; and packing and simultaneously cutting said 
group-strip into two or more strips by moving them trans- 
verse to the direction of web feed to simultaneously form a 
plurality of layers of cellular cores of selected thickness. Ap- 
paratus suitable for performing the method is provided com- 
prising supports for two or more supply rolls of web sheet 




material; means for feeding the sheet material from the 
supply rolls; sheet joining means such as adhesive applicators 
and laminating roHs arranged in the path of web feed for ap- 
plying spaced lines of adhesive between the web surfaces; a 
final adhesive applicator for providing adhesive on the outer 
surface of one of said webs; pressure applying means for 
bringing two or more of the adhesive stripped web surfaces 
into contact to bond same along the fir«t lines of adhesive ap- 
plication; cutting means for cutting group-strips equal in 
length as measured in the direction of web feed to the 
thickness of two or more layers of the cellular core product 
from the advancing web transverse to the direction of move- 
ment; and packing-cutting means for simultaneously packing 
the group-strips against the strips of previously cut group- 
strips and cutting the group-strips into a plurality of separate 
strips equal in length as measured along the web to the 
thickness of the cellular core product, said packing means 
packing two or more tiers of strips simultaneously. 



second intermediate layer interposed between the first inter- 
mediate layer and the design layer. Where a second inter- 
mediate layer is not included, the first intermediate layer is 
such that the adhesion between it and the design layer is less 
than the adhesion between the first intermediate layer and 
the backing sheet and between the design layer and a tacky 
surface. Where a second intermediate layer is inchided, the 
adhesion between the said first and second layers is leas than 
the adhesion respectively between the first intermediate layer 
and the backing sheet, the second intermediate layer and the 
design layer and the design layer and a tacky surface. The 
transfer may be applied to an initial resin coat api^ed to the 
inside of a mould after which the fiber glass article is 
completed by additional layers of fiber glass and resin 
whereby the design is embedded in the article and can be 
seen frx>m the outside. 




There is provided a method of applying transfers or decal- 
comanias to a tacky surface particularly the surface of a par- 
tially cured fiber glass article. The transfer decalcomania in- 
cludes a backing sheet, a first intermediate layer applied to 
the backing sheet and a design layer, with or without a 



3,660,197 

METHOD OF MAKING A WARP SHEET COMPRISING 

CARBON FILAMENTS 

Peter E. MorgBB, StyvcdMie, Coventry, and RooaM WIHan 

Roberts, Camp HIi, Nuiwtoii, both of Engfamd, Bwlgiinri 

to CourtauMs Limited, London, Engtand 

FOed Feb. 28, 1969, Scr. No. 803^1 
Clafans priority, application Great Britain, Feb. 29, 1968, 

9,789/68 
Int CL B32b 31/00 
VS. CL 156—280 9 CUms 

A process for the production of a warp sheet which com- 
prises preparing a sheet of an inert material and coating that 
sheet with a polymeric material which can be rendered tacky, 
causing a number of oriented carbon filaments to adhere to 
the tacky coating, covering the exposed surface of the carbon 
filaments with polymeric material, and treating the polymeric 
material to reduce the degree of tack. Thin warp sheets may 
be prepared by applying a relatively thick layer of carbon 
filaments and removing those which do not adhere while 
thicker sheets are made by spreading the requisite quantity of 
carbon filaments uniformly over the surface. 



3,660,198 

METHOD OF MAKING DOUBLE WALLED^PLASTIC 

ARTICLES 

Alfons W. Thiel, Uferstrassc 15, Mainz (Rhine), Germany 

Filed Aug. 29, 1969, Scr. No. 854,129 

Claims priority, appHfHon Germany, Sept 17, 1968, P 17 

79 723.8; Sept 26, 1968, P 17 79 790.9 

Int CLB32b i;y04 

VS. CL 156—292 19 CUnM 



3,660,196 
METHOD OF APPLYING TRANSFERS TO HBER GLASS 

ARTICLES 
Robert A. KecUng, and John G. Priest, both of London, En- 
gland, aarignors to Johnson, M^they & Co. Limited, Lon- 
don, England 

Continoatlon of appUcation Scr. No. 665^19, Sept. 5, 1967. 

This application Jane 23, 1969, Scr. No. 840,124 

Claims priority, application Great Britain, Sept 5, 1966, 

39394/66 

Int CL B44c 3/02; B32b 31/12; B44d 1/14 

VS. CL 156-235 1 1 Claims 




Double walled plastic articles chiefly receptacles comprise 
jacket and lining members of relatively thin thermoplastic 
sheet material such as foils connected firmly around outer 
peripheral portions and relatively shaped to provide on the 
article an outer annular peripheral wall section containing an 
insulating air space region between the members. The jacket 
and lining are formed with ribs and/or the like which cross 
and are firmly surface bonded to each other under heat and 
pressure within air space region at a plurality of spaced sub- 
stantially flat areas. The jacket and lining may be stepped. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



227 



Special methods and apparatus are provided for producing 
the articles including connecting and shaping tools for form- 
ing bonded double layer regions surrounding air cushion 
areas that function in the process to insure proper forming of 
the jacket and lining as the tool dies come together. The die 
faces also include projections for imparting an added 
mechanical interiock at the bonded areas. The articles may 
be continuously produced starting with two separate heated 
foil webs, which may be differently responsive to heat or 
otherwise different, or starting with continuously extruded 
thermoplastic tubing. In the latter case the heat attendant to 
the extrusion operation may be sufficient for the bonding 
operation so that no added heat is necessary. 



3,660,199 
METHOD OF PREVENTING MEASLING WHEN MAKING 

EPOXY LAMINATES 
Mkbad Rkdticllo, Ambcnt, and Harry A. KrcHmaycr, 

Tonawanda, both of N.Y., assignors to SpankUng Fibre 

Company, I^^ Tonawanda, N.Y. 

Filed Jnly 24, 1969, Scr. No. 844,277 

Int CL C09J 5/00 

VS. CL 156-306 9 Claims 

Measling, the appearance of spou or stars under the sur- 
face of a resin portion of an epoxy-glass fiber laminate, is 
prevented or significantly diminished by a laminating process 
which includes curing plies of glass cloth and epoxy resin at 
an elevated temperature, e.g., 300" to 400° P., at an elevated 
pressure, e.g., 7S0 to 1,500 pounds per square inch, until gel 
formation occurs by reaction of the epoxy resin and curing 
agent, after which heating is continued at approximately the 
same temperature but at a lower pressure, e.g., 50 to 400 
Ibs./sq. in. Suiubly, the initial curing step lasts for about 30 
to 80 minutes and the subsequent step takes about 20 to 50 
minutes, such times varying with the thickness of the 
laminate, the nature of the expoxy resin, the temperature em- 
ployed, the geometry of the laminate, the type of reinforcing 
cloUi. the curing apparatus used and the presence or absence 
of metal molded into the plastic. After completion of heating, 
the laminate is cooled in the press and is then removed. 



3,660,201 

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING A DECORATIVE 

LAMINATED PLASTIC STTIUCTURE CONTAINING IN 

AT LEAST ONE LAYER THEREOF FROM ABOUT 4 TO 

ABOUT 100 PARTS PER MILLION OF A UTHIUM 

COMPOUND 

Ahryn Senior, GrwnMlh, and Gcoiie Edward Power, Wyom- 

ing, both of OUo, mrignnn to Fomka Corpomlion, Cln- 

dnnatifOUo 

Continuatlon-ln-port of applcntion Scr. No. 572,668, Ang. 
16, 1966, now abnndoncd. Tills appttcndon Dec 2, 1969, Scr. 

No. 881,605 
Int CL C09J 5/00 
VS. CL 156-309 7 Clalma 

This invention relates to the process for producing a 
decorative laminated plastic structure in which the ther- 
mosetting resin used to impregnate at least one of the fibrous 
layers of said structure contains a quantity of a Uthium com- 
pound sufficient to provide firom about 4 to about 100 parts 
per million of said lithium compound in said laminated 
plastic structxu^. 



3,660,200 

PROCESS FOR BONDING PREHEATED 

THERMOPLASTIC FILM TO A DISSIMILAR 

SUBSTRATE 

Robert E. Anderson, 108 LaSalle Drive, Richmond, Va., and 

Aagiistas W. Bachman, Jr., WUIiamburg Court, WilUam- 

sbnrg, N.Y. 

Continuation of appUcation Ser. No. 572,260, Aug. 15, 1966, 

now abandoned. This appUcation July 9, 1969, Ser. No. 

845,650 

Int CL C09J 5/06 

VS. CL 156-306 H Chtam 



3,660,202 

BONDDSG OF SHAPED ARTICLES OF POLYESTER 

Robert Alexander Edington, and Derek Harry Aldrcd, both of 

Harragate, England, mrignors to Imperial Chemical Indua- 

tries. Limited, London, England 

Conttaraation-in-part of appUcation Scr. No. 585,243, Oct 10, 

1966, now abandoned. This application Apr. 25, 1969, Scr. 

No. 819^423 
. Claims priority, application Great Britain, Oct 18, 1965, 

43,983/65 
Int CL C09J 3/12 
VS. CL 156—335 7 Claims 

An improved process is described for bonding polyester 
shaped articles to rubber. The improvement comprises treat- 
ing the polyester surface with an aqueous solution of a 
bis(dihydroxyphenyI methyl )phenol which results in an in- 
creased bond strength using conventionid aqueous rubber 
latex and resorcinol formaldehyde condensate dips to bond 
the polyester to the rubber. The surface treatment may be ef- 
fected in a separate prior process followed by a conventional 
bonding process using a rubber latex atid a resorcinol formal- 
dehyde condensate, or it may be effected in a single bath 
process together with a rubber latex and a resorcinol formal- 
dehyde condensate. 



3,660,203 
TAPE PRINTING AND HANDLING SYSTEM 
Christian A. Beck, Rklgcflkld, and Harry E. Lnpcrti, WDton, 
both of Conn^ aarignnn to Pitaey-Bowcs, Inc., Stamford, 
Conn. 

FBed Nov. 19, 1968, Scr. No. 777,015 
Int CLB65C 77/02 
U.S. CL 156-384 1 




The present process relates to a method and an apparatus 
for continuously thermally bonding layers of materials 
together so as to form a laminate ttom a composite which in- 
cludes at least one layer of thermoplastic film and at least 
one layer of substrate. In particular, the present invention is 
of value for bonding together multiple layers of thermoplastic 
fihn and substrate to which have been imparted various 
decorative and utilitarian effects. 




A upe handling systeiv lor a label type printing machine 
wherein the upe includes a backing strip on which is carried 



228 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



an upper reieasable pressure sensitive print receiving strip. 
The composite tape is perforated at regular intervals along its 
length so as to focilitate printing positionment of the tape, 
after which the printed tape portion may be transversely torn 
oCT along said perforations. The tape handling apparatus in- 
cludes a detent for engaging said perforations, a separator for 
facilitating the stripping of the backing strip firom the reieasa- 
ble strip, and a yieldabiy driven take-up spool for the backing 
strip. 



3,660,204 
APPARATUS FOR APPLYING CARRYING HANDLES OF 

PAPER OR PLASTICS MATERIAL TO A WEB 
Hcias WcMcteau, Brodrtcrbeck, and FriedMn Briakneier, 
Ladbcrgcm both of Gerasaay, iMigMNrs to Wtedmoler A 
HolKher, Lcmcrkk, Wcstphaia, Gcnaaay 

Filed Joly 17. 1969, Scr. No. 842,633 
Clates priority, appHcatioB Gcnuuy, July 17, 1968, P 17 69 

880J 

iBt CL B31b 1186 

VS. CL 156-443 ' 10 Clafam 




edge to cause strengthening of the seal and reduction of 
wrinkles in the film adjacent the seal. A preferred device is 
an inverted U-shaped electrically heated blade partially en- 




closed by a pair of cooling bars disposed so that the superim- 
posed layers of scalable fUm pass therebetween in prolonged 
contact with the heated blade. 



3,660,206 
MACHINE FOR ASSEMBLING LAMINA WORKPIECES 
GeriMrd Orid, Rktbcrg, Gcnouiy, Mrifnr to Hdarich 
Kqwr, Rktberg, Wcatfaka, Gcraaay 

FVcd Sept. 1 1, 1969, Scr. No. 857,081 

ClaiaH priority, appHcatioa AiHtria, Sept 13, 1968, A 

8926/68 

Iat.CLB32bi///0.J//20 

VS. CL 156-545 8 ClalM 




U-shaped carrying handles have been made from elongated 
strips of paper or plastics material in that both end portions 
have been folded through 90°. The handles are applied to a 
web intended to make carrying handles in such a manner that 
the end portions of the strip lead in the direction of travel of 
the web. The strip is fvst gripped in known manner in its in- 
termediate portion. The strip end portions are folded through 
90* opposite to the direction of travel of the strip. The result- 
ing legs of the carrying handle are gripped at their end por- 
tions and advanced further. The intermediate portion is 
released. The carrying handles are turned over through 180° 
opposite to the direction of travel of the gripped ends and 
wi^ their now leading legs are connected to the web extend- 
ing in the same direction. 



3,660,205 

DEVICE FOR CONTINUOUSLY SEALING AND 

SEVERING EDGES OF FOLDED FILM 

Monroe F. Taylor, Grecnvflfe, S.C., aMignor to W. R. Grace 

ft Co., Dvacan, S.C. 

FBcd Apr. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 27,503 

Int. CL B32b 31/26 

U.S.CL156— 515 6 Claims 

This invention is a device and a method for continuously 

sealing and severing two superimposed layers of heat-sealable 

film while controlling the cooling of the sealed and severed 



A machine for assembling lamina workpieces has a work- 
piece table and at least one pressure roller located over the 
table for pressing an adhesively coated thread in position on 
the workpiece surfaces. The thread being located by means 
of a guide device comprising a guide tube and a heating tube, 
the guide passage of the guide tube receiving the thread com- 
municates with a hot air passage of a heating tube adapted to 
heat air passing under pressure therethrough into the guide 
passage via passages defined by edge regions of the guide 
tube and the heating tube. 



3,660,207 
APPARATUS FOR THE CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF 

LAMINATES 
lean Schradc, Zurich; HaraM Sevcrus, Wtatcrtbur, and 
Walter MuBer, MeBcn, aH of SwUaeriaad, anlgBon to 
Swiss AhunlniBBi Ltd., CUppb, Swteicrland 

FBcd ScpC 4, 1970, Scr. No. 69,820 
Claims priority, appHoHiaa Switaeriaad, Sept. 9, 1969, 
13602/69 
Int. CL B31f 5/00; B02c 11/08 
VS. CL 156—555 12 ClafaM 

An apparatus for use in the continuous production of com- 
posite plates having a core layer of plastic and cover layers. 
There is used a plurality of first rollers for receiving and 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



229 



discharging the layers, having a space between them equal or fiberglass on their outside surfaces, the press being operable 
larger than the thickness of the laminates prior to rolling and to load the materials, accurately position and support the 




d_i 



'P ^ 



i t i J t 




a series of second parallel successive rollers downstream of 

the first rollers and being at varying planes parallel to the »•<*« panels and fiberglass sheets in precise position during 

direction of movement. the forming operations. 



3,660,208 3,660,210 

THERMOSTATIC HEAT WHEEL STATIC AUTOGENOUS SEALING BAR 

Leo J. Hnbbard, Daytos, Ohk>, asrigMW to Xerox Corpora* H««Ty Samud Ch^mian, RJ). 3, P.O. Box 224A, Hickory 

tion, Rocbcitcr, N.Y. ^^ ***• 

FBcd Dec 29, 1969, Scr. No. 888,702 i *■»«• ^^V 13, 1969, Scr. No. 824,21 1 

Int. CLB65C 9/22. 9/25 ' Int. CL B30b / J/i4 

UACL 156-571 4 Claims U A CL 156-583 8 Claims 





«i 



A heat transfer wheel including a label transfer pad to 
carry address-bearing labels from a label pick-up station to 
the point of application where the addresses are transferred 
to an article through the use of heat, heating means in said 
label transfer pad, said transfer pad being thermally insulated 
from the rest of the wheel to facilitate heat retention and dis- 
tribution; vacuum passage means leading to the label bearing 
surface of the label transfer pad to enable labels to be tem- 
porarily attached thereto; and thermoMatic control means in 
heat exchange relation with said label transfer pad for regu- 
lating operation of said heating means in response to tem- 
perature conditions of said pad so as to maintain said transfer 
pad at a uniform temperature condition. 



A static sealer bar is provided for heat-sealing organic 
polymeric materials, especially fluorocarbon films; the static 
sealer bar is characterizisd by a base member of, for example, 
asbestos material having a heating element disposed in a slot 
or recess extending substantially the entire length of one foce 
of the base member, the slotted surface of the base member 
is covered by a layer of polyimide film which is, in turn, 
covered by a layer of silicone rubber film, and the silicone 
rubber film is preferably covered by a layer of polyimide. A 
method for heat-sealing fluorocarbon films in situ on large 
diameter roUs utilizing the static sealer bar also is provided. 



3,660,209 

LAMINATION PRESS EMPLOYING ECCENTRICALLY 

ACTUATED ROCK SHAFTS FOR MOVING ITS PLATEN 

Billy L. Woods, 3818 West OcodBo, Phoenix, Arix. 

FHed Aag. 4, 1969, Scr. No. 847,245 

InL CL B30b 7/04; B32b 31/20 

VS. CL 156-580 1 Claim 

A laminating press for accurately forming laminated panels 

for building construction comprising a thick foam plastic 

sandwiched between masonite side panels covered with 



3,660,211 
PLASTIC ARTICLE AND METHOD OF PRODUCTION 
Norman M. Brody, Los A ngctes , Calf., ■wignnr to Norman 
Industries, Inc., Santa Fc Spriii«B, CaHf. 

FBcd Jan. 15, 1971, Scr. No. 106,706 

Int CL B44f 1/14 

VS. CL 161-2 16 OaiuK 



74- lOb 




Production of a decorative iridescent cast plastic article 
comprising a clear cast resin, e.g., polyester, body having em- 



230 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



bedded therein an embossed multicolored iridescent fac- 
simile on a metal, e.g., aluminum, foil of a multicolored 
iridescent body, e.g., an abalone shell, the embossed fac- 
simile forming a multicolored iridescent image of the 
iridescent body in the cast resin, with highlights correspond- 
ing to those of the iridescent body, said iridescent cast plastic 
article being produced by forming color separation negatives 
from a photographic color transparency of such iridescent 
body, producing lithographic printing plates from the respec- 
tive color transparencies, printing the colored image of such 
iridescent body from said lithographic plates onto a pre- 
determined area of a metal, e.g., aluminum, foil, embossing 
into the resulting facsimile on such metal foil, a surface con- 
tour bringing out the highlights of the iridescent body, 
cutting the metal foil embossed iridescent facsimile from the 
metal foil, and embedding the metal foil embossed iridescent 
facsimile in a clear casting resin. 



3,660^12 

PLASTIC ATHLETIC LETTERING MATERUL AND 

PROCESS FOR MANUFACTURING SAME 

Robert Jaacs Liebe, Jr., 7 MMdkbrook, Creve Cocur, Mo. 

Filed J«ly 17, 1969, Scr. No. 842,476 

Int. CI. B32b 7106, 27/10, 27/30 

VS. CI. 161-41 3 Claims 

Flexible plastic sheet material is provided from which pig- 
mented letters, designs and the like may be cut for fusing to 
fabrics. A liquid pigmented mass of heat curable plastic, for 
example, plastisol, is knife-spread on a high gloss release 
sheet and heat cured, to serve as the outer, pigmented side of 
the sheet material to be formed. An unpigmented preformed 
flexible thermoplastic sheet, whose fusing temperature is 
lower than the temperature of heat curing, is pressed to the 
newly cured, hot pigmented film and fused to it; this ther- 
moplastic serves as the inner adherent side of the material. 
Letters and designs cut from such material may be ironed 
onto fabric, utilizing heat sufficient to raise the inner, ther- 
moplastic side to fusing temperature without affecting the 
outer, pigmented side. 



3,660,213 

CORRUGATED COVERS 

RoystoD L. Mofldey, Bcwdlcy, Engiaiid, aadgiior to Henry 

BcakboBC (Fortox) Limited, Kiddcrmbister, Engtaiid 

Filed Feb. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 7,518 

Int. CI. F16d 3/84 

VS. CL 161-7 7 Claims 




3,660,214 

CONCRETE BLOCK OR THE LIKE WITH MULTIPLE 

BRICK FACING AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME 

Charles E. Nicbob, Jr., Nortb Augusta, S.C., and GeraM T. 

Howard, Gracewood, Ga., aisigDon to Merry Companici 

Incorporated, Augurta, Ga. 

Flkd Apr. 21, 1969, Scr. No. 817,980 

Int. CL E04c 1/04; B44f 7/00; B32b 5/16 

VS. a. 161—38 29 Claima 



ifi 47a. n 




A method and resulting structural building unit wherein a 
conventional masonry cement block, for example, has a por- 
tion removed, if necessary, to give it a predetermined vertical 
height. The presized block is placed upon a continuously 
moving conveyer and one side of the block is preheated and 
then coated with a liquid material comprising a fmlyester 
resin, a styrene monomer, a solvent, and a catalyst. The 
stored heat in the block quickly evaporates the solvent and 
polymerizes the resin and monomer so that a strongly adher- 
ing bonding coat is formed on the block. A layer of matrix 
materia] of relatively thick consistency, comprising a 
polyester resin, a styrene monomer, finely divided silica, co- 
loidal silica, and a catalyst is applied to the coated block. The 
layer of matrix may be one-eighth inch thick or thicker, de- 
pending upon the type of building unit that is being made. A 
facing of brick or other material is partially embedded in the 
matrix, in spaced relation, to form a facing for the block with 
simulated mortar joints. The non-embedded portions of the 
facing are exposed to the atmosphere. Sand is sprinkled on 
the facing material and the exposed matrix The matrix is 
then cured or polymerized by passing the block through a 
curing oven. The matrix permanently bonds the facing 
material to the block, and renders the covered side of the 
block impervious to moisture. The sand adheres to the 
matrix, but is readily removable from the facing materials. 

3,660,215 

DEFORMABLE FIBREGLASS REINFORCED 

SUPPORTING ELEMENT 

Heinrkh R. PawHdd, Faha West Adrigole, Bwitry, Co. Cork, 

Irdand 

Continuatloa of appttcation Scr. No. 740,923, June 6, 1968, 
now abuMlooed. This application Dec 14, 1970, Scr. No. 

98,206 

Int CL B32b 5/12 

VS. CL 161—57 3 ClainM 

' m n 



i: 1 1: 1 X :i: T T T 
r T :i: :i: :i: •• t t i* 



^1} 



it< 



A corrugated cover which has a number of corrugations 
and a longitudinally extending opening. The cover is made up 
from pairs of* rings formed with ofEset radial slits. The rings 
are connected in pairs to form annuli and the annuli are con- 
nected together by sewing around their inner and outer 
peripheries alternately. 



A supporting element comprising a first layer of a flexible 
grid-like structure, defining the shape of the supporting ele- 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



281 



ment and a second layer of a fibreglass mat, interwoven with 
or bonded to the first layer. One or several additional layers 
formed either by a grid-like structure similar to the first layer 
or by one or several fibreglass mats may be bonded to the 
first and second layers. The supporting element may be 
deformed into any desired configuration. Subsequently mold- 
ing resin is applied to the supporting element. After harden- 
ing of the resin, the supporting element is fairly rigid and 
remains dimensionally stable. 



idhering said layers with a novel curable, liquid adhesive 
;omposition comprising a polyene and a polythiol which, on 
exposure to ionizing radiation or a free radical generating 
agent, cures to a solid adhesive under ambient conditions. 
The novel adhesive can be used in bonding structural cellular 
material such as honeycomb cores and facings. 



3,660,216 
SEMI-RIGID PANELING 
JcraM W. TbcodorMn, Oak Pwrk Heights, Minn., assignor to 
MinncsoU Mfaiing and Manufacturing Company, Saint 
Paul, Minn. 

FOcd Aug. 20, 1969, Scr. No. 851,653 

Int. CL B32b 3/26, 5/18. 27/40 

VS. CL 161-161 14 Claims 




r--// 



r-'O 



A laminate preferably consisting of a 25-250 mil-thick 
sandwich having a microsphere-filled elastomeric core 
(derived from a hollow, particulate filler and an elastomer 
such as polyurethane with a stress at 100 percent elongation 
of 500-4,000 psi) and two 1-10 mil high tensile-strength 
(stress at 2 percent elongation above 10,000 psi) skins pro- 
vides a paneling material with, for example, good corrosion 
and impact resistance. The hollow, particulate filler loading 
is 20-65 volume percent of the core; and the flexural com- 
posite modulus of the sandwich-type laminate is in the range 
of 0.5-4 X 10» psi; and the density can range from about 0.5 
to about 1 .0 g./cm*. These laminates have a wide variety of 
constructional, decorative, and insulative uses. Somewhat 
stiffer and thicker laminates can be provided by using more 
than one core alternating with a plurality of skins. 




3,660,217 
HONEYCOMB AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME 
Clifton L. Kchr, SOvcr Spring; Walter R. Wszoiek, Sykcsvillc, 
and Christian B. Lundsager, Ashton, aU of Md., assignors 
to W. R. Grace & Co., New York, N.Y. 

Filed Feb. 20, 1969, Scr. No. 800,923 

Int CL B32b 3/12 

VS. CL 161—68 25 Claims 



3,660,218 
HYDROPHILIC POLYMER CONTAINING SYNTHETIC 

LEATHER 
Thomas H. Shepherd, HopcwcB, and Eaekid J. Jacob, 
Brtwklyn, both of N.Y., aarignors to National Patent 
Development CorporMioa, New York, N.Y. ^ 

Filed Oct 15, 1968, Scr. No. 768,616 
Int CL B32b 5/16 
VS. a. 161—87 16 Oaims 

A breathable leather substitute is prepared by dispersing 
particles of a hydrophilic acrylate or methacrylate polymer 
through a sheet of a polyurethane and/or vinyl chloride 
polymer, laminating the sheet to a woven or non-woven 
fabric and heating the product to sweU the hydrophilic 
polymer particles. The particles on the surface of the sheet 
are then broken by ruiming the laminate through a sander to 
give a suede-like finish. 



3,660,219 
HETEROGENEOUS CONSTRUCTION OF TEXTILE 
SHUTTLE SIDE WALLS 
Cari Stamer Pugh, Jr., and Robert Clay Curry, both of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, assignors to North American Rockwell Cor- 
poration, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Filed Jan. 11, 1971, Ser. No. 105,389 

Int CL B32b 7 7/04, 21/08; D03I 5/02 

VS. a. 161—93 6 Claims 




Sidewalls for loom shuttles are made of outer or wearing 
surfaces of unidirectional textile fabric reinforced with 
phenolic resin and laminated, providing a high abrasion re- 
sistant surface with a smooth finish. The next layers on each 
side are of glass fiber cloth coated with phenolic resin, and 
finally, between the glass cloth layers, a layer of bulking or 
filler material. This bulking or filling material layer may be 
another laminate of textile fabric and phenolic resin or it may 
be low density material, such as wood. If the bulking layer is 
of phenolic laminate or wood, an increased amount of rigidi- 
ty results, though this is not the primary factor for rigidity, 
which is the result of the outer two layers on each side and 
particularly the glass cloth laminate layers. The sidewaU con- 
struction can be fabricated either by pressing all components 
together as a laminate at one time or forming the individual 
components separately and later bonding them to form tlte 
desired structure in a separate operation. 



3,660,220 
ELECTRICALLY INSUlilTIVE TAPE 
Gayhtrd L. Groff, North St Paul, Mfau., aMlgnor to 
Mining and Mannfactoring Company, St 



Mfai- 
Paid, 



Minn. 



This invention relates to a method and means for laminat- 
ing superimposed layers of the same or different material by 



Coatinnation of appHcadoa Scr. No. 637,765, May 11, 1967, 
now abandoned. This appHcatioa Aug. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 

67,189 

IntCLB32b77/06 

U.S. CL 161-93 9 Oaims 

Electrically insulative tape comprising a base electrically 

insulative sheet impregnated or coated with a resin composi- 



232 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



tion that includes cpoxy resin and an acid-terminated ester place the particles in substantially touching relation and form 

an article, and subjected to high-intensity ionizing radiation 
to polymerize the monomer and bind the particles into an ob- 




reaction product of hydrogenated castor derivative and 
dicarboxylic acid or anhydride. 



3,660^21 

STRETCHABLE CREPED MICA FOIL AND METHOD 

THEREFOR 

HaM-Werncr Rotter, Nanibcff, Gcrmaoy, asigiior to 

SiencM-Sdiackertwerk AktieofCMllKliaft, Bcrtiii- 

Skoieantadt, EriaafCB, Gtrmmnj 

CoatfaiaatkHi of appHcatioii Scr. No. 174,462, Feb. 20, 1962, 

BOW alMBdoacd. This appHcatioa Sept. 20, 1966, Ser. No. 

580330 
Claims priority, application Germany, Feb. 24. 1%I. S 72704 

iBt CL B32b 19/00, 3128, 5/16 
U.S. CI. 161-128 nCtaims 

Method of producing stretchable creped mica foil includes 
depositing a mica suspension upon a web of creped material 
selected from the group consisting of fiber paper and textile 
material and subsequently drying the mica suspension on the 
web; and foil produced thereby. 



3,660,222 

FILLING MATERUL OF POLYESTER FIBERS 

Darid AkxJMdcr Fkmiof, Jr., WUmington, and Gilbert 

Doagias Rawltags, HockesBtB, both of Dd., aasigiiors to E. I. 

du PoBt dc NcoHMirs aad CompaBy, WUmiagtoa, Dd. 

Filed Apr. 1, 1969, Scr. No. 811^19 

iBt. CL B32b 5/14, 5/28 

VS. CL 161-156 2 Claims 




A filling material of polyester fibers is formed by gar- 
netting stople length fibers to a web then spraying a resinous 
bonding agent on the web and curing the resin to bond the 
constituent fibers. The resin is present in diminishing quanti- 
ties through the web from one face to the other. A plurality 
of such webs may be used to form a layered structure which 
has a high degree of filling support wei^t along with a 
desirable degree of softness. 



3,660,223 
RIGID, FLEXIBLE AND COMPOSITE SOLID OBJECTS 
HAVING CELLULOSE CONTAINING RICE HULL 
PARTICLES AND RADIATION INDUCED POLYMER 
AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME 
Samod L. CMaUna, 71 Paddon Road, Wataoavfllc, CaUf. 
CoirtiniiatiQiHin-part of appttcatfcio Scr. No. 720,331, Apr. 
10, 1968. This appllcatloD Sept. 16, 1968, Scr. No. 762,173 
Int. CLB32b 5/76. 27/02 
US. CL 161—168 7 Claims 

Discrete, cellulose containing, rice hull particles are im- 
pregnated with a monomer, usually a liquid, having a radia- 
tion activatabie reaction group, molded under pressure to 




ject of stable shape. Additionally, the monomer may be 
selected to produce objects that are rigid and hard or flexible 
and resilient. A composite layered article is also disclosed. 



3,660,224 

METHOD FOR MAKING ADHERE TO EACH OTHER 

CURED LAYERS OF EPM OR EPDM ELASTOMERS 

AND/OR BUTYL RUBBER AND PRODUCTS THUS 

OBTAINED 

PasquaUno Cau, Oggioiio, and Enncs Andil, Milan, both of 

Italy, Mdgnors to The B. F. Goodridi Company, Aluvn, 

Ohk) 

Flkd Jan. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 7,217 

Claims priority. applicaUon Italy. Feb. 3, 1%9. 12354 A/69; 

Sept. 10. 1969. 2I83J A/69 

Int. CL B27b 27/08; B29h 5/02 

VS. CL 161—252 7 Claims 

The present invention relates to a process for making ad- 
here or for welding together layers or shaped articles such as 
plates, sheets, tube-tires, and the like, based on cured 
synthetic elastomers chosen from among the group including: 
copolymers and/or terpolymers of ethylene, of an alpha- 
olefine and optionally of a polyene, (for example EPM and 
EPDM rubber), and/or butyl rubber, by interposing between 
the layers to be caused to adhere a plastomeric layer consist- 
ing of thermoplastic polymers and/or copolymers, free of 
polar substituting groups or of reactive groups, of ethylene, 
propylene and/or butene, and by the successive heating 
under pressure of the associated layers. 



3.660,225 
DEUGNinCATION AND BLEACHING OF CELLULOSE 

PULP LAYERS WFTH OXYGEN GAS 
Abraham Jacob Vcrrcync, Pc tc u l lcid; Leonard Auftin Job, 
Bramlcy North, both of Republic of South Africa; Paul 
ReroUc, Nogent-snr-Mame, and Johan C. F. C. Richtcr, 
St. Jean Cap Ferrat, both of France, assignors to South 
African Pulp and Paper Industries Limited and L*Air 
Liquide, Societc Anonyse pour L'Etudc et L'Exploitation 
des Procedcs Georges Claude and Akticbolaget Kamyr 
Filed July 10, l%9, Ser. No. 840,639 
Claims priority, application Sweden, July 11, 1968, 9540/68; 
July 15, 1968,9689/68; Jan. 22, 1%9, 868/69; South Africa, 
Oct. 14,1968,68/6629 
IntCLD21cJ/2d 
U.S.CL 162-17 11 Claims 

A method of dividing a stream of pulp into a series of 
layers comprising discrete batches and progressively transfer- 
ring the batches from layer to layer in controlled fashion so 
that the height of each layer does not exceed a maximum 
value at which the pulp at the bottom of a layer has a 
predetermined minimum gaseous content, the pulp being 
conucted with oxygen gas under pressure while progressively 
transferring pulp from one layer to the next in the series. The 
method may occur in an apparatus comprising a cylindrical 
pressure vessel including axially spaced floors which define 
chambers between them, the chambers being subdivided into 
a plurality of compartments by dividing walls disposed axially 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



288 



to the pressure vessel and transversely to the floors, each 
floor having an aperture and the compartments and floors 
being relatively movable to allow pulp in the compartments 
sequentially to be transferred from one chamber to the next 
as relative movement occurs. 



3,660,226 
PAPER MACHINE BROKE CONTROL 
Lewis A. McKcowB, 473 Mayfair Avenue, Ottawa, 3 Ontario, 
Caaada 

Filed Jane 10, 1970, Scr. No. 44,936 
Oahns priority, application Canada, Jnnc 1 1, 1969, 054,067 

Int. CL D21f 7/66 
U.S. CL 162-264 8 Claims 



tral breeder region, a second fissile region wholly or partiaUy 
surrounding said first fissile region with axial and radial 
clearance, an inner breeder region occupying said clearance, 
and an outer breeder region extending frx>m the outer boun- 
dary of the second fissile regicm to the boundary of the core 
itself, which is generally cylindrical. 

A variation envisages the second fissile region only par- 
tially surrounding the first fissile region, the "comer" por- 
tions being occupied by breeder material in place of the fis- 
sile material of a completely embracing second fissile region. 




3,660,228 

NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTtLOL WITH REFLECTOR 

AND ABSORBER MEANS 

Robert E. M^ladl7, Baltimore, Md^ am ignnr to Tdedync 

Inc^ Los Angdca, CaML 

FOcd Nov. 6, 1967, Scr. No. 680,658 
Int. CL G21c 7/00 
VS. CL 176-20 13 



There is described a paper making system that includes ( 1 ) 
a broke tank, couchpit or other receptacle for broke stock 
fibers and ( 1 1 ) a machine chest or other container that feeds 
a supply of suitably prepared fibers to the paper machine. 
The invention is the improvement that comprises means of 
restricting the flow of suitably prepared fibers fix)m the 
machine chest, and in their place feeding broke stock fibers 
from the broke tank, couchpit or other receptacle for broke 
stock fibers so that, when the paper making system is mal- 
functioning, the paper machine can be kept running on sub- 
stantially broke stock. The system has the advantage of being 
able to avoid the excessive production of broke. 




A nuclear reactor of the metal hydride ccmtrol type. Metal 
hydride is in two portiotis, one in the core and the other ex- 
terior of the core, and means are provided fw permitting 
flow of hydrogen between the two portions. Control of reac- 
tivity is obtained by providing heating means in one or both 
portions, the heating being responsive to a neutron aeaaor. 



3,660,227 

NUCLEAR REACTORS 

Ronald TuMtid Adoroyd, VpUm4iyChaittr, mi Manrkc 



3«660,229 
REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM 
Arthur Perks, Stockton Heath, near Warrington, both of En- Herbert N. KHnthril; Waller W. CNfle, and WBIam A. 
ghmd, Bidinnri to UakMi Kinfdon Atonic Emertj CMtcM, aB al Pc tc rb oT B U gh, Otario, Camrfa. am ignnn to 
Authority, London, En||and Canadiaa General Electric Company Limited 

FHcd Nov. 4, 1969, Scr. No. 873,922 FVed Feb. 7, 1969, Scr. No. 797,447 

Clalmi priority. appBctioB Great Britain, Nov. IS. 1968, Int CL G21c 7/00 



54,439/68 
IntCLG21c7/02 



U.S. CL 176—20 



8 



VS. CL 176—17 





>■ 







•^-j. 



A core configuration for a liquid metal cooled fast breeder 
nuclear reactor includes a generally cylindrical breeder re- A method of controlling the pressure in the primary circuit 
gion, a fint fissile region which completely embraces the cen- of a nuclear power plant in which the fluid in the primary cir- 



\ 



234 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



cuit is liquid and the circuit has a surge tank and spray means shroud and the main pressure vessel provides additional 
for condensing vapors in the tank. The pressure in the prima- shielding and is readily available for core flooding. The ar- 
ry circuit is controlled by controlling the spray means in 
response to the pressure in the secondary circuit. 



3,660,230 
NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM 
Herbert S. Baiey, Jr., Mountain View, and Samuel L. 
Stewart, Caapbell, both of Calif., aaslgBors to General 
Elcctrk Company 

Filed Nov. 26, 1968, Ser. No. 779,132 

Int CL G21c 7110 

MJS. CI. 176—36 R 1 Claim 




A nuclear reactor control syitem is deacribed in which 
reactivity in the core is controlled by neutron absorbing 
material which is moved into and out of the fuel containing 
core region. Neutron moderating material is included in fol- 
lowers connected to the neutron absorbing control elements 
■o that the moderating material is brought into the core fuel 
region when the neutron absorbing material is removed 
therefrom. This system is especially applicable to a reactor of 
thefost neutron breeder type. The use of moderating materi- 
al in a fast reactor core improves the inherent safiety charac- 
teristics of the core by improving the Doppler reactivity ef- 
fect and coolant voiding reactivity. The incorporation of the 
moderating material in control material followers results in 
improvement in core fissile requirement, breeding ratio and 
core conversion ratio. 




rangement provides improved safety, simplicity and reliabili- 
ty in steam cooled reactor operation. 



3,660,232 

INTERLOCKED ASSEMBLY OF BLOCKS FOR A 

NUCLEAR REACTOR MODERATING CORE 

Robert BaiUu, Tlmpcrley, ChasUre, Fnglaail, Mslfni to 

Uakcd Klagdom Atomic EMrgy Authority, Loadon, Ea- 

gland 

Filed Mar. 13, 1969, Ser. No. 806,958 
Claims priority, appHcatioa Great Britaia, Mar. 21, 1968, 

13341/68 
lat CL G21c 5100, 5/14 
VS. CL 176-84 S 




^ 3.660,231 

STEAM COOLED NUCLEAR REACTOR 
Jack N. Fox; Ned P. Hansen; Eugene E. Ottch; Ralph W. 
Gucather, aB of San Jose, aad Herbert J. RubitHtcia, Los 
Girtos, all of CaHL, aw i gnocs to Gcaeral Electric Compaay 
Filed Nov. 26, 1968, Scr. No. 778,998 
lat. CL G21c 15/00 
U.S. CL 176—56 16 Claln» 

A nuclear reactor pressure vessel internals arrangement in- 
cluding a core assembly, control means and steam flow 
directing means is disclosed. The reactor utilizes a two-pass 
steam flow scheme in which steam flows downwardly through 
non-fueled core components and then flows upwardly 
through the fuel assemblies. The reactor internals are located 
within a shroud which forms a second pressure-tight vessel 
Water located in an annular space between the internal 



A moderator structure is provided wherein bodies of 
moderator material are stacked in layers to provide juxta 
posed columns. The bodies are each provided with splines 
which have side faces lying in planes passing through the lon- 
gitudinal axis of the body. Bodies in a given layer abut one 
another only by said side faces. 



3,660,233 

NUCLEAR REACTOR UPPER CORE GRID 

Charles Arthur Dalke, San Joae, aad Cedric L. Child, Cuper- 

tlao, both of Calif., aasigaors to Geacral Electric Company 

Filed Nov. 12, 1969, Scr. No. 875,928 

lBt.CI.G21ci/00 

U.S. CL 176-87 6 Claims 

A fuel assembly top guide for the fuel core of a nuclear 

reactor including screws having threads with an acute in- 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



235 



eluded angle between the thread pressure flank face and the 




screw axis for fastening the notched intersections of the 
beams forming the top guide. 



3 660 237 

PROCESS FOR OBTAINING KALLEKREIN FROM 

PANCREAS OR SUBMANDIBULARIS GLANDS OF PIGS 

Fritz SchuHz, Wuppertal-^onaborn, Gcnaaay, aarigaor to 

Farbcafabrikea Bayer Akt i t ag tarih ch a f t, Lcvcrl(uaea, Ger> 

many 

FDed May 19, 1970, Ser. No. 38,906 

laL CL C07g 7/026 

VS. CL 195^^ R ^ Chtos 

Tlie extraction of Kallekrein from the pancreas and sub- 
mandibularis gland of pigs is carried out by subjecting the 
fresh comminuted glands at about room temperature with an 
aqueous solution of a salt, such as sodium chloride, of a con- 
centration of fix)m 3 to 25%. preferably 8% of the salt, at a 
pH value of 5.5 to 9.5, preferably 7.5 to 8.5, in the presence 
of a water-miscible solvent such as methanol, and the mix- 
ture stirred for about 1 hour. The aqueous kallekrein-con- 
taining phase is separated from the solids and the kallekrein 
precipitoted in the presence of kieselguhr and acetone. High 
yields and great reduction in extraction time are noted. 



3,660,234 

METHOD OF ATTENUATING VIRUSES 

Oscar S. Gray, Fort Lauderdale, fla., aaslgaor to Gray ladua- 

tries, lac.. Ft Lauderdale, Fla. 

CoattenaHoa-ia-part of appHcatioa Scr. No. 19,520, Mar. 17, 

1970, aow abaadoaed , which Is a coatiauatioa of appHcatioa 

Scr. No. 687,157, Dk. 1, 1967, aow abmakoacd. This 

appHcadoa Feb. 16, 1971. Scr. No. 115312 

IBL CL C12r 7/00 

VS. CL 195—1.2 13 CUgm 

A live virus is subjected to microwave energy under con- 

trdled conditions whereby the virus is attenuated to a lew 

virulent state. 

The present invention relates to a novel method for at- 
tenuating live viruses; and, more particulariy, the present in- 
vention relates to a novel method for qiuckly attenuating 
vir\tses in a simple, controlled and reproducible manner. 



3 660,238 
EXTRACTION OF ASPARAGINASE FROM BACTERIAL 

CULTURE 
Hcary E. Wade, Klags Bridge Mead, Stralford^b-Caslk, 
SaliBbnry, Eaglaad 

Fled Aag. 21, 1969, Scr. No. 852,082 
Claims priority, appHcatioa Great Britaia, Aug. 23, 1968, 

40344/68 
lat CL C07g 7/025 
U3. CL 195-66 A 1« Oatnt 

The enzyme L-asparaginase, used in the treatment of leu- 
kemia and disseminated cancer, is extracted in high yield by 
treating L-asparaginase producing bacteria with strong alkali 
to release the enzyme from the bacterial cell in soluble form 
and thereafter isolating and purifying the enzyme by conven- 
tional methods. 



3360335 
METHOD FOR PRODUCING PHENYLALANINE BY 
FERMENTATION 
ShtaUi Okamura, Tokyo; SUakhtav Otteka, Yokohama; Akk> 
Yamaaol, Tokyo; Famiyro Yodrfaafa, Kawasaki; Takeshi 
HoMla, Yokohama; K<OI Kabota, Tokyo, aad Takayasa 
TsacMda, KawvaU, aM of Japaa, aiaigaon to AJiaoasoto 
Co., lac^ Tokyo, Japaa 

FBcd A^ 14, 1970, Scr. No. 63353 
Claims priority, application Japan, Aug. 22, 1%9, 
44/66374; Oct 29, 1%9, 44/86601 
lat CL C12d 13/06 
U3.CL195— 29 llClaImB 

MutanU of microorganisms of the genere Brevibacterium, 
Corynebacterium, Arthrobacter, BaciUus, and Candida which 
tolerate amounu of phenylalanine analogues sufficient to in- 
hibit growth of the parent strains produce extracellular L- 
phenylalanine in conventional culture media in amounts suf- 
ficient to warrant recovery. 



3360339 
FIBRINOLYSOKINASES FROM STREPTOMYCES 
Weracr Frommcr, aad Otto Wapmr, both of Wappcrtal-EI- 
bcffdd, Gcnaaay, amigaars to Fartwalabrikca Bayer Ak- 
tiiag sssi achai t L sMrk assa, Gcnaaay 

FBcd Nov. 18, 1969, Scr. No. 87731S 
Cktes priority, appHcatioa Gcnaaay, Nov. 22, 1968, P 18 10 

277.7 
lat CL C12d /i//0 
U3. CL 195-66 B 5 Clafaas 

Fibrinolysokinase of good stability is isolated from culture 
solutions of actinomycetes by heat treatment at a low pH fol- 
lowed by fractional precipiution. 



3360336 
PRODUCTION OF GLUCOAMYLASE 
G. Dworadmck, aad Caroljra A. Nd wa, both of CHa- 
toa, Iowa, amiganri to Staadard Braads lacorporalcd, New 
Yort^ N.Y. 

Fiad Jaa. 8, 1969, Scr. No. 789,964 
lat CL C12d 13/10 
VS. CL 195-65 13 Clahas 

The disclosure is directed to the productimi of the enzyme 
glucoamylase. Dtiring the growth of ^ucoamylase producing 
microorganisms, ammonium hydroxide or ammonia gas is in- 
troduced into the growth medium to provide a source of am- 
monia and to maintain the pH of medium at the level where 
optimum growth of the microorganisms occurs. 



3,660340 
FLAVIN CO-ENZYME ASSAY 
W. ChappeHe, Baltimore aad Grace L. PIcdoto, 
Bladcasbari, both of Md., aasitaon to The Uakcd Stales of 
America m rcprcseatcd by the Admialstrator of the Na- 
tioaal Acroaaatks aad Space Admiatalratioa 

FBcd May 5, 1969, Scr. No. 822,039 
Imt. a. G9lm 31/ 14 

VS. CL 195-1033 R H CW~ 

Flavin coenzymes, the active forms of vitamin Bi, are as- 
sayed by using boiling perchloric acid to rupture bacterial 
cells, tne the flavin from protein, and hydrolyze flavm 
adenine dinuclootide to flavin mononucleotide, which is 
reduced with sodium borohydride and palladium chloride 
and reacted with the enzyme luciferase to produce light with 
intensity directly proportional to flavin concentration. 



286 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660^1 
CONTAINER FOR ORGAN PERFUSION OR THE LIKE 
Paal jMeph MkiyelKB, Hereat, BdgfauB, aaigiior to Baxttf 
Laboratories lac^ Mortoa Grove, II. 

Filed Jaa. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 2^1 
IbL CL C12k 9100 
U.S.CL 195-127 6 Claims 

A container having at least one access port defined 
therein; and a flexible conduit passing through the access 
port in sealing relation, in which the conduit is slideable rela- 
tive to the port without disruption of the seal. 



3,660,242 

' INCUBATOR 

Harry W. Gordoa, Bronx, N.Y., aad Gustav Flagado, Ho Ho 

Ku, N J., assifMirs to Joliiis Schmid, Inc., New Yorli, N.Y. 

FOcd Mar. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 16,681 

Int. CL C12b 1100 

U.S.CL195— 139 7ClaiiM 



7k f ti/n.jju^ 




An incubator is described that comprbes an insulated 
chamber in which heating of a culture media takes place by 
conduction and the incubator is designed to prevent over- 
heating of the culture media and provide uniform tempera- 
ture control. The incubator has a broad field of application 
and is particularly adapted because of xis compactness for 
use in a physician's ofiHce. 



3,660043 
PETRI DISH WITH COMPARTMENT FOR STERILIZED 

SPREADING ELEMENT 
Ceci G. Yoimg, La Canada, Calif., awignor to North Amer- 
ican RockweO Corporation 

FDed Mar. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 20,010 

InL CL C12k mo 

U.S. CL 195—139 12 Claims 




A petri dish compartment for a sterile ball for use with an 
automatic spreading element is provided with at least one 
sloping surface for release and recovery of the ball. The slop- 
ing surface has its highest point adjacent a recessed area in 
the compartment, the recessed area housing the spreading 
element prior to and after streaking. 



3,660044 
FERMENTATION APPARATUS 
Chi-Sln Che, Ponca City, Okla., mrignor to Coatincntai Oil 
Company, Ponca City, Okk. 

FDed Aug. 14, 1969, Scr. No. 850,124 

Int CL C12b 7/70 

U.S. a. 195-143 7 ClainH 




A fermentation apparattis b provided having a reactor ves- 
sel, baffle means, impeUor means, and a telescopeable draft 
tube means which enables the upper portion of the draft tube 
means to be raised and lowered with respect to the lower 
portion of the draft tube means. 



3,660045 
APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS MANUFACTURE OF 
FURFURAL AND ACETIC ACID 
AareJ Zdnik; Frantiack Rcndoa; Frantiaek Konnal: RadWav 
Domamky, afl o( Bratislava, and Jooef P^Jttk, Zvokn, al ol 
CxcchoalovaUa, aarifners to CcduHlovcnska Akadonk 
Vcd, Pragac, Cndtodovakia 

FBed May 21, 1965, Scr. No. 457367 

Claims priority, a p pB c a tfa a CaedMialovakia, May 22, 1964, 

2970-64. The portion of the term of the patent sub«>«iuent 

to May 2, 1987, has been disclaimed. 

lat CL C 10b 49/70, //04 

U.S. CL 202-99 3 ClainH 



■X,r~ 




An apparatus for continuously producing furfural and 
acetic acid by thermodecomposition of ligneous and similar 
raw materials in the presence of the catalyst and in an inert 
atmosphere. A source of raw material is provided, a source 
of catalyst and a source of heated inert gaseous carrier. A 
drier is provided. Means are provided for conveying raw 
material and catalyst from the respective sources to the drier 
and for impregnating such raw material with the catalyst. 
Reactor means are provided and means for conveying im- 
pregnated raw material from the drier into the reactor means 
in a first direction. Pneumatic conveyor means conveys 
heated carrier from the respective source through and 
beyond the reactor means in a direction counter to the first 
direction so that the impregnated material yields distillate 
and solid particulate matter which is entrained by the carrier. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



287 



Means are provided for separating the solid particulate 
matter from the carrier downstream of the reactor means. 
Condensor means separate distillate from the carrier 
downstream of the reactor means. 



The process comprises (a) selectively proportioning both the 
reboiler steam flow rate and the cohunn bottoms Vtitt-cXi 
rate to the distillation column feed rate and (b) adjusting the 
distillate take-off rate in accordance with variations in the 
distillation column feed rate and deviations in the level of the 
column bottoms. 



3,660046 

DISTILLATION APPARATUS HAVING CONCENTRIC 

RISER, EXPANSION AND CONDENSING CHAMBERS 

Verity C. Smith, Dcdham, MMk, Mrignor to Vaponki, Inc., 

Waltham, Maii. 

FDed Ai«. 13, 1969, Scr. No. 849,741 
IntCLBOldi/00 
UA CL 202—187 2 




An apparatus and process for purifying water by distilla- 
tion and subsequent condensation. The impure water is 
heated to form a distillate which is moved in a rotational 
path, expanded condensed and recovered. The recovered 
condensate contacts only materials not imparting impurities 
thereto and does not contact the outer shell of the purifying 
apparatus. Routiona] movement is imparted by means of a 
riser having baffled openings fix)m which the steam exits into 
an expansion zone. 



3,660047 

PROCESS AND APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING WITH 

A COMPUTER A DISTILLATION COLUMN PRODUCT 

AND HEAT FLUID RATES OF FLOW 

Roger G. E. Franks, WDmington, DcL, and Steven L. Ritcbcy, 

Clark, NJ., amignors to E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 

Company, Wilmington, DcL 

FDed July 31, 1970, Scr. No. 59,941 

Int CL BOld 3142; C07c 7 79/04 

U.S. CL 203—1 4 Claims 



3,660048 

NEUTRALIZATION AND DRYING OF HALOGENATED 

AND ALKYLATED HYDROCARBONS 

Utah Tsao, Jersey City, N J., amignor to Tlw Lomnras Com- 

paay, Btoomfl eld , N J. 

FDed Mar. 6, 1969, Scr. No. 804^42 

Int. CL BOld 3\34; C07c 79/00 

UA CL 203-7 15 Cfadmi 



\ (£^ 



aufsr/c _ 



^^' re 



l!~~. 



/o- 



mti/nmcfZMia 
srsreM it 



'T 



musrt 



\\ 



-^ 



jvcifcr/OM 



■OJrr/iK TVmfC/r f5 



/6 



U^ 






Halogenated and alkylated products containing corrosive 
acids are neutralized and dried by contact with caustic in a 
neutralization system in which the neutralized product is 
separated into aqueous and organic phases. The organic 
phase is azeotropically distilled in a drying tower to obtain 
neutralized, dried halogenated product and an overhead con- 
taining halogenated product, water and trace amounts of the 
corrosive acid formed during the distillation. The overhead is 
recycled to the neutralization system after being mixed with 
caustic upstream of the neutralization system, whereby the 
need to protect the neutralization system and recycling 
system from the effects of the corrosive acid is avoided. 



3,660049 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMININ G BOT H 

THE AVERAGE CORROSION RATE, AND THE PITnNG 

TENDENCY, SUBSTANTULLY INDEPENDENTLY OF 

THE RESISTANCE OF THE ELECTROLYTE 

Clafcncc R. Townicnd, Aaahdm, CaHL, amignor to Magna 

Corporation, Santc Fc Springs, CaHf. 

Filed Feb. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 8,809 

Int CLGOln 27/26 

UACL 204-1 T 20Clalma 



--f 







1' tA|-» 



B'?^ 







The method makes use of three electrodes which are ex- 
posed to the corrosive environment, the electrodes being the 

, corroding or teat electrode, the reference electrode, and the 

auxiliary electrode. The corroding electrode is made 10 mfl- 
A process and apparatus for controlling a distillation livolts positive rdative to the reference electrode, and a then 
column, especially useful for purifying tolylene diisocyanate. made 10 millivolts negative relative thereto. The anodic and 



238 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



cathodic currents which flow through a circuit including the 
corroding electrode and the auxiliary electrode are then 
averaged to produce an indication of the general or average 
corrosion rate, there being no substantial error due to the re- 
sistance of the electrolyte. The difference between such 
anodic and cathodic currents is determined in order to pro- 
vide the pitting tendency or pitting index of the system. In ac- 
cordance with a second embodiment of the method, the cor- 
roding electrode is forced to be at the same potential as that 
of the reference electrode. The current which then flows 
through a circuit including the corroding electrode and the 
auxiliary electrode is measured by a microammeter and is the 
pitting tendency of the system. Thereafter, the microamme- 
ter is caused to read zero despite the fact that current is 
passing therethrough, and the corroding electrode is forced 
to be at a 10 millivolt potential difference from the reference 
electrode. The reading of such microammeter is then directly 
proportional to the general or average corrosion rate. 



3,660,250 
METHOD OF DETERMIMNG IMPURITY PROFILE OF A 

SEMICONDUCTOR BODY 

Mkhad C. Duffy, BoMse-Le-Roi, France, and Richard L. 

Hudson, Wappingers Firik, N.Y., aoignors to International 

Business Machines Corporation, Armonli, N.Y. 

Original appttortion Dec. 22, 1967, Scr. No. 692,817, now 

Patent No. 3,554391. Divided and this application Aug. 31, 

1970, Ser. No. 68,271 

Int. CLGOln 27/04 

U.S. CL 204— 1 T 9 Claims 




X (AMOUMT MCMOVCO) 



A machine and method for automatically determining the 
distribution of impurities contained in a semiconductor body. 
The machine is particularly usefid in determining the depth 
of very shallow junctions in the order of one-half micron and 
less. The machine successively anodizes the surface of the 
semiconductor body to produce an anodized semiconductor 
layer, removes the anodized layer by chemical etching, mea- 
sures an electrical characteristic, such as spreading resistance 
and sheet resistance, of the semiconductor body and records 
the electrical characteristic in terms of the characteristic ver- 
sus the amount of material removed. The machine automati- 
cally repeats this cycle until a resistivity profile for the 
desired depth of material is obtained. A sharp change will be 
observed in the recorded proflle of the electrical charac- 
teristic versus the amount of material removed when a PN 
junction is crossed. 



cally deposited on electrically conducting surfaces from a 
bath comprising the copper ion and the pyrophosphate ion 
by mainUining the electrolytic bath constantly free from par- 
ticles having a size substantially exceeding 3 microns. 



3,660,252 

METHOD OF MAKING ENGRAVED PRINTING PLATES 

Gualtiero Glorl, Lausanne, SwItKriand, aMignor to Dc La 

Rue Glort S.A., Lausanne, Switaerland 

Filed June 17, 1970, Scr. No. 47,114 

Int. CL B41n 1104; B41b 1102, B41ni 5100 

U.S. CI. 204-17 11 Claims 

An engraved printing plate for steel or copper plate print- 
ing machines, includes an engraved part made of a material 
which accepts a coloring or inking material and a non-en- 
graved part spaced from the engraved part and having a layer 
of porous material impregnated with hygroscopic substance. 
The porous material can be black chromium or be made 
from nickel phosphide or alumina. The hygroscopic sub- 
stance can be made from lithium chloride. 



3,660,253 

STEEL PICKLING BATH 

Stewart E. Ranch, Jr., and Edward H. Mayer, both of 

Bcthlcbeni, Pa., assignors to Bcthkhcn Stcd Corporation 

Filed Jane 12, 1970, Scr. No. 45,929 

Int. CL C23g 1108 

U.S. CL 204-34 3 Claims 

A method and bath for cleaning and conditioning steel 

prior to tinplating in which the strip is pickled in a dilute 

aqueous solution of nitric and sulfuric acids. The pickled 

strip, when tinplated, has improved corrosion resistance. 



3,660,254 

RECOVERY OF PRODUCTS FROM 

ELECTROCHEMICAL FLUORINATION 

Robert O. Dunn, Bartksvlle, Okla., assignor to Phillips 

P c troteum Company 

Filed June 8, 1970. Scr. No. 44,041 

IntCLBOlki/00 

U.S. CL 204-59 14 Claims 




3,660,251 
METHOD FOR THE ELECTROLYTICAL DEPOSITION 
OF HIGHLY DUCTILE COPPER 
Werner Fluhmann, Zurich, and Walter Saxcr, Urdorf, Zu- 
rich, both of Switaerland, assignors to Werner Ftuhmann 
and Gahaniachc, Zurich, Switaertand 

Filed July 6, 1970, Ser. No. 52,730 

Cbfans priority, appUotion Switzerland, July 10, 1969, 

10563/69 

Int. CL C23b 5148, 5118; BOlk 3100 

U.S.CL204— 15 14 Claims 

A homogenous, brittle-free, pore-firee and dense copper 

layer of high ductility and having a content of included gases 

and/or organic impurities of less than 100 ppm is electrolyti- 



Ruorinated products are recovered from an efDuent 
stream from an electrolytic cell in an electrochemical 
fluorination process by emj^oying a combination of steps 
comprising cooling said effluent stream to a temperatiuv 
near its dew point but insufficient to cause any significant 
condensation thereof, compressing said cooled effluent 
stream, chilling said compressed effluent stream to a tem- 
perature sufficient to condense at least the major portion of 
the components thereof other than hydrogen, and recovering 
fluorinated products from said chilled stream. In a preferred 
embodiment the initial cooling of said effluent stream is ef- 
fected by directly contacting same with a liquid stream com- 
prising the feedstock to the electrolytic cell. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



289 



3,660,255 

PROCESS FOR ELECTROCHEMICAL CONVERSION 

Homer M. Fox; Forrat N. Ruehlen, and Kdth A. Williams, 

all of BartlcaviBc, Okla., amlgnorB to Phillips Petroleum 

Company 

Continuation of Ser. No. 739,476, June 24, 1968, abandoned. 

Filed Sept. 24, 1970, Ser. No. 75,291 

InL CL BOlk 3100 

MS. CL 204-59 10 Claims 



3,660,257 

ELECTROLYTIC PROCESS FOR THE PREPARATION OF 

a-METHYLBENZYL DIMERS FROM SULFONIUM 

COMPOUNDS 

WilliaB J. Settincri, and RHchle A. Wessling, both of 

Midland, Mich., assignors to The Dow Chemical Company, 

Midland, Mick. 

Fikd Dec. 2, 1969, Scr. No. 881,574 
Int. CL C07b 29106; C07c 1100, 15/18 
VS. CL 204-72 10 Claims 

a-Methylbenzyl dimers having the formula 







wherein n is an integer from to 5 and R is an inert sub- 
stituent, are prepared by electrochemically reducing a sul- 
fonium salt having the formula 



In an electrochemical process, the reaction takes place 
within the confines of a porous electrode element. The feed 
materials are introduced into the bottom of this porous elec- 
trode element by means of a sparger which is positioned 
within the bulk of the electrolyte adjacent a bottom surface 
of said electrode element. 



3,660,256 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ALUMINUM POTLINE 

CONTROL 
David L. Uppltt, Scotia, N.Y., and Rafawr W. Schhmk, 
Schenectady, both of N.Y., assignors to General Electric 
Company 

Filed Dec 7, 1967, Ser. No. 688^10 

Int CL C22d 3/12, 3/02 

VS. CL 204-67 . S Claims 



^>- 



CH-S A*^' 



(^1 



(R). 






wherein R, and R, are alkyl or hydroxy-substituted alkyl 
groups and A' is an electrolytically acceptoble anion. The 
reduction and coupling occur at a mercury cathode without 
the formation of organomercury compounds. 




3,660^58 
PROCESS OF REMOVING HYDROLYZED FOLY- 
ACRYLONITRILE FltOM AN ilQUEOUS MIXTURE 
Donald E. Danly, Pensacola, Fbu, and Andrew M. Fatter- 
son, Jr., Decatnr, Ala., asrignors to Monsanto Com- 
pany, St Louis, Mo. 

ContlnuatioD-ln-part of application Ser. No. 618,248, 
Jan. 30, 1967. This appUcation Jan. 23, 1970, Ser. 
No. 5,440 

Int CL COTb 29/06; C07c 121/25, 121/28 
VS. CL 204—73 7 Claims 



A method and apparatus for controlling the operation of 
aluminum reduction cells by controlling the position of the 
cell anode and by controUing the addition of alumina ore to 
the cell electrolyte. Anode position adjustment occurs after 
addition of ahimtna to the electrolyte and is based upon 
periodic measurements of resistance drop across the cell. 
Upon completion of anode position adjustment, the cell re- 
sistance is monitored by periodically determining first and 
second resistance values. The addition of alumina to the elec- 
trolyte is initiated upon detection of a predetermined dif- 
ference between the current second resistance value and a 
base resistance value determined from the first resistance 
values. ,, 




Hydrolyzed polyacrylonitrile is removed frSm an aque- 
ous mixture consisting essentially of a quaternary am- 
monium salt, adiponitrile, acrylonitrile and hydrolyzed 
polyacrylonitrile by containing the mixture at a tempera- 
ture up to about 45" C. and for at least about one hour 
to form an organic phase and a water phase, the phases 
separated by an interface (the interface not being defi- 
nitely defined but consisting essentially of an emulsion 



240 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



which consists essentially of the hydrolyzed polyacrylo- 
nitrile), and withdrawing a portion of the interface and 
filtering said portion to remove the hydrolyzed polyacrylo- 
nitrile. 



3,660^59 

ELECTROLYTIC CELL 

Donald E. Danly and Robert W. McWtaorter, Pensacola, 

Fla^ assignors to Monsanto Company, St Louis, Mo. 
Original application May 31, 1966, Ser. No. 553,851. 
Diiided and this application Mar. 25, 1969, Ser. No. 
810423 

Int a. C07b 29/06; C07c ltl/26; BOlk 1 100 
UA CI. 204—73 A 3 Claims 




An ion exchange membrane divides an electrolytic cell 
into separate anolyte and catholyte compartments. 
Spacer strips between the membrane and cathode define 
smooth-walled catholyte passages between the membrane 
and cathode. The spacer strips are parallel to catholyte 
flow. Anolyte pressure is slightly higher than catholyte 
pressure. The dimensions of the membrane frame are 
chosen to seal against the anode and cathode blocks with- 
out distorting the electrodes. 



3,660,260 

PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF ALKOXYOXETANES 

Sigfricd H. Schroeter, Schenectady, N.Y., assignor to 

General Electric Company 

No Drawing. Original application Sept 29, 1967, Ser. No. 

671»576. Divided and this appUcation Apr. 27, 1970, 

Ser. No. 43,282 

Int CI. BOlj I/IO 
U.S. a. 204—158 R 6 Claims 

Alkoxyoxetanes are produced by the reaction of an 
aldehyde or ketone with a vinyl ether in the presence of 
ultraviolet light. The alkoxyoxetanes produced in accord- 
ance with this invention are useful as solvents for chemi- 
cal reactions and as monomers for polymerization to poly- 
oxyallylene compounds employing, for example, trialkyl 
aluminum compounds with water in accordance with 
known processes. 



3,660,261 

METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF BROMINE 

CONTAMINATION OF CHLORINE 

Edward R. Wright Ft-eeport and Bobby G. Messick, Lake 

Jadtson, Tex., assignors to The Dow Chemical Com* 

pany. Midland, Mich. 

No Drawing. Filed Apr. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 30,352 
Int CI. cold 1/06, 1/08; BOlk 1/00 
VS. CI. 204—98 7 Claims 

Disclosed is a method for reducing the amount of bro- 
mine contamination in free chlorine produced by the 
electrolysis of brine containing chloride and bromide 
ions. The method involves oxidizing the bromide to 
bromate and maintaining the pH of the brine at a value 
of from 2.0 to 6.5 during the electrolysis. 



3,660,262 

PRODUCTION OF ELECTROPHOTOGRAPHIC 

PAPER BY ELECTROPHORETIC DEPOSITION 

Lester L. Spillcr, Indianapolis, Ind., assignor to Ransburg 

Electro-Coating Corp., Indianapolis, Ind. 

nied June 19, 1969, Ser. No. 834,815 

Int CI. BOlk 5/02 

U.S. CI. 204—181 14 Claims 







ececTfoco^ '■/'v^ 



Electrophotographic paper is provided by electro- 
phoretically depositing on paper zinc oxide and a resinous 
binder associated therewith from nonaqueous medium at 
the cathode of a unidirectional electrical system. 



3,660,263 
HOCTILE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION OF CRIT- 
ICAL METALLIC SURFACES BY ELECTRO- 
PHORETICALLY DEPOSITED COATINGS 
Lucien V. Auletta, Wapplngers Falls, Blair E. Coniish, 
Stone Ridge, Eugene P. Damm, Jr., and Mark A. 
Faigenaum, Pou^keepsie, and Andrew M. Simon 
Wapplngers Falls, N.Y., assignors to International Busi- 
ness Machines Corporation, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 
Filed Oct 28, 1969, Ser. No. 871,825 
Int CI. BOlk 5/02; C23b 13/00 
U.S. CI. 204—181 5 aaims 







" 


-0»90 






- «ooo- -j r% 

j 
-L -— -^ 




T«.. ! 

i 

3T9* 


I 1" 




i_ 










Qm^mam Sow «»' 

»oo' 


«.. 



Application techniques and material design properties 
and formulations are described for electrophorctically de- 
posited hostile environment protective coatings for ex- 
posed critical metallic surfaces. Formulation properties 
and examples of electrophorctically depositable aqueous 
polymer latices and/or co-blends of aqueous polymer 
iatices are disclosed. Said latices and/or latice blends hav- 
ing such desirable coating properties as low gas trans- 
mission, adhesion, non-flammability crack resistance, flexi- 
bility, selected and useful dye compatibility, requisite thick- 
ness, electrical requirements and chemical resistance, are 
illustrated for the generic latice blends, polyvinylidene 
chloride (saran) and epoxy ester. 



3,660,264 

SACRIFICIAL ANODE ASSEMBLY FOR 

VESSEL INTERIORS 

Karl Wilhelm Schuller, Lake Jaclcson, Tex., assignor to 

The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Mich. 

Filed July 22, 1970, Ser. No. 57,267 

Int CI. C23f 13/00 

VS. CI. 204—197 5 Claims 

Sacrificial anode assemblies for the protection of vessel 

interiors are provided with means for adjusting anode 

surface exposxu-e to maintain a uniformly protective 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



241 



potential. A packing gland assembly positioned within a 
port in a vessel wall allows adjustment of anode exposure 
from the outside of the vessel. The sacrificial anode is in 




3,660^66 

ELECTROCOATING EQUIPMENT ACCESSORY 

Robert L. Koch II and James H. Mnehlbaner, Evansrillc, 

Ind., assignors to Asbdee Corp^ EransviDe, Ind. 

Filed Feb. 12, 1968, Ser. No. 704,920 

Int CI. BOlk 5/02: C23b 13/00 

VS. CL 204—300 5 aaims 



the form of a rod which may be moved in or out against 
the frictional engagement of a seal ring compressed within 
the packing gland. 



3,660,265 

TANK FOR METAL PLATING CYLINDERS 

Tanno M. Kangas, 1578 Alexandra Blvd., Port Credit 

Peel, Ontario, Canada 

FDed June 3, 1970, Ser. No. 42,960 

Int a. C23b 5/68. 5/56 

VS, CL 204—212 4 Claims 





I 



z/*-' ^17 



An accessory for electrocoating equipment character- 
ized by a floating helper electrode assembly movable 
with respect to fixed electrodes disposed on the sides of 
an electrocoating tank, and where electrical energy induced 
in such floating helper electrode assembly is passed within 
a hollow article being coated for effective inner coating 
action. 



3,660,267 
COAL PROCES^NG 
Robert W. Rieve, Springfield, and Harold Shalit, Drcxel 
Hill, Pa., assignors to Atlantic Richfield Company, New 
York, N.Y. 

Filed Oct 14, 1970, Ser. No. 80,662 

iBt CL ClOg 1/04 

VS. CL 208—8 7 ClainH 



An apparatus for use in electroplating a metal onto the 
surface of a cylinder having a shaft extending from either 
end thereof, said apparatus comprising a tank for con- 
taining electrolyte, a cylindrical sleeve resistant to attack 
by said electrolyte adapted for releasable fixed location on 
each shaft with one end thereof in leak-proof abutment 
with an end of said cylinder, each sleeve being of a length 
such that the total distance between the remote ends of the 
sleeves on said shafts is greater than the distance between 
a pair of opposite walls of said tank, each of said opposite 
walls of said tank having a recess in the upper edge there- 
of dimensioned to releasably accommodate the sleeves ex- 
tending therethrough with the cylinder located for rota- 
tion in said tank to form the cathode during the electro- 
plating, each recess being adapted to releasably receive 
dam means to close said recess such that the level of the 
(electrolyte in said tank may be raised to completely im- 
merse the cylinder during the electroplating, said dam 
means including mutually separable bottom and top mem- 
bers defining a circular opening dimensioned for slidable 
fit with the sleeve extending therethrough and anode 
means for containing said metal to be i^ted. 




A method for hydrogenating coal to at least partially 
liquify same wherein the hydrogenation is carried out in 
at least one zone containing an ebullated bed of substan- 
tially inert, solid contact particles. 



3,660,268 
RECOVERY OF OIL FROM TAR SANDS USING 
HIGH WATER CONTENT OIL-EXTERNAL 
MICELLAR DISPERSIONS 
Joe T. Kelly, deceased, Ute of Litdeton, Colo., by La 
Verne S. Kelly, executrix, and Fred H. Poettmann, 
Littleton, Colo., assignors to Marathon Oil Company, 
Flndhiy, Ohio 

No Drawing. Ffled Dec 29, 1969, Ser. No. 888,900 

Int CL ClOg 1/04 

VS. CL 208—11 13 Claims 

Oil from tar sands is extracted by contacting the tar 

sands with an oil-extemal micellar dispersion (contains 

55-90% water), thereafter the sands are separated from 



242 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



the micellar solution containing solubilized oil, and then 
the oil is recovered from the micellar dispersion. The 
micellar dispersion can be at a temperature in excess of 
100° F. and the pH of the water within the dispersion can 
be about 7-14. Volume amounts of 0.5-30 volumes of 
micellar dispersion per volume of tar sand are useful 
with the process. 

3,660^69 

COAL PROCESSING 

John C. McCauIey, PhUadelphia, Pa., assignor to Atlantic 

Richfield Company, New York, N.Y. 

FUed Oct 14, 1970, Ser. No. 86,661 

Int. CI. ClOgi/04 r 

U.S. CL 208—8 " 6 Claims 




a temperature in the range 825" to 950" F. and a pres- 
sure in the range to 1500 p.s.i.g., and recovering at least 
one upgraded naphtha product from said second con- 
version zone. 



A coal hydrogenation process carried out in the ab- 
sence of hydrogenation catalyst and in the presence of 
water. 



3,660»271 
SERIAL REFORMING WITH PLATINUM ON A NON 
ACIDIC SUPPORT AND PLATINUM-RHENIUM 
ON AN ACIDIC SUPPORT 
Carl D. Keith, Summit, NJ. (% Engelhard Minerals & 
Chemicals Corporation, 429 Delancy St., Newark, N J. 
07105); George P. Masologites, Broomall, Pa.; and 
John Mooi, Homewood, DI. (both % Atlantic Richfield 
Company, 400 E. Sibley Blvd., Harvey, III. 60426) 
No Drawing. Filed Mar. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 21,548 
Claims priority, application Canada, June 20, 1969, 

54,898 
Int CI. ClOg 35/08. 39/00 
VS. CI. 208—65 24 Claims 

A process for the catalytic reforming of naphthene and 
paraffin-containing hydrocarbons to improve their octane 
rating is disclosed which involves the use of a series of 
catalytic reaction zones of which one of the first contains 
a supported platinum group metal-containing, low acidity 
catalyst which is substantially devoid of rhenium and 
which serves to dehydrogenate naphthenes, and one of the 
last of which zones contains a supported platinum group 
metal and rhenium-containing catalyst of higher acidity 
which serves to dehydrocyclize paraffins. 



3,660,272 

GASOLINE PRODUCTION FROM WELLHEAD 

NATURAL GAS 

George W. Frick, Hightstown, NJ., assignor to Cities 

Service Oil Company, Tulsa, Okbi. 

FUed Dec. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 102,687 

Int. CL ClOg 39/00 

VS. CI. 208—93 5 Claims 



3,660,270 
TWO-STAGE PROCESS FOR PRODUCING NAPH- 
THA FROM PETROLEUM DISTILLATES 
Harold F. Mason, Berkeley, Calif., assignor to Chevron 
Research Company, San Frandsco, Calif. 
Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 763,603, 
Sept 30, 1968. This appUcation Jan. 15, 1970, Ser. 
No. 3,237 

Int CI. ClOg 23/00, 37/04 
VS. CI. 208—59 5 Cbdms 




A hydrocarbon conversion process comprising hydro- 
cracking a petroleum distillate in a first conversion zone, 
recovering at least one hydrocracked product, subject- 
ing a portion of the effluent from said first conversion 
zone boiling generally above said hydrocracked product 
to hydrocracking and dehydroge nation in a second con- 
version zone without a net consximption of hydrogen, at 



a] o 



r— 



ito 
•oaunic 



V " « 






R n 



L.C. j 
jfi /\ &< — 



— ^ 

a: 

I 

i 

I B 



HS 

aura- 



■OS "moLysa 1 



ALKVLATC ^r 
•MOllW 



Vvvc*' 



A process for the production of gasoline from wellhead 
natural gas is disclosed in which light hydrocarbon com- 
pounds found in wellhead natural gas are converted by 
an integrated process of operations into salable gasoline 
and natural gas principally composed of methane. 



3,660,273 
PRODUCTION OF IMPROVED LUBRICATING 
OILS BY HYDROCRACKING AND SOLVENT 
EXTRACTION 

Billy H. Cmnmins, Nedcriaad, Tex., aasignor to 
Texaco Inc., New York, N.Y. 
No Drawing. Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 
837,930, June 30, 1969. This appUcation Nov. 12, 1969, 
Ser. No. 876,113 

Int CI. ClOg 41/00, 37/00 

VS. CL 208—96 6 Chdms 

Lube oils of improved ultraviolet stability, color and 

viscosity index are obtained by hydrocracking a lube oil 

fraction and subjecting the product to solvent refining 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



p 



the then dcwaxing. The preferred solvent is N-methyl-2- 
pyrrolidone. The feed may be a wax distillate, a de- 
asphalted residuum and may be subjected to pre-hydro- 
cracking solvent refining step. 



3,660,274 
HYDROCARBON TREATING PROCESS 
James J. Blazck, Reisterstown, and Richard W. Baker, 
ElUcott City, Md., and Charles P. WUson, Jr., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, assignors to W. R. Grace & Co., New York, 
N.Y. 

No Drawing. Continuation of appUcation Ser. No. 
686,725, Nov. 27, 1967. This appUcation Feb. 18, 
1970, Ser. No. 11,928 

Int CL ClOg 11/04 
VS. CL 208—120 1 Claim 

A catalytic process of upgrading hydrocarbons which 
is characterized by contacting the hydrocarbons under re- 
active conditions with a catalyst having a low surface area 
matrix. 



3,660^77 
OXYGENATION-OZONATION OF BOD- 
CONTAINING WATER 
John R. McWhhrter, Westport, Conn., and Ernest K. 
Robinson, West Liberty, W. Va., assignors to Union 
Carbide Corporation, New York, N.Y. 
Continuation-in-part of abandoned appUcation Ser. No. 
52,196, July 7, 1970. This appUcation May 17, 1971, 
Ser. No. 144,243 

Int CL C02c 1/06 
VS. CL 210—6 16 Claims 



3,660,275 

CYCUC HYDROGENATION-REFORMING 
Ralph A. Carey, San Anselmo, and Robert L. Jacobson, 
Pinole, CaUf., assignors to Chevron Research Company, 
San Fhmdsco, Calif. 

No Drawing. FUed Oct 2, 1969, Ser. No. 863,330 
Int CI. ClOg 35/08. 23/04 
VS. CL 208—138 1 Claim 

A process for alternately producing gasoline and jet 
fuel, in a reformer reactor containing a catalyst compris- 
ing platinum on alumina, by 

(a) feeding a kerosene feedstock to the reformer re- 
actor and hydrogenating the kerosene by contacting 
the kerosene with said catalyst in the presence of 
hydrogen at a temperature between 500° and 700° 
P., and at a relatively low pressure, for example, 
below 700 p.s.i.g.; 

(b) preferably sweeping the catalyst bed with hot hy- 
drogen; 

(c) switching from a kerosene feed to the reformer 
reactor to a naphtha feed; and 

(d) feeding a naphtha feedstock to the reformer re- 
actor and contacting the naphtha with said catalyst 
at a temperature between 800° and 1100° F. 



3,660,276 
PURIFICATION OF HYDROCARBON OILS 
John Aldwyn Lacey, SoUhuU, England, assignor to The 
Gas ConncU, London, En^and 
Filed Mar. 20, 1969, Ser. No. 809,016 
Clahns priority, appUcation Great Britahi, Mar. 21, 1968, 
13,738/68; Aug. 22, 1968, 40,252/68 
Int CL ClOg 23/00, 31/14 
VS. CL 208—212 9 Claims 

In a process for desulphurising hydrocarbon distillate 
oils, a mixture of the oil vapour and a carbon oxide-con- 
taining hydrogenating gas is passed over (a) a hydrode- 
sulphurisation catalyst and then (b) a material capable 
of absorbing hydrogen sulphide and rapidly eliminating 
any carbonyl sulphide present either by absorbing the 
carbonyl sulphide or by converting it to hydrogen sulphide 
and absorbing the hydrogen sulphide. 

The hydrogenating gas may be a lean gas, a town gas, 
a rich gas, or a substitute natural gas produced by steam 
reforming the desulphurised distillate oil. 

The material used in stage (b) is preferably zinc oxide. 
The process is capable of attaining a very high degree 
of purification (e.g. 0.2 p.p.m. or less). When a high 
degree of purification cannot be attained by use of a single 
pair of stages (a) and (b), the desired degree of purifica- 
tion can be attained by passing the mixture over (c) a 
zinc oxide-copper oxide composition or by repeating the 
stages (a) and (b). 




BCD-containing water such as sewage is biochemically 
treated with oxygen and the liquid effluent is disinfected 
by chemical treatment with ozone while simultaneously 
fortifying the effluent with dissolved oxygen. 



3,660,278 
PROCESS FOR PREPARING SPECTALLY 
ACTIVATED SLUDGE 
AJdo Mimura, Tokyo, Takatsngu Kawano, Saitama, and 
Kanshi Yamaga, Tokyo, Japan, assignors to Asahi 
Kasci Kogyo KabushUd Kaisha 
No Drawing. FUed Apr. 15, 1969, Ser. No. 816,412 
Claims priority, application Japan, Apr. 27, 1968, 
43/27,978 
Int CL C02c 1/06 
VS. CL 210—11 8 Claims 

A process for preparing a specially activated sludge ca- 
pable of being utilized in the biological treatment of 
waste waters containing poisonous substances, which com- 
prises culturing in liquid media the screened microor- 
ganisms having properties of decomposing said poisonous 
substances contained in the chemical industry waste wa- 
ters or in sewage waste waters, blending said cultured 
liquid of the microorganisms with an aqueous suspen- 
sion of the usual activated sludge used in the treatment 
of the waste waters discharged from the food industries, 
fermentation industries, paper manufacturing industries, 
leather industries, etc. or in that of sewage or human 
excrements, and flowing continuously the aqueous solu- 
tion containing said poisonous substances into the result- 
ing blended liquid under aerobic conditions to force said 
microorganisms to combine with said usual activated 
sludge in commensal state. 



3 660 279 

METHOD FOR SORPTION OF ANTIBIOTICS 

FROM UNFTLTERED LIQUIDS 

Erik Hoff, Odo, Norway, asdgnor to A/S Apodiekemes 

Laboratorium for Spedalpraeparater, Oslo, Norway 

FUed Feb. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 10,183 
Cbdms priority, appUcation Norway, Feb. 12, 1969, 

566/69 
Int a. C02b 1/80 
VS. CL 210—19 5 Oaims 

A method for the sorption of an antibiotic from un- 
filtered liquids using at least one vessel having an inlet 
and an outlet from the liquids which comprises continu- 
ously feeding the unfiltered liquid into the vessel by means 



244 



) 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



of said inlet oscillating the vessel containing the sorbent to the transfer zone, and then is delrvcred from the trans- 
parUcles horizontally around its own axis to provide hori- fer zone to the separation column at a relatively slow rate 
zontal movement with minimal axial movement to the of speed. This two-step transfer mimnuzes undesirable 



^t" 




4H 7 8 9' 



sorbent particles and withdrawing effluent reduced in anti- 
biotic concentration from the vessel by means of said 
outlet. 



3,660,280 

WALYSIS APPARATUS 

George A. Rogers, Crewe, EngUnd, assignor to Calmic 

Engbicering Company Limited, Crewe, England 

FUed Apr. 23, 1969, S«r. No. 818,649 

Claims priority, application Great Britain, Apr. 25, 1968, 

19,761/68 

Int CI. BOld 31/00, 13/00 

U.S. CL 210—22 11 Claims 



^^^^ 



t til, t 1. ti I 1 . «■.- ■ 



^1 



A dialysis system for removing toxic substances from 
the blood, provided with a dialysis membrane in the 
form of a semi-permeable flat member and a flat en- 
velope within which the flat member is situated, and 
including a flexible lattice. 




disturbances in the separation column. In the apparatus, 
the metering and transfer zones are preferably defined by 
suitable hoppers located above the separation column. 



3,660,283 

METHOD FOR REGENERATING CATION 

EXCHANGE RESIN 

Leo F. Ryan, Somervillc, N J., asrignor to Ecodyne 

Corporation, Chicago, HI. 

FUed Oct 7, 1969, Ser. No. 864,347 

InL CI. BOld 15/06 

UA CI. 210—33 5 Claims 



3,660,281 
PERMEATION SEPARATION MEMBRANES 
Frank l^Iliam Tober, Wilmington, DcL, assignor to E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours and Company, Wilmington, Del. 
FUed May 6, 1970, Ser. No. 34,948 
' Int CL BOld 13/00 

VS. a. 21(K— 23 11 Claims 

A membrane for the selective permeation separation 
of aqueous mixtures, which is a thin film or hollow fila- 
ment of a linear aliphatic polyamide resin containing a 
hydrolyzable tannin. 



3,660,282 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR REGENERATING 

MIXED BEDS OF ION EXCHANGE RESINS 
Dennis M. O'Brien, Chatham, NJ., assignor to Ecodyne 
€k>rporation, Cliicago, DL 
FUed June 17, 1969, Ser. No. 834,070 
Int a. BOld 15/06; BOlj 1/06 
VS. CL 210—33 3 Claims 

The invention provides an improved method and appa- 
ratus for delivering a mixture of anion and cation ex- 
change resins to a separation column. In carrying out the 
method, resin is delivered rapidly from a metering zone 




A method is provided for regenerating cation exchange 
resin containing insoluble sulfate-forming cations while 
preventing the formation of sulfate precipitates. In carry- 
ing out the method, sulfuric acid is introduced into a 
regeneration column at a regcnerant inlet to establish a 
concentrated regenerant zone. Exhausted regenerant is 
withdrawn from the column at an outlet. In accordance 
with the invention, dilution water is introduced into the 
column between the regenerant inlet and the outlet to 
form a dilute regenerant zone. During regeneration, the 
resin passes first through the dilute regenerant zone, where 
it is partially regenerated. The resin is then further regen- 
erated in the concentrated regenerant zone. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



245 



3,660,284 

METHOD FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER 

TREATMENT 

Thomas R. Camp, Boston, Mass., assignor of a fractional 

part interest to Walter J. Kreske, Newton Centre, Mass. 
Continuation-in-part of abandoned appUcation Ser. No. 
828,552, May 28, 1969. This appUcation Apr. 9, 1970, 
Ser. No. 26,954 

Int CL C02b 1/20 
VS. CL 210—49 9 Claims 




,«• 



Increasing the efficiency of continuous flow water and 
wastewater treatment plants by mixing the water or waste- 
water with a floe forming chemical in a first mixing stage 
at a speed effecting a mean velocity gradient correspond- 
ing to a flow volume concentration less than 300 parts per 
million until flocculation is substantially complete and 
then either passing it through a rapid filter or alternative- 
ly mixing it in a second mixing stage at a lesser speed 
effecting a velocity gradient corresponding to a selected 
effluent floe volume concentration greater than 300 parts 
per million before passing on to subsequent treatment such 
as settling and filtering. 



3,660,285 

METHOD O F SEP ARATING FLUIDS HAVING 

DIFFERENT DENSITIES 

Arthur L. MariteL Miami, Fhu, assignor to Reynolds 

Sab-Marine Services Corporation, Miami, Fla. 

FUed Not. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 87,435 

Int CL BOld 12/00, 17/02 

VS. a. 210—65 12 Claims 




Methods of separating fluids having different densities 
wherein the fluids are first separated by passing them 
through an axial flow pump. Thereafter, the flow diam- 
eters of the fluids are altered so that the flow diameter 
of one of the fluids is substantially equal to the internal 
diameter of a suitable extractor tube. In one embodiment 
of the invention, a mandrel having a tapered end is in- 
serted into one of the fluids after it has been separated 
in a manner to increase its flow diameter to that of the 
internal diameter of an extractor tube. In another em- 
bodiment, an additional fluid, such as air, is injected into 
the fluids being monitored thereby increasing the flow 
diameter of the fluid to be collected to that of the internal 
diameter of an extractor tube. In another embodiment, 
an obstruction is inserted downstream from the axial flow 
pump thereby creating a venturi flow whereby the ex- 
tractor tube may be positioned to remove substantially 
all of the desired fluid. In all embodiments, it is ineferred 



to use a section of conduit downstream from the axial 
flow pump that is at least translucent whereby visual 
inspection permits the extractor tube to be positioned 
properly for maximum withdrawal efficiency. 



3,660,286 

UQUm WASH CYCLE SOFTENER 

Ralph Raymond Sepnlveda, Suffem, N.Y., and Kenneth 

FVed Sdioene, Palisades Parit, N J., assignors to LcTcr 

Kt>thers Company, New York, N.Y. 

No Drawing, FUed Ian. 3, 1969, Ser. No. 788,918 

Int CL D06m 13/38, 13/46 

VS. CL 252—8.8 5 Clafans 

Fabric softening compositions containing a mixture of 
branched and straight chain di-higher alkyl and straight 
chain di-lower alkyl quaternary ammonium compounds 
with alkyl amine oxictes have been found useful in the 
wash cycle of conventional household or industrial wash- 
ing machines to impart softening to fabrics in the pres- 
ence of either anionic or nonionic detergents or both. 



3,660,287 
AQUEOUS REACTIVE SCALE SOLVENT 
Frank J. Qnattrini, P.O. Box 1414, 
Midland, Tex. 79701 
No Drawing. FUed Oct 12, 1967, Ser. No. 674,730 
Int a. C02b 5/00 
VS. CI. 252 — 8.55 B 13 Oaims 

An aqueous reactive scale solvent composition com- 
prising basically a partially neutralized aminopolyacetic 
acid and a carbonate, such as, ammonium bicarbonate, 
has been found useful for the removal of scale by dissolv- 
ing such deposits as calcium sulfate from oil well equip- 
ment, the porous and permeable zones of the reservoir 
rock, and from industrial equipment. The pH of the aque- 
ous composition should be between 6.5 and 9.S and prefer- 
ably between a narrow range of 7.5 to 7.8, depending 
upon the temperatiu^e of the scale environment, e.g. the 
higher the temperature, the higher should be the pH of 
the solution. 



3,660,288 
GREASE COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING MAGNE- 
SIUM SALTS OF UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS 
Ai» RUST INHIBrrORS 
Eriing Hansen, Oaldand, CaUf., assignor to Ciievnm 

Research Company, San Francisco, Calif. 

No Drawfaig. FUed Sept 30, 1968, Ser. No. 763,920 

Int CI. ClOm 5/16. 5/20 

VS. CL 252—40.7 7 Claims 

Grease compositions providing improved rust resistance 

comprising a major amount of an oil erf lubricating 

viscosity, a minor amount, sufficient to thicken the oil to 

the consistency of a grease thickener, and a minor portion 

of a magnesiimi salt of an unsaturated imsubstituted or 

hydroxy-substituted fatty acid of 14 to 24 carbon atoms. 



3,660,289 
REACTION PRODUCT OF POLY AMINE AND CAR- 

BOXYLIC ACIDS, AND FUELS, LUBRICATING 

OILS, GREASES AND PLASTICS CONTAINING 

SAID PRODUCT 

Henryk A. Cyba, Evanston, lU., assignor to Universal 
on Products Company, Des Plaines, lU. 

No Drawing. FUed May 15, 1970, Ser. No. 37,941 

Int a. ClOm 1/30. 1/32; ClOl 1/22 

VS. CI. 252—51.5 A 16 Chdms 

Reaction product formed by the condensation of a 
polyamine containing at least two primary and/or secon- 
dary nitrogens, polyhalopolyhydropolycyclicdicarboxylic 
acid or derivative and halogen-free dicarboxylic acid or 
derivative. In one embodiment the reaction product is 
used as an additive in hydrocarbon oils and lubricants. 
In another embodiment it is used as an additive in plastics. 



246 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3,660^90 

LUBRICANT COMPOSITIONS 

Roland T. Schlobohm, Bethalto, HI., assignor to Shell 

Oil Company, New York, N.Y. 

No Drawing. FUed Sept 22, 1969, Ser. No. 860,035 

Int CI. ClOm 1/34 

U S. CL 252 51.5 A 5 Claims 

*4-alkylphenyl-r-alkyl-2-naphthylamines and mixtures of 
4-alkylphenyl-l-alkyl-2-naphthylamines with 4-alkylphen- 
yl-2-naphthylamines are effective in improving the oxida- 
tion resistance, cleanliness and bearing performance prop- 
erties of lubricant compositions. 



3,660,294 
METHOD OF CLEANING GLASS 

Alexander Parkas, New York, N.Y., assignor to 
George Goda 
No Drawing. FUed Aug. 31, 1970, Ser. No. 68,535 
Int a. did 7/54 
U.S. CI. 252—100 1 Claim 

A method of cleaning a glass surface by applying a 
mixture of ammonium pcrsulfate and sulfuric acid to the 
surface and then rinsing the surface with water. The 
method leaves the glass free of agents which could inter- 
fere with subsequent analytical tests performed using the 
glassware. 



3,660,291 
MAGNETO-OPTICAL ELEMENTS AND GLASSES 
Guy E. Stong, Elmira, N.Y., assignor to Coming Glass 
Works, Coming, N.Y. 
Filed Jan. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 3,872 
Int CL G02f 1/22: C03c 3/04. 3/30 
UJS. CI. 252— 62.51 . , , 8 Clainw 

The invention relates to magneto-optical elements such 
as switches, modulators and isolators having very high 
Verdet constants. The elements are produced from glasses 
composed essentially of silica (SiOj) as a glass former, 
a rare earth metal oxide as a primary modifier, and one 
or more stabilizing oxides selected from the group con- 
sisting of Zr02, TiOa and NbjOs as secondary modifiers. 



3,660,295 
BLEACHING COMPOSITIONS 
Robert G. La Barge and Donald K. Bradley, Midland, 
Mich., assignors to The Dow Chemical Company, Mid- 
land, Mich. 

Filed Apr. 27, 1970, Ser. No. 32,276 
Int CI. Clld 7/54 
}JJ&. CI. 252—104 9 Claims 

Disclosed herein are liquid bleaching compositions 
which when dispersed in water provide aqueous solutions 
having good oxidizing power. The aqueous solutions can 
be used, for example, to launder clothes. The bleaching 
compositions comprise an inorganic peroxygen compound 
dispersed in a carrier liquid. The carrier liquid also has 
a carboxylic acid anhydride dissolved therein. 



3,660,292 
FERRITE MATERIALS 

Clement Bryce, Southport, England, assignor to 

U.S. Philips Corporation 

No Drawing. Filed Sept 17, 1970, Ser. No. 73^16 

Claims priority, application Great Britain, Sept 18, 1969, 

46,049/69 
Int CI. C04b 35/26, 35/36 
VJ&. a. 252—62.6 1 Claim 

High resistivity manganese-zinc-magnesium-copper fer- 
rites for yoke ring applications. These ferrites have a 
composition expressed in mol. percent within the follow- 
ing ranges : 

Fe^O, 33-39 

MnO 2(K32 

ZnO 1^22 

MgO 12-22 

CuO 0-5-15 



3,660,293 
PRE-ETCH TREATMENT OF ACRYLONITRILE- 
BUTADIENE-STYRENE RESINS FOR ELEC- 
TROLESS PLATING 
Eileen Magnire, San Gabriel, and Leon A. Kadison, Pasa- 
dena, Calif., assignors to Crown City PUting Co., El 

Monte, Calif. ^ 

FUed Sept 23, 1969, Ser. No. 860,236 

Int CI. B44d 1/092 

U.S. a. 252—79.4 21 Claims 






MArt. 



a- 



QLtCOL 
DUCSTATf 

eve-friM 



pdfAJCM 



MSKH 



/CIP 



etarwe 
process 






e/ivsf 



Y 



SPffAV 



3,660,296 
DETERGENT AND ANTISEPTIC COMPOSITIONS 
COMPRISING A STOCK SOLUTION OF 3,4,4'.TRI. 
CHLOROCARBANIUDE AND PROCESS FOR THE 
PREPARATION OF THE STOCK SOLUTION 
Maurice Lavril, Paris, France, aadgnor to EtabUasements 
Clin-By la, Paris, France 
FUed June 19, 1969, Ser. No. 834,637 
Claims priority, application France, June 28, 1968, 
157,133; July 5, 1968, 158,080 
Int CI. Clld 3/48 
VS. CI. 252—106 2 Claims 



Solutions containing glycol diacetate, particularly solu- 
tions containing glycol diacetate at concentrations close 
to solution saturation, are used as a pre-etch to improve 
the adhesion of metals to ABS resins in electroless plating 
processes. i 




4M 4M 



U Ul l« 



Detergent and antiseptic composition comprising a 
stock solution of 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide characterized 
in that the stock solution includes a solubilizing agent 
for 3,4,4'-trichluorocarbanilide compatible with a subse- 
quent aqueous dilution. 



3 660 297 
UQUID PAINT BOOTH DEFLOCCULANT 
Thomas A. McCammon, Grecnrflle, S.C., aaignor to 
M(Mlon-Norwich Products, Inc. 
No Drawing. FUed Jan. 29, 1970, Ser. No. 6,951 
Int CI. Clld 7/06, 7/12. 7/14 
U.S. CI. 252—156 4 aafan 

A paint booth defllocculant wash solution utilizing elec- 
tro-positive lithium ions to precipitate the paint. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



247 



3,660,298 

FURNACE CHARGE FOR USE IN THE PRODUC- 
TION OF SILICON METAL 

Richard J. McCBncy, Lewiston, James H. Downing, 
Oarcnce, and Ben^min J. Wilson, Youngstown, N.Y., 
asrignors to Union Carbide Corporation, New York, 

n.yT 

No Drawing. Filed Nov. 19, 1969, Ser. No. 878,229 

Int CI. C09k 3/00; COlb 33/02 
U.S. CL 252—188.3 3 Claims 

A low density stoichiometric agglomerated furnace 
charge for use in the carbothermic reduction of silica in 
electric type furnaces according to the overall reaction of 
SiOa+2C-»Si+2CO. The charge comprises a fine fraction 
and a coarse fraction of particulated silica homogeneously 
mixed with a particulated carbon and a low density filler 
to provide an overall average bulk density of between 
about 20 and 50 pounds per cubic foot. 



3,660,301 
PROCESS FOR MAKING SIUCA ORGANOSOLS 

James F. Kovarik, Berwyn, and Peter H. Vossos, Lirie, 
m., assignors to Nalco Chemical Company, Chicago, 
IlL 
No Drawing. FUed Feb. 4, 1971, Ser. No. 112,813 

Int CL BOIJ 13/00 
UA CI. 252—309 5 Claims 

A method of preparing silica organosols which com- 
prises: (1) dissolving a quaternary ammonium ccwnpound 
in a non-polar organic solvent; (2) adding an aqueous 
silica sol; (3) adding isopropanol; (4) thoroughly mixing; 
(5) separating the layers; and (6) removing the isopro- 
panol by heat to recover the product. 



3,660,302 
ANHYDROUS SlUaC ACID ORGANOSOLS 
MUton E. Wlnyall, EUicott City, Md., asrignor to 



3,660,299 

VARIABLE DENSITY UGKl FILTERING MEANS u.S. CI. 252—309 
UTILIZING LEUCO PHENAZINE DYES 

Richard J. Hovey, SturbiMge, Mass., assignor to 
American Optical Corporation, SoufliMdge, Mass. 

FUed Apr. 10, 1969, Ser. No. 814,955 

The portion of the term of tiic patent rabsequent to 
Oct 29, 1985, has been disclaimed 

Int CL G02b 5/24 
VS. CL 252—300 2 Claims 



W. R. Grace & Co^ New York, N.Y. 

Filed May 27, 1968, Ser. No. 732,423 

Int CL BOIJ 13/00 



9 Claims 





lino i< 

•CUITION TIMC (IK»T>«I 



-as «B- 



A light filter of variable optical density includes a body 
of solution of a leuco jAenazine dye and a reversible re- 
ducing agent, and exposure of the body to ultraviolet light 
colorizes the leuco dye automaticaUy varying the optical 
density of the body proportionally to the amount of ultra- 
violet light incident on the body. 



A process for preparing non-aqueous organosols of 
low molecular weight siUcic acid. Very stable organosols 
are obtained by adding freshly prepared acidic silica hy- 
drosols to solvents which are strong electron donors and 
which are free of hydroxyl groups and unsaturatioo. 
After removal of water, the resultant anhydrous solutions 
are very stable and the dissolved silicic acid has an un- 
usually low noolecular weight 



i 



3,660,303 

AQUEOUS EMULSIONS 

Armin Hiestand, Bfainingen, Switzerland, assignor to^ 



3,660,300 

METHOD OF PREPARING OXIDIZED 
RADON SOLUTIONS 

Lawrence Stein, Downers Grove, 111., asrignor to the 
United States of America as represented by die United 
States Atomic Energy Commission 

No Drawing. FUed June 5, 1970, Ser. No. 43,990 

Int CL C09k 3/00 
VS. CL 252—301.1 R 5 Claims 

A solution of nonvolatile, oxidized radon is prepared 
by reacting elemental radon with a fluoride-containing 
oxidant and dissolving the radon compound formed 
thereby in a suitable nonreducing, water-free solvent. 



Ciba Limited, Basel, Switzerland 

No Drawing. FUed Jan. 22, 1970, Ser. No. 5,147 

Claims priority, appUcation Switzerland, Jan. 27, 1969, 

1,202/69 

Int CI. BOlj 13/00 
VS. a. 252—311.5 13 Claims 

Aqueous emulsions are provided which contain 

(a) a methylolaminotriazine 

(b) a waxy substance 

(c) a water-soluble non-ionic polyethylene glycol com- 
pound and 

(d) an alkylbenzenesulfonic acid salt. 

In a dilute form, and additionally containing a curing 
catalyst, these emulsions serve for the production of 
wash-fast, water-repellent finishes cm fiber materials. 



248 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



9,660^4 
METHOD OF PRODUCING OILY UQUID- 
CONTAINING MICROCAPSULES 
Hlrohani Matsukawa, Fujimiya-slii, Japan, assignor to 
Fuji Photo Flbn Co^ Ltd., Kanagawa, Japan 
No Drawing. Filed Jane 4, 1969, Ser. No. 830,539 
Claims priority, application Japan, June 4, 1968, 
43/38,087 
Int CI. BOlj 13/02: B44d 1/02 
UA a. 252—316 21 Claims 

A method for producing microcapsules including dis- 
solving a hydrophobic, shell forming polymer in a low 
boiling point solvent, mixing the resulting solution in a 
water-insoluble high boiling point solvent which is a poor 
solvent for the polymer, emulsifying the mixture in an 
aqueous medium at a temperature below the boiling point 
of the low boiling solvent, and heating the emulsion to 
above the boiling point of the low boiling solvent, but 
below the boiling point of the high boiling solvent. 



passed over the catalyst at lOO'-^OO* C. in an amount of 
at least 5 g. per liter of catalyst per hour. By the process 
the initial activity of said catalysts can be restored in an 
economic way. 



3,660,305 
FOAM CONTROL IN LIQUID HYDROCARBONS 

Raymond J. MIchalski, Riverdale, HI., assignor to Nalco 
Chemical Company, Chicago, 111. 
No Drawing. Filed June 6, 1968, Ser. No. 734,881 
Int a. BOld 17/00 
VS. CI. 252—321 8 Clahns 

Improved defoaming compositions are afforded by 
combining acetylenic alcohols with known silicone anti- 
foams. Preferred are acetylenic glycols which contain 
from 8 to 18 carbon atoms in an aliphatic grouping. 



PROCESS FOR REGENERATING A 
DEHALOGENATION CATALYST 
Kurt Senncwald, Hermulhcim, near Cologne, Alexander 
Ohorodnik, Liblar, Joachim Hundeck, Knapsack, near 
Cologne, Werner Mittler, Hermulheim, near Cologne, 
Hermann Vierling, Hurth, near Cologne, and Wolfgang 
Opitz, Knapsack, near Cologne, Germany, assignors to 
Knapsack Aktiengesellschaft, Knapsack, near Cologne, 
Germany 

No Drawfaig. FUed Apr. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 30,334 
Claims priority, application Germany, Apr. 24, 1969, 
P 19 20 806.1 
Int CI. BOIJ 11/18. 11/02 
VS. CI. 252—415 5, Oaims 

A catalyst containing metallic palladium deposited on 
an acidproof carrier for use in the hydrogenation and 
dechlorination of dichloroacetic acid and /or trichloro- 
acetic acid to produce monochloroacetic acid and /or 
acetic is regenerated. To this effect, the poisoned catalyst 
containing moisture in form of water and /or acetic acid 
and /or monochloroacetic acid is treated with chlorine gas 
in an acid medium, at temperatures of between 20 and 
200* C, whereby the metallic palladium is oxidized to 
palladium chloride; residual chlorine is expelled by means 
of an inert gas; and the oxidized catalyst is successively 
treated with a reducing agent to re-effect reduction of the 
palladium chloride to metallic palladium. 



3,66037 
PROCESS FOR REGENERATING FLUORINATION 
CATALYSTS OF THE CHROMOXY-FLUORIDE 
GROUP 
Otto Scherer, Bad Soden, Taunus, Paul Peter Rammelt 
and Jiirgen Korinth, Hofheim, Taunus, and Peter Frisch, 
Schwalhcim, Germany, assignors to Farbwerke Hoechst 
Aktiengeselbchaft vormals Melster Ludns & Bruning, 
Fhukfurt am Main, Germany 
No Drawing. FUed Apr. 4, 1969, Ser. No. 813,692 
Claims priority, application Germany, Apr. 11, 1968, 
P 17 67 200.3 
Int a. BOlj 11/76. 11/02 
VS. a. 252—415 5 Oaims 

Process for regenerating fluorination catalysts of the 
chromoxy-fluoride group, wherein hydrogen fluoride is 



3,660,308 
IN SITU REGENERATION AND RESULFIDING OF 
A PLATINUM. AND SULFUR-CONTAINING CAT- 
ALYST IN A HYDROCARBON CONVERSION 
PLANT CONTAINING METALUC SULFIDE 
SCALE 

John C. Hayes, Palatine, III., assignor to Universal Oil 
Products Company, Des Plalncs, 111. 
No Drawing. Continnation>in-part of application Ser. No. 
663,988, Aug. 29, 1967. This appUcation Mar. 12, 1970, 
Ser. No. 19,126 

The portion of the term of the patent snbseqnent to 
Dec. 2, 1986, hat hccn disclaimed 

Int a. BOlj 11/02. 11/18: ClOg 35/08 
VS. CI. 252—416 8 Claims 

A deactivated hydrocarbon conversion catalyst, com- 
prising a combination of a platinum group component, 
a halogen component and a sulfur component with a 
porous carrier material, is regenerated and resulfided in 
situ in a hydrocarbon conversion plant that contains 
metallic sulfide scale by the steps of: (a) stripping sulfur 
from the catalyst with a hydrogen stream at conditions in- 
cluding a temperature of about 600-800° P., effective to 
remove sulfur from the catalyst while not substantially 
affecting the metallic sulfide scale (b) purging hydrogen 
from the plant (c) burning carbon from the catalyst at 
relatively low severity conditions, including an inlet tem- 
perature of about 650-850" F. (d) purging oxygen from 
the plant (e) circulating a sulfur-free hydrogen stream 
through the plant and into contact with the resulting 
oxidized catalyst at conditions including a temperature 
of about 600-800 P., selected to reduce the resulting 
oxidized catalyst without reducing the metallic sulfide 
scale; and thereafter (f) increasing the temperature of 
the circulating hydro^n stream to a level selected from 
the range of about 1000-1100° P. to reduce at least a 
part of the metallic sulfide scale to hydrogen sulfide and 
continuing the circulation of the resulting stream for 
at least one hour, thereby resulfiding the catalyst. 



3,660,309 

CATALYTIC COMPOSITE OF A PLATINUM GROUP 
COMPONENT AND A GROUP IV-A METALUC 
COMPONENT WITH A CARRIER MATERIAL 
CONTAINING ALUMINA AND CRYSTALLINE 
ALUMINOSIUCATE AND USES THEREOF 
John C. Hayes, Palatine, Roy T. Mitschc, Ishind Lake, 
Richard E. Rausch, Mundelein, and Frederick C. WIK 
~ hetan, Arlin^on Heights, III., assignors to Universal 
Oil Products Company, Des Plaines, 111. 
No Drawfaig. FUed May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,539 
Int CL BOlj 11/78, 11/40 
VS. CL 252—442 22 Cfadms 

A catalytic composite, comprising a platinum group 
component and a Group IV-A metallic component com- 
bined with a carrier material ccMitaining alumina and a 
finely divided crystalline alimiinosilicate, is disclosed. A 
specific example of the catalytic composites disclosed here- 
in is a composite containing 0.01 to 2 wt. percent j^atinum 
and 0.01 to 5 wt. percent germanium, combined with a 
gamma-alumina carrier material having 0.1 to 20 wt. 
percent of the hydrogen form of mordenite uniformly dis- 
tributed therethrough. Principal utility of these catalytic 
composites b, broadly, in processes for the conversion 
of hydrocarbons and, more particularly, in a process for 
the production of LPG and a high octane reformate. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



249 



3,66«^10 
HYDROCARBON CONVERSION CATALYST 
Harris E. Kluksdahl, San Rafael, Calif., assignor to 
Chevron Research Conqiany, San Francisco, Calif. 
Continuation-in>part of application Ser. No. 729,079, May 
14, 1968, now Patent No. 3,558,477, which is a continu- 
atlon-fai-part of appUcation Ser. No. 639,719, May 19, 
1967, now Patent No. 3,415,737, which fai turn is a 
coatiimatlon>ln-part of application Ser. No. 560,166, 
June 21, 1966. Thto applkatloB Not. 19, 1969, Ser. 
No. 878,165 

Int CL BOlj 11/58, 11/40 
VS. CL 252—454 1 Claim 

A hydrocarbon conversion catalyst comprising a crystal- 
line zeolitic molecular sieve cracking component, 0.01 to 
2.0 weight percent, based on said cracking component 
and calculated as the metal, of a hydrogenating compo- 
nent selected from platinum, palladium and iridium and 
compounds of platinum, palladium and iridium and 0.01 
to 2.0 weight percent, based on said cracking component 
and calculated as the metal, of a hydrogenating compo- 
nent selected from the group consisting of rhenium and 
compounds of rhenium. 



(e.g. arsenic) are provided. The heating temperatures in 
the zones are controlled so that sufficient second element 
is vaporized and eiK)ugh mixture of first element and dop- 
ing agent are maintained above the melting point of the 
compound to assure reaction to give a stoichiometric melt 
of compound. A temperature gradient is established 
through said melt, and the temperatiu-e of the high tem- 
perature zone is lowered while maintaining said tempera- 
ture gradient to freeze said melt progressively from one 
end. 



3,660,311 

NOVEL FRAGRANCE METHODS AND 
COMPOSITIONS 
Christian F. Wight, Mount Kisco, N.Y., assignor to Inter- 
national Flavors * Fh^rances Inc, New York, N.Y. 
No Drawiav. Filed Jan. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 1^73 
Int CL A611K 7/00; Cllb 9/00 
VS. CL 252—522 4 CUdms 

Processes for imparting fragrances to articles which 
comi»ise incorporating with such articles an effective 
amount of a polyalkylindanylpropenol, together with com- 
positions for carrying out such processes and the jx'oducts 
so obtained. 



3,660,312 

METHOD OF MAKING DOPED GROUP ID-V 

COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIAL 

Rowfauid E. Johnson and Edward W. Mehal, DaUas, Tex., 

MsigBors to Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, 

Tcz. 

Filed Mar. 21, 1960, Ser. No. 16,572 

Int CL HOlh 1/06: HOll 3/20 

VS. a. 252—518 4 Clahns 



3,660,313 

HIGH FOAMING MIXTURES OF FATTY 

ALCOHOL SULFATES 

WilUam R. AztcU and Eari G. Dc Witt, Baton Rouge, La., 

assignors to Ethyl Corpwation, New Yorit, N.Y. 
No Drawfaig. Continnation-tai-part of application Ser. No. 
2,670, Jan. 13, 1970, now Patent No. 3,598,747, which 
is a contlnnation^-pvt of aband<Mied application Ser. 
No. 558,237, June 17, 1966, wUch fai tun to a con- 
tfamatimi^n'part of abandoned qvUcation Ser. No. 
277,078, May 1, 1963, lUi application Nov. 19, 1970, 
Ser. No. 91,145 

Int CL C07c 141/04: Clld 1/14 
VS. CL 252—545 10 Clafans 

Higher alcohol sulfate compositions are disclosed which 
are primarily derivatives of mixtures of myristyl, paknit- 
yl, and stearyl alcohols containing small quantities of 
alcohols of lower molecular weight. 



3,660,314 

POLYETHERS CONTAINING PHOSPHINYL 

GROUPS 

Edwin J. Vandenbcrg, Wilmington, DeL, asrignor to 

Hercules Incorpwated,- Wilmington, Del. 
No Drawfaig. FUed May 11, 1970, Ser. No. 36,452 
Int CL C08g 23/20, 43/02 
VS. CL 26«— 2 A 11 Cfarims 

Polyethers are provided that have phosphinyl groups 
attached to aliphatic carbons in side chains pendant from 
the polyether backbone. These phosphinyl containing poly- 
ethers are obtained by reacting a polyether containing a 
haloalkyl group, as for example, poly(epibromohydrin), 
with an organic phosphite, phosphonite or phosphinite. 
Said phosphinyl group has the general formula 



where x is to 2. 



-P-(B'),(OB)k. 



»~ 




Method of making Group lU-V compotmd semicon- 
ductor having the requisite impurity level for direct fabri- 
cation into tuimel diodes. In a reaction chamber, a high 
temperature zone containing a mixture of first element 
(e.g. gallium) and excess doping agent (e.g. zinc), and 
a low temperature zone containing excess second element 



3,060,315 
PROCESS FOR PREPARING FLUORINE- 
CONTAINING POLYMERS 
James T. HOI, Wilmfaigton, DeL, and Michael E. Garabe- 
dian, Ringwood, N J., assignors to £. L dn Pont de 
Nemoon and Company, Wilmington, DeL 
No Drawfaig. FUed Sept 22, 1970, Ser. No. 74,527 
Int CL C08g 23/14. 23/20 
VS. CI. 260—2 A 10 Cfadms 

A process having beneficial utility in the manure- 
ture of fluorine-containing p<Hymers from HFPO (hexa- 
ifluoropropylene oxide), especially useful for applica- 
tions reqtiiring difunctional polymer products that are 
substantially free of monofunctional polymer. The polym- 
erization process emi^oys a mixture of HFPO and a 
catalyst; the catalyst, which preferably is substantially 
free of cesium fluoride, is made up of a solution in an 
ethylene glycol ether of a particular organic compound 
containing both cesium and fluorine. The polymeriza- 
tion reaction zone is i«^ferably at about —30 to —60° 
C, and it preferably contains hexafluort^opylene or 
the like as a solvent for the p(4ymer. 



260 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



POLYEPOXIDE BISUREA ADHESIVE COMPOSI- 
TION CONTAINING A 1 - CYANO - 3-(L0WER 
ALKYL) GUANIDINE AS AUXILIARY CURING 

AGENT 
Frederic Cbarica Schaefer, Darien, and James Sterling 
Noland, Greenwich, Conn., assignors to American 
Cyanamid Company, Stamford, Conn. ^. ,«^ 

No Drawing. FUed Nov. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 91,594 
Int CL C08g 30/14 
UA a. 260—2 N , « Claims 

Compositions which consist essentially of an organic 
polyepoxide having at least two reactive 1 :2-cpoxy groups, 
a bisurea curing agent and a l-cyano-3-(lower alkyl) 
guanidine as auxiliary curing agent for useful stability at 
room temperature yet thermoset at 180' F., making this 
composition specially useful as an adhesive for aluminum. 



foams. The new tertiary amines are prepared by alkyla- 
tion of the polyoxyalkylenepolyamine with an aldehyde 
and hydrogenation of the product. 



3,660,317 
SPHEROIDALLY OR BEAD-SHAPED POROUS CON- 

DENSATION-TYPE ION EXCHANGE PRODUCTS 
Kisiiinui Masatsngn, Kol>e, Japan, assignor to C. Weln- 
licrger & Co., Ltd., Osalui-siii, Kita-ini, Japan 
No Drawing. Continuation of application Ser. No. 
774,504, Nov. 8, 1968. This appUcation Nov. 3, 
1970, Ser. No. 86,643 ^^ ,^ *,.^m 

Claims wiority, application Japan, Nov. 14, 1967, 
42/18,142 
Int CI. C08g 9/06 
UA CI. 260—2.2 C •. Claims 

Process of producing porous ion-exchange resin parti- 
cles by forming a precondensate liquid mixture of a 
polyfunctional aldehyde, a phenol and an amine; incorpo- 
rating a soluble filler material in such precondensate 
liquid; dispersing this mixture in a non-aqueous non-sol- 
vent liquid medium composed of a dialkyl phthalate 
higher than methyl and an alkyl chloride, preferably 
carbontetrachloride; condensating the precondensate in 
bead form during such agitation, completing the conden- 
sation by heat-treatment and then dissolving out the filler 
material to form a porous ion-exchange product. 



3,660,320 

DRY BLEND POLYVINYL CHLORIDE FOAM- 

FORMING COMPOSITION AND METHOD 

Murdoch L. Johnson, Fort Lee, and Francis J. W. Bartlett, 

Waillngton, NJ., assignors to The Flintkote Company, 

White PbOns, N.Y. 

No Drawing. Filed June 3, 1969, Ser. No. 830,149 

Int CI. C08f 47/10. 45/40. 29/18 

VS. CL 260—2.5 P 7 Claims 

A particulate, dry blend, vinyl chloride polymer-con- 
taining, foam-forming composition having improved 
foam-forming properties is disclosed. A mixture of vinyl 
chloride polymers having different molecular weights, 
e.g., relative viscosities of 1.4 to 2.6 and a relative viscosity 
difference of 0.003 to 0.7 is used, to provide a composition 
that is foamable over a relatively wide range of heating 
conditions to provide a greater degree of latitude in achiev- 
ing desired combinations of cell structure and physical 
properties of the cellular material. 



') 



3,660,318 
ANTI-FLAME POLYSTYRENE COMPOSITION CON- 

TAINING FLAME-RETARDING HALOGENATED 

COMPOUNDS 
AUra Tanhichi, Kyoto, and Talcaji Nakano, Saita, Japan, 

aarignota to Dai-Icid Kogyo Sciyaku Co., Ltd., Kyoto, 

Japan 

No Drawing. Continoation-tai-part of application Ser. No. 
764,307, Oct 1, 1968. This appUcation Mar. 12, 1970, 
Ser. No. 19,068 _ ^, ,^^, 

Chdms priority, application Japan, Oct 23, 1967, 
42/68,217; June 11, 1968, 43/40,121 
Int CL C08i 1/18 
UA CL 260—2.5 FP 18 Claims 

Novel halogenides of a reaction product of a phenol, 
alcohol, fatty acid, thiophenol or mercaptanc with a 
glycidyl ether, glycidyl ester or glycidyl thioether and, if 
necessary, an alkylene oxide or alkylene sulfide are 
excellent flame-retarding agents for polystyrene and a 
polystyrene composition containing said halogenated com- 
pound is self-extinguishable and resistant to weather and 
discoloration with lapse of time. 



3 660 321 
SHAPED articles' COMPRISING SELF-EX- 
TINGUISHING COMPOSITIONS OF PLASTICS 
AND MICROCAPSULES CONTAINING FLAME- 
ABATING COMPOUNDS AND PROCESS FOR 
PRODUCING THE SAME 
Hans Ebcrhard PractzeL Schubcrtstr. 3, Bcnsbcrg-Franken- 
font Germany, and Herbert Jcnimcr, Deotz-Kollter 
Str. 66, Cologne-Dcntz, Germany 
No Drawing. FUed Sept 22, 1969, Ser. No. 860,010 
Claims priority, appUcation Germany, Sept 30, 1968, 
P 17 94 271.1 
Int CL C08f 7/04; C09k 3/28 
VS. a. 260—2.5 FP 16 Oalms 

Shaped articles of self-extinguishing compositions are 
produced by mixing a combustible plastic with micro- 
capsules having a diameter of 5 to 5000 microns and con- 
taining a flame-abating compound for the plastic and 
forming a shaped article from the mixture, the mixing and 
forming being conducted under conditions such that the 
microcapsules are neither physically nor thermally rup- 
tured and the flame-abating compound is retained in the 
microcapsule. 



3,660,322 

BENZENE-RING-SUBSTITUTED TETRA- 

HYDRO-QUINAZOLINES 

Luigi Bemardi, Alberto Bonslgnori, Scverina Coda, and 
Giselbert Kari Sochowsky, MUan, Italy, assignors to 
Sodeti Farmaccotici Italia, MOan, Italy 
No Drawing. FUed Nov. 21, 1969, Ser. No. 878.880 
Claims priority, qppUcation Italy, Nov. 26, 1968, 
24,160/68 
Int CL C07d 51/48 
U.S. a. 260—251 QA « Clahns 

Quinazolines of the formula: 



3 660 319 

TERTIARY POLYOXYALKYLENEPOLYAMINES 

Ernest Leon Yeakcy, Austin, Ter^ assignor to JeHerson 

Chemical Company, Inc^ Houston, Tex. 
No Drawing. Continuation-in-part of appUcation Ser. No. 
803,934, Mar. 3, 1969. This appUcation Dec. 8, 1970, 
Ser. No. 96,247 

Int a. C08g 22/44 
VS. a. 16^—l.S AC 8 Claims 

New tertiary amines prepared from polyoxyalkylene 




I- wherein Ri is selected from the group consisting of 



i>(ew icniary amines prcparcu iiwui pwiyuAyaiKyicut- ".-«—" --i -- j o •„ '\^^*,a «mm th* 

polyamines are useful catalysts for preparing urethane chlorine, bromme or mtro, and Rj is selected irom tne 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



251 



group consisting of hydrogen, chlorine, bromine or nitro. 
These compounds possess a central nervous system de- 
pressant activity. 



3,660,323 

PRESSURE SENSmVE ADHESIVE MASS 

Roger C. Ragnse, Michigan City, Ind., assignor to The 

SchoU Mfg. Co., Inc., Chicago, Dl. 
No Drawing. FUed Mar. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 24,003 
Int CL C08c 9/08 
VS. CL 260—5 6 Claims 

Pressure sensitive adhesive mass particularly useful far 
adhesive tapes, the mass including a blend of a polyiso- 
prene, a polystyrene-polyisoprene-polystyrene block co- 
polymer, natural rubber, and conventional additives in 
controlled amounts to provide an adhesive cwnposition 
which evidences improved adhesion to the backing coupled 
with satisfactory physical properties in all other respects. 



3,660,324 
PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF CATIONIC 

SYNTHETIC RUBBER LATEX 
Kotaro OncU, Yokkaidd, Japan, assignor to J^>an 

Synthetic Rubber Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 
No Drawing. Hied Mar. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 15,902 
Claims priority, appUcation Japan, Mar. 8, 1969, 
44/17,671 
Int CL C08c 7/18: C08d 7/18; C08f 47/18 
VS. CL 260—17.5 8 Oaims 

A cationic surfactant comprising an adduct of ethylene 
oxide and an alkylamine and an ampholytic surfactant or 
lignin derivative are added to an ordinary anionic syn- 
thetic rubber latex and the pH of the latex is maintained 
within a certain range of about 7.5 to 2.0; a cationic 
synthetic rubber latex is obtained which is not diluted 
with a great amount of an aqueous medium and which is 
exceUent in dispersion stability. 



forming into the desired shape and at kast partially 
curing a foamable composition consisting of the poly- 
urethane prepolymer composition plus a polyfunctional 
amine curative. 



3,660,327 

LACTONE OR LACTAM PRE-ESTERIFIED 

ISOCYANURATE-CONTAINING RESINS 

Donald F. Loncrini and Henry J. MarirawsU, St Louis, 

Mo., Msignors to The P. D. George Company, St 

Louis, Mo. 

No Drawing. FUed June 8, 1970, Ser. No. 44,479 

Int CL C09d 3/70, 3/72 

VS. CL 260—22 TN 40 Claims 

Resins, including polyesters, polyester-amides, poly- 
ester-imides, polyester-amide-imides. etc.. prepared from 
lactone or lactam pre-csterified isocyanurate derivatives 
(PEIC). These resins are preferably derived from hy- 
droxyalkyl, such as hydroxyethyl, isocyanuratcs, and most 
preferably from tris(2-hydroxyethyl) isocyanurate at its 
equivalent, which has been pre-esterified with a lactone, 
a lactam or their equivalents. 

These resins may be cured with curing agents for ex- 
ample triazine-aldehydes such as melamine-aldehydes, 
phenol-aldehydes, isocyanates, etc. 

These resins may be employed in electrical insulation, 
particularly as wire enamels, electrical varnishes, etc. as 
well as for other uses. 



3,660325 
PREPARATION OF TOUGHENED POLYVINYL 
AROMATIC COMPOUND 
Alexander McCoU Brcmncr, Amberiey, near Stroud, Eng- 
hmd, and John Mansel Squire. Dollar, Scotbnd, as- 
signors to The British Petroleum Company Limited, 
London, England 

No Drawing. FUed Feb. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 14,241 
Claims priority, appUcation Great Britain, Mar. 12, 1969, 

13,009/69 
Int a. C08f 15/40, 19/08 
VS. CI. 260—17 R 5 Qalms 

A toughened polyvinyl aromatic compound is made by 
prepolymerising a solution of rubber and vinyl aromatic 
monomer until phase inverted and suspending the solution 
in water using a mixture of hydroxyethyl ceUulose and 
polyvinyl alcohol as suspension stabilisers. Polymerisation 
is then completed in suspension. 



3,660,328 
DIELECTRIC FILMS 
Claude A. Undquist, Jr., Easton, Pa., assignor to 
Pfizer Inc., New York, N.Y. 
No Drawing. Continuation-in-part of appUcation Ser. No. 
697,934, Jan. 15, 1968, now Patent No. 3,551,197. TUs 
appUcation July 27, 1970, Ser. No. 58,722 
Int CL C08g 17/16. 51/04 
VS. CL 260—22 R 4 Claims 

Dielectric films of high capacitance consisting of finely 
divided ceramic dispersed in water-insoluble organic resin 
matrix, and process for their manufacture. 



3,660,326 
POLYURETHANE PREPOLYMER COMPOSITION 
CONTAINING THE REACTION PRODUCT OF A 
CARBOXYUC ACID AND A MONOMERIC 
ISOCYANATE 
John J. Mallabar, Solihull, England, assignor to The 

Dnnlop Company, London, England 

No Drawing. FUed May 20, 1969, Ser. No. 826,263 

Cbdms priority, appUcation Great Britain, May 21, 1968, 

24,074/68 
Int CL C08g 22/04 
VS. a. 260—18 TN 14 Claims 

A polyurethane prepolymer composition comprising a 
polyurethane prepolymer and the reaction product of a 
carboxylic acid with a monomeric isocyanate. Also the 
method for producing shaped articles which comprises 



3,660,329 
WATER-REDUCIBLE PRINTING INK VEHICLE 

AND INKS MADE THEREFROM 
John L. Wysodd, Hasbrouck Heists, N J., assignor to 

FIrye Industries Inc., New York, N.Y. 
No Drawing. FUed May 7, 1969, Ser. No. 822,712 
Int CL C09d 11/10. 11/12 
VS. a. 260—22 CQ 4 Chdms 

A water-reducible ink vehicle composition comprising:, 
in its preferred aspect, an alkaline aqueous phase having 
dissolved therein a cross-linkable water-soluble polyester 
resin and one or more coupler solvents and further, hav- 
ing dispersed therethrough, finely-divided styrenated 
shellac and a wax. The ink vehicle composition can be 
employed per se as an overprint varnish or it can be 
pigmented with a wide variety of pigments to provide 
pigmented inks. 



3,660,330 
AQUEOUS ELECTRODIPPING LACQUER 
COMPOSITIONS 
Rolf Dhein, KrefeM-Bockum, Hans-Jnigen Meibner, Kre- 
feld, and Hermann SchneU, Krefeld-Uerdingen, Ger- 
many, assignors to Farbcnfabriken Bayer AlrtlengeseU- 
schaft, Leverlnisen, Germany 
No Drawfaig. FUed Mav 9, 1969, Ser. No. 823,494 
Cbdms priority, applicanon Germany, June 7, 1968, 
P 17 69 545.3 
Int a. C09d 3/64. 3/72, 5/24 
VS. CL 260—22 TN 9 Claims 

The invention relates to aqueous electrodrpping lacquer 
compositions comprising water-dissolved amine salts of 



252 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



alkyd resin semi-«sters of tetrahydrophthalic acid or its 
homologues, said alkyd resin semi-esters being modified 
with saturated fatty acid radicals and with cross-linking 
N-alkoxymethyl groups and phenol and/or alkylpheools. 



polyvinyl isobutyl ether. These compositions have highly 
improved resistance to stress cracking aiui improved seal 
strength. They can be utilized as hot melt coatings for 
items such as paperboard and corrugated board for use in 
the packaging industry and particularly as pressure sensi- 
tive adhesive coatings. 



VINYL HALIDE RESINS STABI LIZED WITH TET- 
RAHYDROPYRANYL ESTERS AND ETHERS 

Jerome H. Lodwic Shaiwr Heights, Ohio, aasigiior to 

Emery Industries, Inc^ CIndmiatI, Ohio 

No Drawing. Continnation-in-^ul of application Scr. No. 

695,570, Jan. 4, 1968. This application Apr. 29, 1970 

Scr. No. 33,048 

Int CL C08f 45/58 
VS. CL 26«— 23 XA 17 Oainu 

Stabilization of vinyl halide and vinyl halide copolymer 
resin compositions against degradation by heat and the 
like by incorporating therein tetrahydropyranyl ethers or 
esters. 

Vinyl halide resin stabilized compositions containing 
tetrahydropyranyl ethers or esters are employed in com- 
bination with metallic soaps, epoxidized fatty compounds, 
organic chelators and plasticizers. Effective and even syn- 
ergistic stabilizing activities are demonstrated by the dis- 
closed compositions. 



3,660,334 

STRIPPABLE WAX COATING COMPOSITIONS 
Dondnic Aplkos, Park Forest, 111., asrigiinr to Atlantic 

Richfield Compwiy, New York. N.Y. 
No Drawfaig. Original appUcation June 10, 1966, Ser. No. 

556,555, now Patent No. 3,518;Z15, dated June 30, 

1970. Divided and this application Jan. 12, 1970, Ser. 

No. 2,383 

Int CL C08f 45/52 
VA. a. 26»— 284( 13 Clafani 

This invention relates to a strippable wax coating con- 
taining an ethylene-vinyl acetate polymeric composition 
and a stripping agent which is either an N-substituted 
fatty acid amide or a nitrogen containing compound con- 
taining a fatty acid residue. Particularly preferred are 
wax compositions which contain as the stripping agent 
an N-substituted fatty acid amide containing a fatty acid 
residue having from 10 to 17 carbon atoms. The compo- 
sition can also contain minor amounts of a mineral (m1 
to increase the strippability. 



3,660,332 
PROCESS FOR PREPARING GRANULAR 
GRAFT COPOLYMERS 
Kosakn Kamlo, MotoyuU Knwana, Atanafai Takahashi, 
and Masao Sahara, Uozn, Japan, aarignors to Nippon 
Carbide Kogyo Kahnidiiki Kalflha, Tokyo, Japan 
No Drawfaig. Filed Sept 4, 1970, Ser. No. 69,971 
Claims prtority, application Japan, S^L 5, 1969, 
44/75,015 
Int CL C08f 47/02 
VS. CL 26»— 23 XA 9 Oafans 

In a process for preparing a granular graft copolymer 
from a latex of graft copolymer produced by the emulsion 
graft polymerization of 7(V-5 parts of vinyl chloride onto 
30-95 parts of an ethylene /vinyl ester copolymer through 
the salting-out, dehydrating and drying steps, the graft 
copolymer is heat treated at any step prior to the de- 
hydrating step at a temperature of dO'-llO" C. under the 
condition that the value (heating time) ^X (heating tem- 
perature —30)' (min.^. " C) falls within the range of 
2,000 to 20,000 and the graft copolymer is dehydrated at 
a temperature lower than 60° C. but higher than 0° C. 
Thereby the graft copolymer can be dehydrated and dried 
much more conveniently than in the conventional 
processes, and the granular dry graft copolymer thus ob- 
tained causes far less odor of fatty acid during a long 
preservation or use compared to the conventional ones. 
Such improvements are promoted further by adding a Mg, 
Ca, Zn, Sr, Cd, Ba or Pb salt of a higher fatty acid to 
the graft copolymer at any step prior to the drying step. 



3,v6Q,333 
WAX COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING AN ETHYL- 
ENE-VINYL ACETATE COPOLYMER, AN OR- 
GANIC ACID AND A POLYVINYL ALKYL ETHER 
Charles J. Kremer, Brookhaven, Pa., assignor to Atlantic 
Richfield Company, New York, N.Y. 
No Drawfaig. Filed Jnly 22, 1969, Ser. No. 843,787 
Int a. C09d 3/44 
VS. CL 260—23 H 14 Claims 

This invention relates to wax compositions containing 
a wax, an ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, an acid com- 
ponent and a polyvinyl alkyl ether. Most preferably the 
polyvinyl alkyl ether is either polyvinyl methyl ether or 



3,660,335 

^"^^^ PETROLEUM WAX BLENDS 
Charles D. Mason, Florham Park, and Jnllns P. Rakns, 

Baafcfaig Ridge, N J., assignors to Allied Chemical Cor- 

poratkm, New York, N.Y. 

No Drawfaig. FUed June 21, 1966, Ser. No. 559,113 

Int CL C08f 45/52 

VS. CL 260—28.5 1 Clafan 

Blends of petroleum wax with (1) from 1 to 20 wt. 
percent of polybutene-1 having an average molecular 
weight of about 50,000 to 1,000,000 and an isotactic con- 
tent of about 50 to 98 wt. percent, and (2) from 1 to 20 
wt. percent of an ethylene/vinyl acetate cop<rfymer con- 
taining from about 10 to 40 wt. percent vinyl acetate 
have improved tensile strength, hardness, softening points 
and gloss, without markedly increased viscosity or shrink- 
age, and have cloud points not appreciably higher than 
that of the petroleum wax ccMistituent. These blends are 
particularly useful as coatings for paper, paperboard and 
the like. 



PROCESS FOR BLENDING HIGH MOLECULAR 
WEIGHT POLYETHYLENE INTO WAX, AND 
WAX COATING COMPOSmON PRODUCED 
THEREFROM 
Stewart J. Gonta, MarfaM Del Rey, and Thomas HalUs, Jr., 
and Lawrence S. Johnson, Brea, Calif., assignors to 
Union Ofl Company of CaUfomia, Los Angeles, CaUf. 
No Drawing. Continnation-fai-part of abandoned applica- 
tion Ser. No. 680,975, Not. 6, 1967. TUs application 
Not. 27, 1970, Ser. No. 93,032 

Int CL C08f 45/52 
VS. CL 26»— 28.5 6 Cfadms 

Low concentrations of high molecular weight, high 
density polyethylenes are incorporated into wax composi- 
tions used for coatings. A stable colloidal diq>ersion of 
the polyethylene is prepared by blending the same in pow- 
dered form into the wax at below the congealing tem- 
perature of the polymer, and then heating the wax-poly- 
mer blend until the polymer melts. The properties of the 
wax coating combine high viscosity with adhesion and 
gloss at a lowered cost of the polymeric additive. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



253 



3,660,337 

THERMOSTABLE RESINS AND THEIR 

PRODUCTION 

Maurice Babne and Maurice Dudonz, Rhone, France, 

assignors to Rhone-Poolenc S.A., Paris, France 

No Drawfaig. FUed Jnly 8, 1968, Ser. No. 743,016 

Cfadms priority, application Fkance, July 13, 1967, 

114,383 
Tht portion of the term of the patmt subsequent to 
Feb. 1, 1989, has been disdafaned 
Int CL C08g 25/00 
VS. CL 260—29.2 9 Cfadms 

Thermostable resins are made by dissolving in ammonia 
a polycondensation product of a monophenol or poly- 
phenol with a pblyanhydride, a corresponding polyadd, 
evaporating the solution to dryness, and heating the 
residue. 



3,660,338 
AMPHdlERIC STRENGTHENING AGENTS 
FOR PAPER 
Peter Economoo, Bedford, Mask, assignor to American 
Cyanamid Con^any, Stamford, Conn. 
No DrawhM. Conti»mtio»4n-part of abandoned applica- 
tion SerTNo. 546,214, Apr. 29, 1966. TUs application 
Jnly 22, 1969, Ser. No. 843,838 

Int CL C08f 45/24 
VS. CL 260—29.6 NR 14 Clafans 

Normally liquid water-insoluble polysalt coacervates, 
wherein one of the component polymers is only weakly 
ionic, are water-soluble where they contain a sufficient 
amount of an ionization suppress^. ^ 



3,660,339 

LATEX THICKENER 

Theodore R. Schnh, Jr., North Riverside, 111., assignor to 

Nalco Chemical Company, Chicago, III. 

No Drawfam. FUed June 3, 1969, Ser. No. 830,098 

Int CL C08d 7/14 

VS. a. 260—29.7 D 3 Cfadms 

A latex compositi(Hi comjxising a coUoidal aqueous 

emulsion of a polymer and 0.1-5% by weight, based on 

dry latex, of a thickening agent. 

The tfaidkening agent is prepared by reacting a maleic 
anhydride copolymer with a polyalkylene glycol in a 
mole ratio of .001 : 1 to 0.1 : 1. 



3,660,340 

HALOG ENATED HYDROCARBON MATERIALS AS 

TACKIFIERS FOR SYNTHETIC RUBBERS 

Sung Kl Lee, Nfawara Falk, N.Y., assignor to Hooker 
Chemical Corporation, >nanra Falls, N.Y. 

No Drawing. FUed Nor. 30, 1966, Ser. No. 597,878 

Int CL C08c 11/ 24; C08d 13/30 

VS. CL 260—31.8 HA 17 Cfadms 

Tackifying agents for rubbers, especially ethylene-pro- 
pylene (EPDM and EPR) type rubbers, can be prepared 
by treating paraflfinic and/or aromatic hydrocarbon proc- 
ess oils having at least ten carbon atoms with an alkylat- 
ing or acylating or halogenating agent. Four methods of 
preparataion are given: (1) reaction of the hydrocarbon 
oil directly with an alkylation or acylation agent, such as 
polychlorinated benzyl chloride, in the presence of a 
Lewis acid, (2) halogenation of the hydrocarbon oil, (3) 
modification of a halogenated hydrocarbon oil into an 
alkylating agent, such as by treatment with chlorometh- 
yl ether in the presence of a Lewis add, and then further 
reacted with a hydrocarbon oU, and (4) alkylation or 



3,660,341 

HEAT STABLE POLYURETHANE SOLUTIONS 
KomeUns Dinbergs, North Royalton, Ohio, asrignor to 

The B. F. Goodrich Company, New York, N.Y. 

No Drawfaig. FUed Nov. 3, 1969, Ser. No. 873,514 

IntCLC08g5i/'W, J//5S 

U.S. CL 260—32.6 N 5 Clafans 

Solutions of polyurethane are stabilized by the addi- 
tion of an organic halogen-containing compound such as 
ethyl iodide. These stabilized solutions are protected 
against severe degradation on aging, even at high tem- 
peratures. 



3,660,342 

PREPARATION OF 1,3-IHENES 

John C. Dnggan, Chicago, DL, asaignor to Monsanto 

Company, St Louis, Mo. 

No Drawing. FDed Dec 22, 1970, Scr. No. 100,784 

Int CI. C07c 3/10 

VS. CL 260— «66 A 3 Cfadms 

The invention relates to the preparation of 1-vinyl- 

cyclohexene and other 1,3-dienes by an isomerization and 

pyrolysis process. 



3,vov,343 
ADHESIVE DENTAL FILLING MATERIAL AND 
METHOD OF USING THE SAME 
Jacob A. Saffir, Los Angdcs, CaUL, asrignor to Dent^y 
IntematkoaL Inc, Yoffc, Pa. 
No Draiwtaig. FUed June 17, 1970, Ser. No. 47,159 
Int CL C08g 51/04, 33/10 
VS. CL 260-^7 EP 6 Cfadms 

A color stable adhesive dental cc«nposition particularly 
adapted for use as a dental filling material for posterior 
and anterior teeth comprising a dentally acceptable ther- 
mosetting epoxy resin hardened with frcMn about 2% to 
about 50% by weight, based on the weight of the epoxy 
resin of an N-3-oxohydrocarbon-substituted acrylamide of 
the formula 

o o 

R-C-R'-N-C-C=CHi 

k k- 



wherein R and R" are each independently selected from 
hydrogen and lower alkyl radicals and R' is selected from 
ethylene and lower alkyl substituted ethylene radicals. 
Such color stable dental composition preferably comprises 
about 17 to about 70% by weight of such hardened dental- 
ly acceptable epoxy resin and from about 10 to about 83% 
by weight of a finely divided ceramic filler. Due to the 
esthetic resemblance in color to dental enamel such ad- 
hesive dental composition can be utilized to fill both 
anterior and posterior teeth without the need for any 
special retentive means. 



3,660,344 
SELF-EXTINGUISHING POLYAMIDE 
MOULDING COMPOSITIONS 
Dletridi Michael, Krcafcld-Bocknm, and WOfrled KodoL 
Moers, Germany, assigiKMV to FarhmfaiHlkcn Bayer 
Akticageaellsdaft; Leverimsen, Germany 
No Drawing. Continuation of abandoned appifcation Ser. 
No. 804,262, Mar. 4, 1969. This application Mar. 29, 
1971, Ser. No. 129,206 

Int CL C08g 51/10. 51/58 
VS. CL 260—37 N 5 Cfadms 



Self-extinguishing polyamide moulding compositions 
acylation of a hydrocarbon oil, such as by treatment with containing as a flame retardant agent melamine, a deriva- 
benzyl chloride in the presence of a Lewis add, and fol- tive of melamine or the melamine c(»densation product 
lowed by halogenation. melam. 



254 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



3 660t345 

ORGANOPOLYSnX)XANE ELASTOMER 

COMPOSITIONS 

WUUam Joacph Bobear, Latham, N.Y., assignor to 

G«iicral Electric Company 

No Drawing. Filed Sept 9, 1968, Ser. No. 758,575 

Int CL C08f 11/04; C08g 31/02 

UA CL 260—37 SB i® ^*^^ 

Organopolysiloxane compositions are provided whicn 
are convertible to elastomers having hij^ tear strength 
and resiliency comprising either a two component blend 
of a vinyl containing organopolysiloxane gum having 
minor amounts of chemically combined siloxy units with 
at least one vinyl radical attached to silicon, and a vinyl- 
polysiloxane having up to major amounts of chemically 
combined siloxy units with at least one vinyl radical at- 
tached to silicon, or a three component blend compris- 
ing an organopolysiloxane gum free of chemically com- 
bined siloxy units with at least one vinyl radical attached 
to silicon in combination with the aforementioned two 
component blend. 



3,660,348 

COATING COMPOSITIONS BASED ON 

VINYL POLYMERS 

Roger Gamier, Lyon, Roger HogenmuUer, Salnte-Foy> 

le»-Lyon, and Jac<iues Masscbcuf, La Sarranzinicrc, 

France, assignors to Rtaone-Ponlcnc S.A., Paris, France 

No Drawing. Filed Mar. 5, 1969, Scr. No. 804,665 

Claims priority, application France, Mar. 6, 1968, 

142,608 
Int a. C08f 45/28 
UA CI. 260—41 5 Claims 

Polymers of vinyl esters of certain branched chain ali- 
phatic monocar boxy lie acids, alone or with a proportion 
of other vinyl esters as comonomers, dissolve in aliphatic 
hydrocarbons to give solutions useful in paints. 



3 660.346 
FLAME.RETARDED COMPOSITIONS AND 
ADDITIVE SYSTEMS THEREFOR 
Roy A. Gray and Harold R. Deck, Bartlesvlile, Okla., 
aarignors to Phillips Petroleum Company 
No Drawing. FUed Aug. 14, 1970, Ser. No, 63,915 
bt CL C08k / /24: C09k 3/28 
VS, CL 260—41 1® Claims 

Fire-retardant compositions of normally flammable or- 
ganic materials are provided by admixing with said mate- 
rials an additive system consisting essentially of (A) at 
least one bromine-conUining organic compound having 
a bromine content of at least 30 weight percent, (B) at 
least one paracyclophane compound of the formula 



3,660,349 

DISPERSANTS FOR ORGANIC SOLVENT SYSTEMS 

Thomas D. Motaffis, Springfield, Leon Katz, Midland 

Park, and Frederick Grosser, North Plainflcld, NJ., 

assignors to General Anillae ft Film Corporation, New 

York. N.Y. 

No Drawing. Continuation of application Scr. No. 
610,240, Jan. 19, 1967. This application Feb. 25, 
1970, Ser. No. 14,756 

Int CL C08f 45/04, 45/14, 48/28 
MS, CI. 260—41 4 Cbdms 

This invention is directed to a free-flowing colorant 
paste dispersion of high solids comprising a colorant, 
preferably oil-soluble pigments or dyestuffs, and as the 
dispersant, an alkylated polymer of a heterocyclic N-vinyl 
monomer and a hydrocarbon liquid medium having a 
Kauri Butanol Value of less than about 45. 




3,660,350 

FLAME RETARDANT THERMOPLASTIC 

POLYMERS 

Bcraaid G. Knshlcfsky, Ediaoa, N J., assignor to M ft T 

Chemicals Inc., Greenwich, Conn. 

No Drawfaig. FDcd May 7, 1971, Scr. No. 141,387 

Int CL C08f 45/56] C08g 51/56 

UA CL 260—45.75 R 6 Claims 

The drastic reduction in flame-retardant properties that 

occurs when polymer compositions containing organic 

phosphine oxides are processed at elevated temperatures is 

substantially eliminated when the phoq>hine oxides are 

present as complexes with selected Lewis acids. 



wherein each R is selected from hydrogen, chlorine, 
bromine and alkyl radicals having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, 
and optionally (C) antimony trioxide. 



3,660,347 

FILM FOR PROTECTING A VEHICLE 

BOTTOM PLATE 

Geriiard Hermann Wendler, Schwetzingen, and Gunther 

Hefaiz Minet Heidelberg, Germany, assignors to 

Teroson Werke Gjn.bJL, Heidclbcig, Germany 

No Dnwfaig. Filed Feb. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 11,941 

Int CL C08f 45/08; B32b 3/00 

UA CL 117 8 3 Claims 

The bottom plate and other parts of a vehicle are 
protected from corrosion and road materials by apply- 
ing a film comprised of 10 to 40 percent of an ethylene 
copolymer, 90 to 60 percent of inorganic fillers, and 
optionally up to 20 percent of a plasticizer and up to 
10 percent of a vinyl resin to impart special properties. 
The film is self-supporting and has a specific density of 
1.5 to 3.0 g./cm.'. The film is in the form of a sheet 
or shaped to the contour of the surface to which it is 
to be attached by adhesive or melt bonding. 



3,660,351 
FLAME RESISTANT ACRYLONTTRILE POLYMERS 
Richard F^vderick Schmidt Stamford, and JoseiA Jadnto 

Pellon, New Canaan, Conn., asslBnon to American 

Cyanamld Company, Stamford, Conn. 

No Drawhig. Filed Mar. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 19,124 

Int CL C08f 45/58 

UA CL 260—45.85 .8 Cl^ 

An acrylonitrile polymer such as an acrylonitrile fiber 
having improved flame resistance contains a halogeoated 
aromatic compound having the formula 



(1) 



(2) 



(3) 




May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



255 



(i) 



or 



^'^^ Co^ ^'^ Co^ ^^' 




ooc- 



-^CH^COO-^ O 



V V. 



vv^rein Ri is hydrogen, chlorine, bromine or an alkyl 
radical having from 1 to 9 carbon atoms, Rj is an alkyl 
radical having 1 to 22 carbon atoms and the sum of the 
carbon atoms of Ri and Rj is greater than 9, Rj is meth- 
ylene, isopropylidene, oxygen or sulfur; R* is an alkyl 
radical containing at least one carbon atom; R5 is a 2,3- 
dibromopropyl group; X is bromine or chlorine; m is an 
integer of from to 22 and n is an integer of from to 
4 with the proviso that each formula contains at least 
two aromatically bound halogen atoms. 



3,660,352 
HINDERED PHENOL SULFIDE ANTIOXIDANTS 

FOR POLYMERS 

John Song, Bound Brook, N J., assignor to American 

Cyanamld Company, Stamford, Conn. 

No Drawing. Continuation-in-part of application Scr. No. 

705,624rFeb. 15, 1968. This appUcation June 4, 1970, 

Scr. No. 43,594 

Int CL C08c 27/66; C08f 45/58; C08g 51/58 

UA CI. 260—45.95 6 Clahns 

Compounds of the type represented by the formula: 

H« — l^ II— CB«-8-lli 






epoxy-anhydride adhesives. These accelerators can also 
be used in conjunction with known accelerators, such as 
tertiary amines. 

3,660,355 
THERMOSET MOLDING POWDERS FROM HY- 
DROXY-FUNCnONAL ACRYUC RUBBER PAR- 
TICLES AND MONOBLOCKED DIISOCYANATES 
AND MOLDED ARTICLE 
Olln B. Johnson, Llronia, and Santokh S. Labana, Dear- 
born Heights, Midi., assignon to Ford Motor Com- 
pany, Dcfuborn, Mich. 

No Drawing. FUed Dec 21, 1970, Scr. No. 100,459 
Int CI. C08g 22/00 
UA CL 260—77.5 CR 22 Claims 

Novel thermosetting resin powders which can be 
molded to form unique, urethane-crosslinked, elastomer- 
comprising products are prepared by reacting hydroxy- 
functional, elastomeric, acrylic polynier particles with a 
monoblocked diisocyanate. These powders are molded by 
conventional molding techniques to form imique tliermo- 
set products. 

POLYESTER AMIDE ELASTOMERS CONTAINING 

POLYETHER UNITS 
Ednard Radlmann, Lodiar Ruetz, and Gunther Nischck, 
Doimagen, Germany, assignors to Farbenfabriken 
Bayer Aktiengesellschaft Levefkusen, Germany 
No Drawing. FUed Apr. 23, 1970, Ser. No. 31,408 
Claims iniority, application Germany, Apr. 29, 1969, 
P 19 21 738.0 
Int CL C08g 20/30 
UA CL 260—75 N 11 Cfadms 

High molecular weight linear polyester amide elas- 
tomers obtained by polycondensing amide groups con- 
taining dicarboxylic acid esters, optionally together with 
normal dicarboxylic acid esters, with linear alii^tlc poly- 
ether diols. The elastomers are jHocessaMe to obtain 
films and fibers. 



wherein each R is independently a lower alkyl group, 
Ri is higher alkyl or hi^er alkylbenzyl, R3 is hydrogen 
or the group — -CHaSRi, and their use as effective anti- 
oxidants for organic materials normally subject to oxida- 
tive deterioration, especially polyoiefins. 



3,660,353 
MONOMERS AND POLYMERS OF lO^ALKENYL) 

OXYPHENOXARSINES 
Chun-Shan Wang and Davhi P. Sheets, Midhmd, Mich., 

anignors to The Dow Chemical Company, Midhmd, 

Mich. 

No Drawing. FUed Apr. 1, 1970, Scr. No. 24,818 

Int CL C07d 105/06; C08f 3/62. 15/02 

UA CL 260—47 UA 16 aalms 

10-(alkenyloxy)phenoxarsine monomers and certain 
homopolymers, and interpolymers of certain 10-(alkenyl- 
oxy)i^enoxarsines with copolymerizable ethylenically 
unsaturated compounds are disclosed as novel compounds 
useful as herbicides and as antimicrobial agents for the 
control of a wide variety of fungal and bacterial orga- 
nisms. 

3 660,354 
QUATERNARY AMMONIUM AND PHOSPHONIUM 
THIOCYANATES AND THEIR USE AS ACCELER- 
ATORS FOR EPOXY RESINS 
Heinz Uelzmann, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, assignor to The 
General Th*e ft Rubber Company 
No Drawfaig. FUed Aug. 13, 1969, Scr. No. 849,924 
Int CL C08g 30/12 
UA CL 260—47 EC 13 Cfadms 

Quaternary ammonium and phosphonium thiocyanates 
have been found to accelerate the curing of epoxy-amine 
or epoxy-anhydride systems effectively. Since these com- 
pounds are free of protons, they are especially useful for 



3,660,357 

POLY(LACT0NEURETHANE) ADHESIVES 

Edmond G. Kfdycheck, Lorain, Ohio, aai^^nor to The 

B. F. Goodrich Company, New York, N.Y. 
No Drawing. Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 
664,950, Sept 1, 1967. This appUcation Oct 12, 1970, 
Scr. No. 80,156 

Int CL C08g 22/06 
UA CL 260—77.5 AN 5 Cfadms 

Polyurethanes prepared from poly(epsilon-caprolac- 
tones) having molecular weights from about 1800 to 
about 2200, less than one mol of an aliphatic glycol and 
certain aromatic diisocyanates form adhesive materials 
which are soft and tacky when heated but which on ag- 
ing harden and crystallize to form tough, crystalline but 
flexible, bonding agents having good adhesive properties. 
The poly(lactoneurethanes) are particularly adaptable to 
providing articles adhered together with excellent struc- 
tural stability. 

PROCESS FOR PROIH7CING POLYESTERS AND 
SHAPED ARTICLES RESPECTIVELY MADE 
FROM THESE POLYESTERS 
Josef Hradi and Thcodor WImmer, TyroL Austria, 

assignors to Sandoz Ltd., BaseL Switzerland 
No Drawfaig. FUed Nov. 12, 1968, Scr. No. 775,176 
Claims priority, appUcation Austria, Nov. 21, 1967, 
10,487/67; Dec 1, 1967, 10,865/67 
Int CL C08f 17/013 
UA CI. 260—75 R 6 Cfadms 

Polyesters of dicarboxylic adds and diols, more par- 
ticularly, polyethylene terephthalate, are prepared by re- 
acting the selected starting materials in the presence of a 
metallic catalyst consisting of (a) antimony, (b) at least 
one member selected from the group consisting of lead 



256 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



and tin, and (c) an alkali metal in amounts of from 
O.OOS to 1% by weight based upon the amount of car- 
boxylic acids in the process. These polyesters are partic- 
ularly suitable for the production of shaped articles in- 
eluding fibers, filaments and films. 



cyclic aromatic disulfides and reacting the product there- 
of with oxygen or free radical generators. 



3,660359 
THERMOSET RESINS WITH HYDROXY ACRY- 

LATE, METHACRYLONTTRILE AND BLOCKED 

ISOCYANATE 

Santokh S. Labana, Dearborn Heights, Mkh^ assigpor to 

Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Mkh. 

FUcd Jane 5, 1970, Scr. No. 43,893 

Int CL C08q 22/06 

VS. CL 260—77.5 CR 1« Claims 

Novel thermosetting resin powders which can be 
molded to form products characterized in tensile meas- 
urement, by high elongation-to-break, high tensile 
strength and modulus and a high glass transition tem- 
perature are prepared from a mixture of (a) a pre- 
polymer formed by reacting (1) a hydroxy <«ter of 
acrylic or methacrylic acid and a Cj-Cs diol with (2) 
methacrylonitrile or acrylonitrile or a mixture of the 
same, and (b) blocked di- or triisocyanate wherein the 
isocyanate groups are directly attached to an aromatic 
ringiind deblock at temperatiu-es in the range of 120* 
to 160' C. 



3 660 360 
WATER- AND OIL REPELLENCY AGENTS 
Dilip K. Ray-Chaadbari and Carmine P. lovine, Somer- 
set, NJ., assignors to National Starch and Cliemical 
Corporation, New Yoric, N.Y. 
No Drawing. FUcd June 24, 1970, Ser. No. 49,537 
Int CL C08f 15/38, 29/38. 37/00 
VS. CL 260—78.5 E 12 Claims 

Fluoroalkyl - aikoxyalkyl acrylates and methacrylatcs 
comprising the reaction product of a perfluoroalkoxyalkyl 
alkanol and an acrylic or methacrylic acid reagent. The 
resulting monomers may, thereafter be homo- or copo- 
lymerized with a wide variety of conventional ethylenical- 
ly unsaturated, i.e. vinyl, monomers, said polymeric ma- 
terials imparting both water and oil repellency to a wide 
variety of substrates. 



3,660,363 
VULCANISABLE COPOLYMERS 
Richard Gregory Foster and Panl Hcpworth, Rnncom, 
England, assignors to Imperial Chemical Industries 
Limited, London, England 

No Drawing. Filed July 20, 1970, Scr. No. 56,668 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Jnly 22, 1969, 

36,828/69 
Int a. C08f 15/40 
VS. CL 260—80.78 12 Claims 

An amorphous high molecular weight vulcanisable co- 
polymer of ethylene, at least one a-olefin having from 3 
to 8 carbon atoms, and at least one polycyclic diene hav- 
ing the structure 



3 660361 

HIGHLY ORDERED AZO-AROMATIC 

POLYAMIDES 

Hartwlg C Bach, Fensacola, Fla., aflsignor to Monsanto 

Company, St Loads, Mo. 
No Drawing. Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 
789,072rJan. 2, 1969. lUs application Sept 28, 1970, 
Ser. No. 76^84 

The portion of the term of the patent subsequent to 
. Mar. 17, 1987, has been disdafaned 

* Int a. C08g 20/20, 20/22 

VS. CL 260—78 R 12 Ctahns 

Linear polyamides derived from aromatic diacid halides 
and diamines containing azo linkages and asymmetrical 
aromatic radicals have been found to have thermal, me- 
chanical and electrical iM-operties attractive for use of 
the polyamides in the manufacture of fibers, films and 
other shaped articles. 



3,660362 
PRODUCTION OF POLYMERS HAVING LOW 
COLD FLOW PROPERTIES 
Ridiard L. Smith and Carl A. Uraneck, Bartlesvillc, Okla., 
assignors to Phillips Petroleum Company 
No Drawing. Filed June 18, 1970, Scr. No. 47,632 
Int CL C08g 23/00 
VS. CL 260—79 8 aaims 

A method of altering the cold flow prop«ties of poly- 
mers by reacting linear metal-terminated polymers with 




where n is a whole number of at least one and each of 
Ri, Ra, R| and R4 is either a hydrogen atom or a mono- 
valent hydrocarbyl group, or hydrocarbyl derivatives of 
said polycyclic diene. 



3,660,364 
ELASTIC FILMS, FIBERS AND OTHER MANU- 
FACTURED ARTICLES BASED ON UNSATU- 
RATED OLEFINIC COPOLYMERS 
Paolo Longi, Alberto Valvassori, and Francesco Greco, 
Milan, and Ermanno Bemasconi, Caronno Varesino, 
Varese, Italy, assignors to Montecatini Edison S.p.An 
Milan, Italy 

FUcd Apr. 2, 1969, Scr. No. 812,663 

Int a. C08f 15/40, 5/00 

VS. CL 260—80.78 8 Claims 




no »o ioo too MO mc ^ md 100 'Mc % 



These are disclosed elastic manufactured articles, in- 
cluding elastic fibers and films based on unsaturated, vul- 
canizable copolymers of ethylene, at least one branched 
alpha-olefin, hydrocarbon monomers containing at least 
two double bonds and, optionally, propylene, which co- 
polymers are amorphous in the relaxed state but crystal- 
lizable by stretching. The copolymers must contain, by 
moles, 70-90% of polymerized ethylene, 1-29% of 
polymerized branched alpha-olefin, 0.05-3% of the 
polymerized hydrocarbon monomer containing at least 
two double bonds, and 0-28% of polymerized propylene. 
Methods for obtaining the copolymers using catalysts 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



257 



based on vanadium compounds and metallorganic alumi- 
num compounds, and for effectively cross-linking the co- 
polymers are also disclosed. 



3 660365 
PRODUCTION OF ALTERNATING COPOLYlSffiM 
OF BUTADIENE AND ACRYLONITRILE USING 
MANGANESE CHELATE, ZINC HALIDE AND 
MOMFIER 
AUra Onishi, KolchI Irako, and Yoshihiro Hayakawa, 
Tokyo, Takeshi Shimomura, Kobe, and Koichi Iwami 
and Sbo^ Miyamoto, Tokyo, Japan, assignors to 
Bridgestonc Tb-e Company Limited, Tokyo, Japan 
FUcd Oct 28, 1969, Ser. No. 871,926 
Claims priority, application Japan, Nov. 4, 1968, 
43/79,877 
Int a. C08f 1/48 
VS. CL 260—82.5 ^ ^. « Claims 

Alternating copolymers of a conjugated diene and a 
conjugated polar vinyl monomer, wherein the conjugated 
diene unit and the conjugated polar vinyl monomer unit 
are bonded substantially alternately, are produced by 
copolymerizing said conjugated diene with said conjugated 
polar vinyl monomer in the presence of a catalyst pre- 
pared from a component (A) of at least one metal chelate 
complex compound selected from the group consisting 
of metal chelate complex compounds having the general 

formula 

MeLn 

wherein Me represents manganese, cobalt or copper 
metal, n represents the valence of Me and L represents 
a ligand of 1,3-dicarbonyl compound and a component 
(B) of at least one zinc halide selected from the group 
consisting of zinc chloride and zinc bromide. Further- 
more, the molecular weight of the alternate copolymer 
can be controlled and the gelation of the polymerization 
product can be inhibited by adding a modifier selected 
from the group consisting of thiol compounds and iodo- 
form to the above polymerization reaction system. 



3,660367 
NTTROSO POLYMERS 
Nathan Mayes, Barrington, R.I., and Ronald Michaels, 
Boonton, NJ., assignors to Thiokol Chemical Corpo- 
ration, Bistoi, Pa. . __, ^^_ 
No Drawing. Flkd Nov. 13, 1968, Scr. Nb. 775328 
Int CL C08f 3/24 * 
VS. CI. 260—92.1 9 Claims 
A linear nitroso polymer has been provided by polym- 
erizing monomers with pendant, convertible moieties 
which are crosslinkable. These monomers with the crossr 
linkable, pendant groups cannot be introduced into the 
polymer directly, hence, the contribution resides in the 
route of incorporating precursor moieties in the polymer 
backbone and then obtaining a polymer. The polymers 
with the convertible, pendant groups are derived from 
recurring units as rejH-esented by the general formulae: 



3,660366 

POLYMERIZATION PROCESS 

Tatsuo Horic, Tokyo, Tatsno Fuchigami, KawasaU-dd, 

and Mitsno Okazawa, Yokohama-sU, Japan, assignors 

to Nippon Pctrodicmicals Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

FUcd Sept 4, 1968, Scr. No. 757,390 

Claims priority, application Japan, Sept 8, 1967, 

42/57382, 42/57,441 

Int CL C08f 15/04: C08d 3/02 

VS. CL 260—853 1« Claims 




I—nltlAu^LJ. 



z: 



r 



■^ 

5 



^ 



te; 



^F=^ 



I 



^ 



1^, 



~^u 



10 



OCP5N0 — 

2 2, 
CP, 



pCPoNO 

I 

OF, 
I "^ 
C-0 



or 



T— -CP- 



^CPg-NC^ 
CP-, 



2-CP2- 



.gCFgT 



N0-4-CP 

I 
CP5 

c 



z 



wherein Z is a — 0-( lower alkyl) group of 1 to 7 carbon 
atoms or chlorine; and T is a halogen, a perhaloalkyl, 
— NO, or — NO3; and the ratio m:« is from 0:1 to 50:1. 
Liquid and solid polymers are provided as well as elas- 
tomers derived therefrom. A method for preparing and 
converting these monomers has also been disclosed. 



HIGH POLYCHLOROPRENES 
Chester Arthur Hargreaves O, WUndngton, DeL, asdgnor 
to E. I. du Pont dc Nemours and Company, Wilming- 
ton, DeL 

No Drawing. Filed June 27, 1967, Scr. No. 649,090 
Int CL C08f 1/10. 3/20: C08d 3/14 
VS. CL 260—92.3 5 Claims 

Polychloroprenes which melt at temperatures of 80° C. 
and above. At least 95% of the chloroprene units of the 
polymer chain are trans-2-chloro-2-buten-l,4-ylene units 
and at least 95% of all 2-chloro-2-buten-l,4-ylene units 
in the polymer are in the head-to-tail sequence. The 
polychloroprenes are prepared by irradiating crystalline 
chlorpprene at temperatures below —130° C. 



A polymerization process in which the polymerization 
product is insoluble in the reaction mixture and the spe- 
cific gravity of said product is smaller than that of the 
reaction mixture. In said polymerization reaction, the raw 
materials are fed into the reaction apparatus, so as to 
cause rotating current along the length of the apparatus, 
thus the lighter polymer is concentrated on the central 
position of the apparatus during the polymerization re- 
action and it is separated from the reaction mixture con- 
tinuously. This apparatus can also be used for the reacted 
mixture after the reaction In order to separate the polymer 
in the mixture. 



3,660369 
METHOD OF PREPARING LINEAR POLYMERS 

OF CYCLOOLEFINS 
Vitaly Abramovlch Kormer, Ulitsa Zhdeznovodduya 62, 
kr. 2; Boris Daridovich Babitsky, Ulitsa Knuoaogo 
Kursanta 7, kr. 9; Tatyana Lrovna Jnfa, Ulitsa 
Mayakovritogo 3, kr. 23; and Irina AlcxandroTna 
Polctacva, Ulitsa HI IntcrnatsioDala 74, kr. 212, aD of 
Laiin9«d, U.S.S.R. 

No Drawing. Filed Sept 2, 1969, Sen. No. 854,733 

Claims priority, application U.S.SJL, Sept 6, 1968, 

1369,161; May 8, 1969, 1,326,641, 1326,642 

IntCLCOSf 7/00,7/56 

VS. a. 260—93.1 5 Clafatts 

A method for the productimi of linear polymers of 

cyclomonookfins which consists in the polymerization oi 



898 O.G. 



258 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



cyclomonoolefins in the temperatxire range of from —50° 
to +80' C. in the presence of a catalyst comprising r- 
complexes of metals of Groups IV-VIII of the Periodic 
System taken in combination with halides of elements of 
Groups UI-VI of the Periodic System. 



3,660,370 
PRODUCTION OF POLYETHYLENE UNDER fflGH 
PRESSURE WITH METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE 
PEROXIDE INITIATOR 
Hans Cropper, Ludwigsluifeii, Knrt Stark, Heidelberg, 
and Helmut Pfanmnoeller aiad Frkdrlch Urban, Lim- 
bnrgcrfaof, Germany, assignors to Badische Aoilln< & 
Soda-Fabrilt Alcticngesellschaft, Lndwigshafen, Ger- 
many 

No Drawing. Filed Aug. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 64,649 
Claims priority, application Germany, Aog. 28, 1969, 
P 19 43 698.7 
Int CI. C08f 3/04. 1/60 
UA CL 260—94.9 R 6 Qaims 

A process for polymerizing ethylene at pressures of 
more than 1000 atmospheres and at temperatures of from 
150" to 400° C. in the presence of methyl isobutyl ketone 
peroxide. Polyethylene having a density of from 0.924 to 
0.935 g./ccm. is obtained in higher yields than in con- 
ventional methods; it is used for the production of trans- 
parent film and sheeting. 



3,660,373 

PHENYL-AZO-HYDROXYNAPHTHOIC ACID 

AMIDE PIGMENTS 

Armand Roucche, Neu-Allscbwil, Switzerland, assignor to 

Ciba Limited, Basel, Switzerland 

No Drawing. Filed Nov. 24, 1969, Scr. No. 879,615 

Claims priority, application Switzerland, Dec. 12, 1968. 

18,513/68 
Int a. C07b 29/20; C07c 107/08 
U.S. CL 260—203 6 Claims 

Azo pigments of the formula 

OH 
Ri-N=N-Rr-C0NH-R,-X-NHC0NHR4 

in which Ri represents an aromatic radical, R] represents 
a naphthalene radical in which the azo, hydroxy and 
— CO — groups are in 1,2,3-position, R3 represents an 
arylene radical, X represents a direct bond or a — CO — 
group, and R4 represents a carbamide group, an acyl- 
amino group or an acyl or carbalkoxyalkyl radical when 
X represents a direct bond, and R4 represents an alkyl 
or aryl radical when X represents a — CO — group. They 
are useful for coloring plastics and lacquers in orange 
to red shades. 



3,660,371 
UNSATURATED POLYESTER AND EPOXY- 
FUNCTIONAL GRADED-RUBBER PAINT 
AND PROCESS I 
Olin B. Johnson, Livonia, and Santokh S. Labana, Dear- 
born Heights, Mich., assignors to Ford Motor Com- 
pany, Dearborn, Mich. 
No Drawing. Filed Dec. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 100,461 

Int CI. C08g 45/14. 45/04, 15/00 
U.S. a. 117—9331 15 Claims 

A radiation-curable paint which on a pigment and par- 
ticulate filler-free basis consists essentially of vinyl mono- 
mers and a unique, alpha-beta olefinically unsaturated, 
rubber-comprising resin formed by reacting an alpha-beta 
olefinically unsaturated, monocarboxy terminated, ^ly- 
ester having an alpha-beta olefinically unsaturated dicar- 
boxylic acid or anhydride as a constituent monomer 
thereof with an epoxy-functional, graded-rubbcr particle. 
The dispersion is applied to substrates as a paint film and 
cured thereon by exposure to ionizing radiation, e.g., an 
electron beam. 



3,660,372 

BIPHENYL CONTAINING DIAZONIUM 

FLUORIDE COMPOUNDS 

Erwln F. Schocncwaldt Watchnng, and George G. Hazen 

and Richard F. Shnman, Wcstficld, NJ., assignors to 

Merck & Co., Inc^ Rahway, N J. 

No Drawing. Filed Inly 31, 1968, Scr. No. 748,922 

Int CL C07c 113/00 
U.S. CL 260—141 1 Qaim 

The invention relates to various novel 5-(4-fluoro sub- 
stituted phenyl) saUcylic acid and derivatives thereof. 
These compounds are useful intermediates for prepar- 
ing 5-(4-fluorophenyl) salicylic acids and derivatives 
thereof which latter compounds are useful anti-inflam- 
matory agents. These compounds are prepared by de- 
composition of the intermediate diazonium flucMrides. 



3,660,374 
AZO COMPOUNDS FROM ALKYL 
a-ANILINOTOLUATES 
Max A. Weaver, Herman S. Pridgen, and Clarence A. 
Coates, Jr., Kingsport Tenn., assignors to Eastman 
Kodak Company, Rociicster, N.Y. 
No Drawing. Filed Nov. 5, 1968, Scr. No. 773,656 
Int CI. C09b 29/08. 29/24; D06p 3/52 
MS, CL 260—207 8 Claims 

Azo compounds containing a lAcnyl, thiazolyl, benzo- 
thiazolyl, thiadiazolyl or thienyl diazo component and 
an N - alkoxycarbonylbenzyl - N - aralkylaniline coupling 
component are useful as dyes for hydrophobic textile 
materials such as polyester fibers on which the com- 
pounds exhibit improved build-up, excellent brightness 
and superior fastness properties such as fastness to light 
and resistance to sublimation. 



3,660,375 

^ - CRYSTAL MODIFICATION OF 4,4' - BIS- 
(a - ANTHRAQUINONYLAMINOCARBONYL)- 
AZOBENZENE PIGMENT 
Kiaos Ehrhardt Basel, Gcorg Gcigcr, Reinach, Cascl- 
Land, and Fritz Kehrer, Basel, Switzerland, assignors 
to Sandoz Ltd., Basel, Switzerland 

nied Jan. 8, 1970, Ser. No. 1,338 
Claims priority, application Switzerland, Jan. 14, 1969, 

415/69 
Int CI. C09b 67/00 
U.S. a. 260—207.1 1 Claim 

In pigment application, especially in the pigmentation 
of plastic materials, the /3-modification of 4,4'-bis-(o- 
anthraqmnonylaminocarbonyDazobenzene exhibits sub- 
stantially better properties than the known a-crystal modi- 
fication. The /3-crystal form is prepared by grinding the 
a-modification at temperatures in excess of 100° C. 



3,660,376 

N-ARYLIDENE ERYTHROMYCYLAMINES 

Eddie H. Massey, Indianapolis, Ind., assignor to Eli Lilly 

and Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 
No Drawing. Continuation-in-part of application Scr. No. 
878,935, Nov. 21, 1969. This appUcation Sept 30, 1970, 
Scr. No. 77,049 

Int a. C07c 47/18 
U.S. CL 260—210 E 4 Claims 

N-arylidene derivatives of erythromycylamine and of 
erythromycyl B amine having improved oral activity 
with concomitant decrease in side effects. 



May 2, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



259 



3,660,377 
PRODUCTION OF RESINS FROM 
REDUCING SUGARS 
Raoul GuiUaume Philippe Walon, Brussels, Belgium, as- 
signor to CPC Intemational Inc. 
No Drawing. Hied Oct 10, 1969, Ser. No. 865,508 
Int a. C07c 95/04 
UA CL 260—211 R ^ _. .8Clai."M 

Covers a novel edible reducing sugar based resm havmg 
ion exchange capability. Also covers methods for produc- 
ing said resin. 

3,660,378 
2.BENZYLTHIOINOSINE.5'.PHOSPHATE AND 

DERIVATIVES THEREOF 

Kiyofuml IshU, Dteda, Jun Toda and Hisashi AoU, Suita, 

and Yutaka Kuwada, Ashiya, Japan, assignors to 

Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd., Osaka, Japan 

No Drawing. Filed Feb. 20, 1969, Scr. No. 801,145 

Chdms priority, application Japan, Feb. 20, 1968, 

43/10,711; Nov. 19, 1968, 43/84,775 

Int CLC07d 57/54 

UA a. 260—211.5 R ^ 1. ?«*?»» 

The 2-benzylthioinosine-5'-phosphate has the abihty for 

improving or enhancing the flavor of foods and bever- 
ages. Moreover, there is a significant synergistic action 
between the compound and monosodium glutamate. The 
compoimd is produced by phosphorylating 2-benzylthio- 
inosine or 2-benzylthio-2',3'-isopropylideneino8ine. 

3,660,379 
SYNTHETIC PENICILLINS 
Shlro Morimoto, Kobe, Hht>aki Nomura, Osaka, Takeshi 
Fngono and Klhachlro Maeda, Hyogo, and Toshihiro 
Ish^ro, Osaka, Japan, assignors to Takeda Chemical 
Industries, Ltd., Osaka, Japan 
No Drawing. Filed Sept 29, 1969, Scr. No. 862,018 
Claims priority, application Japan, Sept 28, 1968, 
43/70,572 
Int a. C07d 99/16 
UA a. 260—239.1 25 Claims 

Synthetic penicillins of the general formula 



wherein , 

Ri is hydrogen or alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms, 
Ra is hydrogen, halogen or methyl, and 
R3 and R4 are each straight or branched alkyl of 1 to 5 
carbon atoms or, together with each other and the 
nitrogen atom to which they are attached, camphidino 
or a 5- to 7-membered saturated monocyclic hetero- 
cyclic ring which may optionally comprise an oxygen 
or another nitrogen ring atom and/or may optionally 
have an alkyl of 1 to 4 carl)on atoms, hydroxy-alkyl 
of 1 to 4 carbon atoms, benzyl or methyl-benzyl sub- 
stituent attached to a ring atom, 
and non-toxic, pharmacologically acceptable acid addition 
salts thereof, useful as inhibitors of stomach ulcers and 
stomach juice secretion, as well as antitussives and anti- 
emetics. 

3,660,381 
5-ARYL-lH.l,5-BENZODIAZEPINE- 
2,4-DIONES 
Kari-Heinz Weber, Gau-Algeshchn, Herbert Mcrz and 
Karl Zcile, Ingelhclm am Rhcin, Rolf Glcsemann, 
Bingen, and Peter Danncbcrg, Ingelhclm am Rhdn, 
Germany, assignors to C. H. Boehringcr Sohn, Ingcl- 
helm am Rhein, Germany 

No Drawing. FUed July 10, 1969, Scr. No. 840,839 
Int CL C07d 53/04 
UA CL 260—239.3 8 Claims 

5-aryl-lH-l,5-benzodiazepine-2,4-diones of a formula 
selected from the group consisting of 




wherein Ri and Rj are hydrogen, alkyl, cycloalkyl, aral- 
kyl or unsubstitutcd or substituted phenyl, pyridyl, naph- 
thyl or thienyl or alternatively, Ri and Rj together form 
a polymethylene group, and pharmaceutical salts thereof, 
as well as a process for the preparation thereof. These 
compounds are useful as antibacterial agents, and espe- 
cially against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. 



^:x>- 



CH2 



\ 



IV'' 



Rl 



W» 



'-^/^H - C. 
R3 



^H-R2 



Bl 



<JC 



- c: 



- c. 



/ 



CH-R2 



H6 






and 



< 






3,660,380 
ll-SUBSTITUTED 5,ll-DIHYDRO^H.PYRIDOl2,3-bl 

[l,4]BENZODIAZEPIN-6-ONES 
Gunther Schmidt Robert Engclhom, and Matyas Lcitold, 
Bibcrach an dcr Riss, Germany, assignors to Boch- 
rlngor Ingelhclm G.m.bJEI., Ingelhcim am Rhine, Gcr- 

NoDrawing. FHcd Aug. 7, 1969, Scr. No. 848,345 

Claims prioifhr, application Germany, Aug. 20, 1968, 

P 17 95 183.6 

Int CL C07d 53/02 

UA CL 260—239.3 10 Clafans 

11-aminoacetyl - 5,11 - dihydro-6H-pyrido[2,3-b][l,4] 

benzodiazepin-6-ones of the formula 

Rl 



R9 




Rd 



wherein 

Rl is allyl, methylallyl, dimethylallyl, chloroallyl, cyclo- 
hexyl, cycloalkylmethyl, cycloalkylcnylmethyl of 4 to 7 
carbon atoms, phenyl, tolyl, xylyl, methoxyphcnyl, di- 
me ihoxyphenyl, halophenyl, phenylalkyl of 7 to 8 car- 
bon atoms, pyridyl or 

— A— X 

where 

A is straight or branched alkylene of 1 to 4 carbon atoms, 
and 

X is hydroxyl, alkoxy, acyloxy, dialkylamino of 2 to 4 
carbon atoms, or a 5- to 6-membwed nitrogen-contain- 
ing heterocyclic ring linked to A through a ring nitrogen 
atom, 

Rj is hydrogen or methyl, 

Rj is naphthyl, pyrimidyl, thienyl, pyridyl, methylpyridyl 
QK halopyridyl, 



260 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



May 2, 1972 



R4 is hydrogen, methyl, methoxy, trtfluoromethyl, cyaoo, 
halogen, lower alkanoyl or (lower alkoxy of 1 to 2 car- 
bon atoms )-carboayl, 
Rj is hydrogen, methyl, ethyl, methoxy, trifluoromethyl, 
cyano, nitro, halogen, lower alkanoyl or lower alkoxy- 
carbonyl, 
R« is hydrogen, methyl, ethyl, methoxy or halogen, 
R7 is cyano, lower alkanoyl or lower alkoxycarbonyl, 
R« is cyano, nitro, lower alkanoyl or lower alkoxycar- 
bonyl, 
Rt is hydrogen, methyl, ethyl, methoxy or halogen, and 
Rio is hydrogen, methyl, methoxy, trifluoromethyl or 

halogen, 
useful as psychosedative and anticonvulsives in warm- 
blooded animals. 



are prepared in very high yield with high purity by re- 
acting 3- (substituted or unsubstituted)amino-5-methyl- 
isoxazole derivatives with a reagent mixture from iodine 
and chlorine in acetic acid or methanol, in the presence 
of a base. 



3f60vt38Z 

18-METHYL-2a-3a-EPrnnO-5a-ANDROSTANE 
DERIVATTVES 

Taidriro Komciio, Osaka-aU, Japan, anigiior to 
^lionogi ft Co^ Ltd^ Otaka, Japan 

No Dniwins. FUcd Mar. 17, 1969, Scr. No. 807,916 

Claims priority, appUcation Japan, Mar. IS, 1968, 
43/17,702 



3,660,384 

5-[2^5.NITR0.2.FURYL)VINYLlPICOLINa. 
HYDROXAMIC ACID 

, Roland N. Johnson, Norwich, N.Y., aarignor to The 
Norwicli Pliannacal Company 

No Drawing. Filed Mar. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 20,067 

i«^ a. C97d 99/04 
US. CL 260-240 A 1 Claim 

A new compound, 5-[2-(5-nitro-2-furyl)vinyl]picolino- 
hydroxamic acid, is an antibacterial useful in combating 
Shigella ftexneri and Escherichia coli infection in animals 
upon peroral administration. 



Int a. C07c 173/00 
U.S. CL 260—239.5 

A compound of the formula 



2 Claimi 



CHn 



OR 




3,660,385 

2-(5.NlTR0.2.FURnjRYLroENE>.l-TETRALONES 
Rudolf Albrecht,