(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Official gazette of the United States Patent Office. [microform]"

OFFICIAL GAZETTE of the UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 

June 6, 1972 * Volume 899 Number 1 



• CONTENTS 

Page 

Issue of June 6, 1972 l 

Patents and Trademark Notices 

U.S. EHstrict Court Order— Civil Action No. 791—72 2 

Title 37 — Evidence of Patentability or Priority 2 

Patent Suits : 2 

Patent Notices \^ 

Dedication 4 

Certificates of COTrection for the Week of June 6, 1972 4 

Disclaimers 4 

Patents Withdrawn From Register '. 4 

Patents Available for Licensing or Sale 5 

Condition of Patent Applications . 6 

Patents Granted 

General and Mechanical . . . .\. . . 7 

Chemical "217 

Electrical 289 

Design Patents' Granted 398 

Index of Patentees PI i 

Index of Designs PI 47 

Classification of 

Patents PI 49 

Designs » PI 52 

Geographical Index of Residence of Inventors 

Patents PI 53 

Designs PI 55 



Z) 



The foUttwtav are Mailed under direction of the Superintendent of DocoMenta, GoTcrnment 
Printinr Oflce. Washington, D.C., 2*402. to whom all anbacriptiona ahonid be made parable and 
all coBBunicationi addressed: 

THE OFFICIAL GAZETTE (PATENTS SECTION), issued weeklr. subscription $89.00 
per snnum. foreim muilinr $22.25 additional; sincle copies $2.00 each. 

THE OFFICIAL GAZETTE (TRADEMARK SECTION), issued weeklr, subscription $17.00 
per annum, foreign mailins $4.25 additional; sinsla copies 40 cents each. 

CIRCULARS OF GENERAL INFORMATION concerning PATENTS or TRADEMARKS, 
price 15 cents each. 

PRINTED COPIES OF PATENTS are fnrniahcd hj the Patent Oace at 50 cenU each; 
PLANT PATENTS in color. $1.00 each; copies of TRADEMARKS and DESIGN PATENTS 
at 20 cents each. Address orders to the Commissioner of Patento. Washington. D.C.. 202S1. 



Printing authorised by Section 11 (a) 8 of Titla $6, U.S. Code P.O. 



PATENT OFFICE NOTICES 



laratloa states therein that no evidence is known to him which 
Is incoMlstent with that relied on in the affidavit or declara- 
tion, or which would tend to give an impression different from 
that conveyed by the affidavit or declaration. 

(b) If, during the prosecution, the applicant, to establish 
patentability, relies on representations as to facts, data, or 
test results set forth In the speciflcation, such repreientatlons 
win be considered for that purpose only If applicant flies an 
affidavit or declaration attesting as to the truth of the repre- 
sentations and asserting that no facts, data, or test results are 
_. known to him which are inconsistent with |hose set forth in 
The object of this suit under the Patent Laws of The ^^^ Bp«clflcation, or which would tend to give an impression 

United States is to secure (1) an adjudication of Invalidity 

of United States Letters Patent 3,513,668 granted May 26, 

1970, (2) preliminary and permanent injunction against De- 



United States District Court for the 
District of Colmnbia 

Ripple Twist Mills, Inc., Plaintiff 

V. 

Industrial Knitting Cobpokation, Defendant 

Civil Action No. 791— T» , 

OaoBS or PcBLiCATioN ON Absent Defendant in the United 
States Disteict Court roR the District or Columbia 



fendant, Its agents, servants, employees and attorneys enjoin- 
Intr them and each of them from asserting or threatening to 
assert the aforesaid Letters Patent against customers or 
potential caBtomers of Plaintiff and restraining them and each 
of them from filing or prosecuting any civil action or action 
against Plaintiff and/or its customers for Infringement of 
said Letters Patent, (3) costs and attorneys fees, and (4) 
such other and further relief as may to this Court appear 
to be Just and equitable. 

On motion of the Plaintiff, It Is this 27th day of April 
1972, ordered that the Defendant, INDUSTRIAL KNITTING 
CORPORATION, a Canadian corporation having a principal 
place of business at 500 Sauve Street W, Montreal, Quebec, 
Canada, cause its appearance to be entered herein on or be- 
fore the fortieth day exclusive of Sundays and legal holidays, 
occurring after the day of the first publication of this order ; 
otherwise the cause will be proceeded with as in case of 
default. 

WILLIAM B. BRYANT, 

Judge. 



differeat from that conveyed by the specification. 
Dated : April 28, 1972. 

(ROBERT OOTTSCHALK, 
Committioner of Patent$. 
Approted : May 1, 1972. 
Jakes H. Wakelin, Jr., 
A$$iatant Secretary for 
Science and Technoloov- 

[PR Doc. 72-6925 Filed 6-6-72; 8:49 a.n}.] 

Publithed in 57 F.R. 9tt5, May $, 1972 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
PatntOficc 

[37 CPR Part 1] 

Evidence or Patentability or Priority 

Propoted Special Statement in Affidavit or Declaration When 
Relying Upon Facts, Data, Tett Re$ult» or Other Evidence 



Patent Salts 

Notices under 36 U.S.C. 290 ; Patent Act of 1952 

8.«e9,064, L. H. Conover, TETRACYCLINE, fll«d July 7, 
1966, D.C., E.D.N. Y. (Brooklyn), Doc. 66C640, Chat. P$a«r 
<£ Co., Inc. V. Oeneric Formulae Inc. et ano. Traasf<rr«d to 
U.S.D.C, S.D.N.Y., Mar. 11, 1969. i 

2.78f,22«. B. A. Hunter, TRIARYL PHOSPHITE STABI- 
LIZERS FOR SYNTHETIC RUBBERS, Sled Dec. 21, 1967, 
D.C., N.D. Ohio (Cleveland), Doc. C-67-933, Vniroyal Incor- 
porated V. Firettone Tire and Rubber Co. Stipulation and 
order, action dismissed without prejudice, Jan. 12, 1972. 

8,7S7,4M. J. C. Wilborn. MEANS FOR BALANCING 
WHEELS; 8,814,726, Rehnborg and Wilborn, WHEEL BAL- 
ANCE CORRECTION DEVICE, filed Feb. 4, 1972, D.C., W.D. 
Okla. (Oklahoma City), Doc. 72-78-C. John C. Witbom et al. 
V. Virgil H. Salathiel, Motion Product; Inc. j 

8,7U,878, T. A. Te GrotenhulB, FILLERS HAVING VINYL 
Notice Is hereby given that, pursuant to the authority con- glLOXANE GROUPS BONDED TO THE SURFACE THERE- 
talned in section 6 of the Act of July 19, 1952 (66 Stat. 793 ; qf AND COPOLYMERS THEREOF WITH ETHYLENICAL- 
36 U.S.C. 6) the Patent Office proposes to amend Title 37, ly UNSATURATED POLYMERIZABLE MONOMERS ; 2341,- 
Code of Federal Regulations, by adding a new i 1.69. 5^ same, HIGH POLYMERS WITH CHEMICALLY BONDED 

All persons are invited to present their views, objections, REINFORCING AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME, filed 
recommendations, or suggestions In connection with the pro- jy^g jq, 1963, U.S. Ct. of App., 6th Clr., Ohio (Cincinnati), 
posed new section, to the Commissioner of Patents, Washing- ^pp ^q 20845, Westwood Chemical, Inc. v. OtotnaComing 
ton, D.C. 20221, on or before June 27, 1972, on which date a piberglaa Corporation. The Judgment of the District Court is 
hearing will be held at 9 a.m. in Room 8C06, Building 2, Crys- modified by restricting the determination of invalidity to the 
tal Plaza, 2011 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, Va. claims In issue. I.e., claims 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, 14, 16-10, 21, 
22202. All persons wishing to be heard orally at the hearing 23-29 and 28 of Patent '378 and claim 8 of Pateat '666 and 
are requested to notify the Commissioner of Patents of their g^g gg modified the Judgment is affirmed, decided and filed Aug^ 
Intended appearance. Any written comments or suggestions 24, 1971. 

may be Inspected by any person upon written request a rea- g,,,,^,^^, m. E. Bourns, VARIABLE RESISTOR, filed Aug. 
sonable time after the closing date for submitting comments. ^^ ^^^^ ^^^ .^^ j,j (Chicago), Doc. 70cl992, Boumt, Inc. 
New i 1.69 seeks to guard against the omission from facts. ^^'^ Harlan E. Boumt v. Allen-Bradley Co. et al. On motion 
data, test results, or other evidence presented in connection ^^ ^^^ defendants for summary Judgment, It is ordered that 
with patentablUty or priority of Invention, of known evidence ^^^j^^^^^^^, motion for summary Judgment Is granted and 
which Is inconsistent with that presented or which would j^^ ^ ^g entered on the complaint in favor of the de- 

convey a different impression. The purpose is to insure presen- ^^^^.^^3 ^eb 7 1972 
tatlon to the Patent Office of the evidence needed to mi^e an , • > • 



informed decision on patentability or priority of invention. 
The section thus requires a verified statement that no such 
inconsistent evidence is known to the person making the state- 
ment, if such is the fact. 

The text of the proposed new i 1.69 is as follows : 

I 1.69 SpeeiiMl atatement in affidavit or declaration when 
relying upon facta, data, teat reaulta, or other evidence. 



Z341.8M. (See 2,742,378.) 

2348,518. R. Stricklen, MIXTURE AND METHdD FOR IM- 
PARTING A CORROSION-RESISTANT SURFACE TO ALU- 
MINUM, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, AND SILVER; 2381,886, 
H. J. Hartman, METHOD FOR COATING ZINC AND ZINC 
ALLOY SHEETS, filed Mar. 16, 1970, D.C. N.p. 111. (Chi- 
cago). Doc. 70c621, Allied Reaearch Producta, IHc. v. J. M. 



,».y.™y «,.««. y-v.., —.», .^ ' ^ " , ■ Eltzroth d AaaociaU 9. Inc. On stipulation of the parties pur- 

(a) An affidavit or declaration filed during tM prosecution ^^^^ ^^ PR.CP. Ri le 41(a) the above action Ip dismissed, 

of an application presenting evidence urged as bearing on j^^ ^ ^g^g 

patentability or priority of invention will be considered only ' ' 

~if the applicant or other person making the affidavit or dec- 23fl3M. 



(See 2,843,513.) 



June 6, 1972 



U. S. PATENT OFFICE 



8 



8,007,702. R. R. Eby, PHONOGRAPH RECORD STORAGE 
MEANS, filed Dec. 2, 1969, D.C, S.D.N.Y., Doc. 69-5315, 
Richard R. Eby v. F. W. Woolworth Company. Stipulation and 
order, complaint dismissed with prejudice and without costs, 
Jan. 26, 1972. 

8,021371, F. J. Rodgers, HOSE FOR PORTABLE PNEU- 
MATIC EQUIPMENT, filed Feb. 2, 1972, D.C, N.D. Ohio 
(Cleveland), Doc. C72-116, Samuel Moore d Company v. 
Parker Hannifin Corporation. 

8.178321, P. C. Kesllng, ORTHODONTIC APPLIANCE, filed 
Feb. 4. 1972, D.C. S.D.N.Y., Doc. 72-C-532, TP Laboratories, 
Inc. et al. v. Betta Orthodontic Suppliea, Inc. 

8,190312. R. E. Robinson, PROCESS FOR PREPARING 
ESTERS, filed Nov. 7, 1969, D.C, S.D. Tex (Houston), Doc. 
69-H-1096, National Diatillera d Chemical Corporation v. 
Cekmeae Corporation. Stipulation and order of dismissal, Feb.^ 
4, 1972, Same, filed Mar. 23, 1970, D.C, S.D. Tex. (Houston)," 
Doc. 70-H-261, National Diatillera and Chemical Corporation 
V. Celaneae Corporation. Stipulation and order of dismissal, 
Feb. 4, 1972. (Dismissed with prejudice.) 

8.M8308, T. E. Ford, FOOD WRAPPER, filed Feb. 4, 1972. 
D.C. Mass. (Boston), Doc. CA-72. Trana World Services, Inc. 
V. S. S. Kreage Company. 

8,220387. Hollls and Borders, PROCESS FOR PREPARING 
DEHYDRATED POTATOES, filed Nov. 28, 1969, DC. Del. 
(Wilmington), Doc. 3813, American Potato Company v. Gen- 
eral Fooda Corporation. Stipulation of dismissal with preju- 
dice as to all claims and counterclaims, Oct. 20, 1971. 

8.278316. G. V. Cleary, INSERT FOR NEWSPAPERS, filed 
Jan. 18, 1971, D.C, N.D. 111. (Chicago), Doc. 71cl34, Free 
Standing Stuffer, Inc. v. Parmt'a Magazine EnterpHaes. By 
stipulation, motion for dismissal of the complaint under Rule 
41(a) (1) (11), is granted, Feb. 3, 1972. 

8314.726. (See 2,737.420.) 

8.822.288. A. Mayer, CLOTHING DISPLAY RACK ASSEM- 
BLY, filed Nov. 9, 1971, D.C, CD. Calif. (Los Angeles), Doc. 



71-2675-FW. Capitol Hardware Manufacturing Company, Inc. 
V. Reeve Company. 

3328,7M. R. L. Farris, MATTRESS ALARM, filed Feb 3 
1972, D.C, N.D. Tex. (Fort Worth), Doc. CA-4-1899, Robert 
L. FarrU and Edwin O. Cohen v. Electronic Monitora Inc. and 
Harris Hospital. 

8,867300. R. S. Soloff, SONICS, filed Oct. 13, 1970 DC 
Conn. (New Haven), Doc. 14081, Branson Instruments, Incor- 
porated V. Sonics and Materials, Inc., Robert 8. Soloff. Consent 
Judgment, defendants enjoined, Nov. 26, 1971. 

8.800,480, L. S. Turner, ARROW-HELICOPTER TOY • 
D. 212,600. same, AERIAL TOY ; Rer. No. 841,178 (ARROW- 
COPTER), Basic Products Development Company, filed Feb 
5, 1969, D.C.N.J. (Newark), Doc. 132-69, Basic Producta De- 
velopment Co., Inc. v. Plawner Toy Mfg. Co., Inc., Felim 
Plawner and Karl Plawner. Order dismissing complaint Oct 
20.1971. 

8,400,816, BilUg and Schleewelss, OVAL SWIMMING POOL 
filed June 3, 1971, D.C, E.D.N. Y. (Brooklyn), Doc. 71-C-677! 
Bilnor Corp. v. Atreo Mfg. Co., Inc. Case dismissed, Jan. Si' 
1972. 

8.452,006. L. Smolskl. LIQUID TREATMENT APPARATUS 
AND METHOD, filed Feb. 3, 1972, D.C. Mass. (Boston), Doc. 
72-433-J, Polcon Corporation v. Kenica Corporation. 

S,481,0«S. M. L. Whaley, PURSE RING STRIPPER AND 
METHOD OF USING SAME, filed June 14, 1971, D.C, S.D. 
Calif. (San Diego), Doc. No. 71-191-N, Morria L. Whaley v. 
Campbell Machine, Inc. 

8,488.770, W. T. Atkinson. MEAT-LIKE PROTEIN FOOD 
PRODUCT, filed Aug. 18, 1971, D.C, S.D. 111. (Peoria), Doc. 
P-3278, Archer Daniela Midland Company v. Ralaton PuHna 
Company and Swift and Company. 

8345,014, E. Davis, SANITIZERS, filed Feb. 2, 1972, D.C, 
CD. Calif. (Los Angeles), Doc. 72-241- AAH, Elbert Davia 
V. Daya-Eaae Home Producta Corp. 

D. 2U,000. (See/»,390,480.) 

Ber. No. 841,178. ( See 3,390,480. ) 



\ 



r 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



DedlcatkMi 



Re. 2e,759.— Frederick J. Melget, BatUe Creek, Mich. GYNE- 
COLOGY OR LITHOTOMY DRAPE. Patent dated Jao. 6, 
1970. Dedication filed Apr. 14, 1972, by the Inventor. 
Hereby dedicates to and for the free use of the Public all 

of the claims of said patent. 

^ ' 



CcrtificatM of Coirecdon for tte Week of Jane 6, 1972 



Re. 27,085 

3,383,448 

3.456,286 

3.462,794 

3,488.701 

3,489,502 

3.522,674 

3.634,063 

3,545.892 

3,546,123' 

3.546,270 

3,551.427 

3,586,310 

3,658,933 

3,663.880 

3.670.018 

3,574.827 

3,575,991 

3,577,287 

3.578.652 

3.578.843 

3,580,919 

3,583,075 

3,583,352 

3,584,740 

3.584,941 

3,586,152 

3,588,779 

3,500,035 

3,690,559 

3.690.902 

3.591.110 

3,692,373 

3.592,626 

3.594,762 

3,595,256 

3,595,908 

3,596,675 

3,597,437 

3,598,344 

3,698,868 

3,599.022 

3,599,063 

3,699,265 

3.600,466 

3,600,953 

3,601.686 

3.601,963 

3.602,282 

3.602.470 

3,602,689 

3,603,235 

3,603,265 

3,603,463 

3,603,585 

3,603,738 

3,603.981 

3,604.320 

3,605,654 

3.607.334 

3.607.692 

3,607,707 

3,607,876 

3,608,567 

3,608.672 

3,608.646 

3.600,075 

3,609,282 

3,609.415 

3,609,511 

3,609,668 



3.609.678 

3.609,730 

3.610,361 

3,610,825 

3.612.068 

3.612,056 

3,612,311 

3,612,396 

3,612.723 

3,612,902 

3.613,105 

3,613,273 

3,614,060 

3,614,818 

3,615,223 

3,615,320 

3,615,429 

3,615,435 

3,615,639 

3,615,762 

3.615.788 

3,616,360 

3,616,444 

3,616,784 

3,617.070 

3,617,368 

3,617,478 

3,617,479 

3,617,489 

3,617,490 

3.617,672 

3.617,747 

3,617.761 

3.618.003 

3.618,073 

3,618,331 

3,618,746 

3,619,173 

3,619,183 

3,619,195 

3,619,210 

3,610,480 

3,619,605 

3,619,938 

3,620,266 

3,620,302 

3,620,374 

3,620,620 

3,620,665 

3,620,677 

3,620,693 

3,620,714 

3,620,746 

3,620,867 

3,620,961 

3,621,019 

3,621,082 

3,621,091 

3,621,146 

3,621,164 

3,621,402 

3.621.485 

3,621,842 

3,622,084 

3,622,166 

3,622,461 

3,622,517 

3,622,522 

3,622,977 

3,623,016 

3,623,286 



3,628,434 

3,623,660 

3,623,753 

3,623,832 

3.623.940 

3,623,056 

3,623,088 

3,624,076 

3,624,079 

3,624,166 

3,624,250 

3,624,260 

3,624,370 

3,624,395 

3,624,538 

3,624,668 

3,624,970 

3,625,352 

3,625,492 

3,625,501 

3,625,584 

3,626.877 

3,625,978 

3,625,993 

3,626,048 

3,626,140 

3,626,253 

3,626,261 

3,626,266 

3,626,382 

3,626,733 

3.627,016 

3,627,1(3 

3,627,260 

3,627,318 

3,627,376 

3,627,386 

3,627,429 

3,627,536 

3,627,552 

3,627,554 

3,627,566 

3,627,677 

3,627,689 

3,627,776 

3,628,037 

3,628,072 

3,628,120 

3,628,313 

3,628,533 

3,628.658 

3.628.714 

3,628,910 

3,628,914 

3,628.942 

3.628.953 

3.628.957 

3.628,963 

3,628,973 

3,628,994 

3,629,013 

3,629,064 

3,629,209 

3,620,227 

3,629,233 

3,629,443 

3,629,444 

3.629,525 

3.629.683 

3.629.896 

3.680,639 



8.687.773 
3,687,905 
3,638,302 
3,638,309 
3,638,638 
3,639,835 
3,689,352 



3,630,706 

3,630,717 

3,630,727 

3,630,796 

3,630,863 

3,631,042 

3.631,067 

3,631,071 

3,631,090 

3,631,173 

3,631,176, 

3,631,182 

3,631,318 

3,631,321 

3,631,367 

3,631,481 

3,631,503 

3,631,563 

3,631,571 

3,631,858 

3,631,059 

3,632,046 

3,632,058 

3,632,060 

3,632,154 

3,632,157 

3,632,261 

3,632,871 

3,632,401 

3,632,427 

3,632,461 

3,632,475 

3,632,699 

3,632,631 

3,632,865 

3,632,902 

3,632,991 

3,633.112 

3,633.163 

3,633,210 

3,633,327 

3,633,400 

3,633,431 

3,633,628 

3,633,823 

3,633,950 

3,633,981 

3,634,134 

3,634.325 

3,634.452 

3.634.550 

3.634,659 

3,634,741 

3,636,147 

3,636,269 

3,635,371 

3,635,467 

3.635.669 

3.635,731 

3,636,776 

3,636,932 

3,635,955 

3,636,022 

3,636,023 

3,636,170 

3,636,246 

3,636,335 

3,636,421 

3,636,521 

3,636,645 

3,637,688 



3.689,612 
3,639,738 
3,640,158 
3,640,889 
3,641,132 
3,641,342 
3.642.067 



8.642.238 
3.642.434 
3,642,439 
3,643,738 
3,648,739 
3.644,018 
3.644,194 



JUNB 6, 1972 

^ 18.648,042 
3.646.468 
3,646,663 
3,647.241 



Disclaimers 



3,310,659. — Bterlinif BeckvHth, LibertyrlUe Township, 111. 
MULTIPLE JET CONDITIONING CABINET. Patent 
dated Apr. 28, 1964. DlBClaimer filed Apr. 10. 1972, by 
the assignee, Ky$or Induitrlal Corporation. 

Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims 1, 2, 8 and 6 of 
said patent. 



I- 



3,602,287.— iTartin Everadyk. Bedford Heights, Ohio. AP- 
PARATUS FOR FORMING A MBMBBR PROM A 
SLURRY OF MATERIAL. Patent dated Aug. 31, 1071. 
Disclaimer filed Mar. 23, 1972, by the assignee, Offlebay 
Norton Company. 

Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims 1 thi|oiish 5 of 
said patent. 



Patents Withdrawn Fhmi Rcfliter 

RCA Corporation withdraws the following patents from 
the Register of Patents Ayailable for Licensing or Sale. The 
patents were listed as being ayailable, in the OrriciAL Gasctte 

as Indicated below : 

3,273,476. PHOTOCOMPOSINO SYSTEM. Feb. 1«, 1967. 

3,281,738. SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOID, Mat. 28. 1967. 

3,302,168. TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM. July IB. 1967. 

3,302.901. FLUID DRIVE SYSTEM FOR FILM TAKE-UP 
AND REWIND MECHANISM. July 18, 1967. 

3,344,627. SUBSTANTIALLY LINEAR OUTPUT GAG DE- 
VICE, Jan. 2, 1968. 

3,351,938. VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION APPARATUS. Jan. 
30, 1968. 

3,355,618. ELECTRON GUN FOR USE IN A CATHODE RAY 
TUBE EXHIBITING ENHANCED ELECTRON 
EMISSION, Jan. 30, 1968. 

3,363,961. CATHODE ARRANGEMENT OF AN ELECTRON 
MICROSCOPE FOR REDUCING THE OCCUR- 
ENCE OF VIRTUAL CATHODES. Mar. 14. 
1968. 

3,393£47. FILM THREADING ARRANGEMENT. Sept. 24. 
1968. 1 

3,399,405. VEHICLE IDENTIFIER SYSTEM, Oct. 22, 1968. 

3.405,264. SPECIMEN INJECTOR FOR ELECTRON MI- 
CROSCOPES WITH ROTATABLE SPECIMEN 
HOLDER, Jan. 14, 1969. 

3,452;241. ELECTRON GUN SUITABLE FOR ELECTRON 
MICROSCOPE, Sept. 9. 1969. 

3,479^34. PHOTOCOMPOSINO APPARATUS SUPPORT 
STRUCTURE, Jan. 27. 1970. 

3,487,909. ARTICLE HANDLING APPARATUS, July 21, 
1970. 

3.500.310. TRUE PRESENCE VEHICLE DETBCTOR IN- 
CLUDING MEANS TO DISTINGUISH BE- 
TWEEN SLOW AMBIENT CHANGES AND 
CHANGES TO THE PRESENCE OF A VEHI- 
CLE, July 21, 1970. 

3,509.803. PHOTOCOMPOSINO APPARATUS, i Aug. 26, 
1970. I 

3,517 119. DEVICE FOR PRODUCING LINE HALFTONE 
IMAGES SIMILAR TO THE IMAiQES PRO- 
DUCED BY THE WOODCUT TYPE METHOD 
OF PRINTING. Aug. 3, 1971. 

3,528.018. BILEVEL VIDEO SIGNAL RECONSTRUCTION 
CIRCUIT, Aug«3, 1971. 

3,546,681. PROGRAMMED METHOD FOR MANIPULAT- 
ING ELECTRONIC FONTS IN ELECTRONIC 
PHOTOCOMPOSINO SYSTEMS, Aug. 3. 1971. 

3.553,676. ELECTRO-OPTICAL COMPOSITION SYSTEM, 
Aug. 3, 1971. 

3.568.178. ELECTRONIC PHOTOCOMPOSITION SYSTEM, 
Dec. 7. 1971. 

3.573.786. COMPENSATION CIRCUIT FOR ELECTRONIC 
■ PHOTOCOMPOSITION SYSTEM, Djec. 7, 1971. 



June 6, 1972 



U. S. PATENT OFFICE 



3,614,767. ELECTRONIC PHOTOCOMPOSINO SYSTEM 
THAT FORMS CHARACTERS OF DIFFER- 
ENT POINT SIZES, Dec. 21, 1971. 

3,643,019. VARIABLE LENGTH CODING METHOD AND 
APPARATUS, May 2, 1972. 



Patents Available for LicensiBg or Sale 

t^oH; ^Pi9^^ LIGHTENING INSULATOR PAD FOR CAMP- 
LRS. John B. Cato, 206 Combs St.. MUton, Fla., 82570. 

.»?V^^®Mi.®- SYSTEM OF TELEVISION TRANSMISSION 
v?i^^f?^2^^"^/»^^ REPRODUCTION OF THE TELE 
VISLD IMAGE Samuel Freeman, 13 Blrchwood Court, K, 
syosset, N.Y., 11791. 

3,225.76L FATIGUE SUPPORT. Robert Swenson. 1:J0 
Polnciana Drive, Martlnes, Ga., 30007. 

^i^i^i<S^h HAND GUIDED WALK-BEHIND SELF-PRO- 
PELLBb MATERIAL CONVEYING CART. John Fuhrmann. 
Correspondence to : Robert C. Weber, 1022 Elllcott Square, 
cniiaio, M.I., 14203. 

3.528.670. ASTRONOMICAL TELEOBJECTIVE Law- 
rence Monart. 1458 83rd St., Brooklyn. N.Y., 11228. 
^.rh'^^^'liS^ii^ PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF RICH 
\^^h,^rdSKh^^^ NATURAL GAS BY MEANS OF CATA- 
LYTIC HYDROGASIFICATION UNDER PRESSURE OF 
FLUID HYDROCARBONS. Carlo Padovani. Correspondence 
ISLi Murphy & Dobyns, 2001 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 
307, Arlington. Va., 22202. 

3.646.530. RANDOMLY BALL AND GAME APPARATUS. 
n*^n**'"o/i:^oo *'"°*°****' ** **■• ^^^^ Blevado St., Los Angeles, 

3,651.623. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR MOWING 
^ STEEP EMBANKMENTS. Rutherford B. Harley. 4300 Bishop 
Lake Rd.. Marietta. Ga.. 30060. 

3.652^508. VISCOSITY STABLE ALIPHATIC POLYURE- 
THANE COMPOSITIONS AND METHOD OF PREPARA- 
TION. Donald L. Segur. et al. Correspondence to : Henry B. 
Townsend. General Latex and Chemical Corp.. Research Cen- 
ter. High St.. North BUIerlca. Mass.. 01862. 

The following 2 patents are offered by Louis Schacher. et 
al.. 4910 15th Ave.. Brooklyn, N.Y.. 11219. 
D. 191.069. BOTTLE. 
D. 191.770. BOTTLE. 

General Electric Company Ig prepared to grant non-exclu- 
sive licenses under the following 2 patents upon reasonable 
terms to domestic manufacturers. 

Applications for licenses may be addressed to : Division 
Patent Counsel, Space Division, General Electric Company. 
P.O. Box 8555, Philadelphia, Pa., 19101. 

3,629,596. FREE PISTON GENERATOR. 

3,647,925. VARIABLE IMPEDANCE GENERATOR. 

General Motors Corporation is prepared to grant non-exclu- 
sive licenses under the following 3 patents upon reasonable 
terms. 

Applications for license may be addressed to : The Director, 
Patent Section, General Motors, Building, 3044 West Grand 
Blvd., Detroit, Mich., 48202. 



3,666,187. LABORATORY HOMOGENIZER 
3,665.762. CALORIMETER. 

. The RCA Corporation offers to grant non-exclusive licenses 
on reasonable terms and conditions under the foIIowtog« 

InQulrles respecting licenses under these patents should be 
ni''„*«fn^ Vi?Q^^* Corporation. Staff Vice Presidftnl. Domestic 
Licensing. 1133 Avenue of Americas, New YorSfN Y 10036 
3,653,411. CABLE HARNESS ASSEMBLY BOARD AND 

METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME 
3.653.498. STATIC CHARGE PROTECTIVE PACKAGES 

FOR ELECTRON DEVICES v^^^vx^o 

3,653,608. WEB CARTRIDGE. 

3.653,745. CIRCUITS FOR DRIVING LOADS SUCH AS 
LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAYS 

3.653.883. METHOD OF FABRICATING A POROUS TUNG- 
STEN BODY FOR A DISPENSER CATHODE 

3,653.901. COLOR KINESCOPE PRODUCTION WITH A 
TEMPORARY MASK. 

3.653,941. SLURRY PROCESS FOR COATING PARTICU- 
LATE MATERIAL UPON A SURFACE 
3.653,089. ZN DIFFUSION INTO GAP. 
3.654,387. VIDEO TAPE RECORDER SYNCHRONIZING 

3,654,398. DEVICE TO KEEP A CAPSTAN IN PHASE 
WHEN SWITCHING MODES. *-"*»!!• 

3,654.400. WEB HANDLING APPARATUS. 

3.654.440. COUNTER. 

3.654.441. FOUR-PHASE HIGH SPEED COUNTER 
3.654.556. MICROWAVE HYBRID COMPRISING 

TROUGH WAVEGUIDE AND BALANOED 
MIXER UTILIZING SAME. ^^*^-^v-r.i/ 

3.654.572. WAVEGUIDE STRUCTURE. 

3.654,606. ALTERNATING VOLTAGE EXCITATION OF 
LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAY MATRIX. *-- 

3.655.126. MOTION TRANSFER MECHANISM 

3,655.269. LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAY ASSEMBLY HAV- 
ING INDEPENDENT CONTRAST AND 
SPEED OF RESPONSE CONTROLS. 

3.656.912. CORONA GENERATING CIRCUITS FOR ELBC- 
TR^HOTOGRAPHIC PRINTERS COOPERA- 
rKvERS.^^'^'''® ^"^ TELEVISION 

3,656,011. CHARGE COUPLED DEVICE. 

3,656.030. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE WITH PLURALITY 
OF SMALL AREA CONTACTS. ^^«^^^^* 

3,656,062. LIGHTNING PROTECTION SYSTEM. 

3,656,071. WIDE BAND BALUN. 

3,656,121. ELECTRICALLY AND OPTICALLY ACCES- 
SIBLE MEMORY. 

3,657,138. VISIBLE-EMITTING C E R I U M-ACTIVATED 
CALCIUM ALUMINUM OXIDE PHOSPHOR 

3.667,674. COIL SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENT FOR A 
CATHODE RAY TUBE. v» ^ 



3.471.127. TURBOMACHINE ROTOR. 

3,477.647. FUEL SPRAY. 

3,478.816. REGENERATOR MATRIX. 

The Department of Health. Education, and Welfare is offer- 
ing the tsllowing 13 patents for licensing aa provided by 
Title 45 C.F.R. Section 6.3. 

Applications for license should be addressed to : Mr. Nor- 
man J. Latker. Chief, Patent Branch, % National Institutes 
of Health, Room 5A03, Westwood Building. Bethesoa. Md., 3.658.403. 
20014. 



3,658.401. 



3.642.953. 

3,644,647. 

3.646,694. 
3,651.864. 
3,652.680. 

3.654,257. 
3,661.212. 

3,649.613. 
3.655.815. 



3.656.123. 
3.663.659. 



SELECTIVELY SULFONATED BLOCK CO- 
POLYMERS AND PROCESS FOR THEIR 
PREPARATION. 

TREATMENT OF GLAUCOMA EMPLOYING 5- 
(8 - METHYLAMINOPROPYL) 5H DIBENZO 
(a.d) CYCLOHEPTENE. 

PROCESS FOR REMOVAL OF ACIDIC MATE- 3,658.672. 
RIALS FROM FLUIDS. 

COMPACT ROOM SIZE ENVIRONMENTAL 
CONTROL UNIT. 

ANTIHEMOPHILIC FACTOR PREPARED 
FROM BLOOD PLASMA USING POLYETH- 
YLENE GLYCOL. 



IMIDAZOLE CAR- 



DIAZO DERIVATIVES OF 
BOXYLIC ACID ESTERS. 

ATTENUATED LIVE RUBELLA VIRUS VAC- 
CINE AND METHOD OF PRODUCTION. 

TRIAZENO COMPOUNDS. 

THROMBORESISTANT ARTICLES CONTAIN- 
ING BPOXY RESINS AND POLYETHYLENE- 
OXIDE POLYPROPYLENE OXIDE BLOCK 
COPOLYMERS. 

CONTINUOUS FLOW BLOOD SEPARATOR. 

PROCESS FOR THE PREPARATION OF HY- 
DROXYLATED BLOCK POLYMERS. 



3,657,735. ELECTRON BEAM EXCITED LASER. 

3.658,125. INTERNAL CONFIGURATION FOR A RADIAL 
HEAT PIPE. 

3,668.400. METHOD OF MAKING A MULTIALKALI PHO- 
TOCATHODE WITH IMPROVED SENSI- 
TIVITY TO INFRARED LIGHT AND A PHO- 
TOCATHODE MADE THEREBY. 

METHOD OF MANUFACTURE OF CATHODE 
RAY TUBES HAVING FRIT-SEALED -ENVE- 
LOPE ASSEMBLIES. 

HIGH FIDELITY READOUT OP A HOLOGRAM 
PERFORMING THE FUNCTION OF A COM- 
PLEX WAVE MODIFYING STRUCTURE. 

3.668,404. COMPLEX WAVE MODIFYING STRUCTURE 
HOLOGRAPHIC SYSTEM. 

3,668,586. EPITAXIAL SILICON ON HYDROGEN MAG- 
NESIUM ALUMINATE SPINEL SINGLE 
CRYSTALS. 

METHOD OP DETECTING THE COMPLETION 
OF PLASMA ANODIZATION OF A METAL 
ON A SEMICONDUCTOR BODY. 

3,659,035. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE PACKAGE. 

3,659.044. TEST SYSTEM FOR ELECTRICAL APPARA- 
TUS. < 

3.659,118. DECODER CIRCUIT EMPLOYING SWITCHES 
gfUCH AS FIELD EFFECT DEVICES. 

3.659.164. INTERNAL CONSTRUCTION FOR PLASTIC 
SEMICONDUCTOR PACKAGES. 

3.669.222. HIGH EFFICIENCY MODE AVALANCHE DI- 

ODE OSCILLATOR. 

3.659.223. MICROWAVE OSCILLATOR WITH TWO OR. 

MORE PARALLELED SEMICONDUCTIVB 
DEVICES. 

3.669.228. STRIP-TYPE DIRECTIONAL COUPLER HAV- 
ING ELONGATED APERTURE IN GROUND 
PLANE OPPOSITE COUPLING REGION. 

3,659,232. TRANSMISSION LINE FILTER. 



PATENT EXAMINING CORPS 

R. A. WAHL. Assistant Commissioner 
F. H. BRONAUGH, Deputy Assistant Commissioner 

CONDITION OF PATENT APPLICATIONS AS OF MAY 16, 1972 



PATENT EXAMINING QBOCPS 

I 



Actual 
Flllnc DaU 
of OldMt 

NawCue 

Awaiting 

Action 



CHEBCICAL EXAMINING GROUPS 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY AND PETROLEUM CHEMISTRY, GROUP UO-M. 8TERMAN. DU^Wt.. ........ ...... 

Inonanle ComDOunds; InorEanle Compoaitloiu; Organo-Metal and Oigano-MetaUold Cbamlitry; MetaUuivT; Metal Stook; 
Etocto) Cbemlitry: Battarlw; Hydrocarbons; Mineral OH Teetanology; Lubrieattaf Compoaltiona; OaMOoa CompoMtlona; 
Fuel and Igniting Devloet. 

GENERAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, GROUP 120-L MARCUS, Direct^ v^-i:-r-^""-:r-^i"^- 

HeterocycUc; Amides; Alkaloids; Aio; SoUur; Misc. Esters; Carbohydrates; Herbicides; Poisons; Medldnes; Cosmetics; Steroids; 
Ozo and Ozy; Qulnones; Adds; Carboxyllc Add Esters; Add Anhydrides; Acid Halldes. 
HIGH POLYMER CHEMISTRY. PLASTICS AND MOLDING. GROUP 14&-L. J. BERCOVITZ. Director -..--- ----.- - 

Synthetic Resins; Rubber; Proteins; Macromolecular Carbohydrates; Mixed Synthetic Resin CompoeiUcns; Synthetic Resins 
With Natural Polymers and Resins; Natural Resins: Reclaiming; Pore-Forming; Compodttons (Part) e.g.: Coating; Molding; 
Ink; Adhedve and Abrading Compodtlons; Molding, Shaping, and Treating Processes. 
CCHLTINO and LAMINATING, BLEACHING, DYEING AND PHOTOGRAPHY, GROUP IflO-A. P- KENT. Director .. 
Coating- ProcesMS and Misc. Producto; Laminating Methods and Apparatus; Stock Materials; Adhesive Bonding; Special Chem- 
ical M^anofkctures; Special Utility Compodtlons; Bleaching; Dyeing and Photography. 
SPECIALIZED CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES AND CHEMICAL ENQINEERING. GROUP ITO-W.B. KNIGHT. Director. . 
Fertllliers; Foods; Fermentation; Analytical ChemUtry; Reactors; Sugar and Starch; Paper Making; Olau Mmulacture; Gas; 
Heating and Illuminating; Cleaning Processes; Liquid Purification; DlstUlaUon; Preserving; Liquid and SoUd Separation; Gas 
and Liquid Contact Aroaratas; Refrigeration; ConcentratUe Eyaporators; Mineral Oils Apparatus; Misc. Physical Proeessee. 

ELECTRICAL EXAMINING GROUPS 

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS AND RELATED ELEMENTS, GROUP 210-N. ANSHER, Director- ...... .^-----.- 

Generatlon and Utllliatlon; General Applications; Conversion and Distribution; Heating and Related Art Conductors; Switebes; 
Miscellaneous. 

SECURITY, GROUP 220— R. L. CAMPBELL, Director -.; --'v----.-:.----,;-v.-- 

Ordnance, Firearms and Ammunition; Radar, Underwater Signalling, Directional Radio, Torpedoes, Seismic Exploring. Radlo- 
AcUve Batteries; Nuclear Reactors, Powder Metallurgy, Rocket Fuels; Radio-Actlve Material. 

INFORMATION TRANSMISSION, STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL. GROUP 280-J. F. COUCH. Director...— 

Commnnicatians; MnlUplexing Techniques; Facsimile; DaU Processing. Cemputatlon and Conveidon; Storage Devices and 
Related Arts. 

ELECTRONIC COMPONENT SYSTEMS AND DEVICES. GROUP 2W-W. L. CARLSON. Director.. 

Semi-Conductor and Space Discharge Systams and Devices; Electronic Component Circuits; Wave Transmlsrton Lines and 
Networks; Optics; Radiant Energy; Measuring. ^ 

PHYSICS. GROUP 280— R. L. EVANS. Director .....-- 

Photography; Sound and Lighting; Indicators and Optics; Measuring and Telting; Geometrical Instruments. 

DESIGNS. GROUP 290— R. L. CAMPBELL. Director , 

Industrial Arts; Honiehold, Pencoal and Fine Arts. ^ I 

MECHANICAL EXAMINING GROUPS 

HANDLING AND TRANSPORTING MEDIA, GROUP 310-A. BERLIN, Director ... ...-..--.---....-..---..-------.. 

Conveyors; Hoists; Elevators; Artide Handling Implementt; Store Service; Sheet and Web Feeding; Dimendng; Fluid Sprinkling; 

Fire Extinguishers; Coin Handling; Check CwtroUed Apparatus; Classifying and Assorting Solids; Boats; Ships; Aeronautics: 

Motor and Land Vehldes and Appurtenances; Railways and Railway Eqolpmwit; Brakes; Rigid Flexible and Special Reoep- 

tades and Packages. 
MATERIAL SHAPING, ARTICLE MANUFACTURING, TOOLS. GROUP 82(V-D. J. STOCKING. Director ... 

Manufacturing Processes, Assembling, Combined Machines, Special Article Making; Metal Deforming; Sheet Metal snd Wire 

WoAlng; Metal Fndon— Bcmding, Metal Founding; Metallurgical Apparatus; Plastics Working A ppwatus; Plastic Block 

and Earthenware Apparatus; Machine Tools for Shaping or Dividing; Work and Tool Holders Woodworking; Tools; CnUery; 

Jacks. 
AMUSEMENT, HUSBANDRY, PERSONAL TREATMENT, IKFORMATION, GROUP jMO-A.RUEGG, Director - 
Amusement and Exercising Devices; Projectors; Animal and Plant Husbandry; Butchering; Earth Working and Excavating; 

Fishing, etc.: Tobacco; Artificial Body Members; Dentistry; Jewdry; Surgery; ToUetn ; Printing; Typewriters; SUtlonery; 

Information Dissemination. 
HEAT, POWER AND FLUID ENGINEERING, GROUP 840-M. M. NEWMAN, Director 



3-18-71 

1-04-71 
3-03-71 

3-01-71 
11-09-70 



Power Plants; Combustion Engines; Fluid Motors; Pumps; Turbines: Heat Generation and ^diange; Refrigeration; VmtUatkm; 
Drying; Vaporldng; Temperature and Humidity Regulation; Machine Elements; Power Transmission; Fluid HandUng; Lu- 
brication; Joint Packing. 
CONSTRUCTIONS, SUPPOItTS, TEXTILES, CLEANING, GROUP 3M-T. J. mC^EY, Dlrecte....j-.^.-...;^^.-.-^ 

Joints; Fasteners; hod. Pipe and Electrical Connectors; Miscellaneous Hardware; Loeta; BnUdlng Stoudnm; Cloanre Opjwstors; 
Bri<iges: Closures; Earth Engineering; Drilling; Mining; Furniture: Reoeptades; Supports; Crtlnet Strnatmee,- Cmte«ngia 
Separations: Cleaning; Coattag; Pressing; A^ltstlng; foods: Textiles; Apparel and Shoes; Sewing Machines; Winding and 
Reeling. 



3-23-71 



3-01-71 



2-12-71 



a-21-71 



3-18-71 



Expiration 



have 



1 of patenU: The patents within the range of nurnbm indicated below expire during June i^2«2fi» V^^x^^lS^v^T- t.-- 
expired earUer due to shortened tenns under the provisions of Public Law aoo, 7»th Congress, approved August 8, VfU (60 Stot. MO) »^^,^^^JfZ 
mS!mA Connees. approved August 33. 1864 (to Stot. 704). or which may have had thdr teems eortaOad by dMalmar imder the pwv«f2« ©^ 
3MJ^.2«. Other patents, issued attn the dates of the range of numbers indtasted below, may bave ezplrwl before the fall term ol 17 years for 
the same reasons, or have lapsed under the provisions of 35 U.8.C. ISIi 

p,t--t« , Nnmbers 2,709,808 to 3,712 130. indodve 

pK? Pat«to.V.V..V.V.V;."" V.V.VJ1V-^^^^^^^^^ - Nnmbm LSW to 1,403. IndndTe 

6 . ^ 



PATENTS 

GRANTED JUNE 6, 1972 

GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



3,667,069 
JET PUMP CARDIAC REPLACEMENT AND ASSIST 
DEVICE AND METHOD OF AT LEAST PARTIALLY 
REPLACING A DISABLED RIGHT HEART 
Perry L. Blackshcv, Mahtomcdl; Richard J. Fontnmi; Franit 
D. Dorman, botli of St. Paul, and Demctrc M. NicoMf, 
Minneapolis, aU of Mian., aarignon to The ^e«cnts of the 
University of MhincsoCa, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Filed Mar. 27, 1970, Ser. No. 23,388 

Int. CI. A61f 1/24; F04f 5/00. 5/36, 5/44 

VS. CI. 3— 1 12 CiaioM 



be removed by a child of tender years. If one of the liquid 
containers inadvertently ruptures, the others will not be af- 
fected and the pool cover will be maintained in place. 



• ■•MT 
}UtClAVUN 




3,667,071 
SWIMMING POOL LINER HANGER ASSEMBLY 
Monroe P. Hoch, WapwaOopen, Pa., and Joseph BMTvra, 
Long Bcw^ N.Y., airignon to WUkcs Pjool Corporatloii, 
Berwick, Pa. 

Original appHcadon Dec. 12, 1967, Ser. No. 689^86, now 

Patent No. 3,546,720. DMded and thb application Aug. 5, 

1970, Ser. No. 61,408 

Int. CI. E04h 3/16, 3/18 

MS. a. 4—172.21 3 Clahm 



^INTACT 



TaCUSnO »M.»I INTACT 



An implantable jet pump cardiac replacement device and 
method for replacing or assisting the right heart. The jet 
pump device is an elongated tubular structure inclbding an 
upstream driving nozzle from which a driving flow of arterial 
blood under pressure is ejected into a suction nozzle creating 
a zone of reduced pressure to cause venous blood to be 
sucked into and admixed with the driving flow for distribu- 
tion to the pulmonary circulation system. The pump may be 
powered by blood pumped by the left heart or an artificial 
replacement for the left heart. 




3,667,070 
POOL COVER 

Joseph J. Pitti, Wantagh, and George A. Tassone, Brooklyn, 
both of N.Y., assignors to Atreo Manufacturing Co., Inc., 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Filed July 22, 1970, Ser. No. 57,279 

Int. Ci. E04h 3/16, 3/18 

U.S. CI. 4-172.12 , 7 Claims 






y77777777777777777. 



a pool cover for keeping soot and other particles out of a 
pool and for preventing unwanted usage of the pool. The 
pool cover is made of a flexible, durable material and has a 
central cover portion adapted to rest on the surface of the 
pool. A border region is secured to the outer edge of the cen- 
tral cover portion including a plurality of separate and inde- 
peiltlent liquid containers capable of being fllled with a suita- 
ble liquid, such as water. The border region of the pool cover 
rests on the peripheral edge of the pool and is too heavy to 



A hanger assembly for securing a pool liner to the deck of 
a swimming pool including a rigid hook secured to the pool 
deck, a second hook adapted to be secured to the pool liner 
engaging the rigid hook, and a coping means substantially 
covering both hooks and aiding in retaining the hook engage- 
ment is disclosed. The assembly, when the coping means is in 
place, presents a relatively smooth rounded exterior transi- 
tion surface between the pcxrf deck and pool liner. 



3,667,072 

DIVAN-BED 

Enzo BcUIni, Via ddia Uberta 37, Quarrata, Italy 

FBed Nov. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 86,137 

Claims priority, appUcatkin Italy, Nov. 5, 1969, 4847 A/69 

Int. CL A47c ; 7/22, 1 7/36 

US, CL 5—24 4 f-i^hi, 

A divan bed, including a fixed supporting structure, a 

frame tiltable in two positions displaying for use in one of tiie 



8 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



'positions seat cushions and in the other a mattress. It further , I 3,667,074 

comprises a back that 'in the bed arrangement is admitted \\ STUFFED CONTOURED PILLOWS 

Wffllaai M. Emery, New ProvMcnce, N J^ aMttnor to WaHun 



June 6, 1972 




W. Emery, TowMhlp of Bcriuley HdgMs, Uitfon Couirty, 
NJ. 

I f%td Aag. 26, 1969, Scr. No. 853,104 

I IiitCLA47c2i/06 

UACL 5—337 4 Claims 




^A hoad imIIow having a pre-shaped head cradli padded 

permanently with a sheet of foam, a neck roll adjusubiy 

padded with a roll of sheet foam and side wings adjustably 

under the frame to sustain the cushions and is articulated to padded with shreaded foam or fiber and zippered means to 

said frame. provide access to vary the heighth of said adjustable padding 

, ' according to the user's individual requirements. 



3,667,073 

PATIENT TRANSPORTER 

Hiram H. Rcnfroc, 505 BarM, Wot Memphis, Ark. 

Filed Dec. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 99,400 

Int. CL A61g 7/10 

VS. CL 5—81 



llClaintt 



3,667,075 

MATTRESS SPRING BELLOWS ASSEMBLY AS FOR 
HOSPITALS, AND THE LIKE 
Wesley D. BaBm^ c/o S. M. Tucker, 1011 North 15Ui Street, 
ami John H. Staley, 4512 Timbcrcrmt Lane, iMth of Waco, 
Tex. 

I »^ FUcd Feb. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 13,601 
I Int. CL A47c 27/05 



VS. CI 5-348 



^ 




^^^a 





7ClainM 



An apparatus which provides for effortless moving of a 
non-ambulatory patient from his bed or operating table to a 
cart, e.g., recovery room stretcher or the like and from the 
cart to other non-porous surfaces, e.g., X-ray tables, etc. The 
major component, comprises an inflatable mattress having a 
constant flow of air pressure communicating therewith and a 
plurality of nozzles over one side thereof to direct air jets 
outwardly therefi-om. The mattress normally is positioned 
with the air jets directed downwardly to provide an air 
cushion or caster for effortless sliding from one horizontal 
surface to another. However, the mattress may be positioned 
with the air jets directed upwardly for floaUbly supporting a 
patient, having sores, e.g., decubitus ulcers, on a cushion of 
pressurized gas a distance above the mattress. 



The invention discloses a mattress, as for a hospital bed, an 
assembly of inflatable bellows spring segments being inter- 
posed between the under side of the mattress and a support 
box therefor which may be said to correspond to the conven- 
tional bed spring supporting slats under the springs of con- 
ventional mattresses. All of the adjustments offered by con- 
ventional hospital bed frames, and more, may be made for 
the matuess of this invention by virtue of the shapes into 
which the combinations offspring bellows segments may be 
inflated. The invention, in effect, employs a careful selection 
of bellows spring segment shapes, not only to provkle a wide 
range of positional adjustments of the mattress, but these seg- 
ments may serve, cooperatively, to provide the springs of the 
mattress, also with the degree of spring or cushioning effect 
being infinitely adjusuble by virtue of the selective inflation 
of bellows segments, and the selectivity provided as to degree 
of inflation of the respective bellows. 



V 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



9 



3,667,076 3,667,078 

BINMNG MACHINE GOLF CLUB HOLDER 

Jacques Agiaghanian, 12 Res id ence Ics Quinoonccs, 19 Gil- Joseph R. Distasie, 710 Skon RomI, Spring Lriw HdaiMi, 
sur-Yvcttc, and Jcwi Drevct, 30 Avenue du Bois dc ia NJ. 

Marchc, 92 Vaucrcmon, both of Firancc Filed Feb. 19, 1971, Scr. No. 1 16,974 

Filed Nov. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 91^17 Int. CL A63b 57/00 

CWms priority, application France, Nov. 20, 1969, 6939991 VS. CL 15— 104.92 
Int. a. B42c 5/72 « 



20ClalnH 



U.S.a. 11— lA 



6Claims 




Semi-automatic machine for attaching to perforated bun- 
dles of leaves a continuous metallic binding comprising a suc- 
cession of originally open rings. The machine comprises a 
reel for delivering the binding, and a chain along which the 
binding is advanced from a cutting station to a pressing sta- 
tion at which the rings are closed through tlye perforations in 
the bunidle. 



to USM Cor- 



3,667,077 
SHOE LASTING MACHINES 
Richard A. Stcane, Leicester, Ei^nd, assigno 
poratioa, Boston, Mam. 

Filed Jan. 18, 1971, Ser. No. 107,179 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Jan. 17, 1970, 

2,380/70 

Int.CLA43d2//00 

U.S.CL 12—83 7 Claims 




A shoe lasting machine having a block yieldably pressing 
the margin of a shoe upper against a drive roll for tensioning 
the upper heightwise of a last and for feeding the upper mar- 
gin lengthwise, the block being yieldingly pivotable to in- 
crease the entering space between the block and the 
periphery of the roll to accommodate increased thickness of 
the upper margin fed into the bite between the roll and 
block. 




A golf club holder is adapted to be secured to or made a 
part of a golf bag and to carry a plurality of side-opening 
receptacles which face the interior of the bag and into which 
the heads of selected golf clubs can be inserted by means of a 
substantially lateral movement in the opposite direction. The 
receptacles are maintained in appropriate operative position 
by means of rods which extend up from a support and which 
are preferably adjustably vertically positionable, thereby to 
adapt individual receptacles to receive the heads of different 
specific golf clubs. 



3,667,079 

DEVICE FOR SCRAPING OFF AND COLLECTION OF 

MEDICAL REFUSE AND FOR PREVENTION OF ITS 

SPREAD 

John Martin Hagghmd, Valhallaviwen 45A, Ormkokbvik, 

Sweden 

Filed Sept. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 69,832 
Claims priority, application Sweden, Sept. 9, 1969, 12408/69 

Int CL A61g i5/00; B65f 7/00 
U.S.a. 15— 105 14 < 




A scraping off and collecting device for medical refuse 
consisting of a collar with scraping means for scraping the 
refuse off medical instruments, and a throw-away beaker for 
collection of the refuse, the collar being made with stiffening 
projections at an angle to the plane of the collar. The bottom 
of the collar is punched out so that scraping teeth are 
formed. 



10 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,667,080 
FLUTE CLEANER FOR TWIST DRILLS 
Henry Peraoa, 224 Gknwood Avenue, BloomHeld, N J. 
Filed Mar. 29, 1971, Scr. No. 128,740 ' 
Int. CL B23b 51100 



r 



U.S. a. 15—236 



3,667,082 

LIGHT FOR AUTOMOTIVE VEHICLES AND WIPER 
I THEREFOR 

Alfred Roylcr, Stuttgart, Germany, aMlgnor to Robert Boach 
GmbH, Stuttgart, Germany 



77 




t~^ 



Wk 




6 ClaiuM Original appUcatioa Aug. 13, 1968, Ser. No. 752,204, now 
•buidoncd. Divided and tliii appUcatioa Feb. 16, 1971, Scr. 

No. 115,785 
Claims priority, application Germany, Sept. 2, l%7,p 94281; 

IOct. 19, 1967,8 95035 
InU CI. B60s 1106, 1/14. 1/20 
U.S. CI., 15-250.02 IP Claims 



r 



A hand-held flute cleaner for twist drills includes an arm 
member upon which is mounted a pair of cleaning discs 
which are finely rotatable around axles carried in the arm. 
The cleaning discs are preferably made of soft metal such as 
aluminum or may be of plastic. In the periphery of these 
discs are spaced cutouts disposed to enter and engage a sharp 
edge of the flute of the twist drill to scrape the accumulated 
material from the drill. 



Robert 



3,667,081 
WINDOW-CLEANING ARRANGEMENT 
Kari-Hdnz Burger, Buelil, Germany, aarignor to 
Boach GmbH, Stuttgart, Germany 

FVed Oct. 29, 1970, Ser. No. 85,146 
Clainu priority, appHcatloB Germany, Nov. 3, 1969, P 19 55 

127.0 

Int. a. B60i 1/20 

VS. CL 15—250.24 10 Clainv 




An arrangement for cleaning light-emitting and light-ad- 
mitting windows, particularly of motor vehicles. The window 
to be cleaned has a general plane, two transversely spaced 
flrst marginal portions and a second marginal portion which 
connects the flrst marginal portions. A carriage is mounted 
for movement along the second marginal portion between 
the flrst marginal portion and carries a wiper arm assembly 
which moves with it and which is pivoubly mounted on it for 
turning movement about an axis paralleling the general plane 
of the window. A wiper blade is mounted on the assembly 
and extends in at least substantial parallelism with the flrst 
marginal portions but is offset laterally with respect to the 
axis. Biasing means biases the assembly pivotably about the 
axis to maintain the wiper blade in contact with the window. 




The headlights of an autonxstive vehicle are provided with 
wipers having elongated flexible wiping elements which are 
reciprocable along the outer sides of the respective lenses 
toward and away from a paricing position in which they are 
concealed behind the moulding rings of the headlights. Sprin- 
klers are provided to spray water onto the lenses, at least 
during a portion of reciprocatory movement of the wiping 
elements. The operation of the drives for the wiping elements 
and of pumps for the sprinklers is regulated by electric pro- 
gramming circuits. " 



3,667,083 
WINDSHIELD WIPER ASSEMBLY 
Roy E. Linlccr, Nunery Road, TItusville, N J. 

Filed Aug. 28, 1970, Ser. No. 67,916 

Int. a. B60i 1/38 

VS. a. 15—250.42 li ClainH 




A windshield wiper assembly is provided with a wipej 
blade and a backing strip together with a blade retaining clip 
engaging the backing strip and connected to the blade to 
prevent movement of the blade with respect to the backing 
strip. For this purpose the clip preferably has a portion 
thereof located between the backing strip and blade and has 
prongs thereon which project into the material of which the 
blade is formed. The backing strip and/or the blade or both 
may b formed of extruded plastic material and in an alterna- 
tive embodiment of the invention, the wiper blade has an 
electrical heating element carried thereby, whereas blade 
supporting members which are detachably connected to the 
backing strip form part of an electrical circuit including the 
heating element and blade retaining clip. 



\ 



\. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



11 



3,667,084 
LIGHTWEIGHT VACUUM CLEANER 
Bruno M. Valbona, Avon; Robert J. Emmons, Manchester, 
and Maurice P. Samueilan, West Hartford, all of Conn., a»> 
signers to Dynamics Corporation of America, New Yorit, 
N.Y. 

Hied Oct 23, 1970, Scr. No. 83^0 

Int. a. A47I 9/00 

VS. a. 15—323 13 Claims 



through which water passes. Internal and external outlet 
ports are provided along the blade elements of tlie scaling 




A portable lightweight vacuum cleaner having an extenda- 
ble nozzle intake conduit rigidly supported by an easily ad- 
justable resilient seal losing the lower end of a Alter bag com- 
partment into which the intake conduit projects to vary the 
distance between a flxed operating handle and the nozzle 
without changing the manageability and nozzle-floor orienta- 
tion with users of different statures. 



3,667,085 
CASTER PAD 
Charles Cumella, Bronx, and Joaeph Cutrone, North Merick, 
both of N.Y., aHignors to Federal Casters Corporation, 
Coplague, N.Y. 

Filed May 21, 1970, Ser. No. 39,361 

Int CL B60b Ji/00 

U.S. CI. 16—30 8 Claims 




A caster pad for mounting a caster or roller assembly to a 
container or receptacle or the like wherein the caster pad is 
provided at opposite ends thereof with means for removably 
supporting the caster assembly relative to the pad without the 
need for separate fasteners and the like. 



y 



3,667,086 
HAND TYPE HSH SCALING DEVICE 
Paul A. Sexton, 235 Exeter Place, St. Paul, Minn. 
Filed Jan. 18, 1971, Ser. No. 107,238 
Int. CI. A22c 25/02 
VS. CI. 17—66 8 Claims 

' A hand type fish scaling device is comprised of an elongate 
handle having a mounting member projecting from the for- 
ward end of the handle. The handle is hollow and is con- 
nected to one end of a flexible conduit, and the conduit is 
adapted to be connected to a faucet. A channel-shaped scal- 
ing blade and a channel-shaped hood are mounted on the 
mounting member so that a pair of passages are provided. 




blade so that the scaling blade is cons^ntly washed during 
the scaling operation. 



3,667,087 
FEEDING OF FIBROUS MATERIALS TO TEXTILE 
CARDS 
John Daldn, Rotndrit, and Join George CampiwII, 
den, Accrli^toB, both of Fjigland, aarignon to T. M. M. 
(Rcacaivh) Limited, OMham, Lancaririre, England 
Filed Oct. 28, 1969, Ser. No. 871359 
InL CL DOlg 15/40 
VS. CL 19—105 8 < 




In a method of feeding flbrous material to a plurality of 
textile cards, the rate of feed of the flbrous material from a 
common feed means is automatically changed in response to 
a change in the production rate of one or more of the cards 
by an amount equal to or substantially equal to the change in 
production rate of the one or more 'cards. The automatic 
changing of the rate of feed of the fibrous material is con- 
trolled by control means responsive to the stopping or reduc- 
tion in speed of a card and to the bringing of the card from 
the stopped or slow speed condition to iwrmal operating 
speed. 



3,667,088 

SLIDE HOLDER METHOD AND APPARATUS 

Frank David Kurtz, 398 Five Points Road, Honeoyc Falh, 

N.Y. 

Filed Oct 29, 1970, Scr. No. 85,000 
Int a. A44b 21/00; G02b 21/34 
VS. CL 24—81 PC 1 



A method and apparatus for holding together a slide as- 
sembly composed of a slide, a slide preparation on a top sur- 
face thereof, and a cover slip overiying the slide preparation. 
The preferred slide holder of the present invention employs a 
base, a slide support mounted thereon, and a plurality of 
spring arms mounted on the base and biased toward the sbde 
support In operation, a spring arm is manually lifted up, a 



12 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



1. 



June 6, 1972 



slide assembly is placed between the raised spring arm and paratus wherein the crimped yam is passed between a plate 
the sling support, and then the spring arm is allowed to come and a rotataUe roil which are mounted so as to exeft a sub- 




down on top of the cover slip, firmly holding the slide as- 
sembly together. 



3,667,089 
SLIDE FASTENER 

luuM PoFcpp, AiB llcfeocrg, nranfsii/BoociiMC, GcniMUiy 

OrifiBal appHcatton Oct. 27, 1966, Scr. No. 590,080, now 
Patent No. 3,461,486, dated Ang. 19, 1969. Divided and this 

application Feb. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 813,360 
Claims priority, appUcation Germany, Nov. 4, 1965, P 12 80 

609.6 

Int. CI. A44b 19/12 

VS. CL 24— 20S.13 C 2 CUnw 



'( * 




w 5 ;< < M O 7 



^ 



3,667,090 

APPARATUS FOR DEPHASING TEXTURED YARN 

Charles P. Maaioac, Dover, N J., aHignor to J. P. Stevens & 

Co., Inc., New Yorit, N.Y. 

CoirtiBaatioa-in.pai1 of appHcatioa Ser. No. 57,737, July 23, 

1970, Original appHcadoa Mar. 27, 1968, Scr. No. 716,533, 

■ow Patent No. 3,546,744, dated Dec 15, 1970. Divided and 

this application Sept. 9, 1970, Scr.^o. 70,776 

Iat.CLD01bJ/M 

U.S.CL28— ICF 7ClainM 

This inventicn relates to dephasing multifilament single 

end crimped yam. The dephasing is carried/>ut in an ap- 



t 






stantially constant pressure on 4aid yam regardless of varia- 
tions in yam thickness. 



3,667,091 
TEXTILE WARPING DEVICES 
Robert Later, Toorcoing, France, aaripinr to Sodde 
Anonyme DIte FtahliBirnifnH Comard & Cie, Tourooiag, 
France 

I FUed Apr. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 32,935 
I InL a. D02h 5100 

U.S. CL 28— 32 



>ClainH 



■L 



Each half of a slide fastener having two halves adapted to 
be sewn onto a carrier ribbon has a plastic thread formed 
into a series of helical loops defining convolution portions. 
Each convolution portion is flattened only in a limited region 
of each loop that overlaps a loop in the other half of the slide 
fastener and to a width substantially twice the diameter of 
the thread. These flattened regions form coupling surfaces 
which serve to inter-engage with the coupling surfaces 
formed in the other half of the slide fastener. The flattened 
regions are sharply kinked and the convolution portions ad- 
jacent- the flattened regions only are disposed in superposed 
relation Contacting each other and merged opposite to the 
flattened surfaces into oppositely directed, exposed, smooth 
return bend portions. 






1^ 



36 41 



:-l 



r ^ 



The invention relates to textile warping devices for winding 
yams on to warp beams, suitable for use on weaving looms or 
on dyeing equipment in which the warp beam is driven by 
means of flexible drive means such as V-bclts of robber or 
the like, and in which the necessary movements are imparted 
to the mechanism exclusively by means of pneumatic devices 
which may be used for causing engagement of slide head 
members with the warp beam, the control of a presser roller, 
the control of a braking means and the operation of a comb. 
A warp beam may be fitted into the warping device by caus- 
ing it to run up a ramp to bring spindles on the warp beam 
nearly into alignment with apertures in the slide head mem- 
bers which are then moved towards one another giving a 
slight further lift to the warp beam and bringing it clear of 
the ramps. 



MllUken 



13,667,092 
YARN PACKAGE WINDER 
Walter Engds, Tryon, N.C., aaig^ior to Deering 
Rcaearch Corporatiom Spartanburg, S.C. 

I FUed June 22, 1970, Scr. No. 48,039 
' Int. CL B65ii 54100, 54176 

U.S. CL 28—21 1^1 Clafana 

Yam winding apparatus including a yam supply, h>tauble 
yam delivery means, means for conveying yam from the 



i 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



18 



supply to the delivery means. roUUble yam collecting means 
including a supporting base and a central core, the yam 




delivery means including a reference surface against which 
the core bears at the beginning of the winding cycle. 



3,667,093 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CLEANING A 

TEXTILE CREEL AND WINMNG APPARATUS 

Clifford Calpcppcr, Jr., 1401 FcmcHff Road, CharloCte, N.C. 

FBed Jan. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 161 

Int a. DO^Ij 7/00, B65h 49100 

U.S. CL 28—553 16 Claintt 




An apparatus and method for removing waste material, 
such as lint and the like, from textile apparatus such as a yam 
package supporting creel and a beam winding means spaced 
from the creel, which waste material is generated by the un- 
winding of a plurality of ends of yam from packages in the 
creel, advancing of the yam to the winding apparatus and re- 
winding of the yam into a composite package and is normally 
moved toward the winding apparatus by the advancement of 
yam, and wherein air is induced to flow about the textile ap- 
paratus and through a waste material collecting means with 
the air being directed to pass through the creel toward the 
winding means to impart additional impetus to the waste 
material being moved by advancement of the yam and 
thereby ensure continued conveyance of waste material to 
the collecting means. 



3.667,094 

METHOD FOR HEAT-SETTING OF CRIMPS OF 

ARTinCIAL nLAMENT TOWS 

MasaUde Yaaawa, Toyko, Japan, aarignor to 

Proccasiag Research lastitiite Ltd., Tokyo, J^mhi 

Filed May 27, 1970, Ser. No. 40,795 

Int. CL D02g 1112 

VS. CL 28-72.14 5 Clain« 




The present invention provides a method of producing ex- 
cellent crimped fibers, in which artificial fibers are subjected 
to mechanical crimping, enveloped in a crimped sute in a 
wrapping under tension, and are passed through a high tem- 
perature pressurized saturated steam chamber at the anneal- 
ing temperatiu« of the fibers. The crimps are permanently 
fixed by the effect of moisture and heat under a lateral pres- 
sure. The resulting fibers, when made into an end product, 
have a high degree of crimp recovery upon reheating in the 
finishing process, even if the crimps have been straightened 
by processing in air before finishing operaticm. 



3,667,095 
APPARATUS FOR COATING SURFACES AND CURING 
THE SAME AT HIGH SPEEDS 
Arthur E. Ostrowsld, AMp, and Raffaele Basfle, CMc^o, 
both of m., ass ig n o r s to Allied Tube & Conduit Corpora- 
tion, Harvey, lU. 

Filed Dec. 17, 1969, Scr. No. 885^24 

Int a. B23p 35100; 1123k 31102 

VS. CL 29-33 D 5 ciafans 



Fkom 

OMV AMI tins 
4mo Obmmw 


'? 






^ 






/ 




ty ' 


SIXIUO 




PAmj«» 




^'-r «"-« 


-», 






/*■ 








.1Z 








CUT OFF 




cor...... 


. . 1 















/> 



\ 



A machine for galvanizing' and coating of steel tubing 
operating continuously to achieve high rates of production is 
provided with means for applying a protective film to a tube 
formed from strip steel and coated with zinc and includes 
means for removing the solvent from the film material and 
curing the material after the coating has been applied. The 
means includes a multistage heating apparatus to sequentially 
remove the solvent and cure the material. 



toSandvikcH 



3,667,096 
ROLL DEVICE 

Kwt G. Edsmar, Hnddfaige, Sweden, 

Jemvcrks Akticbolag, Sandviken, Sweden 
Continuation of appllcalhw Scr. No. 760,459, Sept 18, 1968, 
now abandoned. This appikation Nov. 4, 1970, Scr. Na. 

87,008 
Claims priority, appUcation Sweden, Sept 18, 1967, 12795/67 

IntCLB21biy/0« 
U.S. CL 29—125 5 n^t-T 

A roll, for rolling metals or for grinding, comprises ( 1 ) a 
roll ring formed of a metal carbide, on (2) a metallic holder 



14 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



or support means, which latter means consists essentially in a 
flanged sleeve, on which the roll ring is disposed, with one 
side face of the same abutting against a peripheral part of the 
flange of the sleeve, and a co-operating flanged muff 
threaded onto the sleeve and having a peripheral part 



change of this diameter is accomplished by changmg of the 
dies for the production of an outer blank diameter and for 
drawing the flange to a determined outer diameter. These 
bearing have inner and outer members which are of sheet 
metal and after assembly the bearings may b<» case hardened. 



« M 







HE 



's: 



-a 




'^^•^■^'^^■^ 



3^7,098 , 

MKTHOD OF MANUFACTURING ORNAMENTAL 
ELEMENT 
EUeier Levy, Bay Shore. N.Y.. mmigaor to FlUgree Aria Inc.. 

New York, N.Y. ^ 

1 Filed July 24, 1969. Ser. No. 844.518 
I Int a. B21f 43/00; B23p 13/00 

U.S. CI. 29-160.6 V li6 Claim. 



abutting against the other side face of the roll ring. Said 
flanges are so profiled as to leave annular slits on either side 
of the roll ring, in which slits there is provided a suitable ad- 
hesive substance "glueing" the roll ring to the flanges of the 
support means. ^ 




3.667.097 
METHOD FOR MAKING A BALL BEARING 
Albert G. Gcrmana. North Caldwell. N J., asrignor to G & H 
Mechanical Laboratory. Inc.. Township of Wayne. Pasu^c 
County, N J. 

Origiiial appHcadon Nov. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 86,772. now 

Patent No. 3,633.982. dated Jan. 1 1, 1972. Divided and this 

appHcatloa Nov. 9. 1971, Ser. No. 197.085 

Int CI. B23p / 1/00; F16c 19/02 

UA CI. 29-148.4 A 9cialms 




An ornamental element for use as a decorative addition to 
jewelry comprises a strip of material having a plurality of 
parts integrally formed from the material, each of the parts 
having a surface exposed at the periphery of the strip. The 
surface of each part is characterized by a first portion of a 
given configuration and a second portion of different con- 
figuration. The second portions of the parts are randomly 
positioned about the axis of the integral strip to effect an ir- 
regular but attractive profile. The method of manufacturing 
the element comprises providing a strip of material having a 
plurality of parts proximately and adjacently arranged along 
the axis of the strip, compressing the parts to alter the con- 
figuration thereof and twisting the strip to rotatably position 
the altered portions randomly at different locations about the 
axis of the strip. In the most preferred embodiment, a plurali- 
ty of strands of metallic material such as gold are combined 
so as to provide a spirally wound strand extending axially on 
a core strand. The strip is then flattened, as by passing it 
between a pair of rollers. The flattened strip is then twisted 
until the flattened portions are randomly positioned about 
the axis of the strip. ' 



« 44 



There is disclosed a method for manufacturing a ball bear- 
ing in which the inner race members are made of sheet metal 
so as to provide a precision bearing of very low cost. The 
sheet meul ball bearing of this invention is contemplated to 
be made with three different styles of internal inner race 
members disposed to be atUched to or used with office furni- 
ture, home appliances, conveyors, automotive devices and 
the like by three different means. Attachment of the bearings 
may be by spot welding, staking, spinning, bolting, riveting, 
in press fit seats and other conventional means. These ball 
bearings are commonly designated as unground cageless 
bearings wherein the balls are arranged in the raceway with 
the balls in substantially tangential circumferential engage- 
ment with each other so as to provide a bearing having a 
determined amount of play after the bearing is assembled. 
The manufacture of the ball bearings is with an "in line" as- 
sembly system or by a rotary table system. In either system 
the bearing components are carrier through several stations 
for assembly to a determined configuration. These bearings 
are contemplated as having an outer flange drawn to a deter- 
mined diameter which is merely a matter of selection. Size 



! 3.667.099 

MEnOD OF SECURING DENSE. METAL-BONDED 

REFHaCTORY NITRIDE BODIES TO STEEL AND 

PRODUCT 

Aton B. Palmer, WUmington. Del., assignor to E. I. du Pont de 

Nemours and Compuiy, Wilmington, Dd. | 

Original application Mar. 5, 1968, Ser. No. 710,620. Divided 
and this appU^ation July 31, 1970, Ser. No. 64,937 
/<lnt. a. B23p 3/20, 3/26 
U.S. a. 29-191 \ 13lCl.lm» 




Dense, metal-bonded refractory nitride elements such as 
cutting edges are secured to metal supports such as steel tool 
shanks by metallurgically bonding between the two materials 
a dense, cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide connecting element 
having an expansion coefficient approximating that of the 
nitride element. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



is 



3,667,100 

METHOD OF MANUFACTURING COMPOSITE WIRE 

PRODUCTS HAVING A TUNGSTEN CORE AND A 

MAGNETIC COVERING 

Michel Marchal, Palaiseau, and Jean Bouygues, Fontenay-Aux- 
Roscs, both of France, assignors to Compagnie Francaise 
Thomapn Houston-Hotchkiss Brandt, Paris, France 

Filed Mar. 25, 1969, Ser. No. 811.281 
IbL CL Glib 5/66; B44d 1/16, 1/06; C23c 11/08, 11/02 

VS. CL 29—195 10 CMam 



3^7,102 
APPARATUS FOR APPLYING INSULATING HOUSINGS 

TO ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS 
Gilbert AuguMe GwlBrmrtte, and MIcild Jean IMonne. bodi 
of Val D'OIm. France, aaiitnnii to AMP Incsrporatod, 
Harrhburg, Pa. 

FDmI July 7, 1970, Ser. No. 52.907 
Clalma priority, appMcalkw i F^wioe. July 11, 1969, 6923903 

Int. CL H05k 13/00 
U.S.CL29— 203 6< 



. N»_ , ^ Hl+CMsSicIs re(Co)S»ni(Co)4tHe 



SILICON 
CARBIDE 
«M-1500»C 'MtLTOFAL 



APPIY COttWICTIVt APPLY NICKEL* 
COATINC FROM IRON K. 



170-250*0 



ff /S /£■ 
-^ a/ /■?& 




\. I 



/7 



/^ 



2£>a. """"" 






/^ 



A tungsten wire core is covered with a sheath of silicon 
carbide, over which a conductive metal coating is applied 
such as aluminum, nickel or the like which wets, but does not 
chemically react with the silicon carbide; a magnetic nickel- 
iron compound is then applied over the metal coating, the 
metal coating providing a good conductive surface beneath 
the magnetic cover. The resultant composite wire core has an 
average tensile strength of 220 kg/mm* and a modulus of 
elasticity of 40.000 kg/mm*. 



3,667,101 
IMPROVED CONNECTORS AND GUIDE MEANS FOR 
ELECTRICAL HARNESS MAKING 
James Albert Kloth, St. Petersburg, Fla., amlgnor to AMP In- 
corporated, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Filed Apr. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 27^85 

Int. CI. HOlr 

U.S. CI. 29-203 HC 8 Claims 



An apparatus for applying insulating housings to electrical 
connectors comprises first means for releasably retaining an 
insulating housing; second means for releasably retaining an 
electrical connector for insertion and retention in the hous- 
ing; and third means for effecting relative reciprocal move- 
ment between the first means and the second means towards 
and away from each other, the connector being inserted into 
the housing as the first means and the second means move 
towards each other, and being retained in the housing and 
released from the second means as the first means and the 
second means move away fix>m each other. 



3,667,103 

APPARATUS FOR INSERTING TERMINALS IN AN 

APERTURED PLATE 

Edwyn H. Petree, Burlington. NX^.. aiwignnr to The United 

States of America as reprcaented by the Secretary of the 

Army 

Filed July 21. 1970. Ser. No. 56.867 
InL CL H05k 13/04 
U.S. CL 29—203 V 2 ' 





Electrical harness is manufactured by positioning connec- 
tor housings in back-to-back relationship, inserting wires 
through the aligned cavities in the housings until the housings 
are on an intermediate portion of the wires, applying electri- 
cal terminals to the ends of the wires, and moving the hous- 
ings axially along the wires until the terminals are contained 
in the cavities. In accordance with alternative embodiment, 
the wires are inserted through cavities in a separate guide 
member prior to application of terminals and insertion of ter- 
minals into housing cavities. Guide is removed from wires 
after insertion of wires into housing cavities. 



An apparatus for inserting terming into a logic plate hav- 
ing a grid of apertures to enclose the terminals including a 
screen adjacent the lower side of the plate to prevent the ter- 
minals from falling through the plate. The plate and screen 
are supported on a frame that is connected to a means for 
vibrating the frame. A means is connected beneath the 
screen for causinjg a greater atmospheric pressure above the 
plate than below it. As the frame is rapidly vibrated with suf- 
ficient amfriitude to cause the terminals to stand on their 
ends, a vacuum means is applied beneath the plate to assist in 
drawing the terminals into the apertures. 



16 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,667,104 

POSITION LOCATING APPARATUS EMPLOYING 

MULTIFLE PROJECTING LAMPS 

GMTfle W. ChanHMTd, EaM BridfewaMr, and David M. Win. 

■or, North Attdboro, both of MaH^ aMltnoii to Teradyne, 

fa^^ BoftoB, Mav. 

FHed July 2, 1970, Scr. No. 51342 

lat. a. H05k 13104; B23q 1 7/00 

VS, CL 29—203 B 6 Oaiim 




progressively inserting a strip of material into a slot. The 
groove is defined by lateraUy spaced gripping surfiK^es on the 
jaw memben, which surfaces are tapered rearwanOy of the 
apparatus in a converging relation and a pair of downwardly 
inclined surfaces extending inwardly of the respective 
gripping surfaces. Anti-friction rollers can be provided on the 
jaw members to facilitate relative movement between the jaw 
members and the strip. At least one insert wheel is joumaled 
on the rearward portion of the apparatus to insert the strip to 
the desired depth. An actuator connected to the jaw mem- 
bers moves the jaw members alternately in an axial direction 
along the strip. A vibrator is mounted on the jaw members 
below the actuator for facilitating insertion of the strip. 
Passages formed in the jaw members direct a lubricant-adhe- 
sive to the sides of the strip prior to insertion thereof. 



Position-locating apparatus projects light from an array of 
lamp devices onto one or more selected locations on a sup- 
port member to indicate automatically that a cor- 
respondingly-selected device is to be positioned at each illu- 
minated location, typically for assembly onto the support 
member. The designation of the selected device lights a 
selected lamp element of the array for illuminating each posi- 
tion through an optical mask. Each lamp projects light over 
an area on the support member that partially overiaps the 
area which one or more other lamp elements can illuminate, 
but only a single lamp illuminates windows in a single unique 
portion of the mask. 



4^ 3,667,105 

STRIP INSERTING APPARATUS ' ^ 

JaoMS F. Sharpc, Buffalo, N.Y., assignor to Acme Highway 
Products CorporatloB, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Filed May 26, 1970, Scr. No. 40,570 

InL CL B23p 19/02; EOlc 23/02 

VS. CL 29—235 16 Clahm 



»« a»->_ as 




t 



■"»^^ »« 



'66 So '^ se « 



<«« 



2»- 







A strip inserting apparatus comprising a pair of elongated 
jaw members extending in a side-by-side relation and con- 
nected together for relative axial movement by a pair of links 
pivotably mounted adjacent opposite ends of the jaw mem- 
bers to form a parallelogram linkage. A longitudinally and 



! to the I 



3,667,106 
COLLAR SALVAGING DEVICE 
George L. HHl, 717 Carby, Houston, Tex. 

Filed July 30, 1969, Scr. No. 856,229 
Int. CL B23p 19/04 
U.S. a. 39—240 



dClafam 



j»-—' 




A toolfor salvagjng collars fix}m pipe having means for 
gripping the collar and rotating the pipe within the collar to 
break the connection and effect removal of the collar 
therefrom, including the novel process of cooling the collar 
while blocks are welded within the pipe and adapting the 
device employed for rotating the pipe to the various sizes of 
pipe. 



3,667,107 

FILLER FOR ROLL- WELD Si RUCTURES 

Raymond H. Anderson, Jr., Santa Ana; Richard A. Rawc, and 

Bennett V. WhHcMM, both of Granada HUls, aU of Cdlf., 

as sl g wys to McDonncO Douglas Corpor a tion 

FUcd Oct 1, 1968, Scr. No. 764,064 
. Int.a.B23p/7/00 
U.S. a. 39-423 2 lOafam 




A roll-welding process for fabricating beryllium roll- 
welded panels where the filler material is an austenitic man- 
ganese or Hadfield steel which can be chemicslly or 
mechanically removed from the structure that has been diffu- 



downwardly tapered groove is provided in the apparatus for sion bonded by the process. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



17 



3,667,106 

METHOD OF MAKING A BERYL LIUM TITANIUM 

COMPOSITE 

Richard Schmidt, McLean, Va., Mrfgnor to The United States 

of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy 

FUcd Apr. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 29,597 

Int. CL B23k 31/02 

U.S. CL 29-480 5 Oakum 




nascent surface which facilitates bonding. Yields are im- 
proved by initially providing a very thin plated coating dl 
silver, copper or nickel, or combinations thereof, on one 
workpiece. 



3,667,111 
PROCESS FOR FLUXING AND BRAZING PARTS MADE 

OF ALUMINIUM OR ALUMINIUM ALLOY 
Andre Chartct, Meudon, France, assigiiiii to Sodctc Anonyme 
Des Usina ChauMon, Asnkrcs, France 

FBed Mar. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 15,601 ^ 

Claims priority, application France, Mar. 5, 1969, 6906106; 
Sept 12,1969,6931230 

Int. CL B23k 31/02, 35/36 
U.S. CL 29—495 6 



A method of making a beryllium reinforced titanium tur- 
bine blade. The method utilizes a preform composed of 
beryllium rods within a titanium structure. The preform is 
formed into intricate blading shapes by isothermal forging 
techniques. 



3,667,109 
VERTICAL BRAZING SYSTEM 
James E. Akcnius, Jackson, Mkh., assignor to Acroquip Cor- 
poration, Jackson, Mich. 

Filed Apr. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 29,909 
lnt.CLB23ki;/02 

7Clatms 



U.S. CL 29—490 







A system for brazing together a fitting and tube while in a 
vertical position. A portion of the interior of the brazing alloy 
reservoir in the fitting is contaminated with a film of material 
such as aluminum before the brazing alloy ring is inserted in 
the reservoir. At the site, the tube is inserted in the fitting to 
which heat is then applied. Since the contaminant prevents 
the melted brazing alloy from adhering to a portion of the 
reservoir interior, the alloy is forced upwardly and 
downwardly into the annular gaps between the tube and 
fitting, into which it continues to be drawn by capillary ac- 
tion. 



3,667,110 
BONMNG METALS WITHOUT BRAZING ALLOYS 
Childress B. Gwyn, Jr., Wcthcrsficld, Coon., Msignor to Con- 
tacts Incorporated, WcthcrsUdd, Conn. 

Filed Nov. 3, 1969, Scr. No. 873,721 
Int. CL B23k 31/02, 35/38 
VS. CL 29-494 18 Claiim 

Excellent bonds between usually-brazed metals are ob- 
tained, without brazing or soldering alloys, by initially oxidiz- 
ing the surfaces to be bonded and then bonding in a reducing 
atmosphere at a temperature below the melting point of 
either metal. If the metals form a eutectic, bonding will be 
carried out above the eutectic temperature. It is believed that 
the oxidation-reduction cycle produces a perfectly clean or 




The process is characterized in that one proceeds to 
prepare a fluxing compound, in that a thin coat of this com- 
pound is deposited on at least those of portions of parts 
requiring to be assemMed, then that after partly melting the 
compound the parts are heated up to brazing temperature. 



3,667,112 
PROCESS FOR MAiONG COUnJNGS OF REDUCED 

SIZE AND CAPABLE Of TRANSMTITING iOGH 
MECHANICAL STRESSES BETWEEN AN ARMORED 
FLEXIBLE MEMBER AND A RIGID ELEMENT 
Andre Chevalier, Pantin; Pierre Grokt, Vfaroflay, and Rem! 
Reynard, Montcswm, all of France, assignors to Instltut 
Francab IXi Pctrolc Des Carburants Et Lubrlllants, Rucfl 
Matanaison (Hants dc Sdne), France 

FUcd Apr. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 25,118 
Clafans priority, application FVwkc, Apr. 3, 1969, 6910365 
Int. a. B21d 39/00; B23p 1 1/02 
U.S. CL 29—508 5 




A process for making a connecting element, made of a 
hard material and provided with a jagged external wall, in- 
tegral with one end of a flexible member having at least one 
armoring consisting of metallic wires, comprising the steps of 
covering said connecting element with an anchoring sleeve 
made of a material of lower hardness than that of the materi- 
al constituting the armoring and said element, laying the ar- 
moring onto said anchoring ring, covering the armoring with 
a compression sleeve of lower hardness than that of the ar- 
moring and drawing the assembly of the connecting element, 
the armoring and said compression ring through a die, 
thereby producing through a great reduction in the diameter 
of said compression ring, a penetration of said armoring into 
said anchoring ring and into said compression ring and at the 
same time an inlaying of the material forming said anchoring 
ring between the jags of said jagged external wall of the con- 
necting element. 



18 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3^7,113 
KNITTING MACHINE NEEDLE BED 
Morrii Philip, 2519 Grand Avcnuk Bronx, N.Y. 
Filed Apr. 17, 1970, ftr. No. 29,47? 
bit CI. B23p 25/00 



VS. CL 29—527.6 



13Cliiim 







A knitting machine needle bed is provided with a hard 
wear surface by removing metal in the areas subjected to 
heavy wear, introducing hard material in such areas, and 
grinding the hardened material down to the proper level. The 
hard material is deposited in particulate, liquid or vapor form 
and becomes substantially integral with the base. If combin- 
ing teeth are to be inserted, the hard material is ground away 
in the appropriate areas, which are then slotted for the inser- 
tion of the combining teeth. 



3,667,114 
TUOL CHANGING AND TRANSFER MECHANISM 
Edwio R. Smith, Seneca Falls, and Conatantinc F. Cafolla, 
Waterloo, both of N.Y., assignors to SFM Corporation, 
Union, N J. 

Filed Oct. 2, 1969, Scr. No. 863,234 

Int CL B23q 3/155 

VS. CL 29—568 10 Claims 




A tool changing and transfer mechanism for use with a 
machine having a tool holding member. A tool storage 
magazine is arranged in spaced relation to the tool holding 
member and adapted to store a plurality of tools in a plurality 
of storage positions. The mechanism includes a tool changer 
comprising a carrier having plural tool engaging devices for 
simultaneously carrying a used tool being returned and a new 
tool to be used. The changer is moved between the storage 
magazine and machine tool holder by controlled drive 
means, and the carrier is moved through a path adjacent the 
magazine storage positions by drive means controlled by 
sensing means movaUe with the carrier and engageable with 
locating stops associated with the storage positions and selec- 
tively actuated by a control circuit including a stepping relay 
and selector switches. The carrier is extended and retracted 
along a first axis for insertion and removal of a tool, rotated 
about a second axis intersecting the first axis for alternative 
Dositioning of the tool engaging devices, and rotated about a 
Uiird to orient it one way for renxiving and replacing tools 
relative to the magazine and another way for removing and 
inserting tools relative to the machine tool holding member. 



t 

S With 
iehman. 



3,667,115 
FABRICATION OF SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES WITH 

CUP-SHAPED REGIONS 
Fred Baraon, Wappinsen Fails, and Herbert S. 
Poughkaeprie, both of N.Y., airignors to Intematloul Bual- 
ncas MacMncs Corporation, Armonii, N.Y. 
Origiaal appMcaHon Jan. 30, 1965, Scr. No. 468,235. now 
Patent No. 3,461^360. DivMed and this application May 12, 
1969, Scr. No. 823,876 
Int CL BOIJ 17/00; HOIg 7i/00 
U.S. CI. 29—571 i Claims 



tNfl 




A method for forming a semiconductor device having a 
substantially cup-shaped region of one conductivity type 
between two regions of opposite conducti^y type to 
preferably form a field effect transistor device. The region 
may be formed through one opening in an insulating layer 
located upon the surface of the device. Two successive diffu- 
sion operations of opposite conductivity types made through 
this same opening in the insulating layer forms the cup- 
shaped region to the desired thickness. 



' 3,667,116 

METHOD OF MANUFACTURING ZENER DIODES 

HAVING IMPROVED CHARACTERISTICS 
Avlo Di Felice, 43 Mount Hood Terrace, Mdroac, Maes. 
Continuation-fai-part of application Scr. No. 539,753, Apr. 4, 
1966, now abandoned. This application May 15, 1969, Scr. 

, No. 825,025 

I Int. a. BOIJ 77/00, HOll 7/00 

VS. a. 29— 574 $ Claims 

A method of manufacturing zener diodes comprising the 
steps of sequentially forming and packaging a plurality of 
diodes, thereafter measuring the knee impedances of the 
diodes and irradiating those which have knee impedances ex- 
ceeding a specified value with a high energy electrpn beam 
approximating the energy levels of beta radiation. 



I, 



ELECTR( 



3,667,117 
tOLUMINESCENT DIODE CONHGURATION 
AND METHOD OF FORMING THE SAME 
Hans J. Kunz, RaMgh, N.C., aarignor to Coming Glaas 
Works, Coming, N.Y. 

FUed Feb. 28, 1969, Ser. No. 803,216 

Int. CI. BOIJ ; 7/00; HOll 7/00 

U.S.CL29— 576 ^^ » (7 Claims 




An electroluminescent diode which includes an elec- 
tromagnetic radiation emitting PN junction formed by diffus- 
ing, into both surfaces of a semiconductor slice of a first con- 
ductivity, a dopant material of opposite type conductivity. 
Contact metallizations are mounted within windows in an in- 
sulating barrier which covers said diode so as to form electri- 
cal contacts engaging both the N and P type areas of the 
diode. An annul^ reflector metallization pad is mounted on 
the surface of the device over the PN junction and spaced 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



19 



from one surface of the semiconductor material by the insu- 
lating coating so as to reflect light out through the surface 
opposite to that on which an anti-reflection coating has been 
placed. 



3,667,118 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FINISHING ELECTRIC 

COILS 
Ghiacppc Camarddla, Via E, Biondi 1, 20154 Milan, Italy 

Filed Apr. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 29,798 
CUfans priority, application Italy, Apr. 26, 1969, 16088 A/69 

Int. CI. HOlf 7/06 
U.S. CL 29-605 9 Claims 



/— 




y 



cut end face of the stranded conductor or between the cut 
end face of the stranded conductor and the end of the ter- 
minal or of the other conductor. During bonding, liquid im- 
pregnant is removed from the interstices between the wires 
of the stranded conductor in the region of a cut end thereof 
by applying vacuum to the stranded conductor. The bonding 
process is preferably a welding process, suitably MIG weld- 
ing, comprising a first stage in which the end of the stranded 
conductor is sealed by a layer of weld metal and a second 
stage in which the connection is completed. 



3,667,120 
APPARATUS FOR REMOVING THE TOPS OF « 
CONTAINERS 
William F. Krist, N106 W20997 Parii HOI Lane. German- 
town, Wis. 

Filed Feb. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 10,259 

Int a. B67b 7/32, 7/38 

U.S. CL 30-15.5 7 Claims 



In a method and apparatus for winding and finishing elec- 
tric coils in which the coils are intermittently advanced by a 
turret through a plurality of working stations including at 
least one winding station and in which the coils remain inter- 
connected by a length of wire extending from the winding 
station to the next station or to all the other working stations, 
the improvement wherein the wire is wrapped around the ter- 
minal lug of the spool in the winding station, and preferably 
simuluneously also in the subsequent station, by engaging 
the mentioned length of wire and rotating same to cause it to 
describe a conical surface which embraces the lug and has its 
apex at the base of the lug. 



3,667,119 
METHOD OF JOINTING AND TERMINATING 
ELECTRIC CABLES 
John Stephen Cleaver, Favcrsham; Peter GuHford, Erith; 
Frederick James Kimiiloii, Bcxleyheath, Kent; ThomM 
John Paget Bccfccnham, Kent, and Norman Richard Stein- 
berg. Dolphin Square, South Wales, all of England, as- 
signors to British Insulated Callcnder's Cables Limited, 
London, England 

Filed Apr. 4, 1969, Scr. No. 813,621 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Apr. 11, 1968, 

17,484/68; June 10, 1968, 27,499/68; 27,500/68; Nov. 11, 
1968, 53371/68; 53,372/68 
Int. CI. HOlr 43/00 
VS. CI. 29-628 R 20 Chdm 




An apparatus for opening metal containers including a cas- 
ing to be supported on the container. A drive shaft, driven 
either through a manual crank or an electric motor, is jour- 
nalled within the casing and carries a drive roller that rides 
against the inner edge of the chime on the container. A slide 
is mounted for lateral movement with resi>ect to the casing 
and a second shaft is joumalled within the slide and carries a 
cutter adapted to engage the outer edge of the chime. The 
second shaft is driven from the first shaft through a gear 
drive. The slide is moved toward the casing to bring the 
cutter into engagement with the chime by a lever arm which 
is pivoted to the casing and acts against the outer end of the 
slide. ^ 




Electric cables having at least one conductor in the form of 
a strand through the interstices of which liquid impregnant 
for the cable dielectric can pass are jointed or terminated by 
forming a heat sink surrounding the end of the stranded con- 
ductor and bonding the stranded conductor to a terminal or 
to another conductor by the application in the molten state 
of an adherent body of metal to substantially the whole of the 



3,667,121 

SAFETY RAZOR 

Fkvnds W. Dorion, Jr., Hingham; Warren L Nisaen, Top- 

sfleld, and Roger L. Perry, LynncfleM Center, aD of Mmb^ 

avignors to The Gillette Company, Boston, Mmb. 

Filed July 10, 1970, Scr. No. 53^80 

Int.CLB26b2//J2 

U.S. CL 30—60 4 r^ ^n , 

A safety razor including a head portion having a cap 
member mounted thereon and adapted to pivot upon one 
end of the razor head, the cap being held and released by a 



20 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 



hook latch means disposed in the razor head. The razor 
further includes a handle portion in which are mounted 




means for adjusting the exposure of the cutting edge of a 
razor blade retained by the head portion. 




I 



3,667,123 
I^NTURE AND METH(N> 



1972 



to 



Elbert P. Huey, ScottMWe, Aiis., 
CoqjMradqo 

FUed July 31, 1970, Scr. No. 59.922 
Int. a. A61c 13100 
UA a. 32—2 



2Claiim 




A prosthetic denture and method of manufacture and self- 
fitting comprising a rigid U-shaped frame bonded into 
notches in bases of a set of artificial teeth; a deformable 
metal mesh forming a plate structure for said set of teeth; a 
soft elastomeric material encapsulating said mesh and bond- 
ing it to said set of teeth to form a deformable plate struc- 
ture, whereby a self-fitting method for installing said set of 
teeth comprises the coating of said plate structure with un- 
cured elastomeric material, then placing said prosthetic 
denture ia a persons oral cavity and deflecting said deforma- 
ble plate structure into a set accurately conforming condition 
with an edentulus ridge in said cavity and allowing said last- 
mentioned elastomeric nuterial to cure in said acc^ately 
conforming condition. ^ 



3,667,122 

SAFETY RAZOR BLADE HOLDER 

Leonard J. Black, Arcadin, Califs aaignor to Padflc Handy 

Cutter, Incorporated, El Monte, CaUf. 
Continuation of application Scr. No. 815,300, Apr. 1 1, 1969, 
now abandoned. This appHcnCion May 12, 1971, Scr. No. 

142,792 

Int. a. B26b 29102 

\}S. Ci. 30—286 9 Claims 



I 



3,667,124 
DENTAL TRAY AND SUPPORT 
Walter P. La Force, Pmfldd, and Gkn A. Wo 

Rocholcr, both ol N.Y., aarignors to Sybron Corportttlon, 
Rochoicr, N.Y. 

j FUed Oct. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 84,975 



Int.CLA61c7//00 



U.S. CL 32—22 



2ClainH 




Discloaed is a dental tray support nKNinted on a single linlc 
member which can be rotated or translated in a horizontal 
plane, the tray support, when not in use, fitting flush with the 
top of aa existing dental cabinet so that the tray support ap- 
pears to be the top of the cabinet. 



I 



to Micro-Mega 



A safety razor blade holder comprising a longitudinally ex- 
tending handle, a threaded stud carried by the handle, a 
guard member slidably mounted on the stud, a lock nut for 
clamping the guard member and handle togetlier. a safety 
razor blade, and means for permitting the guard member to 
be positioned relative to the safety razor blade when such 
blade is in an operative position so as to expose or temporari- 
ly shield the edge of such blade and preventing movement of 
the guard member, even when the lock nut is slightly 
loosened, from allowing the edge of the blade to be exposed 
when such blade is in a second position. 



3,667,125 
DENTAL HANDPIECE 
Michel Scignenrin, Bcsancon, France, 
S.A., Bcsancon, France 

FUed Aug. 29, 1969, Scr. No. 854,140 
Clainu priority, application France, Sept. 19, 1968, 166708 

Int. a. A61c 1108 , 

MS. CL 32—26 t Cialins 

An improved micromotor-driven dental handpiece consists 
of a cylindrical body which includes an inner sleeve and an 
outer sleeve slidingly fitting over the inner sleeve, the two 
sleeves being maintained axially relative to each other. 

A detent slidingly mounted on the outer sleeve releasably 
interconnects it with a gripper-locking sleeve and concur- 
rently actuates a mechanism by means of which the shaft of 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



21 



the handpiece may be intercoupled with the inner sleeve, 
whereupon the locking or releasing of the cutting tool is ef- 




fected by turning the outer and inner sleeve relatively to each 
other. 




A single operating lever^ntrbl for locking and unlocking 
a rotatable head on a dri^ng machine wherein a lock pawl is 
released from engagemrat with the teeth of a ratchet disc. A 
thumb operated lever/extends along the side of the conven- 
tional hand knob and may be operated in one of two ways. 
Upon direct inward movement, the pawl is released only so 
long as the thumb lever is held. In the other mode of opera- 
tion, the thumb lever is locked so that the lock pawl is 
retained out of ratchet disc engagement. 



into the interior mechanism of the caliper and to enable the 
digital counter incorporated to be readily zero-adjusted as 
required. The component parts of the caliper, particulariy of 
the counter mechanism, can be assembled without particular 
skill and the caliper service life is substantially extended with 
reduced maintenance. 



3,667,128 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CONNECTING 
PIPEUNES 
M^BUam A. Morgan, Hourton, Tex., aaifnar to 
Root, lac, Houston, Tex. 

i FBed June 23, 1969, Scr. No. 835,647 
InLCLG01bi/J« 
MS. CL 33-180 R 17 CWim 



> BrowiKA 



3,667,126 
DEVICE FOR LOCKING A ROTATABLE DRAWING 

HEAD 
Otto Wackerfuas, Wilhcfanshavcn, Germany, assignor to 
Franx Kuhlmann KG, Prazisionsmechanik und Maachincn- 
bau, Wilhcfanshavcn, Germany 

FUed Nov. 28, 1969, Scr. No. 880,686 
Clainis priority, application Germany, Nov. 29, 1968, P 18 11 

805J 
"^ Int. Ci. B43I 13108 

U.S. CL 33- 79 R 8 Clainis 




A method and apparatus for determining the spatial rela- 
tionship between a pair of adjacent but separated conduit 
ends, re-establishing the spatial relationship thus determined 
at a remote environment, fashioning a conduit connecting 
segment at the renwte environment and connecting the con- 
duit thus fabricated to the spaced conduit ends. 



3,667,129 

ORTHODONTIST WIRE MARKING DEVICE 

E. Aspd, P.O. Box 251, BonsaD, CaHf. 

FUed Jan. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 6y453 

Int. CL A61c 7100, 19/04 

U.S.CL 33-189 3Clalini 



\ 




X ' 3,667,127 

DIGITAL MICROMETER CALIPER 
Taisukc Tragami, 1-415 SMmoocMai, Shfa^fuku-ku, Tokyo, 
Japan 

FHcd June 4, 1970, Scr. No. 43,478 

Int.CLG01bJ/;« 

U.S. a. 33— 164 R 4Clalna 

This invention is a device for use by orthodontists to mark 
arch wires used in orthodontic work wherein the device em- 
ploy a means for transcribing the measurements made by 
orthodontists onto a wire in a permanent fashion so that the 
orthodontist may then correctly shape and use the marks as 
guides for placement of specific bend, such as loops, or for 
placement of attachments such as hooks on the arch wire 
used in orthodontic work. The device includes a means for 
clamping the unformed wire in position and means for alig- 
ning measurements and impressing permanent markings 
upon the wire in such manner that they may be readily 
Improvements in structure of micrometer calipers of the identified. A cam-like marking device and indicating needle 
digital type, designed to prevent ingress of any foreign matter are worked cooperatively for this purpose. 



\ 




\ 



22 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,667,130 
LIQUID REMOVING APPARATUS AND METHOD 
Robert R. Candor, 5940 Munacr RomI, Miami Towmiiip, 
Oido, aad Janes T. Caiidor>,5440 Cyntliia Lane, Waeiiln«- 
toB TowHhip, Ohio 
Coadnvatioii-iB-part of applicatioB Scr. No. 696,639, Jan. 9, 
1968, wiiicli ii a contfnuadoa-in-pirt of appttcatkm Scr. No. 
639,354, May 18, 1967, now Patent No. 3,405,452, wliicli ii a 
continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 532,266, Mar. 7, 
1966, now Patent No. 3,330,136, wliidi is a continuation-in- 
part of application Ser. No. 219,587, Aug. 27, 1962, now 
Patent No. 3,238,750, and a continuatloB-in-part of 748,298, 
July 29, 1968, and 769,155, Oct. 21, 1968, and 807,539, 

Mar. 17, 1969. This application July 7, 1969, Scr. No. 
842,807. The portion of the term of the patent subsequent 
to Oct 15, 1985, has been disclaimed. 

Int. CI. BOlk 5100 
U.S.CI.34-1 22Clahns 



chamber where atomization and flash-drying takes place 
whereby vapors from the downstack are used to break any 




\ 



This disclosure relates to a laundry apparatus, paper mak- 
ing apparatus or the like wherein the moisture or liquid in the 
wet laundry, food materials, paper slurry or the like, disposed 
therein is renwved by an electrostatic means that provides a 
dififerential in the potential of the moisture in the laundry, 
food materials, paper slurry or the like and an electrode 
means for the moisture to tend to cause the moisture to leave 
the laundry, food materials, paper slurry or the like and move 
toward the electrode means. Such electrode means can com- 
prise a suction nozzle which tends to draw a large volume of 
air through the laundry, food materials, paper sliury or the 
like adjacent thereto to also tend to direct the moisture from 
the laundry, food materials, paper slurry or the like toward 
the electrode means. 




'^O 



vacuum in the inlet chamber and may also be used as a tem- 
pering means to avoid case hardening of the particles. 



WEB 



IN 



I 3,667,132 

WEB DIUER AND METHOD OF TREATING A 
COmiNUOUS SHEET PRINTING MACHINES 
William C. Herbert, Jr., NOD Neck,N.Y., ■ssigimr to Herbert 
Products, Inc., Wcatbury, N.Y. 

Filed July 13, 1970, Ser. No. 54,451 
) Int. CL F26b 7100; F27b 9128 

U.S.a. 34— 18 ---. 15Clainis 



3,667,131 
FLUID ENERGY DRYING MILL 
NicholM N. Stephanoff, Havcrford, Pa., asrignor to Ruid 
Energy Proccaiing & EquipnMnt Conp^y, Hatfield, Pa. 
Filed June 8, 1970, Ser. No. 44,152 
Int.CLF26bi/0« 
UA CL 34—10 I 4 ClabnB 

*A fluid energy drying mill wherein the material to be dried 
is a liquid slurry of solid particles or of solids in solution. The 
slurry, upon being fed into the mill is immediately atomized 
and flash-dried, the atomization being accomplished by high 
pressure, high velocity gaseous fluid jets, while the flash-dry- 
ing is effected by very hot, low pressure, gaseous fluid jets. 
The hot gaseous fluid jets comprise a plurality of gaseous 
fluid streams which enter from at least four different sides 
surrounding the feed inlet and converge at a focal point 
downstream of the inlet whereby the hot gaseous fluid both 
encompasses the fed material and concentrates its heat ener- 
gy in the path of the fed material. The fladi-dried particles 
are then centrifugally passed through the curved portion of 
the mill and centrifugally exhausted from the mill during 
their passage. Optionally, by-pass ducts may be provided 
between the downstack portion of the mill and the inlet 




A web drier positionable between either the upper or 
lower runs of the relatively spaced web treating units of con- 
tinuous sheet printing machines with the web drier having 
web heaters to dry the web and air appliers to break solvent 
laden fumes free of the web while air withdrawal means 
withdraw the applied air, and a method of treating the web to 
dry the same. 



:ement 



I " 3,667,133 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR COOLING CI 

CLINKER 
Roland L. Lincoln, Macungic, Pa., assignor to Fuiltr Com- 
pany 

I Filed Apr. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 26,9 
I Int. CI. F26b 5100 

U.S.CI.34— 20 li Claims 

A method and apparatus for cooling cement clinker which 
includes a conventional clinker cooler wherein clinker to be 
cooled is supported on a grate and moved from a kiln 
through the cooler and cooling air is blown through and 
around the clinker. The air is heated and entrains solids from 



■1 

11 < 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



28 



the hot clinker. Some of the hot air is returned to the kiln 
and the rest of it is directed to a dust collector and then to an 
air cooler. From the air cooler, the air is recirculated to be 
blown through a new supply of hot clinker. The cooler is a 
tank having a plurality of gas tubes therethrough with water 



J; r^-j 




5^ 



filling the tank and surrounding the tubes. The disclosure 
also sets forth that hot air may leave the clinker cooler, go 
directly to the air cooler and then to a conventional bag filter 
where clean air is exhausted to atmosphere. In this instance, 
ambient air is blown through the hot clinker. 



3,667,134 

STERILIZING HAND DRYER 

Thomas Rockson, 1920 RdbroMl Avenue, Holbrook, N.Y. 

Filed Sept. 14, 1970, Ser. No. 71,985 

Int. CL F26b 19100 

U.S. CL 34—60 9 daloM 




An electrical hand dryer apparatus for sterilizing the user's 
hands, having a closed compartment and including a blower 
for recirculating a volume of air past a chamber in which the 
user inserts his hands. The drying apparatus includes ger- 
micidal lamps for sterilizing the air and a means for heating 
the air while it is being recirculated. The apparatus also in- 
cludes moisture absorbing rods for drying the air. 



3,667,135 
VIBRATORY CONVEYOR SYSTEM 
Lome A. RowcU, l.nfhinr, Quebec, Cannda, aaignor to John 
T. Horton, HinsdA, Dl. 

Continuation-in-part of applcation Ser. No. 9,102, Feb. 9, 

1970, which Is a continuatioa of application Ser. No. 772,944, 

Nov. 24, 1968, now abandoned. This application Dec 24, 

1970, Ser. No. 101^43 

Int. CL F26b 13110 

U.S.C1. 34— 92 7Clainu 




A vibratory conveyor system for use in the treatment of 
material as it is being conveyed (e.g., freeze dried), such 
system being in the form of a fiame composed of condiiit 
means for heat exchange medium and superposed vibratory 
conveying decks having conduit means for the heat exchange 
fluid below the surface thereof. In a specific system, four su- 
perposed conveying decks are mount^ on springs and driven 
from a common drive shaft via eccentrics and rockers so that 
the vertical and horizontal forces cancel each other, the 
decks having coils to conduct cooling (or heating) fluid and 
the longitudinal members of the supporting frame being tu- 
bular to receive the same fluid so that they will change 
lengths as the decks change length in response to tempera- 
ture changes. 



3,667,136 
SOUND REPRODUCING EDUCATIONAL TOY BANK 
Karen B. Goodkind, Los Angeks; Brett B. Hamilton, 
Calabasas; Ake L. Larsson, Rcdondo Beach, and Jimmie L. 
Whittington, Manhattan Beach, aD of CaUf., assignors to 
Mattel, Inc., Hawthorne, CaHf. 
Continuation-in-part of application Scr. No. 783,952, Dec. 16, 
1968. This application Mar. 8, 1971, Scr. No. 122,069 
Int. CL G09b 19100 
MS. CL 35—8 A 10 Clafam 



^ 




'SKjt 



^/ 



A toy bank capable of responding to the insertion of a coin 
of any one of four denominations, including I9, 5^, lOy arS 
25f in any one of four coin slots to reproduce any one 



^ 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 

I 



\ 



June 6, ,1972 



' ' of 1 6 unique sayings which is a function of the slot in which 
the coin is inserted and the coin's denomination. A 17th say- 
ing is reproducible whenever a coin it not inserted in any of 
the slots. 



3,667,137 

APPARATUS FOR TEACHING ELECTRICAL CONCEPTS U A O. 3S— 38 
FkwU( J. Mnyfdd, 300 Nortk Street, Grccawkh, Conn. 
Filed Apr. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 25.734 
fait.CLG09b2J//5 
U.S. CL 35- 19 A 5 Clafam 



3,667,139 

METHOD OF WRITING FOR C<»fMUNICATING WFTH 
THI VISUALLY HANDICAPPED AND PAPER 
THEREFOR 
Ruth L. Bvr, 53 WcbMcr Acres, Wclistcr Groves, Mo. 
I Filed Sciit. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 71^30 



Int. a. G09b 21100 




16 Claims 




A method of teaching electrical concepts such as voltage, 
current and resistance by the use of an analogous mechanical 
model is disclosed in which potential is simulated* by releas- 
ing a ball from an elevated position, and electron conduction 
is simulated by the arrangement of a plurality of abutting 
balls on a track that are contacted by the released ball. 



Marking a polyethylene paper overlaying a hard surface 
with an ordinary eMra size ball point pen or dull pencil em- 
bosses characters on the upper side of the paper. These 
raised characters may be read factually by the visually han- 
dicapped, including the blind. The characters can also be 
read visually. The embossing effect is enhanced by rubbing a 
finger over the area marked. A paper embossed with equally 
spaced parallel lines facilitates the method. ......,,^^ 



3^7,138 
SPEECH TRAINING APPARATUS AND METHOD OF 
TEACHING THEREWITH 
Ronald S. CoIwb, MiwMiliae, Wis., sisJ innr to 
Controli, Inc., NOhmiilice, Wit. 

FBcd June 29, 1970, Scr. No. 50,747 
Ial.CLG09b5/M 
UA CL 35—35 C 14 



3,667,140 

PROTECTIVE FOOTGEAR FOR KARATE 

PARTICIPANTS 

Roy E. Honderford, 120 CJu-ktiaiif n, Houston, Tex. 

Filed Sept. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 76,559 

Int a. A43b 7//0; A61f 5100 



MS. CL 36—4 




6Clidim 




A housing has an upper dome illuminated by a lamp. A 
pair of permanent magnet cone speakers are mounted in the 
opposite sidewalls of the housing and connected in series 
across the input to a preamplifier. An amplifier connects the 
sound related output signal to the input of a power transistor 
connected in series with the lamp to a regulated DC supply. 
The speakers, housing and amplifier establish a response 
range from 250 to 4,000 HerU to reject voiceless sounds. A 
potentiometer connects the supply directly to the input of the 
power transistor for preheating of the lamp and controlling 
the response. A delay switch connects and disconnects a re- 
sistor in the base circuit of the transistor to vary the timing 
and cutoff of the lamp. 



As a representative embodiment of the invention ditclosed 
here, a boot or shoe is provided with protective pads around 
and under the heel, under the toe, and on the outward side of 
the shoe. Another pad is placed over the instep and adapted 
to exten^ upwardly therefrom to protect the shin of the 
wearer. 



\ 



3,667,141 
SHOE CLEAT 
Samnd H. White, 20137 Sherwood Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
FUed Oct. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 81,278 I 
Int. CL A43c 15100 ! 

\i&. CL 36—67 B 9 Clafans 

An inexpensive sheet metal cleat for golf shoes or the like 
is formed by stamping from a strip of metal, such as alu- 



\ 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



85 



minum, and has a body section with a roughened or toothed 
surface that it attached to the bottom of a shoe and cleats in- 




tegral with the body section extending in a direction opposite 
to the roughened surface. 



3,667,142 
COMPRESSION PAD OF KNITTED ELASTIC 
Alfred M. Goodloc, dcccMcd, iMe of WcttUdd, NJ., and by 
Edith JamiMMi Goodloc. executrix, 105 Duncan Hia Road, 
Wcitficid, N J. 

FBed Feb. 27, 1970. Scr. No. 15,030 

Int. CL D06f 71136 

U.S.a.38— 66 26Clalnw 



3,667,144 
SCHEDULE DISPLAY DEVICE 



Edward E. Draltc Tlriim Olda., 
Tulsa, OUa. 

filed Dec 15, 1969, Scr. No. 884,915 
InLCLG09f 7//29 
U.S. CL 40—82 



to LVO Cable, Inc., 





This invention relates to a schedule display device. More 
particularly, the invention relates to a device for displaying a 
schedule, such as a television program schedule, printed on a 
strip of rolled paper, the device including a bousing having a 
window, means within the housing for rotatably supporting 
the roll of paper, a iKMizontal drive roller supported in the 
housing adjacent the window, means of rotating the drive 
roller, and means of contacting the paper with the drive 



A resilient body for use under compressive conditions 
comprising knitted material knit fiwn rubber (or other roUer for advancing the paper past the window. 

elastic material) thread-like strands, the said body being of .^^_.^__ 

sufficient thickness to permit considerable travel of com- 
pressing objects into the resilient body. The said resilient 
body is used as a laundry pad on commercial presses in 
laundry and cleaning establishments; as a shock mount, 
vibration damper, vibration isolator, or a cushion or packag- 
ing pad, and as a component dt automobile or other tires. 



3,667.145 
COLOR AND MOTION ANIMATIONS FCHl 

TRANSPARENCIES 
Wright, 6115 North Lake Drive Court, MOwMikce, 



3,667,143 

FEEDING OF MACHINES 
Roger Smith Hal, Thirtk, England, aaslgnor to Baker PferkiM 
Jaxons Limited, Glasgow, Scotland 

FUed May 26, 1970, Scr. No. 40,602 

Int. CLD06f 67/04 

U.S. CL 38—143 7 dainv 



John S 
Wb. 

FUed Sept. 23, 1969, Scr. No. 860,356 
Int. CL G09f 13134 
^^M&. CL 40—106.53 



13 




6ME 



7 




The invention comprises a method of, and apparatus for, 
feeding sheets to a machine. A sheet has one edge secured 
temporarily to a cylinder after such edge has been placed 
under tension and such edge is carried down by the cylinder 
and released onto an endless conveyor which feeds the sheet 
to the machine. The sheet edge is preferably secured by suc- 
tion through openings in the cylinder wall and tensioned by 
at least one gripping means adapted to have linear movement 
parallel with the cylinder axis. 




For use on an overhead projector to give an illusion of mo- 
tion, a transparency sheet bearing art work in the form of a 
grid is superposed on a relatively movable transparency sheet 
or web bearing a second or control grid. The lines or groups 
of lines of the art work grid and the second grid are parallel 
and both are at an angle to the directicm of relative motion. 
On either sheet the lines may be of any appropriate color and 
may be made up of rows of dots. Dots of dUfering color in 
rows at different angles may be used. On either sheet, but not 
both, the lines are desirably arcuate and drawn on like radii 
about centers successively ofhet on a line parallel to the 
direction of relative movement, such arcuate lines being tan- 



/ 



26 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



gent to a construction line at the desired 45° angle to the 
direction of motion. On both sheets, the width or apparent 
width of respective lines is substantially identical with the 
width or apparent width of intervening spaces between the 
lines. 



3,667,146 
DEVICE FOR RAPIDLY LOADING A REMOVABLE 
CYLINDER 
Jean Dvpoay, 258, Rue de StaUagrad 93, Drancy, France 

FDcd May 18, 1970, Scr. No. 38,055 
Clainu priority, applicatkM France, May 21, 1969, 6916476 

lot. Ci. F42b 39104 
MS. CI. 42-89 5 Claims 




^^^ 3,667,147 
RISING BLOCK RIFLE AND FEED MECHANISM 
THEREFOR 
Morris Goldin, Oranfe, and Leonard W. Price, Marina Dd 
Rcy, both of Calif., aasignors to The United States of Amer- 
ica as r ep r esen ted by tiie Secretary of tlie Army 
FOcd Jan. 22, 1970, Ser. No. 5,002 
Int. CL F41c 13100, 11104; F41d 9100 
U.S.CL42— 15 llClainK 




A rifle for use in either full automatic or semiautomatic 
mode in which a cam system is reciprocated in a direction 
parallel to the rifle axis either manually or by a gas driven 
system. The cam system cocks the firing hammer and verti- 
cally reciprocates a rifle breech block containing the firing 
chamber. In the uppermost position, the firing chamber is 



r. 



aligned with a firing pin, which detonates the primer charge 
in a cartridge, actuated by the hammer when a sear is 
released by the rifle trigger. When the breech block is in a 
lowered position the firing chamber is aligned with apertures 
in a magazine through which a rammer is driven by the cam 
system for movement of cartridges into the chamber. A 
spring-biased gate closes the rear end of the firing chamber 
when the block is in the lowered position, but opens to allow 
ejection of a round which has not been fired when the next 
cartridge is driven into or an ejector tube is driven through, 
the chamber. 



3,667,148 

FISHING LINE SUBMERGING DEVICE 

Donald J. Dawson, Roirtc 4, P.O. Box 124-A, Salem, Orcg. 

Filed Sept 17, 1969, Scr. No. 858,788 

Int. CL AOlk 85100 

U.S. a. #3—43.13 



' Clainw 



A device for rapidly loading part of a revolver cylinder, the 
loading speed being the result of a natural combination of a 
thrusting motion whereby rounds of ammunition carried by 
said device are inserted into the cartridge chambers of the 
cylinder, and a sideway motion whereby the device is disen- 
gaged. The loading device comprises a substantially flat sup- 
port having a concave edge and shaped as a circular sector 
matching a portion of the revolver cylinder, and cartridge 
case securing elements located on the support in positions re- 
gistering with the cylinder cartridge chambers, said elements 
opening out on the same side as the concave edge of the sup- 
port. 




A device for connection to a fishing troll line to force the 
tail line and its connected flashers and natural bait or artifi- 
cial lures to a desired depth in water being fished, and includ- 
ing means automatically operated by a fish when striking the 
bait or lure for setting the fish hook. 



3,667,149 
ALL-PURPOSE FISHING FLOAT 
Juics O. Daifle, P.O. Box 515, WcWi, La. 

FOed Oct. 24, 1969, Ser. No. 869,110 
Int. CI. AOlk 93100 ^ 
U.S. CI. 43—43.15 




Clainw 



\ 



A rigid plastic tube is inserted through the central opening 
of a conventional float and retained therein by friction or any 
other suitable means and the portion of the tube above the 
float is provided with a plurality of radial openings, 
preferably vertically aligned. A fishing line is inserted 
through tl)e top of the tube, then outwardly through the up- 
permost of the openings, thence inwardly through another 
opening, thence downwardly through the tube and provided 
therebeneath with a leader, sinker and hook or lure. A 
sleeve, slidably mounted on the tube above the float, may oc- 
cupy a neutral position below the radial openings for the 
relatively free sliding of the fishing line upwardly or 
downwardly, and, the sleeve may be put in an operative posi- 
tion over the portion of the line lying outwardly of the tube 
to gently impede the free movement of the line axially to the 
tube. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



V. 



27 



3,667,150 

HOOKS FOR USE IN FISHING 

laa Keith Hearne, Wayside Langtoft, near Driffleid, England 

FDcd June 9, 1970, Scr. No. 44^12 

Clainu priority, application Great Britain, Mar. 3, 1970, 

10,035/70 
^--^ Int. CL AOlk 83106 

U.S. CI. 43—44.6 3 Claims 



distillate, kerosene or gasoline boiling ranges containing Tall 
Oil Fatty Acid in an amount effective to provide a fuel hav- 
ing a high level of anti-wear, water separation and thermal 
stability properties and a method for operating a turbine or 
diesel engine. 




A fishing hook having a shank and a hook end, and a 
gripping member positioned alongside the shank with the ad- 
jacent ends of the hook and gripping member attached to a 
ring. The free end of the gripping member is movable to and 
from a position adjacent the shank and at rest projects away 
from the shank. A separate member is slidable over the 
gripping member and shank to force them toward each other 
so that bait can be clamped therebetween. 



3,667,151 
ANTIFOUUNG FISHING SINKER 
Lamb, 1617 Maryland Avenue South, Minneapolis, 



John H 
^ Minn 

Filed Mar. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 19,053 
Int a. AOlk 95100 
\}S. CI. 43—44.97 , 



1 Claim 




\ 



3,667,153 
INTERLOCKING ARRANGEMENTS 
Godtfrcd Kirk ChriitiaBMn, BOhind, Denmark, aHigDor to 
Intcricgo A.G., Zug, Swltxcrland 

Filed June 29, 1970, Scr. No. 50384 
Clainu priority, appttcation Denmark, July 3, 1969, 3611/69 

Int.CLA63IJJ/06 
U.S. CI. 46-30 2 ClaiBH 




The coupling of two plate-shaped elements be means of an 
interlocking arrangement formed along the edges of the ele- 
ments. The locking members of one element are in resilient 
engagement with identical locking members on the other ele- 
ment, the thickness of the individual locking members being 
half the thickness of the element and the members being 
staggered alternately to one side and the other of a plane 
through the center of the edge parallel to the side faces of 
the element. 



3,667,154 
TOY SCHOOL BUS AND STATION DEVICE THEREPC« 
Masaru Aoki, Tokyo, Japan, aarignor to Tomy Kogyo Co., 
Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filcd Oct 22, 1970, Scr. No. 82,998 
Claims priority, application Japan, Oct 24, 1969, 44/101079 

Int CI. A63h 33130, 19/15 
VS. CI. 46—40 7 Claims 



A shroud adapted to surround a fishing line sinker to 
reduce the tendency of said sinker from becoming fouled on 
the lake or stream bottom, the shroud being formed from a 
deformable plastic material. The shroud is preferably in the 
shape of a cylinder having one end thereof formed into a 
hemispherical dome. An aperture is formed in the dome to 
permit a swivel or other connector to be forcibly passed 
therethrough for connection to a fish line. 



3,667,152 
FUEL COMPOSITION 
George W. Eckert, Wappingers Falls, N.Y., assignor to Tex- 
aco Inc., New York, N.Y. 
Continuation-in-part of application Scr. No. 827,142, May 23, 

1969, now abandoned. This appttcation Sept 26, 1969, Scr. 
^^ No. 861,469 

Int a. CIOI 1/10 
VS. a. 44—58 10 Clainu 

Turbine and diesel fuel composition comprising a 
hydrocarbon or a mixture of hydrocarbons in the middle 




A toy which comprises, in combination, a vehicle, pas- 
senger-simulated models to be loaded on and unloaded from 
the vehicle and a station device having a track part and a 
platform part. The vehicle has therein conveyor means for 
the models. When the models are fed onto the conveyor 
means through an inlet, they are automatically conveyed to 
an exit and unloaded from the vehicle onto the platform part 
of the station device. 



ir 



28 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3^7.1SS 



3.667,15T^ 



r 



.9,00 /,199 J,007,197U|^ 

JACK-IN-THE BOX INCLUDING BOX WITH INTEGRAL APPARATUS FOR THE HYDRdmNIC CULTIVATION 



INNER CYLINDRICAL WALL 
Inwl Robert Fredwidcr, 344 fftuUcHa Stnct, W 



FUed Nov. S, 1970, Scr. No. 87,307 
Int. CL A63h 13/16 
VS. CL 46—146 



OF VEGETABLES 

Fernando Longhinl, Gcnzano, Italy, assignor to Aeroponica 
' S.P.A., Rome Italy 

FUed Apr. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 31,293 
Claims priority, application Italy, Apr. 26, 1969, 36721 A/69; 
1 Claim I May 24, 1 969, 37384 A/69 

I Int. CLAOlt 3//02 

U.S. a. 47—1.2 I Claims 



■u 




A one-shot molded plastic open-top container comprising 
a box-like member having an integrally molded central com- 
partment with an open top, and an integrally molded cover 
for covering both the compartment and the box itself, said 
cover being hinged at one edge of the box and having a latch 
to hold it in closed condition of both box and compartment. 



3,667,156 
MOTOR-DRIVEN ROLLING TOY 
EiHtn Tomtyama, Tokyo, Japan, and John H. Hcim, Barring- 
ton, RJ., assignnn to Tomy Kogyo Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, 
by said Tomiyania 

FUed Dec. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 94,314 

Inta.A63hii/26 

U.S. CL 46—243 M 6 Clafam 




A rolling toy which comprises a substantially wheel-shaped 
housing and a motivating unit housed therein. The motivating 
unit is carried by a shaft extending axially along the central 
axis of the housing and is arranged to be rotated about the 
central axis. Also, the unit includes power means and other 
elements which are disposed in eccentric relation to the 
shaft, whereby when the unit is rotated by the power means, 
rolling movement is imparted to the housing to cause the 
same to roll along a surface. The toy can return to its rolling 
position automatically when overturned. 




Apparatus for the hydroponic cultivation of vegetables in- 
cluding substantially horizontal tubular structures for holding 
therein transplanted plants. The tubular structure is made of 
a trough-like member and lid members of elastically flexible 
material, yieldably closing the troughlike member and clamp- 
ing the plant between contacting edges of the lids. The tubu- 
lar structure is removable suspended on vertically movable 
vertical ropes guided by a system of pulleys. 



irll 



3,667,1S8 ^- 

CULTIVATION RECEPTACLE 
PMcr Arthur Prfvctt, 22 Bredon Road, Croydon, England 
Filed Oct. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 85,470 
Claims priority, appHcattoa Great Britain, Oct 31, 1969, 
I 53,518/69 

Int. CL AOlg 9/14 



U.S.CL 47—17 



; Clalnw 



] 




A combined humidifier and plant apparatus for humidify- 
ing the atmosphere and for growing and/or displaying of 
plants. For the growing of plants, a tray provided in the 
cabinet supports a layer of soil. The soil is moisturized by a 
water absorbent material that is partly immersed in a water 
trough. The humidifying means includes a fan mounted in the 
cabinet that drives air and water vapor out through an outlet 
to humidify the atmosphere. 



3,667,159 
SEEDLING FLAT 
2019^74tii Street Orde, 



SlMw^ Point, 



George K. Todd, 
Bradnioa, Ha. 

FUed Sept 10, 1970, Scr. No. 71,01 1 
Int CL AOlg 9/02 
VS. CL 47—34.13 

A seedling flat is provided in a first embodiment in the 
form of a unitary plastic member having downwardly extend- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



29 



.ing square tapered soil receiving recesses in which individual 
seedlings are started with one embodiment employing a uni- 




tary polystyrene foamed plastic; a second embodiment is em- 
bodied in a construction formed of rigid plastic plate mem- 
bers connected together in a unitary manner. 



^-^ 3,667,160 

PARKING DEVICE 

Charles R. Sdoum, 120 EUb Street San Frandsco, CaHf. 

Condnuatfon-ln-part of appifc »tfc>n Scr. No. 720,952, Apr. 

12, 1968, now Patent No. 3,613,909, and 24,699, Apr. 11, 

1970. TMs appikntfcwi Aug. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 67,429 

Int a. EOlf 13/00 

VS. CL 49—35 6 Claims 



supported on opposite edge margins of the shutter panel. The 
second shaft means extends through the building wall and is 
fitted with a hand crank member arranged in the building in- 




terior. Tumably manipulating the hand crank operates 
through the gear reduction means for lifting and lowering the 
pair of arms and respectively causing closing and opening 
movement of the shutter panel. 



3,667462 
ROCKING^WINGING WINDOW LEAF 
ChristiaB Lalagnc, Paris, France, aHignor to 
SoucImb NeuveaeL Paris, France 

Filed Oct. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 85,509 
Claims priority, appHcation France, Nov. 19, 1971, 6939722 

Int CL E05d 15/52 
U.S.CL 49-192 11 




1%^ 



A device for use in a parking stall to retain a parked car 
therein until released by payment of a meter parking fee. 
Simple rotary or pivot mounted stops are mechanically actu- 
ated by an automobile engaging same upon entering a park- 
ing stall to lock the steps in position to block fiirther wheel 
passage until released as by a coin operated timer. 



^ 3,667,161 

SHUTTER OPERATING MECHANISM 
John H. Sasano, Holywood, Fla^ Mrigiior to Weather Con- 
trol Shatters, Inc., Holywood, Fla. 

FUed Oct 16, 1970, Scr. No. 81,467 
Int CL E06b 9/02 
VS. CL 49—56 7 OaimB 

Operating mechanism adapted to be incorporated in a win- 
dow closure installation including a shutter panel hingedly 
supported on a horizontal hinge axb and swingable toward 
and away from the plane of closure of a window opening. 
The shutter operating mechanism includes a speed reduction 
assembly including a worm and worm gear fixedly secured 
respectively on first and second shaft means perpendiculariy 
arranged. A pair of arms is fixed in coplanar arrangement on 
the first shaft means and include distal end portions 
runningly engageable in track channel members coplanar 







A window having a rocking-swinging leaf which can be dis- 
placed horizontally in its plane within the fixed window-cas- 
ing by means of a control system and can be brought by 
translational motion from a so-called "rocking" position in 
which the leaf is opened in a bellows-type movement to a so- 
called "swinging" position in which tlie leaf b opened as a 
casement window. The control system comprises a rotatable 
operating handle which is mounted on the leaf and adapted 
to displace a sliding boh which can be detadiably secured to 
the fbced window-casing. The control system and ancillary 
devices for attaching the leaf to the casing are so arranged as 
to permit translational motion of the leaf in the plane of the 
casing between any one of three po siti ons, namely the d osed 
position, the "rocking" position and the "swinging" positioiL 
The centralized control of the leaf from a handle which is 
carried by this latter permits considerate simplification of 
the guiding nteans while the motion-transmission means are 
constituted in addition to the sliding boh and ancillaries by 
the leaf itself. 



30 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



Ir 



June 6, 1972 



3,667,163 

AUTOMOBILE DOOR GUARD 

Erick H. moram 640 UmmI View Drive, Serf BcMh, CaUf.; 

John G. Gibson, 18985 SaOtm ManMna, Fountain VaUcy, 

Calif., and Morgan C. Lindbcrg, Nortli Hollywood, CaHf. 

FDcd Oct. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 79,201 

Int. CL B60J 5/04 

VS, a. 49—462 5 Oaims 



I 3,667,165 

CONDITIONING GRINDER ^ 

Pliilip R. McDowell, and Chariet W. VdiovioiM, both of 
Dowasvicw, Ontario, Canada, aMignon to G & B Auto- 
mated Equipment Limited, Downeview, Oirtario, Canada 
Filed Feb. 16, 1971, Ser. No. 115,364 
I Int. CL B24b 7/02 

U.S.CI. 51— 35 8Clainv 



M 


\\\\ 


\ — 


f_ 




^' 




• 1 



An automobile door guard including a mounting plate 
formed on one side with mounting surface for securement to 
the exterior of an automobile door. A protruding resilient 
bumper is mounted on the side of the ^mounting plate op- 
posite the one side. Adhesive means is disposed on the 
mounting surface and is covered with a removable covering 
strip whereby such strip may be removed and the guard posi- 
tioned on an automobile door with the adhesive means ex- 
posed for adhering such guard to the door. 



3,667,164 

DOOR SILL 

Cray J. Coppins, 13700 Fairiiill Road, Cleveland, Ohio 

Filed June 19, 1969, Ser. No. 834,674 

Int. CL E06b 1/70 

U.S. a. 49—469 7 OaimB 




Door sill includes a substrate or base member of wood or 
other insulating material having a metal sill cover secured to 
the exterior projecting portion of the substrate and terminat- 
ing adjacent the exterior tide of the door when in the closed 
position, and having a rigid vinyl thermal barrier member 
connected to the substrate directly beneath the door when in 
the closed position as by means of downwardly projecting 
ribs which extend into grooves in the substrate. A sealing 
strip on the bottom of the door provides sealing contact with 
the rigid vinyl member when the door is in the closed posi- 
tion. 




A travelling carriage carrying a motor driven grinding 
wheel at the end of a pivoted arm reciprocates back and 
forth along a steel slab workpiece. A hydraulic cylinder 
forces the wheel down against the workpiece, this downward 
movement being controlled in accordance with the power 
being supplied to the motor and the speed of reciprocating 
travel of the carriage. Control of the contact pressure of the 
wheel is thus based on the power being absorbed by the mo- 
tor, which ensures a substantially constant rate of work out- 
put by the wheel. These conditions prevail during carriage 
travel at normal speed. When the carriage slows down to 
change direction at the ends of its reciprocal travel, a 
mechanism sensing the carriage speed reduces the rate of 
work output of the grinding wheel to obtain a more constant 
value for the work output per unit distance of travel, the 
result being more uniformity in the depth of cut. Provision is 
made for indexing the arm transversely of the workpiece at 
each end of carriage travel. The maximum magnitude of the 
acceleration and deceleration of the carriage at the travel 
ends is limited in order to increase the comfort of an opera- 
tor seated on the carriage. The grinding wheel peripheral 
speed is kept constant by a radioactive source and detector 
system that measures wheel diameter and speeds up the 
motor as the wheel wears. To faciliute this speed control a 
D.C. motor is used. As an alternative to a moving carriage, 
the structure carrying the grinding wheel can be stationary, 
the workpiece holder then reciprocating, the same controls 
over the grinding wheel pressure being exercised. 



3,667,166 

APPARATUS FOR GRINDING GLASS SLIDES OR THE 

LIKE 
JaoMs C. White Rutherford, N J., amignnr to Propper Manu- 
facturing Con Inct Long Uand City, N.Y. 

1 Filed Dec. 29, 1969, Scr. No. 888,770 
I Int. CL B24b 7/00 

U.S. CL 51—92 4 Oafans 

A grinding apparatus designed to grind articles such as 
glass slides. A work carriage is situated over a pair of guide 
bars and supported for free movement therealong by way of 
a bearing means operatively connected with the work car- 
riage and having rolling contact with the guide bars. A rotary 



, ■» 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



31 



grinding unit is supported in a floating manner with respect 
to a frame of the apparatus so that the rotary grinding unit 



3,667,168 
MANUFACTURE OF BEARING BALLS 




Jaroslav Braay, Praha, C as ch oe l ov a kia, amlgnnr to Vyakum- 
ay natav strojlrcaslw technolofie a ekonomflcy, Praha, 
Caecboslovalda 

Filed Felk. 26, 1970, Ser. No. 14^20 
Claims priority, appHcatfam Caechoalovakia, Feb. 28, 1969, 

1503/69 
Int. CL B24b l/OO 
U.S.CL 51—289 9( 




can, if necessaiyTyield when encountering extreme grinding 
stresses. 



3,667,167 

WORK DRIVING DEVICE FOR AUTOMATIC 

CAMSHAFT GRINDING MACHINE 

William Emory Happel, Waynesboro, Pa., assignor to Landis 

Tool Company 

Filed Jan. 26, 1971, Ser. No. 109,770 

Int. a. B24b 47/02 

U.S. a. 51—215 H 5 Claims 



The method and apparatus for machining bearing balls 
comprising the steps of locating the balls between two op- 
posed working surfaces rotating one of the bodies about an 
axis, and driving the other body in plane angular thereto and 
tangentially of the ball to create a rolling of the ball resulting 
from two independent component axes of force created by 
the interaction of the two bodies. 



3,667,169 
ABRASIVE FINISHING ARTICLE 
Joseph H. MacKay, Jr., Woodland Hills, Calif., assignor to 
Norton Company 

Filed Apr. 27, 1970, Ser. No. 32,295 

Int. CL B24d 13/14, 13/20 

U.S. CL 5 1 -379 10 Ciainis 



,*^'- 



W K .$$i$5 




^,- 


r* "A 








^ 




^ 


F 


1 




r 




«• 


^ 









A work driving apparatus for a machine tool, such as a 
cam contour grinding machine, for applying a driving torque 
against two spaced angular points through end portion (57) 
and a carbide block (64), to route the workpiece with 
minimal radial displacement. A driving block (41) is hinged 
to a face plate (28) to enable the driving block (41) to com- 
pensate for size variations of the workpiece and to insure 
concentricity with the periphery of the workpiece (W), such 
as an automotive camshaft. Rotation of the work driving 
device (26) automatically angulariy orients the workpiece 
relative, for example, to a master cam (19), as work rest 
pressure restrains rotation of the workpiece. This allows an 
automatic work loader to be used without any devices to 
regulate the angular position of the workpiece. 




An abrasive finishing article in which an axially projecting 
drive member secures the article to a support pad. The drive 
member is formed with a hollow threaded boss, disposed 
through a centrally defined opening in the article, and an 
outwardly extending member at the base of the boss disposed 
on the opposite side of the article to press the article against 
the support pad. The outwardly extending member can .be 
formed with a plurality of Ubs which are pressed into en- 
gagement with baclcing material of the article wherel>y to 
secure the drive member in intimate integral connection with 
the article. The support pad includes a core-socket member 
and an axial stud whereby the drive member boss may be 
threadably retained in female-male engagement with the stud 
and core member, respectively, the core member being 
formed with internal and external abutment surfaces ttx 
close fitting engagement with the top surface <rf the drive 
member and surfaces of the finishing article laterally thereof, 
respectively. 



32 



3^7,170 

FINISHING ARTI CLE AN D SUPPORT MEMBER 
THEREFOR 
JoMph H. MKK«y, Jr^ WootlaMi Hh, CaW. 

nM Mmr. 11, 1969, Scr. No. 806;250 
Int a. B24d 77/00 
UA CL 51—389 9 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 6, 1972 

snowmobile to enter and exit while traveling in a fc>rward 




m^im^sm^^^^^^^^' 



^f» 



J 




A finishing article having a drive member permanently af- 
fixed on one side thereof. The drive member comprises a hol- 
low boss open at its outer end and has an annular lip defining 
an internal screw thread. A support member is provided con- 
nectable with the drive member and can include an axial stud 
having an external screw thread, formed for insertion within 
the driving member boss, and a central socket disposed radi- 
ally about the stud and dose fit therewith for abutment 
. against the driving member boas. 



direction. The doors are each provided with a pair of guides 
for reinforcement and for directing the snowmobile. 



3,667,171 
ROW FOLDING SEATING STRUCTURE 
Robert G. McCldlaiid, and David W. Raymond, both of 
Champalcn, IlL, awigiinrn to American Seating Company, 
Grand RapidB, Mich. 

Fled Jan. 8, 1971, Scr. No. 104,917 

Int CL A47c 1112; E04h 3/12 

VS. CL 52—9 15 Claims 



I 3,667,173 

HANGING ROOF STRUCTURE 
Kari Lcnnart Bilgrcn, grev M ag n lga t a n 4, 
Sweden 

{ Flkd May 19, 1970, Scr. No. 38,829 
Int. a. E04b 1/342. 1/347 
VS. CL 52—83 



^/^' /" 




Stockhofan, 



YClaima 



l'i;<;SSII9IRI3BasaEi^Sj 



J> 



' A han^ng roof structure in which the roof covering! is sup- 
ported by a plurality of lines and tensile forces acting in the 
lines are taken up by an annular beam of lattice construction, 
thereby relieving supporting pillars from bending moments. 



■ 3,667,174 

EXPANSIBLE REVEAL WITH FRONTAL TEAR STRIP 
FOR PLASTER WALLS 
Robert W. Amctt, 1030 Stoocridte, P aaa ilrn a . CaW. 
Flkd Feb. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 11,206 
lot CL E04b 1/41 
VS. CL 52—100 



In a row seating structure a series of telescoping rows are 
provided, each row having spaced vertical carriage-mounted 
columns, each having a cantilever arm adapted to rest upon 
the next adjacent colunrn when the telescoping structure is 
extended and a transverse rear riser beam connecting the 
columns in the row and equipped with forwardly extending 
supporting arms anchored at their rear upon the riser, and a 
spectator tread or platform supported by the arms, the arms 
also providing a seat above the forward end of the tread 
panel or platform. 



3,667,172 

VEHICLE HUT 

Alfvcr M. Erickaoa, P. O. Box 363, EK River, Minn. 

FDed Jane 24, 1970, Scr. No. 49,223 

Int. CL E04h 1/12 

VS. CL 52—64 9 CWras 

A hut for housing a snowmobile or similarly sized vehicle 

having a pair of bottomly hinged doors for permitting the 




An extruded generally T-shaped separator or screed is 
tacked along the wall base vtrith the center leg projecting out- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



38 



wardly. Platter is appUed to the wall base to interlock op- 
posite sides of the screed leg. The screed leg is itself hollow, 
the frontal exposed side being a tear strip finally removed to 
form a reveal, and the rearward side being bowed or sinuous 
to form an expansion mechanism. As the plaster expands and 
contracts transversely to the screed leg, the reveal opens and 
closes correspondingly without any separation of the leg sides 
from the respective sections of the cast wall. 



3,667,177 

MOLDING JOINTS AND UNIVERSAL MOLDING 

MEMBERS THEREFOR 

Etancr G. Blda, 2332 Roiling Hil, S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Filed May 8, 1970, Scr. No. 35,676 

Int. CL E04d 1/36; E04c 1/39 

U.S.CL 52-278 11 



3,667,175 
SOUND ABSORPTION STRUCTURES 
Johan A. BJoriuten, Madison, Wis., amignnr to Griffolyn 
Company, Inc., Houston, Tex. 

Filed Feb. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 11,395 

InL CL E04b 1/82 

VS. CL 52— 144 7 Claims 




Ir^L 




n ii 


^t"^ 


aIjI 



Sound absorption assemblies each comprising a plurality of 
units, each comprising a laterally extending series of verti- 
cally extending readily loaded flexible pockets, each holding 
a weighty particulate mass while permitting some relative 
motion therein, pockets of one unit complementing the 
pockets of the adjacent unit. 



3,667,176 

SPIRAL STAIRCASES 

Donald R. H. MacKay, BHtannla Works. East RomI, Cam- 



Filed Feb. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 12,377 
Claims priority, appHcation Great Britain, Feb. 18, 1969, 

8,696/69 

Int CL £04177/00 
U.S.CL52— 187 15 



A molding joint for thin wall paneling and molding mem- 
bers therefor. A retainer is positioned with a base flange be- 
hind a paneling member as it is being installed. The retainer 
has a receiving area formed from upstanding arms to receive 
and engage the tongue of a T-shaped molding cap which is 
applied after the work is completed. The two-piece molding 
combination can be used for all types of panel joints includ- 
ing inside and outside comers, butt joints, joints between 
walb and ceilings and walls and floors, and joints between 
the edge of paneling members and the wall surfaces to which 
they are attached. Tile-tub joints and tile-wall surface joints 
are also formed with the invention. 



3,667,178 

METHOD AND MEANS FOR BINDING OF GROUND 
SURFACES ON BEDDING WHICH IS UNEVEN OR HAS A 

TENDENCY TO GIVE WAY 
Knut Borve Aigers, EhmMtrahlsvasm 40, Bioauna, Sweden 

Filed Moy 22, 1970, Scr. No. 39,770 
OainM priority, appbcatkm Sweden, May 28, 1969, 7494/69 

InL a E02d 27/00 
VS. CL 52—292 , 6 ( 



/-: 




J^ 



I — i--'--J--u.-,i. ■ .' 




A spiral staircase is built up from modular fabricated step 
units superimposed upon one another without necessitating 
the use of an independent continuous central newel column. 
Each step unit essentially comprises a tubular newel boss 
having a vertical axis, attached to a tread which extends 
laterally and radially in a horizontal plane. The step units are 
secured to each other so that their bosses together constitute 
the central newel post of the staircase. The staircase can be 
erected from a base level, after the lowermost step unit has 
been firmly secured, and while it is being erected, the buil- 
ders can use those units which have already been assembled 
for the purpose of carrying up further step units. 



The present invention relates to a method and means for 
binding ground surfaces on bedding that is uneven or has a 
tendency to give way. A building and/or bedding are |hv>- 
vided with a system of mutually connected vertical walls 
forming a grid, said walls forming or being provided with 
openings into which loose material is introduced to suppmt 
the walls laterally and vertically after height adjustment or 
levelling of said wall system. The height adjustment or 
levelling is accomplished by means of jacks provided in or 
under the grid-work, and can be effected in one or more 
stages. The arrangement can be used to reinforce bedding ir- 
respective of whether or not there is a building standing on it; 
modifications can be made to suit the purpose of the arrange- 
ment. 



899 O.G.— 2 



34 



3^7,179 

WOODEN WINDOW UNITS HAVING PROTECTIVE 
COVERINGS 
Monte M. EfacnlMrs. Ste. GoMvlevc, Mo., Mrigiior to BiMbcit 
Corponrtioa, Stc Genevieve, Mo. 

Condnuatioii-iii-pMrt of appHcatloo Scr. No. 856,630, Sept. 

10, 1969, now Patent No. 3,553,913, dated Jan. 12, 1^1, 

wMch b a contlnuatioii^part of application Scr. No. 

687,748, Dec 4, 1967, now abwMloned. This application May< 

1, 1970, Ser. No. 33,809 

Int. a. E04c 2134; E06b 3166 

U A a 52-302 6 Claims 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZEtTE 

I 



June 6, 1972 
4.HEAR 



,TH 



3,667,181 
FURNACE WALL PARTICULARLY FOR OPEN- 

FURNACES 
Gunter Simon, WietbMlen, Germany, aHignor to Didler- 
Wcriic A.G., WicslMdcn, Germany I 

Filed Aug. 3, 1970, Ser. No. 60,688 | 

Claims friorlty, application Germany, Sept. 16, 1969^ P 19 
I 46 800.9 

' int. CI. E04b 2t56 

3 



U.S. CI. 52—496 





Cnaims 



A two-part laminated wocxien sash having a groove along 
its inner face for receiving peripheral portions of a window 
pane and sealant material in the groove is provided. The ex- 
ternal wooden sash part is provided with a dual plastic extru- 
sion having a first portion forming a generally U-shaped 
sheath of semi-rigid material for receiving the first part prior 
to final assembly of the wooden unit. The second portion of 
the extnision includes a flexible lip along the edge of the 
sheath for sealing against the window pane. In another form 
hereof, dual and triple panes of glass are employed to pro- 
vide insulating panels with spacers between the panes, or a 
single pane of glass. 



\ 



A furnace wall particulariy for the rear wall and the like of 
an industrial furnace having a fiimace framing with wall 
posts. Horizontal carrier rails elevationally slidably mounted 
on the wall posts locate the wall-forming refractory bricks of 
each two consecutive courses of bricks. The brides have 
complementary cooperating recesses to embrace the carrier 
rails. Fwtening members are provided for the carrier rails 
and locking elements bearing against the wall posts 
releasably engage the fastening members. The (Sastening 
members are angle brackets projecting externally beyond the 
thicknes of the wall posts with upwardly pointing free angle 
ends. The locking elements may be ladder-like locking ele- 
ments having at least one stringer and a friurality of trans- 
verse rungs mounted on the sides of the wall posts facing 
away from the furnace interior so that the rungs interpose 
themselves between the wall posts and the free angl^ ends in 
a vertical row. 



3,667,180 

FASTENING MEANS FOR DOUBLE^KIN . 0AM CORE 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION PANEL 

Waiter Tiscliiik, Ricfamond, Ind., — ignor to H. H. Robertson 

Company, PIttslNirgh, Pa. 

FIM Nov. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 86,427 

Int. a. E04c 7//0, 2/20 

UA CI. 52-309 7 Clalnis 



<.»* 



\ 



3,667,182 
BUILDING STRUCTURES 
Jay R. Stemler, Export, Pa., aaslgnor to Ahunlnum Company 
of America, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

i Filed Apr. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 30,106 
Int. CL E04b 1140 
MS. a. 52-497 U Claims 



uk- 





A double-skin building construction panel having, a foam 
core and having its outer skin laterally offset from and 
spaced-apart from its inner skin — each panel presenting an 
overlapping edge portion along one side and an overiapped 
edge portion along its opposite side. The panels are adapted - 
to be assembled in lapped relation without externally visible 
fasteners. Mating elements in the outer skin provide positive 

mechanical engagement of adjacent outer facing sheets when j, -. • 

the panels are erected to the structural framework of a buUd- Sheet panels are connected to building structursil framing 
ing. A clip and fastener arrangement is provided for securing by attaching them to a spline which has a sliding fit with a 
the overlapped edge portion of each panel to the subgirts of a clamp fastened to the framing, thus permitting movement of 
structural framework. the panels relative to the framing. 



June 6, 1972-,.^ 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



35 



3,667,183 

WALL PANEUNG SYSTEM 

William C. Helrich, 2912 WauMUi Drive, Musliogee, Olda. 

Filed Nov. 19, 1969, Ser. No. 878,098 

Int. a. E04c 2132; E04b 1140 

U.S. a. 52—497 1 Claim 




Aluminum wall paneling system featuring panels capable 
of being arranged in a variety of patterns and including deep 
contoured face panels which when used by themselves form a 
solar wall, back panels which when used with the face panels 
form a balTled flange arrangement permitting entrance of air 
and diffused light between the panels while presenting a solid 
front appearance, furring channels accepting the face and 
back panels and also roll form paneling of different design 
and lock channels for snapping within the furring channels 
securing various combinations of the aforementioned panels 
in place while permitting their removal, when desired. 



3,667,184 

INTERLOCKING METAL SHINGLE CONSTRUCTION 

CHfTord C. McrrOl, Fcmdale, and Cari E. Strombeck, Lolcta, 

bothof CaUf. 
Contiauatio»4a-part of application Ser. No. 804,424, Mar. 5, 
1969, now abandoned. This application Feb. 24, 1970, Ser. 

No. 13,592 

Int. CI. E04d 1100 

MS. CL 52-530 9 OalnM 




respect to the weather without requirement of mastic or 
equivalent sealing means. The shingles are arranged such that 
prior to attachment of the shingles of each course the shin- 
gles therein may be shifted laterally and angled, or "skewed", 
relative to each other to adjust the length of the course to the 
dimensions of the roof and thereby prevent the course from 
overlapping the edge of the roof. 

Special forms of shingles are provided for forming valleys, 
and another special form is provided for constructing hip 
roofs — both of which are necessary when two flat roof sur- 
faces intersect to form a valley or a hip. Generally speaking, 
the construction of these special shingjes is substantially the 
same as that outlined above for regular shingles, but differs in 
the one respect that one side of the shingle is formed at an 
angle to the other side. The shingles designed for use in val- 
leys are narrow at the lower and thicker end and wider at the 
top and thin end, while the shingles designed for hips are 
wider at the lower end and narrow at the upper. These spe- 
cial shingles for both hips and valleys are necessarily con- 
structed, sold and used in pairs as they must form a special 
joint where they abut at the hip or valley. Another difference 
between these special shingles for valleys and those for tlie 
regular flat roof structure lies in the fact that there is no 
flange or gutter where the two valley shinies of each pair 
abut each other. 



3,667,185 

PANEL AND LAP JCHNT MADE THEREFROM 

Joseph M. Maurcr, Concord, CaK, nsrignni to Kidwr Ahi- 

miniun & Chemical Corporalloii, Oakland, CaHf. 

Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 23,743 

Int. CL E04d 3130 

MS. CL 52—537 10 ( 




An improved weatherproof joint formed fit)m overlapping 
one panel of improved design with another panel wherein the 
opposing marginal side edges of the panels are provided in 
the joint area with improved interfitting and opposing corru- 
gations which form a unique deep tr\iss-like lap joint struc- 
ture having improved load-bearing characteristics. 



3,667,186 
CONCRETE BLOCKS 
Shoji Kato, 1 Kitahata, Kobata, UJi, Japan 

FBed Ai« 17, 1970, Scr. Na 64,263 
Claims priority, appHcalion Japan, Aug. 16, 1969, 44/64910 

lot CL E04b 2118, 2/26 
MS. CL 52—594 10 < 



A metal shingle construction containing simulated shingles 
formed of sheet metal which present the appearance of 
wooden Hollywood shakes. The shingles of adjacent courses 
are in interlocking engagement as are adjacent shingles in 
each course so as to prevent a hard and driven rain from 
penetrating the joints between adjacent shingles, as well as to 
prevent flapping of the shingles in the wind. Nailing of the 
shingles to a roof substructure is only required at one end of 
each shingle, securance of the opposite end being provided 
by interlocking engagement with the shingles of an adjacent 
course. The nails, or other fastening means, are disposed in 
the shingle construction in completely sheltered position with 




An outwardly bent engaging projection and an engaging 
depression are formed at each end of a substantially flat- 



36 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



shaped concrete block. The engaging depression receives an 
engaging projecticHi of another concrete block, while the en- 
gaging projection of the first concrete block is received by an 
engaging depression of still another concrete block. Thus en- 
gaged with one another so as to be horizontally inseparable, a 
plurality of such concrete blocks form a honeycomblike 
framework which, supplemented virith appropriately shaped 
other concrete blocks of the"^ invention, is rendered into a 
desired substructure. 



3,667,187 

SELF-LOCKING PREFABRICATED PANELS 

John Jcril, Oak Lawn, DL, — Ignnr to BnuMi ImulatkNH, lac, 

Coatlaaatloa of appHcalioB Scr. No. 766,450, Oct 10, 1968. 

This appMcalloB May 1, 1970, Scr. No. 33,767 

lat. CL E04b 1/74, 2/08; E04c 2/32 

VS. CL S2— 582 7 daiim 



longitudinally spaced pouches separated by transversely 
sealed areas having opposed sidewalk opened along an upper 
edge portion and closed along a bottom edge is characterized 
as further comprising the steps of moving adjacent ones of 
the seals together while injecting air into the pouch and lift- 
ing the closed bottom edge to optimally open the pouches 
prior to filling the same. The open pouches are filled by in- 
troducing a nozzle into the pouch and communicating the 
noole with pressurized source of fluid, such as condiments, 
to be packaged for a set time interval to inject a measured 
quantity of the liquid into the pouch. Pouches severed from 
the web are counted and directed to a shipping container 
until a predetermined number of pouches necessary to fill the 
container are counted, at which time subsequently severed 
pouches are momentarily retained to permit replacement of 
the filled container with an empty one. Also a packaging ap- 
paratus has appropriate nteans for automatically performing 
the above described packaging method. 




Self-locking panels having male clips and female slots in 
each panel for locking adjacent panels onto a storage tank or 
the like, and a series of spacer brackets to space the panete 
away from the area being covered to retain a layer of insula- 
tion, and interlocks between the panels lying in a vertical 
plane in end to end relationship. 



ERRATUM 

For Class 52—213 see: 
Patent No. 3,667,192 



3,667,188 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FORMING AND 

FILLING INDIVIDUAL POUCHES 

Harold Thomas Bcaacr, Jr., and Charles E. Chwd, both of 

WOncttc, III., aaigBors, to Cload Machine Corporation, 

Skoliie,IlL 

Filed Feb. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 13,873 

Int. CI. B65b 43/04, 57/10 

U.S. CI. 53—29 39 Claims 




■ti *s 



' 3,667,189 

ENVELOPE WINDOW H<XJ>ER ¥OSL AN INSERTER AND 

METHOD f 

Frank M. Blomom, GIca Elyn, OL, aarignor to The R^ubca R 
DoMMlley CorporatioB, New York. N.Y. 

I FUed Nov. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 91,006 
^ latLCLB6Sb 43/30 

MJ&. CL 53—29 




An envelope open window holder to facilitate the insertion 
of mailing pieces to be contained in an envelope having an 
open window for purposes of displaying the address, having 
an envelope table to support an envelope front side down 
and held in an open position by opener means to accept in- 
serts, the table having a raised portion supporting the upper 
portion of the lip defining the window, and the table defining 
apertures providing substantially airtight communication 
from a vacuum means to the lower portion of the lip defining 
the envelope window such that the lower lip portion adheres 
to the envelope table at a level below the upper lip portion. 
A method for holding the lower lip portion «t a level below 
the upper lip portion during the inserting operation by plac- 
ing the envelope front side down on an envelope table, the 
envelope table having a raised portion supporting the upper 
lip portion, the envelope table also defining apertures under 
the lower lip portion which provides airtight communication 
with a vacuum means, opening the envelope by opener 
means to a position to accept inserts, and pulling the lower 
lip portion to the envelope table by' providing suction 
through the apertures fitnn a vacuum means. 



A method of packaging including the steps of forming and 
sealing a continuous web of film material into a plurality of 



3,667,190 
ORCHARD MACHINE 
Walter E. Tboraloii-Trump, 1544 Ito a rmwood Drive, Port 
Credit, Ontario, CoMda ■ 

Filed June 1 1, 1970, Ser. No. 45,295 
lBtCLB65b 57/00; B65g 47/^ ' 

U.S. CL 53—59 10 Oatn 

A three wheeled orchard machine having a boom which 
raises and lowers a picker's platform. The platform is levelled 
by a conveyor housing which acts both as a levelling rod and 
to convey picked fruit to a lower conveyor. The lower con- 
veyor delivers the fruit to a bin filler mechanism, which is 
also levelled by a levelling rod. The bin filler mechanism has 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



37 



a fixed bottom, and a rotating sidewall having apertures 
therein. As the sidewall routes, the fruit is distributed evenly 
a bin located below the bin filler mechanism. A 



m 




microswitch in the bottom of the rotating sidewall causes the 
bin filler mechanism to lift as the level of fhiit in the bin in- 
creases. The bin filler mechanism and the upper and lower 
conveyors are all driven from one hydraulic motor. 



3,667,191 

REMOVAL OF PARTICULATE MATTER FROM 

GASEOUS WASTES BY WET COLLECTORS 

Martia Prince, Wayne, NJ.; Hllard Blanck, Floral Park, 

N.Y., and Grcgorlo Tarancon, EHzabcth, NJ., ansignnrii to 

SalecB Development Corp., New York, N.Y. 

Filed Nov. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 92,410 

InL CL BOld 47/10 

MS. CL 55—87 23 ClainH 







In the removal of particulate matter from gaseous wastes 
by wet collectors, such as venturi scrubbers, the liquid em- 
ployed to achieve such removal is water with an additive dis- 
solved therein to substantially improve the collection of the 
particulate matter thereby. The additive dissolved in the 
water has, as its essential constituent, a preferably reactive 
mixture of an alkyl or dialkyl-phenyl polyethoxy alcohol, an 
N-substituted acid amide and an ethoxylated fatty alcohol. 
The alky! or dialkyl-phenyl polyethoxy alcohol and the N- 
substituted acid amide are preferably present in the additive 
mixture in approximately equal molar amounts and 
preferably each comprise at least 3S wt. % of the mixture, 
and the ethoxylated fatty alcohol may comprise from Vi to 40 
wt. % of the mixture and preferably from I to 3P wt. % 
thereof. 
X 



3,667,192 
DOOR THRESHOLD AND FASTENER ASSEMBLY 
Cartis O. SewcB, Higkway 43, Swalaad, Ala. 

FBed Feb. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 14,005 
lBt.CLE06bi/00 
U.S. CL 52—213 6 




A base member is positioned against a floor and between 
bordering door jambs. The base member includes a groove 
therein for slidably retaining fasteners which are driven along 
the groove and into engagement with the jambs thereby 
clamping the threshold assembly against the floor of the 
door. The fasteners include slots therein which permit inser- 
tion of a tool so that upon application of withdrawing forces 
on the fasteners, they are easily disengaged fix>m the jambs 
thus permitting removal of the threshold assembly. 



3,667,193 
SMOKE POLLUTION ELIMINATOR 
WiDiam A. McKcnde, Route 5, 6950 ClHtkm 
Ohk> 

FUed Apr. 24, 1969, Scr. No. 818,952 
Int. CL BOld 47/10 
VS. CL 55—227 6 



~ ^ 




««f* 



The pollution eliminator is adapted for connection to the 
outlet of a chimney and includes a pump having a water 
supply connected thereto and an outlet pipe receiving a sub- 
stantially fiiU line pressure flow of water fiom the pump. 
Smoke means connect to the outlet pipe for introduction d 
smoke into the water filled line, a settling tank is connected 
to the outlet pipe to receive a smoke-water mixture 
therefrom, and an aerator receives water from the upper por- 
tion of the settling tank for ultimate return of water to the 
pump for closed system water circulation purposes. 



3,667,194 

INSTALLATION FOR EXTRACTING GAS FROM 

GRANULES 

Hcndrfk Waafag, Hdecn; Hubcrtus A. Manmns, Hocmbrack, 

and AmoMus A. W. SrhaapvrM, Sicin, iril of f^cthcrtendk, 

aasignon to Stamkarbon N.V., Huricn, Ncthulmids 

FBed Oct. 20, 1969, Scr. No. 867,769 
Claims priority, applicalfcm Ncthcriandi, Oct. 19, 1968, 

6815007 

Int. CL BOld 45/02 

VS. CL 55—247 5 Cl^ns 

In order to dislodge our bubbles frcmi particles e.g. cut 

cylindrical fibers, as they enter a confined liquid body 



38 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



through a surface, a small portion of the liquid body near the 
surface is vibrated and the particles are fUnneled into the 
liquid body through the surface by means calculated to sub- 
ject each partick to about the same amount of vibration. By 
preference thU includes funneling the particles onto the cen- 



JUNE 
therein from the separation chamber to the gaseous 



6, 1972 
fluid out- 





tral region of a submerged, perforated plate. The particles 
vibrate to the periphery of the plate and fall into the gap 
between the pUte and the confining walls of the liquid body. 
In a counter current liquid extraction system, liquid may pass 
up through the plate perforations. 



let. Also, means is provided for adjusting the location of the 
valve means relative to the separation chamber. 



3^7,195 
ROTARY AIR FILTER CLEANING APPARATUS 
Fndrkk EnMSt Aiqiiliy, Jr., Cnuirtoa: George Lindol Miner, 
Warwick, and Uond Antlioay James Sousa, Coventry, aO 

of R.I., an^i to GriBMU Corpor^ioa, Providence, R.I. 

Filed Mar. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 19,731 

Int. CI. BOld 41104 

UA CL 55-272 * Claims 



3 667 197 
COMBINATION SEALING, VENTING, AND FILTERING 

MEANS I 

CaH E. Frahm, 1428 Oali MeiMlon RoMi, and Shirley E. 
Frahm, both of 142»Oak Meadow RomI, Arcadia, CaBf. 
Filed Mm-. 23, 1970, Ser. No. 21,763 

Int. a. BOld 46/70 ' 



U.S. CL 55—502 



2 Claims 





This specification discloses vacuum cleaning apparatus for 
a rotary drum filter in which a drive screw for moving the 
suction nozzle axially of tiie rotary drum is supported by two 
movable bearings in addition to end bearings. The movable 
bearings are positioned on guide members which extend 
parallel to the drive screw to support U»e drive screw against 
sagging at locations between the suction nozzle and the end 
bearings. The movable bearing are spaced by rigid connect- 
ing rods. As one movable bearing is pushed along the guide 
member by the advancing suction nozzle, the rods pull the 
oUier movable bearing along to support the drive screw. 



A combination sealing, venting, and filter element for posi- 
tioning between a replaceable water bottie and a dispensing 
stand includes an annular base member from which a 
resilient tapered flange extends upwardly to sealingly engage 
the bottle and from which a second L-shaped flange extends 
radially outwardly tiierefrom to sealingly contact said stand. 
A vent aperture extends through such element and through a 
chamber into which a replaceable filter element is posi- 
tioned. 



OCIainw 



3,667,196 
ADJUSTABLE CYCLONE SEPARATOR 
WilUara J. Koencckc, Glen Rock, N J., amignor to Metal Im- 
provement Company, Inc. 

Filed Sept. 1, 1970, Ser. No. 68,697 

Int. CI. B04c 5104 

\}S, CL 55—312 ^ Claims 

In a cyclone separator, a valve means adjusuble to cause 

partial by-pass of gaseous fluid and solid particles entrained 



3,667,198 

MOUNTING ADAPTOR FOR A REEL STRUCTURE 
Charles M. Gibson, Stockton, CaBf., assignor to Universal 
Harvester Co., Inc., Stockton, CaM. 

, Filed Sept. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 75,533 
I int. a. AOld 57/02 

U.S. Ct 56—227 

A mounting adaptor for attaching a harvesting reel to a 
swather. combine, or like harvesting machine. A typifying 
harvesting reel is a pick-up reel having a plurality of axially 
extending angularly spaced bats or members each equipped 
with a group of pick-up fingers maintained in a predeter- 
mined orientotion as the reel structure is rotated so as to 
enter and engage a crop being harvested at a particular 
disposition with respect thereto. The pick-up reel mcludes a 
control hub rotoUble with the reel about an axis offiset from 
the axB of roUtion thereof and connected ^/rith tiie bats and 
groups of fingers carried tiiereby to enforce tiw desired 
orienution Uiereon.' The. control hub is supported for rota- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



89 



tion by a control plate assembly having bearing structure nuts on the ground and disposing the same into a windrow 
routably supporting the axle of the reel structure and in turn for subsequent pick-up. The conveyor is mounted for shifting 
being supported in the clamp collar of a mounting adaptor movement laterally of the path of travel of the windrower in 
releasably and adjusubly secured to the harvesting machine. 
The mounting adaptor accommodates dimensional dif- 




ferences in the reel support provided by any particular har- 
vesting machine, and it enables the control plate assembly to 
be adjusted with facility to vary the disposition of the bats 
and pick-up fingers and thereby effect the most efficient 
coaction thereof with a crop to be harvested. 



3,667,199 
POWER-OPERATED LAWNMOWER WITH IMPROVED 

DISCHARGE MEANS 

Leonard Bloom, Baltimore, Md., assignor to The Black and 

Decker Manufacturing Company, Towson, Md. 

Filed June 26, 1970, Ser. No. 50,024 

Int. CI. AOld 3SI26 

U.S. CL 56—320.2 3 Claims 




A power-operated lawnmower has ground-engaging wheels 
supporting a deck housing. The deck housing encloses a plu- 
rality of roUry blades, preferably two in number. Each blade 
has a respective discharge channel formed within the deck 
housing. Each channel is preferably of the volute type and 
terminates in a respective lateral discharge opening. The 
discharge openings are formed along one side only of the 
deck housing, thereby providing improved safety and op- 
timum removal of the grass cuttings. 



3,667^00 
FRUIT AND NUT WINDROWER 
Stuart D. Pool, Wheaton, and Harold G. MeitI, Clarendon 
HiUs, both of IH., assignors to International HarvcMcr Com- 
pany, Chicafo, Dl. 

FUcd Aug. 7, 1970, Ser. No. 61,963 

Int. CL AOlg I9I00 

U.S. CL 56—328 R i Claim 

A fruit and nut windrower adapted for coupling behind a 

tractor and including an auger conveyor for gathering fruit or 




response to encountering ground obstructions. Means are 
provided for raising the conveyor from the ground to a trans- 
port position. 



3,667,201 
APPARATUS FOR HARVESTING FRUIT WITH AN 
ELUPTICALLY MOVING STRIKER MEMBER 
Gerald L. Cbuton, and Darrell C. Horn, Lafayette, Calif., as- 
signors to Up-Right, Inc., Berkeley, Cdif. 
Continuation-in-part of appHcation Ser. No. 73,450, SepL 18, 

1970, now abandoned , which is a continuation-in-part of 

application Ser. No. 855^65, Sept. 8, 1969, now abuidoned. 

This application Dec 28, 1970, Ser. No. 101,910 

Int CL AOlg 19100 

U.S. CL 56—330 22 Claimi 



7 




A harvesting machine for use in harvesting fruit, such as 
grapes which grow on a k>ngitudina] row of vines, in which 
the vines are struck with striker members to dislodge the fruit 
therefrom. The striker members are each translated through 
a generally elliptical, horizontal path as the machine moves 
along the row so that the speed of the striker member, into 
an out of the vines, transverse to the row. is maximized, and 
at the same time the longitudinal movement of the striker 
members relative to the vines during engagement therewith is 
minimized to prevent vine or fruit damage. 



40 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



JUN^ 6, 1972 



3^7402 

BEATER MECHANISM FOR AGRICULTURAL ROW 

CROP HARVESTER 

Jolui P. Watts, Roate 2, P.O. Bm 249, HObboro, Orcg. 

Nad Feb. 3, 1971, Scr. No. 112,241 

hd. CL AOlf 79/00 

U.S. CL 56-330 13 daiim 




»• 






—r 



3U 



i.\.-.v.. 



9^^" "1e 



r" "tu 







tieo ' m f g »M 



Beater mechanisin for an agricultural row crop harvester. 
The mechanism includes a plurality of elongated beater 
members, each of which is pivoted for swinging, under 
power, into the path of plants (in a row), which plants move 
relative to the harvester as the latter traveb over a field. The 
beater members have somewhat broom-like constructions, 
with each at its free end including a plurality of elongated 
side-by-side adjacent plant-engaging elements which strike 
stems in plants to dislodge produce. 



3,667,203 
WINDING MACHINE FOR COVERING A HOSE OF HIGH 

POLYMER WITH REINFORCING THREADS 
Bnino KoKhatzky; Attilio E. AoflMctti, and Nino MadoninI, 
aU of Milan, Italy, asrignors to Industrie PirdU S.p.A., 
Milano, Italy 

FHed May 14, 1970, Scr. No. 37,171 
Clainu priority, application Italy, July 4, 1969, 19171 A/69 

Int. CL B65h 81100 
M&. CL 57— 15 13 Claims 




A thread winding machine having a rotation speed in ex- 
cess of 600 r.p.m. consisting of a pair of axially aligned wind- 
ing units oppositely rouuble by a single motor. Each unit 
has a rouuble hollow shaft through which a hose to be 
covered with the thread is passed and a group of containers 
for housing a fixed cone of thread which is disposed coaxially 
of the container and has a base spaced from the container 
wall, the containers being mounted and arranged around th6 
hollow shaft, with their respective axes inclined relative to 
the shaft axis at an angle of from 10** to 20° and their bases 



dispoaed in close proximity to or in contact with one another. 
A conveying ring is mounted on the shaft at one eiKl for guid- 
ing the threads which are paid out through openings in the 
containerB to the hose. A guiding head is mounted on the 
shaft upstream of the conveying ring to operate the laying of 
the threads on the hose. Bralung means is provided for each 
thread during its travel from a container opening to the con- 
veying ring. 



3,667,204 

APPARATUS FOR CONJOINTLY DOVnNG AND 

DONNING A PLURALmr OF BOBBINS OR TUBES 

PLACED ON SPINDLES OF RING SPINNING AND RD4G 

TWISTING MACHINES 
mrkk Buigiiimlrtu. Wlaicrtlrar, and CmIo Gi^gfail, EIb, 
iMIh of SwMicrlaBd, asripinri to Rktcr MmMbc Works, 
Lt4^, Wlnl^rthur, SwItacriHid 

I Fled Dec 4, 1970, Scr. No. 95,180 

Clidnw priority, a p pB ctl oo SwKacriand, Dec. It, 1969, 

18902 
InL CL DOlh 9m 
UACL 57—52 . 16 




An apparatus for jointly doffing and donning a plurality of 
bobbins or tubes respectively, placed upon spindles of a ring 
spinning or ring twisting machine, which comprises a support 
member extending over a plurality of spindles, said support 
member being provided with stops arranged at a mutual 
distance from one another substantially corresponding to the 
spindle gauge. The stops protrude in the direction of the 
spindles. A hose member is supported on the side of the sup- 
port member directed away from the stops, this hose member 
being deformable under the influence of a pressurized medi- 
um and serving to grip the bobbins or tubes brought between 
the hose member and the stops. 



3,667,205 
NffiCHANISM FOR WITHDRAWING AND WINDING 
YARN IN SPINNING UNITS 
•V Brasda, d cccas s d , late of Ccrvcny Koctdcc, 
Caechosiovakia (by DralMMka Braadova and Di^iniar Bras- 
dova, hdrs); Miloriav Prodiaika, Nadiod, CndMMlovakia; 
Vtedimlr Kuhn, Vdkc Svatonovkc, Cacchodovakia, and 

Joacf Oidian, Ccrvcny Koatdec, Cacchoctovakia, — igi 

to EHtex, Zavdy textHniho Strojircnstvi fcncralni retttlcl- 
stid, LIbcrec, Caedioatovakia 

FBed Mar. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 17,737 ^^ 

CWms priority, appUcadon Cacchodovakia, Mar. 7, 1969, 
PV 1695-69 I 

Int. CL DOlh 1112, 7100; B65h 63100 
U.S. CL 57—58.89 1 1 CiainH 

An open end spinning machine including a yam winding 
apparatus having a driven rouuble drum, a bobbin mounting 
frame movable toward and away from the drum so that the 
bobbin may be selectively driven and undriven. in ac- 
cordance with the invention there is provided means, shown 
as hand operated, for raising the bobbin from the drum, and 
means for adjusubly retaining the frame and bobbin in 
elevated position, preferably with the surface of the bobbin 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



41 



spaced only a smdl distance above the peripheral surface of 
the drum. Means, here shown as foot operated, is provided 




3,667,206 
PROCESS FOR OBTAINING A SPONGE.TEXTURED 
THREAD FROM NATURAL SILK THREAD 
Marod MhIus Adrian HWrc, Aibn-Anlcdie, 
dgnor to SodcSc Foredcnw de rifniiMnagir ct 
Loire, France 

FHed Sept 25, 1969, Scr. No. 861,188 
daims priority, appMcadon FVanoc, Sept 25, 1968, 6850428 

Int. CL D02t 3104; D03d 15100 
U.S. CL 57—156 8 <^1 t,v 

Sponge-textured thread is made from natural silk thread by 
subjecting the silk thread to ccxiventional degumming opera- 
tions, then to known operations of the conventional method 
of obtaining a sponge-textured thread; i.e., twisting, fixing by 
thermal or steam treatment and untwisting, and then placing 
the silk thread in a humid medium, which is preferaUy hot. If 
the humid treatment is effected after weaving or knitting, 
these must be very loose. After the degumming step the silk 
thread can be coupled to another thread of silk or other 
fiber. 



for releasing the frame, when desired, whereby it is lowered 
so that the bobbin again rest upon and is driven by the drum. 



3,667,206 

INTERLOCKED MULTl-WIRE MEMBER 

WlUiaa J. GUnMire. Manitoii Bc«i^ Midk, aidtnor to Anwr- 

kaa Chain A Cable Compuiy, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Filed Feb. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 1 1,765 

Int CL D07b 1106; D02g 3136; D07b U08 

UA CI. 57-139 8 Claims 




A multi-wire member in which the outer layer comprises 
alternate base and oversize wires wherein the oversize wires 
have been deformed into interlocking engagement with each 
other and with respect to the wires comprising the next un- 
deriying layer of the member to produce a smooth and sub- 
stantially continuous outer surface. 



3,667,209 
METHOD OF FALSE-TWISTING MULTIFILAMENT 

YARN 
Bobby Ray Fain, BurttngloB, N.C, asdfnor to AlanuuKc Id* 
dudrkt. Inc., Bur1ii«too, N.C. 

FHed Oct. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 81,205 
Int. CL D02g 1102 
lis. CL 57—157 TS 6 




3,667,207 
CRIMPABLE COMPOSITE POLYAMIDE YARN 
Vfctor Ralph Ben, Wilmington, Dd., and Peter Steven Kay, 
MartinsvOc, Va., avignors to E. I. du Pont dc Nemoun 
and Company, Witaniagton, Dd. 

FHed May 1, 1970, Scr. No. 33,955 
Int.CLD02gi/02 
U A CL 57— 140 BY 5 ciain« 

A crimpable bicomponent filament in which one com- 
ponent is a polyamide and the other a random copolyamide 
containing specified percentages of three polymeric units. 
The different unitt and their concentrations are 70-82 per- 
cent hexamethylene adipamide. 13-25 percent caproamide 
and 5-17 percent hexamethylene dodecanedioamide. Yams 
of one or more such filaments are particularly useful in the 
manufacture of hosiery because of their high crimpability, 
high strength and low shrinkage in the fabric. 



The multifilament yam produced by this method has a 
highly crimped or curied ccmfiguration and very littie torque. 
The yam is threaded about the exit pin of a false-twist spin- 
dle by a slip-knot type of loop which prevents passage of the 
twist from one side to the other of the exit pin and permits a 
relatively high number of turns of £slse-twist to be inserted in 
the yam, on the order of from about 150 to 185 turns per 
inch. Fabric knit of this yam, such as ladies' sheer hosiery, 
panty hose, and the like, has a creped appearance when 
relaxed with a high degree of stretchability and recoveralnli- 



to 



3,667,210 
HOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENT 
Hdaz Mdtingcr, PfonlMim, Gcnuany, aaipM 
CorporatioB, Wal«rb«iry, Conn. 

FBad July 6, 1970, Scr. No. 47^42 
Int. CL G04c 3104; H02k 33110 
U.S. CL 58—28 B 12 . 

A horological instrument includes an osdllator such as a 
balance wheel. The oscillator carries a coU, which may con- 
sist of a single conductive ring. Current is induced in the 



I 



42 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 61, 1972 

moving coil by mutual induction from a fixed coil. One or hand portion resetting arrangement is |Ht}vided for shifting a 
more fixed magnetic fields are positioned to drive the ener- second hand connection lever and a minute and hour hand 




gized coil. A circuit is provided to energize the coil with cur- 
rent at the proper moment during its oscillation. 



3,667^11 
DRIVE MECHANISM FOR AN INDICATOR OF THE DAY 

OF THE MONTH IN A TIMEPIECE 
Jean-Claude SchncMcr, La Chaax-de-Fonds, Switzerland, as- 
signor to Faiiriquc d'Hoilogcric Chs. Tlssot et fib S.A., Le 
Lode Canton of Ncuchatd, Switzerland 

Filed Nov. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 85,992 

Claims priority, appilcatioa Switzerland, Nov. 3, 1969, 

16355/69 

Int. CL G04b 19f24 

VS. CI. 58-58 17 Claims 




3,667^12 

RESETTING-TO-ZERO MECHANISMS FOR SECONDS, 

MINUTE, AND HOUR HANDS 

Katnhiko Komiyama, and Yoshio liniuna, both of Tokyo, 

Japan, ■■Ignors to CiliMn Watch Company Limited, 

Tokyo, Japan 

FBed Apr. 19, 1971, Scr. No. 134,944 

Claims priority, application Japan, Apr. 20, 1970, 45/32975; 

June 4, 1970, 45/55024; June 5, 1970, 45/55602 

Int. CL G04f 7/04 

VS. CL 58—74 5 CWnM 

In a timepiece wherein the second, minute and hour hands 

are rotated about a common axis, an externally operated 




correction lever into engagement with respective cams to ac- 
complish the resetting of the hands to a zero position. > 



•uiii 



RATE 



3,667,213 

IE, RESPIRATION AND INTRAVENOUS I 

COUNTER 

John D. Enrign, BrIgham City, Utah, awignor to M< 

mcnt Sdcncc Corporation, Brigiiam Chy, Utah 

Filed Dec 11, 1970, Scr. No. 97,077 

Int. a. G04b 19/00 

VS. a. 58-126 R I Claim 



5. a. 58—1 



In a timepiece having a date indicator, the driving 
mechanism therefor is connected to the 24-hour wheel, 
which \is driven by the movement, through a spiral spring 
which {gradually stores energy from the rotation of the 24- 
hour wheel and imparts the stored energy to the driving 
mechanism to advance the date indicator when the blocking 
mechanism restraining improper movement of the date in- 
dicator is released. '^ 




\ rate counter consisting of scales scribed on a circular 
chart forms the dial face of a sweep second hand stop watch, 
a specified number of counts of a patients pulse beats or 
respiratory motions or a specified number of drops from an 
intravenous apparatus are observed, and the stop watch is 
operated to stop the second had. The stopped second hand is 
positioned directly opposite a scale providing a direct read 
out of the patients pulse or respiration rate per minute or the 
number of cubic centimeters per hour passing from an in- 
travenous apparatus. 



krenousi 



3,667,214 

ENGINE TURBOSUPERCHARGER WITH VIBRATION 
REDUCING DRIVE 
Albert N. Addie, La Grange Park, DL, asrignor to General 
Motors Corporatton, Detroit, Mich. 

1 Filed Mar. 11, 1970, Scr. No. 18,523 

I Int. CL F02b 41/10; F16d 3/12 

VS. CL 60—13 ^ Claima 

A turbosupercharger for an internal combustion engine has 

a speed-increasing drive train to drive the compressor at a 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



48 



predetermined minimum multiple of engine speed and an 
overrunning clutch to permit the compressor to be driven at 
higher speeds by the engine exhaust gases. The turbosu- 
percharger housing provides for the alternative use of two 
torsional vibration and shock-reducing means in the drive 




train, one such means comprising an internally mounted en- 
gine oil lubricated quill shaft drive and the other such means 
comprising the combination of an internally mounted engine 
oil lubricated quill shaft drive arranged in parallel with an ex- 
ternally mounted viscous damper utilizing a silicone damping 
fluid or the like. 



3,667,215 
HEAT ENGINES 
Venltataranianayya K. Rao, Bangalore, India, asrignor to 
Atomk Energy of Canada Limited Commcrical Products, 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 

Filed Nov. 21, 1969, Scr. No. 878,817 
Clainu priority, application Canada, Feb. 14, 1969, 042,928 

Int. CL F03g 7/06 
VS. CL 60—24 7 CUhm 




There is provided a gas cycle which is of particular useful- 
ness in the utilization of heat which is not of relatively hi^ 
temperature. An engine operating with tlie subject gas cycle 
may use thermal energy derived from Radioisotope decay. 



3,667,216 
PRESSURIZATION SYSTEM 



, Mav., and Vh»- 
to 



r 

Vktor A. De Mattia, Jr., EMt 
cent J. Sanacvcro, Jr., Eart Hartford, Conn., 
United Aircraft Corporatkm, Eart Hartford, Conn. 
Filed ScpC 27, 1968, Scr. No. 763,221 
Int. CL CQ6d 5/04 
VS. CL 60—37 3 

A pressurization system for supplying a constant pressure 
source including a liquid propellant source, a reaction 



chamber for disposing the Uquid propellant into a gasified 
product, a storage tank for storing the gasified products and 



/iS'^ 



x^^ 




/2V- 



a feedback system for maintaining the output pressure from 
the storase tank. 



the storage tank. 



3,667,217 

STEAM GAS TURBINE INCLUDING A GAS TURBINE 

AND A STEAM TURBINE WITH A STEAM GENERATOR 

AT THE DOWNSTREAM END 
Jean VMal, VOlc D'Avray; Jem Pariwit, and Jacques 
Lemoine, both of Paris, aD of France, avignors to Stdn In- 
dustrie, Paris, France 

FOed May 13, 1970, Scr. No. 36^16 
Claims priority, application France, May 14, 1969, 6914168 

InL CL FOlk 23/06; F22d 1/12 
VS. CL 60—39.02 4 ClidnH 




A steam gas plant including a gas turbine the exhaust ; 
of the gas turbine feed the burners of the steam generator 
which in turn feeds the steam turbine, a steam generate, and 
a steam turbine, in which the operation of the gas turbine 
continues under full load even for reduced loads on the 
steam turbine. The invention maintains under varying steam 
turbine loads the temperature at the input of a deaerator 
constant, the deaerator being fed in parallel by an 
economizer subjected to the heat of the flue gases of the 
steam generator and by water heaters fed with steam ex- 
tracted from the turbine. To ensure constant te m pe ra ture, 
one of the streams feeding the deaerator is controlled by a 
gate the extent (rf opening of which is defined by the ratio of 
the throughput of flue gases acting on the economizer and 
the flow of water in the economizer and poasibly also by the 
modifications in the temperature at the output of the 
economizer. 



44 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 

I 



June ,6, 1972 



3.667^18 1 3^7^220 

GAS TURBINE TEMPERATURE ADAPTIVE CONTROL GAS TURBINE WTTH ROTARY HEAT EXCHANGERS 

Rkkard K. Davii, Rouokc, V«^ atrignor to General Electric Ludea DekcyMr, ChcOm, fVancc, airignor to Bcanci Mmt«I, 

^""P^'y Sdat-Etkanc (Loire), Fraooe 

Filed Mar. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 23372 Filed Mv. 31, 1970, Scr. No. 24,253 

lat. CL P02c 9/04 CMum priority, applcatioii FVanoe, May 22, 1969, 6915549 

U.S.CL 60-39.28 T 5 Claiim Int. CL P02c 7// 0. F28d 79/0* 



•"osnyf. 



FCHBfeCK 



43 






^ 



-s>- 



T 

— y 






57 



NECiWIVE 

"2 



r 



^ — •- 



i 



®S8&« 



A temperature adaptive control system for controlling the 
rate of fuel flow to a gas turbine having sensors in the path ol 
the exhaust gases which produce an electrical feedback 
signal proportional to temperature. Another signal, propor- 
tional to maximum allowable temperature, normally opposes 
the feedback signal at a summing junction. A third coacting 
signal forms an envelope and varies indirectly with the tem- 
perature of the turbine over a predetermined period of time 
at the end of which it b reduced to zero, causing the fiiel 
flow to increase the maximum controlled rate without ex- 
ceeding the temperature limits defined by the third signal. 



3,667,219 
GAS GENERATOR WITH LIQUID INITUTOR 
James A. Marfree, Jr., Hnntsvflfe; Theodore N. Hubbuch, 
Florence; Henry A. Nappier, Lacey's Spring; William A. 
Duncan, HantarOe, and BOy J. SandHn, AthcM, aU of Ala., 
aaignors to The United States of America as represented by 
the Secretary of the Army 

FUcd July 5, 1967, Scr. No. 651,327 

Int. CI. F02c 3/20; F02g 1/00 

VS. CL 60—39.46 10 Clains 




Porous support materials such as porous firebrick and un- 
glazed clay (date having suspended therein a liquid initiator 
(oxidizing agent) for gas generators employing exothermally 
decompoiing monopropellants. 



U.S. a. 60—39.51 H 




7Claim 



A gat turbine of the type having a pair of rotary heat 
exchanger discs mounted for rotation about a common axis 
transverse to the main axis of the turbine on opposite sides 
thereof is provided with a drive arrangement which will pro- 
vide for expansion between the disc and an annular drive ring 
surrounding the disc. The annular drive ring is provided with 
a plurality of external teeth disposed in meshing engagement 
with a pinion drivingly comiected to the main gear box of the 
turbine. A plurality of cylindrical rods are mounted in a plu- 
rality of equally spaced apart grooves in the circumference of 
each of the discs. Each cylindrical rod is formed with an ar- 
cuate groove in the external surface thereof for the reception 
of a key member having a convex surface which rests in the 
arcuate groove and two plain surfaces which define a 
dihedron, the edge of which is disposed adjacent the interoal 
surface of the annular ring. A pair of wedge membe r s are 
disposed in engagement with each of the surfaces of the key. 
The wedges are biased into engagement with the key by 
means of a spring extending between the wedge and a rib 
formed on the internal surface of the annular ring. 



I 3,667,221 ^- 

FUEL DELIVERY APPARATUS 
Jack R. Taylor, Clndnnati, OMo, aarignor to General 
Company 

I FUcd Apr. 17, 1969, Scr. No. 816,985 



Electric 



U.S. CL 60— 39.74 R 



Int CL FX>2c 7/22 




Apparatus is disclosed for premixing air and fUel cjr carbu- 
reting air prior to introduction thereof into the primary zone 
of a combustor, said apparatus including a housing defining a 
spin chamber therein; the spin chamber is adapted to receive 
air and fUel and vaporize and/or atomize said fiiel and deliver 
said air and fuel into said combustor as a vortical flow. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



45 



3,667,222 ^ until the main valve associated with the leaking branch is 

POWER DEVICE closed, at which time loss (^ reservoir fluid terminates and 

Olvcr E. Saari, NUcs, DL, ami gnor to DUnois Tool Works Inc., further movement of the piston is merely a function of nor- 

Chkago, n. mal system operating conditions and not leakage. Once 

Filed July 22, 1970, Scr. No. 57,245 



Int. CLF15b J/00 



U.S. CL 60—51 



5CUnH 



'^J. 



A power device having a power reservoir in which a com- 
pressible fluid is maintained under pressure, an accumulator 
piston and a drive piston which are simultaneously movable 
to retracted or cocked positions by the introduction of a non- 
compressible power fluid into a cylinder in which the pistons 
are reciprocably movable, the power fluid acting on exposed 
areas of the drive piston to move it with the accumulator 
piston until it reaches its fully cocked position whereupon 
further movement of the accumulator piston exposes addi- 
tional areas of the drive piston to the pressure of the power 
fluid whereby the compressible fluid, acting through the 
power fluid, imparts drive movement to the drive piston and 
multiple seal means on said accumulator piston, reservoir 
means in said accumulator piston to trap any power fluid 
which has by-passed one of said seals to thereby avoid inter- 
mixing of said compressible and non-compressible fluids. 




f^ 







J 



operated by the cam the pilot valve for the leaking branch 
circuit is pressure loaded or mechanically held in a position 
to isolate the branch from the remainder of the system in 
which case the pilot valve is independent of cam position. 



3,667,224 
POWER TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS 
Kdth Foster, Biiiwinghaiii, En^and, aarignor to A. F. 
Hydraulics Limited, c/o NatkNial Raearch Devdopnwnt 
Corporation, London, En^and 

FVcd Nov. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 875,098 
Claims priority, appHcatkm Great BrHain, Nov. 11, 1968. 

53^416/68 
Int. a. F03c 1/00; FlSb 1/02 
VS. CL 60—51 8 < 



3,667,223 
HYMtAUUC SYSTEM HAVING MEANS FOR 
ISOLATING LEAKING BRANCH CIRCUITS > 
Charles T. Thurston, St Charles, Mo., asilgnnr to McDonncO 

Douglas Corporation, SL Louis, Mo. 

Filed Feb. 16, 1971, Ser. No. 115,256 

Int. CL F15b 7/00 

U.S.CL60— 51 11 Claims 

A hydraulic system has a reservoir which contains a 
hydraulic fluid and includes a piston which bears against that 
fluid. The system also has a pump which derives fluid from 
the reservoir and supplies high pressure fluid to a plurality of 
branch circuits, each having a hydraulic motor or some other 
hydraulically powered device or load. The branch circuits are 
connected to the reservoir so that fluid after passing through 
the hydraulic motors is returned to the reservoir at low pres- 
sure. An isolating apparatus is interposed between the pump 
and branch circuits and includes a main valve for isolating 
each branch circuit. Each main valve is normally open, and is 
controlled by a pilot valve which is in turn operated by a cam 
follower disposed in the path of a cam which is carried by 
and responsive to the position and movement of the reservoir 
piston. Should one of the branch circuits develop a leak, the 
volume of the fluid in the reservoir will decrease, causing the 
piston to move through the reservoir and carry its cam with 
it. The cam, by operating the pilot valves associated with the 
main valves, shuts off and opens the main valves sequentially 






^m^ 





A so-called A.F. or "alternating flow" hydraulic system 
comprises a power line interconnecting a generator and a 
pressure chamber of a receiver, a return line, control valve 
means at the receiver end of the system and operative to in- 
terconnect said power and return lines whereby to produce a 
return hydraulic flow through the return line, and control 
means at the generator end of the system. The control means 
sense the change of flow conditions consequent upon opera- 
tion of the valve means and substantially preventing pressure 
pulses from the generator reaching at least a major length of 
the power line connected to the receiver. 



46 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



KT' 



June 4, 1972 



3,667^25 

HYDROSTATIC DRIVE AND CONTROL SYSTEM 

THEREFOR 

Lawrence P. Kamuui, WayMsviUe, Ohio, a«igiior to Scott 

Equipment Company, Dayton, Oliio 

nied Aug. 12, 1970, Ser. No. 63,218 

Int. CL F15b 15/J8 

VS. CI. 60-52 VS 1 Claim 



mrtMHCt 

iimir 



-A"A=r> 






k-.- . 




^«o 



ooMomoncii 

— 1 



^ 



TIMMHWCta 
\ 



eo«T««. \ 

IT "L 



Kino 

V«LVI 



ihmh 



TZx 



rukTi 

WtlTION 

TMMtOUCm 



<Xl^> 



irniraM. 

LMW 




transmission to further prevent damage; means are provided 
whereby fluid flow in a hydrostatic loop can be bypassed 
from its normal drive path in the transmission, through the 
valve means provided. 



An electro-hydraulic system controls the position or move- 
ment of a fixed displacement hydraulic motor, such as a 
piston motor, in accordance with predetermined desired 
rates of movement or positions thereof, and employs a varia- 
ble displacement drive pump having a movable swash plate. 
The position of the swash plate is controlled by an electrical 
control circuit including a series of inputs which represent 
either a desired position of the motor or a desired pump out- 
put. Means are provided for selecting between primary feed- 
back indicative of the position of the swash plate or seconda- 
ry feedback indicative of the position of the motor or device 
being controlled. 



3,667,226 
CONTROL FOR A HYDROSTATIC TRANSMISSION 
Rodger W. Airnui, Downcn Grove, and William R. Borgiiolf, 
Napcrvfllc, both of Dl., — ignori to Intematioiial Harvotcr 
Company, Chicago, DL 

Continuation of Ser. No. 13,856, Feb. 24, 1970, abandoned, 

which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 731 ,590, May 23, 

1968, now abandoned. This application Nov. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 

86375 

Int. CL F16d 31/06 

VS, a. 60—53 R 8 ClaluM 



For a hydlxMtatic transmission having valving means which 
can be selectively positioned corresponding to forward, 
neutral, and reverse drive of the transmission and including 
means for dumping excess fluid pressure from the fluid pres- 
sure circuit in order to prevent damage to the transmission, 
and under certain conditions to prevent overspeeding of the 



I 3,667,227 

HYDRAUUC LOAD LIMITING SYSTEM 

Jerome Bcntkowsky, Loa Altoa, and W. Tait Bcran, Palo Aho, 

both of CaUf., aasignors to The United States of America as 

represented by the Secretary of the Navy 

I Filed Mar. 5, 1971, Ser. No. 121330 
I Int. CL F16d 31/06 

VS. CI. 60—53 WW 1 Claims 




wr-OUT I I MtUL-m 



Apparatus for limiting the load on a hydraulic drive 
system, such as a winch. A feature of the disclosed arrange- 
ment is that limiting is maintained at a relatively constant 
value regardless of whether the load is being controlled by 
the hydraulic drive or is overpowering the drive. 



LUBRIO 



POWER 



3,667,228 

ATING CIRCUrr OF AN AUTOMOTIVE 1 

TRANSMISSION 

Koichi Ohie, Tol(yo, and Koji Enomoto, Yokohama, both 
of Japan, assignors to Nissan Motor Company, Limited, 
Yokoliama, Japan 

Filed Noy. 5, 1970, Ser. No. 87,072 
Claims priority, application Japan, Nov. 12, 1969, 441^90672 

Int CL F16d 31/06; F16h 41/02 
VS. CL 60—54 3 Claims 



»,44/1 




An automotive power transmission lubricating circuit 
which is supplied with a lubricating fluid firom an oil pump 
delivering a pressurized fluid for operating the transmission, 
the lubricating fluid being drawn to the lubricating circuit 
from a passage upstream of a torque converter, whereby the 
lubricating circuit can be supplied with a lubricating fluid at 
any desired flow rate which is not influenced by the opera- 
tion of the torque converter throughout different operations 
of the transmission. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



47 



3,667,229 
DEVICE FOR SUPPLYING FLUID UNDER PRESSURE 
Artvro Crcsto, Turin, Italy, — ignor to Femicdo Manzfad, 
Turin, Italy 

Filed Dec. 15, 1969, Ser. No. 884,890 
Claims priority, application Italy, Dec. 18, 1968, 54336 A/68 

Int. a. F15b 7/00, 7/08 
VS. CL 60—54.6 A 12 Clafam 



*^-V^ ^ 




A device for supplying fluid under pressure has a two-part 
cylinder, one part being of narrower diameter than the other, 
and a two-part piston slidable in the cylinder. Two pressure 
chambers are defined by the cylinders and the piston. Ad- 
vance of the piston reduces the volume of both. One, the 
high pressure chamber feeds an external pressure system, and 
is itself fed by the other chamber through a valve system dur- 
ing an initial phase of the piston stroke. In a later phase the 
feed from the second in the first chamber ceases and instead 
the secottd chamber feeds the fluid reservoir through a con- 
trol valve. Pressure- transmitting means such as a rod is ar- 
ranged between the high pressure chamber and the control 
valve to open the control valve when the pressure in the high 
pressure chamber exceeds a predetennined value. 



3,667,230 

PROCESS FOR THE RATIONAL EXCHANGE OF HEAT 

IN COUNTER-CURRENT HEAT EXCHANGES WHERE 

THE EXCHANGES ARE UNBALANCED 

Jacqiwa StcrHni, Paris, Frimoe, — ilgnnr to Compi«nle-Elec- 

tro-Mccanique, Paria, France 

Filed Jan. 26, 1971, Ser. No. 109^94 

Int. CL FOld 13/02 

U.S.CL60— 65 ' 7Clahm 



1- 



»-- 



H-- 



M 






On 



stream leaves the heat exchanger. The excess heat which is 
available in the hot fluid and cannot be stored for reheating 
the other fluid is thus converted into work energy. 



3,667,231 
HYDRAZINE DECOMPOSITION PROCESS USING 
METAL PROMOTERS 
Theodore N. Hubboch, Florcnoe; James A. Mm4«c, Jr.; WB- 
Uam A. Duncan, both of Huntarlle; Bily J. SandHn, 
Athens, and Hcniy A. Napnier, Laccy's Spring, all of Ala., 
aarignors to The United Sbrtte of America aa rapimuto l by 
the Secretary of the Army 

FDed July 5, 1967, Ser. No. 651,323 
Int. CL C06d 5/04, 5/10 
VS. CL 60—218 5 Clafam 

The use of metal powders as synergistic promoters for solid 
oxidizing agents (initiators) for gas generators. 



3,667,232 

DUAL ORinCE IMPINGEMENT INJECTOR 

James P. ^atchcil, Itorth Pabn Beach, and Allan R. Cohen, 

Patan Beach Gvdens, both of Fla., aMlgiors to Unhcd Air- 

cralt Corporation, Eaat Hartford, Conn. 

Continuation of application Ser. No. 426,711, Jan. 15, 1965. 

This application May 5, 1967, Ser. No. 636,551 

InL CL F02k 9/02 

VS. CL 60—258 8 CWiM 




An injector head having nozzle assemblies with each as- 
sembly being formed with dual coaxial orifices. Streams 
formed by dual orifices of different propellants being 
directed to impinge at a point within a propellant mixing 
zone. Each noole assembly of dual orifices maintaining by a 
momentum exchange between the coaxial streams a single 
stream of its respective propellant. A plurality of dual orifices 
can be located about the face of an injector head and ar- 
ranged to impinge, for example, in a triplicate pattern. 



3,667,233 
DUAL MODE SUPERSONIC COMBUSTION RAMJET 

ENGINE 
Edward T. Curraa, and Frank D. StuU, both of Dayton, Ohio, 
assignors to The United States of America as rcprcaented by 
the Secretary of the Air Force 

Filed Nov. 14, 1969, Ser. No. 870,545 

InL CL F02k 7/08 

U.S.CL 60-270 4CUaK 



The coupling of quantities of heat by exchange between 
two fluids is obtained by dividing the hot fluid into two 
streams at the entrance of a heat exchanger; the first stream 
is introduced into the high temperature portion of the 
exchanger and is then passed to a turbine for reduction in 
pressure while producing work energy; the second stream 
being introduced into a turbine for reduction in pressure 

while producing work energy and is then passed to the heat A supersonic ramjet engine having a fixed-geometry com- 
exchanger at substantially the temperature at which the first bustion chamber. The ramjet engine is operated in the sub- 




48 



sonic mode by injecting fuel in fuel injectors located in a 
uniform cross-section portion of the combustion chamber 
and in the supersonic mode by injecting fUel in fiiel injectors 
located upstream of the subsonic injectors in an adjacent ex- 
panding portion of the combustion chamber. 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6L 1972 



] 



3^7,234 

REDUCING AND RETARDING VOLUME AND 

VELOCITY OF A LIQUID FREE-FLOWING IN ONE 

DIRECTION 

Gabriel V. De Urawlii, Boca Ralam Fhu, anigiior to Tcc- 

■ko, be., Warirfi4^oa« D.C. 

FBad Feb. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 10^5 . 
Iat.CLE02bJ/00 
U.S.CL61— IR 41 




3,667,235 

CONVERTIBLE BARRIER FOR SUBSTANCES 

FLOATING ON WATER 

Paul Pkim, P.O. Box 1002, Tons River, N4., and John J. 

GaBi«hcr, 252 Buricy RomI, Abm^mHs, Md. 

Fifed Apr. 27, 1971, Scr. No. 137,799 

Iiit.CLB63bi5/00 

U.S. CL 61—1 6 Claim 




1.4- 



■ir 



A barrier for substances floating on water having a flota- 
tion member and a liquid pervious and a liquid imf>ervious 
skirt depending therefrom. The liquid impervious skirt is 
deflected at currents greater than about one knot and the 
oily substances are treated with a particulate oleophilic- 
hydrophobic substance less dense than water for retention by 
said liquid pervious skirt. 



3,667436 

METHOD FOR TREATNG SUBSURFACE SOILS 
RolMrl a Roacnc, Tuin, Oida., Mrii^nr to The Dow Chonl- 
cal Coaipony, MMhmd, Mich. 

Fifed June 10, 1970, Scr. No. 45,035 
Int. CL E02d 19(16, 27/16 

ii—ii 



u.s.a.1 



Ctafam 




A method is provided for increasing the stability of subsur- 
face soils. A cavity in the subsoil is filled with a permeably 
consolidated aggregate and optionally clayey soils adjacent to 
the cavity are also treated with a clayey subilizing chemical. 



3,667,237 
NOVEL CONSTRUCTIONS AND METHODS 
P. DoofM, CoroM Dd Mar, CaML, — ignnr to The 
UpiJoha CompMqr, Kafenunoo, Mfch. 

Fifed Aof. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 61,356 
I Int.CLE02dJ/(70 

U.S.CL 61-36 li< 



The volume and velocity of a free flowing body of water, 
such as a river or the like, moving in one direction past a 
control point are there reduced and retarded by diverting 
part of the volume of water, amplifying its velocity, lineariz- 
ing its flow characteristics, and directing this modified flow 
back into the main body of liquid at such an angle as to 
create in the body of the stream, at the control point area, a 
zone of compound flows which through turbulence, drag, and 
other fluid phenomena materially obstruct and retard the 
flow through the control area. 




An improved construction is disclosed which utilizes a 
frozen surface as a support means. The improvement com- 
prises a thermal barrier interposed between the base portion 
of the construction and the ftt>zen surface. The thermal bar- 
rier functions to stabilize the frozen surface by prevention of 
its thawing, thus maintaining support capacity. The thermal 
barrier can be of rigid plastic foam materials, such as polyu- 
rethane foam or a composite of said rigid plastic foams with 
other thermal insulating materials. The advantages of the im- 
proved construction include ease of construction, lower cost. 



and production of a stable construction upon normal 
ble surfaces. 



y unsta- 



3,667,238 

STABILIZED CONSTRUCTION WALL IN UNSTABLE 

FOOTING 
Ben C. Gcrwick, Jr., Oakland, CaHf., assignor to J. H. 
Pomcroy & Co., Inc., San Frandsco, CaUf. 
Original application Mar. 28, 1969, Scr. No. 81 1,331, now 
Patent No. 3,563,044. Divided and this application May 15, 
1970, Scr. No. 37,747 
i Int. ChEOld 3/12,5/18.27104 

VS. CI. *1— 39 1 Clafai 

An arrangement for providing stabilization for a construc- 
tion wall during construction in an unstable footing which in- 
cludes the formation of a basin above the pre-existing surface 
level of a proposed construction zone or site. The basin is 
used to receive fluid therein to provide increased hydrostatic 
' pressure, acting on the wall from inside the construction site 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



40 



to provide pressure within the site to a degree approximating 
the counter-vailing pressures acting on the construction wall 
from ouuide the site. Then, while maintaining the hydrostatic 
pressure, the soil materials within the site are removed by ex- 
cavating down to a predetermined level and replaced (while 
still maintaining the hydrosUtic pressure) with a stabilizing 
fill material of greater strength than the unstable materia 
removed from the site. Thereafter, the hydrostatic pressure 




3,667,239 
ANCIKNI FOR BUOYANT MARINE STRUCTURES 
Geor«e E. Mott, McUdrie, La., asslgnar to Texaco Inc., New 
Yorii, N.Y. 

Fifed Apr. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 33495 

Int. CL B63b 35/44, 21/50 

U.S. CL 61—46.5 10 OalnM 




The invention relates to a buoyant marine platform for 
positioning in a deep water offishore location. The platform 
includes buoyancy control means whereby to regulate the at- 
titude of the unit at the water's surface as well as when sub- 
merged. The platform lower end is provided with an anchor- 
ing member adapted to seat, and be partially imbedded into a 
sloping or contoured ocean floor. Said anchor member com- 
prises separate, yet cooperating components which permit 
adjustment of the anchor's disposition while at the ocean 
floor, to operably engage and fixedly position the buoyant 
^ platform. 



3,667,240 
INSTALLATIONS FOR SUBMARINE WORK 
Robert H. VUain, Maisons-Alfort, France, assignor to Com- 
pagnfe Francalse D'Entrcpriscs MetaUqiMS, Paris, France, 
apart interest 

Fifed Nov. 20, 1969, Scr. No. 878,458 

Chlms priority, application France, Nov. 21, 1968, 174812 

Int. a. E02b 17/00; E21b 15/02 

VS. CL 61—46.5 9 CWnw 

An off-shore drilling platform for hydrocarbons has an 

oscillating column pivoted at its base and kept stable by up- 



ward hydrosUtic pressure, with hydrocarbon storage in the 
column. The difference in the densities of water and 
hydrocarbons in the column is compensated whereby the 
forces acting on the base of the ccdumn and on the pivot 
remain substantially constant. The cdunui has two compart- 
ments, a lower one filled with water, and an upper one form- 
ing a float. Compensating means are pumps and valves ar- 



2?0 



can be relieved and preparation of the site continued. The 
wall structure formed will ultimately be characterized by an 
unsuble footing material on one side of the wall at the lower 
end thereof, a mat of subie footing material on the other side 
of the wall, and a mat of concrete superimposed upon the 
mat of stabilized footing material so that the concrete mat 
can counteract laterally acting forces pressing against the 
outside of the wall. 




ranged so that when the hydrocarbon is introduced into the 
lower compartment it drives out water and corresponding 
mass of liquid is pumped into the upper compartment. The 
pumps and valves are servo-controlled to the levels of the 
two liquids. A gas pocket over the hydrocarbon is kept at 
constant pressure by a pumping system linked to the servo- 
control. \ 



3,667041 
CONSTRUCTION OF A CHAMBER FOR COOLING HOT 

GASES 
German Mnnding, Bad FriedrichshiJL and Willi Zch, Neuen. 
stadt, Kocher, both of Germany, assignors to Messerschmitt- 
Bolkow>Blohni Gcsdbchaft mit bcsdiranidcr Haftui^ Ot* 
tobrunn near Munich, Germany 

FSed M«r. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 16,006 

Clahns priority, application Germany, Mar. 5, 1969, P 19 11 

078.2; June 19, 1969, P 19 30 990.1 

Int CL F25b 9/02 

VS. CL 62—5 14 < 




A construction of a chamber for cooling hot gases such as 
fiiel gases or combustion gases includes means for introduc- 
ing the hot gases into the chamber in a whirling flow and into 
conuct with a coolant which is preferably in solid form and 
is located within the chamber. The gases contact the coolant 
and cause the coolant to slowly dissolve while the gases are 
cooled down. The coolant is advantageously made <^ a L- 
shaped cross-sectional configuration and it inchides a wall 
which surrounds the outlet to the chamber, and which forms, 
with the chamber wall, an over flow weir for the outflow <rf 
the gases after they have been cooled within the chamber. 
The coolant itself advantageously includes means such as 
longitudinally extending grooves for forming rotatable eddies 



50 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



on the whirling gas flow which intensify the heat exchange 
between the relatively cooled boundary layer and the hottei 
routing layers of the whirling gas flow located further inside 
radially. In another embodiment the coolant chamber ad- 
vantageously includes a front wall or closed wall located op- 
posite the outlet which carries the coolant lining in a solid 
form. 



6, 1972 



3,667 ^2 

APPARATUS FOR INTERMITTENTLY PRODUCING 

CARBON DIOXIDE SNOW BY MEANS OF UQUID 

CARBON DIOXIDE 

Robert wnHam KOburn, Lidw Waha, Fla., awlg to RWK 

Devdopmcnt Co., Liricc W^ca, FIil 

Filed Sept 15, 1969, So-. No. 857,743 

Int. a. F25J 1/00. 5/00 

VS. CL 62—10 ^ 12 Clafam 




Apparatxis particularly embodying an improved snow horn 
for producing carbon dioxide snow in a controlled intermit- 
tent manner upon demand. Liquid CO, is directed under 
predetermined conditions of pressure and temperature into 
an upper portion of a hollow double side walled cylindrical 
horn member provided with an open bottom and preferably a 
closed top, the latter having a solenoid actuated dispensing 
valve disposed adjacent thereto with an expansion nozzle 
connected thereto and projecting down into the horn. An an- 
nular area above the liquid CO, inlet in the horn is utilized 
within the hollow well or chamber to collect bubbles of CO, 
gas which may be introduced therewith. The liquid CO, is 
removed from the bottom of the annular chamber to assure 
exit therefrom only of the liquid CO, as by insulated pipe and 
introduced into the nozzle via the solenoid valve. The nozzle 
via minute holes therein preferably imparts a swirling tangen- 
tial movement to the CO, snow formed by the sudden expan- 
sion of the liquid CO,. The liquid CO, entering in the annular 
chamber is subcooled by the tangential swirl or vortex-like 
action of the mixture of snow and gas, to an extent to cause 
any bubbles in the liquid CO, to condense back into liquid 
form. The overall arrangement thereby assures that only 
liquid CO, enters the expansion nozzle to assure positive con- 
trolled formation of COi snow at all times, even though the 
action of the solenoid dispensing valve is intermittant and/or 
off for considerable periods of time. 



3,667,243 
INDIRECT-FREEZING PROCESS WITH HEAT REUSE BY 

AN AUXILIARY WORKING MEMUM 
Chen- Yen Cheng, 2443 South Kninerla Street, Denver, 
Colo^ and Staig-Wang Cheng, 83, Sectfcm 1, Chaog-an EmI 
«omI. Talpd, CMiui /T^wmi 

ConllBualkMi-in.part of application Scr. No. 683,800, Nov. 

17, 1967, which b a contimmtfcMi-fa»-pwt of applfcrallon Scr. 

No. 346,1 12, Feb. 20, 1964, now Patent No. 3,354,083, dated 

Nov. 21, 1967. This application July 10, 1968, Scr. No. 

1 743,707 

I InL a. BOld 9/04 

U.S. a. 62— 58 ^ 5Clalnv 






i/V% 




t&/L),- (S/L), c 



The present invention is related to a separation process by 
which a substonce can be separated in a more or less purified 
state from a solution containing it. In the process, the solu- 
tion is partially solidified by an indirect contact cooling 
operation and the deposited solid is then melted in situ to 
yield the purified substance. High qualit/ deposit is obtained 
by maintaining an appropriate flow of the solution over the 
surface of the deposited solid during the solidification opera- 
tion and by growing the deposit at a low growth rate. Heat 
reuse in these operations is accomplished by the help of an 
auxiliary working medium which undergoes a cyclic change. 
The medium undergoes an endothermic transformation, such 
as melting, vaporization, etc., to absorb the heat liberated 
during the partial solidification operation and undergoes the 
corresponding reverse operation, which is exothermic, to 
supply the heat required in melting the deposited solid. Since 
the transformation temperatures of both the main system and 
the auxiliary system during the operations described above 
are functions of the respective applied pressures, the tem- 
perature differentials required in these heat exchange opera- 
tions between the main and the auxiliary systems can be ob- 
tained by selecting a suiuble working medium and by main- 
taining the pressure applied to these systems during the 
operations or appropriate values. Work is supplied to the 
process through the necessary pressurization operations. 

The working medium used may undergo a set of solid 
liquid transformations, a set of liquid vapor transforma- 
tions, or any other reversible transformations. When a rigid 
wall is used to separate the medium from the main system, 
the pressures applied to them may be different at a given 
time. However, when a deformable vessel is used to separate 
the two systems, both systems are maintained substantially at 
the same pressure at any given time. The processes of the 
present invention are classified according to the nature of 
transformations of the working medium and the nature of the 
wall separating the two systems. The equipments which can 
be used in these processes are also described. 



If 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



51 



3,667,244 

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR FREEZERS 

Wahcr L. Hock, Skokic, HI., and William E. Meyers, Monroe, 

N.C., assignors to Kraftco Corporation, New York, N.Y. 
^ Filed Dec. 29, 1970, Ser. No. 102,284 

Int CI. F25c 7/14 
U.S.CL 62-136 7Ctalms 




3.667,246 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRECISE 
TEMPERATURE CONTROL 
Steven J. St. Lorant, Su Mateo, CaHf., and Phillip L. Dow, 
Geneva, Swhierland, — Ignors to The United States of 
America as represented by the Unttcd State* Atonric Eacray 
Conunission . 

Filed Dec. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 95,237 
Int. CL F25b 41/00 
UA a. 62-208 7cialnii 



LltUlO 
COOlMT 



The present invention is directed to a freezing system of 
the hot gas type and a control system therefor. The freezing 
system is particularly directed to the type wherein a single 
motor is used to drive a dasher for a mix pump or pumps. 
The control system of the invention includes timing devices 
for controlling the start-up and shut-down of the freezing 
system in accordance with a predetermined sequence. 




iriiiriiii-ri-i^ iV'itnTif 



3,667,245 

FAN AND CLUTCH CONTROL CIRCUIT FOR AN AIR 

CONDITMN^ER 

James Peter Till, 341 BfaKldatch Lane, Camp HiU, Pa., and 

WIIHam Jeffrey Hudson, Jr., R.D. #1, P.O. Box 115, Hum- 

rndstovvn. Pa. 

Filed June 8, 1970, Scr. No. 44,493 

Int.CLF25dy7/00 

U.S.CL 62-180 9 Claims 




A temperature control system for maintaining a cryogenic 
load at a predetermined temperature by circulating a wet 
mixture of a coolant through tuUng that is in heat-transfer 
relationship with the load while maintaining the coolant in a 
saturated condition throughout the tubing at a constant tem- 
perature that is slightly cooler than the predetermined load 
temperature. The system includes a preconditioning chamber 
from which liquid coolant is suppUed to the tubing. The 
chamber is partially filled with liquid coolant, with the 
remainder of the chamber filled with vaporous coolant. Inlet 
and outlet metering valves for the tubing are mounted in the 
chamber and controls are provided for maintaining the entire 
interior environment of the chamber including the valves, in- 
terconnecting tubing and both the liquid and vaporous coo- 
lant in a sute of thermodynamic equilibrium at a tempera- 
ture that is a few tenths of a degree lower than the predeter- 
mined temperature of the load. Sensors are provided at the 
load and in the tubing for actuating controllers that manipu- 
late the valves to regulate the coolant flow to be at a rate that 
maintains the coolant in its saturated wet-mixture condition 
in all sections of the tubing during heat transfer frx>m the load 
to the coolant. 



A fan and clutch control circuit controls the operation and 
speed of a fan of an air conditioner over a preselected tem- 
perature range and controls the operation of a magnetically 
operated clutch to drive a compressor of the air conditioner 
at selected temperatures. 



3,667,247 

REFRIGERATION SYSTEM WITH EVAPCHL^TOR 

OUTLET CONTROL VALVE 

Robert H. Proctor, Richmond, Ind., assignor to Controb 

Company of America, Melrose Parl^ DL 

Filed July 10, 1970, Ser. No. 53,861 
Int. CL F25b 41/04 
U.S.CL 62-217 SCIafans 

Refrigerant flows from the compressor and condenser to 
the evaporator by a thermostatic expansion valve having its 
pressure and temperature sensing points in the suction line 
downstream of the evaporator outlet control valve which 
regulates the evaporator pressure relatively independently ot 
the suction line conditions. When the compressor capacity 
significantly exceeds evaporator capacity this system pro- 
vides additional compressor cooling at low suction pressures. 



52 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



The expansion valve may be the bulbless type or the exter- compaitment and in smaUer quantities to maintain the low 
nally equalized type. The ouUet control valve may respond to humidity compartment at above freezing temperatures. The 




refrigerant temperature at the coil outlet, or to fin tempera- 
ture, or may be an evaporator pressure regulator valve. 




high humidity compartment is cooled through its walls to 
keep its temperative slightly above freezing. 



3^7,248 

PROBE TYPE DIE COOLING ARRANGEMENT 

Artlnir H. CarlMMB, Route 1, P.O. Box 369, Smwytr, Mich. 

Filed Sept. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 70,093 

Int CL B22d 27/04; F25b 41/04 



US. CL 62-225 



■ 3,667450 

TORQUE RELEASE ADAPTER FOR POWER-OPERATED 

TOOLS ^ 

Uwreacc S. SchMpd, 250 Goodman HOI Rood, Sudbury, 






3Claiim MaM. 

I filed ScpC 14, 1970, Scr. No. 71305 
* fart. CL F16d 7/06 

VS, CL,64— 29 



TO COMPMCSSOR 

ANc^ cotocNscn 

80 




^ M TMCHMOSTAI 



A cooling arrangement for cooling, with liquid carbon 
dioxide or the like, a die formed with a coolant receiving 
passage in wluch a probe structure is mounted in the passage 
in sealed relation thereto adjacent the outer end of the 
passage, with the probe comprising an elongate tubular 
member formed at one end to receive the coolant fluid and 
at the other end to discharge the fluid into the die passage, 
and an annular heated coolant receiving chamber formed 
about the tubular member adjacent its outer end and formed 
with a heated coolant discharge port adjacent the outer end 
of the passage and a heated coolant receiving port adjacent 
the other end thereof and short of the inner end of the tubu- 
lar member. The coolant receiving end of the tubular 
member and the coolant discharge end of the chamber are 
connected into a closed circuit refrigeration system for sup- 
plying liquified gas to the probe and reliquifying the heated 
gas after it leaves the probe for resupply to the probe. 




3,667,249 

REFRIGERATOR WITH ICE MAKER AND HIGH 

HUMIDITY COMPARTMENT 

Richard C. Brown, and Ormm V. SMiadcrs, boOi of Dayton, 

Ohio, atdgaon to Gcnerai Motors Corporation, Detroit, 

FUcd Sept. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 74,750 

Int. CL F25c 5/18 

VS. CL 62—312 5 Ciynw 

A refrigerator has a high humidity compartment the bot- 
tom oi which is formed by a pan carrying a film of ice water 
supplied by the melting of ice cubes in the storage bin of an 
ice maker. The storage bin has a perforated bottom which 
drains cmto the pan. Refngerated air in large quantities is 
used to maintain a below freezing temperature in the freezing 



A torque release adapter comprising coaxiall]^ aligned 
shafts, opposed discs at the adjacent ends of the shalts having 
spaced parallel surfaces containing circumferentially spaced 
holes for receiving balls, an internally threaded receptacle in- 
tegral with one shaft, said receptacle being concentric with 
the one shaft and an externally threaded cup nut non- 
rouubly mounted on the other shaft so as to be movable axi- 
ally on said other shaft, said cap nut being threaded into the 
receptacle and, in conjunction therewith, providing a closed 
chamber of variable axial length and a plurality of opposed 
dished spring washers mounted on said other shaft in the 
chamber between the cap nut and the disc on said other 
shaft, said cap nut and receptacle being adapted by rotation 
of the shafts relative to each other to change the compression 
of the washers and hence the torque release limit. 



I, 



3,667,251 
ABSORPTION REFRIGERATION SYSTEl^ 
Gabor Miskolczy, Carlisic, and Robert Kaiser, CMnbridge, 
both of Mass., assignors to Avco Corporation, Cincinnati, 
Ohio 

A Filed Nov. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 87,986 
Int. CL F25b 15/00 
VS. CL 62—476 9 Claims 

The invention is directed to an absorption-type refrigera- 
tion system in which a magneto-caloric pump system is used 



JUNE 6, 1972 ^ GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 

in combination with a compatible-ferrofluid refrigerant 



58 



COM* 



. fin |,.,TK " k-atA "^*^fM.»oo 

'"Nr"'^ — ^-^ — T^A-i 0"««--- 






•CWMTOO 



I M 



- -( iv^Tn^ j.noo I l"'!!-~ 

- ^ ;:; ^ . 



'<*\ 
< 



T.IOO 



|i-sn 



ft'iMI 



JCOS(OCN»Clt 



ERRATUM 

For Class 64 — ^29 see: 
Patent No. 3,667,250 

3,667,253 

NEEDLE SELECTOR FOR CIRCULAR KNTTITNG 

MACHINES 

Norbcrt Paul Bourgeois, 7, piaoe des ChMtieux, Troyo. 

France 

FBcd Mar. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 17,656 
Clabns priority, appticatioa France, Mar. 10, 1969, 6906719 

InL CL D04b 15/74 
VS. CI. 66—50 B 9 



P*P«ia 
ft • tiall* 

A-ia/w 



system to replace the percolator-type pump or other conven- 
tional pumps. 



3,667,252 

COUPLING FCMt NULL STRING 

Arthur John Ndaon, 3304 Simsta Drive, San MMeo, Calif 

FDcd Nov. 2, 1970, Scr. Na 85,904 

Int CL F16d 3/06 

VS. CL 64—23.5 




^jf 




The invention relates to a selector device for needles or 
needle accessories of a circular knitting machine adapted to 
select the needles or accessories by means of a removable ro- 
3 Claims tary pattern drum whose periphery may be equipped with 
removable projecting elements arranged according to a 
predetermined knitting pattern and adapted to operate on 
the needles or accesMries through an assembly of linking ele- 
ments arranged in a stepped pattern. 



3,667,254 

HORIZONTAL SELECTOR JACKS AND THEIR 

ACTUATION 

Horst Paepkc, Rottenburg am Nedur, Gcraany. — | to 

The Warner & Swaaey ConqMny. Clev«l«Ml, OMo 
Filed Apr. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 25,961 
Int CL D04b 15/78 
U.S.a66-50R iQ, 



This dual engaging couf^ng connects equal segmental 
lengths of tubing in repeating sequence to form an integrated 
drill string that is suspended by a thrust bearing means from 
an imntersed buoyant pontoon controlled to regulate the 
bearing pressure of the lower terminally connected bit upon 
the bottom of a hole being drilled in subaqueous strata. The 
primary engagement transmits torque, tension and fluid flow 
between adjacent ends of the two rigid members. The secon- 
dary engagement provides uninterrupted translation of the 
string through the torque imparting means and power trans- 
mission by said repeating sequence whereby a subsequent 
coupling becomes engaged prior to disengagement of a 
descending coupling departing from the torquing means. The 
coupling is adapted to rapid assembly and non-selective of 
mating ends to preserve axial alignment of the secondary en- 
gagement. 




A circular knitting machine comprises a rotatable knitting 
needle cylinder which carries a plurality of knitting needles 



54 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 5, 1972 



through knitting stations. A needle*moving jack is pivotally 
connected with each of the knitting needles and is movable 
in a needle-raising stroke and a needle-lowering stroke to ef- 
fect needle raising and lowering, respectively, Each of the 
needle-moving jacks has a butt thereon which is received in a 
cam track which operates to effect the raising and lowering 
of the needle-moving jacks. A mechanism is provided for 
controlling the operation of each knitting needle as it 
progresses through the stations. The mechanism specifically 
effects pivoting of the needle-moving jack so that the butt 
thereon is removed from the cam track to thereby prevent 
raising and lowering of the needle. The means which effects 
the pivoting movement of each needle-moving jack com- 
prises a selector jack which is linearly movable in a direction 
substantially transverse to the axis of rotation of the needle 
cylinder and interconnecting means which operatively con- 
nect the selector jack and the needle moving jack so that 
movement of the selector jack effects the pivoting movement 
of the needle-moving jack. Electromagnetic means are pro- 
vided to control the movement of each selector jack so that a 
selector jack is moved to effect the pivoting movement of the 
needle-moving jack so as to prevent raising and lowering of 
the needle or not moved to allow the needle-moving jack 
with which it is associated to remain with its butt in the cam 
track and effect movement of the needle. 



a slot just wide enough to receive a yam and peimit two 
yams to pass during a yam change. Thereby the risk of the 



3,667,255 

NEEDLE SELECTION ARRANGEMENT FOR A 

CIRCXJLAR KNITTING MACHINE 

Rudolph G. niiilit, Lancartcr. Pa^ — ignnr to Travis NOUs 

\ Corp., a part Interest 

FDed Dec. 29, 1969, Scr. No. 888,697 

Int. a. D04b 15168, 15/74, 15/78 

VJS, CL 66—50 R 2 Clirim 




A flexible band carries jack actuation control means for 
determining when the machine jacks are moved so that their 
butts engage the lower cam race and cause lifting of the nee- 
dles. The control means may be projections carried by the 
band, or holes in the band through which actuators can pro- 
ject, or light-transmitting regions in the band for controlling 
light-responsive jack actuators. The band may be endless, 
and trained about a drum. The jacks are moved vertically 
when actuated, and a magnet or spring is provided to hold 
the jacks down when not actuated. 




^SHi 



latches 6f latch needles becoming damaged by swinj jng into 
latch guard slots during operation of the machine is avoided. 



f 3,667,257 

SLITTING MECHANISM FOR USE WITH CIRCULAR 
KNITTING MACHINES 
Vaugha H. Batter, Hanrfman, Tcnn., —rig:nor to B wlli ig t on 
Industries, Inc., Greensboro, N.C. 

1 Filed Jan. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 1^31 



Int.CI.D04bJ5/i4 



U.S.CL^— 147 



MCliriim 



3,667,256 

MEANS FOR GUARDING NEEDLE LATCHES OF 

CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES 

Kctth Gerald Townacnd, and David Arthur Harlow, both of 

Lcfccatcr, England, a wlgnors to Tiie Bcntky Engineering 

Company limltwi, Ldocatcr, England 

Filed Apr. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 30,177 
ClainH priority, appHcHkm Great Britain, Apr. 23, 1969, 

20,684/69 

Int. CL D04b 15/08 

U.S.a.66— 111 «^ 6ClainK 

In a circular knitting machine there is provided a latch 

guard devoid of feeder receiving slots but formed instead at a 

Jcnitting station or each of a plurality of knitting stations with 




A slitting mechanism for a circular knitting machine is 
made up of a tubular assembly which can be fitted within the 
cylinder assembly of such a machine. The slit mechanism in- 
cludes a heating element for contacting a fabric at a desired 
point for slitting the fabric, and mechanisms are provided for 
actuating the heating element in accordance with a con- 
trolled sequence of operation which is related to the knitting 
cycle of the knitting machine. The tubular assembly may op- 
tionally include a draw-off system at its lower end. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



56 



3,667,258 

APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING STRIPED 

COLORATIONS ON DYEABLE SUBSTRATES IN 

CONTINUOUS FORM 

CUfford Newton, Manchester, England, aarignor to Imperial 

Chemical Industries Limited, London, England 

FUed Nov. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 97,433 

Claims priority, application Great Britain, Nov. 13, 1969, 

55,608/69 

lat a. B05c 5/02 

VS. CI. 68-205 R 2 ClainK 



3,667,260 
EXHAUST PIPE PROTECTOR LOCK 

Danid J. Foote, MBwaukee, Wk., ij^ to 

Company, Milwaukee, Wk. 

Filed Jan. 25, 1971, Ser. No. 109,201 
Int a. E05b 65/12; B60r 25/04 
UA CL 70—159 10 





Striped colorations are produced on dyeable substrates in- 
continuo us or sheet form by applying a plurality of dyestuff 
streams to the substrate at selected points across its width 
while the substrate is moved longitudinally relatively to the 
pointt of application, and then passing the substrate between 
nip rollers, the rate of application of the dyestuff streams 
being so controlled that on passage through the nip the 
dyestuffs are squeezed into the substrate to form non-over- 
lapping longitudinal stripes of the desired widths. 



For the protection of the outer end portion of an internal 
combustion engine exhaust pipe, a protector is available 
which includes a collar secured to the outer end portion of 
the exhaust pipe hingedly carrying a protective cover fcMtned 
with a weighted, radially outwardly projecting fin. The cover 
normally overlies and closes the open outer end of the ex- 
haust pipe to which it is applied but win hingedly move to 
open position through exhaust gas pressure. This invention 
provides a lock for securing the cover in ito closed position to 
prevent the undesired introduction of foreign material into 
the discharge end of the exhaust pipe when the engine is not 
bemg operated and the equipment or vehicle embodying the 
engine is idle and unattended. 



3,667,259 
SAFETY LOCK 
Albert K. Reque, Warsaw, Ind., and JuUus T. FMcrwn, 
Chicago, ni., amignon to Engineering Development Co., 
Inc., Warsaw, Ind. 

FUed Aug. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 61,246 

Int. CL E05b 73/00; G05g 5/00 

VS. a. 70—14 3 ClainK 



t* 3o 



3,667461 
PUSH BUTTON DOOR LOCK 
Thomas K. McGourty, ApCoa, CaHf., m^ 
Rccearch Development Corporation 

Filed Jan. 8, I97I, Scr. No. 104,871 
Int. CL E05b 37/16 
VS. CL 70—301 



;nor to Tbne 



5CWnM 





An improved safety lock which includes two pivotally con- 
^>-^ nected members each having a shank portion with an aper- 
\ ture therein and a hook portion. The shank portions of the 
\ pivoted members are adapted to overiap with the apertures 
^therein being placed in registry so as to receive the hasp of a 
'padlock. With the shank portions of the members over- 
lapping and the holes therein placed in registry, the free end 
parts of the hook portions overiap to define, in association 
with the remainder of the hook portions, a continuous lock 
ring which is adapted to extend through an anchoring aper- 
ture and around a lever or handle of a switch or valve in 
order to prevent the actuation of the switch or valve. The 
overiapping end parts of the lock's hook portions include 
components which cause the end parts to interlock so as to 
prevent the hook portions from being separated and disen- 
gaged from the switch or valve without the release of the 
padlock which extends through the shank portions of the 
safety lock and which normally prevents separating move- 
ment of the hook portions. 






A compact push button lock is provided which can be used 
as a door lock, automobile lock or for various other pur- 
poses. The lock has a large number of permutations and per- 
mits the owner to set the lock to a new combination without 
disassembling the lock or the use of tools. 



3,667,262 

' KEY OPERATED LOCK 

Lewis J. HiU, 4121 N.W. 61at Terrace, Oklahoma City, OUa. 

Filed Jan. 11, 1971, Scr. No. 105,359 

Int. CL E05b 2 7/02, 35/10 

VS. CL 70—384 14 #^t..i.— 

A lock including a body having a cylindrical bore 

therethrough in which a plug is rotatably mounted. Apertures 

in the body slidably receive drivers. The driven are aligned, 

in one position of the lock, with tumbler assemblies movably 

mounted in the plug. The tumbler assemblies extend into a 



56 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June a, 1972 



t 



key slot in the plug, and inseiticMi of a key in this slot biases which has a surface having a co-operative relation with a 
the several tumbler assemblies to a lock-opening positicM) in upered surface on the housing so that when the boh is in the 
which the tumbler assemblies contact the drivers along a 
shear line lying in the interface between the plug and the 
body. The tumbler assemblies are adjustable in their dimen- 
sions by the use of a change key so that they may be altered 
to permit a new key to be made operative for opening the 
lock. 

One part of each tumbler assembly carries a projecting 
flange which projects throu^ a radial slot in the plug into 
one of a plurality of L-shaped slots formed in a master key 
insert assembly. The master key insert assemUy is positioned 
in a slot in the plug which extends substantially paridlel to the 
key slot. The master key insert assembly includes an insert 
plate having a plurality of the described L-shaped slots 
formed therein which slidably acconunodate L-shaqped pins. 
One leg of each L-shaped pin projects into the key slot in a 
position for cooperation with the milled surface of a master 
key, so that when a master key correlated to the particular 
master key insert assembly in use is placed in the key slot. 




LJk^ 



locked position the latch hokls the boh receiving mepns and 
housing securely together. 




3,667,264 
LOCK CORE 

Walter E. Surko, Jr., Southfa^toa, and Janes W. Ellkitt, West 
Haitfard, both of Cona^ aMlgnon to Emhart Corporalioa, 
BkMHnflcid, Com. 

FHcd Feb. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 10.190 
lirt.CLE05b 27/00 
70-2 



U.S.CL 



-369 



l4 



the L-shaped pins are biased by the milled surface of the 
master key to a lock-opening position. The second end of 
each of the L-shaped pins bears against the flange carried by 
one portion (rf each tumbler assembly so that displacement of 
the L-shaped pins by the master key moves the tumbler as- 
semblies to a lock-opening position. 

The master key insert assemUy is slidably disposed in a 
slot formed in the plug, and is retained in the slot by 
cooperating retainer pins slidably positioned in the plug and 
in the master key insert plate. A removal tool passageway is 
provided in the insert plate in alignment with one end of the 
retainer pin slidably mounted in the insert plate, so that a 
removal tool may be used to bias this pin to a position in 
which the retainer pin in the insert plate meets the retainer 
pin slidably mounted in the plug along a shear line such that 
the master key insert assembly may be slidably removed from 
the plug. After removal of the master key insert assembly in 
the manner described, a new master key insert may be 
slidably inserted in the plug so that a new master key must be 
utilized to open the lock. 




A removable or interchangeable figure-8 pin tumbler lock 
core adapted to be received and locked in a housing and for 
operating an associated lock mechanism. The core has a 
body supporting a key plug and a locking element arranged 
for limited angular movement relative to the body and the 
key plug to lock the core in or release it from the housing 
when a control key is inserted in the plug. The lock 
mechanism is operated by inserting an operating key to 
route the plug relative to the body without effecting move- 
ment of the locking element. A line of shear between the 
locking element and the body is formed by a planar surface 
of the body and an arcuate surface of the locking element 
generally tangent thereto. Lugs on the locking element 
cooperate with grooves in the body to prevent escape of pin 
tumblers from the locking element or the body when the 
locking element is rotated between its locking and releasing 
positions. 



3,667,263 
COMBINATION LOCK WINDOW LATCH 
Edward Parry Rogers, The Briars, 81 Shdone RomI, Briton 
Ferry, Neath, Wales 

filed June 25, 1970, Scr. No. 49,891 
Claims priority, appHcatfon Greal Britain, June 26, 1969, 

32,400/69 
Int. CL E05b 57/02, 59/00, 65/06 
VS. CL 70—89 2 daims 

The invention relates to a window latch with a lockable 
boh axially slideably mounted in a housing. The locking 
means for the bolt is a keyless combination lock incorporat- 
ing routable slotted aimidar lucking collars located in the 
bolt housing and disposed coaxially around the boh. The bolt 
in the locked position is received in bolt receiving means, 
there being a invotable latch on the boh receiving means 



3,667,265 

METHOD FOR THE FABRICATION OF STIFFENING 

CORRUGATIONS IN THIN- WALLED, HARD SHEETS, 

ESPECIALLY OF CIRCUMFERENTIAL CREASE 

Gemot Zippe, JaHch, Gcrmaay, asrignor to GcscOadiaft fur 

KcrBVcrfehrcMtcdiBlk mbH, JuMch, Germany 

FBcd Mar. 3, 1970. Ser. No. 16.229 

Claims priority, appUcatioa Austria, Mar. 3, 1969, A 2073/69 

Int. a. B21d/ 7/04 
U.S. a, 72-84 3 data" 

Method of production of beads in thin-walled hard sheet, 
especially of circiunferential creases in rotors of centrifuges, 
by means of a roller and a counter roller as the pressing tools 
which accomodate between them the matesial to bt worked; 
the method includes pressing a roof-shaped groovy into the 






i 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



June 6, 1972 

87 

hard material within ite limits of plastic deformation and th«n t« - i. 

.up.h™^ ™, u. ^ „ j^ m ssr i^csiTii ss'r.^rs.'^^'^sLiri,^ 

rod, sealmg it mto and out of a treating environment so that 




gla to the groove for broadening the groove at right angles 
to its direction of extension. 




3,667,266 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR INFLATING FLUID 

PASSAGEWAYS IN METAL STRIP 

Nerval A. Keith, East AMoo, DL, aasipior to OHn Corporatloa 

Pfcd May 13, 1970, Ser. No. 36,783 

lot a. B2 Id 53/02 

U.S.a.72— 55 8Claiim "n<*««rable rod pinch-off. bulging, or tension foilure is 

avoided. The temperature, and hence viscosity, of the flow- 
mg fluids may be adjusted to control viscous drag forces. 




3,667,268 

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR CORRUGATING 

PLIABLE MATERIAL 

Jakob Rech, Detroit, MWu, asrignor to Burroughs Corpora- 

tloB, Detroit, Mich. ^^^ *^ 

FBed Oct 17, 1969, Scr. No. 867,134 
bt. CL B21d 13/00 
UACL 72-133 25 



A method and apparatus for inflating lengths of metal strip 
having at leayt one inflatable fluid passageway and 
preferably, long lengths of such strip. The process employs a 
coil of the metal strip. The metal strip preferably is of a com- 
posite metal, wherein the inflatable fluid passageways cor- 
respond to patterns of weld inhibiting material. The strip is 
paid off from the coil and pinched to prevent subsequent in- 
flation from reaching the coil itself. The other end of the 
strip IS clamped in a suitable inflation device throu^ which 
pressure is applied to inflate the fluid passageway or 
pawageways. The inflation proceeds up to the pinched oCF 
portion of the strip. Thereafter, the strip is severed just ahead 
of the pinching means, yielding a long length of strip having 
at least one inflated passageway while leaving an open tube 
m the end of the coU ahead of the pinching means for inser- 
tion m the inflation fixture for inflation of a subsequent 
length of strip. The apparatus comprises means for holding a 
cod of the strip, pinching means receiving the strip from the 
coil, inflation means receiving the strip from the pinching 
means and severing means spaced between the pinching 
means and the inflation means for severing the strip from the 
coil after it has been inflated. 




3,667,267 
APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR CONTINUOUS 

MATERIAL FEEDING AND DEFORMATION 
FranAj. Fudis, Jr., Prinoetoa Junctioii, NJ., aMigiior to 
^Weslc m Electric Company, Inoorporalcd. New York, N.Y. 

<>«nnu<ioi»4ii.part of appHcadon Scr. Now 794,488, Jan. 28, 
1969. This appBcatkm Nov. 14, 1969, Scr. No. 876,940 

Int. CLB21cii/00, 7/20 

VS. CL 72—60 75 r-tmt.^ 

Disclosed herein is a process in which flowing fluids are 

utUized to apply viscous drag forces to.a rod of indefinite 

length and advance h continuously through an extrusion die 



Forming corrugations in pliable material, such as metallic 
sheet stock, including the steps of imparting an initial rela- 
tively widely spaced apart corrugations in a workpiece com- 
posed of this material, following which the workpiece is in- 
troduced between two sets of flexible rods or wires which are 
arranged to seat in the loops of the corrugations on opposite 
sides of the workpiece. Thereafter, each such woricpiece is 
transported by sliding motion along the wires and at one or 
more sutions therealong the workpiece is subjected to end- 
wise compression causing contouring <rf the kwps <rf the cor- 
rugations around the wires as mandrels to form a relatively 
densely corrugated article. The wires are capable of lateral 
displacement with respect to one another with the result that 
during endwise compression of the workjMece they will move 
closer together to accommodate the contraction of the work- 
piece and the reduced spacing of the convolutions. 



58 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,667;i69 

APPARATUS TOR THE COLD-BENDING OF PIPES 

Shghkd BcrtBcr, Miuddi, Germany. Miignar to Pwrw* AG, 

Ckw, Swilierlaiid ^ ^, 

fUcd Aug. 27, 1969, Ser. No. 853,243 

Int. a. B21d 7/06. i//06 

U.S.CL 72-166 8CWn. 



J 

tictila 



which it is beneath the first part. The cover is particiilarly 
suiuble for covering a pit adjacent a roUing miU. The mova- 
ble part of the cover may be connected to a sledge in the null 
and carrying the rolls so that on withdrawing the rol^s the 
cover is automatically opened. 




3,667,272 
ROLLING MILLS 
Jack Maltby, Todwick, Sheffield, England, asBignor to 



Davy 



and United Engineering Company Limited, Sheffield, 
Yorkshire, EngUnd 

Filed Jan. 8, 1970, Ser. No. 1 ,496 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Jan. 13, 

1327/69 
Int.CI. 82 lb i//i2 



^i>^t:^ 



U.S. CI. 72—245 



1969, 



11 Claims 



A pipe bending apparatus including an anvil of a desired 
radius and a hammer ram having spaced hammer elements 
kpaced from one another to have a bending radius larger than 
the radius of the anvil. The pipe is adapted to be incremen- 
tally fed through the apparatus between hammering actions. 



3,667,270 

METHOD FOR SMOOTHING ROLLS FOR COLD 

ROLLING OR FINISHING COLD ROLLING OF BRIGHT 

METAL SHEET OR THE LIKE 
WIDem Hendrik Deurloo, Wmuldtn. Nethertands, airignor to 

KaoinkUkc NedcriandKiie Hoogovcns en Stall Fabciekcn 
N.V., »muiden, Nctheriands 

FVcd Apr. 24, 1969, Ser. No. 819,528 
Claims priority, appHcadoB Netherlands, May 1, 1968, 

6806154 
Int. CLB21b 27/00 

UACL 72-236 ^ ^,P*^ 

A considerable reduction of the polishing of rolls of » 
roUing mill for cold-rolling metals is obtained by periodically 
passing a blue annealed steel sheet through the rolls of the 
roUing mill while these exert a pressure on the sheet. The 
blue annealed sheet so used exerts a polishing action on the 
roUs, avoiding need for taking the rolls out of the stands to be 
polished. One blue annealed sheet can be used several times 
for tliis purpose. 




3,667,271 
ROLLING MILLS 
Stanley Fercday, Nottingham, and WWam Harry Smeh, 
Yorkshire, both of Engtand, aadgnors to Davy and Unhed 
Engineering Company Limited, Sheffield, Yorkshire, En- 
gland 

FUcd June 8, 1970, Ser. No. 44,489 

Int.CLB21bi//0« 

US. CL 72—238 * ^ Claims 



A rolling mill stand is constituted by two paire of housing 
posts, the rolls extending between the pairs of posts, and the 
posts of each pair defining between them a window for the 
roll chocks. For each pair of posts, there is a strap bridging 
the postt and interposed between the chocks and roll gap ad- 
justing means. A beam is carried by the two straps and ex- 
tends parallel to the roll axes to bridge the pairs of posts. 
This beam extends, at each end, beyond the housing posts 
and carries means for bending one of the rolls of the mill. 



I 



&^ 




A 



:^' 



x;^ 



J5 




A cover for a pit comprises two parts which when arranged 
in side-by-side relation are together of sufficient size and 
shape to cover the mouth of the pit. One part of the cover is 
secureaUe in the mouth of the pit and the second part is sup- 
ported on inclined surfaces so that the second part can be 
displaced fiom the position where it is side-by-«ide with the 
firet part with their upper surfaces coplanar to a position in 



, 3,667,273 

RUN-OUT TROUGHS FOR EXTRUSION PRESSES 
Oswald Kennedy, and John Ian Harrison, both of Newcastle 
upon Tyne, England, assignors to Vlckers Limited, London, 

England 

Filed Dec. 23, 1969, Ser. No. 887,641 ' 
Clains prtority, appUcation Great Briuin, Dec. 23. 1968, 
I 61,162/68 

' Int. CI. B21ci5/00.B21d 45/00 I 

U.S. CI. 72 257 * Claims 

A nm-out trough for an extrustion press, the troi«h having 
an extendable portion that can be moved from a retracted 
position to an extended position in which it effectively 
lengthens the extruded material supporting surface of the 
trough, the run-out trough being adapted for co-opcraUon 
with an extrusion press such that upon movement of the run- 
out trough, with the extendable portion initially m its 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



59 



minimize 



retracted position, to carry an extrusion away from the press, direct the forces of each through a common axis to _. 

the extendable portion moves to its extended position internal moments and ensure stable operation in a plurality 

, of geometrical arrangements within the operational range of 



the device. 




3,667,276 
SPIRAL ELEMENT AND METHOD FOR MAiONG SAME 
Roderick K. Moodey, Charferol, Pa., Mrignor to Lee-Norw 
Company, Charleroi, Pa. 

Ftted July 14, 1970, Ser. No. 54,747 
Int.a. B21d7 7/06. 7 //74 
VS. CL 72—371 



thereby to support that end portion of the extrusion that is 
the last part of the extrusion to be extruded. 



22 

220 -t^4 



26a • n/ -*— 






24 



^^ 






^26 »« '32 ^, 280 '20 



3,667,274 

APPARATUS FOR BENDING PLATE 

Rkhard Allan Gordon Cape, Lachine, Quebec, Canada, as- ^ "P""** element formed by a method which may comprise 

signor to Dominion Bridge Company Umhed, Montreal, ** '^'P" °^ providing a generally arcuate Wank of arcuate 

Quebec, Canada length not greater than about 180°. applying force to the 

Filed Apr. 3, 1969,'Ser. No. 813,092 *"*** °^ V** **'*"'' *° laterally twist such ends simultaneously 

Claims priority, appUcation Canada, Mar. 4, 1969, 044,626 '" oppo«te directions, and during said twisting restraining the 

Int. CI. B21d J 1/20 arcuate center of the blank from lateral twisting and main- 

U.S. CI. 72—298 5 Clains **»"''»8 *« arcuate lengths of the blank between its arcuate 

-- center and its ends unsupported whereby the twisting forms 

the blank to spiral configuration. 




The method of forming trough members for use in the u^. ci 73 15 R 

fabrication of orthotropic deck bridges which involves apply- 
ing opposing forces to the edges of a flat plate to move the 
edges towards each other. 



3,667,277 

APPARATUS FOR MEASUREMENT OF TEXTILE 

FLAMMABIUTY PROPERTIES 

Bernard Miller, PriMeton; Harold Lambert, PcnnfaigtOB, both 

of N J., and Charles H. Mdser, Jr., Yardky, Pa., wrignors 

to Textile Research Institute, PrinccCon, N J. 

Filed Jan. 13, 1971, Ser. No. 106,115 
Int. CL GOln 25/00 

ISdafans 



3,667,275 

SELF-STABILIZING FORCE DISTRIBUTING 

APPARATUS 

Wayne E. Hunnkutt, Big Bend, Wb., assignor to Applied 

Power Industries, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Filed Feb. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 13,928 

Int.a.B21d7/72 

U.S. CL 72—302 10 Claims 





RECORDER f "^ 



A method and equipment for use in determining the rate of 
flame propagation and other burning characteristics of sheet 
materials wherein a test strip of material is supported ad- 
jacent its opposite edges and after being ignited is advanced 
toward the burning zone at a rate sufficient to maintain said 
zone in a predetermined location. The speed at which the 
strip of material is moved toward the burning zone is ob- 
straighten structures. The device is operative to receive a served and recorded whereby the rate of flame propagation 
force producing power strut and reactive force members to in the material under the test conditions can be determined. 



A freely positionable force transfer device for applying 
forces at selected directions and magnitudes to reform and 



60 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June i, 1972 



The equipment may be housed within an enclosure and the 
composition, pressure, humidity and other conditions of the 
atmosphere in which the burning of the material takes place 
can be varied and controlled so as to obtain consistent and 
accurate determinations as to the flammability and burning 
characteristics of the material under any predetermined con- 
ditions. 



3^7^78 

MFFERENTIAL THERMAL ANALYSIS CELL 

ASSEMBLY 

Hont G. Langcr, W«yluid, Matis.; FranUiB J. Karte, 

Midaiid, and Earl D. Ajicn, AiibHni« both of Mich., a»- 

signars to TIk Dow Chemkal Conpany, NOdbuid, NOdi. 

FBed Oct. 8, 1969. Scr. No. 864.657 

Int. CL GOln 25/00 

VS. CL 73—15 B 10 daimi 



trometer or similar instrument which allows the heating of 
samples within the confinement of the mass spectrometer 
vacuum or adjacent to the ion source. The cell comprises a 
silver block to guarantee uniform heat throughout the cell. It 
is insulated againit the push-through shaft by a section of 
boron nitride, which is an excellent thermal insulator, and by 
sapphire or alumina, for example. The silver cell is equipped 
with two equal temperature sensing wells containing sample 
and reference temperature tensing means. A third and 
usually smaller well, designed to contain the block tempera- 
ture sensing means, is usually provided. The sample itself is 
loaded into a metal cup which is secured to its well, and 
which contacu the temperature sensing means. A similar 
cup, usually containing non-reactive material, is inserted in 
the reference well and contacts its temperature sensing 
means, asually a thermocouple. The cell assembly has a 
detachable temperature sensing head part. 




' 3,667.280 

METHOD FOR DETERMINING THE FREEZING POINT 
OF A HYDROCARBON 
SaniacI W. Strnftom, Floriwant. Mo., asrignor to ShcU OU 
Coapaay, New York, N.Y. 

I FBed jHly 15, 1970, Scr. No. 54,976 



brt. CL GOla 25/02 



se 



UA CL 73—17 R 



This invention relates to a thermal analysis cell which is 
capable of supplying meaningful data in a hi^ vacuum and 
which is particularly useful for operations within a mass spec>^ 
trometer or similar instrument which allows the heating of 
samples within the confinement of the mass spectrometer 
vacuum or adjacent to the ion source. The cell comprises a 
silver block to guarantee uniform heat throughout the cell. It 
is insulated against the push-through shaft by a section of 
boron nitride, which is an excellent thermal insulator, and by 
sapphire or alumina, for example. The silver cell is equipped 
with two equal temperature sensing wells containing sample 
and reference temperature sensing means. The sample itself 
is loaded into a metal cup which is usually secured to its well, 
and which contacts the temperature sensing means. A similar 
cup, usually containing non-reactive material, is inserted in 
the reference well and contacts its temperature sensing 
means, usually thermocouple. The cell assembly has a 
detachable temperature sensing head part. External means 
are provided for utilizing the output of the reference tem- 
perature sensing element for use in controlling the heating of 
the cell. 



TIMfCW*TUWt ^ 



SI«NAL 



^ 



THCmilSTOM 
■MIMC 



Lkwwx' 



^dL 



AMFLIFICM ■ 



^ 



MrrtNCMTM-n 



40- 



^ 



NCCOnOCH 



>— AMPLIFICR 



^ 



37 1 



JtMKnKTWt. 

Rcconon 



Method for detecting the freezing point of a hydnocarbon 
by placing a measured sample of the hydrocarbon in a con- 
tainer aad placing a thermistor in the container into contact 
with the sample. The container is cooled until its temperature 
curve shows a noticeable plateau which is detected by the 
slope of the temperature curve which is being tracked by a 
first derivative circuit. The container is then insulated thus 
warming the sample and, as the last crystals in the sample 
melt, the slope of the curve momentarily accelerates causing 
the circuit to produce a voltage peak which is the freezing 
point offhc sample. 



3,667,279 

DIFFERENTIAL THERMAL ANALYSIS CELL 

ASSEMBLY 

Hont G. LMigcr, Wayland, Mass., assignor to The Dow 

Chemical Company, Midland, Nfich. 
ContinuatioB-in-part of appBcatioa Scr. No. 848,231, Aug. 7, 
1969, now abandoned. This application OcL 8, 1969, Scr. No. 

870,000 

Int. CL GOln 25/00 

U.S.CL73— 15B llClainis 



" i 

VACUUM 



.EXIBLE 



3,667,281 
TESTER FOR PACKAGES WITH FLI 
COVERS 
Charles F. Pfdfer, 39 Parade HiU Lane, New Canaan^ Coon. 

IFUcd Nov. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 86,706 | 
Int. CL GOlm 3/12, 3/26 I 

U.S. CL 73-37 7 ClainM 





This invention relates to a thermal analysis cell which is A vacuum tester for the non-destructive testing of vacuum 
capaUe of supplying meaningful data in a high vacuum and packages, particularly those provided in the packaging of 
which is particulariy useful for operations within a mass spec- meat and heat-and-serve products wherein one of the 



\ 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



61 



packaging members is a flexible member such as film. This 
tester includes a viewing chamber having a selective control 
means disposed to bring the chamber to a reduced pressure 
such as 28 or 30 inches of mercury. The ckxed chamber is 
brought under vacuum which is gradually increased until the 
flexible member enclosing the product just starts to relax at 
which point the selective control means is manipulated to 
maintain this vacuum level and at this subilized pressure a 
gauge is read to determine the degree of vacuum within the 
chamber which is also the vacuum within the package. 



3,667,282 

fLiniMC GAGING SENSOR HEAD 

Bcft J. CzwaUeL and Donald F. MiUer. both of Schenectady, 

both o(, Schenect a dy, N.Y., awlgi to General Electric 

Company 

FBed Fdk 18, 1970, Scr. No. 12,289 

InL CL GOlb 13108 

VS. CL 73—37.7 5 Claims 




" * "■ •'^"■■-•^^ — •<> 



The sensor head component of an apparatus for monitor- 
ing a selected parameter of a continuous material such as 
yam, metal rod, tubing and the like, includes a fluidic long, 
narrow channel for passage of the material therethrough. 
Pressurized fluid is supplied to the center of the channel 
formed by a cover plate member and slotted plate member. 
Passage of the monitored material through the channel varies 
the restriction thereof in proportion to the magnitude of the 
monitored parameter and develops a variable back pressure 
lineaHy proportional thereto. A toggle clamp provides al- 
ternate engagement with and separation of the plate mem- 
bers. A spring device connected to the cover plate member 
provides a means fer loading and threading a yam material in 
the sensor head without stopping the longitudinal motion of 
the yam. 



3,667,283 

MEANS FOR MEASURING THICKNESS OF SHEET 

MATERIAL 

Harao Takcnaka, Tokyo; Hiroslii Okuyama, Kanagawa; 

Noburo Hibino, Kanagawa, and Hichi OMa, Kan^awa, all 

of Japan, assi gnn ii to FlOi Photo FBm Co., Ltd., Kanagawa, 



6ClainM 



FBed May 1, 1970, Scr. No. 33306 
Int. CL GOlb 13/06 
VS. CL 73—37.7 



~* CUUM I 



l_l 



direction of a running web or sheet material. The movable 
thickness gauge is moved in a direction transverse to the 
running direction of the web or sheet 



D 



A stationary thickness gauge is combined with a movaUe 
thickness gauge to measure the true thickness in the lateral 



3,667^84 
TAPERED BORE PROBE 
Ronald D. Amland, Los Anrlt i, and Robert L. CMtle, B 
Scnado, both of CaHf., asslgMirs to Gar Honing Sorvkc, 
Inc., El Scgwsdo, Cam . 

FDcd Apr. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 32.300 
Int. CL GOlb 13/18 
VS. CL 73-37.9 u i 



<'«' 


/ ^^ ^^ 


1 1 i^.U^.^ 


(■^ 


^' u V 



An instrument for verifying the Uper angle of a tapered 
bore comprising a handle portion to which a Upered probe is 
fixed. The tapered probe is formed so as to have a proper 
diametral relationship throughout its length with the tapered 
bore to be verified and has a plurality of radial jets therein, 
each corresponding to a different bore position. Coaxial 
passages are formed in the handle portion and the piobe and 
a connecting rod is movable by an operator in an axial 
direction therein. Air is passed through an axial bore in the 
connecting rod for delivery to a piston at the opposite end 
thereof through which it is radially expelled through one of 
the probe radial jets. The connecting rod may be moved to 
predetermined positions, each corresponding to one radial 
jet. so that the piston may be property aligned therewith. As 
the air passes through the probe radial jets, it is directed 
against the surface of the bore, creating a back pressure in 
the air system. Proper diametral sizing of the respective jets 
will cause equal back pressure readings to be generated when 
air is selectively passed through each of the radial jets, if the 
bore is properly upered. If the bore is not property tapered, 
the back pressure readings will vary between different radial 
passages. 



\ 



3,667085 
LEAK DETECTION SYSTEM 
Edward L. Wright, Plalnfleld, and Ei^cnc T. Mcscck, 
Park, both of NJ., assignors to Costomline Coirtnd 
Prodacts, Inc., Undcn, N J. 

FUed Ang. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 64,736 
Int. CL GOln 3/26, 3/16 
VS. CL 73—40.5 12 











wmm 



A system is disclosed for detecting relativdy small leaks in 
partially inaccessible pipelines having high throughputs. To 
detect the leaks information fix>m a flow meter and pressura 
and temperature transducers at each end of the pipeline are 
fed over telephone lines to a central computation fodlity. At 
the computaticMi center the temperature and pressure infor- 
mation is employed along with information stored in the 
computer to generate set points for a pair fA counters. The 
computer then gates the outputs from the fkm meters into 
the counters over an interval until both of the counters reach 



e2 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



their set points. The computer than examines the numbers in 
the two counters to perfcmn logical operations to determine 
if in foct. the pipeline is leaking. If a confirmed leak is de- 
tected a shut down procedure may be instituted. 



3^7086 
VISCOMETER 
^^^Ham M. Kauftran, Chevy Chaae, and Harry P. KMng, 
Gknami, both of Md., assigiiors to HittiMui Aandatcs, 
Inc., CohunUa, Md. 

FUed Apr. 21, 1970, Scr. No, 30,566 

Int. CLGOln/ 7/70 

U.S. CL 73—59 12 Claiins 



^-^ J \ « 




v^/^//^/^y/////^/)Y^//,y///////-v... ,., .. V - ■:. '. ■ '*-T 




A viscometer, particularly suited for blood viscometry. The 
inventive viscometer is circularly symmetrical and comprises 
a cylindrical channel for housing an unknown fluid and a 
ring-shaped channel, concentric with the cylindrical channel, 
for housing a known Newtonian fluid. A floatable cover ele- 
ment is provided with a cylindrical projection adapted to as- 
sociate with the cylindrical channel and the fluid housed 
therein, and is further provided with a ring-shaped projection 
adapted to associate with the ring-shaped channel and the 
Newtonian fluid housed therein. The cover element floats in 
the known Newtonian fluid with a fluid bearing action, the 
ring-shaped projection being coated with a material which is 
non-wettable, and the channel being coated with a material 
wetteble by the known fluid. The block in which is defined 
the cylindrical channel and the block in which is defined the 
ring-shaped channel are rotated in opposite directions, and 
the relative velocity of rotation therebetween is adjusted until 
the floating cover element is stationary. The relative rotation 
between the cylindrical channel block and the ring-shaped 
channel block is proportional to the viscosity of the unknown 
sample. 



to Air 



3,667,287 
ULTRASONIC TESTING SYSTEM 
Leon D. Fiutm, Woodland HUk, CaHf., 

Prodocts and Chfmkals, Inc., Alcntown, Pa. 
CoBtinaalkMi of appHcatfloa Scr. No. 843,060, July 18, 1969, 
■ow abandoned , which k a contfaraation of appHcathm Scr. 
No. 564,697, July 12, 1966, now abondoncd. Thta application 
Nov. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 93,530 
bt CL GOlB 29104 
UACL 73-67.9 1 Chlm 

Electronic circuitry is described which provides two con- 
tinuously available signals which include means for switching 
a desired one of the two displays on the cathode ray tube. A 
first sweep generator provides a fiill display of the signal. A 
second sweep generator provides an expanded display for 
showing only a desired test area. A switching circuit is pro- 



vided to switch between the two sweep generators to display 
either the entire sweep signal or the test area. The unblank- 
ing signal provided to the cathode ray tube fi-om the second 




sweep ^nerator is superimposed onto the unblanking signal 
of the first sweep generator to brighten the area oi 
during full sweep. 



mterest 



3,667,288 
TENSILE TESTING MACHINE 
John E. Hargrcavcs, 188 Woodbine TcrrMx, Spartanburg, 
S.C. 

Filed Mar. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 15^67 i 
InL CI. GOln 3114, 3110 \ 

U.S.CI.^3-98 .^ 13 Claims 



5. CI. 7: 




A machine for testing the strength of a filameiit, yam, 
fabric, etc specimen by securing said specimen between two 
clamps and applying a controlled amount of force to one of 
said clamps while resisting said force with a pivotably 
mounted lever arm having a predetermined amount of weight 
positioned thereon. The machine of the present invention has 
a rotatably mounted shaft from which is suspended a 
weighted lever arm, said shaft being connected to a first 
specimen hokling means by means of a chain that is secured 
to a drum mounted on the shaft. The shaft further has an 
anti-backlash gear mounted thereon, said gear being opera- 
tively associated with a second gear mounted on a second 
shaft. Said second shaft being joumaled for rotation in one 
direction only, having a one way clutch associated therewith. 
Said second shaft has mounted to an outer end thereof a 
rotauble dial which is calibrated to indicate the amount of 
force applied to the specimen. The dial itself rotates while a 
pointer remains stationary. The controlled amount offeree is 
applied to a second specimen holding means and is generated 
by a hydraulic cylinder or a combination hydraulic cylinder 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



68 



and air cylinder. The weight lever arm has positioned proxi- 
mate thereto an electromagnet which, before application of 
the controlled amount of force to the specimen, remains 
energized to prevent movement of the lever arm during 
securing of the specimen to the specimen holding means. - 
\ 



Ak- 



3,667,289 
APPARATUS FOR TESTING AUTOMOBILES 
Anders Yngvc Back, Johanneshov, Sweden, assignor to 
tiebolaget Scania- Vabis, SodntaUe, Sweden 

Filed Jan. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 1,070 

Int. CI. GOlm 15100 

UA CI. 73-1 17.3 13 Clahns 




r^=#=P=^n 



A measuring and recording apparatus for testing of motor 
cars in accordance with a predetermined test program in- 
' eluding a program unit having a plurality of measuring data 
inputs connected to difTerent measuring points of a motor 
car, particularly points of the motor and electrical system 
thereof. Said inputs are successively switched through to the 
measuring system of a recording instrument, the successive 
switching actions being timed in synchronism with the rota- 
tion of the motor when disabled and rotated by the starter. 
During one revolution of the motor, the relative compres- 
sions of the cylinders are recorded by recording the starter 
current, during another revolution, the primary current of 
the ignition system is recorded, and further sin^e or double 
measurements may be carried out during any subsequent 
revolution. Then, the successive switching actions are timed 
in dependence on time so that during a fixed period, for ex- 
ample, the motor is blocked and the starter is energized, the 
starter current being recorded during this measuring period. 
In this way, a test operation results in a series of successive 
records of magnitudes, essential for the performance of the 
motor car, are obtained. 



3,667,290 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ESTIMATING THE 

FORCE GENERATED BY A MOTOR AS A FUNCTION OF 

AN EXTERNAL LOAD IMPOSED THEREON 
Rkhard E. Hohn, Cincinnati, Ohio, assignor to Cindnnnti 
MilacroB Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Filed Aug. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 61,702 

Int. CL GOll 3100 

U.S. CI. 73-133 9 Claims 

A method and apparatus for estimating the force produced 
by a motor as a result of an external load imposed thereon. 
An apparatus is provided for measuring the total force 
produced by the motor and producing a first input signal as a 
function thereof. A transfer function circuit responsive to the 
input signal operates to subtract from said total force the 
dynamic and frictional forces in said motor. This result is in- 
tegrated to produce an estimated motor velocity. A second 



input signal to the transfer function circuit is provided by an 
apparatus for measuring the actual velocity of the motor. The 
actual velocity is compared with the estimated velocity to 
produce a signal which is input to a feedback loop. The feed- 



•"tWUUC M01DX ion 1 — 

_J 1 





•? 


« 


,-. 


»1 


10, 


- ^i: 


1 






:^ 






DRIVCT 


'J, 


-^ 


■"1 ; 








1 






-Urv^ 


V r 


T 


1 


-IT 


V*\ 




iT^r^^ 


v»% 












""" 


Jtl 








^16 















back loop provides a feedback signal which simultaneously is 
algebraically summed with the first input signal and produced 
by the transfer function circuit as a representation or estima- 
tion of an external load imposed on the motor. 



3,667,291 
TRACTOR PULL LOAD MEASURING DEVICE 
Leonard R. Peak, Lacona, Iowa 

Filed Nov. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 89,628 

InL CL GOll 5lli 

U.S. CI. 73—141 R 9 Claims 




A device having an elongated frame supported at its rear 
end by ground engaging wheels and having a slid below the 
frame pivotally connected thereto forwardly of the wheels. 
The skid is adapted to engage the ground along its length 
during use or be raised above the ground for transport by a 
tongue being connected to the skid and the frame being 
pivoted upwardly about an axis through the wheels thereby 
lifting the rear of the skid. A ballast trolley is moveable from 
over the wheels on the fi-ame to the front end as the wheels 
turn thereby increasing the drag due to the load being trans- 
ferred to the skid engaging the ground. Measuring iixUcia 
along the frame is provided to indicate the pulling ability of 
the vehicle being tested in terms of how far the ballast trolley 
is moved forwardly. 



3,667,292 

DEVICE FCHl CHECKING WHETHER EACH OF 

RUNNING YARNS IS TWISTED AT THE STANDARD 

TURNS PER MINUTE 

YukiMro Hada, FiOiyoahida, Japn, artgnnr to Unltika Ltd., 

Am a raa akl-shi, Hyogo-kcn and Fi^lkdld KnbushlU Kabha, 

FiOiyodikhMhl, Yamanadii^Mn, Japu 

FOcd June 1, 1970, Scr. No. 41,959 

Clafans priority, application Japu^ June 3, 1969, 44/43387 

Int. CL GOll 5100; DOlh 77/00 

U.S. CL 73—160 6 Claini 

The device of the present invention is used for checking 
whether each of ruiming yams is twisted at the standard turns 
l>er minute. This device comprises a driving shaft, a motor 
provided with a variable speed means and a yam contact 
means. The driving shaft is rotated at a rotating speed cor- 
responding to the standard turns per minute, at which each 
of running yams should be twisted. The yam contact means 
is imparted a torque from the shaft and nmning yam, which 



64 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



is brou^t in contact with it. The shaft and the yam contact 
means carry niarks which can be viewed with a stroboscope 



1 



between the thermocouples as established by the bias volt- 
age. The temperature of the sample is then recorded versis 




to determine whether the shaft and contact means are rotat- 
ing at the same speed. 



BIMORPH SENSOR FOR ELECTRICAfLY MEASURING 

PRESSURE CHANGES 
Alvfai G. Moore, Cimbcrlaad, Md., aorignor to Hcrcuks In- 
cofpoivtod, W BiuiHi ^on, DcL 

nkd Apr. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 29,208 

Iiit.CLG01c2f/J0 

VS. CL 73—179 2 Claims 




the time required for the temperature of the sample to reach 
the upper limit of the temperature range of the test run. 







3,667,295 
OIL GAUGE 

StaaitlaM Skutctta, Rothwcc 6 A, 7911 Pfa«wiho»iHRoth, 
Genaaay i 

Filed ScpC 2, 1970, Scr. No. 68,932 
Claiau priority, appHcatkM Gcrmaay, Sept. 6, 1969, P 19 45 

241.6 

bit. CI. GO If 2 J/00 

U.S. CL 73—290 R 1| CWmi 



A bimorph sensor for measuring pressure changes having a 
circular bimorph and a thin flexure comprising iron-nickel 
alloy supporting the circular bimorph at its circiunference 
and said flexure having its outer ^extremity ada p ted to support 
said bimorph in a pressure cell comprising iron-nickel alloy, 
whereby a high electrical output is obtained from the said 
bimorph in response to pressure being applied thereto. 



3,667,294 
APPARATUS FOR THERMAL ANALYSIS 
Robert A. Schocnlaub, Coinmbiis, Ohio, airigiior to The Ed- 
ward Orton, Jr. Ceramic FoundMioii, Cohunbus, Ohio v 
Filed July 23, 1969, Scr. No. 844,031 
Int. CLGOlk 77/00 
VS. CL 73—190 R 6 Claims 

A method and apparatus for high measurement of heat 
content which includes an electric furnace in which a sample 
holding container of predetermined dimensions is placed. A 
pair of differentially connected thermocouples are disposed 
such that one measures the temperature of the container 
walls as a reference and the other the temperature of the 
sample. A source of bias voltage is used to cause the hot 
junction of the reference thermocouple to be maintained at a 
given temperature differential above the other thermocouple. 
A control system is operatively connected to the thermocou- 
ples and to the power source of the furnace to vary the 
amount of heat delivered to the container responsive to 
maintaining the predetermined temperature differential 




A method of and apparatus for checking the liqukl level in 
a container according to which a tubular member is im- 
mersed into said liquid and below its minimum level, whereu- 
pon Uquid and air is trapped in said tubular member by a 
piston and a seal about the rod of a piston and the air is com- 
pressed by the entrapped liquid, the compression stroke on 
the entrapped liquid and air furnishing an indication for the 
liquid level in the respective container. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



65 



3,667,296 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING THE 

SURFACE LEVEL OF MOLTEN MATERIAL IN A MOLD 

Peter Schiefer, Muehlheim (Ruhr), and Bemd Findeisen, 

Duisburg-Buchhoiz, both of Germany, aarignors to Man- 

nesmann Akt i e ng ca s B sch aft, Diifldorf, Gcnnany 

Filed July 24, 1970, Scr. No. 58,044 

Claims priority, appiicatkm Germany, July 28, 1969, P 19 38 

840.0 

Int. CL B22d 11/10; GOlf 23/24 

VS. CL 73—304 R 4 Claims 



to Sodete 
Mecaniqucs 



3,667,298 
MERCURY MANOMETER 
Pierre Chadcnaon, La Tronche, Fraocc, 
Gcacrale De ConstmcCioBS Electriques Et 
(Alsthoa), GrcBobk, Fraacc 

Filed Nov. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 87^55 

Claims priority, application France, Nov. 13, 1969, 6939387; 

July 16, 1970, 7027329 

Int.CI.G01l7/y« 

U.S. CL 73—405 8 Claim 




The rising level of molten metal in a mold, pertaining, for 
example, to a continuous casting apparatus, is supervised by 
electrical resistance wire probes dipping into the mold and 
short circuited by the molten metal therein. The resistance 
change in the circuit is ascertained and used as level indica- 
tion. N 



3,667,297 

FLUERIC TENffERATURE SENSOR 

Cwtcr Vonddl, Vicnaa, Va., a«ignor to The United States of 

America ai rcpreacntcd by the Secretary of the Army 

Continuation of application Scr. No. 629^67, Apr. 5, 1967, 

now abandoned. This appiicatkm May 21, 1969, Scr. No. 

831,813 

Int. CL B21d 28/00 

VS. CL 73—339 A 12 Clainv 



*<■ 



14 












,-tl 



-n 



UMPUHHl "* 



o 



UUbLY^te 



40 



zr 



DWITkL 

w«.. 




^^TT^TTT 



The high precision mercury manometer disclosed herein 
comprises a container exposed to atmospheric pressure and 
seated on one of the trays of a balance. Inserted into the con- 
tainer is a vertical portion of a rigid pipe which is coupled at 
its other end by a flexible connector, to the bottom of a 
second container exposed eithe^ito atmospheric pressure, or 
to a second pressure to be measured. The second container is 
displaceable vertically over the length of a scale graduated 
both above and below the level of the flrst container. The 
connection between the two containers constituted of the 
rigid and flexible conduits has a practically constant volume, 
irrespective of the change in location of the second con- 
tainer. The first container and the balance may be sealed in a 
closed chamber which may be exposed either to atmospheric 
pressure, or to a third pressure between which and the 
second pressure a differential pressure reading is desired. A 
connection is provkled between the closed chamber and the 
second container so that the merctuy level in the latter may 
also be subjected to the third pressure. 



3,667,299 

WHEEL MOUNTING ADAPTOR FOR USE IN WHEEL 

BALANCING 

Warren A. Roberts, 514 Cttnton Street, Redwood City, CaHL 

FDed May 6, 1970, Scr. No. 35,218 

Int. CL GOlm I/O? if60c 25/06 

VS. CL 73—487 9 




A pressure insensitive, temperature dependent fluid oscil- 
lator has a fluid supplied thereto. The frequency of the oscil- 
lator is measured indicating the temperature of the fluid. The 
frequency of the oscillator is made independent of pressure 
fluctuations by having a choked flow condition exist with re- 
gard to the discharge nozzle of the oscillator. 



An evenly balanced annular plate for being nnounted on 
the balancing bead of a bubble wheel balancer is provided on 
at least one side with a plurality of roUtabiy captivated and 
symmetrically spaced balls for engaging a like plurality of lug 
holes of a wheel to support the wheel on the balancing head 
of the bubble wheel balancer. 



899 O.G.— 3 



66 



3,667,300 

ACCELEROMETiai MONITORING DEVICE 

DouglM F. NewcO, Bowk, M«L, Mrignor to The United Stotet 

of America m rcpRMOted by the Secretary of the Navy 

FBed June 1, 1970, Scr. No. 42,218 

Int. CL GOlp 15/OS 

UACL 73-517 4aalni« 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



> June 6, 1972 



] 



3,667,302 

MEMORY MECHANISM FOR PUSHBUTTON TUNERS 
Emery E. Olah, Dee Plalaee, IlL, aerignor to Molorole, Inc., 
Franklin Park, Dl. 

Filed Oct. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 80^95 

Int. CL F16h 35/18 

US. CL 74-10.37 dlCIalma 



^-, 



V/ 



PI 



I 



.^ 









i^ 



34 



^ 






^.- 







An acceleration monitoring device for an ordnance vehicle 
having a pieroelectric transducer for sensing acceleration 
and for providing a signal responsive thereto. The accelera- 
tion responsive signal frequency modulates an oscillator con- 
nected, via a field-«ffect transistor, to the piezoelectric trans- 
ducer to provide an output signal which is transmitted by an 
antenna to a location remote from the ordnance vehicle. The 
field-effect transistor directly couples the piezoelectric trans- 
ducer to the frequency modulated oscillator and, therefore, 
provides both a transient and a quiescent acceleration 
response. A Oass C buffer amplifier is coupled to the 
frequency modulated oscillator and the antenna to isolate the 
oscillator from the adverse effect of detuning which occurs as 
the ordnance vehicle approaches a target or the like. 



For a pushbutton radio tuner, a mechanical memory 
mechanism having a plurality of memory cams positioned at 
axially spaced apart locations on a common shaft. The shaft 
is routed by actuation of a pushbutton which has a portion 
thereof engaging one of the memory elements to tune the 
radio to a desired preselected radio station. A common lock 
mechanism is used to unlock all of the cams on the shaft, and 
friction holding means is provided for each cam to hold the 
cams that are not being set in a fixed position on the shaft, 
while other cams are being set on the shaft. The cam being 
set is moved only under the influence of a setting «ction by 
its associated pushbutton. 



3,667,301 
CONTROL OF GYROSCOPE SPIN-UP DEVICES 
Alan Hugh Kent, WoUngham, and John Clviatopher Ham- 
mond Dnvh, Wargravc, both of Engbmd, amlgnors to Ples- 
•ey Tck co m munlcatioaa Rcacardi Limited, Tapkm, En- 



3,66733 

CONTROL TRANSMISSION 

Detlef Hofmann. Eutingcr Stmme 7S31, KIcMlbrdnn, Gcr^ 

many 

' I Filed Dec 29, 1970, Scr. No. 102,454 

Clatam priority, a ppBcnHo n Germany, Dec. 29, 1969, P 19 65 

279.0 I 

Int. a. F16h 15/04, 55/34, 15/16 



U.S.CL7. 



FBed Oct 2, 1970, Scr. No. 77,593 

Claims priority, application Great Britain, Oct. 3, 1969, 

48,745/69 

Int. a. GOlc 19/26, 19/52 

VJS. CL 74—5.1 9 Claims 





15aainM 



A gyroscope and spin-up system in which the gyroscope 
rotor is rotated by fluid from a spin-up device. Fluid pulses 
are generated as a result of fluid from the spin-up device 
striking pulse-generating fluid-receiving areas provided on 
the rotor. The number of pulses produced depends upon the 
speed of the rotor. The pulses act on a resonant means which 
operates at a predetermined rotor speed to cut off the supply 
of fluid to the spin-up system. 



An infinitely variable transmission, which includes an input 
shaft with a first friction member and an output shaft with a 
second friction member while one of said friction members is 
formed by a sleeve with a conical bore and the other friction 
member is formed by an egg-shaped body of revolution ex- 
tending into said conical bore and in firm contact with the 
wall defining said bore for fiictional engagement and rotation 
with said sleeve, said body of revolution being tikable with 
regard to the axis of said sleeve for varying the transmission 
ratio between said input and output shafts. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



67 



3,667,304 
RIDING LAWN MOWER FRICTION DRIVE 
Edward W. Puller, Galciburg, and Howard K. Duncan, 
RoseviOe, both of DL, amignorB to Outbowd Marine Cor- 
poration, Waukcgan, Dl. 

Filed Sept. 3, 1970, Ser. No. 69,255 

Int. a. F16h 15/08 

UA a. 74-197. . ^ II Claims 




Disclosed herein is a riding lawn mower including a fric- 
tion drive comprising a rotatably driven disc mounted on a 
frame, together with a bracket which supports a roller and 
which is movable relative to a position locating the roller in 
driving engagement with the disc and means on the frame for 
biasing the bracket so as to initially engage the roller with the 
disc with a first normal force and for subsequently increasing 
the normal force between the roller and the disc. 



3,667,305 
MACHINE TOOL HAVING A ROTARY WORKTABLE 
Michelangelo Ranira, Ivrea, Italy, airignor to Ing. C. OUvctti 
A C, S.p.A., Ivrea (Torino), Italy 

FDed June 18, 1970, Ser. No. 47319 
Claims priority, application Italy, June 21, 1969, 52334-A/69 

Int. CL B23b 29/32 "^ 

VS. CL 74-818 9 ciainw 




3,667306 
DEVICE FOR PROVIDING CONTROLLED MOVEMENT 
George L. Bush, Stamford, Conn., assignor to The Bunker- 
Ramo Corporatioa, Oak Brook, lU. 

Filed Feb. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 11,746 

IntCLF16d 27/70 

U.S. CL 74- 1 25.5 4 Oiihm 



A machine tool having a rotary work-table driven in rota- 
tion by a circular gear carried by the work-uble cooperating 
with a worm gear and drive mechanism mounted on the 
work-table support. The underside of the work-table bears 
upon a slideway. The work-uble is locked to the slideway by 
means of three equidistant posts biased into clamping rela- 
tionship with a slot in the slideway. An annular piston 
operates a linkage that engages the posts, and upon actuation 
of the piston the posts are moved to a position spaced fit)m 
the slot to unlock the work-table for rotation. The annular 
piston also moves a plurality of bearings into engagement 
with the underside of the work-uble to remove the full load 
thereof from the slideway to fociliute rotation. 




'» M 'M 



ctnrmtL imt 
tiDcmrs fx 




J*m 



Ml M» 



A device for moving a member by a controlled amount or 
to a controUed position. An element undergoing a rotary 
vibrational movement is coupled to rotate a rotataUe 
member when the element vibrates in one direction but not 
when the element vibrates in the opposite direction, causing 
a slight incremental advance of the roUtaMe member in the 
one direction for each cycle of the vibrating element. 



3,667307 

STEPPING CLUTCH DEVICE 

Hdnz Kekh, VIDingen, Germany, Mdgnor to Kicnzle Ap- 

parate GmbH, Vilfengen, Black Forest, Germany 

Original appHcadon July 15, 1969, Scr. Na 841,773, now 

Patent No. 3389,486. Divided and tl* application Dec 1, 

1970, Ser. No. 94,128 

Claims priority, application Switzerland, July 9, 1968, 

10833/68 

Int. CL FI6I1 27/02; F16d 67/02 

U.S.CL74— 126 lOCIafam 




A stepping clutch device has two annular outer memben 
with inner ratchet teeth, and an inner member having first 
and second sets of resiUent arms having pawl portions engag- 
ing said ratchet teeth and recesses of said two outer mem- 
bers, respectively. The arms can be bent by the ratchet teeth 
in radial direction during relative turning of the outer and 
inner members in one direction, but couple the inner and 
outer members slippage-free during relative turning in the 
opposite direction. The first outer member is fixed, and the 
second outer member is biassed by a spring toward a first end 
position in one direction of roution. Electromagnetic means 
stepwise turn the Second outer member in the opposite 
direction to a second end position so that the inner member 
is turned in successive steps in one direction by the spring 
which is wound up by the electromagnetic means after each 
step. 



68 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



JUNEi 6, 1972 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



3,667,308 
V-BELT 
Schwab, Vlemia, and Ana Mapltach, Maria Eaacr- 
sdorf, both of Awtria, aalgnofs to Sonpcrit AG, Vlama, 
Aintria 

Filed Nov. 23, 1970, Str. No. 91,984 

dalim priority, appHcathm Austria, Dec. 3, 1969, 11267 

Int. a. F16e 5/16, 1122 

U A CL 74—233 19 Oabm 



brakes. The control system then energizes fluid operated 
means for making the appropriate gear interconnections and 
then sequentially releases the input brake and the output 
brake. The input clutch is then engaged and finally the out- 
put clutch is engaged to reestablish a driving connection 
between the engine and driven elementt. The delay between 
release of the input and output brakes assures that abutted 
teeth in the gearing section engage easily at low relative 
speeds and under only light loading. 




A raw-edged V-belt which is of the type embodying at least 
a top cover layer, reinforcement insert means, and a substan- 
tially trapezoidal-shaped core formed of an elastomer. Ac- 
cording to important aspects of the invention, the top cover 
layer is formed of a fiber fleece or a wide-meshed fabric 
completely impregnated with an elastomer. If desired, the 
raw-edged V-belt construction of the invention may further 
be equipped with a bottom cover layer. The invention further 
contemplates that one or both cover layers of the V-belt con- 
sist of an elastomer of low modulus of elasticity, but higher 
breaking elongation, than the elastomer of the core. 






iHirr CONTHOL 



I9-Z-) mtUMATIC ClUCUIT g 




/" 




•TM 



3,667,310 
SELF-TIGHTENING TRANSMISSION GEAR MOUNTING 
Rdnkard Hahacr, Stuttgart, Germany, a wlgn or t« Robert 
Boach Gnri»H, Stuttgart, G«rmany 

Filed Jan. 29, 1971, Ser. No. 111,031 
Clalnu priority, appUcatfon Germany, Feb. 20, 1970^ P 20 07 

849J 
Int. a. F16h 1114; F16d 21104 
MS. CL 74—417 



I priority, 



T 

70^1 



3,667309 
MULTI SPEED DRIVE TRANSMISSION 
Manrfcc F. Franx, Eait Peoria; Charict H. Hcrr, 
Harry B. Newman, Wnrirfngton, and PMBp S. Wcftbcr, 
Morton, al of U., aarignnw to CalcrpBar Tractor Co., 
Peoria, DL 

FHed Oct. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 80,716 

Int. CL B60k 29100, 21/00 

VS. CL 74—340 12 Claims 



lOCWnH 



"*^^M&^ 




A drive gear is freely mounted on a drive shaft and meshes 
with V) output gear on an output shaft. The meshing teeth 
are slanted so that a load on the output shaft and output 
gear, produces an axial force component on the driven gear, 
urging the same into frictional engagement with a threaded 
nut so that the same is held against roution, and moves axi- 
ally to press the drive gear into tight engagement with an 
abutment on the drive shaft while the rotating drive shaft 
screws a threaded portion thereof into the nut. 



Pwd 



1, 



3,667,311 
RECIRCULATING BALL SCREW 
Wyaoi«, Northrldge, CaHf., — ignnr to Schrfllo Com- 

7. Scpuivcda, CaHf . 
Filed Dec. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 96^40 
Int. CL F16h 1/18, 55/22, 57/04 
U.S. CL 74— 424.8 R I 7 dalma 



A drive transnriission for powered vehicles and the like has 
change speed gears which maybe shifted to provide a 
selected one of a plurality of drive ratios and has clutches at 
both the input and output ends whereby the gears may be 
decoupled from both the driving engine and driven shaft and 
may then be braked to a stop to facilitate shifting. Brakes are 
provided at both the input and output ends of the gearing 
section and a pneumatic control system respoitds to move- 
ment of the operator's shift lever by operating the clutches 
and brakes in a programmed sequence which assures smooth 
shifting and avoids damage. Upon movement of the opera- 
tor's shift lever to a selected setting, the control system 
simultaneously disengages both clutches and applies both 




A recirculating ball screw suitable for high speed operation 
and having an improved lubrication system is disclosed. 
Recirculation of the balls is accomplished in a smooth and 
continuous manner by a new ball recirculating member 
which cooperates with the lead screw to urge the balls out of 
their normal ball track to transfer the ball over the lead 
screw in an axial direction and then deposit the ball smoothly 
back into the ball track without the use of ball pick-up fin- 
gers protruding into the ball track. The improved lubrication 
system is comprised of an outer sleeve which seals the lubri- 
cant in place by the use of sealing rings so as to prevent lubri- 
cant contamination and unwanted lubricant migration. 



3,667,312 
DRIVE REDUCTION MECHANISM 

Howard C. Dnhl, 6420 Nynna Parti Drive, Tncoma, Wash. 
Filed Jan. U, 1971, Scr. No. 105,540 
Int a. F16h 1/18; B66d 1/00 
VS. a. 74-425 .Claim. 



system. A force sensitive locking mechanism allows the fiiit 
pivot point to break away when the reaction foroe acting 
thereon exceeds that associated with booster assisted break 





] 

actuation and establishes a second pivot point of relatively 
higher mechanical advantage enabling the vehicle operator 
to actuate the break system independent of the booster assist 



An electric motor is secured to a side wall of a housing 
formed in part from a short length of stock metal tubing. The 
drive shaft of the motor is parallel to the axis of the tubing. A 
belt and pulley drive interconnectt the motor shaft with one 
end of a worm shaft which extends axially through the tubu- 
lar housing and meshes with a worm gear supported in the 
housing. The worm gjear is secured to an output shaft which 
projecu through a wall of the housing and extends perpen- 
dicular to the worm shaft. The worm shaft and the output 
shaft are supported by bearings contained within bearing ^ 
housings which are welded to wall or closure portions <rf the 
tubular housing. 



3,667315 
VEHICLE HANDLE BAR HEATER 

Jack J. PoOy, St., 2524 SHvcr Creek Drive, Franklin Park, OL 

FDed Feb. 10, 1971, Ser. No. 114,134 

InLCLB62k2///2 

U.S. a. 74—551.8 9 ciain» 



3,667313 

FLEXIBLE REMOTE CONTROL WITH SPACED BALL 
BEARINGS 
Don L. Young, Jr., Haaelwood, Mo., assignor to Controlcx 
Corporation of America, Crotoa Falk, N.V. 

Filed Mar. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 17,191 

Int. CI. F16c 1/10 

U.S.CL74-501P / 2 Claims 



/ 



/ 





The tubular cross member defining the handle bar of a 
vehicle, such as a snowmobile, has cartridge heater elements 
in the tubular interior thereof. The wiring from the cartridge 
heater extends through the handle bar to the vehicle battery 
or other source of electricity and includes a heat control and 
electrical switches. 



Flexible remote controls of the type in which at least one 
push-pull blade extends through a tubular sheath and is sup- 
ported on its opposite sides by spaced balls are improved by 
replacing the usual metal ball-cage strips with lightweight, 
flexible plastic strips provided with perforations to hold the 
balls with the desired spacing. 



3,667314 
VARIABLE RATIO LEVER MECHANISM 
Thomas E. Ritter, Utica, Mich., assignor to General Moton 
Corporation, Detroit, Mich. 

Filed Nov, 24, 1970, Ser. No. 92,484 
Int. CL G05g 1/04 
VS. CL 74-518 3 Claims 

A variable ratio lever mechanism for a power booster 
assisted motor vehicle braking system includes a variably 
ratio fulcrum mechanism which normally establishes a first 
pivot point providing the relatively low mechanical ad- 
vantage needed for booster assisted actuation of the brake 



3,667316 
FOOT PEDAL POSITIONING DEVICE 
Rose Valletti, and Angela Arone, both of 241 North Long 
Beach, Freeport, L. I., N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 11, 1971, Ser. No. 123376 
InL a. G05g 1/14 
VS. CL 74-560 ^ 




A positioning device particularly adapted for foot pedal 
controls and the like consisting of a foot shaped platform for 



V 



70 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



receiving a foot pedal controUmd including one or more heel 
stops which automaticaUy podtiQnthe user's heel in front of 
the foot pedal control. The platform also includes an anti- 
friction bottom surface such as foam rubber or suction cups 
which prevent the platform from becoming accidentally 
dislodged from its normal operating position. 



3,667319 
ROLLER TRACTION DRIVE MECHANISM 
Mihoa H. Schcttcr, BloonlMd Hilk, Mich., 
General Motors Corporatioii, Detroit, Mich. 

Flkd July 20, 1970, Scr. No. 56315 
Int. CI. F16o 37106, 13108 
MS. CL 94-665 K 



ISM 

udfiior to 

A Clainv 



3,667317 

BALANCER 

Franz HilBngrathner, Junkersdorf near Cologne, Germany, as- 

slgBor to International Harvoter Compuiy, Chicago. Dl. 

Filed Aug. 26, 1970, Ser. No. 66,949 

Int. CL F02b 75/06 

U.S. CI. 74—604 3 CMm 




A balancer for an engine having a crankshaft including a 
gear connected to and driven by the crankshaft, and a pair of 
meshing pinions connected to and driving a pair of counter- 
routing weights, one of the pinions meshing with the gear. 
The gear has a ring and a hub with projections on each and 
an elastic material interposed to isolate the crankshaft from 
vibrations caused by the roUtion of the weights. 



3,667318 
LIGHTWEIGHT GEAR HOUSING 
Harry R. Lock, Sherman Oaks, Calif., aaaignor to Power 
Farts Company 

Filed Sept. 18, 1970, Ser. No. 73,440 

Int. CI. F16p 1100 

U.S. CI. 74-609 5 Claims 





A contrarotating. equal speed-change ratio, dual output 
compound roller traction driver mechanism from a single in- 
put, wherein the single input drives one member of split input 
sun members. The driven sun members rotates a first set of 
split planet pinions, the latter, in turn, driving both a carrier 
member and a first ring member connected to a fiiBt output 
shaft. The driven carrier member routes the second set of 
split planet pinions on the other or fixed member o^ the split 
input sun members in the opposite direction to that of the 
first set of planet pinions. The second set of planet pinions, in 
turn, drives a second ring member connected to a second 
output shaft for driving the latter at the same speed and 
torque as the first output shaft and in the opposite direction 
thereto. 



t. 



3,667320 
WAVE GENERAT(» CONFIGURATIONS 
Hiigh A. Robinson, Wcnham, Maw., aarignor to USM Cor- 
poration, Boston, Mass. 

I Filed Jan. 18, 1971, Scr. No. 107,038 
' Int.a.F16hi7/(M 

ViS. CL 74—640 




1 Claim 



A lightweight, split housing is provided for drive gears for 
locomotives wheels by a pair of lightweight shells with the 
open edge on one shell having rigidifying means secured 
thereto and projecting therefrom for complementary rigidify- 
ing cooperation with the open edge of the other shell. 



In mechanical harmonic drive actuators, an elliptoidal 
wave shape is employed to generate a circumferential wave 
of radial deflection. The present invention provides an im- 
proved shape for a wave generator cam, specifically a wave 
generator plug defined by a pair of arc centered on the major 
axis, a pair of arc centered on the minor axis, and these arcs 
sharii^ common points of tangency. Bending stress is 
reduced in the deflecting member and better load distribu- 
tion atuined in the wave generator bearing. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



71 



3,667321 

CONTINUOUS TRANSMISSION, ESPECULLY TOR 

AUTOMOBILE VEHICLES 

Jean Maurice, Paris. Rw», aarignor to Societe Anonyme 

Francaiae du Ferodo, Park, France 

Filed Aug. 7, 1969, Ser. No. 848310 

Claims priority, application France, Aug. 29, 1968, 164477 

Int. CI. F16h 47104 

UA CI. 74-682 7cUdm. 



C£2222:S=EZZa2ZZN 




1 I WsT^' ■ ' ■•"'•ItTT?' 



A continuous power transmission device provided between 
a movement take-off and a receiving shaft, especially for au- 
tomobile vehicles. comprUing a reversible continuous speed- 
varying device and a planetary train with four elements, in 
which two elements of said train are continuously active, one 
of said elements being coupled to the movement take-off 
through the intermediary of said reversible continuous speed- 
varying device and the other element being coupled to said 
shaft, each of the two remaining elements, known as change- 
over elements being adapted to be rendered active or pas- 
sive, and further comprising means for rendering one of said 
change-over elements active while the other element is pas- 
sive, and vice versa. 



3,667322 
OIL PRESSURE CONTROLLING DEVICE FOR 
AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION WITH HYDRAULIC 
TORQUE CONVERTER 
MasaakI Noguchi, Nagoya; MasahjPru Sumiyoshi, ToyoU; 
Shigeni Sakakibara, Aichi-Ken; Osamu Ito, Toyota, and 
Takaaki Kato, Toyohashi, aU of Japan, aadgnon to Toyota 
Jklodia Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha, by said Noguchi, Su- 
miyoshi, and Saltakibara and Nippon Denso-KabushikI 
Kaisha, by said Ito and Kato 

Filed July 9, 1970, Ser. No. 53364 
Clainu priority, appUcatioB Japan, July 19, 1969, 44/57145 

Int. CI. F16h 47106, 5/42; B60k 23/00 
UACL 74-731 9 Claim. 




engaging means, and an oil pressure operating circuit for 
controlling the engagement and disengagement of the 
aforesaid frictionally engaging means, said circuit incorporat- 
ing a constant pressure valve for maintaining the operation 
oil pressure in such circuit at a predetermined value, an elec- 
tronically controlled actuator, and an actuating valve for 
changing the predetermined value of the constant pressure 
valve by energizing or de-energizing the actuator. A com- 
puter circuit is provided for controlling the activation of said 
actuator through the medium of deUvery thereto of, respec- 
tively, a signal in accordance with the number of revolutions 
of the output shaft of the gear transmission and a signal in ac- 
cordance with the number of revolutions of the hydraulic 
torque converter turbine shaft. 

» 

3,667323 

HYDRAUUC CONTROL SYSTEM FOR AUlt>MATIC 

TRANSMISSION 

Namk) Irie, Yokohama, Japan, aarignoi to Ntaaan Motor 

Company, Limited, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama CHy, Japui 

Filed Apr. 28, 1970, Ser. No. 32327 

Claims priority, application Japan, Apr. 30, 1969, 44/32720 

Int. a. F16h 5/42; B60k 27/00 
U.S.CL 74-752 C 3 Claims 

/ ' 




A hydrauUc control system for an automotive automatic 
transmission using a planetary gear set, the control system 
havmg a reverse reaction brake which is applied by the mo- 
tion of a manual selector valve when the selector valve is set 
to the neutral position with the engine operating and which is 
prevented from being applied when the vehicle is being 
dnven in a forward direction and the selector valve is shifted 
from the drive to the neutral position. The manual selector 
valve IS controUed by a governor pressure which may be coo- 
nected direct to the source of hydraulic pressure. 



) 



An oil pressure control system is provided in relation to an 
automatic transmission for vehicles composed of a hydraulic 
torque converter pump, a hydraulic torque converter turbine, 
a gear transmission unit incorporating gears and frictionally 



3,667324 

PLANETARY CARRIER ASSEMBLY AND METHOD OF 

MANUFACTURE THEREOF 

James Morrison Laing, Letchworth, England, msIihih to 

Borg- Warner Limhed, Letchworth, Eogbnid 

Filed May 15, 1970, Scr. No. 37,795 
Clainu priority, application Great Britain, June 17, 1969, 

30,711/69 
Int. CL F16h 1/28, 3/44 
VS. CL 74—801 ^ didn* 

A planeury carrier assembly for a transmission in which 
the support for the planet pinions is provided by a preassem- 
bled sheet metal part formed of a support member, a spacer 
and a plate member secured together by welding. Aligned 
holes are bored in the three parts after welding to accom- 



72 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



i 



June 



6, 1972 



modate shafts for the pinions, thrust bearing washers being equilibrate the body to its desired correct balance. The 
located between the planet gears and the support and plate device includes measuring means, correction tools, dnllmg 



»^ 




members. The pinions are secured by an upsetting operation 
on the plate member and the support member at adjacent the 
ends of the pinion shafts. 



3,667^25 

AUTOMATIC SHIFT CONTROL SYSTEM FOR AN 

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION FOR VEHICLES 

Shin Ito; Scitoliu Kubo, and Takalumi Mori, aU of Toyota, 

Japan, assignors to Toyota Jldosha Kogyo Kabushiid 

Kaisha, Toyot»>shi, Japan 

Filed Aug. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 62,557 
Claims priority, application Japan, Oct. 18, 1969, 44/83413 

InCCI. B60li2//00 
U.S. CI. 74—866 1 » Claims 



L^ 






.^L. 



TMwrni , 

OKUT 



■MO I 








means, brake structure and means to transport the bodies 
through the various corrective and measuring stages. 



. I 3,667,327 

MANUALLY OPERATED MARKING TORQUE WRENCH 

Christopher James Lance, Royal Oal^ Mich., assignor to Ivan 

F. IMkiiap, Detroit, Mich., a part Intcrert j 

Filed July 13, 1970, Ser. No. 54,465 

Int. CI. B25b 



U.S, 



3ClaiaM 




An automatic shift control system for an automatic trans- 
mission for vehicles having an engine torque responsive 
signal generator, a vehicle speed responsive signal generator 
and a plurality of discriminating circuits generating a shift 
signal when the relation between these signals satisfies a 
predetermined condition. One of the discriminating circuits 
is connected to a second speed starting circuit which is con- 
nected in turn to a throttle switching which is turned on and 
off depending on the positicn of the throttle valve so that the 
vehicle can be started in the second gear under a low load 
and in the first gear under a high load to the engine. 



A marking wrench has a conventional torque-limiting, 
overcenter connection between its operating handle and a tu- 
bular socket-type wrench. The handle fixedly mounts an 
elongated, laterally offiiet and forwardly extending operator 
arm. which extends just beyond the axis of the wrench 
socket, at one side of that axis. The socket end slidably 
guides a plunger or Uppet coaxial with the socket; and a 
conical cam element at the top of the tappet it enga^ 
cammingly by the operator arm when the over-center con- 
nection is broken. This causes the Uppet to operate a felt- 
tipped marker to mark a fastener engaged by the socket jaw. 
the marker being coaxially slidable in the socket. 



3,667,326 
DEVICE FOR TESTING THE IMBALANCE OF BALANCE 

WHEELS 

Paul Jahn, Sdrambcrg, and Alfred Kapp* Schrambcrg-Sul- 

gen, both o( Germany, aHtgnors to Gcbnider Junghana 

GmbH., Schramberg, Wurttemberg, Germany 

FOed Nov. 16, 1967, Ser. No. 683,724 

Claims priority, appBcaHon Germany, Nov. 16, 1966, J 

32260 

Int. CL B23b 41100, 49/00 

US, CL 408—16 1 Claim 

A device for testing, finding and eliminating any imbalance 

of a rotary body^uch as a balance wheel of watches and 

clocks having various elements to measure imbalance and 



FROM 



I 3,667328 

APPARATUS FOR REMOVING INSULATION 
ELECTRICAL CONDUCTORS 
John D. Stolsheii, La Habra, CaW., aarignor to Republic Cor^ 
poration, Beverly Hila, Calif. 

I Filed Aug. 31, 1970, Ser. No. 68,066 

lat. CL H02g 1/12 
VS. CL 81—9.5 



13 Claims 



A wire stripper of the type wherein an electrically heated 
blade routes about the wire to melt a circle of insulation so 
that an end piece of insulation can be pulled off. A circuit for 
energeing the device operates for a preset time at a predeter- 
mined current, to assure melting of insulation to the required 
depth without damaging the central conductor and to 
minimize the time of the operation. A blade support extends 






June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



78 



along a side of the blade opposite the side that contacts the 
wire, to support the blade against deflection, and to help con- 
fine heat to the blade. The blade is an easily replacable ele- 




tical slicing movements with respect to a stationary knife and 
with each vertical slicing movement accompanied by incre- 
mental horizontal feed movement of the block towards the 
knife for successive slicing thereof; the improvement for said 
microtome which includes a block holder on the forward end 
of the head preformed to snugly receive the tissue block to 
be sliced and with a magnet for holding the tissue block 
within the block holder, a power operated reciprocal block 
support carrier and cassette for the storage of blocks to be 
sliced and for delivering said blocks one at a time to the 
block support for increment positioning vnth respect to the 



ment whose opposite end extends through apertures in a pair 
of spaced pins, and current is carried to the pins by a pair of 
slip nngs and a pair of flexible wires that extend in helixes 
about the shaft from the slip rings to the pins. 



3,667,329 
APPARATUS FOR REWORKING WHEELS ON A RAIL 

VEHICLE 
Thcodor Donbrowsld, Erkdens, Germany, amigiior to Wii- 
hdm Hegenacheidt KommanditgCKliKhaft, Erlcefenz, Ger- 
maoy 

Filed Dec. 16, 1969, Ser. No. 885,398 
Claims priority, appUcation Germany, Dec. 19, 1968, P 18 15 

689J 

InL CI. B23h 5/28 
VS. CL 82—8 9 




"wrj 




'JT^^JWrW 



^ ^^w^TTT;^''XTT^T^<;rT' 



block holder and with power means for effecting automatic 
feed movements of the block support, an improved knife as- 
sembly with flexible blade whose ends are mounted upon 
feed and take-up reels for intermittent advancement, a motor 
for advancing the take-up reel, the power operated conveyor 
belt for transporting aM^ray specimen slices in a continuous 
manner together with a chute for delivery of pardy sliced 
blocks to a stora^ chamber portioned below the block 
holder when retracted adapted to receive blocks when 
released from the block holder and including an electrical 
circuit connected with a series of motors and limit switches 
to provide for an automatic cycling operation in a continuous 
manner. 



d' 



A rail vehicle is supported so that its wheels nave ft«edom 
to route, and thereupon the wheels are engaged and sup- 
ported. The wheel flanges of the wheels are turned until they 
are centrical and cylindrical. The diameter of the thus turned 
wheel flanges is measured and the desired new circum- 
ferential configuration of the wheel rims is determined as a 
function of measurement taken with reference to the axis of 
roution of the wheels and with reference to the diameter of 
the wheel flanges. Thereupon the wheel flanges are turned to 
the thus determined new circumferential configuration. 



3,667 ,331 

APPARATUS FOR CUTTING, TRANSFERRING AND 

DEPOSITING SELF-SUPPORTING STRIP MATERUL 

John Jacob Rcfec, Emporium, Pa., and Henry WiUam 

Roeber, Waterloo, N.Y., amitnoii to Syivania Electric 

Prodocta, lac. 

Original appHcatloa Feb. 20, 1969, Ser. No. 801.1 14, mm 

Patent No. 3,598,009. Divided awl thk appUcation Jan. 25, 

1971, Ser. No. 109,187 

Int. CL B26d 7/06 

VS. CL 83—98 1 c%mt^ 



to Devco, 



3,667330 
MICROTOME ASSEMBLY 
Sidney D. Kobemick, Bfaiirii«ham, Mich., 
Inc., Detroit, Mich. 

FUed Dec. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 98,606 
Int. a. GOln 1/06; B26d 7/02, 7/08 

VS. CL 83—98 18 

In a microtome which has a housing on a support a car- 
riage adapted for forward feed and retraction movements in 
a horizontal plane and mounting a vertically adjusuble head 
which supports a forwardly extending block holder adapted 
to mount a tissue specimen containing block adapted for ver- 




Apparatus for performing the title functions with thick film 
resistor or capacitor miaterial. The material is fed in discrete 



74 



increments to a cutting head which severs selected portions 
and transports the same to a remote location where it is 
deposited across conductors formed on an insulating sub- 
strate. 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 

or 



June 6, 1972 



3,667^32 
APPARATUS FOR STACKING FABRIC FOR PATTERN 

CUTTING 

Robert M. Klrche, 411 West Arbor VHae, Inglcwood, Calif. 

Filed Apr. 19, 1971, S«r. No. 135,058 

Int. CI. B65h 17100, 45/101 

U.S. CI. 83-424 >3 Claims 



respect to bne edge. The system employs spaced condictive 
pins bn the plate supporting bed of the machine for guiding 
the plate into position and for indicating that the plate is in 
position and ready for punching. The plate position sensing 
and punch conuol is performed by an electrical circuit which 
is completed through the locating pins and the conductive 





Apparatus for simultaneously providing a multiplicity of 
similarly sized pieces of sheet material in a stacked relation- 
ship in preparation for a multiple piece cutting operation em- 
ployed in the garment and piece good industry. A movable 
carriage and clamping arrangement withdraws in one pass, a 
plurality of overlying lengths of sheet material from a single 
supply roll or boh of material. Further provision is made to 
individually sever the overlying lengths after the withdrawal 

talces place. 



plate. Time delay devices are employed in the control circuit 
to preclude premature operation of the punch due to ac- 
cidental completion of the sensing circuit during the initial 
placement of the plate into the punch. The sensing circuit 
must be closed for an interval of time before the conUol cir- 
cuit autontatically initiates punching action. 



3,667,333 
SINGLE PASS STRUCTURAL SHAPE PUNCH 
BciUainin Harriaoii Flynn, Jr., P.O. Box 5755, 1629 FuHon 
Drive, Alexandria, La. 

Filed Sept. 30. 1970, Scr. No. 76,918 

Int. a. B26d 9/20 

UACL 83-255 6CtaliM 



3,667,335 

EDGE TRIMMING SHEARS FOR ROLLED METAL 
SHEETS WITH CROSS-KNIVES FOR SEVERING THE 
EDGE STRIPS 
Paul Frledrich Hamacher, St. Ingbert (Saar). (;ermany. as- 
signor to Moeller & Neumann G.m.b.H., St. Ingbert (Saar), 
Gcrmaiy 

Filed Feb. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 1 1^72 | 

Claims priority, appttcatlon Germany, Feb. 15, 1969, P 19 07 

1777.9 
Int. a. B26d 9/00; B23d / 7/04 I 

U.S. CI. 83-513 ICtalim 




Individually movable, integral punch and die assemblies at 
a common punching station cooperate to complete punching 
of a structural member with a single pass of the member 
through the station. 




3,667,334 
THIN CONDUCTIVE HJ^TE LOCATING SYSTEM FOR A 

PUNCH PRESS 
Peter Frank Brunctt, Rochester, N.Y., assignor to Burroughs 
Corporation, Detroit, Nfich. 

Filed May 28, 1970, Scr. No. 41,508 

Int. a. B26f 1/02 

UJS. CL 83—362 3 Claims 

The invention relates to a system for accurately aligning a 

thin conductive plate relative to a plurality <^ punch dies for 

making holes in the plate which are accurately aligned with 



I*A 



A straJght-knIfe edge trimming shears more particularly 
suiuble for opposite mounting in shearing lines for cutting 
thick sheets whose cross-knife for severing the edgp strips 
still conaected to the sheet after the cutting by the edge 
trimming knife has an independent drive and storts its cutting 
action after the edge trimming Itnife mounted ahead of the 
cross-knife. 



3,667,336 

MECHANICAL TUNER FOR STRING INSTRUMENTS 

Sidney Ililer, and Robert G. Towie, both of New City, N.Y., 

assignors to Sidney Itzler, New City, N.Y. | 

Filed July 12, 1971, Scr. No. 161,518 

Int. CI. GlOd 3/00; GlOg 7/02 

U.S. CL 84—454 4 Claims 

The invention relates to a mechanical tuner for stringed in- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



76 



«trumente which permiu student players to rapidly tune and 
retune their instruments and is characterized by the tuner 



13 23 n 




portion in spaced relationship to provide access for a tool to 
selectively rotate the screwhead and the nut for adjustment 
of the spacing between the elements and to lock the 
screwhead and the nut against relative movement. 



3K 24 "29 



forming a part of the instrument during playing and being 
mounted in series with the string. 



3,667339 

FRICTION CONTROLLED TORQUE FASTENING * 

Richard E. Dame, 12625 Billbigton RomI, SOvcr Spring, Md. 

Filed Mar. 30, 1971, Ser. No. 129,545 

Int. CLF16b 37/02 

U.S. CI. 85 — 61 2 ClainK 



3,667,337 

GRIP PLATE FOR WOODEN TRUSS MEMBERS 

James Stanley Burke. 2675 S.W. 69th Court, Miami, Fla. 

Filed June 1 1 , 1 970, Scr. No. 45,330 

Int. CI. F16b 15/00; A43b 23/20 

U.S. CI. 85-13 ictai„ 





Gnp plates or connectors for wooden structural members, 
preferably metal, provided with a plurality of integral 
punched projections in circular arrays or clusters about a 
center opening, the projections being adapted for impressing 
into and engaging in the body of the wood members. The 
projections are in the form of pointed teeth or prongs of al- 
ternating short and long lengths with different end configimi- 
tions. with the tooth edges bevelled at their inside surfaces to 
impart outward deflection to the teeth upon impression into 
the material for enhanced retention therein. 



A friction controlled torque threaded fastening which de- 
pends upon the static coefficient of friction between contact- 
ing surfaces of two parts of the fastening and the normal 
forces which retain said surfaces in engagement with one 
another. The two parts comprise an inner section or core 
having a threaded portion and an outer section or shell. The 
shell has a cylindrical bore of a diameter less than the diame- 
ter of a peripheral surface of circular cross section of the 
core which is appUed to the bore by a shrink fit connection. 
The shell and core are formed of the same material so that 
the connection can be accomplished by heating the shell and 
cooling the core. 



3,667,338 

DEVICE FOR ADJUSTABLE FIXING OF AN ELEMENT 

TO A FIXED ELEMENT 

Rolf Ame Rdnhold Johansson, Lundegrens gata H b. Rung- 

sbacka, Sweden 

FHed Oct. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 865,245 

Claims priority, appUcaCion Sweden, Dec 16, 1968, 17184 

Iitt. CL F16b 25/00 

UAa85-41 ictobB 



3^7340 

FASTENING DEVICE AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME 

Daniel A. Black, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Albert A. IngeraoU, Santa 

Ana; Ira BiV Lcc York, Cocta Mesa, and David O. 

Tttstin, aU of CaHf., assignors to Textron Inc. 

Filed Apr. 29, 1970, Scr. Na 32,970 

lot CL FI6b 13/04 
VS. CL 85—71 1 




s /o 




Screw device for adjusuble interconnecting two elements, 
such as a wall and a door frame, comprising a screw member 
to be screwed into one of the elements having a head portion 
adapted to be engaged by a wrench or similar tool and an ex- 
ternally screw threaded tubular nut member to be screwed 
into the other element, and which rouubly surrounds the 
head portion while being maintained against axial displace- 
ment, the nut member having a socket for receiving the head 



The fastening device is in the nature of a rivet wherein a 
tubular sleeve has a head on one end bearing against one side 
of the work, and an internally threaded tail. A screw ex- 
tended through the head and sleeve is threaded into said tail, 
and is so positioned that the screw head is initially spaced 
from the head of the sleeve; the shank of the sleeve is slotted 
and the resulting strips are notched internally at about the 
middle so that by turning the screw the tail traveb toward the 
head and the strips are folded flat against the other face of 
the work. In the method of making this fastener, after the 
hollow rivet with the head is formed, it is positioned in a die, 
and cutting blades are forced through the wall of the sleeve 
to cut parallel longitudinal slots dividing the middle portion 
of the sleeve into strips of arcuate cross section; then the 
sleeve is held in a die while a tool is inserted and rotated to 
cut a groove into the strips for facilitating the collapsing of 
the sleeve; then the screw is inserted into the sleeve and the 
tail of the sleeve is pressed or swaged into the screw to form 



76 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 



1972 



the internal thread in the Uil and hold the screw. The shank 
between the sleeve head and the adjacent ends of the slots is 
approximately equal to the minimum thickness in which the 
fastener is used. The sleeve head has a recess in both faces to 
accommodate suitable washers. 



3,667341 

ANCHOR BOLT 

Stanley Kaplaa, 10 Grovcr Avcaae Wot, MaMipcqua, N.Y. 

FBcd July 6, 1970, Scr. No. S2,453 

Int. CI. F16b 13106 

\}S. CI. 85—77 1 Claim 



rality of magnetic cores of diverse diameters located in ex- 
citation and load units, respectively. Airgaps, which may be 
of diverse thicknesses, separate corresponding cores on the 
excitation and load units. Individual AC and RF shields are 
included to insure that only concurrent excitation of the 
transducer and weapon release will transfer the power and 
information signals from the delivery vehicle to the ordnance 
device. 




This invention relates to an improvement in anchor bolts 
having a plurality of slots forming sleeve legs having bridge 
portions of narrow width, said legs being moved outwardly in 
a drilled masonry well or hole to rigidly engage the well wall 
upon suitable operation of the bolt. The improvement con- 
sists of the provision of suitable stampings in said bridge por- 
tions to form projections adapted to engage the well wall in 
non-rotative engagement upon insertion in a well. Moreover, 
the stamped out projection re-enforces the narrow bridge 
portion of the sleeve thereby preventing premature collapse 
or rollback upon insertion in close-fitting holes. 



3,667342 
MAGNETIC WEAPON LINK TRANSDUCER 
Frederick E. Wamock, BHhwda, and John H. MaUoy, Sflvcr 
Spring, both of Md., aarignon to The United States o( 
America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy 
FOed Apr. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 26,479 
Int. CL B64d 1104 
liJS, CL 89—1.5 D 7 



ii 



\\\\\\\\\\^ 



^ 



I I 49 



K, 



41- 



m 



J; RACK 



43 



^ 



\%^ 



.\\\\\\\\\\\v 



43 



\ BOMB 




A magnetic weapon link transducer transfers both power 
and option information signals from an ordnance delivery 
vehicle to an ordnance device. The transducer includes a plu- 



3,667343 

MEANS FOR ATTACHING BARREL TO CROSSOVER 

SLIDE FOR QUICK REPLACEMENT 

Chester P. JurkowaU, Budd Ldcc, and MHsic W. Knnd, 

Flanden, both of N J., aalgiMn to The United States of 

America as represented by the Secretary of the Army 

Filed Dec 30, 1969, Scr. No. 889,1 15 

Int. CLF4 If 77/00 

US. CL 89-161 SCIaioM 




In an automatic gun comprising a drum joumaled for rota- 
tion around the exterior of the receiver and a barrel disposed 
for reciprocation therein, a crossover slide is sUdingly 
mounted in a longitudinal slot through the receiver and is 
slidingly engaged with cam tracks in the drum to convert 
rotation thereof to translational movement and transmit the 
translational movement through the receiver. Flanges on the 
crossover slide are engageable by cooperating flanges on the 
barrel responsive to rotation thereof to connect the crossover 
slide to the barrel for translation therewith. A sleeve is 
slidingly mounted on the barrel and is provided with a lug 
receivable by a recess in the receiver and longitudinal 
grooves slidingly engaged with cooperating ribs on the barrel 
to prevent relative rotation of the barrel and receiver when 
the lug is located in the recess. The sleeve is blocked against 
displacement to maintain the lug in the recess by locking col- 
lar rotatingly mounted to the receiver by bayonet lug means. 



3,667344 
POSITION CONTROL SERVO SYSTEMS 
Roy Westbury, Bridgnorth, and John Richard Sfanmons, Wol- 
verhampton, iMith of England, awignon to H. M. Hobson 
Limited, London, England , 

Filed Nov. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 92343 
Clafans priority, application Great Britain, Nov. 25, 1969, 

7,677/69 

Int. CL F15b 13102; FOlb 25126 

U.S.CL9I-1 6Clainv 

A position control servo system comprising a hydraulic ac- 
tuator controlled by a fluid control valve which is responsive 
to output signals applied to it from a pair of transducers. 
eacK of which is responsive to an input signal applied thereto 
to produce an actuator output which a function of the input 
signals, which are in normal operation substantially equal, 
and control means responsive to a difference between the 
transducer output signals up to a predetermined and allowa- 
ble difference to adjust on or the other or both of the trans- 



\J 



> 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



77 



ducen and/or input signals thereto, thereby to maintain the 
tranducer output signals within the predetermined and al- 




steenng gear comprising a pressure operated piston con- 
nected mechanically to a steering member for the dirigible 
wheels of an automotive vehicle, pressure passages extending 
to opposed sides of said piston, a steering shaft, a ball valve 
assembly situated in each passage including a ball valve ele- 
ment and a surrounding valve seat in fluid communication 



lowable difference and to produce an indication when the 
difference is exceeded. 




3,667345 

AIR SHUT^FF TORQUE RESPONSIVE CONTROL 

VALVE UNIT FOR PNEUMATICALLY POWERED 

TOOLS 

Raymond J. Sch acdl cr , and Lester A. Antsbcrg, both of 

Uticn, N.Y., aasi giH wi to Cfakago Pneumatic Tool Company. 

New York. N.Y. ^^ 

FUed Aug. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 65,059 
Int. CL B23b 4Sr04 
\i&. CL 91—59 9 



with said passage, an outlet flow controlling valve seat 
formed in said piston, means carried by the steering shaft for 
shifting said ball valve elements into and out of registry with 
the respective valve seats during application of steering effort 
to said steering shaft thereby controlling pressure distribution 
to said opposed sides of said piston. 




3,667347 

STROKE CONTROL DEVICE FOR HYDRAUUC 

CYLINDERS 

Donald A. Patrick, Sergeant Bhiff, Iowa, assignor to Prince 

Manufacturing Corporation, Sioox Chy, Iowa 

Filed May 22, 1970, Scr. Na 39,656 

Int. CL FlSb 13104 

U.S. a. 91-404 1 



A completely assembled air shut-off control valve unit il- 
lustrated as fitted in a bore of a pneumatically powered nut 
runner in the path of air flow between the throttle valve and 
the motor. The unit is of capsule form defined by means of a 
shell in which the various components are confined. A cap 
closes over an open end of the shell through which end the 
various components may be withdrawn. The valve is of a 
piston and rod form having a spring load in association with 
an adjusting screw and travel nut means for adjusting the 
load of the spring upon the valve. Structural design of the 
valve, together with a valve guide serve to effect pneumatic 
balancing of the valve and consequent reduced friction in its 
movement. 




"V* 



3,667346 
FLUID CONTROL VALVE FOR A HYDROSTATIC 
POWER BOOSTING MECHANISM FOR AN 
.^ AUTOMOTIVE STEERING GEAR 

James J. Duffy, Livonia, Mich., assignor to Ford Motor Com- 
pany, Dearborn, Mich. 

FUed Oct. 29, 1970, Ser. No. 85,013 

Int. CL F15b 9110 

U.S. CL 91—375 A 7 Chdnv 

A power boosting mechanism for an automotive vehicle 



A hydraulic cylinder including a piston rod extending from 
one end and having adjusuble actuating member thereon for 
engaging the piston rod of a control cylinder in communica- 
tion with the hydraulic cylinder such that oil is circulated 
from the hydraulic cylinder through the control cylinder and 
IS shut off upon the actuating element moving the control 
cylinder piston rod to a closed position thereby limiting 
further movement of hydraulic oil within the hydraulic 
cylinder. A double or single acting hydraulic cylinder may be 
employed and upon fluid flowing in a reverse direction the 
control cylinder piston wUl be extended opening the conduit 
from the hydraulic cylinder through the control cyUnder unit 
for oil circulation. The piston in the control cylinder is en- 
tirely metallic and engages an elastomeric seat seal only after 
the oil pressure has substantially dropped due to the iniet 
opening into the cylinder having been closed off by the con- 
trol cylinder piston moving across the inlet opening. The con- 
trol cylinder may be externally mounted on the hydraulic 
cylinder. 



78 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 



1972 



3,667.348 3.667,350 

SEALS BETWEEN COAXIAL ELEMENTS PNEUMATIC TORQUE MOTOR UNIT 

Grcgoriiis Thcodonis Maria Ncdcn, Emmaringel. Eindhoven, Thomas H. Engk, Cape Vincent, N.Y., aarignor to qcneral 
NcCbcrlaBdi, aMifnor to U^. Philips Corporatioa, New Signal Corporation 
Yori^ N.Y. J FUcd Oct. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 79,424 

filed Apr. 1, 1970, Ser. No. 24,506 1 Int. CI. FOlb 3100 

Claims priority, application Netherlands, Apr. 17, 1969, U.S. CI. 92— 1 13 3 Claims 

6905901 

Int. CI. FlSb 27/04 

U.S. CL 92—83 1 1 CUims 




An apparatus such as a hot gas engine and a compressor 
has a rolling diaphragm seal between adjacent walls of a 
piston and cylinder and supported by a liquid, and has an ad- 
ditional piston ring seal between the diaphragm seal and gas 
space above, this ring seal having an operative diameter 
equal to the efTective diameter of the diaphragm seal for 
maintaining constant the volume above said diaphragm seal. 



3,667.349 
SEAL FOR PISTON-CYLINDER ASSEMBLY 
Hans Joachim Siebcrt, Gcrathofcn, Germany, and Grcgoriiis 
Theodonis Maria Neden, Emnutringel, Eindhoven, Nether- 
lands, Msignors to U.S. PhiUps Corporation, New York, 
N.Y. 

Filed Aug. 24, 1970, Ser. No. 66354 

Int. CL FOlb 19.02; F16J 3100 

U.S. a. 92—83 6 Claims 




^^^\ 



A seal for use with a piston rod and a cylinder assembly or 
subassembly, where an annular space between the piston rod 
and cylinder is separated by a sleeve into two annular spaces. 
The sleeve is axially fixed but radially movable relative to the 
cylinder, and radially fixed but axially movable relative to the 
rod, with a rolling diaphragm seal secured between the sleeve 
and rod. 



(UX».„-,.^V '**> 




The disclosure concerns pneumatic torque motor ap- 
paratus for resisting rotation of a shaft in opposite directions 
from a null position. The resisting torque is developed by a 
pair of series-connected calibration springs which are loaded 
by the piston of a pneumatic motor, and which act upon a 
drive rod which engages the shaft through flat bearing sur- 
faces on an attached yoke and cooperating knife edges car- 
ried by a rocker member fixed to the shaft. One end of the 
drive rod is guided for reciprocation within the piston by a 
low friction head, and its tilting movement is limited by 
cooperating guiding surfaces on the yoke and rocker 
member. The head and a low friction annular member inter- 
posed between the two springs serve as seats for the calibra- 
tion springs. 



■ 3,667,351 

DEVICE FOR PRODUCING BAGS BY MEANS OF A 
MANDREL WHEEL 
Alwin Egl, Bcringcn, Switzerland, aasignor to Schweiaerischc 
Industrie-GeacUachaft, Ncuhausen am Rhcinfalt, Switzer- 
land I 

Filed Feb. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 13,132 
Claims priority, application Switzerland, Feb. 25, 
I ^ 2819/69 



Int. CI. B3Ib 1132, 1164; B31c 1102 
U.S.CL93— 12R 



5, 1|69, 




Claim 



A device for producing tubular wrappings for paper bags 
with a mandrel wheel rotating stepwise in a horizontal plane 
and having horizontally outwardly extending pairs of spaced 
parallel folding mandrels. The blanks of bag material are fed 
horizontally toward a position below the folding mandrels 
and are brought into contact pressure with a bottom face of 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



79 



the foldmg mandrels by upwardly moving folding boxes, cutting and creasing dies These dies are in th- ft>r«, «r - 
whereupon a folding fork associated with each folding box sheet metol blanket ^^\k!^ STJ^ t. J , J 
moves upwardly to place and wrap the blanks againS the creased have b^n ch^i^cliv mil^ ^- ^ *^ *^"^ ""^ 

cotr'^rr ''' ^^'^'"^ --'-'' -'^ ^^ -^^- °^ - *-r ^^^^^'-^TrJ^ Z^r^r^ 

*^' match one another in a registered position. 
A feeder is provided for the die cylinders which has the 



3.667352 

LOOP STABILIZE WEB FED VARIABLE REPEAT 

CUTTER-CREASER SYSTEM 

Richard W. Hdmig. BaMmore, and Floyd Stdnmetz, Tlmoni- 

um, both of Md., aasignors to The Rotographk Machinery 

Company, Bahimore, Md. 

Filed Apr. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 29,103 

InL a. B31b 1120; B65b 57102; B31b 7/70 

VS. a. 93-58.2 R 24 ClalnM 



,<r:>2J, 




3,667353 

WEB FED ROTARY VARIABLE REPEAT CUTTER. 

CREASER SYSTEM 

Henry D. Ward, Jr., Pbocnb, and Floyd Steinmetz, Timoni- 

um, both of Md., assignors to The Rotographic Machinery 

Company, Baltimore, Md. 

Filed July 10, 1968, Ser. No. 743,748 

Int CL B31b 7/76 

lis. CL 93—58.2 R 19 cialn» 

A web fed rotary variable cutter-creaser system is provided 
for the packaging industry which is to be fed from a web 
stock of material either printed or unprinted or both. This 
system consists basically of a pair of large diameter, very 
heavy walled drums on which can be mounted a pair of 




qualiues of feeding a selected length of material, yet is con- 
tinuously supplied from a roU web stock of material. A crank 
working direcUy from the die cylinders forms storage loops in 
the web and advances it periodically. Swing rolU are oscU- 
lated by the crank arm and these are geared to a mechanism 
for advancing or retarding the fed portion of the web of 
material in accord with registration marks on the web stock. 



A web fed rotary variable repeat cutter-creaser system is 
provided for the packaging industry which is fed from a web 
stock of material either printed or unprinted or both. This 
system consists basically of a pair of large diameter, very 
heavy walled drums on which is mounted a pair of cutting 
and creasing dies. These dies are in the form of a sheet metal 
blanket into which the shape to be cut and creased has been 
chemically milled. The dies are mounted on these two drums 
so that as they rotate together, with the dies being matched 
one to another in a registered position. 

A feeder is provided for the die cylinders which has the 
qualities of feeding a selected length of material, yet is con- 
tinuously supplied from roll web stock of material. A crank 
working directly from the die cylinders forms storage loops in 
the web and advances it periodically. Swing rolls are oscil- 
lated by the crank arm and these are geared to a mechanism 
for advancing or retarding the fed portion of the web of 
material in accord with registration marks on the web stock. 
Apparatus is provided for stabilizing the storage loops at high 
speeds to prevent the loops from distorting and doubling 
back on itself. Also, an arrangement is provided to create a 
definite bend in the web so that the break or start of the 
storage loop occurs at a predetermined point in the system 
during operation thereof 



3,667354 
WEB FED ROTARY VARUBLE REPEAT CUTTER- 
CREASER SYSTEM 
Floyd Steinmetz, Thnonium, Md., aaignor to The Roto- 
graphic Machinery Company, Baltimore, Md. 
Filed Jan. 30, 1969, Ser. No. 795326 
InL CL B31b 7/76, 77/74, B65b 57100 
MS. CL 93-58.2 R ,« Qains 




A web fed rotary variable repeat cutter-creaser system is 
provided for the packaging industry which is to be fed fh>m a 
web stock of material either printed or unprinted or both 
This system consiste basically of a pair of large diameter very 
heavy walled drums on which can be mounted a pair of 
cutting and creasing dies. These dies are in the form of a 
sheet metal blanket into which the shape to be cut and 
creased have been chemically milled. The dies are mounted 
on these two drums so that as they rotate together, the dies 
will match one another in a registered position. A feeder is 



80 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



provided for the die cylinders which has the qualities of feed- 
ing a selected length of material, yet is continuously supplied 
from roll web stock of material. A crank working directly 
from the die cylinders wraps a storage integral of the web 
about a drum, then unwraps and advances it periodically. 
Swing rolls are oscillated by the crank arm and these are 
geared to a mechanism for advancing or retarding the fed 
portion of the web of material in accord with registration 
marks on the web stock. 



shaped and disposed, to cooperate with an indexing slide, 
having a photomatrix affixed thereto, to positively control 
the movement of the photosensitive material within the 
character spacing gap, thereby assuring a consistent, 
predetermined character spacing of the characters on the 
photosensitive material. 



3^7^55 

OPTICAL SYSTEM FOR FCMMING A \VINDOWED WEB 

IN A COLOR CATHODE RAY TUBESCREEN 

STRUCTURE 

David M. Ng, and Charics H. Rchkope, both of Seneca Falls, 

N.Y., Mrignort to Sylvairia Efedric Products, Inc. 

Fled Nov. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 86,123 

InL CL G03b 4 1 100, 33100; HOIJ 9100 

MS. CL 95—1 12 Claims 




"1 



An improvement is provided in the optical system utilized 
for photo-forming the multiple window pattern defined by 
the opaque interstitial web portion of a CRT composite 
screen structure. Exposure illumination from an elongated 
primary light source is selectively modified by a composite 
light attenuation coating of nonsymmetrical density discrete- 
ly disposed relative to the lens in the pattern exposure 
system. The vapor disposed coating is heavier in the generic 
form of a modified lemniscate which selectively modifies the 
photo exposure to effect a variable gradient of window sizes 
from center to edge of the screen and additionally provides 
windows of a substantially equal size in annular orientation 
progressively about the central axis of the screen. 



3,667,356 

PHOTOTYPESETTING APPARATUS 

Arlcas B. NoMe, 428 Chatauqua, Norman, Okla. 

Contfaiuation-in-part of application Scr. No. 547,400, May 3, 

1966, now Patent No. 3,552^84. This application Feb. 5, 

1970, Scr. No. 8,816 

Int. CL B41b 13110 

MS. CL 95—4.5 16 ClainK 




3,667357 

AUTOMATIC CONTROL DEVICES FOR A CAMERA 
Motomiba Matwda, SaJr^ rtil, Japan, aaaienor to Minoha 
Camera Kabnsyiil if alsha, Ow*a, Japan , 

FlkdDecl2,1969,Scr.No.8844M | 
Claims priority, appMcadon Japan, Dec 24, 1968, 43/94807; 
Dec. 31, 1968.44/728; Feb. 24, 1969,44/16349 i 
Int. CL G03b 7108 
MS. CL 95— 10 CT "^ 61 Claims 




An automatfc exposure control device for a camera is ac- 
tuated by outputs from two separate delay circuits. The first 
delay circuit includes means for storing an electrical signal in 
accordance with the brightness of an object to provide a first 
output, and the second delay circuit includes means for stor- 
ing an electrical signal representative of a desired flash time 
delay to provide a second output. A switching circuit is 
responsive to the first and second outputs whereby a flash 
circuit is actuated only when the second output exceeds the 
first output. A modified embodiment incorporates a third 
delay circuit and the flash is actuated only when the first out- 
put is leas than the third output or when the first output ex- 
ceeds the third output which in turn exceeds the second out- 
put. The first and second delay ' circuits are respectively 
responsive to the brightness of the entire picture and a cen- 
tral portion of the picture, whereas the third delay circuit 
provides the desired flash time delay. 

I 3,667,358 

COLD EMULSION CAMERA 
WilHani D. WllUanu, Jr., 2 Heather Lane, Manwah, N J., and 
Scott UslMr, 98 Copley Avcnnc, Teaneck, N J. 
I Filed Jan. 5, 1971, Scr. No. 103,98 1 
Int. CL G03b 19100 . 
UJS.CL95— IIR 6 Claims 



A phototypesetting apparatus for imprinting typographical 
characters on a photosensitive material, including a character 
spacing assembly having a stop edge and a leading edge 
formed therein, the distance therebetween defining a 
character spacing gap, the character spacing gap being 




A cold emulsion camera in which the film is gripped 
between an optical plug and a metallic plate, which is 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



reduced to a very low temperature by dry ice, for example. 
The optical plug, which may be of optical glass, U sufficiently 
thick to serve as an insulator for preventing frosting of the 
outer face of the plug. The clamping action of a metal plate 
against the inner end of the plug with the interposed film 
prevents frosting in this region. 



3,667,359 
WIOTO INSPECTION POD ASSEMBLY FOR PIPELINES 
Raymond K. Watts, and Walter Harry Chapman, both of □ 
Paso, Tex., assignors to D Paso Natural G« Company, El 
Paao, Tex. 

Hied Nov. 25, 1969, Ser. No. 879,872 

Int. CLG03b J 7/00 

UAa.95-IlHC 8 Claims 



3,667361 
FILM DEVELOPING CAMERA 
Daniel H. Mcggs, Redondo Beach, and John W 

Angdcs, both of CaHL, awig to 

Hawthorne, CaUf . 

Filed Jan. 8, 1969, Scr. No. 789^04 

IatCLG03b 77/50 
U.S.CL95— 13 



81 



Ryan, Los 



12 





A self-contained inspection pod assembly for pipelines, 
propelled by gas pressure within the pipeline. The pod as- 
sembly has resilient cups thereon equipped with spring- 
loaded calibrated valves that stabilize travel speed, and con- 
tains rearwardly directed photographic camera means for 
periodically taking pictures of the pipeline's interior. 



A simple camera and film cartridge which enables the film 
to be developed within the camera, comprising a length of 
film within the cartridge with iu ends joined to form a loop. 
The film loop can be advanced in one direction to take suc- 
cessive pictures and then can be moved in the reverse 
direction for developing. At the beginning of reverse move- 
ment, the film removes a cover that separates it from a 
sponge that is saturated with a monobath developer/fixer 
solution, so that continuous turning of the loop develops the 
film which can then be removed from the cartridge. 



3,667,360 
OPTICAL SCANNING SYSTEM 
Frederick Vidk, Tuckahoc, N.Y., assignor to 
Broadcasting System, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Filed Apr. 23, 1969, Ser. No. 818,769 
Int.CLG03bJ7/02 
MS.C\.9S—\2.S 



3,667362 

PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS WITH MEANS FOR 

ADJUSTING THE EXPOSURE CONTROL IN 

DEPENDENCY ON THE SENSITIVITY OF FILM 

Kari Ncadcckcr, and Anton Thccr, both of Munich, Germany, 

Cohimbb assignors to Agfa-<;cvacrt Aktiengcselbchaft, Uvcrlcuscn, 

Gennany 

Filed Sept. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 75,501 
Claims priority, application Gennany, Oct. 1, 1969, G 69 38 
6Claintt 210.1 

lBtCLG03b77/;« 
U.S. CL 95— 31 FS lo 




A real image of a point source of radiation is formed in 
space by a light beam modulated to convey information and 
reflected from a rotating prism. The rotation of the prism 
causes the image to move along a limacon curve. The moving 
image is reflected by a Mangin mirror and a second real 
image is formed on a photographic film strip. The second 
image remains in focus as it traverses a straight line on the 
film strip with a speed directiy proportional to the tangent of 
the angle formed by the scanning beam by which the second 
image is formed with a line normal to the straight line 
traversed by the second image. 




A photographic camera wherein the exposure control is 
automatically adjusted as a function of the speed <rf fUm in 
the inserted magazine. The camera has a door which opera 
automatically in response to unlocking and thereby disen- 
gages one or more scaiming members from coding elements 
on the inserted magazine. The scanning member or memben 
form part of (Mie or more slides w^iich are coupled to one or 
more adjustable parts of the exposure control and are biased 
in directions to move the scanning members into engagement 
with the corresponding coding elements. The door opening 
mechanism includes a strong spring which biases a lever 
against the door so that the lever tends to move the door 
toward its open position. The lever engages and r e tra c tt the 
slide or slides while it pivots in a direction to open the door. 



82 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



3,667,363 

FILM SENSmVITY COMPENSATED UGHT 

MEASURING NETWORK AND FILM MAGAZINE 

Hanuni Tanaka, Kobe, Japan, awlgnor to ^fllloHa Camera 

Kabushlki Kaidia, Onka, Japan 

FDed Oct 14, 1970, Ser. No. 80,703 

Int.CLG03b77/26 

U.S. CL 95—31 CA 5 Claims 




A camera includes a light responsive network having a pair 
of first and second terminals the resistance between which 
varies the network sensitivity and which are connected to 
first and second contact elements exposed in the camera film 
magazine chamber. A film magazine carries a resistor tape 
whose value corresponds to the film sensitivity and which is 
releasably engaged by the contact elements to cor- 
respondingly vary the network sensitivity. Alternatively, a 
plurality of spaced second contact elements are provided 
which are connected to the second network terminal through 
respective resistors and the film magazine carries a conduc- 
tor tape of a shape and position in accordance with the film 
sensitivity and which engages predetermined second contact 
elements to provide a resistance between the network ter- 
minals to adjust its sensitivity in accordance with the film 
sensitivity. The resistor or conductor tape is the pressure sen- 
sitive tape securing the magazine cover. 



3,667,364 

CAMERA INCLUDING SEQUENTIAL EXPOSURE 

APPARATUS FOR A FILM PLATE 

Arthur S. Mann, 1790 S. W. 23rd Avenue, ^flaml, Fla. 

Filed Dec. 12, 1969, Ser. No. 884,682 

Int.a.G03b;7/i2 

U.S. CL 95—37 13 Clainw 




6, 1972 



1 3f6oTy365 

DEVICE FOR COMPENSATING POSITIONAI, 
DEVUTIONS USEFUL WITH INTERCHANGEAiLE 
LENSES HAVING SCREW THREADS 
Salue Fvjimoto, and Tadayuid Imal, botli of Tokyo, Japan, 
aasignon to KabttshiU Kairiia RIooh, Tokyo, Japan I 
Filed Mar. 2 1 , 1969, Ser. No. 809,286 I 
Claims priority, appUcatioa Japan, Mar. 25, 1968, 43^19337 

Int.CLG03bi/00 
U.S. CL 95—44 R _ 6 ClainH 



A camera including a fixed lens and aperture and means 
for sequentially moving a film plate past the lens sight line to 
present predetermined areas of the film plate for exposure 
each time the lens shutter is actuated. A secondary, simul- 
taneous exposure system photographs and transmits identify- 
ing data, such as a number, to the predetermined film plate 
area. A rack and pinion assembly moves the film plate to 
selected positions for exposure of an area of the film plate 
and includes a numbered and lettered reference guide 
system. A pencil light beam apparatus allows proper align- 
ment of the camera lens with the subject. Micrometer adjust- 
ment means are provided for the rack and pinion assembly. 
A master control switch is located in the secondary exposure 
system which prevents activation of the entire camera unless 
the identifying data is properly positioned. 




A device for compensating positional deviations in screw- 
ing interchangeable lenses into a single-lens reflex camera by 
means of an aperture setting ring including a pin mounted in 
a slot to determine its angular movement. A barrel lens has a 
hook element engagable with a notched area on the aperture 
setting ring. The hook element is mounted to have less angu- 
lar movement than the aperture setting ring so that positive 
engagement is always provided within the range of movement 
of the barrel lens. 



barre 
PHO 



3^067^366 

lOTOGRAPHIC CAMERA WITH BUILT-IN 
RANGEFINDER 
Dieter Enfebmann, Unterhaddng; Dieter Maas, Munich; Rolf 
Sclirodcr, Munkh,^nd Gcrda Unke, Munkh, all of Ger- 
many, assignors to Agfa-Gcvaert AktienfcwUachaft, Lcvcr- 
kttsen, Germany 

Filed May 21, 1970, Ser. No. 39306 
Claims priority, application Germany, May 23, 1969, G 69 

20 873.7 

Int. CI. G03b 3108 

U.S. CL 95-44 C 9 Claims 



2i 2Sf^t9 23 




A photographic camera wherein a plastic camera body 
supports the metallic casing of a built-in rangefinder and a 
lens mount including a focussing ring whose rotation causes 
displacements of a nK>vable optical element in the ran- 
gefinder casing by way of a gear traiir. A shaft of the gear 
train drives a rotary cam which displaces the movable optical 
element by way of one or more levers. Alternatively, the 
shaft of the gear train drives a threaded shaft which effects 
axial movements of a nut so that the latter pivots a lever 
which supports the movable optical element. The connection 
between the shaft of the gear train and the cam or nut is such 
that the shaft can move radially to compensate for eventual 
displacements of the lens mount with reference to the casing 
of the raiigefinder. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



88 



3,667367 

SHUTTER RELEASE TIME PRELIMINARY INDICATION 

DEVICE FOR A PHOTOGRAPHIC CAMERA HAVING A 

BUILT-IN SELF-TIMER 

Fumihiro Miyagawa, Tokyo, Japan, assignor to Ricoh Co., 

Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filed July 27, 1970, Ser. Na 58,414 
Claims priority, application Japan, Aug. 21, 1969, 44/79663 

Int.a.G03by7/J^ 
U.S. CL 95-53.3 4Ctatas 



invention is where the gel composition is heat reversible and 
therefore, can be heated after use to convert to a liquid or 
viscous sute and can then be reused in the system which 
requires a liquid or viscous gel composition for the starting 
material. A gel comprising a solution of metal ions or physi- 
cal developer is an especially preferred system. 




3,667369 

AIR DEFLECTION PLATE FOR A VEHICLE 

DonaM D. Smith, 31 17 Homeway Drive. Cedar Falls, Iowa 

Filed Feb. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 12394 

Int. CL B60h 1/24 

U.S.CL 98-2.12 4cua™ 



A photographic camera having a self-timer which can be 
set to release the shutter alter a predetermined time delay, 
wherein the improvement is in a device operative after the 
setting of the self-timer to indicate when the shutter is about 
to be released. A level connected to the self-timer shaft trips 
a switch a few seconds before the shutter is released and 
turns on a lamp visible from the front of the camera. The 
lamp indicates that the shutter is about to be released and 
serves to alert the persons who are about to be photoa- 
raphed. * 




~zt 



3,667368 

GEL ROLLER FOR USE IN PHOTOGRAPHIC 

PROCESSING 

Alvin Cronig, Uxington, Mass., assignor to Itek Corporation, 

Lexington, Mass. 

Original application Sept. 3, 1968, Ser. No. 756,797, now 

Patent No. 3374,618. Divklcd and this application Dec. 10, 

1970, Ser. No. 96,710 

Int CL G03d 3/00 

UA a. 95-89 A ^ 2 Claims 



f40 




134 



Improved photographic gel processes, apparatus, and com- 
positions wherein the photographic materials are carried in a 
gel composition. The gel composition preferably comprises 
the reaction product of a solution of image forming materials 
and a gel former. Preferably the gel composition structure is 
heat-reversible and flexible. In a preferred method of this in- 
vention, a photosensitive copy medium is exposed and con- 
Ucted with a gel composition comprising a reaction product 
of a solution of image forming materials and a gel former. 
The gel composition is allowed to remain in contact with 
photosensitive material for a sufficient time to process the 
exposed photosensitive material. The gel composition is 
cooled during the processing in order to form a layer which is 
strippable from the photosensitive material. In one embodi- 
ment of this invention, the gel composition is in the liquid or 
viscous state when it is contocted with the photo sensitive 
layer. The gel composition also may be in the form of a tape, 
gel roller, or the like when it is brought into contact with the' 
photosensitive layer. Another preferred embodiment of this 



An air deflection plate for use with a vehicle having a door 
with a vent window and a door window positioned therebe- 
hind. Upper and lower support members are secured to the 
vehicle door adjacent the upper and lower ends of the vent 
window. A U-shaped support extends outwardly from the 
support members and has a rear view mirror operatively 
secured thereto. The deflection plate is fnctionally pivotally 
secured at its upper end to the upper support member and is 
ftictionally pivotally secured at its lower end to the lower 
support member. The air deflection plate is comprised of 
clear safety plate glass and has an inner side edge which is 
complementary in shape to the exterior surface of the vent 
window. The air deflection plate is movable from a first posi- 
tion wherein the inner side edge of the plate is positioned 
closely adjacent the vent window to prevent air currents from 
passing between the air deflection plate and the vent window 
so that the air currents are deflected outwardly and rear- 
wardly therefrom. A resilient molding strip is secured to the 
inner edge of the air deflection plate to effectively seal the 
inner side edge of the air deflection plate against the vent 
window. The air deflection plate is also pivotally movable to 
a second position wherein the inner side edge thereof is posi- 
tioned forwardly and outwardly of the trailing edge thereof 
so that air currents may be deflected into the vehicle cab 
through the door window when the door window is lowered 
or opened. 



3,667370 

NUCLEAR CONTAINMENT EMERGENCY 

VENTILATING SYSTEM 

John H. Noble, WcUealey Mils, Mm., ■islgiiiii to Stone & 

Webster Engineering Corporatktn, Bortoo, Mms. 

FBed Jan. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 2331 

IntCLF24fy//02 

UA CL 98—33 R i^ cWn» 

An emergency air mixing and venting system within the 
containment structure of a nuclear power reactor contain- 



84 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 



1972 



ment system mixes gases and vapors contaminated with the conveyor operates to move each loaded food mold into 
radioactivity with air contained in the containment structure engagement with guides which define a path through the 

cooking vessel. The guides operate to fold the loaded food 
molds into a closed position, thereby to form a U-shaped tor- 

I 























r" 




M- 
25 

X 

[ 

c 


"m 




T 


1 


VM 


ifi 


"~>33 




J 


r» 


-12 




Z' 










•ft 












-« » 


)o * 






-so Jl 

^40 


J4 





ZT 



prior to passing air in the containment through conventional 
gas treatment equipment and subsequently discharging it to 
the outside atmosphere. 




3,667^71 
STOVE VENTILATING APPARATUS 
Kenneth S. RusmU, 3928 Marine Driyc, West Vancouver, 
British Cohunbia, Canada 

fUed Mar. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 23,538 

Int. CL BOId 45/00 

U.S.CL98— 115K 1 Claim 



ils^l 

IB of 



tilla. Means are als^isclosed on each mold to prevent the 
accidenul opening ot the mold while it is in the guides. 
Pusher means are further included in each food mold for au- 
tomatically discharging cooked tortillas onto a tray. 




3,667^73 

AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR VENDING FRIED FOODS 
Frederic A. Sidwr, Glen EUyn, and JoMph Gayaowsid, 
Westchester, both of 111., aas^nors to said SIchcr, by said 
' Gaysow$ld 

Filed June 8, 1970, Scr. No. 44,232 

Int. CLA47J 37/72 

U.S, CI. 99—407 19 Claims 



Ventilating apparatus for cooking stoves ana outer ap- 
pliances using hot oils and fats and including a duct having 
an entrance through which grease-laden air enters the duct. 
A cartridge positioned within the duct is reversiUe between 
two operative positions. This cartridge has a passage 
therethrough in which baffle means is located for causing 
grease to be deposited in the cartridge, the baffle means 
being such that it works effectively regardless of which of the 
two operative positions the cartridge is in. A spray is located 
above the cartridge to wash the grease off the baffle means 
and into a trough located beneath the cartridge. 



3^7^72 
FOOD COOiONG APPARATUS 
Afthnr L. HOvitz; Phflip E. Hllvitz; Harvey M. Hllvitz, and 
Rldurd Campbell, all of Pueblo, Colo., awignors to La Tol- 
tcca Foods, lac PucMo, Colo. 

mad Nov. 13, 1969, Scr. No. 876,429 

Int. CLA47J 37/72 

VS. CL 99—404 19 Claims 

There is disclosed a food cooking apparatus having a con- 
veyor positioned over a cooking vessel. The cooking vessel is 
filled with frying fat and means are provided for heating the 
fat to a predetermined temperature. A plurality of normally 
open food molds are mounted on the conveyor. Uncooked 
tortilla cakes are loaded into the normally open molds and 




A fried potato vending machine characterized by an 
upright cabinet having mounted therein a support for a 
removable multiple bin supfdy tray adapted to have each bin 
filled with a predetermined quantity of raw or partially 
cooked potatoes and a mechanism for feeding the batches of 
potatoes from successive bins to a hopper which empties into 
a cooking bowl pivotally mounted above a storage vessel in 
which a supply of cooking oil is maintained at predetermined 
temperature by an inimersion heater and means for transfer- 
ring a quantity of the hot cooking oil to the cooking bowl in 
which successive batches of potatoes are cooked and when 
cooking is completed, the cooked poutoes are dumped into 
a serving tray fed from a supply stack, the cooking bowl 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



85 



being pivoted, when cooking of each batch is completed, to 
dump the oil through a removable and replaceable filter 
member into the storage vessel. Electrical operating and con- 
trol circuitry, which is actuated by deposit of a coin, includes 
drive motors and timed switches for operating the feeding 
and handling mechanisms and provides for heating the oil, 
the electrical requirements being such that the machine can 
be operated when supplied with current from a conventional 
1 10-1 15 Volt current supply line. 



3,667,374 
DEEP FAT FRYER APPARATUS 
Brandon M. Holmes, NashvOc Tcnn., aaslgnor to P rogre ssi ve 
Products Corporation, NadiviBe, Tcnn. 

FUcd Oct. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 80,736 

Int. a.A47J 37/72 

U.S. CL 99-408 6 Claims 



/«\ 




A deep fat fryer having a pump for circulating cooking 
fluid or oil in a cooking receptacle and a filter for removing 
foreign substances from the cooking oil. Cooking fluid circu- 
lated through the receptacle flow over the heating elements 
and sweeps along foreign particles in the fluid which are 
removed by a filter interposed in the flow path of the cooking 
fluid. 



3,667,375 
MEANS FOR MELTING CONGEALED LIQUID AND FOR 

PREVENTING CCmGELATION 
Eofcnc A. Poltinger, LoirisvOc tmd WlaHon L. Shdton, Jcf- 
feraontown, both of Ky., amit n o n to ConmcrcW Ap. 
pHanccs, Inc. 

FBcd Feb. 24, 1971, Scr. No. 118,283 

Int. CL A47J 37/72 

U.S. CL 99-408 2 CMam 




by iu presence serves to )nelt congealed Uquid in said unit 
and without interference with the normal functioning of the 
cooking operation. 



m 



A heat-conductive member having an upper portion 
conUct with a bath of hot cooking liquid is detachably 
mounted in a collector unit of a pressure cooking vessel and 



3,667,376 
BARBECUE 
Oria D. Thompaon, 40 Owen Boulevard, WBtowd^, Ontario, 
Canada 

Filed July 1 1, 1969, Scr. No. 841,020 

Int. CL A47J 37/07 

VS. CL 99-443 R 6 Claims 




This invention relates to a barbecue that has a rotatably 
mounted grill for holding the foods in which a device is pro- 
vided for preventing the travel of liquid fat beyond the outer 
peripheral edge of the barbecue as the grill is rotated. 



3,667,377 
TYING MECHANISM FOR BALES 
Bcttgt Akc Persson, Traktorgatan, Sweden, 
Mwcr AB, Ystad, Sweden 

Fled Mar. 15, 1971, Scr. No. 124,407 
Int. a. B65b J3/28 
U.S.CL100— 19 3 



to Per- 




A bale tying mechanism in a bale press comprises a 
reciprocable forked needle which forms against three spaced 
intercepting members two standing vrire loops in the spaces 
between the intercepting members. The intermediate inter- 
cepting member has co-operating cutting members for sever- 
ing the wire forming the loops where such wire engages the 
intermediate intercepting member. 



toN. 



3,667,378 
WIRE CMl BAND STRAPPING MACHINE 
PIctcr AmoMus Van de Bit, Zdat, Ncthcrianda, 
V. Mctavcrpa 

FUcd Dec 7, 1970, Scr. No. 95,687 
Claims priority, appMrarfci n Netherlands, Dec 10, 1969, 

6918527 
Int. CL B65b 73/70 
VS. CL 100—26 2 1 

A wire or band strapping machine comprises a driven r<^ 
pair for feeding a wire or band toward a guide loop about an 
object to be strapped, a driven roll pair for reversing the 



86 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



{ 



June 6, 1972 



direction of movement of the wire or band to draw the same support beam that% pivotally connected to said ruler, said 
out of the guide and about the object, and tension means for pressure members forming fluid operable plungers which are 
tightening the wire or band in that reversed direction. The 
tension means is disposed between the two roll pairs, with the 
feeding pair disposed closer to the loop than the reversing 




pair with respect to the direction of travel of the wire or 
band. The wire or band approaches the loop along a horizon- 
tal U-shaped path with the feeding and reversing roll pairs 
operating on the upper and lower horizontal legs of that path, 
respectively, and the tensioning means acting downwardly on 
the wire or band in the bend of its U-shaped path. 



3,667^79 
APPARATUS FOR PREFABRICATING WOOD 
STRUCTURES 
GaD H. Tcmpttn, Vero Beach, fla^ asrignor to TetnpUn As- 
sociates, Inc., Vcro Beach, Fla. 

FUcd Jan. 1 1, 1971, Scr. No. 105,253 

Int. CL B30b 7J00 

VS. CL 100—139 15 Clabm 




Apparatus for fabricating wood trusses providing a moving 
jig upon which the metal truss plates are placed in proper 
position on the tops and bottoms of the joints of the wood 
truss, and are conveyed by the jig through a first pressure 
means which partially drive the truss plates into the wood 
truss at the joints thereof, only forcing penetration sufficient 
to hold the plates in proper position. A set of pressure rollers 
through which the truss, with the truss plates partially in- 
serted in the truss, passes for forcing the truss plates into the 
wood truss into their final joint holding positions. The jib is 
provided with means for properiy positioning the properly 
maintaining the truss thereon, certain of which are automati- 
cally disengaged when the means is reached. 



3,667380 

SMOOTHING RULER FOR PAPER GLAZING 

CALENDERS 

Jargen Schhiakc, and Dieter Junk, both off KrcfeM, Germany, 

assignors to Joii. Klcincwcfcrs Solinc Maschincnfabrik, 

Krcfcid, Germany 

Filed Sept. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 69^405 
Inta.B30bi/04 
U.S.CL100— 161 7 Claims 

For use in connection with a paper glazing calender, a 
smoothing ruler the position of which is adjustable by a plu- 
rality of pressure members which are vertically movable on a 






0^ 



10 

5^ 




sounct 






remote dontrolled and operable at variable pressure to press 
against surface areas of the ruler while a web of material is 
passed thereover, to smooth out creases in said web. 



3,667,381 

REFUSE COMPACTOR AND BAG THEREFOR 
Michael J. Sottas, St. Joseph, and Charles R. Difley 
both of Mich., assignors to Whirlpool Corporation 
. Filed Nov. 5, 1 969, Scr. No. 874,25 1 
I Int. CL B30b 15100 

\}S. CL 100—229 A 



8 




Nilcs, 



Claims 



A refuse receiver in a refuse compactor comprising a 
receptacle having an open top bounded by peripheral edge 
portions, a refuse holding bag in the receptacle having a dou- 
ble cuff formed by a pair of successive outward folds of the 
edge of the bag with opposite edge portions of the bag each 
having a single slit that facilitates folding of the bag sides in 
the pair of successive outward folds to form the double cuff 
and with the single slits facilitating the folding without exces- 
sive danger of refuse spillage through the bag sides at the slits 
during removal of a filled bag from the compactor. A refuse 
holding disposable bag having this construction for position- 
ing in a refiise receptacle having an open top in whic^ refuse 
is compacted. 

I 

3,667382 

PRINTING PUNCHING AND ENCODING APPARATUS 

FOR FILE FOLINE31S AND THE UKE 

Robert P. Kaplan, Tonawanda, N.Y., assignor to Sperry Rand 

Corporation, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Jan. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 6^17 

Int CL B41j 11158, 1100; B41I 19104 

U.S. CL 101—19 9 Claims 

This disclosure describes an apparatus for encoding file 

folders and the like, said file folders having corresponding 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



87 



P'^^ert^^r^^oSr.^X^u;^ ^-j!^^::-^.^!^--!^ 



— ".-.... ui«^ iiic luiucrs arc lo 0< 

stored. The file folders are coded along one edge with per- 
forated digital information, alpha numeric information and 
color code information by the apparatus of the invention 
More specifically, the apparatus includes a means for 




Mt MO Hi M3 171 141 



punching digital perforations, a means for printing numbers 
and a means for printing a color code along the edge of a file 
folder and the like. The punching and printing are all done in 
accordance with input dau derived fi-om the container in 
which the encoded folder is to be ultimately stored. 



3,667,383 

PRINT AND TRANSPORT BELT SYNCHRONIZER 

RonaM H. Mack, Plymouth; Nicholas Kondur, Jr., Plymouth 

Township, both of Mich., and James A. MItcbeU, Parfc, 

France, assignors to Burroughs Corporatkm, Detroit, Mich. 

Filed Dec. 23, 1969, Scr. No. 887,605 

Int. CL B41J 5100 

MS. CL 101-93 C 9 Claims 



. f "" *""" ♦'»-""»"j' iwvaicu itpcxcs, uie arms 

of the stnps acting to resiliently support the type members 




and to mainuin their alignment with a print line during a 
printing operation. 



3,667385 

PAPER FEED TABLE LIFTING DEVICE FOR A 

PRINTING PRESS 

Minora Suzuki, Kanagawa-kcn, Japan, assignor to Kabushiki- 

Kaisha Ricoh, Tokyo, Japan 

Filed Oct. 8, 1969, Scr. No. 864,830 
Claims priority, application Japan, Oct 1 1, 1968, 43/74443 

Int CL B65h 1114 
U.S.CL 101-232 5ci.|„ 




i— 




A high-speed serial printer including a ccmtinuously rotat- 
ing print drum having characters on its periphery, a hammer 
and carrier, and a belt for transporUng the hammer and carri- 
er parallel to the axis of drum along a line of print. A control 
system, including two timing discs, operates in synchronism 
with the drum. The first disc is indicative of the angular posi- 
tion of the drum and the second disc is to signal the hammer 
\ carrier to engage the transport belt at the start of each line of 
pnnt. A double-ended transducer responds to the two Uming 
discs to provide the appropriate signals for the printer. 



3,667384 

SLOTTED PRINT TYPE BELT WITH ANGULARLY 

DISPOSED TYPE MOUNTING STRIPS 

Albert SaMcrman, SouthUdd, Mkh., assignor to BurrouglK 

Corporatkm, Detroit, Mkh. 

Filed Oct. 1, 1970, Ser. No. 77,183 

lat CL B41J 1120 

UACL 101-111 5CtalTO 

A print type belt provides a flexible band that is slotted to 

form a plurality of angular mounting strips extending across 

the band, and a like number of type members removably at- 



A lifting device for a paper feed toble for a printing press 
which operates to lift a table, by rotation of a pinion meshing 
with a rack connected to the table and disposed substantially 
vertically, when the height of a stack of printing sheets on the 
feed table is decreased during printing. A ratchet wheel is 
rotatable with the pinion and a pawl means b movable into 
and out of engagement with the ratchet wheel, for intermit- 
tently rotating the latter. The pawl means normally is 
retained out of engagement with the ratchet wheel, and is 
brought into engagement therewith only responsive to a 
predetermined reduction in the height of the stack of sheets 
on the printing table. Thereupon, the feed table is lifted 
through a distance corresponding to the reduction in the 
height of the stack of sheets thereon. 



3,667386 
CAN CRUSHER 
GrandcU H. Workman, 1845 Federal A^, Los Antdes. 
CaBf. 

Filed May 7, 1971, Ser. No. 141332 

Int CL B30b 7100 

US. CL 100-233 8 Claims 




\ 



An apparatus for two-stage crushing of a can, the center of 
the can being first collapsed by a lever finger whUe the ends 



88 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



of the can are supported on shoulders at the sides of a swing- 
ing jaw on which the lever is fulcrumed, the ends of the can 
being tilted inwardly by such central collapse, and the tilted 
ends then being pushed against a fixed anvil to which ttie 
swinging jaw is hinged, resulting in the can being crushed flat 
between the jaw and the anvil. 



I 



explosive to prevent inadvertent initiation of the devices. 
Subsequent evaporation of the liquid from the explosive, 
over a predetermined interval of time, arms the device. 



3^7^87 
SELF-DESTRUCT LAND MINE 
Jcu P. Pfcard, Morristown; Thomas E. Duoigan, Oak Ridtc, 
and Lawrance W. PeO, Wot Oranfe. >B of N J., asslfiion 
to The Unkcd States of America as rcprcacntcd by the 
Secretary of the Army 

HlMl Jan. 19, 1971, Scr. No. 107,766 

liit.CLF42b2i/00 

VS. a. 102—8 7 Claims 



3,667,389 
SKEET SHOOTING ARRANGEMENT 
Claiidc H. Tritcnnc, 5, rue dcs Mcaaaflca (Haotc-Savoi*), Gail- 
lard, nraacc 

Filed Mar. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 19,791 
Claims priority, applicatloa Fraacc, Mar. 21, 1969, 6908230 

int. CL F42b 15/00: F41c 27/06 
VS. CI. 102—34.1 4 Claims 





A land mine capable of self-destructions after a selected 
period of time which includes a central portion of a friction 
sensitive material capable of supporting self combustion. A 
layer of white phosphorus disposed so as to surround and 
directly contact said friction material and having embedded 
therein a plurality of explosive pellets. One or more thin wall, 
frangible, glass vials containing a vaporizable solvent, 
abutting at least a portion of said white phosphorus and fac- 
ing outwardly thereof. The entire structure being coated with 
an elastic material which is soluble under the action of said 
solvent. There is specifically disclosed the use of acetone in 
conjunction with a nitrocellulose coating and a generally 
spherical configuration. The mine being capable of initial ac- 
tivation by pressure applied thereto, which, ignites the frac- 
tional material and in turn the phosphorus. The ignited 
phosphorus detonates the explosive pellets. The self-destruct 
operation commences when the mine is dropped, as for ex- 
ample, from an airplane, and the glass vial is broken thus 
releasing the solvent which starts the dissolution of the 
nitrocellulose outer film. When dissolved the phosphorus is 
exposed to the atmosphere and self destruction is initiated 
thus providing in addition, a visual indication of activation 
and self-destruction. 



A skaet shooting assembly wherein the skeet has a hoOow 
central channel with a cartridge therein. The ignition bf the 
cartridge charge is accomplished by means of a fuse fired by 
an elongated fiise firing element, preferably of pistol-type^ 
which ^netrates the central channel and engages the car- 
tridge. 



r 



rARi 



3,667390 
EXPLOSIVE WEAPONS AND FRAGMENTS 
ELEMENTS THEREFOR 
Gunnar F. A. Media, and Erik G. Olmoii, both of Fjkilituna, 
Sweden, awigiinn to Fo n v ar e U Fabriksverfc, EfkUrtuna, 
Sweden 

Continuation-in-pMt of appBcatioB Scr. No. 686,189, Nov. 

28, 1967, now ahandonrd TMs application Oct. 2% 1969, 

Scr. No. 872,153 

InL CL F42b 13/48 

VS. d 102—67 7 Claim 



3,667,388 

EXPLOSIVE INITIATING DEVICES 

Robert W. Heiaemann, 147 Elm St., Dover, N J. 

Filed July 1, 1969, Scr. No. 838,120 

lot CI. F42b 3/12, 3/18 

VS. CL 102—28 R 



2 Claims 




An explosive weapon and a fragmentary element therefor 
are disclosed. The explosive weapon comprises an explosive 
charge and a means to combine a plurality of fragmentary 
elements with the explosive charge to form an explosive as- 
sembly. Each of the fragmentary elements comprises a 
member having the general shape of a sphere. Each of the 
members has six flat surfaces located along the greatest 
diameter of the sphere. This greatest diameter occurs along 
the great circle or equatorial zone of the spherically shaped 
Explosive initiating devices constructed to permit a volatile member. Each of the flat surfaces intersects the next ad- 
liquid to peneuate into the housing, therel^ saturating the jacent flat surface at the greatest diameter of thp sphere. 




June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



89 



Therefore, a cross section through the element in a plane in- 
cluding the greatest diameter and the center of the sphere 
has a regular hexagonal shape. The flat surfaces are adjacent 
elements adapted to be facially disposed to prevent rotation 
of the elements with respect to each other. These flat sur- 
faces are further adapted to join other flat surfaces located in 
the structure of the explosive weapon. The fragmentary ele- 
ment has an air resistance that is only slightly greater than 
the air resistance of a totally spherical member of cor- 
responding size. In more specific embodiments of the 
weapon, the fragmentary elements are in flat surface to flat 
surface contact to form rows adjacent each other. The ele- 
ments of adjacent rows interiock each other to prevent shift- 
ing of the rows with respect to each other. 



3,667391 
DETONATOR AND IGNITER FOR EXPLOSIVES 
Rene' Amiable, Scvran; Jean-Nod Lhuillicr, Vcrt-le-Pfetlt, and 
Paul Bcnkhdri, Sevran, ail of France, aarignors to Etat 
Francais rcpresentc pw U Miniatrc dcs Armccs, Delegation 
Miaisteridle pour LArmcmcnt (DIractioa Dcs Poudrcs), 
Paris, France 

FUcd May 1, 1969, Scr. No. 820,902 
Claims priority, applicatloa France, May 17, 1968, 68152245 

Int. CL F42c 19/08 
VS. CL 102-70 2 Oainv 



options of the bomb. The coded signal is transferred to the 
bomb at aircraft-bomb separation via the transducer and 
decoded in the decoder, which includes a plurality of SCR's 
and switch actuators, to initiate the arming and fiizing circuit 
which includes a plurality of fuze sensors, energy storage 
devices, switches, and an arming motor. The encoder in- 
cludes a mechanically initiated ripple option. 



3,667393 
ELECTRIC FUZE FOR SHAPEIMTHARGE MISSILES 
Lars BertM AroasMo; Andcn Bcrtil Amdl, both of 
aa, aad Ulf W. MoHtor, TorrimBa, al of Sweden, 
to Forsvarets Fabriksveriie, Eskibtuna, Sweden 
ConlimiatioB-lB-part of applicatloa Scr. No. 686,068, Nvv. 
28, 1967. This appHcatioa July 24, 1969, Scr. No. 844^54 
Int. CL F42c 13/00 
VS. CL 102—70.2 1 cWm 




4b 




A detonating fuse suitable for an igniter of propelling 
charges, which comprises a narrow metal sheath of lead or 
tin containing a mixture of a secondary explosive with a non- 
explosive ignition-booster. The invention also includes an ig- 
niter containing the detonating fiise. 



3,667392 
ORDNANCE FUZE ENCODING AND DECODING 
SYSTEM 
Rodney E. Grantham, BcthcMla; John H. Mirihiy, Silver 
Spring, and Frederick E. Wamock, BcthcMla, aO of Md., 
amigaors to The United States of America as r cpi cs c u t e d by 
the Secretary of the Navy 

Filed Apr. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 25,942 

InL CL F42c 13/00, 15/24, 11/02 

VS. CL 102-70.2 R ij Chdms 



An electric fuze for a shaped-charge missile, said missile 
having an outer and an inner front closure plate, said plates 
being spaced apart by an air gap, a tubular stand-off member 
projecting forwardly fix>m said front ckxure plates and com- 
prising an outer and an inner tube spaced by an air gap, said 
tubes being mechanically and electrically connected to dif- 
ferent ones of said outer and inner fix>nt closure plates, a 
piezoelectric crystal element being located behind said front 
closure plates and connected in a circuit comfMising an elec- 
tric fuze, said front closure plates, said tubes and said air 
gaps, so that initiation of the fiize occurs when the fix>nt por- 
tion erf the missile is deformed and one or both of said air 
gaps is short-circuited and said piezoelectric crystal generates 
an electric pulse. 



3,667394 
ROLAMTTE SAFETY AND ARMING MECHANISM 
David W. Lewis, Charlottesville, Va., assignor to The United 
States of America as r ep r ca cut e d by the Secretary of the 
Army 

Filed Jan. 2T, 1971, Scr. No. 106340 

Int CL F42c 15/24 

VS. CL 102—78 11 cUbm 





C N CO D 






— « 


« 


OCLMCmr 
MOM 


•Mil 

LCana 




rva 
nacnai 


// 


m 17 


•CMII 


-^ 


, awwTc 




OBXCM 


— 


MO 















—U 





.-BO 




An ordnance fuze system includes a source of D.C. volt- 
ages and an encoder located on an ordnance delivery vehicle, 
such as an aircraft, and a magnetic transducer, decoder, and 
arming and fuzing circuit located on an ordnance device, 
such as a bomb. A ternary voltage code is encoded on the 
aircraft to select the delivery mode, arming time, and fuze 




An inertia! operated fuzing and arming mechanism havii^ 
two telescoping encasing members and a pair of rollers held 
within said encasing members and a pair of roUeis heM 



90 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June i, 1972 



within said encasing members by a plurality of S-shaped flexi- 
ble bands, each band engaging different diameter portions of 
the rollers and the ends of the bands being attached to the in- 
side df said encasing members. A detonator and expiodve are 
associated with one of said encasing members and one of the 
rollers and the other encasing member has an aperture 
therein so that when said two encasing members and said 
roller are aligned, the fiize is activated to detonate the explo- 



sive. 



3^7395 

DUMMY SHELL 

Rudolf Romcr. and Hdoz Hap, both of DuHddorf, Germany, 

aMigBors to RhrinmHaM GmbH, Duaaddorf , Gcmuwy 

Filed May 26, 1969, Scr. No. 827,727 

dains priority, appttcathm Gcnnany, June 1, 1968, P 17 03 

518.6 

Int. CI. F42b 5/22 

VS. Ci. 102—92.7 3 Claims 




A dummy shell with a screwed-in impact-ignition-and- 
decomposition device which comprises means for weakening 
the cross-section of the head of the shell at a set breaking 
point within the range of the connecting plane between the 
impact-ignition device and the decomposition device. By this 
arrangement it is brought about that upon inclined or flat im- 
pact of the shell, the impact-ignition-device separates itself 
from the decomposition device, and the latter remains in the 
jacket of the shell. 



3,667,396 
SOLID PROPELLANT GRAIN IGNITER 
Donald H. Barrett, Waco, Tex., assignor to North American 
Rockwell Corporatioa 

Filed Apr. 2, 1969, Scr. No. 812,935 

Int. CI. F42b 1/00 

VS. CI. 102- 101 8 Claims 




sheet, and an igniter cord attached to the sheet in which said 
cord contains a detonating-igniting composition which when 
initiated by a squib produces hot particles to penetrate the 
sheet interstices and ignite the coating. 

I 

3,667,397 

LINEAR INDUCTION MOTOR SECONDARY MEMBER 
Richard Humphrey Hayncs, Hemlngfbrd Grey, England, as- 
signor to Tirackcd Hovercraft Limited, London, England 
tpyed June 25, 1971, Scr. No. 156,624 
Int. CL H02k 4J/04 
04— 148LM UCIalnM 



Btra 



J^ 




The secondary member in or for a linear induction motor 
of the single-sided and short sutor variety is mounted 
generally horizontally for co-operation with a linear induc- 
tion motor primary member carried above it. The secondary 
member comprises a rolled aluminum reaction plate with 
downwardly-inclined side edges, and magnetic material 
which is interposed between the track and the plane central 
part of the reaction plate. The reaction plate extends beyond 
the magnetic material along either side, and supports are pro- 
vided for supporting the overhanging portions from the track 
inwardly of the downwardly-inclined parts. The reaction 
plate is secured in position by members which are attached 
to the track along either side of the secondary memher and 
which abut the upper surfaces of the downwardly-inclined 
parts of the reaction plate. 



3,667,398 ^~^ 

LINEAR INDUCTION MOTOR SECONDARY MEMBER 

Christopher Durrant English, Burwcll, Engfamd, assignor to 

Tracked Hovercraft Limited, London, England 

Filed June 25, 1971, Ser. No. 156,625 

Claims priority, application Great Britain, June 26, 1970, 

31,143/70 I 

Int CL H02k 4//04 I 

U.S. CI. )04— 148 LM 14 Oabm 




An igniter for a solid propellant grain having a perforated The secondary member in or for a linear induction motor 

sheet substrate, which serves as a support structure for a flex- of the single-sided and short stator variety is mounted 

ible pyrotechnic coating apf>lied to either one side or both generally horizontally for co-operation with a linear induc- 

sides of the sheet and extending into the interstices of the tion motor primary member carried above it. The secondary 




June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



91 



member comprises an aluminum reaction plate disposed 
above magnetic material which supports it from the track. 
The reaction plate is vkrider than the m&gnetic material and 
extends beyond it along either side of the secondary member 
at side portions which in operation provide the longitudinally 
extending parts of the current paths in the reaction plate. 
The reaction plate is clamped down on to the track by 
clamping devices which produce clamping forces on the un- 
dersides of the side portions immediately adjacent the mag- 
netic material. 

\ 



the outer door in its closed position and also in several 
lowered and open positions. The inner ballast flow conxrdl 
door may be opened to a variety of positions ranging from 
fuUy dosed to fiilly opened and may be locked in these posi- 
tions by means of a sliding locking bar whose ends ride in 
guides located on opposite sides of the ballast discharge 
opening. A tool is provided for opening and dosing the inner 
ballast flow control door. 



3,667399 
POWER AND FREE CONVEYOR SYSTEM 
Adolph Cxamcckl, Birmingham, Mich., assignor to Standard 
AlUancc Industries, Inc., Chicago, Dl. 

Filed Sept. 3, 1969, Scr. No. 854,817 ' 
Int CLB65g 7 7/42 
U.S. CI. 104-172 S 7 Claims 



^/' 



3,667,401 
CONTAINER RETAINING LATCH MECHANISM 
PhiOip D. Schwiebcrt, Glencoe, and Edward S. Steck, 
Chfcago, both of DL, assignors to MacLemi-Fogg Lock Nut 
Co., MundcMn, m. 

Hied Feb. 14, 1969, Scr. No. 799,400 
Int. a. B65J J/22; B60p 7/OS 
U.S. a. 105— 366 D 11 




A power-and-free conveyor system of the type having work ' 
carriers each consisting of coupled front and rear trolleys 
adapted to be propelled along a track by lugs on an overhead 
chain drive and each adapted further to be disconnected 
from the drive in a localized close pack section of the con- 
veyor by a cam plate on the rear trolley of the preceding car- 
rier, and wherein the drive and the cam plate of each carrier 
have novel means which are uniquely cooperative to prevent 
the carrier from back-sliding on inclined portions of the track 
in the event the front trolley thereof inadvertently becomes 
uncoupled from the drive and also to more effectively and ef- 
flciently transfer the carrier through a switch point from one 
conveyor to another or from a conveyor onto a spur track for 
forage or the like. 




3,667,400 

RAILWAY BALLAST DISTRIBUTING CAR DOOR 

ASSEMBLY 

Sergio Rene Damy, Apartado Postal "A" 2041, Guadalaisra, 

Jalisco, Mexico 

Filed Nov. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 86,486 

Int. CL B61d 7/18, 7/26; F07f 5/27 

VS. CL 105-239 4 Claims 



A latch mechanism including a pivotable clasp biased for 
engagement with a catch opening in a container part. The 
clasp has a head portion with a cam surface of steep incline 
and a detent suriface of slight incline, with respect to the 
plane of a catch support having an opening through which 
the clasp extends, whereby bias is easily overcome through 
engagement of the detent surface for latching engagement, 
and retention force is large, as a result of the steep angle of 
the cam surface. Space for lateral play of the clasp element 
in its receiving opening of the container, together with wedge 
sides of the clasp and rounded surfaces of the catch opening 
compensate for off-center variations therebetween upon ini- 
tial container seating. Bias springs acting upon the clasp form 
the arms of a lateral "Y" configuration, respectively, to 
balance, center and stabilize the clasp upon final container 
seating. 




3,667,402 
SHELF FOR BOOKS 

Kent M. Graves, 71 West Ave., Apt #12, Brockport, N.Y. 

Filed May 3, 1971, Scr. No. 139,586 

iaLCXAATb 85/00 

VS. a. 108—12 2 CWnw 




A terracing door assembly for a railway hopper car having 
an outer door which also frmctions as a chute and an inner 
ballast flow control door. A mechanism b provided to lock 



The invention relates to a shelf for books or the like having 
an insert which allows the shelf to be easily converted for use 
with either normal or conventional sized books in one in- 
stance or smaller books such as paperbacks in another in- 
stance. 



92 



3,667,403 
PALLET 

JokB A. Aatdbcck, Jr., ChcateffMd, Mo., sHigiior to Pack- 
Rite Packagteg A Crallag Co., Im. 

FIM Joac 1 1, 1970, Scr. No. 45,51 1 

■at. CL B65d I9n8 

U.S. CL 108—58 10 Ciyim 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6. 1972 




A pallet used for the storage and transporting of load bear- 
ing structures. The pallet is formed by securing two mating 
unitary plastic members by means of bolts or other fasteners. 
The two plastic members are formed in a rotational molding 
operation and each includes a pair of spaced outer skins 
which are internally connected by a plurality of properly 
spaced webs for internal strength. The skins also have a plu- 
rality of strategically located apertures which extend through 
each of the skins. 



3 667 404 

REVOLVING DOOR LOCk'mECHANISM AND TRAP 

FLOOR ASSEMBLY 

Eraest Foatcr, 4793 Coacord Avcnoc, Detroit, Mkh. 

Filed Jaa. 18, 1971, Scr. No. 107,096 

Iata.E05gi/00 

U.S. CI. 109-8 8 Claims 




The revolving door lock mechanism and trap floor as- 
sembly includes means for automatically locking a revolving 
door with a person trapped therein fix)m a point remote from 
the door. A trap floor is provided beneath the door assembly. 
A room is provided beneath tlie trap door for incarcerating a 
person. The trap floor includes means for automatically 
opening thereof when a person is standing thereon and, sub- 
sequently, tot automatically closing the floor after the person 
has fallen into the room beneath the trap floor. 



3,667,405 
^VANDAL RESISTIVE POST 
Albert F. RokJi, Jr., 8325 OMo Rivtr Boulevard, PMtsbiirgli, 
Pa. 

I Filed Oct. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 85,1 13 
Int. CL E05g 1104; E04h 12118 
09—51 10 ( 



u- 



. il'll 





A compound post for supporting publicly used parking me- 
ters, flne boxes, vending machines, money changers, and 
other related publicly used facilities, the post being so 
designed as to prevent the vandalism and/or theft of the sup- 
ported facility, and wherein the compound post includes an 
upright pipe having its lower end ground secured, the facility 
mounted for roution about the axis of the pipe at its upper 
end, and at least one otlier pipe telescoped over the upright 
pipe for free rotation thereon to resist the action of a cutting 
tool applied thereto, the other pipe extending substantially 
the entire distance between said facility and the ground. 



3,667,406 
PORTABLE SECURITY VAULT 
Frank Jcaeph Shea, 258 East Shore Trail, Spwta, N J. 

1 Filed Sept. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 68,813 
Int. a. EOSg 1100 
09-57 34Clalim 




A portable security vauh for temporarily storii^ coin 
boxes in transit as collected 6x>m vending devices, telephone 
pay stations and the like includes an elongated tube open at 
opposite ends, a member coextensive lengthwise with the 
tube and slidable interiorly thereof, and a plurality of paddles 
spaced vertically along a lengthwise axis of the member to 
provide tandem spaces between adjacent paddles to store the 
respective coin boxes therein. The paddles are restricted to 
rotation ia a given direction from normal perpendicular posi- 
tions to permit the insertion of coin boxes into the spaces at a 
tube predetermined end and the ejection of the stored coin 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



98 



boxes at the tube opposite end, the latter being responsive to » «<tT .-ao 

repeutive insertion and withdrawal movements of the slidable <^ AiSr-Drr 

member thereat. An arrangement for locking the paddle ewh i m„#, ni^if^ °^^yV._V_ ^ . 

member to the vault structure precludes unautlS ^SlL^^^T^Jll^^S.f'^ 'S? ^"^ 

retrieval of the stored coin boxes at the tube predeterm^ JJSSm. ^"^^ ^ State. Sted Cor^ 

end. The tube ends may be lock-endosed as desired. ^""^ ^ j^ 3^^ ,„^ ^ ^ ,, ^ 

^ Int CL F23in 7/00 

UACL 110—173 A 5, 



3,667.407 

INCINERATOR 
Coarwi H. MWcr. Rogers, Ark., 
thm, Rogers, Ark. 

Flhd Oct. 13. 1970, Scr. No. 80351 
lat. CL F23g 9/00 
U.S.CLI10— 18C 



to Hoyt Corpora- 



5CUms 





An upright incinerator has a burner at the bottom and a 
removable one-piece combined grate and flue. This remova- 
ble unit comprises a bundle of upright bars that deflne the 
flue. A grate of bar stock mounted adjacent the lower end of 
the upright bundle comprises a plurality of circular bars in- 
terconnected to the flue by outwardly extending bars. The 
unit rests removably on the grate. 



ii<:IJS3 



A soaking pit has a sand seal for the cover of its opening 
which extends around the top of the walls of the pit. The bot- 
tom of the sand seal trough is lower at the cover approach 
end than at the opposite end and the trough slopes upwardly 
along each side from the approach end. A peripheral flange 
on the cover extends into the sand in the trough with the bot- 
tom of the flange being spaced the same distance from the 
bottom of the. trough around its periphery. Improved means 
for moving the cover between operative and inoperative posi- 
tions includes a drum mounted on a fixed frame. The drum 
routes about a generally horizontal axis transvene to the 
direction of movement of the cover. A first sheave is 
mounted on the stationary frame substantially parallel to the 
drum on the side thereof toward the pit opening, a wire rope 
passes around the first sheave with one end secured to the 
drum and the other end secured to the cover. A second 
sheave is mounted on the frame substantiaUy parallel to the 
drum on the side thereof away from the pit opening. A 
second rope passes around the second sheave with one end 
attached to the drum and the other end attached to the 
cover. The drum is routed by a reversible motor to move the 
cover. 



3,667.408 

FLARE STACK 

Victor Jadasky, and AnbroK T. UpfoM, both of Samla, On- 

tario, Caaada, aarignors to Polymer Corporatloa Limited 

FDcd Aug. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 60^31 

lot. CL F23J 15/00 

U.S.CL 110-119 7 Claims 



"■fca 




3,667,410 
DRIVE AND CONTROL SYSTEM IN SEWING MACHINES 

PRODUCING GROUPS OF S H'IC HE S 
Ncreo BtencM, Pavia, Italy, art g n o r to NcccM S.pJi., Pavia, 
Italy 

Filed Apr. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 31,252 
Claims priority, appHcatkm Italy, Apr. 23. 1969, 32410 A/69 

Int. CL D05b 69/20 
U.S.CL 112—67 I 




Flare stack smoke is reduced or eliminated by controlling 
the temperature oi the flare. Said temperature is sensed by a 
sensing element e.g. one or more thermocouples connected 
in parallel and located in the vicinity of the flare; the sensing 
element produces a signal which directly or indirectly ac- 
tivates steam control valve to adjust the flow of steam to the 

tip of the flare stack so as to raise or lower the flare tempera- The present invention is a pneumatically actuated control 
*""v**«i **'"P*'"*»^ °^ optimum combustion of flare system for sewing machines to begin and end the sewing 
stack effluent. cycle and simultaneously to place and retain the work clamp 



94 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June », 1972 



or prester foot into proper relationship with the material dur- 
ing the sewing cycle and comprises a first pneumatic circuit 
of a control valve, adjustable inlet valve and exhaust valve 
which circuit is mechanically linked to the sewing cycle con- 
trol element in the sewing machine and a second pneumatic 
circuit of a first control valve, a second control valve actu- 
ated by the mechanical linkage of the first circuit, a third 
control valve actuated by the work clamp control element in 
the sewing machine, an adjustable inlet valve, and an exhaust 
valve which second circuit is mechanically linked to the work 
clamp and means to selectively actuate the control valve of 
the first circuit and the first control valve of the second cir- 
cuit. 



3,667,411 
APPARATUS FOR AUTOMATICALLY SEWING PATCH 

POCKETS ONTO GARMENTS 
SUvano Perlioo, Pavia, Italy, a«igiior to Nccchi S.pJi., Pavia, 
Italy 

Filed July 14, 1970, Scr. No. 54,723 
Claims priority, applicatioa Italy, July 21, 1969, 32414 A/69 

IntCLDOSb 27/00 
U^CI. 112— 121.12 4Claiim 




3,667,412 

NEEDLE POSITIONING MECHANISM FOR SEWING 

MACHINES 

Martia R. Pcria, 75 Lounsbury RomI, Firfrfieid, Conn. 

FUcd J«ly 2, 1970, Scr. No. 51,833 

iBt. CI. D05b 69/22 

VS. CL 1 12— 219 A 12 Claim! 



i; 







M-. 



I^wp 



A needle positioning mechanism for a sewing machine in 
which the needle driving shaft of the sewing head mounts a 
pair of pulley wheels and a lock wheel. The pulley wheels are 
mounted with overriding clutches for independently driving 
the shaft; one pulley wheel connected to the main motor of 
the machine and the other to an auxiliary motor having jux- 
taposed switches in its circuit; one normally open and the 
other normally closed. A lock arm having a detent projection 
at one end is movable by a solanoid energized by an operator 



into contact with the lock wheel which is provided with at 
least one detent recess. In its movement against the lock 
wheel, the lock arm closes the normally open switch as it 
contacts the surface of the lock wheel, to activate the auxilia- 
ry motor, and then closes the normally open switch to deac- 
tivate the auxiliary motor as its projection engages within the 
detent recess of the lock wheel. 



A sewing machine for sewing patch pockets onto garments 
and comprising a pocket clamping and folding device corre- 
lated with a guide system for moving the clamping device 
relative to the machine needle. The clamping device includes 
a plurality of pocket forming blades all actuated by a single 
drive means. 



3,667,413 
COOLING SYSTEMS FOR SEWING MACHINE DRIVING 

UNITS 1 

Johann O. Kldinchmidt; Hdme E. Walter, both of Rlankcn- 
loch, and Hdmar H. Hoi, Karimihc, aU of Gcm^y, aa- 
dgnors to The Singer Company, New York, N.Y. 
1 FUcdJuncU, 1971, Scr. No. 152,139 
I Int. a. D05b 69/00 

VS. a. 1 1 2— 220 t Claims 




An electrically operated driving unit for a sewing machine 
is supported on the sewing machine in axial alignment with 
the main shaft of the sewing machine with which the driving 
unit is operatively connected. The flow of heat from the driv- 
ing unit to a handwheel on the main shaft adjacent thereto is 
controlled by an insulated interposer between the driving 
unit and main drive shaft and by a fan associated with the 
handwheel for inducing a flow of air to cool the handwheel 
and the driving unit. Fan means included within a sealed 
electric motor forming a part of the driving unit also induces 
transfer of heat generated inside the motor to peripheral por- 
tions of the motor which are located within the influence of 
the air flow induced by the handwheel fan. 



3,667^14 

THREAD TENSIONING DEVICE FOR SEWING 
MACHINES 
Stephen J. Dies, Svmmit, NJ., and Sahratarc A. D'Orlo, 
Statcn Island, N.Y., amitnors to The Singer ConqM^, New 
York, N.Y. 

1 FUcd Sept. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 75,430 

I Int. CL D05b 47/00 

VS. CL 1 12—254 $ Oabm 

A needle thread tensioning mechanism for a sewing 

machine which is arranged in the removable top cover of a 

sewing machine bracket arm. A diminutive thread engaging 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



95 



head and operator influenced tension adjusting member 3,667,416 

protrude exteriorly of the top cover, while the mechanisms DEVICES FOR CUTTING A CHANNEL IN A LAYER OF 

ICE, AND AN ICE-BREAKER SHIP EQUIPPED WITH 
SAID DEVICES 
Jean Floravanti, 3 Alice du Ccdre, Chatcnay-Malabry, Hmitci 
dc Seine; Robert Ludca Carrlerc, 28 Avenue fhmirih 
CanuMva, Saint-Gratien, Val d*Otoe; Paul Tbibmik, 30 
Avenue de Cdnture, EncMen-ka-BafaH, Val d'OlM, and 
Alain J. F. R. Horavanti, 3 AUee du Ccdre, Chalcnay. 
Malabry, Hauts de Seine, ail of France 

Filed July 27, 1970, Scr. No. 58,246 
Claims priority, application F^anee, Dec 24, 1969, 6944891 

Int. CL B63b 3 5 /OS 
UAa. 114— 42 n, 




«?' 41 



for influencing the tension imposed upon the thread and a 
tension releasing means are carried inside the top cover. 



3,667,415 

BUOYANCY CONTROL SYSTEM FOR DEEP DIVING 

SUBMERSIBLES 

Roland W. Robbins, Jr., Arnold, Md., assignor to The United 

States of America as represented by the Secretary of the 

Navy 

Filed Oct. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 84,010 

Int. CI. B63g 8/00 

U.S.CL 114-16 E 6 Claims 





A buoyancy control system for a submersible having a hard 
ballast tank, a pump, an automatic spool positioning valve 
and a metering valve for transferring water ballast between 
the tank and ambient regardless of the direction in which the 
pressure gradient is working. The pump is only required to 
move water in one direction, which is against the pressure 
gradient, with the automatic spool positioning valve setting 
itself to control flow in th^ proper direction. Flow with the 
pressure gradient is contrc^ed by a muring valve. 



The invention relates to a method of and devices for 
cutting a channel in a layer of ice covering the surface of an 
expanse of water, said method utilizing a rotary cutting 
device actuated from an independent source of power, the 
cutting force being directed in a substantially horizontal 
plane and being apiidied over a limited ice-cutting front. The 
broken pieces of ice are given a lateral vertical direction, up- 
wards or downwards, and are ejected outside the edges of the 
cut channel. The rotary cutting device comprises two sets of 
spiral-blade cutters with inserted knives, one set on each side 
of the longitudinal axis, the cutters of each set rotating in op- 
posite direction. An ice-breaker ship incorporating the inven- 
tion has conveyor means for transferring the cut ice away 
from the channel, auxiliary screws on each side of the front 
portion and auxiliary devices at the sides of the stem tor 
varying the direction of the cut channel. 



3,667,417 
MESSENGER BUOY RECOVERY DEVICE 
James D. CUnkenbeard, San Gabrld, CaHf., assignor to The 
United States of America as represented by the Secretary of 
the Navy 

Filed Apr. 24, 1970, Ser. No. 31,715 
InL CL B63c 7/02, 7/26 
U.S.CL 114—51 lOCWuK 

A messenger buoy recovery device which can be attached 
by a diver to a submerged object including a spool for exteri- 
orly winding recovery cable, the spool having an interior 
receptacle; an inflaUble float which is adapted to be received 
within said recepUcle; means for retaining the float in the 
receptacle in a deflated condition; and the flat having means 
for manually pulling the float from the receptacle. The float 
may be retained within the receptacle by friction between the 
float and the wall of the receptacle, and means may be pro- 
vided for automatically inflating the buoy when the buoy is 
pulled from the recepude. The recovery device may further 



96 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



include a winding assembly which has a winding spindle portion in conuct with the heat coUector, thereby providing 
which is adapted to be received by the spool receptacle, and rapid and uniform heat transfer to the inter-molecular bond 

between the pellet and the cup, the rapid heat transfer at the 



ID — 

\ 



means may be provided for retaining the spool to the winding 
spindle. 





eutectic temperature permitting a smaller disc orifice 
through which sufTicient Freon pressure is applied to expel 
the peQet from the cup at precisely the eutectic teniperature. 



3,667,420 
FHANGIBLE TARGET APPARATUS 
EU H. ^Icchliiig, 2881 McOain RomI, Lima, Ohio 
Filed Oct 19, 1970, Scr. No. 81,956 

Int. a. B05c 7/02. 7 7/74 
U.S. C$.118— 6 "^ 



3,667/118 
MARINE TOWING DEVICE 
Hans-Georg JaBswn, BrcoMrhavcn, Gcnnany, aastgnor to Ak- 
tien-GescUschafl "Wcser", Bremen, Germany 

Filed Mar. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 24,416 
Claims priority, application Germany, Mar. 15, 1969, G 69 

10 623 

Int. CI. B63b 27/00 

U.S. CI. 1 14—235 A 10 Claims 



1^' 



10 Claims 




A marine towing device has support means which is to be 
mounted on a marine vessel. A hook is pivotably mounted in 
a frame and interposed between and connected with both the 
support means, and the hook is an elastically yieldable unit 
which yields elastically to a predetermined maximum extent 
if tensile forces develop between the support means and the 
hook, as when the latter is engaged with an element to be 
towed. 



3,667,419 
PRECISION TEMPERATURE DETECTION AND ALARM 

SYSTEM 
Joacpli T. SulUvan, Huntiatdoa VaHcy, Pa., assignor to Stan- 
dard-Farrington Alarm & Signal Corp., Trevose, Pa. 
Filed Sept. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 76,017 
^ iBt CI. G08b 7 7/00 

U.S.CL 116—106 4 Claims 

A temperature sensing and alarm system for quickly and 
accurately sensing a sharply defined temperature threshold, 
comprising a Freon powered horn, the Freon stored in a 
cylinder and normally blocked from passage to the horn by a 
eutectic pellet bonded in a brass cup and blocking a Freon 
release orifice. A heat collector is held in tight contact with 
an activator disc which contains the aforementioned cup, the 
cup having angled side walls of a thickness less than the disc 



Apparatus for handling and painting clay pigeons or targets 
is provided. The clay targets are fed in a line along a con- 
veyor and arc then formed into two lines, and subsequently 
four lines, after which the targets are sequentially removed 
from each of the four lines of the conveyor. The day targets 
are then fed to four painting positions. In each position, the 
target is moved upwardly by a plunger into contact with a 
circular brui^h. The brush is located at an angle to the vertical 
with a lower portion submerged in a receptacle cf paint and 
the target is positioned to one side of the recepude so that if 
the target should be broken, it will not tend to fidl into the 
receptacle. The target is rotated by its support while in con- 
tact with the brush and the brush is periodically, incremen- 
tally rotated to supply additional coating material from the 
receptacle. , 



3,667,421 
MECHANISM FOR CONTROLLING THE THICKNESS OF 

A COATING IN A VAPOR DEPOSITION APPARATUS 
MttckeU J. Bala, Enfldd, smI Sol S. Btochcrman, Ncwinglon, 
both of CoDBn — Ignnn to United Aircraft Corporation, 
Eaat Hartford, Conn. 

Contlniiatlon-ln-part of appUcation Scr. No. 806,872, Mar. 

13, 1969, now atendoaed. This application ScpC 17, 1970, 

Scr. No. 72,966 

Int. CL B05c 77/00; C23c 13/08 

U.S.CL 118-7 2CI«inis 

Apparatus for accurately determining and continuously 

measuring the thickness of a coaUng deposited on a substrate 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



m a vacuum deposition chamber and for terminating the 
coating operation after the desired thickness is obtained, the 
apparatus utilizing a mechanical counter for determining the 
length of ingot fed to the crucible in combination with a 




precision laser device for maintaining a constant pool level in 
the crucible since the length of ingot fed is a direct indication 
of the thickness of the coating deposited. 



3,667,422 

APPARATUS FOR TRANSFERRING A PARTICULATE 

MATERIAL TO A WEB 

Bcnno Saladia, Slmach, Switaerland, assignor to Saladin A. 

G., Simach/TG, SwItMriand 

Filed Nov. 14, 1968, Ser. No. 775^19 

Claims priority, application Austria, Nov. 20, 1967, A 

10399/67 

Int. CI. B05c 1/08, 1/16 

UACL 118-34 8 Claims 







97 

temperature to facilitate the transfer of the thermoplastic 
material fix)m the grooves of the drum to the sur&ce of the 
web. The particulate coating material is delivered to tlie 
backing material web at a coating station while the material 
is maintained at a temperature lower than that at which it is 
applied to the backing material. Conversely, the backing 
material is maintained at or heated to a temperature at which 
the particulate material wUI become tacky and move into ad- 
hering engagement with the backing material as it is trans- 
ported into association therewith at the coating station. 

3,667,423 
METAL VAPOR COATING APPARATUS 
Adrian Monroe GanunO, Asliton, Md.; FmnliHn Kdth 
Guinn, JohnMM City, Tcnn.; Urbnn S. Bird, Utricoi, Tcnn^ 
and WlUam R. Housholdcr, Erwin, Tcnn., asrignors to 
Nodcar Fud Services, tac, Whcnton, Md. 

FDcd Dec 6, 1968, Scr. No. 781,928 

lpLCLC23c 77/00 

UACL 118-48 3Clalnis 





\ 
An apparatus for coating nuclear fiiel particles with a 
metal by the decomposition of the metal salts and the deposi- 
tion of the free metal on the fuel particles. 



3,667,424 
MULTI-STATION VACUUM APPARATUS 
William L. ComcMoa, Mountain View, and John G. Martacr, 
Athcrton, both of CaHf., wrignors to Stanford Rcaeuxfa In-' 
stitatc, Mcnlo Park, CaHf. 

Filed Apr. 14, 1969, Scr. No. 815^14 
Int. CL C23c 13/12 
U.S.CI. 118— 49.5 7 



A device for adding a thermoplastic or thermosetting 
materia] to a receiving web includes means for distributing a 
particulate material throughout recesses or grooves defined 
on the surface of an endless member such as a continuously 
rotating drum. The grooves which have been filled with the 
material are then moved into association with a web of a 
material such as a textile material which is moved into con- 
tact with the drum and at the same speed as the drum while it 
is maintained at a temperature great enough to cause the 
tackiness and adherence of the particulate material to the 
web in the pattern defined by the grooves of the drum. The 
granules are advantageously directed to the top face of the 
drum as it rotates and the web is advantageously delivered to 
a location at which it feeds around a major portion c^ the 
lower part of the drum surface. A pressure roller is located at 
the infeed of the web and at the outfeed of the web and is ad- 
vantageously maintained in a heated condition to provide a 

899 O.O.— 4 




A high-current vacuum system suitable for 
deposition of multiple layers onto a subctrate. 



<m- vacuum 
A vacuum 



98 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



chamber encloses a sutionary substrate holder disposed 
above a plurality of vapor sources utilizing diverse heating 
elements. The vapor sources are arranged on a rotatable sup- 
port for sequential movement to a deposition station for the 
vaporization and deposit of low and high temperature metals 
and dielectrics. Manipulators for making and breaking elec- 
trical conuct to the station and for roution of the support 
are positioned without the chamber and are externally 
operated to change sources without breaking vacuum. A 
liquid nitrogen cooled cold cam is situated between the sta- 
tion and the substrate support to funnel the vapor stream 
toward the stationary substrate target. . 



device comprising a roller contacting the belt along a 
genatrix on one side and dipping into a glue trough on the 
opposite side, further comprising a flexible doctor lying 
mainly parallel to said roller and having means to curve an 
adjustable length of both end parts towards said roller. 



3,667^25 

APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING COATING 

THICKNESS 

Wright D. Bozcman, Cahimct, lU., and Clifford D. Blackwdl, 

Crown Point, Ind., assignors to Inland Stcd Company, 

Chicago, lU. 

Filed Mar. 1, 1971, Ser. No. 1 19,479 

Int. CI. B05c 77/06 

U.S. CI. 118-63 SCWms 




A blowing nozzle for controlling coating thickness in con- 
tinuous hot dip metal coating has an elongated orifice ar- 
ranged in a plane perpendicular to the plane of the vertically 
moving strip. A deflectoris mounted on the upper side of the 
nozzle for diverting the effluent gas stream downwardly at an 
7angle against the strip. A guard is mounted on the lower side 
of the nozzle to prevent deposition of coating metal on the 
nozzle in the vicinity of the orifice and on the deflector plate. 



3,667,426 

DEVICE FOR APPLYING GLUE TO THE SUPPORTING 

BELT OF A SCREEN PRINTING SCREEN 

Jacobus G. Vertcgaal, Boxmecr, Nctheriandi, awign or to 

Stork Amrtcrdam N.V., Amtdvcen, Netherlands 

Rkd Apr. 15. 1970, Scr. No. 28,622 

dainw prlorhy, appttartkm Nctheriands, May 2, 1969, 

6906722 

Int. CLBOSc 77/04 

U.S.CL118— 123 4CtalniB 




7 

3,667,427 
IMPROVED CASCADE APPARATUS 
Robert E. Hewitt, Ontario, N.Y., aaignor to Xerox 
tion, Stamford, Conn. 

Filed Jan. 28, 1971, Scr. No. 1 10,488 
j Int. a. G03g 7 J/00 ^ 

ci 118—1 



U.S, 



-637 



Device for applying a film of glue to a travelling belt of a 
screen printing machine, especially for textile fabric, said 




Corpora* 



3 Claims 



Improved cascade apparatiis for developing electrostatic 
images wherein a latent electrosutic image supported on a 
moving member is developed by cascading a flow of 
developer material including a magnetic component and an 
electroscopic component through a development zone. A 
chute receives a sufficient quantity of the developer material 
from a conveyor which moves the developer material in 
buckets from a sump and unloads a developer material at the 
inlet side of the chute. A magnetic member is positioned at 
the inlet side of the chute in close proximity to the path of 
the conveyor to affect the buildup of the magnetic developer 
material in the path of the conveyor buckets such that a suffi- 
cient quantity of the developer material is directed along the 
chute into the development zone instead of a certain portion 
being retumeed into the sump as the buckets are inverted by 
their movement to dump the conveyed developer ^t the inlet 
of the chute leading into the development zone. 



3,667,428 
DEVELOPING SYSTEMS 
Richard E. Smith, Webster, N.Y., assigiior to Xeroii 
tion, Rochester, N.Y. 

Fiiedjuly 1, 1969, Scr. No. 838,141 
Int. a. G03g 7i/00 

a. 118- 



U.S 



-637 




Corpora- 



SCIaims 



A aevelopment system is provided wherein a movable 
developer loaded applicator surface is first doctored on the 
edges and comers of the surface to remove excess developer 
and prevent the accumulation of developer on the comers 
and is finally doctored with another doctoring sufface along 



June 6, 1972 



GEN^ERAL AND MECHANICAL 



99 



the entire applicator surface to provide a uniform distribu- 
tion of developer on the surface which doctored applicator 
surface is brought into developing engagement with an image 
to be developed. Dry and liquid development techniques can 
be employed and the doctoring surfaces may be provided by 
doctor blades or rollers. ^ 



3,667,429 
HRED HEATER 
Alan Cross, Little Neck, N.Y., assignor to The Lummus Com- 
pany, Bloomficid, NJ. 

Filed Jan. 25, 1971, Scr. No. 109,368 

Int.CLF22b27/J0 

U.S. CI. 122-240 B ^ 17 Claims 



cross section of the combined moisture separator and re- 
heater, the overall capacity may be readily increased by 



M 


=^H= 


> 


"^ 


j^ 31 






) iV 


i-ii 






e^. 


^40* 






^Sf~ 


IB 






Bv 


fV 






r 



/ \. 




k-^ 



A fired heater having two parallel vertical radiant sections 
essentially completely separated from each other and a con- 
vection section above and offset fix>m both radiant sections 
with each radiant section having a single row of process tubes 
which are fired from both sides, with tubes of each section 
being interconnected with each other by horizontal crossover 
tubes to provide for flow of process fluid from inlet to outlet 
through both sections. The inlet radiant section may be fired 
at higher heat rates to heat a fluid to be processed from an 
inlet temperat\ire to an intermediate temperature in a short 
residence time. The heater may be employed for: heating a 
mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; pyrolysis of 
hydrocarbons; or sneam reforming of hydrocarbons. 



3,667,430 
MODULAR COMBINED MOISTURE SEPARATOR AND 
' REHEATER 
William Schcnck Hubble; Kenneth K. Wood^ both of Cape 
EUzabcth, Mabie, and Sahratore S. Tramuta, Schenectady, 
N.Y., assignors to General Electric Company 
FUcd June 4, 1970, Scr. No. 43,359 
Int.a.F22g5/76 
U.S. a. 122—483 7 Clafam 

A combined moisture separator and reheater suitable for a 
nuclear steam turbine-generator powerplant has modular re- 
heater stages in which the tubes extend in a transverse 
direction to the shell centerline and a pair of moisture 
separator elements which are positioned in parallel along 
either side of the shell. The steam to be reheated enters the 
shell through a plurality of openings towards the bottom of 
the shell and flovra generally in a vertical direction up 
through the moisture separator elements and over the rows 
of reheater tubes and then out of the shell through a plurality 
of openings toward the top thereof. A uniform flow is main- 
tained by the appropriate arrangement of the reheater stages 
and the moisture separator elements. By standardizing the 



simply adding any desired number of additional axial sections 
of moisture separator elements and reheater stages. 



3,667,431 
ENGINE TEMPERATURE CONTROL SYSTEM 
Don F. Kueny, Waukegan, and Howard M. 
LibcrtyviUe, both of DL, assignors to Outboard Marine Cor- 
poration, Waukegan, DL 

FUcd Jan. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 635 

Int. CL FOlp 7/74, 7/76; F02f 7/70 

U.S. CL 123-41.08 20 Oafam 



9l,^«' I 




Disclosed herein is an internal combustion engine includ- 
ing a cooling system having a first coolant jacket portion for 
cooling the engine in the vicinity of the cylindrical portion of 
the cylinders and a second coolant jacket portion for cooling 
the engine in the vicinity of the cylinder heads. Flow of coo- 
lant from the first coolant jacket portion is selectively ccm- 
troUed by a restricted by-pass which leads to an overflow 
discharge, and by each of a thermostatic valve and a pressure 
responsive valve which are operable to afford coolant flow 
from the first coolant jacket portion to the second coolant 
jacket portion when the temperature or pressure in the first 
coolant jacket portion is above a predetermined value. 



100 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



3,667,432 

ENGINE AIR MANIFOLD 

Jack F. Grcathouac, Hagcrstown, Md., aHigiior to Mack 

Trucks, lac., AUcatown, Pa. 
Coadanatioa of appUcatioa Ser. No. 704,636, Feb. 12, 1968, 
now alMMioiicd. Thk appUcatioa May 4, 1970, Scr. No. 

31372 

fat. CI. F02b 75118 

U.S. CL 123—52 M 5 Claim 




A manifold for a multi-cylinder internal combustion engine 
including a hollow manifold casing having an air inlet con- 
nection and a barrier plate on one side thereof provided with 
ports aligned with the intake passages of the engine, the 
manifold being mounted on the engine block or cylinder 
head with the barrier plate spaced from the head or block to 
enable an insulating barrier of air to be maintained between 
the barrier plate of the manifold and engine for reducing the 
transfer of heat from the engine to the air admitted into the 
engine cylinders, and openings through the baffle plate allow- 
ing air to flow from the passageway to the ports. 



3,667,433 
VARIABLE COMPRESSION RATIO PISTON INCLUDING 

OIL FILTER MEANS 
Walter F. Ucy, Gro«e Pointe, Mkh., aaiignnr to Tdedyne In- 
dustries, Inc^ Los Aaidss, Calif. 

Filed June 1, 1970, Scr. No. 41,918 

Int. CL F02b 75104 

MS. CL 123—78 B 13 Claims 




are each formed with a conically shaped exterior surface that 
mates with a similarly shaped hole within the inner piston 
member for retaining the valves therein. A narrow annulus it 
formed between the inner member and the discharge valve 
for filtering oil before it enters the discharge valve so that im- 
purities which might retain the valve in an opened position 
are filtered out of the oil. A second narrow annulus is pro- 
vided between the discharge orifice and the lower chamber 
so that impurities that might plug up the orifice ar^ filtered 
out of the oil. 



A two-part variable compression ratio piston provided with 
an upper and lower chamber, supply valve means connected 
with the lubrication system of the engine for supplying oil to 
the chambers in a manner which permits the parts by inertia 
forces and the forces generated by combustion chamber 
pressures to move relative to each other at a controlled rate 
to increase the compression ratio of the engine until a 
predetermined constant maximum combustion chamber pres- 
sure has been achieved, a discharge valve assembly for 
discharging some of the oil from the upper chamber to the 
engine crankcase when the pressure in the upper chamber 
exceeds a predetermined maximum value and a restricted 
discharge orifice formed in the inner member and connected 
to the lower chamber for discharging a controlled quantity of 
oil therefrom. The supply valve and discharge valve assembly 



3,667,434 

ROCKER ARM ASSEMBLY INCLUIHNG FULCRUM 
I MOUNTED LUBRICANT DEFLECTOR 
Bernard J. Sandusky, Dearborn Hciglrts, Nflch., sasignor to 
Ford Motor Company, D ea r b orn, Midi. , 

Filed Dec. 31, 1970, Scr. No. 103418 ^ 
Int. a. FOlm 9110; FOll 1118 ' 

MS. a 123-90J5 8 Oaiam 




Nx 



A rocker arm assembly for the operation of a vglve in an 
internal combustion engine in which the rocker arm is 
pivotally mounted on a fulcrum supported by the cylinder 
head of the engine. A lubricant deflecting means mounted on 
the fiiicnim is employed to deflect lubricant that flows 
through a push rod having a lubricant passage positioned 
therein and through an aperture in one end of the rocker arm 
onto the bearing means that pivotally supports the rocket 
arm on the fitlcnun. 



to 



said 



3,667,43S 

VEmCULAR ENGINE BRAKE ASSEMBLY 

Richard M. Bygdncs, Athofton, CaHf., assigi 

Richard M. Bygdncs, by said Perry A. Bygdncs 

Continaa t ton in p a rt of application Scr. No. 797,841, Feb. 10, 

1969, now abandoned. This application Apr. 13, 1970, Scr. 

No. 27,666 
Int CL FOll 13108 I 

U.S. CL 123—97 B ' 9 CUnv 

An engine brake for a two-cycle engine equipped vehicle is 
operative through selective venting of the engine's com- 
bustion chamber and includes a plug with an actuaUe poppet 
valve arranged in a passageway communicating with the 
combustion chamber. In one form, a collector receives gases 
passing from the passageway, the collector being in commu- 
nication with a conduit extending to a controlled air source 
so that gases passing to and frt>m the combustion chamber to 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



101 



the atmosphere pass through the controlled air source. In 3 667 437 

another form, a one-way check valve permits gas discharge MULTIPLE PLUNGQt FUEL INJECTION PUMP 

Alexander Drdsfai, Oiympia FlddB, DL, mrtgnor to AIHa-Chal- 




mers Manufacturing Compnny, MUwankce, Wia. 
Filed Aug. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 65,202 
Int. CL F02m 59100 
U.S.CL 123— 139R 10 



V 





QB ® o o o 



-i4 



.J 



but impedes entry of airborne particles into the combustion 
chamber. 



3,667,436 
FUEL GASmCATION FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION 

ENGINES 
Robert Rcichhdra, 155 LcPorc Drive, LancMtcr, Pa. 
Filed Jan. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 2380 
• Int CL F02m 25106, 1 7/18, 31/08 
U.S.CL 123-119 A 



Multiple plunger fuel injection pump having built in fuel 
injection timing and quantity control. 




3,667,438 

FUEL INJECTING DEVICE FOR AN INTERNAL 

COMBUSTION ENGINE 

Jean MouUn, Chaton, and Mvcd Regneaolt, Paris, both of 

9Claims France, aalgnors to Automobiles Peugeot, Park, France 

Filed Sept. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 76,444 
Claims priority, appHcation Rnnoe, Dec 19, 1969, 6944138 

Int CL F02m 39/00, 59/34 
VS. a. 123—139 AS 4 Oaina 




A system and method is provided adapted to utilize low- 
grade liquid fuel in an internal combustion engine providing 
a gasification chamber and a method for introducing the low- 
grade liquid fuel into the gasification chamber while at the 
same time directing a portion of the engine exhaust products 
to the gasification chamber for direct mixture with the liquid 
fuel to gasify the liquid fuel and thereafter conducting the 
fuel to the engine system. There is also prpvided a system for 
additional indirect heating of the liquid fiiel by circulating a 
portion of the engine exhaust products to the gasification 
chamber vrithout direct mixture with the fuel, and auxiliary 
heat to provide gasification of the liquid fuel on start-up. Air 
may also be introduced into the gasification chamber and, 
preheated. 



\ 



Fuel injecting device for an internal combustion engine 
comprising at least one injection pump connected to at least 
one injector and a regulating system of the liquid abutment 
type formed by a fuel relief or discharge passageway for the 
injection pump in which is interposed a movable ckjsing 
member whose movement is controlled by a fluid pressure 
regulated by an acceleration control of the engine so that the 
amount of fuel delivered for each stroke of the pump is 
determined by the movement of the closing member. The 
characteristic of the injecting device is that a fuel deducting 
chamber having an inlet constituted by a throttling orifice is 
connected in parallel with the discharge passageway up- 
stream of the closing member. 



102 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



3,667,439 
TORQUE AND SPEED CONTROL GOVERNOR 
Eurl B. Mulr, Pahtc Vcrdcs Peninsula, CaUf., aadgnor to 
White Motor Corporadoa, Clevduid, Oliio 

fVcd Aug. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 61,980 

Int. CL F02d 1104 

U.S.CI. 123— 140MC 21 Claims 




An axially movable governor shaft is acted upon by 
flyweights in opposition to a force transfer spring and a plu- 
rality of torque con^'ol springs. The force exerted by the 
springs is increased or decreased by a fuel pressure dif- 
ferential measured at a variable orifice at the fuel inlet. The 
position of a servo valve is controlled both by the pressure 
differential and by the position of the governor shaft to con- 
trol a flow metering oriflce through which fiiel to be injected 
into the engine must pass. 



3,667,440 

FUEL INJECTION APPARATUS FOR AN INTERNAL 

COMBUSTION ENGINE 

HiroyuU Yosliino, Asalta, Japan, assignor to Honda GUwn 

Kogyo KaltMsldld Katalia, Toltyo, Japan 

Filed Oct. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 80,63 1 
Clainu priority, application Japan, May 21, 1970, 45/49063 

Int Ci. F02d 1104 
MS. CI. 123— 140 MP 7 Claims 




V 



6, 1972 



3,667,441 

CAPACITOR DISCHARGE IGNITION SYSTEM WITH 

AUTOMATIC SPARK ADVANCE 

David T. Cavil, Menomonee F^ls, Wis., assignor to Outboard 

Marine Corporation, Waukcgan, Dl. 
Continuation of appHostion Scr. No. 647,426, June 30, 1967, 
now abandoned. This application May 16, 1969, Sfr. No. 
j 825,194 

f InLQ. F02pi/06 

U.S.CL123— 148E 




7Claina 



Disclosed herein is a capacitor discharge ignition system 
which utilizes a magneto-type flywheel assembly with a per- 
manent magnet located in the flywheel to induce a voltage 
pulse in a charge coil located on one leg of a U-shaped coil 
core to charge a capacitor and to induce a trigger pulse in a 
trigger coil to trigger a silicon controlled rectifier which thus 
becomes conducting and closes a circuit between the capaci- 
tor and the primary coil of a transformer for discharge of the 
capacitor. In the disclosed construction, the charging and 
triggering coils constitute portions of a single coil to advance 
the time at which the capacitor discharges and accordingly to 
fire the associated spark plug prior in time to the normal fir- 
ing time in relation to engine crankshaft position, the coil 
core is provided with an extension or foot which extends cir- 
cumferentially of the flywheel in the direction opposite 
flywheel rotation. 



3,667,442 

PNEUMATIC STARTING SYSTEM FOR DIESEL 

ENGINES 

Harvey F. Bredlow, Salem, Va., aHlgnor to Grahfm<WhHc 

Sales Corporation, Salem, Va. 

Filed Feb. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 1 1.754 

Int. CL F02n 7108; F16k i 7/72 

U.S.CL 123-179 F . SCIaiim 



An apparatus is provided for stopping fiiel injection in a 
fuel injection type internal combustion engine wherein a fuel 
supply passage for a ftiel injection pump incorporates a 
pusher facing an inlet valve of the pump. The pusher is ar- 
ranged such that during ordinary engine operation, the 
pusher is retracted to an inoperative position by the supply 
pressure of the fuel within the fuel supply passage whereas a 
valve is displaced upon rapid reduction of engine speed to 
connect the fuel supply passage with the outside atmosphere. 



-ranii "■• -r> Jgi L-l 




A pair of normally open, air-actuated valves supplied from 
a common pressure source and acting respectively as a line 
valve and a pilot valve, the latter for controlling with as- 
sociated time delays closing and reopening of the tine valve, 
for automatically purging a diesel engine of any liquid con- 
densate by applying operating air to the engine's air starter 
motor in two separate stages, one brief and the other ex- 
tended 



\ 



.June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



103 



3,667,443 
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE WITH VENTED 
PISTON CLEARANCE SPACES AND METHOD 
James H. Curric, Rochester, and Stanley H. Midi, Mt. 
Clemens, both of Mkh., assignors to General Motors Cor- 
poration, Detroit, Mich. 

Filed Mar. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 15,494 

Int. CI. FOlb 31100; F02f 3100; F16J 7/00 

U.S. CI. 123-193 P 6aalnis 







"-' ^ -^ 



3,667,445 

SIDE-DRESSING APPARATUS FOR A GRIT4DING 

MACHINE 

Hlroshl Ota, Kariya, Japan, assignor to Toyoda KoU 

Kabushild Kaisha, Kariya-shi, Japan 

Filed Aug. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 65,931 
Clafams priority, application Japan, Aug. 25, 1969, 44/81082 

Int. CL B24b 53112 
MS. a. 125— 1 1 DF 1 1 Clain» 



\ 




\ \ 



An internal combustion engine is provided with pistons 
having vent openings connecting the space between the first 
and second piston rings with the engine crankcase so as to 
vent to the crankcase hydrocarbon-rich gases which escape 
from the combustion chamber past the first piston ring. This 
method of venting the clearance space has been shown to 
reduce hydrocarbon emissions in some instances. 



3,667,444 

ARCHERY BOW WITH SIGHTING MECHANISM 

Alfred J. Depatic, 12229 McShane Drive, FrankUn, Wis., and 

Elwyn P. Hart, 426 South 92nd Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Filed Mar. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 18,078 

Int. CI. F41b 5100 

U.S. CI. 124-24 9 Claims 




An archery bow with a telescopic sight windage is attached 
to a bow by a frame which locates the eye sighting portion of 
the sight immediately adjacent to the shooter's eye with the 
arrow and string drawn back preparatory to actual shooting. 
The mounting frame is light weight and adjustably connected 
to the bow for adjusting the position of telescopic sight rela- 
tive to the archer. The frame includes a locating element ad- 
jacent the archer's head for positioning of the sight with 
respect to the archer. A string guide is provided with an ac- 
curate reference point to which the bow string and arrow is 
drawn each time. 



A side-dressing apparatus for a grinding machine having a 
chuck means for joumaling workpieces transversely of a plu- 
rality of parallel grinding wheels, comprising a plurality of 
dressing members mounted at a precise angle to said grinding 
wheels on a holding member joumaled on said chuck means, 
and transverse to the grinding wheels, said dressing members 
being provided with feeding means including adjusting knobs 
to modulate the rightward and leftward movements of 
diamond dressers set in slidable members engaged in the top 
ends of said dressing members, and means to measure the 
dressing amount to be applied to the sides of the grinding 
wheels, said measuring means having measuring arms, opera- 
tion rods for said measuring arms, movable members moved 
by said rods, resilient members to hold said movable mem- 
bers normally in a neutral position, feelers operated by said 
movable members, and measuring gauges, whereby easy, eflR- 
cient, and safe side dressing of said grinding wheels may be 
accomplished with accurate results and consequent increase 
in production efficiency of grinding. 



3,667,446 
CHARCOAL GRILL 
Paul S. Morton, 82 Mandalay Drive, OBhtcmo, Mich. 
Filed Aug. 12, 1970, Ser. No. 63,166 
Int. CI. A47J 37100; F24b 3100; F24c 7/76 
U.S. CI. 126-9 R 14CWm» 

A portable and collapsible charcoal burning grill having an 
open top base and a removable cover therefor. The grill con- 
struction also comprises an upsUnding collapsible support 
member adapted to be mounted on the open top base when 
in a position of use around the perimeter of the open top, the 
support member being also adapted to collapse and be 
received in the open top base for storage therein. A charcoal 
holding grate is provided and is adapted to be removably 
mounted on the support member when in a position of use 
and further adapted to be receivable in the open top base 
along with the collapsed support member for storage therein. 
A food holding grill is also provided and adapted to be 
removably mounted on the support member when in a posi- 
tion of use and spaced upwardly from the charcoal holding 
grate. The food hokiing grill is also adapted to be receivable 
in the open top base along with the collapsed support 
member and the charcoal holding grate for storage therein. 
The base has a sufficient depth to permit the cover to cover 
the open top to thereby permit a storage of the collapsed 



104 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



support member, the charcoal holding grate means and the 
food holding grill means within the base. If desired, a char- 
coal collecting member may be provided and adapted to be 




removably mounted in the open top b^te below the charcoal 
holding grate when in the position of use. 



3,667,447 
GAS-FIRED DOMESTIC OVENS 
Bda M. Toth, and Ian Thow, both of SoUhuU, Enslaiid, a»- 
sigiiors to ParUasoB Cowan Limited, London, England 

Filed June 19, 1970, Scr. No. 47,798 
Clainu priority, application Great Britain, June 21, 1969, 

31,451/69 
•- Int. CI. F24c 15132 

MS. CL 126—21 A ' 3 Claims 




In a domestic gas-fired oven of the pyrolytic self-cleaning 
type with a forced-draught fan re-circulating a portion of the 
combustion products back through the oven during self- 
cleaning the re-circulation ratio, that is to say, the ratio of 
the total mass circulating to the net mass entering and leav- 
ing the system, is between three to one and five to one, being 
preferably four to one. 



3,667,448 

PORTABLE BRA2aER WITH CLEANING MEANS 

Jack Dorian, 1196 Vermont Way, San Bruno, Calif. 

Coatinnarton-ln-part of application Scr. No. 59,423, July 30, 

1970. This application Jan. 28, 1971, Ser. No. 110,718 

Int. CL A47j 37100; F24b 3100 

MS. CL 126—25 R 15 Clafam 

A portable brazier for cooking and barbequing foods. One 

embodiment of the invention provides a leg-supported bowl 



provided with a rotatable apertured tray dividing the bowl 
into upper and lower compartments and adapted to retain 
the burning coals below a top grill holding the food to be 
cooked. A scraper blade depends from the tray and is 
adapted to rotate with the tray for scraping ashes and other 



\ 




residue from the bowl bottom wall into an opening leading to 
a removable trap. Another embodiment provides a fixed 
blade with a bowl adapted to turn relative to the blade. A 
trap in the bowl receives the ashes and other residup scraped 
from the bowl. 



3,667,449 
GAS-OPERATED BARBECUE GRILL 
Laveme O. Perslngcr, Burbank, and Merle L. 
Glendale, both of CaHf., aarifnors to Big Boy Manufactur- 
ing Co., Inc., Burbank, CaHf. 

I Filed Sept 8, 1970, Scr. No. 70,263 I 
' InL a. A47J 3 7100; F24c 3100 ' 



MS. CL 126—41 R 




3ClainH 



A barbecue grill having a gas burner mounted within a 
firebowl which is supported above a base by a tubular 
column. The burner directs flames horizontally into the 
firebowl and is shielded against fouling by grease drippings 
from the cookinf surface. Pumiceous rock is carried in the 
firebowl and is heated by the burner flames to re-radiate heat 
to the cooking surface. A ceramic-coated metal deflector can 
be provided over the burner to protect the burner and deflect 
the burner flames downwardly towards the firebowl bottom 
for heating the pumiceous rock so that the cooking surface is 
uniformly heated by both direct and radiant heat. 



3,667,450 

OVEN HEATER COMBINATION 

Stanley F. Skafle, Arcadia, Calif., airignor to WMttams Fui> 

nacc Co., Bucna Park, CaHf. 
ContiBuation<4n-part of appHcatkM Scr. No. 16,282, Mar. 4, 
1970, tow abandoned. This ^>pttcation Oct. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 

177,449 
Int. CL F24c 3100 
MJ&. CL 126—85 B 

A closed combustion oven heater combination to be 
mounted in a room of an enclosed structure, such as a 



9 Claims 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



105 



camper, motor home and the like and having an oven enclo- 
sure, a closed combustion chamber disposed under the oven 
enclosure, ducting for bringing intake air into the combustion 
chamber from outside the room, heat exchanging flue spaces 
in communication with the combustion chamber for heating 
the oven, exhaust ducting communication with the heat 



^-\ 






iff — *»/ 



exchanging flue spaces, and a vent to allow heated air to 
escape from the oven enclosure. The oven enclosure is thus 
completely closed from the combustion chamber and the air 
source so that oven enclosure air which may be circulated 
into a room of the enclosed structure is independent of the 
air circulation of the combustion chamber. 



^- 3,667,451 

GAS-nRED HEATER MEANS 
Jamct D. Boucher, Tykr, Tex., anignor to General Electric 
Company 

Filed Aug. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 66,800 

Int. CL F24h 3106 

U.S.CL 126-1 10 R 2Clabns 




The present invention provides improved gas-fired heater 
means for supplying heat to a space, such as a room, house, 
building or the like. The improved heater means includes 
heat exchanger means for transferring heat generated by the 
combustion of a fuel gas-air mixture to an air stream circu- 
lated between the heat exchanger means and the space, and 
pressurized combustor means for mixing fuel gas with pres- 
surized air and burning that mixture to provide a source of 
heat to the heat exchanger means. In accordance with the 
present invention, the pressurized combustor means has its 
discharge fluid-connected to the upper portion of the heat 
exchanger means, and its vent for exhausting the waste 
products of combustion to the atmosphere is fluid-connected 
to the heat exchanger means lower portion. With this ar- 
rangement, the combustion products will be forced 
dowmward through the heat exchanger means and out 
through the vent by the pressurized air during operation of 
the combustor means, but condensate which may deposit 
within the heat exchanger means during dormancy of the 
combustor means will be directed away imvn the combustor 
means by gravity. 



3,667,452 

CONTAINER FOR THE PRESERVATION AND 

CONSUMPTION OF DIFFERENT COOKED FOODS 

Robert BrebMt, 8 bis place Charles Digeon, 94 Saint-Mande, 

and Maurice P. Tamboise, 78 Crespieres, both of France 

Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 23,762 

Claims priority, application FtwKC, Mar. 31, 1969, 6909706 

Int. CLF47J 27/00 
U.S. CL 126—390 5 



*) ^^ S. M- „ /, *?* 



t 



\ 



A sheet metal container for the packaging and service of 
various food products to be heated to different temperatures 
in which the sheet metal container is formed with separated 
compartments having bottom walls at different levels, de- 
pending upon the amount of heat required to be generated in 
the compartment, and having outer walls with surfaces hav- 
ing different reflective characteristics, depending upon the 
amount of heat desired to be generated within the compart- 
ments, and in which the compartments are separated one 
from another with slotted portions in between to minimize 
heat transfer by conduction and which includes a lid having 
corresponding differences in heat reflection of the surfaces 
and with slotted portions therein corresponding to the slotted 
arrangement in the container. 



3,667,453 
EXERCISE CHAIR 
WilUam G. Schenck, and Eari T. Stark, both of 201 North 
Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach, Fla. 

Filed Mar. 15, 1971, Scr. No. 124,201 

Int. CL A61h 1^00 

VS. CL 1 28-24 R 10 Clalns 




An exerciser is provided in the form of an armchair having 
a body-carrying seat member mounted on the chair for rotary 
reciprocating motion about a vertical axis relative to the 
chair including its legs, back and arms. Power driving 
mechanism is provided for effecting the rotary reciprocating 
motion of the seat member so that a person sitting on the 
seat will have imparted to his buttocks a movement which 
will exercise his leg muscles when his feet are on the floor, 
his arm muscles when his arms or hands are engaging the 
arms of the chair and his back muscles through his arms or 
directly if his back is against the back of the armchair. 



3,667,454 

TOOTHBRUSH WITH ULTRAVIOLET EMITTER 

Larry W. Prince, 1320 South Depew Street, Denver, Colo. 

Filed June 12, 1970, Scr. No. 45,634 

InL a. A61h 29/00; A46b 13/02 

VS. CL 128-24.2 12 

A powered, vibrating toothbrush from which ultra-violet 
radiation is emitted at the bristle end. The bristles are carried 



106 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



on the end of a tubular shank projecting from a handle. A by matching male and female reamers so that one fits into 
radiation emitUng lamp tube is enclosed within the shank, the the other to create an interlocking action. Suitable male and 
lamp tube being coated with a radiation blocking material ex- 




M M 



cept at its end portion aligned with the bristles. The source of 
electrical energy in the handle energizes the vibrator and the 
lamp tube. 



3,667,45S 
ROTARY DOUCHE FOR TREATING BREASTS 
Jacques Courtln, 7 Rue Gucnegaud, 75 Paris 6% France 

FUed Apr. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 29,607 
Claiiiu priority, appttcatfoa France, July 29, 1969, 6925877 

lot CL A61h 9m 
U.S. CL 128—66 3 Clabm 




A rotary douche for treating breasts which is used with a 
water supply and which comprises three major component 
parts : a bell-shaped body, a staler and a rotor which are 
easily assembled and disassembled in order to facilitate the 
removal of deposits from the water supply such as calcium. 
The stator includes an extending lip for sealingly engaging 
the chest of the user. The stator is adapted to support the 
rotor for rotation thereon and includes a tubular portion ex- 
tending through a portion tA the bell-shaped body remote 
from the open end and adapted to be connected to a water 
supply. Ports are provided in the tubular member for con- 
ducting the water to the rotor. The rotor includes fingers 
having orifices at their tips so that the rotor is driven by reac- 
tion. 



3,667,456 
mP-JOINT OPERATIONS 
John Chamicy, Hale, England, SHignor to Ciias. F. Thackray 
Limited, Leeds, Yorksiiire, England 

Filed Nov. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 90,914 
Clainis priority, appHcalion Great Britain, Nov. 25, 1969, 

57,539/69 

Int. CLA61by 7/76. /7/i2 

MS, CL 128—92 R 5 Claims 

A method for re-attaching the great trochanter to the 

femur in which the faces to be joined are shaped respectively 




female reamers, preferably of conical or frusto-conical form 
are described, together with holders for the reamers. 



• 3,667,457 

ORTHOPAEDIC APPARATUS FOR TRACTION OF THE 

SnNAL COLUMN 

Giovanni ZumagHni, Turin, Italy, Msignm to Offldna 

Mcdico-Ortopcdica Dott. Giovanni Zumi«Mni, Turin, Italy 

Filed Jan. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 4,383 

Claims priority, application Italy, Jan. 23, 1969, 50266 Ay69 

Int. a. A61h 1102 
U.S.CL128— 75 6ClalnH 




A truss for placing the spine under traction has a pelvic 
girdle and an upwardly extending tractor structure at the top 
of which is connected a head-supporting structure. The lower 
part of the tractor structure has two diverging curved arms 
which extend from the patient's back around to the tides of 
the girdle, where they are pivoted to the girdle. This allows 
the patient to bend forward. Pneumatic cushions on the sup- 
port for the head are inflated to adjust the traction force fine- 
ly. Spring means in the tractor structure act as shock absor- 
bers. Other articulated joints allow the patient to nod and 
turn his head. -^ 



3,667,458 
SURGICAL DRAPE SHEET 
Kay E. Krebs, Nccnah, Wis., assignor to Kimberly-Clarii Cor- 
poratioB, Nccnah, Wis. 

, Filed Mar. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 15,471 , 
I Int. CL A61I 15100 

U.S.CL128— 132 4 

A disposable surgical drape sheet, of the type having a 
porous nonwoven fabric sheet for placing over a surgical pa- 
tient and having a fenestration near its center to expose an 
operative area, is provided with a continuous film of pres- 
sure-sensitive adhesive surrounding the fenestration near its 
center to expose an operative area. It has a continuous film 



Claims 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



107 



of pressure-sensitive adhesive surrounding the fenestration mospheric pressures in which the life support gas enters at 
and extending a substantial distance from the periphery. A the helmet and through ducts at the extremities of the arms 
removable abherent peel strip covering the adhesive area is 
removed before using the sheet, thereby exposing the adhe- 




sive and permitting the sheet to be secured around the opera- 
tive area. Additionally, the adhesive fluid-proofs one side of 
the drape. 



3,667,459 
VENTILATION SYSTEM FOR INFLATABLE PRESSURE 

GARMENTS 
George P. Dumcy, Dover, Del., assignor to ILC Industries, 
Inc., Dover, Dd. 

FUed May 8, 1967, Scr. No. 636355 

Int. CL A62b 7114, 18104 

VS. CL 128—142.5 10 Cbdms 




3,667,460 
VENTILATION SYSTEM FOR INFLATABLE PRESSURE 

GARMENTS 
Leonard F. Shcpard, Dover, Dd., assignor to ILC Industries, 
Inc., Dover, Dd. 

FUed May 8, 1967, Scr. No. 641,735 
Int. CL A62b 7114, 18/04 
VS. a. 128—142.5 7 Clainv 

An improved ventilation system for a space suit or other 
inflatable pressure garment assembly, such as used by as- 
tronauts and by pilots of high altitude vehicles operating in 
an environment having low oxygen content and low at- 




and exits from the garment only through ducts located at the 
legs after passing over the entire body of the wearer. 



3,667,461 

DISPOSABLE SYRINGE 

Paul A. Zamarra, Lake Road, Far HiUs, N J. 

Original application Nov. 5, 1968, Scr. No. 773,455, now 

Patent No. 3^89,362. Divided and this application Dec 7, 

1970, Scr. No. 95,762 

Int CL A61m 1/00 

VS. CL 128—232 5 CMam 



An improved ventilation system for a space suit or other 
inflatable pressure garment assembly, such as used by as- 
tronauts and by pilots of high altitude vehicles operating in 
an environment having low oxygen content and low at- 
mospheric pressures in which the life support gas enters at 
the helmet and exits through conduits leading from the ex- 
tremities of both the arms and legs after passing in contact 
with the entire body of the wearer. 




A spray nozzle has spray openings at one end and a flange 
at its other end, and a bag has folded or pleated portions of 
its thin plastic wall at the mouth of the b«^ or around a bole 
in said wall which has a thickness of the order of from 
0.00125 to O.OOS of an inch. Said pleated portions are 
secured to said flange with a liquid-tight connection by a 
clamping ring which is outside the bag, grips said pleated 
portions between itself and said flange and by said snap ring 
or screw action is quickly attachable to and detachable from 
said flange which is inside the bag, so that the syringe can be 
compactly packaged, easily assembled for use and discarded 
after one use. 



108 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,667,462 

ORTHOPEDIC, SURGICAL, ATHLETIC AND ANIMAL 

BANDAGING 

Jacob R. Moon, St. Mary's Road, Box 642, Hillsborough, 

N.C. 

Filed June 4, 1970, Ser. No. 43,446. The portion of the term of 

the patent subsequent to Apr. 7, 1987, has been dtadaimcd. 

Int. CI. A61f 13102 

MS. CI. 1 28- 169 10 Claims 




A bandage for animal, orthopedic, surgical and athletic ap- 
plications comprises a seamless, stretchable. tube knit of 
synthetic yam with a fuzzy surface engageable by the hooks 
of a set of Velcro straps and which provides a bandage the 
base laps of which can be bonded together so as to minimize 
slippage during use. and the securing strap ends of which are 
adapted to be hidden. 



3,667,463 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TREATMENT OF 

RESPIRATCNIY MSEASE 

David L. Banici« SprlngBcId, OMo, lignnr to Paul A. Groa- 

ri, CvroOloii, OMo« ■ pwt IntCTCit 

fVed Nofv. 14, 1969, Scr. No. 876,660 

Int. CL A61in 15100 

U.S. CL 128—194 2 Claiim 




A method and apparatus for treating respiratory disease is 
disclosed. An aerosol generator provides an initial aerosol 
having an initial oxygen concentration and humidity. Adap- 
tor means are provided to introduce additional oxygen to the 
aerosol to increase the oxygen concentration so as to provide 
the specific oxygen concentration required by the patient. 



3,667,464 
FLUID DISPENSING DEVICE 
Lawrence M. AIHgood, Jr., 2469 Huii(li« Vnfey Drive, 
Decatur, Ga. 

Filed Sept 4, 1970, Scr. No. 69^31 
Int. CL A61m 05116 
U.S. CL 128—214 C 9 CWnw 

A fluid flow regulating device for insuring a constant rate 
of flow therethrough, suitatrfe for use in intravenous therapy, 
including a constant fluid level chamber with an adjustable 
piston having a drip orifice in the head thereof seated within 
and forming the bottom of the chamber. The top portion of 
the chamber has a fluid receiving tube seated therein. A 
buoyant body having an upwardly projecting member is 
located within the chamber and is received within said fluid 



1: 



receiving tube, with at least a portion of the projecting 
member conforming in shape and size to the orifice of the 
fluid receiving tube so as to occlude the orifice when in con- 
tact. The hydrostatic head pressure is kept constant within 




the constant level chamber, thereby providing a constant 
flow rate which can be adjuAed over wide ranges by moving 
the piston up or down to vary the height of the liquid jcolumn 
in said chamber. 



THE 



^ 3,667,465 

APPLICATOR TUBES FOR SUPPOSITORIES AND 

UKE I 

Joseph A. VoM, Denver, Cole, a«lgnor to Kimberly-CUuic 
Corporation, Necnah, Wis. , 

FUed Dec. 8, 1969, Scr. No. 882341 

Int. CL A61f 13120 \ 

U.S. CL 1 28—27 1 1*^ Clainv 




r 



V 



H ml 




An applicator tube and suppository combination is dis- 
closed having a shape and structure such as to permit easy 
and accurate insertion in a body cavity, such as the rectum, 
with the applicator com<^rising a two piece telescoping tubu- 
lar member for easy ejection of the suppository from the ap- 
plicator after initial insertion is accomplished. The telescop- 
ing tubular members are provided with mating ring configu- 
rations which serve to lock the tubular elements in a particu- 
lar juxtaposition to be maintained prior to use, with the rings 
being releasable from each other under slight pressure and 
thereafter serving as guides ans tha tubular members are 
telescoped, one into the other. A novel suppository configu- 
ration and means for latching the suppository in place in the 
applicator prior to use, are also disclosed. 



I 3,667,466 

SELF-DISINTEGRATING DLU>ER LINER AND 
RETAINER 
Harold J. Ralph, 2002 E. SanU Clara, Santa Ana, CaUf. 
Filed Sept. 21, 1970, Ser. No. 74.013 

Int. CL A61ff I3II6 ' 

U.S. CL 128—287 3$ Claims 

A diaper having a disposable liner comprises a vinyl 
retainer having a main body panel and side and end flaps 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



109 



overlying respective side and end edges. Groups of snap 
fasteners are mounted at extremities of the end flaps to per- 
mit the retainer to be adjustably secured about the waist and 
thighs of a baby. Freely inaeruble and removable into and 
from the vinyl retainer is a diaper liner that has adequate 
strength to enable packaging, normal use and handling. 
Nevertheless, the liner is self-segmenting and self-disintegrat- 
ing when ftilly immersed in a body of water. The liner has a 
central panel substantially coextensive with the main body 
panel of the retainer. It also has pleated sides forming a barri- 
er panel and a protective panel extending the length of the 
liner along each edge. The liner is inserted into and posi- 
tioned within the retainer with its central panel and its barri- 
er panels underlying side and end flaps of the retainer, but 




with the outermost protective panels fully overlying the 
retainer side flaps. 

The liner is formed of a number of layers of absorbent 
wadding sandwiched between layers of wet-strength paper. 
All liner layers are perforated along lines at which the sides 
of the central panel adjoin the barrier panels, and all layers 
of the central panel except the upper layer are provided with 
patterns of perforations. Accordingly, the wet-strength layers 
upon total immersion, as in a toilet bowl, are self-segmenting 
along lines bounded by the perforations. The lower layer of 
wet-strength material is additionally self-segmenting along its 
additional patterns of perforations, whereby the interposed 
wadding is released and self-disintegrating. 



3,667,467 

DOUCHE BAG SUPPORT MEANS 

Ebworth D. Dory, 4407 iOmnount Road, Lanham, Md. 

nied Nov. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 90,589 

Int. CL A61m 3100 

U.S. CI. 128—227 6 ClainH 




An improved support means for a douche bag and its 
portable cover assembly in which a hinged cover assembly is 



supported by a notched string and hook arrangement for 
bathroom fixtures, and the like, means for supporting the 
douche bag within the hollowed, contoured cover assembly, 
openings at the upper and lower portions of the cover as- 
sembly, the first for passing the notched string therethrough, 
the second for passing a hose therethrough, and a receptacle 
for liquid cup portion in the lower extremity of the cover as- 
sembly for containing a solution for providing a wash or 
sterilization feature to the douche tip. 



3,667,468 

SANITARY NAPKIN AND METHOD AND MEANS OF 

PRODUCING 

Emit Danid Nyatraad, and Brian H. Mclntoch, both ofGraca 

Bay, Wis., asdgnors to Paper Converting Machine Com- 

pany. Inc., Green Bay, Wis. 

Filed Apr. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 32,560 
lot CL A61f 13116 
VS. CL 128-290 4 ( 




A sanitary napkin which has a fluff layer sandwiched 
between carrier layers, the sandwich being C-folded to pro- 
vide a lined channel on one side of the sandwich which en- 
courages more even, rapid, and complete dispersion of body 
fluids. 



3,667,469 

POST-SURGICAL DRAINAGE POUCH 

Arthur E. Marsan, 1265 BcUairc Avenue, Denver, Colo. 

Filed Dec. 15, 1969, Scr. No. 884342 

Int.CLA61f5/44 

U.S. CL 128—283 20 Clainv 



I 










■^ 



y 



4V 



/y 



-M-^ Sa?" 



This invention is characterized by a drainage pouch having 
a bag of plastic film and a gelatinous sealing member for 
providing a seal between the pouch and the stoma of a pa- 
tient when the pouch is in use on the patient, and novel con- 
struction whereby a single pouch and its sealing member (as 
an article of manufacture) serves a wide range of stoma sizes, 
and also whereby the film bag entirely encloses the sealing 
member before use and serves as the wrapper for the pouch. 
The invention is further characterized by a method of making 
the pouch wherein the sealing member is molded to shape 
and is in operative position within the bag and in which a 
wall of the film serves as a lining for the mold. 



110 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



3^7^70 

BONE SHAVER AND GROOVER 

Frmak F. RuUa, 795 Souttam Artary, Quincy, Mmm. 

Conttnttatfoii of i niM c aHoii Scr. No. 660,621, Aug. 15, 1967, 

Miw abHMloiwd. Thb appliiMdon Apr. 14, 1970, Scr. No. 

28,200 
Illta.A61b/7/22 
U.S. CL 128—304 3 < 




A hand-tool for shaving bone^or cartilage has a flat shank 
slightly bent near its end and Uien reversely curled with a 
sharp edge at its extremity. In one form of the tool a narrow 
extension projects from the middle of the sharp edge, the ex- 
tension having sharp edges on its three sides. 



3,667,471 
SURGICAL CLAMP 
DMuOd B. Doty, Silver Sprli«, and Hdnz W. Kuglcr, College 
Park, both of Md., mitsaon to The United Sutcs of Amer- 
ica as represented by the Secretary of the Army 
Filed Aug. 15, 1969, Ser. No. 850,504 
Int. CL A61b 1 7112, 1 7108; B65d 63100 ' 
U.S. CL 128—325 4 Clafan 




A surgical clamp for application directly to the liver 
parenchyma which includes a rigid elongated base member 
for supporting two flexible foam rubber covered blades and a 
means for the independent adjustment of each blade. A han- 
dle is attached to one end of the clamp base for the con- 
venience of the operator in positioning the clamp and 
manipulating the liver for better exposure. When properly 
positioned one blade is bent through tension to conform to 
the shape of the superior surface of the liver, and the other 
blade is arched through compression against the inferior sur- 
face of the liver to achieve tight compression through blade 
cooperation. 



1972 



I 3.667,473 

ADJUSTABLE ARCH SUPPORT FOR A SHOE 

WWam M. MatlMoa, 2210 North Street, Nacogdochsa, Tex. 

CootlnaatkM-hiiport of application Scr. No. 877,753^ Nov. 

18, \H9. This appHcatloa Apr. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 32^27 

Int. CL A41f 5114 



U.S. CL 128-598 




A shoe is provided with an adjustable arch support which 
is constracted to permit ready adjustment of the height and 
curvature of an arch formed on L c insole of the shoe. An ad- 
justment screw means is positioned to be rotated for lifting 
and lowering at least one arch-forming spring means located 
under the insole of the shoe. Downward pressure through the 
adjustment screw means is distributed by a pressure distribu- 
tion plate positioned above the outsoie of the shoe and 
secured at its rear end to the heel portion of the shoe. The 
adjustment screw means may be accessible from the bottom, 
back, or inside of the shoe. A preferred arrangement pro- 
vides for two arch-forming spring means in a generally side- 
by-side relationship with separate adjustment screw means 
for each spring means. 



DfL> 



3,667,474 
.ATOR FOR PERFORMING MITRAL AN|> 
TRICUSFIDAL COMMISSUROTOMY PER ATRtUM 

CORDIS 
KonsUntfn VasWcvich Lapldn, Srednc-Pervomaiskaya uUtsa, 
29, kv. 34, Moacow; Gcorgy Fcdorovich Romanov, uUtsa 
Gorkogo, 3, kv. 1, Kirovo-Chepetak; VladlnUr Dkh 
Gdavknin, uUtsa Azina, 3, kv. 29, Klrovo-Chepetsk, and 
Lev Mifchailovkh Popov, Tsentralny proezd, 1, ^v. 13, 
Kirova^hepetsk, aU of U.S.S.R. 

I Filed Jan. 5, 1970, Ser. No. 728 

I Int. a. A61m 29/00 

U.S. CL 128- 345 7 Claims 



3,667,472 
ADHESIVE VOtL LIVING TISSUE 
BoUamln D. Halpem, Jcnkintown, Pa., assignor to Borden, 
Inc. 

Hied OcL 19, 1961, Ser. No. 155,741 
Int. CLA61b 7 7/04 
U.S. CL 128—334 R 5 Oaimi 

This invention relates to the surgical use of monomeric 
Cr-C4 alkyl alpha-cyanoacrylate adhesives for the purpose of 
rapidly bonding together moist living tissue. The said adhe- 
sives are applied to the tissue wherein polymerization takes 
place in situ and the tissue is firmly bonded together. 




A dilator for performing mitral and tricuspidal commisu- 
rotomy per atrium cordis, comprising a working head with 
jaws and a jaw actuating mechanism, the working head being 
associated with a hand-operated drive through a flexible 
base. The working head of the dilator has a relatively rigid 
portion which enables the surgeon to easily pass the working 
head with flnger guidance through tracts of any curvature, 
i.e., to utilize the dilator in all current methods of instrumen- 
tal commissurotomy performed per atrium cordis. The work- 
ing head of the dilator is distinguished by its high rigidity and 
strength. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



111 



3,667,475 

ENDO-TRACHEAL TUBE ADAPTORS FOR USE IN 

ADMINISTERING GASES 

Fred W. VcnturdH, and Foy L. BrignMn, both of Radne, 

Wis., aHlgnors to Natkmal Equlpnwnt Rest arch Inc., 

Radne, Wis. 

Conttauatkm-in-part of appHcatlon Scr. No. 499,272, Oct 21, 

1965, now abandoned. TMs appHcation May 10, 1971, Scr. 

No. 141,940 

Int. a. A61m 16100; F16I 271 10 

U.S. CL 1 28—35 1 10 ClainM 




An endo-tracheal tube adaptor including an inexpensive, 
light weight, transparent open-bottom housing, there being a 
flexible elastic diaphragm removably stretched over said 
housing bottom having an expandable opening through which 
the ends of endo-tracheal tubes of various diameters can be 
projected to couple the same to a gas supply line connected 
to said adaptor, the transparency of said housing enabling an 
attendant to detect an accumulation of phlegm or other 
foreign matter therein, and the detachable nature of said 
diaphragm permitting said foreign matter to be readily 
removed from the housing. 



3,667,476 
APPARATUS FOR MONITORING BODY TEMPERATURE 
AND CONTROLUNG A HEATING DEVICE TO 
MAINTAIN A SELECTED TEMPERATURE 
Henry Muilcr, Hatboro, Pa., assignor to Bio/Data Corpora- 
tion, Norristown, Pa. 

Filed Apr. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 31,920 
Int.a.A61b6//0 
U.S. CL 128—399 7 Claims 

A servocircuit measures and controls temperature. A 
thermistor detects temperature and a controller controls a 
heating device to maintain a selected temperature in a living 
organism. The danger of electric shock is removed by using 
field effect transistors to isolate the thermistor from 
hazardous voltage currents. Alarm and control circuitry 
eliminates danger of overheating. 



3,667,477 
IMPLANTABLE VESICAL STIMULATOR 
Jacques G. Sussct, Montreal, Quebec, and Robert Nagler, 
Chomedey, Quebec, both of Canada, a s si gnors to Canadian 
Patents and Development Limited, Ottawa, Ontario, 
Canada 

Filed Nov. 17, 1967, Scr. No. 683,944 
Oafans priority, appUcation Canada, Nov. 25, 1966, 976,490 

Int. CL A61n 1136 
U.S. CL 128—419 E 3 Clafam 

A device and method for artificially electrically stimulating 
the body wall of a bladder by an electromagnetic wave which 
propagates through the bladder wall and is converted by a 
receiving mechanism into electrical stimulating pulses which 
are conducted to the bladder wall. But the receiving 
mechanism receives all its power from the outside source of 



electromagnetic energy and since it uses no internal power 
source for generating the electrical pulses to stimulate the 




bladder wall, a substantially permanent receiving mechanism 
is achieved which requires no free charging of an internal 
power supply. 



3,667,478 

HLTER CIGARETTE INCORPORATING VITAMIN A 
Nelson J. Watcrbury, Pafan Beach, Fla., assignor to F. Barry 

Haskctt, Ocean Ctty, NJ. and Joan Hfaum Martin, 

Washington, D.C., part interest to each 

Continuatkm-in-part of application Scr. No. 666,810, Sept. 

1 1, 1967, now Patent No. 3,525,582, wMch Is a fothinalhm- 

in-part of applkatkm Scr. No. 617,219, Feb. 20, 1967, bow 

abandoned , which Is a contlnnation-in-port of a ppM c a th wi Scr. 

No. 590,392, Oct. 28, 1966, now Patent No. 3339,558. This 

application July 17, I%9, Ser. No. 842,475. The nortion of the 

term of the patent subsequent to Sept 5, 19&4, has been 

disclaimed. 

Int CL A24d 07/06, A24b 75/02 
U.S. CL 131—9 2 Ckabm 




A cigarette is disclosed for introducing Vitamin A into the 
mouth and the respiratory tract of a smoker which consists of 
incorporating in the filter of a filter cigarette a stabilized 
form of Vitamin A. The Vitamin A is in the form of a stabil- 
ized aqueous emulsion of an active Vitamin A or the active 
esters thereof. The subilized form of the Vitamin A used is 
such as to provide stability over long period of storage before 
use in smoking. 



3,667,479 
CIGARETTE WITH MODIFIED PAPER WRAPPER 
Robert A. Sanford, Prospect; Robert Reiner Johnson, and 
Thomas Wade Summers, both of LoulsviBe, dl of Ky., as- 
signors to Brown & WOliamsoQ Tobacco Corporatkm, 
Louisvilic, Ky. 

Filed Jan. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 3^62 

Int CL A24d 7/02 

U.S.CL131— 15 8CUbm 



JL 



JL 



a 



^^^^^^^B 



■ ■ ■■ '"T*" 



a> 



An improved cigarette is prepared through use of a 
modified cigarette paper as a wrapper. The wrapper is 



112 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June Q, 1972 



treated in preselected areas with a bum control additive, 
preferably a strong combustion supporting, oxidizing agent 
When the burning coal reaches the area of treatment, the 
treated area is burned away, allowing for the passage of air 
through the opening created, during smoking of the cigarette. 
This air entering through the opening dilutes the smoke 
stream and results in a substantiaJ reduction in snwke sub- 
stituents delivered on smoking of the cigarette, with a cor- 
responding improvement in the organoleptic properties of 
the smoke. The preselected areas on the wrapper are so ar- 
ranged that larger areas are burned away as the burning coal 
proceeds from the tip of the cigarette toward the mouthpiece 
of the cigarette, so that increasing amounts of air are drawn 
into the tobacco column as smoking proceeds, and sub- 
stituent delivery is correspondingly reduced in greater 
amounts as smoking proceeds, so as to provide for a more 
uniform constituent delivery. The strong, combustion sup- 
porting, oxidizing agent may be sodium chlorate, sodium bro- 
mate, potassium chlorate, an alkali or alkaline earth metal 
perchlorate, sodium nitrite, potassium nitrite, ammonium 
perchlorate or nitric acid. The bum accelerating agent is ap- 
plied so as to cover 2 to 50 percent of the wrapper and in 
concentration constitutes V4 to 8 milligrams per square cen- 
timeter of the treated portion. 



3,667,480- 

aCARETTE HOLDER AND FILTERING UNIT WITH 

MOUTHPIECE 

Stephen Hreno, 29 Dawson Avenue, CHfton, N J. 

Filed Aug. 1 1, 1970, Scr. No. 62,905 

inLCLA24i01/l6 

VJS. a. 131—207 1 Claim 





A tobacco smoke filter employing two barriers in the 
smoke path, each having an opening to form a flow path past 
the barriers. The first barrier defines a small area flowpath in 
which smoke and entrained liquids and solids are accelerated 
and high kinetic energy is imparted to them. The second bar- 
rier diverts the smoke but. because of its closeness to the first 



barrier, the moisture and solids impinge on the latter. A 
third, downstream barrier marks off a smoke storage space 
from which smoke is drawn during initial phases of sub- 
sequent inhalation to overcome feeling that excessive suction 
is required to overcome filter impedence. The filter and 
storage unit is divided into two passageways and is made of 
plastic and surrounded by paper so that the latter is em- 
ployed as a repository for moisture and solids and to retain 
the filter in situ. 



I 3,667,482 

HAIRSETTING DEVICE 
Justin W. Morgan, 1 1 17 Daytona Avenue, Holly Hill, F^- 
Filed Nov. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 89^94 
Int. CI. A4M I/OO 
VS. CI. 132—9 8 



Claims 



A holder for a cigarette, cigar, or pipe bowl has a socket to 
receive the article to be smoked and the smoke is caused to 
circulate through a long filtering passage containing a filter- 
ing medium and then through a reversely directed long cool- 
ing passage leading through the mouthpiece. The filtering 
and cooling passages may be reversed. The filtering and cool- 
ing passages may extend generally longitudinally of the 
mouthpiece axis or generally normal thereto. 



3,667,481 

TOBACCO SMOKE FILTER 

Leonard L. ThonuK, 14092 Aah Street, Westminster, Calif. 

FBed Dec 5, 1969, Ser. No. 882,675 

Int a. A24d 01/04; A24f 07/04. 13/06 

U.S.a. 131— 261B 13 Claims 




A roller lift for effecting straightening of the hair while 
simultaneously supporting a roller for curling a portion 
thereof including a clamping arrangement for positively 
retaining the hair roller in position without movement on the 
roller lift without the need for auxiliary clips or pins which 
might come into contact with the hair or render m(^re dif- 
ficult the use of the roller lift. 



' 3,667,483 
DENTAL FLOSS RECIPROCATOR 
James B. McCabc, 1900 Deo Darn Drive, Birmingham^ Ala. 
I FtM Dec 14, 1970, Scr. No. 97,979 
tet CL A61c 15/00 
U.S.CI 132—92 9|Clainis 




Dental floss reciprocator embodying pair of arms project- 
ing from support frame and spaced fix}m each other to 
receive teeth therebetween. Guides at outer ends of arms 
receive and permit relative movement of floss passing from 
supply reel to take-up reel. Forward and rearward angular 
movement imparted alternately to reels with forward move- 
ment greater than rearward movement to reciprocfite and 
move floss progressively to take-up reel. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



113 



3,667,484 
PORTABLE MONEY COUNTING MACHINE 
Katharina Maria Rcte, Bachcnaucr Str. 19, 7520 
Bruchsal, Baden, Germany 

Filed Mar. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 19,054 
Claims priority, application Germany, Mar. 15, 1969, G 69 

10 464 

Int CL G07d 9/00 

VS. CL 133—8 R 3 Claims 



3,667,486 
AUTOMATIC WHEEL CLEANING APPARATUS 
Joseph J. Cole, and Charles A. Bookwakcr, IL both of c/o 
Nora Plaza Car Wash, 1300 E. 86th Street, IndianapaHB. 
Ind. 

Filed Feb. 19, 1971, Scr. No. 116^09 

Int a. B60s 3/04; B08b 3/04 

VS. CL 134-45 7 ciahm 




Money counting apparatus comprises a housing having 
means for counting and sorting coins located therein, a ro- 
tary disk is mounted on top of the housing and is adapted to 
centrifugally separate and feed coins. A cover member is 
mounted above the disk. The housing and cover member are 
provided with cooperating interlocking means for selectively 
securing the cover on the housing in a first position enclosing 
the disk, and a second position inverted thereto to form a 
feed tray for the disk. 



3,667,485 

FARE BOX WITH BELT CONVEYOR AND COIN SIZE 

DETTEtfCTT'OR 

WilUam J. Scsko, 12942 Highway 3, Brancrton, Wwh. 

Filed Oct 21, 1969, Scr. No. 868,114 

Int. CI. G074 3/00 

VS. a. 133—8 36 Claims 





Wheel cleaning apparatus for automatic vehicle washing 
installations in which steam is applied to a wheel while the 
wheel is in conuct with a projecting wand. Contact between 
the wand and a passing wheel closes an electrical circuit and 
actuates a solenoid which opens a valve to permit steam to 
pass from a source to and through the steam outlet. When 
the wheel passes beyond the wand the electrical circuit is 
broken and the steam control valve closes. 



Fare box in which belt conveyors transport coins and dol- 
lar bills past an inspection window to a vault. The coins are 
sized, indicated audibly, and registered. Both sides of dollar 
bills may be inspected by transillumination or by automatic 
reversal of the bills in transit. The coin size detector com- 
prises a multiple-contact switch employing an actuator arm 
driven in a first direction by the coins and in the opposite 
direction by a spring, the length of the stroke of the actuator 
arm in the first direction determining which contacts are 
transferred when the arm moves in the reverse direction. 



3,667,487 
INTEGRATED CHEMICAL CLEANING APPARATUS 
Ddbert L. Scboenbcck, Clarendon HiU, and Recce Kincaid, 
Crete, both of III., assignors to Richardson Chemical Clean- 
ing Service, Inc., Scbererviile, Ind. 

Filed Dec. 1 1, 1970, Ser. No. 97,160 

Int CL B08b 9/00, 13/00 

VS. CL 134-108 4 Claims 






--> TJ 







An integral chemical cleaning apparatus for supplying and 
recirculating compositions used in the process of removing 
scale, rust, grease and dirt coatings from internal metallic 
surfaces of closed industrial equipment where the stages of 
pickling, passivating and flushing are performed consecutive- 
ly without change-over to separate devices for each of such 
stages of the process. The apparatus comprises a circulating 
pump forcing fluids from a supply source to valve means 
capable of directing flow in either of two directions for 
reverse cleaning and flushing and circulation back to said 
valve and on through a second valve means for discharge into 
one (rf a plurality of filters for removal of insoluble particles 
wherein said filtrate is c<^ected in said supply source for 
recirculation into the system. 



114 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June €, 1972 



3,667,488 

DEVICE FOR REMOVING DIRT AND CORROSION 

FROM HEAT EXCHANGER CORES 

H«rold W. Pl^fcm P.O. Box 381, HopMm, ^Och. 

FUcd Feb. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 12,114 

lULCLBOSb 3/08, 9/02 



3,667,490 
ELECTRO-PNEUMATIC DIGITAL INTERFACE 
CHfTord W. Alfea, L«dacton, Ky.. anitiior to Wcadiighouw 
Air Brake Company, WUmcrdlag, Pa. 

. Filed Apr. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 32,697 
I Int. CL F15c 3/08; F16k 31/02 



U.S.a. 134— 169A 



3 Claim VS. CI. 137-81.5 




The compact portable device for flushing out and remov- 
ing dirt and corrosion from the cores of heat exchangers em- 
ploys an upstanding open top container for the liquid having 
a bonom of substantial area to constitute a base. A mul- 
tifunctional mounting and top is employed with a portion 
thereof to close the container and with a portion thereof con- 
stituting passages and support and securing means for first a 
depending immersion-type motor-driven pump and secondly 
a valving mechanism preferably constructed of dielectric 
material which is affixed to the multi-functional top between 
the same and the bottom of the pump motor. The valving 

mechanism has passages for alternately connecting the 
discharge of the pump with either of two passages to provide 
for reversing flow of the liquid under pressure through the 
heat exchanger core with attendant recirculation through the 
container. 




H-^^-;^ 







An electro-pneumatic digital interface device uti izing a 
low level electrical input signal to control an interruptier vane 
in a control port to a fluidic device. 



Claiim 



3,667,489 
PURE FLUID DEVICE 
Paul M. Blaiklock, Newton Centre, and Ham-Dktcr Kinncr, 
DuxlNiry, both of Mass., asdgnors to FhikUc Industries, 
Inc., Htngham, Maw. 

FUcd Jan. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 2,297 

Int. CL F15c 1/18 

U.S. CL 137— 81.5 8 Claims 



A pure fluid device for providing efficient digital opera- 
tion. A laminar input stream is caused to interact with one or 
more control streams within a confined interaction chamber 
to provide a binary output pressure whose level depends 
upon the laminar or turbulent condition of flow within the 
chamber. Jhe invention provides extremely rapid switching 
in a precisely controllable manner. The invention is also 
operable to provide controllable proportional amplification 
by producing an output pressure of a magnitude variable in 
response to control pressure variation. 



i 



3.667,491 
FUNCTION GENERATOR USING FLUID AMPLIFIERS 
Thad M. Hasbrouck, WHhcrtfleid, Conn., assignor t<f United 
Aircraft Corporation, East Hartford, Conn. 
j Filed May 4, 1970, Scr. No. 34,287 
■ Int. CL FlSc 1/14, 4/00 

U.S. CL 137—81.5 4 Claims 



^M«J 




The function generator generates a nonlinear open loop 
schedule summing by a fluid amplifler the outputs of two or 
more fluid amplifiers that are both responsive to two pr more 
independent variables. 



to 



I 3,667,492 

PURE FLUID AM>ITION AND SUBTRACTION 
Carmine V. Di CamOio, SUver Spring, Md., 
Bowica Fluidics Corporadon 

I Filed Feb. 18, 1969, Scr. No. 800,163 I 
Int. a. FlSc 7/74 ' ! 

U.S. CI. 137—81.5 7 Clalnv 




Accurate analog addition and subtraction are performed in 
a proportional fluidic amplifier of the stream interaction type 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



115 



in which a pair of control nozzles are superposed, one atop 
the other, so as to issue their respective control streams 
against the same point in the power stream flow path. 



3,667,493 
FLOAT VALVE FOR AIR LINE LUBRICATORS 
Barry E. Undatrom, Englewood, and Donald A. Robb, 
Denver, Colo., assignors to WOkcrson Corporation, En- 
glewood, Colo. 

Filed Dec. 28, 1970, Ser. No. 101,966 

Int. CL F16k 33/00 

U.S. CL 137—87 10 Ciainv 




This invention relates to a float-actuated shut-off valve for 
use in the pressurized reservoir of an air line lubricator to 
cooperate with the latter upon a drop in the oil level below a 
predetermined point so as to automatically open an air line 
to the air pressure within said reservoir and use the resulting 
pressurized line to either actuate a warning device or shut 
down the pneumatic equipment dependent upon the system 
for lubrication. 



3,667,494 
MASS AIR FLOW MEASURING MEANS 
Elmer A. Hmm, 22905 Edim RomI, South Bend, Ind. 

Original application Oct. 9, 1967, Scr. No. 673,815, now 

Patent No. 3,549^15, dated Dec 22, 1970. Divided and thb 

application Aug. 11, 1970, Scr. No. 62^08 

Int. a. GO If 7/00 

U.S. a. 137-100 5 Claims 



"i 4S. >?* 'i» 



I4» ,10* 




3,667,495 
PROPORTIONING DEVICE, ESPECIALLY FOR WATER 

TREATMENT SYSTEMS 
Hansjorg Schuler, WaMrems, and Hartmut Dopriaff, Wlnncn- 
dcn, both of Germany, assignors to Julias Dopaiafr KG, 
Wianendcn, Germany 

Filed Mar. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 21,460 
Claims priority, application Sweden, Feb. 16, 1970, 1914/70 

Int. CL G05d 77/OJ5, 11/13 
U.S. CL 137-101.21 38 Claims 




A proportioning device for the admixture of an additive 
fluid into a fluid medium flowing in a pipe or conduit. The 
flow rate of the fluid medium is measured and the pump 
which introduces the additive fluid is controlled in response 

to the measured flow rate. The measuring system includes a 
body disposed to be moved linearly against the force of a 
spring by the fluid medium passing thereby, in one embodi- 
ment, this body has a surface which varies along its length 
and the additive fluid pump has a plunger in contact with this 
surface. As the body is moved by the varying flow rates of 
the fluid medium, the effective plunging stroke of the pump 
is controlled. In another embodiment, a magnetic fieki is 
used to detect changes in the position of the body. 



3,667,496 
PRESSURE-MODULATED HYDRAULIC CONTROL 

VALVE 
John Wayne Schletzbaum, HudMO, and Reno 
Rodeghiero, Cedar Faib, both of Iowa, aasignon to Deere & 
Company, MoHnc, DL 

FUcd Oct. 22, 1969, Scr. No. 868,498 
InL CL B60t 75/04 
U.S.CL 137—1163 3 1 



A mass air flow sensitive fuel control for controlling fuel to 
a multiple cylinder internal combustion engine wherein the 
fuel control apparatus includes mass air flow sensing means 
such as a high gain venturi disposed in the air induction 
passage for measuring the mass air flow to a single engine 
cylinder and a fuel control valve actuated as a function of the 
venturi air pressure output for controlling fuel flow to all of 
the engine cylinders as a function of the mass air flow to the 
one engine cylinder. 



A pressure-modulated hydraulic control valve is provided 
for controlling fluid flow to engage and disengage a dif- 



116 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June Q, 1972 



ferential lock. A manual actuator acts through a modulating 
spring to shift a spool valve to selectively establish conditions 
in the control valve for engaging and disengaging the dif- 
ferential lock and the manual actuator includes a length ad- 
justable link which may be adjusted without disassembly to 
change the modulating force to desired values. A check valve 
in the pressure port normally prevents flow to the spool valve 
when the lock is disengaged and a pin extends from the 
check valve into the valve bore and is engaged and moved by 
a ramp on the spool valve to unseat the check valve when the 
spool valve is shifted to establish the condition for engaging 
the lock. 



which is biased to close the branch conduit and open the 
main conduit. The gate is pressed by the fluid pressure to 
close flow to the main conduit and allow flow to the branch. 
When the supply of fluid is cut off, the gate swings to close 
the branch and open the main conduit. 



3,667,497 

HYDRAUUC SYSTEMS 

George K. Farmery, Scolhcm, Engfauid, asrignor to Clayton 

Dewandre Company Limited, Lincoln, EngbuMl - 

FUed May 11, 1970, Scr. No. 36,002 

Int. CL G05d 77/00. B60q ;/00 

VS. a. 137—118 5 Claima 




A hydrodynamic type hydraulic system for actuating the 
brakes and other auxiliary devices on a motor vehicle in- 
cludes a solenoid-operated valve for controlling the flow of 
pressure fluid to the auxiliary devices, said valve being con- 
trolled by means responsive to the pressure at the output side 
of the pump and additionally by means responsive to fluid 
level in the system reservoir. 



P^- 




3,667,498 
WATER SPRINKLING SYSTEM 
Shiuo Mizuno, Toliyo, Japan, awignor to Snnko Engineering 
Company, Limited, Toliyo, Japan 

Filed Dec 29, 1969, Scr. No. 888,319 
Claims priority, application Japan, Dec 26, 1968, 43/96273 

Int. CI. AOlg 25/00; B05b 9/00 
U.S.CL 137—119 19Clainn 



I 3,667,499 

I LIQUID DISPENSING SYSTEM 

Donald L. Brantoa, and James R. Mowcry, both of Ddavan, 
Wis., aasignors to Sta-RMc IndiHtrica, Inc., Dclavan, Wit. s 
I FUed May 4, 1970, Scr. No. 34,372 I 
' int. CL B23b 41/08; F16c 41/04 ' 

U.S.CL 37—318 19ClainM 




The disclosed liquid dispensing system contemplates a 
liquid source comprising a plurality of containers arranged in 
a vertical column. Each of the containers is provided with an 
outlet means adjacent to the bottom thereof and which may 
be coupled to a vertically extending manifold tube. The 
liquid in the containers flows by gravity from the containen 
to a pump connected to the manifold tube. The pump is 
operated as required to force the liquid into a pressure accu- 
mulator tank from which the liquid is drawn at the point of 
use. 



3,667,500 
UQUID LEVEL CONTROLLER 
LcsHe f; Stone, WeHchcatcr, Dl., aarignor to Tlie Riehardnn 
Company, Metanoae Parii, DL 

FUed Dec 11, 1969, Scr. No. 884,301 

Int. CL F16k 21/18 

US. CL 137—386 $ Claims 



A water sprinkling system comprising a main supply con- 
duit and a plurality of branch conduits. Each branch conduit 
is connected to the main supply conduit by a valve which is 
constructed to switch the flow of fluid from the branch con- 
duit to the main conduit by cutting off the fluid pressure for a 
selected time interval. Each valve comprises a pivoted gate 



~^ 







Sl, 



•«» 



T:r 



>' 



jt 



J^ 



-II.— 



\.' 



'-4^^ 



An apparatus for controlling liquid levels for viscous 
liquids such as printing ink utilizing pneumatic probes and 
responsive liquid regulating means. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



117 



3,667,501 
SELECTOR VALVE ASSEMBLY WTTH MECHANICAL 

LATCH 

Joaeph B. Snoy, ami Bradford K. ShuU, both of Rockford, Dl., 

amignors to Twin Disc, Incorporated, Racine, Wis. 

FUed Dec. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 102,780 

Int. CLF16k 77/20 

U.S. CL 137— 612.1 llClainv 




A selector valve assembly for use with power shift trans- 
missions to select various operating speed ranges, and of the 
type having a plurality of shiftable hydraulic spools. The as- 
sembly includes a mechanical latch plate for holding the 
selected spools in an extended, operative position. A neutral 
piston is provided for engagement with the latch plate to urge 
the latter to the piston releasing position to thereby disen- 
gage the spools. 



^ 3,667,502 

SELF.RECYCLING ACTUATOR AND VALVE 
INCORPORATING IT 
Nod A. Otto, Whippany, N J., aasignor to AutcAnatic Switch 
Co. 

Filed Mar. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 24,916 

Int CL F16k 31/383, 31/385 

U.S.CL 137—624.14 9ClainH 




pilot valve adapted to vent the high pressure side of the main 
valve member. The self-recycling actuator controls the pilot 
valve and is operated by the high pressure fluid from the inlet 
of the main valve. High pressure fluid brought to the inlet of 
the self-recycling actuator displaces a plunger member 
thereby opening the pilot valve and hence the main valve. At 
the same time, high pressure fluid enters a recycling 
chamber. As pressure builds up in the recycling chamber, the 
plunger is returned to its initial position. Vent means reduces 
the pressure in the recycling chamber thereby initiating a 
new cycle. 



3,667,503 
SINGLE-HANDLE MIXING AND PROPORTIONING 

VALVE 
Gerald J. FarreU, Elmhurat, and Frank J. Bartos, CMcago, 
both of IlL, assignors to Elkay Manufacturing Company, 
Broadview, Dl. 

Filed June 5, 1970, Scr. No. 43^)1 1 

Int CLF16k 77/00 

U.S. CL 137-625.4 21 CWnv 



!*°i*i 




There are disclosed two embodiments of a water faucet 
mixing and proportioning valve including a housing defining 
a valve seat having hot and cold water inlet ports and an out- 
let port, a valve plate having a mixing cavity cooperating with 
the inlet and outlet ports to control the flow therethrough, a 
bearing mounted on the housing for pivotal movement about 
an axis, and a lever pivotally mounted on the bearing and 
having a handle at one end and coupled at the other end to 
the valve plate for movement thereof, the lever being limited 
to pivotal movement with the bearing about the axis for ac- 
commodating curvilinear hand movement and rectilinear 
valve plate movement between full-off and fiill-on positions 
and being limited to pivotal movement with respect to the 
bearing in a direction parallel to the axis for accomnKxlating 
rectilinear movement of the valve plate between full-hot and 
full-cold positions; seals and hydraulic seal loading means are 
also provided. 



A self-recycling actuator operated by a source of fluid 
pressure is used to control the operation of a valve. The valve 
has a main valve member whose position is controlled by a 



3,667,504 
ZERO-LEAKAGE SPOOL VALVE 
Richard Arthur Wktren; Raymond Richard Mcysenburg. 
both of Cedar FaHs, and Robert Hugh Tweedy, BrookfWd. 
aU of Wis., assignors to Deere & Compuiy, Moline, lU. 
Filed Dec 28, 1970, Scr. No. 101,917 
Int CLF16k 77/07 
U.S. a. 137—625.69 13 Clafana 

A plurality of O-ring packings are mounted between ports 
in a spool valve bore. A valve spool is selectively shiftable in 



118 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



the bore for routing fluid among the ports and includes a plu- 
rality of lands, each (^ which, when located between a pair of 
ports, is seatingly engaged by one of the packings for 
preventing leakage between the pair of ports. Under normal 
operating conditions, the fluid pressures respectively existing 
at the pair c^ ports are different and this pressure differential 
exists across the packing. In order to prevent the packing 




from being dislodged from its mounting groove by fluid pres- 
sure, when the land portion is moved past the packing, a 
passage means located in the valve spool connects the fluid 
pressure at the port, away from which the land portion is 
moving, to the side of the > packing remote from the port, to 
balance the pressure on the opposite sides of the packing, 
when the land portion is just about to move past the packing. 




June & 1972 

direction and a hydraulic cylinder assembly acts to move it in 
the other direction. Pressure in the hydraulic cylinder is ob- 
tained frofn a control line extending to the surface. 



3,667,506 

CORRUGATED METAL TUBE FOR AN EXTERNAL 

CONDUCTOR OR SHEATH OF AN ELECTRIC CABLE 

Robert Joctcur, Lyoa, France, aMignor to Cable De L^ Al- 

sacienac, Lyoa, France i 

FUed Dec. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 99,205 | 

Claims priortty, appllcatloa France, Dec. 18, 1969, 6943940 

Int. CI. F16I 9/06 
U.S.CL 1^8—156 4palnH 



3,667,505 
ROTARY BALL VALVE FOR WELLS 
Gary A. Radig, Lakewood, CaHf., aadgnor to Cook Testing 
Co., Loot Beach, CaHf. 

FUed Jan. 27, 1971, Scr. No. 110,078 

Int. CLF16k 77/76 

U.S. CI. 137—630.14 9 Oainn 




A corrugated metal strip is curved and transversely over- 
lapped to form a tube, the corrugation being inclined relative 
to the transverse axis such that the edges have their corruga- 
tions axially offset by half a corrugation and the external 
zone in turn is axially offset by one half a corrugation to 
define an edge abutment determining the exact diaitieter of 
the completed tube. ~^^^ --^^ 



3,667,507 
DOUBLE-LIFT DOBBV 
Joseph Palau, Dulngt, Haule-Savoic, and Jacques dc Gcr- 
mond, Mcnthon-^ Bernard, both of France, aasifnors to 
Staubl Ltd., Horgen-Zurkh, Swttaeriand 

Filed June 24, 1970, Scr. No. 49308 
ClalnH priority, appUciition Swttaeriand, June 25, 1969, 

9705/69 
Int CL D03c 1/06 \ 

UACI. 139— 71 ^\ M Claims 



A subsurface safety valve for a well employs a rotary ball 
valve assembly which includes a ball member interposed 
between annular seats positioned within the housing. The 
upper seat is mounted on a carrier having flange portions en- 
gaging under a shoulder within the housing. A lower seat is 
spring-loaded against the spherical surface of the ball 
member. Integral offset aligned pins on the ball member are 
engaged by arms on an actuator mounted for axial movement 
within the housing, the arms straddling the ball member and 
having laterally opening slots which engage the pins. The ball 
member and the flange portion of the carrier have laterally 
spaced parallel vertical surfaces which are received between 
similar surfaces on the actuator arms. A bypass valve is pro- 
vided between the actuator and the housing so that fluid may 
pass through housing ports and actuator ports to equalize 
pressure across the ball member during the first part of 
movement of the actuator, the subsequent part of the move- 
ment serving to move the ball member between open and 
closed positions. A spring moves the actuator axially in one 




A double lift dobby with a balance for each heald and with 
a draw hook for each end of the balance. The dobby also in- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



119 



eludes a draw knife slidably arranged in the same guideway 
with the draw hook so that, whenever the draw hook is 
hooked in or engages the draw knife, both the draw hook and 
draw knife are guided within the single guideway so that no 
relative motion takes place between the draw knife and the 
draw hook during the whole of their commonly executed 
movement. 



3,667,50b 
GUIDE ELEMENT FOR THE WEFT PICKING MEANS IN 

A LOOM 

Anton Xavcr IngHn, Zuchwfl SO, SwUaerland, assignor to 

Sulacr Brothers, Ltd., WInterthur, Switacrland 

FUed Dec 6, 1968, Ser. No. 781,799 

Clafans priority, appUcatkin Switaerland, Dec. 8, 1967, 

17279/67 

hULCLDOSd 49/60, 47/00 

U.S. CL 139—188 8 ClalnK 



« w f *» 



3,667,510 
APPARATUS FOR WINDING COILS FOR ELECTRICAL 

MACHINES 
Klaus-Dieter Sattler, 24 Lubeck, Luisewtrasse 3C, Germany 

FUed Feb. 24, 1970, Ser. No. 13^36 
Clains priority, applkatkw Germany, Mar. 7, 1969, P 19 11 

551.6-32 

Int.a.B21fi/04 

U.S. CL 140—92.2 9 CWnM 





The weft picking means is guided through the shed through 
a plurality of spaced guide elements. Each guide element is 
constructed with a foot which secures the guide element to 
the loom frame and a pair of jaws which define a guide path 
for the picking means. Either the jaws are formed with a 
reduced cross-section between the picking means guide sur- 
faces and foot or the foot is formed with a reduced cross-sec- 
tion adjacent the jaws so as to permit resilient deflection of 
the jaws under canting forces of the picking means. 



In an apparatus for winding concentrically disposed coils, 
or groups of coils respectively, for electrical machines, 
wherein the coil wire is wound around the outer surfaces of 
coil carriers with differentiy dimensioned outer circum- 
ferences defining the widths of the coils, the invention resides 
in that the cchI carrier for the coil of smallest width remains 
stationary during the winding operation, as is known per se, 
while its surface on which the wire is to be wound is arranged 
in parallel relation to the axis of winding, or the axis of the 
coil respectively, wherein the remaining coil carriers for sup- 
porting the coils of greater widths are arranged in pairs op- 
posite to each other with respect to the winding axis, and are 
formed as hinged arms which are pivoted for each width of 
coil successively in pairs out of a position of rest, in which 
they do not interfere with the winding of the preceding coil 
carrier, into a working or winding position, in which the 
winding circumferences of all of the coil carriers are disposed 
parallel to each other and eccentrically or concentrically 
with respect to the winding axis. 



3,667309 3,667311 

WIRE FABRIC AND APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR DEVICE FOR CRACKING THE SHELLS OF NUTS 

MAKING SAME Anton F. Van Dcr Wey, 350 Bourbcau Street, Asbestos, 

Herbert E. Rohrbncher, Whittler, CaHf., assignor to Bcrgandl Quebec, CanMla 
Maaufacturiag Company, Inc., El Monte, CaUf. FUed June 1, 1970, Scr. No. 41,952 

Original appUcatkMi Aug. 4, 1967, Scr. No. 658330, now Claims priority, appHcadon Canada, Apr. 25, 1969, 060391 
Patent No. 33 1 2,760, dated May 1 9, 1 970. Divided and thk Int. CL A23n S/02 

appUcatlon Feb. 12, 1970, Ser. No. 10,885 ^^' CL 146—14 

Int, CI Bill 23/00, 27/04 
VS. CL 140—3 C 8 Claims 



«^ or 



M/ 






z* 







This disclosure describes a wire fiabric of open construc- 
tion including a plurality of wires each of which is formed 
into a coil. The several coils are interlinked and secured 
together to form a wire fabric of open construction. The wire 
is of non-circular cross section and provides a wire fabric of 
increasejl strength. 



A device for cracking the shells of edible nuts comprising a 
body member having a cavity for receiving a nut. An impac- 
tor is resilientiy connected to the body member. The impac- 
tor is manually pulled away from the body member against 
the force exerted by its resilient connection, and then 
released, to be projected by the resilient connection against a 
nut in the cavity. 



120 



3,667,512 
POWDER SAMPLER 
Meryl R. Jackson, Schaiunburg, DI., assignor to Freeman 
Laboratories, Inc., Roa cm ont, DL 

Flkd Oct 21, 1970, Ser. No. 82,686 

Int.a.B65b4i/50 

VS. a. 141—130 7 Claims 



X^^J^ 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 6, 1972 

the spacing between the surfaces being adjustable either by 




A sampling device for obtaining representative samples of 
material from a bulk quantity thereof includes a plurality of 
rotating sample containers which are sequentially and repeti- 
tively fed by a flow stream of the material. The flow stream 
eminates from a hopper. The mechanism controls the flow 
rate of the flow stream to insure representativeness and 
statistical validity of the samples. 



3,667,513 
GENERATION OF ALKAU METAL VAPORS 
Paolo Delia PorU; Mario ZucchindU, and Cario Emill, all of 
Milan, Italy, aaignors to S.AX.S. Getters S.p.A., Milan, 
Italy 

Filed May 20, 1970, Scr. No. 39,119 
Claims priority, application Italy, May 24, 1969, 17303 A/69 

Int. CI. B6Sb 1/04, 3104 
\}J&. CI. 141—31 1 13 ClainH 




An alkali metal generator comprising: an evacuated con- 
tainer; at least one heat-responsive source of an alkali metal 
vapor in the container; a closed conduit for connecting the 
evacuated container to a vessel to be charged with the alkali 
metal vapor; and means for opening said closed conduit. The 
container can also have a getter device. 



3,667,514 
GUIDING CIRCULAR SAWS 
OUver E. Krog, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada, as- 
signor to Canadian Forest Products Ltd., British Columbia, 
Canada 

Filed Jan. 22, 1970, Scr. No. 4^17 
Claims priority, application Canada, Jai^ 5, 1970, 071^40 
Int. CL B27b 5134 
MJ&. CI. 143—37 R 8 Claims 

A guide for a circular saw comprising a pair of guide ele- 
ments each with a guide surface for guiding the saw or saws. 




cams or wedges movable between the two elements 



3,667,515 
PILE CUTTING DEVICE 
Robert J. Corey, LowcO, MaM., 
Steeplejacks, Inc., Lowci, Ma«. 

1 Filed Jan. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 5,511 
\ Int. CI. B27b 23/00 

U.S.a. 143— 34 




Corey's 



1 Claim 



A pile cutting device comprising a base having a guide 
adapted for reception of a pile, the base being adapted for 
reciprocal movement with respect to the pile, connectors af- 
flxed to the base for suspending the base in a substantially 
horizontal plane, a blade having a pair of opposite extremi- 
ties, one of the extremities being pivotably mounted to the 
base, an actuator having a fixed member and a movable 
member, the fixed member being pivoted to the base and the 
movable member being pivotably mounted to the other ex- 
tremity of the blade, the blade being swept across the guide- 
when the actuator is engaged and being retracted away from 
the guide when the actuator is disengaged. When the pile 
cutter is lowered to the base of a pile, the guide being posi- 
tioned about the pile for restricting the lateral movement of 
the base with respect to the pile, the actuator is. engaged 
causing the blade to shear the pile at its base. 



Ohki 



* 3,667,516 

APPARATUS FOR SHARPENING LEADS FOR PENCILS 

ORTHEUKE 

Robert M. Gro^Jcan, 4625 Merry Lane, Toledo, < 

Filed Mar. 27, 1970, Ser. No. 23,312 

Int. CL B43I 23100 

U.S. CL 144— 28.1 1 19 Claims 

A disposable, expendable sharpener for leads and a drive 

for manipulating and rotating the sharpener are provided. 

The sharpener includes a bottom wall, side wall, and central 

truncated cone or hub which are integrally formed of foamed 

plastic material. A top is provided for the sharpener with an 

opening for access to a truncated conical abrasive surface in 

the sharpener. A flexible lip extends from an edge of the top 

toward the abrasive surface to urge a lead inserted in the 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



121 



opening against the surface. The lip tends to enclose the 3,667,518 

sharpener to restrict spreading of graphite powder therefrom SCREWDRIVER WITH BIT STORING HANDLE 

and also wipes graphite powder from the lead when being George B. Stflhri^on, Jr., Dayton, Ohio, assignor to Gardner- 
sharpened and wh^n removed. The drive for the sharpener Denver Company, Dayton, Ohk> 
includes a gear arrangement which causes the sharpener to Filed Apr. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 33^55 

move in a circular path and, at the same time, to rotate about Int. CI. B25g 1108 

VS. CL 145—62 3 Clabm 




its own axis, with a vertical line through the conical abrasive 
surface of the sharpener being stationary. This line represents 
the position at which the lead is inserted for sharpening, 
which is accomplished without need for rotating or otherwise 
manipulating the lead. 



3,667,517 
LOG BARKER ^ 
Allaa M. Bcntley, and Etancr Christcnaen, both of Everett, 
Wash., assignors to The Black Clawaon Company, 
MMdktown, Ohio 

' Filed Sept. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 69,038 

Int. CL B27I 1/00 
VS. CL 144—208 E 13 ClaiuK 





A hand tod, in the form c^ a screwdriver in which a series 
of tool bits are stored in longitudinal recesses formed in the 
outer circumferential surface of the handle. The tool bits are 
retained in the recesses by an elastic O-ring, and may be easi- 
ly removed by rolling back the O-ring for snap fitting into the 
shank portion of the tool. 



3,667,519 

FOOD CHOPPER 

Lmirinc R. Shadduck, 6220 Byron Street, Roscmont, DI. 

FUcd Apr. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 26,952 

Int. a. A47J 43100; B26b 3104 

VS. a. 146—160 3 OalnM 



An annular barking rotor has a hub portion rotatably sup- 
ported by a concentric anti-friction bearing and supports a 
plurality of radially pivotable barking arms each biased by an 
air motor mounted on the rotor and connected to an annular 
air chamber within the rotor. Air is supplied to the chamber 
and motors through a set of sliding air shoes, and the pres- 
sure of the air is controlled by a series of pilot operated 
valves, relay exhaust valves and regulating valves actuated by 
controls located at a remote console. Pilot operated 
diaphragm exhaust valves are carried by the rotor for con- 
necting the air chamber directly to atmosphere and are actu- 
ated by a pulse of pilot air supplied through another air shoe 
connected to the main air supply through a pilot operated 
valve controlled by a valve also located at the console. 




A hand-operated food chopper has concentric cylindrical 
cutting blades which have large openings in their vertical 
walls to permit flow of chopped nuuerials therethrough and 
prevent clogging. Spring-actuated motion of one or more of 
the blades is also provided to further insure against clogging. 



3,667,520 
WEIGHT CONTROLLED SUCING SYSTEM INCLUDING 

GROSS ERROR DETECTING MEANS 
Kcitb E. HckA, Garrett, Ind., assignor to Peter Eduich & 
Sons, Inc. 

FDcd Dec 14, 1970, Scr. No. 97,590 
Int. CL B26d 4156 
VS. CL 146-94 R 10 Claims 

A slicer control system of the type for use in slicing opera- 
tions wherein a predetermined number of slices are cut from 
a length oi material and are intended to have a predeter- 
mined weight. The exemplary embodiment employs a slice 
receiver which receives slices as they are cut and a take-away 
conveyor for removing slices from the slice receiver after a 
predetermined number of slices are cut. The invention 
further includes a weight monitoring system for comparing 
the weight of the slices cut against a predetermined standard 
to prematurely actuate the take-away conveyor when a 



122 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



predetermined error exists even though the predetermined 
number of slices have not yet been cut to minimize the 







eoMTWat 



number of groups of slices having gross errors and ultimately 
require rejection for weight deviation from a standard. 



3,667^21 

HOLD DOWN ATTACHMENT FOR A SKINNING 

MACHINE 

Donald L. Bcasley, Dcs Moines, Iowa, assignor to Townaend 

Engineering Company, Dcs Moines, Iowa 

Filed Aug. 18, 1969, Scr. No. 850,960 

Int. CLA22C 77/72 

VS. CU 146—130 12 Claims 




A hold down attachment for a skinning machine compris- 
ing a hold down roller means rotatably mounted above the 
feed roller and skinning blade of the skinning machine. The 
hold down roller means is comprised of a plurality of spaced 
apart resilient rollers mounted on a driven shaft and adapted 
to engage the slab being skinned. The configuration of the 
resilient rollers is such that the slab is simultaneously 
stretched in two lateral directions as the slab is being skinned 
which maintains the bottom of the slab in a straight or 
horizontal condition as it engages the skinning blade. A 
modified form of the hold down roller means it. also disclosed 
and comprises a plurality of spaced apart rollers, each of 
which are comprised of four spring loaded shoes extending 
outwardly from a central hub portion. The spring loaded 
shoes engage the slab being skinned and simultaneously 
stretch the slab in two lateral directions as the slab is being 
skinned to maintain the bottom of the slab in a straight or 
horizontal condition to achieve the same results as the first 
described embodiment. 



3,667^22 

SUCING APPARATUS 

David W. Bingiuun, Brigiitoa, Victoria, Australia, assignor to 

Fitters Proprietary Limited, Mooral>Mn, Victoria, Australia 

Filed Jan. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 6,525 

Clainu priority, appiiotlon Australia, Feb. 12, 1969, 

50353/69 

Int. CL B26d 4/22, 5114 

\}S. CL 146— 131 11 Claii"s 

Cutting or slicing apparatus having a cutter blade movably 

mounted on a frame so as to be oscillatable along an arcuate 



path of travel, and gauge means adapted to correctly locate 
material to be cut by the cutter blade and which is also 
movably mounted on the aforementioned frame. Tht gauge 
means is positioned in advance of the cutting edge of the 
blade to allow passage of cut material to a conveyor Jocated 







i±3 



therebeneath, and it is coupled with the cutter blade so as to 
reciprocate in response to oscillatory movement of that 
blade. The coupling is such that a constant spacing is main- 
tained between the cutting edge of the blade and the ad- 
jacent side of the gauge means. 



I 3,667,523 

APPARATUS AND PROCESS FOR THE REMOVAL OF 
THE GERM AND BRAN COAT FROM CEREAL GRAINS 
Lawrence Lynn; Jolui W. Hunnell, both of Houston, Tex., and 
Cari B. Legcr, Kaplan, La., assignors to Food Engfaiccring 
International, Inc., AMwvile, La. 

Filed Dec. 29, 1969, Scr. No."888,219 

Int a. B02b 3108 

U.S. a. 146— 221.8 12lClaintt 




-12 



^ 



^:--^T»».-( :- 



2 SUPPLY 



m 



i 

An improvement in apparatus and method for the removal 
of the seed coat, or bran layers, and the germ from cereal 
grains in the presence of a liquid. Said improvement in ap- 
paratus and method includes the provision, and use, of a ves- 
sel containing kernels of grain (preferably whole kernels) im- 
mersed in a liquid medium, and means for moving a member 
such as a blade or bar rapidly through the liquid medium and 
preferably at a velocity relative to said medium in excess of 
1 feet per second to cause an impacting face of said mova- 
ble member to strike against the kernels of cereal grain in 
said liquid to detach the seed coat and germ from said ker- 
nels. 



3,667,524 

HIGH-tNERGY PROPELLANT CONTAINING COATED 
HYDRAZINIUM AZIDE 
John E. Paustian, WUppany, and Marvin M. Fein, Wcatflcid, 
both of N J., assignors to Thiokol Chemical Corporation, 
Bristol* Pa. 

Original application May 12, 1966, Scr. Na 551,8381, now 
Patent No. 3,459.607, dated Aug. 5, 1969. Divided and thb 
application Mar. 28, 1969, Ser. No. 828,052 i 
Int. CLC06b 79/02 | 

U.S. CL 149—8 3 Clainv 

A high energy propellant of hydrazinium azide coated with 
a non-hygroscopic coating. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



123 



^^ 3,667,525 

THREADED RING 
Rudolf Spieth, Kennenburger Str. 40, D 73 EssHngen am 
Nediar Kenncnburg, Germany 

Filed July 28, 1970, Scr. No. 58^67 
Clainu priority, application Germany, July 29, 1969, P 19 38 

448.6 

Int. CL F16b 39100 

U.S.CL 151-21 C , 3Clain» 




A threaded ring of one piece construction for securing cut- 
ters and the like to a shaft is disclosed. The ring has a single 
threaded portion for engaging threads upon the shaft. An 
outer portion has screws which pass through an intermediate 
portion and engage other threacte in the threaded portion. By 
tightening the screws, the intermediate portion flexes radially 
to lock onto the shaft, preventing the threaded ring frx>m 
loosening upon the threads of the shaft. 



3,667,526 

FASTENERS HAVING LOCKING KEYS 

Robert Neuschotz, 1 162 Angelo Drive, Bcveriy Hills, CaUf. 

Original application Feb. 12, 1969, Ser. No. 798,659, now 

Patent No. 3,537,1 18. Divided and this application Mar. 17, 

1970, Ser. No. 20,294. The portion of the term of the patent 

subsequent to Mar. 21, 1989, has been disclaimed. 

Int. CL F16b 39106 

U.S. CL151— 23 14 Claims 




■•Kl 2l 



A fastener having a thread with a groove Extending 
through and interrupting the thread, and a locking key 
retained in the groove and adapted to be driven axially to 
lock the fastener in a carrier part, with the groove being 
deformed by the key, upon initial installation thereof in the 
groove, to a slightly undercut cross-section confining and 
retaining the key in the groove. 



^ 3,667,527 

TREAD RING FOR REMOVABLE TREAD TIRES 
Carlo Magistrini, Moua, and Luigi MidoGcM, MlM^ both of 
Italy, assignors to Industrie Plrdll S.pjL, MBan, Italy 

FDed June 30, 1970, Scr. Na 51,100 

Claims priority, appUcation Italy, July 29, 1%9, 20215 A/69; 

Mar. 13, 1970, 21873 A/70 

Int. CLB60C 77/02 

U.S. CL 152—176 8 CMnm 

A separable tread ring for pneumatic tires which embodies 

an armor longitudinally resistant to tension, the armor being 

formed by a helically wound metal cord, the coils of which 



are disposed generally parallel to the mid-circumferential 
plane of the tire. Two additional layers of metal cords paral- 
lel to each other in each layer are provided, the cords being 
disposed in two directions crossed relative to the mid-circum- 
ferential plane at angles ranging from 10° to 65°. The latter 




layers are disposed radially inwardly relative to the armor. A 
third layer of extensible metal cords is positioned radially 
outwardly of the armor, the cords of such layer being 
inclined with respect to the mid-circumferential plane at an 
angle ranging between 10° and 65°. 



3,667,528 

SPIKE FOR MOTOR VEHICLE TIRES 

Gcorg Gottauf, Munidi, Germany, amignni to Staldgmlwr 

Otto Grubcr & Company, Municli, Germany 

Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 736,616, June 

13, 1968, now Patent No. 3,545,515. This application July 

10, 1970, Ser. No. 53,838 

Claims priority, application Germany, July 26, 1%9, P 1938 

091.7 
Int.a. B60c77/76 

U.S. CL 152—210 9 Claims 




Spike for motor vehicle tires comprises casing of synthetic 
material with reinforcing jacket embedded in casing. Hard 
metal pin is centrally disposed in reinforcing jacket Jacket 
surrounds hard metal pin and includes pair of opposed side 
edge portions that overlap one another to form a seam. Al- 
ternatively, opposed side edge portions of reinforcing jacket 
may meet along line of contact which is curved and sloping 
relative to longitudinal axis of metal pin. 



N 



3,667,529 
HIGH SPEED RADIAL PLY TIRES 
Henri Mirtain, Compicgne, France, awignoi to Uniroyal En- 
gicbcrt France, NcuiUy sur Sdnc, France 

Filed May 20, 1970, Scr. No. 39,1 15 
Clafans priority, application France, May 30, 1969, 6917845 

Int. CL B60c 9118 
VS. CL 152-361 27 CUnv 

Radial ply pneumatic tires capable of being rtui at very 
high speeds are disclosed. Such tires are characterized by a 
tread-reinforcing breaker having a plural-layer non-metallic 
textile cord ply structure wider than the tread, with the cords 
oriented at a 0° angle to the median equatorial plane, and a 
single-layer ply structure, narrower than the tread, of metal- 
lic wires or strips oriented at a substantial bias angle, 
preferably between about 20° and 45°, to the said plane. The 
plural-layer ply structure is constituted by a single length of 



124 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June «, 1972 



breaker cord fabric wound in a continuous spiral circum- 
ferentially of the carcass for at least a plurality of full turns, if 
the metal ply structure in such a tire is superposed onto the 




textile ply structure, the tire is additionally provided with 
means indicating the manner in which it should be mounted 
on a vehicle so as to have a specified direction of rotation 
during normal high speed forward movement of the vehicle. 



3,667^30 
PORTABLE TUtE BREAKER 
John V. Gray, P.O. Box 217, Sevcry, Kam. 

Filed Oct. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 83,261 
bit. CI.B60C 25/06 
U.S.CL 157- 1.26 



7Claiim 




This tool can be easily made from mostly standard parts, 
such as standard pipe for the cylindrical arm having an 
arched member to straddle a tire of any size fixed to one end 
of the pipe and a piston in said pipe having a rod extending 
from the inner end of said pipe with a wedge head on its 
outer end for pressing against the bead edge of a tire, while 
the outer end of the arched member is pfirchased against the 
opposite edge of the wheel rim. and a hand pump unit having 
a threaded port connected to the outer end of the cylindrical 
arm for pumping fluid under pressure against said piston to 
press said wedge head between the bead edge of the tire and 
the rim edge of the wheel for breaking the tire off the side of 
the rim without necessarily eemoving the wheel firom its axle. 
The tool can be readily handled by the cylindrical arm with 
one hand while the other hand is used for operating the hand 
pump. A tire iron may be used for the pump handle. 



to Revcmfold 



3,667,531 
miAPE SUDE CARRIER 
Edmond J. Wilkim, Levfttown, Ptu, sHigiM 
IncM Levtttown, Pa. 

FDed Feb. 2, 1971, Scr. No. 111,852 

Int. CL A47b 5/032 

VS. CL 160-345 7 Oaiin 

A drape slide carrier for a draw drape for homes and the 

like, said drape carrier preventing bunching or gathering of 



drape pleat headings as the drape is being opened, compris- 
ing a housing adapted to receive a pull cord, a cord lock and 
release member pivotally mounted in the housing with a 
locking leg for grasping the cord when the drape is being 
opened to move the drape and prevent bunching or gathering 




of the drape pleat headings until the drape reaches thi end of 
its travel, and with a release leg for releasing the locking leg 
from the cord, a hook plate for receiving a hook that sup- 
ports the drape, and a track slide member connecting the 
hook plate to the housing and adapted to ride in a track of a 
drape traverse rod. 



3,667,532 
PIECE OF FURNITURE 
Rudolf Kurz, Bisrinteii, Germany, avignor to Kurz GmbH, 
s, Bietiglieim, Germany I 

filed June 23, 1 970, Ser. No. 49,034 ' 
Claims priority, applicatioa Germany, June 27, 1969, f 19 32 
I 649.9 

US. CL 160—371 

! 




Claims 



3U-^ 


^% 




20 



■38 



A frame has transversely spaced frame portions which are 
suitably connected with one another. Elongated flexible sup- 
port webs are carried by the frame extending in parallelism 
with one another and with the frame portions. Flexible tubu- 
lar sections of synthetic plastic material extend transversely 
of the frame portions from one to the other, being located in 
parallelism with each other and arrayed lengthwise of the 
frame portions. Sheet-material strips are each connected with 
the end portions of the tubular members located adjacent the 
respective frame portions; these sheet material strips extend 
lengthwise of the respective frame portions and are pecured 
to the sane. ^ 



' 3,667,533 

MAKING DIRECnONALLY SOUDIFIED CASTINGS 
Raymond R. BoodMr, Tcqucrta, Ila., and Ciiarln M. Phippa, 
Jr., Wapping, Conn., — ignors to United Aircraft Corpora* 
tion, Eaat Hartford, Conn. 

I Filed Apr. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 32,593 
^ Int. CL B22d 25106 

MS. CI. 164—60 aiClafam 

K mold having a crucible portion connecting with the arti- 
cle forming portion is positioned within a tapering susceptor 



\ 



ala 



w 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



125 



heated by a surrounding induction coil and the susceptor 
serves to control the temperature gradient during the solidifi- 
cation of the alloy in the mold. The crucible is located at the 




bottom of the assembly until the alloy is melted and the en- 
tire assemblage is then inverted to cause the molten alloy to 
flow into the article portion of the mold, the latter being 
preferably positioned on a chill plate. 



3,667,534 
STEEL INGOT MAKING METHOD 
Tatsuro Kanokogi, Osaka, and Kunio Yasumoto, Hyogo, botfi 
of Japan, awlgnon to SumHomo Metal Industries Ltd. (Su- 
mMonM Klnxoku Kogyo Kabushiki KaWia), Osaka-shl, 
Japaa 

CondnuatkM of application Scr. No. 703385, Feb. 6, 1968, 
now abandoned. This application Mar. 1 1, 1971, Scr. No. 

123,394 

Int. CL B22d 1 1 112, 27110 

MS. CL 164-83 5 OaimB 




A method for semi-continuously casting long-length, large 
steel ingot by pouring molten steel into a thin walled, water 
cooled, long-length mold made of iron, steel or cast iron 
which does not thermally deform, in c<»itact with the molten 
steel during pouring and withdrawing the solidifying ingot 
down through the mold at suitable speed without directly 
water cooling the solidifying, ingot until a predetermined 
length of ingot is obtained, and then holding the ingot in the 
mold for a while till the ingot solidify enough to draw out 
from the mold on to a truck which carry away the said ingot 
to further processing and apparatus thereof. 



predetermined controlled uncontaminated gaseous environ- 
ment. The apparatus permits rapid solidification of the 



3,667,535 

CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE GRAVITY CASTING 

SYSTEM 

MarduO K. Thomai, Jr., and Jnmi N. ThompUas, both of 

Philadelphia, Pa., aarignors to Tlw United States of America 

ns r cpiMmted by the Secretary of the Navy 

FOed Oct. 22, 1970, Scr. No. 83,059 

Int. CL B22d 27116 

MS. CL 164—258 8 Onfam 

AJ) improved system for evaluation of unique materials 
formed by quenching the same in their liquid state under 



\ 



\ 




material in the desired gaseous atmosphere such that the pos- 
sibility of undesirable oxidation or contamination is 
minimized. 



3,667,536 

APPARATUS FOR RECIPROCATING CONTINUOUS 

CASTING MOULDS BY MEANS Of FLEXIBLE 

DRAWING MEMBERS 

Picro Colombo, 27, Via Leopard!, Udfaie, Itidy 

FOed Sept. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 74,643 
Clainis priority, application Italy, Sept. 27, 1969, 7339 A/69 

Int. a. B22d 1 1100, 27108 
MS. CL 164—260 9 dafam 




An apparatus for vertically reciprocating open-ended 
moulds for the continuous casting of metals. The apparatus 
comprises a supporting platform for each mould, and means 
for slidably guiding said platform in its reciprocating move- 
ment. Hydraulic or mechanical driving means are provided 
for effecting said reciprocating movement and flexible draw- 
ing members, such as ropes, cords, cables, chains or straps, 
connect said driving means to said platform. 



3,667,537 
COOLING DEVICE FOR A CONTINUOUS>CASTING 

WHEEL 
Robert Petit, Roany-Sous-Boia, France, aarignor to Sodete 
NouvcBc SpMcm, Paris, France 

FDed Dec 30, 1969, Scr. No. 889,023 

Clafans priority, application France, Dec. 30, 1968, 182114 

Int.CLB22d7//06 

U.S. CL 164—278 8 Clafam 

A cooling device in which spaces are left between two ad- 



I 



126 OFFICIAL GAZETTE 

joining boxes surrounding the wheel so as to permit cleaning 



June 6, il972 




3,667^9 

ON-OFF TIME PROPORTIONING SUMMER-WINTER 

THERMOSTAT AND CONTROL SYSTEM EMPLOYING 

SAME 
RuMcn P. Swcgcr, Rockford, 01., aalsnor to Barbcr^oknan 
Compaqy, Rockford, 111. , 

1 Filed May 24, 1971, Ser. No. 146,117 ^ 
Int a. F25b 29/00 ! 

VS. CL US— 26 12 Cl«»n» 



^^^Sf.^ 



while the wheel is moving. 



3,667,538 

COOLING SYSTEM FOR CONTINUOUS CASTING 

INSTALLATIONS 

Otmar Kktahagaucr; Peter Ccrwcnka, and EwaM NeulMucr, 

al of Kapfenberg, AMtria, asrignon to Gebr. Bohler & Co. 

AkticiitcaeilKhaft, VIcmia, AoMria 

CoatiauatkM of appHcatioa Ser. No. 773,622, Nov. 5, 1968, 
■ow abaadoMd. Thb appMcatioB May 12, 1971, Ser. No. 

142,771 

iBt CI. B22d/ 7/00. 27/02 

VS. CL 164-283 ' Claims 




'^r^'- 




\ 



A heating-cooling thermostat employs alternative circuits 
during heating and cooling seasons to move an actuator in 
one direction. Heaters controlled by thermostatic conUcts in 
each of the alternative circuits heat bimetals to open the con- 
tacts periodically to provide pulsed on-ofF current through 
the actuator. The on-off time ratio is modified by the devia- 
tion of the controlled temperature from a setpoint to provide 
on-off time proportioned current to the actuator. 



^ 3,667,540 

HEAT REMOVAL SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR FUEL 
ASSEMBLIES 
Robert W. Kupp, 227 Beechwood RomI, Rtdgewood, f^J. 
I Filed ScpC 3, 1968, Ser. No. 756^82 
I Int. a. F28f 7/00; G21h 5/00 

U.S. CI. 165-47 ^ 6 Claims 



A continuous casting installation with a structure for cool- 
ing the mold. The continuous casting mold is provided with a 
cooling means formed in part by a pair of opposed upper 
arms which extend from the mold. A carriage means is pro- 
vided for moving the mold, and this carriage "means has a pair 
of arms extending beneath and engaging the upper arms of 
the mold so that the arms of the carriage means form a pair 
of lower arms coacting with the upper arms to support the 
mold on the carriage means. The upper arms form part of a 
cooling means for the mold, while the lower arms of the car- 
riage means are formed with passages through which cooling 
fluid is directed to and from the cooling means of the mold, 
in this way it becomes possible to simply separate a mold 
from the carriage means with an automatic separation of the 
cooling coimections, aiKi a new mold, of a different size, for 
example, can replace the old mold, with the coruiections for 
the flow of cooling fluid being automatically made simply by 
mounting of a new mold on the carriage means. 




\ 



A system to remove heat from nuclear fuel assemblies is 
disclosed. Such heat removal system includes one or more 
units having a base and one or more plates extending out- 
wardly therefrom, the units being adapted to fit in a nuclear 
fuel assembly when it is placed in a shipping cask. Tile plates 
of the heat removal device, which are formed of a heat con- 
ductive material, fit between the pins of the nuclear fuel as- 
sembly and convey heat from the assembly to the shipping 
cask, from whence it is removed to the atmosphere by con- 
duction through the cask. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



127 



/■ 



3,667,541 3,667,543 



Raad Company, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 17,672 
Int. CI. F28d 1/06 
VS. CI. 165—74 



6 Claims 




Inc., Comnwrcc, CaUf. 

Original appUcatlon Mar. 2, 1970, Ser. Na 15,403, now 

Patent No. 3,580,332, dated May 25, 1971, DIvkled and this 

appttcatkm May 22, 1970, Ser. No. 39,637 

Int.a. E2Ibii/;2 

U.S. CI. 166-125 33Clalni8 



N 



A cooler for gas of a radiator type having a unitized and 
readily replaceable core. The core comprises a plurality of 
tube nests which are sucked in surmounting relationship. 
The nests are held in this relationship in that the tubes ter- 
minate in, and are held by, at either ends thereof, tube plates. 
Inside and outside waterheads enclose the ends of the tubes 
and are fixed to the tube plates. These components comprise 
the replaceable and unitized tube core. The core is carried 
within a shell or housing and bolted thereto at one end 
thereof for its replaceable mounting therein. The housing has 
transverse ribs having arcuate cross sections. These ribs are 
arrayed across the inside of the housing, and face the exter- 
nal surfaces of the core to redirect gas from the housing back 
into the tube nests. The housing includes inlet and outlet gas 
plenums, at the upper and lower portions thereof, for con- 
ducting gas through the cooler and through the core. The 
waterheads have porting to accommodate circulation of cool- 
ing water. 




3,667,542 
HEAT TRANSFER ROLL 




■\\ 



Ralph C. Parkcs, Hancock Street and Lehigh Avenue, 
PhilMMpMa, Pa. 

Filed Jan. 5, 1971, Ser. No. 104,005 
InLCLF28f 5/02 
VS. CL 165—89 




A retrievable well packer to be lowered in a well casing 
and having a main body with expanders and initially 
3 Clafam f^cuacted slips thereon for anchoring the body to the well 
casing, and also an initially retracted packing thereon ex- 
pandable against the casing, the slips and packing being ex- 
panded by moving the body upwardly and a device 
downwardly along the body, the upward force and movement 
of the body being transmitted to the slips and packing by a 
structure releasably locked to the body, such structure being 
released from the body when the well packer is to be 
retrieved to enable the body to be moved upwardly of the 
slips, expanders and packing to effect retraction from the 
casing of such slips and packing. 



An inner cylindrical shell; an outer cylindrical shell enclos- 
ing, and spaced from, the inner shell to provide a jacket 
adapted to hold a high boiling point liquid; a source of heat 
in said inner shell for heating the liquid, and agitating means 
operable when the roll is rotated to bring said liquid into 
uniform contact with the inner surface of said outer shell. 



3,667,544 
DUMBELL SCRAPER 
WUIard F. AlUnion, Hacienda Heights, CaHf., aari^ior to ShcU 
0« Company, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Sept. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 70,743 
Int. CLE2 lb i 7/02 
U.S.CL 166— 170 6ClainH 

A dumbell-shaped paraffin scraper of a type that may be 



128 OFFICIAL GAZETTE 

pumped through a parafTin coated portion of a well flow line 



June «, 1972 



ireo 




porated in the string below a casing hanger secured to the 
latter, enabling the joint to be disconnected, in the event the 
casing string sticks in the well bore during its reciprocation 
while being cemented, and the casing string above the joint 
and the casing hanger removed. An extension tool secured to 
the lower end of a length of casing string is attached to the 



in order to remove the paraffin. 



3,667,545 

FLOODING EFnCIENCY WITH ZONE BOUNDARY 

PLUGGING 

Bruce L. Kniglit, LMfcton, Cohk, aasigiior to Marathoa GO 

Company, Fladlay, Ohio 

Filed Sept. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 75,859 
hit CL E21b 33/138, 43122 
MS. CL 166—269 6 Claiins 

« 



•";. 



X7Z7P7. 



///////// 



'////y//A 



Z^^m^^^. 



M«u >ii—iai ma 



Injection of an aqueous solution containing a mobility 
reducing agent into a portion of a highly permeable zone ad- 
jacent to a lesser permeaUe zone is effective to influence 
zone boundary plugging in a highly stratified reservoir and 
thereby increase the efficiency of a subsequent micellar 
flooding process in the highly and/or lesser permeable 
zone(s). Such reduces or eliminates micellar slug loss to the 
tighter zones. Thus, a more economical flood can be ef- 
fected. 



3,667,546 
WATERFLOODING METHOD 
Harry W. Parker, Lubbock, Tex., aiwignor to Phinips Petrole- 
um Company 

FDcd May 28, 1970, Scr. No. 41,543 

Int.CLE21b4J/22 

U.S. CL 166—274 9 Claims 

A method of waterflooding a formation with a flood water 

and surfactant mixture whereby gel particles are added to the 

injection mixture to improve the efficiency of the flood. 



•it. 



casing hlmger and spaced therefrom a distance correspond- 
ing to the distance between the wellhead and upper end (rf 
the casing string cemented in the well bore, and is lowered to 
place th« tool over such upper end. with the hanger landed in 
the wellhead, after which the casing string cemented in 
placed is pulled upwardly into and secured to the eitensicMi 
tool by slips of the tool. ..^.^ 



Marathoa 



3,667,548 
METHOD OF WELL STIMULATION 
Harry W. Milton, Jr., Flndlay, Ohio, awlgnnr to 

Oil Company, Flndlay, Ohio 

Filed Dec. 7, 1970, Ser. No. 95,965 

lBt.CLE21b4J/25 

U.S. CL 166—305 R 15 Claims 

Crude oil production from a producing means in fluid 
communication with an oil-bearing subterranean reservoir is 
improved by injecting into the formation about 0.1 - 10 bar- 
rels of a micellar dispersion per vertical foot of oil-bearing 
sand and then injecting a sufficient volume of hydrocarbon 
solution containing an oil-wetting agent, e.g. high molecular 
amines, substituted-ammonium compounds, etc., into the for- 
mation to displace the micellar dispersion radially out into 
the reservoir and to wet the reservoir rock with the hydrocar- 
bon solution to a distance of about 3-20 feet, and thereafter 
returning the well to production. Such a process, inter alia, 
improves the relative permeability to the flow of crude oil 
and establishes an oleophilic character in the reservoir im- 
mediately adjacent to the wellbore, the overall effect being to 
improve the productivity index. --.^^ 



3,667,547 

METHOD OF CEMENTING A CASING STRING IN A 

WELL BORE AND HANGING ITIN A SUBSEA 

WELLHEAD 

Arthur G. Ahbtone, Ventura, CaUf., assignor to Vctco 

OffriMire Industries, Inc., Ventura, Calif. 

Filed Aug. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 67,005 

Int a. E21b 33113, 29100 

MS. CL 166—286 5 ClaioK 

Method of cementing a casing string in a well bore and 
hanging it in a subsea wellhead, a safety joint being incor- 



3,667,549 
FIRE EXTINGUISHER 
Frederic Sachs, Neuilly-sur-Seinc, and Guy Vanotti, Oyonnax, 
both of France, assignors to Compagnie Centrale Sidi, Le 
Biance-Mcsnil, France 

Filed May 24, 1971, Ser. No. 146,161 
Clainu priority, application France, June 15, 1970, 7021858 

Int. CL A62c 13100 ^ 
MS. CL 169-31 R ^ Claims 

A poruble extinguisher having a reservoir for an extin- 
guishing medium, a functional plate secured thereto by a cut 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



129 



segment member having a **C"-shaped cross-section which by rotary shaft, the connections between the implements and 
serves to position a hood member so as to align an opening in the shafts include quick releases so that various implements. 




the skirt of the hood member with an outlet nozzle in the 
functional plate member. 



3,667,550 

LISTER-CHISEL COMBINATION 

Charles L. Lehman, Route 3, P.O. Box 53, Corpus Christ!, 

Tex. 
Contlnuaftioo-ln-part of appMcarton Ser. No. 703,977, Feb. 8, 

1968, now Patent No. 3,554,296. This appttcatkm Oct 22, 

1969, Scr. No. 868.556. The portion of the term of the patent 
subsequent to Jan. 12, 1988, has been disclaimed. 

Int. CL AOlb 13108, 39120 
VS. CL 172—700 3 Clainw 






a jf j»i 



, I O I I \ — / ■*— I ^ 



r 






A plurality of chisels are supported in spaced-apart loca- 
tions along a laterally extending tool bar which is adapted to 
be moved forwardly over the ground level. Each chisel has a 
forwardly extending point at its lower end for penetrating the 
soil to form a narrow trench therein as the tool bar moves 
forwardly. A lister is mounted on each chisel to dispose its 
lower cutting edges in position to sever the soil above the 
lower end of the chisel point and turn it onto beds on op- 
posite sides of the trench. 



3,667,551 

CULTIVATING IMPLEMENTS 

ComcUs van der Ldy, 7 Bnisclienrain, Zug, Switzerland, and 

Ary van der Ldy, 10 Wevcrskade, Maasland, Netherlands 

Continuation of application Scr. No. 727,109, May 6, 1968, 

now abandoned. This application July 8, 1970, Scr. No. 

56,164 

Claims priority, application Netherlands, May 12, 1%7, 

67/06637 

Int.CLAOIbJJ/00 

U.S. CL 172—59 5 Claims 

An agricultural machine with implements that are powered 




including spreaders, tined members and other working imple- 
ments, can be interchanged. 



^ 



3,667,552 
CABLE FEED DEVICE 
John Edward Gordon, 337 Mafai Street East, Gah, Ontario, 
Canada 

FDed June 3, 1970, Scr. No. 43,138 
Int. a. E21c 5106 
MS. CL 173—147 14 < 





A cable feed device for a drilling apparatus and more par- 
ticularly improved means for maintaining tension in a feed 
cable during the feeding of a drill rod. 



3,667,553 

TELESCOPING SEA FLOOR SOIL SAMPLER 

Henry L. GUI, OJai, CaHf., assignor to The United States of 

America as represented Iqr the Secretary of the Navy 

Original application Apr. 1, 1969, Scr. No. 813,403, now 

Patent No. 3,576,220. Divided and this application Dec 14, 

1970, Scr. No. 97^27 

Int. CL E21h 7/72, 49102 

MS. CL 175—6 5 Chrims 

A deep penetrating ocean bottom soil sampler employing a 

plurality of telescofwig tubes that may be sequentially driven 



899 O.O.— 5 



130 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



downwardly to penetrate the ocean floor a distance equal to compressed air down through the tubing annulus of a dual 
approximately V4 of the cumulative length of the tubes. As pupe string to a novel sub. where the flow divides to enable 

^ i part of the air to power the air hammer while the remaining 

air flow, is directs! into the hole annulus. The spent air ex- 








e49 



N 



hausts n-om the bit face and carries cuttings back into the sub 

the sampler with extended tubeS is withdrawn, it extracts an *"<» *"»<> »he inner tubing string. An enlargement formed on 

elongate core comprising a representative ocean bottom soil »he sub extenor prevents commglmg of the sam|,les with 

I r o r material from the borehole annulus. 



3,667^54 

METHOD FOR HANDLING COLUMN OF DRILL PIPE 

DURING DRILLING OPERATIONS 

Eugene A. Snrithcnnan, 1921 Bank of South West Building. 

Houston, Tex. 

Continuation of appHcaiion Scr. No. 859,634, Sept. 22, 1969, 

now abandoned , Continuation-in-iiatt of application Scr. No. 

685,686, Nov. 24, 1967, now abandoned. This application 

Nov. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 93340 

Int. CL E21b 7/00. 19/00 

VS. CL 175—57 10 CUdms 



139667^56 
DIRECTIONAL DRILLING APPARATUS 
John Keller Hcndcrwm, 4012 East 41st Place, Tulsa, Okla. 
I FBcd Jan. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 979 

I Int. CL E21b 7/04 

U.S.CL175— 73 



Jh 


X 

* 




y^ 


17 


1 


S. 




'/^ 




\ 












J 


« 






1 


4 ^ 






,/ 


f / 


1 


n 










3CUmB 



A method for removing or installing a column of drill pipe 
or tubing relative to a well bore during drilling or workover 
operations wherein the drill string is moved from the well 
bore preferably in one continuous piece without breaking it 
into Sorter sections, and is moved in an upwardly and radi- 
ally outwardly curved path from the well bore to a substan- 
tially horizontal attitude for storage preferably in a generally 
circular configuration on the ground or support means for 
later return to the well bore moving approximately along the 
same path, and as one piece. 



This invention relates to a directional drilling apparatus. 
More particularly, the invention is a drilling tool including 
provisions for changing the (Tirection of drilling of a 
borehole, the tool including a tubular body having means at 
the upper end for attachment of a drill string, a drill bit af- 
fixed to the lower end of the body by means of a slip clutch 
drill bit so that the drill bit is rotated when the tubular body 
is rotated while permitting the drill bit to be rotated indepen- 
dently of the body, means within the tubular body for rotat- 
ing the drill bit, and means controllable from the surface of 
the earth of varying the angle of the drilling axis of the drill 
bit relative to the tubular body. 



3,667,555 
AIR DRILLING METHOD USING CONTROLLED SPLIT 

STREAM 

Wayland D. Elcnburg, P. O. Box 1588, Monahans, Tex. 

nkd May 11, 1970, Scr. No. 36,352 

Int.CLE21b'#9/02 

U.S. CL 175—60 10 Claims 

Method and apparatus for drilling and for obtaining uncon- 

taminated formation samples with an air hammer by flowing 



EVENTER 



I 3,667,557 

MUD DIVERTER AND INSIDE BLOWOUT PRE^ 

DRILLING TOOL 
WilUam L. Todd, Los Angdcs, CaHf., and James D. Mott, 
Hoiaton, Tex., anrignors to Hydril Company I 

I Filed Jan. 20, 1971, Scr. No. 107,951 ^ 

I Int. CL E21b 27/00, 41/00, 1 7/04, 2I/0C^ 

VS. a. 175-242 22 ClaimB 

A tubular nwmber positioned in the driU string above a 

drill bit includes a rotatable ball valve to divert drilling fluid 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



131 



and the like in the well bore if the drill bit nozzles become 
clogged thus permitting continued circulation of the drilling 
fluid. The member also includes a movable sleeve to auto- 
matically prevent flow of the drilling fluid or the like up the 




drill string from the drill bit. The rotatable ball valve tends to 
prevent clogging of the drill bit noales by maintaining 
smaller channeled openings in the rotatable ball valve un- 
clogged by wiping the ball valve surface and flushing the 
wiped clogging particles into the well bore. 



3,667,558 
CABLE.TYPE CORING APPARATUS FOR RETRIEVING 

UNDERGROUND SPECIMENS 
Honore Jowph Lambot, Rue Kindcnnans 14, 1050 BnixcUcs, 
Belgium 

FBcd Apr. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 26,972 

Claims priority, application Belghm^ Apr. 24, 1969^ 73209 

Int a. E21b 9/20, 25/00 

VS. CL 175—246 2 Clainw 





3,667,559 
PILOT BIT WITH MULTIPLE CUTTING EDGES 
John G. Bennctti, Cupertino, Calif., assignor to Pcngo Cor- 
poration, Sunnyvale, CaUf. 

Filed Nov. 19, 1970, Scr. No. 91,058 

Int. CL E21c 13/04 

VS. CL 175—392 5 ClainH 




Earth auger pilot bit is an improvement upon U.S. Pat. No. 
2,773,673. The body of the bit is cone-shaped with a "fish 
tail" lower extremity. The improvement consists of having 
two (or more) spiral cutting blades protruding from the 
cone-shaped body and extending into the fish-tail, the second 
blade on each side joining the leading blade of the other at 
the bottom of the bit to reinforce same. The plural blades re- 
sist fracture upon severe impact and divide the wear, thereby 
prolonging the life of the bit. 



to W. 



3906/9300 

WEIGHING APPARATUS 
Geoffrey Cyril Cooke, Sto ur bridg e , Fjigland, 
& T. Avery Limited, Birmingham, England 

FBcd Feb. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 14,942 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Mar. 7, 1969, 

12,090/69 

Int.CLGOlgi/74 

U.S. CL 177—211 16 Oains 




Load measuring apparatus, e.g. self-indicating weigher, 
having a parallelogramic link system which includes three 
flexure strips, forming top and bottom linkages connecting a 
frtune member and a moveable load receiving member. Two 
of the strips are spaced apart horizontally to form one link- 
age, which may be the top one; and the other strip, which 
mounts a plurality of strain gauges responsive to flexure 
thereof to provide a measure of the applied load, forms the 
other linkage, e.g. the bottom one. 



A cable-type coring apparatus comprises a string of tubing 
with an annular coring bit at its lower end, a coring head with 
a core extractor slidable within the tulmig, and means for 
retrieving the head with a cut core therein. Water under 
pressure forces the coring head and retrieval means 
downwardly until the head locks in coring position in the tub- 
ing with a latch action. An upward pull on the cable un- 
latches the head and also vents the water under pressure so 
that it no longer forces the assembly downward, whereupon 
continued pulling on the cable retrieves the coring head and 
cut core. 



3,667,561 
WEIGHING AND HEIGHT MEASURING DEVICE 
WHUam Y. HntcMiHOB, Cliici«o, and Walter P. Kushmvk, 
NOet, both of Dl., assignors to Continental Scale Corpora- 
tion, Chicafo, DL 

FBcd Oct. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 83,924 

Int. a. GOlg 23/37, 19/50 

VS. CL 177—245 6 CUuh 

A device for measuring weight and/or height espe ci ally 

adapted for use with a renrate digital read-out system com- 



132 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



prising a mechanical leverage weighing structure having a to the platfonn level and providing supporting structure for a 
high degree of sensitivity and low friction and hysteresis cou- fuel tank and battery compartment The fuel tank and bat- 





tery conjpartments are supported at a level below the opera- 
tor platform of the vehicle. 



3(667(964 
TRANSPORTING APPARATUS 
pled with a compatible electronic measuring system and/or a Gerhard SchncUf Stuttgart, Gcmmy, avlgnor to Robert 
height measuring means compatible with said system. Boach GnbH, Stuttgart, Germany 

FUmI Nov. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 86,686 

aaims priority, appicatkui Germany, Nov. 6, 1969, P 19 55 
3,667,562 , 837J i 

MOTORCYCLE SNOWMOBILE CCMWVERSION UNIT | Iirt. CL B62d 5/04 | 



WOiMii F. ConptOB, 675 W. Hanilloiv A^ D, S«i FMro, u.S. CL I80-79.I 
CaHf. 

FBcd Oct. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 85,421 

Int. CL B62m 27102; ^iS2A 55/04 

US. CL 180—5 R 5 daims 



14 Claim 





«) iMVMiMH » 



A conversion unit on which the chassis of a motorcycle 
may be removably mounted after the front and rear wheek of 
the motorcycle have been separated therefrom, and the mo- 
torcycle when so positioned on the unit cooperating 
therewith to provide a power driven snowmobile. The unit is 
particularly adapted for use in portions of the country that 
are subject to extensive snowfall, with the motorcycle capa- 
ble of being used for its normal purposes during the spring, 
summer and fall of the year, and during the winter being 
removably mountabie on the unit to provide a vehicle that 
can negotiate a snow-covered terrain. 



A vehicle from one of whose longitudinally spaced ends a 
lifting fork projects which is movable between a raised and a 
lowered position. A ground-engaging steering wheel is pro- 
vided in the region of the other end of the vehicle and pivou- 
ble about an upright axis, and supporting wheels tumably 
mounted in the region of the fork and displaceable to and 
from a ground-engaging position. Auxiliary steering wheels 
are also provided in the region of the fork and displaceable 
to and from a ground-engaging position as well as pivotable 
about auxiliary upright axes. Means is provided for effecting 
displacement of the support wheels to, and at the same time 
of the auxiliary steering wheels from the respective ground- 
engaging position when the fork moves to raised position, 
and vice versa. 



3,667,563 
SUPPORTING STRUCTURE FOR PLATFORM DEFINING 

FUEL AND BATTERY CC^fPARTMENT 
E««eiie V. Kerb, Wert AHs, and Robert C. Haupt, Mflwan- 
kee, both of Wb., Mslgnnri to Alls rhahwri Manufactur- 
ing Company, Mlwaukce, Wis. 

Fled Nov. 21, 1969, Scr. No. 878,748 
btL CL B62d 25/00 
U.S. CL 180— 68.5 11 OainM 

Platfonn support structure on a tractor having access steps 



I 3,667,565 

DRIVER CAB OF COMMERCIAL-TYPE MOTOR 
VEHICLES 
AdoH Sleiacr, Gcriingen, and Hans Rinnergschwcntncr, 
Roteaieh, both of Germany, assignon to Daimler-Bens All- 



FHed May 22, 1970, Scr. No. 39,764 
Claims priority, application Germany, May 24, 1969, P 19 26 
1 779.9 

I Int.CLB62d27/M 

U.S. CL 180—89 

A driver cab for commercial-types of vehicles which is 
spring-supported with respect to the vehicle frame by spring 



J 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



188 



or guide elements arranged between the vehicle frame and which has a self contained propellant supply which powers a 
the driver cab on opposite sides of the vehicle; the spring or rocket engine to provide gas pressure within a plenum. This 




3,667,566 

RELEASABLE CONNECTOR, PARTICULARLY FOR 

TILT CAB VEHICLES 

WiOiam C. N. Hopkins, P. a Box 4551, Walnut Cnck, CtMl. 

FHed May 28, 1970, Scr. No. 41,182 

Int CL B62d 27/06 

VS. CL 180—89 20 




A releasable connector comprises a first pan in the form of 
a collar or cup having an internal annular groove and a 
second part comprising a cylinder and piston jointly defining 
a latch arrangement insertaUe into the collar and including 
an annular expansible-contractable latch member for selec- 
tively nesting in said groove and to secure said parts together. 
The latch arrangement includes an annular latch part having 
a conical latch face and fixed to the cylinder, and an annular 
latch part carried by the piston and having a conical latch 
face jointly defining an annular channel within which the 
latch member is seated. The width of the channel is varied 
selectively by movement of the piston to expand the latch 
member into the groove to secure the parts together or to 
permit retraction of the latch member so that the two parts 
can be separated. The connector is particularly adapted for 
use with tilt cab vehicles, the first part preferably being 
secured to the cab and the second part being mounted on the 
vehicle chassis. 



3,667,567 
ROCKET POWERED GROUND EFFECT MACHINE 



Eugene V. Rutkowski, Los Angdcs, Oriif., 
Inc., RedoDdo Bcwdi, CriH . 

FHed Feb. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 14,592 
Int. CL B60v ;//4 
U.S.CL 180-117 



to TRW 




40 



T 



type of device has particular applicability in ikmi atmospheric 
conditions. 



guide elements are thereby connected with each other by a 
subilizer, preferably in the form of a torsion rod. 



3,6674^68 
PRESSURE COMPENSATOR FOR SPEAKER CABINETS 
Arthur Ucbwrhcr, c/o Electronics, Inc., Indintrliri Pwii, WB- 
low Grove, Pa. 

Filed Sept. 15, 1970, Ser. No. 72,463 

Int. CL GlOh 13/00; H04r 1/28 

VS. CL 181—31 B 8 CbduM 




A pressure compensator for speaker cabinets is provided 
which includes a flexible rubber diaphragm attached to the 
rear of a speaker cabinet covering a plurality of vent holes 
and which includes an adjustable rod engaged in a plastic 
dome within a sponge rubber ball at the center of the 
diaphragm which extends the diaphragm so as to form a 
logarithmic profile to substantially reduce the back wave. A 
second diaphragm may also be employed spaced from the 
first mentioned diaphragm for greater suppression. 



3,667,569 
SOUND TUBE HEADSET 
Richard C. Mackcy, Woodland HiHs, and W. James Neil, 
Santa Mooka, both of CaHf., assignors to Acoustiionc Cor- 
poratkm, Chatiworth, CaUf. 

FDcd Jan. II, 1971, Ser. No. 105,343 

Int CL A61b 7/02; GlOk 13/00; G02k 13/00 

VS. CL 181-31 R 7 cUdnv 




7 Clalnis A sound tube headset formed of flexible tubing having ar- 
A rocket powered ground ettect machine is provided cuate end portions adapted to rest on the ears, extend 



184 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



p. 



downwardly behind the ears and forwardly in front of the 
wearer and with an adjustable slider for holding the lower 
portions of the tubes together and for slightly tensioning the 
same in the region of the clavicle to effectively secure the ear 
engaging portions in position and substantially obviate inad- 
vertent dislodgment 



paratus, the second enclosure surrounding at least partially 
the first enclosure and so on, the means for securing the ap- 
paratus to the first enclosure and the means for securing the 
enclosures to one another being constituted by vibration- 
damping members. 



3,667^70 
SILENCERS FOR FIREARMS, INTERNAL COMBUSTION 

ENGINES, C« THE LIKE 

NfitchcU L. WerBeU, ID, Powder Springs, Ga., assignor to 

Michad H. Adair and Roaer S. Reeves, lU, New Yorli, 

N.Y., attomcys-in-tect 

Condnuation-lii-purt of appMcadoo Scr. No. 700,239, Jan. 24, 

1968, now Patent No. 3,300,955, dated Mar. 17, 1970. This 

application Mar. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 19,829 

Int. CL F41f 17112; F41c 21118; FOln 1108 



U.S. CL 181—36 R 



27aainv 




Silencers for use in conjunction with firearms and as muf- 
flers for internal combustion engines and the like are pro- 
vided with entry, suppression and resonant chambers ar- 
ranged coaxially within a tubular housing. A plurality of heli- 
cal suppressor elements are axially disposed in the suppres- 
sion chamber and arranged in opposition to each other. The 
entry and resonate chambers may be provided with baffles. 
The entry chamber may be provided with an excess pressure 
relief valve. Oriflced resilient plugs may be provided in the 
vicinity of the discharge end of the silencer particularly for 
use in conjunction with firearms. At the entry end of the 
silencer there may be provided a tube with an L-shaped slot 
permitting ready mounting of the silencer on the barrel of a 
firearm. 



3,667,571 
SOUND-INSULATING DEVICE FOR NOISY APPARATUS 
Rolicrt Fattday, 21 B rue Nicolas Bnuuid, 25 Bcsancon, 
Frmnet 

Filed May 17, 1971, Scr. No. 143,900 

Claims priority, application France, Nov. 6, 1970, 7040095 

Int. a. FOln 1108 

UJS. CL 181—36 A 11 Clainv 




3,667,572 
TREAD SUPPORTING ASSEMBLY 
Charles E. Anderson, dtccawd, P.O. Box 264, late of 
dinia, Ohio (Ann Thadiston, Executrix), Hilisboro, Ol^o 
Filed Mar. 5, 1971, Scr. No. 121,470 
Int. CL E06c 7150; E04f 1 1/16 
VS. CL 182-220 



Sar- 



(Claims 




A tread support assembly for mounting a stair tread on a 
beam having a sloping upper face. The tread support includes 
an angle shaped support member and a main member of sub- 
stantially channel shape. One flange of the main member and 
one flange of the support member are attached to the sloping 
face of the beam with the web of the main member resting on 
a free end of an outwardly extending flange of the support 
member adjacent the other flange of the main mennber. A 
slide member embraces and holds the other flange of the 
main member and the outwardly extending flange of the sup- 
port member in flatwise relation. The tread is attached to the 
web of the main member. "^ 



3,667,573 
DRAIN SPOUT ATTACHMENT 
James D. Edwards, 828 East PlynMMith, Glendora, Calif. 
I Filed Sept. 15, 1970, Scr. No. 

I Int. CL F16n 33/00 

U.S.CL 184-1.5 - 




1 Claim 



A drain spout attachment for an automobile craakcase oil 

drainage receptacle of the type having an upright collection 

tank with an upwardly opening funnel at its upper end and 

adapted for collecting drainage oil from the crankcase of an 

automobile elevated on a hoist. The spout attachment 

mounts on and projects horizontally from the funnel rim in a 

manner such that the receptacle may be placed below the au- 

Sound-insulating device for apparatus generating intensive tomoWle with the spout projecting over the hoist frame 

noise comprising a series of n impervious enclosures of in- member which normally underiies the automobile crankcase 

creasing dimensions, the first enclosure having the smallest drain opening to permit location of the spout dire<^y below 

dimensions enclosing completely tmd directly the said ap- the drain opening. 



I 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



135 



3,667,574 
CHASSIS LUBRICATION SYSTEMS 
Max Edward Grantham, Plympton, Plymouth, England, m- 
iignor to Tccalonh (Engineering) Unrited, Plymouth. 
Devon, Ei^lland 

FDcd Dec 2, 1969, Scr. No. 881,423 

^ ClaimB priority, application Great Britain, Dec. 3, 1968, 

57369/68 

Im. CL F16n 7/14, 13/22 

UACL184-7R 3Ctal„ 




A motion transfer device is provided for use in lubricating 
apparatus and systems. This device is for axial mounting on a 
pump having a rotating shaft. A diaphragm 17 is moved by 
reduced air pressure in space 16 and moves an inner housing 
23 axially. Housing 23 cooperates with member 19 via balk 
21 running in helical grooves in the housing and member. 
This member causes shaft 1 to rotate by use of a pawl and 
ratchet ( 14,15). Housing 23 is constrained to move axially by 
balls 24 rolling in axial grooves in the housing 23 and on oart 
29(nG. 1). 



3,667,575 
DOUBLE ACTING FREE WHEEL 
Marcd Pierre Alexis Bouhot, 35 Avenue du General SarraiL 
Paris, France 

Original application Apr. 9, 1968, Scr. No. 719,922, now 

Patent No. 3,499,511, dated Mar. 10, 1970. Divided and this 

application Sept. 12, 1969, Scr. No. 870,726 

Claims priority, appUcation France, Apr. 19, 1967, 103325; 

Nov. 21, 1967, 129035 

Int CL B60i 7/12 

MS. CL 188-134 . i claim 




means to displace said wedging cam means thereby to release 
said input drive means and said output driven shaft, means 
sensitive to the torque resisting rotation of said output driven 
shaft, said torque sensitive means being associated with said 
displacing means whereby when the resistance to torque 
reaches a predetermined value said displacing means is actu- 
ated to displace said wedging cam means. 



The invention relates to stopping device for disconnecting 
two shafts, which comprises input drive means, an output 
driven shaft, displaceable wedging cam means releasably 
coupling said input drive means to said output driven shaft. 



3,667,576 
HYDRAULIC PRESSURE ACTUATED PRESSING DEVICE 

FOR DISC BRAKE 
Tadasu Iric, Toyonaka, and Kaname Dot, Ibaragi, both of 
Japan, asdgnors to Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd., 
Osaka, Japan ^^ 

Filed Jan. 27, 1971, Scr. No. 110,237 

Claims priority, application Japan, Jan. 29, 1970, 45/8180 

Int CLB60I 77/20 

U.S. CL 188-345 2 Claims 




A hydraulic pressure actuated pressing device for disc 
brake to compensate the wear of friction pads and to keep 
the braking clearance constant. A piston of the pressing 
device has a liquid chamber inside thereof ccmtaining a quan- 
tity of liquid so that a proper braking cleance is maintained 
in accordance with the increase of the wear of friction pads 
while preventing the piston from being retracted even when 
the hydraulic braking pressure is lost. 



3,667,577 

VEHICLE SPEED RESPONSIVE CONTROLS FOR 

TRANSMISSION, CLUTCH AND ENGINE 

Charies Tctrca Wcymann, Parte, France, amig to 

SJ.D.A.R.O Sodete InduitrlcBe de "« T | M ntllh Auto* 
matiqucs Robomatic Oiw, FVanoc 

Filed Apr. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 26^05 
OaimB priority, application FVancc, Apr. 28, 1969, 6913392 

Int. CL B60k 21/00, 29/00 
U.S. CL 192— .08 9 m.a-~ 

The present invention relates to an automatic gearbox con- 
trol device for automobiles wliich is applicable to any con- 
ventional mechanical gearbox and can be coupled to an ex- 
isting vehicle without any major modification. The control 
device comprises : a source of pressure fluid, a double-action 
ratio-changing jack actuated by said pressure fluid through 
two electrovalves selectively, and an electrical regulating 
contactor propelled at a speed proportional to that <rf the 
vehicle and comprising two terminals selectively supplied 
with current by said regulator from the vehicle battery for 
supplying two connections to said electrovalves respectively, 
each of said connections comprising two contactors in paral- 
lel, namely a self-maintaining contactor activated t^ the 
ratio-changing member operatively connected to said jack 
and a maneuver contactor activated by the vehicle clutch i.e. 



\ 



136 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



which closes in the de-clutched position. The control device frictional engagement wiA the friction disc. The pinion is 
also includes means for automatically idling an associated en- adapted to be connected to a load to be positioned by rota- 
tion of the power shaft. A power application to tht shaft 
causes the pinion to be driven by the cooperating drive col- 
lar, balls, clutch disc and balls, while lifting the dutch disc 
out of frictional engagement with the friction disc. B«clc load 
similarly causes the clutch disc to be strongly urged into 
locking action, when power application ceases. 




I 3,667^79 

BRAKE OPERATED TRANSMISSION SHIFTER 
Joseph Vina, 414 Broad Avenue, BcBe Vcnon, Pa. 
Filed Nov. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 90,646 
int. CL B60k 21/00 
VS. CI. 192-4 A 



'iCIainiB 



-^l^' ^ .' 



gine or cutting off the fuel supply thereto during ratio shift- 
ing. 



3,667,578 
BMHRECnONAL DRIVE RELEASED BRAKE 
Robert M. JoIumni, Levittown, Pa., — rig»nr to Harold Beck 
& Sons, lac, Newtown, Pa. 

Filed May 14, 1971, Ser. No. 143,535 

IMLCLFIM 67/00. 55/48 

VS, CL 192—8 R 4 Cialnis 





An eagine compression brake system in which km auto- 
matic transmission is down shifted to second gear and to low 
gear on moderate to heavy braking pressure appliod to the 
brake pedal. The down shifting may be electrically actuated 
by pressure actuated twitches which are exposed to the 
hydraulic pressure in the conventional brake system, by flexi- 
Ue cables which are moved by a piston system actusuted by 
the hydraulic pressure in the conventional brake system and 
by mechanical linkage controlled by a separate foot pedal. 



r^ 



■^--fi 



3,667,580 
MACHINE TOOL INDEXING SYSTEM 
wnu Schachcr, F iis d rkh s lM ien, and Hdm Mvschntr, KrcH- 
brana, both of Genmniy, — ignnrs to Zahnradiabrik 
Fi ledi ki wh rfen. AG, Frtod h kh rini en , Gcnnany 

FDcd May 1, 1970, Scr. No. 33,545 I 
Oalms priority, appBcalkwi Gcnnany, May 3, 1969^ P 19 22 
644.9; June 14, 1969, P 19 30 295.5 
Int. CL F16d 67/02, 57/00 
VS. CL 192—12 A 



A bi-directional stop clutch or brake for power trans- 
mitting rotating shafts is disclosed in which a friction disc is 
fixed to a fixed housing fixnn which a power transmitting 
shaft extends. A clutch disc adapted to engage said friction 
disc is routably and slidably disposed on the shaft without 
the housing for braking the shaft A drive collar is pinned to 
the shaft concentrically of the friction disc and between the 
clutch disc and the housing. The drive collar has formed 
therein a concentric series of conical depressions, and the 
clutch disc has also formed therein a corresponding series of 
conical depressions, the two series of depressions being in 
lutual alignment and holding therebetween a plurality of 

lis. one ball per each opposed pair of conical depressions. 
Distally of the clutch disc and spaced apart therefrom is a 
flanged pinion which is rotatably sleeved upon the shaft and 
positioned thereon by means of an annular thrust bearing and 
fixed collar positioned distally thereof. Facing portions of the 
flanged pinion and clutch disc likewise have corresponding 
concentric arrangements of conical depressions formed 
therein so as to house a plurality of balls therein. A helical 
spring engages the flanged pinion and clutch disc while being 
in compression, thereby normally urging the clutch disc into 




7 .^ 



In a machine tool a spindle is brought to a slow speed, e.g.. 
for indexing to selective angular positions, by means of a 
clutch and a hydraulic pump, in a hydraulic control system, 
wherein the spindle is slowed down, or stopped, or reversed. 
The construction, and a number of modifications, envisages 
carrying a conventional indexing mechanism preferably on 
the spindle itself, together with the clutch, as well as the 
hydraulic pump in a compact assembly. The hydraulic system 
includes a pressure source and a throttle which controls dif- 
ferential pressures acting on the hydraulic pump to drive it as 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



187 



a motor by which the slow speed of the spindle is produced 
by rotation thereof through the clutch. Differential pressure 
in the system can be utilized in conjunction with a control 
device to which an indexing mechanism actuation is respon- 
sive. However, the invention has use in any installation where 
a compact mechanism for slow drive of a shaft is desired, or 
where it is desired to stop and momentarily reverse such 
shaft, the main power to the shaft being rendered ineffective 
in any suitable manner when the mechanism of the invention 
is operating. 



3.667,581 

COMBINATION CLUTCH-BRAKE 

James V. Hanks, Minneapolis, Minn., assignor to 

Manufacturing Company, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Filed Mar. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 19383 

Int. CL F16d 67/02 



Horton 



VS. CL 192W-18.1 



7ClainM 




A combination dutch-brake which includes a clutch unit 
including a clutch housing, a first hub. an annular clutch 
piston slidably mounted on said hub. an annular clutch 
cylinder carried by said clutch housing, a friction disc having 
fins thereon slidably mounted on and rotatable with the first 
hub. a brake unit including a disc journal having air 
passageways extending radially therein and mounted on a 
second hub. means rotatably mounting said second hub axi- 
ally on said first hub, spring means normally urging said fric- 
tion disc out of engagement with said disc journal, a brake 
housing mounted on said second hub, means connecting said 
clutch housing with said brake housing said brake housing 
having an annular cylinder formed therein, an annular piston 
base having an annular brake piston thereon and slidable 
within the annular cylinder, the brake piston having a friction 
facing thereon in axial alignment with the disc journal, means 
for normally urging the annular brake piston vrith said fric- 
tion facing thereon out of engagement with said disc journal, 
means for causing fluid pressure to urge said clutch piston 
against said friction disc to cause said second hub to rotate, 
means for causing fluid pressure to urge said brake piston 
against said disc journal to brake the second hub, the friction 
disc formed with air passageways extending therethrough, the 
disc journal formed with air passageways extending 
therethrough and communicating with said air passageways 
of said friction disc, the brake piston base formed with air 
passageways extending therethrough and communicating 
with said air passageways of said disc journal, and the means 
connecting said clutch housing with said brake housing being 
separable. 



3,667,582 
RADIAL SPRING CLUTCH 
Howard O. Borck, Detroit, and Leo W. Cook, Roy^ Oak, 
both of Mkh., assignors to Boii-Wamcr Cor p or a tion, 
Chicago, IB. 

Fikd Joly 27, 1970, Scr. No. 58,309 
Int CL F16d 23/00 
VS. CL 192—99 A 15 < 




A friction clutch assembly including a driving member, a 
driven member, a reaction member, a pressure plate, release 
levers pivotally connected to the reaction member at a point 
between a front surface of the reaction member and the driV'* 
ing member and pressure springs disposed between the reac- 
tion member and the release levers such that upon wear of 
the friction frK;ing an increase in medianical advantage is 
used to maintain a substantially constant pressure plate load 
while the clutch is engaged regardless of clutch teiang wear 
and upon clutch release a decrease in mechanical advantage 
is used to reduce operator's efforts. 



3,667383 

SELF-MODULATED INPUT CLUTCH FOR VEHICLE 

DRIVE TRANSMISSIONS 

rimrr 1 Flrhariii, Ifslamasnn. mrh . sssi g ii n i tn r a l i n iasi 
Tractor Co., PMria, IB. 

fUed Apr. 22, 1970, Scr. Na 30^80 

InLCLF16d2i/;0 

U.S. CL 192—105 A 6 CWn« 







SICNM. 



A clutch for a vehicle having a change speed gear box 
transmission automatically performs control functions which 
have heretofore required skilled manipulation of a dutch 



138 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



pedal or the like by the operator. Springs exerting an engage- 
ment force on the clutch plates react against a movable 
piston which responds to a centrifitgally generated fluid pres- 
sure to increase the spring force as a function of engine 
speed at the lower range of engine speeds. To facilitate start- 
ups and to avoid stalling, additional springs automatically dis- 
engage the clutch at the idling range of engine speed. The 
springs and variable fluid pressure provide modulated en- 
gagement or disengagement within an intermediate range of 
speeds and further means engage the clutch with a fixed 
clutch capacity at normal operating speeds. Fluid signal 
means force disengagement during shift transients at higher 
engine speeds. Clutch action differs under different operating 
conditions in a manner conforming with skilled manual con- 
trol of a clutch under similar conditions. 



3,667,584 
TRANSPORT ROLLER 
Bcngt Sigvard K a r l— on, Enriwde, Sweden, aadgnor to Sand- 
vikciis Jcrnvcrks Aktkbolat, Sandvikcn, Sweden 

Filed June 25, 1970, Ser. No. 49355 

dafam priority, appHclloB Sweden, July 8, 1969. 9631/69 

Int CL B65g 13100 

MS. CL 193—37 2 ClainH 




For a transport roller useful in handling timber and similar 
bulky objects, the surface of a cylindrical roller of metal is 
provided with spaced rows of studs tipped with wear-resistant 
material. The studs are fixed to steel strips, which strips are 
welded or otherwise anchored to the surface of the roller, 
being disposed in a predetermined pattern thereover. 



3,667,585 
COIN TESTING APPARATUS 
Werner Lindner, Bmrtriwide, Germany, aaignor to Natiomd 
Rejectors, Inc. GmbH, Buxtdmde, Germany 

Filed June 16, 1970, Ser. No. 46,643 
Oatans priority, appMniHow Germany, July 10, 1969, P 19 34 

911.2 

Int.a.G07fi/02 

U.S. CL 194— 101 2ClalnM 




The coin testing apparatus comprises a magnet, a deflect- 
ing sheet and an anvil arranged one after the other in the 
dropping path of the coins. The apparatus permits separation 
of coins of low, medium and high electric conductivity in a 
way that the coins of low and high conductivity are directed 
to a channel for acceptable coins whereas the coins of medi- 
um conductivity are directed to the coin return channel. 



I 3,667,586 

* ENDLESS BELT CONVEYORS 
Edmund William Matthews, Halow, England, aarignor to 
Dowty Mcco Limited, Worcester, England I 

Filed Nov. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 85,980 j 

Claims priority, applic a tion Great Britain, Nov. 15, ^968, 
I 56,023/68; 56,024/68 



Int. a. B65g , 15100 




Claims 



An endless belt conveyor having means for mounting a reel 
for belting, whereby belting may be readily added to or 
removed from the endless belt when the overall length of the 
conveyor has to be increased or decreased. 



3,667,587 
CCmTINUOUS ROD MAIONG MACHINES 
Edward G. Pl'tston, London, England, amignor to Molens, 
Lfanltad, London, Eoftaad 

Filed Apr. 15, 1970, Ser. No. 28^00 
Clainw priority, appBcatlon Great Britain, Apr. 18, 1969, 

120,000/69; Jan. 9, 1970, 1,192/70 
IntCLB65g<<7/26 
U.S. CL 198—25 



lOOainv 



•• •• •• •• ••l«*l«« •• ^>^^^H_ 



•• •• •• •• 

•• •• •• •• 







This invention is concerned with a fluted deflector drum 
which receives axially moving cigarettes or tlie like and 
decelerates them by means of suction in the drum applied 
through ports in the flutes. In order to adjust the decelera- 
tion, part of the drum is surrounded by a cowl formed with 
apertures which can be selectively closed to provide a varia- 
ble restriction against air flow produced by the suctiop in the 
drum. 



to FMC Cor> 



5 Claims 



3,667,588 
CONVEY<Hl SYSTEM 
Robert J. Traube, San Mateo, CaUf., 

poration, San Jose, C^if. 

I Filed Aug. 21, 1968, Ser. No. 754,443 
I Int. CL B65g 43108, 47110 

UA CL 198—38 

A storage and retrieval system for goods has two power 
operated conveyors movable in separate endless loops past 
two (or more) spaced apart picking stations, each picking 
station common to both conveyors. Each conveyor has bins 
with compartments in which goods are stored. Although the 
bios on each conveyor remain in the same sequence, the bins 
are movable relative to each other on the conveyor to define 
"buffer" zones wliich permit simultaneous picking by two 
spaced apart pickers. The control system for the conveyors 
includes a reader which receives digital data concerning a 
group of orders to be picked from a stack of cards, each card 
giving the identity, quantity, and distribution of one of the ar- 
ticles to be picked. The two conveyors are automatically 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



189 



stopped alternately with the bins containing ordered goods at 
the picking stations, and the operator at each picking station 
picks goods from the bins in accordance with a read-out unit 
which displays the card data. A plurality of packing lanes 



materia] having parallel bristles inclined in the direction of 
feed. The tips of the bristles engage and resiliently support 




originate at each picking station and terminate at a plurality 
of packing stations. Each picker distributes goods to the 
separate packing lanes in accordance with the read-out unit 
at the picking station. 




A conveying system including a series of conveyor sections 
with each conveying section including a series of rolls to sup- 
port the articles being conveyed. At least one roll of the se- 
ries is a drive roll. A drive shaft extends longitudinally of the 
conveyor sections and the drive shaft is individually con- 
nected to each drive roll through a clutch which is arranged 
to disengage the driving connection to each drive roll under 
predetermined overload conditions. Means is also provided 
for returning the clutch to an engaged position after a 
predetermined period of disengagement, whereby the clutch 
will reengage if the overload condition has been cured and 
will again disengage if the overload condition continues to 
exist. 



3,667,590 
' VIBRATORY PILE FEEDER 
Dennis E. Mead, Caaenovia, N.Y. 

FOcd Jan. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 273 
Int. CL B65g 27100 
MS, CL 198—220 BA 3 

A feeder for objects uses a vibratory element bearing a pile 





t^UQ^QtJIO- 9'L,45 



objects to be fed, and the inclination cX the bristle 
establishes the direction of feed as the element is vibrated. 



3,667,591 
NEWSPAPER BUNIHX FEEMNG AND STORING ^ 
SYSTEM 
Thomaa R. Sykcs, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mslgnni to Gcr> 
rard Company Ltd., Hamton, Ontario, Canada 
Filed Nov. 19, 1969, Ser. No. 878,063 
Int CLB65g 27/00 
U.S. CL 198—220 R 3 ( 



3,667,589 
CONVEYING SYSTEM HAVING AN AUTOMATICALLY 

DEACTIVATED DRIVE 
Charles F. Constable, South Milwaukee, Wis., aasignar to Jos. 
Schlitx Brewing Company, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Filed Apr. 1, 1970, Ser. No. 24,611 

Int. CL B65g 13102 

U.S.CL198— 127 5 Claims 




A feeding and storage system for handling bundled 
newspapers and the like is provided by a spiral chute 
mounted for oscillatory ntovement, the chute having a helical 
ramp encircling a central vertical column the ramp having a 
helix angle such that the bundle will be held by friction from 
moving down the ramp under gravitation with the chute sta- 
tionary. Oscillatory movement in the requisite mode to move 
the bundle from the input end of the ramp to the output end 
is provided by a suitable drive and a control is provided ad- 
jacent each end of the ramp so that the ramp can be filled as 
a storage unit from the input end with the output end 
blocked and wlien the ramp is fiill or partially fiill and it is 
desired to draw off stored bundles, the chute can be con- 
trolled from the delivery end to effect bundle delivery. 



3,667,592 

BAND-SAW CARRIER AND DISPENSER 

George S. Ayoub, 124 W^icr Street, I wm dMl w 

FUcd Ai«. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 65,632 

InL CL B65d 85167 

U.S. CL 206— 16 R 10< 

A band-saw carrier and dispenser has a bottom plate and a 
cover plate which has posts that extend through holes in the 



140 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



bottom plate. Retaining means retain the posts in said holes, vibratory energy to the package in the vicinity of the 
which is accomplished by distorting portions of the posts, as gathered region of film. The invention in its nxxlifled ent- 

bodiments farther envisions elimination of present bands. 





closure cHps or other closure devices by using instead a tem- 

by heat, to extend them to the bottom plate and thereby ^^"^ ^'"^ gathering and holding means, and then applying 
retain both plates together. ultrasonic energy to the gathered region of film to form a 

permanent closure not requiring a band or clip. 



3^7^93 

FLOWABLE DUNNAGE APPARATUS AND METHOD OF 

PACKAGING WITH FLOWABLE AND COMnJABLE 

INFLATED DUNNAGE MATERIAL 

John M. PMdkton, SMO Mapkwood, Gntndait, Wb. 

CMtiBairtkHHiaipait of appHadoB Scr. No. 777,940, Oct. 1, 

1968, BOW aba n doB td , whkh is a condauatloo^i-part of 

appttcatkM Scr. No. 617,977, Feb. 23, 1967, now aho n do n wi. 

Thk appHcatioa Mar. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 23,650 

Int. a. B65d 77/26, 81/02, 85/30 

M&. CL 206—46 FR 5 CWm 




Flowahle dunnage apparatus characterized by discrete in- 
flated capsules formed of elastic impervious webs in facing 
relationship and sealed along their edges with a quantity of 
air under pressure captured therein, the discrete capsules 
being of minuscule dimension as compared to the dimensions 
of an outer container, and the dimensions of smaller articles 
or containers disposed within the outer container. The dis- 
crete capsules are adapted to flow into a partly filled con- 
tainer and to partly fill the interstices thereof, and to fill the 
outer container to a surcharged condition before the closing 
thereof. The closing of the outer container, either by placing 
flaps into position, or by placing a separable closure 
thereover, exerts pressure on the compliant capsules, causing 
them to All the interstices of the outer container substantially 
completely, and to prevent migration or shifting of smaller 
containers or articles within the outer container. 

The invention herein also comprehends a method of 
packaging with flowable and compliant dunnage material. 



3,667,594 

CLOSURE FOR FILM PACKAGES AND METHOD OF 

MAKING SAME 

Artlmr D. Hcrrcl, Bay City, Mich., aarignnr to Tlw Dow 

ClMaiical Compaoy, Midland, Mich. 

FOcd Nov. 20, 1969, Scr. No. 878,462 
Int. CL B65d 75/48, 79/00 
MS. CL 206—46 R 1 Claim 

A method of forming improved film packages of a type 
wherein one or more of the package ends or regions is 
gathered and tied closed by encircling metal bands, closure 
clips or other closure devices. The resultant closure of com- 
pressed film is made leak-proof by application of ultrasonic 



3,667,595 

DEVICE FOR PACKAGING REELS OF MAGNETIC TAPE 

OR THE LIKE AND FCNl STOWING THEM BY 

SUSPENSION 

Pierre A. Pmm, 20 me GaiMkm, Paris 13", I^ancc 

Filed June 23, 1970, Scr. Na 49,112 

daims priority, a ppMcatiou fVancc, June 25, 1969, 69^1301 

Int. CL B65d 85/04, 85/66 
VS. CL 206—53 4 CMnm 




This invention relates to a device for packaging reels of 
magnetic tape, cinematographic film or the like and for stow- 
ing them in a suspension-type fliing cabinet, comprising on 
the one hand a relatively supple, open annular band, which is 
U-sectioned and centered on the geometric axis of a reel, on 
the other hand a locking member connecting the ends of the 
band and finally, at least one resilient means tending to apply 
said band, for the purpose of sealing, against the edge of the 
sides of the reel to be protected, wherein a resilient-return 
slide is guided in concentric translation on the outer face of 
the first end of the band, the free terminal part of this slide 
being separated, by a slit perpendicular to the above-men- 
tioned axis, into two arms having two locking teeth project- 
ing into a direction parallel to this axis, said teeth bei^g capa- 
ble of cooperating with a guard member unitary with the 
second end of this band and provided for the passage of said 
slide. 



- 3,667,596 

SHEET MSPENSING UNIT 
Malcolm B. Lucas, SpringBcM Township, Hamilton County; 
Jaime P. VlBanueva, Ondnnati, and Stewart Rowc, Wyom- 
ing, al of Ohio, awignnrs to The Proctor & Gamble Com- 
pany, Ondnnati, Ohio 

FDcd May 27, 1970, Scr. No. 40,981 I 
Int. a. B65d 71/00, 85/00 ' 

U.S. CL 206— 57 R SOainw 

A sheet dispensing unit in which a stack of sheet materials 
is adhesively fastened along one end to a rectangular header 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



141 



piece having a depending skirt along its periphery. The covered by a sleeve of thermoplastic material and the top of 
header piece is m turn suspended by a pair of oppositely the load may be covered by a separate sheet to which the 




?«. 



/»■«■ 



i 



^ 



y»f 



^^F^. 






disposed, spaced hanger blades adapted to enter slots inter- 
mediate the sides of the stack and the side portions of the 
skirt. 



3,667,597 

CONTAINER FOR DISPENSING PAPER 

LcsHc Homstcr. 1 1204 Wester Rood. Cbo. Mkh. 

FHcd Apr. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 32,288 

Int. CL B65d 85/67; B65h 75/38 

VS. CL 206-58 



2ClalnK 




A conuiner for dispensing paper of the type which is nor- 
mally rolled about a tubular core, including means carried by 
the container for releasably attaching the container to a 
readily accessible place in a motor vehicle or the like. In a 
preferred embodiment, the container comprises a substan- 
tially enclosed hollow housing having two opposed end walls 
connected by longitudinally disposed side walls; the opposing 
end walls having means for rotatably mounting the tubular 
core of the paper roll, while one of the side walls is provided 
with an elongated opening having a length at least equal to 
the longitudinal length of the paper roll to permit the 
withdrawal of selected lengths of the paper therethrough as 
the paper roll is rotated. In the second embodiment, means 
are provided on one of the end walls to cause rotation of the 
paper roll. 



3,667,598 
WRAPPED PALLET LOAD 
Seynour Zelnick, Orange, N J., and Martin Michari WUd- 
BMOcr, Statcn bland, N.Y., assignors to Wddotron Cor- 
poratioa, Newark, N J. 
Original application Oct. 7, 1968, Scr. No. 765,302. Divided 
and this application Feb. 18, 1971, Scr. No. 116,454 
Int. CL B65d 65/16, 71/00, 85/62 
VS. CL 206—65 S 7 Clainv 

A pallet load of product is secured onto a pallet by enclos- 
ing the load including the top thereof in thermoplastic film 
which is heat shrunk to the load, to a sheet of thermoplastic 
film on the pallet under the load, and to the edge of the pal- 
let therearound. The load enclosing film may be an inverted 
bag which covers the top and side of the load and the lower 
end of the bag is fiised to said sheet which is on the pallet 
under the load. Alternatively, the side of the load may be 



sleeve is fused. Also, layers of thermoplastic sheet material 
may be disposed between layers of the pallet load and heat 
sealed to the sleeve which surrounds the pallet load. 



3,667,599 
CONTINUOUS CORRUGATED BELT WITH WIRE 
SCREEN 
OHvcr K. Hobs, P. a Box 1306, Suffolk, Va. 

Fikd Dec 8, 1969, Ser. No. 882,846 
Int. CL B03b 7/00; B07b 13/04 
U.S.CL209— 12 11 



\ 



\\ 




An apparatus adapted to separate peanuts from grass, 
vines, dirt and other waste material combines a sloping rotat- 
ing continuous belt having recesses therein adapted to trap 
the waste material and carry it away as the peanuts roll down 
its sloping surface with baffles or curtains, a barrier or reser- 
voir across the lower end of the belt and screening means to 
remove substantially all of the material which remains with 
peanuts after harvesting. 



3,667,600 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CENTRIFUGAL 

CLASSmCATION 

Kazuo Oi, Tokyo, and Katuo NcgisU, Nogani-Machi, both of 

Japan, assignors to Kazuo Oi, Tokyo, Japan 

FUed Nov. 14, 1969, Scr. No. 876^22 
Claims priority, application Japan, Nov. 27, 1968, 43/86786 

IntCLB04ci/00 
U.S. CL 209—144 4 Cfadna 

A method and apparatus for classifying powdery material 
comprising a tangential inlet for the material suspended in a 
gas, means above and below the tangential inlet for introduc- 
ing additional gas tangentiaDy in the same direction as said 
tangential inlet. Helical guides are provided for guiding the 



142 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



l 



June «, 1972 



material inflow and lower gas inflow upwardly. A peripheral 
inlet for inducing air from the outside of the apparatus is pro- 



firom the influent and are cam retracted to leave them on the 
periphery of the screen. A hinged presser plate holds soft, or- 
ganic material against the screen to be comminuted and car- 
ried away with the effluent and into the disposal system. A 




vided between the upper gas inflow and the material inflow 
to aid in dispersing the powdery material. 



3,667,601 
APPARATUS FOR THE DRY SEPARATION OF 
GRANULAR MATERIALS 
Norrls Johnflton, and Mark Latkcr, both of OJai, CaHf., aa- 
■igiion to Albert M. Clark; John C. Manning, Bakcnfidd 
and John G. Troster, Atherton, all of Calif., part interest to 
each 

Filed Oct. 6, 1969, Scr. No. 863,989 

Int. CL B07b 3100 

MS. CL 209-466 6 Claims 




-yM 



tM 



Granular material dry separator apparatus embodying a 
resiliently mounted porous deck vibrated longitudinally, the 
deck having parallel transverse upper grooves at right angles 
to its longitudinal direction of vibration. Granular material is 
dropped onto the deck at one end, low pressure air being 
forced upwardly through the deck while it is being vibrated 
to cause granules or particles of greater specific gravity to 
drop to the bottom of the grooves while the lighter particles 
are caused to float upwardly and flow progressively from 
groove to groove toward the opposite end of the porous bed 
or deck. At predetermined intervals, a mechanism tilts the 
porous deck to discharge the granular contents in the 
grooves into collection troughs. 




skew-mounted scavenger roller made up of flexible discs 
routes against the screen for cleaning off pieces of paper, 
etc.. that remain on the surface of the screen, for disposal as 
trash. 



I 



\ 



3,667,603 

HYDRAUUC MANIFOLD SYSTEM 

Richard B. Couraon, Warren, Mich., aasignor tb Almo 

Manifbid and Tool Company, Center Line, Mich. 
Contini«tion-in-pui of appHortion Scr. No. 758,338, Sept. 9, 
1968, now abandoned. This application June 8, 1970, Scr. 
I No. 44,231 

I Int. a. BOld 35114, 35102 



U.S. a.'210— 130 



1» Claims 



\ 



-C.I — ! *l \ 

MM 



7^. 









L: 







3,667,602 
SELECTIVE COMMINUTION AND SCAVENGING 
METHOD 
Richard Crandall, 17792 Lewis Lane, Huntington Beach, 
CaHf., and Carl H. NordcU, Crystal Bay, Ncv. 
Orifiiial applicalion Sept. 6, 1968, Scr. No. 757,877, now 
Patent No. 3,570,671. Divided and this application May 18, 
1970, Scr. No. 48,746 
Int. CL BOld 35128 
MS, CL 210-67 5 Claims 

A drum screen is inserted into a raw sewage line. Rake fin- 
gers help elevate solid materials picked up by the screen 



A hydraulic manifold system is disclosed comprising, in 
combination, a hydraulic manifold having a liquid-directing 
hydraulic circuit therein, liquid filter means associated with 
said hydraulic manifold for filtering hydraulic liquid entering 
a part of said hydraulic circuit, and by-pass means including 
a uni-directional check valve associated with said filter 
means operative upon clogging of the filtering action thereof, 
each said hydraulic numifold, filter means and by-pass means 
itself consisting of no pipes, said filter means comprising a 
filter cavity having inlet and outlet liquid passage means 
therefor and constructed to receive within itself and to seal 
against a replaceable liquid filter cartridge disposed in said 
filter cavity, said hydraulic manifold having means for 
mounting thereon at least one hydraulic liquid fiow-control 
valve, said hydraulic circuit comprising inlet and outlet ports 
in said hydraulic manifold for hydraulic liquid, respectively. 



1 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



148 



entering and leaving the latter, a pair of control ports in said 
hydraulic manifold for said flow-control valve for hydraulic 
liquid, respectively, entering and leaving said flow-contrx>l 
valve, and liquid passage means for directing hydraulic liquid 
from said filter cavity outlet liquid passage means to one of 
said control ports and from the other of said control ports to 
said hydraulic manifold outlet port, said filter cavity inlet and 
outlet liquid passage means in communication, respectively, 
with said hydraulic manifold inlet port and said one control 
port, said check valve having inlet and outlet liquid passage 
means therefor in communication, respectively, with said 
filter cavity and said one control port and constructed to 
open in the event of clogging of the filtering action to by-pass 
hydraulic liquid around said filter cartridge fit>m said hydrau- 
lic manifold inlet port through said check valve to said one 
control port. 



3,667,604 
MOVING BED APPARATUS FOR THE TREATMENT OF 

FLUID 
Pierre Lagouttc, Chariy, France, sHignor to Filtrcs Vemay, 
Villeurbannc (Rhone), France 

Filed June 4, 1970, Scr. No. 43,467 
Clainu priority, application France, Sept. 9, 1969, 6931267 

Int. CL BOld 33116 
U.S.CL210— 136 2ClainM 



\ 




A fluid is filtered by passing a stream of fluid through a 
porous wall of an inlet chamber through a treatment zone 
filled with treatment material and then through another 
porous wall into a collecting chamber. The flow from the 
inlet chamber to the collecting chamber is substantially 
horizontal and a vertically upwardly directed liquid stream 
passes through the treatment material at the bottom of the 
container to entrain particles of the treatment material and 
lift them to the top of the container to provide for recircula- 
tion of the treatment material. The treatment material is 
regenerated during the circulation with the impurities being 
removed from the container near the top portion thereof 
above the treatment material. 



\ 



3,667,605 

SUBMERGED OIL LEAK CONTROL 

Robert O. ZieUnski, Route #2, Box 20, Delton, Mich. 

Filed May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,087 

Int. CI. E02b 15104 

U.S.CL 210—170 



casing means and communicating with the interior thereof 
through an opening in the top wall theretrf'. The tubular 




mearts is braced by a plurality of cables connected thereto 
and to anchor means located on the ocean floor. 



3,667,606 

CONSTRUCTION OF FILTERS 

Carmen Muda Negro, O'DonncU 13, MadMd, Spain 

Filed Dec. 17, 1970, Scr. Na 99,041 

Claims priority, application Spain, Dec 30, 1969, 375038 

Int. CL BOld 27104 

MJ&. CL 210—193 7 







A filtering canister which contains a filtering medium of 
diatomaceous earth which is retained within the canister by a 
foraminous support consisting of a series of concentric trun- 
cated cones of foraminous sheet material and a fabric 
disposed between the filtering medium and the sheet materi- 
al. The innermost cone is secured at its inner edge around a 
central vertical pipe exteitding through the cover which per- 
mits the recharging of the filtering medium. Hoops are pro- 
vided to loosely retain the fabric in place in the vertices of 
the cones when flow is arrested. 



T. 



lOaim 



3,667,607 
CHROMATOGRAPHIC MATERIAL 
Marcus K. Brandt, Easton, 1*a., aarignor to J. 
Chemical Company, PhUilpaburg, Fa. 

Filcd Nov. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 93,299 
Int. CL BOld 15108 
VJ&. CL 210—198 10 1 

A thin layer chromatographic strip in the form of an ekm- 



Cup-shaped casing means inverted upon or adjacent to the gated tape carrying indicia related to chromatographic test 
ocean floor and tubular means extending upwardly from said areas, the areas being in contact with a reservoir Ux solvent. 



\ 



/ 



144 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June J5, 1972 



the combination of test areas, indicia, and reservoir being 
periodicaUy reproduced on the length of the tape, whereby 
the indicia may be used to initiate sampling, solvent applica- 




the oil riaing under the tent then collects in the peak of the 
tent whence it it conveyed upwardly by hydrostatic pressure 
through a conduit into a flexible collection receptacle. The 
apparatus may be dropped fix>m an airplane by a parachute, 
in which case the collection receptacle itself can be the 
parachute. The apparatus is buoyant yet weighted to main- 
tain an upright attitude and to position the tent at a desired 
depth 



tion, and control passage through development and drying 
stages, and initiation and termination of scanning stages, 
thereby to make possible a sequence of unrelated or related 
analyses automatically on said tape. 




Oil is removed from contaminated water by means of a 
fibrous structure of low denier polyolefin fibers attached to a 
pumping system. The polyolefin fiber structure can absorb 
many times its own weight of oil while absorbing little or no 
water. The oil is then easily removed from the fibrous struc- 
ture by pumping. 



3,667,609 

APPARATUS FOR COLLECTING OIL FROM THE 

SURFACE OF A BODY OF WATER 

Wmiain H. Dwaid, 541 Putman Rd., Rogers, Ark. 

FOcd Oct. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 80^50 

Int. a. C02b 9102 

VS. CL 210—242 



SCiabns 




Oil is collected from the surface of a body of water by im- 
mersing a tent-shaped collector just under the surface of the 
water. The wave action drives oil down below the tent, and 



1. 

APPkRAl 



\ 



3,667,610 
iTUS FOR COLLECTING OIL FROM THE 
SURFACE OF A BODY OF WATER 
wmiam H. Daniel, Route 3, Roscrs, Ark. 

I fUed Fell. 8, 1971, Scr. No. 113,254 
I Int. CL C02b 9102 

U.S. CL 210—242 



SOafam 



3,667,608 
APPARATUS FOR REMOVING OIL SPILLS FROM THE 

SURFACE OF A BODY OF WATER 
lUdpk H. Burroughs, Chapd HiD, and Paul R. Cox, Jr., Cary, 
both of N.C., a ss i gnors to Hcrcuks Incorporated, Wilming- 
ton, Dd. 

Filed Apr. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 31,472 

Int. CL E02b 15104 

U.S. CL 210-242 4ClainH 



^ 






jt 



\ 



i» 



Oil is collected from the surface of a body of water by im- 
mersing a tent-shaped collector from above the surface of the 
water to a depth such that the hydrostatic pressure of the oil 
in the collector will pump oil to an elevation above the sur- 
face of the water and into a collection receptacle. The collec- 
tor slides vertically on a conduit and delivers the oil into the 
lower end of the conduit, the lower end of the conduit being 
positioned at a depth which determines the height to which 
the oil can be pumped above the surface of the water. 



I 



3,667,611 
SWIMMING POOL LEAF TRAP 
Andrew L. Pansini, 180 Los Ccrros Drive, Grcenbrne, Snn 
Raiacl. CaHf . 

I Fled Feb. 1 1, 1970, Scr. No. 10^85 
Int. CL E03r 5104; BOld 35128 
U.S. a. 210— 244 ^ 4Clalm8 




A portable leaf trap for use with swimming pools dompris- 
ing a dome-like housing, perforate means affixed to the hous- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



145 



ing, a flexible base member extending outwardly from the 
housing, and lift means. An opening is provided in the side of 
the housing to provide communication between the outside 
of the housing and an interior defined by the perforate means 
and the housing inner surface. The leaf trap is adapted to be 
positioned over a swimming pool drain upon the floor of the 
pool with leaves and the like entering the trap interior 
through said opening. The lifting element is afFixed to the 
perforate means in the vicinity of said opening and ofliwt 
with respect to the center of gravity of the trap. When an up- 
wardly directed force is applied to the lifting element, the 
leaf trap tends to pivot therearound thus trapping the leaves 
and the like within the interior at a location remote from said 
opening. 



3,667,612 

ARTinClAL KIDNEY SYSTEM 

Joe H. Leonard, 1 105 Remington Rd., KnoxvUle, Tcnn. 

Flicd Sept. 4, 1969, Scr. No. 855,191 

Int. a. BOld 3 1/00, 13/00 

VS. CL 210-321 15 CialnH 




An open-topped, elongated, rectangular tank is mounted 
on a framework that is fitted with casters, enabling the unit 
to be moved from place to place in a hospital, clinic, or in 
the residence of a patient. The framework supports a motor 
driven recirculating pump for causing a continuous flow of a 
dialyzing fluid out of and back into the tank. A pair of clear, 
colorless elongated plates are clamped together with one or 
more lengths of clear colorless tubes of semipermeable 
material confined between them, and this assembly is im- 
mersed in the dialyzing fluid in the tank. The ends of the tube 
or tubes have connection to an artery and a vein of a patient, 
so that the patient's heart will produce a flow of his blood 
through the tubes, where toxic substances are removed from 
the blood by the dialytic action. 



3,667,613 ^ 
APPARATUS FOR HLTERING COOiONG UQUID 
Raymond H. Angold, 179 Fairway HiU Crescent, Kin^on, 
Ontario, Canada 

Continuation-in-part of application Scr. No. 716,437, Mar. 
27, 1968, now abmidoned. This application Oct. 2, 1970, Scr. 

No. 77,592 
Int. CI. BOld 25/36 
U.S. CL 210-336 16 Claims 

A filter assembly for use in apparatus for cooking food in a 
hot cooking liquid, in which the filter assembly is rotated to 
centrifiigally clean the filter medium. The filter assembly is 
particularly suitable for continuously filtering uncooked and 
partly cooked foodstuffs from the cooking liquid, and is sup- 
ported with a cooperating impervious tube spaced therefrom 
to form a receiving chamber for filtered liquid. The chamber 
is connected to a conduit for conveying the filtered liquid, 
for example, back to a supply reservoir for re-use. The filter 
medium is rnie of a cloth woven from strands or fibers of a 
fluorinated ethylene or propylene resin, a silicone-based ther- 
mosetting resin or like substance having similar non-stick and 
low friction characteristics: strands or fibers of the materials 
mentioned above pressed together into a felt-like mat struc- 
ture; or a wire screen whose wire strands are substantially 
wholly coated, preferably with tetrafluoreth)4ene, or another 
of the above resins. The filter assembly includes means for 



routably mounting the same in a housing. Preferably, at least 
one turbulence-generating bar or like structure is provided 
adjacent the filter surface. This bar creates turbulence in the 
liquid when the filter assembly is being rotated, and that tur- 



-r-Kr r ! 1 ! r ; I ^r-r^ 




bulence tends to loosen filtered material deposited on the 
filter surface and effects an auxiliary cleansing action on said 
surface. At least one filter and impervious surface arrange- 
ment is provided. Some back flushing also occurs when the 
filter assembly is cleaned. 



3,667,614 

FILTERING An>ARATUS 

Thomas R. KomUne, Gladstone, NJ., Msignor to KomHne- 

Sanderson Engineering Corporation, Pcapocfc, N J. 

Filed Feb. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 8,531 

Int a. BOld 33/14 

U.S. a. 210— 401 3ClafaM 




A rotary drum-type vacuum filter in uiiich the grids which 
support the flexible filter medium over the filtering compart- 
ments of the drum are respectively formed to provide one or 
more corrugations extending generally in the direction of the 
drum axis and defining one or more channels, said corruga- 
tions also defining valleys in addition to said channeb and 
into which the flexiMe filter mediimi is sucked during its im- 
mersion in the slurry being fihered to form corrugations in 
the filter media which mate with said valleys. Thereafter, 
when the filter medium emerges from the slurry with a filter 
cake formed thereon said mating corrugations, the channels 
are eliminated t>y removal of the filter ntedium from the 
drum for passage on to the discharge roll. Such elimination 
of the mating corrugations from the flexible filter medium 
and the resulting elongation of the filter medium rdative to 
the less flexible filter cake, facilitates the separation of the 
cake from the medium. 



146 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, i 1972 



3^7^15 

SELF-CLEANING TUBULAR SCREEN 

DavM M. I ilrw. Ariii«lMi IfclgliU , nL, ■■ignor to Univcr- 

Mri Oil Produc te Cumpamy, Do Plainw, DL 

CoiitiaiwtkMHta-p«r« of appHcatloa Scr. No. 787,708, Dec 30, 

1968, BOW PMcBt No. 3,S61,605. This appHcatloii Oct 5, 

1970, Ser. No. 77,944. The portion of the term oT the patent 

subsequent to Feb. 9, 1988, has been disclaimed. 

Int. CL BOld 29/22 

VS. CL 210—497.1 8 Clabna 




A self-cleaning tubular screen adapted for de-watering or 
classifying particulates and the method of making such 
screen. The screen embodies a slotted construction to pro- 
vide a self-cleaning "V" slot that enlarges in the outward 
radial direction. The support rods for the tubular screen are 
located on the inner periphery of the tubular screen and at- 
tached to the wide face of the wedge-shaped wire in a 
manner so as to preclude any interference with the slot open- 
ing. This is accomplished by utilizing a wire having a ridge 
portion on the wide face thereof to prevent the weld con- 
necting the wire to the rods from disturbing the edges of the 
wide face. 



3,667,616 
STRAINER 
Alex Wayne, Des Moines, Iowa, 
turing Company 

FUcd Oct. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 85,170 
Int. a. BOld 35/28 
VS. CL 210—451 



to Deiavan Manufac> 



6Claims 




A fluid strainer and method of making same comprises an 
integral one-piece body having a mounting end, a strainer 
end and a cap member, both the strainer end and the cap 
member having a cross sectional dimension smaller than that 
of the strainer element. The strainer element is slid over the 
cap member and strainer end and is brought into abutting 
relationship with a shoulder which separates the mounting 
and strainer ends and the cross sectional dimension of the 
cap member is radially expanded in cross sectional dimension 
so as to engage the strainer element and firmly position and 
retain same on the strainer body. 



and other products. These display trays are connectable with 
a movaMe frame, which swings about pivot means from a 
neutral or median position to predetermined angular posi- 
tions, in which the trays assume from a superposed and coin- 
ciding location to each other a parallel position in which the 
trays are transposed to a staggered formation or step-like 
positions, in which the articles retained on their successive 
trays, are exposed to view with their front and/or rear por- 
tions, as desired. 




The trays of the display device may be adjusted and fixed 
in any desired parallel position to each other whereby any 
further parallel movement of the trays may be impeded. The 
arrangement of the frame of the device and its parts may also 
be carried out, so that the framework is subdivided and 
guidance of the trays occurs in a manner that, e.g., one or 
more selected upper trays are displaced to an extreme for- 
ward and parallel position, while one or more of selected 
lower trays are guided to likewise take up an extreme for- 
ward parallel position, whereas the remaining trays assume 
other non-coexterudve or non-equidistant but parallel posi- 
tions. 



3,667,618 
MECHANISM FOR UFTING AND CONVEYING 
MATERIEL 
Peter H. Bcftoln, AroMla, Orilf., avignor to General Con- 
veyor, Inc., B Monte, CaMf. 

FDcd Ai«. 19, 1969, Ser. No. 851^356 

Int. CL B65g 1/06 

VS. CL 212—128 1 Claim 



3,667,617 
TILTABLE RACK OR DISPLAY DEVICE 
Jerry Cohn, 1546 BnMdway, New Yorii, N.Y. 

Filed July 23, 1970, Ser. No. 57>«7 

IafLCLA47t3/I4 

U.S. CL 21 1—128 12 Oainv 

The inventicm has reference to tiltable and adjustable 
racks, carriers and like display devices equipped with shelves 
or trays for carrying articles, e.g., samples of fabrics, tiles. 





^ 




nA 


--5^^ 


mr- 


« ' 

£ 


i?^ 


--^rv^- 




I 




<« 




a 
* 




Mi- 




« 
4 


—J 




\ 


' 


% 

l" 


;<!s<j r- 


y 



An overhead travelling crane movable along a path of 
travel, and also from side to side along the path has fixed to it 
a depending boom or mast which carries a movable section 
which caa be raised and lowered to pick up materiel from 
either side of the path by means of a fork-like device near the 
bottom of the movable section. In the usual arrangement 
there are two such masts provided with lifting forks spaced 
apart from each other along the path, such that the forks can 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



147 



lift the two ends of cylindrical or pipe-like objects having 
cylindrical or tubular end members which can be grasped by 
the two spaced forks. ObjecU thus lifted by the forks can be 
carried along the path to some other location. A guide means 
equipped with wheels and rollers provides ease of movement 
of the movable mast sections up and down the fTxed inast 
section without binding even under eccentric loading.^ 



3,667,619 
STEM FEED ARRANGEMENT 
Thorc UndMon, Alfta, Sweden, aidgnor to Oitbcrgs Fabriks 
AB, AHta, Sweden 

Filed Aug. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 62,087 
-Claims priority, application Sweden, Nov. 28, 1969, 16399 

Int CL B65g 61/00 
VS. CL 214—1 PB 1 Claim 




Felled trees were heretofore fed by a crane one by one to a 
working unit. This method implied poor utilization of the 
crane capacity. At the invention the upper part of an inclined 
sliding chute serves as a buffer space for trees into which a 
crane can load the entire tree bundle and during the intervals 
carry out other useful work. The bufTer store of trees rests 
against the inside of the longer arm of an unequally armed 
angular lever, which with its comer is mounted at the sliding 
chute. By turning upwardly the shorter arm of the angular 
lever the tree located closest is taken along and by a full turn 
of the lever lifted over to the lower part of the chute on 
which it slides down to the unit. Thereafter the lever is swung 
into the opposite direction back to its original position for re- 
peating the batching operation. 



3,667,620 
SELF-CONTAINED UNLOADING APPARATUS 
Harry Steiro, Madison, Wis., assignor to Wisconsin Foundry 
and Machine Conpwiy, Madison, Wb. 

Filed Oct. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 82,359 

Int. a. B60p 1/48 

U.S.CL214-tlP SClainH 




A material handling unit for detachable ctmnection to the 
rear end of a vehicle and which permits gravitational unload- 
ing of heavy objects such as heavy concrete pipes from the 



bed of a truck. The unit is self-contained and can be easily 
attached to or detached from the vehicle. The unit contains 
ite own hydraulic system including the extensible cylinders, 
fluid pump, reservoir and control apparatus. 



3,667,621 

FLUID POWER SYSTEM FOR A SELF-CONTAINED 

UNLOADING UNIT 

Everett P. Bwlow, Cambridge, Wb., Msignor to Wisconsin 

Foundry and Machine Compw^y, Madison, Wis. 

Filed Oct. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 82,449 

Int. CL B60p 1/48 

VS. a. 214—1 P 4 ciain« 




A precharged, closed circuit, fluid power system for a 
material handling unit which permits controlled gravitational 
unloading of heavy objects such as heavy concrete pipes 
from the bed of a truck. The system comprises extensible 
cylinders, fluid pump, reservcHT and control apparatus. 



3,667,622 

METHOD OF AND MEANS FOR STACKING MOULDED 

ARTICLES IN GROUPS 

Hermann Kamphues, Rhcine, and Hans-Jurgen Rosengartcn, 

Georgsmarienhutte, both of Germany, anignors to C 

Keller & Co., Laggenbeck, Germany 

Filed Jan. 5, 1971, Ser. No. 104,035 
Claims priority, application Germany, Aug. 17, 1970, P 20 40 

8133 

Int. CL B65g 57/26 

VS. CL 214-6 A 5 claims 



'\J|-» 



n 



iL 



ffll 



^ 






I— i 



Moulded articles such as bricks are arranged in a plurality 
of aligned rows side by side on a conveyor belt. The rows are 
transferred to a second belt and have their spacing adjusted. 
The articles are then seized in a group and lifted off the belt, 
turned through 1 80* and deposited on a next group dt arti- 
cles to form a two-tier set-up. This is then transferred by a 
gripping device to a firing carriage. 



3,667,623 
EDGER STACKER 
John R. Frailer, Dayton, and Larry D. Longstrcth, WHmii^ 
ton, both of Ohio, assl^piors to The National Ovh Rcgtatcr 
Company, Dayton, Ohio 

FUcd Sept. 4, 1970, Scr. No. 69,559 

Int CLB65g 57/00 

U.S.CL 214-7 3Clabm 

An edger-sucker apparatus for stacking letter mail on a 

long lower edge of the letters. The apparatus includes a pair 



148 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



of input belts which deliver letters to an entry point, whence 
they are deflected by a first portion of a stacking plate sup- 
ported on a table to a stack of letters already stacked by the 
apparatus. The stacking plate has a second portion upstand- 
ing from the table, which portion has an opening therein. A 
pusher plate passes through the second portion to push the 
stack of letters (already stacked) away from the second por- 
tion to provide a clearance for the next approaching letter to 




be inserted between the stack and the second portion of the 
stacking plate. As the pusher plate advances out of the open- 
ing in the second portion of the stacking plate, it moves the 
nearest letter in the stack towards an edger plate to '^'edge" 
the letter. An orbital-type drive is used to drive the pusher 
plate and create a vibration on the table, which facilitates 
edging of the letters. 



3,667,624 
CASSETTE-TAPE SUPPLYING APPARATUS 
Mitsuo Ogura, Odawara, awl Shiiiichi Fukaiawa, Chigasaki, 
both of Japan, anigiion to Hitachi, Ltd., Toltyo, Japan 

Filed Jan. 28, 1971, Scr. No. 110,476 

Clainu priority, application Japan, Jan. 30, 1970, 45/771 1 

Int. CLB65g 60/00 

U.S. CL 2 14—8.5 A 3 dainv 




A cassette-tape supplying apparatus permitting a continu- 
ous recording or reproduction of a number of cassette tapes, 
which is constructed such that a number of cassettes are set 
upright on an input hopper and that they are fed under the 
upright state in the order of the first, second and third hol- 
ders to be outputted from said third holder, and in which said 
second holder is adapted, upcm swivelling, to mount said cas- 
settes onto at least one deck. 



to Tiw Goodyear 



3,667,625 
DUNNAGE DEVICE 
Gcorfe A. Lucaa, Rodonart, Ga., iwiflnr 
Tire St Rubiicr Company, Alaron, Oido 

Filed Aug. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 61,161 
Int CL B65g 1/14 
VS. CL 214—10.5 D 13 

An inflatable, bladderless dunnage device of economical 
construction for shoring merchandise in a storage compart- 



ment. The member includes a unitary body and valve means 
connected therewith. The body is formed of a laminate of 
pressure-retaining, flexible material including a layer or sheet 
of flexible polymeric material and a layer of open mtah tex- 
tile fabric covering at least substantially the entire outer sur- 
face of the polymeric material layer. The polymeric material 




fills the openings or interstices of the fabric layer to form a 
bond therewith capable of withstanding at least low to inter- 
mediate pressure when the member is inflated. Preferably the 
polymeric material is at least substantially air impervious and 
the textile fabric layer is preferably of a leno weave construc- 
tion. 



3,667,626 
SEALING MEANS 
Aldo TordU, and Andre Jacqucmct, both of Crand^Lancy, 
Geneva, Switacriand, aasiffiori to Sandco Limited, (Mtawa, 



Filed July 31, 1969, Scr. No. 846,366 

Claims priority, application Switaerland, Aug. 1, 1968, 

115550/68; May 13, 1969, 7327/69 

Int. CL F26b 25/00 

VS. CL ai4— 17 B 11 




ClainH 



In a sealing means between two ntembers that are movable 
in relation to each other, one of the members having a seal- 
ing ridge which ridge is movable towards the other of said 
members forming a slit therewith, the sealing ridge is pro- 
vided with a surface facing said other member, said surface 
being parallel with the surface of said other member, means 
are provided for biasing the sealing ridge in the direction 
towards said other member. 



3,667,627 

FEED ARRANGEMENT FOR A COMBUSTION FURNACE 

Joluuuica Joaef Martin, and Erich Weber, both of Mimchen, 

Germany, aMignori to Joaef Martin Fcvcrungsbau GmbH, 

Munchen, Germany 

Filed Dec. 29, 1969, Scr. No. 888,483 
Clainu priority, application Germany, Dec 30, 1968, P 18 17 

436.2 
Int. CL B65f 25/08; F23k 3/12 
VS. CL U4—23 9\ Clafam 

The lower open end of an upstanding supply chute com- 
municates with the upper surfaces of two pairs of stepwise ar- 
ranged and partly "bverlapping upper pushing members and 



J 



I 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



149 



tower supportmg members for transferring to the same com- neutral position when the emergency brakes of the vehicle 
bustible material. The respective elements are upwardly arc applied; and means is responsive to the shifting of the 
mclmed relaUve to the horizontal and towards the furnace in- transmission to neutral position to increase the speed of the 





14 




let, and with the pushing elements reciprocable relative to 
the supporting elemenu towards and away from the furnace 
inlet so as to stepwise displace the combustible material from 
the support surfaces into the furnace. 



vehicle engine to provide sufficient torque for operating a 
hydraulic pump in connection with the vehicle engine for 
delivering sufficient power to operate the trash packer 
mechanism of the trash collection vehicle. 



3,667,628 
APPARATUS FOR LOADING PALLETS 
Friedrich Gabler, and Arthur Giordan, both of Stuttgart- 
Muhlhausen, Germany, aalgnors to Carl Drohmann 
GmbH, Stuttgart-Bad Canmtatt, Germany 

Filed Jan. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 5,598 
Claims priority, application Germany, Feb. 5, 1969, P 19 05 
^ 714.8 

Int. CLB65g 5 7/26 
U.S. CL 214-6 DK 3 QainK 



2i^2)K27Z3^Hti^2Ht2S»^ /H^/ 



3,667,630 

AUTOMOBILE TOWING ASSEMBLY 

Albert Rockwood Scott, 287 Wycfawood Ave, Toronto, On- 

tairo, Canada 
Contfaiuation of a p pH c nrto n Scr. No. 808,414, Mar. 19, 1969, 
now abandoned. This applcation July 20, 1970, Scr. No. 

64.016 
Claims priority, application Great BriUin, Mar. 21, 1968, 

13,638/68 
Int. CL B60p 3/12 
VS. CL 214—86 A I6 



♦ yrfi*) 





-M 7 « 



In an apparatus for loading pallets comprising a conveyor 
by which objects are introduced to the loading zone, and a 
ram for transferring such objects sideways on to a carrier 
which can be retracted to deposit the objects on to a waiting 
pallet, the use of a multi-part carrier associated with stop 
means to allow for size-adjustment and squaring-up at all 
four sides of an assembly of objects on the carrier. 



A standard automobile or truck is ctMivertible to a towing 
vehicle by the easy installation (and removal) of a frame to 
which is connected a derrick, source of power, rotataUe 
draw-bar system, sling unit and rotatably liftable load bearing 
towing wheel arrangement which is lockable in lowered 
operating position and elevated by the rotation into the verti- 
cal out-of-use po«itipn-of said draw system. 




3,667,629 

CONTROL AND POWER APPARATUS FOR OPERATING 

TRASH COLLECTKN^ VEHICLE PACKERS 

Frands X. La Voie, 2818 North 51 Street, Phoenix, Ariz. 
Hied Feb. 16, 1971, Scr. No. 115,188 
Int. CLB6« J/00 
U.S. CL 214-833 9Clafans 

A control and power apparatus for operating trash collec- 
tion vehicle packers wherein a trash collecting vehicle is pro- 
vided with a chassis and wheels driven by an engine carried 
on the chassis and wherein emergency brakes for the wheels 
are manually controlled and wherein means is provided for 
automatically shifting the transmission of the vehicle to 



3,667,631 

HYDRAUUC UTIUTY LIFT PC« TRUCKS 

Jcrald W. BMmp, 1506 Highway 56, Dodge City, Kam. 

Filed Jan. 22, 1971, Ser. No. 106,777 

Int. CL B66c 7/00, B66f 3/00 

VS. CL 214—86 A 8 < 

A hydraulic utility lift for pick-up trucks and other vehicles 
consisting of a frame adapted to be mounted under the rear 
portion of the truck bed and carrying a lift arm operable to 
lift a load disposed rearwardly of said truck as said arm is 
pivoted from a downwardly and rearwardly inclined position 
to a substantially horizontal position, a hydraulic ram for 
pivoting said arm, and a linkage operatively connecting said 
ram to said arm, said linkage having a novel arrangement 
whereby it both converts horizontal movements of said ram 



150 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



to vertical movement lifting said arm, whereby said ram may bucket mounted on an earth handling apparatus. The bucket 
be elevated to preserve better ground clearance for said lift, thereby is quickly converted to a fork lift having ^1 the 




M^».W^.WWW.l.^VW»».WIi 



w\wAuw i wvwwwww«ww.'.mwwiiwi»mwimu^uki.>.>.w.wmwwu 



and also provides a more uniform power ratio for said ram, 
permitting economies in the design of said ram. 



3,667,632 
FLOOR CRANE 
Anthony CHfrord Tidswdl, 18, Ncne Road, Huntinsdon, 
Hundngdonshire, England 

^ Filed Jan. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 3,541 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Jan. 21, 1969, 

3,391/69 

Int. a. B66c 23100 

MS. CL 214—130 R 2 Oafam 




A floor crane having a wheeled base with an upright sup- 
port pivoted to one end thereof, a jib pivoted to the upper 
end of the upright support and a fluid ram interconnecting 
the upright support and jib such that the upright support can 
be disposed parallel with the base with the jib and fluid ram 
substantially disposed therebetween. 




movements imparted to the bucket for lifting and conveying 
a load. 



3,667,634 
INSTRUMENT FOR PRESENTING AN OBJECT TQ BE 

VIEWED 

Raymond-Gerard Potterat, 6, Avenue da Alpcs, 1006 
Lausanne, Vaud, Swltaeriand | 

Filed Sept. 30, 1970, Scr. No. 76,775 | 

Clainw priority, application Switzerland, Oct. 1, 1969, 
I 13248/69 L 

I Int. CL B65g 7/(70 I 

VS. a. 214—340 ^ 10 Clabm 



I* i 19 W 




md±A 



k .< I 1 1 



^\7^ 



A device for presenting an article to be viewed, with an 
elongated support and means mounted thereon for holding 
and rotating the article. These means are actuated at distance 
and at will, without cutting the field oLview. 



I 



3,667,635 
COMBD^EO TRUCK BODY AND WHEELED RACK AND 

METHOD OF LOADING AND UNLOAMNG A VAN 
Ralph H. Hackney, Waridi^ton, N.C., aMignor to J. A. 
Hackney & Sons, Inc. I 

Original application July 14, 1969, Scr. No. 841,529,'now 
Patent No. 3,572,815, dated Mar. 30, 1971. DIvkled and thta 
Application D«^ 3, 1970, Scr. No. 94^66 | 
' Int CL B60p 1164 I 



U.S.CL2 



3,667,633 
FORK LIFT ATTACHMENT 
Michael Cappdla, Lancaster, N.Y., aarignor to Scrgi Bros., 
IoCm Dcpcw, N.Y. 

FBed July 29, 1970, Scr. No. 59,184 

Int CL B66f 9100 

U.S. CL 214—145 4 Oafam 

A pair of fork lift elements are clamped at their rear ends A combined van type truck body and a wheeled rack or 
in laterally spaced relation between pivotal segments of a cart of a size commensurate with the internal dimensions of 



4—515 




June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



151 



the body to be loaded into or removed from the body 
through rear access doors with the body also including roll- 
up type overhead doors along each side thereof to enable ac- 
cess to both longitudinal sides of the rack or cart throughout 
the longitudinal dimension thereof so that items to be 
delivered may be unloaded from either side of the body at 
any point throughout the longitudinal length and vertical 
height thereof so that non-deliverable items may remain in 
the body without hindering delivery of items at subsequent 
delivery sites thereby enabling a novel method of loading and 
unloading a van body to be effectively practiced. 



3,667,636 
SAFETY-CLOSURE DEVICE 
William James Landen, Cheshire, Conn., assignor to Eyelet 
Spcciahy Company, WalHngford, Conn. 

Filed Nov. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 92,728 

Int CI. A61J 1100 

U.S. CL 215-9 21 Claims 




The invention contemplates selectively openable closure 
means that is tamper-proof, in the sense that a correct 
sequence of two deliberate and independent movements of 
two parts is necessary in order to achieve access to the con- 
tents of the bottle or the like which is protected by the clo- 
sure. / 

The specific construction that is described involves a bottle 
with a neck having a circular opening, and a closure cap hav- 
ing a cylindrical wall to overlap and lock to the outer surface 
of the neck. The closed end of the cap has an axially tapering 
yieldable section which engages the circular neck opening in 
the course of closing the bottle. The nature of the lock is 
such as to preload the yieldable engagement and to utilize 
the resilient action to retain the lock and to establish a liquid 
seal of the bottle contents. 



^^ 3,667,637 

SAFETY DEVICE FOR FLIP CAP CLOSURE 
Richard B. Bagguley, Dolton, and Carmen T. Mwda, 

Westchester, both of Dl., assignors to Contfaiental Can Com- 
pany, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

FUed Dec 14, 1970, Scr. No. 97^73 

Int CL A61J 1100; B65d 55102 

U.S.CL 215-9 4Clafam 



2«j 
S6^25.So' 
32 



^ ^W^M k 



/'• K 




A flexible safety shield for preventing the opening of a flip 
cap closure until the shield is depressed. 



3,667,638 
LEVER OPENED SEALED CONTAINER 
Orlando D. CamUo, Jr., Chio^o, IB., assignor to Abbott 
Laboratories, North Chicago, DL 

FDcd Dec 1 1, 1969, Scr. Na 884,086 

Int CL B65d 1102 

US. CL 215—32 1 cinini 




In containers having an integrally molded cap and sealing 
web, an integral handle, preferably on the mold parting line 
and extending from the cap, enables cap removal with low 
force. A fulcrum, within or without the container, cooperates 
with the handle to open the container. 



3,667,639 
LINED HOLLOW WOOD BCH>Y 
Arthur P. PCdL Akron, N.Y., assignnr to Arrow Tank Com- 
pany Inc., Buffakt, N.Y. 

Filed June 30, 1970, Scr. No. 51,122 
Int a. B65d 9/00. 9134 
MS. CL 217—4 R 6 




A lined hollow wood body formed of a plurality of staves, 
each of which is covered across its inner surface and edge 
faces by a plastic liner mechanically locked in place by the 
mating edges of adjacent suve sections. A bottom wall hav- 
ing a plastic liner on the inner surface thereof is secured to 
the inner side of the body in a fluid tight relation. Also, an 
annular seal is interposed between an atmular riKHilder on 
the bottom wall and the inner side of the body to form a 
second sealing means therebetween. 



3,667,640 

CONDUIT PLUG 

Joseph G. Morrow, P. O. Box 21 1, East Patcrson, N J. 

Contfaiuation of application Scr. No. 778,499, Nov. 25, 1968, 

now abandoned. This appikatlon July 13, 1970, Scr. No. 

56,215 
Int CL B65d 39112 
MS. CL 220-24.5 6 Clafam 

A plug assembly for sealing the open end of a conduit, 
which assembly includes a resilient plug on the opposite sides 
of which are disposed a pair of plates which are drawn 
toward one another to apply pressure to the plug sandwiched 
therebetween. Under pressure, the plug expands into sealing 
relationship with the interior of the conduit. The plug in- 
cludes angularly oriented side surface areas which are en- 
gaged by similarly oriented portions of the side plates such 
that pressure developed between the plates is laterally dis- 
tributed across the thickness of the plug whereby an area 



I 



152 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE ,|^; 



June 6,11972 



contact of engagement can be established between the 
perimeter of the plug and the interior of the conduit. Alter- 
natively, or in addition thereto, a central side surface of the 
plug is concavely bowed with respect to a central plane 



^ti?l-r'H^K'• 




rotatable upper and threaded lower cap parts assembled 
together ooaxially and having a resilient drive connection 
between them capable of transmitting a predetermined max- 
imum torque between the upper and lower cap parts in the 
closing direction. When during the screwing on of the cap 
onto the neck of a container or filling spout by the manual 
application of closing torque to the upper cap part, directly 
the closure cap reaches a certain degree of tightness on the 
cooperating part of the conuiner or spout such that the 
predetermined transmitted closing torque is exceeded, the 
resilient drive connection yields ratchetwise to allow the con- 



J4> M 'S4 



thereof such that a flat central mating portion of the 
cooperating plate member, when applied thereto, will 
esublish an area contact of engagement between the central 
portion of the thickness of the perimeter of the plug and the 
interior of the conduit. 




3,667,641 
RESERVOIR COVER ARRANGEMENT 
Howard S. Dial, Valley Cral Rd^ Lebanon, N J. 
FUed Mar. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 15,439 
-- lot CL B6Sd 87118 

MS. CL 220-26 S 



4Claiim 




tinued free rotation of the upper cap part relatively to the 
threaded lower cap part. In this way excessive tightening of 
the closure, such as would lead to difficulty in loosening it 
manually, is prevented. The resilient drive connection may 
comprise a disc having oblique spring tongues engaging 
ratchetwise in cooperating recess for example in the interior 
of a hollow pressed-out hand grip portion on the upper cap 
part; or spring-loaded ball catches cooperating with recesses; 
or dog-like projections with oblique or rounded faces 
cooperating with recesses; or oblique spring tongues engag- 
ing behind rigid projections. 



I 3,667,643 

EASY-LIFT PULL TAB 
Anilkumar J. Patd, Chicago, 01., awlgnor to Continent Can 
Conpaay, lac. New Ydirk, N.Y. 

I filed Dec 28, 1970, Scr. No. 101,694 

^ UM. a B65d 77/20 

U.S.CL220— 54 3JCIaimB 



A reservoir is provided with a flexible, floating, cover 
secured to the sides of the reservoir along a line located 
between the anticipated upper and lower levels which water 
or other liquid in the reservoir may assume whereby the 
cover will remain in contact with the surface of the liquid as 
its level fluctuates up and down. A drain extending through 
the wall of the reservoir is arranged to draw off any rain or 
melted snow accumulating on the upper surface of the cover. 




A pull tab for an easy opening container. The pull tab is of 
the type having a pair of fulcrum leg?. The fulcrum legs are 
each formed with an extension of single layer of sheet metal 
which projectt outwardly of the fulcrum ends of the legs. 



3,667,642 
SCREW-ON CLOSURE MEMBERS FOR CONTAINERS, 

ETC. 
Werner Blau, and Theo Gcrdes, both of Langenfcld/Rhineland, 
Germany, n wl g nor s to Blau KG Fabrlk Fur Kraftfahraeug- 
teiie, Langenfeld-Immigrath/Rhineland and Volkswagen- 
werk AG( Wolfsburg, Germany 

FHcd Dec 2, 1970, Scr. No. 94,410 
Claims priority, appttcatioa Germany, Dec 3, 1969, P 19 60 

674.7 

Int.CLB65d-4//04 

U.S. CL 220—39 R 15 Claims 

A screw-on closure cap for closing the filling opening of a 

container or a tubular spout, the cap comprising relatively 



3,667,6^4 

REVERSING RUPTURE DISC FOR PROTECTING 
EQUIPMENT FROM EXCESSIVE PRESSURE AND 
METHOD OF MANUFACTURE 
Manfred Fortnann, Bcnsberg, Germany, assignor to In- 
teratom IntematkHule Atomreaktorbau Gmbl^ Bcn- 
sbcrg/Cologne, Germany I 

Filed May 22, 1970, Ser. No. 39,78 1 I 
Claims priority, application Germany, May 24, 1969, P 19 26 
I 706.2 

I Int. CI. B65d 25100 \ 

U.S. CI. 220-89 A 14 Claims 

A reversing rupture disc assembly for protecting a vessel or 
other apparatus from excessive pressure has a carrier ring 
mounuMe in the apparatus and a reversing rupture disc 
tightly positioned in the ring. The disc has a curvature ob- 
tained by imparting a force thereto so as to strain the materi- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



1S8 



al from which the disc is made. The disc is disposed in the 
ring, so that the convex surface of the disc is directed toward 
the pressure. The disc has a weak buckling zone located in 
the mid-region of the disc, whereby the disc buckles inwardly 
and ruptures in response to the excessive pressure, the disc 
deviating from a spherical form at the mid-region, so that the 
radius of curvature of the disc decreases going from the mid- 



bracket having an upwardly projecting yielding clip whereby 
an elongated item may be releasably held by the clips in a 





position close to the body of the lunch 'box and extending 
longitudinally thereof below the cover. 



region to the edge of the disc and, so th at the sector angle ^ 
of the disc is greater than 3.82 VS/R. where S is the disc 
thickness and R is the average radius of curvature of the disc. 
The material of which the disc is made has a positive stress- 
strain curve after undergoing the strain required to obtain the 
curvature, the curve having a slope dcr/dc greater than about 
lOOkgf/mm*. 



3,667,645 

COVER AND KN(» ASSEMBLY FOR A COFFEE 

PERCCXJiTCNt 

MOton Emmcr, 2171 Bn«g St^ Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Filed June 17, 1970, Scr. Na 46,896 

Int.CLA47Ji;/a4 

U.S. a. 220—82.5 9 dafam 



3,667,647 

HOLDER FOR A NUMBER OF ASSOOATED 

INDIYIDUAL CONTAINERS 

Lcendcrt Van DmIcii, SUdMrvccr, NcthcriuKk, asrignor to N. 

V. PiMtic Indintrle Van Dnalen, Sttedraeht, NcUicriandB 

Filed. Mar. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 20,741 
Claims priority, application Ncthcriandi, Mar. 26, 1969, 
I 6904643 
Int'CL B65d 69100, 21/02 
VS. CL 220—23.4 



«^ij 





to .12 


'*^ -^ { 


1 • »"^ ' 


.1, ., ll 






A stackable holder for a number of individual containers, 
for vegeubles and fruit, with a plate which carries the con- 
tainers by their bottom and is provided with openings and 
raised parte to ventilate the contente of the containers. 

A cover and knob assembly for a cofifee percolator; the ^~~~'^^'^"~^~ 

cover having an opening for the knob. The knob comprises a 3,667,648 

hollow body closed at one end and open at its other and has SLIP OUT GLASS PANEL FOR COVER MEMBER 

ite closed end section projecting from and overlying the Walter Koziol, RumcU, DL, aarignor to Beatrice Foods Co., 
edges of the cover opening and its open end section extend- Chicago, lU. 

ing through the cover opening. The open end section has op- Filed July 6, 1970, Ser. No. 52^90 

positely laterally facing detent projections at its bonom. A U- InL CL B65d 43/12 

shaped spring clip having arcuate sides with the altitude of U.S. CL 220—41 9 rt ^fi^n i 

the arcs greater than the distance between the projections ", _ '* .»o 

and the underside of the cover, supported on the projections 
by the convex edges of the arcuate portions of its sides, with 
the ends of the sides resiliently pressing against the underside 
of the cover. 



3,667,646 
AUXILIARY CARRIER FOR PORTABLE BOXES 
Edwin R Graf, W187, 56876 Jewd Crcit Drive, Muskego, 
Wk. 

FUed Aug. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 65,967 

Int. CL B65d 25/00; A45c 13/40 

VS. CL 220—85 R 3 ClainH 

A pair of comer brackets are removably strapped to 

spaced comers of the main body portion of a lunch box, each 




A cover member for a cooking unit wherein a panel can be 
inserted and removed without fastening means or the 



154 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



,1, 



removal or the moving of any parts in the cover member. A 
frame is provided with an opening to receive a panel which is 
formed in two different planes and preferably, substantially 
L-shaped. The frame contains two pairs of oppositely 
disposed and spaced flanges, the lower pair supporting the 
panel in its one dimension and a base or ledge portion which 
supports the panel in its second and shorter dimension. 



3,667,649 

CLOSURE DEVICE FtNl SEALING AN OPENING IN A 

WALL OF A PRESSURIZABLE CHAMBER 

Gcorgci IMHct, 26, nw Edouurd ValHaiit, GrenoUe (iMre), 

France 

Filed Nov. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 86,182 

Claim priority, appMctlon France, Nov. 5, 1969, 6938066 

Int. CL A47J 36/10 

VS. a. 220—55 Y 5 Claim 



sembly with a base plate and a cover plate connected to each 
other but spaced apart. One of two shorter plates of the sub- 
assembly hai a lateral extension that passes out a longitudinal 
slot in the casing for external manual movement of that plate. 
That shorter plate has an intermediate boss routably mount- 
ing a gear that is also routed during this movement relative 
to the base plate by engagement seriatim with dents in a 
flange of the base plate. Diagonally opposite that engagement 
the gear during rotation and linear movement engages 
seriatim openings in a depending flange of the other shorter 
plate to move it and its article-pushing finer flange a greater 
distance to move an article partially out of the casing. 




' 3,667,651 

DEVICE FOR DERIVING LIMITED REdPROCATT^G 

MOTION FROM ROTATIONAL MOTION 

Jusdn J. Shapiro, 1802 Second St., Berkeley, CaUf. 

Filed Dec. 1 1, 1970, Scr. No. 97,1 13 

Int. CI. B67d 5/08; F16d 71/00 

VS. CI. 22»— 63 13 CWms 



The combination of a pressurizable chamber and a closure 
device comprised of a closure member operable to close an 
opening in a wall of the chamber, a sealing member operable 
to seal the opening when the closure member is disposed in 
the opening and a plurality of locking members movable 
radially outwardly of the opening so as to lock the closure 
member against movement outwardly of the opening due to 
pressurization of the chamber; the locking members when in 
their locking position abutting the closure member and hav- 
ing portions thereof engaging in corresponding recesses in 
that portion of the wall surrounding the opening. The locking 
members may be moved automatically by means of jacks. 




3,667,650 

IHSra74SING PACKAGE AND SUBASSEMBLY 

THEREFOR 

RIcvdo Noda, 802 Zenoiiia St, Denver, Colo., and Manuel R. 

Espino, Apt. 2, 277 Silver Ct., Elgin, Dl. 

ContinuatfoD-in-port of application Ser. No. 820,825, May 1, 

1969, now Patent No. 3^558,008. This application Dec 21, 

1970, Scr. No. 100,173 

Int CL B65g 59/06 

U.S. CL 221—250 12 Claim 



A device for deriving limited reciprocating motion from a 
bi-directioaal electric motor. The device is employed, for ex- 
ample, to reciprocate the plunger of a liquid dispensing pipet 
to dispense a measured amount of liquid with each reciproca- 
tion. The motor drives the plunger upwardly, drawing liquid 
reagent into the pipet, until an adjustable stop carried by the 
plunger engages the top flange of the pipet barrel. This 
causes the motor to reverse and move the plunger 
downwardly to its bottom limiting position, discharging the 
measured amount of reagent into a collection receptacle. 



METHi 




3,667,652 
lOD AND APPARATUS FOR SEPARATELY 
PACKAGING TWO LIQUIDS WHICH ARE TO BE 
SIMULTANEOUSLY DISPENSED | 

Bruno Moranc, Paris; ManHo MaurcOi, Vanjoura; Cluuics 
PaoictU, Aurinay Sous Bois; Louis Merricn, Fontcnay Sous 
Bob, and Robert Sathicq, VIDcpintc, all of France, assignors 
to L'OrcBl, Paris, France 

FiledDec. 1,1969, Ser. No. 881,081 | 

Claims ttiority, application France, Dec. 10, 1968, 177518; 
I May 13, 1969, 6915369 

■^ Int. a. B67d 5/60^ f 

VS. CL 222-145 21 CUdm 




A dispensing package has a casing from which packaged 
articles are partially removed in sequence by each cycle of Two liquids are stored in a single jacket on opposite sides 
the operation within the casing of components of a subas- of a plug of compressible material. The fluids are nuxcd by 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



155 



applying fluid pressure to compress the plug and the mixture tion, a moveable framework is provided which enables the 
is then dispensed through a valve or nozzle in the jacket. Tfie 
pressure may be supplied by actuating a piston or by releas- 
ing a compressed fluid into the jacket, or both. 



3,667,653 
DOSAGING DEVICE FCHt VISCOUS SUBSTANCES 
Horst LocwenthaL TIcngen, Germany, assignor to Schwe- 
izerische Induatrie-GcMllschaft, Ncuhausen am Rhelnfall, 
Switzerland 

Filed July 15, 1970, Ser. No. 55,087 

Claims priority, application Switzerland, July 16, 1969, 

10861/69 

Int a. GOlf 13/00 

VS. a. 222-217 1 Claim 





applicator device to be adjusted in both vertical and horizon- 
tal directions. 



29 20 20 20 20 



The dosaging device comprises rotary slide valve in the 
housing of which is arranged a rotatable cylindrical main 
cock which is -combined with an independently rotatable aux- 
iliary cock, both of which arc rotatable about the same 
horizontal axis. The main cock is provided with a plurality of 
axially alined chambers which open toward the circum- 
ference of the cock and are adapted to communicate with an 
inlet aperture in the housing. Each chamber extends over a 
sector angle of about 180° along the perimeter of the main 
cock. In each chamber extends a displacement sector extend- 
ing over a sector angle of 9(f and forming a part of the aux- 
ihfuy cock whose other part is formed by a shaft about which 
the main cock is rotatable relatively to the auxiliary cock. 
The housing has two parallel rows of outlet apertures con- 
nectable with the containers which receive the dosages ex- 
pelled by the cooperation of the two cocks from the cham- 
bers in the main cock. 



3,667,654 
MATERIAL APPUCATOR DEVICE 
Percy Ray HoUey, 1507 SlegMed SL, Victoria, Tex. 
Filed May 21, 1970, Ser. No. 39317 
Int. CL GOlf 77/20 
U.S. CI. 222—336 5 ClainK 

A support is rotatably mounted within a housing one side 
of which is open. A plurality of propelling arms are each 
swingably mounted by the support and are resiliently biased 
in one direction. The support is rotated during operation to 
cause the arms to be alternately cocked and released to 
propel material onto a suitable surface. Feed means is pro- 
vided for feeding material to the propelling arms and the 
device is adjustable both in elevation and azimuth. In addi- 



ERRATUM 

For Class 222 — 4-12 see: 
Patent No. 3,667,665 



3,667,655 

METHOD FOR THE RAPID ASSEMBLY OF DIPTUBES 

INTO SPRAY CANS AND A DIPTUBE USEFUL THEREIN 

Herman Kniericm, Jr., BaUwin, Mo., Mnignttr to The Dow 

Chemical Company, Midland, Mich. 

Flied Mar. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 23,600 

Int a. B67d 5/60; B65b 3/04 

VS. CL 222-464 u Claim 




Method for the rapid assembly of long flexible diptubes 
into spray cans wherein the diptube is fixed into a coiled con- 
figuration prior to its insertion into the spray can and regains 
its normal shape after assembly. 



3,667,656 

EXTENSIBLE SPOUTS FOR CONTAINERS 

John J. De Putron, 5098 Seven Oaks Station, Detroit, Mich. 

Filed Sept. 17. 1969, Scr. No. 858,726 

Int. a. B67d 3/00 

U.S. CL 222-524 16Clafan 




A container having an extensible dispensing spout A cap is 
removaUy secured to the container and to the spout to seal 



1 



156 OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 6j 1972 

the spout within the container in retracted position and to be I 3,667^9 

used for extending the spout without touching it by hand. TELESCOPING DRAPERY PROCESSING MACHINE 

Vcnw P. Chmfl, P. O. Wax 9922, SmcnmnHo, C^U. 

Flkd May 17, 1971, Scr. No. 143,905 
3,667,657 Int. CL A41h 43/00; DO^ 1/00, 1/IO i 

MSPOSABLE COtfT/JNER MS. CL 223—32 1 1 Oaiam 

Marcdo CMquiar-AriaB, IiMiir«eiitM Sw 403 1st floor, Mex- 
ico City, Mexico 

Flkd ScpC 29, 1969, Scr. No. 861,841 

Claim priority, a pp Hct io n Mexico, Jan. 2, 1969, 108027 

Int. a.B65d 47/70 

U.S. CL 222—541 5 Claims 



t-d. 



.1 



'i-. 



V 



A prophylactic, dosified, disposable syringe includes a con- 
tainer comprising a cylinder composed of material capable of 
being cut, a piston operable in the cylinder for expelling the 
contained dosage, and means operable upon ejecting move- 
ment of said piston for cutting the wall of the cylinder to 
preclude reuse thereof. 



3,667,658 

UQUID DISPENSER WITH SEPARABLY ATTACHED 

MEASURING DEVICE 

Robert WllUam Young, Cheltenham, England, assignor to 

Autic Devdopments Limited, Chehenliam, England 

Filed June 1, 1970, Scr. No. 42^61 
Claims priority, appHaidon Great Britain, May 31, 1969, 

27,680/69 

Int. CL B65d 5/72 

U.S. a. 222—569 4 Claims 





A low clearance machine for processing draperies has an 
upper rigid frame carrying an integral drapery support bar 
with its spaced apart legs reciprocally mounted in upright 
support posts on a base unit and a positive loop drive system 
in the base unit connected to the distal ends of said legs and 
a drapery pleater bar extending between the posts whereby 
the operation of the drive system will simultaneously move 
the frame and the pleater bar in opposite directions for quick 
efficient processing of draperies in the machine. 



3,667,660 
EMERGENCY VEHICLE RESCUE DEVICE ANp 
I METHOD 

Bmcc B. Lewis, 12623 Stillman St., Lakcwood, Calif. 
Filed Dec. 15, 1969, Scr. No. 885,242 
bit.a.B26fi/00^ 
U.S.CL 225-1 8 



Haims 




^rrt^ 



The connecting means has adapter means for attachment 
to the measure and include a resilient seal for engagement 
within the mouth of the bottle. A tension rod passes through 
the seal and is threaded adjacent one end to carry clamping 
means. The other end of the tension rod has means which 
limit insertion of the rod into the adapter means and enable 
the rod to be turned and tightened by a cooperating key, 
whereupon the clamping means clamp against, the inside of 
the bottle and provide positive retention to prevent 
withdrawal of the seal from the mouth of the bottle except by 
releasing the clamping means using said key. 



An emergency rescue device and method of releasing an 
accident victim trapped in a vehicle by locked or jammed 
doors. The device comprises powerful hook means on one 
etKl of a flexible draft line, the hook means being usable to 
smash the door window for engagement of the hook over the 
window sill. The fr«e end of the draft line is attachable to 
another vehicle and used to deform or smash the door in- 
stantly for withdrawal of the victim for emergency treatment 
or frx>m fire or explosion hazards. A supplemental or 
snubbing draft line movably attached to the main draft line 
can be attached to a fixed anchorage thereby enabling a 
rescue vehicle to apply a pulling force along a line at an 
angle to the pulling force acting on the door being opened. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



167 



3,667,661 

APPARATUS FOR USE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 

SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES 

Frauds Louis Fwmcr, 106 HoUfact Rd, Sutton CoMflcId, 

WvwIckaM^, Ei^laiid 

FUed Apr. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 26,734 

ClataM priority, i n>lic 1fc iM GreM Britain, May 1, 1969, 

22,180/69 

Int. CLB26f J/00 

U.S. CL 225—2 5 ClainM 




When a semi-conductor slice is subjected to a manufactur- 
ing process to convert it to a plurality of semi-conductor 
components, it is then necessary to separate the semi-con- 
ductor components. The invention provides apparatus for 
doing this in which a pair of resilient diaphragms are used to 
sandwich the wafer, the diaphragms then being distended to 
crack the slice along previously scribed lines. 



3,667,662 

CAPILLARY TUBE CUTTING AND FEEDING 

APPARATUS 

Saul R. Gilford, and IgnMio P. Echo^aray, both of Oberlin, 

Ohio, ec iigio rs to GUford Instrument Laboratories, Inc., 

Oberlin, Ohio 

FBcd Aug. 18, 1969, Scr. No. 850^84 
^-- Int.CLB26fi/00 

U.S. CL 225—96.5 7 Clafam 




A length of capillary tubing is mounted to an apparatus, 
being carried by a reciprocable carriage and a fixed support 
serving as a guide. The carriage and support have releasable 
unilateral respective first and second grab means. The grab 
means are effective in opposite directions of axial nnovement 
of the length of tubing so that movement of the carriage 
toward the support will hold the length of tubing on the car- 
riage but permit the length to slip past the second grab 
means, but upon return movement cf the carriage the second 
grab means locks the length in position and the first grab 
means permits slipping movement of the length of tubing 
relative to the carriage. In this manner a forward stroke of 
the carriage will feed a length of tubing past the support and 
a return, or rearward stroke will return the carriage without 
concurrent movement of the length of tubing. The length fed, 
at most equals the length of the forward stroke, but can be 
varied by suitable means, for example, for the purpose of 
feeding a small end for trimming. A cutter is driven by and 



synchronized with return movement of the carriage to score 
the fed length of tubing. The apparatus includes means sup- 
porting a cuvette or carrier into which the tubing end is in- 
serted during the stroke. Means are provided laterally to 
strain the short free end of the length of tubing beyond the 
score line to cause the short end to break off, either falling 
into waste in the case of trim, or being captured in the cu- 
vette in the case of a regular measured length. Means are 
provided to control the length fed by the carriage. 



3,667,663 
FEEDER UNIT 
I J. Kacmardk, Parnu Heights, and Robert K. Norton, 
Twinsburg, both of Ohio, — Ignon to Harris-Intcrtype Cot^ 
poration, Clevdand, Ohio 

Filed Mar. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 19,221 

IBL CL B26f 3/00; B65h 35/00 

U.S. CL 225— 100 7 OdnM 




An improved apparatus for processing a stream of articles 
formed from sheet material with the articles arranged in in- 
terconnected rows extending transverse to the direction of 
movement of the articles includes a first means for transport- 
ing the articles at a first speed and a second means for receiv- 
ing the articles from the first means and conveying the arti- 
cles at a second speed which is in excess of the first speed. 
The second means for receiving the articles includes a con- 
veyor unit and a plurality of rollers operatively associated 
with the conveyor unit and each oi which have an article 
conveying position and an inactive position in which the 
roller does not cooperate with the conveyor to convey the ar- 
ticles. Means are provided for selectively moving at least one 
of the rollers between its positions so that the one roller may 
engage with one of the transversely extending rows of articles 
as the trailing edge of that row of articles passes fix>m the 
first means. The one row of articles is then speeded up rela- 
tive to the next successive row of articles which is engaged 
with the first means to thereby disconnect the one row from 
the next row of articles to thereby space the one row of arti- 
cles relative to the next successive row of articles so as to 
faciliute processing of the articles as they move through the 
apparatus. The selective operation of the one roller enabtoi 
the apparatus to process articles having a wide variety of 
configurations. 



3,667,664 

APPARATUS FCm KEEPING A STATE OP TENSION 

CONSTANT ON A MATERIAL WEB WHICH RUNS 

BETWEEN SUCCESSIVE PAIRS <^ MOVING RCMXERS 

Peter S ch roedcr, Stockackcr, Swltacriand, mmitfuat to 

Weber A.G., RoCfarirt, Swll»rlaiid 

Fled Feb. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 14,508 
Clafana priority, appBctlon Switacriand, Feb. 28, 1969, 

3016/69 
Int. CL B65h 43/00 
U.S. CL 226—30 6 < 

An apparatus for keeping a state of tension constant on a 
material web which runs between successive pairs of driving 
rollers includes a torsion bar having a lever extension with a 



168 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6j 1972 



guide roller over which the material is directed. Sensing 
means are associated with the lever to sense variations of the 
torsion acting on the bar through the displacement of the 
lever by the variations in tension of the material which is 



single flat blank of material in such a manner that the 
resultant box has three-ply end walls and two-ply side walls. 




being fed and this sensing means is connected to electrical 
cont ol means for varying the speed of one or the other set of 
rollers or for braking the speed of one of the sets of the rol- 
lers in order to vary the tension on the web material which is 
fed. 



3,667,665 

APPARATUS FOR PREPARING FLOCKED FABRIC 

Frands T. Spencer, Biddcfard, Maine, anignor to West Point- 

Pepperdl, Inc^ Boston, MiM. 
Continuation of application Scr. ^io. 834^25, Jnnc 19, 1969, 
now abuidoned. This application May 20, 1971, Scr. No. 

145,547 

Int. a. GO If ///20 

VS. CL 222—412 4 ClaimB 







■H^ 



Flock distributing apparatus of the kind which comprises 
an elongate receptacle for flock, said receptacle having a 
foraminous bottom, an elongate rotary agitator within and 
extending longitudinally oi the receptacle and which is 
operative to cause flock fiber to sift down through the bot- 
tom of the receptacle, and with further provision of means 
operative to drop flock down onto the rotary agitator at 
definitely spaced points lengthwise of the latter. 



3,667,666 
FOLDABLE STCNIAGE BOX 
JaaMs T. Pryor, Dalas, Tex., —ignnr to Perma Products Ca, 
Dallas, Tex. 

Fikd Dec 30, 1970, Scr. No. 102,847 

Int. CL B65d S/00 

UJS.CL229— 16B 3 Cialna 



r 



-j^ 



Si. 



fto r*0 f* o 



':t 



i \ 



1^ 



[ 



4 



<-; 



tir 



ill 



A storage box is disclosed that is folded into a box trom a 



» 3,667,667 

DOUBLE BOILER AND THROW-A-WAY FOOD 
PACKAGE 
Henry E. Frankenbcrg, Bcrwyn, DL, assignor to Continental 
Can Company, Inc., New Yorli, N.Y. 

1 Filed Dec. 15, 1970, Scr. No. 98^)5 
I Int. CI. B65d ' 

U.S. Ci. 229—5 1 TS 14 Claims 




This disclosure relates to an improved container particu- 
larly of the so-called double boiler type, in which a cover is 
secured to the container body by an overfolded or crimped 
peripheral edge of the latter. Between adjacent side edges of 
the cover an edge of the periphery thereof is inwardly ofFiset 
and in this area the cover is not crimped to the container but 
is actually spaced slightly from the crimp which servos as a 
vent for steam when the container contents are heated. 
Moreover, at this same area there is located the starting end 
of a tear strip portion, and since the latter is not secured to 
the container by the crimp, the starting end can be easily 
gripped and the tear strip portion readily removed to g|un ac- 
cess to the container contents. 



3,667,668 
CARD PUNCH SYSTEM AND PROCESS 
Clarence G. McCune, Balboa; John C. Vinocr, Analtetan, and 
Kenneth E. Graves, San Jose, aO of Odif., sssigiwrs to 
CyifonUa Computer Products, Inc^ Analidm, Cdif . 
I Filed June 18, 1970, Scr. No. 47,215 
I Int. CL G06k ;/;« 

MS. a. 234—15 -.^ 21 Clalnw 







iy J.4 ..\M iis\ . J t . [ . \.\.^..^J ^ J^ 4^4 J ^ 




1 Mvrrwt 



Jsca» 



The time required to punch IBM cards can be reduced by 
using a memory for storing a large number of programs. The 
card reading capability of a conventional keypunch machine 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



159 



can be used to load the program information. The memory 
can also be used to store keystroke data while the system is 
executing automatic operations. 



^ 3,667,669 

APPARATUS FOR PREP^UNG A PRINTED AND 
PUNCHED CARD 
Etsuro Nagata, Tokyo, Japan, assignor to Tokyo Shibaura 
Electric Co., Ltd., KawasaU-shi, Japan 

Filed Apr. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 27,408 
Claims priority, appUcation Japan, Apr. 14, 1%9, 44/28383; 

44/28382 

Int. a. B41J 5142 

U.S. CL 234—24 10 Claims 




^^^p^ 



3,667,671 
ANTI-REVERSE ODOMETER ONE-WAY DRIVE 
Gueotcr Hactatd, Swarti Creek, Midu, frignirr to 
Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich. 

Filed Aug. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 65,791 

Int. CL GO Ic 22/00 

U.S. CL 235—96 3 ClaiuK 




This invention relates to a drive mechanism adapted to 
drive a plurality of numbered or counting wheels such as 
those commonly found in use on odometers wherein the 
drive mechanism comprises a flexible finger which drives the 
counter in a forward or counting direction, but prevents driv- 
ing the counter in the reverse direction. 



An apparatus for preparing a printed and punched card 
comprising a readout means for reading out signals 
representing information punched in a tape, a letter signal 
generating means for generating letter signals corresponding 
to the types successively passing through a printing section, a 
printing means for printing in two rows by a double-faced 
hammer with a paper card interposed therebetween, a 
punching means for punching the paper card by the vertical 
movement of a punching rod and a control device for actuat- 
ing both printing and punching means at the same time when 
the letter signals are exactly identified with the information 
signals. 



3.667,670 
ADDING MACHINE WITH PRINTING DEVICE 
Manki OkaJima, Yokohama, and Ryuzaburo Yolioyama, 
Urawa, both of Japan, assign nri to Ricoh Co., Ltd., Tokyo, 
Japan 

Filed Nov. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 89308 
Claims priority, application Japan, Nov. 14, 1969, 44/91040 

Int. CI. G06c 27100, 15148 
MS. CL 235—60 MT 6 CWnw 



MeMn 



3,667,672 
LAP COUNTER FOR TOY VEHICLES 

R. Kennedy, Compton, and Brian S. Prodfsr, Tor* 
both of CaUf ., asrig^ion to Mattd, taMU, Hawtfaomc, 
CaHf. 

Continuation of application Scr. No. 812,736, Apr. 2, 1969, 
now abandoned. This application Jan. 28, 1971, Scr. No. 

110,673 
Int. a. B61I 1116; G06ai 1108 
U.S. CL 235—98 B 16 < 





In a printing adding machine having a totalizer comprising 
a set of pinions cooperating with a set of racks, a second 
totalizer is provided for storing a number which is the sum of 
totals stored in the first totalizer. The second totalizer com- 
prises a second set of pinions cooperating with a second set 
of racks which are connected to the first set of racks for up- 
ward and downward movement therewith. 



A device for placement on a toy racing track to count the 
number of laps traversed by a toy vehicle, comprising a 
spring loaded lever extending into the path of the vehicle that 
advances counting wheels which dkplay the count. The 
deflection of the lever by the toy vehicle winds the spring, 
and the advance of a counting wheel occurs only on the 
return of the lever, so that the counting wheels do not 
receive the shock of a fast vehicle hitting the lever. The lever 
directly advances both a digit wheel and a 10-counting 
wheel, the digit wheel having a depression that allows a 
ratchet on the lever to engage the ten-counting wheel once in 
each revolution of the digit wheel. 



3,667,673 

WIND ACTUATED CONTROL DEVICE AND METHOD 

OF REGULATION THERECW* 

Vladcmar Knudsen, 2443 Makiki HeigbU Drive, Honolulu, 

Hawaii 

Filed Nov. 5, 1970, Scr. Na 87,073 
Int. CLB05b 77/00 
U.S. a. 239—1 6 Claims 

The invention comprises an assemblage of a wind-sensitive 



1^ 



r\ 



Ju^E 6,1 1972 



160 OFFICIAL GAZETTE 

device cou|ded to responsive power-operated means which in 3,667,675 

turn are connected to a given deice which requires move- ELECTROSTATIC POWDER COATING APPARAtUS 

ment or adjustment dicuted by wind direction or wind Rkhard M. SbcnnaB, Northvlle, Mkh., and Robert M. 

velocity, or both. Webb, Chicago, DL, avigDors to Graco Inc., Minneapolis, 

In the example given, the invention, as shown in the Minn. 

filed Feb. 16, 1971, Scr. No. 115,685 
Int. CL B05b 5/00 
__ U.S.CL239-IS 24 < 




specification, is shown by way of illustration, as connected to 
and controlling the nozzle fit of a rotary irrigation sprinkler, 
with respect to the horizontal, and with respect to the wind- 
velocity and direction, in order automatically to achieve an 
optimunf spray pattern. 



3,667,674 
ELECTROSTATIC POWDER COATING APPARATUS 
RoaaM F. Panom, St Paul, Mfam.; Rldwrd M. Sherman, 
Northvillc, Mick^ and Robert M. Webb, Chicago, m., aa- 
sigBors to Graco Inc., MinacopoHs, Mina. 

Filed Feb. 16, 1971, Scr. No. 115,542 

Int.Cl.B05b5/00 

U^.CL 239-15 14 Claims 





An electrostatic powder coating apparatus for coating the 
surfaces of articles with pulverulent materials having an 
ionization member which serves as both an improved charg- 
ing means and a pattern forming deflecting means including a 
probe portion positioned immediately to the rear of a deflect- 
ing member and a probe portion extending past a forward* 
nK38t surface of the deflecting member, with said portions of 
the probe being maintained at an electrical potential substan- 
tially different than that of the article to be coated. 



ITING 



3,667,676 
APPARATUS FOR ELECTROSTATICALLY COA1 
POWDERS ON A WCMUCPIECE 
Tamotsu Watanabc, and Fumio Onouc, both of Tokyo, Japan, 
avigDon to Nippon Kogd Kogyo Co^ Ltd. 

FVcd Dec 18, 1969, Scr. No. 886,170 
Claims priority, application Japan, Mar. 26, 1969, 44/22366; 
1 June 1 1 , 1%9, 44/45364; 44/45365 1 

I Int. CLBOSb 5/00 I 

VS, a. i39— 15 5 Claln» 




An electrostatic powder coating apparatus for coating th^ 
surfaces of articles with pulverulent materials having a qrick 
and efficient material change feature such that said apparatus 
is adapted for selectively spraying materials having different 
characteristics wherein the change from one material to 
another can be accomplished without extensive purging of 
the system, said apparatus including a spray gun, a powder 
supply means adapted to be removably connected to the inlet 
of said spray gun, and a control means adapted to be con- 
nected to a switching means on said gun for controlling the 
supply of pulverulent materials to said gun. 



Apparatus for electrostatically coating powders on a work- 
piece fiom a rotating injection head having a plurality of noz- 
zles disposed outwardly from the axis of the rotating injection 
head and rotatably mounted on the injection head for 
dispersing the powders. Each of the nozzles has a curved or 
bent portion, such that the distance between the nozzle and 
the axis of the rotating injection head and the angle from 
which the powders are dispersed are variable. The apparatus 
is utilized for performing a method of electrosutically coat- 
ing powders on a workpiece comprising the steps of 
dispersing the powders in such a manner that the angle at 
which the powders are dispersed is variable. The apparatus 
also comprises a mixer connected to a source of compressed 
air for supplying the powders from a source through a pipe 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



161 



into the injection head with an air stream fed from a com- 
pressed air source, a controller for controlling the powder 
supply from the powder source to the injection head, and a 
constant powder supplying means for supplying the powders 
from the powder source to the mixer, whereby the powder 
supply is controlled by the powder supply means. 



3,667,677 

FABRIC PLEATER GUIM: 

Edmund Jay Sprong, 38 Loc k wood Lane, Riverside, Conn. 

filed Sept 28, 1970, Scr. No. 76,062 

Int. CL A41h 43/00: D06J I/OO, 1/12 

VS. a. 223—34 5 CWms 




An adjustable fabric pleater guide which is portable and is 
provided with a scale on the measuring stick as well as in- 
dexes on the adjustable fabric guides for rapidly setting the 
required pleats longitudinally on the fabric. 



3,667,678 

NOZZLE STRUCTURE FOR JET PRINTERS 

John W. Haskd, Endwdl, N.Y., avignor to International 

Bnriacss Machima CorporatloB, Armook, N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 19^67 

Int.CLB05bJ/;4 

U.S.CL 239-102 



aOalmt 



-SWLMMIU 




An ink jet nozzle structure comprising a thin tube, con- 
nected to a pressuriixd ink reservoir, is encircled by an A. C. 
driven coil which induces longitudinal reciprocating motion 
to cause formation of ink droplets. A permanent magnet is in 
the proximity of the drive coil provides a biasing action. The 
tube length is chosen so as to permit it to vibrate resonantly 
at the frequency of the induced longitudinal reciprocating 
motion. Resonant vibration permits the tube to be supported 
at two points along its length greatly increasing its mechani- 
cal stability. An air damper located near the tip of the nozzle 
broadens the resonant response and provides differential 
signals proportional to the longitudinal movement of the tube 
to maintain movements at a fixed or preset level. 



3,667,679 
APPARATUS FOR MIXING A PLURALITY OF GASEOUS 

STREAMS 
Joaef Wicseabcrgcr, Vienna, Austria, aiignor to Dumag Ohg, 
Dr. Ludwig Kahiaa St Co., Wicn, Austria 

FBcd Dec 22, 1969, Scr. No. 887,1 IS 
Claims priority, appHcatkm Austria, Apr. 8, 1969, A 3379/69 

Int. CL B05b 3/14 
VS. CL 239—102 3 Claims 

A method of mixing compressible fluid nwdia (which may 



include an atomized spray) comprising delivering said media 
to a mixing zone, at least one said medium being a gas or 
vapor, and imparting to said gaseous or vaporous medium in 



mmtf w ▼■ 




the mixing zone a superscmic velocity and/or a sonic vibra- 
tion, whereby the supersonic velocity and/or the sonic vibra- 
tion promotes mixing of the fluid media. 



3,667,680 
JET ENGINE EXHAUST NOZZLE SYSTEM 
WUve N. Weed, ScMlc, Wariu, airipMir to Hm Bocii« Com- 
pany, Seattle, WadL 

FHed Apr. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 31^77 
InL CL B63ta 25/46; F02k 3/10 
VS. CL 239—265.17 24 < 




N. 



A variable area two-stage ejection nozzle exhaust system 
for a turbojet engine having an afterburner, wherein, a pri- 
mary nozzle has s^rfierical segments contained within a spher- 
ical shell housing which spherical segments are (Mvotally ad- 
justaMe in response to augmented aiKl fK>n-augmented en- 
gine operation to provide for an efficient exhaust nozzle exit 
area choke plane; and a secondary nozzle with aerodynami- 
cally actuated trailing edge flaps for varying the secondary 
exhaust nozzle exit area in response to primary nozzle pres- 
sure variations and airfdane Mach number. Also provided 
within the primary nozzle are separate clamshell type blocker 
doors which, in combination with fluid flow turning vanes in- 
corporated into the primary nozzle wall, turn the fluid flow to 
obtain reverse thrust from the turbojet engine. 

For engine sound sup p res si on, an increase in the primary 
nozzle exit area at power settings below rKNmal cruise power 
produces a sound suppression mode throu^ the over expan- 
sicHi of the exhaust gases. 

At higher engine power settings, one embodiment for 
sound suppression b accomplished by rotating channel 



899 O.G.— 6 



i 



162 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



■pokes into the exit gas flow and at the same time routing in- 
ternal clamshells to uncover openings to suppression tubes 
that are rotated outward into the firee-stream airflow. The 
suppression tube exits are sized to equal the area of the flow 
blocked by the channel spokes to maintain engine/exhaust 
area match. 



compensate for wear therebetween, with such adjusUbility 
not materially affecting the flow volume of atomizing air. The 
main body and adjacent enclosure parts of the spray gun 
housing are secured together by a plurality of longitudinally 
extending fastening means to eliminate the need for distor- 
tion prone tools. 



3,667,681 
PLASTIC BEARING FOR AN AIRLESS SPRAY GUN ^ ryiu— 

Erwin B. Blandia, Sterliiig Hdihto, Mkh., Mrignor to ^•f™*"?™?^ *f" 



3,667,683 ^- 

DIVERTER VALVE ASSEMBLY 

Calif., iMlpinr to Hydh> Manu- 



General Motors Corporatfon, Detroit, Midi. 

mod Oct. 21, 1970, So-. No. 82,716 
Iirt. CL B05b 15/02 
VS. CL 239—393 



2Claimi 




3,667,682 
SPRAY GUN 
John M. Puradl, Milwaukee, Wik, avignor to Grovhac, Inc., 
Mihraukcc, Wis. 

FUed July 20, 1970, Ser. No. 56,513 

lat CL B05b 7/12 

VS. CL 239—412 9 Claims 




facturing Inc., gj**-*****, CaM. 

Origiaal ap pB c ado B Mar. 16, 1967, Ser. No. 623,676, now 

Patent No. 3,500324. Divkied and this appHcatloB F«l». 25, 

i970, Ser. No. 17,995 

Int. CL E03c 1/084 

VS. CL 239—428.5 ^ 4 Oainit 



A plastic disc-like bearing for a turret member housing of 
an airless spray gun includes a roughened generally spherical 
outer surface that engages a generally spherical seat of the 
housing. An integral peripheral flange of the bearing has a 
roughened surface that engages a flange seat of the housing 
adjacent the periphery of the spherical seat. A smooth 
generally spherical inner surface of the bearing engages a 
generally spherical turret member received within the hous- 
ing and a conventional plastic ring cooperates with the 
plastic bearing to support the turret member for rotational 
movement between a spraying position and a non-spraying 
position. In the spraying position, a spraying oriflce of the 
turret member faces outwardly of apertures in the plastic 
bearing and the housing, the aperture of the bearing being 
the smaller of the two. 




The invention described herein is an oral syringe which 
dispenses fluid under pressure for the purpose of cleaning 
teeth and massaging gums. A finger operated push button 
carried on the syringe handle allows the user to meter desired 
amounts of mouthwash from a container into the pressurized 
fluid stream through interconnecting valve passages and 
chambers. An aerator-valve assembly permits the syringe to^ 
be detachably coupled to an ordinary water faucet and addi- 
tionally allows the user to by-pass fluid from the syringe 
without the necessity of detaching the entire assembly. 



3,667,684 
FUEL INJECTION VALVE 
Waiter Baumgart, Gcrgcn, Germany, asrignor to V«b 
Wcritc, Ua-Komiiinat fur Kraftflalnei«ldle, Rcn^k-Wcrkc, 
R< Iclw nbacii, Germany 

j Hied Sept. 17, 1970, Ser. No. 72,955 

I Int. CL B05b 1/30 

VS. a. 239—533 10 Claims 



The disclosed gun for spraying atomized materials includes 
a housing having an oriflce for discharge of the materials and 
atomizing air vent means associated with the orifice for 
atomizing the materials upon discharge from the orifice. A 
movable member and separate orifice closure member are 
reciprocally disposed in the housing and driven in sequence 
to provide for the venting of atomizing air through the vent 
means prior to the discharge of materials through the orifice. 
Adjustability is provided between the orifice containing 
member of the housing and the orifice closure member to 




A fuel injection valve comprising a nozzle body having an 
inlet and an outlet and a cavity therebetween, a nozzle nee- 
dle arranged in said cavity and spaced apart from said nozzle 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



168 



body to define an annular space therebetween for forming a 
fluid passage, said nozzle needle being mounted for 
reciprocating movement between opened and closed posi- 
tions in said cavity, said nozzle body being sealed off at one 
end thereof by stop means, said nozzle needle at the end 
thereof adjacent said stop means being connected to a 
diaphragm arranged in said stop means, resilient guide means 
arranged in said nozzle body at the other end thereof from 
said stop means, said diaphragm and resilient guide means 
being mounted in said housing for securing said nozzle nee- 
dle in a desired spatial relationship in said cavity whereby 
pressure applied onto said diaphragm acts to move said nee- 
dle in said cavity between said open and closed position. 



3,667,685 
IRRIGATION DEVICES 
Isaac Rinkcwich, New York, N.Y. 
tion Systems, Inc., New York, N.Y 

FUed Apr. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 25,677 
Int. CL B05b 15/00 
VS. CL 239—542 



to Riniu) Irrlga- 



12Claina 




3,667,686 
ELECTROMAGNETIC FUEL INJECTORS 
Georges Gamier, Blois, France, msignor to Roto-DicseL 
CUdiy (Hauts-de Seine), France 

Filed Aug. 26, 1970, Ser. No. 67,133 
Claims priority, appHcation France, Sept. 15, 1969, 6931319 

Int. CL B05b 1/30 
VS. CL 239—585 5 ClainK 




Electromagnetic fbel injector comprising a cylindrical 
body to which is attached an injection nozzle containing a 
sliding metering pintle in rigidly fixed relation to a movable 
armature or pallet which is attracted at each injection stroke 
of the cycle by an inductor formed of a magnetic core which 
carries a field winding and housed within the said injector 
body, wherein a stack of grain-oriented laminations which 



are cut out in the shape of m and form the inductor core is 
clamped at the eixl nearest the movable pallet within a hole 
formed through a holding disc Of non-magnetic material 
which is stetionarily secured within the injector body and at 
the opposite end by the clamping lips of two strips of non- 
magnetic metal each located within one at the two recesses 
which form a separation between the three magnetic arms of 
the said core and acccmiodate the field winding >»iuch is 
placed round the central arm, that end of the stack of 
laminations which is directed towards the movable pallet and 
that face of the holding disc which is also directed towards 
the said pallet being placed level with each other so as to 
form a reference plane which constitutes one side of the air- 
gap. 



3,667,687 
APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING HIGH EXPANSION 

FOAM 
Leo E. RivUng, Springfield, and Adolph Blum, Scotch PlainB, 
both of N J., aaaignon to The Meari Corporation, West 
RoaeOc Park, N J. 

FUed Aug. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 62,429 

InL a. B05b 1/14; F23d 13/44 

VS. CL 239— 553 J g Cbrina 



An irrigation device effecting drip action of water fed from 
a central tube by effecting a substantial pressure drop along 
the path of the water as it flows from the central feed tube to 
the exit of the device. The flow path of the water is 
labyrinthine so that the water path continuously reverses in 
order to create substantial turbulence to maintain in suspen- 
sion the foreign matter to minimize the likelihood of 
clogging. The labyrinthine path causes the water to travel a 
considerable distance, thereby increasing the pressure drop 
so that the water drips at a slow rate. 




Foam producing apparatus comprising eduction means 
using compressed gas to sweep and educe lower pressure gas 
or gas laden with dust contamiruuits or other materiak 
toward a porous foam forming barrier surface; foam forming 
solution spray nozzles direct such solution to wet the barrier 
surface; the gas creates foam at the screen, with the foam 
being moved beyond the screen by the gas. 



3,667,688 
METHOD FOR SHEARING SOLIDS IN A SOLIDS-UQUID 

SUSPENSION 
Joseph l a nn i rril i, Macon, Ga., assignor to J. M. Hubcr Cor- 
poration, Locust, N J. 

Original application June 28, 1968, Ser. Na 740,955, now 

Patent No. 3,556,416, dated Jan. 19, 1971. Divided and thh 

applicatioa Nov. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 89,973 

Int. CL B02c 19/00 

UACL 241-1 4 Claims 




A method for dis-aggregating solid particles in a slurry by 
pumping the slurry at pressures in excess of 1,000 p. s. i. 



164 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



ITTl 



June 6, 1972 



through a column containing paiticulate media clamped in a metallic sulphides from om containing talcy minerals or 
fixed position is dis c l o sed. natural slimes and the invention has been applied with signal 

' success to the flotation of copper-nickel sulphide ores con- 

taining over 40 percent weight of talcoee host rock minerals. 



MBTHCN)] 



3,667,689 
METHOD FOR PRODUCING MINERAL PRODUCTS 

Brooks WUlky, and Joseph lannkdV, both of Macon, I 3,667,691 

Ga.^ a wl g iwrs to J. M. H»bcr Coi poi t h m. Locust, N J. MBTHCN) FCMl CRUSHING METAL TURNINGS 

FVed Dec 15, 1969, Scr. No. 885,168 A. Gcotie GoMbsrg, Montreri, Quebec, CMMMla, 

Iirt.CLB02c 27/00 L L Sdig A SoM lAL, VBe La Srik, Quebec, 

U.S.CL241— 15 4CW1W I Ned July 22, 1970, Ssr. No. 57,049 

V Iata.B02c27/00 

U.S. CL 241—24 




A method for producing minerals of reduced particle size 
and increased brightness, particularly high grade coating 
clays employing a hard, abrasive grinding medium following 
a pretreatment of magnetic separation is disclosed. Coating 
clays are prepared by the delamination of stack-like particles 
contained in magnetically extracted coarser clays employing 
a hard, abrasive grinding medium and high intensity grinding 
techniques. 



3.667,690 

FLOTATION OF COPPER-NICKEL SUUIDE ORES 

DavM Weston, 34 Parkwood Avcaue, Toronto, 7, Oatarte, 



CoBdaoatioB-iB-pait of appHcatkm Scr. No. 727,268, May 7, 

1968, Mw Patairt No. 3,596,838. TWs appMcatioa Nov. 3, 

1969, Scr. No. 873,91 1. The portkm of the term of the patent 
subsequent to Aug. 3, 1988, has been disclaimed. 

Int. CL B03b 1104 
U.S.CL241— 20 271 



ALKAUNC AGENT - 

ACT1VAT0« 

•CTTINa ASCNT — 



»CT aniNOMe 

AHO COMCMTiaNIMe 
(STEP C) 



XANTMATC COLUCCTM- 



ruKTHCR 
CONOITIONINC 



OIS»CRSIN« AOCNT- 
FHOTMIH 



FUKTHER 

COHOITIONIM 

UTfP SI 




In the crushing of metal turnings, the turnings are first 
passed through a centrifugal separating drum where the fines 
and solid chunks are separated from the clusters of turnings. 
The chunks are removed, and the clusters of turnings are 
then passed to a shredding apparatus, which includes an 
endless chain conveyor, mounting teeth for advancing the 
clusters of metal turnings towards the crusher or pulverizer 
and statioiuuy teeth spaced above the conveyor and 
cooperating with the teeth on the conveyor for shredding the 



large cliBters of metal turnings as they are advanced 
the crusher or pulverizer. 



towards 



3,667,692 
PUMP STORAGE GRINDER 

■ucnara k^ laraoc, i^arvsse, ni.T., assigiMii 
ncnt/One CorporaCioii, Latham, N.Y. 

Fled Apr. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 26,925 
lot. CL B02c 13118 
U.S. CL 241—36 



to Bavfapon- 



27 



Flotation c^ sulphide minerals from their ores is achieved 
by a process in wMch two or more conditioning steps are car- 
ried out prior to a froth flotation step. The first step com- 
prises conditioning a pulp of the ore in the presence of at 
least one alkaline agent selected from a group of agents 
which is defined in the specificaticm vi^iich follows. The pulp 
is then fkirther conditioned in the presence dt a member of 
the xanthate family of flotation reagents and sufficient 
dispersing agent to effectively disperse the host rock 
minerals. The resulting pulp is then subjected to froth flota- 
tion. Preferably there are three separate conditioning steps, 
namely conditioning carried out in the presence of ( 1 ) one of 
the heretnafker defined alkaline agents, (2) a member of the 
x a nth a t e Csmily of flotation reagents, and (3) sodium silicate. 
The invention is particularly valuable for the recovery of 




The pump storage grinder empk>ys a tank having • sewage 
inlet aiid a removable top cover supporting a depending 
sealed housing having a nsotor and motor controb for driving 
a grinder or comminutor and pump externally of the 
chamber by means ot a common motor shaft The chamber is 
formed by a contrcd housing integral with the cover, a tube 
and pump head, all held together by means of tenswn bolts 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



166 



secured between the pump head and cover. The motor shaft 
extends through the pump head to drive a resUient helical 
pump and a comminutor impeUer disc with depending blades 
that cooperate with a comminutor ring hekl between a com- 
mmutor inlet shroud and a pump housing secured to the 
pump head. A pump discharge chamber is provided in the 
head with a one-way valved passage leading to a discharge 
conduit extending through the cover. The level responsi^ 
motor control is provided with a liquid pressure sensing tube 
extendmg through the chamber in communication with a de- 
pending pipe secured to the pump head and housing 



the matenal flung reversely in the feed stack may be directed 
m Its flight to reduce the damaging wear on the walls <rf the 
feed stack. The control is obtained by utilizing the breaker 
bars on the off-side relative to rotation of the hammer rotor 
to direct the trajectory of the flying material in a predeter- 
mmed path in the fieed stack to minimize the inuMct and 
wear on the walls of the feed stack. 



3,667,693 

REFUSE CAN BOTTLE CRUSHER 

KatUeea E. Leeds, P.O. Box 201, New Port Rltchcry Fla. 

a«l James E. Davis, 6758 Chcrtnut St., Cincinnati, Ohio ' 
Filed Oct. 31, 1969, Scr. No. 873,000 

lat CL B02c 19114 
U.S.CL 241-99 icUdm 



/.. 



3,667,695 

REELING APPARATUS WITH DYNAMIC VIBRATION 

ABSORBER 

PbiUp J. Browasconbc, MHIta«ton, N J., Maignor to Euscnc 

Dictzgcn Co., CMc^o, m. 

filed Feb. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 11,471 

Int CL B65h 75102; G03b 1104; B65h 75134 

U.S.CL 242-55 ij cw« 





A garbage can incorporating a lid having a bottle crusher 
built thereinto, the bottle crusher incorporating a receptacle 
mto which a bottle is receivable and held by a botUe holder 
after which a plunger drives ram against the bottle to crush 
the same, the broken bottle droping into the garbage can. 



Reeling apparatus adapted for feeding reeled film between 
reels, film cartridges, etc. in either direction and uses thereof 
in unage projection devices. The film reels are driven by 
respective electric motor-driven spindles having in the spin- 
dle drive a dynamic vibration absorber which resonates at 
sixty cycles per second to eliminate jittering at slow speed 
film drive of an image projected on a screen. 



3,667,694 

MATERUL REDUCING HAMMER MILL 

Robert M. WttUams, Laduc, Mo., aaslgiiui to WflUams Patent 

Cmshcr A PuKcrlaer Co., Iim:., St. Louis, Mo. 

FDed July 17, 1970, Scr. No. 55,728 

Int. CL B02c 13102 

UACL 241-186 R jQatais 



3,667,696 
CORE GRIPPING AND RELEASE DEVICE 
Reginald J. McCarthy, London, Ei^land, assignor to Frank F 
Pershkc Limited, Surrey, England 

FBed Apr. 22, 1970, Scr. Na 30,918 
Claims priprity, appHcndoo Great Britain, Apr. 24, 1969. 

20,999/69 

Int. CL B65h 75124 

U A CL 242-72 3 Clafans 



^- 





An expandable and contracuble device for mounting on a 
driven shaft of a paper or Uke handling machine for drivingly 
engaging the core of a reel of paper and comprising a one- 

A material reducing hammer mill of reversible character e;:^2l^irtS^e^„'tn^ S^^l! "1 iSl^T* '"™^ 



166 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



3^7,697 
MECHANISM FOR HOLDING A TUBULAR CORE 

Erich Binder, Regensdorf/Zurich, Switzerland, assignor to 
Ciba-Gcigy AG, Bawl, Switzerland 

fUad Dw. 16, 1969, Str. No. 885,491 

OataM priority, appHcatioa Switaeriand, Dec. 17, 1968, 

18733/68 

Int. CL B65h 75/24 

VS. CL 242—72 6 Claim 



• * • • » 11 

1\U 1 !1 




This invention relates to a mechanism for securely holding 
a tubular core on which a band of material such as photo- 
graphic paper is to be wound. The core is held by a gripping 
mechanism inside a mandrel on which the core is mounted. 
Running through the mandrel coaxially therewith is a routa- 
ble shaft having three rollers each mounted on a different 
apex of a triangular plate securely coupled to the shaft. Studs 
radially located within the mandrel are positioned to be en- 
gaged by the rollers so that on roUtion of the shaft relative to 
the mandrel the studs protrude through the periphery of the 
mandrel to grip the core. A friction clutch between the man- 
drel and the shaft is provided to hold them in position after 
the studs have been engaged with the core. 



/-ar. 



'/JTf 




limited retracting movement of the spool. The Invention 
resides in an improved and simpiifSed means for effecting 
such locking action consifting of a pawl and ratchet nonnally 
biaaed to an engaged position in which they prevent unwind- 
ing rotation of the spool and a member journaled concentri- 
cally with the spool for limited rotation and having a fric- 
tional driving connection with the spool. The said member is 
frictionally driven to one limit of its nwvement by a limited 
extension of the beh and in that position holds the pawl out 
of engagement during further extension. Initial retracting 
movement at any degree of extension moves the member to a 
position in which it allows pawl engagement; thereby locking 
the bek against further extension. The member is preferably" 
so constructed that further retracting movement of the beh 
moves the member beyond the last mentioned position to a 
position in which it again holds the pawl out of engagement 
with the ratchet to minimize noise and wear during retrac- 
tion. 

The invention further contemplates means for unlocking 
the retractor manually and also an improved means for un- 
locking the retractor or holding it unlocked automatically 
when the belt is substantially fully retracted, said last men- 
tioned means being driven by the spool and effective to hold 
the pawl out of engagement when the belt is fully reuacted 
and during a limited initial extension from fully retracted 
position. 



3,667,698 

LOCKING SEAT BELT RETRACTOR 

Robert C. Fbhcr, 580 E. Loaglakc Rd^ Bloomfleld Hills, 

Mich. 

ContlBiiatioa of appUcatlon Scr. No. 759,064, Sept 1 1, 1968, 

■ow abaadoncd , and a contlnuatioii-in-part of 629,689, Apr. 

10, 1967, now abandoned. This application Jan. 22, 1971, 

Scr. No. 108,923 

Int. a. A62b 35/00 

VS. CL 242— 107.4 28 dafana 



This invention relates to an automatic locking seat belt 
retractor of the type in which the belt is wound on a spring 
actuated spool which exerts a constant belt retracting force 
on the belt while allowing the belt to be extended by 
manually puUing it off the spocd, and in which means are pro- 
vided f<»- locking the belt against further extension at any 
desired degree of extension by locking the spool against un- 
winding rotation, which means operates in response to a 



I 



3,667,699 
APPARATUS FOR IMPROVED PAYOUT OF WIRE 
STRAND FROM STRAND PACKAGES 
MarcuB E. Hobbs, and Carroll W. Bonnet, both of BaMmore, 
Md., MslgDors to Bethlehem Sted Corporation 
I Filed Feb. 10, 1970, Scr. No. 10,163 

1 Int. CL B65h 49/00 

U.S. q. 242-129 



16Clafam 




An orifice of a critical diameter is provided in or adjacent 
to one side of a wire strand package to facilitate controlled 
payout from a package of stiff wire strand about a temporary 
core positioned within the orifice. 



3,667,700 
TAPE TRANSPORT APPARATUS 
Murray C. Carney, and EBb Spckhcr, ID, both of Sprlng- 
ficM, 01., assignors to Songamo Electric Company, Sprlng- 
flcM,IU. 

Filed Mar. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 17,847 
' Int. CL B65h 59/38, 63/02; Gl lb 15/32 
U.S. CL 242— 189 16 Claims 

Apparatus for transferring a flexible Upe from a supply 
reel to a take-up reel including drive motor and brake means 
for each of the Upe reels, a capstan disposed between the 
reels for effecting selective transfer of the tape between the 
reels, and a pair of Upe storage devices each disposed 
between one of the upe reels and the capstan, each storage 
device being adapted to accommodate variations in Upe 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



167 



length betwi^n Uie associated upe reel and the capstan and air sealing means prior to insertion in the system. A carrier 
havmg switch conucu operable to control roUtion and brak- specifically designed for conuinen uses the^nuiner^ 

body. The container is held in position by a harness attached 



Jff -49 g^ Sf 





^se 



to the air sealing means by resilient straps allowing the con- 

;«» «r *!.. — .^^:».-j . . ■ .... tainer to be easily attached to the air sealins means A carrier 

mg of the associated Upe reel m a manner to maintain linear u„^„„ „ i _i, r . w i , '^"'"» "'^«"'»- ^ wtmer 

Uoe transfer over the climtan ^'"^S .* '*"8^. "^ »"*»n8 resdientiy attached to an air sealing 

means is also disclosed. 



Upe transfer over the capstan. 



3.667.701 3 667 703 

James E.Bh.j;!tSl^.^^^.lS^3:^Cybem«. Cor. AUXHJARY Am INTAlifm AIR AND SPACECRAFT 
poration. Sunnyvale. CaBf. „ . ^ _^ ^ ^ ENGINES 

Filed May 7. 1970. Ser. No. 35^56 "1"if ^ll^'^J^tT"^' '"^'^ ^ MesKrachmllt. 

•^ Bolkow-Bk>hm GmbH, Munich, Germany 

, Q^^ FDed Jan. 26. 1970, Scr. No. 5,520 

^™" aaims priority, application Germany, Feb. 7, 1969, P 19 06 

157.5 

Int. a. B64d 27/00, 29/00 

VS. CL 244-53 B i6 Claims 



InL CL G03b 1/04; Glib 15/32 
U.S.CL 242—192 




Magnetic Upe apparatus including a Upe magazine having 
takeup and supply reels whose rims are engaged by constant- 
torque slip clutches which are concurrentiy engaged with the 
reels driving them in opposite directions to maintain the 
length of Upe extending between the reels in a tension condi- 
tion. Means for driving the tape back and forth include a 
shuttie bar having idler rollers which move alternatively 
between two counter-routing capstans to engage two guide 
rollers mounted in the magazine itself to move the tape in a 
forward or reverse direction. 



3,667,702 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TRANSPORTING 

CONTAINERS THROUGH A PNEUMATIC TUBE SYSTEM 

WBHam E. KcBey, Houston, Tex., aarignor to C. K. KcUey & 

Sons, Inc., Houston, Tex. 

nied Mar. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 21,143 

Int. CL B65g 51/06 

VS. CL 243—32 7 dafam 

A method of transporting containers through a pneumatic 

tube system by detachably securing the containers directiy to 




Auxiliary air intake constrtiction for jet engines having a 
main air intake enclosed in an engine cowling and leading to 
the engine air inlet. The auxiliary air intake conststs of a slot 
extending through a portion <rf such cowding and defined by 
wails which form an acute angle with the axis of the main air 
intake. A recess is formed in one of said walls and a doOT 
structure for at least one sliding door is arranged within said 
recess. Said door structure includes operating means for 
retracting same within said recess to open said auxiliary air 
intake and for extending same across siid slot to close same. 
Said door structure is so positioned and arranged that when 
in extended position iu outer surfisce is substantially flush 
with the surface of the engine cowling and its inner surface k 
substantially flush with the wall defining the main air intake. 



168 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



3,667,704 
CLOSABLE AIR INTAKE DUCT MOUNTED ON 
THE FUSELAGE AND OPEN IN THE DIREC- 
TION OF FLIGHT 
Karl H. Assmann, Gcnnering, Germany, assignor to 
Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blolim GmbH, Munich, Ger- 
many 

FUed May 5, 1970, Scr. No. 34,693 

' Claims priority, apppUcation Germany, May 23, 1969, 

P 19 26 553.3 

Int a. B64d 33/02 

U.S. CI. 244—53 B 5 Claims 




Door for the air intake duct of auxiliary engine of jet 
aircraft. The door is pivotally mounted at the forward 
end of the recess in the fuselage which recess is normally 
provided and aligned with the air intake duct for the 
auxiliary engine. In open position the door surfaces are 
aligned with the surfaces of the auxiliary air intake duct 
while in closed position the door provides a surface 
aligned with the inner surface of the main air intake duct. 




ture or chassis through elastic support means connecting 
the engine to said frame structure or chassis, applicable 
notably to motor vehicles and machine tools, and adapted 
to introduce into the frame structure, as near as possible 
to said elastic support means, a second vibration of same 
modulus but of inverted phase in relation to the first 
vibration, through a bar resiliently connected both to 



3,667,705 
AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM FOR 

PARACHUTES 

Stephen L. Snyder, 331 Cherry Hill Blvd., 

Cherry HiU, N J. 08034 

FUed Jan. 12, 1970, Ser. No. 2,332 

Int a. B64d 17/58 

VS. CI. 244—150 25 Claims 



A differential rate control switch and a barometric con- 
trol device are jointly operative to trigger a parachute 
opening mechanism at an elevation preset relative to 
acutal ground level. The barometric control device de- 
termines the altitude at which the parachute is opened if 
the chutist is falling at a high enough velocity as deter- 
mined by the rate control switch. The system is readily 
adjusted for the current barometric pressure at the desired 
ground level elevation immediately prior to use. 



3,667,706 

ANTIVIBRATORY DEVICES WITH PHASE 

REVERSAL 

Pierre Ilbcrghien, Bfllancoort, Friince, assignor to Regie 

Nationale dcs Usfaies Renault ft Automobiles Peugeot, 

Billancourt, Hauts-de-Seine, and Paris, Fnatot 

Filed lune 22, 1970, Ser. No. 48,175 
Chdms priority, application France, July 25, 1969, 

6925512 

Int CI. F16f 15/00 

153. a. 248—9 6 Claims 

Device for damping out a vibration generated by 

an engine and transmitted directly to the frame stnic- 




the en|ine and to said frame structure and adapted to 
carry throughout its length an inertia weight displace- 
able therealong for adjustment purpose, characterized 
in that the terminal elastic elements connecting said bar 
to said engine and to said frame structure have aniso- 
tropic elastic properties depending on the stiffness values 
of the elements along two orthogonal axes substantial- 
ly perpendicular to the bar axis. 



BUly 



UA d. 



3,667,707 

AIR SUPPORT 

Y. K. Mui, Astoria, N.Y., assignor to 

Dynamics Corporation, Westbury, N.Y. 

FUed Apr. 22, 1970, Scr. No. 30,626 

Int CI. F16f 11/00 



Korfund 



248—20 



i 



Claims 




An air support for maintaining a load at a pitselected 
height while isolating the load with respect to vibraticHis. 
The support includes a housing which is disposed above 
and in slidable engagement with a base. Support ior the 
housing is provided by an inflatable bag to which com- 
pressed air is supplied through an air admission valve. 
When the housing moves downward from the preselected 
height, a rod forces the check valve open admitting addi- 
tional air to the bag. The rod carries a piston joumalled 
in a passageway whereby air is continuously allowed to 
escape from the system. If the housing moves above the 
preselected height by more than a predetermined dis- 
tance the rod also moves upward allowing additional air 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



169 



to escape from the bag to provide a fast return to the pension length of the article supported by the band 
preselected height without or with a minimum of oscilla- member, such mechanism embodying a routably mounted 
tion. 



3,667,708 

COMBINATION FISHING ROD AND FLASHLIGHT 

HOLDER ATTACHMENT 

John F. Smcltzcr, Mcriden, Iowa 51037 

Continuation-in-part of appUcation Scr. No. 889,484, 

Dec. 31, 1969. This appUcation Apr. 1, 1970, Ser. 

No. 24,651 

Int CL AOlk 97/70 
U.S. CI. 248—39 2 Claims 




A combination fishing rod and flashlight holder at- 
tachment for use with a cylindrical container comprising 
a flexible band adapted to be extended around the con- 
tainer and secured thereto. A first tubular support mem- 
ber is selectively movably secured to the band and is 
adapted to receive one end of a fishing rod therein to sup- 
port the same. Second and third tubular support mem- 
bers are adjustably movably secured to the band on op- 
posite sides of the first support member and are adapted 
to receive either a flashlight or a fishing rod therein to 
support the same. The attachment includes tightening 
means to maintain the band on the container in the se- 
lected position and to permit the attachment to be easily 
removed therefrom. The first support member also has 
means thereon for supporting a flashlight thereon. A 
stringer attachment is secured to the band below the first 
support member to permit a stringer to be secured to the 
attachment. The second and third support members ex- 
tend upwardly and outwardly from the band and are 
designed to permit the fisherman to fish at night with a 
flashlight being placed in one of the tubular support 
members so as to direct light on the upper end of the 
fishing rod in the first support member. The second and 
third support members are spaced approximately 180 de- 
grees apart with respect to the container to permit the 
fisherman to selectively use either of the same depending 
upon the direction of the stream flow. The first support 
member also has means thereon for supporting a flash- 
light thereon. 



3,667,709 
LENGTHWISE ADJUSTABLE SUSPENSION DEVICE 
FOR ARTICLES, PARTICULARLY SANITATION 
AND HEATING PIPES 

Rodolf Linser, Renningcn, Germany, assignor to 
Stanzwerke Glaras AG, Buchholz, Switzerland 
FUed Sept 25, 1970, Scr. No. 75,323 
Int CI. F161 3/14 
VS. a. 248—59 4 Claims 

A lengthwise adjustable su^)ension device for articles, 
such as in particular sanitation or plumbing pipes and 
heating conduits, which is of the type incorporating a 
suspension band member provided at one end thereof with 
an attachment element to which there can be secured the 
article which is to be suspended. The invention contem- 
plates the provision of mechanism fcx- regulating the sus- 




..*" 



element onto which there can be wound-up and wound-off 
one end of the band member. 



3,667,710 
FLEXIBLE STRAP FASTENER 
Koy A. Moody, Flossmoor, and Jack E. Caveney, Chi- 
cago, lU., assignors to Panduit Corp., TInley Park, 

FUed Aug. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 67,117 

Int CI. F161 3/14 

VS. CI. 248 — 71 16 Chdms 



W 18 




Z_ 



33 



"^(h:i».>i2:^r,. '» 




30"^ 13 * 



iiiirtiyitffr' \^ ] 



A flexible strap fastener and several embodiments there- 
of are disclosed herein and include generally an elongated 
head strap portion, an elongated tail strap portion, and a 
resilient mount interconnecting said strap portions and 
adapted to be pushed into an opening in a panel to retain 
the entire strap fastener thereto. The head and tail straps 
are provided with a means for adjustable interconnection 
whereby the flexible strap fastener is formed into an article 
retaining loop. 

3 667 711 

HANGER FOR PIPES AND CONDUITS 

Martin S. Kissel, 806 Main St., Latrobc, Pa. 15650 

FUed Oct 13, 1970, Scr. No. 80,273 

Int CI. F161 3/04 

VS. CI. 248—72 9 Claims 




The specification discloses a hanger for supporting a 
pipe or conduit or the like on a flange, such as the flange 
of a beam. The hanger is in the form of an L shaped 
member adapted to engage the upper side of the flange 



170 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



at one end of one of the legs and to engage the top of 
the pipe or the like with the end of the other of the legs. 
A U bolt embracing the pipe or the like from beneath has 
leg portions extending through the ranger and receiving 
nuts to clamp the assembly fixedly in place. 



3,667,712 

NOZZLE STORAGE UNIT 

George Michael Furgoeson, Dogwood Drive, 

Centerbrooii, Conn. 06409 

FUed July 10, 1970, Ser. No. 53,864 

Int CL A47f 5/08, 7/00 

UA CI. 248—75 6 Claims 




A device for storing a hose nozzle comprising a support 
member, an externally threaded bracket member on the 
support member for threadably receiving a hose nozzle, 
and a pair of apertured members resiliently connected to 
the support member and adapted to receive and hold 
a hose through the apertures. The support member, brack- 
et member, and apertured members preferably are con- 
structed from a single piece of semi-flexible plastic. 



3,667,713 

ADJUSTABLE TABLE LEG 

Robert A. Clarke, Blanford, Mass., assignor to The 

Columbia Manufacturing Co., Inc., Westfield, Mass. 

Filed Feb. 8, 1971, Ser. No. 113,432 

Int CI. F16m 11/26 

U.S. a. 248—188.5 2 Claims 




1 



3,667,714 

TANK SUPPORT 

Theodore Ziaylek, Ir., P.O. Box 292, 

Yardlcy, Pa. 19068 
Filed Aug. 14, 1970, Ser. No. 63,822 
Int CI. A47f 5/00 ' 
U.S. CV 248—284 51 




^^Z2ZZZZZ2 



Claims 



A bracket for supporting a tank, cylinder, or other 
container such as an oxygen tank, compressed air cylinder, 
fire extinguisher or the like, is movable to a retracted or 
inactive position wherein the tank may be housed within 
a cabinet or recess in a wall, fire apparatus or the like 
and is movable to an extended or operative position per- 
mitting easy removal of the tank for use. Means are 
further provided for releasably holding the bracket and 
tank in either of its alternative positions. 



>IJNT1NI 



3,667,715 
MOUNTING APPARATUS FOR REMOTE DIS- 
ENGAGEMENT AND ENGAGEMENT OF 
SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS 
Jofaann Mcrtcns, Santa Cruz, Calif., assignor to Nuclear 
Waste Syrtems Company, Campbell, Calif. 
FUed Jan. 25, 1971, Ser. No. 109,182 
Int CL B67d 5/64; F04d 13/08 
VS. a. 248—327 ^ 10 aalms 



$. d. 



',1 



Adjustable table leg assembly having a mounting plate 
and depending therefrom a fixed tubular sleeve provided 
with a slot spaced from the lower open end thereof and a 
V-shaped rod brace member of spring metal having its 
outer ends fixed to the plate with the lower looped end 
spring tensioned against the sleeve at said slot. A tapered 
stud is fixed on the looped end of the brace and projects 
through said slot. An adjustable tubular lower leg section 
is slidably inserted in the sleeve and has a series of longi- 
tudinally spaced holes releasably engageable by the 
tapered stud to secure said leg section by the brace mem- 
ber at a selected position of telescopic extension. 




Mounting apparatus for lowering, raising and securing 
in place a submersible pump. The apparatus includes an 
alignment rack for aligning within a liquid holding vat 
a submersible pump with a discharge pipe within the vat 
for coupling to the pump. Adjustable members are adapted 
for engaging the pump within the vat and extending out- 
side the vat. The members are further adapted to urge 
the pump in and out of coupling relationship to the dis- 
charge pipe responsive to adjustments performed on said 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



171 



members outside the vat. A pump cage is guided relative 
to the alignment rack and discharge pipe. The cage is 
movable laterally with relationship to the discharge pipe 
so as to move the pump laterally clear of the discharge 
tube when the pump and pipe are uncoupled, and pulley 
means are provided for raising and lowering the pump 
from and to the cage when clear of the discharge tube. 



3,667,716 

TELESCOPING CHAIR BASE 

Bernard J. Fries, Jenison, Mich., assignor to Steelcase 

Inc., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Filed Aug. 31, 1970, Ser. No. 68,178 

Int CI. F16m U/00. 13/00 

US, CI. 248—405 11 Claims 




A threaded chair spindle is threadably carried by a nut 
which b rotatably supported by a hub tube such that 
the lower bearing surface of the spindle extends within 
the hub tube. A spindle cover tube is longitudinally fixed 
with respect to said spindle and encloses the threaded 
portion of the spindle but can be rotated with respect 
to the spindle. An elongated, vertical rib projects in- 
wardly from the inside surface of the spindle cover tube 
and mates with a vertical groove in the side of the nut 
so that the spindle and the spindle cover tube can be 
raised or lowered by rotating the spindle cover tube with 
respect to the spindle. 



3,667,717 
DEVICE FOR RAINWATER PIPES IN BUILDINGS 

PROVTOED WITH CORNICES 

Kemiedi Ulf Foike Fasth, Halmstad, Sweden, assignor to 

AB C. W. Erikssons Piatsh^cri Eftr. Halmstad, Sweden 

FUed July 22, 1970, Ser. No. 57,052 

Claims priority, ^tplication Sweden, July 24, 1969, 

10,416/69 

Int CI. E02b 9/04; £04d 13/00 

US. CI. 248—48.2 6 Claims 




even under considerable load. To obtain this, the mount- 
ing members are provided with stirrups carrying the gutter 
lengths proper, the said stirrups being slidingly mounted 
in the upright limbs of the mounting members by means 
of slides which may be adjusted to desired inclination by 
means of an arrangement of holes and a locking means. 



3,667,718 
ADJUSTABLE REAR VIEW MIRROR ASSEMBLY 
Gerald E. Goslin, Mount aemcns, Russell R. Hersh- 
berger, Bhrningham, and George J. Mach, Berkley, 
Mich., assignors to General Motors Corporation, 
Detroit, Mich. 
Continuation of abandoned application Ser. No. 770,522, 
OdL 25, 1968. This appUcatlon May 18, 1971, Ser. 
No. 144,595 

Int a. B60r 1/06 
US. a. 248-^487 7 Cbrims 




A rear view mirror assembly for use on motor vehicles 
having an outwardly extending removable cargo includes 
an L-shaped support arm that has a lower leg supported 
at the vehicle door for rotation about a vertical axis and 
has an upper leg supporting a mirror element for rota- 
tion about a horizontal axis. The mirror element is mov- 
able between an inboard position used under normal driv- 
ing conditions and an outboard viewing position used 
when a cargo is being carried by rotation of the support 
member about the vertical axis coupled with rotation of 
the mirror element about the horizontal axis. 



3,667,719 
ARRANGEMENT FOR THE BOTTOM POURING OF 

SLAG INTO A CHILL MOULD 
Vitaly MikhaOovich Batfal, Ulitsa Semashko 10, kr. 
54/3; Jury Vadimovich Latasfa, Vozdokhoflotsky proa- 
pekt 48, kv. 14; and Boris IzraOevich Medovar, Bulrar 
Lesi UkrainU 2, kv. 8, aU of KicT, U.&SJt 

FUed Not. 18, 1969, Ser. No. 877,663 

Int CI. B22d 27/02 

US, CL 249—109 3 Claims 




A gutter assembly intended for use in buildings provided 
with roof cornices of the kind carried in generally U- 
shaped mounting members. The roof gutter is mounted in 
said cornices such that the correct fall of a gutter length 
is easily obtainable and the inclination given to it remains 



An arrangement for the bottom pouring of slag into a 
chill mould of an electroslag furnace, comprising a head 
piece for allowing the liquid slag to be poured, and a mem- 
ber provided with a duct connecting the cavity of the head- 
piece with the cavity of a chill mould, the member with 



172 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



duct being mounted so as to be capable of moving in re- 
lation to the chill mould in order to overlap this duct 
at the point where it communicates with the cavity of the 
chill mould after the liquid slag has been poured there- 
into, and wherein the pouring of the slag into the chill 
mould enables ingots to be obtained without any lateral 
projections in their bottom end. and allows effecting the 
accurate dosing of slag being poured into the chill mould. 



inner surface of the housing to form a seal to provide an 
improved closing characteristic, and the bases oC the 
translating means are further away from the bore where- 
by the sealing means on the bottom of the packing ele- 
ment is only slightly compressed allowing a fast response 
and quick adjustment of the packing clement to changes 
in diameter and configuration of moved-through com- 
ponents of the drilling string. 



3,667,720 

TEE ROD CONFIGURATION FOR SEALING THE 

THREADED INNER END OF A SHEBOLT 

Chester I. WiUlams, 347 Grecnbriar SE., 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 49506 

FUed Sept 22, 1969, Scr. No. 859,757 

Int CL E04g 17/06, 17/08 

U.S. a. 249—213 4 Claims 





3 667 722 
FROFORflONAL VALVE 
Sherwin D. Katz, SkoUe, and Joseph M. tevon, 
Arlington Heights, IlL, aisigiion to I-T-E In^rial 
Corporation 

Filed Oct 22, 1970, Scr. No. 83,062 
! IntCLF16kii/70 

UA a. 251—30 10 Claims 



The interior threading on the inner. end of a shebolt in- 
stalled in a wall-form tie system is sealed against the in- 
gress of concrete by the presence of an annular ring adja- 
cent the inner extremity of the threading at the ends of 
the iimer tie rod. The sealing ring is deformable, and op- 
erates preferably in conjunction with a positive stc^ ar- 
rangement engageable with the end oi the tie rod. 



3,667,721 

BLOWOUT PREVENTER 

Ado N. Vnjasinovic, Fnlierton, CaUf ., assignor to 

The Rnckcr Company, Oakland, Calif. 

Filed Apr. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 27,947 

Int a. E21b 33/06 

\5J&. CI. 251—1 8 Claims 




A proportional variable flow control valve including 
a piston type main valve member having a pilot valve 
slidable axially therein that controls the pressure drop 
across the main valve and hence the opening of the main 
valve. The piston type main valve forms a chamber in 
the main valve housing that is continuously presBiirized 
by inlet fluid thereby tending to close the valve, and the 
ball valve is positioned to relieve pressure in this cham- 
ber to permit opening of the valve under a constant inlet 
fluid biasing force acting on the valve. An actuator is 
provided for the ball pilot valve that shifts the ball valve 
in an amount proportional to the desired flow rate through 
the main valve and in response to the differential pres- 
sures the main valve opens a corresponding amount. 



An improved blowout preventer in which a packing ele- 
ment having a resilient sealing means and a plurality of 
metallic translating means slidably moves against a curved 
inner surface of a housing for moving into a sealed 
position in which the packing element is positioned 
against but not connected to an actuating piston for in- 
creased sealing performance, freedom of movement, and 
for ease of replacement and in which the axial extent of 
the curved portion of the translating means is less than 
the curved outer surface of the packing element whereby 
the sealing means may circumferentially contact the curved 



3 667 723 
ELECTROMAGNETIC d'eTENT MEANS FOR 
SLIDING SPOOLS OF DIRECTIONAL CONTROL 

VALVES 
Klaus Schneider, Ladwigsburg, Gcmuny, assignor to 
Robert Bosch G Jn.b JH., Stuttgart Germany 
Filed Dec 3, 1970, Scr. No. 94,913 
Clidmfl priority, application Germany, Dec. 11, 1969, 
P 19 62 069.0 
Int CI. F16k 31/44 
\5S. CL 251—68 17 Claims 

A* detent device for the sliding spool of a directional 
control valve wherein the spool is permanently biased 
to a neutral position and is movable to two operative posi- 
tions. The detent device has an armature which is mounted 
on the spool and is movable toward a first or a second 
electromagnet in the valve housing in response to move- 
ment of the spool to the one or the other operative posi- 
tion. The electromagnets are automatically energized 
shortly before the spool reaches an operative position, and 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



173 



at least one electromagnet can be deenergized with a fixed holds the valve in assembled relationship, and the valve 

or vanable delay followmg energization to permit a body. The sealing rmg is also in engagement with a valve 

resetUng sprmg to return the spool to its neutral position, seat, such that the sealing ring, deformed by the con- 
Altemauvcly, the spool can carry an electromagnet which / w 



™» 



jKi_ 



^ 15, 

^ \ * » 



-—J ~ — It 




is movable against a first or a second armature in the 
housing when the spool moves toward its first or second 
operative position. The electromagnet is energized shortly 
before it reaches the one or the other armature. 



3,667,724 ^ 

SOLENOID ACTUATED DISPENSING VALVE 

Richard T. ComeUns, Minneapolis, Minn., assignor to 

The Cornelius Company, Anolui, Minn. 

Filed June 10, 1970, Scr. No. 44,925 

Int CI. F16k 31/05 

U.S. a. 251—138 5 Oaims 




necting means, biases the seat toward the valve member, 
thereby establishing the initial engagement between the 
seat and the valve member. 



3 667 726 
FABRICATED GASI^TED VALVE BODY CON- 
STRUCTION FOR BUTTERFLY VALVES 
Herman S. Church, Cuyahoga Falls, and Duanc J. Cbuk, 
Kent Ohio, assignors to Teiedyne Mid-America Cor- 
poration, Hartville, Ohio 

FDcd Jan. 4, 1971, Scr. No. 103,505 

Int a. F16k 1/22 

US, CL 251—151 10 Claims 




A di^>ensing device hn the form of a mixing valve 
assembly has separate actuator arms for the fluids to be 
mixed, a solenoid having a plunger arranged to rock the 
actuator arms, and a selectively actuatable switch on the 
device connected in circuit with the solenoid. There is also 
included a manually movable lever located at the discharge 
nozzle for actuating the switch. ^ 



3,667,725 

UNSTRESSED SEATS FOR BETWEEN 

FLANGE VALVES 

Domer Scaramncd, (Ndahoma City, Olda., assignor to 

Balon Corporation, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Continuation-in-part of application Scr. No. 526,936, Jan. 
3, 1966, now Patent No. 3,428,292. This appplication 
Aug. 7, 1968, Scr. No. 750,873 

Int CL F16k 5/06 
VS. CL 251—151 7 Claims 

An improved valve wherein a sealing ring is disposed 
in a counterbore in the valve body and maintains seal- 
ing engagement between the connecting means which 




V.^V\\\\\'J 



A fabricated plate metal valve body has spaced inner 
and outer metal ring members assembled concentrically. 
Valve operator trunnions are connected to the rings and 
extend in diametrically opposite directions. A rubber gas- 
ket is molded to and bonded with the metal rings within 
the outer ring and completely surrounding the inner ring. 
The gasket has annular seeing portions projecting 
axially in cross section beyond the planes of the ends of 
the outer ring to form seals engageable with the ends 
of pipe flanges with which the valve body is assembled. 
A butterfly valve is assembled with the valve body having 
an operating shaft extending through the truimions and 
a movable valve disc connected to the shaft and adapted 
to be moved to a position in sealing contact throughout 
its periphery with a gasket interiorly of the inner ring. 
The inner diameter of the gasket is slightly smaller than 
the outer diameter of the valve disc which rotates within 
the valve body. Provision may be made to minimize any 



m 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June iI, 1972 



reduction in the inner diameter of the gasket incident 
to expansion of the gasket material from the heat of 
high temperature liquids passing through the valve. 



3,667,727 

SEAT FOR BALL OR GATE VALVES 

Billy W. Bowden, P.O. Box 308, Hammond, La. 70401 

Condnoatioa-in-iNirt of abandoned application Scr. No. 

852,420, Aug. 22, 1969. This application May 10, 1971, 

Scr. No. 141,721 

Int CI. F16k 5/20 
\}S, CI. 251—172 6 Claims 




A seat for a ball or gate valve includes an insert which 
maintains a constant sealed contact with the ball or gate 
no matter what pressure differential exists between line 
pressure and the valve body cavity pressure. 



3,667,728 

SELF-LOADING DOLLY 

Herbert J. Garelick, St Paul, Minn., assignor to 

Garellck Mfg. Co., St Paul, Minn. 

FUed Aug. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 65,796 

Int CL B62b 1/06 

U.S. CL 254—8 R 1 Claim 



\*.~, /c 



•^^zrii^^'-^:Z 




I 3,667,729 

I GATE CLOSURE APPARATUS 

Raymond J. HInkd, Arena, N. Dak. 58413 

i FUed Apr. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 30,008 i 

Int CL B66f 3/00 

VS. CL 254—77 5' Claims 




Wire gate closure and tensioning apparatus coOiprising 
a frame mounted on a stationary fence post and pivotal ly 
carrying a take-up mechanism which engages one end of 
a chain or cable, the other end of which joins with a 
moveable end of the gate. The take-up mechanism in- 
cludes a handle on each side of the fence for drawing the 
moveable end of the gate toward the stationary post. A 
latch maintains the take-up mechanism in position when 
the gate is closed. 



3,667,730 

QUICK ACTION JACK 

Alan F. KoUmar, 495 Graymont Drive, 

Santa Rosa, Calif. 95405 

FUed May 8, 1970, Ser. No. 35,689 

Int CL B60fl 9/q2 



U.S. CL 254—86 R 



10 Claims 






Apparatus for lifting a vehicle, such as a snowmobile, 
from the ground, whereby it may be transported or reposi- 
tioned; said apparatus being easily operable by one per- 
son. The apparatus includes a U shaped handle assembly, 
the legs of which are spaced apart sufficiently far to com- 
fortably span the width of a snowmobile. The tip of each 
leg is provided with a wheel assembly including an an- 
gularly formed structure which, in combination with a 
tie bar, functions to lift the snowmobile upwardly, when 
the handle assembly is depressed. In use, the apparatus is 
moved along the length of the snowmobile, with a wheel 
assembly on each side of the snowmobile. When the ap- 
paratus has been brought to a point just beyond the center 
of gravity »t the snowmobile the tie bar is inserted 
through fittings on the wheel assembly. The front end of 
the snowmobile will then be lifted when the handle as- 
sembly is pressed downwardly. The rear end of the snow- 
mobile may then be easily lifted and supported, off ,the 
ground, by attachment to the handle assembly. 




-\-t 



An upright support jack structure including a lower 
base portion and an upper screw portion partially tele- 
scoped downwardly into the upper end of the bftse por- 
tion. A radially expanded segmental thrust nut is sup- 
ported within the upper end portion of the base portion 
against rotation relative thereto and the base portion in- 
cludes means operative from the exterior of the base por- 
tion for radially inwardly shifting the segments of the 
thrust nut into threaded engagement with the screw por- 
tion of the jack. When the segments of the thrust nut are 
radially inwardly shifted into threaded engagement with 
the screw portion the thrust nut segments are supported 
from the base portion against downward movement rela- 
tive thereto and accordingly, rotation of the upper screw 
portion relative to the base portion when the thrust nut 
is threadedly engaged with the screw portion will cause 
the screw portioa to be elevated relative to tfie base 
portion. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



175 



3,667,731 
CHAIN GUIDING APPARATUS 

Jean-Louis Corgnet Bonlogne-Billancourt France, as- 
signor to Compagnic Francaisc des Petroles, Paris, 
France 

FOcd Dec. 11, 1969, Scr. No. 884,438 
Clabns priority, application Fnmce, Dec. 11, 1968, 

177,682 
^^ Inta.B66di/i« 

U.S. CL 254—190 R 1 Claim 



ventional single screw extruder, and which includes two 
axially parallel screws, located in a housing and having 
an essentially identical flight gradient, which almost com- 
pletely engage into each other and can be rotated in the 
same direction. Each screw is shaped to provide sealing 
ridges which close the conventional screw threads and 




An anchor chain guide having at least two mutually 
perpendicular pulleys with the bearing support of one 
journaled on the shaft of the other so that the central 
or symmetry plane of each pulley is tangent to the entry 
groove of the other. In one embodiment the bearing 
support for one of the pulleys slides on a circular track 
whose center coincides with the axis of the other pulley. 
In another embodiment the bearing support mounts a 
pair of tangent pulleys in the same plane and is journaled 
for rotation about the horizontal shaft of a third pulley. 
With both arrangements the anchor chain always lies 
in the central plane of both pulleys around which it is 
guided, thus eliminating lateral stresses and undue fric- 
tional wear, and preventing the chain from jimiping over 
the pulley cheeks. 

3,667,732 

APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING A 

HOMOGENEOUS MIXTURE 

Pierre Lejeune, Grenoble, France, assignor to 

Creusot-Loire, Paris, France 

Filed Aug. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 65,363 

Int CL BOlf 5/02 

VS. CI. 259—4 3 Claims 




which engage with correspondingly shaped passageways 
provided in the flights of the adjacent screw, whereby the 
plastication can be carried out with only partially filled 
screw threads, and a constant sealing engagement of the 
screws is insured. The trapped air and the developing gases 
can escape through vapor outlets provided in the housing. 




3,6 67,734 
FEED-MIXING APPARATUS 
Arnold Burton Skrommc, MoUne, DL, Harold Richard 
lind^rom, Des Moines, Iowa, Etiar August Kenning- 
sen, Gcncsco, and Royal LowcD Bcldin, East Molinc, 
ni^ Donald Thomas Soiiie, Ankeny, Iowa, and Elmer 
Richard Ecfccrt, Horicon, Wis., assignors to Deere ft 
Company, Moline, DL 

FUed Feb. 23, 1971, Ser. No. 118,050 

Int CL BOlf 15/02 

VS. a. 259—44 22 CUdms 



A homogeneous mixture of two substances, for exam- 
ple a fluid suspension of fibres and a diluent in the manu- 
facture of non-woven fabrics or paper pulp, is produced 
from a mixture of the two substances and injecting the 
mixture through a plurality of ducts into a dilution cham- 
ber. 



3,667,733 

DEVICE FOR THE PLASTICATION OF 

POWDERY PLASTIC MATERIALS 

Rudolf Paul Fritsch, Goslarer Str. 58, 

Stuttgart-Weilimdorf, Germany 

FUed Jan. 27, 1971, Ser. No. 110,115 

Oaims priority, appUcatfon Germany, Jan. 28, 1970, 

P 20 03 593J 

^ Int a. BOlf 7/05 

U.S. CL 259—6 17 Oaims 

A device for the pressureless plastication of powdery 

plastic materials, which can be used in front of a con- 




Feed-mixlng apparatus including a cylindrical tank 
having a substantially horizontal bottom, a mixing auger 
oxitained within a vertical tubular housing mounted con- 
centrically within the tank, and a h(Mizontal blade fixed 
at one end to the lower porticm of the auger and having 
an outer end extending in dose proximity to the tank wall. 



176 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6. 1972 



the blade being operable to sweep across the bottom of 
the tank as the auger is rotated and thereby promote mix- 
ing ol the material contained therein. 



3 667 735 
CENTRIFUGAL CEMENT SLURRY MIXER 
MazweU G. Hood, St. Ives, New South Wales, Australia, 
•flrignor to Fowler Rex Pty. Limited, Brookvalc, New 
Sootii Wales, AostnUa 

Filed June 3, 1970, Scr. No. 43,002 

Int CL B28c 5/06 

VS, CL 259—151 5 Claimi 





3,667,737 
ENTRAINMENT OF A UQUID MEDIUM OR 
OTHER ADDITIVE IN A UQUID OR OTHER 
FORMULATION 
Alan Colin Scott Howe, Hemcl Hempstead, England, 
assignor to John Lalng ft Son limited, London, Eng- 
land 

FDcd Not. 28, 1969, Ser. No. 880,682 
Cbdms prlMity, application Great Britatai, Nov. 30, 1968, 

56,951/68 

Int CL B28c 5/10 

VS. CL^59— 164 2 Oahns 



An apparatus for mixing cement-water slurry in which 
a tank having an annular mixing chamber is disposed 
about a core and a flexible hollow cylinder mounted above 
the core has flexible walls for the introduction of pulsating 
air into it. Tangentially located nozzles admit water to the 
upper part of the chamber. Cement is also introduced into 
the upper region of the chamber near the flexible pulsating 
walL The slurry mixed in the chamber is recirculated 
from a suction outlet near the bottom ai the chamber to 
an intermediate level via a valve which can deliver water 
alcMie or slurry from within the chamber or slurry from 
the suction outlet. 



MOBILE MIXING MACHINE 
Dale E. Carroll, 13864 Putney Road, 

Poway, CaBf. 92064 

FDcd Aug. 28, 1969, Ser. No. 853,770 

Int CL B28c 5/20, 5/42. 7/06 

US, CL 259—161 3 Claims 




A cavitation dement for inducing cavitation In, for 
example, a wet concrete mix. The element has a smooth 
upstream profile and a Muff downstream profile with 
formations on its upper surface which induce a corrugated 
shape to the envelope <^ the cavitation immediately down- 
stream of the bluff profile. An inlet within the element 
communicates with a number of apertures opening into 
the bluff profile whereby a jet, or jets, of fluid or other 
additive are supplied through the apertures into cavitation 
induced by the bluff profile. 



1i 



3,667,738 

UMP BODY FOR CONCRETE MIX 

Glcnway Mazon, Jr., Milwankee, yf)M. 

Filed Mar. 11, 1971, Scr. No. 123,262 

Int a. B28c 5/18 



VS, CL 259—171 



UOainia 




A mobile mixing machine includes a plurality of con- 
tainers, one for each of the materials which are to be 
mixed. Superimposed conveyors are disposed below the 
containers, one conveyor extending rearwardly farther 
than the other. The outlet of one of the containers is 
disposed rearwardly of the rear end of the other con- 
veyor. The conveyors move the materials toward a mix- 
ing diamber, the latter being preferably of the rotary 
type, the axis of ^iliich extends hwizontally. 



A frame structure tiltably sui^rting a dump body is 
removably mounted on a flat bed truck. The body side 
walls amverge toward a discharge outlet at one end of the 
body, from a zone nearer its other end, and also converge 
towards said other end from said zone. Its bottom wall 
inclines upwardly towards the outlet from said zone. Pref- 
erably the body is mounted with its plane of symmetry 
oblique to the longitudinal centerline of the truck chassis, 
discharge outlet forwardly and at the driver's side; but 
means are disclosed for securing it to a truck in several 
orientations. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



177 



3,667,739 
PROCESS AND APPARATUS REGULATING 
THE FUEL-AIR MIXTURE IN INTERNAL 
COMBUSTION ENGINES OPERATING WITH 
CARBURETORS 
Franz Menke, Ncckargcmnnd, Gmnany, assignor to 
Eltro GmbH & Co., Heidelberg, Germany 
FUcd Dec 9, 1969, Ser. No. 883,433 
Int CL F02m 1/10, 7/04 
UJ. a. 261—1 15 Cbims 




3,667,741 
CARBURETTERS FOR INTERNAL 
COMBUSTION ENGINES 
Peter P. Swatman, SolihuO, En^tand, assignor to British 
Leyland (Austin-Morris) Limited, Birmingham, Eng- 
land 
Continuation of appUcation Ser. No. 791,399, Jan. 15, 

1969. This appUcation Aug. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 67,988 

Clafans priority, application Great Britafai, Jan. 25, 1968, 

3,856/68; May 9, 1968, 21,917/68 

Int CL F02m 7/04 

VS. CL 261—50 A 8 Clainis 




A process and apparatus for regulating a fuel-air mix- 
ture for internal combustion engines comprises a plurality 
of telescoped tubes defining Venturi passages for dis- 
charging air at constant velocity in the region of a variable 
fuel inlet. The inlet and air passages are conjointly regu- 
lated to be correspondingly varied in size to change engine 
operation. The size of the fuel inlet is additionally and in- 
dependently regulated, in superposition with the above reg- 
ulation, in response to temperature and pressure changes 
during variation of engine operating conditions. 



3,667,740 

CARBURETOR 

Sten-Erik Mortstedt Ostra Bcrgsgatan 11, 

611 00 Nykophig, Sweden 

FUcd Aug. 1, 1969, Scr. No. 846,904 

Chdms priority, application Sweden, Mar. 14, 1969, 

3,595/69 

Int CL F02m 1/10. 7/16 

VS. CL 261—39 A 6 Claims 




A fuel-injection type carburetor for internal combustion 
engines, including means for automatically varying the 
rate of fuel flow into the air pipe in relation to the air 
pressure within said pipe and including the possibility for 
temperature and atmospheric pressure compensation. 



A carburetter of the controllable jet, automatic vari- 
able-choke type has a single main control member (e.g. 
a rotatable shutter) which regulates the effective cross- 
sectional area of the choke and also supplants the usual 
throttle disc. 



3,667,742 

FIXING ARRANGEMENT 

Roman C. Kamob, Nmlfa Rose, N.Y., assignor to 

Xerox Corporation, Stamford, Conn. 

FOed Dec. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 101,730 

Int CL G03g 13/20, 15/20 

VS. CL 263 — 6 E 6 Clafans 




Apparatus for fusing electroscopic toner images onto a 
support in which a pair of elastically deformable shell 
members of a generally cylindrical configuraticm are each 
supported in a deformed generally elliptical configuration 
about a pair of generally parallel spaced xoXLtr members 
with the roller members being biased in a direction gen- 
erally al(Mig the minor axis of the req)ective elliptical 
configuration to further defcxm at least a portion of the 
elliptical surface oi one oi the shell members against at 
least a portion of the elliptical surface of the other of the 
shell members thereby in'oviding an extended nip or area 
of contact between the shell members. A source of heat 
energy associated with at least one of the shell members 
produces a heating oi the shell members to an elevated 



178 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 



1972 



temperature and as the heated shell members are ad- 
vanced about the roller members in the deformed c<mi- 
figuration a sapport member having unfused electro- 
scopic toner imases thereon will be advanced therebe- 
tween to pfx>duce at least a partial melting of the toner 
images cm the support within the extended nip area. 



3,667,743 

HEARTH SCRAPING DEVICE 

Edward J. Kovaldk and Edward D. DowHiig, Pittsburgh, 

Pa., asdsnors to Pnllmaii Incofporated, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FDcd Feb. 9, 1971, Ser. No. 1 13,898 

lot a. F27b 9/16 

VJS, CI. 263—7 15 Claims 




The specification discloses a hearth scraping device, 
particularly for rotary hearth furnaces, to level the bed 
of mill scale initially provided on the hearth for better 
seating of the work product therein and to remove ex- 
cess scale derived from the work product while holding 
the furnace temperature sufficiently high that the mill 
scale is loose and manageable. The device comprises a 
counterbalanced cantilever type boom, carrying a series 
of canted scraper blades, inserted horizontally through 
a dean-out door into the furnace substantially along a 
radial line. When in installed position, the boom is. 
hingedly supported at its outer end on a pedestal struc- 
ture and raised and lowered under manual control by 
a jack to a position for appropriate scraping action by 
the scraper blades which, in cooperation with the rota- 
tion of the hearth, causes progressive movement of the 
scale from blade to blade radially outward through the 
clean-out door. The boom assembly has suitable passages 
provided therein for water circulation and consequent 
cooling to withstand exposure to heat. 



3,667,744 

COMBUSTION APPARATUS 

Robert M. D'Arc^, lames C. Birtell, and Emmery P. 

Henaley, Borger, Tex., and Robert C. Pryor, Bardes- 

▼ille, OidflM assignors to Phillips Petroleum Company 

FOcd Aug. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 65,533 

bit CI. r27b 3/10 

U.S. CL 263—40 R 11 Claims 




An apparatus for establishing controlled temperatures 
and oxygen content of a gas for removal of deposits from 
equipment by oxidation. A chamber in which the equip- 
ment to be cleaned is positioned is adapted with gas cir- 
culating ductwork and with a burner for the introduction 
of hot gases of controlled oxygen content. 



1 



3,667,745 

CRUCIBLE FURNACE 

L4uearo8 J. Lazarldis, Lincoln, Mass., assignor to 

Thermo Electron Corporation, Waltham, Mass. 

FUed Apr. 15, 1970, Scr. No. 28,860 ^ 

Int a. F27b 14/14 

U.S. CI. 266—33 R 7 Claims 




y 



A crucible furnace for the melting of metals or other 
substances having high melting points which includes a 
refractory vessel or crucible for containing the material 
to be melted, the vessel being surrounded by a baffle gen- 
erally conforming in shape to the vessel. External to the 
baffle is a chamber at the base of which fuel and combus- 
tion air, at times preheated, are separately introfiuced, 
tubulently mixed and ignited. The baffle is perforated in 
a pattern of holes which serve to direct combustion gases 
in the form of jets upon the outer wall of the vessel. This 
action enhances heat transfer by disrupting stagnant 
boundary layers of gas along the wall of the crucible, con- 
tributes to the uniformity of heat distribution in the 
crucible, and contributes in achieving high overall heat 
transfer ooefflcient. The products of combusticm are drawn 
out of an annular space about the upper periphery of the 
crucible which is sealed so that no contact with the con- 
tents of the crucible is possible. The products of combus- 
tion may also be passed through a recuperator when pre- 
heating of the incoming combustion air is desirable to 
increase efficiency and flame temperature. 



\ 



\ 



3 667 746 
FURNACE FOR CONTINubuS HEAT PROCE^ING 

OF VARIOUS MATERIALS 
Gleb Nikolaevich Makarov, Ulitsa Gotvalda 14, kv. 53;' 
Boris Nlkolacvicii Zhitov, Trifonovskaya ulitsa 61, kv. 
3; Anatoly MUdiallovich Zagoreti, Nizhne-Pervomais- 
kaya nlitsa 3, kv. 57; Jnry Gcrmanovich Korolev, 
Unirersitetsky prospckt 6, korpus 2, kv. 68; and 
Konstantfai Ivanovlch Syskov, Federativny pro^ekt 6, 
korpus 6, kv. 47, all of Moscow, U.SJS.R.; Jury Yakovle- 
Tich Flloncnko, Ulitsa Pcrova 45, Lipetsk, U.8.S.R.; 
Semen Semcnovich Dvorin, Eniselskaya nlitsa 16/21, 
kv. 27; and Rnvim Zinorievich Lcmcr, Ulitsa Marii 
Ulvanovoi 17, korpns 2, kr. 4, bofli of Moscow, 
U.S.SJt.; Fnat Akhtemovlch Mnstafin, Tagil, Gazet- 
nava nlitsa 80/29, kw. 10; and Alcxandr Scmenovich 
SemenoT, Ulitsa K. Mana 99, kr. 52, both of Nizhny 
Tagil, U.S.SJI.; and Leonid lostfovich ErUn, UUtsa 
Malyskeva 76, kv. 36; Nikolai Sergecvich Grayaznov, 
UUtsa Malyshcva 76, kv. 5; IzraO Mlkhailovkh Lazov- 
Ay, Ulitsa Malydieva 76, kv. 10; and Pctr Yakovlevich 
Nefebov, Ulitsa TItova 18, kv. 7, all of Sverdlovsk, 
UJSJS.R. 

I ' FUed Jan. 29, 1970, Scr. No. 6,800 
I Int a. F27b 17/00 

VS, CI. 266—21 5 Claims 

A furnace for continuous heat processing of various 
materials comprising a ring-shaped hearth with a plat- 
form for placement of the material to be jx'ocessed, the 

\ 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



179 



hearth being rotatable in an annular passage of the fur- tracks may be either overhead tracks or may be ground 
naoe. The hearth is hollow and has an inner chamber for supported tracks. The apparatus includes various arrange- 



\ 




passing combustible gases from a burner to the material 
via apertures in the platform. 



3,667,747 

CONVEYOR HEATER 

Robert W. GraybUI, Stanley C. Reibcr, and Donald W. 

Nacc, Yorit, Pa., and Ellis S. White, Glyndon, Md., 

assignors to Fccor Industries, Ltd., Yoric, Pa. 

Filed May 19, 1970, Scr. No. 38,849 

bit CI. F27b 1/20 

UJS. CL 266—24 10 Claims 




An apparatus for preheating a scrap charge before 
it is melted in a furnace includes a combustor and a 
plenum which are installed on a vibratory conveyor for 
movement conjointly therewith. The combustor, which 
has a non-refractory combustion chamber lining which 
is cooled by the incoming air, delivers heated air under 
pressure to the plenum located under the conveyor 
trough, from which the heated air is forced through a 
plurality of passageways in the conveyor surface to the 
scrap charge carried in the conveyor trough. After the 
scrap is preheated, a gate-ramp at the downstream end 
of the conveyor lowers to deliver the scrap to the 
furnace. 



3,667,748 
ARRANGEMENT FOR OPENING AND CLOSING 

TAPHOLES OF METALLURGICAL FURNACES 
Herbert Dienenthal, Obersdorf-Rodgen, and Theodor 
Zimmcrmann, Siegen im Westphalia, Germany, as- 
signors to Dango & Dienenthal Kommandi^esellschaft, 
Siegen Im Westphalia, Germany 

FUed Feb. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 11,117 
Claims priority, application Germany, Feb. 25, 1969, 
P 19 09 326.6 
Int CI. C21b 7/12 
U.S. CI. 166— Al 3 Claims 

Apparatus for opening and closing tapholes of metal- 
lurgical furnaces, particularly rotatable hearth furnaces 
and furnaces having plural tapholes, includes a carriage 
or trolley, a track supporting the carriage or trolley, and 
a taphole drilling machine and a taphole plugging ma- 
chine supported in side by side relation on the carriage 
or trolley. The tracks run at a uniform spacing from 
the wall of a furnace, and a centering arm on the wp- 
paratus cooperates with guides on the furnace, one ad- 
jacent each taphole, for proper location of the taphole 
drilling machine and the taphole plugging machine. The 




\ 



ments for supplying electric and fluid power to the ma- 
chines from stationary sources thereof. 



3,667,749 

SPRING DECK FOR FURNITURE 

John G. Piatt, Carthage, and Robert O. Isaacs, JopUn, 

Mo., assignors to FI«i-0>Laton, Inc^ Carthage, Mo. 

FUed July 23, 1970, Ser. No. 57,458 

Int CI. F16f 3/02 

VS. CL 267—112 14 CUms 



\ 



it'- 




A spring deck for furniture having open rigid cushion 
frames, said deck consisting of a flexible sheet of material 
non-elastic in its own plane, an elongated mounting mem- 
ber extending generally parallel to and spaced apart from 
one edge of said sheet, and elastically extensible mem- 
bers extending between and interccMmecting said mount- 
ing member with the adjacent edge of said sheet, said 
mounting member and the distal edge of said sheet being 
adapted to be firmly affixed to opposite sides of a furniture 
frame. 



3,667,750 

PLASnc SPRING FEEDER PLATE 

F^rederick R. Kuehn, Baltimore, Md., assignor to 

Koppera Company, Inc. 

FHed Nov. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 91,832 

Int CL B65h 5/16 

U5. a. 271—44 R 5 Clafans 

A spring feeder plate consists of a synthetic organic 

solid plastic that is highly resistant to ruptures induced 

by flexing of the plate during reciprocation of a spring 



180 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



feeder bar in sheet feeding machines. In such machines, machine. The transport apparatus includes a movable 

paper board sheets are fed from beneath a stack of such member in the normal path of movement of the leading 

sheets by a reciprocating feeder bar which extends across edge of the original document. The leading edge strikes 

the width of a feed table. The sheets are fed along a the movable member during each cycle of the document 




substantially horizontal feed path toward adjacent proc- 
essing machinery. At least one flexible plastic spring feed- 
er plate is mounted on the feeder bar for engaging the 
trailing edge of each successive bottom sheet as the bar 
reciprocates. 



3,667,751 

CARTON BLANK AUGNING APPARATUS 

Peter Zcmov, Wanwatosa, Thomas H. Gabcl, Meno* 

moBec Falls, and Normaii C. Abler, Wanwatosa, Wis., 

aaslgnon to Zcmd Corporatkni, New Berlin, Wis. 

Filed Dec. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 94,481 

1^ a. B65II 9/04 

VS, a. 271—49 16 Claims 




A carton blank aligning apparatus including a number 
of plows supported in a parallel spaced relation on each 
side of files of carton blanks being conveyed in a shingled 
relation on a conveyor, the plows being supported for 
vibratory motion on a pair of leaf springs. A vibrating 
device is used to vibrate the plow support to realign the 
edges of any canted carton blanks with the edges of 
the files. A ramp is provided in the conveyor to elevate 
the leading edge of the carton blanks as they move 
between the plows, and a roller is used to aid the move- 
ment of the blanks as they enter the space between the 
plows. 

3,667,752 
DOCUMENT TURNAROUND WITH IMPROVED 

AUTOMATIC SKEW CORRECTION 

Caaimir S. Samczyli, Franklin Park, 111., assignor to Bell 

ft Howell Company, Chicago, Dl. 

Continnatton-in-part of application Scr. No. 855,891, 

Sept 8, 1969. This application Nov. 6, 1969, Scr. 

No. 874,552 

Int CI. B65h 9/06 

UA CL 271—53 4 Hafans 

This invention is directed to aK)aratus for repeatedly 

transporting an wiginal document along a straight line 

path through an exposure staticm of an oflSce c<^>ying 



I f'',, ^ ] 




V- 



through the transport apparatus, causing localized buck- 
ling of the document thereby automatically correcting a 
skew condition which the document may acquire as a 
result of improper insertion into the copying machine or 
misalignment of the document transport members. 



I 



3,667,753 
GATE MECHANISM FOR PROCESSING A 



STREAM OF ARTICLES 

Robert K. Norton, Twinabnig, Ohio, aai^nor to Harris- 

Intertypc Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio 

\ Filed Jan. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 1,257 I 

X I Int CL B65h 29/60 I 

VS. CL 271—64 10 Cfadms 




An improved apparatus for processing a stream of ar- 
ticles made of sheet material includes an article classify- 
ing gate which has a first position in which it directs a 
flow of articles of one class to a first means for receiving 
the articles and a second position in which it directs the 
flow of the articles of another class to a second means 
for receiving the articles. The gate has a link associated 
therewith which is movable by a plurality of spaced apart 
cam members which move the gate between its first and 
second positions in a timed relationship with the flow of 
articles past the gate. The link is operable to move the 
gate when a cam follower mounted thereon engages with 
one of the cam members and is ineffective to control the 
position of the gate when the cam follower is not en- 
gaged with one of the cam members. A spring loaded 
toggle linkage is provided for maintaining iht gate in a 



\ 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



181 



selected position to which it has been moved by the cam 
members during the portion of the operation of the ap- 
paratus in which the cam members are not engaged with 
the cam follower. This construction allows the spaced 
apart cam members to be moved relative to each other so 
as to enable the ai^ratus to classify many different types 
and sizes of articles without the necessity of long time de- 
lays and costly change-over procedures every time it is 
dnired to classify a new set of articles which are different 
from the preceding set of articles which have been classi- 
fied by the apparatus. 



3,667,754 

MULTIPLE SWITCH AMUSEMENT PROJECTION 

DEVICE AND METHOD 

Stanley S. Coole, ClcTclaad, Ohio, assignor to Ohio 

Diaplaya, Inc~ Cleveland, Ohio 

Filed Od. IS, 1970, Scr. No. 80,997 

lot CL A63J 5/00 

VS. a. 272—8 P 8 Chdnis 




A viewing screen and a console are provided including 
a plurality of switches arranged in three groups of three 
switches in each group. Closing of one switch in each 
group causes a plurality of images to be projected on the 
screen. The device gives the appearance that the indi- 
vidual switches control image selection. In reality, the 
switches simply activate a slide change mechanism of a 
slide projector to project a predetermined composite 
image carried by a single slide onto the screen. 



3,667,755 

ADJUSTABLE SULT 

^ Jbacph H. Manning 711 Beach Road, Apt 200, 

Swasota, Fla. 33581 

Filed May 18, 1970, Scr. No. 38,066 

Int CI. A63b 25/00 

VS. a. 272—70.1 4 Claims 



/WC 




Adjustable stilts are provided each comprised of a 
vertical pole and a foot bracket adjustably mounted 
thereon by means of at least one U-<>oit encompassing 
the pole and having its ends engaging and affixed to the 
bracket by means of nuts or thumbscrews, thereby safely 
securing the bracket to the pole and permitting rapid 
height adjustment of the bracket A second U-bolt spaced 
from the first may be utilized to support one end of the 
bracket. Alternatively, in a preferred embodiment utiliz- 
ing (mly a single U-bolt, the upper portion of the step is 
supported by providing an caning at the inner end of 
the step through which the pole is disposed. 



3 667 756 

MOTOR OPERATED CHBLiyS SWING 

Edmund Barrett Narbcrth, Pa., aarignor to JcnUntown 

Metal Products, Inc, JcnUntown, Pa. 

Filed Dec 16, 1969, Scr. No. 885,525 

_,^ _ Int CL A63g P/id 

VS. CL 272—86 9 claims 




A child's swing operated by a ^>ring motor. The swing 
includes a frame, upstanding legs su^^wrting the frame 
and a swing scat su&pended from the frame. The spring 
motor includes a coiled spring having one end secured to 
a ratchet wheel and the other end secured to the frame. 
A first pawl is pivotally mounted on the frame and a sec- 
ond pawl is pivotally mounted on a hanger bar which 
supports the swing seat. The hanger bar is freely pivot- 
ally suspended by a rod secured to the ratchet M/htel. 
The swing is powered by the coiled sjN-ing and alternate 
engagement of the pawls in the ratchet wheel, thereby 
imwinding the spring. Sound deadening means is associ- 
ated with the pawl mounted on the frame to reduce the 
noise of the engagement and disengagement of the pawl 
with the ratchet teeth. 



3,667,757 

BOARD GAME APPARATUS 

Eugene P. Holmberg, 7755 Shoup Ave., 

Canoga Park, CaUf . 91304 

Filed Mar. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 16,061 

Int CL A63f i/OO 

VS. CL 27S— 135 G 5 Claims 



UCard 




EndCort 



i 




^==^ 



18 and CVER 



-At- 

13 

a 



u14 

14-1 



I 



A 



16 

a 



15 I 17 



J4 



M-Cordl ^ 


D 
D 



bidCvtf 





8-^ 



Idi 



2thai6 
i-a=j — 



7M0 

t-l.) 



Jd 



JdJ 



22 



L J 



A game board apparatus having a plurality of visible 
playing regions, each including a plurality of playing 



W 



182 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE \ 



June 6, 



1972 



panel portions having a card display region where a par- 
ticular group of cards corresponding to that player's in- 
dividual hand is di^layed, having a plurality of card in- 
formation matching display sections and corresponding 
to information in various combinations which may be 
displayed by the group of cards (usually three) of a par- 
ticular player's individual hand when displayed in the 
playing card display region, and with said game board 
also being provided with an individual alternate (or addi- 
tional) type-of-play selection panel visibly marked there- . 
on so that an individual player may place one or more 
playing pieces either thereon or on any of the previously 
mentioned playing panel portions to indicate the type of 
play selected by the player for the immediately subse- 
quent hand of playing cards displayed in the playing card 
display region. The playing panel portions and the com- 
bination information matching display sections each bears 
and visibly displays correlated reward value ratio mark- 
ings to indicate a corresponding return of playing pieces 
to the particular individual player corresponding to the 
game point value of the playing pieces placed by said 
player on the type-of-play selection panel or the playing 
panel portions (or both). 



3,667,758 

PLASTIC FINS FOR ARCHERY ARROWS 

BJorn R. Bengtsson, Box 71, 

S-124 21 Ban^iagcn 1, Sweden 

Filed Aug. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 61,697 

daimfl priority, appiioition Sweden, Ang. 7, 1969, 

11,009/69 

Int CI. F41b 5/02 

VS. CL 273—106.5 C 1 Claim 




A plastic guide fin for archery arrows, the edge surface 
of said fin adapted to be secured to the arrow shank by 
gluing being shaped like a foot having narrowly spaced 
notches to provide a penetration of glue therethrough and 
an embedding of the foot portions therebetween where- 
by a mechanical glue joint is obtained. 



3,667,759 

PLAYING CARDS WTTH CONVENTIONAL 

BAS-RELIEF INDICIA 

Rnfli L. Bair, 53 Webster Acres, 

Webster Groves, Mo. 63119 

Filed June 11, 1970, Scr. No. 45,328 

Int a. A63f 1/02 

VS, a. 273—152.1 



4 Claims 




PUZZLE FORMING REGULAR GEOMETRIC 
FIGURES FROM A CHANGEABLE NUMBER 
OF PIECES HAVING SEQUENTIALLY IN. 
CREASING SURFACE AREAS 

Winston L. Nelson, 24 Ersldnc Drive, 

MoiTistown, NJ. 07960 

Filed Jan. 23, 1970, Scr. No. 5,331 

Int CI. A63f 9/10 

U.S. CL 273—157 R 10 Claims 




A puzzle having a set of pieces, said pieces having se- 
quential unit surfaces area differences and being com- 
binable to form a composite rectangular figure. The rec- 
tangular figure thus formed has a surface area which is 
one-half the total number of pieces times the sum of the 
beginning and ending unit areas of the pieces. An ad- 
justable frame is provided to accommodate larger and 
smaller numbered sets of pieces forming corresponding 
larger and smaller rectangular figures. Alternative pieces 
having the same area but of different shape than individ- 
ual ones of the pieces may be provided. Respective pieces 
may be of four different colors so selected that when the 
pieces form said rectangular figure no pieces of the same 
color are adjacent each other. 



>LF] 



VI 3,667,761 

GOLF PUTTER WITH ALIGNING DEVICt 

John J. palotsee, % J. P. Potter & Guide Co., Box \lli, 

i Yoongstown, Ohio 44501 

FOed Sept 8, 1970, Scr. No. 70,346 

Int CI. A63b 69/36 

U.S. CI. 273—186 A 8 Claims 



\ 



,.^ 




A golf putter includes an enlarged and rearwardly 
elongated upper portion which is provided with a device 
for correct^ aligning the putter with a golf ball and a 
Playing cards of a deck of playing cards are made hole into which the ball is to be driven. The aligning de- 
with conunon back surfaces and front surfaces having vice consists of an elongated rod, which may be tele- 
raised standard playing card value and suit indicia and scoping, attached to the head of the putter and extending 
corre^wnding {Minted indicia. normal to the ball striking face of the putter. The rod 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



188 



may be retained in a V-shaped groove extending across 
the upper surface of the elongated portion by means of 
a bar or rod magnet within the putter head immediately 
below and parallel to the groove. Alternatively, the rod 
may be positioned in a through bore in the enlarged 
portion and retained therein either by a bar magnet ex- 
tending parallel to the rod or by a spring-biased ball en- 
gaging a groove in the rod. Markings may be provided on 
the rod to provide reference points which can be used 
by the golfer to determine the length of the stroke needed 
to drive a ball the desired distance. The elongated sur- 
face of the enlarged portion is adapted to provide an 
aiming aid when the rod is detached from the club. 



3,667,762 
MINIATURIZED TAPE RECORDER 
James E. Schcid, Oxnard, Calif., assignor to the United 
States off America as represented by die Secretary of 
the Navy 



Filed Apr. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 25,771 
bit CI. Glib 15/29 



VS, CI. 274—4 D 



7 Claims 




A small, rugged tape recorder especially adapted for 
use in biomedical research and for aircraft, missile and 
undersea instrumentation systems where space limitations 
preclude the use of standard-size equipment. A feature of 
the design is that tape-to-head contact is independent of 
tape tension. Short-term speed variations (wow and 
flutter) do not exceed 1.2% peak-to-peak in the frequency 
range of zero to 70 hertz. 



3,667,763 
SIMPLIFIED TALKING TOY 
William F. Summerfield, Huntington Beach, and Fleet 
E. Nnttall, Los Angeles, Calif., assignors to Mattel, 
Inc., Hawthorne, CaUf . 

FUed Oct 1, 1970, Scr. No. 77,158 

Int CL Glib 3/00. 3/10. 17/06 

U.S. a. 274—9 R 3 Claims 




supported stylus moving along the groove causes the dia- 
phragm to vibrate and produce sounds of substantial vol- 
ume. The groove is formed in a spiral and can be played 
by any one of several styluses located along a circle on 
a rotatable head. The head slowly rotates as the styluses 
move along the groove, and the styluses are spaced so 
that as one stylus is leaving the end of the spiral groove, 
which lies near the center of the record, the next suc- 
cessive stylus is entering the beginning of the groove at 
the periphery of the record. The diaphragm is contained 
in a wheel-shaped housing which is pivotally mounted 
on a handle that a child can use to push the wheel along 
the ground. The diaphragm is fixed to the inside of the 
wheel housing, and the stylus-holding head is fixed to 
an end of the handle which protrudes into the housing. 



3,667,764 
TOY PHONOGRAPH MECHANISM 
Henry Ncmetli, Massapcqna, Edwin August Nielsen, 
Oceansidc, and Harvey Bcrldn, Merrick, N.Y., assignors 
to Ideal Toy Corpwaflon, HoDis, N.Y. 

Filed Oct 1, 1969, Scr. No. 862,694 

Int CL Glib 25/04. 25/06 

U.S. CL 274—9 R 16 Claims 




A phonograph for use in dolls, toys, games and the like 
which includes a record member or disc having plural 
individual sound grooves on the surface arranged con- 
centrically of each other and a battery-powered, motor- 
driven, record-playing mechanism arranged to play the 
messages of the individual sound grooves when the atti- 
tude or position of the phonograph is changed, and on a 
random basis, such that the mechanism appears to func- 
tion spontaneously and produces any one of the plural 
messages. 

3,667,765 

TOY PHONOGRAPH 

Katsnmi Watanabc, 376 Ozenji, Kawasaid-siii, Japan 

Continuation<in-part of application Scr. No. 748,283, 

July 29, 1968. This appUcation Jan. 29, 1970, Scr. 

No. 6,761 

Int CL Glib 25/04. 17/06 
U.S. CL 214— U 10 Claims 




A toy phonograph which includes a speaker diaphragm 
that has a record groove formed in it so that a firmly 



A toy phonograph capable of achieving a constant ro- 
tary speed for a disk record. The record is carried by a 
turntable which is driven by a spring which is manually 
actuated to have a driving force stored therein. A pick-up 
has a stylus pressing against the disk record, and the 
pressure with which the stylus presses against ibe record 
gradually diminishes as the stylus approaches the central 
region of the record. The driving si»ing gradually runs 
down also as the stylus api»'oaches the central region of 



i 



184 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6» 1972 



the record, so that in this way the drop in the pressure of 
the stylus on the record compensates for the running 
down of the spring to contribute toward the maintenance 
of a substantially constant rotary speed for the record. 



SEALING AND GIUDINg' DEVICE FOR A SHAFT 

DRIVEN IN ROTATION 

Louis SoflBmcyer, Roc de Binningham 222, 

1070 BnMseb, Belginm 

Filed May 28, 1970, Scr. No. 41,314 

Claimfl priority, applkadon Bclgliim, Mar. 20, 1970, 

86,755 

Lrt. a. F16] 15/40; F02ff 11/00 

VA CL 277—22 3 Claims 




A sealing and guiding device is provided for a shaft 
driven in rotation and intended to operate in an enclosure 
under a pressure different from normal atmospheric pres- 
sure. The device comprises seals of rigid material arranged, 
to ensure the seal-tightness of the shaft in a container 
which is contiguous to the working enclosure. The con- 
tainer is filled with a lubricant which is cooled by passing 
a cooling agent through a coil in the container. The con- 
tainer is pressurized to a value similar to that {M'evailing in 
the enclosure. The shaft is supported and guided in guide 
bearings arranged in a clearance between an indented por- 
tion of the container and the shaft. 



3,667,767 

SEAL WITH VARUBLE SEALING LIP PRESSURE 

Thomai W. Baltewcll, Hnnm, Ohio, asrignor to General 

Motora Cwporatioii, Detroit, Midi. 

FUcd Sept 14, 1970, Scr. No. 71,808 

Int CL F16J 15/32, 15/54 

U.S. CL 277—95 1 Claim 




A seal for a liquid filled chamber has a radially open 
cavity behind a flexible wall which carries annular sealing 



lips. Under static conditions the cavity is filled with liquid 
under positive pressure and increases the sealing Ig) con- 
tact pressure. Under dynamic conditions the liquid is ex- 
pelled from the cavity, the pressure of the liquid in the 
seal area is reduced, and the sealing lip contact pressure 
is lighter. 



3,667,768 

HOLDER FOR SPADE DRILL 

William H. Stokey, CIcTcland, Ohio, vsigiior to AlUed 

Machiac & Enginccriiig Corporatioii, Cleveland, Ohio 



I FUed Apr. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 26,839 
I Int. CL B23b 27/16 



5 Claims 




A holder for a spade drill. The holder has the usual 
bifurcated end for receiving the spade drill and the usual 
clamping screw located through the bifurcated end of the 
holder and through the usual relatively large aperture in 
the spade drill for frictionally clamping the spade drill 
between the furcations of the holder. A setscrew vtrith 
conical end is located through a diametrically disposed 
tapped opening in one of the furcations, the conical end 
of the setscrew being received in the aperture in the blade 
drill, in contact with the usual bevelled edge at the rear 
side of said aperture, for holding the blade drill against 
accidental movement in the holder. 



3,667,769 
SAFETY SKI BINDING 
Helnrich Wundcr, Rothschwaigc, near Dachau, Ger- 
many, assignor to Hdnrich Wonder KG., Rothsch- 
waigc, near Dachan, Germany 

Filed Jan. 15, 1970, Ser. No. 3,035 

Claims priority, application Gcnnany, Jan. 16, 1969, 

P 19 01 980.8 

Int. CL A63c 9/00 

VJS. CI. 280—11.35 T 8 Claims 




At least one boot-engaging portion, i.e. a heel-and/or 
toe-engaging portion, is mountable on a ski for pivotal 
movement \mder the influence of a predetermined torsion- 
al force about an upright axis ixom a normal operating 
position in which it connects the boot with the ski, to a 
laterally displaced release position in which it disconnects 
the boot from the ski. Mounting means mounts the boot- 
engaging portion for pivotal movement short of the releaser^ 
portion in response to torsional forces smaller than the 
predetermined torsional force. 




June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



185 



3fW7,770 of the two skids is an integral springing member, prefer- 

- . „ SKI-BINDING TOE MECHANI^ ably elastic synthetic plastic material, these skids being 

John S. Lawrence, Ofdcn, Utah, assignor to Browning * 

Arms Company, Morgue Utah 

FUed Oct 6, 1970, Scr. No. 78,500 

IbL CL A63c 9/00 

VS. CI. 280—11.35 T 10 Chdms 





A toe ski safety binding comprising a base support 
constructed for mounting on a ski and ski boot toe hold- 
ing means for releasably holding the toe end of a ski 
boot to said ski, the ski boot toe holding means consist- 
ing of a cam plate whose forward end is in rotary con- 
tact with a spring-loaded cam follower; the cam plate 
constrained to move horizontally within a predetermined 
area and is linked to a base-supported post. Also pro- 
vided is a cam-controlled skid plate structure to releas- 
ably support the toe end of said ski boot. 



made rigid only in the region of the joint which connects 
them. 



3,667,773 

SURVEYOR FIELD TRIPOD 

Donald J. Hess, Rte. 1, P.O. Box 268A, 

Wynne, Ark. 72396 

FUcd Nov. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 90,255 

Int CL F16m 11/42 

U.S. CL 280—30 9 Claims 



3,667J71 

ADJUSTABLE MAGNETIC SKI BINDING 

Richard C. Larson, 4420 Great Oak Road, 

RockiriUc, Md. 20853 

Filed July 7, 1969, Scr. No. 839,584 

Int CL A63c 9/08 

\5A. CI. 280—11.35 M 20 Claims 





A magnetic ski binding employing a plurality of rotat- 
able bar magnets for attracting magnetically attractable 
plates in the sole of a ski boot including ski mounted 
plunger means for rotating the bar magnets from a shimted 
position in which the boot is not attracted by the magnets 
to a boot attracting position upon the placing of a ski boot 
on the plunger means with the plunger means being ad- 
justable to vary the extent of magnet rotation and con- 
sequently vary the force with which the boot is attracted 
to the ski wherein spring means are also provided for 
moving the magnets to the shunted position to enable an 
easy removal of the boot from the ski. 



3,667,772 

SINGLE-TRACK SLED VEHICLE 

Heinz Eggert, Moosstrasse 11, Salzbmis, Austria 

FUcd Mar. 25, 1970, Scr. No. 22,512 

^ Claims priority, application Austria, Mar. 26, 1969, 

A 2,971/69 

Int CI. B62b 13/04 

U.S. CL 280—16 1 Chdm 

The invention relates to a single-track sled vehicle with 

a steerable front skid and a framelike rear skid connected 

to it by a joint and carrying the rider's seat wherein each 



A transportable tripod for holding surveying or other 
instruments, including a beam frame with three support 
elements which rest on the ground. A central, vertical 
beam is hollow to slideably receive an instrument sup- 
port stem and an inclined beam extends from each sup- 
port element to connect with the central, vertical beam 
near its top. A bearing sleeve rests on the top of the 
vertical beam to be rotatable relative to the remainder 
of the frame. A seat support and a cotmter-balancing 
bracket are afiixed to opposite sides of the bearing sleeve 
and turnable therewith. Also, an instrument guide fork 
is connected to the sleeve to extend upwardly parallel 
to the stem above the seat support. During transport, the 
forward support element is used as a hitch for connection 
to a prime mover. The rearward two support elements 
are linked to wheels which are pivoted to a travel posi- 
tion. Each of the support elements are plates with 
anchor means to seciu-e the tripod to the ground. 



3,667,774 

HEIGHT CHANGING MECHANISM 

WUbnivWebb ScUcy, MaHbad, Fla., aarignor to 

Vactronics Incorporated, Orlando, Fla. 

FUcd Nov. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 875,436 

Int CL B62d 21 /IS 

U.S. a. 280—43.17 5 Chdms 

>A self-locking height changing mechanism particularly 

adapted for use with machines, tools, vehicles or the lilie 



186 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 

4 



equipped with a housing and having an axle whose oper- 
ative position with respect to the housing is to be selec- 
tively changed. This novel mechanism includes the use of 
a height-controlling member associated with the axle, and 



C, 1972 




capable of sliding movement as well as rocking move- 
ment in the housing. The height-controlling member is 
normally locked with respect to the housing, but which is 
easily unlocked by the operator in the course of selectively 
changing the height of the machine. 



3,667,775 

SEMICLOSED LOOP AUTOMATIC 

LEVELING SYSTEM 

James E. Whelan, Dayton, Ohio, assignor to General 

Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich. 

FUcd Sept 21, 1970, Scr. No. 73,963 

Iht CL B60g 17/04 

MS. a. 280—124 F 3 Claims 




In preferred form, a vehicle leveling system compres- 
sor operated proportional to vehicle engine speed to direct 
compressed air into a pressurizable air control chamber 
of a leveler unit. An exhaust opening from the leveler unit 
is controlled by an undamped on-off exhaust valve con- 
tinually operated in response to normal vehicle road 
movements and changes in loading to effect an on-off 
ratio for exhaust flow from the control chamber into an 
air collector tank. The air collector tank serves to collect 
excess air dumped from the leveler unit to prevent exhaust 
to atmosphere during dynamic operation. An intake valve 
and a relief valve on the tank and a desiccant cartridge 
in the tank cooperate to eliminate water in the system 
during its operation. 



3,667,776 
CROP DEFLECTOR ATTACHMENT FOR 
AGRICULTURAL TRACTORS 
Kenneth Earl Mnrpky, Dike, William Marion Enbanlc, 
Waterloo, and Lamar VnUiams, Cedar Falls, Iowa, 
aarigBors to Deere & Company, MoUne, ID. 
FUcd June 26, 1970, Ser. No. 50,229 
lot CL B60r 27100 
UA CL 280—150 R 6 Claims 

An attachment for deflecting crops around that portion 
of the rear axle of an agricultural tractor projecting out- 
wardly from the ground-engaging drive wheel mounted 



thereon. The attachment comprises a cone-shaped mem- 
ber releasably mounted on and substantially enclosing the 
projecting outer end portion of the axle, the member be- 
ing mounted coaxially with the wheel and including a 
conical outer surface extending between a relatively large 
end portion adjacent to the wheel and a relatively small 




^^, 



t^-ij 



end portion adjacent to the outer end of the axle. The 
cone-shaped member is mounted on the axle by means of 
an assembly substantially enclosed by the member and 
releasably connectible to the axle outer end portion, the 
^sembly including a plurality of radially extending por- 
tions on which the member is releasably mountable. 



3 667 777 

TOWABLE SPRING SCOOTER FOR PRODUCING 

UNDULATING MOTIONS 

Eduardo Eori<inez, 6125 GUa Drive, 

El Paso, Tex. 79905 
Filed Dec 9, 1970, Scr. No. 96,563 
Int a. B60d 1/04'. A63g 13/00 ^ 
U.S. CL 280—480 2 




A wheeled spring body having a handle bar assembly, 
supporting platform, and powered drive means thereon. 



3 667 778 

ANIUACK-KNIFING COUPLING DEVICi; 

Firederick John Charies Hope, Datchet, England, asrignor 

to Self Energising Disc Brakes limited, Datchet, Eng- 



Filed Jane 18, 1970, Scr. No. 47,362 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, June 24, 1969, 
I 31,773/69 



U.S. a. 280—432 



bit CI. B62d 53/0% 



5 Claims 




A fifth wheel coupling is provided for articulated 
vehicles which includes means for resisting "jackknife" 
movement between the tractor and trailer units of the 
vehicle. The coupling embodies a substantially standard 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



187 



king pin engageable with a conventional fifth wheel. Ro- 
tatably mounted on the king pin is an annular member 
which carries a tongue engageable in the slot in the 
flfth wheel. Braking means are provided, acting be- 
tween the annular member and the trailer unit for re- 
sisting jackknife movement of the vehicle. 



3 667 779 
BALED HAY LOADING APPARATUS FOR LOAD- 
ING ONTO A TRANSPORT VEHICLE 
Richard B. Miskin, Ucon, Idaho 83454 
Continuation*fa(i-part of application Ser. No. 610,977, Jan. 
23, 1967, now Patent No. 3,467,265. This apirfication 
July 31, 1968, Scr. No. 769,767 

InL CI. B60d 1/14 
VS. CL 280—473 1 Claim 




A baled hay loading machine with an upper platform 
that extends rearwardly and with drive means for loading 
bales of hay and the like upwardly and then rearwardly 
along the rear of the platform. The extra long platform 
and elevator chain means provide means for accumulation 
of bales along the length of the truck bed waiting for a 
worker to carry them to desired positions on the truck 
bed. 



3,667,780 

BUMPER HITCH ASSEMBLY TENSION 

EQUALIZER 

John C. Abromavage, Tempe, and James W. Ryden, 

Phoenix, Ariz., assignors to Advanced Management 

Engineering & Research Company, Phoenix, Ariz. 

FUcd Mar. 30, 1971, Scr. No. 129,515 

InL CI. B60d 1/14 

U.S. CI. 280—502 6 Oafans 




particularly suited for use with bumpers that are not 
straight line. Such bumpers create a need for plural top 
hooks, two for each bumper attaching clamp, to compen- 
sate for bumper deviation from a straight line. In such a 
four hook hook-up, in the absence of equalizing means 
equal tension on all top hooks cannot be obtained. The 
equalizer of the present invention controls the tension on 
the safety chains and thereby on all top hooks using an 
equalizer bar pivotable about a point, and capable of 
shifting position to gain equal tension when a bottom at- 
tachment hook is tightened. 



3,667,781 
CONNECTOR MEANS FOR FLEXIBLE CONDUIT 
Le Grand K. Holbrook, Salt Lake Oty, Utah, asrignor to 
Medical Development Corporation, Salt Lake City, 
Utah 

FUcd Jnnc 26, 1970, Ser. No. 50,195 

InL CL F16I 11/12 

VS. CL 285—45 2 Claims 




A connector means for flexible conduit, usable particu- 
larly in hospital and especially surgical contexts where 
tubing is to be cut to length on site. The cotmector means 
includes a connector and tube combination wherein the 
tube is slideable relative to the connector, yet wherein 
the juncture is protected against contamination. Wedging 
or constriction means are supplied so as to prevent in- 
advertent pull-out of the tube relative to the connector. 
Multiple connector and tube combinations may be op- 
eratively associated together in the manner below de- 
scribed, and the connector may be used for completing 
connection to a number of different, desired objects. 



3 667 782 
JOINTS FOR COIWECTING PIPES 
Pierre Viazii, Bormcs-lcS'Mlmosas, France, assignor to 
Sodete Internationale d' Application dc Procedes In« 
dnstricls (SXA JX) S.A., Panama, Republic of Panama 

FUcd Not. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 89,877 
Clahns priority, application France, Dec. 3, 1969, 
6941772; Apr. 21, 1970, 7014462; Jnnc 10, 1970, 
7021340 

InL CL F16I 17/00 
VS, CL 285—110 12 Claims 




A bumper hitch assembly tension equalizer, particularly 
a temporary or "rental" hitch assembly which is easily The invention concerns a joint for connecting smooth- 
fastenable to various types of automobile bumpers and ended pipes and comprising a sleeve of resilient material 



188 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, W72 



fitted on the adjacent ends of two ra>es. The sleeve has, 
at each of its ends, a circular throat, having, in longitu- 
dinal section, a concave iXHtion bonded by two lips. The 
edges of these lips are located on circles of smaller diam- 
eter than the outside diameter of the pipes to be connected 
and are adapted to move into contact with and to be 
resiliently deformed by the outer surface of the pipes. 
The sleeve has further at its central zone a thickened por- 
tion having an inner cylindrical surface of circular cross- 
section having a diameter corresponding to the outside 
diameter of the pipes and adapted to move into oxitact 
with that part of the pipes extending on either side of the 
line at which the pipes meet 



3,(67,783 

UQUID TIGHT STRAIN RELIEF CONNECTOR 

ThomM J. SotoloBgo, Red Bank, N J^ asatgnor to Thomas 

ft Bctii Corporalioii, EUzabcth, N J. 

Filed Jnly 8, 1970, Scr. No. 53,169 

laL CL H02g 3/ 18; F161 41/00 

VS, CL 285—161 7 Oalms 




A connector for coupling an electrical conductor to an 
electrical enclosure providing a liquid tight coupling 
against moisture and providing strain relief for the con- 
ductor. The cotmector consists of a body member suitably 
threaded to receive a fastening means for fastening the 
connector to the electrical enclosure and also for receiving 
thereupon a gland nut for assembling the overall connec- 
tor. The transverse passage of the body member is out- 
wardly tapered at a first end for receipt therein of a com- 
plementary tapered deformable bushing providing a mois- 
ture seal within the connector. In contact with the bush- 
ing and housed within a gland nut having an inwardly 
tapered longitudinal passage is a segmented conductcH* 
grilling means having a surface configuration comple- 
mentary to the inward taper of the gland nut. When 
assembled the interaction of the body member, gland 
nut, bushing and conductor grip means is to force the 
segments of the conductor grip means inwardly securely 
gripping the conducts to provide strain relief and to 
further provide for the deformation of the bushing to 
provide desired moisture sealing within the cotmector. 



3,667,784 
DRILL ROD nilUCTURE 
L^ W. HokaBflOB, KIriilaad Lake, Ontario, and John 
W. McBcan, Swastika, Ontario, Canada, assignors to 
Hcalfa A Sherwood DrilUng Limited, Kfarkland Lake, 
Ontario, f-— ^^ 

Filed Apr. 3, 1970, Ser. No. 25,479 

Lit a. F161 15/00 

VS. CL 285—173 1 Clafan 




rod has substantially uniform inside and outside diameters. 
The invention relates to drill rods of substantially large 
size, say, exceeding about two inches in outside dia|neter. 



3,667,785 
COUPLER FOR TUBULAR MEMBERS 
Martin Kapeker, 41 Decker St, Copiagne, N.Y. 

FUed May 20, 1970, Scr. No. 39,103 I 
Int CL F16I 21/02, 49/00 
VS, CL 185—231 7 Claims 



11726 




A coupler for releasably coupling two tubular members 
such as glass tubes without affecting substances passing 
through the tubes comprises an engaging coupling mem- 
ber in the form of an O-ring made of Teflon tightly 
fitted about an end of one of the tubes and a receiving 
coupling member in the form of a peripheral groove in 
the inside wall of an end of the second tube. By forcing 
the two tube ends into each other while holding the tubes 
in alignment the O-ring is caused to engage the groove 
with a pressure fit. Separation of the tubes is effected by 
slightly tilting the tube having the engaging coupling mem- 
ber with reference to the other tube thereby forcing the 
O-ring out of engagement with the groove. Airtight cou- 
pling is obtained by providing a second O-ring at the en- 
gaging coupling member. 



3,667,786 

FLOOR JOIST STABILIZER 

Henry R. Cooper, 5302 ^ncer Highway, 

Pasadena, Tex. 77505 

I Filed Apr. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 31,943 

Int CL F16b 7/04 

VJS, CL 987—20.94 6 Claims 




A floor joist stabilizer for aflixing a joist to a sill upon 
The invention relates to a drill rod structure having which mobile homes and the like are situated to establish 
aluminum alloy drill pipe and steel couplings. The joints a simple strong connection therebetween, preventing twist- 
between the pipe and couplings are threaded and the drill ing movement of the joist with respect to the sill and 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



189 



allowing re-use of the stabilizer. The stabilizer is self- 
positioning on the joist and therefore does not require 
hammering or any modification in the field by the user. 



3,667,787 

KEY TOP MOUNT 

Norman F. Semoor, Coenr d'Ariene, Idaho, assignor to 

Key Tronic Corp., Spokane, Wash. 

FDcd Dec 14, 1970, 8a. No. 97,675 

Int CL F16d 1/06 

U.S. CL 287—53 H 4 Claims 



3 667 789 
ASSEMBLY TOLERANCE CONTROL SPACER 
James A. McNecly, Manchester, and Ernest R. Russell, 
Florissant, Mo., aarignors to Moog IndniMcs. Inc. 
StLoDis,Mo. 

Filed Oct 12, 1970, Scr. No. 79,820 

Int CL F16c 11/06 

VJS. CL 287—87 lo Oaims 



'** ,iz 





A key top mount for computer terminals or other key- 
board installations. The key top recess and supporting 
plunger post end are complementary to one another. In- 
clined surfaces are provided in such fashion as to permit 
alternate positioning of the key top on the plunger. By 
turning one element 180* relative to the other, the key top 
can be positioned perpendicular to the post or can be 
angularly inclined. 



An assembly tolerance control spacer to absorb or take- 
up space differences occurring in a product made up of 
a plurality of components having size or tolerance char- 
acteristics which may vary from component to component, 
the control spacer being included in the assembled product 
so as to absorb tolerance variations by collapsing more 
or less to result in a predictable assembly result for the 
product. 



3,667,788 

CAM LOCK DEVICE FOR TELESCOPING TUBING 

William S. Greenwood, Nntiey, NJ., assignor to 

H ft G Industries, Inc., BcUeyinc, N J. 

Filed July 7, 1970, Scr. No. 52,903 

Int CL F16b 21/09 

XiS. a. 287—58 CT 8 Claims 



3,667,790 
KNOT WINDER FOR TYING FISH HOOKS 
John H. Taylor, 2033 Wilbur St 92109, and Robert 
C. PcUman, 4505 Quantico 92117, both of San Diego, 

FDed Jan. 25, 1971, Ser. No. 109,227 

Int CL B65h 69/04 

U.S. CL 289—17 8 Cfadms 





A hand held knot winding tool in which a fish hook 
is secured in a holder and spun rapidly by a squeeze action 
drive mechanism, to wind a knot around a leader attached 
to the hook. Only one hand is necessary to operate the 
tool, leaving the other hand free to guide and ccMnplete 
the knot. 



A two-piece cam lock device for telescoping tubing in 
which a first piece is fixed to the tubing of smaller diameter 
and the second piece is rotatable on the first piece between 
eccentric and concentric positions ^so as to be slideable 
within the tubing of larger diameter when the cam lock 
device is concentrically positioned and to frictionally pre- 
vent relative axial movement between the two lengths of 
tubing when the two pieces of the cam lock device are in 
eccentric relationship. Relative rotation of the tubing is 
effective to lock and unlock the cam lock device by rotat- 
ing the two pieces between eccentric and concentric posi- 
tions. 



3,667,791 
DOOR LOCK MECHANISM 
KenicU Kazaoka and TakasU Jtaido, Kariya^U, Japan, 
aasignon to Aisin SdU Company limited, Kariya-sU, 
AicU-kcn, Iwpm 

Filed Feb. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 9,775 
Oaims priority, application Japan, Feb. 13, 1969, 
44/10370 
Int a. E05c 3/24 
MS. CL 19fl—l\% 9 Oafans 

A door lock mechanism comprising a base member 
fixedly mounted on a door of an automotive vdiicle; a 
recess f(Mined on the base member and having an arc- 
shaped periphery defining part oil the configuration of 



I 



190 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



JtJNE S, 1972 



the recess; a sector latch member pivotably mounted in the 
recess, the latch member fonatd with an arc-shaped pe- 
ripheral part having the same radius as that of the arc- 
shaped periphery of the recess. A spring urging the latch 
member to rotate in one direction with a checker rotatably 
mounted on the base; a second ^ring urging the checker 
to rotate hi a direction opposite to the one direction. A 



^Jfi a 16 ,l7o ,30 




first and a second tooth is formed on the latch member 
for cooperating in succession with the first and second 
tooth to keep the latch member in its safety latch and full 
latch position; and a second and substantially radially di- 
recting recess for cooperatingly receiving a sUiker is 
mounted on a stationary part of the vehicle when the 
door is operated in its closing direction. 



3,667,792 

DOOR LOCK MECHANISM 

Noioma Torii, Kariya-aU, Japan, assignor to Aisin SeiU 

Company Limited, Kariya-siii, Aiclii«kcn, Japan 

FUed Mar. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 20,185 

Ciaims priority, application Ji^an, Mar. 18, 1969, 

44/20,618 

Int a. E05c 3/26 

VS. CL 292—216 3 Claims 




An improved door lock mechanism which provides ful- 
filment of the door lock function to be manipulated from 
inside of the vehicle; door lock function by key operation 
from outside of the vehicle; automatic release function 
in the case that the door should he closed following the 
erroneous locking of the door from inside; and keyless 
lock operation from outside without use of a manual 
key. 



3,667,793 
WEDGE-SUDE LATCH 
Andre I. Vairin, 694 Wnrncr Pairolt Road, Oregon City, 
Greg. 97054; and William L. McCarter, 6420 NE. 
41st St; and Henry O. Geisler, 8811 SE. Herbert Court, 
both of Portland, Oreg. 97232 

Filed Sept 3, 1970, Ser. No. 69,375 
Int a. E05c 3/26 
VA a. 292—216 1 Claim 

A latch having a latching cam pivotally mounted on a 
pivot pin transverse to an elongated latch housing, the 
cam having a cMifiguration sudi that it is rotatably driven 
into locked position when a closure arm portion engages 
a catch. The latch housing contains an internally movable 



slide, which slide is resiliently urged into engagement with 
the internal part of said cam, but is retractable therefrom 
by the latch handle. The cam-engaging face of said slide is 
a surface which is shaped to wedge under a part of the 
cam, when the latter is counter rotated into locking posi- 




tion, against a torsion spring tending to rotate the cam 
^to open position. Only when the slide is longitudinally 
retracted within the housing, by operation of the latch 
handle, does the cam again rotate into unlocked ppsition, 
permitting the latch to be opened. 



3,667,794 

ANTI-INTRUSION DOOR SECURITY DEVICE 
Ben C. Lentz, Jr., Memirfiis, Tcmt, assignor to Maggie 
i Birdell Lentz, Memphb, Tcnn. I 

I Filed May 7, 1971, Ser. No. 141,261 
Int CL E05c 17/36 
US. CL 292—264 10 




paims 



A device which may be attached to existing doors of 
a residence to safeguard against unwarranted intrusion 
while the occupants are sleeping or when answering a 
knock at the door, i.e., the device must be actuated by a 
person within the residence. The device includes a sub- 
stantially indestructible tempered steel bar which bridges 
the crack of a door that is ajar. The bar is suspended 
from a pair of short chains which are inaccessible from the 
exterior side of the door. The free end of one of the chains 
is attached to a wedge which is removably received by a 
peculiar tamperproof receptacle. The receptacle is at- 
tached to a wraparound plate that is suitably fitted to the 
door panel by utilizing the existing door knob hardware 
to aid io the attachment thereof and for more positive 
reinforcement. The other chain has the opposite end at- 
tached to structure which is anchored into existing ad- 
jacent stud structure, i.e., 2" x 4" lumber or the like, 
so that the wall and/or the door panel would splinter 
before the device would become disengaged from either 
the wall or the door panel, irrespective of the amount of 
force being exerted from without. The docK amy be 
opened slightly to greet callers or guests while (be de- 
vice is engaged with absolute assurance that unwarranted 
intruders cannot break in, i.e., through the partially 
opened door. - .^ ,.^ 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



191 



3,667,795 J 

RELEASING AND CRCUI^^ING OVERSHOT 

Claude W. Gray, % OK FtdOiiand Rental Tbols, Inc., 

P.O. Box 10131, Honma, La. 70360 

FVed Dec. 8, 1970, Scr. No. 96,180 

Int CL E21b 31/02 

US. CL 294—86.17 9 Claims 




which respectively cause the pair of links and the tongs to 
move symmetricidly upon extension and retraction of the 
hydraulic actuator. The various pivot points are selected 
such that the second and third cross-connected links coop- 
erate with the tongs to grip logs when the actuator is 
extended. Also, the tong and linkage arrangement is de- 
signed so as to make it possible to pick up large bundles 
of logs as well as single small logs. 



3,667,797 

CUSHIONING DEVICE 

Edward D. KOby, Rte. 2, Box 413, 

Grldky, CaUf . 95948 

Filed Jan. 13, 1971, Scr. No. 106,057 

Int a. B25b 11/00 

US. CL 294—103 R 12 



Claims 



A releasing aixl circulating overshot with basket grapple 
and provided with a control spring operable, upon rota- 
tion of the overshot bowl, to urge the grapple basket into 
and out of contracted frictional engagement with an asso- 
ciated fish. The control spring is of the helical compres- 
sion type and serves to maintain the basket grapple and 
bowl in relatively axially displaced positions with the 
basket grapple in its uppermost expanded "release" posi- 
tion while the overshot is being pulled upward past tool 
collars or tool joints without actuation of the basket grap- 
ple to catch the collars or tool joints. The spring also 
serves to allow the grapple to be set, when desired, merely 
by rotation of the bowl relative to the basket grapple. 




3,667,796 

LOGGING GRAPPLE 

Welker W. F^uk, Sehna, Calif., assignor to Deere ft 

Company, MoUne, nl. 

Filed Oct 30, 1970, Ser. No. 85,367 

Int CL B66c 1/10 

US. CI. 294—88 - 16 Claims 



A cushionmg device for the clamping jaws of a tiee 
shaker or the like providing a substantially solid, relatively 
hard pad of somewhat compressible material adapted to be 
mounted on the jaws having an outwardly disposed tree 
gripping surface and means within the pad inwardly spaced 
from the gripjMng surfece providing a readily compressible 
pocket to permit limited inward deformation of the grip- 
ping surface of the pad in intimately conforming, tightly 
gripping relation to a tree trunk or limb with only a mini- 
mum of jaw claminng jM-essure while transmitting substan- 
tially the entire shaking force from the shaker to the tree. 



3,667,798 

GRIPPING TOOL 

John W. Rnsztowicx, P.O. Box 116, Udca, Mich. 

FUed Feb. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 15,065 

Int CL B25b 7/00, 7/12 



48087 



U.S. CL 294—104 



3 Claims 





A pair of opposed arcuate tongs of a logging grapple 
are respectively pivoted to a pair of links, which are, in 
turn, pivoted to a yoke. A rotary fluid motor is supported 
on the yoke and is connected thereto to rotate the same 
through 360°. A hydraulic actuator has opposite ends 
pivotally connected to the tongs. Interconnecting the pair 
of links is a first cross-connected link and interconnecting 
the tongs are second and third cross-connected links, 



A gripping tool haviitg a frame including an extending 
member with a jaw portion at one end and a handle at the 
other end, a bell crank connected to the extension adja- 
cent the jaw portim having a cooperating jaw portion 
thereon, an actuating lever pivotally omnected to the 
handle, and a linkage ocmnecting the actuating lever and 
the beU crank for closing the jaw member. The parts of 
the gripping tool are integrally formed with resilient 
pivotal connections to reopen the jaws after each closing 
therof. The gripping tool is particularly suitable for use 
as a disgorger of fish hooks and lures. 



192 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



t' 



June 6, 1972 



3,667,799 

CAMPER KITCHEN AND miLITY TRAILER 

Robert Stealcy Shryock, 43 E. Goada Coma DriTc, 

New Bnumfcb, Tex. 78130 

Flkd Apr. 20, 1971, Scr. No. 135,660 

lot a. B60p 3132 

U.S. CL 296—23 B 4 Claims 



££^ 



backrest to enable such seat to be positioned at different 
heights. The guard plate and the partition frane are 
attached between the legs of a roll bar. Locks are pro- 
vided for locking the partition windows closed which 
may be unlocked only from the front seat of the auto- 



'r » • 





A trailer for camping, including partitions and shelving 
for the placement of utilities, chairs, bait, a sink and 
stove. The camper kitchen and utility trailer also provides 
means for guns, fishing tackle, an outboard motor, a 
refrigerator, and also provides shelter means. 



3,667,800 

TRANSPORTABLE CABIN 

James D. R. Cadibcrt, 1 The Glade, 

Welwyn Garden, Eiuland 

Filed Oct 24, 1969, Scr. No. 869,296 

Claims priority, application Great Biitain, Oct 25, 1968, 

50,790/68 

Int CL B60p 3/34 

U.S. CL 296—23 G 15 Claima 



mobile. A window guideway is formed integral with the 
partition frame, including a pair of channels separated 
by a spacer which allows the two partition windows to 
to slide across each other in such channels vyithout 
contacting. 

3 667 802 

COfVERING STRUCTURE FOR VEmCLES 

Charics E. Lore, 4517 SE. 31st, 

Dciaty.OUa. 73115 i 

I Filed Feb. 18, 1971, Scr. No. 116,421 
Int a. B60J U/00 
U.S. CL a96— 98 It 





This invention is a cabin having sides formed of rigid 
panels which can be easily collapsed for transport, pos- 
sibly being towed behind a car in which case it can be 
mounted on wheels and axles. The cabin can have two 
floors but can still be folded into a package no larger 
than a conventional caravan by reason of an arrange- 
ment whereby the sides fold about for-and-aft hinges. 



3,66 7,801 
^V3!JSJ?"°^ PARTmON APPARATUS HAVING 
HORIZONTAL SLIDING WINDOW POIOION 
MOUNTED ON GUARD PLATE 

lolm R. Settea, Rte. 5, P.O. Box 522, 

Oiympia, Wash. 98501 

Contimi«ti<».iBHpart of appUcatioB Ser. No. 758,947, 

Sf^-ll» JL^** ™« •PPBcation Dec. 18, 1969, Ser. 
No. 886,083 

,T., ^ -.« Int CL B62d ii/W 

UA a. 296-24 R 10 Claims 

An automobUe partition apparatus is described in 
which a pair of horizontal sliding partition window por- 
tions are mounted on the top of a guard plate extend- 
ing across the entire width of the automobile adjacent 
the top of the front seat backrest. The guard plate ex- 
tends parallel pertly down the rear of the front seat 



A covering structure for extending a tarpaulin over the 
cargo carried in a truck or trailer, including a pair of 
track supporting frames mounted for vertical movement 
on opposite sides of the bed of the truck, a pair of gear 
tracks mounted on said track supporting frames and ex- 
tending along the sides of the bed of the truck, gears en- 
gaging the tracks on the track supporting structures, and 
a shaft interconnecting the gears through friction clutch 
elements which permit the shaft to rotate relative to the 
gears. A motor is drivingly connected to one end of the 
shaft and one edge of a tarpaulin is connected to the cen- 
tral portion of the shaft between the gears. When the 
gears are engaged through the clutches with the shaft, and 
the motor is energized, the tarpaulin can be rolled up to 
uncover the cargo in the bed of the truck or rolled out 
and extended across the cargo to protect it from inclement 
weather. 



3,667,803 
CONVERTIBLE FURNITURE 
Iward J. Ford, 33 Mnlbcny Crescent, 

West Brayton, En^and 

Filed Oct 31, 1969, Ser. No. 873,004 

Claims priority, application Great Brttafai, Nov. 22, 1968, 

5,470/68 
iBt a. A47b «5/W; A47c 7150, 27/00 
UA CL 297—119 2 

A piece of furniture comprises a support portion and an 
upper portion that includes a table top and a OBshion ar- 
ranged back-to-back, the upper portion being pivotally 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



193 



mounted on the support portion so that the article can be a constant locus within the respective round holes thronoh 
converted from a table to a leg rest and vice versa by turn- the resilient packing, trtl^^CranTr^th^ mo^SlS 
mg the upper portK,n so as to bring the table top or of said extern'S geafto thfSck ™. S as to ^^ iS 

mchnation to the back arm corresponding to the gear 
ratio between the internal gear and the external gear. 




w w^-.,™, 3,667,805 

LIMITED MOTION DEVICE FOR SHOULDER 

HARNESSES AND THE LIKE 

Edward W. Apri, 998 LeUth St. 

Altadena, CaUf. 91001 

Ffled Apr. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 33,188 



cushion uppermost as required. Means are provided for 
locking the upper portion to the support porticm when the 
article is to be used as a table. 



3,667,804 
SEATRECUNER 
Hideald YasnL 2-6-12 Nilhi-rokngoo, Ota-kn, Tokyo, 
Japao, and Snkeo Tsununl, 62-574 NUna, Mino, 
Osaka-fu, Japan 

Piled May 27, 1970, Scr. No. 40,871 

Claims priority, application Japan, June 25 ,1969, 

44/59,553 

,^^ _ Int CL A47c i/W4 

UA a 297-362 1 cirin 






A motion restraining device in which a slider carrying 
an acceleration sensitive detent is movable in an anchor«S 
track that has detent arrestors along the path of the slider 
The slider ha^ a pin which extends through a slot in the 
aetent. The slot is oriented such that slow motion of the 
restraimng device is permitted, while fast acceleration re- 
suits m a force on the slpt by the pin to displace tiie detent 
into engagement with the detent arrestors. 



3,667306 

AUTOMATIC LOCKING RESTOAINT BELT 
„ ^ ^ UNEAR RETRACTOR 

Raymond G. Sprecher, Detroit Mich., aarianor to 

^ 9 uaims 



This mvention relates to a seat recliner for conti-olling 
an angle of reclination of a back-rest of a seat, which is 
characterized, among others, by the facts that no control- 
ling spring is used as in the conventional devices, and 
that a shock absorber is incorporated so as to 
prevent propagation of vibrations produced in the chassis 
floor to the back-rest, and in which an internal gear is 
carried on a base arm fixed to a seat and several round 
holes are formed in a back arm fixed to the back-rest, 
with a resilient packing being rotatably fitted into each of 
said holes, and an external gear with teeth less in number 
than said internal gear is coupled to and supported by 
said resilient packings through swingable pins. Said ex- 
ternal gear is meshed with said internal gear, and in the 
center hole of said external gear is fitted a cam provided 
on a cam shaft, the latter carrying at its end a grip. In 
accordance with rotation of said grip, the external gear 
is also rotated in meshed relation with the internal gear 
through the cam, and in response to this rotating motion 
of the external gear, said swingable pins are swung along 

899 O.O.— 7 




An automatic lockmg restraint belt linear retractor in- 
cludes a generally fork-like carrier that has a ^wiU 
fJi^ ^r^u^^ extending therefrom and spring biased 
toward the base waU of the retractor houiS? Mo^ 
ment of the free end of a restraint belt ou^Jfy of 
^housmg moves the belt from a fully stowed position 
withm the housmg and concomitant therewith m^^ 
earner from a fuUy retracted position toward a succes- 
sive series of extended positions. During movemem^ 
^ i^'J? ?* fint extended position of the scries from 
an mtermcdiate position slighUy retracted therefrom, the 
spring bias causes the pawl legs to engage and moli re- 

wSvi; SSJ^°« ^*"^" fr°" unbtoSed positioi to 
blocked positions m which the blocking members Wo^ 
engagement of the pawl leg, and linear ratchcTwaUs^ 



194 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6. 1972 



a channel-shaped linear ratchet member mounted on the 
base wall. With the blocking members in blocked posi- 
tions, the carrier is thus free to move to any extended 
position of the series and upon the initial retracting 
movement therefrom, the pawl legs engage and move the 
blocking members to unblocked positions to allow en- 
gagement of the pawl legs and the ratchet waUs where- 
upon a subsequent outwardly applied belt force pivots 
the base of the carrier into engagement with the cover 
wall of the housing to hold the carrier from further ex- 
tending movement and the free end of the belt from cor- 
responding movement outwardly of the housing. 



said openings at a point intermediate the radial extent 
thereof and gates swingable on said pintles to selective- 
ly mucky earth strata generating fluid spoil, said machine 
side of the pintle moving outwardly beyond the front 
wall as gate portions at the other side of the pintl^ move 
inwardly of said wall. 



3,667,807 
SHOULDER BELT RELEASABLE 

HOLDING MEANS 
Jacob E. Bccsoii, 943 Klngslcy Drive, 

Arcadia, Calif . 91006 
Filed Apr. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 27,38Z 
Int CI. A26b 35/00 
UA CI. 297—389 



3,667,809 I 

APPARATUS FOR OPERATING ON BRUSH STOCKS 
Harold Henry FUchcr, Haveot, Eogbuad, assigaor to 
J. Evans & Sob (Portimoath) Limited, Portsaioath, 

Filed Aug. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 63,497 , 

Claims priority, application Great Britain, Ang. 25, v6 V 

42,274/69 1/^ 



\5JA. CL 300—11 



Int a. B25b 1/20 



9 Claims 



6 Claims 





An automobile shoulder belt releasable holding means 
including retainer means moimted adjacent the wind- 
shidd of a vehicle for releasably retaining the tongue end 
of said belt and maintaining the belt in a fully extended 
position <rf nwi-use ready for immediate release and use. 



3 667 808 
TUNNELING MACHWE WITH TANDEM 

SPOIL BARRIERS 
John R. Tabor, Radnc, Wis., assignor to Mining Equip- 
ment Mannfactnring Corporation, Racine, Wis. 
Origiiial application July 9, 1968, Ser. No. 743,363, now 
Patent No. 3,561,223, dated Feb. 9, 1971. Divided 
and this application Feb. 24, 1970, Ser. No. 16,993 
Int a. EOlq 3/03 
UA CL 299—33 ^ Claims 



\^t 



The invention provides apparatus for supporting and 
clamping brush stocks in a brush making machine com- 
prising a releasable stop for supporting the brush stocks 
in a guide while a clamping device clamps one stock to 
be operated on by a tool, while the operation by the 
tool is being carried out, the stop is released to dis- 
charge one brush stock and then is repositioned tp again 
support the brush stocks. 



3,667,810 

COMBINATION BRAKE WARNING SWITCH AND 
PROPORTIONING VALVE 
Richard J. SUagy, Parma, Ohio, assignor to The 
Weatlicrlicad Company, Cleveland, Ohio , 
I Filed Apr. 22, 1970, Ser. No. 30,887 
Int a. B60t 8/26. 1 1 /34, 1 7/22 I 
U,S. CU 303—6 C 6 Claims 





A tunneling machine for excavating through relative- 
ly muck earth strata generating fluid spoil, said machine 
having a shield with a fixed substantially closed bulk- 
head and an excavating wheel ahead of the bulkhead, 
said wheel having a face which can be substantially 
completely closed to breast fluid spoil, whereby two spoil 
barriers in tandem resist flow of fluid spoil. The wheel 
has a substantially closed front face with radially elon- 
gated openings, transversely extending pintles spaiming 



A combination brake warning switch and proportioning 
valve includes a housing having an axial bore within which 
is located a switch piston and a proportioning piston at 
opposite ends of the bore. Fluid from two circuits of a 
dual brake system master cylinder is introduced to the 
bore on opposite sides of the switch piston which performs 
a switch actuating function in case of a pressure unbal- 
ance. The proportioning valve piston cooperates with a 
valve seat member slidably carried on the end of the 
switch piston to reduce the outlet pressure in one circuit 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



when the inlet pressure exceeds a predetermined level. 
In the event of failure of the other circuit, movement of 
the switch piston moves the valve seat member away 
from the proportioning piston which is then inoperable. 
When the proportioning valve is operative, the movable 
valve seat member cooperates with the proportioning 
piston so that the proportional relation between inlet 
and outlet pressures in the one circuit is maintained when 
the pressures are decreasing. A stop is provided to prevent 
the valve seat member from engaging the proportioning 
piston in the event of a pressure loss in the one circuit. 



195 

actuation of the system causes a temporary and false con- 
trol signal to be generated due to initial charging of the 
control elements. This false control signal is appUed to the 



3,667,811 
ANTISKID BRAKE CONTROL MECHANISM 

Tosiaki Okamoto and Maiami Inada, Kariya-dii, Japan, 
assignors to Aisin Scild Company Limited, Kariya-ahi, 
AicU-kcn, Japan 

Filed Mar. 5, 1970, Ser. No. 16,885 

Claims priority, appUcation Japan, Mar. 8, 1969, 

44/20,818; Apr. 5, 1969, 44/31,002 

Int CL B60t 8/04 

UA a. 303—21 F 5 Claims 




brake modulator to exercise the modulator. Any move- 
ment of the modulator interior parts is sensed by a switch 
and immediately acts through a drift prevention circuit to 
extmguish the effect of the false control signal 



Vk }i 




n.T<^... 3,667,813 

™^B^^I25JP^^^'^^'™^G SPINNING OF 

J"^P^^^ WHEELS OF A MOTOR VEHICLE 

Manfred H. Bnrckhardt Waibllngen, Hans^org Flonis, 

Goppingoi, and Horst Grossner, Geradatetten, Ga- 

rArt-SSXaeSf^^ Aktiengesellschaft, 

ri I 5"!t^^ ^h *•*•' Ser. No. 872,892 
Claims priority, application Germany, Nov. 2. 1968. 
P 18 06 671.2 






frs\-j^^ 



-M M« «o 



X 



An antiskid brake pressm-e control mechanism being 
provided with a first and second pneumatically operated 
servo assembly, the first servo assembly comprising a di- 
ai^agm piston which is urged by a first spring for nor- 
mally opening a valve in a hydraulic brake apply circuit 
adapted for on-off ccMitrol of the fluid communication be- 
tween the master cylinder and preferred wheel cylinder 
assemblies, with both being provided in the hydraulic 
brake system to be controlled by a change-off valve ac- 
tuated by a skid sensor, and second servo assembly com- 
prising a diaphraghm piston urged by a second spring and 
adapted for actuating a plunger upon the operation of said 
first servo assembly for increasing or decreasing as the 
case may be, the effective volume of said hydraulic brake 
circuit part leading to said preferred wheel cylinder as- 
semblies for decreasing or increasing the hydraulic brake 
pressure prevailing therein. 




An mstaUation for preventing the spinning of the driven 
wheels of a motor vehicle in which the rotational slip- 
page between the driven and non-driven wheels is deter- 
mined, and in which the rotational speed of the driven 
wheels is controlled in dependence on the magnimde 
of such shppage. 



„^ 3,667,812 

SKID CONTROL SYSTEM CYCLING AND CHECK- 
ING CIRCUIT, INCLUDING DRIFT PREVEN- 
TION MEANS 

Ralph W. Carp, Baltimore, and Frederick O. Micsteifeld, 

Joppa, Md., assignors to The Bcndix Corporation 

Filed Dec 7, 1970, Ser. No. 95,650 

bit CL B60t 8/06 

UA a. 303—21 AF 17 Claims 

A skid control system includes at least a single control 

channel and a brake pressure modulating valve. Initial 



3,667,814 
AMu^ ^^. »YA^^^^^^ LOADER 

vs. a. 3«£!5»^ ■**«^^^- "'■">: "'^ , <,^ 

A vacuum loading apparatus for transferring dry par- 
ticulate material from a storage point to a point of use 
or to a transport vehicle. The loader includes a pocketed 
wheel which is sealed against escape of air through the 
pockets or around the wheel. The pocketed wheel is ro- 
tated so that material drops into a pocket at the uoper 
side of the wheel and is delivered through a dischSge 
opemng at the lower side of the wheel A system includi^ 



196 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6^ 1972 



a flexible hose delivers the dry material to a hopper over- directly by the wheel or through a speed selector device 
lying the pocketed wheel. The air flow passes through a having wheel and vehicle engine input drives, the selector 




filter above the hopper and then to a suction fan to 
provide the power. 



3,667^15 
SERVO MSTRDUTORS IN PNEUMATIC BRAKING 

SYSTEMS OF VEHICLES WITH TRAILER 

Braao Zoppi, Milan, Italy, atnltnitf to Fabbrica ItaUana 

Mained MaidU S.p.A^ Milan, Italy 

Filed Oct 23, 1M9, Scr. No. MS,M1 

Clafana priority, appMcatfcwi Italy, May 2, 19<9, 



VS. CL 3«3— 7 



Int CL BMt 13/28 



4 Claims 






^^fcffe 





/*~^^^^n^ 



/r 



/ 




device selecting the higher of the two input speeds for the 
pump drive. 



3,667,817 
^ DRILL PIPE WITH WEAR SLEEVE 
Jacluon M. Kellner, Midland, Tex., assignor tc 
International, Inc., Midbuid, Tex. 
Filed May 21, 1970, Ser. No. 39,430 
lot. CL F16c 17/00 
UJS. CI. 308—4 A 4 



Servo distributor apparatus for rapidly increasing pneu- 
matic pressure applied to the braking system of a towed 
vehicle upon initial phase of actuation of the brake pedal 
of the towing vehicle and for controllably increasing the 
pressure thereafter so that braking of the towed vehicle 
will occiir either before or simultaneously with the brak- 
ing of the towing vehicle. 




Smith 



Claims 



3,667,816 
VEHICLE WHEEL VELOCITY CONTROL SYSTEM 

AND METHOD 

Jdm L. Hanwd, Grone Potaite Woods, Rfldi., aasignor to 

Goieral Motors Comontioa, Detroit, Mich. 

FDcd Feb. 16, 1978, Scr. No. 11,512 

Int CL B68( 8/12 

VS. CL 38S— 21 F 9 Claims 

A vehicle brake system in v^iich the wheel to be braked 

drives a positive displacement pump, the output fluid of 

which passes through a viscous orifice and also through 

a variable orifice in parallel flow relationship to the viscous 

orifice. The variaUe orifice is controlled to generate a jH-es- 

sore from the pump output through \diich the wheel brake 

is Implied. A pressure reducing valve and a pn^sxue relief 

valve are also provided. A modified system further uses a 

vehicle deceleration sensing mechanism to control the rate 

ot wheel deceleration so that wheel deceleration is slightly 

greater than the synchitmized deceleration obtained by 

control pressure feedback. The pump may be driven 



\ 



A m4tal drill pipe is provided with a metal wear sleeve 
and a fabric reinforced flexible, adhesive, plastics material 
insert between the wear sleeve and the pipe. The insert is 
built up on the pipe by applying alternate layers of liquid, 
uncured plastics material and fabric. The sleeve is made 
in sections which are clamped around the insert. The insert 
is then cured and thereafter the sleeve sections are welded^ 
together. The sleeve is mechanically interlocked to the 
insert, e.g. by a thread on the inside of the sleeve. The 
ends of the sleeve are internally flared to increase their 
flexibility and fiuther increase in flexibility is afforded by 
annular grooves in the outer periphery of the sleeve 
adjacent the internally flared end portions. The, grooves 
also serve as wear indicators. 



3,667,818 

HEAVY DUTY CASTER AXLE AND 

INTEGRAL FITTING 

Vincent Wallace AdamsU and Ernest Bcatty Moorc, 

G^recnTille, Miss., assignors to Keystone ConfoUdated 

Industries, Inc., Peoria, DL 

FUcd Oct 19, 1970, Scr. No. 81,644 
Int CL F16c 1/24 
VS. a. 308—92 

A heavy duty caster axle having an integral grease 
fitting formed at one end protected by a radially and for- 
wardly extending annular flange which substantially en- 
compasses the grease fitting. An axial passage is formed 



4 Claims 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



through the grease fitting and extends into the axle to ter- 
minate in a diametrically extending passage opening to 
the exterior surface thereof. The axle and fitting are 
formed from a cylindrical blank by the steps of forming 
an enlarged radial flange spaced from one end of the 



1 




blank, forming the end of the blank at the fiange to pro- 
vide the outline of the fitting, drilling an axial passage 
into the formed end and shank and a transverse passage, 
and either forming the flange into a protective cup or 
attaching a protective cup onto the fitting end and flange. 



3 667 819 

THRUST BEARUVG'aND MOUNTING 

ARRANGEMENT THEREFOR 

Raymood C. Jemess, MihnMkec, Wis., assignor to Allis- 

Chalmcrs Mannfactnrlag Company, MOwankec, Wis. 

Filed Aug. 17, 1970, Scr. No. 64,473 

..„ ^ Int CL F16c i7/i0 

VS. CL 30»-135 11 Claims 





A thrust shoe and mounting arrangement therefor par- 
ticularly suitable for use as the thrust bearing for the trun- 
nion of a rotary grinding mill or the like, in which the 
thrust shoe is provided with a wedgclike projection which 
is received in a correspondingly-shaped wedge-shaped re- 
cess machined in the end wall of the bearing insert of the 
upwardly open main bearing for the trunnion. The pro- 
jection on the thrust shoe and the recess in which it is 
received typically might extend through a peripheral angle 
of 120 degrees. A detachable retainer member or clamp 
overlies the thrust shoe at each of the circumferentially 
spaced opposite ends thereof, to normally prevent move- 
ment of the thrust shoe relative to the bearing insert both 
in a circumferential as well as axial direction. The end 
retainer members may be removed to permit the thrust 
shoe to be slidably moved along the main bearing insert 
in a circumferential direction until the thrust shoe is free 
of the bearing insert, thereby permitting removal and 
replacement of the thrust shoe. 



m 

bearing in the form of an elastomeric body is disposed 
between the load carrying surfaces and cooperates there- 
with to carry both vertical and horizontal loads between 
the load carrying surfaces predominately in compression 
while cariymg torsional or turning loads predominately 
m shear. The compressive stiffness of the elastomeric body 



11-.^ 




18 substantiaUy increased by the addition of a relatively 
nonextensible conical annular plate embedded in and bond- 
ed to the elastomeric body intermediate the load carryinc 
surfaces without substantially affecting the shear stiflfnMB 
Of Uie body m accommodating relative angular movement 
between the center plates. 



^w™,x . 3,667,821 

GUIDANGE AND RETENHON CAGE FOR 
SPHERICAL ROLLER BEARING 

U..CL 308-212^^^^^^^/^* ,3 calm. 



\ 




\\ 



3,667,820 

RAILWAY CAR HAVING RESILIENT 

CENTER BEARING 

lames W. Sherrick, Edfaiboro, Pa., assignor to 

Lord C<Mrporatioa, Erie, Pa. 

Filed Dec 11, 1970, Scr. No. 97^17 

Int a. F16o 17/10; B61f 5/16 

UACL 308-137 5 Claims 

In a railway car havmg duck and car body center plates 

disposed in telescoping relation, preferably defining nested 

conical opposed load carrying surfaces, a unitary resilient 



A cage device for a spherical roUer bearing includes 

Siaj'Td'oAlf L^'"^ " P^^°"^ ** one%utboard 
^S!vf .i K .^* ^^""^ °'" ^° ''"ch rings which are 
^iboned between the rows of rolling elements in the 
raceway of a two-row spherical roller bearing. The annu- 
lar nngs have a pluraUty of pins or prongs extending 
axiaUy outwardly tiierefrom. Each of the pSngs^S 
nto a bore m a respective roller. The crSs^s^tio^of 

tore^^^th.' °'^?' '^^u^ If"' "^ ^* «""°«^r oi the 
th. J ^"*'" '"'^^ ^""^ ^« P~°« and walls of 

Llb^in %K "" * ''°^ ™'"^« ^* ^° »» 0Pe™tinK in- 
stallation. The prongs not only retain tiie roUers in the 

bearmg raceway, but the close running fit between the 

prong and the bore also serves to gm*dc the roUer ^ 

turn the roUers act to pilot the cage 



198 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



i 



June «, 1972 



3,667,822 

CONED END ROLLER BEARING 

Jack W. Annstrong, BaMwinsvUk,. N.Y., assignor to 

Upe-RoUway Corporation 

FOed Mar. 1, 1971, Scr. No. 119,482 

Int CL F16c 19/34 

U.S. a. 308—213 1 Oaim 



the cathode and a first plate grid electrode having a 
substantially annular protuberance thereon, comprising 
the steps of projecting light into a space formed between 
the catl^ode and first plate grid electrode through at least 



\ 





21 31 26 27 30 




A radial type roller bearing having a relatively high 
axial load carrying capacity. The bearing rollers are 
formed with fnisto-conical end faces which engage corre- 
spondingly tapered race flanges to take the thrust loads. 
The angle of the coned portion of the rollers is within a 
predetermined range that is the critical factor in obtaining 
the performance desired. 



33-1132 



one void area formed in part of the protuberance, present- 
ing the resultant image of said space in an optically mag- 
nified form on a screen positioned outside of the elec- 
tron gun member, and adjusting and determining the 
space while monitoring the optically magnified image. 



3,667,823 

ALUMINUM BASED ALLOY BEARING 

Fkcd J. Wdiiitte, Ordiard Lain, Midi., assignor to 

GeBMal Motors CorporatioB, Detnrit, Midi. 

OilgiBal appKcalion Oct 29, 1968, Ser. No. 771,416, now 

Patent No. 3,562,884, dated Feb. 16, 1971. Divided 

aad tUs application Aug. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 62,391 

Int a. F16c 33/12 

VS, a. 308—237 6 Claims 



3,667,825 
KPPARATUS FOR DISFEN«NG SHEET 

MATERIAL 

4niiin B. Pagel, JaacaTilk, Vna., assignor to 

Newell Mfg. Co., Frceport, 111. 

FUed Dec 17, 1970, Scr. No. 99,043 

Int CI. B65h 19/00 

VS. Q. 312 — 39 $ Claims 



DIRGCTON OF 
JOURNAL MOTK 





In a preferred embodiment a cast strip of aluminum 
bearing alloy containing a minor portion of lead dispersed 
as small spherical particles in the aluminum matrix is 
rolled lengthwise, whereby the soft lead particles are 
flattened and lengthened in the direction of rolling. Sleeve 
bearing blanks are then cut from the cast and rolled strip 
in a direction and manner such that the longest dimension 
of the flattened lead particles in the finished bearing is 
transverse to the intended direction of rotation of a mating 
journal member. 



3,667,824 
METHOD FOR ADJUSTING THE SPACE BETWEEN 
CATHODE AND FIRST PLATE GRID ELEC- 
TRODES IN AN ELECTRON GUN MEMBER 
AsaUdc Tsnncte, Kawasaki, and SUnichl Sawagata, 
Tokyo, Japan, assignors to Tokyo Shibaur^ Electric 
Co., Ltd., Kawasald-shi, Japan 
Original appUcation May 6, 1968, Ser. No. 726,765. 
Divided and this appUcation Aug. 10, 1970, Ser. 
No. 62,594 

Int a. HOIJ 9/42, 9/44 
HA, CL 316—23 3 Claims 

In an electron gun member, a method for adjusting the 
space between the electron beam emitting surface plate of 



A material dispenser with an outlet formed by a door 
which is partially opened when the dispenser is operated 
to dispense sheets of material. In the dispenser, a web 
of material is squeezed between an idler roller and a 
drive roller to pull the web from a roll when a power, 
source is activated to rotate the drive roller. When the 
door is fully opened to load a roll of material into the 
dispenser, a spring acts to yieldably catch against a link- 
age connected to the door to hold the latter in its fully 
opened position until a pressure is applied to the door 
to overcome the effect of the spring thereby allowing the 
door to be returned to its closed position. 



3,667,826 
MERCHANDISE DISPLAY UNIT 
Gerald L. Wood, Overland Park, Kans., Harvey L. 
Kcrister, Grain Valley, Mo., and James E. ZcDer, Bea- 
trice, Nebr., assignors to Hallmark Cards, Incorporated, 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Filed Nov. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 91,331 
Int CI. A47f 3/14 
UA CI. 312—118 

Units for displaying articles of merchandise are dis- 
closed which each have knock-down back and base frames 
and a merchandise storage unit and merchandise display 
members for positioning articles of merchandise. Units 



6 Claims 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



199 



having adjustable shelves, rotary spinners, sloping display angle to an optic axis thereof and a quarter-wave plate 

panel with shelves thereon, stepped compartments, and opposite z surfaces of said irregular ferroclL^c cS^S 

^ ^^^ provided with an electrical means for apply an elec- 




:t '^.)»^v 



vertically spaced bars with display members thereon are 
disclosed as exemplary of the inventive concept. 



3,667,827 

ASTRONOMICAL TELE^BJECnVE 

Lawrence Monail, 1458 83rd St, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 16, 1971, Ser. No. 124,678 

Int a. G02b 17/00, 23/02 



11228 



U.S. CL 350—55 



18 Claims 




A tele-objective is presented in which the diffraction 
""effects produced by the central obstruction affecting the 
image quality are very small. Plane and spherical optical 
surfaces are the only ones used. A relatively small posi- 
tive achromatic doublet provides correction of aberra- 
tions of a concave spherical primary mirror. The tele-ob- 
jective is compact and has a long effective focal length. 
The tele-objective can be used advantageously in a tele- 
scopic apparatus by the addition of a field lens. 



3,667,828 
DIGITAL LIGHT DEFLECTOR 

Hiroomi Kojima, Hachioji, Sadao Nomura, Tokyo, and 
AUo Knmada, Kodaira, Japan, anignorB to ffitachi, 
Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filed Jane 12, 1970, Ser. No. 45,835 
Claims priority, application Japan, June 30, 1969, 
44/51,608 
Int a. G02f 1/20 
U.S. CI. 350—150 5 Oaims 

A digital light deflector comprising a cascade arrange- 
ments of n stages of a quarter-wave irregular ferroelec- 
tric crystal and a unit constituted by a uniaxial bire- 
fringent crystal cut at its opposite surfaces with a specified 



«, ^ 



-4L 



T 



%k 



t-^L— I 






T 



%^ 



\"-- 



PT 



xs 



trie field at least equal to the coercive field of said crystal 
if necessary, to deflect the Ught being transmitted through 
said umt *^ 



3,667,829 

ELECTRO-OPTIC PHASE MODULATOR 

Cari N. Klahr, 678 Cedar Lawn Ave., 

Lawrence, N.Y. 11559 
Filed Mar. 30, 1970, Ser. No. 23,696 




ITus mvention is an electro-optical phase modulator 
compnsmg (a) a medium whose index of refraction can 
be varied by the injection of electric current following 
electrical breakdown; (b) appropriate electrodes for in- 
jecuon into the medium; (c) signal-controlled current 
sources for supplying current to the electrodes; and (d) 
a coherent optical beam whose optical path traverses the 
region whose index of refraction is varied by the injected 
current. This modulator can be used for direct phase 
modulation and for spatial deflection of the coherent 
opucal beam, dependent on the spatial characteristics of 
the electrodes and the injected current. 



DISPLAY SYSTEM UTuiziNG A SELECTIVFIV 

^'L"?^"'**"^' *»■ ™^«. CaHf., assignor to 
Filed Apr. 8, 1970, Ser. No. 26^7 

fT« m »« ,^, Int CL HOlj 29/72 

UA a. 350—161 g ctaj-^ 

fii^ l^'?f '^«'^ "^''P^^y 'y'^^^" "^"'^g a deformaNe metal 
mm Iight-reflectmg surface or light valve is disclosed A 
Ught valve is assembled consisting of a very thin metal 

fir7»r°"T^" * '"uPP^^ ^'^- ^° *^«* of <lie»«ctric ma- 
terial is placed on the lower surface of the film within 
each grid opemng. This assembly is placed in a cathode 
ray tube so that an electron beam may be caused to im- 
pinge upon the dielectric areas. In one embodiment, a con- 
ventional optical system is used to direct collimated Usht 
against the upper surface of the metal fihn. Light reflecS 
from distorted portions of the metal fihn is transmittS to 
a display screen, while light reflected ftom undistortedpo^ 
ions of the metal film does not reach the screcT^n 
the electron beam impinges upon the didectric aJeaT^e 



I 



200 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June i 1972 



areas are attracted by electrostatic attraction forces to- 3, 667,8 32 

ward the adjacent grid members. This causes surface dis- LIGHTCONDUCTING STRUCTURE COMPRISWG 

tortions or dimplerin the metal film. A spot of light ^R^D LENTICULAR GRADIENT INDEX 

appears on the display screen at locations corresponding ^^^^ ^j^^^ ^^ ^ HkojcM Matmrniirm Adriy., 

Japan, aarignors to Nippon Sclfoc KahnshlM Kaidia 
(also known as Mppon Selfoc Co^ Ltd.), Tokyo-to, 
Japan 

Filed July 30, 1970, Scr. No. 59,577 
Claims priority, appUcation iwptai, Aug. 4, 1969, 




VS. CI. 350—175 GN 



bit CL G02b 5/14 



to the dimi^e locations. Where the dielectric areas are 
very small and closely spaced, an image corresponding to 
the areas scanned by the electron beam will appear on 
the display screen. 

3,667,831 
THREE-DIMENSIONAL ZONE PLATE GRID 
ENCODING AND DECODING 
Keith S. Pcnningtmi, Somen, and Glemnore L. Siielton, 
Jr., Cannel, N.Y., and Peter M. Will, Norwalk, Conn., 
amigpon to brtaiuitional Kuincss Machines Corpora- 
tion, Aimmik, N.Y. 

FDed Dec 23, 1969, Ser. No. 887,687 

Int. a. G02b 27/38 

UJS, CI. 350—162 SF 22 Claims 




J^r*^ 




Claims 



\ 



A light-conducting structure such as a multi-ocular lens 
or face plate comprising at least two sets of columinar 
transparent elements, each element having two side sur- 
faces and two light-conducting surfaces, both extended in 
a plane parallel relation, the element having a Refractive 
Index distribution in a plane perpendicular to a center 
plane thereof varying in such a manner that the Refrac- 
tive Index is gradually decreased proportionally to the 
second power of distance measured from the center plane, 
transparent elements constituting each set being assembled 
successively together along their side surfaces, and the two 
sets being combined together so that the light-conducting 
surfaces confront each other, and the lengthwise direc- 
tions thereof intersect each other at a predetermined 
angle. 



3,667,833 

REAR VIEW MIRROR 

William K. Baldwin, Sr., 5040 Jackaon St, Spaee 22, 

North Highlands, CaBf. 95660 

1 Filed Sept 25, 1970, Scr. No. 75,442 

I lot CI. G02b 5/08 

VJS. CI 350—303 t Claim 






tj^ ^^^ 




A retr view mirror having a plane and a con? ex por- 
tion for viewing on both sides of the vehicle in fiddition 
to the rear thereof. 



Depth of range information is extracted by projecting 
the image of a zone plate upon a scene and photograph- 
ing the scene at a different angle from the zone plate 
source. A transparency ot the photograph including zone 
I^te modulation of the scene formed on planes in the 
scene is then filtered by a scanning slit at the zone plate 
focal plane and presented upon an output screen from end 
to end, as a function of original range, from the zone 
plate. The reflection of the image upon the screen in 
viewed in a varifocal mirror driven in synchronism with 
scanning by the filter. The screen and the varifocal mirror 
may be connected by a low-bandwidth, video channel and 
a channel for control signals for the mirror. 



3,667,834 
ADJUSTABLE LENGTH TEMPLE FOR SPECTACLES 
Ellison L. Davison, Gibsonia, Cari H. BrinkhoS, Pitts- 
bmrgh, and Robert F. MenoM, Monrocvillc, Pa., as- 
signors to Nfinc Safety Appliaaccs Company, Pitts- 
bargk,Pa. 

Contimiation-in.iMut of appBcation Ser. No. 16,374, 
Mar. 4, 1970. This appUcation Mar. 22, 1971, Scr. 
No. 126,572 r 

Int a. G02c 5/20 
VS. CL 351—118 i Claims 

^A spectacles temple is formed from a front sleeve and 
a rear head-engageable temple member fitting snugly in 
the back end of the sleeve and slidable lengthwise in it 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



301 



The front end of the rear member is provided with a slot 
separating it into upper and lower spring prongs. One 
prong is provided with a laterally projecting boss pressed 






^-^ 



tightly against the sleeve, and the other prong is provided 
with a locking boss projecting into a recess in a row of 
longitudinally spaced recesses in the sleeve wall to ncx-- 
mally lock the temple member and sleeve together. 



3,667,835 

FILM CARTRIDGE ATTACHING APPARATUS 

Arthur E. Napnao, Chicago, U., assignor to Bell & 

HoweD Company, Ciiicago, UL 

FUed Apr. 15, 1970, Scr. No. 28,829 

Int CL G03b 21/04 

VS. a. 352—72 8 Claims 



/C'>>. 




An apparatus for selectively attaching one or a group 
of film cartridges to a motion picture projector for mov- 
ing one or more cartridges relative thereto. The appara- 
tus includes an attaching member movably supported on 
the projector and having a plurality of hooks, one for each 
cartridge, positionable over a ledge in a cartridge, and a 
manually operable lever for moving the cartridge or car- 
tridges into engagement with each hook. 



MOTION PICTURE CAMERA WITH MEANS 
PRODUCING A DISSOLVING EFFECT 
Helm TUelc, Ldnfclden, near Stuttgart, and Konrad 
Franke and Dicttkh Becker, Stnttgart-Mohringcn, Ger- 
many, aarignon to Zeb> Ikon Akfici«csclbdiaft, Stntt- 
(srtf CvcnDSBy 

FUed Apr. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 29,202 

Claims priority, apiriication Germany, Apr. 22, 1969, 

P 19 20 438.7 

lot CL G03b 19/18 

VS, CL 352—91 3 Claims 




wind-up spindle, which latter is equipped with a non- 
reversing lock. During the dissolving procedure the film 
gripper moves the film forwardly a predetermined length 
while the wind-up spindle is stopped, so that this length of 
film forms a loop in the film space around the wind-up 
spindle whereupon the film gripper moves the film rcar- 
wardly back upon the delivery spool. During the same 
period of time the film is moved in this manner, the dia- 
I^ragm is varied from the actual exposiu-e aperture to 
its smallest aperture and then is opened again to its ex- 
posure aperture. 



3 667 837 
CINEMATOGRAPH PROJECTOR PARTICULARLY 

FOR SUBSTANDARD FILMS 

Eugenio Agrati, \la A. da Baggio 20/5, and Emdo Sala, 

Via A. da Baggio 20/13, botii of Afilan, Italy 

FUed June 8, 1970, Ser. No. 44,223 

Claims priority, appUcation Italy, Oct 10, 1969, 

23,199/69 

Int a. GOln 21/14 

VS. CL 352—242 i Clirim 




A cinematograph projector having a spherical upper 
casing slidably supported on a cradle-like support base and 
controlled by means of a rack and pinicxi arrangement. 



3,667,838 
UPDATABLE FILM APPARATUS FOR A 

MICROFILM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM 

William Wadsworth Wood, 235 Penirian Ave., 

Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 

FDed Nov. 17, 1969, Scr. No. 877^66 

Int CL G03b 23/12 

VS. CL 353—26 3 cWms 




"^A motion picture camera with a motor operated dia- 
phragm and suitable for producing a dissolving or fading 
effect at the end of a scene photographed. Separate mo- ^^. -j^»„u8 muiu 
tors are provided for the film moving gripper and the film mainder of the reels 



A plurality of reels coaxially positioned in adjacent 
relation are driven in synchronism with each other. Each 
of a plurality of strips of film is wound on a separate 
one of the reels so that any of the reels may be removed 
for updating without preventing the driving of the re- 



202 



\ 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6i 1972 



3,M7,839 

MICROFICHE VIEWER 

Mttiricc H. Artand, Spring Valley, Calif., aarignor to 

SCrombcrg Datagraphiz, Inc, San Diego, Calif. 

Filed May 4, 1970, Ser. No. 34,199 

Int. a. G03b 23/08 

VA CL 353—27 9 Claims 




oper material which forms on the charged layer powder 
images, and a withdrawn position remote from the car- 
rier. A cleaning device is also provided which can similarly 
be moved radially of the drum between a position engag- 
ing the latter and removing residual electroscopic devel- 
oper material from the layer and a radially witljdrawn 
position. A moving arrangement is provided for moving 
one or both of these devices between their respective 
positions. The moving arrangement includes a pivoting 
crank and a lever for pivoting it located adjacent to the 
accessible end of the drum. When the moving arrange- 
ment is in a location in which the one or both devices 
are in thtir operating positions, the lever will bloci with- 
drawal of the drum from the housing. 



so il 



A compact portable projection viewer for microimages 
is disclosed. The viewer includes a projection lamp, means 
for positioning a selected microfiche image in a projection 
station, and an Qptical system movable between a com- 
pact storage position and a viewing position in which the 
image is projected on a viewing screen. A simple, effec- 
tive focusing system is included. In one embodiment, a 
parallel rotatable roller system is provided for moving 
a microfiche sheet, through the projection station in a 
first direction. Means are provided for moving the roller 
assembly, with the microfiche, in a direction perpendicular 
to the foA direction. Thus, any selected microimages on 
the sheet may be located at the projection station. 



ELECTROPHOTodnAPHIC COPIER WITH 
REMOVABLE DRUM 
Herbert Engcl, Manich, Karl Hartwig, Unterfaachlng, and 
Gmttier Sdmall, Mmdch, Germany, assignors to 
AgfahGcyaert Aktfengcselbdiaft, Lcverimsen, Gennany 

Filed Dec 10, 1970, Ser. No. 96,939 

Claims priflvlty, ivpHcatioB Germany, Dec. 10, 1969, 

F 19 61 836.1 

bit CL G03g 15/00 

VS, CL 355—3 10 Claims 



=T^ 

«£ ,;«!^ 



<t»3D (?i jj 




3,667,M1 

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR REPRODUC- 
ING A COLORED IMAGE BY ELECTROPHOTO- 
GRAPHIC MEANS 
Donald Alexander Ross, Princeton, N J. 
i RCA Corporation, New York, 
' Filed Mar. 26, 1970, Ser. No. 
Int CL G03g 15/00. 13/00 
US. CL 355—4 10 Claims 



A xerographic carrier is mounted in a housing for travel 
in a predetermined direction and has an exposed lAoto- 
conductive layer which is adapted to be imiformly charged 
in preparation for transfer of latent images to the layer. 
The carrier can be withdrawn from the housing in a pre- 
determined path. It is usually a drum mounted on a sta- 
tionary shaft in the housing. A developer device is 
mounted in the housing and can move substantially 
radially of the drum between a position engaging the 
drum for discharging onto the same electroscopic devel- 



NJ.,aarignqrto 
rk,N.Y; I 
>. 22,912 



K »uf^' 




V^7^ 




®r" 



An electrophotographic recording element is exposed 
with three differently colored and differently oriented 
banded images in register. The resultant banded latent 
image of each of the color-banded images is developed 
selectively with a different toner of a complementary 
color for a subtractive process. The novel apparatus com- 
prises dichroic reflectors and three differently oriented 
line screens for simultaneously projecting three illumina- 
tion patterns of the colcH-ed image to be reproduced with 
lights of three primary colors. At least two rotatable 
screw-type toner applicators are provided for developing 
the bands of two of the color-banded images thf t slant 
in different directions. 



3,667,842 
IMAGING APPARATUS 

Armistead Wharton, Henrietta, N.Y., assignor to 
Xerox Corporation, Stamford, Conn. 
1 Filed Jane 17, 1970, Ser. No. 46,948 
I Int CL G03g 15/04 

U.S. a. 355— 8 12 Claims 

A scanning optical system using one lens that [M'ojects 
multiple distinct images of portions of a single dbject at 
predetermined positions along the path of a moving non- 
planar receptor. The lens projects light rays that are di- 
vided by strategically placed reflecting surfaces. The input 
can be transparent or opaque and is projectable at various 
magnifications. Varying processing equipment is opera- 
tively placed along the path of the moving image receptor. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



203 



In a machine for automatically producing images from 3,667,844 

photoelectrophorctic suspensions using a cylindrical trans- MULTIPLE MASKING ATTACHMENT FOR 

parent image receptor which is exposed and re-exposed PHOTO EASEL 

Loyd W. Pittman, St Louis, Mo., by Rnth Pittman, 

snniiing spouse and heir of said Pittman, deceased 

Filed Apr. 8, 1970, Ser. No. 26,663 

iBt CL G03b 27/55 

U.S. CL 355—54 % rui— 




during one cycle of rotation, imaging electrodes are placed 
at the predetermined positions where the multiple images 
are projected from the object. 



3,667,843 

CONVEYOR AND PRINTER MECHANISM 

George K. Czamiitow, Rodiester, N.Y., assignor to 

Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y. 

Filed Dec. 12, 1969, Ser. No. 884,577 

Int CL G03b 29/00 

\5S, CL 355—29 9 Claims 




An interlock is provided between a paper advance 
roller on a print module, which print module is slidable 
into a chassis of a larger unit, such as a reader-printer, 
and a conveyor within the chassis for conveying a finished 
print frwn the print modulate to an exit slot. The inter- 
lock comprises a pair of similar rotatable couplers which 
have extending lugs that are engageable with each other 
when the print module is in position within the chassis. 
One of the couplers is spring-biased on its rotational axis 
to provide relative movement if the lugs engage each 
other head-on during movement of the print module into 
the chassis. The conveyor provides a path from the paper 
advance device to the exit slot and includes a fixed plate 
through which drive rollers extend and a removable plate 
parallel thereto through which pressure rollers extend 
which are spring-biased against the drive rollers. 




An attachment for a photo easel, the device comprising 
a unit incorporating a plurality of different sized windows 
so that the device may be used as a masking attachment 
for exposing only preselected confined portions of a sheet 
of photographic paper for printing photographic repro- 
ductions. 



3 667 845 
APPARATUS FOR HOLDING TWO FILMS IN 
INTIMATE CONTACT WITH EACH OTHER 
Minard A. Lcavitt Sepnlveda, and PonI B. Ronhmd, El 
Toro, Calif., asBignors to Cnticr-Hammcr, Inc~ Mil- 
wanltec, Wis. 
Continnatton-in>part of iqmiication Ser. No. 27,690, 

t^'}^*jr^' ""* ■PPMortion Jane 15, 1970, Ser. 
No* 46,430 

,T« ^ Int CL G03b 27/20 

UA CL 355—91 5 claims 




A contact printer has two closely spaced adjacent platens 
with dissimilar patterns of fluid passages. Fluid is forced 
through the passages to form between the platens and the 
adjacent fihn surfaces fluid cushions that hold the films 
in mtimate contact with each other. The passages are suflS- 
ciently concentrated and so arranged to support the fiiwyt 
between the platens without appreciable lateral movement 
In the preferred embodiment, the platens are slabs of 
microporous material. In another embodiment, the platens 
are slabs of nonporous material having discrete holes. 



3 667 846 

OPTICAL SURFACE INSPECHON APPARATUS 

ClurlM Nater, 1519 Broolnralc Drire, San Jose, CaHf. 

ai^AS 'SS? "^ "^ '"» "^' -*• '^ 

FOed July 28, 1969, Ser. No. 845,163 
.Tc ^ ,., Int CL GOlb i;/iO 

VS. CL 356—120 9 Claims 

An apparatus for optically detecting microscopic irregu- 
larities or relative elevational variations in or of a mate- 
nal surface comprising a means for illuminating a micro- 
scopic area of the surface to be monitored or evaluated 
an optical detector means which produces an output signal 
responsive to the position of a light spot cast thereupon, 
and an optical lens system for imaging the illuminated sur- 
face area onto the detector means. Preferably, both the 
lUununaUng means and the imaging lens system have their 



204 



OFFICIAL GAZETTTE 



mT] 



June 6, 1972 



optical axes angularly disposed relative to the work sur- 
face so that a change in the elevation of the illuminated 




surface area will produce a shift in the position of the 
spot imaged onto the detector. 



to a semiconductor flip chip substrate. An aligmaent de- 
vice which has an approximately right-angle set of mir- 
rors is inserted between the solder balls of the semicon- 
ductor flip chip and the bonding pads of the semiconduc- 
tor flip chip substrate, so as to align the solder balls of 
the semiconductor flip chip in relation to the bonding pads 
of the semiconductor flip chip substrate. Optical means is 
provided within the alignment device so as to present the 
super-positioning of the images of the solder balls of the 
semiconductor flip chip in relation to the bonding pads 
of the semiconductor flip chip substrate. After the solder 
balls of the semiconductor flip chip have been aligned 
in relation to the bonding pads of the semiconductor flip 
chip substrate, the alignment device is removed from 
therebetween. Subsequently, the solder balls of the semi- 
conductor flip chip may be pressed against the 4>onding 
pads of the semiccMiductor flip chip substrate. 



3,667,847 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR INVESTIGATION 

OF PROJECTILE FLIGHT 
WflUam C. GffifiB, Ridgecrest, Califs aasignor to the 
United Stitcs of America as represented by the Secre- 
tary of the Navy 

Filed Aug. 24, 1970, Scr. No. 66,368 

Int. CL GOlb 19/34 

VS, a. 35^—138 1 Chdm 




A device comprising two intersecting planar mirrors is 
placed adjacent to the flight path of a projectile with the 
line of intersection of the two mirrors normal to the line 
of sight of a camera. The angle at which the mirrors in- 
tersect is chosen to provide five separate images visible in 
a single photograph made of the projectile by the camera. 



3,667,848 

SEMICONDUCTOR CHIP BONDING METHOD 

John O. Pcrdval, Dayton, OUo, assignor to The National 

Cash Register Company, Dayton, Oiiio 

Filed Feb. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 7,648 

Int a. GOlb 11/26 

U.S. CL 356—153 1 Oatan 




The present invention relates to a method and appara- 
tus for aligning and bonding a semiconductor flip chip 



3,667,849 

LASER PLUMMET LEVEL 

Robert L. Appier, ElUcott aty, and Hobcrt H. Hoehn, 

Laortl, Mdn assignon to Optic Sciences Corporation, 

Cohimbia, Md. 

Filed Oct. 28, 1969, Scr. No. 871,922 

Int. a. GOlb 11/26 

US. Cl« 356 — 152 51 Claims 




A precision surveying instrument which projects orthog- 
onal laser beam as datum references, the beams being per- 
pendicular and parallel respectively to the local gravity 
vector to provide fixed horizontal and/or vertical refer- 
ences from which measurements can be made. Sensors of 
many forms, depending on the accuracy required, can 
probe these beams along their lengths to align a series of 
components or to measure deviations therefrom. No op- 
erator handling is necessary after the initial set-up and 
inadvertent compromise of the datum is avoided. 



3,667,850 

FLARE RADIOMETER 
Chester L. Smith, Lake Hopatcong, and Louis R. Szabo, 
l a nd i n g, N J., assignors to the United States of Amer- 
ica aa r^vsented by the Secretary of the Army 
FUed Nor. 23, 1970, Ser. No. 91,896 
Int. CL GOlj 3/50 



U.S.C 



356—186 




CUdms 



A compact, inexpensive radiometer analyzes incoming 
light from a flare or other source and gives a rapid read- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



205 



out as to the output of the light source in all of the var- 
ious bands and pass-bands of the spectnmi. 



3,667,851 

MEASURING SYSTEM FOR AN ANALYTICAL 

CENTRIFUGE 

Rasmus Strandc Aim, Osteras, Norway, assignor to Norsit 

Hydro-Elelttrist Kvaelstofaktieselsluio, Oslo, Norway 

FUed Jan. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 970 

Ciahns priority, application Norway, Jan. 6, 1969, 39/69 

Int CL GOln 15/04 
VS. CL 356—197 10 Claims 




A measuring system for an analytical centrifuge having 
a rotor with two or more preferably swinging sedimenta- 
tion cells to be scanned by light passage. The scanning 
means has a preferably adjustable and preferably curved 
optical slit through wliich the light passes to reach the 
rotor and traverses a radially extending slit located in 
front of each sedimentation cell. A cathode ray tube with 
a vertical deflection system has applied thereto signals 
generated by the light beam passing through the sedimen- 
tation cells. A synchronizing means causes the horizon- 
tal deflection in the cathode ray tube according to the 
light scanning of each separate cell during the rotation 
of the rotor. Trigger means has one or more members 
rotating with the rotor cooperating with one or more 
stationary members making possible simultaneous observa- 
tion or registration of the measuring curve for two or 
more arbitrarily chosen sedimentation cells on the cathode 
ray tube. 

-- 3,667,852 

CAR WASHING ASSEMBLY WHH PRESSURIZED 

WA1ER SUPPLY 

Frank E. Mayden, Springfield, IlL, assignor of a fractional 

part fatferest to Theresa E. MiQrden, SptingflehL DL 

FUed Oct 1, 1970, Ser. No. 77,294 

_,^ _ Int a. A411 ii/25 

VS. CL 401—263 4 Claims 




A fountain type wand defining a handle at one end and 
having a panel-like head at its other end of greater length 
than width and disposed transverse to the longitudinal 
axis of the wand. The head is mounted on the wand for 
oscillation about an axis extending transversely of the 
wand and generally paralleling the longitudinal center line 
of the head. An endwise outwardly opening U-shaped 



the handle and tht head is oscillatably supported between 
the free ends of the legs of the U-shaped frame. A soft 
cover is provided for the head and is constructed <rf a 
material through which fluids may pass and which is capa- 
ble of retaining a given quantity (rf fluids in the manner 
of a ^xmge. The cover not only covers the head but also 
one side of the supporting frame and the head is in the 
form of a manifold to which cleaning fluids imder pres- 
sure may be supplied and includes outlet openings opening 
outwardly of the side of the frame which is covered by 
the soft cover. Further, the cover is provided with an 
opening in registry with the outlet openings in the head 
whereby water and other cleaning fluids may be discharged 
from the manifold in jet fashion without passing tluough 
the material oi the cover. 



3,M7,8S3 

LIQUID FEED CONTROL FOR CLEANING 

APPARATUS 

Donald N. Smytit, South Plympttm, South Australia, 
Australia, assignor to S.A. Bmsh Company, Limited, 
Albert Park, Soatfa An8tadh^ AnstraUa 
Original application Ang. 13, 1968, Ser. No. 752,284, now 
Patent No. 3,583,818, dated June 8,. 1971. Divided 
and this iq>pUcation Oct 28, 1970, Ser. No. 84,638 
Clafans priority, ap^cation Australia, Aug. 25, 1967, 

26,399/67 

Int a. A46b 11/04 

VS. CL 401—291 4 Oafans 



^>f 




A liquid feed control for liquid shampoo apparatus 
wherein the liquid shampoo is fed to the cleaning members 
from a liquid shampoo container whose outlet is formed 
as a weir situated above the normal level of Uquid in the 
container so that during shampooing operations the inertia 
of the liquid causes flow of liquid over the weir onto the 
cleaning members. 



3,667,854 

BINDER FOR A SUSPENSION FILE 

F^ank D. Jonas, Oyster Bay, N.Y., assignor to Oxford 

Pendaflex Corporation, Garden aty, N.Y. 

Filed Aug. 31, 1970, Ser. No. 68J21 

laLCL^U 3/00, 15/00 

VS. CL 402—17 1 Oahn 




A binder for retaining loose pages is adapted to be 
stored in a conventional suspension file when the binder 



frame is supported from the end of the wand remote from is not in use. Hook shaped members project outwardly 



206 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



TT] 



June S, 1972 



from the ^ine of each leaf of the binder for engaging 
parallelly extending suspension rails. 



3,M7,855 
PORTABLE DRILL GUIDE 
ADaa O. DooglaM, 5635 Kansas Are. 68110, and 
Robert F. Douglass, 5708 WlUtt St. 68152, both of 
Omaha, Ncbr. 

Flkd Sent 29, 1970, Ser. No. 76,469 

bt CL B23b 45/14 

VS, CL 408—114 6 Claims 



spade-like drilling edges at one end thereof from which 
spiraling grooves extend toward the other end to provide 
helical cutting edges circumferentially spaced from one 
another by the grooves. Two diametrically opposed 
grooves are deeper than the remaining grooves, and all 



rr-F. 




A portable drill guide comprising attachment means 
adapted to be anchored to a work-piece and on which a 
hand lever control rack and pinion is mounted, an el<Mi- 
gated frame means attached to the outer end of the rack 
bar in a manner for the adjustable positioning of the 
frame means so that a far end thereof can be fixed in a 
position closer or farther from the rack bar and so that 
the frame means can be positioned anywhere in a plane 
at a right angle to the rack bar, the far end of the frame 
means rotatably supporting and guiding a power drill 
assembly. 

SMALL POINT RETRACTABLE BORING TOOL 

Robert W. Walker, Detroit, Mich., assignor to 

The Valeron Corporation 

FDcd May 18, 1970, Scr. No. 38,152 

bt CL B23b 29/034 

VS, CL 408—158 9 Claims 




je 



A boring tool with means for adjusting a single point 
boring bar to change its cutting diameter and which in- 
cludes a housing support receptive of the tool shank there- 
within, spaced bearing supports, and means acting on the 
bar between the bearing supports to flex the shank and 
change the relative location of its cutting point, particu- 
larly including a linear actuating rod adapted to effect 
the change through actuation from the supported end of 
the tool and while it is in service. 




grooves spiral in the same direction and at the same 
pitch. The cutting edges are interrupted by notches spaced 
longitudinally of the cutting edges to form cutting teeth, 
the notches sinraling about the tool body in th* same di- 
rection as the grooves, but at« steeper {Htch. 



3,667,857 

COMBINED DRILL AND REAMER 

CONSTRUCTION 

Milo W. Shaner, Bridgeport, and Robert S. Cave, Bay 

City, Mich., assignors to National Twist Drill & Tool 

Co., Rochester, Mich. ^ 

FDed Oct 30, 1970, Scr. No. 85,625 

Int CL B23b 51/08 

VS. CL 408—230 13 Claims 

A rotary cutting tool combining the characteristics of a 

drill and a reamer has a cylindrical body provided with 



3,667,858 

CONDUIT REAMING MEANS 

Andrew Bain, 2440 Greenwich St., 

San nirndsco, Calif. 94123 
Filed Oct 19, 1970, Scr. No. 81,659 
Int CL B23d 77/12 
U.S. CL, 408—229 10 




uu 



Claims 



Means are provided for reaming out a hollow elon- 
gated conduit containing wires extending therethrough 
and out one end (hereof. The means includes a housing 
having a /hollow cavity and separable into two parts so 
that the wires can be placed along the cavity and the 
two parts locked together. The housing includes a 
conically-shaped reaming portion which is then extended 
into the conduit and the inner wall of the conduit can be 
reamed without removing the wires therefrom. 



3,667,859 
HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS 
Inge Kore Dragsund and Erling M. Naas, Brattvag, Nor- 
way, assignors to A/S Hydranllk Brattvaag, Brattvag, 
Norway 

FUed July 24, 1970, Scr. No. 58,083 ^ 

ClaiiBs priority, application Norway, July 25, 1969, 

j 3,076/69 I 

I Int CL F04d 27/00; F04b <#9/0O I 

\5JS. CL 415—148 8 Claims 

Hydraulic systems of the low pressure type which 

comprise a pump driving a motor, the working medium 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



207 



supply and discharge of which is controlled by a hand- the drive shaft having an end portion extending exterioriy 
operated control valve, said systems being provided with of the machine casing. 




^ 3,667,860 

DIFFUSER VALVE MECHANISM FOR 
CENTRIFUGAL GAS COMPRESSOR 
James W. Endrcas, Syracuse, Edson H. Byms, Fayette- 
ville, and Carl M. Anderson, Syracuse, N.Y., assignors 
to Carrier Corporation, Syracuse, N.Y. 

Filed Mar. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 19,200 

Int CL F04d 75/00, 27/00 

U.S. CL 415—150 7 Claims 




An annular support member is fixedly mounted con- 
centrically of the impeller and has an annular surface 
forming one side wall of the diffuser passage. A sleeve 
valve is mounted at the bore of the support member for 
movement transversely of the diffuser passage. A valve 
actuating mechanism is carried by the support member 
and operable exteriorly of the machine casing for moving 
the valve transversely of the diffuser passage. The valve 
actuating mechanism includes a plurality of crankshafts 
joumaled for rotation in the support. A drive shaft is 
provided to effect rotation of the crankshafts in imison, 



3 667 861 
WIND VANE CONTROLLING DIRECTION 

AND BRAKE MEANS 

Albert A. Parish, Earth, Tex., assi^ior to KJM.P. 

Lake Pump Mfg. Co., Earth, Tex. 

Filed May 1, 1970, Ser. No. 33,590 

,,„ ^ Int a. F03b 7/00 

UA CL 416-14 2 Oaims 



an automatically controlled by-pass passage from motor 
to pump. The passage opening in said by-pass passage is 
controlled by pressure of oil in an area between the slide 
of the control valve and the motor. 




A windmill including a base and a rotary blade structure 
joumalled from the base for rotation about a horizontal 
axis. The base includes a rearwardly displaced upstanding 
tail vane depending and joumalled from a shaft parallel- 
ing and spaced to one side of the blade structure axis of 
rotation. The base is supported for rotation about an 
upstanding axis laterally spaced to the other side of the 
axis of rotation of the rotary blade structure, and is pro- 
vided with brake structure operable on the blade structure 
and actuated by the tail vane upcm swinging (rf the tail 
vane from a vertical position toward a hcmzontal posi- 
ti(Mi. 



3,667,862 

BLADE INSPECTION SYSTEM AND METHOD 

Robert A. Pair, Linwood, Pa., aa^nor to The Bodns 

Company, Seatde, Wash. 

Piled Dec 9, 1970, Scr. No. 96,419 

-TO ^ - Int a B64c 27/-^5 

UA CL 416-61 11 ciain„ 




There is disclosed a method and system for inspecting 
a rotor blade to detect the presence of a crack in the 
blade spar. A liner, preferably made of a material of 
low permeability and in the shape of a sleeve or bag is 
placed inside the spar. The sleeve is spaced from the 
spar along its entire length by means of a bleeder cloth 
and means are provided for evacuating the area occupied 
by the bleeder. A pressure sensitive device is hermetically 
coupled to the evacuated area for testing and monitoring 
the pressure within that area. If a crack develops in the 
spar, air will enter the evacuated area resulting in a loss 
of vacuum which will be detected by the pressure sen- 
sitive device. 



208 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,^7,863 

ROTOR HUB AND BLADE ATTACHMENTS 

Gerald L. Bremier, 50 Melody Lane, 

Oiinda, CaUf . 94563 

Filed Feb. 3, 197f , Ser. No. 8,232 

iBt CL B«4c 27/3% 



and closed by a valve plug member (14, 14') including 
a portioa (16, 16') adapted to close the orifice and a 
softer portion (15, 15') adapted to penetrate into said port 



UA a. 416—138 



8 Claimf 




This invention relates to an improved attachment for a 
rotor blade in a rotating wing aircraft having a semi- 
rigid rotor system. More particularly, the invention pro- 
vides a low cost, lightweight, low maintenance rotor 
system embodying all of the desired characteristics of the 
semi-rigid hub but with a minimum chance of fatigue 
or failure. 

3,667,864 
AIR- OR GAS-MOVING EQUIPMENT FOR USE 
WITH HEAT EXCHANGE AND/OR GAS- 
SCRUBBING APPARATUS 
Edumiid Murphy, La Spezia, Italy, aarignor to Cooling 
DeTclopmeiit \jiA^ Laccne, Swttzcrlaiid 
FIM May 7, 1970, Ser. No. 35,357 
Claims priority, ^ipUcation Great Brttaln, May 14, 1969,. 

24,507/69 

bit CL P04b 17100, 35/00; F24h 3/02 

U.S. a. 417—53 13 Claims 




for keeping it clean from concrete particles, said valve 
plug member being moved in time sequence with respect 
to valves for introducing compressed air in said chambers 
and discharging concrete therefrom. 



AIR COMPRESSOR 

Uwis Riditer, 1414 E. 29tli St, 

Dcs Moines, Iowa 50317 

Filed Mar. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 16,524 

lot CI. F04b 23/14 

VS. a. 417—203 10 Clalflu 




Air- or gas-moving equipment for a heat exchange or 
gas-scrubbing apparatus comprises a plurality of air- or 
gas-moving units, each comprising a fluid operated turbine 
and a fan coupled to, so as to be driven by, the turbine, the 
turbines being connected in series for operation by a 
conunon operating fluid supply. The equipment may com- 
prise a number of independent sets of series-connected 
units, the sets either being connectible in series to a com- 
mon operating fluid supply, or each set connectible inde- 
pendently to a conunon operating fluid supply or each set 
connectible to a separate independent supply or two or 
more sets may be series-connected to one fluid supply and 
another set or sets to another fluid supply. 




3,667,865 
COMPRESSED AIR PUMP, PARTICULARLY FOR 

CONCRETE 
Gioyamii Faldl, Via Por S. Maria 4, Florence, Italy 
FUed Jan. 13, 1970, Ser. No. 2,512 
Claims priority, application Italy, Jan. 24, 1969, 
11,982/69 
bit CL F04b 15/02: F04f 3/36; F16k 3/36 
U.S. CI. 417—122 6 Claims 

A pump for concrete operated by compressed air com- 
prises two chambers (1, 1') in each of which the con- 
crete is fed through a valve port (4, 4') in the upper 
part of the chamber, which port is sequentially opened 



A powered shaft having a propeller, draws air into a 
passageway through which the shaft extends and the pas- 
sageway has an outlet in conununication with a com- 
pressed air chamber. Air is moved through the passage- 
way outlet by an air transfer means which includes a 
stationary plate having circularly arranged teeth covered 
by a plate on the shaft which includes a rotataUe gear 
registering with the teeth. An opening through the two 
plates communicates at times with at least one of the 
teeth cavities which is sealed as the rotatable plate moves 
over the cavity whereupon it is then exposed to the com- 
pressed air chamber and forced out by the teeth on the 
gear which then leaves a vacuum in the cavities to re- 
ceive additional air from the opening communicating 
with the passageway whereupon the cycle is repeated. The 
air may be totally drawn into the passageway by the 
propeller or may enter as a result of external pressures 
for which appropriate inlet openings are provided. A 
flywheel may also be provided on the powered shaft to 
assist in the rotation thereof and in the sealing of the 
rotatable plate. Vanes may also be provided on the pow- 
ered shaft in the outlet opening of the compressed air 
chamber to further assist in the turning of the shaft as 
air is released from the chamber. 



Juke 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



209 



3,667,867 
HYDRAULIC APPARATUS 
Kenneth Raymond Boydell, Bredons Hardwidt, near 
TewkeslMiry, and John diristopber Eglington Flint 
Ciialford Hill, Stroud, England, assignors to Dowty 
Technical Developments Limited, BrocUiampton Parl(, 
Brockhampton, Cheltenham, Eni^and 

FUed Sept 19, 1969, Ser. No. 859,297 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Sept 21, 1968, 

44,989/68 

Int a. F04b 1/26: FOlb 13/04 

U.S. a. 417—222 10 Claims 



o '? 




A variable-displacement pump or motor including a 
displacement-varying member on which a restoring force 
operates to urge it to one displacement limit, a hydraulic 
servo-cylinder containing a piston and a control tmit, the 
piston being connected to adjust the displacement varying 
member and the control unit fitting into the servo-cylinder 
to co-operate with a high pressure port in the servo-cylin- 
der and operating to generate a control pressure in the 
working space to cause adjustment of the displacement 
varying member. 

3,667,868 

RADIAL PISTON PUMP 

Rudolf Brunner, Baldham, Germany, assignor to Messrs. 

Hcilmeier & Wchnlein, Munich, Germany 

Filed Feb. 4, 1970, Ser. No. 8,681 

Claims priori^, application Germany, Feb. 11, 1969, 

P 19 06 773J; Switzerland, Jan. 28, 1970, 1,202/70 

Int CI. F04b 1/04. 23/06 

UA CL 417—273 13 Claims 



3,667,869 

DUAL CYLINDER-CONCRETE PUMP 

Kari Schlecht, 91 Echterdingerstrasse, D-7024 

Bemfaausen-Stuttgart Germany 

FUed Feb. 26, 1971» Ser. No. 119,182 

Claims priority, application Germany, Mar. 4, 1970, 

P 20 10 112.6 

Int a. F04b 17/00, 35/00. 23/04. 41/06. 15/02 

UJ5. a. 417—346 8 Claims 




There is disclosed a dual cylinder-concrete pump in 
which each of the two conveying cylinders is operatively 
associated with a positively controlled three-way valve 
operatively associated with each conveying cylinder for 
the selective connection of each such conveying cylinder 
with a filling funnel and a conveying coiiduit or line. 
According to the invention a third three-way valve is 
arranged between the discharge openings of both three- 
way valves associated with the conveying cylinders and 
the aforesaid conveying conduit. 



3,667,870 
MOTOR DRIVEN PUMP 
Ynji Yoshida, Neyagawa, and Noriyosi Asada and Takao 
Fnnatsn, Hirakata-sfai, Japan, assignors to Matsushita 
. Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan 

FUed Jan. 4, 1971, Ser. No. 103,368 
Clabns priority, appUcation Japan, Jan. 9, 1970, 
45/3,059; Feb. 19, 1970, 45/14,674, 45/14,675, 
45/14,676, 45/14,678, 45/14,679, 45/14,681, 
45/14 682 

Int CL F04b 17/00. 35/04; H02k 1/32. 9/00 
VS, CL 417—357 12 Claims 




t2a^ 



A rotary piston pump is adapted to pump hydraulic 
fluid. A shaft, having eccentric cams, is rotated in bear- 
ings. The cams act against pistons acting within cylinder 
blocks. The pistons may be spring-loaded. The cylinder 
blocks are arranged in rows forming an asterisk (star) 
shape about the shaft. Two rows sandwich a base plate 
having an outlet manifold. The casing members are 
clamped by bolts and the casing members clamp the 
rows of cylinder blocks and base plate. 




A motor driven pump comprising a stator chamber and 
a rotor chamber separated from each other by means of 
a cylindrical sleeve, a hollow rotor shaft carried by a 
bearing block fixed in said cylindrical sleeve, and a pump 
impeller secured to the tip end of said hollow rotor shaft, 
the hollow interior of said rotor being communicating with 
main liquid flow. 



210 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



3 667 871 
_ CONTACT STRUCTURES FX)R VACUUM-TYPE 
CIRCUIT INTERRUPTERS HAVING RADIALLY 
OUTWARDLY-EXTENDING SPOKES 
Richard L. Hnndsted, FUMnit^ Pa., assignor to West- 
inghonse Electik Coqwration, Pittsborsh, Pa. 
FUed Feb. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 797,930 
Int CI. HOlh 33/66 
U.S. CL 200—144 B 12 aaims 



June J, 1972 



I 

an elongated column member suitably mounted on a 
support and extending downwardly into a body of water 
and having a diffusing member, a submersible mcvtor and 
an upwardly directed propeller associated with the motor, 
all being mounted adjacent a lower end of the column 
member whereby operation of the propeller and the dif- 
fusing member effect an upwardly and outwardly diffused 




The contact structure of a vacuum-type circuit inter- 
rupter is provided with radially-outwardly extending 
spokes, or contact bars, extending outwardly from a cen- 
tral primary contact region. The arc is initiated at the 
primary contacting surfaces adjacent the central point of 
the separable contact structure, and, because of the 
provision of the outwardly extending spokes, the arc is 
moved outwardly to the arc-dissipation surfaces which 
extend to the outer periphery of the contacts. The arc is 
rapidly moved outwardly, and the primary arcing surfaces 
are thereby prevented from becoming eroded. 




flow in the body of water thereby moving warmer sub- 
surface water to the surface and effecting a circulation 
that provides aeration thereof and decreasing stratification 
and more uniform temperature of the body of water and 
the water is moved with a velocity of flow sufficient to 
substantially eliminate adherence of bamacles^o surfaces 
within the body of water. 



3,667,872 

AIR CIRCULATING DEVICE 

Harry B. Norman, 7803 S. Saginaw Ave., 

Chicago, in. 60649 

Filcd Jan. 7, 1971, Ser. No. 104,651 

Int CL FOld 1/02; F04b 17/00. 35/04 



VS. CL 417—423 



. 3,667,874 

TWOSTAGE COMPRESSOR HAVING INTER- 
ENGAGING ROTARY MEMBERS 
Roger C. Weathcrston, WUUamsviUe, and Geofge R. 
Dnryea, Boffalo, N.Y., assignors to Cornell Aeronau- 
tiaU Laboratory, Inc^ Builalo, N.Y. 

I FUed July 24, 1970, Ser. No. 58,009 



6 Claims VS. C\. 418—9 



Int. CL FOlc 1/18. 1/30 



3 Claims 




An air circulating device having a single electric motor 
to rotate blades coimected perpendicular to and between 
two parallel rotating plates driven by the motor. The 
blades intersect on one edge to define a centerline about 
which the blades rotate. An enclosure is provided to en- 
close the air circulating device. The enclosure has an air 
inlet at the lower rear of the enclosure and a manually or 
automatically adjustable air outlet at the top of the front 
of the enclosure. 




^ 



\ 



3,667,873 
WATER MOVING APPARATUS FOR DESTRATI- 
nCATION, ICE REDUCTION AND BARNACLE 
CONTROL 

Roy A. Cramer, Jr., % Anchormatic, 1020 E. 79th 
Terrace, Kansas City, Mo. 64131 
FUed Nov. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 85,898 
bit a. BOlf 5/12; E02b 3/00; F04b 17/00 
UA CL 417-424 9 Claims 

A water moving apparatus for destratification, ice re- 
duction and barnacle control in a body of water includes 



•N 






T?r^^5;^SSmS^ 



'^^ 




5YP 



-1 



2 
1 



A two-staged Roots type compressor having a housing 
separated into two compartments by a partition, each 
compartment containing a working chamber having 
rotary mating impellers therein, inlets to each chamber 
and outlets from each chamber, passages in the partition 
communicating the outlet of one chamber with the inlet 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



211 



of the other chamber, a valved passage in the partition 
communicating the inlets of each chamber, the impellers 
of each chamber being mounted on common shafts. 



3,667,875 

PUMP 

Chan Yoen lik. Lot 5030, Hong Kong 

FUed Jan. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 939 

CbOnu priority, application Great Britain, Jan. 7, 1969, 

950/69 

Int. CL F04c 1/02 

VS. CI. 418—56 1 Claim 




The invention provides a pump having a pumping 
action similar to that of a sliding vane rotary pump, but 
which has a non-rotary pumping element. The pump 
comprises a cylindrical pump chamber having an inlet 
port and an outlet port, a cylindrical pumping element 
disposed within said pump chamber said pumping ele- 
ment being of a diameter less than that of the pump cham- 
ber, a tongue engaged within a recess formed in the pe- 
riphery of said pump chamber between said inlet and 
outlet ports said tongue being in operative association 
with said pumping operation, a cam or eccentric rotat- 
ably engaged within a bore of said pumping element, 
and a drive shaft carrying said cam or eccentric jour- 
nalled in bearings of the pump chamber. 



3,667,876 
ROTARY FLUID FLOW MACHINES 
Michael David Boyd, Fbit 3, 136 Anderson St, 
South Yarra, Victoria, Australia 
' Contimiation-in-part of application Ser. No. 826,046, 
May 2, 1969. This appUcation Dec. 21, 1970, Ser. 
No. 99,975 

Int a. F02b 53/00 
VS. CL 418—68 22 Claims 




strained by engagement between the two end surfaces 
for movement in the cavity of the type involving a first 
axial rotational component of motion and a second axial 
reciprocatory component. Between each pair of cooperat- 
ing end surfaces, a plurality of chambers is defined, the 
volumes of which undergo cyclic variation when the 
annular member undergoes such movement The annular 
member is afRxed to a cylindrical sleeve which defines 
two axial cylindrical extensions to the member, one to 
either axial side thereof, one cylindrical surface of the 
sleeve slidingly engaging one cylindrical surface of the 
axial member. The body is provided with ports defined 
by root portions of the undulating surfaces on the body 
and cooperating transverse edges of the sleeve extensions, 
and communication between the ports and the respective 
chambers is controlled by the sleeve during reciprocating 
motion thereof. 

3,667,877 
RADIAL SEAL FOR A ROTARY PISTON INTERNAL 

COMBUSTION ENGINE 
Heinz Lamm, Esslingen-St. Bernhardt Germany, assignor 
to Daimler-Benz Aktiengesellschaft, Stuttgart-Unter- 
tnrkheim, Germany 

nied Oct 24, 1969, Ser. No. 869,097 

Claims priority, q»pUcation Germany, Oct 25, 1968, 

P 18 05 040.3 

Int a. FOlc 19/02; F03c 5/00; F04c 27/00 

VS. CL 418—121 2 Cbdms 




A radial seal for a rotary piston internal combustion 
engine in which a sealing bar, possibly constructed of sev- 
eral parts, is arranged in each groove provided in the pis- 
ton comers; each sealing bar is urged in the radially out- 
ward direction by a spring means that consists of two leaf 
springs having different radii of curvature, with the leaf 
spring of larger radius of curvature abutting directly 
against the groove bottom while the leaf spring with small- 
er radius of curvature rests on the curved surface of the 
leaf spring with the larger radius of curvature. 



3,667,878 

PUMP CONSTRUCTION 

Leo C. Reeve, Lombard, IIL, assignor to Porfland 

Cement Association, Skolde, in. 

FUed Jan. 8, 1971, Ser. No. 104,856 

Int a. FOlc 1/00, 11/00; F04b 15/02 

VS. CL 418—173 20 CUdms 



27 26 . 12a 17 



A rotary fluid flow machine comprising a body, an 
axial member or shaft rotatable relative to the body, and 
a generally annular member mounted for axial reciproca- 
tion and rotation in a generally annular cavity defined 
between the body and the shaft. The axial member and 
the body are relatively rotatable, and the annular mem- 
ber is provided with undulating end surfaces. The axial 
cavity is defined by spaced concentric inner and outer 
cylindrical surfaces and by a pair of axially spaced end 
surfaces of undulating configuration, each cooperating 
with a separate one of the undulating surfaces of the an- 
nular member, whereby the annular member is con- 




A pump is provided which is capable of handling a 
flowable product such as plastic concrete or the like. The 
pump includes two moving parts both of which are driven 
from a single power source. One moving part comprises 



212 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



1972 



a rotating wall which cooperates with a stationary arcuate 
wall to form a cavity in which is disposed an impeller. 
The impeller is carried by the rotating wall and moves 
therewith. The second moving part is a substantially cylin- 
drical member disposed within the cavity and rotatable 
about an axis offset but parallel to the axis of the rotating 
wall. The cylindrical member is provided with an open- 
ing through which the impeller extends. The cylindrical 
member is rotated by the impeller. The stationary arcuate 
wall is provided with a product discharge port and the 
rotating wall is provided with a product infeed port dis- 
posed rearwardly of the impeller. 



3,667^79 

SCREW PUMP 

Onzio Cerpcni, 4 Via Giotto, Viareggio, Italy 

FUcd Feb. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 10,209 

Claims priority, ivplicati<m Italy, Feb. 12, 1969, 

34,901/69 

iBt CL Flic 1/16; F03c 3/00; F04c 1/10 

VS, CL 418— 2«2 3 Claims 






23 X> 10 36 




h ? 



^ 



y 






providing part of the mould walls. The magnets may be 
permanent magnets, permanent electromagnetic chucks, 
switchable permanent magnetic chucdcs or electromagnets. 



I 



>r to Tkc B. F. 



3,667,881 
TIRE COOLING 
Francis J. Cimprich, Caaton, Ohio, assignoi 

Goodrich Company, New York, N.Y. 

Continuation of application Ser. No. 660,162, July 31, 

1967, which is a continuation-in-part of abandoned 

application Ser. No. 623,415, Mar. 15, 1967. This 

appUcation Mar. 3, 1971, Ser. No. 120,700 

Int CI. B29h 5/02. 17/00 

UA CI. 425—28 7 Claims 




Post cure inflation tire apparatus having a ring which 
circumferentially encompasses the tire which is subject 
to being held by a pair of axially spaced movable rim 
flanges wherein the ring directs coolant against the pe- 
riphery of such tire to cool such tire to a uniform tem- 
perature; 



A pump of the screw type having a pair of screws of 
opposite pitch and means for securing together each 
screw as a pair on the same shaft so that axial thrust is 
withstood by said securing means. 



3,667,880 

EDGE FORM ASSEMBLY FOR PRESSING OF 

ARTICLES 

Michael Anky Malct and David Leslie Hills, Watford, 

England, anignors to National Research Development 

Corporation, London, England 

FOed Not. 25, 1969, Ser. No. 879,879 
Claims priority, application Great ^ritaha, Nov. 26, 1968, 

56,110/68 

Int CL 1128b 3/00 

U.S. CL ^5—3 16 Claims 



I ->. 3,667,882 

INDUSTRIAL TIRE MOLD 

Donald H. Ross, Chalfont, Pa., assignor to Super Tire 

Engineering Company, Camden, N J. 

Filed Jan. 19, 1971, Ser. No. 107,746 

Int CL B29c 5/00; B29d 27/00; B29h 11/00 

VS. a. 425—117 6 Claims 





An a{^)aratus for use in the pressing of articles com- 
prising a vertically displaceable edge form com- 
ponent for the mould walls which component can be held 
magnetically to a locating structure during pressing. In 
some embodiments of the invention, the component is 
associated with a stationary edge form component also 



A mold for industrial tires and wheels of polyurethane 
and the like has a lower portion, an open-top upper 
portion, a cover for the upper portion, and provision for 
spacers between the lower and upper mold portions for 
adjusting the height of the mold to accommodate tires 
or wheels of different axial dimensions. The mold receives 
an aimular hub to the surface of which a polyurethane 
or like solid tire is to be molded. The lower mold has 
a spindle having hollow radial arms with pins therein 
which may be cammed radially outwardly. A sleeve 
extends upwardly from the spindle through the lid of tlie 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



218 



upper mold portion. A stem within said sleeve has a cam 
at its lower end and a nut at its upper end. Turning the 
nut causes the stem to move downwardly and cams the 
radial pins outwardly to press against the inner surface 
of the annular hub thereby to maintain the hub centered 
about the axis of the mold. The mold cover has a hub 
portion having therein cam followers which engage cam 
slots in the outer surface of the sleeve so that by moving 
the lid rotationally the lid is cammed downwardly into 
closed position. 



3 667 883 
SHOE BOTTOM MOLDING APPARATUS 
Herbert Ludwig, deceased, late of Uescn, near Bremen, 
Germany, by Frledrich Koch, AcUm, near Bremen, 
and Hans Loewe, czecntors, Frankfurt am Mafai, Ger- 
many, assignon to Dcsaaa-Werke GmbH, Bremen, Gcr^ 
many 

FUed June 10, 1968, Ser. No. 740,427 

Int CL B291I 5/12. 7/08 

V3. CL 425—119 18 Claims 



provided and electric circuit means are present to measure 
and compare the signals and provide an output signal 
under predetermined conditions, which ouQwt *ig n» } js 



\\ " n n n 





Injection molding apparatus embodying an open-top 
mold, a rotatable support for mounting two lasts for 
alternate disposition at a predetermined distance above 
the open top of the mold, a carriage mounting the rotat- 
able support for movement vertically with respect to the 
mold to bring the bottom of the last located above the 
mold into engagement therewith for injection of bottom- 
forming material, and means supporting the carriage on 
a cdumn for heightwise adjustment relative to the mold 
to accommodate lasts of different height. 



3 667 884 

CONTROL APPARATUS FOR INJECTION 

MOLDING PRESS 

Nyles V. Rdnfdd, 610 l^eesldc Drive, 

Akron, Ohio 44313 

Contimation-fai-part of application Ser. No. 791,372, 

Jan. 15, 1969. This application Nov. 25, 1969, Ser. 

No. 879,853 

Int a. B29c 3/06 
UA CL 425—149 2 Claims 

-^ The new control for an injection molding press includes 
an electric signal or voltage supi^y means that is opera- 
tively secured to one of two relatively movable pi«ss 
platens, and has a member associated therewith for cag- 
ing the signal produced. A contact means is operatively 
secured to the other of the relatively movable platens and 
positioned to contact the signal means when the mold 
sections are adjacent or in contact and vary the signal 
dependent upon the relative positions or movement of 
the mold sections on the platens. A controllable variable 
second signal or voltage generating or supply means is 



used for terminating actuation of the injection means in 
the press when the mold sections are starting to be sepa- 
rated. 



3^7,885 

MOLDING MACHINES 

Richard K. Shelby, 1320 Sandburg Toncc. 

Chicago. ID. 60610 

FOed Not. 5, WO, Ser. No. 87,024 

,,^ _ lirt. CL B29c J7/(W 

U.S. CL 425—155 24 




A driving mechanism for molding machines, presses 
and the like, where a platen is shifted with respect to a 
thermoplastic web. The drive mechanism includes a rotat- 
ing crank which shifts a drive bar through a path vdiere 
it causes a drive link to shift the platen to and from 
a molding position. The crank arm and an oscillating link 
which is connected to the other end of the drive bar cre- 
ates a path of movement for the drive link which includes 
a dwell period sufficient for the platen to remain in the 
molding for a preselected amount of time. 



yimet^ U 



MAN-MAm VILMtaNT SPINS 
^ EXTRUDER HEAD 

Charles GantUer, Lyon, and Jca».Maife 

Cotean, France, aarignora to 

tiieDe dc TcztOca Artiictek cC 

Famn 

Claims priority, appttcatloB Fnmet, Aag, 21, INS, 

«T« ^ .<.- _ Int CL DOld J/00 

UA CL 425—192 7 nrft, 

A sinnneret for use in extrusion of man-made fibers and 

a novel extruder head equipped with the spinneret TTie 



214 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



Tl 



June 6, 



972 



spinneret is rectangular and arcuate along its width with provides a device for separating in a mould the bottom 
the marginal edges of the spinneret of substantially the scrap formed in the mould bottom, this device compris- 
a ^in e arcuate configuration as the spinneret face through- ing in at least one of the mould halves, at the level of said 

bottom scrap, a member on which said scrap is adapted 
to be crushed during the mould closing movement and 
said member is also adapted, during the noould oponing 




out. The spinneret is adapted to be clamped to a mating 
arcuate marginal portion of the extruder head to thereby 
assure an impervious coimection between the head and the 
qnnneret. 

3 667 887 

CORE PIN MOUNTING MEANS FOR INJECTION 

MOLDING APPARATUS 

Oscar Reias, Great Neck, N.Y^ aasigiior to APL 

Corponitioii, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

FDcd Nov. 6, 1969, Scr. No. 874,662 

lot CL B29c niOT; B29f 7/022 

\5S. CL 425—242 3 Claims 



29 32 




movement, to produce a displacement of said scrap in rela- 
tion to the bottom of the blown hollow body retained in 
the mould-half provided with said member. This invention 
is applicable to the removal of moulding scraps, wastes 
and like useless projections formed during the moulding 
of hollow articles. 






/ 




t 




F^ 


r^ 


LV 


f. 



..r 




3 667 889 

VACUUM MOULDING MACHINE 

Nerfe MarteDi, 6 Via Cavaioni, Bologna, Italy 

Filed Aug. 14, 1970, Ser. No. 63,857 

Claims priority, application Italy, Aug. 25, 1969 

7,274/69 

Int. CL B29c 17/04 

U.S. a. 425—314 24 Claims 



Mold core pins are mounted on a turntable so that 
they can be indexed to four stations in sequence. Each 
core pin is formed with a peripheral annular flange that 
extends radially outwardly from the core pin and that 
has a radial taper. Partible injection and blow molds each 
having at least two sections are engageable with the core 
pins at selected stations. The molds cooperate with the 
core ptns to form mold cavities. Each section of each mold 
is formed with a recess, and each of the recesses is tapered 
comi^ementally to the core pin flanges. When the mold 
sections are closed about the core pins, the flanges enter 
the recesses. The connection between each core pin and 
the turntable is resilient so that the core pins when en- 
gaged are positioned by the interaction of the flanges and 
recesses. At all other times, the core pins are positioned 
by their resilient connections to the turntable. 




3,667,888 
DEVICE FOR REMOVING BOTTOM SCRAPS OF 
EXTRUSION-BLOWN HOLLOW THERMOPLAS- 
TIC BODIES 
Hmiert Blanchard, Lc Havre, Fhuice, assignor to 
SidcL Lc Havre, France 
Filed Jime 12, 1970, Scr. No. 45,727 
Claims priority, application F^snoe, June 18, 1969, 

6920326 

Int. CL B29d 23/03 

U.S. CL 425—307 14 Claims 

This invention relates to the moulding of thermoplastic 

articles by the so-called extrusion-blowing process and 



A vacuum moulding machine for forming unilaterally 
directed projecting moulds in continuous webs of thermo- 
plastic synthetic material, comprising a driven rotatable 
drum, a plurality of suction moulds disposed peripherally 
around the drum, an automatically controlled vacuum 
distributor device connecting the suction moulds to a 
vacuum, and an endless cutting band traversing the web 
with its cutting portion parallel and adjacent to the web 
on the side of the projecting mouldings with its cutting 
edge directed in the opposite direction to the direction of 
movement of the web, the web passing around and held 
by suction in contact with the moulds on a portion of the 
drum periphery while the moulds are formed unilaterally 
in the web and the cutting device cuts the moulded por- 
tions from the web. The cutting band is askew to the 
direction of web movement and guides are provided for 
the band cutting portion. A support is provided for the 
web adjacent to the cutting band and thrust rollers press 
the web edges against the support. Stacking means are 
provided for stacking the moulds severed from the web. 



June 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



215 



3,667,890 
PRESS 

Sergio Rnsmlnl, Via Bodio 16, MUan, Italy 

Filed May 5, 1970, Scr. No. 34,687 

Claims priority, application Italy, Apr. 16, 1969, 

19,696/69 

Int CL B29f 1/00; B30b 1/16 

U.S. CL 425—406 8 Claims 



3,667,892 

CONTROL MEANS FOR PRESSURIZED 

GAS-FIRED SPACE HEAIER 

Richard C. Bamett and James D. Boodier, Tylo*, Tex., 

assignors to General Electric Company 

Filed Sept 2, 1970, Scr. No. 69,043 

Int CL F23n 5/00 

\}S. CL 431—31 3 




A press having two stationary plates arranged spaced 
from each other. This press includes a mobile plate ar- 
ranged between said stationary plates and a plurality of 
toggles. Each of these toggles includes a shorter arm 
pivotally connected to the mobile plate and a longer arm 
which is hinged on its free end to a guide member. 



3,667,891 
MOLDING PRESS 
Robert J. Gclin, Newari(, Ohio, assignor to Owens- 
Coming FIbcrglas Corporation 
FOed Aug. 13, 1969, Ser. No. 849,671 
Int CL B30b 5/02; B29c 3/00 
MS, CI. 425—408 5 Claims 




A low-cost, high-speed press for molding plastic articles 
having a movable upper platen and a fixed lower platen 
with opposed matching dies attached thereto. The uRjer 
platen is moved between a remote upper position to a 
lower molding position at high speed by a motor-driven 
suspension system. When the upper platen is in the lower 
molding position, a plurality of platen stops are moved 
into locking position to prevent upward movement of 
the upper platen and molding force is applied by means 
of a fluid-filled pressure bag positioned between the die 
plates and one of the platens. The platen stops are ad- 
justable in height to compensate for variable heights in 
the dies used with the press and vertical platen guides as- 
sure mold alignment throughout the range of movement 
by the upper platen. 




"'^? 



U5 45h 



This invention provides means for controlling the 
supply of combustion air and fuel gas to gas-fired space 
heater means employing pressurized combustor means 
including a fuel gas-air mixing area having a valved 
source of fuel gas and a source of pressurized com- 
bustion air fluid-connected to it. The present invention 
interposes movable damper means between the combus- 
tion air source and the gas-air mixing area and switch 
means actuatable by movement of the damper means in 
response to combustion air flowing between the combus- 
tion air source and the gas-air mixing area to control 
the opening and closing of the fuel gas source valve such 
that fuel gas is not admitted to the gas-air mixing area 
unless the flow of combustion air is sufficient to move 
the damper means to actuate the switch means to open 
the fuel gas source valve. 



3,667393 

OIL OR GAS BURNER WITH A CROSS-CURRENT 

BLOWER HAVING RETURN FLOW MEANS 

Kurt Zcnkner, Hertzstrasse 12, Ettlingcn, Gcnnany 

FUed Apr. 1, 1968, Scr. No. 717,698 

Claims priority, an»lication Germany, Mar. 31, 1967, 

Z 12,777 
The portion of the term of ttic patent subsequent to 
Ang. 27, 1985, has been disclaimed 
,^^ _ Int CL F23n 5/05 

UA CL 431—79 35 




An oil or gas burner has a casing formed by a lower 
casing member and a cover plate forming an elongated 
casing with rounded ends. A blower rotor is located in 
an opening in one of the ends, the casing wall adjacent 
the opening forming a guide plate at the intake side of 
the rotor. The angle between the tangent to the casing 
wall at the beginning of the guide plate and the tangent 
to the casing wall at the other end of the rounded end 
portion is less than 90', preferably 30'-60'. There is 
provided at the other side of the rotor from the guide 
plate, where the rotor is slighUy spaced from the longitu- 
dinal wall of the casing, a vortex baffle-plate which tapers 



216 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June a, 1972 



in cross-section towards the periphery of the rotor, and 
between which and the end portion of the longitudinal 
wall one or more passages are formed through which 
some of the air fed by the rotor can be returned from 
the fvessure-side to the suction-side. 



3,M7,894 

OIL BURNER 

Nomuw E. Flounoy, Rkhmond, V a^ 

Tcuco lac. New Yoifc, N.Y. 

FDed Dec 7, 197«, Scr. No. 95,651 

bL CL F23d 11/00 

VS, CL 431—114 



to 



4 ClainH 




A gun type oil burner provided with a bafBe plate be- 
tween the blower and air inlet, combined with sound 
d<«drning material so arranged as to materially lessen 
the fan noise. 



3,«7^5 

ELECTRICALLY IGNTIED GAS TORCH WITH 

LAMINAR GAS FLOW IN REMOVABLE TIP 

Albert ROM, Wniowkk, Ohio, MaigBor to Hairis 

Calorific CoB^any, CkTdaod, <Niio 

FDed Sept 18, 1970, Scr. No. 73,577 

bt CL F23q 3/00 

US. CL 431—255 14 Claims 




A idumber's gas torch has a conventional flame- 
adjustment valve; in series with that valve, an on-off valve 
is lever-operated and is latched open automatically on 
operation of the lever. An electric igniter is actuated by 
the lever to ignite the torch simultaneous with opening 
of the ouroff valve. Another series valve is automatically 
closed when the tordi tip is unscrewed and is reopened 
as another tip is attached. A trigger releases the latch 
and allows the on-off valve to close under spring pressure. 
The electric igniter has a grounded metal frame, and the 
torch handle and connected parts are electrically conduc- 
tive. The Vintage generated by the ignition device is 
transmitted to a spark gap in the torch tip near the flame 
end thereof by a series of conductors insulated from the 
handle and torch tip, and including an insulated con- 
ductor wire lying in the torch tip adjacent the wall. Sev- 
eral diameters upstream of the spark gap and also the 
flame end, the insulated conductor leaves its position 



against the torch tip wall and is spaced therefrom so as 
not to interfere with laminar flow of the combustible gas 
and air mixture approaching the flame, thus avoiding an 
unstable flame which would result from turbulent flow. 



3,M7396 
APPLYING FILM OF CTAIN TO TISSUE MOUNTED 

ON A MOVING SLIDE T 

James Bfnjamfn McConnick, La Graase, and Ld^on 
Clifford Johnsoo, WcstnoBt, IIL, aa^aors to Miles 
Laboratories, bc^ Elkhart, lad. 
AppUcalioa Jnac 7, 1965, Ser. No. 461,613, aow Patent 
No. 3^431,886, which is a contianatioa^a-part of ap- 
pUcatfoa Scr. No. 379,822, Joly 2, 1964. Divided 
this appHcatioa Oct 21, 1968, Sar. No. 822,752 
laL CL D86p 3/00 
UJS. CL 8—3 11 Claim 



l06 




IIO\ "^ 
/OS 



An>antus and the method of operation thereof is de- 
scribed for conveying objects, such as microscope slides, 
over a flat liquid applying surface and injecting a treating 
liquid into the space between the object and the surface. 



3,667 J97 

UNIFORMLY DYED YELLOW TO NAVY BLUE 
WATER SWELLABLE CELLULOSIC FIBERS 
Joha BtackwcD, Keaactt Square, Pa., aad Maaoo Toji, 
Stratford, N J., aaiiaoBS to E. L dn Poat de NcaioBis 
aad Compaay, WHarfagtoa, DcL 
No Drawtaig. Filed Nov. 25, 1969, Scr. No. 879,899 
lat CL D«6p 3/82 I 

UA CL 8—21 C 5 Clafaas 

Water swellable cellulosic fibers, for examine, cotton, 
or blends or mixtures thereof with synthetic fibers, for 
example, polyester fibers, uniformly dyed to yellow to 
navy blue shades with essentially water insoluble, mono- 
azo or disazo disperse dyes, for example, 2-diloro-4- 
nitro-4' - [N,N - bis (benzoyloxyethyl) amino ]azobenzene, 
said dyed fibers being fast to washing, drycleaning and 
crocking and having a reflectance color value (S') after 
scour of .at least about 2. 



3,667 898 

PROCESS FOR dyeing' 1EXT1LE MATERIALS 

FROM ORGANIC SOLVENT MEDL4 

^\l^* Bcrgaiaa, Mldlaad, Mich., aad Ross R. Dawsoa, 

Boffafc, N.Y., asaigaors to The Dow Chcailcal Coai- 

paay, Mldlaad, Mich. 

Co atianati oB-ia-part of appUcatton Ser. No. 678,433, 
Sept 25, 1967. TUs appUcatioB May 26, 1969, 
Scr. No. 827,620 

Int CL D06p 1/68 
UA a. 8—94 19 Claims 

The present invention concerns a method for dyeing 
textile filwrs, particularly in their woven, yam or loose 
mat state, employing dyestuffs dissolved or dispersed in 
organic solvents, particularly chlcMinated hydrocarbon s(d- 
vents, for fixing the dyestuff into the fiber during the proc- 
ess and for recovering substantially completely the sol- 
vent from the dyed fabric. The technique <rf the present 
invention employs compositions comprising hydrophobic 
organic solvents alone and/or in admixture with co- 
solvents, swelling agents and fixatives which are com- 
patible with the solvent and the soluble and/or dispers- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



GENERAL AND MECHANICAL 



217 



ible organic dyestuffs. The novel method comprises apply- a solvent boiling between albout 40' C. and the softening 
ing solvent compositions of dyestuffs to textiles, diffusing point of the fiber, and recovering the solvent either con- 

temporaneosuly with said fixation or in a rinse step fol- 

lowing said fixation. 




and fixing the dyestuff into the textile fibers while main- 
taining the textile fiber in a zone filled with the vapors of 



3,667,899 
DYEING OF POLYACRYLONTTRILE TEXTILE MA- 
TERIALS WITH CAHONIC DYES IN THE PRES- 
ENCE OF AROMATIC ESTERS 

James J. Hartaett, Newark, aad Robert Feigia, West 
(kaaae, N J., aarigaors to Sybnm Corporatioa, Rodcs- 
ter^RY. 

No Drawiag. Filed Apr. 3, 1970, Ser. No. 25,578 

lat CL D«6p 5/04 
VS. CI. 8—173 25 ClalBM 

Esters of the monocarboxylic and/or dicarboxylic aro- 
matic acids and derivatives thereof are used as leveling 
agents in the dyeing of polyacrylonltrik-cMitaining ma- 
terials with cationic dyes. Level dyeing of polyacrylo- 
nitrile moieties are achieved without loss of color yields 
or bulking effects. 



CHEMICAL 



3,667,908 

METHOD OF DYEING NATURAL AND 
SYNTHETIC FIBERS 

Averai T. Trimble, Jr., Charlotte, N.C., assignor to 
CaroChem Corporation, Chariotte, N.C. 

No Drawfaig. FUcd Nov. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 875,557 

lat. CL D06p 5/04 
VS. CL 8—173 2 Clafaas 

A textile dyeing process wherein a methyloxolane is 
employed as a carrier alone and in combination with other 
known carriers. 

3,667,901 

METHOD OF PRODUCING ORTHOVANADATES 
OF RARE-EARTH METALS 

Vsevolod Scnicaovi<A Krylov, UUtsa Tcreahkovoi 2, kv. 
65; Ivan ^^kolacvlch Popkov, UUtsa Tcreslikovoi 2, 
kr. 14; Robert Leoaidovich Magoaor, UUtsa Ostrovi- 
dova 30, kr. 16; aad Mlkhafl Nikohwvich Pnriag, 
UUtsa TcreshkoToi 2, kr. 37, aU of Odessa, U.S.S.R.; 
uhmt^wmtam Saakovich Bagdasarov, UUtsa Garibaldi 59, 
kotpus 2, kv. 42, Moscow, UJS.SJI.; Raisa Fedorovaa 
Sagtaui, UUtsa Tereshkovoi 2, kv. 28, Odessa, U.S.SJt; 
aad Viktor laaokoitievldi Popov, UUtsa Lentau 24, 
kr. 16, Fryariao Moakovskoi OblMt, U.S.SJI. 

No Drawing. Filed Aug. 21, 1970, Scr. No. 66,143 

laL CL C22b 59/00 
VS. CL 23—19 V "2 Oabns 

A method of producing orthovanadates al rare-earth 
metals, consisting in that aqueous solutions of nitrates of 
rare-earth metals are prepared with pH=S.5-6.2, and an 
aqueous solution of ammonium metavanadate is prepared 
with pH=9.8-ll, whereupon said solutions are interacted 
under dynamic conditions with Re =1000-6000, till the 
pH of the medium becomes equal to 9.5-10.5. The result- 
ing precipitate of the orthovanadate of a rare-earth metal 
is separated from the solution, dried at a temperature of 
80-120" C, and then calcined at a temperature of 900- 
1200* C. 

The present method makes it possible to preclude the 
formation of polyvanadates and to obtain chemically and 
granulometrically homogeneous desired products, ade- 
quate to meet the requiremens of various branches of en- 
gineering and industry, such as quantum electronics, ana- 
lytical chemistry, colot television. 



3,667.902 
MANUFACTURE OF SODIUM CARBONATE 
Joseph Kay and Ernest BlumenthaL Northwich, Eagfaad, 
assigaors to Imperial Chemical ladnrtiics Liaiited, Lon- 
don, England 

No Drawfaig. Filed Jan. 12, 1970, Scr. No. 2,371 
Claims priority, appUcatioa Grttt Brltaia, Jaa. 23, 1969, 

3,944/69 
lat CL COld 7/12 
VS. a. 23—63 11 Cfarims 

A process for the^ manufacturer of sodium carbonate 
monohydrate which comprises the step of reacting an 
aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide with an aqueous 
suspension of sodium sesquicarbonate at an elevated tem- 
perature in the presence of an excess of bicarbonate ions. 



3,667,903 
PROCESS FOR PRODUCING POLYMERIC 
ALUMINUM-AMIDO-POLYPHOSPHATE 
Ernest Stoasel, 203 W. 81st St, 
New York, N.Y. 
No Drawfaig. Filed Oct 16, 1968, Scr. No. 768,188 
The porttoa of die term of the pateat sabseqacat to 
Dec 3, 1985, has been disclaimed 
Int CL COlb 25/00 
VS. CL 23—105 7 Cfadms 

Polymerization products are obtained from aqueous 
solutions of reactants which are polymerizable at an ele- 
vated polymerization temperature above the boiling point 
of water and which during polymerization become higlily 
viscous or rigid so that mixing of, and uniform heat trans- 
fer within, the polymerizing mass are impeded, by sub- 
jecting a ccmcentrated aqueous solution of the reactants, 
which may contain foaming and foam stabilizing agents, 
to foaming so that a foam consisting of a dispersion of 
a gas in a continuous liquid phase is formed, the liquid 
phase consisting of the solution of the reactants being 
present in the form of thin foam lamellae. The thus- 
formed foam is then maintained at polymerization tem- 
perature until the desired degree of polymerization of the 
reactants has been reached within the lamellae, and dur- 
ing this polymerization the foam bubbles of the foamed 
mass are continuously displaced relative to each other. 
It is acheived thereby that the reaction mixture, due to 
being in foamed condition, remains easily stirrable and 
this facilitates relative displacement of the foam bubbles 
and thereby uniform heat transfer throughout the entire 
foam mass. Furthermore, the polymerization of the 



I 



\ 



218 



lamellae-forming reaction mixture will take place at an 
elevated pressure caused by the expansion of the dis- 
persed gas within the individual foam bubbles during the 
heating of the foam to polymerization temperature. 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE June 6. 1972 

I 3,667,907 P 

MANUFACTURE OF HYDROGEN CYANHIE 

John Derek Rushmcre, Wilmington, Dcl^ assignDr to 



3,667,904 
PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF MKTURES 

OF PHOSPHORIC AND NITRIC ACID 
Andre Roche and Robert Anunridi, Toolonse, and Gil- 
bert Coosserans, Portet, France, assignors to Azote ct 
Frodnifs Chimiqacs SA^ TodIodsc, FVance 
Continuation-in-part ot application Scr. No. 698,829, 
Jan. 18, 1969. lUs application Apr. 13, 1970, Ser. 
No. 28,118 
Claims prkMlty, qipUcation FIrance, Jan. 26, 1967, 
92,529; Aug. 17, 1967, 118,085 
bit CI. COlb 25/28 
US. CL 23—107 5 Claims 

This invention is directed to a ixt)cess for the prepara- 
tion of monoammonium phos{^te by ammoniation of 
mixtures of phosphoric and nitric acids in the presence of 
at least partially water-miscible Ci to C« alkanol charac- 
terized in that the alcoholic solution to be ammoniated 
contains 16 to 8% of water. 



E. L dn Pont de Nemours and Company, Wilmington, 

Del. 

No Drawing. FUcd May 4, 1970, Scr. No. 34,577 
Int CI. COlc i/02 ^ 
U.S. CI. 23—151 4 Oalms 

An improvement in the Andrussow process for the 
manufacture of hydrogen cyanide is provided. The im- 
provement comprises the use of steam in the synthesis 
mixture ia place of nitrogen which is present in air. Pref- 
erably, a synthesis mixture containing by volume 
methane/ammonia/steam/oxygen within the range of 
1-2:1:1:1 to 1-2:1:4:1 is employed. 



REM( 



SULFUR 



3,667,908 
lOVAL AND RECOVERY OF S! 
OXIDES FROM GASES 
Samuel L. Torrcncc, Charieston, S.C., assignor to 
Westvaco Corporation, New York, N.Y. 
Continuation of abandoned application Ser. No. 724,777, 
Apr. 29, 1968. TUs appUcation Nov. 27, 1970. Ser. 
No. 93,485 

Int CL COlb 17/60 
US. CL 23—178 3 (haims 



3 667 905 
CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF ALUMINIUM 

SULPHATE 

Geoife H. Jennings, 23 Crimea St, St Kilda, 

Victoila, Australia 

No Drawing. Filed July 29, 1970, Scr. No. 59,325 

Claims pri<nlty, q^licatlon Australia, Aug. 6, 1969, 

59,156/69 
Int CL coif 7/00 
US. CL 23—123 6 Claims 

A continuous process for the production of aluminium 
sulphate, either as alum crystals or alum solutions in com- 
mercial concentrations at ambient temperature, in which 
sulphuric acid at concentrations of 20-100% and dry 
alumina hydrate or bauxite or other form of aliuninium 
hydroxide, together with diluent feed water as may be 
required depending upon the concentration of the sulphuric 
acid used, are separately fed to the inlet of a multi-pass 
heat-exchange tubular reactor, the mixture of reactants 
being at a temperature of 70-120° C. when fed into said 
reactor and being rapidly brought to a temperature of 
110-120' C. after entering said reactor and being main- 
tained at a temperatiu-e of 11 0-1 20" C. in traversing said 
reactor to the outlet. 



^ 



"-C 



u. 



^^ o**rf f,,^m a#3 



*£rer^rep so. 



y. 



Li 






r~c . 



/' 



^iT 



t 1 



3,667,906 
METHOD FOR PRODUCING MANGANESE DI- 
OXIDE CONTAINING LESS POTASSIUM 
Sdya Sasaki, Yamagata, Japan, assignor to Tekkoslia 
Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 
No Drawing. FDcd May 11, 1970, Scr. No. 36,417 
Claims priority, appUcation Japan, May 15, 1969, 
44/36,995 
Int a. COlg 45/02; BOlk 1/00 
US. CL 23-145 3 Ctaims 

An ore containing a decreased amount of potassium 
is obtained by reducing-roasting manganese oxide ores 
cmitaining potassium, thereby converting manganese 
components in the ores into MnO, and removing potas- 
sium components from the reduced-roasted ores by ex- 
tracting them with water at elevated temperatures. Into 
tiie resulting ore containing the decreased amount of 
potassium is added an acid to extract the manganese 
components and, furthermore, by oxidizing the manga- 
nese components in the second extract thus obtained 
electrolytically or with an oxidizing agent, manganese 
dioxide containing less potassium can be obtained. 



A prociss for removing sulfur dioxide and sulfur tri- 
oxide from a gaseous stream whereby sulfur dio^^iide is 
oxidized to sulfur trioxide and the sulfur trioxide is ad- 
sorbed onto an activated carbon adsorbent having elemen- 
tal sulfur adsorbed thereon; thereafter the adsorbent is re- 
generated producing sulfur dioxide and activated carbon 
adsorbent with a minimal loss of adsorbent due to burn- 
oflf; elemental sulfur is adsorbed onto the regenerated ad- 
sorbent aod the adsorbent is then recycled to contact the 
gaseous stream and the sulfur dioxide produced during re- 
generation is recovered. 



' 3,667,909 

METHOD FOR THE PREPARATION OF ULTRA 
HIGH PURITY SlOa IN A POROUS BEAD FORM 
Ian M. Thomas, Temperance, Mich., asrignor to 
CKrcns-niinois, Inc. 1 

No Drawing. FUed Aug. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 61,849 
Int. Ci. COlb 33/00 
U.S. CL 23—182 R 22 Claims 

There is disclosed the preparation of high purity, sili- 
con oxide in the form of porous beads of a high surface 
area by hydrolyzing a silicon alkoxide dissolved in a hy- 
droxyl containing organic solvent with less than a stoichio- 
metric amount of water so as to provide a partially hy- 
drolyzed soluble intermediate product. The resulting par- 
tially hydrolyzed intermediate product is then treated 
with an immiscible organic medium so as to form a dis- 
continuous phase of liquid partially hydrolyzed intermedi- 
ate product dispersed in a continuous phase of organic 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



219 



medium. The dispersed intermediate product is then treat- 
ed with a base and a quantity of water sufficient to hy- 
drolyze residual alkoxy groups in the dispersed intermedi- 
ate product. The resulting mixture is stirred until the dis- 
persed intermediate is converted to firm, hard, solid, porous 
beads of silicon oxide. The beads are typically recovered 
by filtration and evaporation of non-solid residues or by 
like method. v 



3,667,910 
PROCESS FOR REMOVING SULFUR OXIDES 

FROM WASTE GAS 
Yoshltomo EgucU, Takarazului, Japan, assignor to 
Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd., Onka, Japan 
FUed Aug. 27, 1969, Scr. No. 853,440 
Claims priority, appUcation Japan, Aug. 27, 1968, 
43/61,322; May 13, 1969, 44/36,774 
Int a. COlb 17/56, 17/60 
US. CL 23—178 4 Claims 

In the process for removing sulfur oxides from waste 
gases with employment of activated carbon as the ad- 
sorbent, the chemical exhaustion of activated carbon and 
the lowering of its abihty for adsorbing sulfur oxides in 
the regeneration step can be remarkably prevented by 
regenerating the sulfur oxides-adsorlnng activated carbon 
with the desorbent containing carbon monoxide gas and/ 
or hydrogen gas in a concentration at least about 40% 
at a temperature from about 230° C. to about 450° C. 
The most advantageous results can be attained by em- 
ploying vanadium oxide-supporting activated carbon as 
the adsorbent. 



3,667,913 

CHROMIUM-DIOXn^-CATALYST 

Franz Hund, Krefcld-Bockum, Germany, assignor to 

Farbcnfabriken Bayer Akticngcsellsdiaft, Lcvcrimscn, 

Germany 
Continuation of anpUcation Scr. No. 660,690, Aug. 15, 

1967. TUs appUcation May 4, 1970, Scr. No. 33,148 

Int CL COlb 7/04 

US. a. 23—219 6 Claims 

Chromium-dioxide of rutile-type crystal-structure and 
modified chromium-dioxide containing oxides and/<X' 
fluorides of cations which have radii in the range be- 
tween 0.46 and 0.91 A. can be used as catalysts with high 
and permanent activity to promote oxidation-processes 
such as oxidation of hydrogen-chloride to chlorine and 
water, conversion of sutfur-dioxide to sulfur-trioxide oxi- 
dation of carbon-monoxide to carbon-dioxide, oxidation 
of ammonia to nitric oxides, oxidation and oxychlorination 
of hydrocarbons, combustion of hydrogen or alcohols and 
the like. The chromiiun-dioxide or the modified chromi- 
um-dioxide can be used as such or together with carriers. 
Furthermore it is possible to combine the chromiiun-di- 
oxide catalysts with other catalytically active materials. 



3,667,911 
METHOD OF TREATING SOLIDS WITH HIGH 
DYNAMIC PRESSURE 
Anthony S. Balchan and George R. Cowan, Woodbury, 
NJ., assignors to E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Com- 
pany, Wilmington, DcL 

Filed Mar. 4, 1969, Scr. No. 804,194 
Claims priority, qij^cation Great Britain, June 28, 1968, 

31,117/68 
Int CL COlb 31/06, 21/06 
US. CI. 23—209.1 7 Claims 

A process for treating solid materials with controlled, 
very high, dynamic pressures all or a portion of the total 
'pressiu-e rise occurring in a shock compression and any 
remaining portion occurring as a smooth, rapid (non- 
shock) compression, the pressure being released smooth- 
ly to ambient conditions, comprising subjecting the lateral 
boundaries of a body of a solid material to a pressure 
pulse moving at practically constant velocity in the direc- 
tion of the body's axial dimension and having practically 
uniform magnitude and duration over the lateral bound- 
aries, the magnitude and duration being sufficient to sus- 
tain a shock wave of substantially uniform intensity span- 
ning a major portion of the body between the lateral 
boundaries. The process is useful in converting non- 
diamond carbon to diamond and hexagonal boron nitride 
to cubic and wurtzitic boron nitride and in compacting 
solid materials such as silicon carbide powder. 



3,667,914 

APPARATUS AND PROCESS FOR TESTING 

EXHAUST GAS CATALYST SYSTEMS 

Charies R. Penquite, Ballwin, and George E. Barker, St 

Louis, Mo., assignors to Monsanto Company, St Loois, 

Mo. 

FUcd Nov. 3, 1970, Scr. No. 86,549 

Int CL GOln 7/00, 9/32 

US. a. 23—230 PC 22 Claims 




3,667,912 
CHEMICAL PRODUCTION OF CHLORINE 
Daniel I. Jaszka, Tonawanda, N.Y., assignor to Hooker 
Chemical Corporation, Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
No Drawing. FUed Dec 21, 1970, Ser. No. 100,463 
Int CL COlb 7/02.11/02 
US. a. 23—219 12 Oalms 

Substantially pure chlorine is produced under reaction 
conditions commonly employed for chlorine dioxide pro- 
duction, involving reaction of a chlorate, chloride and a 
mineral acid, by catalyzing the reaction with hexavalent 
molybdenum. 



An apparatus and process for testing catalytic systems 
used in the treatment of exhausts from hydrocarbon com- 
bustion engines. The apparatus comprises a system which 
includes a reactor system holding a sample tube. The sam- 
ple tube is provided with a diametrally reduced portion 
having a glass wool plug therein and the catalyst to be 
tested is disposed upon this plug. The sample tube is in- 
serted in an electric resistance heater or furnace. A pre- 
determined exhaust gas mixture or mixtures is passed 
through the catalyst bed at a desired test temperature. Pe- 
riodically, without removing the catalyst sample from the 
sample tube, a pressure drop measurement is made across 
the sample tube in order to determine the degradation of 
the catalyst bed. The exhaust gas mixtures are passed 
through the catalyst bed at a predetermined rate designed 
for laboratory scale equipment. However, when the pres- 
sure drop measurement is made, a carefully controlled and 
precisely reproducible gas flow rate appropriate for meas- 
uring catalyst degradation by pressure drop measurement 
is used. 



220 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 61 1972 



COLORIMETRIC METHODS AND COMPOSITIONS 

FOR DETERMINING IRON IN BLOOD 

Bcnuund Kkta, New Hyde Park, N.Y^ aaigiior to 

Hoffiiuuiii*La Rodie Incn Nntlcy, N J. 

Coillnulio»4ii-Mrt of appUcadon Ser. No. 7H616, 

Oct 2, 1M8. lUs appHcalkNi Apr. 28, 1970, Scr. 

No. 32,755 

lit CL G«lB 21/26, 31/22, 33/18 
U^. CL 25— 23f B 6 Oainis 






1 oo 


-0 0t»' 


on 


-0 04»' 


ow 


-OOM' 


in 


-0 04f 


oao 


-o on' 


t 00 


-0 0«* 


OM 



A diagnostic kit is described comprising as a first 
reagent a reducing agent and, as a second reagent, a 
buffered 5-(pyridyl)-2H-l,4-benzodiazepine, or a water- 
soluble acid addition salt thereof. The enzodiazepine is 
buffered with a buffer pair comprising a water-soluble 
salt of acetic acid and either ascorbic acid or acetic acid. 
Also described is a method of utilizing these reagents in 
aqueous solution in a continuous flow quantitative analysis 
of the iron in senui. 



3 M7 914 

STERILIZATION INDICATOR 

Martiii E. Stkrm and Rodcik P. Kwok, Chkago, lU., 

a«igBon to Johnson ft Johnson 

FDed Not. 17, 1970, Ser. No. 90,238 

Int CL GOlk 11/12, 11/20; GOln 3/22 

VS. CL 23—230 R li Claims 



16 




^ 



Sr£A/L- 
IZATION 
ZONE 




Low-cost telltale composition, which changes from a 
substantially light coIot to a substantially dark color 
under either steam or ethylene oxide sterilization con- 
ditioiM hut is otherwise substantially insensitive to normal 
ambient environmental conditions including daylight, 
comixises a solutiMi or dried solution of silver nitrate 
and a buffering quantity of a nitrate preservative selected 
from the group consisting of nitric acid, sodium nitrate 
or potassium nitrate. The telltale composition in aqueous 
alcoholic s(^ution is ixintable on any substrate without 
imparting substantial ccrfm- thereto, but is selectively 
colorable by the addition of desired pigments or dyes. 



be horizontal or vertical, continuously, including coordi- 
nated mec h a n ism for automatically applying sample to 
chromatographic test areas in sequence on a unitary base, 
mechanism for moving such test areas continuously into 
contact with solvent, and mechanism for activation of 
developing, color reaction, delay, drying, and densijtomet- 



3 667 917 

CHROMATOGRAPHY APPARATUS AND METHOD 

Marcos K. Bnadt, Easton, Pa., assignor to J. T. Baker 

Chemical Company, Phillipabarg, N J. 

FDed Not. 27; 1970, Ser. No. 93,064 

bit CL BOld 15/08: GOln 31/08 

U.S. CL 23—230 R 20 Claims 

Method and apparatus for automatically performing 

manipulations in thin layer chromatography, whether it 




ric analy^s, as well as feed and take-up, the apparatus in- 
cluding means responsive at intervals to indicia on the 
base related to the chromatogram to activate and deacti- 
vate portions of the apparatus and to relate the chro- 
matographic operations to the progress of the chromato- 
graphicalfy active areas throu^ the machine. 



icalW 



3,667,918 

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ANALYSb 

OF NO AND NO, 

Norman A. LyAkow, Chicago, DL, aarignor to 

|PoUntion Montton, Inc., Chicaso, DL 

iFUed Feb. 17, 1971, Scr. No. 116,188 

lafLCL GOln 31/06, 21/06 

VS, CL 23—232 R 14 rtaims 




Method and apparatus for determining the concen- 
tration of NO and NOj in gas sample in which a gas 
sample containing NO and NOj is first passed through 
a scrubber in which the sample is contacted with a reagent 
solution capable of development of color in response to 
contact with NO,, with the intensity of the color thus 
developed being a measure of the NO, content of the gas 
sample, and then the unabsorbed gases are treated to 
remove residual amounts of NO3 and the NO io the 
sample is oxidized to NOj which is absorbed in a second 
scrubber with a reagent solution capable of development 
of color in response to contact with NOj, with the in- 
tensity of color developed in the second scrubber Jwing 
a measure of the NO content of the gas samite. 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



221 



3,667,919 
SULFONATION REACTOR HEAD OF IMPROVED 

ADJUSTABILITY 
Rudolph E. Dcnzler, Stirling, and Charles F. Fischer, 
Jency City, N J., aoignors to Colgate-PalmoliTe Com- 
pany, New Yoifc, N.Y. 

Filed Jan. 6, 1971, Scr. No. 104,237 

Int CL BOIJ 1/00; C07b 13/06 

US. a. 23—285 7 aaims 




3 667 921 
FLUX GROWTH OF RARE EARTH FLUORII»S 
William H. Grodkiewici, Mmray HiU, anl Lc Grand 
G. Van Uitcrt, Morris Towndiip, Morrta County, NJ., 
asrignors to BeO Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, 
Murray HID, N J. 

FDed Aug. 7, 1969, Ser. No. 848,285 
Int CL BOIJ 17/04; COM 17/00 
U.S.CL23— 300 7ChdnH 

Rare earth fluorides are grown from a liquid phase 
which includes a flux ingredient such as beryllium fluoride. 
Improved effectiveness of the product as an up-converting 
phosphor is attributable in part to the gettering actimi of 
the flux ingredient for oxygen. 



3 667t922 
PRODUCnON OF CYCUC PHOSPHONTIIUUC 
CHLORIDE POLYMERS 
James Ernest Proctor, London, F,"giwnd, Nonnan Love- 
lace Paddock, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 
and Harold Tk-evor Searle, Strcetly, Engbud, assignars 
to Hooker Chemical Coriwratlon, Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Continuation-in-part oi application Scr. No. 185,389, Aih-. 
5, 1962, which is a comdnnation-in-part of amplication 
Ser. No. 807,749, Apr. 21, 1959, now abandoned. This 
appUcation Sept 15, 1969, Ser. No. 871,406 
Int CL COlb 21/52, 25/10 
US, CL 23—357 3 ciafans 



A reactor head for a sulfonation reactor in which the 
feed gap for the inner orifice ring is adjustable and the 
feed gap for the outer orifice ring is separately adjustable, 
the adjusting mechanisms for the inner and outer rings 
are calibrated so that an operator may at all times be 
aware of the size of the gap. The inner and outer gaps 
may range from zero gap to as large a gap as may be 
desired. 



3,667,920 
MIXING TRAYS 
Ernest Korcf, Panama City, Republic of Panama, and 
EUtMh E. Petty, Mount Zton, ID., aarignors to M. Neu- 
munz ft Son, Inc^ New York, N.Y. 

FUed Not. 13, 1969, Scr. No. 876,452 

Int CL BOIJ 9/16; Cllc 3/12 

VS. CL 23—288 E 22 Chdms 




Method and apparatus for agitating a liquid, promoting 
a reaction between a liquid, a solid and/or a gas or main- 
taining or changing the temperature of a liquid. The liquid 
is passed along the length of an inclined side wall and the 
gas for agitation and/or mixing is passed upwardly along 
the inclined surface of the side wall to mix with the 
liquid. 




TMfMM) 



j&sto 



In the production of phosphonitrilic chlorides by the 
reaction of phosphorus pentachloride and ammoniimi 
chloride in an inert solvent the proportion of trimeric 
phosphonitrilic chloride is greatly increased by adding at 
least a major proportion of the ^osphorus pentachloride 
to the ammonium chloride slowly and evenly during a 
period of time corresponding to about 50 to about 100 
percent of the total time during which the reaction takes 
place. 



3667 923 
PREPARATION OF LTTHIUM, SODIUM AND 
QUATERNARY AMMONIUM CYANOBORO. 
HYDRIDES 
Robert C. Wade, Ipswich, Mass., assignor to Vention 
Corporation, Bcvcriy, Mass. 
No Drawing. Filed June 16, 1969, Scr. No. 833,722 
Int CL COlc 3/08; COlb 35/00 
VS. CL 23—358 4 chdms 

The mvention relates to the preparation of lithium, 
sodium and quaternary ammonium cyanoborohydrides. 
These compounds are prepared by mixing substantially 
anhydrous hydrogen cyanide with a substantially an- 
hydrous lithium or sodium or quaternary ammonium 
borohydride at a temperature between 0° C. and 100° C. 
in a substantially anhydrous solvent, such as tetrahydro- 
furan, glyme, diglyme, triglyme or dimethyl formamide 
or mixtures of these at atmospheric pressure. If desired, 
to avoid loss of hydrogen cyanide, a pressure of from 
about 1 to 5 pounds per square inch may be used. Pref- 
erably, the preparation is carried out in two stages (1) 
initially at a temperature between about 10' to about 
35" C. until substantially all hydrogen has ceased to be 



222 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



evolved and (2) then at a temperature between about 35' 
C. and the boiling point of the solvent until all the inter- 
mediate products have been converted to the desired 
cyanoborohydride. 



pension of enough glass powder to settle such powder 
onto each spaced in the form of a mound. The base 
width of the spacer elements determines the depth of 
the mound. This in turn facilitates accurate dimension- 
ing of the space provided inside the flat pack. 



STRESS RELIEVED WELDED STEEL COMPOSITE 
WnUam T. De Long and Panl T. CoKoran, West Man- 

dMflter TownaUp, Yorit County, Pa^ asrignora to 

Tdcdync Inc^ Lot Aoseles, CaBf . 

No Dnnvlns. Filed Dec. 30, 1969, Scr. No. 889,320 

bt CL B23b 15/00; B23p 3/00 

VS. CL 2»— 196.1 1 Claim 

A low alloy high strength steel weld deposit of high 
toughness and superior resistance to thermal degradation 
and which, after a stress relief consisting of a 16-bour 
soak at 1025' F. followed by cooling at a rate of 200* F. 
per hour, has Charpy V-notch impact strength of at least 
20. ft.-lbs. at —60 • F. at yield strength levels which are 
selectable between about 90K s.i. and about 145K s.i., the 
deposit consisting essentially of 



Percent by Weight 

E>«n»Pt Broad Pr«ferred 

Carbon 1.12 i 10 

M*nganese 25-.9 .36-.75 

3Ulcon 2O-.70 .26-85 

Chromium .2-2.0 2-1 35 

Nickel 2.(M.8 8.0-4.0 

Molybdenum .2-1.2 35-1 

Phosphorus «.020 > 012 

Solftir. 1.020 1.012 

Iron- Balance Balance 

t Maximum. 

also a low alloy steel weld deposit having a yield strength 
of at least 130K s.i. and Charpy V-notch energy absorp- 
tion at -60' F. of at least 20 ft.-lbs. after being stress re- 
lieved by soaking for 16 hours at 1025' F. followed by 
cooling at a rate of 200" F. per hour, the deposit consist- 
ing essentially of 

Percent by Weight 

'>«°"°t Broad Pre ferred exSaSe 

^^>oa. 06-.12 .07-.10 .08 

5fe°«»«»«^ 26-.9 .86-.75 7b 

M^oon-. aO-.70 .26-.66 .4 

Chromium 6-2.0 .76-1.88 1.0 

Nlokrt^- 2.0-4.6 8.0-4.0 8.8 

Molybdenum »-i.2 .6-1.0 .78 

Fhosphorus. i,02D 1.012 <.0l 

Solftir J.020 >.012 <.01 

"0° Balanc e Balance Balance 

I liiaximum. 



3,667,925 
METHOD FOR BONDING WITH DEPOSITED 
PARTICULATE GLASS 
John E. Sheppard, Cornwells Heights, and Vincent J. 
PeUechia, Lansdak, Pa., assignon to General Instru- 
ment Corporation, Newaric, N J. 

Filed Feb. 19, 1970, Ser. No. 12,679 

Int a. C03c 29/00 

UA CL 65-43 7 claims 



^^^A. 




A process for applying glass to frame-like spacers for 
glass-sealing the spacers to lids and for thereby closing 
flat packs. The spacers are submerged in a liquid sus- 



3 667 926 
METHOD FOR COATING GLASS ' 
Larry Q. Green, Wilmington, Del., and Larry L. Light, 

Kinnelon, N J., assignors to E. L dn Pont de Nemours 

and Company, Wilmington, Del. 

No Drawing. FUcd Nov. 6, 1969, Ser. No. 874.690 
InL CI. C03c 17/10 T 

UA CI. 65-60 12 balms 

Method of producing scratch resistance on glass by 
contacting it while hot with (a) an aqueous solution of 
a water-stable titanium composition and (b) an aqueous 
dispersion of a surface lubricating composition, the glass 
temperature being high enough to cause immediate and 
substantially complete vaporization of the water content 
of the solution and dispersion. 



3,667,927 

APPARATUS FDR BLOW MOLDING GLASS BULBS 

TaiuuU Knroluwa, Chlgasakl-shi, Jnnji Yamada, Oda- 

wara.dii, and Makoto Wada, KawasaU-aU, Japan, as- 

dgnors to Tokyo Shlbanra DcnU KabushlU Kaisha, 

Kawaaaki-slil, Japan 

Piled July 23, 1969, Ser. No. 843,991 
Claims priority, application Japan, July 31, 1968, 
43/54,07f, 43/54,079743/54,080 [ 

I Int a. C03b 9/12 ' 



U.S. a. 65—185 



13 Claims 







20 



o 




T 



An improved apparatus for blowing molding glass bulbs 
comprising a plate link for conveyor feeding a ribbon of 
semifused glass, a blow head link conveyor disposed on one 
side of a running surface of the plate link conveyor and 
adapted to support a series of blow heads moved in syn- 
chronism with the plate links and in the same direction 
therewith, and a mold link conveyor disposed on the other 
side of the running surface of the plate link conveyor and 
adapted to support a series of molds moved in syn- 
chronism with the blow heads and in the same dittcUon 
therewith, said apparatus being provided with pressurizer 
apparatus for which this invention provides improved 
blow heads having air blast pipes adapted to blow air into 
formed bulbs and fed in synchronism with the bulbs and 
m the same direction as the feed passage of the glass rib- 
bon having bulbs i)low-molded between the blow head 
Imks and the mold links. Furthermore, there is described 
herein a structure of the pressurizer heads with improved 
operating , mechanism. 



_ 3,667,928 

INCREASED COMPONENT CONCENTRATION OF 

NinnUENT SOLUTIONS OF TRACE METALS 

Peter Stanley Baddond, Anaheim, Calif., assignor to 

Union OO Company of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 

No Drawing. FUed Nov. 12, 1969, Ser. No. 875,741 

Int CI. C05b 7/00 

UA q. 71—34 6 Claims 

A solution suitable for application to i^ants and soU 

to cQrrect a plurality of trace metal deficiencies Is dc- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



223 



scribed which comprises an aqueous solution of the sul- 
fate salts of two or more of iron, zinc and manganese to- 
gether with mono-potassium or mono-ammonium hydro- 



A»r% M^ 




gen orthophosphate having an acidic pH value from about 
1.5 to about 4, and wherein the components of the solu- 
tion manifest a mutually increased solubility. 



3,667,929 

METHOD OF EFFECTING DISSOLUTION OF 
SOLUTES IN WATER AND COMPOSITIONS 
THEREFOR 

George W. Fleming, Jr., P.O. Box 10372, 
Chariotte, N.C. 28201 

No Drawing. Continuation*in-part of application Scr. No. 
382,950, July 15, 1964. This application July 30, 1969, 
Scr. No. 846,274 

Int CI. AOln 11/04; A61k 27/00; C05c 5/02 
U.S. CL 71—67 6 Claims 

Aqueous solutions of uniform concentration throughout 
a vessel are produced without substantial agitation by pro- 
viding a composition including a solute and an effervescent 
reaction mixture in finely divided form uniformly coated 
with a thin film of a slowly dispersible material, whereby 
upon addition to a vessel of water the mixture effervesces 
and the gas is entrapped to exert a buoyant effect where- 
by the bulk of the solute is dissolved in the upper reaches 
of the vessel and disperses throughout the vessel by grav- 
ity, yielding a solution of uniform concentration through- 
out the vessel. The method and composition therefore find 
particular utility in the field of veterinary medicines and 
agricultural chemicals which are employed in the form 
of aqueous solution. 



3,667,930 

3-AMINO-5-HALOGENATEDARYLOXYMETHYL. 
l,2,4^XADIAZOLES 

Horman Brener, Rcgensbnrg, Germany, assignor to Olin 
Mathicson Chcmkal Corporation 

No Drawing. AppUcation Oct 9, 1967, Ser. No. 673,977, 
now Patent No. 3,564,606, dated Feb. 16, 1971, which 
is a continnation-in-part of application Scr. No. 566,480, 
July 20, 1966. Divided and this appUcation Dec. 24, 
1969, Ser. No. 888,206 

Int CL AOln 9/22 
U.S. a. 71—92 6 aalms 

A series of 3-amino-5-halogenatedaryloxymethyI-l,2,4- 
oxadiazoles are provided by the reaction of selected acyl 
carbodiimides with hydroxylamine or salts thereof to pro- 
vide an intermediate N-acylsubstituted-N'-hydroxyguani- 
dine which is converted to the substituted- 1,2,4-oxadi- 
azoles by treatment with base. The substituted- 1,2,4- 
oxadiazoles are useful agricultural chemicals, and it has 
been found that they are particularly outstanding selec- 
tive herbicides. 



3,667,931 
BISXANTHATE RICE HERBICIDES 
Kenneth L. Viste, Warminster, and Manin H. Fletoch- 
fresscr, Warrington, Pa., assignors to Rohm and Haas 
Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

No Drawing. FUed Jan. 21, 1970, Ser. No. 4,742 
Int CL AOln 9/12 
U.S. CL 71—102 9 Claims 

Weeds in rice are controlled by aj^lying a bisxanthate 
compound of the formula 

S s 

R— O— C— 8— R"— 8— C— O— R' 

wherein R and R' are ethyl or n-i»opyl and R" fe a di- 
valent (C1-C4) alkylene radical. The bisxanthates and 
herbicidal compositions containing them are useful for 
the control of weeds in both direct seeded and trans- 
planted rice. 



3,667,932 
METHOD OF MAKING A DISPERSION- 
HARDENED FERROUS ALLOY 
Horace Pops, Edgewood Borough, Pa., assignor to 
United States Steel Corporation 
No Drawing. Filed Aug. 20, 1964, Scr. No. 390,992 
The portion of the term of the patent subsequent to 
Dec 6, 1987, has been disclaimed 
Int CL C21d 1/00 
US. CL 75— .5 BC 9 Claims 

1. A process for producing dispersion-hardened ferrous 
alloys comprising making a mixture of ferrous metal and 
aluminum oxide, randomly distributing said aluminum 
oxide throughout said ferrous metal by passing induced 
current supplied by a high-frequency power source through 
the mixture to melt the metal and stir the mixture and 
cooling the mixture to produce a solidified body contain- 
ing a fine dispersion of aluminum oxide. 



3,667,933 
ROTARY KILN REDUCTION OF IRON OXIDES 
WITH PNEUMATIC FEEDING OF A PORTION 
OF THE CHARGE 

Guenter Hcitmann, Frankfnrt-Niederrad, Germany, as- 
signor to MetaligcseUschaft Akticngescllscliaft, Fkvnk- 
furt am Mahi, Germany, and Tlie Steel Company df 
Canada Limited, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, fractional 
part taitorest to each 

No Drawing. Continuation of mipUcation Scr. No. 
559,065, June 21, 1966. This application Jan. 12. 
1970, Ser. No. 1,952 

Claims priority, application Germany, June 23, 1965, 

M 65,693 

Int CI. C21b 13/08; C22b 23/02 
U.S. CL 75 — 33 3 Claims 

Improvements of an ore treating process, wherein the 
ore and the treating agent are both fed to a rotary kiln 
which operates at a temperature and pressure sufficient 
to carry out such treatment, wherein the ore is fed to 
the treating zone in such a manner that all of it is fed 
at a given point and that the feeding is carried out under 
such conditions that the ore being fed is distributed 
throughout at least a portion of the rotary kiln with the 
larger particles of ore being deposited the furthest 
distance from the discharge end of the kiln and the 
smaller particles, of ore being deposited most proximate 
to the discharge end of the kiln so that the deposition 
point of the ore particles distance from the discharge 
end is proportional to the size of the particles being de- 
posiited, whereby providing a residence time of the par- 
ticles in the kiln proportional to the size of the particles. 



224 



3,M7»934 
REFINING OF ZINC 

LcsUe Jack Dciliaiii, deceased, late of ATonmovth, Eog- 
land, by Mkhael Gordon Derham, legal representadye, 
and Glen Owen John, Bristol, England; said John as- 
rigDor to Imperial SmeUlDg Corporation (Alloys) Lim- 
ited, London, Engbuid 
No Drawing. Filed Oct 15, 1969, Ser. No. 867,120 

Claims priority, upUcation Great Britain, Oct 23, 1968, 
50,378/68, 50,379/68, 50,380/68 



I 

OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



I 



June 6, 1972 



3,667,938 

NICKEL BASE ALLOY 

WOUam J. Boesch, Utica, N. Y., asrimor to Spedal 

Metals Corporation, New Hartford, N.Y. 

Continaation-in-part of application Ser. No. 675,468, 

Oct 16, 1967. This application May 5, 1970, Ser. 

No. 34,743 

Int a. C22c 19/00 
VS. CL 75—171 6 Clafans 



U.S.CL 75—86 



Int CL C22b 19/32, 9/10 



8 Claims 



Zinc which contains aluminium as an impurity is puri- 
fied hy treating the molten metal with chlorine, in free 
or combined form, under a molten flux formed from 
soditun chloride and aluminium chloride. 



3,667,935 

PROCESS FOR PREPARING NITROGEN-FREE 
PLATINUM POWDERS 



OUycr A. Short, Wilmington, Del., assipior to E. L dn 
Pont de Nemours and Company, ^^llmington, Del. 

No Drawing. Coodnaation-iB-part of abandoned applica- 
tion Ser. No. 756,394, Ang. 30, 1968. This appUcation 
Feb. 4, 1971, Ser. No. 112,789 

Int CL C22b 11/04 
VA CL 75—109 1 Claim 

Nitrogen-free platinum powders are prepared by pre- 
cipitation from an aqueous platinum chloride solution, 
with zinc and hydrochloric acid. This nitrogen-free plati- 
num powder is relatively coarse and can be used in the 
production of various electrical circuit structures. 



3,667,936 
DENTAL ALLOY 



Midiel Katz, Forest HUb, N.Y., assignor to Aurinm 
Research Corporation, New York, N.Y. 

No Drawing. FUed Mar. 21, 1969, Ser. No. 809,381 

Int CL C22c 5/00 
VS. CL 75—134 N 5 Claims 

A precious alloy for use in dental frames on which 
ceramic coverings are formed by baking. Palladium is 
used in an amount ranging between 8 and SO weight per- 
cent and indium is used in an amount ranging between 3 
and 12 weight percent. The remainder of the alloy con- 
sists primarily of gold, or gold and silver, and small 
amounts of trace metals. With such an alloy, there is no 
need for the use of platinum as in the prior art dental al- 
loys having the same desirable characteristics. 



3,667,937 
DENTAL FILLING 



/ 




An alloy consisting essentially of 12 to 20% chromium, 
13 to 19% cobalt, 4.5 to about 7% titanium, 1.3 to 3% 
aluminum, 2 to 3.5% molybdenum, 0.5 to 2.5% tungsten, 
the combined molybdenum and tungsten content being 3 
to 6%, OJDS to 0.15% carbon, 0.005 to 0.03% boron, the 
titanium and aluminum content being balanced so as to 
provide a titanium to aluminum ratio within a specified 
relationship and a combined titanium and aluminum con- 
tent of 6.5 to 9%, the balance of the alloy being essen- 
tially nickel with up to 0.75% manganese, up to 0.2% 
yttrium, up to 0.2% other rare earth elements such as ce- 
rium or lanthanum and up to 0.5% iron. 



Clyde E. Ingersirfl, Tonawanda, and Reginald V. Williams, 
St., deceased, bite of Buffalo, N.Y., by John A. WO- 
liams and Elizabeth P. WHliams, executors; said Inger- 
soD assignor to WilUams Gold Refining Incorporated, 
Buffalo, N.Y. 

No Drawing. Ffled Oct 7, 1970, Ser. No. 78,990 

Int CL C22c 5/00; A61k 5/02 
VS. CL 75—165 2 Claims 

A metal alloy dental filling consisting of about 99.7 
to 99.95 parts pure gold alloyed with about .05 to .30 
part calcium is condensed in a prepared tooth cavity. 
The addition of calcium to pure g(rid results in a sig- 
nificantly harder filling. 



3,667,939 

mGH TEMPERATURE COBALT-BASE SHEET 
ALLOY 
Ralph J. Hecht, West Pafan Beach, and Richard J. Fcnton, 
Palm Beach Shores, Fla., asstpiors to United Aircraft 
Corporation, East Hartf md. Conn. i 

Filed Dec 30, 1971. Ser. No. 102,747 
Int CL C22c 19/00 
VS. CL 75—171 ^ 3 ^l 



\ 



i9m»''*/V- 



/em^t^^tV^JV 



■((aof 




/et>ff y»X> -«<*» K**" Jt*^ .arttr 



A superior wrought cobalt-base alloy for high tempera- 
ture use is provided at the nominal composition, by 
weight, of 0.9 percent carbon, 25 percent chiomittm 0.9 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



percent titanium, 1 percent iron, 15 percent nickel, 7.7 
percent tungsten, 0.4 percent zirccmium, 1 percent colum- 
bium, 2.7 percent tantalum, balance essentially cobalt. 



3,667,940 

COLUMBIUM BASE ALLOY 

William K. McDonald, Salem, Oreg., assignor to 

Telcdyne, Inc., Albany, Cta^ 

No Drawing. Filed Apr. 10, 1969, Ser. No. 815,219 

Int CL C22c 27/00 

VS. CL 75—174 9 Cbdms 

A columbium base alloy is disclosed having high 

strength and oxidation resistant properties particularly at 

elevated temperatures and also adequate low temperature 

ductility. The alloy contains 20 to 33% hafnium, 11 to 

20% tungsten and 0.5 to 2% zirconium, and may contain 

small amounts of one or more other elements including 



225 



edge breaking, curling and cracking are prevented. A 
uniform foil as thin as 0.004 in. can be prepared in this 
way. The present invention is an improvement over the 
method described and claimed in my previous U.S. Pat. 
No. 3,396,015, issued Aug. 6, 1968. 



3,667,943 
QUINACRIDONE PIGMENTS IN ELECTRO- 
PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGING 
Lester Weinberger, Pcnfield, N.Y., asrignor to Xerox 

Corporation, Rochester, N.Y. 

No Drawing. FOed Aug. 22, 1968, Ser. No. 754,726 

Int CL G03g 5/06 

VS. CL 96—1 PC 6 Claims 

An electrophotographic plate including a i^otoconduc- 

tive layer comprising a novel quinacridone pigment in a 

binder material, said quinacridone pigment having the 

formula: 



<o>-^ 



rV 



NHCHr 



3-NH-R' 




aluminum, iron, carbon and titanium to modify the prop- wherein R=CH3, CaH^OCHs, OCjHs or a halogen and 

erties of the alloy for various applications, and may also wherein R'=an aromatic, heterocyclic, alicyclic or ali- 

contain up to about 4% of tantalum without materially phatic group is disclosed. Methods of preparing said plate 

effecting the properties of the alloy except to increase its and of using said plate in electrophotographic processes 

density. are also disclosed. 



3,667341 
METALUC ALLOY FOR BEARINGS 



AMo Dacco*, Mihm, Italy, assignor to Liasa del Dott 
Aide Dacco*, MUu, Italy 
No Drawing. FUed Not. 3, 1969, Ser. No. 873,506 
Clafans priority, application Italy, Nov. 14, 1968, 
23,736/68 
Int CL C22c 17/00 
VS. CL 75—178 AC 5 Cbdms 

Metallic alloy of the Zn-Al-Cu type, in particular for 
the manufacture <rf bearings, comprising 2-8% of electro- 
lytic coiq>er, 12-42% of pure al umin um, the remainder 



3,667,944 
QUINACRIDONE PIGMENTS IN ELECTRO- 
PHOTOGRAPHIC RECORDING 
Lester Weinberger, Brighton, N.Y., assigiior to Xerox 

Corporation, Rochester, N.Y. 

No Drawing. FUed Nov. 1, 1968, Ser. No. 772,842 

Int CL G03g 5/06 

VS. CL 96—1 PC 6 Claims 

An electrophotogra|)hic plate including a photoconduc- 

tive layer comprisiiig a novel quinacridone pigment in a 

binder material, said) quinacridone pigment having the 

formula: 




NHC 



\3 

o I loT To 



°^V\n. 



:hiNH(!J- 





zinc with a high degree of purity, and including an addi- 
tion of cobalt in the range of 0.02 to 0.35%. 



3,667,942 

METHOD OF POWDER ROLLING NICKEL- 

IRON-COBALT ALLOYS 

Jcny C. LaPhmte, Hempstead, and IlionuH A. Poole, 

Setanket, N.Y., aasigniurs to AUoys UnUmilcd Inc., 

Mchrflle, N.Y. 

No Drawfa«. FUed June 9, 1970, Ser. No. 44,854 
bit CL B22f 1/00 
VS, CL 75—214 9 Qafans 

The alloy 29 Ni, 17 Co, balance iron is prepared as a 
fine powder in the fully annealed ccHidition and is rolled 
without added binders into a green strip of about 80% 
density. After sintering at about 1800*-1900* F. for an 
hour, it is reduced by rolling about 18 to 20%, after which 
it is resintered. By controlling coil and roU diameters, 



wherein R=CH3, C3H5, OCHj, OCaHs or a halogen and 
wherein R'=COOH, COOCa/2, SO3H, or S03Ca/2 is 
disclosed. Methods of preparing said plate and of using 
said plate in electrophotographic processes are also dis- 
closed. 



3,667,945 
QUINACRIDONE PIGMENTS IN ELECTRO- 
PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGING 
Vsevolod 'nriagfai, Rodiesttf , N.Y., assignor to Xorox 

Corporation, Rochester, N.Y. 
No Drawing. Continuation of aniHcation Ser. No. 
469,143, July 2, 1965. This appUcation June 20, 
1969, Ser. No. 842,769 

Int CL G03g 5/06 
VS. a. 96—1 PC 9 Cfadms 

An electrophotographic method which employs quin- 
acridone pigments as the photoconductor in the imaging 
plate. 



899 O.O.— 8 



226 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,667,946 

SURFACE TREATMENT OF PHOTOPOLYMER 

FILM USED FOR RECORDING HOLOGRAMS 

Eugene J. StnrdeTaot, WilmiiistoB, Del^ assfgiior to 

Holotron Coipontioii, WUmiiigtoii, DcL 

Filed Sept. 23, 1970, Ser. No. 74,590 

lot CL G03c 5/12 
VS. CL 94—35.1 13 Claims 

Techniques for treating and handling photopolymer 
film utilized to recwd in the visible or near visible range 
an electromagnetic radiation pattern such as a holographic 
interference pattern. Prior to exposure of a photopolyna- 
erizable film material to the radiation pattern, the film is 
polymerized at its surface primarily to improve mechani- 
cal rigidity of the film. A pipcess of manufacturing elon- 
gated photopolymerizable recording film includes ex- 
truding a liquid monomer composition onto a substrate 
and polymerizing the monomer composition at least at 
its surface before the material is rolled or otherwise sub- 
jected to mechanical stresses. A technique for copying a 
master holographic movie onto photopolymerizable film 
includes extruding a liquid monomer composition onto 
the holographic movie, exposing the monomer layer to 
the holographic information recorded on the master film, 
polymerizing the remaining monomer and then separating 
the now hardened polymerized film from the master movie 
fihn. 



3,667,947 
COLOR CRT SCREEN EXPOSURE METHOD 



Lcfler H. McKee, Seneca Falls, N.Y^ assicoor to 
Sylvanla Electric Products Inc. 

Original application Nov. 1, 1967, Ser. No. 679,869, now 
Patent No. 3,559,546, dated Feb. 2, 1971. Divided 
and this appUcation Sept 4, 1970, Ser. No. 69,815 

Int CI. G03c 5/00 
VA CL 96—36.1 6 Claims 




3,667,948 

TOPOGRAPHIC MAP AND PROCESS FOR 
SYMBOLIZING PHOTOGRAPHS T 
Mylon Merriam, Washington, D.C., assignor to die' United 
States of America as represented by the Secretary of 
the Army 
Continiiation-iii-part of abandoned application Ser. No. 
472,371, Jtdy 15, 1965. This appUcation June 6, 1969, 
Ser. No. 831,193 1 

InL CL G03c 5/00; G03f 1/02 
VS. CL 96—44 s'Chdms 



A method for light forming a cathode ray tube 
patterned screen utilizing unattenuated radiant energy 
of the light source. A photosensitive i^osphor-contain- 
ing coating disposed on the screen panel is exposed, 
through an adjacently positioned negative mask, by 
radiant energy of substantially constant intensity from 
a substantially unattenuated direct light source oriented 
within an apertured light enclosure. Since the utilized 
area of the light source is smaller than the discrete 
aperture area, the light source is moved in a prede- 
termined manner relative to the aperture to effect a 
simulated light source area equalling the aperture area. 




This invention relates to a uniform tone image bearing 
photographic film screen and the method of preparing the 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



2S7 



film screen from a photograph. The film screen is subse- 
quently utilized in making a map in which cartographic 




symbols are displayed as alterations in the tone of the im- 
ages from the film screen, while maintaining the texture 
of the photographic image. 



3,667,949 
IMAGEWISE PHOTOCHROMIC PROCESS UTILIZ- 
ING SPIROPYRAN COMPOUNDS AND HALO- 
GENATED HYDROCARBON PHOTOACTIVATORS 
Eiichi Inoue, Isamu Shimizu, and Ha^me Kobayasfai, 
Tokyo, Japan, assignors to Canon Camera KabnshiU 
Kaisha, Tokyo, Japan 

No Drawing. Filed Mar. 6, 1969, Ser. No. 805,004 

Claims inriority, application Japan, Mar. 12, 1968, 

43/15,712, 43/15,987 

Int CL G03c 1/52 

VS. CL 96—48 2 Claims 

A stable colored image is obtained by using a spiropyran 

compound and an ionic compound in a coexistent state, 

applying image-wise radiation thereto. 

The colored state can be eliminated by neutralizing 
the ionic compound. 

Thus, the photochromic image formation can be re- 
peatedly effected. 



3,667,950 

BLEACH-FIXING SOLUTION FOR COLOR 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Uroyuki Amano, Hamhiko Iwano, and Kazno Shirasu, 

Kanagawa, Japan, assignors to Fuji Photo Film Co., 

Ltd., Kanagawa, Japan 

No Drawfaig. FOed Dec. 16, 1970, Ser. No. 98,881 

Chdms priority, application Japan, Dec. 16, 1969, 

44/101,115 

Int CL G03c 5/32 

VS. CL 96-60 12 dahns 

A single bleach-fixing solution for ccrior photographic 

light-sensitive materials comprising a ferricyanide and a 

thiocyanate and containing at least one compound having 

an aldehyde group or a methylol group is disclosed. 



which functions as a hardening agent for photograjriiic 
emulsion are rendered less corrosive to processing equip- 
ment by incorporation therein of a minor amount of a 
polyalkylene glycol. 



H 



3 667 952 *' 

COLOR STABILOATION PROCESSING 

try J. Faisbender, Rochester, N.Y., assignor to 
Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y. 

No Drawing. Filed Oct 6, 1969, Ser. No. 864,177 
, „ Int CL G03c 5/5«, 7/iO 

UA CL 96-61 5 cWms 

The use of carbonyl-bisulfite adducts, e.g., formakle- 
hyde bisulfite, in color stabilization processes which in- 
volve treating an imagewise exposed, incorporated coupler, 
multilayer, silver halide sensitized photographic element 
in a developer to form silver and color images and then 
treating the developed element with a thiosulf ate sUbilizer 
to stabilize the nondeveloped silver, prevents objection- 
able stain which otiierwise results in background areas. 
The carbonyl-bisulfite adduct is desirably incorporated 
into a thiosulfate stabilizer composition. 



3,667,953 
COLOR PHOTOGRAPmc POSITIVE MATERLiLS 
Sh^ra Watanabe, YuUh Yasnda, and Kazuya Sano, 
Kanagawa, Japan, asrignors to FOji Photo Film Co., 
Ltd., Kanagawa, Japan 

FUed Mar. 25, 1970, Ser. No. 22,468 
Claims priority, applicntion Japan, Oct 9, 1969. 
44/80,987 
,to «. ^ Int CL G03c i/76 

VS. a. 96—74 7 OabBs 

Multi-layer color photographic light-sensitive positive 
material incorporating, in addition to cyan, magenta and 
yellow dyes in the light-sensitive emulsion layers thereof, 
at least one of a red or blue dye-forming coupler capable 
of forming a dye or dyes having absorption maximums 
at 460-520 nm. and 570-640 nm., respectively. Such red 
and blue dye couplers are selected such that the dyes are 
formed selectively in high density images areas and result 
in the production of images possessing excellent repro- 
duction of both colors and black. 



3,667,954 

TRIBROMOMETHYL SULFONYL PYRIDAZINE OR 

PHTHALAZINE PHOTOACTIVATORS 
Kohei Itano, Masashi Nakano, and Mitsnni Hashimoto, 

Tokyo, Japan, assignors to Keullel ft Esser Company, 

Morristown, NJ. 

No Drawing. Filed Apr. 22, 1970, Ser. No. 30,974 

Claims iviority, apirilcation Japan, Apr. 21, 1969. 

44/30,278 

WTO ^ „ Inta.G03ci/52. 7/72 

UA CI. 96-90 6 Claims 

A light-sensiUve prmtmg material comprising a photo- 
activator capable of forming a free radical by action of 
light and a discoloring agent showing a visible color 
change by action of said free radical, characterized by 
using as the photo-activator a pyridazine or phthalazine 
derivative which is represented by the general formula 



Ri 



Ri 



Rt 



3,667,951 
PHOTOGRAPHIC STABILIZING BATHS INHIBITED 
AGAINST CORROSION WITH POLYALKYLENE 
GLYCOLS 
Henry J. Fassbcnder and Nelson S. Case, Rochester, N.Y., 
assignors to Eastman Kodak Company, Rodiester, N.Y. 
No Drawfaig. FDed Mar. 3, 1969, Ser. No. 803,937 
Int a. G03c 5/38 
VS. CL 96—61 15 Claims 

Stabilizing baths which are utilized in rapid access 
processing of photographic elements and which comprise wherein Ri, R, and R, are individually a hydrogen atom 
a thiocyanate stabilizmg agent and an aluminum salt a hydroxy group, a lower alkyl group, an alkyUulfonyl 



Ri [-80,CBri or 



Ri-4 jUsOtCBn 



228 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



i 



June 



group, an alkoxy group or an alkoxycarbonyl group, pro- 
vided that R2 and Rs may form a benzene ring and, in 
the case of an N-oxide type compound, Rj may be a tri- 
bromomethyl sulfonyl group. 



3,667,fS5 
TWO-COMFONENT DIAZOTYPE PHOTOSENSI- 
TIVE MATERIAL 
SUceaU YoaUda, YokohuuMU, Kuagawa-kea, 
TadaaU Saito, KawasaU-aU, Kanagawa-kea, Japan, aa- 
dgMNTi to KabuUU Kataha Rkoh, Tokyo, Japan 
No Drawinf. FOcd Jnne 6, 1969, Scr. No. 8314f2 
dafaM priorily, appikaHon Japo, Jaw 15, 196S, 
43/41,288 
Int. C3. Gf3c 1/58, 1/54 
VS, CL 96—91 R 8 Claims 

Two^omponent diazotype photosensitive material con- 
taining a coupling component of the following general 
Formula 1 and a diazocompound of the following gen- 
eral FOTmola 2 gives a navy blue or dark blue dye-image 
having high density and fastness by developing in an al- 
kaline solution or vapor. 

NH 

S 

Ri Ri N NH 

N HC C=NH 



HO 




(1) 



ORi 




NtX 



(2) 



3,667356 
UGHT*SENSnTVE SILVER HALIDE COLOR 
PHOTOGRAPmC MATERIALS CONTAIN- 
ING CYAN COUPLERS 
No Drawing. FDcd Feb. 18, 1970, Scr. No. 12,476 
ClainH prioiMy, application Japan, Feb. 24, 1969, 

44/13^16 

Int. CL G83c 1/40 

VA CL 96— 106 4 Claims 

A compound <A the general formula 






-CONH(CHt)iCH=CH(CHi);CHi 



i=N-.^^ 



i 



OR 



wherein R is a lower alkyl group, a lower alkoxy group, 
or a phenoxy or aralkoxy group which may have a sub- 
stituent selected from atkyl, alkoxy and halogen is found 
to be useful as a cyan coupler providing auto-maaidng 
mechanism Ux light-sensitive coIcm: photogn^hic mate- 
rials so as to compensate the deficient ooIcm- reproduc- 
tivity <tf said materials. 



6, 1972 



3,667,957 
PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIAL WITH A STABILIZER 

ANTIFOGGANT BIDENTATE COMPOUND 

Jozef Fknns WlUems, WlkiJI^ Fnaa Clcnwnt HcngcbMrt, 

Kontich, and Robert Joseph PoUct, Vremdc, Belgfaim, 

tmkwann to Gcvacrt-Agfa N.V., MortssL Bdginm 

No Drawing. FOcd Feb. 13, 1969, Scr. No. 799,097 

CbUnut priority, application Great Britain, Feb. 22, 1968, 

8,652/68 
• Int CL G03c 1/34 

UA a. 96—109 7 Claims 

Photographic materials arc provided which comprise in 
a light-sensitive silver halide emulsion layer or in a water- 
permeable layer adjacent thereto a compound of the for- 
mula: 

,-N^ 
^Z C-A-Q-X 

H 

wherein: 

Z represents the atoms necessary to close a het^rocyde, 

Q stands for sulphur or selenium, 

A stands for alkylene which may be interrupted by one or 
more hetero atoms, S-alkylene which may be interrupted 
by one or more hetero atoms, or arylene, 

X stands for alkyl, alkenyl or aryl, or 

A and X together represent the atoms necessary to com- 
plete a saturated heterocycle, 

the said compound comprising directly or indirectly linked 
to the group Z and/or X a — COOM or — SO|M group 
wherein M is hydrogen, ammonium, a metal atom or 
organic ammonium. These materials have reduced fogging 
tendency, even under conditions of high humidity and 
heat, and their sensitivity is substantially unaffected by 
the presence of the aforesaid compound. 



1 

smvE 



3,667,958 

™^'!!!]S^*''"^ ^^ND IHERMOSENSmVE ELE- 

^fflNTS, COMPOSITIONS AND PROCESSES 

IVands J. Evans, Rochester, N.Y., mrignor to 

Eartnan Kodak Company, Rochester, N.Y. 

No Drawhv. FOcd Apr. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 27,105 

^^CiG^ic 1/02 

UA CI 96N-114.1 27 Claims 

A reducing agent combination of a polyhy(boxyben- 
zene reducing agent with a reducing agent which is a 
hydroxylamine, a reductone and/or a hydrazine, in a 
photosensitive and thermosensitive element, composition 
and/or process emfdoying an oxidation-reduction image 
forming combination provides greater image discrimina- 
tion or resolution, with an increase in relative speed and 
improved black tone. Such a reducing agent combination 
can be employed in an image reproduction sheet in which 
a radiation sensitive heavy metal salt can be reduced 
to free metal and form the image components in an oxi- 
dation reduction reaction combination by prxxlucing a 
visible color change with an organic silver salt. 



3,667,959 

PHOTOSENSITIVE AND THERMOSENSITIVE ELE- 

MENT, COMPOSITIONS AND PROCESS 
^'T'*^.^^'^'^ "^ Rkhard A. de Manrinc. Roches- 

ter, N.Y., asrignors to Fnwtman Kodak Comnanv. 

Rochester, N^yT ^^ ^^'^' 

No Drawing. Filed May 1, 1970, Scr. No. 33,966 
^^^ _ Int CL G03c i/W 

UA CL 96-114.1 27 CUdms 

A non-aqueous, pcrfar, organic solvent, such as a c«n- 
pound containing a 1 

10 o 
4-. -8- I 

or — SOa — moiety, in a photosensitive and thermosensi- 
tive element suitable for dry processing with heat, provides 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



229 



improved maximum image densities and reduced exposure 
and processing time in some cases. A combination of a 
non-aqueous, polar, organic compound, such as one con- 
taining a 

o 



mcludes reducing in the ingested resulting fecdstuffs of 
the proportion of acetic acid in the rumen while increas- 
ing the total steam volatile fatty acid output by the rumen 
microflora. 



X X 



or — SQi — moiety, in conjunction with a stable source 
of silver for physical development are useful in i^oto- 
sensitive elements for dry processing. The element can 
contain a sensitizing dye and a photosensitive silver ha- 
lide, or other suitable photosensitive metal salts. 



3 667 960 
SPECTRALLY SUPERSEN^TIZED SILVER HALIDE 

PHOTOGRAPHIC EMULSION 
Kdsnkc SUba, Sato AUra, and MotoUko Tsnbota, 
Kanapnra, Japan, assignors to RiJI Photo FUm Co., 
Ltd., Kanagawa, Japan 

FOcd Mar. 27, 1970, Ser. No. 23,122 
Clafans priority, application Japan, Mar. 27, 1969, 
44/23,320 
Int a. G03c ///¥ 
UA CL 96—124 15 Claims 

Supersensitization of sflver halide photographic emul- 
sions by employing a combination of specific sensitizing 
dyes, one containing a heterocyclic nucleus selected from 
the group consisting of naphthoseienazole and naphthox- 
azole and the other of which containing a 2-quinoline 
nucleus. The particular combination of spectral sensitiz- 
ing dyes employed provide a high degree of supersen- 
sitization over the entire visible range. 



3 667 961 

PROCESS FOR IMPROVING DIGESTIBILrrV OF 

FEEDSTUFFS FOR RUMINANT ANIMALS 

John W. Algeo, Santa Yncz, CaHf., assignor to Santa 

Ynez Research Farm, Santa Ynez, Calif. 

FDcd Sept 22, 1967, Scr. No. 674,050 

Int CL A23k 1/00 

UA CL 99-2 R 22 Cbdms 



^ « 3,667,962 

^^fSS^^™° ™"NK BASE FOR MAKING 
CARBONATED BEVERAGES BY ADDITION 
TO WATER 
^^Ti*^^ Fritzbcrg, MInneapolfa, Mbm., and Donald 

C. FeUcBz, Wcstficld, N.Y., assignors to The Pillsbory 

Company, Mfameapolis, Minn. 

No Drawhig. FOcd July 14, 1969, Scr. No. 841,613 
,T« ^ ^ Irt. CL A23I 7/2(J 

UA CL 99-78 9 Claims 

A dried base which forms a carbonated beverage when 
added to water. The base consists of two porous friable 
bodies, one containing a soluble, thermoplastic, amor- 
phous saccharide and an edible acid, the other a soluble, 
thermoplastic, amorphous saccharide and an edible car- 
bonate which will react with the acid when placed in 
water to evolve carbon dioxide. Premature reaction be- 
tween acid and carbonate is prevented by their physical 
separation. 

3,667,963 

METHOD OF MAKING PIZZA 

Raymond G. Katter, 2833 Banbniy Road, and Joseph L. 

Sfif^' o'f/A ^"''» 2»^ E^ »x»* o« S«»Jt Lake CHy, 
utan 84121 

FUed Dec. 17, 1969, Scr. No. 885,750 
.TO « .... Int. CL A21d 7i/(W 

UA q. 99-86 « chdms 

A pizza or similar food product is prepared by slicing a 
baked roll, applying a sealing layer of margarine to the 
soft interior surface of the roll, applying a liquid sauce 
over the sealing layer, and baking the resulting combina- 
tion. 



^ — 







«.r,^« 3,667,964 

ESTERS OF MDIOLS AND 1,3,5 x-POLYOLS AS 

, u «, ADDmVESFOR BAKED GOODS 

Sf-^*. V*^^ ^^^ Highlands, N J., and 

5SSS"^'^!l^'^"^*"«' ""^ Theodore P. Labnza, 

^JE*^^''^' ^"^ Mrignors to Easo Research 

and Engineering Company 

No Drawfaig. FUed Apr. 1, 1970, Ser. No. 24,796 
.TO ^ .» InL a. A21d 2/76 

UA CL 99—90 P 10 Clafans 

Baked food additives which comprise certain esters of 
polyalcohols, such as esters of 1,3-diols and 1,3,5 x-poly- 
ols, are excellent dou^ conditioners, anti-staling agents 
and preservatives. The present invention is concerned gen- 
eraUy with high quality baked food compositions and is 
more specificaUy concerned with addiUve materials for 
addition to baked foods, which materials comprise par- 
ticular esters of particular diols and polyols. 



The invention comprises a rapid process and relative- 
ly economical equipment for increasing nutrient avail- 
ability of ruminant animal feedstuils, which includes the 
irreversible rearrangement of initial molecular bond 
structures of such feedstuffs to different molecular bond 
structures with concomitant degradation of relatively in- 
digestible molecular structures to shorter chain length 
more digestible carbohydrates by subjecting ruminant 
animal feedstuffs in a closed vessel to high pressure steam 
for relative short time intervals and thereafter rapidly 
releasing the thus subjected feedstuffs to atmospheric con- 
ditions, together with means for successively collecting 
and storing the thus subjected feedstuffs, and which also 



«.,^ 3,667,965 

BAKED FLOUR COMPOSHIONS CONTAINING 

w ^ „. ^ auphahc diols 

John W. Fhmkcnfeld, Athmtic lii|rhi«»dff. nj.. and 
^iS^^SSiii*'^"^*^ «nd TWodoS P. LSbnza, 
. ^ i^'l?^' **■*» «aBlgnore to Ean Rcseaith 
and Enginea1iu(Company 

No Drawing. FOcd Jan. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 4.427 
Int CL A21d 2/74 
VS. CL 99—90 P 11 ciafan. 

This mvention relates to baked flour compositions 
which comprise certain aliphatic polyalcohols such as 1,3- 
diols and 1,3.5, x-polyols. These baked flour compositions 
contaimng aliphatic diols have exceUent anti-staling prop- 
erties and greatiy improved storage properties due to 
mold inhibition. In addition, since they are energy dense 
compounds which are rapidly and completely metabolized, 
they improve the nutritional qualities of the product. 



230 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June (, 1972 



YEAST RAISED BAKED PRODUCTS AND 
PREPARATION THEREOF 
Albeit Peter Centplella, Edwardsbnrg, Mkh., and Billy 
Gene Razor, Elkhart, Ind^ asaignors to Miles Labora- 
tories, Inc^ Elkhart, Ind. 

No Drawing. FUcd Not. 3, 1969, Scr. No. 873,712 
bt CL A21d 2/14 
V3. CL 99L— 91 12 Claims 

A yeast raised baked product and a method for prepar- 
ing such a baked product utilizing a dough additive com- 
prising a polyester of citric acid and sorbitol which im- 
parts improved characteristics to the dough and the baked 
product resulting therefrom. 



3,667,969 
ARTIFICIAL SWEETENING COMPOSITION 

Paul Kxacauer, New Yoik, N.Y., asalgiior to American 

Sweetener Coip., New York, N.Y. 
No Drawing. Continuation-bHpart of application Ser. No. 

808,984, Mar. 20, 1969. TUs application Sept. 28, 

1970, Ser. No. 76,216 

lot CL A23I 1/26 
U.S. a. 99—141 A 10 Claims 

The bitter after-taste characteristic of artificial sweeten- 
ing compositions is eliminated by a composition compris- 
ing a major amount of saccharin and minor amounts of 
d-galactose. The flavor of the sweetening composition 
may be further improved by the addition of small amounts 
of sodium chloride and/or calcium hydroxide. 



3,667,967 
PROCESS FOR IMPROVED APPLE JUICE 
EXTRACTION 
Michael L. Coltart. Winficid, British Columbia, and David 
Patoo, Kelowna, British ColomMa, Canada, assignors 
to Am-Rype Products Ltd., Kelowna, British Columbia, 
Canada 

FUed Apr. 1, 1969, Scr. No. 811,794 
Claims priority, application Canada, Dec. 6, 1968, 

37,047 

Int. CL A231 1/02, 3/30 

U.S. CL 99—105 5 Claims 




}^ 



Mjmtomt 



A process and apparatus for improving the yield of 
juice which may be extracted from a vegetable or fruit 
pulp. The process subjects the pulp to ultrasonic vibrations 
in the frequency range between 20 and 300 kc/s at a 
sound intensity of up to about 20 watts/sq. cm. It has 
also been found advantageous to treat expressed juice, 
which has been produced by ultrasonic means or other- 
wise, with ultrasonic vibrations, in order to improve the 
quality and fllterability of the juice. Although ultrasonic 
vibrations may be generated in many ways it has been 
found particularly suitable to employ a sonic whistle which 
may be placed in line in continuous production equip- 
ment. 



3,667,970 
PROCESS FOR PRESERVING MEAT 



Juergcn Sclicide, Holzmindcn, Germany, assignor to 
Farbenfabriken Bayer Aktiengesellscliaft, Leverkuscn. 
Germany 
No Drawing. Continuation-in>part of abandoned applica- 
tions Scr. No. 822,290 and Scr. No. 822,291, both 
May 6, 1969. This application June 3, 1971, Scr. No. 
149,813 

Claims priority, application Germany, May 10, 1968, 

P 17 67 438J, P 17 67 439.4 

Int. a. A23b 1/00. 3/00 

U.S. CL 99—169 9 Claims 

The surface of fresh meat is treated with a mixture of 

from 2>30% by weight of a monoglyceride and from 

98-70% by wei^t of a di- or triglyceride of paraffinic or 

oleflnic carboxylic acids with from 8-22 carbon atoms to 

form a coherent film over the meat surface to improve 

the storageability and quality of the meat. 



3,667,968 

CHEESE FLAVORS 

Robert L. Kasik, Oak Lawn, and Anthony J. Luksas, 

Chicago, DL, assignors to Beatrice Foods Co., Chicago, 

IIL 
No Drawing. Continnation>in-part of application Scr. No. 

824,250, May 13, 1969. This application May 13, 1969, 

Scr. No. 824,259 

Int. CL A23c 79/02, i9//2; A231 //26 
UA a. 99—140 R 34 Claims 

Cheese flavors and cheese flavored products are pro- 
duced in a short time by growing a combination of one 
member of the genus Bacillus and one member of the 
genus Streptococcus in an aqueous medium containing 
a protein and a carb<Aydrate to produce a ferment. The 
resulting ferment is inoculated with specific cheese flavor 
organisms such as Penicillium roquefortii and further fer- 
mented. The product is then formed into a cheese or dried 
to a powder, as desired. 



' 3,667,971 

METHOD OF FORMING AND WRAPPING 

FOODSTUFFS 

Fred William Branncr, Eugene, Oreg., assignor to 

Manning's Inc., San Frimdsco, CaUf . 

Filed Inly 13, 1970, Scr. No. 54,115 

Int CL B65b 25/06 

VS. CL 99—171 R 6 Claims 



1 




A method for forming and wrapping foodstuffs such as 
tamales whereby a foodstuff is deposited on a wrapping 
material, the foodstuff and wrapping material being 
formed into a U-shape and then heat sealed across the 
upwardly extending edges after depositing filling material 
into the foodstuff. The wrapping material is tl^en heat 
sealed between adjoining foodstuffs. 



3,667,972 

CHEMICAL NICKEL PLATING BATHS 
Mignel Coll-Palagos, Rye, N.Y., assignor to Stauffcr 

Chemical Company, New Yorit, N.Y. 
No Drawing. Continuation of application Scr. No. 
687,470, Dec. 4, 1967. This application June 11, 
1970, Ser. No. 48,836 

Int a. C23c 3/02 
U.S. a. 106—1 8 Claims 

Acidic electroless plating solution comprising nickel 
ions, hypophosphite ions, and an ion of the group of 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



231 



sulfamate, fluoborate and mixtures thereof for improved hydroxide whereby the coated fibers form an injectable 

solution stability and providing electroless plates char- and extrudable paste, and process for producing same 

acterized by lower internal stresses so as to provide im- 

proved adhesion. Stability is further improved by the addi- —^^^^^^^'■~— 

tion of glycolate ions and acetate i(His. Boric acid is used 

to further improve characteristics of the plating bath. ERRATUM 



3,667,973 

SPONTANEOUS FLUORIDE OPAL GLASSES WITH 

THERMALLY REVERSIBLE OPACITY 

James E. Flannery, Coming, N.Y., assignor to 

Condng Glass Works, Condng, N.Y. 

FUed Oct. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 79,501 

Int. CL C03c 3/04 

VS. CL 106—54 2 Clahns 

This invention relates to the manufacture of spontane- 
ous alkali metal fluoride opal glasses containing opacity 
dcnsifying agents and exhibiting thermally reversible 
opacity; that is, they may be heated to clearness and 
cooled to opacity without deformation of the glass being 
heated. Operative compositions include glasses consisting 
essentially, by weight on the oxide basis, of 70-80% 
SiOa, 1-3% AI2O3, 7-14% BjOs, 1.5-4% LijO, 0-10% 
R3O, wherein RjO is at least one alkali metal oxide se- 
lected from the group consisting of K2O and NajO, 
3-6% F, and a total of 1-3% of an opacity densifying 
agent selected from the group consisting of M0O3, WO3, 
and AssOs. 



For Class 106 — 90 see: 
Patent No. 3,668,150 



3,667,976 

COLORED CEMENT 

Theodore F. Tanner, Houston, Tex., aasignor to General 

Portland Cement Co., Dallas, Tex. 

No Drawing. Filed June 30, 1970, Scr. No. 51,361 

Int. CL C04b 7/70 

UA CL 106—97 17 claims 

Cement, and particularly portland cement, can be 

colored to a variety of different hues by admixing 

selected metals with the raw materials from which the 

cement is made prior to or during burning of the raw 

materials. The metals can be introduced in elemental or 

combined form. Generally, the metab are introduced in 

amounts from 0.2 to 2.0% by weight expressed as the 

oxide of the metal based on the total amount of dry raw 

materials which are introduced into the kiln. Burning 

temperatures at which the raw materials and coloring 

agent are reacted are conventional. 



3,667,974 
PROCESS FOR PREPARING A MOLDED PITCH. 
POWDER GRANULE SYSTEM WITH AN EVf- 
^PROVED BONDING MATERIAL AND PRO- 

DUCnON PRODUCED THEREFROM 
Kaoru Umeya, Scndai-shl, AUra Watanabc, Okayama, 
and ShinBci Gomi, Tokyo, Japan, assignors to Knreha 
Kagakn Kogyo KabasUU Kabha, ToIq^o, and Kyushu 
Taika Renga Kahnshiki Kaisiw, Okayama, Japan 
No Drawing. Filed June 12, 1969, Ser. No. 832,812 
Claims priority, application Japan, June 12, 1968, 
43/39,898 
Int CL C04b 35/02, 35/04 
VS, CI. 106—58 7 Claims 

A refractory which is high in compressive strength at 
both room temperature and at high temperatues in soften- 
ing point under load, and in resistance to slags can be 
economically obtained by compression molding as a first 
embodiment a mixture comprising 100 parts of powder 
granules 1 to 30 parts of a special pitch prepared by 
heating any hydrocarbon containing crude oil at 700° 
to 2300° C. for a short time and further heat treating 
the resulting tarry materials at 150° to 550° C. As a sec- 
ond embodiment 100 parts of powder granules are ad- 
mixed with special pitch and less than 70% of an aro- 
matic tar which has been likewise heated at 700° to 
230° C. for a short time, and then further heated at 150° 
to 550° C. 



3,667,975 

EXTRUDABLE REFRACTORY FIBROUS 
MATERIAL 

Dwlght Maxwell Teagoe, Birmingham, William F. Bert- 
rand, St Clair Shores, Philip J. WIDson, Royal Oak, 
and Frank E. Ammermann, Ann Arbor, Mich., as- 
signors to Chrysler Corporation, Highland Paik, Mich. 
No Drawing. FUed Mar. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 17,900 
Int a. C04b 35/10 

U.S. CL 106—65 4 Claims 

A refractory fibrous product composed of refractwy 
fibers coated with a lubricating layer of aluminum meta- 



3,667,977 

EXPLOSION.PROOF ASBESTOS-CEMENT SHAPES 

James E. Harbison, Ambler, Pa., assignm- to Certain. 

Teed Products Corporation, Ardmorc, Pa. 

No Drawing. FOcd Feb. 6, 1970, Scr. No. 9,423 

,To ^. , Int CL C04b i7/0« 

VS. CL 106-99 3 cudms 

Asbestos-cement shapes are formed from a furnish 
contammg a small quantity of vegetable fibers distr*uted 
therem, the shapes being formed by screw extrusion, there- 
by providing articles or shapes in which fibers extend 
randomly from the exterior surface of the shapes into the 
mterior regions thereof and thus provide "bleed" chan- 
nels through which vapor formed in the interior may 
escape when the shapes are subjected to heating, with 
consequent substantial elimination of tendency to ex- 
plode. 



3 667 978 
UGHT-WEIGHT HIGH.]sTRENGTH CEMENT 
COMPOSITIONS 
Aintole N. VassUcTsky, deceased, late of West HaTcn, 
Conn., by bene VassUevsky, execntriz. West Haven, 
Conn^ and Adolf Renke, Lincolndale, N.Y.: Said Irene 
Vasrilcvsi^ aasignor to VJLB. Aasodatca. Ibc^ Lto- 
colndak, N.Y. 

^'^ J?!T?*- Continnatlon.in.part of application Scr. No. 
570,743, Aug. 8, 1966, wUch U a continnation.in-part 
of application Scr. No. 306,702, Sept 5, 1963. TUa 
application May 26, 1969, Scr. No. 829458 

WT « ^ .^.^^^ C04b 7/00. 9/00, 9/14 

VS. CL 106-105 4 cwnia 

A hydraulic cement binder ccmsisting of magnesium 
oxide, magnesium sulfate and calcium chloride in pro- 
portion such that a magnesium oxychloride/magnesium 
oxysulfate/calcium sulfate hardenable mass is produced 
upon addition of water and setting. The binder is com- 
bined with organic matter which is treated to partially hy- 
drolyze the cellulosic material and thereafter neutralize 
It. For decreased brittleness and increased waterproofing 
characteristics, the binder contains sodium silicate and sili- 
cofluoride. 



I 



232 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 0, 1972 



3^7,979 
INVESTMENT CASTING WAX 
John C. Merses, Jr^ Gkn MIlli, and Richard E. Ware, 
Trainer, Pil« MsipM>n to Son Oli Company, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

No Drawing. Filed Apr. 30, 1971, Ser. No. 139,243 
Int a. C08h 9/10 
UA CL 106—268 16 Chims 

,An improved investment casting wax composition con- 
sisting essentially of about 35-65 weight percent refined 
petroleum wax, solid chloronaled polyphenyl, acid type 
montan wax and stearic acid. Said composition has the 
advantage of low shrinkage, low penetration and rapid 
set up. 

3 667 980 
STRONG SALT FLOOR COMPRISING HALITE 
CRYSTALS, MAGNESIUM SULFATE AND 
POTASSIUM 
UMcfa E. G. Ndtzcl and David S. Botts, Ogdcn, Utah, 
assignors to Great Salt Lalw Minerais ft Clicmicals 
Corporation, New York, N.Y. 

Filed Sept 24. 1968, Ser. No. 761,961 

Int CI. C08h 17/24 

VS, CL 106—286 10 Claims 



3,667,983 

FLEXIBLE COLOUR PRINTED LAMINATE AND 

METHOD OF MAKING SAME 

Robert H. Haggas, 9 Soothway, Eldwidc, and John S. 

Haggaa, 4 Stoney Ridge, Cottingley, both of Bfaigiey, 




Hydrottd MgS04 



filed Mth additional NoCi. 



A reinforced, sodium chloride floor for a solar pond is 
developed. First, a brine is evaporated under conditions 
which deposit a sodium chloride layer, containing a high 
volume-percent of voids, on the pond bottom. The so- 
dium chloride layer is then covered with brines of pre- 
selected compositions such that first hydrated magnesium 
sulfate and then additional sodium chloride is deposited 
in the voids. There results a floor which is stronger and 
more compact than sodium chloride floors developed by 
prior art methods. 



3,667,981 

UPGRADED CAST REFRACTORY PRODUCTS 
Marc Roland Gilbert Esaonlt, Le Pontct, and Michel 

Loois Ayme-Jonve, Sorgncs, Fktmce, assignor to 

L'Electro-Refractaire, Parte, Frimce 

No Drawing. FDed Dec 23, 1969, Ser. No. 887,774 

Claims priority, JVpHcation FVance, Dec. 27, 1968, 

181 380 

Int CI. VMg 23/02, 21/00 

VS, CL 117—2 R 6 Claims 

The invention relates to cast refractory products hav- 
ing dispersed shrinlcage cavities or voids, these products 
being characterized in that said cavities or voids are filled 
with a suitable grout comprising powdered refractory 
materials. 



No Drawing. Contfamation^n-part of application Ser. No. 

626,937, Mar. 30, 1967. Iliifl appUcation Dec 4, 1969, 

Ser. No. 882,275 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, Apr. 7, 1966, 
I 15,551/66 

I Int CL B44d 1/32; B44m J/24 
U.S. CL 117—15 Siciahns 

A colour printing process which enables conventional 
lithographic and letterjM'ess inks and techniques to be 
employed for printing on classes of flexible thermoplastic 
sheet material, to which such inks, being polymerisable, 
do not normally adhere readily, so as to provide a durable 
print. The problem of obtaining an enduring bond be- 
tween such inks and base sheet, is overcome by the 
use of a synthetic lacquer which permeates the printwork 
and serves both as a bonding agent and as a protective 
coating. The resulting colour prints are more delicate 
than those produced by the silk screen process which has 
hitherto, normally been used for such base materials. 

I 

3,667,984 
COATED POROUS STRUCTURES AND METHOD 

FOR FORMING THEM 
Whitney R. Adams, WOmlngtoB, DcL, assignor to Scott 

Paper Company, Delaware Coonty, Pa. 
Application Aug. 16, 1968, Ser. No. 756,344, which k 
a coBtinnation4n-p«rt of apirfication Ser. No. 491,612, 
Sept 30, 1965. Divided and this application Inly 14, 
1969, Ser. No. 870,692 I 

int CL B44d 1/094 J 

U.S. CL 117—21 Ul Cbdms 




Porotis structures such as cellular honeycombs and 
reticulated foams coated wtih organic resins of the ther- 
moplastic or thermosetting type, and structures in which 
the internal material comprising the structure being coated 
is removed as by leaching or hydrolysis to leave only 
the coating material as an integral structure. Processes 
for forming the above structures in which the surface 
of the porous structure is treated to temporarily attach 
a coating material in the form of powder, as by wetting 
the surface with a liquid or an adhesive and dusting the 
surface with the powder, heated to melt the powder into 
a smooth contiguous coating, and, in some instances, 
subjected to hydrolysis to remove the material comprising 
the original structure being coated so as to lefve only 
the structure formed by the coating material. 



3,667,982 

PLASTICS COATED MATERIAL 

Edwards BokaMers, Bamsley, England, assignor to 

BokHez Proce a sea limited, Bandey, England 

No Drawfaig. FDed June 29, 1970, Ser. No. 50,912 

Int CL B44c 1/02, 5/00 

U.8. CL 117—10 11 Claims 

The invention comprises a method of producing a 

grained effect on the face of a layer of thermoplastic 

material coated on to a sheet of pliable carrier material, 

in which a protective film is applied to the surface of 

said layer, and the material is tumbled or crumbled to 

distort the layer to produce the grained effect. 



I 3 667,985 

METAIXIC SURFACE TREATMENT METHOD 
David J. Levine and Moses A. LevlBStein, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, assignors to General Electric Company 
Origfaul application Dec 14, 1967, Ser. No. 693,691, now 
Patent No. 3,540,878. Divided and tUs appUcatton 
Apr. 23, 1970, Ser. No. 43,289 i 

Int CL B44d 1/094, 1/34 I 

VS. a. 117—22 4 Clafans 

The metallic powder produced from a ternary alloy of 
Ti, Al and C, having a dispersion of TljAlC complex car- 
bide in a matrix of Ti or Al or their alloys, preferably the 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



283 



binary TijAl with the Ti within the gamma range of the a developing path with the image-bearing surface contact- 
Ti-Al phase diagram and avoiding detrimental amounts ing a develc^ing liquid in effective field contnd spacing 
of TLAI3, allows accurate control of the deposition of with an electrically conductive surface of an image inten- 

sifier moving along the developing path. Developing liquid 
is supplied to the surface of the image intensifier by a 
porous wiper wetted with developing liquid, and an in- 
coming image-bearing carrier is guided al<»g the develop- 
ing path in contact with the developing liqmd by ridges 
extending along the developing path on an upwardly 
concave wall which forms a trough through which the 
image intensifier moves. As the carrier moves through 
the developing trough, the image-bearing surface is pressed 
into effective field control spacing with the image inten- 
sifier over an elongated distance of the developing path by 
developing liquid ixliich is received into a chamber and 
directed against the back side of the carrier by orifices 
formed in the upwardly concave wall. After passing 
through the trough, the carrier is guided through a pair of 
cooperating squeegee rcrilers which remove excess de- 
veloping liquid from the carrier. 




either or both Al and Ti or their alloys in a diffusion pack- 
type method for coating an article. Deposition is brought 
about through the use of a halide salt activator preferably 
in the fluoride or chloride class. 



3 667 986 
OPAQUE COMPOSITION FOR FORMING A 
WINDOWED WEB IN A CATHODE RAY 
TUBE SCREEN STRUCTURE 
Robert A. Hedler, Seneca Falls, N.Y., aarignor to 

Sylvania Electric Products Inc 
No Drawing. Filed May 28, 1970, Ser. No. 41,530 
Int CL B44d 1/02, 5/00; C03c 17/00 
U.S. CL 117—33.5 CM 5 Claims 

An improved opaque composition which is formulated 
to be utilized in a minimal step process for forming a 
uniform opaque interstitial pattern for a color cathode 
ray tube screen structure. The opaque composition, con- 
taining a high percentage of an organic solvent, is dis- 
posed in a manner to form an opaque interstitial web hav- 
ing multitudinous windows therein wherein phosphor 
pattern elements are subsequently disposed. 



3,667,987 

METHOD OF DEVELOPING LATENT 

elecikostahc images 

George J. Miller, Skoldc, DL, aarignor to SCM 

Corporation, New YotIl, N.Y. 

FDed Dec 12, 1969, Ser. No. 88433 

lot CL G03g 13/10. 15/10 

U.S. CL 117—37 LE 6 Clafans 



3,667,988 

MASKING IN SURFACE TOEATMENT OF 

ARTICLES 

Seinosnke HoriU, Nagoya-sid, Japan, assignor to Nagoya 

Ynkagakn-Kogyo gahnAnrt Kaisha, TakMii, AidU- 

ken, Japan 

FUed June 30, 1970, Ser. No. 51,141 

Cfadms priority, appUcation Japan, July 9, 1969, 

44/54,378; May 25, 1978, 45/44,692 

Int CL B44d 1/02, 1/52 

U.S. CL 117—38 6 Claims 




A method of masking for protecting a specified area 
of surface of articles from coating or plating characterized 
in that protecting elements made of synthetic resin foam 
in the shape of a column, doughnut, ball, tnmcated 
cylinder, prism, cube, cap or ring are used and wherein 
said synthetic resin foam is stable and restrains elasticity 
at normal temperature, but when heated above a predeter- 
mined temperature rapidly contracts in its volume, there- 
by said area being effectively masked during coating or 
plating and during heat-treatment of the coated or {dated 
article the protecting element is contracted in volunae and 
freely removed from the article. 




3,667389 
METHOD FOR SELECITVELY COATING ARTICLES 
John M. Keatfav, Mnhienbcrg Park, Pa., Msi^ar to 
Western Electric Company, Incorporated. New York, 

Orii^ application Dec 26, 1968, Ser. No. 787,040. now 
Patent No. 3,587,524, dated Jone 28, 1971. DHded 
and tUs appUcation Aug. 6, 1970, Ser. No. 61,786 
Int CL B44d 1/18, 1/52 
VS. CL 117—38 3 Cl^ms 

Articles to be selectively coated, are conveyed through 
a coating station by a tape which serves ako to mask 
areas of the articles where coating is not desired. The tape 
is in the form of an endless belt and coating matorial is 
continuously removed from the t^>e so that each article 
A latent electrostatic image on a surface of a carrier is to be coated is presented with a cleaned portion of the 
developed into a visible image by moving the carrier along tape as a mask. Automatic aiq;iaratu8 is provided to al- 



234 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



L 



June 6, 1972 



temately raise and lower sections of the tape over a 
support track for the articles in coordination with feed- 




used. Where dimethylaminoborane is used in the activat- 
ing solution, the metal surface is thereafter stabilized with 
an aqueous stabilizing solution of dimethylaminoborane. 
Electroless plating is then carried out, producing a stress 
free hermetically sealed nickel coating of substantially 
uniform thickness directly on the aluminum metal, mag- 
nesium metal, or beryllium metal surface. Once such a 
coating is established, further plating with copper, nickel 
or other metals may be effected by electrolytic or elec- 
troless means. The nickel coated surface is preserved in 
a proper state for any such additional plating by holding 
it in an aqueous preservative solution of dimethylamino- 
borane. 

I - 



ION 



ing and accumulating devices to bring parts into and out 
of engagement with the tape. 



3,(67.992 

FULMINAnNG MATERIAL APPUCATK 

TECHNIQUE 

Stephen V. Brown, WilUanuport, TV»nuM B. McDonoagh, 

AUenwood, and John W. Shaffer, Wlllianispoct, Pg., 

assignon to Sylvania Electric Prodncta Inc. 

Filed Oct 22, 1970, Ser. No. 83,135 

Int CL B44d i/i¥ 

US. CL 117—69 8 Claims 



3,667,990 
PRODUCTION OF INDICIA UPON SURFACE 
Mnnay K. Rogera^ d tc eaeed, late of Somerset, Ky., by 
May B. Rogo^ executrix, Somcraet, Ky., aaaignor to 
Mi-MaAcr Corporation, Feranaon, Ky. 

FDcd Jane 18, 1969, Ser. No. 834,620 

Int CL B05c 1/16, 5/00; B44d 1/09, 1/52 

VA CL 117-3S 8 Claims 





A stenciling system including method and apparatus for 
marking Indicia on a surface wherein the dispensing noz- 
zle of a flexible tube of marking material is applied di- 
rectly to said surface while being guided by said stencil. 
Regulation of the flow of ink is accomplished through 
manual pressure on the sides of the tube. A stencil as- 
sembly is disclosed having a unitary frame with bent- 
over edges to hold individual stencil members in position 
to form a composite display. A package is included in the 
kit for storing two stencils and two tubes of ink, said 
stencils bisecting the package to form compartments for 
the tubes. 



A mediod of applying fulminating material on the 
primer anvil wire of a percussive-type photoflash lamp in 
which: the anvil wire is dipped into an aqueous slurry 
containing red phosphorus to provide a coating thereof on 
the wire; the coating is dried; and then the coated wire 
is dipped into an aqueous solution of sodium chlorate so 
as to permeate the phosphorus containing coating with the 
chlorate solution. 



3,667,991 

PROCESSES FOR NICKEL PLATING METALS 

Geoife A. MiUer, Sooth Attlcboro, Mass., assignor to 

Texas Inrtnunents Incorporated, DaOas, Tex. 

No Drawing. Filed Feb. 2, 1970, Ser. No. 8,014 

Alumi nu m metals liaving nickel coatings plated direct- 
ly thereon may be prepared by electroless deposition of 
nickel from an aqueous plating solution containing nickel 
ions, dimethylaminoborane, a carboxylic acid complex- 
mg agent and a stress reducer. Nickel plated magnesium 
metals and beryllium metals may be similarly prepared. 
The metal surface is rendered susceptible to plating by 
initially contacting it with a novel activating solution con- 
taining ammonium bifluoride and either dimethylamino- 
borane or nitric acid, and then rinsing if nitric acid is 



3,667,993 

METHOD FOR COATING A SUBSTRATE WITH A 
HEAT CURABLE SIUCONE RUBBER AND RE- 
SULTING PRODUCT 
Joseph Eogene Stevenson, Adrian, Mich., assignor to 

Stanffer^Wacker Silicone Corporation 

No Drawing. Filed Mar. 27, 1968, Ser. No. 716,341 

Int CL B32b 25/20; B44d 1/14 

VS, a. 117—72 3 aaims 



Substrates are coated with heat curable silicone 
bers using alkenyl acyloxysilanes as primers. 



rub- 



3,667,994 

TEXTURED RELEASE PAPER 

FrankUn J. Ward, Sooth Porttand, Maine, assignor to 

Scott Paper Company, Delaware County, Pa. 

No Drawing. FDcd July 24, 1970, Ser. No. 58,175 

Int a. B32b 29/00; B44d 1/14 

VS. CL 117—76 P 4 Claims 

A textured release paper is made by first coating a 

base paper with a mineral pigment coating having a 

smooth surface, then applying an alcoholic solution of 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



235 



a polyamide which forms a textured surface upon drying 
and curing. Polyvinyl chloride plastisols are applied to 
the release paper, dried and cured, and when stripped 
off as self-supporting films exhibit the same embossed 
texture of the polyamide surface. The release coating may 
contain a thermosetting resin which provides hardness 
and solvent resistance to the release coating. 



3^7,995 
METHOD FOR COATING A REINFORCED HOSE 
Robert H. Kaufman, Temirfe, and Donald Richardson, 
Wyoodaring, Pa., aasigaon to North American Rock- 
^ wen Corporation, P it t s b ui gh, Pa. 

FDcd Not. 5, 1970, Ser. No. 87,062 

lot CL B44d 1/08, 1/06 

VS. CL 117—94 -^ 5 Clafans 




r r r r rf T Tff^fr^fjy 



An improved method for manufacturing strand rein- 
forced flexible hose comprising moving a strand covered 
hose carcass through a coating stage in such a maimer 
that substantially only compressive forces are present in 
the hose carcass in the direction parallel to its longitudinal 
axis at the time the hose is wound on a reel for storage. 
The hose is ridded of any excess coating material and 
stored on a reel or other suitable storage device at a rate 
not greater than the rate at which the hose is exiting from 
the coating operation. The apparatus comprises means 
for moving the hose through the coating operation with 
substantially only compressive fcM-ces as aforesaid, and 
means for coating the strand reinforced hose. 



3,667,996 
HYDROXYLATED COPOLYMERS COMPOSED 
OF MONOMETHYLSILOXANE UNITS AND 
DIPHENYLSILOXANE UNITS 
Robert C. Antoncn, % Dow Coming Coiporation, 
Midland, Mich. 48640 
No Drawing. Original application Feb. 25, 1969, Ser. No. 
802,217, now Patent No. 3,632,798, dated Jan. 4, 
1972. Divided and this appUcation Oct 27, 1970, Ser. 
No. 84,486 

Int CL B44d 5/00, 5/12 
VS. CL 117—97 7 Oaims 

Hydroxylated copolymers of (CeHs)3SiO units and 
CHsSiOi.6 units are disclosed. The diphenylsiloxane units 
are present in an amount of 20 to SO mol percent and 
are bonded to monomethylsiloxane units which ccmtain 
the hydroxyl groups. Also disclosed are the above hydrox- 
ylated copolymers modified by linking segments of 



Ri / 



B,\ R, 

081-4-0810— 



where x is at least 2 and R is methyl, phenyl or 3,3,3- 
trifluori^ropyl and the segments are iH-esent in amounts 
of 1 to 50 wei^t percent. The hydroxylated copolymers 
and the modified hydroxylated copolymers are resins use- 
ful in protective coatings, laminates, release coatings and 
molding resins. 



3,667,997 
PROCESS FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF OPEN- 
PORE POLYVINYL CHLORIDE FOAMS HAVING 
HYDROPHILIC QUALITIES WHICH ARE CAPA- 
BLE OF A REVERSIBLE ABSORPTION AND 
YIELDING OF MOISTURE 

Otto Fochs, Oberlar, Germany, assignor to Dynandt 
Nobel AG., Troisdorf, Bezirfc, Cologne, Gemumy 

Filed Jan. 2, 1969, Ser. No. 789,083 

Claims priority, apiriication Germany, Jan. 2, 1968, 

P 16 69 997.1 

Int CL B32b 27/08 

VS. CL 117—98 5 Clafans 




rHOM JO* BtLATtVI 
MOISriMl CONTENT TO 

e»« ici.<Tivt MOSTuaf 

COMTtNT »T ZOrC 



TZ — r 



Production of polyvinyl chloride foam form articles 
which are hydrophilic and have reversible absorption and 
desorption of moisture characteristics by impregnating 
previously formed foams of polyvinyl chloride with about 
4 to 20 weight percent polyvinyl alcohol. The polyvinyl 
alcohols as used in an acetyl content of less than about 
5% and are impregnated as an aqueous solution thereof. 



3,667,998 
PROCESS FOR APPLYING COHERENT COATINGS 
Heinz Esser, Borscheid, Germany, assignor to Farl>ai- 
fabriken Bayer AktiengeseUschaft, Leveifcnaen, Ger- 
many 

No Drawfaig. FUed Sept 26, 1969, Ser. No. 861,502 
Claims priority, application Germany, Sept 28, 1968, 
P 17 96 270.8 
Int a. B44d 1/08. 1/12 
VS. CL 117—105.5 6 Oafans 

Process for the production of a coherent coating on a 
support by the method of simultaneously spraying a dis- 
persion of rubber or synthetic resin and/or an emulsion 
of bitumen or tar or tar pitch, with a precipitating agent 
for the emulsion or dispersion, on to the support in which 
process a dispersion or emulsion is used which contains 
5 to 85% by weight of an inorganic, non-fibrous filler, 
based on its total solids content. 



3,667,999 

FLAME RETARDANT CELLULOSIC MATERIAI^ 

Francis Raymond Stoveken, Scotch Plidns, and Warren 

Clifford Mayer, Somerville, N J., aasignors to JcAnson 

ft Johnson 

No Drawtaig. Filed Apr. 15, 1969, Ser. No. 816,414 

Int a. C09k 3/28; C09d 5/18; D21h / /28 

VS. CL 117—137 6 Oafans 

Flame retardant matnials having excellent tensile 
strength, good tear resistance and elongation, improved 
drape and softness comprising a cellulosic base structure, 
a self cross-linked polymeric acrylic resin, anunonium 
bromide, and a weakly base, water-soluUe aliirfiatic 
organic, nitrogenous compound omtaining an amino 
group; and methods of making the same by simplified 
single-bath procedures. 



1 

1. 



286 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



ANTI-SOILING FOLYiSTER TEXTILE MATERIAL 
Ala S. FotMhinn, Udw Hlinraiha, aad Loois E. TVepMK>, 
Wctlfldd. N Jn aarignon to CdaBcse Corporation, New 
Yoifcf N.V. . . « •., 

No DraWiM. CondnoatfoB^iHpart of appUcadoa Scr. No. 
945j93%hify 25, 1M9. T^ appnaidoB Apr. 2, 1970, 
Scr. No. 22,14« _^ ,,,^^ 

1M, CL B23b 27/06: DMm i5/a¥ 
UA CL 117— 138.S F 3 Ctalms 

There is provided a method of preventing wet-soU re- 
deposition and improving the stain-release character- 
istics of textile materials comprised of from about 20 to 
about 100 percent (by weight) of polyester comprising 
the step of incorporating into said textile material from 
about 0.0001 to about 10 percent (by weight of polyester 
fiber in said textile material) of hydroxypropyl methyl 
cellulose prior to the time said textile material is 
laundered. 



3,668,001 
FIBROUS STRUCTURE HAVING DURABLE ELAS- 

TICTTY AND CREASE-RESISTIVITY AND ITS 

MANUFACTURE ^ ^ 

KcnMro Hosokawa, Onka, Masao Matsul, TakatnU, and 

Noila Endo, Micfaio IiUkawa, and Susomu Toknra, 

Osidai, Japan, asBignmrs to Kanegafnchi Boseld Kabu- 

sUld Kataha, Tokyo, Japan 

No Drawlns. Filed May 29, 1969, Ser. No. 829,135 

ClainM priMity, appUcation Jvan, Mar. 28, 1969, 

44/23,608 

Int a. D06m 15/00 

UA a. 117—139.4 29 Clalnis 

A fibrous structure such as yams, fabrics, clothes and 
the like, having durable elasticity and crease-resistivity, 
particularly ladies hosiery having excellent smoothness, 
softness and stretchability, which is manufactured by ap- 
plying homogeneously to a fibrous structure at most 10% 
by weight, based on the structure, of polyorganosiloxane 
IMvpolymer in the form of its non-aqueous solution to- 
gether with catalyst for polymerization thereof and then 
by heating the structure at 50-200» C. to polymerize pre- 
polymer thereon into polyorganosiloxane having an elon- 
gation at break of at least 50%, a tensile strength at break 
of 1-50 kg./cm.» and a hardness of 5-50'. 



dered g^tat in a dispersion medium, thinly coating the in- 
sulator on a shadow mask electrode having electron beam 
holes, subiecting the insulator to heat treatment, an< 
posing a shadow mask lens electrode on the insulator 



3,668,002 
SHADOW MASK HAVING FOCUSING FUNCTION 

. AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME 
Tadao Okalic, HacUoJi-fiU, Makoto Tanaka, Mosadiino- 
shi, Shozo Tamnra and Masakazn Ftekndiinia, Hadiioji- 
M, and MUsnin Oikawa, T<Ayo, Japan, assignors to 
HItacfai, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filed Jnne 25, 1969, Scr. No. 836,519 

Clainis priority, application Japan, July 1, 1968, 

43/45,085; Dec 6, 1968, 43/88,980 

Int CL HOIJ 29/46 

UA CL 117—210 6 Clainis 



2^ 



dis- 



3,668,003 
PRINTED CIRCUITS 

Ralph'^WilUam Furaea, EaUng, London, England, 
asrignor to Ctridfilte Limited 
No Drawing. FUcd Nov. 26, 1969, Scr. No. 880,362 
Int. CL C23c 3/02 
UA CL 117—212 10 Claims 

A method is provided for forming a conductive pat- 
tern on a printed circuit board. A non-conductive sub- 
strate is first sensitized over an entire region and an ac- 
tivating agent is applied as a pattern within the sensitized 
region. The activated substrate is then immersed in an 
electroless plating solution to deposit a metal layer on the 
activated pattern. A heavier layer of metal may then be 
applied to the conductive pattern by an electrQlytic 
process. 



3,668,004 
SEMICONDUCnVE DEVICE FOR AND METHOD 

OF MANUFACTURING THE SAME 
MasayuU Yamamoto, Hisaaiii ToU, and Hideo Sidbuya, 
KodainMld, Japan, assignors to mtadU, Ltd., Tokyo, 
Japan 
Ori^nal application Ana. 30, 1967, Scr. No. 664,461. 
Divided and this appUcation Ang. 29, 1969, Scr. No. 
871,103 

Claimg priority, application Japan, Sept 2, 1966, 
41/57,558; Sept 12, 1966, 41/59,837; Mar. 24, 
1967, 42/17,991 1 

Int CL B44d 1/16. 1/18 ' 

UA CL 17—215 8 Oaims 




This specification discloses a semiconductor device com- 
prising a silicon substrate, an insulating film containing 
silicon oxide and phosphorus oxide which is formed on 
the surface of said silicon substrate, and a |Ht>tective coat- 
ing containing aluminum oxide which is formed cm the 
insulating film. I 

In the semiconductor device of this invention; said 
protective coating containing aluminum oxide serves to 
prevent said insulating film containing silicon oxide and 
phosphorus oxide from reacting with any moisture in the 
external atnx>sphere, thereby improving the water re- 
sisting property of the semiconductor device and stabilis- 
ing the semiconductor surface characteristics of the latter. 



A method of making a shadow mask having a focus- 
ing function comprising the steps of preparing an insula- 
tor having the form of a paste prepared by mixing pow- 



3,668^5 

PROCESS FOR THE COATn<fG OF ELECTRODES 

Gay Shiae, Rixensart and Gnstave Joannes, Abolens, 

Bclgfaun, assignors to Solvay A Cic, Braasels, Bclglnm 

No Drawing. FOcd Jan. 11, 1971, Scr. No. 105,628 

Clainis priority, anpUcation Lnxcmbarg, Jan. 9, 1970, 

60,168 
Int CL B44d 1/18 
UA a. 117—215 13 Claims 

Electrodes coated with ruthenium dioxide are manu- 
factured by applying an anchoring layer containing at 
least- one compound oxidizable by ruthenium tetroxide 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



287 



to the area of an etched metal support wherein the ru- 
thenium dioxide is to be fixed, exposing the thus coated 
support to ruthenium tetroxide in the gaseous state, which 
is decomposed to ruthenium dioxide upon contact with 
the anchoring layer on which it is preferentially fixed 
and then heating the thus treated support. Electrodes pro- 
duced in this manner have an adherent coating of ru- 
thenium dioxide which is resistant to electrolyte corrosion 
and support high current dennties. 



3,668,008 
IONIZED AIR CLEANING DEVICE 

Gerard T. Scverynse, Fairport N.Y., assignor to 

Xerox Corporation, Rochester, N.Y. 

Filed Jane 4, 1969, Scr. No. 830,337 

Int CL G03g 13/00, 15/00; B08b 5/00 

UA CL 134-1 8 Claims 



3,668,006 
FORMATION OF HIGH-SIRENGTH HIGH- 
MODULUS COATED FILAMENTS 
John B. Higgtai, Philadelphia, and Amo Gatti, Norris- 

town. Pa., assignors to General Electric Company 

CoBtinnation of application Ser. No. 483,978, Aug. 31, 

1965. This appUcatton Jane 2, 1969, Scr. No. 834,194 

Int a. C23c 13/04 

UA CL 117—231 i ciabn 





A substrate of core filament, of relatively small diam- 
eter, is heated to at least 900° C. in the presence of hy- 
drogen, methane and boron trichloride in preselected 
proportions to produce a strong, stiff, relatively large 
diameter filament which, apart from the core, comprises 
a 21-35% carlxMi, remainder boron, compound essentially 
free of faults, cracks, grain boundaries, etc. Preferably a 
tungsten substrate filament about 1 mil in diameter is 
heated to 900° C. and then 1200° C. in the presence of 
an atmosphere comprised, in mole fractions, of the fol- 
lowing: 0.605-O.686 hydrogen, 0.076-0.185 methane, and 
0.210-0.238 boron trichloride. After several minutes 
filamentary diameters on the order of 4-7 mils are at- 
tained with filament properties approaching those of 
amorphous boron carbide. 



Method and apparatus for cleaning a residual toner 
powder image bearing surface after transfer of substan- 
tially all of a charged toner image therefrom to a support 
medium. A flow of ionized air is directed to the surface 
and neutralizes any charge on the residual particles re- 
maining on the surface after image transfer to allow the 
particles to be readily removed. A nozzle is utilized to 
direct the flow against the surface and ionizes the air flow- 
ing therethrough by applying a potential between two elec- 
trically insulated opposite sides of the nozzle. 



3,668,009 

CLEANING METHOD 

Fred Norman Teomac, Sooth Bend, Ind., and Lester W. 

Hairiman, An^ton, Tex., aasigmm to Hie Dow 

Chemical Comrany, Midland, Midi. 

No Drawfaig. Filed Apr. 13, 1970, Scr. No. 28,079 
.TO ^ , Int CL C23g i/i<J; B08b J/0« 
UA CL 134—2 7 cUdms 

Improved method of cleaning a ferrous metal surfece 
having a hardness deposit by contacting it with an aque- 
ous alkaline cleaning solution containing about 0.1 to 40 
weight percent of an ammoniated polycarboxylic acid 
complexing agent The improvement involves including 
with the solution in an amount of from 0.0005 to 0.1 
weight percent a corrosion inhibiting compound of the 
formula: 



R-C— (-0-C-6 C-i-N-^I 



O / OH _ 

T"-H-H— hTT^'C'^^-'^^^ 



wherein R is an alkyl or alkenyl group containing from 
12 to 18 carbon atoms, a is 1 or 2 and 6 is 1-5. 



3,668,007 
SYRUP FRACTIONATION PROCESS 
Cari Thomas Eggcr, Gerald Bernard Pfnndstein, and 
Donald Lcc Gillenwater, Mnscatinc, Iowa, assignon to 
Grain Processing Corporation, Muscatine, Iowa 
No Drawfa^. FDed Oct 8, 1970, Scr. No. 79,302 
Int CL BOld 13/00; C13k 1/06. 1/08 
UA CL 127—38 5 Cfadms 

Starch is subjected to hydrolysis with an acid to convert 
the starch to hydrolyzate product which is then fraction- 
ated under applied pressure by means of membrane sepa- 
ration to recover a lower conversion product and a higher 
conversion product. 



3,668,010 
FUEL CELLS AND FUEL CELL BATTERIES 
OPERATING AT HIGH TEMPERATURE AND 
PROCESS OF MANUFACTURE THEREOF 
Jacques FaOy, Orsay, Yvon Lazemiec, Safait-lVflchel-snr- 
Orge, and Clande Lasne, Antony, FWuice, assignon to 
Compagnie Generalc d'Electridte, Paris, France 

FUed May 15, 1970, Ser. No. 37,641 
Chdms priority, application France, May 16, 1969, 
6915968; Oct 1, 1969, 6935500 
Int CL HOlm 27/16 
UA a. 136—86 F 19 Qafans 

A solid electrolyte fuel cell operating at a high tempera- 
ture, comprising several elements electrically connected 
in series. These elements are supported by one electrolyte 



238 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



tube, and one end of the external electrode of an element which the catalytically active metal is Raney nlctal, 
protrudes slightly above the internal electrode of the fol- Raney iron or Raney cobalt partically coated with cop- 
per, mercury, silver, or alloy or a mixture thereof. The 
fuel cell comprising conventional elements, an alktline 
electrolyte and said electrode. The electrodes have im- 
proved catalytic activity, especially improved loadl ca- 
pacity and an improved rest potential. 




lowing element. This enables simplified assembly and a 
reduction in the weight and the cost price of the fuel cell. 



3,668,013 

FUEL CELL SYSTEM WITH PNEUMATIC 
FUEL FLOW CONTROL 

Thomas C. Fhuz, BoHon, Coiul, assigBor to United 
Aircraft Corporatioii, Eait Hartford, Conn. 

Filed Apr. 21, 1969, Scr. No. 817.697 



lot CI. HOlm 27/02; G05d U/02 
US. a. 136—86 B 



5 Claims 



3,668,011 

GALVANIC CELL BATTERY WITH GAS 
DIFFUSION ELECTRODES 

Horst Gnme and Angnst lilliisel, KelUicim, Germany, 
aarignors to Varta Akticngesellsdiaft, Frankfort am 
Main, Germany 

Filed Aog. 8, 1968, Scr. No. 751,097 

Claims priority, vpUcation Geimany, Aug. 19, 1967, 

V 34480 

Int a. HOlm 27/02 
U.S. CL 136—86 R 11 Claims 



f' 



X 



I 



T 






I 



u 






Galvanic cell battery having a plurality of gas diffusion 
electrodes of one or both polarities wherein the gas cham- 
bers of all the electrodes of one polarity are arranged in 
a plurality of groups such that, with respect to the flow 
of operating gas through the gas chambers, all the gas 
chambers in one group thereof are connected in parallel 
with one another and all the groups of gas chambers of 
the electrodes of the same pcdarity are connected together 
in series with one another and the number of gas cham- 
bers in the respective groups decreases continuously from 
the first to the last of the series of groups. 



3,668,012 

ELECTRODE FOR ELECTROCHEMICAL DEVICES 
AND METHOD OF ITS MANUFACTURE 

Margarcte Jung, KeUieim, Tannus, and Hans H. von 
Dochrcn, Frankfort am Main, Germany, assignors to 
Varta Alctiengeseilscliaft, FVankfOrt am Main, Ger- 
many 

Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 325,567, 
Nov. 22, 1963. This application Nov. 13, 1968, 
Ser. No. 791,827 

Int CL HOlm 27/04 
U.S. CL 136—86 D 7 Qaims 

An electrode especially suitable for use in electrochemi- 
cal cells, like in a fuel cell with alkaline electrolyte in 



^ 

_<i_ 






Jl^~\ 



£ v/fi/jr. 







A control is disclosed for automatically metering fluid 
flow as a function of the difference between two pressures 
or of a single pressure. A restriction is disposed in the 
fluid outlet line so that the metered flow will depend upon 
pressure differential across the restriction. The pressure 
upstream of the restriction is regulated by a valve in the 
sui^ly line activated by a computing diaphragm assem- 
bly consisting essentially of three spaced interconnected 
disc elements responsive to the difference between the 
two pressures or a single control pressure when one of the 
pressures ,is fixed. 



3,668,014 

ELECTRODE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING 

SAME 

Emanuel G. KatsooUs, Long Island City, and WiUlam S. 
Fryer, Roslyn Estates, N.Y., asadgnor to Lccsona Cor- 
poration, Warwick, R J. 

No Drawing. Filed June 10, 1968, Ser. No. 735J81 



U.S. a. 136—120 



Int CL HOlm 35/00 



f 



10 Claims 



A mat of polyfluorocarbon fibers having controlled pore 
size and hydrophobicity is impregnated with a catalytic 
substance to form a light-weight catalytic mass having a 
low, uniform loading of the catalytic substance. This cat- 
alytic mass, particularly when combined with an elec- 
trically-conducting element, and /or a continuous hydro- 
phobic polymer membrane is suitable for use as an elec- 
trode in an electrochemical cell, e.g. as a fuel or oxidant 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



289 



electrode in a fuel cell or as the cathode in a metal-air steel after the time interval, such that the acid-soluble Al 
battery, wherein it provides high current densities at rela- in the remaining molten steel is more than 0.010% to 
tively constant voltages over a long period of time. 



3,668,015 

HIGH VERSATILE RADIOISOTOPE 
THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR 

Alan J. Streb, George S. Sdrers, and Howard R. Kelly, 
BaMmorc, Md., aaignon to Tcledyne, Inc., Los 
Angdes, Calif. 

Filed May 15, 1967, Scr. No. 638,367 



U.S. CL 136—202 



Int CL HOlT 1/04, 1/30; Gllh 1/10 



10 Claims 



An improved thermoelectric generator assembly in- 
cluding a radioisotopic heat source capsule, thermal in- 
sulation in the form of an open-ended cup surrounding 
the capsule and directing the heat axially toward the open 
end, shielding means including an open-ended corrosive 
resistant cylindrical casing for receiving the cup-shaped 
insulation and the heat source capsule in nested fashion. 
Thermoelectric converter means are positioned within the 
open end of the cup-shaped insulation, thermally coupled 
to the heat source capsule, and a first highly heat conduc- 
tive cover overlies the thermoelectric converted means 




with its periphery contacting a portion of the open-ended 
casing. A second corrosive resistant cover overlying the 
first cover, sealed to the cylindrical casing and forming 
therewith a highly corrosive resistant assembly. 




obtain an ingot. The ingot is then subjected to hot- 
rolling, cold-rolling recrystallizing and annealing. 



3,668,017 

TUNGSTEN BORIDE-CONTAINING ARTICLES 
AND PRODUCTION THEREOF 

Daniel Paul Henri Mandinean, PontUcrry, ftfichele 
Yvonne Christiane Monrey, and Georges PUtti^e 
Henri Pizzini, Paris, and Jacques Constant Poulidn, 
Antony, France, aasipiors to Ecok Nationale Snpoiearc 
des Mines dc Paris, and Sodctc Nationale dTtade ct 
dc Constractton de Motenrs d'Aviation SJ4JS.CJVLA., 
botii of Paris, Fhmce 

No Drawing. Filed Dec 5, 1969, Ser. No. 882,713 

Claims priority, appUcaHoa Fhmce, Dec 10, 1968, 

177,408 

Int CL C23c 11/08 
US. CL 148—6^ 2 Claims 

Articles, preferably of filamentary form, containing or 
consisting essentially of timgsten boride have improved 
mechanical properties when the tungsten boride WaBt con- 
stitutes at least 80% of the tungsten boride content. When 
the article consists of a tungsten boride core with an outer 
layer of boron, the latter is preferably amorphous. 



3,668.016 

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING COLD-ROLLED STEEL 
PLATE HIGH IN THE COLD-FORMABILITY 

Mineo Shimizu, Hirodd Takechi, Oroynki Ka^oka, and U.S. CI. 148 ^9.5 

IVfinorn Kawaharada, Kitakynskn, Japan, assignors to 

^^»pon Steel Corporation, Tokyo, J^Nm 

Filed Mar. 3, 1969, Ser. No. 803,669 

Clalmi priority, applkatioB Japan, Mw. 2, 1968, 
43/13,459 

Int CI. B22d 25/06 
US. CL 148—2 1 Claim 

Cdd-rolled steel having excellent cold-formability is 
made by pouring into a mold a molten steel having a com- 
position of C^O.07 wt. percent, 0.04 to 0.20 wt. percent 
Mn, 0.004 to 0.020 wt. percent S, the ratio of Mn to S 
being at least 7, not more than 0.0030% N, and the 
balance iron and impurities. The molten steel is allowed 
to rim in the mold for a time interval. Then the core of 
the molten steel is killed by adding Al to the molten 



3,668,018 

METHOD OF AUTOMATICALLY CONTROLLING 
THE LOCATION OF A NOZZLE IN HEAT TREAT- 
MENTS BY HOT GAS FLAMES 

YosldaU Arata, AmagasaU, and Katsnnori Inooc, AsUya- 
sU, Japan, assignors to Iwatani ft Co. LtiL, Osaka, 
Japan 

Filed Feb. 24, 1969, Scr. No. 801^86 

Claims pifority, appHcatfon Japan, Apr. 30, 1968, 
43/28,902 



Int a. B23k 7/00 



4 Claims 




The distance between a gas flame no2zle used in heat 
treating and the work is automatically controlled so that 



I 



(MA 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 



the heat is transferred most effectively to the work. 
Electrodes adjacent to the nozzle project down toward 
the flame and detect any variation in electrical char- 
acteristics of the flame, the detected values being trans- 
mitted in the form of control signals to an automatic 
control system which maintains the nozzle at optimum 
distance from the work. 



1972 



3,668,019 
ALUMINUM ELECTRICAL CONDUCTOR WIRE 

Harold Y. Huflkkcr, Lower Boirell, Pa., assignor to 

Ahuniimm Company of America, PittriNirgli, Pa. 

No Drawiiv. Filed Dec. 39, 1969, Scr. No. 889,313 

lot CL C22c 21/00: C22f 1/04 

VS. CI. 148—11.5 A 8 Claims 

Electrical conductor wire in a strain-hardened condition 
suited for use in stranded conductors for above-ground 
power transmission and composed of an aluminimi base 
alloy containing 0.04 to 0.3% magnesium and up to 0.5% 
copper, the balance being aluminum with certain maxi- 
mirni limits on other elements and impurities. This wire 
and stranded conductor produced therefrom exhibits a 
hi^y useful combination of conductivity, strength and 
resistance to creep. 



3,668,020 
METHOD OF MAKING STEEL WIRES 



vnOf rt A. Lnckt, Onusie, Comk, 

States Steel Corporatfon 



to United 



operation or subsequent to it, but prior to annealing, 
is treated, as by spraying, with an aqueous suspension 
of calcium hydroxide. The heat-resistant solid component 
of the suspension dries on the strip as a semi-adherent 
coating, and protects the strip from rusting during 
storage and shipping. 



No Drawiiw. Original appUcatioB Mar. 18, 1968, Scr. No. 

714,074. DiiMcd and this appHcalion Nov. 9, 1970, 

Scr. No. 88,132 

Int a. C21d 9/52 
VS. CL 148—12 6 Claims 

The method of making a high strength ductile cold 
drawn wire from hot rolled rods made from commonly 
used steels including .65 to 1.00% carbon, .25 to 1.20% 
manganese, .35% maximum silicon, .20% maximum alu- 
minum, .05% maximum sulphur, .012% maximum nitro- 
gen, and .05% maximum phosphorus, but with the addi- 
tion of .03 to .15% vanadium and .20% maximum molyb- 
denum. The hot rolled rod is drawn to finished size using 
only one patenting step with the reduction in area being 
at least approximately 60%. 



3,668,021 

HEAT.STABLE RUST INHIBITORS 

Caiiyle E. Siiocmakcr, Bctlrielicm, Pa., assignor to 

BctUchcm Steel Cocporation 

Filed Oct 29, 1969, Scr. No. 872,091 

Int CL C21d 1/00; C23c 3/04; B44d 1/20 

VS. CL 148—12.1 5 Claims 



In a process for inhibiting formation of rust on cold 



3,668,022 

METHOD OF IHEATING AN ALLOY STEEt 
FOR ENAMELING 

John P. Novak, Homewood, U., aarinor to Inland 
Stcd Company, CUo^o, DL 

Condnaation-in-pait of application Scr. No. 686,618, 
Nor. 29, 1967. This application Oct 26, 1970, 
Scr. No. 83,946 



U.S. a. 148—16 



bt CL C21d 1/74 



7 Claims 




A method of treating a cold rolled sheet of low carbon 
steel containing titanium in order to prevent the occur- 
rence of objectionable shadow lines normally appearing 
un the surface thereof after applying a single or multiple 
coating of a vitreous enamel which comprises heat treat- 
ing the cold rolled 5heet in a reducing non-oxidizing 
atmosphere containing carbon monoxide gas having a 
concentration between about 0.50% and 1.50% by v(rf- 
ume and with a controlled amount of moisture so that 
the treating atmosjrfiere remains non-oxidizing to the 
steel lit heat treating temperature. The sheet is treated in 
either a continuous normalizing apparatus or in an open- 
coil annealing apparatus. The required amount of carbon 
monoxide gas can be provided in the treating atmosphere 
and the treating atmosphere maintained non-oxidizing to 
the steel by passing at least a portion of a reducing non- 
oxidizing treating atmosphere comprised of a mixture of 
hydrogen and nitrogen with a small amount of moisture 
through a porous bed of charcoal disposed within the 
treating zone. 



^ 3,668,023 

TANTALUM-CONTAINING PRECIPITATION- 
STRENGTHENED NICKEL-BASE ALLOY 

Pcahotan Sobrab KotvaL 4923 Media Drive, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 46208 

No Drawing. Filed Jnnc 20, 1969, Scr. No. 835,211 

Int CL C22c 19/00 
VS. CL 148—32.5 5 Claims 

Tantalnm-bearing precipitaticMi-strengthened hot-woric- 
able nickel-base alloys aJso containing chromium and 
molybdemmi and having an intermetallic phase of stoi- 
chiometry A|M wherein M consists essentially oi Ta and 



rolled ferrous strip, the strip, either during the rolling wherein A consists essentially of nickel. 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



241 



3,668,024 

METHOD OF ANNEALING METAL POWDER 

Milton Johnson, Wankcsha, Wis., assignor to A. O. Smith- 
Inland Inc., Milwaakce, Wis. 



Continnation-taHart of application Scr. No. 671,290, 
Sept 28, 1967. IVa application Oct 7, 1969, Scr. 
No. 868469 

IntCLB22f //0O 
U.S. CL 148—126 12 Claims 

The invention relates to a process for annealing steel 
powder. The powder is continuously passed through an 
annealing furnace and heated to a temperature in the 
range of 1450* F. to 2100' F. while exposed to a reduc- 
ing gas. The dew point of the furnace atmosphere is 
maintained at a value slightly below the equilibrium 
value throughout the length of the heating zone by ad- 
justment of the rate of flow of the reducing gas to the 
furnace. 

By maintaining the dew point of the furnace atmos- 
phere within precise limits, a substantially complete re- 
duction of the carbon content of the steel particles is ob- 
tained and welding of the particles is prevented, so that 
the sintered cake of particles can be readily broken up 
after annealing to restore the as-atomized particle size 
and thereby provide an increased density for the com- 
pacted and sintered part. 



to generate a colored smoke, an inorganic oxidizer in an 
amount sufficient to oxidize the composition and a suit- 
able polymeric fuel binder in an amount sufficient to bind 
the ingredients of the smoke producing composition into 
a cohesive castable mass. 



3,668,027 

'^*S5!SE,.9IL.**^™^G NITROCELLULOSE- 
SJISSS-U^MNE WATER-BEARING EX- 
PLOSIVE COMPOSITIONS 

Gordon M. Gay, Tacoma, Wash., aarignor to Comerdal 
Solvents Corporation, New York, N.Y. 

No Drawing. Ffled Sept 26, 1969, Scr. No. 861,490 

,ia ^ ..« Int CL C06b 5/(M 

VS. CL 149-95 2 Clafans 

Water-bearing explosive compositions characterized by 
hi^ detonation velocity comjMising a mixture of an in- 
organic oxidizer salt, nitroglycerine and/or other nitrate 
esters, nitrocellulose, water and a water thickening agent. 
The water-bearing explosive compositions, gels and slur- 
ries, are prepared by first pregelling nitroglycerine and 
mtrooellulose followed by adding the remaining ingredi- 
ents of the explosive composition. 



3,668,025 

METHOD FOR ALLOYING METALS IN THE 
PRESENCE OF REACTIVE MATERIALS 

Joseph M. lUnm, Yotktown Hdghts, and Jan P. Hockstra, 
Putnam Valley, N.Y., assignors to International Bnsi- 
ncas Machines Corporation, Armonk, N.Y. 

Contfamation td abandoned an>lication Scr. No. 745,009, 
Jnly 15, 1968. HiIs application May 6, 1971, Scr. No. 
140,941 

Int CL HOll 7/46 

VS. CL 148-^178 31 




3,668,028 

METHOD OF MAKING PRINTING MASKS WITH 
HIGH ENERGY BEAMS 

OUver A. Siort Wilmington, Del., assignor to E. L dn 
Pont de Nemonrs and Company, I'Hlmfaigton, DcL 

Filed June 10, 1970, Ser. No. 45,157 

-Tfl ^ ,. Int CL B41c 7/i¥ 

VS. CL 156-3 9 chlms 



The invention involves a process for alloying a metal 
such as aluminum into a semiconductor such as germa- 
-.nium in the presence of reactive insulating material such 
as silicon dioxide. A layer of an organic material is de- 
posited on the surface of the insulating material prior to 
alloying and heated for a time and temperature sufficient 
to leave a residue of the organic material at the surface 
of the insulating material. The organic material is re- 
moved by spraying with an organic solvent such as tri- 
chk>ro-ethylene while the materials are still hot. Alloy- 
ing of the metal with the semiconductor is then carried 
out and any reaction between the aluminum and the sili- 
con dioxide which might be expected to occur is mini- 
mized. 

3,668,026 

CAOTABLE PYROTECHNIC COLORED SMOKE 
COMPOSITION 

Joseph E. Flanagan, Woodland Hills, CaUf ., assignor to 
"North American Rockwell Cmporation 

No Drawing. Filed Dec 14, 1970, Scr. No. 98,177 

Int CL C06d 3/00 
VS. CL 149—19 12 Clafans 

A castable pyrotechnic composition for colored smoke 
production comprising iodoform in an amount sufficient 




A stencil ma^ suitable fw printing electronic circuits 
and the like is made by applying a beam of high-energy 
emissions such as an electron beam or a laser beam to an 
original blank comprising two layers of different volatili- 
zability in response to impingement by the beam. The beam 
is applied to the layer which is more readily volatilized to 
form a groove therethrough bottoming at the inner surface 
of the second layer. Perforations extending entirely 
through the blank are produced where desired by increas- 
ing the beam energy applied to selected points along the 
bottom of the groove. Because the second layer is less 
readily volatilized, uncontrolled variations in the depths 
of the grooves and the danger of having a groove break 
entirely through the blank where this is not desired are 
minimized. 



242 



I 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3 668 029 to expand partially, then bringing the panel sections wiui 

CHEMICAL MACHINING PROCESS their foam faces together sandwich style, to a vertical posi- 

Raymond B. BloMJ ck , Luicartcr, and Robert A. Meier, 
Stevens, both ol Pa., asrignors to Anmtrong Cork Conv 
pany, L4mcastcr, Pa. 

FUed Oct. 9, 1969, Ser. No. 865.100 

Int. CI. C23f 1/02 

U.S. CI. 156-11 1 Claim 




IS^ 



A process for chemically machining metals, particularly 
steels and steel alloys, to depths greater than 0.010 inches by 
using a chemical etching solution. The metal is coated with 
an etch-resist, exposed to an energy source to harden and 
bond a predetermined area of the resist to the metal and then 
developed to remove the unhardened and unbonded resist. 
The metal is then recoated with resist, again exposed to an 
energy source to harden and bond the second resist layer to 
the first resist layer at the aforesaid predetermined area and 
then developed to remove the unhardened and unbonded re- 
sist. The metal is then passed through a chemical etching 
solution to chemically machine those areas of the metal un- 
protected by the double layer of resist. 

3 668 030 
METHOD OF MAKINg'mATING MALE EMBOSSING 

ROLLS 

Frank W. Brodcrkk, 52 PIttsford Way, New ProvMencc, N J. 

Filed Sept. 8, 1970, Ser. No. 70,434 

Int. CI. B44n 3/02 

U.S. CI. 156-14 20 Claims 




tion and allowing the foam to complete expansion, coalesce 
and gel ia this vertical position. 



4 Claims 




I 3,668,032 

METHOD OF MAKING A FLEXIBLE LETTERPRESS 

MAT 
Charles W. Bunting; DavM P. Grocber, and Louk W. Pettto, 

all of Dayton, Ohk>, anignors to McCaO Corporation, New 

York, N.Y. 

Original appUcatkm Aug. 28, 1967, Ser. No. 663,858, now 

Patent No. 3,568,595, dated Mar. 9, 1971. Divided and this 

1 appUcatkm Oct. 26, 1970, Ser. No. 83,737 

I Int.a.B29c/7/04 

VS. CL 156—215 

A first portion of a sheet of thermoplastic material is 
placed on the face of an engraved master plate, and the plate 
and sheet are positioned between the platens of a hydraulic 
press. The first portion of the sheet and the master plate are 
pre-heated and are then pressed together to mold an impres- 
sion of the face within the first portion of the sheet. The 
master plate and sheet portion are cooled while the pressure 
is maintained, after which the pressure is released and the 
sheet is shifted laterally a precise predetermined distance 
relative to the master plate while maintaining the angular 
orientatk>n of the sheet, to position a second portior of the 
sheet over the face of the master plate. The steps of pre-heat- 
ing, pressing, cooling and releasing are then repeated to 
produce a flexible mat having a pair of identical impressions 
in precise spaced relation and corresponding angular orienta- 
tion. One or more metal layers are electrolytically deposited 
on the mat, and the resulting thin sheet of deposited^ metal is 
separated from the mat and laminated to a pre-curved rein- 
forcing plate which is trintmed along its edge. 



A method for manufacture of a male embossing roll which 
registers exactly with another male embossing roll, which 
comprises forming in the second roll a mating female pattern, 
filling the female pattern depressions with resist, and then 
etching, thereby to produce a male design corresponding to 
the female design. The filling of the preliminarily formed 
female design by a resist comprising chrome plating is a 
preferred embodiment, the entire roll being chrome plated 
after the formation of the female design, the chrome plate 
then' being removed from the surface of the roll except in 
those areas corresponding to the depressions in the female 
pattern previously formed therein. 

3,668,031 
METHOD OF MAKING FOAM CORE SANDWICH PANEL 
Bernard J. BMt, Bethlehem, Pa., asrignor to Bethlehem Sted 
Corporation 

FUed M«r. 3, 1970, Ser. No. 16,179 

Int. CLB32b 5/75 

VJS. a. 156—79 3 Clalma 

A method of making a foam core sandwich panel suitable 

for use in the building industry by spreading two horizontal 

panels with a polyurethane foamable resin, allowing the resin 



I 3,668,033 

LAMINATING METHOD AND APPARATUS 
Ralph M. Evans, Gkndale, Arbu, aadgnor to Royal Industries, 
PMMiena, CaUf . 

ContiauatkM-ln-part of appUcatkm Ser. No. 510,597, Nov. 
30, 1965, now abandoned. This appUcadon Oct. 14» 1966, 
Ser. No. 586,803 
. Int. CI. B29c/ 7/04 I 

VS. CI. 156—212 12 Claims 

A method and apparatus for mailing a configurated, 
laminated workpiece, the apparatus being comprised of a 
forming press having a lower, stationary platen and an upper 
reciprocable platen which cooperate to apply pressure to 
selected portions of the laminated workpiece. Movable edge 
members are hingedly atuched to the upper platen and are 
adapted to be manually routed to bend veneer into a 
generally contiguous configuration with a base component. 
Alternatively, a latch mechanism may be used to forcibly 
rotate each edge member and bend the veneer. A heater is 
pivoully supported above the upper platen and upon a carri- 
er frame or tumstyle which is freely, arcuately swingable 
through all or nearly all of 360° so that it may be easily posi- 
tioned in the most effective location to accommodate soften- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



248 



ing of the veneer immediately prior to bending. A stationary and/or roughening and coating with the adhesive, while the 
heating element may be supported near the upper edge of the other surface which was provided with a completely dry ad- 
hesive coating is applied to and pressed against the moist ad- 
hesive surface. 




3,668,036 

METHOD FOR ATTACHING GASKET AND/OR 

INSULATOR MEMBERS TO PLATE STRUCTURES 

Robert G. Famam, New Lisbon, Wis., assignor to F. D. Fm^ 

namCo. , 

Filed Jan. 26, 1970, Ser. Na 5,734 

Int.a.B32bi;/20 

U.S. CL 156—252 H Clainv 



lower platen to aid the pivotal heater in the softening 
process. 



22 



3,668,034 

METHOD FOR MAKING A DECORATIVE PLASTIC 

LAMINATE 

Arthur S. Nlch<rias, and Sarkis M. KaMounI, both of Grand 

Rapids, Mich., assignors to U. S. Industries, Inc. 

Original appUcatkm Mar. 26, 1968, Ser. No. 716,140. 

DIvMed and this appUcatkm Aug. 5, 1970, Ser. No. 61,215 

Int. CL B29c J 9/00 

VS. CL 156-245 11 Clainv 




This disclosure relates to plastic laminates, preferaUy in 
the nature of an article, having an outer metalized layer, an 
intermediate bonding layer of a relatively low melting point, 
and a backing layer formed of a synthetic thermoplastic 
material whose melting point is at least as high and 
preferably higher than the melting point of the intermediate 
layer. The laminate is formed by bonding the outer metalized 
layer to the intermediate layer, preferably by heat fusion, 
placing the laminate of the metalized layer and the inter- 
mediate layer into a mold and injecting the backing material 
into the mold to form an article and to bond the backing 
material to the intermediate layer. 



3,668,035 

PROCESS FOR ADHESIVE BONDING OF POLYVINYL 

CHLORIDE MATERIALS 

Alois Felden, Munich, Germany, assignor to StaMgruger Otto 

Gruber Sc Co., Munchen, Germany 

FUed Apr. 24, 1969, Ser. No. 819,101 
Claims prkirity, appUcatkm Germany, Apr. 25, 1968, P 17 69 

245.4 
InLCLB32bi;/00 
U.S. a. 156—249 27 daiuK 

A process for the adhesive bonding of PVC materials in- 
cludes preparing at least of the bonding surfaces by purifying 



^ 



[ •M^JUS^JOB^M^JW^^^Ij^mX 



''r^'iT'f^^r^ff^^.fww.n^jL 



T 



26 '6 



■ 20 



v////////m 



■to 



A method of securing top and bottom members to inter- 
mediate plate structures by providing spaced apertures in the 
plate, positioning members on either side of the plate at least 
one of which is provided with mating portions such that the 
mating portions are within the spaced apertures in engaging 
relationship with the other member and providing an a^ie- 
sive on at least those portions of the members in mating en- 
gagement to thereby form a unitary structure of somewhat 
rigid stability. The products formed by the disclosed methods 
will find application for use in conjunction with carburetor 
assemblies wherein the plate structure is metal so as to act, 
for example, as a heat dissipator between the carburetor 
manifold and carburetor throttle body. The method may be 
used in many other types of assemblies wherein the assembly 
of three parts is difficult to accomplish at high speed with 
complete reliability. 



3,668,037 
METHOD FOR MAKING TABLETS 
Boyd C. Blab-, Topeka, Kans., assignor to Brackctt Strippii« 
Machine Co., Inc., Topeka, Kans. 
Original appUcatkm Jan. 15, 1968, Ser. No. 697,685, now 
Patent No. 3,560^1 L DMdcd and this appUcatkm Aug. 14, 
1970, Ser. No. 63315 
Int.CLB32bJ//00 
U.S. CI. 156—267 4 Cbdms 

A method for making tablets and including arranging a 
plurality of sheets into a set, registering edges of the sheets in 
the set, moving sets in a defined path, adjusting the spacing 
between seU, holding the set in a pressed together condition, 
grinding one edge of the set and applying a hardenabie quick 
drying adhesive to said one edge of the set, said method in- 
cluding maintaining the edges of the set in registry during 
grinding the one edge and applying adhesive thereto, said 
method including applying a strip having adhesive to the one 
edge, folding opposite margins of the strip to engage exterior 
sheets, and cutting the strip adjacent opposite ends of the 
one edge. 



244 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,668,038 
PROCESS FOR PREPARING A FLEXIBLE PACKAGING 

MATERIAL 

Charks C. Kirk, Laurd; ThoauH E. Fcringlon, Sandy Sprii^ 

and Raank S. Gregorian, SOvcr Spring, all of Md., m- 

signors to W. R. Grace & Co., New York, N.Y. 

Original application Feb. 2, 1970, Scr. No. 692,240, now 

Patent No. 3,539,437. Divided and this application Feb. 2, 

1970, Ser. No. 12,493 

Int. CI. B32b 33100 

MS. CL 156—276 5 OainH 



FfeMfbh 
Sk90t of Paptr 



FInt FlwibI* 
Th0rmcph$tfc Film 



Second Flulbh 
Thtrmophatle Film 



Filler 



Third Fhxibh 
Tb0rmofito$tie Film 



This invention is directed to a process for preparing self- 
supporting laminate films having low permeability to gases 
and to the films prepared by said process, all as described 
hereinafter. 



3,668,039 
METHOD FOR JACKETING FIBROUS DUCTS 
DavM Waksnian, Rodand Park, Kam., and James R. Stewart, 
Kansas City, Mo^ assignors to Ccrtain-Tccd Saint Gobain 
Insulation Corporation, Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 

Filed Apr. 14, 1970, Ser. No. 28,369 

Int. CI. B29c 77/07 

U.S. CL 156—287 6 Claims 




A method and apparatus for applying a jacket sheet to an 
open ended porous fibrous duct, by wrapping the sheet 
around the duct, applying end closures to the ends of the 
duct, at least one such closure having a vacuum connection 
so that by reduction of pressure in the interior of the duct, 
the external atmospheric pressure will serve to hold the 
jacket sheet snugly against the duct, and interconnecting the 
adjacent edges of the jacket sheet while it is being held 
snugly against the exterior of the duct under the influence of 
the reduced internal pressure and the external atmospheric 
pressure. 



r 



3,668,040 

METHOD AND MEANS FOR B(»^iDING BEARING 

LINERS 

Gordon J. Clark, Bristol, Conn., assignor to Textron Inc., 

Providence, R.L . 

FUed Nov. 3, 1969, Scr. No. 873,161 

Inta.B32bi//20 ' 



U.S. CL 956—294 






2_^; 




Claims 



/n/OiCArvtt 



The invention contemplates maintenance of uniform con- 
trolled pressure and temperature at the zone of bonding a 
fabric of the like liner to a bearing ring or the like, the pres- 
sure and temperature being at the levels required for op- 
timum curing of the particular thermosetting material in- 
volved. The pressure is developed by axial compression of an 
elastomeric plug, which is so constrained that radial loading 
of the lining on the bearing element necessarily results from 
hydrostatic deformation of the plug. The heat supplied for 
curing also causes the plug to expand, but the invention pro- 
vides for automatic compensation for plug expansion so as to 
maintain substantially constant pressure loading on the liner 
in the course of a curing cycle. Means are disclosed for the 
bonding of a plurality of lined bearing elements in a single 
batch processing cycle. 



3,668,041 

METHOD FOR MAKING A HRE-RETARDAlfT 

INSULATION CONSTRUCTION 

Thor J. G. Lonning, SufBeid, Conn., — ignor to Monsanto 

Company, St. Louis, Mo. 

Ori^nal appUcatkM Mar. 25, 1968, Scr. No. 715 J92. 

Divided and this application Feb. 27, 1970, Scr. No. 18393 

Int. CL C09j 7100 

U.S. CL 156—309 3 Claims 




A method for making a fire-retardant. faced, low density 
insulation construction from a preformed facing layer ccMn- 
prising vinyl chloride polymer and flame retardant plasticizer 
composition therefor; a preformed bat comprising a matrix of 
siliceous fibers bound together with a thennoset aminoplast 
modified phenolic resin adhesive, and a preformed solid ad- 
hesive li^er comprising vinyl chloride polymer resin adhesive 
having a heat softening temperature below the heat softening 
temperature of said facing layer, said method comprising the 
steps of heat fusing a said facing layer to a said adhesive layer 
and heat fusing the laminate comprising such facing layer 
and such adhesive layer to a said bat. 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



245 



3,668,042 where a vacuum transfer arm moves an individual die fix>m 

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING MAGNETIC TRANSDUCER tfie tape to a pre-positioned and pre-heated package unit on 

WITH NARROW SENSING TIP 
WflUam A. Farrand, Fulkrton, Calif., assignor to North 
American Rockwcti Corporation 

Original appttcadon Mar. 15, 1967, Scr. No. 623^85. now 
abandoned. Divfcled and this appttcatkm July 14, 1969, Scr. 

No. 851,534 

Int. a. C09j 5100 

UA CL 156—309 1 Claim 




A process for producing magnetic transducer comprising a 
relatively thin portion forming a sensing tip connected to a 
relatively thicker core portion including conductors wound 
around the core portion. The thin portion is separated in the 
region of its tip by a narrow gap filled with a material for 
forming a magnetic flux insulator. 




the carrier. The transfer arm includes a vibratory tip to 
produce a scrubbing motion between the die and the lead to 
enhance the bonding action between the parts. 



3,668,045 
APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING ROD-LIKE ARTICLES 
Desmond Walter Molins, London, England, assignor to Molins 
Machine Company Limited, London, England 

Filed Apr. 17, 1970, Ser. No. 29,478 
Chdms priority, appttcatkm Great Britain, Apr. 18, 1969, 

20,001/69 

Int. CL B65h 81100 

U.S. a. 156—441 1 Oafan 



\ 



3,668,043 

METHOD OF BONDING POLYPROPYLENE TO RUBBER 

-^ AND THE METHOD OF MAKING INSULATED 

ELECTRICAL CONDUCTORS THEREFROM 

Gordon J. Mutae, Wcatboro, Mass., assignor to United Sted 

Corporation 

Ori^nal appBcaHon Sept. 20, 1969, Scr. No. 801,188, now 
Patent No. 3^92,728. DIvMed and this appHcatton Nov. 17, 
1970, Ser. No. 90,473 
Int CL C09j 5100; B32b 25108 
U.S. CL 1 56—32 1 2 Claims 

The method of the invention comprises the steps of provid- 
ing an electrically conductive metal core, covering the core 
with a polyolefin insulating layer, heating the insulating layer 
to a temperature of 400" to 500" P., then applying a suitable 
adhesive composition to the insulating layer while it is in the 
temperature range of 400' to 500° F., then applying a second 
application of the adhesive composition to the polyolefin-ad- 
hesive covered conductor, and then applying an elastomer 
sheath to the polyolefin-adhesive covered conductor after the 
second application of adhesive composition has been applied 
thereto. 




In the production of a continuous wrapped rod, e.g. of 
filter material for subdivision into filter rods, the continuous 
wrapper web is provided along each of its marginal portions, 
but on opposite sides, with a line of heat-sensitive polyvinyl 
acetate which is dried before the marginal portions are foled 
on each other, and is then reactivated by heat. 



3,668,044 

APPARATUS FC« BONMNG SEMI-CONDUCTTVE 

DEVICES 

Mordechai WIcsler, Lexington, and John S. Madntyre, Lynn- 

fldd, both of Mnik, atsignon to Tdedyne, Inc., Hawthorne, 

CaUf. 

Filed Apr. 9, 1970, Scr. No. 26^38 

Int.CLB32bi7/20 

UA CL 156—366 U Ctahni 

Semi-conductive devices are assembled and bonded to 
package bases on an automatic basis. The devices are trans- 
ferred one at a time from a tape indexing unit onto an index- 
ing carrier which convey package assemblies through a heat- 
ing zone prior to receipt of the dice. The tape indexer in- 
cludes a drive mechanism adapted to feed a tape carrying a 
plurality of longitudinally spaced dice past a pick-off point 



3,668,046 
APPARATUS FOR PERFORMING WELDING OR HOT 
GLUING OPERATIONS ON CONTINUOUSLY MOVED 

WEBS 
Frank Bomc, Ibbenburcn>Dorenthe, Germany, awlgnnr to 
WindmoUer & Hobchcr, Lcngerkh of Watphatta, Gcr- 
many 

Filed Apr. 22, 1970, Scr. No. 30^67 
Claims priority, appttcatlon Germany, May 14, 1969, P 19 24 

730^ 
Int. CL B32b 31120, 3 1 108 
U.S. CL 156—553 7 Oafana 

In flat bag-making machines, a web which is themnoptastk 
or coated with a thermoplastic layer is withdrawn from a 
supply roll and continuously advanced, formed into a tubing 
in a tube-making device, whereafter the tubing is {xxxxssed 
to form flat bags in that welded or hot glued seams are 
formed and the tubing is transversely cut. The apparatus 
comprises a carrier, which supports the web and on which 
the heated welding or hot gluing jaws are mounted to be 
reciprocable to and from the carrier, whereas the carrier it- 



246 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



self is reciprocable relative to the web in the direction of 
travel thereof in such a manner that the movement of the 
carrier relative to the web is zero for a time which is suffi- 
cient for the welding or gluing operation. The carrier consists 
of a rocker, which is pivoted on an axis that is transverse to 
the direction of travel of the web and extends through the 



are fed into the gap at the correct moment, and to the cor- 
rect depth, and so that the proper tension in tape and spent 
films is maintained at all times. 




3 668,048 

PLASTIC EGG PACKAGE SPOT WELDING APPARATUS 

Hikoji Noguchi, and Yodiinobu Miyaato, both of Tokyo, 

Japan, Msignon to said NoguchI, by said Mlyazatoi 

Filed Nov. 14, 1969, Ser. No. 876,906 I 

Claims priority, application Japan. Feb. 14, l%9, 44/10912, 

44/10913; Dec. 23. 1968,43/112452,43/112453,43/112454; 

Dec. 28, 1968,44/501,44/502,44/503; Jan. 7, 1969.44/2071; 

Feb. 5, 1%9, 44/10035; Feb. 8, 1%9, 44/1 1044; Feb. 13, 1%9. 

44/12583; Feb. 14, 1%9, 44/ 12584, 44/ 12585; Mar. 19, 1%9 

44/24608 
I Int. a. B30b 15134; B29c 27/04 

VS. a. 156—583 



transverse center plane of the rocker, the latter is pivotally 
movable within a loop which is formed in the web by means 
of two stationary guide rollers, and the rocker is provided 
with drive means which impart to the rocker a rocking nw- 
tion at a peripheral velocity which is temporarily equal to the 
velocity of travel of the web. 



3,668,047 

BONDING MACHINE 

Kenneth G. Heller, 335 Palomar Drive, Redwood CHy, CaMf. 

Filed Nov. 20, 1969, Ser. No. 878,514 

int. a. B32b J//06. B65c 9//« 

U.S. CI. 156-541 II Claims 




13 Claims 







Apparatus for continuoi^y sealing the flange of the cover 
to the flange of the body of a plastic egg package with a plu- 
rality of spot welds using intermittently moving receiving 
boxes adapted to hold the body of the egg package with the 
flange of the body resting thereon vrith the cover thereof 
protruding outside thereof and means for closing the cover 
tightly against the body for spot welding the flanges^ 

' 3,668,049 I 

LAMINATED PACKING MATERIAL WITH SPACED 
PARALLEL REINFORCING MEMBERS 
Ade WllUam SOfvcrttn, Sandvikcn, Sweden, airifnor to Sand- 

vikcrn Jcrnvcrks AkHcbolag, Sandvlkcns, Sweden 
Continuation of appilcadon Ser. No. 783,478, Dec. 13, 1968, 
now abandoned. This application June 17, 1971, Ser. No. 

154,198 
Claims priority, application Sweden, Dec. 19. l%7l 17384/67 



lnt.a.B32bi//0 



VS. a. 161—38 



A bonding machine for adhesively joining sheets of paper 
or the like, having as its principal elements a housing, and 
within it an anvil, an actuating mechanism, and a tape 
system. When the machine is idle there exists a gap between 
the anvil and the surface of the actuating mechanism facing 
it. Sheets to be bonded are placed into this gap. When the ac- 
tuating mechanism is depressed it moves down toward the 
anvil, thus compressing the sheets. Upon releasing the actuat- 
ing mechanism it moves away from the anvil and picks up the 
topmost sheet by vacuum action. At the sanw time the tape 
system transports a two-sided adhesive sticker between the 
separated shieets. When the actuating mechanism is again 
depressed, the sheets are recompressed but this time over the 
sticker, thus making a bond. The bonded sheets may be 
withdrawn as soon as the actuating mechanism is released 
again. The cycle may be repeated several times if more than 
two sheets are to be bonded together. The tape system, 
preferably in cartridge form, consists of two-sided adhesive 
stickers stored on a supply spool between cover films. A 
takeup spool reels in spent cover films. Gears, drive 
sprockets, and clutches transmit and synchronize motions of 
actuating mechanism, tape, and spook, so that the stickers 




6Clalna 



A Uminated packing material consisting essentially of two 
outer, layer-like members and an intermediate array of 
spaced, parallel, stiffening rib members secured to said outer 
members. At least one of said outer members may comprise 
two layers of paper with an intermediate layer of fabric. The 
rib members may be in the form of relatively short, flat, strips 
of wood fiber board whose abutting ends are staggered from 
rib to rib. ^^^^^^^^^_^___^ 

3,668,050 
SURGICAL DRAPE 
Harold F. DonncBy, Applcton, Wb., assignor ui Kimberly- 
Clark Corporation, Nccnah, Wis. 

Filed Mar. 9, 1970, Ser. No. 17^1 

Int. CL A6H 13fOO; B32b 3/26, 27/40 

U.S.CL 161-39 15 Claims 

Disposable surgical drape comprising a fibrous base sheet 

having a primary operative area; a sheet of fluid impervious 

plastic film, such as polypropylene film, laminated to the 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



247 



base sheet in the primary operative area; and a sheet of fluid 
absorbent plastic foam material, such as a thin sheet of 



3,668,053 

ARTICLE FOR PREVENTING EDGE DEFECT IN 

COMPRESSION STRETCHED ACRYUC SHEET 

RonaM L. Ayres, Saugus, CaUf ., assignor to Fortin Plastics, 

Inc., Saugus, CaHf. 

Original application Sept. 9, 1968, Ser. No. 758,395, now 

Patent No. 3,562^83, dated Feb. 9, 1971. Divided and this 

appUcatkm May 25, 1970, Ser. No. 48,691 

Int. a. B32b 3/02, 3/30 

polyurethane foam, laminated to the outer surface of the u^. ci. 161—118 4 Claims 

film. 



3,668,051 

COMPOUND-CURVED STRUCTURE 

William H. Sccmann, III, 1320 6th St., New Oricans, La. 

Filed May 29, 1969, Ser. No. 829,067 

Int. CI. D03d/ 7/00 

U.S. CI. 161-77 lOOaims 





An article for preventing edge defects in compression- 
stretched acrylic sheets comprising providing the circunv 
ferential end surfaces of an acrylic blank to be stretched with 
a groove substantially continuous therewith, the depth of the 
groove being greater than S percent and, preferably, being 
greater than about 10 percent of the initial thickness of the 
acrylic blank. The groove may have various configurations, 
e.g., V- and U-shaped configurations. Preferably, the center 
line of the groove lies in the plane bisecting the blank in the 
thickness direction. 



A method of constructing boat hulls by fiberglass or fer- 

rocement techniques utilizing a surface defining base maten- , .uta nc^ 

9i of A nliable sheetins material of, for example, a loosely 3,668,1154 

t: n fab^or ellirmesh reinforced with springy rods of, "«" BULK CORRl^ATED N^^^ F^RIC 

for example, fiberglass or steel; the base material is attached Robert J^Shunpf, Appkton^ Wis., asrignor to Kimberiy-Clarii 

to a skeleton framework and readily and easily assumes and Corporati«i^e«iah, Wte. 

forms the compound-curved surface of the hull, and a resm Filed ^^'i,!. 1970^- N<k 24,197 

or concrete is subsequently added and allowed to harden. Int CL D04h 1/00, 3/00 

U.S. CL 161 — 1211 s uauns 



3,668,052 
CORRUGATED ARCUATE MEMBER 
Richard D. Pratt, Cincinnati, Ohio, aarignor to General Elec- 
tric Company 

Filed Mm-. 20, 1970, Ser. No. 21,405 

bA.CLB33bl/00,3J28 

UAO. 161— 117 2 Claims 




A corrugated arcuate member having a plurality of 
generally circumferentially disposed substantially rigid corru- 
gations is provided with improved formability as a resuh of a 
plurality of generally transverse slots disposed along a radi- 
ally outer portion of the corrugations. Arc-holding means is 
secured with the member to hold the member in arcuate 
shape. 




A tough, high bulk, flexible fabric is provided which has a 
grainy wrinkled texture with a multiplicity of transversely 
discontinuous furrows and ridges. The fabric is somewhat 
elastic, especially in the machine direction, and comprises a 
corrugated web of initially alined textile fibers implanted in a 
continuous thin film of thermoplastic adhesive, the fiber-ad- 
hesive web thereafter being corrugated into a multitude of 
furrows and grooves vrith irregularly root- and side-con- 
nected convolutions. The fabric is produced by implanting 
the fibers into the thermoplastic adhesive film, adhering the 
resulting web onto an abherent heated surface, and advanc- 
ing the surface against a gathering blade to corrugate the web 
and form irregularly root- and side-connected sinusoidal con- 
volutions. 



248 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



6, 1972 



3,668,055 

SUPERIMPOSED EMBOSSED PACKING SHEETS 

Gcorfc G«nrd, PoM PIcMant, N J^ anlgiior to Jiffy Manu- 

tectarinc Co., HUMde, N J. 
ContiBiuitioii of applkatkm Scr. No. 676,573, Oct. 19, 1967, 
■ow abuMloacd. Thk appHcatioB Sept 1, 1970, Scr. No. 

68,745 

lot. CL B32b 3100, 7100 

MS. CL 161—136 2 Claims 



material, the solidified material in the form of a shoe upper 
or glove is removed from engagement with the molding sur- 
face and the liquid is removed without expanding the 
solidified material leaving pores and discontinuities in the 



solidified material to 
vapor. 





4t- 



A one-piece microporous clothing article such as a shoe 
upper or glove is formed by molding a solidifiable liquid 
emulsion of fine droplets of an organic liquid in a continuous 
phase comprising reactive material convertible through reac- 
tion to solidified resilient condition. The emulsion is caused 
to gel and solidify with said droplets held in the solidified 



constitute passageways 



for 



air and 



3,668,057 
LAMINAR STRUCTURES OF METAL AND 
CRYSTALLINE COPOLYKETONES AND METHOD OF 
y FORMING SAME 

FnuKO Agolini, and Rudolph John Angdo, both of Wilming- 
ton, Dd., Msignors to E. L du Font de Nemours and Com- 
pany, WBmington, DcL 

1 fUed June 10, 1970, Scr. No. 45,235 
I Int. CL B32b 15108 

MS. CL 161—165 16 Claims 

A laminar structure is provided which is characterized by 
at least one layer of a metal bonded to at least one layer of a 
crystalline copolyketone having the following recurring struc- 
tural unit: ^ 



The disclosure of the present application relates to em- 
bossment between engraved rollers of a series or plurality of 
sheets of relatively heavypaper or similar matted fibrous 
materials to obtain varying patterns of rows of mound-like 
embossments which are arranged in successive areas, usually 
successive squares, longitudinally and then diagonally in 
respect to the main axis of the paper sheets. Alter emboss- 
ment the sheets are passed through shorter or longer paths of 
travel before again being assembled so that their matching 
mounds and recesses will be offset in such a manner that they 
will no longer match. 

The disclosure further relates to the composite packing 
material and to a method and apparatus for making the same. 



3,668,096 

INTEGRAL MICROPOROUS ARTICLE AND PROCESS 

OF MAKING 

Stanley L Hayes, Jr., HMoilon, Mas., Mriginr to USM Cor- 

poratioa, Fkmington, N J. 

Filed Dec 12, 1969, Scr. No. 884,571 

Int. CL B29d 27104; B32b 3126 

MS.XX 161—159 18 Claim 




wherein the 



moiety is either 



(T moiety) or 



r\ 



\- 






(I moiety), and the T:I ratio varies from 90:10 to 30:50; said 
laminar structure being usefltl for printed circuit applica- 
tions. 



3,668,058 

MATRIX MATERIAL FOR PRODUCTION OF PLASTIC^ 
PRINTING PLATES 
Nicholas J. Pappadakia, LIncrofI, NJ., a«ignor to Tcnneco 
Ciicmicab, Inc 

1 Filed July 31, 1969, Scr. No. 846,341 
I Int. CL B41b 5/02 

U.S. 6. 161—165 

A matrix material comprises a sheet of fibrous cellulosic 
material impregnated with a thermosetting resin, a coating of 
a thermosetting resin on one surface of said sheet, and a pre- 
cast sheet of polypropylene film affixed to the coated side of 
the inv>regnated cellulosic sheet with an adhesive. 



9Clafans 



i unpr 



lERS 



3,668,059 
HIGH MODULUS BORON NITRIDE FIBl 
Economy, Effgcrlsvfllc and Rucy-Yuan Lin, WBliam- 
sviBe, both of N.Y., assignon to The Carborundum Com- 
pany, Niafara Fall, N.Y. I 
FUed Jan. 8, 1971, Scr. No. 105,129 \ 
Int. CL COlb 21106; COlg 57100; B32b 15102 
MS. CL 161—170 6 Claims 
Boiic oxide fibers having a maximum diameter of about 10 
microns are heated in an ammonia atmosphere ifnder such 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



249 



conditions as to produce partially nitrided fibers consisting 
essentially of B. N, O and H wherein the N is present to the 
extent of from about 35 percent to about 55 percent. The 
partially nitrided fibers are then heated in an inert at- 
mosphere at a temperature of at least about 1800°C while 
simultaneously subjecting the fibers to sufficient longitudinal 
tension as to at least prevent longitudinal shrinkage of the 
fibers and preferably to cause elongation of the fibers during 
heating. The resulting fibers, consisting essentially of boron 
nitride, are of high purity and are characterized by a relative- 
ly high Young's modulus of elasticity, which renders them 
especially suitable for reinforcing plastic, ceramic or metal 
matrices in the preparation of fiber reinforced composites. 



axially oriented, due to the heat shrinking phenomenon. Such 
a tear string has various advantages in shrink film wrapped 
packages. 



3 668 060 
HLAMENTS AND HLMS OF POLYMERS OF ALKYLENE 

SULFIDES 
Wahcr J. PolcsUk, Summh, N J., assignor to Cdanese Cor- 
poration, New Yorli, N.Y. 

Original application Aug. 29, 1966, Scr. No. 575,722, now 

Patent No. 3^39,676. Divided and this application Apr. 10, 

1970, Scr. No. 31,447 

Int. CL DOld 5122; B29d 27100 

UACL 161-173 8 Claims 



WDlum* Ctonqi on e.jrtnn%K>n m Roly«tAyl«n« 

^ 5JM. F .b», — '— ' 



3,668,062 
THREE-DIMENSIONAL CRYSTAL WHISKERS AND 
METHOD FOR PREPARATION THEREOF 
James J. Shyne, CaMwd, and John V. KOkwAi, 
Brook, both of N J., assignors to General T echnotogicB Cor- 
poration, Rcston, Va. 

Continuation-in-part of application Scr. No. 479,1 1 1, Aug. 

12, 1965, now abandoned. This application Sept. 8, 1969, 

Scr. No. 856,066 

Int CL C23c 13100; COM 7102 

MS. a. 161—177 7 Clafans 



c 




pwcMMT mmmmt» w>odwct» 



ftju.L'Nceou 

THHCC - IMMCMnMAL 
IHfrlVICHML 




The invention disclosed is for three-dimensional crystal 
whiskers, a method for preparation thereof, and products 
containing such crystal whiskers. In one embodiment, the 
three-dimensional whiskers include a principal, rigid, elon- 
gated single crystal whisker fiber having a plurality of secon- 
dary, relatively shorter length, single crystal whiskers ap- 
pended along the length of each of the principal whiskers and 
disposed in a direction generally transverse the axis <A each 
of the principal whiskers. In a second embodin»ent, the 
crystal whiskers may be characterized as a cluster ball of nee- 
dle-like whiskers. 



Hard stretch filaments and films produced by extruding a 
heat softened or molten polymer of alkylene sulfide, such as 
polyethylene sulfide, having an inherent viscosity of about 
0.5 or greater, through a shaping orifice to form the filament 
or film and taking up the product at a linear rate of from 20 
to 3,000 meters per minute at a drawdown ratio of from 
100:1 to 4000:1. A filament which spontaneously develops 
helical crimps along its length produced when a drawdown 
ratio greater than 1200:1 is used. Open-celled filaments or 
films produced firom the hard stretch filaments and films by 
stretching the filaments or films in a range of from about 50 
percent of the unstretched length up to about 90 percent of 
the breaking elongation and stabilized by heating the fila- 
ment or film while in the stretched state to a temperature in 
the range from about 80°C. to a temperature below the melt- 
ing point of the polymer. 



3,668,063 

REMOVAL OF ENTRAINED AIR FROM CELLULOSE 

PULP BEFORE BLEACHING OF THE PULP 

Hans-Erik Engstrom, SundsvaD, Sweden, assignor to Sands 

Akticbolag, SundsvaD, Sweden 
Continuation of application Scr. No. 771,593, Oct. 29, 1968, 
now abandoned. This appttctfkm Apr. 1, 1971, Scr. No. 

130,504 

Claims priority, appbcation Sweden, Nov. 10, 1967, 15463/67 

Int. CL D21c 3126 

MS. CL 162-19 5 Claims 

Preliminary to being delivered by a "thick stock pump" 

means to a generally vertical bleaching vessel there is added 

to a cellulose pulp a fluid, such as steam, oxygen or a gaseous 

bleaching agent to flow countercurrent to the pulp in such 

manner that any air in the pulp is displaced and is replaced 

by bleaching agent before bleaching of the pulp in the 

bleaching vessel. 



3,668,061 
TEAR STRING FOR SHRINK FILM PACKAGES 
Harold M. Forman, 151 East 10th St., Conshohocken, Pa. 
FDed Nov. 5, 1970, Scr. No. 87,238 
Int CLB65d 77/20 
U.S. a. 161-175 lOCIahns 

A tear string having particular utility in connection with 
packages overwrapped with heat scalable shrink film com- 
prises an elastic core, one or more textile covers wrapped 
around the core and an outer coating of a fiised ther- 
moplastic synthetic resin. The core is in teitsion aiKi, addi- 
tionally, the outer coating may be axially oriented. Thus, 
when the string is heated to the thermoplastic temperature of 
the resin coating, the stored tensile forces in the core are 
released and tend to make the string contract toward its 
original dimensions. This effect is enhanced if the coating is 



3,668,064 

COMPOSITION BOARD AND METHOD OF MAKING IT 

Leonard J. Kuecra, Box 82 Rogers Route, IntematioMd FOb, 

Minn. 

FUed Jan. 28, 1970, Scr. No. 6,590 

Int. CL D21h 3100, 3/06 

MS. CL 162—171 8 dafans 

This invention relates to a structural composition board 
and method of making it. The board is made from finely di- 
vided ligno-cellulose material and pulverized additives such 
as asphahites and pulverized pine wood pitch. The pulverized 
material or materials are intimately mixed with the finely di- 
vided ligno-cellulose material in a liquid suspension. A 
board-like product is formed from the liquid suspension of 
ligno-cellulose and pulverized material; the board-like 
product is dried; dried board is subjected to pressure to con- 
solidate and bond the board-like product while internal heat 
is above the softening point of the pulverized material in the 



250 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 



board-like product. At least about 5 percent of the 
asphaltites is employed in the board-like product. 



6, 1972 



plasma column and interacting the plasma in a predeter- 
mined direction with externally supplied radio-frequency 



396689O6S 

APPARATUS FOR THE CONVERSION OF HIGH 

TEMPERATURE PLASMA ENERGY INTO ELECTRICAL 

ENERGY 
Ralph W. Moir, Livcrmorc, CaUf., assignor to The United 
States of America as represented by tiw United States 
Atomic Energy Commission 

nied Sept. 15, 1970, Ser. No. 72,294 

Int. CI. G21b 1100 

U.S. CI. 176—3 10 Claims 




High temperature plasma is produced in a controlled ther- 
monuclear reactor and a plasma beam is directed therefrom 
through an expander having a decreasing intensity magnetic 
field to provide an ion beam in which the ions have substan- 
tially only translational kinetic energy. The ions of the beam 
are then directed, by application of an E x B field, into an 
offiset collector system having collectors arranged in a zig-zag 
pattern while the electrons are separated from the ions. The 
collectors situated in an E x B field have progressively lower 
retarding potentials applied thereto so that ions having a 
kinetic energy exceeding that of a particular stage are col- 
lected in successively lower energy groups to produce an 
electrical current therein. An advantage is obtained in that 
ions in a beam having a wide energy spread are collected at 
an electrode where there is a low energy differential between 
the effective retarding potential of the particular collector 
electrode and the group of energetic ions collected thereat 
making for efficient conversion of the kinetic energy of the 
particles into electrical energy. 



3,668,066 
DYNAMIC STABILIZER FOR PLASMA INSTABILITIES 
TO IMPROVE PLASMA CONFINEMENT AND TO 
INCREASE PLASMA DENSITY 
Hans W. HemM, W. Princeton; Chu, Tsu-Kai, and Thomas 
C. Simonen, both of Princeton, all of N J., assignors to The 
United States of America as represented by tlie United 
States Atomic Energy Commission 

Filed Feb. 18, 1970, Set. No. 12,310 
Int. a. G21b 1100 
IIS. CI. 176— 5 4 Claims 

Method and apparatus for dynamic stabilization of plasma 
instabilities for improving plasma confinement and for in- 
creasing plasma density independent of the phase of the in- 
stabilities. The method comprises confining the plasma 
column between ionizing plates which supply energetic parti- 
cles to the plasma in a direction parallel to the axis of the 




fields having a selectively variable power level ampli 
a sufficiently high frequency range. 



ude and 



3,668,067 

POLYGONAL ASTRON REACTOR FOR PRODUCING 
CONTROLLED FUSION REACTIONS 
Nicholas C. ChristoOlos, Hayward, Calif., assignor to The 
United States of America as r e pres en ted by the United 
States Atomic Energy Commission 

I FUed Oct. 16, 1969, Ser. No. 867,035 
1 Int. a. G21b 1102 \ 

U.S, CI. 176—5 10 Claims 




An Astron reactor including a plurality of linear magnetic 
field regions joined by intervening curved magnetic fields and 
arranged in a polygonal configuration. Energetic charged 
particles are introduced and trapped in the linear sections to 
form cylindrical sheaths, i.e., E-layers, of charged particles 
rotating about the axis of each section with the magnetic 
field thereof interacting with the linear magnetic regions to 
produce a closed system of magnetic field lines defining a 
containment zone for charged particles. Fuel materials in- 
uoduced into the field are ionized and heated to form a high 
temperature plasma trapped in said zone. The ratio of the 
lengths of the linear and curved field regions is regulated to 
offset Bohm diffusion losses. A high molecular weight initia- 
tor plasma may also be introduced to heat the fuel tp fusion 
temperatures. 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



261 



3,668,068 
PLASMA CONHNEMENT APPARATUS 
Christopher John Hamitton Watson, Merlon College, Oxford, 
England, assignor ro United Kingdon Atomic Energy 
Authority, London, England 

nied Jan. 21,1 969, Ser. No. 792,573 
Claims priority, application Great Britain, May 22, 1968, 

24,456/68 

Int. CI. G2 lb 7/00 

U.S. CI. 176-7 1 Claim 



^r? ,19 /fi 



vided to pass through the upper end and extend into the 
water in the condensation chamber. The reactor pressure 
vessel of the nuclear reactor is located within the cylindrical 
wall and surrounded by a cylindrical biological shield. The 
diameter of the shield is less than the diameter of the cylin- 
drical wall so as to form an annular passageway between the 
shield and the cylindrical wall from the calotte-shaped region 
of the safety container above, to the calotte-shaped region of 
the safety container below, the condensation chamber. 




3,668,070 

NUCLEAR REACTOR WITH HEAT PIPES FOR HEAT 

EXTRACTION 

Peter Fiebelmann, Besozzo, and Helmut Neu, Travedona, both 

of Italy, assignors to European Atomic Energy Community 

(Euratom), Brussels, Belgium 

Filed May 12, 1969, Ser. No. 823,681 
Claims priority, application Germany, May 21, 1968, P 17 64 

347.9 

Int. a. G21k 14/00 

U.S. a. 176—40 3 Claims 



Loss of plasma from the loss regions of a static magnetic 
field confinement system is reduced by localizing in the loss 
region a radio frequency electromagnetic radiation which is 
nearly but not exactly in resonance with the ion cyclotron 
frequency and is arranged to reflect back into the confined 
plasma ions moving out of the static magnetic field through 
the loss regions. 



3,668,069 
PRESSURE SUPPRESSION CONTAINMENT FOR A 
LIQUID-COOLED NUCLEAR REACTOR 
Walter Ullrich, Neu-Isenburg; Kari-Heinz Lohsc, Frank- 
furt am Main; Jochen Leuteritz, Bruchkobei; Gunter 
Zeitzschel, Frankfurt am Main, and Robert FassI, Munich, all 
of Germany, awignors to Ucentia Palcnt-Verwaltunga- 
G.m.b.H., Frankfurt am Main, Germany 

Filed Oct. 9, 1968, Ser. No. 766,049 

Int. a. G21c 9/00 

VS. a. 176—38 16 ClainiK 





Containment apparatus and a pressure suppression system 
for a liquid-cooled nuclear reactor. The apparatus includes a 
safety container formed by a spherical pressure shell and a 
condensation chamber filled with water arranged within the 
safety container. The condensation chamber, which is annu- 
lar in shape, is bounded on the outside by the safety con- 
tainer, on the inside by a cylindrical wall within the con- 
tainer, and at the top and bottom by annular ends respective- 
ly connecting the top and the bottom of the cylinder with the 
safety container. A plurality of condensation tubes are pro- 



A nuclear reactor with a heat extraction system comprising 
two groups of heat pipes which extend through the reactor 
core and which deliver heat to heat sinks disposed outside 
the core. All pipes of one group being parallel, the two 
groups are arranged in a mutual right angle relation and they 
intersect each other. 



3,668,071 

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING INOSINE 

Takashi Nara, Tokyo; Masanani Misawa, Kawanki-ahl, aad 

Toshio Komuro, Mach i da-s hi , all of Japan, aiBlgnon to 

Kyowa Halilto Kogyo Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Continuation of application Ser. No. 565,105, July 14, 1966, 

now abandoned. This application July 12, 1968, Ser. No. 

744,295 

Claims priority, application Japan, July 20, 1 %5, 40/43402 

Int. CL C12d 13/06 

VS. CL 195—28 N 12 Clalnis 

An improvement in a fermentation process for producing 

inosine. A microorganism belonging to Brevibacterium or 

Corynebacterium is cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium 

containing hypoxanthine or natural substances containing the 

same. 



252 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,668,072 
FERMENTATION PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF 

IX)RNITHINE 
Kulo Aiido, Kawasaki-shi, and Hideo OWd, Tokyo, both of 
Japaa, anicBon to Chugal Sdyaku Kabuahiki Kaisha, 
Tokyo, Japaa 
Continaatioii-iB-parl of appttcadon Ser. No. 724,299, Feb. 5, 
1968, now abandoocd , which is a continuadoa of application 
Scr. No. 469,307, July 2, 1965, now abandoned. This 
appUcatkm Jan. 2, 1969, Scr. No. 788,659 
Int. CI. C12d 13106 
VS. CI. 195—29 4 Claims 

L-ornithine can be produced by cultivating an auxotrophic 
mutant of Escherichia coli which requires arginine or citrul- 
line, but not ornithine for the growth in a cultivation medium 
containing assimilable carbon, nitrogen sources, inorganic 
ions and arginine or citrulline, phosphate ion of said medium 
being limited to about O.S - 3.5/1 mok/ml, under aerobic 
condition. 



3,668,073 
PREPARATION OF L-LEUCINE BY FERMENTATION 
Sumio Kurihara; Kazumi Araki; Hlroyuki Ucda, and 
Masahiko Ikumo, all of Hofu-shl, Japan, assignors to 
Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha 

Filed Jan. 9, 1969, Scr. No. 790,177 
Claims priority, application Japan, Jan. 1 1, 1968, 43/1089 
Int. CL C12b 1100 
U.S. CI. 195—29 7 Clalnw 

L-leucine is prepared by culturing a L-leucine-producing 
microorganism of the genus Corynebacterium in a culture 
medium containing a carbon source, a nitrogen source, inor- 
ganic material, nutrients and an isoleucine, methionine, 
phenylalanine or valine promoter. Mixtures of the promoters 
may also be employed. Corynebacterium glutamkum ATCC 
21,301 and 21,335 are particularly suitable microorganisms 
for use in the process. L-leucine is an essential amino acid 
and is useful as a nutrient additive in food and feedstuffis for 
human and animals, respectively. 



3,668,074 
PROCESS FOR lSOLATI(M«J BY CRYSTALLIZATION OF 
THE MO-FE PROTEIN OF THE ENZYME NTTROGENASE 
Rkhard Charles Bums, WUmingtoa, DeL, atrignor to E. L du 
Pont dc Nemours and Company, ^^Ifaningtoii, DeL 
filed Dec 17, 1969. Scr. No. 885,909 
Int. CL C07g 7102 
U.S. a. 195—62 6 dainiB 

Disclosed is a process for obtaining crystals of the Mo-Fe 
protein fraction of the enzyme nit^ogenase. This fraction is 
essential in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen by certain 
microorganisms. 



the growth of mycoplasmas in culture media especially media 
used for tissue cultures in which mycoplasmas fi^equently 
occur as undesirable contaminants. 



I. 



3,668,076 

DL^GNOSnC AGENT 

Han»<;corg Rcy; Hans WlcHnicr, and PHcr Ricckaiann, all 

of Mannhdm-Waldhof, Germany, assignors to Bochringcr 

Mannhdm GmbH, Mannheim, Germany 

FOed June 17, 1969, Scr. No. 834,178 
Claims priority, appUcatkm Germany, July 15. 1968, P 17 73 
1 839.5 

I InL a. GOln 31114 

VJ&. a. 1 95— 103.5 R |9 Claims 

Diagnostic agent suitable for use in carrying but rapid 
analytical determinations of the presence and/or concentra- 
tion of hydroperoxides, substances which react with the 
liberation of hydrogen peroxide, peroxidase orp«roxidate ac- 
tive substances, comprising a chromogen which is oxidized 
by hydroperoxide in the presence of peroxidase or peroxidate 
active substances to form a dyestuff, the color intensity of 
which i^ dependent on the quantity of peroxide, peroxidase 
or peroxidate active substance present in the test sample, 
wherein the chromogen is a compound having the formula: 



=N-N=C— R 



wherein Y is hydroxyl, mercapto, or amino, Z is hydroxyl, 
wherein Y AND Z together can represent oxygen, and R is 
hydrogen, mercapto, amino, lower alkyl, pyridino, 
morpholino, piperazinyl, arylpiperazinyl, phenyl, or phenyl 
substituted by one or more of hydroxyl, nitro, alkyl or alkox- 




yi 



3,668,077 

PROCESS FOR CONVERSION OF MUNICIPAL WASTE 
Thomas E. Ban, South Eadd, Olifa>, assignor to McDowcH- 
WeUman Engbieerlng Company, Cleveland, Ohio 
Filed June 19, 1970, Scr. No. 47,713 
I Int. CL COlb 49106 

U.S.a;201— 29 ^ 



Claims 



[^rr'*^^"*i**r «^^S4&^ 



3,668,075 

GROWTH INHmrnONS OF SELECnVE 

MYCOPLASMAS 

Thomas Cckoric, Jr.; George Evans, both of Hopatcong, and 

RonaM Searcy, Upper Montdnir, aD of NJ., assignors to 

Hoffman-LaRoche, Inc., Nutley, N J. 

Contimiarion-in-part of appUcadon Scr. No. 676,976, Oct 20, 

1967, now abandoned. This appUcatkm Oct. 4, 1968, Ser. No. 

765,028 
Int. CL C12k 1106 
MS. CL 195—103.5 10 Claims 

The use of certain heparinoid compounds to selectively in- 
hibit the growth of mycoplasmas is described. 

The invention provides a practical means for facilitating 
the selective identification of mycoplasmas. The identifica- 
tion of mycoplasmas isolated from man is especially useful as 
a diagnostic aid in prescribing treatment for diseases caused 
by these microorganisms. 
Additionally, the invention provides a means of preventing 




cum a. «i.>t$. 

IllTAL TO 



MAWAM or COMIIMIKD nxCO 

■uawiru uvutl 



There is provided a process for treating municipal solid 
waste or the like characterized by disposing such material as 
a burden on a traveling grate, passing hot gases through the 
burden to carbonize carbonizable fractions thereof, and 
separating gas-entrained materials, e.g. water and organic 
materials, from the gases issuing from the burden. The un- 
volatilized solid material is composed largely of glass and 
metallics which may be further processed as desired. The 
process is characterized in that it is adaptable to a}ntinuous 
treatment of solid waste material, e.g. rubbish. 



June 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



253 



3,668,078 

FRACTIONAL DISTILLATION BYPASS CONTROL 

PROCESS 

Eric O. Holland, Borgcr, Tex., assignor to Phillips Petroleum 

Company 

Filed Apr. 25, 1969, Ser. No. 819,145 

Int.CLB01di/<«2 

U.S. CL 203-3 5 ClainK 



3,668,080 
METHOD OF PRODUCING SEPARATING NOZZLES 
Klaus Weber, Pforzhdm; Erwin Becker, Karisruhe, and 
Werner Groastuck, Pforzheim, all of Germany, assign or s to 
Klaus D. Weber, Pforzheim, Germany 

Filed Feb. 18, 1970, Ser. No. 12.265 
Clainv priority, appUcatkn Germany, Feb. 21, 1969, P 19 08 

693.2 

Int. a. C23b 7102; B21d 53100; BOld 57/00 

U.S. a. 204—9 30 Clabns 




\.^ .S^ 



The composition of the overhead or bottoms product of a 
distillation is analyzed and a portion of the feed is passed 
directly to a recovery step when an analyzer output indicates 
a predetermined composition of the overhead or bottoms 
product. 



3,668,079 
ELECTROLYTIC RECORDING MEDIUM 
Arthur S. Diamond, Pakis Verdcs Peninsula, and DavM E. 
Carr, Playa Dd Rcy, both of Calif., aasigiiors to Telauto- 
graph Corporation, Los Angeles, CaUf . 

Filed May 13, 1971, Scr. No. 142,902 

Int. a. B21h 1120 

U.S. CL 204—2 12 Clain» 




An improved electrolytic recording medium for use with 
dissolving electrode type of facsimile recording apparatus is 
disclosed comprising a porous sheet impregnated with an 
aqueous medium including a marking compound, an elec- 
trolyte and an effective amount of a compatible, fluorescent 
brightening agent. 




A method of producing separating nozzles with slot-shaped 
nozzle-channels of a very high degree of accuracy for 
separating gaseous or vaporous substances into particles of 
different molecular weights, this method consisting of first 
producing a thin molding bar which consists of a material 
which may be easily melted or chemically disst^ved and is 
made of a size and shape exactly corresponding to those of 
the inner surfaces of two walls of the nozzle channel which 
consist of strips of a very thin sheet metal wfaKh are applied 
upon and thus mokled to the shape of this bar. Snudl parti- 
tions of sheet metal are also inserted into the molding bar 
which, when the nozzle walls are completed and the material 
of the moldmg bar is completely removed, remain between 
and thereby reinforce the nozzle walls. 



3,668,061 
PRODUCTION OF ELECTROLYTIC METAL 
William Gerard Bomer, Ringwood, NJ.. assignor to The In- 
ternational Nkkd Company, Inc., New York, N.Y. 
FUcd Mar. 17, 1971, Scr. No. 125,423 
Int CL C23b 7102; BOIk 7/00; C23b 7/00 
U.S.CL204— 12 12 Claims 

Metals such as nickel are electroformed upon a matrix or 
mandrel having an epoxy resist pattern thereon to provide 
foraminous or dividable electrodeposited metal separable 
from the matrix wherein the matrix is prepared by depositing 
from 2 to 30 microinches of standard chromium thereon and 
the desired resist pattern is applied to the chromium-plated 
surface in the form of a thermoset epoxy ink or paint con- 
taining dicyandiamide as a heat-curing agent and then heat 
curing the resist pattern to provide a repeatedly reuseable 
matrix. 



3,668,082 
METHOD FOR STRONGLY ADHERING A METAL FILM 

ON EPOXY SUBSTRATES 
Glenn V. Elmore, VcstaL N.Y., assignor to International Busi- 
ness Machines Corporation, Armonl^ N.Y. 

FOed Dec. 7, 1970, Scr. No. 95,939 
Int. CL C23b 5164 
U.S. CL 204—30 7 OairaB 

An epoxy board is prepared for metal plating by dipping 
the same in a molten eutectic comprising 60% KOH and 40% 
NaOH. The epoxy board is then rinsed and neutralized, after 
which it is sensitized and activated conventionally and im- 
mersed in an electroless deposition bath for metal plating 
thereon. The resultant metal film is found to be strongly 
bonded to the epoxy board. 



254 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June 6, 1972 



3,668,083 
PROCESS OF ELECTROPLATING RHENIUM AND BATH 

FOR THIS PROCESS 

Andre Meyer, Geneva, Switicriand, and Donald Gardner 

Fouike, Passaic, NJ., assignors to Sei>Rcx Corporation, 

Nutiey, N J. 

Continuation of application Scr. No. 739,165, June 24, 1926, 

now abandoned. Thb application Oct 27, 1970, Ser. No. 

84,505 
Claims priority, application Switzerland, July 3, 1%7, 9470/67 

Int. CI. C23b 5/32, 5/24 
VS. CL 204—43 10 Claims 

The invention relates to a bath for electrodepositing low- 
stress rhenium and its alloys of the perrhenate type and is 
characterized by the addition of ions which make up one or 
more of the following salts: magnesium sulfate, magnesium 
sulfamate, aluminum sulfate and aluminum sulfamate. The 
invention also relates to the process of electroplating from 
said bath. 



taining a small amount of copper nitrate at a temperature not 
lower than 70° C. and with a current density of aifode not 
higher than 4 A/dm'. 



3,668,084 
PROCESS FOR PLATING URANIUM WITH METAL 
Gcorie S. Petit, and Ralph R. Wright, both of 0$k Ridge, 
Tena., assignors to The United States of America as 
represented by the United States Atomic Energy Commis- 
sion 

Filed June 10, 1970, Ser. No. 45,085 

Int. CL COlg 43/00 

VS. CL 204— 1.5 7 Claims 




^ 3,668,086 

ELECTROCHEMICAL GENERATION OF SOLUBLE 
NICKEUO) CATALYSTS 
William B. Hughes, BartlcsvUle, Okla., assignor to PhiUips 
Petroleum Company 

Filed July 28, 1970, Ser. No. 59,018 
Int. a. BOlk 3/00 
VS. CI. 204—59 R 

A method of generating soluble zero-valent nickel catalyst 
consisting of eiectrochemically reducing suitable nickel(II)- 
ligand complexes wherein said electrochemical reduction can 
be achieved with or without the presence of an electrolyte. 



t Claims 



A process for providing a uranium metal article with a 
tenaciously adhering metal plating deposited from aqueous 
solution. Prior to plating, oxides and other contaminants are 
removed from the surface of the article. The article then is 
heated in vacuum under selected conditions to form thereon 
a very thin and highly protective oxide film which is non- 
wettable by water. The surface of the oxide-coated article is 
made wettable by water by contacting the article with a basic 
wetting solution. The resulting wettable, oxide-coated article 
is then electroplated with metal in an aqueous metal-plating 
bath. 



3,668,085 

METHOD OF ELECTROLYTICALLY COATING LEAD 

DIOXIDE ON THE SURFACE OF VARIOUS MATERIALS 

Shinzo Kiyohara, and Yasuichi Shibazaki, both of Yokohama, 
Japan, assignors to Isomura Sangyo Kaisha, Ltd., Tokyo, 
Japan 

FDcd Aug. 21, 1969, Scr. No. 852,074 
Clafam priority, appUcadon Japan, Aug. 24, 1968, 43/60211 

Int.CLC23b;//00 
U.S. CL 204—57 2 ClainB 

Lead dioxide is coated on the surface of a base electrode 
by electrolyzing an acidic aqueous lead nitrate solution con- 



3,668,087 
BRINE DECHLORINATION 
Leonard A. Fabiano, TrumbuU, Conn., 
poration 

1 Filed Feb. 3, 1971, Scr. No. 1 12,316 
I InL a. COld 1/08; BOlk 1/00 

VS. a. 204—99 



to Qiln Cor^ 



4ClaimB 



~l t " y // martfr 



^ 



.* JB^'-X,'^ lit- 



t 



7Z^ 






-'it 



\ 



tectirf 



V*' 



^a 



HCM' ^ 






E 




In the vacuum dechlorination of acidic alkali metal 
chloride brine effluent from a mercury cathode electrolytic 
cell, cMorine is recovered and an efTluent environmentally 
acceptable is produced using steam jet vacuum with rectifica- 
tion to remove chlorine to acceptable amounts in ^he aque- 
ous effluent. 



4 Claims 



3,668,088 

METHOD OF PRODUCING COLLOIDAL SILICA BY 
ELECTRODL^LYSIS OF A SIUCATE 
Ralph K. Ilcr, Wihnhigton, Dd., asignor to E. I. dti Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Wilmington, Del. 

Filed Dec. 2, 1969, Scr. No. 881^371 
Int CL BOlk l/OO 
U.S.CL204— 101 

Silica sol is made by electrodialysis of a solelectr^Iyte con- 
taining an aqueous silica sol, aqueous sodium or potassium 
silicate, and a supplementary electrolyte such as sodium or 
potassium carbonate or sulfate. Temperature is maintained at 
50° to 100° C. A source of non-siliceous anion is added as 
needed to maintain normality of the supplementary elec- 
trolyte between 0.01 and 0.15, and silicate is added as neces- 
sary to mainUin pH between 8.0 and 9.5. After the electrodi- 



JUNE 6, 1972 



CHEMICAL 



255 



alysis, most of the sodium ions and the anions of the supple- pounds with ultraviolet light in the presence of ketone. The 
mentary electrolyte are removed by treatment with ion preferred compounds bleached are the epoxidized higher 

fatty acid esters. Benzophenone, acetophenone, and acetone 
are examples of some suitable ketones. ' 




ky' 



exchange resins, then the sol is concentrated to 30 or 40 per- 
cent silica. 



3,668,089 
TIN OXIDE ETCHING METHOD 
Eugene W. Chase, West Orange, and Harold J. Robinson, 
South Plainfleld, both of N J., assignors to BcU Telephone 
Laboratories, Incorporated, Murray HiU, N J. 
Filed Nov. 10, 1969, Scr. No. 875,258 
-^ iBt a. B23p l/OO, C23f l/OO 

VS. CI. 204— 143 R 4 Claims 



3,668,092 

BLEACHING OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTERS AND/OR 

EPOXY COMPOUNDS EMPLOYING ULTRAVIOLET 

UGHT 
William H. French, St. PauL and OUvcr A. Ossanna, 
Bloomington, both of Nflnn., assignors to Ashland OB, Inc., 
Houston, Tex. 

Filed Feb. 2, 1971, Ser. No. 112,088 
Int. a. BOIJ I/IO 
VS. a. 204—158 R 16 ClalnK 

A process of bleaching carboxylic acid esters and/or epoxy 
compounds by irradiating the esters and/or epoxy com- 
pounds with ultraviolet light in the presence of a peroxy com- 
pound. The preferred compounds bleached are the epox- 
idized higher fatty acid esters. Hydrogen peroxide and 
peracetic acid are examples of suitable peroxy compounds. 



13a 

V////////////A 



m^m^^^mmm^^ 




13 b 

12 

II 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^-.0 



Tin oxide (SnOi) is etched by forming a layer of a metal 
such as aluminum on the portions of the SnOi surface to be 
etched, and then contacting the metal with an aqueous solu- 
tion of hydrochloric acid. Passage of a current through the 
tin oxide-metal composite as cathode while in contact with 
the solution as electrolyte may be employed to speed up 
removal of SnO|. 



3,668,091 
ULTRAVIOLET UGHT BLEACHING OF CARBOXYUC 

ACID ESTERS AND EPOXY COMPOUNDS 
William H. French, St. PauL and OUvcr A. Ossanna, 
Bloomington, both of Minn., assignors to Ashland OU, Inc., 
Houston, Tex. 

Filed Feb. 2, 1971, Scr. No. 112,067 

Int. a. BOIJ I/IO 

U.S.a.204— 158R 17 Claims 

A process of bleaching carboxylic acid esters and/or epoxy 

compounds by irradiating the esters and/or epoxy com- 



3,668,090 

METHOD FOR THE ELECTROLYTIC REMOVAL OF 

DRAWING OR ROLLING LUBRICANTS ON STEEL 

STRANDS 

Richard L. Sallo, Greensburg, and Charies D. Stridwr, Mon- 

roeville Borough, both of Pa., assignors to United States 

Stcd Corporation 

Filed Apr. 20, 1970, Scr. No. 30,358 
Int. a. C23b 1/04 
VS. CI. 204—145 R 5 Claims 

A one-step method for the removal of drawing or rolling 
lubricants from metal strands is described, in which the 
strands are subjected to an electrolytic treatment at a current 
density of 30-60 amps/in* in an aqueous bath which contains 
about 6 to 16 wt. percent NaOH, .5 to 6% Na4Pi07 and .5 to 
5% Na,COs. 



3,668,093 

PHOTOINmATION OF VINYL POLYMERIZATION BY 

TIUAROYLPHOSPHINES 

Thomas Albert Rcttig, Wifanington, DcL, airignor to E. L du 

Pont dc Nemours and Company, WUmtaigtoii, Dd. 

Filed May 6, 1971, Scr. No. 140,987 

Int. a. C08d l/OO; C08f 1/16 

VS. CI. 204-159.23 13 ClainK 

Acyl phosphines of the formula 

R»— P-R» 

wherein R', R* and R', alike or different, are aryl or aroyl 
groups having up to 13 carbon atoms and such aryl or aroyl 
groups substituted with halogen of atomic number 9-35, 
alkyl of up to six carbon atoms, or alkoxy of up to six carbon 
atoms, with the proviso that at least one of R', R' and R' is 
aroyl, are effective as photoinitiators for photopolymeriza- 
tion of ethylenically unsaturated compounds. Compositions 
containing such an acyl phosphine and an ethylenically un- 
saturated compound are useful in preparing photoimaging 
compositions, adhesives, coating compositions and the like. 



3.668,094 

NOVEL GLASSY COMPOSITIONS ZINC AND ALPHA 

HYDROXY DIPHOSPHONIC ACIDS 

George Birdscyc Hatch, Allison Parli, Pa., assignor to Calgon 

Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Filed Oct. 16, 1970, Scr. No. 81,559 
Int. CL C02b 5/06; C23f U/16, 14/02 
U.S.CL252-180 11 CUrims 

Novel alkali metal zinc and ammonium zinc glasses of 
alpha hydroxy diphosphonic acids are disclosed along with 
the use of these glassy compositions in small concentrations 
to inhibit corrosion and scale formation in aqueous systems. 



3,668,095 

METHOD OF MANUFACTURING A METALUC OXIDE 

nLM ON A SUBSTRATE 

Hisao Katto; Kazunari KobayMhi, both of Hachloji; Yasushi 

Koga, Mitaka, and Machiko Koyama, Tokoroaawa, aU of 

Japan, assignors to Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 

Filed Mar. 26, 1970, Scr. No. 22,908 

Claims priority, application Japan, Mar. 31 , 1%9, 44/23791; 

Feb. 16,1970,45/12660 

Int. CL BOlk l/OO; B32b 15/04; B32f 11/00; B32b 15/04; 

B22h 17/00 

U.S.CL204— 164 15 OainB 

A method for manufacturing a thin, hi^y pure metallic 

oxide film by the use of glow discharge on a substrate includ- 



256 



OFFICIAL GAZETTE 



June e, 1972 



in« the steos of oreparing a mixture gas of oxygen and a faces and wherein the foil is passed over a counter electrode 
mfJSfc trkle^A^nLned pressure in an evacuated and i. subjected to electric high-frequency voltages having a 
chamber into which a substrate is placed, applymg a high al- 




ternating electrical field of a frequency higher than 1 KHz to 
the chamber to produce the glow discharge adjacent to the 
substrate, thereby causing the required chemical reaction for 
the formation of the metallic oxide. 



3,668,096 
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING 
POLYMERIZATION REACTIONS 
WilUam H. Cook, Upper Montdair, N J., Mrignor to Monsan- 
to Company, St. Lmdk, Mo. 

IUmI Nov. 13, 1968, Ser. No. 775,236 

Int CL BOlk 1100 

MS. CL 204—165 « CW"" 





frequency of 20-80 kc transmitted to the foil by means of 
elecuodes directed towards its surface. 

I 3,668,098 

' COATING COMPOSITIONS 

WotfaaM Dalmcr, and Hdnrich Lackncr, both of Grax, Aus- 

tria, MrigDors to Vlanova Kuntthan Aktlcnccselbchaft, 

Wlen,AMtria 

FIM Nov. 13, 1968, S«. No. 775,531 
CUtas priority, a ppM c