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Full text of "The official handbook : containing the lessons on cookery which constitute the course of instruction"

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THE OFFICIAL HANDBOOK FOR THE 

NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL 
FOR COOKERY 



CONTAINING THE 

■ 



LESSONS ON COOKERY 



WHICH CONSTITUTE 



XLbc ©rfcinars Course of Jnstruction in tbe Scbooi 

WITH LISTS OF UTENSILS NECESSARY, AND 
LESSONS ON CLEANING UTENSILS 






//// . 



M 



Compiled by R. O. C. 

FROM THE COURSE OF PRACTICE IN THE NATIONAL 
TRAINING SCHOOL 



A NEW AND CHEAPEN EDITION 
' - ^Twenty- Si tth Thousand; 1 



' i ■ • ; 



LONDON : CHAPMAN & HALL, Ld. 



fHI 



«-r Q-A. 



If I) C • $ 



1 



.4. ' 



CONTENTS. 



PREFACE .... 

LIST OF UTENSILS . 
LIST OF CLEANING MATERIALS 
LESSONS ON CLEANING . 



PAGB 

3 

5 

12 

13 



LESSONS ON COOKERY 17 

APPENDIX . 445 

RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE SCHOOL . . . .455 

INDEX 467 



•• ••• • • 

• • • • • • 

• •••••• 



• • •"• 



• « • • 



•--•* -•• «-•' 



PREFACE TO NEW EDITION. 

I. This work has been written to explain in an 
easy and altogether new way the first principles 
of good Cookery, and being in the form of lessons 
is especially addressed to those who wish to carry 
them into practice. It has been the aim of the 
writer to leave no detail, however small, vaguely 
stated. It is taken for granted that the learner has 
no knowledge on the subject. The loose expres- 
sions, such as " a pinch/' a " little," found in most 
cookery books, are therefore avoided as much as 
is possible, and precise quantities are given. 

II. The work is not to be regarded as an exhaus- 
tive cookery book with very numerous recipes. It 
aims to be rather a grammar than a dictionary. 

III. The lessons give a sufficient number of 
examples of cookery, illustrating many degrees of 
cost: thus the rich may have a dish of curried rabbit 
for y. g\d., and the poor may have a dish of curried 
tripe for io|^. 

A 2 



4 Preface. 

IV. The work is based upon the instruction given 
by the cooks in the School, and it has been used 
and tested in the National Training School for 
Cookery since 1875. The instructors now em- 
ployed in local schools throughout the country have 
been taught and practised by means of these lessons. 

V. It has been found that it is most convenient 
to practise the lesson with the instructions in sight 
close at hand. An edition of each lesson has been 
printed on separate sheets of thick paper, for the 
use of students and teachers, which may be obtained 
at the National Training School for Cookery, or at 
the Publishers. 

VI. The present Edition has been revised 
throughout; some changes have been made, and 
some new recipes have been added in an Appendix. 

VII. Still the writer continues to request that 
the notices of any errors and omissions, which are 
inevitable in a work of this kind, may be com- 
municated to R. O, C. to the care of the Publishers. 

R. O. C. 



National Training School for Cookery, 



UTENSILS REQUIRED FOR THE LOCAL CLASSES 
FOR COOKERY, IN CONNECTION WITH THE 
NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR COOKERY. 

As supplied to the Schools by Messrs. B. Perkins and Son. 
FOR A HIGH CLASS COOKERY DEMONSTRATION LESSOR. 

LIST OF UTENSILS AND THEIR AVERAGE COST. 

£ s. d. 

2 large sanitary seamless saucepans o 7 10 

1 small ditto . . . . • 017 

1 oval pot 050 

2 sanitary seamless stewpans o 5 3 

I copper stewpan 090 

1 deep stewpan for frying 046 

I frying basket 039 

1 frying pan 013 

1 omelet pan 010 

1 colander ..016 

1 Yorkshire-pudding tin 009 

2 baking sheets 044 

1 set of scales and weights (4 lbs. and down) . . . o 15 6 

2 cake tins . . • 014 

2 souffle't moulds 02S 

3 measures (1 gill, § pint, and 1 pint) 020 

1 pudding mould 013 

2 jelly moulds 060 

1 aspic jelly mould . . 026 

6 patty pans 004 

2 cook's knives 036 

6 wooden spoons 012 

2 forks 016 

4 iron spoons 012 

2 tea spoons . . . , 005 

1 grater ! o o 7 

I flour dredger 4 . . . o o 10 

1 pepper dredger 010 

1 pail 012 

1 can 043 

2 galvanized washing-up tubs ° 5 9 

1 egg whisk 009 

2 strainers , . . . , . . . . .029 

Carry forward . . . • ^5 1 n 



6 National Training School for Cookery. 

£ s. d. 

Brought forward . . .5111 

1 hair sieve 010 

I wire sieve , . .029 

1 paste board ° 3 9 

1 rolling pin 006 

1 box of paste cutters . 030 

1 pastry brush 010 

2 French vegetable cutters . 010 

1 fish kettle 063 

£6 1 2 

UTENSILS ALSO REQUIRED. 

£ s. d 
6 plates 016 

2 soup plates . . . 006 

4 dishes .046 

3 pie dishes 009 

3 large basins ° 3 9 

4 small basins 014 

2 jugs 010 

6 tea-cloths, about yd. yard 046 

2 pudding-cloths, about $d. yard 005 

2 dish-cloths, about \d. yard 000 



£0 18 



STOVE REQUIRED. 
Gas stoves, price from about £4. 4s. od. to £7 ys. od. 

N.B. If utensils be required for a practice class, to accommodate 
ten pupils, the above list of utensils must be doubled in number, and 
in addition 10 knives 17^. 6d, a flour box 3^., and seasoning box 5^. 
will be required. 



National Training School for Cookery. 



UTENSILS REQUIRED FOR THE LOCAL CLASSES 
FOR COOKERY, IN CONNECTION WITH THE 
NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR COOKERY. 

FOR A PLAIN COOKERY DEMONSTRATION LESSON. 
LIST OF UTENSILS AND THEIR AVERAGE COST. 

i oval iron boiler .050 

2 large saucepans ° 7 5 

2 medium ditto . . • • 041 

1 frying pan . . ..016 

1 omelet pan • . . .010 

r colander 016 

1 Yorkshire-pudding tin 009 

2 baking sheets . . . 044 

1 weighing machine and weights o 15 6 

2 cake tins . . . . . . . ..014 

1 bread tin 010 

3 tin measures (1 gill, ^ pint and 1 pint) 020 

6 patty pans .004 

2 cook's knives 036 

2 forks . . 014 

4 iron spoons 012 

4 wooden spoons . .011 

2 tea-spoons . . . • 005 

1 bread and nutmeg grater . 007 

1 flour dredger . . . . • . . . . . o o 10 

1 pepper dredger « . . .010 

1 pail 012 

1 can • • .043 

2 galvanized washing-up tubs 059 

1 gravy strainer 013 

1 paste board °39 

1 rolling pin 006 

£3 12 4 



8 National Training School for Cookery, 

UTENSILS ALSO REQUIRED. 

£ * d. 
6 plates o i 6 

2 soup plates o o 6 

4 dishes 046 

3 pie dishes 009 

3 large basins . o 3 9 

4 small basins . .. .. . . . ..014 

2 jugs . .......... o i o 

6 tea-cloths, about gd. yard 046 

2 pudding-cloths, about $d. yard 005 

2 dish-cloths, about 4d. yard 006 



^018 



STOVE REQUIRED. 
Gas stoves, price from about ^4 4^. od. to £7 7s. od. 

N.B. If utensils be required for a practice class, to accommodate ten 
pupils, the above lists of. utensils must be doubled in number, and in 
addition 10 knives 17.?. 6d., a flour box 3.?., and seasoning box 5^., will 
be required. 



National Training School for Cookery. 9 

A COMPLETE AND ECONOMICAL ESTIMATE LIST 
OF UTENSILS REQUIRED IN A KITCHEN, 

AND THEIR AVERAGE COST. 

£ s. a. 

4 saucepans (sizes from i\ pint to 5 quarts) . . . .098 

1 potato steamer 026 

I enamelled saucepan (size 1 quart) 023 

I copper preserving pan , ..0176 

1 soup digester (size 4 quarts) . , . . . .039 
1 oval boiling pot (4J gallons) . . , . . ..086 

1 fish kettle " 069 

2 frying pans o 2 10 

1 French stewpan . . .023 

1 frying basket 029 

1 brass bottle-jack o 10 6 

1 meat screen and dripping pan 0156 

1 basting ladle . . . . . . . .014 

1 gridiron 016 

1 baking sheet with turned ends 016 

1 Yorkshire-pudding tin 009 

1 wrought-iron teakettle 040 

1 coffee pot (French, to hold 3 pints) . . ..036 

1 soufiie't tin (size 1^ pint) 014 

1 mould for apple Charlotte ..013 

1 jelly mould (size 1^ pint) 026 

1 aspic jelly mould . . . . , . . ..026 

1 tin colander . .016 

2 cake tins (1 round, gd., and 1 oblong, is.) . . . . o j 9 
6 patty pans, 6d. ; 2 open tart tins, is. 4d. . . .0110 

1 strainer 013 

1 wrought-iron salamander 056 

1 pair of steak tongs . . . . , . . ..019 

1 paste board 039 

1 rolling pin 006 

1 paste brush, is. ; 1 paste jagger, is 020 

I box of paste cutters . . . . . . ..030 

I chopping board .020 

1 marble mortar 083 

1 lignum- vitas pestle 029 

1 flour dredger , . . . . o o 10 

1 sugar dredger . . .012 

1 slice, is. ; 1 egg slice, 10^/. o 1 10 

1 egg whisk 009 

r wire sieve 029 

Carry forward . . . .^784 



io National Training School for Cookery. 

£ 

Brought forward ... 7 

I hair sieve o 

I whitebait sieve o 

1 tammy cloth o 

1 patent felt jelly bag o 

1 flour tub o 

1 Japanned spice box . . o 

1 canister for tea o 

1 canister for coffee o 

1 coffee mill o 

1 box of vegetable cutters . o 

1 meat cleaver . . . ... . . .0 

1 meat saw o 

1 mincing knife o 

1 carving knife and fork o 

1 dozen table knives and forks, 10s. 6d. dozen . . .0 

2 cook's knives (French) o 

1 vegetable knife ......... o 

1 dishing-up fork o 

1 kitchen steel o 

3 iron spoons o 

6 wooden spoons o 

1 larding needle o 

1 trussing needle o 

1 set of steel skewers . o 

1 bread grater . o 

2 tin funnels . o 

1 seasoning box . .0 

4 tin measures (from J pint to 1 quart) . . . . o 
i corkscrew o 

1 improved weighing machine and weights . . . . o ; 

J dozen quenelle shells o 

1 set of 3 pot triangles „ „ . o 

1 toasting fork o 

1 salt box o 

1 salt cellar o 

1 meringue bag with funnel o 

1 mustard pot, is. 6d. ; 1 pepper box, 6d. . . .0 

1 Japanned tea-tray o 

1 kitchen fender o 

I set of fire irons o 

1 coal scuttle . o 

1 hand shovel , . o 

1 cinder sifter, is. gd. ; coal hammer, u. 6d. . . .0 



s. 


d. 


8 


4 


1 





2 


3 


2 


6 


3 





3 





2 


9 


1 





1 





3 


6 


3 


3 


2 


10 


2 


6 


1 


6 


4 





5 


3 


4 





I 


3 


I 


9 


I 


6 


O 


1 of 


O 


11 


O 


7 


O 


6 


I 





O 


8 


O 


7 


5 





2 


11 





8 


7 


6 


1 


3 


2 


3 


1 





2 


3 





9 


1 


3 


2 





4 


2 


3 


6 


5 


6 


3 


6 


1 





3 


3 



£13 4 o^ 



Kitchen Requisites. 1 1 



KITCHEN STOVES. 

£ s. d. 

The "Mistress"* cooking range in all sizes ; prices varying 

from about ^6 to 10 o o 

Or the " Kensington Range " from about . ^13 ioj\ to 16 10 o 

Or the " Kensington Kitchener " from about . ^nto 16 o o 



*Frymometer (for testing the heat of fat for frying) . . o 10 6 

* Thermometer for testing the heat of the oven for baking . o 10 6 

Fitting thermometer in the oven door 050 

N.B. This thermometer is fixed in the oven door, and cannot, 
therefore, register the proper heat inside the oven. 

Black Boards for lectures, varying in size from 30 inches by 24 inches 
to 61 inches by 48 inches ; prices from 4-f. 6d. to 13J. 6d. 

* This stove and these instruments are used in the National Training School for 
Cookery. 



12 National Training School for Cookery. 



LIST OF CLEANING UTENSILS AND MATERIALS 
REQUIRED, 

AND THEIR AVERAGE COST. 

£ s. d. 

*i tin water-can 043 

■*i dustpan, is., and brush, is. 6d. 026 

*i handbowl . . . . 023 

*i galvanized pail 016 

*2 galvanized tubs for sink o 5 9 

*2 scrubbing brushes 026 

*3 black-lead brushes o 3 3 

*i sweep's brush 009 

*i flue brush 016 

*i hair broom 029 

*i bass broom 019 

*i knife board . ..019 

*i wooden soap box 006 

*i sink brush 006 

*i sieve brush . . . . . . .012 

*i pot brush 009 

*i pair of washleather gloves o o 10 

*i chamois leather 010 

1 hearthstone . .006 

1 box of blacklead 006 

Whitening 001 

Rottenstone 001 

Bath brickdust 001 

J quire of emery cloth 009 

6 lbs. of soda 007 

1 bar of scrubbing soap . . 0011 

Sand 006 

Salt 004 

White chalk 002 

1 yard of house flannel 006 

£2 o 3 



National Training School for Cookery. 13 



LESSONS ON CLEANING STOVES, GRATES, AND 
KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

TO CLEAN AN OPEN KITCHEN RANGE. 

1. We should rake out all the cinders, and sift them into 
a scuttle for use. 

N.B.— All the dust should be thrown away. 

2. We take a sweep's brush, and sweep down all the soot 
from the flues and oven. 

3. We should remove the soot door at the back, and the 
rings on the top of the oven, force the flue brush upwards 
and downwards ; then sweep the soot from the top of the 
oven, down the flue at the side of the oven, the farthest 
from the fire, and remove the small flush door on the top 
over this side, and sweep all the soot off the sides to the 
bottom. 

4. We must then remove a small door under the bottom 
of the oven, and carefully draw out the soot from the right 
hand, and also the left hand, with the raker, and then re- 
place the doors and dampers. 

5. We must now clean the boiler flue. We remove the 
soot door at the back, and force the flue brush in the 
opening upwards and downwards : then take the raker, 
and carefully rake away all the clinkers and soot from 
under the boiler, and now replace the soot door. 

N.B. — The water is heated from the heat that passes under the boiler, and 
not the surface heat in front, therefore if the flue under the boiler is not 
clear of clinkers, no hot water can be obtained. 

6. We mix some pounded black lead in a gallipot, with 
enough water to make it into a smooth thick liquid. We 
dip the black-lead brush in the mixture, and black-lead 
the whole of the range, beginning from the top of the stove 
by the dampers, and then downwards. 



1 4 National Training School for Cookery. 

7. When the black lead is dry, we brush it all over with 
a dry brush. 

8. We then take another brush, and polish the range all 
over, so as to make it quite bright. 

N.B. — The bars of the stove should be done in the same way. 

9. We take the sweep's brush, and sweep the remaining 
soot and dust from the stove, and the hearth. 

10. We polish the steel handles and bolts of the oven, by 
rubbing them with emery paper. 

11. The brass handles and bolts we should polish, with 
bath brickdust and a leather. 

IS. We get a flannel and a pail of hot water, put in it 
some soda, and wash the hearth all over. 

N.B. — We must not wet it too much. 

13. We take a hearthstone, and rub it all over the hearth. 

14. We then wring the flannel out in the hot water, 
and smooth the hearth over, rubbing it lightly all in one 
direction. 

15. We must black-lead and polish the inside of the 
fender, in the same way as we did the range, and brighten 
the rim of it by rubbing it with emery paper. 



TO LAY A FIRE. 

1. We should place a few sifted cinders at the bottom 
of the grate. 

2. We then put in a piece of crumpled paper, and 
arrange the sticks over it, laying them across each other. 

3. We now put a few pieces of coal on the top, rather to 
the front, so as to leave a good draught at the back to 
draw the fire. 

4. When the fire has lighted, and has burned up a little, 
we can add more sifted cinders mixed with the coal. 

5. We should only put small quantities of coal and 
cinders on the fire at a time. 



Lessons on Cleaning Stoves. 15 



TO CLEAN A CLOSE KITCHEN RANGE. 

1. We proceed in the same way, as for an open range 
(from note 1 to note 6). 

2. We should pull out the drawer just below the oven, in 
which we shall find the soot has fallen. 

3. We empty all the soot away, and sweep out the 
drawer clean. 

4. We now take the sweep's brush, and sweep down the 
range. 

5. We black-lead, polish the range, and clean the hearth 
and fender, as described for an open range (from note 3 to 
end). 

6. We take down the iron plate-rack across the top of 
the range, and rub the bars with emery cloth. 

7. We should dust the fire-irons, and if they are rusty, 
they should be rubbed with emery cloth or oil and leather. 



TO CLEAN A GAS STOVE. 

1. We require the same materials as for a kitchen range. 

2. We lift out the bars at the top, and rub them with 
emery cloth until they are quite clean and bright. 

3. We wash the top of the stove with a flannel dipped in 
hot water and soda, so as to remove all grease and dirt ; 
we then wring out the flannel, and partially dry the top of 
the stove. 

4. We now black-lead and polish it, in the same way as 
for the kitchen range. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to stop up the gas holes with black lead. 

5. We place the bars back over the stove. 

6. We polish the brass handles of the gas burners, with 
bath brickdust and a leather. 

7. We wash the tiles round the stove, with the flannel, 
hot water, and soda. 

8. We dry them with a cloth. 



1 6 Lessons on Cleaning. 

TO CLEAN AN IRON SAUCEPAN. 

1. We should wash the saucepan well, in hot water and 
soda. 

N.B.— All the black should be removed, from the outside and bottom. 

2. We must soap the palm of one hand, and rub the 
inside of the saucepan. 

N.B. — In washing any greasy utensil, it is best if possible, to use the hand 
instead of a flannel, as the latter retains the grease and so keeps putting 
the grease on again, instead of rubbing it off. 

3. We mix some sand and powdered soda together, and 
then dip the soap into it, and rub the inside of the sauce- 
pan until it is quite clean and bright. 

4. We now rinse it in water, and dry it with a cloth. 

5. We should clean the lid in the same way. 

N.B. — A white enamelled stewpan is cleansed in the same way, great care 
should be taken to remove all the stains off the white enamel inside. - 

N.B. — Salt might be mixed with the sand, and used to remove the stains from 
the enamel. 



TO CLEAN A COPPER STEWPAN. 

1. We mix some sand and salt together on a plate, half 
the quantity of salt to that of sand. 

2. We wash the stewpan well in hot water and soda. 

3. We soap the hand, dip it in the salt and sand, and 
rub the inside of the pan, until all stains are removed, and 
it has become clean and bright. 

4. We rinse it out well in the water, dry the inside 
quickly, and then turn over the pan, and clean the copper 
outside. 

5. We should rub it in the same way with a soaped 
hand, dipped in sand and salt. 

N.B. — If there are many stains on it, an old half lemon, or vinegar, might 

be used to remove them. 
N.B. — Only the copper part should be cleaned with lemon or vinegar. 

6. We now rinse it again thoroughly, and dry it quickly 
with a cloth. 



LESSONS ON COOKERY. 



ROASTING. 

Now we will show you how to roast meat at an open 
range, but first we must see that the fire is clear and 
bright. 

1. We must take the shovel and put it in at the back of 
the fire and push all the red hot coals to the front. 

2. We put fresh coal at the back, packing it together 
rather closely, but taking care that we leave a draught at 
the back, to draw the fire and make it burn clear and 
bright. 

3. We must fill in all the spaces in the front of the fire: 
with small lumps of coal or coke. 

N.B. — If it be a close range with which we are dealing, we should pull out 
the centre damper only, which will create a draught at the back, and 
help to draw the fire up quickly. 

4. We now take our joint, say a leg of 'mutton. 

5. We must see that it is quite clean, and, if necessary, 
we must scrape it with a knife and wipe it over with a 
clean cloth. 

N.B. — Meat should not, as a rule, be 'washed in water, as it takes some of 
the goodness out. If meat has been kept some time and is not quite 
fresh, then you might wash it with a little vinegar and water, but it must 
be well wiped afterwards. 

6. We take the leg of mutton and with a sharp knife cut 
off the knuckle bone. 

N.B. — The knuckle bone we put aside ; it can be used with beef for beef tea, 
or be put in the stockpot, or the trimmings and one pint of water will 
make gravy for the joint when done, allowing it to simmer while the 
joint is roasting. 



1 8 National Training School for Cookery. 

7. We trim off the piece of flank and remove the thick 
piece of skin from the part where the leg joins the loin. 
(These trimmings must be put aside, as they can be used 
for other purposes.) 

8. We must now weigh the leg of mutton, so as to find 
out how long it will take to roast it, as a quarter of an 
hour is allowed for each pound of weight, and one quarter of 
an hour besides. 

N.B. — When we have a joint without bone, such as rolled ribs of beef or 
topside of beef, we must allow twenty minutes to each pound of weight, 
as it is all solid meat. 

9. We take the leg of mutton, which weighs say seven 
pounds, it will therefore take two hours to roast. 

10. We put the roasting screen in front of the fire to 
keep off the draught and keep in all the heat. 

11. We put the dripping pan down on a stand within the 
screen, close to the fire, with the dripping ladle. 

12. We hang the roasting jack up from the mantelpiece 
over the dripping pan. 

N.B. — Some roasting screens contain the dripping pan and the jack, which 
are of course more convenient. 

13. We take the hook of the roasting jack and pass it 
through the knuckle-end of the leg. 

14. We must wind up the jack with the key, before we 
put the joint on, so as to make it twist the meat round. 

15. We must put the joint close to the fire for the first 
five minutes. 

16. After that time we can draw the joint a little further 
back, or it will cook too quickly and become burnt and dried. 

N.B.— Meat that is frozen must be placed some way from the fire at first, 
and then drawn gradually towards it, as it must thaw slowly or it may 
become tough. 

17. We must baste the joint every five minutes with the 
drippings that run from it into the pan, using the dripping 
ladle. 

18. We let the joint roast for two hours } as its weight is 
seven pounds. 

19. After that time, and just before we dish up the 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Roasting. 19 

joint, we must sprinkle about a saltspoonftil of salt over it, 
and then baste it well. 

20. We must take a large dish and warm it well. 

21. Now we can take the hook of the jack, and place the 
joint on to the hot dish, and draw out the hook. 

22. We take about a gill of hot stock and pour it into the 
dish. [This makes the gravy, and when the joint is cut, 
the juices from the meat will add to it.] 

23. We must take a piece of demy paper and cut it like 
a fringe. This we put round the end of the knuckle bone. 

N.B. — The dripping in the pan should be poured into a basin, and when it is 
cold there will be under the cruet °f dripping a good gravy. When the 
dripping is required for use it must be carefully removed from the top 
of the gravy, and clarified. (See Lesson on "Frying.") Nearly all 
joints can be roasted in this way. Attention should be paid to the rules 
explained above concerning joints of meat without bone. 



2o National Training School for Cookery, 
BOILING. 

Now we will show you how to boil meat. 

1. We must give attention to the fire, and build it up 
gradually with small pieces of coal, so as to make it burn 
clear and bright. 

2. We must not have a smoky fire for boiling, or the 
meat will get smoked, we should start with a good fire, 
and keep it up by adding occasionally small coal, and so 
prevent smoke as much as possible. 

N.B. — We do not require such a clear bright fire as for roasting. 

3. We now take a saucepan sufficiently large to hold 
the joint to be cooked. 

4. We fill the saucepan almost full of cold water, and 
put it on the fire to warm. 

N.B.— Salt should always be added to the water in the saucepan to make 
the water taste, unless the meat to be cooked is already salted, in which 
case it should be omitted. 

5. We now take the joint, say, for example, a piece of 
the silver side of beef salted. 

6. W T e must see that it is quite clean, and if necessary 
we must scrape it with a knife, and wipe it over with a 
clean cloth. 

N.B. — Meat should not as a rule be washed in water, as it takes some of the 
goodness out. Meat that has been kept some time, and is not quite 
fresh, might be washed with vinegar and water, but it must be well 
wiped afterwards. 

N.B. — Salt meat must not be washed with vinegar and water, but only with 
salt and water. 

7. We must now weigh the piece of salt beef, so as to 
find out how long it will take to boil, as ten minutes are 
allowed for each lb. of meat. 

N.B. — This rule refers to the boiling of all meat except pork, which requires 
fifteen minutes to each lb. of meat. 

A. — In boiling vieat to be eaten the joint should be first plunged into boiling 
water, in order that the albumen on the outside of the joint may become 
hardened, and so prevent the escape of the juices of the meat. 

B. — The temperature of the water should then be lowered gradually (by 
adding a small quantity of cold water and drawing the saucepan to the 
side oi the fire), and the meat allowed to simmer gently, or it will become 
tough. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Boiling. 21 

C — In boiling meat for the purpose of making soup, the meat should be put 
into cold water, in order to extract all the goodness from the meat. 

D.— The water should be brought gradually to boiling point, then moved to 
the side of the fire, and left to simmer gen^y for some length of time. 

N.B. — Salt meat must be put into warm water, so as to extract a little of 
the salt before the pores of the skin are closed up ; if the meat were put 
into boiling water the pores of the skin would be closed, and the meat 
would be hardened by the salt not being allowed to escape. 

8. When the water in the saucepan is warm, we take the 
beef y which weighs, say, eight pounds (it will therefore take 
about one hour and twenty minutes), and put it in the sauce- 
pan; there should be only just enough water to cover the 
joint. 

9. We let the water just boil up, and then we should 
move the saucepan to the side of the fire, and let it simmer 
gently for the remainder of the time. 

10. As soon as the water comes to the boil we must 
take a large spoon and skim the water carefully. 

N.B. — The sctim should be skimmed off directly it rises, or it will boil down 
again in the meat and spoil it. Scum is the impurity which rises from 
the meat. 

N.B. — We must be very careful not to let the meat toil, or it will be 
hardened and tough. 

11. When the meat is sufficiently cooked, we take it 
carefully out of the saucepan and put it on a hot dish for 
serving. We pour about a gill of the liquor (in which it was 
boiled) round the joint (this makes the gravy, and when 
the joint is cut the juices from the meat will add to it). 

N.B. — The liquor from boiled meat can always be used for different pur- 
poses, and should therefore never be thrown away, but poured into a 
clean basin and put aside to cool, the fat should be carefully removed 
from the top of the liqtcor, while it is cold, before being used. Salt 
liquor is often used for making pea soup. 



22 National Training School for Cookery. 

BAKING. 

Meat, Bread, Pastry, &c. 



Now we will show you how to bake meat. 

1. We must have a good fire, and keep it up, adding by- 
degrees small pieces of coal, as the oven is required to be 
very hot. 

N.B. — If it be a close range with which we are dealing, we should pull out 
the damper placed over the oven in order to draw all the heat of the fire 
towards the oven. The ventilator of the oven should be closed. 

N.B. — In kitchen stoves there is usually either a handle at the top of the 
oven, to be pulled out for opening the ventilator, or a slide ventilator 
at the bottom. 

2. We should test the heat of the oven by the thermometer 
which is fixed in the door of the oven, the heat should rise 
to 240 Fahrenheit. 

3. We take the joint, see that it is clean, as directed in 
" Lesson on Roasting," Note 5, and weigh it, so as to find 
out how long it will take to bake, as ten minutes are allowed 
for each pound of weight. 

N.B. — When we have a joint without bone we must allow about fifteen 
minutes to each pound of weight, as it is solid meat. 

4. We take the hot water tin, on which the stand for the 
meat is placed, lift up the upper tin or tray and fill the 
wider tin half full of warm water, we then fit on the 
upper tin. 

N.B. — In one corner of the upper tin is a small hole or escape for the steam. 
The water below must only just reach this hole, and not come into it. 

N.B. — The water is placed in the tin to prevent the tin and the meat from 
getting burnt, and so causing a disagreeable smell. 

5. We place the stand on the hot water tin to raise the 
joint and prevent it from standing in its own dripping, 
which would sodden and spoil the meat. 

6. We now take the joint, which weighs say seven pounds 
(it will therefore take one hour and ten minutes to bake), 
and put it on the stand. We should dredge four over it. 

7. We put the tin with the meat in the oven. The oven 
should be kept very hot for the first five minutes, in order to 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Baking. 25 

form a brown crust on the outside of the joint, to keep in 
the juices of the meat. After that time the ventilator of 
the oven should be opened, so as to allow the steam to 
escape, or the meat would get sodden. 

N.B. — Meat that is frozen must be gradually warmed, to thaw it before 
shutting it up in the hot oven, or it would be tough. 

8. We must baste the joint every fifteen minutes with the 
drippings that run from the meat into the pan, using the 
dripping ladle. 

N.B. — Joints that are not very fat must be even more frequently basted, or 
they would burn : if there is not sufficient dripping from the meat, a 
little extra dripping should be put into the pan. 

N.B. — Joints that have no fat should be covered with a piece oiivhitey brown 
paper which has been spread with butter or dripping — it will prevent the 
meat catching too quickly. 

9. We should turn the joint over occasionally, as the 
upper side will get browned quicker than the lower. 

N.B. — Potatoes, washed and peeled, or a small suet or dripping and flour 
pudding (see " Puddings," Lesson No. 28), or a Yorkshire pudding (see 
" Puddings," Lesson No. 29), might be baked under the meat, but they 
should only be put in half an hour before the meat is finished. 

10. Just before we dish up the joint, we should sprinkle 
about a saltspoonful of salt over it, and then baste it well. 

11. We serve the joint on a hot dish (as described in 
"Lesson on Roasting," Note 22, and act with regard to 
the dripping according to the " N.B." after Note 23.) 

N.B. — Pastry ox bread, &c, should not be baked in the oven at the same 
time as the meat, as the steam would prevent their baking properly, 
For baking small patties and tartlets made of Puff Paste, the ther- 
mometer fixed in the oven door should rise to 300 Fahrenheit. For 
meat pies, tarts, &c, the thermometer should rise to 280 . For bread 
the thermometer should rise to 280 , and must be reduced after a quarter 
of an hour to 220 . 



24 National Training School for Cookery. 



FRYING. 

And Lessons on Clarifying Butter, Fat, and Dripping. 



The principles of frying. 
• 1. We must have a clear bright fire. 

N.B. We must be very careful it is not smoky. 

2. We should be careful that the utensil used is very 
rlean, for if there is anything sticking at the bottom of the 
pan, it will quickly catch or burn, and so spoil the contents. 

3. We should clarify all fat {not lard), dripping, and 
butter y before using them, to remove the impurities from 
the former, and the butter-milk, and other watery sub- 
stance, from the latter. 

N.B. — Fat need not be clarified more than once. After using it we should 
always pour it off carefully in a basin, and when it is cold we should 
remove the sediment from the bottom of the cake of fat. Btitter must 
be clarified each time it is used, to remove all watery substances. 

4. We must have the fat very hot ; good frying depends 
on the fat being properly heated. 

5. We should test the heat of the fat by a frimometer, 
if possible ; the heat should rise to 345 degrees Fahrenheit 
for ordinary frying, and 400 degrees for whitebait. 

N. B. — If there be no frimometer, the heat of the fat may be tested by the 
look — as fat gets quite still and begins to smoke when it is very hot — or 
by throwing in a small piece of crumb of bread, and if it fries directly a 
light brown, the fat is ready for use. 

6. We should use a deep pan with plenty of fat, so that 
anything put in may be entirely covered. 

7. We can fry bacon in its own fat, it only requires 
watching and turning till it is done (see Lesson on " Liver 
and Bacon," from Note 1 to Note 5). 

8. We can fry chops or steaks, or slices of meat, in either 
an oz. of clarified dripping or butter. 

9. We should melt the fat first, but it does not require 
to be heated. 

10. We must be watchful, when the meat is frying, not 
to allow it to burn ; we should turn it over occasionally. 

N.B. — If there be a gridiron it is much better to grill chops and steaks, as it 
prevents their being greasy (see Lesson on a "Grilled Steak"). For 
frying Fish, see " Fish," Lessons Nos. 3, 6, 7, and 13. For frying Meat, 
Rissoles, Potatoes, &c, see "Cooked Meat," Lessons Nos. 2 and 6; 
" Australian Meat," Lesson No. 4; "Entrees," Lessons Nos. 4 and 11 ; 
fend *' Vegetables," Lessons Nos. 3 and 4. 



.essons 



on Frying and Clarifying Fat. 25 



To render down or clarify fat. 

1. We take any scraps of cooked or uncooked fat, and cut 
them up in small pieces. 

2. We 'put the pieces in an old but clean saucepan, and 
pour in just enough cold zvater to cover them. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire and keep it boiling ; 
it will take about an hour, the lid should be off the saucepan. 

4. We must stir the fat occasionally, to prevent it from 
burning or sticking to the bottom of the saucepan. 

5. When the water has evaporated, and the pieces of fat 
are cooked, we should pour the melted fat through an old 
sieve into a basin, and when cold it can be used for all 
frying purposes instead of lard. 

To clarify dripping. 

1. We should put the dripping in a saucepan, and put it 
on the fire to boil. 

2. When it boils we pour it into a basin in which there 
should be half a pint of cold zvater. 

3. When the dripping is cold, we take a knife and cut 
round the edge, so as to take out the cake of dripping. 

4. We should scrape off all the sediment that will be 
found on the bottom of the cake, and wipe it dry with a cloth. 

To clarify butter. 

1. We put the quantity of butter required for present use 
in a small saucepan, and put it on the fire and let it boil. 

2. When the butter has boiled, we must take a spoon 
and remove the white scum from the top. 

3. We should then pour the clear butter carefully into 
the pan for use, as below the butter will be a little more 
watery substance. 



26 National Training School for Cookery. 

COOKED MEAT. 

Lesson No. i. 

HASHED MEAT. 

Average cost of " Hashed Meat" 



INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i lb. of scraps of cold meat and bone 6 

2 small onions i 

i carrot \ 

i bunch of herbs (consisting of i bay leaf, a j 

sprig of marjoram, thyme, parsley,) . . . . > \ 

About a tablespoonful of flour ) 

i dessertspoonful of mushroom ketchup i 

Sippets of bread j 

Salt and pepper ^ i| 

i oz. of butter ) 

io 



Time required, about two hours; or if the stock for the gravy is already 
made, tlien only half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to Hash Cold Meat. 

1. We take any remains of cold meat, cut off all the meat 
from the bone, and cut it into thin slices. 

2. We chop the bone in pieces, and put them into a 
saucepan. 

3. We take one onion, peel it and cut it in quarters. 

4. We take one carrot, wash it, scrape it, and cut it in 
quarters. 

5. We take a sprig of parsley, wash it, and dry it in a cloth. 

6. We take one bay leaf, one sprig of marjoram and 
thyme, and the parsley, and tie them tightly together with 
a piece of string. 

7. We put the herbs and the vegetables into the saucepan 
with the bones, and pour in enough cold water to cover 
them. 



Lessons on Re-Cooking Meat.— Hashed Meat. 27 

8. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it boils we 
should add pepper and salt, according to taste. 

9. We now put the lid on, and move the saucepan to 
the side of the fire to stew gently for one hour, or one hour 
and a half ; we should watch it and skim it occasionally. 

10. We take a small onion, peel it, and cut it in slices. 

11. We put an ounce of butter into a frying pan. 

12. We put the pan on the fire, and when the butter is 
melted we add the sliced onion, and let it fry a nice brown. 

13. We must shake the pan occasionally to prevent the 
slices of onion from sticking to the bottom of the pan, and 
burning. 

14. When the onion is sufficiently browned, we strain off 
the butter, and put the onion on to a plate. 

15. When the bones have stewed long enough, we should 
strain off the liquor into a basin. 

16. We wash out the saucepan, and pour back the liquor. 

17. We put a tablespoonful of flour into a small basin. 

18. We add a tablespoonful of the liquor to the flour, and 
stir it into a smooth paste. 

19. We stir this paste gradually into the liquor in the 
saucepan. 

20. We also add the browned onion, and a dessertspoonful 
of mushroom ketchup. 

21. We put the saucepan on the fire, and stir the sauce 
until it boils and thickens. 

22. We let it boil for two or three minutes, until the flour 
is cooked. 

N.B. — We should be careful to stir the sauce smoothly while it boils, or it 
will be lumpy. 

23. We then move the saucepan to the side of the fire, 
and when it is off the boil, we lay in the pieces of meat to 
warm through. 

N.B. — We must not let the sauce boil while the meat is in it, or the meat 
will get hard and tough. 

24. We cut a thin slice of bread, and cut it into square 
pieces. 



28 National Training School for Cookery. 

25. We cut these square pieces in half, cornerwise, mak- 
ing the pieces into triangles. 

26. We put one ounce of clarified dripping (see Lesson on 
" Frying ") in a frying pan to melt. 

27. When the dripping is quite hot we put in the sippets 
of bread, and let them fry a light brown. 

28. We should turn them, so that they get browned on 
each side. 

29. We put a piece of kitchen paper on a plate, and 
when the sippets are fried, we turn them on to the paper to 
drain off the grease. 

N.B. — If liked, the bread could be toasted before the fire instead of fried ; 
in which case the bread should be cut into sippets after it is toasted. 

30. For serving we put the slices of meat on a hot dish, 
in the centre, strain the sauce over them and put the sippets 
of bread round the edge of the dish. 



Lessons on Re-Cooking Meat. — Meat Fritters. 29 

COOKED MEAT. 

Lesson No. 2. 

MEAT FRITTERS. 

Average cost of " Meat Fritters. 
INGREDIENTS 

d. 

Slices of cold meat 6 

4 oz. of flour 4 

i tablespoonful of salad oil ) 

Salt / 

2 eggs 2 

Dripping for frying 

9i 

Time required, about half an hour {and one hour for the batter to rise). 



Now we will show you how to make Meat Fritters, i.e. 
frying meat in batter. 

1. We put four ounces of flour and half a saltspoo?iful of 
salt into a basin. 

2. We add a tablespoonful of salad oil and mix the flout 
into a smooth paste. 

N.B. — We must be careful that the oil is quite sweet. If the oil is objected 
to, one ounce of melted butter can be used instead. 

3. We now stir in smoothly by degrees, a quarter of a pint 
of tepid water ; we must be careful that there are no lumps. 

4. We break two eggs, put the whites on a plate (the 
yolks we should put in a cup, as they will not be required 
for present use). 

5. We sprinkle a quarter of a saltspoonful of salt over the 
whites of the eggs, and whip them to a stiff froth with a knife. 

6. We stir the whipped whites of the eggs lightly into the 
batter. 

N.B.— In winter, clean snow might be used in the batter instead of the whites 
of eggs. 

N.B. — This batter might be made without the whites of eggs, in which case 
it should be mixed with half a pint of beer, instead uf the water, but the 
batter made with beer will not rise as much as when eggs are used. 

N.B. — The beer will not taste after the batter is fried. 



30 National Training School for Cookery. 

7. We stand the batter aside for one hour to rise, or 
until required for frying, but it should not stand longer 
than one hour. 

8. We put half a pound of clarified dripping (see Lesson 
on " Frying ") into a saucepan, and put it on the fire to 
heat. 

9. We take some cold meat, and cut it up into thin slices. 

N.B. — Cold boiled, or roast pork, or boiled bacon is very nice fried in 
batter. 

10. When the batter has risen and the fritters are re- 
quired for use, we stir the batter lightly with a spoon, so as 
to be sure that there are no lumps settled at the bottom. 

11. When the dripping is quite hot and smoking, we take 
the slices of meat, dip them in the batter so that they are 
quite covered, and then drop them into the hot fat. 

N.B. —We must not put in too many slices at a time, as they should not 
touch each other. 

12. We must turn them over so that they are fried a 
nice brown on both sides. 

13. We put a piece of kitchen paper on a plate. 

14. As the fritters are fried, we take them carefully out 
of the fat with a perforated spoon, and put them on the 
paper to drain off the grease. 

N.B. — We must be careful to skim the fat from time to time, or the little 
loose pieces of batter will burn and spoil the fat. 

N.B. — Slices of apple or orange can be fried in this batter in the same way, 
only that the batter should be sweetened, and sugar sprinkled over the 
fritters when they are fried. 

N.B. — Fish can be fried in batter the same way, only that the batter in 
usually made with beer instead of white of egg. 

15. For serving, we turn the fritters on to a hot dish. 



Lessons on Re-Cooking Meat,— Goblet Pie 31 

COOKED MEAT. 
Lesson No. 3. 

GOBLET PIE. 

Average cost of a " Goblet Pie* 1 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

Any scraps of cold meat 3 

■z tablespoonsful of chopped suet \\ 

2 do. of moist sugar \ 

2 do. of currants \ 

2 do. of plums \ 

2 do. of chopped apples \ 

\ lb. of flour ) a 

5 of a teaspoonful of baking-powder \ 4 

i oz. of dripping \ 

7\ 

Time required, about three-quarters of an hour. 

Now we will show you how to make a " Goblet Pie." 

N.B. — This pie is made with equal quantities of ingredients. 

1. We take any scraps of cold meat (the smallest scraps 
would do that would not do for anything else), put them 
on a board, and chop them up as finely as possible (there 
should be about two tablespoonsful of chopped meat). 

2. We take about two ounces of suet, put it on a board, 
cut away the skin, and chop it up very finely (there should 
be about two tablespoonsful). 

3. We take two small apples, peel them, cut out the core, 
and chop them up finely (there should be about two table- 
spoonsful). 

4. We take two tablespoonsful of plums, stone them, and 
chop them up in small pieces. 

5. We take two tablespoonsful of currants, wash them, 
dry them in a cloth, and pick them over. 

6. We put all these ingredients into a basin with tzvo 
tablespoonsful of moist sugar, and mix them all well 
together with a spoon. 

7. We then turn the mixture into a small pie dish, 



32 National Training School for Cookery. 

8. We put a quarter of a pound of flour into a basin, and 
mix into it a few grains of salt, and a quarter of a teaspoonful 
of baking powder. 

9. We take one ounce of clarified dripping and rub it well 
and lightly into the flour with our hands, until it resembles 
sifted bread crumbs. 

10. We now add to it sufficient water to mix it into a 

stiff paste. 

11. We flour a board and turn the paste out on it. 

12. We take a rolling-pin, flour it, and roll out the paste 
to the shape of the pie dish, only a little larger, and to 
about a quarter of an inch in thickness. 

13. We wet the edge of the pie dish with water. 

14. We take a knife, dip it in flour, and cut a strip of the 
paste, the width of the edge of the pie dish, and place it 

round the edge of the dish. 

15. We should cut this strip of paste from round the edge 
of the paste, leaving the centre piece rather larger than the 
top of the pie dish. 

16. We wet the edge of the paste with water. 

17. We take the remaining piece of paste, and place it 
over the pie dish, pressing the edges together with our 
thumb. 

N.B.— We must be very careful not to break the paste. 

18. We take a knife, dip it in flour, and trim off all the 
rough edges of the paste, round the edge of the dish. 

19. We take a knife, and with the back of the blade we 
make little notches in the edge of the paste, pressing the 
paste firmly with our thumb, to keep it in its proper place. 

20. We make a little hole with the knife, in the centre of 
the pie to let the steam out while the pie is baking. 

21. We put the pie into the oven (the heat should rise to 
220°), to bake for half an hour. It is then ready for serving. 



Lessons on Re-Cooking Meat. — Curry. $i 

COOKED MEAT. 

Lesson No. 4. 

CURRY. 

Average cost of a " Curry ' ' (made with cold meat). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

Scraps of cold meat 6 

2 oz. of clarified dripping I 

(or butter 2d. ) 

1 apple % 

1 onion | 

1 dessertspoonful of curry powder \ 

1 dessertspoonful of flour • 1 

Salt \ 

9 

Time required, about three quarters of an hour. 

Now we will show you how to make a Curry. 

1. We put two ounces of clarified dripping, or butter into 
a saucepan, and put it on the fire to heat. 

2. We take one onion, peel it, put it on a board, and chop 
it up as finely as possible. 

3. When the dripping is quite hot, we put in the cJwpped 
onion to brown ; we must be careful it does not burn. 

4. We should shake the saucepan occasionally to prevent 
the onion from sticking to the bottom. 

5. We take the cold meat and cut it up into small pieces. 

6. We take one small apple, peel it, take out the core, and 
chop it up very finely on a board. 

7. When the onion is sufficiently brown, we should strain 
it off, and pour the dripping back into the saucepan. 

N.B. We should put the browned onion on a plate. 

8. We now put the pieces of cold meat into the saucepan, 
and let them brown on both sides. 

9. We add one dessertspoonful of curry pozvder, 07ie dessert- 
spoonful of flour, the chopped apple, and a little salt, accord- 
ing to taste. 



34 National Training School for Cookery, 



10. We now pour in half a pint of cold water, and put 
back the browned onion. 

N.B. — If the onion had been left in while the meat was browning, it would 
have got burnt. 

11. We should stir smoothly and carefully until it boils, 
and then move it to the side of the fire to simmer for half 
an hour. 

12. The lid should be off the saucepan as the sauce is to 
reduce. 

13. For serving we take the meat out of the saucepan 
and put it on a hot dish and pour the sauce over it. 

N,b. Boiled rice should be served with the curry (see Lesson on " Rice '■'). 



Lessons on Re-Cooking Meat. — Shepherd's Pie. 35 

COOKED MEAT. 

Lesson No. 5. 

SHEPHERD'S PIE. 

Average cost of a " Shepherd's Pie! 1 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

Scraps of cold meat . 6 

i small onion I i 

Pepper and salt / 3 

ig lb. of potatoes i h 

t oz. of butter i 

e tablespoonful of milk | 

Time required, about an hour and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Shepherds Pie. 

1. We take one and a half pound of potatoes, wash them, 
and boil them as described (see " Vegetables/' Lesson 
No. I). 

N.R. — This quantity of potato will cover a quart pie dish. 
N.B. — Any remains of cold potatoes should be used, instead of boiling fresh 
ones. 

2. We put one ounce of butter, and one tablespoonful of 
milky into a saucepan, and put it on the fire to boil. 

3. We put the boiled potatoes into another saucepan, and 
mash them up with a fork or spoon. 

4. When the milk boils we pour it into the mashed 
potatoes, and stir them into a smooth paste. 

5. We put the saucepan on the fire and let the potatoes 
just boil ; we must be careful they do not burn. 

6. We take any scraps of cold meat, cut them in small 
pieces, and put them in a pie dish in layers. 

7. If there is not much fat with the meat, we should mix 
a few slices of pork fat with the meat. 

8. We take one small onion, peel it, and chop it up as 
finely as possible on a board. 



C 2 



36 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We sprinkle each layer of meat with plenty of pepper 
and salt, and a little of the chopped onion. 

10. We fill the dish half full of cold water. 

N.B. — If there be any cold gravy it would, of course, be better than the 

water. 
N.B. — The pie dish should be quite full of meat, and rather heaped in the 

centre, so as to raise the crust of potato. 

11. We take the mashed potato and put it over the top of 
the meat, smoothing it over neatly with a knife. 

12. We take a fork, and mark all over the top of the 

Potato. 

N.B. — If liked, the mashed potato might be mixed with half its weight of 
flour into a dough, to make a more substantial crust ; it must be then 
rolled out with a rolling-pin like pastry. 

13. We put the pie dish into the oven, or into a Dutch 
oven in front of the fire, for half an hour, to brown the crust 
of potato and warm the meat through, it is then ready for 
serving - . 



Lessons on Re-Cooking Meat. — Fried Rissoles. 37 

COOKED MEAT. 

Lesson No. 6. 

FRIED RISSOLES. 

Average cost of " Fried Rissoles " made of cold meat. 
(This quantity makes about 8). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of scraps of cold meat i 

2 tablespoonsful of chopped suet \\ 

2 do. of bread crumbs h 

1 do. of chopped parsley \ 

\ a teaspoonful of chopped herbs, marjoram ) ^ 

and thyme I 3 

1 egg I 

Crumb of bread ) 

Salt and pepper / 

1 gill of stock ) •{ 

\ oz. of flour j 4 

Use of dripping for frying 

~l\ 
Time required, about half an hour. 

Now we will show you how to make Rissoles with cold 
meat. 

1. We put about half a pound of clarified dripping into 
a saucepan and put it on the fire to heat. 

2. We take the scraps of cold meat, and chop them up as 
finely as possible on a board, when chopped, there should 
be about two tablespoonsfid. 

3. We take tzuo ounces of suet, put it on a board, cut 
away the skin and chop it up as finely as possible. There 
should be two tablespoonsfid. 

4. We take a grater and grate some crumbs of bread on 
to a piece of paper. 

N.B. — More than two tablespoonsful of bread crumbs will be required, as the 
rissoles should be dipped in bread crumbs before they are fried. 

5. We take two sprigs of parsley, wash it, and dry it in a 
cloth. 

6. We put the parsley on a boa rd, and chop it up finely ; 
there should be one tablespoonful. 

7. We take a sprig of marjoram and a sprig of thyme, 



38 National Training School for Cookery. 



take away the stalks, and rub the leaves through a strainer, 
or chop them up finely on a board. 

N.B. — The stalks of the herbs are bitter to taste, and can therefore only be 
used for flavouring, and not for eating. 

8. We put the meat, suet, and two tablespoons fid of bread 
crumbs into a basin, and mix them together. 

9. We now add the herbs, half an ounce of flour, and a 
teaspoonful of salt. 

N. B. — If liked, a little chopped onion or chopped lemon peel might be added. 

10. We add one gill of stock to the basin, and mix all 
together lightly. 

11. We take a board, flour it, and turn the mixture on 
to it. 

12. We also flour our hands, to prevent the mixture from 
sticking. 

13. We form the mixture into little balls, and we should 
sprinkle a little flour over them. 

14. We break an egg on to a plate, and beat it very 
slightly with a knife. 

15. We put the balls into the egg, and egg them well all 
over. 

16. We now put them into the bread crumbs and cover 
them well, but not too thickly. 

N.B. — We must be careful to finger them as little as possible. 

17. We put the rissoles into a frying basket, a few at a 
time, as they must not touch each other. 

18. When the fat in the saucepan is quite hot and 
smoking, we put in the frying basket, and let the rissoles 
fry a pale brown. 

19. If there is not sufficient fat to cover the rissoles, we 
must shake the basket occasionally, that they may get fried 
on all sides alike. 

N.B. — If there be no frying-basket, we should carefully put the rissoles into 
the fat with a spoon, and then we must turn them over, so as to get 
them equally browned. 

20. We put a piece of kitchen paper on a plate. 

21. When the rissoles are fried, we turn them carefully 
on to the paper to drain off the g?'ease. 

22. For serving, we put them on a hot dish. 



Lessons on Re-Cooking Meat. — Minced Meat. 30 



COOKED MEAT. 

Lesson No. 7. 

MINCED MEAT. 

Average cost of " Minced Meat " with rice or potatoes. 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

Scraps of cold meat 3 

1 tablespoon ful of mushroom ketchup ( 

Pepper and salt I 

\ lb. of Patna rice or 1 lb. of potatoes i\ 

\ oz. of flour I 3 

1 gill of stock I 4 

IL 

Time required to cook the potatoes, half an hour ; to cook the mince, five minutes. 

Now we will show you how to make a Mince of cold 
meat. 

1. If the mince is served with rice (see Lesson on "Rice "), 
or if with mashed potatoes (see "Vegetables," Lesson No. 2. 

2. We put any scraps of cold meat on a board, and mince 
them up with a sharp knife. 

3. We put the minced meat, and half an ounce of flonr 
into a saucepan, with one gill of stock, and a tablespoonful 
of mushroom ketchup, and season it with pepper, and salt to 
taste. 

4. We put the saucepan on the fire, to let the mince just 
warm through. 

5. We should stir it occasionally, to prevent the meat 
from sticking to the bottom of the saucepan. 

6. For serving, we turn the mince on to a hot dish, with 
a border of boiled rice or mashed potato. 



40 National Traintjzg School for Cookery. 

AUSTRALIAN MEAT. 
Lesson No. i. 

MULLIGATAWNY. 

Average cost of " Mulligatawny Soup " (3 quarts) made 
from " Atistralian Meat." 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 lb. tin of Australian calf's head i o 

2 lbs. of Australian mutton i 2 

2 apples o 1 

2 leeks o 1 

2 carrots, 1 turnip o 1 ^ 

2 good-sized onions o 1 

2 tablespoonsful of flour \ 

1 tablespoonful of curry powder > o 1 

Salt and sugar ) 

A bouquet garni (of parsley, thyme, mar- \ 1 



joram and 2 bay leaves) j 2 

2 8 

Time required, three hotirs. 

Now we will show you how to make Mulligatawny Soup. 

1. We take a tin of Australian mutton and open it care- 
fully. 

2. We take a spoon and carefully remove all the fat 
from the top of the meat. 

N.B. — The fat should only be removed from that part of the meat which is 

required for immediate use. 
N.B. — The fat should be clarified, by putting it into boiling water, and 

when cold can then be used as dripping. 

3. We take two pounds of the mutton out of the tin, put 
it in a basin with two quarts of warm water. 

4. We take two apples, peel them, and put them on a plate. 

5. We cut the apples in quarters, cut out the core, and 
then cut the quarters into slices, and put them into a sauce- 
pan with two ounces of the clarified fat. 

6. We take one turnip and two good-sized onions, peel 
them, cut them in pieces, and put them in the saucepan. 

7. We put the saucepan on the fire, and give one stir to 
the vegetables with a wooden spoon. 



Lessons 071 Attstralian Meat. — Mulligatawny. 41 

8. We take two leeks t wash them well in cold water, and 
cut off the green tops of the leaves. 

9. We cut up the leeks and put them in the saucepan. 

10. We take two carrots, wash them, scrape them with a 
knife, cut them in pieces, and put them in the saucepan. 

11. We give one stir with a wooden spoon to mix the 
vegetables together, and let them fry for ten minutes. 

12. We also add a sprig of parsley, a sprig of thyme, a 
sprig of marjoram and two bay-leaves, tied tightly together 
with a piece of string. 

13. When the vegetables have fried for ten minutes wc 
take half a pint of the liquor (in which the meat is soaking), 
pour it into the saucepan, and let it boil and reduce to a 
quarter of a pint. 

14. We should stir the vegetables occasionally. 

15. We put two tablespooiisfid of flour and one tablespoon- 
fid of enrry powder into a basin, and mix them into a 
smooth paste with one gill (quarter of a pint) of the liquor. 

16. We stir this mixture into the saucepan with the 

vegetables. 

17. We now put the meat and the remaining liquor into 
the saucepan, put the lid on and let it come to the boil. 

18. When it boils we should put one saltspoonfid of salt 
and half a saltspoonfid of moist sugar into the saucepan. 

19. We now move the saucepan to the side of the fire 
and let it simmer for two hours and a half. 

20. We should watch it, and skim it occasionally with a 
spoon. 

21. After that time we strain the soup through a strainer 
into a basin. 

22. We pour the soup back into the saucepan. 

23. We open the two pound tin of calf's head, remove 
all the fat from the top, and stir the contents of the tin 
into the soup in the saucepan. 

24. For serving we pour the soup into a hot soup -tureen. 



42 National Training School for Cookery. 

AUSTRALIAN MEAT. 

Lesson No. 2. 

SAUSAGE ROLLS. 

Average cost of " Sausage Rolls " (about two dozen) made 
from " Australian Mince Meat!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of mince meat 37 

I lb. of flour , x\ 

£ lb. of dripping 4 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder 1 

Seasoning > | 

4 sage leaves f 

1 egg 1 

Time required, half an ho2ir. 

Now we will show you how to make Sausage Rolls. 

1. We take a tin of Australian mince meat and open it 
carefully. 

2. We take a spoon and carefully remove the fat from 
the top of the meat. 

N.B. — The fat should be clarified by putting it into a basin of boiling water, 
and when cold can then be used as dripping. 

3. We take half a pound of the mince meat out of the tin, 
put it in a basin, and season it well with pepper and salt. 

4. We take four sage leaves, put them on a board, and 
chop them up as finely as possible with a knife. 

5. We mix the chopped sage well into the mince meat with 
a spoon. 

6. Weputthreeqttartersofapou7idoffourmtod.noth.erb3.sin. 

7. We add to it one teaspoonful of baking powder, salt (as 
much as would cover a threepenny piece, and half a pound of 
clarified dripping. 

8. We rub the dripping 'well into thenar with our hands. 

N.B. — We must mix it thoroughly, and be careful not to leave any lumps. 



Lessons on Australian Meat. — Sausage Rolls. 43 



9. We add enough water to the flour to make it into a 
stiff paste. 

10. We flour the paste board. 

11. We turn the paste out on the board. 

N.B. — We should divide the paste in two, so as not to handle it too much. 

12. We take a rolling pin, flour it, and roll out each 
portion into a thin sheet, about one- eighth of an inch in 
thickness. 

13. We cut the paste into pieces about six inches square. 

14. We should collect all the scraps of paste (so that 
none is wasted), fold them together, and roil them out and 
cut them into squares. 

N.B. — There should be about two dozen squares of paste. 

15. We should put about a tablespoonful of the mince 
meat into the centre of each square of paste. 

16. We fold the paste round the meat, joining it smoothly 
down the centre, and pressing the ends of the paste together 
with our finger and thumb. 

17. We take a baking tin, grease it well, and place the 
sausage rolts on it. 

18. We break one egg on to a plate, and beat it slightly 
with a knife. 

19. We take a paste brush, dip it in the egg, and paint 
over the tops of the rolls. 

20. We place the tin in a hot oven to bake for 15 
minutes. 

N.B. — We should look at them once or twice, and turn them if necessary, so 
that they shall be equally baked. 

21. For serving we take the rolls off the tin and place 
them on a hot dish. 



44 National Training School for Cookery, 

AUSTRALIAN MEAT. 

Lesson No. 3. 

MEAT PIE. 

Average cost of a "Meat Pie" (a quart dish) made from 
Australian mutton or beef 'and kidneys. 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

i| lb. of Australian mutton or beef o 10 \ 

\ lb. do. kidneys o 37 

f lb. of flour o 1^ 

i lb. of dripping ) " 

Pepper and salt J 

Time required, ahout three-quarters of an hour. 

Now we will show you how to make a Meat Pie. 

1. We take a tin of Australian mutton or beef, and open 
it carefully. 

2. We take a spoon, and carefully remove the fat from 
the part of the meat which is required for use. 

N.B. — All the fat should not be removed, as the meat not required for 
immediate use will keep better with the fat on the top ; but a tin of 
Australian meat will not keep more than two or three days after it has 
once been opened. 

3. We take a tin of kidneys, open it carefully, and remove 
the fat from the part of the meat which is required for use. 

N.B. — The fat should be clarified, by putting it into boiling water, and 
when cold can then be used as dripping. 

4. We take one and a half pound of the meat {mutton or 
beef) out of the tin, and cut it neatly into nice sized pieces, 
and season the pieces with pepper and salt. 

5. We take half a pound of the kidneys, and cut them up 
in pieces. 

6. We put three-quarters of a pound of flour into a basin, 
with salt (to cover thinly a threepenny piece) . 

7. We take a quarter of a pound of clarified dripping and 
rub it well into the flour with our hands. 

N.B. — We should be careful not to leave any lumps. 



Lessons on Australian Meat. — Meat Pie. 45 

8. We add sufficient water to make it into a stiff paste; 
it will take rather less than one gill (quarter of a pint). 

9. We take a board, flour it, and put the paste on it. 

10. We take a quart pie-dish and fill it with the pieces 
of meat and kidney. 

11. We take a little of the jelly out of the tin and put it 
in the dish with the meat, to make the gravy. 

12. We take a rolling pin, flour it, and roll out the paste 
to the shape of the top of the pie-dish, only rather larger. 

N.B. — We should keep our hands floured, to prevent the paste sticking. 

13. We take a knife, dip it in the flour, and cut off a 
strip of the paste about one inch wide. 

N.B. — This strip should be cut off from round the edge of the paste, leaving 
the centre piece the size of the top of the pie-dish. 

14. We wet the edge of the pie-dish with water, and 
place the strip of paste round the edge. 

15. We now wet the strip of paste on the pie-dish. 

16. We take the piece of paste, lay it over the top of the 
pie-dish, pressing the edges together with our thumb. 

17. We take a knife, flour it, and trim off the rough 
edges of the paste. 

18. We take the knife, and with the back of the blade, 
we make little notches in the edge of the paste, pressing it 
with our thumb, to keep it in its proper place. 

19. We should make a small hole in the centre of the 
paste, to let out the steam, whilst it is baking. 

20. We can ornament the top of the pie with the remains 
of the paste, according to taste, and biush over the top of 
the pie with some white of egg. 

21. We put the pie into a quick oven to bake for half an 
hour. 

22. We must look at it occasionally, to see that it does 
not burn. After that time it is ready for serving. 



46 National Training School for Cookery, 



AUSTRALIAN MEAT. 

Lesson No. 4. 

RISSOLES. 

Average cost of " Rissoles," made from Australian meat 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

h, lb. of Australian meat , . . ^k 

\ lb. of flour 1 

3 oz. of dripping i^ 

Salt and pepper ) x 

A few sprigs of dried herbs , j * 

1 egg 1 

2 oz. of vermicelli or some bread crumbs .... I i 
Clarified dripping (for frying) J 2 

7* 

Time required, one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Rissoles of 
Australian meat. 

1. We put one pound of clarified dripping into a saucepan 
and put it on the fire to heat. 

N. B. — We must watch it and be careful it does not burn. 

2. We put half a p07ind of flour into a basin with salt (to 
cover thinly a threepenny piece), and three ounces of clarified 
dripping. 

3. We rub the dripping well into the flour with our hands, 
until it is quite a powder. 

4. We then add a little cold water and mix it into a stiff 
paste. 

5. We flour a board and turn the paste out on to it. 

6. We take a tin of Australian meat, open it carefully, 
and with a spoon remove all the fat off the part of the 
meat required for immediate use. 

N.B.— The /at should be clarified by putting it into boiling water ; and 
when cold can then be used for dripping. 

7. We take half a pound of meat out of the tin and scrape 
off as much of the jelly as possible. 



Lessons on Australian Meat. — Rissoles. 47 

8. We put the meat on a board and chop it up as finely 
as possible. 

N.B. — Minced meat might be used, which would not of course require 
chopping up. 

9. We take a small bunch of dried herbs and rub the 
leaves into a powder. 

N.B. — The stalks of the herbs need not be thrown away, as they can be used 
in soups for flavouring. 

10. We sprinkle the herbs over the meat, also a little 
pepper and salt, and a little flour. 

11. We take a rolling pin and roll out the paste as thin as 
possible. 

12. We cut the paste into rounds with a cutter (which 
should be dipped in flour) ; the rounds should be rather 
larger than the top of a tea-cup. 

13. We put some meat into the centre of each round of 
paste. 

14. We break an egg on to a plate and beat it up 
slightly with a knife. 

15. We take a paste-brush, dip it in the egg, and just wet 
the edges of the paste with the egg. 

16. We fold the paste carefully over the meat, pressing 
the edges together with our thumbs. 

17. We take two ounces of vermicelli and rub it between 
our hands, crushing it up as finely as possible. 

18. We put this crushed vermicelli on to a piece of 
paper. 

19. We put the rissoles into the plate of egg, and egg 
them well all over with the brush. 

20. We then turn them into the crushed vermicelli, and 
cover them well with it but not too thickly. 

N.B. — We must be careful to finger them as little as possible, so as not to 
rub off any of the egg or vermicelli, or the rissoles will burst while frying. 

N.B. — Bread crumbs might be used instead of vermicelli. 

21. We take a frying basket and put in the rissoles ; we 
must be careful that they do not touch each other. 

22. When the fat in the saucepan is quite hot and 



48 National Training School for Cookery. 

smoking, we put in the frying-basket and let the rissoles fry 
for a minute or two until they have become a pale brown. 

23. We take a piece of kitchen paper and put it on a 
plate. 

24. As the rissoles are fried we turn them from the fry- 
ing-basket on to the piece of paper to drain off the grease. 

25. We then put them on a hot dish and they are ready 
for serving. 



Lessons on Australian Meat. — Savoury Hash. 49 

AUSTRALIAN MEAT. 

Lesson No. 5. 

SAVOURY HASH. 

Average cost of a "Savoury Hash" made from Aus- 
tralian Mutton. 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 
\\ lb. of Australian mutton o \o\ 

1 oz. of butter o I 

2 oz. of flour J 

2 an onion - o o\ 

1 sprig of thyme and marjoram ) 

2 sprigs of parsley i x 

Pepper and salt j ° °4 

1 dessertspoonful of mushroom ketchup. ... o o| 

1 of 

Time required, about ten minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Savoury Hash. 

1. We put one ounce of butter into a saucepan and put it 
on the fire to melt. 

2. We take half an onion, peel it, and cut it in slices. 

3. We put the onion into the butter. 

4. We also stir in half an ounce of flour, and let all fry 
for a minute or two to brown. 

5. We take a tin of Australian mutton, open it carefully, 
and remove the fat from the part of the meat required for 
immediate use. 

N.B. — We should clarify the fat by putting it into boiling water, and when it 
is cold it can be used as dripping. 

6. We take one and a half pound of the mutton out of the tin. 

7. If all the meat is required for present use, we should 
turn it all out of the tin, and we should then rinse out the 
tin with half a pint of warm water to make the gravy for 
the hash. 

N.B. — If all the meat has not been taicen out of the tin, we should take some 
of the jelly out of the tin, and melt it in half a pint of warm water to 
make the gravy. 

D 



50 National Training School for Cookery. 

8. We pour this gravy into the saucepan, with the flour 
and butter, and stir well until it boils and thickens. 

9. We now move the saucepan to the side of the fire to 
keep warm. 

10. We take a sprig or two of parsley (wash it and dry it 
in a cloth), and a sprig of marjoram and thyme, take away 
the stalks, and chop up the leaves finely on a board. 
(There should be about a dessertspoonful.) 

11. We cut up the meat into neat pieces, and sprinkle 
over each piece some of the chopped herbs, and a little pepper 
and salt. 

12. We put the meat into the saucepan of sazice, and let 
it just warm through for about five minutes. 

13. We now pour into the sauce a dessertspoonful of 
mushroom ketchup. 

14. For serving we put the meat on a hot dish, and strain 
the sauce over it. 



Lessons on Australian Meat. — Mince. 51 



AUSTRALIAN MEAT. 

Lesson No. 6. 

MINCE. 

Average cost of "Mince" served with " Mashed Potatoes'* 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 lb. of Australian mince meat . . . , 7 

i\ lb. of potatoes 13 

i"oz. of butter , 1 

1 tablespoonful of milk o\ 

I tablespoonful of mushroom ketchup ) 

Salt and pepper , j 



lO'i 



Time required, about forty minutes. 

Now we will show you how to make 2. Mince, served with 
Mashed Potatoes. 

1. We take one pound and a half of potatoes, wash them well 
in cold water, and scrub them clean with a scrubbing brush. 

2. We take a sharp knife, peel them, and carefully cut 
out the eyes and any black specks about the potato. 

3. We put them into a saucepan with cold water, enough 
to cover them, and sprinkle over them one teaspoonfid of 
salt. 

4. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil the potatoes 
for, from twenty minutes to half an hour. 

5. We should take a fork and put it into the potatoes ', to 
feel if the centre is quite tender. 

6. When they are sufficiently boiled, we drain off all the 
water, and stand the saucepan by the side of the fire, with 

t the lid half on, to ste am the potatoes. 

7. We put one ounce of butter, and 07ie tablespoonful of 
milk into a small saucepan, and put it on the fire to boil. 

8. When the potatoes have become quite dry, we should 
t take the saucepan off the fire and stand it on a piece of 

paper on the table. 



52 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We should mash them up smoothly with a spoon or 
fork. 

N.B. — The best way to mash potatoes is to rub them through a wire sieve , 
we can then be sure there are no lumps left. 

10. When the milk boils we should pour it into the 
mashed potatoes, and stir it till it is quite smooth. 

11. We add pepper and salt according to taste. 

12. We stand the saucepan of mashed potatoes by the side 
of the fire to keep warm until required for use. 

13. We take a tin of A ustralian mince meat, open it care- 
fully, and remove all the fat from the part of the meat 
required for immediate use. 

N.B. — This fat should be clarified by putting it into boiling water, and when 
cold it can be used as dripping. 

14. We take one potmd of the mince out of the tin, put it 
in a saucepan with one tablespoonful of mushroom ketchup, 
and stir it into a paste. 

15. We put the saucepan on the fire and let the mince 
just warm through. 

N.B. — We should be very careful that it does not boil, or the meat will get 
hardened. 

16. For serving we make a wall of the mashed potatoes 
round the edge of a hot dish, and we pour the mince in the 
centre ; we should stand the dish in front of the fire to 
colour the potato a pale brown. 



Cooking Meat. — {Entrees). — Indian Cttrry. 53 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. i. 

CURRY. 

Average cost of a " Curry (Indian) of Rabbit" &c. 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 rabbit, is. gd., or chicken, etc 2 g 

Half an ounce of coriander seed 

2 cloves of garlic 

1 dessertspoonful of turmerick 

8 berries of red pepper 

2 inches of the stick of cinnamon 

6 cardamums 

A small piece of green ginger, about the 

size of a nut 

5 small onions I 

Salt j ° 2 

3 ounces of fresh butter , o 5! 

Half a pint of cream 1 o 

The juice of half a lemon o of 

4 "* 

Time required, about two hours. 



Now we will show you how to make a Ctirry. 

1. We take a rabbit [which has been skinned and pro- 
perly prepared for cooking] and put it on a board. 

2. We cut it up in the same way as for carving, taking 
care that the pieces are nearly all of one size. 

N.B. — Chicken, veal, and other meats would serve the purpose for curry as 
well as rabbit. 

3. We take a quarter of an ounce of coriander seed, put it 
into the mortar, and pound it very fine with a pestle. 

4. We take the pounded seed out of the mortar, and put 
it on a piece of paper ; we must scrape out the mortar 
cleanly so that none be lost. 

5. We take two cloves of garlic, peel them with a sharp 
knife and place them in the mortar. 

6. We also put into the mortar a dessertspoonful of tur- 
merick. % 



54 National Training School for Cookery. 

7. We add eight berries of red pepper and one inch of the 
stick of cinnamon. 

8. We put in four cardamums. 

9. We take a piece of green ginger about the size of a 
nut and slice it very thinly. 

10. We take three small onions and peel off the two outer 
skins. 

11. We divide the onions into quarters and place them 
and the sliced ginger in the mortar. 

12. We must now pound up all these spices and the 
onions as finely as possible with the pestle. 

13. We now add to them the pounded coriaiider seed and 
mix them all up together. 

14. We turn all this pounded mixture out of the mortar 
into a half-pint basin. 

15. We take a teacupfnl of cold water and rinse out the 
mortar, and then pour the water on to the pounded mixture 
in the basin. 

16. We take the pieces of rabbit and wash them in cold 
water. 

17. We take the pieces of rabbit out of the cold water 
and place them on a sieve to drain. 

18. We take a stew-pan and put in it three ounces of fresh 

hitter. 

19. We put the stew-pan on the fire to melt the butter. 

N.B. — We must be careful that it does not burn. 

20. We take two small onions and peel off the two outer 
skins. 

21. We divide the onions in half down the centre, and 
cut them up so that the slices are in half circles. 

22. We put these sliced onions into the melted butter, 
we also add two cardamums, and let them fry a pale 
brown. 

23. We then take the onions carefully out of the stew- 
pan with a slice, and place them on a piece of whitey-brown 
paper to drain off the grease. 



Cooking Meat. — {Entries) — Indian Curry. 55 

24. We now take the basin of spices, and add as much 
cold water as will make the basin three parts full. 

25. We add to the basin of spices a small dessertspoon- 
ful of salt. 

26. We now pour all the contents of the basin into the 
melted butter in the stew-pan, to cook for about twenty 
minutes, stirring well all the time with a wooden spoon. 

N.B. — To test when the spices are sufficiently cooked, you should smell 
them, and if they are quite done, no particular spice should predo- 
minate. 

27. We now place the pieces of rabbit in the stew-pan 
to brown. 

28. We must turn the pieces of rabbit occasionally so 
that they get brown on all sides. 

29. We now pour into the stew-pan a teacupful of cold 
water to make the meat tender. 

30. We put the lid on the stew-pan, and let it all cook 
steadily for about an hour. 

31. We must watch it carefully, and stir it perpetually. 

N.B. — A good deal of stirring is required. 

32. We must add by degrees a teacupful of cold water, 
to wash down the bits of spice which will stick to the sides 
of the stew-pan. 

33. We must also add by degrees, half a pint of cream, or 
good milk \water might even be used instead] and mix it 
well together with a wooden spoon. 

N.B. — We must be careful that no pieces of meat or spices* stick to the 
bottom of the pan. 

34. We now take half the fried onions, chop them up 
finely, and add them to the curry. 

35. We then put into the mortar five coriander seeds, and 
one inch of the stick of cinnamon, and pound them well 
together with a pestle. 

36. When the rabbit is quite done, we take the pieces 
out with a fork, arrange them nicely on a hot dish, and 
pour the gravy round. 

37. We then sprinkle over the rabbit the remainder of 



56 National Training School for Cookery. 

the fried onions, the pounded cimiamon, and coriander 
seed. 

38. We take a fresh lemon, cut it in half, and squeeze 
all the juice of it through a strainer over the rabbit, and it 
is ready for serving. 

N.B — Boiled Patna rice should be served with the above curry. 



Cooking Meat. — [Entries!) Quenelles of Veal. 57 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. 2. 

QUENELLES OF VEAL. 

Average cost of " Quenelles of Veal [about 1 2) and the 
Sauce!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 lb. of the fillet of veal i 3 

2 oz. of butter o 2 

2| oz. of flour o o\ 

f pint of 2nd white stock o 3! 

2 eggs o 2 

1 dozen button mushrooms o 6 

1 gill of cream o 6 

1 teaspoonful of lemon juice ) 1 

Salt J 2 

2 nf 
7Yw£ required, about three-quarters of an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Quenelles of Veal. 

1. We put one ounce of butter and two oimces of flour into 
a stew-pan and mix them well together with a wooden 
spoon. 

2. We add one gill (quarter of a pint) of second white 
stock. 

3. We put the stewpan on the fire and stir well until it 
boils and thickens, and leaves the sides of the stewpan. 

4. We now pour this mixture or panada (as it is called) 
on to a plate. 

5. We stand the plate aside to cool. 

6. We take one pound of the fillet of veal and put it on 
a board. 

7. We take a sharp knife, cut away all the skin and fat, 
and cut up the meat into small pieces. 

8. We put these pieces of veal into a mortar, and pound 
them well with the pestle. 

9. We place a wire sieve over the plate ; we take this 



58 National Training School for Cookery. 

pounded meat and pass it through the sieve, rubbing it with 
a wooden spoon. 

10. When the panada on the plate is cold, we put half of 
it, and one egg in the mortar, and pound it to a cream. 

11. We then add half the meat, and salt and pepper to 
taste, and pound all well together with the pestle. 

12. We put into the mortar the remainder of the panada, 
break in another egg, and add the rest of the meat. 

13. We pound these well together again with the pestle. 

14. We turn the mixture from the mortar into a basin. 

15. We take a saute-pan and butter it inside. 

16. We take a dessertspoon, and fill it with the mixture, 
shaping it to the form of an oval with a knife, which we 
must dip occasionally into hot water to prevent the mixture 
from sticking. 

17. We take another dessertspoon, and dip it into boiling 
water. 

18. We scoop the quenelle from the first spoon into the 
second spoon, and put it into the saute-pan, and continue 
doing this till we have used up all the mixture. 

19. We must now make the sauce, to be served with the 

quenelles. 

20. We take a stewpan, and put in one ounce of butter, 
and three quarters of an ounce of flour. 

21. We put the stewpan on the fire, and mix them 
together with a wooden spoon. 

22. We take one dozen of button mushrooms, cut off the 
end of the stalks, and wash them well in cold water. 

23. We take them out of the water, put them upon a 
board, and peel them carefully with a sharp knife. 

24. We pour half a pint of second white stock to the 
mixture in the stewpan, and add the mushroom peelings for 
flavouring. 

25. We must stir well until it boils and thickens. 

26. We stand the stewpan by the side of the fire with the 
lid half on, and let it simmer for ten minutes. 



Cooking Meat. — (Entrdes.) Quenelles of Veal. 59 

27. We then take a spoon, and skim off all the butter 
from the top of the sauce. 

28. We now stir into the saiice one gill of cream, and 
stand the stewpan aside to keep warm, until required for 
use. 

29. We take the peeled mushrooms and put them in a 
stewpan with a piece of butter the size of a nut. 

30. We squeeze over them a teaspoonful of lemon juice 
and pour in one tablespoonfid of cold water, 

31. We put the stewpan on the fire and just bring them 
to the boil. 

32. We now pour boiling water carefully into the saute* 
pan, enough to cover the quenelles. 

N.B. — We must be careful to pour the water very gently into the saut^-pan 
or the quenelles will be spoiled. 

33. We put the saute-pan on the fire to poach the quenelles 
for ten minutes. 

N.B. — We must watch them and occasionally turn them carefully with a spoon. 

34. When the quenelles are done, we lift them carefully 
out of the water, and lay them on a cloth to drain off the 
water. 

35. We must arrange them tastily in a circle on a hot 
dtsh. 

36. We fill in the centre of the dish with the boiled mush- 
rooms. 

N.B. — Peas (see "Vegetables," Lesson No. 9) or spinach (see "Vegetables," 
Lesson No. 8) may be served with them instead, according to taste. 

37. We take the stewpan off the fire, and pour the sauce' 
through a strainer over the quenelles. They are now ready 
for serving. 



60 National Training School for Cookery. 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. 3. 

BRAISED FILLETS OF BEEF. 

Average cost of "Braised Fillets of Beef ! y 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 lb. of fillet of beef i 4 

\ lb. of the fat of bacon o 3 

A bouquet garni of parsley, thvme, and ) x 

bay leaf J ° 0:i 

2 young carrots o 1 

1 onion, and a f of a stick of celery o 1 

A pint of good stock o j\ 

2 45 

Time required (the stock should be maae the day before), about one hour and a half. 

Now we will show you how to lard and braise Fillets of Beef. 

1. We take one pound of fillet of beef (cut from the under- 
cut of the sirloin), and put it on a board. 

2. We take a sharp knife, and cut the beef into small 
round fillets, to about the size of the top of a breakfast cup, 
and about three-quarters of an inch in thickness, and trim 
them neatly. 

3. We take a strip of the fat of bacon (nearest the rind 
is best, as it is harder), about one inch wide. 

4. We take a sharp knife and cut up this piece of bacon 
into little strips, an inch long, and one-eighth of an inch in 
width and thickness. 

5. We take each fillet and hold it in a clean cloth. 

6. We take a larding needle with a little strip of bacon 
in it, and lard each fillet neatly in regular rows ; until one 
side of the fillet is entirely covered with strips of bacon. 

7. When we have larded all the fillets, we lay them care- 
fully in a clean saute-pan. 

8. We add a bouquet garni, consisting of a sprig of 
parsley, thyme, and a bay leaf, all tied neatly and tightly 
together. 



Cooking Meat. — (En fades. ) Braised Fillets of Beef. 6 1 

9. We take two young carrots, scrape them clean with 
a knife, and cut them in halves. 

10. We take an onion and peel it carefully. 

11. We add these vegetables and a quarter of a stick of 
celery to the fillets in the saute-pan. 

12. We now pour in a pint of good stock, put the saute- 
pan on the fire, and baste the fillets continually. 

N.B. — The stock must not cover the meat. 

13. We take a piece of kitchen paper, and cut a round 
to the size of the saute-pan and butter it. 

14. As soon as the stock boils, we lay this round of paper 
on the fillets in the saute-pan. 

N.B. — This paper is to prevent the meat browning too quickly. 

15. We must lift the paper every now and then, when 
we require to baste the fillets. 

16. We should put the saute-pan into a very hot oven, 
to brown the fillets. 

17. We let the pint of stock reduce to a half glaze, which 
will take about half an hour. 

18. We must watch it, frequently raise the paper, and 
baste the fillets with the stock. 

N.B. — If the fillets are not brown enough, we take a salamander and heat it 
in the fire. 

19. We hold the salamander over the fillets, to brown 
them a nice colour. 

20. We take the fillets carefully out of the saute-pan, and 
arrange them on a hot dish in a circle, on a border of 
masked potatoes. (See " Vegetables," Lesson No. 2.) 

N. B. — We must stand this dish on the hot plate, or near the fire, to keep 
warm until the sauce is ready. 

N.B. — The centre of the dish may be filled in with mixed vegetables, i.e., 
peas and beans, which should be cut in the shape of dice, carrots and 
turnips cut with a cutter, to the size of the peas. 

21. We put the saute-pan on the fire, and let the sauce 
reduce to a half glaze. 

22. We then strain the glaze round the meat and it is 
ready for serving. 



62 National Training School for Cookery. 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. 4. 

MUTTON CUTLETS. 

Average cost of " Mutton Cutlets!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s, d. 

3 lbs. of the best end of the neck of mutton . . 30 

Bread crumbs . o 1 

*egg o 1 

Salt and pepper o oj 

3 ounces of clarified butter o 3 



3 54 
Time required, about three- quarters of an hour. 

Now we will show you how to fry Mutton Cutlets. 

1. We take three pounds of the best end of the neck of 
mutton and put it on a board. 

2. We take a saw and saw off the end of the rib bone, 
leaving the cutlet bone three inches in length. 

3. We saw off the chine bone, which lies at the back of 
the cutlets. 

4. We joint each cutlet with the chopper. 

5. We take a sharp knife and cut off each cutlet close to 
the bone. 

6. We take a cutlet-bat, wet it, and beat each cutlet to 
about half an inch in thickness. 

7. We trim the cutlet round, leaving about half an inch 
of the rib bone bare. 

8. We form the cutlets to a good shape. 

N.B. — The trimmings of the cutlets should be put aside, as the fat may be 
clarified and used as dripping. 

9. We take a wire sieve and stand it over a piece of 
paper. 

10. We take some crumb of bread and rub it through the 
sieve. 



Cooking Meat.— (Entries.) Mutton Cutlets. 63 

11. We take one egg and beat it on a plate with a knife. 

12. We season the cutlets on both sides with, pepper and 
salt. 

13. We lay them in the egg, and egg them well all over 
with a brush. 

14. We then put them in the bread crumbs and cover 
them well. 

N.B. — We should be careful to finger them as little as possible, and lift 
them by the bare bone. 

15. We take a saute-pan, and pour in it three ounces of 
melted clarified butter, lard, or clarified dripping (see 
Lesson " Frying "). 

16. We now lay in the cutlets, with the bones to the 
centre of the saute-pan. 

17. We must now put the saute-pan on a very quick fire 
for about seven minutes. 

18. We must watch and turn the cutlets when they have 
become a light brown, so as to fry them the same colour on 
both sides. 

19. We place a piece of whitey-brown paper on a plate. 

20. When the cutlets are done, we take them carefully 
out with a fork, and lay them on the paper to drain off the 
grease. 

N.B. — We should be careful not to stick the fork into the meat (or the gravy 
will run out), but into the fat. 

21. For serving, we arrange them nicely on a dish, in a 
circle, one leaning over the other ; the centre may be filled 
with any vegetable according to taste. 



64 National Training School for Cookery. 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. 5. 

CHAUD FROID OF CHICKEN. 

Average cost of " Chaud Froid of Chicken!' 
INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 chicken 2 9 

\ a pint of white sauce o 8^ 

1 gill of cream o 6~ 

2 tablespoonsful of aspic jelly ) 

Chopped pieces of aspic jelly J * 5 

Mixed vegetables o 9 

1 gill of mayonnaise sauce o 55 

6 6| 

Time required, about one hour and three-quarters. 



Now we will show you how to make Chaud froid of 
Chicken. 

1. We put half a pint of white sauce (see " Sauces," 
Lesson No. i), in a stewpan. 

2. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil, and stir well 
with a wooden spoon till the sauce is reduced to one gill (or 
quarter of a pint) 

3. We then add one gill (or quarter of a pint) of cream> 
and stir again until it just boils. 

4. We take a tammy sieve and stand it over a basin. 

5. We take the stewpan off the fire and pass the contents 
through the sieve into the basin. 

6. When it is all passed through into the basin, we stir 
in two tables poonsf id of aspic jelly (see "Jelly," Lesson No. 2). 

N.B. — This aspic jelly should be made with chicken as well as veal. 

7. We take a cold roast chicken (see "Trussing a Fowl for 
Roasting "), and put it on a board. 

N.B. — The chicken must be young, as the flesh should be as white as 
possible. 

8. We cut it up in the same way as for carving, taking 



Cooking Meat. — (Entries) Chaud Froid of Chicken. 6$ 

care that the pieces are all of one size. We must remove 
the skin and neatly trim each piece. 

9. We take these pieces of chicken and dip them in the 
sauce, covering them well over. 

10. We stand a drainer over a dish. 

11. We place the pieces of chicken on the drainer, and let 
them remain until the sauce is set over each piece. 

12. For serving- we arrange the pieces of chicken on 
chopped aspic jelly (see "Jelly," Lesson No. 2,) in a circle on 
a dish. 

13. The centre should be filled in with mixed vegetables, 
i.e., cooked potato, carrot, and beet-root, stamped out with a 
vegetable cutter, cooked French beans, cut to the shape of 
dice, and green peas, all mixed together, with two table- 
spoonsful of mayonnaise sauce. (See " Sauces," Lesson No. 3.) 



66 National Training School for Cookery^ 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. 6. 

VEAL CUTLETS. 

Average cost of " Grilled or Fried Veal Cutlets. 

INGREDIENTS, 

s. d. 
3 lbs. of the best end of the neck of veal .... 3 o 

Savory thyme \ 

A very little lemon rind > o of 

1 bunch of parsley ) 

1 ounce of butter . . „ o 1 

1 teaspoonful of lemon juice o o| 

1 egg o 1 

Pepper and salt 

Bread crumbs ....*.., 



} 



c I 



3 4 

£ lb. of bacon for rolls o 6 

3 10 

Time required, half an hour. 



IN ow we will show you how to grill Veal Cutlets. 

1. We take three pounds of the best end of the neck of 
veal, or veal cutlet, and put it on a board. 

2. We take a saw and saw off the end of the rib bone, 
leaving the cutlet bone three inches in length. 

3. We saw off the chine bone, which lies at the back of 

the cutlets. 

4. We joint each cutlet with the chopper. 

5. We take a sharp knife and cut off each cutlet close to 
the bone, so as to get an extra cutlet between each. bone. 

6. We take a cutlet bat and beat each cutlet to about 
half an inch in thickness. 

7. We trim the cutlet round, leaving about half an inch 
of the rib bone bare. 

8. We form the cutlets to a good shape. 

N.B. — The trimmings of the cutlets should be put aside, as the fat may bfc 
clarified, and used for dripping. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — (Entries.) Veal Cutlets. 6 J 

9. We take a little savoury thyme, put it on a board, and 
chop it up very finely (the thyme, when chopped, should fill 
a saltspoon). 

10. We take a small bunch of parsley, wash it in cold 
water, and dry it in a cloth. 

11. We chop this parsley up very finely, on a board. 

12. We put one ounce of butter on a kitchen plate, and 
put it in the oven to melt. 

13. When the butter is melted, we add a teaspoonful of 
lemon juice, and the chopped thyme, and parsley. 

14. We take a lemon, wipe it clean with a cloth. 

15. We take a grater, and just give one grate of the 
lemon rind, over the other ingredients. 

16. We add one egg and pepper and salt to taste, and beat 
all up together with a knife. 

17. We take a wire sieve and stand it over a piece of 
paper. 

18. We take some crumb of bread and rub it through the 
sieve. 

19. We dip each cutlet into the plate, and cover them 
all over with the mixture. 

20. We then put them in the bread crumbs and covet 
them well. 

N.B.— We should finger them as little as possible. 

21. We take a gridiron and hold it to the fire to warm. 

22. We arrange the cutlets on the gridiron. 

23. We place the gridiron in front of a bright fire, but 
not too near, or the bread crumbs will burn before the 
cutlets are sufficiently cooked. 

24. We should then let them grill for about ten minutes, 
and when they have become a pale brown on one side, we 
should turn the gridiron so as to brown them on both sides 
alike. 

25. For serving, we arrange the cutlets on a wall of 
mashed potatoes, (see " Vegetables," Lesson No. 2) in a 
circle on a hot dish, one leaning over the other \ the centre 



68 National Training School for Cookery, 

may be filled in with rolls of bacon, (see below) and with a 
thick brown sauce (see " Sauces," Lesson No. 2). 



For Rolls of Bacon. 

1. We cut some thin slices of bacon, about two incites 
wide, and about four inches in length. 

2. We roll up these strips of bacon. 

3. We take a skewer and run it through the centre of 
each roll of bacon. 

4. We place this skewer, with the bacon, on a tin and 
put it in the oven for six minutes. 

5. For serving, we take the rolls of bacon off the skewer, 
and arrange them in the centre of the cutlets \ as described 
above. 



Cooking Meat. — (Entrdes.) Fricassee of Chicken. 69 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. 7. 

FRICASSEE OF CHICKEN. 



Average cost of a " Fricassee 
of Chicken!' 



INGREDIENTS. 



1 young chicken 2 

i small carrot 

* an onion 

1 stick of celery 

2 or 3 sprigs of parsley 

t sprig of thyme 

1 bay leaf 

2 cloves 

6 peppercorns 

1 blade of mace 

1 \ pint of second white stock . . o 

1 oz. of butter o 

i| oz. of flour , , o 

2 dozen of button mushrooms ) 

Fried bread ) x 

1 gill of cream o 



4 "£ 



Time required, about o?ie hour and a half. 



Average cost of a " Fricassee 
of Cold Chicken!' 



INGREDIENTS. 



\ a carrot . . . 

\ of an onion I 

2 a stick of celery \ o 

A bouquet garni, of parsley, j 

thyme, and bay-leaf J 

1 gill of cream o 

1 clove j 

3 peppercorns ; o 

I a blade of mace ) 

1 pint of good white stock .... o 

I an oz. of butter ) 

1 oz. of flour / ° 

1 dozen button mushrooms .... o 
Fried bread ) 



Salt 



Time required, about forty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Fricassee of 
Chicken. 

1. We take a young chicken, clean it, draw it (see "Trussing 
a Fowl for Roasting," from Note i to Note 12), and skin it. 

2. We cut the chicken into joints, and put them in a 
basin of cold water for about ten minutes. 

3. After that time we take the pieces of chicken out of 
the water and dry them in a clean cloth. 

4. We take one small carrot, wash and scrape it clean, 
and cut it into slices. 

5. We take half an onion and peel it. 

6. We take one stick of celery and two or three sprigs of 
parsley, and wash them in cold water. 



70 National Training School for Cookery. 

7. We put these vegetables into a stewpan. , 

8. We add to them one sprig of thyme \ one bay leaf, two 

cloves, six peppercorns, and one blade of mace. 

9. We now put in the pieces of chicken, and add one 
pint and a half of second white stock. 

10. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil gently for 
about half an hour. 

11. When the pieces of chicken are quite done, we take 
them out of the stewpan, wash them in a basin of cold 
water, and dry them in a cloth. 

12. We strain the stock from the stewpan into the basin. 

13. We take two dozen of button mushrooms, cut off the 
ends of the stalks, wash them in cold water, and peel 
them. 

14. We take the peeled mushrooms, and put them into 
the stewpan with a piece of butter the size of a nut. 

15. We squeeze over them a teaspoonful of lemon juice, 
and pour in a tablespoojtfid of cold water. 

16. We put the stewpan on the fire and just bring them 
to the boil. 

17. We then take the stewpan off the fire and turn them 
on to a plate. 

18. We wash out the stewpan, and then put in it one 

ounce of butter. 

19. We put the stewpan on the fire to melt the butter. 

20. We then add one and a half ounce of flour to the 
butter, stirring it well with a wooden spoon. 

21. We now remove all the grease from the chicken stock, 
and add it and the trimmings of the mushrooms to the 
stewpan, and stir well until it boils. 

22. We must now move the stewpan to the side of the 
fire, and let it boil gently for twenty minutes. The cover 
of the stewpan should be half on. 

23. After that time we take a spoon and carefully skim 
off all the butter that will have risen to the top of the sauce. 

24. We now put the stewpan over the fire to boil, and 



Cooking Meat.— {Entries.) Fricassee of Chicken. 71 

let the sauce reduce to about one pint, and then add one gill 
of cream. 

25. We take the pieces of chicken and put them in 
another stewpan, with the two dozen of button mushrooms. 

26. When the sauce is sufficiently reduced, we strain it 
over the chicken. 

27. We then stand the stewpan in a saucepan of hot 
water over the fire until the chicken is quite hot. 

28. For serving, we arrange the fricassee of chicken on a 
hot dish, with fried bread (as described in "Vegetables," 
Lesson No. 8, Note 13 to Note 17). 



Now we will show you how to make a Fricassee of Cold 
Chicken. 

1. We take some cold roast or boiled chicken. 

2. We cut the chicken up into neat pieces, and take away 
the skin. 

3. We put one pint of good white stock (see " Lesson on 
Stock "), and the chicken bones into a stewpan. 

4. We take half a carrot, wash and scrape it clean, and 
cut it into slices. 

5. We take a quarter of an onion and peel it. 

6. We take half a stick of celery and wash it in cold 
water. 

7. We put these vegetables into the stewpan. 

8. We add to them a bouquet garni (consisting of a 
sprig of parsley, one sprig of thyme, and one bay leaf tied 
tightly together), one clove, three peppercorns, and half a 
blade of mace. 

9. We put the stewpan on the fire and let it boil for 
twenty minutes. 

10. After that time we strain the stock into a basin. 



72 National Training School for Cookery. 

11. We take one dozen of button mushrooms, cut off the 
end of the stalks, wash them in cold water, and peel them. 

12. We take the peeled mushrooms and put them in a 
stewpan with a piece of butter the size of a nut. 

13. We squeeze over them a teaspoonful of lemon juice, 
and pour in a tablespoonfid of cold water. 

14. We put the stewpan on the fire and just bring them 
to the boil. 

15. We then take the stewpan off the fire and turn them 
on to a plate. 

16. We put half an ounce of butter into a stewpan. 

17. We put the stewpan on the fire. When the butter is 
melted we put in one ounce of flour, stirring it well with a 
wooden spoon. 

18. We now add the chicken stock, and the mushroom 
peelings, and stir the sauce well until it boils. 

19. We let it boil for ten minutes to cook the flour. 

20. After that time we add one gill of cream, and salt to 
taste. 

21. We put the pieces of chicken and the button mush- 
rooms into another stewpan. 

22. We strain the sauce over the chicken, and then stand 
the stewpan, in a saucepan of hot water, over the fire until 
the chicken is quite hot. 

23. For serving, we arrange the fricassee of chicken on a 
hot dish, with some fried bread (as described in "Vegetables," 
Lesson No. 8, Note 13 to Note 17), put round the edge. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. —{Entries.) — Beef Olives. 73 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. 8. 

BEEF OLIVES. 

Average cost of " Beef Olives." 

INGREDIENTS. 

5. d. 
\\ lb. of beef or rump steak, or the fillet ) 

ofbeef ) 2 ° 

2 oz. of beef suet o x\ 

3 oz. of bread crumbs o d\ 

1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley o o| 

\ of a teaspoonful of chopped thyme and I x 

marjoram j °* 

A little grated lemon rind and nutmeg . . ) A 

Salt and pepper J ° ° 4 

1 egg o 1 

1 pint of brown sauce or stock i 2 



3 6 
Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Beef Olives. 

1. We take one pound and a half 'of beef ox rump steak, or 
the filet of beef and put it on a board. 

2. We cut the beef in slices about half an inch in thick- 
ness and four inches in length, and beat them out with a 
wet cutlet bat. 

N.B. — We should be careful that all the slices ara of the same size. 

3. We take the trimmings that remain, chop them up 
very finely, and put them in a basin. 

4. We take two ounces of beef suet, and put it on a board. 

5. We take a knife and cut away all the skin, and chop 
the suet up very finely. 

6. We stand a wire sieve over a piece of paper. 

7. We take some crumb of bread and rub it through the 
sieve. (There should be three ounces of bread crumbs) 

8. We take a little parsley and chop it up finely. (There 
should be one teaspoonful of chopped parsley) 



74 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We take a little thyme and marjoram and chop them 
up finely. (There should be about a quarter of a teaspoonful 
of chopped thyme and marjoram}} 

10. We add all these things (i.e., suet, bread crumbs, 
parsley, thyme, and marjoram) to the chopped beef in the 
basin. 

11. We also grate about half a teaspoonful of lemon rind, 
and nutmeg (as much as would cover a ^d. piece) into the 
basin. 

12. We season it with pepper and salt according to taste, 
and add one egg, and mix all well together with a wooden 
spoon. 

13. We take this mixture out of the basin, and form it 
into pieces the shape and size of a cork. 

14. We roll up each slice of beef, placing a piece of 
stuffing in the centre. 

15. We should tie each roll round with a piece of twine 
to fasten it securely together. 

16. We place these rolls in a stewpan, with about one 
pint of brown sauce (see " Sauces," Lesson No. 2), ox good 
stock (see Lesson on " Stock"). 

17. We put the stewpan on the fire and let them stew 
gently for three quarters of an hour. 

18. For serving, we should take off the twine from round | 
the beef olives, and arrange them on a hot dish in a circle, ; 
pouring the sauce round the edge ; the centre may be filled 
in with dressed spinach (see " Vegetables," Lesson No. 8), 
or with mashed potatoes (see " Vegetables," Lesson No. 2), 



Lessons on Cooking Meat.— {Entries.} — Irish Stew. 75 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. 9. 

IRISH STEW. 

Average cost of an " Irish Stew!' 
INGREDIENTS. 






3 lbs. of the best end of the neck of mutton 
or the scrag end 



s. d. 

3 o 



1 teaspoonful of salt .1 1 

1 saltspoonful of pepper J 

1 doz. of button onions or two moderate ones o 1 

6 large potatoes o 2 

3 3| 

Time required, about two hours. 

Now we will show you how to make an Irish 

Stew. 

1. We take the best end of the neck of mutton and cut 
and trim the cutlets in the same way as for "haricot 
mutton" (see "Entrees," Lesson No. 10, from Note I to 
Note 8). 

2. We place the cutlets in a stewpan. 

3. We sprinkle over them a teaspoonful of salt and a 
saltspoonful of pepper y and pour in one and a half pint of cold 
water. 

4. We put the stewpan on the fire, and when it has come 
to the boil we should skim it. 

5. We now draw the stewpan to the side of the fire, and 
let it simmer gently for one hour. 

6. We must watch it and skim it occasionally and re- 
move dX\ fat. 

7. We take half a dozen of potatoes y wash, scrub them, 
and peel them. 

8. We cut these potatoes in halves. 

9. We take one dozen of button onions, or two moderate- 
sized ones, and peel them carefully. 



7 6 * National Training School for Cookery. 

10. We add the onions and potatoes to the stew, and let 
it simmer for one hour. 

11. After that time we should take a fork and feel if the 
vegetables are quite tender. 

12. For serving we arrange the cutlets in a circle on a 
hot dish, and pour the sauce round, and the vegetables in the 
centre. 

N.B. — The scrag end of the neck of mutton might be used instead of the 
best end, but care should be taken in cleansing it before use. 



Cooking Meat. — {Entries.) — Haricot Miction, jj 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. io. 

HARICOT MUTTON. 

Average cost of " Haricot Mutton." 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

3 lbs. of the best end of the neck of mutton 3 o 

1 onion o o\ 

Pepper and salt ) . 

1 tablespoonful of flour . * . . . „ / 

1 pint of second stock o 3! 

1 carrot o oh 

x turnip o o£ 

1 dozen button onions o 1 

3 61 
Time required, about o?ie hour and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make Haricot Mutton. 

1. We take the best end of the neck of mutton and put it 
on a board. 

2. We take a saw and saw off the end of the rib bone, 
leaving the cutlet bone three inches in length. 

3. We saw off the chine bone which lies at the back of 
the cutlets. 

4. We joint each cutlet with a chopper. 

5. We take a sharp knife and cut off each cutlet. 

6. We take a cutlet-bat and beat each cutlet to about 
rather more than half an inch in thickness. 

7. We trim the cutlet round, leaving about half an inch 
of the rib bone bare. 

8. We form the cutlets to a good shape. 

N.B. — The trimmings of the cutlets should be put aside, as the fat may be 
clarified and used for dripping (see Lesson on " Frying "). 

9. We take one onion, peel it, and cut it in slices. 

10. We put the onion and the cutlets in a stewpan, with 
i two ounces of butter. 



J 8 National Training School for Cookery. 



11. We put the stewpan on a quick fire to fry the cutlets 
a nice brown. 

12. We must watch and turn the cutlets when they have 
become a light brown, so as to fry them the same colour 
on both sides : — We then remove the cictlets from the stew- 
pan. 

13. We should pour off the grease from the stewpan (and 
leave the onion), and then add one tablespoonful of flour, 
and pour in by degrees one pint of second stock, and stir well 
until it boils. 

14. We strain this sauce, and return the cutlets with the 
sauce into the stewpan. 

15. We take one carrot, wash it, and scrape it clean with 
a knife, and cut it in the shape of young carrots, or into 
fancy shapes with a cutter. 

16. We take one turnip, peel it, and cut it in very small 
dice. 

17. We take one dozen button onions and peel them very 
carefully, so as not to break them in pieces. 

18. We put the stewpan on the fire and let the meat 
stew gently for half an hour, then add the prepared vege- 
tables, and let all simmer for half an hour. 

19. After that time we should take a fork and feel if the 
vegetables are quite tender. 

. 20. For serving we arrange the cutlets in a circle on a 
hot dish with the vegetables in the centre ; we remove all 
grease from the sauce and pour it round. 

N.B. — The scrag end of the neck of mutton might be used instead of the 
best end, but care should be taken in cleansing it before use. 






Cooking Meat. — {Entries!) — Croquettes of Chicken. 79 



ENTREES. 
Lesson No. ii. 

CROQUETTES OR RISSOLES OF 
CHICKEN. 

Average cost of " Croquettes or Rissoles of Chicken ' 
(about 15). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

\ a cold chicken i 4.7 

2 oz. of lean ham or bacon o x\ 

6 mushrooms o 3 

\ oz. of flour ) Q z i 

1 oz. of butter J 4 

2 tablespoonsful of cream o 3 

1 gill of stock o 1 

Seasoning o oj 

1 teaspoonful of lemon juice o o\ 

1 egg o 1 

£ lb. of bread crumbs o 2 

2 6\ 
If for rissoles with paste — 

4 oz. of flour and 3 oz. of butter o 3^ 

2 9! 
Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Croquettes or Ris- 
soles of Chicken. 

1. We take the half chicke7i (either roasted or boiled), cut 
away all the flesh from the bones, and put it on a board. 

2. We cut away the skin, and mince the meat up very 
finely. 

3. We take the mushrooms, wash them, peel them, and 
mince them and the ham up finely on the board, mixing 

' them with the minced chicken. 

4. We put one ounce of butter in a stewpan, and put it on 
the fire. 

5. When the butter is melted, we stir in half an ounce of 
flour, and mix it to a smooth paste. 



80 National Training School for Cookery. 

6. We now add the stock, and stir again smoothly, until 
it boils and thickens. 

7. We move the stewpan to the side of the fire, and stir 
in two tablespoonsful of cream. 

8. We add one teaspoonful of lemon juice to the sauce. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to let any pips fall in. 

9. We season the sauce with pepper, and salt according to 
taste, and, if liked, we might grate about half a saltspoonful 
of nutmeg into it. 

10. We now stir in the minced chicken, ham, and mush- 
rooms until all are well mixed together. 

11. We take a plate, and turn the contents of the stew- 
pan on to it. 

12. We take a piece of kitchen paper, cut it to the size of 
the plate, butter it, and lay it on the top of the mixture, and 
stand the plate aside to cool. 

13. When the mixture is cold, we put one pound and a half 
of lard, or clarified dripping in a deep stewpan, and put it 
on the fire to heat. 

14. We take some crumb of bread, and rub it through a 
wire sieve on to a piece of paper. 

15. If rissoles are required, we put four ounces of flour on 
a board, and rub into it three ounces of butter, until both are 
thoroughly mixed, and there are no lumps remaining. 

16. We mix the flour and butter into a stiff smooth paste 
with cold water. 

17. We take a rolling-pin, flour it, sprinkle some flour 
over the board, and roll the paste out into as thin a sheet as 
possible. 

18. We flour our hands, dip a knife in flour (to prevent 
any sticking), and form the chicken mixture into any fancy 
shapes for croquettes, either in balls or long rolls, &c., or we 
can roll it in the paste for rissoles. 

19. We break an egg on to a plate, and beat it up slightly 
with a knife. 



Cooking Meat. — (Entries.) — Croquettes of Chicken. 8 ] 

20. We dip the croquettes or rissoles into the egg, and 
egg them well all over with a paste brush. 

21. We now roll them in the bread crumbs, covering 
them well all over. 

N.B. — We must be careful to cover them smoothly and not too thickly. 

22. We take a frying basket and arrange the croquettes 
or rissoles in it, but we must finger them as little as possible, 
and not allow them to touch each other. 

23. When the fat on the fire is quite hot and smoking, 
we put in the frying basket for two minutes or so, to fry 
them a pale yellow. 

24. We put a piece of whitey-brown paper on a plate, 
and as the rissoles are fried we turn them on to the paper 
to drain off the grease. 

25. For serving we arrange them tastily on a hot dish, 
with fried parsley in the centre. 

N.B. — Cold veal or pheasant, &c, might be used r or the rissoles ^nd cro- 
quettes instead of chicken, if preferred. 



82 National Training School for Cookery. 

ENTREES. 

Lesson No. 12. 

CURRIED RABBIT. 

Average cost of " Curried Rabbit or Veal? 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 rabbit or i J lb. of veal cutlet i 9 

5 lb. of butter o 4 

2 onions \ , 

1 apple / ° x * 

2 tablespoonsful of curry powder o 4 

1 pint of good stock o j\ 

1 gill (j pint) of cream O 6 

1 lemon » a 

I a teaspoonful of salt j ° x 2 

3 9k 

Time required, about two hottrs and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Curry of rabbit 
or veal. 

1. We put a quarter of a pound of butter into a stewpan 
and put it on the fire to melt. 

2. We take two onions, peel them, put them on a board, 
and chop them up as finely as possible. 

3. We put the chopped onions into the melted butter, and 
let them fry a light brown. 

N.B. — We must be careful that they do not burn. 

4. We take a rabbit (which has been skinned and pro- 
perly prepared for cooking), wash it well, and dry it in a 
cloth. 

5. We put the rabbit on a board and cut it up in pieces 
of equal size. 

6. If veal is used we should put it on a board and cut it 
into equal sized pieces. 

N.B. — If preferred chicken can be used instead of rabbit or veal. 

7. When the onions are fried we strain them from the 
butter* 



Cooking Meat. — [Ent7"des) — Ctirried Rabbit. $$ 



8. We put the butter back into the stewpan. 

9. We now put in the pieces of meat, put the stewpan 
over a quick fire, and let it fry for ten minutes. 

10. We must watch it and turn the pieces of meat occa- 
sionally, so that they are fried on both sides alike. 

11. We take an apple, peel it, cut out the core, and chop 
it up as finely as possible on a board. 

12. When the meat is fried we add to it two tablespoons- 
fid of curry powder, and half a teaspoonfid of salt, and stir 
well over the fire for five mimctes. 

13. We then put in the fried onions, the chopped apple, 
and one pint of good stock. 

14. We move the stewpan to the side of the fire and let 
it simmer gently for two hours. 

15. After that time we stir in one gill (quarter of a pint) 
of cream. " : ■' V. 

16. We take a lemon, wipe it clean with a cloth, and peel 
it as thinly as possible with a sharp knife (the peel we 
should put aside as it is not required for present use). 

17. We cut the lemon in half, and squeeze the juice of it 
through a strainer into the stewpan. 

18. For serving we take the pieces of meat out of the 
stewpan and arrange them nicely on a hot dish, and pour 
the sat ice over the meat. 

N.B. — Boiled rice (see Lesson on " Rice") should be ferved with the curry. 



84 National Training School for Cookery. 

RICE. 

Average cost of "Boiled Rice" to be served with 
Curry, &c. 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of Patna rice ) • 

I of a teaspoonful of salt « J 2 

Time required, about half an. hour. 



Now we will show you how to boil Rice to be served 
with curry, &c. 

1. We take a large stewpan and pour in it four quart* oj 
water. 

2. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil the water. 

3. We take half a pound of Patna rice, put it in a 
basin of cold water, and wash it well. 

4. We drain off the water and rub the rice with our 
hands. 

5. We must carefully pick out all the yellow grains and 
bits of black. 

6. We must wash the rice in this manner four times. 

7. Just before putting the rice on to boil we must pour 
some fresh cold water over it. 

8. When the water in the stewpan is quite boiling, we 
throw the rice into it, stirring it round with a spoon. 

9. We must add one quarter of a teaspoonful of salt, 
which will make the scum rise. 

10. We must take a spoon and skim it occasionally. 

11. The rice should boil fast from fifteen to twenty minutes. 

N.B. — To test if the rice is sufficiently boiled, we should take out a grain or 
two, and press it between the thumb and finger, and if quite done, 
it will mash. 

12. We now pour the rice out of the saucepan into a 
colander to drain off the water. 



Lessons on Cooking. — Boiled Rice. 85 

13. We take the colander which contains the rice, and 
hold it under the tap. 

14. We turn the tap and let the cold water run on to 
the rice for one or two seconds. (This is to separate the 
grains of rice.) 

15. We take a clean dry stewpan and put it at the side 
of the fire. 

16. When the water is quite drained from the rice, we 
turn it from the colander into the dry stewpan at the side 
of the fire. 

17. We put the lid half on the stewpan. 

18. We watch it, and stir it occasionally, to prevent the 
grains from sticking to the bottom of the stewpan. 

19. When the rice is quite dry, we take it out carefully 
with a wooden spoon, and place it lightly on to a hot dish, 
it is then ready for serving. 



86 National Training School for Cookery 

STEWS. 

Lesson No. i. 

A-LA-MODE BEEF. 

Average cost of " A-la-Mode Beep 

INGREDIENTS- 

s. d. 

r cow-heel o 6 

An ox-cheek 2 o 

3 oz. of dripping o ii 

3 carrots •• o ih 

6 onions o 2 

j. bunch of herbs (marjoram, thvrae, parsley, ) 1 

and bayleaf ) .' j ° °T 



o o 



2 tablespoon sful of flour. 

Pepper and salt j 

2 nf 

Time required, three hours. 



Now we will show you how to make A -la-mode Beef. 

1. We take a dressed cow-heel and wash it thoroughly in 
water. 

2. We put the cow-heel on a board, and cut off all the 
flesh ; we cut the flesh into neat pieces. 

3. We take an ox-cheek and wash it well in cold water. 

N.B. — We must be sure it is quite clean and free from all impurities. 

4. We put the ox-cheek on a board, and rub it well with 
salt. 

5. We then rub it quite dry in a clean cloth. 

6. We put three ounces of clarified dripping into a large 
saucepan, and put it on the fire to melt. 

7. We cut the ox-cheek up into neat pieces. 

N.B. — We should weigh the flesh of the ox-check and cow-heel, so as to know 
how much water should be added, as 1 pint is allowed to each lb. of meat. 

8. We flour each piece. 

9. When the dripping is melted, we put in the floured 
pieces of ox-cheek, And let them fry a nice brown. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — A -la- Mode Beef. S7 

10. We must stir the pieces occasionally, and not let 
them stick to the bottom of the saucepan. 

11. We take three carrots, wash them, scrape them clean, 
and cut them in slices with a sharp knife. 

12. We take six onions, peel them, and cut them in 
slices. 

13. We take a sprig or two of parsley, wash it, and dry it 
in a cloth. 

14. We take one sprig of marjoram, thyme, one bay-leaf 
and the parsley, and tie them tightly together with a piece 
of string. 

15. We put these vegetables and the bunch of herbs into 
the saucepan. 

16. W r e also pour in the proper quantity of water, 
namely, one pint of tvater to each pon nd of meat. 

17. We put two tablespoonsfnl of 'flour into a basin, and 
mix it into a smooth paste with cold water. 

18. We now put the pieces of cow-heel into the saucepan, 
and plenty of pepper and salt to taste. 

19. We stir the paste smoothly into the saucepan. 

20. We put the lid on the saucepan, and when it boils 
we should move the saucepan to the side of the fire, and let 
it stew gently for three hours. 

21. We must watch it and skim it very often. 

N.B. — We must be always careful to skim anything that is cooking directly 
the scum rises, or it will boil down again into the meat and will spoil it— 
sctim is the impurity which rises from the meat or vegetables. 

22. When the stew is finished, we pour it into a large 
dish or a soup tureen ; it is then ready for serving. 

N.B. — The bones of the cozvheel should be put into the stockpot- 



88 National Training School for Cookery. 



STEWS. 
Lesson No. 2. 

BRAZILIAN STEW. 

Average cost of a " Brazilian Stezv." 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

4 lbs. of shin or sticking of beef at gd. per lb. 3 o 

2 carrots o l 

2 turnips , l 

4 onions o r i 

A bunch of herbs, i. e., marjoram, thyme, ) 

and parsley \ i 

Pepper and salt j 

1 gill of vinegar o o\ 

3 4* 
Time required, about three hours and ten minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Brazilian 
Stew. 

1. We take four pounds of the shin or sticking of beef, put 
it on a board, and cut all the meat off the bone. 

2. We cut the meat up into neat pieces. 

3. We put some vinegar into a basin ; we dip each piece 
of meat into the vinegar. 

N.B. — Putting meat into vinegar will make it tender, therefore any tough 
pieces of meat may be used for this stew. The vinegar will not be 
tasted when the meat is cooked. 

4. We take two carrots, wash them, scrape them clean, 
and cut them into slices with a sharp knife. 

5. We take two turnips and four onions, peel them, and 
cut them up into slices. 

6. We put the pieces of meat into a saucepan, arranging 
them closely together. 

7. We should sprinkle some pepper and salt over the 
meat. 

8. We now put in all the vegetables, and we also add a 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Brazilian Stew. 89 



small bunch of herbs, namely, a sprig of marjoram, tiiyme, 
and parsley, tied tightly together. 

N.B. — We put no water in this stew ; the vinegar draws out the juices of the 
meat, and makes plenty of gravy. 

9. We shut down the lid tight, put the saucepan by the 
side of the fire, and let it simmer gently for at least three 
hours. 

10. For serving we turn the stew on to a hot dish, or in 
a soup tureen. 



90 National Training School for Cookery, 

STEWS. 

Lesson No. 3. 

IRISH STEW. 

Average cost of an " Irish Stew." 



INGREDIENTS. 



d. 



2 lbs. of potatoes 2 

1 lb. of the scrag end of mutton 8 

1 lb. of onions I 

Pepper and salt ......... j * 

11 

Time required, about three hours. 



Now we will show you how to make an " Irish Stew" 

1. We take two pounds of potatoes, wash them well in 
cold water. 

2. We take a sharp knife, peel them, carefully cut out 
the eyes or any black specks about the potatoes, and cut 
them in slices. 

3. We take one pound of onions, peel them, and cut them 
in slices. 

4. We take one pound of the scrag end of the neck of 
mutton, wash it in cold water, scrape it clean with a knife, i 
and cut off the fat. 

5. We put the meat on a board, and cut it up in small 
pieces. 

6. We take a large saucepan, put in a layer of meat, then 
a layer of potatoes, then a layer of onions. 

7. We should sprinkle a little pepper, and salt over each 
layei for seasoning. 

8. We continue to fill the saucepan in this way, till there 
is no meat or vegetables left. 

9. We now pour in sufficient cold water to cover the 
bottom of the saucepan (about half a pint). 

10. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it has 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Irish Stew. 91 

:ome to the boil, we must skim it, draw it to the side 
of the fire, and let it stew gently for, from one hour and a 
half, to two hours. 

11. We must watch it, skim it well while it is cooking, 
and stir it occasionally to prevent its catching. 

12. For serving we turn the stew out on a hot dish. 

N.B. — If a larger quantity of potato be required in the stew, the extra quantity 
of potato should be parboiled (see note below), and then cut in slices, and 
added to the stew h, an hour before it is rpady for serving - . If all the 
potatoes were put in with the meat at first, so much water would be 
required that the stew would be spoiled. 

N.B. — For parboiling (or half boiling) potatoes we wash them, and peel them, 
put them in a saucepan with enough cold water to cover them, put the 
saucepan on the fire, and let the potatoes boil for about a \ of an hour. 



92 National Training School for Cookery. 

STEWS. 

Lesson No. 4. 

STEWED BRISKET OF BEEF (cold). 

Average cost of " Stewed Brisket of Beef? 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

7 lbs. of brisket of beef at gd. per lb 5 3 

2 carrots o 1 

1 turnip o o\ 

2 onions o 1 

1 head of celery o 4 

1 leek o 1 

Bouquet garni {i.e., sprig- of thyme, mar-] 

joram, and bay leaf) 

6 cloves \ 

T2 peppercorns ( 

6 allspice 

1 tablespoonful of salt J 

6 o| 
For \ an ounce of glaze o 2 

6 2! 

Time required, about four hours. 

Now we will show you how to stew Brisket of Beef, 
to be served cold. 

1. We take seven pounds of brisket of beef (not very fat), 
see that it is quite clean, and, if necessary, scrape it with 
a knife and wipe it with a clean cloth, and then put it into 
a large saucepan. 

2. We take two carrots, wash and scrape them clean and 
cut them in halves. 

3. We take one turnip and two onions, wash them and 
peel them, and cut the turnip in quarters. 

4. We take one leek and one head of celery, wash them 
well in water, cut the long green leaves off the leek, and the 
green tops from the celery. 

5. We add all these vegetables to the meat in the 
saucepan. 

6. We also add a bouquet garni, of thyme, marjoram, 
and a bay leaf tied tightly together, six cloves, twelve pepper- 



L essons on L oo king Meat. — Stewed Brisket of Beef . 9 ; 



corns, six allspice, one tablespoonful of salt, and three quarts 
of cold water. 

7. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it comes 
to the boil we should skim it well. 

8. We then move the saucepan to the side of the fire, 
and let the contents simmer gently for three hours, we must 
watch it and skim it occasionally. 

9. After that time we take the meat out of the saucepan 
and put it on a dish. 

10. We take a knife and carefully remove the flat bones 
at the side of the beef, 

11. We place the beef between two dishes and some 
heavy weight on the top to press the beef 

12. We pour the stock through a strainer into a basin, 
and when it is cold we should remove every particle of fat, 

N.B. — Instead of reducing the stock for glaze, glaze can be bought at the 
grocer's ; about half an ounce would be required, and it should be put in 
a gaily pot with about a tablespoonful of water ; the gaily pot must be 
placed in a saucepan of boiling water, over the fire ; when the glaze is 
melted, it should be stirred with the brush, before brushing over the 
meat, as directed in paragraph 14. The stock can be used for soup. 

13. We then put the stock in a stewpan, and put it on 
the fire to boil, without the lid, so as to reduce the stock to 
a glaze, about a gill (a quarter of a pint). 

14. We now take the beef, and with a paste brush cover 
the joint with the glaze, brushing it over several times until 
all the glaze is used up ; as soon as the glaze is cold and set 
on the beef it is ready for serving. 



94 National Training School for Cookery. 



STEWS. 

Lesson No. 5. 

STEWED RABBIT. 

Average cost of a " Stewed Rabbit." 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 rabbit i 9 

£ lb. of bacon o 3 

1 carrot \ 

1 onion f ■ 

1 shalot I 

1 oz. of flour J 

2 4 

1 pint of second stock 3f<^., or water. 
Time required, about two hours. 



Now we will show you how to Stew a Rabbit. 

1. We take a rabbit (which has been skinned and pro- 
perly prepared for cooking), put it on a board, and cut it 
up into neat pieces, with a sharp knife. 

2. We must wash the pieces of rabbit, and dry them in 
a clean cloth. 

3. We take a quarter of a pound of bacon, and cut it up 
in inch lengths ; we put it in a saucepan over the fire to fry 
for about six minutes ; we then take it out, and put it on a 
plate. 

4. We now put the pieces of rabbit in the saucepan, and 
let them fry brown, in the bacon fat. We must watch it, 
and turn the pieces occasionally. 

5. We take a carrot, wash it, scrape it clean with a 
knife, and cut it in half. 

6. We take an onion, and a shalot, and peel them. 

7. We now put the fried bacon, and the vegetables into 
the saucepan, with the rabbit. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Stewed Rabbit. 95 

8. We also add one ounce of flour, pepper, and salt to 
taste, and pour in one pint of second stock or water. 

9. We put the saucepan over the fire, and stir well till it 
boils, then skim it well, and move the saucepan to the side 
of the fire, to simmer gently, for about one hour and a 
quarter, or perhaps a little longer if the rabbit is old. 

10. For serving, we arrange the rabbit, and bacon on a 
hot dish, and strain the sauce over it. 



9& National Training School for Cookery. 

STEWS. 

Lesson No. 6. 

STEWED OX CHEEK. 

Average cost of " Stezved Ox Cheek" and about 4 quarts of 

Soup. 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

Ox cheek, about 6 lbs., at 4//. per lb 2 o 

2 carrots o r 

1 turnip o o| 

\ head of celery o 2 

4 onions o o\ 

Bouquet garni [i.e. sprig of thyme, mar- 
joram, parsley, and a bayleaf) 

12 cloves 

1 blade of mace 

20 peppercorns 

Salt 

1 oz. of butter I 

r oz. of flour ] 

1 teaspoonful of Harvey Sauce ) 

1 teaspoonful of mushroom ketchup .... j 



o i4 



7% 



Time required, about four hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to Stew Ox Cheek. 

1. We take the ox cheek, and wash it well in warm water, 
put it on a board, and carefully cut all the flesh off the 
bone, with a sharp knife. 

2. We roll ihs flesh up, and tie it round with a piece of 
string, put it in a stewpan with one ounce of clarified 
dripping, and put it over the fire to fry brown. 

3. We take two carrots, wash them, scrape them clean 
with a knife, and cut them in halves. 

4. We take a turnip, wash it, peel it, and cut it in half. 

5. We take half a head of celery, wash it well, and cut 
off the green tops of the leaves. 

6. We take four onions, peel them, and stick tzvelve clovts 
into one of them. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Stew 3d Ox Cheek. 9 7 

7. We put the rolled ox cheek, the bones, and all these 
vegetables into a saucepan, we also add a blade of mace, 
twenty peppercorns, a tablespoonfid of salt, and a bouquet garni, 
consisting of a sprig of thyme, marjoram, parsley, and a bay 
leaf, tied tightly together. 

8. We pour in sufficient cold water to cover it all, about 
six quarts ; put the saucepan on the fire, bring it to the boil, 
then skim it well, and move the saucepan to the side of the 
fire to simmer gently for four hours. 

9. When the ox cheek is nearly done, we should make the 
sauce. 

10. We put one ounce of butter in a small stewpan, and 
put it over the fire to melt. 

11. We now stir in smoothly one ounce of flour. 

12. We take one pint of ox cJieek stock, from the saucepan, 
and pour it into the stewpan, stirring well until the sauce 
boils, and thickens, we then add a teaspoonful of mushroom 
ketchup, and a teaspoonfid of Harvey sauce, and stand the 
stewpan by the side of the fire to keep warm. 

13. For serving, we take the rolled ox cheek out of the 
saucepan, carefully remove the string, place it in the centre 
of a hot dish, and pour the sauce over it. 

N. B. — The stock should be poured through a strainer into a basin, and put 
aside to cool, so that the fat can be removed ; the stock can then be used 
for Ox Cheek Soup, and it should be thickened with two otinces of flour ; 
the flour must be mixed to a smooth paste with a little of the stock, then 
added to the remainder of the stock, and stirred over the fire till it boils 
and thickens. The remains of the Ox Cheek, after serving, should be 
cut up in small pieces, and added to the soup. 



9S National Training School for Cookery. 

STEWS. 

Lesson No. 7. 

STEWED BREAST or NEOK OF LAMB, 
WITH PEAS. 

Average cost of " Stewed Breast of Lamb" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 
1 breast of Lamb, or 2 lbs. of the neck .... 2 o 

1 pint of green peas o 3 

1 onion o o\ 

Dessertspoonful of mint J 

1 oz. of flour > o o\ 

Salt and pepper ) 

2 4 
Time required, about one hour and a half. 



Now we will show you how to Stew Breast or Neck of 
Lamb. 

1. We take the lamb, put it on a board, and cut it up 
in small pieces, then wash it well in cold water, and put 
it in a saucepan with one quart of cold water. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it comes 
to the boil we must skim it well, and add about a teaspoon- 
ful of salt, and skim again ; then move the saucepan to the 
side of the fire, to simmer gently for half an hour, 

3. We must now skim it well, and put in the pint of peas, 
and let all simmer half an hour longer. 

4. We take the onion, peel it, and chop it, and the mint, 
up finely on a board, we add these to the stewed lamb, and 
pepper to taste. 

5. We mix one ounce of flour very smoothly in a cup, 
tvith a tablespoonful of water, and stir it into the saucepan 
to thicken the gravy. 

6. We let it all simmer again for ten minutes. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. Stewed Breast of Lamb. 99 

7. For serving, we must carefully remove all grease 
(either with a spoon or by putting a piece of clean blotting- 
paper or whitey-brown paper on the top of the stew, which 
will absorb the grease), and turn the stew on to a hot dish ; 
the meat should be arranged in the centre, and the peas and 
gravy round. 



iod National 



Training- 



School for Cookery. 



STEWS. 

Lesson No. 8. 

STEWED KNUCKLE OF VEAL. 

Average cost of " Stewed Knuckle of Veal" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

4 lbs. of knuckle of veal 2 o 

\ lb. of rice , o of 

1 onion o o \ 

\ of a teaspoonful of salt 1 

5 of a teaspoonful of pepper > o 1 

1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley ...... ) 

2 2.\ 

If served with " Melted Butter sauce," z%d. ; 

Or with " Sharp Sauce" 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ pint of veal stock 

1 onion o\ 

1 shalot Oj 

1 carrot o\ 

1 oz. butter \ 

1 oz. flour o.j 

1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley ) 

1 tablespoonful of vinegar > of 

Pepper and salt ) 

n 

Time required, about two hours, 



Now we will show you how to stew knuckle of veal 

1. We take the four pounds of knuckle of veal, wash it 
well in cold water, and put it in a saucepan with four pints 
of cold water ; put the saucepan over the fire, and when it 
boils we should add a teaspoonful of salt, and skim it well, 
and move the saucepan to the side of the fire, to simmer 
for two hours. 

N.B. — If the veal is to be served with "sharp sauce " we omit the rice and 
onion. For sharp sauce see below, No. 7. 

2. We take one onion, peel it, and cut it in slices. 

3. We take a quarter of a pound of rice, and wash it well 
in two waters. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. Steived Knuckle of VeaL i o i 

4. We take two or three sprigs of parsley, wash it, dry it, 
and chop it up finely on a board ; there should be a table- 
spoonfid. 

5. When the veal has simmered for one Jwitr, we add the 
sliced onion, the rice, and salt and pepper, and let it simmer 
for one Jwur more. 

6. We now add the chopped parsley. For serving - , we 
place the veal on a hot dish, and pour the gravy a?id vege- 
tables round. 

N.B. — If liked, melted butter (see Sauces, Lesson No. 7), with a teaspoonful 
of chopped parsley in it, could be poured in addition over the veal. 

7. For " sharp sauce," we take an onion and a shalot, 
peel them, and chop them up very finely on a board. 

8. We take a carrot, wash it, scrape it clean with a knife, 
and chop it up finely. 

9. We take a sprig or two of parsley, wash it, dry it, and 
chop it up finely. 

10. We put one ounce of butter in a stewpan, and put it 
over the fire : we add the onion, shalot, and carrot, and let 
them fry in the butter for about five minutes — they must 
not burn ; we then add one ounce of flour, and half a pint 
of veal stock, and stir well till it boils and thickens. 

11. Just before serving, we stir in a tablespoonful of 
vinegar and the chopped parsley. For serving knuckle of 
veal with sharp sauce, we place the veal on a hot dish, and 
pour the sauce over it. 

N.B. — The remainder of the stock, which is then not required, should be 
strained into a basin, and can then be used for soup. 



102 National Training School for Cookery. 

TRIPE. 
Lesson No. i. 

CURRIED TRIPE. 

Average cost of " Curried Tripe? 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i lb. of tripe 8 

\ lb. of Patna rice of 

i onion o| 

Flour, sugar, and curry powder i| 

Time required, about three hours. 



Now we will show you how to make a Curry of Tripe. 

1. We take one pound of tripe, put it in a saucepan of 
cold water, and let it boil up. Immediately it boils take 
it out of the water. 

N.B. — This is called blanching. 

2. We cut the tripe up into small pieces. 

3. We take a saucepan and lay the pieces of tripe in it 
and pour in sufficient cold water to cover the tripe. 

4. We take a small onion and peel it, and cut it partially 
through. 

5. We put the onion into the saucepan of tripe. 

6. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it boils 
we must remove it to the side of the fire and let it simmer 
for not less than two hours and a half. 

7. After that time we try the tripe with a fork, and if it 
is sufficiently cooked, it will be very tender. 

8. We take the saucepan off the fire, and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table. 

9. We take the pieces of tripe out with a fork, and put 
them on a dish. 

10. We take a small saucepan and put in it one ounce of j 
flour, one dessertspoonful of curry poivder, and half an ounce 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Curried Tripe, icr 



of drippings and mix them all well together with a wooden 
spoon. 

11. We add cold water ; sufficient to make the above into 
a stiff paste. 

12. We now pour in half a pint of the liquor, in which 
the tripe was boiled. 

13. We put the saucepan on the fire, and stir the mixture 
well until it boils and thickens. We must not let it get 
lumpy. 

14. We stir in a qicarter of a teaspoonfid of brown sugar 
and salt according to taste. We must now stand the 
saucepan aside to get cool. 

15. We take the onion which was boiled with the tripe, 
and cut it in shreds and add it to the sauce. 

16. When the sauce is a little cool, we put in the pieces 
of tripe and just let them warm through. 

17. We take a dish and warm it, and pour the tripe and 
sauce on it, keeping it as much in the centre of the dish as 
possible. 

18. We take a teacupfid of Patna rice, wash it well in 
two or three waters, and put it in a saucepan full of boiling 
water. We must be sure the water is boiling. (N.B. — Rice 
should be boiled in plenty of water.) We add to it a 
saltspoonftd of salt. 

19. We must let it boil from a quarter of an hour to 
twenty minutes, after that time, we must feel the rice to see 
if it is soft. 

20. When the rice is sufficiently cooked, we strain it off, 
and pour cold water over it. 

21. We then put the rice back into the empty saucepan, 
and stand the saucepan by the side of the fire to dry the 
rice. The lid should be only half on the saucepan. 

22. When the rice is quite dry we take it out of the 
saucepan and arrange it round the tripe. It is now ready 
for serving. 



io4 National Training School for Cookery. 

TRIPE. 

Lesson No. 2. 

TRIPE IN MILK. 

Average cost of " Tripe in Milk" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 lb. of tripe o 8 

3 or 4 good-sized onions o 2 

i pint of milk o z\ 

Seasoning and flour o oj 



Time required, about two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to cook Tripe in Milk. 

1. We take one pound of tripe, put it into a saucepan 
of cold water to boil up and blanch. When it boils wc 
take it off the fire. 

2. We put the tripe on a board and cut it in small pieces. 

3. We take tJiree or four good-sized onions y peel them 
and cut them partially through. 

4. We put the tripe and onions into a saucepan, with one 
pint of milk. 

5. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil 

6. When it boils, we should move the saucepan to the 
side of the fire, and let it simmer for not less than two 
hours. 

7. After that time, we should feel the tripe with a fork, 
and if it is sufficiently cooked it will be very tender. 

8. We take the saucepan off the fire and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table. 

9. We take the onions out of the saucepan and put 
them on a board and chop them up finely. 

10. We take the tripe out of the saucepan and arrange it 
on a warm dish. 






Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Tripe in Milk. 105 

11. We stand the dish near the fire to keep warm. 

12. We take a dessertspoonful of flour, and mix it to a 
smooth paste with cold milk. 

13. We stir, by degrees, the paste into the hot milky and 
iet it boil and thicken. 

14. We now stir the onion into the milk, and let it warm 
through. 

15. We season the onion sauce, according to taste, and 
pour it over the tripe. It is now ready for serving. 



io6 National Training School for Cookery. 



TRIPE. 

Lesson No. 3. 

TRIPE A LA COUTANCE. 

Average cost of " Tripe a la Coutance" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 lb. of thin tripe o 8 

| lb. of bacon o 6 

i small carrot o o\ 

4 mushrooms o i| 

\ a. large onion or 6 small green onions . . ) 

Bouquet garni > o 2f 

2 shalots and parsley ) 

2 oz. of butter o 2 

i tablespoonful of Harvey sauce | 

i tablespoonful of mushroom ketchup . . . . / ° 2 

i oz. of flour o o\ 

I pint of stock o j\ 

The juice of half a lemon o i 

Salt and pepper o o\ 



2 7* 



Time required, about two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to cook Tripe a la Cou- 
tance. 

1. We wash the tripe well in cold water. 

2. We put the tripe in a stewpan with cold water enough 
to cover it. 

3. We put the stewpan on the fire and bring it to the 
boil. 

N.B.— This is to blanch the tripe. 

4. We then take the tripe out of the stewpan and dry it 
in a clean cloth. 

5. We put the tripe on a board, and with a sharp knife 
cut it into strips about two inches wide and four inches in 
length. 

N.B.— Only the thin part of the tripe can be used for "tripe a la Coutance;" 
if there are any thick pieces they can be cooked with milk and oniom 
(see "Tripe," Lesson No. 2). 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Tripe a la Coutance. 107 

6. We take the half pound of bacon and cut it in very 
thin slices, the same size as the strips of tripe. 

7. We take one shalot, peel it, and two or three sprigs of 
parsley, and chop them up finely on a board. 

8. We lay one slice of bacon on each strip of tripe, 
sprinkle a little chopped shalot and parsley over each slice of 
bacon, roll them up together, and tie them firmly round 
with a piece of string. 

9. We take the carrot, wash it, scrape it clean with a 
knife, and cut it in slices. 

10. We take the half onion and the other shalot, peel 
them, and cut them in slices. 

11. We take a sprig of marjoram, thyme, and a bay -leaf, 
and tie them tightly together with a piece of string. 

12. We take the mushrooms, wash them, and cut off the 
end of the stalks. 

13. We arrange the rolls of tripe and bacon in a stewpan. 

14. We also add all the vegetables and the herbs. 

15. We pour in a pint of stock, and put the stewpan on 
the fire. 

16. When it just boils we remove the stewpan to the 
side of the fire, and let the contents simmer gently for two 
hours. 

17. After that time we take out the rolls of tripe and put 
them on a plate. 

18. We take a strainer, hold it over a basin, and strain 
the stock. 

19. We put two ounces of butter into another stewpan, 
and put it on the fire to melt. 

20. When the butter is melted we add to it one ounce of 
flour, and mix them smoothly together. 

21. We now add the stock, and stir it over the fire until 
it boils and thickens. 

22. We take half a lemon and squeeze the juice of it into 
the sauce. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to let any pips fall in. 



io8 National Training School for Cookery. 



23. We also stir in one tablespoonful of Harvey sauce, and 
one tablespoonful of mushroom ketchup, and season the sauce 
with pepper and salt. 

24. We now place in the rolls of tripe, and let them 
warm through. 

25. For serving we arrange the rolls of tripe in a circle 
on a hot dish, with some puree of carrot, or spinach (see 
"Vegetables," Lessons Nos. 6 and 8), or with a mixture of 
vegetables (according to taste), in the centre, and pour the 
sauce round the edge. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Braised Fillet of Veal 109 

BRAISED FILLET OF VEAL. 

Average cost of il A Braised Fillet of Veal!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

3! lbs. of the fillet of veal 3 6 

\ lb. of the fat of bacon o 6 

A bouquet garni of parsley, thvme, and 1 l 

bayleaf ) ° Ci 

1 onion o o V 

3 pints of good stock 1 c;i 

2 young carrots o 1 

Celery and turnip { . 

Salt J ° °* 

6 o 

Time required {the stock should be made the day before) , about one hour and a half 



Now we will show you how to Braise a Fillet of Veal. 

1. We take three and a half pounds of the fillet of veal, 
put it on a board, and cut off all the skin with a sharp knife. 

2. We lard this fillet in the same way as for fillets of 
beef (see " Entree," Lesson No. 3, from Note 3 to Note 7). 

3. We place the fillet carefully in a braising pan. 

4. We add a bouquet garni, consisting of a sprig 6f parsley, 
thyme, and a bay-leaf all tied neatly and tightly together. 

5. We take two young carrots, wash them, scrape them 
clean with a knife and cut them in halves. 

6. We take an onion and a quarter of a turnip, and peel 
them carefully. 

7. W T e add these vegetables, and half a stick of celery, to 
the fillet in the braising pan. 

8. We now pour in about three pints of good stock (the 
stock must not cover the meat), put the braising pan on the 
fire, and baste the fillet continually. 

9. We take a piece of kitchen paper, cut a round to the 
size of the braising pan and butter it. 

10. As soon as the stock boils, we lay this round of paper 
on the fillet in the stewpan. 

N.B. — This paper is to prevent the meat from browning too quickly. 



no National Training School for Cookery, 

11. We keep the lid of the braising pan on, and place it 
in a hot oven, and let it cook slowly for 07ie hour and a 
quarter. 

12. We must watch it, frequently raise the paper, and 
baste the veal with the stock. 

13. We take the veal out of the braising pan, and place 
it on a hot dish. 

N.B. — We must stand this dish on the hot plate, or near the fire, to keep 
warm until the sauce is ready. 

14. We put the braising pan on the fire and let the sauce 
reduce to a half glaze. 

15. We then strain the glaze round the meat. 

16. We serve it with dressed spinach (see " Vegetables/' 
Lesson No. 8), or with dressed carrots and turnips (see 
" Vegetables," Lesson No. 6). 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Roast Btcllock's Heart-. 1 1 1 



ROAST BULLOCK'S OR CALF'S HEART. 

EITHER IN FRONT OF THE FIRE OR IN A STEWPAN. 

Average cost of a " Buttock's or Calfs Heart stuffed" and 
'''Brown Sauce!' 

INGREDIENTS. 



"Bullock's or Calfs Heart" 

s. d. 
i bullock's heart (or calfs) zs. or 2 6 

2 oz. of suet o 15 

\ lb. of biead crumbs o 1 

1 gill (| pint of milk) o of 

1 egg o 1 

Salt and pepper \ 

1 tablespoonful of chopped 

parsley I 

I dessertspoonful of chopped ) o i| 
mixed herbs : thyme, 
lemon thyme, and marjo- 
ram - 

\ lb. dripping o 2 



"Sauce." 

s. d. 
1 small onion and half a carrot o o| 

Salt and pepper ) , 

J oz. of flow ) ° °* 

1 oz. of butter o 1 

t dessertspoonful of mushroom 

ketchup o ok 



Time required, about two hours and a 



Now we will show you how to stuff a Bullock's Heart and 
roast it. 

1. We must first prepare the fire for roasting as described 
in "Roasting," Lesson No. 1. 

2. We take a bullock's heart, and wash it thoroughly in 
salt and water, carefully cleansing all the cavities of the 
heart, and removing all the blood. 

3. We take it out of the salt and water, and put it into a 
basin of clean water, wash it again, until it is quite clean, 
and wipe it thoroughly dry with a cloth. 

N.B. — If the heart is not quite dry, it will not roast properly. 

4. We put the heart on a board, and with a sharp knife 
cut off fat flaps, or deaf ears (as they are called). 

5. We put two ounces of suet on a board, cut away all the 



i 1 2 National Training School for Cookery. 

skin, and chop it up as finely as possible ; we should sprinkle 
a little flour over the suet, to prevent it from sticking to the 
board or knife. 

6. We grate some bread crumbs with a grater on to the 
board. 

7. We wash two or three sprigs of parsley in cold water, 
dry them in a cloth, and chop the parsley up as finely as 
possible on a board ; when chopped there should be about 
one tablespoonful. 

8. We take a sprig of thyme, lemon thyme and marjoram, 
rub them through a strainer, or chop them up finely on a 
board ; there should be about one dessertspoonful of the 
mixed herbs. 

9. We now mix the chopped suet, and bread crumbs well 
together, and then add the parsley, the herbs, one teaspoon- 
ful of salt, and pepper to taste, and mix them thoroughly 

together. 

10. We now mix it with one gill (a quarter of a pint) of 
milk, and one egg. 

11. We take the heart and fill all the cavities with the. 
stuffing, pressing it in as firmly as possible. 

N.B. — If there be any stuffing over, it can be put aside for the sauce. 

12. We grease a piece of kitchen paper well with a piece 
of butter or dripping ; and then place over the top of the 
heart where the cavities are, and tie it on tightly with string. 

13. We put the roasting screen in front of the fire, to 
keep off the draught, and to keep in all the heat. 

N.B. — The Bullock's or Calf's heart can be roasted in a stewpan instead of 
in front of the fire. 

N.B. — For roasting in a stewpan. 

A. We take the heart already stuffed and prepared as above and put it in 
a stewpan, with 2 oz. of clarified dripping, and put the stewpan over a 
slow fire. 

B. We must baste it well with the dripping, and turn it occasionally. The 
Bullock's heart will take two hours to roast, the Calf's heart only one 
hour. 

N.B. — A Bullock's heart is better roasted in front of the fire on account ol its 
size. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — -Roast Bullock's Heart. 1 1 3 

21. We put the dripping-pan, or a large dish, down on a 
stand within the screen close to the fire, with the dripping 
ladle or a large spoon in it. 

22. We hang the roasting-jack up from the mantlepiece 
] over the dripping-pan. 

N.B. — If there be no roasting-jack, we can manage with a strong piece of 
worsted tied to a poor man's jack. 

23. We must wind up the jack with its key, before we 
put the meat on. 

24. We take the hook of the roasting-jack and pass 
it through the heart, and hang it on the jack or the 
worsted. 

N.B. — If the heart is hanging from a piece of worsted, we must twist the 
worsted occasionally to make it go round. 

25. We put about a quarter of a pound of clarified 
dripping into the dripping-pan, and baste the Jieart occa- 
sionally. 

26. It will take about tzvo hours to roast. 

27. We take one small onion, peel it, and cut it in 
slices. 

28. We put the onion in a saucepan, with one ounce of 
butter, or clarified dripping. 

29. We put the saucepan on the fire, and let the onion 
fry a nice brown. 

30. We now add one tablespoonful of flour, and mix them 
smoothly together with a wooden spoon. 

. 31. We pour in half a pint of cold water, season it with 
salt and pepper to taste, and stir smoothly until it boils and 
thickens. 

32. We then stand the saucepan by the side of the fire 
1 until required for use. 

33. When the heart is roasted, we take it down, place 
t the heart on a hot dish and draw out the hook. 

34. We cut the string and take off the greased paper. 



1 1 4 National Training School for Cookery. 

35. If there be any stuffing over, we now stir it into 
the sauce ; we also add one dessertspoonful of mushroom 
ketchup. 

N. B. — If the flavouring of mushroom ketchup be disliked, it may be omitted. 

36. We pour the sauce round the heart on the dish, and 
it is then ready for serving. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Cornish Pasties, i 1 5 
CORNISH PASTIES. 

Average cost of " Cornish Pasties " (about 12). 
INGREDIENTS. 

a. 

£ lb. of buttock steak or beef skirt . . . . t . . . 5 

i lb. of potatoes o\ 

1 onion oh 

1 lb. of flour 2 

6 oz. of dripping 3 

Salt and pepper ) i 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder J * 

Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how we make Cornish Pasties. 

1. We take half a pound of buttock steak or beef skirt, put 
it on a board, and cut it up into small pieces. 

2. We take half a pound of potatoes, wash and peel them 
put them on a board, and cut them up into small pieces. 

3. We take one small onion, peel it, put it on a board, 
and chop it up as finely as possible. 

4. We put one pound of flour into a basin with a little 
salt, and a teaspoonful of baking powder. 

5. We put in six ounces of dripping, and rub it well into 
\hz flour with our hands. 

6. We now add enough cold water to mix it into a 

stiff paste. 

7. We flour a board and turn the paste on to it. 

8. We take a rolling-pin, flour it, and roll the paste out 
into a thin sheet, about a quarter of an inch in thickness. 

9. We cut the paste into pieces about six or seven inches 
square. 

10. We place a little of the meat and potato in the centre 
of each square, sprinkle over it a little pepper and salt, and 
a very little of the chopped onion. 

11. We fold the paste over the meat, joining it by pressing 
the ed^es together with our thumb and finger. 



i 1 6 National Training School for Cookery, 



12. We grease a baking tin and put the pasties on it. 

N.B.— If there be no baking tin we should grease the shelf in the oven to 
prevent the pasties from sticking. 

13. We put the tin into the oven to bake from half am 
hour to tJiree quai'ters of an hour. 

14. For serving, we put the pasties on a dish. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Sausage Rolls. 117 



SAUSAGE ROLLS. 

Average cost of " Sausage Rolls " (about one dozen) made 
with cooked or uncooked meat. 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i lb. of cooked or uncooked meat 5 

1 lb. flour 2 

£ lb. dripping 4 

1 teaspoonful baking powder \ 

Seasoning ^ 

I a shalot \ 1 

1 small onion h 



4 sage leaves 
*egg 



1 1 

Time reguired half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Sausage Rolls, 

1. We take J talf a pound of meat {cooked or uncooked), put 
it on a board, take away all the fat, and mince the. meat up 
as finely as possible. 

2. We take the mince meat, put it in a basin, and season 
it well with pepper and salt. 

3. We take four sage leaves, put them on a board, and 
chop them up as finely as possible with a knife. 

4. We take half a shalot and one small onion, peel them, 
and chop them up upon the board. 

5. We mix the chopped sage, shalot, and onion well into 
the mince meat with a spoon. 

6. We put one pound of flour into a basin. 

7. We add to it one teaspoonful of baking powder, a 
quarter of a saltspoonful of salt, and half a pound of 
clarified dripping. 

8. We rub the dripping well into the flour with our 
hands. 

N.B. — We must mix it thoroughly and be careful not to leave any lump*. 

9. We add enough water to the flour to make it into a 
stiff paste. 



1 1 8 National Training School for Cookery. 

10. We flour the paste board. 

11. We turn the paste out on the board. 

N.B. — We should divide the paste in two, so as not to handle it too much. 

12. We take a rolling pin, flour it, and roll out each 
portion into a thin sheet, about one-eighth of an inch in 
thickness. 

13. We cut the paste into pieces about six inches square. 

14. We should collect all the scraps of paste (so that 
none is wasted), fold them together, and roll them out and 
cut them into squares. 

N.B. — There should be about one dozen squares of paste. 

15. We should put about a tablespoonful of the mince 
meat and herbs into the centre of each square of paste. 

16. We fold the paste round the meat, joining it smoothly 
down the centre, and pressing the ends of the paste together . 
with our finger and thumb. 

17. We take a baking tin, grease it well, and place the 
sausage rolls on it. 

18. We break one egg on to a plate, and beat it slightly 
with a knife. 

19. We take a paste brush, dip it in the egg, and paint 
over the tops of the rolls. 

20. We place the tin in a hot oven to bake for fifteen 
minutes if the meat is already cooked, but if raw meat is 
used, then half an hour is required. 

N.B. — We should look at them once or twice, and turn them if necessary, so 
that they shall be equally baked. 

21. For serving we take the rolls ofif the tin and place 
them on a hot dish. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Veal and Ham Pie. 1 1 9 



VEAL AND HAM PIE. 

Average cost of " Veal and Ham Pie" {about a quart 
pie-dish). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

x\ lb. of fillet of veal (lean) 1 6 

\ lb. of bacon o 3 

2 eggs o 2 

1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley ) 

Salt and pepper / o 2V 

I lb. of flour ) 

3 oz. of butter o 3 

3 oz. of lard o 2 

2 6\ 

Time required, about two hours. 



Now we will show you how to make a Veal and Ham 
Pie. 

1. We put three quarters of a pound of flour, three ounces 
of butter, and two ounces of lard, on a board. 

2. We take a knife and chop up the butter and lard into 
the flour, sprinkle over a quarter of a saltspoonful of salt, 
heap it on the board, and make a well in the centre. 

3. We add a large tablespoonful of water, and beat it up 
slightly with a knife. 

4. We now, slowly and lightly, mix it all with our 
fingers, adding more water if necessary, until it be formed 
into a stiff paste. 

5. We must keep our hands, and the board well floured, 
that the paste may not stick. 

6. We take a rolling-pin, flour it, and roll out the paste, 
and fold it in half, turn it round with the rough edges 
towards us, roll it again, and fold it as before three times 
more ; the last time we should roll it out to the size of the 
pie-dish to be used, only a little larger, and to the thickness 
of about a quarter of an inch. 

7. We put a small saucepan of water on the fire to boil ; 
when the water boils, we should put in two eggs, and let 
them boil for tot minuUs. 



120 National T7'aining School for Cookery. 



8. We take one pound and a half of fillet of veal, and a 
quarter of a pound of bacon, and cut them up in small pieces 
with a sharp knife. 

9. When the eggs are sufficiently boiled, we take them 
out of the saucepan, tap them all round on a cup, take the 
shell off, and put them in a little cold water. 

10. We take them out of the water, and carefully cut 
them in quarters. 

11. We put the veal, bacon, and hard-boiled eggs into the 
pie-dish, we also sprinkle over the meat a teaspoonful of 
chopped parsley, and a teaspoonful of pepper and salt mixed, 
and pour in two tablespoonsful of cold water, or stock. 

12. We now take a knife, flour it, and cut a strip of the 
paste the width of the edge of the pie dish. We wet the edge 
of the pie-dish with cold water, or white of egg, and place 
the paste round the edge of the dish, joining it smoothly 
together. 

13. We now wet the edge of the paste, take the remaining 
piece of paste and lay it carefully over the top of the pie, 
pressing it down with our thumb all round the edge. 

14. We take a knife, flour it, and trim off all the rough 
edges of the paste round the edge of the dish. 

15. We should make little notches in the edge of the 
paste with the back of the knife, pressing the paste firmly I 
with our thumb to keep it in its proper place. 

16. We should make a small hole in the centre of the 
paste, to let out the steam, while it is baking. 

17. We can ornament the top of the pie with any remains 
of paste according to taste, and if there be any white of egg, 
we should brush over the top of the pie. 

18. We put the pie into a hot oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise to 240 Fahrenheit), for one hour 
and a half ; we must watch it occasionally and turn it, to 
prevent it burning: it should become a pale brown. It is 
then ready for serving. 



Lessons on Cooking- Meat. — Rabbit Pie. i 2 1 
RABBIT PIE. 

Average cost of "Rabbit Pie" (in about a quart pie-dish). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 Rabbit i 9 

\ lb. of bacon or salt pork o 6 

I lb. of beefsteak o 6 

Salt and pepper i 

1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley > o a\ 

4 lb. of flour ) 

6 oz. of clarified dripping o 3 

3 2 > 
Time required, about two hours and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make a Rabbit Pie. 

1. We must first make the paste, in the same way as for 
zeal and ham pie, from note I to note 8. 

N.B. — Clarified dripping may be used, instead of the butter and lard, foi 
economy's sake. 

2. We take a rabbit (which has been skinned and properly 
prepared for cooking), wash it well in cold water, wipe it 
dry, and put it on a board. 

3. We take a sharp knife, and cut it up in neat pieces, 
about equal sizes. 

4. We take half a pound of bacon, or salt pork, put it on a 
board, and cut it slices. 

5. We put half a pound of beef-steak on a board, and cut 
Ij'ft in small pieces. 

6. We arrange the rabbit, bacon, and beef in a pie-dish, 
and sprinkle over them a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and 
a teaspoonful of pepper and salt mixed, and pour in about a 
tablespoonful of cold water, or stock. 

7. We finish the pie in the same way, as (or veal and ham 
t>ie,from note 13 to note 19. 



122 National Training School for Cookery. 

8. We place the pie in a hot oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise to 240 Fahrenheit) to bake slowly 
for one hour and a half, to two hoars, according to the age 
of the rabbit, as an old rabbit takes longer to cook. We 
must watch it occasionally, and turn it, to prevent it burn- 
ing : it should become a pale brown. It is then ready for 
serving. 



Lesson on Cooking Meat. — Beef Steak Pie. 123 
MEAT PIE (BEEF STEAK). 

Average cost of a " Meat Pie " (in a quart dish). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 \ lb. buttock steak 1 6 

\ lb. bullock's kidney o 8 

Seasoning (flour, salt, and pepper) o oh 

fib. of flour o ij 

I lb. clarified dripping o 4 

2 8 
Time required, about two hours and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make a Meat Pie. 

1. We take one pound and a half of buttock steak, put it 
on a board, and cut it in thin slices. 

2. We should cut away all the skin. 

3. We take half a pound of bullock's kidney, put it on a 
plate, and cut it in slices. 

4. We put one tablespoonful of flour, one teaspoonfid of 
salt, and a teaspoonfid of pepper on to a plate, and mix 
them well together. 

5. We dip each slice of meat, and kidney into the season- 
ing, and roll them up into little rolls. 

6. We arrange these rolls of meat, and kidney in a quart 
pie dish, and fill up the dish tzvo-thirds with water. 

7. We put three-quarters of a pound of flour into a basin. 

8. We add half a saltspoonful of salt to the flour, and 
mix them well together. 

9. We take half a pound of clarified dripping, cut it in 
small pieces, and rub it well into the. flour with our hands. 

N.B. — We should be careful that there are no lumps of dripping in the flour. 

10. We then add by degrees, enough cold water, to make 
it into a stiff paste. 

11. We take a rolling-pin and. flour it. We also sprinkle 
flour on the board, and flour our hands to prevent the paste 
from sticking. 



I:>4 National Training School for Cookery. 

12. We take the paste out of the basin and put it on a 
board. 

13. We roll out the paste once to the shape of the pie dish, 
only rather larger, and to the thickness of about one-third 
of an inch. 

14. We wet the edge of the dish with water. 

15. We take a knife, dip it in flour ", and cut a strip of the 
paste the width of the edge of the pie dish, and place it 
round the edge of the dish. 

N.B. — We should cut this strip of paste from round the edge of the paste, 
leaving the centre piece the size and shape of the top of the pie dish. 

16. We wet the edge of the paste with zvater. 

17. We take the remaining paste and place it over the 
pie dish, pressing it down with our thumb all round the 
edge. 

N.B. — We must be very careful not to break the paste. 

18. We take a knife, dip it in flour, and trim off all the 
rough edges of the paste round the edge of the dish. 

19. We take a knife, and with the back of the blade we 
make little notches in the edge of the paste, pressing the 
paste firmly with our thumb to keep it in its proper place. 

N.B. — We can ornament the top of the pie with any remaining paste to our 
fancy. 

20. We make a hole with the knife in the centre of the 
pie to let out the steam while the pie is baking. 

N.B. — If there were not an escape for the steam it would sodden the inside of 
the crust, and so prevent it from baking properly. 

21. We put the pie into the oven to bake gently for two 
hours. We must watch it occasionally, and turn it to 
prevent its burning. It should become a pale brown. It 
is then ready for serving. 

N.B. — Meat pies should be put in the hottest part of the oven first, which, in 
most ovens, is the top, to make the crust light, and then put in a cooler 
part to cook the meat thoroughly. 

N.B. —This pie could be made with veal or mutton instead of steak. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat.— Beef Steak Pudding. 125 
MEAT PUDDING. 

Average cost of a " Meat Pudding " (a quart basin.) 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

6 oz. of suet o 3^ 

1 lb. of flour o 2 

1 teaspoon ful of baking powder o o\ 

Seasoning o o\ 

i\ lb. of buttock steak, io^. per lb 1 3 

I lb. bullock's kidney o 8 

2 5* 
Time required about two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Meat Pudding. 

1. We take a large saucepan full of cold water, and put 
it on the fire to boil. 

2. We take six ounces of suet and put it on a board. 

3. We take a knife and cut away all the skin, and chop 
up the suet as finely as possible, and sprinkle a little flour 
over the suet to prevent its sticking. 

4. We put one pound of flour into a basin, and add to it 
& teaspoonful of 'baking powder and half a saltspoonful of salt 
and mix all well together. 

5. We now add the chopped suet and rub it well into the 
flour with our hands. 

N.B. — We should be careful not to leave any lumps of suet. 

6. We then add by degrees about half a pint of cold water 
co make it into a paste ; we should mix it well. 

7. We put one teaspoonful of salt and one teaspoonful of 
; pepper on a plate, and mix them together. 

8. We take one poitnd and a half of buttock steak, put it 

1 on a board, and cut it in slices about three inches long and 
I tzuo indies broad. 

N.B. — We should cut away all the skin. 

9. We take half a pound of hillock's Sidney, put it oa a 
I board, and cut it in slices. 



[26 National Training School for Cookery, 

10. We dip each slice of meat and kidney into the plate 
of seasoning. 

11. We take a quart basin and grease it well inside with 
dripping. 

12. We take a rolling pin and flour it ; we also sprinkle a 
very little flour on the board to prevent the paste sticking. 

N.B. — In making paste we should always keep our hands well floured to 
prevent its sticking to them. 

13. We take the paste out of the basin and put it on the 
board. 

14. We cut off about one-third of the paste and lay it 
aside for the cover or top of the pudding. 

15. We roll out the remainder of the paste to a round 
twice the size of the top of the basin ; it should be about 
one-third of an inch in thickness. 

16. We line the basin inside smoothly with the paste. 

17. We place the slices of meat and kidney in the basin, 
fitting them neatly in. 

18. We pour in about one gill and a half of water y so as 
to fill the basin to within half an inch of the top. 

19. We roll the remaining pieces of paste to a round, the 
size of the top of the basin, to about a quarter of an inch in 
thickness. 

20. We wet the edge of the paste in the basin with cold 
water, and cover over the top of the basin with the round 
of paste. 

21. We must join the paste together at the edge of the 
basin, pressing the edges together with our thumb. 

22. We take a knife, flour it, and trim the edges of the 
paste neatly round. 

23. We take a small pudding cloth, wring it out in warm 
water, and flour it. 

24. We put this cloth over the top of the basin, tying it 
on tightly with a piece of string under the rim of the basin. 

25. We tie the four corners of the cloth together over 
the top of the pudding. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Beef Steak P tedding. 127 

26. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the pudding and let it boil for two hours. 

N.B. — The lid should be on the saucepan. 

N.B. — We should keep a kettle of boiling water and fill up the saucepan, as 
the water in it boils away. 

27. After that time we take the pudding out of the sauce- 
pan and take off the cloth. 

28. We place a hot dish on the top of the pudding, turn 
the basin and dish quite over, and carefully raising the 
basin, we should leave the pudding in the middle of the dish 
unbroken. It is then ready for serving. 

N. B. — This pudding might be made of beef skirt or Australian beef. 






28 National Training School for Cookerv. 



PIG'S FRY. 

Average cost of this dish, i.e., "Poor Mans Goose'* (i quart 

dish)— 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i lb. of pig's fry 6 

2,\ lbs. of potatoes o.\ 

i onion o k 

Sage and seasoning o| 

9i 
Time required about one hour and a quarter. 



I 



Now we will show you how to cook Pigs Fry — M Poor 
Mans Goose!' 

1. We take two pounds and a half of potatoes, and put 
them in a basin of cold water. 

2. We take a scrubbing brush and scrub and wash the 
potatoes well. 

3. We put the potatoes into a saucepan of cold water. 

4. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. 

5. As soon as it boils we take the potatoes out of the 
water (N.B. — This is called par-boiling potatoes), we peel 
them, and cut them in slices with a sharp knife. 

6. We take one onion and peel it. 

7. We take two or three sage-leaves and put them on a 
board. 

8. We chop up the onion and sage together on the board 
with a sharp knife. 

9. We take one pound of pig's fry and cut it in small 
pieces. 

10. We take a quart pie-dish and grease the dish with 
dripping or fat. 

11. We put a layer of sliced potatoes in the bottom of the 
pie-dish. 

12. We sprinkle a little of the chopped sage and onion % 
pepper and salt, over the potatoes. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Pigs Fry. 129 



13. We now put a layer of the pig' 's fry. 

14. We sprinkle a little of the chopped sage and o?iion, 
pepper and salt, over the pig's fry. 

15. Now we add another layer of sliced potatoes, and 
sprinkle them with a little of the chopped sage and onion, 
pepper and salt. 

16. We put in another layer of pig's fry, and sprinkle 
the remainder of the chopped sage and onion, and a little 
pepper and salt on the top. 

17. We cover these layers with the rest of the sliced 
potatoes. 

18. We now fill up the pie-dish with water for gravy. 

19. We take the skin usually sent with the pig's fry and 
put it over the top of the pie-dish. 

20. If the skin be not sent we must take a piece of whitey- 
brown paper and grease it with some dripping or fat, and 
put that over the pie-dish instead. 

21. We put the pie-dish into a moderate oven to bake 
for from three quarters of an hour to one hour. After that 
time it is ready for serving. 



130 National Training School for Cookery. 
PORK PIE. 

Average cost of "Pork Pie' (1 lb.) 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

\ lb. lard o 3 

1 lb. pork (either loin or leg) o 10 

Seasoning o o\ 

1 lb. of flour , o 2 

1 egg o 1 

,' 4* 
Time required two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Pork Pie. 

1. We put a quarter of a pound of lard and a quarter of 
a pint of cold water into rather a large saucepan. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. 

N.B. — We must watch it, as if it boils over it will catch fire. 

3. We take one pound of lean pork (cut either from the loin 
or from the leg), put it on a board, and cut it up in pieces 
of about one inch square. 

4. We put one pound of flour into a basin. 

5. When the lard and water are quite boiling, we pour 
them into the middle of the flour and mix them well with 
a spoon. 

6. When the paste is cool enough we should knead it well 
with our hands. 

N.B. — More water must not be added, as the paste is required to be 
rather stiff. 

7. We take the paste out of the basin, and put it on a 
floured board. 

8. We cut off a quarter of the paste, and the remainder 
we mould into the shape of a basin, pressing it inside with 
one hand and supporting it outside with the other. 

9. We should shape it as evenly as possible, and it should 
be about one-third of an inch in thickness all round. 

10. We should take a knife, flour it, and cut the top of 
the shape level all round. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Pork Pie. 131 

11. We dip the pieces of pork into cold water, then season 
them well with pepper and salt. 

12. We should put these pieces inside the mould of paste 
as close together as possible. 

N.B. — The pie can be flavoured, if liked, with chopped sage, about a tea- 
spoonful sprinkled well amongst the pieces of pork. 

13. We take the remainder of the paste and roll it out 
(with a floured rolling pin), and cut it to the size of the top 
of the mould and to about the thickness of one-third of an 
inch. 

14. We take an egg and break it into two cups, dividing 
the yolk from the white. 

15. We take a paste brush, dip it into the white of egg, 
and egg the edge of the mould of paste. 

16. We take the piece of paste and put it over the top of 
the pie, pressing the edges together with our thumb. 

17. We cut little leaves out of the remaining paste, dip 
them in the white of the egg, and stick them on the top of 
the pie. 

18. We wet the/zV all over with the yolk of egg. 

19. We put the pie in a moderate oven to bake for two 
hours. After that time it is ready for serving. 



1 5 2 National Training School for Cookery. 



SEA PIE. 

Average cost of a " Sea Pie " (about two quarts). 

INGREDIENTS 

s. d. 

2 lbs. of buttock steak at rod i 8 

2 onions o i 

i small carrot ) , 

Pepper and salt ) ° ° 2 

fib. of flour o \\ 

\ lb. of suet ) ± 

i teaspoonful of baking powder j ° 2 - 



2 I 



Time ?-equired about two hours. 

Now we will show you how to make a Sea Pie. 

1. We put two pounds of buttock steak on a board, and 
cut it in slices with a sharp knife. 

2. We take two onions, peel them, and slice them as 
thinly as possible. 

3. We take a small carrot, wash it, scrape it clean with 
a knife, and cut it in thin slices. 

4. We season the slices of meat with pepper and salt to 
taste. 

5. We put the slices of meat in layers in a two quart 
saucepan, sprinkling a little of the sliced vegetables on each 
layer of the meat. 

6. We pour in enough cold water just to cover the meat. 

7. We put the saucepan on the fire, just bring it to the 
boil, and then move it to the side of the fire to simmer. 

N.B. — During this time we make the crust. 

8. We take a quarter of a pound of suet, put it on a board, 
cut away all the skin, and chop it up as finely as possible. 

9. We should sprinkle a little flour over the suet, to 
prevent it sticking to the board or knife. 

10. We put three qicarters of a pound of flour hAo a basin, 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Sea Pie. 133 



and mix into it half a saltspoonful of salt, and one teaspoonfnl 
of baking powder. 

11. We now put in the chopped suet and rub it well into 
the flour with our hands. 

12. We add sufficient cold water to mix it into a stiff 
paste. 

13. We flour a bocrd and turn the paste out on it. 

14. We take a rolling-pin, flour it, and roll out the paste 
to the size of the saucepan. 

15. This quantity of paste will roll out to the size of a 
two quart saucepan, so that if a smaller saucepan is used 
less paste will be required. 

16. We put this paste over the meat in the saucepan, and 
let it simmer gently for one hour and a half. 

N.B. — The lid should be on the saucepan. 

17. We must watch it, and be careful to pass a knife 
round the sides of the saucepan, or the paste will stick. 

N.B. — Sailors add sliced potatoes to the pie when they can get them. 

18. For serving, we carefully remove the crust, turn the 
meat, vegetables, and gravy on to a hot dish, and place the 
crust over it. 



r34 National Training School for Cookery. 



BOILED PIG'S HEAD (salted) WITH 
ONION SAUCE. 

Average cost of " Pig's Head" $d. or 6d. per lb. 



NGREDIENTS. 



For " Brawn." 

s. d. 

\ a pig's head i 3 

40 peppercorns \ 

2 blades of mace r 

4 cloves I ° 1 

12 allspice ) 

A bunch of herbs ) 

2 large onions J ° I 



For " Onion Sauce." 

d. 

3 onions 1^ 

3 gills of milk \\ 

1 oz. of flour o\ 

\ oz. of butter ) , 

Pepper and salt j °* 



3* 



Time required [after salting) for boiling pig 's head about two hours ; for making 
into brawn, two hours. 



Now we will show you how to boil Pig^s Head. 

1. We take %.pig*s head, wash it thoroughly in plenty of 
tepid water. 

2. We take out the brains and throw them away. 

3. We cut out the little veins and all the splinters of bone. 

4. We wash the head in all parts with plenty of salt, 
thoroughly cleansing it from blood. 

5. We lay the head in pickle (see Pickle for Meat) for 
three days. 

6. When the head is salted, we put it into a saucepan 
with cold water enough to cover it. 

7. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. 

8. When it boils we draw the saucepan to the side of the 
fire, and let it simmer gently for from one hour and a half 
to two hours, according to the size and age of the pig. 

N.B. — Boiled pig's head is eaten with boiled rabbit, or with veal, or with 
onion sauce. 

N.B. — If preferred the pig's head can be made into brawn (see below). 

For making Onion Sauce, 

9. We take three or four onions, peel them, and cut then* 
in quarters. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Pig's Head. 135 

10. We put them into a saucepan with water enough to 
cover them. 

11. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil until the 
onions are quite tender. 

12. We then strain them off, throw the water away, put 
the onions on a board, and chop them up small. 

13. We throw the onions into a saucepan with three gills 
(one gill is a quarter of a pint) of milk, put it on the fire, 
and let it come to the boil. 

14. We put one ounce of flour into a basin and mix it 
with half an ounce of butter into a paste with a knife. 

15. We stir this paste smoothly into the boiling milk and 
onions, and continue to stir it until it boils. 

16. We season the sauce with pepper and salt to taste, 
and then move the saucepan to the side of the fire to keep 
warm till required for use. 

17. We take a grater and grate some bread crumbs on to 
a plate. 

18. We put the plate in the oven or in a Dutch oven to 
brown the bread crumbs. 

19. When the pig s head is sufficiently boiled we take it 
out of the saucepan and put it on a hot dish. 

20. We take out the tongue, skin it, and put it back on 
the dish with the head. 

21. We sprinkle the browned bread crumbs over the pig's 
head, and pour the onion sauce round it, or, if preferred, it 
may be served separately in a sauce boat. 



For making the pig's head into Brawn. 

1. We salt and boil the pig's head in the same way as 
above from Note 1 to Note 8. 

2. When the pigs head is sufficiently boiled we take it 
out of the saucepan and put it on a board. 

3. We cut all the meat off the bones, and cut it into 
small pieces the shape of dice ; we also cut up the ear and 
the tongue (the tongue should be previously skinned). 



6 National Training School for Cookery 



4. We put the bones back into the saucepan with a quart 
of the liquor (in which the head was boiled) , forty pepper- 
corns, two blades of mace, four cloves, and twelve allspice. 

5. We also add a bunch of herbs, namely, a sprig oj 
marjoram, thyme, and two bay leaves tied tightly together. 

6. We take tivo onions, peel them, cut them in quarters, 
and put them into the saucepan. 

7. We put the saucepan on the fire and let it come to 
the boil, we should remove the lid and let the liquor reduce 
for about half an hour. 

8. After that time we strain the liquor into a basin. 

9. We pour one pint and a half of the strained liquor back 
into the saucepan and put it on the fire. 

10. We now put the pieces of meat into the liquor, season 
it with pepper (and salt if necessary) to taste, and let it come 
to the boil. 

11. We take a basin or tin mould, rinse it in cold water. 

12. We then pour the meat and the liquor together into 
the wet basin or tin, and stand it aside to get cold and set. 

13. For serving we turn the brawn out of the basin on 
to a dish. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Sheep's Head. 137 



SHEEP'S HEAD. 

Average cost of " S keeps Head}' consisting of I quart of 
broth and I dish of boiled sheep s head, with vegetables 
or Browned sheep's head. 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d 

1 sheep's head i o 

Salt ) 

1 oz. of rice > o o\ 

4 peppercorns ) 

2 turnips o i 

1 carrot o o^ 

1 onion o o| 

\ small head of celery o 2 

1 sprig of thyme ) , 

2 sprigs of parsley J 

Toasted crusts of bread o o\ 

£ oz. of flour o o^ 

z oz. clarified dripping or \ oz. butter o o\ 

Time required [after the sheep's head has been soaked for 2 hours), one and a half hours. 



Now we will show you how to cook Sheep s Head. 

1. We take a sheep s head (which has been previously 
chopped half way through by the butcher) and put it in a 
basin of warm water, with a dessertspoonful of salt. 

2. We should wash the head thoroughly, carefully re- 
moving the brains (which should be put aside) and all the 
splinters of the bones. 

N.B. — If this be not thoroughly done, the sheep's head will be spoiled. 

3. We now put the sheep s head in a basin of salt and 
water, to soak for two hours. 

4. After the head has been soaked, we take it out of the 
water, and carefully cut the tongue out with a knife. 

5. We tie the head together with a piece of string, to 
keep it in shape. 

6. We put the head and the tongue in a large saucepan. 

7. We pour in sufficient lukewarm water to cover the 
head. 



138 National Training School for Cookery. 

8. We add a good saltspoonful of salt, and ^.peppercorns. 

N.B. — If liked, one ounce of pearl barley, previously washed, may be now 
added. 

9. We put the saucepan on the fire, and let it boil very 
gently for 1 hour. 

10. We must watch it and skim it occasionally with a 
spoon, removing as much of the fat as possible. 

11. We take two turnips, wash them in cold water, peel 
them, and cut them in quarters with a sharp knife. 

12. We take a carrot, scrape it clean with a knife, and 
cut it in pieces. 

13. We take a good-sized onion, peel it, and cut it in 

quarters. 

14. We take half a small head of celery, and two sprigs of 
parsley, and wash them in cold water. 

15. When the sheep's head has boiled for an hour i we 
should add all these vegetables. 

16. We take one ounce of rice, wash it well in cold water, 
and add it to the saucepan. 

17. We also add one sprig of thyme. 

18. We now move the saucepan to the side of the fire 
and let it simmer gently for one hour and a half 

N.B. —The lid should be on the saucepan. 

19. Half an hour before the sheep's head is finished, we 
wash the brains well in cold water (removing all the skin). 

20. We tie the brains up in a piece of muslin and put 
them in the saucepan with the head, to boil for ten minutes. 

21. We put one ounce of clarified dripping, or half an ounce 
of butter, into a small saucepan. 

22. We put the saucepan on the fire to melt the drip- 
ping, and then add half an ounce of flour and mix them well 
together with a spoon. 

23. We take one gill (a quarter of a pint) of broth from the 
saucepan in which the head is boiling, and add it by degrees 
to the sauce, stirring it as smoothly as possible until it boils 
and thickens. 

24. We now move the saucepan to the side of the fire. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat, — Sheep's Head. 139 

25. When the brains have boiled for ten minutes we take 
them out of the saucepan, take them out of the muslin, and 
chop them up in small pieces with a knife. 

26. We add the brains to the sauce. 

27. When the sheep's head is sufficiently cooked we take 
it out of the saucepan, cut away the string, and place it on 
a warm dish. 

28. We take the tongue, skin it carefully, and place it on 
the same dish. 

29. We take out the turnips, put them in a basin, and 
mash them with a fork. 

30. We take out the carrot and arrange it alternately 
with the mashed turnips round the sheep's head. 

31. We take the brain sauce and pour it over the sheep's 
head. 

32. We should pour the broth carefully into a basin, 
without the bread or vegetables. 

N.B. — Bread or vegetables should never be kept in broth, as they would turn 
it sour. 

33. We put the basin of broth away until required for 
use. 

N.B. — All the fat should be removed from the broth before it is used. 

N.B. — When the broth is required for use, a few toasted crusts of bread 
might be added, and a little chopped parsley. 

N.B. — The fat from the broth should be melted down into dripping. 



N.B. — If the sheep's head be preferred browned. 

1. We proceed as above (see from Note 1 to Note 17). 

2. We then move the saucepan to the side of the fire, 
and let it simmer gently for one hour, 

N.B. — The lid should be on the saucepan. 

3. We take a piece of stale bread and grate a tablespoon- 
ful of bread crumbs with a grater. 

4. We mix with these crumbs a teaspoonful of parsley, 
and a teaspoonful of mixed herbs, chopped up finely. 

6. When the head has simmered for one hour, we take it 
out of the saucepan. 



140 National Training School for Cookery. 

6. We cut away the string round it, and lay it on a dish. 

7. We sprinkle the bread crumbs and herbs over the 
head, and put a few tiny pieces of dripping on it. 

8. We put the dish in the oven, or in front of the fire, for 
ten to fifteen minutes ; it will be then ready for serving. 

9. We take the brains and wash them well in cold 
water (removing all the skin). 

10. We tie the brains up in a piece of muslin and put 
them in the saucepan of broth (in which the sheep's head was 
boiled) to boil for ten minutes. 

N.B. — For serving, the tongue should be skinned as above, and served 
separately with the brain sauce (see above from Note 21 to Note 27). 

11. We proceed with the broth the same as above, from 
Note 32. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Grilled SteaR. 141 



A GRILLED STEAK. 

Average cost of — " Grilled Steak." 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb rump steak » 8 

Lemon, salt, and parsley 1 

Rutter and salad oil 1 

10 

Time required, about ten minutes. 



Now we will show you how to Grill a Steak (either beef 
or rump steak will do, but the latter is more tender). 

1. We take a small bunch of parsley, wash it. dry it well 
in a cloth, and put it on a board. 

2. We must chop the parsley up very fine with a knife. 

3. We take a qitarter of an ounce of butter and mix it 
well with the chopped parsley. 

4. We sprinkle over it pepper and salt (according to 
taste), and six drops of lemon juice. 

5. We make it all up into a small pat. 

6. We take half a pound of rump steak , half an inch in 
thickness. 

7. We pour about a tablespoonful of salad oil on to a plate. 

8. We dip both sides of the steak into the oil. 

9. We take a gridiron and warm it well by the fire. 

10. We place the oiled steak on the gridiron, and hang it 
on the bars of the stove close to the fire to cook quickly. 

N.B. — If the meat is at all frozen it must be warmed gradually through, 
before putting it quite near the fire, or it will be tough. 

11. W T e must turn the gridiron with the steak occa- 
sionally ; it will take from ten to twelve minutes, according 
to the brightness and heat of the fire. 

12. When the steak is sufficiently cooked, we must place 
it on a hot dish ; and we should be careful not to stick 



*4 2 National Training School for Cookery. 

the fork into the meat (or the gravy will run out, but into 
the fat). 

13. We take the pat of green butter and put it on the 
steak, spreading it all over with a knife. It is now ready 
for serving. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Stewed Steak. 143 
STEWED STEAK. 

Average cost for " Stewing a Steak!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 lb. of rump steak 1 4 

1 carrot o o\ 

1 turnip o o^ 

2 onions o 1 

\ oz. of butter o ok 

% oz. of flour I , 

Pepper and salt j * 

1 tablespoonful of mushroom ketchup .... o ok 



1 7\ 
Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to Stew a Steak (either beef 
or rump steak will do, the latter is more tender). 

1. We take one pound of rump steak, one and a half inch 
in thickness, and put it on a board. 

2. We cut off all the skin, and fat from the steak. 

3. We take one carrot, one turnip, and wash them well in 
cold water. 

4. We take a sharp knife, scrape the carrot clean, and 
cut it up to the shape of dice. 

5. We take the turnip, peel it, and cut it up to the shape 
of dice. 

6. We take two small onions, peel them, and cut them 
in quarters. 

7. We put half an ounce of butter in a stewpan, put it on 
the fire, and when the butter is melted, we put the steak in 
it to fry brown on both sides. 

8. We put the onion, the carrot, and turnip, into the 
stewpan with the steak. 

9. We take a basin and put in it half an ounce of flour, 
half a teaspoonfid of salt, half a saltspoonful of pepper, and 
mix them together with a wooden spoon. 

10. We stir in gradually half a pint of water. 



1 44 National Training School for Cookery. 

11. We pour this sauce into the stewpan, with the steak 
and vegetables, and stir all together until it boils and 
thickens. 

12. We let it gently simmer one hour. 

13. We take the fat which we have cut off the steak, and 
cut it into small pieces. 

14. We put the pieces of fat on a tin dish. 

15. We put the fat in the oven to cook till brown. 

N.B. — It is better for stewed steak, to cook the fat separately, as it keeps 
the gravy of the steak free from grease. 

16. When the steak is sufficiently stewed, we must put 
it on a hot dish, put the vegetables round, and pour the 
sauce over ; we take the tin dish out of the oven, and place 
the pieces of fat about on the steak. It is now ready for 
serving. 

N.B. — If liked, for serving the steak might be cut up in small pieces, about 
the size of a veal cutlet, and the vegetables arranged on eacli piece of 
steak, or in the centre. 
About a teaspoonful of chopped parsley sprinkled over the top is an 
improvement to the taste and look. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Toad in the Hole. 145 
TOAD IN THE HOLE. 

Average cost of " Toad in the Hole!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

\ lb. of flour o 1 

2 eggs o 2 

1 pint of milk o 2^ 

i| lbs. of meat (either beef or mutton) . . ) 

Seasoning } l ° 

HI 

Time required, about one hour and three quarters. 

Now we will show you how to make Toad in the Hole. 

1. We put eight ounces of flour into a basin, with half a 
saltspoonful of salt. 

2. We break two eggs into thefloitr, and stir in smoothly, 
and by degrees, one pint of milk. 

N.B. — We must be careful that it is not lumpy. 

3. We should beat it up as much as possible, as it will 
make the batter lighter. 

4. We take one pound of meat, put it on a board, and cut 
it in neat pieces. 

N.B. — Buttock steak, beef skirt, or any pieces of mutton might be used ; for 
instance, the short bones from the neck of mutton. Sausages or cold meat 
might very well be used. 

5. We take a pie dish or a tin and grease it inside with 
clarified dripping. 

6. We season the pieces of meat with pepper and salt, 
and place them in the greased dish. 

7. We pour the batter over the meat y and put the dish in 
the oven to bake for one hour. 

8. After that time it is ready for serving. 



146 National Training ScJiool for Cookery. 



BUBBLE AND SQUEAK. 

Average cost of " Bubble and Squeak." 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 lb. of boiled salt beef, or pork o 10 \ 

1 cabbage o 2 



1 o\ 
Time required, about half-an-hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Bubble and Squeak. 

1. We take a cabbage, and wash it well in salt and water. 

2. We put a saucepan of water on the fire to boil, we 
add a tablespoon/id of salt, and a tiny piece of common soda, 
about the size of a pea. 

3. When the water boils, we put in the cabbage, and let 
it boil for about twenty minutes. We should feel the stalk 
with a fork to see if it is tender, and then drain off all the 
water, and put the cabbage on a plate. 

N.B. — Any remains of cold boiled cabbage could be used instead of boiling 
a fresh one. 

4. We cut some thin slices of cold salt beef, and a little 
of the fat, and put them in a frying pan. 

5. We put the pan over the fire, and fry the meat a light 
brown. We must turn the slices occasionally, and not let 
them burn. 

6. We arrange the slices in the centre of a hot dish, 
cover the dish, and stand it in the oven to keep warm. 

7. We take the boiled cabbage, put it on a board, chop it 
up in small pieces, and put it in the frying pan to fry, a few 
minutes. We must stir it, and not let it burn, or stick to 
the pan. 

N.B. — If there are any remains of cold boiled carrots or parsnips, they could 
be chopped up and warmed in a saucepan with about § oz. of clarified 
dripping. 

8. For serving, we put the fried cabbage, and carrots or 
parsnips round the dish, and the slices of meat in the centre. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Mutton Broth. 14? 
MUTTON BROTH. 

Average cost of '" Mutton Broth" {about five pints). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 
3 lbs. of the scrag end of the neck of mutton, 

xod. per lb 2 6 

2 oz. of pearl barley or rice o o^ 

I turnip o oh 

1 onion o ok 



2 leeks . . o 1 

1 carrot o oh, 

1 teaspoonful of parsley ) ^ 

Salt and pepper J % 

2 9z 

Time required, about two hours and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make Mutton Broth. 

1. We take two ounces of pearl barley, wash it well, and 
put it in a basin of cold water to soak. 

2. We put three pounds of the scrag end of the neck of 
mutton on a board, and cut it up in joints. 

3. We wash the pieces of mutton in cold water, and then 
put them in a stewpan with three quarts of cold water, put 
the stewpan on the fire, and when it comes to the boil, 
skim it well, and add a teaspoonful of salt (which will 
encourage the scum to rise), skim it again, and move it to 
the side of the fire, to simmer gently for one hour and a 
half ; we must watch it, and skim it occasionally. 

4. We take a turnip and an onion, wash them, and peel 
them. 

5. We take a carrot, wash it, and scrape it. 

6. We take two leeks, cut off the tops of the green leaves, 
and wash them well. 

7. We cut up all the vegetables to the shape of dice. 

8. When the mutton has simmered long enough, we 
tstrain off the liquor into a basin, and take the mutton, and 

cut up all the meat into small pieces. 



i4§ National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We return the liquor to the saucepan, add the meat, 
vegetables, the soaked barley, and pepper and salt to taste, 
an J put the saucepan by the side of the fire, to simmer 
gently, for about half an hour, until the vegetables are 
tender. 

10. We take a sprig or two of parsley, wash it, and chop 
up finely on a board. 

11. When the broth is finished, we must skim off all the 
grease, and then add the chopped parsley. 

12. For serving, we pour the broth into a hot soup tureen. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Roast Rabbit Stuffed. 1 49 
ROAST RABBIT STUFFED. 

Average cost of " Stuffed Rabbit!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 Rabbit i g 

£ lb. of bread crumbs o i 

2 oz. of suet ...» o 1 1 

A teaspoonful of chopped parsley \ 

A teaspoonful of chopped herbs (marjoram I 

and thyme) ) o zk 

A little grated lemon rind and nutmeg . . 

Salt and pepper J 

1 egg , o 1 

1 onion , : . . . o oh 

1 shalot o o^ 

§ pint of stock o 3J 

1 oz. of flour o o I 

j oz. of butter o 1 

2 7! 

Time required, about one hour and three quarters. 



Now we will show you how to Stuff and Roast a Rabbit. 

1. We take a rabbit (which has been skinned and pro- 
perly prepared for cooking), wash it well in cold water, 
and wipe it dry inside. 

2. We take the rabbi fs liver ; put it in a small saucepan, 
and cover it with water, put the saucepan on the fire, and 
when it comes to the boil we should take out the lizer, and 
put it on a board. 

N.B. — This is called parboiling the liver. 

3. We chop up the liver into small pieces. 

4. We place a wire sieve over the board, take some 
crumb of bread, and rub it through the sieve, there should 
be about a quarter of a pound of breadcrumbs. 

5. We put two ounces of suet on the board, cut away 
ithe skin, and chop it up finely. 

6. We take a sprig of thyme and marjoram y and about 
two sprigs of parsley, take away the stalks, and chop them 
them up finely, there should be about a dessertspoonfid. 

7. We put the liver, breadcrumbs, suet, and mixed herbs 
into a basin, we also grate over about half a teaspoonful of 



150 National Training School for Cookery. 

lemon rind and nutmeg (as much as would cover one side 
of a 3d. piece), we season it with pepper and salt to taste, 
add one egg, and mix all well together with a wooden 
spoon. 

8. We fill the inside of the rabbit with this stuffing, and 
sew it up with string. 

9. For trussing it, we place it on a board, cut off the 
fore joints of the shoulders and legs, press the legs close 
to the body on either side, and pass a skewer through each 
to secure them : draw back the head between the shoulders, 
and pass a skewer through to keep it back. 

10. We grease a piece of paper with some clarified 
dripping or butter, and wrap it round the rabbit, to prevent 
it burning ; we put it on a tin with about an ounce of 
clarified dripping. 

11. We put the tin in a hot oven to bake for about one 
hour; we must watch it frequently and baste it well; a 
few minutes before it is done, we should remove the 
buttered paper, and sprinkle over the rabbit about a 
quarter of a saltspoonful of salt, and baste it well. 

12. While the rabbit is baking we should make the 
sauce : we take one small onion and a shalot, peel them, cut 
them in slices, and put them in a stewpan with one ounce 
of butter. 

13. We put the pan over the fire, and let the onion fry 
for about three minutes ; it must not burn. 

14. We now add 07ie ounce of flour, and stir it well ; we 
pour in half a pint of stock, and stir well till it boils and 
thickens ; we season it with pepper and salt to taste, and 
move the stewpan to the side of the fire to keep warm. 

N.B. — If mushrooms can be obtained they would improve the sauce: about 
six would be wanted, well washed, peeled, and cut in quarters, added 
to the sauce, and stewed in it gently for ten minutes. 

15. For serving, we take the rabbit out of the oven, 
place it on a hot dish, carefully remove the skewers, and 
pour the sauce through a strainer over the rabbit. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Liver and Sacon. i s 
LIVER AND BACON. 

Average cost of " Liver and Bacon" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 lbs. sheep's or calf's liver i 4 

1 lb. bacon 1 o 

1 dessertspoonful of flour j 

Pepper and salt , o o| 

1 small onion ; 

JLil 
Time required, about half an hour. 

Now we will show you how to cook Liver and Bacon. 

1. We take one pound of bacon, put it on a board, and cut 
it in thin slices. 

2. We cut the rind off each slice of bacon. 

3. We put these slices of bacon into a frying-pan. 

4. We put the frying-pan on the fire to fry the bacon. 
It will take about ten minutes. 

N.B. — If the bacon is not very fat, we must put a small piece of dripping in 
the frying-pan with the bacon. 

5. We should turn it when one side is fried. 

6. We now take two pounds of sheep's or calf's liver, put 
it on a board, and cut it in slices. 

7. We put about two tablespoonsful of flour on a plate. 

8. We dip the slices of liver into the flour, and flour 
them well on both sides. 

9. When the bacon is fried we take it out of the frying- 
pan and put it on a warm dish. 

10. We stand the dish near the fire to keep warm. 

11. We put the slices of liver in the frying-pan, a few at 
a time, as they must not be on the top of each other. 

N.B. — If the flavour of onion is liked, a small onion, peeled, and cut in slices, 
might be fried with the liver. 

12. The liver will take about a quarter of an hour to fry. 

13. We should watch it occasionally, and turn it once. 

14. To see when the liver is sufficiently cooked we 



152 National Training School for Cookery. 

should cut a slice ; the inside should be of a brownish 

colour. 

15. When the liver is all cooked we should place it on 
the dish with the bacon. 

16. We put a dessertspoonful of flour in a cup, and mix it 
into a smooth paste with nearly a gill (quarter of a pint) of 
water. 

17. We pour the flour and water into the frying-pan and 
stir it until it boils and thickens. 

18. We add pepper and salt to taste, and pour this sauce 
over the liver and bacon. It is then ready for serving. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Brain Cakes. 153 
BRAIN CAKES. 

Average cost of " Brain Cakes " (about 6 cakes). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 
Calf s or sheep's brains (about 5 ozs. ) 3 

1 oz. of flour o^ 

\ oz. of butter o| 

Pepper and salt J 

\ teaspoonful of chopped parsley f i 

Nutmeg I 

2 sage leaves J 

2 eggs I 2 » 

3 oz. of bread crumbs j i 



Time required, about two hours. 



Now we will show you how to make Brain Cakes. 

1. We take the brains, wash them well in cold water, to 
remove all impurities, then put them in a stewpan, cover 
them with cold water, and add one teaspoonful of salt, and 
two sage leaves. 

2. We put the stewpan on the fire, and when it comes 
to the boil, we should skim it well, and move it rather to 
the side of the fire, to boil gently for ten minutes. 

3. After that time, we turn the brains on to a plate, and 
when quite cold, we should cut them up in small pieces. 

4. We take a sprig or two of parsley, wash it, dry it, and 
chop it up finely on a board ; there should be about half 
a teaspoonful. 

5. We place a wire sieve over a plate, take some crumb 
of bread and rub it through the sieve ; there should be 
about three ounces of bread-crumbs. 

6. We put half an ounce of butter in a stewpan, put it 
over the fire, and when it is melted, stir in one ounce of 
flour \ we also add one gill (quarter of a pint) of cold water, 
and half a teaspoon] c id of chopped parsley ; we stir it all over 

t the fire, until it boils, and thickens. 

7. We now add two ounces of bread-crumbs, and the 
brains ; and take a grater and a nutmeg, and give tivo 



154 National Training School for Cookery, 

grates of the nutmeg over the sauce ; add pepper, and salt to 
taste, and mix all well together. 

8. We take an egg, break it, put the white in a cup (it 
is not required for present use), and add the yolk to the 
sauce, and stir well over the fire till cooked ; it will take 
about five minutes. 

9. We must then turn the mixture on to a plate, and 
stand it aside to cool. 

10. We put one pound of clarified dripping or lard into 
a deep stewpan, and put it on the fire to heat : we must 
be careful it does not burn. 

11. When the mixture is quite cold, we divide it into 
pieces of equal size, and form them into cakes ; we must 
sprinkle some flour over them, to prevent them from 
sticking. 

12. We break an egg on to a plate, and beat it up slightly 
with a knife. 

13. We dip the cakes into the egg, and egg them well 
all over with a paste-brush. 

14. We take the rest of the bread-crumbs, and cover the 
cakes well all over with them. 

15. We take a frying basket, and arrange the cakes in 
it ; we must finger them as little as possible, and not allow 
them to touch each other. 

16. When the fat is quite hot, and smoking (we should 
test the heat of it by throwing in a piece of bread, which 
should fry brown directly), we put in the frying basket, for 
two minutes or so, to fry the cakes a pale yellow. 

17. We put a piece of whitey-brown paper on a plate, 
and as the cakes are fried, we turn them on to the paper, to 
drain off the grease. 

18. For serving, we arrange the cakes tastily on a hot 
dish, and, if liked, garnish them with fried parsley (see Vege- 
tables, Lesson No. 4, note 20). 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Braised Liver. 155 



BRAISED LIVER. 

Average cost of " Braised Liver?* 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of sheep's liver 4 

a oz. of fat bacon 1 1 

1 carrot o\ 

1 onion, or 1 doz. button onions 1 

Bouquet garni {i.e. sprig of thyme, parsley, 

and bay leaf ) 

r oz. of flour 

Salt and pepper 

a oz. of butter a 

10 

Time required, about 2 hours and half. 



Now we will show you how to lard and braise liver. 

1. We take two ounces of fat bacon, put it on a board, 
and cut it into strips one inch long, and one eighth of an inch 
in width and thickness. 

2 We take a larding needle with a little strip of bacon in 
it, and lard half a pound of sheep's liver neatly, in regular 
rows, until one side is entirely covered with strips of bacon. 

3. We put two ounces of butter and the larded liver into 
a stewpan, put it over the fire, and fry the liver brown ; we 
must be careful not to burn it. 

4. We now take out the liver, and put it on a plate. 

5. We stir smoothly into the butter, in the stewpan, one 
ounce of flour, and pour in one pint of stock or water, place 
the stewpan over the fire, and stir well till it boils and 
thickens, then move it to the side of the fire. 

6. We take a carrot, wash it, scrape it clean with a knife, 
and cut it in half. 

7. We take an onion or one dozen button onions, wash 
them, and peel them carefully. 

8. We add these vegetables, and the liver to the stewpan, 
and season with pepper and salt, to taste ; we also add a 
bouquet garni, consisting of a sprig of thyme, parsley, and a 
bay leaf, tied tightly together. 



156 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We let it all simmer gently for two hours. 

10. After that time we take the liver out of the stewpan, 
and put it on a hot dish, pour the sauce through a strainer 
over the liver > and if there are any button onions, they 
should be carefully taken out of the strainer, and served in 
the sauce, with the liver. It is then ready for serving. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Haricot Mutton. 157 
HARICOT MUTTON. 

Average cost of " Haricot Mutton? 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 lbs. of the scrag end of the neck of mutton .... 1 4 

2 onions I 

2 carrots O 1 

2 turnips O J 

1 tablespoonful of mushroom ketchup o £ 

I oz. of clarified dripping J 

1 oz. of flour J o I 

Pepper and salt ) 

1 jjj 

Time required, about two hours and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make Haricot Mutton. 

1. We take the mutton, wash it well, dry it, put it on a 
board, and cut it up in pieces ; if it is very fat, we must cut 
the fat away. 

N.B. — Any pieces of mutton can be used instead. 

2. We put the pieces of mutton in a saucepan, with one 
ounce of dripping, put it over the fire, to fry the mutton brown ; 
we must watch it, and turn the pieces, to fry both sides. 

3. We take two carrots, wash them, scrape them clean 
with a knife, and cut them to the shape of dice. 

4. We take two turnips, and two onions, wash them, peel 
them, and cut them the same size as the carrots. 

5. We add these vegetables to the saucepan, season it 
with pepper and salt to taste, and pour in one pint and a half 
of cold water. 

6. We put one ounce of flour into a basin, and mix it to 
a smooth paste, with about a tablespoonful of zvater, we stir 
this paste into the saucepan, and stir well over the fire till 
it boils, we must skim it well and add a tablespoonful of 
mushroom ketchup; move the saucepan to the side of the 
fire, to simmer gently for two hours. 

7. For serving, we arrange the meat in a circle on a hot 
dish, place the vegetables in the centre, and pour the sauce 
all over. 



158 National .Training School for Cookery. 
CALFS-HEAD, ROLLED AND STUFFED- 

Average cost of " Calf s-head? 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

\ a calf 's-head 5 o 

3 oz. of suet o 2 

7 oz. of bread crumbs o 2 

1 tablespoonful of mixed herbs (basil, mar- 
joram, thyme, and parsley) 



xegg 

Cayenne pepper and salt 

1 gill of brown sauce o 3I 

1 gill of tomato sauce 1 iof 

7 8 
Time required, about three hours. 



Now we will show you how to cook Calf 1 s-head. 

1. We put the half head on a board, take a sharp knife, 
and commence from the lip, keep the knife close to the bone, 
and carefully remove the flesh in one piece. We cut out 
the tongue and the brains, and put them aside. 

2. We put the head and bones in cold water, while we 
make the forcemeat. 

3. We take three ounces of beef suet, put it on a board, 
cut away all skin, and chop it up very finely with a knife. 

4. We place a wire sieve over a piece of paper, take some 
crumb of bread and rub it through the sieve. We weigh 
out six ounces of bread crumbs, the rest we put aside for 
further use. 

5. We put a small sprig of thyme, of basil, of marjoram 
and of parsley, on a board, take away the stalks, and chop 
the herbs up very finely. (There should be a tablespoonful) 

6. We put the suet, bread crumbs, and mixed herbs into a 
basin, we also add about half a teaspoonful of grated lemon 
rind, season it with pepper, and salt to taste, break in one 
egg, and mix all well together with a wooden spoon. 

7. We take the head out of the water, lay it on a board, 
and dry it with a clean cloth. 

8. We now place the forcemeat in the centre of the head s 
roll it up tightly in a clean cloth, and fasten it securely at 
both ends, with a piece of string. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Calfs-head. 159 

9. We put the rolled head, bones, and tongue into a large 
saucepan, and cover them with cold water, we also add a 
tablespoonful of salt. 

10. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it comes 
i to the boil, we must skim it carefully with a spoon, and then 
; move the saucepan to the side of the fire, to simmer gently 
I for two hours. 

11. While the head is cooking we should prepare the 
i sauce. We want one gill of brown sauce {see " Sauces," Lesson 
} No. 2), and a gill of Tomato sauce {see " Sauces," Lesson No. 6). 

N.B. — If liked, the Tomato Sauce might be omitted. 

12. We mix the sauces together, add a few grains of 
I Cayenne pepper, and salt to taste, and pour it into a stew- 

| pan, put the lid on, and stand it by the side of the fire, to 
keep warm till required for use. 

13. Half an hour before the head is finished, we wash the 
brains in cold water (removing all skin), and put them into 
the saucepan with the head, to cook for ten minutes. 

14. We take the remaining bread crumbs and put them 
on a plate in the oven to brown. 

N.B. — We must be careful they do not get burnt. 

15. We now take the tongue, and brains out of the 
saucepan, and cut them in small pieces. 

16. We break one egg on a plate, and beat it slightly. 

17. We take the rolled head out of the saucepan, take off 
the cloth, and place it in the middle of a hot dish, egg it 
over with the egg, and then cover it with the brozvned bread 
crumbs. 

18. We put the tongue and brains round the head, and 
I pour the sauce round. 

It is now ready for serving. 

19. We pour the stock through a strainer into a basin 
a and stand it aside to get cold. 

N.B. — This stock should be used for mock turtle soup {see " Soups," Lesson 
No. 7, from paragraph/) ; the remains of the calf s-head, after serving, 
can be used for the soup, the forcemeat should be removed, and can be 
used for the balls, and the flesh should be cut up in small pieces and put 
in the soup. 



160 National Training School for Cookery. 



SHEEP'S TROTTERS. 

Average cost of " Sheep's Trotters" with either " Piquante 
Sauce" or " White Sauce" 



INGREDIENTS. 



s. d. 
i 4 



4 trotters 

i tablespoonful of vinegar , 

i carrot f 

i onion 

i oz. of flour o o\ 



For Piquante Sauce. 

d. 

i carrot o\ 

i onion ok 



i oz. butter i 

| oz. of flour o| 

Pepper and salt 1 

I dessertspoonful of Harvey Sauce 
i dessertspoonful of Mushroom 

Ketchup 

i tablespoonful of vinegar 

| pint of brown stock 3! 

~7i 



For White Sauce. 

1 oz. butter 

\ oz. of flour 

1 gill of milk 

Pepper and salt \ 

4 mushrooms (if obtainable) . . . . > 
I pint of stock from sheep's trotters ) 



d. 

1 

ok 

A 



4k 



Time required, abotctfour hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to cook Sheep's Trotters. 

1. We take the sheep's trotters, wash them well in a basin 
of cold water ; then put them in a stewpan, with sufficient 
cold water to cover them, put the stewpan on the fire, and 
when it boils, take the stewpan off, strain off the water, and 
put the trotters in a basin of cold water. 

N.B.— This is to blanch them. 

2. We wash the stewpan out, wash the trotters tho- 
roughly, and then put them back in the stewpan. 

3. We take a carrot, wash it, and scrape it clean with a 
sharp knife. 

4. We take an onion, wash it, and peel it. 

5. We put one ounce of flour into a basin, and mix it 
smoothly with a tablespoonful of cold water. 



Lessons on Cooking Meat. — Sheep's Trotters. 161 

6. We now put the vegetables into the stewpan with 
the trotters, we also add a tablespoonful of vinegar, two 
quarts of water, and a tablespoonful of salt ; and stir in the 
flour and water. 

7. We put the stewpan over the fire, and stir it till it 
just boils, then move it to the side of the fire, to simmer 
for four hours. 

8. While the trotters are cooking, we should make the 
sauce, either piquante sauce, or white sauce, according to 
taste. For piquante sauce, or white sauce, the above pro- 
portion of ingredients should be used, and the sauces made 
in the same way as directed in " Sauces, Lessons No. I and 
No. 4." 

9. After that time we take the trotters carefully out of 
the stewpan, and arrange them on a hot dish, and serve 
them with the sauce, which can either be poured over the 
trotters, or served separately in a sauce-boat, according to 
taste. 



1 62 National Training School for Cookery. 
TRUSSING A FOWL FOR BOILING. 

Average cost of a "Boiled Fowl" and "Egg Sauce!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

i fowl 2 9 

\\ oz. of butter o if 

i carrot \ 

i small onion > o i 

A bouquet of herbs ) 

2 eggs o 2 

i oz. of flower \ L 

% pint of milk j ° z 2 

Gill of cream o 6 



Time required t about one hour and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to prepare a Fowl, and truss 
it for boiling. 

1. We take a fowl that has been already plucked, and 
put it on a board. 

2. We prepare it and clean it in the same way as 
described in " Trussing a Fowl for Roasting," from Note I 
to Note 12. 

3. We take a sharp knife and cut off the claws, and the 
end of the legs of the fowl to the first joint. 

4. We take a twist of paper or taper and light it. 

5. We take the fowl up by its legs, and hold the lighted 
paper under it to singe off the little hairs. 

6. We then hold the fowl up by its wings and singe the 
other end. 

N.B. — We must be careful in singeing not to blacken or mark the fowl in 
any way. 

7. We turn the fowl on its back with the tail towards us. 

8. We put our hands through the incision (made for 
drawing the fowl), and pass two fingers round the inside 
of the leg, so as to loosen the outside skin. 

9. We draw this outside skin right off the legs, and 
press the legs well into the sides of the fowl, forcing the 
breast up to give the fowl a good shape. 



Cooking Poultry. — Trussing Boiled Fowl. 163 



10. We pull this outside skin and turn it neatly inside 
the. fowl over the joints of the legs. 

11. We turn the fowl on its breast, and draw tightly the 
breast skin over the incision on to the back of the neck. 

12. We cross the ends of the wings over the back of the 
neck. 

13. We now turn the fowl on its back with the neck 
towards us. 

14. We take a trussing needle and thread it with fine 
t twine. 

15. We take the threaded trussing needle, and pass it 
I through the bottom of one thigh, through the body, and 

out on the other side through the other thigh. 

16. We must now turn the fowl on its breast, and take 
the threaded trussing needle again, and pass it through the 
middle of the pinion or wing, through the little bone, called 
the sidesman or stepmother's wing, catching up the skin 
which folds over the incision, and out through the other 
little bone and wing. 

17. We must pull this twine very tightly and tie it as 
firmly as possible at the side of the fowl. 

18. We turn the fowl over on its back, keeping the neck 
still towards us. 

19. We put our finger in the incision (made for drawing 
the fowl), and lift up the end of the breast bone. 

20. We take the threaded trussing needle and pass it 
through the skin over the bottom of the breast bone, over 
one leg, back through the body close to the back bone, and 
tie it firmly over the other leg at the side. 

21. We take a piece of kitchen paper and butter it well. 

22. We take this piece of buttered paper and wrap it 
\ well round the fowl. 

23. We take a large saucepan half full of hot second 
1 white stock or water ; and put it on the fire. 

N.B. — The reason why second white stock should be used is that the good- 
ness which comes from the fowl after boiling adds to the goodness of 
this stock, which can afterwards be used for soup. 

N.B. — If hot water be used, the goodness which comes from the fowl after 
boiling is only wasted, as it is not of sufficient strength to make the Large 
quantity of water of any use. 

L 2 



164 National Training School for Cookery. 

24. When the water is quite boiling, we place the fowl 
in the saucepan with its breast downwards. 

25. We also put into the saucepan one carrot, which has 
been scraped, a small onion, which has been peeled, and a 
bouquet of herbs for flavouring. 

26. The fowl will take from three-quarters of an hour to 
one hour to boil, according to its size. 

N.B. — We must not allow it to boil fast, only to simmer. The saucepan 
should be at the side of the fire. 



Now we must make the Egg Sauce to be served with 
the boiled fowl. 

N.B. — If liked, the eggs can be omitted, and only plain white sauce poured 
over the fowl for serving. 

1. We take a small saucepan full of hot water, and put it 
on the fire to boil. 

2. When the water is quite boiling, we put in two eggs 
to boil for ten minutes. 

3. We take a stewpan and put in it one ounce of butter 
and one ounce of flour. 

4. We mix them well together with a wooden spoon. 

5. We pour in half a pint of milk. 

6. We put the stewpan on the fire, and stir the mixture 
with a wooden spoon until it boils and thickens. 

7. We must then remove the stewpan to the side of the 
fire until required for use. 

8. When the eggs are sufficiently boiled, we take them 
carefully out of the saucepan with a spoon. 

9. We take the eggs and knock them against the edge 
of a basin to break off all the shell. 

10. We take a small basin of cold water. 

11. We cut the eggs in half and take out the yolks. 

12. We put the whites into cold zvater to prevent their 
turning yellow. 

13. We take the whites of the eggs out. of the water and 
cut them to the shape of small dice. 

14. We add the pieces of white of egg to the sauce in the 
stewpan. 



Cooking Poultry. — Tries sing Boiled Fowl. 165 

15. We now add one gill of cream to the sauce. 

16. We move the stewpan to the centre of the fire, and 
stir well till it boils again. 

N.B. — We must be careful in stirring not to break the pieces of egg. 

17. When the fowl is sufficiently boiled we take it out 
of the saucepan ; we take off the buttered paper, and place 
the fowl on a hot dish. 

18. We take a knife and cut the twine, and draw it all 
out of the fowl 

19. We take the stewpan off the fire and pour the sauce 
over the fowl. 

20. We take a wire sieve with the hard boiled yolks of 
the eggs, place it over the fowl, and rub the yolks through 
on to the breast. It is then ready for serving. 

N.B. — The neck, gizzard, liver, heart, and claws of the fowl (namely the 
Giblets), should be put aside, and when properly prepared can be used 
for soup (see "Soups," Lesson No. 6), or should be put in the stock pot. 

N.B. — To clean and prepare the giblets for use. 

A. We take the gizzard, cut it very carefully with a knife down the centre, 
where there is a sort of seam (we must be sure only to cut the first or 
outer skin), and draw off the outer skin without breaking the inside, 
which should be thrown away. 

B. We take the outer skin of the gizzard, the heart, and liver, wash them 
well in water, and dry them in a cloth. 

C. We take the neck, cut off the head, which is of no use, draw the skin 
off the neck, and wash the latter well in water, so as to remove the 
blood and any impurities. 

D. We put the claws and ends of legs in a basin of boiling water for some 
minutes, then take a knife, cut off the nails, and draw off the outer skin, 
which can be pulled off like a glove. 



1 66 National Training School for Cookery. 



TRUSSING A FOWL FOR ROASTING. 

Average cost of " Roasting a Fowl " and making " Bread 

Saucer 

INGREDIENTS. 

j. d. 

i fowl 2 9 

i oz. of butter o i 

i penny roll or a gill of bread crumbs o i 

i onion o o\ 

\ pint of milk o i.\ 

Speppercorns ) , 

Salt ) ° ° 4 

i tablespoonful of cream o i| 

3 2i 

Time required, about three quarters of an hour. 



Now we will show you how to prepare a Fowl and truss 
it for roasting. 

1. We take a suitable fowl that has been already plucked, 
and put it on a board. 

2. We turn the fowl on its breast, and make an incision 
of an inch long down the neck, three inches below the head. 

3. We pass our thumb round this incision and loosen the 
skin. 

4. We take a sharp knife and put it under the skin, and 
cut off the neck as near the body as possible. 

5. We must be careful in cutting off the neck to leave a 
piece of skin to fold over on to the back of the neck and 
cover the opening. 

6. We take out the crop which lies in the front of the neck. 

7. Then with our finger we loosen the liver and the 
other parts at the breast end. 

8. We must now turn the fowl round, and make an inci- 
sion at the vent, about one inch and a half wide. 

9. We must put our hand through this incision into the 
body and draw out all the interiors carefully, so as not to 
mess the fowl. 



Cooking Poultry, — Trussing Roast Fowl. 167 

10. We must be very careful not to break the gall bag, 
or the liver will be spoiled. 

N.B. — We take the liver, heart, and gizzard, and put them in a basin of 
water, with about half a teaspoonful of salt ; the other interiors should 
be thrown away. 

N.B. — We should look through the fowl from one end to the other and see 
it is perfectly cleared out. 

11. We take a damp cloth and wipe out the inside of the 
/ fowl to clean it thoroughly. 

N.B. — If the fowl is not quite fresh, we should use a little vinegar and water 
on the cloth we use for cleaning it, and then take a clean cloth and wipe 
it quite dry. 

12. We take a sharp knife and cut off the claws from 
t the legs of the fowl. 

13. We take a basin of boiling water, and hold the end 
of the legs of the fowl in the water for a minute or two. 

14. We then take off the outside skin as far as to the 
I first joint. 

15. We take a twist of paper or a taper and light it. 

16. We take the fowl up by its legs and hold the lighted 
paper under it to singe off the little hairs. 

17. We then hold the fowl up by its wings and singe 
the other end. 

N.B. — We must be careful in singeing not to blacken or mark the fowl in 
any way. 

18. We turn the fowl on its breast, and draw tightly the 
I breast skin over the incision on to the back of the neck. 

19. We cross the ends of the wings over the back of the 
\ neck. 

20. We now turn the fowl on its back with the neck 
t towards us, 

21. We take a trussing needle and thread it with fine twine. 

22. We hold the legs up and press the thighs well into 
t the sides of the fowl, forcing the breast up to give the fowl 
a a good shape. 

23. We take the threaded trussing needle, and pass it 
t through the bottom of one thigh, through the body, and 
tout on the other side through the other thigh. 

N.B — If liked, a part of the gizzard and liver (when cleaned, see Note at 
the end of " Trussing a Fowl for Boiling ") can be put into the wings of 
the fowl. 



1 68 National Training School for Cookery. 

24. We must now turn the fowl on its breast, and take 
the threaded trussing needle again, and pass it through the 
middle of the pinion or wing, through the little bone called 
the sidesman or stepmother's wing, catching up the skin 
which folds over the incision, and out through the other 
little bone and wing. 

25. We must pull this twine very tightly and tie it as 
firmly as possible at the side of the fowl. 

26. We turn the fowl over on its back, keeping the neck 
still towards us. 

27. We put our finger in the incision (made for drawing 
the fowl) and lift up the end of the breast bone. 

28. We take the threaded trussing needle and pass it 
through the skin over the bottom of the breast bone, over 
the end of one leg, back through the body close to the 
backbone, and tie it firmly over the other leg at the side. 

N.B. — If there is no gravy ready for serving with the roast fowl, we should 
prepare it now (see Note at the end). 

29. We now put the screen with the jack and dripping- 
pan before the fire. 

30. We must make up the fire in the same manner as 
described in Roasting. 

N.B. — We do not require such a large fire as for roasting meat. 

31. We take the trussed fowl and pass the hook of the 
jack through the back of the fowl, and hang it up on the 
jack. 

N.B. — If the fire is very fierce, we should take a piece of whitey brown paper, 
butter it, and tie it over the fowl so as to prevent it from burning. 

32. We put one ounce of butter in the dripping-pan to 
melt. 

33. We use this melted butter to baste the fowl, as the 
fowl is not very fat, there will not be much dripping 
from it. 

34. The fowl will take from half an hour to three-quarters 
of an hour to roast, according to its size. 

35. We must baste the fowl frequently. 

N.B. — While the fowl is roasting, we should make the bread sauce (see below). 
N.B. — If liked, the roast fowl can be garnished with rolls of bacon (see the 
end of "Veal Cutlets," Entrees, Lesson No. 6). 



Cooking Poultry, — Trussing Roast Fowl. 169 

36. When the fowl is quite done, we take it off the jack, 
and put it on a hot dish. 

37. We take a knife and cut the twine, and draw it all 
out of the fowl, and take off the paper before serving. 



For making Bread Sauce. 

1. We take a French penny roll, or a gill of bread crumbs, 
and cut it in half. 

2. We pull out all the inside crumb, and put it on a 
plate. 

3. We pull this crumb apart into small pieces. 

4. We take a small onion, and peel it with an onion knife. 

5. We take a small stewpan and put in it the peeled onion. 

6. We pour in half a pint of milk. 

7. We now put in the crumb of the roll. 

8. We add five peppercorns, and salt to taste. 

9. We stand the stewpan aside with the lid on, for a 
quarter of an hour, to soak the crumb. 

10. After that time we put the stewpan on the fire, and 
stir the sauce smoothly with a wooden spoon, until it boils. 

11. We now add a tablespoonfid of cream, and stir the 
Uauce until it just boils again. 

12. Before serving the sauce, we must take out the onion, 
1 ind pour the sauce into a sauce tureen. 

N.B. — The neck, gizzard, liver, and claws of the fowl, when properly pre- 
pared (see Note at the end of "Trussing a Fowl for Boiling"), can be 
used for soup, or gravy, to be served with the Roast Fowl. For making 
the gravy, we put the giblets into a saucepan with enough water to cover 
them (about \ a pint), we also add half an onio?i (peeled), 6 peppercorns, 
and salt to taste. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it comes 
to the boil, we move it to the side to simmer while the/owl is roasting. 

For serving, we strain the gravy into a basin and colour it, if necessary, by 
stirring in a quarter of a teaspoonful of "Liedig's Extract," or ten or 
twelve drops of caramel, we then pour it in a sauce tureen, or round 
the fowl. 



1 70 National Training School for Cookery. 

SOUPS. 
Lesson No. i. 

clear SOUP. 

Average cost for making " Clear Soup" (to he served) with 

Vegetables or Savoury Custard {about 3 pints). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 quarts of stock 2 45 

§ lb. of gravy beef o 6| 

2 carrots o 1 

1 turnip o o \ 

2 leeks o 2 

1 cabbage lettuce o 1 

1 tablespoonful of young peas } 

1 lump of sugar > o 1 

Salt ) 

For "Savoury Custard." 

1 gill of stock o 2 

3 eggs o 3 

Butter o o \ 

o 5* 
Time required, {the stock should be made the day before, ) about one hotcr and a half. 

Now we will show you how to make Clear Soup. 

1. We take two quarts of stock (see Lesson on " Stock") ; 
we must be careful to remove from it all fat. 

2. We put the stock into a stewpan. 

3. We take three quarters of a pound of gravy beef (from 
the shin of beef), put it on a board, and cut off all the fat 
and skin with a sharp knife. 

4. We chop the beef 'up very fine. 

N.B. — The proportion of beef for clarifying stock is one pound to every 
five pounds of meat with which the stock is made. 

5. We put the chopped gravy beef into the stewpan. 

6. We take one carrot, one turnip », and one leek, and wash 
them well in cold water. 

7. We take the vegetables out of the water and put 
them on a board. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — 'Clear Soup. 171 

8. We take a sharp knife, and scrape the carrot quite 
clean, and slice it up. 

9. We take the turnip, peel it, and cut it in small 
pieces. 

10. We take the leek, and cut off part of the long green 
leaves, and the little straggling roots, and chop up finely 
the remainder. 

11. We put all these vegetables into the stewpan, and 
stir them all well with an iron spoon, until they are well 
mixed with the beef and stock. 

12. We put the stewpan on the fire, and stir the contents 
until it boils. 

13. We must stand the stewpan by the side of the fire 
for twenty minutes. 

14. We take a clean soup cloth, and fix it on the soup 
stand. 

15. We take a large basin, and place it below the cloth. 

16. We take the stewpan off the fire, and pour the 
contents carefully into the cloth, and let it all pass into 
the basin. 

N.B. — The chopped gravy beef acts as a filter to the soup. 

17. After the soup has all passed through, we remove the 
basin and put a clean one in its place. 

18. We take a soup ladle and pour a little of the soup 
(at a time) over the meat in the cloth, and let it pass 
through very slowly. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to disturb the deposit of chopped beef, which 

settles at the bottom of the cloth. 
N.B — If savoury custard should be preferred in the soup, instead of shredded 

vegetables, see No. 31. 

19. We take a small carrot, a leek, cabbage lettuce, and a 
' tablespoonful of young peas, and wash them in cold water. 

20. We put the vegetables on a board, scrape the carrot 
clean, and cut off all the outside leaves of the lettuce, and 
the long green leaves of the leek. 

21. We must shred the carrot, leek and cabbage lettuce 
very finely in equal lengths. 



172 National Training School for Cookery. 

22. We put the shredded carrot and leek into a small 
saucepan of cold water with half a saltspoonful of salt. 

23. We put the saucepan on the fire and let it just come j 
to the boil. 

N.B. — This is to blanch the vegetables. 

24. We take the saucepan off the fire and strain thr 
water from the vegetables. 

25. We take a stewpan, and put in the blanched vege- 
tables and cabbage lettuce and peas ; we add a lump of sugar 
and half a pint of the clear soup 

26. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil fast, and re- 
duce the soup to a glaze over the vegetables. 

27. We take the basin of strained soup and pour the 
soup on the vegetables in the stewpan, and let it just boil. 

28. We then remove the stewpan to the side of the fire> 
and let it boil gently for half an hour. 

29. For serving we pour the soup into a hot soup tureen. 
For Savoury Ctistard. 

30. We take the yolks of three eggs, and the white of one, 
and put them in a small basin. 

31. We add one gill of the clear soup, and a quarter of a 
saltspoonful of salt. 

32. We whisk up the eggs and the stock well together. 

33. We take a small gallipot and butter it inside. 

34. We pour the mixture into the gallipot. 

35. We take a piece of whitey-brown paper and butter it. 

36. We put this buttered paper over the top of the 
gallipot and tie it on with a piece of string. 

37. We take a saucepan of hot water and put it on the 
fire. 

38. When the water is quite boiling, we stand the little 
gallipot in it. 

N.B. — The water must not quite reach the paper with which the gallipot is 
covered. 

39. We draw this saucepan to the side of the fire, and j 
let it simmer for a quarter of an hour. 

N.B. — It must not boil or the custard will be spoiled. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Clear Soup, 173 

40. We take the gallipot out of the saucepan, take off 
he buttered paper, and turn the custard out on to a plate 
o cool. 

41. We cut the custard into small pieces the shape of 
liamonds. 

42. Just before serving, we pour the soup into the hot 
ureen.and add the savoury custard to the soup. 



i 74 National Training School for Cookery. 

SOUPS. 
Lesson No. 2. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

Average cost of " Tapioca Cream" {about ipint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 pint of white stock o j\ 

1 oz. of tapioca o i 

Yolks of 2 eggs o 2 

1 gill of cream or good milk j , 

Salt / ° 6 



44 



Time required {the stock should be made the day before), about a quarter 0] 

an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Tapioca Cream. 

1. We take one pint of white stock (see "Lesson on 
Stock,") and pour it in a stewpan. 

2. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil. 

3. We take one ounce of prepared crushed tapioca. 

4. When the white stock boils, we stir in gradually the 
tapioca. 

5. We move the saucepan to the side of the fire, and let 
it all simmer until the tapioca is quite clear. 

6. Now we must prepare the liaison. 

7. We put the yolks of two eggs in a basin, and add 
to them one gill {or qitarter of a pint) of cream or good 
milk. 

8. We just stir it with a wooden spoon, and then pour 
the mixture through a strainer into another basin. 

9. When the stock is quite boiling, we add it by degrees 
to the liaison, stirring well all the time. 

N.B. — We must be careful that the eggs do not curdle. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Tapioca Cream. 175 

10. We add salt to the soup, according to taste, and pour 
the soup back into the stewpan. 

11. We place the stewpan on the fire for three minutes, 
stirring all the time. 

N. B. — It must not boil, or it would curdle. 

For serving, we pour it into a hot soup tureen. 



I J 6 National Training School for Cookery, 



SOUPS. 

Lesson No. 3. 

BONNE FEMME SOUP. 

Average cost of "Bonne Femme Soitp " (one pint and a half). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 small lettuces o 2 

2 leaves of sorrel o 1 

4 sprigs of tarragon o 1 

4 sprigs of chervil o 1 

\ a cucumber o 4 

\ oz. of butter o ok 

Salt \ 

1 saltspoonful of sugar ] ° °4 

x\ pint of white stock o \o\ 

The yolks of 3 eggs o 3" 

1 gill of cream or milk o 6 

The crust of a French roll o 1 

2 6\ 

Time required, about half an hour. ( The stock should be made the day before. ) 



Now we will show you how to make Bonne Femme Soup. 

1. We take two small lettuces, two leaves of sorrel, fou>- 
sprigs of tarragon, four sprigs of chervil, and wash them 
well in cold water. 

2. We take these vegetables and herbs out of the water, 
put them upon a board, and shred them finely. 

3. We take a cucumber and cut it in half. 

4. We peel half the cucumber, and cut it up in thin 
slices, and then shred it with a sharp knife. 

5. We put half an ounce of butter in a stewpan, and put 
it on the fire to melt. 

6. We place all the shredded vegetables and herbs in the 
stewpan to sweat for five minutes. 

7. We sprinkle over them half a saltspoonful of salt, and 
a saltspoonful of castor sugar. 

8. We must watch it occasionally, as the vegetables must 
not burn or in any way discolour. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Bonne Femme Soup. 1 7 7 

9. We take spirit and a half of white stock (see " Lesson 
on Stock ") and put it in another saucepan. 

10. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. 

11. We must now make a " liaison!' 

12. We take the yolks of three eggs, put them in a basin, 
and beat them well. 

13. We stir in one gill (quarter of a pint) of cream or 
milk. 

14. We take a French roll 'and cut off all the crust 

15. We put the crust on a tin, and put it in the oven to 
dry for a minute or two. 

16. When the stock is quite boiling, we pour it into the 
stewpan with the vegetables, and let all boil gently for ten 
minutes until the vegetables are quite tender. 

17. We now stir in the liaison, straining it through a 
hair-sieve into the stewpan. 

18. We stand the stewpan by the side of the fire to keep 
warm until required for use. 

N.B. — We must not let it boil as, now the " liaison" is added, it would 
curdle. 

19. We take the tin out of the oven and turn the dried 
:rust on to a board. 

20. We cut this crust up into small pieces, or in any 
: ancy shapes, according to taste. 

21. We place these pieces of crust in a hot soup tureen 
ind pour the soup over them. It is then ready for serving. 



ijS National Training School Jor Cookery. 

SOUPS. 

Lesson No. 4. 

PUREE OF POTATOES. 

Average cost for making a " PurSe of Potatoes " (about 
1 pint and a half.) 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 lb. of potatoes o i 

1 small onion o o\ 

2 leaves of celery , o I 

1 oz. of butter t o i 

ij pint of white stock o xoi 

Salt ) 

1 gill of cream J ° 

Fried bread . , , „ o 2 



Time required {the stock should be made the day before), about three-quarters of an i 

hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Pure'e of Potatoes. 

1. We take one pound of potatoes, put them in a basin of 
cold water and scrub them clean with a scrubbing brush. 

2. We take a sharp knife and peel the potatoes } and cut 
them in thin slices. 

3. We take a small onion, wash it well in cold water, and 
peel it. 

4. We take two leaves of celery and wash them. 

5. We take a stewpan and put in it one oitnce of butter. 

6. We now add the sliced potatoes, the onion, and the 

celery. 

7. We put the stewpan on the fire and let the vegetables 
sweat tor five minutes , we must take care that they do not 
discolour. 

8. We pour into the stewpan one pint of white stock and 
stir frequently with a wooden spoon to prevent it from 
burning. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Purge of Potatoes. 179 

9. We let it boil gently till the vegetables are quite 
cooked. 

10. We put an extra half pint of white stock into a stew- 
pan, and put it on the fire to heat. 

11. We now place a tammy-sieve over a basin and pass 
the contents of the stewpan through the sieve with a wooden 
spoon, adding by degrees the half pint of hot white stock, 
which will enable it to pass through more easily. 

12. We take the stewpan and wash it out. 

13. We pour the Puree back into the stewpan. 

14. We add salt according to taste, and one gill (quarter 
of a pint) of cream and stir smoothly with a wooden spoon 
until it boils. 

15. For serving we pour it into a hot soup tureen. 

N.B. — Fried bread cut in the shape of dice should be served with the pur& 
(see " Vegetables," Lesson No. 8, from Note 13 to 17). 



i8o National Training School for Cookery. 

SOUPS. 

Lesson No. 5. 

SPRING VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Average cost of " Spring Vegetable Soup " (two quarts). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 lbs. of the shin of beef i 6 

2 lbs. of the knuckle of veal i o 

Salt >; 1 o i 

2 young carrots j 

i young turnip o o\ 

i leek o i 

| of a head of celery o 2 

1 cauliflower o 4 

1 gill of peas ) 

J of a saltspoonful of carbonate of soda . . j J 

3 Si 
Time required, about five hours. 

Now we will show you how to make two quarts of Spring 
Vegetable Soup. 

1. We take two pounds of shin of beef , and two pounds of 
knuckle of veal, and put them on a board. 

2. We must cut off all the meat from the bone with a 
sharp knife. 

3. We cut off all the fat from the meat (the fat we put 
aside for other purposes). 

4. We take a chopper and break the bones in halves. 

5. We take out all the marrow inside the bones, and put 
it aside for other uses. 

N.B. — If the fat and marrow were to go into the soup they would make it; 
greasy. 

6. We take a stockpot or a large stewpan, and put thej 
meat and bones into it. 

7. We pour in five pints of cold water. 

8. We put in a teaspoonfid of salt. This will assist the) 
scum to rise. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Spring Vegetable Soup. 1 8 1 

9. We put the stockpot on the fire, with the lid on, and 
let it come to the boil quickly. 

10. We take a spoon and remove all the scum as it 
rises. 

11. We now draw the stockpot rather to the side of the 
fire and let it simmer gently for five hours. 

12. We take two young carrots, scrape them clean with a 
knife, and cut them in slices. 

13. We take one young turnip, peel it, and cut it in slices. 

14. We take half a head of celery and one leek, wash them 
well in cold water, and cut them in squares with a knife. 

15. We take one cauliflower, wash it in cold water, and 
put it in a basin of cold water, with a dessertspoonful of 
salt, for two or three minutes. 

16. We then take the cauliflower out of the water, and 
squeeze it dry in a cloth. 

17. We take a knife and cut off all the green leaves and 
the stalk from the cauliflower, and pull the flower into 
sprigs. 

18. We must watch and skim the soup occasionally, and 
we should add a little cold water to make the scum rise. 

19. One hour before serving the soup we should add the 
vegetables. 

20. We must first put in the sliced carrots, and the cut 
up celery and leek. (These vegetables take the longest to 
boil.) 

21. In half an hour we should add the sliced turnips, and 
fifteen minutes after that the cut up flower of the cairti- 
flower, 

22. We take a saucepan full of hot water, and put it on 
the fire to boil. 

23. When the water is quite boiling, we put in one gill of 
shelled peas, a teaspoonful of salt, and a quarter of a salt- 
spoo7iful of carbonate of soda, and let it boil from fifteen 
to twenty minutes y according to the age of the peas. 

N.B. — The cover should be off the saucepan. 



1 82 National Training School for Cookery. 

24. After that time we should feel the peas, and if they 
are quite soft we take them out of the saucepan and drain 
them in a colander. 

25. For serving, we put the boiled peas into a hot soup 
tureen, and ladle the soup and the other vegetables from the 
stockpot out into the tureen. 



Lessons on Making Sotip. — Giblet Soup. 18 



o 



SOUPS. 

Lesson No. 6. 

GIBLET SOUP. 

Average cost of " Giblet Soup " (about three pints). 

INGREDIENTS. 

2 sets of giblets 2 o 

\ of a head of celery o 2 

1 carrot o oh 

1 turnip o oh 

2 small onions o o\ 

2 cloves \ 

1 blade of mace , f 

A bouquet garni of parsley, thyme, lemon- I ° - 
thyme, basil, marjoram and bay leaf . . J 

2 quarts of second white stock 1 2 ] 

i§ oz. of clarified butter o 1^ 

1 oz. of flour o i 

h a pint of Madeira 1 

30 drops of lemon juice o 1 

A few grains of Cayenne pepper i 

Salt ) ° °i 

4 9l 

{Slock made the day before.) Time reqtcired, about three hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make Giblet Soup. 

1. We take two sets of goose ox four of ducks giblets, scald 
and skin the claws, ends of legs, &c, and wash them clean 
in cold water (see Note for " Cleaning Giblets " at the end 
of " Trussing a Fowl for Boiling "). 

2. We should put them into boiling water to blanch 
them, ior five minutes. 

3. We then lay them in a basin of cold water, and wash 
and scrape them clean. 

4. We take them out of the water and drain them. 

5. We take a knife and cut the giblets in pieces to about 
one and a half inch in length. 

6. We put the pieces of giblet into a stewpan. 

7. We take a quarter of a head of celery and wash it well 
in cold water. 



184 National Training School for Cookery. 

8. We take one carrot, wash it in cold water, and scrape 
it clean with a knife. 

9. We take one turnip and two small onions, wash them 
in cold water and peel them. 

10. We add these vegetables to the giblets in the stewpan. 

11. We also put in two cloves, one blade of mace, and a 
bouquet garni, consisting of parsley, one sprig of thyme, 
lemon-thyme, basil, marjoram, and one bay-leaf all tied 
tightly together. 

12. We pour in two quarts of second white stock. 

13. We put the stewpan on the fire, and let it boil gently 
for two hours ; we must skim it occasionally. 

14. After that time, we take out the best pieces of the 
giblets, and trim them neatly. 

15. We put these pieces aside until required for use. 

16. We leave the stewpan on the fire to boil for half an 



17. We put an ounce and a half of clarified butter, and 
one ounce of flour into a stewpan. 

18. We put the stewpan on the fire, and let the flour and 
butter fry for a few minutes, stirring it well with a wooden 
spoon. 

19. We now add the stock and stir it well until it boils. 

20. We must now remove the stewpan to the side of the 
fire, and let it boil gently for twenty minutes (the cover of 
the saucepan should be only half on). 

21. After that time, we take a spoon and carefully skim 
off all the butter that will have risen to the top of the soup. 

22. We now strain the soup into a basin, add to it half 
a pint of Madeira, thirty drops of lemon juice, a few grains 
(just enough to cover thinly a threepenny piece) of Cayenne 
pepper, and salt according to taste. 

23. For serving, we pour the soup into a hot soup tureen, 
and add to it the pieces of gib let that were put aside. 

N.B. — If the wine be disliked, it may be omitted. 



Lesson on Making Soup. — Mock Turtle Soup. 185 



SOUPS. 

Lesson No. 7. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 



Average cost of 



Mock Turtle Soup " (about two quarts). 



INGREDIENTS. 



\ a calf's head 5 

3 oz. of butter ) 

| a tablespoonful of salt ) 

\ lb. of lean ham o 

i shalot \ 

i clove of garlic I 

6 mushrooms o 

i carrot 

\ head of celery 

I leek 



d. 
o 

3 
3 
ok 

4 



| a turnip 

Bouquet garni (i.e. sprig of thyme, mar- / 

joram, parsley, basil, and a bay leaf) . 

i blade of mace 

6 cloves 

3 oz. of flour j 

2 wine glasses of sherry o 

The juice of § a lemon o 

I dozen forcemeat balls (see "Entrees," 

Lesson No. 8) o 



o 5^ 



4 



7 5 






Time required, about six hours. 

N.B. — If the soup is required to be made in one day, the stock should be 
made early in the morning, so as to give time for it to get cold to have 
the fat removed. 

N.B. — If liked, the calf's head could be served the previous day (see Calf's 
head rolled and boiled), and this soup be made with the calf's head 
stock, and the remains of the calf's head will be sufficient to cut up and 
put in the soup. In this case we commence this lesson from paragraph 7. 



Now we will show you how to make Mock Turtte Soup. 

1. We take half a calf's head, and wash it well in water, 
to remove all blood and impurities. 

2. We cut all the flesh from the bones, and tie the flesh 
up in a very clean cloth or napkin. 

3. We put it in a large stewpan with the bones and four 
quarts of cold water, and half a tablespoonful of salt. 

4. We put the stewpan on the fire, and let it come to 
the boil. 



1 86 National Training School for Cookery, 

5. As soon as it boils, we should skim it carefully with 
a spoon, and move the stewpan to the side of the fire to 

stew gently for three hours. 

N.B. — We should watch it and skim it occasionally. 

6. After that time we take out the calf's head, and pour 
the stock through a strainer into a basin. 

7. We stand the basin of stock aside to get cold, when 
we should carefully remove every particle of fat from the 
top of the stock. 

8. We must now make some forcemeat (see " Beef 
J)lives," Entrees, Lesson No. 8, from Note 4 to Note 12), 

and make it up into little balls, about one dozen. 

9. We take six mitshrooms (cut off the end of the stalks), 
one onion, and half a turnip, wash them, peel them, and cut 
them up in slices. 

10. We take one carrot, wash it, scrape it clean, and cut 

it in slices. 

11. We take half a head of celery, and one leek, wash 
them, cut off the long green leaves (to be thrown away), 
and cut them in slices. 

12. We put a quarter of a potmd of lean ham on a board, 
and cut it up in small pieces. 

13. We put one oicnce of butter in a stewpan, and put it 
on the fire to melt. 

14. We add the ham and all the sliced vegetables to the 
butter in the stewpan. 

15. We also add one shalot (peeled), one clove of garlic, 
one blade of mace, six cloves, and a bouquet garni (consisting 
of a sprig of thyme, marjoram, parsley, basil, and a bay leaf 
tied tightly together). 

16. We let all these vegetables and herbs, &c, fry in the 
butter for ten minutes. We must stir them occasionally. 

17. After that time we add three ounces of flour, and stir 
well. 

18. We now add the stock and stir it until it boils, then 
move the stewpan to the side of the fire, and let it simmer 
for about ten minutes. 



Lessens on Making Soup. — Mock Turtle Souft. 187 

19. We must then take a spoon and remove every 
particle of scum. 

20. We now strain the soup into another stewpan. 

21. We take the calf's head out of the cloth, and cut it 
up in small and neat pieces. 

22. We add the pieces of calf's head to the soup, also 
two wine glasses of sherry, the dozen forcemeat balls, and 
squeeze in through a strainer the juice of half a lemon. 

23. We let the soup just come to the boil, and then pour 
it in a hot soup tureen for serving. 






1 88 National Training School for Cookery. 



SOUPS. 

Lesson No. 8. 

POT-AU-FEU OR SOUP. 

And use of Meat from which the Soup has been made. 

Average cost of " Pot-ait-feu" consisting of about five 
quarts of soup, and a dish of meat with vegetables. 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 
4 lbs. of beef, or 4 lbs. of the meat off the ox 

cheek 2 o 

Sago or tapioca for soup o o\ 

\ oz. salt, 2 turnips o 1 

2 carrots o 1 

2 leeks o 2 

1 parsnip o 1 

1 small head of celery o 3 

2 or 3 sprigs of parsley o o\ 

1 cabbage o 1 

1 bay-leaf, thyme and marjoram, and 1 onion, 

stuck with 3 cloves o 1 

2 n 
Time required, about four hours. 



Now we will show you how to make Pot-au-feu, 

1. We put six qicarts of water in a large pot. 

2. We take four pounds of the sticking of beef, or four 
pounds of the meat off the ox cheek, without any bone, tie it 
up firmly into a shape with a piece of string, and put it 
into the pot. 

3. We put the pot on the fire to boil. 

4. When the water is quite boiling we put in half an 
ounce of salt, and then move the pot to the side of the fire 
to simmer. 

5. We take two carrots, two leeks, two turnips, one parsnip, 
one small head of celery, and wash them well in cold water. 

6. We scrape the carrots and the parsnip, and cut them 
in quarters with a knife. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Pot-au-Feu or Soup. 189 

7. We take the leeks and cut off the long green leaves, as 
only the white part is required. 

8. We take the head of celery and cut off the green tops 
of the leaves. 

9. We tie the leeks, the celery, and the parsnip and carrot 
together with a piece of string. 

10. We take a cabbage, cut it in two, and wash it 
thoroughly in cold water, and tie it firmly together with 
string. 

11. We should skim the Pot-au-feu occasionally with a 
spoon. 

12. When the Pot-au-feu has boiled very gently for one 
hour, we add to it all the vegetables, except the cabbage. 

13. We take one bay -leaf, a sprig of parsley, a sprig of 
thyme, a sprig of marjoram, and tie them together with a 
piece of string. 

14. We put these herbs into the pot. 

15. We take one onion, peel it, and stick three cloves in it. 

16. We put the onion into the pot. 

17. When the vegetables have been two hours in the pot 
we put in the cabbage. 

18. When the contents of the pot have simmered gently 
for four hours, we take out the meat and put it on a hot dish. 

19. We garnish the meat with the carrots, turnips, and 
parsnips, and pour over it about half a pint of the liquor for 
gravy. 

20. We take out the cabbage and serve it in a hot vege- 
table dish. 

21. We strain the liquor through a colander or cloth into 
a basin, and put it by to cool. 

22. We do not remove the fat until the liquor is required 
for use ; it keeps the air from it. 

To make a soup of the liquor. 

23. We put two quarts of the liquor in a saucer an, and 
put it on the fire to boil. 






i go National Training School for Cookery. 

24. We take two ounces of crushed tapioca or small sago y 
and when the liquor boils we sprinkle in the tapioca or sago, 
and let it boil for fifteen minutes, stirring occasionally. 

25. We then pour it into a soup-tureen, and it is ready 
for use. 

N.B. — If liked, Beef a-la-mode, or rissoles (see "Cooked Meat," Lesson 
No. 6), can be made with the meat from the pot-au-feu. 

For " Beef a-la-mode!' 

1. We put two oiinces of dripping into a saucepan and 
put it on the fire to melt. 

2. We then stir in one tablespoonful of flour. 

3. We take one pound and a half of the meat and cut it 
in neat pieces. 

4. We put these pieces of meat into the saucepan. 

5. When the meat is fried we turn over the slices of 
meat and pour in half a pint of cold water. 

6. We take one carrot, wash it, scrape it clean and cut it 
in slices. 

7. We put the carrot into the saucepan ; we also add a 
bunch of herbs, namely, a sprig of marjoram and thyme, and 
a bay-leaf, tied tightly together. 

8. We let it just come to the boil and then move the 
saucepan to the side of the fire and let it simmer gently for 
three hours. 

9. We should watch it and stir it occasionally. 

10. For serving, we turn the meat on to a hot dish, and 
place the carrot on the top of the meat. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Ox-Tail Sottp. 191 

SOUPS. 
Lesson No. 9. 

OX-TAIL SOUP. 

Average cost of " Ox-tail Soup" {about three pints and 

a half) 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 ox-tail 2 6 

4 oz. of butter o 4 

2 carrots o 1 

1 turnip o o| 

1 onion stuck with six cloves o o\ 

\ a head of celery o 2 

3 oz. of flour \ 

Bouquet garni (i.e. sprig of thyme, mar- 
joram, parsley, and a bay leaf) I i 

12 peppercorns / 

1 teaspoonful of salt 

2 quarts of water / 

3 3l 
Or with 3 quarts of second stock 1 9 

5 o| 
Time required (stock already made), about two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make Ox-tail Soup. 

1. We take the ox-tail, put it on a board, and cut it 
through the joints into pieces with a knife. 

2. We put the pieces of ox-tail into a stewpan, cover 
them with cold water, and put the stewpan on the fire to 
boil. 

3. We let it boil for five minutes, take the stewpan off 
the fire, strain off the water, and wipe the pieces of ox-tail 
dry with a clean cloth. 

4. We put the ox-tail back in the stewpan, with two 
ounces of butter. 

5. We take one carrot, wash it, scrape it clean with a 
knife, cut it in half, and put it in the stewpan. 



192 National Training School for Cookery. 

6. We take an onion, peel it, and stick six cloves in it. 

7. We take half a head of celery, wash it, and cut off the 
green tops of the leaves. 

8. We put the onion and celery into the stewpan ; we also 
add twelve peppercorns, and a bouquet garni, consisting of a 
sprig of parsley, thyme, marjoram, and a bay-leaf, all tied 
tightly together. 

9. We should place the lid on the stewpan, and put it 
over the fire for ten minutes, stirring occasionally. 

10. We must now add two quarts of cold water, and a 
teaspoonful of salt. 

N.B. — If there is any stock that can be used, it would of course im- 
prove the soup, then three quarts of it should be used instead of the 
water. 

11. When it boils we must skim it well, and then draw 
the stewpan to the side of the fire to simmer for two 
hours. 

12. Half-an-hour before the stock is done, we put two 
ounces of butter into another stewpan. 

13. We take one carrot, wash it, scrape it clean with a 
knife, and cut it up into rounds the size of a shilling. 

14. We take a small turnip, wash it, peel it, and cut it up 
like the carrot. 

15. We add these vegetables to the butter, put the 
stewpan on the fire, and let them cook for ten minutes ; 
we must stir them occasionally, and not allow them to 
discolour. 

16. When the stock is ready, we should take the pieces 
of ox-tail out, and pour the stock through a strainer into a 
basin. 

17. We put three ounces of flour into the stewpan, with 
the vegetables and butter, and stir well. 

18. We now add the stock to the stewpan, put it over the 
fire, and stir well until it boils and thickens, then move the 
stewpan to the side of the fire, and let it simmer until the 
vegetables are tender: it will take about a quarter of an 
hour. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Ox- Tail Soup. 193 

19. We must watch it, and carefully skim it, and remove 
any fat that rises to the top. 

20. We now add the pieces of ox-tail to the soup, and 
let it just warm. 

21. For serving, we pour the soup into a hot soup- 
turecn. 






94 National Training School for Cookery. 

SOUPS. 

Lesson No. io. 

SEMOLINA SOUP. 

Average cost of " Semolina Soup " (about one quart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i quart of second stock j\ 

2 tablespoonsful of semolina ij 

I pint of milk i x 

Salt and pepper j T % 

9l 

[Stock already made. ) Time required, about half-an-Jwur . 



Now we will show you how to make Semolina Soup. 

1. We put one quart of second stock (or stock from pot-au- 
feu) into a saucepan, and put it on the fire to boil. 

2. When the stock is boiling, we stir in very gradually, 
two tablespoonsful of Semolina. 

3. We must stir it well while it boils, for ten minutes. 

4. We now add half a pint of milk, and pepper and salt 
to taste. 

N.B. — The milk might be omitted if not required. 

5. We let the soup warm through, stirring well all the 
time, and then pour it into a hot soup tureen, or basin, for 
serving. 

N.B. — Toasted, or fried bread, cut in the shape of dice, should be served 
with this soup. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Milk Soup. 195 






SOUPS. 
Lesson No. ii. 

MILK SOUP. 

Average cost of " Milk Soup " (about two quarts). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 lbs. potatoes 2 

2 leeks or onions , 1 

2 oz. butter 2 

£oz.salt I i 

Pepper J ° 4 

1 pint of milk 2J 

3 tablespoonsful of tapioca i| 

~9\ 
Time required, about two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make Milk Soup. 

1. We put two quarts of water into a large saucepan, and 
put it on the fire to boil. 

2. We take two pounds of potatoes, wash, and scrub them 
clean in cold water, peel them, and cut them in quarters. 

3. We take two leeks, cut off the green tops of the leaves. 
wash them well in cold water, and cut them up. 

N.B. — Onions can be used instead of leeks, only they would give a stronger 
flavour. 

4. We put two ounces of butter into a stewpan, we add 
the vegetables, put the stewpan on the fire, and let the vege- 
tables sweat in the butter for five minutes. 

5. When the water is quite boiling we pour in the vege- 
tables and butter, we also add a quarter of an ounce of salt t 
and pepper to taste e 

6. We let it boil till done to a mash. 

7. We then strain off the soup through the colander, or 
wire sieve. 

8. We rub the vegetables through the colander, with a 
wooden spoon. 

N 2 



196 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We return the pulp and the soup to the saucepan, add 
to it one pint of milk, and put it on the fire to boil. 

10. When it boils we sprinkle in by degrees, three table 
spoonsful of crushed tapioca, stirring it well the whole time. 

11. We let it boil gently fifteen minutes. 

12. For serving, we pour the soup in a hot tureen. 

N.B. — To improve this soup more milk and less water should be used, and 
half a gill of cream stirred in at the last. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Cabbage Soup. 197 

SOUPS. 

Lesson No. 12. 

CABBAGE SOUP. 

Average cost of making " Cabbage Soup " (about one quart 

and a half). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 cabbage 2 

2 oz. of butter 2 

§ of a pint of milk 2 

Pepper and salt ) » 

A slice of bread j °- 

Time required, about one hour and a quarter. 

Now we will show you how to make Cabbage Soup. 

1. We put three pints of water into a saucepan, and put 
it on the fire to boil. 

2. We take a good sized cabbage, wash it well in cold 
water, and trim off the outside dead leaves. 

3. We cut the cabbage up, but not into very small pieces. 

4. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the cabbage, and let it boil for five minutes. 

N.B.— This is to blanch it. 

5. We now pour off the water from the cabbage. 

6. We add to the cabbage, two quarts of water, two 
ounces of butter t and pepper and salt for seasoning, and let 
it boil for one hour. 

7. After that time, we pour in three quarters of a pint of 
milk, and let it boil up. 

8. We take a slice of bread, stick it on a toasting fork, 
and toast it slightly on both sides in front of the fire. 

9. We cut the toasted b read up in pieces, the size of dice, 
and put them into a hot soup tureen or basin. 

10. We pour the cabbage soup on to the bread 'in the soup 
tureen, and it is ready for serving. 



198 National Training School for Cookery. 

SOUPS. 
Lesson No. 13. 

PEA SOUP. 

Average cost of " Pea Soup " (about 2 quarts) 
INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 quart of split peas o 5 

2 onions o 1 

1 turnip o o^ 

1 carrot o 0% 

1 head of celery o 4 

Teaspoonful of salt ) L 

£ a teaspoonful of pepper / 4 

Cooked or uncooked bones o 2 

Time required {after the peas have been soaked all night), abouttwo hours and a naif . 

Now we will show you how to make Pea Soup. 

1. We put a quart of split peas into a basin with cold 
water to cover them, and let them soak for twelve hours. 

N.B. — This should be done over night. 

2. We put two quarts of cold water and the split peas 
into a saucepan, and put it on the fire to boil. 

N.B. — If there is any liquor from boiled meat it would of course be better 
than water for the soup. 

3. We take two onions and one turnip, wash them in 
cold water, peel them, and cut them in halves. 

4. We take one carrot y wash it, and scrape it clean with 
a knife. 

5. We take one head of celery, cut off the ends of the 
root, and wash it well in cold water. 

6. When the water in the saucepan is boiling we put in 
all the vegetables. 

7. We take tivopennyworth of cooked, or uncooked bones, 
wash them, add them to the saucepan, and season it with one 
teaspoonful of salt, and half a teaspoonful of ground pepper. 

N.B. — If some liquor (in which meat or pork has been boiled) is used the 
addition of bones will not then be necessary. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Pea Soitp. 199 

8. We let it all boil slowly for two hours, and we must 
watch it and skim it occasionally. 

9. After that time we take the bones out of the saucepan. 

10. We place a colander or wire sieve over a basin. 

11. We pour the contents of the saucepan into the 
colander, and rub them through into the basin with a 
wooden spoon. 

12. The pea soicp is then ready for serving. 

13. Powdered {dried) mint, and toasted bread, cut to the 
shape of dice, should be handed with the soup, either pat 
in, or served separately on plates. 



200 National Training School for Cookery. 

SOUPS. 
Lesson No. 14. 

MACCARONI SOUP. 

Average cost of " Maccaroni Soup" made from Bones 
(about 3 pints). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

Bones (if bought) 2 

1 tablespoonful of salt and peppercorns . . . . ) x 

1 good-sized turnip and 4 leeks J 42 

2 carrots 1 

2 onions, 2 cloves, and a blade of mace i| 

A bunch of herbs, i.e. marjoram, thyme, lemon \ x 

thyme, and parsley ) ° f 

\ lb. of maccaroni 1^ 

Time required, about two and a half hours. 



Now we will show you how to make Soup from Bones. 

1. We take the bones and cut off all the meat that can be 
used. 

N.B. — Cooked or uncooked bones can be used. 

2. We break up the bones in pieces and put them into a 
saucepan, with cold water enough to cover them, and one 
quart more. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. 

4. When it just boils, we put in a tablespoonful of salt, to 
help the scum to rise. 

5. We take one good-sized turnip \ peel it, and cut it in 

quarters. 

N.B. — When turnips are used only for flavouring, they can be peeled thinner 
than if for eating. 

6. We take two carrots, wash them, scrape them, and cut 
them in quarters ; we take four leeks, wash them, and shred 
them up finely. 

N.B. — As these vegetables are prepared, they should be thrown into cold 
water to keep them fresh. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Macaroni Soup. 201 

7. We take two onions, peel them, and stick two cloves 
into one onion. 

N.B. — The outer skins of the onions can be put into a saucepan by the side 
of the fire to brown ; when browned, they are useful for colouring gravies 
and soups. 

8. We should skim the soup well and then put in the 
vegetables ; we also add a blade of mace and a teaspoonful 
of peppercorns. 

9. We must move the saucepan to the side of the fire, 
and let it simmer gently for two hours and a half. 

10. We should raise the lid slightly to let out the steam. 

N.B. — It is better to boil maccaroni separately, as the first water is not clean. 
The soup can be thickened with maccaroni, vermicelli, barley, or rice. 

11. If the soup is thickened with maccaroni, we should 
put a saucepan of water on the fire to boil. 

12. When the water is quite boiling we put in a quarter 
of a pound of maccaroni, and sprinkle about half a saltspoon- 
ful of salt over it. 

13. We put the saucepan on the fire, and let it boil until 
the maccaroni is quite tender ; it will take about half an 
hour. 

14. We should feel the maccaroni with our fingers, to see 
that it is quite soft, and tender. 

15. When it is sufficiently boiled, we turn it into a colander, 
to strain the water off, then pour some cold water on it, 
and wash the maccaroni again. 

16. We put the maccaroni on a board, and cut it into 
small pieces about a quarter of an inch in length, it is then 
ready to be put into the soup. 

N.B. — If barley is used instead of maccaroni, it will take a much longer time 
to boil, but if vermicelli is used, it takes a very short time to boil. 

17. When the soup is ready for use, we should put the 
maccaroni into a soup tureen, and strain the hot soup over 
it. It is then ready for serving. 



202 National Training Sc/wol for Cookery. 

SOUPS. 
Lesson No. 15. 

LENTIL PUREE. 

Average cost of " Lentil Soup" {about one pint and a half), 

INGREDIENTS. 

d, 

1 pint of red lentils 3 

1 onion o| 

3 sticks of celery 1 

1 oz. of butter j 

Pepper and salt ; i| 

2 quarts of water ) 

~5f 

Time required, about one hour and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make lentil soup, 

1. We take one pint of red lentils, and wash them well in 
cold water. 

2. We take a saucepan, and butter it well inside with 
one ounce of butter. 

3. We take the lentils out of the water, and put them in 
the saucepan. 

4. We take an onion, peel it, and cut it in slices. 

5. We take three sticks of celery, cut off the green tops, 
wash them, and add them and the sliced onion to the sauce- 
pan. 

6. We put the saucepan over the fire with the lid on, for 
five minutes. 

7. We now add two quarts of cold water; move the 
saucepan rather to the side of the fire, and let the contents 
simmer/tfr one hour, 

8. We place a hair sieve over a basin, and pass the 
contents of the saucepan through with a wooden spoon. 

N.B. — A wire sieve, or even a colander, might be used, but the hair sieve 
is the best. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Lentil Puree. 203 

9. We pour the puree back into the saucepan ; add pep- 
per and salt to taste ; put the saucepan on the fire to warm 
the puree. 

10. For serving, we pour \h& puree into a hot soup tureen 
or basin. 

N.B. — Toasted, or fried bread, cut in the shape of dice, should be served 
with the purie. 



204 National Training School for Cookery. 

SOUPS. 

Lesson No. 16. 

HARICOT PUREE. 

Average cost of " Haricot Soup " {about two quarts), 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i pint of Haricot beans 3 

1 onion j 

1 teaspoonful of salt ; o| 

Pepper ) 

Pint of milk 2J 

2 quarts of water. 

6 

Time required, after the beans are soaked, about four hours and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make Haricot Puree. 

1. We soak one quart of Haricot beans in cold water all 
night. 

2. We take the soaked beans out of the water, and put 
them in a saucepan, with two quarts of cold water, and a 
teaspoonful of salt. 

3. We take an onion, peel it, and cut it in slices. 

4. We add the sliced onion to the saucepan. 

5. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it boils, 
we move it rather to the side of the fire, and let it boil 
gently for four hours. 

6. After that time, we place a wire sieve, or colander, 
over a basin, and pass the contents of the saucepan through 
the sieve with a wooden spoon. 

7. We now stir in three quarters of a pint of milk, pour 
the puree back into the saucepan, add pepper and salt to 
taste, and put the saucepan on the fire to warm the puree : 
we must stir it well while it is warming. 

8. For serving, we pour the puree into a hot soup tureen 
or basin. 

N.B. — Toasted or fried bread, cut in the shape of dice, should be served 
with the purde. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Vegetable Puree. 205 



SOUPS. 
Lesson No. 17. 

VEGETABLE PUREE. 

Average cost of " Vegetable Puree" {about five pints). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

3 carrots o \\ 

2 turnips o i 

1 head of celery o 4 

2 onions o 1 

2 leeks o 2 

1 lettuce o 1 

1 small cabbage o 1^ 

Pepper and salt I 

I lb. of butter ) ° 4 

3 quarts of water. 

1 4 
Time required, about one kotcr and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Vegetable Purie. 

1. We take three carrots, wash them well, scrape them 
and cut them in slices. 

2. We take two turnips, and two onions, wash them well, 
peel them, and cut them in slices. 

3. We take one head of celery and two leeks, wash them 
well, and cut them up in quarters. 

4. We take one lettuce and a small cabbage, wash them 
well, and cut them in quarters. 

5. We put a qicarter of a pound of butter into a saucepan 
and add all the vegetables. 

6. We put the saucepan over the fire, to cook for ten 
minutes. We must stir the vegetables occasionally. 

7. We then add three quarts of cold water, and when it 
boils, we must skim it well, and then move the saucepan 
rather to the side of the fire, and let the contents simmer 
for one hour. 



206 National Training School for Cookery. 

8. We place a hair sieve over a basin, and pass the 
contents of the saucepan through the sieve with a wooden 
spoon. 

N.B. — A wire sieve, or colander might be used, but a hair sieve is the best. 

9. We now pour the puree back into the saucepan, and 
put it on the fire to warm. 

10. For serving, we pour the puree into a hot soup 
tureen, or basin. 

N.B. — Toasted or fried bread, cut in the shape of dice, should be served 
with the purde. 



Lessons on Making Soup.— Stock. 207 



STOCK. 

Average cost of brown or white " Stock " for soup (about 

two quarts). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 
4 lbs. of shin of beef, or 2 lbs. of knuckle ) 

of veal and 2 lbs. of beef j 3 ° 

4 young carrots or 2 old ones o 2 

1 turnip o o| 

1 onion o o k 

1 leek o 1 

Half a head of celery ) 

Salt } ° 2 

3 6 

Time required, about five hours. 



Now we will show you how to make Stock for soup. It 
should be made the day before it is required for use. 

1. We take four pounds of shin of beef and put it on a 
board. 

2. We must cut off all the meat from the bone, with a 
sharp knife. 

3. We take a chopper and break the bone in half. 

4. We take out all the marrow inside the bone, and put 
it aside for other uses. 

N.B. — If the marrow were to go into the stock, it would make it greasy. 

5. We take a stockpot or a large stewpan, and put the 
meat and bone into it. 

6. We pour in five pints of cold water. 

N.B. — One pint of water is allowed for each pound of meat, and one pint over. 

7. We put in half a teaspoonful of salt. This will assist 
the scum to rise. 

8. We put the stockpot on the fire with the lid on, and 
let it come to the boil quickly. 



2o8 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We take four young carrots, scrape them clean with 
a knife, and cut them in pieces. 

10. We take one turnip and one onion, peel them and cut 
them in quarters. 

11. We take a leek and half a head of celery and wash 
them well in cold water. 

12. We take a spoon and remove the scum and fat from 
the stock as it rises. 

13. Now we put in all the vegetables, and let it simmer 
gently for five hours, 

14. We must watch and skim it occasionally, and we 
should add a little cold water to make the scum rise. 

15. We take a clean cloth and put it over a good-sized 
basin. 

16. We put a hair-sieve on the top of the cloth over the 
basin. 

17. When the stock has been simmering for five hours we 
take the stockpot off the fire. 

18. We pour the contents into the sieve, which contains 
the meat, bone, and vegetables ; and the cloth very effectually 
strains the stock. 

N.B. — The meat and bone can be used again for second stock, with the 
addition of fresh vegetables and water. 

19. We take the basin (into which the stock has been 
strained), and put it in a cool place till the next day, when 
it will be a stiff jelly. 

20. When this stock jelly is required for use, we must 
take off the fat from the top with a spoon. 

21. We take a clean cloth and dip it in hot water, and 
wipe over the top of the jelly so as to remove every particle 
of fat. 

22. Now we must take a clean dry cloth and wipe the 
top of the jelly dry. It is now ready for use. 

N.B. — For some soups, vegetable soups, or purees, white stock is required. 
White stock is made in the same way, only with veal instead of beef, 
and it can also be made of veal and beef mixed, or rabbit and beef, but 
veal alone is considered best. 



Lessons on Making Soup. — Vegetable Stock. 209 
VEGETABLE STOCK. 

Average cost of " Vegetable Stock " (about two quarts;. 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 cabbage 1 

3 large or 6 small onions i| 

2 carrots 1 

1 turnip o| 

2 oz. of butter 2 

3 cloves I 

30 peppercorns I 

A bunch of herbs (thyme, marjoram, and a ) o\ 

bay-leaf) 

Salt J 

6\ 

Time required, about two hours and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make Vegetable Stock. 

1. We take one cabbage, wash it well in cold water, and 
cut it in quarters. 

2. We take two carrots, wash them, scrape them clean, 
and cut them in quarters. 

3. We take one turnip, peel it, and cut it in quarters. 

4. We take three large or six small onions, and wash 
them clean (the skins are to be left on). 

5. We put all these vegetables into a saucepan, with tzuo 
oimces of butter. 

6. We also add a bwich of herbs (namely, a sprig of 
thyme, marjoram, and a bay-leaf) tied tightly together, three 
cloves and thirty peppercorns. 

7. We put the saucepan on the fire, and let the 
vegetables and herbs sweat in the butter for ten mirmtes. 
We must stir them and not let them burn. 

8. We now pour in three quarts of cold water, and add 
salt according to taste. 

9. When the water boils we move the saucepan to the 
side of the fire and let it simmer gently for two hours. We 
must watch it and skim it occasionally. 



2io National Training School for Cookery. 



10. After that time we strain the stock into a basin, and 
it is ready for use. It is now reduced to two quarts and, 
7 *"l,f a pint 

N.B. — This stock can be used for thick vegetable soups. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Boiled Turbot. 



21 I 






FISH. 

Lesson No. l. 

BOILED TURBOT, AND LOBSTER 
SAUCE. 

Turbot varies in price considerably. 

Average cost of ingredients for " Lobster Sauce" 

s - d - 

Lobster 2 

2 oz. of butter o 2 

i tablespoonful of cream \ x i 

i oz. of flour i 

£ a tablespoonful of lemon juice j ° °^ 

2 4 

Time required, about half an hour. 






Now we will show you how to boil Turbot and make 
Lobster Sauce. 

1. We take the turbot. 

2. We put it in a basin of cold water and wash it well. 

3. We get a fishkettle and fill it with cold water, add to 
it as much salt as will make the water taste salt, and put it 
on the fire to boil. 

4. We take the turbot out of the basin. 

5. We put it on the drainer of the fishkettle, and put it 
in the kettle of boiling water, so that it is well covered with 
water. 

6. We let it boil for twenty minutes or half an hour. 

7. We must watch it and skim the water if necessary. 

N.B. — While the turbot is boiling, we should make the lobster sauce (see 
below). 

8. When the fish is sufficiently boiled, the flesh will 
divide from the bone. 

9. Now we take the drainer carefully out of the fishkettle, 
stand it. across the kettle a minute to drain, and slip the fish 
carefully on to a hot dish for serving. 

O 2 



2 i 2 National Training School for Cookery. 

For Lobster Sauce. 

1. We take a small lobster — it should be a hen lobster if 
possible. 

2. We put the lobster on a board. 

3. We take a chopper and break the shell of the lobster 
by hitting it with the blade of the chopper, not with the 
edge ; 1st because it would cut the lobster in pieces, and 
2nd because it would spoil the edge of the chopper. 

4. We break all the shell off the claws and back with 
our fingers and take out all the flesh. 

5. We cut this flesh up with a sharp knife to the size of 
small dice. 

6. If the lobster is a hen lobster we shall find a bit of coral 
in the neck, and a strip of it down the back. 

7. We take all this coral out of the lobster and wash it 
carefully in cold water in a small basin. 

8. We take the coral out of the basin and put it in a 
mortar with one ounce of butter. 

9. We pound the coral and the butter well with the 
pestle. 

10. We take it out of the mortar, and scrape the mortar 
out quite clean with a palette knife, for none must be lost. 

11. If we have not a palette knife we can manage as well 
with a piece of uncooked potato cut into the shape of a 
knife blade with a thick back, with this we can scrape all 
out of the mortar. 

12. We take a hair sieve and put it over a plate. 

18. We rub the pounded mixture through the sieve with 
the back of a wooden spoon. 

14. We must turn up the sieve when all the mixture has 
passed through, and we shall find some sticking on the 
underneath part. 

15. We scrape all this carefully off with the spoon. 

16. We make it all into a little pat. 

17. We take a stewpan and put in it one ounce of butter 
and one ounce of flour. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Lobster Sauce. 213 

18. We mix them well together with a wooden spoon. 

19. We add half a pint of cold zvater. 

20. We put the stewpan on the fire. 

21. We stir the mixture smooth, with a wooden spoon 
until it boils, and thickens. We add a large tablespooiiful of 
cream, and stir well till it boils again. 

22. We then take the stewpan off the fire, and stand it 
on a piece of paper on the table. 

23. We add to the mixture in the stewpan the pat of 
coral butter, by degrees, to colour it. 

N.B. — If there be no coral, the sauce might be coloured with half a teaspoon- 
ful of essence of anchovy. 

24. We stir it quite smoothly with a wooden spoon, it 
must not be lumpy. 

25. We now add pepper and salt, and a fezv grains of 
Cayenne pepper, according to taste. 

26. We take the chopped lobster, and mix it into the 
sauce, and add half a teaspoonful of lemon juice. 

27. We pour the sauce into a sauceboat, and serve it 
with the turbot. 



2 1 4 National Training School for Cookery. 

FISH. 

Lesson No. 2. 

FISH PUDDING. 

v Average cost of " Fish Pudding and Egg Sauce, 

INGREDIENTS. 

" Sauce." 



"Haddock." 

s. d, 

Haddock i o 

2 lbs. of potatoes o 2 

2 oz. of butter o 2 

1 egg , o 1 



d. 
2 oz. of butter 2 

1 oz. of flour oj 

\ gill of cream . ■. 3 

2 eggs and salt 2 



7) 



Time required, about one hour and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Fish Pudding with 
Haddock. 

N.B. — Any cold boiled fish can be used for the fish pudding, instead of haddock. 

1. We take a fishkettle of warm water, and we put in it 
a little salt, and put it on the fire to boil. 

2. We take a haddock, and put it into a basin of cold 
water and wash it well. 

3. We take the haddock out of the basin and put it into 
the fishkettle of boiling water, laying it carefully on the 
drainer so that it is well covered with water. 

4. We let it simmer {or fifteen minutes. 

5. We take six potatoes, put them into a basin of cold 
water, and scrub them well with a scrubbing-brush. 

N.B. — Any cold potatoes can of course be used instead of boiling fresh ones, 

6. We take the potatoes out of the basin, and dry them 
with a cloth. 

7. We take a sharp knife and peel \he potatoes. 

8. We take a saucepan of cold water, and lay the potatoes 
in it. 

9. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. It must not 
boil less than twenty minutes, or more than three-quarters 
of an hour, according to the size of the potatoes 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Fish Pudding. 215 

10. When we think the potatoes are sufficiently done, we 
take a steel fork and try the potatoes, to see if they are 
tender all through. 

11. When they are quite boiled, we drain off all the water 
from the saucepan, and sprinkle the potatoes with a little 
salt. 

12. We put on the lid of the saucepan, and stand it 
by the side of the fire to steam the potatoes until they have 
become quite mealy and dry. 

13. We should shake the saucepan every now and then, 
to prevent the potatoes from sticking to the bottom. 

14. When the haddock is sufficiently boiled, we take it 
carefully out of the fishkettle. 

15. We take a sharp knife, and cut off the head and tail 
of the fish. 

16. We skin the fish from the head to the tail. 

17. We cut up the fish and take out all the bones. 

18. We cut the fish up into small pieces the size of dice, 
and put them in a large basin. 

19. When the potatoes are steamed, we take them out of 
the saucepan with a spoon. 

20. We have a wire sieve ready standing over a large 
plate. 

21. We rub the potatoes quickly through the sieve with a 
wooden spoon. 

N.B. — The potatoes when sifted should be of the same weight as the Jlsh'. 

22. We add the sifted potatoes to the haddock, and mix 
them well together with a wooden spoon. 

23. We add salt and pepper, and a few grains of Cayenne 
pepper to taste. 

24. We put in one ounce and a half of butter. 

25. We take one egg, and beat it slightly in a basin. 

26. We pour the egg into the above mixture, and mix 
all together to a thick paste. 

27. We take a large-sized flat tin, and butter it well with 
our fingers. 






2 1 6 National Training School for Cookery, 

28. We put the mixture on to this tin, and shape it as 
well as we can like a haddock. 

N.B. — If preferred, the mixture can be formed into cutlets, or croquette 
shapes, or as fish cakes, and egged and bread crumbed and fried in 
dripping, as for lobster cutlets (see "Fish," Lesson No. j, Note 34 to 
Note 40). 

29. We cut up half an ounce of butter into small pieces, 
and put them all about on the shape. 

30. We put the tin into a quick oven for a quarter of an 
hour. It should become a pale-brown colour. 

Now we will make the Sauce. 

1. We take a stewpan, and put in it two ounces of butter 
and one ounce of flour. 

2. We mix them well together with a wooden spoon. 

3. We add half a teaspoonful of salt. 

4. We pour in half a pint of cold water. 

5. We put the stewpan on the fire, and stir all smooth 
with a wooden spoon until it boils. 

6. We now add two tablespoonsful of cream, and let it 
boil, stirring all the time. 

7. We stand the stewpan by the side of the fire. The 
mixture must not boil again, but only keep warm. 

8. We take a saucepan of warm water and put it on the 
fire to boil. 

9. When the water boils we put two eggs in to boil for 
ten minutes. 

10. We put the eggs into cold water for a minute, and 
then shell them. 

11. We cut the eggs with a sharp knife into little square 
pieces. 

12. We take the stewpan of sauce off the fire, and stand 
it on a piece of paper on the table. 

13. We add the cut-up eggs to the sauce, and stir them 
lightly in, not to break the pieces of egg. 

14. For serving we move the fish pudding carefully on 
to a hot dish, and pour the egg-sauce round. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — 'Whitebait. i\-] 

FISH. 

Lesson No. 3. 

WHITEBAIT. 

Whitebait varies in price ; it is in season from July to September. 

Now we will show you how to fry Whitebait 

1. We take a saucepan, and put in it one pound and a 
half of lard, or clarified dripping. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire to heat the fat. 
When the fat smokes it will then be hot enough. 

N.B. — The fat requires to be much hotter for frying whitebait, than for any- 
thing else. 

N.B. — If possible the fat should be tested by a frimometer, and the heat 
should rise to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. 

3. We take the whitebait, wash them in iced zvater, pick 
them over carefully, and dry them well in a cloth. 

4. We take a sheet of paper, and put on it a good tea- 
cupful of flour. 

5. We take the whitebait, and sprinkle them in the flour. 
They must not touch each other, and we must ringer them 
as little as possible. 

6. We take up the paper, and shake the whitebait well 
in the flour, so that they are well covered with^^r. 

7. We turn the whitebait from the paper of floitr, into a 
whitebait basket, and sift all the loose floitr back on to the 
paper. 

8. We then turn the whitebait a few at a .time, into the 
frying basket and put it into the boiling fat for one minute. 
The whitebait should be quite crisp. 

9. We put a piece of whitey-brown paper on a plate, 
stand the plate near the fire, and turn the fried whitebait 
on to the paper to drain off the grease. (We serve them 
on a napkin on a hot dish. Lemon cut, and thin slices of 
brown bread and bittter should be served with the white- 
bait^ 



218 National Training School for Cookery 



FISH. 

Lesson No. 4. 

SOLE AU GRATIN. 

Average cost of " Sole au Gratin" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 sole 1 o 

Parsley and \ of shalot o oh 

4 mushrooms o 2 

A teaspoonful of lemon juice . . I t 

Salt and pepper j ° ° 5 

2 tablespoonsful of glaze o 3 

I oz. butler o 07 

Crumbs o og 



1 7 

Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to cook Sole ait Gratin. 

1. We take a small sole and cut off with a sharp knife 
the outside fins. 

2. We cut through the skin only, across the head and 
the tail, on both sides of the fish. 

3. We take the skin off from the tail to the head. 

4. We wash the sole in cold water and dry it with a 
cloth, and nick it with a knife on both sides. 

5. We can cook the sole in fillets, if required, or whole. 
(N.B. —If in fillets, we fillet the sole the same as for the 
fried fillets in Lesson No. 6.) We are going to cook the 
sole whole. 

6. We take a small bunch of parsley and dry it well in a 
cloth. 

7. We chop the parsley up finely on a board. 

8. We chop a quarter of a shalot up finely and mix it 
with the parsley. 

9. The chopped parsley and shalot should fill a tablespoon. 

10. We take four small mitshrooms, cut off the roots, and 
then wash the mushrooms well in a basin of cold water. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Sole au Gratin. 219 

11. We take them out of the water, dry them in a cloth 
and peel them. 

12. We chop them up finely. 

13. We take a dish, and spread a little butter on it with 
our fingers. 

14. We sprinkle half of the chopped parsley, shalot, and 
mushroom over the bottom of the buttered dish. 

15. We pour half a teaspoonful of lemon juice over the 
chopped parsley, shalot, and mushroom in the dish, also 
sprinkle half a saltspoonfid of salt and a quarter of a salt- 
spoonful of pepper. 

16. We lay the sole carefully in the dish, and sprinkle 
over it the remainder of the chopped parsley, shalot, and 
mushroom. 

17. We sprinkle over the sole pepper and salt (enough 
to cover a threepenny piece), and squeeze over it half a tea- 
spoonfid of lemon juice. 

18. We take half an ounce of butter and cut it in small 
pieces and put them over the sole. 

19. We pour over it two tablespoonsful of glaze. 

N.B. — Glaze can be bought, or it can be made by reducing some strong 
stock over the fire (see "Stews," Lesson No 4, Note 12). 

20. We take a wire sieve and put it over a piece of 
paper. 

21. We take some crumb of bread and rub it through 
the sieve. 

22. We take these bread crumbs and put them on a flat 
tin. We put this tin into the oven to dry, and slightly 
brown, the bread crumbs. 

23. When the crumbs are done we sift them over the 

sole. 

24. We now put the dish into a brisk oven for ten 
minutes. We must take a fork and feel in the thick part 
of the sole if the fish is tender. 

25. We carefully move the sole with a slice on to a clean 
dish, and pour the saucf round. It is then ready for serving. 



220 National Training School for Cookery. 

FISH. 

Lesson No. 5. 

FILLETS OF SOLES A LA MAiTRE 
D'HOTEL. 

Average cost of " Fillets of Soles a la Maitre d' Hotel" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

Sole .... r o 

Lemon juice ; o o\ 

1 oz. of butter o i" 

I oz. of flour , o oj 

\ gill of cream o 3 



1 4f 



Time required about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to cook Fillets of Soles a la 
Maitre d' Hotel 

N.B. — Fillets of plaice or whiting could be cooked in this way. 

1. We take one sole and fillet it in the same way as for 
fried fillets (see " Fish," Lesson No. 6). 

2. We take the bones and fins of the sole, put them into 
a stewpan with half a pint of water, and put it on the fire 
to boil. 

3. We take a flat tin pan and butter it with our fingers. 

4. We fold the fillets loosely over and lay them in the 
buttered tin. 

5. We sprinkle a quarter of a saltspoonful of salt over 
the fillets and squeeze six drops of lemon juice, and cover 
them with a piece of buttered paper. 

6. We put the tin with the fillets into a sharp oven for 
six minutes. 

Now we will make the Sauce. 

N.B. — If there be no cream, the sauce can be made with milk ; the bones of 
the fish should therefore be boiled in half a pint of milk instead of water. 






Cooking Fish. — Soles a la Maitre oT Hotel 22 \ 

1. We take a small bunch of parsley \ wash it, dry it, and 
chop it finely with a knife on a board. 

2. We take a stewpan and put in it one ounce of butter 
and three-quarters of an ounce of flour. 

3. We mix them smoothly together with a wooden 
spoon. 

4. We take the saucepan of fish stock and pour it by 
degrees through a strainer into the stewpan of butter and 
flour, stirring well. 

5. We put the stewpan on the fire and stir the mixture 
smoothly with a wooden spoon ; we now add two table- 
spoonsful of cream and stir it well until it Hoils. 

6. We take the stewpan off the fire and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table. 

7. We add the chopped parsley to the mixture. 

8. We add half a teaspoonfid of lemon juice, salt, and 
pepper to taste, and stir the sauce well. 

9. Now we take the fillets out of the oven and arrange 
them on a hot dish ; we add the liquor from the fillets oj 
soles out of the tin, to the sauce. 

10. We pour the sauce over the fillets of soles. It is now 
ready for serving. 



222 National Training School for Cookery. 

FISH. 

Lesson No. 6. 

FRIED FILLETS OF SOLE. 

Average cost of ' " Fried Fillets of Sole, and Anchovy Sauce!' 

INGREDIENTS. 
For "Fried Sole." | For ' ' Anchovy Sauce." 



s. d. 

1 1 lb. of lard or clarified drip- 
ping for frying 

Sole i o 

i egg o i 

Crumbs o o| 



d. 

i oz. fresh butter v i 

\-oz. flour I 

Anchovy sauce [; t 



Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to Fry Fillets of Sole, Plaice, 
or Whiting. 

1. We take one sole, wash it well, and lay it on a board. 

2. We take a sharp knife and cut off all the outside fins, 
the head, and the tail. 

3. We take the skin off the sole, from the tail to the head. 

4. We cut down the centre of the fish. 

5. We slide the knife along carefully between the flesh 
and the bones, holding the flesh in one hand and drawing 
it gently away as the knife cuts it away from the bone. 

6. We do both sides of the fish alike, and it will make 
four fillets. 

7. We put each fillet separately on a plate, and rub it 
over with flour. 

8. We take a wire sieve and stand it over a piece of 
paper. 

9. We take some crumb of bread and rub it through the 
sieve. 

10. We take one egg and beat it on a plate with a knife. 

11. We lay the fillets in the egg, and egg them well all 
over with a brush. 



Lessons on Cod king Fish. — Fried Fillets of Sole. 223 

12. We then put them in the bread crumbs, and cover 
them well. We should be careful to finger them as little 
as possible. 

13. We take a saucepan, and put in it one pound and a 
half of lard or clarified dripping. 

Now we must make the Butter Sauce with Anchovy (see 
below). 

14. We put the saucepan on the fire to heat the fat. 
Test the heat of it by throwing in a piece of bread, and if 
it makes a fizzing noise it is ready. 

N.B. The heat is tested best by a frimometer ; the heat should rise to 345*. 

15. We take a frying basket, and place in it the fillets. 

16. The fillets should be slightly bent, or folded over, to 
prevent their being quite flat when fried. 

17. When the fat is quite hot, we put in the frying 
basket, with the fillets, for three minutes. 

18. We put a piece of whitey-brown paper on a plate. 

19. When the fillets are done, they should be a pale 
brown : we turn them out on to the paper on the plate, to 
drain off the grease. 

20. We serve them in a hot dish on a napkin, garnished 
with a little fried parsley [Refer to " Fish," Lesson No. 7, 
Note 41]. 

For Anchovy Sauce. 

1. We take a stewpan, and put in it one ounce of butter 
and half an ounce of flour. 

2. We mix them well with a wooden spoon. 

3. We add one gill and a half of cold water. 

4. We put the stewpan on the fire, and stir well with a 
ivooden spoon until the mixture is quite smooth and boils. 

5. We take the stewpan off the fire, and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table. 

N.B. — About a quarter of an ounce of butter stirred into the sauce at the 
last, very much improves it. 

6. We now add one tablespoonful of anchovy sauce, and 
stir it well into the butter sauce. 

1. For serving, we pour it into a sauceboat. 



224 National Training School for Cookery. 



FISH. 
Lesson No. 7. 

LOBSTER CUTLETS. 

Average cost of " Lobster Cutlets" {about seven). 
INGREDIENTS. 



s. d. 
ik oz. of butter 



1 lobster 



o i* 

1 tablespoonful of cream ii 

Seasoning and flavouring i~ 

I oz. of flour l 

iegg '..'.'..'. o i 4 

Bread q l 

Parsley | 

Time required about three hours. 



Now we will show you how to make Lobster Cutlets. 

1. We take a small lobster — it should be a hen lobster if 
possible. 

2. We put the lobster on a board. 

3. We take a chopper and break the shell of the lobster 
by hitting it with the blade of the chopper, not with the 
edge ; 1st, because it would cut the lobster in pieces, and 
2nd, because it would spoil the edge of the chopper. 

4. We break all the shell off the claws and back with our 
fingers and take out all the Jlesh. 

5. We cut this flesh up in pieces, with a sharp knife to 
the size of dice. 

6. If the lobster is a hen lobster we shall find a bit of 
coral in the neck, and a strip of it down the back. 

7. We take all this coral out of the lobster and wash it 
carefully in cold water in a small basin. 

8. We take the coral oat of the basin and put it in a 
mortar with one ounce of butter. 

9. We pound the coral and the butter well with the 
pestle. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Lobster Cutlets. 225 



10. We take it out of the mortar and scrape the mortar 
out quite clean with a palette knife or a slice of raw potato, 
for none must be lost. 

11. We take a hair sieve and put it over a plate. 

12. We pass the pounded mixture through the sieve with 
a wooden spoon. 

13. We must turn up the sieve when all the mixture has 
passed through, and we shall find some sticking inside. 

14. We scrape all this carefully off with the spoon. 

15. We make it all into a little pat. 

16. We take a stewpan and put in it one ounce of flour 
and half an ounce of butter. We mix them well together 
with a wooden spoon. 

17. We add one gill of cold water (one gill is a quarter 
pint). We put the stewpan on the fire and stir the mixture 
with a wooden spoon till it boils and thickens. 

18. We add one tablespoonful of cream and stir smoothly 
until it boils. 

19. We take the stewpan off the fire and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table. 

20. We now stir in by degrees the pat of coral butter. 
We must be sure the sauce is quite smooth and not 
lumpy. 

21. We add salt and pepper and a few grains of cayenne 
pepper, according to taste, and about six drops of lemon face, 
and mix well. 

22. We add the chopped lobster, and mix it with the 
sauce. 

23. We take a clean plate and pour the mixture from 
the stewpan on to it, smoothing it with a knife. 

24. We take a piece of paper and cut it round to the 
size of the plate. We butter it with a knife. 

25. We put the buttered paper over the mixture which 
is in the plate, to prevent the dust from getting in. 

26. We take the plate and stand it on ice (if possible), 
or put it in a cold place to cool. 



226 National Training School for Cookery. 

27. We take a wire sieve and put it over a piece of 
paper. 

28. We take a piece of crumb of bread and rub it 
through the wire sieve. 

29. We take one egg and beat it slightly with a knife on 
a plate. 

30. We take a saucepan and put in it one pound and a 
half of lard or clarified dripping. 

31. We put the saucepan on the fire to heat the fat. It 
must not burn. 

32. We take the plate of lobster mixture, which should 
by this time be cold and rather stiff. 

33. We shape the mixture into cutlets. This quantity 
will make seven. 

34. We dip the cutlets into the egg, and egg them well all 
over with a brush. 

35. We take them carefully out of the egg and cover 
them well with the bread crumbs. 

N.B. — If the cutlets are not well covered with egg and bread-crumbs they 
will burst in the frying. 

36. We take a frying basket and lay in it the lobster 
cutlets, a few at a time, so as not to touch each other. 

37. When the fat is quite hot, we should test it by a 
frimometer if possible, and the heat should rise to 345°, 
or by throwing into it a piece of bi'ead : if it makes a sharp 
fizzing noise it is ready. 

38. We put the frying basket into the fat, for three 
minutes, or perhaps less. The cutlets should become a pale 
brown. 

39. We put a piece of whitey-brown paper on a plate 
ready to receive the cutlets when they come out of the 
boiling /#£ This is to drain all the grease from them. 

40. We take the small claws of the lobster, and stick 
them into the end of each cutlet, to represent the bone. 

41. We take a few sprigs of parsley, wash them, dry 
them in a cloth, and put them into the frying basket. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Lobster Cutlets. 227 

42. We just toss the basket with the parsley into the 
boiling/^ for a second. 

43. We arrange the cutlets on a napkin on a hot dish, 
and garnish them with the fried parsley. It is now ready 
for serving. 



22S National Training School for Cookery. 

FISH. 

Lesson No. 8. 

BOILED COD FISH AND OYSTER 
SAUCE. 

Cod-fish varies in price considerably. 
It is in season from October to February. 

Average cost of " Oyster Sauce!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

i dozen oysters i 6 

i-oz. butter ( , 

£-oz. flour J 

i tablespoonful of cream o ih 

Lemon-juice and cayenne pepper o o^ 

i 8i 

Time required about twe?ity minutes. 



Now we will show you how to cook Cod Fish^ and make 
Oyster Sauce. 

1. We take a slice of cod weighing one pound. 

2. We put it in a basin of cold water, and wash it well. 

3. We take a small fish-kettle and fill it with warm water, 
and add to it as much salt as will make the water taste salt. 

4. We put the fish-kettle on the fire to boil. 

5. We take the cod out of the basin, and place it on 
the drainer in the fish-kettle, and let it boil for fifteen 
mint ties. 

N.B. — It must not boil fast. 

N.B. — While ihejis/i is boiling, we should make the sauce : see below. 

6. When the slice of cod is sufficiently cooked, the flesh 
will leave the bone 

N.B. — The bone is usually left in, or the fish would break to pieces. 

7. We serve the slice of cod on a folded napkin on a hot 
dish, with oyster sauce. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Oyster Saitce. 229 

For Oyster Sauce. 

1. We take oiie dozen oysters and the liquor that is with 
them, and put them into a small saucepan. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire and bring them to 
the boil, this is to blanch the oysters. 

3. We take the saucepan off the fire as soon as it boils. 

4. We take a basin and pour into it the oyster liquor 
through a strainer. 

5. We take the oysters, and lay them on a plate. 

6. We take off the beards and all the hard parts of the 
oysters, leaving only the soft part. 

7. We take a stewpan and put in half an oimce of butter, 
and a quarter of an ounce of flour. 

8. We mix the floiLr and the butter well together with 
a wooden spoon. 

9. We now add to the contents of the stewpan the 
oyster liquor which is in the basin. 

10. We put the stewpan on the fire and stir the mixture 
well with a wooden spoon until it boils and thickens. 

11. We now add one tablespoonfid of cream, and stir 
again until it boils. 

12. We take the stewpan off the fire and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table. 

13. We add six drops of lemon juice and a few grains of 
cayenne pepper according to taste. 

14. We take the trimmed oysters and cut them into 
small pieces. 

15. We add the pieces of oyster to the mixture in the 
stewpan and mix all together with a wooden spoon. We 
then pour the sauce into a hot sauce-boat and it is ready 
for serving. 



230 National Training School for Cookery. 

FISH. 

Lesson No. 9. 

GRILLED SALMON, AND TARTARE 
SAUCE. 

Salmon varies in price considerably. 
It is in season from May to August. 

Average cost of " Tartare Sauce? 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 eggs 2 

Salt and pepper i 

A tablespoonful of French vinegar / z 

Gherkins or capers I 

1 teaspoonful of made mustard \ x 

1 teaspoonful of tarragon vinegar J ° 2 

1 gill of oil 6 



10 
Time required, about fifteen minutes. 



Now we will show you how to cook Salmon, and make 
Tartare Sauce. 

1. We take a slice of salmon weighing one pound. 

2. We wipe the salmon with a clean cloth. 

3. We take a plate, and pour on it about a gill of 
salad oil. 

4. We dip the slice of salmon into the oil, on both sides 
the oil will prevent the fish from drying whilst cooking. 

5. We season the slice on both sides, with pepper am 
salt. 

6. We take a gridiron and heat it on both sides, by the 
fire. This is to prevent the fish sticking. 

7. When the gridiron is hot, we place on the slice of 
salmon, and let it grill for a quarter, of an hour. 

N.B. — While the salmon is cooking, we must make the sauce. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Grilled Salmon. 231 

8. We must turn the gridiron occasionally, so as to cook 
the fish on both sides, which should become of a pale 
brown colour. 

9. When the fish is quite done, we can remove the bone 
from the centre of the slice. We serve the salmon on a 
napkin on a hot dish. 



For Tartare Sauce. 

1. We take two eggs, put the yolks in one basin, and 
the zvhitcs (which will not be wanted) into another basin. 

2. We take a wooden spoon, and just stir the yolks 
enough to break them. 

3. We add to them a saltspoonfid of salt, and half a 
saltspoonfid of pepper, and a tablespoonfid of French vinegar. 

4. We take a bottle of salad oil, and, putting our thumb 
half over the top, pour in drop by drop, the oil, stirring 
well with a whisk the whole time ; a gill of oil will be 
sufficient. 

5. We now stir in a teaspoonful of ready-made mustard, 
and a teaspoonfid of tarragon vinegar. 

6. We take a few gherkins or capers, and chop them up 
finely on a board, there should be enough to fill a table- 
spoon. 

7. We take these chopped gherkins or capers and put 
them all into the sauce, and mix them with a spoon. 

8. We serve the sauce in a sauce tureen, with the grilled 
salmon. 



232 



National Training School for Cookery. 



FISH. 

Lesson No. 10. 

BAKED MACKEREL OR HERRING. 

Average cost of " Mackerel or Herring " (baked with 
bread crumbs and herbs). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 mackerel 6d. or herrings 2d. 

1 dessertspoonful of chopped herbs and onions 1 

1 dessertspoonful of chopped parsley o\ 

1 dessertspoonful of bread crumbs ) L 

Pepper and salt j ° z 

2 oz. of dripping 1 



3 



With Herrings, $d. 
With Mackerel, gd. 

Time required about forty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to bake Mackerel 01 
Herrings with herbs and bread crumbs. 

1. We wash the mackerel or herrings in cold water, dry 
them in a cloth, and put them upon a board. 

2. We take a sharp knife, cut off the heads of the fish 
and carefully split open each fish and take out the back 
bone. 

3. We lay one fish open flat on a tin (skin downwards). 

4. We take a sprig of parsley \ wash it in water, and dry 
it in a cloth. 

5. We put the parsley on a board and take away the 
stalks and chop it up as finely as possible (there should be 
about a dessertspoonful). 

6. We take half an onion, peel it, put it on a board, with 
a sprig of thyme and marjoram, and chop them up finely 
(there should be about a dessertspoonful). 

7. We take a grater, stand it on the board, and grate a 
few bread crumbs (there should be about a dessertspoonful). 



Cooking Fish. — Baked Mackerel or Herring. 233 

8. We mix the onion, herbs, and bread crumbs together. 

9. We sprinkle pepper and salt to taste, over the fish in 
the tin. 

10. We then sprinkle over the fish the mixture of herbs 
and bread crumbs. 

11. We take the other fish and lay it over the one in the 
tin (skin upwards). 

12. We put two ounces of clarified dripping in a saucepan, 
and put it on the fire to melt. 

13. We pour the melted dripping over the fish in the tin. 

14. We cover the tin with a dish, and stand it on the hot 
plate or in the oven to bake for half an hour. 

15. We must watch it and baste it occasionally with the 
dripping. 

16. For serving, we turn the fish carefully out of the tin 
on to a hot dish. 






234 National Training School for Cookery. 

FISH. 

Lesson No. ii. 

BAKED STUFFED HADDOCK. 

Average cost of a " Stuffed Haddock " (baked). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i Haddock s 6 

Bread crumbs i 

i dessertspoonful of chopped parsley oV 

i teaspoonful of chopped herbs o* 

Pepper and salt ) 

2 oz. of suet J 

i egg i 

2 oz. of dripping i 

ii 

Time required, about three-quarters of an hour. 

Now we will show you how to Stuff a Haddock and 
Bake it. 

1. We take a haddock, wash it, clean It carefully in cold 
water, and dry it in a cloth. 

2. We stand a grater on a piece of paper and grate some 
bread crumbs. 

3. We take a sprig of parsley, wash it in cold water, and 
dry it in a cloth. 

4. We put the parsley on a board, and chop it up finely 
(There should be about a dessertspoonful.) 

5. We take a small sprig of thyme and marjoram, take 
away the stalks, and chop the herbs up finely on a board. 
(There should be about a teaspoonful) 

N.B. — The stalks will do for flavouring, but they cannot be eaten, as they 
are bitter. 

6. We mix all the herbs together with two tablespoon sf til 
of the bread crumbs. 

N.B. — The remainder of the bread crumbs we shall require for rolling the 
fish in. 

7. We add pepper and salt to taste, and mix the stuffing 
together with two ounces of suet (finely chopped). 



Cooking Fish. — Baked Stuffed Haddock. 235 

8. We stuff the belly of the fish with the stuffing and sew 
it up. 

9. We break an egg into a plate, and brush the fish over 
with it, then roll it in the bread crumbs, covering it well all 
over. 

10. We grease a dish or tin with a piece of dripping. 

11. We lay the fish on the dish or tin and put it into the 
oven to bake for from half to three-quarters of an hour % 
basting it frequently with dripping. 

12. Before serving, we should carefully take away the 
cotton with which the fish was sewed. 



236 National Training School for Cookery 



FISH. 

Lesson No. 12. 

FISH BAKED IN VINEGAR. 

Average cost of " Fish Baked in Vinegary 

INGREDIENTS- 

d. 

6 Herrings 6 

30 peppercorns \ 

1 blade of mace / 

1 shalot : I x 

1 bay leaf j 

1 gill (J pint) of vinegar | , 

Salt j °* 

~7\ 



Time required, abotit two hours. 



Now we will show you how to Bake Fish (such as 
herrings or mackerel), in Vinegar. 

1. We take the fish, wash them, and clean them tho- 
roughly in cold water. 

2. We put the fish on a board, and cut them into thick 
pieces. 

3. We lay these pieces close together in a stone jar, with 
thirty peppercorns and half a teaspoonfid of salt. 

4. We add one blade of mace and a bay-leaf. 

5. We take one shalot, peel it, and add it, or part of it 
(according to taste), to the fish. 

6. We pour in one gilt (a quarter of a pint) of vinegar, and 
tie a piece of brown paper tightly over the top of the jar 
with a piece of string. 

7. We put the jar into a very slow oven to bake for two 
hours, or it may stand in a baker's oven all night. 

N.B. — The fish is to be eaten cold. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Fried Plaice. 237 



FISH. 

Lesson No. 13. 

FRIED PLAIOE. 

Average cost of " Plaice" (fried). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d 

1 Plaice 1 o 

1 egg o 1 

Bread crumbs o o 

Dripping for frying 

1 1 

Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to fry Plaice in Egg and 
Bread Crumbs, or Batter. 

1. We put about half a pound of clarified dripping into a 
saucepan, and put it on the fire to heat. 

2. We take the plaice, wash it in cold water, and dry it 
in a cloth. 

3. We put the plaice on a board, and with a sharp knife 
carefully cut off the head and the tail. 

4. We hold a grater over a piece of paper and grate 
some bread crumbs. 

5. We cut up the fish into slices or fillets. 

6. We break an egg on to a plate and beat it lightly with 
a knife. 

7. We dip the slices of fish into the egg, and egg them 
well all over. 

8. We then roll them in the bread crumbs, covering them 

well. 

N.B. — We must shake off the loose crumbs. 

9. When the dripping is quite hot and smoking we care- 



238 National Training School for Cookery. 

fully put in the fish, fingering it as little as possible, so as 
not to take off any of the egg or bread crumbs. 

N.B. — We should not put too many pieces at a time into the dripping, as 
they must not touch each other. 

10. We put a piece of whitey-brown paper on to a plate, 
and as the fis/i is fried we take it out of the dripping care- 
fully with a slice, and lay it on the paper to drain off the 
grease. 

N.B. — Soles or any fish can be fried in the same way. 

N.B. — For frying fish in batter, we dip each piece of fish in the batter, made 
as for meat fritters (see Cooked Meat, Lesson No. 2), and fry it in the 
same way as above. 

11. For serving we should arrange the fish on a hot dish 
and garnish it with a few sprigs of parsley. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Boiled Fish. 239 

FISH. 
Lesson No. 14. 

I BOILED FISH. 

^Average cost of the Sauce to be served with boiled fish 
(about half a pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 oz. of butter i 

\ oz. flour o\ 

Anchovy sauce or lemon juice o\ 

jL 

Time required for boiling fish, about twenty minutes to three quarters of an hour t 
according to the size of the fish. 



Now we will show you how to Boil Fish. 

1. We put a saucepan or fish-kettle of water on the fire 
to boil. 

2. We take the fish and clean it thoroughly in cold 
water. 

3. When the water is warm, we put in the fish on a 
strainer or a plate (there should be sufficient water just to 
cover the fish.) 

N.B. — For salmon the water must be boiling, but for all other fish it should 
only be warm water. 

4. We also put in some salt, enough to make the water 
taste salt. 

5. We put the lid on the saucepan, and move it to the 
side of the fire to simmer gently iox from twenty minutes to 
three-quarters of an hour (according to the size of the fish). 

6. We must watch it and skim it occasionally. 

7. When we find that the skin of the fish is cracking, we 
shall know that it is sufficiently boiled. 

While the fish is boiling we make Melted Butter sauce 
(see " Sauces/' Lesson No. 7). 



240 National Training School for Cookery. 

8. For serving, we take the fish carefully out of the 
saucepan and place it on a hot dish, we pour the sauce into 
a sauce boat or a basin, or round thefish. 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Stewed Eels. 241 



FISH. 

Lesson No. 15. 

STEWED EELS. 

Average cost of " stewed Eels!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 lb. of eels i o 

1 oz. of flour o o \ 

1 oz. of butter o i 

1 teaspoonful of chopped parsley \ , 

Cayenne pepper and salt / ° °- 

1 i| 

Time required, about half a?i hour. 



Now we will show you how to Stew Eels. 

1. We must put the eels on a board, cut off their heads, 
and cut down the front of them, clean them thoroughly 
inside, and skin them, beginning from the head. 

2. We now cut them in pieces, about one inch in length, 
wash the pieces in cold water, and put them in a stewpan, 
with half a pint of cold water, put the stewpan on the fire, 
and when it comes to the boil, skim it well, and move it to 
the side of the fire, to simmer for ten minutes. 

3. We put one ounce of flour in a basin, and mix it to a 
smooth paste with about a iiblespoonful of 'water. 

4. We take a sprig or two of parsley, wash it, dry it, 
and chop it up finely on a board, there should be about a 
tcaspoonful. 

5. When the eels have simmered, we stir in the flour, and 
season it with very little cayenne pepper and salt to taste, 
and let it cook over the fire, for about five minutes ; we 
must stir it well. 

N.B. — If liked, about half a teaspoonful of chopped onion might be added. 



242 National Training School for Cookery, 

6. We now add one ounce of butter, and stir it well, and 
then add the chopped parsley. 

7. For serving, we arrange the eels in a circle on a hot 
dish, and pour the sauce round. 

N.B. — Eels must be very fresh, they should be only just dead, before cook- 
ing. If liked, the sauce can be made richer by using stock instead of 
water, or the eels can be served with the following sauces : Tartare (see 
: 'Fish," Lesson No. 9), Melted Butter (see "Sauces," Lesson No. 7). 



Lessons on Cooking Fish. — Kedgeree. 243 

FISH. 

Lesson No. 16. 

KEDGEREE. 

Average cost of " Kedgeree? 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

£ lb. of boiled fish 5 

\ lb. rice of 

2 eggs 2 

2 ozs. butter » 

Cayenne pepper and salt J 2 

IT 

Time required, about half-an-hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Kedgeree. 

1. We take a quarter of a pound of rice, wash it, boil it, 
and dry it, as directed in Lesson on rice. 

2. While the rice is boiling - , we take a small saucepan 
full of hot water, and put it on the fire to boil ; when it 
boils, we should put two eggs in carefully, and let them 
boil hard for ten minutes. 

3. We take some cold boiled fish, break it in pieces, and 
carefully remove all the bones. 

4. When the eggs are sufficiently boiled, we take them 
out of the saucepan ; we should tap them all over on the 
edge of a basin, and take off all the shell : we then put the 
eggs in a basin of cold water. 

5. We take the eggs out of the water, put them on a 
board, cut them in halves, take out the yolks, and cut the 
whites up in pieces to the shape of dice. 

6. When the boiled rice is dry, we put two ounces of 
butter in a stewpan, put it on the fire, and when the butter 
is melted, we should add the rice and stir it well with a 
fork. 

N.B. — We must not use a spoon. 

Q ? 



244 National Training School for Cookery, 

7. We now add the fish, the whites of the eggs, a fevb 
grains of cayenne pepper (about as much as would thinly 
cover one side of a threepenny-piece), and salt to taste ; 
mix it all well together, and turn it out on a hot dish. 

8. We must now place a sieve over it, take the yolks of 
the eggs, and rub them through the sieve all over the fish 
and rice : it is now ready for serving. 



Lessons on Cooking Vegetables. — Boiled Potatoes. 245 

VEGETABLES. 
Lesson No. r. 

BOILED AND STEAMED POTATOES. 



Time required for boiling: — 
Old potatoes, ibout half an Jiour. 
New potatoes, about twenty minutes. 
Steamed potatoes, half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to dress Potatoes. 
For boiling Old Potatoes. 

1. We wash two pounds of potatoes well in cold water, 
and scrub them clean with a scrubbing brush. 

N.B. — If the potatoes are diseased then we take a sharp knife, peel them 
and carefully cut out the eyes and any black specks about the potato, but 
it is much better to boil them in their skins. 

2. We put them in a saucepan with cold water, enough 
to cover them, and sprinkle over them a teaspoon/ ul 
of salt. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire, to boil the potatoes 
for from twenty minutes to half an hour. 

4. We should take a fork and put it into the potatoes, to 
feel if the centre is quite tender. 

5. When they are sufficiently boiled, we drain off all the 
water, and place a clean cloth over the potatoes in the 
saucepan. 

6. We stand the saucepan by the side of the fire, with 
the lid on, to steam the potatoes. 

7. When the potatoes have become quite dry, we take 
them carefully cut of the saucepan, peel them without 
breaking them, and place them in a hot vegetable dish for 



246 National Training School for Cookery. 

For boiling New Potatoes. 

1. We wash two pounds of potatoes in cold water. 

2. We take a knife and scrape them. 

3. We take a saucepan of warm water, and put it on the 
fire to boil. 

4. When the water is quite boiling, we put in the new 
potatoes, and sprinkle over them a teaspoonful of salt. 

5. We let them boil for a quarter of an hour; we should 
take a fork or skewer, and put it in the potatoes, to feel if 
the centre is quite tender. 

6. We then drain off all the water, and place a clean 
cloth in the saucepan, over the potatoes, and stand the 
saucepan by the side of the fire with the lid on. 

7. When they have become quite dry, we take them out 
of the saucepan, and arrange them on a hot vegetable dish 
for serving. 



For Steamed Potatoes. 

N.B. — Old potatoes only, can be steamed. 

1. We wash the potatoes well in cold water, and scrub 
them clean with a scrubbing brush. 

N.B. — It is best to steam the potatoes in their skins, but they can be peeled 
if preferred. 

2. We take a potato steamer, fill the saucepan with hot 
water, and put it on the fire to boil. 

3. When the water is quite boiling, we put the potatoes 
in the steamer, and sprinkle them over with salt. 

4. W T e place the steamer on the saucepan of boiling 
water, and cover it down tight to keep the steam in. 

5. We let the potatoes steam for half an hour. 

6. We should take a fork and put it in \h^ potatoes, to 
feel if the centre is quite tender. 



Lessons on Cooking Vegetables. — Steamed Potatoes. 247 

7. When they are sufficiently steamed, we take them 
carefully out of the steamer, peel them without breaking 
them, and arrange them on a hot vegetable dish for 



248 National Training School for Cookery. 

VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 2. ' 

MASHED, SAUTE, AND BAKED 
POTATOES. 

Average cost of a dish of " Potatoes." 

INGREDIENTS. 

For " Sattte" Potatoes" 



For " Mashi'd Potatoes:' 

d. 

2 lbs of old potatoes 2 

1 oz. of butter 1 

1 gill of milk ) 1 

Pepper and salt ) ~ 



Time required, about forty minuie.s. 



d 

New potatoes 2 

2 oz. of butter | 

Salt j 2 



4 
Time required, about half an hour. 



Time required for Baked Potatoes, about three-quarters of an hour. 



Now we will show you how to dress Potatoes. 
For a d ish of Mashed Potatoes. 

1. We take two pounds of old potatoes, wash them, and 
steam them as for steaming potatoes (see "Vegetables, Lesson 

No. 1 "). 

2. We take a stew-pan and put in it one ounce of btttter^ 
one gill of milk, and pepper and salt to taste. 

3. W T e put the stew-pan on the fire to boil. 

4. We place a wire sieve over a plate. 

5. We take the steamed potatoes, one at a time, out of 
the steamer, put them on the sieve, and pass them through 
on to the plate as quickly as possible, rubbing them with a 
wooden spoon. 

6. We take the sifted potato and stir it into the boiling 
milk, in the stew-pan. 

7. We must now beat it all lightly together, and then 
turn it into a hot vegetable dish for serving. 



L essons on Cooking Vegetables. — Baked Potatoes. 249 

For Saute' Potatoes — 

1. We take some nezv potatoes, as small as possible, wash 
them in cold water, and scrape them clean. 

N.B. — If the potatoes are large, they should be cut in halves, or even in 
quarters, and trimmed. 

2. We put them in a saucepan, with cold water. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire, and only just bring 
them to the boil. 

4. We then drain off the water, and wipe the potatoes 
dry in a clean cloth. 

' 5. We take a thick stewpan and put in it two ounces of 
butter, and the potatoes. 

6. We put the stewpan on a quick fire for about tzventy 
minutes, to brown the potatoes ; we must watch them, and 
when they have begun to brown we should toss them occa- 
sionally in the stewpan, so as to brown them on all sides 
alike. 

7. We then strain off the butter, sprinkle them over with 
salt, and serve them on a hot vegetable dish. 



For Baked Potatoes — 

1. We take the potatoes, wash, and scrub them well with 
a scrubbing-brush in a basin of cold water. 

2. We take them out of the water, and dry them with a 
cloth. 

3. We put them in a brisk oven to bake ; they will take 
from half an hour to tJiree-quarters of 'an hour, according to 
the heat of the oven, and the size of the potatoes. 

4. We take a steel fork or skewer, and stick it into ih-z 
potatoes, to see if they are done. They must be soft inside. 

5. We take a table napkin and fold it. 

6. We place the folded napkin on a hot dish. 

7. When the potatoes are sufficiently baked, we take 
them out of the oven, and arrange them on the napkin for 



250 National Training School for Cookery. 

VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 3. 

FRIED POTATOES. 

Average cost of " Potato Chips or Fried Slices of Potato. 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 lb. of Potatoes } 

Salt / r 

The use of i| lb. of clarified fat or lard for frying. 

Time required, about eight minutes for either. 



Now we will show you how to dress Potatoes. 
For Potato Chips — 

1. We wash the potatoes well in cold water, and scrub 
them clean with a scrubbing-brush. 

2. We take a sharp knife, peel them, and carefully cut 
out the eyes and any black specks about them. 

3. We must now peel the potatoes very thinly in ribbons, 
and twist them into fancy shapes. 

4. We take a saucepan and put in it one pound and 
a half of clarified fat or lard. 

5. We put the saucepan on the fire to heat the fat. We 
must test the heat of it with a piece of bread (see Lesson 
on " Frying"). 

6. We take a frying-basket and put the ribbons of potato 
in it. 

7. When the fat is quite hot we put in the frying-basket 
with the potatoes for about six minutes. 

8. We place a piece of whitey-brown paper on a plate. 

9. When the chips are done, they should be quite crisp 
and of a pale brown colour. We turn them out on to the 
paper, to drain off the grease, and sprinkle over them a little 
salt. 

10. We serve them on a hot dish. 



L csso7is on Cooking Vegetables. — Fried Potatoes. 2 5 1 



For Fried Slices of Potato — 

1- We take the potatoes, wash them clean, and peel them 
with a sharp knife. 

2. We put the potatoes on a board, and cut them in 
slices, about one-eighth of an inch in thickness. 

3. We take a saucepan and put in it one and a half pound 
of clarified dripping or lard. 

4. We take a frying-basket and place in it the sliced 
potatoes. 

5. We put the saucepan on the fire to warm the fat. 

6. When the fat is warm, but not very hot, we place in 
the frying-basket with the slices of potatoes, and let them 
boil in the fat, until they are quite tender. 

N.B. — We should take out a piece of potato and press it between the thumb 
and finger, to feel that it is quite tender. 

7. We must now take out the frying-basket with the 
potatoes and place it on a plate. 

8. We leave the fat on the fire to heat. 

9. When the fat is quite hot, we place in the frying- 
basket with the potatoes for about two minutes. 

10. We put a piece of whitey-brown paper on a plate. 

11. When the potatoes are fried, they should be a pale 
brown ; we turn them out on to the paper to drain off the 
grease. 

12. We should sprinkle a little salt over them. 

13. For serving we arrange them on a hot dish. 



252 National Training School for Cookery. 

VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 4. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Average cost of" Potato Croqitettes" {about 18). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 lbs. potatoes 2 

1 oz. butter ) k 

1 tablespoonful of milk / 4 

3 e gg s ■ 3 

A small bunch of parsley 1 

Bread crumbs I 

Pepper and salt / 

Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Potato Croquettes. 

1. We take two pounds of potatoes, wash, scrub, and boil or 
steam them (see " Vegetables," Lesson No. 1). 

N.B. — Any remains of cold potatoes could be used up in this way, instead of 
boiling fresh ones. 

2. We place a wire sieve over a plate. 

3. We take the potatoes, one at a time, place them on 
the sieve and rub them through with a wooden spoon as 
quickly as possible on to the plate. 

N.B. — The potatoes can be passed through the sieve much quicker while 
they are hot. 

4. We put I oz. of butter and a tablespoonful of milk into 
a stewpan, and put it on the fire. 

5. When the milk and butter are hot, we stir in smoothly 
the sifted potato. 

6. We take the stewpan off the fire, and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table. 

7. W T e break two eggs, put the whites in a cup (as they 
are not required for present use), and stir the yolks, one at 
a time, into the potato in the stewpan. 

8. We take two or three sprigs of parsley, wash them in cold 



Lessons on Cooking Vegetables. -Potato Croquettes. 2 5 3 

Abater, dry them in a cloth, and chop them up finely on a 
board (there should be about a tcaspoonful). 

9. We sprinkle the parsley into the stewpan, and season 
the potato according to taste with pepper and salt. 

10. We turn the potato mixture on to a plate and stand 
it aside till cold. 

11. We put 1 lb. of clarified dripping into a deep stewpan, 
and put it on the fire to heat; we must be careful it does 
not burn. 

12. We take some crumb of bread, and rub it through a 
wire sieve on to a piece of paper. 

13. When the potato mixture is cold, we form it into 
croquettes or balls, according to taste. 

14. We break an egg on to a plate and beat it up slightly 
with a knife. 

15. We dip the croquettes into the egg, and egg them 
well all over with a paste brush. 

16. We now roll them in the bread crumbs, covering 
them well all over. 

N.B. — We must be careful to cover them smoothly and not too thickly. 

17. We take a frying basket and arrange the croquettes 
in it ; but we must finger them as little as possible, and 
not allow them to touch each other. 

18. When thejfatf on the fire is quite hot and smoking 
(we should test the heat by throwing in a piece of bread 
which should fry brown directly), we put in the frying 
basket for two minutes or so to fry the croquettes a pale 
yellow. 

19. We put a piece of whitey-brown paper on a plate, 
and as the croquettes are fried we turn them on to the 
paper to drain off the grease. 

20. We put three or four small sprigs of parsley (washed 
and dried) into the frying basket, and just toss the basket 
into the boiling fat for a second or so. 

21. For serving, we arrange the croquettes tastily on a 
hot dish, with the fried parsley in the centre. 



254 National Training School for Cookery. 

VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 5. 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

Average cost of dressing " Brussels Sprouts? 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 lbs. of Brussels sprouts 6 

Salt j 

\ of a saltspoonful of carbonate of soda . . . . f A 

i ounce of butter X x * 

Pepper J 

~\ 
Time required, about half an hotir. 



Now we will show you how to dress Brussels Sprouts. 

1. We take the Brussels sprouts, wash them well in two 
or three waters, and trim them. 

2. We take a saucepan with plenty of warm water in it. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. 

4. When the water is quite boiling, we add a tablespoon- 
ful of salt, and a quarter of a saltspoonful of carbonate of soda. 

5. We put in the sprouts, and let them boil quickly for 
from ten to twenty minutes, according to their age. 

N.B. — Young sprouts take the shortest time to boil. 

6. We must keep the lid off the saucepan the whole time. 

7. After that time, we pour the sprouts into a colander 
to drain. 

8. When the sprouts are quite dry, we put them in a 
saute-pan with one ounce of butter. 

9. We sprinkle over them a little pepper and salt, and toss 
them over the fire for a few minutes, but they must not fry. 

10. For serving, we arrange them tastily on a hot vege- 
table dish. 



Lessons on CookuigVcgetables.-Carrots&Turnips. 255 

VEGETABLES. 
Lesson No. 6. 

CARROTS AND TURNIPS. 

Average cost of dressing u Carrots and Turnips!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

Carrots or Turnips » 

2 tahlespoonsful of salt J 

Half a pint of stock 3 1 

Dessertspoonful of castor sugar , o| 

Half an ounce of butter o| 



Time required, about three-quarters of an hour. 

Now we will show you how to dress Carrots and Turnips. 
For Carrots — 

1. We take a saucepan of water, and put it on the fire to 
boil. 

2. When the water is quite boiling, we add a tablespoon- 
ful of salt. 

3. We take the carrots, and if they are quite young, we 
put them into the saucepan of boiling water, to boil for 
tzventy minittes. 

4. We must take a fork and stick it in the carrots to feel 
that they are quite tender all through. 

5. After that time we take them out of the saucepan, 
and rub them clean with a cloth. 

N.B. — If the carrots are old we should wash, scrape them clean with a 
knife, and cut them to the shape of young carrots, or cut them in 
quarters, or in fancy shapes, with a cutter, before boiling. 

6. We should let them boil for from half an hour to 
thrcc-qitarters of an hour. 

7. We take a stewpan and put the boiled carrots in it. 

8. We pour in about a quarter of a pint of stock, enough 
to cover them. 

9. We put in a piece of butter, the size of a nut, and 



256 National Training School for Cookery. 

sprinkle about a teaspoonful of white castor sugar over 
them. 

10. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil (the lid should 
be off), and reduce to a glaze over the carrots. 

11. We then take them out of the stewpan, and they are 
ready for serving. 



For Turnips — 

1. We take the turnips and wash them well in cold 
water. 

2. We take them out of the water, put them on a board, 
peel them with a sharp knife, and cut them in quarters, or 
cut them out with a round cutter. 

3. We take a saucepan of water and put it on the fire to 
boil. 

4. When the water is quite boiling we add a tablespoonful 
of salt. 

5. We now put in the cut-up turnips, and let them boil 
for from ten to fifteen minutes. 

6. When they are sufficiently boiled, we take them out 
of the saucepan, and put them into a stewpan with about 
a quarter of a pint of stock, enough to cover them. 

7. We add to them a piece of butter, the size of a nut y 
and sprinkle over them about a teaspoonful of white castor 
sugar. 

8. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil (the lid should-, 
be off), and reduce to a glaze over the turnips 

9. We then take them out of the stewpan, and they are 
ready for serving. 

N.B. — The turnips and the carrots, as described above, can be served with, 
braised veal (see Braised Fillet of Veal), qr separately as a vegetable^ 



Lessons on Cooking Vegetables -Boiled Cauliflower. 257 

VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 7. 

BOILED CAULIFLOWER AND CAULI- 
FLOWER AU GRATIN. 

Average cost of dressing "Cauliflower an Grating 

INGREDIENTS- 

d. 

Cauliflower 6 

Salt j 

Half an ounce of butter . i 

i ounce of flour ) 

Tablespoonful of cream i£ 

2 ounces of Parmesan cheese | 

Cayenne pepper / 3 



ii 
Time required, about an hour. 



Now we will show you how to dress a Caidiflowcr. 

1. We take a cauliflozver and wash it well in two or three 
waters, and take a knife, and cut off the end of the stalk 
and any withered outside leaves. 

2. We put it in a basin of cold water, with a dessertspoon- 
fid of salt, and let it stand for two or three minutes. 

3. We take a large saucepan full of water, and put it on 
the fire to boil. 

4. When the water is quite boiling we put in a table- 
spoonfid of salt. 

5. We take the cauliflower out of the salt and water, 
and place it in the saucepan with the flower downwards, 
and let it boil till it is quite tender for from fifteen to 
twenty minutes. 

6. We must take it carefully out with a slice, and feel 
the centre of the flower with our finger, to see that it is 
quite tender. 

7. After that time we take it out of the saucepan, and 
put it on a sieve to drain. 

8. For serving, we place it on a hot vegetable dish. 

R 



258 National Training School for Cookery. 

If Cauliflower au Gratin be required — 

1. We take the cauliflower and wash it, and boil it in the 
same way as described above, from Note 1 to Note 6. 

2. When the cauliflower is sufficiently boiled, we take it 
out of the saucepan with a slice and put it on a plate. 

3. We take a knife and cut off all the outside green 
leaves. 

4. We put a cloth over the cauliflower, and squeeze all 
the water out of the cauliflower. 

5. We put half an ounce of butter and one ounce of flour 
in a stewpan, and mix them well together with a wooden 
spoon. 

6. We pour in one gill (or quarter of a pint) of cold 

water. 

7. We put the stewpan on the fire, and stir smoothly 
until it boils and thickens. 

8. We now add one tablespoonful of cream, cayenne 
pepper (about as much as would very thinly cover half the 
top of a threepenny piece), and salt, according to taste. 

9. We stand the stewpan by the side of the fire, until the 
sauce is required for use. 

10. We take two ounces of Parmesan cheese, and grate it 
with a grater on to a piece of paper. 

11. We now take the stewpan off the fire and stand it on 
a piece of paper on the table. 

12. We stir rather more than half the grated cheese into 
the sauce. 

13. We place the cauliflower on a tin dish. 

14. We pour the sauce all over the cauliflower. 

15. We take the remainder of the grated cheese and 
sprinkle it over the cauliflower, and brown the top of it with 
a hot salamander. 

16. The cauliflower should become a pale brown, and be 
served hot. 



Lessons on Cooking Vegetables. — Spinach. 259 



VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 8. 

SPINACH. 

Average cost of dressing " Spinach." 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 lbs. of spinach o 6 

Salt ) 

3 ounces of butter j ° 3 

Half a gill of cream ..... o 3 

Pepper '( x 

A slice of bread J ° °* 



1 o± 
Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to dress Spinach. 

1. We take two pounds of spinach and place it on a board. 

2. We must pick off all the stalks from the leaves. 

3. We put the leaves in plenty of cold water, and wash 
them two or three times. 

4. We turn the spinach on to a colander to drain. 

5. We take a large saucepan and put the spinach into it, 
sprinkle a salt spoonful of salt over it, and put it on the fire 
to boil. The drops of water on the leaves and their own 
juice are sufficient without adding any water. 

6. We let it boil quickly for ten minutes, with the 
cover off. 

7. We then pour the spinach into the colander to drain. 

8. We must now press all the water out of the spinach, 
squeezing it quite dry. 

9. We put it on a board and chop it up as finely as 
possible. 

N.B. — If preferred, the spinach might be rubbed through a wire sieve 
instead of being chopped up. 

10. We take a stewpan and put in it one ounce of butter^ 

R 2 






260 National Training School for Cookery. 

11. We put the spinach in the stewpan, and add about 
half a saltspoonful of pepper and a saltspoonful of salt or more, 
according to taste, and half a gill of cream, and mix all 
together with a wooden spoon. 

12. We put the stewpan on the fire and stir the spinach 
until it is quite hot 

13. We cut a slice of crumb of bread, about a quarter of 
an inch in thickness, put it on a board, and cut it up into 
triangular pieces. 

14. We take a frying-pan, and put into it two ounces of 

butter or clarified dripping. 

15. We put the frying-pan on the fire to heat the fat. 

16. When the fat is quite hot, we throw in the pieces of 
bread, and let them fry a pale brown. 

17. We take the pieces of fried bread and arrange them 
round a hot vegetable dish to form a wall. 

18. We serve the dressed spinach in the centre. 



Lessons on Cooking Vegetables. — Peas. 261 



VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 9. 

PEAS. 

Average cost of dressing "Peas" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

£ a peck of Peas i o 

Salt I 

£ of a saltspoonful of carbonate of soda . . > o o^ 

I an ounce of butter ) 

Castor sujrar o oj 



1 
Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to dress Peas. 

1. We take the peas and shell them. 

2. We take a saucepan full of warm water and put it on 
the fire to boil. 

3. When the water is quite boiling, we put in the shelled 
peas, a teaspoonfid of salt, and a quarter of a saltspoonful of 
carbonate of soda. 

N.B. — The soda will keep the peas a good colour. 

4. We let them boil for from fifteen to twenty minutes, 
according to the age of the peas. (The cover should be off 
the saucepan.) 

5. After that time we should feel the peas, that they are 
quite soft, we then take them out of the saucepan and drain 
off all the water in a colander. 

6. We now turn the peas into a saute-pan with half an 
ounce of butter. 

7. We sprinkle about half a teaspoonful of salt, and 
about a teaspoonful of castor sugar over the peas, and toss 
them over the fire for a few minutes, but they must not fry. 

8. For serving, we arrange them on a hot vegetable dish. 



262 National Training School for Cookery. 

VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 10. 

HARICOT BEANS. 

Average cost of " Haricot Beans" with "Parsley and Butter* 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 pint of beans 3 

1 oz. of butter 1 

A sprig of parsley 1 

Pepper and salt > o\ 

\ oz. of clarified dripping ) 

~\ 

Time required, after the beans are soaked, about two hours and ten minutes. 



Now we will show you how to boil Haricot Beans y and 
serve them with parsley and butter. 

1. We soak one pint of haricot beans in cold water all 
night. 

2. We put them into a saucepan with three pints of cold 
water ; and a qitarter of an oitnce of clarified dripping. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it boils 
we move it rather to the side of the fire and let it boil very 
gently for two hoitrs. 

4. After that time we turn the beans on to a colander, 
drain off the water, and put the beans back into the dry 
saucepan with one ounce of butter. 

5. We take a sprig of parsley, wash it, and dry it in a 
cloth, put it on a board and chop it up as finely as possible. 

6. We sprinkle the parsley over the beans and season 
them with pepper and salt. 

7. We put the saucepan on the fire and stir the contents 
carefully for about five minittes. 

8. For serving, we turn the beans on to a hot dish. 



Lessons on Cooking- Vegetables. — Turnips. 263 

VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. ii. 

turnips. 

Average cost of a dish of " Turnips " boiled and mashed. 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

4 large turnips 4 

1 oz. of butter \ 

Pepper and salt j 

5 

Time required, about three-quarters of an hour. 

Now we will show you how to boil Titmips and mash 
them. 

1. We put two quarts of zvarm zvater and a tablespoonful 
of salt into a saucepan, and put it on the fire to boil. 

2. We take some turnips, wash them in cold water, and 
peel them thickly with a sharp knife. 

3. If the turnips are very large, we should cut them in 
quarters. 

4. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling we 
put in the titmips and let them boil gently until they are 
quite tender. 

5. We should feel them with a fork to see if they are 
tender all through. 

6. We then turn them into a colander and drain them 
very dry. 

7. For serving, we put them on to a hot dish. If mashed 
titmips are required, 

8. We boil them as above. 

9. We squeeze them as dry as possible in the colander, 
pressing them with a plate. 

10. When the turnips are quite free from water, we hold 
the colander over a saucepan and rub the turnips through 
with a wooden spoon. 






264 National Training School for Cookery. 

11. We put one ounce of butter into the saucepan with the 
turnips and pepper and salt to taste. 

12. We put the saucepan on the fire, and stir the contents 
until the butter is well mixed with the turnips and they are 
.horoughly warmed through. 

13. For serving, we turn the turnips on to a hot dish. 



Lessons on Cooking Vegetables. — Carrots. 265 

VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 12. 

CARROTS. 

Average cost of a dish of " Carrots" 

INGREDIENTS- 

d. 

Carrots, 6 young 3d., or 4 old ) 

1 tablespoonful of salt j 4 



Now we will show you how to boil Carrots. 

1. We put tzvo quarts of warm water into a saucepan 
with one good tablespoonftd of sa/t, and put it on the fire to 
boil. 

2. We take the carrots and cut off the green tops and 
wash the can'ots well in cold water. 

3. We scrape the carrots clean with a sharp knife, and 
carefully remove any black specks. 

4. If the carrots are very large we cut them in halves 
and quarters. 

5. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the carrots and let them boil until they are tender. 

N.B. — Yoitng carrots need not be cut up, nor do they take so long to boil as 
old ones. 

6. For serving we turn the carrots into a colander to 
drain, and then put them on a hot dish. 



266 National Training School for Cookery. 

VEGETABLES. 

Lesson No. 13. 

STEWED LENTILS. 

Average cost of" Stewed Lentils" (one pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 pint of brown lentils (Fronch) 3 

1 oz. of butter 1 

1 gill of stock 1 

1 onion ) 1 

Pepper and salt J 3 

Time required, after the lentils are soaked, about one hour and a half. 



Now we will show you how to stew lentils. 

1. We take one pint of brown lentils (the French are best 
suited for stewing), wash them well in cold water, and put 
them to soak in water for four hours, or all night is best. 

2. After that time, we take the lentils out of the water, 
put them in a saucepan, cover them with cold water, add a 
teaspoonful of salt \ put the saucepan over the fire to boil. 
When it boils, move the saucepan to the side of the fire to 
simmer for one hour. 

N. B. — The lid should be off the saucepan, all the water will be absorbed 
by the lentils. 

3. We take one small onion, peel it, and cut it in slices. 

4. We put one ounce of butter into a saucepan, add the 
sliced onion, put it over the fire to fry the onion brown. We 
must stir it occasionally, and be careful the onion does not 
burn. 

5. When the lentils are done, we turn them into the 
saucepan with the onion, and add one gill (or ^ of a pint) of 
second stock. We season it with pepper and salt to taste, and 
stir it over the fire for ten minutes. 

6. For serving we pour the contents of the saucepan into 
a hot vegetable dish. 



Lessons on Making Sauces. — White Sauce. 267 

SAUCES. 

Lesson No. i. 

WHITE SAUCE. 

I Average cost of " White Sauce" (about one pint and a half). 
INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 pint of white stock o 7^ 

2 oz. of butter o 2 

\\ oz. of flour o o k 

6 mushrooms o 3 

Half a pint of cream 1 o 

The juice of half a lemon o o j 

2 ii 

Time required {if the Stock is made), about half an hour. 

Now we will show you how to make White Sauce. 

1. We put tivo ounces of butter into a stewpan. 

2. We put the stewpan on the fire, and when the butter 
is melted we stir in one ounce and a half of flour with a 
wooden spoon. 

3. We add one pint of zvJiite stock (see Lesson on " Stock"), 
and stir it until it boils. 

4. We take half a dozen mushrooms, wash them and peel 
them. 

5. We add them to the sauce. 

6. We let it come to the boil again, then move the stew- 
pan to the side of the fire, with the lid half on, to simmer 
for twenty minutes, to throw up the butter. 

7. As the butter rises we skim it off with an iron spoon. 

8. We pour the sauce through a tammy cloth, into 
another saucepan. 

9. We put this saucepan on the fire, and stir till it boils, 
then add half a pint of cream, take half a lemon, and squeeze 
in the juice, and let the sauce boil well, for from three to five 
minutes. 

10. We pour it into a basin and stir while it cools, it is 
then ready for use. 






268 National Training School for Cookery. 

SAUCES. 

Lesson No. 2. 

BROWN SAUCE. 

Average cost of " Brown Sauce" (about one pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 pint of brown stock o 75 

i| oz. of flour ) 1 

Salt and pepper J ° °'~ 

•2 oz. butter o 2 

4 mushrooms o 2 

1 carrot o o' 

1 small onion o o\ 

1 shalot o ok 

1 1 

Time required, about 15 minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Brown Sauce, 

1. We take four mushrooms (if large, or six small), cut 
off the end of the stalks, wash them well in cold water, and 
peel them. 

2. We take one carrot, wash it, scrape it clean, and cut 
it in slices. 

3. We take one small onion, and a shalot, wash them, 
peel them, and cut them in slices. 

4. We pat two ounces of butter into a stewpan, and put it 
on the fire to melt. 

5. When the butter in the stewpan is melted, we add all 
the vegetables, and let them fry brown ; we also stir in two 
ounces of flour, and mix it into a smooth paste with a 
wooden spoon. 

6. We now add one pint of brown stock, and stir the 
sauce smoothly over the fire, until it boils and thickens. 

N.B. — The mtishrooms might be omitted if liked, and the sauce flavoured 
according to the dish with which it is to be served. 

7. We then move the stewpan to the side of the fire, 
and let it simmer gently for ten minutes. 



Lessons on Making Sauces. — Brown Sauce. 269 

8. We must watch it carefully, and skim off all the 
butter as it rises to the top of the sauce. 

9. We season the sauce with pepper and salt according to 
taste. 

N.B. — If the sauce is not brown enough in colour, a teaspoonful of caramel 
[burnt sugar) might be stirred into it. 

N.B.— For making caramel (browned sugar) for colouring gravies, &c. We 
put a quarter of a pound of moist or loaf sugar into an old saucepan, and 
put it on the fire and let it burn until it has become quite a dark brown 
liquid ; we add to it half a pint of boiling water and let it boil for five 
minutes, stirring it occasionally ; we then strain it, and pour it in a 
bottle, and it is ready for use at any time. 

10. We now strain the sauce through a tammy sieve into 
a basin, and it is then ready for use. 



270 National Training School for Cookery. 

SAUCES. 

Lesson No. 3. 

MAYONNAISE SAUCE. 

Average cost of "Mayonnaise Sauce" 7 
{not quite half a pint). 



INGREDIENTS. 

d. 
2 esfcr S 2 



Salt and pepper ) x 

1 teaspoonful of common vinegar ) 2 

§ a teaspoonful of mustard ) , 

1 teaspoonful of Tarragon or French vinegar . j 2 

1 gill of salad oil 6 

10 

Time required, about 10 minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Mayonnaise Sauce. 

1. We take two eggs and put the yolks in one basin and 
the whites (which will not be wanted) into another basin. 

2. We take a wooden spoon and just stir the yolks 
enough to break them. 

3. We add to them a saltspoonful of salt, and half a salt- 
spoonful of pepper. 

4. We take a bottle of salad oil, and, putting our thumb 
half over the top, pour in, drop by drop, the oil, stirring 
well with a whisk the whole time ; a gill of oil will be 
sufficient. 

5. We now stir in smoothly a teaspoonful of Tarragon or 
French vinegar, and a teaspoonful of common vinegar, also 
half a teaspoonful of ready-made mustard, according to 
taste. 

6. The sauce is now ready for use. 



Lessons on Making Sauce. — Plqziante Sauce. 271 

SAUCES. 

Lesson No. 4. 

SAUCE PIQUANTE 

Average cost of Sauce Piquante or sharp sauce (about 
half a pint.) 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 shalot, half a carrot, 3 mushrooms z\ 

1 oz. of butter 1 

j oz. of flour 0} 

Half a pint of brown stock 3! 

1 sprig of thyme . 

1 bay leaf t 

Salt and Cayenne pepper I 

2 tablespoonsful of vinegar ) 

8 
Time required, about twenty-five minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Sauce Piquante or 
sharp sauce. 

1. We take a shalot and three mushrooms, and peel them, 
we scrape half a carrot, and then chop them up together 
very finely on a board. 

2. We put the chopped shalot, carrot, and mushroom into 
a stewpan with one ounce of butter. 

3. We put the stewpan on the fire and try them brown. 

4. We then stir in half an ounce of flour and half a pint 
of brown stock (see Lesson on "Stock"). 

5. We also add one sprig of thyme, a bay leaf, and one 
tablespoonful of Harvey Sauce and stir the sauce well until 
it boils. 

6. We then move the stewpan to the side of the fire, and 
let it simmer for twenty minutes. 

7. We season the sauce with salt according to taste, 
Cayenne pepper (enough to cover very thinly half the top of 

<a threepenny piece), and add two tablespoonsful of vinegar. 

8. We strain the sauce and it is then ready for use. 



272 



National Training School for Cookery. 



SAUCES. 

Lesson No. 5. 

DUTCH SAUCE. 

Average cost of" Dutch Sauce" 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

Half a pint of melted butter 3 

5 yolks of eggs 5 

Salt and Cayenne pepper \ 

2 teaspoonsful of lemon juice ) x 

9 

N.R ■ -If liked, a more economical Dutch sauce can be made. 

Ingredients required. 

d. 

I a teaspoonful of flour ) 

1 oz. of butter J I 

2 tablespoonsful of vinegar ) 

2 tablespoonsful of water [ z\ 

The yolks of 2 eggs 



The juice of half a lemon 
Salt and pepper 



1* 



Time required ', about twenty minutes. ,\ 

Mix the flour and butter together, in a stewpan over the fire, then add the 
eggs, vhiegar, and water, and proceed in the same way as below, from note four. 
Great care should be taken to mix it smoothly and not let it curdle. 
Time required, about teti minutes. 

Now we will show you how to make Dutch Sauce, 

1. We take half a pint of melted butter and put it into a 
stewpan. 

2. We add the yolks of five eggs. 

3. We stand the stewpan in a saucepan of hot water over 
the fire, and stir well with a w T hisk. 

4. We season it with salt according to taste, and Cayenne 
pepper (enough to cover very thinly half the top of a three- 
penny piece). 

5. We must stir continually until it thickens, and we 
must not let the sauce boil or it will curdle. 

6. Just before the sauce is finished we stir in two tea- 
spoonsful of lemon juice. 

7. We pour the sauce into a hot sauce-boat and it is then 
ready for serving. 



Lessons on Making Sauce. — Tomato Sauce. 273 

SAUCES. 

Lesson No. 6. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

Average cost oi" Tomato Sauce" (about one gill). 
INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

6 tomatos i 6 

3 shalots o 13 

1 tablespoonful of vinegar s 

2 oz. of lean ham r a 

1 bayleaf and sprig of thyme I * 4 

12 peppercorns and salt / 

1 oz. of butter o 1 

1 IOJj 

Time required, about twenty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Tomato Sauc^. 

1. We take a saute-pan, and butter it well inside, with one 
ounce of butter. 

2. We take six tomatoes, wipe them in a clean cloth, put 
them on a plate, cut them in slices ; and put them into the 
saute-pan. 

3. We take two ounces of lean ham, and chop it up finely. 

4. We take three shalots, peel them, chop them up 
finely on a board, and put them into the saute-pan, we also 
add the chopped ham, twelve peppercorns, half a teaspoonful 
of salt, a tablespoofiful of vinegar, a sprig of thyme and a 
bayleaf, tied together. 

5. We put the saute-pan over the fire, and stir the contents 
well, with a spoon, until they are reduced ; it will take about 
fifteen minutes. 

6. We place a hair sieve over a basin, pour the contents 
of the saute-pan on to it, and rub them through, with a 
wooden spoon ; when it has all passed through into the 
basin, we return it to the saute-pan and let it warm through 
over the fire : It is now ready for use, to be served with 
cutlets or with Brown sauce for Calf s-head. 



274 National Training School for Cookery. 

SAUCES. 

Lesson No. 7. 

MELTED BUTTER SAUCE. 

(For Fish or Pudding.) 

Average cost of" Melted Butter Sauce" (about a quarter of 

a pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 oz. of fresh butter x\ 

\ oz. of flour \ 



Time required, about 5 minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Melted Butter Sauce. 

1. We put one ounce of butter into a stewpan, put it over 
the fire ; and when it is melted, we stir in half an ounce of 

flour 1 and mix them smoothly together with a wooden spoon. 

2. We now pour in a gill {quarter of a pint) and a half 
of cold water, and stir the sauce smoothly until it boils and 
thickens. 

N.B. — About a quarter of an oz. of butter stirred into the sauce just before 
serving, very much improves it, and makes it smoother. 

If the sauce is to be served with fish, we can add a tablespoonful of anchovy 
sauce, or a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and pepper and salt to taste. 

If the sauce is for puddings, we sweeten it according to taste with castor 
sugar, and add, if liked, half a wineglassful of sherry ; if it is to be 
served with treacle pudding, the sauce should be sweetened with treacle. 



Lessons on Making Pastry. — Puff Paste. 275 

PASTRY. 

Lesson No. i. 

PUFF PASTE. 

Average cost of" Puff Paste" (to cover about 1 pint and 
a J pie dish, or make about 8 patty cases). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of flour i\ 

I lb. of fresh butter 8 

Salt ) i 

A few drops of lemon juice J ° z 

77w* required, one hour and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make Puff Paste for a 
//7/2V to?Y, tartlets, or /atf#/ ^.s^. 

1. We take half a pound of butter and lay it on a clean 
cloth. 

2. We fold the cloth over the butter and squeeze it to 
get all the water out of the butter. 

3. We take half a pound of flour, put it in a heap on a 
board, and make a well in the centre of the flour. 

4. We add a quarter of a saltspoonful of salt, a teaspoon- 
ful of lemon j idee, and sufficient water to make the paste of 
the same consistency as the squeezed butter, and work it 
well together. 

5. We take a rolling pin, flour it, and also sprinkle flour 
on the board to prevent the paste from sticking. 

6. We roll out the paste rather thin, to about a quarter 
of an inch in thickness. 



276 National Training School for Cookery. 

7. We place the pat of squeezed butter on one half of the 
paste, and fold the other half over the butter, so as to cover 
it entirely, pressing the edges together with our thumb. 

8. We let it stand on a plate in a cool place for a 
quarter of an hour. 

N.B. — It is not necessary to do this in cold weather, it might be rolled at 
once. 

9. We bring the paste back and place it on the board, 
we roll it out with the rolling pin and fold it over in three. 

10. We turn it round with the rough edges towards us. 

11. We roll it again and fold it in three. 

12. We put it aside again for a quarter of an hour. 

13. We bring it back on the board and roll it with a 
rolling pin and fold it in three, twice as before. 

14. We put it aside again for a quarter of an hour. 

15. We bring it back to the board and roll it and fold it 
in three as before. 

16. We put it aside for another quarter of an hour. 

17. We bring it back to the board, and roll it out ready, 
if for a fruit tart, (see "Pastry," Lesson No. 2, from note 
14 to note 27). 

18. If the paste is used for tartlets, the paste should be 
one-eighth of an inch thick. (If for patty cases, see below). 

19. We take the tartlet tins and wet them with the paste 
brush. 

20. We cut the paste out with a cutter, a size larger than 
the tins. The cutter must hz floured, or the paste will stick 
to it. 

21. We fix the paste into the tins, and put a dummy in 
the centre of the tartlet, to prevent the paste rising straight, 

22. We put the tins on a baking sheet. 

23. We put the baking sheet in a hot oven for six 
minutes ; the thermometer fixed in the oven door should 
rise to 300 Fahrenheit. 

24. When the tartlets are baked sufficiently, we take 
them out of the oven. 



Lessons on Making Paltry. — Puff Paste. 277 

25. We take out the dummies, and turn the paste out of 
the tin. 

26. We fill in the tartlets with Jam. 



N.B. — If Patty Cases are required, 

1. We take the puff paste, it should be half an inch thick, 
and stamp it out with a round cutter, the usual size of an 
oyster patty. 

2. We take these cut rounds, and place them on a 
baking sheet. 

3. We take a round cittter, three sizes smaller, and dip it 
in hot water, and stamp the cut rounds of paste in the 
centre, but not right through. 

4. We put the baking sheet in a hot oven for six minutes. 

N.B. — The heat of the oven should be the same as for tartlets. 

5. When the patties are sufficiently baked, we take the 
baking sheet out of the oven. 

6. The cut centre of each patty case wilL have risen so 
that we can take it off. 

7. We take a small knife, and with the point cut out all 
the moist paste from the centre of the patty case. 

8. Now the cases are ready to be filled in with either 
prepared oysters, minced veal, chicken, or pheasant, &c, 
according to taste. 



2y& National Training School for Cookery. 

PASTRY. 

Lesson No. 2. 

SHORT CRUST. 

Average cost of " Short Crust " 
(to cover a pint and a half pie dish.) 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

6 oz. of flour 1 

4 oz. of butter 4 

1 oz. of castor sugar 

Yolk of 1 egg , 

Salt / ** 



A teaspoonful of lemon juice 



Time required, about an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Short Crust. 

1. We take six ounces of flour and four ounces of butter. 

2. We put these on a clean board, and mix them well 
together, rubbing them lightly with our hands until there 
are no lumps of hitter left, and the flour and butter 
resemble sifted bread crumbs. 

3. We take a large tablespoonful of castor sugar. 

4. We mix the sugar well into the buttered flour. 

5. We heap it on the board, making a well in the centre. 

6. We take the yolk of one egg and place it in the well. 

7. We sprinkle a quarter of a saltspoonful of salt over 
the egg. 

8. We add a teaspoonful of lemon juice. 

9. We add a large tablespoonful of cold water. 

10. We slowly and lightly mix all these ingredients with 
our fingers until they are formed into a stiff paste. 

11. We must keep our hands and the board well floured 
that the paste may not stick. 

12. We fold the paste over and knead it lightly with our 
knuckle \ 






Lessons on Making Pastry. — Short Crust. 279 

13. We take a rolling pin and flour it, and roll out the 
paste to the size and thickness required. 

14. If the paste is for a fruit tart we roll it out to the 
shape of the pie dish, only a little larger, and to the thick- 
ness of about a qtiarter of an inch. 

15. We arrange the fruit in the pie dish, heaped up in 
the centre. 

16. We sprinkle a tablespoonful of moist sugar over the 
fruit, or more or less according to the fruit used. 

17. We take a paste brush and wet the edge of the dish 
with water, or a little white of egg. 

18. We cut a strip of the paste the width of the edge of 
the pie dish and place it round the edge of the dish. 

19. We take the paste brush again, and wet the edge of 
the paste with water or white of egg. 

20. We take the remaining paste and lay it over the pie 
dish, pressing it down with our thumb all round the edge. 

21. We must be very careful not to break the paste. 

22. We take a knife and trim off all the rough edges oi 
the paste round the edge of the dish. 

23. We take a knife and with the back of the blade we 
make little notches in the edge of the paste, pressing the 
paste firmly with our thumb to keep it in its proper place. 

24. We make a little hole in the paste of the tart, to 
let out the steam. 

25. We take the paste brush, and wet the tart all over 
with water. 

26. We sprinkle some castor sugar over the tart. This 
is to glaze it. 

27. We now put the tart into a hot oven (the thermo 
meter fixed in the oven door should rise to 240 Fahrenheit) 
for half an hour, or three quarters of an hour, according to 
the size of the tart. We must watch it occasionally and 
turn it, to prevent its burning. It should become a pale 
brown. It is then ready for serving, either hot or cold 
according to taste. 



280 National Training School for Cookery. 



PASTRY. 
Lesson No. 3. 

GENOESE PASTRY. 

Average cost of " Genoese Pastry. " 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

6 ozs. of flour o i 

6 ozs. of butter o 6 

8 ozs. of castor sugar o 3 

7 eggs o 7 



1 5 

Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Genoese Pastry. 

1. We take a small stewpan and put in it six ounces of 
butter. 

2. We put the stewpan on the fire to melt the butter. 
We must be careful that it does not burn or boil. 

3. We take a round tin two inches deep and fit into it a 
sheet of paper, cut round so that it will allow one inch of 
paper to be above the edge of the tin. 

4. We must butter the paper with a paste brush dipped 
in the melted butter. 

5. We stand a wire sieve over a plate, and rub through 
it six ounces of flour. 

6. We take a large basin and break into it seven eggs. 

7. We add half a pound of castor sugar. 

8. We take a large saucepan of boiling water and put it 
on the fire. 

9. We stand the basin containing the eggs and sugar in 
the saucepan of boiling water, and whip the eggs and su,gar 
for twenty minutes. They must not get very hot. 

10. We take the basin out of the saucepan, and stand it 
on the table. 



Lessons on Making Pastry. — Genoese Pastry. 281 

^ 11. We now add the butter and then sprinkle in the 
sifted flour y stirring lightly with a wooden spoon all the 
time. 

12. We pour this mixture into the prepared tin. 

13. We put the tin into a quick oven to bake (the ther- 
mometer in the oven door should rise to 220 ), for half an 
hour. The mixture should become a pale brown. 

N.B. — When the paste is sufficiently baked no mark should remain on it if 
pressed with the finger. 

14. When it is quite baked, we take the tin out of the 
oven, and turn the cake upside down on a hair sieve to 
cool. 

15. When it is cold we cut it into little shapes with a 
cutter. Sandwiches of jam can be made with it if required. 



282 National Training School for Cookery. 

PASTRY. 

Lesson No. 4. 

ROUGH PUFF PASTE. 

Average cost of" Rough Puff Paste" (to cover about a 
pint and \ pie dish). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

8 ozs. of flour 1^ 

6 ozs. of butter 6 

Salt \ A 

\ a teaspoonful of lemon juice J 4 

7*Vȣ required, about a quarter of an hour to make. 



Now we will show you how to make Rough Pitff Paste. 

1. We take eight ounces of flour and six ounces of butter 
and put them on a clean board. 

2. We take a knife and chop up the butter in the flour. 

3. We heap it on the board, making a well in the centre. 

4. We sprinkle a quarter of a saltspoonful of salt over the 
flour, and squeeze half a teaspoonful of lemon juice. 

5. We add a /# r£^ tablespoonful of cold water, and beat it 
up slightly with a knife. 

6. We now slowly, and lightly, mix it all with our 
ringers, adding more water if necessary, until it be formed 
into a stiff paste. 

7. We must keep our hands and the board well floured, 
that the paste may not stick. 

8. We take a rolling pin, flour it, and roll out the paste, 
and fold it over in half. 

9. We turn it round with the rough edges towards us. 

10. We roll it again and fold it in half. 



Lessons on Making Pastry. — Rough Piiff Paste. 283 

11. We must roll out the paste, and fold it twice more 
as before. 

N.B. — The paste is now ready to be used for a meat pie, apple tart, tart- 
lets, &c. The heat of the oven should rise to 280 , but it must be reduced 
down to 220° after the first quarter of an hour. 



284 National Training School for Cookery. 



PASTRY. 

Lesson No. 5. 

SUET CRUST FOR BEEF-STEAK AND KIDNEY 
PUDDING, OR ROLY POLY PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Suet Crust" (for a quart pudding). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of flour i| 

5 oz. of beef suet } 3 

Salt I 2 * 

4 

For Beefsteak Pudding. For Roly Poly Pudding. 

s. d. d. 

i| lb. of rump or beefsteak 19 § pot of jam or marmalade. . 4 

\ lb. of beef kidney ;...) g — — 

Pepper and salt J 

2 3 

7Yz«£ reqtiired, about three hours and a half for the Meat Pudding. 
For the Roly Poly, about two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make Suet Crust, to be 
used for either a Beef-Steak Pudding, or Roly-Poly, &c. 

1. We take five ounces of beef suet, and put it on a 
board. 

2. We take a knife, and cut away all the skin, and chop 
up the suet as finely as possible. 

3. We put half a pound of flour into a basin, and add to 
it the chopped suet and a teaspoo7tful of salt. 

N.B. — If the paste is to be used for a Roly Poly, we should only add a 
quarter of a saltspoonful of salt. 

4. We rub the S7iet well into the flour with our hands. 

5. We then add, by degrees, enough cold water to make 
it into a stiff paste. We should mix it well. 

6. We take the paste out of the basin, and put it on a 
board. 






Lessons on Making Pastry. — Suet Crust. 285 

7. We take a rolling-pin and flour it. We also sprinkle 
flour on the board, to prevent the paste from sticking. 

N.B. — If a Roly Poly is to be made, we proceed as directed, see Note 24. 

8. We roll out the paste once, to the thickness of rather 
more than one-eighth of an inch. 

N.B. — Now the paste is ready for use, and if it is required for beef-steak 
pudding — 

9. We take a quart pudding basin, and butter it well 
inside. 

10. We line the basin smoothly inside with paste. 

11. We take a knife, flour it, and cut away the paste 
that is above the edge of the basin. 

12. We fold this paste together, and roll it out to a 
round, the size of the top of the basin, one-eighth of an 
inch in thickness. 

13. We take one pound and a half of rump or beef -steak, 
put it on a board, and cut it into thin slices. 

14. We flour the slices well (using about a tablespoonful 
of flour), and season them with plenty of pepper and salt. 

15. We take half a pound of beef kidney, and cut it up 
in small pieces. 

16. We roll up the slices of beef -steak, and fill the basin 
with the meat and the kidney. 

N.B. — The pudding might be flavoured with shalot, parsley, and mushrooms 
according to taste. 

17. We now pour into the basin one gill of water. 

18. We wet the paste round the edge of the basin with 
cold water, and cover over the top of the basin with the 
round of paste. 

19. We must join the paste together at the edge of the 
basin, pressing it down with our thumb. 

20. We take a pudding cloth, flour it, and lay it over 
the top of the basin, tying it on tightly with a piece of 
twine. 

21. W 7 e take a large saucepan of warm water, and put it 
on the fire to boil. 



286 National Training School for Cookery. 

22. When the water is quite boiling, we put in the 
pudding, and let it boil for three hours. 

23. For serving, we take off the cloth and turn the 
pudding carefully out of the basin on to a hot dish. 

24. For a Roly-Poly Pudding, we roll out the paste very 
thin, we take half a pot of jam or marmalade, spread it 
well all over the paste, and then roll the paste up. 

25. We take a clean cloth, wring it out in warm water 
sprinkle a little flour over it, place the rolled paste in the 
middle of it, roll it round, and tie it securely at each end 
with string. 

26. We put the pudding into the saucepan of boiling, 
water to boil for two hours. 

27. For serving, we take the pudding out, carefully take 
off the cloth, and place the pudding on a hot dish. 



Lessons on Making Pastry. — Short Crust. 287 

PASTRY. 
Lesson No. 6. 

SHORT CRUST FOR APPLE TURNOVERS 
AND APPLE DUMPLINGS, &c. 

Average cost of " Apple Turnovers " (about three). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 
f lb. of flour 2 

\ lb. of clarified dripping or butter \d 2 

\ a teaspoonful of baking powder I 

3 apples / 

3 teaspoonsful of moist sugar 1 

7 
Time required, about half an hour. 






Now we will show you how to make Apple Turnovers. 

1. We take three apples, peel and quarter them, cut out 
the core, and cut them into thin slices. 

N.B. — One apple is required for each turnover. 

N.B. — If 3. fruit pie or apple dumplings are required, see below. 

2. We put three quarters of a pound of flour into a basin, 
and mix into it half a teaspoonful of baking powder. 

3. We take a quarter of a pound of clarified dripping or 
butter, and rub it well into the flour with our hands. 

4. We add enough cold water to moisten it, and mix it 
into a stiff paste. 

6. We take a board, flour it, and turn the paste out on to it. 

6. We flour a rolling pin, and roll out the paste to about 
a quarter of an inch in thickness. 

7. We cut the paste into rounds ; each round should be 
about the size of a small plate. 

8. We lay the apple on one half of the round of paste, 
and sprinkle over it one teaspoonful of moist sugar. 



288 National Training School, for Cookery. 



9. We wet the edges of the paste, fold the paste over the 
apple, pressing the edges together with our thumb. 

N.B. — We must be careful to join the paste together on all sides, or the 
juice of the apple will run out whilst it is cooking. 

10. We grease a tin with a little dripping, and place the 
turnovers on it. 

11. We put the tin into the oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise to 220 ) to bake for a quarter 
of an hour. 

12. For serving we place the turnovers on a hot dish. 

For Baked Apple Dumplings. 

1. We divide the paste into three portions. 

2. We take three apples, peel them, and cut out the core 
from the centre. 

N.B. — We must not cut the apples in pieces. 

3. We fill the centre of the apples with moist sugar. 

4. We press each apple into the centre of each portion of 
paste, and gradually work the paste over the apple, until the 
apple is entirely covered in. 

N.B. — We must be very careful to join the paste together as neatly as pos- 
sible, so as not to show the join ; and there must be no cracks in the 
paste. 

5. We grease a tin, as described above, place the 
dumplings on it, and put it in the oven to bake for a 
quarter of an hour. 

6. For serving we take the dumplings off the tin, and 
put them on a hot dish. 

1. If the paste is for a Fruit Pie, we roll it out to the 
shape of the pie dish, only a little larger, and to the thick- 
ness of about a quarter of an inch. 

2. We arrange the fruit in the pie dish, heaped up in the 
centre. 

3. We sprinkle a tablespoonful of moist sugar over the 
fruit, or more or less according to the fruit used. 

4. We take a. paste brush and wet the edge of the dish 
with water, or a little white of egg. 



Lessons on Making Pastry. — Short Crust. 289 

6. We cut a strip of tlie paste the width of the edge of tlte 
pie dish, and place it round the edge of the dish. 

6. We take the paste brush again and wet the edge of the 
paste with water or white of egg. 

7. We take the remaining paste and lay it over the pie 
dish, pressing it down with our thumb all round the edge. 

8. We must be very careful not to break the paste. 

9. We take a kfiife and trim off all the rough edges of the 
paste round the edge of the dish. 

10. We take a knife y and with the back of the blade we 
make little notches in the edge of the paste, pressing the paste 
firmly with our thumb to keep it in its proper place. 

11. We make a little hole in the paste of the tart, to let 
out the steam. 

12. We take the paste brush and wet the tart all over 
with water. 

13. We sprinkle some pounded loaf sugar over the tart, 
this is to glaze it. 

14. We now put the tart into a hot oven (the thermo- 
meter at the oven door should rise to 240 ) for half an hour, 
or three quarters of a?i hour, according to the size of the 
tart. We must watch it occasionally and turn it, to prevent 
its burning ; it should become a pale brown. It is then 
ready for serving, either hot or cold according to taste. 

N.B. — If a better crust is required for apple turnovers, &c„ see "Pastry," 
Lesson No. 2. 



290 National Training School for Cookery. 



PASTRY. 

Lesson No. 7. 

FLAKY CRUST FOR FRUIT PIES AND 
OPEN TARTS. 

Average cost of " Flaky Crust" (to cover a 
quart pie or tart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

f lb. of flour 3 

§ lb. of butter 8 

10 
Time required {for making the pastry) , about a quarter of an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Flaky Crust for pies 
or tarts. 

1. We put three-quarters of a pound of flour and a quarter 
of a saltspoonful of salt into a basin, and mix it into a 
stiff paste with water (about one gill). 

2. We flour a board, and turn the paste out on it. 

3. We take a rolling pin , flour it, and roll out the paste 
to a thin sheet. 

4. We divide the half-pound of butter into three portions. 

5. We take one portion of the butter and spread it all 
over the paste with a knife. 

6. We sprinkle a little flour over the butter, and fold the 
paste into three. 

7. We flour the rolling pin and roll out the paste, and 
spread another portion of the butter over it. 

8. We fold the paste as before, roll it out, and add the 
remainder of the butter. 



Lessons on Making Pastry. — Flaky Crust. 291 

9. We then fold the paste again, and roll it out to the 
size and thickness required either for a fruit pie or an open 
tart. 

N.B. — This crust should be baked in a quick oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240 ). 

N.B. — The top of a fruit pie should be brushed over with water, and then 
sprinkled with pounded white sugar. 

N.B. — For an open tart we take a tin (the size required) and grease it with 
clarified dripping or butter. We should roll out the paste to a thin 
sheet about a quarter of an inch in thickness, and rather larger than the 
size of the tin. We place the paste in the greased tin, pressing it into 
the shape of the tin with our thumb. We should place a dummy or a 
piece of crust of bread in the centre of the paste to prevent the paste from 
rising while baking. We put the tin in the oven to bake for twenty 
minutes. The jam should be put into the tart after it is baked. 



292 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. i. 

CABINET PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Cabinet Pudding " (about one pint 
and a half). 



INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 
1 doz. cherries or raisins and two or three ) * 

pieces of angelica J ° 2 

4 sponge cakes and | a doz. ratafias o 7 

1 oz. of loaf sugar and 15 drops of essence ) . 

ofVanilla } ° °* 

4 eggs o 4 

1 pint of milk o ■zS 

Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Cabinet Pudding. 

1. We take a pint and a half mould, and butter it inside 
with our fingers. 

2. We take a dozen raisins, or dried cherries, and two 
or three pieces of angelica, and ornament the bottom of the 
mould with them. 

3. We take four sponge cakes and break them in 
pieces. 

4. We partly fill the mould with pieces of cake and half a 
dozen ratafias. 

5. We take 4 yolks and 2 whites of eggs, and put them in 
a basin. 

6. We add to the eggs one ounce of white sugar, and whip 
them together lightly. 

7. We stir in by degrees one pint of milk. 

8. We flavour it by adding fifteen drops of essence of 
Vanilla. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — u Cabinet!' 293 

9. We pour this mixture over the cakes in the mould. 

10. We place a piece of buttered paper over the top of the 

mould. 

11. We take a saucepan half full of boiling water, and 
stand it on the side of the fire. 

12. We stand the mould in the saucepan to steam for 
from three quarters of an hour to an hour. 

N.B. — The water should only reach half-way up the mould, or it would boil 
over and spoil the puddi?ig. 

13. For serving, we turn the pudding carefully out of the 
mould on to a hot dish. 

N B.— For a cold " Cabinet Pudding," see " Puddings," Lesson No. 27. 



294 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 2. 

BAKED LEMON PUDDING. 

Average cost of "Lemon Pudding" {in about 1 pint dish). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 lemons o 3 

3 ozs. of loaf sugar „ o 1 

3 eggs o 3 

1 a gill of cream o 3 

\ a gill of milk o o\ 

2 ozs. of cake crumbs ) x 

\ inch of cinnamon stick J 2 " 1 

x of 
Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Lemon Pudding. 

1. We take two lemons, wipe them clean in a cloth, and, 
grate the rind of them on six lumps of sugar. 

2. We take a quarter of an inch of the stick of cinnamon 
and put it in a mortar. 

3. We pound the cinnamon well in the mortar with the 

sugar. 

4. We put this into a basin. 

5. We take three ounces of cake crumbs, and add them 
to the above in the basin, and mix all well together. 

6. We take the two lemons, cut them in halves, and 
squeeze the juice of them into the basin, through a strainer. 

7. We add the yolks of 'three eggs, and beat them in with 
the above. {Two of the whites of eggs we put on a plate, 
the other we put aside.) 

8. We stir in well and smoothly half a gill of cream, and 
half a gill of milk with a wooden spoon. 

9. We whip the whites of the two eggs to a stiff froth, 
with a knife, and add them at the last moment to the above 
mixture, stirring it lightly. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — " Lemon!' 2g5 

10. We take a pie dish, and line the edge of it with puff 
paste (see " Pastry," Lesson No. i). 

11. We pour the mixture into the pie dish. 

12. We put the pie dish in the oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise to 220°) to bake, till the mixture 
is set, and of a light brown colour ; it is then readv for 



296 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 3. 

APPLE CHARLOTTE. 

Average cost of" Apple Charlotte" {about one pint dish). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 lbs. of apples o 6 

\ lb. of loaf sugar o 2 

The rind of one lemon o 1 

Bread and clarified butter o 6| 

Time required, about two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make an Apple Charlotte. 

1. We take two pounds of good cooking apples, and peel 
them thinly with a sharp knife. 

2. We take a knife and cut them in slices, and take out 
the core. 

3. We put these sliced apples into a stewpan, with 
sufficient sugar to sweeten them, and one gill of water. 

4. We take a lemon, wipe it clean in a cloth, and peel it 

very thinly. 

5. We take the rind of the lemon, and tie it together with 
a piece of cotton, and put it in the stewpan with the apples, 

6. We put the stewpan on the fire, and stir well with a 
wooden spoon until it boils, and the apples are reduced to 
about half the quantity. It will take from one hour to one 
hour and a half. 

7. We take the stewpan off the fire, and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table, and we must take out the lemon 
peel. 

8. We take a plain round tin mould (about one pint). 

9. We cut a slice of the crumb of bread, one-eighth of an 
inch in thickness, and round to the size of the mould. 



Lessons on Puddings. — Apple Charlotte. 297 

10. We put a quarter of a pound of butter in a stewpan to 
melt and clarify. 

11. We must cut the rowid of bread into quarters, dip 
them in the clarified butter, and place them at the bottom 
of the mould. 

12. We now cut slices of the crumb of bread, one-eighth of 
an incJi in tJiickness, and the depth of the mould in length. 

13. We cut these slices into strips an i7ich wide. 

14. We dip these strips into the clarified butter, and place 
them round inside the mould, allowing them to lie half over 
each other. 

15. We must now pour the apples into the middle of the 
mould. 

16. We cover the apples with a round of bread dipped in 
the clarified bittter. 

17. We put the mould into the oven (the thermometer 
at the oven door should rise to about 220°) to bake for 
three-quarters of an hour. 

N.B. — The bread should be quite brown and crisp. 

18. For serving, we turn it carefully out of the mould on 
to a hot dish. 



298 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 4. 

PANCAKES. 

Average cost of " Pancakes " (about eight). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 
3 ozs. of flour 1 

2 eggs 2 

I a pint of milk i 

1 a saltspoonful of salt I x 

3 ozs. of lard ] 2 * 

The juice of half a lemon i 

2 ozs. of moist sugar. \ 



Time required, about twenty minutes. 



Now we will show you how we make Pancakes. 

1. We take three ounces of flour, and put it in a basin. 

2. We add half a saltspoonful of salt, and mix it well into 
the flour. 

3. We break two eggs into the flour, and add a dessert- 
spoonful of milk, and mix all well together with a wooden 
spoon. 

4. We stir in gradually half a pint of milk, making the 
mixture very smooth. 

N. B. — If possible it is better to let this mixture stand before frying it into 
pancakes. 

5. We put a fryingpan on the fire, and put into it a piece 
of lard the size of a nut, and let it get quite hot, but it must 
not burn. 

6. We then pour into the fryingpan two large table- 
spoonsful of the batter, and let it run thinly all over the 
pan. 

7. When the pancake has become a light brown on one 
side, we should shake the pan, and toss the pancake over, to 
brown the other side the same. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Pancakes. 299 

8. We should stand a plate on the hot-plate, or in the 
front of the fire to heat. 

9. When the pancake is fried, we turn it on to this heated 
plate. 

10. We should squeeze about fifteen drops of lemon juice, 
and sprinkle a teaspoonful of moist s?cgar over it. 

11. We now roll up the pancake, and place it on the edge 
of the plate, so as to leave room for the remainder of the 
pancakes. 

N. B. — We should fry all the pancakes in this manner, adding each time a 
piece of lard the size of a nut. 

12. For serving we arrange the pancakes on a hot dish, 
olacing one on the top of the other. 



o 



oo National Training School for Cookery. 



PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 5. 

RICE PUDDING. 

Average cost of "Rice Pudding" (about one pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\\ oz. of Carolina rice o\ 

Butter o\ 

1 tablespoonful of moist sugar o\ 

1 pint of milk 2t 

~3§ 

Time required, about two hours. 



Now we will show you how to make a plain Rice 
Pudding. 

1. We take a pint dish and butter it well inside. 

2. We take one ounce and a half of Carolina rice, and wash 
it well in two or* three waters. 

3. We put the rice into the buttered dish, and sprinkle 
over it a tablespoonful of moist sugar. 

4. We fill up the dish with milk. 

N.B. — Nutmeg may be grated, or pounded ctnnamon be sifted, over the top 
of the pudding before it is put in the oven. 

5. We put the dish into the oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door, should rise to about 220 ) to bake for two 
hours. 

6. We must watch it occasionally, and as the rice soaks 
up the milk, more milk should be added (carefully lifting 
up the skim and pouring the milk in at the side), so as to 
keep the dish always full. It is then ready for serving. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Custard. 301 
PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 6. 

CUSTARD PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Custard Pudding " (about one pinl 
and a half). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

4 eggs 4 

i pint of milk 2 

Grated nutmeg and salt ) x 

1 tablespoonful of castor sugar j ° z 

Butter and flour for paste 2 

it 

Time required, abozit thirty-five minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Cttstard Pudding, 

1. We take a pint and a half dish and line the dish 
throughout with paste (see " Pastry," Lesson No. 2). 

N.B. — The pudding can be made without paste, if preferred ; in which case 
the dish must be butttered inside. 

2. We break four eggs, put the yolks into a basin, with 
the whites of two eggs, and beat them well together (the 
others we put aside). 

3. We add a tablespoonful of castor sugar. 

4. We stir one pint of cold milk in with the eggs, and a 
quarter of a saltspoonful of salt. 

5. We pour this custard into the dish lined with paste. 

6. We grate half a teaspoonful of nutmeg over the top. 

7. We put the dish into a moderate oven (the thermo- 
meter at the oven door should rise to 2 20°) to bake for half 
an hour. It is then ready for serving. 






302 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 7. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

Average cost of "Plum, Pudding" {about two pounds). 



INGREDIENTS. 



INGREDIENTS. 



s. d. 

1 lb. of beef suet o 5 

2 lb. of currants o 3 

I lb. of sultanas or raisins .... o 3 
5 lb. of mixed candied peel, ) 

viz., citron, lemon & orange j ° 3 

£ lb. of bread crumbs ) 1 

i lb. of flour j ° 2 * 

J lb. of moist sugar o 2 

1 lemon o 2 

4 eggs 04 

1 gill (| pint) of milk o oh 

1 wineglassful of brandy o 6 

2 ozs. of almonds o ij 

5 of a teaspoonful of salt . . . . ) 

I a nutmeg j ° 



9h 



INGREDIENTS for Brandy or 

Wine Sauce. 



3 eggs 

1 gill of cream (or milk %d.) ... 
1 wineglassful of brandy or 
sherry 

1 dessertspoonful of sugar . . . 



Time required, about Jive hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Plum Pudding. 

1. We put a saucepan of warm- water on the fire to 
boil. 

2. We take half a pound of beef suet, put it on a board, 
cut away all the skin, and chop up the suet as finely as 
possible with a sharp knife. 

3. We take half a pound of currants, wash them clean in 
water, and rub them dry in a cloth. 

4. We take up the citrrants in handfuls, and drop them, 
a few at a time, on to a plate, so as to find out if there are 
any stones with them. 

5. We take half a pound of sultana raisins, and pick 
them over. 



N.B. — If large raisins are used, they should be stoned„ 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Plum. 303 

6. We place a wire sieve over a piece of paper. 

7. We take some crumb of bread and rub it through the 
sieve. (There should be a quarter of a pound of bread 
crumbs) 

8. We take a quarter of a pound of mixed peel, citron, 
lemon, and orange, and cut it up into small pieces. 

9. We put a quarter of a pound of flour into a kitchen 
basin, and add to it the chopped suet, and half a teaspoonful 
of salt. 

10. We rub the suet well into the flour with our hands, 

N.B. — We should be careful not to leave any lumps. 

11. We now add the bread crumbs, the currants and 
raisins, half a pound of moist sugar, and the pieces of 
candied peel, and mix all well together. 

12. We take a lemon, wipe it clean in a cloth, and grate 
the rind of it into the basin. 

13. We also grate half a nutmeg into the basin, and add 
two ounces of almonds (previously blanched and chopped 
up finely). 

14. We break four eggs into a basin, and add to them 
one gill (quarter of a pint) of milk and a wineglassful of 
brandy. 

15. We stir this into the ingredients in the basin, mixing 
them all together. 

16. We take a strong pudding-cloth, sprinkle about a 
teaspoonful of flour over it, and lay it in a basin. 

17. We turn the mixture from the basin into the centre 
of the floured cloth. 

18. We tie up the pudding tightly in the cloth with a piece 
of string. 

N.B. — If preferred, the pudding might be put into a buttered mould and a 
.cloth tied over the top. 

19. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the puddingy and let it boil for five hours. 



304 National Training School for Cookery. 

20. For serving, we take the pudding out of the cloth 
and turn it on to a hot dish. 

N.B. — Brandy or wine sauce (see below) can be served with the pudding if 
liked, either poured over it or served separately in a sauce boat. 



For Brandy or Wine Sauce. 

1. We put three yolks of eggs into a small stewpan. 

2. We add a dessertspoonful of castor sugar, one gill (a 
quarter of a pint) of cream or milk, and a wineglassfid of 
brandy or sherry, and whisk all well together with a whisk. 

3. We take a saucepan, fill it half full of hot water, and 
put it on the fire. 

4. We stand the stewpan in the saucepan of hot water, 
and whisk the sauce well for about six or eight minictes. 

N.B. — We must be careful that the sauce does not boil, or it will curdle. 

5. After that time we take the stewpan out of the 
saucepan. 

6. We pour the sauce over the plum pudding (see above) 
or into a sauce-boat for serving. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Vemioise. 305 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 8. 

VENNOISE PUDDING. 

Average cost of a "Vemioise Pudding" {one pint and a 
half mould). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

5 oz. of crumb of bread o 2 

2 ozs. of candied peel o 2 

3 ozs. of castor sugar ) ± 

1 oz. of lump sugar J ° Ji 

1 lemon o 2 

4 eggs o 4 

\ a pint of milk o i\ 

1 gill (5 pint) of cream o 6 

3 ozs. of Sultana raisins o 1^ 

1 wineglassful of sherry o 6 

2 z\ 

Time required, about two hours. 



Now we will show you how to make a Vemioise 
Pudding. 

1. We take a piece of stale crumb of bread (about five 
ounces), put it upon a board, and cut it up in the shape of 
dice. 

2. We put the bread into a basin with three ounces of 
castor sugar and three ounces of sultana raisins. 

3. We take a lemon, wipe it clean with a cloth, and grate 
the rind of it into the basin. 

4. We chop up two ounces of candied peel and put it into 
the basin. 

5. We pour in a wineglassful of sherry. 

6. We put a saucepan of warm water on the fire to 
boil. 

7. We put one ounce of lump sugar into a stewpan, and 
put it on the fire to brown. 

8. When it has become a dark brown liquid we add to 



306 National Training School for Cookery. 

it half a pint of milk, and stir it until the milk is sufficiently 
coloured. 

N.B. — We must be careful that the sugar is quite dissolved, that there be 
no lumps left. 

9. We then stand the stewpan on a piece of paper on the 
table. 

10. We put the yolks of four eggs into a basin (the whites 
we should put aside, as they are not required for present 
use). 

11. We pour the coloured milk into the eggs, stirring well 
all the time. 

12. We stir the milk and eggs into the ingredients in the 
basin. 

13. We also add one gill (a quarter of a pint) of cream. 

14. We take a pint and a half mould and butter it inside. 

15. We pour the pudding into the mould. 

16. We butter a piece of kitchen paper and lay it over 
the top of the mould. 

17. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
place in the mould to steam (the water should only reach 
half way up the mould, or it will boil over and get into the 
pudding). 

18. We let the pudding steam for one hour and a half. 

19. For serving, we take the buttered paper off from the 
top; of the mould, and turn the pudding out carefully on to 
a hot dish. 

N.B. — German Sauce (see " Puddings," Lesson No. io) can be served with 
the pudding if liked, either poured round it, or served separately in a 

sa i iceboat. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Amber. 307 



PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 9. 

AMBER PUDDING. 

Average cost of an " Amber Pudding" (one pint dish). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

6 apples o 4 

3 ozs. of moist sugar o 1 

1 lemon o 2 

2 ozs. of butter o 3 

3 e g& s o 3 

Putt paste o 4 

1 5 

Time required, about one hour and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make an Amber Pudding. 

1. We take six large apples, peel them, cut out the core, 
and cut them up into slices. 

2. We put the apples into a stewpan with three oimces of 
moist sugar, and two ounces of butter. 

3. We take a lemon, wipe it clean with a cloth, and peel 
it as thinly as possible with a sharp knife. 

4. We cut the lemon in half and squeeze the juice through 
a strainer into the stewpan. 

5. We also add the lemon peel. 

6. We put the stewpan on the fire and let it stew till the 
apples are quite tender (it will take about three-quarters oj 
an hour). 

7. We place a hair sieve over a large basin. 

8. When the apples are sufficiently stewed, we pour them 
on to the sieve and rub them through into the basin with a 
wooden spoon. 

9. We stir the yolks of three eggs into the basin. 

u 2 



308 National Training School for Cookery. 

10. We take a pie-dish (about one pint), and line the edge 
with puff paste (see " Pastry," Lesson No. i). 

N.B. — If we have, no puff paste, short paste (see "Pastry," Lesson No. 2) 
will do. 

11. We pour the mixture into the pie-dish, and put it in 
the oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise to 
240 ) for twenty minutes. 

12. We whip the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth. 

13. When the pudding is a light brown, we take it out 
spread the whipped whites of the eggs over the top, and sift 
about a dessertspoonful of castor sugar over it. 

14. We put the dish back in the oven till the icing is a 
light brown ; the pudding is then ready for serving. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Brown Bread. 309 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 10. 

BROWN BREAD PUDDING. 

Average cost of a " Brown Bread Pudding and German 
Sauce" (one pint mould). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

A loaf of brown bread o 2 

1 lemon o 2 

Half a teaspoonful of essence of Vanilla. . "1 



3 ozs. of castor sugar 



1 gill (i pint) of milk o of 

1 gill ( \ pint) of cream o 6 

4 eggs , o 4 

1 4l 

German Sauce. 

2 eggs o 2 

1 vvineglassful of sherry o 6 

1 dessertspoonful of castor sugar o o\ 

o 8| 
Time required, about one hour and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Brown Bread 
Pudding. 

1. We take a stale brown loaf and cut off all the crust. 

2. We put a wire sieve over a plate and rub the crumb 
cf bread through it. 

3. We put one gill (quarter of a pint) of milk into a 
stewpan, and put it on the fire to boil. 

4. We put five ounces of the bread cnmib into a basin, 
with three ounces of castor sugar. 

5. We take a lemon, wipe it clean in a cloth, and grate 
the rind over the bread crumbs. 

6. We also add half a teaspoonfid of essence of Vanilla. 

7. We put a stewpan full of warm water on the fire to 

bull. 



310 National Training School for Cookery. 

8. When the milk boils we pour it over the crumbs. 

9. We put one gill (quarter of a pint) of cream into a 
basin, and whip it to a stiff froth with a whisk. 

10. We add the cream to the other ingredients, and also 
stir in one at a time the yolks of 'four eggs (the whites of two 
of the eggs we put on a plate, the others we put aside). 

11. We whip the whites of the two eggs to a stiff froth 
with a knife, and then stir them lightly into the basin, 
mixing all the ingredients together. 

12. We take -&pint mould and butter it well inside. 

13. We pour the mixture into the mould, butter a piece 
of kitchen paper, and place it over the top. 

14. When the water in the stewpan is quite boiling, we 
stand the mould in it to steam the pudding (the water 
should only reach half-way up the mould, or it will boil 
over and spoil the pudding). 

15. We let it steam for one hour and a quarter. 

16. For serving we take off the buttered paper, and turn 
the pnddtng on to a hot dish. 



GERMAN SAUCE. 



1. We put the yolks of two eggs into a stewpan with a 
wineglassful of sherry and a dessertspoonfid of castor sugar. 

2. We put the stewpan on the fire and mill it with a 
whisk till it comes to a thick froth. 

N.B. — We must be careful that the sauce does not boil, or it will curdle. 

3. We pour the sauce round the pudding ; it is ready for 
serving. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Carrot. 3 1 1 

PUDDINGS. 
Lesson No. it. 

CARROT PUDDING. 

Average cost of a u Carrot Pudding" {one pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

\ lb. of carrots o 1 

3 ozs. of bread crumbs o 1 

2 ozs. of butter o 2 

\ a gill of cream o 3 

2 eggs o 2 

\ a gill of sherry o 3 

1 oz. of castor sugar o 1 

1 tablespoonful of orange flower water .... o i£ 

Puff paste o 4 

j_3 

Time required, about three quarters of an hottr. 



Now we will show you how to make a Carrot Puddi?ig. 

1. We take a quarter of a pound of carrots, wash them 
and scrape them clean with a knife. 

2. We take a grater, and grate all the red part of the 
carrots into a basin. 

3. We stand a wire sieve over a plate. 

4. We take some crumb of bread, and rub it through the 
sieve, there should be about three ounces of bread crumbs. 

5. We put the bread crumbs into the basin with the 
carrot, we also add one oimce of castor sugar. 

6. We put two ounces of 'butter into a stewpan, and put it 
on the fire to melt. 

7. When the butter is melted, we take the stewpan off 
the fire, and stand it on a piece of paper on the table. 

8. We then stir into it half a gill (one gill is a quarter of 
a pint) of sherry, half a gill of cream, and a tablespoonful of 
orange flower water. 



3T2 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We also add the yolks of two eggs (the whites we put 
on a plate). 

10. We whip the whites of the two eggs to a stiff froth 
with a knife, and then stir them lightly into the stewpan, 
mixing all the ingredients together. 

. 11. We then pour the contents of the stewpan into the 
basin with the carrot and bread crumbs, and mix them well 
together. 

12. W T e take a pie-dish (about one pint) and line the 
edge of it with puff paste (see " Pastry," Lesson No i). 

13. We pour the pudding into the pie-dish, and put it 
into the oven (the thermometer at the oven door should 
rise to 240 ) to bake for half an hour; it is then ready for 
serving. 



Lessons on Making Puddings.- — Alexandra. 313 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 12. 

ALEXANDRA PUDDING. 

Average cost of an "A lexandra Pudding" {one pint and half) , 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

10 eggs o 10 

2 ozs. of castor sugar o i 

1 gill (\ pint) of milk o of 

£ a pint of good cream i o 

1 teaspoonful of essence of Vanilla o i 



2 o: 



Time required, about one hour and twenty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make an Alexandra 
Pudding. 

1. We put a saucepan of warm water on the fire to boil. 

2. We put the yolks of ten eggs into a basin (the whites 
of five of the eggs we put in another basin, the others we 
put aside). 

3. We stir into the yolks of the eggs two ounces of castor 
sugar. 

4. We also add one gill (quarter of a pint) of milk and 
half a pint of good cream, 

5. We whip the whites of the five eggs slightly with a 
whisk or knife. 

6. We take a plain tin mould (about one pint and a half 
and butter it inside, we cover the bottom with three rounds 
of buttered paper. 

7. We add the whipped whites of the eggs, and a teaspoon* 
ful of essence of Vanilla to the mixture in the basin, and stir 
all lightly together. 

8. We pour the mixture through a strainer, into the 
mould, and tie over it a piece of stiff paper with a string. 



314 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. When the water in the saucepan boils we stand in 
the mould. (The water should only reach half way up the 
mould, or it will boil over and spoil the pudding?) 

10. We let it simmer gently until the pudding is quite 
firm. (It will take about one hour and a quarter?) 

N.B. — It must on no account boil fast. 

11. After that time we take the pudding out of the sauce- 
pan and stand it in ice. 

12. For serving, we take off the buttered paper and turn 
the pudding carefully out on to a dish, and ornament it 
with red currant jelly according to taste. 



Lessons on Making Puddings, — Blanc- Mange. 315 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 13. 

BLANC-MANGE. 

Average cost of " Blanc-mange" (about one quart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

a. 

4. tablespoonsful of cornflour 2 

1 quart of milk 4 

3 ozs. of loaf sugar. . j 

1 inch of the stick of cinnamon or lemon peel j r 

7 

Time required, about a quarter of an /wur to make, and about three quarters uf 
an hour to get cold. 



Now we will show you how to make a Blanc-mange. 

1. We put one quart of milk into a saucepan with three 
ounces of loaf sugar, and one inch of the stick of cinnamon or 
the peel of a quarter of a lemon for flavouring. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. 

3. We put four tablespoonsful of cornflour into a basin 
and mix it smoothly with a tablespoonful of cold milk. 

4. When the milk in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
stir in the cornflour quickly and let it boil for two minutes, 
stirring continually. 

N.B. — We must be very careful not to let it get lumpy. 

5. We take a quart basin or a mould and rinse it out in 
cold water. 

6. We now take the piece of cinnamon or lemon peel 
out of the cornflour, and pour the cornflour into the basin, 
and stand it aside to cool. 

7. When the blanc-mange is quite cold, we turn it out of 
the basin on to a dish, and it is ready for serving. 

N.B. — If liked the blanc-mange may be served with jam — or with custard- 
sauoc (see Souffle's, Lesson No. r). 



316 National Training School for Cookery, 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 14. 

BOILED BATTER PUDDING. 

Average cost of a " Boiled Batter Pudding? (about a pint 
and a, half}. 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

6 oz. of flour ) 

Salt ( z 

3 e ggs 3 

1 pint of milk 2% 

~h 

Time required, about two hours and fifteen minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Boiled Batter 
Pudding. 

1. We put a saucepan of warm water on the fire to boil. 

2. We put six ounces of flour into a basin and mix half 
a saltspoonful of salt with it. 

3. We break three eggs into the flour, and beat them well 
together. 

4. We now add by degrees one pint of milk, stirring very 
smoothly all the time, until the batter is well mixed. 

5. We take a pudding basin and grease it inside with 
butter. 

6. We stir the batter, and then pour it into the basin. 

7. We wring out a pudding cloth in warm and then cold 
water, and flour it well. 

8. We place the cloth over the batter, and tie it on 
securely with a piece of string, just below the rim of the 
basin. We tie the four corners of the cloth over the top. 

9. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling we 
put in the pudding, and let it boil for one hoiir and a half 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Boiled Batter. 317 

10. For serving, we take the basin out of the saucepan, 
take off the cloth, and turn the pudding carefully out on a 
hot dish. 



318 National Training School for Cookery. 



PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 15. 

CORNFLOUR PUDDING. 

Average cost of a " Cornflour Pudding" (in a cup). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 teaspoonful of cornflour oh 

J pint of milk of 

4 lumps of sugar 03 

1 egg i" 

Z 4 

Time required, about three quarters of an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Cornflour Pudding 
(in a cup, for infants or invalids). 

1. We put a saucepan half full of warm water on the fire 
to boil. 

2. We put one teaspoonful of cornflour into a sauce- 
pan. 

3. We pour in by degrees a quarter of a pint of milk, 
mixing it very smoothly. 

N.B. — We must be careful that it does not get lumpy. 

4. We now add to it four lumps of sugar, put the sauce- 
pan on the fire and stir smoothly until it boils ; it will take 
about ten minutes. 

5. We then move the saucepan to the side of the fire. 

6. We break one egg into the saucepan, and beat it up 
until it is all well mixed. 

N.B. — If liked, the pudding can be flavoured with essence of vanilla, about 
five drops should be added. 

7. We take a cup (just large enough to hold the, pudding), 
and grease it inside with a piece of butter. 

8. We pour the mixture out of the saucepan into the 
cup. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Cornflour. 319 



9. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
stand in the cup (but we must be careful that the water 
only comes halfway up the cup, or it will boil over and 
get into the cup), and let it steam for twenty-five minutes. 

10. For serving, we take out the cup, and the pudding 
may be turned out or not, according to taste. 



320 National Training School for Cookery. 



PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 16. 

BATTER PUDDING. 

Average cost of a " Batter Pudding" (in a cup). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i egg i 

i dessertspoonful of flour J 

i teacupful of milk \ x 

Salt I a 



Fime required, about thirty-five minutes to make and thirty minutes to stand. 

Now we will show you how to make Batter Pudding 
(in a cup for infants or invalids). 

1. We put a saucepan half full of warm water on the fire 
to boil. 

2. We put a dessertspoonful of flour into a ibasin with a 
few groAns of salt. 

3. We break one egg into the basin and mix it well into 
the flour. 

4. We now add by degrees a teacupfid of milk, stirring 
vigorously with a wooden spoon. 

5. We let the batter stand for half an hour. 

6. After that time we take a cup (just large enough to hold 
the batter) and grease it well inside with a piece of butter. 

7. We stir the batter, and then pour it into the cup. 

8. We take a small cloth, wring it out in boiling water, 
flour it well, and tie it over the top of the cup, with a piece 

of string. 

N.B. — We tie the four corners of the cloth together over the top of the cup. 

9. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the cup, and let it boil for three quarters of an hottr. 

10. For serving, we take the cloth off the cup, and the 
pudding may be turned out or not, according to taste. 

Now it is finished. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Cornftoiir. 32 1 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 17. 

CORNFLOUR PUDDING. 

Average cost of a " Cornflour Pudding " (about one quart; 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

4 tablespoonsful of cornflour I 

1 quart of milk 5 

3 tablespoonsful of pounded sugar 1 

2 eggs 2 

1 inch of the stick of cinnamon or a bay leaf ( , 

1 ol 



Grated nutmeg 



91 



Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Cornflour Pudding. 

1. We put four tablespoons/id of cornflour into a basin, 
and mix it quite smooth with a tablespoonfid of cold milk. 

2. We put the remainder of the quart of milk into a 
saucepan with three tablespoonsfid of pounded sicgar and one 
inch of the stick of cinnamon or a bay deaf. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. 

4. When the milk boils we pour it on to the mixture^ 
stirring it smoothly all the time. 

5. We break two eggs into the cornflour, and beat it up 
lightly. 

6. We take a quart pie-dish and grease it inside with 
butter. 

7. We pour the mixture into the pie-dish, and grate half 
a teaspoonful of nutmeg over the top. 

8. We put the dish into the oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise to 220 ) to bake for half an hour. 

9. It will then be ready for serving. 



322 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 18. 

RICE PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Rice Pudding" (about one quart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of rice i \ 

i quart of milk 5 

2 eggs 2 

2 oz. of moist sugar , of 

2 oz. of suet . . . , , 1 

Grated nutmeg , oj 

Time required, from forty minutes to an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Rice Pudding. 

1. We wash half a pound of rice in two or three waters, 
and then put it into a saucepan of cold water, and put it on 
the fire till it boils and swells. 

2. We break two eggs into a basin. 

3. We add to them two ounces of moist sugar and one 
quart of milk, and stir them together. 

4. We put two ounces of suet on a board, cut away all 
the skin, and shred it as finely as possible. 

5. We take a qitart dish, and grease it inside with clarified 
dripping or butter. 

6. We drain off the rice on a colander as dry as possible, 
and lay it in the greased dish. 

7. We pour the mixture of milk and eggs over the rice, 
and sprinkle the shredded sitet over the top. 

8. We take a grater, and grate half a teaspoonful of 
nittmeg over the top. 

9. We put the dish into an oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 220°) to bake for, from forty 
minutes to an hour. 

10. After that time it is ready for serving. 



L essons on Making Puddings. — Curates. 323 



PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 19. 

CURATE'S PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Curates Pudding" (about one quart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 lb. of potatoes i 

3 eggs 3 

1 pint of milk 2| 

Sugar , o\ 

7 
Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Curates or Sweet 
Potato Pudding. 

1. We take one pound of potatoes, wash them, and boil 
them as described (see " Vegetables," Lesson No. 1). 

N.B. — Any remains of cold boiled potatoes could be used instead of fresh 
ones. 

2. We rub these boiled potatoes through a colander into 
a basin with a wooden spoon. 

3. We break three eggs into another basin, and stir into 
them one pint of milk. 

4. We stir the milk and eggs smoothly into the potatoes, 
and sweeten it with sugar according to taste. 

5. We take a quart pie dish, grease it inside, and pour 
the mixture into it. 

6. We put the pie dish in the oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise to 220 ) to bake for half an hour; 
it will then be ready for serving. 



X n 



324 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 20. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Bread Pudding" {one pint and a half). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 lb. of scraps of bread ih 

1 pint of milk 2| 

2 eggs 2 

2 tablespoonsful of moist sugar Oj 

4 oz. of raisins or currants i 

2 oz. of suet i| 

Time reqicired, three quarters of an hour. 

Now we will show you how to make a Bread Pudding. 

1. We put one pound of scraps of bread into a basin, with 
plenty of cold water to soak. 

N.B. — Any scraps of bread, either crumb or crust, however stale, so long as 
they are not mouldy or burnt, can be used for this pudding. 

2. We put one quart of milk into a saucepan, and put it 
on the fire to boil. 

3. We put into the milk a piece of butter the size of a 
nut, to prevent it from burning. 

4. We take the bread out of the basin and squeeze out 
all the water. 

5. We empty the water out of the basin, and put back 
the bread. 

6. When the milk boils we pour it over the bread, and 
let the bread soak until it is soft. 

7. We break two eggs into a small basin, add to them 
two tablespooftsful of moist sugar, and beat them lightly 
together. 

8. We take four ounces of large raisins and stone them, 
or, if currants are preferred, we should wash them, dry them 
in a cloth, and pick them over to see there are no stones 
with them. 



Lessons on Making Puddings, — Bread Pudding, 325 

9. We take two ounces of suet, put it on a board, cut 
away the skin, and chop it up finely. 

10. We now beat the bread up with a fork as smooth as 
possible. 

11. We put in the raisins or currants, the chopped suet, 
the eggs, and sugar, and mix them all well together. 

12. We take a pint and a half pie dish or tin, grease it 
well inside, and pour in the mixture. 

13. We put it in the oven (the thermometer at the oven 
door should rise to 220 ) to bake, for half an hour ; it will 
then be ready for serving. 



326 National Training School for Coo!: cry 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 21. 

TREACLE PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Treacle Pudding" {one quart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 lb. of flour 2j 

5 lb. of suet 2 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder } 

Salt \ o£ 

1 teaspoonful of ground ginger ) 

About a \ lb. of treacle i 

About 5 of a pint of milk o\ 

1 egg . 1 

T 
/ 

Time required, two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Treacle Pudding. 

1. We put a large saucepan of warm water on the fire to 
boil. 

2. We take a quarter of a pound of suet, put it on a board, 
cut away the skin, and chop up the suet as finely as possible. 

3. We put one pound of flour into a basin with a little 
salt, and one teaspoonful of baking powder. 

4. We add the chopped suet and one teaspoonful of ground 
ginger, and mix all well together with a spoon. 

5. We put a quarter of a pound of treacle into a basin 
with a quarter of a pint of milk and one egg, and mix them 
together. 

N.B. — If liked, rather more treacle can be added. 

6. We stir this into the mixture in the basin, and add 
more milk if required to make the pudding moist. 

N.B. — When the pudding is mixed it should be rather stiff. 

7. We take a quart basin, grease it well inside, and pour 
the mixture into it. 

N.B. — We should be careful that the basin is full, for if not quite full the 
water will ge< into it and spoil the pudding. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Treacle. 327 

8. We sprinkle some flour over the top of the padding, 
put a cloth over it, and tie it tightly down with a piece of 
string, just below the rim of the basin, and tie the corners 
of the cloth together. 

9. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the pudding, and let it boil for two hours. 

10. For serving, we take the pudding out of the saucepan, 
take off the cloth, place a hot dish over the pudding, and 
turn it carefully out of the basin. 



328 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 22. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Plum Pudding" {about a pound). 

INGREDIENTS, 

d. 

5 oz. of bread crumbs i \ 

7 oz. of flour o\ 

\ lb. of suet . 2 

\ lb. of raisins i \ 

\ lb. of currants x\ 

2 oz. of moist sugar o| 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder o \ 

2 eggs 2 

I gill (I pint) of milk o| 

10 

Time required, two a?id a half hours. 



Now we will show you how to make a Plum Pudding. 

1. We put a large saucepan of warm water on the fire to 
boil. 

2. We stand a grater on a piece of paper, and grate some 

bread crumbs ; there should be five ounces. 

3. We take a quarter of a pound of suet and put it on a 
board. 

4. We take a knife, cut away all the skin, and chop up 
the suet as finely as possible. 

5. We should sprinkle flour over the suet to prevent it 
sticking to the board or knife. 

6. We take a quarter of a pound of currants, wash them 
well in cold water, and rub them dry in a cloth. 

7. We take up the currants in handsful and drop them, a 
few at a time, on to a plate, so as to find out if there are 
any stones mixed with the currants. 

8. We take a qtiarter of a pound of large raisins and' 
stone them. 



Lessons o?i Making Puddings. — Plum Pudding. 329 

9. We put seven ounces of flour into a basin, and add 
to it the chopped suet, quarter of a saltspoonfid of salt, and a 
tea spoonful of baking poivder. 

10. We rub the suet well into the flour with our hands. 

N.B. — We should be careful not to leave any lumps. 

11. We now add the bread crumbs, the currants and 
raisins, two ounces of moist sugar, and mix all well with 
a wooden spoon. 

N.B. — If preferred, treacle may be used instead of sugar. 

12. We break two eggs into a basin, add to them one gill 
(a quarter of a pint) of milk and beat them up. 

13. We now stir the milk and eggs into the pudding and 
mix all well together. 

14. We take a cloth, wring it out of hot water, Hour it, 
and lay it over a quart basin. 

N.B. — We should be careful that the cloth is strong and that there are no 
holes in it. 

15. We turn the mixture from the basin into the centre 
of the floured cloth. 

16. We hold up the four corners of the cloth and tie up 
the pudding tightly with a piece of string. 

17. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the pudding, and let it boil for two hours. 

N.B. — The lid should be on the saucepan. 

18. For serving, we take the pudding out of the cloth 
and turn it on to a hot dish. 



330 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 23. 

TAPIOCA AND APPLES. 

Average cost of " Stewed Tapioca and Apples." 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 tablespoonsful of Tapioca o| 

6 apples 4 

4 cloves and the peel and juice of half a lemon i 

3 tablespoonsful of sugar o§ 

6 

Time required {after the tapioca has soaked twelve hours), about three- 
quarters of an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a stew of Tapioca 
and Apples. 

1. We put two tablespoonsful of tapioca into a basin with 
one pint of water, and let it soak for twelve hours. 

N.B.— This should be done over-night. 

2. We take six apples, peel, quarter, and core them. 

3. We put three tablespoonsful of sugar into a saucepan 
with half a pint of cold water, put it over the fire and stir, 
until it has reduced and become a thick syrup. 

4. We take half a lemon, wipe it clean with a cloth, and 
peel it very thinly with a sharp knife. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to cut any of the white, as it is very bitter. 

5. We put the soaked tapioca into a large saucepan, add 
the syrupy the lemon peel, and four cloves. 

6. We put the saucepan on the fire and stir it well until 
it boils. 

N.B. — We should be careful not to let any stick to the bottom. 

7. We let it boil for ten minutes, until the tapioca has 
become clear. 

8. After that time we put the apples into the saucepan^ 






Lessons on Puddings. — Tapioca and Apples. 



oo 



arranging them at the bottom, so that they are covered 
with the tapioca. 

9. We move the saucepan to the side of the fire and let 
the apples stew gently for from fifteen to thirty minutes, 
according to their size. 

10. We must not let them boil, or they will break. 

11. We now squeeze the juice of the half 'lemon over the 
apples, and stir carefully. 

12. When they are stewed quite tender, we take them 
out of the saucepan and put them on a dish. 

13. We take the lemon peel and the cloves out of the 
tapioca sauce, and colour the sauce (if liked) by adding 
half a teaspoonful of cochineal. 

14. We now pour the tapioca sauce over the apples. It is 
then ready for serving. 



332 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS 

Lesson No. 24. 

BOILED LEMON PUDDING. 

Average cost of a "Boiled Lemon Pudding" (in about one 

pint basin}) 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of bread crumbs 2 

\ lb. of suet r z\ 

2 oz. of flour o{ 

J lb. of moist sugar 1 

2 lemons 3 

2 eggs 2 

2 tablespoonsful of milk . ok 

777/z* required, about two hours. 



Now we will show you how to make a Lemon Pudding, 

1. We put a large saucepan full of water on the fire to boil. 

2. We put a quarter of a pound of suet on a board, cut 
away all the skin, and chop it up finely. 

3. We put two ounces of flour m a basin, and add to it 
the chopped suet y and rub the suet well into the flour with 
our fingers. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to leave any lumps. 

4. We place a wire sieve over a plate ; we take half a 
pound of the cntmb of bread, and rub it through the sieve, 
we add these bread crumbs to theflour and suet ; we also 
add a quarter of a pound of moist sugar. 

5. We take two lemons, wipe them clean with a cloth, 
and grate the rinds of them into the basin ; we then cut the 
lemons in half, and squeeze in the juice of both the lemons; 
we must be careful not to let the pips fall into the 
basin : we mix all these ingredients well together. 

6. We break two eggs into a basin ; and add to them two 
tablespoonsful of milk and beat them together. 



Lessons on Ptiddings. — Boiled Lemon Pudding. 333 

7. We now pour the eggs and milk on to the other 
ingredients, and mix them well together. 

8. We take a small pint basin, and butter it well inside, 
we pour the mixture into the basin ; we take a clean cloth, 
wring it out in hot, and then in cold water, sprinkle a 
little Jtour over it, and tie it over the top of the basin, with 
a piece of string. 

9. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the pitdding, and let it boil, for one hour and a half. 

10. For serving we take the pudding out of the saucepan, 
take off the cloth, and turn the pudding carefully out on to 
a hot dish. 



334 National Training School for Cookery. 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 25. 

SEMOLINA PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Semolina Pudding." 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ pint milk i \ 

1 tablespoonful semolina o| 

1 egg 1 

1 dessertspoonful moist sugar ( i 

Butter and nutmeg J ° 2 



31 

Time required, about twenty-five minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Semolina Pudding. 

1. We put half a pint of milk and one tablespoonful of 
semolina into a saucepan. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire and stir occasionally 
until it boils and swells, then we set it by the side of the 
lire. 

3. We break one egg into a basin and add to it a dessert- 
spoonful of moist sugar and beat them lightly together with 
a fork. 

4. We take a three-quarters of a pint pie-dish and grease 
it inside with a piece of butter. 

5. When the semolina is sufficiently cool, we stir in lightly 
the sweetened egg. 

6. We pour this mixture into the pie-dish. 

7. We take a grater and a nutmeg and grate a quarter of 
a teaspoonful over the mixture. 

8. We put the dish into the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 2 20°) to bake for a quarter of an 
hour, and it is ready for serving. 

N.B. Puddings can be made in the same way with sago, tapioca, or rice. 



Lessons on Puddings. — Baked Batter. 335 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 26. 

BAKED BATTER PUDDING WITH FRUIT. 

Average cost of "Batter and Fruit Pudding" {one pint 
and a half). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of flour of 

Salt ( 1 

\ pint milk j I+ 

2 e<?gs 2 

\ lb. fruit of 

I oz. butter oV 

Sugar o\ 

Time required, about forty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Batter Pudding 
with fruit in it. 

1. We take a quarter of a pound of floitr and put it in a 
basin. 

2. We add a quarter of a teaspoonful of salt. 

3. We stir in gradually half a pint of milk. 

4. When it has become sufficiently liquid, we should beat 
it with a spoon instead of stirring it, as that will make it 
lighter. 

5. We break an egg into a cup, and then add it to the 
batter, beating it up lightly all the time, until it is thoroughly 
mixed. 

6. We then break a second egg into the cup and add it to 
the batter y mixing it thoroughly as before. 

N.B. — Eggs should always be broken separately into a cup to see if they are 
good before cooking. 

The more the batter is beaten the lighter it becomes. 

7. We take a pint and a half pie-dish and grease it well 
inside with butter. 

8„ We pour the batter into the pie-dish. 



336 National Training School for Cookery. 



9. We take a quarter of a pound of damsons (or any 
other fruit), and wipe them with a cloth to be sure that 
they are quite clean. 

10. We sprinkle the fruit into the batter > and put two or 
three bits of butter on the top to prevent its being dry. 

N.B. — If preferred the fruit can be omitted. 

11. We put the pie-dish into the oven (the thermometer 
at the oven door should rise to 220°) to bake for half an 
hour. 

12. After that time we take the pie-dish out of the oven 
and sprinkle some sugar over the top, and it is ready for 

serving. 

N.B. — Sugar should, of course, be eaten with the batter pudding. 

N.B. — If sugar were added to the batter before it was baked it would make 
it heavy. 









Lessons on Making Puddings. — Cold Cabinet t>Z7 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 27. 

COLD CABINET PUDDING. 

Average cost of a "Cold Cabinet P lidding" {one pint mould). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

6 sponge finger biscuits o 3 

2 oz. ratafias o 2 

\ pint of milk o 1 \ 

\ oz. of best gelatine o \\ 

The yolks of 4 eggs o 4 

2 oz. of dried cherries I , 

Two or three pieces of angelica j ° I 3 

\ a gill of cream o 3 

1 teaspoonful of essence of vanilla \ 

I tablespoonful of castor sugar \ ° 2 

Time required to make, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Cold Cabinet 
Pudding. 

1. We take a pint mould and ornament the bottom of it 
(according to taste) with the dried cherries, and pieces oj 
angelica. 

2. We split the sponge-biscuits in half, and line the inside 
of the tin with them and the ratafias in the moidd. 

N.B. — We must place the biscuits only round the sides of the tin (not over 
the bottom), arranging them alternately back and front next the tin. 

3. We break four eggs, put the yolks in a basin (the 
whites we put aside, as they are not required for present 
use), and beat them well with a wooden spoon. 

4. We stir half a pint of milk into the eggs, and pour 
the mixture into a jug. 

5. We take a saucepan, fill it half full of hot water, and 
put it on the fire to boil, when the water boils we move 
the saucepan to the side of the fire. 



338 National Training Sctiool for Cookery. 

6. We stand the jug in the saucepan, and stir the custard 
very smoothly until it thickens and becomes the substance 
of cream, but it must not boil or it will curdle. 

7. We put half an ounce of gelatine in a small stewpan 
or gallipot, with a tablespoonful of water ; and stand it near 
the fire to melt. 

8. When the custard is sufficiently thick, we take the 
jug out of the saucepan and stand it aside to cool. 

N.B.— We should place a piece of paper over the mouth of the jug to pre- 
vent the dust getting in. 

9. We stir the gelatine until it is quite melted. 

10. We pour the melted gelatine through a strainer into 
the custard. 

11. We also add half a gill (one gill is a quarter of a 
pint) of cream, a teaspoonful of essence of vanilla, and a table- 
spoonful of castor sugar. 

12. We pour it all on the cakes in the mould. 

13. We stand the mould in a cold place to set; in 
summer time it should be placed on ice. 

14. When the pudding is quite cold and set, we turn it 
out carefully on to a dish, and it is ready for serving. 









Lessons on Making Puddings. — Suet Pudding. 339 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 28. 

SUET PUDDING. 

Average cost of a " Suet Pudding" (about two pounds). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of suet 4 

1 lb. of flour 2,\ 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder Oj 

Time required, about one hour and three-quarters. 

Now we will show you how to make a Suet Pudding. 

1. We put a saucepan of warm water on the fire to boil. 

2. We take half a pound of suet, put it on a board, cut 
away all the skin, and chop the suet up as finely as possible 
with a sharp knife. 

3. We put one poitnd of four into a basin, with one tea- 
spoonfid of baking powder. 

4. We add the chopped suet and rub it well into the flour 
with our hands. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to have any lumps. 

5. We now add enough cold water to mix it into a stiff 
paste. 

6. We take a strong pudding cloth, wring it out in 
boiling water, and sprinkle flour over it. 

7. We turn the paste out on to the cloth, hold up the 
ends of the cloth, and tie it tightly round the pudding with 
a piece of string, leaving room for the pudding to swell. 

8. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the pudding, and let it boil gently for one hour and a 
half 

N.B. — We should keep a kettle of boiling water and fill up the saucepan as 
the water in it boiLs away. 

9. For serving, we take the pudding out of the saucepan, 
take off the cloth, and turn it on to a hot dish. 

N.B. — This pudding can be eaten with meat, or it can be eaten with sugar, 
jam, or treacle. 



Y 2 



34 O National Training School for Cookery. 



PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 29. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

Average cost of a " Yorkshire Pudding " (about one pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 
8 oz. of flour i| 

1 pint of milk 2J 

2 eggs j 



J* 

Time required, one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Yorkshire 
Pudding. 

1. We put eight ounces of flour into a basin, and mix into 
it half a salt-spoonful of salt. 

2. We break two eggs into the flour and stir it well. 

3. We now add by degrees a pint of milk, beating all 
the time with a wooden spoon to make the batter as smooth 
and as light as possible. 

4. We take a pudding tin (about a pint), place it under 
the meat that is roasting in front of the fire, to catch some 
dripping to grease the tin. 

5. We then pour the batter into the tin and let it cook 
under the meat for half an hour, or put it in the oven to 
bake for twenty minutes. 

6. We must watch it, and turn the tin, so that the 
puddifig does not get burnt. 

N.B. — A commoner and more substantial Yorkshire pudding can be made in 
the same way as above, only with 6 oz. of flour, 1 egg, 1 pint of milk, 
and 1 tablespoojiful of chopped suet sprinkled over the batter when it is 
poured into the tin. 

7. When the pudding is sufficiently cooked, we turn it 
carefully out of the tin on to a hot dish, and it is then 
ready for serving with the roast meat. 



Lessons on Making Puddings. — Fig Pudding. 3 4 1 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 30. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Average cost of" Fig Pudding" {about I pound), 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

1 lb of dried figs o 6 

\ lb of moist sugar o r 

6 oz. of suet o 3^ 

5 lb. of bread crumbs \ L 

J lb. of flour ) ° 2 - 

2 eggs o 2 

2 tablespoonsful of milk \ 3 

Salt ) ° °* 

i 4 

Tune required, about three hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Fig Pudding, 

1. We put a large saucepan of warm water on the fire to 
boil. 

2. We put six ounces of suet on a board, cut away all the 
skin, and chop up the suet as finely as possible. 

3. We take half a poimd of dried figs, and chop them up 
finely with a sharp knife. 

4. We place a wire sieve on the board, take some crumb 
of bread and rub it through, there should be a quarter of a 
pound of bread crumbs. 

5. We put a qitarter of a pound of flour into a basin, and 
add to it the chopped suet, and half a saltspoonful of salt. 

6. We rub the suet well into the four with our hands. 

N.B. — We should be careful not to leave any lumps. 

7. We now add the bread crumbs, the figs, a quarter of 
a pound of moist sugar, and about a quarter of a nutmeg 
grated, and mix them all well together. 

8. We break two eggs into a basin, and add two table- 



342 National Training School for Cookery. 



spoonsful of milk, we stir this into the ingredients in the 
basin, and mix all well together. 

9. We take a pudding cloth, lay it in a basin, and 
sprinkle about a teaspoonful of flour over it. 

10. We turn the mixture into the centre of the floured 
cloth, and tie it up in the cloth, with a piece of string. 

N.B. — If preferred, the pudding could be put into a hcttered mould or 
basin and a cloth tied over the top, but it is better to boil it in a cloth. 

11. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the pudding, and let it boil for two hours and a half 

N.B. — If the pudding is boiled in a mould or basin, we must allow at least 
three hours for boiling. 

12. For serving we take the pudding out of the cloth, 
snd turn it on to a hot dish. 

N.B. — This pudding can be served with "Melted Butter Sauce" (see 
"Sauces," Lesson No. 7.) 



Lessons on Making Puddings.-, — Marmalade. 343 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 31. 

MARMALADE PUDDING. 

Average cost of a "Marmalade Pudding" (about one pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

3 tablespoonsful of marmalade o 4 

2 oz. of moist sugar o o| 

1 oz. of candied peel o 1 

3 oz. of flour ) 1 

3 oz. of bread crumbs / 4 

£ lb of suet o 2 J 

1 lemon o \\ 

*egg J 



1 c^ 



Time required, about three hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Marmalade Pudding, 

1. We put a saucepan of warm water on the fire to boil. 

2. We put a quarter of a pound of suet, on a board, cut 
away all the skin, and chop it up finely with a knife. 

3. We place a wire sieve on a plate, take some crumb of 
bread, and rub it through the sieve, there should be three 
ounces of bread crumbs. 

4. We put three ounces of flour in a basin, add to it a 
quarter of a saltspoonful of salt, and the chopped suet, and 
rub them together with our fingers. 

N.B. — We must be careful there are no lumps. 

5. We now add the bread crumbs and two ounces of moist 
sugar, take a lemon, wipe it clean, and grate the rind into 
the basin. We also add one ounce of candied peel, cut in 
small pieces, and three tablespoonsful of marmalade, and mix 
them all well together. 

6. We cut the lemon in half, and squeeze the juice of it 
into the basin over the other ingredients, we also add one 
egg, and mix it all well together. 



344 National Training School for Cookery. 

7. We take about a pint basin, butter it inside, and turn 
the mixture into it, but the basin must be quite full. 

8. We take a small pudding cloth, wring it out in warm 
water, and then in cold water, and sprinkle some flour over 
it, we put this cloth over the top of the basin, and tie it on 
tightly with a piece of string under the rim of the basin ; we 
tie the four corners of the cloth together over the top of 
the pudding. 

9. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the pudding and let it boil for three hours. 

N.B. — The lid should be on the saucepan. 

N.B. — We should keep a kettle of water boiling on the fire, and fill up the 
saucepan, as the water in it boils away. 

10. For serving we take the basin out of the saucepan, 
take off the cloth, and turn the pudding carefully out of the 
basin on to a hot dish. 



Lessons on Puddings. — Ginger Pudding. 345 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 32. 

GINGER PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Ginger Pudding" {in about a pint basin). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of flour 1 

\ lb. of suet a| 

h lb. of moist sugar 2 

2 large teaspoonsful of grated ginger ) 1 1 

\ oz. of butter ) 3 

7 
Time required, about six hotirs and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make a Ginger Pudding. 

1. We put a large saucepan of water on the fire to boil. 

2. We put a quarter of a pound of suet on a board, cut 
away the skin and chop it up very finely with a sharp knife. 

3. We put half a pound of flour into a basin, add the 
chopped suet, and rub it well into the flour with our fingers. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to leave any lumps. 

4. We take some ginger and a grater, and grate two 
large teaspoonsful of sugar. 

5. We now add the grated ginger and half a pound of 
moist sugar to the basin, and mix all well together. 

6. We take a small basin [about I pint) butter it well 
inside, and turn the dry mixture into the basin. 

7. We take spudding cloth, wring it out in hot water, 
and then in cold, and sprinkle some flour over it. 

8. We place the floured cloth over the basin, and tie it 
on with string just below the rim ; we tie the ends of the 
cloth together. 

9. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the pudding, and let it boil, for at least six hours. 

10. For serving we take out the basin, take off the cloth, 
and turn the pudding carefully out on to a hot dish. 

N.B. — If liked, melted butter sauce (see " Sauces," Lesson No. 7) may be 
served with the pudding. 



346 National Training School for Cookery 



PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. $$. 

BREAD-AND-BUTTER PUDDING. 

Average cost of "Bread-and-Butter Pudding" (in one-pint 

disk). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

6 thin slices of bread and butter 4 

\ oz. of clarified dripping \ 

1 oz. of currants L o| 

Nutmeg, and 1 tablespoonful of moist sugar J 

2 eggs 2 

1 pint of milk 2§ 

7V/b« required, about one hour. 

Now we will show you how to make Bread-and-Butter 
Pudding. 

1. We butter, and cut six thin slices of bread, 

2. We grease the inside of a pint pie dish, with half an 
ounce of clarified dripping. 

3. We take one ounce of currants, wash them well, dry 
them in a clean cloth, and pick them over. 

4. We lay the slices of bread and butter in the pie dish, 
and sprinkle the currants between each slice of bread and 
butter. 

N.B. — One ounce of candied peel, chopped up fine, might be sprinkled in as 
well, if liked. 

5. We break two eggs into a cup, and beat them up well, 
we add to them a tablespoonful of moist sugar and a pint of 
milk, and stir them well together. 

6. We pour this custard over the bread and butter in the 
pie dish, take a grater and a nutmeg, and grate about half 
a teaspoonfid of nutmeg over the top ; and then let the 
pudding soak, for half an hour before baking. 

7. After that time we put the pudding into a moderate 
oven (the thermometer at the oven door should mark 220 
Fahrenheit), to bake for about half an hour. 

8. The pudding can be served in the dish, or turned 
out on to a hot flat dish, and then sprinkled with half a 
teaspoonfid of castor sugar. 



Lessons on Puddings. — Apple Amber Pudding. 347 

PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 34. 

APPLE AMBER PUDDING. 

Average cost of an "Apple Amber Pudding" (in about a 
pint moidd) 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

6 oz. of bread crumbs c i| 

2 oz. of flour o o\ 

4 oz. of suet o 2§ 

1 lb. of apples o 3 

2 oz. of castor sugar i 

1 lemon , o if 

Nutmeg ) 

3 eggs o 3 

\ oz. of butter o o\ 



1 o 



Time required, about two Jiours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make an Apple Amber 
Pudding. 

1. We put a large saucepan of warm water on the fire to 
boil 

2. We put two ounces of flour into a basin. 

3. We put four ounces of suet on a board, cut away the 
skin, and chop it up finely ; we add the chopped suet to the 

flour, and rub them together with our fingers. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to leave any lumps. 

4. We place a wire sieve over a board, take six ounces 
of the crumb of bread, and rub it through the sieve. 

5. We take about three quarters of a pound of apples, peel 
them with a sharp knife, cut out the core, and chop up the 
apples ; there should be half a pound of chopped apples. 

6. We now add the bread crumbs and two ounces of castor 
sugar to the flour and suet and mix them together, we also 
add the chopped apples ; we take a lemon, wipe it clean, and 



348 National Training School for Cookery. 

grate the rind of it into the basin, we also grate in about 
a quarter of a teaspoonful of nutmeg. 

7. We take three eggs, break them one by one, into 
another basin, and then add them to the other ingredients, 
and mix them all well together. 

8. We take about a pint mould, or basin, butter it well 
inside, with half an ounce of butter , and then pour in the 
mixture. 

9. We take a clean cloth, wring it out in hot, and then 
cold water, sprinkle a little flour over it, and place it over 
the top of the mould, and tie it on with string. 

10. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the puddingy and let it boil for tzvo hours and a half 
to three hours. 

11. For serving, we take out the pudding, take off the 
cloth, and carefully turn the pudding out of the mould, on 
to a hot dish. 



Lessons on Ptiddings. — Baked Plum Pudding. 349 



PUDDINGS. 

Lesson No. 35. 

BAKED PLUM PUDDING. 

Average cost for making a " Baked Plum Pudding" (2 lbs). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

£ lb. of suet Q.\ 

£ lb. of flour 2 

£ lb. of large raisins i h 

1 lb. of currants ij 

2 oz. of candied peel i 

2 oz. of moist sugar oh 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder ) i 

£ of a teaspoonful of mixed spice J 2 

1 egg 1 

I pint of milk i 

Time required about one hour and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Baked Plum 
Pudding. 

1. We put a quarter of a pound of suet on a board, cut 
away all the skin, and chop it up as finely as possible 
with a sharp knife. 

N.B. — We should sprinkle a X\\.\\& flour over the suet to prevent it sticking to 
the knife. 

2. We put three-quarters of a pound of flour into a basin, 
and mix into it a teaspoonful of baking powder. 

3. We now add the chopped suet, and rub it well into 
the flour with our hands. 

4. We take a quarter of a pound of large raisins and 
stone them. 

5. We take a quarter of a pound of currants, wash them, 
and dry them in a cloth, and pick them over to see there 
are no stones mixed with them. 

6. We take two ounces of mixed candied peel, and cut it 
up in small pieces on a board. 



350 'National Training School for Cookery. 

7. We now add all these ingredients to the four in the 
basin. 

8. We also add two ounces of moist sugar, and sprinkle 
over a quarter of a teaspoonful of mixed spice. 

9. We break I egg into a cup, and beat it up lightly 
with a gill of milk (a gill is a quarter of a pint). 

10. We pour the egg and milk into the ingredients in the 
basin, and mix them all well together into a stiff paste. 

11. If necessary, we can add another gill of milk. (The 
mixture should be so stiff that a spoon can stand up in it). 

12. We take a i^ pint tin or a disk, and grease it inside 
with a little clarified dripping. 

13. We turn the mixture into the tin and put it into a 
moderate oven to bake for one hour. 

14. After that time we take it out of the oven, and it is 
ready for serving. ^ 



Lessons on Puddings. — Norfolk Dumplings. 351 



NORFOLK DUMPLINGS. 

Average cost of " Norfolk Dumplings " (about ten). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 lb. of patent flour ^ 

Water J 3 

3 
Time reqtiired, about half-an-hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Norfolk Dumplings. 

1. We put a saucepan of warm water on the fire to 
boil. «• 

2. We put one pound of patent floitr into a basin. 

3. We add to it enough cold water to make it into a 
smooth dough ; — it must not be too stiff. 

4. We form this dough into round balls about the size of 
a large egg. 

N.B. — This quantity will make about ten dumplings. 

5. When the water in the saucepan is quite boiling, we 
put in the dumpfaigs, and let them boil for twenty minutes. 

6. After that time we take them out of the saucepan, 
and they are then ready for serving. 



352 National Training School for Cookery. 



JELLIES. 
Lesson No. i. 

WINE JELLY. 

Average cost of " Wine Jelly from Calf's Feet " (about 
one quart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 calf's feet i 6 

3 lemons o 4^ 

2 eggs o 2 

4 oz. of loaf sugar j 

1 inch of the stick of cinnamon > o of 

4 cloves ) 

1 wine-glass of sherry o 6 

Half a wine-glass of brandy « o 3 

2 10J 

Time requh'ed : the jelly stock should be made the day before required 
for use ; to finish making it, about an hour. 

Now we will show you how to make about one quart of 
Wine Jelly from Calf's Feet. 

1. We take two calf's feet and put them on a board. 

2. We chop eachy^ in four pieces with a chopper. 

3. We put these pieces in a basin of clean cold water and 
wash them well. 

4. We take them out of the basin and put them in a 
stew-pan with sufficient cold water to cover them. 

N.B.— This is to blanch them. 

5. We put the stew-pan on the fire to boil. 

6. When the water boils we take the stew-pan and 
stand it on a piece of paper on the table. 

7. We take the pieces of the feet out of the stew-pan 
with a fork and put them in a basin of cold water and wash 
them well. 

8. We empty the water out of the stew-pan. 

9. We wash the stew-pan well. 

10. We take the pieces of the feet out of the basin and 
put them in the stew-pan with five pints of cold water. 

N.B. — This stock will be reduced to about one pint and a half, when it is 
sufficiently boiled. 



Lessons on Making Jellies. — Wine Jelly. 353 

11. We put the stew-pan on the fire to boil. 

12. We must watch it and skim it often with a skimming 
spoon. 

13. We must let it boil very gently for five hours. 

14. After that time we strain off the liquor through a 
hair sieve into a basin. 

15. We must put this basin in a cool place for some 
hours, until the stock is perfectly cold and is in a jelly. 

16. We now take this basin of jelly stock and skim off all 
the fat carefully with a spoon. 

17. We take a clean cloth and put it in hot water. 

18. We take this damp cloth and dab it over the jelly 
stock } so as to remove every particle of grease. 

19. We take a clean dry cloth and rub lightly over the 
ielly stock to dry it. 

20. We take three lemons, wipe them clean in a cloth, 
and peel them very thinly with a sharp knife. 

N.B. — We must be careful, in peeling the lemons, not to cut any of the 
white skin, as it would make the. jelly bitter. 

21. We put the lemon peel into a stew-pan. 

22. We squeeze the juice of the two lemons through a 
strainer into the stew-pan. 

23. We take tzvo eggs and put the yolks in one basin, 
and the whites in another. 

24. We whip the whites of the eggs slightly, but not 
very stiff. 

25. We put the whipped white of egg into the stew-pan 
and the crushed egg shell. 

26. We put in also four ounces of loaf sugar, one inch of 
the stick of cinnamon, and four cloves. 

27. We whip all these together with a whisk. 

28. We now add the jelly stock. 

29. We put the stew-pan on the fire, and whisk well 
till it boils. 

30. We now put the lid on the stew-pan, and stand it 
by the side of the fire for twenty minutes to form a crust. 



354 National Training School for Cookery. 



31. We place the jelly bag stand in front of the fire, and 
hang the jelly bag in it, we must put a basin on the stand 
underneath the jelly bag. 

N.B. — We must be sure that the jelly bag is quite clean. 

32. We take a jug of warm water, and pour it through 
the jelly bag. 

33. We must do this four or five times, always using 
warm water until the bag is quite warm. 

34. We must look at the jelly in the stew-pan, and when 
the crust is formed, it is ready to be strained. 

N.B. — We must be sure that there is no water left in the bag, before passing 
the jelly through, and the basin in the stand should be quite dry. 

N.B. — The pouring of the jelly into the bag forces the water (the few drops 
that remain) first out into the basin ; these first few drops should be 
thrown away and a clean basin put in its place immediately. 

35. We now take the stew-pan off the fire, and pour the 
jelly carefully into the bag to pass into the basin. 

36. We repeat this two or three times, until the jelly 
runs through quite clear. 

N.B. — We must be careful in pouring the jelly through the bag, that we do 
not disturb the sediment at the bottom of the bag, which will serve as a 
filter. 

3 7. We ad d a ivineglassful of sherry, and half a wineglassfiu 
of brandy, or any other wine or liqueur according to taste. 

38. We take a quart mould, scald it with boiling water, 
and then rinse it in cold water. 

39. We place the mould in ice. 

N.B. — We must be careful that the mould stands quite straight and firm. 

40. We pour in enough of the jelly just to cover the 
bottom of the mould. 

41. When this jelly has set slightly, we can garnish the 
mould with grapes, strawberries, &c, according to taste. 

42. We then pour the remainder of the jelly into the 
mould, and let it stand in the ice, until it is firmly set. 

43. When the jelly is required for use, we dip the mould 
into a basin of hot water for about a second. 

44. We shake the mould to loosen the jelly, place a dish 
over the top of the mould, and turn the jelly carefully out,, 
so as not to break it. It is then ready for serving. 



Lessons on Making Jellies. — Aspic Jelly. 355 

JELLIES. 

Lesson No. 2. 

ASPIC JELLY. 

Average cost of " Savoury or Aspic Jelly " (about one quart) 
INGREDIENTS. 



s. d 
2 calf's feet i 6 

2 lbs. of knuckle of veal I 4 

Salt 

30 peppercorns 

2 blades of mace 

1 clove of garlic 

2 shalots 

1 sprig of thyme 

Two or three sprigs of parsley 

1 onion, stuck with four cloves ) 

1 leek o o\ 

\ a head of celery o 2 

2 carrots } t 

1 turnip ) ° I 2 

1 sprig of tarragon \ 

1 sprig of chervil 

2 bay leaves \ o 6 

The rind of 1 lemon I 

The juice of 3 lemons J 

The whites of 2 eggs ; o 2 

1 lb. of lean veal o 10 

1 gill of chablis or sherry o 6 

2 tablespoonsful of French vinegar o 2 



5 6i 



Time required {the jelly stock should be made the day before) to finish 
making it, if not decorated, about an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make one quart of Savoury 
or Aspic Jelly. 

1. We take two calf's feet and put them on a board. 

2. We chop the feet in eight pieces with a chopper. 

3. We put these pieces in a basin of clean cold water 
and wash them well. 

4. We take them out of the basin and put them in a 
stew-pan, with sufficient cold water to cover them. 

5. We put the stew-pan on the fire to boil. 

N.B. — This is to blanch them. 

Z 2 



356 National Training School for Cookery \ 

6. When the water boils, we take the stew-pan off, and 
stand it on a piece of paper, on the table. 

7. We take the pieces of feet out of the stew-pan with a 
fork, put them in a basin of cold water, and wash them well. 

8. We empty the water out of the stew-pan. 

9. We wash the stew-pan well. 

10. We take the pieces of feet out of the basin, and put 
them back into the stew-pan. 

11. We take two pounds of knuckle of veal, and put it on 
a board. 

12. We take a sharp knife, and cut off the meat from the 
bone. 

13. We put the meat and the bone into the stew-pan, 
with the feet. 

14. We pour in five pints of water, put the stew-pan on 
the fire, and just bring it to the boil. 

15. We must watch it, and skim it with a spoon. 

16. We now add half a teaspoonfid of salt, thirty pepper- 
corns, two blades of mace, one clove of garlic, two shalots, one 
sprig of thyme, and two or three sprigs of parsley. 

17. We take an onion, peel it, and stick four cloves in it. 

18. We take one leek, and half a head of celery, and wash 
them in cold water. 

19. We take two carrots, wash them, and scrape them 
clean. 

20. We take a turnip, wash it and peel it. 

21. We put all these vegetables into the stew-pan. 

22. We also add one sprig of tarragon, one sprig of 
chervil, and two bay leaves. 

23. We let all these boil gently for five hours. 

24. After that time, we strain off the liquor, through a 
hair sieve into a basin. 

25. We must put this basin into a cool place, for some 
hours until the stock is perfectly cold, and in a jelly. 



Lessons on Making Jellies. — Aspic Jelly. 357 

26. We now take the basin of jelly, and skim off all the 
fat carefully with a spoon. 

27. We take a clean cloth and put it in hot water. 

28. We take this damp cloth, and dab it over the jelly 
stock, so as to remove every particle of grease. 

29. We take a clean dry cloth, and rub lightly over the 
felly stock, to dry it. 

30. We take one lemon, wipe it clean in a cloth, and peel 
it very thinly, with a sharp knife. 

N.B. — We must be careful in peeling the lemon not to cut any of the pith, 
as it would make the jelly bitter. 

31. We put the lemon peel into a stew-pan. 

32. We squeeze the juice of three lemons, through a 
strainer, into the stew-pan. 

33. We whip the whites of two eggs slightly, but not 
very stiff. 

34. We put the whipped whites of the eggs into the stew- 
pan, also the egg shells. 

35. We take one pound of lean veal, put it on a board, 
and chop it up finely. 

36. We put this chopped veal in the stew-pan. 

37. We pour in one gill of chablis or sherry, and two 
tablespoonsful of French vinegar. 

38. We add salt and pepper to taste, and whip altogether 
with a whisk. 

39. We put in the jelly stock. 

40. We put the stew-pan on the fire, and whisk well 
until it boils. 

41. We now take a large spoon and skim it carefully if 
necessary. 

42. We put the stew-pan by the side of the fire, and let 
it stand for half an hour to form a crust. 

43. We take a clean soup cloth, or a jelly bag, and fix it 
on the stand. 

44. We take a large basin, and place it below the cloth 






358 National Training School for Cookery. 

45. We take the stew-pan off the fire, and pour the con- 
tents into the cloth, and let it all pass into the basin. 

N.B. — The chopped veal acts as a filter to the jelly. 

46. After the jelly has all passed through, we remove 
the basin, and put a clean one in its place. 

47. We take a soup ladle, and pour a ladle-ful of the jelly, 
at a time, over the meat in the cloth, and let it pass for the 
second time, very slowly, into the basin. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to disturb the deposit of chopped veal, which 
settles at the bottom of the cloth. 

48. If a border mould of Aspic jelly be required, we take 
the mould, scald it with boiling water, and then rinse it in 
cold water. 

N.B. — If the Aspic jelly is only required for garnishing cold meats, &c, we 
stand the basin of jelly on ice, or in a cool place, until it be firmly set ; 
we can then cut the jelly into fancy shapes, or chop it up finely with a 
knife. 

49. We place the mould in ice. 

N.B. — We must be careful that the mould stands quite straight and firm. 

50. We pour in enough of the jelly just to cover the 
bottom of the mould. 

51. When this jelly has slightly set, we can garnish the 
mould with fish or vegetables, &c, according to taste, or 
with what it is to be served. 

52. We then pour the remainder of the jelly into the 
mould, and let it stand in the ice until it is firmly set. 

53. When the jelly is required for use, we dip the mould 
into a basin of hot water for about a second. 

54. We shake the mould to loosen the jelly, and place a 
dish over the top of the mould, and turn the jelly carefully 
out, so as not to break it. It is then ready for serving. 

N.B. — The centre of the mould can be filled with a salad of mixed vegetables. 

(See No. 13 in Entries, Lesson No. 5.) 
N.B. — A less expensive recipe for Aspic Jelly will be found in the Appendix. 



Lessons on Making Jellies. — Iceland Moss. 359 

JELLIES. 

Lesson No. 3. 

ICELAND MOSS. 

Average cost of " Water Jelly or Milk Jelly made with 
Iceland Moss " (about one quart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

For Milk Jelly. 



For Water Jelly. 

d. 
1 oz. of Iceland Moss . . . . ) 

1 quart of water j 

2 tablespoonsful of pounded 

loaf sugar \ 



(To be eaten with wine or milk.) 



d. 
1 oz. of Iceland Moss i 

1 quart of milk 5 

2 tablespoonsful of pounded 

loaf sugar 1 



Time required [after the Iceland Moss has soaked all night), for " Water Jelly,' 
about one hour ; for " Milk Jelly," about two hours. 



Now we will show you how to make Jelly with Iceland 
Moss. 

1. We wash one oz. of Iceland Moss well in cold water. 

2. We then put it in a basin of cold water, and let it soak 
all night. 

3. After that time we take it out of the water and 
squeeze it dry in a cloth. 

4. We then put it in a saucepan with one quart of cold 
water. 

5. We put the saucepan on the fire and let it boil for one 
hour ; we must stir it frequently. 

6. We then strain it through a sieve into a basin, and 
sweeten it with loaf sugar. 

7. It can be taken with either wine or milk according to 
taste. 



360 National Training School for Cookery, 



For Milk Jelly :— 

L. We boil the moss in the same quantity of milk instead 
of water (after it has been soaked) as above, only for two 
hours instead of one hour. 

2. We then strain it into a basin and sweeten with loaf 
sugar according to taste. 

3. When it is cold we turn the felly out of the basin on 
to a dish and it is ready for use. 



Lessons on Making Jellies. — Milk Jelly. 361 

JELLIES. 

Lesson No. 4. 

MILK JELLY FROM COW-HEEL, 
AND THE MEAT SERVED WITH ONION SAUCE. 

Average cost of about one quart of " Milk Jelly" 
and the meat served with the onion sauce — ■ 



Milk Jelly. 

d. 

1 cow-heel 6 

I quart of milk 5 

a inches of the stick of 

cinnamon 

Sugar 



INGREDIENTS. 

Onion Sauce. 



a. 

3 or 4 onions 1 £ 

£ pint of milk ii 

1 an oz. of flour \ a 

2 an oz. of butter } ° 4 

"si 



Time required, about four hours. 



Now we will show you how to make a Milk Jelly from 
Cow-heel. 

1. We buy a dressed cozv-heel from a tripe shop. 

2. We put the cozv-heel on a board, and cut it up into 
small pieces. 

3 We put these pieces into an earthen jar or a saucepan 
with one quart of milk and two inches of the stick of 
cinnamon. 

4. We put the lid on the top of the jar, put a piece of 
paper over the lid, and tie it tightly down. 

5. We put the jar into a very slow oven to stew for at 
least three hours. 

6. If there is no oven to the stove, we can stand the jar 
by the side of the fire to stew. 

N.B. — It reduces less if stewed in the oven. 

7. When the stew is finished we take the jar out of the 
oven, take off the lid, and strain the milk into a basin, and 
sweeten it according to taste. 



362 National Training School for Cookery. 

8. We put the basin aside till the jelly is set ; it may be 
eaten hot or cold according to taste. 



For serving the Cow-Heel with Onion Sauce : — 

1. We take three or four onions, peel them, and cut them 
in quarters. 

2. We put them into a saucepan with half a pint of 
milk. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil till the onions 
are quite tender ; it will take about one hour. 

4. After that time we strain off the milk into a basin, 
put the onions on a board, and chop them up small. 

5. We put half an ounce of butter into the saucepan and 
put it on the fire to melt. 

6. When the butter is melted we add half an ounce of 
flour, and mix them smoothly together with a wooden 

spoon. 

7. We pour the milk in gradually, stirring it till it boils 
and thickens. 

8. We then add the onions, season with pepper and salt 
according to taste ; and move the saucepan to the side of 
the fire. 

9. We put the pieces of cow-heel into the sauce, and let 
them warm through. 

10. For serving we put the pieces of cow-heel on a hot 
dish, and pour over them the onion sauce. 

N.B. — The meat from the cow-heel might be served as a curry. The curry 
should be made in the same way as described in "Cooked Meat," 
Lesson No. 4. 

N.B.— -The bones of the cow-heel should be put into the stock-pot. 



Lessons on Making Jellies. — Ox Foot Jelly. 363 

JELLIES. 

Lesson No. 5. 

JELLY AND STEW FROM OX FOOT. 

Average cost of about one quart of " Jelly and a stew " 
made from Ox Foot. — 



For Jelly. 
1 ox foot 


INGREC 
s. d. 


)IENTS. 

For Stew. 

1 carrot, i turnip, i onion „ 
\ oz. of dripping 


d. 

. 0! 


\ lb. of lump sugar . . 


. . 01 
. . 01 
..03 
.. 00^ 


1 egg 


h oz. of butter 


. 0^ 


2 lemons 

Spices 


Flour and seasoning 


■ oi 




* sk 


2 2 



Jelly flavoured with porter would be is. z\d. 
Time required : — 

1st day to stew the foot 7 hours. 

2nd day to finish jelly i| ,, 

To make stew ik ,, 






Total 10 hours. 



Now we will show you how to make a jelly from Ox 
Foot. 

1. We take a scalded ox foot, put it in cold water, and 
wash it well. 

2. We take it out of the water, dry it in a cloth, and put 
it on a board. 

3. We cut the foot with a sharp knife across the first 
joint and down between the hoofs, and chop the long piece 
in half. 

4. We put these pieces into a saucepan with enough cold- 
water to cover them. 

5. We put the saucepan on the fire and just bring it to 
the boil. 



364 National Training School for Cookery. 

6. We then take the pieces out, and wash them 
thoroughly in a basin of cold water. 

7. We empty the water out of the saucepan, and wash it 
out well. 

8. We put the pieces of foot back in the saucepan, cover- 
ing them well with cold water (about two quarts will be 
enough for a moderate sized foot). 

9. We put the saucepan on the fire, and when it boils 
we should move it to the side of the fire and let it stew 
gently for six hours. 

10. We must watch it and skim it carefully with a spoon 
from time to time. 

11. After that time we strain off the stock into a basin, 
and put it aside to cool. 

N.B. — The foot we should put aside until required for use. 

12. When the stock is quite cold we take an iron spoon, 
dip it in hot water, and carefully skim off the fat. 

13. We take a clean cloth, dip it in hot water, and wipe 
over the top of the jelly, so as to remove every particle of fat. 

N.B. — Y or Porter Jelly, see below. 

14. We take two lemons, wipe them with a cloth to be 
sure that they are quite clean, and peel them very thinly 
with a sharp knife. 

N.B. — We must be careful in peeling the lemons not to cut any of the white 
skin, as it would make the jelly bitter. 

15. We put the peel of one lemon into the stewpan or 
saucepan. 

16. We cut the lemons in halves, and squeeze the juice 
of the two into the saucepan. 

N.B. — We must be careful to remove all the pips. 

17. We take one egg, put the yolk in one basin and the 
white in another. 

18. We whip up the white of the egg slightly. 

19. We put the whipped white of the egg and the egg 
shell into the saucepan. 

20. We put in a quarter of a pound of lump sugar, half 
an inch of the stick of cinnamon, four cloves, and about a 
quarter of an inch of saffron. 



Lessons qn Making Jellies. — Ox-foot Jelly. 365 

21. We now add the jelly stock. 

22. We put the saucepan on the fire and stir the con- 
tents well with a whisk or iron spoon until it boils. 

23. We now put the lid on the saucepan, and stand it by 
the side of the fire for twenty minutes or half an hour. 

24. If there is no jelly bag we should take a clean cloth 
folded over cornerways, and sew it up one side, making it 
in the shape of a jelly bag. 

25. We place two chairs back to back in front of the 
fire. 

26. We take the sewn up cloth, hang it between the two 
chairs, by pinning it open to the top bar of each chair. 

27. We must place a basin underneath the bag. 

28. We must look at the jelly in the saucepan, and 
when there is a good crust formed over, it is ready to be 
strained. 

29. We then take the saucepan off the fire and pour the 
jelly carefully into the bag to pass into the basin. 

30. We repeat this two or three times until the jelly runs 
through quite clear. 

N.B. — A glass of wine may be added now if desired. 

31. We take a quart basin or a mould, scald it with hot 
water, and then rinse it out with cold. 

32. We pour the jelly into the basin and stand it aside 
to cool and set until it is required for use. 

N.B. — If porter jelly be required we put the jelly-stock into a saucepan with 
a quarter of a pound of lu?np sugar, half a teaspoonful of mixed spice, 
and half a pint of porter ; we put it on the fire and let it boil for an hour 
and a half, stirring occasionally ; we then strain it in the same way as 
for the lemon jelly. 



2,66 National Training School for Cookery. 

Now we will show you how to make a stew of the meat of 
the foot. 

1. We take one carrot, wash it, scrape it clean, and cut it 
in slices with a sharp knife. 

2. We take a small turnip and an onion, peel them, and 
cut them in slices. 

3. We put these vegetables into a saucepan with half an 
ounce of clarified dripping. 

4. We put the saucepan on the fire and let the vegetables 
fry a light brown ; we must be careful they do not burn. 

5. We cut the meat off the bones of the foot, cut it up 
into nice pieces, and season them with pepper and salt 
according to taste. 

6. We put these pieces of meat into the saucepan with 

the vegetables. 

7. We then pour in one pint of cold water, just bring it to 
the boil, and remove the saucepan to the side of the fire to 
stew gently one hour or till the vegetables are tender. 

8. We then strain off the liquor and put the vegetables 
and meat on a dish. 

9. We put the dish near the fire to keep warm. 

10. We put half an ounce of butter into the saucepan and 
put it on the fire to melt. 

11. When the butter is melted we add half an ounce of 
four, and mix them well together with a wooden spoon. 

12. We stir in gradually the liquor, and stir it till it boils 
and thickens. 

13. We then remove the saucepan to the side of the fire. 

N.B. — The sauce can be coloured with burnt sugar or a browned onion. 

14. We now place in the meat and the vegetables, and 
let them just warm through. 

15. We serve this stew on a hot dish with boiled potatoes (see 
Vegetables, Lesson No. i), or rice (see Rice, Lesson No, i). 

N.B. — The bones of the foot should be put in the stock-pot. 



Lessons on Making Jellies. — Apple Jelly. 367 

JELLIES. 

Lesson No. 6. 

APPLE JELLY. 

Average cost of " Apple Jelly " {about one and a half pint). 
INGREDIENTS. 

a. 

1 pound of apples 4 

1 lemon ! 1 

3 oz. of lump sugar 1" 

1 oz. of gelatine 3 

2 a teaspoonful of cochineal 1 



Kj.-'j 



Time required, about one hour. 

Now we will show you how to make Apple Jelly. 

1. We take one pound of apples, peel them with a sharp 
knife, cut them in half, take out the core, and then cut the 
apples in small pieces. 

2. We put the apples in a stewpan with three ounces of 
lump sugar and half a pint of water. 

3. We take a lemon, wipe it clean with a cloth. 

4. We take a grater and grate the rind of the lemon over 
the apples. 

N.B. — We should be very careful only to grate the yellow peel of the lemon, 
as the white rind is very bitter. 

5. We cut the lemon in half, and squeeze the juice through 
a strainer on the apples. 

6. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil, and cook the 
apples quite tender. 

7. We must stir the apples occasionally to prevent it 
sticking to the bottom of the pan and burning. 

8. We put one ounce of gelatine in a gallipot or small 
saucepan with half a gill (one gill is a quarter of a pint) of 
cold water, and stand it by the side of the fire to dissolve. 



368 Nxtional Training School for Cookery. 

9. When the apples are cooked to a pulp, we place a hair 
sieve over a basin and rub the apples through with a wooden 
spoon. 

10. We now stir the melted gelatine into the apple. 

N.B. — We must be very careful that the gelatine is quite smoothly dissolved, 
there should be no lumps. 

N.B. — If liked, part of the apple might be coloured by stirring in half a tea- 
spoonful of cochineal. 

11. We take a pint and a half mould, rinse it out in 
boiling water and then in cold v/ater. 

12. We can ornament the bottom of the mould with 
pistachio nuts cut in small pieces, or preserved cherries, 
according to taste. 

13. We now pour the apple in the mould, and if part of 
the apple is coloured we should fill the mould with alternate 
layers of coloured and plain apple. 

14. We stand the mould aside in a cool place to set the 

apple. 

15. For serving we dip the mould in boiling water for a 
second and then turn out the apple jelly carefully on to a 
dish. 

N.B. — Half a pint of 'dotible cream whipped to a stiff froth should be served 
with the apple jelly, either put round the edge of the dish or in the 
centre of the mould. 



Lessons on Making Creams. — Vanilla Cream. 369 

CREAMS. 
Lesson No. i. 

VANILLA CREAM. 

Average cost of " Vanilla Cream " made with boiled custard 
(about a pint and a half). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

3 e SS 5 o 3 

\ pint of milk o x\ 

1 ounce of best gelatine o 3 

\ pint of double cream 1 3 

i tablespoonful of castor sugar o o\ 

\ teaspoonful of essence of Vanilla o oj 

1 11 
Time required for making, about three-quarters of a?i hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Vanilla Cream. 

1. We take the yolks of three eggs and one white, put 
them into a basin, and beat them well with a wooden 
spoon. 

2. We stir in half a pint of milk. 

3. We pour this mixture into a jug. 

4. We take a saucepan half full of hot water, and put it 
on the fire to boil. 

5. When the water is quite boiling, we move the sauce- 
pan to the side of the fire. 

6. We stand the jug of custard in the saucepan of boiling 
water, and stir the mixture very smoothly until it thickens 
and becomes the substance of cream. 

N.B. — We must stir it very carefully and watch it continually that it does 
not curdle. 

7. When the custard is sufficiently thick, we take the jug 
out of the water and stand it aside to cool. 

8. We put one ounce of the best gelatine in a small stew- 
pan, with two tablespoonsftd of cold water to soak and swell. 

A A 



370 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We then put the stewpan on the fire, and stir the 
gelatine until it is quite melted. 

10. We pour this melted gelatine through a strainer and 
stir it into the custard. 

11. We pour half a pint of double cream into a basin, and 
whisk it to a stiff froth with the whisk. 

12. We add to it a tablespoonful of castor sugar and halj 
a teaspoonful of essence of Vanilla. 

N.B. — If any other flavouring be preferred, it should be now added, instead 
of the essence of Vanilla. 

13. When the custard is sufficiently cooled, we stir it 
lightly into the whipped cream. 

14. We take a pint and a half mould, scald it with hoi 
water, and then rinse it out with cold. 

15. We pour the cream into the mould, and stand it in 
ice, until required for use. 

16. For serving, we should dip the mould into boiling 
water for a second, shake it to loosen the cream, and then 
turn it out carefully on to a dish. 

N.B. — This is an economical recipe for making cream, but if made entirely 
of cream, instead of cream and custard, it would of course be richer. 



Lessons on Making Creams. — Strazvberry Cream. 371 

CREAMS. 

Lesson No. 2. 

STRAWBERRY CREAM. 

Average cost of " Strazvberry Cream " {about one pint). 

INGREDIENTS. s d 

1 pint of fresh strawberries o 6 

2 \ ozs. of castor sugar o 6\ 

\ of an oz. of the best gelatine o 2| 

The juice of one lemon o 15 

\ pint of good cream 1 3 

2 \\ 

Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Strawberry 
Cream. 

1. We take a pint of fresh strazvberries, and put them on 
a board. 

2. We must pick them over, and put aside any that are 
not quite good. 

3. We must stalk them, and put them in a basin. 

4. We sprinkle over them half an ounce of white castor 
sugar, which will help to draw out the juice. 

5. We take a silk sieve and place it over a basin. 

N. B. —A hair sieve could be used instead. 

6. We pass the fruit through the sieve with a wooden 
spoon. 

7. We put three-qtiarters of an ounce of the best gelatine 
into a small stewpan, with two tablespoon sful of cold water, 
to soak and to swell. 

8. We then put the stewpan on the fire, and stir the 
gelatine until it is quite melted. 

9. We add two otmces of castor sugar, and squeeze the 
juice of one lemon through a strainer into the stewpan, 

A A 2 



372 National Training School for Cookery. 

10. We pour this mixture through a strainer, and stir it 
into the strawberries in the basin, and mix them well 
together. 

11. We pour half a pint of good cream into a basin, and 
whip it to a stiff froth with a whisk. 

12. We now add this cream to the strawberries in the 
basin, and stir them lightly together. 

13. We take a pint mould, scald it with hot water, and 
then rinse it out with cold. 

14. We pour the strawberry cream into the mould, and 
stand it in ice, until required for use. 

15. For serving, we should dip the mould into boiling 
water for a second, shake it to loosen the cream, and then 
turn it out carefuliv on to a dish. 






essons on Making Creams. — Charlotte Russc. 373 

CREAMS. 

Lesson No. 3. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Average cost of " Charlotte Russc " {about one pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

12 sponge finger biscuits o 6 

£ oz. of the best gelatine o i| 

I gill of milk o o\ 



--> 



\ pint of double cream i 

i dessertspoonful of sifted sugar o oV 

30 drops of essence of Vanilla o 1 

2 oh 

Time required for making, about half an hour. 

Now we will show you how to make a Charlotte Russe. 

1. We take a pint tin, and line it inside with sponge finger 
biscuits. 

N.B. — We must be careful to fit the biscuits close to each other, so that they 
form a wall of themselves. 

2. We take a knife and cut off the tops of the finger 
biscuits that stand above the tin. 

3. We put half an ounce of the best gelatine in a small 
stewpan, with one gill (a quarter of a pint) of cold milk, to 
soak and swell. 

4. We pour half a pint of double cream into a basin, and 
whip it to a stiff froth with a whisk. 

5. We add to it a dessertspoonful of sifted castor sugar, 
and thirty drops of essence of vanilla. 

6. We put the stewpan on the fire, and stir the gelatine 
until it is quite melted. 

7. We stir the melted gelatine into the cream, pouring it 
through a strainer. 

8. We pour this cream into the tin. 

N.B. — We must be careful, in pouring in the cream, not to disarrange the 
finger biscuits. 

9. We stand this tin in ice, until it is required for use. 

10. For serving, we dip the tin into hot zuaterfor a second, 
shake the tin to loosen the cream, and turn it carefully on 
to a dish. 

N.B. — A more economical Charlotte Russe might be made by using a q'inrter 
of a pint of custard to a quarter of a pint of cream (as in " Creams," 
Lesson No. 1). 



374 National Training School for Cookery. 

SOUFFLES. 
Lesson No. i. 

VANILLA SOUFFLE. 

Average cost of " Vanilla Souffle" {about one and a half 
pint) and the sauce to be served with it. 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

4 eggs 4 

i\ oz. of butter at is. 6d. lb i| 

A dessertspoonful of sugar \ 

i oz. of flour f j 

\ a teaspoonful of essence of Vanilla I 

Salt J 

i gill of milk of 

Time required, about three-quarters of an hour. 
For Wine Sauce. 



d. 
i oz. of sugar o\ 

i tablespoonful of jam 2 

Wine glass of sherry 6 

\ a teaspoonful of lemon-juice i 

~li 

Time required, about ten minutes. 



For Custard Sauce. 

d. 
i egg i 

Sugar and 6 drops of Vanilla 02 
1 gill of milk of 

~\ 

Time required, about ten minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Steamed Vanilla 
Souffle Pudding. 

1. We must prepare the tin for the souffle pudding. 

2. We take a pint and a half tin and butter it well inside, 
using our fingers for that purpose. 

3. We take a piece of paper and fold it so as to make a 
band round the tin, allowing about two inches of paper to 
stand up above the tin. 

4. We butter the part of the paper above the tin with a 
knife. 

5. We put the paper round the outside of the tin and tie 
it on with string. 



Lessons on making Souffles. — Vanilla Souffle. 375 

6. We take a stewpan and just melt one ounce of butter 
in it over the fire. 

7. We take the stewpan off the fire and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table. 

8. We add one ounce of flour to the melted butter, and 
mix them both well together. 

9. We then add rather more than a dessertspoonful of 
pounded sugar. 

10. We add one gill of milk (a gill is a quarter of a pint). 

11. We put the stewpan on the fire, and stir smoothly 
with a wooden spoon until it thickens. 

12. We then take the stewpan off the fire again. 

13. We add to the mixture the yolks of three eggs, one at 
a time, and beat all well together. 

14. We take the three whites of the eggs, and put them 
in a basin with one more white to make four, adding half a 
saltspoonfid of salt, and then whip the whites quite stiff. 

15. We add the whites to the above mixture and stir it 
lightly. 

16. We now add the flavouring — half a teaspoonfid of 
Vanilla essence. 

N.B. — If the essence is very strong, or the bottle newly opened, so much is 
not required. 

17. We mix all together and pour it into the buttered 
tin. 

18. We have ready a saucepan half filled with hot water, 
and put it on the fire to boil. 

19. When the water boils we stand the tin in it, but we 
must be careful that the water does not reach the paper 
round the tin, for it is only the steam which cooks the pudding. 

20. We move the saucepan to the side of the fire, and 
let the pudding steam from twenty to thirty 7nimttes. 

21. We must watch it, not letting the water boil too 
fast, or the saucepan will get dry and thepudding will burn. 



37 6 National Training School for Cookery. 

22. When it is sufficiently steamed, we take the tin out 
of the saucepan of water. 

N.B. — To test if the pudding be done, we should touch the centre of the 
pudding with our finger ; it should feel firm. 

23. We shake the tin and turn the Souffle Pudding out 
on a hot dish, and pour the sauce round it, which we must 
prepare while the souffle is being steamed. 

N.B. — If a baked Vanilla Souffle' Pudding is required, we put the tin in a 
quick oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise to 240 ) to 
bake for half an hour, instead of putting it in the boiling water. No 
sauce is then wanted. 



Now we will make the sauce for the Steamed Vanilla 
Souffle- Pudding. 

For Wine Sauce. 

1. We take a small saucepan and put in it one ounce of 
loaf sugar and one gill (or quarter pint) of cold water. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire, and stir the sugar 
and water with a spoon until the sugar has quite melted, 
and it has become a smooth syrup reduced in quantity. 

3. We put into it a tablespoonful of apricot jam-. 

4. We stir it all together over the fire to melt the jam. 

5. We add a wineglassfid of sherry and half a teaspoonful 
of lemon juice. We stir it all again. 

6. We take the stewpan off the fire and pour the sauce 
round the soufflet pudding. 

N.B. We must pour the sauce round the pudding very carefully, so as not 
to drop any of it on the side of it. 



We can make a Custard Sauce if preferred : 

1. We break a whole egg in a basin and whip it well. 

2. We add half a teaspoonfid of pounded sugar. 

3. We add one gill (quarter pint) of milk, and six drops 
of Vanilla essence. 

4. We pour all the mixture into a jug or gallipot. 

5. We get a large saucepan of hot water and put it on 
the fire. 



Lessons on Making Souffles. — Vanilla Souffle. 2)11 

6. We stand the gallipot in a saucepan. 

N.B. — The water must only come halfway up the gallipot. 

7. We stir the mixture in the gallipot with a wooden 
spoon. 

8. As soon as the mixture has thickened we take the 
gallipot out of the saucepan. 

9. We pour the custard round the Souffle Pudding, and 
it is ready for serving. 



yS National Training School for Cookery. 



/ 



SOUFFLES. 

Lesson No. 2. 

CHEESE SOUFFLi. 

Average cost of " Cheese Soufflet." 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 oz. of butter and \ oz. of flour ij 

1 teaspoonful of mignonette pepper 0.7 

Salt and pepper, and cayenne pepper o\ 

1 gill of milk of 

2 eggs 2 

3 oz. of Parmesan cheese 4J 

ji 

Time required, about forty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Cheese Souffle, 

1. We take a stewpan, and put into it one ounce of butter. 

2. We add one teaspoonful of mignonette pepper. 

3. We put the stewpan on the fire, and let the pepper fry \ 
Im the butter (to extract the flavour of the pepper) for two or 
three minutes. 

4. We take the stewpan off the fire, and strain the butter 
into a basin ; as the pepper is only for flavouring, the grains 
must not be left in the butter. 

5. We wash out the stewpan to prevent any of the grains 
remaining. 

6. We pour the flavoured butter back in the stewpan. 

7. We add half an ounce of flour, a teaspoonful of salt, 
and half a teaspoonful of pepper, and cayenne pepper (about 
as much as would thinly cover half the top of a threepenny 
piece) according to taste ; and stir well together with a 
wooden spoon. 

8. We add one gill (or quarter of a pint) of milk. 

9. We put the stewpan on the fire, and stir the mixture 
smooth until it thickens. 



Lessons on Making Souffle's. — Cheese Souffle. 379 

10. We take the stewpan off the fire, and stand it on a 
piece of paper on the table. 

11. We add one by one the yolks of tzvo eggs, and beat 
them well together. 

12. We take three ounces of Parmesan cheese. 

13. We grate the cheese with a grater on to a plate or 
piece of paper. 

14. We add the three ounces of grated cheese to the above 
mixture in the stewpan, and mix it all well together. 

15. We whip the whites of two eggs with a little salt in a 
basin quite stiff. 

16. We add the whites to the above mixture, and stir it 
lightly. 

17. We take a plain tin pint mould, and prepare it in 
the same way as we did for the Vanilla Souffle Pudding. 
(See Souffles, Lesson No. 1.) 

18. We pour the mixture into the buttered tin mould. 

N.B. — This same mixture, if poured into Ramaquin papers and baked, will 
make cheese Ramaquins. 

19. We put the tin in the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240 ) to bake from twenty minutes 
to half an hour. We must look at it once or twice to see 
it does not burn, but the door of the oven should not be 
opened too often while the souffle' is inside, lest it should 
check the souffle from rising properly. 

N.B. — To serve a baked souffle it should be kept in its tin, the buttered 
paper taken off, and a clean napkin folded round the tin. It can also 
be baked in a mould which slips inside a plated or silver dish sold for 
the purpose. This is the more elegant way of serving a souffle or fondu. 



380 National Training School for Cookery. 

SOUFFLES. 
Lesson No. 3. 

POTATO SOUFFI_£. 

Average cost of " Potato Souffle? 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

4 potatoes i| 

1 oz. of butter i 

2 tablespoonsful of milk o\ 

4 eggs , .' 4 

Seasoning o| 

li 

Time required, about an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Potato Souffle. 

1. We take four good sized potatoes, wash and scrub them 
with a scrubbing brush in a basin of cold water. 

2. We take them out of the water, and dry them with a 
cloth. 

3. We put them in the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 230 ) to bake ; they will take from 
half an hour to three qitarters of an hour, according to the 
heat of the oven, and the size of the potatoes. 

4. We take a skewer, and stick it into the potatoes to see 
if they are done. They must be soft inside. 

N.B. — This should be carefully done so as not to spoil the potato skins. 

5. When they are done we take them out and cut them 
(with a sharp knife) in half — so that each half of the potato 
will stand — because we shall want to use the skins to put 
the potato into them again. 

6. We take a small spoon and scoop out carefully all 
the inside of the potatoes. We must take care not to make 
holes or spoil the skins in any way. 

7. We take a wire sieve and put it over a plate, and take 
the inside of the potatoes and rub it through with a wooden 
spoon. 



Lessons on Making Soitffles.— Potato Souffle. 381 

8. We put one ounce of butter and two tablespoonsful oj 
milk in a stewpan, and put it on the fire to boil. 

9. We add salt and pepper according to taste. 

10. We then add three ounces of the sifted potatoes, and 
stir it smoothly. 

11. We must now take the stewpan off the fire, and stand 
it on a piece of paper or wooden trivet, on the table. 

12. We take three eggs, and add, one by one, only the 
yolks, beating all well together with a wooden spoon. 

13. We take the three whites, and add another white to 
make four, and put them in a basin ; we add a quarter of a 
saltspoonful of salt to them, and whip them to a stiff froth. 

14. We add the wJiites to the above mixture, and stir the 
whole lightly. 

15. We now stand the eight half -potato skins on a baking 
sheet. 

16. We pour the mixture carefully into each potato skin 
(they should be only half full). 

17. We put the sheet into the oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise to 240 ) for ten minutes, until they 
have risen well, and become a pale brown colour. 

18. We should fold a table napkin, and arrange them on 
it for serving. 



382 National Training School for Cookery. 

. . 

SOUFFLES. 

Lesson No. 4. 

OMELETTE SOUFFLEE. 

Average cost of an Omelette Souffle'e {in a half -pint dish). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

6 eggs , 6 

\ oz. of flour o\ 

\ oz. of butter o| 

3 ozs. castor sugar i 

Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make an Omelette Soufflee. 

1. We take six eggs, put four yolks in a basin (the other 
two yolks are not required for present use), and put the 
whites of the six eggs in another basin. 

2. We add three ounces of castor sugar to the yolks of the 
eggs, and beat them up well with a wooden spoon, for ten 
minutes. 

3. We now stir in smoothly half an ounce of flour. 

N.B. — If the soufflee is to be flavoured, the flavouring should now be added, 
about fifteen drops of vanilla, or any other essence preferred. 

4. We take a whisk, and whip the whites of the eggs to a 
stiff froth, and then stir them lightly into the contents, in 
the other basin. 

5. We take half an ounce of butter and butter the inside 
of a half pint pie dish or soufflee tin ; we then pour in the 
mixture. 

N.B.— If jam is added it must be put in the centre of the soufflde, before it 
is baked. 

6. We put it in a quick oven (the thermometer at the 
door of the oven marking 240 ) to bake for ten minutes. 

7. We must serve the soufflee as soon as it is baked, or it 
will fall. 



Lesson on Making Sweet Omelettes, 383 
SWEET OMELETTE. 

Average cost of a " Sweet Omelette!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 eggs 2 

\ oz. of butter at is. 6d. a lb of 

Jam 1 

Sugar and salt o\ 

1 teaspoonful of orange flower water i 

IT 

Time required, about teyi minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Sweet Omelette of 
two eggs. 

1. We break two eggs ; we put the whites in one basin 
and the yolks in another. 

2. We put one teaspoonful of orange flower water, and one 
tablespoonful of castor sugar into a stewpan. 

3. We put the stewpan on the fire, and let it boil quickly 
for three minutes, stirring occasionally. 

4. We then pour it into a cup to cool ; add to it the yolks 
of eggs, and beat them to a cream. 

5. We add a quarter of a saltspoonful of salt to the zvhites 
of egg, and whip them to a stiff froth. 

6. We add the whites to the mixture in the basin, and 
mix them together very lightly. 

7. We put half an ottnce of butter into a frying pan. 

8. We put the pan on the fire, and let the butter get quite 
hot, but not burn. 

9. When the butter is quite hot we must pour in the 
mixture. 

10. We may let it stay on a slow fire for two, but not 
more than three- mifiutes. 

11. We must then take the pan off the fire and put it in 
the oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise to 
240°). 



384 National Training School for Cookery. 

12. We let it stay for about three or four minutes in the 
oven. 

13. We take rather more than a dessertspoonful of jam. 

14. We put the jam into a stewpan on the fire, and stir 
it until it has melted. 

15. We take the pan out of the oven. 

16. We take a knife and pass it round the edge of the 
omelette, to ease it from the pan. 

17. We give the pan a shake to loosen the omelette. 

18. We turn the omelette on to a hot dish. 

19. We spread the jam on the omelette, and fold it over 
like a sandwich. 

20. We sprinkle about a teaspoonful of white castor sugar 
over it, and it is ready for serving, 



Lesson on Making Savoury Omelette. 385 



SAVOURY OMELETTE. 

Average cost of a " Savoury Omelette" 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 eggs at id. each 2 

Salt, pepper, and parsley oj 

I oz. butter i£ 

4 
Time required, about four minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make a Savoury Omelette 
of two eggs. 

1. We break tzvo eggs into a basin. 

2. We add salt and pepper to taste. 

3. We take a sprig of parsley, wash it, dry it, and chop it 
up finely on a board (there should be about a teaspoonfid). 

4. We add the chopped parsley to the eggs. 

5. We beat the eggs lightly for two seconds with a fork. 

N.B.— The omelette could be flavoured with chopped herbs or mushrooms, 
with bacon or kid?iey cut in small pieces, or with grated cheese, according 
to taste. 

6. We take one ounce of butter, and put it in an omelette 
or frying pan. 

7. We put the pan on the fire to melt the butter. 

N.B. — The fire should be bright and clear. 

8. We wait till the bittter is quite hot, taking care that it 
does not burn. 

9. We pour the mixture of the egg into the pan. 

10. We stir the mixture quickly with a spoon. 

11. We must not let it burn or stick to the pan. We 
must shake the pan to prevent the omelette sticking or 
burning. 

12. We turn it quickly towards the handle of the pan 
and with the spoon, turn it over for a second, and then on 
to a hot dish, and it is ready for serving. 






B B 



386 A T ational Training School for Cookery. 
MACCARONI. 

Lesson No, I. 

Average cost of " Maccaroni with Milk " and " Maccaroni 
with Cheese? 

INGREDIENTS 

d. 

\ lb. of Maccaroni ) , 

Salt j 2 5 

1 quart of skimmed milk i\ 

2 oz. of cheese 2" 

1 oz. of butter 1 

Salt and pepper, and cayenne pepper 05 



Time required, about one hour and three-quarters. 



Now we will show you how to cook Maccaroni. 

1. We put a saucepan of hot water on the fire to boil. 

2. We take half a pound of maccaroni, and put it in the 
saucepan of boiling water, with one tablespoonful of salt, and 
Jet it boil gently for half an hour. 

3. After that time we pour the water out of the sauce- 
pan. 

4. We put one quart of skimmed milk into the saucepan. 

5. We put the saucepan on the fire, just bring it to the 
boil, and then move it to the side of the fire and let it 
simmer gently for one hour. 

6. When the maccaroni is sufficiently cooked and quite 
tender, we turn it out on a hot dish, and it can be eaten 
with sugar or treacle. 

N.B. — If liked, maccaroni and cheese can be made of it. 

7. For maccaroni and cheese, we take two ounces of cheese, 
and grate it with a grater on to a piece of paper. 

8. We take a dish or a tin and grease it well inside with 
a piece of dripping or butter. 

9. When the maccaroni is sufficiently cooked (as above) 
we turn it out of the saucepan on to the greased dish. 






Lessons an Cooking Maccaroni. 3S7 

10. We sprinkle over it pepper and salt and two or three 
grains of cayenne pepper, according to taste ; or 3 about half a 
teaspoonfu I of mustard might be mixed with it. 

11. We stir part of the grated cheese into the maccaroni 
and the remainder we sprinkle over the top. 

12. We take one ounce of butter, cut it in small pieces, 
and put these pieces of butter about on the top of the 
maccaroni. 

13. We put the dish in the oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise to 240 ), or in a Dutch oven 
before the fire for ten minutes ; it should become a pale 
brown. 

14. It will then be ready for serving. 



388 National Training School for Cookery, 



o 



STEWED MACCARONI. 

Lesson No. 2. 

Average cost of " Maccaroni Stewed in Stock" 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of maccaroni *.»... q.\ 

Salt and pepper , * ) 

1 pint of stock } 4 

Time required, about forty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to stew Maccaroni. 

1. We take half a pound of maccaroni and put it in a 
saucepan with plenty of hot water and a dessertspoonful of 

salt. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire, bring it to the boil, 
and let it boil gently for ten minutes. 

3. After that time we put the maccaroni into a colander, 
take it to the tap, and turn some cold zvater on it. 

4. We now let the maccaroni drain in the colander. 

5. We then turn it on a board, and cut it up in pieces. 

6. We put one pint of stock into a saucepan. 

7. We put the maccaroni into the stocky and season it 
with pepper and salt, according to taste. 

8. We put the saucepan on the fire, just bring it to the 
boil, and then move the saucepan to the side of the fire, and 
let it simmer gently for twenty minutes. 

N.B. — The lid should be on the saucepan. 

9. For serving, we turn the maccaroni out on a hot dish. 









Lesson on Making Cheese Straws. 389 



CHEESE STRAWS. 

Average cost of " Ingredients " for " Cheese Straws 
(about three dozen). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 oz. of butter z\ 

2 oz. of flour oh 

2 oz. of grated Parmesan cheese 3" 

1 oz. of Cheddar cheese 1^ 

1 egg 1 

Salt and cayenne pepper o| 



Time required, about twenty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Cheese Straws. 

1. We put two ounces offloitr on a board, and mix into it 
half a saltspoonful of salt, and a quarter of a saltspoonful of 
cayenne pepper. 

2. We take two ounces of Parmesan cheese and one ounce of 
Cheddar or some strong cheese, and grate them on a grater. 

3. We rub the cheese and two ounces of butter into the 
flour. 

4. We now mix all the ingredients together with the yolk 
of an egg into a smooth stiff 'paste. 

5. We flour the board and the rolling pin, and roll out 
the paste into a strip one-eighth of an inch in thickness, and 
five inches wide (the length the cheese straws are to be). 

6. We now take a sharp knife, dip it in flour, and cut the 
paste into strips one-eighth of an inch wide, so that they will 
he five inches long and one-eighth of an inch in thickness. 

7. We take two round cutters, dip them in flour, and cut 
little rings of paste. 

8. We take a baking sheet, and grease it with butter. 

9. We put the cheese straws and the rings on the baking 
sheet, and put it into a hot oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240 ) for ten minutes. 



390 National Training School for Cookery. 

10. We must look at the cheese straws occasionally, and 
see that they do not burn ; they should be of a pale brown 
colour when done. 

11. For serving, we take the cheese straws off the baking 
sheet, and put them through the rings of paste like a bundle 
of sticks. 



Lesson on Pickling Cabbage. 391 



PICKLED CABBAGE. 

Average cost of " Pickled Cabbage!' 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

A red cabbage o 3 

A gallon of vinegar 1 4 

Mace, cloves, allspice, whole pepper o x\ 

Salt and ginger , o o| 

1 9 
Time required, about three days. 



Now we will show you how to Pickle a Cabbage. 

1. We take a red cabbage, cut it in half, and cut out the stalk, 
and wash it well in salt and cold water. 

N.B. — A white-heart cabbage will do to pickle, but g)'een cabbages cannot be used. 

2. We put it on a board, and cut it in thin slices. 

3. We lay the slices in a large pan, sprinkle a handful of 
salt over each layer of slices, cover the top well with salt, 
and leave them for tzuo days. 

N.B. — We must turn the slices every morning and evening, and sprinkle a 
handful of salt over the layers each time we turn them. 

4. We then drain the slices on a hair sieve for one day. 

5. We put a gallon of vinegar, two blades of mace, twenty- 
four cloves, twenty -four allspice berries, and twenty- four 
peppercorns into a saucepan, with three pieces of ginger an 
inch long. 

6. We put the saucepan on the fire and let it boil up. 

7. We then turn the vinegar and spices out of the sauce- 
pan into a broad pan to cool. 

N.B. — They must on no account be allowed to cool in the saucepan. 

8. We put the cabbage into a stone jar, and pour the 
vinegar and spices over it. 

9. The cabbage must be quite covered with vinegar, and 
as it soaks it up more vinegar must be poured over it 

N.B. — This quantity of vinegar is sufficient for a large cabbage; a smaller 
one will take less. 

10. We tie the jar over with wash leather, brown paper, 
or a bladder. The Pickle is now ready for use. 



392 National Training School for Cookery. 
PICKLE FOR MEAT. 

Average cost of" Pickle for Meat" (about one gallon). 

INGREDIENTS. 

it 

i lb. of salt o\ 

6 oz. brown sugar l 

ik oz. saltpetre o; 

i gallon water 

Time required, about half an hour to make. 



Now we will show you how to make Pickle for Meat. 

1. We put one pound of salt, six ounces of brown sugar, 
one ounce and a half of saltpetre, and one gallon of zvater 
into a large saucepan. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire to bring it to the 
boil, and then let it boil for five minutes. We must keep it 
well skimmed. 

3. We then strain it into a tub or large basin. 

4. When the pickle is quite cold, meat can be put into it. 

N.B. — The meat should be kept well covered with the pickle 9 days. 

N.B. — This fickle will keep for 3 weeks in summer and 3 months in winter. 

N.B. — When the pickle is required again after it has once been used, it 
should be boiled up again, skimmed, strained, and allowed to get cold 
before the fresh meat is put into it. 

\.B. — If used for pig's head the pickle should be thrown away and not used 
again. 






Lessons on Making Cakes. -Sultana Cake. 39 

CAKES. 

Lesson No. i. 

SULTANA CAKE. 

Average cost of a " Sultana Cake" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

\ lb. of flour o x\ 

\ lb. of butter o 4 

£ lb. of sugar o 1 

{ lb. of sultana raisins o i£ 

1 oz. of candied peel o 1 

2 eggs o 2 

1 teaspoon ful of baking powder o o\ 

Two tablespoonsful of milk o o| 

1 lemon o 2 



x A 



Time required, about one hoiir and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Sultana Cake. 

1. We put half a pound of flour into a basin. 

2. We rub a quarter of a pound of butter into the flour 
with our hands. 

3. We now add a quarter of a pound of castor sugar, a 
teaspoonful of baking powder \ and a quarter of a pound of 
sultana raisins. 

4. We take a lemon, wipe it clean in a cloth, and grate 
the find of it into the basin. 

5. We cut up one ounce of candied peel into small pieces, 
and add it to the other ingredients. 

6. We put two tablespoonsful of milk into a small basin, 
and add to it the yolks of two eggs. (The whites we put on 
a plate.) 

7. We stir the milk and the eggs together, and then 
pour it into the other ingredients, and mix all together. 

8. We butter a cake tin. 



394 National Training School for Cookery. 



9. We whip the whites of the eggs into a stiff froth with a 
knife, and stir it lightly into the mixture, 

10. We now pour it into the tin, and put it into the 
oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise to 
240 ) to bake for one hour and a quarter. 

11. After that time we turn the cake out of the tin and 
stand it on its side, or on a sieve to cool. It is then ready 
for serving. 

N.B — This will prevent it getting heavy. 



Lessons on Making Cakes. — German Pound. 395 

CAKES. 
Lesson No. 2. 

GERMAN POUND CAKE. 

Average cost of a " German Pound Cake" 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. a. 

10 oz. of flour o 2 

8 oz. of fresh butter o 10 

8 oz. of castor sugar o 3 

2 oz. of candied peel o \h, 

I lemon o 2" 

\ lb. of sultana raisins o i| 

4 eggs o 4 



2 o 



Time required, about two hours and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make a German Pound 
Cake. 

1. We stand a wire sieve over a plate and rub through it 
ten ounces of flour. 

2. We put eight ounces of fresh butter into a basin, and 
work it to a cream with our hand. 

3. We add a tablespoonful of the sifted flour, a tablespoon- 
ful of castor sugar, and one egg, and mix them well into 
the butter. 

4. We continue to mix in by degrees the flour, siigar, 
and eggs until they are all used up. 

5. We take a lemon, wipe it clean in a cloth, and grate 
the rind of it into the basin. 

6. We also add a quarter of a pound of sultana raisins, 
and two ounces of candied peel (cut up in small pieces). 

7. We stir all the ingredients together with a spoon. 

8. We line a cake tin with buttered foolscap paper, and 
put three rounds of buttered paper at the bottom of the 
tin. 



396 National Training School for Cookery. 

9. We pour the mixture into the tin, and put it into the 
oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise to 240 ) 
to bake for two hours. 

10. After that time we turn the cake out of the tin, and 
stand it on its side, or on a sieve to cool. It is then ready 
for serving. 

N.R. — This will prevent it getting heavy. 



Lessons on Making Cakes. — Plain Cake. 397 

CAKES. 

Lesson No. 3. 

PLAIN CAKE. 

Average cost of this " Cake " {about 1 pound). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 lb. of flour 2^ 

3 oz. of dripping 2 

Baking powder, allspice, and salt of 

\ lb. of currants i± 

I pint of milk i|- 

\ lb. of sugar 1 

Time required, about one hour and a half. 

Now we will show you how to make a Plain Cake. 

1. We take one pound of flour and put it in a pan or large 
basin. 

2. We mix into the flour a teaspoonful of baking poivder 
and half a saltspoonful of salt. 

3. We take fozir ounces of clarified dripping, rub it w r ell 
into the flour with our fingers until there are no lumps 
remaining. 

4. We take a quarter of a pound of currants, put them in 
a cloth, and rub them clean. 

5. We add the currants to the flour, also half a teaspoon- 
ful of ground allspice, and a quarter of a pound of brown 
sugar. 

6. We mix these ingredients together with a wooden 
spoon. 

7. We now pour in half a pint of milk, and mix it all 

well together. 

8. We take a pound tin and grease it inside with a piece 
of dripping. 

9. We pour this mixture into the tin. 



398 National Training School for Cookery. 

10. We put the tin into the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240 ) to bake for one hour. 

11. After that time we take the tin out of the oven. 

12. We turn the cake out of the tin and stand it on its 
side to cool. It is then ready for serving. 

N.B. — This will prevent it getting heavy. 



Lessons on Making Cakes. — Seed Cake. 399 

CAKES. 

Lesson No. 4. 

SEED CAKE. 

Average cost of a " Seed Cake." 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

10 oz. of flour l\ 

2 oz. of sugar oh 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder ( l 

1 teaspoonful of carraway seeds J ° z 

2 oz. of clarified dripping i 

Two tablespoonsful of milk o\ 

Salt ] x 

7Y/«£ required, one hour a?id a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Seed Cake. 

1. We take ten ounces of flour and put it in a basin. 

2. We mix into the flour, one teaspoonful of baking 
powder, and half a saltspoonfid of salt. 

3. We take tzvo ounces of clarified dripping and rub it 
well into the flour with our hands, until there are no lumps 
remaining. 

4. We add two oimces of crushed loaf sugar and one tea- 
spoonfiil of carraway seeds. 

5. We mix these well together with a wooden spoon. 

6. We break one egg into a cup and beat it up with two 

tablespoonsful of milk. 

7. We pour this into the basin and mix all quickly- 
together into a stiff paste, stiff enough to allow a spoon to 
stand up in it. 

8. We take a cake tin and grease it inside with a piece 
of dripping. 

9. W 7 e pour the mixture into the tin and put it at once in 
the oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise to 
2 40°) to bake for one hour. 



4-00 National Training School for Cookery, 

10. To know when the cake is sufficiently baked, we run 
a clean knife into it, if it comes out perfectly bright and 
undimmed by steam, the cake is done. 

11. We turn the cake out of the tin and stand it on its 
side to cool. It is then ready for serving. 



Lessons on Making Cakes. — Plum Cake. 401 

CAKES. 

Lesson No. 5. 

PLUM CAKE. 

Average cost of a "Plum Cake " (about one and a half pound), 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 lb. of flour i\ 

\ lb. of fruit (plums or currants) zk 

3 oz. of dripping 2 

\ lb. of sugar 1 

1 egg 1 

Two tablespoonsful of milk o| 

A teaspoonful of baking powder | x 

Salt .. ) °* 

2 oz. of candied peel 1 



10 



Time required, about one hour and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make a Plum Cake. 

1. We put one pound of flour into a basin, with a tea- 
spoonful of baking powder and half a saltspoonful of salt. 

2. We take a quarter of a pound of clarified dripping and 
rub it well into the flour with our hands until there are no 
lumps remaining. 

3. We take half a pound of plums or currants or a 
quarter of a pound of each and add them to the flour. 

N.B. — If currants are used they should be well washed and dried in a cloth 
and picked over to see there are no stones in them. Large plums should 
be stoned before they are used. 

4. We take two ounces of candied peel y cut it in small 
pieces and put it in the basin. We also add a quarter of a 
pound of sugar. 

N.B. — If peel is disliked it may be omitted. 

5. We break one egg into a basin and add to it two table- 
spoonsful of milk, and beat them up. 

6. We stir this into the ingredients in the basin, mixing 
them all well together. 



4-02 National Training School for Cookery. 

7. We take a tin and grease it inside with dripping. 

8. We pour the mixture into the tin and put it into the 
oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise to 
240 ) to bake for about an hour. 

9. After that time we turn the cake out of the tin and 
stand it on its side slanting against a plate till it is cold. 
It is then ready for serving. 

N.B. — Tbv will prevent it getting heavy. 



Lessons on Making Cakes. — Cornflour Cake. 403 

CAKES. 

Lesson No. 6. 

CORNFLOUR CAKE. 

Average cost of a "Cornflour Cake" (about half a pound). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 tablespoonful of flour I 

\ lb. of cornflour j 2 

\ lb. of loaf sugar , i 

2 oz. of butter 2 

1 teaspoonful of baking powder o\ 

2 eggs 2 



7* 



Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make a Cornflour Cake. 

1. We put two ounces of butter into a basin, and beat it 
to a cream. 

2. We add to the butter a quarter of a pound of poitnded 
loaf sugar \ and mix it well. 

3. We break in tzvo eggs and beat all well together. 

4. We now stir lightly into the mixture a quarter of a 
pound of comfloitr, one tablespoonful of flour, and a teaspoonful 
of baking powder, and beat it well together for five minutes. 

5. We grease a cake tin inside with butter or dripping. 

6. We pour the mixture into the tin and put it imme- 
diately into the oven (the thermometer at the oven dooi 
should rise to 240 ) to bake for half an hour. 

7. After that time we turn the cake out of the tin and 
slant it against a plate until it is cold. (This will prevent 
its getting heavy.) It is then ready for serving. 

N.B. — If preferred, the mixture could be baked in small tins instead of one 
large one, in which case it would only take fifteen minutes to bake. 

C C 2 



404 National Training School for Cookery. 

CAKES. 

Lesson No. 7. 

DOUGH CAKE. 

Average cost of a "Dough Cake* (about two pounds arid 

■ a half). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ a quartern of dough 4 

1 egg 1 

\ lb. of sugar 1 

\ lb. of currants 1 

2 oz. of butter 2 

1 oz. of candied peel 1 

10 

Time required, abozit an hour and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make a Dough Cake. 

1. We put half a quartern of dough (made as for bread, 
see "Bread," Lesson No. i) into a basin. 

2. We take a quarter of a pound of currants, wash them, 
dry them in a cloth, and pick them over to see there are no 
stones mixed with them. 

3. We add the currants, a quarter of a pound of moist 
sugar, and one ounce of candied peel chopped finely, to 
the dough. 

N.B. — If liked, half a teaspoonful of mixed spice might be added. 

4. We now break one egg into the basin, add two ounces of 
butter, and beat all the ingredients well together. 

5. We take a tin, and grease it well inside with dripping. 

6. We turn the mixture into the greased tin. 

7. We put the tin into the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240 ) until the cake is sufficiently 
baked ; it will take about forty miiiutes. 

N.B. — To test if the cake is done, we should run a clean knife into it, and if 
it comes out clean, the cake is sufficiently baked. 

8. We then turn the cake out of the tin, and place it on its 
side, leaning against a plate until it is cold. It is then ready 
for serving. 

N.B. — This will prevent it getting heavy. 



Lesson on Making Shrewsbury Cakes. 405 
SHREWSBURY CAKES. 

Average cost of " Shrewsbury Cakes" (about half a pound). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of butter 4 

\ lb. of castor sugar x\ 

6 oz. of flour x 

1 teaspoonful of grated lemon rind q\ 

1 egg i 

Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Shrewsbury Cakes. 

1. We put a quarter of a pound of butter and a quarter of 
a pound of castor sugar into a basin, and beat them together 
till the mixture is of the same consistency as cream. 

N.B. — If the butter is very hard, it might be beaten over hot water. 

2. We add to the mixture one egg and about a teaspoon- 
ful of grated lemon rind, and beat all well together. 

3. We now stir in smoothly by degrees six ounces of 
flour. 

N.B. — We must be careful not to let it get lumpy. 

4. We flour a board and turn the paste out on it. 

5. We take a rolling-pin, flour it, and roll out the paste as 
thin as possible. 

6. We dip a cutter or wine-glass in flour, and cut the 
paste into biscuits or cakes. 

7. We grease a baking tin with dripping or butter, and 
put the cakes on it. 

8. We put the tin into the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240 ) to bake for about twenty 
minutes ; they should be a light brown when baked. 

9. The cakes are then ready for use. 



406 National Training School for Cookery. 
ROCK CAKES. 

Average cost of "Rock Cakes" (about one pound). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of flour ±\ 

| lb. of currants i\ 

\ lb. of sugar i 

i oz. of candied peel i 

i teaspoonful of baking powder o \ 

i teaspoonful of grated nutmeg or ginger o\ 

3 oz. of clarified dripping 2 

1 egg 1 

About 1 tablespoonful of milk o\ 

Time required, half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Rock Cakes. 

1. We put half a pound of flour into a basin. 

2. We stir one teaspoonful of baking pozvder into the 
flour. 

3. We take three ounces of clarified dripping, and rub it 
well into the flour with our hands, untrl there are no lumps 
remaining. 

4. We take a quarter of a pound of currants, put them in 
a cloth, rub them clean, and pick them over to see that 
there are no stones with them. 

5. We add the currants to the flour, also one teaspoonful 
of ground ginger ox grated nutmeg, and a quarter. of a pound 
of crushed loaf sugar. 

6. We take o?ie ounce of candied peel, cut it in pieces, and 
add it to the other ingredients. 

7. We mix all these ingredients together with a wooden 
spoon. 

8. We break one egg into a cup, and beat it up with 
about one tablespoonful of milk.. 

9. We pour this into the basin, and mix all well together 
into a very stiff paste. 



Lesson on Making Rock Cakes. 407 

10. We take a tin, and grease it with dripping. 

11. We divide the paste into small portions with two 
forks, and lay them in rough heaps on the tin. 

12. We put them into the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240 ) to bake for about fifteen 
minutes. 

13. After that time we take them out of the oven, and 
the cakes are then ready for use. 



408 National Training School for Cookery. 



BUNS. 

Average cost of u Buns " (this quantity will make about 

twenty-seven). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i oz. of German yeast i 

i| lb. of flour . 3.1 

3 gills of milk „ i| 

1 oz. of butter 1 

\ lb. of moist sugar 1 

\ lb. of sultana raisins or currants ii 

Time required, about two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make Buns. 

1. We put one gill and a half (one gill is a quarter of a 
pint) of milk into a saucepan and put it on the fire. 

2. We put one ounce of German yeast into a basin. 

3. When the milk is just warm, we pour it by degrees on 
to the yeast, mixing them well together with a spoon. 

4. We put one pound of flour into a large basin and stir 
into it the milk and yeast, mixing it into a dough. 

5. We cover the basin with a cloth, and stand it on the 
fender, and let it rise for about one hour. 

6. We put one gill and a half of milk into a saucepan, 
with one ounce of butter, and put it on the fire to warm. 

7. We put half a pound of 'flour -into a basin and stir into 
it the milk and butter. 

8. When the dough is sufficiently risen, we turn it into 
this mixture, and work them well together. 

9. We now add a quarter of a pound of sultana raisins or 
currants and a quarter of a pound of moist sugar, and mix 
all well together. 

N.B. — If currants are used they should be well washed, dried in a cloth, and 
carefully picked over to see if there are any stones mixed with them. 

10. We cover the basin with a cloth and stand it near 
the fire to rise aeain for one hour. 



Lesson on Making Buns. 409 



11. After that time we take a tin and grease it with 
dripping or butter. 

N. B. —If there is no tin, the shelf from the oven should be greased and used 
instead. 

12. We flour a paste board and turn the dough out on it. 

13. We take a knife, dip it in flour, and cut the dough 
into pieces. 

14. We flour our hands, and form the dough into balls. 

N.B. — This quantity of dough will make about twenty-seven ordinary sized 
buns. 

15. We put the buns on the tin. 

16. We put the tin into the oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise to 240 ) to bake the buns for 
about half an hour. 

17. When they are half done, we take the tin out of the 
oven, brush the buns over with water, and sprinkle white 
sugar over them. 

18. We now put the tin back in the oven. 

19. When the buns are sufficiently baked, we take them 
off the tin and slant them against a plate until they are 
cold. They are then ready for serving. 

N.B. — This will prevent their getting heavy. 



410 National Training School for Cookery. 
RICE BUNS. 

Average cost of " Rice Buns" (about eight or ten). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i tablespoonful of flour „ i k 

5 lb. of ground rice : f * 2 

J lb. of sugar i 

2 oz. of butter 2 

2 eggs 2 

| a teaspoonful of baking powder , o| 

7Y»z<? reqtrired, half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Rice Buns. 

1. We put a quarter of a pound of ground rice and a 
tablespoonful of flour into a basin, with half a teaspoonful of 
baking powder. 

2. We add a quarter of a pound of pounded loaf sugar ; 
and two ounces of butter ', and mix all together with a wooden 
spoon. 

3. We break in two eggs and beat all lightly together. 

N.B. — We should be careful to see that the eggs are good before adding them 
to the mixture. 

4. We take some small tins or patty pans, and grease 
them well with a piece of dripping or butter. 

5. We fill these tins tzvo-thirds full with the mixtitre. 

N.B. — This quantity will make about eight or ten buns. 

N.B. — If there are no small tins, the mixture could be put into a cake tin, 
which should be previously greased inside. 

6. We put the tins into the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240°) to bake for fifteen minutes. 

7. After that time, we turn the buns out of the tins, and 
lean them against a plate until they are cold. They are 
then ready for serving. 

N.B. — This will prevent their getting heavy. 






Lesson on Making Ginger-Bread Nuts. 4 1 1 
GINGER-BREAD NUTS. 

Average cost of " Ginger-bread Nuts " (?.bout twenty-four), 

INGREDIENTS- 

d. 

1 lb. of flour 2j 

\ lb. of treacle 2 

4 oz. of butter 4 

\ an oz. of ground ginger o? 

Allspice 1 

1 teaspoonful of carbonate of soda ' o\ 

Salt ! 

3 oz. of moist sugar . . . | 

Two tablespoonsful of milk j x 

10 

Time required, about twenty-five minutes. 

Now we will show you how to make Ginger-bread Nuts. 

1. We put one pound of floitr into a basin with about half 
a saltspoonfid of salt. 

2. We also add half an ounce of ground ginger, three 
ounces of moist sugar, one teaspoonful of carbonate of soda, 
and allspice (about as much as will cover a threepenny piece). 

3. We put half a pound of treacle and four ounces of 
butter into a saucepan, and melt them together over the fire. 

4. We mix the ingredients together with two tablespoons- 
ful of milk, and then add the melted treacle and the four 
ounces of butter, and mix all well together into a firm paste. 

N.B. — We should be very careful that all the ingredients are well mixed and 
that there are no lumps left. 

5. We flour a board and turn the paste out on to it. 

6. We should flour our hands and knead the paste. 

7. We now divide the paste into about twenty -f our pieces. 

8. We roll each piece into a ball, like a walnut, and put 
them two inches apart on a greased tin. 

9. We put them in the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240 ) for fifteen minutes. 

10. After that time we turn the ginger-bread nuts off the 
tin and set them aside to cool. They are then ready for 
serving. 



4T2 National Training School for Cookery. 
MILK BISCUITS. 

Average cost of " Milk Biscuits " (about two dozen). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i gill ( \ pint) of milk ot 

i oz. of butter i~ 

\ lb. of flour i| 

i teaspoonful of baking powder ot 

3 

Time required, about half an kour. 



Now we will show you how to make Milk Biscuits. 

1. We put one gill (a quarter of a pint) of milk into 
a saucepan ; we add to it one ounce of butter, and put it on 
the fire to warm. 

2. We put half a pound of flour into a basin with a 

teaspoonful of baking powder. 

3. When the milk is hot, we pour it into the flour and 
stir it carefully into a smooth, stiff paste. 

4. We flour a board and turn the paste out on it. 

5. We take a rolling pin, flour it, and roll the paste out 
into as thin a sheet as possible. 

6. We flour a docker or a tumbler and cut the paste out 
into rounds, about the size of the top of a teacup. 

7. We grease a tin with dripping or butter, and place the 
biscuits on it. 

8. We put the tin into the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240 ) to bake for twenty minutes. 

9. After that time we turn the biscuits off the tin, and 
set them aside to cool. They are then ready for serving. 



JLesson on Making Oatmeal Biscuits. 413 
OATMEAL BISCUITS. 

Average cost of " Oatmeal Biscuits" (about half a pound). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

7 oz. of flour 1^ 

3 oz. of oatmeal o.^ 

3 oz. of castor sugar of 

3 oz. of lard or butter 3 

\ of a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda o\ 

1 egg 1 



Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Oatmeal Biscuits. 

1. We put three ounces of lard or butter into a saucepan, 
and put it on the fire to melt and warm. 

2. We put seven ounces of flour into a basin with three 
ounces of oatmeal, tJiree ounces of castor sugar, and a quarter 
of a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda, and mix all toge- 
ther with a spoon. 

3. We now stir in the melted lard. 

4. We put about a tablespoonful of cold water into a tea 
cup ; we break one egg into the water and beat them 
slightly together. 

5. We add this to the mixture in the basin, and mix all 
well and smoothly together with a spoon. 

6. We flour a board and turn the paste out on it. 

7. We take a rolling pin, flour it, and roll out the paste 
as thin as possible. 

8. We flour a tumbler and cut the paste into biscuits 
according to taste. 

9. We grease a baking tin with dripping or butter y and 
place the biscuits on it. 

10. We put the tin into the oven (the thermometer at the 
oven door should rise to 240°) to bake for twenty minutes. 

11. After that time we turn the biscuits off the tin, and 
set them aside to cool ; they are then ready for serving. 



414 National Training School for Cookery. 



SCONES. 

Average cost of " Scones " (about eight). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

1 lb. of flour 2.\ 

\ pint of milk \\ 

3 oz. of butter 3 

\ oz. of cream of tartar , 

\ oz. of carbonate of soda J> 1 

1 oz. of sugar , 



Time required, about forty minutes. 






Now we will show you how to make Scones. 

1. We put one pound of flour into a basin and mix into 
it half an ounce of cream of tartar, a quarter of an ounce of 
carbonate of soda, and 07ie ounce of sugar. 

2. We take three ounces of butter, and rub it well into 
the flour with our hands. 

3. We turn it out on to a floured board. 

4. We mix it into a smooth paste with half a pint of milk. 

5. We flour a rolling pin and roll it out to make sure 
that the butter is well mixed in the flour. 

6. We flour the rolling pin and roll out the paste to a 
thin sheet, about one-third of an inch in thickness. 

7. We take a knife, dip it in flour, and cut the paste into 
triangular pieces, each side about four inches long. 

8. We flour a tin, put the scones on it, and bake them 
directly in the oven (the thermometer at the oven door 
should rise to 240°) for thirty to forty minutes. 

9. When the scones are half done, we should brush them 
over with milk, 

N.B. — Scones should be served hot. 



Lesson on Making Short-Bread. 415 

SHORT-BREAD. 

Average cost of " Short-Bread? 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. of flour of 

2 oz. of butter 2 

1 oz. of castor sugar o\ 

3 
Time required, about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make S J tort-Bread. 

1. We put two oitnces of butter in a saucepan, and put it 
on the fire to melt and warm. 

2. We put a quarter of a pound of flour into a basin with 
one ounce of castor (pounded lump) sugar, and the melted 
butter. 

3. We mix these ingredients well together. 

4. We flour a board and turn the paste out on it. 

5. We flour our hands and knead the paste well. 

6. We take a rolling pin, flour it, and roll out the paste 
to about one-tJtird of an inch in thickness. 

7. We flour a knife and cut the paste into oval shapes. 

8. We grease a baking tin with dripping or butter. 

9. We put the short-bread on the tin, and put it in the 
oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise to 240 ) 
to bake till a pale brown. We should then take out the tin 
and set the short-bread aside to cool ; it is then ready for 
serving. 



41 6 National Training School for Cookery. 
MILK ROLLS. 

Average cost of "Milk Rolls" (about twelve). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i lb. of self-raising flour 3 

2 oz. of butter 2 

Milk 1 

6 

Titne required, abotit half an hour. 

Now we will show you how to make Milk Rolls. 

1. We put one pound of self-raising flour 'into a basin and 
rub two ounces of butter into it with our hands. 

2. We add sufficient milk to make it into a lithe firm 
dough. 

3. We sprinkle flour over a board, and turn the dough 
out on it. 

4. We take a knife, dip it in flour, and cut the dough into 
twelve pieces. 

N.B.— We should keep our hands floured to prevent the dough from sticking 
to them. 

5. We form each piece into a small roll. 

6. We flour a baking tin. 

7. We put these roils on to the tin and put the tin in the 
oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise to 240 ) 
to bake for twenty minutes. 

8. The milk rolls will then be ready for use. 



On Making Yorkshire Tea Cakes. 417 
YORKSHIRE TEA CAKES. 

Average cost of " Yorkshire Tea Cakes " (about two). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

§ of a lb. of flour - i| 

i| gill of milk . . , of 

I oz. of butter , i 

*egg 1 

£ an oz. of German yeast ot 

5 
Time required, about one hozcr and a half. 

Now we will show you how to make Yorkshire Tea 
Cakes. 

1. We put one gill and a half (one gill is a quarter of a 
pint) of milk into a small saucepan and put it on the fire. 

2. We put half an ounce of Gennan yeast into a basin, 
and when the milk is just warm we pour it on to the yeast. 

3. We put three-quarters of a pound of flour into a large 
basin, and rub into it one ounce of butter. 

4. We beat up one egg in a cup, and then add it to the 
flour. 

5. We now pour the yeast and milk through a strainer 
into the basin, and mix all well together with a wooden 
spoon. 

6. We flour a board and turn the dough out on it. 

7. We flour our hands and knead the dough for a minute 
or two. 

8. We take a knife, dip it in flour, and divide the dough 
into cakes. 

9. We take some cake tins (as many as are required), 
and grease them inside with dripping. 

10. We put the cakes into the tins. 

N.B. — The tins should be only three-quarters full, so as to allow for the 
cakes to rise. 

D D 



4 1 8 National Training School for Cookery. 

11. We stand the tins near the fire, and allow the cakes 
to rise for one hour. 

12. After that time we put the tins into the oven (the 
thermometer at the oven door should rise to 240 ) to bake 
for a quarter of an hour. 

13. We then turn the cakes out of the tins, and place 
them on a sieve, or on the seat of a cane chair, to cool. 
They are then ready for serving. 

N. B. — This will prevent them from getting heavy. 



Lessons on Making Bread. 419 



BREAD. 

Average cost of "Bread" {about a quartern), 



INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

3! lbs. flour (ands) at 2s. \d. the peck 7 

1 oz. German yeast ) 

1 teaspoonful of salt / 



Time required, quarter of an hour for making, two or three hours for rising, 
and one hour and a half for baking. 



Now we will show you how to make Bread. 

1. We take three pounds and a half of seconds flour, put 
three pounds of it into a large pan, and make a hole or well 
in the centre of the flour. 

N.B. — Half a pound is reserved to work the bread up with. 

2. We put one ounce of German yeast into a basin. 

3. We add about a gill of tepid water, and stir the yeast 
into a stiff paste. 

4. We then fill the basin with hike-warm water, and stir 
the yeast smoothly, making in all about 07ie pint and three 
gills. 

5. We add to the flour, a teaspoonful of salt, and then 
pour in by degrees the yeast, mixing the flour lightly into a 
dough with our hands. 

6. We should add more lukewarm water if the dough is 
too stiff. 

N. B. — We must be sure to mix up all the flour into dough. 

7. We sprinkle about a tablespoonful of dry flour over 
the dough, and cover the pan with a cloth. 

8. We place the pan near the fire for at least two hours 
to let the dough rise. 

9. When the dough has risen sufficiently, we take up the 

D D 2 



42 o National Training School for Cookery. 

pan and work in more flour, if necessary, to make the 
dough stiff enough to turn out of the pan. 

N.B. — We must keep our hands well floured all through the process of 
bread making. 

10. We turn the dough out on a well-floured board, and 
knead it well, using up a good deal more flour. 

11. We divide the dough into six equal pieces, knead each 
piece separately, and make into a loaf. 

N.B. — If the bread is to be baked in tins we form each loaf into a dumpling 
or ball (with a smooth surface and no cracks in it), either long or round 
according to the shape of the tin. 

12. We put the bread into the tins, which should be well 
floured. 

13. We cut a slit in the top of the dough, or prick it with 
a fork. 

N.B. — If the bread is to be made into cottage loaves, — 

14. We divide each piece into two, one rather larger 
than the other. 

15. We make each into a ball, put the smaller one on the 
top of the other, and press our forefinger into the middle of 
the top. 

N.B. — Cottage loaves are baked on floured tins. 

N.B. — If there are no tins the oven shelf should be washed and floured, and 
a tin is not then necessary. 

16. We let the loaves rise half an hour in a warm place 
before we put them in the oven. 

17. We then put them in the oven (the thermometer at 
the oven door should rise' to 280 , and after a quarter of an 
hour be reduced to 220 ) for about one hour and a half 

N.B. — To test if the bread is sufficiently baked we should run a clean knife 
into the loaves, and if it comes out perfectly bright the bread is done. 

18. When we take the bread out of the oven we stand 
each loaf up on its side to cool. It is then ready for use. 



Sick-Room Cookery. — Chicken Panada. 4.21 
SICK-ROOM COOKERY 

Lesson No. i. 

CHICKEN PANADA. 

Average cost of " Chicken Panada? 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

\ a chicken 1 6 

A tablespoonful of cream o i| 



1 ri 



Time required, about two hours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make Chicken Panada. 

1. We take a chicken and clean it in the same way that 
we do for roasting a fowl (see "Trussing a Fowl for 
Roasting "). 

2. We cut the chicken in half, dividing it down the 
middle of the back with a sharp knife. 

3. We take all the flesh off the bones of half the chicken, 
and cut it into small pieces with a sharp knife. 

4. We put the pieces of chicken into a gallipot, and 
sprinkle over them half a saltspoonful of salt. 

5. We take a piece of paper and tie it over the top of 
the gallipot. 

6. We take a saucepan half full of boiling water, and put 
it on the fire. 

7. We stand the gallipot in the saucepan, and let it 
simmer for two hours. The water must not cover the 
gallipot. 

8. After that time we take the gallipot out of the 
saucepan. 

9. We take the pieces of chicken out with a spoon, We 
must not lose any of the liquor. 

10. We take the pieces of chicken, and put them into a 
mortar and pound them well to a pulp. 



422 National Training School for Cookery, 

11. We take a tammy sieve and stand it over a basin. 

12. We take the pounded chicken and pass it through the 
sieve, rubbing it with a wooden spoon. 

13. We pour a little of the chicken liquor into the pulp 
on the sieve to make it pass through more easily. 

14. When all the chicken pulp has been passed through 
into the basin, we stir in one tablespotnful of cream,. 

15. When the Panada is required, it should be warmed, 
but great care should be taken not to let it boil or the 
cream will curdle. 



We use the bones for Chicken Broth. 

1. We take the chicken bones and put them in a saucepan 
with one pint of cold water. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire, and let it simmer 
gently for two hours. 

3. We must watch it, and skim it occasionally. 

4. When required for use, we take a strainer and strain 
the chicken broth into a basin. 

5. We flavour it with pepper and salt according to the 
taste oi the patient. 



Sick- Room Cookery. — Beef Essence. 423 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 2. 

BEEF ESSENCE. 

Average cost of " Beef Essence? 

INGREDIENT. 

1 lb. of gravy beef gd. 

Time required, about two hours. 



Now we will show you how to make Beef Essence. 

1. We take one pound of gravy beef, and cut off all fat 
And gristle with a sharp knife. 

2. We cut the lean up into small pieces, and put them 
into ajar. 

3. We put the cover over the jar and tie a piece of paper 
over it. 

4. We take a saucepan half full of boiling water, and 
stand it on the fire. 

5. We stand the jar in the saucepan of boiling water to 
steam for two hours. The water must not cover the jar. 

6. When it is done we take a strainer and put it over 
a basin. 

7. We strain off the liquor into the basin, and flavour it 
with pepper and salt according to the patient's complaint. 

N.B. — The meat can be put aside and used again for second stock. 



4 National Training School for Cookery. 



SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 3. 

CREAM OF BARLEY. 

Average cost of " Cream of Barley." 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

\ lb. veal cutlet 7! 

I oz. of barley Oj 

\ gill of cream 3 



10I 
Time required, about two /tours and a half. 



Now we will show you how to make Cream of Barley, 

1. We take half a pound of veal cutlet, and cut off all the 
fat with a sharp knife. 

2. We cut the lean into small pieces and put it in a 

saucepan with one pint of cold water. 

3. We add half an ounce of barley, (previously well washed 
and soaked an hour in cold water), and half a saltspoonful of 
salt. 

4. We put the saucepan on the fire, and let it boil gently 
for two hours. 

5. We strain off the liquor into a basin, and put the meat 
and barley in a mortar and pound them together. 

6. We take a hair sieve, and put it over a basin. 

7. We turn the pounded meat and barley on to the sieve, 
and rub them through with a wooden spoon. 

8. We pour the liquor on to the sieve to help the pulp to 
pass through. 

9. When it has all passed through the sieve into the 
basin, we stir in smoothly two table spoonsful of cream. 

10. When the Cream of Barley is required, it should be 
warmed, but great care must be taken not to let it boil or 
the cream will curdle. 



Lessons on Sick-Room, Cookery. — Arrowroot. 425 
SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 4. 

A CUP OF ARROWROOT AND ARROW- 
ROOT PUDDING. 

Average cost of " Cup of Arrowroot" and 'Arrowroot 
Pudding" 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 
A dessertspoonful of arrowroot o\ 

1 a pint of milk ) r i 

Castor sugar , j 4 

~^r 

2 eggs . 2 

Time required, about half an Iwur. 

Now we will show you how to make a Cup of Arrowroot. 

1. We take a dessertspoonful of A rrowroot, and put it into 
a small basin. 

2. We add a dessertspoonful of cold milk, and stir it 
smoothly into a paste with a spoon. 

3. We add a small teaspoonful of castor sugar, according 
to taste. 

4. We take a small saucepan, and put in it half a pint of 
cold milk. 

5. We put the saucepan on the fire, and watch the milk 
carefully until it boils. 

6. When it is quite boiling, we pour it on to the arrowroot 
paste, stirring all the time to get it quite smooth. 

N.B. — If the patient prefers an Arrowroot Pudding: — 

7. We add to the mixture described above, the yolks of 
two eggs, whipping it all well together. 

N.B. — The eggs should not be added till the mixture has cooled a little, or 
they would curdle. 



426 National Training School for Cookery. 



8. We put the whites of the same eggs into another 
basin, and whisk them to a stiff froth. 

9. We add the whites of the eggs to the arrozvroot 
mixture, stirring them lightly together. 

10. We pour the mixture into a buttered dish, and put it 
into the oven (the thermometer at the oven door should rise 
to 240 ) to bake for ten minutes. It should be then served 
at once. 



Lessons on Sick- Room Cookery. — Rice Water. 427 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 5. 

RICE WATER. 

Average cost of " Rice Water." 
INGREDIENTS. 



d. 

3 oz. of Carolina rice o| 

1 inch of the stick of cinnamon \ 

Sugar ) 



OS 

1 
Time reqtiired, abozit one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Rice Water. 

1. We take three ounces of Carolina rice, and wash it well 
in two or three waters. 

2. We take a stewpan with one quart of warm water. 

3. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil. 

4. When the water is quite boiling, we put in the rice, 
and one inch of the stick of cinnamon, and let it boil for one 
hour, until the rice has become a pulp. 

5. We then take the stewpan off the fire, and strain the 
rice water into a basin, and sweeten it according to taste. 

N.B. — When cold it is ready for use. 



428 National Training School for Cookery. 
SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 6. 

BARLEY WATER. 

Average cost of" Clear Barley Water" (about half a pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 oz. of pearl barley o| 

The rind of a quarter of a lemon o| 

2 lumps of loaf sugar o\ 

1 

Time required, about one hour. 

For Making Thick Barley Water (about one pi?it\. 

d. 

2 oz. of pearl barley o\ 

The rind of half a lemon o\ 

Sugar o| 

Ji 
Time required, about two hours. 

Now we will show you how to make two kinds of Barley 
Water — Clear Barley Water and thick Barley Water. 

For half a pint of clear barley water : — 

1. We take two ounces of pearl barley y and wash it well 
in two or three waters. 

2. We put a kettle of water on the fire to boil. 

3. We take a quarter of a lemon, wipe it clean in a cloth, 
and peel it very thinly. 

N.B. — We must be careful, in peeling the lemon, not to cut any of the white 
skin, as it would make it bitter. 

4. We put the washed barley into a jug. 

5. We put in the lemon peel, and two lumps of loaf 
sugar. 

6. When the water in the kettle is quite boiling, we pour 
one pint of it on to the barley in the jug. 



Lessons on Sick- Room Cookery. — Barley Water. 429 

7. We cover over the top of the jug, and let it stand on 
ice or in a cool place, until it is perfectly cold. 

8. We then strain the water into a clean jug for use. 

N.B. — The barley can be used again with the addition of one ounce of fresh. 



For one pint of thick Barley Water : — 

1. We take two ounces of pearl barley \ and wash it well in 
two or three waters. 

2 We put the barley into a stewpan, with one quart of 
cold water. 

3. We put the stewpan on the fire, and let it boil gently 
for two hours. 

4- We take half a lemon, wipe it clean in a cloth, and 
peel it very thinly. 

5- We put the lemon peel into a jug. 

6. When the barley water is sufficiently boiled, we strain 
it into the jug over the lemon. 

7. We put the jug into a cool place, and when it is 
perfectly cold, we take out the lemon peel, and sweeten the 
water, according to taste. It is then ready for use. 



BARLEY WATER FOR INVALIDS. 

Time required, five minutes. 

1. We take one ounce of Robinson s Patent Barley, mixed 
with a wine-glass full of cold water. 

2. We pour this into a stewpan containing one quart of 
boiling water. 

3. We stir this over the fire while boiling for five 
minutes. 

4. We then flavour it with a small piece of lemon peel 
or cinnamon. 

5. We put the jug into a cool place, and when it is 
perfectly cold we take out the lemon peel and sweeten the 
water, according to taste. It is then ready for use. 



43 o National Training School for Cookery. 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 7. 

APPLE WATER. 

Average cost of "Apple Water " {one quart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

6 apples 5 

The rind of half a lemon j ± 

Sugar „.„..../ l 

j£ 

Time required for making, about eight minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Apple Water. ' 

1. We take six apples, peel them, and cut out the core. 

N.B.— When the apples are juicy, six will be sufficient, but more may be 
required according to the season of the year. 

2. We put a kettle of water on the fire to boil. 

3. We cut the apples up in slices. 

4. We take half a lemon, wipe it clean in a cloth, and 
peel it very thinly. 

5. We put the slices of apple and the lemon rind into a 
J u g- 

6. When the water is quite boiling, we pour one quart of 
it on to the apples in the jug. 

7. We sweeten it according to taste. 

8. We stand the jug of apple water aside to cool. 

9. When the water is quite cold we strain it into another 
jug, and it is then ready for use. 



Lessons on Sick- Room Cookery. — Lemonade, 431 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 8. 

LEMONADE. 

Average cost oi" Lemonade" {one pint ixnd a half). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 lemons 3 

Loaf sugar o\ 

~K 

Time required, about one hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Lemonade. 

1. We put a kettle of water on the fire to boil. 

2. We take two lemons, wipe them clean in a cloth, and 
peel them very thinly. 

N.B. — We should be careful, in peeling the lemons, not to cut any of the 
pith, or white skin, as it would make the lemonade bitter. 

3. We now cut off all the pith. 

4. We cut up the lemons into thin slices, take out all the 
pips, and put the slices and half the rind of the lemons into 
a jug. 

5. We add loaf sugar, according to taste, about one 
ounce. 

6. When the water is quite boiling, we pour one pint 
a7id a half on to the lemons in the jug. 

7. We cover over the jug, and stand it aside to cool. 

8. When the lemonade is quite cold, we strain it into 
another jug, and it is then ready for use. 



43 2 National Training School for Cookery. 
SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 9. 

TOAST AND WATER. 

A verage cost of " Toast and Water " {one quart). 

INGREDIENTS. 

1 crust of bread \d. 

1 quart of cold water. 

Time, required, half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Toast and Water. 

1. We take a crust of bread and toast it quite brown on 
all sides in front of the fire. 

N.B. — Crumb should not be used as it would turn sour. 

2. We put the toasted crust of 'bread 'into a jug, and pour 
on it one quart of cold water. 

3. We cover the jug over with a cloth, and stand it aside 
for half an hour. It is then ready for use. 

N.B. — This is a pleasant drink, and considered more refreshing than when 
made with boiling water. 



Lessons on Sick-Room Cookery. — Gruel. 433 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 10. 

GRUEL. 

Average cost of " Gruel" {one pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

2 dessertspoonsful of patent groats o\ 

Sugar o| 

\ oz. of fresh butter oh 

\ gill (2 tablespoonsful) of rum 3 

4 
Time reqtcired, about fifteen vnnutes. 

Now we will show you how to make Gruel. 

1. We put a stew-pan with one pint of zvatet on the fire 
to boil. 

2. We take two dessertspoonsful of patent groats, and put 
them in a basin. 

3. We add by degrees two tablespoonsful of cold water to 
the groats y and stir it into a smooth paste. 

4. When the water in the stew-pan is quite boiling, we 
pour in the mixed gruel, and stir it well with a wooden 
spoon, until it has boiled for ten minutes (it must not be 
lumpy), we then pour it into a basin. 

5. Now it is ready for use. 

N.B.-=-If the gruel be required for a cold — 

6. We stir in \ oz. of fresh butter, and sweeten it 
according to taste. 

7. We also add two tablespoonsful of rum. 

N.B. — If the patient is feverish, spirits should not be added, 



E E 



434 National Training School for Cookery. 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 
Lesson No. ii. 

WHITE WINE WHEY, OR TREACLE 
POSSET. 

Average cost of " White Wine Whey" or " Treacle Posset " 
{half a pint). 



For White Wine Whey. 

d. 

\ pint of milk i 

4 lumps of sugar o\ 

i wineglassful of wine 3 



INGREDIENTS. 

For Treacle Posset. 



d. 

I pint of milk x 

\ a gill of treacle t 



t3 — 

Time required, about ten minutes. 

Now we will show you how to make White Wine Whey. 

1. We put half a pint of milk into a saucepan and four 
lumps of sugar. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire to boil. 

3. When it boils we pour in a wineglassful of wine 
{sherry or cowslip) according to taste. 

N.B. — If the milk is not quite boiling the wine will not curdle it. 

4. We move the saucepan to the side of the fire, and let 
it stand for about one minute. 

5. We then strain the whey into a glass and it is ready 
for serving at once. 

N.B. — The curds are not digestible. 

N.B. — Treacle posset is made in the same way, except that no sugar should 
be added to the milk, and the same quantity of treacle is used instead of 
wine. 



Lessons on Sick-Room Cookery. — Bran Tea. 435 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 12. 

BRAN TEA. 

Average cost of " Bran Tea " (one quart), 

INGREDIENTS. 

3 tablespoonsful of bran. ) A , 
Sugar or honey. J 4 " 

Time required, about twenty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Bran Tea. 

1. We put a kettle of warm water on the fire to boil. 

2. We take three tablespoonsful of bran (not too coarse, 
for that is greasy) and put it into a large jug. 

N.B. — Bran is the husk of the grain which is sifted from the flour after the 
wheat is ground by the miller. 

3. When the water is quite boiling, we pour one quart 
into the jug. 

4. We cover the jug and let it stand for a quarter of an 
hour to draw. 

5. When it is drawn, we strain off the tea through a piece 
of muslin, and sweeten it according to taste with either 
sugar or honey. It is then ready for use. 

N.B.— When wine is good for the patient it may be added to the tea, or 
lemon juice, but it is very good without. 

N.B. — This is an invaluable drink for softening the throat. 



43 6 National Training School for Cookery. 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 13. 

MUTTON BROTH. 

Average cost of " Mutton Broth " [two quarts). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

4 lbs. of the scrag end of the neck of mutton . 2 8 

2 knuckles from the legs of mutter 1 o 

A saltspoonful of salt .... I 1 

2 oz. of Patna rice » ° 2 

Time required for making, — the stock should be made the day before, ana 
then the broth can be finished iii about half an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make two quarts of Mutton 
Broth. 

1. We take four pounds of the scrag end of the neck of 
mutton , wash it well, put it on a board, cut away all the fat, 
and chop it up in large pieces. 

2. We put these pieces into a stewpan, with two knuckle- 
bones from the legs of mutton. 

3. We pour in five pints of cold water and add a salt- 
spoonful of salt. 

4. We put the stewpan on the fire, just bring it to the 
boil, and then let it simmer iorfour hours. 

5. We must watch it and skim it very often. 

6. After that time we strain the stock into a basin, and 
put it aside until it is quite cold and in a stiff jelly. 

7. We then take the stock and remove all the fat from 
the top with a spoon. 

8. We take a clean cloth and dip it in hot water, and 
dab over the top of the stock so as to remove every particle 
of grease. 

9. We must now take a clean dry cloth and wipe the top 
of the stock dry. 



Lessons on Sick- Room Cookery. — Mutton Broth. 437 

10. We take two ounces of Paina rice, and wash it well 
in two or three waters. 

11. We put the stock into a stewpan. 

12. We put the stewpan on the fire to boil. 

13. When the stock is quite boiling we stir in the rice, 
and let it boil for twenty-five minutes to cook the rice. 

N.B. — We should feel that the rice is quite tender. 

14. We season it with pepper and salt, according to the 
patient's complaint. 

15. For serving, we pour the broth into a basin. 

N.B. — The bones should be put in the stock poL 



438 National Training School for Cookery. 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 14. 

MUTTON BROTH. 

Average cost of this dish, &#., about one quart of mutton 
broth and a dish of boiled mutton with parsley sauce — 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

2 lbs. of the scrag end of the neck of mutton i 4 
1 oz. of pearl barley or rice 



\ a saltspoonful 

A r>7 nf hnttpr 



of salt ° °5 



oz. of butter , o 



\ oz. of flour ( 1 

2 sprigs of parsley j ° ° % 

7Y;/z£ required, about two hours and forty minutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Mutton Broth. 

1. We take two pounds of the scrag end of the neck of 
mutton, and wash it well until it is quite clean. 

2. We put the meat into a large saucepan with three 
pints of cold water, and put it on the fire to boil. 

3. We take one ounce of pearl barley or rice, and wash it 
well in cold water. 

4. When the water boils we put in the pearl barley or 
rice and half a saltspoonful of salt to help the scum to 
rise. 

6. We now draw the saucepan to the side of the fire and 
let it simmer gently for two hours and a half. 

6. We must watch it and skim it occasionally with a 
spoon. 

7. If the meat is required for immediate use we should 
make sauce to pour over it. 

8. We take a sprig or two of parsley, wash it and wring 
it in a cloth, put it on a board, and chop it up finely with a 
knife. 



Lessons on Sick- Room Cookery. — Mutton Broth. 439 

9. We put half an ounce of bittter into a saucepan ana 
put it on the fire. 

10. When the butter is melted we stir in smoothly half 
an ounce offloitr with a wooden spoon. 

11. We take one gill (quarter pint) of broth from the 
muttoit, pour it on to the butter and flour, and stir smoothly 
until it boils and thickens. 

12. We now add the chopped parsley to the sauce, and 
move the saucepan to the side of the fire to keep warm till 
required for use. 

13. When the mutton is sufficiently cooked, we take out 
the meat and put it on a hot dish. 

14. We pour the parsley saicce all over the mutton. 

15. We pour the broth into a basin to cool. 

16. When it is cold we should remove all the fat before 
warming it up for use. 

N.B. — If the broth is required for immediate use we can remove the grease 
with blotting paper or whitey -brown paper. 



44° National, Training School for Cookery. 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 15. 

BEEF TEA. 

Average cost of " Beef Tea M (one pint and a half), 

INGREDIENTS. 
1 lb. of gravy beef c . gd. 

Time required, about one hour and ten mi?iutes. 



Now we will show you how to make Beef Tea. 

1. We take one pound of gravy beef put it on a board 
and cut it up very fine, removing all the skin and fat. 

2. We put the meat into a saucepan with one quart of 
cold water, half a saltspoonful of salt, and two or three pep- 
percorns, if allowed. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire, and just bring it to 
the boil. 

4. We then move it to the side of the fire to simmer 
gently for one hour. 

N. B. — The lid should be on the saucepan. 

5. After that time we pour off the beef tea and let it get 
cold. 

6. We should remove all fat from the beef tea before 
warming it up for use. 

N.B. — Fat can be taken off hot beef tea with blotting paper or vvhitey-brown 

paper. 
N.B. — It is better not to strain beef tea, as it removes all the little brown 

particles which are most nutritious. 



Lessons on Sick- Room Cookery. — Beef Tea. 441 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. l6. 

BEEF TEA. 

(made with equal quantities of beef and water.; 
Average cost of " Beef Tea " (half a pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

J lb. of gravy beef $\d. 

Time required, about three hours and a quarter. 



Now we will show you how to make Beef Tea. 

1. We take half a poimd of gravy beef put it on a 
board, and cut it up very finely, removing all the skin and 
fat. 

2. We put the meat into a stone jar, with half a pint of 
water. 

N.B. — In making this beef tea the quantity of meat and water should be of 
equal weight, i.e., one pint to one pound. 

3. We put the lid on the jar, and tie a piece of paper 
over it. 

4. We stand the jar in a saucepan of boiling water on 
the hob for three hours, or in the oven for one hour and a 
half 

N.B.— If the jar is put into the saucepan of boiling water, we should be 
careful that the water does not cover the jar, or it would get inside. 

5. After that time we take out the jar, and pour off the 
beef tea into a cup. 

N.B. — If allowed, we add salt according to taste. 



442 National Training School for Cookery. 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 17. 

QUICK BEEF TEA. 

Average cost of " Beef Tea " {half a pint). 

INGREDIENTS. 

£ lb. gravy beef $\d. 

Time required, about a quarter of an hour. 



Now we will show you how to make Quick Beef Tea. 

1. We take half a pound of gravy beef put it on a board, 
and cut it up very fine, removing all the skin and fat. 

2. We put it in a saucepan with its equal weight in 
water, i.e., half a pint. 

3. We put the saucepan on the fire and bring it quickly 
to the boil. 

4. We let it boil for five minutes, and then pour it off 
into a cup and it is ready for serving. 

N.B. — We should be careful to remove any particles of fat, with blotting- 
paper, or whitey-brown paper floated on the top of the beef tea, and 
it will absorb the fat. 



Sick- Room Cookery, — Savoury Custard. 443 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

Lesson No. 18. 

SAVOURY CUSTARD. 

Average cost of " Savoury Custard" {one gill). 
INGREDIENTS. 

a. 



1 egg j. 

Salt 

1 gill of beef tea 2 J 



3i 



Time required, about twenty minutes. 

Now we will show you how to make Savoury Custard. 

1. We take one egg and break it into a small basin. 

2. We add one gill of beef tea, and a quarter of a salt- 
spoonful of salt. 

3. We whisk up the egg and the beef tea well together. 

4. We take a small gallipot and butter it inside. 

5. We pour the mixture into the gallipot. 

6. We take a piece of whitey-brown paper and butter it. 

7. We put this buttered paper over the top of the gallipot, 
and tie it on with a piece of string. 

8. We take a saucepan of hot water and put it on the 
fire. 

9. When the water is quite boiling, we stand the little 
gallipot in it. 

N.B. — The water must not quite reach the paper with which the gallipot is 
covered. 

10. We draw this saucepan to the side of the fire, and 
let it simmer for a quarter of an hour. 

N.B. — It must not boil, or the custard will be spoiled. 

11. We take the gallipot out of the saucepan, take off 
the buttered paper, turn the custard out on to a hot dish, 
it is ready for serving. 



APPENDIX. 



LIST OF RECIPES. 

i. ORDINARY SALAD. 

2. TOMATES FARCIE AU GRATIN. 

3. SICK-ROOM COOKERY— SCOLLOPED OYSTERS. 

4. ,, ,, FRIED SWEETBREAD. 



Appendix — Ordinary Salad. 447 



ORDINARY SALAD. 

Average cost of 

INGREDIENTS. 

d. 

i Cos or long lettuce, or two cabbage lettuces . . i\ 

2 tablespoon sful of best salad oil 3 

1 dessertspoonful of common vinegar, or 1 tea- ~| 

spoonful of tarragon and one teaspoonful > 1 

of common vinegar J 

1 saltspoon of salt ) 1 

f a saltspoonful of pepper ) 4 

I a teaspoonful of ready-made mustard \ 3 

k a small onion, or two or three spring onions j * 



Time required, about a quarter of an hour. 



Now we will show you how to dress an " ordinary salad" 

N.B. — A salad can be made with watercress, mustard and cress, endive, beet- 
root, cucumber, celery, and any cold boiled vegetable, such as, potato, 
carrot, turnip, parsnip, the flower of cauliflower, and cabbage, according to 
taste. They can be dressed as an ordinary salad, or with a mayonnaise 
sauce. (See Sauces, Lesson No. 3.) 

1. We take the lettuce, wash it well in cold water, and 
pull off each leaf separately, so as to get them quite free 
from dirt or grit. 

2. We put the lettuce into a clean cloth, hold the cloth up 
by the corners, and shake the lettuce well, so as to get it 
quite dry. 

3. We break up the leaves of the lettuce into small pieces, 
and put them into a salad bowl. 

N.B. — A lettuce should never be cut with a knife. If the flavour of onion is 
liked, the dish could be rubbed round with half an onion, or two or three 
spring onions (washed and the green tops cut oft) can be put in the salad. 

4. We take a bottle of salad oil and pour two tablespoonsful 
of oil over the lettuce, and mix it up well with a spoon and fork. 

5. We take the tablespoon, put in it a saltspoonful of 
salt, half a saltspoonful of pepper, half a teaspoonful of ready- 
made mustard (if liked), and a dessertspoonful of common or 
tarragon vinegar, or half and half, according to taste ; mix 
all up together, and then pour it over the lettuce ; mix up 
the lettuce well. 

6. The salad is now ready for serving. 



448 National Training School for Cookery. 



TOMATES FARCIE AU GRATIN. 



Average cost of 



INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

7 tomatoes, 3^. each 1 9 

2 shalots ) 

1 small onion j 

6 mushrooms 3 

2 oz. chopped ham i| 

2 oz. butter, at is. 4<f. a lb 2 

1 tablespoon ful of chopped parsley ) x 

Nutmeg, pepper and salt j 

1 tablespoonful of grated bread-crumbs . . \ 
1 tablespoonful of grated Parmasan cheese J 

2 7 

Time required, about half-an-hour. 



Now we will show you how to cook " Tomates Farcies au 
gratin." 

1. We take the shalots and the onion, peel them, and 
chop them up finely on a board. 

2. We take the mushrooms, cut off the ends of the 
stalks, wash them in cold water, peel them, and chop them 
up finely. 

3. We take two ounces of ham, and chop it up finely. 

4. We take the parsley, wash it, dry it, and chop it up 

finely. 

5. We take some crumb of bread and rub it through a 
wire sieve on to a plate ; there should be a tablespoonful of 
crumbs. 

6. We put the crumbs on a tin in the oven to brown ; 
we must watch them, and not let them burn ; when they 
are brown enough we take the tin out and turn the crumbs 
on to a plate. 

7. We put two ounces of butter in a stewpan, we also 
add the chopped ham, and vegetables ; put the stewpan 
over the fire, and stir the contents well for ten minutes ; 



Appendix — Tomates Farcie an Gratin. 449 

after that time we take the stewpan off the fire, and stand 
it on a piece of paper on the table. 

8. We take seven tomatoes (they should be of equal 
sizes if possible), cut off the tops of them with a sharp 
knife, and carefully scoop out the inside. 

9. We take an ounce of Parmasan cheese, and grate it 
with a grater over the browned bread-crumbs on the plate. 

10. We fill each tomato with the mixture in the stewpan, 
and sprinkle the bread-crumbs and cheese over the top of 
each one. 

11. We put the stuffed tomatoes on to a tin, and put 
them in the oven to warm. 

12. For serving, we arrange them nicely on a hot dish. 



* t 



45° National Training School for Cookery 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 

SCOLLOPED OYSTERS. 

Average cost {for four scollop shells). 

INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 
2 doz. cooking oysters, is. 6d. or 2s. per doz. . . 40 

Bread-crumbs 2 

2 oz. of butter 2J 



4 4i 



Time required, about half-an-hour. 



Now we will show you how to " scollop oysters? 

1. We put two dozen oysters, and the liquor that is with 
them, into a small saucepan. 

2. We put the saucepan on the fire, and bring them to 
the boil ; this is to blanch the oysters. 

3. We take the saucepan off the fire as soon as it boils, 
and pour the liquor through a strainer into a basin. 

4. We place the oysters on a plate, and take off the 
beards and all the hard parts of the oysters. 

5. We put a wire sieve over a plate, and rub through it 
some crumb of stale bread. 

6. We take four scollop shells, and grease them well 
inside with butter. 

7. We sprinkle about a teaspoonful of bread-crumbs into 
each scollop shell. 

8. We then put in the oysters, six in each shell, and 
sprinkle in with them a dessertspoonful of bread-crumbs, 
and three or four tiny bits of butter, about the size of dice. 

9. We should mix a saltspoonful of pepper and salt 
together, and sprinkle it over the oysters, then pour in the 



Sick-room Cookery. — Scolloped Oysters. 451 

oyster liquor, and fill up the shells with a smooth layer of 
bread-crumbs, and two or three little bits of butter on the 
top. 

10. We put the shells on a tin, put it in a brisk oven to 
bake for from ten to fifteen minutes : the scollops should be 
a pale brown. 

11. For serving, we fold a napkin neatly, and put it on a 
hot dish, and place the scollops on it. 



?F2 



45 2 National Training School for Cookery. 



SICK-ROOM COOKERY. 
FRIED SWEETBREADS. 



Average cost of 



INGREDIENTS. 

s. d. 

Sweetbreads, from 4s. to $s. each 5 o 

1 egg 1 

Bread-crumbs 1 

2 or 3 sprigs of parsley j z 

Lard, or clarified dripping for frying 



5 2 
Time required, about half-an-hour. 



Now we will show you how to fry sweetbreads. 

N.B. — Calves' heart, or throat sweetbreads are what are ordinarily sold, lambs' 
sweetbreads are more tender and delicate. 

1. We take the sweetbreads and put them into a sauce- 
pan, with luke-warm water enough to cover them ; put the 
saucepan over the fire, and just bring it to the boil. 

N.B. — This is to blanch them, and should be done as soon as the sweetbreads 
arrive, in order to prevent their turning sour. 

2. We take the sweetbreads out of the saucepan, lay 
them in a cloth, and gently wipe them ; then put them on 
a board, and cut them in slices about half an inch thick. 

N.B. —If the sweetbread is small it can be fried whole. Lambs' sweetbread 
need not be cut up. 

3. We proceed with the szveetbreads as described in 
"Fish, Lesson No. 7," from note 27 to end, excluding 
Notes 32, 33, and 40. 

They are then ready for serving. 



Appendix — Aspic Jelly. 



453 



ASPIC JELLY. 

ONE QUART. 
Average cost of 

INGREDIENTS. 



2 calves' feet 

Salt 

30 peppercorns ... 

2 blades of mace 

1 clove of garlic 

2 shalots 

1 sprig of thyme 

I small bunch of parsley 

1 onion, stuck with 4 cloves ... 

1 leek 

\ a head of celery 

2 carrots 

1 turnip 

1 sprig of tarragon 

1 sprig of chervil 

2 bay leaves 

The rind and juice of 1 lemon 

The whites of 2 eggs 

£ gill of common vinegar 

1 tablespoonful chili vinegar ... 

\ gill of tarragon vinegar 

1 gill of sherry 

2 quarts of water 



s. d. 
1 6 



\ 1 o 



J 



3 4 



Time required, about seven hours. 



Now we will show you how to make Aspic Jelly. 

1. We take two calves' feet and put them on a board. 

2. We chop them in eight pieces with a chopper. 

3. We wash them well in cold water. 

4. We put them in a stewpan with sufficient cold water 
to cover them, and let them boil up on the fire to blanch 
them, then pour the water off and wash them again in cold 
water. 

5. We wash the stewpan and put back the pieces of feet 
into it, with two quarts of 'water \ put it on the fire, and just 
bring it to the boil, watch it and skim it occasionally. 



454 National Training School for Cookery. 

6. We now add half a teaspoonfiil of salt and all the other 
ingredients except the lemon, the eggs, and the vinegars. 

N.B. — The vegetables should be washed, scraped, and peeled before use. 

7. We let all boil gently for five hours. 

8. We then strain it off through a hair sieve into a basin, 
and let stand until perfectly cold ; skim off the fat from the 
top, and wipe it with a cloth dipped in hot water, to remove 
every particle of grease. 

9. We put the stock into a clean stewpan, peel the lemon 
very thinly, and add the peel, and juice, to the stock, also 
add the whipped whites of two eggs, and the shells, the 
vinegars, and salt to taste, whisk all over the fire until it 
boils ; then put the stewpan by the side of the fire, and let 
it stand for half-an-hour, to form a crust. 

10. We take a clean soup cloth, and fix it on the stand. 

11. We pour the contents into the cloth, and let it all 
run through into a basin placed underneath. 

12. We let it pass a second time slowly, into the basin. 

13. We scald a mould with boiling water, then rinse it 
in cold water before pouring the jelly into it. 

14. We garnish the mould, with fish, or vegetables, 
according to taste, and stand it aside until cold. 

15. When the jelly is required, we should dip the mould 
into a basin of hot water, for about a second, shake the 
mould to loosen the jelly, place a dish over the top of the 
mould, and turn the jelly carefully out, it is then ready for 
serving. 



National Training School for Cookery. 455 



REGULATIONS AND FEES 

OF THE 

NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR COOKERY, 
SOUTH KENSINGTON 



The National Training School for Cookery was established in 
the year 1874. 

The chief object of the school was to train teachers who should 
become instructors of cookery in training schools, board schools, 
and similar institutions. 

The courses of instruction in the school are : — 

1. For educated persons who wish to qualify themselves to 
become teachers of cookery. 

2. For students and cooks. 

3. For those who wish to be able to practise cookery in their 
homes. 

The course of instruction for a Teacher of cookery has been 
drawn up by Mrs. C. Clarke, the Lady Superintendent, and is as 
follows : — 

Teachers of Cookery can now pass through a full course of 
20 weeks' training in Cookery, and practice in teaching at the 
National Training School for Cookery, South Kensington. The 
fee is ;£2i. Teachers of Plain Cookery only can now pass 
through a course lasting 10 weeks. The fee is £6 6s. 

Twenty Weeks' Course. Fee, £2t. 

MORNING. AFTERNOON. 

i st Week Scullery, Learning H. C. Demonstration. 

2nd „ Scullery, Teaching n 

3rd ,, Plain Cookery Demonstration „ 

4th ,, ., „ „ 



45 ^ National Training School for Cookery, 



5th' 


Wee 


6th 


>' 


7 th 


» 


8th 


» 


9th 


5> 


ioth 


»> 


nth 


JJ 


1 2th 


>? 


13th 


>J 


14th 


?> 


15th 


>5 


1 6th 


5> 


17th 


» 


1 8th 


•>•> 


19th 


J) 


20th 





Plain Cookery Practice Kitchen 



Plain Cookery Practice Kitchen 



High Class Practice Kitchen 



High Class Practice Kitchen 
Demonstration, Public. 

>> if 

Demonstration 

Theoretical Examination. 



Learning. 

» 
Teaching. 

?» 
Learning. 

» 
Teaching. 



Ten Weeks' Plain Cookery Teachers' Course. 
Fee, £6 6s. 



1 st Week- 


—Demonstration, 10 to 12. 


Scullery learning, 2 to 4 


2nd „ 


»> 


?> 


Scullery teaching, „ 


3rd » 


Practice, 


10 to 3, 




4 th „ 


»> 


5> 




5th „ 


»> 


?> 




6th „ 


5> 


>> 




7 th „ 


Teaching 


>» 




8th „ 


» 


5» 




9th „ 


Demonstration, 10 to 12. 




ioth „ 


j> 


91 





Theoretical Examination. 



National Training School for Cookery. 45 7 

Students in training are expected to attend an Evening Class 
held by a Staff Teacher once a week. 

A Student in training for 20 weeks for a Teacher first passes 
through the Scullery and Demonstration Classes for four weeks. 
She then spends four weeks learning in the Plain Cookery Practice 
Kitchen, and a fortnight teaching. She next goes into the High 
Class Practice Kitchen, and spends four weeks learning, and a 
fortnight teaching. The last month is devoted to Practice in 
Demonstrating in public, for which the Lady Superintendent has 
drawn up careful and full rules ; these are hung up close to where 
the Student stands to give her demonstration. 

During her course of training at the School, the Student can, if 
she likes, dine with the other Pupils for 6d. or is. 

When the Staff Teachers are all employed, a few extra teachers 
are taken on as improvers, at^"i a week, as this fits them to fill 
good appointments in the Provinces, when they offer. These 
engagements are terminable by a week's notice on either side, but 
employment is not compulsory nor is it guaranteed. 

The work of Teachers on the Staff varies somewhat according 
to the nature of their appointment. If employed in the School 
itself she will have to be in her kitchen by 9. 30 a.m. to see that 
her kitchen-maid has everything in proper order for the Pupils to 
begin work at 10 a.m. ; the Teacher would in most cases be able 
to leave the School at 5 p.m. 



If a Staff Teacher be sent to the Provinces the hours of work 
in that case depend greatly upon the Local Committee, who for 
the time being employ her, but the number of hours of work are 
limited to 24 in the week, to be distributed by arrangement with 
the Local Committee and the Teacher. 

Students will be admitted either by payment of fees, or by sub- 
scribers' votes. 

If by voles, the Candidate must not be under 18 or exceed 35 years of age. 
She must be sufficiently educated to be able to perform the duties of 
an instructor after the special training in Cookery. 

The diplomas of Teachers are of tvvo classes. 

A Candidate is to understand that she will be required to be proficient 
in Pronunciation, Enunciation, Common Arithmetic, and Writing and 
Spelling correctly, which proficiency will be tested at the final examin- 
ation ; and no diploma can be given unless she possesses these qualifi- 
cations in addition to the knowledge requisite for a Teacher of Cookery 
itself. 



458 National Training School for Cookery. 

The conditions of admission are — 

(a) That the Student agrees to obey all the Rules of the School laid 

down by the Executive Committee. 
(&) That for any infraction of the Rules, the Student may be discharged 

at a day's notice, without having a claim of any kind upon the School. 
(c) That it be clearly understood that the Committee are not responsible 

for finding any paid employment for the Students while in the School 

or afterwards, the employment of Teachers, certified by the School, 

resting wholly with the public. 

At the end of the Pupil's course of training in the School, she 
will be expected, before receiving any diploma, to pass a 
Theoretical Examination ; specimens of the questions which 
have been asked can be obtained in the School from the Secre- 
tary for id. The whole fee of ^"21 when the Candidate has no 
vote, or so much of the fee as remains due when she has any 
votes, to be paid in three equal instalments, each in advance. 
The course of instruction is as follows — 

Practice in scullery work and cleaning, and practice in teaching the same. 
The best way of lighting and managing a fire, of cleaning a fire-place, 
regulating flues, the management of the oven, etc., or of patent fire- 
places in general use for cooking, the difference between a close 
range and an open one, etc. 
The proper and highest degree of cleanliness to be obtained in pots 
and pans, the best method of cleaning such articles, of removing 
stains from enamel, burnishing copper, etc. 
Practice in Plain Cookery and teaching the same. 
Practice in High Class Cookery and teaching the same. 
Teaching both kinds of Cookery by Public Demonstration. 

N.B. — Any person may attend the Cookery Classes, and Demonstrations at 
the usual Fees without passing any Examination. 

Teachers, w r hile on the Staff, and employed in the School, are 
not free to take any engagement without leave of the Committee 
in writing ; when their services are not required, they will receive 
one month's notice. Teachers holding diplomas not on the Staff 
are free to make any engagement for teaching they may think fit, 
and may refer to the Lady Superintendent, who will give additional 
information as to their qualifications when requested to do so. 



INSTRUCTION BY DEMONSTRATION AND PRACTICE 
FOR LEARNERS. 

Courses of Teaching by Demonstration, and Courses of Practice in 
Cookery and Cleaning are now being regularly held at the National 
Training School of Cookery, Exhibition Road, South Kensington. 
Persons desirous of joining the Courses should apply personally, or by 
letter enclosing 3 stamps to the Lady Superintendent, at the School. 
Pupils can enter for the Courses on any Monday. 



National Training School for Cookery. 459 

£ *■ d. 

Scullery cleaning (five lessons) 10 a.m. to 12 noon 10 6 

Ten Plain Cookery Demonstrations 10 a.m. to 12 noon 4 6 

Ten High Class Demonstrations 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 10 6 

Ten Plain Cookery Practice lessons 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 220 

Ten High Class Practice lessons 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 330 

Single lessons from 6d. to xos. 6d. 

If the Scullery work be omitted, the High Class Practice Kitchen 
fee will be ^4 4s., and the Plain Cookery Practice Kitchen £$ 35-. 
Fees to be paid on entry. 

The following is an outline of the Practice in Scullery work, 
and Cleaning: — 

The best way of Lighting and Managing a Fire — Of Cleaning 
a Fire-place — Regulating Flues — The Management of the Oven, 
and of Fire-places in general use for Cooking — The Difference 
between a Close Range and an Open one, &c. 

The proper and highest degree of Cleanliness to be obtained 
in Pots and Pans ; the best method of cleaning such articles — 
Of removing Stains from Enamel — Burnishing Copper, &c. 



THE LESSONS REPEAT THEMSELVES EVERY FORTNIGHT. 

PLAIN COOKERY DEMONSTRATION. 
Morning from 10 to 12. 

Fee, 4s. 6oJ. the Course. Single Lessons, 6d. 
FIRST WEEK. 

Monday... Sheep's Head, Milk Soup Maigre, Macaroni, Stewed Liver and 

Bacon, Sea Pie. 
Tuesday... Irish Stew, Bone Soup, Breast of Veal, Baked Plum Pudding, Ragout 

of Rabbit. 
Wednesday Meat Pie, Toad in the Hole, Pea Soup, Cornish Pasties, Fruit 

Turnovers, Pot au Feu. 
Thursday... Rissoles, Mulligatawny Soup, Sausage Rolls, Croquettes, Pancakes, 

Pork Pie. 
Friday.., Baked Haddock, Plaice fried, Mackerel stuffed, Fish Pudding, Broiled 

Fish, Fish Soup. 



460 National Training School for Cookery. 



SECOND WEEK. 

Monday ... Bread, Roast Joint, Boiled Suet Pudding, Baked Meat, Yorkshire 

Pudding, Boiled Meat, Haricot Pur£e, Stewed Knuckle of Veal 

and Melted Butter. 
Tuesday ... Cold Meat — Hash, Balls of Meat, Patties, Shepherd's Pie, Gateau 

of Cold Meat, Boudinettes of Meat, Apple Dumplings, Tripe and 

Onions. 
Wednesday Roast Heart, Mutton Broth, Beefsteak Pudding, Piquante Sauce, 

Marmalade Pudding. 
Thursday Curry of Cold Meat, Cabbage Soup, Mince, Gingerbread, Apple 

Pudding, Cakes. 
Friday ... Sick-room Cookery. 



HIGH CLASS COOKERY DEMONSTRATION. 

Afternoon, from 2 to 4. 
Fee, 10s. 6d. the Course. Single Lessons, is. 6d. 



FIRST WEEK. 

Monday... Braising, Trussing, Boning, 

Stewing. 
Tuesday... Soups and Purees. 
Wednesday Vegetables, Salads and 

Savouries. 
Thursday Entrees. 
Friday ... Entries. 



SECOND WEEK. 

Monday... Omelettes and Souffle's, etc. 

Vienna Bread. 
Tuesday... Pastry various. 
Wednesday Puddings various. 
Thursday Jellies and Creams, etc. 

Meringues. 
Friday ... Fish Entries. 



The School is on view every day from 2 to 4 p.m. (Saturdays 
excepted), and Dishes made in the School are for sale at cost price 
after 3 o'clock. 

Lessons given in all branches of Cookery. 



HIGH CLASS COOKERY PRACTICE KITCHEN. 

A high class " Practice Kitchen " is now open where a Student 
may go through a course of Practice in Cookery, for which a fee 
of ^4 45. will be charged, but this is reduced to ^3 3s. if the 
Student has attended the " scullery " course at 10s. 6d. The 
course in this Practice Kitchen occupies 2 weeks from to to 4 
daily. A limited number of daily Pupils are now admitted in the 
Practice Kitchen at a fee of jos. 6d. for each day's instruction to 
new Pupils, and 6s. 6d. to old Pupils. 

An Appointment must be made for single lessons. 

Pupils are requested each to bring a large bib-apron with them, 
marked with their names. 



National Training School for Cookery. 461 



FIRST WEEK. 

Monday ... Bread and Cakes, Vegetables and Savouries. 

Tuesday ... Soups and Purees, Braising and Stewing. 

Wednesday ... Entries and Sauces, Vegetables and Savouries. 

Thursday ... Entries and Sauces, Braising and Stewing. 

Friday ... Soups and Purees, Bread and Cakes. 



SECOND WEEK. 

Monday ... Omelets and Souffles and Pastry. 

Tuesday ... Puddings and Fish. 

Wednesday ... Jellies and Creams, Pastry. 

Thursday ... Jellies and Creams, Omelets and Souffle^s. 

Friday ... Fish and Puddings. 

Single Lessons in the Newest Entries, &c, 10s. 6d. 
the Day 



PLAIN COOKERY PRACTICE KITCHEN. 

The fee for joining this class is ^3 3^., unless the Student has 
already been through the Scullery Class at 105. 6d., in which case 
it is reduced to £2 2s. The instruction in this kitchen comprises 
both French and English Plain Cookery. A single day's in- 
struction in this kitchen can be attended at a charge of 6s. 6d. for 
new Pupils and 4s. 6d. for old Pupils. 



FIRST WEEK. 



Monday ... Milk Soup, Irish Stew, Beefsteak Pie, Treacle Pudding, Semolina 
Pudding, Toad in the Hole, Potatoes, a Vegetable, Pig's Head, 
Pot au Feu, Rock Cakes, Gingerbread, Herring, Toast Sandwich, 
Beef Teas (various), Gruel, Stewed Brisket of Beef, Lemon Pudding, 
Spotted Dick, Ragout of Rabbit. 

Tuesday ... Pot au Feu, Brisket of Beef, Fish (boiled), Sea Pie, Lentil Soup, Batter 
Pudding, Apple Pudding, Potatoes and Vegetables, Mutton Broth, 
Fish Cakes, Blancmange, Lemonade, etc., Fig Pudding, etc., 
Pickle for Meat, Silver Side of Beef to Salt. 



462 National Training School for Cookery. 

Wednesday Mutton Broth, Semolina Soup, Fried Fish, Roast Rabbit, Brazilian 
Stew, Baked Apple Dumplings, Haricot Beans, Potatoes, Sausage 
Rolls, Milk Jelly from Cowheel, Pickle for Vegetables, Plum Cake, 
Scones, Oatmeal Biscuits. 

Thursday Haricot Purde, Baked Fish, Ox-cheek Stew, Potatoes, Rice Cutlets, 
Shin of Beef Stewed, Suet Pudding, Roly Poly Pudding, Breast of 
Veal, Roast Joint, Pork Pie, Brawn, Marmalade Pudding, Seed 
Cake, Milk Biscuits, Boudinettes, Tripe and Onions. 

Friday ... Render down and clarify 61bs. of Fat, Maccaroni Soup, Hash, Mince, 
Rissoles, Shepherd's Pie, Potatoes, Lentils, Bread Pudding, Gateau 
of Cold Meat, Arrowroot, Short-bread, Dough Cake, Maccaroni 
Cheese, Swiss Roll, Tea Cakes, etc. 



SECOND WEEK. 

Monday ... Cabbage Soup, Rabbit Pie, Bullock's Heart, Potatoes, Suet Pudding, 
Treacle and Plum Puddings, Rice Pudding, Gingerbread, Yorkshire 
Pudding, Marmalade Pudding, Rice Buns, Rock Cakes, Mulliga- 
tawny Soup, Lemon Sponge, Cornflour Cake, Meat Pudding. 

Tuesday ... Spring Soup Maigre, Bread, A Pudding, Mulligatawny Soup, Fish 
(fried), Tripe, Maccaroni Sweet, Apple Amber Pudding, Potatoes, 
Vegetables, Curried Rabbit, Sheep's Head (boiled), Kedgeree, Plum 
Pudding, Tea Cakes, Apple Jelly, Buns. 

Wednesday Fish Cakes, Boiled Rabbit, Liver and Bacon, Pea Soup, Haricot 
Mutton, Potatoes, Cornish Pasties, Stewed Knuckle of Veal, Veal 
Tea, A Pudding, Prepare Giblets, Arrowroot Pudding. 

Thursday Stewed Knuckle of Veal, Parsley and Butter Sauce, Giblet Pie, Scotch 
Scallops, Goblet Pie, Boiled Pork and Peas Pudding, Pancakes, 
Bread and Butter Pudding, Potatoes, Fritters, Brandy Wafers, 
Barley Water, Shrewsbury Cakes, Potted Fish, Ox-foot Jelly. 

Friday ... Fish Soup, 61bs. of Fat to clarify, Fish (fried), Boil the Silver Side, 
Dumplings, Jelly, Ragout of Mutton, Potato Salad, Curried Eggs, 
Poached Eggs, Biscuits, Apple Charlotte, Toast and Eggs, Porridge, 
Hominy Blancmange, Savoury Custard, Eggs sur le plat. 

Single Recipes are sold at the School at id. each. Lists on 
application, price id. 

A certain number of marks, proportionate to merit, will be 
awarded daily for the execution of each day's work of the practice 
in Cookery and Scullery. 



National Training School for Cookery. 463 

Post-Office Orders and Cheques should be made payable to the 
Lady Superintendent of the School, Mrs. Charles Clarke, at 
the South Kensington Post Office, Exhibition Road, S.W. 

Subscriptions and Donations to be paid to Miss Incledon, 
Secretary, at the National Training School. 



TERMS ON WHICH THE COMMITTEE WILL 
OPEN COUNTRY AND SUBURBAN CLASSES:- 

The Lady Superintendent is authorised by the Committee to 
open Demonstration Cookery Classes where she can hire a suit- 
able room, and dispose of forty tickets at 4/6 each (transferable), 
for a course of Ten Lessons in Plain Cookery, and thirty tickets 
at 1 os. 6d. each (transferable), for a course of Ten Lessons in 
High Class Cookery. 

For the Plain Cookery, after the sale of 40 Tickets at 4s. 6d., 
school children and poor children are admitted at is. the Ten 
Lessons, or 2d. each Lesson. 

The Committee will then undertake the entire arrangement of 
the Classes, supplying all the stoves, utensils, and materials need- 
ful, and bearing all other needful outlay. 

Single Admission at the door, 1*. 6d. to the High Class 
Cookery, and 6d. to the Plain Cookery ; School Children, Boys or 
Girls, admitted at a considerable reduction. 



Classes for Practice in Cookery to follow these Demonstration 
Lessons will be formed (for not less than Ten Pupils) on the 
following terms : — 

For a course of Ten Lessons in Plain Cookery, or in High 
Class Cookery, of three hours each lesson, £l is. Each pupil to 
find her own materials. 

The School cannot be held responsible for the Teachers unless 
sent direct from this School, or specially recommended by the 
Lady Superintendent in writing. 



464 National Training School for Cookery, 

Conditions on which the Committee will send out Staff 
Teachers to give Instruction in Cookery, in localities 

WHERE THE LOCAL COMMITTEE PREFER TO TAKE THE MONEY 
RISK AND THE ARRANGEMENT OF THE CLASSES ON THEM- 
SELVES : — 

Terms, for Weekly Engagements, with board and lodging, £3 $s. , 
and travelling expenses extra (Second Class). 

Not more than Twelve Demonstration or Practice Lessons of 
two hours each are to be given in one week. 

A suitable room with the requisite seats, tables, stoves, utensils, 
fuel and provisions, together with a Kitchen-maid, must be pro- 
vided by those engaging the Teacher. 

The arrangements of the Lessons, the charges for admission, 
inserting reports and notices in the local papers, will be left 
entirely in their hands. 

Terms for engagements for one day only (for distances beyond 
20 miles of London), for One Lesson in the day (whether High 
Class or Plain Cookery) 155-.; and 215. for two Lessons, one 
High Class and one Plain Cookery. Travelling expenses extra 
(Second Class). 

In London and its immediate neighbourhood, \os. 6d. a Lesson. 

Hire of stove and utensils for course of Ten Demonstration 
Lessons, £2 2s. and carriage. 

For Elementary Schools and Training Colleges, the fee is js. 6d. 
a Lesson. 



National Training School for Cookery. 465 
RULES 

FOR THE GUIDANCE of LOCAL COMMITTEES AND 
TEACHERS SENT BY SOUTH KENSINGTON 

1. The hours of teaching are limited to twenty-four in a week when held in 
the same town, but when held in different localities the hours of Lessons are 
limited to 20, to be distributed by arrangement between the Local Committee 
and the Teacher. 

2. The Teacher is to be provided with a Kitchen-maid, who is to be her 
servant, and for whose work the Teacher is responsible. 

3. The Teacher's time (within the above limits) and services are to be at 
the disposal of the Local Committee, and any cause of complaint on either 
side should be referred to the Lady Superintendent. No private Lessons are to 
be given by the Teacher. 

4. The Teacher will give in writing her orders for materials, and some of 
the Local Committee are expected to sign these orders and see that they are 
executed, the Teacher's responsibility ceasing when these orders are given. 

5. No testimonials or gratuities, monetary or otherwise, are to be received 
by Teachers, nor any commission or bonus, either directly or indirectly, from 
Tradesmen or Committees. 

6. The Teacher is to reside within reasonable distance of her place of work, 
and not to make any charges for travelling, except when sent out in the service 
of the Local Committee. 

7. The Teacher is to order nothing except on forms authorised or counter- 
signed by the Committee or their representative. 

8. To prevent confusion, the Teachers are to cook by the recipes printed 
and provided by the National Training School for Cookery. 

9. Courses of systematic Lessons have been prepared for the Teachers ; 
these, modified to suit the requirements of particular localities, are recom- 
mended as models for Local Committees. 

10. The number of Pupils at a Demonstration Lesson is practically unlimited ; 
the number of Pupils at a Practice Lesson is limited to ten. 

1 1 . The sale of the dishes cooked should be under the management of the 
Local Committee. 

12. It must be always borne in mind that the sale of food and the taking 0/ 
orders for dishes must be subordinate to the great object of the School, i.e.. 
the giving a thorough and efficient practical Lesson. 

13. The Teacher is allowed Second Class Railway Fare, and the actual 
expenses incurred in the journey upon her certifying to them. 

14. The Teacher to be allowed her dinner at the Local School, on the days 
when she teaches there. 



For further particulars, apply to the Lady Superintendent at the 

School. 



G G 






INDEX. 



GG 2 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

A-la-mode Beef — Stews 86 

A.-la-mode Beef — Soups 190 

Alexandra pudding — Puddings ... 313 

Amber pudding — Puddings 307 

Anchovy sauce — Fish..,.. 223 

Apple amber pudding — Puddings 347 

— charlotte — Puddings 296 

— jelly— Jellies 367 

— turnovers and dumplings of 

short crust — Pastry 287 

— water — Sick-room cookery 430 
Apples and tapioca — Puddings ... 330 
Arrowroot, cup of — Sick-room 

cookery 425 

— pudding — Sick - room 

cookery 425 

Aspic jelly from calf's feet — Jellies 355 
Australian meat — 

— mince 51 

— mulligatawny 40 

~ Pie 44 

— rissoles 46 

— sausage rolls 42 

— savoury hash 49 

Bacon, rolls of— Entrees 68 

Baked batter pudding with fruit 

—Puddings 335 

— fish in vinegar 236 

■ — lemon pudding — Puddings 294 

— mackerel or herring — Fish 232 

— plum pudding — Puddings 349 

— potatoes — Vegetables 249 

— stuffed haddock — Fish ... 234 
Baking meat 22 



Barley water (clear) — Sick-room 

cookery 428 

— water (thick) — Sick-room 

cookery 429 

Batter pudding with fruit, baked 

—Puddings 335 

— pudding, boiled — Puddings 316 

— pudding, in a cup — Pud- 

dings 320 

Beans, haricot — Vegetables 262 

Beef, a-la-mode — Stews 86 

— — — Soups 190 

— braised fillets of — Entrees... 60 

— essence — Sick-room cookery 423 

— olives — Entrees 73 

— steak pie 123 

— steak pudding 125 

— — — Pastry 284 

— stewed brisket of — Stews ... 92 

— tea, Liebig's quick — Sick- 

room cookery 442 

— — Sick-room cookery 440, 441 
Biscuits, milk 412 

— oatmeal 413 

Blanc-mange — Puddings 315 

Boiled batter — Puddings 316 

— cauliflower — Vegetables ... 257 

— cod — Fish 228 

— custard — Creams 369 

— fish 239 

— fowl 162 

— lemon pudding — Puddings 332 

— mutton and parsley sauce 

— Sick-room cookery ... 438 

— new potatoes — Vegetables 246 



Index. 



460 



Boiled pig's head, salted 134 

— potatoes — Vegetables 245 

— rice 84 

— rice — Tripe 103 

— sheep's head 137 

— tripe, with milk and onions 

—Tripe 104 

— turbot— Fish 211 

Boiling meat 20 

Bonne femme — Soups 176 

Brain cakes 153 

Braised fillet of veal 109 

— fillet of beef— Entrees 60 

— liver 155 

Bran tea — Sick-room cookery ... 435 

Brawn — boiled pig's head 135 

Brazilian stew — Stews 88 

Bread 4*9 

Bread and butter pudding — Pud- 
dings 346 

— pudding — Puddings 324 

— sauce — Roast fowl 169 

Breast, or neck of lamb stewed — 

Stews 98 

Brisket of beef (cold) stewed — 

Stews 92 

Broth— Mutton T47 

— mutton — Sick-room cook- 

ery 43 6 

— mutton — Sick-room cook- 

ery 438 

— fromsheep'shead — Sheep's 

head 137 

Brown bread pudding — Puddings 309 

— sauce — Sauces 268 

— stock 207 

Browned sheep's head 139 

Brussels sprouts — Vegetables 254 

Bubble and squeak 146 

Bullock's heart, stuffed and roasted 1 1 1 

Butter, clarifying — Frying 25 

Butter sauce (melted) — Sauces ... 274 

Buns 408 

— rice 410 

Cabbage, pickled 391 



Cabbage soup — Soups 197 

Cabinet pudding — Puddings 292 

— — (cold) — Puddings 337 

Cakes— Brain 153 

— corn-flour cake 403 

— dough cake 404 

— German pound cake 395 

— plain cake 397 

— plum cake 401 

— rock 406 

— seed cake 399 

— Shrewsbury 405 

— Sultana cake 393 

Calf 's head, rolled and stuffed ... 158 

Carrots — Vegetables 265 

Carrots and turnips — Vegetables 255 

Carrot pudding — Puddings 311 

Cauliflower au gratin — Vegetables 258 

— boiled — Vegetables 257 

Charlotte russe — Creams 373 

Chaudfroid of chicken — Entrees . 64 

Cheese with maccaroni 387 

— souffle — Souffles 378 

— straws 389 

Chicken broth — Sick-room cook- 
ery 422 

— chaudfroid of — Entrees ... 64 

— croquettes or rissoles of — 

Entrees 79 

— fricassee of — Entrees 69 

— panada — Sick-room cook- 

ery 421 

Clarifying butter — Frying 25 

— dripping — Frying 25 

— fat — Frying 25 

Cleaning a close kitchen range ... 15 

— a copper stewpan 16 

— a gas stove 15 

— an enamelled stewpan 16 

— an iron saucepan 16 

— an open kitchen range ... 13 

Clear soup — Soups 170 

Cod, boiled — Fish 228 

Cold cabinet pudding — Puddings 337 

— chicken, fricassee of — 

Entrees 71 



xyo 



Index. 



PAGE 

Cold meat — curry 33 

— — fried rissoles 37 

— — goblet pie 31 

— — hashed meat 26 

— — meat fritters 29 

— — minced meat 39 

— — shepherd's pie 35 

Cooked meat — curry 33 

— — fried rissoles 37 

— — goblet pie 31 

— — hashed meat 26 

— — meat fritters 29 

— — minced meat 39 

— — shepherd's pie ... 35 
Corn-flour cake — Cakes 403 

— pudding— Puddings 321 

— — in a cup — Puddings... 318 

Cornish pasties 1 15 

Cow-heel milk jelly— Jellies 361 

— stewed, with onion sauce — 

Jellies 362 

Cream of barley — Sick - room 

cookery 424 

Creams — charlotte russe 373 

— Strawberry cream 371 

— vanilla cream 369 

Croquettes of potato — Vege- 
tables 252 

— or rissoles of chicken — 

Entrees 79 

Cup of arrowroot — Sick-room 

cookery 425 

Curate's pudding — P uddings 323 

Curried rabbit or veal — Entrees .. 82 

Curry, of cold meat 33 

— of tripe — Tripe 102 

— (Indian) — Entrees 53 

Custard, boiled — Creams 369 

— pudding, baked — Puddings 301 

— sauce — Souffles 376 

Cutlets, lobster — Fish 224 

— mutton — Entrees 62 

— veal — Entrees 66 

Dough cake — Cakes 404 

Dripping, clarifying — Frying 25 



PAGE 

Drinks — Apple water — Sick- 
room cookery 430 

— barley water (clear) — Sick- 

room cookery 428 

— barley water (thick) — Sick- 

room cookery 429 

— bran tea —Sick-room cook- 

ery 435 

— lemonade — Sick -room 

cookery ,. 431 

— rice water — Sick - room 

cookery -.. 427 

— toast and water — Sick- 

room cookery 432 

— treacle posset— Sick-room 

cookery 434 

— white wine whey — Sick- 

room cookery 434 

Dutch sauce— Sauces 272 

Dumplings— Norfolk 350 

Eels, stewed— Fish 241 

Egg sauce— Boiled fowl 164 

— — Fish 216 

Entrees — beef olives 73 

— braised fillets of beef 60 

— chaudfroid of chicken 64 

— croquettes or rissoles of 

chicken 79 

— curried rabbit or veal 82 

— curry (Indian) 53 

— fricassee of chicken 69 

— fricassee of cold chicken... 71 

— haricot mutton 77 

— Irish stew 75 

— mutton cutlets 62 

— quenelles of veal 57 

— veal cutlets 66 

Essence of beef — Sick-room 

cookery...^, 423 

Fat, clarifying — Frying 25 

Fig pudding — Puddings 341 

Fillet of veal, braised 109 

Fillets of beef, braised— Entrees . 60 



Index. 



471 



Fillets of sole a la maitre d'hotel 
—Fish 

— of sole, fried — Fish 

Fire, to lay a 

Fish, baked in vinegar 

— baked mackerel or herring 

— baked stuffed haddock ... 

— boiled 

— boiled cod 

— boiled turbot 

— fillets of sole a. la maitre 

d'hotel 

— fish pudding 

— fried fillets of sole 

— fried plaice 

— grilled salmon 

— kedgeree 

— lobster cutlets 

— sole au gratin 

— stewed eels 

— whitebait 

Flaky crust (for pies and tarts) — 

Pastry 

Fowl, boiled 

— for boiling, trussing a 

— for roasting, trussing a 

— roasted 

Fricassee of chicken — Entrees . . . 

— of cold chicken — Entrees 
Fried fillets of sole — Fish 

— plaice — Fish 

— potato-chips — Vegetables. . 

— rissoles of cold meat 

— slices of potato — Vege- 

tables 

Fruit tart of short crust — Pastry 
Frying , 



Genoese pastry — Pastry ... 
German pound-cake — Cakes 

— sauce — Puddings 

Giblet soup — Soups 

Ginger-bread nuts 

— pudding — Puddings... 
Goblet pie — Cooked meat ... 
Grilled salmon — Fish 



220 
222 

14 
236 
232 
234 
239 
228 
211 

220 
214 
222 

237 
230 

243 
224 
218 
241 
217 

290 
162 
162 
166 
166 
69 
7i 
222 

237 
250 

37 

251 

278 

24 

280 

395 
310 

183 
411 

345 

3i 

230 



Grilled Steak 141 

Gruel — Sick-room cookery 433 

Haddock, baked and stuffed — 

Fish ... 234 

Haricot beans — Vegetables 262 

— mutton — Entrees 77 

— - 157 

— puree — Soups 204 

Hash, savoury, of Australian meat 49 

Hashed meat — Cooked meat 26 

Herringor mackerel, baked — Fish 232 

Iceland moss jelly — Jellies 359 

Irish stew — Entrees 75 

— — Stews 90 

jAM-roly-poly — Pastry 284 

Jam tart — Pastry 291 

Jellies — Apple jelly 367 

— aspic jelly from calf's feet 355 

— Iceland moss jelly 359 

— milkjelly from cow-heel... 361 

— ox-foot jelly 363 

— porter jelly 365 

— wine jelly from calf's feet 352 

Kedgeree — Fish 243 

Knuckle of veal stewed — Stews. . . 100 

Lamb, stewed, breast or neck of 

— Stews 98 

Lemon pudding, baked — Pud- 
dings 294 

— pudding, boiled — Puddings 332 
Lemonade — Sick-room cookery... 431 

Lentil puree — Soups 202 

Lentils, stewed — Vegetables 266 

Liver and bacon 151 

— braised 155 

Liebig's quick beef-tea — Sick- 
room cookery 442 

List of cleaning materials and 
utensils required in a 

kitchen \Z 



472 



Ijzdex. 



PAGE 

List of utensils required for a high- 
class cookery demon- 
stration lesson (local 

classes) 5 

— utensils required for a plain 

class cookery demon- 
stration lesson (local 

classes) 7 

— utensils required in a kit- 

chen 9 

Lobster cutlets — Fish 224 

— sauce — Fish 212 

MACCARONI in milk — Maccaroni 386 

— with cheese — 386 

— soup — Soups 200 

— stewed in stock 388 

Mackerel or herring, baked — Fish 232 

Marmalade pudding — Puddings 343 

Mashed potatoes— Vegetables ... 248 

— turnips — Vegetables 263 

Mayonnaise — Sauces 270 

Meat, Australian. 

— — mince 5 1 

— — mulligatawny 40 

— — pie 44 

— — rissoles 46 

— — sausage rolls ... 42 

— — savoury hash ... 49 

— baking 22 

— boiling 20 

— fritters — Cooked meat 29 

— hashed — Cooked meat 26 

— minced — Cooked meat ... 39 

— pie, of Australian meat ... 44 

— pie, beef-steak 123 

— pudding, beef-steak 125 

— re-cooked — Curry 33 

— re-cooked — Fried rissoles . 37 

— re-cooked — Goblet pie ... 31 

— re-cooked — Hashed meat . 26 

— re-cooked — Meat fritters . 29 

— re-cooked — Minced meat . 39 

— re-cooked — Shepherd's pie 35 

— roasting 17 

Melted butter sauce — Sauces 2 74 



PAGE 

Milk biscuits 412 

— jelly from cow - heel — 

Jellies 361 

— rolls 416 

— soup — Soups 195 

Mince, of Australian meat 51 

Minced meat — Cooked meat 39 

Mock-turtle — Soups 185 

Mutton, boiled, with parsley sauce 

— Sick-room cookery ... 438 

— broth 147 

— — Sick-room cookery 436 

— — Sick-room cookery 438 

— cutlets — Entrees 62 

— haricot — Entrees 77 

— haricot 157 

Mulligatawny, of Australian meat 40 

New potatoes boiled — Vege- 
tables 246 

Norfolk dumplings 351 

Oatmeal biscuits ,. 413 

Omelette, savoury 385 

— sweet 383 

— soufflee — souffles 382 

Onion sauce — Boiled pig's head . 134 

Ox-cheek soup — Stews 97 

— stewed — Stews 96 

Ox-foot jelly — Jellies 363 

Ox-tail soup — Soups 191 

Oyster sauce — Fish 229 

Pancakes — Puddings 298 

Pastry — beef-steak pie 123 

— beef-steak pudding 125, 284 

— Cornish pasties 115 

— flaky crusts, for pies and tarts 290 

— fruit tart of short crust ... 278 

— Genoese pastry 280 

— patty cases of puff paste ... 277 

— pie — Australian meat 44 

— pork pie 130 

— puffpaste 27c 

— rabbit pie I2T 

— rissoles of Australian meat 54 



Index. 



473 



PAGE 

Pastry — rissoles of chicken — Entrees 79 

— roly-poly pudding . 284 

— rough puff paste, for pies, 

tarts, and tartlets 282 

— sausage rolls 117 

— — rolls of Australian 
meat 46 

— short crust 278 

— — crust for apple turn- 

overs and dumplings ... 287 

— tartlets of puff paste 276 

— veal and ham pie 119 

Patty cases of puff paste — Pastry 277 

Pea soup — Soups 198 

Peas — Vegetables 261 

Pickle for meat , 392 

Pickled cabbage 391 

Pie — Australian meat 44 

— beefsteak 123 

— pork 130 

— sea 132 

— shepherd's, of cold meat ... 35 

— rabbit 121 

— veal and ham 119 

Pig's head, salted and boiled 134 

— fry — Poor man's goose 128 

Piquante sauce — Sauces. 271 

— — Sheep's trotters... 160 

Plaice, fried — Fish 237 

Plain cake — Cakes 397 

Plum cake — Cakes 401 

— pudding, boiled — Puddings 302,328 

— puddings, baked — Puddings 349 

Poor man's goose — Pig's fry 1 28 

Pork pie 130 

Porter jelly — fellies 365 

Potato chips, fried — Vegetables. . . 250 

— croquettes — Vegetables .. 252 

— fried slices of — Vegetables 251 

— souffle —Souffles 380 

Potatoes, baked — Vegetables 249 

— boiled — Vegetables 245 

— mashed — Vegetables 248 

— new, boiled — Vegetables... 246 

— puree of — Soups 178 

— saute — Vegetables 249 



PAGE 

Potatoes, steamed — Vegetables... 246 

Pot-au-feu, or soup — Soups 188 

Pudding, fish — Fish 214 

— roly poly — Pastry 284 

Puddings — Alexandra pudding... 313 

— amber pudding 307 

— apple amber pudding 347 

— — charlotte 296 

— arrowroot — Sick - room 

cookery 425 

— baked batter and fruit 335 

— baked lemon 294 

— baked plum pudding 349 

— batter pudding in a cup ... 320 

— beef-steak 125 

— beef-steak — Pastry 284 

— blanc-mange 315 

— boiled batter 316 

-- — lemon pudding 332 

— bread and butter pudding . 346 

— bread-pudding 324 

— brown bread pudding 309 

— cabinet pudding 292 

— carrot pudding 311 

— cold cabinet pudding 337 

— corn-flour pudding 321 

— corn-flour pudding in a cup 318 

— curate's pudding 323 

— custard pudding 301 

— fig pudding 341 

— ginger pudding 345 

— marmalade pudding 343 

— pancakes 298 

— plum pudding 302 

— — puddings 328 

— rice pudding 300 

— rice pudding (with egg) ... 322 

— semolina pudding 334 

— suet pudding 339 

— tapioca and apples 330 

— treacle pudding 326 

— Vennoise pudding 305 

— Yorkshire pudding 340 

Puff paste — Pastry , 275 

— rough, for pies, tarts, 

and tartlets — Pastry 282 



474 



Index. 



PAGE 

Puree, haricot — Soups 204 

— lentil — Soups 202 

— potato — Soups 178 

— vegetable — Soups 205 

Quenelles of veal— Entrees ... 57 

Rabbit, curry of— Entrees 82 

— pie 121 

— stewed — Stews 94 

— stuffed and roasted 149 

Regulations, rules, and fees, of 

the National Training School for 

Cookery 444 

Rice, boiled 84 

— — Tripe 103 

— buns 410 

— water — Sick-room cookery 427 

— pudding (with egg) — 

Puddings 322 

— pudding 300 

Rissoles, fried — Cooked meat ... 37 

— of Australian meat 46 

— or croquettes of chicken — 

Entrees 79 

Roast rabbit stuffed 149 

Roasting meat 17 

Rock cakes 406 

Rolls of bacon — Entrees 68 

Roly-poly pudding — Pastry 284 

Rough puff paste, for pies, tarts, 

and tartlets— Pastry 282 

Salmon, grilled— Fish 230 

Sauce, anchovy — Fish 223 

— bread 169 

— brown — Sauces 268 

— custard — Soumets 376 

— Dutch — Sauces 272 

— egg 146 

— egg — Fish 216 

— German — Puddings 310 

— lobster— Fish 212 

— mayonnaise — Sauces 270 

— melted butter — Sauces ... 274 

— oyster — Fish 229 



PAGE 

Sauce, piquante — Sauces 271 

— piquante — Sheep's trotters 160 

— Tartare — Fish 231 

— tomato — Sauces '.. 273 

— white— Sheep's trotters ... 160 

— white — Sauces 267 

— wine — Soumets 376 

— wine or brandy — Puddings 304 
Sausage rolls 117 

— of Australian meat 42 

Saute potatoes — Vegetables 249 

Savoury custard — Clear soup 172 

— — Sick-room cookery ... 443 

— hash of Australian meat... 49 

— omelet 385 

Scones 414 

Sea pie 132 

Seedcake — Cakes 399 

Semolina pudding — Puddings . . 334 

— soup — Soups 194 

Sheep's head, boiled 137 

— — broth 137 

— — browned 139 

— trotters 160 

Shepherd's pie — Cooked meat ... 35 

Short-bread 415 

Short crust — Pastry 278 

— for apple dumplings and 

turnovers — Pastry 287 

Sick-room cookery — apple water 430 

— — arrowroot pudding 425 

— — barley water (clear) 428 

— — barley water (thick) 429 

— — beef essence 423 

— — — tea 440) 441 

— — boiled mutton, with 

parsley sauce 438 

— — bran tea 435 

— — chicken panada ... 421 

— — cream of barley ... 424 

— — cup of arrowroot ... 425 

— - g rue l 433 

— — lemonade 431 

— — Liebeg's quick beef 

tea 442 

— — mutton broth 436, 438 



Index. 



475 



PAGE 

Sick-room cookery — rice water .. 427 

— — savoury custard ... 443 

— — toast and water ... 432 

— — treacle posset 434 

— — white wine whey ... 434 
Sole a la maitre d'hotel, fillets of 

—Fish 220 

— au gratin — Fish 218 

— fried fillets of— Fish 222 

Souffle cheese — Souffles 378 

Souffles —omelette soufflee 382 

— potato — Souffles 380 

— vanilla — Souffles 374 

Soup— ox- cheek — Stews 97 

Soups — bonne femme soup 176 

— cabbage soup 197 

— clear soup 170 

— giblet soup 183 

— haricot puree 204 

— lentil puree » 202 

— maccaroni soup 200 

-— milk soup 195 

— mock turtle soup 1 85 

— mulligatawny soup — Aus- 

tralian meat 40 

— ox-tail soup 191 

— pea soup 198 

— pot-au-feu 1S8 

— puree of potatoes 17& 

— semolina soup 104 

— spring vegetable soup 180 

— tapioca cream 174 

— vegetable puree 205 

Spinach — Vegetables 259 

Spring vegetable soup — Soups ... 180 

Strawberry cream — Creams 371 

Steak, grilled 141 

— stewed 143 

Steamed potatoes — Vegetables ... 246 

Stock, brown 207 

— made with vegetables 209 

— white 207 

Stew, Irish — Entrees 75 

Stewed beef or ox-cheek, with 

vegetables — Pot - au- 

feu 188 



Stewed breast or neck of lamb — 

Stews 98 

— cow-heel, with onion sauce 

— Jellies 362 

— eels — Fish 241 

— knuckle of veal — Stews... 100 

— lentils— Vegetables 266 

— maccaroni 388 

— ox-cheek — Stews 96 

— ox-foot — Jellies 366 

— steak 143 

— rabbit — Stews 94 

Stews — a-la-mode beef 86 

— Brazilian stew 88 

— Irish stew 90 

— stewed breast or neck of 

lamb 98 

— — brisket of beef (cold) 92 

— -— knuckle of veal ... 100 

— — ox-cheek 96 

— — rabbit 94 

Suet crust — Pastry 284 

— pudding — Puddings 339 

Sultana cake — Cakes 393 

Tapioca and apples — Puddings 330 

— cream — Soups 174 

Tart, jam — Pastry 291 

— fruit — Pastry 287 

— - - 278 

Tartare sauce — Fish 231 

Tartlets of puff paste — Pastry 276 

Toad-in-the-hole 145 

Toast and water — Sick - room 

cookery 432 

Tomato sauce — Sauces 273 

Treacle posset — Sick-room cook- 
er 435 

— pudding — Puddings 326 

Tripe a la Coutance — Tripe 106 

— boiled, with milk and onions 104 

— curried tripe 102 

Trussing a fowl for boiling 162 

— a fowl for roasting 166 

Turbot, boiled — Fish 211 

Turnips and carrots— Vegetables 255 



47 6 



Index. 



PAGE 

Turnips, mashed — Vegetables ... 263 

Turnovers, apple — Pastry 287 

Vanilla cream— Creams 369 

— souffle — Souffles 374 

Veal, curry of — Entrees 82 

— cutlets — Entrees 66 

— fillet of, braised 109 

— and ham pie 119 

— stewed knuckle of — Stews ico 

— quenelles of — Entries 57 

Vegetable puree — Soups 205 

— stock 209 

— baked potatoes 249 

— boiled cauliflower 257 

— — new potatoes 246 

— — potatoes 245 

— brussels sprouts 254 

— carrots 265 

— — and turnips 255 

— cauliflower au gratfn 258 

— fried potato chips 250 

— — slices of potato 251 



PAGfl 

Vegetable puree, haricot beans ... 262 

— mashed potatoes 248 

— — turnips 263 

— peas 261 

■ — potato croquettes 252 

— saute potatoes , 249 

— spinach 259 

— steamed potatoes 246 

— stewed lentils 266 

Vennoise pudding — Puddings ... 305 

White sauce— Sauces 267 

— — sheep's trotters 160 

— stock 183 

— wine whey — Sick - room 

cookery 434 

Whitebait — Fish 217 

Wine jelly from calf's feet — Jellies 352 

— or brandy sauce — Puddings 304 

— sauce — Soufflets 376 

Yorkshire pudding — Puddings 340 

— tea cakes 417 



THE END. 



Richard Clay & Sons, Limited, London &> Bungay. 



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The Size of an 
Ordinary Hair-Brush. 




When filled with boiling 
water, dries the longest 
and thickest hair after 
washing in ten to twelve 
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(PATENTED IN EUROPE AND AMERICA.) 

As Advertised, f Polished Nickel Silver, in box 7s. 6d. 
Post Free. \ Sterling* Silver, in case ... 55s. Od. 

Used by the Members of the English and Russian Royal Families. 

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Write for Press Opinions. 



MANUFACTURES S 



B. PERKINS & SON, 133 Bermondsey St., S.E., & 42 Snow Hill, E.C. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



AN ENTIRELY NEW AND ORIGINAL COOKERY BOOK. 

HILDA'S 'WHERE IS IT?' OF RECIPES. 

Containing many old CAPE, INDIAN, and MALAY DISHES, and 
PRESERVES ; also directions for Polishing Furniture, Cleaning Silk, 
&c. ; and a Collection of Home Remedies in Case of Sickness. 

By Hildagonda J. Duckitt. 
FIFTH THOUSAND. 
Interleaved with "White Paper for adding Recipes. Crown 8vo. 45. 6d. 

The Morning Post says: — "'Hilda's "Where is it?" of Recipes' may be recom" 
mended as containing clear directions for the preparation of many delicacies for the 
table. The recipes include Cape, Indian and Malay dishes and preserves, some of 
which are as good as they are rare. Space has also been found for other matters 
besides eatables, and the possessors of this small volume will find themselves pro- 
vided with directions for polishing furniture, cleaning materials, and administering 
homely remedies to the sick." 

The Princess says : — " A book of novel arrangement. . . . There are instructions in 
this book that, I suppose, it would be a thousand chances one would ever meet else- 
where, some of them as old as a century, and it should certainly be added to the 
collections of every housewife." 

The Saturday Review says : — " A capital book ... a most interesting collec- 
tion. . . . much is new, and what is not is often newly put." 

Vanity Fair says : — " The author lives at the Cape, and has collected from various 
sources — the majority of them the archives of her own family — valuable old recipes, 
owned and practised by the Malay, Indian, and French cooks, whom it was the 
custom of Cape families of Dutch descent to employ. Attached to the book is a, 
pencil, intended to do duty on the blank pages left for the purpose of memoranda 
writing, where recipes from other sources may be committed to paper." 

FIFTH EDITION. 

THE PYTCHLEY BOOK OF 

REFINED COOKERY AND BILLS OF FARE. 

By Major L*****. Large Crown 8vo, 8s. 

" The author has done his work in the proper way. He begins on the right prin- 
ciple by giving a gross of bills of fare. They supply an aim, and his introductions and 
general rules are written with an energy which can hardly fail to inspire the indis- 
pensable enthusiasm. . . . The great merit of Major L 's recipes is, that 

among the five hundred and fifty-four that he gives, a very lai-ge proportion are really 
possible for small households." — Pall Mall Gazette. 

"The author has arranged his volume with evident care, and a number of menus 
suitable for each month of the year are given in French and English. They are dis- 
tinguished by variety and economy, and are manifestly the compilation of one who 
knows well how to appreciate a good dinner well served. . . . The volume cannot 
fail to prove of service to all who care to live well, and at the same time to study 
reasonable economy." — Society. 

"This is a volume which will be found particularly useful during the approaching 
hunting season, and to those who are in the habit of giving hunt breakfasts or similar 
parties it will be invaluable. The author deals with the subject of cookery in a lucid 
and exhaustive manner, a special feature in the publication being a collection of 4 bills 
of fare,' which comprises twelve for each month of the year. ' Wines and their service ' 
are also dealt with." — Sportsman. 

" ' The Pytchley Book of Refined Cookery and Bills of Fare,' by Major L., is evi- 
dently the production of a man who has studied the gastronomic art with great 
interest. The book opens with a number of menus in French and in English, twelve 
for each month, and then goes on to give, shortly and clearly, the recipes for cooking 
the dishes which have been set out ; and it leaves nothing to be desired. It is hand- 
somely got up, and beyond doubt will have a considerable popularity." — Scotsman. 

" Contains a large number of excellent menus and a good deal of valuable advice."— 
Athenceum, 



LONDON: CHAPMAN AND HALL, Limited. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



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iv ADVERTISEMENTS. 



NINTH THOUSAND. 

BREAKFAST AND SAVOURY DISHES. 

By It. O. C, 

Compiler of the " Official Handbook for the National Training School for 



Cookery." Crown 8vo, Is. 



From "THE TIMES." 

" The success which has attended the publication of the ' Official Handbook of the 
National Training School for Cookery ' — a collection of recipes, indeed, rather than a 
handbook in the accepted sense of the title — has encouraged the compiler, R. O. C, 
to issue a shilling pamphlet entitled ' Breakfast and Savoury Dishes,' for the prepar- 
ation of which forty-three recipes have been drawn up with careful detail. Loose 
phraseology of the old cookery books, such as take a ' little ' or a ' pinch ' or a ' spoon- 
ful,' and so forth, is discarded, and precise terms and quantities are used instead. At 
the head of each recipe the quantity of ingredients required for carrying out the 
recipe, and the cost thereof, are given. Of the forty-three recipes three are allotted 
to the preparation of potables in ordinary use at the British breakfast-table. A warn- 
ing note is sounded against allowing tea to stand longer than five minutes, after which 
the decoction becomes charged with an unwholesome amount of tannin. Deliberate 
operations are insisted upon for the making of good coffee, and the use and re-use of 
cocoa-nibs are expounded. Then follow ten methods of making breads, scones, 
galettesr muffins, crumpets, oat-cakes, short-bread, milk-rolls, and Yorkshire tea-cakes. 
Somersetshire girdle (or gridiron) cake might very well have been added to this list. 
A daintier and not more costly way of cooking ceufs au beurre noir is by treating each 
egg separately, and serving it in a little pipkin or cocote ; and a few more than three 
recipes for various savoury omelettes might have been given in place of those for 
potted meats, which do not recommend themselves to small households while endless 
tins of potted meats are procurable at any grocer's. Then useful recipes for cooking 
fish— including a succulent arrangement of lobster au gratin (at a cost of 3s. 9d.)—- 
follow next ; and the series concludes with recipes for grilled and devilled chicken 
or turkey, and for pigeon pie, in the completion of which the necessity of following 
the sound practice of pouring flavoursome gravy through the hole in the crust of the 
baked pie is enforced. 

"This little book, as will be seen, is intended for the ready and managing house- 
keeper. But a Vatel may not find many of its suggestions beneath his notice." 



THE ROYAL CONFECTIONER: English and Foreign. 
A Practical Treatise. By C. E. FRANCATELLI. With numerous 
Illustrations. Sixth Thousand. Crown 8vo, 5s. 



BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS, AND BALL SUPPERS. 

By Major L . Crown 8vo, 45. 



SEVENTH THOUSAND. 

HOW TO COOK FISH. A Series of Lessons in Cookery, 

from the Official Handbook to the National Training School for 
Cookery, South Kensington. Compiled by " R. 0. C." Crown 8vo, 

sewed, '3d. 



THIRD THOUSAND. 

SICK-ROOM COOKERY. From the Official Handbook to 

the National School for Cookery, South Kensington. Compiled by 
" R. 0. C." Crown 8vo, sewed, 6d. 



THE KINGSWOOD COOKERY BOOK. By H. F. 
WICKEN. Crown 8vo, 2s. 



LONDON : CHAPMAN AND HALL, Limited. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



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Ask for RIPPINGILLE'S PATENT 

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Full Illustrated Catalogue and name of nearest Agent, together with a Guide to Cookery, 
will be sent free on application to the Sole Manufacturers, 

THE ALBION LAMP CO., BIRMINGHAM. 

RIPPINGILLE'S. 

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VI 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



George Meredith's Works. 



Uniform Edition. 

One of our Conquerors. 

Diana of the Crossways. 

Evan Harrington. 

The Ordeal of Richard Feverel. 

The Adventures of Harry Richmond. 

Sandra Belloni. 



Crown 8vo, 3s. 6d. each. 

Yittoria. 

Rhoda Fleming. 

Beauchamp's Career. 

The Egoist. 

The Shaving of Shagpat and Farina. 



The 6s. Edition is still to be had. 



Charles Dickens's Works. 

THE ONLY COMPLETE COPYRIGHT EDITIONS 

THE HALF-GROWN EDITION. 

This Edition contains the whole of Dickens's Works, with all the Original Illustrations, is com- 
plete in 21 crown 8vo vols., and is printed from the Edition that was carefully corrected by 
the Author in 1867 and 1868. Price 2s. 6d, each. 

The Pickwick Papers. With 43 Illustrations by 

Seymour and " Phiz." 
Barnab^ Rudge : a Tale of the Riots of '80. 

With 76 Illustrations by George Catterinole and 

H. K. Browne. 
Oliver Twist. With 24 Illustrations by George 

Cruikshank. 
The Old Curiosity Shop. With 75 Illustrations 

by George Cattermole and H. K. Browne. 
David Copperfield. With 40 Illustrations by 



Phiz. 
Nicholas Nickleby. 

"Phiz." 
Martin Chuzzlewit. 

"Phiz." 
Dombev and Son. 

"Phiz." 
Sketches by "Boz." 

George Cruikshank. 
Christmas Books. 



With 40 Illustrations by 

With 40 Illustrations by 

With 40 Illustrations by 

With 40 Illustrations by 

With 63 Illustrations by 



Landseer, Doyle, Maclise, Leech, &c. 



Bleak House. With 40 Illustrations by " Phiz." 

Little Dorrit. With 40 Illustrations by "Phiz." 

Christmas Stories from " Household Words." 
With 14 Illustrations by Dalziel, Green, Ma- 
honey, &c. 

American Notes and Reprinted Pieces. With 
8 Illustrations by Marcus Stone and F. Walker. 

Hard Times and Pictures from Italy. With 
8 Illustrations by F. Walker and Marcus Stone. 

A Child's History of England. With 8 Illustra- 
tions by Marcus Stone. 

Great Expectations. With 8 Illustrations by 
Marcus Stone. 

A Tale of Two Cities. With 16 Illustrations by 
"Phiz." 

Uncommercial Traveller. With 8 Illustrations 
by Marcus Stone. 

Our Mutual Friend. With 40 Illustrations by 
Marcus Stone. 

Edwin Drood, and other Stories. With 12 

Illustrations by Luke Fildes. 



THE OTHER EDITIONS OF DICKENS'S WORKS ARE:— 

THE ILLUSTRATED LIBRARY EDITION. 

With the Original Illustrations. Complete in 30 Volumes. Demy 8vo, 10s. each. 

THE LIBRARY EDITION. 

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THE CROWN EDITION. 

Complete in 17 Volumes. Containing all the Original Illustrations ; and the Letterpress printed from 

Type especially cast for this Edition. Large Crown 8vo, 5s. each. 

THE PICTORIAL EDITION. 

Containing upwards of Nine Hundred Engravings. Complete in 17 Volumes. Royal 8vo, 3s. 6d. each. 

THE CABINET EDITION. 

In 32 Volumes, small fcap. 8vo, Marble Paper Sides, Cloth Backs, with uncut edges, Is. 6d. each. Each 

Volume contains Eight Illustrations reproduced from the Originals. In sets only, bound in blue or 

red cloth, with cut edges, £2 8s. 



CHAPMAN & HALL, Limited, LONDON. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. vii 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

IN THE 

ELEVENTH EDITION OF THE OFFICIAL HANDBOOK 



NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR COOKERY. 



PAGE 

Adams & Son— "Kitchen Requisites" v. 

Borwick & Sons — " Baking Powder " Second Page of Cover 

Brown & Polson—" Corn Flour" iii. 

Chapman & Hall— "Publishers" ii., iv., vi., viii. 

Florador Second Page of Cover 

Gridley & Co.— "Isinglassine" iii. 

Keen, Robinson & Co. — "Mustard" Facing Second Page of Cover 

Liebig's Extract of Meat Co.— " Extract of Meat " Facing Title Page 

Lovelock, J. F.—" Mincing and Sausage-Making Machines" vii. 

Marshall, James— "Farola" Facing Third Page of Cover 

Menier— "Chocolat-Menier" Third Page of Cover 

Perkins, B., & Son— "Sanitary Seamless Steel Kitchen Requisites" i. 

Rippingille— "Oil Cooking Stoves" v. 



LOVELOCKS 

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parts of the World. ^Purchasers are cautioned against imitations. 

I F. LOVELOCK, Broadway Works, 201 Mare Street, Hackney, London. 

ESTABLISHED 1856. 



Vlll 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CHAPMAN'S MAGAZINE OF FICTION 

Edited by OSWALD CRAWFURD. 

PRICE SIXPENCE, MONTHLY. 



A NON-ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY PERIODICAL AT THE PRICE OF 6d., 

DEVOTED TO FICTION ONLY, 

CHAPMAN'S MAGAZINE, 

is in size, shape, and literary quality, a counterpart in regard to fiction, of what the 
FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW is in regard to political and social essay writing. 

The following Authors are among the Contributors to Chapman's .Magazine, and 
every effort is made to bring forward the work of new and promising writers of fiction. 



GRANT ALLEN. 
HAMILTON AIDE. 
E. F. BENSON, 
WALTER BESANT. 
Mrs. CLIFFORD. 
S. R. CROCKETT. 
GEORGE GISSING. 
THOMAS HARDY. 
BEATRICE HARRADEN. 
BRET HARTE. 
JOHN OLIVER HOBBES. 
ANTHONY HOPE. 



E. W. HORNUNG. 
VIOLET HUNT. 
HENRY JAMES. . 
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Mrs. LYNN LINTON. 
IAN MACLAREN. 
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BARRY PAIN. 
GILBERT PARKER. 
JAMES PAYN. 



F. C. PHILIPS. 
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EDEN PHILLPOTTS. 
MORLEY ROBERTS. 
W. CLARK RUSSELL. 
Mrs. F. A. STEELE. 
FLORENCE WARDEN. 
MARRIOTT WATSON. 
STANLEY WEYMAN. 
I. ZANGWILL. 



Chapman's Magazine represents a new departure in the publication of fiction. In 
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volume equal in amount of reading matter to an ordinary 6s. novel, and containing, as 
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subscribers, for 6s., twelve such volumes of varied fiction of the highest class. 



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The price of the volumes (containing four numbers) of Chapman's Magazine, 
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The case for binding can be had separately through all Booksellers and Newsagents 
for Is. 6d., and post free from Messrs. Chapman & Hall for Is. 9d. 



CHAPMAN & HALL, Limited, LONDON. 



April, 1896 



GENERAL CATALOGUE 
OF BOOKS 



PUBLISHED BY 



CHAPMAN AND HALL, Ld. 




LONDON 
n, HENRIETTA STREET,: CO VENT GARDEN, W.C 

AGENTS FOR 

THE SCIENCE AND ART DEPARTMENT, SOUTH KENSINGTON, and 

MESSRS. JOHN WILEY & SONS of NEW YORK 

FOR LIST OF DIFFERENT CA TA LOG WES ISSUED, SEE FACE 47 



NOTICE. 



MESSRS. CHAPMAN 6- HAIL NOW HOLD THE EXCLU- 
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OF NEW YORK, AN AGENCY HITHERTO DISTRIBUTED 
AMONG SEVERAL OF THE CHLEF LONDON PUBLISHERS. 
THE VARIOUS PUB LLC A TIONS OF MESSRS. WILE Y &> SONS 
DEAL WLTH M/LLTARY AND NAVAL ENGLNEERLNG, 
ASTRONOMY, CHEMLSTRY, ASSAYING, CIVIL AND 
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A LLST OF SPECIAL CATALOGUES WILL BE FOUND ON 
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A 2 



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