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Full text of "Official proceedings of the Democratic National Convention, held in 1860, at Charleston and Baltimore : proceedings at Charleston, April 23-May 3"

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^eTM ^ c y SkTic p 3.YTy, ^\7f\o n */ co rive y^Ttt^-H ^ Ck^. r im&7h>^ a >i ^. 

ib^ OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS 



Ot' THE 



leiMcratit llalianiil Conbeittioit, 



HELID IlSr ISSO, 



AT CHARLESTON AND BALTIMORE. 



PROCEEDINGS AT CHARLESTON. 



APRIL 23-MAT 3. 



prepar);d and published under the direction of 



■4MJN Px. PARKliURST, Recording Secretary. 



s • ■■ * 



•:-> 



C % H V E L A N O : 

NEV15S* PRINT, PLAIN DEALER JOB OFFICE. 

1860. 



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PEOCEEDINGS 



OP THE 



i^tttoctafic |tafi0ttal ^mvmim 

AT CHARLESTON, 1860. 



Monday, April 23, I860, 

In accordance with tbe call of the Democratic National Committee, the 
Delegates to the National Convention assembled at 12 oVlock this morning, 
in the Hall of the South Carolii^p. Institute, in Charleston, S. C. 

Hon. David A. Smalley, of Vermont, Chairman of the Democratic Na^ 
tional Committee, called the Convention to order, in the following words : 

Gentlemen of the Convention : We are assembled on this occasion a» 
the National Democratic Convention, called by the National Democratic 
Committee, pursuant to the authority confided in them by the Convention 
assembled at Cincinnati, to nominate candidates for the Presidency and Vice 
Presidency of the United States, and to transact such other business as the 
interests of the Democratic party may dictate. What is the pleasure of the 
Convention ? 

Mr. H. K. tlACKSON, of Georgia, nominated Thompson B. Flournoy, of 
Arkansas, as President of the Convention j>ro tern. Carried unanimously. 

Messrs. H. K. Jackson, of Georgia, and G. W. McCook, of Ohio, were 
appointed a Committee to conduct the temporary Presiding Officer to the 
Chair. 

Col. Flournoy, on taking the Chair, said : 

Gentlemen of the Convention : I thank you most sincerely for the 
honor you have done me, and I shall endeavor so to demean myself as to 
bring about a speedy organization of this body ; and, I hope, in a satisfactory 
manner. 

The Rev. Charles Hahckel, D. D., of the Episcopal Church, then 
addressed the Throne of Grace in prayer. The Delegates all in a standing 
position during the prayer. 

Mr. Fisher, of Virginia. We are not yet organized, as I understand, nor 
has a Secretary yet been appointed. I therefore propose the name of William 
F. Ritchie, of Virginia, as temporary Secretary of the Convention. Carried 
%5 unanimously. 

^ Mr. Fisher. I now ask the Presiding Officer to read a letter which I will 

^ send to the Chair, and in connection with whit h I have a resolution to offer. 

Gov. J. A. Winston, of Alabama, objected to the reception of the com- 
munication until the Convent on was permanently organized, 

Mr. Fisher. The letter relates to the organization. 



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4 Democratic National Convention. 

The President. The Chair decides that if it relates to the organization 
it IS m order. ' 

Mr. Fisher took the Secretary's stand, and was about to read the commu- 
nication, when 

Mr. John Cochran, of New York, claimed to be heard one moment before 
the letter was read. 

Mr, Fisher. That is the very issue involved. 

Mr. Cochran. I claim to have the floor, and shall retain it until I am 
properly interrupted. I rise to a question of order. The resolution must be 
ottered betorethe communication is read, otherwise there is no question before 
the Convention. 

Mr Lawrevce, of Louisiana, rose to a point of order. The gentleman 
irom New York has no right to address the Convention. 

Mr. Fisher. The gentleman is not properly a member of this body. 

Mr. CocHRi.N. I rise to a point of order, and shall not yield the floor, 
i he gentleman from Virginia claims thac he has a resolution to offer. It is 
^^m?* n^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^ communication when no motion is before the House. 

i he Chair. The Chair decided that if the communication refers strictly 
to the organi zation, it can be read. 

Mr. PuGH, of Ohio, ^he proper way of the gentleman from Virginia will 
be to communicate to the Chair, or to the Convention, the substance of the 
letter ; then we shall see to what business it relates. 

Mr. Fisher. I have been requested to read the communication, and I shall 
do so. [Mr F. proceeded to the Clerk's stand and attempted to read the com- 
munication.] 

The Chair. Before the letter is read, th# Chair inquires of the gentleman 
whether it is a communication from a State ? 

Mr. Fisher. It is from a Delegatton claiming a seat here. 
Mr. Cochran. I rise to a point of order. I had been awarded the floor, 
and had not yielded it. I claim, therefore, that the gentleman from Virginia 
IS out ot order. ^ 

Mr. Fisher. The State of Virginia is not responsible for my conduct. I 
am responsible alone for my own acts, and I stand here on the right to the 
tloor, awarded me by the Chair. 

The Chair. The gentleman from Virginia is out of order. The Chair 
d ^cides that the communication, being only from a contesting Delegation not 
now recognized by the Convention, is out, of order. The gentleman from 
JNew York (Mr. Cochran) has been awarded the floor. 

Mr. Fisher. The Delegates from whom this communication comes are 
representatives of the State of New York. They claim it as a ricrht to be 
neard — ° 

Tile Chair— [rapping to order.] The gentleman from Virginia has been 
ruled out of order, and I call upon the Convention to support the Chair. 

Mr Fisheu. I have the floor, and I do not mean to be unfairly ruled out 
of order. [Shr.uts of "Order I order! "] 

Mr John Cochran. I move, Mr. President, that the rules of the last Na- 
tional Convention be adopted as the rules to govern this body. 

Mr. L. P. Walker, of Alabama, rose to address the Convention. 

1 he Chair. Debate is out of order, unless some question is before the Con- 
vention. Does the gentleman from Alabama make any motion ? 

Mr. Walker. I desire to sj^eak. 

Mr. Walker. I appeal from the decision of the Chair by which I am ruled 
out of order, and that i have a right to do. 

The Chair. The gentlem m has a right to appeal. The question will be, 
shall the decision of the Chair be sustained? 

Mr. Walker. I desire to be heard— [Cries of " Question ! question ! "] 

1 he Chair. Nothing is in order until the question on the appeal is decided. 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 5 

Mr. Clark, of Mississippi, in a loud tone of voi e, claimed the right of the 
gentleman from Alabama (Mr. Walker) to be heard on the appeal he had 
taken from the decision of the Chair, 

The Chair. If the Convention will come to order, the Chair will state the 
question before it. 

Mr. Walker. If the Chair will refrain from entering into a conferenci 
with me, and will allow me to si eak for a few moments, he will then him- 
self iinder>tand what is the qnestion to which I desire to sj eak. 

The Chair, The Chair has no desire to preverit the gentleman from beicg 
heard, unless the Convention itself shall decline to hear him. He is in order 
if speaking on the appeal from the decision o\ the Chair. 

Mr. Walker. The question properly before the Convention is, whether 
the communication pre^^ented by the gentleman f n m Virginia (Mr. Fisher) 
shall be read. It is simply a pari iauicntary rule that any gentleman whr; 
offers to a body like this a respectful paper, has the right to demand that it be 
read. The gentleman fmm Virginia has presented a communication relating 
directly to the organization of this Convention, from a State Delegation claim- 
ing the right of a seat here. It must be entertained at oLce, if the right of the 
contesting delegation is to be respected at all. I hold that the question on 
the reading of the communication is before the House, and as I rose to 
speak to that question, I hold that the decision of the Chair ruling me out 
of order is incorrect. 

The Chair. The question before the Convention if, shall the decision of 
the Chair be sustained? 

The Chair was sustained by a vote almost unanimous. 

The Chair. The ayes have it, and the decision of the Chair is sustained. 

Mr. Fisher. I now offer the resolution which I purported to offer in con- 
nection with the communication which I desired to read. 

The Chair. A question is already pending. It is the motion of the gen- 
tleman from New York, that the rules of the last Natiunal Convention be 
adopted as the rules to govern the present Convention. 

The motion was unanimously adopted. 

Mr. Fisher. I now ask to read the communication and the resolution 
which I purport to offer in connection therewith. 

The Chair. It has already been decided that this subject is not in order. 
The decision of the Chair in that respect, has been sustained by the voice of 
the Convention. The Chair is therefore compelle 1 to rule the gentleman frorii 
Virginia again out of order. 

Mr. Geo. W. McCook, of Ohio, offered the following : 

Besolved, 'I hat a Committee of one from each State be selected by the 
respective delegations, whose duty it shall be to select permaner t officers of 
the Convention. 

Mr. Fisher. I move to amend this resolution, and I presnine my right 
to do so will not be disputed. 

The Chair. An amendment will be in order if it is pertinent to the ques- 
tion before the ConAer»tion. 

Mr. Barksdale, of Mississippi, obtained the floor, and moved the followinj.: 
as a substitute for Mr. McCook's resolution : 

Resolved, That a Committee on Credentials be appointed by the several rel- 
egations respectively, to be composed of one from each State in which there 
is no disputed delegation, whose duty it shall be to report to the Conventiou 
the Delegates that are entitled to Seats on this floor. 

Mr. Richardson said : Mr. President— I hope my friend from Ohio will 
accept the amendment of the gentleirian from Mississippi. 'I'here is a con- 
troversy in the State which I represent upon this floor. Sir, I want the 
Convention, and I ^ant the country, to see what are its merits. I shrink from 



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6 Democratic National Convention. 

no investi^atioD, and when the Convention comes to see the character of the 
contest, they will be amazed at what small things contests can be raised about. 

It is humiliating to me, at this period of my life, to have a contest of this 
matter of my Democracy with such opponents as those who are contesting 
my seat here. I am anxious that the Convention shall have this matter be- 
fore them, without one word or any action from me, and decide it. With that 
decision I am sure I shall be satisfied. 

Mr. John Cochran, of New York, rose to speak, but was interrupted by 

Mr. Lawbenoe, of Louisiana, who rose to a point of order. No gentlemen 
from New York had yet been admitted as regular Delegates by the voice of 
the Convention, ana until that question had been decided, no person had a 
right to be heard from that State? 

Mr. CocHBAN. Mr. Chairman, I ask the gentleman from Louisiana by what 
right he himself holds a seat on this floor? 

Mr. Lawbence, As a Delegate from the State of Louisiana, whose seat 
is not contested. 

Mr. Cochran. And, Sir, by the same right, as Delegates from the State of 
New York, do we hold our seats here on this floor. 

Mr. Lawbence. It is well known that there are two sets of Delegates from 
the State of New York, both claiming a right to seats in this Convention. 
One of those delegations is headed by Mayor Wood, the representative man 
of the New York Democracy. The other, by Mr. Dean Richmond, an equally 
worthy gentleman and reliable Democrat. I hold that— 

The Chaib. The gentleman from Louisiana is not in order. The Chair 
has already decided that all discussion is out of order upon this question until 
the Convention shall have been permanently organized. 

Mr. W. S. Babbt, of Mississippi, asked that the roll be called. The Con- 
vention could not proceed with any regularity until it is ascertained who are 
JW)d who are not Delegates. 

Mr. CocHBAN obtained the floor. He said : Mr. Chairman — I was well 
pleased to hear the remarks of the gentleman from Illinois, respecting the 
resolution offeicd by the gentleman from Mississippi. The sentiments 
expressed by him are ours, and the amendment ofl*ered meets the unqualified 
approbation of the Delegates from New York. We are the sole representa- 
tives of the regular and orthodox Democracy of that State, but while 
maintaining that position, we are not actuated by such feelings as to pretend 
that there may be no controversy respecting our claims. Whether the gen- 
tlemen who contest our seats come with claims of greater or less magnitude, 
we have no objection that every man shall be heard in his own behaff. We 
of New York have not been educated in that school of ethics or politics to 
claim that we only can be right, or to desire to sit in adjudication on our own 
case. If the Convention should offer to us to be judges in our own case, w« 
would decline it as men and as gentlemen, but more particularly as men 
clothed with the robes of regularity, and as representatives of the Democracy 
of the great State of New York. Wishing to submit ourselves to the 
decision of the Convention, we are ready to agree in the adoption of the pro- 
posed amendment. 

Mr. PuoH, of Ohio, desired that the resolution should set forth the States 
from which there are supposed to be contested seats^ 

Mr. Babksdale. then modified his substitute so as to provide for the 
appointment of a Committee on permanent organization — one from each State 
(except in New York and Illinois,) to be selected by the Delegates from each 
State. 

Mr. McCooK. I accept the amendment proposed by the gentleman from 
Mississippi, with the understanding that it is to be confined to the Delegate* 
whose seats are contested entirely. If it is so modified, I will accept it 



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Proceeding's at Charleston. 7 

There is then no objection to it, for we come here as Demorrats whose Con- 
ventions have always excluded from their Committees the States whose seats 
are contested. 

Mr. W. S. Barry, of Mississippi, suggested that the resolution be so framed 
as to create a Committee on the contested seals only. If a general Committee 
on credcLtials is formed, it may be five days before they report. 

The resolution of Mr. McCook, as proposed to be amended by Mr. Barks- 
dale, was then read. 

Mr. Mathews, of Missislippi, was about to offer a resolution as a substi- 
tute for the oriscinal resolution and the amendment, when — 

Mr. John Cochran rose to a point of order. The original resolution 
related to a permanent organization of this Convention, The proposed amend- 
ment had reference to certain seats alleged to be contested, and was not pertt^ 
nent to the original motion. 

Mr. J. B. Clark, of Mit^souri, obtained the floor. He held that the 
amendment was not pertinent to the original resolution. The National Com- 
mittee admit to the floor of the Convention such Delegates from the several 
States as are entitled to seats. Every gentleman here is, therefore, to be 
regarded as a Delegate. He therefore moved the previous question, with a 
view of bringing the Convention to a vote on the original resolution. 

The Chair inquired, before putting the motion for the previous question, 
whether the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. McCook) had accepted the amendment 
of the gentleman from Mississippi. 

Mr. MoCooK. The amendment of the gentleman from Mississippi was not 
modified in accordance with my suggestion, and, therefore, I did not accept it. 
While 1 am in favor, with him, of a Committee on Contested Seats, I am anx- 
ious that the question on organization should be disembarrassed of this issue. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois, argued that the original resolution contem.- 
plated a permanent organization. The amendment oflered by the gentleman 
from Mississippi contemplated a Committee on Contested Seats, but if adopted, 
would really exclude the two great States of New York and Illinois from a 
representation or the Committee on Organization. To this hje objected. 

Judge Meek, of Alabama, raised the point of order, that none of the reso- 
lutions are in order until the roll of Delegates has been called, in order that 
it may be ascertained who are the representatives properly present in the 
Convention. 

Mr. Richardson. The substitute offered by the gentleman from Mississippi 
varies the proposition from its original form. The original had referencaonly 
to the Committee upon Credentials. The gentleman from Ohio proposes to 
raise a Committee upon Organization. The gentleman from Mississippi 
moves to amend by excluding the two States in which there is said to be a 
contest. From that Committee ought to be excluded only the State that is 
called up. There is no reason why the State of Illinois and the State of 
New York should be excluded from the Committee on Organization. There 
may be. and there are reasons which I acknowledge to be satisfactory to me, 
why I should not sit in the contested case of Illinois. But there is no reason 
why a member of our Delegation should not sit in the contested case of Ne^v 
York. But when you come to pluralities, you not only take us from the 
Committees but strike down the power of the two Slates in this Convention. 

Mr. Barksdale desired to correct a misapprehension of some Delegates. 
He did not desire to discuss the merits of any contested seat, but he referred 
to the Cincinnati Convention, at which no State from which thei-e ware con- 
testants was admitted to a representation on the Committee on Permanent 
Organization. 

Mr. Craig, of Missouri, desired to correct the gentleman from Mississippi. 
The contested seat from that State was decided at Cincinnati before the per- 



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8 Democratic National Convention. 

manent organization, aed the Missouri Pel egates were fully re] )reserited on 
the Committee. 

Mr. Cessna, of Penns\ Ivania, moved to amend by striking ou^ all after 
the enacting clause in the original resolutions, and inserting as lollows : 

Resolved, That there now shall be appointed two Committees ; each to con- 
sist of one membei from ea h State, t«' be selected by the respective delega- 
tions thereof ; one a Committee on Permanent Organization, and the other ori 
Credentials ; and that in determining the controversy in regaid to the disputed 
seats of the Illinois Delegation, the members of the Committee on Creden- 
tials of that State shall not be permitted to vote thereon, and in determining 
the controversy from the State of New York, the members of the Committee 
on Credentials from that State shall not be permitted to vote. 

Mr. Cessna moved the previous question, which being ordered, the vote 
was taken upon the above substitute by States, and the same was adopted, as 
follows : 



Yeas. Nays. 



Yeas. Kajs. 



North Carolina ..10 

South Carolina 8 

Geoi-gia .. . 10 

.^Idbauia 

Louisiana . 

•Ussouri . 9 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 11 

Ohio 28 

1 Misisis>ippi 

Texas 

15 Florida 3 



Tea.s. }.avi 

Tennessee ..12 

Kentucky 12 

Wisconsin 5 

Michigan 6 

Iowa 4 

Arkansas 

California 2 

Oregon .s 

inne^ota 4 



Maine 8 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 13 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut & 

New Jersey 7 

Pennsylvania 27 

Delaware ... 3 

Maryland 7 1 Missis »ippi 7 

New York 35 Texas 4 257 

Virginia - - - 

Mr. Fisher. We protest against the vote of the State of New York being 
received and counted here. 

The Chair. The protest is not now in order. 

Mr. Fisher. We desire to enter it on the journal. 

The origmal resolution, as amended, was then adopted. 

Mr. Cessna moved to reconsider the vote, and to ky the motion on the 
table. Agreed to. 

Mr. Mathews, of Mississippi, oflfered the following : 

Besolvedf 'Ihat the Delegates from the States of New York and lUinoi?, 
whose seats are contested, be requested not to participate in the proceedings of 
this body, until the Committee on Credentials shall have determined and 
reported to the Convention, which of said contestants are entitled to seats. 

Mr. Clark, of Missouri, raised the point of order that a similar motion had 
been offered, and the Convention had virtually rejected it. 

The Chair. The point of order is not well taken. 

Mr. Cessna moved to lay the resolution on the table. 

Mr. Clark, of Mississippi, objected to the delegations fiom New York 
voting on this question, on the ground that they are parties in interest. 

The vote to lay the -resolution on the table was then demanded by States^ 
and resulted as follows : 



Maine 

New Hampshire 
Vermont 


Yeas. Nays. 

8 

5 

5 


North Carolina. . 
South Carolina.. 

Georgia 

Alabama 

Louisiana 


Yeas. 
....10 
8 


Nays. 

10 
9 

6 

7 
4 


Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Wisconsin 

Iowa 

Michigan 


Yeas. Navfe 
...... "12 

12 


Massachusetts , . . 
Rhode Island .. 


13 

4 

6 

7 

27 

3 

8 

85 

15 


4 


Connecticut* 


Missouri 


.... 9 


A 


New Jersey 

Pennsylvaaia 

Delaware 


Indiana 

Illinois • 

Ohio : 


13 

....11 
. 23 


California 

Oregon 

Minnesota 


4 

3 

4 


Maryland 

NewY6rk 


Mississippi 

Texas . . _ 




259 44 


Virginia 


Florida 


.... 8 





So the resolution was laid on the table. 

The roll of States was then called, and the following Committees were 
appointed : ♦ 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 9 

On Permanent Organization— Virginia, John Braunon ; Indiana, S. K. Wolfe; Corinecticiit, A. 0. 
Liopit; Minnesota; J. Travis Rosser ; Michigan, A. C. Baldwin; South Carolina, B. H.Wilson; 
uregon, John K. Limerick; New York, Sidney T. Fai'child; Louisiana, E. LaSere ; Rhode Island, 
John M. Franci« ; Massachusetts, Chester W. thapin ; Le aware, John B. Pennington ; Iowa, E. H. 
Tha>er ; New Jertey, Robert Hamilton ; Illinois. A. M. Herrington ; Texas, F K. Lubfe'ock; Penn- 
syivania, John Cessna ; Ohio, George W. Houk ; Florida. Thomas J. Eppes ; California, G. W. Pat- 
rick ; wississippi, Charles Ciaik; Arkansas, John J. Sturman ; North Carolina, Wm. A. Moure; 
> arylana, John B. Emory ; Missouri, Samnei B. ChurchiJ; Georgia. John H. Lumpkin t Tennes- 
see, Thomas M. Jones ; Kentucky, Colbej t Cecil ; Wisconsin, E. S. Bragg ; Alabamia, A. B. Meek ; 
Vermont, H. g. Stuughton; New Hampshire, Robert S. Webstet ;. Maine, Wm. H. Burrell 

On Credentials— Virginia, E. W. Hubbard; Indiana, S. A. Hall; Connecticut, James Gallagher ; 
Minnesota, Henry H. fcjibley; Michigan, Benjamin Fo lett ; South Carolina, B F.Perry; Oregon, 
Laiising ^tont ; New York D. DeWolt ; Louisiana, F. H. Hatch ; Rhode Island, George H. Browne; 
Massachusetts, Oliver Stevens ; Delaware, Wm. G. Whitely ; Iowa. D, 0. Finch; New Jersey, Albert 
K. ^peer; Illinois, Wra J. Allen; Texas Gen. E.Greer'; Pennsylvania, A. M North; Ohio, Jut*. B. 
Stee^man ; Florida, Charles E. Dycke ; California, John S.Dudley; Mississippi, Wm S.Barry; 
Arkansas. Van H. Manning ; North Carolina, R. R. Bridges ; Maryland. Wm. S Gittings ; Mis- 
souri, John M. i^rum ; Georgia. Julian Hartiidge ; Tennessee, W H. Carroll;. Kentucky, 6. T. Wood,; 
Wisconsin, P. H. Smith; Aiabama, M. W. M. Brooks^ Vermont, Stepben Thomas; New Hamp- 
shire, Aaron P. Hughes; Maine, Charles D. Jameson. 

Mr. S. H. BusKiBK, of Indiana, moved the following: 

Hesolved, That the States be called in their order, and that the list of Dele- 
gates from each State be furnished to the Secretarj^ and, whenever there is a 
contest, the papers relating to such be referred to the Committee on Creden- 
tials. 

Adopted, and the list of Delegates handed to the Secretary, by the Chair- 
men of the different Delegations. 

Mr. Lawbknce, of Louisiana, moved as an amendment, to add at the end of 
the resolution that the communication of the New York contesting Delega- 
tion in the hands of the Chairman be read, and then referred to the Commit- 
tee on Contested Seats. 

Mr. Cochran moved to amend, by referring the letter without reading, and 
called the previous question, which was ordered. 

Mr. Cochran's amendment was adopted, and the resolution of Mr. Buskirk 
amended so as to refer the New York letter to the Committee on Contested 
ISeats without reading, was then agreed to. 

Mr. 0. B. FicKLiN, of Illinois, offered the following resolution : 

Hesolved, That a Committee of one Delegate from each State, to be selected 
by the Delegation thereof, be appointed to report resolutions, and that all reso- 
lutions, in relation to the platform of the Democratic party, be referred to said 
Committee, on presentation, without debate. 

Pending the question on this resolution, the Convention, on motion of Mr. 
Dawson, of Pennsylvania, adjourned until 10 o'clock to-morrow (Tuesday) 
morning. 



Tuesday, April 24, 1860. 

The Convention re-assembled at 10 o'clock, in the Hall of the Institute. 
The galleries were filled, the North gallery being reserved exclusively for 
ladies. 

Hon. T. B. Flournoy called the Convention to order, and announced that the 
first business in order was the reading of the minutes of yesterday's proceed- 
ings, but these not being in readiness, the reading was suspended. 

The President pro ^6m. announced that the next business in order Was the 
report of the Committees. 

Mr. Payne, of Ohio, suggested that the question pending at the adjourn- 
ment was first in order. The reports of Committees would only be first in 
order after the permanent organization was completed. 

The President. The question pending at the adjournment is not neces- 
satily in order, but the Chair will entertain a motion to take up the business 
on the tablej if no objections are made. '' 



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10 



Democratic National Convention. 



Judge Meek, of Alabama, moved that the Committee on Permanent Organiz- 
ation be now requested to report. 

The Presibent pro tern. That is in order. If the Committee on Perma- 
nent Organization is ready to report, their report will be received. 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania, Chairman of the" Committee, made the 
following report of Permanent Officers of the Convention: 

For Fresident^Ron. CALEB CUSHING, of Massachusetts. 
For Viee Presidents and Secretaries: 



KAINX. 

Vice President— Th. D. Bobinson. 
Secretary — C. Record. 

NIW HAKPSHIRK. 

Vice President — Daniel Marcy. 
Secretary— George A. Bingham. 

VERMONT. 

Tice President-— Jasper Band. 
Secretary— P. W. Hyde. 

MA8SA0HU8KTT8. 

Vice President— Isaac Davis. 
Secretary— B. F. Watson. 

BHODX ISLAND. 

Vice President— Gideon Bradford. 
Secretary — Amnsa Sprague. 

COMNBCTICUT. 

Vice President— Samuel Arnold, 
Secretary— M. B. West. 

IfKW JERSEY. 

Vice President— Wm. Wright. 
St{cr»tary— Jon 0. Baflferty. 

NEW YORK. 

vice President— Erastus Corning. 
Secretary—Edward Cooper. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

VicePres't — Th- s. Cunningham. 
Secretary—Franklin Vansant. 

DELAWARE. 

Vice President— W. H. Boss 
Secretary— John H. Buley. 

MARYLAND. 

Vice President— W. P. Bowie 



VIRGINIA 

Vice President— 0. B. Funston. 
Secretary— Robert H. Glass. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Vice President — Bedford Brown 
Secretary — L. W. Humphrey. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Vice President — B. H Brown. 
JSeeretary — Franklin Gaillard. 

QEOEQIA. 

Vice President — James Thomas. 
Secretary — J. J. Dimond. 

ALABAMA. 

Vice President— B. G. Scott. 
Secretary- N. H. B. Dawson. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Vice President — James Drane. 
Secretary— W. H. U. lybon. 

LOUISIANA. 

Vice President— B. Taylor. 
Secretary— Charles Jones. 

OHIO. 

Vice Preside nt — David Tod, 
Secretary — W. M. Stark. 

KENTUCKY. 

Vice President — B. Spalding. 
Secretary— Bobert McKee. 

T£NN£88££. 

Vice President-^. O. C. Atkins. 
Secretary — John R. Howard. 

INDIANA. 

Vice President— Isaac C. Elston. 
Secretary— Lafayette Devlin 



ILLINOIS. 

Vice President— Z Casey. 
Secretary— R. E. Goodeli. 

ARKANSAS. "I 

Vice President— Francis A.Terry. 
Secretary— F. W Hoadley. 

MICHIGAN. 

Vice President— H.H Riley. 
Secretary — John G, Parkhurst. 

FLORIDA. 

Vice President— B. F. Wardlaw. 
Secretary— 0. E. Dyeke. 

TEXAS. 

Vice President — H. B. Runnels. 
Secretary— Thomas P. Ochiltree. 

MISSOURI. 

Vice Pres't— Abraham Hunter. 
Secretary— J. T. Mense. 

IOWA. 

Vice President— T. W. Claggett. 
Secretary— J, W. Bosler. 

WISCONSIN. 

VicePresideut— Fred'kW, Horn. 
Secretary— A F Pratt. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Vice President— J. A. Dreibelbis. 
Secretary— John 8. Dudley. 

MINNESOTA. 

Vice President— W. W. Phelps. 
Secretary— G. T. Kosser. 

OREGON 

Vi:;e President— S. P. Denisoii. 
Secretary— B. F. Metcalf. 



Secretary-E.L F.Hardcastle. , ^ „,....„,, *.«ct«»,i. 

The announcement of the name of the permanent President was received 
with loud applause. 

The Committee further recommended that the rules and regulations 
adopted by the National Democratic Convention of 1852 and 1856 be adopted 
bv this Convention for its government, with this additional rule : 

" That in any State which has not provided or directed by its State Conven- 
tion bow its vote may be given, the Convention will recognize the right of 
each Delegate to cast his individual vote." 

John N. Francis, Secretary. JOHN CESSNA, Chairman. 

Mr. McCooK, of Ohio, moved that the report of the Committee be accepted, 
and the Committee discharged. Agreed to. 

Mr. McCooK moved that the report of the Committee be adopted. 

Mr. Clark, of Mississippi, stated that the additional rule had been added by 
the Committee without the knowledge or consent of a majority of the mem- 
bers. The question on its adoption was brought before the Committee, and 
voted down on a call of the States. 

Mr. Cassidy, of Pennsylvania, rose to a point of order. The report had 
been adopted, and there was no question before the Convention. 

The Chair. The point of order is not well taken. 

Mr. Clark. The report has been accepted, not adopted. The Committee 
at Its regular meeting, had refused to alter the rules of the former Conven- 
tions, by the addition of the rule now reported. He did not charge any un- 
fairness to the, presiding ofleicer of the Committee, who, doubtless, did his 
best to get all the Committee together again, to re-consider its original action. 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 11 

But he, and others of the Committee, had not been notified and hadnoknow^i 
ledge of the alteration that had been made, imtil it was announced here. He 
therefore moved that the proposed additional rule be stricken from the report. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. If I propose to go into an inquiry of what 
was done by the Committee, it might be proper to say that the pr^ position 
now submitted was acted upon in a fuller meeting, as I am told, than that of 
last night, and adopted unanimousl)^ I do not propose to discuss with the 
gentleman Irom Mississippi the subject as to the action of the Committee. I 
propose to place it upon the basis of its own merits. Where a State Conven- 
tion has met and instructed its Delegation as a unit, and they have accepted 
the condition, they are bound by it. Wherever they give no such instruction, 
wherever they have refused in a State Convention to give such instruction, it 
is proper to place the right of the Delegate upon the broad and di-tinct 
ground of right. But where they have entered into an organization, and are 
pledged, they are not at liberty to over-run the expressed wishes and will of 
their constituents. But I propose to place the question of individuality upon 
the broad ground of right, and right alone. [Applause.] I say upon that 
ground the report of the Committee ought to be adopted. 

Mr. Lubbock, of Texas, made an explanation of the action of the Com- 
mittee. They had spent some three hours in session, at which this subject 
was fully, fairly and freely discussed. The resolution now proposed to be 
added had been voted down. The Chairman of the Committee h d CjJled a 
meeting this morning, in order, as it was understood, to receive the names of 
the Vice Presidents and Secretaries not reported at the reajular meetina:. At 
this adjourned meeting, when many members of the Committee were absent, 
the alteration had been made. He called upon the Convention to sustain the 
majority of the Committee, and to discountenance any usurpation of power 
on the part of a portion of a Committee. They had to-day presented to the 
Convention, as its permarent presiding officer, a man of ability— -a man of 
intellect — a man of power — [cheers] — and the rights of every Delegate were 
safe in his hands. The merits of the proposed amendnaent were fully 
discussed before the Committee, and no reason was seen, u;^ on a full argument,, 
why the rule that had worked well in 1852 and 1856 should not work well 
now. 

Mr, Barry, of Mississippi, suggested that the Committee on Permanent 
Organization had no power or right to report rules. He should raise the poinfe 
of order at the proper time. 

Mr. Lubbock continued to argue in favor of striking the proposed amendr 
meut from the report. 

Mr. Salisbury, of Delaware, desired the reading of the proposed rule, as^ 
many of the Delegates did not fully understand the question. 

Mr. Cessna explained that, as Chairman of the Committee on Organization,, 
he had labored hard to get the whole of the Committee together, again to 
consider this question of rules. If he had failed, it had only been because 
of the limited time. As to the merits of the proposed amendment, he held 
that the old rule of 1852 and 1856 would be construed to deprive those Dele- 
gates who happened to be in a minority from freely and fully expressing 
their views in the Convention and in reality disfranchising them. '1 he rule 
which it was proposed to add to the rules of the former National Conventions 
of the party, was to the effect that in any State, which is not directed by its 
State Convention how to cast its vote, the Convention will recognize the 
right of each Delegate to cast his individual vote. Although it was not in 
order to allude to what had taken place in a Committee, yet as other gentle- 
men had done so, he might be permitted to say that a similar proposition hadi 
only been voted down by a small majority. Upon the re-assembling of the 
Committee, a large majority had agreed to the rule now reported. As he 



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12 Democratic National Convention, 

had stated already, he had endeavored to procure the atterdance of all the 
Committee at the adjonrned morning session. Only two had been absent, and 
with these exceptions, he had been unanimously instructed to make the 
report as it had been made. They had heard that the rule formerly adopted 
had worked well in foimer years, and they were therefore urged to adhere to 
the old rule. 

But, as he had said, should the old rule prevail uoav and the majority of the 
Pennsylvania Delegation decide f^mong themselves to cast the vote of the State 
as a unit, he and the constituency represented by him would be virtually 
-disfranchised. In the Pennsylvania State Convention, of which he was a 
jnember, no proj option to cast the vote of the State as a unit was entertained. 
The Committee on Eesolutions in that Convention had, o. the contrary, rejected 
such a prop< sition. The amended rule was designed simply to explain beyond 
a misconstruction, what was the honest meaning of the rule that heretofore 
prevailed, but which was now in danger of misinterpretation. In the Conventions 
at Baltimore and Cincinnati, the right of every Delegate to vote had been 
recognized, and several of the States, Ohio amongst the number, had divided 
their votes on almost every ballot. It might as well be claimed that it was 
wrong to change the platiorm, as that it was wrong to alter the rules. He ^s a 
Northern man, had come here prepared to change the platform of the party, if 
it was deemed advisable to do so, and he had also come with a candidate from 
the extreme South as his first choice for the Presidency. He asked the 
Convention not to strike out this amendment, and so leave him to be dis- 
franchised if a wrong interpretation should be put upon the old rule. 

Mr. C. did not profess to be extreme in his views, but he desired to be pro- 
tected in his rights. He was not of those to threaten non- concurrence in the will 
of the majority, but was prepared to submit and to stay in the Convention, even 
it disfranchised. There were some of his colleagues who were prepared to vote 
for one man, who was not his own choice. They also were in a minority of the 
whole Delegation, and it would be an act of injustice to disfranchise them. He 
again appealed to the Convention not to reject the proposed amendment to the 
rules. To disfranchise- a portion of the Democracy of Pennsylvania might be 
to give that State to the Republicans, but if the rights of all Delegates were 
respected, the Democracy would again achieve there a glorious triumph. 
[Applause.] 

Mr. Bab«y, of Mississippi, raised the point of order that the Committee on 
Permanent Organization had no right to report rules, and that so much of their 
report should be rejected. 

Mr. JosiAH Randall, of Pennsylvania, said he, too, vas in favor of a candi- 
date from the South, and would vote for no man who had not the entire 
confidence of the South. If the gentleman from his own State, (Mr. Cessna,) 
said as much, he would act differently fr©m what was supposed to be h^'s views 
and wishes at home. He desired that the proposed amendment should be 
stricken out, because with the two-third rule that prevailed in the Convention, 
;such amendment would virtually disfranchise the majority, and enable one-thinl 
of a delegation to neutralize the action of the remaining two- thirds. He re- 
viewed the action of the Pennsylvania State Convention, ^and protested against 
any action of the Convention that would destroy the efficacy of the vote of that 
State in the Convention. 

Mr. Bishop, of Connecticut, claimed that the point of order raised by the 
gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Barry) ought to be decided at once by the 
Chair. 

The Chair. The point of order must be settled at once by the Chair. The 
Convention yesterday decided to adopt the rules of the last National Convention, 
and the Chair is of opinion that in reporting rules, the Committee traveled out 
of its province, and that so much of its report is out of order. [Applause.] 

Mr. Bishop. I now move the previous question. 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 13 

The Chair. The gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Kicliardson) was recogniz'jd 
by the Chair, and has the floor. 

Mr. Bishop. I raise the point that the gentleman rose to address the Chair, 
on a question now declared out of order, and is not, therefore, entitled to the 
floor. 

Mr. EicHARDSON, who had remained standing, said that he had heard the 
remarks of the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Randall) with surprise. It 
might be interesting for the Convention to know how long that gentleman had 
baen a member of the Democratic party. 

A Voice. I hope the President will not allow anv personal allusions. 
[Cries of "Order ! order!" *-Go on 1 Go on!"] 

Several Delegates rose at once to points of order, without being recognized 
by the Chair, when 

Mr. McCooK, of Ohio, desired to appeal from a decision of the Chair. It had 
been decided by the Chair that so much of ihe report as related to the recom- 
mendation of rules to govern the Convention, was out of order. The Chair 
had based his decision "ipon the statement that the rules of the last Convention 
had been adopted yesterday by the present Convention to govern its action. 
This was an error, rhe resolution adopted yesterday had reference only to the 
temporary organization, and only adopted the old rules unt 1 the permanent 
organization should be effected. Ohio, on this ground, desired to appeal from 
the decision of the Chair. 

The President pro tem The Chair now remembers that the statement of 
the gentleman from Ohio, Mr. McCook, is correct. The Chair in making his 
former decision, labored under a ni'sapprehension, and now recalls and reverses 
that decision. The report of the Committee on Organization is in order. 

Mr. Laweence, of Louisiana, read from the report of the previous day's pro- 
ceedings, and argued that the resolution contemplated that the Committee on 
Organization should report permanent officers only, and that they had no power 
to report rules. 

Mr. Whitney. I call for a division of the question on the report of the 
Committee. 

Mr. Briere, of Alabama, again raised the point of order, that the Committee 
on Organization had, under the resolution, no power to report rules at all. 

Mr. Cessna rose to a point of order. The Convention was now entertaining 
questions as to the power of the Committee on Organization to report rules. 
The report made by that Committee had been received and accepted. It was 
too late now to entertain such questions of order as had been raised. The point 
should have been taken before the acceptance of the Committee's report. 

Mr. Whitney. Do I understand the Chair to rule that the question on the 
adoption of the report of the Committee on Organization is divisible ? 

Tiie President pro tem. The Chtir so dtjcides, the question is divisible. 

Mr. RicHAKDso.>f. I claim the right to the floor, which [have not yet yielded. 
After I have said what I desire to say, then the gentlem m can press his motion 
lor a division ti the question. 

The President pro tem. The gentleman from Illinois is entitled to the 
floor. 

A DELEaATE. The Chair has decided the question to be divisible. The 
question, therefore, is on that j)ortion relating to the permanent organization. 
The gentleman from Illinois must sp«ak to the questioii of the permanent 
organization, unless he appeal from the decision of the Chair. 

Mr. Samuels, of Iowa. Whether the question is divisible or not, is now im- 
m iterial. The call for a division cannot affect the right of the gentleman from 
Illinois to the floor. He was entitled to the floor, and could not be deprived 
of it by any such point of order. 

The President j)ro tem. The question as to whether the report is divisible 



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14 Democratic National Cmveniion. 

ctoe up in order. The Chair has decided that it is divisihle. Does the een- 
tleman from llhnois appeal from the decision of the Chair ? ^^ 

^U^t'Z'ttiff^'^TV'^ *.' v^^""' *^ ♦^^ gentleman from IllinoiB^ 

The Chaib. Certainly not. The point of order havino- been raised wa. 
decided by the Chair, but the division of the question 0^ not be called for 
until ^e gentleman from Illinois had yielded the floor ' 

A Delegate raised the jwint of order that the gentleman from Illinois had 

TjTorZZot\TmT^'''''^' ''*•' *^'^^" *« «°- '•>« second «me, ani 
Cn heard ' *<> speak again until others desiring the floor had 

fl«!?'th^''rh«?rTH^'"''.''r- ^'^'° '\' g^"*'*™--^ from Illinois obtained the 
Mr TiTn„ fl ' °'''"'^^ ry '"^" gentleman who desired to speak. 

Mr Richardson was proceeding when the points of order had interrunted 

J h;ved''tf hadTr;'' *° *t^'"^™^"^™ Pennsylvania, Mr. RandT^He 
ftelieved it had been asserted, and not denied by him, that he had recentlv 

rkLTbut fitt^e'" 'iTf 'f,' ^''r' ^'J^ P°'"^^^ ^^^^^ of'the gents 
dphtr. Tl,! r .^^ gentleman has taken upon hiitiself to thrust into this 

debate the complicated question of the Presidency, and to raise the question 
between Northern and Southern candidates. He was not here for the purpose 
hloH Kot^^ '^T <!"!?' 'o"?""^- From early boyhood to this hour hisman! 
hood had been devoted to the cause of the Democratic party, until his life hTd 
^IZ T TT'I *°<» y«»»^ leaf-" He did not desire to^'be driven by re- 
quite of yesterday from h>s position. It might be that some of those who had 
fought and contended with the Democrats thronghout many a cammi^n were 
willing to follow the example of the Greeks of old before Tmy an^ wheA Thev 
(K.uld no mak. an impression upon its walls, to enter within them concealed 
in a wooden horse, and thus to effect the capture of the city. When gentlemen 

Sr nnouuTtil^T' "^t P'^"^ "'A'"'''' '""'^ «- welcomcTnd they 
will, no doubt, in t me, do good service in the party ; but the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania, in his attempt to thrust this question of the PrLSv u "onT 
was premature, and he protested against his^coui^e. The Conventiou were en! 
gaged in deciding a question of right or wrong respecting a report Zhe Com- 
mittee on Organization. The Committee had reported rules for the govZ- 
ment of the Convention. In all previous Conventions which he had atEd 
^Ih^'S'^/h''' °° 0'-g*°'=^«ti«" had exercised the same power! This Com-' 
T^rr .r°ir "<\'"°^\'han former Committees had dine, and they had?n 
their report followed out the spirit of the resolutions adopted at Cincinnati 
Mr. Wright, of Pennsylvania, took the floor. ^^mcinnati. 

ha^/w^ •'*''• " ^p""*"' ''^. ^"°°^y ' ''^"'^ " You ought to know me, for I 
have been in every Convention that ever was held. [Loud laughter 1 If 

membeL'^ofT'.""' "' r^'''" ^'^^'^ '^"'^ ^'^""•'i be harmonv ^mong the 
Oommln./ } I^«°«'"at>« party it was now. He was surprised that ofter a 
Oomm.ttee composed of representatives of every State in the Union had 
made a report, with only two States dissenting/any opposition should be 
mado to us adoption. He charged upon those who had made this opposition 
the consequences that might ensue from the rejection of this report It wa^ 
well known that unless some harmonv shall prevail in the Convention IC 
nominations made here would be worth but the paper upon which the names 
of ihe nominees were written. From the year 1836 to 1860 he had been a 
member of the National Democratic Convention every time it had assembled 
and he never yet had seen an attempt to reject a report of this kind for^d 

LTtn «n ^""^'"'"^"-i ^"^^ ^'.^?'''' °f e^'ery Democratic Convention h^d 
been to allow every Delegate entitled to a vote to cast that vote as he pleaa^ 
unless under instructions from his State. The State of PennTyrvan a hS 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 15 

given this privilege to her representatives here, and it was the people, not 
the Delegates, who were heard. When it was agreed by a State that her vote 
should be cast as a unit, he was the last man to object to it ; but when the 
State Convention fails to exercise that power, or is silent upon the subject, 
then it is the province of the Delegates who are here, to act in their repre- 
gentative capacity, and to cast their votes in conformity with the wishes of 
their constituency. It was well known in the Convention of 1844 when the 
Democratic party did him the honor to make him the presiding officer, the 
State of Pennsylvania exercised the right to cast its divided vote. In th« 
Convention of 1848, the Delegation of Pennsylvania was again divided from 
the State, and he was himself one of eight Delegates who cast votes in the 
minority. In 1852 Pennsylvania presented its own candidate, and was there- 
fore united. 

A Delegate. Did not the State of Pennsylvania cast a unit vote in 1844 ? 

Mr. Wright. No. Only upon some points upon the question of the adop- 
tion of the two-third rule, the vote stood twelve to thirteen. The minority 
nominated for the Presidency Kichard M. Johnson. He thought he could 
pledge Pennsylvania as a unit this time for a Presidential candidate. Now 
the Committee had brought this report into the Convention, and he advocated 
its adoption. But he was not one who would secede, if the Convention 
should adopt a rule unpalatable to him. He Would stay in the Convention 
so long as a majority of the body remained here. But if the rule was 
adopted here as adopted at Cincinnati, it would be construed into the right to 
deny him the privilege of casting a representative vote for his own district. 
They would be acting in opposition to the Democracy of his own State, who 
had agreed that he should have the*power he claimed. The Cgnvention had 
no right to ostracise him, and to deprive him of a power conferred upon him 
by the State he represented. He moved the previous question. 

[Cries of " No ! no !" and several Delegates attempting to speak amidst 
calls for ** Question !" and cries of " Hear 1 hear ! hear 1'^] 

Mr. Wright insisted upon the call for the previous question. 

The President |jro fern. The Chair desires to explain the state of the 
question. The Chair decided the report of the Committee, so far as it related 
to rules, out of order. The only question now before the House is on that 
portion of the report which names permanent officers. The previous ques- 
tion has been demanded upon this, and until the Convention shall decide 
whether or not it will order the previous question, debate is out of order. 

Mr. McCooK rose to a question of privilege. He desired to remind the 
Chair that the State of Ohio had appealed irom its decision, and that the 
Ghair had receded therefrom. 

'J he President pro tern. The gentleman from Ohio is correct. The Chair 
reviewed its decision, but decided that a division of the question on th« 
report was in order. The previous question has been demanded. 

[Loud cries of ** Question ! question !"] 

The previous question was then ordered. 

The President pro tern. The question now is on the adoption of the 
report of the Committee naming permanent officers of this Convention. 
[Ories of " Que^^tion ! question !"J 

The report was then adopted with one dis^^enting voice. 

Several Delegates rose to address the Chair. 

The President pro tern. No business is in order until the permanent offi- 
cers now chosen have taken their places. 

Mr. Samuels, of Pennsylvania, obtained the floor, and moved the appoint- 
ment of a Committee of two to conduct the permanent presiding officer to 
the Chair. Agreed to. 



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16 Democratic National Convention. 

Messrs. Clark, of Mississippi, and Eichardson, of Illinois, were appointed 
such Committee. 

The President ^0 tem. then addressed the Convention as follows : 

GrENTLEMEN OF THE CONVENTION : — Before introducing to you the perma- 
nent officer of this Convention, I wish to return to you my thanks for the 
compliment you have paid me. To have presided over such a body as .this 
is indeed honor enough for any gentleman. But before retiring, fellow-citi- 
zens, let me exhort you in your councils to moderation and harmony. 
Recollect we are brethren eno;aged in the same great cause — embarked on 
the same vessel, and under such circumstances that one plank of the ship 
cannot sink without the others being subiiierged Recollect that we have a 
common destiny and a common fame. You should regard each other as 
brothers, and not as hostile forces marching forward to hostile musif^, under 
different flags. The Democratic party has but one flag — the flag of our 
common country — and that teaches us fraternal love and unity. Let us 
then talk no more about sections. We know no North, no South, no East, 
no West, where Democrats are concerned. No ; we go on the Democratic 
principle, that it matters not where a Democrat resides — whether in the land 
of perpetual flowers, or in the land of eternal icebergs and everlasting frosts — 
if he be a Democrat, he may embark on the same deck, and be protected by 
the same Stars and Strips. He is a Democrat, and, all other things being 
equal, he is entitled to the same consideration from wherever he may come. 
Let us talk no more of sections. It obliterates the kindest feelings from our 
hearts. To take a sectional view of Democrats, as compared with the broad 
ground of Democratic brotherly love, regardless of sections, is like a sluggish, 
winding, obscure stream, as compared with the noble and gigantic Mississippi, 
which rolls onward in its course to the Gulf of Mexico. Fellow- citizens, our 
duty here is plain. We come here to consider the good of the great Demo- 
cratic party. To efiect our object, requires a concentration of efforts. It is 
our duty to meet all our brethren most cordially, and so to combine all in^ 
terests as to secure the effect and advantages of a concentration of effort. 
That concentration of effort may well be illustrated by the course of the 
great Father of Waters, the river which commences at its source in the moun- 
tains, in springs and streams so small, that a hunter would scarcely widen 
his steps to cross them. But, running on, it mingles with other streams ; 
yet so shallow that the mother duck can scarcely swim her callow young in 
its waters. Then rolling onward, it mingles with yet other streams, until, at 
last, it forms the j^reat Mississippi River— so deep and so vast that all the 
navies of the world could ride in safety upon its waters. It is your duty to 
gather all these streams of Democracy together into one flood, so that the 
oark freighted with all our hopes and destinies may ride in triumph and in 
safety, [Loud and continued applause.] 

The Committbe appeared upon the platform with the Hon. Caleb . 
CusniNG, who advanced and shook hands with the temporary President. 

Mr. Flournoy. Gkntlemen op the Convention: — It is with ereat 
pleasure I introduce to you, as your permanent presiding officer, Col. Caleb 
Cushinty, of Massachusetts, and allow me to congratulate you on the wisdom 
of your selection. 

Mr. Gushing was greeted with loud and long-continued applause. When 
the cheers had subsided, he spoke as follows : 

Gentlemen of the Convention : —I respectfully tender to you the most 
earnest expression of profound gratitude fv>r the honor which you have this 
d'vy done me in appointing me to preside over your delil orations. It is, 
however, a responsible duty imposed, muv^h more than a high honor conferred. 
In the discharge of that duty, in the direction of business and of debate, in 
the preservation of order, it shall be my constant endeavor faithfully and 



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Proce(*dings at Charleston. 17 

Impartially to officiate ^ere 'xs your minister, and most hnmbly to reflect 
your will. In a great deliberative assembly like this, it is not the presiding 
officer in whom the strength resides. It is not his strength, but yours—yowr: 
intelligence; vour seose of order; your instinct of self respect. 1 rely, 
gentlemen, confidently upon you, not upon myself, for the prompt and par- 
fiamentary dispatch of the business of this Convention 

Gentlemen, you have come here from the green hills of the Eastern States 
—from the rich States of the mperial center -from the sun-lighted plains of 
the South— from the fertile States of the mighty basin ot the Mississippi-- 
from the golden shores ot the distant Oregon and California— [loud cheers !] 
—you have come hither in the exercise of the highest functions of a free 
people, to participate, to aid in the selection of the future rulers of the 
Republic. You do this as the representatives of the Democratic party^of 
that great party of the Union, whose proud mission it has been, whose proud 
miss on it is, to maintain the public liberties— to reconcile popular freedom 
with constituted order— to maintain the sacred, reserved rights of the sove^ 
reign States -[loud and long cominued applause]— to staud, in a word, the 
perpetual sentinels on the outpost of the Goostitution. [Cries of *' that's the 
talk," and loud cheers.] Ours, gentlemen, is the motto inscribed on that 
scroll in the hands of the m mumental statue of the -reat statesman of South 
Carolina '* Truth, Justice, and the Constitutitm." [Loud cheeis.] Opposed 
to us are those who labor to overthrow the Constitution, i;nder the false and 
insidious pretense of supporting it ; those who are aiming to produce in this 
country a permanent sectional conspiracy— a traitorous sectional conspiracy 
of one half the States of the Union against the other half; those who, mi- 
pelled by the stupid and half insane spirit of fa-tiou and fanaticism, would 
hurry our land on to revolution and to civil war ; those, the banded enemies 
of the Constitution, it is the part— the hio;h and noble part of the Democratic 
party of the Union to withstand ; to strike down and to conquer ! Aye ! 
that is our part, and we will do it. In the name of our dear country, with 
the help of God we will do it. [Loud cheers.] Ave, we will do it, for, 
gentlemen, we will not distrust ourselves', we will not despair of the genius 
of our country ; we will continue to repose with undoubting faith m the good 
Providence of Almighty God. [Loud applause.] 

Gentlemen, I will not longer detriin you from the important business of the 
Convention. Allow me a few moments fur the i urp se of completing the 
arrancrements with the elected officers of the Cuveiitiou, jj^nd then the Chair 
will c'all upon you for such motions and propositions as may be in order before 
the Convention. [Applause.] i, r .i, tt- -d -a ^ 

Ihe Temporary Secretary proceeded to call the roll of the Vice Presidents^ 
who took their places upon the platform. 

The names of the Secretaries were then called. . . c^ 

The President stated that it might occupy some minutes for the Secreta-- 
ries to make arrangements amongst themselves for the business of the Co.ii^> 
vention. He therefore suggested a brief recess. 

The Convention took five minutes recess. 

Upon the Convention being again called to order^ 

Mr. Jacksov, of Georgia, rose to a question of privilege. That que«tioi> 
referred to the Delegation from the State of Georgia, on whose behalt he 
claimed for one moment the attention of the Convention. 

The President. The gentleman will state his question of privilege. 

Mr. Jackson. It is as to the right of the St^te of Georgia to a larger 
nrmberof representatives on the floor than the regular number allowed her 
on the flooi: of the Conveatiop. The question as to the representation of 
Geojcria had been referred back, by the Committee on Credentials, to the 
Dele|ates from the State, on tj^e ground that while a greater number o^ 
% 



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18 Democratic National Convention. 

Delegates thnn were regularly entitled to seats claimed admission to thr 
Convention, tin re was yet not a contest as :o the seats. The State of Georgia 
had appointed forty Dtdegntv s to come to Charle?^ton, at two Conventions- 
which had been held at different times in that State. 

Mr. Saylk.s, ot Rhode Inland, rose to a question of order. The Delegates 
from Georgia had appeared before the Committee on Credentials, and it was 
out of order to bring this subject before the Convention in advance of the 
re^wrt of the Committee. 

Mr. Jackson said the Committee on Credentials had already acted on the 
matter, by referring it back to the Delegation from the State. 

'1 he Pri 8IDENT. The gentleman from Georgia will please pause a few 
minutes. The question ot order has been raised that the subject has been 
referred to the Committee on Credentials, and that the report of that Com- 
miitee is not yet in possession (»f the Convention. The point of order is well 
taken. The subject cannot now be brought up in order; but any motion 
the gentleman fr»«m Georgia has to make will be in order whenever the 
report of the Committee on Credentials shall be presented to the Con- 
vention. 

Mr. Barky, of Mississippi, moved that the rules of the Democratic Con- 
vention of 1856 be adopted as the rules of this, and on this he called the 
previous question. 

Mr. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania, raised the point of order that the 
repirtof a Committee on Organization, embracing the question of rules, wa» 
yet bef re ihe Convention. The resolution, therefore, on the same subject, 
was not in order. 

I'he President. The question pending befor'? the Convention when tlm 
permanent officers took their places, was on the remaining portion of the report 
of the Committee on Organization; that question is the one now in order. 

Mr. Barry. Then I move to strike out from the report the additional rule. 

Mr. McCooK moved that the Convention take a recess till 4 P. M. The 
Committee on Credentials had not yet reported, and there is great difference 
ol opinion on the report of the Committee on Organization, now before tb© 
Convention. For the convenience of the Convention he made this nuotion 
for a recess. 

The President. The Chair will take the opportunity, before putting the 
questi n for recess, as he is not aware h )w that will be decided, to give two 
notices : 

The first was a notice that the Committee on Credentials desired the 
attendance of its members. 

The second was a letter from ihe Trustees of the Charleston College, 
inviting the m mbers of the Convention to visit their Institution, which 
was read as follows : 

To the Hrmorahle^ the President of the National Democratic Convention now 
meeting in Charleston: 

•Sir: — In obedience to the directions of the Trustees of the College of 
Charleston, I beg leave to submit to you, sir, and through you, if you please, 
;to the other members of the Convention over which you preside, tho sub- 
jr.iiied notice — and to invite you and them, at your individual or collective 
<X)nvvenien©e, to visit the Museum of the College. We flatter ourselves that 
you will find it deserving of your atfention -; and we shall be much gratified 
if your examination of it should hereafter be one of many agreeable recol- 
lections of your meeting in our city. 

I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, sir, your very obedient 
servant, ' M, KING. 

Chabletston, April 23, 1860. 



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Proceeding's at Charleston. iS 

COLLEGE OF CeARLESTON. 

The Museum of the College of Charleston will be open to visitors every 
week day during the meeting of the Convention. On Saturday from 9 A. M. 
to 6 P. M., and on every other week day from noon to 6 P. M. 

It contains an extensive collection of highly valuable and many rare spe- 
cimens in Natural History, Mineralogj^, •Geology, and Paleontology, of great 
interest to the scientific inquirer, and well worthy the attention of every 
intelligent observer. By order of the Board of Trustees, 

April 23, 1860. M. KING, President. 

The invitation was accepted by the Convention unanimously. 

The question was then taken on Mr. McCook's motion -for a recess, and the 
same was lost. 

Mr. RussEL, of Virginia, called for the reading of the latter portion of the 
report of the Committee on Organization, which was read. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, rose to a point of order, when the temporary 
Presiding Officer left the Chair ; the report of the Committee on Organiza- 
tion was before the Convention, and the previous question was called and 
ordered. A division of the question was called for. The question was put 
on the first portioa of the report of the Committee on Organization, and it 
was adopted. The present Presiding Officer then took the Chair. The ques- 
tion DOW was upon the adoption of the latter portion of the report. As the 
^previous question had been ordered, the latter portion of the repoft must be 
voted upon without debate or amendment. 

The President. If the facts are as stated by the gentleman from Michi- 
gan, the point of order is well taken, and the position of the gentleman is 
correct. The present presiding officer will appeal to his predecessor for in- 
formation as to the correct position of the question. 

Mr. Flournoy explained the position of the question, showing that the 
previous question had been ordered ; that the question on the first part of 
the report had been put and carried, and that the Convention was still under 
the operation of the previous question, thus preventing amendment or debate. 

Several Voices *' What is the question before the Convention ?" 

The President announced the question to be on a motion made before the 
previous question was ordered, to strike out from the report of the Committee 
on Organization the additional rule. 

The vote by States was demanded, and the rdll was called. 

When Virginia was called, Mr. Moffit protested against the whole tote of 
the State being cast in the negative. He denied the justice of the principle 
that a district had not the right to decide how it would vote. Whilst he 
denied the propriety of any interference on the part of this Convention, he 
contended for the principle, and in the name of his constitueiits protested 
against the principle contended for. He claimed and reserved to himself and 
colleague the right, at any time, to decide for his district. He was appointed 
by the people of his own district, and was responsible to them alone 

When Indiana was called, several Delegates from that State rose to make 
statements, and great confusion ensued, until the Chair compelled the observ- 
ance of order. 

When the State of Tennessee was called, Mr. Ewing stated that the Dele- 
ga'ion at its previous meeting had adopted a resolution that on all questions 
bat the nomination of a President, the vote of the State should be cast as a 
unit. He had taken the sense of the Delegation, and the majority had voted 
"" no." He was, in casting the vote in the negative, not representing his own 
individual opinion at all. An affirmative vote on this proposition would 
virtually abolish the rules adopted at former Conventions. He was, there- 
fore, individually opposed to the vote. 

Mr. Burrows, of Arkansas, cast half a vote in the affirmative. 



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Yeas. Nays. 

Maine, 8 

New Hampshire 6 

Vermont 6 

Matigachnsetts -6 54 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut ^ 6 

New York 35 

New Jersey 7 

Penn«yivauia 14 101 

Delaware H ii 

Maryland H 4i 

Virginia -.15 



Yeas. Nays*. 

Ohio 2Sf 

Iniiana _.. 13 

Illinois IL 

^'ichigan 6 

Wiscunsm 5 

Iowa. ^^ 4 

Minnesota 4 

CaliforMii 2i U 

Oregon 3 

103i IdT 



20 liemocratic National ConveTHion. 

Mr. Hooker, of Mi-^sissippi, protested against his State casting a united vote^ 
when he was opposed to the vote thus cast. He was called to order, and the 
vote was then announced, the motion to strike oat the additional rule being 
lost by the following vote : ^ 

Yeas. Nays. 

North Carolina 7 3 

South Carolina. 8 

Georgia 10 

1 Florida 3 

Alabama. 9 

Louisiana 6 

Mississippi 7 

Texas 4 

1^ Arkansas... i 7ii( 

} Missouri 3 7 

[ Tennesspe 12 

IKentucJcy 12 

At the request of Mr. Clark, of Mississippi, the report of the Gommittee on 
Organization was again read, and adopted by an almost unateimous vote. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, moved to re-consider that vote, and to lay that 
resolution on the table. Adopted. 

Mr. Payne, of Ohio, called for the consideration of the resolution for the ap- 
pointment of a Committee of one from each State to report a Platform,, and that 
aill resolutions relating to the Platform shall be referred to that Committee 
without debate. Upon that resolution he called the previous question.. 

Mr. Barlow, of New York, desired to offer an amendment, and asked that it ' 
be read for information of the Convention. 

Mr. Payne. I object to the reading, and demand that the call for the pre- 
vious question shall be put. 

The previous question was ordered and the resolution adopted. 

Mr. Payne moved to re-consider that vote, and to lay the resolution on the 
table. Adopted. 

Mr. Burrows, of Arkansas?, offered the following : 

Besolved, That this Conventioti will not proceed to ballot for a candidate for 
the Presidency, until the Platform shall have been adopted. 

The President. The first business in order will be the call of the States,, 
that the names of the Committee on Resolutions may be handed in. The ques- 
tion will then be taken on the motion of the gentleman from Arkansas. 

The following names were then reported as the Committee on Resolutions: 

Committee on Resolutions and Platform— Maine, A. M Roberts; New Hampshire, Wm. Beven ; 
Vermont, E. M. Brown ; Massachusetts, B. F. Butler ; Rhode Island C.S.Bradley; Connecticut, 
A G Hazard; New York, Ed Cogswell; New Jersey, Benj Williamson; Pennsylvania, A. B. 
Wright ; Delaware, J. A. Bayard ; Maryland, B. S. Johnsf n ; Virginia, J. Barbour ; North Carolina, 
W. W. Avery vSouth Carolina, J. S. Preston ; Georgia, J. Wingfield ; Florida, J. B. Owens; Alabama, 
John Erwin ; Louisiana, B A Hunter; Mississippi, E Barksdale ; Texas, F. S Stockdale; Arkansas, 
N, B. Burrows; Missouri, John M, Krum ; Tennessee, Samuel Milligan ; Kentucky, R. K. Williams , 
Ohio, H. B. Payne; Indiana, P. C. Dunning; Illinois, 0. B. Fickiin; Michigan, G V N Lothrop; 
Wisconsin, A. S. Palmer ; Iowa, B. M. Samuels ; Minnesota, J. M. Cavanaugh ; California, Austin E: 
Smith ; Oregon, James J. Stevens. 

Mr. RicHABDsoN, by consent of the Convention, stated that in a few remarks 
he made this morning, he had been misinterpreted by a certain gentleman on the 
floor. He had intended no discourtesy to the gentleman from Pennsylvania, 
Mr. Randall, or to the Whig party, all of whom he desired to see come into the 
Democratic fold. He could not, he would not offer a discourtesy to a gentle- 
man so much his senior as the gentleman from Pennsylvania. He deemed this 
explanation to be a duty — nothing more, and nothing less. 

The question then recurring on the resolution of Mr. Burrows, of Arkansas, 

Mr. Bishop called for the previous question. 

Mr. Hamilton, of Maryland, moved to lay the resolution on the table. 

The vote was called by States, and the motion to lay the resolution on the 
table was lost by the following vote: 



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Proceedings at Charleston* 21 



Yeas. Nays, 

Maine 8 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont. _- ._ 5 

Massachusetts 11 

Rh(KJe Island. 4 

Connecticut 2 4 

New York 35 

New Jersey 7 

Pennsylvania... 17 10 

Delaware 3 

Maryland 5i 2i! 

Virginia 15 



Yeas Nays.i Yeas. Nays 
North Carolina 10 | Ohio 23 



Iniliana. 13 

Illinois 11 

Vlichigan 6 

Wisconsin - 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota .._. 4 

California 4 

Oregon -. 3 



jSo ith Carolina.. 

iGeorgia _ 10 

[Florida 3 

lAlabama 9 

'Louisiana. _.. 6 

jMississippi 7 

jTexas... 4 

lArkansns 4 

•Missouri 9 

^iTennessee 32 32^70^ 

iKentucky 12 

The question recurring on the adoption of the resolution, the call for the pre- 
vious question was seconded, and the previous question ordered. 

The resolution was then adopted by an almost unanimous vote, only two or 
three voices bein^ heard in the negative. 

Mr. Bishop, of ronnecticut, offered the following : 

Resolved, That no member of this Convention be allowed to speak more than 
once on the same question, nor for a longer time than fifteen minutes. 

Mr. Bishop called for the previous question. 

Mr. CooPE|t, of Alabama, moved to lay the resolution on the table. Lost, 

Mr. White, of Massachusetts, called for a division of the question. 

The previous question was seconded and ordered before the question w^as put, 

Mr. AvEBv, of Noith Carolina, raised the point of order that the Convention 
was acting unyler the rules of the House of Representatives, and that the one 
hour rule was, therefore, the rule of the Convention. This resolution would 
consequently be an alteration of the rules, and must lie over one day. 

The President decided the point of order well taken, and the mover of the 
resolution gave notice that he should call it up for adoption to-morrow. 

Mr. Fisher, of Virginia, moved the following : 

Resolved, That the Presiding OflBcer of this Convention be, and he is hereby 
requested, to invite the ministers of different denominations in this city to open 
the daily proceedings with prayer. Adopted. 

Mr, Whiting, of Delaware, moved to adjourn until 10 o'clock to-morrow 
morning. He mfvde the motion because the Committee on Contested Seats de- 
sired to hold a session in the Hall this afternoon, and they would be prepared 
to report to-morrow morning. 

The motion was temporarily waived. 

Mr. E WING, of Tennessee, suggested that the several resolutions to be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Platform be handed to the Chairman of that Com- 
mittee. Agreed to. 

* Judge Meek, of Alabama, presented to the Convention the Platform of his 
State, which was referred under the rule. 

The Chair announced that the Committee on Re5olutions would, meet at 
'Masonic Hall at 6 this afternoon. 

It was announced that the Committee on Contested Seats would meet at 
Market Hall at 5 P. M,, to adjourn to the Hall of the Convention. 

The Secretaries of the Convention were requested to meet in their Room 
after the adjournment. 

Mr. Pearce, of Louisiana, handed in a resolution from his State, which was 
referred under the rule. 

On motion of Mr. Pearce, the Cv:>nvention then adjourned until 10 A. M., to- 
morrow* 

T H I :r. JD 3D .Au "^r . 

Wednesday, April 25, 1860. 

The Convention met at ten o'clock, A. M., and the proceedings were 
opened by prayer by the Rev. Dr. Bachman. 

In consequence of the necessary ^.bsence of Mr. Htde, Chairman of the 
Recording Secretaries, the reading of yesterday's Journal was by unanimous 



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Yeas. 

Maine 8 

Connecticut 1 

New Jersey _« 

Pennsylvania 27 

Delaware 3 

Missouri _ 9 

Tennessee- 12 

Kentucky 11 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 1 

Michigan _ l 

Wigconsia ..!!...! 5 

Iowa 4 

California 1 4 



*2 Democrattc National ConvenUon. 

consent dispensed with, and the keeping of the records of the Convention 
were placed in charge of John Gr. Pakkhurst, of Michigan. 

The calling of the roll was by unanimous consent dispensed with. 

No Committee being ready to report, the President stated the first busi- 
ness in o rder to be the resolution of Mr. Bishop, of Connecticut. 

The Secretary read the resolution as follows : 

Unsolved, That no member of this Convention be allowed to speak mor^ 
than once on the same question, nor for a longer time than fifteen miuutes. 

Mr. Bishop demanded the previous question on the res(ilution. 

The call for the previous question was seconded, and on the question, 
** Shall the main question be now put ?" a vote by States was called for by 
several States. 

The question being taken by a vote of States resulted^, yeas 121, nays 182, 
as follows : 

Nays. 

! New Hampshire 6 

Vermont .',.'.'.'* 5 

' Massachusetts „ ig 

' lihode Island 4 

J Connecticut ||j* 5, 

t New York ...3& 

1 Maryland ]" g 

Virginia. "..,'....'.,15 

North Carolina 19 

I South Carolina « ] g, 

) Georgia 10 

> Florida „ 3 

\ Alabama ^ 

Louisiana 6 

Mississippi. 7 

Texas 4 

Arkansas " 4 

Kentucky ^ 

Ohio „ 2S 

Minnesota 4 

Oregon „ 3 

So the main que&tion was not ordered. 

Mr. Walker, of Alabama, moved to amend the resolution by adding : 

Provided, That it shall* not be applied to any discussion upon the platform 
to be reported to this Convention by the Committee on Resolutions. 

Mr. Bishop accepted the amendment of the gentleman from Alabama, 
and called the previous question on the resolution as modified. 

The call for the previous question was sustained, and the main question 
ordered to be put. 

The question was taken on the resolution as modified, and it was adopted. 

Mr. SiMMONs, of South Carolina, offered the following resolution : 

Resolved, That such part of the South gallery of this hall as may be neces- 
sary for the accommodation of the alternates be reserved for their use, and 
that the remaining part of the galleries be opened for the public accommo- 
dation. 

Mr. Craig, of Missouri, moved to lay the resolution on the table, which 
motion was agreed to. 

The President laid before the Convention the following communication 
from the Commissioners of the Orphan Asylum of Charleston. 

Charleston,. April 24, 1860. 
To the Eonorahle, the President and Delegates of the Democratic Convention : 

Gentlemen : — The Commissioners of the Orphan House of Charleston 
respectfully invite the Delegates of the Democratic National Convention, now 
assembled in this city, to visit the Orphan Asylum of Charleston, situated in 
Calhoun street, to inspect its organization, domestic arrangements, discipline, 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 23 

and economy, and to examine, more especiallv, the educational dei<artraeijts 
of their School. 

The Institution will be open to the inspection of the Dele<rates at all times, 
but more especially on Wednesday afternoon, the 25th of April instant, at 
4r o'clock, when the Public Exhibition of the School takes place. 

Respectfu ly, H. A. DeSAUSSURE, 

Chairman of Commissioners Orphan House. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, moved that when the Convention adjourn it 
adjourn to meet at 4 o'clock, P. M. 

A Delegate moved to amend the motion so that it would read five o'clock 
instead of four. 

Mr. Dent, of Pennsylvania, moved that when the Convention adjourn, it 
adjourn to meet at 7 o'clock P. M. 

The question being taken on the motion that when the Convention adjourn, 
it ; djourn to meet at 7 o'clock, it was decided in the negative. 

The question being taken on the motion tk it when the Convention adjourn, 
it be to meet at 5 o'clock, it was also lost. 

The question was then taken on the motion that when the Convention 
adjourn, it be to meet at four o'clock, aud it was a ,reed to. 

On motion, the Convention then adjourned. 

AFTERNOON" SESSION. 

The Convention re-assembled at four o'clock, P. M. 

Mr. Wright, of Massachusetts, moved the following resolution, viz : 

Resolved, That the Committee oti Resolutions be instructed to report in 
print, so that QYQvy member may be furnished with a copy — which was 
unanimously adopted. 

Mr. LowRY, of Indiana, offered the following resolution, viz : 

Resolved, That the Officer of the Convention having charge of that matter, 
be and he is hereby required to have the doors to the Hall of the Convention 
opened for the admission ot those entitled to enter, at least one hour bejfore 
the time set for each meeting of this body. V\ hich was adopted. 

A communication from the officers of the Cit idel Academy, inviting the 
members of the Convention to attend the parade at 5>^ o'clock, Thursday 
P. M., at the Academy grounds, was read and received w^th cheers. 

Mr. LowRY, of Indiana, moved the following resolution : • 

Resolved, That a Committee of one from each State be appointed by the 
Delegates thereof, to report the names of one person from each State, to 
constiiute the Democratic National Committee, to continue in office until 
their successors are appointed, whose duty it sha 1 be, in addition to other 
things, to fix the time and place for the holding of the next National Con- 
vention, and said first named Committee shall also consider and rep rt. 

Mr. Lawrence, of Louisiana, moved that the resolution be laid over 
-one .^ay. 

Mr. Burnett, of Alabama, moved to amend by adding, " and .-aid Com- 
mittee shall not issue tickets o admission to the floor of the Convention to 
any Delegates whose seats may be contested." 

Mr. Terry, of Arkansas, offiered a further amendment as follows : 

** And said Committtee shall have power to fill any vacancy in said 
Committee." 

Mr. PuoH, of Ohio, moved that the resolution and amendments be 
referred to a committee of thirty three, one from each State, and upon this 
he called the previous question. 



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24 Democratic National Convention. 

The call ^or the previous question was seconded and ordered, and the 
main question was put, and the motion of Mr. Pugh was carried. 

The names of the mes^iibers of this Committee to be handed in to-morrow 
mprninj?. 

Mr. Krum, of Missouri, Chairman of the Committee on Credentials, then 
presented the following rep )rt and resolutions, upon which the Convention 
had agreed, and he claimed for it the attention of the Convention : 

MAJORITY REPORT. 

To the National Democratic Convention : 

Mr, President : — Your Committee on Credentials, immediately after their 
app(>intmerit, entered upon the discharge of the duties assigned them, and 
carefully examined the credentials of the several Delegates to this Convention. 

Your Commit fee find that all the States in the Union, exc pt the States of 
Massachusetts, Maryland, Illinois and New York, are represented in this 
Convention by Delegates duly elected in the several States by State or 
District organizations of the Democratic party, and your Committee append 
to this report, as a part thereof, full lists of the Delegates so elected. 

Your Committee further report that there were contesting claimants to the 
sweats held by the Delegations in the following cases, viz: 

[m the Fifth Congressional District of Mnssachusetts. 

Ixi the Fourth Congressional District of Maryland. 

In the Stat3 of Illinois, and 

In the State of New York. 

The contestants in these several casps had a full and impartial hearing 
before your Committee, and, after a full consideration of their respective 
claims, your Committee are of opinion that the sitting Delegates representing 
these Districts and States are justly entitled to their respective seats. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN. M. KRUM, Chairman. 

Resolved. That the sitting Delegates to this Convention from the State of 
Illinois, of whom Col. W. A. Richardson is Chairman, are entitled to their 
respective seats. 

Resolved^ 'I'hat Cornelius Doherty and K. S. Chaffee, Delegates represent- 
ing the Fifth Congressional District of M ssachusetts, are entitled to their 
re^spective seats. 

Revived, That F. M. Landham and Robert J. Brent, Delegates represent- 
ing the Fourth Congressional District of Maryland, aie entitled to their 
respective seat-^ 

Resolved, 'I hat the Delegates to this Convention from the State of New 
York, of which Dean Richmo d is Chairman, are entitled as such to seats 
therein. 

Adopted. 

Mr Brooks, of Alabama, presented the following Minority Report and 
Resolutions : 

MINORITY REPORT. 
To the Honorable President of the National Democratic Convention : 

The und rsigned, members of the Committee on Credential, under an 
imperious sense of duty, are constrained to dissent from the report of the 
mnjority of this Committee, «nd respectfully recommend that the two 
Del eirations from the State of New York be authorized to select each thirty- 
live Delegates, and that the seventy Delegates thus selected be admitted t® 
this Convention as the Delegates of the New York Democracy, and that they 
be allowed two hours to report their selection — the two Delegations to vote 
separately, each to be ensitled to seventeen votes, the remaining vote of said 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 25 

State to be cast alternately by the two Delegations, tbe sitting menbers 
casting it the first time. 

(Signed.) WM. M. BROOKS, Delescate from Alabama. 

JOHN a DUDLEY, Delegate from California. 

E. GREEN, Delegate from Texas. 

VAN H. MANNING, Delegate from Arkansas. 

JULIAN HARTRIDGE, Delegate from Georgia. 

W. S. BARRY, of Mississippi. 

Mr. Brooks, of Alabama, offered the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the two Delegations from New York be authorized to 
select each thirty- five Delegates, and that the seventy Delegates thus selected, 
be admitted to this Convention as Delegates from the New York Democracy, 
and that they be allowed two hours to report their selection. The two 
Delegations to vote separately, each to be entitled to seventeen votes, the 
remaining vote to be cast alternately by the two Delegations — the sitting 
members to cast it the first time. 

Mr. McCooK, of Ohio, moved the adoption of the Majority Report, together 
with the Resolutions accompanying said report. 

Mr. Brooks, of Alabama, moved the adoption of the Minority Report of 
the Committee on Credentials and Resolutions, as an amendment to the 
Majority Report. 

'Ihe previous question being demanded by.Mr. McCook, was then seconded 
and ordered, and a division of the question called for. 

The reso utions and reports were read. 

The main question was ordered. 

The first, second, and third resolutions of the Majority Ileport were adopted. 

The question then being on the amendment of Mr. Brooks, of Alabama, 
the State of Alabama called for the vote by States, and the State of Missis- 
sippi seconded the call. 

The amendment was lost by the following vote : 



Maine 

New Hampshire 
Vermont.- 


Yeas. 


Nays. 
8. 
5 
5 
13 
4 
6 

"7 
27 
3 

1^ 


North Carolina.. 
South Carolina.. 

Georgia 

Florida 

Alabama 

Louisiana .. 


Yeas. 
.... 5 

--.'.'lO 

.'-■.'.* 9 


Nays. 
4 

3 
6 

1 
8 
3 
12 


Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 


Yeas. 


Nays. 
23 
13 


Massachusetts . . . 
Rhode Island ... 
Connecticut 




Michigan 

Wisconsin 




5 
4 


¥ewYork. 

New Jersey 

Ponusylvania 


■--- 


Mississippi 

Texas 

Arkansas 


7 

4 

... 3 


Minnesota 

California . . . 
Oregon 


56 


4 


Delaware 




Missouri 


1 




Maryland 

Virginia 


..... 3>i 


Tennessee 

Kentucky 


... 9 


210X 



The question then recurring on the adoption of the resolution of the ma- 
jority, the same was adopted by a large majority. 

On motion of Mr. Peck, of Michigan, the entire Report of the Committee 
was then adopted. 

Mr. North, of Pennsylvania, moved to re-consider the motion to adopt the 
report, and to lay that motion on the table. Agreed to. 

Mr. North, of Pennsylvania, moved that the rejected claimants for seats 
in this Convention be allowed honorary seats on the floor of the Convention. 

The resolution was laid over under the rules for one day. 

Mr. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania, offered the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the appointment of a Committee of one from each State to 
select a National Committee of the Democratic party, for the next four years, 
, be postponed until after the nomination of a candidate for the Presidency. 
Which was adopted. 



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2^ Democratic National Convention, 

The Peesident. I will entreat the Convention to be in order while the 
painful announcement of the death of a member of this C(mveution is an- 
nounced. *« «u 

Hon. H. E. Stoughton, of Vermont. 

Mr. Presidknt;-! arise by request of the Delegation from Vermont, to an- 
nounce to this Convention the sad intelligence of the sudden death of Hon 
John S. Robinson, one of the Delegates at large from our State, who but ves- 
terday stood in his place upon this floor, in his usual health, officiating as 
Chairman of this Delegation. ° 

This morning about six o'clock, and while the deceased was apparentlv in 
a quiet slumber, he had an attack of apoplexy, and so sudden /as his death 
that he was not able to utter one word or wish to be communicated to those 

fW'^^ f^ 'V'"^^.^" ^''''''^ ^^^^ ^^Suish by the intelligence of the death 
of their friend m this far distant city. 

The deceased was about fifty-five years of age, a lawyer, standing in the 
Iront rank of his prufession, always a Democrat, and as such a member of our 
State senate and in 1853 he whs elected Governor in the Federal State of 
Vermont— the only Democratic Governor of that State any of the Delecrates 
present have seen since they were voters therein. '^ 

We, in common with al who knew him, held him in high estimation for 
his purity in public and private life. 

.u^^t^?^'^}?^' ^° ^^® adjournment of this Convention, will be taken from 
the Mills House to the New York steamboat, to be conveyed to New York 
and thence to his own mountain home, it being all we have left of him to re- 
turn to the widow and fatherless. 

Col B. F. Wardlaw, of Florida. The sad announcement of death at any 
time, Mr. President, chills the heart and deadens every sensibility • but Sir 
when that naelancholy announcement is made upon an occasion of this 'sort! 
It comes with double force, and falls like a leaden pall upon the inmost re- 
cesses of onr soul. Our deliberations had scarcely begun ere the unreientin;; 
monster Death, invades our councils-the councils ot this mighty Republic 

One of the De'egates to this Convention, from the Old Green Mountain 
»tate has been suddenly struck down in our midst; and whilst we bow in 
humble reverence to Omnipotent fiat, as he lies near by, still in the chilly 
arms of death, far awav^ from his home in the icy mountains of the North 
the Peninsula htate, Florida, desires, as an humble tribute of respect to* 
mingle her grief m condolence, and with her rich profusion of flowers' to 
scatter them around the bi r of the lamented son of Vermont. Therefore I 
tender the following re.-olution : * 

Resolved That with feelings of deep regret, this Convention has just learned 
that one of her members. Gov. Robinson, a Delegate from Vermont, has sud- 
denly passed from time to eternity, and in respect to his memory, thiij Con- 
vention will now stand adjourned until 10 o'clock to-morrow. 

Oapt. Isaiah Ryjjders, of New York, moved that the Convention, on 
adjourumg, proceed in a body to the Mills House. 

The resolutions ef Mr. Wardlaw and Capt. Ryn lers were adopteJ, and the 
i^onvention then adjourned until 10 o'clock to-morrow, and proceeded in a 
body to attend the remains of Governor Robinson toxhe boat. 



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27 



APPENDIX TO THE THIRD DAY'S PROCEEDINGS. 



List of Delegates appended to the Be; 
with their Post 

MAINE. 

Bion Bradbury, Eastport. 
Ge*>rge F Shepley, Portland. 
E Wilder Farley, Newcastle. 
Amos M Roberts, Bangor. 
S R Lyman, Portland. 
Tliomas K Lane, vSaco. 
S Blanchard, Yarmonth. 
Caiviri Kecord, Auburn. 
Ttiomas D Robinson, Bath. 
Henry W Owen, Bath. 
Henry A Wyman. Snowhegau. 
Charles D Jameson. Bangor. 
J VVithrop Jones, Ellsworth. 
F S J Talbot, East Machias. 
J Y McClintock, Belfast. 
W H Burrill, Belfast. 

VERMONT. 

Joiin S Robinson, Bennington. 
Jasper Rand, Berkshire. 
Henry Keyes, iS'ewbury. 
E M Brown, Woodstock. 
Charles G Eastman, Montpelier. 
Pitt W Hyde, Hydeville. 
H E Stoughton, Bellows Falls. 
Stephen Thomas, West Fairies. 
Lucius Robinson, Newport. 
H B Smith, Milton. 

Nf;W HAMPSHIBB. 

Josiah Minot, Concord. 
Daniel Marcy, I'ortsmouth. 
Robert 8 Webster, North Birosteaa. 
G'orge W Stevene, Dover. 
Aaron P Hughes, Nashua. 
Bdward W Harrington, Manchester. 
AlpheusF Snow, Claremont. 
Ansel Gloyer. Alstead. 
William Burns, Lancaster. 
George A Bingham, Bath. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Caleb Gushing, Newburyport. 
Jhs G Whitney, Boston. 
Oliver Stevens, B'Ston. 
I8aac Davis, Woi-cester. 
Wm C N Swift, New Bedford. 
JCdward Merrill, New B«-dtord. 
Pbineas W Leland, Fall River. 
Alex Lincoln, Hingham. 
Orison Underwood, Mi ford. 
Bradford L Wales, Randolph. 
James Riley, Bi ston. 
Isaac H Wright, Boston. 
Oorueliux Dohertv, Boston. 
K S Chaffee, E-.tst Cambridge. 
E G Williams, Newburyport. 
CG Clark, L\nn. 
F Prince, Wiiichester. 
Geo Johnson, Bradford. 
Benj F Butler, Lowell. 
Walter Fessenden, Townsend. 
Henry H Stevens, Dudley. 
Geo W Gill, Worcester. 
C W Chapin, Springfield. 
Josiah Allis, Whately. 
I> N Carpenter, Greenfield. 
Charles Heebner, Lee. 

CONNECTICUT. 

James T Pratt. Rock Hill. 
Sumuel Arnold, Haddam. 
Andrew C Lippitt, New London. 
W D Bishop, Bridgeport. 



ort of the Committee on Credentials, 
Office addresses. 

A G Hazard, Enfield. 

M R West, Stafford. 

E Aug Kupsell, Middletown. 

C M Ingersol, New Haven. 

William L Converse, Norwich. 

«ufus L Baker, Windham. 

James Gallagher, New Haven. *^. 

P C Calhoun, Bridgeport 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Welcome B Sayles, Providence. 
Charles S Bradley, Providence. 
George H Browne Providence. 
John N Francis*, Providt nee. 
Fidward F Newton, Newport. 
Amaaa Sprague, Providence. 
Gideon Bradford, Piovideuce. 
Jacob babbit, Bristol. 

NKW YORK. 

Dean Richmond, Buffalo, Erie county. 
Augustus >chell New York (;ity. 
Isaac V Fowler, New York City. 
Delos DeWolf, Oswego, Oswego county. 
William H Ludlow, Sayville. Suffolk county. 
Tennis G Bergen, Bayridge, Kings county. 
H McLaughlin, Brooklyn, Kings county. 
Francis H !?pinola, Brooklyn, Kings county. 
John Y Savage, New York City. 
Wm Miner, New York City. 
Samuel L M Barlow, New York City. 
John Clancy, New York City. 
Isaiah Rynders, New York City. 
Edmund Driggs, Brooklyn, Kiugs county. 
John Cochran, New York City. 
Arguste Belmont, New York City. 
Nelscm J Waterburj , New York City. 
Wm N Mclntyre, New York City. 
Edward Cooper, New York City. 
Samuel F Butterworth, New York City. 
Gouverneur Kemble, Cold Springs, Putnam co. 
Edwin Croswell, New York City. 
Benjamin F Edsail, Goshen, Orange county. 
John C HoUey, Monticello, Sullivan county. 
Wm F Russell, Sangerties, Ulster county. 
Geo Beach, Cairo, Green county. 
Theodore Miller, Hudson Columbia county. 
Henry Staats, Red Hook, Dutchess county. 
David L Seymour, Troy, Rensselaer county. 
Moses Warren, Troy, Rensselaer county. 
Ernstus Corning, Albany, Albany county. 
Peter Cagger, Albany, Albany county. 
John Titcomb, Waterford, Saratoga county. 
Charles R. Ingalls. Greenwich, Washington co. 
Lemuel Stetson, Plattsburgh, ( linton county. 
Hf^nry A Tilden, New Lebanon, Columbia county. 
James C Spencer, Odgensburgh, St Lawrence eo. 
Lorenzo Carryl, Salisbury, Herkim^-r county. 
Alonzu C Page, Schenectady, Schenectady country. 
David Spraker, Canajoharie, Montgomery county. 
Samuel North, Unadilla, Otsego county. 
Alexander H Burhans, Roxbury, Delaware co. 
John Stryker, Rome, Oneida county. 
D P Bissel, Utica, Oneida county. 
Henry S Randall, Cortlandvill«». Cortland county. 
John F Hubbard, Jr., Norwich, Chenango co. 
Williard Johnson, Fulton, Oswego county. 
Sidney T Fairchild, Cazenovia, Madison county^ 
D C West, Lowvi.le, Lewis county. 
Allen C Beach, Watertown, Jefferson county, 
James P Haskin, Syracuse, Onondago county. 
John J Peck, Syracuse, Onondago county. 
Elmore P Ross, Ai^burn, Cayuga county. 



* At the adjourned session of the Convention at Baltimore, no corrected listu of DelegateB. were 
fumiBhe^ the Secretary ; and, coiu»eqttently, the above is the only list published. 



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Democratic National Convention. 



John N Knapp, Auburn. Cayu^ county. 
Wm W Wright, Geneva. Ontario county. 
Darius A Ogden, Penn Yan, Yates county 
Henry D Barto, Trumansbuigli, Tompkins county 
Charles Hulett, Horsehead^, Chemung county. 
<3 C B Walker, Corning, Steuben county. 
A J Abbott, Genesee, Livingston county. 
8 B J<wtttj ( larkson, Monroe county. 
B F Gilkeson, Rochester Monroe county, 
Marshall B Champlain, Cuba. Allegany county. 
Henry J Glowacki, Batavia, Genesee county. 
«{inford E Church, Albion, Orleans couBty. 
A H Eastman, Lockport, Niagara county. 
John T Hudson, Buffalo, Erie county. 
Alpheus Prince, Clarence. Erie county. 
John C Devereux, EUicottville, Cattaraugus co, 
H J Miner, Dunkirk, Chautauq-ue co. 

NEW JERSEY. 

William Wright, Newark- 
Benjamin Wi liamson. Elizabeth. 
James W Wall, (absent) Hurliagton, 
John 0'E,aflferty, New Germantown. 
Samuel Hanna, Camden. 
John L Sharp, Miilville. 
George F Fort, New Egypt. 
David Naar. Trenton. 
Albert R Speer, New Brunswick. 
Joshua Doughty, Somervilie. 
Robert Hamilton, Newton. 
John Huyler, Hackensack. 
Samuel Westcott, Jersey City. 
J;icob Van Arsdale, Newark. 

PKNNSYLVANIA. 

Joseph B Baker, I'hiladelphia. 
Witliam Bigler, Clearfield 
Kennedy L Blood, Brookville. 
Richard Brodhead, Easton. 
N B BroAvne, Philadelphia. 
Edward Campbell, Jr., Pittsburgh. 
Tiowis C Cassidy, Philadelphia. 
John Cessna, Beoford. 
Hugh Clark, Philadelphia. 
A H CofFroth, Somerset. 
Heister Clymer, Heading. > 
Thomas Cunningham, Beaver. 
John L Dawson, Uniontown. 
Henry H Dent, Condersport. 
James Dunlap, Butler. 
Peter Ent, Lightstreet. 
B C Evans, West Chester. 
William A Galbraith, Erie, 
James A Gibson, Pittsburgh. ■ 
Robert M. Gibson, Washington. 
D Gloniuger, Lebanon. 
A J Glossbrenner, York. 
H A Guernsey, Wilisboro'. 
R J Haldeman, Harrisburg, 
Charles Hotlestein, Milton- 
Francis W Hughes, Pottsville. 
Owon Jones, Cabinet. 
S P Johnson, West Greenville. 
F Lauer, Reading. 
Samuel Megargee, Philadelphia, 
William Montgomery, Washington. 
William H McGee, Allegheny City. 
George ^'cHenry, Darby. .i . 
( hambers McKibbon, Philadelphia, 
James Nill, Chambersburg, 
H M North, Columbia. 
Asa Packer, Mauch Chunk. 
Israel Painter, We^t Newton. 
Henry M Phillips, Philadelphia. 
A A Plumer, Franklin. 
Joeiah Randall, Philadelphia. 
John Reifsnyder, Liverpool. 
W M Reilley, Philadelphia 
John Roberts, Philadelphia. 
John Ross, McVeytown. 
W P Shattuck, Meadville. 
D W Gray, Wendridge. 



George N Smith, Johnstown. 
H B Swarr, Lancaster. 
Franklin Vanzant, Oakford. 
L Ward, Towanda. 
H W Weir, Indiana. 
Thomas B Wilson, Allentown. 
Hendricks Wright, Wilkesbarre. 

DELAWARE. 

John H Beverley, Smyrna. 
William H Rdss Seaford. 
James A Bayard, Wilmington. 
John B Penningt(m, Dover, 
William G. Whiteley, Newcastle. 
William Saulsbury, Georgetown. 

MARYLAND. 

John Contee, Baena Vista. 

William T. Hamilton. Hagerstown. 

Levin Woolford, Princess Ann. 

John R Emory, Centerville. 

Wm 8 Gittings, Baltimore City. 

Samuel S Mafflt, Elkton, Cecil county, ■ 

Carville S Stansbury, Stemoer's Run. 

William Byrne Baltimore City. 

ELF Hardcastle, Royal Oak 

Daniel Field, Federalshurgh . 

Robert J Brent, Baltimor • City. 

T M Lanahan, Baltimore City. 

Bradley J Johnt^on, Fredrick City. 

John J Morrison, Barton, Allegheny county. 

Oscar Miles, Milestown, St Mary's county, 

D W Bowie, Prince George county. 

VIRGINIA. 

Arthur R (Smith, Portsmouth. 

John J Kindred, Jerusalem. 

Lewis E Harvie, Chala, A tielia county. 

Wm P Thompson, Crimea, Dinwiddle county. 

William H Clark, Halifax Court H.-use. 

Walter Coles, ."Ittsylvania Court Houso. 

Edmund W Hubart, Curdsville. 

Robert H Glass, Lynchburg. 

William L Early, Madison Court House 

Robert A.' Coghill, New G'asgow. 

Walter D Leake Goochland Court House. 

James Hobbs, Manchester. 

George Bi)oker, Hampton. 

M W Fisher, Eastville. 

Wm A Buckner, Bowling Green. 

Henry T Garnett, Oak Grove, Westmoreland co. 

James Barbour, Brandy station. 

John Seddon, Fredericksburg, 

John Blair Hoge, Martinsburgh. 

0. R, Funston, White Post. 

S M Yost, Staunton 

S H Moffatt, Harrisonburgh. 

Daniel H Hoge, BlackSbUrg. 

James W Davis, Greenville Court House. 

Robert Crockett, Wytheville. 

William T Cecil, Tazewe-l Court House. 

Henry Fitzbugh, Kanawha Court House. 

JohnBrannon, Weston. 

William G Brown, Kingwood. 

Charles W Russell, V'heeling. 

NORTH CAHOLINA. 

William W Avery, Morgantown. 
William S Ashe, Wilminarton. 
Bedford Brown, Locust Hill. 
^ViUiam W Holden, Raleigh. 
William A Moore, Edenton. 
Nicholas M Long, Wei don. 
Hobert R Bridges, Tarboro'. 
Lotty W Humphrey Richland. 
Walter L Steel, Rockingham. 
James Fulton, Wilmington. 
Thomas S Green Warrenton. 
J W B Watson, Smithfield. 
Robert P. Dick, Greensboro'. 
Charles S Winstead, Roxboro'. * 
Samuel Hargrave, Lexington. 
Hampton B Hammond, Wadesboro 
William Landers, Lincolnton. 



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CVrfambus Mills, Columly«3. 
Henry T. Farmer, Flat flock. 

SOUTH CaROLIMA. 

James Simmons, (Jbarieston. 

Samnel McGowan, Abbeville Court House. 

H B Wilson, Georgetown, 

R B Boylston. Winnsboro' 

J H Witherspoon, Lancaster Court House. 

S3 W Charles, Darliugton Court House. 

George N Keynolds, Charleston. 

Thomas Y. Simons, Charleston. 

Jam«s Patterson, Barnwell Court House. 

B H Brown, Barnwell Court House. 

Arthur Simpkins, Edgefield Court House. 

Lemuel Boozer, Lexington Court HousV 

B F Ferry, Greenville. 

J P Reid, Anderson Court House. 

John s Preston^ Columbia. 

Franklin Gaillard, Cotimibia. 

GEO&aiA. 

Houry L Benning, Columbus. 
John H Lumpkin. Rome. 
Isaiah T Irwin, Washington. 
Henry R Ja^.kson, Savannah. 
Junius Wingfield, Eatonton. 
Hiram Warner, Greenville. 
Solomon Cohe , Savannah. 
James L Seward, Thomasville. 
Julian Hat tridge, Savannah. 
WB Gaulden, Uuntsville. 
W J Johnson, Fort Gaines. 
John A Jones, Columbus. 
James M Clark, Lumpkin. 
W M Slaughter. x\lbany. 
E L Stroecker. Macon. 
P Tracy, Macon. 
C Gibson, Griffin. 
E J McGehee, Perry. 
James J Dim. nd, Stone fountain. 
J A Render, Greenville. 
Samuel C Candler, Carre.Iton. 
G J Fain, Calhoun, 
E R Hardin, Dalton. 
James Hoge, Atalanta. 
Mark Johnston, Canersville. 
William H Hull. Athens, 
fieorge Hillyer, Monroe. 
A A Franklin Hill, Athens. 
Henry P Thomas, Lawrenceyille. 
L H Briscoe, Miiledgeville. 
Jeff Lamar, Covington. 
J W Burney, Monticello. 
James Thomas, Sparta, 

L A Nelms, , 

1) C Barrow, Lexington. 
H Cleveland, Augusta, 
H R Casey, Appling. 

FLORIDA. 

T J Eppes, Apalachicola. 

John Milton, Marianna. 

B K Wardlaw, Madison Court House. 

C B Djcke, TallahHSsee 

George L Bowne, Key West. 

John B Owens, Ocala. 

ALABAMA. 

F S Lyon, Demopolis. 

A B Meek, Mobile. 

W L Yancey, Vontgomery. 

L W Lawler, Talladega. 

J A Winston, Mobile. 

L P Walker, Huntsville 

H D Smith, Graveley Springs, 

G G Griffin, Demopolis. 

N H R Dawson, Selma. 

R G Scott, Claiborne. 

J W Portis, Stiggsville. 

L L Cato, Eufaula. 

T J Burnett, Greenville. 

J YS. Breare, Newton, Dale couaty. 



^f J Bulger, Dadeville. 

P O Harper, West Point. 

J C B Mitchell, Mount jvicigff. 

W C Mclver. Tuskeegee. 

John Erwin. Gre nsborough-, 

W IM Brooks, Marion. 

J C Guild, Tuscaloosa, 

A W Dillard, Livingston. 

P G Norman. Tuscumbia. 

• { M Patton, Flo»-ence. 

W C Sherrod, Courtland, 

R Chapman, Huntsville. 

G C Bradley Huntsville. 

T B Cooper, Centen 

A J Henry, Guntersvlre. 

J T Bradford, Talladega. 

W Garrett. Socopetoy, 

P G King, MontevalJo. 

MISSISSIPPI, 

W S B rry, Columbus 

Charles Clark, Prentiss,, Bolivar couaty. 

E Barksaale, Jackson. 

W S Wilson, Port Gibson. 

James Drane, Bankston. 

Beverly ^'athews Columbus. 

J M Thomson, Houston, 

W H H Tyson, CarroUviile. 

Joseph R Davis, Canton, 

C E Hooker. Jacksohi 

J T .'•MiDS, Delta, Coahema county. 

D C Glenn, Mississippi City. 

George H Gordon, Woodvillo. 

LOUISIANA. 

E LaSere, New Orleans. . " 

■ E Lawrence, New Orlearts* 
F H Hatch, New Orleans. 
A Talbot, Iberville. 
R A Huuter. Alexandria. 
Richard Taylor, St Charles Parish. 
D D Withers, New Orleans. 
John Tarlton, Bayou Bueff, St Mary's Parisli, 
Charles Jones, Trinity. 
B W Pearce, Sparta, B4enville Parish. 
A "^'outon. Vermillion ville. 
James A McHatton, Baton Rouge. • 

TEXAS 

H R Runnels, Boston, Bowie county. 

E Greer, ftlari<hall, Harrison county. 

Thomas P Ochiltree, Marshall, Harrison c«»nty, 

M W Covey, Jefferson, Cass county. 

F R Lubbo k, Houston, Harris county. 

Guy Bryan, Galveston. 

Josiah F Crosby, El Paso. 

F S Stockdale, Port Laraea. 

ARKANSAS. 

J P Johnson, Laconia, 
Thompson B Flournoy, Laconia. 
N B Burrows, Van Bureu. 
F A Terry, Waverly Post Office. 
John J Sturman, Dardanelle. 
John A Jordan, South Bend, 
Van H Manning, Hamburg. 
P W Hoadley, Little Rock. 

KENTUCKY, 

G A Caldwell, Louisville. 

D P White, Green sburg. 

J C Mason, Owiugsville. 

R K Williams. Maylield. 

William Bradley, Madisonville. 

G H Morrow, Paducah. 

Laleyette Green, Falls of Rough. 

S B Greenfield, Hopkinsville. 

G T Wood, MunfordsviUe. 

J A Finn, Franklin. 

S B Field, Columbia, 

John S Kindrlck, Somerset. 

R Spalding, Lebanon. 

W B Read, Hodgesville 

John Dishman, Barbourville. 



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■Colbert Cecil, Piketon. 

William Garvin , Louisville. 

S E Oe haven. La Grange. 

R M Johnson, White Sulphur. . 

J B Beck, Lexington, 

N Green, New Liberty 

H McKee, Louisville. 

H D Helm, Newport 

11 P Butler, (Jar ronton 

TJENNE83BK. 

Andrew Ewing, Nashville. 

John Ji How-ird, L-ibanon. 

J D Atkins. Paris. 

Samuel Mi li^an, Greenville. 

WilUatn Henry Maxwell, Jonesborough. 

J -hn D Riley, Rogersville. 

Thomas M Lyou, Knoxville. 

WEB Jones, Livingston. 

George W Rowles, 'Jieveland. 

William Wallace, Maryyilte, 

David Bnoford, Dixon Springs. 

J a nes M Shield, Manchester. 

John McGavock, Franklin. 

James M Avenr, Murfreesb^ro'. 

Robert v»athew8, Shelbyvi.le. 

W L McOielland, Lewisburgh. 

Thomas \W Jones, Pulaski. 

W (J Whitthorne, Columbia. 

Alfred Robb, Clarksviile 

Thomas -enees, Spi'ingfield. 

William H Wall, Paris. 

James Connor. Ripley. 

William d. Carroll, Memphis. 

Samuel McOl onahan Jackson. 

MISSOURI 

J B Henderson, Louisiana. 

W r VV Mcllhany, St. Charles. 

R F Lakeman, Uannibal. 

G A Shortndgc, Bloomingtott, 

JohnBulark, Washington City, D C. 

Austin A King, Richmond. Ray county. 

George I' Norris, Platte City. 

James Craig, St. Joseph. 

Wm Douglas, Boonville, Cooper county. 

N C Claiborne. Kansas City. 

P S WilKtfs, Springfield 

J A Scott, fclik Mills. 

C G Corwin, Jefferson City. 

J F Mense, Washington, Franklin county. 

A Hunter, Benton, Scott count,)'. 

John O'Fallon, jr.. Sulphur Springs, Jefferson co 

John M lirum, St. Louis. 

Sam B Churchill, St. Louis. 

IOWA. 

A C Dodge, Burlington. 

B M Samuels, Dubttque. 

© Finch, Dv^s M -. .OS. 

Wm H Merntt, Cedar Rapids. 

T W Claggett, Keokuk. 

J W Busier, Sioux City. 

E H 'lhayer,-Muscatine. 

W H M Pusey, Council Bluffs. 

WISCONSIN. 

John R Sharpstein, Milwaukee. 
Alex S Palmer, €ren«va. 
Alex F Pratt, Waukesha. 
Wm A Barstow, Jhnesville. 
Jam '8 H Earnest, >hui8burgh. 
Charles Whipple, Eau Claire. 
Perry H Smith, App eton 
Fred W Horn, Cedar bur^-h. 
Edward S Bragg, Fond du Lad. 
John Fitzgerald, Oshkosh 

MINNESOTA. 

W A Gormans, St. PauL 
Geo L Becker, St Paul. 
Henry H Sibley, Mendota. 
A JEdgerton, Mantorville. 
A M Fridley, St, Anthony. 
.T Travirt Ross r, Mankato. 
W W Phelps, Red Wing. 



ILLINOIS. 

S S Marshall, McLeansboro'. 
O B Ficklin, Charleston. 
W A Richardson, Quincy. 
R T Merrick, (.Jhicago. 
Wm VJ Jackson, Jnion 
John I'latt. Warren. 
I John B Turner, Chicago. 
A VI Herrington. G^'neva. 
Allen Withers, Bloomiiigton. 
R E Goodell, Joliet. 
B S Prettyman, Pekin. 
K Holloway, Monmouth. 
W H Rolloson, Dallas City. 
James ^i Campbell, Macomb. 
Murray McCounell, Jaeksonville. 
Wm F Thornton, Shelbyville. 
Aaron Sh iw, Lawrenceville. 
W F Linder, Chicago. 
S A Buck master, Alton. 
Z Casey, Mount Vernon. 
W J Allen, Marion. 
W H Green, Metropolis. 

OHIO. 

George W McCook, Steubenvilte. 

George E Pugh, Cincinnati. 

D P Rhodes, C evtland 

Washington McLean, Cincinnati. 

Henry B Bowman, Cincinnati 

Charles Rule, Cincinnati. 

VVwsley M Cameron, Cincinnati. 

Win T Forrest, Cincinnati. 

A P Miller, Hamilton 

Geo W Honk, Dayton. 

Sabirt Scott, St Mary's. 

Joshua To wnsend, Greenville, Darke county. 

Jamed B Steedman, Toledo. 

Wm Mungen, Findley. 

J B Cockerill, West Dnion. 

T C Kennedy, Batavia, 

Durbin Ward, Lebanon. 

vV M Stark, Xenia. 

Geo Sp nee, Springfield. 

R E Runkle, West Liberty, Logan county, 

Kdward F Di'^kinson, Frem »nt, Sandusky co. 

Abner M Jackson, Bucyrus 

Thomas McNally, Chillicothe. 

Wells A Hutchins, Portsmouth. 

LocL Smith, Athens. 

E F Bingham, vJcArthur, Vinton co. 

VVayne Griswold, Circlevil e. 

Geo B Smythe, Newark 

Thos W Bartley, Mansfield. 

John Tifft, Norwalk. 

J A Marchand. Wo(»ster^ 

J P Jeffreys, " 

J G St wart, Cpshocton. 

li H Nugeii,N'evvcomer.itown, Tuscarawis co. 

SR Hosmer, Zanesville 

W W Cones, Cincinnati. 

J 3 Way, Woodsfie d, M<mroe county. 

W Baton, Morristrwn, Belmont county. 

S Lahm, Canton. 

S D Harris, Jr, Ravenna. 

H B Pnyne, Ceveland. 

J W Gray, '" 

DHvid Tod, Brier Hill. 

I)B Woods. Warren. 

Thrmaij S W<x)ds, New Lisbon. 

8 F Potts, CaiTollion Carroll county. 

INDIANA 

E '^ Huntington, Terre Hante. 

S H Huskirk, Bloominitou. 

Robert Lowry, Goshen. 

James B Foley, Greensburgh. 

John S Gavitt, Evansville. 

Smith Miller, Patoka. 

J B Norman, New Albany* 

S K Wolfe, Corydon. 

P C Dunning, Bloomington. 

H W Harrington, Madison. 



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J V Bemusdaffer, Greensburph. 

John Andregjf, Lawrenceburgh 

Lafayette Devlin, Cambridge Oity. 

E 'mnnd Johnson, Newcastle. 

W H Taibott, Indianapolis 

J M GregK, Dmvilie. 

F Read, Terre Haute . 

H K Wilj-on, SulJivan. 

L B Stockton, Lafa>ette 

l8>iac U fclston, Crawfurdbville. 

<T Hathaway. Laporte. 

8 A Hall. Log4,na|»ort. 

P Hoagland, Fort Wavne. 

G W McConni-ll. Angola 

Win Garver, Noblesville. 

John RCoffroth, Huntington. 

MICHIGAN. 

George V N Lothrop. Hetroit. 
Charles E Stuart. Kalamazoo. 
H Fi Kiley, Constantine. 
George W Peek. Lansing. 
Benj Fo'lett, Yp ilanti. 
Fid us Livermore, Jackson. 



Jo')n G Parkhurst. CoMwater. 
Philo Wilson, Oanandaigua. 
FrankLn Muzzy. Niles. 
Alex F Bell, Uetroit. 
Ang'istus C Baldwin. Pontiac. 
William rf Bancroft, Port Huron. 

OREGON. 

Lansing Stout, Washlngt- n, D C. 
.1 K Lamerick. Jacksonville. 
Isaac J Stevens. Was-hingK.n, D <T. 
Justus .-^teinherger, Washintrt.n. DC. 
R R Metcalfe, Independence, Texas. 
A. P Dennitson, The Dalles, Oregon. 

CALIFORNIA. 

J BMwell. OhJco, Buite county. 

G W Patrick. Sonora, Tuolumne county. 

Le^vis \i Bradley, Stockton. 

Austin E Smith. San Francisco 

John A nreibelbis, Shnsia. 

John S Dudley. Yreka. Siskiyoii coutity. 

John Rains. Los Angeles. 

D S Gregory. Monterey. 



mu n *• „ , Thursday, April 26, 1860. 

ihe Convention was call'id to order at 10 o'clock. 
The proceedings were opened by prayer, by the Rev. Mr. Forrest 
On motion of Mr. M:ller, of Indiana, the rei ling of the Journal of 'yesterday 
was dispensed with. *^ •^'^i^aj 

The ubfini^hed business of yesterday was called up. 

The consideration of Mr. North's resolution not being called for by the 
mover, war passed over. "^ 

Mr. FiTZHUGH, of Virginia, presented a series of resolutions, which were read 
and referred to the Committee on Resolutions. The resolu ions are as follows • 

liesolved, That the rendition of fugitive slaves and other pn.perty by one 
btate to another is a right secured by the laws of nations, recognized by the 
Oolonies and the mother country previous to the Declaration of Independence 
by the Courts of Great Britain and by the Supreme Court of the United 
btates, and by the law and courts of all civilized nations, and a fortiori is 
the duty of the States of this (.Confederacy under the Constitution and laws 

Hesolved, That the refusal of the GFovernors of the several States to deliver 
up tugitives from justice and fugitive slaves, is an open and pa'pable viola- 
tion of the above natural and international law and the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, constituting official perjury by such Governors as 
have evaded or refused to perform this duty, and If persevered in, must lead 
to the severance of the Union. 

Mr. Hughes of Pennsylvania, presented a resolution, which was read and 
referred to the Committee on Piariorm. The resolution was sm f(^llows : 

Resolved, That while recognizing i he doctrine that the General Govern- 
ment has no power to create in, or exclude from, by legislation, any species 
of property m any State or Territory, yet we maintain that it is the duty of 
that Government to provide the Courts with ample process and ministerial 
officers for the protect on and enforcement of any existing ri<^ht, or the cor- 
rection of any wrong, over which said Government, under the Constitution 
has jurisdiction. ' 

Mr. Wateeburt, of New York, moved to accept the invitations received 
from the several Institutions of the city of Charleston, to visit the same 
and that the President of the Convention return the thanks of the Conven- 
tion for such invitations — which motion was carried. 

Mr. Browne, of Pennsylvania, moved the following : 
_ Resolved, That the citizens of the several States, when emigrating into a 
Federal Territory, retain the right to slave and other property wMch th«y 



i 



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32 Democratic National Convention. 

take with them, until there is some prohibition by Uwlul authority ; and 
that, as declared by the Supreme Court, Congress cannot interfere with such 
right in a Territory, nor can a Territorial Legislature do so, until authorized 
by the adoption of a State Constitution ; and that the attempted exercise of 
such a function by a Territorial Legislature is unconstitutional, and dangerous 
to the peace of the Union. 

The resolution, alter having been read, was referred to the Committee on 
Platform. 

Mr. Walker, of Alabama. As a pendent to the resolution of the gentle- 
man from Pennsylvania, I offer the following : 

Resolved, That it is the duty of the Federal Government, in all its depart- 
ments within their constitutional sphere, to afford adequate protection and 
equal advantage to all descriptions of property recognized as such by the 
laws of any of the States, as well within 'the Territories as upon the high 
seas, and every place subject to its exclusive power of legislation. 

Mr. Bkowne. I desire to say I accept that very cheerfully as an amend- 
ment, if it is intended as such. 

Mr. Wall, of Tennessee, offered the following resolutions, being the 
Platform advocated by that State : 

Be it Resolved, That we hereby re-affirm the principles announced in the 
Platform of the Democratic party adopted in Convention at Cincinnati, in 
June, 1856, and that we hold them to be a true exposition of our doctrines 
on the subjects embraced. 

Resolved, That tha views expressed by the Supreme Court of the United 
States in the decision of the case of" Dred Scott," are, in our opinion, a true 
and clear exp)sition of the powers reposed in Congress upon the subject of 
the Territories of the United States, and the rights guaranteed to the resi- 
d^ents in the Territories. 

Resolved, That the States of the Confederacy are equals in political rights ; 
each Stat^ has the right to settle for itself all questions of internal policy ; 
the right to have or not to have slavery is one of the prerogatives of self- 
government — the States <Ud not surrender this right m the Federal Consti- 
tution, and lennessee will not now do so. 

Resolved, That the Federal Government has no power to interfere with 
slavery in the States, nor to introduce or exclude it from the TerritOiies, and 
no duty to perform in relation thereto, but to protect the rights of the 
owner from wrong, and to restore fugitives from labor ; these duties it cannot 
withhold without a violation of the Constitution. 

Resolved, That the organization of the Eepublican party upon strictly 
sectional principles, and its hostility to the institution of slavery, which is 
recognized by the Constitution, and which is inseparably connected with the 
social and industrial pursuits of the Southern States of the Confederacy, is 
war upon the principles of the Constitution and upon the rights of the States. 

Resolved, That the late treasonable invasion of Virginia by an organized 
band of Republicans, was the necessary result of the doctrines teachings, 
and principles of that party; was the beginning of the 'irrepressible confiict^^ 
of Mr. Seward ; was a blow aimed at the institution of slavery by an effort to 
exdte servile insurrection ; was war upon the South, and as such, it is the 
duty of the South to prepare to mainta n its rights under the Constitution. 

Resolved, That if this war upon the Constitutional rights of the South is 
persisted in, it must soon cease to be a war of words. If the Republican 
party would prevent a conflict of arms, let them stand by the Constitution 
and fulfill its obligations — we ask nothing more, we will submit to nothing less. 

The resolutions were referred. 

Mr. Wolfe, of Indiana, moved the following : 

Resolved', That the Federal Government has no power to interfere with 
davery in the States, nor to iiitrodue or exclude it from the Territories, and 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 33 

130 duty to perform in relation thereto, but to faithfuHy enforce th' Fugitive 
Slave Law, and all the decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States in 
regard to all the rights of. the people of every State and Territory tinder the 
Constitution of the United States. 

The resolution was referred. 

Mr. CrLENN, of Mississippi, presented the following : 

1. A citizen of any State in the Union may immigra"te to the Territori.'S with his 
property, whether it consists of slaves or any other subject of personal v wnersbip. 

2. So long as the Territorial condition exists, the relation of master and slave 
is not to be disturbed by Federal or Territorial legislation ; and if so disturbed, 
the Federal Government must furnish ample protection therefor. 

3. Whenever a Territory shall be entitled to admission into the 1 nion as a 
State the inhabitants may, in forming their Constitution, decide fort emselves 
whether it shall authorize or exclude slavery. ' 

The resolution was referred. 

Mr. HoEN, of Wisconsin, offered the following : 

Resolved^ That the letter of President Buchanan, accepting the nonnnation at 
Cincinnati, where he explains the Cincinnati Platform in relation to the power 
of a Territorial Legislature on the subject of slavery is eminently sou' d, and is 
hereby referred to the Committee on resolutions for their consideratic^u.' 

The resolution was referred. 

Mr. MouTON, of Louisiana, offered the following : 

Resolved, That the Territories of the United -States belong to tl e several 
States as their common property, and not to the individual citizen s thereof, 
that the Federal Constitution recognizes property in slaves, and as such the 
owner thereof is entitled to carry his slaves into any Territory of the United 
States and hold them as property. And in case the people of the Territories, 
by inaction, unfriendly legislation or otherwise, should endanger the tenure of 
such property or discriminate against it by withholding that protection given to 
this species of property in the Territories, it is the duty of the Grenoral Gov- 
ernment to interpose, by an active exertion of its Constitutional i owers to 
secure the rights of slaveholders. 

The resolution was referred. 

Mr. Greenfield, of Kentucky, offered the following : 

Resolved, That it is the duty of the National Government to provid 5 by law, 
for paying for such fugitives from labor as, by the illegal interprsition of 
State authorities, the owners thereof may be prevented from receiv'n^ under 
the Fugitive Slave Law. ° 

Keferred to the Committee on Platform, 

Capt. Kynders, of New York. If the gentleman from Kentucky will 
induce the Government to give the United States Marshals sufficiei't power, 
he may rest assured the South shall have all her fugitive slaves returned 
He was somewhat interested in that matter himself. [Applause.] 

Mr. BiDWELL, of California, moved the following : 

Resolved, That our States and Territories on the Pacific, and the Torritories 
of the Great Basin, and of both slopes of the Rocky Mountains, demand the 
early construction of a railroad to connect them with the internal navi^^ation 
and railway system of the Atlantic States ; and that on the ground ( f postal 
communication, protection of Territories and States, and of military defense 
the General Government has accepted authority under the Constitution. ' 

Mr. Cbaig, of Missouri, offered the following : 

Resolved, That the Democratic party are in favor of granting such consti- 
tutional aid as will insure the speedy construction of a railroad connecting the 
Atlantic and Pacific States, 

Referred under the rule. 

Mr. Stout, of Oregon, offered the following: 
3 



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84: Democratic National Convention. 

Besolved, That to preserve the Union, the equality of States must be main- 
tained, and every branch of the Federal Government should exercise all their 
Constitutional powers for the protection of persons and property. 
Keferred. 

Mr. McCoNNELL, of Illinois, offered the following : 

Resolved, That the Federal Government has no power to interfere with 

slavery in the States, or to introduce it or exclude it from the Territories 

and has no duty to perform in relation thereto, except to secure the rights of 

the owner by a return of the fugitive slave, as provided by the Constitution. 

deferred. 

Mr. Seward, of Georgia, presented the following : 

Resolved, That the Constitution of the United States extends to the several 
Stales, and to every citizen, the full protection of persons and property in all 
the States and Territories ; and that those rights, as declared and determined 
by .he Courts, under the Constitution, are to be respected and maintained 
by ihe Government of the United States ; and that James Guthrie, of Ken- 
tucky, be the nominee of the Democratic party for President of the United 
States, on this platform. 
1'he motion was referred. 

]\Ir. Cessna, of Pennsylvania, offered the following : 
Resolved, That the convictions of the Democratic party of the country 
remain unshaken in the wisdom and justice and adequate protection of iron, 
conl, wool, and the other great staples of our country, based upon the neces- 
sities of a reasonable revenue system of the General Government; and 
approving of the views of President Buchanan upon the subject of specific 
duties, we earnestly desire our Kepresentatives in Congress to produce such 
modifications of the existing laws as the unwise legislation of the Republican 
pi ty in 1857 renders absolutely necessary to the prosperity of the great inter- 
est s of the country. 

Mr. PuGH moved that after disposing of such resolutions as are now before 
th ', Convention, all further resolutions offered be referred to the Committee 
or Platform without being read before the Convention. 
This resolution was carried. 

Resolutions were then presented by Messrs. Brooks, of Alabama, West of 
C( nnecticut, Dudley, of Calitornia, Green, of North Carolina, Rosser, of Min- 
nesota, O'Fallon, of Missouri, Tarlton, of Louisiana, and Read, of Indiana • 
al '. of which were referred to the Committee on Platform. ' 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, moved that the Convention adjourn until 4 o'clock 
P M. 

Mr. MoNTaoMERY, of Pennsylvania, stated that the Convention had before 
it a resolution undetermined, and asked to have a vote taken upon it and de- 
si ed Mr. Stuart to withdraw his motion for that purpose. ' 
Mr. Stuart withdrew his motion. 

Mr. Ingersoll, of Connecticut, renewed the motion to adjourn, upon 
^^ hich a vote was taken, and the motion to adjourn was lost. 

Mr. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania, called up the resolution heretofore 
( ffered by him, and modified it so as to read as follows : 

Resolved, That the Committee appointed to frame rules aild regulations for 
t he future action of our Executive National Committee, shall not report until 
p fter the nomination of candidates for President and Vice President. 
Mr. Bigler offered as an amendment, the following : 
**And they shall report as members of the National Committee, such per- 
sons as shall have been selected for that purpose by the respective State 
delegations for their respective States." 

Mr. Seward, of Georgia, moved to refer the resolutions to the Committee 
ordered yesterday, and called for the previous question. 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 35 

The call for the previous question was seconded, and the main question 
ordered. 

The two propositions were committed to the Committee heretofore ordered. 

The Convention then, on motion of Mr. Weight, of Mass., took a recess 
till 4 o'clcok P. M. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Mr. Sayles, of Rhode Island, offered the following resolution : 

Besolved, That the Committee on Resolutions be instructed to report forth- 
with to this Convention, the platform adopted by the Cincinnati Convention, 
wi^h the following additional resolution : 

Resolved, That we recognize to the fullest extent, the principle that to pre- 
serve the Union the equality of the States must be maintained, the decisions 
of the Courts enforced ; and that every branch of the Federal Government 
shall exercise all its Constitutional powers in the protection of persons and 
property both in the States and Territories ; and upon that moved the previ- 
ous question. 

Mr. BococK, of Virginia, raised a point of order, and insisted upon the reso- 
olutions goinor to the Committee on Platform without debate. 

The President sustained the point of order. 

Mr. Mitchell, of Alabama, offered a resolution of inquiry, as to whether 
the Committee had agreed upon a platform. 

Mr. Bowie, of Maryland, offered as an amendment, the following : 

Ordered, that the Committee on Resolutions be requested to report to this^ 
Convention the result of its deliberations, to-morrow at 10 o'clock. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, moved that the Convention adjourn ; whieL 
motion was carried, and the Convention adjourned till to-morrow at 10 A. M. 

The following is the Committee elected by the States to report rules and; 
regulations for the guidance of the next National Executive Committee : 

Committee on Rules and Regulations— Maine, Henry A. Wyman; New Hampshire, Ansel Glover ; 
Vermont, Lucius Robinson; Massachusetts, W. C. N. Swift; Rhode Isiand, Edward F. Newton' 
Connecticut, James T. Pratt : New York, Marshall B. Champlin; New Jersey, Geo F. Fort • Penn- 
sylvania, Jo.siah Randall ; Dt-laware, John B. Pennington; ^'arvland C. S Stansbury; Virginia W 
F. Thompson; North Carolina, Samuel Hargrave ; South Carolina, Franklin Gaillarfi; Georgia* 
John A. Jones ; Florida, Thomas J. Eppes ; Alabama, Thomas J. Burnett ; Louisiana, E. Lawrence 
JJississippi J. M. Th^pson; Texhs, W. H Parsons; Arkansas, John J. Sturman ; Missouri, J. 
MKrum; Tennessee, W. E. B. Jones; Kentucky, D. P. White; Ohio, Wells A. Hutchins; Indiana. 
John B. Norman ; Illinois, Samuei S. Marshall j Michigan, Fidus Livermore ; Wisconsin, J. H. 
Earnest; Iowa, Wm. H. Merritt; Minnesota, A. M. Fridley; California, G. W. Patrick; Oreeon, 
Justus Steinberger. ' * ' 

Friday, April 27, 1860. 

The Convention was called to order at 10 o'clock A. M., by Gen. Caleb; 
CusHiNG, President of the Convention, and he introduced to the Convention 
the Rev. Mr. Smythe, of Charleston, who offered up prayer. 

Mr. BuTTERwoRTH, of Ncw York, moved to suspend the reading of the 
Journal. Agreed to. 

Mr. Cochran presented the following communication from the working 
men of New York, Brooklyn, and Green])ort, which was referred to the 
Committee on Resolutions : 

^ , ^^ . ^ New York, April 20, 1860. 

10 the National Democratic Convention : 

At a meeting of the representatives of the working men of the different 
Wards of this City, Brooklyn, and Green Point, held on the evening of the 
16th instant, at Union Hall, 195 Bowery, it was 

Resolved, That the officers of the meeting be instructed to address the 
National Democratic Convention, to assemble at Charleston, and respectfully 
request the Convention to declare itself opposed to all further traffic in the- 



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36 Democratic National Convention. 

public lands of the United States, and in favor of laying them out in farms 
and lots for the free and exclusive use oi' actual settlers. 

We see this singular condition of affairs — that while the wealth of our 
country is rapidly accumulating — while ii.'ternal improvements of every de- 
scription are fast increasing — and while mochinery has multiplied the powers 
>of production to an immense extent ; yet, with all these material advanta- 
ges, the compensation for useful labor is getting less and less. 

We seek the cause of this anomaly, and we trace it to the monopoly of 
the land, with labor at the mercy of capital. We, therefore, desire to abolish 
the monopoly, not by interfering with the conventional rights of persons 
now in possession, but by averting the further sale of all land not yet appro- 
priated as private property, and by allowing these lands, hereafter, to be 
freely occupied by those who may choose to settle on them. 

We propose that the public lands hereafter shall not he owned, but occupied 
only — the occupant having the right to sell or otherwise dispose of his or her 
improvements to any one not in possession of other lands; so that, by pre- 
venting any individual from becoming possessed of more than a limited quan- 
tity, every one toay enjoy the right. Respectfully, 

Benjamin Hague, Secretary. HENRY BEENY, Chairman. 

The unfinished business of yesterday being called up, the resolution of 
Mr. Mitchell, of Alabama, was consid. red in order ; but it being under- 
.stood that the Committee on Platform and Resolutions were ready to rejort 
the Platform, Mr. Mitchell withdrew his resolution. 

The President here requested the Select Cfunmittee heretof re appointed 
under Mr, Pugh*s resolution, to assemble in front of the stand for tiie pur- 
pose of consultation. 

Gov. King, of Missouri, offered a resolution, which was received and read 
by the Clerk, and which was on motion of Mr. iSpinola, of Kew York, 
referred to the Select Committee. The resolutioais as follows : 

Whereas, the Democracy of the Territory of Kansas have sent to this 
Convention Delegates to cast herein the votes of Kansas in the event of her 
admission into the Union ; and whereas, the times indicate that before the 
meeting of the next National Convention, Kansas will be a sovereign State, 
and with the view of enabling the proposed State to have upon the next Exec- 
utive Committee of the party a representative, be it, therefore, by this Con- 
vention, 

Resolved, That the Delegation here representing the Democracy of Kansas, 
be, and they are .hereby, empowered to select one member for the National 
Committee, which person thus selected shall be placed upon the National 
Demo ratic Committee as a member thereof, upon the admission of Kansas 
into the Union as a sovereign State. 

Mr. Ochilthee, of Texas, offered a series of resolutions, which were 
referred to the Committee on Platform and Resolutions without reading. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, moved that the Convention take a recess of 
•one hour^ 

Mr. Wardlaw, of Florida, moved to amend by substituting the follow- 
ing, viz : ** That the Convention suspend proceedings for one hour ;" which 
amendment was accepted by Mr. Stuart, and the question on suspending 
business was put and carried. 

The hour for a recess having expired, the President called the Conven- 
tion to order at twenty minutes past eleven o'clock. 

Mr. W. W. Avery, of North Carolina, Chairman of the Committee on 
the Platform and Resolutions, made a report, and asked leave to make an 
explanation, which was granted. 

The following is the Report on Platform and Resolutions offered by Mr. 
Avery, 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 37 

I am instructed, as Chairman of the Committee on Resolutions, to report 
to the Convention the Platform of Resolutions which they have adopted. 
I am further instructed by the Committee to state that entire unanimity did, 
not prevail as to several of the resolutions. 

The first and third resolutions in reference to slavery in the Territories, 
and the duty of the Greneral Grovernment to protect the rights of persons an<l 
property, were adopted by a majority of the Committee. 

The second resolution, in relation to the fugitive slave law, and the fourth 
resolution, in regard to our foreign born citizens, were unanimously adopted ; 
aod the fifth resolution, in reference to the acquisition of Cuba, was adopted 
without division. 

The last resolution of the series, in regard to the Pacific; Railroad, was 
adopted by a majority. 

The Committee on Resolutions, by their Chairman, Mr. Avery, submits the 
following report. W. W. AVERY, Chairman. 

PLATFORM.— MAJORITY REPORT. 

Besolved, That the Platform adopted at Cincinnati be affirmed, with the 
following resolutions : 

1. Resolved^ That the National Democracy of the United States hold 
these cardinal principles on the subject of Slavery in the Territories : First, 
That Congress has no power to abolish slavery in the Territories. Second, 
That the Territorial Legislature has no power to abolish slavery in *ny Ter- 
ritory, nor to prohibit the introduction of slaves therein, nor any powe- to 
exclude slavery therefrom, nor anv power to destroy or impair the right of 
property in slaves by any legislation wha<-ever. 

2. Resolvedy That the enactments of State Legislatures to defeat the 
faith:ul execu'^ion of th6 Fugitive Slave Law are hostile in character, subver- 
sive of the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effect. 

3. Resolved, That it is the duty of the Federal Government to project, 
when necessary, the rights of persons and property on the hiy:h seas, in th:; 
Territories, or wherever else its Constitutional authority extend^. 

4. Resolved, That the Deraocrac- of the Nation recognize it as the imper- 
ative duty of this Government to prote t the naturalized citizen in all his 
rights, whether at home or in foreign lands, to the same extent as its native- 
born citizens. 

5. Resolved, That the National Democracy earnestly recommend the ac- 
quisiti n of the Island of Cuba at the earliest practicable period. 

Whereas, That one of the greatest nee ssities of the* age, in a political, 
commercial, postal and military point of view, is a speedy communicatiun 
between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the National Democratic party do hereby pledge them- 
selves to use every means in their power to secure the passage of some b 11 
for the construction of a Pacific Railroad from the Mississippi River to the 
Pacific Ocean, at the earliest pricticab e moment. 

Mr. Avery, after miking his report, proceeded to address th'3 Convention, 
but on request, yielded the floor for the purpose of receiving the Minority 
Report of toe Committee on Resolutions and Platform. 

Mr. Payne, of Ohio, a member of the Committee on Plat^erm and Resolu- 
tions, ofi'ered a Report and Resolutions from a minority of said C m'nittee, 
which he moved as a substitute for thje Majority Report made by Mr. Avery, 
which Report and Resolutions offered by Mr. Payne are as follows, viz : 

MINORITY REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS. 

The undersigned, a minority of the Committee on Resolutions, regretting 
their inability to concur with the report of the majority of you" Committ e,, 



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38 Democratic National Convention. 

feel constra'ned to submit the folio mug as their Keport, and recommend its 
adoption as a substitute for the report of the majority. 
Respectfully submitted. 

AMOS R0BER1 S, Delegate from Maine. 

W. BURNS, Delegate from New Hampshire. 

E. M. BROWN, Delegate from Vermont. 

C. S. BRA.DLEY, Delegate from Rhode Island. 

A. G. HAZZARP, Delegate from Connecticut. 

BENJ. WILLIAMSON, Delegate from New Jersey. 

H. B. PAYNE, Delegate from Ohio. 

P. C. DUNNING, Delegate from Indiana. 

0. B. FICKLIN, Delegate from Illinois. 

G. V. N. LOTHROP, Delegate from Michigan. 

A. S. PALMER, Delegate from Wisconsin. 

BEN. M. SAMUELS, Delecrate from Iowa. 

JAS. M. CAVANAUGH, Delegate from Minnesota. 

HENDRICK B. WRIGHT, Delegate from Pennsylvania. 
In compliance with the wish of the New York Delegation, I concur with 
this Report as far as it goes. 

EDWIN CROSWELL, Delegate from New York. 

1. Resolved^ That we, the Democracy of the Union, in Convention assem- 
bled, hereby declare our affirmance of the Resolutions unanimously adopted 
and declared as a Platform of Principles by the Democratic Convention at 
Cincinnati, in the year 1856, believing that Democratic prirciples are un- 
changeable in their nature, when applied to the same subject matters ; and 
we recommend as the only further resolutions the following : 

2. Besovedj That all questions in regard to the rights of property in 
States or Territories, arising under the Constitution of the United States, are 
judicial in their character ; and the Democratic party is pledged to abide by 
and faithfully carry out such determination of these questions as has been or 
may be made by the Supreme Court of the United States. 

3. Besolved, That it is the duty of the United States to afford ample and 
complete protection to all its citizens, whether at home or abroad, and 
whether native or foreign born. 

4. Besolved J That one of the necessities of the age, in a military, commer- 
cial, and postal point of view, is speedy communication between the Atlantie 
and Pacific States ; and the Democratic party pledge such Constitutional Gov- 
ernment aid as will insure the construction of a Railroad to the Pacific coast, 
at the earliest practicable period. 

5. Besolved f That the Democratic party are in favor of the acquisition of 
the Island of Cuba, on such terms as shall be honorable to ourselves and just 
to Spain. 

6. Besolved^ That the enactments of State Legislatures to defeat the faithful 
execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, are hostile in character, subversive of 
the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effect. 

Mr. Butler, of Massachusetts, a member of the Committee on Platform and 
Resolutions, offered another Report as a Minority Report, which he moved be 
received as a substitute for the resolutions reported by Mr. Avery and Mr. 
Payne. The following are the resolutions reported by Mr. Butler : 

Besolved, That we, the Democracy of the Union, in Convention assembled, 
hereb/ declare ©ur affirmance of the Democratic Resolutions unanimously, 
adopted and declared as a Platform of Principles at CincinnatK, in the year 
1856, without addition or alteration, believing that Democratic principles are 
unchangeable in their nature, when applied to the same subject matter, and 
we recommend as the only farther resolution the following : 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 39 

Resolved^ That it is the duty of the United States to extend its protoctioa 
alike over all its citizens, whether native or naturalized. 

A minority of your Committee have agreed to report the above as the sol e 
resolutions upon the subject of the principles of the party. 

In behalf of a minority of the Committee. B. F. BUTLELl. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York, offered an amendment to the amendmer t 
offered by Mr. Butler, of Massachufetts, by substituting therefor the following : 

Resolved, That the several States of this Union are, under the Constitutioi>, 
equal, and that the people thereof are entitled to the ifree and undisturbed pos- 
session and enjoyment of their rights of person and property in the common 
Territories ; and that any attempt by Congress or a Territorial Legislatuie to 
annul, abridge or discriminate against any such equality or rights, would bo 
unwise in policy and repugnant to the Constitution^ and that it is the duty cf 
the Federal Government, whenever such rights are violated, to afford t hj 
necessary, proper, and constitutional remedies for such violations. 

Resolved, That the Platform of Principles adopted by the Convention hel.l 
in Cincinnati, in 1856, and the foregoing resolutions, are hereby declared to le 
the Platform of the Democratic party. 

The President. The Chair will state the condition of the question for tiie 
purpose of determining the question of order. The report of the Commitloc 
presented by Mr. Avery, of North Carolina, is the first question before the 
Convention. To the resolutions presented by the gentleman from Nort;h Caro- 
lina, Mr. Payne, of Ohio, offers a series of resolutions as a substitute or as a n 
amendment in gross. The gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Butler) movos 
an amendment to the amendment. Iq the opinion of the Chair, amendments 
can go no further, the proposition of the gentleman from New York being aw 
amendment in the third degree. 

Mr. Cochran. I give notice, then, that I will offer the amendment I have 
indicated, as soon as the amendment last offered is disposed of. 

Mr. Whitney, of Massachusetts. I wish to state that I shall call for a divi- 
sion of the report of the majority, so that the sense of the Convention may be 
taken separately upon each resolution. I also desire to move an amendm<Mit, 
which, with the permission of the gentleman from North Carolina, I will havo 
read. 

Objection was made to the reading of the amendment. 

Mr. Avery. On behalf of tho majority of the Committee on Resolutions, I 
am instructed to say that it is with profound regret we have appeared belor^' 
this Convention to present a report that has not met the sanction of the enlir i 
Committee whom I have the honor to represent upon this occasion ; an<l I 
desire, before proceeding, to inquire of the gentleman from Ohio, who rej^n^ ■ 
sents a branch of the minority, whether he represents a greater numbei <^( 
States than are affixed to the report which he has made upon this occasion. 

Mr. Payne. 1 read the names of the delegates. 

Mr. Avery. I understood the gentleman from Ohio to say that he r>3| re 
sented only thirteen States of this Federal Union, in the report which he h !S 
made.' 

Mr. Payne. Fifteen States are represented. I explained that apon the 
printed copy of the report the names of two States, New York and Penns) l- 
vania, were omitted, which have been supplied. 

Mr. Avery. I did not understand the explanation of the gentleman fi» m 
Ohio, or I should not have made the inquiry. 

Mr. Avery then proceeded to address the Convention, and occupied his lull 
hour. 

Mr. Payne, of Ohio, followed Mr. Avery in an address to the Convention. 

Mr. B. F. Butler, of Massachusetts, obtained the floor, and addressed the 
Convention for the time allotted him under the rule. 



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40 Democratic National Convention, 

On motion of Mr. Barksdale, of Mississippi, the Convention then adjourned 
until f( ur o'clock P. M. 

AFTERKOON SESSION. 

The Convention was called to order by the President, at 4 o'clock P. M., when 

Mr. Sayles, of Rhode Island, offered the following resolution : 

BesoJvedy That the Committee to whom has been referred the subject of the 
t me aid place of holding the next Convention, appointment of National Com- 
n ittee, &c., be requested to consider the propriety of fixing the number of 
P.ilega.es for whom seats shall be provided in the next National Convention, 
to be li nited to the number of Senators and Representatives to which such 
S< ate is entitled in the Congress of the United States. The resolution was read 
a> d ad.>pted, and refened to the Committee. 

The President then proceeded to remark as follows : 

The President gave notice that for the convenience of members of the 
Couvendon, assuming that most of them were by this time known to the offi- 
ce! > at the door, he had given orders to the officers to admit them henceforth 
with or without tickets. He also desired to say to the Convention that it had 
thus far proceeded in its del ibeiations with much decorum and with proper 
attontion to parliamentary rules. The Chair confidently believed that the 
Corvention would so continue to act to the l?st ; and now having arrived at 
that stage of the proceedings which is of the highest importance, and when 
much interest and excitement prevailed, he called upon them to preserve their 
own dignity and self-respect, here, in the metropolis of the State of South 
('arulina. 

Mr. Barksdale, of Mississippi, then addressed the Convention. 

Mr. K]NG, of Missouri, then obtained the floor, and addressed the Conven- 
tion for an hour. 

Mr. Yancy, of Alabama, then proceeded to the stand ; and, on motion of 
Mr. 8AMI.ELS, of Iowa, the time for Mr. Yancy's remarks was extended to one 
hour and a half. 

Mr. PuGH, of Ohio, next obtained the floor, and the same courtesy which 
} ad beer extended to Mr. Yancy was extended to him, and he proceeded to 
addiess the Convention. Before Mr. Pugh concluded his remarks, it was 
isugges ted that the Convention adjourn for one hour ; but before any motion 
was made, 

Mr. Whitney, of Massachusetts, gave notice that he would to-morrow 
»;.»11 up his motion which he had to-day asked to have read. 

A motion was then made that the Convention adjourn for one hour. 

Mr. Hatch, of Louisiana, moved that the Convention do now adjourn. 

The question beina: taken first on Mr. Hatch's motion to adjourn, was lost." 

A vote was then taken on the motion to adjourn for one hour, which mo- 
tivMi was carried. 

The hour having expired, the Convention was called to order by the Presi- 
ileiit. 

Mr. Si'iNOLA, of New York, offered a resolution that a final vole be t ken 
oi) the resolutions and amendments thereto, which are now before the Con- 
vention, at 12 o'clock to-morrow. 

Mr. Clark, of Mississippi, objected, and 

Mr. Pugh, of Ohio, resumed and concluded his address. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York, again offered his amendment, and claimed that 
f he friends of a measure had a right to perfect it before any amendments were 
made. 

M r. Clark, of Missouri, asked if the gentleman was a friend of the Majority 
lieporl. 

M r. Cochran. If the amendment I proposed to make is adopted, I shall be. 



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Proceedings at Charleston. * 41 



"o 



Mr. Stuabt, of MichigaD, raised the point of order that while the right 
claimed by the gentleman from New York existed to a certain extent, his 
alteration was, in fact, to entirely change the whole proposition. 

Mr. Clark raised a point of order, and stated that the proposition of Mr. 
Cochran took the shape of an amendment, and was not in order. 

The President decided the motion of Mr. Cochran to be out of order. 

Mr. Bishop, of Connecticut, demanded the previous question on the reso- 
lutions. 

Before the demand for the previous question was seconded, 

Mr. Clark, of Mississippi, moved that the Convention adjourn, and upon 
this motion, 

Mr. Samuels, in behalf of the State of Iowa, called for a vote by States. 

The vote was taken, and the motion to adjourn was decided in the affirma- 
tive. The vote was as follows : 

Yeas. Nays 



Maine 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont, -. 5 

Massacliu'etts..-- 7 5Va 

Rhode Island. 4 

Oonnecticut... _- 1 5 

New York 35 

New Jersey 7 

Pennsylvania. 8 19 

IMaware 3 

Maryland 8 

Virginia 15 



Yeas. Nays.i Yeas. Naya. 

North Carolina 10 i Onio 23 

South Carolina, 8 1 Indiana 13 

Georgia «10 ilUinois 5 6 

Florida - 3 {Michigan 6 

Alabama 9 jWisconsin 5 

Louisiana 6 [Iowa 4 

Mississippi - 7 {Minnesota IM ^/i 

Texas 4 i California 4 

Arkansas 4 lOregon.., 3 

Missouri.. 3 6 i 

Tennessee .12 1 158>^ 144 

Kentucky .12 



So the motion was carried and the Convention adjourned. 



Saturday, April 28, 1860. 

The Convention met and was called to order by the President, and no 
elergyman being present, the Convention proceeded to business without 
prayer. 

The President made some remarks, and admonished the members of the 
Convention of the necessity of preserving order in their deliberations. 

Mr. BiGLER, of Pennsylvania, was proceeding to make some remarks, when 

Mr. Bishop, of Connecticut, arose to a point of order and claimed the floor. 

John Cochran, of New York, spoke upon the question of order. 

Mr. Randall, of Pennsylvania, claimed that wh^n the Convention ad- 
journed last night he had the floor, and was now entitled to it. 

The President decided that as the previous question had not been 
seconded when the Convention adjourned, the motion for the previous ques- 
tion fell with the adjournment. 

Senator Bigler, of Pennsylvania, then moved that the majority and minor- 
ity reports be recommitted to the Committee, with instructions to report in 
an hour the following resolutions : 

Resolved, That the Platform adopted by the Democratic party at Cincin- 
nati be aflirmed, with the following explanatory resolutions ; 

Resolved, 




gress, IS provisions 
the United States have an equal 
their rights, either of person or property, being destroyed or impaired by Con- 
gressional or Territorial legislation. 

Rf'solved, That the Democratic party stands pledged to the doctrine that 
it is the duty of Government to maintain all tke constitutional rights of 
propertv^ of whatever kind, in the Territories, and to enforce all the decisions 
of the Supreme Court in reference thereto. 



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^2 * Democratic National Convention, 

Resolved, That it is the duty of the United States to afford ample and 
complete protection to all its citizens, whether at home or abroad and 
whether native or foreign. ' 

f solved, That one of the necessities of the age, in a military, commercial, 
and postal pomt of view is speedy communication between the Atlantic and 
Pacific States ; and the Democratic party pledge such Constitutional Govern- 
ment aid as will insure the construction of a railroad to the Pacific coast at 
the earliest practicable period. -4 

I^esolved, That the Democratic party are in favor of the acquisitionTf 
to S ain '''' "'' *^™^ ^' ^^^^^ ^^ honorable to ourselves and just 

Resolved, That the enactments of State Legislatures to defeat the faithful 
execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, are hostile in character, subversive of 
the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effect. 
He moved the previous question. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York, submitted, as a question of order, that the 
previous question, if sustained, would operate on the resolutions reported by 
the Committee as well a^ on the motion to recommit. He hoped, therefore, 
the gentleman from Pennsylvania would withdraw the motion foV the pre- 
vious question, and in this connection he (Mr. C.) would move to amend the 
proposed instructions by adding to the series the resolutions which he ha^ 
offered to the Convention yesterday. - 

sta^di^^^^^^^^^^'^^^^^''''''^'''^'^^^^^^^®*^'^^^^^^ ^ P^^""* ^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 
Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, made some suggestions to the Chair 

Mr. Cochran made further remarks upon his point of order 

Mr. Stuart now made a point of order. 

The President decided that Mr. Cochran's question was not properly one 
of order ; that it was an inquiry for information, and could not be entertained 
by the Chair while the gentleman from Pennsylvania was upon the floor 
^ Senator Bigler believed that his motion was understood, and, therefore 
insisted on the demand for the previous question. ' 

Mr Phillips, of Pennsylvania, addressed the Chair, and Mr. Stuart 
called him to order. 

Mr. Randall spoke upon a privileged question. 

Mr. Marshall, of Illinois, rose to a point of order. 

Mr. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania, moved to lay Mr. Bigier's motion on 
ine table. Me did not regard as a compromise, a proposition for a Congressional 
slave code and the re-opening of the African slave trade. 

Mr. Phillips, of Pennsylvania, and several other delegates, inquired if the 
eflect of the adoption of Mr. Montgomery's motion would not be to lay the 
whole subject on the table. ^ 

The President decided that that would be the effect of the motion. 

Mr. Montgomery withdrew his motion. 

Senator Bigler again insisted on his (demand for the previous question. 

Mr Montgomery inquired whether the previous question, if sustained, 
would not apply to the whole platform? ^ ^ » 

The President said that he could answer the question if it was the wish 
ot the Convention. [Cries of *' Yes, yes."] 

Mr Miles, of Maryland, desired to know distinctly, from the Chair 
whether the previous question would cut off all debate upon the platform? 
It so, as a representative of the slave district of Maryland, he should claim 
tJie privilege of being heard by the Convention, to show that the gentleman 
who had represented the State of Maryland on the Committee on Resolutions 

Sf ; I tTt ^ ?"^^®' r^®^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^®^^^'<i a<^ ^<^°^e, and misrepresented the 
btate of Maryland. [Loud cheers.] 

The President decided that debate was out of order. 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 48 

Mr. Pratt, of Connecticut, raised the question of order, that the motion 
of Mr. Bigler was only a particular form of offering an amendment in the 
third degree, and was therefore not in order. 

The President decided that although such might be the effect of the motion, 
the practice was perfectly well settled in the House of Eepresentatives that 
such a motion could be entertained. In reply to the interrogatories as to the 
effect of the previous question, he stated that by an express rule of the House 
of Eepresentatives when the previous question was moved on a series of propo- 
sitions, if seconded, it applied to the whole series. If now seconded, there- 
fore, and the main question ordered, the question would be first on the motion 
to commit ; if that failed, then upon the amendment in third order, and finally 
upon the majority report of the Committee. 

Mr. PuGH, of Ohio, inquired whether, if the previous question was 
seconded and the main question ordered, it would then be in order to call for a 
division of the question on the motion of the gentleman from Pennsylvania? 

The President replied that, by an express rule of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, it was in order to call for a division of the question either before 
or after the main question was ordered. 

Mr. Walker, of Alabama, called for a division of the question, so that it 
should first be taken on the motion to recommit, and then on the instructions. 

The previous question was seconded. 

Mr. Nelms, of Georgia, rose to a question of privilege. The Convention, 
by a resolution adopted on Wednesday, decided that in cases where the dele- 
gations had not been otherwise instructed by their State Conventions, indi- 
vidual members of such delegations should have the right to vote in opposition 
to the vote of the majority. The Georgia State Convention had adopted the 
following resolution : 

" Resolved, That the delegates from this State to the Charleston Convention 
be requested to cast the vote of Georgia as a unit." 

It would be seen that the resolution was merely a request, appealing to their 
discretion, and not an instruction. A portion of his delegation had differed 
with the majority, and he now claimed it as a right that they should be repre- 
sented in the Convention. 

Mr. Jones, of Georgia, in behalf of the majority of that delegation, said 
that the minority in this case was a minority small in numbers, not only in 
their delegation here but in the State of Georgia. If the request of this State 
Convention was a mere appeal to their discretion, where was the necessity of 
the request? Was it supposed that any portion of the delegation would 
prove so refractory as to require positive instructions? Bequests of sovereign- 
ties are the laws of subjects ; and when Kings, States, Conventions, and 
especially Conventions of the Democracy, speak to their constituents by 
requests, their requests are laws. 

The question of order having been raised that no debate was in order, 

The President decided that the previous question, having been seconded, 
no debate was in order at this time. Whenever the question properly arose, 
it must be decided in some way. 

Several further inquiries were propounded, and an*swered by the President, 
as to the effect of ordering the main question. 

The State of Georgia demanded that the vote on the question before the 
house should be taken by States. 

The vote on the question — " Shall the main question be bow put ?"— was 
then taken by States, and the following is the result : — Yeas 302, Nays 1. 

Mr. Horn, of Wisconsin, being temporarily in the Chair, announced the 
result. So the main question was ordered. 

The President again took the Chair, and Mr. John Cochran; of New 
York, asked if the vote would not first be on his amendment to the instruc- 
tions proposed by Mr. Bigler. 



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44 



Democratic National, Convention, 



Mr. Ce-sna, of Pennsylvania, raised the question of order that no amend- 
ment offered by Mr. Cochran was pending. The gentleman from Pennsyl- 
vania moved to recommit with instructions, and demanded the previous 
question on the motion. The gentleman from New York rose while the gen- 
tleman from Pennsylvania was on the floor, and proposed his amendment, but 
the gentleman from Pennsylvania being on the floor, it could not have been 
received. 

Mr. Cochran stated that the gentleman from Pennsylvania yielded for 
that purpose. 

Mr. Bfgler said he did not yield the floor for that purpose. 

Mr. John Cochran said he would withdraw his amendment. 

Mr. Cessna demanded a division of the question, so that the vote should 
first be taken on the motion to recommit, and then upon the instructio-is. 

Mr. Cochran raised the question of order, that after the main question had 
been ord-red no division of the question could be entertainel. The rule of 
the House, as recently amended, permits the call for a division of the ques- 
tion either before or after the main question h^s been seconded, but the rules 
for the government of the Convention being those in force in the House of 
Representatives at the time of the Cincinnati Convention, expressly provide 
that no call for a division can be entertained after the main question has 
been ordered. 

Mr. BiGLER, of Pennsylvania, said the gentleman from New York was right 
as to his question of order. He, however, had no objection to such a division 
himself. 

The President said that inasmuch as two members of the House had 
stated with confidence that a division of the main question could not take 
p^ace after the main question had been ordered, he would simply read the 
rule of the House of Representatives on the subject : 

"53. Any member may call for the division of a question before or after 
the main qoestion is ordered. — Septemher 15 1837.'' 

Mr. Walker, of Alabama, said he had called tor a division of the question 
b-fore the m*\in question was ordered. 

The President replied that he was aware of it, and would entertain the 
call. 

'J'he question being first upon the first branch of the motion of Mr. Bigler 
to commit the resolutions offered by the Committee on Resolutions, with the 
amendments, back to the Committee. 

Alabama demanded that the vote be by States. 

The question was taken, and it was decided in the affirmative. Yeas 152, 
nays 151, as fo lows : 



Yeas. Nays, 



Maine 3 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 8 

Rhode Island 

CoHnecticut \}^ 

NewYork 

New Jersey 4 

Pennsylvania 16 

Delaware 3 

Maryland' 5>^ 

Virginia 14 



Yeas, Nays 



5 North Carolina 10 

6 South Carolina 8 

5 Goorgia 10 

5 Florida •.... 3 

4 Alabama 9 

43^ Loui4«ua 6 

35 Mississippi 7 

3 fTexas 4 

11 Arkansas 4 

Missouri 5 4 

2% Tenness^^e ... II 1 

1 i Kentucky 12 



Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Iowa 

Minnesota 1 

California 4 

Oregon 3 



Nays. 
23 

13 
11 

6 

5 

4 

3 







152 151 



So the proposed platforms were recommitted. 

Mr. PfliLLiPS, of Pennsylvania, moved to recons'der the vote by which the 
resolutions were recommitted, and also moved to lay the motion to recon- 
s'der on the table. 

Tne latter motion was agreed to. 

The question then recurred on the second branch of Mr. Bigler^s motion, 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 45 

which was to require the Committee to report the resolutions proposed by 
him. 

Mr. Bishop, of Connecticut, asked the Chair whether, if the proposition to 
instruct was voted down, the Committee would be required to report in one 
hour ? 

The Pkesident said the question of instructions and time were distinct and 
divisible. 

.Mr. BiGLEB proposed to modify his motion, so far as relates to time. 

Mr. Samuels, of Iowa, objected. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, asked for a vote on each resolution separately, — 
first on the one instructing the affirmation of the Cincinnati platform. 

Mr. Bayard opposed any instructions. Let the whole matter be referred, 
and the majority and minority each report a platform, and the Convention 
vote distinctly on them. 

Mr. Brooks, of Alabama, m(>ved to lay the instructions on the table. 

Mr. BiGLEB, proposed to modify his propositions so as to meet the sug- 
gestion of the gentleman from Delaware. 

Objection was made. 

A Delegate raised the question that the motion to lay the instructions on 
the table would carry the whole subject with it. 

The President decided that inasmuch as the report of the Committee, 
with the amendments, had been recommitted and were now not before the 
Convention, the motion to lay on the table would simply apply to the 
instructions, leaving the original matter in the hands of the Committee. 

Gov. Winston, of Alabama, contended that the previous question not 
being exhausted, his colleague's motion was not in order. 

The President decided the point not well taken. 

Mr. Seward, of Georgia, again raised the question of privilege relative to 
the right of individual delegates in the Georgia delegation to cast their own 
TOte. 

The President repeated his former decision that the question could not 
be entertained at this time. 

The question was then taken on the motion of Mr. Brooks, and it was 
-decided in the affirmative, yeas 242)^, nays 56)^, as follows : 

Yeas. Nays. 

North Carolina 10 

South Carolina. _. 8 

Georgia 10 

Florida 3 

Alabama 9 

Louisiana 6 

Mississippi 7 

Texas 4 

Arkansas __ 4 

Vligsourl 4 5 

Tenn^sst-e 11 242% otttz 

Kentucky 5 7 

So the instructions were laid on the table. 

When the State of Geori;ia wa« called, the Chairman of that delegation 
announced the vote of the State in the affirmative. 

Mr. Seward claimed the right to cast his vote in the negative. 

Mr. Nelms, of Georgia, claimed the right to have two votes of the Georgia 
delegation cast in the negative. 

Mr. Lamar, of Georgia, called for the reading of the resolution adopted by 
the Convention oa the question of allowing individual members of the dele- 
gation to vote. 

The resolution was read as follows : 

" That in any State which has not provided or directed by its State Con- 
vention how its vote may be given, the Convention will recognize the right 
of each delegate to cast his individual vote." 



Yeas. Nays 

Maine 8 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 12>i» y^ 

Khode Island 4 

"Connecticut 5 1 

New York 35 

New Jersey 7 

Pennsylvania 8 15 

Delaware 3 

Maryland b% %% 

Virginia 15 



Y'eas. Nays. 

Ohio 23 

Indiana 13 

Illinois ,.ll 

Michigan - «i 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota.-- 4 

California 333 '2 

Oregon. 3 



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46 Democratic National Convention, 

Mr. Nelms, of Georgia, said he had been informed that in the Georgia 
Convention, the word '^instructed'' was proposed and rejected. 

Mr. Jones, of Georgia, explained that he, as a member of the Georgia 
Convention, proposed to insert the word "instructed," but did not press the 
motion, on the statement of the presiding officer that the word "requested" 
would cover the whole ground. 

Mr. Nelms contended that the request of the Georgia delegation to vote 
as a unit was, he had stated before, simply an appeal to the discretion of the 
delegation, and the minority were at liberty to cast their individual votes. 

Mr. Montgomery moved that in every instance where positive instructions 
have not been given by the State Conventions, the individual delegates be 
permitted to cast their votes as they think proper. 

Judge Meek, of Alabama, raised the question that the motion was out of 
order. 

The President decided the motion to be out of order. 

Mr. Jackson, of Georgia, spoke in behalf of allowing the majority to cast 
the vote of the State as a unit. 

The President decided that, under the language of the rule adopted by 
the Convention, the expression "provided or directed" was one of broader 
import than merely an instruction. If the word "directed" had been alone 
used, he would have held that the request of the Georgia Convention would 
have been sufficient to require the delegation to vote as a unit ; but holding 
the request came within the intent and meaning of the word "provided," as 
used in the rule of the Convention, he would direct that the vote of the 
State be received, as given by the Chairman of the delegation, as a unit. 

Mr. Isaac H. Wright, of Massachasetts, moved that the Committee on 
Platforms be instructed to report at 4 o'clock this afternoon. He moved the 
previous question. 

Hon. WiLLARD Saulsburt, of Delaware, was about to speak against any 
limitation upon the time when the Committee should report, when he was 
ruled out of order, the previous question having been moved. 

Mr. Jones, of Georgia, moved that the Convention adjourn until 10 o'clock 
Monday morning. 

Mr. Payne, of Ohio, asked and obtained leave for the Committee on Keso- 
lutions to retire to their Committee room. 

Mr. Burrows, of Arkansas, hoped that the Convention would adjourn. 

Mr. Martin moved that the vote be taken by States. 

The motion to adjourn was withdrawn. 

The previous question being seconded and the main question ordered on 
instructing the Committee on Resolutions to report a 4 o'clock, it was taken 
and decided in the affirmative. 

So the Committee were instructed to report at four o'clock, P. M. 

On motion of Mr. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania, the Convention then 
adjourned till 4 o'clock, P. M. 

EVENING SESSION. 

The Convention re-assembled at four o'clock P. M., and was called to 
order by the President. 

Mr. Avery, of North Carolina, from the Committee on Resolutions, said 
that a majority of the Committee were ready to report, but the minority 
asked the indulgence of the Committee for a few moments longer. 

Mr. GiTTiNGs, of Maryland, hoped that the Convention would adjourn over 
until Monday morning at eleven o'clock, and he would make that motion. 

Mr. GiTTiNG* withdrew his motion to adjourn. 

Mr. Avery, of North Carolina. I beg leave, on behalf of the Committee 
on Resolutions, to make a report. I will state that the Committee understood 



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Proceedings at Charleston, ^ 47 

that this report embodies in substance the Bayard resolutions, and in substance 
the resolutions ot the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Bigler), and in sub- 
stance the resolutions offered by the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Cochran), being modified in such shape as the Committee think will meet the 
approbation of the Convention. 

Resolved^ That the platform adopted by the Democratic party at Cincin- 
nati be affirmed, with the following explanatory resolutions. 

1. That the government of a Territory organized by an act of Congress, 
is provisional and temporary ; and,'during its existence, all citizens of the 
United States have an equal right to settle with their property in the Terri- 
tory without their rights, either of person or property, being destroyed or 
impaired by Congressional or Territorial legislation. 

2. That it is the duty of the Federal Government, in all its depart- 
ments, to protect, when necessary, the rights of persons and property in the 
Territories, and wherever else its constitutional authority extends. 

3. That whjn the settlers in a Territory having an adequite popula- 
tion form a State Constitution, the right of sovereignty commences, and, 
being consummated by admission into the Union, they stand on an equal 
footing with the people of other States ; and the State thus organized ought 
to be admitted into the Federal Union, whether its Constitution prohibits or 
recognizes the institution of slavery. 

4. That the Democratic party ate in favor of the acquisition of the 
Island of Cuba, on such terms as shall be honorable to ourselves and just to 
Spain, at the earliest practicable moment. 

5. That the enactments of State Legislatures to defeat the faithful 
execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, are hostile in character, subversive of 
the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effect. 

6. That the Democracy of the United States recognize it as the imper- 
ative duty of this Grovernment to protect the naturalized citizen in all his 
right?, whether at home or in foreign lands, to the same extent as its native- 
born citizens. 

Whereas^ one of the greatest necessities of the age, in a political, commer- 
cial, postal and military point of view, is a speedy communication between 
the Atlantic and Pacific coasts ; therefore, be it 

Besolved, That the Democratic party do. hereby pledge themselves to use 
every means in their power to secure the passage of some bill, to the extent 
of the constitutional authority of Congress, for the construction of a Pacific 
Kailroad, from the Mississippi Eiver to the Pacific Ocean, at the earliest 
practicable moment. 

Mr. Avery addressed tfie Convention upon the subject of his report. 

Mr. Stevens, of Oregon, desired to present a few thoughts, but 

The President decided that he was out of order, and that Mr. Avery had 
the floor ; and Mr. Avery proceeded to address the Convention. 

Mr. Samuels, of Iowa, submitted a report from a minority of the Commit- 
tee, which he offered as a substitute for, and an amendment to, the majority 
report made by Mr. Avery. The following is the 

KEPOET OF THE MINORITY OF THE COMMITTEE ON RESO- 
LUTIONS, 

As amended and reported hack to the Convention^ hy Mr. Samuels. 
1. 'Resolved^ That we, the Democracy of the Union in Convention assem- 
bled, hereby declare our affirmance of the resolutions unanimously adopted 
and declared as a platform of principles by the Democratic Convention at 
Cincinnati, in the year 1856, believino; that Democratic principles are un- 
changeable in their nature, when applied to the same subject matters ; and 
we recommend as the only further resolutions the following : 



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■^S Democratic National Convention. 

ii3\ ^"^""^''? ^ difference of opinion exists in the Democratic p.rty as to 
the nature and extent of the powers of a Territorial Legislature, and as to 
the powers and duties of Congress, under the Constitution of the UnLd 
btates, over the institution of slavery within the Territories, 

iJewZj;erf,'Ihat^the Democratic party will abide by the decision of the Su- 
preme Court of the United States upon these questions of Constitutionallaw 

3. Besolved Th:,t it is the duty of the United States to aJTord ample aiTd 
nTlitrSgnborn.'" '"^ ^"'^^'^^' "^^*^«"- ^* ^^—r abroad, and^h^etS 

.i.t »n^TiTi' "^ • ^* T ?^ *^? ^necessities of the age, in a military, commer- 
cial, and postal poiU of view, IS speedy communication between the Atlantic 
and Pacihc States ; and the Democratic party pledge such Oonstitutiorl Gov- 
e nment aid as will insure the construction of a Eailroad to the Paciflc coast 
at the earliest practicable period. ' 

T 1^" A'^fn^'f' That the Democratic party are in favor of the acquisition of the 
Island of ^uba on such terms as shall be honorable to ourselves and ju«t to Spain 
f«u;fi.f^i f- Tbat the enactments of the State Legislatures to.defea th^ 
faithful execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, are hostile in character sub- 
versive of the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effect. 

Mr' InT^^^f addressed the Convention upon the subject of his report. 

Mr BuTLM, of Massachusetts, then submitted a report from a minority of 
the Comnaittee, which he offered as a substitute for both of the r~ 
already submitted, which report of Mr. Butler is as follows : ^ 

ResoM,T:Ui we, the Democracy of the Union, in Convention assembled 
hereby declare our affirmance of the Democratic resolutions unaniZuslv 

Ift^rwittr.^'^'l"'.-'^^'"?'"'^"™ of principles at Cincinnati, in th^jea^ 
I806, without addition or alteration, believing that Democr.,tic principles are 
unchangeable m their nature, when applied to the same subject matW^d 
w e recommend as the only farther resolution, the followincr • ' 

Resolved, That it is the duty of the United States to extend its protection 
alike over all its citizens, whether native or naturalized. P-^otection 

A minonty of your Committee have agreed to report the above as the sole 
resolutions upon the subject of the principles of the party. 

In behalf of a minority of the Committee 

P C DUNNrar**TT'"'''"'- ^'- CAVANAUGH, Minnesota. 

P. C, DUNNING, Indiana; B. WILLIAMSON, N. Jtrsey. 

Mr. BuTLEB addressed the Convention on the subject of his report, 
sas ak?.'erdVl r °°°' ^'^ ^T^' ^^ Maryland, and Mr. Burrows, of Arkan- 

Mr rL™t^ Convention at length upon thg subject of the platform. 
tl,r[" ^'-''T ' °^ ^'f^^J'' <^««»anded the previous question, and before 
he demand was seconded, Mr. Jackson, of Georgia, moved that he Conven! 

StTtes"'oi°"hisCtL"'^'"''^'^^''°^ '"""^'''^ '' ""^^ ^- ^ -*« by 
A vote was taken upon the question to adjourn with the following result : 

^^^■^ ■''•'"■ ''""s'lvorth Carolina ^T ^Y^loh.o ^-- ^"f^- 

^^^:::— I i<ir.^,i^-»- ,« '-'--" ^ 

RhodeUland 4 Alabama 1 9 

Connecticut 1 5 Louisiana ;— — • » 

^is^—-r, ^^&'»' ■----" 

S^i*™^ 3 !Mi88ouri :..,.:: * 

^^y}^^^ 5 3 ITennessee I.:.:: 

^^^Smia. _ 15 [Kentucky.. \ q 

So the motion to adjourn was lost. 

The demand for the previous question was then seconded. 



13 

Illinois 11 

Michigau g 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 4 

California ."|4 

Oregon 3 



97 205^ 



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Proceeding's at Charleston. 



49 



Mr. Clark, of Mississippi, moved for a division of the first series of reso- 
lutions, so that the vote may be taken on the third resolution separately. 

Mr. Howard, of Tennessee, moved that the Convention adjourn, and called 
for a vote by Stages. 

A vote was taken on the motion to adjourn, and resulted as follows : 



Yeas. Nays. 




Maine 

Nevv Hampshire 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 6 7i 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut.. 6 

New York £5 

Now Jersey 7 

Pennsylvania 13 11 

Delaware 3 

Maryland 6i 2i 

Virginia 14 1 



Yeas. Nays, 

North Carolina 10 

South Carolina 

Georgia 10 

Florida 3 

Alabama 9 

Louisiana. 6 

Mississippi 7 

Texas 4 

Xrkansas 4 

Missouri 

Tennessee 12 

Kentucky 7i 






Ohio 


Yeas. Is ays. 
23 


8 


Indiana....! 


13 





Illinois 


11 





Michigan 


6 





Wisconsin 


5 





Iowa 


4 





Minnesota.. 


4 





California 


4 


9 
9 

U 


Oregon 


3 

139 169 



Mr. Seward, of Georgia, moved to reconsider the vote on the question of 
seconding the demand for the previous question. 

The Chair decided Mr. Seward's motion to be out of order. 

Mr. Jackson, of Georgia, moved to lay the whole proceedings on the 
question upon the table, and upon that called for a vote by States. 

The vote was taken on laying the whole subject on the table, and it was 
lost by the following vote : 



Yeas. Nays, 

Maine 8 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 4i SI 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut 6 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 3 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 



Yeas. Nays 
10 



N'orth Carolina 

South Carolina 

Greorgia 10 

Florida 3 

Alabama ^ 

Louisiana 

viississippi 

Texas. 

Arkansas 

Missouri 

Te!>nessee , 

Kentucky 



Ohio.. 

Indiana..... 

Illinois 

Michigan .. 
Wisconsin.. 

Iowa , 

Minnesota.. 
California.. 
Oregon 



Yeas. Nay 8b 

aa 

13 

11 

6 

5 

4 

4 

4 

3 



20^ 2SH 



Mr. GiTTiNGS, of Maryland, moved to adjourn, and called for a vote by 
States, which was taken and resulted as follows : 



Yeas. Najs. 

Maine 8 

New Hampshire 6 

Vermont - 5 

Massachusetts 5^ 7 

Rhode Island 8 

Connecticut H 41 

New York 35 

New Jersey 4 8 

Pennsylvania 14 13 

Delaware 3 

Maryland 5i 2i 

Virginia 15 



Yeas. Nays. 

North Carolina .10 

South Carolina., 8 

Georgia 10 

Florida 8 

Alabama 9 

Louisiana 6 

Mississippi 7 

Texas 4 

Arkansas 4 

Missouri 4 5 

Tennessee 12 

Kentucky llf }i 



Yeas. Nays. 

Ohio.. 23 

Indiana.. 13 

Illinois U 

Michigan... 6 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa.. 4 

Minnesota 1 3 

California . 4 

Oregon 3 

126 178 



Mr. BuTTERwoRTH Called for a division of the resolutions as reported by 
the majority. 

The President stated that the question now before the house is, " Shall 
the main question be put ?*» 

Mr. Hunter, of Louisiana, desired to be heard, and moved that a vote be 
taken, and that then the Convention adjourn till Monday morning. 

Mr. Jackson, of Georgia, moved to lay the motion on the table. 

Mr. MiLTON, of Florida, called on the South to do her part irf this matter 
manfully. She had been met fairly in argument, and listened to attentively. 
She should not now offer factious opposition to the vote. 

The question, " Shall the main question be now put ?" was voted on, and 
the State of Georgia called for a vote by States, and the following is the 
result : 

4 



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50 



Democratic National Convention. 



Yeas. Nays. 

Maine g 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 13 

Khode Islaid 4 

Connecticut '. (j 

New York 35 

New Jersey. 7 

Pennsylvania .27 

Delaware 3 

Maryland ...8 

Virginia V16 



North Carolina. 
South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 8 

Alabima _[ 9 

Louisiana .".". 6 

Mississippi ... 7 

TexHS \ 4 

Arkansas _. ' 4 

Missouri _. 5 

Tennessee ' 3 

Kentucky ___'_ 7 



Yeas. Nays. 
...10 



10 



r,-.. Y^as. Nays 
Ohio 23 

Indiana ^ ! . . 13 

Illinois ]!JI!ll 

Michigan '""' g 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa _"_'^ 4 

Minni'sota..... ""' 4 

California 4 

Oregon... '',',\\ 3 

272 'sT 



lowi' f . • ' ^^^?■^^^g^"' ^oved to reconsider the vote last taken and to 
lay that motion on the table, which motion was carried and then on m.' 
of Mr. Stuart, the Convention. adjourned. ' "^^^'^^ 

The Convention v as called to order at half-pasUeT "' ^'"' '"' '''"• 
Prayer was delivered bj Rev. Mr. Dana, of the Central Presbvterian Church 

^^^:^1'^'^\^^^^^^ of Saturday be dispS 

The President. The Chair desires to say that on Saturdav last aft^r . 

warm debate and a protract^^ of tL a^^L^t le 

tn ^n .« Ki ^^^'' '' Pf ^'^^^^ conscious that in using peremptory lan^u^^^^^^^ 
to an assemblage composed of so many high-spirited gentlemen he ma vS 
given umbrage, although not designed. ^ Bis remafks hTd been rend e^ 
cTa^r V^^''^^"'^"a.'^"* prevailed, but he deemed It proper Ld£ 

Z ?L f AK-^'^' ''^'T *^ ^^y «^^^b«^ of the Convention!^ 
V^^onll^^^^^^ "" ^^' ^^^^^ *^^ -^^^^--^ of the Convention for a 

+T.5p ^'^^^^J''^'^^^ of Mississippi. As one of the members who have addressed 
the Convention, m behalf of the Majority Report, I deem it proper to state in 
response to the gentleman from Ohio, that I did' not undersLn^hs remarks 

cH.^nlf aT T^ '" '^ '^'"'^^^ ^^^^^ J ^^^ I ^^ g^^ifi^d that, with hTac 
customed frankness and courtesy, he has disavowed such an int;ntion. 

ordered trtZ''L,-n'^*'^!-*^\^ of the adjournment, the Convention had 
lav on thp tlhlp r^l^''''*^^''^. ^^^P^^- ^ "^^*^on to reconsider and to 
S.-n ^^^ *^^^^ had been adopted. The question then was upon taking the 
mam question, which is a series of resolutions to be voted upon 
ro f "^T^^^^ ?^ .*^^ Committee, through their Chairman *Mr Averv 
reported the resolutions adopted by that majority. Thereupon Mr sfmuek 

r^But eVm^ved^'irh T^r^f ^°^^ ^^^Ld, the repoToi tSmtoritt ' 
ir rmtdrJnf^^^^^^^^ *he minority, to substitute 



,v . J ' ^' ^.^vwijv^i j^^vmuii yji Liitj minor 

their amendment by the adoption of the amendment of that 



first 



minority. The 



bi^t question would be upon the amendment of Mr. Butler, then upon that of 
Mr Samuels, then, if loth ftil, upon the adoption of the majority rTort 



''ays. I 



Yeas. Naya. 
23 



The question was then taken by States on the amendment of Mr. B^utler and 
the same was lost by the following vote : ouuer, ana 

__ . Yea3. Nays ypas T 

^f°S,— - ---. 3 5 NorthCarolina ... . Z 

vrmnnT^'^'"^ ^ ''^"t*^ Carolina.. .:. 

Vermont.. 5 Georgia..., . 10 

Massachusetts.. .4.— 8 6 Florida ..■".■".*"."'. 

Alabama . 

Louisiana ' * 

Mississippi __, 

Texas ._"'"* 

Arkansas . 



Rfiode Island 4 

Connecticut '.'_', 2^ 3'.j; 

New York 35 

New Jersey 6 2 

PennsylvaiJia \'.U^ \oy, 

Delaware 3 

Maryland "' 6>/ 23^ 



Virginia.. 



Missouri '"" 41/ 

Tennessee """.11 ^ 



12>i 2^8 [Kentucky 



4 
4 

1 
3 



Ohio. 

Indiana .iJiV.'.'. 

Illinois '.''[['.'. 

Michigan "."" 

Wisconsin 

Iowa ... \'_\ 

Minnesota .[ \iz 

California 

Oregon '' 3 



13 
11 

6. 

5 

4 

2K 

4 



105 19» 



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Proceeding's at Charleston. 



51 



When the State of Georgia was called, Mr. Seward challenged the vote. 

Mr. Flournoy, on the State of Arkansas being called, gave notice that he 
-desired to explain the vote of that State at the proper time. 

When New Jersey was called, Mr. Williamson, of New Jersey, called atten- 
tion of the Chair to the fact that a difference existed amongst the Delegates as 
to how the vote was to be cast. He read the reflations of the State Conven- 
tion, on instructing the Delegates to vote for William C. Alexander for Vice 
President, and recommended them to cast their other votes as a unit. The 
decision of the Chair on the Georgia case was held to prevent the individual 
Delegates of his State from voting as they pleased. He held that the State 
had not instructed or requested their Delegates to vote as a unit, in the resolu- 
tions passed. Tne difference between the two resolutions showed that no 
instructions were intended except as related to the vote for Vice President. 

Mr. O'Rafferty contended that the resolution was similar to the Georgia 
resolution, and the Delegates were bound to vote as a unit. 

The Chair decided that the same rule applied to both cases, and that the 
vote of New Jersey mu.<t be cast as a unit. 

Mr, Williamson appealed fr<;m the decision of the Chair. 

Mr. Phillips moved to lay the appeal on the table. 

Mr. CocHRA^ raised the point of order, that pending an undebatable ques- 
tion, the appeal must be taken without debate. 

Michigan demanded the vote by States. 

Mr. Irving, of Alabama, raised the point of order that the question was out 
of order during the calling of the roll. 

The President. The question cannot be avoided now, as it affects the vote 
of the State. 

The vote on tho motion to lay the appeal on the table was then taken, and^ 
it was lost by the following vote : 



Yeas Nays. 

M!aine ,-,.3 5 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont _. 5 

Massachusetts 9 4 

Rhode Island 4 

Counecticut 2^ 3i 

New York.. 35 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 17 

Delaware _. 3 

Marylajid _. 5 

Virginia 14 



10 



Ohio 


Yeas. Navs. 
...... 23 


Indiana . _. 


13 


Illinois ,. 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Iowa .... . . 


11 

6 

5 

4 


Minnesota 

California 

Oregon 


4^ 

4 

3 



146 150 



Yeas. Nays. 

North Carolina... 10 

S mth Carolina 8 

Georgia 10 

Florida 3 

Alabama 9 

Louisiana.--. 6 

Mississippi 7 

Texas 4 

Arkansas 3 1 

Missouri _ 4i- 4\ 

Tennessee 11 1 

Kentucky 10 2 

The President. I^he question before the house now is, " Shall the decision, 
of the € hair be sustained ?" 

The vote was taken, and the result was as follows : 

Yeas. Nays. I Yeas. Nays. Yeas. Nays. 
...3 5 iNorth Carolina 10 Ohio 23 

5 ISouth Carolina 8 

6 JGeorgcia 10 

5i[Florida - 3 

4 jAlabama 9 

3T|Louisiana - 6 

Hississippi 7 ' 

Tex}<8 4 

Arkansas 3 1 

Missouri 4^^ 4^ 

Tennessee -.11 1 

Kentucky .10^ IJ 



Maine... , 

New Hampshire 

Vermont . 

Massachusetts -- 7i 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 2i 

New York 

New Jersey _. 

Pennsylvania _.17 

Delaware. 3 

Maryland 5 

Virginia 14 



Ohio 

Indiana... 

Illinois 

Michigan. ' . 

Wisconsin -.. 

Iowa ,• 

Minnesota 

California ^ 4 

Oregon 3 



11 
6 
5 
4 
4 



145 161 



Mr. Stuart moved to re-consider the vote on Mr. Butler's resolutions, and 
to lay that motion on the table. 

A Delegate raised the point of order that while under the operation of the., 
previous question — 

Mr. Seward, of Georgia^ Is the motion divisible ? 

The President. It is not. 



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52 • Democratic National Convention, 

The President read from the rules to show that the motion to re-consider 
and lay on the table was in order. 

After some further discussion by Messrs. Cochran and Skinner, 

Mr. BiGLER rose to speak to the point of order. 

Mr. Spinola. The question has been decided, and no motion is before the 
House. 

The motion of Mr. Stuart was adopted. 

Mr, Butler called for a division of the question on the next resolution in 
order, being the minority report, so that the vote be first taken on that portion 
re-enacting the Cincinnati Platform. • 

Mr. Phillips, of Pennsylvania, raised the point that the question was not 
divisible, being a motion to strike out and insert. 

Mr. Spinola raised the point of order that the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
was not in his place. 

Mr. Phillips went to his place and renewed his point of order. 

The Chair referred to the rule that the motion to .<trike out and insert shall 
be deemed indivisible, and decided the point well tjiken. 

The question then being on the report of the minority presented bv Mr 
Samuels — 

Mr. B. P. Butler desired to make a motion. 

The President. The gentleman from Massachusetts has a ri^-ht to address 
the Chair. ° 

Mr. Butler. I desire to move to lay the whole subject of the Platform on 
the table, in order to proceed to ballot for a Presidential candidate. 

Mr. Winston raised the point of order that the House having ordered the 
previous question to be taken now, all motions were out of order until the 
question has been taken. 

Mr. Hooker, of Mississippi, understood the motion to be to ^o into the 
nomination for President. The rule adopted by t le Convention prevented the 
nomination until after the Platform had been adopted. It was therefore a 
reversal of the rule, and ^ut of ord^r. ' ' 

Mr. Butler withdrew his motion to lay on the table. 

The question was then upon the adoption of tlie Minority Report and Reso- 
lutions,and a vote was called by States, and the following Was the result of the 
Tote: 



Yeas. Nays. 

Maine 8 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont ., 5 

>'a8sachu3ett3 7 6 

Rhole Island 4 

Connecticut 6 

:New York 35 

New Jersey 5 2 

Pennsylvania 12 15 

Delaware 3 

Warylaod Z\ 4i 

Virginia I 14 



Yeas. Nays, 

North Carolina \o 

Sonth (y'arolina 8 

Greorgia lo 

Florida 3 

Alabama 9 

Louisiana (j 

"■ ■ './ 7 

Texas 4 

Arkansas 4 

Missouri 4 5 

Tennessee 1 n 



Yeas. Nays. 

Ohio 23 

Indiana.... 13 

Illinois 11 

Michigan ;.',*. g 

Wisconsin '. 5 

Iowa ]] 4 

Minnesota.., 4 

California 4 

Oregon ZZ z 

165 188 



Kentucky 2J^ 9\ 

So the Minority Resolutions were adopted. 

Mr. Stuart moved to re-consider the vote and to lay that motion on the 
tanle. 

Mr. Cochran raised the point of order, that the question could n ot be put 
whilst the previous question was before the House. 

The President decided that he would receive both motions of Mr. Stuart 
but that the question would not then be put, but would be put as soon as the' 
question on the resolutions had been taken. 

Mr. Ashe, of North Carolina, made an earnest appeal to the North to pause 
before consummating this action. It could but lead to a division and ruin 
for as a representative of North Carolina he could not remain in the Convent 
tion if this Platform was adopted. 



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Prmeedings ot Charleston. 



63 



The question then being on the adoption of the report as amended, Mr. B. 
F. Butler, of Massachusetts, moved for a division of the question, so as to 
take the vote first on the proposition, as follows : 

1. Resolved, That we, the Democracy of the Union in Convention assem- 
bled, hereby declare our affirmance of the resolutions unanimously adopted 
and declared as a platform of princifjles by the Democratic Convention at 
Cincinnati, in the year 1856, believing that Democratic principles are un- 
changeable in their nature, when applied to the same subject matters. 

Mr. Sewaed, of Georgia, raised the point of order that the question was 
not divisible. 

The Chair decided that the report having been amended by the insertion 
of the minority resolutions, the call for a division was in order on any sub- 
stantive propositions that would make sense when standing alone. 

A vote on Mr. Butler's proposition was then ordered, and the State of 
Michigan demanded a vote by States, which was taken, and the resolution 
was adopted by the following vote : 

Yeas. Nays 

Maine 8 

New Hampshire 5 



Yei'mont 5 

Miissacliusetts 13 

Rhodt' Island 4 

Connecticut 6 

KewYork 35 

New Jersey 7 

Pennsylvania 27 

Delaware 2 

Maryland 6 

Virginia 14 



Yeas. 

. .0 


Nays. 

8 
10 
3 
9 
6 
7 
4 
4 


Ohio ,,.. 


Yeas* 
2S 




Indiana 

Illinois 


18 

1] 




Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Iowa -. 

Minnesota 4 < 


6 

5 

4 

4 




(.'Hliforniai«<<... 


u. 


7*< 


Oregon 


/2 


10 V^ 
12 


mX 



Nays. 



3 



North Carolina. 

South Carolina. 

Georgia 

Florida. 

Alabama 

Louidiana 

Misissippi 

Texas ,,, 

A rkansas . . . . 

1 Missouri 

3 Tennessee 

liKentucky 

Mr. Stuakt moved to reconsider the vote just taken, and to lay that mo^ 
tioii upon the table. 

This motion was received, but Lot voted upon. 

Mr. Driggs, of New York, moved to lay the balance of the resolutions 
upon the table. 

Mr. Yancy, of Alabama, rose and made a point of order, that the previous 
question was before the House, and that the previous question ran through 
all the propositions before the House, and therefore a motion to lay on tlie 
table was not in order. 

The Presidknt ruled that the motion to lay on the table was in order. 

The question upon laying upon the table was then put, and a vote was 
called for by States. The following was the result : 

Yeas. Nays, 
Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont ,. 

M assach usett s 8^ 

Khode Island 

Ck)nnecticut 2 

New York 

New Jersey 5 

Penns^ylvania 1Q% 

Delaware 2 

Maryland 

Virginia 11 

The States of Florida, Alabama, Mis..i*^bippi, and three ofthe'votisfrom Arkansas, after having 

i.l"" r^^?"" the last pro. osition, asked leave to withdraw the votecast. Leave was granted 

and the votes ot said states were wilhdrawn. graniea 

Mr. EwiNG, of Tennessee, called for a division of the question, so that a 
vote might be had on the following^preamble and resolution, viz : 

2. loasmuch as differences of opinion exist in the Democratic party as to 
the nature and extent of the powers of a Territorial Legislature, arjd as to 
the powers and duties of Congress, under the Constitution of the United 
States, over the institution of slavery within the Territories : 

Resolved, That the Democratic party will abide by the decision of the Su- 
preme Court of the United States upon these questions of Constitutional law 



fays. 
8 


North Carolina . . . 
South Caroliha... 


Yeas. 
... 9 

... 8 


Nays. 
\ 


Ohio 


Yeas, 


Nays. 
13 


5 


Indiana 




5 


Georgia 




10 


Illinois 




li 


4>^2 


Florida , 




3 


Michisran 




6 


4 


Alabama 






Wisconsin 




5 


4 


Louisiana 




6 


Iowa 




4 


35 


Mi.ssit!sippi . ..• 

Texas.... 






Minnesota. .. . 


1 


8 


2 


California 




4 


lOi^^ArkanHjis 


... 


1 


Oregon 




3 


1 " 


Missouri ., 




9 








8 


Tennessee 


. 10^^ 


JH 




81 


188 


4 


Kentucky 


--. IV^ 









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54 



Democratic National Convention. 



Mr. Brown, of North Carolina, addressed the Convention on the subject. 

Mr. RicHAKDSON, of Illinois, rose, and was about to address the Convention 
in response to Mr. Brown, but was called to order by Mr. Meek, and several 
other gentlemen from Alabama and Mississippi. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York, believed peacci offerings were about to be 
made, and called on the Convention to hear. 

Mr. Meek insisted on his point of order, and a vote was then had on the 
preamble and resolution as follows : 

Yeas. Nays. 

^ North Carolina 10 

I South Carolina 

^ Georgia 

? »^lorida 

• Alabama : 

3 Lcmisiana 

) Missif'Sippi 

r Texas 

» Arkansas 

J Missouri 4 5 

SiTennessee... 12 

ISKentucky .\...A 8 

The States of Greorgia, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, and Arkansas, deolined 
voting. 

So the preamble and resolution included in it was lost. 

Mr. EwiJsG, of Tennessee, moved to reconsider the vote just taken, and to 
lay this motion on the table — which motion was received but not voted upon. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, then called for a division of the remainder of 
the resolutions, and a vote was demanded by States upon each. 

A vote was then had upon the following resolution, viz : 

Resolved, That it is the duty ot the United States to afford ample and com- 
plete protection to all its citizens, whether at home or abroad, and whether 
native or foreiojn born. Which resulted as follows : . 



Maine, 


Yeas. Nays 
8 


Nhw Hampshire.. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts.... 

Rhode Island 

< onnpcticut 


......1 4 

. . .. ft 

13 

4. 

6 


New York . ... 


3.') 


''^ew Jersey _. 




Pennsylvania 

Delaware 


8 10 

2 

8 


Virgin. a 


16 





Yeas. Nays* 


Ohio 


2a 


Indiana 


13 


Illinois .. 


11 


Michigan 


ft 


Wisconsin 


5 


Iowa 


...-L... 4 


Minnesota 


4 


California 


4 


Oregon 


3 



21 



2^8 



Maine 


Y'eas. 
8 


North Carolina 


Yea*. 
Iti 


Ohio „.. 

Indiana 

Illinois 


Yeas 
2« 


>ew Hampshire 

Venuuiit 


5 
5 


South Carolina 


fe 


13 


G orgi»< 

Florida 

Alabama 

Louisiana... 


10 


11 


MassHchusetrs 

Khode Island 

Connecticut 


13 
4 

6 
35 

7 
27 


Michigan ....^ 

Wisconsin.. 

Iowa... 

JM inuesota 


6 

6 

4 


iNew York 


Mississippi 

Texas 


4 


New Jersey 


Calitoinia 


4 




4 


Oregon 


3 


Delaware 


3 
8 
15 


Missouri 


9 




Marjland 

Virginia 


Tennessee 

Kentucky 


12 

12 


274 



The States of Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas, declined voting. 

So the Eesolution was unanimously adopted. 
A vote was then taken upon the following resolution, viz : 
Resolved, That one of the necessities of the age, in a military,, commercial, 
and postal point of view, is speedy communication between the Atlantic and 
Pacific States ; and the Democratic party pledge such Constitutional Gov- 
^nment aid as will insure the construction of a Railroad to the Pacific coast, 
at the earliest practicable period. Which resulted as follows, viz : 

Yeas^Nays. _ _ Yeas. Nays. Yeas. Na^y^. 



North Carolina. 

South Carolina ...... 8 

Georgia 10 

Floriila 

Alabama 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

Texas 

Arkansas 4 

Missouri 9 

Tennessee Si- 
Kentucky .^1,2 

The States of Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, aBd? Texas, declined v(>ting. 

So the resolution wa& adopted* 



Maine 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont , 5 

Massachusetts 12J 

Rhode island , 4 

<^onnecticut 6 

New York 3^^ 

New Jersev 7 

Pennsylvania 27 

IKiiaware 

Maiylaud! 7 

Tirginia 11 



lOtOhio „ 23 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 11 

Michigan , 6 

Wi8Cou!«in 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 4 

California 4 

Oregon 3 



252 20i 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 



55 



Mr. McCooK, of Ohio, moved to reconsider, which motion was received. 

A vote was then had on the following resolution, viz : 

Resolved, That the Democratic party are in favor of the acquisition of the 
Island of Cuba, on such terms as shall be honorable to ourselves and just to 
Spain, 

Mr. Meek, of Alabama, moved that the vote upon the above resolution be 
taken by acclamation, but a vote by States was insisted upon, and the vote 
taken by States, and resulted as follows : 

Yeas.! Yeas. 

Maine 8 North Carolina 1" 

New Hampshire 5 South Carolina 8 

Vermont ... 5 Georgia, 10 

Massachusetts 13 'Klorida 

Rhodf Island 4 Alabama 

Connecticut Louisiana 

New York 35 Mississippi 

NewJers<^v 7 Texas 

Pennsylvania.... 27 Arkansas 3 

Delaware 2 Missfouri 9 

Maryland 8 Tennessee 12 

Virjjinia 15 Kentucky 12 

Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas, declined voting. 

Resolution adopted unanimously. 

A vote was then taken on the following resolution, viz : 

6. Resolved, That the enactments of State Legislatures to defeat the faith- 
ful execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, are hostile in character, subversive 
of the Constitution, and revolutionary in effect. 

The result was as follows : 

Yeas. 

North Carolina 10 Ohio 2.3 

South Carolina 8 Indiana 13 

Georgia 10 Iiltnois li 

Klorida Mi-higan. '> 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 4 

G||,lifornia 4 

Oregon - 3 



Yeas. 

Ohio 23 

Indiana !3 

Illinois 11 

Michigan ,.. t> 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 4 

Califvrnia ... 4 

Oregon 3 

272 



Yeas 

^'aine 8 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont • 5 

Massachusetts 13 

hhode Islitnd 4 | Alabama. 

('onn^cticut 6 jLouisiana. 

New York ...! S^ jMississippi 

New Jersey 7 jTexas 

Pennsylvania , 27 I Arkansas . 

Delaware 2 jMi8.somi ... 

Maryland 8 jTennessee 12 272 

Virginia 16 'Kentucky 12 

Florida Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas, refused to vote. 

Resolution adopted unanimously. 

Mr. Stuakt, of Michigan, moved to reconsider, and desired to make some 
remarks. 

Mr. Mekk, of Alabama, rose to a point of order, and claimed that Mr. Stuart 
could not speak to the question till the resolutions had been adopted in a body 
as a whole. 

The Chair decided Mr. Stuart to be in order, and Mr. Stuart proceeded to 
address the Convention, when 

Mr. Yancy beorged leave to interrupt him for an explanation, which he made. 

Several gentlemen rose to points of order, and 

Mr. Stuart said he would not occupy the attention of the Convention if it 
was not the desire of the Convention, and moved to lay his motion to recon- 
sider on the table, but gave way to 

Mr. Walker, of Alabama, who presented a written communication to the 
Convention, under instructions from his Delegation, which communication is 
as iollows, viz : 
To the Hon. Caleb CusJiing, President of the Democratic National Convention, 

now in session in the City of Charleston, iSouth Carolina : 

The undersigned Delegates, representing the State of Alabama in this 
Convention, respectfully beg leave to lay before your honorable body, the 
following statement of facts : 



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56 Democratic National Convention. 

On the eleventh day of January, 1860, the Democratic party of the State 
of Alabama met in Convention, in the City of Montgomery, and adopted, with 
singular unanimity, a series of resolutions, herewith submitted. 

RESOLUTIONS OF THE DEMOCRATIC STATE CONVENTION. 

1. Resolved hy the Democracy of the State of Alabama^ in Convention 
assembled^ That holding all issues and principles upon which thej^ have here- 
tofore afiiliated and acted with the National Democratic party to be inferior 
in dignity and importance to the grea^ question of slavery, they content 
themselves with a general re- affirmance of the Cincinnati Platform as to such 
issues, and also indorse said Platform as to slavery, together with the fol- 
lowing resolutions : 

2 Resolved farther^ That we re-affirm so much of the first resolution of the 
Platform adopted in Convention by the Democracy of this State, on the 8th 
of January, 1856, as relat- s to the subject of slavery, to wit : "The unqual- 
ified right of the people of the slave-holding States to the protection of their 
property in the States, in the Territories, and in the wilderness, in which Ter- 
ritorial Governments are as yet unorganized." 

3. Resolved farther^ That in order to meet and clear away all obstacles to a 
full enjoyment of this right in the Territories, we re-affirm the principle of 
the 9th resolution of the Platform adopted in Convention by the Demi/cracy 
of this State, on the lith of February, 1848, to wit : "That it is the duty of 
the General Government, by all proper legislation, to secure an entry into 
those Territories to all the citizens of the United States, together with their 
property of every description, and that the same should remain protected by 
the United States while the Territories are under its authority." 

4. Resolved farther^ That the Constitution of the United States is a compact 
between sovereign and co-equal States, united upon the basis of perfect 
equality of rights and privileges. 

5. Resolved farther^ That the Territories of the United States are common 
property, in which the States have equal rights, and to which the citizens of 
every State may rightfully emigrate wiih their slaves or other property recog- 
nized as such, in any of the Stated of the Union, or by the Constitution of the 
United States. 

6. Resolved farther^ That the Congress of the United States has no power 
to abolish slavery in the Territories, or to prohibit its introduction into any 
of them. 

7. Resolved further J That the Territorial Legislatures, created by the legis- 
lation of Congress, have no power to abolish slavery, or to prohibit the 
introduction of the same, or to impair by unfriendly legislation, the security 
and full enjoyment of the same within the Territories, and such constitutianal 
power certainly does not belong to the people of the Territories in any capa- 
city, before, in the exercise of a lawful authority, they form a Constitution 
preparatory to admission as a State into the Union ; and their action in the 
exercise of such lawful authority, certainly cannot operate or take effect before 
their actual admission as a State into the Union. 

8. Resolved farther^ That the principles enunciated by Chief Justice Taney, 
in his opinion in the Dred Scott case, deny to the Territorial Legislature the 
power to destroy or impair by any legislation whatevei', the right of property 
in slaves, and maintain it to be the duty of the Federal Government, in all oi 
its departments, to protect the rights of the owner of such property in the 
Territories ; and the principles so declared are hereby asserted to be the rights 
of the South, and the South should maintain them. 

9. Resolved further^ That we hold all of the foregoing propositions to con- 
tain cardinal principles — true in themselves — and just and proper, and neces- 
sary for the safety of all that is dear to us, and we do hereby instruct our 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 57 

Delegates to the Charleston Convention, to present them for the calm consid- 
eration and approval of that body — from whose justice and patriotism we 
anticip^^te their adoption. 

10. Resolved further^ That our Delegates to the Cl:arleston Convention are 
hereby expressly instructed to insist that said Convention shall adopt a plat- 
form of principles, recognizing distinctly the rights of the South as asserted 
in the foregoing resolutions ; and if the said National Convention shall refuse 
to adopt, ill substance, the propositions embraced in the preceding resolutions, 
prior to nominating candidates, our Delegates to said Convention are hereby 
positively instructed to withdraw therefrom. 

11. Resolved farther^ That our Delegates to the Charleston Convention 
shall cast the voie of Alabama as a unit, ard a majority of our Delegates shall 
determine how the vote of this State shall be given. 

12. Resolved furHier, That an Executive Committee, to consist of one from 
each Congressional District, be appointed, whose duty it shall be, in the event 
that our Delegates withdraw from the Charleston Convention, in obedience to 
the 10th resolution, to call a Convention of the Democracy of Alabama, to 
meet at an early day to consider what is best to be done. 

Under these resolutions, the undersigned received their appointment, and 
participated in the action of this Convention. 

By the resolution of instruction — the tenth in the series — we were directed 
to insist that the Platform adopted by this Convention should embody, *' in 
substance," the propositions embraced in the preceding lesolutions, prior to 
nominating caiididates. 

Anxious, if possible, to continue our relations with this Convention, and 
thus to maintain the nationality of the Democratic party, we agr(ed to accept, 
as the substance of the Alabama Platform, either of the two reports submitted 
to this Convention by the majority of the Committee on Resolutions — this 
majority representing not only a majority of the States of the Ucion, but 
hIso the only States at all likely to be carried by the Democratic party in the 
Presidential election. 

We beg to make these Reports parts of this communication : 

PLATFORM— FIRST MAJORITY REPORT. 

Resolved, That the Platform adopted at Cincinnati be affirmed, with the 
following resolutions : 

1. That the National Democracy of the United States hold these cardinal 
principles on the subject of slavery in the Territories : First, That Congress 
has no power to abolish slavery in the Territories. Second, That the Tei'ri- 
torial Legislature has no power to abolish slavery in any Territory, nor to 
prohibit the introduction of slaves therein ; nor any power to exclude slavery 
therefrom, nor any power to destroy or impair the right of property in slaves 
by any legislation whatever. 

2. Resolved, That the enactments of State Legislatures to defeat the faith- 
ful execution of the Fugitive Slave Law are hot* tile in character, subversive 
of the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effect. 

3. Resolved, That it is the duty of the Federal Government to protect, 
when necessary, the rights of persons and property on the high seas, in the 
territories, or wherever else its constitutional authority extends. 

4. Resolved, That the Democracy of the Nation recognize it as the imper- 
ative duty of this Government to protect the naturalized citizen in all his 
rights, whether at home or in foreign lands, to the same extent as its native- 
born citizens. 

5. Resolved, That the National Democracy earnestly recommend the acqui- 
sition of the Island of Cuba at the earliest practicable period. 

Whereas, That one of the greatest necessities of the age, in a political, 



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58 Democratic National Convention. 

commercial, postal, and military point of view, is a speedy communication 
between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the National Democratic party do hereby pledge themselves 
to use every means in their power to secure the passage of some bill for the 
construction of a Pacific Railroad, from the Mississippi River to the Pacific 
Ocean, at the earliest practicable moment. 

SECOND MAJORITY REPORT. 

Resolved, That the Platform adopted by the Democratic party at Cincin- 
nati be affirmed, with the following explanatory resolutions : 

1. That the Government of a Territory organized by an act of Congress is 
provisional and temporary, and during its existence all citizens of the^United 
States have an equal right to settle with their propertv in the Territory, 
without their rights, either of person or property, being destroyed or impaired 
by Congressional or Territorial legislation. 

2. That it is the duty of the Federal Government, in all its departments, 
to protect, when necessary, the ri^'hts of persons and property in the Terri- 
tories, and wherever else its constitutional authority extends. 

3. That when the settlers in a Territory having an adequate population, 
form a State Constitution, the right of sovereignty commences, and being 
consummated by admission into the Union, they stand on an equal footing 
with the people of other States, and the State thus organized ought to be ad- 
niitted into the Federal Union, whether its Constitution prohibits or recocr- 
nizes the institution of slavery. ° 

Resolved, That the Democratic party are in favor of the acquisition of 
the Island of Cuba, on such terms as shall be honorable to ourselves and just 
to Spain, at the earliest practicable moment. 

Resolved, That the enactments of State Legislatures to defe«t the faithful 
execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, are hostile in character, subversive of 
the Constitution, and revolutior»ary in their eff*ect. 

Resolved, That the Democracy of the United States recognize it as the imper- 
ative duty of this Government to protect the naturalized citizen in all his 
rights, whether at home or in foreign lands, to the same extent as its native- 
born citizens. 

Whereas, One of the greatest necessities of the age, in a political, 
commercial, postal and military point of view, is a speedy communication 
between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the National Democratic party do hereby pledge them- 
selves to use every means in their power to secure the passage of some bill, 
to the extent of the constitutional authoritv of Congress, for the construction 
of a Pacific Railroad from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, at the 
earliest practicable moment. 

These reports received the indorsement, in the Committee on Resolutions 
of every Southern State, and had either of them been adopted a.s the Platform' 
of principles of the Democratic party, although, possibly, in some respects, 
subject to criiicisio, we should not have felt ourselves in duty bound to with- 
hold our acquiescence. 

But it has been the pleasure of this Convention, by an almost exclusive 
sectional vote, not representing a majority of the States, nor a majority of the 
Democratic electoral votes, to adopt a Platform which does not, in our opin- 
ion, nor m the opinion of those who urge it, embody in substance the princi- 
ples of the Alabama resolutions. 

That Platform is as follows: 

Resolved, That we, the Democracy of the Union in Convention assem- 
bled, hereby declare our affirmance of the resolutions unanimously adopted 
and declared as a platform of principles by the Democratic Convention at 



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Proceedings at Charlesten. 5§ 

Cincinnati, in the year 1856, believina: that Democratic principles are un- 
ohant^eable in their nature, when applied to the same subject matters. 

Resolved, That it is the duty of the United States to afford ample and 
complete protection to all its citizens, whether at home or abroad, and 
whether native or foreign born. 

Resolved, That one of the necessities of the age, in a military, commercial, 
and ])OStal point of view, is speedy communication between the Atlantic and 
Pacific States ; and the Democratic party pledge such Constitutional Govern- 
ment aid as will insure the construction of a railroad to the Pacific coast at 
the earliest practicable period. 

Resolved, That the Democratic party are in favor of the acquisition of 
tlie Island of Cuba, on such terms as shall be honorable to ourselves and just 

•to Spain. ^ , r • i r i 

Resolved, That the enactments of State Legislatures to defeat the faithful^ 

execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, are hostile in character, subversive of 

the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effect. 

The points of difference between the Northern and Southern Democracy 

are: 

1st. As regards the status of slavery as a political institution in the Terri- 
tories, whilst they remain in the Territories, and the power of the people of a 
Territory to exclude it by unfriendly legislation. 

And 2d. As regards the duty of the Federal Government to protect the 
owner of slaves in the enjoyment of his property in the Territories, so long as 
they remain such. 

'Ihis Convention ha*s refused, by the platform adopted, to settle either of 
these propositions in favor of the South. We deny to the people of a Terri- 
tory any power to legislate aj^ainst the institution of slavery, and we assert 
that it is the duty of the Federal Government, in all its deportments, to pro- 
tect the owner of slaves in the enjoyment of his property in the Territories. 
These principles, as we state them, ar« embodied in the Alabama Platfor>u. 

Here, then, is a plain, explicit and direct issue between this Convention and 
the constituency which we have the honor to represent in this body. 

Instructed, as we are, not to waive this issue, the contingency therefore, 
has arisen when, in our opinion, it becomes our duty to withdraw from this 
Convention. 

W e beg, sir, to communicate this fact through you, and to assure the Con- 
vention that we do so m no spirit of anger, but under a sense of imperative 
obligation— properly appreciating its responsibilities, and cheerfully submit- 
ting to its consequences. 

° L. P, WAI.KER, Chairman. F. G. NORMAN, 

F. S. LYON J. C. GUILD, 

JOHN A. WINSTON, JULirS C. B. MITCHELL. 

H. D. SMITH, W. C. -HERROD, 

JOHN ERWIN, G. G. GRIFFIN 

W. L. YANCY, J. T. BRADFORD, 

D.W.BAINE, ' T.J BURNETT, 

N H. R. DAWSON, A G. HENRY, 

R M PAT TON WILLIAM M.BROOKS, 

W. c! McIVER,' R- CHAPMAN, 
P.O. Harper, [Delegate appointed though not participating m 
LEWIS L. CATO, tho Convention] 

JOHN W. PORTfS, _ ^^^ 

ROBERT G SCOTT, THOS, B COOPER, 

A b MEEK, PEYTON G. KING, 

J. R BREARE, W. G. gAHRKTT, 

A. W. DILLARD, M. J. BOLGER, 

Judge Meek offered the following resolution, uhich was unanimously 
adopted: 

Resolved, I'hat in the ev^'ut the Alabama delegation should withdraw from 
the Convention, no delegate or any other person shall thenceforward, have any 
authority to represent Alabama upon the florr of the Convention,, or to cast 



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60 Democratic National Convention. 

the vote of Alabama therein ; and that our (Chairman be instructed so to in- 
form said Convention. 

And thereupon the delegation from Alabama withdrew from the Conven- 



tion 



Mr. Barry, of Mississippi, rose and stated that they would retire from the 
Convention with the delegation from Alabama, and would have no further 
connection with the Convention. That they had prepared a protest, but 
were not m readiness to present it to the Convention. They protested against 
any other persons being allowed to represent the State of Mississippi in the 
Convention. 

^ Mr. MouTON, of Louisiana, rose in behalf of the delegation from that 
State, and stated that the majority of the delegation would no longer take a 
part in the proceedings of the Convention. That two delegates still deter- 
/ mined to remain in the Convention. 

Mr. Simmons, of South Carolina, presented to the Convention a statement 
in .vriting, as follow^s ; 

To the Eon. Caleb Cushing, President of the Charleston Convention : 

We, the undersigned, delegates appointed by the Democratic State Con- 
vention of South Carolina, beg leave respectfully to state, that accordincr to 
the principles enunciated in their platform at Columbia, the power, either of 
the Federal Government, or of its agent, the Territorial Government, to abol- 
ish or legislate against property in slaves, by either direct or indirect legisla- 
tion, IS explicitly denied; and as the i)lattbrm adopted by this Convention 
palpably and intentionally pretermits any expression affirming the incapacity 
of the Territorial Government so to legislate, they do not believe they would 
be acting in good faith to their principles, or in accordance with the wishes 
of theif constituents, longer to remain in tliis Convention ; and they hereby 
therefrom respectfully announce their withdrawal. 

s. mcgovvan, b h brown 

R: ^:mYL^f6^. Delegatesj;mn^d congressional District. 

Delegates from the State atlarge. Delegate fr'om 4th Congressional District. 

i «; /;c)\ J, .r.^*^^^ ' JOFIN S. PRESTON, 

n^ia...; ; ^^f ^^^^' . , ^^. . FRANKLIN GAILLARD, 

Delegar^es^from^st J^ongres^sional District. Delegates from 6th Congressional District 

THUS. Y. SIMONS, 
Delegates from 2d Congressional District. 

And which he stated was signed by all the delegates but three. 
Mr. Glenn, of Mississit>pi, addressed the Convention, and read a commu- 
nication which is as follows : 

To the President of the Democratic Convention : 

Sir— As Ctiairman of the Delegation which has the honor to represent the 
State of Mississippi on this floor, I desire to be heard by you and by the 
Convention. 

In common consultation we have met here, the representatives of sister 
States, to resolve the principles of a great parly. While maintaining prirci- 
ples, we profess no spirit, save that of harmony, conciliation, the success of 
our party, and the safety of our organization. But to the former the latter 
must yield, for no organization is valuable without it, and no success is hon- 
orable which does not crown it. 

We came here .^imply asking a recognition of the equal rights of our State 
under the laws and Constitution of our common Government ; that our right 
to property should be asserted, and the protection of that property, when ■ 
necessary, should be yielded by the Government, which claims our allegiance. 
We had regarded Government and protection as co-relative ideas, and that 
so long as the one was maintained the other still endured. 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 61 

After a deliberation of many days, it has been announced to us by a con- 
trolling majority of Kepresentatives of nearly one-half the States of this 
Union, and that, too, in the most solemn and impressive manner, that our 
demand cannot be met, and our rights cannot be recognized. Wl^ile it is 
granted that the capacity of the Federal Government is ample to protect all 
other property within its jurisdiction, it is claimed to be impotent when 
called upon to act in favor of a species of property recognized in fifteen sov- 
ereign States. Within those States even Black tlepublicans admit it to be 
guaranteed by the Constitution, and to be only assailed by a Higher Law ; 
without them they claim the right to prohibit or destroy it. The controlling 
majority of Northern Representatives on this floor, while they deny all power 
to destroy, equally deny ail power to proiect ; and this, they assure us, is 
and must, and shall be the condition of our co-operation in the next Presi- 
dential election. 

In this sta?e of affairs our duty is plain and obvious. The State which 
sent us here, announced to us her principU g. In common with seventeen of 
her sister States, she has asked a recognition of her Constitutional rights. 
These have been plainly and explicitly denied to her. We have oifered to 
yield everything except an abandonment ol her rights— everything except her 
honor — and it has availed us nothing. 

As the representatives of Mississippi, knowing her wishes — as honorable 
men, regarding her commands, we withdraw from the Convention, and, as far 
as our action is concerned, absolve her from all coBnection with this body, 
and all responsibility for its action. 

To you, sir, as presiding officer of the Convention while it h*^s existed in 
its integrity, we desire, collectively as a delegation, and individually as men, 
to tender the highest assurancesof our profound respect and consideration. 

(Signed) D. C. GLENN,' W.S.WILSON, 

Chairman of the Mississippi Delegation. ISAAC ENLOE, 

GEORGE H. GORDON, CHAS- EDWARD HO )KER, 

JAMBS DRANE, W. H. H TYSON, 

BEVERLY MATHEWS, ETHELBEBT BaRKSDALE, 

J. T. SIMMS, W. S BARRY, 

JOS, R. DAVIS, J. M. THOMPSON. 

Mr. Milton, of Florida, addresssd the Convention, and presented a com- 
munication, as follows : 

To the Eon, Caleb Gushing ^ President of the Democratic National Convention : 

The undersigned, Democratic Delegates from the State of Florida, enter 
this, their solemn protest, against the action of the Convention in voting down 
the platform of the majority. 

Florida, with her Southern sisters, is entitled to a clear and unambiguous 
recognition of her rights in the Territories, and this being refused by the 
rejection of the majority report, we protest against receiving the Cincinnati 
Platform with the interpretation that it favors the doctrine of Squatter 
Sovereignty in the Territories, which doctrine, in the name of the people 
represented by us, we repudiate. 

T. J. EI^PES, JOHN MILTON, C. F. DYKE, 

B. F. WARDLAW, J B. OWENS, Delegates from Florida. 

The delegates from Florida, before retiring, have adopted the following 
resolution : 

Besolvedf That no person not a regularly appointed delegate has a right to 
cast the vote of the State of Florida in this Convention. 

JOHN MILTON, Chairman Delegation. 

Mr. Brtan, of Texas, addressed the Convention, and presented a protest, in 
writing, as follow s : 

Ifpn. Caleb Gushing^ President of the Democratic National Convention : 
The undersigned, Delegates from the State of Texas, would respectfully 



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62 Democratic Nahoriav Convention, 

protest against the late action of this Convention, in refusing to adopt the 
report of the majority of the Committee on Resolutions, which operates as 
the virtual adoption of principles affirming doctrines in opposition to the 
decision of the Supreme Court in the Dred Scott case, and in conflict with the 
Federal Constitution, and especially opposed to the Platform of the Demo- 
crtuic party of Texas, which declares: 

1st. That the Democratic party of the State of Texas re-affirm, and concur 
in the principles contained in the Platform of the National Democratic Con- 
vention, held at Cincinnati in June, 1856, as a true expression of political 
faitb and opinion, and herewith re-assert and set forth the principles therein 
coiitained, as embracing the only doctrine which can preserve the integrity of 
the Union and the equal rights of the States, "expressly rejecting any interpre- 
tMion thereof favoring the doetrine known as Squatter Sovereignty ^^^ and that we 
will continue to adhere to and abide by the principles ard doctrines of the 
Virginia and Kentucky resolutions of 1798 and 1799, and Mr. Madison's 
report relative thereto. 

2d. 'J 'hat it is the right of every citizen to take his property of any kind, 
including slaves, into the common territory belonging equally to all the States 
of the Confederacy, and to have it protected there under the Federal Consti- 
tution. Neither Congress nor a Territorial Legcislature, nor any human 
power, has any authority, either directly or indirectly, to impair these sacred 
rights; and they, having been affirmed by the Supreme Court in the decision 
ot the Dred Scott case, we declare that it is thedutv of the Federal Govern- 
ment, the common agent of all the States, to establish such government and 
enact such laws for the Territories, and so change the same from time to time 
as may be necessary to insure protection and preservation of these rights, and 
prevent every infringement of the same. The affirmation of this principle of 
the duty of Congress to simply protect the right of property, is nowise in con- 
flict with the heretofore established and well recognized principles of the 
Democratic party, that Congress does not possess the power to legislate 
slavery into the Territories, or to exclude it therefrom. 

Recognizing these declarations of principles as instructions to ns for our 
government in the National Convention, and believing that a repudiation of 
them by all of the Northern States except the noble States of Oregon and 
California, the whole vote of which is more than doubtful in the ensuing 
Presidential election, demand from us our unqualified disapproval. 

The undersigned do not deem this the place or time to discuss the prac- 
tical illustration that has been given of the irrepressible conflict between the 
Northern and Southern States, that has prevailed in this Convention for the 
last week. 

It is sufficient to say, that if the principles of the Northern D emocracy are 
properly represented, by the opinion and action of the majority of the del- 
egates from that section on this floor, we do not hesitate to declare that their 
principles are not only not ours, but, if adhered to and enforced by them, will 
destroy this Union. 

In consideration of the foregoing facts, we cannot remain in the Convention. 
We consequently respectfully withdraw, leaving no one authorized to cast 
the vote of the State of Texas. 

GUY M. BRYAM, Chairman. H. R. RUNNELS. WM. H. PARSONS. 

F. R. LUB80 ;K. WM. P. OCHILTREE. R WARD. 

F. S. STOOKDALE. M. W. COVEY. J. F. CROSBY, 
E. GREER. 

Mr. Burrows, of Arkansas, rose and addressed the Convention, rmd presented 
a communication, as follows : 
Hon. Caleb Gushing^ President of Charlestion Convention : 

The undersigned Delegates, accredited by the Democracy of Arkansas to 
represent said Democracy in the Convention of the Democracy of the United 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 68 

States, assembled on the 23d of April, 1860, beg leave to submit the following 
protest against certain actions of this Convention, and statement of the causes 
which, in their opinion, require them to retire from 'his Convention. 

1st. The Convention of the Democracy of the State of Arkansas, convened 
at Little Eock on the 2d day oi April, 1860, passed, among other things, the 
following rcvsolutions, viz : 

1st. Resolved, We, the Democracy of Arkansas, through our representa- 
tives in Convention assembled, proclaim our confidence in the virtue and 
intelligence of th(^ people, and unabated faith in the principles ol the 
Democracv. 

2 i. We re-affen the political principles enunciated in the Cincinnati Plat- 
f( rai by the Democracy of the United States in June, 1856, and assert as 
illustrative thereof, that neither Congress nor a Territorial Legislature, whether 
by direct legislation or by legislation of an indirect and unfriendly character, 
possesses the power to annul or impair the Ccnstiiutional rights of any citizen 
of the United States to take his slave property into the common Territories, 
and there hold and enjoy the same, and that if experience should at any time 
prove that the judiciary and executive power do not possess the means to 
insure protection to Constitutional rights in a Territory, and if the Territorial 
Government should fail or refuse to provide the necessary remedies for that 
purpose, it will be the duty of Congress to supply the deficiency. 

3d. That the representatives ol the Democracy of Arkansas, in the 
Charleston Convention, be instructed to insist upon the recognition by said 
Convention of the purpose hereinbefore declared, prior to balloting for any 
candidate for the Presidency, and if said Convention refuse to recognize the 
rights of the South in the Territories of the United States, the representatives 
of the Democracy of Arkansas be instructed to retire from said Convention, 
and refuse' to aid in the selection of any candidate whomsoever by said 
Convention. 

4th. That the unity of the Democratic party and the safety of the South 
demands the adoption of the two-thirds rule by the Charleston Convention of 
the Democracy of the United States, and that our delegates to said Conven- 
tion be required to insist upon and maintain the adoption thereof as an indis- 
pensable necessity. 

In accordance with the instructions contained in resolution 3d, above, one 
of the undersigned had the honor, on the second day of the session of this 
Convention, to offer to the consideration of this Convention the following 
resolution, viz: ^^ Resolved, That the Convention will not proceed to nominate 
a candidate for the Presidency until the platform shall have been made," 
which said resolution was passed by the Convention by great unanimity. 
Subsequently the Committee on Resolutions and Platform, appointed by the 
Convention, in accordance with the usages and custom of the Democratic 
party of the United States, agreed upon and reported to this Convention a 
platform of prin(iples, recognizing the principle contained in the resolutions 
of the Democracy of Arkansas, above cited, and fully asserting the equal 
rights of the Southern States in the common Territories of the United States, 
and the duty of the Federal Government to protect those rights when neces- 
sary, according to the usages and customs of the Democracy of the United 
States, as developed by the practice of said Democracy, assembled in Conven- 
tions on former occasions, and in strict accordance, as is believed by the un- 
dersigned, with the compact and agreement made* by and between the D em- 
ocrats of the several States, upon which the Conventions of the Democracy of 
the United States were agreed first to be founded, and assented to by the sev- 
eral Southern States. The report and <letermination of the (Committee on 
Platform became and was henceforward as the platform of the Democracy of 
the United States, and this Convention had no duty to perform in relation 



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64 Democratic National Convention. 

thereto, but to receive, .lonfirm and publish the same, and cause it to b3 car- 
ried into effect wherever in the respective States the Democracy were able to 
enforce their decrees at the ballot box. 

The undersigned are confirmed in this opinion by reference not only to the 
history of the past, which shows that in all instances the sovereignty of the 
States, and not the electoral votes of the States, has uniformly been repre- 
sented in the Committee on Platform, and that the report of the Committee 
has invariably been registered as the supreme law ot the Democratic party 
by unanimous consent of the entire Conventions, without changing or in any 
manner altering any part or portion thereof. It is asserted as a part of our 
traditional learning, and confidently believed, that the Democracy of the 
United States, by a peculiar system of checks and balances, ifrmed after the 
fashion of the Federal Government, were contracted and bound themselves 
to fully recognize the sovereignty of the States in making the Platform, and 
the population or masses of the States, in naming the candidate to be placed 
on the Platform. That many States have been uniformly allowed to voie 
the fall strength of their electoral college in these Conventions, when it was 
well known that said States had never heretofore, and probably would never 
hereafter, give a single electoral vote at the polls to the candidate which 
they had so large a share in nominating, cannot bs accounted for on any 
otht r principle than that it was intended only as a recognition of the sover- 
eignty and equality of said Stales. 

Would it be right at this time for the numerical majority to deprive all the 
Black Republican States represented on this flo ^r by their representatives, 
which by custom they have so long «njoyed, simply because it is now evident 
that they are or will be unable to vote the Democratic ticket in the next 
Presidential election ? 

By common consent we say that a reckless numerical majority should not 
be thus allowed to tread under foot the vested rights of those States, and the 
well established usages and cubtoms of the party. 

If thus it be wrong for the numerical majority to deprive the Black Repub- 
lican States of this long vested right, how much more unjust is it for the 
numerical majority to deprive all the States of their vested right to make 
and declare the Platform in the usual and customary manner ? And when 
we call to mind that the numerical majority resides chiefly in the Black 
Republican States, to whom the South has uniformly accorded so large a 
privilege, in naming candidates who were alone to be elected by Southern 
votes, we have much reason to believe that he to whom you gave an inch 
seems emboldened thereby to demand an ell. 

The undersigned beg leave to state that many patriotic States, Right Dem- 
ocrats, in the South, have long contended that these Conventions of the 
Democracy, representing in fact the whole consolidated strength of the Union, 
acting through party sympathy upon the individual members of society, 
would ultimate in a despotic, colossal centralism, possessed of power to over- 
ride and destroy at its will and pleasure the Constitutions and reserved rights 
of any and all the States. The South, however, has heretofore felt safe, 
because of the checks and balances imposed upon the machinery of the Con- 
ventions. The South felt that where she retained an equal power to write 
the creed of faith, she could trust her Northern sisters, with tlieir immense 
populations, to name the candidate ; and all would alike support the creed 
and the candidate. 

The undersigned, well knowing the hostility of the Northern masses 
towards the "peculiar institutions" of the South, and calling to mind the 
relative numbers of the Northern and Southern States, assert with confidence 
that no Southern State in the Union would ever have consented to surrender 
so abjectly and hopelessly, all their fortunes to the numerical majority who 



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Proeeedings at Charleston, 65 

have just now voted to set aside the Platform, unless upon the full assurance 
that the States were entitled by agreement to make and establish the creed 
of faith and prescribe the rule of action. This violation of plighted faith on 
the part of the numerical majority — this violation of the well established 
usage and custom of the party— drive us to the conclusion that we cannot 
longer trust the fortunes of the slaveholding States to the chances of a nu- 
merical majority in a Convention, where all the Black Republicans of the 
Union, the immense populations of Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania 
and Ohio, and other Northern States, are fully represented, on the one side 
against the small populations from the slave States on the other — had these 
populations adhered strictly to the usages and customs of the party, longer 
associations might have been practicable ; but annihilation is staring us in the 
face, and we are admonished of our duty to stand upon our reserved rights. 

We declare, therefore, that we believe our mission in this Convention at an 
end : 

1st. Because the numerical majority have usurped the prerogatives of the 
States in setting aside the platform made by the States, and have thus unset- 
tled the basis of the Convention, and thereby permanently disorganized its 
Constitution. Its decrees, therefore, become null and void. 

2d. Because we were positively instructed bj- the Democracy of Arkan- 
sas to insist on the recognition of the equal rights of the South in common 
Territories, and protection in those rights by the Federal Grovernment prior 
to any nomination of a candidate, and as this Convention has refused to recog- 
nize the principle required by the Stat« of Arkansas, in her popular Conven- 
tion first, and twice subsequently re-asserted by Arkansas, together with all 
her Southern sisters in the report of Platform to this Convention, and as we 
cannot serve two masters, we are determined first to serve the Lord our God 
we cannot ballot for any candidate whatever. 

3d. In retiring, we deny to any person or persons any right whatever to 
cast hereafter, in this Convention, either our vote or the vote of Arkansas on 
any propositions which may ©r can possibly come up for consideration. The 
delegates of Arkansas cannot take any part in placing a sound candidate on 
an unsound platform, because it would disgrace any sound Southern man who 
would consent to stand on such a platform ; and as a Squatter Sovereignty 
platform has been adopted, we believe that good faith and honor requires that 
the Chief of Squatter Sovereignty should be placed on it; we wish no part or 
lot in such misfortune, nor do we believe that we can safely linger under the 
shade of tlie upas tree this day planted certainly. 

P. JGRDAK, 

N. B. BURROWS, 

VAN H. MANNING. 

Mr. Bewnino, of Georgia, asked leave of the Convention to withdraw for 
consultation, and leave was granted. 

Mr. IlussELL, of Virginia, addressed the Convention, 

Mr. Bayard, of Delaware, addressed the Convention, and stated that he and 
his colleagues would withdraw from the Convention. 

Mr. Saulsbuby, of Delaware, also addressed thie Convention. 

Mr. Mberick, of Illinois, addressed the Convention. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York, moved that the Convention adjourn till 10 
o'clock to-morrow, which motion prevailed, and the Convention adjourned. 



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66 Democratic National Convention, 



TirESDAY, May 1, 1860. 
The Convention was called to order soon after 10 o'clock. 
Prayer by Rev. Mr Ingersoll. 

On motion, the reading of the Journal was dispensed with. 
The President stated the regular order of business to be, the motions to 
reconsider, and the motions bo lay the motions to reconsider on the table, by 
which the various resolutions constituting the platform were adopted. Pend- 
ing the determination of these questions, yesterday evening, the Chairmen of 
several of the delegations rose to questions of privilege, under which their 
delegations retired from the hall. When the Convention adjourned the gen- 
tleman from Illinois (Mr, Merrick) was upon the floor. 

Mr. Benning, of Georgia, rose to a question of privilege, and stated that 
after retiring yesterday, the delegation from Georgia came to the conclusion 
to present to the Convention two resolutions, which are as follows : 

Resolved^ That upon the opening of the Convention this morning, our 
Chairman be requested to state to the President that the Georgia delegation, 
after a mature deliberation, have felt it to be their duty, under existing cir- 
cumstances, not to participate further in the deliberations of the Convention, 
and that therefore the delegation withdraw. 

Resolvedy That all who acquiesce in the foregoing resolution sign the same, 
and request the Convention to enter it on their records. 
(Signed) JUNIUS WINGFIBLD, HENRY L BENNING, 

HENRY R. JACKSON, P. TRACY, 

J. M. CLARK, JEFFERSON N. LAMAR, 

WM. M. SLAUGHTER, EDMOND J. McGEHEE, 

JOHN A. JONES, GEORGE HILLYER, 

DAVID C. BARROW, MARK JOHNSTON, 

JAS. J. DIMOND, EDWARD R. HARDEN, 

A. FRANKLIN HILL, JOHN H. LUMPKIN, 

EDW. L. STROEOKBR, G. G. FAIN, 

0. C. GIBSON, JAMES HOGE, 

HENRY 0. THOMAS, W. J. JOHNSON. 

The undersisrned, delegates from Georgia, having voted in the meeting of 
the delegation against withdrawing from the Convention, yet believe, under 
the instructions contained in the resolution of the Georgia Convention, that 
the vote of the majority should control our action, and we therefore with- 
draw with the majority. 

ISAIAH T. IRWIN, JULIAN HARTRIDGE, 

WILLIAM H. HULL, L. H. BRISCOE. 

This paper is signed by twenty-six out of the thirty-six delegates in that 
Convention from the State of Georgia. 

I have now, Mr. President, discharged the duty which has been entrusted 
to me by my delegation. 

The majority of the Georgia delegation then retired from the hall. 
Mr. Johnson, of Arkansas, addressed the Convention. 
Mr. Terry, of Arkansas, then read the following paper to the Convention : 
Ih the H(M» Caleb Cushingy President: 

The undersigned, delegates from Arkansas, ask permission to make the fol- 
lowing statement : 

We have, thus far, abstained from taking any active part in the measures 
which were consummated on yesterday, in this Convention, by the with- 
drawal, in whole or in part, of several Southern States. We have counseled 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 67 

our Southern friends to patience and forbearance ; and, while we were con- 
scious of causes sufficient to induce them to this step, yet we still hoped that 
some more auspicious event would transpire that would, avert its necessity. 
Nothing has occurred to palliate these causes. Hence we cannot hesitate in 
our course, and therefore ask permission to withdraw and surrender to our 
State the high trust reposed in us. To you, sir, who have with so much 
ability presided over our deliberations, and meted out justice with an even 
hand, we part with sorrow. Hoping that the cloud which now hangs over 
our beloved country may be dispelled, and her counsels directed by some 
statesmanlike yourself -able, honest, just, and true. 

FRANCIS TERRY, Vice President. 

J. P. JOEINSON, Chairman of Delegation. 
Charleston, May 1, 1860. F. W, HOADLET, Secretary. 

The Tennessee delegation asked and obtained leave to retire for consulta- 
tion. 

Mr. Glass, of Virginia, asked leave of the Convention for the Virginia 
delegation to retire for consultation, and leave was granted. 

A ponion of the delegations from Kentucky, from North Carolina, and 
from Maryland, also had leave to retire for consultation. 

Mr. Cohen, of Georgia, addressed the Convention. 

Mr. Flournoy, of Arkansas, addressed the Convention. 

Mr. Goui.DEN, of Georgia, addressed the Convention, and stated his reasons 
for remaining in it . 

Mr. McCooK, of Ohio. I move the adoption of the following resolution : 

Resolved, That at 2 o'clock P. M. of this day, the Convention will proceed 
by a call of the States to nominate a candidate for the Presidency, and imme- 
diately thereafter a candidate for the Vice Presidency. 

The time given by this resolution will afford the State which asks the long- 
est time the period they request for her deliberations, and upon the motion 
which I now submit I ask the previous question. 

Voices. Say 4 o'clock. 

Mr. PuGH, of Ohio, suggested to his colleague that several States had had 
leave to retire, and it seemed to him that they ought not to ask a vote on this 
resolution till they returned. 

Mr. Van Arsdale, of New Jersey, submitted a protest against the decision 
of the Convention yesterday that the delegation from New Jersey should not 
be required to give the vote of that State as a unit. The protest was as fol- 
lows : 

The undersigned, delegates from the State of New Jersey to the Demo- 
cratic National Convention at Charleston, and representing a large majority 
of the Democracy of that State, in view of the decision made by the said 
Convention on the morning of the 30th April, 1860, denying to the majority 
of said delegates the right of representing their State in the manner provided 
by their State Convention, held on the 28th of March, 1860, in the following 
words, to wit : 

" Resolvedy That we recommend to the representatives of this State to the 
Charleston Convention to cast on all occasions that may arise in the Conven- 
tion a united. vote" — do hereby solemnly and earnestly protest against such 
decision, for the following reasons : 

Ist. Because it is the duty of the representatives to obey the will and carry 
out the wishes of their constituents. 

2d. Because a rule of the National Convention, depriving all delegations 
whose manner of voting may have \iQQn provided for by their respective State 
Conventions from casting individual votes. 

3d. Because, under the above rule, and in obedience to its requirement, ther 



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68 Democratic National Convention. 

delegates of the State of Georgia, by the nnquestioned ruling of the Presi- 
dent of the Convention, were deprived of the privilege of voting accordincr 
to their individual judgment. ^ 

4th. Because the consistent ruling of the President of the Convention was 
overruled by a majority of the votes of delegations who were themselves 
under the constrairit of provisions made by their respective State Con^rentions 
Therefore the undersigned hold that the rights ot the sovereign State of 
JNew Jersey have been infringed to its great wrong and detriment, andsolemnlv 
protest against the same. 

Done at Charleston this first day of May, in the year one thousand ei^ht 
hundred and sixty. ^ 

J. VAN ARSDALE, JOHN HUYLER, 

For 5th Congressional District. DAVID NA AR 

WM. WRIGHT, S DOUGHTY ^ 

^P^\^' I^^FFERTY, SAMUEL HANNA. 

A. R. SPEER, 
Mr. CocBBAN, of New York, moved to amend the resolution of the cren- 
fleman from Ohio (Mr. McCook) by inserting four o'clock instead of "two." 
He said that several States were now in consultation, and he wished to give 
them time. ° 

Mr. PuGH inquired if it would be in order to take the vote now upon Mr. 
MeCook's resolution, during the absence of those delegations who had ob- 
tained leave of the Convention to retire ? 

The Pbesident stated that in his construction of the rules, the Convention 
having given unanimous consent to the temporary retirement of the delecta- 
tions of the several States for the purpose of consultation, it had, by that' 
very act, decided that it would not divide upon any material questions until 
those delegations had had notice to return. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. Suppose the Convention should give leave 
i» a delegation to retire, and it should not return, were the Convention then 
not to proceed ? 

The President said he could make no decision upon that question untilit 
should arise. He only decided upon the question as to the several delega- 
tions who had express leave of the Convention to retire for the purpose'^of 
deliberation. 

Mr. Richardson was not in favor of proceeding into any important busi- 
ness durina the absence of any of the delegations. 
Mr. McCooK withdrew the demand for the previous question. 
Mr. BiDWELL read resolutions of California concerning the slavery ques- 
tion, and explained his vote on the minority platform, taking what was <^ood 
and rejecting what was bad. Tlie California resolutions were as follows"; 

1. Eesolved, That the platform a,dopted by the Cincinnati Convention in 
1856 is hereby affirmed. 

^ 2. BesoWed, That to entitle a Territory to form a Constitution for admis- 
sion into the Union as a sovereign State, it should contain a reasonable num- 
ber of inhabitants, which should not be less than the number required for a 
representative in Congress. 

3. Resolved, That the true interpretation of the Cincinnati Platform is 
hereby declared to be that the right to hold slaves in a Territory rests upon 
the same ground, and is entitled to the same protection, as other property. 

4. Eesolved, That any infraction of the rights of property in a Territory 
would be a judicial question, and that it is the duty of Congress to pass such 
laws as may be necessary to secure the faithful execution of the mandates of 
the Courts. 

5. Resolved, That Congress has the power at any time to change or repeal 
any Territorial organic act, and to revise or annul any Territorial law con- 
flicting therewith. 



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Yeas. Nays.! Yeas. Nays. 

North Carolina 8^ UOhio 23 

Indiana » '3 

lUinoi-* U 

Michigan fi 

Wisconsin o 

Iowa 4: 

Minnesota .-- Ik 2i 

California 3 1 

Oregon 3 

92 159 



Proceedings at Charleston. 69 

He concluded by moving the previous question on behalf of Mr. McCook. 

Mr. McCooK again withdrew his call for the previous question. 

Messrs. Krum, of Missouri, Seward, of Georgia, Hoi den, of North Caroli- 
na, Richardson, of Illinois, Perry, of South Carolina, Howard, of Tennessee, 
and Caldwell, of Kentucky, addressed the Convention. 

Mr. McCook renewed his demand for the previous question. 

Mr. Caldwell, of Kentucky, moved that the Convention do now ad- 
journ, and a vote by States was demanded, and resulted as follows : 

Yeas. Nays 

Maine, 2 t 

New Hampshire 6 South Carolina. 

Vermont 5Georgia 

Massachusetts 8 5 Florida 

Bhode Island 4 Alabama -.. 

Connecticut 2 4 Louisiana 

New York 35| Mississippi - 

New Jersey _. 5 2 Texas 

Pennsylvauia 12 13 Arkansas 1 

Delaware 2 |Mis>sonri 4i 4^ 

Maryland 4 4T5nne8Ree.-- 9 

Virsfinia. ...15 iKentucky 11^ 

The States of Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, MifSissippi, and Texas, declined voting. 

And the motion to adjourn was lost. 

When the State of Georgia offered to vote on the last question, 

Mr. Horn, of Wisconsin, objected to the vote of Georgia being cast by the 
portion present, the State having withdrawn. 

Mr. GoHEN, of Georgia, explained that Georgia was represented here by 
ten delegates who refused to withdraw. The delegates were requested by 
their State to cast their votes in Convention as a unit. The act of withdrawal 
had been done by the majority out of the Convention, not in it. He claimed 
the right of the remaining delegates to cast the vote of the State. 

The President decided, that as the State had ordered the majority of the 
delegates to vote, and as that majority had officially represented to the Con- 
vention that they had concluded to withdraw, the minority had no right to 
represent the State. 

Mr. HoLDEN, of Georgia, appealed from the decision of the Chair. He said : 
Whom the Gods would destrov they tirst make mad. The decision of the 
Chair is most suicidal and destructive. It destroyed the rights of the State. 
He came here to represent the Democracy of his District. He held that the 
bolters and seceders did not represent she Democracy of the State ; that they 
did not follow their duty to their State. They came here with instructions 
to vote, not to bolt. Those who remain, remain to vote — remain with, and 
act with the Democratic Convention, and they called upon its members to sus- 
tain them. 

Mr. King, of Missouri, took the floor. 

The President. The Chair begs to remind the gentleman that the ques- 
tion is not debateable, and that the Chair only allowed discussion on the part 
of the gentleman from Georgia as an act of courtesy. 

Mr. King. If I am not in order I do not desire to occupy the floor. 

Mr. Samuels. I desire to know whether the decision of Chair is that the 
majority of the delegation from Georgia having withdrawn, therefore, the re- 
maining delegates have no right to represent the State. 

The President. And for the further reason that the delegation have re- 
ported to the Convention that a majority have given notice that the delegates 
have decided to withdraw. 

After further debate, the decision of the Chair was sustained by 148 ayes 
to 100 nays. 

Mr. Seward, of Georgia, protested against the act of injustice to the State, 
and withdrew from the Convention. 



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70 Democratic National Convention, 

The previous questioa on the motion of Mr. Howard was then seconded. 

The Chair declared the former motion for adjournment lost. 

Mr. Owen, of Maine, moved to adjourn till 5 o'clock, and Mr. Kandall till 
the usual hour to-moriow. 

Mr. Cochran discussed the point of order, as to which motion had prece- 
dence. 

The Convention adjourned to meet at five o^clock P. M. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The President asked to lay before the Convention a written communica- 
tion which had been handed to him. 

It was a communication Irom the Delegation of the State of Louisiana, and 
is as follows: 

Charleston, April 30, 1860. 
To the Hon. Caleb Cushnig^ President of the Democratic Convention : 

Sir : The undersigned, delegates from the State of Louisiana, in withdraw- 
ing from the Convention, beg leave to make the following statement of facts: 

On the 5th day of March, 1860, the Democracy of Louisiana assembled in 
State Convention at Baton Rouge, and unanimously adopted the following 
declaration of their principles : 

Besolvedy That the Territories of the United States belong to the several 
States as their common property, and not to individual citizens thereof; that 
the Federal Constitution recognizes property in slaves ; and as such, the 
owner thereof is entitled to carry his slaves into any Territory in the United 
States ; to hold them there as property; and in case the people of the Terri- 
torie-^, by inaction, unfriendly legislation or otherwise, should endanger the 
tenure of such property, or discriminate against it by withholding that pro- 
tection given to other species of property in the Territories, it is the duty of 
the General Government to interpose, by the active exertion of its constitu- 
tio»al power, to secure the rights of the slaveholder. 

The principles enunciated in the foregoing resolution are guaranteed to us 
by the Constitution of the United States, and their unequivocal recognition 
by the Democracy of the Union we regard as essential, not only to the integ- 
rity of the party, but to the safety of the States whose interests are directly 
involved. They have been embodied in both of the series of resolutions pre^ 
rented to the Convention by a majority of the States of the Union, and have 
been rejected by a numerical vote of the delegates. 

The Convention has, by this vote, refused to recognize the fundamental 
principles of the Democracy of the State we have the honor to represent, and 
we feel constrained, in obedience to a high sense of duty, to withdraw from 
its deliberations, and unanimously to enter our solemn protest against its 
action. 

We ask that the communication may be spread upon the minutes of the 
Convention, and beg leave to express our appreciation of the justice and dig- 
nity which have characterized your action as its presiding officer. 

(Signed) A. MOUTON. JOHN TARLTON, 

RICHARD TAYLOR, EMILE LaSERE, 

F. H. HATCH, E. LAWRENCE, 

A. TALBOT, B. W. PEARCE, 

R. A. HUNTER, D. D. WITHERS. 

The undersio^ned, in explanation of their position, beg leave to annex the 
following statement, viz : 

Whilst we took the same view with our colleagues, that the platform of 
principles, as adopted by this Convention, was not what was expected by 
Louisiana, and desired by ourselves, as sufficient to guard the rights of that 
State, and of the whole South, under the Constitution, are now unwilling 



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Proceedings at Charleston, 



71 



precipitately to retire from the Convention, until all hope of accommodation 
shall have been exhausted, and until the last moment had arrived, at which, 
in justice to our own honor, and the interest and dignity of our State, we 
would be forced to retire. We, therefore, were opposed to the retirement of the 
delegation at the time it was made ; but believing that the other members of the 
delegation were actuated by the same high motives which governed our own 
opinions, and desiring our State to present a firm, undivided front, we being 
in the minority of the delegation, were willing to yield, and did yield, our 
oinnions to the judgment of the majority. J. A. McBATTON, 

Charleston, S. C, May 1, 1860. CHARLES JONES. 

Mr. Howard, of Tennessee, asked to state a question of privilege, and of- 
fered a resolution, which is as follows, viz : 

Resolved, That the President of the Convention be and is hereby directed 
not to declare any person nominated for the office of President or Vice Pres- 
ident unless he shall have received a number of votes equal to two-thirds of 
the votes of all the Electoral Colleges. 

Mr. McGooK, of Ohio, called up his resolution, the previous question hav- 
ing been seconded, that the main question should now be put. 

'i^he President stated that it was his duty now to call on the House to 
determine whether the main question must now be put. 

Mr. Howard raised a point of order, viz : that the time fixed in Mr. Mc- 
Cook's resolution had passed. 

The President. The time named in the resolution cannot affect its pas- 
sage, and if adopted the effect would be to take the House to a vote instanter. 

Mr. EussELL, of Virginia, called for a vote by States. 

And the question was then put,— '* Shall the main question now be 
put ?" and the vote on such question was as follows, viz : 



Yeas. Nays 



Maine 5 a 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 6 7 

Rhode Island 4 

Con necticut 3^^ 2 

New York 35 

New Jersey 7 

Pennsylvania lOK 16^'- 

Delaware 2 

Maryland 3 5 

Virginia 15 



Yeas, i^ ays. 
10 



Yeas. Nays 

Ohio -^3 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 11 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 2J^ 

California 

Oregon 



4 



North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia..., 

Florida.. 

Alabama 

Ltuisiaua • 

Mississippi 

Texas 

Arkansas 1 

Missouri 43^ 4^ 

Tennessee 1 U 149 102 

^ Kentucky . 12 

So the question was decided in the affirmative. 

The main question was then put, and Mr. McCook's resolution was adopted. 

Mr. Stuaet moved to reconsider the vote by which the resolution wa« 
agr ?ed to, and to lay the motion on the table. 

The President. The motion would be entered. 

Mr. Howard called vp his resolution, and the Chair decided it to be in order. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois, moved to lay the resolution of Mr. Howard 
on the table ; and upon this motion, 

Mr. Russell, of Virginia, called for a vote by States. 

The vote on Mr. Richardson's resolution to lay on the table was as follows: 



Yeas Nays 

Maine 5 3 

New Hampshire ... 5 

Vermont 5 

Mas achusetts .. 4>^ 834 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut 3>^ S^^. 

New York 36 

Nfw Jersey li^ 5-i 

Pennsylvania 10 16>^ 

Delaware 2 

Maryland 2 6 

Virainia 16 



Yeas. Nays. 

North Carolina 10 

South Carolina 

Greorgia 

Florida ^ 

Alabama 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

Texas . 

irkansas 1 

vlissouri ^k ^^ 

Tennessee 1 11 

Kentucky 12 



Yeas Nays. 

Ohio ...23 

Indiana 13 

Illinois , 11 

Michigan ... 6 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 2^ l>i 

California . 4 

Oregon 3 

lin 141 



So the motion to lay on the table was lost. 



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'^^ Democratic National Convention. 

Th^^JZ^tfl °^ Michigan, contended that the resolution was not in order. 
The effect of it was to change the rules of this Convention, and it mustthere- 

!ws s'bjeT '" ""' ^''- ^^ """^"^ ""^ *^^ ™^« °f '^' ConveXn u^n 

r.J/"*'^?'^' That two-thirds of the whole number of votes given shall be 

necessary to a nomination of a candidate for President and Vice Pr^ident bv 

^:il'C:^:Z:;. ''-'' ^^ '^^ rulcthattwo-tMrds of thevS^S 

Was there a gentleman here prepared to admit the doctrine that at any future 

^hpl hIiT ^ f^'''°Ty^i '^^ ^°*«^' by "'"^ly ^«f««»g *<> vote, could break up 
their deliberations ? The mere statement of the question itself was its own 

eTvenT wh!. 9 '^X'°' °^ '''V''^' ^as-"two-thirds of the votes given " 
States. ^' ^'''^° ^°' * candidate for President of the United 

Mr. Stctart would not detain the Convention further with the discussion of 
this question of order. He asked whether gentlemen were prepared to set a 
new precedent, which would in future times enable one-third oWe gentle! 
men attending a National Convention to break it up by refusin<r to voti ° 

Mr. Phillips, of Pennsylvania, submitted the question of order, that the 

?a „ u?'" %Tv, ^'"^'f' ^^'^ ®'"*^'> ^^ t"" !**« « "taking his po nt The 
resolution of the gentleman from Tennesee h«d been introduced by una^! 
mous consent, and was in the full possession of the Convention. He would 

'a^wasio^o'l^r^-^'"^*'' *" .P-'i''°^-t-y ™le«, the gentleman from Mi°hU 
gan was too late in making his point of order 

ord^er'tWrrj;rin?'AT'^'"""1 f'^°°» ^i^Wgan has raised the point of 
change of thP rXnf .h n gentleman from Tennessee will constitute a 
l.Zf -1 1 °^ ^^^ Convention, as adopted at its present session in 

accordance with the rule of the (invention of 1852. The gentleman from 
ord"er'r?/'*rK^>""f ^"^j^'"^ 'bat it is too late to make^tUs questionTf 
order. As the Chair entertains a different opinion upon the question he 
desires to state that opinion. The resolution of the Convention oJ^ 1852 is in 
di^whnfl "^ .! gentleman from Michigan has stated it, that two-thirds of 
d ir. f p""*??' f ''5'';?.^'^^° 'ball be necessary to a nomination of Can- 
dida es for President and Vice President. Now, it is true that, in a ri-^orou^ 
construction of this order, it applies to a nomination of c'andida es fo 
President and Vice President by this Convention. 

Thus far the hair concurs with the gentlemanfrom Michigan. The Chair 
i» not prepared to determine what is the force of the words "votes .^iven " 
tarcHnJTi" >?'P'-«f '"""f tl^e words might be "votes cast" in a btllot in 
Z nL I "'-""^ rule does not say so. It uses the absolute independ- 

ent phrase "votes given." The gentleman from Michigan objects to that 
construction on the ground of alleged inconvenience, that of havin" the 
nomination of a Convention prevented by the secession of one-third of the 
states in that Convention. The Chair can see that the argument of ingonve- 
nience IS sufficiently strong, if not stronger upon the other side. A Conven- 
irh,"/. '*[ ' '"' '^«*' authority. Its sole authority is its moral 

authority, as the representative of the opinion of the party whose members 
rnTTlW P^''^- • ^' ''"^' *° 'be Chair that the inconvenience of rum 
^!v h!M ! "?7'"*''°? t'y a fractional party of the Convention, although it 
m The Tw!h q^T° '"''' T'"'"*"'^ binding nomination upon the people 
Irk. fr i,^ .\ States, IS a vastly greater inconvenience than that which would 
arii,e from the fact that a secession of one-third of the members would 
prevent a nomination. A n..mination to be made by the Convention is a 
constitutional necessity It is a formal recommendation to the constrents 
l\J^ Convention. That recommendation, in order that it should have 
moral authority with the persons to whom it is addressed, should be the act 



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Proceedings at CImrleston. 73 

of all the States of the Union. (Applause.) The Chair, tlierefore, is not 
prepared to adopt the construction of the gentleman from Michigan of the 
rule of 1652 ; and, therefore, tlie Chair is of the opinion that the resolution 
of the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Howard) does not constitute such a 
modification of the standing rules of the Convention as shall require it to lie 
over for one day. 

Mr. Stuart. I trust it is not necessary for me to say that, in taking an 
appeal from the decision of the Chair, it is in consequence of no want of 
respect for the occupant of the Chair. I contend that the construction given 
by the Chair to the words "votes given," as relating to the place where given, 
can never receive the sanction of logic. Can this Convention give a vote 
anywhere else than here ? 

" Resolved, That two thirds of the votes given here" is not that super- 
erogation ? All votes are given here, and they can be given nowhere else. 
The rule, therefore, is plain and palpable. Two-thirds of the votes given on 
a question. I beg gentlemen to remember that the nomination of a candidate 
for President and Vice President is the only question we can make before 
this body ; that, in its business, requires a two-third vote. Now, I say with 
the utmost respect for the presiding officer, that the construction of these 
words to the place where given cannot bear the test of investigation, for we 
can give a vote nowhere else unless we adjourn somewhere else. It is of 
the utmost importance that this Convention should decide rightly. Let us 
meet every question upon the broad principles of right — do not let us com- 
promit our honor in doing a thing we do not believe to be right. 

The President. The question now is, '* Shall the decision of the Chair 
stand as the judgment of the Convention ?" 

Michigan demanded a vote by States. 

The question was then taken with the following result: 



Yeas. Nays. 

Maine. ._ 3 6 

New Hampshire 1 4 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts b\ 34 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut 2}- 3 

New York 35 

New Jersey i.. 5i li 

Pennsylvania 17f 9i 

Delaware 2 

Maryland 6 2 

Virginia 15 



Ohio 


Yeag. Nays- 
... 23 


Indiana 

IlHpois 


1^ 

11 


Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Iowa . 


6 

5 

4 


Minnesota... . 


1 2i 


Cnlifornia 

Oregon 


- 4 

3 



144 108 



Yeas. Nays. 

North Carolina... ,10 

South Carolina 1 

Georgia .• 

Florida -.---..- 

Alabama - 

Louisiana 

Mississippi .- 

Texas . 

Arkansas 

Mis-ouri... 4i 4i 

Tennessee 11 1 

Kentucky lU \ 

So the decision of the Chair was sustained. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, offered the following amendment to the resolu- 
tion : 

"And that every delegate voting for a candidate will be bound to abide by 
the result of the nomination.*' 

Mr. Howard, of Tennessee, simply desired to know who had invested the 
gentleman from Michigan with the power to bind the consciences of those 
who were his peers. 

Mr. Butler, of Massachusetts, inquired if the amendment was germane to 
the principal question. 

Mr. RiiSSELL, of Virginia, desired to say that as long as the delegation from 
Virginia continued in this Convention and participated in its proceedings, she 
expected to be boun(J by every nomination, by every act that was done. 

Mr. Stuart said that the suggestion he wished to make was this : that the 
resolution of the gentleman from Tennessee, instructing the Chair not to de- 
clare any man nominated unless he had received two-thirds of the votes which 
constituted this body. What he proposed to add was that the result, when 
declared, should be binding upon every gentleman who participated in the 
proceedings of the body. 



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Democratic National Convention, 



The President decided the amendment of the gentleman from Michigan 
not to be in order. 

The previous question upon the adoption of the resolution was moved, 
seconded, and the main question ordered. 

Ohio demanded a vote by States. 

The question was then tak:en upon Mr. Howard's resolution with the fol- 
lowing result : 





Yeas. 


Nays. 




Yeas. 


Nays 




Yeas. 


Nays 


Maine 


.-. 3 

.... 


5 
5 


North Carolina.. 
South Carolina-. 


....10 
--. 1 






Ohio 





23 


New Hampshire . 


Indiana 





13 


Vermont 





5 


Georgia 


.... 





Illinois 





11 


Massachusetts 


.... 8^ 


4M 


Florida • 


.... 





Michigan 





6 


Rhode Island 


.... 


4 


Alabama 


.... 





Wisconsin 





6 


Connecticut 


2>^ 


:ii^ 


Louiir-iana ,. 


.... 





Iowa 





4 


New York 


... 35 


o" 


Mississippi 








Minnesota 


H 


2i 


New Jersey 


.. 5^ 


IX 


Texas 








California ... 


4 





Pennsylvania 


viy^ 


oy^ 


Arkansas 





1 


Oregon 


3 





Delaware 


2 





Missouri 


.... 2i 


n 








Maryland 


.... 6 


2 


Tennessee 


... n 


1 




141 


112 


Virginia 


....16 





Kentucky 


....11 


1 









And the resolution of Mr. Howard wa<? declared to be adopted. 

Mr. BiGLER, of Pennsylvania, moved to reconsider the vote just taken, and 
to lay that motion on the table, and Mr. Bigler's motion was adopted. 

Mr. McCooK, of Ohio, now demanded that the Convention now proceed to 
vote by States for President of the United States. 

Mr. King, of Missouri. Do I understand that nominations are now in 
order ? 

The President. The Chair understands it now to be in order to call on 
the several States to vote. 

Mr King. I put in nomination, before this Convention, as a candidate for 
the office of President of the United States, Stephen A. Douglas. (Ap- 
plause.) 

^Ir. Caldwell, of Kentucky. I am instructed by the delegation from 
Kentucky unanimously to nominate for the office of President, Kentucky's 
favorite son and incorruptible statesman, James Guthrie. (Applause.) 

Mr. BiDWELL, of California. 1 desire to put in nomination Daniel S. 
Dickinson, of New York, *' the noblest Koman of them all.'* (Applause.) 

Mr. Russell, of Virginia. By the unanimous direction of the delegation 
from Virginia, I offer to this Convention the name of Robert M. T. Hunter, 
of that State. (Applause.) 

Mr. EwiNG, of Tennessee. I put in nominatior the name of the Hon. 
Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee. (Applause.) 

Mr. Stout, of Oregon. I desire to place in nomination General Joseph 
Lane, of Oregon. (Applause.) 

The Convention then proceeded in the execution of its order to vote by 
States for a candidate for the Presidency. 



FIRST VOTE FOE PRESIDENT, 

Maine — DouglasS, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire — Douglas 5. 

Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 51, Hunter 6, Davis Ij. 

Rhode Island — ^Douglas 4. 

Connecticut— Douglas 3^, Toucey 2>^. 

New York— Douglas 'JS. 

New Jersey— Guthrie 7. 

Pennsylvania — Douglas 9, Guthrie 9, Dickinson 2, 

Hunter 3, Lane 3, Pearce 1. 
Delawar a— Hunter 2. 

Maryland — Douglas 2, Dickinson 1, Hunter 6. 
Virginia— Hunter 15. 
North Carolina — Douglas 1, Hunter 9. 
South ( arolina — Hunter 1. 
Arkansas— Hunter 1. 



Missouri — Douglas 4^, Guthrie 4>^. 
Tennessee — Johnson 12, 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois — Douglas 11. 
Michigan — Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Do ugiua 5. 
Iowa — Douglas 4, 
Minnesota — Douglas 4. 
California — Dickinson 4. 
Oregon — Lane 8. 

Whole number of electoral votes, 303— Neces- 
sary to a choice, under the decision of the Chair, 
202. Douglas 146>^, Guthrie 35, Dickinson 7, 
Bunter 42, Johnson 12, Lane 6, Davis l>i, Tuucey 
2>i, Pearce], 



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The Chair decided there was no choice, and the 
Cou vent ion proceeded to » 

SECGNU VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine — Pouglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire — Douglas 6. 

Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 63^, Hunter 634. 

Rhode Island — Douglas 4. 

Connecticut — Douglas 3>^, Toucey 2X- 

New York — Douglas 35. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9)^, Guthrie 10, Hunter 3, 

Dickinson iXj Lane 3. 
Delaware — Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 2 Hunter 5, Dickinson 1. 
Virginia— Hunter 15. 
North Carolina— Douglas 1, Hunter 9, 
South Carolina — Hunter 1. 
Arkansas — bunter 1 
Missouri — Douglas 43^, Guthrie 4)i8. 
Tennessee— Johnson 12. 
Kentucky — Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana — Douglas 18. 
Illinois — Douglas 11. 
Michigan — Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin — Douglas 5. 
Iowa — Douglas 4. 
Minuesota — Douglas 4. 
California — Dickinson 4. 
Oregon — Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes, 303 — Necessary to a 
choice under the ruling of the Chair, 202. Douglas 
147, Guthrie 36>^, Hunter 41 >i, Davis 1. Toucey 
2^. Dickinson 6;», Johnson 12, Lane 6. 

The Chair decided that no choice bad been 
made, and the Convention proceeded to a 

THIRD VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 

Maine — Douglas 5, Guthrie 3, 

New Hampshire — Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Jdasnachusetts— Douglas 6i, Hunter 51, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 

Connecticut — Douglas 3i, Guthrie 2 J. 

New York — Douglas 35, 

New Jersey — Douglas 1 1-2, Guthrie 5 1-2. 

Pennsylvania— I' uuglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 9 1-2, Dick 

inson 1 1-2, Hunter 3 1-2, Lane 3. 
Delaware — Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Guthrie 2, Dickinson 1, Hunter 5. 
Virginia— Huuter 15. 
North Caroliua- Guthrie 1, Hunter 9 
Arkansas — Diet inson 1. 
A'issouri— Douglas 4 1-2, Guthiie4 1-2. 
Teonesee — Johnson 12. 
Kentucky — Guthrie 12. 
Ohio — Douglas 23. 
Indiana — Dou/ilas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan — Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. 
Minnesota— Douglas 4. 
California— Dickinson 4. 
Oregon — Lane 3. 

Whole number of electora' votes, 303 -Neces- 
sary to a choice, »nder the ruling of the Chair 202 
Douglas 148 1-2. Guthrie 42. Dickinson 6 1-2, Hun 
ter ;i6, Johnson 12, Lane 6, D.ivis 1. 

Under such ruling there being no choice, the 
Convention proceeded to a 

FOURTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

^'aine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3, 

New Hampshire — Douglas 5. 

Vermont — Douglas 5 

Massachusetts — Douglas 7, Hunter 5, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island — Douglas 4. 

Connecti'ut- D .uglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 12. 

New York— Douglas 36. 



New Jersey — Douglas 1 1-2 ; Guthrie 51-2. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2 ; Guthrie 9 1-2, Hun- 
ter 4 1-2, Lane 3, Dickinson 1-2. 

Delaware — Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 2, Guthrie 1-2, Hunter o, 
Dickinson 1-2. 

Virginia— Hunter 15. 

North Carolina— Douglas 1, Hunter 9. 

Arkansas — Hunter 1. 
issouri — Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee— Johnson 12. 

Kentucky — Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 23. 

Indiana— Douglas 13. 

Illinois — Douglas 11. 

Michigan — Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin- Douglas 5. 

Iowa — Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 4. 

California — Dickinson 4. 

Oregwn— Lane 3. 
Whole number of -votes cast, 252 — Necessary to a 

choice, under the ruling of the Chair 202. Dou- 
glas 149, Guthrie 37 1 2, Hunter'41 1-2, Da\is 1, 

Lane 6, Dickinson 6, Johnson 12. 

There being no eliction, the Convention pro- 
ceeded to a 

FIFTH VOTE FOE PRESIDENT. 

Maine — Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. * 

New Hampshire — Douglas 6. 

Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Hunter 5, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island- Douglas 4. 

Connecticut- Douglas 3 1-2 Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York — DougUis 35. 

New Jersey — Douglas 1 1-2, Guthrie 5 1-2. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 9 1-2. Dick- 
inson 1, Hunter 4, Lane 3. 

Delaware — Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 2 1-2, Guthrie 1-2, Hunter 5. 

Virginia— Hunter 15 

North Carolina— Guthrie 1, Hunter 9. 

Arkansas — Hunter I. 

Missouri — Douglas, 41-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee— Johnson 12. 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 23. 

Indiana— Douglas 18. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas H. 

Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 

Iowa — Doug' as *. 

Minnesota— Douglas 4. 

California— Dickinson 4. 

Oregon — Lane 3. 
Whole number of votes cast, 252 — Necetsary t^ 

a choice under the ruling of the (hair 202. Dou- 
glas 149 1-2, Guthrie 37 1-2, Dickinson 6, Hunter 

41, Johnson 12, Lane 6, Davis 1. 

There being no election, the Convention pro- 

ceeded to a 

SIXTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 
New Hampshire— Douglas 6. 
Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Hunter 5, Lane 1. 
Rhode Island — Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 
New York— Douglas 35. 
New Jersey— Douglas 1 1-2, Guthrie 5 12. 
Pennsylvania — Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 9 1 2, Dick- 
inson 1, Huuter 4, Lane 3. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 212, Guthrie 1-2, Hunter 5. 
Virginia— Hunter 15. 
North Carolina— Douglas 1. Hunter 9. 
Arkanf-as — Hunter 1. 
Missouri - Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2, 
Tennessee— Johnson 12. 



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Democratic National Convention, 



Kentucky — Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 23. 

Indiana — Douglas 13. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan — D )uglas 6. 

Wisconsin — Douglas 5. 

Iowa — Douglas 4. 

Minnesota — Douglas 4. 

California — Guthrie 2, Dickin&on 2. 

Oregon — Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes cast 252 — Necessary to a 
choioe, under the ruling of the Chair, 202. Dou- 
glas 149 1-2 Guthrie 39 1-2, Dickinson 3, Hunter 
41. Johnson 12, Lane 7. 

There being n© election, the Convention pro- 
^^eeded to a 

SEVEKTH VOTE FOE PRBSIORNT. 

Maine— Douglas 5. Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire — Douglas 5. 

■Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Mtssachusetts— Douglas 7, Hunter 5, Davis 1. 

Bhode Island — Douglas 4. 

€oanecticut— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

Mt?w York— Douglas 35. 

Kew Jersey —Douglas 1 1-2, Guthrie 6 1-2. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie.lu 1-. ,Hun- 

ter 4. T,ane 3. 
D 'la ware— Hunter 2. 
• Maryland— IKjuglas 2 1-2, Guthrie 1-2, Hunter 5, 
Virginia— Hunter 15. 
North OaroJina— Douglas 1, Hunter 9. 
Arkansas— Hunter 1. 
Missouri~D )ugla8 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio---Djuglas 23. 
Indiana— D )Uglag 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan- -Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa- "Douglas 4. 



^'innesota— Douglas 4. 
California"-Dickiuson 4. 
Oregon—Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes 252. Douelas 160 1-2, 
Guthrie 38 1 2, Dickinson 4, Hunter 41, Johnson 

11, Lane 6, Davis 1. 

And under the ruling of the Ghair, there being 
no choice, the Convention proceeded to an 

EIGHTH VOTE TOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 6, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire DouglaaS. 

Vermont Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts Douglas 7 1-2, Hunter 4 1-2, 

Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie2 1-2. 

New York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Donglas 1 1-2. Guthrie .'» 1-2. 

Pennsvlvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 10 1-2, 

Hunter 4, Lan»3 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 2, Guthrie 1-2, Dickinson 

1-2. Hunter 5 

Virginia Hunter 15. 

North Carolina Douglas 1, Hunter 9. 

Arkansas Hunter 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee D tuglas 1. Johnson 11. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11. 

Michigan D mglas 6 

Wisconsin Douglas 6. 

Iowa Douglas 4 

Minnesota Douglas 4 

California Dickinson 4. 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Wholenumber of votes 252. D)ugla8 150 1-2, 
Guthrie 38 1-2, Dickinson 41-2, Hunter 40 1-2, 
Johnson 11, Lane 6, Davis 1. 

Before the annoncement of the result of the eighth vote, 

Mr. Stevens, of Massachusetts, arose and stated that one of the delegates 
from Massachusetts having been ill, had substituted his alternate to cast his 
vote, and had instructed him to vote for Stephrn A. Douglas. That he 
had violated his instructions, and that the principal had been brought into 
the Convention and desired to cast his own vote, and wanted the vote of Mas- 
sachusetts changed one-half vote. 

The Prksident decided that the principal had the right at any time before 
the vote was announced, to control his vote, and the vote of Massachusetts 
would be changed according to the wishes of the gentleman, and was so 
changed before the announcement of the vote. 

Under the ruling of the Chair, there being no choice, the Convention pro- 
ceeded to a 

NINTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 5. 

Massachustts Douglas 7, Hunter 4, Davis 1 1-2 

Rhode Island Douglas 4 

Connecticut Douglas 31-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 1 1-2. Guthrie 51 2. 

Pennsylvania Douglas 91-2, Guthrie 10 1-2, 

Hunter 4, Lane 3. 

D4aware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 2 12, Guthrie 1-2, Hunter 4 

Virginia Hunter 15. 

North Carolina Douglas 1, Hunter 9. 

Arkansas Hunter 1. 



Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 

Kentucky Guthrie \i. 

Ohio Douglas 23 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11, 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California Guthrie 3, Dickinson 1 . 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes 352. Douglas 150 1-2, 
Guthrie 41, Dickinson 1, Hunter 39 1-2, Johnson 
12, Lane 6, Davis 1. 

Before the 9th vote was announced, 

Mr. Edgerton, of Minnesota arose and desired to make a change of one 



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vote from Minnesota, taking it from Mr. Douglas and giving it to Mr. John- 
son. 

Mr. Gorman objected, stating that a resolution had been adopted in their 
delegation directing him, as chairman, to cast the whole vote of Minnesota for 
Stephen A. Douglas, so long as he should consider it of advantage to Mr. 
Douglas. 

Mr. Samuels, of Iowa, arose to a point of order : that the State Conv^en- 
tion of Minnesota had passed resolutions, which, according to the decision of 
the President of this Convention, would be considered instructions, and that 
the delegMtion was bound to vote according to those instructions. 

The President decided that the delegates of Minnesota had the right to 
cast their votes as their consciences should dictate to them, and that the reso- 
lution of the Minnesota State Convention did not go so far as to amount to 
instructions, and that the vote of Minnesota could be chanajed, and was ac- 
cordingly changed before the 9th vote was announced, Mr. Edgerton and Mr. 
Fridley voting for Mr. Johnson. 



Uniler the decision of the Ghair, there hieing no Kentucky — Guthrie 12. 
choice, the Convention proceeddd to a jO hio — Houglas 23. 

Indiana—Douglas 13. 
Illinois — Douglas II. 



TBNTH VOTE FOR PRJBSIDfiNT 



Maine — Douglas 5, Guthrie U. 

Newr Hampshire — Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 6. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Hunter 4 1-2, Davis li. 

Rhode Island — Douglas 4. 

Oounecticut— Douglas 3 1- 2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

Neve York— Douglas 35. 

iNew Jersey — Douglas 1 1-2, Guthrie 5 1-2. 

Pennsylvania — Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 11 1-2, 

Hunter 3 1-2. Lane 2 1-2. 
Delaware — Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 1-2, Hu»ter 4. 
Virginia— Hunter 15 
North Carolina— Douglas 1, Hunter 9. 
Arkansas— Hunter 1. 
Missouri- Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 
Tenuessee — Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 
Kentucky — Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indianar— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan — Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa — Dtiuglas 4. 
Minnesota -Douglas 3, Johnson 1 
California— Dickinson 4. 
Oregon — Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes, 252— Dougla*" 1501-2 
Guthrie 39 1-2, Dickinson 4, Hunter 39, Johnson 
1 «, Lane 5 1-2, Davis 1 1-2. 

Under the ruling of the Chair there being no 
choice, the Conventioa proceeded to a 

ELEVENTH VOTB f OE 1PE^8IDI^•T. 

Main-e- Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, 
11-2. 

Bhode Island— Douglas 4. 

Connecticut— D(.ugla8 31-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York— Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 1 1-2, Guthrie 5 1-2. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 11 1-2, 
Huuter 31-2. Laue21-2. 

Delaware — Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 3 1-2, Outhri« 1-2, Hun- 
ter 4. * 

Virginia— Hunter 15. 

Norih Oarolma— Doaglaa 1, Hunter 9. 

Arkansas— Lane 1, 

Missouri- Douglas 4 l-% Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee— Ddiiglas 1, Johztson 11. 



Michigan---Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 

Iowa- Douglas 4. 

Minaeaota — Douglas 8, Johnson 1. 

California —Dickinson 4. 

Oregon— Lane 8. 

Whole number of votes, 252— Douglas 150 1-2, 
Guthrie 3i) 1-2, Dickinson 4, Hunter 68, Johnson, 
12, Lane 6 1-2, Davis 11-2. 

After the announcement of the Eleventh Vote, 
a motion was made to adjourn, and was put and 
lost. 

There being no choice, the Convention pro- 
ceeded to a 

TWELFTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 6, Guthrie 3 . 

NewSampsliire — Douglas 6, 

Vermont -Douglas 6. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Hunter 4 1-2, Davis 

I L-2. 
Rhode Island — Douglas 4. ' 

CoDuecticut— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 
New York— Douglas 35. 
N«w Jersey- Douglas 1 1-2, Guthrie 5 1-2. 
Pennsylvania— Dougl«68 9 1-2, Guthrie 11 1-2, 

Hunter 3 1-2, Lane 2 1-2 
Delaware — Hunter 2. 
Maryland -Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 1-2, Huw- 

ter, 4. 
Virginia — Hunter 15. 
iNorth Caroliua— Douglas 1, Hunter 9. 
Arkansas— Lane 1. 

Missouri— Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, John* on 11. 
Kentucky- -Guthrie 12. 
Ohio -Douglas 23. 



Hunter 4 1-2, Davis Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois — Douglas 11. 



ichigan — Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin — Douglas 6. 
Iowa- Douglas 4. 

Minnesota- Douglas 3, Johns >n 1. 
California — Dickinson 4. 
Oregon— Lane 3. 

Total number of votes, 252. Douglas, 150 1 2 
Guthrie 39 12, Dickinson 4, Hunter 3tt, JohnSon 
12, Lane 6 1-2, Davis 1 1-2. 

The Chair decided tfait tbere had b^n no 
ohoice made, and on motion of Mr. RicbardsoO) 
Of llliii6!8, the Convention adjoorned until'ten 
^clbck to^morro^ Mortiing. 



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Democratic National Convention, 



I^TII^TT3E3: JD J^^ST ^ 

Wednesday, May 2, 1860. 

The Convention, after having heen entertained by Gilmore^s Brass Band, 
of Boston, was called to order by the President at half-pa^t 10 A. M. 

The proceedings were opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Kendrtck. 

On motion of Mr. Atkiss, of Tennessee, the reading of the Journal of 
yesterday was dispensed with. 

The Convention then resumed the execution of its order to vote for a can- 
didate for the office of President. 



THIRTEENTH VOTJ FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine- Douorias 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire — Douglas 5. 

Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Mas=«achu8etts— Douglas 7, Hunter 4 1-2, Daris 

1 1-2. 
Rhode I-iland— Douglas 4 » 
Connecticut— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 
New York — Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 1 1-2, Guthrie 5, Lane 1-2. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 91-2, Guthrie 12, Hun- 
ter 3, Lane 2 1-2. 
Delaware -Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglass 1-2, Guthrie 1-2, Hunter 4. 
Virginia— Hunter 15. 
North Carolina— Lane 10. 
Arkansas — Lane 1. 

Missouri— Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 
Keatuckyr— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio- Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Towa— Douglas 4 
Minnesota — Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 
California— Dickinson 1, Lane 3. 
Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes, 2i2 - D ugla^ 149 1-2 
Guthrie391-2, Dickinson 1. Hunter 281-2, John- 
son 12, Lane 20, Divis 1 1-2. and Under the rul- 
ing of the Chair there was no choice, and the 
Convention proceeded to the 

FOURTEENTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 6. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Guthrie 2, Hunter 3, 

Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas S}4, Guthrie 2X. 
New York- Douglas 35. 
New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 4>^, Lane K. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9K, Guthrie 12, Hunter 3 

Lane 234. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 3>^, Guthrie K. Hunter 4. 
Virginia— Hunter 15. 
^'orth Carolina— Lane 10. 
Arkansas— Lane 1. 
Missouri— Douglas 43^, Guthrie 4>^. 
Tennessee— Douglas l, Johnson 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. 
Minnesota— Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 
Caiiforniar— Dickinson K, Lane 3>^. 
Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole No. of votes 252— Douglas 150, Guthrie 41, 
Dickmson K. Hunter 27, Johnson 12, Lane 20K 
Davis 1. 



There being no choice, the Convention proceeded 
to the 

FIFTEENTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 5 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7. Guthrie 2)^. Hunter 2K, 

Davis 1 \ 

Rhode Island— Douglas 4. "*^ 

Connecticut— Douglas 33^, Guthrie 23^. 
New York— Douglas 35. 
New Jersey— Douglas 2. Guthrie 43^, l.ane H. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 934, Guthrie 12, Hunter S, 

Lane 2%. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 3>^, Guthrie H, Hunter 4. 
Virginia— Hunter 16. 
North Carolina—Lane 10. 
Arkansas— Lane 1. 

Missouri— Douglas 4>^, Guthrie 434. /^ 

Tennessee— Douglas 1, John.son 11. 
Kentncky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois- Douglas 11. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin — Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. 
Minnesota— Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 
California— Dickmson 34, Lane S}4. 
Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes 252— Douglas 150, Guth- 
rie 41X, Dickinson K, Hunter 26>^. .Johnson 12, 
Lane 2034, Davis 1. Necessary to a choice under 
the decision of the Chair, 20J. There being no 
choice, the Convention proceeded to the 

SIXTEENTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 6, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Guthrie 234. Hunter 2X. 

Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas 3, Guthrie 234. 
New York— Douglas 35. 
New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 434, Lane 34. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 934. Guthrie 1234, Hunter 

2X. Lane 2X. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 

VI aryland— Douglas 334, Guthrie }i Hunter 4. 
Virginia— Hunter 15. 
North Carolina— Lane 10. 
Arkansas— Lane I. 
Missouri— Douglas 434. Guthrie 434. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio- Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. 
Minnesota— Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 
California— Dickmson }4, Lane 334. 
Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole No. of votes 262— Douglas 150, Guthrie ^ 
Dickinson Ht Hunter 2t), Johnson 12, Lane 20>i^ 
Davis 1. Necessary to a choice, under the decision 
of the <;hair, 202. There being no choice, the Con- 
vention proceeded to th« 



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Proceedings at 



Charleston, 



79 



8EVBNTEENTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglass. 

Verftiont— Douglas 6. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Guthrie 2K, Hunter 2>^, 
Davis 1. 

Rhode fsland— Douglas 4. 

Connecticut— Douglas 3><, Guthrie 2><. 

New York— Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 4X, Lane ]4.. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9K, Guthrie liiX, Hunter 
21-2, l.ane2l-2. 

Delaware— Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie, 1-2, Hunter 4. 

Virginia- Hunter 15. 

North Carolina— Lane 10. 

Arkansas— I. ane 1. 

Missouri— Douglas 4 1-2. Guthrie 4 1-2. 

T ennesee- Douglas 1. Johnson 11. 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— "ouglas '1'^. 

Indiana- Douglas 13, 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Vi' isconsin— Douglas 5. 

Iowa— Douglas 4. 
^ ivjinnesota- Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California— Dickinson 1-2, Lane 3 1-2. 
■^"•Oregon— Lane 3. 

•^ Whole No. of votes 25a-Douglas 150, Guthrie 42. 

Dickinson 1-2, Hunter 26, Johnson 12, Lane 20 1-2, 

Davis 1. Necessary to a choice 202. No election, 

and the Convention proceeded to the 

EIGHT KENTH VOTE FOR PRESIDEST. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont- 1 .'ouglas 5. 

Massachusetts- Douglas 7, Guthrie 2 1-2, Hunter 
2 1-2. Davis 1. 

Rhode Island— Douglas 4.' 

Connecticut— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York— Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 4 1-2, Lane 1-2. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 12, Dickin- 
son 1-2, Hunter 2 1-2, Lane 2 1-2. 

Delaware— Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 1-2, Hunter 4. 

Virginia— Hunter 15. 

North Carolina— I. ane 10. 

Arkansas— Lane 1. 

Missouri- Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee— Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 23. 

Indiana- Douglas 13. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin—Douglas 5. 

Iowa— Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California— Dickinson X, Lane 3>^. 

Oregon— Lane 3. 
Whole No. of votes 252— Douglas 150, Guthrie 41 K, 

Dickinson 1, Hunter 26, Johnson 12, Lane 20 1-2, 

Davjs 1, Required for an election. 202. No choice, 

and the President directed the Convention to pro- 
ceed to the 

NINETEENTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire- Douglas 6. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Guthrie 2K, Hunter 2K, 

Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas 3^, Guthrie 2K. 
New York— Douglas 35. 
New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 4M, Lane K. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9>^, Guthrie 12, Dickinson 

%, Hunter 2 1^'. Lane2K. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 3K, Guthrie %, Hunter 4. 
Virginia— Hunter 15. 
North Carolma— Lane 10. 
Arkansas— Lane 1 



Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 

Iowa— Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California- Dickinson ^ Lane 3>^, 

uregon— Lane 3. 

Whole No. of votes cast. 252— Douglas 160, Guth- 
rie 41^. Dickinson 1, Hunter 26. Johnson 12, Lane 
2()M, Davis 1. !No choice having been made, the 
Convention proceeded to the 

TWENTIETH BALLOT FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire- Douglas 5. 

Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Guthrie 2M, Hunter 2M , 

Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas 334, Guthrie 2K. 
New York— Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 4>^, Lane M. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9X, Guthrie 12><2, Hunter 

2^, Lane2>^. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. * 

Maryland— Douglas 3^, Guthrie >^, Hunter 4. 
Virginia— Hunter 15. 
North (Carolina -Lane 10. 
Arkansas — Lane 1. 
Missouri— Douglas 4>^, Guthrie 4><. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. 
Minnesota— Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 
California— Dickinson 14, Lane 3X. 
( regon— Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes cast, 252— Douglas ISO, 
Guthrie 42, Dickinson >i. Hunter 26, Johnson 12, 
Lane 2034, Davis 1. There being no choice, the 
Convention proceeded to the 



Missouri— Douglas 4 K, Guthrie 4>^. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 



TWENTY-FIRST VOTE FOB PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3, 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts Dougla§ 7, Guthrie 2 1-2, Hunter 

2 1-2; Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 21-2. 

New York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 4 1-2, Lane 1-2 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 12 1-2, 

Hunter21-2. Lane2 1-2. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

^'aryland Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 

Virginia Hunter 15. 

North Carolina Lane 10. 

Arkansas Lane 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2, 

Tennessee Douglas 1. Johnson 11. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23. 

Indiana Dougla"« 13. 

Illinois Dougias 11. 

Michigan Douglas 6, 

Wisconsin Dougias 4. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California Dickinson 1-2, Lane 3 1-2. 

Oregon ....Lane 8. 

Douglas 150 1-2, Guthrie 41 1-2, Dickinson 1-2, 
Hunter 26, Johnson 12, Lane 20 1-2, Davis 1. 

Whole number of votes 2''2. Necessary to a 
choice, under the decision of the Chair 202. No 
choice having been made, the Convention went 
into the 

TWENTY-SECOND VOTE FOR PRERIDINT. 

Maine .. .Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont. Douglas 5. 



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^^ Democratic National Convention, 

MMsachusetts Douglas 7; Guthrie 21-2, Hun 



ter 2 1-2, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2 

New York Douglas 35. 

Kew Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 4 1-2, I,anel-2 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 12 1-2 

Hunter 2 1-2, Lan* 2 1-2. ' 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Doulgas 4, Hunter 4 

Virginia Hunter 15. 

Norih Carolina Lane 10. 

Arkansas Lane 1. 

Missouri. Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2 



Tennesee Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 



Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Hlinois Douglas 11. 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California Dickinson 1-2, Lane 3 1-2 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Douglas 15(» 1-2, Guthrie 41 1-2, Dickinson l-'2, 
Hunter 26, Johnson 12, Lane 20 1-2, I -avis 1 
rpi ^ - . - Whole number of votes 252. No choice.' 

I he Convention then proceeded to the 23d vote for President. 



"ix7u« T'- • • ^-^y^^^^^yj. VKJ uuc ^ou. vocc lor rresjQent. 

When Virginia was called upon to vote, Mr. Russell. Chairman of thp 

S^h'r^lT^^ '' ' ^^"*^^" of privilege, asking the™ructln' f 

tne Ohair as to his duty m announcing the vote of Virginia. The practice 

crat^c'cISfnl' h'f r '' '^!^^f^^^ ^^te as a unit^n National'^Demo! 

Uwfnr?W^^^^^ long that it had become common 

aw for that delegation. He understood that a resolution was introduced kito 

tl7^':Z!lu&^^ ^^^^^^^^- ^-- that'stat" o 

voie as a unit m this body, but was withdrawn on the statement that the 

vpnfTnn T f 1 n^^""*- T^® delegates were not elected by the State Con- 
vention, but in the Congressional Districts from which they came 

t},ttZ^^^^^''^^^'^^^^i^''^^^^^^ to cast the vote of 

the State as a unit upon the nominations. Two gentlemen, however stated 
at he time that they would not hold themselves bound so t^ v<)Te wWver 
m their judgment, the interests of the party required them to c^t Tmlrent 
tn vAf ^-J. ""^f^I: ^f «*^*«d at the same time that whenever they sought 
Ipnfl ^^"'"''1^ ^' should bring the matter before the Convention^ Thesl 
fvfr«r'.°/?^^r^^*^^^^^^^ vote, desired to cast that vote 

Vrdnia t hi"^^ .recommended by the majority of the delegation flom 
Iratrthdr 'vote '^"^'"^ '"'" '^' circumstances, they had no right to sep- 
St^p'h^JnntV' ^^^ijgi^^a, said this was not the first time the vote of the 
importa^t^^^^^^ They had divided on other questions a^ 

StreTpnt^^ ^^ ^^'' Convention. He repre^ 

thfm and hpTnt /!IT ^^^^^g^°l^» ^^ich would hold him accountable to 
them, and he intended to redeem the pledges he had made to his people 
who were entitled to be heard through him ^ ^ ' 

law ofS ntt.!f'^•^^*' T^'l ^t '^'^'' ^^ ^^^ Convention and the comn.on 
IZfVJf ^Tfi?''*''' P^'> ""^ Virginia, the majority of the delegation were 
lus d to allow th^' '"'' ■! '^'* ^'^*^- ^^ ^^^2, the National Con ventfon re! 
tused to allow the mmority to separate their vote from that of the maioritv 

Mr. Yost, of Virginia, had cast his vote for Mr. Hunter as Ions as he conM 
ft^t!.lT*^ any advantage to him ; he Was now disposed to voK his col 
stituents desired, for Stephen A. Douglas. « <*« ms con- 

ool • PRESIDENT decided that unless instructions had been given by a State 
each individual delegate had a right to cast his own vote. " ^ ^ '^ 
ine result of the vote was then announced as follows: 



Maine..!!f,^^g^-5rG;Tri^^ iS^ T-^::--^-^¥ 35. 

New Hampshire Douglas 6. 

J^ermont Douglas 5. 

2 1^2,^'CvteT^''*^'^ 7, GatbTie 21-2. Hunter 
Rhode Island... ...Doufflas 4 vrVl ••■"-«»««' ^. xxuui.or ». 



New Jersey Douglas 2, (Juthrie 4 1-2, Lane 1-2 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrte 12 1-2, 

Hunter 2, Lane 2 1-2 ' 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4. Hunter 4. 



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Proceedinsrs at Charleston. 



81 



Arkansas Lane 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee Douglas 1. Johnson 11. 

Kentuckj Guthne I'i, 

Ohio Doujflas 23. 

Indiana Douglas 13. I 

Illinois Douglas U. 

Michigan IJouglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California Dickiason 1-2, Lane 3 1-2. 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Douglas 152 1-2. Guthrie 41 1-2, Dickinson 1-2, 
Hunter 25, Johnson i2. Lane 19 1-2, Davis I. 

Whole vote 252. No choice, and the Convention 
proceeded to the 

TWENTY-FOURTH VOTE FOB PBB8IDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts Douglas 7, Guthrie 2 1-2, Hun- 
ter 2 1-2, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 31-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York Dougl as 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 41-2, Lane 1-2 

Pennsvlvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 12 1-2, 

Hunter 2 1-2, Lane 21-2. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina Lane 10 

Arkansas Dickinson 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, GnthHe41-2. 

Tennesee...... Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 



Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11. 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California Dickinson 1-2, Lane 3 1-2. 

Oi'egon Lane 3. 

Douglas 151 I 2, Guthrie 41 1 2, Dickinson 1 1-2 
Hunter 25, Johnson 12, Lane 19 1-2, Davis 1. 

Whole vote 252. No choice being made, the 
Convention proceeded to a 

TWENTY-FIFTH VOTE FOB PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

^ew Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 5. ^ . « „ 

Massachusetts Douglas 7, Guthrie 2 1-2, Hun- 
ter 2 1-2, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York Douglas 36. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 4 1-2, Lane 1-2 

Pennsvlvania Douglas 91-2, Guthrie 12 1-2, 

Hunter 2 1-2, I ane 2 1-2, 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina..... Hunter 10. 

Arkansas Dickinson 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2. Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11. 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 8, Johnson 1. 

6 



California Dickinson 1-2, Lane 3 1-2. 

j 'regon Lane 3. 

Dorg as 151 1-2, Guthrie 41 1-2, Dickinson 1 l-2» 

Hunter 35. Johnson 12, Lane 9 1-2, Davis 1. 
1 Whole number of votes 252. No choice being 

made, the Convention proceeded to the 

TWENTY-SIXTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts- Douglas 7, Guthrie 2K, Hunter 2><, 

Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas 3>^, Guthrie 2}i. 
New York— Douglas 35. 
New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie il4. Lane K. 
Pennsylvania-Douglas 9><. Guthrie 12'A, Hunter 

2^, Lane 2)4. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 
Maryland— Douglas 4, Hunter 4, Lane 1. 
Virginia— Hunter 14. 
North Carolina— Dickinson 10. 
Arkansas— Dickinson 1. 
Missouri— Douglas 4X, Guthrie i^i, 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
■ 'hio— Douglas 28. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. ^ 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Lane 1. 
California— Dickinson 1, Lane 3. 
Oregon— Lane 3. 

Total number of votes cast, 252— Douglas 151 K, 
Guthrie 41 K, Dickinson 12, Hunter 25, Johnson 12, 
Lane 9, Davis 1. So there was no choice. 

Mr. Brown, of North Carolina, in casting the vote 
of North Carolina on this ballot, said she would 
vote for that distinguished statesman, incorruptible 
patriot, and National Democrat, Daniel y. Dickin- 
son, of New York. 

The Convention then proceeded to take the 



TWENTY-SEVENTH VOTE FOB PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 6, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 6. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. „ _ ,^ . ^,^ „ * m^ 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Guthrie 2K Hunter 2>^, 

Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4^ 
Connecticut— Douglas 3)^, Guthrie 2K. 
New York— Douglas 35. ^ , , ,,, ^ 
New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie ^H, Lane ><. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9K, Guthrie 12>^, Hunter 

214, Lane 2v^. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 
Maryland— Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 
Virginia— Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 
North Carolina— Dickinson 10. 
Arkansas— Dickinson 1. 
Missouri— Douglas 4K, Guthrie 4J<. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Johnson 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio-Douglas 23. ^ 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas H. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. ^ , , 
Minnesota-Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 
Oalifornia— Guthrie 1, Dickinson 1, Lane 2. 
Oregon— Lane 3. 

Total vote 252— DouglRS 151 >^, Guthrie 42M, Dick- 
inson 12, Hunter 25, Johnson 12, Lane 8, Davis 1. 
No choice, and the Convention proceeded to the 

TWENTY-EIGHTH VOTE FOB PRESIDENT. 

^f alne— Dougl as 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 6. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 7, Guthrie 2)^, Hunter 2X* 

Davis 1. _ . ^ 

Rhode Island— Dougjas 4. ^ ^, , ^,^ 
Connecticut— Douglas 3>^, Guthrie 2M. 
New York- Douglas 35. 
New Jersey-Douglas 2, Guthrie 4M, Lane K. 
Pennsylvania -Douglas 9^, Guthrie 13, Hunter 2K 

Lane 2. 
Delaware— Hnnter 2. 



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82 



Democratic National Convention, 



Maryland— Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 
Virginia— Douglas 1. Hunter 14. 
North Carolina— Dickinson 10. 
Arkansas— Dickinson 1. 
Missouri— Douglas 4M, Guthrie 4>^. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Johnson U. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
'Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas U. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. 
Minnesota— Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 
California— Dickinson Ij^, Lane 23^. 
Oregon- Lane 3. 

Total vote 252— Douglas 161 >^, Guthrie 42, Dickin- 
son 12 >^, Hunter 25, Johnson 12, Lane 8, Davis 1. 
No choice, and the Convention proceeded to the 

TWENTY-NINTH VOTE FOR POESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Veimont Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts Douglas 7, Guthrie 2 1-2, Hun- 
ter 2 1-2, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2, 

N w York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 41-2, Lanel-2. 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 13, Hun- 
ter 2 1-2. Lane 2. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina Dickinson 10. 

Arkansas Dickinson 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee Douglas 1 , Johnson 11. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 28. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11. 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

"VVisconsin Doutrlas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

3Iinnesota Douglas 3, Johnson 1, 

California Dickinson 2, Lane 2. 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Douglas 151 1-2, Guthrie 42, Dickinson 18, Hun- 
ter 25, Johnson 12, Lane 7 i-2^ Davis 1. 

Total vote 262. No choice, and the Convention 
proceeded to the 

THIRTIETH VOTB FOR PBE8ID15T. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthri« 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Yermont Douglag 5. 

Massachusetts Douglas 7, Guthrie 2 1-2, Hunter 

2 1-2, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2 

New York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 4 1-2, Lrtne 1-2 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie J5, Hunte." 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina Dickinson 10. 

Arkansas Dickinson 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2 

Tennessee Douglas I, Guthrie 1, Johnson 10 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. -^auBon l\j. 

Ohio Douglas 23. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11, 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin. v., ..Douglas 5. 

lawa ]>oiigUui 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Johnson 1 



California Dickinson 2, Lane 2. 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Douglas 151 1-2, Guthrie 45, Dickinson 13, Hun* 
ter 25, Johnson 11, Lane 5 1-2, Davis I. 

Total vote 252. No choice, and the Convention 
proceeded to the 

THIRTY FIRST VOTE FoR PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

\ew Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Do glas 5. 

MHssachu-etts Douglas 7, Guthrie 2 1-2, Hun- 
ter 2 1-2, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York .... Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 4 1-2, Lane 1-2. 

Fennsylvauia Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie i7 1-2. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 

Virgiaia Doug-as 1, Hunter 14. 

North CaroliuH Hunter 10. 

Arkansas Dickinson 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee Duuglas 1, Guthrie 1. Johnson 10. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11. 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

viinnesota Douglas 3, Johnson L 

California Dickinson 2, Lane 2. 

Oregon Lane 8, 

Douglas 161 1-2, Guthrie 47 1-2, Dickinson 3, 

Hunter 32 1-2, Johnson 11, Lane 5 1-2, Davis 1. 
Total vote 252. No choice, and the Convention 

proceeded to the 

THIRTY-SECOND VOTE FOB PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 8. 

New Hampshire Donglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts Douglas 7, Guthrie 2K, Hunter 

2 >^, Davis L 

Khode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3i. Guthrie 2i. 

New York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey.... Douglas 2, Guthrie 4%, Lane %. 

Pennsyl^uia Douglas 9>^, Guthrie 17>^. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas Dickinson 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4>^, Guthrie 4>^. 

Tennessee Douglas 1, Guthrie 1, Johnson 10. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11. 

i'lichigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 6. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California Dickinson 2, Lane 2. 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Douglas 152%, Guthrie 47)^, Dickinson 3, Hun 
ter 22i, Johnson 11, Lane 14 >^, Davis 1. 

Total vote 252. No choice, and the Convention 
proceeded to the 

THIRTY-THIRD VOTE FOB PBBSIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 6. 

Massachusetts Douglas 7, uGthrie 2>^, Hunter 

2i,Davisl. 



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Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Cout ecticut Douglas 3>^, Guthrie 2}4. 

New York Douglas 85. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 4)4, Lane )4. 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Caioliua Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas Dickinson 1. 

Aiissouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee Doughis 1. Guthrie 1, Johnson 10. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 2d. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Dlinois Douglas 11 

Michigan Dougias 6. 

Wiseonsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota i>(ouglas 3, Johnson 1. 

Calitornia Dickinson 2, Lane 2. 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Douglas 152 1-2, Guthrie 47 1-2, Dickinson 3, 
Hunter 22 t-2, Johnson 11, Lane 14)^, Davis 1. 

Total vote 252. No choice, and the Convention 
proceeded to the 

THIETY-FOURTH VOTE FOB PBESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. | 



Vermont Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts Douglas 7, Guthrie 2K. Hunter 

2^, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3^, Guthrie 2%, 

New York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 4 i-^. Lane ^. 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9%, Guthrie 17*. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4. Hunter 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas Dickinson 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4i, Guthrie 4*. 

Tenijessee Douglas 1, Guthrie 1, Johnson 10, 

Kentucky Guthrie 12, 

Ohio Douglas 23, 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11, 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4, 

Minuexota Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California Dickinson 4. 

V>regon Lane 3. 

Douglas 1521, Guthrie 47|, Dickinson 5, Hunter 
22 J^, Johnson 11, Lane 12i, Davis 1. 

Total number no votes 258. No choice. 



Mr. Krum, of Missouri. Mr. President, I rise to a privileged question. My 
attention has been called to the proceedings of the City Council of Charles- 
ton in respect to the Hall occupied by this Convention. The very magnani- 
mous and liberal action of the Council seems to render it proper that it 
should meet with an appropriate response from this Convention, i, therefor e^ 
move the adoption of the following resolution ; 

Resolved, That the thanks of tne Convention be returned to the City 
Council of Charleston for the liberal appropriation made by said Council to 
defray the expense of the Hall of the South Carolina Institute, in which the 
sessions of this Convention have been held. 

The resolution was unanimously adopted. 

On motion of Mr. Ashe, of North Carolina, the Convention then took a 
J. ecess till 5 o'clock P. M. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The Convention re-assembled at 5 o'clock, and the roll of States was at 
once called for the thirty-fifth ballot, with the following result : 

THIRTY-FIFTH VOTE FOB PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 6M, Guthrie 8>^, Hunter 2, 

Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas 3><, Guthrie 2\i, 
New York— Douglas 35. 
New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 4>^, Lane K. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9>^, Guthrie 17 X. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 
Maryland— Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 
Virginia- Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 
North Carolina— Douglas 1, Lane 9. 
Arkansas— Dickinson 1. 

Mr. GiTTiNGS, of Maryland, moved that after next ballot, the Convention 
adjourn to meet in the city of Baltimore on the first Monday of June next, 

Mr. Ludlow, of New York, raised the question of order, that the motion 
was not in order while the Convention was in the execution of its order^ 
adopted under the previous question. 

Mr. Eandall, of Pennsylvania, wanted to address the Convention, but 
was decided to be out of order. 



Missouri— Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

'I ennesee— J'ouglas 1, Johnson 11. 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 2a. 

Indiana— Douglas 13. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 

Iowa— Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Johnson 1. 

California— Dickinson 3 1-2. Lane 1-2, 

Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole No. of votes 252— Douglas 162, Guthrie 47M 
Dickinson 43^, Hunter 22, Johnson 12, Lane 13, 
Davis 1. No election. 



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Democratic National Convention, 



The President decided that a motion to name a time and place of meet- 
ing was, by the rules and practice of the House of Representatives, 
always in order. 

Mr. John Cochran, of New York, said the motion to fix the time of 
adjournment was a privileged question, but when the matter of place was 
added, the question became one not of privilege. 

Mr. GriTTiNGS said, at the suggestion of gentlemen around him, he would 
withdraw the motion, to renew it at some subsequent time. 

The thirty- sixth vote was then taken and announced as follows : 

THIRTY -SIXTH VOTE FOB PRESIDENT* 

Maine— Oouglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Oouglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 6, Guthrie 4, Hifliter 

Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 
New York— Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 4 1-2, Lane 1-2, 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17K. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 
Maryland— Douglas 4, Hunter. 4. 
Virginia— Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 
"North Carolina— Douglas 1, Lane 9, 
Arkansas— Dickinson 1. 

On the above vote Arkansas cast one vote for Breckinridge. 

Mr. Beck, of Kentucky, appealed to the gentleman to withdraw that vote. 
He assured him it was not the wish of Mr. Breckinridge to appear here as a 
candidate in opposition to the distinguished gentleman from Kentucky, whose 
name had been before the Convention from the first. 

The vouc was accordingly withdrawn and cast for Dickinson. 

Mr. EwiNG, of Tennessee, said the delegation from the State of Tennessee 
had, with one exception, cast their vote steadily for a gifted son of that 
State. Without communication with their candidate, however, a majority 
of the delegation had come to the conclusion to withdraw their vote from him, 
and they hoped a nomination would now be made. 

The Convention then proceeded to a 37th vote with the following result : 



Missouri- Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2, 

Tennessee— Douglas 1. Johnson 11, 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 23. 

Indiana— Douglas 13. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6, 

Wisconsin— Dougla* 5, 

Iowa— Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Johnson 1, 

California— Dickinson 3>^, Lane >^, 

Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole No, of votes 252— Douglas 151 >^, Guthrie 48, 
Dickinson 414', Hunter 22, Johnson 12, Kane 13, 
Davis 1. Required for an election. 252. No choice. 



THIRTY-SEVENTH VOTE FOB PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 6. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 6, Guthrie 6, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 

Connecticut— I ouglas 33^, Guthrie 2M. 

New York- Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 4>^ Lane K. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9>^, Guthrie 17X. 

Delaware— Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 

Virginia— Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolma— Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas— Dickinson 1. 

Missouri— Douglas 4>^, Guthrie 4X. 

Tennessee— Douglas 1, Gnthrie 10>^, Johnson }i, 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 23. 

Indiana— Douglas 13. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin— Douglas 6. 

Iowa— Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 

California— Dickinson 3X. Davis ^. 

Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole No. of votes cast 252— Douglas 151 K, Guth -- . . 

rie 64>i, Dickinson 5>i', Hunter 16. Johnson >i, Lane Guthrie 66, Dickinson 6>i, Hunter 16, Johnson 0, 
12K, Davis 13^. No choice. Lane 13. No choice. 

^Ir. GriTTiNQs, of Maryland, then desired to renew his motion, that when 
the Convention adjourns, it adjourn to meet in Baltimore on the first Mon- 
day in June. 

The Pbesident decided the motion out of order, on the ground suggested 
by Mr. Cochran, when the motion was before made,. The motion could be 
made that when the Convention adjourns, it adjourn to meet on the first 



THIRTy^EIvJHTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 
New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 
Vermont— Douglas 5. 
Massachusetts— Douglas 6, Guthrie 7, 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
(.'onnecticut— Douglas 3><, Guthrie 2H. 
New York— Douglas 35. 
New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 4^j Lane H. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9X, Guthne 17/«. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 
Maryland— Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 
Virginia— Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 
North Carolina— Douglas 1, Lane 9, 
Arkansas — Dickinson 1. 
Missouri— Douglas 4^, Guthrie 4>^. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas U. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
]owa-»Douglas4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dichinson 1. 
Call ornia— Dickinson 3>i, Lane X. 
Oregon— Lane 3. 
Whole number of votes cast, 252— Douglas 151 K. 



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Monday of nexiJunei, and the place of meeting could be fixed at some 
subsequent tim-e. . . , „ xi. i 

Mr. GiTTiNGS said be would submit bis motion m that form ; the only 
object be bad in making tbe motion was to enable bim to go home to bis 

family. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, moved to lay Mr. Gittings' motion to adjourn on 
tbe table, which motion carried, and Mr. Grittings' resolution was laid upon 

tbe table. - -r» . i i. j 

Tbe Convention then proceeded to take the 39th vote for President, and 

tbe following was tbe result : 



THIRTY-NINTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 
New Hampshire— Douglas 6. 
Vermont— Douglas 5 ^ ^ ,, . „ 
M assachusetts— Douglas 6, Guthrie 7. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4 , 

Connecticut— Douglas 3M, Guthrie 2K. 
New York— Douglas 35. _ , . ^ 
New Jersey-Douglas 2, Guthrie 5.^ 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 93^, Guthrie nyi. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. ^ ^^ . . 
Maryland— I *ouglas 4, Guthrie 4. 
Virgmia-Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 
North Carolina— Oouglasl, Lane 9. 
Arkansas-^ ickinsonl. 
Missouri— Douglas 4K, Guthrie 4^- 
Tennessee— DouglaB I, Guthrie 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 2y. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. „._,,, , 

Minnesota— Douglas 8, Dickinson 1. 
California— Dickinson 3%, Lane >i. 

^vfhoVV?o''^of votes 252-Do«gla8 mK, Gtrthrie 
66 H. Dickinson 53^. Hunter 16,. Lane 12 M, 
No choice. 

FORTIETH -VOTE FOR PRBSIDBNT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 
New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 
Vermont— Douglas 5 , ^ ^, . „ 
Massachusetts— Douglas 6. Guthrie 7. 
Rhode Island-Douglas 4 _ ^, . ... 
Connecticut— Douglas 3>^, Guthrie 2M. 
New York- Douglas 35. ^ ^^ . ^ 
New Jersey-Douglas 2. Guthrie 5^ . 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9^, Guthrie nx. 
Delaware— Hunter 2 ^ ^^ . . 
Maryland— Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 
Vlrginla-Douglas 1 Hunfceri4. 
North Carolina— '^owglaa 1, Lane 9. 
Arkansas— Wckinson 1. 
Missouri— Douglas 4>^, Guthrie 4%. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Guthrie i;. 
Kentucky— Outhrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana— i'ouglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
Wisconsin— Douglas 5^ 
Iowa— Douglas 4 „ ^. . . , 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dickm^on}- 
California— Dickinson 3^, Lane M. 

vv hoirnuufber o' yotes 2o2— Douglas 1 51 M, Guth- 
rie 663^, Dickinson 5^, Hunter 16. Lane 12>^. 
No choice. 

FORTY-FIRST VOTE FOE PEESIDENT- 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 
New Hampshire— Douglas 6. 
Vermont— Douglas 5 ^ ^ ^^ , ^ 
Massachusetts— Douglass, Guthne <, 
Rhode Island-Douglas 4. . 

Connecticut— Douglas 3Ji, Guthne 2K. 
New York— Douglas 35. ^ ^, . ^ 
New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthne 5. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9M, Guthrie 17K. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. ^ , . , 
Maryland-Douglas 4, Guthne 4. 
Virginia— Douglas 1. Hunter 14. 
North Carolina— Douglas 1, Lane 9. 
Arkaasas— Dickinscua 1. 



Missouri— Douglas 4K, Guthrie 4>^. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 
Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio— Douglas 23. 
Indiana— Douglas 13. 
Illinois— Douglas 11. 
Michigan— Douglas 6. 
V\ isconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. 



i-owa, — uougias '±. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dickingoa 1. 
California— Dickinson 8, Lane 1. 
Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole No. of votes 262— Dowglae ISIM, Guthrie 
66 M.Dickinson 5, Hunter 16, Lane 13. 

No choice. 

FORTY-SECOND VOTE FOR PRESIMNT. 

Maine- Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire — Douglas 6. 

^"^6! mcmt^ — Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 6, Guthrie 7. 

Rhode Island — Douglas 4 

Connecticut— Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York — Douglas 35. 

New Jersfy— Douglas 2, Guthrie 5 

Pena8.vlvaaia— Douglas 91-2, Guthrie 171-2. 

Delaware -Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 

Virginia— Douglas I, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina— Douglas 1 Lane 9. 

Arkansas — Dickinson 1. 

Missouri— Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee— Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio- Douglas 23. 

Indiana— Douglas 13. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 

Iowa— Douglas 4 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 

California— Dickinson 3, Lane i. 

Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes, 252 - Douglas 1511-2, 
Guthrie 66 1-2, Dickinson 6, Hunter 16, Lane 13. 

No choice. 

FORTY-THIED VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3, 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 5.» , . „ ,^ . , 

Massachusetts Douglas 6, Guthne 6, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. „ ^. . ^ , „ 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthne 21-2. 

New York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthjie ^ 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

Df'laware Hunter 2. 

Vlaryland Douglas 4, Hunter 4. 

Virginia Douglas L Hunter 14. 

North Carolina Douglas I, Lane 9. 

Arkansas Dickinson 1- ^ , . ^ , „ 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthne 4 1-2. 

Tennessee Douglas 1. Guthrie 11. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11. 



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Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Doug las 4. 

Minnesota DouglasS Dickinson 1. 

California Dickinson 3, Lane 1. 

Oiegon ....Lane 3. 

Donglas 151 1 -2, Guthrie 65 1-2, Dickinson 5, 
Hunter 16, Lane 13, Davis 1. 

Whole number of votes 2'i2. No choice. 

rCRTY-roURTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine .. .Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 5. 

31assachu8ett8 Douglas 6. Guthrie 6, Davis 1 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York Douglas 35. 

^ew Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 5- 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Doulgas 4, Guthrie 4, 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

N Tth Carolina Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

ArUansas Dickinson 1. 

Missouri Douglas 41-2. Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennesee Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23 

Indiana Douglas 18. 

Illinois Douglas 11. 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 

California Dickinson 3, Lane 1. 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Douglas 151 1-2, Guthrie 65 1-2, Dickinson 6, 
Hunter 16, Lane 13, Davis 1. 

Whole number of votes 252. No choice, and 
45th vote ordered. 



roRTV-FIFTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 

Maine— Douglass, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 6. 

Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 6, Guthrie 6, Davis 1 

Rhode Island — Douglas 4. 

Connecticut— Douglas '6i, Guthrie 2>^. 

New York— Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 5. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

Delawara— Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 

Virginia— Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina — Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas— Dickinson 1 

Missouri— Douglaf? 4^, Guthrie 4>^. 

Tennessee— Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Uhio^Douglas 23. 

Indiana— Douglas 13. 

Illinois — Douglas 11. ^ 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin — Dougias 5. 

Iowa— Douglas 4, 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 

^-ilifornia— Dickinson 3, Lane 1. 

Oregon— Lane 3. 

Douglas 151 >^, Guthrie 65i, Dickinson 5, Hun 
ter 16, Lane 13. Davis 1 

Total vote, i252. No choice, and 46th vote or- 
dered. 

FORTY-SIXTH VOTE FOE PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 5. 

Mas8achustts Douglas 6, Guthrie 6, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 



New York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 5 

Pennsylvania Douglas 91-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

D^'laware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas Dickinson I. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11, 

Michigan Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 

California......DiGkin8on 3, Lane 1, 

Oregon , Lane 3 

Douglas 151 K, Guthrie 65'^, Dickinson 5, Hun- 
ter 16, Lane 13, Davis 1. 

Whole number of votes 252. No choice, and 
47th vote ordered. 

FORTY-SEVENTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 6. 

Vermont DouglaS 5. 

Massachusetts Douglas 6, Guthrie 6, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

Vew York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 5- 

Pennsylvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Maryland Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

N;orth Carolina Douglas 1, Lan« 9. 

Arkansas Dickinson 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee Douglas 1, GuthiLll. 

Kentucky Guthrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas 11. 

Michigan Douglas 6, 

Wisconsin .....Douglas 5. 

Towa Douglas 4. 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Dickinson 1, 

California Dickinson 3, Lane 1. 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Douglas 151 1-2. Guthrie 65 1-2, Dickinson 5, 
Hunter 16, Lane 13, Davis 1. 

Whol^ number of votes, 262- No choice, and 
48th vote ordered. 

FOETY-EIGHTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT 

Maine— Douglas 6, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire — Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 6, Guthrie 6, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 

Connecticut— Douglas 3 1- 2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York— Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 5. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

Delaware — Hunter 2 

Maryland— Douglas 4, Guthrie4. 

Virginia— Dou6 1 as 1, Hunter 14 

North Carolina— Douglas 1. LaRe 9. 

Arkansas— Dickinson 1. 

^'issouri- Douglas 4 1-2. Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessjee— Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 23. 

Indiana— Douglas 13. 

Illinois— Douglas Jl. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin- Douglas 5. ^ 

Iowa— Douglas 4. 



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Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dickinson 1 
California— Diclunson 3, Lane 1. 
Oregon — Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes, 252— Douglas- 151 1-2 
Gnthrie 65 1-2, Dickinson 5, Hunter 16, Lane 13, 
Davis 1. 

No choice, and 4:9th vote ordered. 

rORTY-NINTH VOTB FOE PRESIDENT. 

Vaine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3, 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont— D lUglas 5 

Massachusetts— Douglas 6 Guthrie 6 Davis I. 

Rhmle Island— Djuglas 4 

Connecticut— D 'Ugla«^ 3 1-2. Guthrie 2 12. 

New York— Douglas 35. 

New Jer»ey— Dmglas 2, Guthrie 5 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2 ; Guthrie 17 1-2. 



Maryland— Douglas 4. Guthile 4. 

Virginia— Douglas 1. Hunter 14. 

North Carolina— Douglas I, Lane 9. 

Arkansas — Lane 1 

Missouri— Douglas 4 12. Guthrie 4 1-2, 

Tennessee— D^>ugias I.Guthrie 11. 

Kentucky— -Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 23. 

Indiana— Douglas 13. 

I Uiuois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin— Douglas 6. 

Iowa— Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dickinson 1 

California— Dickinson 3, Lane 1. 

Oregon- Lane 3. 

Whol6 number of votes cast, 252— Douglas 15H, 
Guthriu 05 1-2, Dickinson 4, Hunter 16, Lane 14, 
Davis 1^ No :;hoice. 



Delaware— Hunter 2. • 

A Delegate, from North Carolina, moved that the Convention adjourn, 
which motion w^s put and lost. 

The Conveation then proceeded to 
the following result 



» take the 50th vote for President, with 



FIFTIETH VOTE POR PERBIDBNT. 

Maine— Douglas 6, Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Dmglas 6. 

Missachusetts— Douglas 6, Guthrie 6, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 

Connecticut -Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New Y««rk— Douglas 35. 

New Jersev— Douglas 2, Guthrie 5. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

Delaware — Hunter 2. 

Maryland- Dcaglas 4, Guthrie 4. 

Virginia- Douglas 1, Hunter 14 

North Carolina— Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas— Lane 1 

Missouri— Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tenn'^-see— Douglas 1, Guthrie II. 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio — Douglas 23. 

Indiana—Douglas 13. 

II linoi<»— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin -Douglas 5. 

Iowa-- Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 8, Dickinson 1. 

California— Dickinson 3, Lane I. 

Oregon— Lane 8. 

Whole number of votes, 252— Douglas 1511-2 
Guthrie 6.5 1-2, Dickinson 4, Hunter II), Lam 
14, Davis 1. No choice 

FIFTY-FIRST VOTE FOR PRK8IDBN!t* 

Maine— Douglas 5. Guthrie 3 . 

New Hampshire— Douglas 6. 

Vermont -Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts- -Douglas 6, Guthrie fi, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 

Connecticut— Douglas 8 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York— D'Miglas 35. 

New Jersey- Douglas 2, Guthrie 5 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

Delaware— Hunter 2. 

Maryland -Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 

Virginia— Donglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina— Douglas 1, Lme 9. 

Arkansas — Lane 1. 

Missouri— Douglas 4 1-2. Guthrie 4 1-2. 

Tennessee— Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 

Keuiuoky- -Guthrie 12. 

Ohio -Douglas 23. 

Indiana — Douglas 13, 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 



Iowa- Douglas 4. 

Minnesota- Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 
California— Dickinson 3, Lane 1 
Oregon— Lane 3 

Total number of votes, 252, Douglas, 151 1-2, 
Guthrie 161-2. Dickinson 4, Hunter 16, Lane 14, 
Davis 1. No choice. 

PIETY-SECONn VOTB FOR PRESIDENT, 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guthrie 3. 
New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 
Vermont— Douglas 5. „ ,^ . . 

Massachusetts- Douglas 6, Hunter 6, Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas Zj4, Guthrie 2>^. 
New York— Douglas 35. 
Pennsylvania— Douglas 9>^, Guthrie 1*3^. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 
Maryland— Douglas 4 Guthrie 4. 
Virginia— Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 
North Carolina— Douglas 1, Lane 9. 
Arkansas— Lane 1, 
Missouri— Douglas iK, Guthrie i%. 
Tennessee— Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 
1 Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 
Ohio — Douglas 23. 
i Indiana— Douglas 13. 
llllinois — Douglas 11. 
i Michigan — Douglas 6. 
, I Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 
Iowa— Douglas 4. 

Minnesota^Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 
California — Dickinson 3, Lane 1. 
Oregon — Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes, 252. Douglas 161 J4» 
Guthrie 65>^, Dickins n4, Hunter 16, Lane 14» 
Davis 1. No choice. 

FIFTY-THIRD VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine— Douglas 6, Guthrie 3. 
New Hampshire- Donglas 5. 
Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Massachusetts— Douglas 6, Hunter 6. Davis 1. 
Rhode Island— Douglas 4. 
Connecticut— Douglas Hy Guthrie 2J. 
New York— Douglas 35. 
New Jersey — Douglas 2. Guthrie 5. 
Pennsylvania— l»ouglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 
Delaware— Hunter 2. 
Maryland— Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 
Virginia— Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 
North Carolina— Douglas 1, Lane 9. 
Arkansas — Lane 1. 

I Missouri— Douglas 41-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 
I Tennesee— Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 



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83 



Democratic National Convention, 



Kentncky— Guthrie 12. 

Oh.o — Doiij^las 23. • 

In liana — Doualas 13. 

TUinois— Do?iglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wiscon«n— D.)uglas 6. 

Iowa — Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 

Calif<»rnia — Dickinson 3, Lane 1. 

Oregon— Lane 3. 

Tnta vote 252. Douglas 1511-2. Guthrie 65)^. 
Dickinson 4, Hunter Id Lane 14, Davis 1. 

No choice. 

riFTY-FOURTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine — Douglas 5. Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire — Douglas 5. 

Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Massacbusetts — Douglas 6, Hanter 6, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island— Douglas 4. * 

Connecticut -Douglas 3 1-2 Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New YurK— Douglas 35. 



New Jersey— Douglas 2. Guthrie 5. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, ftuthrie 17 1-2. 

Delaware — Hunter 2. 

Maryland— Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 

Virginia— Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina— Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas — Lane 1. 

Vlissouri— Douglas, 41-9, Hunter 4 1-2. 

Tennessee— Douglas 1. Guthrie 11. 

Kentucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio — Douglas 23. 

Indiana— Douglas IS. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

iHichigan— Douglas *>. 

Wisconsin— Douglas 5. 

Iowa — Douglas ^. 

^linnesota — Douglas 3, Dick'nson 1. 

California- Dickinson 1, Lane 3. 

Oregon— Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes cast, 2.52— Douglas 151 
1-2, Guthrie Q\, Dickinson 3, Hunter ^u,;-* Lane 16 
Davis 1. No choice. 



Mr. Green, of North Carolina, moved that the Convention adjourn. The 
question was taken, and the motion did not prevail. 

The Convention then proceeded to the 55th ballot fur President, with the 
folio winof result : 



FtPrY-FlFTH VOTE POR PRESIDJINT. 

Maine— Douglas 6, Guthrie 3. 

New H'impp!hire — Douglas 5. 

Vermont— Douglas 5 

Ma-ssuchu-etts- Douglas 6, Guthrie 6, Davis 1. 

Rho'le Isfland — Douglas 4. 

Ccnnecricut— D.>uglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

New York— Douglas 35. 

New Jersey — Douglas 2, Guthrie 5. 

Pennsylvania — Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

De'aware— Hunter 2. 

Maryland — Douglas 4. Guthrie 4. 

Vi?ginia— Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North Cai'olina — Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas — Lane 1. 

Missouri - Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2, 

Tf^unessee — Doug'as 1, Guthrie 11, 

Kentucky — Guthrie 12. 

Ohio— Douglas 23 

I uiiiana— Douglas 13. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan — Douglas 0, 

Wisconsin — Douglas 5. 

Iowa — Douglas 4. 

Minnesota — Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 

California — Dickinson 3, Land 1. 

Oregon — Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes cast. 252— Douglas 151 j, 
Guthrie 65 1-i, Dickinson 4, Hunter lb, Lane 14, 
Davis 1. No choice. 

FIFTY-SIXTH VOTB FOR PRRSIDBNT. 

Maine— Douglas 5, Guihrie 3. 

New Hampshire— Douglas 5. 

Vermont — Douglas 5. 

Musaachusetts— Douglas 6, Guthrie fi, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island — Douglas 4. 

Connecticut — Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie 2 1-2. 

Mew Yom — Douglas 35. 

New Jersey— Douglas 2, Guthrie 5. 

Pennsylvania— Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-i. 

Delaware— Hunter 2 

Blaryland— Douglas 4, Guthrie 4. 

Virginia— Douglas I, Hunter 14. 

North Carolina- -Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas— Lane 1. 

Missouri— Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 



Tennessee -Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 

lientucky— Guthrie 12. 

Ohio- Douglas 23. 

Indiana — Douglas 13. 

Illinois— Douglas 11. 

Michigan— Douglas 6. 

Wisconsin-— Douglas 5. 

Iowa- -Douglas 4. 

Minnesota— Douglas 3, Dickinson 1. 

'"alifornia— Dickinson . , Lane 1. 

jregon — Lane 3. 

Whole number of votes 252. Douglas<l6) 1-2, 
Guthrie G6 1-2, Dickinson 4, Hunter 16, Lane 14, 
Davis 1. No choice. 

FIFTT-8EVENTH VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 

Maine Douglas 6. Guthrie 3. 

New Hampshire Douglas 5. 

Vermont Douglas 5. 

MassHchuseits Douglas 6, Guthrie 6, Davis 1. 

Rhode Island Douglas 4. 

Connecticut Douglas 3 1-2, Guthrie2 1-2. 

New York Douglas 35. 

New Jersey Douglas 2, Guthrie 5. 

Pennsvlvania Douglas 9 1-2, Guthrie 17 1-2. 

Delaware Hunter 2. 

Marylan** Douglas 4. Guthrie 4. 

Virginia Douglas 1, Hunter 14. 

North CaroUna Douglas 1, Lane 9. 

Arkansas Laue 1. 

Missouri Douglas 4 1-2, Guthrie 4 1-2. 

I'ennessee Douglas 1, Guthrie 11. 

Kentucky Guihrie 12. 

Ohio Douglas 23. 

Indiana Douglas 13. 

Illinois Douglas IL 

Michigan Douglas 6 

Wisconsin Douglas 5. 

Iowa Douglas 4 

Minnesota Douglas 3, Dickinson L 

California Dickinson 3, Lane 1. 

Oregon Lane 3. 

Douglas 151 1-2, Guthrie 65 1-2, Dickinson 4, 
Hunter IH, Lane 14, Davis 1. 

Whole number of votes 2,52. Necessary to a 
choice, under the decision of the Convention, 202. 
No choice having been made. 



Mr. Ashe, of North Carolina, moved that the Convention adjourn, and 
upon that motion he called for a vote by States. 



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Proceedings ot Charleston. 89 

Mr. GiTTiNGS, of Maryland, moved that when they adjourn, it be to meet 
at Baltimore, the first day of June next, and he called for a vote by States. 

On motion of Mr. Montgomery, the motion of Mr. Gittings was laid upon 
the table. 

The question was then taken on Mr. Ashe's motion to adjourn, and it 
resulted as follows : — Yeas 148, nays 100. 

The Convention then adjourned till Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. 



Thursdat, May 3, 1860. 

The Convenlion was called to order by the President at 10 o'clock, A. M. 

Prayer was offered by the Rev. Mr. Mickler. 

On 'motion, the rending of yesterday's Joumal was dispensed with. 

Mr. Russell, of Virginia, rose in his place and offered the following reso- 
lution, viz : 

Resolved, That when this Convention adjourn to-day, it be adjourned to 
re-assemble at Baltimore, Maryland, on Monday, the 18th day of June next, 
aTid that it be respectfully recommei ded to the Democratic party of the sev- 
eral States to make provision for supplying all vacancies in their respective 
delegations to this Convention when it shall re-assemble. 

Mr. Atkins, of Tennessee, moved to amend the resolution by striking out 
"Baltii.'ore," and inserting Philadelphia. 

Mr. Mason, of Kentucky, raised a point of order, that the preceding ques- 
tion was the nomination of President and Vice President of the United States. 

Mr. Russell then moved that the pending question be laid upon the table. 
And upon this motion, 

Mr. Mason called for a vote by States. 

The vote to lay on the table was then had, and the following is the result: 



North Carolina 4 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida * 

Alabama 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

Texas 

Arkansas 1 

Missouri 41 

Tennessee 4>^ 

Kentucky 



Nays 




Yeas. 


Nays. 


6 


Ohio 


23 








Indiana 


13 








Illinois .. 


11 








Michigan .... 


6 








Wisconsin 


6 








Iowa 


4 








Minnesota 


3 


1 





California ... 





4 





Oregon 





3 


4i 








7y^ 




199 


51 


12 









Yeas. Nays. 

Maine . . 5 3 

New H ampshire 5 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 7J4 6K 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut 6 

New York 35 

New Jerstey 7 

Pennsylvania 27 

Dlaware 

Maryland 4 4 

Virginia 14^^ %. 

So the motion to lay on the table was carried. 

Mr. Russell's resolution to adjourn was then called np and the reading 
commenced, when several gentlemen endeavored to get the floor. 

Mr. Peck, of Michigan, raised a point of order, that nothing would be now 
in order until the reading of the resolution was completed. 

The reading of the resolution was completed, and Hon. D. L. Seymour, of 
New York, offered an amendment that the word New York be substituted 
for Baltimore. 

Mr. Randall, of Pennsylvania, raised a point of order, and the President 
deemed Mr. Randall out of order in raising the point. 

Several members then raised points of order. 

Mr. Randall, of Pennsylvania, moved to amend the resolution by striking 
out the time and place, and inserting the 4th day of July, at Independence 
H-ai, Philadelphia. 

Mr. Ludlow, of New York, called for the previous question. 

The demand for the previous question was seconded. 

The President then stated the question then before the Convention. 



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90 Democratic National Convention, 

The first question, being on Mr. Seymour's amendment, was taken, and 
the amendment was lost. 

The next question in order was the amendment offered by Mr. Atkins, of 
Tennessee, and a vote was called for by States. 

The roll of States was called, and the following is the result of the vote : 
Ayes 86)^, nays 166. 

So the amendment was lost. 

And the question then was upon the oriajinal Virginia resolution to adjourn 
to meet at Baltimore on the 18th day of June, 1860, and the State of New 
York called for a vote by States. 

The roll of States was called, and the following is the result of the vote : 



Teas. Nays. 

Maine 5 3 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 10 3 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut 6 

New York 35 

New Jersey.... 2 5 

Pennsylvania 23^ 3i 

Delaware 

Maryland ..... 5 



Yeas. Nays. 
Ohio 23 

Indiana 1^ 

Illinois 11 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota By i 

California 4 

Oregon 3 



Yeas. Nays. 

North Carolina IOC 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida , 

Alabama 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

Texas 

i^ Arkansas 1 

Missouri « 3 

Tennessee 7 6 194i- 55 

Virginia 14i i [Kentucky,. 12 

So the Virginia resolution was adopted. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, moved that the Convention do now adjourn. 

Mr. Miles, of Maryland, hoped that arrangements would be made for 
printing the official proceedings of the Convention. 

The Peesident asked permission, before putting the motion to adjourn, to 
address a few words to the Convention, and he proceeded as follows : 

I desire first to say, and in saying it to bear testimony to your constituents 
and to the people of the United States, that considering the numerousness of 
this assembly, and the important interests involved in deliberations and the 
emotions thus naturally awakened in your bosoms, — considering all this, I say 
your sessions have been distinguished by order, by freedom from personalities, 
by decorum, and by an observance of parliamentary method and law. In 
competition for the floor, and in the zeal of geutlemen to promote their re- 
spective opinions by motions or objections to motions, in the lassitude of pro- 
tracted sittings, occasions have occurred of apparent, but only apparent con- 
fusion. But there has been no real confusion, no deliberate violation of order. 
I am better able than any other person to speak knowingly on this point, and 
to speak impartially, and I say it with pride and pleasure, one thing espe- 
cially proper for me to say from the Chair. I desire further to say, for a^d 
in behalf of myself, that I also know by knowledge of my own heart and 
conscience, that in the midst of circumstances always arduous, and in some 
respects peculiar embarrassments, it has been my steady purpose and con- 
stant endeavor to discharge imp irtially the duties of the Chair. If, in the 
execution of the duties, it shall have happened to me to address any gentle- 
man abruptly, or not to have duly recognized him, I beg pardon of him and 
of the Convention. Finally, permit me to remind you, gentlemen, that not 
merely the fortunes of the great constitutional party which you represent, but 
the fortunes of the Constitution also are at stake on the acts of this Conven- 
tion. During a period now of eighty- four years, we, the States of this 
Union, have been associated together, in one form or another, for objects of 
domestic order and foreign security. We have traversed side by side the 
wars of the Revolution and other and later wars, — through peace and war, 
through sunshine and storm. We have held our way manfully on until 
\N e have come to be a great Republic. Shall we cease to be such ? I will 
not believe it. I will not believe that the noble work of our fathers is to be 



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Proceedings at Charleston. 91 

shattered— that this great Republic is to be but a name, but a history of a 
mighty people once existing, but existing no longer save as a shadowy mem- 
ory or a monumental ruin by the side of the pathway of time. I fondly 
trust that we shall continue to march on forever, the hope of nations, as well 

fJ^^ ""^r ^ "! 'I *^^ ""^^^ ^^¥i^^ ^"^^^* ^^^« ^f t^« firmament which 
roll on without rest, because bound for eternity-without haste, because pre- 
destined for eternity. So may it be with this glorious Confederacy of Stites. 
1 pray you, therefore gentlemen, in your return to your constituents, and to 
the bosoms of your families, to take with you as your guiding thought the 
sentiment of the Constitution and the Union, and with this I cordilUy bid 
you farewell until the prescribed re-assembling of the Convention 

fl,.^';-?''f''fi.''' ^^^t^^ ''^J^? 'l^^ of Baltimore, tendered the hospitalities of 
that city to the members of the Convention. 

The motion of Mr. Stuart to adjourn was then put, and the Convention 
adjourned to meet m the city of Baltimore, on the 18th day of June 18Gu 



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I860, 
AT CHARLESTON AND BALTIMORE. 

PROCEEDINGS AT BALTIMORE. 

JUNE 18 — 23. 



MoNDATf, June 18, 1860. 

The National Democratic Convention, in accordance with the order of 
adjournment adopted at Charleston, re-assembled in the city of Baltimore, 
on the 18th day of June, 1860. mi . i. i i ^ a 

The Convention assembled at the Front Street Theater, the place selected 
for the holding thereof,- at 10 o» clock A. M. ^ ^ ^ ^ ,. , .^ 

The President, Hon. Calkb Cushing, directed the Secretary to call the roii 
of States, in order to ascertain if the delegates were present. 

On the calling of the roll, the following States were found to be fully repre- 
sented, viz : Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 
New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Missouri, Ohio, 
Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, California, Oregon. 

Connecticut was represented in part, there being some misunderstanding as 
to the hour.of meeting. The Chairman of the delegation stated that the del- 
egation would all be here by 12 o» clock. 

Pennsylvania was represented with but two exceptions. 

Two delegates were present from Delaware. 

When the State of South Carolina was called, the Chair directed that oiily 
those States be called which were present at the adjournment of the Con- 
vention at Charleston ; consequently, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Ala- 
bama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas, were not called. ^ • ^ n 

Subsequently, on a call of the States that were not represented m lull, 
Connecticut and Kentucky were found to be fully represented. 

At eleven o'clock A. M., the President said : 

Gentlemen of the Convention— The standing hour of adjournment has 
already passed. The Chair has been informed, however, that some misappre- 
hension existed upon that point, and that some gentlemen supposed the hour 
of adjournment to be noon, whereas, in fact, it was ten o'clock A. M. In view 
of that uncertainty as to the understanding of members, the Chair will, m the 
first place, direct the Secrttary to call the roll of States, in order to ascertain 



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9i Democratic National Convention, 

whether delegates are present, and after that, if they are present, will proceed 
to call the Convention to order for the purposes of business. Each Chairman, 
as his State is called, will be good enough to respond upon the question of 
fact whether his delegation be cr be not present. 

Mr. Saulsbury, of Delaware. I understand that a portion of our delegation 
are unable to gain admission to the hall, from the fact that they have no tick- 
etsi. I do not know what has been the order of this adjourned Convention in 
reference to issuing tickets, but I understand that some of the members are 
outside wishing admission who cannot get in, being refused by the doorkeeper. 
They cannot obtain tickets. I do not understand who issues tickets to this 
Convention. I would like the Chair to indicate by what authority tickets are 
issued, and how delegates may gain admission to the floor. 

The President. The Chair will inform the geiitleman from Delaware (Mr. 
Saulsbury) that, according to the usage established at Charleston, the tickets 
of the delegates were prepared in packages to be delivered to the chairmen of 
the respective delegations. 

Mr. Howard, of Tennessee. I desiie to make a motion in regard to the 
seats which I think will settle the matter. It is this : that the President— 
A Delegate. The Convention is not in order. 

The President. The Convention has not been called to order. The Secre- 
tary will again call the roll of the States reported as not fully represented. 
The Secretary called the States aforesaid, and they were reported now full. 
The President then called the Convention to order, stating that the hour 
for opening had already passed, the reason for such postponement being that 
there was a misunderstanding as to the hour. Some having thought that 
noon was the appointed time, whpreas ten o'clock was the time. He announced 
that the Convention would be opened with prayer. 

The opening prayer, by Rev. John McCron, was delivered as follows : 
Thou, who sittest upon the circle of the earth and observest the children 
of men— in whom our fathers trusted and were not confounded— by whose 
gracious assistance they wrenched the liberties of these confederated common- 
wealths from the iron grasp ( f unsympathizing power — to Thee we offer the 
grateful homage of our hearts and lips for the glorious inheritance which they 
have bequeathed to us. "Our lines are fallen to us in pleasant places— -vea 
we have a goodly heritage." We recognize Thy hand in the national blessings 
we enjoy, and we pray Thee to accept the praises that we bring, for a little 
one has now become a thousand and commands the admiration of the world 

And we pray Thee, God, that the compact Thou hast blessed maybe 
perpetuated in all its integrity and beauty by the cement of Thy favor, and in 
tne shadow of the impenetrable shield of the guardianship of Omnipotence. 
To this end we beseech Thee to give us the wisdom that cometh from above 
so that we may always place the administration of national affairs in hands 
that are pure and competent to discharge the obligations involved in the 
trust. 

And as the waters of the political deep are agitated by the rising tempest 
of seetional discord, give the spirit of a large and liberal forbearance to every 
one, that "peace may be within our walls and prosperity within our palaces." 
May the hatchet of strife be buried and the damps of its sepulchre destroy its 
temper and corrode its edge, and the calumet of fraternal peace pass contin- 
ually from hand to hand throughout the States and Territories of our beloved 
Confederacy. 

And as this Convention has met to consider the interests vital to our coun- 
try, and to select from their fellow-citizens candidates for Executive authority 
give the healthful spirit of thy grace, that the result mav redound to Thy 
honor and to the welfare of the land of our love. Say, in Thy mercy, " Land 
of th« Pilgrim, may thy glory brighten ! Land of Washington, may thy 
freedom be eternal ! Land of Charity, may Thy hand never lack th« ireins 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 95 

to gratif}' thy benevolent desires ! May thy soil never be trodden by the foot 
of an invader, nor the walls of thy hamlets echo the war-whoop of conquest.'^ 

Our Father, who art in Heaven, hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom 
come; Thy will be dune on eaith as it is in Heaven; give us this day our 
daily bread ; forgive us our trespasses as w^e forgive them who trespa-s against 
us; lead us not into temptation, but deliver ns from evil; for thine is the 
kingdom, the power and glory, forever. Amen. 

At the conclusion of the prayer, Mr. Gushing proceeded to address the 
Convention as follows : 

Gentlemen of the Convention : — Permit me, in the first place, to congratu- 
late }ou upon your being re-assembled here for the discharge of your import- 
ant duties in the interests of the Democratic party of the United States, and I 
beg leave, in the second place, to communicate to the Convention the state of 
the various bri3nches of its business, as they now come up for consideration 
before you. 

Prior to the adjournment of the Convention, two principal subjects of action 
were before it. One, the adoption of the doctrinal resolutions constituting the 
pli^tform of the Convention ; the other, voting upon the question of the nomi- 
nation of a candidate for the Presidency. 

In the course of the discussion of the question of a platform, the Convention 
adopted a vote, the effect of which was to amend the report of the majority of 
the Committee on the Platform by substituting the report ol the minority of 
that Committee; and after the adoption of that motion, and the substitution 
of the minority for the majority report, a division was called for upon the 
several i esolutions constituting that platform, being five in number. The 1st, 
8d, 4th, and 5th of those resolutions were adopted by the Convention, and 
the 2d was rejected. After the vote on the adoption of the 1st, 3d, 4th and 
5th of those resolutions, a motion was made in each case to reconsider the 
vote, and to lay that motion of reconsideration upon the table. But neither of 
those motions to reconsider cr to lay on the table was put, the putting of these 
motions having been prevented by the intervention of quebtions of privilege, 
and the ultimate vote competent in such case, to wit : of the adoption of the 
report of the majority as amended by the report of the minority, had not 
been acted upon by the Convention. So that at the time when the Conven- 
tion adjourned there remained pending before it these motions, to wit : To 
reconsider — the resolutions constituting the platform, and the ulterior ques- 
tion of adopting the majority as amended by the substitution of the minority 
report. Those questions, and those only, as the Chair understood the mo- 
tions before the Convention, were not acted upon prior to the adjournment. 

After the disposition of the intervening questions of privilege, a motion 
was made by Mr. McCook, of Ohio, to proceed to vote for candidates for Pres- 
ident and Vice President. Upon that motion the Convention instructed the 
Chair (not, as has been erroneously supposed, in the recess of the Conven- 
tion, the Chair determining for the Convention, but the Convention instructing 
the Chair,) to make no declaration of a nomination except upon a vote equiv- 
alent to two-thirds in the Electoral College of the United States, and upon 
that balloting, no such vote being given, that order was, upon the motion of 
the gentleman from Virginia, (Mr. Kussell,) laid on the table, for the purpose 
of enabling him to propose a motion, which he subsequently did, that the 
Convention adjourn from the city of Charleston to the city of Baltimore, and 
with a provision concerning the filling of vacancies embraced in the same 
resolution, which resolution the Secretary will please to read. 

The Secretaky read the resolution, as follows : 

"^e5o?vecf, That when this Convention adjourns to-day, it adjourns to re- 
assemble at Baltimore, Md., on Monday, the 18th day of June, and that it be 
respectfully recoinmended to the Democratic party of the several States to 



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96 JDemocratic National Convention. 

make provision for supplying all vacancies in their respective delegations to 
this Convention when it shall re- assemble." 

The President. The Convention will thus perceive that the order 
adopted by it provided, among other things, that it is respectfully recom- j 
mended to the Democratic party of the several States to make provision for , 
supplying all vacancies in their respective delegations to this Convention when j 
it shall re-assemble. What is the construction of that resolution ?— what is \ 
the scope of its application ?— is a question not for the Chair to determine or f 
to sug<;est to the Convention, but for the Convention itself to determine. 

Ho'wever that may be, in the preparatory arrangement for the present f 
assembling of this Convention there were addressed to the Chair the creden- 
tials of members elected, or purporting to be elected, affirmed and confirmed I 
by the original Conventions and accredited to this Convention. Iq three of [ 
those cases, or perhaps four, the credentials were authentic and complete, | 
presenting no question of controverting delegates. In four others, to wit — { 
the States of Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, and Delaware, there were contest- i 
ing applications. Upon those applications the Chair was called to determine ^ 
whether it possessed any power to determine prima facie membership of this 
Convention. That question was presented in its most absolute and complete ' 
form in the case of Mississippi, where there was no contest either through | 
irregularity of form or of competing delegations, and so also in the cases of ? 
Florida, Texas, and Arkansas. In those four States, there being an apparent I 
authenticity of commission, the Chair was called upon to determine the na- r 
ked abstract question whether he had power, peremptorily and preliminarily, 
to determine the prima fade membership of all alleged members of this Con- ' 
vention. The Chair would gladly have satisfied himself that he had this f 
power, but upon examining the source of his power, to wit— the rules of the 
House' of Representatives, he was unable to discern that he had any authority, f 
even prima facie, to scrutinize and canvass credentials, although they were ! 
such as, upon their face, were free from contest or controversy, either of form [ 
or of substance, and therefore he deemed it his duty to reserve the deter- ^ 
mination of that question to be submittd to the Convention. And in due r 
time the Chair will present that question as one of privilege to this body. j 

And now, gentlemen, having thus presented to you the exact state of the i 
questions pending or involved in the action of the Convention when it ad- j 
journed, the Chair begs leave only to add a single observation of a more gen- [ 
eral nature. We assemble here now at a time A^hen the enemies of the 
Democratic party— when, let me say, the enemies of the Constitution of the \ 
United States, are in the field (applause) with their selected leaders, with ; 
their banners displayed, advancing to the combat with the constitutional 
interests and party of the United States ; and upon you, gentlemen, upon f 
your action, upon your spirit of harmony, upon your devotion to the Consti- 
tution, upon your solicitude to maintain the interests, the honor and the I 
integrity of the Democratic party as the guardians of the Constitution—upon \ 
you,° gentlemen, it depends whether the issue of that combat is to be victory i 
or defeat for the Constitution of the United States. (Renewed applause.) 

It does not become the Chair to discuss any of the personal or political 
demands of that question. It may be permitted, however, to exhort you in [ 
the spirit of our community, of party interests, in the faith of our common 
respect for the Constitution, in the sense of our common devotion to the 
interests and honor of our country ; I say to exhort you to feel that we come 
here this day not to determine any mere technical questions of form, not 
merely to gain personal or party triumphs, but we come here in the exercise 
of a solemn duty, in a crisis of the condition of the affairs of our country, 
such as has never yet befallen the United States. Shall we not all enter 
upon this duty in the solemn and profound conviction of the responsibilities 



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Proceedings 



at Baltimore, 



97 



thus devolved upon us, of our high duty to our country, to ourselves, and 
to the States of this Union? (Applause.) Gentlemen, the Convention is 
now in order for the transaction of business. 

Mr. Howard, of Tennessee, had taken the floor for the purpose of making 
a motion. 
Mr. Howard, of Tennessee, offered the following resolut'on : 
Resolved, That the President of this Convention direct the Sergeant-at- 
Arnas to issue tickets of admission to the delegates of the Convention as 
originally constituted and organized at Charleston. 

Mr. Kavanaqh, of Minnesota. I move to lay the resolution upon the 
table, and upon that I call for a vote by States. 

Mr. Russell, of Virginia. I rise to ask a few questions of the Chair 
for information. I suppose they relate to a privileged question, so that I am 
entitled to ask them, notwithstanding the motion which has been made. I 
would ask the Chair if he has not undertaken to decide that the gentlemen 
who have seats here as delegates from the State of Virginia have a right to 
sit here ? If he has undertaken to decide that question, I ask him to^state 
to this Convention upon what ground he has decided that we are entitled to 
be here ? I ask him to state if it was upon the ground that we had appeared 
and been recognized as proper delegates to this Convention when it was 
formerly in session ? If he acted upon that ground with regard to the dele- 
gates from Virginia, and other delegates here, I ask him to state, for our 
information, why he has not, upon the same ground, issued tickets to all 
those formerly seated in this Convention with uncontested seats, or with seats 
which, if they were contested, were decided to be properly occupied by those 
gentlemen ? I ask the Chair to state whether he has undertaken, in con- 
sequence of any action which those delegates themselves have taken, or in 
consequence of any rumored or reported action elsewhere in the country, to 
decide that they have deprived themselves of the right to return, as we have 
returned, with the permission of the Chair? I desire the Chair to state 
whether the same grounds do not apply, in his opinion, to all those delega- 
tions with uncontested seats here, as to Virginia ? 

The Pkesident. With the permission of the Convention, the Chair will 
respond to the questions of the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Bussell,) if it 
be understood by the Convention that it is competent for the Chair to do so, 
pending the motion of the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Kavanagh) to lay 
on the table the resolution of the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Howard.) 
Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. I hope there will be unanimous consent given to 
the Cnair, but with the understanding that neither the Chair nor the gentleman 
from Virginia (Mr. Russell) had the right to make any statement in the 
present condition of the business. (Cries of " leave," "leave.") 

The President. The Chair will then state, in response to the inquiry of 
the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Russell,) that the Chair did not undertake 
to judge anything, neither to decide that there were or were not vacancies. 
All the Chair undertook to say was that the gentlemen borne upon its roll 
as members of this Convention at the time of its adjournment at Charleston, 
were entitled to recognition of membership precisely to-day as they would had 
the Convention adjourned yesterday. [Applause.] To have gone beyond 
this point would have been to enter into the canvass of conflicting credentials 
upon new elections of members. The Chair was thoroughly convinced that 
he had no power to enter into that inquiry of conflicting credentials of persons 
alleging to have been elected to this Convention by State Conventions held 
since the adjournment of this ConventiQn at Charleston. The Chair wijl sug- 
gest to the gentleman from Virginia that the question did not present itself 
m the form of simplicity and unity in which his inquiry would suppose, inas- 
much as several States to which he refers, idid not assume that the resolution 
7 



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98 Democratic National Convention, 

in the adjournment created vacancies to be filled by new action of the respec- 
tive States ; and if the Chair had entered into any inquiry of the new creden- 
tials, as for instance to discriminate upon the question whether these credentials 
came from a new State Convention called anew, and that Convention vaca- 
ting anterior commissions ; or whether they emanate from a Convention called 
anew and simply confirming anterior commissions ; — in either case if the Chair 
had gone into the question it would have been necessary for him to hdd hear- 
ings and investigations of credentials and of facts in regard to eight States of 
the Union, as to which he had no more power under the rules of the House 
of Representatives than any other member of the Convention. 

Whilst the Chair is disposed to exert the whole power, in any contingency,, 
of the Speaker of the House of Eepresentatives — having entered upon the 
discharge of this most unwelcome and responsible duty with a determination to 
act without favor ai^d also without fear — yet the Chair knows that it is impos- 
sible that he shall maintain order in this Convention, that the deliberations of 
this Convention shall go on in any system vf regularity, unless the Chair takes 
care to walk carefully and rigorously in the simple line of routine and of tech- 
nical authority. [Applause.] Within the line ot technical authority, and 
upon the rules of the House of Representatives, as constituting the guide of the 
Chair, the Chair will take leave to decide all questions as they mny arise, in or 
out of the Convention. But the Chair does not propose to assume any judicial 
or quasi-judicial authority in regard to the canvass of credentials and the 
authenticity of membership ; an authority manifestly not conferred upon the 
presiding ofiicer, according to precedent and the uniform usage, of the two 
houses of the Congress of the United States never preliminarily determined 
by the presiding officer of either house of Congress. In issuing tickets to the 
gentlemen borne on the roll of the Convention, already sufficiently authenti- 
cated by the proceedings ol the Convention itself, at the timo- of adjournment 
the Chair did that at least which was in the sphere of the duties of the Chair ; 
and in doing that he in no degree involved or prejudiced the question of what 
was the right of any gentleman ; thai depending upon the action of this Con- 
vention. The Chair, as he before intimated, will now make this the first ques- 
tion, a question of privilege, that the Convention may instruct the Chair 
regarding his duty concerning the delegations of the other States, 

Mr. Church, of New York. I will ask the gentleman from Minnesota, 
(Mr. Kavanagh) to withdraw his motion to lay the resolution of the gentleman 
from Tennessee (Mr. Howard) upon the table,*in order to enable melo offer an 
amendment which 1 think will dispose of this whole matter of contested seats. 

Mr. Kavanagh. The gentleman can read his amendment even if my 
motion is not withdrawn. 

The President. If the gentleman insists upon his motion to lay upon the 
table, it will not be in order for any proposition to be lead. 

Mr. John Cochran, of New York, asked consent of the Convention that 
the resolution be read for information. 

No objection being made, the proposed amendment of Mr. Church was read 
as follows : 

Besolved, That the credentials of all persons claiming seats in this Con- 
vention made vacant by the secession of delegates at Charleston be referred to 
the Committee on Credentials, and said Committee is hereby instructed, as 
soon as practicable, to examine the same and report the names oi persons 
entitled to such seats, with the district — understanding, however, that every 
person accepting a seat in this Convention is bound in honor and faith to abide 
by the action of this Convention and support its nominations. 

Mr* Kavanagh, of Minnesota. I will withdraw my motion to lay upon the 
table, and accept the amendment of the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Church,) and upon that I call the previous question 



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Proceedings at Baltimore, 99 

Mr. Saulsbury. I rise to a privileged question. It must be apparent to 
the Nvhole Convention that its fate, and the fate of the whole partv, depends 

upon that resolution. I think I have indicated as far as 

Mr. Kavanagh. I rise to a question of order. The gentleman from Del- 
aware rose to a privileged question. I believe he is attempting to make a 
general speech on politics, and I hold that tliat is not a privileged question 
even in a Democratic Convention. * 

Mr. SAULSBUfiY. The question is debatable. 
^ The President. The gentleman from Delaware will please to pause. The 
Ohiir does not understand that any debatable question is pending. The gen- 
tleman from iSTew York (Mr. Church,) by unanimous consent had leave to read 
ail amendment. That having been read, conversation occurred upon the 
applause in the galleries. That conversation having ceased, the question 
recurs upon the motion of the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Kavanagh) 
upon laying the resolution of the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Howard) on 
the table. 

Mr. Saulsbury. My privileged question is this, that the Convention has 
no right to prescribe terms to its members, which terms are not made in the 
authority of the States from which they come. The resolution proposes to 

annex a condition to the admission of delegates to this floor. I wish to say 

• Mr. Kavanagh. Is that a privileged question ? 

Mr. Saulsbury. I am perfectly in order. I say I come here intending, if 
this Convention makes ai^y nomination [calls to order] to support it. 

The President. The gentleman from Minnesota again calls the gentleman 
from Delaware to order. The Chair begs leave to state that the suggestions 
.he gentleman from Delaware is making are substantially arguments in oppo- - 
sition to the amendment of the gentleman from New York, (Mr. Church,) and 
would be in order if the motion to lay on the table were not pending. 

Mr. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania. I understand that the resolution of the 
gentleman from N^ew York was accepted by the gentleman from Minnesota, . 
who withdrew his m >tion to lay the resolution of the gentleman from Tennes- 
see (Mr. Howard) on the table, and called the previous question upon that 
amendment. 

The President. The Chair was unaware that any such action had been 
taken by the gentleman from Minnesota. The gentleman from Minnesota - 
will be good enough to state whether he did accept the amendment of the 
gentleman from New York, and move the previous question upon it. 

Mr. Kavanagh Upon the request of the gentleman from New York I. 
withdrew the call for the previous question — accepted the gentleman's 
amendment, and moved the previous question on that amendment. 

Mr. Phillips, of Pennsylvania. It is not in the power of the gentleman 
tio accept the amendment. In the first place, his motion was to lay upon 
the table, not to amend. In the next place, the resolution of the gentleman 
from Tennessee w^ read for information, and was not presented to the body. 
It was read by leave, while the motion to lay on the table was pending, which 
was not debatable. The gentleman did say he accepted it, but he had no 
power to do so. If he had been the mover of the original motion, he might 
have done so, not otherwise. He only, therefore, withdrew his motion to 
lay on the table, and that being done, and the floor being yielded, it was in 
order for the gentleman from New York to offer his amendment. 

The President decided both points of order raised by Mr. Phillips well 
taken. 

Mr. Church, of New York. I would inquire of the Chair if it is now in 
order for me to offer an amendment to the resolution of the gentleman from 
Tennessee? (Mr. Howard.) 
The President. If the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Kavanagh) states 



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100 Democratic National Convention. 

to the Chair that he withdraws his motion to lay upon the table, and his? 
motion for the previous question, then the Chair will rule that the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Church) is in order. He can move his proposition as 
an amendment. 

Mr. Kavanagh. I do withdraw those motions. 

The Chair. The gentleman from New York (Mr Church) is now in order. 

Mr. Church. Then I move the resolution which has been read as an 
amendment to the resolution of the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Howard), 
and upon that I call the previous question. 

Mr. GiLMORE, of Pennsylvania, i wish to offer an amendment to the 
amendment. 

The President. That will not be in order pending a call for the previous 
question. ^ 

Mr. Randall, of Pennsylvania. I understand that there is now before 
the Convention a proposition of the gentleman from New York (Mr. Church), 
As it is a distinct proposition, I desire to say a few words upon it. 

The President decided Mr. Randall not to be in order in his remarks. 

Mr. Randall, of Pennsylvania. As the proposition before the Convention 
contains two distinct propositions, I call for a division of the question. 

The President. The Chair cannot entertain any proposition at this time., 

Mr. AvEaY, of North Carolina, called for a division of the question. 

Mr. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania. I rise to a point of order that there 
can be no division now, as the previous question has been demanded. 

The President. The Chair begs leave to state to the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Montgomery) that he is perfectly correct. The Chair has 
already determined that it is the duty of the Chair first to call for a second 
to the demand for the previous question. 

Mr. , of Tennessee. I rise to a point of order that there is no 

Committee on Credentials to which to refer this matter. 

The President. The Chair will inform the gentleman from Tennessee 
that that is not a question of order but of substance, and that the Convention 
may at any time revive the Committee on Credentials by an order of refer- 
ence. The duty of the Chair now is to put the question upon seconding the 
demand for the previous question. 

The question was stated to be upon seconding'the demand for the previous 
question. Being taken viva voce, 

The President stated that the nof s appeared to have it. 

Mr. RicHARD&oN, of Illinois, doubted the announcement, and asked that 
the vote be taken by States, which was ordered. 

Mr. Brodhead, of Pennsylvania, stated that the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Church) was willing to withdraw his call for the previous, 
question. 

Mr. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania. The vote having been ordered to be 
taken by States, it is not now in order to withdraw the call for the previous 
question . 

The President. The Chair will suggest to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Church) that the previous question having been demanded, the 
Chair put the question to the Convention whether they seconded that demand, 
and in the judgment of the Chair it was negatived. Thereupon the gentle- 
man from Illinois (Mr. Richardson) called for the verification of that vote 
by States. After the vote thus made and taken, the Chair does not under- 
stand that it is competent to withdraw the call for the previous question. 

Mr. Saulsbuby, of Delaware, moved that the Convention take a recess 
until four o'clock this afternoon. 

Mr. Samuels, of Iowa, appealed to the gentleman ft-om Delaware (Mr. 
Saulsbury) to withdraw his motion for one moment. If, after the sugges- 



■•• ••• • • 

•5 • ' ! ** 
• *•• *• • 



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Proceeding's at Baltimore, 



101 



tion he desired to make, the gentleman desired the motion for a recess, he 
would renew it. 

Mr. Saulsbukt said he would withdraw upon that condition. 

Mr. MontgomeTby, of Pennsylvania, objected to any suggestions or dis- 
cussions. 

Mr. Rynders, of New York, rose to a point of order that the motion to 
take a recess having been withdrawn, the demand for the previous question 
wa^ then operative, and no debate was in order. 

The President sustained the point of order. 

Mr. Samuels, of Iowa. Then I will renew the motion for a recess, though 
I shall vote against it. 

Mr. Ludlow, of New York, called for a vote by States upon this motion, 
which was ordered. 

The Skcretaby proceeded to call the roll of States on the motion to take 
a reeess till four o'clock, which resulted as toUows : 



Yea.^ Nays 

Maine 1^ &% 

New Hampshire 3^ 4> 

Vermont 6 

Mas-^achu-etts 13 

Rtiode Island 4 

<yOhnecticut __ 1 5 

New York 35 

New Jersey. 5 2 

Pennsylvania 6 21 

Delaware 3 

Maryland 6 2 

Virginia. 16 



Yeas. >iays. 
. 10 



Xorth ^'arolina 
^^onth Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

Alabama 

Louisiana 

Misjiissippi 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Missouri 6K 

Tennpssee 8>| 

Kentucky 3 



Yeas. Nays. 

Ohio. 23 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 11 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin 6 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 1}^ 2H 

California 4 

Oregon 3 

73i 178^ 



Niorth Carolina.. 
S- uth Carolina . . 


Yeas. Nays. 
30 


Ohio 

Indiana 


Yeas Navs 

- 23 * 

. - .13 


Georgia 

Florida 

A labama . . 


Illinois ,.. 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Iowa 

Minnesota .... 


11 

6 

5 


Louisii^na 

Mississippi 





4 

2^ IK 


Texas 


California 

Oregon 




A rkanpaa. . . 


1 


3 


Vlissouri 

Tennessee.. . 
Kentucky 


: 2k ava 

.... 3 8 
li 10% 


108i UH 



So the motion to take a recess was lost, and the question being then taken 
by States upon recording th-e demand for the previous question, it was not 
agreed to. Yeas 107 j^, nays 140j^, as follows : 

Yeas Nays. 

Maine 2 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont iK H 

M.issa'husetts . 4^ 4i 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut 3>^ 2 

New York 3f) 

N^w Jersey 2i 4i 

Peimsjlvania 9i 16>^ 

Delaware 2 

Maryhmd 2 6 

Virginia 15 

The question was then stated to be upon the amendment to the amendment. 

Mr. GiLMoRE, of Pennsylvania, offered the following amendment to Mr. 
Church's resolution : 

Resolved^ That the President of the Convention be directed to issue tickets 
of admission to seats in the Convention to the delegates from the States of 
Texas, Florida, Mississippi and Arkansas, in which States there are i^o con- 
testing delegations. 

Mr. Eandall, of Pmansylvania. I believe it will be better for the harmony 
of this body that we should now take a recess, but I do not desire to contra- 
vene the wishes of the Convention. If it is understood that I shall be 
entitled to the floor, I will move that this Convention now take a recess 
till four o'clock this afternoon. 

Mr. Spinola, of 5^ew York, moved that the Convention adjourn till ten 
o'clock A. M. to-morrow. 

Mr. Kandall, of Pennsylvania. At the request of several friends, I accept 
the modification of the gentleman from New York (Mr, Spinola.) 

The motion to adjourn was put, and the President decided it to be lost, 
And a division was called for, and 



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102 Democratic National Convention, 

Mr. Spinola, of New York, called for a vote by States, which was ordered, 
and the following is the result of the vote. Yeas 33, nays 216. 

So the motion to adjourn was not agreed to. 

Mr. Phillips, of Penrsylvania, then moved that the Convention take a 
recess until five o'clock P. M., which motion was agreed to, and the Conven- 
tion took a recess. 

EVENING SESSION. 

The Convention was called to order at five o'clock. 

The President said: Mr. Randall, of Pennsylvania, has the floor, upon 
an amendment moved by Mr. Gilmore, of Pennsylvania. Before proceeding 
in the debate, the Chair begs leave to state to the Convention that he has had 
}>laced in his hands credentials of gentlemen claiming seats in the Convention 
fr m the States of Delaware, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louis- 
iana, Texas and Arkansas, including in that enumeration the letter presented 
to the Convention in his place, by Mr Howard, of Tennessee, in behalf af 
ihe gentlemen claiming seats from the State of Mississippi, and in addition 
to that, there has been addressed to the Chair a communication from Mr. 
Ghaff'ee, claiming a seat from the State of Massachusetts. The Chair deems 
it his duty to communicate the fact to the Convention that those several 
documents have been placed in his hands, to be presented at the proper time 
to the consideration of the Convention. 

Mr. Gilmore, of Pennsylvania. I have made a small addition to the 
amendment I off*ered this morning to the amendment of the gentleman from 
New York (Mr. Church), for the purpose of covering the cases mentioned by 
the Chair just now. 

The amendment, as modified, was read as follows : 

Resolved^ That the President of the Convention be authorized to issue 
tickets of admission to seats in this Convention to the delegates from the 
States of Arkansas, Texas, Florida and Mississippi,, in which States there are 
no contesting delegations, and that in those States, to wit : Delaware, Geor- 
o:ia, Alabama, and Louisiana, where there are contesting delegations, a Com- 
mittee on Credentials shall be appointed, by the several delegations, to report 
upon said States. 

Mr. Ci>ARK, of Missouri, called for the reading of the original resolution, 
and the amendment of the gentleman from New York (Mr. Church). They 
were accordingly read. 

Mr. Clark. I will now ask that my friend from Pennsylvania (Mr. 
Gilmore) accept as a substitute for his amendment what I will send to the 
Chair to be read for information. If it be accepted it will then stand in the 
condition of an amendment to an amendment. 

Objectio s were made to the naodification of Mr. Gilmore*s resolution, and 
also to Mr. Clark^s proposition being read. 

Mr. Gilmore. Then, for the pwrpose of arranging all difiiculties, I ask to 
withdrav^^ the amendment I ofi'ered this morning, and substitute the one I 
have just offered, and which has been read. 

I'he question was stated to be upon the amendment to the araendment as 
modified. 

Mr. Clark of Missouri. I ask that my amendment be read, that the gen- 
tleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Gilmore) may accept it in lieu of his own, if 
he prefers it. 

Mr. Samuels, of Iowa, said he would withdraw the objection he had made 
in order that the Convention may ascertain what the proposition is. 

The proposition was then read, as follows r Strike out the provfeo in the 
amendment of Mr. Church, of New York, and add the following : 
Resolved^ That the citizoBS of the several States of the Uni^n ^ve an 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 103 

equal right to settle and remain in the Territories of the United States, and 
to hold therein, unmolested by any legislation whatever, their slave and 
other pro] )erty ; and that this Convention recognizes the opinion of the 
Supreme Court of the United States in the Dred Scott case as a true exposi- 
tion of the Constitution in regard to the rights of the citizens of the several 
States and Territories of the United States upon all subjects concerning 
which it treats ; and that the members of this Convention pledge themselves, 
and require all others who may be authorized as delegates, to make the same 
pledge, to support the Democratic candidates, fairly and in good faith, nomi- 
nated by this Convention according to the usages of the National Democratic 
Party. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York. What is the position of this proposition just 
read ? 

The President. It was read merely for information. 

The question was stated to be upon the amendment to the amendment, 
when Mr. Kandall, ol Pennsylvania, addressed the Convention. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois, addressed the Convention on the proposition 
submitted. 

Mb. Gilmore opposed its adoption. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York, addressed the Convention upon the several 
propositions under consideration, and opposed the amendment of Mr. Gil- 
more. 

Mr. Russell, of Virginia, addressed the Convention, and was in fevor of 
the adoption of the amendment offered by Mr. Gilmore. 

Mr. Montgomery addressed the Convention in opposition to the last 
amendment offered, and in favor of the resolution offered by Mr. Church, of 
New York. 

Mr. EwiNG, of Tennessee, addressed the Convention. 

Mr. Claiborne, of Missouri. With the permission of my friend from Ten- 
nessee (Mr. Ewing), I will say that it has been hinted by the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Russell), and repeated by the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. 
Ewing) that there is no contest before this Convention as to the seats claimed 
by the delegates from Arkansas, who held seats in the National Democratic 
Convention at Charleston. I will ask the President of this Convention if he 
has has not this day received evidence of the fact that there is a contest here 
about the seats of the delegation from Arkansas ? 

A communication to the President of the Convention w as then read, and 

Mr. Claiborne asked if there was not another paper from the delegation of 
Arkansas ? One was sent by a messenger to the President, by Gen. I lust, of 
Arkansas, this morning. 

The President, after examining the file of papers before him, stated that 
no such communication had been received. 

Mr. Ewing, of Tennessee, resumed his remarks. 

Mr. LoRiNG, of Massachusetts, addressed the Convention in favor of the 
second amendment. 

Mr. Merrick, of Illinois, addressed the Convention in favor of the 
amendment offered by Mr. Church, and in opposition to the amendment 
offered by Mr. Gilmore. 

Mr. Samuels asked the President whether there were any credentials pre- 
sented to him from the Florida delegation ? He had understood they did 
not ask for an admission. 

The President. The delegation have placed in my hands a published 
report in one of the journals of Florida, of the proceedings of the Convention 
in that State. 

Mr. Samuels. Are they accredited to this Convention ? 

The President. I do not know. The gentleman can have them read. 



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104 Democratic National Convention. 

Mr. King, of Missouri, claimed the floor, and the I?lorida proceedings were 
not read. Mr. King then addressed the Convention in opposition to the 
second amendment. 

Mr. West, of Connecticut, addressed the Convention in opposition to the 
amendment of Mr. Gilmore. 

Mr. Hunter, of Missouri, addressed the Convention in favor of the Gil- 
more amendment. 

Mr. AvEEY, of North Carolina, addressed the Convention in favor of the 
Gilmore amendment. 

Mr. Atkins, of Tennessee, addressed the Convention at some length, and 
then moved the previous question. 

Mr. lMoffatt, of Virginia, moved that the Convention do now adjourn, 
which motion was not agreed to. 

The vote seconding the demand for the previous question was then put, 
aad a vote by States was demanded, and the demand for the previous ques- 
tion was recorded by the following vote, viz : yeas 233, nays 18>^. 

The question was then announced to be on ordering the previous question 
to be put, when, 

Oil motion of Mr. Richardson, of Illinois, the Convention adjourned. 



Tuesday, June 19, 1860. 

The Convention was called to order at 10>^ o'clock A. M., by the Presi- 
dent, Hon. Caleb Cushing. 

Prayer was offered by the Rev. Dr. Puller, of Baltimore. 

On motion of Mr. Ludlow, of New York, the reading of the Journal of 
Monday was dispensed with. 

The President stated the question to be upon ordering the main question 
to be put, the demand for the previous question having been seconded yes- 
terday upon the amendment of Mr. Gilmore, of Pennsylvania, to the amend- 
ment of Mr. Church, of New York, to the resolution of Mr. Howard, ot Ten- 
nessee. 

Mr. Church, of New York. I desire to ask the unanimous consent for the 
purpose of submitting a proposition calculated to harmonize all the questions 
now pendiug before the ('onvention. (Cries of " hear," " hear.") 

Upon a consultation with the gentleman who moves an amendment to my 
amendment (Mr Gilmore, of Pennsylvania), he has agreed, if it meets with 
the approbation of this Convention, for the purpose of harmonizing the action 
of this Convention, to an arranc;ement alike honorable to both sides, and 
which, if carried out, will terminate the controversy as to all pending ques- 
tions. The proposition which has been made and*^ accepted is simply this : 
The gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Gilmore), is to withdraw his amend- 
ment to my amendment, and then I am to withdraw the latter part of my 
resolution, leaving only a simple resolution of reference to the Committee on 
Credentials. I will now ask the unanimous consent ot the Convention for the 
purpose of carrying out that understanding. 

The President. The Chair will suggest to the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Church), aud to the Convention, tiiat, as there has been a second to the 
demand for the previous question, the object which he proposes can only be 
reached either by putting the vote upon the main question and rejecting it, 
or by the unanimous consent of the Convention. 

No objection being heard, unanimous consent was granted. 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 105 

Mr. GiLMORE, of Pennsylvania. For the purpose of carrying out the ar- 
rangement that has just been announced, 1 beg leave to withdraw my amend- 
ment to the amendment of the gentleman from New York (Mr. Church). 
The amendment of Mr. Gilmore was as follows : 

Resolved, That the President of the Convention be directed to issue tickets 
of admission to seats in the Convention to the delegates from the States of 
Texas, Florida, Mississippi and Arkansas, in which States there are no con- 
testing delegations. 

The amendment to the amendment was accordingly withdrawn. 
Mr. Church, of New York. For the purpose of perfecting the arrange- 
ment, I will now modify my resolution by striking out the latter part of it, 
leaving it simply a resolution of reference to the Committee on Credentials. 

'I'he reading of thu original resolution of Mr. Howard, of Tennessee, togeth- 
er with the amendment of Mr. Church, of New York, as proposed yesterday, 
was called for, and they were read os follows : 
Mr. Howard's original resolution : 

Resolved, That the President of tliis Convention direct the Sergeant-at- 
Arms to issue tickets of admission to the delegates of the Convention as ori- 
ginally constituted and organized at Charleston. 
Mr. Church's amendment: 

Resolved, That the credentials of all persons claiming sweats in this Conven- 
tion made vacant by the secession of delegates at Charleston, be referred to 
tiie Committee on Credentials ; and said Committee is hereby instructed, as 
soon as practicable, to examine the same, and report the names of persons 
entitled to such seats, with the distinct understanding, however, that every 
j-erson accepting a seat in this Convention is bound in honor and good faith 
to abide by the action of this Convention and support its nominees. 

The amendment, as modified by Mr. Church, was then read as follows : 
Resolved, That the credentials of all persons claiming seats in this Conven- 
tion made vacant by the secession of delegates at Charleston, be referred to 
the Committee on Credentials, and said Committee is hereby instructed, as 
soon as practicable, to examine the same and report the names of persons en- 
titled to such seats. 

The President. The next question is, Shall the main question now be 
put upon the modified amendment which occupies the place of the original 
btjfore the modification was made. 

The question being taken, the main question was unanimously ordered. 
The question recurred upon the amendment of Mr. Church, of New York, 
as modified. 

Mr. Ward, of Ohio. I desire, before the question is put, to inquire what 
the exact question is ? I desire now to know whether that is a substitute 
for the original proposition, or merely an addition by way of amendment 
to it. 

The President. The Chair will state that he understands the question 
to be upon the substitution of the proposition of the gentleman from New 
York, for the original proposition of the gentleman from Tennessee. 

The question being then taken on the amendment of Mr. Church, of New 
York, was agreed to, and the resolution of Mr. Howard, of Tennessee, as 
amended, was adopted. 

Mr. OocHRAN, of New York, made a motion to reconsider the last vote 
and to lay the motion to reconsider on the table, which was agreed to. 
Mr McCooK, ot Ohio, moved that the Convention do now adjourn. 
Mr. Hallett, of Massachusetts, rose to a question of privilege. 
Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. There can be no higher question of privilege 
than that of adjournment. 

The President. The gentleman is right, but the Chair suggests that he 



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108 Democratic National Convention, 

understands the explanation of the gentleman from Massachusetts to relate to 
a cortested seat in that delegation. 

Mr. Brodhead moved to amend the motion to adjourn by inserting " to 5 
o*clock this afternoon." 

The President. The motion to adjourn is not amendable. 

Mr. Phillips, of Pennsylvania. I move that when this Convention ad- 
journ to-day it bo to meet at 5 o'clock this afternoon. 

The President. The Chair is of opinion that that motion is in order. 

Mr. SruART. I beg leave to suggest that that motion cannot be in order. 

Mr. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania. 1 would state to the Convention that 
tbe delegation from Massachusetts desire, before the House adjourns, to sub- 
mit a proposition. There is a contested seat in that delegation, and it may 
a^ well be disposed of at once. I would suggest to my colleague (Mr. Phil- 
lips) that he withdraw his motion. 

Mr. Phillips. The motion I made does not interfere with anything the 
gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr Hallett) may desire to present. I would 
also state that it is, I believe, the universal practice to allow the House, by its 
vote, to fix the time to which it will adjourn before it does adjourn. That 
certainly must be so, for unless that vote is taken before adjournment it never 
can be taken. 

Mr. McCooK, of Ohio, withdrew his motion to adjourn. 

Mr. Phillips, of Pennsylvania, then moved that when this Convention 
adjourn it be to meet at 5 o'clock this afternoon. 

Mr. Sturman, of Arkansas, asked the gentleman to withdraw his motion 
to allow him to present to the Convention a statement from his colleague. 
This morning he had the protest of the contesting delegates from Arkansas 
handed to him, with a polite Request to present it to the Convention. He 
would send it to the Chair and request that it be read. 

Mr. Hallett, of Massachusetts, obtained the floor. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, desired to submit some remarks upon the mo- 
tion of the gentleman from Pennsylvania. 

The President stated that the* Chair would receive the document from the 
gentleman from Arkansas, but at present he could not entertain any new 
proposition pending the motion to adjourn. 

A Delegate from New York inquired if it would be in order to refer the 
paper to the Committee on Credentials ? 

The Chair. Not pending the present motion to fix the hour to which the 
Convention will adjourn. 

Mr. Stuart. On that motion I claim the floor. 

The President. The House having given its unanimous assent to the 
gentleman from Arkansas to present this paper, it will now be read. 

Mr. SruART. The consent of the Convention was not given. 

Mr. Cochran moved that the paper, without reading, be referred to the 
Committee on Credentials. 

The President. That is not in order. It can ba read by unanimous con- 
sent, not otherwise. 

Many Delegates objected. 

The President. The question then is on the motion to adjourn till 5 o'clock. 

Mr. Phillips, of Pennsylvania, read from the rules of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, to show that the motion to adjourn was always in order, and that the 
motion to fix a day to which the House will adjourn takes precedence of any 
other, and that both these mo. ions, together with the motion to lay on the 
table, must be decided without debate. 

The President suggested that that might not apply to fixing an hour to 
which to adjourn. 

Mr. Phillips believed that it did. 



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Proceeding's at Baltimore. 



107 



Mr. Stuart said the rule applied to fixing a day, and had no applicat'ion to 
this case. It was always in order to proceed to show that the hour designated 
was an impracticable one. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York, suggested thnt the rules of the House of Repre- 
sentatives wore applicable to this body as far as they wrre practicable. The 
House sat for months, this Convention for days. Hours of a day were to this 
Convention as days were to the sessions of the House. 

Mr. Stuart moved to lay the motion on the table. 

The President said that that motion was not in order. 

Mr. CocfiRAN. The motion to fix a time is a privileged motion, the same 
as the motion to lay on the table. 

Mr. Stuart. It would be strange if we could not get rid of a subject 

Mr. Hallett, of Massachusetts, desired to submit a matter to the Conven- 
tion in reference to a contested seat in Massachusetts. His alternate at 
Charleston claimed to retain his seat in this Convention. He desired to have 
a hearing before the Committee on Credentials upon that question, and would 
submit the question whenever it was in order, or now, by general consent. 

Mr. Clark and Mr. Claiborne, of Missouri, stated that a similar case had 
occurred in the Missouri delegation. 

Mr. Briggs, of New York, inquired whether, under the resolution adopted 
this morning, all these cases did not go necessarily to the Committee ? 

The Secretary read the resolution of the gentleman from New York, from 
which it appears that only credentials from seceding States went to the 
Committee. 

Mr. Stuart suggested that unanimous consent be given to have all such 
cases referred to the Committee. 

No objection being made, the order was made. 

Tho President here announced that Mr. Stout, of Oregon, Mr. Whitely, 
of Delaware, Mr. Wood, of Kentucky, and Mr. Gregory, of California, 
desired to be excused from serving on the Committee on Credentials. 

Bv unanimous consent of the Convention, the following delegotes were 
substituted in their place : Mr. Stevens, of Oregon; Mr. Buley, of Delaware; 
Mr. Morrow, of Kentucky ; and Mr Dudley, of California. 

The Committee on Credentials now stands as follows : 

Arkansas, Van. H. Manning ; Coanectieut, James Gallagher ; California, John S. Diidl'^y , Dela- 
ware, John H. Buley : Indiana, S. A. Hall ; Illinois, William J. Allen ; Iowa, D. G Finch ; Ken- 
tucky, G H. Morrow; Maine, Charles D. Mason ; vfassachnsetts Oliver Stevens ; Michigan, Benj. 
Follett; Minnes.ta, Henry H. Sibley ; Maryland, William S. Gittings : MiKsonri, John M. Krum ; 
New Haupshire, Aaron P." Hughes; New York, D. DeWolf 5 New Jersey, Alfred R. Spear; ^orth 
Carolina, B R. Bridges ; Ohio, James B. Steedman ; Oregon, Isaac J. Stevens ; Pennsylvania, H. 
M. North; Rhode Island, George H. Browne; Tennessee. Wm. H. Carroll; Vermont, Stephen 
Thomas ; Virginia, E W. Hubbard ; Wisconsin, P. H, Smith. 

The question was then taken on the motion to adjourn till 5 o'clock. 
Beft^re the vote was announced, 

Mr. McCooK called for a vote by States. 

The question being taken by a call of the States, resulted as follows : 



Yeas. Nays 

Maine, 8 

N«w Hampshire 6 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 13 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut i.- 21^ 3i 

New York... 35 

New Jersey 7 

Pennsylvania 26 1 

elaware 2 

Maryland -. 8 

Virginia 15 

On motion of Mr. 
^djourned. 



Yeas. Nays Yeas. Nays. 

North Carolina 10 Ohio 28 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

Alabama 

Louisiana. -- 

Mississippi 

Texas 

Arkansas 1 

Missouri 3 

Tennessee..- 12 

Kentucky 12 

BuTTERWORTH, of New York, the Convention then 



Ohio 

Jndiana 

lllinniH 

Michigan _ 6 

Wisconsin 

Iowa 

Minnesota 4 

California 4 

Oregon 3 

185i 



eel 



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108 Democratic National Convention, 

EVENING SJBSSION. 

The Convention re-assemhled at 5 o'clock. 

Messrs. Fisher, of Virginia, Stetson, of New York, and King, of IVI issouri, 
desired information from the Chair, in relation to tickets of admission to the 
Convention. 

Mr. Stuaut. Mr. President, I rise merely to state that, according to 
my understanding, there can be no business that ought to occupy the atten- 
tion of this Convention this evening. The Committee on Credentials will 
not report till to-morrow. I therefore move that the Convention adjourn. 

The PRESIDENT. The Chair requests the gentleman to withdraw his mo- 
tion for a moment, that the Chair may present a communication he has re^ 
ceived to the Convention- 
Mr. Stuart. Certainly. 

The motion to adjourn was accordingly withdrawn. 

The President. Before proceeding to make that communication, the 
Chair desires to make a suggestion to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. 
Fisher), and at the same time to make a suggestion to the Convention itself. 
At the assembling of this Convention at Charleston, a system of organization 
was adopted which involved the delivery of tickets for admission of mem- 
bers to the floor, the hall, and to their seats in the hall. That system was 
resumed at the assembling of the Oonventi,on in the city of Baltimore ; and 
the duty devolved, as a matter of necessity, upon the Chair to direct the dis- 
tribution of those tickets of admission. Was the Chair to give directions that 
ail persons assuming to be members of this Convention should be admitted 
without tickets? Grdntlemen, have we not been occupied in a debate of an 
entire day, the whole of which assumes that no gentleman shall come into 
this hall as a member, and take the seat of a member, without such a ticket 
of admission ? What would have been the condition of things in this hall if 
tnere had been no system at the door of checking the admission of persons, 
and discriminating between those who were recognized as of right members 
of this Convention, and those who were not so recognized ? Would it have 
been possible to have continued the deliberations of this body, with the free 
admission of persons at the doors of this hall, without any check or guard to 
their admission ? The Chair submits it to the good sense of every menj^ber 
of this body that it would have been materially and morally impossible to go 
on without some provision for the delivery of tickets of members of this body 
at the door of this Convention. In this state of facts, in this evident necessity 
for some sach provision, it appears that the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. 
Fisher), had not obtained the ticket which, as the Chair is informed by the 
Sergeant-at-Arms, was, in the ordinary course of business, delivered to the 
Chairman of the Virginia delegation. If that was so, surely the Sergeant-at- 
Arras and the officers of the Convention can only regret that the accident 
occurred. 

But beyond that fact, the Chair wilt submit to the gentleman from Vir- 
ginia (Mr. Fisher), that the solemn appeal he has made to the country 
against this ordinary expedient of tickets for the admission of members to the 
Convention, is an appeal to the country against a primary and obvious neces- 
sity of order in the Convention. If the Convention shall desire to change that 
system, no person will accept that change more gratefully than the Chair. 
(Cries of '* no change," '* no change ") The duties devolved upon me as the 
presiding officer of this Convention ; the necessity of preserving order in the 
Convention ; putting motions ; hearing and deciding questions of order, and 
the other necessary duties of the Chair, are quite enough occupation for him, 
and he deeply regrets, that in addition to that occupation— in itself quite 
enough for him to discharge — there is devolved upon him, in regard to the 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 109 

admission of members and spectators, an amount of duty incdnparably great- 
er than all the other duties of the Chair. He deplores this, and would be 
deeply grateful to the Convention if they would adopt some other order, if 
any other order be possible, by which there can be regularity of admission to 
the Convention. 

With these remarks, the Chair submits the whole subject to the Conven- * 
tion ; and if the Convention will be good enough to pass an order designating 
some other person to attend to this duty, the Chair will be deeply gratified to 
be relieved from this, the most onerous duty devolved upon the Chair. 

Mr. Stfart, of Michigan. I think that the whole subject is disposed of 
satisfactorily, and I hope that the motion will be put that the Convention 
adjourn. 

The Pbesident. The Chair begs leave before putting the quesMon to lay 
before the Convention a communication from Mr. Krum, the Chairman of the 
Committee on Credentials. 

COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMITTEE ON CREDEN'I lALS- 

The Secretaby read the following letter : 
Hon. Caleb Gushing^ President^ i^c, : 

My Dear Sir : I am instructed by the Committee on Credentials to say 
they will be unable to report at the afternoon session of this day, and beg 
pormission of the Convention to continue our session during the sitting of the 
Convention. Very respectfully, &c., 

19th June, 1860. JOHN M. KEUM, Chairman. 

The President. As no objection is made, the Chair will take it for 
granted that the permission is given. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, moved that the Convention do now adjourn. 

The motion to adjourn was agreed to, and the Convention accordingly 
adjourned. 



Wednesday, June 20, 1860. 

The Convention was called to order at twenty minutes past 10 o'clock A. M. 

The Prksident introduced the Rev. Mr. Bowbn, >vho offered up a prayer. 

Mr. Ludlow, of New York. Mr. President, I would ask whether there is 
any information in the possession of the Chair, or any member of this Con. 
vention, as to the probable time when the Committee on Credentials will be 
prepared to report. • 

'I he President. The Chair has not yet received any information upon the 
subject, but is informed that presently it will be communicated to the Chair. 

Mr. Ludlow. I will, therefore, in order to facilitate the business of the 
Convention, move that the reading of the journal be dispensed with. 

The motion prevailed. 

Mr. King, of Missouri, rose to a privileged question and stated it. 

Mr. Clark, of Missouri, made a statement upon the privileged question 
stated by Mr. King. 

Mr. Ludlow, of New York. I rise to a point of order. It is this : The 
Chair recognized €rov. King. Gov. King has yielded the floor. Having 
made his explanation, he has exhausted his question of privilege. I now 
want to know what the question is before the Convention. 

The President. The Convention will understand that no question is 
pending, and that the remarks of the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. King), as 
jilso those of the ot'her gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Clark), are only pro- 



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110 Democratic National Convention. 

ceeding under the assumed indulgence of the Convention. If objection be 
made, it is the duty of the Chair to arrest the course of remark. 

Mr. Ludlow. Who is entitled to the floor ? 

The President. Mr. Clark, of Missouri, was recognized. 

Mr. Ludlow. Is he in order ? 
♦ The President, tie is not in order unless by unanimous consent. 

Mr. Ludlow. I object. 

The President. The gentleman from Missouri will observe that objectix>n 
18 made from various quarters, and he will not, therefore, be in order to 
proceed. 

Mr. Clark. I only want to place the record of my State right. 

Mr. Ludlow. I now move, sir, that this Convention take a recess until 
five o'clock P. M. 

The President. The Chair requests the gentleman to withdraw the 
motion a moment in order that he may have read a letter from the delegation 
from Florida, for the purpose of correcting a misapprehension arising in the 
public mmd, and possibly in the Convention, in consequence of a miscon- 
struction of a statement made by the Chair. 

The Secretary then read the following letter ; 

kooms of the florida delegation to the) 
Democratic Convention at Richmond, > 
Baltimore, June 19th, I860,) 
Oen, Caleb Cushing, President Baltimore Convention : 

Sir : In yesterday's proceedings of the Convention over which you 
preside, you are reported as stating that credentials of gentlemen claiming 
seats in the Convention from Florida had been placed in your hands. In 
this you have— unintentionally, doubtless— done the State of Florida great 
injustice. 

By reference to the proceedings of the recent Democratic Convention of 
- that State, a newspaper copy of which was placed in your hands by one of 
our delegation, as we learn from him, for your private information only, and 
not as " credentials," you will perceive that Florida accredited her delegates 
to Richmond only. It is true her delegates to Richmond are entrusted with 
a large discretion for the purpose of harmonizing the Democracy, if possible 
upoQ the principles rejected at Charleston. ' 

In the exercise of that discretion the Florida delegates, during the recess 
of the Richmond Convention, are in attendance at Baltimore, observant spec- 
tators of your proceedings, and prepared to avail themselves of the first 
honorable opening for a re- union with their Democratic brethren ; but as 
yet the^ have seen nothing to induce them to suppose that such opening will 
occur, aad until it does they have unanimously determined not to participate 
in your proceedings in any manner whatever. 

They have therefore to request that Florida may be omitted from the list 
of those States represented, or seeking to be represented, in the Convention 
over which you preside, until they shall themselves notify you of their desire 
to participate in your proceedings. N. BAKER, Chairman. 

GEO. W. CALL. 
JAS. B. OWENS, 
W. D. BARNES, 
JOS. JOHN vv ILLIAMS, 
B. F. WARDLAW, 
Florida Delegation, Richmond. 
The President. The Chair will only add in further explanation that his 
remark to which the letter refers was undoubtedly misapprehended. His 
statement was that the official proceedings of the Convention contained in a 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. Ill 

newspaper had been placed in his hands. He did not mean to be understood 
as sayiijg that the delegation had presented crt^dentials to the Convention, for 
he well understood at the time that it was otherwise ; and in view of 'the 
respectful and dignified tone of this letter, further explaining the matter, the 
('hair had asked this indulgence of the Convention. 

Mr. Lui)Low, of New, York. I am informed from an authentic source that 
the Committee on Credentials will not be prepared to report until five o'clock 
this afternoon, and in view of that fact, and also in view of the additional fact 
that there is no other business and can be no other business before the Con- 
vention, I move that we take a recess until five o'clock. 

The motion was put and carried, and accordingly, at 10 minutes before 11 
o'clock, the Convention took a recess. 

EVENING SESSION. 

The Convention was called to order at precisely five o'clock. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. I have, within the last five minutes, had an 
interview with the Chairman of the Committee on Credentials, as I passed 
along by the building, in order to ascertain, if possible, when they would be 
able to report ; and I understand from him that it will not be possible for them 
to report until to-morrow morning. Therefore, sir, without taking further 
time, I will move that the Convention adjourn, which will be an adjournment 
until to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock. 

The motion was put and carried, and accordingly the Convention adjourned. 



Thursday, June 21, 1860. 

The Convention was called to order by the President, at 10 o'clock A. M. 

Prayer was offered by the Rov. Henry Slicer. 

Mr. Dawson, of Pennsylvania, moved to dispense with the reading of the 
journal, which was agreed to. 

The President announced that reports of Committees were in order. 

At this point of the opening proceedings, just at the moment when the most 
intense anxiety prevailed as to the presentation of the report of the Committee 
on Credentials, and when the Chairman, Mr. Krum, was expected to rise, a 
loud crash proceeded from the center of the floor. For a moment a scene of 
the wildest excitement ensued, which was communicated to all parts of the 
house, though fortunately the ladies who filled the dress circle, and the 
crowded upper tiers of male spectators, were able in a moment to comprehend 
the nature of the accident. 

The floor being cleared, it was ascertained that the front of the stage and 
the portion covering the orchestra had given away, and suddenly sunk about 
three feet in the center, throwing the settees and those who were on them, 
within a circle of about fifty feet, into one wedged mass, from which they 
extricated themselves as rapidly as possible, and fled in all directions to distant 
parts of the house. Fortunately no one was injured, as would doubtless have 
been the case if the floor had sunk down all the way to the basement under- 
neath. 

The extent of the damage done was proved upon investigation to be very 
slight. The simple slipping of an upright support to the transverse beams 
upon which the joist and floor rested, caused the floor to be lowered to the 
ground. The floor itself being laid in battoned sections, was easily taken up, 
other supports placed in the proper places and the floor speedily relaid. 

Mr. Ludlow, of New York. In view of the fact that there are now three 



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112 Democratic National Convention, 

times .the number of delegates present on the floor, I move that we take a 
recess for one hour. (Cries of "No," "no," "no !'') 

The President. How can the seats be otherwise repaired ? 

The motion to take a recess was put and declared carried. 

Mr. Stuart. We cannot do any business as a Convention. I, therefore, 
make the suggestion to the Chair that all tickets, whether held by delegates 
or reporters, alter this floor shall have been cleared, be given up as gentlemen 
come in, as being the only remedy for this abuse. 

[The object beinor to prevent delegates, after they have obtained admittance, 
from sendmg out their tickets to other parties, who again use them.] 

Several Members. " That's right." 

The President. During the sitting at Charleston the Chair ventured to 
take that step, and he would have renewed it now except for suggestions 
made in regard to his exercise of authority that tended to render him reserved 
upon that point. He will now, in view of the accident that has occured, 
assume to direct that every ticket, upon being. presented by any gentleman 
havif g a right to admission, shall f)e delivered up to the officer, upon enter- 
ing, and that a check be given to each gentleman admitted, with which he 
may resume his seat. 

The Chair bess leave to make a further suggestion — that with the under- 
standing that a proper arrangement shall be made by which it shall be 
rendered impossible that other gentlemen shall be introduced upon delegates' 
tickets, the Chair will adopt "^ome process for that purpose. Meanwhile, in 
order that the injury may be repaired, he respectfully requests of gentlemen 
to vacate the hall, in order that the workmen may proceed to their work. 

Mr. Rynders, of New York. I doubt if an hour will be time enough to 
do it. 

The floor was then slowly cleared, and the workmen at once pioceeded to 
make the necessary repairs. The damage was found to be easily remedied, 
and within the hour the floor was entirely replaced, with such additional pre- 
cautions as to avoid a recurrence of the mishap. 

At twelve o'clock M. the Convention was cnlled to order by 

The Prksident, who said : Gentlemen : — The members of the Convention 
appear to have re-assembled ; the period of the recess has expired ; the Con- 
vention will please come to order. 

Mr. Craig, of Missoun. I desire to offer some resolutions, which I will 
send to the Secretary to have read. 

Mr. McCooK, of Ohio. T object to the introduct'on of resolutions at this 
time as out of order. 

The Prestoent. The onlv question is the point of order raised bv the 
gentleman from Ohio (Nfr. McCook). 

Mr. Craig. I would beg the gentleman from Ohio to w ithdraw his point of 
order. 

The President. Until the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. McCook) has with- 
drawn it, the Chair must enforce the rules of order. The gentleman from Ohio 
utyects to the proposed resolutions as not in order. The Chair requf'sts the 
Convention to revert to the fact that at the moment when the cause arose this 
moining that led to our separation an hour ago, the Chair had announced that 
the business in order was the reports from Committees, and the Chair was 
waiting for a report to be presented from the Committee on Credentials. And 
without deciding the general question whether if no report is to be made, 
resolutions would be in order, the Chair is of opinion that under the rules of 
the Convention and the caill of the Chair, the first business is to receive reporti^ 
of Committees, 

Mr. CraIg. Will the Chair allow me to appeal to the gentleman from Ohio 



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Proceeding's at Baltimore. 118 



"& 



(Mr. Mc€ook) to allow the resolutions to be read? I will not ask for any 
action of the C »nvention. 

jection was maie by several delegates. 

Mr. Craig I would ask, if the Chairman of the Committee on Credentials 
demamiitig his privilege, am T not in order? 

1'he President. The Chair will decide that qaestion when it arises. The 
Chair perceives that the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Krum) is upon the 
fluv>r, a ■> the Chair supposes, for the purpose of presenting his report. 

REPORTS FROM THE COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. 

Mr. Krum, oi Missouri. The Committee on Credentials is now prepared to 
report. 

Mr. Cla.uk, of Missouri. I ask the Ci airman of the Committee (Mr. Krum) 
to proceed to the Secretar-y's desk to read his report from there. 

Mr. Krum. I think I can make myself heard from here. I trust my brother 
members of the Convention will give their attention while the Committee 
present their report. And allow me, before proceeding to the reading of that 
report, to advert to a fact or two, which T regard as not inappropriate. This 
is the first time in the history of the Dimocratic party when questions of the 
kind which have undergone investigation before your Committee have ever 
a>isen. The remarkable question has arisen that after the b ;ginning of the 
session of a National Convention questions of vacancies have 

Mr. Davis, of Virginia. I rise to a point of order. Is this speech in order, 
or is the report first in order? If the speech is in order, I want to hear it ; if " 
it is not, I do not want to hear it. I demand t le decision of the Chair upon 
the point of order. 

The President. The gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Davis) makes a point 
of order on the remarks the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Krum) is making. 

Mr. K«UM. xAllow m*^ before that question is decided 

Mr. Dwis. Lit the Chair decide the question. 

Mr, Kkum. In the rem irk I whs about to make I was not going to discuss 
the merits of the report. I was designing to make som 3 prefatory remarks 
whioh I did not deem inappropriate, not afifecting the subject matter of the 
report, or any question of privilege of this body. I had supposed that the 
courtesy of gentlemen would be extended to the C )mmittee to say at least a 
word of explanation in regard to the labors which they have undergone. I had 
hoped to have had that courtesy from the Old Dominion. 

Mr. Davis, of Virginia. I want to have it understood that some courtesy is 
due also to the Old Dominion to be heard if the gentleman says anything that 
the Old Dominion does not like. Is thit also to be accorded to them? 

Mr. Krum. If I shall say anything that is disagreeable to the Old Dominion 
or her representatives here I trust that this C invention will unanimously allow 
me to retire to my distant home in the West. I hope my friend will be satis- 
fied to listen to a dozen words. 

Objection was made by delegates from several States. 

The President. Objection is made to the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. 
Krum) goin : on. The Chair will suggest as a solution of the whole question, 
that the C lairman of the C )mmittee should offer his report, and then he will 
be entitled to go on with his remarks after he has submitted his report. If 
the Chair is required to rule upon the point of order, he must rule that the 
Giairman of the Committee is to first submit his report, and then he will have 
the floor to make his remarks upon the report. % 

Mr. KiiUM. I will then send up my report to be read. 

8 



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114 Democratic National Convention, 

THE MAJORITY REPORT. 

The report was then read as follows : 
T> the Persident of the National Democratic Convention: 

Mr. President: Tue C )rainittee upon Credentials respectfully report tl at 
prior to the adjournment of this Convention at Ctiarlestor, on the 3d of May 
last, the following resolution was adopted : 

'* Resolved, Tiiat when this Convention adjourns to-day it be adjourned to 
re-asjsemble at Baltimore, Md., on Monday, the 18th of June next, and that it 
be respectfully recommended to the Democratic party of the several States to 
make provision for supplying all vacancies in their respective delegations to 
this Convantion when it shall re-assemble." 

On the re-a^sembling of this Convention in Baltimore, the foUowing resolu- 
tion wag adopted : 

Resolved^ That the credentials of all persons claiming seats in this Conven- 
tioii made vacant by the secession of delegates at Charleston, be referred to 
the Committee on Credentials ; and said Committee is hereby instructed, as 
soon as practicable, to examine the same, and report the names of persons 
entitied to such seats. 

By the further order of the Convention, the claims of all other persons 
claiming seats were also referred to your C >mmittee. Your Committee thus 
instructed have proceeded to examine the claims of all pers( ns which huve 
been brought before them. Your Committee found that the delegatit.ns of the 
several States of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Florida had 
become wholly vacant by reason of the secession of the entire o'iginal delega- 
te >ns from this Convention ; the delegations of the States of Georgia, Arkansas 
and Delaware had become vucant in part only from the same cause. In no 
other State had there been any secession, but individual seats were contested 
in the delegations from the States of Massachusetts and Missouri. 

Aside from the above, no question touching the seats of delegates was 
brought tx) the notice of your Committee. After patient and full investigation, 
your Committee are of opinion that the persons hereinafter named in the 
resolutions, which are herewith submitted as a part of this report, are sever- 
ally entitled to seats as delegates in this Convention, and they respectfully 
recommend that they be so received by this Convention. 

From the State of Florida no credentials of any delegates were presented to 
your Committee. From 1 he States of Mississippi and Texas no contesting 
claimants appear. From Alabama, Louisian?\, Georgia and Arkansas there 
appeared contesting claimants for all the vacant seats. Of the four votes to 
which the State of Arkansas is entitled, the now sitting delegates represent 
one vote. The seats representing the remaining three votes had become 
vacant by the secession of the original delegates. These seats were all con- 
tested, one set of contestants consisting of six persons, and the other set con- 
sisting of three persons. Your Committee are of opinion that all of these 
contestants should be admitted to seats as delegates, with the power of voting 
as hereinafter declared in the resolution herewith reported in that behalf. 

In the Fifth Congressional District of Massachusetts it appeared that B. F. 
Hallett and another person were appointed delegates to this Convention, and 
R . L. Chaffee and another person were appointed substitutes. That Mr. 
Hallett, not being able to attend at Charleston, notified Mr. Chaffee of that 
fact, who thereupon proceeded to Charleston, presented his credentials, and 
was duly admitted to his seat, which he continued to fill at the time of the 
adjournment of this Convention to Baltimore. At the re-assembling of the 
Convention at Baltimore, Mr. Hallett appeared, claimed the seat which had 
been awarded to Mr. Chaffee, and receiving the entrance ticket from the 
Chairman of the Massachusetts delegation, actually took possession of the 
geat. Your Committee are of opinion that when Mr. Hallett had notified 



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Proceedinsrs at Baltimore. Ho 



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Mr. Chaffee that he could not fulfill his duty as .delegate, and Mr. Chaffee 
repairing to Charleston had been duly admitted to this Convention, his rights 
to his seat became absolute, and not subject to be superseded at the pleasure 
of Mr. Hallett, and that Mr. Chaffee is now the rightful delegate to this Con- 
vention. 

In the Eighth Electoral District of Missouri the facts are precisely parallel 
to the above Massachusetts case. The only difference is in terms, Johnson 
B. Clardy having been elected delegate, and John O'Fallon, Jr., having been 
elected alternate. Your Committee, for reasons above stated, are of opinion 
that Mr. O'Fallon is now the rightful delegate 

In regard to the contesting claimants from Georgia, your Committee have 
to report that the evidence adduced before your Committee by the respective 
parties, presented a great variety of novel, as well as complexed facts and 
questions, touching the rights of either parties to seats. Your Committee, m 
attempting to solve these difficulties, encountered embarassments on every 
hand. After a most patient consideration of the whole matter, it seemed to 
your Committee that the only way of reaching a satisfactory adjustnaent is 
to admit to seats both delegations, with power to each of said delfigations to 
cast one half of the vote of the State, in the manner expressed in the resolu- 
tion herewith submitted. This solution seems equitable to your Committee, 
and therefore they recommend the adoption of said resolution. All of which 
is respect fullv submitted. JOHN M. KRUM, Chairman. 

1. Resolved, That George H. Gordon, E. Barksdale, W. F. Barry, H. 0. 
Chambers, Joseph- R. Davis, Beverly Matthews, Charles Clark, Wm. L. 
Featherston, P. F. Liddell, C. G. Armistead, Wm F. Avant, and T. J. 
Hudson, are entitled to seats in this Convention, as delegates from the State 
of Mississippi. 

2. Besolned, That Pierre Soule, F. Gottman, R. C. Wickliffe, Michael 
Ryan, Manuel White, Charles Brenveneau, Gustavus Leroy, JJEj_Miirse, A. 
S. Herron, M. D. Colmer, J. N. T. Richardson, and J. L. Walker, are entitled 
to seats in this Convention, as delegates from the State of Louisiana. 

3. Resolved, That R. W. Johnson, T. C. Hindman, J. P. Johnson, De- 
Roan Carroll, J. Gould, John A. Jordan, N. B. Burrows, and F. W. Hoad- 
ley be admitted to seats as delegates from the State of Arkansas, with power 
to cast two votes, and that Thos. H. Bradley, M. Hooper, and D. C. Cross, 
be also admitted to seats as delegates from the same State, with power to cast 
me vote, and in case either portion of said delegates shall refuse or neglect to 
take their said seats, or to cast their said votes, the other portion of said 
delegates taking seats in this Convention, shall be entitled to cast the entire 
three votes of said district. 

4. Resolved, That Guy M. Bryan, F. R. Lubbock, F. S. Starkdale, E. 
Greer, H. R. Runnells, Thos. P. Ochiltree, M. W. Covie, and J. F. Crosby, 
are entitled to seats as delegates from Texas. 

5. Resolved, That James A. Bayard and Wm. G. Whitely are entitled to 
seats from the county of New Castle, Delaware. 

6. Resolved, That R. L. Chaffee, who was duly admitted at Charleston as 
a delegate from the Fifth Congressional District of Massachusetts, is still 
entitled to said seat in this Convention, and that Benjamin F. Hallett, who 
has assumed said seat, is not entitled thereto. 

7. Resolved, That John O'Fallon, Jr., who was duly admitted at Charles- 
ton as a delegate from the Eighth Congressional District of Missouri, is still 
entitled to said seat in this Convention ; and that John B. Olardy, who has 
assumed said seat, is not entitled thereto. 

8. Resolved, That R. A. Barker, D.„a,Hlimpia:gy, John Forsyth, William 
Garrett, J. J. Seivels, S. C. Posey, li_JL_JBar!SiiBS, Joseph C. Bradley, Thomas 
B. Cooper, James Williams, 0. H. Bynum, Samuel W. Weaxley, L, V. B. 



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116 Democratic National Convention, 

Martin, John W. VVarrack, W. R. R. Wyatt, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas M. 
Mathews and Norment McLeod, are entitled to seats in this Convention as 
delegates from the State of Alabama. 

9. Besolved, That the delegation from the State of Georgia, of which H. 
L. Benningis Chairman, be admitted to the Convention, with power to cast 
one-half of the vote of said State ; and that the delegation from said State, 
of which Col. Gardner is Chairman, be also admitted to the Convention, with 
power to cast one-half the vote of said State, and if either of said delegations 
refuse or neglect to cast the vote as above indicated, that in such case the 
delegates present in the Convention be authorized to cast the full vote of 
said State. 

Mr. Krum. Mr. President, when the question of order was made by the 
gentleman from Virginia, I was about to submit a few prefatory remarks, 
which I deemed as due to the Committee itself, but being one of those that 
always submit with cheerfulness to the rules and actions of Democratic Con- 
ventions, I yielded to the question of order thus made. 

The remarks I was about to submit have no relation to the merits of the 
report. I was about to refer to the remarkable fact that has been developed 
since the session of this body in a distant Southern city, and I refer to it for 
the purpose of saying a word in respect to the labors of the Committee on 
Credentials and the manner in which those laborcJ have been performed by 
that Committee. The report just submitted to you, as doubtless you all 
know, involves new, complex and unusual questions, that have arisen since 
the session at Charleston. The Committee to whom those questions were 
referred have, in the discharge of their duties, desired to do justice and to 
discharge those duties with fidelity, and in their behalf I desire to say that 
they have labored with an industry that I have never seen surpassed and 
rarely equaled. A limited time was allowed to your Committee, for, Mr. 
President, we were aware that you were sitting here impatiently. We had 
the conviction thrust upon us that it was necessary to have our labors com- 
pleted at an early day. We come before you, therefore, knowing that our 
work has been but imperfectly performed. If further time had been allowed 
to us, we doubtless could have perfected it and presented a more elaborate 
report. These remarks, I thought, were due to the Committee. 

Now, Mr. President, I have only to say that it has been communicated to 
the Chairman of the Committee that a portion of that Committee desired to 
present a minority report, and in addition to that, that one of the Committee 
desires to present another minority report, and I trust an opportunity will be 
given to those gentlemen to do so. 

MINORITY REPORT. 

Mr. Stevens, of Oregon, then rose and submitted the minority report as 
follows : 

To the President of the Democratic National Convention : 

Sir :— We, the undersigned, members of the Committee on Credentials, 
feel constrained to dissent from many of the views and a large portion of the 
action of the majority of the Committee in respect to the rights of delegates 
to seats referred to them by the Convention, and to respectfully recommend 
the adoption of the following resolutions : 

1. Besolved, That B. F. Hallett is entitled to a seat in this Convention as 
a delegate from the 5th Congressional District of Massachusetts. 

2. Besolved, That John B. Gardy is entitled to a seat in this Convention 
as a delegate from the 8th Congressional District of the State of Missouri. 

3. Resolved, That James A. Bayard and W. 0. Whitely are entitled to 
seats m this Convention as delegates from the State of Delaware. 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 117 

4. Resolved^ That the delegation headed by R. W. Johnson are entitled 
to seats as delegates in this Convention frona the State of Arkansas. 

5. Resolved, That the delegation of which Guy M. Bryan is Chairman are 
entitled to seats as delegates in this Convention from the State of Texas. 

6. Resolved, That the delegation of which John Tarlton is Chairman are • 
entitled to seats in this Convention as delegates from the State of Louisiana. 

7. Resolved, That the delegation of which L. P. Walker is Chairman are 
entitled to seats in this Convention as delegates from the State of Alabama. 

8. Resovled, That the delegation of which Henry L. Benning is Chairman 
are entitled to seats in this Convention from the State of Georgia. 

9. Resolved, 'Jhat the delegation from the State of Florida, accredited to 
the Charleston Convention, are invited to take seats in this Convention and 
cast the vote of Florida. 

The principles involved in these resolutions and the facts on which they 
rest are of such gravity and moment that we deem it due to the Convention 
and to ourselves to set them forth with care and particularity. We differ 
radically from the majority of tfte Committee, both in much of the action w e 
reccommend to the Convention and the principks which should control such 
action. It is a question not simply of the integrity, but the existence of the 
Democratic party in several States of this Union. It is a question whether 
the Democratic party in said State shall be ostracized and branded as unwor- 
thy of affiliation with the national organization. 

It is a question whether persons irregularly called, or withdrawing from 
the regular Convention, shall have the sanction of the National Convention 
to raise the flaji, of rebellion against their respective State organizations. It is 
a question whether the Convention itself shall repudiate its own deliberate 
action at Charleston. We do not magnify the importance of these questions 
when we assert that upon their proper solution depends the fact as to whether 
therG shall be a National Democratic party or not. The task will not 1 e 
difficult to show that the action recommended by the majority of the Com- 
mittee is grossly inconsistent, and should be reprobated and condemned by 
this Convention. But to the task, without further preamble. 

Reserving to the closing portion of this report the cases of contested seats 
in the Massachusetts and Missouri delegation, we come at once to the cases 
of the delegates who withdrew from the Charleston Convention. This 
Convention, on the eve of its adjournment at Charleston, and in the great 
cause of the restoration of harmony to our distracted party, "respectfully 
recommended to the Democratic party of the several btates to make provision 
for supplying all vacancies in their respective delegations to this Convention 
when it shall re- assemble.'* We call particular attention to the wording of 
the resolution. Certain delegates had withdrawn. They had placed on the 
Convention the reasons of their withdrawal. 

They still, however, were the representatives of the Democratic party of 
their several States. Their withdrawal was not a resignation. It was not so 
considered by the Convention. The vacancies referred to had reference to the 
contingency of vacancies at the time of re- assembling, and the resolution 
proposed to provide for supplying them. The Convention did not presume 
to touch the question as to whether the withdrawal of the delegates consti- 
tuted a resignation, nor had it any right to interfere in the matter. A 
resignation must be made to the appointing power, and to be complete and 
final must be accepted by the appointing power. It was well known on 
the adjournment of the Convention at Charleston that the withdrawing 
delegates desired the instruction of their several constituencies before 
deciding on their future course. 

Such was the spirit and purpose of their deliberations at Charleston. They 
consulted their respective constituencies. In every case except the case of 



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118 Democratic National Convention. 

3outh Carolina, their constituencies directed or authorized them — the vacan- 
cies being filled as contemplated in the resolution of the Convention — to 
repair to Baltimore, and there in earnest efforts with their brethren of the 
Convention, to endeavor once more to unite their party and promote harmony 
and peace in the great cause of their country. The resolution of the Con- 
vention did not prejudge the question since so strenuously raised that their 
withdrawal was a resignation, but left the whole question to the said delegates, 
and their respective constituencies, to the end that every State in this "Union 
might be represented in Baltimore. 

The Committee has passed resolutions, declaring by a vote of 16 to 9, that 
the delegation from Louisiana, headed by Pierre Soule — by a vote of 14 to 11, 
that the delegation from Alabama, headed by Parsons — and by a vote of 13 
to 10, that half of each delegation claiming seats from Georgia, are entitled 
to seats in the Convention. The resolutions recommended by the undersigned 
to the Convention declare the right of the delegations elected to Charleston, 
with vacancies supplied, as contemplated in the resolution of the Convention 
Lo which reference has been made, and accredited to Baltimore, to said seats. 
The Committee which thus recommend the irregular delegates from these 
three States, have rejected the regular delegates Irom Delaware, and admitted 
the Charleston delegates. 

It has admitted irregular delegates from Arkansas, and rejected a portion of 
the Charleston delegates, as modified, by the filling of vacancies. It has ad- 
mitted the Charleston delegates from Mississippi by a vote of 23 to 2, and the 
Charleston delegates from Texas by a vote of 19 to 6. The fact that delega- 
tions are not contested does not establish the right to seats in the Convention. 
There may be irregular delegates without contest, and there may be a contest 
between two sets of irregular delegates. The right of persons to seats as del- 
egates is to be determined by the fact as to whether they were appointed by 
the constituency which they claim to represent, and appointed according to 
the usages of said constituency. Wanting these essential pre-requisites, they 
are not entitled to seats, even if there be no contestants ; and having these, 
their right to seats is not impaired or affected by contestants. 

The Committee, in deciding by a vote of 23 to 2, that the Charleston dele- 
gates from Mississippi are entitled to seats in the Baltimore Convention, have 
decided rightly, just because they were duly accredited to Charleston, have 
never since resigned, and have received instructions from the State of Missis- 
sippi, through a Convention called by the Democratic Executive Committee 
of the State, to return to Baltimore. 

The Charleston delegates, both from Alabama and Greorgia, stand in pre- 
cisely the same position. They were also duly accredited to Charleston. 
They withdrew and never resigned. They returned to their respective con- 
iititiuencies. The Executive Committees in these States, as in the case of Mis- 
sissippi, called a Convention of the party. The Convention met. The 
delegates, as in the case of Mississippi, submitted their action to the Conven- 
tions, and these Conventions approved their course, continued their powers, 
and accredited them to Baltimore. Their rights stand on precisely the same 
basis, and are sustained by the same authority as in Mississippi. The contest- 
ants were appointed by nobody authorized to meet according to the usages of 
the party in these States, and are not entitled to any consideration whatever. 

In the case of Alabama, the Convention assembled on the call of the Dem- 
ocratic Executive Committee (addressed to the Democracy of the State,) was 
very largely attended, nearly every county in the State having been repre- 
sented. A small number of persons, however, issued a notice, which was 
j)ublished in only three newspapers in the State — in two papers the notice 
was without signers, and in the third paper (Mobile Jiegister) it was signed by 
John Forsyth and thirty-five others. The notice in one paper called upon 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 119 

all Democrats and all other persom-'m the second paper upon Democrats and 
all conservatives, and the third paper (Mobile Register) upon the people of Ala- 
hama, to hold coT:;iity meetings and send delegates to a State Convention, to 
be held in Montg m'ery or Selma, the 4th day of June, to appoint delegates 
to Baltimore. Twenty-eight counties only out of fifty-two were represented. 
It was the coming together of persons from all parties outside of the regu- 
lar organization to strike down the Democracy of the State. It was a call 
withoutany official authority whatsoever. We thus find the Democracy of the 
State assembling in Convention according to the usages of the party, and we 
find at the same time persons assembling at the call of unauthorized individ- 
uals. In the former case the whole State was represented. In the latter 
about half the State. Yet the majority of the Committee have indorsed the 
action of the Democracy of Alabama," and have repudiated, contrary to all 
precedent, usage, right and justice, the action of the former ; not only this, 
they have repudiated the principles of their own action in the case of the Mis- 
sissippi delegation. ' , r n • v. 

But tl e action of the majority of the Committee in the case of Oreorgia has 
gone one step further in its disregard of the acknowledged principles of the 
party. The Convention which the Committee put on an equality with the 
regularly authorized Convention, consisted in great part of persons who just 
participated in the regular Democratic Convention of the State. The regular 
called Convention consisted of nearly four hundred delegates, representing 
all the counties of the Stare. The resolutions of the Convention having been 
adopted by a vote of 299 to 41, these latter withdrew from the Convention 
and organized anew. Thus the majority of your Committee have exalted the 
pretensions of less than one-eighth of the delegates of the State Convention 
to an equality with the rights of seven-eighths of the Democracy of the State. 
In the case of Louisiana, the old Convention, which originally appointed 
the delegates to Charleston, was re-assembled on the call of the Executive 
Committee of the State, and by a decisive majority accridited the Charleston 
delegates to Baltimore. The reasons for this action have their parallels in the 
cases' of Texas and Delaware, which have received the sanction of the Com- 
mittee. In Texas, the delegates come back accredited by the Democratic Ex- 
e<?utive Committee simply— it being a manifest impossibility, from want of 
time, to assemble the party in a State Convention ; and in Delaware, under the 
usages and rules of the party, the old Convention was re- assembled. In Lou- 
isiana there was time to assemble the old Convention, but not to order an 
election of delegates in the several parishes to meet a new Convention. The 
Executive Committee did every thing it could to get the expression of the 
views of the State. It re-assembled the old Convention, nearly every parish 
in the State being represented, and accredited the Charleston delegates to Bal- 
timore. 1 1 xv 

But the Convention whose delegates to Baltimore have been indorsed by the 
majority of your Committee, was called at the instance of two local organi- 
zations, and of Dr. Cottman, a former member of the National Executive 
Committee of the party, rhe calls were somewhat conflicting. The notice 
did not reach many parishes in the State. Only twenty parishes out of thir- 
ty-nine are preterided to be represented, and in several of these there is no 
reason to doubt the fact that the delegates did not leave behind them a single 
constituent agreeing with them in sentiments. In not a single parish was this 
call responded to by a majority of the Democratic voters. The Convention 
only represented a very small portion of the party — it was totally irregular, 
bchides. 

The majoiity of the Committee object to the action of the old ( convention 
on its re-assembling at the call of the Executive Committee, on the ground 
th t it was defunct and could not be brought to life. Yet it indorses the action 



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120 Democratic National Convention, 

of the other Convention on the call in part of the equally defunct member of 
the National Commiitee, Dr. Cottman. The following the usage of Dela- 
ware, by the Executive Committee of Louisiana, though manifestly a neces- 
sity for the reasons stated, has no weight as a precedent wnth this majority, 
('onceding their ground of its being irregular, seals as delegates should be 
given to the body called by the regular authority and not to the body assem- 
bled by no responsible authority whatever, and especally when the former 
represented the great body of the party and the latter did not. All these con- 
siderat'ons, however, have been disregarded by the majority of the Committee, 
who have persisted by a vote of \% to 9 to award the seats as delegates to the 
representatives of the disorganizing minority Convention. 

In the case of Arkansas, the majority of the Committee propose to divide- 
out the seats to all applicants. In this State the Democratic party were about 
assembling in their District (Conventions, consi&ting of delegates from the sev- 
erai counties of the State, for the nomination of member of Congress, when 
their delegates returned from Charleston. As m Texas, there was not time 
for the assembling of a State Convention. In these District Conventions, 
delegates were selected to represent the party at Baltimore. A call was how- 
over issued in a Memphis paper,, without any signature whatever, calling upon 
the people of the Northern District to assemble in mass meeting at Madison,, 
to elect delegates to Baliimore. 

Some four or five hundred men from ten to twelve counties tbus assembled and 
appointed three delegates to Baltimore. The majority of the Committee 
propose to allow these men to vote in the Convention. There are twenty- 
seven counties and twenty-five thousand voters in the district. Col. Hindman, 
a delegate, elected by the District Convention, to Baltimore, was elected to 
Congress, in 1858, by eighteen thousand majority, and was unanimously re- 
nominated by the Convention which selected him as a delegate- to Baltimore. 
These facts show the significance of the action of the District Convention iri 
electing delegates to Baltimore as representing truly the sentiment of the 
Democratic party of the district, and they exhibit the utter insignificance of 
the anonymously called Convention, for it will be borne in mind that it was 
held at a central point, at the western terminus of the railroad from Memphis,, 
and where several stage and wagon routes meet. They were elected as dele- 
gates generally from the State to the National Convention, with the hope 
that they might get in without any definite claim. 

In Massachusetts and Missouri, the contests are- between principals now 
holding their seats and substitutes who held their places at Charleston. In 
each case the principal was detained at home by sickness in his family. In 
each case the principal gave notice to his^ substiUite that he should take his 
seat at Baltimore. The majority of the Committee hold that the principals,, 
elected as such by the proper Conventions, are not entitled to their seats and 
have reported accordingly. We hold that a substitute is appointed simply 
to act in the absence of the principal, and that his authority ceases whenever 
the principal makes his appearance and takes his seat. We emphatically 
declare that such has been the invariable usage in all Conventions of the 
party, whether National or State, and that it is basc^d on reason and the 
representative principle 

All which is respectfully submitted. 
I-^AAC J. SFEFENS, Oregon, A. R SPEER, New Jersey, 

H. M. NORTH, Pennsylvania, JOHN H. BULEY, Delaware, 

E. W. HUBBARD, Virginia, R. R. BRIDGES, North Carolina, 

WM. H. CARilOLL, Tennessee, GEO. H. MORROW, Kentuckv, 

D. S. GREGORY, California. " 
In the points of difference; between, the majority and minority reports of the 



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Proceedinsrs at Baltimore. 121 



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Committee on Credentials, I concur in the conclusion of tlie minority report 
in the cases of Georgia, Alabama, Missouri and Massachusetts. 

AARON V. HUGHES, New Hampshire. 
Mr. Stevens. It will be observed that the Committee are nearly unani- 
mous, and the two reports agree in the case of Texas, Missouri and Delaware. 
I am requested to state that the delegate from Tennessee dissents from a portion 
of the conclusion of the Committee, but votes under instruction of his co- 
delegates ; also that the gentleman from New Hampshire agrees with the 
report of the minority, in the case of Georgia, Alabama, Massachusetts and 
Missouri. 

A SECOND MINORITY REPORT. 

Mr. GiTTiNGS, of Maryland. Mr. President : Being unable to agree with 
either wing of the Committee on Credentials, I have drawn up a report, 
which I submit to the Convention. 

The report was then read as follows : 
Hon. Caleb Cushingy President: 

Sir ; — The undersigned, a delegate from the State of Maryland, and repre- 
senting that State upon the Committee on Credentials, begs leave to say to 
the Democratic National Convention that, while he concurs in and indorses 
the report of the majority of the Committee upon Credentials— so far as 
relates to the contested seats of the State of Massachusetts ; the contested 
seat in the State of Missouri ; the contested seats in the State of Delaware ; 
as also in regard to the contested delegations in the States of Arkansas, 
Georgia and Louisiana, and agreeing with them also in their recommendation 
to admit the delegations now present nnd claiming seats from the States of 
Texas and Mississippi — he differs from and protests against their action with 
regard to the State of Alabama. 

Upon a careful examination of all the facts concerning this State, the 
undersigned believes and so reports, that the delegation of which L. P. Walker 
is chairman is the regularly elected representative of the State of Alabama, 
and as such is clearly entitled to seats in the Democratic National Convention. 

Coming here as they do, not alone by virtue of the commission under 
which they held their seats at Charleston, but having been re-elected 
and accredited by a State Convention called together in accordance 
with the usages of the Democratic party of the State of Alabama, the under- 
signed holds it to be the imperative duty of this National Convention to 
recognize their claims as the only authorized delegates from the State of 
Alabama. 

The undersigned therefore offers the following : 

Resolved, That so much of the majority report of the Committee on 
Credentials as relates to ]\Iassachusetts, Missouri, Delaware, Arkansas, Georgia, 
Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas be adopted. 

Resolved^ That the delegation of which L. P. Walker is Chairman, be and 
they are hereby declared the only regular authorized representatives of the 
State of Alabama, and as such, are entitled to seats in this National Demo- 
cratic Convention. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Baltimore, June 21, 1860. W. S. GITTINGS. 

Mr. GiTTiNGS. I move that the report be printed, and that we take a 
recess till 3 o'clock. [Many voices, ** no," "no."] 

Mr. GiTTiNGS. I withdraw it. 

Mr. Krum resumed the floor. 

Mr. Phillips desired to make a suggestion to the gentleman from Maryland . 

Mr. Krum declined to yield the floor. He then said : Mr. President and 
gentlemen, of the Convention, by the majority and minority reports you are 



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122 Democratic National Convention. 

now possessed of the questions which arise in respect to those reports, and it is 
not my purpose now to enter upon a debate in respect to any of those ques- 
tions, but merely to make a suggestion io order that we may understand each 
other m our tuture action in regard to those reports. And, in the first place 
1 am thorougly convinced that an extended debate in regard to any one of 
the questions wil result in little if any good to the harmony of this Conven- 
tion ; and, as the propositions are plainly stated and addressed to the 
judgment of the Convention in the several reports, I desire to state that 
withm a resonable time, I shall move the previous question, in order that we 
may come to direct action. [Applause, and cries from all quarters, " move it 
now,'; - now,- "now.-] I am appealed to on every hand to move it now. 
1 desire to state that I am under such obligations to brethren of the Com- 
mittee, with whom I have acted with entire harmony and good faith, that I 
could not do so. [Renewed cries of " question,- and '^ move it now.-] 

Mr. Phillips, of Pennsylvania. I suggest that as the reports of the 

majority and minority agree as to recommending the admission of the dele- 

gates from Mississippi, Texas and Delaware, I ask the unanimous consent of 

the Convention to let the vote be taken upon them now. [Many voices— 

^A^'" rl^^*"^ ^^- P^^s^^6°^» t^l^ nie with what fairness it can be refused '^ 

Mr. CEJ^SNA, of Pennsylvania. I call my colleague to order 

The President. The Chair begs leave to inquire whether the gentleman 

from Missouri (Mr. Krum) made a motion or yielded the floor ? He did not 

know which, it was done so abruptly. 

A Delegate. He yielded the floor to the gentleman from Oregon (Mr 
Stevens). « v 

The President The Chair did not so understand, and therefore wishes to 
inquire of the gentleman from Missouri ? 

Mr. Krum No, sir— -I only yielded temporar-ly. 

'I^he President. Then the gentleman from Missouri has the floor. 

Mr. Phillips. I submit that the gentleman cannot yield the floor tempo- 
rarily, but must yield it absolutelv— and I understood the gentleman to sav 
that he did yield it to the gentleman from Oregon. 

Points of order were made by Mr. Schell,''of 'New York, Mr. Atkins of 
Tennessee and Mr. Waterbury, of New York, upon Mr. Krum, each claim- 
ing that Mr. Krum had yielded the floor. 

The President stated that he must determine the question of order by 
ascertaining the question of fact. If the gentleman from Missouri sav s to 
the Convention that he had finished what he had to sav, and had ceased to 
speak in order to enable the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Stevens) to speak 
—it that was his intention when he left his position, the Chair will be bound 
to say that the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Krum) had lost the floor and 
could hot resume it, and upon that question of fact and intention the Chair 
will be bound to accept the declaration upon honor of the gentleman from 
Missouri. ° 

^ Mr Krum, of Missouri. I trust that whenever I speak it will be regarded 
that I speak upon honor. I speak to you now upon honor. I state now, as 
1 did before, that the fact is I supposed I had the right to yield the floor 
temporarily to the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Stevens) that he might make 
some explanation or comment to this Convention. I did so, and it was my 
design to resume the floor. And I did not suppose I had lost my right to the 
floor simply because I stepped from this elevation. 

The President. The gentleman from Missouri now explains that what 
be said was, ^ I yield the floor temporarily to the gentleman from Oregon - 
iNo.v the Chair does not understand that any gentleman in this body can 
yield the floor to any other gentleman to speak, until the gentleman so pro- 
posing to speak shall bo recognized by the Chair. If it were otherwise, there 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 123 

would be an end of all order of debate, as well as interchange of fair rights 
of inequality upon the floor of the Convention. And now as the gentleman 
from Missouri (Mr. Krum) says that in sitting down he said, *^ I yield the 
floor, &c.,'' the Chair rules that that is a yielding of the floor ; and if the 
gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Stevens) had got the floor so that he could bo 
recognized, he would have been recognized. But in this case the Chair 
recognized the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Phillips), and the Chair is 
of opinion that he is entitled to the floor. ^ 

Mr. Phillips submitted some remarks upon the subject of the several 
reports of the Committees, and was called to order by Mr. Stuart, of Michi- 
gan, and by Mr. Pugh, of Ohio. 

Mr. Phillil'S. I did aot mean to submit any motion of amendment at 
this time. My object is merely to call the attention of the Convention to 
some points presented by the difl'erent reports of the Committee on Creden- 
tia s, and upon that it occurred to me that the duty of the Convention would 
be plain. I repeat, I invite the attention of the Convention to the fact that 
the Committee on Credentials report unanimously in iavor of the admission 
of the delegations of Mississippi, Texas and Delaware. Upon all those dele- 
gations there is unanimity. 

Mr. Steveits, of Oregon. I do not rise to inflict a speech upon this Con- 
vention. I am content, for the most part, to rest the views of the minority 
of the Committee on Credentials on the report which they have presented to 
the Convention. That report has been read, and shows entire unanimity in 
the Committee as regards Delaware, Texas and Mississippi. Those three 
cases inv^ Ive the principles which the minority of the Committee have 
adopted in reference to the action they ask of this Convention upon the 
resolutions they have submitted. My friend from Pennsylvania (Mr. Phil- 
lips) has well put the case of those three States, and I need add nothing 
further. I now call the previous question. 

Mr. Goulden, of Georgia. I appeal to this Convention to hear me for a 
few moments. 

The President. 1 must state the question, as it is called for. It is the 
duty of the Chair now to put the preliminary question, which is upon the 
second of the demand for the previous question. Is the Convention ready 
for that question ? 

Mr. Goulden, of Georgia. Before the question is put, allow me to say 
a word. 

The President. The gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Goulden) is out of 
order. 

Mr. Avery, of North Carolina. I rise to a privileged question. Before 
the question is put upon seconding the demand for the previous question, I 
call tor a division of the question upon the resolutions. 

The President. That can be done as well after the previous question is 
ordered. 

The question was then put to the Convention — 

" Shall the demand for the previous question be seconded? " 

And the Convention agreed to the seconding of the demand for ftie previous 
question. 

The President. The question now is — 

**Shall the main question be now put ?" 

A vote was taken, and the main question was ordered. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York. We of the New York delegation, wish to 
consult before voting upon this question. And for the purpose of aflbrding us 
that opportunity, I n\ove that when this Convention adjourn, it be to meet at 
5 o'clock this afternoon. 

Cries of " no adjournment," ** let us vote." 



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121 Democratic National Convention, 

The question was then taken upon the vote of Mr. Cochran, and the Chair 
announced that it was not agreed to. 

Mr Eandall, of Pennsylvania, moved that the Convention take a recess 
until half-past four o'clock, and upon that he called for the vote by States 
1 ^'- ^^UART, of Michigan. I would suggest to the Chair that after the 
liouse has ordered the main question to be put, nothing can take precedence of 
It but a motion to adjourn generally. 

Mr Seymour, of New York. I move that the Convention now adjourn till 
live o clock this afternoon. We wish an opportunity to look through the reports. 

Mr. bTUART, of Michigan. There is no motion in order but a general motion 
to adjourn. » * 

Mr. Seymour. Then I move to adjourn. 

Mr. Avery, of North Carolina. I will withdraw my motion for a division of 
tbe question. 

Mr. Phillips, of Pennsylvania, and others renewed the call for the division 
oi the question. 

The President.^ The division of the question has now been called for 
I he tirst question is now upon the motion of Mr. Seymour, of New York to 
adjourn. ^ » , f^^ 

The question being taken, the motion to adjourn was not agreed to. 

Mr Randall, of Pennsylvania. I move the Convention adjourn to hklf- 
past four o'clock. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. I must insist upon my point of order, that after 
the house has ordered the main question to be now put, it cuts off every ques- 
tion except the motion to adjourn generally. 

Mr. Ludlow, of New York. I have a suggrestion to make in favor of a 
recess It is that the large delegation of New York has had no opportunity of 
consultation upon the questions now before the Convention. I now move that 
the Convention take a recess until 5 o'clock this afternoon. 

The President. There is no question before the Convention except the 
motion of the gentleman from New York (Mr. Ludlow,) to take a recess until 
5 o clock, and the Chair does not understand that in this stage of the previous 
question a motion for a recess is in order. A motion to adjourn is in order but 
not a motion for a recess. ' 

Mr. Bradford, oI Pennsylvania. I move that when the Convention adjourn 
to-day, it be to half- past four o'clock this afternoon. 

Mr. Samuels, of Iowa. I ask the Chair, in connection with that motion to 
pass upon the question of order made by the gentleman from Michigan 
(Mr. btuart,) and tuat is that such a motion is not in order after the prevfous 
question has been ordered. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. I would suggest that the Convention go on with 
the business of the Convention, so that we may be able to proceed to a vote 
immediately upon assembling again. 

The President The Chair understands that the main question havin^j 
been ordered, the first question is upon the amendments to the majority report 
the amendments consisting of the two minority reports. j ^ i > 

Mr.^ Stuart, of Michigan. With that understanding, I will withdraw mv 
objection. oj j 

Mr Cessna, of Pennsylvania. The delegation from Pennsylvania uix.a 
consultation are willing to withdraw their opposition, and to vote in favor of 
the motion, if the call of the States is withdrawn. 

Mr. Randall, of Pennsylvania. If the call of the vote by States is with- 
drawn, the motion will probably now be carried. 

Mr. Saulsbury withdrew the call. 

The question was then taken upon the motion to take a recess and was 
a greed to. 

Thereupon the Convention took a recess until half-past four o'clock. 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 



125 



BVENIKCr SESSION. 

The Convention was called to or.ier by the President at 5 o'clock 
frnrnW V "^.^ °r .^T ^"'■^ ^'- Pi-e^'l^nt :_0u behalf of the deleaation 
hPvn^tK ^ ' V!f"''^'''"''P°'°'^yf°'-h'^^'»gl^«P'tW« Convention waiting 
beyond he time of the recess. And I am authorized by them in view of thl 
act that they are now m consultation, and will be unable for some length of 
tmie o record their votes upon the question now before the Convention. I am 
deputized by them to appear before you and ask a further recess and time to- 
Many voices. "No, no," "yes, yes." 

Mr. Johnson, of Maryland. I would suggest, in order to save the time of 
h,s Convention, that the vote be now taken, and the vote of New York be 
recorded when she is ready to give it. 

Responses of "good, good," and "no, no." 

Voices'^^'^nrno "^ ^^""^y^""*"'*- I move a recess till 8 o'cl.ck this evening. 

Several Delegates moved to adjourn. 

Mr. Bbadfokd. I move we do now adjourn. 

Mr. Saulsbcky, of Delaware. I call for the Vote bv States 

wht ?otf :ou7be''r"'"""^ '"'I""' ■' '''' ^■°°^^"«- ^'ij°--d- '« 

The President. Till 10 o'clock to-morrow morning. 

The call of the States having been completed, and ' all havincr responded 
with the exception of the New York delegation, who were abs^tVcoCua- 

YoTkl^!L'ff.^''V''^'"'*'^; "^^ matter of form, of the Chairman of the New 

tl7tutlJ """"t material, but receiving no answer, he would assume 

that there was no one here authorized to cast the vote of that State 

hp W r ^'"^ ^/ff?"^ Y^^ ^"^ '^^^'' ^^^""'^ declaring the vote just* taken, that 
he had received this afternoon a communication from gentlemen of the State of 

wo.ldoffp^M^h P ^^^.^^^V ^PP^^*^"i^y t« F«««nt this afternoon, but 
W hp ff\?K ^ ''^"^!^"/^"'^^''^ morning. He desired to state this 
lest he might be supposed to have overlooked it. 

The vote was then announced on the motion to adjourn— aves 161i, nays 48 



as : 



reas. Nays. I 



Maine . 

New Hampshire \ 

Vermont 

Massachusetts -. 4^^ 

Rhode Island "" 4 

Connecticut . 2 

New York 

New Jersey 4 

Pennsylvania 15 

Delaware _ 2 

Maryland '_ 4 

Virginia 14 



iNorth Carolina 

4i'South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida '...'.'. 

Alabama . 

Louisiana ..'..'. 

Mississippi . 

Texas '.'.'.'". 

Arkansas 

Missouri.. p, 

Tennessee ', 5 

Kentucky .12 

Whereupon the Convention adjourned. 



Teas. Nays, 



8 



i 2i 



Ohio _ __ 

fndiana... "!l3 

Illinois ^^ix 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin VS.'.'. 6 

Iowa '_] 4 

Minnesota 4 

California .'. 4 

Oregon 3 



Yeas. Nays. 



I61i 48 



Friday, June 22, 1860. 

At 10 O'clock the President called the Convention to order, and it was 
opened by the Rev. Mr. Schwartz with prayer. 

Mr. Wright, of Massachusetts, called for the reading of the journal. 

Mr. McCooK, of Ohio, moved to dispense with the reading of the iournal. 

Mr. Wright. I desire to have it read because there is a difference of opin- 
ion as to the state of the motions before the Convention. It is proper that 



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126 Democratic National Convention, 

we should know how the journal stands, and I submit to the gentleman the 
propriety of havins: it read. 

Many Voices. " No," " no." 

Mr. McCooK. "We can have the state of the questions from the Chair. 

Tlie question was taken, and the reading of the journal was dispensed with. 

The President. At the adjournment of the Convention yesterday, it had 
ordered that the main question be now put. If it be the pleasure of the Con- 
vention, the Chairman will have reported in due form, the order of questions 
as they arise to which the main question applies. 

The Secretary here read the resolutions of the majority of the Committee. 

Mr. Krum rose to a question of privilege. His attention had been directed 
to the fact that errors had occurred in the names of the deleojates in both the 
report of the majority and the minority, and he asked permission to correct 
the same. 

The President stated thit he had been informed of the errors by the gen- 
tlemen who made the several reports, and if the Convention pleased the 
Chairman woul dr understand that by unanimous consent the gentlemen from 
Missouri have permission to correct the misnomers. 

Mr. Stevens, of Oregon, desired to state that an omission had occurred, 
in the minority report, of a resolution in regard to the delegates from Missis- 
sippi, and he would ask the unanimous consent of the i'onvention to have it 
incorporated. 

Resolved, That George H. Gordon, E. Barksdale, W. F. Barry, H. C. 
Chambers, Joseph R. Davis, Beverly Matthews, Charles Clark, Wm. L. 
Featherston, P. F. Siidell, C. G. Armistead, Wm. F. Cevant and F. G. Hud- 
son are entitled to seats in this Convention as delegates frora the State of 



The President. The Chair will undersstand that unless objection is made, 
the unanimous consent of the Convention will be given that the clerical errors 
be corrected. 

The resolutions of the minority report (Mr Stevens*) w^re then read as 
corrected ; also the resolution reported by Mr. Gittings, of Maryland. 

Mr. Sibley, of Minnesota. Mr. President, I desire to propound a single 
respectful interrogatory. It will be recollected that yesterday the Chairman 
of the Commitee on Credentials, while proceeding to address the Convention 
upon the presentation of the majority report, under a misapprehension of his 
right, yielded the floor to the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Stevens), for 
explanation, and was thus unable to proceed. I now submit to the Chair the 
question whether, according to the rules and practice of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, which govern this body, the Chairman of the Committee has not 
a right to close the debate before the previous question is put ? 

The President. If the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Krum) desires to 
close debate, it is, as the Chair understands, his privilege to do so, even after 
the main question has been ordered. Before doing so, the Chair desires to 
inquire of the gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Gittings) whether he wishes to 
make an amendment to his resolution ? 

Mr. Gittings. It has been sugscested that as there has been no new matter 
in my first resolution it is out of order. I readily see that it is so, and to 
save the Chair the pain of calling me to order, I shall ask permission of the 
Convention to withdraw it, leaving but one resolution. 

The President. The Chair will understand the Convention as givinoj its 
unanimous consent to the amendment desired by the gentleman from Mary- 
land (Mr. Gittings), 

Mr. Wrioht, of Massachusetts. Before that question is decided I wish to* 
rai«5e a question of order whether the gentlemm from Maryland did submit a 
motion to the Convention to amend the reiK>rt before the Convention by the 



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Proceedings at Baltimore, 127 

su'bstitution of his resolution yesterday for the majority resolution ? I did 
not hear it. I heard him submit a motion to print. 

Mr. GiTTiNGs. I undoubtedly made the motion. If my friend did not 
hear it, either his hearing is bad, or my voice is very feeble. 

Mr. Wright. I receive the gentleman's explanation, but respectfully 
submit that the gentleman omitted to do it, though he intended to make the 
motion. 

The President. The Chair understood the gentleman from Maryland to 
make the motion. 

Mr. Wright. Do i now understand the first resolution moved to be out 
of order as a proposition to amend the majority report ? 

The President. Ihe first resolution has been withdrawn by unanimous 
consent. [Voices, *'oh, no.''] Does not the gentleman from Maryland 
withdraw the proposition ? 

Mr. Wright. I do not consent, it is out of order. 

The President suggested to the gentleman from Maryland, in order not to 
require the Chair to rule his amendment out of order, to ask the consent of 
the Convention to withdraw his resolution. 

Mr. Wright now rose to another question— whether the second resolution, 
being identical with a proposition in the majority report, is not also surplusage 
and out of ord'r ? 

The President stated that he would rule upon that question when it 
game up fol* action upon it. 

Mr. GriTTiNGS. Inasmuch as there is some disposition to debate, I will 
withdraw both the resolutions. 

The President. By unanimous consent the gentleman from Maryland 
wishes to withdraw h's proposition. 

Unanimous consent was given, and Mr. Gittings withdrew his Minority 
Report and Resolutions. 

Mr. Krum. I rise to a further question of privilege, to correct the list of 
names, Mr. Burrows and Mr. Manning belonging to the Arkansas delegation 
instead of Florida. 

He then asked leave, in behalf of the majority of the Committee on Cre- 
dentials, to file a brief statement of their reasons. 

Mr. Sibley, of Minnesota, inquired whether a single objection was suffi- 
cient to prevent the speech of the Chairman of the Committee being made ? 

Mr. Krum. If the Convention will allow me to present this brief statement 
I will consent to make no speech whatever. 

Mr. Wright rose to a point of order. There had been no debate upon the 
resolutions and therefore the claim of the Chairman of the Committee could 
not be allowed. 

The President. The gentleman from Missouri has the floor. The Chair 
desires to understand whether he wishes to exercise his presumed right to be 
heard. 

Mr. Krum. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Waterbubt, of New York, insisted that the point of order taken by 
the gentleman from Massachusetts was correct — that there had been no 
debate, and therefore the gentleman from Missouri had no right to speak as 
Chairman of the Committee. 

Mr. Atkins, of 'I'ennessee. I trust the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Waterbury) will withdraw the point of order he has made upon the gentlemah 
from Missouri, (Mr. Krum.) There certainly was some little debate yes- 
terday upon this proposition. 

Mr. Waterbury, of New York. I am not aware of any debate upon this 
proposition, unless it be the few remarks made by the gentleman from Mis- 
souri himself (Mr. Krum) and the suggestion made by the gentleman from 



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128 Democratic National Convention, 

Pennsylvania (Mr. Phillips.) But the gentleman from Pennsylvania did not 
debate the merits of the propositions before the Convention. And there has 
not been, in the proper sense of the term, any debate whatever upon these 
propositions. • 

Mr. Clark, of Missouri. Before the Chair announces its opinion, I wish 
to call the attention o^ the President to the remarks of the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania, (Mr. Phillips,) and some remarks of the gentleman from 
Oregon, (Mr. Stevens,) in reference to the various reports. I make these sug- 
gestions merely to enable the Chair to determine whether there has been any 
debate at all or not. 

The President. The Chair is aware of that, and the Chair was about to 
say that yesterday, upon the report of the Committee on Credentials being 
rendered, the gentleman from Missouri, (Mr. Krum,) the Chairman of the 
Committee, made a speech within the rules of the Convention. The Chair 
would be bound to consider that as debate, although it was only on one side 
of the question. After that followed — although it may have been but a sin- 
gle sentence — yet there followed'a remark or two from the gentleman from 
Oregon, (Mr. Stevens,) and after that there followed more suggestions from 
the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Phillips,) upon which suggestions the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Stuart,) made a point of order whether or not 
debate was in order at that time, and whether what the gentlemin from Penn- 
sylvania, (Mr. Phillips) was saying, constituted debate in order ? ^The Chair 
expressly ruled at that time that the several propositions bef )re the Conven- 
tion were debatable propositions, and that the Chair understood the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania to be debating those propositions in order; therefore, the 
Chair is of opinion that there was debate, and that upon that state of facts, 
in concurrence with the usage of the House of Representatives— which the 
Chair assumes to bind him in all matters not expressly set down in the rules, 
the Chair rules that the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Krum) has the right 
to address the Convention. 

Mr. Krum, of Missouri. I will submit to this Convention a few remarks, 
and in order that they may be concisely stated, I have taken the trouble to 
condense them in as brief a space as the circumstances in which I am placed 
will allow. The gentleman then proceeded to read as follows : 

It will be observed that the majority report contains only the conclusions 
and recommendations of the Committee. This is the usual course. Commit- 
tees are the chosen organs for investigation of deliberative bodies. Their 
reports are confided in, and unless assailed, stand unquestioned. In the 
matter now before the Convention, the report of the Committee is assailed 
by a minority report, (signed by I. J. Stevens and eight others,) and a state- 
ment of certain premises and labored argument have been presented by the 
minority of the Commitee, to support the conclusions of this minority. 

The statements contained in this minority report, on which the main argu- 
ment of these gentlemen is founded, are for the most part naked assumptions, 
not established by any evidence before the Committee, and depend entirely 
for their verity upon the mere ipse dixit of the gentlemen who make them. 

The task of exposing the misstatements contained in this minority report 
is an easy one, and it will be done in terse but unmistakable language. In 
the brief space of fifteen minutes the most salient points can only be noticed. 
If the facts assumed by these gentlemen have no foundation, as a matter of 
course their argument based upon them falls to the ground. Now to the 
work : 

First It is asserted that the withdrawal from this Convention of certain 
delegates, was not a resignation ; that the vacancies referred to (in the resolu- 
tion of this Convention,) had reference to the contingency of vacancies at the 
time of rc-assemblingt 4*^., i, e, prospective vacancies ! A b alder absurdity 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. )29 

was never uttered. Now what was the subject matter of which the Com- 
mittee had jurisdiction ? Was it not the " Credentials of all persons clairning 
seats, 4*^., made vacant by the secession of delegates at Charleston P^ This 
Convention decided for itself whether vacancies had occurred. The Democ- 
racy of the States, aifected by such withdrawal, in every instance, by 
appointing delegates anew, virtually admitted that vacancies had occurred. 
The claimants who appeared before your Committee, by accepting a new 
appointment admitted the fact, and the gentlemen of the minority stultify 
their own statement by acting on these very cases. 

If there were no vaamcies by secesvsion, there was nothing for the Com- 
mittee to do in respect to such cases. Out upon such nonsense ! 

Secondly, In attempting to show the inconsistency of the majority report, 
these gentlemen state that delegates were recommended to seats who had not 
been re-appointed or re- accredited to Baltimore aft^r their secession at Charles- 
ton. To this a flat denial is given. This denial is based upon the evidence 
that was before the Committee. In every case, to wit, in Alabama, Georgia, 
Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas, the parties admitted to seats by 
the majority report had been severally elected, appointed or re- accredited in 
8ome form, since the adjournment at Charleston. Of this fact, (if the evidence 
is reliable,) successful contradiction is challenged. 

The minority gentlemen again stultify themselves, for they show that re- 
elections took place in three States, but they strangely forgot to state the 
fact, (established before the Committee,) that Messrs. Bayard and Whitely 
were re-appointed according to the rules of the Democracy of New Castle 
county, Delaware, and the Texas delegation were directed by the Executive 
Committee of that State to repair to Baltimore. It was in evidence before 
the Committee that this was a customary mode in those States of making 
nominations and appointing delegates, &c. The Committee considered it tan- 
tamount to a re-appointment. But what of Mississippi? Is it not the boast 
of some of the Mississippi delegation, that they have been re- appointed since 
their secession without opposition? If there has not been a new election, 
how comes it that delegates are here from Mississippi who were not at Charles- 
ton? The credentials of this delegation show upon their face that they were 
appointed by the Convention that sat on the 30th and 31st of May, 3860 ! 
The temerity of the gentlemen is without a parallel. No new election in 
Mississippi? , , . . 

The following are some of the reasons which influenced the decision of the 
majority of the Committee in respect to the claimants from Alabama, of which 
L. P. Walker is Chairman. He and his associates claim to have been appoint- 
ed by a Convention that sat on the 4:th of June inst. Several of these were 
not seceders at Charleston. Mark this fact. But where were these delegates 
appointed on the 4:th of June to go?— to what Convention? They were 
instructed by the Convention that appointed them to rq>air to Richmond and 
to co-operate with the delegates of that Convention^ ^c. 

This is written upon the face of the credentials which were before your 
Committee. It is true, a little lower down in the same paper, they are *' ac- 
credited " to this Convention ! 

These gentlemen were considered by your Committee, for this and other 
reasons, as delegates to the Richmond Convention and not to this. A roving 
commission ! Suppose their instructions had included Conventions of the 
Blacfc Republicans of Chicago, and of the Mormons of Utah— would this 
Oonvention allow them seats after they had boxed the compass under such a 
roving commission? Your Committee said no, and every true Democrat 
throughout the land will respond no ! (Applause and some hisses.) 

In the Arkansas case, the applicants for seats show no regularity of record. 
The seceders from Charleston having vacated their seats by the act of 
9 



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130 Democratic National Convention, 

secession, the Committee felt it their duty either to recommend to the Con- 
vention the exclusion of both sets of applicants on the score of irregularity, 
or to admit both. The two District Conventions that are alleged to have 
sustained the action of theseceders and to have accredited them to Baltimore, 
had, by their own admission, no power to act in the premises, and therefore 
their action does not entitle the applicants to seats in the Convention. The 
opposing claimants were appointed by a Convention called, upon notice, in 
the usual way, by individuals not possessing an official character, and they 
are therefore, technically speaking, no more entitled than the others to seats ; 
but the Committee, disregarding technicalities and not desiring to leave the 
Democracy of Arkansas unrepresented on this floor, decided to recommend 
that all the claimants be admitted to seats in the Convention, on the terms 
and conditions specified in their report. 

In the Louisiana case it is clearly demonstrated likewise, that according to 
strict usage neither of the delegations were entitled to be received by this 
Convention. The seceders from Charleston did not present themselves before 
a new Convention, fresh from the people, but the old Convention which had 
adjourned sine die^ (and therefore had by its own act and the usages of the 
party terminated its legal existence,) was called together to indorse the action 
of the seceders. That so called Convention had therefore no more right than 
any other like number of individual Democrats to assume to act as the repre- 
sentatives of t lie Democracy of Louisiana. Their proceedings in any case 
were of no force or validity, and their action in re- accrediting the seceding 
delegates to Baltimore was a gross usurpation of power on their part. 

On the other hand, the delegation whose admission has been recommended 
by the Committee was appointed by a Convention assembled at Donaldson- 
ville, composed of delegates from twenty-one parishes, (includinsj the city of 
New Orleans,) out of thirty-nine parishes in the State. It is true that the 
call for the Democracy of the State to send delegates to the Convention was 
made by individual Democrats and by two distinct Democratic clubs, but in- 
asmuch as the State Executive Committee refused to call a new Convention, 
and thus appeal to the Democracy to indorse or condemn the action of their 
delegates at Charleston who withdrew from the Convention, there was no other 
course to be pursued than for known and distinguished members of the party 
to issue the call, and for the Democracy to sustain it by the appointment of 
delegates in accordance with such call. An emergency had arisen, and inas- 
much as the Executive Committee had refused to act, it seemed to the Com- 
mittee that there was no other course left to the Democracy of Louisiana, but 
to assemble in Convention upon the spontaneous Call of individual Democrats. 

The admission of both of the delegations presenting themselves from Greor- 
gia, was recommended because the Committee believed that each of tbose 
delegations represent the opinions and sentiments of a part of the Democracy 
of the State. The withdrawal from the Convention of a part of its members 
was occasioned, as the evidence before the Committee dernonstrated,by a dif- 
ference of construction between them and their associates upon oertain points 
in the Democratic platform. Two Conventions, each claiming to be the cor- 
rect and only exponents of the Democratic sentiment of the State, Were held, 
and each appointed a delegation to this Convention. The regularity of both of 
these Conventions was involved in doubt. At all events one does not seena 
more regular than the other. After a full investigation of the facts in this 
case, the Committee, deeming it of the highest importance that the harmony 
of the party in Georgia required that both delegations should be admitted upon 
the floor of the Convention, with equal privileges, so recommended to the 
Conveiition in their report. It is undeniable that the appointiiig power in both 
cases was composed of delegates fresh from the ranks of the Democracy, and 
in the opinion of the Committee, the irregularities alleged in either case were 
not sufficient to justify the exclusion of either of the delegations. 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 131 

The Oommittee consisted of twenty-five members, and the majority report 
received the sanction of sixteen, as to'the greater portion of it, and the whole 
is approved by fifteen. The minority report is approved altogether by nine 
and but partially by one member. 

Practically, then, the question is presented by the minority report, shall the 
statements and opinions of nine gentlemen outweigh and overbalance the 
statements and opinions of fifteen of equal respectability, touching the same 
matter? 

Mr. Brown, of North Carolina, It is with very great reluctance that I 
venture to interpose a few words upon this occasion. Sir, it would give me 
infinitely more pleasure to pour oil on the agitated waves which now disturb 
us, than to say anything which would have a contrary effect. 

Mr. Sibley^ of Minnesota. I rise to appoint of order. 

Mr. Brown, of North Carolina. I ask leave of the Convention to make an 
explanation as to a matter of fact within my personal kowledge? 

Mr. Sibley. The gentleman has anticipated my point of order by asking 
<»nsent to speak. 

Mr. Gorman, of Minnesota. The necessity of the case requires that I shall 
insist upon the point of order. 

The President. The Chair must decide that no debate is now in order. 

Mr. Stevens, of Oregon. I rise to a personal explanation. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. I must object. 

Mr. Stevens. I have only two sentences to say. 

Mr. Stuart. I must object. 

The President. The Chair must administer the rules of the Convention,, 
which preclude debate in this stage of the business. 

Mr. Stevens. I appeal to the gentleman to allow me to make a personal 
•explanation. 

Mr. Stuart. No gentleman will go farther than myself in relation to per- 
sonal matters, but it is obvious to all that we must proceed with business. 

The President. The Chairman will state that the first question in the 
order of motion and of vote is the proposition of the gentleman from Oregon 
(Mr. Stevens); that gentleman moves certain matter as a substitute for the 
report of the Committee. The Chair understands that motion to be equiva- 
lent to a motion to strike out and insert, and although the Chair feels that 
there may be some doubt as to what should be the construction of a case like 
this, and, indeed, of what is the true construction of the universal rule that a 
motion to strike out and insert is indivisible, with-ut going to the extent that 
that universal declaration applies to this motion, or what is behind the mo- 
tion. The Chair has, on reflection, come to the conclusion to rule that this 
motion to strike out and insert is indivisible ; and, therefore, unless overruled 
by the Convention, the Chair will be prepared to put the question upon the 
series of resolutions in block. Having come to that conclusion, of course, 
upon a 'prima facie reflection upon the subject, the Chair will be subject to be 
instructed and directed by the Convention. The Chair had conceived that if 
the resolutions of the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Stevens), should be 
adopted, then they would be divisible, and the separate propositions con- 
tained in the report of the minority would be susceptible ^i being voted upon 
separately; or if the motion for substitution should be rejected, then, upon 
the Convention being brought to a vote upon the resolutions of the gentleman 
from Missouri (Mr. Krum) those propositions would be separable. Upon 
this view of the whole case, the Chair has arrived at this prima facie conclu- 
sion, subject to be instructed or directed by the Convention. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York. I shall appeal from the decision of the 
Chair, merely to make an explanation to the Convention upon the ruling of 
the <-hair ; and having made that explanation, I shall leave it to the contem- 



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132 Democratic National Convention, 

plation and judgment of the Chair and withdraw the appeal. It is undoubt- 
edly true that the motion to strike out and insert is indivisible ; the motion 
to strike out and inserting one independent proposition of the majority re- 
pprt is indivisible. But the rule is applicable to that and nothing more; that 
is, if upon the first branch of the majority report the motion should be ma^e 
to strike out that branch and insert the first branch of the minority report, 
that motion would be indivisible. That is the extent of the application of 
the rule of the House. But that does not reach an amendraent in the nature 
of a substitute. That motion, I think, is as divisible being a substitute as it 
would be if it was a simple motion to amend ; for the substitute is nothing 
more than an amendment of the nature of a substitute. I now withdraw my 
appeal. 

Cries of '* question," ** questional' 

The President. The Chair will repeat that he suggested the doubt in 
his mind, behind this question, whether the motion of the gentleman from 
Oregon (Mr. Stevens), might or might not involve divisible matter ; but he 
concluded still that it would be more convenient for him to rule upon that 
which is the prima facie construction of the rule of the Convention. If that 
prima facie construction be not correct, then the Chair would be most gladly 
instructed or overruled by the Convention. 

Cries of " question," "question!" 

The President. Before putting the question the Chair desires to remind 
the Convention that he informed the Convention yesterday that he had been 
requested to lay before the Convention a communication from gentlemen from 
Arkansas. He had no opportunity of having it read then ; he again informs 
the Convention that he has been requested to present that communication in 
order to have it read. 

Mr. Gorman, of Minnesota, and others, objected to the reading of the 
communication. 

Objections being made, the President stated the communication could not 
be read. 

The question recurred upon the motion to substitute the resolutions of Mr. 
Stevens, of Oregon, on part of the minority of the Committee on Credentials, 
for the resolutions of Mr. Krum, of Missouri, on pa*t of the majority of the 
same Committee. 

Upon that question, Mr. McCook called for a vote by States, which was 
ordered. 

The President. The vote by States has been called for by the State of 
'Ohio. The Secretary will, in the first place, report the resolutions now to be 
voted upon, as they have been corrected by Mr. Stevens, of Oregon, and then 
the Secretary will proceed to call the vote by States. 

The resolutions were then read as follows : 

1. Resolved, That B. F. Hallett is entitled to a seat in this Convention as 
a delegate from the 5th Congressional District of Massachusetts. 

2. Resolved, That Johnson B. Clardy is entitled to a seat in this Conven- 
tion as a delegate from the 8th Congressional District of the State of Mis- 
souri. 

3. Resolved, That James A. Bayard and W. G. Whitely are entitled to 
seats in this Convention as delegates from the State of Delaware. 

4. Resolved, That the delegation headed by R. W. Johnson are entitled to 
seats as delegates in this Convention from the State of Arkansas. 

6. Resolved, That the delegation of which Guy N. Bryan is Chairman, am 
entitled to seats as delegates in this Convention from the State of Texas. 

6. Resolved, That the delegation of which John Tarleton is Chairman are 
entitled to seats in this Convention as delegates from the State of Louisiana, 

7. Resolved, That the delegation of which L. P. Walker is Chairman are 
entitled to seats in this Convention from the State of Alabama, 



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138 



8. Resolved, That the delegation of which Henry L. Benning is Chairman 
are entitled to seats in this Convention from the State of Georgia. 

9. Resolved, That the delegation from the State of Florida, accredited to 
the Charleston Convention, are entitled to take seats in this Convention and 
oast the vote of Florida. , „. « t. tt n 

10. Resovled, That Oeorge H. Gordon, E. Barksdale, W. S. Barry, H. C. 
Chambers, Joseph R. Davis, Beverly Matthews, Charles Clark, William b. 
Featherstone, P. F. Sidddl, Wirt Adams, C. G Armistead, A. M. Clayton, 
and F. G. Hudson, are entitled to seats in this Convention as delegates from 
the State of Mississippi. 

The Secretary proceeded to call the roll of States. 

The Chair then announced the vote upon the question of substituting the 
resolutions of the minority in place of the majority resolutions -yeas 100)^, 
navs 150— as follows : 



Teas. Nays 

Maine -.. 2>^ b% 

New H ampshire K 4 >2 

Vermont.. 1/^ 3/^2 

Massachusetts — .8 5 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut. -- 23>^ S)- 

N«w York 35 

New Jersey 4 8 

Pennsylvania 17 10 



Delaware 2 ilUinoia ... 

Mary-land ^K 2 | Michigan.. 

Virginia 14 1 jWisconsin 

North Carolina 9 1 ;Iowa 

Arkansas ^ ^Minnesota 

Missouri 5 4 California 

Tennessee 10 1 

Kentucky 10 2 

Ohio 23 

Indiana 13 



11 
6 
5 
4 

. 4 



Oregon 3 

lOOi 150 



Maryland % vote not voted ; Tennessee 1 vote not voted. 

So the motion to substitute the minority for the majority resolutions was 

The President. The Secretary will now repeat the original resolutions 
in block if no division is called. 

The Secretary read the resolutions. •. r * 4? j i 

Mr Flournoy, of Arkansas, by unanimous consent, read the list ot dele- 
crates from Arkansas. Mr. Hoadley's name should be transferred from Texai 
to Arkansas, and the name of Mr. Leroy Carroll should be De Rosa Carroll. 

Mr. Jones, of Tennessee, and Mr. Church, of New York, called for a di- 
vision of the question on the resolutions— the vote to be taken on each reso- 
lution separately. rx, . /ti/t 11*- o i ^ 

The President inquired of the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. McCook), 
whether he limited his call of the States to the whole matter, or intended it 
to apply to a single proposition ? ^ ^ ^.^ 

Mr. McCooK, of Ohio, said he limited his call to the vote just taken. 
There were propositions which did not require the vote to be taken by fetatea, 
and it would consume time to do so. 

The Chair. Then the call already made has exhausted the motion. 

Mr. Saulsbury, of Delaware, and Mr. Gilmore, of Pennsylvania, renewed 
the call of States. 

The President. On each one of the propositions or one only i 

Mr. Saulsbury and Mr. Gilmore. Each one. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

The Secretary then read t^ first of the series of resolutions : 

1. Resolved, That George H. Gordon, E. Barksdale, W. S Barry H. u 
Chambers, Joseph E. Davis, Beverly Matthews, Charles Clark, Wil ham b. 
Featherstone, P. F. Siddell, Wirt A.lams, C. G. Armistead, AM. Clayton, 
and F. G. Hudson are entitled to seats in this Convention as delegates trom 
the State of Mississippi. 01/ . fK« 

The question being taken by States, resulted— ayes 250, nays Ay^ , tne 
nays being a half vote from Iowa and two from Pennsylvania. 

The resolution was accordingly adopted. 



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Illinois 11 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin ... 5 

I<»wa 4 

Minnesota 2i 1| 

California 4 

Oregon 3 



134 Democratic National Convention, 

Mr. Rynders called for the admission of the delegates from Mississippi 
instanter, in accordance with the vote just tak en. 

Several delegates signified their dissent. 

Mr. Rynders. I make that motion. I don*t care whether you say aye or 
no. 

Mr. Cochran said that the propositions were heing voted upon seriatim, 
and until the last one was adopted, the whole question had not been put as 
determined, so that the delegates from Mississippi could not take their seats* 

The President ruled in accordance with the suggestion of Mr. Cochran. 

Mr. Mason, of Kentucky, respectfully differed with ^e Chair, but did no* 
take an appeal. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. The Chair is undoubtedly correct. 

LOUISIANA. 
The Secretary then read the second resolution, to wit : 

2. Resolved, 1^hat Tierre Soule, F. Cottman, R. C. VYickliffe, Michael Ryan^ 
Manuel White, Charles Brenveneau, Gustavus Leroy, J. E. Morse, A, S. 
llerroD, M. D. Colmar, J. N. T. Richardson, and J. L. Walker, are entitled 
to seats in this Convention as delegates from the State of Louisiana. 

rhe question being taken on the second resolution by States, resulted — ayes 
153, nays 98 — as follows : 

Yeas. Nays 

Maine b% 'l}i . 

New Hampshire 4 ' 

Yermont 4)^ 

Massachusetts 5 

Rhode Island 4 

(Connecticut 2% 2H 

New York ....36 

New Jersey -i^ ^h 

Pennsylvania 10 17 

The resolution was accordingly adopted. 

ARKANSAS. 
The third resolution was then read : 

3. Resolved, That R. W. Johnson, T. C. Hindman, J. P. Johnson, De 
Rosa Carroll, J. Gould, John A. Jordan, B. B. Burr(»w and F. W. Hoadley 
be admitted to seats as delegates from the State of Arkansas, with power to 
cast two votes, and that Thos. H. Bradley, M. Hooper and D. C. Cross be also 
admitted to seats as delegates from the same State, with power to cast on4 
vote, and in case either portion of said delegates shall refuse or neglect to take 
their said seats, or to cast their said votes, the other portion of said delegates 
taking seats in this Convention shall be entitled to cast the entire three votes 
of said State. 

Mr. Saulsbury moved to divide the resolution and take the question on 
three distinct branches of it, to wit : first, in regard to the admission of Mr. 
Johnson and his coadjutors, with power to cast two votes ; second, as to the 
adrnission of Mr. Hooper and coadjutors, with power to cast one vote ; and 
third, as to how the vote of the State is to be ca^t in case either one of those 
delegates does not choose to take his seat. 

The President ruled the resolution divisible, as each part makes sense 
with the other parts rejected. 

The question was then stated on the first part of the resolution, and the 
State of Maine called. 

Mr. Wright, of Massachusetts, appealed from the decision of the Chair 
as to the divisibility of the question. 

Mr. Sturman made a point of order that the State of Maine, having been 
called, the appeal came too late. 

The President. The State of Maine has not answered. 



Delaware 2 

Maryland 2>^ b% 

Virginia 1 13 

North Carolina 2 8 

Arkansas \ | 

Missouri 4 6 

Tennessee _, 2 10 

Kentucky 2 10 

Ohio 23 

Indiana 13 



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135 



Mr. GoBMAN, of Minnesota, inquired how it would; be possible, if the 
Convention rejected the latter part of the resolution, for the State of Arkan- 
sas to be represented by any other than two votes ? It would disfranchise the 
State of one vote. 

The President stated that it was not in the power of the Convention to 
adopt a proposition which was unjust or which would disfranchise a State. 

Mr. Stuart moved to lay the appeal from the decision of the Chair on 
the table, which was agreed to. 

The vote was then taken by States on the first part of the resolution, and 
resulted — ayes 182, nays 69 — as follows : 



Yeas, Nays. 



Maine bi 

New Hampshire 5 

Vermont 5 

Massachusetts 13 

Rhode Island '. 4 

Connecticut , 6 

New York 35 

New Jersey 7 

Penpsylvania 10 

Delaware 2 

Maryland 2i 

Virginia 



2i North Carolina .. 1 

South Carolina 



Yeas. Nays, 



Georgia 

Florida 

Alabama... 
Louisiiiiia .. 
Missis-sippi . 

T.^xa* 

,^rkan>as 

Missouri . . 
Tenneswe .- 
Ivintucky . 



. 
.lU 



Yeas Nayf. 

Ohio .23 

Indiana 13 

Illinois ,..- 11 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin. 5 

Iowa 3i U 

Minnesota 4 

California 4 

Oregon 3 



182 



69 



The vote was then taken on the second 
resulted— ayes 150, nays 100)^— as follows : 



branch of the resolution, and 



Yeas. Nays. 

Maine 5i 2^ 

New Hampshire . . 6 

Vermont *i J 

Massachusetts . . _ 5 8 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut. 3)^ 23^ 

New York 35 

New Jersey ...2K 4.^ 

Pennsylvania 10 17 

Delaware 2 

Maryland 2 6 

Virginia 1 1^ 



Yeas. Nays^ 

N'ortli Carolina 1 9 

South Carolina 

Georgia -.. 

Florida 

AJ?J>ama 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Missouri 4 5 

Tennessee }^ 11 

Kentucky 2 10 



Yeas. 

Ohio 2:} 

Indiana 13 

lUinojs --- 11 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 2i 

California 

Oregon 



Nays. 



150 1001^ 



Arkansas declining to vote. 

Mr. Brodhkad, of Pennsylvania, for the purpose of saving time, appealed 
to the gentleman who called for the vote by States to withdraw it on the 
remainder of the resolution. 

The call was accordingly withdrawn, and the question taken viva voce, 
resulting in the* adoption of the last branch of the resolution. 

So the entire resolution was adopted. 



TEXAS. 

The fourth resolution, in regard to Texas, was then read as follows : 

4. Resolved, That Gay M. Bryan, F. R. Lubbock, F. S. Stockdale, E. 
Greer, H. R Runnells, Thos. P. Ocliiltree, M. W. Covie and J. S. Crosby, are 
entitled to seats as delegates from Texas. 

Mr. Brodhead, of Pennsylvania, suggested that the vote upon this resolu-^ 
tion be taken viva voce, but objection being made, 

The Secretary proceeded to call the roll of States, which having teen 
concluded the vote was announced: Yeas 250, nays 2>^, the nays being 
Pennsylvania 2, Iowa %. 

The resolution was accordingly adojjted. 

DELAWARE. 
The fifth resolution was then read, as follows : 

5. Resolved, That James A. Bayard and Wm. G. Whitely are entitkd ^o 
seats from the county of New Castle, Delaware. 



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136 



Democratic National Convention. 



Mr. Rrodhead, of Pennsylvania, suggested that it would save time to 
take the vote viva voce^ which was agreed to. 
The question being taken, the resolution was adopted. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

The sixth resolution was then read, as follows : 

6. Resolved, That K. S. Chaffee, who was duly adraited at Charleston as 
a delegate from the Fifth Congressional District of Massachusetts, is still 
entitled to said seat in this Convention, and that Benjamin F. flallett, who 
has ;idsumed said seat, is not entitled , thereto. 

The question being taken upon this resolution by States, resulted — yeas 
138, nays 112j^ — as follows : 

Yeas. Nays-! Yeas. Nays. | Yeas. Nays. 



M*ine. .>>^ 

New Hampshire *i\ 

Vermont 3 

Mtsoachurfetts 3 

Rhode Island 4 

Couuecrioit 'di 

New York . 35 

New Jersey 1>^ 

Pennsylvania 9 J 

Delaware 

Maryland 2\ 

Yirginia 



2 ,^ 3 Nor t h Carol ina . 
2i South Carolina . 
2 Georitia 

Florida 

Al.-ibama . 

Louisiana 

^ ississippi . 

4| Texas 



AFKausas... 

Missouri 

Tennessee . 
Kentucky,. 



lO'Ohio 

Indiana. 13 

Illifois U 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin 6 

Iowa -...- 3J 

Minnesota 2>^ 

California 

1 Oregon 



138 112i 



1'he resolution was accordingly adopted. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. I rise to a privileged question. I move to 
reconsider the vote just taken, and move to lay that motion on the table. I 
understand that that motion cannot now be taken up, but it can be received. 
I also make the same motion in regard to each of the other votes taken this 
morning upon the propositions from the Committee on Credentials, including 
the vote on the minority reports. 

The President said the several motions of Mr. Stuart would be receeived 
and entered upon the journal. 

So the motions of Mr. Stuart were considered and entered, as having been 
so many distinct motions made and entered in their order, upon the rejec- 
tion of the Minority Report, and the adoption of each resolution reported by 
the majority of the Committee on Credentials, to be acted upon when pro- 
perly called up, in their order. 

MISSOURI. 

The seventh resolution was then read as follows : 

7. Resolved, That John O'Fallon, Jr., who was duly admitted at Charleston, 
as a delegate from the Eighth Congressional District of Missouri, is still enti- 
tled to said seat in this Convention ; and that Johi. B. Clardy, who has assumed 
aaid seat, is not entitled thereto. 

The question being taken by States upon the resolution — it resulted — yeas 
138I-, nays 112— as follows : 



Yeas. Nays 



Maine 5>^ 

New Hampshire 2)^ 

Vermont 3 

Massach u>ett s 5 

Rhode Island 4 

(/onnecticut 3)^ 

New York. 35 

New Jersey 1><^ 

Pennsylvania lU 

Delaware 

Marylami 2>^ 

Virginia. 



2>^ 

^% 
17 
2 

15 



Yeas. Nays, 
10 



>rorth r'arolina 

South Carolina... 

Georgia. 

Florida . 

Alabama 

Lcuisiana 

Mississippi 

Texas 

Arkansas i 

Missouri V/^ 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 



Yeas. Nays, 

Ohio 23 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 11 

Michigan _. 6 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa Z)4 IH 

Minnesota 2^ l>i 

California 4 

Oregon 3 

138i 112 



The resolution was accordingly adopted. 



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Yeas. Nays 

North Carolina l>i 8 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

Aiabama 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

Texas 

Arkansas ^ H 

Missouri 4 5 

Tennessee 2 10 

Kentucky IK 10)4 



Yeas. Nays- 
Ohio 28 

Indiana 13 

Illinoi-i 11 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 2}i IJ- 

California 4 

Oregon. 3 

148i lOH 



Proceedings at Baltimore, 137 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania, moved that the vote just taken be reconsidered, 
and that the motion to reconsi<]er be laid upon the table. 

The motion was received and ordered to be entered upon the journal. 

ALABAMA. 

The eighth resolution was then read, as follows : 

8. Resolved, That R. A. Baker, D. C. Humphreys, John Forsyth, Wm. Gar- 
rett, J. J. Se.bles, S. 0. Posey, L. E. Parsons, Joseph C. Bradley, The mas B. 
Cooper. James Williams, 0. H. Bynum, Samuel D. Weakley, L. V. B. Martin, 
John W. Wornack, W. R. R. Wyatt, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas M. Mathews 
and Norment McLeod, are entitled to seats in this Convention as delegates 
from tl.e State of Alabama. 

The question then being taken by States upon this resolution, it resulted — 
yeas 148|, nays 101^, — as follows : 

Yeas. Nays 

Maine, 5K 2>^ 

New Hampshire 2>^ 2 

Vermont 4^ ^ 

Massachusetts 5 8 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut _. 3| 2^^ 

New York 35 

New Jersey 3 4 

Pennsylvania. — 10 17 

Delaware 2 

Maryland 2 € 

Virginia >i 141 

New Hampshire \^ declined voting. 

The resolution was accordingly adopted. 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania, moved to reconsider the vote just taken, and 
tiiat that motion be laid upon the table. 

The motion was received and ordered to be entered upon the journal. 

Mr. Seward, of Georgia, sent the following communication to the Secretary's 
desk to be filed, a copy of which had also upon the assembling of the Con- 
vention in the morning, been placed in the hands of the President of the 
Convention : 

Baltimore, June 22, 1860. 
Hon. Caleb' Cushing, President of the National Democratic Convention: 

Sir : — In obedience to instructions herewith enclosed, I withdraw the 
application of the National Democratic Delegates from Georgia, for seats in 
the Convention over which you prei^ide, and I request that the instructions 
be read to the Convention. 

Yours respectfully, JAMES GARDNER, 

Chairman Georgia National Democratic Delegation, 

Consultation Room of the Georgia National Delegation, ) 

Baliimore, June 22, 1860. ( 
Resolved, That our Chairman, Mr. Gardner, be and is hereby instructed to 
withdraw the application of the National Democratic Delegates of Georgia, for 
seats in the Convention now sitting in this city. 

Resolved^ That we are prompted to this course by a sincere de=iire to relieve 
the Convention of embarrassment, and to promote as far as possible the har- 
mony of the Convention. 

Resolved, That we do not hereby admit that the delegation headed by the 
Hoi». Henry L. Benning, as Chairman, represents the National Democracy of 
Georgia, nevertheless, we shall rejoice sincerely to see them adhere to the Con- 
vention, and in good faith support its nominees. 

JAMES GARDNER, Chairman, 
B. Y. Martin, Secretary. 



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138 Democratic National Conventicm. 

GEORGIA. 

The ninth and last resolution of the series was then read, as follows : 

9. Resdved, That the delegation from the State of Georgia, of which H. L. 
Benning is Chairman, be admitted to the Convention, with power to cast one 
half of the vote of said State ; and that 1 he delegation from said State of which 
Col. Gardner is Chairman, be also admitted to the Convention, with power to 
cast one-half the vote of said State, and if either of said delegations refuse or 
neglect to cast the vote as above indicated, that in such case the delegates pre- 
sent in the Convention be authorized to cast the full vote of said State. 

The Secretary proceeded to call the roll, and as he called the State of 
Maine — 

Mr. Williamson, of Kentucky, called for a division of the question upon the 
resolution. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. I submit that that motion cannot be made. The 
rule is that if the remaining portion will by itself stand so as to make sense, 
' and the portion included in the first division, will also by itself stand so as to 
make sense, then it may be divided, but not otherwise. I have examined this 
resolution, with a view to call for the division myself, but I am satisfied that 
it is incapable of division. 

Mr. Sibley, of Minne.^ota. I call the gentleman to order; the Secretary had 
commenced the call of the roll, and the State of Maine had responded. 

The President. The Chair thinks that the gentleman from Kentucky, 
(Mr. Williamson) addressed the Chair before any response was given from 
Maine. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. The rule is that the portion to be voted upon 
must make sense by itself, and the portion left must make sense by itself, or 
else the proposition is not divisible. 

The President. The Chair is informed by the Secretary that the State of 
Maine had been called, and the response entered upon the record, before the 
Chair was addressed. If that be so, the Chair is bound to decide that the call 
for the division is too late. 

Mr. Williamson, of Kentucky. T think there must be an error on the part 
of the Secretary. I addressed the Chair before the State of Maine responded 
to the call of the Secretary ; but I did not get my proposition fully submitted 
before that State responded. 

Mr. Rynders, of New York. I can say that we here understood the vote of 
Maine to be announced before the Ghair was addressed. 

Mr. Jones, of Tennessee. I wish to know if I did not demand a division of 
the question upon every distinct proposition susceptible of division ? 

The President. That was the understanding; of the Chair of the effect of 
the demand of the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Jones) and the gentleman 
from Delaware (Mr. Siulsbury.) 

Mr. Jones. Then I submit to the Chair whether we cannot vote upon each 
portion of the resolution now reported to the Convention ? 

The President. If the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Jones) claims that 
right now, the Chair will be bound to rule as he did in the case of Arkansas. 
The Chair will be bound to look into the question of divisibility. It will not 
be a division upon the demand of the gentleman from Kentucky, (Mr. Wil- 
liamson,) but the demand of the gentleman from Tennessee, (Mr. Jones.) 

Subsequently the President said : The Chair, on inspecting the 9th resolu- 
tion, pertaining to the State of Georgia, perceives that it is constructed on 
precisely the same principles with the resolution pertaining to the Sate of 
Arkansas. And the Ciiair having ruled that that was divisible, is bound to 
make the same ruling in this case. If the Chair is in error upon this subject 
he has no pride of opinion about it, and of course submits it to the Convijnti .n. 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. ISO- 

Bat the Chairjmust make the decision that it is divisible. The Secretary will 
report the first branch of the resolutien. 

The^ Secret ABY reported it as follows : 

*' Resolved, That the delegation from the State of Georgia, of which H. L, 
Benning is Chairman, be admitted to the Convention, with power to cast one- 
half of the vote of said State." 

Mr. Waterbury, of New York. Is it in order to divide the first part of the 
resolution ? 

Mr. SruART, of Michigan. That is the very point that I raised. If you 
divide the first part of the resolution, and reject the first part and retain the 
last part, it will have no sense. 

The President. The Chair has ruled that the part just read by the S cre- 
tary constitutes the first branch of the resolution. 

Mr. Brodhead, of Pennsylvania. I would suggest that the first division 
ghould end with the word " Convention," so that it w i|l read — 

^^Besolvedf That the delegation from the State of Georgia, of which H. L. 
Benning is Coairman, be admitted to the Convention.'* 

Mr. 3tuart, of Michigan. The idea is this : The Chair cannot anticipate 
what the vote will be ; the proposition may be carried or rejected. But it is 
not susceptible of division unless, in either event, the remaining words have 
a substantive meaning by themselves. Suppose the first part is voted down 
and the latter part adopted — ''with power to cast one-half of the vote of said 
State." Those words would have no meaning at all by themselves. 

Mr. Cochran, of New York. The gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Stuart) 
states the proposition correctly. If the first branch of the resolution be 
abstracted the last is naught. 

The President. The Chair has two or three times endeavored to state 
what he means to rule ; but gentlemen have interposed with suggestions from 
time to time so that he has not as yet been able to do it. The Chair takes 
the same view of this resolution as he did of the resolution in regard to 
G-eorgi^. The resolution begins — 

" Resolved^ That the delegation from the State of Georgia, of which H. L. 
Benning is Chairman, be admitted to the Convention with power to cast one- 
half of the vote of that State.*' 

The Chair finds there a proposition having sense. It may or may not, if 
adopted alone, operate unjustly. That is not a qnest'on of order ; the ques- 
tion of justice or injustice is independent of the question of sense. 

As to the decision suggested by the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. 
Brodhead), if the first part he proposes be rejected, then there remain words 
of no possible application to any part of the resolution, to wit : "with power 
to cast one-half of the vote of said State." The view, therefore, of the 
Chair is that the division must beat the end of the words, ** of said State." 

Mr. Seward, of Georgia. I rise to a question of privilege on behalf of 
the contestants from the State of Georgia. I send a communication to the 
Chair, which I desire to have read. It is intended as a peace measure, and 
to relieve this Convention of this perplexing and troublesome question. 
[Criesof "object," "object," and ''question."] 

Mr. Williamson, of Kentucky. I withdraw the call for a division of this 
resolution, if it is upon my motion. 

The President. The Gbair understands that the call is upon the motion 
of the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Jones.) 

Mr. Williamson. Then I hope that gentleman will withdraw the call. 

Mr. Jones. I cannot withdraw it. 

Mr. Seward, of Georgia. I insist upon my question of privilege, and that 
no gentleman has a right to object to it, because it atfects the rights of 
members upon this floor. 



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1*0 Democratic National Convention. 

The President. The Chair will state to the Convention that the gentle- 
man from Georgia (Mr. Seward) presents this letter and desires that it be read 

Mr. BuTTERwoRTH, of ^ew York. I object to the reading of it at this 
time. ^ 

The Prbsidejtt. The Chair understands, in the first place, that in the 
present stage of the question— that is, under the operation of the previous 
question— It is not competent to introduce any document to be read, except 
by unanimous consent of the Convention, or under a suspension of the rules. 
And the Chair is not aware how, in this stage of the question, there can be a 
motion to suspend the rules. Therefore, the Chair understands that in this 
stage of the question there must be unanimous consent for the reading of a 
document. 

[It was understood that the letter was from Col. Gardner, the Chairman of 
tlie contesting delegation from the State of Georgia, notifying the Convention 
that they withdrew from all further contest, and which letter had been placed 
on the Secretary's files.] 

Mr. Jones, of Tennessee. At the request of several gentlemen I withdraw 
my call for a division of the question. 

The President stated the question to be upon agreeing to the entire reso- 
Jution, as originally reported by the Secretary to the Convention. 
^ Ihe question being then taken by States upon the resolution, it was re- 
jected—yeas 106>^, nays 145— as follows : 



Teas. Nays. 
Maine _. 4 4 

N«w Hampshire 2 3 

Vermont z% i>/ 

Massachusetts 6 g 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut Z}4 8}4 

New York 35 

Newr Jersey 2 5 

Pennsylvania 9>^ 17>^ 

Delaware * 2 



Yeas. Nays. 

Maryland 2 6 

Virginia 1 14 

North Carolina 1 9 

Arkansas >^ )/ 

Missouri 4 5 

Tennessee 12 

Kentucky ii>/ 

Ohio 23 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 11 



Yeas. Nays. 
Michigan 6 

Wisconsin 6 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 2}4 1)4 

California 4 

Oregon 3 

. 106>^ 145 



Mr Church, of New York. The delegation from New York have had no 
opportunity 

The President. Will the gentleman excuse the Chair a moment ? The 
Chair will state that as he now understands it all the resolutions reported 
trom the Committee on Credentials have been acted upon, and therefore the 
previous question, so far as it is applicable to this subject matter has been 
exhausted. 

Mr. Church, of New York. The New York delegation have had no op- 
portunity to vote upon the question of the admission of delegates from the 
Mate of Georgia in accordance with their wishes, or as they believe would 
be right and just to the Democracy of that State. Coming here, as the New 
lOTk delegation did, with the determination, so far as it lay in their power 
to reconcile the Democracy of this great nation, and to harmonize the party! 
so that th« results of this Convention would be indorsed by the Democracy 
ot this nation, we propose now to submit a motion in relation to that State— 
Creorgia— which I have no doubt will meet with the approbation of this Con- 
vention. That motion is that the delegation from the State of Georgia, 
claiming seats in this Convention, of which H. L. Benning is Chairman, be 
admitted to this Convention, and upon that I call the previous question. 

Mr. 13R0D1IEAD, of Pennsylvania. I have a similar proposition, reduced to 
writing, in the form of a resolution, which I hope the gentleman will ac- 
cept. ° 

Mr. Church. I will accept it. 

The PfiESiDENT. The Chair wishes to understand whether the proposition 
sent to the Chair by the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Brodhead), is the 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 141 

same proposition as that submitted by the gentleman from Kew York (Mr. 
Church ?; 

Mr. Brodhead. It is the same. 

Mr Seward, of Georgia. I rise to a point of order. 

The President. The Chair asks the gentleman to let the resolution be 
reported. 

The resolution was then read as follows : 

Resolved^ That the delegation of which Henry L. Benning is Chairman are 
entitled to seats in this Convention from the State of Georgia. 

Mr. Seward. My point of order is this : That the majority report, as 
amended, has not been acted upon. And although the previous question may 
have been exhausted, that is the pending proposition before the Convention, 
and the Convention must be brought to a direc'- vote upon the report as 
amended before it is finally disposed of. 

The President. In regard to the question of order raised by the gentle- 
man from Georgia (Mr. Seward), the Chair considers that, according to his 
understanding of the state of proceedings, all matters reported from the Com- 
mittee, upon which it is competent to vote, have been voted upon, and, 
therefore, the previous question is exhausted, and no additional motion need 
be put or is in order to be put. 

Mr. Hallett, pi Massachusetts, here obtained the floor, but was called to 
order by several delegates. 

Mr. Church, of New York. I rise to a point of order. I submit that 
having myself offered a resolution and called the previous question upon it 
no debate is in order. * 

The President. The gentleman from New York undoubtedly has reason 
in his suggestion. The gentleman from Massachusetts has risen to some- 
thing, the Chair cannot tell what. It may or may not be some competent 
motion, notwithstanding the gentleman has moved the previous question. 

Mr. Church. The gentleman has announced that he rose for the purpose 
of discussing my resolution. 

The Prksident. J he Chair did not so understand him. The gentleman 
from Massachusetts will state to what question he has arisen. 

Mr. Hallett. I understand that a motion was made by the gentleman 
from New York to admit the Georgia delegation accredited to the Charleston 
Convention ? 

The President. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Hallett. And that the motion is before the Convention ? 

The President. The gentleman from New York demanded the previous 
question, and it is the duty of the Chair to put it unless some privileged mo- 
tion intervenes. The Secretary will please read the resolution of the gentle- 
man from New York. 

The resolution was read accordingly. 

The President. The question is on seconding the previous question. 

The question being then taken on seconding the previous question, it was 
agreed to. 

The question recurring on ordering the main question, it was also agreed 
to. 

The question being then taken on the resolution of the gentleman from 
New York (Mr. Church), it was adopted, and the Georgia seceding delegates 
declared entitled to their seats. 

Mr. Hallett and numerous others addressed the Chair at the same in- 
stant. 

The President recognized the gentleman from Massachusetts, and 

Mr. Hallett addressed the Convention and moved that the Convention 
take a recess till 5 o'clock. 



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142 Democratic National Convention, 

Mr. Stuart. I now move to lay on the table the motion to reconsider, 
made by the gentleman from Massachusetts. 

Mr. CocHRAJT. I now move that when the Convention adjourn it be to 
meet at 5 o'clock. 

The President inquired if the gentleman from Michigan asked for a vote 
on each ofne of the resolutions to lay it on the table, or if his motion referred 
to the 9th only? 

Mr. Russell, Chairman of the Virginia delegation. Mr. President, I wish, 
before the Convention adjourns, to make an announcement in behalf of the 
Yirginia delegation. I wish to do it at the proper time. 

The President. The Chair would like to be informed by the gentleman 
from Michigan whether his motion is intended to be applied to each of the 
resolutions seriatim f 

Mr. Stuart. I have no choice. I suppose the proper mode of proceeding 
would be to call up one at a time. If the Chair deems it his duty to take 
them up in this order, I am entirely satisfied. 

The President. The Chair does not deem it his duty to volunteer, but if 
any gentleman wishes to call for the vote in that order he can do so. 

Mr. Stuart, I will call for them in their order. 

The President. The question is now upon the motion of the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Cochran,) that when the Convention adjourn it be to 
meet at 5 o'clock this afternoon. 

Upon that question Mr. Saulsbury called for a vore by States, which was 
ordered. The question being then taken bv States, the motion was not agreed 
to— Yeas 82^-, nays 168. 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania, called up the several motions to reconsider, 
with the accompanying motions to lay on the table. 

The President stated the first question to be upon laying upon the table 
the motion to reconsider the vote by which the Convention refused to substi- 
tute the resolutions reported by the minority of the Committee on Credentials 
for those reported by the majority of said Committee. 

Upon thi^ question the State of Tennessee demand<3d a vote by States 
which was ordered. The question being then taken by States, the motion to 
lay on the table was not agreed to — yeas 113 1, nays ISB^r, as follows : 



Yeas. Nays, 

Maine b}4. 2>^ 

NeH' Hampshire 3 2 

Vermont ^\ y^ 

Ma^ijsacluisetts 5 8 

Rhode Island 4 

Connecticut 3^ 2i 

Ne.v York 35 

New Jersey 33^ 3^ 

Pennsylvania 10 17 

Delaware 2 



Yeas. Nays. 

Maryland 2 6 

Yirginia Jo 

North Carolina 1 9 

Arkansas \ i 

Missouri 4-8 4^ 

Tirnnesee 12 

Kentucky 2 10 

Ohio 23 

Indiana .13 

Illinois 11 



Yeas. Nays- 

Michigan, 6 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota 21 1^- 

Calilornia 4 

Oregon.. 3 

113i ISgi 



The question recurred upon the motion to reconsider the vote rejecting 
the minority resolutions. 

Mr. CocHRAiT, of New York, moved that when this Convention adjourn, it 
be to meet this evening at 7 o'clock, which was agreed to. 

Mr. Cochran moved that the Convention do now adjourn, which was 
agreed to. 

And the Convention accordingly took a recess until 7 o* clock P. M. 

EVENING SESSION. 

The Convention was called to order at a few minutes past 7 o'clock. 

The President stated that the pending question to be upon reconsidering 
the vote by which the Convention refused to substitute the resolutions sub- 
mitted upon the part of the minority of the Committee on Credentials in 
place of the resolutions submitted by the majority of said Committee. 



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Proceedings at Baltimore, 



143 



Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania, called for the previous question upon this 
motion, which was seconded, and the main question ordered to be put. 

The question recurred upon the motion to reconsider. 

Mr. Saulsbuey, of Delaware, called for a vote by States, which was or- 
dered. 

The question being then taken by States, the motion to reconsider was not 
agreed to — yeas 113, nays 139 — as follows : 



Yeas. Nays. 

Maine ■• ^% b% 

New Hampshire 2 3 

Vermont I 4 

Massachusetts 8 5 

Khcde Island 4 

Connecticut 2K ^% 

New York.... 35 

^ew Jersey --- 4K 2,% 

Pennsylvania 17 10 

Delaware 2 



Yeas. Nays. 

Maryland 6 2 

Virginia l** 

North Carolina 9 1 

Arkansas % Yi 

Vlissouri 4K ^% 

Tennessee lU 2 

Kentucky 10 2 

Ohio... 23 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 11 



Yeas. Nays. 

Michigan 6 

Wisconsin 5 

Iowa 4 

Minnesota IK 2K 

California _ .4 

>regon 3 

113 139 



The next question was upon the motion to lay upon the table the motion 
to reconsider the vote by which the Convention adopted the first resolution 
of the majority report in relation to delegates from Mississippi. 

The question being taken, the motion to lay on the table was agreed to. 

The next question was upon the motion to lay upon the table the motion 
to reconsider the vote by which the Convention adopted the majority reso- 
lution in relation to delegates from Louisiana. 

Mr. Saulsbury, of Delaware. At the request of others, not that I care so 
much about it myself, I call for a vote by States. 

The question being taken by States, the motion to lay on the table was 
agreed to — yeas 150^, nays 99, — as follows : — 



Yeas. Nays.i 



Maine 5>: 

New Hampshire 4/^ 

Vermont 4>a 

Massachusetts 5 

Phode Island 4 

(Jonnecticnt 3>^ 

New York 8=> 

New Jerney lYz 

Pennsylvania .10 

Delaware . 



2>^'Maryland 2 

l,^iVirginia 

>^jNorth Carolina 1 

8 'Arkansas % 

{Mi'souri \% 

2KjTenn»"8see 2 

•Kentucky .- 2 

4i^]0hio 23 

17 {Indiana : 13 

2 ilUinois 11 



Yeas. Nays. Yeas* 

ti Michigan 6 

1.5 Wisconsin 5 

83^ Iowa 4 

n^ Minnesota 2>^ 

4K California 

10 Oregon 

10 

150>^ 



Nays. 



4 
3 



The next question was upon laying upon the table the motion to reconsider 
the vote by which the Convention adopted the majority resolution in relation 
to delegates from Arkansas. 

'J'he question being taken, the motion was agreed to. 

The next question was upon the same motion in relation to Texas. 

The question being taken, the motion to reconsider was laid upon the table. 

The next question was upon the same motion in relation to Delaware, and 
the motion to lay upon the table was agreed to. 

The next question was upon laying upon the table the motion to recon- 
sider the vote by which the Convention adopted the 6ch resolution in relation 
to the claim of Mr. K. S. Chaffee, as against Mr. B. F. Hallett. 

The motion to reconsider was laid upon the table. 

The next question was upon laying upon the table the motion to reconsider 
the vote by which the Convention adopted the 7th resolution of the majority 
report, giving John O'Fallou, Jr., the seat in the Missouri contest. 

The motion to reconsider was laid upon the table. 

The next question was upon the motion to lay upon the table the motion to 
reconsider the vote upon the resolution in relation to Alabama — the motion 
was agreed to. 

The same with regard to the vote of the Convention, rejecting the resolu- 
tion of the majority in relation to Greorgia. 

The next question was upon the motion to lay upon the table the motioti 



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141 Democratic National Convention, 

to reconsider the vote adopting the resolution offered by Mr. Church, of New 
York, admitting the original delegates from the State of Georgia to vote in 
the Convention. 

The motion was laid upon the table. 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania. I now offer the following resolution : 

Besolvedf That this Convention do now proceed to nominate candidates for 
President and Vice President of the United States. 

And on that resolution I call the previous question. 

Mr. Stansbury. I move that the Convention do now adjourn sine die. 

The President. The gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Cessna) moved 
a resolution to proceed to ballot for nominations for President and Vice 
President, and upon that motion he demanded the previous question. It is 
the duty of the Chair to call for a second to that question in the ordinary 
course of business. The Chair understands the gentleman from Maryland 
(Mr. Stansbury) interposed with a motion the Convention do adjourn sine die. 

Mr. McKiBBEN, of Pennsylvania. 1 second that motion. 

The President. The Chair supposes that motion to be in order. 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania. Certainly ; there is no doubt about it; and 
on that motion I demand a vote by States. 

Mr. McKibben. The gentleman has no right to speak for the Pennsylvania 
delegation and demand a vote by States. 

A Voice. New York demands it. 

Mr. MoFFATT, of Virginia. I rise to a question of privilege. 

Mr. Stansbury, of Maryland. As gentlemen object to my motion I 
withdraw it. 

Mr. Mopfatt, of Virginia. Have I the right to the floor ? 

The President. The gentleman is entitled to the floor. 

Mr. Moffatt, of Virginia. I understand that the proceedings in which we 
have been engaged this evening have been fully consummated ; and that the 
question of contested seats here is at an end. I therefore raise this point, 
whether or not it is the duty of the Chair at once to issue tickets to the 
admitted delegates, in order that they participate in the proceedings of this 
Convention. 

The President. The Chair will state that he so understands his duty, 
and has already given that direction. 

The demand for the previous question was then seconded. 

Mr. KussELL, of Virginia. If it be the pleasure of yourself, Mr. President, 
and the Convention, I will now make the brief announcement of which I 
made mention this morning. 

Mr. Gorman, of Minnesota. I object to the gentleman's proceeding, and I 
raise the point of order that he has no right to make any debate, or any other 
announcement pending the call for the previous question. 

Mr. Russell. I rise to a question of privilege. 

The President. The gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Russell) rises to address 
the Chair, and the Chair desires to know what proposition he desires to 
make. 

Voices. Let the gentleman proceed. 

Mr. Russell. I consider it a question of privilege, and the Chair will de- 
cide whether it is so or not whon I submit it. I will detain the Convention 
but a very brief time. I understand that the action of this Convention upon 
the various questions arising out of the reports from the Committee on Cre- 
dentials has become final, complete and irrevocable. And it has become my 
duty now, by direction of a large majority of the delegation from Virginia, 
respectfully to inform this body that it is inconsistent with their convictions 
of duty to participate longer in its deliberations. 

The delegates from Virginia^ who participate in this movement, have come 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. H5 

to the conclusion which I have announced, after long, mature and anxious 
deliberation, and after, in their Judgment, having exhausted all honi)rable 
efforts to obviate this necessity. In addition to the facts which appear upon 
your record, I desire the attention of this body long enough only to state that 
it is ascertained that the delegations to which you, sir, under the order of this 
Convention have just directed tickets to be issued— some of them at least, 
and aU of them whom we regard as the representatives of the Democracy of 
their States— will decline to join here in the deliberations of this body. For 
the rest, the reasons which impel us to take this important step will be ren- 
dered to those to whom only we are responsible, the Democracy of the Old 
Dominion. To you, sir, and to the bo ly over which you preside, I have onlv 
to say in addition, that we bid you a respectful adieu. 

Mr. MoFFATT, of Virginia, obtained the floor. 

The portion of the delegation Irom Virginia which retired ^ben left their 
seats. 

Mr. MoFFATT, resumed If it be your pleasure, Mr. President, and the 
pleasure of this Convention, I desire to do what I have not done since the 
time of my first connection with, this body, and that is to occupy some por- 
tion of your time in defining the position which I occupy as one of the repre- 
sentatives from the Commonwealth of Virginia, and to say a few words on 
behalf of my colleagues who remain as members of this Convention. I will 
commence by saying that I was appointed, as was my colleague who repre- 
sents jointly with me the Eleventh Electoral District of Virginia, by a Dis- 
trict Convention, composed of delegates elected by the sovereign people o/ 
that district. I owe allegiance to that district Convention and to none else. 
I was elected by that district Convention a delegate to this National Conven- 
tion, and was given a charter to represent that constituency in the Conven- 
tion. 

But I never was elected to any other Convention. I was authorized to 
represent that constituency in this Convention, but I never was authorized 
to withdraw from it. I was appointed to carry out the wishes of the people, 
who are national and not sectional — men who are willing to stand by the 
banner now, as they have in times past, of the National Democracy. There- 
fore, acting here in the absence of instructions from that constituency, I can 
never feel justified in separating from this body. I desire to say a few* words 
in regard to the action that has precipitated upon the country the fearful issue 
which we now behold. What is the spectacle that presents itself? 

Mr. Augustus Schell, of New York, called the gentleman to order, and 
objected to his proceeding further in his remarks. 

Mr. Lander, of North Carolina. Mr. President, painful as the duty is, it 
is, nevertheless, my duty to announce here, as a representative of the*^ dele- 
gates from North Carolina, that a very large majority of them are compelled 
to retire permanently from this Convention on account of the unjust action 
as we conceive, that has this day been perpetrated upon some of our sovereieri 
States and fellow-citizens of the South. We of the South have heretofore 
maintained and supported the Northern Democracy, for the reason that thev 
are willing to attribute to us in the South equality in the Union. The vote 
to-day has satisfied the majority of the North Carolina delegates that that 
being refused by our brethren of the Northern Democracy, North Carolina - 
Rip Van Winkle as you may call her— can no longer remain in this Conven- 
tion. The rights of sovereign States and of gentlemen of the South have been 
denied by a majority of this body. We cannot act, as we conceive, in view 
of this wrong. 1 use the word '* wrong" with no intention to reflect upon 
those gentlemen of the North Carolina delegation who differ with me or with 
the majority of the delegation. For these reasons, without assigning any 
more, as I have no idea of inflicting a speech upon this Convention, who are 



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146 Democratic National Convention^ 

in no state of preparation to receive it, I announce that eight out of ten of 
the votes of North Carolina ask to retire. 

Mr. EwiNG, of Tennessee. Mr. President, in behalf of the delegration from 
Tennessee, I beg leave to address this Convention upon this occasion, so im- 
portant, and, to us, so solemn in its consequences. The delegation from Ten- 
nessee have exhibited, so far as they knew how, every disposition to harmo- 
nize this Convention, and to bring its labors to a happy result. They were 
the first, when the majority platform was not adopted, to seek for some prop- 
osition for compromise — something that would enable us to harmonize. They 
have a candidate who was dear to them. They cast away his prospect for 
the sake of harmony. They have yielded all that they can. They have 
endeavored with all their power to accomplibh the result they came here for, 
but they fear that the result is not to be accomplished in a manner that can 
render a just and proper account to their constituents. We have consulted 
together, and after anxious and long deliberation, without knowing exactly 
what phase this matter might finally present, we have nqt adopted any de- 
cisive rule for our action ; but a large majority of our delegates — some 20 to 
4— have decided that upon the result which is now obtained, we shall ask 
leave of this Convention to retire, that we may consult and announce our 
final action ? We shall take do further part in the deliberations of this Con- 
vention, unless our minds should change, and of that I can offer you no rea- 
sonable hope. 

Mr. Caldwell, of Kentucky. Mr. President, I am initructed by a majority 
of the Kentucky delegation to state that circumstances have arisen that make 
it exceedingly doubtful in their minds whether they should continue in this 
body. We have arrived now at a point when a grave question arises in the 
minds of a large majority of our delegation, whether it is not our duty to 
retire and report to our constituents that we have failed in our mission. We 
have not yet determined to withdraw, but we ask permission to retire for 
consultation. 

The President. The Chair will understand that leave is granted. 

Mr. Stuart. That cannot be the understanding of the Convention. I 
object to it. 

L'he President. The Chair desires tbat there may be some understanding 
for his own guidance. It has repeatedly occurred heretofore that delegations 
have retired on leave for consultation. Kentucky now makes that request. 
Is the Ch:ur to understand that the Convention does or does not consent to 
the application ? 

Many Voices. Yes, yes. 

Mr. Stuart and others. No, no. 

Mr. MoCooK, of Ohio. According to the rule adopted at Charleston, the 
effect of a delegation retiring is to suspend ousiness. Every member is will- 
ing that the Kentucky delegation should have time for deliberation, but our 
proceedings have been protracted and the time of those who remain is to be 
considered, as well as of the few who wish to retire. I am therefore opposed 
to granting leave, if it is to suspend our proceedings. 

Mr. Stuart. Mr. President, I understand that the delegation wish to re- 
tire but a very few minutes. I therefore withdraw my objection. 

Mr. Johnson, of Maryland. Mr. President, I am authorized by my col- 
leagues to report the state of facts in regard to a portion of the Maryland 
delegation. Mr. Johnson stated that a portion of the delegates thought it no 
longer consistent with their rights and honor to participate in the proceed- 
ings of the Convention, but did not state what portion of the delegates 
s ould withdraw from the Convention. 

Me. Glass, of Yirginia. It is due to me, Mr. President, to state that I, as 
one of the representatives of Virginia, have riot concurred with the majority 



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Proceedings at Baltimore, 147 

of my delegation in the important steps which they have just announced to 
this Convention. I have doDe everything in my power to preserve the na- 
tionality of the Democratic party, and the harmony and successful termination 
of this Convention, believing that upon that harmony depends the most mo- 
mentous consequences to our country. I have, however, in deference to the 
overwhelming expression of the purpose of the majority of my delegatior, 
declined any further participation in the deliberations of this Convention. 
But in doing so, I wish it distinctly placed on record, that I do not intend to 
indorse their action. That I reserve to myself and constituency in the 
future, as circumstances may determine. My sole purpose in going out and 
declining any farther action on this occasion, is to preserve, if possible, the 
union and harmony of the Democracy of Virginia. With that view I decline 
any further participation with this body. 

iVIr. Waterson, of Tennessee. I was a member of the Baltimore Conven- 
tion twenty years ago, and since that time I have voted for every Democratic 
candidate for President, and for every Democratic nonainee in my bail wick, 
and I shall be among the last to leave the ship ; I shall cling to the last 
spar ; and having voted for the last twenty years, as I have said, I announce 
to this Convention that, if I live until the next Presidential election, I shall 
vote for the nominee of this Convention. (Loud applause.) 

Mr. Jones, of Tennessee, here got and claimed the floor. 

Mr. Waterson. I am not through yet. But I am proud that my friend 
by my side is actuated by the same sentiments and the same considerations 
that animate me. (Renewed applause.) There are some gallant spirits here 
from the land of Jackson who will remain. (Applause ) I had the honor 
of being a member of the State Convention that accredited the delegates to 
this Convention. I had the honor of being a member of the Committee who 
drew up the resolutions adopted by that Committee. We labored for hours, 
intending if we could to erect a platform upon which every national man 
in every portion of our beloved country could stand. We did so, as I verily 
believe. That Convention recommended for the Presidency a distinguished 
citizen of my own State, Q-ov. Johnson. I am only sorry that I have not 
the resolutions in my pocket. But I well remember what was declared in 
the resolution; it recommended Gov. Johnson for the Presidency, and after 
declaring that he was our first choice, we pledged ourselves to give our 
hearty support to the nominee of the party whether he lives in the North or 
the South, (applause,) provided he cordially indorses the Cincinnati plat- 
form. 

I have no fears that this Convention will nominate a candidate that does 
not cordially indorse the Cincinnati platform. Upon the principle of that 
platform we have gone into every contest for the past twelve years, and we 
have achieved triumph after triumph. I trust that never while the feeling 
of gratitude warms my bosom towards the galLuit men of the North, who 
have fought our battles, will I ever be found acting otherwise than with the 
Democratic party. I do not remember any time when the gallant Democrats 
of the North were called upon to come to our rescue that they did not march 
forth by our side. There has been no unconditional resolve on the part of 
the Tennessee delegation, and I trust that better counsels will prevail. They 
are my friends of days past ; we have labored shoulder to shoulder against 
the common enemy, and £ trust that in the approaching canvass it will not 
be necessary for us to turn our shields against them. But if the battle must 
come, let it come ; I am prepared to do my duty. (Applause.) This is not 
of my seeking ; I have witnessed these indications for some time past ; I see 
that there is obliged to be a battle among the Democracy; that somebody 
must be beaten. I shall discharge my duty as a Democrat, and a National 
Democrat, let th« result be wkat it may. (Loud applause.) I shall follow 



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1*8 Democratic National Convention^ 

my convictiotis of right. T have given no vote that I did not beliere wm 
right in Itself, that I should not believe to be Democratic • and I am proud 
to see sitting; around me the representatives from the 4th Congressional dis- 
trict—the Memphis district— who are my friends. They will not abandoft 
their post. I am the only representative who is here, or who has been here 
from the Congressional district which I have the honor to represent. That 
makes two votes. My friend sitting by my side is the sole representative- 
from the Knoxville district in the State of Tennessee, the only representativr 
from that district who is here or who has been here during the sittings of thi*- 
Convention. That makes three votes, and here is my friend Mr. Cooper 
(laughter and loud applause), who is the editor of a Democratic newspaper in 
another Congressional district, and I know that he does not believe in bolting. 
(Applause.) And I see by my side another friend, his colleague, and if I 
were to see him leave it would cause me sorrow. I do not believe that h» 
will do it,- 1 shall believe it when I see it, and not before. I have felt it mv 
duty to say this much, and now 1 take my seat. 

Mr. Jones, of Tennessee. I shall not detain the Convention long. I de- 
sire to state that I have been connected with thi3 Convention from its very 
beginning. I was in the city of Charleston before thi& Convention assembled; 
I staid there until it adjourned to this place ; I voted for that adjournment; 
1 counseled it, because I believed it would tend to harmonize the great De- 
mocratic party, the national party of this country. And although I have 
been a Democrat ever since I first drew^ milk from my mother's breast, 
(laughter and applause,) I do not believe that I am aged and experienced 
enough to undertake the work of breaking up the Democratic party. (Ap- 
plause.) I went back from Charleston and reported my action to my constit- 
uents. I supported Gov. Johnson, the choice of Tennessee, to the 'very lasi, 
even after every other Tennesseean had pulled down his flag. I befieve that 
the people of Tennessee, and especially the Democracy of the Gibraltar of the 
•Knoxville district, supported me in the course I have pursued. What 
grounds had Alabama and all those other States for leaving this Convention? 
They said they left because they could not get Congressional protection, and 
the words had hardly came from their lips in the Convention before yovt 
could hear them upon the streets saying that if a certain man was not nom- 
inated they would support the nominee. Then there is a contest here about 
men, it would^seem. I have never cast my vote for that individual. 

But I do think that gentlemen have attempted to break up the Democratiff 
party upon hostility to a man and riot upon principles that affect the interests 
of the South. (Applause.) I do hope that the Tennesseean delegation who 
have retired to consult, will, with the wisdom and the philosophy of old, and 
with the patriotism of a Washington who fought and bled for his country, 
with the devotion of that great man who said "the Union must and shall be 
preserved '» will reconsider their action and come back into this Convention. 

Mr. SjtfiTH, of California, rose and addressed the Convention, but hi» 
remarks being^of an uncivil and personal character, he was called to order by 
several delegates. 

The President. The gentleman is not in order — the Chair is constrained 
to say. 

Mr. Smith. Very well, then, I will withdraw from the Convention. 

Mr. Stevens, of Oregon. I can say in behalf of the delegation from Ore- 
gon, that I have a most melancholy duty to perform. It is somewhat signi- 
ficant, Mr. President and gentleman of this Convention, that that district of 
country which is entirely aloof from the theater of this turmoil feels com- 
pelled to take a certain decisive step. I participated in the proceedings of 
th« Convention at Charleston, and I have done my part as well as I could at 
Baltimore. At no period at either place have I allowed my feelings to get 



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Proceedinsrs at Baltimore. 149 



"& 



the better of my judgment, and I approacli this question and this exigency 
with as much coolness and am prepared for it with as mucti deliberation as I 
•ever approached any event ill my life. IV! r. President, there is remarkable 
5igni6cance in the fact that the Democratic party on the Pacific coast feel 
compelled to take this course. We have a growing empire on that coa.st 
that has been wrought out by the sacrifice of the blood and the peril of the 
la-t twelve years. On every route that leads from the Mississippi valley to 
that Western shore the bones of your emigrants are scattered. At every step 
almost, the tombstones of the suflering, way-worn travelers are found. ^^ e 
are still on that Western coas% planting our footsteps in blood in endeavoring 
to develop the country. We have come to this Convention and we have 
labored earnestly to bring about harmony. We have sought to stand upon 
principles alone. We did hope when this Convention re- assembled at Balti- 
more, that it would bring together the Democratic party in every sovereign 
State. 

We find ourselves grievously mistaken. By your action to-day, gentlemen 
AS much entitled to seats as ourselves, in our opinion, are excluded from the 
floor. We do not mean to impugn the motives of others, but are conscious 
that a most grievous wrong and insult has been given to sovereign States. 
Those States are the weak parties in this contest, and we have resolved to 
*tand by them and assert thoir rights. I now announce that the delegation 
from Oregon have come to the conclusion to withdraw from the deiiberationa 
and take no further part in them. 

Mr. MoFFATT, of Virginia, concluded the remarks he was about to make, 
when called to order by Mr. Schell, of New York. 

Mr. Davis, of Virginia, announced his determination to remain in the Con- 
vention, and give his reasons therefor. 
Mr. Riley, of Pennsylvania, moved to adjourn. 
Mr. McCooK called ifor the vote by States on the motion to adjourn. 
Appeals were made to the gentleman to withdraw the call, but without avail, 
Mr. MoFFATT begged leave to announce the introduction into the Convention, 
O'f Col. Di'lard, as an alternate from one of the Eastern Districts of the State 
of Virginia. 

The vote was taken by States on the motion to adjourn, and resulted as 
follows : -Ayes 18>^, nays 210>^. 

So the motion to adjourn was rejected. 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania. 1 now a^k the Chair to ascertain from the 
Convention, whether or not there is a second to my demand for the previous 
question npon the resolution to proceed to ballot for candidates for the Pres- 
idency and Vice Presidency. 

Mr. Clark, of Missouri. ,1 desire to be heard on the part of Missouri 
before that question is taken. The object of my rising now is to ask per- 
mission for a portion of the delegation from Missouri to consult as to their 
further action. I am the Chairman of that delegation, but I do not ask th's 
for myself; my purpose is fixed. But it is due to my colleagues who desire 
an opportunity for consultation that they should be allowed a little time for 
that purpose. I therefore request that instead of the Convention proceeding 
with their business to-night, they will adjourn until to-morrow morning. 
This is an important crisis in our history. We must have some consultation 
before any other vote is taken. I propose this to the gentleman from Penn- 
sylvania (Mr. Cessna,) that as there are several delegations who desire to con- 
sult before turther action, that the previous question be sustained, and then 
the Convention adjourn, and they proceed at once in the morning ^o business, 
with the understanding that we will then announce our determina-tion. 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania. I will state to the gentleman from Missouu 
(Mr, Clark.) that so far as my own views are concerned, whatever may be 



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150 Democratic National Convention, 

the wishes of the majority of the Convention, which I cannot undertake to 
explain, the purpose for which I made my motion was, that we might get 
through as much of the preliminary business as possible to-fiight. I would 
not myself be willing to withdraw the demand for the previous qu stion, or 
delay in any way the action of this Convention before we reach that point, if 
we ever do reach it, at which the previous question shall have been seconded 
and the main question ordered, in order that if this Convention shall then be 
disposed to adjourn, the first business to-morrow morning shall be balloting 
for nominations. But I have no right to say what the majority of this Con- 
vention will do. 

Mr. Clark. I have no right to press this matter. If it is not agreed that 
this Convention will adjourn after ordering the previous question, I will pro- 
reed now, but I would prefer to wait. 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan, said that it was his understanding that the pre- 
vious question had been seconded. 

After some consultation, it seemed to be understood that the previous 
question had been seconded, and the question was upon ordering the main 
question to be now put. 

Mr. Craig, of Missouri. I hope the suggestion of my colleague, (Mr. 
Clark,) may be ndopted, and fearing that at least the course of one delegate 
from Missouri may be misapprehended, I will say, that although I am proud 
to follow almost anywhere my distinguished colleague may lead, I never will 
follow him out of a Democratic Convention, or out of the Democratic party. 

Mr. Clark. As the remarks of my colleague (Mr. Craig) might place me 
in a false position, I will announce now what I would not have done but for 
his remarks. I remarked when I o;ot up before that my own purpose was 
fixed, and the de'ay I asked was in behalf of a portion of the Missouri dele- 
ojation, who wanted time to consult. My own purpose is fixed. For weal 
or woe, as the representative of a large constituency in this Convention, and 
as the representative in the Congress of the United States of 100,006 people, 
and having to vote in the House of Representatives for President, if the ques- 
tion ever g )es to that House. I am in this Convention, and intend to stay in 
it. [Grrtat a|)plause.] I place myself upon the organization of the great 
party of which I am an honorable member, and will have to throw myself 
upon the good sense and patriotism of my constituency, in whatever theater of 
action they may place me, to justify me in adhering to the old time honored 
usages of the party which have brought us renown and glory in this great 
Union. [Renewed applause.] 

I will not extend my remarks, but will ask this Convention to adjourn, as 
the demand for the previous question has been recorded. 

Mr. Clark withdrew the motion to adjourn, at the request of Mr. Gaulden, 
of Georgia. 

A Delega»^e from Virginia asked if the alternates of the Virginia delegation 
would be allowed to hold the seats of those delegates who had withdrawn 
from this Convention. 

Cries of "yes, yes.'* 

The Prksident. The Chair does not understand that that is a question 
competent tor him to determine. 

The Delegate from Virginia. I wish to say, in addition, that as the Vice 
President for Virginia has also seceded, we have elected Hon. William G. 
Brown in his place. [Applause.] 

Mr. Gaulden, of Georgia, here announced his determination to continue to 
aet in this Convention, and addressed the Convention in an eloquent manner, 
advocating the maintenance of the integrity of the National Democratic party. 

Mr. Whitney, of Massachusetts. I am instructed by a majority of the 



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Proceedings at Baltimore, 151 

Massachusetts delegation, to ask leave of this Convention to retire for con- 
sultation. 

Mr. Satilsbury, of Delaware, announced that on a future ballot the Dela- 
ware delegation should decline to vote, resuming the right to change their 
course at any time. 

Mr. Steele, of North Carolina, gave his reasons for continuing to act in the 
Convontiori. 

Mr. EwiNG, of Tennessee. Mr. President, the majority of the df^legation 
from Tennessee who asked the indulgence of this Convention to ret re for 
consultation, have done so, and as tl e re^^ult (.f their dtliberations I haT3 to 
announce that nineteen out of the twenty-four representatives havedecifei to 
retire, and five to remain. 

Mr. Clairorne, of Missouri. For nearly three weeks, I have listened 
patiently to everything tha*- has been said in thi- C >nvention, both at Charles- 
ton and Baltimore. I desire now to state the reasons for pursuing the course 
'•hat I now take, so far as my connection with this Convention is concerned; 
a'ld let me say, I hop« there will be no adjournment to-night, until we shall 
make a national nomination. [Apjilause.J 

r have ever been taught to believe Ihat the cardinal pr nciple of Democracy 
is, that the majority shall govern. To day, T have seen the majority of the 
Committee on Credentials report to admit certain delegates, and exclude others, 
and the majority of the Committee adopt that report. To-day, for the first 
time in the history of Democricy, I have seen the mother of States starting 
madly Irom a National Convention. I am a Southern man, born and raised 
beneath the sunny sky of the South. 

Not a drop of blood in my veins ever flowed in veins north of Mason and 
Dixon's line. My ancestors for 300 years sleep beneath the turf that shelters 
the boms of Washington, and T thank God that they rest in the graves of 
honest slave-holders. [Applause.] Sir, it has been the fortune of a distin- 
guished candidate at Charleston to be reproached with having, like Esau, sold 
his birth-right for a mess of pottage. They tell me I am a traitor to the insti- 
tutions of the Souih because T voted there and shall vote here for Stephen A. 
Doujrlas. I hu 1 back the ephuhet. 

When the delegation from Alabama withdrew from the Charleston Conven- 
tion under the instructii)ns of their State, I felt that the heavens should have 
been hung in crape, for I feared that the example of the distinguished son of 
that State would work the ruin of the national DemocraMc party of the 
country. But since tl en. Southern State after State has closed up the ranks, 
and theDomocracy is still, T believe, omnipotent and triumphant. 

Sir, I trust this Convention will soon proceed to the nomination, and t' at 
to-morrow will witness the D ^mocratic party united and harmonious, and that 
the shout will go up from every hill and valley in the land announcing the 
triumphs of the party that still carries before it, as itss'tield, the Constitution, 
and that strikes and crosses swords with the enemies of that Constitution and 
the Union. [Applause.] The Democratic party has passed through ordeals 
before, and it will pass this one, as sure as there is a God in heaven. ^ The 
success that attended with our fathers in the revolutionary struggle will be 
ours in this great struggle, and we shall be victorious over every fo". 

The gentl*-man conclu led his remarks by saying, that with Doug'as, Missouri 
would give twenty-five thousand majority. 

Cries of "question, question." 

The President. Shall the main question be now pu ? 

The motion "shall the main question be now put," to go into a nomination 
of candidates for President and Vice President was carried. 

The President. The motion has been carried. Will the Convention now 
vote upon the main question ? 

Mr. Cessna, of, Pennsylvania. I move an adjournment (Cries of " No, no.'') 



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^^2 Democratic National Convention. 

mo^nin?'^^^"' ^ ^'" "^^^'"^ ^^^ ^'^^* ^"^ ""'^"^ *^® statement I proposed in the 

The vote h in- taken viva voce, the President decided that the question had 
)^^r '" affirmative, whereupon the Convention, at To:30; 



List of Delegates for the St^Ue of Alabama, in the National Convention, with 
their Post Office addresses. 



William Garrett, Socopotdy. 

John F.n«yr,h Mol)i e 

K4>bt A Baker, Summerfield. 



4 i; ^cGinney, Lownde.-sboro. i W. S- Throckmorton, Tuscumbi* 
W.\\ K Wyatt. Aut lugaville. J. C. Hradloy, H^intsvllle. 



I>. (;. Humphrejv. Huniavill -.* 
Sidney 0. Pasny. Florence 



t£ /;?£■; s;:::;;; Kt:-siS'sL '■ :™ES=- 



tin vv\ Wornack Eutaw- jThomas B. Cooper, Center. 

V B Martin. I'lisr^iiinna!) F ,.,.r;r, v r» »,..i..j. 



L. V B Martin, luscaiooaa, jlpwisE Parsons, falladega. 
ko^:ilonn^:<i[^{;r''''- l ,;n^„ ;^n w';.?'?"'*^"^'"^ \m.V.^n Jenkins, Mardeiville, 

T. M. ^'atho^v; Ca^mta. j ^' Weakley, . ,orence, |Benj H.rrison, Montgomery 



Saturday, June 23, 1860. 

.itV^vT^p'^^'''^'.'^^^"^']^^"*' ^^^- ^^^^^ Cushing, took his seat and 
called the Convention to order, when the Rev. Dr. Cumrnings opened with 
prayer. q ^ ^^ wim 

was'd'ptTed S; """'"^ '' '^"^' '"^ ''^'"^^ ^^ ^^^ j^^^^^^ ^' ^-*-^^^ 
At the request of Mr. Garrett, of Alabama, the Secretary read a cor- 
rected list of the Alabama delegation as admitted to this Convention 

Mr. Garrett also announced that the delegation from Alabama had chosen 
Hugh Monroe Vice President, and Bush Jones Secretarv for the State of Ala- 
bama 

Mr. Caldwell, of Kentucky. After the withdrawal of the Kentucky 
delegation last evening, we held a hurried consultation, and, under the cirl 
ctimstances, hastened back to the hall for the purpose of announcing our de- 
termination. After making one or two ineffectual efforts to be heard by the 
President, an adjournment intervened before I succeeded. It is proper that I 
should state that after the meeting that we had last evening, the night inter- 
vened, and upon a consultation this morning there were some slight chancres 
iQ the opinions of some of our delegation, and it is my duty now to report'to 
the Convention the determinition at present arrived at. The circumstances 
m which we are placed are exceedingly embarrassing, and we have not there- 
fore been enabled to come to an entirely harmonious conclusion. The re- 
suit IS, ho'.vever, that the delegates of Kentucky remain in the Convention. 
CxVpplause.) I here are ten delegates who withdraw from the Convention 

The exact character of their withdrawal is set forth in a single paragraph, 
with their names appended, which I shall desire the Secretary to read before 
I sit-down. There are five others -completing that delegation-who desire 
for the presentto suspend their connection with the action of this Convention 
I need not go into any reasons for it, btjcause froru the remarks that I made 
last evening our views will have been understood. I will add here, that 
taere may be no misunderstanding, that I myself am one of- those five, and 
we have also signed a short paper, which I shall also ask the Secretary to 
read to the Convention. ^ 

Not desiring to detain the Convention longer, it only remains for me to say 
that having placed in nomination before this Convention a distinguished and 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 155 

favored son of Kentucky, being actuated in our withdrawal by circumstances 
that impel us to think that it is our duty to retire for the present. I also 
deem it my duty in justice to that distinguished, patriotic, and national Dem- 
ocrat, to withdraw his name from before the Convention, which 1 now do. I 
will ask the Secretary to read the papers I have indicated, and also one which 
a gentleman of our delegation has handed me, which he desires to be read. I 
ask that the three papers be read. 

The first paper, signed by James G. Leach, was then read. 

Mr. Payne, of Ohio, said he considered the paper just read an abuse of the 
privilege of this body, and an insult to its members; and he moved that it be 
returned to the gentleman who signed it, and be uot received by the Conven- 
tion ; and he gave notice that he should object to any communication, from 
any source, reflecting upon the action of this body. 

Mr. Leach disclaimed any intention of disrespect. 

'I'he question being taken on the motion of the gentleman from Ohio, de- 
clining to receive the paper, it was agreed to. 

So the Convention declined to receive the paper. 

The Secretary then read the communication signed by the retiring and 
remaining delegates from Kentucky, as follows : 
To the Hon, Caleb Cashingy President of the Democratic National Convention^ 

assembled in the city of Baltimore : 

The Democratic Convention for the State of Kentucky, held in the city of 
Frankfort, on the 9th day of January, 1860, among others, adopted the fol- 
lowing resolution : 

Resolved, That we pledge the Democracy of Kentucky to an honest and 
industrious support of the nominee of the Charleston Convention. 

Since the adoption of this resolution, and the assembly of this Convention, 
events have transpired not then contemplated, notwithstanding which we 
have labored diligently to preserve the harmony and unity of said Conven- 
tion, but discord and disintegration have prevailed to such an extent that we 
feel that our efforts cannot accomplish this end. 

Therefore, without intending to vacate our seats, or to join or participate in 
fwiy other Convention or organization in this city, and with the intention of 
again co-operating with this Convention, should its unity and harmony be 
restored by any future event, we now declare that we will not participate in 
the meantime in the deliberations of this Convention, nor hold ourselves or 
constituents bound by its action, but leave both at full liberty to act as future 
circumstances may dictate. 

N. W. WILLIAMSON, 
G. A. CALDWELL, 

Delegates for State at large. 
VV. BRADLEY, 
SAMUEL B. FIELD, 
THOMAS J. YOUNG. 

Resolved, That the Chairman of our delegation be instructed to inform the 
Convention in our behalf that in the present condition of that body we deem' 
it inconsistent with our duty to ourselves and our constituents to participate 
further in its deliberations. Our reasons for so doing will be given to the 
Democracy of Kentucky. 

JNO. DISHMAN, J. S. KENDALL, 

JOS. B. BEi^K, D. W. QUARLES, 

COLBERT CECIL, L. GilEEN, 

R. M JOHNSON, CAL. BUTLER, 

R. NICKEE, JAS. G. LEACH. 

Mr. West, of Connecticut, inquired what motion was now pending ? 



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1§4: DemacmUc National Convention. 

The President. The motion to proceed to the vote for candidates for 
President and Vice President of the United States. 
Mr. West. I hope the motion will now be put. 

Mr. Reed, of Kentucky. I do not rise to make a speech— God knowa I 
am tired of speaking -but simply to announce the fact that I, as one of the 
Kentucky delegation, together with others, have seen no cause as yet for 
abandoning this Convention. (Applause.) I read in the history of the an- 
cient city of the plain that an angel of the Lord was sent to inquire whether 
there were any righteous mon to be found that that city might be saved, the 
promise being that if five could be found it should not be destroyed. (Ap- 
plause.) I am happy to say that from Kentucky there are not only five but 
nine men who will stand by this Convention. (Applause ) It is a Demo- 
cratic Convention. It belongs to the Democratic party. We, of Kentuckv, 
stand here opposing secession and sectionalism North and South. We will 
stand with you as a wall of fire in opposing both extremes. (Appiause.) We 
will rally upon the principles of equal rights and exclusive privileges to none. 
We will form a nucleus here around which all conservative men o1' both sec- 
tions can rally and save the nation. I am not going to abandon the Conven- 
tion because it is apparent that one of our glorious chieftains is not likely to 
receive the nomination. (Applause.) No. I have gratitude in my heart to 
the man whose pathway from the city of Washington to his house in the far 
West is lighted by his own effigies. (Applause.) We in Kentucky owe to 
him, and to the North and West, our homes and firesides. G-entlemen who 
own a hundred slaves each say I am right. I will go home to my constitu- 
ents and to the campaign, and camp-fires will he lighted in the mountains 
and valleys, and in less than seventy days you will hear a shout that will 
turn the course of aff'airs and set things right. (Applause.) We will take 
this matter out of the hands of politicians and the Administration and return 
it to the people. (Applause.) I stand pledged to stand by the nominee of 
the Convention by solemn resolution binding upon me and every Kentucki an. 
I will stand by it though the heavens fall. (Applause.) I have been a 
Democrat from my infancy. I regard this as a strife between Democracy and 
Federalism. Non-intervention I regard as Democracy, and Gonc^ressional in- 
tervention as Federalism. (Applause.) ° 

My colleague (Mr. Caldwell) has withdrawn the name of Mr. Guthrie, the 
choice of Kentucky. I put his name again in nomination— Kentucky's favor- 
ite son. 

Mr. Clark, of Missouri. Before the Convention proceeds to a ballot, in 
accordance with my promise of last night, I desire to state what is the con- 
clusion the Missouri delegation have reached after consultation. 

Mr. King, of Missouri. I would like the gentleman, in making that an- 
nouncement, to state that it is the action of but a part of the Missouri dflca- 
tion. A number of us here had no desire to consult. I wanted to cons.ih 
with no one. 

Mr. Clark. My colleague would have had no need for an explanation if 
he had had a little patience. I announced to the Convention yesterday that 
there was a portion of the Missouri delegation who asked me to request of the 
Convention time for consultation. I did not include myself, nor did I include 
my colleague. That portion of my delegation have consulted, and it is my 
duty now to announce to the Convention the conclusion of that consultation. 
I have to announce that two of the Missouri delegation desire to withdraw 
from this Convention. In doing this, I claim that it is right that they 
should take the responsibility, and that the honor attaching to such a move- 
ment should be theirs entirely. 

Mr. Hill, of North Carolina. Mr. President, the Convention has know- 
ledge that on yesterday a portion of the delegation from North Carolina re- 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 155 

tired for reasons satisfactory to themselves. At the time I thought my col- 
leagues were wrong, having perceived no sufficient reason in the action of this 
Convention to justify a retirement from the Convention. Since that time I 
feel it due to my constituents and the State to which I owe allegiance to join 
my destiny to theirs. -ir i. i, 

I part with my brethren here to-day, as the gentleman from Kentucky 
Slid, more in sorrow than in anger ; hut a sense of duty requires that I de- 
clare that I no longer can take part in the proceedings of this Convention. 

Mr. Jones, of Tennessee, rose to correct some newspaper report of his re- 
marks and also to announce that instead of nineteen delegates retiring Irom 
the Tennessee delegation, hut thirteen had withdrawn from the Convention. 

Mr. Jones, of Pennsylvania, raised the point of order that no speeches 
were in order, as the previous question had been called on the resolution of 
Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania, to proceed to the ballot for nomination of Presi- 
dent and Yice President. , . -, i 

The President ruled that no gentleman could proceed with any remarks 
without the unanimous consent of the Convention. 

Several DeU^gates asked Mr. Jones, of Pennsylvania, to withdraw his ob- 
jection, but he refused to do so. , . , n -, j •+ i.- 

The President said he had received two papers which he deemed ^^ ^^ nis 
duty to communicate to the Convention. One was a paper signed by Mr. 
Sturman, of Arkansas, and the other a paper from the State of Georgia. 

Obiection was made to the reading of the papers. . , . ,. 

Mr. Sturman, of Arkansas, desired leave to state why he retired from the 

Convention. . ^ xi. x j- ^.i, 

Mr. Jones, of Pennsylvania, insisted upon his point, that pending tne ques- 
tion before the Convention no gentleman was in order to address the Conven- 

The President ruled that the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Sturman) 
could not proceed, as objection had been made. , . ^ 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsvlvania, called for the vote upon his resolution to 
proceed to nominate candidates for President and Yice President. 

The President. Gentlemen of the Convention, a motion has been made 
by the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Cessna,) to the consideration of 
which the Chair will now proceed. . , ^ ... ^-u ^ 

But before doing so, I beg the indulgence of the Convention to say that 
whilst deeply sensible of the honor done me by the Convention m placing me 
in this chair, I was not less deeply sensible of the difficulties general and 
personal, looming up in the future to environ my path. Nevertheless, m the 
solicitude to maintain the harmony and union of the Democratic party, and n 
the face of the retirement of the delegations of several States, 1 continued 
at my post, laboring to that end, and in that sense had the honor to meet you 
gentlemen, here in Baltimore. But circumstances have since transpired which 
compel me to pause. The delegations of a majority of the States of this 
Union have, either in whole or in part, in one form or another, ceased to par- 
ticipate in the deliberations of this body. At no time would any considera- 
tion of candidates have affected my judgment as to my duty. And 1 camie 
here prepared, regardless of all per.-onal preferences, cordially to support the 
nominations of this Convention, whosoever they might be. But under the 
present circumstances I deem it a duty of self-respeet, and I deem it still more 
a duty to this Convention as at present organized— I say l deena it my duty 
in both relations, whilst tendering my most grateful acknowledgments to 
gentlemen of all sides, and especially to those gentlemen who may have dif- 
fered with me in opinion in any respect-whilst tendering my most grateful 
acknowledgments to all gentlemen for the candid and honorable support 
which they have given the Chair, even when they differed m opinion upon 



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156 Democratic National Convention. 

rulings, and whilst tendering also the gentlemen present my most cordial re- 
spects and regards, not knowing a single gentleman upon this floor as to whom 
I have other than sentiments of cordiality and friendship — I dcim it my duty 
to resign my seat as presiding officer of this Convention. [Applause.] I deem 
it my duty to resign my place as presiding officer of this Convention in order 
to take my seat on the floor as a member of the delegation of M-^ss achusetts, 
and to abide whatever may be its determination in regard to its further action 
in this Convention, And I deem this above all a duty I owe to the memberi 
of the Convention as to whom my action would no longer represent the will 
of the majority of the Convention. 

Mr. CcsHiNG here left the chair, and took his place with the Massachusette 
delegation. 

Hon. DwiD Tod, of Ohio, immediately assumed the chair and was greeted 
with enthusiiistic and hearty cheeis. After order was restored, he ^aid : 

As tht- present presiding ofB jer of this Convention by common consent of 
ujy brother Vice Presidents, with great diffidence I assume the chair. When 
I announce to you that for 34 years I have stood up in that distiict so long 
misrepresented by Joshua R. Giddings, with the Demmocratic banner in my 
hand, [applause,] I know that T shall receive the good wishes of this Cmven- 
tion, at least, fv)r the discharge of tbe duties of the chair. If there are no 
p ivileged questions intervening, the S-'cretary wjII proceed with the call of 
the S ates. 

Mr. Butler, of MassachuSvtts, addressed the chair. 

Objection was made to his speaking. 

The Presdent. The gentleman from MassachuS-^tts will take his seat. 

The Secretaev proceeded to call the States amid great confusion and strug- 
gles for the floor. 

Mr. Stoughton, of Vermont, challenged the vote of that State. 

The President, That cannot be entertained before the result is announced. 
The Chair appealed to the honor of membars of the Convention to preserve 
order until the vote was taken. 

Mr. Butler. I assure the C )nvention that I will not detain them but a 
moment. 

The President. Objection being made, the gentleman from Massachusetta 
must take his seat. 

Mr. Butler. I desire to present, as a question of privilege, a protest re- 
spectful in its cliaracter and terms to this Convention. I ask for Massacbu- 
tietts the same rtspectful hearing that has been given to everybody else. 

The Presideot. Is the objection withdrawn ? 

Several Voices. '' No, no." 

Many Delegates appealed in behalf of allowing Mr. Butler to proceed. 

The Pkesident directed the cdl to piocieed. 
^ Toe resolution ordering the Convention to proceed to vote for candidates for 
the office of President and Vice Pre.-^ident of the United States was adopted. 

The President then directed the Secretary to call the Sta*-.es for the purpose 
of recording their votes for a candidate for the office of President of the Uni- 
ted States. 

Mr. Claiborne, of Missouri, appealed to the Convention to allow Mr. But- 
ler to address them. 

Mr. Sayles, of Rhode Island, seconded the appeal. The privilege had 
been accorded to every State. 

Objection being still made, the Secretary proceeded to call the States. * Mas- 
sachusetts being called — 

Mr, Butler said : Mr. President, I have the instruction of a majority of 
the delegation from Massachusetts to present a written protest. I will send 
it to the Chair to have it read. And further, with your leave, I desire to s'»j 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 167 

what I think will be pleasant to the Convention. First, that while a majority 
of the delegates from Massachiisetts do not purpose further to participate in 
the doings of this Convention, we desire to part, if we may, to meet you a* 
friends and Democrats again. We desire to part in the same spirit of manly 
eourtesy wi*.h which we came together. 

The following is the protest of the Massachusetts delegation : — 

Massachusetts Delegation, Barnum's Hotel, ) 
Baltimore, June 22, 1860. S 
To the President of the Convention . 

The undersigned, a majority of the delegates from Massichusetts to the 
National Democratic Convantion, in view of the action this day taken by the 
Convention in excluding the Hon. Benj. F. Hallett from the seat occupied by 
him as a delegate from the Fifth Congressional District Of our State, and the 
assignment of his seat to Mr. K. S. CUaffee, who was selected only as a sub- 
stitute by the District Democratic Convention which elected Mr. Hallett as 
one of the deleojates, do hereby protest against the action of this body in thus 
excludins: an old, faithful and most efficient servant of the National Demo- 
cratic cause — a regularly elected and commissioned delegate, for circum- 
iiances arising from a mournful domestic affliction which prevented him from 
attending the earlier sittings of this body, and caused the substitution of Mr. 
Chaffee in his place. 

We therefore desire to lay before the Convention our respectful protest 
against the aforesaid action, and also our request that it may be entered upon 
the recoids. 
J AS S. WHITNEY, Del. at large. C. S. GUSHING, Del. at large. 
W. C. N. SWIFT, 1st Dist. P. W. LEf^AND, 2d Dist. 

ALEXANDER LINCOLN, 2d Dist. BRADFORD L. WALES, 3d Dist, 
JAMES RILEY, 4th Dist. ISAAC H. WRIGHT, 4th Dist. 

CORNELIUS DO HE RTY, 5th Dist. GEO. R. LORING, 6th Dist. 
E. S. WILLIAMS, 6th Dist. GEO JOHNSON, 7th Dist.* 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 8th Dist. A. W. CHAPIN, 10th Dist. 

D. N. CARPENTER, 11th Dist. 
A portion of the Massachusetts delegation here retired. 
Mr. Dawson, of Pennsylvania, asked leave for the Pennsylvania delega- 
tion to retire for consultation merely in reference to their choice for the Pres- 
idency? 

The request was granted by unanimous consent. 

The Secretary then proceeded with the call, calling again the State of 
Massachusetts. 

Mr. Stevens, of Massachusetts, said — I am not ready at this moment to 
cast the vote of Massachusetts, the delegation being in consultation as to 
their rights. But I cannot permit the call of Ma.ssachusetts to be made 
twice without some resp<in8e, and in doing so I propose to reflect in no way 
upon the action of those delegates who have withdrawn. It is my convic- 
tion that should I withdraw* from this Convention it would meet with the 
deepest reprobation of my constituents. (Applause.) I profess, as one of 
the dele^^ates at t'arge, to know the sentiments of the people of Massachu- 
setts, and I say that they are for the principle of non-intervention and for 
Stephen A.Douglas. (Applause.) Our party has been laboring hard to 
stem the side of abolitionism and fanaticism. The Democracy of Massachu- 
setts never split upon any platform, and are ever ready to maintain the in- 
tegrity of our organization. 

At the call of the State of Maryland, 

Mr. BRENT'said — Before my vote is cast I desire to submit an explanation. 
Nat one word would have passed my lips but for the remarks of my col- 



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158 Democratic National Convention. 

league yesterday (Mr. Johnson). The Democracy of Maryland, assembled 
in this city, by a platform of resolutions passed in March, 1860, unanimously 
declared that they would plant themselves on the doctrine of non-interven- 
tion by Congress with slavery in the Territories, reaffirming the Cincinnati 
platform, and declaring at the same time that a difference of opinion upon 
questions of Territorial and Congressional power was a matter of toleration. 
After that declaration I have no hesitation in standing upon the Charleston 
platform, and standing on that platform I cast my vote for Douglas. 

At the call of the State of North Carolina, 

Mr. Dick, of North Carolina, said — I stand alone for North Carolina. I 
stand by the national Democracy and by the gallant champion of the North- 
West. 

Mr. JoN^ES, of Pennsylvania, insisted that gentleman should not be allowed, 
in explaiaing their votes, to make stump speeches. 

Mr. Dick. I had hoped that I could claim the courtesy of the Convention 
after patient, anxious, silent waiting for sixteen days. I have a birth- right 
amidst the national Democracy which I never intend to forfeit. (Applause.) 

Although my friends have gone — friends with whom I have heretofore 
rallied in many a fiercely-fought contest, I bid them good bye with sorrow, 
saying naught against their motives. They have gone from us, and, as I 
think, with strange gods, but I intend to worship where I have done hereto- 
fore. My constituents sent me here knowing that I would vote for Stephen 
A. Douglas. (Applause.) I have seen no cause of secescion. I stand by 
the Northern Democracy that have stood by me in the hour of trial. Soon a 
great battle is to be fought, which, in all probability, will decide the desti- 
nies of my country. I see arrayed three hostile armies — one disorg mized, 
the other two organized with their chosen leaders. True, one is but a small 
army, with no ammunition, and with old rusty guns long since condemned. 
(Laughter.) But the other is a foe to be dreaded. They are falling into 
line and advancing. They have an experienced chieftain, and above their 
heads waves the dark banner of treason and disunion, stained with the blood 
of Virginia's sons. (Applause.) 

Mr. Jones, of Pennsylvania, raised a question of order. 

The President ruled that the gentleman had a right to proceed, but it 
rested with himself whether he exceeded the bounds of the courtesy extended 
to him by the house. 

North Carolina was again called. 

Mr. Dick resumed. I expect to stand upon the deck of the old Democratic 
ship, launched eighty- four years ago, freighted with the hopes and interests 
and destinies of the country, as I have stood upon her when *' she walked 
the waters like a thing of life, " and seemed to dare the elements to strife. 
Now, in the midst of storms and tempests, I expect to stand by her, and I 
hope and believe she will outride the storm, and lead us to the haven of a 
glorious destiny. [Applause.] But if she must go down amid the dark 
waters of division and sectionalism, I expect to cling to the last spar that 
floats upon the troubled waters, and go down with the hopes and interests of 
the country. Believing, as I do, that old North Carolina will do all she can, 
she now casts her one vote in this Convention for Stephen A. Douglas. 
[Applause.] 

When the State of Georgia was called, 

Mr. Gaulden, of, Georgia, took the floor and said : I hold in my hand 
some resolutions of the Benning delegation, from Georgia, which has been 
admitted by a vote of this Assembly, to seats upon the floor. 

Mr. Gaulden read the resolutions and continued his remarks : — 

Now these learned gentleman of the majority seem to have been very much 
disgusted at the course I have pursued here. I have as na,uch pity and cou- 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 169 

tempt for them as they possibly can have for me. Majorities have no terrors 
for me. I was notified by the Secretary of the Georgia delegation, to meet 
them at their room yesterday evening, with an intimation that they were dis- 
posed to put me on trial, and see whether I was worthy to go with them. 1 told 
him that if that was the idea I plead to the jurisdiction, and was responsible 
to the State of Georgia, and not to tihem. However he gave me to understand 
that that was not really the idea, but that they merely wanted to see me down 
there; I went, but it soon become obvious that they desired to put nae in a 
position where I would be obliged to go with them. I told them I considered 
myself a delegate to this Convention under my original appointment to 
Charleston ; I had gone there and refused to secede. Two Conventions in 
Georgia, their Convention and another, had indorsed me and sent me here, 
and that I claimed the right to participate in the proceedings of this Con- 
vention, and under the decision at Charleston to cast a pro rata vote. I 
distinctly warned them that I would not be bound to go with them finally in 
any course they might pursue ; that I belonged to the great National Demo- 
cratic party of the United States, and was here representing the State of 
Georgia, under their indorsement, and had the right to act with them up to 
a certain time, but reserved to myself the right, when the final rupture came, 
to go where I pleased, and act upon my individual reponsibility. We had 
a great deal of discussion, they trying to bring me down to pledges, which I 
scorned then as I do now, and have as much disgust for them as they can 
have for me. 

I told them that under the peculiar circumstances of the case, though 1 
claimed the right to participate in the proceedings of this Convention, and 
should do 80, I would not attempt to cast the vote of the State of Georgia. 
That is the only pledge I made them. That seemed to be their holy horror; 
they seemed to have a terrible dread that I would come here, under my 
Charleston appointment, and cast the whole ten votes of Georgia. I told 
them I would not do that ; that under the peculiar circumstances of the case 
I doubted my right to vote at all ; and that until I gave them formal notice 
of the final dissolution of all connection betv een them and me, I would not 
attempt to cast a vote at all. But I did reserve to myself the right to come 
here and participate with what I believed to be the National Democracy of 
these United States, the men with whom I cast my fortunes, and upon whom 
in my humble judgment, depends Lot only the perpetuity of this Union, but 
the perpetuity of civil liberty itsel f. I told them I considered it a duty I owed to 
myself and this Convention, and to the country not to come here and cast 
the vote of the State of Georgia at any rate until the connection between 
them and me had been dissolved. And I now publicly do dissolve all con- 
nection between that delegation and myself. [Applause.] I trust I shall be 
excused for the present from voting. 
When the State of Alabama was called, 

Mr. Parsons, of Alabama, said : I have been instructed by my delegation 
to announce briefly the principles which have governed us in the result to 
which we have come. Coming from the extreme South, representing a Con- 
servative constituency, devoted to the Constitution and rights of the several 
States in this Union, we look to the preservation of those rights now with 
more than ordinary solicitude by clinging to the Democratic organization. 
We prefer non-intervention and union to intervention and disunion. ". [Ap- 
plause.] And in urging this I am confident I speak the sentiments of a large 
majority of the people of Alabama. [App^use.] We come here prepared 
to see the most desperate efforts to break tp the Democratic party. Shall 
that be done ? ^[ Cries of *' no, no. "] Shall it be said that in 1860, here in 
Baltimore, the grave of this Union was dug ? The Star Spangled Banner still 
waves over us— shall it still continue to wave ? [Applause, and cries of 



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160 Democratic National Convention. 

"yes, yes."] You will find a response come up from the Gulf States— the 
Cotton States — such as never bfifore has been heard since this Republic was 
established. [Applause.] You have been told by distinguished gentlemen 
of our State that we do not speak the sentiments of our people. We appeal 
to the verdict of the ballot box. We made the issue with them in 1850 and 
1854, and we tell them to take warning from the result of that issue. The 
struggle for disunion is putting forth its last efforts. But the people will 
rally around us. 

Such being the principles and convictions we entertain in the depths of our 
hearts, we cast our votes as a unit — nine votes for Stephen A. Douglas. 
[Loud applause.] 

When the State of Louisiana was called, 

Hon. Pierre Soitle, of Louisiana, rose and was received with enthusiastic 
cheers and applause. After silence had been restored, the gentleman pro- 
ceeded as follows : 

Though mindful of what she owes to her sister States of the South, and 
ever ready to act in concert with them, when actual aggression shall call for 
actual resistance, Louisiana is unwilling to risk her future and the future of 
this Union upon impracticable issues and purely theoretical abstractions. She 
cannot be so far oblivious of past services as to disown that fearless and in- 
domitable champion of popular rights and of State equality, who, in that 
great and memorable struggle which initiated, in his State, the war now so 
unrelentingly waged against him, bore so gallantly the brunt of the battle, 
victoriously vindicating the rights of the South against infuriated opponents, 
and, by the lurid glare of his burning effigies, rode triumphant the storm 
wh^ch unprincipled and discredited politicians, in league with the high priesti 
of Black Republicanism, had raised around him :— Louisiana casts her vote 
for Stephen A. Douglas. 

When the State of Arkansas was called, 

Mr. Sturman, of Arkansas, said— I am positively instructed to vote for a 
certain platform, and one of a certain set of men on that platform, and, there- 
fore, failing in that, 1 must retire from this Convention. 

Mr. Flournoy, of Arkansas. It was not my purpose, knowing the impa- 
tience of this body, to have made anything like a speech on this occasion; but 
the hearty welcome you give me inclines me to believe that you will hear 
me patiently for a few minutes. 

First, let me explain my position as connected with this Convention, for it 
is rather a delicate one. I was nominated as a delegate for the Charleston 
Oonvention when it was known that I was called the head and front of the 
Douglas party in my State. It was a personal compliment, for I believed 
that I was in a minority in that Convention. But, sir, it was not a hopeless 
minority — it was a strong one, for they were afraid to make an issue before 
the Convention, which was strong enough to have voted down any anti- 
Douglas resolutions. I will explain how those resolutions were passed*^ upon 
us. We had kept a boat some thirty- six hours waiting, as the only means 
by which we could get home, waiting for the Convention to close. When 
we got through with the appointment of delegates and other business we took 
our leave. Before we got to the boat those instructions were passed. 

Though I did not feel bound to follow those instructions, still I did respect 
them at Charleston and carried them out to the letter— though it frequently 
brought Flournoy, the individual, in conflict with Flournoy, the delegate. 
(Laughter.) I am at this moment peculiarly circumstanced in regard to°that 
inatter. When I came here this morning I expected to follow out my con- 
victions and to vote for Douglas on the first ballot, I was instructed before 
I went to Charleston to vote for Mr. Breckinridge, amongst others; but I 
have exhausted the instructions, except that I have not had an opportunity 



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Proceeding's at Baltimore, 161 

to vote for Mr. Breckinridge, and as I wish to have a record wthout impeach- 
ment, I propose to cast my own vote for him. 

If I can be indulged a moment longer, I desire to say that I am a Southera 
man, born and reared amid the institution of slavery. I first learned to whirl 
the top and bounce the ball with the young African. Pjvery thing I own on 
earth is the result of slave labor. 'I he bread that feeds my wife and little 
ones is produced by the labor of slaves. They live on my plantation with 
every feeling of kindness as between master and slave. Sir, if I could see 
that there is anything intended in our platform unfriendly to the institution 
of slavery— if I could see that we did not get every constitutional right we 
are entitled to, I would be the last on earth to submit in this Union; I would 
myself apply the torch to the magazine and blow it into atoms before I would 
submit to wronsj. TApplause.) But I feel that in the doctrine of non-inter- 
vention and popular sovereignty are enough to protect the interests of th« 
South. I would scorn to entertain the belief that this heart could not em- 
brace the whole of this mighty Union— that it was so narrow and contracted 
as to recognize only the flag of a section in the stars and the stripes. Sir, it 
is the flag of the whole country. (Applause.) 

Under the circumstances, I cast one- half a vote for Breckinridge and one 
vote for Douglas. 

At the call of the State of Michigan, 

Mr. Stuart responded — Michigan will not detain this Convention long in 
jiving arguments in favor of her devotion to the party and the Union. She 
will manifest it by conforming to the usages of the Democratic party, and 
abiding by the result of all Conventions in which she takes part. She cast* 
six votes for Douglas. 

At the call of the State of Iowa, 

Mr. Dodge said — Mr. President, knowing, as I do, the impatience of this 
Convention, I will not at this stage of the proceedings detain you long. M j 
colleagues have expressed a wish that I, as a North-Western man, should 
make some reply to the remarks of the gentlemen from Alabama (Mr. Par- 
sons), and Louisiana (Mr. Soule). Their language is that of true Democrats 
and patriots, and has imparted joy and gladness to the hearts of every mepi- 
ber of this Convention, and to none more than to the delegation from Iowa. 

It was my fortune to have served in the Senate with my eloquent friend 
from Louisiana at the time of the passage of the measures to which he has 
referred. My votes, I can aver, were given to sustain what I deemed to be 
sound, constitutional principles, and are perhaps a true reflex of the senti- 
ments of the Democracy of my section of the Union and of our distinguished 
candidate for the Presidency. How strange and unnatural, that Stephen A. 
Douglas, covered with wounds inflicted by fanatical abolitionists, should not 
be esteemed a true friend of the South, or that the gallant old warrior and 
veteran of Democracy (Col. Eichardson), the indefatigable and self-sacrificing 
friend of Judge Douglas on this floor, should now be regarded with feelings 
of opposition, if not hostility, by Southern men. 

In war he has periled his life in defense of a Southern State. In the House 
of Representatives he fought the most memorable legislative battle on record, 
to relieve the South from the odious and unconstitutional Missouri restriction. 
To Douglas in the Senate and Richardson in the House, do the South owe, 
more than to any other two living men, that great measure of deliverance and., 
justice — the repeal of the so called Missouri Compromise. Sir, the Democ- 
racy of the North- West have been alike true and loyal to the whole country. 
We have risked everything to do justice to our brethren of the South, and 
we think that the time has now arrived when they should be willing to haz- 
ard something for our sake. We know that the candidate whom we present 
is a man in whom alt sections can safely confide. (Applause.) Judge Doug- 



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162 Democratic National Convention. 

las has earned tor himself, by his uncanqaerable energy, untiring industry, 
a^ld extraordinary talents, united to an undying attachment to the Union» :i 
ret>utation aiid a name which will adorn the brightest pages of our couuiry** 
history. (.Appiaurfe.; 

Never, since the days of General Jackson, were the people, the Democratia 
voters, so overwhelmingly in favor of any man for the Presidency. (Aj>- 
plauvse.) His supporters in the North-West are the men whose pride and 
glory it was and is to have voted against the " Wilmot Proviso" in all, its 
shapes and phases— to have voted for all the Compromise measures of 1850, 
the JTugitive Slave Law includ d — and for the Kansas and Nebraska Bill of 
1854' The mal- administration of affairs in Kansas, and the audacious inter- 
ference of the people of Massachusetts and Missouri in the affairs of that 
Territory, caused the overthrow of the Democratic party in the North- WeRt, 
while it only gained Kentucky and Tennessee in the !:!'Outh. Surely States 
which owe their redemption from the opposition to our self-immolation for 
them, should be slow to ask us to join in forming new issues, such as must 
prove disastrous both to our party and country. 

Allow me to say en passant that Delaware was for the " Wilmot Proviso" 
when Iowa was helping to fight the battle of the South against it. Our fa- 
thers were defeated for voting with your fathers for the Missouri restriction of 
1820; their sons have been overwhelmed with defeat for voting with you for 
its repeal. Let us, now that all obstacles are removed, strictly adhere to the 
wise and just principle of non-intervention, leaving to the people interested 
the right to determine their domestic institutions in their own way, subject, 
of course, to the Constitution of the United States. (Applause.) 

The Democracy of the North- West believe Mr. Douglas to be eminently- 
qualified for the Presidency, and worthy to fill that exalted station; but we 
would not be his friends or supporters if we did Eot know him to be in favor 
of the equality of the States and of even and exact justice to the people of 
every one of them. If he had the slightest taint of abolition about him, or if 
all his past life were not a guaranty that he would use the army, navy, and 
evjry power Avith which he may bo clothed for the protection of the South, 
and do it justice in the formation of his Cabinet and the distribution of his 
patronage, we would, instead of supporting, scorn and spurn him. Iowa casts 
four votes for Stephen A. Douglas. (Applause.) 

Before the vote was anounced, 

Mr Stoughton, of Vermont, challenged the vote of that State. 

Mr. Smith. It becomes necessary for me to say that Vermont votes as a 
unit for Douglas, until directed otherwise by a majority of delegates. And 
the instructions by which we are governed apply to the delegate who declines 
to vote with us. [Mr. S. here read the resolution of instruction to cast the 
vote for such candidate as a majority of the delegates shall, after consultation, 
select.] I submit that with such instructions, the gentleman is not at liberty 
to decline to vote so long as he remains in it. 

The President. The Cbair is of opinion that the Chairman of the dele- 
gation is authorized, in view of the action at Charleston, to cast the entire 
vote of the State, so long as all the delegation are present. 

Mr. Stevens, of Massachusetts, here rose and stated that, although some 
of the delegation from Massachusetts had withdrawn, he was instructed by 
the remainder of the delegation to cast the entire vote of the State. 

Mr. BissELL. of New York, rose to a question of privilege. He desired 
the Secretary should announce the vote of the State of Pennsylvania. 

The Secretary announced it. Douglas 10, Breckinridge S, Guthrie 3, aftd 
Seymour 1. 

*Mr. BissELL. I did not hfear the name of Seymour announced from the 
Chairman of the delegation, Sir^ I have been from the first instructed to 



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Proceeding's gU Baltimore. 



163 



•wltlidraw his name as a candidate, whenever presented. [ Appl'ause.] I will 
tnow beg leave to read his letter addressed to me : 

** Utica, June 14, 1860. 

(xBNTLKMKN : — Allusion having been made to my name in connection with 
the nominations to be made at Baltimore, I wish to state in writing what I 
have heretofore said to you in conversation, that I am. averse to being placed 
iu nomination by the National Democratic Convention. I do not suppose my 
name will be presented on that occasion, but if it is, I request that you will, 
as delegates from this district, withdraw it from consideration. I cannot, 
•under any circumstances, be a candidate for the office of President or Vici* 
President. Yours, truly. HORATIO SE YMOUR. " 

To Messrs. John Stryker.D. P. BisselU Delegates, (Sfc. 

The reading of the letter was followed by applause. Mr. B. then proceeded 

to say : , , , ^ i. i.- 

It is due to Mr. Seymour to say that he has ever expressed to me, nis 
neighbor and friend, the same feehng. I withdraw his name, as his friend 
and neighbor. 

One of the delegates from Maryland desired to withdraw his vote for 
Breckinridge, and to decline to cast any vote. The Chairman of the dele- 
gation bad°made a mistake in annnouncing half a vote for Breckinridge. 

The delegation from the State of Pennsylvania, desired to have placed upon 
therecords'of the Convention, the manner in which the several delegates 
from that State cast their votes, and the Chairman of the delegation filed the 
following statement : 

ivifl4«rs OassUiv Dessaa, Coffroth, Cunningham, Gibson, R. M., Grant, Grey, Griffith, Halderman, 
M^tg^mery, Nili, pSr^tufe 6hatcuck, Smith. Ward, Weir, Wilson, Wright, voted 

%e8s?8^''Baker^ Blfter. Bradford, Dent, Ent, Evans, Guernsey, McHenry, McKibben, Megargee, 
Packer Piumm 'r, KaudaU, Roberts, Pnillips, Swarr, Hottenstein, declined to vote. 
Messrs. Bloo I andGlossbrenner voted for Horatio Seymour. n„,>,,u 

Messrs Brodhead, Clymer, Hughas, Jones, Van /.ant, Lauer, voted for James Guthrie. 
Sf^srsSbeU Dawson; Gibloa, J. A-, Gloninger, McKee, Magee, Reilley, voted ft>r Breckto- 
rtdge. 4f. 

RESULT OF THE FIRST BALLOT. 

The Secretary here announced the result of the first ballot as follows : 
Whole vote cast, 190^ . 



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NVw Hampshire. 

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Jl assachusetts ... 
Rhode Island..... 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania.... 

Mary laud 

Virginia 

l^onh Carolina.. 

Aitbaraa 

liouisiana . 



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Olj Missouri — 
OilTennessee .. 
OljKentucky .. 

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0*1 Indiana .... 

Ojllllinois 

Oil Michigan ., , 
111 Wisconsin.., 

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164 Democratic National Conversion. 

Mr. Church, of New Yopk. Mr. President, I offer for the consideration of 
the Convention the following resolution- 
Mr. Flournoy. I want to insist that we take at least another ballot befbrr 
^we pass any resolution, for we can make i| stronger, a great deal. 

Many Delfgates. ^'Agreed," "agreed," "another ballot/' 

Mr. Church. Let me say to my friend that he can make it just as stroiig 
as he pleases upon this resolution. 

Cries of "read it," *• read it." 

The resolution was then read, as follows : 

''Resolved, That Stephejt A. Douglas, of the State of Illinois, having now 
received two-thirds of all the votes given in this Convention,, he is hereby de- 
clared, in accordance with the rules governing this body and in accordance 
with the uniform custom and rules of former Democratic National Conven- 
tions, the rei^ular nominee of the Democratic party oi the United States fur 
•the office of President." [Loud applause ] 

Mr. Church then stated that this resolution came under the order of th«- 
previous question. 

Mr. Jones, of Pennsylvania, rose and was ])roceeding to speak, when 

Mr. Gorman, of Minnesota, called the gentleman to order. 

Mr. Jones then insisted that the resolution was out of order. 

The President ruled that it was in order. 

Mr. Jones. 1 insist that it cannot be submitted without giving one day '» 
.notice, under the rules adopted at Charleston. 

Mr. Church. The original rule of this Convention required that whea 
two-thirds of all the votes were cast for any candidate, that candidate shaH 
-be declared the nominee. During the sitting of the Charleston Convention, 
after the secession, a resolution was offered instructing the President to declare 
VLO person nominated until he had received two- thirds of all the votes of a full 
Convention. A question of order was raised that it required one day's notice. 
The Chair ruled that the resolution was only one of instruction to the Chair- 
?man of that Convention, in regard to the original rule, and that it did not alter 
.or change that rule. Now my resolution is one changing the instructions to 
'the presiding officer, and, as such, it is strictly in order, according to the deci«- 
iion heretofore made. 

Now T desire to say a single word with reference to 4ihe action of the dele- 
:gates from New York upon the question of the number of votes required to 
.jQominate a candidate. New York came to this Convention for peace and 
•hatmony. We represent a larger constituency than any other delegation — 
.^limbering 200,000 honest, loyal, faithful Democrats — and from the first 
assembling of the Convention at Charleston down to the present moment, for 
sixteen long days and nights, have we honestly and faithfully endeavored to 
carry out the instructions of our constituents. We have yielded everything 
but personal honor in order to heal up the divisions of the Convention. Orw 
question after another has been presented to us, and we have been asked Ut 
yield this point, and that point, and the other point, and we have never failed 
to respond whenever we have been asked until we were required to yi-eld ev- 
erythidg which distinguishes our ©lanhood — nay more, everything which dis- 
tinguishes the manhood of the 200,000 Democrats behind us. [Applause.] 
When we came to that point — though we say it with pain, and sorrow, and 
anguish— when we were asked to admit, without question or examination, 
the whole body of seceders who came here to our doors — not repentant, no;fc 
determine I to abide by our action, bnt demanding the surrender of our prin- 
ciples into their hands — when we were asked to do that, and, besides, to giv» 
,n\) our candidate and the candidate of the choice of the Democracy of New 
York— ft candidate who will sweep New York as with a whirlwind — 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 165 

|applause]-wlien we were asked to do all that, we said firmly we cannot in 
honor comply with your demands. j ^ ^'^ 

^J.^^k^A ['^tf " Q^ l^^' re^solution After the secession at Charleston we 
were asked by those Southern States who did not secede to unite with them in 
vIZ" rTf^"" clissolution of this body, and in making some a.ljustment of the 
Tarioub difficulties with which we were surrounded. We were told bv tho^e 
gentlemen that if we would pass a resolution of instructions to our presiding 
oftcer that it should require two-thirds of a full Convention to nominate and 
also, when we got through, mike some slight amendment to our platform 
tiiey would remain m the Convention, stand by its action, and fight the seceders 
and disunionists to the very bitter end. They told us that the question was 
brought before our delegation of altering the rule of the Convention in relation 
to the number required to nominate. We were opposed to it, we thouffbt it an 
murage to require two-thirds even of the body deliberating to nominate. New 
York has often given its vote in National Conventions to repeal that rule I 
renaember well, when in 184i, New York had a favorite candidate of her own 
ai)d when this rule was thrust upon us and enforced for the purpose of defeat 
ing that candidate. We have always been opposed to the two-third rule. But 
by the construction we were asked to give that rule we were asked to increase 
ttie number necessary to nominate from two-thirds to five-sixths of the Conven- 
tion. We thought that was outrageous, undemocratic, despotic, wrono-. But 
wo said-I said to our delegation, in God's name let us s^acrifice all we'^can for 
peace and harmony. Kentucky, that gallant State, has held communion with 
us ; 1 ennessee, the land of the hero Jackson, who had more worshipers in 
.New York than— I was going to say—in all the rest of the Union besides ; all 
tfiese States have communed with us, and they have asked this of us as u 
}>eace offering. 1 advised it to be done ; we agreed to do it ; we did it, and we 
did it as a peace offering, for harmony and for no other purpose, and not because 
t was in accordance with our wishes. It seems now that this peace offering 
has been spurned. Notwithstanding the sacrifice we have made for peace and 
harmony, we have had no peace and had no liarmony. 

And now, gentlemen, I am willing, the New York delegation is ready to take 
^l the responsibility of this resolution which I have offered. [Great applause 1 
Ko biate will go further now or hereafter to unite or cement the Democrat:© 
F u ^^V r 1 "P ^^'® unfortunate division which has been made. Yet I say in 
behalf of the glorious Democracy of the Empire State, that we will stand by 
Uie right and fight It through. [Renewed applause.] The difficulties which 
Have attended this Convention have been most unfortunate ; but the worst, 
result that can happen is that tho.'^e gentlemen, by their action, will have 
dec ed a Black Republican President of the United States. And if that resuk 
»hal happen then I say that they, and they alone, will be responsible for that 
result. [Loud ap])lause.] 

nJ^^'J^^^^\^^ Pennsylvania. When the gentleman from New York (Mr 
Ohurch) speaks of " those gentlemen," does he refer to those here who refuse 
to break down the previous action of this Convention, or to those who have 
•eceaed f 

Mr. Church. I speak of those who have retired from this C.)nvention who 
bave violated the obligations which every man is under who enters into a 
bonvention to abide in firmness, in honesty, in good laith by its action and to 
tupport its nominees [applause :] and I say if this division, caused by themselves 
merely because we have dncided the cases of contesting delegations, shall 
cause the defeat of the party, they alone will be responsible. They sav w« 
decided wron-ly. Suppose, merely for the sake of the argument, that we have 
we nad a right to decide, and when that decision was made by a mai-.ritv of 
the Convention, every good Democrat was bound to acquiesce in it. [Applause ] 
Why, sirs, it is a new theory, a new doctrine, that a minoritv of the Convention 



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166 Democratic National Convention, 

or any portion of that minority, havo the right to set up their jiidgment against 
that of the majority of the Convention. And even if it should be admitted 
that we were wrong in our decision, that is no reason for seceding from thi» 
Convention, yet that is the only reason I haveheard for tbe secession here. 

The secedersat Charleston said they went out of the Convention because w«- 
had not adopted principles that they could stand upon ; that they differed with 
us apon vital principles, and yet they earner back to our doors and asked admis- 
liion, although we had refused to change the principles we had adopted.^ 

I have but one or two remarks more to make. All that I have said is in 
grief rather than in anger. Sir, no portion of the Democracy of this country 
have fought Black Republicanism with more courage and more fidelity than 
the Democracy of New York. 

The Chair informed the gentleman that his time had expired. 

Mr Davis, of Virginia. On the ballot taken to-day, as I understand the 
announcement from the Chair, some 190 votes were cast in this Con vent-ion. 
Now how in the name of common sense do you expect to get two-thirds of tbe 
vores of the Electorial College ? If the Democratic voters of the United States 
were asked to-dav their choice for tlie President of the United States, nineteen- 
tvventieths would say Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois. [Applause.] I have 
v.n doubt that every village post office in the United States has been eagerly 
watched since the sitting of this Convention, and the inquiry made by many 
men, " what is the Convention doing ? " If the delegates to the great National 
DeTnocratic Convention were as true and generous as the people who have ap- 
pointed them, they would have nominated Stephen A. Douglas long since. 
[Applause.] We are called upon now to do what we ought to halve done at 
Charleston, otherwise we must stay here and ballot and ballot, and ballot with- 
out ever nominating. If we had adopted this resolution at Charleston, as we 
ought to have done, we would have concluded long since. 

Mr. Hogp:. of Virginia, asked leave, on the part of the Virginia delegation, 
for five minutes to consult, at the end of which time he thought they could 
present a proposition that wolud settle this whole matter ? Leave was granted. 

Mr. Dunning, of Indiana. The State of Indiana having voted 58 times for 
Stephen A. Douglas, as many other States have done, I desir.>. to say that I hope 
the resolution will be so amended as to declare him the unanimous nominee of 
the Democratic party, as ho is the unanimous choice of the honest voters of 
the Democratic party of this great country. 

Mr. GiTTiNGS, of "^Maryland. I rise to enter a protest on the part of the 
(joustituency I represent ; and a large portion, almost the entire majority of the 
Democratic voters of the State of Maryland, against this resolution. The rub 
was laid down at Charleston that two-thirds vf the electoral college— 202 votes 
should he required to nominate. I am not prepared to say whether or not 
before that Convention had proceeded to buisness I would have voted io 
rescind that rule and have a candidate nominated by a bare majority, 

Mr. Gallaghek, of Connecticut. As I understand this motion, the Pres- 
ident of this Convention at Charleston decided that it required two-thirds of 
all the votes of the electoral college to nominate, notwithstanding several 
States had seceded from the Convention. From that decision an appeal wae 
taken, and bv the vote of Now York, I am sorry to say the Chair was sus- 
tained, and ail that is now necessary is to rescind the vote sustaining the decision 
of the Chair. 

The Chairman (Mr. Tod, of Ohio ) The Chair will explain. The reso- 
lution passed at Charleston, as understood by the then President of this Con- 
vention, as understood by the present occupant of the Chair, was not a chang© 
in the rule requiring two-thirds of the vote given to nominate, but merely a 
direction to the Chair from the Convention not to dec'are any one nominated 
until he had received two- thirds of the votes of the electoral college. And 



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Proceeding's at Baltimore, 167 

tlio present occupant of toe Chair will not feel at liberty, unrier that direc- 
tion, to declare any one nominated until he gets 202 votes, unless the 
Convention shall otherwise instruct him. But the Chair does not under- 
stand the original rule, requiring two-thirds of the votes cast necessary for a 
nomination, to have been altered in the slightest degree at Charleston. 

Mr. GiTTiNGS. I hope we will adhere to the rule. I have voted fifty 
t^mes for Mr. Douglas, and will vote fifty times more for him, if that will 
secure his nomination. I hope he will be nominated. There are delegates 
enough here to make two thirds of the electoral cfdlege, if they will only 
vote. I do not believe an\^ man who remains here is inclined to be factious. 
Thank God the factious men, a^ I believe, have all gone hence. [Applause.] 
I hope that this resolution will be withdrawn for the present, at least, so that 
we can have a few more ballots, and see what we can do. I think it is pre- 
mature, and I appeal to my friends of the Douglas party, not to press it now, 
for you have always been fair and consistent. I served for two days on the 
Committee on Credentials, and I say to you and to the world that the only 
spirit of compromise, the only desire for harmony, came from the Douglas men 
on that Committee. Upon one particular point, where their feelings were, 
perhaps, more enlisted than upon any other question, upon my appeal, know- 
ing I was conservative in my views, the gentlemen from Illinois and Ohio on 
that Committee were kind enough to change their votes for the sake of har- 
mony. 

Mr. HoGE, of Virginia. The voice that has heretofore been uttered from 
Virginia in this Convention, is the voice of politicians — not the voice of the 
people. [Applause.] While we are deserted by the politicians, you will 
find that the voice of the people of Virginia will be pronounced in fa\or of 
the nominees of this Convention. [Applause.] 

Now, in reference to the resolution before us, I honestly believe when the 
rule was changed at Charleston it was iniquitously done, though I submitted 
that the vote of Virginia should be cast as a unit for that change. I did it 
hoping that good might come out of evil. Now if it be true that any gentle- 
man has remained in this Convention and refused to vote, and thereby de- 
prived the members here — who desire to act conscientiously — of the 
opportunity to make a fair and regular nomination according to the rule 
pdop'ted, if, after another opportunity is afforded them, they do not vote, I will 
submit a motion on behalf of the Old Dominion to declare the nomination 
unanimous. I, therefore, on behalf of the Virginia delegation, and my friend 
from Maryland (Mr. Gittings,) and the rest of us who stand here deserted by 
our late colleagues, entreat that an opportunity may be given to ^yqxj gentle- 
man present to vote. And then if they decline to vote, I will treat them as 
out of the Convention ; and if there is not enough votes then given to make 
up a two-third vote of the elctoral college, 1 will myself move to declare the 
nomination unanimous. [Applause.] 

Mr. Church, of New York. There seems to be a disposition on the part of 
several gentlemen to have another ballot. [Cries of "yes !" ''yes ! "] And 
New York, standing as she has stood from the beginning in this Convention, 
will not stand in the way of any fair and honest proposition. [Applause ] 
I therefore will withdraw the resolution I have offered, and suggest that we at 
once proceed to another ballot for President. 

The Seceet.ary then proceeded to call the roll of States for the second 
ballot for a candidate for the office of President of the United States. 

When the Slate of Arkansas was called, 

Mr. Flournoy, of Arkansas, said that he now considered himself absolved 
from the instructions of his State Convention, and had great pleasure in casting 
the vote of Arkansas for Stephen A. Douglas, 

When the State of Mennesota was called, 



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168 



Democratic National Convention. 



Mr. Gorman, of Minnesota, said that a portion of his delegation being absent 
or declining to vote, in behalf of the majority of that delegation, he cast the 
four votes of Minnesota for Stephen A. Douglas. 

Mr. Becker, of Minnesota, announced that°he and two of his colleagues bad 
raoated their seats in the Convention. 

The call of the States having been concluded, the fallowing was announced 
as the result of the 

SECOND BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes actually cast, 194>^, as follows : 



D?3 






M^iue 

New Ffampshire 

Ve>rjaont _. 

Massachusetts .... 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

N^w York 

N«wr Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

VirKJnia 

North {'arolina. . 

Alabama 

Louisiana . . . 



•Mi 
35 

2% 
19 

2% 

3 

1 

9 









: B 









o>i 

















7 


2>^ 


u 






























8TATB8. 



Vrkanf^as . . 

Usiouri ... 
i'eiineshee 
Kentucky . 
Ohio 

ndiana 

Illinois ... 
viichigan . 
Wisconsin . 

Iowa 

Minnesota 



3 

3 
23 
13 
11 
G 
5 
4 
4 



(5 '^ 

O Z 

















5«^ 












^% 



Mr. HoGE, of Virginia, obtained the floor. 

Mr. Claek, of Missouri. Will the gentleman allow me to say a word bffoF« 
he proceeds? 

Mr. Hogs. Certainly, with pleasure. 

Mr. Clafk. It is known to this Convention that at Charleston as well as 
here, I have never cast a vote for Stephen A. Douglas. I have taken my 
course at Charleston and here, in obedience to what I thought were the wishes 
ot my constituents, although in that I may have been mistaken. I endeavored 
to place in nomination a gentleman agreeing in aU particulars more fully, -as I 
tiiought, with the wishes of Missouri than Mr. Douglas. I have never had any 
hostility towards. Mr. Douglas, but have always regarded him— and have so 
announced in Congress and elsewhere— as a great and patriotic statesman. 
[Applause.] I should feel the interests and destinies of my country entirely 
«'ife in his hands and under his administration. [Renewed applause.] I have 
my personal preference, in obedience to what I consider the will and sentiment 
ot the State I in part represent. I was commissioned to the National Demo- 
cratic Convention,. and I know of none but this one. [Applause.] I have 
hnked my destiny to this, and as I said yesterday, for weal or woe, T shall live 
and die m the Democratic party. With that view, in order that we may end 
our Labors here, and give the country repose, until they begin to shout for 
victory, I intend to second the motion of the gentleman from Virginia, (Mr, 
Hoge,) to declare Stephen A. Douglas the nominee unanimously of thia 
Convention, 

Mr. HoGE, of Virginia. Before I submit the resolution I promised, I desire 
lo submit one single remark. The Virginia delegates who remain in this, 
the National and the only National Convention of the Democratic party, liave 
cast only the individual vote of their respective districts. We have not 
attempted to ca>t the vote of any gentleman who has left here, and I feel the 
utmost confidence that tho^e gentlemen will not undertake elsewhere to cast 
m\j votes but their own. 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 169 

I now beg leave to submit the followinor resolution, being th.i same as that 
fyffered by the gentleman from New York (Mr. Church,) with a slight modifica- 
tion that he and I have made : 

" Resolved unanimously, That Stephen A. Douglas, of the State of Illinois, 
having now received two-thirds of all the votes given in this Convention, he is 
hereby declared, in accordance with rules governing this body, and in accord- 
ance with the uniform customs and rules of former Democratic National Con- 
ventions, the regular nominee of the Democratic party of the United States, for 
the office of President of the United States." ' 

Mr. Seymour, of New York. I and some of my friends have occupied a 
ioraewhat peculiar position both at Charleston and here. We have among us 
a distinguished Democrat whose name has been frequently mentioned as th« 
itandard-bearer of the Democracy in this campaign. I have known him long, 
ttood by his side through many contests, and was prepared to stand by him if 
he was the choice of the Democratic party at this time. And I have felt bound 
from time to time, during the deliberations of the New York delegation, to cast 
my vote for him. But now I feel, and I say it with great gratification, that I 
s-hould be speaking the sentiment of my constituency, and the sentiment of the 
•titire Democracy of the State of New York more correctly, if Ishould coincide 
with my political friends, which I most cheerfully do, in the vote now about 
to be pronounced. [Applause.] And I rejoice that it is to be pronounced in a 
tone that will reach every heart in this confederacy. Stephen A. Douglas, of 
Illinois, for ten years in the Senate of the United States, has been the champion 
and the leader of the Democracy, and he is now, as I believe, to be the 
honored instrument of one now more glorious triumph of the old Democracj'. 
[Applause.] Whatever disturbances and disruptions may have exhisted, by 
the vote now to be given it will appear that the good and true men who have 
remained here will with one voice, hail the name of their standard-bearer, 
Stephon A. Douglas, of Illinois [Loud applause.] 

The reading of the resolution being called for, the Secretary again read it. 

Mr. Mason, of Kentucky. Mr. President — The resolutian offered by the 
gentleman from New York would beaf criticism. Now, if you will not say in 
the resolution that this is the rule which has heretofore governed the Demo- 
eiatic party — because you voted at Charleston, that it was not, and for our ac- 
cainmodation ; if you will not make this new construction, but simply declare 
tliat, under all the circumstances, Mr. Douglas ojight to be the unanimous nom- 
inee of this party, I should not be surprised if the State of Kentucky would 
agree with you, and that quite likely you may get the vote of that State, though 
I cannot say it with certainty. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. There has never been a nomination for Presi- 
dent under a^ny other construction than that made by my friend from New York 
in his resolution. It is true you agreed at Charleston that you would not do it 
this time, .but always heretofore you have nominated the candidate by a two- 
third vote. Mr. S^even^on, of. Virginia, in 1848, when the New York delega- 
tion was excluded, and Gen. Ci-sswas nominated, declared that 170 votes were 
two-thirds. The action of the Conventions has been unifo:*m upon thi'^ subject 

The question being token on the resolution of Mr. Church, oi New York, as 
offered by Mr. Hoge, of Virginia, an overwhelming and unanimous " aye'' waa 
given. 

The negative vote was called for and there being no response, 

The President sa d — Gentlemen of the Convtniion, as your presiding officer 
J declare Sephen A. Douglas, of Illinois, by the unanimous vote of this Con- 
vention, the nominee of tiie Democratic party of the United States, for Presi- 
dent. And may God, in his infioite mercy protect him, and with him thi« 
Union. 

This announcement was received by the Convention with profound attention 



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170 DemocrcUic National Convention. 

and responded to with the most enthusiastic acclamations and cheers. The 
cheering continued for several minutes, in the midst of which the banner of 
the Ke^ stone Club was displayed from the upper gallerv, and the band struck 
up ^'Hail to the Chief. " 

A second banner inscribed with the name of "Douglas, the next President 
of the United States," '* PennsyWanii good for 40,000 for Dougks," was re- 
oeived with a fresh outburst of enthusiasm. 

Cheer followed cheer, hats were waving in all part^ of the house, the bands 
playing, and a general scene of cofigratulation g'>ing on among the dilegjit«R. 

Calls followed for various speakers, interrupted by renewed propositions f«r 
three more cheers for Douglas, which were given with a will as often as called 
for. 

RESPONSES OF THE STATES 

Loud calls were then made for Mr. Dawson. 

Mr. Dawson, of Pennsylvania, thereupon addressed the Convention as fol- 
lows : — 

Mr. President^ and Qentlemen of the Convention : — It is scarcely necessary 
forme to say that at no time during the sittings of this body did Judge Dnu- 
glas r^^ceive the united voice of the delegation from Pennsylvania. And, I may 
further add, that in the consideration of a platform a majority of us united 
with our S mthern friends, ready to give them all that we believed Ihera 
entitled to under the Federal Constitution. In our judgment they asked for 
nothing more, and we were not willing to give them less. [Applause.] In 
our actions then we have been overruled by a decided majority of this body, 
and for Pennsylvania, I am free to say that, attached as we are to the Demo- 
cratic party, its principles, its discipline, its organization, standing true forever 
in the eloquent language of the President in his opening speech at Charleston, 
'* Standing as perpetual sentinels upon the outposts of the Constitution, " w« 
will, I trust, abid 3 by its decisions and support its nominees. [Cheers.] 

Judge Douglas is a man of acknowledged talent, and everywhere regarded as 
the accomplished statesman, skilled in the art of ruling. Born under a New 
England sun, yet by adoption a citizen of the West, honored and cherised in 
the valley of the Mississippi, and on the slopes of the Atlantic, he now should 
belong to the whole country. [Cheers.] Unrestrained, to some extent, in 
early life, in the learning of the schools, the deficiency, if any exists, has been 
largely compensated by the generous measure in which nature has dealt 
upon him her choicest gifts of intellect and charactor. [Applause.] L^ki^ 
Henry of the Revclution, like Peel of England, these noble qualities have 
made him the architect of his own fortune. (Cheers.] 

That the Union is a confederacy endowed with special powers, the St ites 
composing it retaining all the undelegated attributes of sovereignty, is the 
fundamental truth of our political system. In defense of this truth we ar« 
about to engage in a new contest, and in the comprehension of its true charac- 
ter we have ihoroughiy to educate the public mind. The popular heart is to 
be won back to loyalfy by holding up to its contemplation the image of th« 
Constitution in this severe beauty of lineament and proportion. The errmg 
conclusions of our fellow citizens of all sections are to be corrected V>y a 
thorough and persevering exposition of their fallacy, and in place of these a>« to 
be inculcated the paramount claims of the Federal compact to the hearty a 3 1< {fi- 
ance, in letter and spirit, of every American who can comprehend and 
appeciate the institutions of his country, and who really cherishes a desin lor 
their perpetuity. [Applause.] 

If here in this beautiful city which looks out upon the Chesapeak, wecoidd 
have needed any incitement to a broad patriotism in our deliberations, it should 
have been found in the associations in the midst of which we are assembled, 
for it was at Annapolis at the close of the Revolution that Washington resigned 



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Proceedings at Balimme. ^l^ 

his commission. It is also within sight of the spot at which we are cri^Tcned 
that imposing monuments rise to the greatness of his memory and to tiae 
patriotism of the sons of Maryland. [Cheers.] , . , . .u 

Pennsylvania, tlie Stata in which independence was first proclaimed and the 
work of the Revolution secured by the corsiructi* r of the federal compact i he 
State which holds within her bo!^om the ashes of Franklin and boasts the hrsi 
battle-field of Washington, will be true to her noble memoru s. [Applause.] 
\nd in the fullness of that enlightened conservative sentiment for v\hich she- 
has been distinguished, will rally, I hope, in giant strength, cast the dust from 
her eyes, and aid the friends of the Democratic party once more to elect their 
nominee. [Loud and long continued cheering.] 

Mr. Shepley, of Maine, being loudly called for, he aro^e and said : 
Mr. President, and Gentlemen of the Convention :— It is known to you that 
(Hir own State, on the Northern frontier, which has occupied but little time of 
your Convention, has, until the last two bollots, been divided in its votes and 
in its preference lor candidates. But, sir, that division m the expression ol 
our opinions was not a division as to who was the preference of the Democracy 
of Maine. The Democracy of Maine have been in the habit of sacrificing 
their own preferences for the harmony of the Democratic i aity, and so long 
as any of us believe that by the sacrifice of individual preiei^enccs, either 
of our own or of our constituents, we can do anything for the harmony and 
the unity of the party, we are disposed to make that sacrifice for ourselves and 



for them. 



But, Mr. President, there arose a delicate and responsible duty for those 
of us who were in the minority to perform. 'J'here was a time when some of 
those from New England, with whom we acted, withdrew from the Conven- 
tion, and it then became the duty of the minority of our delecrates to deter- 
mine their course of action. We accordingly decided, in the first place, that 
if we went out of this Convention because some question, m regard to the 
admissibility of delegates, was decided contrary to our convictions, there 
would be an end to Conventions. But we decided that we might separate 
upon a question of principle, and that if, upon any question of principle, we 
were defeated, we would go out, even if we went out alone. But that was 
not the case, and so we determined to remain. I say this, merely as intro- 
ductory to the point I am about to make— that when any delegate decided to 
remain in this Convention, he virtually agreed to the resolution which has 
just been pas>ed. [Applause.] That he acknowleged the principle that 
there was a quorum present, with power to make a^rommation, though there 
were not two-thirds of this Convention left. 

I have only one word to say, in conclusion. We represent 55,(00 Demo- 
crats in the State of Maine, and although it has been urged here that there 
is no Northern Democracy, in the coming election we will show those men 
of the lowlands, who have said it, that 



There are hills beyond Pent!and, 
There are fritlis beyond Fortn ; 

If there are lords in the ^outh!and, 
There are chiefs in the ISorth." 



Mr. Cochran, of New York, was then loudly called for. He rose and 

Gentlemen—- It is with no reluctance, though with much diffidence, that I 
rise to respond to the calls with which I have been honored. I congratiilate 
the whole country upon the successful termination of your labors. (Ap- 
plause.) My own individual efi-orts, it is due to you to say, have not been 
bent to this issue. I frankly say that, with all the efforts of which I 
am capable, but still with manly openness, I have opposed the course which 
hm at last brought this Convention to the haven of its desires. But, sir, my 



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172 Democratic National Convention. 

course was adopted under the pressure of convictions and of affections other- 
^ise given than to the favorite of Illinois. There was a gentleman from the 
far South- Wes^ whose position we of New York had long contemplated with 
»ati^faction, and it might not seem strange to our fellow- Democrats, in glane- 
mz along our own borders, our eyes had been directed to some of our own 
favorite sons. But the time has arrived when these differences of opinion are 
to be merged in the authoritative decrees of the great Democratic party and 
r i'fuf't? '' f'^ announced to the people of the United States I for on, 
lend the feeble volume of my voice to those winds and currents that are now 
bearing to every portion of the Union the honored, illustrious, impregnabk 
name of Stephen A. Douglas. (Loud cheers.) pie^u^ow 

Sir it is the part of patriotism, when sacrifices are required upon the com- 
monaltarofoiircountry to make them, and when those sacrifices are in 
accordance w'th the best feelings of loyalty and devotion to the whole coun- 
try it is better that they should be made with a volition that shows no re- 
actance and with alacrity and with energy. I should do a great wron-x both 
to myself and my constituents, were I to suppress the declaration that h°e wW 
stands forth now as the standard-bearer of the Democratic party is one who 
will command a roar of acclamation from the hills and fields, from the streets 
and groves of the State of New York, loud as from voices without number. 
(Cheers ) I proclaim to this Convention here to-dav assembled, that he who 
has commanded the suffrages of my fellow-delegates is the man who was de- 

Nn!ltW% !^r ^'"^"Tlt P^"y°f t»^« United States. • (Apolause.) 
Now that the to, ,s over and the controversy is at an end which has "been so 
fairly and manfully conducted by all, I here come forward for myself, and 
those who feel with me and declare that the reluctance of the past will be 
compensated by the cordiality of the future, (applause,) and notwithstanding 
secession after secession has^ taken place in the National Democratic Conven- 
tion, with such a standard-bearer as you have this day given us, we shall be 
t'bf l'17o7="Tn'" ''PP°^''^°°- (Cheers.) I have aris^en only in response to 
the call of my fellow Democrats, not to make a speech, not to present an 
argument, but to declare that patriotism and honesty require that those who 
have been sent here as delegates are in strict honor bound by the action of 
his Convention. (Applause.) But above and beyond the obligations of 
honor, there IS a volition that will expand from these walls to the whole 

(Loud^cCerst '^' *"'^^* "P°° '"'^''* ^°' ^''P''«° ^- Douglas. 

7 o'clock'"" °^ ^^' ^™*^''' "'^ ^'"'^'S*"' *^« Convention took a recess till 

EVENING SESSION. 

The Peesident called the Convention to order at 7 o'clock 

I he Prksident requested each of the several delegations to name one of 

their own number to constitute a member of the Executive National Com- 

ra'ttee. 

Mr. Sayles, of Rhode Island, said that there was a resolution referring to 
that matter, and a Committee had been appointed. 

The President then called the attention of that Committee to the dk- 
charge of their duty. 

Mr. Jones, of Tennessee. Mr. President, the Southern delegates in their 
X^onvention have conferred together and have agreed unanimouslv to nomi- 

of fL ^ J/'' .^fff ^"* ^^ ,^^ V^^^'^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ H^«- Benjamin Fitzpatrick, 
oi the btate of Alabama. (Applause.) 

£K^^'^ft''^\?^^^''''V'V ^^^his nomination being made by consultation of 
ihe Southern States, including Missouri, (we claim to be a Western State, 



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Proceedings cU Baltimore, 



173 



however—laughter,) I beg leave to second the nomination, and to say to the 
Convention that after long and somewhat intimate acquaintance with Gov 
JTitzpatrick, a better nomination could not be made. He is a self-made man 
-ti man m the prime of Ufe—a man of vigorous intellect— a man of L'reat 
administrative talent— a popular Governor of his own State—a national man 
-~a life-long Democrat. He lives in the State that first seceded from this 
Convention We have selected him for his peculiar fitness, his high qualfi- 
cations, and because he lives in a State where his name will give such a ma- 
jonty as will astonish every portion of the country. (Applause ) His name 
IS a tower of strength. (Appl.iuse,) 

Mr. GiTTiNGS, of ]\Iaryland. I «all for the vote by States. I consider it 
an eminently fit nomination, and I have an object in calling for the vote by 
tetates. I want it to go out that every State voted for Mr. Fitzpatrick ami 
their votes were so recorded. * 

THE FIRST GUN. 

Mr. Satires, of Rhode Island. I have a telegraphic despatch The first 
gun. 

Providence, R. L— 4 o'clock. Your note is received. We are now firine 
a hundred guns, amidst great enthusiasm over the name of Stephen A. Duuift 
la/i. (Enthusiastic cheers.) * 

Mr. Oagqer, of New York. I h>ave the 

SECOND GUN. 

Tboy, N. Y. The nomination of Douglas received with immense enthu- 
•iasm. A salute now being fired. (Renewed applause.) 

The Pbesident, (after calling the Convention to order repeatedly)- Gen- 
tlemen, you all know that the Chair feels so much disposition to join in these 
yells that he can't keep order. (Laughter.) The Secretary will now proceed 
with the call of States. 

CALL OF THE STATES ON THE NOMINATION OP VICE PRESI 

DENT. 

At the call of the States the response was promptly given in favor of M^ 
Fitzpatrick, with no exception until the State of Pennsylvania was reached, 
when one vote was announced for William F. Alexander, of New Jersey. 

Mr. Whitebubn, of New Jersey. I was authorized before the meeting of 
this Convention, by Mr. Alexander, not to allow his name to be presented a^ 
as a candidate. 

The call having been completed, the vote was announced as fdllows : 

Whole numoer of votes cast, 199|, as follows, viz : 



BALLOT FOB VICE I'BESIDENT. 



For Benjaiuini 
Fitzpatrick. 

Matne 7 

Kew Hampshire 6 

Vermont. U 

MasHHchusetts 10 

Bhode Island 4 

Ciuinecticut 6 

New York S.** 

New Jersey T 

Pennsylvania 14 

Delaware 

Maryland _ 3 

Virginia 3 



For Benjamin 
Fitzpatrick 

North Carolina I 

bouth Carolina 

(■Jeorgia 

Florida 

Alabama -_.^..- 9 

Louisiana « 6 

Mississippi , f 

Texas 

Arkansas 4....... 4 

Missouri 6 

lennessee . 3 

Kentucky , 4i 



For BenJHittlii 
FitzpuirJcfe. 

Ohio 23 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 11 

Michigan , C 

Wisconsin , 6 

Iowa .„ 4 

Minnesota 4 

aliforiiia 

Oregon t> 

Total iQg^ 



Pennsylvania cast one blank vote. 

The Pbesident. — The Chair, therefore, announces that the Democratic 



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174 Demoaratic National Convention. 

Qonvention have made choice of Benjamin Fitzpatrick as their candidate for 
Vice President of the United States. 

Mr. Stevens, of Massachusetts, asked leave to file a statement of the del 
egate from Massachusetts, (Mr. Chaffee,) whose right to a seat had been sus- 
tained by this Convention, as against the contestant, in answer to the protej*t 
of a portion of the Massachusetts delegation, who withdrew. 

Agreed to, and the following is the statement. 

In Convention, June 23d, 1860. 

The undersigned respectfully represents, in reply to the protest presented 
by B. F. Butler, and others of his colleagues, from the State of Massachusetts, 
respecting his rights as a member of this Convention, the following brief con- 
siderations of fact and argument, namely : That on the 19th day of October, 
1859, Benjamin F. Hallett and Cornelius Doherty, of Boston, were duly 
elected delegates from the Fifth Congressional District of Massachusetts, and 
K. S. Chaffee, of Cambridge, and Silas Pierce, of Boston, as substitute Dele- 
gates, to attend the National Democratic Convention at Charleston. 

That on the ITchday of. April, 1860, Mr. Hallett formally notified the un- 
dersigned of his determination not to attend the said Convention, for reasons 
of a private nature, which are immaterial here. That thereupon, the under- 
uigned repaired to the city of Charleston, for the purpose of discharging his 
duty as a substitute delegate to the Convention, and that, upon the report of 
the Committee on Credentials in his favor, (his seat having been contested,) 
he was confirmed as a member of the Convention, and acted as such up to 
the time of the adjournment of the Convention to Charletson.. 

That upon the re-assembling of the Convention, at its present session, Mr. 
Hallett presented himself before the Convention, claiming, and in fact, assum- 
ing the seat of the undersigned, and that the question of contested right in 
the premises was referred to the Committee on Credentials for decision, and 
their report, in his favor, was adopted, with a large majority, by the Conven- 
tion itself. To all which facts, in the opinion of the undersigned, the follow- 
ing considerations of argument properly applied : 

1. That by the same authority by which Mr. Hallett was authorized to 
act as a delegate to the National Convention, the undersigned was invested 
with the right to act as su«h, in a certain contingency, to wit : the non-at- 
tendance of the former, for any cause whatever. 

2. That the undersigned, therefore, was not the personal agent of Mf, 
Hallett, in any proper sense, or his mere personal substitute, but was the agent 
of the District Convention itself, expressly designated as its substitute del»- 
gate, and having authority to act as such, in case the former should, for any 
reason, decline to act. 

3. That Mr. Hallett's notification to the undersigned, of his intention nol 
to attend the Convention at Charleston, was, in effect, an act of resignation on 
his part, and that the undersigned was substituted in his stead, in this contin- 
gency, not by Mr. Hallett's own act, but by the act of the District Conven- 
tion itself. 

4. That in this view, the undersigned, having availed himself of his 
rights in this respect, and having attended upon the discharge of his dele- 
gated duties, is amenable to no other body than that by which he was ap- 
pointed, and holds a seat in the Convention of absolute right. 

All of which is respectfully submitted and subscribed. 

K S. CHAFFEE. 

Mr. Stevens, of Massachusetts, submitted the following resolution, which 
was adopted : 

Resolved, That John G. Parkhurst, Recording Secretary of this Conventiop., 
hi requested to prepare the proceedings of this Convention, to be printed ia 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 175 

proper form, and that the National Committee cause 10,000 copies of the saro* 
when so prepared, to be printed and distributed among the delegates of this 
Convention. 

EEPORT ON KULES AND REGULATIONS. 

Mr. KauM, of Missouri, from the Committee on Rules and Regulations, 
«ubmitted the foHowing Report : — 

Mr. President : The Committee on Rules and Regulations, to which was 
referred the several matters contemplated hy the resolution of Mr. Pugh, of 
Ohio, beg leave to report : 

That they have had the same under consideration, and as the result of their 
deliberatioiis, submit to the Convention the following resolutions, and recom- 
mend their adoption : 

1. Besolvecl, That in the next National Democratic Convention the num- 
ber of delegates from each State shall not exceed double the number of the 
electoral votes of the State from which such delegates may be elected or ap- 
pointed. 

2. Resolved^ That a Committee consisting of one from each State, be 
appointed, which shall be called the Natioaal Denwcratic Committee ; and that 
iaid Committee shall have authority to call and designate the time and place 
of holding the next National Democratic Convention, and provide accommo- 
dation therefor ; and said Committee, in conformity with usage, shall also 
have power and authority to take all such measures as in the opinion of said 
Committee may best promote the interests, insure the suscess, and preserve 
the unity and harmony of the Democratic party. And said Committee shall 
have po ver to fill any vacancy that may occur in their number by resigna- 
tion, death, or refusal to act ; but in filling vacancies, it shall be the duty of 
sftid Committee to appoint the person who may be designated for the place 
by the Executive or Central Committee or Convention of the State in which 
8uch vacancy may occur ; but if no person be designated after reasonable no- 
tice, as herein provided, then said Committee may fill the vacancy at pleas- 
ure. And the said National Democratic CoonmiHee shall also have power to 
appoint from their own members an JExecut've Committee ; and said National 
Committee shall continue in office until their successors shall be duly 
appointed. 

3. Resolved, That in the Call of said National Democratic Committee for 
holding the next National Cgnvention, they shall designate the number cf 
delegates to which each State may be entitled. 

4. Resolved, That the National Committee cause an Official Report of the 
Proceedings of this Convention to be prepared, published and distributed 
among and to each of the members thereof; which report shall contain a list 
of the names o\ the several members of this Convention, with the Post-office 
address of each delegate, and the number of electoral votes of each State. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN M. KRUM, Chairman. 
On motion of Mr. Pratt, of Connecticut, the report was adopted. 

NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE. 

The Convention then duly appointed the following named gentlemen t^ 
serve as the National Democratic Committee, as provided in the Report submit- 
ted hy the Chairman of the Committee on Rules and Regulations, viz : 

SYLVANUS R. LYMAN, of Portland, Maine. 
ALPHEUS F. SNOW, of Claremont, New Hampshire. 
CHARLES G. EASTMAN, of Montpelier, Vermont. 



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176 Democratic National Convention. 

FREDERICK 0. PRINCE, of Boston, Massachusetts. 
JACOB BABBITT, of Bristol, Rhode Island. 
WM. L. CONVERGE, of Norwich, Cot.necticut. 
AUGUSTE BELMONT, of New York City, New York. 
JACOB VAN ARSDALE, of Newark, New Jersey. 
RICHARD J. H ALDERMAN, of Harrisburgh, Pennsvlvaiua. 
THOS. M. LANAHAN, of Baltimore, Maryland. 
JOHN. A. HARMAN, of Stanton, Virginia. 
ROBERT P. DICK, of Greensborough, North Carolina. 
WM. B. CAULDEN, of Huntsviile, Georgia. 
W. W. MOORE, of Jacksonville, Florida. 
OATLEY H. BYNUM, of Portland. Alabama. 
THOS. C01TMAN, of Donaldsonville, Louisiana. 
THOMPSON B. FLOURNOY, of Arkansas. 
JAMES CRAIG, of St. Joseph's, Missouri. 
J. KNOX WALKER, of Memphis, Tennessee. 
HENRY C. HARRISON, of Covington, Kentucky. 
HUGH J. JEWETT, of Zanesville, Ohio. 
H. W. HARRINGTON, of Madison, Indiana. 
MURRAY McCONNELL, of Jacksonville, Illinois. 
BEN J. FOLLETT, of Ypsilanti, Michigan. 
JOHN R. SHARPSTEIN, of Milwaukee. Wisconsin. 
WM. H. MERRITT, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
HENRY H. SIBLEY, of Minnesota. 
JAMES A. McDOUGAL, of San Francisco, California. 
WM. B. EARNEST, of Oregon. 
SAMUEL TOWNSEND, of Delaware, 
-, of South Carolina. 



-, of Mississippi. 



, — A. J. HAMILTON, of Texas. 

COMMITTEE TO WAIT ON CANDIDATES. 

Mr. Ludlow, of New York, offered the following resolution, which was 
adopted : 

Resolved, That a Committee of nine be appointed by the President to in- 
form the candidates nominated for President and Vice President of the United 
States of their nomination by this Convention and request their acceptance. 
The Chairman announced the following.as said Committee : 

WILLIAM H. LUDLOW, of New York. 

J. L. SEWARD, of Georgia. 

J. L. DAWSON, of Pennsylvania. 

ROBERT C. WICKLIPFE, of Louisiana. 

W. A. GORMAN, of Minnesota. 

T. B. FLOURNOY, of Arkansas. 

A. A. KING, of Missouri. 

BION BRADBURY, of Maine. 

R. P. DICK, of North Carolina. 

Mr. Payke, of^Ohio. It is generally understood that the platform was 
adopted at Charleston. I understand that a distinguished member from Lou- 
isiana, (Mr. Wicklitfe,) desires to present a resolution relating to the plat- 
form, and I hope he will be allowed to do so. 

Gov. WiCKLiFFE, of Louisiana. In behalf of the Committee on Resolu- 
tions, I beg leave to present the following. The adoption of it will give to 
Stephen A. Douglas forty thousand votes in two of the Southern States of 
this Union. 



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Proceeding's at Baltimore. 177 

Resolved, That it is in accordance with the interpretation of the Cincinnati 
platform, that during the existence of the Territorial Governments the mea- 
sure of restriction, whatever it may be, imposed by the Federal Constitution 
on the power of the Territorial Legislature over the subject of the domestic 
relations, as the same has been or shall hereafter be finally determined by 
the Supreme Court of the United States, should be respected by all good 
citizens, and enforced with promptness and fidelity by every branch of the 
General Government. * 

Mr. Payne. Mr. President, I undertake to say that no fair-minded man, 
North or South, can find fault with one word of that resolution. (Several 
voices, "not a word.") Now, with the permission of the Chair, I wiil read 
it again in the hearing of this part of the house. 

'L'he gentleman read the resolution from his seat, and moved the previous 
question. 

Mr. Davis, of Virginia. I say that's unfair. I protest against it, and I 
want to be heard. 

Mr. Payne withdrew the call. 

Mr. Davis then gave his reasons for opposing the resolution. 

Mr. Payne. I now demand the previous question. 

The previous question was then seconded and the Convention ordered that 
it now be taken. 

The resolution was adopted with one or two dissenting voices. 

Mr. Price, of Louisiana, moved to reconsider the vote on its adoption, and 
to lay that motion on the table, which was agreed to. 

SPEECH OF COL. KICHARDSON.—LETTER FROM MR. DOUGLAS. 

Mr. Richardson, of Illinois. Mr. Chairmau, the labors of this Convention, 
atduous as they have been, are now drawing to a close. Arduous duties lie 
before us in the canvass that is to come, consequent upon the nomination that 
we have made here to-day. To the Convention, to those who have been our 
friends, for their support on behalf of our nominee for the Presidency, and on 
behalf of his State, as also to this entire Convention, I return my profound 
thanks. We have been involved in seeming difficulties, great and perilous 
during the time that we have been deliberating here. But the Democratic - 
party 'have passed through greater difficulties than these, and come from the 
contest with their banner untorn and with triumph perched upon it. (Ap- 
plause.) 

I have no complaint to make against those who have seceded from this 
Convention. But I desire to say, "before I leave, that I wish them to go to 
their constituents with all the responsilnlity of that aet resting upon them if 
the Democratic party is broken down and destroyed. As for us, we have 
nothing to do but with our nominations to go forth to fight this battle for the 
success of the Democratic party and the perpetuity of this Government. And 
if those gentlemen who have seceded from us bring this Government into 
peril, the responsibility of the act will rest upon them, and not upon us. 
(Applause.) . 

Sir, what a spectacle do we present. Day after day during this discussion 
I have heard it said that this whole discussion was to secure the nomination 
of a particular man. My lips were sealed. When gentlemen have charged 
that all this effort on our part has been to nominate a single man, Mr. Presi- 
dent, the time has arrived wrhen I can put the denial straight, flat upon that 
statement, and produce the proof that will put them to blush whenever they 
repeat it again. (Applause.) I will not repeat the transactions that occur- 
red at Charieston or here, I will refer to them only for the purpose of calliog 
attention to another thing. At Charleston we were told by the seceders that 
12 



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178 Democratic National Convention, 

they went off on account of tlie platform. How do they stand before the 
country to-day ? They come back here upon that platform precisely as they 
left it at Charleston. (Applause.) 'I'hey sought admission into your Conven- 
tion, and the Convention acted upon their application. Then another set of 
gentlemen, who were in here and had pledged themselves to stand by th« 
nominees, if they could get 202 votes in the nomination — these othar gentle- 
men told you that unless you admitted those seceders, they would go out 
too. They made an issue not uj^on the candidate, not upon the platform, 
but upon the contest over the seats which the seceders claimed, here. (Ap- 
plause.) 

I attribute none but patriotic motives to every gentleman. But I must 
Bay, I do not know how elevated that patriotism that leads men to go out of 
a National Democratic Convention, and seeks to break up the party, because 
you will not let this man or that man, or the other man, sit here in this Con- 
vention. (Applause.) So help me God ! if I was influenced by such con- 
siderations, I would go home and seek the most insignificant town in my 
State and remain there the balance of my life, for I should not want to be 
seen by many people. (Great applause.) 

Now, Mr. President, 1 am going to m ike an announcement that will ao- 
oount for the currency of a rumor prevalent here the other day. Judge 
Douglas will accept the nomination. (Loud cheers and applause.) But 
Judge Douglas was prepared, for the harmony of the party, for the success of 
the party, for the preservation of the government, always and at all times, to 
withdraw his name from the Convention. (Applause.) I mean those gen- 
tlemen shall meet that issue when they go home. I have had in my pos- 
session, since the session of this Convention here, his authority placed in my 
hands to withdraw his name, to be used by his friends whenever they deemed 
it necessary to do so. (Great applause.) And I now send to the Secretary's 
desk a letter which though marked "private," I ask may be read to this 
Convention. 

The Secretaey read the following letter : 

\^Private.'\ 
Washington, 11 P. M., June 20, 186a 

My Dear Sir : I learn there is imminent danger that the Democratio 
party will be demoralized, if not destroyed by the breaking up of the Con- 
vemion. Such a result would inevitably expose the country to the perils of 
sectional strife between the Northern and Southern partisans of Congressional 
intervention upon the subject of slavery in the Territories. I firmly and con- 
scientiously believe that there is no safety for the country — no hope for the 
preservation of the Union, except by a faithful and rigid adherence to the 
doctrine of non-intervention by Congress with slavery in the Territories. 
(Applause.) Intervention means disunion. There is no difference in princi- 
ple between Northern and Southern Interventionists. The one intervenes 
for slavery, and the other against slavery ; but each appeals to the passions 
and prejudices of his own section against the peace of the whole country and 
the right of self-government by the people of the Territories. Hence the 
doctrine of non-intervention must be maintained at all hazards. But while I 
can never sacrifice the principle, even to attain the Presidency, I w^il I cheer- 
fully and joyfully sacrifice myself to maintain the principle. (Applause.) If, 
therefore, you and my other friends, who have stood by me with such heroio 
firmness ai Charleston and Baltimore, shall be of the opinion that the princi- 
ple can be preserved and the unity and ascendancy of the Democratic party 
maintained, and the country saved from the perils of Northern abolitionism 
and Southern disunion by withdrawing my name and uniting upon some other 
lion- intervention and Union- loving Democrat, I beseech you to pursue that 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 179 

course. (Applause.) Do not understar.d me as wishin.sj to dictate to my friends. 
I have imi)lioit confidence in your's and their patriotism, judgmbnt and dis- 
cretion. Whatever you may do in the premises will meet my hearty ap- 
proval, but I conjure vou to act with an eye single to the safety and welfare 
of the country, aiid without the slightest regard to my individual interest or 
aggrandizement. (Applause.) Mv interests will be but i)romoted, and am- 
bition gratified, and motives vindicated by that course on the part ot my 
friends which will be most eTectual in saving the country from being ruled 
or ruined by a sectional party. 

The action of the Charleston Convention in sustaining me by so large a ma- 
jority on the Platform, and designating me as the first choice of the party for 
the Presidency, is all tl e personal triumph I desire. This letter is prompted 
by the same motives which induced my despatch four years ago, withdrawmg 
my name from the Cincinnati Convention. i? • j 

With this knowledge of my opinions and wishes, you and other frienda 
must act upon your own convictions of duty. 

Very truly, your friend, S. A. DOUGLAS. 
Hon. Wm. a. Eichaedson, Baltimore, Md. 

The reading of the letter was received with the most enthusiastic applause 
the whole Convention rising in their seats, waving their hats and cheering. 

Mr. EicHARDSON resumed. Mr. President, we have discharged our whole 
duty. Whatever may befall us in that future so uncertain, we have the 
proud consolation that we have discharged our duty to just political associa- 
tions ; we have discharged our duty to this bright heritage that our fathers 
have given to us ; wg have discharged our duty to the country so connected 
with the hopes of all the future ; we have discharged our duty to that God 
who placed us here that we might advance the great interests of our fellow- 
man. (Applause.) t.- -u ij 
So anxious was my friend, the nominee of this Convention, that this should 
be impressed upon the minds of all his friends here that he telegraphed the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Richmond) on yesterday, [ believe, to the 
»ame effect. I trust that no person who knows me believes that I would be 
guilty of manufacturing evidence f )r an occasion of this sort. (Cries of " no," 
"no.") I have borne Uiis letter with me lor three days, but those gentle- 
men who have seceded from this Convention placed it out of my power to use 
ir. And the responsibility, therefore, is on them. I do not care it we have 
but ten friends in the South. In all time to come, I shall be found, so long 
as my heart continues to beat, striving to maintain all their constitutional 
rights. I have stood amid the ^torm of Northern fanaticism, and I under- 
stand what it is. I understand what you have to pass through in your sec- 
tion of the countr3% and appreciate your position. But in a just cause you 
cannot fail. We will be enabled with you to pass that crisis, and place the 
government where it will be so administered as to secure all the rights of all 
sections of the country. It is in hours of danger that true men are found, 
and in such hours alone. Meet this issue boldly, fearlessly, and for the right. 
In thirty days from this time we shall have established our ascendancy 
throughout the North- West, and we shall have such an organizaWon and 
power' then as will give us the control of that Northern empire now fast grow- 
ing into such vast importance and power. 

Sir, we shall have a terrible conflict. I expect to traverse the State m 
which I live from the lakes to the Ohio river. I expect to meet everywhere 
my fellow-citizens ; I know their temper, and I know that they will put 
their mark upon that man who, when our army was winning for itself th« 
proudest laurels, declared in Congress that it was an unnecessary and an un- 
constitutional war. (Applause.) We in the North have one sectional party 



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180 Democratic National Convention. 

to fight, and intend to whip them. You have an equally sectional party to 
fight in the South, and we expect you to whip them. When the election 
comes on in November next, we shall carry a majority of the electoral vote 
of the North, and we expect you to carry a majority of the electoral vote of 
the ISouth. (Applause.) I am exceedingly obliged to the Convention for the 
kindness and patience with which they have listened to my remsrks. 

Mr. Cessna, of Pennsylvania. We were informed, upon the opening of 
this Convention in this citj^, by our late highly respected and most lamented 
pre!^iding officer, that when we adjourned at Charleston there were pending 
three motions to reconsider, and three motions so lay those motions to recon- 
sider on the table. I move that the question be now taken upon those mo- 
tions. 

Tl^fi motion to lay on the table the motion to reconsider the vote by which 
the first resolution in the minority Keport of the Committee on Platform was 
adopted was then put and carried. 

The several motions to lay on the table, the several motions to Teconsider 
the vote adoptins: the 3d, 4th and 5th Resolutions in the minority Report 
substituted for the majority Report of the Committee on Platform and Reso- 
lutions, were then put and carried, and the motions to reconsider pending be- 
fore the Convention at the time of its adjournment from Charleston to Balti- 
more, were severally laid upon the table. 

RESOLUTIONS OF THANKS. 

Mr. Seymour, of New York, offered the following resolution, whichi wa» 
adopted, the question being put by Vice President Elston, of Indiana : 

Resolved^ That the thanks of this Convention be presented to the Hon. 
David Tod, for the dignified, impartial and courteous manner in which he 
has presided over this Convention. 

The following resolutions were also adopted : 

Resolved^ That our thanks are due and hereby tendered to the several 
railroad companies which have furnished us with half fare tickets to this 
Convention; and especially to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company, 
for their kind exertions with other companies to procure for us such tickets, 
and for the extra trains run for our accommodation ; and also to the Adams 
Express Company, for their kindness in transmitting messages, &C., for th« 
accommodation of delegates. 

Reiolvedj That the thanks of this Convention be and are hereby tendered 
to R. Eaton Goodell, of Illinois, and E. 0. Perrine, of New York, principal 
Reading Secretaries, and to John G. Park hurst, of Michigan, and Franklin 
Vansant, of Pennsylvania, principal Recording Secretaries, for the energy, 
fidelity and attention with which they have discharged their respective 
duties. 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Convention be tendered to the Marshal 
of the Police of Baltimore and those acting under him for the able manner 
in which they discharged their duties ; also, to the 8er2:eant at-Arms of this 
Convention, and those acting under him, and all the officers of the Conven- 
tion, for the efficient and able manner in which they have discharged their 
duties. 

Mr. Merrick, of Illinois, offered the following resolutit»n : 

Resolved, That the tbanks of this Convention be tendered to the Committee 
of Arrangements on the part of the State of Maryland and the city of Balti- 
more, and for the liberal and generous arrangements provided for the accom- 
modation of this Convention, and the uniform courtesy displayed to its mem- 
bers. 

Mr. Warwack, of Alabama. I desire to return the thanks of Alabama 
to this Convention for the nomioat'on you have made for Vice President of 



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Proceedings at Baltimore. 181a 

the United States. Alabama has her choice dow for Pi^esideiit and Vice 
President, and we pledge Alabama to give her electoral vote foi the ticket 
you have this day nomi'^ated-such a vota as she has not given since she 
voted for Jackson in 1828. I wished, when I heard the speech of the gentle- 
man from Illinois (Mr. Richardson), that I had such a/nend as^udge Doug- 
las has in him. (Applauie,) In 1856 Alabama voted for Mr. Douglas eight 
times, and the intriguers saw that he stood next for the nomination at the 
end of the next four years, that he must certainly be our next President and - 
they resorted to every measure to break him down. But Alabama will be 
true to the Union and the Democratic party. We know not who may be the 
nominee of the seceding Convention, but let him be froni the boath or from 
the North, if he be nominated by them, the State of Alabama will cast her 
electoral vote for the nominees of this Convention. . u^ , a 

Mr. Stuart, of Michigan. Mr. President, we shall never be able to ad- 
iourn in a better mood than we are now. I therefore propose that we ad- 
journ, and let us go into the field where the enemy are and conquer them in 
a hand-to-hand fight. (Applause.) 

THE PRESIDENT'S ADIEU. 

The President. Before putting the motion, the Chair must not forget to 
say how profoundly graleful he feels for the vote of thanks so generously 
tendered to him tor his conduct in presiding over your deliberations Galled,, 
for the first time, to preside over some six hundred gentlemen, th.- Chair 
announced to you in the beginning that he never could succeed m preserving 
order, unless he had the help and support of every member. He is proud tc 
sav now that he was not disappointed in that expectation. ^ ^ 

One word more. The victory in this contest, fellow Deniocrats is m our 
hands. We have only to continue firmly, nationally, sternly, fau'ly honor- 
ably in the discharge of our duties, as we have done since we met at Charles^ 
ton. to crown our efforts with entire success. ' ^ . ti , 

Wishing you all a safe return to your homes, to your wives and children, . 
and God grant that you may all have them at home waitmg for you. 

After putting the motion to adjourn, a r.A w.a 

The President said, I now declare this Convention adjourned, and bid. 

^^The'foliowing is a statement of the number of Presidential electors to - 
which each State is entitled, viz : 



states. 

Maine ^ 

New Hampshire » 

Vermont -- ^ 

Massachusetts 1^ 



States. Stales. 

Tennessee 12 

Kentucky 1'-^ 

Ohio iiS 

Indiana 13 

Illinois 11 



Virginia J^ ; 

North Carolina ..-l" ^ 

South Carolina 8 ' 

Georgia 1^ : 

nhole Isrand.... • • • • ^ Florida 3 ^J--- ;;•• - 

Connecticut 6,Alabama ttiwisooS"" 

NewYork 35 Lc>u.siana "* ? Iowa 4 

New Jersey, o? ^^^^^^^^ 3:: IKnesota":::..::":. -.: . • . . 4 



-- 



i)<«laware 



Mi^^souri 9 Oregon 



Viurvland » Ml*^SOuri ^ ^.^f,^ 

'''^^''''' DAVID TOD, President. 

John Gr. Paekhubst, for the Secretaries, 



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182 



Democratic National ConverUioTL 



Recapitulation of tlie Fifty-seven Ballots at Charleston. 



1. 

2. 

3... 

4.. 

5., 

0., 

7.. 

8.. 

9.. 
10.. 
II... 
12.. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16-. 
17-. 
18.. 
19.. 
2^) . 
21... 
22.- 
23.. 
24-- 
25.- 
26 . 
27... 
28 
29 



145>^ 

147 

liS)^ 

149 

149^^ 

UQ% 

I5(iK 
I50>^ 
IfO S 
150, 
J50H' 
149>^ 
1.50 
50 
I'lO 
150 
150 
150 
150 
I50>^ 
1505^ 
1523^ 
1511^ 
l51>o^ 

'51>^ 

1 .'^T 1/ 



42 

41 K 
36 

41 
41 
41 



35 
36 

42 

38K 



40>^ 38i^ 
39>^ 41 



39 

38 
38 
28>^ 
27 

26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
25 
25 
35 
25 
25 
25 



391^ 
39 V, 

39>^ 
41 

4i^i 

42 I 

42 I 

413^ 

41 ^a 

42 

41 K 

413^ 

413^ 

41K 

41>^ 

41>^ 

42>^ 

42 

40 



20| 
20^ 
19 i^ 

9 





s ? 




° E 








B 




f 


6 


7 


6 


fii 


b 


6K 


t 


5 


b 


5 


h 


3 


7 


4 


6 


4M 


6 


1 


6 


4 


6 


>< 4 


6 


}i 4 


() 


1 


20 


% 


20 


\ Vz 


20 


i %. 


20 


\ y^ 


20 


\ 1 


20 


1 


20 


1 y^ 


20 


\ % 


20 


\ % 



1 

12 

12^^ 
12>^ 

1!? 



1513 

151>^ 

152>^ 

152^-a' 

152>i^ 

152 

\^\% 

151 y^ 

1513^ 

my^ 

\5i% 

151^ 
15 1 1^ 

15 1>^ 

1513^ 

1511^ 

i-5lv, 

15!^ 

151^ 

I5i 

l.M 

151K 

I. -113^ 

I5U^ 

151>^ 

•51X 



25 

32 ^ 

'^2)5^ 

22 

22 

?2 

22 

16 

16 

16 

16 

Ifi 

16 

16 

16 

16 

16 

16 

16 

]6 

16 

16 

16 

16 

20 >^ 

16 

16 

16 



47>2^ 

47H 

47>g 

47 >^ 

48 ■ 

64 J^ 

66 
66 
60K 

66 >; 

65>ii 

65 K 

65^2 

65'/., 
65 ^ 
65M 

(^ii ' ; 
65>i^ 
65K 
65K 
61 

65 >^ 
6o>^ 
65 io 



5^ 

5 

14,'-// 
I4i 

\n 

131- 
133^ 
13 

131^ 

13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
16 
14 
14 
14 



3 
3 
5 

4H 
4ii 
5M 
^% 

b% 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 
4 
4 
4 



On the first ballot Mr. Toucej received 2J votes and Mr. Pierce 1 ; and on 
the second ballot Toucey received 2^ votes. 



MR. DOUGLAS' LETTER OF ACCEPTANCE. 

Washington, June 29, 1860. 
Gentlemen :— In accordance with the verbal assurance which I gave yoa 
when you place<i in my hands the authentic evidence of my nomination for 
the Presidency by the National Convention of the Democratic party, I now 
send you my formal acceptance. Upon a careful examination of the platform 
of prmciple adopted at Charleston, and re-affirmed at Bltimore, with an 
additional resolution, which is in perfect harmony with the others, I find it to. 
be a faithful embodiment of the time-honored principles of the Democrafeio 
party, as the same are now proclaimed and understood by all parties in th« 
Presidential contests of 1848, 1852, and 1856. Upon looking into the pro- 
ceedings of the Convention, also, I find that the nomination was made with 
great unanimity in the presence, and with the concurrence, of more than two- 
thirds of the whole number of delegates, and in exact accordance with tke 
long established usages of the party. 



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Democratic National Convention, 188 

My inflexible purpose not to be a candidate, nor accept the nomination in 
any contingency, except as the regular nominee of the National Democratic 
party, and in that case only upon conditions that the usages, as well as the 
principles of the party, should be strictly adhered to, had been proclaimed for 
a long time and become well known to the country. These conditions hav- 
ing all been complied with by the free and voluntary action of the Democratio 
maases and their faithful representatives, without any agency, interference, 
or procurement on my part, I feel bound in honor and duty to accept the 
nomination. 

In taking this step, I am not unmindful of the responsibility it imposes ; 
but in a tirm reliance on Divine Providence, I have faith that the people will 
comprehend the true nature of the issue involved and eventually maintain 
the right. The peace of the country and perpetuity of the Union have been 
put in jeopardy by attempts to interfere with and control the domestic affairs 
of the people in the Territories, through the agency of the Federal Govern- 
m.ent. If the power and duty of Federal interference be conceded, two hostile 
parties must be the inevitable result. The one inflaming the passions and 
ambition of the North, and the other of the South ; and each struggling to 
use the Federal power and authority for the aggrandizement of its own section 
at the expense of the equal rights of the other, and in derogation of those 
fundamental principles of self government which were firmly established in 
this country by the American revolution as the basis of our entire Eepublican 
system. 

During the memorable period in our political history, when the advocates 
df federal intervention upon the subject of slavery in the Territories had well 
nigh precipitated the country into revolution, the Northern interventionists, 
demanding the Wilmot proviso for the prohibition of slavery, and the South- 
ern interventionists, then few in number, and without a single Reprcricntativo 
in either House of Congress, insisting upon Congressional legislation for the 
protection of slavery, in opposition to the wishes of the people in either case, 
it will be remembered that it required all the wisdom, power, and influence 
of a Clay and a Webster, and a Cass, supported by conservative and patriotic 
men. Whig and Democrat, of that day, to devise and carry out a line of policy 
which would restore peace to the country and stability to the Union. 

The essential living principle of that policy, as applied in the legislation of 
1850, was, and now is, non-intervention by Congress with slavery in the 
Territories. The fair application of this just and equitable principle restored 
harmony and fraternity to a distracted country. 

If we now depart from that wise and just policy which produced these 
happy results, and permit the country to be again distracted, if not precipitated 
into revolution by a sectional content between pro-slavery and anti-slavery 
iuterventionirits, where shall we look for another Clay, another Webster, or 
another Cass, to pilot the ship of State over the breakers into the haven of 
peace and safety ? 

The Federal Union must be preserved. The Constitution must be main- 
tained inviolate in all its parts. Every right g^uaranteed by the Constitution 
must be protected by law in all cases where legislation is necessary to its en- 
joyment. The judicial authority, as provided in the Constitution, must be 
sustained, and its decisions implicitly obeyed and faithfully executed. The 
laws must be administered and the constitutional authorities upheld, and all 
unlawful resistance suppressed. 

These things must all be done with firmness, imparLialit3% and fidelity, if 
we expect to enjuy and transmit, unimpaired, to our posterit}^, that blessed 
inhen.ance which we have received in trust from the patriots and sages of 
the Kevoiution. 



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188 Democratic National Convention, 

It is to maintain these that I consent to take the position now assigned me, 
and welcome the consequences of personal good or personal ill, which that 
position may bring. Nothing else could induce me to brave the detraction 
which it invites, and incur the heavy responsibility which it imposes. I have 
nothing to add but the expression of my profound thanks for the honor so 
unexpectedly conferred upon me, and my cordial acknowledgments for the 
flattering terms in which I have been notified of my nomination. Whatever 
may be honorably done, I shall cheerfully do to maintain the integrity of the 
X)art J and the triumph of its principles. 



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