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Full text of "Official proceedings of the National Democratic Convention, held in Chicago, Ill., June 21st, 22nd and 23rd, 1892"


THE LIBRARY 
OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

I 

NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC 

CONVENTION, 

HELD IN CHICAGO, ILL., JUNE 21sT, 22ND AND 23RD, 

1892. 



CONTAINING, ALSO, THE 

PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC 
COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS, 

WITH AN APPENDIX CONTAINING THE 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE COMMITTEE ON NOTIFICATION, ORGANIZA- 
TION OF THE NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE OF 1892, 
AND THE LETTERS OF ACCEPTANCE OF GROVER 
CLEVELAND AND ADLAI E. STEVENSON. 



REPORTED FOR THE CONVENTION BY 

EDWARD B. DICKINSON, 

OFFICIAL STHNOGRAPHER. 



CHICAGO: 

CAMERON, AMBERG & Co., 71-73 LAKE STREET. 
1892. 



JK 

2.31 3 



INDEX. 



Addresses of 

Abbett, (N. J.,) Nominating Cleveland 103 

Bragg, (Wisconsin,) Nominating Mitchell for Vice-President 171 

Cockran, (New York,) On situation in New York State 145 

Collins, (Mass.,) Seconding nomination of Cleveland 130 

Collins, (Mass.,) As to future National Democratic Conventions 180 

Daniel, (Va.,) Seconding nomination of Hill 136 

DeWitt, (N. Y.,) Nominating Hill 108 

Duncombe, (Iowa,) Nominating Horace Boies 121 

Elias, (N. C.,) Seconding nomination of Stevenson 169 

English, (Indiana,) Seconding nomination of Cleveland 120 

Fellows, (N. Y. , ) Seconding nomination of Hill 114 

Fenelon, (Kan.,) Seconding nomination of Cleveland 126 

Goode, (Va.,) Seconding nomination of Cleveland 142 

Green, ( Ills. , ) Seconding nomination of Cleveland 119 

Hensel, (Penn.,) Seconding nomination of Cleveland 133 

Kernan, (La.,) Seconding nomination of Boies 129 

Lamb, (Ind.,) Nominating Gray 161 

McKenzie, (Ky.,) Seconding nomination of Cleveland 127 

Neal, (Ohio,) Tariff amendment 82 

Ochs, (Tenn.,) Seconding nomination of Cleveland 135 

Patterson, (Col.,) On Coinage Amendment 93 

Phelps, (Missouri,) Presenting zinc gavel 68 

Ross, (D. C.,) Welcome to National Committee 3 

Rhea, (Ky.,) Seconding nomination of Stevenson 166 

Scott, ( Kansas,) Seconding nomination of Gray 165 

Vilas, (Wis.,) Tariff Amendment 86 

Uhl, (Mich.,) Nominating Morse for Vice-President 167 

Wallace, (Missouri,) Seconding nomination of Cleveland 131 

Watterson, (Ky.,) Tariff Amendment. 83 

Watterson, (Ky.,) Seconding nomination of Boies 129 

White, (Cal.,)To Stevenson 226 

Wilson, (W. Va.,) Permanent Chairman 62 

Wilson, (W. Va..) On Notification of Cleveland 220 

Worthington, (Ills.,) Nominating Stevenson for Vice-President 163 

Abbett, Leon, Address of, nominating Cleveland 102 

Alaska Memorial to Convention 39 

Lists of 

Assistant Reading Clerks 60 

Assistant Secretaries 60 

Assistant Sergean ts-at- Arms 60 

Ballot- 
On Adoption of Tariff Amendment to Platform 92 

For nominees for Presidency 157 

For nominees for Vice-Presidency 1 76 

(Revised) For nominees for Vice-Presidency 178 



550321 



vi INDEX. 

Bell, Nicholas M. , Chief Reading Clerk 26-60 

Bell, Nicholas M., Resolution of thanks to 181-218 

Bell, Nicholas M., Placed on Notification Committee as Secretary 181 

Elaine, James G., Resolution of sympathy for 35-217 

Boies, Horace, Placed in nomination for Presidency 121 

Bragg, EdwardS., Address nominating John L. Mitchell for Vice-Presidency, 171 

Brice, Calvin S., Resolution of thanks to 186-194 

Bright, Richard J., Sergeant-at-Arms 26-60 

Bright, Richard J., Resolution of thanks to 186 

Broadwater, C. A., Resolution on death of 201 

Call for National Democratic Convention of 1892 22 

Canda, Chas. J., Resolution of thanks 186-204 

Canda, Ferdinand E., Resolution of thanks to 186 

Chicago selected as the place for holding Convention 21 

Cleveland, Grover, Placed in nomination for Presidency 102 

Cleveland, Grover, Unanimously nominated for the Presidency by the Con- 
vention 158 

Cleveland, Grover, Official notification of nomination 218 

Cleveland, Grover, Address of, in reply to Notification Committee 223 

Cleveland, Grover, Letter of Acceptance of 234 

Cockran, Bourke, Address of, on the situation in New York State 145 

Collins, Patrick A., Address of, seconding nomination of Cleveland 130 

Collins, Patrick, Address of, on future Democratic Conventions 179 

Committees 

Of Arrangements, Meeting of xi 

To Escort Permanent Chairman 62 

On Credentials, Appointment of 31 

On Credentials, Report of 45 

On Notification, Appointment of 70 

On Notification, Proceedings of 214 

On Notification, Address of, to Grover Cleveland 218 

On Notification, Address of, to Adlai E. Stevenson 227 

On Permanent Organization, Appointment of. 32 

On Permanent Organization, Report of 59 

On Resolutions, Appointment of 33 

On Resolutions, Report of 76 

On Rules, Appointment of 32 

On Rules, Report of 66 

Of Seven, Appointment of 12 

Convention 

First Day 25 

Second Day (morning session) 38 

Second Day (evening session) 74 

Third Day 160 

Official List of Delegates to 46 

Rules to govern 29 

Daniel, John W., Address of, seconding nomination of Hill 136 

Delegates, Official list of 46 

DeWitt, William H. , Address of, nominating Hill 108 

Dickinson, Edward B., Appointed Official Stenographer 26-60 

Dickinson, Edward B., Resolutions of thanks to 186-204 

Dickson, William, Resolution of thanks to 22 

Duncombe, John F., Address of, nominating Boies 121 

Elias, Kope, Address of, seconding nomination of Stevenson 169 

English, William H., Address of, seconding nomination of Cleveland 120 

Fellows, John R., Address of, seconding nomination of Hill 114 

Fenelon, Thomas D., Address of, seconding nomination of Cleveland 126 

Gavel, Presentation of 68 

Green, A- W., Address of, seconding Nomination of Cleveland 119 

Goode, John, Address of, seconding nomination of Cleveland 142 



INDEX. vii 

Green, Rev. Thomas E., Prayer of 74-160 

Gray, Isaac P. , Placed in nomination for Vice-Presidency 161 

Henry, Rev. Alfred H., Prayer of 38 

Hopkins, John P., Chief Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms 60 

Hill, David B., Placed in nomination for Presidency 108 

Hensel, W. U., Address of, seconding nomination of Cleveland 133 

Harrity, Wm. F., Elected chairman of the National Democratic Committee. . 200 

Kernan, Thos. J., Address of, seconding nomination of Boies 129 

Lamb, John E., Address of, nominating Isaac P. Gray 161 

Letter of Acceptance of Grover Cleveland 234 

Letter of Acceptance of Adlai E. Stevenson , 241 

McHenry, Henry D. , Resolution on death of 15 

McKenzie, James A., Address of, secondig nomination of Cleveland 127 

Mitchell, John L., Placed in nomination for Vice-Presidency 171 

Morse, Allan B., Placed in nomination for Vice- Presidency 167 

Neal, Lawrence T., Address of, on Tariff Amendment to Platform 82 

National Democratic Committee, 1888, Preliminary Proceedings of 3 

National Democratic Committee, 1892, Appointment of 69 

National Democratic Committee, 1892, Organization of 185 

National Democratic Committee, 1892, List, and officers of .. . . 212 

National Democratic Committee, 1892, Executive and Campaign Committees of, 213 

New York City Local Committee, Proceedings of 231 

Ochs, George W., Address of, seconding nomination of Cleveland 135 

Oelrichs, Herman, Resolution of thanks to 23 

Owens, William C. , Temporary Chairman 26 

Owens, William C., Address of 27 

Owens, William C. , Resolution of thanks to 66 

Palmer, John M. , Address of 42 

Patterson, Thomas M., Address of, on Coinage Amendment 93 

Phelps, William H., Address of, presenting gavel 68 

Platform, The 93 

Prayers... , 25-38-74-160 

Presidency, Ballot for 157 

Resolutions in regard to 

Arrangements for future conventions (Collins, Mass.) 180 

Bell, Placed on Notification Committee (Chipley, Fla.) 181 

Elaine (Cable, 111.) 35 

Blaine (Cullop, Ind.) 217 

Chairman National Democratic Committee (Honey, R. I.) 179 

Convention of 1896, authority to call (Brice, Ohio) 179 

Death of C. A. Broadwater (Sheerin, Ind.) 201 

Death of Henry D. McHenry (Watterson, Ky. ) 15 

Death of Wm. L. Scott (Watterson. Ky.) 15 

Platform engrossed for Mr. Wilson (Rhodes, Ala.) 218 

Printing of Official Proceedings (Watterson, Ky. ) 181 

Wilson, W. L., Placed on Notification Committee (Mack, N. Y.) 179 

Resolutions of thanks to 

Nicholas M. Bell .., 181-218 

Calvin S . Brice 1 86-194 

Richard J. Bright 186 

Charles J. Canda 186-204 

Ferdinand E. Canda 186 

Chicago Committees 22-186 

Edward B. Dickinson 186-204 

William Dickson . 22 

Herman Oelrichs 23 

William C. Owens 66 

President and Officers of the Convention 181 

Secretaries of Convention 181 

S. P. Sheerin 186 

W.L.Wilson ..181-218 



viii INDEX. 

Rhea, John S., Address of, seconding nomination of Stevenson 166 

Roosevelt, Robert B., Elected Treasurer National Democratic Committee. . . . 201 

Rouse, Rev. John, Prayer 25 

Rules of Convention ... . 29 

Rules and Order of Business 67 

Scott, Tully, Address of, seconding nomination of Gray 165 

Scott, William L. , Resolution on death of 15 

Secretaries of Convention, List of 61 

Sergeant-at- Arms, Appointment of 26 

Sheerin, S. P., Temporary and Permanent Secretary. ... 26-59 

Sheerin, S. P., Elected Secretary National Democratic Committee 201 

Stenographer, Appointment of 26 

Stevenson, Adlai E., Placed in nomination for Vice-President 163 

Stevenson, Adlai E., Unanimously nominated Tor Vice-President by the Con- 
vention 175 

Stevenson, Adlai E., Official notification of nomination 227 

Stevenson, Adlai E., Address in reply to Notification Committee 228 

Stevenson, Adlai E., Letter of Acceptance of 241 

Swett, Edward C , Address on Elaine resolution 35 

Temporary Organization 26 

Uhl, Edwin F., Address of, nominating Allan B. Morse 167 

Vice-Presidency, Ballots for 176-178 

Vice Presidents of Convention, List of - 61 

Vilas, William F., Address of, on Platform Amendments 86 

Voorhees, D. W., Letter of, read to Convention 121 

Wallace, William H., Address of, seconding nomination of Cleveland 131 

Watterson, Henry, Address on Tariff Amendment 83 

Watterson, Henry, Address of, seconding nomination of Boies 129 

White, Stephen M., Address of, to Stevenson 226 

Wilson, William L. , Permanent Chairman 59 

Wilson, William L., Address of, as Permanent Chairman 62 

Wilson, William L., Address of, notifying Cleveland of nomination 220 

Wilson, William L., Resolution of thanks to 218 

Worthington, N. E., Address of, nominating Stevenson 163 

World's Columbian Exposition, Invitation of 36 



COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS 

FOR THE 

NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC C NVENTION 



CHICAGO, ILL., JUNE 21ST, 1892. 



On the 23d day of January, 1892, there met at the Palmer House, 
in the city of Chicago, Judge John P. Altgeld, John A. King, Walter 
S. Bogle, F. H. Winston, De Witt C. Cregier, W. C. Goudy, A. F. 
Seeberger, Charles Kern, Lambert Tree, Gen. John C. Black and 
A. T. Ewing, of Chicago, and Arthur Sewall, S. P. Sheerin, C. S. 
Thomas and J. J. Richardson, of the National Committee. 

Judge John P. Altgeld was called upon to preside, A. T. Ewing 
acting as temporary Secretary. 

These gentlemen met for the purpose of making preliminary 
arrangements for the National Democratic Convention, which was 
to be held in the city of Chicago on the 2 1st day of June, 1892, that 
city having been selected as the place for holding the Convention, 
without any solicitation on the part of its citizens. 

It was agreed that the agreements made by the citizens of Chi- 
cago with the National Committee of 1884 should be adopted. 
They were to furnish rooms for the National Committee, traveling 
expenses of Committee to and from Chicago, hotel expenses of Com- 
mitteemen and their wives while in Chicago, room for Convention, 
with committee rooms, music, etc., and carriage hire of the Sub- 
Committee of the National Committee while making preparations. 

The chairman appointed a committee of seven, consisting of 
De Witt C. Cregier, W. C. Goudy, Frederick H. Winston, A. F. 
Seeberger, Lambert Tree, Charles Kern and Walter S. Bogle, for 
the purpose of making up a list of the names of Democrats to be 
called together for the purpose of effecting a permanent organiza- 
tion to look after preparations for the National Democratic Con- 
vention. 



xii CITIZENS' COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS. 

At a later meeting, held at the Iroquois Club, James C. Strain 
was added to the committee and appointed permanent Secretary, 
and the following named persons, in addition to those above men- 
tioned, were selected as a Committee of Arrangements: John P. 
Hopkins, Joseph Donnersberger, Peter Kiolbassa, Samuel B. Chase, 
Adolph Kraus, Washington Hesing, W. D. Kerfoot, Thomas Gahan 
and John A. King. 

The following Committees on Finance and Buildings were ap- 
pointed : 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

Chairman, F. H. WINSTON. Secretary, JAMES C. STRAIX. 

Treasurer, A. F. SEEBERGER. 

POTTER PALMER, J. IRVING PEARCE, 

ERSKINE M. PHELPS, REDMOND PRINDIVILLE, 

JOHN P. ALTGELD, WILLIAM McCov, 

DE WITT C. CREGIER, J. W. RICHARDS, 

CHARLES KERN, F. S. WINSTON, 

W. D. KERFOOT, CHARLES H. SCHWAB, 

JOHN H. PRENTISS, JOHN W. LANEHART, 

WILLIAM C. SEIPP, M. F. GALLAGHER, 

CHARLES H. WACKER, JAMES WOODS, 

JOHN CUDAHY, CARTER H. HARRISON, 

PETER KIOLBASSA, L. Z. LEITER, 

DANIEL CORKERY, JESSE SHERWOOD, 

JOHN A. KING, GEORGE HOFMANN, JR., 

LEO AUSTRIAN. 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS. 

F. H. WINSTON, JOHN P. HOPKINS, 

JOSEPH DONNERSBERGER, WASHINGTON HESING, 

HARRY WILKINSON. 

The National Committee having decided that it required a hall 
to seat about fifteen thousand persons, after canvassing the several 
large buildings in the city, together with the Exposition Building 
and Auditorium, the local committee, in order to meet the require- 
ments of the National Committee, decided upon building a conven- 
tion hall that would seat twenty thousand people ; depending upon 
the generosity of the citizens of Chicago, backed up by their usual 
local pride, to furnish them with the means of building the hall. 



CITIZENS' COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS. xiii 

Plans were submitted and finally adopted for the erection of a 
building with an actual seating capacity of nineteen thousand six 
hundred, and which would be in all respects a model convention hall. 

The citizens of Chicago nobly responded to the appeal of the 
local committee and supplied ample means for carrying out all 
the plans in relation to the building and caring for the National 
Committee. 

After some considerable time consumed in looking up a site for 
the building, the committee recommended a place on the Lake 
Front, fronting on Michigan Avenue, north of the old Exposition 
Building. The contract was awarded on the llth day of April, 
1892. A few days after awarding the contract there commenced a 
season of rain and storms such as was never before known in the 
city of Chicago, which continued almost incessantly until after the 
close of the National Convention. While having a liberal supply 
of means for carrying out their agreement with the National 
Committee, the local committee were beset and hampered by the 
elements. 

The building was erected under the most adverse circumstances, 
men being engaged to work both night and day until the comple- 
tion of the mammoth undertaking, just thirty days after letting the 
contract. The auditorium of the building, as originally constructed, 
was admirably arranged, not a post or pillar obstructing the view 
of the delegates. The auditorium on the main floor was four hun- 
dred and eighty feet long by two hundred and forty-eight feet 
wide. Outside of the space allotted to the delegates, the arrange- 
ment was in the shape of an amphitheatre. The galleries above were 
eighty-four feet deep and extended entirely around the building. 

The platform equipments were excellent, while the press accom- 
modations were a revelation even in these days of modern ideas 
and conveniences. The latter surpassed those of any previous 
convention ever held. 

On the night of the eleventh of June, when the building was com- 
pleted and the decorations for the Convention were under way, a 
terrific wind and rain storm swept over the city and carried away 
the roof of the Convention hall. Immediate preparations were 
commenced for replacing the roof ; an additional force of men was 
engaged and work was again resumed. Night and day an increased 
force of men worked on the structure and finally succeeded in get- 
ting the hall ready for the National Convention. 



xiv CITIZENS' COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS. 

The building was thus finished under the most trying circumstances. 
It rained continually day after day and night after night, and it was 
only through the most persevering efforts exerted by Mr. F. H. 
Winston, chairman of the Committee on Finance and Buildings, 
together with the able assistance of Joseph Donnersberger and other 
able members of the committee that the building was completed in 
time. 

Relative to the work of the local committee, this statement is 
made on account of the very many unjust criticisms made by 
persons who undoubtedly suffered inconveniences on account of the 
wretched weather that prevailed during the week of the National 
Democratic Convention. 

As stated in the foregoing, such a season of inclement weather 
was never before known in the history of Chicago. Too much 
praise cannot be given to the chairman of the Committee on Finance 
and Buildings who, together with his able co-workers, through 
energetic work and heroic sacrifices on their part, brought their 
work to a successful completion. 

While the Committee on Finance and Buildings were perfecting 
arrangements for holding the Convention, the following Committee 
on Reception was appointed to look after the comforts and wants 
of the delegates from the several States to the National Democratic 
Convention : 

Chairman, JOHN C. BLACK. Vice Chairman, HENRY M. SHEPARD. 

Secretary, JAMES C. STRAIN. 

CLAYTON E. CRAFTS, DENNIS CONSIDINE, 

WM. C. GOUDY, WILLIAM C. ASAY, 

D. S. DALEY, M. J. BUTLER, 

J. H. FARRELL, CHARLES SIGWALT, 

JOHN S. COOPER, JOHN CUNNINGHAM, 

LAMBERT TREE, THOMAS BYRNE, 

R. J. SMITH, JOHN McGiLLEN, 

CHARLES CORKERY, FRANK X. BRANDECKER, JR., 

B. E. BREMNER, P. J. O'CONNELL, 

E. S. CUMMINGS, SIGMUND ZEISLER, 
E. E. BROWN, EDWARD ROSE, 
W. G. EWING, A. W. RUDNICKI, 
STEPHEN G. CLARK, Louis NETTELHORST, 
A. T. EWING, W. T. BAKER, 
ADOLPH SCHOENINGER, FRANK SCALES, 

P. O. STENSLAND, JONAS HUTCHINSON, 

MARK L. CRAWFORD, M. F. TULEY, 

D. R. CAMERON, J. S. GRINNELL, 



CITIZENS' COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS. xv 

DR. J. F. TODD, EGBERT JAMIESON, 

MARTIN J. RUSSELL, FRANK WENTER, 

FRANK G. HOYNE, F. J. GAULTER, 

THOMAS GAHAN, HARRY KOHN, 

LAWRENCE M. ENNIS, THOMAS A. MORAN, 

WALTER S. BOGLE, W. H. RUSSELL, 

J. M. BROWN, HENRY F. DONOVAN, 

DR. D. G. MOORE, GEO. H. KETTELLE, 

WILLIAM LOEFFLER, JOHN T. NOYES. 
J. G. EVEREST, 

From the incipiency of the undertaking to its successful comple- 
tion, the local committees worked in harmony to attain their end. 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 



The National Democratic Committee met on the 21st day of Jan- 
uary, 1892, pursuant to call, at the Arlington Hotel, in the City of 
Washington, D. C., at 12 o'clock noon, the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee, Hon. Calvin S. Brice, of Ohio, presiding. 

Hon. John W. Ross, the member of the Board of District Com- 
missioners, welcomed the National Committee to the City of Wash- 
ington in an appropriate address. 

The Secretary of the Committee, Hon. S. P. Sheerin, of Indiana, 
read the following call for the present meeting : 

INDIANAPOLIS, Indiana, Dec. 10th, 1892. 
DEAR SIR: 

A meeting of the Democratic National Committee will be held at the Arlington 
Hotel, in the City of Washington, D. C., on Thursday, the 21st day of January, 
1892, at 12 o'clock M., to fix the time and place of holding the National Demo- 
cratic Convention for the nomination of candidates for President and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the United States, and for such other business as may come before the 
Committee. Respectfully yours, 

S. P. SHEERIN, 

Secretary Nat. Dem. Com. 

The Secretary then called the roll of the Committee; all the 
States were represented either by the member in person or by prox- 
ies, as follows: 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 



Alabama H. D. CLAYTON, JR. 
Arizona HON. MARK A. SMITH 

(Proxy for J. C. HERNDON). 
Arkansas W. L. TERRY (Proxy for 

U. M. ROSE). 

California M. F. TARPEY. 
Colorado C. S. THOMAS. 
Connecticut CARLOS FRENCH. 
Delaware JOHN W. CAUSEY (Proxy 

for J. A. RODNEY). 

District of Columbia WM. DICKSON. 
Florida WALLACE S. JONES (Proxy 

for SAMUEL PASCO). 
Georgia CALVIN S. BRICE (Proxy for 

J. H. ESTILL). 
Idaho WM. F. VILAS (Proxy for J. W. 

JONES). 
Illinois BEN. T. CABLE (Proxy for E. 

M. PHELPS). 

Indiana 1 ^. P. SHEERIN. 
Iowa J. J. RICHARDSON. 
Kansas C. W. BLAIR. 
Kentucky HENRY WATTERSON. 
Louisiana-?.. D. WHITE (Proxy for 

J. JEFFRIES). 

Maine ARTHUR SEWALL. 
Maryland h.. P. GORMAN. 
Massachusetts CHAS. D. LEWIS. 
Michigan EDWIN B. WINANS (Proxy 

for O. M. BARNES). 
Minnesota MICHAEL DORAN. 
Mississippi CHAR. HOWRY. 
Missouri JOHN G. PRATHER. 



Montana A. W. LYMAN (Proxy for 

C. A. BROADWATER). 
Nebraska JAMES E. BOYD. 
Nevada R. P. KEATING. 
New Hampshire A. W. SULLOWAY. 
New Jersey MILES Ross. 
New Mexico G. C. POSEY. 
New York Morning, S. W. BEARDS- 
LEY; Evening, BOURKE CocKRAN 
(Proxies for W. F. SHEEHAN). 
North Dakota W. E. PuRCELL. 
North Carolina M. W. RANSOM. 
Oklahoma JOHN WALLACE. 
Ohio CALVIN S. BRICE. 
Oregon A. NOLTNER. 
Pennsylvania W. T. HARRITY. 
Rhode Island SAMUEL R. HONEY. 
South Carolina GEORGE JOHNSTONE 

(Proxy for J. C. HASKELL). 
South Dakota JOHN D. LAWLER. 
Tennessee R. F. LOONEY. 
Texas O. T. HOLT. 
Utah ARTHUR P. GORMAN (Proxy for 

WM. F. FERRY). 
Vermont HIRAM ATKINS. 
Virginia JOHN S. BARBOUR. 
Washington }. A. KUHN. 
West Virginia]. D. ST. CLAIR (Proxy 

for J. N. CAMDEN). 
Wisconsin J. L. MITCHELL. 
Wyoming L. KABIS (Proxy for W. L. 
KUYKENDALL). 



MR. VILAS : I suppose in accordance with the usual custom of 
the National Committee, we ought to have an executive session for 
the purpose of arranging the order of business, and the general dis- 
position of the duties of the Committee before us. I therefore move 
that the Committee now proceed to a session for that purpose with 
closed doors. 

This motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIRMAN : The sergeant-at-arms will clear the room of 
all persons not members of this Committee, or holding proxies. 
As we have a great deal to do, and gentlemen do not want to 
wait in idleness, some order of business is requested to be suggested. 
I cannot say in advance how long the proceedings of the Committee 
will take upon matters of detail. I do think, however, that inasmuch. 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 5 

as we are to have luncheon in the dining room of this hotel, 
restricted entirely to members of this Committee, at 3:30, and that 
luncheon can hardly last less than thirty minutes, that the Committee 
will not be ready to hear the orators to present the claims of the 
respective cities, until after that time ; say at four o'clock. I am 
speaking without the authority of this Committee ; but it seems to 
me that we shall not be able to take up the matter of the various cities 
until about four o'clock. We can discharge whatever executive 
business we have before us, before luncheon. 

MR. THOMAS, of Colorado, moved that the Committee meet at 
four o'clock, for the purpose of hearing from the different cities on 
the subject of a selection of a place for the next national convention. 

This motion was withdrawn. 

THE CHAIRMAN : The first business is the election of new mem- 
bers ; the Secretary's statement of those who hold proxies will be 
sufficient, in case there is no objection, without further inspection 
of the proxies. The next regular order is the election of new 
members. 

JAMES F. KERR, of Pennsylvania : As Chairman of the State 
Central Committee, it was pretty generally understood among our 
people that I should represent the State of Pennsylvania on this 
Committee. At the meeting of the Executive Committee in Decem- 
ber last, I came here and was admitted to the Committee by its 
courtesy. Since that time considerable controversy has arisen in 
our State as to the competency of the State Central Committee to 
fill the place. There is a difference of opinion over that; we had 
a meeting of the State Central Committee yesterday, called the 
regular annual meeting, for the election of Chairman and Secretary, 
at which time the filling of the vacancy came up. A portion of our 
people believed that there was no vacancy ; and I am here holding 
the place in a rather peculiar situation. I suppose I have the right 
to hold it until the meeting of our State Convention is convened and 
the delegation to the National Democratic Convention from our 
State is chosen. Whether that supposition is correct or not, I am 
not prepared to argue here. But I want to say to you gentlemen 
here, as the representatives of the Democratic Party in the United 
States, holding the position that I do in this city, that I do not 
desire to hold the position on this Committee because I may have 
the legal right to do so, against the better judgment of the Demo- 
crats who are directing the affairs of our party, or if by my holding it 
it will be misunderstood. 1 want to relieve the Committee here 



6 PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 

to-day of any embarrassment in this matter; and I say to them that 
I tender my resignation and will settle the matter by creating a 
vacancy upon the Committee in this manner. 

WILLIAM F. HARRITY, of Pennsylvania : I have the recom- 
mendation of the State Central Committee of Pennsylvania to the 
Secretary and respectfully submit it for the consideration of the 
Committee. 

THE CHAIRMAN : The next business in order will be the filling of 
vacancies, or settling any contests which may have arisen. What 
will be the pleasure of the Committee as to the manner in which 
that shall be done ? 

MR. THOMAS, of Colorado : I move the appointment of a Com- 
mittee of five to which those contests shall be referred, to report to 
the Committee as soon as practicable. 

MR. VILAS, of Idaho : I move as an amendment that the Sec- 
retary call the roll; and that each case be disposed of by the Com- 
mittee as it is called. 

This amendment was adopted, and the motion as amended was 
adopted. 

The Secretary then called the name of Arkansas. 

THE CHAIRMAN : There is a vacancy caused by the resignation 
of Hon. S. P. Hughes ; the State Central Committee recommends 
the election of Hon. U. M. Rose as member of this Committee. 

MR. SULLOWAY : I move that Mr. Rose be elected a member of 
this Committee in place of Mr. Hughes, resigned. 

This motion was adopted and Mr. Rose was declared elected. 

The Secretary then called the name of Kentucky. 

THE CHAIRMAN: There is a vacancy in the Committee occa- 
sioned by the death of Mr. Henry D. McHenry, which occurred 
about a year or eighteen months ago. The State Central Commit- 
tee of Kentucky has recommended to this Committee that this 
Committee elect Hon. Henry Watterson to fill that vacancy. The 
Executive Committee, which as you may know, constitutes a majority 
of the full Committee, 25 members, at its first meeting thereafter, 
admitted Mr. Watterson and recognized him as a member ; he has 
since been recognized by the Committee and the officers of the 
Committee as the member from the State of Kentucky. Whatever 
formal action is needed by the full Committee may be taken now. 

MR. NOLTNER, of Oregon : I move that the action of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee be approved ; and that Mr. Watterson be elected 
a member of this Committee in place of Mr. McHenry, deceased. 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 7 

This motion was adopted, and Mr. Watterson was declared 
duly elected. 

The Secretary called the name of Mississippi. 

THE CHAIRMAN : In that case the Executive Committee admitted 
Mr. Charles Howry, on the recommendation of the State Central 
Committee of Mississippi, there being no contest. 

MR. LOONEY, of Tennessee : I move that Mr. Howry be elected 
a member of this Committee in place of Mr. Johnston, resigned. 

This motion was adopted. 

The Secretary called the name of Montana. 

MR. MITCHELL, of Montana : I believe that I am the regularly 
appointed Committeeman from Montana; I was named as such in 
St. Louis, and acted with the Committee there and with the Com- 
mittee here in electing its Chairman; and have acted with it in 
other matters on other occasions up to the present time. In the 
first place I was elected by the Convention, and regularly named 
by the Chairman. Our delegation to St. Louis were instructed to 
name me. They did so and I was elected. Subsequently a Conven- 
tion assembled in Montana, and from a misunderstanding, and while 
I was absent from the State at the time, and was absent for some 
time after the adjournment of the Convention, Hon. C. A. Broad- 
water was elected to this Committee. I was never notified of any 
intended change. In the first place, I don't recognize the authority 
of the Convention to make the change ; and I was never notified ; I 
understand that no proceeding of the Convention was certified to 
the National Committee. So the matter stands in that way. I 
was notified by the Secretary of the Committee of this meeting in 
the regular form, as read here. 

THE CHAIRMAN : By no fault of the gentleman from Montana, a 
duplicate record has grown up, arising out of the peculiar state of 
facts which relate to the Territories which were formed into States 
immediately after the last presidential election. Two members of 
the National Committee were sent out to Montana for the purpose 
of bringing about harmony there by reconciling the opposing fac- 
tions. When the two members were there for that purpose, a recon- 
ciliation was brought about, and an understanding reached that 
certain gentlemen should be named for Senators and Members of 
Congress, for Governor, for Chairman of the State Qentral Com- 
mittee and member of the National Committee; and it was their 
impression, or the impression of some of them, that the then mem- 
ber of the National Committee assented to that arrangement; it 



8 PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 

seems to have been a mistake, and that Mr. Mitchell was not pres- 
ent, and was not aware of that arrangement which was ratified there. 
Their proceeding was certified to the Executive Committee of the 
National Committee, and thereupon, hearing nothing to the con- 
trary, we took up the name of Mr. Broadwater, conferred with him 
as the member of the National Committee from that State for the 
past three years; and had no information until yesterday that there 
was any such state of affairs existing there. 

Mr. Broadwater has been active and one of the most efficient 
members of the Committee, and whatever may be the action taken 
as to his seat in this Committee, is certainly entitled to the thanks 
of the Democracy for his very liberal contributions to the cause, 
and for his hearty work in its behalf. On attending this meeting, 
and on hearing that the member who had been selected by the 
National Convention four years ago had no knowledge of this sub- 
sequent action, he said that he would not enter into any contest on 
the matter; and, as I understand it, absented himself from this 
meeting, although he gave a proxy to a gentleman in case there was 
a vacancy, or in case it was desired that he should be admitted to 
represent the State. Inasmuch as I know about the matter, I want 
the members of the Committee to understand that this arrangement 
was brought about at my instance, not the selection of Mr. Broad- 
water, because I did not know him or that they would name him as 
a member of the Committee; but at my instance this reconciliation 
in the State of Montana was brought about. I do not know that I 
ever felt more chagrined, after accepting very large contributions 
from the gentleman, and treating him as a member of the Commit- 
tee for a period of three years, and then being obliged to say to 
him that there was some question about his seat; that there was 
somebody else who claimed the .seat in this Committee. 

After a long discussion upon the subject, Mr. E. D. White, of 
Louisiana, offered the following, which was adopted : 

Without in any way committing itself to the right of a State Con- 
vention to change a member of this Committee, inasmuch as the 
claimant from Montana was elected by the Territory, this Committee 
considers that on the cessation of Territoryhood and the arising of 
the condition of Statehood, the State becomes entitled to name a 
member of this Committee; and this Committee in consequence, 
recognizes the action of the Democratic Convention of Montana, 
and seats Mr. Broadwater. 

Mr. White then offered the following resolution: 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 9 

Resolved, That Mr. Mitchell, the gentleman who was accredited 
to this Committee from the Territory of Montana being present at 
the request of the Secretary, this Committee appreciates the alac- 
rity of Mr. Mitchell in attending this meeting and cordially 
invites Mr. Mitchell to participate in the deliberations of this Com- 
mittee until the end of this session. 

MR. DORAN, of Minnesota: Does that intend to permit him to 
vote? 

THE CHAIRMAN : The Chair does not so understand; Mr. 
Mitchell is entitled to be present at the deliberations ; Mr. Broad- 
water's proxy is here and entitled to vote. 

The resolution of Mr. White was unanimously adopted. 

The Secretary called the name of New Mexico. 

THE CHAIRMAN : There is a vacancy in the Territory of New 
Mexico occasioned by the death of the former member. The State 
Central Committee has recommended Mr. Niel B. Field for the 
action of this Committee. 

MR. TARPEY, of California : I move that his credentials be ac- 
cepted, and Mr. Field be elected as a member of this Committee 
from New Mexico. 

This motion was adopted and Mr. Field declared elected. 

The Secretary called the name of North Dakota. 

THE CHAIRMAN : There is a recommendation from the State 
Convention of North Dakota, asking that Mr. W. E. Purcell be 
elected a member of this Committee from that State. 

MR. DORAN: I move that Mr. Purcell be elected a member of 
the National Committee from North Dakota, and that the State of 
North Dakota be placed upon the roll of States. 

This motion was adopted, and Mr. Purcell was declared elected. 

The Secretary called the name of Oklahoma. 

THE CHAIRMAN : This Territory has been formed since the last 
National Democratic Convention was held ; the gentleman is here 
with the credentials from the Territorial Central Committee of 
Oklahoma, asking that he be elected a member of this Committee 
from that Territory. 

MR. THOMAS : I move that Mr. John Wallace be elected a mem- 
ber of this Committee from Oklahoma. 

This motion was adopted, and Mr. Wallace was declared elected. 

The Secretary called the name of New York. 

THE CHAIRMAN : The Executive Committee has recognized Mr. 
William F. Sheehan, and asks that its action be confirmed, and that 
Mr. Sheehan be elected to the Committee. 



10 PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 

MR. A. W. SULLOWAY, of New Hampshire : I move that Mr. 
Sheehan be elected a member of this Committee from New York. 

This motion was adopted and Mr. Sheehan declared elected. 

The Secretary called the name of Pennsylvania. 

THE CHAWMAN : There is a vacancy from Pennsylvania. The 
recommendation is made by the State Central Committee of that 
Stale that Mr. W. T. Harrity be elected a member of this Committee 
from that State. 

MR. GORMAN, of Maryland : I offer the following resolution : 

WHEREAS, This Committee delegated to the Executive Committee 
the power to act in the recess of the Committee, and the Executive 
Committee having acted and admitted Mr. Kerr to the Committee, 
and Mr. Kerr having resigned the place 

Resolved, That the action of the Executive Committee in appoint- 
ing Mr. Kerr as a member of this Committee be approved and 
ratified. 

This resolution was adopted. 

MR. GORMAN : I now move that Mr. Kerr's resignation be ac- 
cepted. 

This motion was adopted. 

MR. DORAN : I move that Mr. Harrity be elected a member of 
this Committee from Pennsylvania. 

This motion was adopted, and Mr. Harrity was declared elected. 

MR. THOMAS : I move that the same resolution be adopted with 
reference to Mr. Kerr as was adopted with reference to Mr. Mitch- 
ell ; that we appreciate his alacrity in attending the meeting ; and 
that he be invited to remain and participate in its deliberations to 
the close of its session. 

This motion was adopted. 

The Secretary called the name of South Dakota. 

THE CHAIRMAN : The question arises as to the status of South 
Dakota in this Committee. Mr. Steele was appointed a member of 
this Committee for Dakota, which has been divided into two States 
since. Mr. Sleele, living in the southern division, the Chair would 
hold that he should continue on the Committee to represent the 
State of South Dakota. 

On motion of Mr. White, the State of South Dakota was directed 
to be placed on the roll of States of this Committee, and Mr. 
Steele was declared to be the member of the Committee from that 
State. 

THE CHAIRMAN : The next business in order is the fixing the time 
for holding the Convention. 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 11 

MR. WHITE : I move that we proceed to fix the time for holding 
the Convention ; and that it be Tuesday, June 21, 1892, at twelve 
o'clock noon. 

MR. WATTERSON, of Kentucky: I move to amend by making it 
Tuesday, July 5, 1892, at the same hour. 

This amendment was withdrawn after some discussion. 

THE CHAIRMAN : As there is no contest, we will dispense with 
the roll call; the question is on the adoption of the motion that we 
fix Tuesday, June 21, 1892, at twelve o'clock noon, as the time of 
holding the next National Democratic Convention. 

This motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIRMAN : The next business in order will be the fixing of 
the place at which the Convention is to be held. The Charr will 
entertain a motion as to the order of procedure. 

MR. GORMAN : I move that the cities which desire the Conven- 
tion to be held there be called in their alphabetical order; that the 
delegation from each city be allowed twenty minutes in which to 
present the claims of their respective cities, to divide the time as 
they may elect. 

MR. BLAIR, of Kansas : I move to amend by striking out twenty 
and inserting thirty minutes to each city. 

This amendment was lost ; and the original motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIRMAN : I suggest that the question arises as to what 
regulation this Committee will adopt in regard to admitting other 
persons than those gentlemen who wish to present the claims of 
their respective cities. The Sub-Committee have had that subject 
under consideration. These views were presented : first the doors 
to be thrown open and they be admitted without restriction ; and 
second, that tickets be furnished to the chairman of each city 
delegation, sufficient according to their estimate, to bring in the 
friends who had come with them. The Committee had adopted 
that plan, subject to your approval ; that the delegations be ad- 
mitted, the citizens of Washington and casual visitors ; the Com- 
mittee has not decided whether they ought to be admitted at one 
time ; it will be more convenient to admit them all at once; it will 
be very difficult to admit them in any other way than to admit 
the visitors, and then call on the orators. The Chair will take that 
to be the sense of the Committee unless objection is made. 

I omitted to state that the press will be admitted unless there is 
objection; and also that the local committee of the District of 
Columbia, to whom we are indebted for this hall and all the other 



12 PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 

arrangements made, have been furnished with a reasonable number 
of tickets, admitting them and some of their friends; members of 
the National Committee can have their friends present, in not 
unreasonably great numbers, and can procure cards admitting them 
also. Unless there is objection, that will be taken as a direction to 
the officers. 

Mr. Thomas offered the following resolution : 

Resolved, That a committee of seven be appointed by the chair 
(of which the latter shall be Chairman) who shall have exclusive 
charge and management of the arrangements for holding the Con- 
vention, and take such action for the promotion of the interests of 
the party as they may deem best, until the meeting of the Demo- 
cratic Convention. 

This resolution was adopted. 

The Chairman subsequently appointed the following gentlemen 
as such Committee : Mr. C. S. Brice, Mr. S. P. Sheerin, Mr. E. M. 
Phelps, Mr. A. P. Gorman, Mr. M. Doran, Mr. A. Sewall and Mr. 
O. T. Holt. 

THE CHAIRMAN : The Chair suggests to the Committee that in 
view of the long and valuable services of the late member from 
Pennsylvania, as well as the similar services of the late member 
from Kentucky, that it may be well for a committee to be appointed 
to prepare and present after the recess, some formal resolutions, 
which may be spread upon the records of this Committee. I should 
like to entertain a motion to that effect. 

Mr. BEARDSLEY, of New York: I move that a committee of five 
be appointed by the Chair to prepare and present such resolution. 

This resolution was adopted. 

The mover of the resolution having requested not to be placed 
on the committee as chairman, the Chair appointed as such com- 
mittee Messrs. Ransom, Vilas, Watterson, Beardsley and Looney. 

Mr. Vilas asking to be excused, the Chair appointed Mr. Harrity 
in his place. 

MR. MITCHELL, of Wisconsin: I move that the roll be called and 
that the member from each State shall present the name of the city 
from such State (if such there be) desiring the Convention to be 
held therein; and that the cities so presented be arranged alphabet- 
ically by the Secretary. And that the Secretary notify the delega- 
tions officially, of the order of procedure which has been adopted 
by this Committee. 

The motion was adopted. 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 13 

Upon the call of the roll of the States in pursuance of this reso- 
lution, the member from California presented the name of San 
Francisco; the member from Indiana presented the name of Indian- 
apolis; the member from Michigan presented the name of Detroit; 
the member from Minnesota presented the name of St. Paul; the 
member from Missouri presented the name of Kansas City; the 
member from New York presented the name of New York City; the 
member from Ohio presented the name of Cincinnati; the member 
from Rhode Island presented the name of Providence; the member 
from Wisconsin presented the name of Milwaukee. 

On motion the Committee took a recess until 3.30 P. M., during 
which time luncheon was served to the Committee in the dining 
hall of the hotel. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 



Upon re-convening, the claims of the various cities were presented 
as follows: 

Cincinnati By Hon. Wm. M. Ramsay and Hon. John F. Follett. 

Detroit By Hon. W. S. Mabury and Hon. L. Chipman. 

Indianapolis By Hon. David Turpie and Hon. Charles L. Jewitt. 

Kansas City By Hon. G. F. Putnam and Senator Geo. G. Vest. 

Milwaukee By Governor Peck, Mayor Somers and Hon. J. G. 
Donnelly. 

New York By Mr. James Breslan, Hon. Theodore Myers and 
Hon. John R. Fellows. 

San Francisco By Hon. M. F. Tarpey and Hon. Jas. V. Coleman. 

St. Paul By Hon. Geo. W. Lawler and Hon. Thos. Wilson. 

Communications from the several cities stating the inducements 
and guarantees offered by them, respectively, were also filed with 
the Secretary. 

On motion of Mr. Noltner, the Committee took a recess until 9 
o'clock P. M. 

EVENING SESSION. 



The Committee re-convened promptly at 9 o'clock p. M. 

THE CHAIRMAN : As this is an executive session, the sergeant-at- 
arms will see that all persons not members of the Committee or 
holding proxies retire from the room. 



14 PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 

The Secretary called the roll of members ; each State was repre- 
sented by its member or by proxy ; Mr. Bourke Cockran holding 
the proxy of Mr. Sheehan, in place of Mr. Beardsley. 

MR. VILAS : I move that the following call be adopted ; and that 
the name of the place at which the Convention is to be held shall be 
inserted when it is decided upon. 

CALL. 

The National Democratic Committee, having met in the city of Washington, 
on the twenty-first day of January, 1892, has appointed Tuesday, the twenty-first 
day of June, 1892, as the time, and chosen the city of .... as the place 
for holding the National Democratic Convention. Each State is entitled to a rep- 
resentation therein equal to double the number of its Senators and Representatives 
in the Congress of the United States ; and each Territory and the District of 
Columbia shall have two delegates. All Democratic conservative citizens of the 
United States, irrespective of past political associations and differences, who can 
unite with us in the effort for pure, economical and constitutional government, are 
cordially invited to join us in sending delegates to the Convention. 

W. L. Terry, of Arkansas, offered an amendment that each State 
shall be entitled to double the representation under the new 
apportionment. 

This amendment was accepted and the call, as amended, was 
adopted as the call, the name of the place to be inserted when 
determined upon. 

Mr. Tarpey, of California, moved that the Committee proceed to 
ballot for place of holding Convention. 

Mr. Cockran, of New York, moved to amend as follows : That 
the Secretary call the roll, and that as each member's name is 
called he shall state the city of his choice. 

This amendment was adopted, and the motion as amended was 
adopted. 

The Committee proceeded to cast the first ballot as follows: 
Whole number of votes cast ... 49 

Chicago, ...... 1 

Cincinnati, ...... 3 

Detroit, 2 

Indianapolis, ...... 2 

Kansas City, . . . . . . 13 

Milwaukee, . . . . . .8 

New York, ...... 5 

St. Paul, 7 

San Francisco, ...... 8 49 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 15 

Mr. Blair, of Kansas, was called to the chair. 

Mr. Watterson, of Kentucky, then offered the following resolutions 
from the Committee appointed to draft resolution on the deaths of 
Mr. McHenry and Mr. Scott : 

Since the last meeting of this Committee it has pleased Almighty 
God to remove from the midst of us the Hon. Wm. L. Scott, a 
member from the State of Pennsylvania, and the Hon. Henry D. 
McHenry, a member from the State of Kentucky, therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED, That in the death of these gentlemen this Com- 
mittee deplores the loss of Democrats faithful to every duty, and of 
colleagues endeared to their associates by years of friendly inter- 
course. 

Resolved, that this expression of respectful homage be spread 
upon the records of this Committee, and that the Secretary be 
instructed to transmit a copy of the same to the family of the 
deceased. 

These resolutions were unanimously adopted by a rising vote. 

The Committee then proceeded to ballot as follows: 

SECOND BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Detroit, 2 

Indianapolis, . . . . . .2 

Kansas City, ...... 12 

Milwaukee, ...... 10 

New York, ...... 4 

St. Paul, 7 

San Francisco, ...... 8 

Chicago, ...... 2 

Cincinnati, ...... 2 49 

THIRD BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Cincinnati, ...... 3 

Detroit, 1 

Indianapolis, ...... 2 

Kansas City, ...... 5 

Milwaukee, . . . . . . 10 

New York, ...... 1 

St. Paul, 9 

San Francisco, ..... 15 

Chicago, ...... 3 49 



16 PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 

FOURTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes, .... 49 

Cincinnati, ...... 6 

Detroit, 3 

Indianapolis, ...... 7 

Kansas City, ...... 6 

Milwaukee, ...... 8 

New York, ...... 1 

St. Paul, 13 

San Francisco, ..... 2 

Chicago, 3 49 

FIFTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Cincinnati, . . . . . . 11 

Detroit, 1 

Indianapolis, ...... 2 

Kansas City, . . . . . . 10 

Milwaukee, . . . . . . 10 

New York, .*.... 4 

St. Paul, ; 8 

Chicago, 3 49 

SIXTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Cincinnati, ...... 2 

Detroit, 19 

Indianapolis, ...... 3 

Kansas City, ...... 6 

Milwaukee, ...... 8 

New York, . . . . . . 3 

St. Paul, 6 

Chicago, 2 49 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 17 

SEVENTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Des Moines, ...... 17 

Detroit, . . . . * . . i 

Cincinnati, ...... 2 

Indianapolis, ...... l 

Kansas City, ...... 7 

Milwaukee, ...... 9 

New York, ...... 3 

St. Paul, ...... 4 

Chicago, 5 49 

EIGHTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, 

Cincinnati, ...... 

Detroit, 

Indianapolis, . . . . . 

Kansas City, ...... 

Milwaukee, . . . . . 9 

New York, ...... 1 

St. Paul, 6 

Chicago, 349 

NINTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Cincinnati, ...... l 

Detroit, 1 

Indianapolis, ...... l 

Kansas City, ...... 6 

Milwaukee, ...... 20 

New York, 10 

St. Paul, 6 

Chicago, 4 49 




18 PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 

TENTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Detroit, 1 

Indianapolis, . . . . . . 1 

Kansas City, ...... 7 

Milwaukee, . . . . . . 18 

New York, 1 

St. Paul, 8 

Chicago, 13 49 

ELEVENTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Detroit, 1 

Indianapolis, ...... 1 

Kansas City, 3 

Milwaukee, . . . . . . 22 

New York, ...... 1 

St. Paul, 6 

Chicago, ..'... 15 49 

TWELFTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Detroit, ...... 1 

Indianapolis, ...... 1 

Kansas City, ...... 3 

New York, ...... 1 

Chicago, . . . . . . 17 

St. Paul, 6 

Milwaukee, ...... 20 49 

THIRTEENTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Detroit, 1 

Indianapolis, ...... 1 

Kansas City, ...... 4 

Milwaukee, . . . . . . 21 

St. Paul, 5 

Chicago, 17 49 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 19 

MR. VILAS : Before Milwaukee determined to present the claims 
of that city before the National Committee as the proper place for 
holding the National Convention, citizens of Milwaukee went to 
Chicago, at my suggestion, and had a conversation with leading 
citizens of that city, and they were assured that the city of Chi- 
cago was not in the race for the Convention, did not desire it, nor 
did they think it proper that Chicago should have it, under the 
peculiar circumstances in which they were placed. Of course it was 
perfectly obvious to us that Milwaukee could never be a competitor 
for the place against Chicago. 

I want to make that statement, with other reasons that have been 
given to-day, that the Committee might know the facts with refer- 
ence to the dealings of Milwaukee with the city of Chicago, to show 
that Chicago could not fairly receive the Convention. 

MR. BRICE, of Ohio : If the Committee will excuse me, I ought, 
perhaps, to say a word. One of the members of the Committee has 
asked a question which each of the other members has the right to 
ask me. The subject of the place of holding the Convention has 
been one that has given me personally some anxiety during the past 
few weeks. I was committed to a city in my own State; that com- 
mittal was more on the theory that for various reasons the city of 
New York was practically out of the situation, and would not be 
chosen ; that the city of Chicago, for reasons which you can under- 
stand as well as I, was not to be chosen, would not ask the Conven- 
tion and could not give the guarantees that this Convention would 
require. I do not hesitate to state publicly, as I have stated pri- 
vately to friends of mine, that in my judgment there were but twcfc 
cities in this country Chicago and New York fully capable of 
accommodating the Convention; that outside of those two cities 
eight or nine other cities were perhaps equally capable of accom- 
modating the Convention, with the single exception of the City of 
Cincinnati, which, by reason of the large population, I believe 
would be better capable of affording the requisite accommodations 
than any of the others. That may have been a personal prejudice 
of my own. However, I put them all substantially on a level. 

As the time for holding this meeting approached, statements by 
friends of the various committees were made to me personally as to 
the -character and extent of the guarantees that would be made, as 
to the accommodations which would be afforded, the course that 
would be adopted by the hotel-keepers as a class ; the care that 
would be taken of the Committee, of the Convention, of the 



20 PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 

delegates, of the visiting clubs and crowds. The results of those 
inquiries have not been collected, as I presumed they would be, by 
some committee of this Committee, and carefully reported, as on a 
serious business question like this should have been done. But it 
was not done. Perhaps I am to blame that this was neglected. 
Many of the members of this Committee are voting upon a slight 
knowledge of the situation, some from motives of personal friendship 
for citizens of particular cities, or from a personal choice of loca- 
tion. But if we approach this as a Committee of the National 
Democratic Party, we must approach it on a business basis, and 
endeavor to decide it on the line of putting the Convention where 
it can be best accommodated. I am ready to say now, as I said 
before, that if New York and Chicago are unavailable, I have no 
preference, except the personal one arising in regard to my own 
State, as among several of the cities competing. There are no 
motives in my own mind, nor, so far as I know, in the minds of 
those who have given most thought to this subject, other than to 
dispose of the question on a purely business basis. 

Within the past three days, since this subject has been discussed 
in this city, the question of Chicago has been pressed by members 
of this Committee, not, I will say, by the representatives of Illinois 
in the House and in the Senate, nor by any organized committee 
or delegation coming here to represent the city of Chicago, but by 
members of the Committee who did not have any particular loca- 
tion to which they felt themselves pledged ; men from a distance 
who had attended Democratic Conventions before and who had in 
mind the kind and character of the accommodations that a con- 
vention ought to have. I stated to many of those gentlemen, and 
I have stated to several of the delegations in a body perhaps, that 
the city of Chicago was regarded by members of the Committee 
as unwilling to give to the Committee those financial and other 
guarantees which were required before this Committee could take 
such action. Thereupon the gentlemen who were interested in the 
city of Chicago, or who were interested rather in locating the Con- 
vention in Chicago, communicated with gentlemen in Chicago of a 
financial responsibility sufficient to secure the carrying out of all 
their promises and all their, agreements ; and their response was 
that while Chicago was not in a position to make application, and 
had taken no organized step to send a delegation to the Committee 
asking for the Convention, if the Committee saw fit to locate it in 
Chicago, they would give the guarantee that they would do in every 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 21 

respect what they had done in 1884. When my city of Cincinnati 
was pressed out of the running by the fact that it did not offer the 
requisite accommodations, my mind went next to the city which 
seemed to afford the greatest accommodations ; and I will take the 
personal responsibility of saying, and I am authorized to say, on the 
guarantees which have been received by members of the Committee, 
that the same guarantees that were given in 1884 on the part of 
Chicago will be given now. That is the reason why my vote went 
to the city of Chicago ; and while it is purely personal, inasmuch 
as the question was asked of me by one or two delegates, I have 
thought it best to state publicly what I have just stated. 
The Committee proceeded to cast the 

FOURTEENTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Chicago, . . . . . . 21 

Milwaukee, ...... 22 

Detroit, 1 

Kansas City, 2 

St. Paul, 349 

FIFTEENTH BALLOT. 

Whole number of votes cast, ... 49 

Chicago, . '...-.. ;-. 27 

Milwaukee, ...... 18 

Kansas City, ...... 2 

Detroit, 1 

St. Paul, 149 

Chicago having received a majority of all the votes cast, was 
declared the choice of the Committee as the place of holding the 
Convention; and on motion of Mr. Mitchell, of Wisconsin, the 
choice was made unanimous. 

Mr. Mitchell, of Wisconsin, formally tendered his resignation, stat- 
ing that it had been tendered to and accepted by the State Central 
Committee of Wisconsin, to take effect February 1, 1892, who had 
recommended E. C. Wall as his successor, to take effect February 1, 
1892. 

Mr. Mitchell's resignation was accepted, and Mr. E. C. Wall was 
elected his successor. 



22 PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 

On motion of Mr. Watterson, of Kentucky, the blank left in the 
official call was directed to be filled by the insertion of the name 
of the city of Chicago as the place for holding the Convention. 

The following is the call adopted by the Committee at this 
session : 

CALL 

FOR THE 

NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, 

1892. 

The National Democratic Committee, at a meeting held this day in the city of 
Washington, D. C., has appointed Tuesday, the 21st day of June, 1892, as the 
time, and chosen the city of Chicago as the place, for holding the National Demo 
cratic Convention. Each State is entitled to representation therein equal to 
double the representation to which it is entitled in the next Electoral College, and 
each Territory and the District of Columbia shall have two delegates. All Demo- 
cratic conservative citizens of the United States, irrespective of past political asso- 
ciations and differences, who can unite with us in the effort for pure, economical 
and constitutional government, are cordially invited to join in sending delegates 
1 1 the Convention. 

January 21, 1892. CALVIN S. BRICE, 

Chairman. 

SIMON P. SHEERIN, 

Secretary. 

Mr. Watterson, of Kentucky, offered the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are due to Hon. 
William Dickson, the member from the District of Columbia, and 
the Committee of Reception, for his and their tireless and suc- 
cessful efforts towards the comfort and convenience of members 
during their sojourn in Washington. 

Mr. Atkins, of Vermont, moved that the arrangements, aside from 
those that belong to the Committee of Seven, for the official report 
of the Convention, and all those matters be placed in the hands of 
the Chairman and Secretary. 

The motion was adopted. 

Mr. Neil B. Field, of New Mexico, offered the following resolu- 
tion : 

WHEREAS, The Democrats of the Territory of New Mexico have 
refused to accept Statehood under a constitution which attempted 
to secure to the Republicans control of the Legislature, and have 
sacrificed their personal interests to the good of the party at large, 



PRELIMINARY PROCEEDINGS. 23 

Therefore, Be it Resolved, That in the next National Convention 
the Democrats of New Mexico should be entitled to representation 
equal to that allowed to the States last admitted into the Union. 

MR. GORMAN, of Maryland : I move to lay the motion on the 
table, as I submit that the Committee has no power to entertain it. 
This motion was adopted. 
Mr. Sheerin, of Indiana, offered the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the National Democratic Committee accepts with 
regret the resignation of Mr. Herman Oelrichs, the representative 
from the State of New York. In consenting to the retirement, by 
his own request, of so honored and valuable an associate, the mem- 
bers of the Committee desire to express their high appreciation of 
the wisdom of his counsel, the energy and attention which he has 
bestowed for the benefit of the party, and his usefulness as an 
adviser. 

The Chairman of the National Democratic Committee is requested 
to formally convey to Mr. Herman Oelrichs these expressions of 
the high esteem in which he has been uniformly held by his asso- 
ciates on the Committee. 

On motion, the Committee adjourned, to meet on Monday, June 
20, 1892, at 12 o'clock noon, at a place to be fixed by the Com- 
mittee of Arrangements. Due notice will be given to each member 
of the Committee. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION, 



FIRST DAY. 



CHICAGO, June 21, 1892. 

The National Democratic Convention, to nominate 
candidates for the office of President and Vice-President 
of the United States, assembled in the building prepared 
for them, in the City of Chicago, this day at 12 o'clock, 
noon, pursuant to the call of the National Democratic 
Committee. 

Hon. Calvin S. Brice, of Ohio, the Chairman of the 
National Democratic Committee, called the Convention 
to order at 12:40 P. M., in the following words : 

THE CHAIR : The Convention will come to order. I have the 
pleasure of introducing the Rev. John Rouse, D.D., pastor of 
Trinity Episcopal Church, of Chicago, who will open the proceed- 
ings of this Convention with prayer : 

r 
PRAYER. 

O Almighty God, Lord of Sabaoth, and Great Judge of all the 
earth, Who hath created man in Thine image, that he may do Thy 
will on earth, as Thy holy angels always do Thy service in Heaven, 
vouchsafe to send Thy blessing upon these, Thy servants, that they 
may be guided by Thy holy spirit to do all such things as are pleas- 
ing in Thy sight. Fill them with wisdom and understanding that 
truth and justice may be promoted by their consultations, and piety 
and religion increased throughout this land. Let all bitterness and 
wrath, all anger and evil speaking be put away from them, with all 
malice, so that they may rightly discharge their duties to Thee, to 
each other, and to all men. We adore and magnify Thy glorious 



26 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

name for all the blessings, many and great, that Thou hast showered 
upon this nation, and we beseech Thee to continue Thy loving 
kindness, so that peace may flourish'and true liberty abound. O, 
Thou that hearest prayer, we are not worthy of the least of all thy 
mercies, but hear Thou from Heaven, Thy dwelling place, and when 
Thou hearest, Lord, forgive and graciously hearken to these our 
supplications, which we make in the name and for the sake of 
Thy Son, our Savior, Jesus Christ. 

Our Father Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name, Thy 
kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven. Give 
us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses as we 
forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into 
temptation, but deliver us from evil : for Thine is the kingdom, and 
the power, and the glory, forever and forever. Amen. 

THE CHAIR: Gentlemen of the Convention: By direction of 
the National Committee, the Chair presents to the Convention as 
its temporary officers, the gentlemen named in the following list, 
which the Secretary will read. 

Hon. S. P. Sheerin, Secretary of the National Dem- 
ocratic Committee, then read the following- list of the 
Temporary Organization : 

For. Temporary Chairman Hon. William C. Owens, of Kentucky. 

For Secretary Hon. Simon P. Sheerin, of Indiana. 

For Assistant Secretaries Edward L. Merritt, of Illinois ; William 
H. Doyle, of Pennsylvania ; Hambleton Shepperd, of Virginia ; 
Clinton Tillery, of Missouri ; L. E. Rowley, of Michigan ; Robert E. 
Wilson, of Mississippi ; Charles R. De Freest, of New York ; James 
C. Strain, of Illinois. 

For Chief Reading Clerk Hon. Nicholas M. Bell, of Missouri. 

Por Assistant Reading Clerks Martin Morrison, of Indiana; Cato 
Sells, of Iowa ; Bernard Brown, of Montana ; William E. Thompson, 
of Michigan ; Henry J. Lynn, of Tennessee ; William W. Carr, of 
Pennsylvania. 

For Sergeant-at-Arms Hon. Richard J. Bright, of Indiana. 

For Official Stenographer Edward B. Dickinson, of New York. 
The Convention unanimously adopted the list as read 
by Mr. Sheerin, after which the Chairman said : 

THE CHAIR : The Chair will appoint as a Committee to present 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 27 

to you the Temporary Chairman, Gen. Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illi- 
nois ; Hon. Charles L. Jewett, of Indiana ; and Hon. Thomas L. 
Wilson, of Minnesota. 

The Committee appointed to present the Temporary 
Chairman to the Convention escorted him to the plat- 
form, after which the Chairman said : 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention : I have the honor 
and the pleasure to introduce your Temporary Chairman, Hon. W. 
C. Owens, of Kentucky. 

Mr. Owens then addressed the Convention as follows : 

ADDRESS OF HON. WILLIAM C. OWENS, OF KENTUCKY. 

Two great dangers menace the Democratic party ; one is 
external, the other internal. The first is the organized machinery 
of organized capital supported by the whole power of the govern- 
ment ; the second is a disposition among Democrats to make issues 
among themselves. Two needs, therefore, stand before us indis- 
pensable to success unity and harmony. Of the first this chair 
and gavel stand representative ; the second it remains for you to 
supply. 

In this spirit I greet you, fellow Democrats, as the advance guard 
of a grand army sent forward to blaze a pathway to victory. How 
momentous is your responsibility, I need not tell you. If you work 
in wisdom, the millions toiling in shop and mine and field will rise 
and call you blessed. The roll-call of the republic attests that its 
heart and its conscience are with us in our war with the representa- 
tives of greed. The best thought of our party is a platform that 
challenges the approbation and invites the support of the people. 

We can succeed ; we must do more. We must deserve success. 
Above the ruin, if need be, of selfish combinations, we must rear a 
temple to the plain people, and build a shrine so broad that every 
lover of his kind may kneel. Let us not mistake ; our work begins 
here; under the sun of summer and the frost of autumn we must 
carry it forward with unfaltering courage to a triumphant close. 

This, again, must be a campaign of education. The study of the 
cornfield, begun in the West or South, must be carried into every 
hamlet of the East and North. 

The burden must be lifted from the back of toil, and to that end 
they have a right to demand that whoever bears our banner must 



28 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

lift it above the smoke of conflict and the din of faction, that every 
Democrat of the Union may follow its lead in exultation and irre- 
sistible combat. The people must learn their true relation to the 
tax-gatherer. They must learn that no railroad presidents cham- 
pion the tribunes of the people ; that no taskmasters write our 
tariff bills. They must learn,* too, that for personal and political 
advantage their country was menaced by the threat of war, and 
they wiH learn with shame and regret that on the very day that the 
warlike proclamation of the President was read in the halls of Con- 
gress, the peaceful response of the little eight-by-ten republic of 
Chili accepting the terms of the Presidential "ultimatum was read in 
every capital of the world. Our opponents must be measured by 
their deeds, and not by their professions. 

The Fifty-first Congress wrote the blackest page in the history of 
our legislative government, and became a thing of the past. It 
challenged the approval of the people, and they responded in tones 
so portentous that it seemed the voice of God. With a unanimity 
that finds no parallel in the story of popular government they 
declared that a billion dollars was far too much to pay for such a 
museum of freaks. If we but permit it they will stand by their 
verdicts. 

That our cause may triumph, let us work in kindness. In the 
heat of contention let us not forget that our political friend and 
brother may be just as honest, and perhaps better informed. Im- 
pelled by one purpose, and that purpose the common good, we will 
free ourselves from the bickerings and heartburnings that character- 
ized the Republican party when its Marshal Ney went down at 
Minneapolis before the mailed legions of the bread-and-butter 
brigade. 

MR. WHITE, of California : Mr. Chairman, I desire to read the 
following resolution. Shall I read it, or send it to the Secretary to 
be read ? I will read it. 

Resolved, That the roll of States and Territories be now called, 
and that each delegation name one member to act as member of 
the Committee on Credentials, one member on the Committee on 
Permanent Organization, one member on the Committee on Reso- 
lutions, and that all resolutions relating to the platform of the 
Democratic party be referred to the Committee on Resolutions 
without debate ; and that the credentials of each delegation be 
delivered to the member of the Committee on Credentials from 
such delegation. I move the adoption of the resolution. 

THE CHAIR : Send the resolution to the desk. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 29 

GEN. E. S. BRAGG, of Wisconsin : Mr. Chairman, I move to 
strike out all of that resolution after the word "resolved," and 
incorporate the following, which the Secretary will please read. 

THE CHAIR: The gentleman from Wisconsin moves to strike 
out all of the resolution offered by the gentleman from California, 
after the word "resolved," and to insert the following, which will 
be read by the Secretary. 

THE SECRETARY : Mr. Bragg offers the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the rules of the last National Democratic Con- 
vention govern this body until otherwise ordered. 

GEN. BRAGG : I move its adoption. 

MR. WHITE : Mr. Chairman, I will temporarily withdraw the 
resolution offered by myself, as I think Gen. Bragg's resolution is in 
order first. 

THE CHAIR : The resolution is withdrawn by the gentleman 
from California for the purpose of acting upon the resolution pre- 
sented by Gen. Bragg, of Wisconsin. The question is on the 
adoption of the resolution presented by the gentleman from Wis- 
consin. 

The resolution of Gen. Bragg was again read to the 
Convention by Secretary Bell and unanimously adopted.* 

MR. WHITE : I now again offer the resolution presented before. 
THE CHAIR : Send the resolution to the Secretary to be read. 

MR. WHITE : It is practically the same resolution adopted at the 
last National Convention. 

The resolution was again read by the Secretary. 

MR. RUFUS N. RHODES, of Alabama : I [desire to offer as an 
amendment the following : 

MR. JOHN I. LEVEY, of Oklahoma : Mr. Chairman, the Okla- 
homa delegation has no seat in this Convention, and we want to 
know the reason why. 



* For general information these rules as adopted by the National Democratic Convention, 
held in Cincinnati on the first day of June, 1852. are here inserted, as follows: 

"Resolved, That the rules of the House of Representatives, as far as applicable for the govern- 
ment of the Convention, be adopted as the rules of this Convention. 

"Resolved, That two-thirds of the whole number of votes given shall be necessary to be a 
nomination of Candidates for President and Vice-President of the United States by this Convention. 

" Resolved, That in voting upon any question which may arise in the proceedings of this Con- 
vention, the vote shall be taken by States, at the request of any one State each State to be en- 
titled to the number of votes {o which each State is entitled in the next electoral college, without 
regard to the number of delegates in attendance ; the manner in which said vote is to be cast to be 
decided by the delegation of each State by itself." 



80 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

THE CHAIR : The business of the Sergeant-at-Arms is to furnish 
you with seats or to furnish you information. 

The following resolution offered by Mr. Rhodes, of 
Alabama, was read by the Secretary : 

Resolved, That the roll of the States and Territories be now 
called and that each delegation name one member to act as a mem- 
ber of the Committee on Credentials, one member on the Committee 
on Permanent Organization, one member on the Committee on 
Rules and Order of Business, one member on the Committee on 
Platform ; and that all resolutions in relation to the platform, and 
all communications addressed to the Convention be referred with- 
out reading to this committee without debate. 

MR. RHODES : The amendment simply provides for an additional 
committee : a Committee on Rules and Order of Business. 

MR. STEPHEN N. WHITE, of California : The gentleman is labor- 
ing under a mistake. The Committee on Permanent Organization 
refers to the Committee on Permanent Organization and Order of 
Business. It is so designated in the official report of the two last 
Conventions. 

MR. RHODES : The difference is that one committee is provided 
by the gentleman from California on Organization and Rules and 
Order of Business ; and the amendment provides for two, one on 
Organization, and another committee on Rules and Order of 
Business. 

THE CHAIR : The question is on the amendment. 

The amendment was adopted. 

THE CHAIR: The question is now on the resolution as amended. 

The resolution as amended was unanimously adopted. 

THE CHAIR : Under that resolution the roll call of the States 
will be in order. The Secretary will call the roll. 

THE SECRETARY : I would ask the gentlemen of the different 
delegations if they will write out the names of these gentlemen of 
these different committees, and send them to the Clerk's desk. 

The call of the roll of the States was commenced, and 
the following names were announced on the different 
committees. 

The chairmen of several delegations, during the call 
of the roll, announced the names of gentlemen to serve 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



31 



on the National Committee, on the Committee on Noti- 
fication, and as Vice-Presidents and Secretaries of the 
Permanent Organization. Whereupon. Mr. Barnes 
Compton, of Maryland, said : 

MR. COMPTON, of Maryland : I rise to a point of order, Mr. 
Chairman. 

THE CHAIR : State the point of order. 

MR. COMPTON : It is this : that a number of delegations are 
indicating gentlemen to serve on committees not called for by the 
resolutions, and If this is to be done then we ask the same privilege. 

THE CHAIR : If the committee is not provided for, those gentle- 
men will have but little work to do, and it will not be necessary to 
appoint them. 

MR. COMPTON : Then my point of order is well taken, I presume ? 

THE CHAIR : Yes, your point is well taken. 

The following are the several committees : 

COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. 



Alabama Jno. B. Knox. 
Arkansas W. J. Stowers. 
California^. W. Foote. 
Colorado Thos. J. O'Donnell. 
Connecticut James B. Shannon. 
Delaware John W. Causey. 
Florida F. Adams. 
Georgia F. H. Richardson. 
Idaho}. M. Burke. 
Illinois E. R. E. Kimbrough. 
Indiana John E. Lamb. 
Iowa M. B. Hendrick. 
Kansas W. C. Jones. 
Kentucky C. H. Rodes. 
Louisiana Walter H. Rogers. 
Maine Geo. E. Hughes. 
Maryland Frank T. Shaw. 
Massachusetts John H. Sullivan. 
Michigan Edwin F. Conely. 
Minnesota C. D. O'Brien. 
Mississippi M. F. Smith. 
Missouri A. K. Edmunds. 
Montana Walter Cooper. 
Nebraska Frank H. Spearman. 
Nevada P. C. Webber. 
New Hampshire Irving W. Drew. 

*Contesting delegation. 



New Jersey J. F. Carrigan. 

New York W. Bourke Cockran. 

North Carolina W. P. Roberts. 

North Dakota E. E. Cole. 

Ohio Albert Zugschwerth. 

Oregon J. J. Daley. 

Pennsylvania Harry A. Hall. 

Rhode Island John S. Parker. 

South Carolina J. L. Irby. 

South Dakota T). W. Flick. 

Tennessee J. C. Bradford. 

Texas D. C. Giddings. 

Vermont H. E. Folsom. 

Virginia W. R. McKenney. 

Washington W. H. Dumphy. 

West Virginia John W. St. Clair. 

Wisconsin Edw. S. Bragg. 

Wyoming Nat. Baker. 

Alaska A. K. Delaney. 

Arizona A. G. Oliver. 

District of Columbia James L. Norris. 

New Mexico Felix Martinez. 

Oklahoma John I. Levey. 

Utah* \ Henry P ' Henderson - 
I O. W. Powers. 

Indian Territory S. E. Jackson. 



32 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON PERMANENT ORGANIZATION. 



Alabama Geo. P. Harrison. 
Arkansas S. W. Fordyce. 
California L. W. Buck. 
Colorado James B. Orman. 
Connecticut E. C. Benedict. 
Delaware R. R. Kenney. 
Florida}. S. White. 
Georgia Wrn. Clifton. 
Idaho J. M. Bennett. 
Illinois Fred. H. Winston. 
Indiana Hugh Dougherty. 
Iowa N. C. Ridenour. 
Kansas Thomas G. Fitch. 
Kentucky John B. Castleman. 
Louisiana E. Howard McCaleb. 
Maine Chas. B. Morton. 
Maryland J. Freeman Rasin. 
Massachusetts John H. McDonough. 
Michigan Thos. McNiff. 
Minnesota Alex. McKinnon. 
Mississippi F. K. Winchester. 
Missouri W. H. Phelps. 
Montana Frank G. Higgins. 
Nebraska Robert Clegg. 
Nevada P. J. Dunne. 
New Hampshire Albert N. Flinn. 



New Jersey James Smith, Jr. 
New YorkWm. C. DeWitt. 
North Carolina W. H. Williams. 
North Dakota]. F. O'Brien. 
Ohio C. N. Haskell. 
Oregon T. G. Reames. 
Pennsylvania A. A. Plummer. 
Rhode Island Wm. B. Nichols. 
South Carolina J. E. Tindall. 
South Dakota John A. Bowler. 
Tennessee D. D. Anderson. 
Texas J. O. Nicholson. 
Vermont J. H. Donnelly. 
Virginia C. V. Meredith. 
Washington F. P. Hogan. 
West Virginia John II. Russell. 
Wisconsin John Ringle. 
Wyoming Douglas A. Preston. 
Alaska James Sheakley. 
Arizona M. J. Nugent. 
District of Columbia J. Fred Kelley. 
New Mexico Bernard Seligman. 
Oklahoma ( Not reported). 

Utah-* \ J hn T " Caine ' 
I T. J. Kiesel. 

Indian Territory W. E. Jackson. 



COMMITTEE ON RULES. 



Alabama Thos. R. Roulhas. 
Arkansas J. C. Hawthorn. 
California Thomas F. Barry. 
Colorado D. C. Donovan. 
Connecticut Robt. J. Vance. 
Delaware W. L. Sirman. 
Florida C. E. Garner. 
Georgia F. C. Foster. 
Idaho J. G. Brown. 
Illinois W. E. Murphy. 
Indiana Wm. E. English. 
Iowa David J. Argus. 
Kansas Tully Scott. 
Kentucky W. B. Holdeman. 
Louisiana H. W. Ogden. 
Maine Cleveland C. Homer. 
Maryland John I. Wirt. 

*Contesting delegation. 



Massachusetts Edward Avery. 
Michigan Geo. M. Kinsbury. 
Minnesota M. Mullen. 
Mississippi R. H. Henry. 
Missouri Martin L. Clardy. 
Montana Allen Joyes. 
Nebraska J. F. Crocker. 
Nevada C. W. Hinchcliff. . 
New Hampshire Geo. B. Chandler. 
New Jersey John H. Scudder. 
New York George Raints. 
North Carolina W. J. Green. 
North Dakota W. N. Roach. 
Ohio H. S. Chapman. 
Oregon H. C. Grady. 
Pennsylvania Geo. A. Jenks. 
Rhode Island Amos J. Dawley/ Jr. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



South Carolina J. G. Evans. 
South Dakota P. F. Wickham. 
Tennessee Wm. Sandford. 
Texas Scott Field. 
Vermont John Robinson. 
Virginia John F. Ryan. 
Washington M. J. Maloney. 
West Virginia John H. Robinson. 
Wisconsin H. J. Galliger. 



V 

Wyoming John Harper. 

Alaska James Sheakley. 

Arizona A. C. Baker. 

District of Columbia W. H. Manogue. 

New Mexico E. V. Chavez. 

Oklahoma (Not reported). 

Utah* \ J hn T> Caine " 
1 O. W. Powers. 

Indian Territoiy S. E. Jackson. 



COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS. 



Alabama A. G. Smith. 
Arkansas H. G. Bunn. 
California S. L. Thompson. 
Colorado Thomas M. Patterson. 
Connecticut A. P. Hyde. 
Delaware Thos. F. Bayard. 
Florida D. L. Gaulden. 
Georgia L. F. Garrard. 
Idaho G. V. Bryan. 
Illinois Clayton E. Crafts. 
Indiana Chas. L. Jewett. 
Iowa N. B. Holbrook. 
Kansas Thos. P. Fenlon. 
Kentucky Jas. A. McKenzie. 
Louisiana Frank C. Zacharie. 
Maine Joseph P. Bass. 
Maryland Chas. J. M. Gwynn. 
Massachusetts John E. Russell. 
Michigan Edwin F. Uhl. 
Minnesota Lewis Baker. 
Mississippi H. M. Street. 
Missouri -C. H. Jones. 
Montana Allen Joyes. 
Nebraska N. S. Harwood. 
Nevada R. M. Clarke. 
New Hampshire Harry Bingham. 



New Jersey J. R. McPherson. 

New York Roswell P. Flower. 

North Carolina?. H. Busbee. 

North Dakota W. E. Purcell. 

Ohio Lawrence T. Neal. 

Oregon F. V. Holman. 

Pennsylvania Geo. A. Ross. 

Rhode Island Hugh J. Carroll. 

South Carolina W. J. Talbert. 

South Dakota W. R. Steele. 

Tennessee J D. C. Atkins. 

Texas Seth Shepard. 

Vermont H. F. Brigham. 

Virginia John W. Daniel. 

Washington J. A. Munday. 

West Virginia J. B. Taney. 

Wisconsin Wm. F. Vilas. 

Wyoming Geo. T. Beck. 

Alaska James Sheakley. 

Arizona L. C. Hughes. 

District of Columbia Henry E. Davis. 

New Mexico Idus L. Fielder. 

Oklahoma H. A. Hasken. 

Utah* \ John T ' Caine< 
1 O. W. Powers. 

Indian Territory W. C. Jackson. 



MR. BELL : The Territory of Utah sends a contesting delegation. 
THE CHAIR : Let both go to the Committee of Credentials. 
THE SECRETARY : These Committees will meet in the ante-rooms 
of this building immediately after the adjournment. 
MR. W. E. ENGLISH : Where are the ante-rooms ? 
THE SECRETARY : In the committee rooms around the building. 
A DELEGATE : Why didn't you say so ? 



"Contesting delegation. 
3 



34 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

MR. W. E. ENGLISH, of Indiana : Mr. President, I observe that 
there is a large number of unoccupied seats in the building, and in 
behalf of the Indiana delegation I desire to offer a resolution. 

The resolution offered by Mr. English was as follows : 

Resolved, That the officers of this Convention be directed to 
admit all ex-soldiers of the late war to the unoccupied seats in the 
galleries during the sessions of this Convention. 

MR. WILLIAM A. COLLIER, of Tennessee : Mr. President, I am 
informed that there are now at the doors of this wigwam 25,000 
Democrats, gathered here from all parts of this country, who desire 
seats in this hall, while there are more vacant seats here than there 
have ever been in any Democratic Convention. I desire to move 
that the officers of this Convention and the National Executive 
Committee be instructed to admit Democrats to these unoccupied 
seats until they are filled, and that no Democrat shall be compelled 
to knock in vain at the door of any Democratic Convention for 
admission. 

MR. BRONSTON, of Kentucky, moved to refer the resolution to 
the Committee on Resolutions and the motion was adopted. 

MR. F. V. HOLMAN, of Oregon : Mr. President, the Republicans 
have had a majority in the State of Oregon for a number of years 
between 7,000 and 8,000. This spring has witnessed a great change, 
culminating in the June election ; that Republican majority has been 
reduced from 8,000 to a plurality which is only 3,000 less than a 
majority. I come from the city of Portland, the strongest Republi- 
can city on the Pacific coast, whose ordinary Republican majority 
is 2,000. Yesterday they had a city election there. I hold in my 
hand two telegrams which announce the glad news that the Repub- 
licans in Portland, Oregon, have been defeated by 1,000 majority, 
and that Portland is a Democratic city. 

MR. J. W. ORR, of Kansas : Mr. President, I move that all of 
the organized visiting clubs to this Convention be permitted to 
occupy the vacant seats in this hall. 

MR. BRONSTON, of Kentucky : I move you, sir, that the resolu- 
tion be referred to the Committee on Resolutions. There are many 
good Democrats here who do not belong to any organized clubs. 

THE CHAIR : We will vote upon the motion of the gentleman 
from Kentucky to refer the motion to the Committee on Resolu- 
tions. 

This resolution was adopted, and it was referred to 
the Committee on Resolutions. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 35 

THE CHAIR: The Alabama delegation requests the Chair to 
announce that there has been a change in the committee from that 
State, and that George P. Harrison is the member on Permanent 
Organization. 

MR. BEN. T. CABLE, of Illinois : Mr. Chairman, I beg to offer this 
resolution and move its adoption. 

Resolved, That this Convention tender its profound sympathy to 
that distinguished American, James G. Blaine, in the heavy affliction 
which has befallen him. 

The resolution as read was unanimously adopted with 
unmistakable indications of a genuine sympathy for the 
distinguished statesman. 

MR. COLLIER : I called your attention to the fact that there are 
25,000 Democrats outside desiring to be admitted. I made a mo- 
tion in reference to them, and I would like to ask what disposition 
was made of my motion. 

THE CHAIR : That resolution has been referred to the Committee 
on Resolutions. 

MR. COLLIER : We have met here to nominate the next President 
of the United States, and I desire that the committee should be 
instructed to issue tickets to these Democrats until every vacant 
seat in this hall is filled with a Democrat. 

THE CHAIR : That whole matter has been referred to the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions. 

MR. E. C. SWETT, of Maine : Mr. President and Gentlemen of 
the Convention : In behalf of the Maine delegation, and in behalf of 
the people of Maine, irrespective of party predilections, I desire to 
convey to the Democratic National Convention our appreciation of 
this grateful expression of sympathy with our most distinguished 
fellow-citizen in this hour of his bereavement. 

The Democrats of Maine, deeper than those of any other northern 
State, have drank of the cup of official and political ostracism which 
the Republican party in the days of its supremacy commends to its 
opponents ; but God forbid that the Democracy of Maine or the 
Democracy of any State should fail of honest sympathy in the 
presence of that grim tyrant who wipes out party lines, " levels all 
rank and lays the shepherd's crook beside the sceptre." 



36 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Of the many bereavements that have fallen upon our distinguished 
fellow citizen during the past two years it may be truly said 
" One woe doth tread upon another's heel, 
So fast they follow." 

And may such comfort come to him and his as springs from the 
expression of sympathy, which only a Democratic National Conven- 
tion can tender, from every section and from every State. 

This eloquent tribute was followed by renewed and 
prolonged applause. 

THE CHAIR : The Secretary will report a communication from 
the President of the World's Columbian Exposition. 

The Secretary then read the following communication : 

WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

WM. T. BAKER, President. 

HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM, Vice-Pres. 

HOWARD O. EDMONDS, Secretary. 

CHICAGO, Jung 21, 1892. 
HON. W. C. OWENS, 

Chairman National Democratic Convention 
DEAR SIR : 

On behalf of the World's Columbian Exposition, I take pleasure in extending 
this invitation to the National Democratic Convention to visit the grounds of the 
Exposition at Jackson Park. This great National enterprise is of such paramount 
interest and importance to all the people, that I trust their representatives assem- 
bled here will embrace this opportunity to view the progress of the work. 

Very respectfully, 

WM. T. BAKER, President. 

GEN. BRAGG : I move you, sir, that the Convention do now 
adjourn until to-morrow at 12 o'clock. 

A delegate offered to amend the motion by an ad- 
journment until 11 o'clock, which amendment was 
accepted by Gen. Bragg. 

The motion to adjourn was seconded by Mr. Flower,, 
of New York. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 37 

MR. E. R. E. KIMBROUGH, of Illinois: Before that question is put 
I desire to ask information from the Chair. When will the Com- 
mittees appointed by this* Convention assemble for the purpose of 
deliberation ? 

THE CHAIR : Immediately after adjournment, in the rooms to the 
right of this building. 

A DELEGATE: I desired to make the same inquiry, and it is 
answered. 

Upon the motion to adjourn being put to the Con- 
vention it was unanimously adopted, and the Conven- 
tion adjourned to Wednesday, June 22, 1892, at 11 
o'clock, A. M. 



38 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



SECOND DAY. 



MORNING SESSION. 

CHICAGO, June 22, 1892. 

Pursuant to adjournment, the Convention met at 11 
o'clock A. M., Wednesday, June 22, 18 ( .)2. 

The Convention was called to order by the Chair- 
man, Mr. Owens, at 11:30 A. M.,in the following words: 

THE CHAIR : The Convention will come to order. Prayer will 
be offered by Rev. Alfred H. Henry, of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

PRAYER. 

Almighty God, Father of men and Ruler of the universe, we bow 
ourselves reverently before Thee and ask Thy blessing upon this 
great gathering, representing in deliberative assembly every section 
and every interest of this national commonwealth. Under Thy 
providence, this Convention has been called together ; be Thou its 
presiding officer. So order the deliberations of this body of dele- 
gates that from out of the chaos of man's passions and ambitions 
shall emerge the spirit of harmony and order. Guide Thou the 
framers of the party platform so that every true lover of liberty and 
of the rights of man shall be able to find a place where he may 
stand erect for the principles that have made the past of this Nation 
glorious, and that we trust shall make the future still more glorious. 
Guide Thou the choice of this Convention so that its nominees in 
character and conviction shall represent the spirit of modern 
Democracy, a progressive Democracy, of a Democracy that is 
arrayed on the side of the masses as against the classes, and that 
strives to lift from the shoulders of the people the burdens borne 
for the benefit of the favored few. May the nominees of this Con- 
vention be in touch with the multitude of toilers that bear the heat 
and burden of the day, and lead them to victory, not for the sake 
of mere spoil of office, or of power, but for the sake of inherent 
principles. To this end grant wisdom, right, conviction and 
courage of their convictions to Thy servants here assembled, and to 
Thee we will ascribe praise now and forever. Amen. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 39 

THE CHAIR : The first business of the Convention will be the 
report of the Committee on Credentials. Is that committee ready 
to report? 

MR. P. E. WINSTON, of Minnesota : Mr. Chairman, I understand 
there are two ex-Senators in the City of Chicago. One of these gen- 
tlemen has had the honor to preside over two National Democratic 
Conventions, and I move you, sir, that this Convention extend the 
courtesy of the platform to these two gentlemen, and that they 
be invited to take seats upon the platform. 

THE CHAIR (without putting the motion) : The motion is car- 
ried, and the gentlemen will be invited to take seats. 

MR. WINSTON : I refer to the Hon. James R. Doolittle and the 
Hon. Lyman Trumbull. 

THE CHAIR : Is the Committee on Credentials ready to report? 

MR. F. T. SHAW, of Maryland : The Committee on Credentials is 
not yet ready to make their report. 

THE CHAIR : At what time may I state to the Convention they 
will be ready ? 

MR. SHAW : I am inclined to think not before 2 o'clock. 

THE CHAIR : The Committee on Credentials not being ready to 
report, what is the will of the Convention ? 

MR. A. K. DELANEY, of Alaska : I hold in my hand, sir, a memo- 
rial from the Democratic Territorial Convention of Alaska to this 
Convention. In submitting it, sir, I wish to say that it is the 
expression of a pioneer people engaged in building up civilization 
in the wildest and most remote dominion of the Republic. I beg 
to hope, sir, that it will receive respectful consideration by the 
Committee on Resolutions, and I submit it. It is as follows : 

TO THE 
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION. 

The Democracy of Alaska assembled in Territorial Convention 
desire to respectfully call the attention of Congress, through the 
Democratic National Convention, to the following facts concern- 
ing the condition of our people : 

We are denied representation in Congress. 

Our legal jurisprudence is a distortion and a deformity. The Act 
of Congress of May 17, 1884, known as the "Organic Act," by ex- 
tending to this Territory without specification the general laws of 
the State of Oregon, many of which are unadapted to our condition, 



40 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

and totally at variance with our necessities, has bequeathed to us a 
jurisprudence hopelessly entailed with ambiguity and confusion. 

Our judicial system is faulty in that the powers of the court of 
final resort are vested in a single judge ; and it is insufficient as to 
the number and jurisdiction of inferior courts, all of which renders 
the administration of justice unstable, uncertain and long-delayed. 

The General Land Laws of the United States by express provision 
are denied to us. 

We have no voice in the management or control of the public 
schools in which our children are being educated. 

We have neither local self-government nor the means whereby it 
may be established. 

Our postal service is insufficient and totally inadequate to meet 
the growing wants of a progressive and enterprising people. 

Our most populous town is without government buildings neces- 
sary for the transaction of public business, and those in other 
localities are crumbling into decay. 

We, therefore, respectfully submit as American Citizens, that we 
are entitled to such legislation by Congress as will secure to us the 
following : 

First A delegate in Congress. 

Second A code of laws adapted to our condition and demanded 
by our necessities. 

Third A judicial system which shall provide three judges, 
located at appropriate places throughout the Territory, who shall 
preside at their respective trial courts, all of whom shall constitute 
a court in bane to hear and determine appeals from the trial court, 
from which court in bane appeals and writs of error may be taken 
to the United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Ninth Judicial 
Circuit, as now provided by law. 

Fourth The extension of the General Land Laws of the United 
States to the Territory, whereby title may be acquired to our agri- 
cultural, grazing and timber lands, under such restrictions, however, 
as will preserve from the grasp of speculators, syndicates and cor- 
porations, and secure to actual and bona fide settlers and residents 
of the Territory that heritage of the people, the public lands. 

Fifth Aside from a Territorial Board and Superintendent of 
Education, having general supervision of the public schools of the 
Territory, we insist that the immediate management of such schools, 
especially in the most populous settlements, should be placed in the 
hands of local Trustees, chosen by the people of each town and 
village, respectively, and vested with the powers usually exercised 
by similar boards in the States and other Territories of the Union. 

Sixth Provision for the establishment of municipal government 
by the people of such towns and villages as may desire it. 

Seventh The establishment of a weekly mail service between 
Alaska and Puget Sound. 

Eighth A reasonable appropriation for government buildings 
at Juneau, and for the repair for such buildings at Sitka and Wrangel. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 41 

Deeply conscious of the justice of our cause, and believing in the 
wisdom and patriotism of the Democracy, we ask the National 
Democratic Convention to voice this, the appeal of a pioneer 
people engaged in building up civilization in the wildest and most 
remote dominion of the Republic. 

THE CHAIR : It will go to the Committee on Resolutions. What 
is the pleasure of the Convention? No business is in order until 
the report of the Committee on Credentials is presented. 

MR. C. J. BRONSTON, of Kentucky : I move that you appoint a 
committee of two to wait upon the Committee on Credentials, which 
I understand is now in session, and ascertain from them at what 
hour this Convention can expect a report. 

THE CHAIR : The gentleman from Kentucky, Mr. Bronston, 
moves that a committee of two be appointed to wait upon the Com- 
mittee on Credentials, and ask when in all probability we may 
expect a report. 

This motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair will appoint on that committee Mr. 
Bronston, of Kentucky, and Mr. English, of Indiana. 

MR. S. N. FOSTER, of Indiana : Mr. Chairman, Mr. English is 
not in the delegation.^ 

THE CHAIR : Will you suggest the name of some gentleman in 
the delegation ? 

MR. BRONSTON : I suggest the name of Judge Charles Pollard. 

MR. L. A. JOHNSON, of Ohio : I move you, Mr. Chairman, that 
this Convention invite the Hon. Roger Q. Mills, Senator from 
Texas, to address the Convention. 

THE CHAIR : It is moved by Mr. Johnson, of Ohio, that the 
Senator from Texas, the Hon. Roger Q. Mills, be invited to address 
this Convention. 

This motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIR : I will appoint Mr. Johnson, of Ohio, and Mr. 
Goodman, of Missouri, to escort Mr. Mills to the platform. 

MR. E. W. PETTUS, of Alabama : Mr. Chairman, I have here a 
resolution, and I ask that it be referred to the Committee on Reso- 
lutions. 

It was so referred without reading under the rule. 

MR. JOHNSON : The committee report that Mr. Mills was taken 
sick, and had to go to his room. 



42 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

THE CHAIR: The committee oppointed to wait upon Senator 
Mills, from Texas, and ask him to address this Convention, report 
that that gentleman is too ill, and has been compelled to leave the 
hall and go to his hotel. 

MR. JOHN V. SHEEHAN, of Michigan : I move you that the hon- 
orable Senator from Illinois, Senator Palmer, be asked to address 
this Convention. 

This motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair will appoint the gentleman from Michi- 
gan, Mr. Sheehan, and Mr. Jackson, of Iowa, to present the request 
of this Convention to Senator Palmer, and escort him to the speak- 
er's stand. 

Senator Palmer having been escorted to the platform, 
the Chairman said : 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, I need not intro- 
duce to you this battle-scarred veteran of the Democracy. You all 
know Senator Palmer. He will speak for himself. 

ADDRESS OF SENATOR PALMER. 

GENTLEMEN OF THE CONVENTION : I find an honor thrust upon 
me very suddenly after coming^into this great body. I think I am 
hardly treated with fairness. I have not had an opportunity of 
estimating this marvelous assembly of Democrats. Some years ago 
I was speaking in southern Illinois, at the top of what is very rare in 
that State, a high hill ; some men sat upon the fence a hundred yards 
from me. I said, "Come up here" ; they said, "I won't." Said I : 
"You will have to leave this township, or you will hear this speech 
to-night." They made up their minds that wherever they might go 
my voice would follow them, and they surrendered. 

Yet I am impressed with this marvelous assemblage. I am more 
impressed with its marvelous and most important mission. The 
great fact is apparent to me of the representatives of the great 
Democratic party assembled in National Convention to select lead- 
ers in the contest which is before us. I think I have a right, point- 
ing to my locks to-day, to speak to this assembly as one having 
experience at least, and I come urging you I need not urge you to 
be patriotic ; that is an instinct of Democratic hearts I urge you 
to the adoption of every expedient to secure harmony in our ranks, 
because there lies before us one of the most important political 
contests in which the Democracy of the country has been engaged 
for a quarter of a century. The great crucial contest lies just 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 43 

before us, and unity therefore is essential. Every Democrat should 
forget every subject of controversy. We should be brothers, actu- 
ated by a common motive, pledged to a common purpose, and 
engaged in a common, earnest and patriotic endeavor. 

The welfare of the country is in your keeping. The great work 
of restoring the constitutional liberty of the country has devolved 
upon you. It is your work. Shall we allow any paltry subject of 
dispute, any matter of a personal character, to interpose when our 
country calls upon us in trumpet tones : "Come up to the work." 
Shall we do it ? Let us be one one in spirit, one in pui^iose, and 
let us be one in the great battle. Let there be no sulkers, no ser- 
pents in the camp. Let us all work for the accomplishment of this 
.great purpose. 

I cannot afford to take your time now. I expect a harmonious 
result. The names that will be presented to you will be the names 
of patriotic men. Choose from among them him that shall bear 
the banner aloft. You cannot make a mistake. Get a fair, un- 
swerving, unalterable Democrat a Democrat that is in earnest, and 
put the flag in his hands and follow him. 

Let me tell you that if the Democratic party and the country are 
deceived in this contest, it is not the fault of the Republicans. At 
Minneapolis they flung their banner to the breeze, and inscribed upon 
it, in bold terms, all that is odious in Republicanism. They have 
written upon its face a menace to the peace of the country, in a new 
force bill. As sure as Benjamin Harrison is elected, and the next 
Congress is Republican, we will have a force bill such as the ingen- 
uity of John I. Davenport or the devil may suggest. 

It is due to the Minneapolis Convention to admit that they have 
not attempted to deceive the country on the point. They declare 
their purpose, and if they succeed we shall have no right to com- 
plain. They have told you what they mean to do. If we are 
prepared to pass under the yoke we are well warned; and after the 
election, if we are beaten, we shall have no right to complain. They 
have added to the tariff more McKinleyism than we have had 
before. The country is to be walled round by what is called pro- 
tection. This great giant republic, with its 65,000,000 of inhabitants, 
with resources unsurpassed anywhere on earth, is to be fettered. 
Its wings are to be clipped, if I may use that expression. We are 
forbidden, our farmers are forbidden to find a market ; they must 
toil for the trusts and monopolies. They have warned us. If we 
submit to it, if the country submits, we have no right to complain. 



44 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Gentlemen of the Convention, you want to go to work. You 
want to deliberate. You owe it to us to arm the country for this 
great contest ; you owe it to us to give us a platform ; a platform 
plain and clear no juggling of words ; let us have no trouble 
about interpretation. Write the platform on your banner that 
every man may read and understand. After the nominations are 
made let us go to work. We expect these Illinois men to work as 
they never have worked before. I remember the time when I saw 
the prairie fires over one whole State. I want to see in Illinois a 
fire of fervent patriotism that will consume everything before it. 
That is how we are going to work in Illinois. 

We only ask you to give us good candidates, and our platform 
can't be bad because it must be Democratic. Blow the trumpet and 
Illinois will rally, will come as one man and will fight this great 
battle, and I shall expect to see in November that Illinois has 
elected our admirable State ticket and has carried the State for the 
Democratic electoral ticket. We do not intend to burn Chicago, 
but we will paint it amazingly red. 

MR. G. B. CHAPMAN, of Ohio : Mr. Chairman, I move you, sir, 
that John R. Fellows, of New York, be invited to address this Con- 
vention. 

This motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIR : The gentleman from Ohio, Mr. Chapman, is 
appointed a committee to await upon Mr. Fellows. 

Mr. Fellows arose in his seat, and the Chair said : 

THE CHAIR : Will the gentleman come to the platform ? 

MR. FELLOWS : (Making a gesture of dissent,) Mr. Chairman, 
I am a delegate in this Convention. At the proper time, when it 
shall be in place for delegates to express their sentiments upon this 
floor, it maybe my privilege to have something to say to the Con- 
vention. That time has not yet arrived, and I recognize that with 
the great number of distinguished gentlemen whose names and 
deeds are so well known to the Democracy present in this room, 
who are not wearing the badges of delegates, it would be improper 
for one who occupies that position now to claim the attention of the 
Convention. 

MR. BRONSTON, of Kentucky : Mr. Chairman, I am informed 
that the Committee on Credentials is now ready to report, through 
its Chairman, John E. Lamb, of Indiana. 

MR. JOHN E. LAMB, of Indiana. The Committee on Credentials 
is now ready to report. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 45 

THE CHAIR : The Convention is ready to receive the report of 
the Committee on Credentials. 

MR. LAMB : I am directed by the Committee on Credentials to 
make the following unanimous report : 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. 

In the contest from the State of Alabama, the regular delegation, 
as recommended by the National Democratic Committee, is seated 
and is given the right to vote ; while the contesting delegation is 
given seats upon the floor of this Convention. In the twenty-third 
and twenty-fifth districts of Pennsylvania the regular delegates, as 
recommended by the National Committee, are given seats and votes 
upon the floor. In the State of Ohio, first district, the regular 
delegate, Mr. Louis G. Barnard, is seated. In the Territory of Utah 
the regular delegation, recommended by the National Committee, 
Henry B. Henderson and John T. Caine, are given seats and votes 
upon the floor. In the Indian Territory, the members of both dele- 
gations, Messrs. S. E. Jackson, W. C. Jackson, T. B. Bell and A. R. 
Sneed, are given seats, and one-half vote each. In the District of 
Columbia, Messrs. James L. Norris and Henry E. Davis are given 
seats and votes upon the floor. In the Territories of New Mexico and 
Arizona, it was recommended by the National Committee that each 
be given six seats upon the floor of this Convention. In view of the 
fact that these two Territories have been debarred from the sister- 
hood of States in this Union upon the sole ground that they were 
Democratic, and in view of the further fact that a Democratic 
House has already passed an enabling act to make them States of 
this Union, your committee unanimously adopts the recommenda- 
tions of the National Committee and submits them for the approval 
of this Convention. 

MR. LAMB : I move the adoption of the report of the Committee. 
THE CHAIR : The question is upon th'e adoption of the report. 
The report was adopted. 

The following list of delegates from the different States 
and Territories are entitled to seats in this Convention as 
delegates, as reported by the Committee on Credentials: 



46 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



LIST OF DELEGATES. 



ALABAMA. 



Gen. E. W. Pettus. 
Rufus N. Rhodes. 
District. 
1st Joseph C. Rich. 

Julian A. Walters. 
2nd W. F. Vandiver. 

C. F. Rankin. 
3rd A. H. Merrill. 

Geo. P. Harrison. 
4th J. H. King. 

M. L. Wood. 
5th Ben. Fitzpatrick. 

Shirley Bragg. 



AT LARGE. 



John B. Knox. 
A. G. Smith. 



District. 
6th.. 



L. B. Musgrove. 

S. C. M. Amason. 

7th H. M. Howard. 

A. L. Woodliff. 

8th R. W. Lowe. 

T. R. Roulhac. 

9th -A. O. Lane. 

Thomas M. Walthall. 



ARKANSAS. 



AT LARGE. 



John H. Rogers. 
S. W. Fordyce. 
District. 

1st Julius Lesser. 

J. C. Hawthorne. 

2nd J. B. Speers. 

Wm. J. Little. 

3rd J. S. Steele. 

W. H. Arnold. 



H. G. Bunn. 
John G. Fletcher. 
District. 

4th Thos. B. Martin. 

W. J. Stowers. 

5th Jos. Frauenthal. 

B. R. Davidson. 

6th J. C. South. 

J. C. Goodrum, Sr. 



CALIFORNIA. 



W. W. Foote. 
S. M. White. 
District. 
1st C. W. Taylor. 

T. L. Thompson. 
2nd Russ Stephens. 

W. S. McGee. 
3rd F. J. Moffitt. 

L. W. Buck. 
4th J. F. Sullivan. 

Jos. Clark. 



AT LARGE. 



J. V. Coleman. 
A. B. Butler. 
District. 

5th L. A. Whitehurst. 

T. F. Barry. 

6th J. D. Carr. 

Geo. S. Patton. 

7th H. W. Patton. 

W. W. Phillips. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



47 



COLORADO. 



AT LARGE. 



T. M. Patterson. 

Theodore J. O' Donnell. 
District. 

1st Frank Adams. 

Wm. Bailey. 

CONNECTICUT. 



Dr. Henry Paul. 

J. B. Orman. 
District. 

2nd Martin Currigan. 

C. Donovan. 



AT LARGE. 



Alvan P. Hyde. 
Carlos French. 
District. 

1st Robert J. Vance. 

Edwin C. Pinney. 

2nd Norris G. Osborn. 

Clinton B. Davis. 



James B. Shannon. 
E. C. Benedict. 



District. 
3rd.. 



Cyrus G. Beckwith. 

Joel W. Webb. 

4th Robert L. Clarkson. 

Sidney P. Ensign. 



Thos. F. Bayard. 
Hiram R. Borie. 
R. R. Kenney. 



F. Adams. 
J. E. Grady. 
H. T. Likes. 
J. S. White. 
F. A. Bailey. 
C. E. Garner. 
N. P. Bishoff. 
W. S. Jones. 



DELAWARE. 

AT LARGE. 



FLORIDA. 



AT LARGE. 



GEORGIA. 



James M. Smith. 
F. H. Richardson. 
District. 
1st George A. Mercer. 

W. M. Clifton. 
2nd J. M. Griggs. 

John Triplet!. 
3rd Bascom Myrick. 

C. C. Duncan. 
4th L. F. Garrard. 

L. P. Mandel. 
5th Milton A. Candler. 

George Hillyer. 
6th Fred Dismuke. 

Richard Johnston. 



AT LARGE. 



District. 
7th . 



Robert J. Reynolds. 
John W. Causey. 
W. L. Sirman. 



John F. Dunn. 
W. D. Chipley. 

A. B. Hawkins. 
T. A. Jennings. 
D. L. Gaulden. 

B. Genevar. 
Alex. St. Clair. 
S. M. Sparkman. 



F. K. Dubignon. 
Dupont Guerry. 



...... W. W. Vandivere. 

I. W. Glover. 
8th W. B. Burnett. 

F. C. Foster. 
9th J. B. Brown. 

Lewis Davis. 
10th A. W. Barrett. 

W. O. Mitchell, 
llth Walter B. McArthur. 

F. W. Lamb. 



48 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



James H. Hawley. 
R. C. Johnson. 
John M. Burke. 



IDAHO. 

AT LARGE. 



ILLINOIS. 



John G. Brown. 
G. V. Bryan. 
J. M. Bennett. 



A. E. Stevenson. 
A. W. Green. 
Clayton E. Crafts. 
Ben. T. Cable. 
District. 
1st John P. Hopkins. 

Michael Mclnerney. 
2nd L. W. Kadlec. 

Wm. H. Joyce. 
3rd Roger C. Sullivan. 

John J. Gaynor. 
4th Frederick Griesheimer 

F. H. Winston. 
5th John C. Donnelly. 

Chas. A. Goodwin. 
6th E. R. Carr. 

J. Stanley Brown. 
7th Chas. K. Ladd. 

Sherwood Dixon. 
8th R. L. Allen. 

J. H. Eckels. 
9th Lyon Karr. 

D. C. Taylor. 
10th John Finley. 

A. M. Brown. 



AT LARGE. E. N. Worthington. 
Walter Watson. 
John A. King. 
Samuel B. Chase. 
District. 
llth Truman Plantz. 

Guy C. Scott. 
12th R. F. Newcomb. 

Jos. M. Page. 
13th Frank K. Jones. 

James B. Ricks. 
14th James S. Ewing. 

B. K. Durfee. 
15th E. R. E. Kimbrough. 

Thos. B. Carson. 
16th Adam Rinard. 

H. B. Lee. 
17th Wm. M. Farmer. 

Thomas M. Thornton. 
18th C. D. Hoiles. 

R. D. W. Holder. 
19th Silas Cook. 

John C. Edwards. 
20th W. K. Murphy. 

George W. Andrews. 



INDIANA. 



AT LARGE. 



D. W. Voorhees. 
Chas. L. Jewett. 
District. 
1st E. P. Richardson. 

Philip Zoercher. 
2nd R. C. Houston. 

W. A. Cullop. 
3rd E. G. Niklaus. 

D. A. Jennings. 
4th Herman Trichler. 

John Beggs. 
5th O. B. Johnson. 

W. S. Sherley. 
6th Joshua Chitwood. 

J. H. Smith. 
7th Alexander Ayres. 

Will. E. English. 



Hugh Dougherty. 
Samuel E. Morss. 



District. 
8th.. 



John E. Lamb. 

Samuel T. Catlin. 
9th James Murdock. 

James R. Tyre. 
10th Charles R. Pollard. 

John E. Cass. 
llth Herman E. Wicking. 

Emerson E. McGriff. 
12th Samuel M. Foster. 

N. B. Newman. 
13th Orlando M. Packard. 

Harry S. Chester. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



49 



J. H. Shields. 
L. M. Martin. 
District. 
1st David J. Ayers. 

Wm. N. Hood. 
2nd N. B. Holbrook. 

Nath. French. 
3rd O. B. Harriman. 

L. W. Gowen. 
4th R. J. McHugh. 

M. B. Hendrick. 
5th H. J. Stiger, 

M. R. Jackson. 
6th G. B. McFall. 

I. L. Patton. 



IOWA. 



AT LARGE. 



Edward Campbell. 
John F. Buncombe. 



District. 
7th 


. . Samuel J. Gilpin. 


8th 


E. R. Cassatt. 
. ..N. C. Ridenour. 


9th 


J. W. Freeland. 
. . .Lucius Wells. 


10th 


Frank P. Bradley. 
. . .John McCarthy. 


llth 


F. C. Brown. 
. . . Wm H. Dent, 




Parker K. Holbrook. 



KANSAS. 



AT LARGE. 



Thomas Fenlon. 
George W. Click. 
Tully Scott. 
District. 

1st J. W. Orr. 

J. R. Garrett. 

2nd B. J. Sheridan. 

Wm. C. Perry. 

3rd John A. Eaton. 

Dr. C. Gilbert. 

4th Thomas W. Morgan. 

S. P. Isenhart. 



District. 
5th.. 



W. C. Jones. 
Thomas Fitch. 
Wm. Lapp. 



6th. 
7th. 



KENTUCKY. 



Henry Watterson. 
John B. Castleman. 
District. 
1st T. E. Moss. 

Robert Walker. 
2nd Reuben Miller. 

Charles Meachem. 
3rd John S. Rhea. 

W. A. Helm. 
4th B. F. Beard. 

B. T. Titsey. 
5th W. B. Haldeman. 

W. J. Abrahams. 
6th ..Dr. J. C. Terrell. 

B. F. Harrison. 



AT LARGE. 



...C. B. Gill. 

W. H. L. Lepperell. 
...J. D. Sherrick. 

S. P. Reynolds. 
. . J. B. McClenland. 

J. F. Stewart. 



James A. McKenzie. 
W. C. Owens. 



District. 
7th.. 



C. J. Bronston. 

William Lindsey. 
8th C. H. Rodes. 

J. II. Sullivan. 
9th Walter Sharp. 

J. H. Northrop. 
10th John P. Salyer. 

J. M. Robertson, 
llth O. H. Waddell. 

G. A. Devons. 



50 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



LOUISIANA. 

AT LARGE. 



E. B. Kruttschnitt. 

F. C. Zacharie. 
District. 

1st Walter H. Rogers. 

Thomas Duffy. 
2nd E. Howard McCaleb. 

A. W. Crandell. 
3rd H. C. Drew. 

Geo. M. Robertson. 



Nathan Cleves. 
Daniel J. McGillicuddy. 
District. 

1st Jeremiah G. Shaw. 

Edw. C. Swett. 

2nd Alfred S. Kimball. 

George E. Hughes. 

MARYLAND. 



John Fitzpatrick. 
John C. Bach. 
District. 

4th James Jeffries. 

Harry W. Ogden. 
5th J. L. Dagg. 

A. S. Caldwell. 
6th Trios. J. Kernan. 

J. T. Young. 
MAINE. 

AT LARGE. 

Charles B. Morton. 
Thomas White. 
District. 

3rd William R. Hunnewell. 

Cleveland C. Homer. 

4th Joseph P. Bass. 

David C. Parker. 



Arthur P. Gorman. 
Frank Brown. 
C. J. M. Gwinn. 
Barnes Compton. 
District. . 

1st R. D. Hynson. 

L. L. Waters. 

2nd Murray Vandiver. 

Frank T. Shaw. 

3rd Frank A. Furst. 

James Bond. 



AT LARGE. 



L. V. Baughman. 
John S. Wirl. 
George M. Upshur. 

District. 

4th John Gill. 

Lloyd Jackson. 
5th Thos. H. Hunt. 

J. W. Cox. 
6th Asa Millison. 

Buchanan Schley. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

AT LARGE. 



John H. Sullivan.* 
Patrick A. Collins. 
District. 
1st Adams C. Deane. 

James J. Curran. 
2nd Wm. E. Bridgman. 

Dr. W. E. Mellen. 
3rd .' John R. Thayer. 

John O'Gara. 
4th Robt. M. Burnett. 

Jas. P. Murphy. 
5th Peter H. Donohoe. 

Alexander B. Bruce. 

6th Thos. A. Devine. 

Benj. F. Brickett. 

*Altfcrnate for John W. Corcoran. 



John E. Russell. 
Albert C. Houghton. 
7th John R. Murphy. 

Henry A. Marks. 
8th Nathan Matthews, Jr. 

John F. O'Brien. 
9th Edward J. Donovan. 

James H. Stack. 
10th Josiah Quincy. 

John H. McDonough. 
llth Patrick Maguire. 

Jasper N. Keller. 
12th Edward Avery. 

Wm. L. Douglas. 
13th John W. Coughlin. 

Henry C. Thatcher. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



51 



Don M. Dickinson. 
Edward Ryan. 



District. 

1st Edward F. Conely. 

Chas. W. Casgrain. 
2nd John Strong. 

J. V. Sheehan. 
3rd L. N. Burke. 

C. F. Cook. 
4th George M. Kingsbury. 

J. G. Miller. 
5th Henry F. McCormick. 

Albert K. Roof. 
6th Rich. A. Montgomery. 

Clarence Tinker. 

MINNESOTA. 



MICHIGAN. 

AT LARGE.. 

Spencer O. Fisher. 
Edwin F. Uhl. 
District. 

7th Charles A. Ward. 

Robert Willis. 
8th John H. Fedewa. 

Farnham Lyon. 
9th Thomas McNiff. 

M. J. Law. 
10th Andrew W. Comstock. 

W. J. Martin, 
llth H. B. Hudson. 

Stiles Kennedy. 
12th John Power. 

Solomon S. Curry. 



AT LARGE. 



Michael Doran. 
Phil. B. Winston. 
District. 

1st C. J. Haines. 

H. R. Wells. 

2nd M. Mullen. 

James Manning. 

3rd Joseph Roach. . 

F. Nicolin. 

4th C. D. O'Brien. 

James S. O'Brien. 

MISSOURI. 

AT LARGE. 
Charles C. Maffitt. 
William H. Phelps. 
District. 
1st Ben Eli Guthrie. 

William B. Hayes. 
2nd John L. Mirick. 

T. S. Dines. 
3rd E. S. Garver. 

D. C. Allen. 
4th John W. Walker. 

Dr. J. A. Postlewaite. 
5th William H. Wallace. 

John S. Blackwell. 
6th Wm. Steele. 

John D. Allen. 
7th E. C. More. 

Dr. A. K. Edmonds. 
8th JohnR. Walker. 

John B. Wolfe. 



Lewis Baker. 
Thomas Wilson. 
District. 

5th Titus Mareck. 

Chas. M. Foote. 

6th Theodore Bruener. 

J. G. Brown. 

7th Alex. McKinnon. 

Dennis O'Brien. 



District. 
9th . 



Charles H. Jones. 
Martin L. Clardy. 



M. S. Goodman. 

T. F. McDearmon. 
10th Charles Costello. 

James I. Jones, 
llth Wm. Haney. 

John J. Burk. 
12th Edward Butler*. 

Dr. F. J. Lutz. 
13th W. S. Anthony. 

F. M. Mansfield. 
14th Jos. J. Russell. 

J. B. Tillman. 
15th J. G. McGannon. 

Thomas Connor. 



52 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



MISSISSIPPI. 



AT LARGE. 



W. V. Sullivan. 
W. H. Sims. 

District. 

1st H. L. Muldrow. 

Wm. M. Cox. 
2nd Wm. A. McDonald. 

R. T. Fant. 
3rd Leroy Percy. 

W. H. Stovall. 
4th J. H. Brinker. 

Percy R. Somerville. 



H. M. Street. 
Murray F. Smith. 

District, 

5th John S. Williams. 

W. N. King. 
6th Frank K. Winchester. 

F. H. Lewis. 
7th R. H. Henry. 

Chas. A. Gordon. 



S. T. Hauser. 
W. A. Clark. 
Timothy E. Collins. 



MONTANA. 



AT LARGE. 



NEBRASKA. 



Frank G. Higgins. 
Walter Cooper. 
Thomas Joies. 



AT LARGE. 



James E. Boyd. 
Tobias Castor. 
District. 

1st '". Robert Clegg. 

N. S. Harwood. 

2nd Charles Ogden. 

John A. Creighton. 

3rd John Bern. 

F. J. Hale. 



Milton Doolittle. 
W. H. Thompson. 
District. 

4th Daniel W. Cook. 

Matt. Miller. 

5th R. A. Batty. 

Frank H. Spearman. 

6th John F. Crocker. 

James C. Dahlman. 



NEVADA. 

AT LARGE. 

Robert P. Keating.* 
R. M. Clarke. 
J. H. McMillan. 
* Represented by P. J. Dunne. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



C. W. Hinchcliff. 
E. P. Hardesty. 
P. C. Webber. 



AT LARGE. 



Harry Bingham. 

Frank Jones. 
District. 

1st Henry R. Parker. 

Dennis F. O'Conner. 



Alvah W. Sulloway. 

George B. Chandler. 
District. 

2nd Albert N. Flinn. 

Irving W. Drew 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



58 



. NEW JERSEY. 

AT LARGE. 

John R. McPherson. 
James Smith, Jr. 
District. District. 

1st W. J. Thompson. 5th. 

George H. Barker. 

2nd John H. Scudder. 

T. E. Prickett. 

8rdi '. . .Millard F. Ross. 

John Hone, Jr. 

4ih Johnson Cornish. 

J. N. Pidcock. 



Miles Ross. 
Leon Abbett. 



Roswell P. Flower. 
Edward Murphy, Jr. 
District. 
1st. SolomanS. Townsend. 

Edward Hawkins. 
2nd John Delmar. 

Michael J. Coffey. 
3rd James W. Ridgway. 

Wm. C. DeWitt. 
4th James Kane. 

Robert Black. 
5th Patrick H. McCurren. 

J. P. Adams. 
6th Benjamin Wood. 

John R. Fellows. 
7th Robert B. Roosevelt. 

John M. Bruno. 
8th DeWitt Leventritt. 

John Fox. . 
9th Amos J. Cummings. 

Patrick Keenan. 
10th , . . .Richard Croker. 

W. Bourke Cockran. 
llth Hugh J. Grant. 

Franklin Bartlett. 
12th Perry Belmont. 

George Ehret. 

13th David McClure. 

. DeLancy Nicoll. 
14th Francis Larkin, Jr. 

Henry D. Purroy. 
15th George M. Beebe. 

Henry Bacon. 
16th. James W. Hinckley. 

Samuel J. Tilden, Jr. 
17th J. C. Broadhead. 

George W. Youmans. 



J. F. Carrigan. 

Louis Braun. 

6th ..' Gottfried Kruger. 

John B. Dusenberry. 

7th Dennis McLaughlin. 

Robert Davis. 

8th Joseph W. Yates. 

Thos. Nevins. 
NEW YORK. 

AT LARGE. 

Daniel E. Sickles. 
Henry W. Slocum. 
District. 
18th James Keenan. 

Robert W. Hamilton. 
19th James H. Manning. 

Anthony N. Brady. 
20th '...John Foley. 

A. J. Quackenbush. 
21st Henry Griffin. 

Wm. P. Cantwell. 
22nd Levi H. Brown. 

S. R. Phelps. 
23rd James L. Dempsey. 

W. C. Schwaube. 
24th Albert C. Tennant. 

Clinton Beckwith. 
25th.., Wm. B. Kirk. 

Hugh Duffy. 
26th E. F. Danf orth. 

C. E. Remick. 
27th C, N. Bulger. 

Hiram W. Babcock. 
28th> Alexander C. Eustace. 

Chauncey L. Becker. 
29th Frank Campbell. 

Frank Rice. 
30th Frederick Cook. 

George Raines. 
31st .John Cunneen. 

D. J. Bissell. . . 
82nd. : . Wm. F. Sheehan. 

Gerhart Lang. 
33rd C. S. Dunckelberger. 

Matthew Scanlon. 
34th.- James W. McMahon. 

Fred. L. Newton. 



54 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



NORTH CAROLINA. 



AT LARGE. 



E. C. Smith. 
Wharton J. Green. 
District, 
1st Wilson G. Lamb. 

W. P. Roberts. 
2nd Frank W. Barnes. 

S. H. Holloway. 
3rd W. S. Cook. 

L. J. Moore. 
4th F. A. Busbee. 

James W. Pou. 
5th John W. Graham. 

J. L. King. 



John D. Bellamy. 
Jos. P. Caldwell. 
District. 
6th J. T. LeGrand. 

. S. Latimer. 
7th W. W. H. Williams. 

M. M. Phinnix. 
8th Cyrus W. Watson. 

W. L. Scott. 
9th Kope Elias. 

R. M. Furman. 



NORTH DAKOTA. 



AT LARGE. 



W. N. Roach. 
T. F. O'Brien. 
E. E. Cole. 



W. E. Purcell. 

A. Blewett. 

J. E. Campbell. 



OHIO. 



Calvin S. Brice. 
James E. Campbell. 
District. 
1st Louis G. Bernard. 

Otway J. Cosgrove. 
2nd Michael Devenny. 

Louis Remelin. 
3rd Frank Huffman. 

Peter Schwab. 
4th George W. Hull. 

J. K. Cummings. 
5th Fred. Lessaur. 

Chas. K. Haskell. 
6th R. T. Hough. 

M. J. Hutchinson. 
7th Chas. W. Constantine. 

F. G. Davis. 
8th Albert Zugschwert. 

L. D. Johnson. 
9th W. J. Colburn. 

Wm. Habbeler. 
10th Michael Stanton. 

George H. Chapman, 
llth A. B. Cole. 

Jos. D. Huffman. 



LARGE. 

Lawrence T. Neal. 
Robert Blee. 
District. 
12th James Kilbourne. 

Daniel Danehy. 
13th G. G. Engler. 

W. A. Schofield. 
14th Benjamin Meyers. 

C. E. Critchfield. 
15th Frank H. Southard. 

James T. Kane. 
16th ^George McKee. 

George W. McCook. 
17th Lewis P. Ohliger. 

R. W. Tanneyhill. 

18th W. K. L. Warwick. 

-John C. Welty. 
19th Thos. F. Walsh. 

Charles Fillius. 
20th Charles P. Salen. 

R. R. Holden. 
21st John H. Farley. 

T. L. Johnson. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 
OREGON. 



55 



Fred. V. Holman. 
Henry C. Grady. 
Henry Blackman. 
.J. L. Cowan.* 



AT LARGE. 



John J. Daly. 
A. Bush. 

Samuel F.JFlood. 
Thos. G. Reames. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



AT LARGE. 



W. U. Hensel. 
George Ross. 
Charles Robinson. 
Grant Herring. 
District. 
1st Robert E. Deady. 

P. J. Corcoran. 
2nd John R. Read. 

John J. Molony. 
3rd Peter Monroe. 

Thomas J. Ryan. 
4th Samuel Josephs. 

Thomas Delahanty. 
5th Cornelius M. Smith. 

Wm. F. Harrity. 
6th O. B. Dickinson. 

A. M. Holding. 
7th I. Heston Todd. 

R. K. Bachman. 
8th William Mutchler. 

J. Davis Brodhead. 
9th Jeremiah Hagenman. 

Robert E. Wright. 
10th John A. Coyle. 

William B. Given, 
llth Frank J. Fitzsimmons. 

Frank M. Vandling. 
12th John T. Lenahan. 

John Smoulter, Jr. 
13th M. P. Quinn. 

M. T. O'Connor. 
14th S. P. Light. 

Christian Hanlen. 



Harry Alvan Hall. 
William M. Singerly. 
John L. McKinney. 
Henry Meyer. 
District. 
15th George S. Purdy. 

Nelson Lee. 
16th J. Henry Cochran. 

John W. Bailey. 
17th William Krickbaum. 

Lewis Dewart. 
18th H. J. McAteer. 

D. M. Crawford. 
19th R. E. Shearer. 

Horace Keesey. 
20th John M. Reynolds. 

Herman Baumer. 
21st Thomas Lynch. 

George A. Jenks. 
22nd James M. Guffy. 

George S. Fleming. 
23rd Frank C. Osbourn. 

Herman F. Kunkle. 
24th S. L. Mestrezat. 

Dr. T. H. Sharpnack. 
25th W. B. Clendennin. 

S. B. Griffith. 
26th John C. Brady. 

John Fertig. 
27th A. A. Plumer. 

Charles Schimmelfing. 
28th William A. Wallace. 

Thomas Collins. 



*Represented by Dr. Mullinix, Alternate. 



56 



RHODE ISLAND. 

AT LARGE. 



Franklin P. Owen. 
Hugh J. Carroll. 
Francis L. O'Reilly. 
F. E. Bartlett. 



Wm. B. Nichols. 
John T. Parker. 
Amos J. Dawley. 
Samuel R. Honey. 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 



AT LARGE. 



B. R. Tillman. 

John L. Irby. 
District. 
1st Theodore G.Jervey, Jr. 

C. M. Efird. 
2nd. . . ; John G. Evans. 

A. M. Youmans. 
3rd J. H. McCalley. 

D. K. Norris. 
4th B. F. Perry. 

R. W. Harris. 



J. William Stokes. 
W. J. Talbert. 
District. 

5th T. J. Cunningham. 

J. W. Floyd. 

6th I. E. Tindel. 

E. J. Stackhouse. 

7th H. R. Thomas. 

Josiah Doar. 



SOUTH DAKOTA. 

AT LARGE. 



District. 

1st Bartlett Tripp. 

2nd Wm. Van Eps. 

3rd .A. W. Mullen. 

4th., ..P. F. Wickham. 



District. 

5th John A. Bowler. 

6th Peter Couchman. 

?th D. W. Flick. 

8th.. . Wm. R. Steele. 



TENNESSEE. 



AT LARGE. . 



James D. Porter. ' 
Julius A. Taylor. 

District. 

1st John Caldwell. 

John T. Essary. 
2nd Martin L. Ross. 

Samuel G. Heiskell. 
3rd George W, Ochs. 

Charles H. Carpenter. 
4th Louis C, Alexander. 

Elijah G. Tollett, Jr. 
5th Robert E. L. Mount- 
castle. 

John C. New. 



James C. Bradford. 
David D. Anderson. 

District. 

6th John Overton. 

Hardin N. Leech. 
7th JohnT. Allen. . 

Jas. A. Cunningham. 
8th J. D. C. Atkins, 

Wm. P. Robertson. 
9th Henry C. Burnett. 

Samuel R. Latta. 
10th Wm. A. Collier. 

Wm. Sanford. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



TEXAS. 



AT LARGE. 



John A. Ireland. 
H; D. McDonald. 



District. 




1st 


0. T. Holt. - 




T. H. Ball. 


2nd 


J. C. Wootters. 




E. S. Hicks. 


8rd 


R. N. Stafford. 




J. F. Mitchell. 


4th , 


Howard Templeton 




R. D. Harrell. 


5th 


Yancey Lewis. 




C. L. Galloway. 


6th -. 


Byron Drew. 




R. E. Prince. 


7th 


Scott-Fields. 




W. T. Hefley. 



District. 
8th.. 



Seth Shephard. 

J. W. Throckmorton. 



.. ...T. T. D. Andrews. 

L. L. Shields. 
9th . D. C. Giddins. 

John VV. Parker. 
10th... C. C. Sweney. 

W. B. Sayers. 
llth A. C. Jones. 

J. O. Nicholson. 
12th J. H. McLeary. 

Fred. Opp. 
18th J. J. Taylor. 

W. P. Sebastian. 



VERMONT. 



Dr. J. D. Harrahan. 
John Robinson. 



AT LARGE. 



District. 
1st.. 



..John H. Donnelly. 
Herbert F. Bringham. 



Dr. J. Henry Jackson. 

Harley E. Folspm. 
District. 

2nd Oscar C.. Miller.. 

Henry E. Fitzgerald. 



District. 
1st.. 



2nd. 
3rd. 
4th. 
5th. 



John W. Daniel. 
S. Welford Corbin. 



...Frank Fletcher. 

Lloyd T. Smith. 
..W. A. Young. 

J. F. Bryant. 
..C. V. Meredith. 

B. L. Wenston. 
..W. R. McKenney. 

F. E. Buford. 
..O. W. Dudley. 

Wm. Semple. 



VIRGINIA. 



AT LARGE. 



John Goode. 
Basil B. Gordon. 



District. 
6th.. 



Carter Glass. 

Wood Bouldin, Jr. 
7th.;.. ... M. L. Watson. 

S. V. Southall. 
8th J. F. Ryan. 

J. C. Gibson. 
9th A. Fulkerson. 

Henry Stuart. 
10th M. W. Paxton. 

Taylor Berry. 



WASHINGTON. 



AT LARGE. 



John Collins. 
Chauncey W. Griggs. 
Henry J. Snively. 
Henry S. Blanford. 



James. A. Munday. 
F. P. Hogan. 
Martin J. Maloney. 
William H. Dunphy. 



58 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



WEST VIRGINIA. 



AT LARGE. 



J. N. Camden. 
J. B. Taney. 

District. 

1st W. Marsh Arnold. 

John J. Davis. 
2nd John A. Robinson. 

J. Ed. Watson. 



B. F. Martin. 
J. W. St. Clair. 

District. 

3rd W. E. Chelton. 

A. T. Mathews. 
4th John Hove Russell. 

D. T. B. Carpenter. 



WISCONSIN. 



AT LARGE. 



W. F. Vilas. 
Edward S. Bragg. 
District. 
1st W. W. Strong. 

H. J. Gallagher. 
2nd S. W. Lamoreux. 

Carl Feld. 
3rd A. H. Krouskopf. 

George W. Bishop. 
4th J. G. Donnelly. 

W. A. Walker. 
5th Frank Geele. 

C. A. Koenitzer. 



District. 
6th.. 



E. C. Wall. 
John H. Knight. 



J. W. Hume. 

A. J. Schmitz. 
7th Ira A. Hill. 

William Carson. 
8th Rush Winslow. 

L. M. Nash. 
9th John Ringle. 

Joseph Fisher. 
10th S. C. Johnson. 

James Barden. 



WYOMING. 

AT LARGE. 



Colin Hunter. 
R. H. Homer. 
D. C. Preston. 



A. C. Beckwith. 
Nat. Baker. 
George T. Beck. 



THE TERRITORIES. 



A. K. Delaney. 



A. G. Oliver. 
A. C. Baker. 
E. E. Ellinwood. 



ALASKA. 
ARIZONA. 

AT LARGE. 



James Sheakley. 



M. J. Nugent. 
L. C. Hughes. 
H. T. Smith. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

AT LARGE. 



James L. Norris. 



Henry E. Davis. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



69 



INDIAN TERRITORY. 

AT LARGE. 



W. C. Jackson. 
L. B. Bell. 



Felix Martinez 
Idus L. Tielder. 
G. A. Richardson. 



H. A. Haskins. 



NEW MEXICO. 

AT LARGE. 



OKLAHOMA. 

AT LARGE. 

UTAH. 
AT LARGE. 



Henry P. Henderson. 



Solomon E. Jackson. 
John S. Sneed. 



Bernard Seligman. 
E. V. Long. 
E. V. Chavez. 



John T. Levey. 



John T. Caine. 



THE CHAIR : The next business in order will be the report of 
the Committee on Permanent Organization. 

Mr. W. S. Fordyce, of Arkansas, arose and stated 
that the Committee was ready to report. The report 
was sent to the platform, and read by the Secretary, as 
follows : 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PERMANENT ORGANIZATION. 



CHICAGO, June 22, 1892. 



To the National Democratic Convention: 



Your Committee on Permanent Organization have the honor to 
submit the following report, and recommend its adoption by the 
Convention, viz : 

FOR PRESIDENT OF THE CONVENTION : 

WILLIAM L. WILSON. 
Of West Virginia. 

FOR SECRETARY OF THE CONVENTION : 

SIMON P. SHEERIN, 
Of Indiana. 



60 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



FOR ASSISTANT SECRETARIES 



EDWARD L. MERRITT, Illinois. 
WM. H. DOYLE, Pennsylvania. 
HAMBLETON SHKPPERD, Virginia. 
CLINTON TILLERY, Missouri. 
L. E. ROWLEY, Michigan. 



ROBERT E. WILSON, Mississippi. 
CHARLES R. DEFREEST, New York. 
JAMES C. STRAIN, Illinois. 
THOMAS BRADY, Minnesota. 



FOR CHIEF READING SECRETARY : 

NICHOLAS M. BELL, 
Of Missouri. 



FOR ASSISTANT READING SECRETARIES : 



MARTIN MORRISON, Indiana. 
CATO SELLS, Iowa. 
H. S. MARTIN, Kansas. 
BERNARD BROWN, Montana. 



WM. E. THOMPSON, Michigan. 
WM. WILKINS CARR, Pennsylvania. 
HENRY J. LYNN, Tennessee. 
THOMAS M. KNAPP, Missouri. 



FOR SERGEANT-AT-ARMS : 

RICHARD J. BRIGHT, 
Of Indiana. 

FOR CHIEF ASSISTANT SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

JOHN P. HOPKINS, 
Of Illinois. 



FOR ASSISTANT SERGEANT-AT-ARMS : 



L. B. WHITFIELD, Alabama. 
W. S. BANCROFT, Arkansas. 
N. ROSENBERG, California. 
JOHN CORDON, Idaho. 
LEVI MOCK, Indiana. 
HARRY EVANS, Iowa. 
E. E. MURPHY, Kansas. 
THOMAS L. KEARNS V Louisiana. 
E. O. MAHONEY, Maryland. 
GEORGE W. THOMPSON, Michigan. 



D. O'BRIEN, Minnesota. 

HUGH McGowN, Missouri. 

G. A. LIBBER, North Dakota. 

GEORGE H. SEALS, Ohio. 

JOHN McCALL, South Carolina. 

J. A. HOUHAHAN, South Dakota. 

GEO. W. FULTON, JR. , Texas. 

G. W. KELLY, Vermont. 

H. R. HERD, Wyoming. 

B. F. LAFAYETTE, Indian Territory. 



FOR OFFICIAL STENOGRAPHER : 

EDWARD B. DICKINSON, 
Of New York. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



61 



And representing the different States, as recommended 
by their respective delegations, the following, viz : 



VICE PRESIDENTS : 



Alabama W. F. Vandiver. 
Arkansas J. G. Fletcher. 
California J. D. Carr. 
Colorado Dr. Henry Paul. 
Connecticut N. G. Osborn. 
Delaware H. R. Cole. 
Florida A. B. Hawkins. 
Georgia J. M. Griggs. 
Idaho R. C. Johnson. 
Illinois N. E. Worthington. 
Indiana James Murdock. 
Iowa Lucius Wells. 
Kansas W. C. Perry. 
Kentucky Thos. E. Moss. 
Louisiana John Fitzpatrick. 
Maine D. J. McGillicuddy. 
Maryland Lewis L. Waters. 
Massachusetts A. C. Houghton. 
Michigan Wellington R. Burt. 
Minnesota P. B. Winston. 
Mississippi H. L. Muldrow. 
Missouri W. II. Wallace. 
Montana Frank G. Higgins. 
Nebraska John E. Boyd. 
Nevada E. P. Hardesty. 
New Hampshire Geo. B. Chandler. 



New Jersey John Hone, Jr. 
New York Roswell P. Flower. 
North Carolina Marshall M. Phinnix 
North Dakota]. E. Campbell. 
Ohio Robert Blee. 
Oregon T. G. Reames. 
Pennsylvania Chas. Robinson. 
Rhode Island Francis L. O'Reilly. 
South Carolina B. R. Tillman. 
South Dakota Peter Couchman. 
Tennessee Julius A. Taylor. 
7Vjrfl.r John A. Ireland. 
Vermont J. H. Jackson. 
Virginia S. Wellford Corbin. 
Washington -H. S. Blandford. 
West Virginia A. T. Matthews. 
Wisconsin William Carson. 
Wyoming Colin Hunter. 
Alaska A. K. Delaney. 
Arizona A. G. Oliver. 
Dist. of Columbia Chas. Van Dorre. 
Indian Territory W. C. Jackson. 
New Mexico G. A. Richardson. 
Oklahoma John I. Levey. 
UtahH. P. Henderson. 



SECRETARIES : 



Alabama L. Strauss. 
Arkansas Julius Lesser. 
California J. C. Kays. 
Colorado William Bailey. 
Connecticut None reported. 
Delaware Chas. W. McPhee. 
Florida N. P. Bishop. 
Georgia Bascomb Merrick. 
Idaho J. C. Rosown. 
Illinois James C. Strain. 
Indiana Frank Burk. 
Iowa M. R. Jackson. 
Kansas B. J. Sheridan. 
Kentucky?,. H. Sullivan. 
Louisiana Geo. M. Robertson. 
Maine D. C. Parker. 



Maryland Murray Vandiver. 
Massachusetts (None reported). 
Michigan Clarence Tinker. 
Minnesota C. J. Haines. 
Mississippi R. E. Wilson. 
Missouri W. S. Anthonv. 
Montana F. H. Sidney. 
Nebraska (None Reported). 
Nevada Robert Lewers. 
New Hampshire D. F. O'Connor. 
New Jersey M. T. Barrett. 
New York Patrick H. McCurren. 
North Carolina (None reported). 
North Dakota Andrew Blewett. 
Ohio Frank Huffman. 
Oregon?,. F. Flood. 



62 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



Pennslyvania Geo. S. Fleming. 
Rhode Island Amos J. Dawley. 
South Carolina J. W. Stokes. 
South Dakota Ambrose W. Mullen. 
Tennessee Charles Ridley. 
Texas Yancey Lewis. 
Vermont H. E. Fitzgerald. 
Virginia (None reported.) 
Washington (None reported.) 
West Virginia E. R. McGuin. 

W. H. PHELPS, 

Secretary. 



Wisconsin (None reported). 
Wyoming D. C. Preston. 
Alaska James Sheakley. 
Arizona (None reported). 
Dist. of Columbia]. N. McGill. 
Indian Territory S. E. Jackson. 
New Mexico E. V. Chavez. 
Oklahoma (None reported). 
Utah John T. Caine. 

F. W. FORDYCE, 

Chairman. 



THE CHAIR : The question is on the adoption of the report from 
the Committee on Permanent Organization. 

The report was unanimously adopted. 

THE CHAIR: Mr. Dickinson, of Michigan, is recognized. 

MR. DON M. DICKINSON : I move that a committee of five be 
appointed by the Chair to notify the permanent Chairman, Mr. 
Wilson, of his selection, and to escort him to the platform. 
This motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair will appoint as that committee Don M. 
Dickinson, of Michigan ; ]. F. Duncombe, of Iowa ; John R. Fel- 
lows, of New York; Joseph C. Rich, of Alabama, and Martin L. 
Clardy, of Missouri. The gentlemen will assemble in front of the 
Secretary's desk. 

The committee thus appointed having escorted Mr. 
Wilson to the platform, the Chair said : 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen, it gives me much pleasure to present 
to you, as Permanent Chairman of this Convention, one of the 
bravest Democrats in America, Mr. William L. Wilson, of West 
Virginia. 

Mr. Wilson addressed the Convention as follows : 

ADDRESS OF HON. WILLIAM L. WILSON. 

GENTLEMEN OF THE CONVENTION : I thank you most heartily 
for this honor. I shall try to meet the duties of the high position 
to which you call me with the spirit of fairness and equality that 
is Democracy. This Convention has a high and patriotic work to 
perform. We owe much to our party ; we owe much to our 
country. The mission of the Democratic party is to fight for the 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 63 

under dog. When that party is out of power we may be sure there 
is an under dog to fight for, and that the under dog is generally the 
American people. When that party is out of power we may be 
sure that some party is in control of our Government that repre- 
sents a section, and not the whole country ; that stands for a class, 
and not the whole people. 

Never was this truth brought home to us more than by the recent 
Convention at Minneapolis. We are not deceived as to the temper ; 
we are not in doubt as to the purposes of our opponents. Having 
taxed us for years, without excuse and without mercy, they now 
propose to disarm us of further power to resist their exactions. 
Republican success in this campaign, whether we look to the party 
platform, the party candidates, or the utterances of the party lead- 
ers, means that the people are to be stripped of their franchise 
through force bills, in order that they may be stripped of their sub- 
stance through tariff bills. 

Free government is self-government. There is no self-govern- 
ment where the people do not control their own elections and levy 
their own taxes. When either of these rights is taken away or 
diminished, a breach is made, not in the outer defenses, but in the 
citadel of our freedom. For years we have been struggling to re- 
cover the lost right of taxing ourselves, and now we are threatened 
with the loss of the greater right of governing ourselves. The loss 
of the one follows in necessary succession the loss of the other. 
When you confer on government the power of dealing out wealth, 
you unchain every evil that can prey upon, and eventually destroy, 
free institutions excessive taxation, class taxation, billion-dollar 
Congresses, a corrupt civil service, a debauched ballot-box and pur- 
chased elections. In every campaign the privilege of taxing the 
people will be bartered for contributions to corrupt them at the 
polls; after every victory there will be a new McKinley bill to 
repay those contributions with taxes wrung from the people. 

For every self-governing people there can be no more momen- 
tous question than the question of taxation. It is the question, as 
Mr. Burke truly said, around which all the great battles of freedom 
have been fought. It is the question out of which flow all the 
issues of government. Until we settle, this question wisely, perma- 
nently, justly, we build all other reforms on a foundation of sand. 
We and the great party we represent are to-day for tariff reform, 
because it is the only gateway to genuine Democratic government. 



64 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

The distinguished leader who presided over the Republican 
Convention boasted that he did not know what tariff reform was. 
Whoever said that he did ? Let us hope, with that charity " that 
beareth all things, and believeth all things," that he is truly as 
ignorant as he vaunts himself to be. Unfortunately the people are 
not so ignorant of the meaning of protection, at least of the pro- 
tection which is dealt out to them in the bill that bears his name. 
They see that meaning "writ large" to-day, in a prostrated agri- 
culture, in a shackled commerce, in stricken industries, in the 
compulsory idleness of labor, in law-made wealth, in the discontent 
of the workingman and the despair of the farmer. They know by 
hard experience that his protection as a system of taxation is but the 
old crafty scheme by which the rich compel the poor to pay the 
expenses of government. They know by hard experience that pro- 
tection as a system of tribute is but the old crafty scheme by which 
the power of taxation of the people is made the private property of 
a few of the people. 

Tariff reform seeks to readjust this system of taxation, and to 
purge away this system of tribute. It means that we have not 
reached the goal of perfect freedom so long as any citizen is forced 
by law to pay tribute to any other citizen, and until our taxes are 
proportioned to the ability and duty of the taxpayer, rather than to 
his ignorance, his weakness and his patience. 

Governor McKinley further charges that the Democratic party 
believes in taxing ourselves. I'm afraid, gentlemen, we must admit 
this charge. What right or excuse have we for taxing anybody 
else? With a continent for a country, with freedom and intelligence 
as the instruments for its development, we stand disgraced in the 
eyes of mankind if we cannot, and if we do not, support our own 
government. We can throw that support on other people only by 
beggary or by force. If we use the one we are a pauper nation ; 
if we use the other we are a pirate nation. 

The Democratic party does not intend that we shall be either. 
No more does it intend that they shall falsely call it taxing other 
people to transfer our taxes from the possession of those who own 
the property of the country to the bellies and backs of those who do 
the work of the country. It believes that frugality is an essential 
virtue of free government. It believes that taxes should be limited 
to public needs and be levied by the plain rule of justice and 
equality. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 65 

But, gentlemen, we are confronted with a new cry in this cam- 
paign. The Republican party, says Governor McKinley, now stands 
for protection and reciprocity. He was for protection alone when 
he framed his bill in the House, or rather permitted its beneficiaries 
to frame it for him ; and firmly resisted all efforts of the statesman 
from Maine to annex reciprocity to it. No wonder that he favors 
the reciprocity added by the Senate. You may explore the pages 
of burlesque literature for anything more supremely ludicrous than 
the so-called reciprocity of the McKinley bill. It is not reciprocity 
at all. It is retaliation, and, worst of all, retaliation on our own 
people. It punishes American citizens for the necessities or the 
follies of other people. It says to a few small countries south of it : 
" If you are forced by your necessities or led by your follies to make 
bread higher and scarcer to your people, we will make shoes and 
sugar higher and scarcer to our people." 

And now we are told that reciprocity is to be their battle-cry. 
Already we are regaled with pictures of Benjamin Harrison clad in 
armour, and going forth to battle for reciprocity on a plumed steed. 
Simple Simon fishing for whales in his mother's rain barrel and in 
great triumph capturing an occasional wiggle-waggle, is the only 
true realistic picture of the reciprocity of the McKinley bill. 

We are for the protection that protects, and for the reciprocity 
that reciprocates. We are in favor of protecting every man in the 
enjoyment of the fruit of his labor, diminished only by his proper 
contribution to the support of the Government, and we are for that 
real reciprocity, not through dickering diplomacy and Presidential 
proclamations, but by laws of Congress, that removes all unneces- 
sary obstacles between the American producer and the markets he 
is obliged to seek for his products. 

But, gentlemen, I must not keep you from the work that is before 
you. Let us take up that work as brothers, as patriots, as Demo- 
crats. In so large a convention as this, larger in number than any 
previous gathering of our party, and representing a larger constit- 
uency than ever before assembled in any convention, it would be 
strange, ominously strange, if there were not some differences of 
opinion on matters of policy, and some differences of judgment or 
of preference as to the choice of candidates. It is the sign of a free 
Democracy that is many-voiced, and, within the limits of true free- 
dom, tumultuous. It wears no collars ; it serves no masters. We 
cannot shut our eyes to the fact that many who have heretofore fol- 
lowed our flag with enthusiasm are to-day calling, with excusable 



66 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

impatience, for immediate relief from the evils that encompass them. 
Whatever can be done to relieve the burdens, to restore, broaden 
and increase the prosperity of the people and every part of them, 
within the limits and according to the principles of free govern- 
ment, that the Democratic party dares to promise, that it will do 
with all its might. Whatever is beyond this, whatever is incompati- 
ble with free government and our historic liberty, it dares not 
promise to anyone. 

Inveterate evils in the body politic cannot be cured in a moment, 
any more than inveterate diseases in the human system. Whoever 
professes the power to do so is himself deceived, or himself a de- 
ceiver. Our party is not a quack nor a worker of miracles. 

It is not for me, gentlemen, the impartial servant of you all, to 
attempt to foreshadow what your choice will be or ought to be, 
in the selection of your candidates. You will make that selection 
under your own sense of responsibility to the people you represent 
and to your country. One thing only I venture to say : Whoever 
may.be your chosen leader in this campaign, no telegram will flash 
across the sea from the castle of absentee tariff lords to congratu- 
late him. But from the home of labor, from the fireside of the 
toiler, from the hearts of all who love justice and do equity, who 
wish and intend that our matchless heritage of freedom shall be 
the common wealth of all our people, and the common opportunity 
of all our youth, will come up prayers for his success and recruits 
for the great Democratic host that must strike down the beast of 
sectionalism and the Moloch of monopoly, before we can have ever 
again a people's government, administered by a people's faithful 
representatives. 

Mr. Clardy, of Missouri, offered the following reso- 
lution, which was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Convention are due and are 
hereby tendered to the Temporary Chairman, the Hon. William C. 
Owens, for the able and impartial manner in which he has discharged 
his duties. 

THE CHAIR : The Committee on Rules is ready to report. 
The gentleman from Indiana will read the report. 

MR. WILLIAM E. ENGLISH, of Indiana, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Rules : Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen : As Chairman of 
the Committee on Rules and Order of Business of this Convention, 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 67 

I have been instructed by the majority of that committee to submit 
the following report : 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON RULES AND ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

To the National Democratic Convention : 

Your Committee on Rules and Order of Business beg leave to 
submit as follows : 

We recommend the following order of business to be observed by 
this Convention : 

First Report of the Committee on Credentials. 

Second Report of the Committee on Permanent Organization. 

Third Report of the Committee on Resolutions. 

Fourth Nomination of a candidate for the office of President of 
the United States. 

Fifth Nomination of a candidate for the office of Vice-President 
of the United States. 

Your Committee further recommends that the rules of the last 
Democratic Convention shall be adopted for the government of this 
Convention.* 

This report is respectfully submitted, signed by all the Committee 
on Rules. 

I now move the adoption of the recommendation of the Committee. 
The report as submitted was unanimously adopted. 

The Secretary requested the secretaries of all dele- 
gations to hand to the official stenographer, before the 
close of the Convention, a full list of their respective 
delegations, carefully and plainly written, to avoid errors 
in spelling and other inaccuracies in the names of del- 
egates as they are to appear in the official record of the 
Convention. 

THE CHAIR : The next order of business is the report of the 
Committee on Resolutions. Is that Committee ready to report? 



*For the rules referred to, see page 29 of this Record. 



68 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

There was no response to this inquiry. Mr. William 
H. Phelps, of Missouri, secured the floor and, coming 
to the front of the platform, presented a gavel, made of 
zinc, to President Wilson, in the following words : 

MR. PHELPS : Mr. Chairman In behalf of the zinc producers 
and miners of Missouri, I present to you this gavel, not made of tin 
nor stolen from a Nebraska homestead, but mined and made in 
Jasper County, Missouri, and bearing the inscription, "We need no 
protection," as a protest against the mockery of legislation which 
imposes a useless tariff of thirty per cent upon the metal as a pretext 
for taxing the lamp, pick, shirt, and blanket of the miner more than 
forty per cent. 

The Missouri zinc fields, like the American wheat fields, are the 
most productive in the world. The same market which fixes the 
price of the farmer's wheat regulates the price of the miner's zinc, 
and he has long since learned, what the farmer is rapidly learning, 
that the market in which he sells the product of his labor, is the one 
in which he should purchase the implements of his avocation and 
the necessities of his household, and he is ready to do his part in 
giving the electoral vote of Missouri to the nominee of this Conven- 
tion by 40,000 majority. 

At the close of Mr. Phelps' speech, he handed the 
gavel to the President. 

THE CHAIR: The zinc miners of Missouri, through Mr. Phelps, 
of the Missouri delegation, present to this Convention a gavel as a 
protest against any attempted protection upon that which they 
produce, with the expectation and hope that this Convention or its 
nominee will use this gavel to knock out of the tariff the protection 
upon zinc. 

THE CHAIR: Is the Committee on Platform ready to report? 
The Secretary of the Convention will now call the roll of the States, 
that they may hand in the names of the members of the National 
Committee and members of the Notification Committee. The Clerk 
will call the roll. 

MR. J. W. ORR, of Kansas : Our delegation selected among other 
committeemen and other selections, a Vice-President. Shall we 
report the name of our Vice-President to the Convention? 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



69 



THE CHAIR : The name has already been reported. The Secre- 
tary will proceed with calling the roll of States for National Com- 
mittee and names of the Committee on Notification. 

MR. BELL (Chief Reading Clerk) : I am requested to ask each 
delegation to send up a written statement giving the names for 
National Committeemen and the Committee on Notification. 

I will not call the roll, but each delegation can send the names 
to the desk of the Official Stenographer. 

The following gentlemen were selected as members 
of the National Democratic Committee and of the Noti- 
fication Committee : 



NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 



Alabama Henry D. Clayton. 
Arkansas U. M. Rose. 
California M. F. Tarpey. 
Colorado Chas.' S. Thomas. 
Connecticut Carlos French. 
Delaware Lewis C. Vandegrift. 
Florida Samuel Pasco. 
Georgia Clark Howell, Jr. 
Idaho Frank W. Beane. 
Illinois Ben. T. Cable. 
Indiana S. P. Sheerin. 
Iowa J. J. Richardson. 
Kansas Chas. W. Blair. 
Kentucky Thomas H. Sherley. 
Louisiana J ames Jeffries. 
Maine Arthur Sewall. 
Maryland Arthur P. Gorman. 
Massachusetts Josiah Quincy. 
Michigan Daniel J. Campau. 
Minnesota Michael Doran. 
Mississippi Chas. B. Howry. 
Missouri John G. Prather. 
Montana A. J. Davidson. 
Nebraska Tobias Castor. 
Nevada R. P. Keating. 
New Hampshire AlvahW. Sulloway. 



New Jersey Miles Ross. 

New York William F. Sheehan. 

North Carolina M. W. Ransom. 

North Dakota Wm. C. Leistikow. 

Ohio Calvin S. Brice. 

Oregon E. D. McKee. 

Pennsylvania Wm. F. Harrity. 

Rhode Island Samuel R. Honey. 

South Carolina M. L. Donaldson. 

South Dakota James M. Woods. 

Tennessee Holmes Cummings. 

Texas O. T. Holt. 

Vermont Bradley B. Smalley. 

Virginia Basil B. Gordon. 

Washington Hugh C. Wallace. 

West Virginia John Sheridan. 

Wisconsin E. C. Wall. 

Wyoming W. L. Kuykendall. 

Alaska A. K. Delaney. 

Arizona Chas. M. Shannon. 

Dist. of Columbia James L. Norris. 

New Mexico H. B. Ferguson. 

Oklahoma T. M. Richardson. 

Utah Samuel A. Merritt. 

Indian Territory Dr. E. N. Allen. 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



NOTIFICATION COMMITTEE. 



Alabama Rufus N. Rhodes. 
Arkansas B. R. Davidson. 
California Stephen M. White. 
Colorado Frank Adams. 
Conntcticut Robert J. Vance. 
Delaware Robt. J. Reynolds. 
Florida W. D. Chipley. 
Georgia John Triplett. 
Idaho R. Z. Johnson. 
Illinois Thomas M. Thornton. 
Indiana William A. Cullop. 
Iowa L. M. Martin. 
Kansas James W. Orr. 
Kentucky John P. Salyer. 
Louisiana A. W. Crandall. 
Maine Edw. C. Swett. 
Maryland L. Victor Baughman. 
Massachusetts Patrick Maguire. 
Michigan Richard A. Montgomery. 
Minnesota Charles M. Foote. 
Mississippi W. V. Sullivan. 
Missouri James W. Walker. 
Montana S. T. Hauser. 
Nebraska John A. Crayton. 
Nevada C. W. Hinchcliffe. 
New Hampshire Henry R. Parker. 



New Jersey George H. Barker. 
New York Norman E. Mack. 
North Carolina Kope Elias. 
North Dakota Andrew Blewett. 
Ohio R. R. Holden. 
Oregon Henry Blackman. 
Pennsylvania J. Henry Cochran. 
Rhode Island Fayette E. Bartlett. 
South Carolina T. D. Jervey, Jr. 
South Dakota Wm. Van Epps. 
Tennessee -W '. A. Collier. 
Texas J. H. McLeary. 
Vermont Oscar C. Miller. 
Virginia Abraham Fulkerson. 
Washington John Collins. 
West Virginia John Sheridan. 
Wisconsin James Barden. 
Wyoming Robert H. Homer. 
Alaska James Sheakley. 
Arizona E. E. Ellinwood. 
Dist. of Columbia Henry E. Davis. 
New Mexico E. V. Long. 
Oklahoma T. M. Richardson. 
Utah Henry P. Henderson. 



MR. WALKER, of Missouri : I move that the Hon. John G. Car- 
lisle, of Kentucky, be invited to come to the platform and address 
the Convention. 

This motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIR : I appoint Mr. Walker, of Missouri, and Governor 
Porter, of Tennessee, a committee to escort Mr. Carlisle to the 
chair. 

After waiting- a proper time for the committee to con- 
vey the request of the Convention to Mr. Carlisle, the 
Chair said : 

Gentlemen of the Convention, the committee reports that Senator 
Carlisle is not present. 

MR. FORDYCE, of Arkansas : I move that ex-Gov. James E. 
Campbell, of Ohio, be requested to address the Convention. 

This motion was adopted. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 71 

THE CHAIR : I will appoint Mr. Fordyce and Mr. Martin, of 
We'st Virginia, to escort Gov. Campbell to the platform. 

The committee having performed this duty, the Chair 
said : 

THE CHAIR : Your enthusiasm shows that among the quadrupeds 
the camel is the favorite Democratic animal. I introduce to you 
now ex-Gov. Campbell, of Ohio. 

Ex-Gov. CAMPBELL : Mr. Chairman, I am afraid that this audi- 
ence has not any especial amusement in hand. [Loud cries of 
" Louder."] I would be glad to talk louder, but there are too 
many Democrats here for any one man to talk to. I am afraid the 
audience, having no other amusement, wishes, as the Chairman 
insinuates, to trot out the Democratic menagerie. I am exhibited 
on all kinds of occasions, and I certainly would not make an excep- 
tion of this. I am complimented and flattered by your invitation. 
I would not think of repaying that kindness by inflicting a speech 
on you. And if I did, I could but fail by contrast with the mag- 
nificent, the matchless oration delivered to you this day from this 
platform. So I simply thank you, and ask you when November 
rolls around to keep your eye on Ohio. 

Mr. Quinn, of Pennsylvania, moved that the Hon. 
William U. Hensel, the Attorney-General of Pennsyl- 
vania, be invited to address the Convention. 

The motion was adopted. 

THE CHAIR : I appoint Mr. Quinn and Mr. Allen, of Missouri, 
to escort Mr. Hensel to the platform. 

MR. F. G. DAVIS, of Ohio : I move you, sir, that the Chair ap- 
point a committee of two to wait on the Committee on Resolutions 
for the purpose of ascertaining when the'y will be ready to report. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, it is moved by Mr. 
Davis, of Ohio, that the Chair appoint a committee of two to wait 
on the Committee on Platform and ascertain when they will prob- 
ably be ready to report to the Convention. 

The motion was adopted. 

Mr. Davis, of Ohio, and Mr. Hensel, of Pennsylvania, 
. were appointed the committee. 



72 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

MR. GEO. W. OCHS, of Tennessee : I move you that ex-Gov. 
Bob Taylor, of Tennessee, be invited to address the Convention., 

THE CHAIR : I am requested by the Governor to say that he is 
not well enough to respond. Mr. Henry, of Mississippi, moves that 
the Convention invite the Hon. Henry Watterson to address it in 
his own matchless manner. 

The motion was adopted, and Mr. Henry, of Missis- 
sippi, and Mr. Foster, of Indiana, were appointed a 
committee to wait on Mr. Watterson. 

Mr. W. BOURKE COCKRAN : Mr. President, it is impossible to 
follow the proceedings of the Convention while the aisles are occu- 
pied and conversation is carried on in the neighborhood of the 
delegations. I will ask that order be preserved before any business 
is undertaken by the Convention. I make that point of order. 

THE CHAIR : The point of order made by the gentleman from 
New York (Mr. Cockran) is well taken. The gentlemen in the 
aisles will take their seats. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair is requested by the Tennessee delega- 
tion to invite ex-Gov. Taylor, of Tennessee, to address the Conven- 
tion. 

There was such great confusion that the Chair was 
unable to gain the attention of the Convention, but 
finally recognized W. Bourke Cockran, of New York, 
who said : 

Mr. Chairman, I desire to ask the nature of the business before 
the Convention, and that it be stated, so that the delegates may 
understand it. 

THE CHAIR : Gov. Taylor has been invited to address the Con- 
vention, but the Chair has received a message from the Governor 
that he was not well enough to speak, and in deference to that sug- 
gestion of Gov. Taylor, the Chair did not put the motion. 

MR. J. S. WILLIAMS, of Mississippi : Mr. Chairman, I move you 
that the Hon. W. Bourke Cockran, of New York, be invited to ad- 
dress this meeting. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair will put no motion until the Convention 
comes to order. 

MR. COCKRAN : I expect to have some business with this Con- 
vention later on. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 73 

The speaker was interrupted by cries of " Platform" 
and " Louder." After the confusion had subsided Mr. 
Cockran said: 

Mr. Chairman, I' can neither be sent to the platform nor taken 
from it by any noise. I desire to state to the Convention that 1 
expect to have business with it later on. For the present I believe 
that if there be no other business to occupy the attention of the 
Convention the delegates had better fortify their systems by sub- 
stantial refreshments. The intellectual refreshment which the 
Chair afforded us will not be eclipsed by any orator that will take 
the platform on this day, or during the session of this Convention. 

Hon. Don M. Dickinson, of Michigan, was recognized 
by the Chair, and moved that the Convention take a 
recess until 5 o'clock P. M. 

This motion was adopted, and the Convention took a 
recess until 5 o'clock p. M. this day.' 



74 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



SECOND DAY. 



EVENING SESSION. 

CHICAGO, June 2, 1892. 

The Chairman called the Convention to order at 5:33, 
as follows : 

THE CHAIR : The Convention will be in order. Gentlemen will 
please take their seats. Prayer will be offered by Rev. Thomas E. 
Green, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

PRAYER. 

Let us pray. We praise Thee, O God, and we acknowledge Thee 
to be the Lord. All the earth doth worship Thee, the Father 
Everlasting. We adore Thee as the King of kings and Ruler of 
nations, for of Thy will they are and have their being. We worship 
Thee as the Source of wisdom and truth, for of Triee comes every 
good and perfect gift. We adore 'Thee as the great All-Father, 
Who hast made of one kindred all the nations of the earth. 
Vouchsafe to reveal Thyself to us at this time in Thy manifold rela- 
tion of Creator, Father and Guide. Rule Thou over us, for Thou 
art mighty. Give us wisdom, for we are ignorant. Still the turbu- 
lent voices of earth's contentions, for Thou art upright. Especially 
grant Thy blessing to this Convention, assembled for the great con- 
cerns of state, gathered from all the broad face of this land, covered 
with Thy manifold blessings. We seek Thee, as in our bounden 
duty, for Thy guidance and Thy grace, and as we come at this time 
to the great concern of this gathering, grant Thou especially Thy 
mighty benediction of wisdom and of truth ; and as these Thy servants 
shall choose one who shall be their leader in the contest for the 
magistracy of this great nation, give Thou them wisdom that they 
may choose aright. May he whom they select be a man of clean 
hands and pure heart, one who is above all selfish ambition, whose 
aim shall be his country's and his God's ; and in whatever work we 
may engage in the days to come may the right be victorious over 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 75 

wrong, may liberty be victorious over oppression, may virtue be 
victorious over vice, may that righteousness that exalteth a nation 
be ours, and may Thy blessing be upon us and upon our children 
now and forevermore. Amen. 

MR. W. W. VANDIVERE, of Georgia : I move that the Conven- 
tion adjourn until 11 o'clock to-morrow morning. 

This motion was lost. 

Gov. GLICK, of Kansas : As there is nothing before the Conven- 
tion; I desire to offer this resolution, which I will send to the plat- 
form. 

This resolution went to the Committee on Resolutions 
under the rule. 

MR. JOHN POWER, of Michigan : I am requested to announce to 
the Chair that the Committee on Platform will be ready to report 
in fifteen minutes. 

THE CHAIR : The Committee on Resolutions have ended their 
labors, and will be ready to present their report by the chairman 
of that committee at once, Mr. Jones, of Missouri. 

MR. JONES : Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention I 
presume that this committee, in its relation to the Convention, pre- 
sents a case of being better late than never. I wish to say, how- 
ever, in behalf of my colleagues, that any delay to which you have 
been subjected was due to no lack of diligence or industry on our 
part. If you will keep a little quieter there will be no difficulty, 
perhaps, in hearing. 

I am instructed by the Committee on Resolutions to present to 
you, as the report of that committee, the following resolutions, and 
to move their adoption. In order that you may distinctly hear 
what the committee has prepared, I intend to ask a gentleman who is 
as familiar as myself with the phraseology of the platform to read it 
for me, and when it has been read I shall move the previous ques- 
tion upon the adoption of the platform. I ask Senator Vilas, of 
Wisconsin, to read the resolutions. 

Mr. T. M. PATTERSON, of Colorado : Mr. Chairman, in view of 
that statement, I desire to say that I represent a minority of the 
Committee on Resolutions, and I desire to announce that the 
minority expects to be heard, in order to present its report before 
the previous question shall be put. 



76 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Mr. Vilas then proceeded to read the resolution, as 
follows : 

The representatives of the Democratic party of the United States, 
in National Convention assembled, do reaffirm their allegiance to 
the principles of the party as formulated by Jefferson and exempli- 
fied by the long and illustrious line of his successors in Democratic 
leadership, from Madison to Cleveland* ; we believe the public 
welfare demands that these principles be applied to the conduct of 
the Federal Government through the accession of power of* the 
party that advocates them ; and we solemnly declare that the need 
of a return to these fundamental principles of free popular govern- 
ment, based on home rule and individual liberty, was never more 
urgent than now, when the tendency to centralize all power at the 
Federal Capital has become a menace to the reserved rights of the 
States that strikes at the very roots of our government under the 
Constitution as framed by the fathers of the republic. 

We warn the people of our common country, jealous for the pres- 
ervation of their free institutions, that the policy of Federal control 
of elections to which the Republican party has committed itself is 
fraught with the gravest dangers, scarcely less momentous than 
would result from a revolution practically establishing monarchy 
on the ruins of the republic. It strikes at the North as well as at the 
South, and injures the colored citizen even more than the white ; 
it means a horde of deputy marshals at every polling-place, armed 
with Federal power, returning boards appointed and controlled by 
Federal authority, the outrage of the electoral rights of the people 
in the several States, the subjugation of the colored people to the 
control of the party in power and the reviving of race antagonisms, 
now happily abated, of the utmost peril to the safety and happiness 
of all : a measure deliberately and justly described by a leading 
Republican Senator as " the most infamous bill that ever crossed 
the threshold of the Senate." Such a policy, if sanctioned by law, 
would mean the dominance of a self-perpetuating oligarchy of office- 
holders, and the party first intrusted with its machinery could be 
dislodged from power only by an appeal to the reserved right of 
the people to resist oppression, which is inherent in all self-govern- 
ing communities. Two years ago this revolutionary policy was 



*At this point in the reading of the report, all proceedings were interrupted by a scene ot 
tumultuous confusion. For twenty minutes after the mention of Mr. Cleveland's name Senator 
Vilas waited for the cheers, shouts, applause, etc., etc., to subside, before he could proceed. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 77 

emphatically condemned by the people at the polls ; but in con- 
tempt of that verdict the Republican party has defiantly declared 
in its latest authoritative utterance that its success in the coming 
elections will mean the enactment of the Force Bill and the usur- 
pation of despotic control over elections in all the States. 

Believing that the preservation of republican government in the 
United States is dependent upon the defeat of this policy of legal- 
ized force and fraud, we invite the support of all citizens who desire 
to see the Constitution maintained in its integrity with the laws 
pursuant thereto which have given our country a hundred years of 
unexampled prosperity ; and we pledge the Democratic party, if it 
be intrusted with power, not only to the defeat of the Force Bill,, 
but also to relentless opposition to the Republican policy of profli- 
gate expenditure which, in the short space of two years, has 
squandered an enormous surplus and emptied an overflowing Treas- 
ury, after piling new burdens of taxation upon the already overtaxed 
labor of the country. 

We reiterate the oft-repeated doctrines of the Democratic party, 
that the necessity of the government is the only justification for 
taxation, and whenever a tax is unnecessary it is unjustifiable ; that 
when custom-house taxation is levied upon articles of any kind pro- 
duced in this country, the difference between the cost of labor here 
and labor abroad, when such a difference exists, fully measures any 
possible benefits to labor, and the enormous additional impositions 
of the existing tariff fall with crushing force upon our farmers and 
workingmen, and, for the mere advantage of the few whom it 
enriches, exact from labor a grossly unjust share of the expenses of 
government, and we demand such a revision of the tariff laws as 
will remove their iniquitous inequalities, lighten their oppressions, 
and put them on a constitutional and equitable basis. 

But in making reductions in taxes, it is not proposed to injure 
any domestic industries, but rather to promote their healthy growth. 
From the foundation of this government taxes collected at the cus- 
tom house have been the chief source of Federal revenue. Such 
they must continue. to be. Moreover, many industries have come 
to rely upon legislation for successful continuance, so that any 
change of law must be at every step regardful of the labor and cap- 
ital thus involved. The process of reform must be subject in the 
execution of this plain dictate of justice. 

We denounce the McKinley tariff law enacted by the Fifty-first 
Congress as the culminating atrocity of class legislation ; we endorse 



78 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

the efforts made by the Democrats of the* present Congress to 
modify its most oppressive features in the direction of free raw ma- 
terials and cheaper manufactured goods that enter into general 
consumption ; and we promise its repeal as one of the beneficent 
results that will follow the action of the people in intrusting power 
to the Democratic party. Since the McKinley tariff went into 
operation there have been ten reductions of the wages of laboring 
men to one increase. We deny that there has been any increase of 
prosperity to the country since that tariff went into operation, and 
we point to the dullness and distress, the wage reductions and 
strikes in the iron trade, as the best possible evidence that no such 
prosperity has resulted from the KcKinley act. 

We call the attention of thoughtful Americans to the fact that 
after thirty years of restrictive taxes against the importation of for- 
eign wealth, in exchange for our agricultural surplus, the homes and 
farms of the country have become burdened with a real estate mort- 
gage debt of over $2,500,000,000, exclusive of all other forms of 
indebtedness; that in one of the chief agricultural States of the West 
there appears a real estate mortgage debt averaging $165 per capita 
of the total population ; and that similar conditions and tendencies 
are shown to exist in other agricultural exporting States. We de- 
nounce a policy which fosters no industry so much as it does that 
of the Sheriff. 

Trade interchange on the basis of reciprocal advantages to the 
countries participating is a time-honored doctrine of the Democratic 
faith, but we denounce the sham reciprocity which juggles with the 
people's desire for enlarged foreign markets and freer exchanges by 
pretending to establish closer trade relations for a country whose 
articles of export are almost exclusively agricultural products 
with other countries that are also agricultural, while erecting a 
custom-house barrier of prohibitive tariff taxes against the richest 
countries of the world, that stand ready to take our entire surplus 
of products and to exchange therefor commodities which are neces- 
saries and comforts of life among our own people. 

We recognize in the trusts and combinations, which are designed 
to enable capital to secure more than its just share of the joint 
product of capital and labor, a natural consequence of the prohib- 
itive taxes which prevent the free competition, which is the life of 
honest trade, but believe their worst evils can be abated by law, 
and we demand the rigid enforcement of the laws made to prevent 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 79 

and control them, together with such further legislation in restraint 
of their abuses as experience may show to be necessary. 

The Republican party, while professing a policy of reserving the 
public land for small holdings by actual settlers, has given away the 
people's heritage till now a few railroad and non-resident aliens, 
individual and corporate, possess a larger area than that of all our 
farms between the two seas. The last Democratic administration 
reversed the improvident and unwise policy of the Republican 
party touching the public domain, and reclaimed from corporations 
and syndicates, alien and domestic, and restored to the people 
nearly one hundred million (100,000,000) acres of valuable land to 
be sacredly held as homesteads for our citizens, and we pledge our- 
selves to continue this policy until every acre of land so unlawfully 
held shall be reclaimed and restored to the people. 

We denounce the Republican legislation known as the Sherman 
act of 1890 as a cowardly makeshift, fraught with possibilities of 
danger in the future, which should make all of its supporters, as well 
as its author, anxious for its speedy repeal. We hold to the use of 
both gold and silver as the standard money of the country, and to 
the coinage of both gold and silver without discriminating against 
either metal or charge for mintage, but the dollar unit of coinage 
of both metals must be of equal intrinsic and exchangeable value, 
or be adjusted through international agreement or by such safe- 
guards of legislation as shall insure the maintenance of the party of 
the two metals and the- equal power of every dollar at all times in 
the markets and in the payment of debts ; and we demand that all 
paper currency shall be kept at par with and redeemable in such 
coin. We insist upon this policy as especially necessary for the 
protection of the farmers and laboring classes, the first and most 
defenseless victims of unstable money and a fluctuating currency. 

We recommend that the prohibitory 10 per cent tax on State bank 
issues be repealed. 

Public office is a public trust. We reaffirm the declaration of the 
Democratic National Convention of 1876 for the reform of the civil 
service, and we call for the honest enforcement of all laws regulat- 
ing the same. The nomination of a President, as in the recent Re- 
publican Convention, by delegations composed largely of his 
appointees, holding office at his pleasure, is a scandalous satire 
upon free popular institutions, and a startling illustration of the 
methods by which a Pesident may gratify his ambition. We de- 
nounce a policy under which the Federal officeholders usurp control 



80 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

of party conventions in the States, and we pledge the Democratic 
party to reform these and all other abuses which threaten individual 
liberty and local self-goverment. 

The Democratic party is the only party that has ever given the 
country a foreign policy consistent and vigorous, compelling respect 
abroad and inspiring confidence at home. While avoiding entang- 
ling alliances, it has aimed to cultivate friendly relations with other 
nations, and especially with our neighbors on the American conti- 
nent whose destiny is closely linked with our own, and we view 
with alarm the tendency to a policy of irritation and bluster which 
is liable at any time to confront us with the alternative of humilia- 
tion or war. We favor the maintenance of a navy strong enough 
for all purposes of National defense, and to properly maintain the 
honor and dignity of the country abroad. 

This country has always been the refuge of the oppressed from 
every land exiles for conscience's sake and in the spirit of the 
founders of our government we condemn the oppression practised 
by the Russian Government upon its Lutheran and Jewish subjects, 
and we call upon our National Government, in the interest of jus- 
tice and humanity, by all just and proper means, to use its prompt 
and best efforts to bring about a cessation of these cruel persecu- 
tions in the dominions of the Czar, and to secure to the oppressed 
equal rights. 

We tender our profound and earnest sympathy to those lovers of 
freedom who are struggling for home rule and the great cause of 
local self-government in Ireland. 

We heartily approve all legitimate efforts to prevent the United 
States from being used as the dumping ground for the known crim- 
inals and professional paupers of Europe, and we demand the rigid 
enforcement of the laws against Chinese immigration and the im- 
portation of foreign workmen under contract to degrade American 
labor and lessen its wages, but we condemn and denounce any and 
all attempts to restrict the immigration of the industrious and 
worthy of foreign lands. 

This Convention hereby renews the expression of appreciation of 
the patriotism of the soldiers and sailors of the Union in the war 
for its preservation, and we favor just and liberal pensions for all 
disabled Union soldiers, their widows and dependents, but we de- 
mand that the work of the Pension Office shall be done industri- 
ously, impartially and honestly. We denounce the present admin- 
istration of that office as incompetent, corrupt, disgraceful and dis- 
honest. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 81 

The Federal Government should care for and improve the Missis- 
sippi River and other great waterways of the Republic, so as to 
secure for the interior States easy and cheap transportation to the 
tide-water. When any waterway of the Republic is of sufficient 
importance to demand the aid of the government that such aid 
should be extended upon a definite plan of continuous work until 
permanent improvement is secured. 

For purposes of national defense and the promotion of commerce 
between the States we recognize the early construction of the 
Nicaragua Canal and its protection against foreign control as of 
great importance to the United States. 

Recognizing the World's Columbian Exposition as a national 
undertaking of vast importance, in which the General Government 
has invited the co-operation of all the powers of the world, and ap- 
preciating the acceptance by many of such powers of the invitation 
so extended, and the broad and liberal efforts being made by them 
to contribute to the grandeur of the undertaking, we are of opinion 
that Congress should make such necessary financial provision as 
shall be requisite to the maintenance of the national honor and 
public faith. 

Popular education being the only safe basis of popular suffrage, 
we recommend to the several States most liberal appropriations for 
the public schools. Free common schools are the nursery of good 
government, and they have always received the fostering care of 
the Democratic party, which favors every means of increasing intel- 
ligence. Freedom of education, being an essentiar of civil and 
religious liberty, as well as a necessity for the development of intel- 
ligence, must not be interfered with under any pretext whatever. 
We are opposed to State interference with parental rights and 
rights of conscience in the education of children, as an infringement 
of the fundamental Democratic doctrine that the largest individual 
liberty consistent with the rights of others insures the highest type 
of American citizenship and the best government. 

We approve the action of the present House of Representatives 
in passing bills for the admission into the Union as States the Ter- 
ritories of New Mexico and Arizona, and we favor the early admis- 
sion of all the Territories having the necessary population and 
resources to entitle them to Statehood, and while they remain Ter- 
ritories we hold that the officials appointed to administer the gov- 
ernment of any Territory, together with the District of Columbia, 



82 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

and Alaska, should be bona fide residents of the Territory or Dis- 
trict in which their duties are to be performed. The Democratic 
party believes in home rule and the control of their own affairs by 
the people of the vicinage. 

We favor legislation by Congress and State Legislatures to protect 
the lives and limbs of railway employes, and those of other hazard- 
ous transportation companies, and denounce the inactivity of the 
Republican party, and particularly the Republican Senate, for 
causing the defeat of measures beneficial and protective to this class 
of wage-workers. 

We are in favor of the enactment by the States of laws for abol- 
ishing the notorious sweating system, for abolishing contract con- 
vict labor, and for prohibiting the employment in factories of 
children under 15 years of age. 

We are opposed to all sumptuary laws as an interference with the 
individual rights of the citizen. 

Upon this statement of principles and policies the Democratic 
party asks the intelligent judgment of the American people. It 
asks a change of administration and a change of party, in order 
that there may be a change of system and a change of methods, 
thus assuring the maintenance unimpaired of institutions under 
which the republic has grown great and powerful. 

MR. JONES : In behalf of the Committee on Resolutions, I move 
the adoption of the platform as read. 

MR. LAWRENCE T. NEAL, of Ohio : Mr. Chairman and gentle- 
men of the Convention As a representative from the State of Ohio 
on the Committee on Resolutions, I gave notice of my intention to 
present to this Convention an amendment to the section of the plat- 
form relating to the tariff. I have been unable conscientiously to 
agree with the majority of my fellow members upon that section of 
that platform. I therefore gave notice to the Committee that I 
would move in open Convention to strike out that section of the 
platform pertaining to the tariff, all the words preceding the denun- 
ciation of the McKinley act, and substituting therefor the following : 

"We denounce Republican protection as a fraud, a robbery of 
the great majority of the American people for the benefit of the 
few. We declare it to be a fundamental principle of the Demo- 
cratic party that the Federal Government has no constitutional 
power to impose and collect tariff duties except for the purposes of 
revenue only, and demand that the collection of such taxes shall be 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 83 

limited to the necessities of the government when honestly and 
economically administered." 

BOURKE COCKRAN, of New York : If the gentleman will allow 
me for a moment, I desire to suggest that the amendment be re- 
ported again by the Clerk of the Convention. 

THE CHAIR: The Clerk will report the amendment. 

The Clerk then read as follows : 

" We denounce Republican protection as a fraud, a robbery of 
the great majority of the American people for the benefit of the 
few. We declare it to be a fundamental principle of the Demo- 
cratic party that the Federal Government has no constitutional 
power to impose and collect tariff duties except for the purposes of 
revenue only, and demand that the collection of such taxes shall be 
limited to the necessities of the government when honestly and 
economically administered." 

JOHN R. WALKER, of Missouri : We want to'Jiear that which you 
wish to strike out read. We call for the reading of that which you 
propose to strike out. 

MR. NEAL: Gentleman of the Convention, the proposition is to 
strike out the portions of the section relating to the tariff, which the 
Secretary will now read, and insert, in lieu thereof, the amendment 
proposed by myself. 

The Clerk then read the following : 

" We reiterate the oft-repeated doctrine of the Democratic party, 
that the necessity of government is the only justification for taxation; 
and whenever a tax is unnecessary it is unjustifiable ; that when 
custom-house taxation is levied upon articles of any kind produced 
in this country, the difference between the cost of labor here and 
labor abroad, when such a difference exists, fully measures any pos- 
sible benefits to labor; and the enormous additional impositions of 
the existing tariff fall with crushing force upon our farmers and 
workingmen, and, for the mere advantage of the few whom it en- 
riches, exact from labor a grossly unjust share of the expenses of 
government. 

"And we demand such a revision of the tariff laws as will remove 
their iniquitous inequality, lighten their oppressions, and put them 
on a constitutional and equitable basis ; but, in making reduction 
in taxes, it is not proposed to injure any domestic industry, but, 
rather, to promote their healthy growth. From the foundation of 



84 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

this government taxes collected at the custom-house have been the 
chief source of federal revenue. Such they must continue to be. 
Moreover, many industries have come to rely upon legislation for 
successful continuance, so that any change of law must be, at every 
step, regardful of the labor and capital thus involved. The process 
of reform must be subject to the execution of this plain dictate of 
justice." 

MR. NEAL : Gentlemen of the Convention, the history of our 
country demonstrates the fact that the American people will consider 
and determine but one great public question at a time. Many ques- 
tions, in a government like ours, and with its varied interests, will 
necessarily attract some share of public attention at one and the 
same time. But it is none the less true that some one question will 
overshadow all others in importance, and command for itself the 
highest place in the thoughts of the people. Such a question we now 
have in the federal system of protective taxation. Tariff reform has 
been the leading political issue in the country since the Democratic 
party commenced the battle for a revision and reduction of tariff 
taxes more that four years ago. it must continue to be such until 
it shall be as firmly established as any fundamental principle can 
be that the Federal Government has no constitutional power to im- 
pose and collect tariff duties except for revenue alone, and that 
even then the collection of such taxes shall be limited to the neces- 
sities of the government when honestly and economically admin- 
istered. 

A protective tariff is a robbery of the great majority of the people 
by the minority. We believe it to be so ; we ought to have the 
courage of our convictions, and should so declare in this enuncia- 
tion of them. The fact that its insidious purposes are accomplished 
under the forms of law, and that it is called taxation, renders it 
none the less a robbery. That its purposes are accomplished by 
stealth and secrecy, as is the crime of an assassin, aggravates, rather 
than lessens, the enormity of the offense. Republican protection is 
as hostile to our form of government as was the principle of taxation 
without representation, for which our fathers rebelled and fought 
and achieved independence. To longer heed the siren cry of Re- 
publican protection will be to consent to the degradation of the 
masses in the interest of the classes, and to change the form and 
character of our government itself by converting it from Democ- 
racy, a government by the people, into an aristocracy of wealth. 

The rapid concentration of the wealth of the country, under the 
fostering care of protection, foreshadows this threatened change. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 85 

The ownership of more than one-half of all the property of this 
great country by 17,000 persons, and the still rnore astounding fact 
that 250 of our 63,000,000 of people own, absolutely own, one- 
twelfth of all the property of 63,000,000 of people proves with strik- 
ing force the necessity for this change. My friends, let us go for- 
ward in this great battle which we have commenced. Let us not 
turn our backs upon the enemy, but let us meet this controlling 
question in such manner that the most uneducated and ignorant 
man who reads that platform may understand it. Let us continue 
this fight until the people of this country shall have reached a full 
and final conclusion upon this great question, and shall have de- 
termined it in favor of the struggling, toiling millions of this land, 
who too long already have been the unwilling, but misguided, vic- 
tims of this cruel and odious doctrine of protection. 

HENRY WATTERSON, of Kentucky : Mr. Chairman, before I open 
my lips to express an opinion on this matter, I desire to have read 
an extract from the tariff plank of the National Democratic Platform 
of 1876. 

The Clerk read as follows : 

" We denounce the present tariff, levied upon nearly four thou- 
sand articles, as a masterpiece of injustice, inequality and false pre- 
tense, which yields a dwindling and not a yearly rising revenue, and 
has impoverished many industries to subsidize a few. It prohibits 
imports that might purchase the products of American labor. It 
has degraded American commerce from the first to an inferior rank 
upon the high seas. It has cut down the values of American manu- 
factures at home and abroad. It has depleted the returns of 
American agriculture and industry, followed by half our people. It 
costs the people five times more than it produces to the treasury, 
obstructs the process of production and wastes the fruit of labor. 
It promotes fraud, fosters smuggling, enriches dishonest officials 
and bankrupts honest merchants. We demand that all custom- 
house taxation shall be only for revenue." 

MR. WATTERSON : This declaration of principles comes to us 
with the impression of the wisdom and the benediction of the spirit 
of that sage and saint of Democrats, Samuel J. Tilden. 

Twelve long years I fought, upon all occasions and upon every 
corner, to establish the doctrines of that plank as an article of car- 
dinal Democratic faith, and finally, when seeing it at last practically 
affirmed in three great Democratic tariff acts, and finally in the 



86 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

message of a great Democratic President; finally, when I saw it 
affirmed and proclaimed by the Democratic Convention which 
assembled in 1888 in St. Louis, I said : "My labors are over, my 
fight is ended, the victory is won, and I can go to sleep ; I shall 
never again be needed in a Democratic platform committee, and 
can intrust safely to younger and less experienced hands this work 
of my life and love." And when I listened to the extraordinary 
essay we have heard from this desk, I asked myself whether we 
were indeed in a Democratic Convention, or simply in a Republican 
Convention revised by James G. Elaine or Benjamin F. Butler, for 
the tariff plank we have listened to this afternoon is almost identi- 
cal in principle with the minority report submitted to the Demo- 
cratic Convention in 1884 by Benjamin F. Butler, and voted down 
almost unanimously. 

I have no dissertation to offer you, but simply a statement of 
facts which ought to accomplish one of two things ; either you 
should reject this monstrosity which has been hurled among you, 
and adopt in its place this simple, lucid and true amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Ohio, who preceded me ; or if you do not 
want to do that, if you want to take some time to think about it, 
"recommit the whole matter to the committee, with instructions to 
clarify and purge themselves. 

WILLIAM F. VILAS, of Wisconsin : Mr. President and gentlemen 
of the Convention, I shall detain you but a moment. I presume 
there is no gentleman here who is at all acquainted with my public 
record and my private record, as a follower of the Democratic 
party, who does not know that every expression in the proposed 
resolution read by the gentleman from Ohio I have over and over 
again reiterated from the stump and the platform for now these 
many years. But I desire also to make this remark : It is impossi- 
ble to say too much; it is impossible, almost, to say enough in de- 
nunciation of the iniquitous and reckless tariff legislation which has 
been inflicted upon this country. There are many things to be 
said with reference to it ; there are many declarations to be made 
in regard to it. You can extend your platform to any degree you 
see fit, or that the wearied powers of your committeemen in hearing 
argument and debate would enable them to give to its consideration, 
but this resolution, which you propose to strike out, was a resolu- 
tion reported to the Convention of 1884, over which I had the 
honor to preside, and it was reported by that prince of tariff re- 
formers, Colonel William R. Morrison, and of all the eloquent voices 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 87 

which were lifted in behalf of it on that occasion, none were so 
sweet to the ears of the Democrats, none rang with such blissful joy 
on all hands as that of the distinguished gentleman from Kentucky, 
Mr. Watterson. 

MR. WATTERSON (referring to what Mr. Vilas is about to read) : 
Read it well ; you can do it a great deal better than I can. 

MR. VILAS (continuing) : He said in reference to it, " it is an 
honest platform, entirely so. It is a sound platform, eminently so." 
Now, I shall not pause to read at length the argument which the 
distinguished gentleman made on that occasion, but half of the 
words, in point of volume, in that part of the platform which it is 
proposed to strike out, and which I have heard baptized as Re- 
publican to-day, I bowed down to in 1884 as sound Democratic 
doctrine, under the leadership of our distinguished and magnificent 
friend. 

Now, fellow Democrats, if you desire the additional expression 
of this further idea in regard to the tariff, which the gentleman from 
Ohio has read, why nobody can take it with more satisfaction than I. 

Gentlemen, I don't propose to enter into any debate or discussion 
of the particular form of words in which we declare our opposition 
to tariff legislation. I do not think it makes much difference in 
what form of words we repeat our unvarying and unswerving hostil- 
ity to that great robbery and iniquity. I do not care much for the 
words, because five years ago next fall a President of the United 
States led the Democratic party into a position on that tariff ques- 
tion, which was not only right and proper, and splendid and Demo- 
cratic, but it has given life blood and eternal perpetuation to that 
party. 

Now, fellow Democrats of the Convention, I desire only to sug- 
gest that if it please you to take in this form of words, you take it 
in, and leave that other also, upon which Mr. Cleveland was elected 
President. 

MR. WATTERSON : One word only, in relation to a reference by 
my honored and distinguished friend, the Senator from Wisconsin, 
who presided over that Convention of 1884, and that is this : In 
1884 we were in the midst of the throes of the great internecine 
tariff controversy. The party seemed to be split wide open, and, 
after fifty-two hours of unbroken discussion in the Platform Com- 
mittee, the best that the more moderate and conservative members 
of the committee, myself among the number, could obtain, as com- 
mon ground to stand upon, was the platform of 1884 of that 



88 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Convention. But since that time we have had the second Morrison 
bill, the Mills bill, the message of the President of 1887, and the 
campaign of education in 1888, and I say to myself: "My God, is 
it possible that, in 1892, we have to go back for a tariff plank to the 
straddle of 1884?" 

MR. JONES : Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen On behalf of the 
Committee on Resolutions, I wish to say that we accept the amend- 
ment of the gentleman from Ohio as an addition to Section 3. 

MR. WALKER, of Missouri : I wish to understand this. 
THE CHAIR: As an addition to Section 3. 
MR. WALKER : Then we are opposed to it. 

MR. WATTERSON : Mr. Chairman, the Convention needs to be 
instructed whether it is proposed to accept the amendment of the 
gentleman from Ohio as a substitute, which motion I support, or 
whether it is meant to tack it on as a tail or addendum, which I 
oppose. 

THE CHAIR: Allow the Chair to explain to the Convention the 
status of the matter. If the Convention will keep quiet I think I 
can be heard. The status of the matter at present is this : The 
gentleman from Ohio offered an amendment by which he proposed 
to strike out certain portions of the platform, as read, and to insert 
therefor an amendment, which he presented. The Chairman of the 
Committee on Resolutions, speaking on behalf of that committee, 
offered to accept the proposed amendment as an addition to the 
platform. 

MR. THOMAS L. JOHNSON, of Ohio : Gentlemen of the Conven- 
tion I endorse heartily the amendment of my colleague from 
Ohio. The Democratic party has been hungering for years for a 
Democratic platform of the tariff, and, thank God, it has at last 
come, and not a miserable addition to that stump speech. Strike 
out what they put in, and put it in clear, ringing terms what we 
mean. We, on the stump and in the Democratic press, denounce 
the protective tariff as a fraud. Say so in your platform. We are 
speaking to the people. Be honest to your people. The only 
trouble has been that the leaders are frightened ; the Democratic 
party is all right. 

THE CHAIR : The question is on the adoption of the resolutions. 

MR. NEAL : Mr. Chairman, I demand a call of the roll of States 
upon my amendment. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 89 

* 

THE CHAIR : The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Ohio, which is a motion to strike out and insert, 
and upon that the call of the roll of States is asked. 

H. L. Muldrow, of Mississippi, arose, saying : "I rise to a parlia- 
mentary inquiry." 

THE CHAIR: When order is restored the Chairman will state the 
question. He will recognize no one until there is order in the 
Convention. 

MR. COCKRAN, of New York : Then I think you will have to 
wait a week. 

MR. MULDROW : I rise to make a parliamentary inquiry. If 
it is in order, I desire to move that this tariff plank be referred 
back to the Committee on Platform. If it is in order, I desire to 
make that motion. 

THE CHAIR : If you will wait a moment until order is restored, 
we will make the Convention understand. 

In the confusion, this motion of Mr. Muldrow's was 
lost sight of and not put. 

After considerable delay, the call of the roll was 
begun. 

HON. T. J. O'Donnell, of the Colorado delegation, said : Colo- 
rado votes for the honest Democratic plank ; it votes aye. 

When Illinois was called, Gen. Stevenson said: 

Mr. President, upon the poll of the delegation from Illinois the 
vote stands 33 yeas and 15 nays. By instructions of the State Con- 
vention, I cast the 48 votes of Illinois yea. 

When the State of Minnesota was called, Judge Wil- 
son announced the vote of the State as 18 nays. Mr. 
Mareck, of the delegation, secured recognition, and 
said : 

Here is one vote yea from Minnesota. I wish to be recorded 
yea. 

JUDGE WILSON : Mr. Chairman, I do not wish to be misunder- 
stood. The Minnesota delegation is instructed to vote on all ques- 
tions as a unit. On this question there are 13 votes nay, and 5 votes 
yea; therefore I, as chairman of the delegation, cast 18 votes votes 
nay. 



90 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



Minnesota was recorded 18 votes nay. 

Pennsylvania, through its chairman, declared the vote 
to be 64 nays. As soon as the vote was announced, 
William A. Wallace, of the Pennsylvania delegation, 
arose and said : 

On behalf of 15 members of that delegation, I protest, sir, against 
the use of the power by the delegation to bind those fifteen men on 
questions of principle. No one has authority or power to bind me 
or state my opinion in matters of principle, or in matters of right 
and wrong. They have no right to cast my vote on a question of 
principle, and I solemnly protest. 

READING CLERK MORRISON : State of Rhode Island? 

MR. WALLACE, of Pennsylvania : Mr. Chairman, I rise to ask 
how the vote of Pennsylvania is recorded, and to inquire if the vote 
of a minority of a delegation is to be counted with the majority 
vote? 

W. U. HENSEL, of Pennsylvania : Before the Chair decides that 
question, I desire to state the conditions under which the delegation 
from Pennsylvania was sent to this Convention, if the Chair desires 
information on that subject. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair will state that he is not informed what 
the action of previous Democratic Conventions has been when a 
question of this character has arisen. The Chair himself would rule 
that the vote of a delegation, as announced by the chairman of that 
delegation, would be received, unless the Convention decided 
otherwise. 

MR. WALLACE : Then I appeal to the Convention, and demand 
a call of States. 

MR. HENSEL : I rise to a point of order. 

THE CHAIR : The gentleman will state his point of order. 

MR. HENSEL : The delegation from Pennsylvania comes into 
this Convention delegated by a State Convention, which instructed 
it to vote as a unit upon all questions which might come before it, 
and that its vote should be cast in accordance with the direction of 
a majority of this delegation. Upon a call being taken in the Penn- 
sylvania delegation, it was ascertained that 49 of its members were 
in favor of the negative of this proposition. When the roll was 
called and it was announced there being a division in the Illinois 
delegation, that under their resolution to vote as a unit the vote of 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 91 

that State should be cast and should be counted as the majority di- 
rected, I announced this vote of the Pennsylvania delegation in this 
manner. This Convention, by a unanimous vote upon the unani- 
mous recommendation of its Committee on Rules, re-adopted the 
rules of the National Conventions of 1884 and of 1888, and those 
rules I submit, sir, provide, and the precedents of those Conven- 
tions establish it, that when a State delegation has been instructed 
to vote as a unit, its vote should be so announced by its chairman, 
and should be so recorded by the officers of this Convention. I, 
therefore, Mr. Chairman, raise the point of order that until the 
action of this Convention taken this morning is reconsidered, and 
the rules which it adopted have been rescinded or modified, the 
proposition of the distinguished gentleman on my left (Mr. Wallace) 
is not in order. 

MR. CHAIR : The Chair would like to make a ruling in view of 
some investigations that have been made as to this question. Since 
he made the previous ruling he has been informed, by gentlemen 
familiar with the proceedings for two or three Conventions past, 
that wherever the States themselves have adopted the unit rule, the 
Convention has enforced it. He, therefore, repeats the ruling he 
has made, that the announcement of the vote given by the chair- 
man of the State delegation must be accepted as the vote of that 
delegation, and that an appeal from the decision of the Chair can- 
not be taken pending a roll call. 

MR. WALLACE : I desire to say, sir, that when I arose to my feet 
I proposed to withdraw the appeal, because I felt that my object 
has been attained. I had asserted the right of fifteen men in the 
Pennsylvania delegation to their individual opinion upon this ques- 
tion of principle, and I now assert it. 

MR. OWENS : What is the vote of Pennsylvania ? 
THE OFFICIAL STENOGRAPHER : Sixty-four nays. 

MR. OWENS : As opposed to that, I want to call the attention of 
the Convention to the fact that New York is still Democratic. 

When the State of Wisconsin was called, the chair- 
man of the delegation, Mr. Lamoreaux, responded as 
follows : 

Mr. President, the State of Wisconsin, being under the unit rule, 
has directed me to cast the entire vote, without protest from the 
minority, 24 votes no. 



92 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



MR. JACKSON, of Indian Territory : We desire to have Indian 
Territory placed upon the roll, and we will vote. She casts her 
votes, 2 ayes. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen, listen and the vote will be announced. 
Secretary reads : Yeas, 564 ; nays, 342. 
THE CHAIR : The amendment is adopted. 

The balloting, by States, was as follows : 

States. Total Vote. 

Alabama 22 

Arkansas 16 

California 18 

Colorado 8 

Connecticut 12 

Delaware 6 

Florida 8 

Georgia 26 

Idaho 6 

Illinois 48 

Indiana 30 

Iowa 26 

Kansas 20 

Kentucky 26 

Louisiana 16 

Maine 12 

Maryland 16 

Massachusetts 30 

Michigan 28 

Minnesota 18 

Mississippi 18 

Missouri 34 

Montana 6 

Nebraska 16 

Nevada 6 

New Hampshire. . . 8 
New Jersey 20 

MR. OWENS : Mr. Chairman and the country is still Demo- 
cratic. 

THE CHAIR : The gentleman from Colorado, Thomas M. Patter- 
son, is recognized. 

MR. PATTERSON, of Colorado : Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of 
the Convention 

At this point a number of delegates endeavored to 
get the floor. 



Ayes. 
12 


Nays. 
10 


States. Tota 
New York 


I Vote. 

19, 


Ayes. 

72 


Nayt. 




16 

18 


North Carolina. . . 
North Dakota. 


22 
6 


17 
6 


5 


8 




Ohio 


46 


46 






12 




8 


7 


1 


3 


6 
5 


Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island. . . . 


64 

8 




64 

8 


22 
6 

48 


4 


South Carolina. . . 
South Dakota.. . . 


18 
8 
24 


18 
1 
5 


7 
18 


15 


15 


Texas 


m 


30 




26 




Vermont 


8 




8 




20 


Virginia 


94 


11 


11 


26 




Washington 


8 


8 




8 


8 
12 


West Virginia. . . . 
Wisconsin 


12 
24 


12 


24 


7 


9 


Wyoming 


6 


6 




26 

28 


4 


Territories. 
Alaska 


y 




2 




18 


Arizona . . . 


6 


6 




11 . 
34 
6 


6 


Dist. of Columbia 
Indian Territory.. 
New Mexico 


2 
2 
6 


2 

5 


2 
1 


16 




Oklahoma 


9, 


2 




6 




Utah 


9, 


2 






8 
20 


Totals 


910 


564 


342 















NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 93 

THE CHAIR : The gentleman from Colorado has the floor. The 
Convention must come to order. The Chair can recognize nobody 
else while the gentleman from Colorado has the floor. 

B. J. SHERIDAN, of Kansas : I want to be heard in the interest 
of the gentleman who is about to speak, Mr. Chairman. I want to 
say that it seems to me the gentlemen here who are not delegates 
are making a great deal of trouble in regard to what is announced 
to the Convention, and the galleries are doing most of the voting, 
if they can do it by their lip service and mockery. I want the del- 
egates to have a fair chance. I want the Chairman to call the 
sergeant-at-arms to keep order. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair holds that the point of order is well 
taken, that the parties in the gallery must keep quiet. 

MR. PATTERSON : Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Conven- 
tion There was another matter of difference between the members 
of the Committee on Resolutions. The difference relates to the 
coinage plank. The difference is embraced in the use of a single 
word, and the substitute that some of the members from the South 
and West offer consists in the addition of a word of five letters, 
namely the word "free." (Cries of "four letters," and laughter.) The 
speaker addressing you accepts the unanimous amendment that is sug- 
gested by the delegates a word of four letters only, and that word 
"free." The substitute that is offered is the resolution of the com- 
mittee, word for word, with the simple addition of the word I have 
suggested. And I desire, for the information of the delegates, to read 
the substitute exactly as it stands : " We denounce the Republican 
legislation, known as the Sherman Act of 1890, as a cowardly make- 
shift fraught with possibilities of danger in the future, which should 
make all of its supporters, as well as its author, anxious for its 
speedy repeal. We hold to the use of both gold and silver as the 
standard money of the country, and to the free coinage of both 
gold and silver, without discrimination against either metal or 
charge for mintage ; but the dollar unit of coinage of both metals 
must be of equal intrinsic and exchangeable value, or be adjusted 
through international agreement, or by such safeguards of legisla- 
tion as shall insure the maintenance of the parity of the two metals 
and the equal power of every dollar at all times in the markets and 
in the payment of debts. And we demand that all paper currency 
shall be kept at par with and redeemable by it. We insist upon 
this policy as especially necessary for the protection of the farmers 
and laboring classes, the first and most defenseless victims of unsta- 
ble money and a fluctuating currency." 



94 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

And, gentlemen of the Convention, if you will do me the honor 
and kindness to bear with me for a short time, I will endeavor to 
tell you why this difference has been brought before the body of 
delegates. The difference, fellow delegates, was fundamental. It 
was not a matter of whim. It has been charged that the free coin- 
age men of the West and South sought to foist the extreme views of 
bimetallists upon the Democratic Convention. Free discussion and 
a respectful hearing is due to every honest advocate of an honest 
cause. Though you may differ from me, there are millions of 
people in this country, whose votes you are now seeking, who do 
not differ with me, and will feel toward the party as you may con- 
duct yourselves toward their representatives for the short time they 
may be before you. (Applause, accompanied by noise and confu- 
sion.) Gentlemen, I cannot speak to you unless I can be at least 
partially heard, if it takes all night. 

It has been charged that the free coinage men of the West and 
South came to this Convention to urge what has been denominated 
as their extreme views upon the coinage question. On the con- 
trary, they are satisfied to receive from this body its expression of 
faith in what the most pronounced opponent of free coinage loves 
to assert as his belief. We agree that the free coinage shall con- 
sist 

J. A. MCK.ENZIE, of Kentucky : Mr. Chairman, it must be evi- 
dent to the gentlemen that in the impatient temper of this Conven- 
tion that it is not the time to make an address that I know so much 
interest attaches to as the one he is now making. I, therefore, 
venture to suggest that this whole matter be recommitted to the 
Committee on Platform. 

MR. PATTERSON (continuing) : All we have sought to have en- 
grafted in the platform is the recognition 

A DELEGATE : It certainly cannot be that the delegates will 
refuse to hear the gentleman from Colorado. 

THE CHAIR : The gentleman from Colorado has the floor, and 
cannot be taken from the floor by any other member. 

A DELEGATE : I hope the Convention will hear the gentleman 
from Colorado. 

MR. PATTERSON (continuing) : All we have asked is the recogni- 
tion of the doctrine of free bimetallic coinage as a doctrine of the 
Democratic party. Not the coinage of a 70-cent dollar, but the 
coinage of gold and silver dollars of a fixed parity, and each dollar 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 95 

containing metal of equal intrinsic value. The only matter of dis- 
pute between us and the committee was whether or not the Demo- 
cratic Convention would recognize free bimetallic coinage of dollars 
of equal intrinsic value as a part of the Democratic faith, or take 
refuge under the same kind of a contemptible straddle that dis- 
graced the Republican Convention at Minneapolis. Gentlemen of 
the Convention, I recognize and respect your impatience. I have 
stated all that was necessary to bring before you of the matter of 
difference. Having done that, as a representative of the free 
metallic coinage men of the Convention, we have done our duty, 
and the responsibility now rests with you. 

THE CHAIR: The question is on the adoption of the amendment 
offered by the gentleman from Colorado. 

On a call for the yeas and nays, the Chairman de- 
clared the amendment lost. 

THE CHAIR : The question is now on the adoption of the plat- 
form as amended. 

The yeas and nays being- called for, the platform was 
declared adopted. 

The following is the amended platform, as adopted by 
the Convention : 

PLATFORM. 

The representatives of the Democratic party of the United States, 
in National Convention assembled, do reaffirm their allegiance to 
the principles of the party, as formulated by Jefferson and exempli- 
fied by the long and illustrious line of his successors in Democratic 
leadership, from Madison to Cleveland ; we believe the public wel- 
fare demands that these principles be applied to the conduct of the 
Federal Government through the accession to power of the party 
that advocates them ; and we solemnly declare that the need of a 
return to these fundamental principles of free popular government, 
based on home rule and individual liberty, was never more urgent 
than now, when the tendency to centralize all power at the Federal 
capital has become a menace to the reserved rights of the States 
that strikes at the very roots of our Government under the Consti- 
tution as framed by the fathers of the Republic. 

We warn the people of our common country, jealous for the pres- 
ervation of their free institutions, that the policy of Federal control 



96 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

of elections, to which the Republican party has committed itself, is 
fraught with the gravest dangers, scarcely less momentous than 
would result from a revolution practically establishing monarchy 
on the ruins of the Republic. It strikes at the North as well as at 
the South, and injures the colored citizen even more than the white ; 
it means a horde of deputy marshals at every polling place, armed 
with Federal power, returning boards appointed and controlled by 
Federal authority, the outrage of the electoral rights of the people 
in the several States, the subjugation of the colored people to the 
control of the party in power, and the reviving of race antagonisms, 
now happily abated, of the utmost peril to the safety and happiness 
of all; a measure deliberately and justly described by a leading 
Republican Senator as " the most infamous bill that ever crossed 
the threshold of the Senate." Such a policy, if sanctioned by law, 
would mean the dominance of a self-perpetuating oligarchy of 
office-holders, and the party first intrusted with its machinery could 
be dislodged from power only by an appeal to the reserved right of 
the people to resist oppression, which is inherent in all self-govern- 
ing communities. Two years ago this revolutionary policy was 
emphatically condemned by the people at the polls, but in con- 
tempt of that verdict the Republican party has defiantly declared 
in its latest authoritative utterance that its success in the coming 
elections will mean the enactment of the Force Bill and the usurpa- 
tion of despotic control over elections in all the States. 

Believing that the preservation of Republican government in the 
United States is dependent upon the defeat of this policy of legal- 
ized force and fraud, we invite the support of all citizens who desire 
to see the Constitution maintained in its integrity with the laws 
pursuant thereto, which have given our country a hundred years of 
unexampled prosperity ; and we pledge the Democratic party, if 
it be intrusted with power, not only to the defeat of the Force 
Bill, but also to relentless opposition to the Republican policy of 
profligate expenditure, which, in the short space of two years, 
squandered an enormous surplus and emptied an overflowing Treas- 
ury, after piling new burdens of taxation upon the already overtaxed 
labor of the country. 

We denounce Republican protection as a fraud, a robbery of the 
great majority of the American people for the benefit of the few. 
We declare it to be a fundamental principle of the Democratic 
party that the Federal Government has no constitutional power to 
impose and collect tariff duties, except for the purpose of revenue 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 97 

only, and we demand that the collection of such taxes shall be lim- 
ited to the necessities of the Government when honestly and eco- 
nomically administered. 

We denounce the McKinley tariff law enacted by the Fifty-first 
Congress as the culminating atrocity of class legislation ; we endorse 
the efforts made by the Democrats of the present Congress to 
modify its most oppressive features in the direction of free raw ma- 
terials and cheaper manufactured goods that enter into general 
consumption ; and we promise its repeal as one of the beneficent 
results that will follow the action of the people in intrusting power 
to the Democratic party. Since the McKinley tariff went into 
operation there have been ten reductions of the wages of laboring 
men to one increase. We deny that there has been any increase of 
prosperity to the country since that tariff went into operation, and 
we point to the dullness and distress, the wage reductions and 
strikes in the iron trade, as the best possible evidence that no such 
prosperity has resulted from the McKinley Act. 

We call the attention of thoughtful Americans to the fact that 
after thirty years of restrictive taxes against the importation of for- 
eign wealth, in exchange for our agricultural surplus, the homes and 
farms of the country have become burdened with a real estate 
mortgage debt of over $2,500,000,000, exclusive of all other forms of 
indebtedness ; that in one of the chief agricultural States of the 
West there appears a real estate mortgage debt averaging $165 per 
capita of the total populatiop ; and that similar conditions and ten- 
dencies are shown to exist in other agricultural exporting States. 
We denounce a policy which fosters no industry so much as it does 
that of the Sheriff. 

Trade interchange, on the basis of reciprocal advantages to the 
countries participating, is a time-honored doctrine of the Demo- 
cratic faith, but we denounce the sham reciprocity which juggles 
with the people's desire for enlarged foreign markets and freer ex- 
changes by pretending to establish closer trade relations for a 
country whose articles of export are almost exclusively agricultural 
products with other countries that are also agricultural, while erect- 
ing a custom-house barrier of prohibitive tariff taxes against the 
richest countries of the world, that stand ready to take our entire 
surplus of products, and to exchange therefor commodities which 
are necessaries and comforts of life among our own people. 

W r e recognize in the Trusts and Combinations, which are designed 
to enable capital to secure more than its just share of the joint 

7 



98 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

product of Capital and Labor, a natural consequence of the pro- 
hibitive taxes, which prevent the free competition, which is the life 
of honest trade, but believe their worst evils can be abated by law, 
and we demand the rigid enforcement oMhe laws made to prevent 
and control them, together with such further legislation in restraint 
of their abuses as experience may show to be necessary. 

The Republican party, while professing a policy of reserving the 
public land for small holdings by actual settlers, has given away 
the people's heritage, till now a few railroad and non-resident aliens, 
individual and corporate, possess a larger area than that of all our 
farms between the two seas. The last Democratic administration 
reversed the improvident and unwise policy of the Republican party 
touching the public domain, and reclaimed from corporations and 
syndicates, alien and domestic, and restored to the people nearly 
one hundred million (100,000,000) acres of valuable land, to be 
sacredly held as homesteads for our citizens, and we pledge our- 
selves to continue this policy until every acre of land so unlawfully 
held shall be reclaimed and restored to the people. 

We denounce the Republican legislation known as the Sherman 
Act of 1890 as a cowardly makeshift, fraught with possibilities of 
danger in the future, which should make all of its supporters, as 
well as its author, anxious for its speedy repeal. We hold to the 
use of both gold and silver as the standard money of the country, 
and to the coinage of both gold and silver without discriminating 
against either metal or charge for mintage, but the dollar unit of 
coinage of both metals must be of equal intrinsic and exchangeable 
value, or be adjusted through international agreement or by such 
safeguards of legislation as shall insure the maintenance of the 
parity of the two metals and the equal power of every dollar at all 
times in the markets and in the payment of debts ; and we demand 
that all paper currency shall be kept at par with and redeemable in 
such coin. We insist upon this policy as especially necessary for 
the protection of the farmers and laboring classes, the first and most 
defenseless victims of unstable money and a fluctuating currency. 

We recommend that the prohibitory 10 per cent tax on State 
bank issues be repealed. 

Public office is a public trust. We reaffirm the declaration of the 
Democratic National Convention of 1876 for the reform of the civil 
service, and we call for the honest enforcement of all laws regulat- 
ing the same. The nomination of a President, as in the recent Re- 
publican Convention, by delegations composed largely of his 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 99 

appointees, holding office at his pleasure, is a scandalous satire 
upon free popular institutions and a startling illustration of the 
methods by which a President may gratify his ambition. We de- 
nounce a policy under which the Federal office-holders usurp con- 
trol of party conventions in the States, and we pledge the Demo- 
cratic party to reform these and all other abuses which threaten 
individual liberty and local self-government. 

The Democratic party is the only party that has ever given the 
country a foreign policy consistent and vigorous, compelling respect 
abroad and inspiring confidence at home. While avoiding entan- 
gling alliance, it has aimed to cultivate friendly relations with other 
nations, and especially with our neighbors on the American Conti- 
nent, whose destiny is closely linked with our own, and we view 
with alarm the tendency to a policy of irritation and bluster which 
is liable at any time to confront us with the alternative of humilia- 
tion or war. We favor the maintenance of a navy strong enough for . 
all purposes of national defense, and to properly maintain the honor 
and dignity of the country abroad. 

This country has always been the refuge of the oppressed from 
every land exiles for conscience sake and in the spirit of the 
founders of our Government we condemn the oppression practised 
by the Russian Government upon its Lutheran and Jewish subjects, 
and we call upon our National Government, in the interest of justice 
and humanity, by all just and proper means, to use its prompt and 
best efforts to bring about a cessation of these cruel persecutions in 
the dominions of the Czar and to secure to the oppressed equal 
rights. 

We tender our profound and earnest sympathy to those lovers of 
freedom who are struggling for home rule and the great cause of 
local self-government in Ireland. 

We heartily approve all legitimate efforts to prevent the United 
States from being used as the dumping ground for the known crim- 
inals and professional paupers of Europe ; and we demand the 
rigid enforcement of the laws against Chinese immigration and the 
importation of foreign workmen under contract, to degrade Ameri- 
can labor and lessen its wages ; but we condemn and denounce any 
and all attempts to restrict the immigration of the industrious and 
worthy of foreign lands. 

This Convention hereby renews the expression of appreciation of 
the patriotism of the soldiers and sailors of the Union in the war 
for its preservation, and we favor just and liberal pensions for all 



100 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

disabled Union soldiers, their widows and dependents, but we de- 
mand that the work of the Pensio'n Office shall be done industriously, 
impartially and honestly. We denounce the present administration 
of that office as incompetent, corrupt, disgraceful and dishonest. 

The Federal Government should care for and improve the Missis- 
sippi River and other great waterways of the Republic, so as to 
secure for the interior States easy and cheap transportation to tide- 
water. When any waterway of the Republic is of sufficient impor- 
tance to demand aid of the Government, such aid should be 
extended upon a definite plan of continuous work, until permanent 
improvement is secured. 

For purposes of national defense and the promotion of commerce 
between the States, we recognize the early construction of the 
Nicaragua Canal and its protection against foreign control as of 
great importance to the United States. 

Recognizing the World's Columbian Exposition as a national 
undertaking of vast importance, in which the General Government 
has invited the co-operation of all the powers of the world, and ap- 
preciating the acceptance by many of such powers of the invitation 
so extended, and the broad and liberal efforts being made by them 
to contribute to the grandeur of the undertaking, we are of opinion 
that Congress should make such necessary financial provision as 
shall be requisite to the maintenance of the national honor and 
public faith. 

Popular education being the only safe basis of popular suffrage, 
we recommend to the several States most liberal appropriations for 
the public schools. Free common schools are the nursery of good 
government, and they have always received the fostering care of 
the Democratic party, which favors every means of increasing intel- 
ligence. Freedom of education, being an essential of civil and 
religious liberty, as well as a necessity for the development of intel- 
ligence, must not be interfered with under any pretext whatever. 
We are opposed to State interference with parental rights and rights 
of conscience in the education of children as an infringement of 
the fundamental Democratic doctrine that the largest individual 
liberty consistent with the rights of others insures the highest type 
of American citizenship and the best government. 

We approve the action of the present House of Representatives 
in passing bills for admitting into the Union as States the Territo- 
ries of New Mexico and Arizona, and we favor the early admission 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 101 

of all the Territories having the necessary population and resources 
to entitle them to Statehood, and while they remain Territories we 
hold that the officials appointed to administer the government of 
any Territory, together with the District of Columbia and Alaska, 
should be bona fide residents of the Territory or district in which 
their duties are to be performed. The Democratic party believes 
in home rule and the control of their own affairs by the people of 
the vicinage. 

We favor legislature by Congress and State Legislatures to pro- 
tect the lives and limbs of railway employes and those of other haz- 
ardous transportation companies, and denounce the inactivity of 
the Republican party, and particularly the Republican Senate, for 
causing the defeat of measures beneficial and protective to this class 
of wage-workers. 

We are in favor of the enactment by the States of laws for abol- 
ishing the notorious sweating system, for abolishing contract convict 
labor, and for prohibiting the employment in factories of children 
under 15 years of age. 

We are opposed to all sumptuary laws, as an interference with the 
individual rights of the citizen. 

Upon this statement of principles and policies, the Democratic 
party asks the intelligent judgment of the American people. It 
asks a change of administration and a change of party, in order 
that there may be a change of system and a change of methods, 
thus assuring the maintenance unimpaired of institutions under 
which the Republic has grown great and powerful. 

After the adoption of the platform, the Chairman 
said : 

THE CHAIR : The next order of business, gentlemen, is the call 
of the roll of States for the nomination of candidates for the office 
of President. The Clerk will proceed with the call of the roll. 

MR. W. C. OWENS, of Kentucky : We don't know what that roll 
is being called for. 

THE CHAIR : Under the order of business, the roll of the States 
is now to be called for nominees for the office of President. 

The Clerk commenced to call the roll, and proceeded 
as far as Alabama, when he was interrupted. 

MR. FENLON, of Arkansas : I move that the rules be suspended, 
and that this Convention do now adjourn. 



102 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

This motion was not put, the roll call being in pro- 
gress. 

The Clerk again called the State of Alabama, from 
which there was no response. He then called the State 
of Arkansas. 

MR. FORDYCE, of Arkansas : Arkansas yields her place to New 
Jersey. 

MR. CLARK, of Montana : I desire to know the question upon 
which we are voting. 

THE CHAIR : We are not voting. We are calling the names of 
the States for the nomination of President. The State of Arkansas 
yields to New Jersey. 

The Clerk thereupon called the State of New Jersey, 
when Gov. Leon Abbett, of that State, came forward to 
the platform. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair presents to the Convention Gov. Leon 
Abbett, of New Jersey. 

ADDRESS OF HON. LEON ABBETT. 

MR. CHAIRMAN AND GENTLEMEN OF THE CONVENTION In pre- 
senting a name to this Convention, I speak for the united Democ- 
racy of the State of New Jersey, whose loyalty to Democratic 
principles, faithful services to the party, and whose contributions to 
its successes entitle it to the respectful consideration of the Democ- 
racy of the Union. Its electoral vote has always been cast in sup- 
port of Democratic principles and Democratic candidates. 

In voicing the unanimous wish of the delegation from New Jersey, 
I present, as their candidate for the suffrage of this Convention, the 
name of a distinguished Democratic statesman, born upon its soil, 
for whom in two great Presidential contests the State of New Jersey 
has given its electoral vote. 

The supreme consideration in the mind of the Democracy of New 
Jersey is the success of the Democratic party and its principles. 
We have been in the past, and will be in the future, ready at all 
times to sacrifice personal preferences in deference to the clear 
expression of the will of the Democracy of the Union. It is because 
this name will awaken throughout our State the enthusiasm of the 
Democracy, and insure success ; it is because he represents the 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 103 

great Democratic principles and policy upon which this entire Con- 
vention is to-day a unit ; it is because we believe that with him as 
a candidate, the Democracy of the Union will sweep the country 
and establish its principles throughout the length and breadth of 
the land, that we offer to the Convention as a nominee, the choice 
of the Democracy of New Jersey^ Grover Cleveland. 

If any doubt existed in the minds of the Democrats of New 
Jersey of his ability to lead the great Democratic hosts to victory, 
they would not present his name to-day ; with them the success of 
the party and the establishment of its principles are beyond their 
love or admiration for any man. 

We feel certain that every Democratic State, though its preference 
may be for some other distinguished Democrat, will give its warm, 
enthusiastic and earnest support to the nominee of this Convention. 
The man whom we present will rally to his party thousands of inde- 
pendent voters whose choice is determined by their personal con- 
viction that the candidate will represent principles, and that if 
chosen by the people, they will secure an honest, pure and conserv- 
ative administration, and the great interests of the country will be 
encouraged and protected. The time will come when other dis- 
tinguished Democrats, who have been mentioned in connection 
with this nomination, will receive that consideration to which the 
great services they have rendered their party entitle them, but we 
stand to-day in the presence of the fact that the majority of the 
Democratic masses throughout the country, the rank and file, the 
millions of its voters, demand the nomination of Grover Cleveland. 

This sentiment is so strong and overpowering that it has affected 
and controlled the actions of delegates who would otherwise pre- 
sent the name of some distinguished leader of their own State, with 
whom they feel victory would be assured, and in whom the entire 
country would feel confidence, but the people have spoken, and 
favorite sons and leaders are standing aside in obedience to their 
will. 

Shall we listen to the voice of the Democracy of the Union ; 
shall we place on our banner the man of their choice, the man in 
whom they believe, or shall we, for any consideration of policy or 
expediency, hesitate to obey their will ? 

I have sublime faith in the expression of the people when it is 
clear and decisive. When the question- before them is one that 
has excited discussion and debate ; when it appeals to their inter- 
ests and their feelings, and calls for the exercise of their judgment ; 



104 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

and when they then say "We want this man, and we can elect him," 
we, their representatives, must not disobey nor disappoint them. 
It is incumbent upon us to obey their wishes, and concur in their 
judgment ; then, having given them the candidate of their choice, 
they will give us their best, their most energetic efforts to secure 
success. 

We confidently rely upon the loyal and successful work of the 
Democratic leaders who have advocated other candidates. We 
know that in the great State across the river from New Jersey, now 
controlled by the Democratic party, there is no Democrat who will 
shirk the duty of making every effort to secure the success of the 
candidate of this Convention, notwithstanding his judgment may 
differ from that of the majority. The Democracy of New York, 
and its great leaders, whose efforts and splendid generalship have 
given to us a Democratic Senator and Governor, will always be 
true to the great party they represent ; they will not waver, nor 
will they rest in the coming canvass, until they have achieved suc- 
cess. Their grand victories of the past, their natural and honorable 
ambition, their unquestioned Democracy, will make them arise and 
fight as never before, and, with those that they represent and lead, 
they will marshal the great independent vote, and we will again 
secure a Democratic victory in New York. The grand Democrats, 
under whose leadership the City and State of New York are now 
governed, will give to the cause the great weight of their organiza- 
tions. The thundering echoes of this Convention announcing the 
nomination of Grover Cleveland will not have died out over the 
hills and through the valleys of this land, before you will hear and 
see all our leaders rallying to the support of our candidate. They 
will begin their efforts for organization and success, and continue 
their work until victory crowns their efforts. All Democrats will 
fight for victory, and they will succeed, because the principles of 
the party enunciated here are for the best interests of the country 
at large, and because the people of this land have unquestioning 
faith that Grover Cleveland will give the country a pure, honest and 
stable government, and an administration in which the great busi- 
ness interests of the country, and the agricultural and laboring inter- 
ests of the masses will receive proper and due consideration. 

The question has been asked, Why is it that the masses of the 
party demand the nomination of Grover Cleveland ? Why is it that 
this man, who has no offices to distribute, no wealth to command, 
should have secured the spontaneous support of the great body of 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 105 

Democracy? Why is it, with all that has been urged against him, 
the people still cry, " Give us Cleveland " ? 

Why is it, although he has pronounced in honest, clear and able 
language, his views upon questions upon which some of his party 
may differ with him, that he is still near and dear to the masses? 
It is because he has crystalized into a living issue the great princi- 
ple upon which this battle is to be fought out at the coming election. 
If he did not create tariff reform, he made it a presidential issue ; 
he vitalized it, and presented it to our party as the issue for which 
we could fight and continue to battle, until upon it victory is now 
assured. There are few men who, in his position, would have had 
the courage to boldly make the issue of tariff reform, and present it 
clearly and forcibly, as he did in his great message of 1887. I be- 
lieve that his policy then was to force a national issue which would 
appeal to the judgment of the people. 

We must honor a man who is honest enough, and bold enough, 
under such circumstances, to proclaim that the success of the party 
upon principle is better than evasion or shirking of true national 
issues for temporary success. When victory is obtained upon a 
principle, it forms the solid foundation of party success in the 
future. It is no longer the question of a battle to be won on the 
mistakes of our foes, but it is a victory to be accomplished by a 
charge along the whole line under the banner of principle. 

There is another reason why the people demand his nomination. 
They feel that the tariff reform views of President Cleveland and the 
principles laid down in his great message, whatever its temporary 
effect may have been, gave us a living and a vital issue to fight for, 
which has made the great victories since 1888 possible. It consoli- 
dated in one solid phalanx the Democracy of the Nation. In every 
State of this Union that policy has been placed in Democratic plat- 
forms, and our battles have been fought upon it, and this great body 
of representative Democrats have seen its good results. Every 
man in this Convention recognizes this as the policy of the party. 
In Massachusetts it gave us a Russell ; in Iowa it gave us a Boies. 
In Wisconsin it gave us a Peck for Governor, and Vilas for Sena- 
tor. In Michigan it gave us Winans for Governor, and it gave us 
a Democratic Legislature, and it will give us eight electoral votes 
for President. In 1889, in Ohio, it gave us James E. Campbell for 
Governor, and in 1891 to defeat him it required the power, the 
wealth and the machinery of the entire Republican party. In 
Pennsylvania it gave us Robert E. Pattison. In Connecticut it 



106 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

gave us a Democratic Governor, who was kept out of office by the 
infamous conduct of the Republican party. In New Hampshire it 
gave us a Legislature, of which we were defrauded. In Illinois it 
gave us a Palmer for Senator; and in Nebraska it gave us Boyd for 
Governor. In the great Southern States it has continued in power 
Democratic Governors and Democratic Legislatures. 

In New Jersey, the power of the Democracy has been strength- 
ened, and the Legislature and Executive are now both Democratic. 
In the great State of New York it gave us David B. Hill for Sena- 
tor, and Roswell P. Flower for Governor. 

(The mention of the name of David B. Hill was the signal for a 
long continued outburst of cheers, applause, etc., which, finally 
abating, the speaker continued.) 

With all these glorious achievements, it is the wisest and best 
party policy to nominate again the man whose policy made these 
successes possible. The people believe that these victories, which 
gave us a Democratic House of Representatives in 1890, and Dem- 
ocratic Governors and Senators in Republican and doubtful States, 
are due to the courage and wisdom of Grover Cleveland. And so 
believing, they recognize him as their great leader. 

In presenting this name to the Convention, it is no reflection 
upon any of the masterful leaders of the party. The victories 
which have been obtained are not alone the heritage of these States; 
they belong to the whole party. I feel that every Democratic State, 
and every individual Democrat, has reason to rejoice and be proud, 
and applaud these splendid successes. The candidacy of Grover 
Cleveland is not a reflection upon others ; it is not antagonistic to 
any great Democratic leader. He comes before this Convention 
not as the candidate of any one State. He is the choice of the 
great majority of Democratic voters. 

The Democracy of New Jersey, therefore, presents to this Con- 
vention, in this, the people's year, their nominee, the nominee of 
the people, the plain, blunt, honest citizen, the idol of the Demo- 
cratic masses, Grover Cleveland. 

At the mention of Mr. Cleveland's name, another 
prolonged demonstration occurred of about equal dura- 
tion to that which took place when the same speaker 
referred to Mr. Hill. 

The Secretary proceeded with the call of the States, 
beginning with California. George F. Patton responded 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 107 

on behalf of the delegation, seconding the nomination of 
Grover Cleveland. 

Colorado was the next State called, when Mr. T. J. 
O'Donnell announced to the Chair that Colorado yielded 
to the State of New York. 

William C. DeWitt, from the State of New York, 
came to the platform. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, I desire to present 
to you the Hon. William C. DeWitt, of the State of New York. 

At this point the continued rainstorm and confusion 
in the hall made it impossible for the speaker to be 
heard by more than a few in his immediate vicinity. 
Hon. Bourke Cockran said : 

MR. COCKRAN : Mr. Chairman, I ask that the proceedings be 
suspended for the present on account of the down-pouring storm, 
which renders it impossible for the speaker to be heard. 

Without any formal action, proceedings were sus- 
pended until the violence of the storm had sufficiently 
abated to enable Mr. DeWitt to make himself heard. 

The fifteen minutes having expired, the Chair said: 

THE CHAIR : If the Convention will come to order, and the 
parties in the gallery will keep quiet, we can proceed. 

J. C. SOUTH, of Arkansas : I move that the nominations be 
closed, if no more are to be made. 

THE CHAIR : The gentleman from New York has the floor. 

MR. SCOTT, of Kansas : I agree with you that the gentleman 
from New York should be heard, and I move that the galleries be 
cleared, unless they keep quiet. I move you, therefore, that the 
galleries be cleared unless this noise be stopped. 

MR. WELLS, of Iowa : I move that we. adjourn until 10 o'clock 
to-morrow morning. 

THE CHAIR: The Convention will be in order. That motion 
has been made already. 

A DELEGATE : I understand that the gentleman on my left made 
a motion to adjourn until 10 o'clock to-morrow morning. 

THE CHAIR : That is true. 



108 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

MR. FENLOX, of Kansas : Let us know what is in order. 

THE CHAIR : It is in order to have order. The gentleman from 
New York has the floor, and cannot be taken off the floor without 
his consent, and we are simply waiting for the Convention to come 
to order before he proceeds. 

Mr. DeWitt came down to the Stenographer's table, 
in order to get away from the down pour of rain falling 
upon the desk of the Chairman, and was about to begin, 
when Mr. Sheehan, of New York, advised him not to 
proceed, as he could not be heard, on account of the 
storm prevailing at the time. 

After a few minutes' waiting, and amid cries of "Go 
on, go on," Mr. DeWitt resumed his position in front 
of the Chairman's desk and spoke : 

ADDRESS OF HON. WILLIAM H. DE WITT. 

Mr. President and Fellow Delegates : By the favor of my col- 
leagues, I have now the high honor to speak the voice of the State 
of New York in this council of the Democracy of the Nation. 

Our majestic commonwealth needs no eulogy here. Gateway of 
commerce, both from the ocean and the lakes ; vast arsenal of 
thought, through whose press the intelligence of the world is gath- 
ered and scattered throughout the land ; joined to the agricultural 
regions by the fertile valleys of the Hudson, the Mohawk, and the 
Genesee, and opening up through the triple city, seated upon its 
bay, those greater, higher, affluent relations with the other peoples 
of the globe ; the fullest development of which will be the source of 
our best prosperity, the State of New York is none the less par- 
amount in our political than our commercial affairs. Her great city is 
the life-giving heart of the Democratic party. Her electoral vote 
is the keystone of the Federal arch, upon which alone we can rest 
the citadel of our hopes. She realizes in her present relations with 
the Democratic party of the Nation what was said of the Roman 
Amphitheater : 

" While stands the Coliseum, Rome shall stand ; 
When falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall ; 
And when Rome falls the world." 

In view of that critical and important position occupied by our 
State in the impending contest, I take great pride, while speaking 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 109 

for its regular organization of the party, in pointing to our past tri- 
umphs. In 1885 we carried New York by 11,134 majority; in 
1886, by 7,797; in 1887, by 17,077; in 1888, by 19,171 ; in 1889, by 
20,527, and in 1891, by 47,937. So that the present organization 
speaks not only for the State, indispensable to your success in the 
Presidential campaign, but speaks for that State organized and 
arrayed upon the lines of victory. These are stubborn facts, which 
hypocrisy cannot conceal nor detraction obliterate. 

So, too, at the outset, this Convention should fully understand 
the true nature of the Democracy of the people of New York. It 
is fundamental and vital in character. We believe in the brother- 
hood of man, and in all the hearty doctrines of equality and fra- 
ternity which arises from that faith. 

The supreme evil of our age is the use of the law-making power 
of State and Nation for the enrichment of the few at the expense of 
the many. In olden times the bandit armed his followers, and de- 
scended with fire and sword upon the industrial classes. In modern 
times the same spirit of rapine erects a manufactory, or organizes a 
corporation, and through a clause in a tariff act, a donation of the 
public domain, or the acquisition of chartered privileges effects the 
same result. 

Of the 4,000 millionaires in the country, 1,700 are said to have 
amassed their fortunes through the tariff, and an equal number 
through the corporations. Out of these causes all the features of 
an aristocracy have arisen in our social life. Caste and class dis- 
tinction, profligacy and splendor, social dudes and political ascetics 
have taken the place of the plain, earnest people of former genera- 
tions. 

The money power dominates the land and subordinates the sov-~ 
ereignty of the people. Patriotic statesmanship and oratory no 
longer enjoy the honors of the Republic, and the apostles of truth, 
justice and liberty are supplanted by the pliant instruments of vast 
pecuniary and political combinations. In such a crisis the Democ- 
racy of New York wants a revival of the fundamental principles of 
the party. A leader who holds that corporations created by State 
or Nation, are not amenable to the control of their creator, or who 
fails to sympathize with at least an international effort to enlarge 
the currency of the world in the interests of productive industry, or 
who makes his friends and counsellors among the plutocrats of the 
land, lacks the qualities indispensable to a triumphant standard- 
bearer of our unterrified constituency. Humanity is better than 
dogma, and the love of man is the life of the Republic. 



110 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Our people want a leader filled with the instincts, aspirations, 
shrewdness, sagacity, hopes, fears, joys and sorrows, which crowd 
their struggle for life and happiness. 

We, therefore, present for your suffrages the name of him who, 
having enjoyed all the honors of our State, still finds his highest 
boast in the sentiment "I am a Democrat." However eminent may 
be his post of duty, he does not descend to us from above, but in 
the roll-call of the Democracy, he steps proudly from the ranks. 
Do you ask for his credentials? We point you to the unbroken 
series of victories by which he has rendered New York a veritable 
Gibraltar to the Democracy of the Union. When, with all the 
power and patronage of the Federal Government at his command, 
the distinguished ex-President lost .the State of New York by a mi- 
nority of 14,000 votes, Governor Hill carried it by a majority of over 
19,000 votes. At every election during the last ten years he and 
his friends have met with constantly increasing success. No sane 
man can reject the force of those statistics, and in pointing the 
finger of destiny it must outweigh all theory, prophesy, promises 
and dreams. 

The experience of the past must, under like circumstances, fore- 
cast the events of the future, and in this instance the conditions 
remain unchanged. 

Mr. Hill never had any alliance with malcontents, nor any favor 
in the Republican party. The class of men from our State who so 
violently oppose his nomination to-day have uniformly opposed 
him in the past. He has always been nominated under a shower 
of their vituperation and abuse, and he has always emerged from 
the conflict with the increasing commendation of the people. Be- 
ginning public life as an associate of Samuel J. Tilden in the Legis- 
lature, he has been mayor of the city of his home ; he was elected 
Lieutenant-Governor by the largest vote ever given to the candidate 
of any party in the State of New York ; he has been twice elected 
its Governor, and now represents it in the Senate of the United 
States. 

It is not essential that I should embark in fulsome eulogy. His 
signally successful administration of these great trusts establishes 
his capacity, and you will pardon the liberty of a friend when I say 
that the fact that he is a poor man, fully and absolutely devoted to 
the service of his party, is worth a thousand labored eulogies in 
demonstrating the patriotism and integrity of his character. He is 
a Cavalier rather than a Roundhead. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. Ill 

In opposition to sumptuary laws, in persistent advocacy of the 
bill granting freedom of religious worship, in the increase of public 
holidays, labor day and half holiday, in supporting outdoor sports 
and pastimes, he has done more than any public man of his time to 
foster and develop general liberty appropriate to modern civiliza- 
tion. For these services he encounters the hostility of the bigot 
and the hypocrite. 

He is a firm adherent to the principles of frugality and economy 
in public affairs, so long characteristic of the party. During his 
administration as Governor, our State debt of $7,000,000 was 
reduced to virtually nothing, while the property and interests of the 
State were adequately maintained and improved. These things 
speak in tones of thunder against the vilifications of his enemies. 

From the beginning of his public career he has remained the 
faithful, efficient, untiring friend and servant of the laboring classes, 
and they have reciprocated his devotion by loyalty and support, 
which has rendered him invincible. 

You will understand how a character thus radical and active 
should stir up enmity and strife. 

It is said, if we make another nomination we shall have a calm 
election, our dear business interests will not be disturbed, and the 
people will be quite indifferent about the result. 

If it, indeed, be true that politics has sunk so low that no man 
can serve his party earnestly without personal reproach ; if national 
contentions, through regular organization, have, indeed, become 
pernicious and disreputable, then the entire system of popular gov- 
ernment is a failure. Nothing is more healthy than political agita- 
tion, and nothing is more dangerous than political stagnation. Men 
of kindred convictions and emotions naturally combine on all 
great questions of civil government ; and where population is im- 
mense, there must be parties governed by appropriate organizations. 
It is because Mr. Hill awakens party feeling, agitates the contending 
forces to the very dregs, excites the wrath of the Republican and 
the enthusiasm of the Democrat, that he is a healthy and success- 
ful candidate. Politic nominations to men who esteem themselves 
better than their party, or to suckle and support the heartless mid- 
dleman of the times, are distasteful to our people. 

We present David B. Hill as the candidate of an unterrified and 
aggressive Democracy. His experience teaches us that such is the 
way to success. 






112 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

We love him not merely for the enemies he has made, but for 
the enemies he has conquered. He has never been defeated, and 
having just entered upon the high office of Senator of the United 
States, if he entertained the slightest doubt of his ability to carry 
his State he would not suffer his name to be connected with the 
nomination. Besides, the delegation from New York is not itself 
unmindful of its own responsibility, and of the great duty of truth 
and candor it owes to this body. 

We have never misled you in presenting a sterling Democrat to 
your favor. We gave you Horatio Seymour, and our people en- 
dorsed him against General Grant. We gave you Samuel J. Tilden, 
and in turn our State endorsed him. We acquiesced in, but we did 
not advise, the nomination of 1888. The consequences are known. 
Not for a single instant would we counsel and urge this Convention 
to nominate David B. Hill were we not sure, from careful scrutiny and 
deliberation, fortified by the tests of our elections, that he can 
carry the State, the vote of which in the Electoral College, under 
the recent apportionment, is absolutely indispensable to a Demo- 
cratic victory. 

Another thought, Mr. President, higher and deeper than any 
mere matter of individual candidacy, must be expressed before my 
task is completed. 

In this national household of the Democratic party, a certain 
comity between the different States is due to the sovereignty of each 
and the fraternity of all. The delegates from New York were 
elected by the unanimous votes of a State Convention, duly called, 
under the authority which has held undisputed sway since 1848, and 
which was approved by the party at the last election by a majority 
of 48,000 in the State. Not a dissenting voice marred the harmo- 
nious action of this regularly constituted and authoritative body. 

Our delegation is headed by the Governor and Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor, freshly chosen by unprecedented party majorities, and it is 
filled by representatives from the various districts, many of whom 
are well known to you all. 

For no earthly reason worthy a moment's consideration, other 
than that this State Convention preferred the leadership of Senator 
Hill, and this delegation sympathized with that preference, a revolt 
was set afoot in our State, an organization was formed, an attack 
was instigated upon us through an unfriendly press ; a parcel of 
gentlemen were selected to come here to contest our seats and 
nullify our influence, and thus a distinguished candidate for the 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 113 

Presidency, whom heretofore we had assisted in becoming Governor 
and President, was put upon a war footing toward the regular State 
organization of the party. 

The contesting delegation has been dismissed from your doors, 
and now you are asked, not merely to defeat the choice of our State 
for the nomination, but, in addition, to force upon us a candidate 
from our own homes, hostile to our organization. Such is not the 
measure of courtesy and friendship which we, of New York State, 
should think due, under like circumstances, to the representatives 
of a sister State. 

That concern for the rights and sentiments of others, which is 
the source of all gentility, is indispensable to the nobility of this 
body. There is no alloy of enmity or opposition in the fraternal 
affection with which the delegation from New York greets its breth- 
ren upon this floor. No scaly gauntlets, with joints of steel, glove 
our hands. Our pulses will throb in unison with our brothers from 
any State whose chosen son shall be presented to the consideration 
of this Convention. 

We salute the rising leader from Iowa, whose home victories 
shine upon our arms like a sunburst from out the parting clouds of 
his far western sky. We bow to the venerable sage of Illinois, or 
the rugged foe of the tariff barons who stands by his side. We ap- 
preciate the capacity which has organized victory against the over- 
whelming odds in Pennsylvania. We are at home with our friends 
from Indiana. We fully sympathize with the battle-stained and in- 
domitable leader in Ohio. We watch with anxiety and affection the 
wonderful power for organization and triumph, which characterizes 
the Senator from Maryland, and our hearts burned once more with 
the immortal fires of the sunny land when he was presented, who, 
in the form of his incomparable genius, evoked from the humanity 
of his character and the elevation of his oratory and statesmanship, 
towers in the vanguard of our thickening hosts like a pillar of cloud 
by day, and of fire by night, the Senator from Kentucky. 

Whosoever of these may be selected, or whatsoever State may 
succeed in this Convention, we shall join in the exultation, and 
bear our part to the uttermost in the ensuing contest. 

This is the spirit in which we meet our brethren, and this is the 
spirit we expect to be reciprocated. In no other way can the har- 
mony and dignity of the States be fostered and preserved by this 
Convention. 

In thus presenting and conceding the force and strength of the 
candidates of the various States, you will not understand us as 



114 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

abating a single jot from our own preferences, or gainsaying in the 
slightest degree our unclouded conviction that the fortunes of our 
party will rest most safely in the custody of our chosen leader in our 
own State. Hill defeated Harrison in New York, in 1888, by 
20,000, and under conditions less encouraging than those which 
confront us to day, and he can repeat the triumph with redoubled 
effect. This is the conclusive point. Contemplate the ensuing 
controversy from whatever standpoint you may choose, you cannot 
escape the fact that our State is the battleground of the campaign. 

Ours is the coigne of vantage, the point of strategy, the spot of 
victory or defeat. We appreciate the responsibility of our position, 
and would speak to you like men whose blood flows in their words. 
The common enemy is strongly entrenched in the capital. You are 
the generals of the army of invasion, in grand council assembled. 
We hail from Waterloo ; and we fearlessly proclaim that Hill is the 
Blucher who can drive the Republican chieftain to St. Helena in 
November. 

One single word, fellow delegates, and I am through. I want to 
address a word to the men upon this floor who stand with us in our 
position. It is this : It took just three hundred brave men to stop 
the Persians at the Pass of Thermopylae and rescue the immortal 
plains of Greece. If we have three hundred votes upon this floor, 
give Providence a chance to make a President of the United States, 
right here and now; and if we have three hundred votes, like the 
Greeks, let us stand as a wall of living and impenetrable fire. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, I now have the 
pleasure of presenting to you Hon. John R. Fellows, of the State of 
New York. 

ADDRESS OF HON. JOHN R. FELLOWS. 

Mr. President, Fellow Delegates I shall not weary your patience 
by a lengthened speech, and in this vast amphitheatre, and with a 
broken voice, I beg of you the courtesy of your silence and atten- 
tion for the very few minutes it is my privilege to stand in your 
presence. 

The honor has been assigned me, in the delegation of which I am 
a member, of seconding, in behalf of the Democracy of New York, 
the nomination of David Bennett Hill, just made. 

It has been my privilege, as very many of the delegates assembled 
before me know, through many years of the past, through service 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 115 

in which my hairs have grown gray in the cause of Democracy, to 
stand in the presence of the representatives of the party assembled 
in its national council, and voice the sentiment of the State of New 
York. I occupy precisely that position to-day. With one unbroken 
voice, reaching from the cataract upon her western border to the 
ocean which washes her eastern shore, she comes here demanding 
the nomination of Governor Hill for the Presidency. 

In the past there have been differences, and here and there some 
portion of our people have dissented in view from the great over- 
whelming sentiment of the State. That is but natural and to be 
expected. It is difficult to get the Democracy of as great a State 
as the State New York to be thoroughly in accord in opinion. The 
oldest man who sits before me hardly remembers the time when 
New York, with an unbroken front and a united voice, has come 
into a Democratic Convention making to their brethren of all the 
Union the appeal which New York makes to-day. 

There is no break in their columns, there is no faltering in her 
expression. Sirs, I am one of those Democrats who, like my 
brother and colleague who has just left this platform, believe in rely- 
ing upon Democratic sentiment, Democratic faith, and Democratic 
energy, to win our victories. We welcome, with gratitude and thank- 
fulness, accessions from every quarter. If those who have formerly 
acted with the Republican party, now animated by the consciousness 
and the reproach of wrongdoing in the past, and enlightened as to 
the principles and purposes of our party, choose to ally their fate 
with ours, our doors and our arms alike are open to receive them ; 
but when they come to us protesting that they must lead and guide, 
and we must be but the followers ; when they come to us telling us 
that if we will give them a certain name they will ally themselves 
with us, and if we give them any other they will range themselves 
with the opposition, I tell them it is not by such rewards as that 
that we seek their fellowship or their association. We want to know, 
sir, what the Democratic demand is, first, and responding to that, 
we have seldom failed to be successful. 1 speak in disparagement 
of no other candidate. I am not here to coin epithets, to create 
divisions or differences further than they now exist, but when a 
State like New York, whose vote in November is absolutely essen- 
tial to your success, comes with such singular unanimity of ex- 
pression and purpose as animates her now, we have a right to appeal 
to a Democratic Convention to deliberate long and well before they 
fling their defiance in her face. 



116 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Gentlemen of the Convention, what is the situation ? We wel- 
come our brothers from every State in the Union ; we are glad to 
feel the beating of their pulse, to touch elbows with them in this 
great council of our party. But, after all, we must look with more 
of deference, it seems to me, to those States from which we expect 
to realize the support that will enable us to win in November than 
to those who can give us no aid in the final battle of the ballot-box. 

Where will you turn, on the night of November next, for the 
news, either of victory or defeat? Where will the heart, the ear 
and the expectation of every Democrat in this broad Republic be 
directed after the voting has closed and the ballots, which re- 
cord the people's will, are being counted ? The Democrats of 
Pennsylvania are true, earnest, faithful, patriotic and steadfast, but 
you know now, as well as you will know on the night of November 
8, that Pennsylvania, by many thousands, will be found in the Re- 
publican colnmn. You will look to New York to decide this battle. 
Her verdict will be the verdict that makes victory or defeat. 

We present to you a candidate whose name is a synonym for 
victory. He came into power with the State in the hands of our polit- 
ical foes. Its Legislature was Republican ; its State officers were, 
many of them, Republican. With ceaseless vigilance, with tireless 
patience, with an energy that never faltered and a devotion that 
never weakened, with steady purpose and resolute will, this strong, 
bold, brave, gallant Democratic leader grappled with the Republi- 
can foe in every part of the field, until last January, standing in the 
place from which he had been sent as Governor to the higher 
councils of the Nation, he turned over to the honored chairman 
of the delegation sitting before me a State which in every de- 
partment, in every office, in both branches of the Legislature, in 
every department and function of government, was solidly Demo- 
cratic. 

Governor Hill organizes victory. What he has done in the State 
he would do for the Nation. Make him President, give him four 
years in the White House, and there would not be enough left of 
the Republican party to sweep up and carry to its grave. 

I do not wonder they hate him. I do not wonder that through 
their press to-day, and through the voices of their most prominent 
leaders, they implore a Democratic Convention to nominate some 
other than Hill. 

Maligned, traduced, slandered, villified as few men have been, 
this man, to those who know him, stands before the country as he 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 117 

stands in the affection of his friends, a man without a shadow of a 
stain, either upon his personal or his official career. 

Poor, as has been said, in the world's goods, never obedient to 
the demands of the tempter, never swerved from the path of official 
rectitude, but consistently and forever pursuing a course which 
built up his party, which destroyed its foes, this man has made 
himself the idol of the Democracy of New York. 

One thing may truthfully be said of David B. Hill ; he never won 
a victory in all his long career that, when it was won, did not leave 
the Democratic party infinitely stronger and better equipped for 
the succeeding contest. His triumphs have ever been the triumphs 
of his party ; and to-day, with a candidate meeting the sentiments 
of the Democracy of New York, it is as rock-ribbed and as certain 
a Democratic State as Texas or Kentucky. As has been said, the 
Governor of the State is here, the Lieutenant-Governor, the Secre- 
tary of State, its Treasurer, State Comptroller, Democratic mem- 
bers of Congress, Democratic members of the Legislature, all telling 
you from every part of the State of the danger that threatens if cer- 
tain action be taken, and of the- triumph that awaits us if you meet 
the will of the Democracy of New York. Gentlemen, do not mis- 
understand me. There is many a man sitting in this audience, and 
whose voice has filled with its clamor the streets of Chicago in vitu- 
peration and defamation of the regular delegates who sit here, whose 
voices will be heard no more until election day. The old guard, 
the solid Democracy of the State, the men who sit before you there, 
representing the constituencies from which they come, are the men 
which you, and you, and you, rely upon to win victories in New 
York, if any are to be won. We have held that State in the Demo- 
cratic line for nine years now. We have fulfilled well the trust 
which the people reposed in us. The organization has been efficient 
and active ; the people have responded with alacrity to its demands, 
because its demands have met their sentiments ; and trust us now 
with a candidate who meets the requirements of the New York 
Democracy, and it is just as certain as that the sun will go down on 
the night of November 8 that we will give you the thirty-six elec- 
toral votes of that State. 

I leave the question with you. (Cries of "Time," "Go on.") I 
am not to be at all disturbed by the clamor of the galleries. (Cries 
of "That's right.") The Convention is yielding a most respectful 
attention, for which I am profoundly grateful. I shall not occupy 
its time longer. To you, who sit before me, and not to the 



118 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

men who occupy those benches (pointing to the galleries) the duty 
is entrusted of speaking for the Democratic party of this Republic. 
Upon you the stern duty and solemn obligation rest. 

New York may have wearied you with her demands in the past, 
but New York comes now as she never came before, in a united 
column, pledged by the strongest ties with the memory of past vic- 
tories, with present achievements and triumphs in her hands, to be 
shown here as the reward of her labors. New York comes here 
now asking the Democracy of the Nation to intrust to her keeping, 
in one more National battle, the interests, the responsibilities, the 
sacred trusts, which hitherto, in her State relation, she has taken 
up and discharged so faithfully, and that we will do, as God lives 
and reigns, if you will give us the candidate. But the sentiment of 
New York, with a unanimity which never before was known in our 
State, demands (a cry of " Give us Grover Cleveland," and an 
attempt to drown the voice of the speaker was indulged in, mingled 
with cries of " Go on.") I should have finished some time ago, 
gentlemen, if the galleries had not undertaken to debate the ques- 
tion with me. 

I am speaking to delegates who will presently be called upon to 
vote. I know the solemn sense of responsibility they feel. I ask 
them to heed the protestations which the Democracy of New York 
makes. I bid you look upon the gallant leaders who, in all the 
fights of the past, have conducted us to those glorious triumphs, 
which have thrilled with gratification the hearts of the whole Union, 
and to ask you once more to leave the Democratic banner in our 
hands and keeping. 

The Secretary then called the State of Connecticut. 

HON. CARLOS FRENCH, of Connecticut : Connecticut seconds 
the nomination of Grover Cleveland. 

The States of Delaware, Florida, Georgia and Idaho, 
each announced that they had no candidate to present. 

When the State of Illinois was reached, General Ste- 
venson arose and said : 

MR. STEVENSON : Mr. President, the delegation from Illinois 
have selected the Hon. A. W. Green, one of its members, to second 
the nomination of one of the candidates, whose name has been 
placed before this Convention. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, I have the honor to 
present Mr. A. W. Green, of the State of Illinois. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 119 

ADDRESS OF A. W. GREEN, ESQ. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention: "Illinois 
casts forty-eight votes for Grover Cleveland." 

When the roll of States of this Convention shall be called that 
will be the answer of the great State of Illinois ; and I will tell you 
the reason why. We have assembled here to-day as the represent- 
atives of the Democracy of this great Union. The conventions 
of the various States and Territories have met and selected us as 
their representatives, and in their name and stead to perform the 
work of this Convention. A part, and the most important part, of 
that work is to select a candidate for the high office of President 
of the United States. It is a fundamental principle of the Democ- 
racy that the will of the people must prevail. It is radically opposed 
to the Republican doctrine that there should be a government of 
the minority and for the minority. That distinguished statesman, 
the late Governor of New York, who has been placed in nomination 
here to-night, has recently in a letter called attention to this Demo- 
cratic doctrine, and cited in illustration of it, from the writings 
of another Democratic statesman, these words : " If chosen by the 
suffrages of my countrymen to attempt this work I shall, with God's 
help, be the efficient instrument of their will." These are the words 
of the great Democratic statesman whose leadership we loved in 
his lifetime, and whose memory we now revere, Samuel J. Tilden. 

We have been chosen by the suffrages of our countrymen to per- 
form the work of this Convention. If we can discover their will it 
is our duty to become the efficient instrument of that will. Who 
that looks over the occurrences of the last few months can fail to 
be convinced that in this mighty contest which we are now entering, 
the Democratic voters of this country have chosen as their leader, 
that tower of strength that stood four-square to all the winds that 
blew Grover Cleveland. 

Why is this? The cause of tariff reform is the great cause of the 
Democratic party. And in that cause the Democratic party has 
chosen Grover Cleveland as its leader. That cause must be fought 
to the end. We have fought it for years. It is old, but, as Grover 
Cleveland himself said in his speech in Rhode Island, the Ten 
Commandments are thousands of years old ; but they and the 
doctrine of tariff reform will be preached and taught until mankind, 
and the Republican party shall heed the injunction, "Thou shall 
not steal." 



120 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Give us Grover Cleveland, gentlemen, as your candidate, and in 
November we will bring the State of Illinois into the Democratic 
column aye, in Cook County alone, with such a cause and such a 
man, we can redeem the great State of Illinois. 

When the State of Indiana was called Mr. Morss 
arose and addressed the Chairman as follows : 

In behalf of the entire delegation of Indiana the Hon. William 
E. English will very briefly second the nomination of Mr. Cleveland. 

THE CHAIR : I have the honor of introducing to you the Hon. 
William E. English, of the State of Indiana. 

ADDRESS OF HON. WILLIAM E. ENGLISH. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention : I desire to 
say in the outset that I am here not only to represent the Indiana 
delegation, but I am here to render an explanation to this Conven- 
tion, and I promise you that as the hour is late, I will detain you 
but three or four minutes at the outside. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention, it was the will 
and the desire of the Indiana delegation that that well-beloved son 
of Indiana, the Hon. Daniel W. Voorhees, should appear when 
Indiana's name was called, to second the nomination of a great 
name, which has been already presented to this Convention; but, 
Mr. Chairman, it is my unpleasant duty to announce to the Conven- 
tion that that distinguished Democrat, who is loved and honored 
wherever the word Democracy is known, is confined to his room by 
serious indisposition, and will not be able to be present at this 
session of the Convention, and I will read to you a letter which he 
addressed to the delegation from Indiana, for he is now, as always, 
loyal to the interests of that great State, and has written to us a 
communication expressive of his opinion of the situation. It is as 
follows : 

CHICAGO, June 22, 1892. 
HON. JOHN E. LAMB, 

MY DEAR SIR : I am so indisposed to-day that my physician strongly advises 
me against going into the Convention, and especially against making the exertion 
necessary to a speech. As you are fully aware, I would most gladly carry out the 
wishes of the delegation in seconding Mr. Cleveland's nomination. This duty 
must be performed by some one from our State, and it rests with the delegation to 
make the proper selection. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 121 

I sincerely trust that our portion in regard to this matter may be left in no 
doubt whatever, and that the Convention may be fully assured that the Democracy 
of Indiana accepts and indorses Mr. Cleveland's nomination without reservation 
or hesitation. Let the Convention also be assured that it is our firm resolve to face 
the enemy in our State in an unbroken line of battle, and to win a decisive and 
glorious victory in November. 

Very faithfully yours, 

D. W. VOORHEES. 

At the conclusion of the reading of the letter from 
Senator Voorhees, Mr. English further addressed the 
Convention as follows : 

Now, Mr. Chairman, the delegation from Indiana did me the high 
honor to select me to take Mr. Voorhees' place in this regard ; but, 
Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention, it would be a 
bold man who, at any time or under any circumstances, in any great 
forum, where eloquence and oratory and ability were important 
factors, would attempt to take the place of Daniel W. Voorhees. 

I recognize my inability to do so, and I shall not attempt to, 
further than to say, on the part of the united delegation from Indi- 
ana, that in fulfillment of the sentiment of the citizens of Indiana, 
as expressed in that letter of our great leader, in fulfillment of our 
duty to our conscience as Democrats, in fulfillment of our duty 
to the instructions of the gallant Democracy of Indiana in State 
convention assembled, in fulfillment of our duty to the rank and 
file of that Indiana Democracy, on behalf of the united delegation 
from that State, on behalf of the Democracy of the State that 
knew and loved Thomas A. Hendricks, I desire to second the 
nomination of him who has already been chosen first in the hearts 
of the rank and file of the Democracy of this Nation, that great foe 
to monopoly, that great defender of honesty, that great leader of 
leaders, that great Democrat of Democrats, honest Grover Cleveland. 

The Secretary then called the State of Iowa. 

MR. J. H. SHIELDS, of Iowa: Iowa has selected the Hon. John 
F. Duncombe to present to this Convention her candidate for Presi- 
dent of the United States. 

THE CHAIR: I present to you the Hon. John F. Duncombe, of 
the State of Iowa. 

ADDRESS OF HON. JOHN F. DUNCOMBE. 

Mr. President and gentlemen of the Convention : To-night for 
the first time in the history of the American Republic, the name of 
a man whose home is west of the Mississippi River will be presented 



122 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

to a Democratic National Convention for nomination to the exalted 
position of President of the United States. 

Heretofore the Northern, the Southern, the Eastern and the 
Middle States have furnished all but one of the Presidential nomi- 
nees of the Democratic party. 

For thirty-five years the Republican party has chosen all but one 
of its candidates from the West, and the eastern candidate was 
defeated. For thirty-five years the Democratic party has chosen 
all its candidates from the East, and during that time only one Demo- 
cratic President has been inaugurated. For over a quarter of a 
century no man residing outside of the limits of the Empire State 
has had the honor of a Democratic Presidential nomination. If 
the Democracy of New York were united to-day, her honored 
statesmen might furnish Presidential candidates for a quarter of a 
century to come, and the Democracy of the greater Northwest and 
the great Southwest would not complain or seek to pluck one honor 
from the brilliant stars which New York has placed in the crown of 
the Republic. 

All Democrats deeply regret that there is dissension within 
her borders, which they fear, if a candidate should be nominated 
from New York, would imperil Democratic success ; and they 
know that there is a country west of the Mississippi River, pur- 
chased and made part of the Union by Thomas Jefferson, the 
father of Democracy, where there is but one Presidential candidate ; 
a country forever honored by the bravery of the gallant sons of the 
South, who fought in its defense under the lion-hearted leader of 
Democracy, Andrew Jackson. 

There is a land, the great Empire of the Gulf, whose brave sons 
made the name of the Lone Star State immortal in their heroic 
struggle for liberty, where forever enshrined in memory are the 
names of those who were baptized in blood at the Alamo] whose 
deeds stand forth above the bravest acts of men like mighty -mount- 
ains on the plain. There is a land, fragrant with flowers and orange 
groves, where the golden rays of the setting sun are deflected from 
the waves of the Pacific. There is a land where the glistening, 
snow-capped mountain peaks of Nevada, Colorado, Wyoming, 
Idaho, Montana and the Dakotas sparkle with their silver and gold. 
There is a land, the heart of America, where hundreds of millions 
of bushels of wheat and corn, and millions of cattle furnish food 
for our fathers and mothers in the east. A land filled with schools, 
colleges and universities unsurpassed. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 123 

In that land, west of the Mississippi, is a State larger than New 
York, surrounded by her elder sisters, Missouri and Illinois, and 
her younger sisters, Nebraska and Minnesota ; a State bordered on 
the east and on the west by the father and mother of waters, and 
held in their embrace ; a State whose springs and brooks and rivers 
flow on unceasingly to the Southern Gulf, emblematic of the eternal 
love which should forever bind in unity the dwellers in the great 
Mississippi Valley. In that State there lives a noble son of New 
York, honored by an election to her Legislature over a third of a 
century ago ; a son worthy and well qualified for the highest honor 
which this great intelligent Convention can place upon him ; a son 
who, born and reared in poverty, accustomed to hard labor, has 
thereby learned to sympathize with the poor and distressed, with the 
laborers of the land. The name of that noble son of New York, 
and adopted son of Iowa, is u Horace Boies. 

In the days of Lincoln he was a Republican. But at that time, 
and until 1880, the Republicans of Iowa were as ardent advocates 
of tariff reform as are the Democrats of to-day. Year after year 
they met in their State convention and resolved in favor of a reve- 
nue tariff, but never before that time in favor of a protective tariff. 
At that time there was no prominent Republican in Iowa who 
favored a protective tariff. Grimes, Kirkwood and Allison were 
then all tariff reformers. 

When the Iowa Republicans, in 1880, deserted their tariff princi- 
ples, and Iowa followed the worshipers of protection, and when, by 
sumptuary legislation in Iowa, they confiscated millions of dollars' 
worth of property without any compensation, our candidate refused 
to follow his party, and united with the Democratic party. He did 
this without any hope of political reward. He did it when the 
Democratic party in Iowa had been defeated by a majority for Gar- 
field of over 78,000. He did it when Iowa was the banner Repub- 
lican State. He was led to this course solely by the courage of his 
convictions, by his conscience and his innate love of justice. 

From that time he has fought unceasingly for the cause of De- 
mocracy. His eminent legal talents led the leaders of the party to 
offer him the nomination for Judge of the Supreme Court of Iowa, 
and his name has been frequently mentioned for offices ; but since 
he came to Iowa, and until 1889, he has declined to accept any 
nomination, and only consented to accept the nomination for Gov- 
ernor then at the urgent solicitation of his friends, and when chosen 
by acclamation. After receiving this nomination, his sincere, logical, 



124 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

powerful, truthful and convincing arguments brought dismay to the 
intolerant bosses of the Republican party all over Iowa. He abused 
no one, but was the subject of constant abuse. He kindled the 
smoldering embers of Democracy into a blaze of enthusiasm on 
every hill-top and in every valley in the State. 

His scimiter flashed at the head of an army of Iowa Democrats, 
who had fought more than thirty battles, only to be overpowered 
by numbers, but never conquered. He infused new courage in the 
hearts of all his followers, and the Iowa Democracy, by the aid of 
tariff reformers and the opponents of sumptuary laws, who have 
since become Democrats, routed the enemy and placed the laurel 
wreath of victory upon the head of their hero, Horace Boies. 

Again, in 1890, his voice was heard rallying the forces of Democ- 
racy against the iniquities of the obnoxious McKinley law, against 
intolerance, against sumptuary legislation, against paternal govern- 
ment, against centralization, against that tyrannical, kingly invention, 
the force bill, and again the pennant of Democracy waived aloft in 
victory. 

In 1891 he was again, by acclamation, placed at the head of the 
Democratic column for re-election ; and in the most stubbornly 
fought political battle that Iowa ever witnessed, when 22,000 more 
votes were polled than had ever been polled before in any State 
election, and nearly that number more than in any Presidential 
election, his majority for Governor was increased from 6,523 to 
8,216, and the entire Democratic ticket was elected. This increase 
in Democratic votes came, not from the residents of the cities, but 
from the farmers of Iowa, who were tired of being impoverished by 
constantly contributing to the wealth of others under the false pre- 
tense of raising money to pay the burdens of governmental tax- 
ation. 

Under his administration the business of the State has been c<Jn- 
ducted systematically, successfully, honestly and satisfactorily. He 
has proven his eminent executive ability. He has, by his acts, 
silenced the vituperation of his political traducers, and stands to- 
day at the head of a united Democracy in Iowa, as aggressive, as 
courageous and as heroic as the noble Democracy of Texas, Mis- 
souri, Kentucky or any other State. Among the great leaders of 
the party, no one has sounder views on the tariff, or on any other 
political question. His ideas are those of a plain, old-fashioned 
Jeffersonian Democrat. He is by nature a Democrat, as well as a 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 125 

Democrat from principle. His writings, his speeches and his mes- 
sages prove him to be a statesman standing at the very head of the 
list of eminent men of the Nation. His firmness, his judgment, his 
courage, his intelligence, his honesty, his easy assimilation with the 
masses, his power to make men feel his brotherly affection, his 
power to give confidence to all his followers, well fit him as a great 
leader. Iowa Democrats love him for the friends he has made, and 
because he has led them through the wilderness into the promised 
land. 

When our Democratic fathers are convincing themselves that the 
right to nominate a Democratic candidate for President from the 
East is an exclusive God-given right, let them remember that their 
western sons are of age ; and let them do justice to their honored 
names by doing justice to their sons. 

Our candidate has no one to fry fat from lusty protective tariff bene- 
ficiaries to corrupt voters, but around his head beams a bright halo 
of honor, of virtue and truth, which will, like a pillar of fire in the 
night-time of Republican misrule, lead a united host of Democrats 
and liberal independent voters to the glorious day of victory. If 
nominated, as a laborer, he will rally the laboring men of the coun- 
try. As a practical farmer, he will rally the farmers all over the 
land. His conservatism will bring to his standard the solid business 
men of the Nation. New England, New York, Pennsylvania and 
New Jersey, as they study the conservative character of our candi- 
date, and Democrats all over the Union will thank God that under 
our leader they can fight the battle of tariff reform unitedly. 

In moving the nomination of the candidate of the Iowa Democ- 
racy, I plead for one who, if nominated, will be supported by every 
Democrat and thousands of independent voters ; I plead for the 
champion of labor, the champion of the farmers of the Nation. I 
plead for the rights of that great country west of the Mississippi, in 
exjent over one-half of the Nation, that never before has had a 
Democratic Presidential candidate. I plead for the Democracy of 
eighteen States and Territories of that vast empire. I plead for the 
gallant men of Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and Missouri, who never 
falter in their Democracy. I plead for a candidate whose nomina- 
tion will insure the electoral vote of Iowa to the Democratic party. 
I plead for harmony and for Democratic victory. 

The delegates to this Convention will make an irreparable mistake 
if they forget that before November there will be a calm of the 
surging billows of this great ocean of enthusiasm, during which calm 



126 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

the voters, in their quiet homes, at their firesides, in the midst of 
their families, and with their neighbors and friends, will discuss and 
decide the Presidential question ; during which calm every voter 
will consider who is nearest his own heart, who is most in sympathy 
with his own condition, and who will best fill the executive office in 
that plain, honest, old-fashioned Democratic way 'which the people 
most dearly love. 

But this Convention will make no mistake if it shall select as its 
nominee that man of correct habits, of honest purposes, of patriotic 
motives, of clear cultivated mental vision, of sterling integrity, of 
calm deliberation and judgment, of manly and moral courage, of 
deep thought and study, of unflagging industry; that careful, pains- 
taking man, without spot or blemish ; that noble son of the East, 
and adopted son of the West, who has never been defeated, who 
has no foes in his own party to conciliate, who has no errors to cor- 
rect and no explanations or apologies to make, and who will, if 
nominated, fill the struggling, fighting Democracy of Iowa, the 
great West and the entire Nation with unconquerable courage ; that 
born peerless leader, who will in November, if nominated, march at 
the head of an army of 7,000,000 of voters with 50,000 waving banners 
under the triumphal arch, and on whose brow will again be placed 
the wreath of victory, whom Iowa now nominates, honest Horace 
Boies. 

After Mr. Duncombe's speech was concluded the roll 
call was continued, and the State of Kansas was called. 
Ex-Governor Click responded as follows : 

The delegation from Kansas has selected one of her distinguished 
citizens, Mr. Thomas D. Fenelon, to second the nomination of one 
of the candidates already placed before the Convention. 

ADDRESS OF HON. THOMAS D. FENELON. 

Having been thirty-six hours at hard work in preparing the mag- 
nificent set of resolutions adopted to-day, my voice is in no condition 
to make a speech. And the hour warns me that you are in no 
temper to listen to a speech. Therefore I will make no speech. 

Only one thought occurs to me, in looking over the magnificent 
assemblage of delegates, this body of great men and fair women that 
grace our Convention with their presence, I am reminded of a Sen- 
ator from our State who has denounced us as the street-walkers of 
the century. Are you here ? 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 127 

Let me make one remark in passing and tell you that that dis- 
tinguished gentleman is now a pedestrian himself. I will not say a 
street-walker. He is, in his own felicitous language, " a statesman 
without a job ;" and about the only Republican statesman of late 
years that has not had a job of some kind or other. Now, gentle- 
men, I am directed by the courtesy of my fellow delegates, and by 
the unanimous vote of a hundred and twenty thousand Democrats 
in Kansas, to second the nomination of the distinguished son of 
New York and Ex-President of the United States. 

Gentlemen, but one word ; time is up now, but one word. Let 
me make a prediction. That if we are true although I am no 
prophet nor son of a prophet, I am going to indulge in the prediction, 
that the ides of next November will bring to us glad tidings of great 
joy, like those that were brought to the hills of Bethlehem long ago. 
I thank you, gentlemen. 

The Secretary resumed the call .of States with Ken- 
tucky. 

The chairman of the Kentucky delegation, Hon. C. 
J. Bronston, said : 

Kentucky has no candidate to present to this Convention ; but 
the friends of Mr. Cleveland in that delegation have selected Hon. 
J. A. McKenzie to second his nomination ; and the friends of Mr. 
Boies have selected Hon. Henry Watterson to second his nomination. 

The Hon. James A; McKenzie declined to take the 
platform, but standing upon his chair in the Kentucky 
delegation, spoke as follows : 



ADDRESS OF HON. JAMES A. MCKENZIE. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention: I am not 
going to make any lengthy speech, and I want to say in the outset 
that I trust that if I address this Convention longer than three min- 
utes I sincerely hope that some honest, tired Democrat will suspend 
my cadaver from one of the cross-beams of this highly artistic but 
somewhat leaky auditorium. 

I arise here for the purpose of seconding the nomination of a 
distinguished New Yorker, one whose nomination has already been 
made. (A voice, "Which one?) 



128 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

MR. MCKENZIE: You just wait a minute ; of one whose nomi- 
nation has already been made by a convention larger and more 
potential than this ; a convention consisting of unbought and un- 
purchasable Democrats ; a convention remote from town, unawed 
by influence, and unbribed by gain. A convention whose influence 
will reach from Rainy Lake to Key West, and from Androscoggin 
to Yuba Dam. Pardon the force and seeming profanity of the last 
geographical allusion ; but all over this country the Democrats are 
realizing that Mr. Cleveland is the honest, earnest, persistent, defiant 
and relentless opponent of that axiom of the Republican party 
which announces that in the sweat of the hired man's face thou 
shalt eat bread. (Laughter, noise and confusion, mingled with cries 
of "time.") 

Now, one moment; if you knew how many good things I had to 
say, you would keep as quiet as a dormouse in a prayer-meeting. 
Do you want me to stop ? (Cries of "no, go on.") 

The American people believe that Mr. Cleveland is the persistent 
advocate of everything on God's green earth that is right, and the 
persistent opponent of everything that is wrong ; and that he wants 
to see the blessings of civilization and religious liberty prevail in 
this land ; and if you can pick a flaw in that platform, why just 
start in. 

The Republican party has levied a tax upon everything that enters 
into the consumption of the average household except air, sunshine 
and water ; and the only reason they have not taxed those articles 
is because nobody in New England is engaged in the manufacture 
of any one of them. 

Mr. Chairman, if anybody in New England ever sets up a sun- 
shine factory, they will start a report that God Almighty is making 
an indifferent article of sunshine, and that it is militating against 
the dignity of American labor. I represent to-day, allow me to say 
in conclusion, I represent, in my judgment, more than half of the 
unterrified Democrats of Kentucky, a State, thank God, where a 
damn lie is the first lick ; a State that produces a kind of liquor so 
good as to make intemperance a virtue ; a State that produces a 
line of horses so fast as to keep the wind in perpetual jealousy, and 
to make lightning look like a puling paralytic. Representing, Mr. 
Chairman, more than half of the Democrats of that great State, it 
affords me great pleasure to say that on every hillside, in every val- 
ley of that magnificent commonwealth, where the sun delights to 
kiss her cheek like a lover, everybody, male and female, including 
Indians not taxed, is for Grover Cleveland. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 129 

Henry Watterson stepped upon the platform, and the 
Chair said: 

THE CHAIR : I present to you the Hon. Henry Watterson, of 
Kentucky. 

ADDRESS OF HON. HENRY WATTERSON. 

I second the nomination of Horace Boies, of Iowa, and bear wit- 
ness to the truth of all that has been said of him by his friend and 
neighbor, Judge Buncombe. He comes from a State which stands 
behind him as rock-ribbed and impregnable as the everlasting hills. 
He represents a section which henceforward the Democratic party 
must look to for generous inspirations and increasing majorities. 
Thrice has he led the legions of Democracy to victory in the Re- 
publican stronghold, and if he be chosen by this Convention to 
bear our standard, he will plant it over the roof of the White House 
and rivet it to the dome of the National Capitol. 

When the State of Louisiana was called, E. B. Krutt- 
schmitt addressed the Chairman as follows : 

THE CHAIRMAN : The State of Louisiana has no name to present 
to the Convention, but one of her delegates will ask the privilege 
to second one of the nominations already made. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, I present to you 
the Hon. T. J. Kernan, of Louisiana. 

ADDRESS OF HON. THOMAS J. KERNAN. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention : If you inter- 
rupt me, I will tell you a story, so don't do it. Louisiana has no 
favorite son to present for the highest office within the gift of the 
people of the Republic, but it is no doubtful State, and it is content 
to guarantee beyond the shadow of a doubt the support of its eight 
Electoral votes to the nominee of this Convention, no matter who 
he may be. But speaking for a number of its delegates upon this 
floor, and speaking for a majority of the Democrats of the Demo- 
cratic district which I represent, and speaking, as I believe, for a 
majority of the Democrats of Democratic Louisiana, I claim the 
privilege of seconding the nomination of one whose name has been 
placed before you. Louisiana, that bright and sweet State, the 
land of sunshine and of sugar, recognizes in him, one who has 
made a special study of the corn fields in the West. And she who 

9 



130 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

is well versed in the study of cotton fields of the South, is well con- 
tent to intrust in his hands the guardianship of tariff reform and of 
all the great principles of the grand old Democratic party, as 
announced in the magnificent platform adopted by this Convention 
to-night. I second the nomination of Gov. Horace Boies, of Iowa. 

The Secretary called the States of Maine and Mary- 
land, which had no candidates to offer. 

When Massachusetts was called, Hon. Patrick A. 
Collins was recognized by the Chair. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, I need hardly to 
introduce to a National Democratic Convention, Hon. Patrick 
A. Collins, of Massachusetts. 

ADDRESS OF HON. PATRICK A. COLLINS. 

If my worn voice were on its last errand the request conveyed 
by it to every delegate would be this : " When you are voting for a 
candidate for President heed the voice not of locality, but the voice 
of the Democracy of the whole Union." 

I belong to that class of Democrats, fortunately very large, who 
are for and not against some other Democrat. I am a construc- 
tionist and not a destroyer. I believe that every State in this Union 
contains at least one Democrat fit to be President of the United 
States ; and I deplore the malignity with which certain eminent gen- 
tlemen not very far from the State of New York have been hounded 
and misrepresented by the fool- friends of other people. I believe, 
as I say, that every State, including my own State, too, contains at 
least one man large enough to be President of the United States ; 
but there stands forward one man taller than all the rest. Quarrel 
with the sentiment if you please, analyze the reason and reject it 
because you cannot solve it, as it eludes analysis, and yet stronger 
than any man in this or any preceding generation in the hearts of 
the Democracy of the country, is the name and fame of Grover 
Cleveland. My friend from New York who made the proposing 
speech implored some 300 supposititious delegates to stand together 
as the Greeks stood together in the pass at Thermopylae. Does he 
mean to say that the other 600 here bearing commissions from 
Democratic constituents are Persians? 

I address myself not to 300 but to 900 Democratic delegates. I 
do not argue with a faction. I address myself to the entire Democ- 
racy. To-day we have several candidates, but to-morrow we shall 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 131 

have but one ; and upon whomsoever your choice falls, I believe 
that a united Democracy will see that he bears the title of President 
of the United States. And among them all, friends, when you go 
to the people, dismiss locality and forget individual friendship, and 
you will find that ninety-nine men out of one hundred in the United 
States of America, taken altogether, will ask you to give them a 
chance to right the wrong and rectify the mistake made four years 
ago, by voting for Grover Cleveland. 

The State of Michigan was called by the Secretary 
and Mr. Fisher, of the Michigan delegation, said : 

The State of Michigan will cast twenty-eight votes for the nom- 
inee of this Convention. It has no name to propose. 

The roll-call proceeded, and Mr. Wilson responded 
for Minnesota, as follows : 

Mr. Chairman : I am directed by the delegates in this Conven- 
tion from the State of Minnesota, to give expression to the almost 
unanimous wish and sentiment of the Democrats of that State, by 
seconding the nomination of Grover Cleveland. 

In response to the roll-call, the Chairman of the 
Mississippi delegation said that the State had no candi- 
date to present. 

The State of Missouri being called, Hon. Wm. H. 
Wallace, of that delegation, responded as follows : 

ADDRESS OF HON. WILLIAM H. WALLACE. 

Mr. Chairman and Delegates of this great Convention : Men 
come and men go. Parties and governments rise and fall. The 
very stars leap from their sockets in the skies and rush on to ruin 
in their trackless voyage. The sun is often eclipsed, and once we 
are told it stood still. But the Democratic majority of grand old 
Missouri goes on forever. No man or devil can divide it; no defeat 
can conquer it j no sophistry can change it ; no money can buy it. 
It is as fixed and as resplendent in the political heavens as Venus, 
as warlike as Mars, as resistless as Jupiter. Roll what way it will, 
whether it be knownothingism or prohibition, or Farmers' Alliance 
or Republicanism, it dashes against Gibraltar and gathers sea foam 
for its victory when it reaches the Missouri lines. Say whatever 
else you will about us, let Republicans scheme and plan until their 



132 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

heads are gray, let the battle rage until filthy Mammon has expended 
his last dollar, and red-plumed Lucifer has shouted himself hoarse 
with urging on his fiery steeds, yet never will the Democratic flag go 
down on Missouri soil. 

We have served you so long and so faithfully, that my heart is 
trembling and has trembled all along with the thought, seeing we 
have served you so faithfully, that possibly in this grand council 
chamber you do not wish to hear me. I wish you knew us better. 
Come and see us. Come all of you at once, delegates, audience, 
Tammany braves and all. Come ! Come ! I invite you to come to 
us as the disciples went forth to the world, without purse and with- 
out scrip. Come ! Twenty thousand hospitable Christian homes 
will receive you, and bed and board shall be as free as the song of 
the whip-poor-will that serenades you by night, or the mocking bird 
that wakes you up when Aurora strews the skies with her flowers. 
Gentlemen of the Convention, I bear but one message from mag- 
nificent Missouri. As the prairie flower turns its face to the king 
of day as he mounts up into the sky ; as it looks toward him, re- 
ceiving from him light and warmth and strength, so, I say to you, 
does the Democracy of Missouri, with her loving, confiding, child- 
like heart turn toward and follow Grover Cleveland. Intending, as 
I believe to-night, to say my last word, with one joyous hope, I come 
in the name of Missouri to second the nomination of Grover 
Cleveland. 

Upon Montana being- called, Mr. W. A. Clark, of that 
State, said : 

Iowa's favorite son is good enough for Montana. Under him the 
power of the moneyed and corrupt influences of the land will have no 
control, and as a great representative of the great and magnificent 
West, into which the center of population is rapidly and surely 
gravitating, and with which we are intimately associated and identi- 
fied, we are willing that the interests of our State and that of the 
United States shall be placed under his guidance. Montana is one 
of the newest States, and one of the greatest producers of metals, 
and gladly seconds the nomination of Horace Boies. 

The Secretary then called the State of Nebraska, and 
the chairman of that delegation announced that Ne- 
braska had no candidate. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 133 

The Secretary resumed the call of States with Nevada, 
New Hampshire and New Jersey, each of which an- 
nounced that they had no candidate to present to the 
Convention. When New York was reached that dele- 
gation asked to be passed, which was done by consent 
of the Convention. 

North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio and Oregon 
presented no candidates. 

When Pennsylvania was reached, Hon. William U. 
Hensel was recognized by the Chair. 

THE CHAIR : I have the honor to present the Hon. W. U. Hen- 
sel, of Pennsylvania. 

ADDRESS OF HON. WILLIAM U. HENSEL. 

Mr. Chairman : Pennsylvania's 500,000 Democrats have sent 
their representatives here to make no demands. They come hither 
to indulge in no idle threats, they stand here to extend to the Demo- 
crats assembled within these walls no empty promises. Second in 
numbers only to but one constituency represented on this floor, they 
will neither yield to that nor to any other in their loyalty to Demo- 
cratic principles and their fidelity to Democratic nominees. Only 
twelve years ago, by the invitation of our good brethren from our 
sister State of New York, they gave their favorite son, the gallant 
and glorious Hancock, to the Democracy of the Union as their candi- 
date for President, and when he fell on the field of battle, no shot 
from Pennsylvania struck him in the back. 

Seeking only here the selection of such men and the approval of 
such measures as will promote the best interests of their party and 
of their country, they anticipated the expression of the popular will, 
that its interests would be best served by a the renomination of 
Grover Cleveland. They declared that he had given to his party 
an intellectual and political leadership, and to the country a pure 
and elevated administration. They remember that, nominated 
eight years ago in misgivings and doubt, he had vindicated the sa- 
gacity of that choice, and had carried the standard of his party to 
its first substantial victory achieved within nearly the period of a 
generation. Under his administration the dignity of American 
citizenship was maintained at home and enforced abroad. The 



134 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

departments of the public service were administered with efficiency 
and economy, and under wise executive direction were first taken 
the practical steps for the rehabilitation of an American navy, to 
the end that there should be constructed an armament that would 
be the terror of the nations and the glory of the seas. 

It has been seen that with a courage born of conviction a Demo- 
cratic President dared to stake his own immediate political fortunes, 
and to postpone temporary success for permanent party advantage 
upon the great Democratic maxim of "Unnecessary taxation is un- 
just taxation." The slender sapling of tariff reform, planted, it 
seems, but yesterday by Morrison and Carlisle, and Watterson and 
Mills, under the careful nurture of Grover Cleveland, has become 
a sturdy oak, wide-branching to the storm, deep-rooted in the soil. 

Another inspiring influence of the political ideas which it was boast- 
fully said had gone down four years ago in the campaign of educa- 
tion, we have witnessed the annihilation of a Republican Congress, 
the restoration of the popular branch of the Government from Rep- 
resentatives faithless to the people's cause, until the few survivals of 
the opposition stand as melancholy memorials, like blasted pines 
in the track of the forest fires. Moreover, we are encouraged in this 
Convention to second his nomination because he is the candidate 
of no State. There stands Massachusetts ; she brings to this Conven- 
tion the standard which her gallant young Governor has carried 
twice to victory, and he bids his friends to group it here with those 
of Oregon and California. Illinois, with two favorite sons, either 
of them fit for the highest honors of this Convention, records her 
vote with those of all New England. Not only from shattered 
strongholds of Republican power in the Northwest, but from the 
South, where Democratic representatives on this floor have the best 
right to be heard, hear we the same voice of accord. Not more 
surely is he the desire of Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota, than 
he is of the great Democratic States of Missouri, Tennessee and 
Texas. Nor have we misgivings for New York, for well we know 
that in the last roll-call of this Convention, and in the roll-call of 
the Electoral College that great State, though long the pole-star of 
political leadership, will see to it that no other in the sisterhood 
records more votes for the candidate of a united Democracy than 
the imperial commonwealth of New York. 

There was no response when the State of Rhode 
Island was called. When South Carolina was called, 
Mr. V. K. Tillman arose and said : 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 135 

Coming from the South Atlantic coast to this great inland city, I 
would be glad, if you were not so tired, to say a few words. In be- 
half of the Democrats from that State who are represented here, we 
desire to second the nomination of Horace Boies, of Iowa. 

In the call of the State of Tennessee, Mr. Ochs was 
recognized by the Chair. 

THE CHAIR : I have the honor to present Hon. George W. Ochs, 
of Tennessee. 

ADDRESS OF HON. GEORGE W. OCHS. 

I represent in age, in sentiment and in nativity, a class of Demo- 
cratic voters of the South, who were born after the tocsin of the 
war had sounded, whose political creed was not molded in sectional 
hate, whose political views were not warped by civil strife ; in 
short, a class whose Democracy is untinged by issues of the war. 
I yield to no one in admiration for those heroes who died for a 
cause they deemed right. Through my veins flows the blood of one 
who unsheathed his sword for the Union, while his helpmate, she 
who gave me birth, gave brother and gave fortune to the lost cause. 
Missionary Ridge, Lookout Mountain, the sodden fields of Chicka- 
mauga, encircle the city of my home, and are to me everlasting 
monuments to American valor; that soil which now nurtures tempt- 
ing berry and luscious grape, where daffodil and daisy nod to pass- 
ing winds, where peace and plenty declare a reunited country, is 
consecrated by the blood of martyrs whose chivalry and whose 
heroism, whose dauntless courage and unselfish sacrifices have made 
the name of American soldiery honored and respected from pole to 
pole. At the outskirts of my city are two sacred spots, where sleep 
20,000 soldiers of the blue and the gray. And every breeze that 
sweeps across that valley sings a requiem that repeats to us : The 
war is an epoch that is ended. The issues of that struggle have 
been superseded by the enduring questions of national liberty, pub- 
lic economy, constitutional purity, the broader doctrines enunciated 
by Jefferson, taught by Jackson, and practiced and exemplified by 
Democratic statesmen of the present day. 

One grand figure has for ten years appeared before the youth of 
this land, pre-eminently as the embodiment of that lofty statesman- 
ship, which is not tinctured by issues of the war, and is free from 
all sectional prejudices. He has ignored in his teachings, his papers 
and his public acts, these dead issues, and he has been the guide 



136 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

for progressive Democratic thought, the oracle for patriotic Ameri- 
cans, the mentor for the rising generation. In him the young men 
of the Union have discerned a character distinguished for honesty 
and integrity, of fearless fidelity to public promises, and resolute 
probity in the discharge of public duty ; a living, unflinching expo- 
nent of the burning truths of undefiled democracy. His example 
has elevated political life, his record has chastened public service, 
his career has honored American citizenship. For his ability as a 
leader, his integrity as a statesman, his fidelity as an administrator, 
his courage of conviction, his fearless devotion to duty, his honora- 
ble career as Mayor, as Governor and as President, on behalf of 
the State of Tennessee, and in the name of the young men of the 
country, I second the nomination of Grover Cleveland, of New 
York. 

For Texas, Mr. McDonald said : 

Mr. Chairman, I come from a State which is imperial in her do- 
main, and imperial in her Democratic majority of 200,000, and, in 
behalf of the Democracy of that State, I second the nomination of 
Grover Cleveland. 

The State of Vermont had no candidate to" present. 
At the call of Virginia, Senator John W. Daniel, on 
behalf of the delegation from that State, said : 

ADDRESS OF HON. JOHN W. DANIEL. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the National Democratic Con- 
vention : Pursuing the instincts of that Democracy which has been 
the devotion of my life, and which is a part of my being, responding 
to the request of about one-half of the delegated Democrats of old 
Virginia, I rise to second the nomination which has been made by 
the solid Democracy of the Empire State, and I name for the office 
of President of the United States that great Democrat, whose history 
for a quarter of a century has been the rise and progress of Democ- 
racy in New York ; that fearless, that undaunted, that upright, 
straightforward and unadulterated Democrat, David Bennett Hill. 
We do not love him for the enemies he has made, but we love him 
for the deeds which he has performed, for the battles which he 
has fought, for the victories for the country which he has won, and 
we love him for the enemies of Democracy whom he has conquered. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 137 

The candidacy of David Bennett Hill will command the support 
of every element of the Democratic party in all this broad Nation. 

Tell me, my brother Democrats, if the business men of this 
country should not rally around the standard of a leader who re- 
duced the debt in the Empire State, and who, at the conclusion of 
his service, left the lowest tax rate upon the schedule of the people's 
burdens which has been in that State through a period of thirty-six 
years. 

When I look across this vast Convention I recognize in yon solid 
body of delegates of New York the heroic faces of two of the old 
corps commanders of the Army of the Potomac. I am not probably 
as young as the 'young Democrat from Tennessee who has spoken 
to you, but when I, who had the honor to wear a gray jacket on the 
field of Gettysburg, look over the united Democracy of New York 
and see the valiant leaders of the army of the Union, I say in my 
heart, " Democracy means fraternity, and under the banner of David 
B. Hill there is but one uniform, one army and an undivided 
country." 

There are two great issues at the present time which divide this 
people, the first the issue of monetary reform. In the platform 
which has gone forth from this Convention to-day, you have uncon- 
sciously embodied the doctrines of Hill's Elmira speech. Then 
why not have that man to represent you? 

The second of these great issues is tariff reform, and the dis- 
tinguished Governor of New Jersey has stated before this Conven- 
tion what tariff reform has done for this country. I could but 
remember, as his eloquent words fell from his lips, that on the floor 
of this Convention to-night you have seen the solid delegation of 
New York, which represents David B. Hill, vote for genuine tariff 
reform, while New Jersey voted upon the other side ; but, gentle- 
men of the Convention, the issue of issues, the great overshadowing 
issue of all, compared to which every other issue is frivolous and 
vain, is the issue of the force bill ; and I hope that every Democratic 
orator in this campaign upon which we are entering, on the prairies 
of the West, in the cities of the East, among the cotton fields of the 
South, will not forget in the first clause of every speech he makes 
to remind his countrymen that if this force bill should pass, the 
Federal Government will become a sword whose hilt is at the Capi- 
tal, and whose point will be everywhere amongst the States. I 
would remind you also, gentlemen of this Convention, that in the 



138 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

greatest of all the parliamentary fights of modern times A. P. Gor- 
man, of Maryland, and the other Democratic Senators were the 
only power that stood between you and ruin, and it was David B. 
Hill, of New York, who, standing in the place of Thomas A. Hen- 
dricks, of Indiana, warned his countrymen of the danger in store 
for them, and roused them to a realizing sense of their peril. 

David Bennett Hill, of New York, was born a child of the people, 
and throughout his life, since he reached the age of 21, he has been 
a man of the people. Never, in any period of his political career, 
can you point to the day when he catered to plutocracy or com- 
pounded with monopoly of any kind. For twenty years he has 
marched at the head of the bravest, truest and hardest working of 
the Democrats of New York. In the Legislature of New York he 
was a lieutenant of that illustrious Democratic statesman, Samuel 
J. Tilden. When there was not a corporal's guard of Democrats in 
that body, as the companion of Tilden, it was David Bennett Hill 
who investigated 

At this point there was great confusion, occupants 
of the gallery indulging in all manner of cat- calls. 
During the tumult, Bourke Cockran, of New York, was 
recognized by the Chairman, upon which there was in- 
creased confusion among the occupants of the gallery. 

MR. COCKRAN : Mr. Chairman, I rise in behalf of my delegation 
to distinctly notify this Convention that if the candidate of the del- 
egation from New York cannot have respect accorded to him by 
the spectators in these galleries, and if the voice of the gentleman 
who is seconding his nomination is not permitted to be heard by 
this Convention, the New York delegation is ready to leave this 
room, and will do so at once. 

A scene of great confusion ensued, dozens of the del- 
egates standing on the chairs striving to gain the floor. 

MR. JOHN SHARPE WILLIAMS, of Mississippi : Mr. Chairman, I 
move that the sergeant-at-arms, at the head of the Chicago police, 
clear the galleries. 

This motion was almost drowned in the noise and 
confusion in the galleries. 

MR. DANIEL : Gentlemen, I will not detain you much longer. 
(Great confusion, mingled with cries from different parts of the hall 
that the Chairman clear the galleries and preserve order.) 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 139 

THE CHAIR : The Chair wishes to state that the confusion has 
not originated among the delegates, but that the occupants of the 
galleries are the ones who are interrupting the proceedings of this 
body. 

MR. WILLIAMS : Therefore I move, Mr. Chairman, the galleries 
be cleared. 

MR. MURRAY F. SMITH, of Mississippi : Mr. Chairman, the delib- 
erations of this body have been this evening continually interrupted 
by people in these galleries, who have hissed and yelled, and given 
utterance to all sorts of contemptible interjections. These inter- 
ruptions from this howling mob in the gallery should be stopped, 
and therefore I move you that the sergeant-at-arms, with sufficient 
force of police, shall clear this gallery at once. 

This motion was seconded from different parts of the 
Convention. 

MR. WILLIAMS : My motion, Mr. Chairman, has precedence. 
My motion was that the sergeant-at-arms, at the head of the Chi- 
cago police, should clear the galleries. 

A DELEGATE : I move that the sergeant-at-arms, at the head of 
the Chicago police force, clear out the gallery. 

MR. JOHN H. ROGERS, of Arkansas : I rise to a point of order. 

THE CHAIR : The gentleman will state his point of order. 

MR. ROGERS : I desire to advise this Democratic Convention 
that this is a deliberative body, and not the Fifty- first Congress of 
the United States. The distinguished Senator from Virginia has a 
right to be heard in the Democratic Convention. 

MR. OWEN : I move you that this Convention adjourn until 
to-morrow morning at 11 o'clock. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair has directed the sergeant-at-arms to use 
all the police force of the house and all the deputy sergeants-at-arms 
to suppress disorder whenever it occurs. During almost all the 
time of the delivery of these nominating speeches there has been 
perfect quiet and perfect attention on the part of the members of 
the Convention, and the interruptions, the calls and the confusion 
have come not from the membership of this body, but from the 
occupants of the galleries and other positions in the house. The 
sergeant-at-arms will see that the police force here preserve sufficient 
order to conduct the proceedings of this Convention in quiet, and 
to allow the speakers to be heard. 



140 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

THOMAS J. O'!)ONNELL, of Colorado : I rise, sir, to a question of 
the highest privilege. There are more men within these railings, 
which are supposed to separate the delegates from the mob, who 
are not delegates than there are of those who are delegates. It will 
evidently be useless for this Convention to attempt to do any busi- 
ness here to-night. The Chair says it will rely upon the sergeant- 
at-arms. Everybody, every delegate in this Convention, has seen 
men by the hundreds climbing over these railings, and everybody 
but delegates seem to have rights upon this floor. I saw to-night 
one of the vice-presidents of this Convention refused admission, 
while I have seen thousands of men who have no badges or tickets 
as delegates admitted upon this floor. Now, sir, I move that this 
Convention hear Senator Daniel to-morrow morning at 11 o'clock. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair has been requested to state, by the 
sergeant-at-arms, that a very large number of persons have secured 
admission to the hall to-night by what he calls "split tickets" ; in 
other words, delegates have allowed their tickets to be used to 
bring persons into the hall who had no tickets to come in, and in 
that way the hall has become crowded, and this confusion has oc- 
curred. 

BOURKE COCKRAN, of New York : I ask that the question to 
adjourn be put. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair is informed by gentlemen who are 
familiar with past Conventions and rules, that during the call of 
the States for nominating speeches, no motion to adjourn is in 
order. 

MR. COCKRAN : I desire to call the attention of the Chair to the 
decision in 1884, when an adjournment was taken at 6 o'clock in 
the evening of the second day, during the nominating speeches, 
which were concluded the following morning. I call the attention of 
the Chair to that case, of which I know from my personal memory. 
The motion was entertained, voted upon and carried. I ask the 
Chair now to put the motion to this Convention, and I demand a 
call of the roll of States upon it. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair has made his ruling upon information 
from gentlemen familiar with previous conventions, 

MR. COCKRAN : Then I appeal from the decision of the Chair. 

MR. COLLINS, of Massachusetts : I rise to a point of order. Has 
not the gentleman from Virginia the floor? How can he be taken 
off the floor by the gentleman from New York ? 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 141 

THE CHAIR: He cannot. The gentleman from Virginia has the 
floor, and he has ceased speaking at the request of the Chairman 
until the Convention will come to order ; and the Chair will state 
that as soon as the Convention comes to order he will proceed with 
his remarks, but not until then. 

Senator Daniel, at last able to continue, added : 
I am well aware, gentlemen of the Convention, that the con- 
tinued noise cannot be attributed to any good Democrat of this 
Convention, whoever he may be. I am not one who ever con- 
ceives evil in his heart, or utters untruths with his tongue against 
his brethren. I was about to say that when the corrupt judges 
of New York were arraigned at the bar of public judgment and 
driven to retirement during the Tweed regime, it was this young 
Democrat, David B. Hill, who appeared at the bar of the Senate 
as their prosecutor, and from that day until this there has been 
no peril to Democratic principles in this land in which he did 
not appear at roll call on the line of battle. About this time the 
history of politics of New York turned over a new page ; there was 
about to be nominated a Governor and a Lieutenant-Governor from 
two cities of that .great State, whose mayors had signalized their 
careers by their economy, virtue and the business methods of their 
administrations. And when the people found in Grover Cleveland 
the proper and fit candidate for Governor, they found also in David 
Bennett Hill, the Mayor of Elmira, the fit man to be his compan- 
ion ; and when there came that tidal wave of well nigh 200,000 
majority in the Empire State Grover Cleveland was their chief 
executive and David B. Hill was his lieutenant. And when your 
leader, my countrymen, by your voice and the voice of all the 
Democrats of this land, the Governor of New York was called to a 
still higher station, David B. Hill became his successor. So wisely 
did he discharge and so purely did he administer the executive 
office of that great State that when the election came around, he 
was nominated to succeed himself, and in 1888 he was elected. I 
had the honor to be in New York State on the eve of the election, 
when he was candidate for Governor and Cleveland was the candi- 
date for President, and I stood as near to him as I stand now to the 
speaker's chair, when, with a clear, ringing voice and a manly bear- 
ing; when, with the intrepidity of a brave, true man, he said to the 
assembled multitude : " If either of us shall fall in this campaign, I 
pray to God it may be I, and not Grover Cleveland." 



142 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

He was elected then, my countrymen, but where yet was the 
Empire State ? For twenty years our majorities had been swallowed 
up by a Republican gerrymander. While the great commercial 
metropolis of this Nation held political power the Legislature of 
New York was so manipulated by the Republican machine that Re- 
publican Senators continued to appear in Washington, with a hostile 
Legislature against him, environed on all sides by Federal and by 
adverse State influence, the dauntless Governor of New York ad- 
dressed himself to the task of redeeming his State and making it 
whole in the Democratic family ; and so well did he foil the efforts 
of the conspirators against him, that a little later he had got the 
Assembly elected, had re-apportioned congressional districts of that 
State, had re-apportioned the legislative districts of that State also, 
and that Legislature, when it assembled, did him the honor, with its 
unanimous Democratic voice, to elect him Senator of the United 
States. And to-day, my countrymen, when you calculate upon 
carrying this election for any Democrat, do not forget, when you 
cast your vote in this election, that you have confidence that New 
York will be Democratic, because you have, down in the secret 
recesses of your heart, slander and contumely to the contrary not- 
withstanding, confidence in the deeds which David Bennett Hill has 
done, and overwhelming confidence in the fidelity of the deeds that 
he will do. 

Armed from head to heel, the Democracy of New York enters 
this contest ; and by the vote of her worthy citizens, by the vote of 
the solid Democracy of New York, which has stood there for 
twenty years unbroken, we shall see the light of victory blaze upon 
us in all the Northern sky ; and in the name of those brave and 
true and undaunted veterans, I join them in asking you to give to 
those who must bear the heat and burden of the fray the choice and 
selection of the candidate who is to lead them, and to ratify their 
request of you that his name shall be David Bennett Hill. 

THE CHAIR : I have to introduce Hon. John Goode, of Vir- 
ginia. 

ADDRESS OF HON. JOHN GOODE. 

Gentlemen of the Convention : Differing, as I do most sincerely, 
from my eloquent and honorable colleague from Virginia, I claim 
your indulgence for two minutes only. More than 100 years ago 
Patrick Henry, that forest-born Demosthenes, whose heaven-born 
eloquence first kindled the fires of the American Revolution, said : 
" There is no better teacher than experience ; there is no safer 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 143 

criterion by which to judge the future than by the past." And 
judging the future by the past, we all know that Grover Cleveland 
will give us a safe, pure, honest and successful administration, be- 
cause he believes in a strict construction of the Federal Constitu- 
tion. He believes that a public office is a public trust. He believes 
that the tariff is a tax, and that all unnecessary taxation is unjust 
taxation. He believes in a sound, stable currency, of a volume suffi- 
cient to supply the wants of the people, consisting of gold, silver 
and paper money at par with each other. He believes that the 
public lands acquired by the common blood and common treasure 
should be held by the Government in trust for the benefit of all the 
people. The people have faith in him. They admire him for his 
massive intellect; they admire him for the purity of his purposes; 
they admire him for the honesty of his methods ; they admire him 
because he has the courage of his convictions, and can stand 
four-square to any wind that blows. And now, in conclusion, my 
friends, for I do not intend to detain you, let me say, you are about 
to enter upon a political battle that will be hotly contested all along 
the line. There is no child's play before you ; you cannot rest 
upon laurels already won. As Napoleon Bonaparte said to his 
army in Italy, " There are other marches to be made ; there are 
other battles to be fought ; there are other victories to be won." 
Let us, one and all, come together this night and resolve that all 
divisions and dissensions shall be forever in the deep bosom of the 
ocean buried. Let us prepare to move forward with uplifted brow, 
and with unfaltering faith in the right. With all my heart, and 
representing, as I believe, a majority of the Democracy of 
Virginia, I second the nomination of Grover Cleveland. And 
I believe, my countrymen, that with him as our candidate our 
banners will dance in the glad sunlight of a glorious and magnificent 
victory. 

H. J. SNIVELY, of Washington : Mr. Chairman, the State of 
Washington, through its Democracy, sends its first greeting to the 
Democracy of the Nation in Convention assembled, and we promise 
to send you next November the first electoral vote of that State. 
And, Mr. Chairman, in behalf of the Democracy of the State of 
Washington, I desire to second the nomination of that grand states- 
man who, as President of the United States, seems to have been the 
only President during the last fifty years who remembered that a 
public office was a public trust. 



144 . OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Gen. J. W. St. Clair responded for the State of West 
Virginia, as follows : 

Mr. Chairman : Applying the rule of my venerable friend from 
Virginia, that we are to judge of the future by the past, for fear that 
we might have the same thing that we had in 1888 with Grover 
Cleveland as our candidate, I second the nomination of a winner 
and a Democrat, David B. Hill. 

B. F. MARTIN, of West Virginia : The great sentiment of the 
Democracy of West Virginia, I am satisfied, is in favor of Grover 
Cleveland, of New York, and I think I represent a majority of the 
delegates when I rise in my place to second his nomination. I am 
sure I represent the sentiments of the Second District of the State, 
as well as the First District. 

JOHN J. DAVID, of West Virginia : Mr. Chairman, I desire to say 
that nine-tenths of the Democracy of West Virginia favor the nomi- 
nation of Grover Cleveland. 

GENERAL ST. CLAIR: I know the sentiment of the people of 
West Virginia, and I have no hesitation in saying that the gentle- 
man is mistaken. 

Hon. S. W. Lamoreaux, of Wisconsin, responded for 
that State, as follows : 

Mr. Chairman, Wisconsin has no name to present to this Conven- 
tion as a candidate for President, but we desire to second the nomina- 
tion of Grover Cleveland. If he is nominated by this Convention, 
Wisconsin will give him its electoral votes next November. 

BOURKE COCKRAN, of New York : Mr. Chairman, does that com- 
plete the call of the roll ? 

THE CHAIR : It does. 

MR. COCKRAN : I understand that the State of New York has 
been passed, and my colleagues desire that I should now say a few 
words. I have a request to make to the Convention, and I am 
about to ask its indulgence. It is now five minutes of two. I am 
worn out, physically, and I think the Convention is worn out. It 
will be a matter of great physical hardship for me to address the 
Convention now. What I have to say I think the extraordinary 
political condition of this campaign makes necessary. I say it in 
all good faith, and in all kindness, and I ask the indulgence of this 
Convention, that we may take a recess until 10:30 o'clock to- 
morrow. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 145 

The suggestion of Mr. Cockran being manifestly not 
in harmony with the temper of the Convention, and not 
being in the form of a motion, he reluctantly yielded, 
and came forward to the platform. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, I present to you the 
Hon. Bourke Cockran, of the State of New York. 

ADDRESS OF HON. BOURKE COCKRAN. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention : Our State be- 
ing threatened with an invasion, and the invading force being of our 
political household, my associates in the delegation have asked me 
to present to this Convention before it proceeds to take final action 
upon the great question now before it, a plain, quiet, friendly state- 
ment of the political conditions in that State. I make this state- 
ment to you, gentlemen, I will say in advance, in no spirit of 
unkindness to anybody, with no desire to find fault with whatever 
may be the action of this Convention, determined to promise you 
in advance that whatever your wisdom may decide, the Democracy 
of New York could not be disloyal if it tried to be. 

We have had the action of our State foretold for us, our loyalty 
pledged for us by gentlemen who are about to reject our advice, 
and by some gentlemen who have not hesitated to taunt us. Gen- 
tlemen, we will be loyal, but our experiences in this body are apt to 
convince us that there may be such a thing as too much loyalty for 
one's personal comfort. It seems to me that the spirit in which this 
Convention has approached this subject; is the profession of the 
belief that New York Democrats will be loyal anyhow, and because 
they will be loyal they must be outraged by the party which depends 
on their loyalty. We have come here to this Convention, and, 
notwithstanding that fate to which we are about to be led, we state 
to you that, if it be decided to cast aside the precedents of a cen- 
tury, to violate every notion of State rights, as these notions have 
been entertained, cherished and protected as articles of Demo- 
cratic faith; if it be determined to thrust down our throats a 
nomination against which we protest ; if it be determined by this 
Convention that contumely shall be heaped upon the heads of loyal 
soldiers, those soldiers must still be loyal, no matter what outrage 
may be perpetrated against them by the party or the cause which 
they serve. 
10 



146 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

But, gentlemen, while the members of this delegation in this 
Convention, while the members of the great organization which we 
represent, will be loyal to the action of this body, no matter what 
its action may be. there is in the State of New York a vote which 
cannot be controlled by political machinery, and that is not always 
the Mugwump vote. The distinguished gentleman from New Jersey 
who proposed the name of Mr. Cleveland, and some of the gentle- 
men who seconded the nomination, seem to have reached the 
conclusion that the business of the Democratic party is to officer 
its Conventions, shape its policies, and name its candidates in order 
to please an element that despises our party and derides its history 
and professes superiority to it. Mr. Chairman, it is said there is an 
independent element that will accept a certain candidacy and no 
other ; that there is an element that will accept a certain candidacy 
because it is better than the Democratic party ; that the candidate 
is superior to the party from which he springs, and so it will 
support the man while it will continue to deride and denounce the 
party. If there be in all this world anything better than the Dem- 
ocratic party I want to see it and to get into it. I have never 
known the Republican that I am not willing to welcome into the 
party if he professes a desire to be a Democrat. God forbid that 
this party of ours, whose growth is the hope of the nation, shall 
close its doors against any man who is ready to profess its faith and 
enlist in its armies. But what we do protest against in New York 
is that our party shall be surrendered to the control of those who 
despise and dislike it, that one man may be exalted and the Demo- 
cratic hosts may be degraded. 

Mr. Chairman, let me say to this Convention in a spirit of entire 
candor and in the same spirit of friendly discussion in which I hope 
to continue and conclude, that it is not surprising to me that Mr. 
Cleveland should be popular in other States. It is not surprising to 
me, above all, that he should be popular in Republican States. You 
gentlemen who live outside the State of New York remember him 
only as the last Democratic President and the only Democratic 
President who ever administered the affairs of this nation within the 
memory of most of you. All your associations with him were 
pleasant ones ; all your memories of him are probably grateful ones. 
He was the only man whose career brought you in touch with the 
great Federal Government which you support by your taxes and 
which you would defend with your lives if it were in danger For 
four years you have seen nothing of him. For four years he has 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 147 

passed off the stage, and, except an occasional letter written to some 
friend upon some public question, you have had no evidences even 
of his existence, except those memories of which I have spoken. 
But with us, gentlemen, in the State of New York, let me say to you 
in kindness, let me say it to you in no spirit of disparagement to Mr. 
Cleveland or to his history, to his record as an administrative 
officer, to his patriotism as a man, to his virtue as a citizen let me 
say, I repeat, that in the State of New York for four years the forces 
that have invoked his name, the men who have been known as the 
Cleveland Democracy, are. the men over whose prostrate bodies the 
Democratic party has been compelled to march to victory. 

We were told in the campaign of 1888 that the Democratic nomi- 
nation for Governor was not up to the Cleveland standard, and men 
who are here from New York State supporting Mr. Cleveland's 
candidacy then headed a bolt against the Democratic candidate 
and called upon all men who made the Cleveland ideal of Democ- 
racy their standard to destroy and overthrow the Democratic 
candidate for Governor. Well, the people were not up to the 
Cleveland standard, but they were up to the Democratic standard 
"by '20,000 majority. Ever since he vacated his office, the ex-Cabinet 
ministers who lived in the State of New York, with one exception 
and he was too busy to attend to politics every Federal office- 
holder who drew a salary from the Federal treasury during his 
administration, was arrayed against us in the same Mugwump oppo- 
sition, which had for its aim and its purpose the turning over of the 
State of New York to the Republican party, unless the Democracy 
would pay blackmail to the Mugwumps. 

We have met their challenges, and we have overthrown them. 
We have marched, by steadily increasing majorities, from victory to 
victory, until, as you were told by Colonel Fellows to-night, the 
State of New York is as Democratic as Texas. But throughout all 
these four years these men who have assumed to speak of Cleveland 
Democracy as their own special property have been the foes of 
every Democratic measure which the Democratic party supported, 
and which the Democratic party wrung from Republican hostility. 

When the Legislature of the State of New York was won last year, 
and the vicious apportionment of thirty years was about to be wiped 
out, during the contest and struggle for the possession of the Senate, 
these same Mugwumps abused us in the press, denounced us as 
public enemies, and, when we finally succeeded, they declared that 



148 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Governor Hill had stolen the Legislature. Gentlemen of the Con- 
vention, we do not think it became the Republican party to talk of 
thefts of Legislatures or of Presidencies. We thank Governor Hill 
for getting that Legislature, and we trust, under God, we may never 
be deprived of a leader who is ready to take from the reluctant 
hand of the Republican enemy the plunder which he has withheld 
from the righful majority for a quarter of a century. 

In 1889 our State ticket was opposed because it was declared that 
that, too, was inferior to the standard of Democracy set up by the 
Cleveland adherents. The result was the same triumphant vindica- 
tion of Democracy that has always been obtained when it is Opposed 
by the Mugwumps. In 1890 ihe City of New York, when we had 
passed a new electoral law, under which the largest powers were 
vested in the County Clerk and Sheriff, these same men made a 
combination with the Republicans, by which they took the nomina- 
tion for Mayor and gave the nomination for County Clerk and 
Sheriff to the Republicans, and tried to elect the ticket by a cam- 
paign of slander, outrage and contumely leveled against the regular 
Democratic organization. They denounced the Democratic party 
of the city of New York as the organized crime of the county. 
They declared that the men who made Democratic majorities were 
what they call semi-criminals, and beyond the pale of civilized life. 
We met them in the localities where we were known ; we appealed 
to the judgment of our neighbors and of the voters who knew us, 
and we were vindicated by majorities ranging from 30,000 to 60,000. 
cast for our party and for the safety of the Republic. 

When, in that same campaign, the dark cloud of the Force Bill 
hung over the Capitol at Washington when it had passed the 
House and had already crossed the threshold of the Senate ; when 
we saw the Republican autocrats who had obtained possession of 
the Congress, riding rough-shod over Democratic majorities in 
Democratic districts, crowding on to the point where free institu- 
tions would be overthrown, and representative government be 
merely a mockery in the City and County of New York we raised 
our voice in protest in the name of a commercial community, and 
from the instinct of self-preservation, in that great town, sprang the 
tidal wave which overwhelmed with disaster the Republican mis- 
creants that had plundered the Treasury and threatened the Consti- 
tution. The man who has been presented to you here to-night on 
behalf of the solid New York delegation appealed to the merchants 
of New York to stay the hand of Republican legislation. He pointed 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 149 

out to them that every man that owned aline of credit in a Southern 
State, every man who wanted to open a business connection in a 
Southern town, had a vital interest in the preservation of white 
civilization throughout the South. The response was prompt and 
overwhelming. 

Now, gentlemen, when you are asked to make this nomination 
against our protest, it means the endorsement of the war that has 
been made against us and against the Democratic party ; it means 
that we should debase ourselves before the men whom we have 
trampled in the dust in the name of a triumphant, aggressive and 
militant Democracy ; it means that the men who have carried the 
banner to victory by majorities reaching 48,000 are to be dishon- 
ored in a Democratic Convention, and they are to have the brand 
of disapproval placed upon their actions because, forsooth, their 
methods have been objectionable to Republicans. 

I have said that I can understand, above all, the popularity of 
Mr. Cleveland in Republican States. The gentleman from Pennsyl- 
vania declared that Pennsylvania never made a threat in a Demo- 
cratic Convention, and I was reminded that if she did it would be 
about as absurd as a baby threatening a giant with the instrument 
by which the teething process is facilitated. What could she 
threaten the Democracy with ? May I not call your attention here, 
gentlemen, to the peculiar character of the organization of our Con- 
vention, and the extraordinary power for evil that is sometimes 
exercised by these Republican strongholds ? I say it without the 
slightest reflection upon the gentlemen who sit in this Convention. 
The criticism is addressed solely to the system. Here we have 
Pennsylvania, rabid in its Republicanism, exercising the enormous 
influence of sixty-four votes on the floor of this Convention more 
than twice as many as the imperial State of Texas can cast in obedi- 
ence to the judgment of its delegates and then, after its represent- 
atives have started us upon a doubtful career, on the second Tues- 
day in November next they will, with thirty-two electoral votes, 
thrust us into the ditch which they have dug for us in this Conven- 
tion. And so in all the States Republican by overwhelming 
majorities, who send down delegates here instructed to invade the 
Democratic stronghold of New York, and beat down our barriers 
because they know our hand will never be raised against Democrats. 
When, with that presumption upon our loyalty which is supposed to 
give them impunity, they ask the Democratic party to outrage its 
defenders and its soldiers that they, as beneficiaries of its success 



150 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

may dictate its policy, isn't it well to remember for a moment the 
cause that produced this singular popularity of their candidate in 
States certain to refuse him their electoral votes? It is plain, and 
easy to be ascertained. Mr. Cleveland is popular in Republican 
States, because his Democracy is not offensive to Republicans. If 
I might go behind the glowing periods of the gentleman from Penn- 
sylvania, whose poetic fervor undoubtedly betrayed him into some 
extravagance of expression, if he will permit me even that degree of 
criticism, we will find an explanation for this extraordinary activity 
of delegates from Republican States in the belief that this particular 
nomination may increase chances in Senatorial districts of the 
State, chances of candidates for County Clerk, chances, perhaps, 
for candidates for Congress in the few Democratic localities to be 
found in these Republican strongholds ; and right here, gentlemen, 
is the kernel of our objection to Mr. Cleveland's availability. I be- 
lieve that Mr. Cleveland is a very popular man, a most popular 
man. I have said that I believe that he is a most popular man let' 
me say a man of extraordinary popularity every day in the year, 
except one, and that is election day. It is a popularity which I 
might describe as tumultuous, but not reducible to votes. It is a 
popularity based upon the fact that his opponents speak well of him, 
but will not vote for him. So it is delusive. So it is calculated to 
arouse enthusiasm four months before election, and to produce dis- 
appointment for four years after election. 

My fellow citizens, don't we remember four years ago in St. 
Louis ? I will venture to say there are now right in this body a few 
gentlemen whose memories are tinged with sadness as they reflect 
upon the enthusiasm and confidence with which we laid wagers of 
three and four to one that Cleveland would be elected after the 
nomination of 1888. In the State of New York the Democratic 
party was seriously impoverished, and the Republican adherents 
raised to a degree of wealth which they never enjoyed before, even 
from the operations of the robber tariff. We were misled by that 
fictitious popularity which comes from the forbearance of the enemy. 
We in New York do not want to be misled in that way again. The 
man whom we consider stronger than any other, the man in whose 
leadership we have faith, is he who bears upon his bosom the marks 
of the weapons of the Republican foe. The man who bleeds for the 
cause in front of the army is the man that knows no laggards in his 
rear. 

We have a homogeneous party now. For God's sake leave it to 
us. If we be not accorded the nomination that we ask for from the 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 151 

State of New York, give us any citizen in this United States who is 
a Democrat. Give us some man who will not raise up against us 
any active hostile force within our own ranks. 

I believe it was the distinguished military hero from Massachu- 
setts, Gen. Collins, who declared there was no Democrat in this 
Union who would vote against that ticket ; but there sit behind him 
two soldiers whose deeds have not escaped the attention of history, 
two heroes who have led the Union armies to victory, but who 
have never made faces at the vanquished foe, and they will tell you 
here, comrades who fought with them, heroes who sustained them 
and heroes who lowered their swords to them on the field of battle 
they will tell you that the soldier vote of New York of whom there 
are at least 25,000 Democratic will not support the nomination of 
Mr. Cleveland, and did not support him in 1888. Gentlemen, I 
submit to you, is it wise to antagonize that vote, to antagonize it 
without reason, to antagonize it blindly, defiantly, recklessly ? 

What is the excuse given for the course you are invited to take ? 
As I understand it, there are two excuses ; one, that we can get this 
Mugwump vote. Now I warn this Convention, from the experience 
of every Democrat who has carried the State of New York and 
none has failed to do it in nine years except Mr. Cleveland that 
you cannot get one Mugwump vote without driving away a hundred 
Democratic votes. The Democratic party cannot fuse with the 
party that despises it, which derides its principles. The Republican 
party differs with us on principles. They differ with us on theories. 
We march against them in serried hosts. We take from them every- 
thing they have in the way of political property. We leave not 
sticking in their hands one single office which we can take from 
them. In this we may violate the abstract ethics of civil service 
reform, but we strengthen the Democratic party. We have to-day 
in the State of New York a Capitol in which every executive officer 
is a Democrat, in which both Houses of the Legislature are Demo- 
cratic ; in which there is not a single person, I believe, employed 
who is not a Democrat. We have produced in that Capitol such a 
political atmosphere that no Republican can breathe it and live. 
And every hour our Democratic forces grow stronger. 

But while these Republicans go down before us, we respect them 
and they respect us. We ask no quarter and we give none when 
the Lord delivers the Philistines into our hands. But with the 
Mugwump there can be no treaty of peace nor implied faith. He 
has no weapon but slander and abuse. He does not want to enter 



152 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

the Democratic party ; he wants to own it. He wants you to lend 
him this party organization to accomplish his own purposes, and 
not for the good of the Democratic party. 

Now, gentlemen of the Convention, we have got the political con- 
ditions of New York, as I have said, in such a state, in the teeth of 
Mugwump opposition, that we are invincible if we can hold the 
Democratic vote. Let me give you one final illustration of the 
T icthod under which we have marched to these Democratic suc- 
cesses. In the city and county of New York we have a majority of 
some 50,000 or 60,000. The county of Kings, containing the city 
of Brooklyn, gives a majority of 12,000 to 20,000 12,000 for a 
Mugwump candidate and 20,000 for a straight Democrat. In the 
State outside these cities the Republican majorities reach 70,000 to 
80,000. It is the strongest Republican State in the United States 
above Harlem Bridge, and that mighty volume of Republican 
strength sweeps down upon us every fall, and there we stand to meet 
it under Democratic leadership and overcome it and dissipate it. 

The Republican machinery got its ascendancy in this manner : 
In the country districts which are Republican they had election 
boards consisting of three members two Republicans and one 
Democrat. In the city and county of New York they made elec- 
tion boards of four two Democrats and two Republicans, and 
whenever a dispute could be raised at the ballot boxes, the Demo- 
crats in Democratic districts were kept in line, so that five, six, and 
eight thousand Democratic voters were often unable to get near 
the ballot box, while the inspectors would debate the qualifications 
of the voters, dishonest objections being raised by the Republican 
inspectors. When we got possession of the State Government, one 
of our first steps was to make the election boards Democratic in 
the city of New York, giving the Republicans a minority, the same 
as they gave us in the Republican counties. Well, you would im- 
agine that we were about to take down the pillars upon which the 
temple of liberty and constitutional government rested. The Mug- 
wumps and Republicans declared that the Constitution was in dan- 
ger, that the Republic was about to be subverted, when the 
Democrats were about to have a chance to get even justice. They 
opposed it in the Legislature, and the Mugwumps, Democratic and 
Republican, went before the Governor of our State, who sits before 
you no\v, and threatened him with political ruin if he dared to sign 
it ; and the Governor signed it just as fast as he could reach for 
a pen. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 153 

Now we have a Democratic Election Board, and we have a Dem- 
ocratic Governor, and we are prepared to see that every Democrat 
gets a chance to vote, and that any man who is willing to swear his 
ballot into the box shall have a chance to cast it promptly, and let 
him answer in the courts if he does wrong to any of our statutes. 

Mr. Orr, a delegate from Texas, attempted to get the 
floor. 

MR. COCKRAN : I yield to the gentleman. The gentleman has a 
right to ask me a question. 

MR. ORR : We think the gentleman from New York has had long 
enough to speak. 

A DELEGATE FROM TEXAS (to Mr. Cockran) : What you have 
done meets the approval of the Texas delegation. 

MR. COCKRAN (continuing) : I mention these instances to you in 
order that you may understand the kind of a battle we have waged 
in the City and County of New York and the State of New York for 
the past nine years. I mention it to you as the triumphant outcome 
of the open and unreserved profession of the Democratic faith. 
You have but to look to the history of 1888 to see the results of 
coquetry with Mugwump pretensions. 

I have heard it stated here, I think, by the gentleman from Penn- 
sylvania, that in 1884 the State of New York protested against the 
nomination of Mr. Cleveland, and foretold his probable defeat. 
The gentleman from Pennsylvania is mistaken in his history. The 
State of New York voted for Mr. Cleveland in 1884. The State of 
New York, by an overwhelming majority, presented his name to 
this -Convention. A minority of the delegation protested in the hearing 
of the nominating body against the great folly of imperilling prospects 
that looked as fair as any that dawned over the Democracy. Now, 
the prophesy was not carried out or realized. But why ? We are 
told that Mr. Cleveland carried the State. We are told that he was 
successful at the polls, but do not the gentlemen remember that the 
victory was due to Burchard, rather than to this amazing popularity 
which appears to be so great before the eye in springtime, and so 
impalpable in the colder lights of November ? Is not this denial of 
justice to Burchard enough to make his grave clothes fit him uncan- 
nily? isn't it enough to make his bones turn in their resting place? 

Is there a greater instance of ingratitude than this forgetfulness 
of the gentleman from Pennsylvania to do credit to the memory of 
the preserver and savior of the Democracy of the year 1884? 



154 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

To-day we have a united delegation from all the State, with the 
history that I have mentioned behind it, warning you, gentlemen, 
that this step which you are about to take is fraught with imminent 
peril to the Democratic party. But you remind me of my profession 
of loyalty. You remind me of the glorious history of the organiza- 
tion with which I am identified, which rocked the cradle of liberty 
and unfurled the banner of Democracy when Jefferson was elected, 
watched over our liberties through the darkest hours of radical 
ascendancy, kept alight the fires of Democracy in its old home in 
Fourteenth Street, when there was barely a hustings upon which 
Democratic faith could be proclaimed throughout all the Northern 
States. You remind me of that glorious history, and you say to me 
that we must be loyal to the Democracy ; that the State Democracy, 
by the record of David B. Hill, must be loyal to the Democratic party. 

Aye, gentlemen, we of the regular Democracy will be loyal to the 
party, and we will be loyal no matter who is selected. We are the 
Janizaries of the party. But then all the faithful are not comprised 
within the ranks of the militant organization that must bear the 
brunt of the combat. We will go back to our people, if you send 
us back ; we will take the commission which you place in our hands ; 
we will submit to the indignity and the outrage, and we will try to 
undo all we have done for nine years. We will try to take these 
two irreconcilable elements, the Mugwumps and the Democrats, 
and fuse them into a mighty force for victory in November, but let 
me warn you, gentlemen, that the professions of nine years and the 
lessons of nine years cannot be unlearned in three months. Those 
men have been taught by us to believe that the Mugmump was the 
natural foe of universal suffrage and of free Democratic institutions ; 
that his hostility to Democracy was based on the fact that it was 
the party of the horny-handed and of the brow that sweated with 
toil if we go back and tell them now that the Mugwumps are, 
after all, the true exponents of Democratic faith, that the Demo- 
cratic Convention has accepted a nomination from their hands and 
rejected the advice of the Democratic party, one of two results will 
follow, in my judgment : Either these people will doubt our sin- 
cerity and refuse to support the ticket, or else they will concede 
our sincerity and visit us with their contempt ; and in both events 
the ticket will be menaced with disaster. 

Now, remember that it takes not much absenteeism from the polls 
to damage Democratic prospects. The dangers to Democratic 
success from Democratic sources are seldom visible on the surface. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 155 

The dangers from Mugwump opposition are magnified ten thousand- 
fold in advance of the crucial test of the ballot box. I never knew 
a Mugwump follower ; all the Mugwumps I ever knew were leaders 
and officers. You can gauge the number of them by the number of 
persons you can place upon a platform ; the Mugwump who is not 
placed upon the platform either goes fishing or votes the other 
ticket. When Democrats become cold to the party they don't rush 
out and be interviewed. Democrats whose absence from the polls 
will mean disaster give little manifestation of their displeasure. You 
never realize the peril until the day after election. As in 1888, we 
were betting large sums of money on what seemed a sure thing ; 
yet when the votes were counted that silent distrust of the ticket in 
Democratic districts was found to have blasted all our hopes and 
ruined all our prospects. 

I say to you, gentlemen, to night, in all candor and all honor, that 
for the personality of Mr. Cleveland I have the profoundest respect 
and for himself I have even a warm friendship. I oppose him in 
this Convention because he comes between my party and the light 
of success at the polls ; I oppose him in this Convention because 
his candidacy imperils the success of a party which is now visited 
with bright and alluring prospects. I appeal to you to pause now 
before this contemplated action be consummated, before this in- 
vasion of my State be made complete. Build, gentlemen, build 
your hopes of success not upon the shifting sands of political specu- 
lation and prophecy, not upon divided, discordant, and repellant 
forces which it is impossible to fuse together build it upon the solid 
rock of Democratic harmony, Democratic unity and Democratic en- 
thusiasm. The people whom you have trusted will lead you to victory 
by majorities so decisive that the Republican prospects throughout 
the nation will undergo the same blight which they have received 
in the State whose triumphant Democracy asks you now only for the 
permission to assure you a Democratic victory in November. 

On the call, the Territory of Alaska responded as fol- 
lows : 

The delegates from far Alaska are here chiefly by courtesy. We 
do not desire to participate in the nomination ; but will cast our 
votes when the roll is called. 

When New Mexico was called, one of the delegates 
responded as follows : 

On behalf of some of the representatives of that disfranchised 
State, I second the nomination of David B. Hill, of New York. 



156 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Another delegate from New Mexico seconded the 
nomination of Mr. Cleveland, and still another that of 
Governor Boies. 

When the Indian Territory was called, the chairman 
of that delegation responded : " We pass." 

THE CHAIR : The Chair will now direct a call of the States for 
the purpose of voting for a candidate for President of the United 
States. Three names have been presented to the Convention, the 
name of Grover Cleveland, of New York ; that of David B. Hill, of 
New York, and that of Horace Boies, of Iowa. 

A delegate from New Mexico moved that the Con- 
vention now adjourn until 11 o'clock, upon which mo- 
tion a roll call was demanded. 

THE CHAIR : As there is a demand for a call of the roll by States, 
the Chair will direct that the roll be called on the motion to adjourn. 

MR. S. J. KERNAN : I rise to a parliamentary inquiry. I desire 
to inquire, before the call of the States is proceeded with, what the 
question is ? 

THE CHAIR : It is on the motion of the gentleman from New 
Mexico that the Convention do now adjourn until to-morrow morn- 
ing at 10 o'clock, and the roll of the States has been called for. 

The mover of the motion to adjourn here announced 
that he withdrew his motion to adjourn. 

THE CHAIR : The roll call of States for votes upon the nomina- 
tions will now be proceeded with. 

THE CLERK: Alabama. 

A delegate renewed the motion to adjourn until to- 
morrow morning at 10 o'clock. Mr. Hensel, of Penn- 
sylvania, rose to a point of order, that the roll call 
having begun, the motion to adjourn was not now in 
order. 

THE CHAIR : The point is well taken, and the roll call of States 
will proceed. 

The call of States was then proceeded with. 
The result of the ballot before any changes were 
made was as follows : 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 



157 



BALLOT FOR NOMINEES FOR THE PRESIDENCY. 



STATES. 


TOTAL VOTE 


CLEVELAND. 


t/5 

jjf 

o 

P5 


J 
3 

ffi 


GORMAN. 


CARLISLE. 


STEVENSON. 


CAMPBELL. 


MORRISON. 


RUSSELL. 


WHITNEY. 


PATTISON. 




22 
16 

18 
8 


14 
16 
18 


1 


2 


1 




2 


2 








Arkansas 




































5 


3 


















Comnecticut ... . 


12 
6 
8 
26 
6 


12 
6 
5 
17 


















Delaware 






















Florida. . 








ft 














Georgia 


6 


5 


4 
































Illinois . . . 


48 
30 
% 


48 
30 






















Indiana 
























36 






















20 
26 
16 
1 


20 
18 
3 
q 






















Kentucky. . 


2 
11 






6 














Louisiana 


1 
1 


1 
1 

94- 
















Maine 












1 






16 
30 
28 
18 
18 
34 
fi 


6 

24 
28 
18 
8 
34 


















Massachusetts 


1 


4 












1 






Michigan 


















M innesota 






















Mississippi . 


3 


3 


4 


































6 






















16 
fi 


15 






1 


















4 




2 
















New Hampshire 


8 
20 

72 


8 
20 




















New Jersey .. 


























79 


















North Carolina. ., 


22 
6 

46 

8 

(if 


3* 
6 
14 
8 
64 


1 








16* 




1 









North Dakota 








Ohio 


16 


6 


5 


5 














Oregon. , 




































Rhode Island 


8 
18 
8 
9 4 


8 
2 

7 
94 
























13 

1 


q 
t. 


























































30 
8 
24 
8 
12 

Ox) 


23 
8 
12 
8 

7 
94 


6 


i 








































11 


1 


































.... 


i 


3 














1 


















6 
2 
6 
2 
6 
2 
2 
2 


3 
2 
5 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 






3 










































1 








































1 


i 




































Utah 












































Totals . . 












o 
i 






1 




910 


617* 


103 


114 


36* 


14 


16* 




o 


1 


1 



158 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



RECAPITULATION OF VOTE. 

Cleveland .' 61?i 

Hill 114 

Boies 103 

Morrison 3 

Campbell 2 

Gorman 36 

Carlisle 14 

Stevenson 16| 

Pattison 1 

Russell 1 

Whitney 1 



Total votes cast 909 

Necessary for a choice 607 

A delegate moved that the nomination of Grover 
Cleveland be made unanimous. Before this motion 
could be put, another delegate moved that the rule be 
suspended, and that Grover Cleveland be nominated by 
this Convention by acclamation. 

Senator Daniel, of Virginia, was recognized by the 
Chairman and said : 

The Democratic party of the United States have uttered their 
voice through the lips of their chosen delegates, and by that voice 
it has been decreed that Grover Cleveland is the nominee of every 
Democrat in this Convention for the office of President of the 
United States. On behalf of the delegation from Virginia which 
came here divided, but who will go forth as one, on behalf of every 
true and tried Democrat who loves the great party that bears the 
banner of the people, I move you sir, now, that one thousand voices 
shall ascend from this Convention, and that their only words shall 
be that Grover Cleveland is their leader in this great campaign. 
There must be never a laggard in this fight ; each and every man 
must lay aside all feeling of resentment, and in good faith come 
forward and give this chosen leader the same loyalty which he would 
demand had the man of his choice been designated by this Con- 
vention as the nominee of the party. We must, we can, and we 
will, my countrymen, carry this contest to a triumphant close ; I 
move you that the nomination of Grover Cleveland be made unani- 
mous. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 159 

This motion was adopted, and Hon. Grover Cleve- 
land, of New York, was declared to be the nominee of 
the Democratic party for the office of President of the 
United States. 

The Chairman recognized Governor Flower, of the 
New York delegation ; but the confusion was so great 
that he could not be heard. 

HON. BOURKE COCKRAN, of New York : Mr. Chairman, there 
have been some expressions of dissent in the neighborhood of this 
delegation to the call which was put by the Chair; and as no roll 
was called, I deem it my duty to state to this Convention that on 
the motion to make the nomination of Grover Cleveland unanimous, 
the vote of the State of New York, in full accord with the sentiment 
of the Convention, was cast in the affirmative. 

On the simultaneous motion of many delegates, after 
having been in continuous session all night, the Con- 
vention adjourned at 4.40 A. M., to meet at two o'clock, 
Thursday, June 23, 1892. 



160 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



THIRD DAY. 



CHICAGO, June 23, 1892. 

The Convention was called to order by the Chairman 
at 2.55 P. M., in the following words : 

THE CHAIR : The Convention will come to order. Prayer will 
be offered by Rev. Dr. Green, of Iowa. 

REV. THOMAS E. GREEN : Will the delegates oblige me by taking 
their seats that I may make the opening prayer. We are about to 
engage in prayer ; will you kindly cease conversation for just a 
moment. 

PRAYER. 

Let us pray: We thank Thee, Almighty God, for this another 
day. Vouchsafe to us, we pray, that we may appreciate its possi- 
bilities and be true to its responsibilities, and as we come to com- 
plete the work that Thou hast given us to do, we pray anew for Thy 
direction and guidance. Oh, Thou God of battles, Thou God of 
truth, Thou God of humanity, may the right be mighty and prevail. 
Speed Thou the people's cause. May the rule of oppression of class 
and of wealth be broken down. May the rule of humanity on the 
broad platform of the Carpenter of Nazareth be triumphant and pre- 
vail, and in this contest may that which is righteous be everywhere 
established. May those who are to be elected to preside over the 
destinies of this nation be true to our motto that " Public office is a 
public trust," and reverencing Thee and serving the nation, may 
they receive of Thee that benediction that is above all benedictions 
of earth, the benediction of duty rightly done. And so may the 
angels of charity and humanity brood over this broad land and 
bless it with the kiss of peace, and may Thy kingdom come and 
Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. We ask it for Christ's 
sake. Amen. 

THE CHAIR : The Convention will come to order. 

HON. S. M. WHITE, of California : I rise to ask when and where 
the Committee on Notification will meet. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 161 

THE READING CLERK : I atn directed by the Chair to say that 
the Committee on Notification will meet at the President's desk 
immediately after the final adjournment of the Convention. 

THE CHAIR : The next order of business is the nomination of 
candidates for the office of Vice-President of the United States. 
The Clerk will now call the roll of States in their order for nomina- 
tion for that office. 

GOVERNOR PORTER, of Tennessee : I have a resolution to offer 
which I will send up to the desk. 

The resolution was then read as follows : 

Resolved, That nominating speeches be limited to five minutes 
each, and that seconding speeches be limited to two minutes each. 

This resolution was adopted. 

The call of the States then proceeded. 

For Alabama, E. W. Pettis, delegate- at- large, stated 
that they had no nomination to make. The chairman 
of the Arkansas delegation stated that they desired to 
pass the nomination in favor of Indiana. 

In response to the call of Indiana, the chairman of 
the delegation, Hon. S. E. Morss, stated that Hon. 
John E. Lamb would present, on behalf of the Indiana 
delegates, the name of a citizen of that State for Vice- 
President. 

THE CHAIR : I have the honor to present to you the Hon. J. E. 
Lamb, of Indiana. 

ADDRESS OF HON. JOHN E. LAMB. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention : When I was 
elected a delegate to this Convention from my district, I hoped to 
have the honor, as well as the pleasure, of casting my vote for an 
honored son of Indiana for the Presidency of the United States. 
But, on my arrival at this Convention, it was found that the majority 
had already decided that another than an Indianian should lead the 
contest in the coming campaign. We bowed our heads to their 
judgment and united with the Cleveland Democracy of Indiana. 

Yesterday Grover Cleveland was the choice of a majority of the 
Democratic party, to-day he is the unanimous nominee of the 
11 



162 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Democratic party, and the question which confronts this Convention 
is, Who shall it be that will have the honor to hold up the hands and 
the arms of the candidate who carries the banner of Democracy in 
this campaign ? Where shall he come from? Xew Jersey? New 
Jersey, God bless her, is always Democratic. Connecticut is surely 
safe, and when, the dawn broke upon us this morning, after a night 
of struggle and of toil, the eloquent tongue of the distinguished 
gentleman from New York, the Hon. Bourke Cockran, whose name 
I love to honor, told this Convention that New York was as rock- 
ribbed as Texas for any Democrat that could be made the nominee 
of this Convention. That being true, the thirty-six electoral votes 
of the great State of New York are solid for that prince of Demo- 
crats, Grover Cleveland. 

I come from the State which is the centre of the political battle- 
field of the great West ; the State which has given to the history of 
American politics the immortal name of Thomas A. Hendricks. 
Whenever the Democratic party has listened to its advice, whenever 
it has honored the State of Indiana with a place upon its ticket, 
whether it was in the gran.d battle of 1876, the fruits of which vic- 
tory were stolen from us, or in the grand battle of 1884, when you 
had Indiana on the ticket, you had Democratic victory. 

And now in behalf of this State, which has never faltered, which 
has never sulked, which has fought every inch of ground, I desire, 
in behalf of the united delegation from Indiana, to ask this Con- 
vention to make fifteen votes in the electoral college certain by 
placing upon your ticket the name of an honored leader who never 
lost a battle, Hon. Isaac P. Gray. 

As to our candidate, he has been tried in the balance and never 
found wanting. In the great contest of 1884 he carried the State 
of Indiana for governor by a thousand more votes than Cleveland 
and Hendricks. What more could I say for him? The tongue of 
slander has never been able to pierce his Democratic armor. For 
twenty years he has fought the battles of Democracy. He will 
fight them again, whether upon the ticket or not; but, my friends, 
if there is to be a certainty of fifteen electoral votes for Grover 
Cleveland and Isaac P. Gray in the State of Indiana, nominate that 
ticket and we will deliver the votes. 

THE CHAIR : Hon. Isaac P. Gray has been placed in nomination 
by Mr. Lamb, of Indiana. 

HON. T. J. O'DONNELL, of Colorado : Colorado has no nominee 
and yields its place to Illinois. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 163 

HON. N. E. WORTHINGTON, of Illinois, said : . 

ADDRESS OF N. E. WORTHINGTON. 

Mr. Chairman and Fellow Delegates : Illinois has presented no 
Presidential candidate to this Convention. It has within its bor- 
ders more than one favorite son whom it would have delighted to 
honor, and who are worthy of all the political honors that could be 
Conferred upon them ; but here, in this great city of Chicago, in 
this great commonwealth of Illinois bordering upon the lake and 
the Mississippi, in the center of this great Republic, the Democracy 
caught the vibration of the ground swell that came from the South, 
and the East, and the West, put aside its favorite sons, and for the 
time buried its State pride, and echoing back Texas, Connecticut 
and California, with forty-eight votes shouted the name of Grover 
Cleveland. But for the Vice-Presidency, for the second highest 
place in the gift of the people, it has a candidate so fully equipped 
by nature and education that it feels that it would be a political fault 
to fail to urge his name for nomination before you. I stand here, 
gentlemen, to name a candidate for that position. A man that is 
known by every woman, child and voter that ever licked a postage 
stamp, in every village and hamlet in the land. A big-bodied, big- 
hearted, big-brained man. A man of commanding presence and of 
dignified mien ; a man whose coujtesy in his every-day manners is 
rarely equaled, and never excelled ; a man who, in the administra- 
tion of his duties in the last Democratic administration, was the 
beau ideal of an honest, honorable, useful and efficient Democratic 
office-holder. Like his great leader, who is to bear your banner, 
he believes that a public office is a public trust, but he believes, 
also, that the Democrats are the best trustees of this public trust. 
Nor can the pride of office make him proud and haughty. I appeal to 
every Senator present here if he ever found the haughtiness of office 
produce a chilliness in the atmosphere of the room of the Assistant 
Postmaster General during Cleveland's administration. 

Gentlemen, we have nailed our banner to the mast. The Demo- 
cratic party never surrenders. We propose to make true what our 
Republican friends say of us, that we do our quarreling before the 
Convention and fighting against our enemies afterwards. We 
believe that every Democrat will put on his armor. We, in the 
West, have been making a magnificent campaign of late years; we 
have been educating the people ; and the proud results are seen in 



164 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

JJoyd, of Nebraska ; Boies, of Iowa ; and Peck, of Wisconsin.''. They 
are seen in that grand old man who represents Illinois in the United 
States Senate. They are seen'in the reduction of the Republican 
majority from 60,000 to 13,000 in Illinois. They are seen in a 
Democratic Treasurer and Superintendent of Instruction now in 
this State. We propose, in this campaign, to take the last citadel. 
We have a Governor that we are going to elect. Will you help us 
give the twenty-four electoral votes to Grover Cleveland ? If you 
will, vote for the man whose name I now present; a man who does 
not have to get a certificate from a labor organization to prove that 
he is a friend of the people ; a man whom we all love Adlai E. 
Stevenson, of Illinois. 

THE CHAIR : The name of Hon. Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois, 
is presented to the Convention. The Secretary will proceed with 
the call. 

In response to the call of Connecticut, Senator Rob- 
ert J. Vance, of that State, said : 

MR. VANCE : The Delegation from the State of Connecticut is 
firmly convinced that, in the making of a ticket that shall go on ir- 
resistibly to victory next November, the wishes, the desires and the 
hopes of the great State of Indiana should be considered. We 
think that the proper way in which to supplement the work that was 
done early this morning is to consider the wishes of that State. 
And, therefore, I take pleasure in seconding the nomination which will 
give us a ticket, if the motion is successful, and the vote of Con- 
necticut is in the majority, under which New York, Indiana, New 
Jersey and the sole Democratic State in New England, Connecticut, 
shall all fight, a banner on which shall be inscribed the names of 
Cleveland and Gray. 

Delaware, Florida and Georgia announced, through 
their respective chairmen, that they had no candidate to 
present. 

When Idaho was called, Mr. Hawley, of that State's 
delegation, said : 

Idaho has no name to present, Mr. Chairman, but we take pleas- 
ure in seconding the nomination of that distinguished son of Indi- 
ana, Isaac P. Gray. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 165 

When Illinois was reached, John A. King, of Chi- 
cago, arose and requested that this State be passed for 
the time being. 

When Iowa's turn arrived, Hon. J. H. Shields, of 
Dubuque, spoke for his delegation, as follows : 

Iowa has no candidate for Vice- President. I wish to say just one 
word before you pass Iowa. I have said that Iowa has no candi- 
date for Vice-President. I also wish to say that it is the personal 
wish of Governor Boies, it is the personal wish of the Iowa delega- 
tion, and it is the wish of the Democracy of Iowa, that he be not 
nominated nor named as a candidate for the Vice-Presidency in 
this Convention. I say this believing that you might as well know 
it first at last. 

When Kansas was reached, the chairman of the dele- 
gation said : 

On behalf of the delegation from the State of Kansas, it is desired 
that Mr. Tully Scott, one of the delegates, second the nomination 
of one of the candidates already named. 

ADDRESS OF HON. TULLY SCOTT. 

Hailing from a State that in 1888 gave a majority of 80,000 for a 
Republican candidate, and through the efforts, through the services 
and the gallant devotion of the Democracy of that State, that tre- 
mendous [and enormous majority was reduced two years later, in 
1890, to a minority of 47,000. We believe, sir, that in this nomina- 
tion there ought to be practical politics. We believe, sir, that, in 
the language of a late gallant son of Indiana, the books of this 
Nation ought to be open, and therefore the Democracy of Kansas 
believes, knowing that Mr. Harrison is from Indiana, that if there 
is any State pride in this canvas, the Democracy ought to be in it, 
and I am instructed, therefore, Mr. Chairman, on behalf of the del- 
egation from Kansas, to second the nomination of Isaac P. Gray, 
of Indiana. 

Kentucky was then called, and Mr. Bronston said : 

The State of Kentucky has no candidate to present for Vice- 
President ; but, in behalf and at the request of a part of the delega- 
tion from Kentucky, Hon. John S. Rhea, one of our delegates, will 
second the nomination of a gentleman before this Convention. 



166 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, I present to you 
Hon. J. S. Rhea, of Kentucky. 

ADDRESS OF HON. JOHN S. RHEA. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Convention : Hailing from 
that great commonwealth which is the birthplace of tariff reform 
and the home of the star-eyed goddess, I second the nomination of 
the Hon. Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois. Going back to the time 
when modern prophets of tax reform were infants, mewling and 
puking in their nurses' arms, Kentucky, through Elijah Hise and 
Lynn Boyd, dared to beard the lion in his den, the Douglas in his 
hall, and meet Henry Clay on his chosen battle-ground and declare 
the doctrine that it was the inalienable, inherent right of every man 
to sell the product of his labor in that market which would pay him 
the greatest price, and spend its return in that same market unre- 
stricted by law, save and except sc; far as might be necessary to 
raise money to bear the expenses of a Government, honestly and 
economically administered. 

Kentucky takes her Democracy like she does her whisky 
straight. 

I come before this Convention representing that contingent which 
was fearful to follow the flag of Grover Cleveland or get on the band 
wagon, because they feared they might follow the Democratic hearse 
in November ; but in the presence of this vast assembly I have been 
overwhelmed by the enthusiasm that greets his great name, and I 
believe we are on the high road to Democratic success. I support 
Illinois' candidate because I understand he is a Democrat who be- 
lieves that to the victor belong the spoils. Because he believes, 
further, that there are honest and competent men enough in the 
Democratic party to fill all the offices, and I make the assertion 
that if he is placed in this high position Mugwumps and Repub- 
licans will receive no quarter at his hands. 

The States of Louisiana, Maine, Maryland and Massa- 
chusetts announced, through their respective chairmen, 
that they had no candidate to present. 

When the State of Michigan was called, the chairman 
of the delegation said: 

Michigan wishes to present a candidate through Hon. Edwin F. 
Uhl. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 167 

THE CHAIR: Gentlemen of the Convention: I present to you 
the Hon. Edwin F. Uhl, of the State of Michigan. 

ADDRESS OF HON. EDWIN F. UHL. 

If my memory is accurate, it was within a pistol shot of where 
this convention hall now stands that the great Senator from New 
York, in 1880, in addressing himself to the Republican National 
Convention, said: "Any Republican can carry Michigan." 
He spoke with the knowledge that for twenty-five years the 
Peninsular State had given majorities to his party rising as high 
as 60,000. Not long thereafter, in 1885, the Senator saw that Re- 
publican column shattered by a Democratic lawyer, who was elected 
to the bench of the Supreme Court, the highest appellate tribunal 
in the State, by a majority of 30,000. That lawyer was the Hon. 
Allen B. Morse, its present Chief Justice. His adversary was the 
Hon. Thomas M. Cooley, who, by common consent, had taken rank 
among the foremost jurists of his time, and whose renown as such 
had passed the boundaries of the continent. Following that victory 
the delegates from my State on the floor of this Convention, come 
to the great council of the party as representatives of the triumph- 
ant Democracy in Michigan. They come with a State administra- 
tion behind them solidly Democratic, with a Democratic Legislature 
pioneer in this generation in the enactment of an electoral law 
which brings the choice of the Chief Magistrate of the Nation 
nearer to the citizen. They believe they can hold the citadel against 
the assaults of the enemy in the coming contest. They are pre- 
pared to pledge to the National Democracy nine out of Michigan's 
fourteen electoral votes. They offer more. Nominate here and now, 
as a candidate for the office of Vice-President, Michigan's soldier 
Chief Justice, whom I have the honor, at the instance of my dele- 
gation, to present, and she will give the entire fourteen. They offer 
still more. Make that nomination, and thousands of votes will be 
secured for the national ticket in the doubtful States of the Union, 
which will be lost by a nomination less wise, and which may decide 
the contest. 

With no thought to detract a feather's weight from the just claims 
of the distinguished gentlemen who have been or who may be 
named in connection with this nomination, I respectfully insist that 
Michigan's candidate has elements of strength superior to them all. 
He was a brave soldier. He carries an armless sleeve. This is 
much, but it is not all. He is an able lawyer, a wise legislator, and 



168 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

a profound jurist. He is in the full flush of manhood, just past the 
meridian of life. He is especially strong with the people ; he is 
especially strong with the Grand Army of the Republic. From 
1861 to 1865 he fought with dauntless courage to make certain an 
indestructible Union of indestructible States; but when the contest 
was over, when the integrity of the Union was saved from the wreck 
of war, he fought no more. Entering the service as a private in the 
Sixteenth Michigan Infantry, he participated in every battle of the 
Peninsula campaign. He was in the fierce fire at Antietam under 
McClellan. He was with Pope at" Manassas. He stood by the 
Rock of Chickamauga, fit follower of that leader of adamant. He 
was in the red storm at Mission Ridge, as Assistant Adjutant-Gen- 
eral in the Fourth Army Corps. 

While leading his men he left an arm on those historic heights. 
Himself binding up his wounds with the one hand remaining, he 
did not quit the field, but fought on single-handed in the strict sense 
of the term to the close of that memorable struggle. With an arm 
torn away, he remained in active service in the field to the close of 
September following, and upon his retirement received a most flat- 
tering testimonial from Gen. Sheridan, as to his worth, both as a 
soldier and an officer. 

Out of the galaxy of gallant heroes in the firmament of Democ- 
racy, who are sprinkled as stars in its depths, can you name me 
one of sterner stuff or cast in a more heroic mold? When the brave 
men who wore the gray, with whom he had on many a field crossed 
bayonets, turned back to their war-wasted homes, when once again 
from every roof-tree of the South there floated the flag of the Re- 
public, there was no bitterness left in his heart. He would obliterate 
rather the traces of the war with the same hand that smote ; he 
would obscure the recollection of bitterness engendered in the hot 
blast at Gettysburg and Antietam by the memory of the brave deeds 
which there gave new meaning to heroism on either side, and by 
the common glory of Bunker Hill and Yorktown. 

Do you remember, my fellow-delegates, that there are yet surviv- 
ing nearly 1,000,000 members of the Grand Army of the Republic? 
Do you remember that they hold in highest esteem and honor, 
whenever opportunity presents, one who has taken his place in the 
ranks and fought his own way to position and fame? Can you fail 
to appreciate that the nomination of this man will light the torch of 
enthusiasm around every camp-fire of the Grand Army and add 
much strength to your ticket? I have said he is strong with the 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 169 

people. He is one of the people in the strictest sense of that term. 
He is near to the people, he knows their wants, their burdens, their 
hopes, their aspirations. He sympathizes with the people and they 
in turn give him their confidence and support in the fullest measure. 
Twice elected as State's Attorney in a Republican district, elected 
State Senator by 2,200 majority in a district which gave Grant 2,700 
majority over Greeley, elected Mayor of his city when everyone on 
the ticket besides was defeated, receiving the highest number of 
votes of any candidate on the ticket as Attorney-General, and finally 
elected Justice of the Supreme Court by a triumphant majority 
these are the touch-stones by which his strength with the people 
has been tested. He is a great campaigner, a vigorous debater, who 
will bring converts to our cause and supporters to himself wherever 
he is heard. 

Be assured his learning and ability are commensurate with the 
duties of the high office to which we would elevate him. To what- 
ever station of duty he has been called he has been found fit for the 
largest service to the commonwealth. Trained in the tenets formu- 
lated by Jefferson and enforced by J ackson and Cleveland, he stands 
for the equality of all citizens, for the reserved rights of the States, 
for the supremacy of the Federal Government within constitutional 
limitations, for the assertion of self-government and home rule. 
Such is our candidate. We present the Hon. Allen B. Morse, Chief 
Justice of Michigan, for Vice- President. 

THE CHAIR : Allen B. Morse, of Michigan is put in nomination. 
The Secretary will proceed with the call. 

In answer to the call, the chairman of the delegations 
from Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Ne- 
braska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey and New 
York responded that they had no candidates to present 
to the Convention. 

When the State of North Carolina was called, Hon. 
Kope Ellas, of its delegation, addressed the Convention 
as follows : 

ADDRESS OF HON. KOPE ELIAS. 

I rise, sir, and gentlemen of this Convention, to second in behalf 
of the delegation to this Convention from the State of North Caro- 
lina, the nomination of Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois. Although 



170 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

he lives in the State of Illinois, we claim him as a North Carolinian, 
because his ancestry were of us. General Stevenson is entitled to 
the nomination of this Convention for the second place on its ticket. 
Why do I say this? Because, Mr. Chairman and fellow delegates, 
it would be simply the proper recognition of his valiant service 
upon the battle-fields in defense of our indissoluble Union. His 
record has been made as a military officer. While Grover Cleve- 
land was presiding as Chief Executive of this government he called 
General Stevenson to his council as First Assistant Postmaster-Gen- 
eral of the United States. If General Stevenson was recognized as 
possessing the requisite wisdom and capacity to have a seat in the 
cabinet of the President, then Grover Cleveland, and since you have 
renominated Mr. Cleveland for this highest office in the gift of the 
American people, why not recognize the eminent fitness of General 
Stevenson for the office of Vice-President of this government by 
placing him in the second place on the Democratic ticket? 

North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode 
Island, South Carolina and South Dakota made no 
response when their names were called, and signified 
that they had no candidate for* presentation. 

When the name of the State of Tennessee was called, 
Hon. James Cunningham responded : 

Mr. Chairman, there is a State in the American union that has 
given the Democratic party a Jackson, the hero of New Orleans, 
who first announced the doctrine that to the victors belong the 
spoils. That same State gave to the Democratic party a Polk, under 
whose administration an empire was added to our country. That 
same State gave to the Democratic party a Johnson, whose name is 
immortal. As the representative of a majority of the delegation of 
that State, I now second the nomination of Isaac P. Gray. 

Texas, through the chairman of the delegation, Hon. 
John Ireland, seconded the nomination of Adlai E. 
Stevenson. 

Vermont announced through the chairman of its dele- 
gation that it had no candidate to present. 

In response to the name of the State of Virginia, 
Hon. John Goode, of that State, said : 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 171 

On behalf of a portion of the Virginia delegation, I rise to 
second the nomination of Adlai E. Stevenstfn, of Illinois. 

In response to the name of the State of Washington, 
H. J. Snively said : 

The State of Washington has no candidate for the office of Vice- 
President of the United States, but she will cast her eight solid 
votes for the gallant gentleman from the State of Indiana, Isaac 
P. Gray. 

West Virginia announced through the chairman of 
its delegation that it has no candidate to present. 

S. W. LAMEROUX, of Wisconsin : Wisconsin desires the privilege 
of addressing this Convention through their eminent statesman and 
warrior, General Edward S. Bragg. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, I present to you 
Hon. Edward S. Bragg, of the State of Wisconsin. 

ADDRESS OF GENERAL EDWARD S. BRAGG. 

Gentlemen of the Convention : On behalf of the delegation of 
the State in which I live, which, for the. first time in many years 
presents herself in convention with the authority to state for her, 
Democratic Wisconsin, I am chosen to present a candidate for her. 
If I knew the particular qualifications that each (interrupted by 
cries of "Louder" from the galleries) I am not in the habit of talk- 
ing to the galleries ; if I were I would remind them of the old tale of 
that fellow who came up last when Gabriel blowed his horn and 
called out "Louder." Here stand the men I am talking to (indi- 
cating the delegates). Gentlemen of the Convention, Wisconsin 
has within her borders, if you wish it and desire it as a qualification, 
a soldier 

At this point the rain came down in torrents, accom- 
panied by heavy thunder, and the voice of the speaker 
was entirely drowned and he was obliged to await the 
storm's subsidence. The band struck up with the baby 
song from "Wang" and the Pennsylvania delegation, 
taking advantage of the air, gathered around Mr. Hensel 
and sang a selection from a hand-bill which had been 
distributed through the hall ; a large portion of the 



172 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Convention joined in the singing. Several attempts 
were made to do convention business, but while the 
storm raged it was the regular order, and all acquiesced 
in the edict of a Higher Authority than that of the 
Convention Chairman. 

In the disorder Mr. Ryan, of Michigan, advanced to 
the platform and addressed the Chairman as follows : 

Mr. Chairman : After sitting here in this building in an all- 
night session, with the rain pouring in upon us, I think, if possible, 
we ought to transact our business as rapidly as we can do it and 
adjourn to our homes. 

When order was partially restored, the Chairman 
requested Gen. Bragg to resume his address, which he 
did as follows : 

GEN. BRAGG : At an early hour this morning, my fellow delegates, 
we closed the work which gave to the people their choice, that great 
tribune of the popular right, around whom centres the affection of 
the Democracy, North, South, East and West, Grover Cleveland, 
not of New York, but Grover Cleveland of the United States. 

And now it comes to us to complete that ticket by placing upon it 
a second who shall be worthy of his chief, and upon whom his man- 
tle may fall and like confidence rest in the minds of the people 
upon the successor, if it must be, as upon the chief, as it will be. 

Democratic Wisconsin presents to the Convention for its support 
the name of John L. Mitchell, of Milwaukee, a member of Congress 
from that district, Chairman of the Congressional Democratic 
Committee having charge of this campaign, a man whose character 
in private life is above reproach ; who stands eminent in public life, 
and who as a soldier, has his record written in the records of the 
Army of the Cumberland. Chickamauga, Stone River and Atlanta, 
all give the name of our candidate, John L. Mitchell, eminent in 
peace, brave in war, sound in his Democracy, trusted by all who 
know him, and worthy to be trusted by all of those even though 
they do not know him, but who claim the name of Democrats. 

I present his name for your consideration in behalf of Demo- 
cratic Wisconsin, which expects to give, and will give, its twelve 
electoral votes for Grover Cleveland and John L. Mitchell if you so 
complete the ticket. 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 178 

THE CHAIR : The name of Hon. John L. Mitchell, of Wisconsin, 
is presented to the Convention. 

No response was heard from Wyoming, Alaska, Ari- 
zona or the District of Columbia. 

When New Mexico was reached, Felix Martinez, of 
that delegation, arose and said : 

MR. MARTINEZ: The State of New Mexico takes a back seat 
now, but when she shall have rolled up her six electoral votes for 
Grover Cleveland we trust that we will have a more prominent po- 
sition in the National Democracy. In the name of five of the six 
delegates of New Mexico to this Convention, I desire to second the 
nomination of one of the first men and truest Democrats in all this 
world, Isaac P. Gray, of Indiana. 

Oklahoma, through Henry Haskins, expressed her 
choice as follows : 

Mr. Chairman, Oklahoma seconds the nomination of that match- 
less statesman, Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois. 

Indian Territory announced that it'had no candidate. 
At this point W. F. Vandiver, of Alabama, said : 

MR. VANDIVER : Yesterday we had the storm clouds, and after- 
ward the calm. Later on we had here what appeared to be a Dem- 
ocratic storm in a Democratic Convention ; a few years ago the 
dark clouds hovered o'er the North and the South, and in the 
course of a few years we had the calm. The old soldiers of the 
North and the old soldiers of the South have declared that the 
storm clouds between them have passed away forever, and, Mr. 
Chairman, if the issues of the war are left entirely to the old soldiers 
of the South and the old soldiers of the North, no division or dis- 
union in sentiments or principles can ever be recorded in this grand 
Nation of ours. As I look over this Alabama delegation I see those 
who were members of the grand old Southern army, and I see those 
who were then boys and are now men, who are the sons of noble 
heroes of that cause. I place my hand here on one of the oldest gen- 
erals in the Southern army, and declare that the vote of Alabama 
will be cast for the one-armed soldier from the State of Michigan. 

Mr. J. H. King, of Alabama, spoke as follows : 

Mr. Chairman, in behalf of the son of a dead Confederate soldier, 
representing him in this mighty presence, as well as my people, I 



174 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

take great pleasure in seconding the nomination of the one-armed 
hero of Missionary Ridge. With that grand and great apostle of 
tariff reform, with that statesman in Washington associated with a 
soldier, I think I can see now the Moses and the Aaron leading the 
Democratic children of Israel out of the Egyptian house of bond- 
age, and I can, Mr. Chairman, methinks, hear the tramp of the 
Republican host as they go down into the Red Sea of destruction. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, four names have 
been presented to the Convention as candidates for nomination for 
Vice-President of the United States : the names of Isaac P. Gray, 
of Indiana ; Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois ; Allen P. Morse, of 
Michigan ; John L. Mitchell, of Wisconsin. The Secretary of the 
Convention will now call the roll of States to receive the votes. 

When the State of Colorado was reached, Hon. T. J. 
O'Donnell said : 

Colorado wants a candidate who can take the party in out of the 
wet, and it casts its eight votes for Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois. 

When Iowa was reached, J. H. Shields said : 

Iowa casts her twenty-six votes for a man who needs no introduc- 
tion to the Democracy of the United States, nor any praise in a 
National Democratic Convention, that Democrat of Democrats, 
that peerless son of Kentucky, Colonel Henry Watterson. 

As the last State was called, and it was seen that 
Adlai E. Stevenson was leading all the candidates, the 
chairman of the Iowa delegation arose and stated that he 
desired to change the vote of Iowa from Watterson to 
Stevenson. 

This was the signal for a general stampede to Steven- 
son, and chairmen of delegations in all parts of the hall 
were seen standing on chairs endeavoring to catch the 
eye of the Speaker. As delegation after delegation fol- 
lowed the lead of Iowa, and it became evident that Ste- 
venson was to be nominated, Mr. Cole, of Ohio, was 
recognized by the Chair, and moved that the rules be 
suspended and that General Stevenson be nominated 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 175 

by acclamation. The motion was seconded by W. U. 
Hensel, of Pennsylvania. 

THE CHAIR : Adlai E. Stevenson, having already received more 
than two-thirds of the votes of this Convention, it is moved by Mr. 
Cole, of Ohio, and seconded by Mr. Hensel, of Pennsylvania, that 
the rules be suspended, and that he be declared nominated for the 
office of Vice-President unanimously. 

On being put, the motion was unanimously adopted, 
and Gen. Adlai E. Stevenson was declared the nom- 
inee of the Democratic party for the office of Vice- 
President of the United States. 

The following is the result of the ballot at the close 
of the roll call, before any changes were recorded. 



176 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



BALLOT FOR NOMINEES FOR THE VICE-PRESIDENCY. 



STATE. 


w 

ill 

o 

-1 


MORSE. 


> 

ai 



f 


STEVEN- 
SON. 


i 2 

H 

- x 

5 


COCKRAN. 


w 

H 
H 

H 


ij 

= a 
u 

2 


t/j 
9 

o 
8 


Alabama 


99 


9,9 
















Arkansas 


16 




16 














California 


18 




(1 


q 












Colorado 


8 






8 












Connecticut 


19, 




19, 














Delaware 


6 


6 
















Florida. ... 


g 




2 


Q 












Georgia 


96 


10 


q 


7 












Idaho 


6 



















Illinois 


48 






48 












Indiana 


RO 




80 














Iowa 


9,6 








9,6 










Kansas 


9,0 




9f\ 














Kentucky. . 


9,6 




19, 


19, 








9, 




Louisiana 


16 






16 












Maine 


19 




4 


7 












Maryland 


16 




19 


4 












Massachusetts 


90 


5 


5 


90 














<>8 


9,8 
















Minnesota 


18 




18 














Mississippi 


18 


1 


q 


8 














34 


8 


10 


16 












Montana . 


fi 










5 


1 








16 




5 


6 








5 




Nevada 


6 




6 
















8 






8 












New Jersey . . 


^O 




19 


1 












New York 


79 






79 














9-> 






99, 












North Dakota 


6 




6 














Ohio 


46 




4 


38 








4 




Oregon.. . 


8 




8 
















64 




64 














Rhode Island 


8 




8 














South Carolina 


18 






18 












South Dakota .... 


8 




9 


4 








9 




Tennessee 


4 


1 


14 


8 










1 


Texas ... 







4 


96 












Vermont 


8 




8 














Virginia. ... 


94 






94 














8 




8 














West Virginia 


19 


4 


4 


4 














94 














94 






6 














6 






9 






1 








1 




Arizona 


6 




1 


5 












District of Columbia 


9 






1 








1 




New Mexico 


I 




B 


1 














> 






9 












Utah 


8 


1 


1 














Indian Territory 


a 




9 


































Total 


910 


86 


343 


402 


26 


5 


1 


45 


1 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 177 

RECAPITULATION OF VOTE. 

Stevenson 402 

Gray 343 

Morse 86 

Mitchell 45 

Watterson 26 

Cockran 5 

Boies 1 

Tree ". 1 

Total vote cast* 909 

Necessary for a choice , 607 



*Maine voting but n. 



The following table shows the result of the ballot, em- 
bracing all the changes which were recognized by the 
Chair before the motion to make the nomination unani- 
mous was adopted : 



12 



178 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 



REVISED BALLOT FOR NOMINEES FOR THE VICE-PRESIDENCY. 



STATE. 


M 

-g 

r 

H 


> 


O 


STEVEN- 
SON. 


MORSE. 


1* 

H 

i 


Alabama 


22 
16 
18 
8 
12 
6 
8 
26 
6 
48 
30 
26 
20 
26 
16 
12 
16 
80 
28 
18 
18 
34 
6 
16 
6 
8 
20 
72 
22 
6 
46 
8 
64 
8 
18 
8 
24 
30 
8 
24 

12 
24 
6 
2 
6 
2 
6 
2 
2 
2 






22 






16 
9 






California 


9 

8 














12 










6 




Florida 


2 


6 
26 










Idaho. .. . . 


6 








48 






Indiana 


30 






Iowa 


26 






Kansas 


20 






Kentucky 


26 
16 

7 
4 
30 






Louisiana 








Maine 


4 

12 






Maryland.. 






Massachusetts 










28 








18 
8 
34 
6 
16 
5 
8 
1 
72 
22 




Mississippi . . 


9 


1 




Missouri 




Montana . 
















Nevada 


1 






New Hampshire 






New 1 ersey . 


19 






New York 






North Carolina . . 








North Dakota 


6 








Ohio 


46 
8 
64 






Oregon .. 








Pennsylvania 








Rhode Island 


8 








18 
4 
24 
30 






South Dakota 


2 




2 


Tennessee 




Texas 










8 






Virginia 


24 






Washington ... 


8 
4 






West Virginia 


4 
24 


' 4 




\Visconsin .. 




Wyoming ; 






6 
1 


Alaska 




1 
5 

1 
1 
2 




Arizona 


1 








1 


New Mexico. .... 


5 




Oklahoma 






Utah 


1 
2 


1 


.. .. 


Indian Territory 










Total.. 


910 


185 


652 


62 


10 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 179 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Convention, please come to 
order. There is a number of resolutions which have been sent to 
the desk to be presented to you for your consideration. The Clerk 
will read them. 

Chief Reading Clerk Bell then read the following 
resolution, offered by Hon. Calvin S. Brice, of QJiio : 

Resolved, That the National Committee are hereby empowered 
and directed to fix the time and place for holding the next National 
Convention, and that the basis of representation therein be the 
same as fixed for this Convention. 

The resolution was unanimously adopted. 
Norman E. Mack, of New York, offered the following 
resolution which was read by the clerk : 

Resolved, That the name of Hon. W. L. Wilson, permanent Chair- 
man of this Convention, be added to the committee appointed by 
the several States to notify the nominees of this Convention of their 
selection as candidates for the office of President and Vice-President 
of the United States. 

Gen. Patrick Collins, of Massachusetts, put the ques- 
tion as follows : 

On account of the modesty of the permanent Chairman of this 
Convention, I have been requested to put this question. The 
gentlemen in favor of this resolution will say aye. 

The resolution was thereupon unanimously adopted. 

The following resolution, presented by Hon. Samuel 

R. Honey, of Rhode Island, was then read by the Clerk: 

Resolved, That the National 'Committee is authorized and em- 
powered in its discretion to select as its Chairman and also as the 
Chairman of its Executive Committee persons who are not mem- 
bers of the said National Committee. 

The resolution was unanimously adopted. 
Permanent Chairman Wilson then took the chair and 
recognized General Collins, of Massachusetts, who said : 

ADDRESS OF GENERAL~COLLINS. 

Gentlemen of the Convention : I propose to address myself to 
the common sense, good judgment and experience of the 900 men 
selected by the Democratic party as delegates to this Convention. 



180 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

Twelve years ago I sent to the Chair a resolution instructing the 
National Committee to provide accommodation in the next Conven- 
tion for the delegates, the alternates, the National Committee, the 
members of the press and none others. The time was not ripe for 
the adoption of that; and without disparagement to our National 
Committee, I feel free to say, in the presence of the small fraction 
of the great American public outside of ourselves as delegates, that a 
mistake has been made, and that the time has now come when a 
Democratic Convention should be a deliberative body, not gov- 
erned by outside influences. If we could be on exhibition in the 
view of the 65,000,000 of our people, and of the 7,000,000 of 
Democrats who will vote the Democratic ticket, well and good ; 
but what is the use? What is the sense in having 15,000 persons who 
can hardly see, and who can not hear, prolong the proceedings of a 
Democratic Convention and prevent it from being deliberative ? 
It is not the discomforts, it is not the inconveniences, but it is the 
danger of wrecking a Convention that we are face to face with to day j 
and I feel confident that we have reached the climax of absurdity, 
and therefore, I ask you, fellow delegates to pass the following 
resolution : 

Resolved, That the National Democratic Committee be instructed 
to provide in the next Convention, accommodations for the dele- 
gates, the alternates, the members of the press, the National Com- 
mittee and none others. 

I offer that resolution to the end that the people who are here by 
their proxies may have that consideration paid to their interests 
which can only be secured in a really deliberative body ; and upon 
that resolution I call for the roll of the States. 

At this point, the ropes which held one of the electric 
lights suspended, became loosened or broken, and the 
rapid descent of the light caused great confusion. It 
seemed for a time that some of the delegates in the 
New York delegation seated directly beneath it, were 
in imminent and deadly peril. Col. Bright, the Ser- 
geant-at-arms, and the police, soon secured the light, 
removed all cause for apprehension, and restored order. 

Mr. W. U. Hensel, of Pennsylvania, then said : 

MR. HENSEL : Mr. Chairman, I think it must be apparent to all 
the delegates here, that even a roll-call of the States cannot now b& 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION. 181 

taken with that deliberation necessary to the proper proceedings of 
this Convention. I therefore move you that the resolution of Gen- 
eral Collins be referred to the next National Democratic Committee, 
with the affirmative recommendation of this Convention and with 
full power to act. 

THE CHAIR : It is moved that the resolution of General Collins 
be referred to the next National Committee with an affirmative 
recommendation and with the power to act. 

This motion was adopted. 

The following resolutions were also offered by Hon. 
W. B. Chipley, of Florida. 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Convention are due and arc 
hereby tendered Hon. Nicholas M. Bell and other Secretaries of 
the Convention, and 

Resolved, That Hon. Nicholas M. Bell be added to the Notifica- 
tion Committee as its Secretary. 

This resolution was adopted. 

By Hon. Calvin S. Brice, of Ohio : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Convention are hereby tendered 
to the Chicago Committee and the citizens of Chicago for their 
courtesies to this Convention. 

This resolution was adopted. 

By Hon. Henry Watterson, of Kentucky : 

Resolved, That the Official Stenographer be directed to prepare 
the proceedings of this Convention, to be printed in proper form, 
and that the National Committee cause a suitable number of copies 
to be distributed among the delegates to this Convention, and such 
others as may be entitled to receive them. 

This resolution was adopted. 

MR. WATTERSON : Gentlemen of the Convention, it is moved and 
seconded that the thanks of this body be tendered to the President 
and other officers of this Convention for their services. 

This resolution was adopted. 

HON. J. RUSSELL, of Missouri : I move the Convention do now 
adjourn sine die. 



182 OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

MR. WATTERSON : The gentleman from Missouri moves that 
this Convention do now adjourn sine die. 

In announcing the vote, Chairman Wilson said : 

The Chair, thanking the Convention for its kindness to himself, 
and asking its indulgence for any lack of capacity to perform the 
duties of his office, hereby declares the Convention adjourned 
sine die. 

The Convention was thereupon adjourned sine die at 
5:18 o'clock p. M. 



APPENDIX. 



ORGANIZATION 



OF THE 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE 



OF 1892. 



PALMER HOUSE, CHICAGO, June 23, 1892, 

5 o'clock P. M. 

The National Committee of 1892 met for the purpose 
of temporary organization, at the Palmer House, Grand 
Parlor, at 5 o'clock p. M. 

The Committee was called to order by Hon. Calvin 
S. Brice, as follows : 

THE CHAIR : It has been customary for the old members of the 
National Committee to meet for the purpose of finishing any busi- 
ness that they might have ; and then that the roll should be called, 
and then that the old members should retire, and the new Com- 
mittee would then organize. If there be no objection, in accord- 
ance with that custom, I will call the old Committee to order, and 
will entertain any motions which may be offered. 



186 APPENDIX. 

The following resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee be and they are cor- 
dially extended to Hon. S. P. Sheerin, Secretary ; to Col. Richard 
J. Bright, Sergeant- at- Arms ; to C. J. Canda, Esq., Treasurer ; to 
F. E. Canda, Esq., Assistant Treasurer, and to Col. Edward B. 
Dickinson, Assistant Secretary and Official Stenographer, for the 
care, tact and fidelity with which they have performed the arduous, 
delicate and often vexatious duties of their respective positions, in 
preparing for the holding of the Convention just closed. 

THE CHAIR : If there be no objection, I will hold that this is a 
separable resolution, in order that each of these officers may have a 
copy if he desires, including his own name. 

SENATOR M. W. RANSOM, of North Carolina : As the oldest 
member in service of this Committee, I claim the privilege and the 
pleasure of presenting this resolution : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are due and are 
hereby tendered to Hon. Calvin S. Brice, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee, for the able, faithful and devoted manner in which he has 
discharged all the duties belonging to his position ; and that he de- 
serves the gratitude of the Democratic party of the country for his 
great services to its cause. 

The question being put by Senator Ransom, the res- 
olution was unanimously adopted. 

On motion of Senator Gorman, of Maryland, the fol- 
lowing resolution was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are due to and are 
hereby tendered the citizens of Chicago, to the Finance, Building 
and Reception Committees for their hospitality. 

THE CHAIR : If there is no other business, a motion to adjourn 
will be in order. 

MR. TARPEY, of California : I move that the Committee of 1888 
adjourn sine die. 

This motion was adopted, and the Committee of 1888 
adjourned sine die. 



APPENDIX. 187 

The Committee of 1892 was then called to order by 
the Secretary, who called the roll, by which it appeared 
that the following States were represented : 

Alabama Henry D. Clayton Eufaula. 

Arkansas . . .U. M. Rose Little Rock. 

California M. F. Tarpey Alameda. 

Colorado Charles S. Thomas Denver. 

Connecticut Carlos French Seymour. 

Delaware Lewis C. Vandegrift Wilmington. 

Florida Samuel Pasco Monrtcello. 

Georgia Clark Howell, Jr Atlanta. 

Idaho Frank W. Beane Blackfoot. 

Illinois Ben T. Cable Rock Island. 

Indiana S. P. Sheerin Logansport. 

Iowa J. J. Richardson Davenport. 

Kansas Charles W. Blair Leavenworth. 

Kentucky Thomas H. Shenley Louisville. 

Louisiana James Jeffries Rapides. 

Maine Arthur Sewall Bath. 

Maryland Arthur P. Gorman Laurel. 

Massachusetts Josiah Quincy Boston. 

Michigan Daniel J. Campau Detroit. 

Minnesota Michael Doran St. Paul. 

Mississippi Charles D. Howry Oxford. 

Missouri John G. Prather St. Louis. 

Montana A. J. Davidson Helena. 

Nebraska Tobias Castor Lincoln. 

Nevada R. P. Keating.. Virginia City. 

New Hampshire A. W. Sulloway Franklin. 

New Jersey. Miles Ross New Brunswick. 

New York William F. Sheehan Buffalo. 

North Carolina M. W. Ransom Weldon. 

North Dakota William C. Leistikow Grafton. 

Ohio Calvin S. Brice Lima. 

Oregon E. D. McKee Portland. 

Pennsylvania William F. Harrity Philadelphia. 

Rhode Island Samuel R. Honey Newport. 

South Carolina M. F. Donoldson Greenville. 

South Dakota (not reported) 

Tennessee Holmes Cummings Memphis. 

Texas O. T. Holt Houston. 

Vermont Bradley B. Smalley Burlington. 

Virginia Basil B. Gordon Sandy. 

Washington Hugh C. Wallace Tacoma. 

West Virginia (not reported) 

Wisconsin E. C. Wall.....' Milwaukee. 

Wyoming W. L. Kuykendall . ..Saratoga. 



188 APPENDIX. 

Alaska A . K. Delaney Juneau. 

Arizona Charles M. Shannon Clifton. 

Indian Territory E. N. Allen . .McAllister. 

District of Columbia James L. Norris Washington. 

New Mexico H. B. Ferguson 

Oklahoma T. M. Richardson Oklahoma City. 

Utah Samuel A. Merritt Salt Lake City. 

On motion of Mr. C. W. Blair, of Kansas, Hon. Calvin 
S. Brice was elected temporary Chairman of the Com- 
mittee ; Hon. S. P. Sheerin was elected temporary 
Secretary ; Charles J. Canda was elected temporary 
Treasurer, and Edward B. Dickinson, Official Stenog- 
rapher. 

On motion of Mr. Tarpey, the Committee adjourned 
to meet on such day as should be determined far the 
meeting of the Notification Committee, due notice 
whereof will be given by the Secretary of this Com- 
mittee. 



APPENDIX. 



189 



FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL, NEW YORK CITY, 

July 21, 1892. 



The meeting was called to order at 12 o'clock, M., 
pursuant to call, the Chairman, Hon. Calvin S. Brice, 
of Ohio, presiding, and the Secretary, Hon. S. P. Shee- 
rin, of Indiana, recording. 

THE CHAIR : All gentlemen who are not members of the National 
Committee, if there are any such present, will please retire. The 
Sergeant-at-Arms will close the door. The Committee is now in 
session. The Secretary will call the roll. 

The roll of the Committee was called by the Secre- 
tary, on which it appeared the following States were 
represented, either by the member in person or by 
proxy : 



Alabama R. N. Rhodes (proxy for 

Henry D. Clayton, Jr. ) 
Arkansas U. M. Rose. 
California M. F. Tarpey. 
Colorado C. S. Thomas. 
Connecticut Carlos French. 
Delaware Lewis C. Vandegrift. 
Florida Samuel Pasco. 
Georgia Clark Howell, Jr. 
Idaho S. P. Sheerin (proxy for Frank 

W. Beane). 

///inoisBen. T. Cable. 
Indiana S. P. Sheeiin. 
Iowa J. J. Richardson. 
Kansas Charles W. Blair. 



Kentucky Thomas H. Sherley. 
Louisiana James Jeffries. 
Maine Arthur Sewall. 
Maryland Arthur P. Gorman . 
Massachusetts Josiah Quincy. 
Michigan Justin R. Whiting (proxy 

for Daniel J. Campau). 
Minnesota Michael Doran. 
Mississippi Charles D. Howry. 
Missouri John G. Prather. 
Montana A. P. Gorman (proxy for A. 

J. Davidson). 
Nebraska Tobias Castor. 
Nevada Horatio C. King (proxy for 

R. P. Keating). 



190 



APPENDIX. 



New Hampshire A. W. Sulloway. 
New Jersey M. F. Ross (proxy for 

Miles Ross). 

New York William F. Sheehan. 
North Carolina M. W. Ransom. 
North Dakota (not represented). 
Ohio Calvin S. Brice. 
Oregon Francis Lynde Stetson (proxy 

for E. D. McKee). 
Pennsylvania William F. Harrity. 
Rhode Island Samuel R. Honey. 
South Carolina M. F. Donaldson. 
South Dakota 
Tennessee (not represented). 
Texas William C. Whitney (proxy for 

O. T. Holt). 



Vermont Bradley B. Smalley. 
Virginia Basil D. Gordon. 
Washington Hugh C. Wallace. 
West Virginia John Sheridan. 
Wisconsin &. C. Wall. 
Wyoming Robert H. Homer (proxy 

for W. L. Kuykendall). 
Alaska (not represented). 
Arizona A. P. Gorman (proxy for 

Charles M. Shannon). 
District of Columbia James L. Norris. 
New Mexico H. B. Ferguson. 
Indian Territory E. N. Allen. 
Utah JohnT. Caine (proxy for Samuel 

A. Merritt). 



At the conclusion of the calling of the roll, Mr. Owen 
arose and stated that he challenged the right of Mr. 
Allen to represent Indian Territory. 



THE CHAIR : Let that be passed. Is there a contest? 

THE SECRETARY : There is a contest in Indian Territory, 
members are present. 



Both 



THE CHAIR : What will be the pleasure of the Committee ? Will 
it be that the two members remain in the room until the matter is 
taken up, and that it be temporarily passed now ? If that be the 
pleasure of the Committee we will proceed with the regular business. 

At this point Mr. Henry E. Davis stated that he de- 
sired to challenge the right of Mr. Norris to represent 
the District of Columbia. 

THE CHAIR : Let the same 'action be taken as to that also, if 
there is no objection. 

SENATOR A. P. GORMAN, of Maryland : I would suggest that the 
matter be referred to a committee of three. 

THE CHAIR : Do you put that in the form of a motion ? 

MR. GORMAN: Yes, sir. I move that the contested cases be 
referred to a committee of three, who will take the papers and 
report to this Committee. 



APPENDIX. 191 

This motion being duly seconded, was put to a vote 
and carried. 

THE CHAIR : That covers both cases, as I understand it. How 
shall that committee be appointed ? 

MR. GORMAN : By the Chairman. 

THE CHAIR : What will be the pleasure of the Committee as to 
the members remaining present during this meeting? 

A MEMBER : I move that the gentlemen be allowed to remain 
until the matter is finally determined. 

This motion being- duly seconded, was put to a vote 
and carried. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen of the Committee : The next business 
in order will be the permanent organization of this Committee. 
Before that takes place, I have a personal explanation or a personal 
statement to make to the members of this Committee. I under- 
stand that we are here without reporters, in a confidential way, in 
conference as to the best interests of this Committee and the Dem- 
ocratic party. 

When the Committee honored me with an election as Chairman 
pro tern, at Chicago, I made my acknowledgments to the Committee 
with much less warmth of expression than my feelings really 
prompted, because only those who have participated in the struggle 
and in the associations formed during a national campaign are 
conscious how deep the ties grow to be, and how much affected any 
one of a sensitive temperament is by any such evidence of confidence 
and regard. I stated then to the Committee that my engagements, 
formed some months previous to the National Convention, pre- 
cluded the possibility of my occupying the Chairmanship of the 
Committee through this national campaign, and that I would only 
hold the place of Chairman until the permanent organization of 
this Committee, and should not be a candidate for re-election. To 
that conclusion* then announced I still adhere, and. for the reasons 
which I then gave. 

Since the Committee adjourned, a number of personal friends on 
the Committee, loath to sever the relations which existed between 



192 APPENDIX. 

us, have been endeavoring to keep our organization intact by sug- 
gesting that I be a candidate for the office of Chairman of the 
National Committee, but not for the Chairmanship of the Campaign 
Committee. In other words, they desired to honor me with the 
rank and title of that place without putting on me the burden and 
responsibility of the campaign, and they have been kind enough 
to assure me that their feeling was shared in by a very large number 
of perhaps all the Committee. 

It is impossible for me to consent to put myself in such a position. 
I have considered it fully and carefully. I have considered fully, 
because such evidence of confidence in me and of regard for me on 
the part of such gentlemen as makeup this Committee, made it proper 
that I should do so. I understand that the suggestion is made, not as 
antagonistic to any other person or adverse to any other action that 
might be taken, but simply and entirely a suggestion made by indi- 
vidual members of the Committee, because they wanted the friendly 
relations to continue which have existed for some years between us. 
But my own personal position is such with regard to my private 
business affairs as to make it imperative for me to shape everything 
so that I can have a reasonable amount of freedom for the next 
three or four months. I have been engaged at Washington for the 
past seven months, and I really require the next few months to put 
my own house in order. 

In the campaign of 1888 I believe that I merited the confidence 
of those who were associated with me by the attention which I then 
gave to the business with which I was charged. Every thought, 
every interest, every moment of time, every particle of nerve force 
and of brain power that was in me, I gave to the campaign of 1888. 
It would not be possible for me to repeat it. I did my best, and if 
I should attempt to do anything of that kind again, I would fall 
below the standard which I then established for myself. It is possi- 
ble for another to make such a fight. 

I am perfectly willing to leave my record where I made it not 
with the general public where failure or success is the only standard 
of recognition and appreciation, because no man has a right to 
undertake a contest of any sort and fail but with the Committee 
itself. I took charge of the campaign and I failed. So far as the 
general body of the Democracy and the public are concerned, I 
have no claim to their confidence or regard. I am only entitled to 



APPENDIX. 193 

it from those who were associated with me in the contest. I claim 
nothing from the outside public who had a right to look for success 
and nothing else who can claim that we had no business to under- 
take a contest unless we could be successful. I am speaking freely 
about my own personal views, so that you may see how I regard the 
situation. 

The Chairmanship of the National Democratic Committee is as 
high an honor, in my mind, as lies within the power of the party to 
confer upon anyone. It is equal to any other of the great distinc- 
tions in the party. To have had that honor, and to have had it even 
with imperfect success' is something which I shall always treasure 
along with the associations then formed, the confidences established 
and the regards and friendships then secured. 

I do not think it would be right for you, if in a moment of senti- 
ment you wished to, to put me back as Chairman of the National 
Democratic Committee, and I do not think it would be right for me 
to accept it. 

I am of the opinion that there is in the minds of all of us the 
name of a man who will fill this same place with great ability, with 
great distinction, and in the end, take from me all the love and 
sentiment which I am rejoicing in now. 

I am trying to bring before you the feeling which I have enter- 
tained since the adjournment of the Convention, in talking with A, 
B and C, who have kindly said, " Let us make you Chairman again ; 
let us reward you for past services." Even the feeling which you 
have for me, and it is the expression of almost every member of 
this Committee, together with that of many leading Democrats out- 
side of the Committee, I think it would be improper for me, in jus- 
tice to myself, to accept it, and, except for the sentiment, improper 
for you to offer it to me. 

Gentlemen, I have failed to express myself clearly if I have been 
unsuccessful in impressing upon you how deeply I feel upon this 
subject, and how much I appreciate the kindness with which I have 
been treated by all the members of this Committee. We will now 
proceed with the permanent organization. 

MR. TARPEY, of California : In consideration of what has been 
said by the Chairman, I deem it proper at this time, gentlemen, to 

13 



194 APPENDIX. 

offer a resolution, and I do so feeling that it would be adopted by 
every member of this Committee without a single exception. 

The resolution offered by Mr. Tarpey was as follows : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are hereby tendered 
to the Hon. Calvin S. Brice for the able, dignified and courteous 
manner in which he, as Chairman of the Committee, has presided 
over its deliberations and directed its management ; and we deeply 
regret that the pressure of personal and business affairs is such that 
he cannot accept the Chairmanship of this Committee. 

MR. TARPEY : I move the adoption of the foregoing resolution. 
MR. WHITNEY, of New York : I second the motion. 

MR. GORMAN : Mr. Chairman, before the resolutions are adopted, 
I would like to say a few words. Of course, I take pleasure in 
seconding this resolution, but I cannot permit the opportunity to 
pass without saying, from my own connection with this Committee 
and some intimate relations with it during the campaign, watching 
closely as I did every movement and every action of those who 
conducted the campaign of 1888, that the Democratic party is 
under deep and lasting obligations to you. 

I think if the records were searched, the fact would be ascertained 
that of all the Chairmen we have had at least since the war and 
during my time, no man ever occupied the position of Chairman of 
the Campaign Committee who discharged his duties more faithfully 
or intelligently than you did ; that no man in the party, whether in 
office or out of it, ever assumed such responsibilities or contributed 
so much to the success of Democratic principles, and all without 
the slightest personal interests in the result of the contest. 

While the unthinking and the hypercritical among the press and 
others may condemn and criticise you for the loss of that campaign, 
no greater injustice was ever done a commanding officer. That cam- 
paign was fought as intelligently, as energetically, as any contest 
that we ever had. There was not a man in the party from the can- 
didates down who did not believe that our weakness was in the 
centres of population and in the manufacturing centres, and it was 
the combined judgment of every man who looked at and had an 
interest in the contest that there the fight should be made. There, 
Mr. Chairman, you made it, and the results show that you did 



APPENDIX. 185 

because we weakened the Republicans in their own strongholds 
while we lost in the country districts. 

Whatever fault of judgment it was, it was not yours. You came 
to occupy the position by the request of the candidates ; you came 
as one not skilled in political management, but you had the good 
sense to adopt the judgment of those who surrounded you and their 
judgment and their determination of the lines of battle you adopted. 

I want to say to this Committee to-day, that no mere resolutions 
can express my feelings. You deserve great gratitude for your 
action, and no man regrets more than I do that your business and 
personal affairs make it impossible for you to serve your party again 
in that capacity. 

In 1884 a like case presented itself to the National Democratic 
Committee. Mr. Barnum, who was the Chairman of this Committee, 
had lost the contest of 1880. The same criticisms were made, but 
we said, "We know you are loyal; we know your work and we will 
place you again at the head of the Committee." We did place him 
at the head of the Committee, and he won the contest in 1884. 
Therefore, sir, in relinquishing your services, I do not do it because 
of the criticisms which have been made. Your experience in the 
past four years better fits you for such a contest, and I only reluc- 
tantly consent to your withdrawal because of your own personal 
relations. 

SENATOR M. W. RANSOM, of North Carolina : I hope the Com- 
mittee will permit me to unite my expressions with those of the 
Senator from Maryland, so well said. I should do injustice to my 
judgment and heart hope if I permitted this occasion to pass with- 
out bearing my testimony to the unsurpassed and unequaled devo- 
tion with which you have met every duty as the Chairman of this 
Committee. 

It is a matter of regret to me, and I think it is an occasion of loss 
to the country, that the present generation and the young men who 
will come soon afterwards shall not have knowledge of your action 
in the position which you have filled. I do not know myself what 
others think, but a signal and conspicuous instance of great public 
virtue is worth more to mankind than any object you can mention. 
No boy ever read the story of Codes at the Roman bridge without 
being a nobler boy ; no American citizen or European ever read of 



196 APPENDIX. 

General Washington refusing to touch a dollar of public money 
when he offered his unrivaled services to his country without feeling 
new courage and a new impulse to honorable action, and, to me, 
living in an eminently practical time, when everything is utilita- 
rianism, when men do not look to sentiment but to material results 
and effects, it is the very highest moral gratification to know that in 
this country of ours, and in this party of ours, a man has been 
found who illustrated the public services to his party by acts of 
unsurpassed devotion. 

If the history of your administration should be published it would 
read like a romance, and would show a generosity on your part 
without a parallel in the history of this or any other country. 

At the same time, I must be permitted to say that your sense of 
justice to every member of this Committee, your uniform and in- 
variable courtesies, your regard for our sensibilities and our conven- 
iences tie the heart and soul of every man to you. I wish the 
history of your administration could be published, as an example to 
all your successors, in order that they might see how disinterested,. 
how noble, and how modest one Democrat has been in the dis- 
charge of a great duty which he was invited to take upon his hands. 

I regret with pain and with sorrow that you have come to the 
conclusion that you have. It is only another instance of that virtue 
which has brought you to the position you now hold, and which I 
hope will protect and guide our party and our people to permanent 
victory in this country. Your presence here prevents me from say- 
ing more regarding the regrets of this Committee in accepting your 
resignation. Speaking for myself, and what I believe to be the gen- 
eral sentiment of the Committee, I may say that almost every man 
here is filled with the same regret and pain that I feel. I thank you 
personally for your great courtesy and consideration to me and my 
friends ever since you have been Chairman, and I thank the gentle- 
men for having heard me so patiently. 

MR. WHITNEY : Mr. Chairman, having personally been inti- 
mately associated with both the campaigns of 1884 and 1888, partly 
from personal friendships which I value very highly, and partly 
from a feeling of devotion to the party, it gives me great pleasure ta 
hear these words of appreciation which have been uttered with re- 
gard to the Chairmanship of the campaign of 1888. The Chairman. 



APPENDIX. 197 

at that time, urged almost by the personal friendship of a few of us, 
undertook something with regard to which he distrusted himself, 
and, having undertaken it under circumstances which were very 
difficult and adverse, with issues which were new and untried, and 
with a party in a state of alarm, those of us who were near him 
know that by no possible lack of labor or time and by no personal 
restraint upon himself, but by every possible sacrifice, he gave 
everything that he had to the success of that campaign. I do not 
agree with the spirit which indicates that his work has not been 
appreciated. The personal friendships then formed, and afterwards 
strengthened, he now cherishes, for he has told me that they are a 
treasure to him, and will be for the rest of his life. We who are as- 
sociated with him will likewise cherish them forever. 

The Democratic party, outside of a few newspaper criticisms, 
never failed to appreciate the wonderful energy which he put into 
the campaign, and the wonderful success with which he, as an indi- 
vidual, conducted it. I will say that from my personal knowledge, 
because for the last six weeks of the campaign I was under the 
orders of the Chairman, and passed most of my time here in this 
city, if it had not been his determination for the last nine months 
that he would not, under all the circumstances, undertake this work 
again, so far as I am personally concerned nobody would have 
taken preference in my mind to his candidacy for this place. I 
have never, in public or in private, failed to do justice, so far as I 
could, to the great services which Senator Brice contributed to the 
Democratic party in 1888. 

Gentlemen, turning to the future, it must be that we wish to 
organize in a wy which will bring to the support of the Democratic 
party the combined force of the intelligence, the sagacity and brains 
of all. 

Personal considerations with us allow of no possible weight in the 
presence of the triumph of principles in which we believe, and I 
know that there is not a man in this room who is not saying to him- 
self now, "We must all of us share in the work. The party looks 
to us for the political sagacity to conduct it to success." 

No man can do it alone ; but if I were asked to name half a dozen 
men in this party who could fill the office of Chairman of this Com- 
mittee acceptably, and execute its duties satisfactorily, I would 



198 APPENDIX. 

name three men, and those are the three men who have preceded 
me. My personal friendships for these three gentlemen dominate 
all political considerations in my mind. I cherish them as the 
dearest things in life. There is nothing in politics stronger than 
the personal affections which grow up between men standing to- 
gether for a common cause, and through good report and through 
evil report. 

Now, gentlemen, if I believed that we were allowing Senator 
Brice to take a back seat in this campaign, I would raise my voice 
in protest. Let us organize in such a way that we will stand to- 
gether, and we will organize in such a way that we will stand to- 
gether. Whoever is selected as the Chairman of this Committee 
will feel that we have done a wise thing in bringing together the 
leading spirits of the party, and all of us will feel that everything 
which can be done which will contribute to the success of the Dem- 
ocratic party will be done. 

MR. C. S. THOMAS, of Colorado : I only wish to detain the Com- 
mittee a moment by saying that we from the Far West, like those 
who have been more intimately associated with our distinguished 
Chairman, fully appreciate all that he has done for the party, and 
regret as deeply and poignantly as anyone can the conclusion and 
result which he has just announced. We have not been so inti- 
mately associated with the work of campaigns in the past, because 
the distance which separates us from the center of national political 
action has made it impossible. 

My experience, particularly, upon the National Committee, has 
made me feel that, with our present Chairman in charge of our 
campaign, the experience gathered by him four years ago would 
prove a great and sure foundation for success in this campaign. It 
was that feeling, and the desire to see our Chairman remain, not 
only because of the apparent necessity to the party, but also be- 
cause it would be a mark of the recognition and confidence which 
this Committee repose in him, regardless of what the outside world 
may say, that caused me to travel 3,000 miles for the purpose of 
casting my vote for him. I regret, as much as any one can, that 
the necessities of our Chairman's position make it necessary that 
he should come to this conclusion, and I hope I ought not to say 
"I hope," because I know that we shall find him by the side of 
whomever may be selected to preside over the destinies of this 



APPENDIX. 199 

Committee for the next four years, giving him that aid and that 
counsel which he himself has reaped from the experience of the 
past, and the result which we all hope to achieve may be as much 
due to his own efforts as those of the new organization. 

MR. ARTHUR SEWALL, of Maine (in the chair) : The matter be- 
fore the meeting is the resolution of Mr. Tarpey. Are you ready 
for the question ? All those in favor of giving the resolution pass- 
age will please manifest it by standing. 

The resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising 
vote. 

MR. CLARK HOWELL, JR., of Georgia : In the discussion, Mr. 
Chairman, incident to Mr. Brice's positive refusal to allow the use 
of his name, I do not believe that a word has been stated that does 
not voice the sentiment of Democracy from Maine to California. 
Therefore, in consideration of the remarks which have been made 
by Senator Gorman, Senator Ransom, Mr. Whitney and others, I 
move that the veil of secrecy be removed from so much of the pro- 
ceedings of this Committee as refers to the resolutions which have 
been adopted. I make this motion in justice to the Committee and 
in justice to the Chairman. 

This motion, being duly seconded, was put to a vote 
and carried. 

At this point Senator Brice resumed the Chair. 

THE CHAIR : Gentlemen, I thank you sincerely for the resolution 
to which I have listened, and the expressions of approval and appro- 
bation which have been made. I feel very much as those of us who 
have been at college did when commencement day came and we 
knew that it was necessary for us to part that the time had come 
when we must go out into the world and sever the connection 
which had previously existed. Then we could not help having 
some feeling at the thought of being separated, and could not help 
being moved by it. 

Now, we will proceed with the regular order of business, which is 
the selection of a Chairman of the National Democratic Committee. 
Nominations are in order for that office. 



200 APPENDIX. 

MR. WHITNEY: I nominate Mr. Harrity, from Pennsylvania, a 
member of the Committee from Pennsylvania, as Chairman of the 
Committee. 

THE CHAIR : Mr. Harrity, of Pennsylvania, is placed in nomi- 
nation. Are there any other nominations? 

There being no response, Mr. Tarpey, of California, 
said : 

I move that the nomination of Mr. Harrity be made by acclama- 
tion. 

This motion, being duly seconded by Mr. Clark 
Howell, Jr., of Georgia, was put to a vote and carried. 

Senator Brice then introduced Mr. W. F. Harrity, of 
Pennsylvania, as the Chairman of the Committee. Mr. 
Harrity said : 

Gentlemen of the Committee, I am extremely grateful for the dis- 
tinguished honor that you have, unworthily as I fear, bestowed upon 
me. The only remark that I can make at this time is the promise 
to give my best effort to aid in achieving success for our party, its 
principles and its candidates. They deserve success, and it will be 
your duty and mine, so far as lies in our power, to see that success 
is achieved. I confidently believe it will be. 

I am deeply sensible, gentlemen, of the great responsibilities that 
devolve upon me as the Chairman of the National Democratic 
Committee, and I am not at all unmindful of my own shortcomings. 
For this reason I shall need, and I shall not hesitate to ask for, your 
aid and your indulgence. I am sure I shall feel obliged to lean 
heavily upon the members of this Committee, and I firmly believe 
that each and all of you will give me your assistance and support 
throughout the campaign. 

I am prepared, gentleman, to entertain any suggestion, motion or 
resolution bearing upon the campaign upon which we have entered, 
or upon the business for which we are called together. 

MR. SMALLEY, of Vermont: I suppose that the next business in 
order will be the election of a Secretary. 



APPENDIX. 201 

THE CHAIR : What is the pleasure of the meeting? 

MR. SMALLEY : I nominate for the office of Secretary of the 
National Democratic Committee the present Secretary, Mr. Sheerin, 
of Indiana. 

MR. THOMAS, of Colorado : Four years ago the State of Colo- 
rado had the honor of placing Mr. Sheerin in nomination, and it 
simply craves the opportunity now to heartily second the same. 

THE CHAIR : Mr. Sheerin, of Indiana, has been nominated for 
the office of Secretary of this Committee. Are there any other nom- 
inations. 

A MEMBER : I move that Mr. Sheerin be elected by acclamation. 

This motion, being duly seconded, was put to a vote 
and unanimously carried. 

MR. SHEERIN, of Indiana : I thank you, gentlemen, for this high 
honor, and will do my utmost to discharge to your satisfaction the 
duties of the position to which you have elected me. 

THE CHAIR : The election of a Treasurer is next in order. 

MR. SHEEHAN, of New York : Without making any extended re- 
marks, I simply desire to name for this position the Hon. Robert 
B. Roosevelt, of New York City. I have known Mr. Roosevelt for 
a number of years, as doubtless many of the older members of this 
Committee have, and as the Treasurer properly comes from the 
City of New York, my judgment, and the judgment of those with 
whom I have talked on the subject, is that no better man for that 
position can be selected than Mr. Robert B. Roosevelt. 

Upon motion, duly made and seconded, Mr. Roose- 
velt was declared elected Treasurer of the Committee, 
by acclamation. 

Mr. Sheerin, of Indiana, offered the following resolu- 
tions : 

WHEREAS, Since the last meeting of this Committee it has pleased 
Almighty God to remove from our midst Hon. C. A. Broadwater, 
the member from the State of Montana, therefore be it 

Resolved, That in the death of Mr. Broadwater the Committee 
loses one who, in the short time he had been a member, had proven 



202 APPENDIX. 

his value to this body as a Democrat of unswerving loyalty, ener- 
getic and efficient in the performance of the duties pertaining to his 
position, and one whose death is a serious loss to the Democracy of 
his State and to the country. 

Resolved, That this expression of sorrow be spread upon the rec- 
ords of this Committee, and that the Secretary be instructed to 
transmit a copy of the same to the family of the deceased. 

This motion was unanimously adopted. 

THE CHAIR: The Chair desires to announce the appointment of 
the committee authorized under the resolution offered by Senator 
Gorman. The committee is to consist of Senator Gorman, Senator 
Pasco and Mr. Blair. 

MR. WHITNEY : I move the passage of four resolutions, which I 
will read, and before reading them let me say that they are the 
usual resolutions, with the exception of one, which, perhaps, needs 
a little explanation. Therefore, I will read it first. It provides for 
an Advisory Committee, for an Executive Committee the usual 
Executive Committee, and a Campaign Committee of the Executive 
Committee. It provides, also, for an Advisory Committee to be 
appointed, the number of which is to be determined by the Cam- 
paign Committee, which can be appointed from within or without 
the membership of the National Committee. It follows somewhat 
the practice in our State, in which we recognize that each cam- 
paign is to be treated by itself. We are accustomed to make up a 
Campaign Committee which is of a miscellaneous character. The 
candidates usually have two or three very earnest, active and zeal- 
ous friends who are willing to act upon that committee. It places 
in the power of the party a wider scope in selection of men who are 
willing to devote themselves to the work of the campaign, and, to 
my mind, it is the true way of organization. Perhaps I ought not 
to suggest it in the form of a regular resolution, but it seems to me 
that it is the proper thing for this Committee to organize in this 
manner. When we were discussing the question whether Mr. Brice 
should be made the Chairman of this Committee, it seemed to me 
that he ought to have a place on it, at least, where he should go, and 
others to whom we look for the success of the campaign should go, 
and take the responsibility of the position and the honor of the po- 
sition, and pull together for the success of the ticket. Now, I be- 
lieve there are men whom the Democracy of the country recognize 



APPENDIX. 203 

as skilled in the management of party affairs, who could serve upon 
an Advisory Committee, and whose services would be extremely 
valuable. I only go back to the campaign of 1876, because there I 
became intimately acquainted with that great man who was, to my 
mind, the greatest organizer that was ever in our party, Mr. Tilden. 
His campaign was run in his own house, without a paper hardly, 
but there he was thinking of the campaign at all times there he 
was to be found, day and night, in constant communication with 
the leading men of the party, and there it was that the brain work 
of the campaign was done. Let us have the benefit of the brains 
and experience of a number of our public men, a half a dozen or a 
dozen whose brain work we want for this fight. Let us place them 
in a position of honor, where they will find pleasure in the work 
which will bring success to the ticket. For that reason I have sug- 
gested the appointment of an additional committee. Perhaps the 
Secretary had better read the whole resolutions. 

The resolutions offered by Mr. Whitney were as fol- 
lows : 

Resolved, That the Executive Committee of the National Demo- 
cratic Committee shall consist of twenty-five members, who shall 
be designated by the Chairman of the National Committee, and 
that the Chairman of the National Committee shall be ex officio 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. 

Resolved, That the Campaign Committee of the National Demo- 
cratic Committee shall consist of nine members, who shall be desig- 
nated by the Chairman of the National Committee, the said Chair- 
man to be also one of the members of said Campaign Committee ; 
and that said Campaign Committee, when appointed, shall select its 
own Chairman from within or without the said Campaign Commit- 
tee, or from within or without the National Democratic Committee. 

Resolved, That the Advisory Committee of the National Demo- 
cratic Committee, which Committee the Chairman of the National 
Democratic Committee is hereby authorized to appoint, from within 
or without the membership of the National Democratic Committee, 
shall consist of such number of members as may be deemed proper 
by the Campaign Committee. 

Resolved, That the conduct and direction of the campaign of 1892 
shall be under the charge of the Chairman of the National Demo- 
cratic Committee and "of the Campaign Committee, subject to the 
approval of the Executive Committee of the National Democratic 
Committee. 



204 APPENDIX. 

THE CHAIR : You have heard the resolutions, gentlemen ; what 
is your pleasure ? 

Upon motion by Senator Brice, duly seconded, the 
resolutions were adopted as read. 

Mr. Thomas, of Colorado, then presented the follow- 
ing resolution, and moved its adoption : 

Resolved, That the sincere and earnest thanks of this Committee 
are hereby tendered to the Hon. C. J. Canda, for many years Treas- 
urer of the National Democratic Committee, for the able, conscien- 
tious and thorough manner in which he has discharged the duties of 
his office, and for the constant and unfailing courtesy which ever 
characterized his intercourse with its members. 

This resolution, being duly seconded, was unani- 
mously adopted. 

MR. BRICE, of Ohio : An Official Stenographer in 1888 was 
appointed Mr. Edward B. Dickinson who is now on his summer 
vacation, and who is not able to be present. He wrote me a letter, 
which I received a short time ago, and which, perhaps, I ought to 
have produced at this meeting. In that letter he stated that his 
business would not allow him this year, in consequence of his engage- 
ments in the courts and elsewhere, to do the work of this Committee, 
but I think a resolution somewhat similar to the one just offered on 
behalf of Mr. Canda is due to Col. Dickinson, because of the arduous 
and valuable services he has rendered in the four previous cam- 
paigns, and I move that a resolution be spread upon the records of 
this meeting expressing thanks to Col. Dickinson for his past services, 
and regretting that he cannot continue with us in the future. 

This motion, being duly seconded, was put to a vote 
and unanimously carried, and the following resolutions 
were directed to be spread upon the records of the 
Committee : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are due and are 
hereby tendered to Col. Edward B. Dickinson for his faithful and 
valuable services as Official Stenographer of the National Demo- 
cratic Committee, during the past sixteen years. 

Resolved, That this Committee learns with sincere regret that, 
owing to his official position in court, and to the pressure of his private 
business engagements, Colonel Dickinson will be unable to continue 
in the service of the Committee during the coming campaign. 



APPENDIX. 205 

MR. WHITNEY : I have been visited by a number of real estate 
men, and we have the option of one or two houses suitable for the 
headquarters of the National Democratic Committee. I think if 
we could get one soon, we ought to do it, and if we could open our 
headquarters before the Republicans do, that it would be a very 
good idea. Therefore, I move that the Chairman and Secretary be 
constituted a committee on headquarters. 

MR. BRICE : With power ? 
MR. WHITNEY : With power. 

This motion, being duly seconded; was put to a vote 
and carried. 

THE SECRETARY : I have a communication here which seems to 
be important, which I will read : 

NEW YORK, July 20, 1892. 
To the Members of the National Democratic Committee : 

GENTLEMEN: A committee representing New York Typograph- 
ical Union, No. 6, and Philadelphia Typographical Union, No. 2, de- 
sires to appear before your Committee on a matter relating to the 
printing trade. Please notify us by telegraph, at the rooms of the 
New York Typographical Union, 240 William Street, of the earliest 
date and hour when these committees can appear before you. 

Respectfully yours, 

GEORGE CHANCE, JOSEPH D. WELDRICK, 

President, No. 2. Treasurer, No. 6. 

WILLIAM J. BOLLMAN, WILLIAM McCABE, No. 6. 

Secretary, No. 2. C. M. MAXWELL, No. 6. 

JEFF. W. SMITH, F. J. KUSTENMACHER, No. 6. 

Chairman Bus, Com., No. 2. 

THE CHAIR : What disposition should be made of the communi- 
cation which has just been received. 

MR. SMALLEY, of Vermont : It seems to me that it would be good 
policy for this Committee to give that committee a hearing. I 
have not the slightest idea what they want, but they represent a 
very large and influential body. It is evident that we have got to 
take a recess to hear the report of the Committee on Contested 



206 APPENDIX. 

Seats. I think that they should be notified that they will be 
allowed to appear, at the convenience of the committee. I do not 
make that as a motion, because there are other gentlemen who 
know more about the matter than I. 

MR. SHEEHAN, of New York : I have been making some inqui- 
ries with reference to the subject matter addressed to the Secretary, 
which affects very materially the party in this State, and also other 
parts of the country. It seems to me that the desire is that all Dem- 
ocratic newspapers and newspaper organizations throughout the 
country should be unionized, if this Committee can bring it about. 
In view of the fact that the New York Tribune, which was for a 
long time what is called a " rat office," has been unionized as a Re- 
publican paper, I think we ought to do something in that direction. 
It also seems to me that if we are to do anything in that direction 
we cannot well do it in public. If you admit any gentlemen here 
and give them a hearing at this time, letting them specifically state 
their grievances against the newspapers, then all the owners of those 
papers will rebel at being compelled to accede to their demands. 
It seems to me that the matter might be referred to the Executive 
Committee, or to the Campaign Committee, and that these gentle- 
men might be notified that if they have any grievances against any 
newspapers, they might submit the same to that committee, either 
in person or in writing. 

THE CHAIR : Does the gentleman make that as a motion? 
MR. SHEEHAN : Yes, sir. 

THE CHAIR : It has been moved by the member from New York 
that the committee be notified that their communication has been 
referred to the Campaign Committee, and that that committee, 
when appointed, will fix a time and place for the hearing. 

This motion, being duly seconded, was put to a vote 
and carried. 

MR. RICHARDSON, of Iowa : I move, Mr. Chairman, that the 
Report of the Committee on Contested Seats in the National Demo- 
cratic Committee shall be accepted as final, when made. 

MR. DORAN, of Minnesota : I do not know what that committee 
has to say. I think we ought to know. 

MR. RICHARDSON, of Iowa : It is to prevent calling the Com- 
mittee together again to consider the question. 



APPENDIX. 207 

SENATOR PASCO, of Florida : It would seem to me tfiat, if we are 
to have another session of the Committee at this time, it would be 
far better to submit their report and let it be referred to the entire 
National Committee, and I hope the gentleman will withdraw his 
motion. I suppose there will be another meeting soon of this Com- 
mittee, and the committee to whom this matter has been referred 
can, probably, make their report at that adjourned meeting. 

MR. SHEEHAN, of New York : There probably will not be another 
meeting of this Committee before election. That resolution which 
was offered will have to be determined upon before that time, and, 
it seems to me, this committee, of which the eminent Senator from 
Florida is a member, can be trusted to decide the question upon its 
merits. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair ought to state that he will be absolutely 
unable to announce any committees this afternoon. It is a matter 
that will require considerable time, and the Chair will have to be 
assisted by experienced members of this Committee. I ought to add 
that it is my intention to make up the committees authorized to be 
appointed, at as early a time as practicable, and to announce them 
and convene them ; but it would be impossible to do that to-day. 

SENATOR PASCO, of Florida : It would seem to be necessary that 
the question should be decided at the present time, as to who the 
regular delegates in these two contested cases are. Why should we 
not let those cases be settled here now. Could not these gentlemen 
state their claims before the full Committee, and could we not 
decide at once ? 

THE CHAIR : The resolution already adopted would have to be 
reconsidered before that could be done. 

The original motion of Mr. Richardson, of Iowa, that 
the report of the Committee on Contested Seats should 
be accepted as final when made, was then put, and being 
duly seconded, carried. 

SENATOR PASCO, of Florida : I move that the resolution adopted 
by the National Democratic Convention, with reference to the 
restrictions to be made for the holding of the Convention in 1896, 
be adopted by this Committee. 



208 APPENDIX. 

THE CHAIR : As I understand it, that was a resolution adopted 
by the National Democratic Convention with reference to the 
restrictions to be made for holding a new National Convention, 
which provided that the matter should be referred to a sub-com- 
mittee of five, of which the Chairman should be one. 

MR. WHITNEY : If I understand the resolution that was referred to 
this Committee, it provided for the holding of a Convention in a small 
hall. In other words that there should not be any large audience. 
This Committee does not meet until a very short time before the 
National Democratic Convention meets. They meet for the pur- 
pose of considering where the next Convention shall be held. With 
an uncertainty as to how this Committee will act when the special 
committee reports, it leaves the question almost in as bad condition 
as it is now. If you are going to pass upon it, you can do it just as 
well now as at any other time. I think it would be wise to appoint 
a committee to report only a month or two before the Convention. 
When this Committee meets for the purpose of naming a time and 
place for the next Convention, it seems to me that that would be a 
very proper time for that committee to make a report, and for this 
General Committee to pass upon it at that time. 

SENATOR PASCO, of Florida : The National Committee will meet 
in 1896 for the purpose of making the arrangements. At that time 
the report of this committee will be made, and if the resolution 
which I have suggested is passed, that committee will then be ready 
to report, and that will settle the matter. The entire National 
Democratic Committee will have to act upon it. It will be time 
enough to determine the manner in which the National Convention 
shall be held. It will be a meeting called for that purpose, and at 
that time the sub-committee, which is to be appointed, will be 
ready with their report. There is no necessity for any action prior 
to that time. 

SENATOR GORMAN, of Maryland : The resolution offered by the 
Senator from Florida provides that the committee may be appointed 
and a determination arrived at early in 1893 or 1894. This Com- 
mittee will be called together at the close of the campaign, and, we 
all trust, on the fourth of March in Washington, if we are success- 
ful in electing our candidates. But this question ought to be deter- 
mined long before the meeting of the National Committee for the 
purpose of selecting a place, and preventing the unseemly struggle 



APPENDIX. 209 

which has occurred every four years among the various cities in 
their efforts to secure the Convention. I should like to have the 
resolution adopted with a view of having the whole matter deter- 
mined long before that time, the committee to report at some future 
meeting of this Committee. 

THE CHAIR : The motion is that the resolution offered by Gen- 
eral Collins in the National Democratic Convention with reference to 
the provisions for holding the next National Convention, the sug- 
gestion being made that it be held in a small hall, be referred to a 
committee of five of this Committee, to be appointed by the Chair, 
to report at a future meeting of this Committee, the Chairman of 
this Committee to be the Chairman of that committee. 

The motion, being duly seconded, was put to a vote 
and carried. 

Mr. Norris, of the District of Columbia, then stated 
that he proposed to offer a resolution relative to the 
Campaign Book, stating that a book had been prepared 
containing a number of speeches made on the floor of 
the House of Representatives on the tariff, in advocacy 
of lower duties. 

Upon motion of Mr. Doran, Mr. Norris consenting 
thereto, the matter contained in the resolution was 
referred to the Campaign Committee of the National 
Democratic Committee. 

MR. TARPEY, of California : I would like to ask what has been 
done by the Congressional Committee, if anything, in relation to 
the Campaign Text Book? Heretofore we have been furnished 
with that rather early in the campaign, and I think the earlier the 
better, because in places as remote as California we are required to 
have our ammunition in the magazines as early as possible. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair is unable to furnish any definite infor- 
mation as to that. I take it the Campaign Committee, when 
appointed, will immediately place itself in communication with the 
Executive Committee. Perhaps Senator Brice may have some in- 
formation on that subject ? 

14 



210 APPENDIX. 

SENATOR BRICE, of Ohio : No arrangements have as yet been 
made, so far as I know, that have resulted in the publication of any 
documents except speeches that have been made by Senators and 
Members of the House. Such speeches as are selected by the Con- 
gressional Committee for general circulation are being printed in 
large numbers, so as to respond to the demands of the kind of which 
the gentleman speaks. Nothing further than that has been done. 

A MEMBER : In reference to the Congressional Committee, I will 
state that we have prepared a text book for the use of speakers. 
That book is completed and printed, so that those books of the 
Congressional Committee will be distributed. That is a book in the 
neighboorhood of 100 pages, which has been prepared by Members 
of the House and of the Senate selected for that particular purpose. 
It is not a campaign book, but a book for the use of speakers, simi- 
lar to that issued by the Republicans. 

THE CHAIR: Are there any other motions or resolutions to be 
offered ? 

MR. TARPEY, of California : I would like to make a suggestion. 
Would it not be well to request the Secretary to correspond with 
the State Committeeman, the Chairmen of the State Committees of 
the respective States, and get from them the names and addresses 
of every member of the State Committees, and place them on file 
with this Committee as early as possible. 

THE CHAIR : The suggestion will be adopted. Are there any 
other suggestions ? 

A MEMBER: I would suggest that a list of the members of the 
National Committee, with their full addresses, be furnished each 
member. 

THE CHAIR : That will be done, I take it, just as soon as' the 
committees are appointed so that it may be complete. 

MR. RICHARDSON, of Iowa : I move that the Committee adjourn, 
subject to the call of the Chairman. 

MR. NORRIS, of the District of Columbia : I am here for the 
District of Columbia, and am ready now to adjust this matter. It 
can be done in a very few minutes. I have prepared a statement 
which, if your Committee will permit me, I will read. 



APPENDIX. 211 

THE CHAIR : That matter has already been referred to a sub- 
committee. What is the pleasure of the Committee? 

MR. DORAN, of Minnesota : We have passed on that already, I 
think. 

MR. WHITNEY : It occurs to me to make a suggestion, which I 
think will expedite the action of the Campaign Committee when 
appointed, and that is that every member of this Committee from a 
doubtful State, or a State which he considers doubtful, or the Com- 
mittee consider to be so, immediately upon arriving home, by con- 
ference with the Chairman of the State Committee, or by himself, 
make a report at once in writing to the Chairman of this Committee. 
The purpose of that, and its propriety, I think anybody well knows 
without any necessity of explanation. I make that motion. 

This motion, being duly seconded, was put to a vote 
and carried. 

MR. SEWALL, of Maine : I would like to have it understood, un- 
less objection is made, that the speeches made in response to the 
resolution of Mr. Tarpey, regarding your predecessor, be entered 
in full upon the minutes of this meeting. 

THE CHAIR : The Chair understands that that will be done. 

MR. TARPEY : I would like to say one wdrd of explanation. 
When I arose to offer that resolution I intended to have said some- 
thing regarding the resolution, but my emotions were greater than 
I was aware of, and I was obliged to present the resolution without 
any comment. 

MR. WHITNEY : I would like to have the motion I last made be 
understood to relate to every State in the Union. 

This motion, being duly seconded, was put to a vote 
and carried. 

Upon motion of Mr. Blair, of Kansas, the meeting 
adjourned, to re-convene at the call of the Chairman. 



212 APPENDIX. 

The following is a list of the National Democratic 
Committee, the Executive Committee, and the Cam- 
paign Committee of 1892 : 

NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE. 

Alabama Henry D. Clayton . . . Eufaula. 

Arkansas U.M.Rose... Little Rock. 

California M. F. Tarpey Alameda. 

Colorado Charles S. Thomas Denver. 

Connecticut Carlos French Seymour. 

Delaware Lewis C. Vandegrift Wilmington. 

Florida Samuel Pasco Monticello. 

Georgia Clark Howell, Jr Atlanta. 

Idaho Frank W. Beane Blackfoot, 

Illinois Ben. T. Cable Rock Island. 

Indiana.. Simon P. Sheerin Logansport. 

Iowa J. J. Richardson Davenport 

Kansas Charles W. Blair Leavenworth. 

Kentucky Thomas H. Sherley Louisville. 

Louisiana James Jeffries Rapides. 

Maine Arthur Sewall Bath. 

Maryland Arthur P. Gorman Laurel. 

Massachusetts Josiah Quincy Boston. 

Michigan Daniel J. Campau Detroit. 

Minnesota Michael Doran St. Paul. 

Mississippi Charles B. Howry Oxford. 

Missouri John G. Prather , St. Louis. 

Montana < . . . A. J. Davidson Helena. 

Nebraska Tobias Castor Lincoln. 

Nevada R. P. Keating Virginia City. 

New Hampshire Alvah W. Sulloway Franklin. 

New Jersey Miles Ross New Brunswick. 

New York William F. Sheehan Buffalo. 

North Carolina M . W. Ransom Weldon. 

North Dakota William C. Leistikow Grafton. 

Ohio Calvin S. Brice Lima. 

Oregon E. D. McKee Portland. 

Pennsylvania William F. Harrity Philadelphia. 

Rhode Island. Samuel R. Honey Newport. 

South Carolina M. L. Donaldson Greenville. 

South Dakota James M. Woods Rapid City. 

Tennessee Holmes Cummings Memphis. 

Texas ..., O. T. Holt Houston. 

Vermont Bradley B. Smalley Burlington. 

Virginia Basil B. Gordon Charlottesville. 

Washington Hugh C. Wallace Tacoma. 



APPENDIX. 213 

West Virginia John Sheridan Piedmont. 

Wisconsin E. C. Wall Milwaukee. 

Wyoming W. L. Kuykendall Saratoga. 

Alaska A. K. Delaney Juneau. 

Arizona Charles M. Shannon Clifton. 

District of Columbia James L. Norris Washington. 

New Mexico H. B. Ferguson Albuquerque. 

Oklahoma T. M. Richardson Oklahoma City. 

Utah Samuel A. Merritt Salt Lake City. 

Indian Territory 

OFFICERS. 

WILLIAM F. HARRITY, 
Chairman National Democratic Committee. 

SIMON P. SHEERIN, 
Secretary National Democratic Committee. 

ROBERT B. ROOSEVELT, 
Treasurer National Democratic Committee. 

DON M. DICKINSON, 
Chairman Campaign Committee. 

B. B. SMALLEY, 
Chairman Committee on Campaign Speakers. 

JOSIAH QUINCY, 
Chairman Committee oh Campaign Literature. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

M. F. TARPEY. CHARLES S. THOMAS. CARLOS FRENCH. 

SAMUEL PASCO. CLARK HOWELL, JR. J. J. RICHARDSON. 

CHARLES W. BLAIR. THOMAS H. SHERLEY. JAMES JEFFRIES. 

ARTHUR SEWALL. ARTHUR P. GORMAN. DANIEL J. CAMPAU. 

MICHAEL DORAN. CHARLES B. HOWRY. JOHN G. PRATHER. 

ALVAH W. SULLOWAY. MILES Ross. WILLIAM F. SHEEHAN. 

M. W. RANSOM. CALVIN S. BRICE. SAMUEL R. HONEY. 

HOLMES CUMMINGS. O. T. HOLT. BRADLEY B. SMALLEY. 

BASIL B. GORDON. 

WILLIAM F. HARRITY, S. P. SHEERIN, 

Chairman. Secretary. 

CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE. 

CALVIN S. BRICE. A. P. GORMAN. WILLIAM F. SHEEHAN. 

B. B. SMALLEY. M. W. RANSOM. B. T. CABLE. 

E. C. WALL. JOSIAH QUINCY. WILLIAM F. HARRITY. 

WILLIAM C. WHITNEY. 

DON M. DICKINSON, B. B. SMALLEY, 

Chairman. Secretary. 

COMMITTEE IN CHARGE AT CHICAGO. 

DON M. DICKINSON, Chairman, ex-officio. 
B T. CABLE, of Illinois. E. C. WALL, of Wisconsin. 



214 APPENDIX. 

The following is the official record of the proceedings 
of the committee appointed to notify the candidates, as 
furnished by Hon. Nicholas M. Bell, secretary of that 
committee : 

COMMITTEE OF NOTIFICATION. 

Committee met immediately after the adjournment of 
the Convention. Hon. Rufus N. Rhodes, of Alabama, 
was chosen temporary chairman, and Nicholas M. Bell, 
of St. Louis, Missouri, temporary secretary. Mr. Mc- 
Leary, of Texas, nominated Mr. Collier, of Tennessee, 
as chairman of the committee. Mr. White, of Califor- 
nia, nominated Mr. Wilson, Chairman of the Conven- 
tion, as chairman of the committee. After djscussion, 
Mr. Collier's name was withdrawn and Mr. Wilson was 
unanimously elected chairman of the committee : and 
upon motion of Gov. Houser, of Montana, Nicholas M. 
Bell, of St. Louis, Mo., was elected secretary, and the 
following members were present and answered to their 
names : 

Alabama Rufus N. Rhodes Birmingham. 

Arkansas B. R. Davidson Fayetteville. 

California Stephen M. White 

Colorado Frank Adams Gunnison. 

Florida W. D. Chipley Pensacola. 

Georgia John Triplett Thomasville. 

Idaho R. L. Johnson Boise City. 

Illinois Thomas M. Thornton Shelby ville. 

Indiana W. A. Cullop Vincennes. 

Kansas James W. Orr Atchison 

Kentucky John P. Salyer West Liberty. 

Louisiana A. W. Crandall New Orleans. 

Maine Edward C. Swett Portland. 

Michigan Richard A. Montgomery Lansing. 

Minnesota Charles M. Foote Minneapolis. 

Mississippi W. V. Sullivan 

Montana S. T. Houser Helena. 

Nebraska .John A. Crayton Omaha. 

Nevada.. . C. W. Hutchcliff. . , ..Austin. 



APPENDIX. 215 

New Hampshire Henry R. Parker Dover. 

New York. . : Norman E. Mack Buffalo. 

North Carolina Kope Elias Franklin. 

North Dakota Andrew Blewett Jamestown. 

Oregon Henry Blackman 

Pennsylvania J. Henry Cochran Williamsport. 

South Carolina T. D. Jerney, Jr Charleston. 

South Dakota Wm. Van Eps Sioux Falls. 

Tennessee Wm. A. Collier Memphis. 

Texas J. H. McLeary San Antonio. 

Vermont , Oscar C. Miller ; Newport. 

Virginia Abraham Fulkenson Bristol. 

Washington John Collins 

Wisconsin James Barden Superior. 

Wyoming Robert H. Homer Washington. 

Alaska James Sheakley 

Arizona E. E. Elwood 

District of Columbia Henry E. Davis 

New Mexico E. V. Long Las Vegas. 

Oklahoma T. M. Richardson 

Utah Henry P. Henderson 

ABSENT. 

Connecticut Robert J. Vance 

Delaware Robert J. Reynolds 

Iowa L. M. Martin 

Maryland L. Victor Baughman Fredericksburg. 

Massachusetts. . . Patrick Maguire Boston. 

Missouri James W. Walker St. Joseph. 

New Jersey George H. Barker 

Ohio R. R. Holden 

Rhode Island Fayette E. Bartlett 

On motion of Governor White, of California, Hon. 
W. C. Owens, temporary Chairman of the Convention, 
was invited to accompany the committee when it noti- 
fies the .nominees of their nomination. 

The following- resolution was offered by Hon. Mr. 
Chipley, of Florida, and adopted : 

Resolved, That the Chairman be requested to extend to the Na- 
tional Democratic Committee an invitation to be present when the 
official notification of the nominees of that Convention is made. 



216 APPENDIX. 

Upon motion of Mr. Chipley, of Florida, the Secre- 
tary was directed to cause an official copy of the Plat- 
form and the addresses of the committee to be properly 
engrossed and bound for the committee to present to 
each of the nominees. 

Upon motion of Hon. W. A. Cullop, of Indiana, the 
chairman was instructed to appoint a committee of five 
to wait on the nominees to learn when and where it 
would be their pleasure to receive the committee, and 
make such arrangements on the part of the committee 
as was necessary. 

The chairman appointed Hon. Norman E. Mack, of 
Buffalo, New York ; Hon. W. A. Cullop, of Indiana ; 
Hon. Robt. J. Vance, of Connecticut ; Hon. Patrick 
Maguire, of Massachusetts ; and Hon. Geo. H. Barker, 
of New Jersey. 

On motion of Mr. Collier, of Tennessee, the chair- 
man appointed a committee of three, consisting of Mr. 
Collier, Mr. McLeary, of Texas, and Mr. Foote, of Min- 
nesota, a committee to draft addresses for the com- 
mittee to the nominees for President and Vice-President. 

On motion of Mr. Chipley, of Florida, the committee 
adjourned, to meet at the call of the chairman. 

On July 8th, the Hon. W. L. Wilson, chairman, di- 
rected the secretary to call the committee to meet in 
New York City, at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, on July 20th, 
at ten o'clock, A. M. 

The committee met, pursuant to the call, at the time 
and place designated above. 

The Sub-Committee of Arrangements appointed, re- 
ported that the committee would publicly notify the 



APPENDIX. 217 

nominees of their nominations at the Madison Square 
Garden, at 8.30 p. M. that day, and that a local committee 
of one hundred citizens of the City and State of New 
York had been appointed a Committee of Arrangements 
to entertain the committee. 

The sub-committee to prepare addresses, presented 
their report of the two letters of the Committee of Noti- 
fication. They were duly signed. On motion of Mr. 
Chipley, of Florida, the secretary, Nicholas M. Bell, 
was directed at the proper time in the proceedings to 
read same, as the representative of the committee. 
Mr. White, of California, offered a substitute that the 
chairman of the sub-committee be requested to read 
the addresses of the committee ; on vote being taken 
the substitute was lost, the original motion as introduced 
by Mr. Chipley was adopted. The following invitation 
of the Manhattan Club was unanimously accepted : 

MANHATTAN CLUB, Fifth Avenue Hotel, July 19th, 1892. 

DEAR SIR: The Manhattan Club desires to invite through you, the members 
of the Notification Committee and their friends to a reception to be given at the 
Club House, Wednesday evening, 20th inst., immediately after the ceremonies at 
Madison Square Garden. 

Signed, 

D. P. GILLETT, Secretary. 
NICHOLAS M. BELL, ESQ., 

Secretary of the Committee of Notification, 

Fifth Avenue Hotel. 

The following resolution was offered by Mr. Cullop, 
of Indiana, and adopted : 

WHEREAS, At the National Democratic Convention, at Chicago, 
a resolution was unanimously adopted expressing sympathy with 
Hon. James G. Blaine in his late sad bereavement ;" 

Therefore be it Resolved, That the Secretary of the Convention 
and of this committee cause to be prepared an engrossed certified 
copy of said resolution, signed by the Chairman and Secretary of 
the Convention and the chairman of this committee, and transmit the 
same to the Hon. James G. Blaine. 



218 APPENDIX. 

The following- resolution was offered by Mr. R. 
Rhodes, of Alabama, and unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this committee be tendered to the 
chairman, Hon. W. L. Wilson, of Washington, D. C., and the sec- 
retary, Nicholas M. Bell, of St. Louis, Missouri, for the courtesies 
extended to the committee, and further 

Resolved, That the secretary be requested to have an additional 
copy of the Platform, engrossed and bound in the same manner as 
the copies already prepared for Mr. Cleveland and Mr. Stevenson, 
and presented to the Hon. W. L. Wilson, Chairman of the Conven- 
tion and chairman of the committee, as a compliment from the 
committee. 

Upon motion of Hon. Kope Elias, of North Caro- 
lina, the committee adjourned, to meet at 8 o'clock P.M., 
to attend the ceremonies at Madison Square Garden. 

The Committee, at 8 o'clock, met on platform at 
Madison Square Garden, and in the presence of fifteen 
thousand enthusiastic Democrats, and under circum- 
stances without precedent in political annals, Grover 
Cleveland and Adlai E. Stevenson were officially in- 
formed of their nominations for President and Vice- 
President of the United States. 

The following address was read by Hon. Nicholas 
M. Bell, Secretary of the Committee on Notification : 

Grover Cleveland, New York : 

As members of the Notification Committee delegated by the Xa 
tional Democratic Convention, which assembled in Chicago, June 
21, it is our agreeable duty to inform you that upon a single ballot 
you were unanimously nominated for the Presidency of the United 
States. 

Nothing could evince the affection and confidence in which you 
are held by the Democratic party more positively than the fact that 
you have three times been made its candidate for that office. Your 
devotion to the principles of the party of Thomas Jefferson, your 



APPENDIX. 219 

courageous, conservative and exemplary administration when the 
Chief Executive of the United States, and the prosperity of the 
country under that administration, have won for you the respect of 
every citizen. 

In the maintenance of the doctrines which you have so clearly 
expounded and so consistently advocated, and which form the basis 
of the declaration of principles formulated by the Democratic Con- 
vention which has again placed you in nomination, rests the hope 
of the people for constitutional government. They turn now to the 
Democratic party, that the blessings of civic and industrial liberty 
may be secured to them, and in response to the people's demand 
that party has chosen for its leader him whose public record con- 
veys the guarantee that the will of the people will not be thwarted. 

It is, then, not only with a sense of profound personal satisfac- 
tion, but also with the assurance that your nomination is welcomed 
by every man who feels the burden of unjust taxation, and the dis- 
tress of unwarranted legislative interference with the rights of the 
citizen, that we inform you of the action of the National Demo- 
cratic Convention, and submit herewith its declaration of principles. 

Firmly believing that there is no other safe repository for the 
liberties of the people and the welfare of the nation than the hands 
of a Democratic administration, we most heartily congratulate the 
country upon the opportunity presented by your candidacy for a 
return to the methods and measures of that party which has ad- 
ministered and will ever administer the Government for the good 
of our country and in the interests of the entire people. 

That our cause the people's cause will triumph we have no 
doubt, and, judging the future by the past, the administration which 
you will give to the people of the United States will be directed by 
wisdom, statesmanship, integrity and patriotism, and will cause 
your fellow Democrats to regard with the same pride and pleasure 
your future career as President of this great republic that they now 
enjoy in the remembrance of your former administration. 

We are, sir, respectfully yours, 

WM. L. WILSON, Chairman. 
NICHOLAS M. BELL, Secretary. 

R. N. RHODES, Alabama. H. R. PARKER, New Hampshire. 

B. R. DAVIDSON, Arkansas. G. H. PARKER, New Jersey. 

STEPHEN M. WHITE, California. N. E. MACK, New York. 



220 



APPENDIX. 



FRANK ADAMS, Colorado. 

R. J. VANCE, Connecticut. 

R. J. REYNOLDS, Delaware. 

W. D. CHIPLEY, Florida. 

J. T. RIPLET, Georgia. 

G. V. BRYAN, Idaho. 

T. M. THORNTON, Illinois. 

W. D. CULLOP, Indiana. 

L. M. MARTIN, Iowa. 

J. W. ORR, Kansas. 

J. P. SALYER, Kentucky. 

A. C RANDALL, Louisiana. 

E. C. SWETT, Maine. 

L. V. BAUGHMAN, Maryland. 

P. McGuiRE, Massachusetts. 

R. A. MONTGOMERY, Michigan. 

C. M. FOOTE, Minnesota. 

W. V. SULLIVAN, Mississippi. 

J. W. WALKER, Missouri. 

S. P. HAUSEN, Montana. 

J. A. CREIGHTON, Nebraska. 



KOPE ELIAS, North Carolina. 
ANDREW BLEWETT, North Dakota. 
R. R. HOLDEN, Ohio. 
HENRY BLACKMAN, Oregon. 
HENRY COCHRAN, Pennsylvania. 
F. E. BARTLETT, Rhode Island. 
T. D. JERVEY, JR., South Carolina. 
W. A. COLLIER, Tennessee. 
J. H. McLEARY, Texas. 

A. FULKENSON, Virginia. 
O. C. MILLER, Vermont. 
J. COLLINS, Washington. 

B. F. MARTIN, West Virginia. 
JAMES BORDEN, Wisconsin. 
R. H. HOMER, Wyoming. 

J. SHEAKLEY, Alaska. 

E. E. ELLINWOOD, Arizona. 

HENRY E. DAVIS, Dist. Columbia. 

E. V. LANG, New Mexico. 

H. P. HENDERSON, Utah. 

MR. JACKSON, Indian Territory. 



C. W. HINCHCLIFFE, Nevada. 

Speech of Hon. Wm. L. Wilson, Chairman of the 
Notification Committee of the National Democratic Con- 
vention, notifying Mr. Cleveland of his nomination, in 
Madison Square Garden, New York, July 20, 1892. 



Mr. Cleveland : 

We bring you, to-night, a message from the Democratic party. 
We come as a Committee of its National Convention, representing 
every Democratic constituency in the country, to give you official 
notification that you have been chosen as its candidate for the office 
of President of the United States. 

We are also charged with the duty of presenting you the platform 
of principles adopted by that Convention. This platform contains 
a full and explicit declaration of the position of the National Dem- 
ocratic party on the great political issues of the day ; but in all its 
utterances it is merely a development of one great principle, that 



APPENDIX. 221 

whatever governments and laws can do for a people must be done 
for all the people, without precedence of section or grades of citi- 
zenship. 

We believe that a government administered in this spirit, in such 
a country as ours, will secure a larger measure of freedom and pros- 
perity to its own people than has heretofore been possible in the 
world, and that it will be an example and an inspiration to all other 
people. To make and keep ours such a government to guard with 
jealous care the rights of equal citizenship to bear our freedom 
safely along the march of our material progress, unharmed by the 
mighty agencies that minister to that progress is the high and glo- 
rious duty of the Democratic party; a duty that commits it to never 
ending warfare with the strongest and most enduring forces of hu- 
man nature the lust of power and the lust of greed. These are the 
forces that in all other ages, and in almost all other lands, have put 
down freedom and brought government under their control, and 
that are seeking in our own land to add a greater victory and a 
richer prize to all the triumphs of the past. 

It is a dangerous thing for a political party to continue its exist- 
ence after the work which called it into being has been accomplished. 
It will inevitably pass as the political organization against which we 
contend has already passed, into the "service of the great special 
interests which everywhere strive to secure political power for their 
own advantage. Of the present policies of that party it may truly be 
said that they all tend to the centralization of political power in the 
Federal Government and the centralization of wealth in favored 
classes. Against both tendencies we fight, as against enemies of our 
freedom. We believe that the opportunities of material prosperity 
which our country offers, as never before in human history, are a 
part of that freedom, not to be staked on the issue of political bat- 
tles, or made the booty of party victories. The wealth that all may 
gain is not a menace but a strong buttress to free government. All 
men will protect what all may hope to acquire as the open prizes of 
industry, thrift and intelligence. But the wealth that comes from 
control and perversion of the power of taxation, that is gathered by 
unjust laws from the labor of the people, is a source of rightful dis- 
content and a growing peril to our freedom. As guardians of that 
freedom we plant ourselves upon the principle that the necessities 
of government are the beginning, and the necessities of government 
are the ending of just taxation. Whatever goes beyond this 



222 APPENDIX. 

increases the power of government at the expense of the liberties of 
the people. The government that deals with the citizen at long 
range, and, through officials not chosen by himself, will become his 
master ; the government that is carried on beneath his own eye, by 
his own chosen servants, and within reach of his own regulating and 
punishing arm, that government can be kept his servant. 

Yet we have but recently and barely escaped a successful effort to 
strike down the government that stands nearest the citizen, and to 
strip from the people in the States that right preservative of all 
other rights, the right of holding their own elections and of choos- 
ing their own representatives. 

Such, sir, are some of the issues of the campaign on which we are 
about to enter. They go to the foundation of our liberty. In this 
great contest your party has summoned you to be its leader. Four 
years ago, in the mid-career of a service that well deserved the high- 
est honors your countrymen could bestow, as we feel sure that it 
will receive the highest encomiums that history can award, you were 
struck down because as a Democrat you could make no terms with 
those who wished to plunder the people's treasury, or those who 
sought to perpetuate the passions of civil strife. Your countrymen 
will right that wrong. They will do it not for your sake alone, but 
for their own sake and the sake of the Republic. They have seen the 
fruits of that defeat in many forms of misgovernment. With an 
overflowing treasury they have seen taxes increased on the necessa- 
ries of life and the necessaries of labor, because private interests 
demanded it. They have seen that overflowing treasury emptied 
by extravagant expenditures and tricks of book-keeping resorted to 
to hide its emptiness from the people. They have seen an attempt 
to turn the gratitude of a great Nation into an electioneering fund for 
a political party, and service to that party in the conflicts of peace 
counts for more than service to the country in the conflicts of war. 
They have seen the Federal administration passionately attempt to 
destroy free elections in the States. They have seen the influence 
of our Government in its diplomatic and naval service thrown 
without rebuke against freedom and in favor of despotism in a 
struggling sister republic. And seeing all this they have lost no 
opportunity in the past four years to honor your administration by 
laying the heavy hand of punishment upon those who have thus de- 
parted from its spirit and its policies. 



APPENDIX. 223 

And now, sir, we put into your hands the commission of which we 
are bearers. It is the highest honor your party can bestow. It is 
the gravest call to duty your fellow Democrats can make. But we 
believe that we can assure you that there are no " weak, weary or 
despondent Democrats " in the ranks of our party to-day, and that 
with the people's cause as our cause, you will lead us to a victory 
in which the principles of, our party shall gloriously triumph, and 
the welfare of our country shall be mightily promoted. 

Mr. Cleveland replied as follows : 

Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen The message you deliver from 
the National Democracy arouses within me emotions which would 
be well nigh overwhelming if I did not recognize here assembled 
the representatives of a great party who must share with me the 
responsibility your mission invites. I find much relief in the reflec- 
tion that I have been selected merely to stand for the principles and 
purposes to which my party is pledged, and for the enforcement and 
supremacy of which all who have any right to claim Democratic fel- 
lowship must constantly and persistently labor. 

Our party responsibility is indeed great. We assume a momen- 
tous obligation to our countrymen when, in return for their trust 
and confidence, we promise them a rectification of their wrongs and 
a better realization of the advantages which are due to them under 
our free and beneficent institutions. 

But, if our responsibility is great, our party is strong. It is strong 
in its sympathy with the needs of the people, in its insistence upon 
the exercise of governmental powers strictly within the constitu- 
tional permission the people have granted, and in its willingness to 
risk its life and hope upon the people's intelligence and patriotism. 

Never has a great party, intent upon the promotion of right and 
justice, had better incentive for effort than is now presented to us. 

Turning our eyes to the plain people of the land, we see them 
burdened as consumers with a tariff system that unjustly and re- 
lentlessly demands from them in the purchase of the necessaries 
and comforts of life, an amount scarcely met by the wages of hard 
and steady toil while the exactions thus wrung from them build up 
and increase the fortunes of those for whose benefit this injustice is 
perpetuated. 



224 APPENDIX. 

We see the farmer listening to a delusive story that fills his mind 
with visions of advantage, while his pocket is robbed by the stealthy 
hand of high protection. 

Our workingmen are still told the tale, oft repeated in spite of its 
demonstrated falsity, that the existing protective tariff is a boon to 
them, and that under its beneficent operation their wages must in- 
crease, while, as they listen, scenes are enacted in the very abiding 
place of high protection that mock the hopes of toil and attest the 
tender mercy the workingman receives from those made selfish and 
sordid by unjust governmental favoritism. 

We oppose earnestly and stubbornly the theory upon which our 
opponents seek to justify and uphold existing tariff laws. We need 
not base our attack upon questions of constitutional permission or 
legislative power. We denounce this theory upon the highest pos- 
sible grounds when we contend that in present conditions its opera- 
tion is unjust and that laws enacted in accordance with it are 
inequitable and unfair. 

Ours is not a destructive party. We are not at enmity with the 
rights of any of our citizens. All are our countrymen. We are not 
recklessly heedless of any American interests, nor will we abandon 
our regard for them ; but invoking the love of fairness and justice 
which belongs to true Americanism, and upon which our constitu- 
tion rests, we insist that no plan of tariff legislation shall be toler- 
ated which has for its object and purpose a forced contribution from 
the earnings and income of the mass of our citizens, to swell directly 
the accumulations of a favored few ; nor will we permit a pretended 
solicitude for American labor, or any other specious pretext of be- 
nevolent care for others, to blind the eyes of the people to the 
selfish schemes of those who seek, through the aid of unequal tariff 
laws, to gain unearned and unreasonable advantages at the expense 
of their fellows. 

We have also assumed, in our covenant with those whose support 
we invite, the duty of opposing to the death another avowed scheme 
of our adversaries, which, under the guise of protecting the suffrage, 
covers, but does not conceal, a design thereby to perpetuate the power 
of a party afraid to trust its continuance to the untrammeled and 
intelligent votes of the American people. We are pledged to resist 
the legislation intended to complete this scheme, because we have 



APPENDIX. 225 

not forgotten the saturnalia of theft and brutal control which fol- 
lowed another Federal regulation of State suffrage ; because we 
know that the managers of a party which did not scruple to rob the 
people of a President would not hesitate to use the machinery cre- 
ated by such legislation to revive corrupt instrumentalities for par- 
tisan purposes ; because an attempt to enforce such legislation 
would rekindle animosities where peace and hopefulness now pre- 
vail ; because such an attempt would replace prosperous activity 
with discouragement and dread throughout a large section of our 
country, and would menace, everywhere in the land, the rights re- 
served to the States and to the people, which underlie the safe- 
guards of American liberty. 

I shall not attempt to specify at this time other objects and aims 
of Democratic endeavor which add inspiration to our mission. True 
to its history and its creed, our party will respond to the wants of 
the people within safe lines and guided by enlightened statesman- 
ship. To the troubled and impatient within our membership we 
commend continued, unswerving allegiance to the party whose prin- 
ciples in all times past have been found sufficient for them, and 
whose aggregate wisdom and patriotism, their experience teaches, 
can always be trusted. 

In a tone of partisanship which befits the occasion, let me say to 
you, as equal partners in the campaign upon which we to-day enter, 
that the personal fortunes of those to whom you have intrusted 
your banners are only important as they are related to the fate of 
the principles they represent and to the party which they lead. 

I cannot, therefore, forbear reminding you and all those attached 
to the Democrotic party or supporting the principles which we pro- 
fess that defeat in the pending campaign, followed by the consum- 
mation of the legislative schemes our opponents contemplate, and 
accompanied by such other incidents of their success as might more 
firmly fix their power, would present a most discouraging outlook 
for future Democratic supremacy and for the accomplishment of the 
objects we have at heart. 

Moreover, every sincere Democrat must believe that the interests 
of this country are deeply involved in the victory of our party in 
the struggle that awaits us. Thus patriotic solicitude exalts the 
hope of partisanship, and should intensify our determination to win 
success. 



226 APPENDIX. 

This success can only be achieved by systematic and intelligent 
effort on the part of all enlisted in our cause. Let us tell the people 
plainly and honestly what we believe and how we propose to serve 
the interests of the entire country, and then let us, after the manner 
of true Democracy, rely upon the thoughtfulness and patriotism of 
our fellow countrymen. 

It only remains for me to say to you, in advance of a more formal 
response to your message, that I obey the command of my party, 
and confidently anticipate that an intelligent and earnest presen- 
tation of our cause will insure a popular endorsement of the action 
of the body you represent. 

Ex-Gov. Stephen M. White, of California, delivered 
the following address to Adlai E. Stevenson, the nomi- 
nee for Vice- President : 

Mr. Stevenson : 



The Democratic party, recognizing your worth and popularity, 
has selected you as its candidate for Vice-President of the United 
States, and this committee, in obedience to the instructions of the 
National Convention, by which it was appointed, is present to notify 
you of your nomination. 

The circumstances attending the conferring of this honor are such 
as to augment the gratification which, in any event, would accom- 
pany the discharge of the duty which we are here to perform. The 
great organization in whose battles for the public welfare you have 
borne so conspicuous a part has emphatically manifested its unfal- 
tering approval of the enlightened and progressive administration 
with which you were for four years prominently identified. That 
period of our country's history has been compared by the American 
people with the record of the Presidential term which is approach- 
ing completion. To the contrast thus appearing the Democracy 
turns proudly and with confidence. 

This is an intelligent and a patriotic people. Intelligence and 
patriotism, guided by experience, must enable us to learn the truth 
with reference to partisan professions, and to accurately determine 
the various effects of divergent political policies. Time has furnished 
ample opportunity to study all pending questions of importance, 



APPENDIX. 227 

and a general sentiment resulting from more thorough education 
protests against an extravagant and partial tariff; against Federal 
control of elections ; demands governmental reform, and insures 
Democratic victory. 

Candid in our platform, rejoicing in the character and statesman- 
ship of our chosen leaders, conscious of the honesty and ability of 
those upon whose suffrages we must rely, we are prepared and 
anxious to meet the issue. We have nothing to fear, and can have 
nothing to regret. 

The unanimous expression of the committee will be presented by 
Hon. Nicholas M. Bell, its secretary. 

THE COMMITTEE TO MR. STEVENSON. 

Mr. Bell then read the formal notification to Mr. Ste- 
venson, as follows : 

Adlai E. Stevenson, Illinois : The National Democratic Con- 
vention, which assembled in Chicago, June 21, has directed us, the 
members of the Notification Committee, to inform you of your nom- 
ination upon the first ballot by that Convention for the Vice- 
Presidency of the United States. 

We are able to assure you that the honor has been conferred 
because the Democratic party has recognized in you a leader whose 
every public act has strengthened the party in the respect of the 
people. As an officer of the administration, as a pleader for Dem- 
ocratic principles, as a statesman who has sought to protect all the 
people in all their risks, you have long enjoyed the esteem of your 
immediate constituents and the confidence of the country at large. 

The declaration of principles formulated by the Convention which 
has placed you in nomination is herewith submitted, and it will, we 
have every reason to believe, from your public and private utter- 
ances, meet with your approval and invite your zealous advocacy. 

The mission which has been intrusted to us has been made all 
the more agreeable by the fact that your nomination has been re- 
ceived by the public with the most cordial approbation. 

In the high office for which you have been named by the unani- 
mous voice of the National Democracy, there will be called into 



228 APPENDIX. 

exercise those virtues and abilities which have ever marked your 
participation in the affairs of State. That you will employ them to 
the satisfaction of your party and your country, your past service 
to the people affords the unquestionable guarantee. 

In advising you of the action of the Convention, we beg to con- 
vey the assurances of our personal respect and good will. 
We are, sir, 

Yours respectfully, 

W. L. WILSON, Chairman. 
NICHOLAS M. BELL, Secretary. 

R. N. RHODES, Alabama. B. R. DAVIDSON, Arkansas. 
STEPHEN M. WHITE, California. FRANK ADAMS, Colorado. 

R. J. VANCE, Connecticut. R. J. REYNOLDS, Delaware. 

W. D. CHIPLEY, Florida. ' G. V. BRYAN, Idaho. 

J. T. RIPLET, Georgia. T. M. THORNTON, Illinois. 

W. D. CULLOP, Indiana. L. M. MARTIN, Iowa. 

J. W. ORR, Kansas. J. P. SALYER, Kentucky. 

A. CRANDALL, Louisiana. E. C. SWETT, Maine. 

L. V. BAUGHMAN, Maryland. P. McGuiRE, Massachusetts. 

R. A. MONTGOMERY, Michigan. C. M. FOOTE, Minnesota. 

W. V. SULLIVAN, Mississippi. J. W. WALKER, Missouri. 

S. P. HAUSEN, Montana. J. A. CREIGHTON, Nebraska. 

C. W. HINCHCLIFFE, Nevada. H. R. PARKER, New Hampshire. 

G. H. BARKER, New Jersey. N. E. MACK, New York. 

KOPE ELIAS, North Carolina. ANDREW BLEWETT, North Dakota. 

R. R. HOLDEN, Ohio. HENRY BLACKMAN, Oregon. 

HENRY COCHRAN, Pennsylvania. F. E. BARTLETT, Rhode Island. 

T. D. JERVEY, JR., South Carolina. W. A. COLLIER, Tennessee. 

J. H. MCLEARY, Texas. A. FULKENSON, Virginia. 

O. C. MILLER, Vermont. J. COLLINS, Washington. 

B. F. MARTIN, West Virginia. JAMES BORDEN, Wisconsin. 
R. H. HOMER, Wyoming. J. SHEAKLEY, Alaska. 

E. E. ELLINWOOD, Arizona. HENRY E. DAVIS, Dist. of Columb. 

E. V. LANG, New Mexico. H. P. HENDERSON, Utah. 

Reply of Hon. A. E. Stevenson to the address of 
Notification of his nomination as the Democratic candi- 
date for Vice- President. 

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Committee : I cannot too 
earnestly express my appreciation of the honor conferred upon me 



APPENDIX. 229 

by the great delegated assembly which you officially represent. To 
have been selected by the National Democratic Convention as its 
candidate for high office, is a distinction of which any citizen might 
well be proud. I should do violence to my own feelings, sir, should I 
fail to express my gratitude for the courteous terms in which you 
have advised me of the result of the deliberations of the Convention. 

Distrusting my capacity fully to meet the expectations of those 
who have honored me by their confidence, I accept the nomination 
so generously tendered. Should the action of the Chicago Con- 
vention receive the approval of the people, I shall, to the best of 
my humble ability, discharge with fidelity the duties of the impor- 
tant trust confided to me. 

Reference has been made in terms of commendation to the late 
Democratic administration. Identified in some measure in an 
important branch of the public service with that administration, I 
am gratified to know that it has in so marked a degree received the 
endorsement of the Democratic party in its National Convention. 
I am pursuaded that intelligent discussion of the issues involved in 
the pending contest for political supremacy, will result in victory 
to the party which stands for honest methods in government, 
economy in public expenditures, and relief to the people from the 
burdens of unjust taxation. 

I am not unmindful, Mr. Chairman, of the grave responsibilities 
which attach to the great office for which I have been named. I 
may be pardoned for quoting in this connection the words of the 
honored patriot, Thomas A. Hendricks, when officially informed 
that he had been designated by his party for the Vice-Presidency 
in 1884. He said: 

" I know that sometimes it is understood that this particular office 
does not involve much responsibility, and as a general rule that is 
so. But sometimes it comes to represent very great responsibilities 
and it may be so in the near future. The two parties in the Senate 
being so nearly evenly divided, the Vice- President may have to 
decide upon questions of law by the exercise of the casting vote. 
The responsibility would then become very great. It would not 
then be the responsibility of representing a District or a State. It 
would be the responsibility of representing the whole country, and 
the obligation would be to the judgment of the whole country. 
And that vote when thus cast should be in obedience to the just 
expectations and requirements of the people of the United States." 



230 APPENDIX. 

Should it please my countrymen to call me to this office, the high 
appreciation of its dignity and of its responsibilities as expressed 
in the utterances and illustrated in the public life of the eminent 
statesman whom I have mentioned will be a light to my own path- 
way. 

In the contest upon which we now enter we make no appeal to 
the passions, but to the sober judgment of the people. We believe 
that the welfare of the toiling millions of our countrymen is bound 
up in the success of the Democratic party. Recent occurrences in 
a neighboring State have sadly emphasized the fact that a high pro- 
tective tariff affords no protection, and tends in no way to better 
the condition of those who earn their bread by daily toil. 

Believing in the right of every voter to cast his ballot unawed by 
power, the Democratic party will steadily oppose all legislation 
which threatens to imperil that right by the interposition of Federal 
bayonets at the polls. 

In a more formal manner, hereafter, Mr. Chairman, I will indicate 
by letter my acceptance of the nomination tendered me by the 
National Democratic Convention, and will give expression to my 
views touching the important questions enunciated in its platform. 

Secretary Nicholas M. Bell, on behalf of the com- 
mittee, presented Mr. Cleveland and Mr. Stevenson with 
a handsome sealskin portfolio, which contained the 
formal address of notification, neatly engrossed, and 
signed by every member of the Notification Committee. 
Besides the address, it contained an engrossed copy of 
the Chicago platform, bound in white buckskin, and em- 
bellished with gold. 

On completion of the notification ceremonies, the 
Notification Committee, accompanied by Mr. Cleveland, 
Mr. Stevenson, the National Democratic Committee, and 
a large number of prominent Democrats, proceeded to 
the Manhattan Club reception. 



APPENDIX. 



231 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE LOCAL COMMITTEE 

OF NEW YORK CITY, 

IN REGARD TO THE CEREMONIES OF NOTIFICATION. 



A number of Democrats of the City of New York had 
been called together by the Hon. William C. Whitney, 
Hon. John T. Agnew and Hon. Hugh J. Grant, Mayor 
of the City, to form a Local Committee to act in con- 
junction with the Notification Committee in the matter 
of the notification proceedings. The gentlemen so 
called were Messrs. 



John H. V. Arnold, 
. R. Coudert, 
John M. Bowers, 
Patrick Divver, 
Charles T. Barney, 
Paul Dana, 
Simon Bernheimer, 
George Ehret, 
Edward Cooper, 
Charles S. Fairchild, 
J. Sergeant Cram, 
Elbridge T. Gerry, 
W. Bourke Cockran, 
Herman Oelrichs, 
Henry Hilton, 
O. B. Potter, 



George C. Clausen, 
E. Ellery Anderson, 
John F. Carroll, 
David Banks, 
Henry F. Dimock, 
David S. Brown, 
Timothy C. Eastman, 
Franklin Bartlett, 
Smith Ely, 
James S. Coleman, 
Frank T. Fitzgerald, 
Richard Croker, 
Thomas F. Gilroy, 
Rand. Guggenheimer, 
James H. Parker, 
Louis Heintz, 



John T. Agnew, 
Magrane Coxe, 
Samuel D. Babcock, 
Peter Doelger, 
Perry Belmont, 
Franklin Edson, 
C. C. Baldwin, 
James Everard, 
John C. Calhoun, 
Ashbel P. Fitch, 
John D. Crimmins, 
Henry Gunther, 
William R. Grace, 
Jos. J. O'Donoghue, 
George Hoadly, 
Charles B. Peet, 



232 



APPENDIX. 



G. G. Haven, 
George W. Plunkitt, 
John H. Inman, 
John Reilly, 
John Kelly, 
Samuel Spencer, 
Frank R. Lawrence, 
Ballard Smith, 
Theodore W. Myers, 
Walter Stanton, 
Cord Meyer, Jr. 
Nelson Smith, 
David McClure, 
Daniel F. McMahon, 
Martin T. McMahon, 
Jenkins Van Schaick, 
Delancey Nicoll, 
Sidney Webster. 



Henry D. Purroy, 
Edward P. Hagan, 
Herman Ridder, 
Eugene Kelly, 

E. D. Randolph, 
Joseph J. Little, 

F. L. Stetson, 
Arthur Leary, 
Nathan Straus, 
James J. Martin, 

J. Edward Simmons, 
Robert Maclay, 
William Salomon, 
Evan Thomas. 
Henry Villard, 
Eckstine Norton, 
James T. Woodward, 



John Hunter, 
Jacob Ruppert, 

D. Willis James, 
Robert B. Roosevelt, 
Patrick Keenan, 
James Stillman, 
William Lummis, 
John C. Sheehan, 
John A. McCall, 
Edward Schell, 
Henry G. Marquand, 

E. C. Schaefer, 
Jordon L. Mott, 
William P. Thompson, 
H. I. Nicholas, 

John R. Voorhis, 
Benjamin Wood, 



This committee met at the Governor's room, in the 
City Hall, on the 12th day of June, 1892. It organized 
by electing Samuel D. Babcock, Esq., chairman, and 
David McClure, Esq., secretary. 

\ committee consisting of Messrs. Whitney, Grant, 
Babcock and McClure, was appointed to confer with the 
Sub-Committee on Notification. This sub-committee 
of four met the Sub-Committee on Notification, and it 
was arranged that the details of the arrangements as to 
place of notification, and other matters connected there- 
with, should be put in the control of the local com- 
mittee. Thereupon, the latter local committee provided 
Madison Square Garden as the place where the notifi- 
cation ceremony should take place, and perfected all 
arrangements as to admission, decorations and music. 
Admission to the hall was free to all, tickets being nec- 
essary only for the stage, the capacity of which was 
limited, and certain of the boxes. The Manhattan Club, 



APPENDIX. 233 

of the City of New York, through the Local Committee, 
extended an invitation to Mr. Cleveland and Mr. Ste- 
venson, to the members of the National Committee and 
to the Committee on Notification to attend a reception 
to be held at the club house immediately following the 
notification proceedings at Madison Square Garden. 

In accordance with the arrangements made, Mr. 
Cleveland and Mr. Stevenson, and the members of the 
Notification and National Committees, met the Recep- 
tion Committee of the local committee at the Manhat- 
tan Club at 8 o'clock in the evening of July 20th. Mr. 
Cleveland, escorted by Messrs. Samuel D. Babcock and 
John T. Agnew, and the members of the Notification 
and National Committees by other members of the local 
Reception Committee, proceeded to Madison Square 
Garden. 



234 APPENDIX. 



LETTER OF HON. GROVER CLEVELAND, 

ACCEPTING THE DEMOCRATIC NOMINATION FOR THE PRESIDENCY. 



To Hon. William L. Wilson, and others, Committee, etc.: 

GENTLEMEN In responding to your formal notification of my 
nomination to the Presidency by the National Democracy, I hope I 
may be permitted to say at the outset that continued reflection and 
observation have confirmed me in my adherence to the opinions, 
which I have heretofore plainly and publicly declared, touching the 
questions involved in the canvass. 

This is a time, above all others, when these questions should be 
considered in the light afforded by a sober apprehension of the 
principles upon which our government is based, and a clear under- 
standing of the relation it bears to the people for whose benefit it 
was created. We shall thus be supplied with a test by which the 
value of any proposition relating to the maintenance and adminis- 
tration of our government can be ascertained, and by which the 
justice and honesty of every political question can be judged. If 
doctrines or theories are presented which do not satisfy this test, 
loyal Americanism must pronounce them false and mischievous. 

The protection of the people in the exclusive use and enjoyment 
of their property and earnings, concededly constitutes the especial 
purpose and mission of our free government. This design is so 
interwoven with the structure of our plan of rule that failure to 
protect the citizen in such use and enjoyment, or their unjustifiable 
diminution by the government itself, is a betrayal of the people's 
trust. 

We have, however, undertaken to build a great nation upon a plan 
especially our own. To maintain it and to furnish through its 
agency the means for the accomplishment of national objects, the 
American people are willing through federal taxation to surrender 
a part of their earnings and income. 



APPENDIX. 235 

Tariff legislation presents a familiar form of federal taxation. 
Such legislation results as surely in a tax upon the daily life of our 
people as the tribute paid directly into the hand of the tax-gatherer. 
We feel the burden of these tariff taxes too palpably to be persua- 
ded by any sophistry that they do not exist, or are paid for by 
foreigners. 

Such taxes, representing a diminution of the property rights of 
the people, are only justifiable when laid and collected for the pur- 
pose of maintaining our government, and furnishing the means for 
the accomplishment of its legitimate purposes and functions. This 
is taxation under the operation of a tariff for revenue. It accords 
with the professions of American free institutions, and its justice 
and honesty answer the test supplied by a correct appreciation of 
the principles upon which these institutions rest. 

This theory of tariff legislation manifestly enjoins strict economy 
in public expenditures and their limitation to legitimate public uses, 
inasmuch as it exhibits as absolute extortion any exaction, by way 
of taxation, from the substance of the people, beyond the necessi- 
ties of a careful and proper administration of government. 

Opposed to this theory the dogma is now boldly presented, that 
tariff taxation is justifiable for the express purpose and intent of 
thereby promoting especial interests and enterprises. Such a propo- 
sition is so clearly contrary to the spirit of our constitution and so 
directly encourages the disturbance by selfishness and greed of 
patriotic sentiment, that its statement would rudely shock our 
people, if they had not already been insidiously allured from the 
safe landmarks of principle. Never have honest desire for national 
growth, patriotic devotion to country, and sincere regard for those 
who toil, been so betrayed to the support of a pernicious doctrine. 
In its behalf, the plea that our infant industries should be fostered, 
did service until discredited by our stalwart growth ; then followed 
the exigencies of a terrible war which made our people heedless of 
the opportunities for ulterior schemes afforded by their willing and 
patriotic payment of unprecedented tribute ; and now, after a long 
period of peace, when our overburdened countrymen ask for relief 
and a restoration to a fuller enjoyment of their incomes and earnings, 
they are met by the claim that tariff taxation for the sake of pro- 
tection is an American system, the continuance of which is necessary 
in order that high wages may be paid to our workingmen and a 
home market be provided for our farm products. 



236 APPENDIX. 

These pretenses should no longer deceive. The truth is that such 
a system is directly antagonized by every sentiment of justice and 
fairness of which Americans are pre-eminently proud. It is also 
true that while our workingmen and farmers can, the least of all 
our people, defend themselves against the harder home life which 
such tariff taxation decrees, the workingman suffering from the im- 
portation and employment of pauper labor instigated by his pro- 
fessed friends, and seeking security for his interests in organized 
co-operation, still waits for a division of the advantages secured to 
his employer under cover of a generous solicitude for his wages, 
while the farmer is learning that the prices of his products are fixed 
in foreign markets, where he suffers from a competition invited and 
built up by the system he is asked to support. 

The struggle for unearned advantage at the doors of the govern- 
ment tramples on the rights of those who patiently rely upon 
assurances of American equality. Every governmental concession 
to clamorous favorites invites corruption in political affairs by en- 
couraging the expenditure of money to debauch suffrage in support 
of a policy directly favorable to private and selfish gain. This in 
the end must strangle patriotism and weaken popular confidence in 
the rectitude of republican institutions. 

Though the subject of tariff legislation involves a question of 
markets, it also involves a question of morals. We cannot with 
impunity permit injustice to taint the spirit of right and equity 
which is the life of our republic ; and we shall fail to reach our 
national destiny if greed and selfishness lead the way. 

Recognizing these truths, the National Democracy will seek by 
the application, of just and sound principles to equalize to our 
people the blessings due them from the government they support, 
to promote among our countrymen a closer community of interests 
cemented by patriotism and national pride, and to point out a fair 
field, where prosperous and diversified American enterprise may 
grow and thrive in the wholesome atmosphere of American industry, 
ingenuity and intelligence. 

Tariff reform is still our purpose. Though we oppose the theory 
that tariff laws may be passed having for their object the granting 
of discriminating and unfair governmental aid to private ventures, 
we wage no exterminating war against any American interests. We 
believe a readjustment can be accomplished in accordance with the 



APPENDIX. 237 

principles we profess without disaster or demolition. We believe 
that the advantages of freer raw materials should be accorded to 
our manufacturers, and we contemplate a fair and careful distribu- 
tion of necessary tariff burdens, rather than the precipitation of 
free trade. 

We anticipate with calmness the misrepresentation of our motives 
and purposes, instigated by a selfishness which seeks to hold in 
unrelenting grasp its unfair advantage under present tariff laws. 
We will rely upon the intelligence of our fellow countrymen to reject 
the charge that a party comprising a majority of our people is 
planning the destruction or injury of American interests; and we 
know they cannot be frightened by the spectre of impossible free 
trade. 

The administration and management of our government depend 
upon popular will. Federal power is the instrument of that will 
not its master. Therefore the attempt of the opponents of Democ- 
racy to interfere with and control the suffrage of the States through 
federal agencies, develops a design, which no explanation can miti- 
gate, to reverse the fundamental and safe relations between the 
people and their government. Such an attempt cannot fail to be 
regarded by thoughtful men as proof of a bold determination to 
secure the ascendancy of a discredited party in reckless disregard 
of a free expression of the popular will. To resist such a scheme 
is an impulse of Democracy. At all times and in all places we trust 
the people. As against a disposition to force the way to federal 
power, we present to them as our claim to their confidence and 
support, a steady championship of their rights. 

The people are entitled to sound and honest money, abundantly 
sufficient in volume to supply their business needs. But whatever 
may be the form of the people's currency, national or State whether 
gold, silver or paper it should be so regulated and guarded by 
governmental action, or by wise and careful laws, that no one can 
be deluded as to the certainty and stability of its value. Every 
dollar put into the hands of the people should be of the same 
intrinsic value or purchasing power. With this condition absolutely 
guaranteed, both gold and silver can be safely utilized, upon equal 
terms, in the adjustment of our currency. 

In dealing with this subject no selfish scheme should be allowed 
to intervene and no doubtful experiment should be attempted. The 



238 APPENDIX. 

wants of our people, arising from the deficiency or imperfect distri- 
bution of money circulation, ought to be fully and honestly recog- 
nized and efficiently remedied. It should, however, be constantly 
remembered that the inconvenience or loss that might arise from 
such a situation, can be much easier borne than the universal dis- 
tress which must follow a discredited currency. 

Public officials are the agents of the people. It is, therefore, their 
duty to secure for those whom they represent the best and most 
efficient performance of public work. This plainly can be best 
accomplished by regarding ascertained fitness in the selection of 
government employes. These considerations alone are sufficient 
justification for an honest adherence to the letter and spirit of Civil 
Service Reform. There are, however, other features of this plan 
which abundantly commend it. Through its operation worthy merit 
in every station and condition of American life is recognized in the 
distribution of public employment, while its application tends to 
raise the standard of political activity from spoils hunting and 
unthinking party affiliation to the advocacy of party principles by 
reason and argument. 

The American people are generous and grateful : and they have 
impressed these characteristics upon their government. Therefore, 
all patriotic and just citizens must commend liberal consideration 
for our worthy veteran soldiers and for the families of those who 
have died. No complaint should be made of the amount of public 
money paid to those actually disabled or made dependent by rea- 
son of army service. But our pension roll should be a roll of 
honor, uncontaminaled by ill desert and unvitiated by demagogic 
use. This is due to those whose worthy names adorn the roll, and 
to all our people who delight to honor the brave and the true. It 
is also due to those who in years to come should be allowed to 
hear, reverently and lovingly, the story of American patriotism and 
fortitude, illustrated by our pension roll. The preferences ac- 
corded to veteran soldiers in public employment should be secured 
to them honestly and without evasion, and when capable and 
worthy, their claim to the helpful regard and gratitude of their 
countrymen should be ungrudgingly acknowledged. 

The assurance to the people of the utmost individual liberty con- 
sistent with peace and good order is a cardinal principle of our 
government. This gives no sanction to vexatious sumptuary laws 
which unnecessarily interfere with such habits and customs of our 



APPENDIX. 239 

people as are not offensive to a just moral sense and are not incon- 
sistent with good citizenship and the public welfare. The same 
principle requires that the line between the subjects which are 
properly within governmental control and those which are more 
fittingly left to parental regulation should be carefully kept in view. 
An enforced education, wisely deemed a proper preparation for 
citizenship, should not involve the impairment of wholesome 
parental authority nor do violence to the household conscience. 
Paternalism in government finds no approval in the creed of De- 
mocracy. It is a symptom of misrule, whether it is manifested in 
unauthorized gifts or by an unwarranted control of personal and 
family affairs. 

Our people, still cherishing the feeling of human fellowship which 
belonged to our beginning as a nation, require their government to 
express for them their sympathy with all those who are oppressed 
under any rule less free than ours. 

A generous hospitality, which is one of the most prominent of 
our national characteristics, prompts us to welcome the worthy and 
industrious of all lands to homes and citizenship among us. This 
hospitable sentiment is not violated, however, by careful and reason- 
able regulations for the protection of the public health, nor does it 
justify the reception of immigrants who have no appreciation of our 
institutions and whose presence among us is a menace to peace and 
good order. 

The importance of the construction of the Nicaragua Ship Canal 
as a means of promoting commerce between our States and with 
foreign countries, and also as a contribution by Americans to the 
enterprises which advance the interests of the world of civilization, 
should commend the project to governmental approval and indorse- 
ment. 

Our countrymen not only expect from those who represent them 
in public places a sedulous care for the things which are directly 
and palpably related to their material interests, but they also fully 
appreciate the value of cultivating our national pride and maintain- 
ing our national honor. Both their material interests and their 
national pride and honor are involved in the success of the Colum- 
bian Exposition ; and they will not be inclined to condone any 
neglect of effort on the part of their government to insure in the 
grandeur of this event a fitting exhibit of American growth and 
greatness, and a splendid demonstration of American patriotism. 



240 APPENDIX. 

In an imperfect and incomplete manner, I have thus endeavored 
to state some of the things which accord with the creed and inten- 
tions of the party to which I have given my life-long allegiance. 
My attempt has not been to instruct my countrymen nor my party, 
but to remind both that Democratic doctrine lies near the princi- 
ples of our government and tends to promote the people's good. I 
am willing to be accused of addressing my countrymen upon trite 
topics and in homely fashion, for I believe that important truths 
are found on the surface of thought, and that they should be stated in 
direct and simple terms. Though much is left unwritten, my record 
as a public servant leaves no excuse for misunderstanding my belief 
and position on the questions which are now presented to the voters 
of the land for their decision. 

Called for the third time to represent the party of my choice in a 
contest for the supremacy of Democratic principles, my grateful 
appreciation of its confidence less than ever effaces the solemn 
sense of my responsibility. 

If the action of the Convention you represent shall be endorsed 
by the suffrages of my countrymen, I will assume the duties of the 
great office for which I have been nominated, knowing full well its 
labors and perplexities, and with humble reliance upon the Divine 
Being, infinite in power to aid, and constant in a watchful care over 
our favored Nation. 

Yours very truly, 

GROVER CLEVELAND. 
GRAY GABLES, September 26, 1892. 



APPENDIX. 241 



LETTER OF ACCEPTANCE OF HON. ADLAI E. 
STEVENSON. 



CHARLESTON, W. VA., Oct. 29, 1892. 
To the Honorable Wm. L. Wilson, Chairman, etc.: 

When in the presence of 20,000 of my countrymen I accepted the 
honor conferred upon me by the Convention over which you pre- 
sided, I promised to indicate by letter, in a more formal manner, 
my acceptance of the nomination tendered me by the assembled 
representatives of the Democratic party of the United States. 

Since that time I have been engaged continually in the discussion 
before the people, in many of the States of the Union, of the issues 
emphasized by the Convention and represented by our candidate, 
Grover Cleveland. Opportunity has thus been denied me to write 
with the care I would like the more formal answer promised to your 
committee. The full discussion of public questions, commonly ex- 
pected from a candidate for Vice-President, has been rendered less 
imperative by the complete presentation of the Democratic creed 
by the gentleman with whom I have the honor to be associated as a 
candidate on the National ticket. His treatment of the issues now 
before the country for discussion and settlement was so complete 
that I can do little more than indorse his position and give it the 
emphasis of my unqualified approval. 

The greatest power conferred upon human government is that of 
taxation. All the great struggles of the past for a broader political 
liberty have looked toward the limitation of this power by the right 
to tax a right which should always be limited by the necessities of 
government and to benefits which may be shared by all. When- 
ever this power is used to draw tribute from the many for the benefit 
of the few, or when part of the people are oppressed in order that 

16 



242 APPENDIX. 

the remainder may prosper unduly, equality is lost sight of, injustice 
hardens into precedent, which is used to excuse new exactions, and 
there arise artificial distinctions which the beneficiaries come to look 
upon, in due time, as vested rights sacred to themselves. 

It is plain that our present inequitable system of tariff taxation 
has promoted the growth of such conditions in our land, favored 
though it has been by an industrious and enterprising people, a 
friendly climate, a productive soil, and the highest development of 
political liberty. If the beneficiaries of this system shall be able to 
add a new tenure of power to those they have already enjoyed, the 
development of these unfavorable conditions must continue, until 
the power to tax will be lodged in those who are willing and able to 
pay for the perpetuation of privileges originally conferred by a con- 
fiding people for the preservation inviolate of their own govern- 
ment. 

There is no longer pretext or excuse for maintaining this war 
tariff in times of peace and more than a quarter of a century after 
armed conflict has ceased. The platform of the National Demo- 
cratic Convention demands the reform of this system and the adop- 
tion in its place of one which will insure equality to all people. I 
am in full and hearty accord with these purposes. 

The Convention also declared its position on the currency ques- 
tion in no unmeaning words when it said in its platform : 

" We hold to the use of both gold and silver as the standard money 
of the country, and to the coinage of both gold and silver without 
discriminating against either metal or charge for mintage, but the 
dollar unit of coinage of both metals must be of equal intrinsic and 
exchangeable value, or be adjusted through international agreement 
or by such safeguards of legislation as shall insure the parity of the 
two metals and the equal power of every dollar at all times in the 
markets and in payments of debts, and we demand that all paper 
currency shall be kept at par with and redeemable in such coin." 

To this plain and unequivocal declaration in favor of sound, honest 
money, I subscribe without reservation or qualification. A safe 
circulating medium is absolutely essential to the protection of the 
business interests of our country, while to the wage-earner, or to the 
farmer, it is all-important that every dollar, whatever its form, that 
finds its way into his pocket, shall be of equal, unquestioned and 
universally exchangeable value and of equal purchasing power. 



APPENDIX. 243 

Another issue of great moment in the pending contest is the Force 
Bill, the magnitude of which cannot be overestimated. It may 
mean the control of the election of the Representatives in Congress 
by the bayonet. The Republican party, by its acts in the Fifty-first 
Congress, and by its platform in its late National Convention, 
stands pledged to the passage of this bill. That it will pass when 
it has the power no sane man can doubt. To all our people who 
desire the peace and prosperity of our common country this ques- 
tion is all-important. 

Since my nomination I have been in eight of the] Southern and 
Southwestern States of the Union, and have talked with men of all 
classes and conditions there. I found a general apprehension of 
the evil which it is believed would result from the passage of the 
Lodge Bill or similar threatened legislation. I found that the in- 
dustries established by Northern capital during Mr. Cleveland's 
administration were in a languishing condition, that the immigra- 
tion of labor and the investment of capital invited to those States 
by their then peaceful condition had in a large measure ceased. 
The enactment of the Force Bill into law, while it would threaten 
the liberties of the entire people, would undoubtedly retard the ma- 
terial growth of the States at which it is especially aimed, would 
incite in many communities race troubles and invite retaliatory 
legislation, which would disturb property values and discontinue 
and destroy the security of Northern investments. And its reflex 
action upon the Northern States would result in a consequent loss 
of commercial and trade relations with the vast territory now be- 
coming tributary to this wealth and prosperity. 

I say nothing now of the inherent vice of the un-American and 
revolutionary spirit involved in the Lodge Bill, which was pro- 
nounced by a Republican Senator "the most infamous that ever 
crossed the threshold of the Senate." I appeal to the instinct of 
self-interest and to the sense of common justice in the American 
people. The era of good feeling and renewed commercial relations 
commencing with the election of Mr. Cleveland in 1884 should not 
be interrupted by the inauguration of a policy which tends to 
destroy popular representation and the purity of local self-govern- 
ment, which furnishes an instrument to discredited Federal power 
to perpetuate itself, which seeks to keep alive sectional jealousies 



244 APPENDIX. 

and strife, and which offers no excuse or palliation for its existence 
except the perpetuation in power of a political party which has lost 
public confidence. 

I accept the nomination tendered me, and should the action of the 
Convention meet the approval of my countrymen, will, to the best 
of my ability, discharge with fidelity the duties of the important 
trust confided in me. 

Very respectfully, 

A. E. STEVENSON. 



ERRATA. 



Page 4, line 7, for G. C. Posey, representative from New Mexico, 
read Neal B. Field. 

Page 13, afternoon session, line 5, for Charles L. Jewitt, read 
Charles L. Jewett. 



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