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Full text of "Official Program Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta"

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WMtam. 

LDEN GATE BRIDGE 

FIESTA 

FRANCISCO 

- - * JUNE i 

10 3 7 




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Official Souvenir Program 

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE FIESTA 

Celebrating the Opening of the World's Longest Single Span 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
MAY 27 to JUNE 2 1937 




Sponsored By 
GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE AND HIGHWAY DISTRICT 

REDWOOD EMPIRE ASSOCIATION 
AND THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Citizens' Committee 




Hon. Arthur M. Brown, Jr. 

General Chairman 




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With eager expectation, San Franciscans and the citizens of the 
Redwood Empire have looked forward to this day when the mighty 
Golden Gate Bridge would be opened to the traffic of the world. And 
now that this glorious enterprise is completed, rejoicing is in every heart. 

To you who have come from afar, we offer hospitality beyond 
measure. May the Bridge be a bond, uniting us ever in the bonds of 
brotherhood. 

To you in these Western States, particularly those who live in the 
glorious realms of the Redwood Empire, and who joined us in financing 
this incomparable structure, we share this hour of high satisfaction in the 
accomplishment. 

The Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta is a civic celebration in which you 
all are a part. We are all one, in spirit and in fact, in helping to make 
the occasion memorable. 

The curtain rises. The pageant unrolls. Voices are lifted in song. 

Let us lift up our hearts in thanksgiving. Let us give honor to whom 
honor is due; to those who conceived this mighty project and to those 
who made its building possible; to the engineers who designed it and 
the directors and management that built it. 

Let us pay tribute to the men whose hands actually constructed it. 

Let us remember, in deep sorrow, those whose lives were sacrificed 
in the course of its construction. 

We present a Fiesta we trust will prove worthy of the Bridge it glori- 
fies. We have done our best and now submit the finished work for your 
approval. 

Let us rejoice and be glad! 



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HON. ANGELO J. ROSSI 

Mayor of San Francisco 

Honorary Chairman, Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta 



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to Our Fiesta Quests 



Once more San Francisco lays claim to the admiration of the world. 

Across its Golden Gate stretches the bridge of steel so long deemed 
impossible. 

We have labored for months to make the Golden Gate Bridge 
Fiesta unique among great community festivals. And it is unique in the 
truest sense of the word. 

Here are gathered citizens of all the Western slope of this continent, 
citizens of Canada and Mexico and of great American States, and, 
above all, of our own beloved California, from the farthest reaches of 
its justly famed Redwood Empire to its remotest Southland. 

America's spectacular city welcomes you to marvel at its equally 
spectacular Bridge and to throw care to the winds that waft in through 
the Golden Gate while you revel in this most fascinating of all Fiestas. 

Now we are in the midst of a celebration of joy, triumph, and thanks- 
giving for the creation and completion of the miracle on which you gaze 
in wonder today. 

San Francisco is yours. You are welcome. And if you absorb a little 
of the spirit of what San Francisco has been, what it is, and, God willing, 
what it will become, it is our hope you will feel repaid for your coming. 



General Chairman 

Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta 

Citizens' Committee 





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ARTHUR M. BROWN, Jr. 

General Chairman Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta Citizens' Committee 



Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 




WARREN SHANNON 

San Francisco 

Director 



HUGO D. NEWHOUSE 

San Francisco 

Director 




WILLIAM P. FILMRR 

San Francisco 

Director and President of Board 



THOMAS MAXWELL 

Napa, Napa County 

Director 



A. R. O'BRIEN 

Ukiah, Mendocino County 

Director 




RICHARD J. WELCH 

San Francisco 

Director 




HARRY LUTGENS 

San Rafael, Marin County 

Director 



Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 




FRANK P. DOYLE 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma County 

Director 





Iohn p. Mclaughlin 

San Francisco 
Director 



ROBERT H. TRUMBULL 

Novato, Marin County 

Director and Vice-President 

of Board 




J. A. McMINN 

Healdsburg, Sonoma County 

Director 






ARTHUR M. BROWN, Jr. 

San Francisco 

Director 



HENRY WESTBROOK, Jr. 

Smith River, Del Norte Countv 

Director 



W. D. HADELER 

San Francisco 

Director 



Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District 

STAFF AND FORMER DIRECTORS 




W. W. FELT, Jr. 


GEORGE H. HARLAN 


ROY S. WEST 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 


San Francisco 


Sausalito 


San Francisco 


San Francisco 


Secretary 


Attorney 


Auditor 


Former Director 




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WILLIAM P. STANTON 

San Francisco 

Former Director 



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JAMES REED 

San Francisco 

General Manager 




FRANCIS V. KEESLING 

San Francisco 

Former Director 




MILTON M. McVAY 

Crescent City, Del Norte County 

Former Director 



JOHN RUCKSTELL 

San Francisco 

First Auditor 

(Deceased) 



ALAN MacDONALD 

San Francisco 

First General Manager 

(Deceased) 



CARL HENRY 

San Francisco 

Former Director 

(Deceased) 



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By J. LAWRENCE TOOLE 



BYRON tells us that "History with all its volumes 
hath but a single page." 

On that page can now be written a new and 
shining sentence, to endure forever in annals of the 
world's achievements and genius — The Golden 
Gate Bridge was opened. 

The biggest task that ever challenged the genius, 
courage and will of man has been accomplished. 
After nearly a century of dreaming, decades of 
talk, and five years of heroic labor, the Bridge 
stands here, the noblest structure of steel upon this 
planet. 

• • • • 

TO every stranger who sees it for the first time 
the wonder of its size, of its beauty and its 
grace will be an imperishable memory. They will be 
told its story and amazed. 

Generation after generation the story and en- 
chantment of the Golden Gate Bridge will be 
handed on by all who come under its spell. 

Custom will not stale, nor time wither the birth 
of this wonder structure today stretching across the 
mile-wide expanse of ocean water where San Fran- 
cisco's dramatic history began, the Golden Gate. 
The Golden Gate! 

Its glittering bars are the breakers high, 

Its hinges are hills of granite, 
Its bolts are the winds, its arch the sky, 

Its corner-stone a planet. 

Now, this day and forever, far above those high 
breakers there stretches between granite hills, under 
the arch of the sky, the mightiest single span bridge 
ever built, final accomplishment of an engineering 
achievement without equal or comparison. 

• • • • 

DEEP into Time goes back the dream of a bridge 
across the Golden Gate. 

Old, old Indian legends tell of a day when inland 
valleys and all of San Francisco Bay was a great 
lake and how, by prayer and supplication a miracle 
was performed and a great gap cleft between the 
lake and sea, that gap which is the Golden Gate. 
More or less, geologists agree that this happened 
although their theory of its happening does not 
agree with Indian legend. 

Somehow, some time, it happened, and through 
the ages that gap has been. Through it from time 
immemorable the Pacific Ocean has poured into the 
bay that was once a lake. 

Through it just 160 years ago a Spanish navigator, 



Ayala, steered the first ship ever to anchor in the 
Bay. Since then, led in the beginning by adventurous 
sailors bent on conquest, Spanish, Russian, English, 
ships and commerce of all the world have sailed 
and steamed through the Golden Gate in unceas- 
ing and ever increasing number, until today the 
Golden Gate Bridge looks upon one of the greatest 
commercial ports in the world. 

• • • • 

AYALA'S little ship "San Carlos" had found a 
bay empty, save for a few low-hewn craft, but 
a harbor of undreamed of magnitude and beauty, 
the harbor navigators had sought on this edge of 
the Pacific for 200 years before his discovery, and 
that the greatest navigator of all, Drake, had 
missed somehow by a few ship lengths. 

A year after Ayala's coming the Spanish soldier 
Anza arrived at the Golden Gate and planted a 
cross and the flag of Spain near the point now 
known as Old Fort Point — San Francisco terminal of 
the Golden Gate Bridge. 

There a tiny Spanish settlement started and grew. 
This settlement, springing up around the adobe 
church of the Mission Dolores and the adobe Span- 
ish officers' clubhouse of the Presidio, was not the 
beginning of San Francisco. 

Down near the Bay the little settlement of Yerba 
Buena had been started. In I 847 the name of Yerba 
Buena was changed to San Francisco, a year after 
the American flag had been raised in this city and 
at Monterey. 

At that time the total population of San Francisco 
was 470 and that it remained until 1849 and the 
discovery of gold. In that single year of 1849, 700 
ships sailed through the Golden Gate and San 
Francisco expanded to a city of more than 40,000. 

• • • • 

FROM those days, when daring adventurers flocked 
by untrodden land and sea trails to San Francisco 
Bay the dream of a Bridge across the Golden Gate 
persisted. Pioneers viewed the stretch of turbulent 
water that barred progress dry-shod to the north 
and longed for a bridge. Their dream grew, to die 
under the frowns of generations that declared it 
impossible, grew again as other generations grew, 
and died again. Always it came to life. And now at 
last it is realized. The realization of San Francisco's 
dream is before your eyes. 

• • • • 
r LSEWHERE in these pages is told the long story 



of the actual realization of that dream, of this 
welding of the great Redwood Empire of California 

(Continued on Page 27-A) 
9 




I 






MHHBI 




Greetings to the 

Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District 

from The Builders of the Bridge 



o 

o 



BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION 

Structural Steel Furnished and Erected 

JOHN A. ROEBLING & SONS CO. OF CALIFORNIA 

Manufacturing, Furnishing and Erection of Cables 

PACIFIC BRIDGE COMPANY 

Main Piers and Bridge Deck 

BARRETT & HILP 

Anchorages, Cable Housing, Pylons, Toll Plaza and Bridge Deck 

EATON & SMITH 

Presidio Approach Roads and Viaducts 

POMEROY, Inc., & RAYMOND CONCRETE PILE CO. 

Steel, Approach Spans 

ALTA ELECTRIC AND MECHANICAL COMPANY 

Electrical Work 



: 



The Fiesta Is Here!! 



IT WAS the great, jovial President Taft who coined 
that famous dictum: San Francisco knows how: 

This Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta is new proof of 
the truth of that saying. 

Fiesta minded from the days when that little 
huddle of shacks known as Yerba Buena was the 
nucleus of what became proud San Francisco, 
there runs through this city's history a golden thread 
strung with jewels of festivals. 

In the beginning, the color, animation and con- 
genital gaiety of Spanish don and senorita perme- 
ated San Francisco's Fiestas. 

Somewhat later, the boisterous, lusty ardor of 
adventurers lured to the Golden Gate by a golden 
dream, sharpened the growing city's outbursts of 
gaiety. 

And then, as San Francisco grew to maturity and 
its pulse steadied down to a rhythmic beat, its 
ardor for festivity slackened, but did not die. 

The colorfully dramatic, and sometimes sombre 
and tragic, processional of its workaday life since 
this century began has been broken again and 
again by celebrations and festivals that no one old 
enough to remember can forget. 

• • • • 

Where, and from what, San Francisco derived its 
deathless love of gaiety and good cheer and the 
high courage and spirit that has borne it triumph- 
antly through disaster and depression, it would be 
hard to say. 

The city itself is a pageant of spectacular beauty 
which fills the eye and lifts the soul to gladness. 

Indifferent to fate, Bret Harte decribed it, and 
hard to leave, Stevenson found it. 

Indifferent to fate it may be, but not indifferent 
to laughter and joy nor to festival that bubbles 
with life and gaiety. 

All its life it has been a place of pageants and 
fiestas. Always it has delighted to trick itself out in 
gay raiment and give itself up to jubilation. 

• • • • 

Its founding 160 years ago was made a festival, 
a festival procession of buck-skinned soldiers, 
bright-shawled Indian women and Franciscan padres 
bearing banners and holy pictures. A gay cavalcade 
and its first. 

Later in that same year another festival and the 
first public banquet, they called it a feast of thanks- 
giving, marked the completion of the Presidio, some 
of which still stands out there, guarded maybe by 
the ghosts of padres and conquistadors. 

A little later that same dead year the comple- 
tion of the first Mission Dolores was made occasion 
for fiesta. 

And of this there remains the words of the first 
festival reporter, Father Palou: "A procession was 
formed (after the Mass) in which Our Seraphic 



Father San Francisco, patron of the port, was car- 
ried. The function was celebrated with Salvos of 
muskets . . . and swivel guns (from the bark San 
Carlos) and with rockets." 

Translate rockets into fireworks, As it was in the 
oldest day so it is still with the San Francisco of 
1937 in festival mood; brilliant processions, caval- 
cades, fireworks, a people exuberantly happy, cos- 
tumed and gay. 

• • • • 

Time marched on in San Francisco, studded with 
festival and celebration until the first American 
house builder, Jacob R. Leese, caught the town's 
fiesta spirit and gave a party. 

It was a house-warming and all the town of 
Yerba Buena was invited. And every one living 
here at that time attended, soldiers and padres, 
Dons and Donnas, gamblers, horse thieves. 

For two whole days they danced and drank and 
most of a third day they gathered on Rincon Hill 
to eat barbecued ox and venison. 

That was in 1835, ten years before the Stars and 
Stripes was hoisted in Portsmouth Square and San 
Francisco's festival began to be less Castilian. 

Stream-lined have San Francisco's great festivals 
been in recent years, stirring the world's admira- 
tion, scarcely less than the city's brave and gallant 
recovery from the devastating havoc of the fire 
of 1906. 

Its still remembered Portola festival, its glad cele- 
bration of the return of its sons from war, the 
marvel days and nights of its Exposition, its brilliant 
celebration of California's Diamond Jubilee and 
many another civic outpouring of joy have risen in 
a smooth crescendo to this great climax, the 
Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta. 

Months ago San Francisco learned that this 
Bridge, greatest of all suspension spans, most spec- 
tacular in the world, flung across the world's most 
spectacular strait, would be finished in May. 

It was sensed that its completion and opening 
called for a celebration unparalleled in even San 
Francisco's history. This, a Citizens' Committee 
appointed by Mayor Angelo J. Rossi, undertook. 

• • • • 

Typical and characteristic was the construction 
of the Golden Gate Bridge, started and carried 
through while the entire nation was bowed by the 
worst depression in its history. 

Typical and characteristic of San Francisco too is 
this Fiesta of celebration conceived with a daring 
almost audacious and carried through with utmost 
spirit, energy and loyalty. 

San Francisco gave its word to the world the 
Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta would be the greatest 
and most colorful community celebration ever held 
in the West. It has, as always, kept its word. 



10- A 



The Engineering Staff 




JOSEPH B. STRAUSS 

Chief Engineer 

CLIFFORD E. PAINE RUSSELL CONE 

Principal Assistant Engineer Resident Engineer 

Below, center — O. H. Ammann, New York, consulting engineer; Prof. Charles Derleth, Jr., Berkeley, consulting 

engineer; Andrew C. Lawson, Berkeley, consulting geologist; Leon S. MoisseirT, New York, consulting engineer. 



11 



The Man Who Built the Bridge 



POET, dreamer, philosopher, a man like Lincoln 
endowed with a keen sense and confidence in Di- 
vine Providence, an equal of Joyce Kilmer in love 
and worship of trees and nature, and, like Napoleon, 
permeated with consciousness that no obstacle is 
insurmountable. . . . 

Such a man, in a nutshell of type, is Joseph B. 
Strauss, bridge builder extraordinary, creator and 
designer of the Golden Sate Bridge. 

A little man, almost a wisp of a man physically, 
but a giant mentally, is Chief Bridge Engineer 
Strauss. Now deep in his sixties his once dark and 
abundant hair has thinned and taken a lighter shade. 

Keen as they always were are his piercing and 
steady gray eyes, low and controlled and incisive as 
it has been since his youth is his voice, raised only 
when impelled by conviction. 

A pleasant little man, approachable as a child, 
loyal, with almost an Irish loyalty, to his job and to 
his friends. 

Many poems he has written in ink and heard 
small circles applaud. Now here at the Golden Gate 
he has written his greatest poem, a poem of incred- 
ible beauty etched in imperishable steel upon the 
sky, a poem which no small circle but all the world 
admires and applauds. 

More space than this page allows would be 
needed to outline the life story and achievements 
of this master engineer and all the honors that have 
been showered upon him. 

• • • • 

Born in Cincinnati he graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati in 1893. Later that university 
conferred on him the Degree of Doctor of Science. 
In 1894 he organized and became president of the 
Strauss Engineering Corporation. 

Since that time he has been in charge of design 
and construction of bridges all over the world. To 
his credit stand more than four hundred great steel 
bridges. 

He designed the Republican Bridge at Petrograd, 
formerly St. Petersburg, Russia; the Longview, 
Wash., bridge across the Columbia River; the beau- 
tiful bascule span of the famous Arlington Memo- 
rial Bridge at Washington, D. C, and many others 
of note. 

As Consulting Engineer to Port of New York 
Authority he shares credit for the Hudson River 
bridge and the Bayonne Arch at Bavonne, New 
Jersey. 

He is a member of many important societies of 
engineers in the United States and is consulting 
engineer for half a dozei foreign Governments 
stretched around the globe from the Republic of 
of Panama to Egypt. 

For more than twenty years the vision of a bridge 
across the Golden Gate has lived and grown in the 
thoughts of Poet-Engineer Strauss. He has lived with 
it, eaten with it, slept with it and dreamed of it. 



He saturated himself in the beauty of the Golden 
Gate and the majesty of the Redwood trees. 

All that before the city of San Francisco in 1917, 
asked him to tackle the problem of bridging the 
Gate, a problem generations of San Franciscans 
had regarded as insoluble and impossible. 

• • • * 

To the Heaven given brain and imagination of 
this great engineer no bridge job, however difficult, 
was impossible; no task a gifted brain and imagina- 
tion tackled insurmountable. 

In that spirit, bulwarked by vast learning and 
experience, this quiet, unobstrusive wisp of a man, 
Joseph B. Strauss, tackled his biggest job. 

And what a job it was that was put in his hands. 
To bridge a mile wide cleft in coast through which 
the Pacific Ocean poured into the Bay of San Fran- 
cisco in a turbulent ebb and flow of deep water. 

It just couldn't be done, he was warned. Jere- 
miahs of every class and kind and sort wailed. It can 
be done and it will be done, replied Indomitable 
Strauss. 

And it has been done. Through nearly five years 
of actual building, slowed and delayed often by 
elements no human can control, the work went on 
bit by bit until today the poet-engineer with the 
small voice can look at it and say to San Francisco 
and the world: Here is the bridge you thought 
impossible. 

• * * • 

In his office high up at III Sutter Street his 
best loved poem, "The Redwood Trees," hangs. 

But greatest of his poems is the Golden Gate 
Bridge which he hands over, complete and glorious, 
to the public this week, to find its niche awaiting in 
history. 

Sharing with Chief Engineer Strauss the glory of 
achievement of the longest and highest single sus- 
pension bridge ever built by man, is a group of 
engineers regarded as among the most brilliant in 
the United States. 

Principal assistant to the chief engineer was 
Clifford E. Paine, a graduate of the University of 
Michigan and an engineer of national reputation. 
Resident engineer during construction was young 
and smiling Russell Cone who nicks up the Golden 
Gate Bridge as the third of the world's big sus- 
pension bridges on his record. 

Consulting Engineers on the staff were O. H. 
Ammann of New York, who learned his engineering 
in Switzerland, is present chief engineer for Port of 
New York Authority and internationally famous as a 
bridge builder; Leon S, Moisseiff, graduate of Co- 
lumbia University and engineer of design for New 
York; Charles Derleth, dean of the College of 
Engineering at the University of California and 
Andrew C. Lawson, formerly professor of geology 
at the University of California. 




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12 



UBe ^Bridge of^Ages 



By GEORGE STERLING 



°£ 



Editors Note — The following prophetic poetical essay 
was written by George Sterling, -famed San Francisco 
poet, in 1925, when the Golden Gate Bridge was still 
"a dream." Now, 12 years later, the "dream" is a reality. 



H 



ow little did Portola dream, gazing down from 
the San Matean hills, of the long constellations of 
light that should girdle, nightly, the Bay below! 

How little did our own Argonauts, come hither to 
drain California of its gold and then return to what 
they fondly called "God's country," dream of the 
empire they were to found and of the royal city 
that was to be its standard-bearer! 

Let us not regard ourselves as greatly their supe- 
riors in vision, for we ourselves have but faintly 
conceived, since in the main they are inconceivable, 
the strength and splendor that await our California 
beyond the distant horizon of Time. 

We, too, are only at the beginnings of the glory 
to be. 

But whatever the beauty and opulence that the 
ages have in store for those who follow in our foot- 
steps, one thing at least is to be our changeless 
memorial, the criterion by which our inherited 
vitality and acquired artistry are to be judged in 
the councils of the Future. 

One testimonial is to stand unaltered in its mag- 
nificence, to bear witness to what manner of men 
were those who could dream with their souls and 
shape with their hands earth's most colossal fab- 
rication . 

From the first cave-man who, uneasily, made com- 
radeship with an equally suspicious fellow-man, to 
the last court of nations seeking hopefully the end 
of war and conquest, all the hidden and mysterious 
forces of the world have steadily worked for the 
closer communion of men, for their deeper com- 



prehension one of another, for their ultimate union 
in one vast brotherhood. 

The work begun by the first man to travel beyond 
his borders has been carried on by ship, telegraph, 
telephone and radio, until at last man may speak to 
man from the uttermost spaces of the planet. 

The winds of the world are no more universal, 
"the wings of the morning" no swifter. 

And part and parcel of this tremendous plan for 
mutual understanding and achievement is the 
Titanic edifice by which we purpose to link the most 
dynamic portions of America's imperial State. 

It is no light task to which we are setting our 
hands and minds. Nothing comparable to such a 
creation has been even attempted, thus far, by man. 
Matched with this tremendous span earth's other 
bridges seem the work of pigmies. Matched with 
the good it will accomplish, other bridges seem the 
pathway of ants. 

By our daring and endurance we are to drive a 
channel for the tides of uncounted generations, 
when the ocean of the resources of the North is to 
flow into the ocean of the treasures of , ,ie South, a 
canal not of water but of concrete and steel. 

Let us approach the work with a sense of awe, of 
reverence, remembering that hereby we are to 
bear witness to the faith in man that is within us, 
and to our devotion to that faith. 

Let us realize the almost incredible importance of 
an undertaking that is to knit together not merely 
cities but states, not millions of men but, eventually, 
billions. The future is ours as well as theirs to serve. 

Let us so turn us to the task that our fellows 
unborn, gazing on the sunset as it makes its vast 
rose-window below the arch of our Bridge, may say 
with all truth: "This is the eterna rainbow that they 
conceived and set to form, a promise indeed that 
the race of man shall endure unto the ages." 



12- A 



Xjfa/JiyniNi#M*tf MILK 




9 Excitement . . . thrills . . . the gaiety of the 
Fiesta inevitably bring their toll of fatigue. Keep 
up your pep with an occasional glass of cool, fresh 
milk. There are so many delicious ways to enjoy 
this wholesome, healthful food drink. Perhaps you 



prefer a long, frosty milk-shake, a refreshing glass 
of buttermilk, a "pick-up" chocolate milk, or simply 
good fresh milk as you enjoy it at home. 

San Francisco's milk supply is of the highest 
quality standard. Drink it . . . it's your treat. 



MILK DISTRIBUTORS OF SAN FRANCISCO 



13 




DO YOU REMEMBER THE GOLDEN GATE WHEN— 




OUTSIDE LOOKING IN — TODAY 




BEAUTY FRAMES IT NOW 
13-A 



Dutch Boy Makes History! 




PLUGS HOLE IN DYKE 

"I can keep this up for weeks" he says, "as long as they 
keep feeding me Red Cap, Best Pal, or Love Nest candy bars 

You too will appreciate the delicious flavor and extra quality of these 
tasty, energy filled Euclid candy bars. 

LOVE NEST ^he wor 'd's most delicious Nut Roll, filled with crunchy 
nuts and caramel candy. 

BEST PAL Tempting rich caramel and appetite teasing cocoanut 
covered with fresh milk chocolate. 

RED C A P Roasted Spanish Peanuts rolled in creamy fudge and 
covered with pure milk chocolate. 



rom 




Fiesta Boys" 



^Buyfi 



THE EUCLID CANDY CO. 

OF CALIFORNIA, INC. 

RED CAP . . . BEST PAL . . . LOVE NEST CANDY BARS 



14 



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innnnrinnrinnnrtnnririnnrin^^ 

Official Fiesta Program 

MAY 27 - JUNE 2, INCLUSIVE 



TUESDAY, MAY 25 

8:00 P.M.— Radio Stars' Show. Civic Auditorium. The 
Pacific Coast's leading radio stars and masters of cere- 
mony in three hours of entertainment. Chairman, Fred 
Pabst. 

First official appearance of Fiesta Band. Director, 
Phil Sapiro. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 

8 A.M. to 8 P.M. — Arrival of Cavalcade Units — from 
Canada, Mexico, Western States and California Coun- 
ties. Informal parades up Market Street from Embar- 
cadero. Receptions by Mayor Angelo J. Rossi at City 
Hall. 

12 Noon to 12 Midnight — Industrial and Manufacturers 
Exposition. Dreamland Auditorium, Post and Steiner 
Streets. Displaying the diversified products of Cali- 
fornia in colorful exhibits. Floor shows at 2:45 P.M. and 
8:45 P.M. Admission 25 cents. 

12 Noon — City-wide Fiesta Luncheon. Bal Tabarin Cafe. 
Held under auspices of San Francisco Advertising Club. 
Welcome to guests, visiting dignitaries and Fiesta 
officials. 

2-4 P.M. — Review of Junior Traffic Patrol. Civic Audi- 
torium. Guest Patrols from Northern California cities. 
Guest Band: Provo, Utah, High School. 

8:00 P.M. — Fiesta Costume Ball and '49er Fandango. 
Coronation of Queens; Gala Mardi Gras. Only those in 
costume admitted to floor of Auditorium. Mayor Rossi 
and Chairman Arthur M. Brown, Jr., to crown queens 
from 19 Northern California Counties. Introduction of 
film stars from Hollywood. Hugo D. Newhouse, Chair- 
man. 

THURSDAY, MAY 27 

Opening of Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta 

6 A.M. to 6 P.M.— PEDESTRIAN WALK ON GOLDEN 
GATE BRIDGE. The Bridge will open simultaneously 
on the San Francisco and Marin sides — the only day the 
Bridge will be exclusively reserved for pedestrians. 
Souvenir Pedestrian Day tickets 25c on sale at Manx 
Hotel and Toll Plaza on San Francisco side. 

All Day — Pacific Coast Championship Bowling Tourna- 
ment, Golden Gate Recreation Parlors, 115 Jones Street. 
H. Alten, Chairman. 

All Day — Pacific Coast Invitational Handball Tournament. 
Y.M.C.A. Courts, Golden Gate Ave. and Leavenworth. 
Fay Bowman and John Condon, Chairmen. 

10:00 A.M.— SPECTACULAR DAY PARADE from Van 
Ness Ave. and Union St., north on Van Ness to Fran- 
cisco Street, west to Franklin Street, north to Bay Street, 
west to Buchanan Street, north to Marina Boulevard and 
thence west to Crissy Field, at the Presidio. All the color 
and romance of the West passing in thrilling review. 

12 Noon to 12 Midnight — Industrial and Manufacturers 
Exposition in Dreamland Auditorium, Post and Steiner 
Streets. Display of California Products. Floor Shows at 
2:45 P.M. and 8:45 P.M. 

3:30 P.M. — Native Sons' and Daughters' Ceremonial. Toll 
Plaza of the Bridge. An impressive ritual by the grand 
officers of the order under the direction of J. Hartley 
Russell, Grand President. 

4:00 P.M. — Hard-Rock Drilling Championship Contest 
preliminaries. Crissy Field at the Presidio. 



8:30 P.M.— DAZZLING DRAMATIC PAGEANT, "The 
Span of Gold," with JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, 
famous baritone, and cast of 3000. An empellished His- 
torical Pageant of the History of California from primi- 
tive times to statehood — presented in eight stirring 
episodes climaxing in the breath-taking illumination of the 
Bridge for the first time — the greatest Pageant ever seen 
in the West — bringing to life the very spirit of the Fiesta 
— staged in an incomparable setting in the world's largest 
outdoor theatre at Crissy Field in the Presidio. Tickets 
$2 and $1 — all seats reserved — colorful costumes — capti- 
vating music — beautiful girls and the gayest of dancing 
scenes. 

10:00 P.M. — Gorgeous Display of Fireworks, Crissy Field. 

FRIDAY, MAY 28 

OPENING OF GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 
TO TRAFFIC 

All Day — Pacific Coast Championship Bowling Tourna- 
ment, 115 Jones Street. 
All Day — Pacific Coast Invitational Handball Tournament. 

Y. M. C. A. Courts, Golden Gate Ave. and Leaven- 
worth Street. 

9:30 A.M. — Dedication of Marin Approach to Golden 
Gate Bridge on Marin County side as newest link in 
the Redwood Empire's state highway system. Sponsored 
by Redwood Empire Association and attended by Gov- 
ernors of Western States, representatives of foreign 
nations and other dignitaries. Speeches by Governor 
Frank F. Merriam, Mayor Rossi and others in official 
party. "Hands Across the Golden Gate" ceremony. 
Harry G. Ridgway, Chairman. 

10:15 A.M. — International California Redwood Log- Bar- 
rier Sawing Contest at Marin County Bridgehead, open- 
ing Marin Approach to traffic. Contestants: Paul Searles, 
Longview, Wash., winner of Pacific Logging Congress 
title; Myron Higbee, Kellogg, Idaho, champion of Idaho; 
and Ray Shuller, Eureka, champion of the California 
Redwoods. 

10:30 A.M. — Chain-cutting Ceremonial on Golden Gate 
Bridge at Marin Tower, marking San Francisco-Marin 
County line. Participants: Mayor Rossi, William P. Fil- 
mer, President of Golden Gate Bridge and Highway 
District, and Frank P. Doyle, Bridge Director and 
Treasurer of Redwood Empire Association. 

10:50 A.M. — Floral Gate Ceremonial on Toll Plaza at 
south Bridgehead on San Francisco side; Fiesta Queens 
garlanded with flowers, will form living gate, which 
will be opened to official party following presentation of 
the completed Golden Gate Bridge to the Golden Gate 
Bridge and Highway District by Chief Engineer Joseph 
B. Strauss, and acceptance by William P. Filmer, Presi- 
dent of Bridge District. 

1 1 :00 A.M. — Massed flight over Bridge by 500 planes 
from Navy aircraft carriers Ranger, Lexington and 
Saratoga and battleships 60 miles out at sea. The great- 
est massed air flight ever made over San Francisco 
with planes in battle formation. 

9:30-11:15 A.M. — Review of Colorful Cavalcades from 
Canada, Mexico, Western States and California Coun- 
ties at Crissy Field in the Presidio. Reserved seats to 
grandstands $1.00. 

11:30 A.M. — Bridge Opening Ceremonies at Crissy Field. 
Francis V. Keesling, former Bridge Director, speaker of 
the day. Talks by Joseph B. Strauss, chief engineer, 
leading clergymen, officials and distinguished guests. 
Chairman Arthur M. Brown, Jr., presiding. 



3 



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(Continued on Page 15-A) 



JULfULOJL2JLOJLOJlJUULJ^^ 

14-A 






^•ANGELO HOSSt.Wft V °L 







VTCI5R 

^f TRADE ^ MARK J| ^^ 



E dedicate this page to all of the men whose 
engineering genius — ability — and loyalty made 
this magnificent dream become a reality and 
express our gratification that VICTOR welding 
and cutting equipments were among the chosen 
tools. 

YicIoR Equipment Gompan/ 

WELDING EQUIPMENT DIVISION 
844-50 Folsom St. 3821 Santa Fe Ave. 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES 



FIESTA PROGRAM (Continued) 



° 

° 



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12 Noon — Opening of Golden Gate Bridge to Traffic. 
Accompanied by booming of cannons, and blowing of 
whistles all over San Francisco and Marin County. 
Traffic will move over Bridge simultaneously from San 
Francisco and Marin County sides. 

12 Noon to 12 Midnight — Industrial and Manufacturers' 
Exposition. Dreamland Auditorium, Post and Steiner 
Streets. Colorful display of California's varied products, 
etc. Floor Shows at 2:45 and 8:45 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. — Official Fiesta Luncheon to visiting dignitaries. 
Commercial Club, 465 California Street. 

1:30 P.M. — Hard-rock Drilling Contest Preliminaries. 
Crissy Field. Participants: Miners from Mother Lode and 
other mining districts of California and Nevada. 

2-5:30 P.M. — Fashion Shows, Entertainment. All down- 
town stores. 

2:30 P.M. — North Coast Council Meeting, California State 
Chamber of Commerce. 

3 P.M.— ARRIVAL OF UNITED STATES FLEET. The 
Flightiest armada ever concentrated in an American port 
in peace-time. All the capital ships of the Navy led by 
the battleship Pennsylvania with Admiral Arthur J. 
Hepburn, Commander-in-Chief of the Fleet. 

3:30 P.M. — Boat Ride on San Francisco Bay for visiting 
dignitaries. 

6:30 P.M. — North Coast Council, California State Cham- 
ber of Commerce dinner. 

8:00 P.M. — Russian Children's Festival, Potrero Hill 
Neighborhood House, 953 De Haro Street. 

8:00 P.M. — Professional Wrestling Bouts, Civic Audi- 
torium. 

8:30 P.M. — DAZZLING, DRAMATIC PAGEANT, 
"The Span of Gold," with JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, 
famous baritone, and cast of 3000; symphonic orchestra 
of 100 pieces, directed by Charles Hart. An outstanding 
feature of the Fiesta. Staged at Crissy Field in the 
Presidio. 

10:00 P.M. — Grand Fireworks Display. Illumination of 
Bridge. 

SATURDAY, MAY 29 

All Day — Yacht Regatta. Yachting races, Power Boat 
races, and other water attractions. Start and finish lines 
off Yacht Harbor at the Marina. 

All Day — Pacific Coast Championship Bowling Tourna- 
ment, 115 Jones Street. 

All Day — Grand Russian Yarmarka (Russian Fair), Sig- 
mund Stern Grove, Sloat Boulevard and Nineteenth 
Avenue. Depicting a bit of old Russia before the revo- 
lution and the part Russians have played in the History 
of San Francisco. Displaying Russian art and culture — 
Native Russians in costumes presenting folk songs, 
dances and versatile entertainment. Take No. 17 or 
No. 12 car direct to grove; also K car. 

All Day — Pacific Coast Invitational Handball Tournament. 
Y. M. C. A. Courts, Golden Gate Ave. and Leaven- 
worth Street. 

All Day — Marvelous Marin Fiesta. All Marin County holds 
"Open House" — Street singing, dancing, entertainment 

A.M. and P.M. — U. S. Navy Intership Baseball Cham- 
pionship, City Play. 7th and Harrison Streets, Chestnut 
and Buchanan Streets, 17th and Carolina Streets. 

1 1 A.M. — Arrival at San Francisco Municipal Airport of 
Aerial Cavalcades from all sections of Pacific Coast. 

12 Noon to 12 Midnight — Industrial and Manufacturers' 
Exposition. Dreamland Auditorium, Post and Steiner 
Streets. 

1 P.M. — Northern California Championship Horseshoe 
Pitching, Golden Gate Park. 

2:00 P. M— Frontier Days Wild West Show, Crissy Field. 
Wild West roping and shooting — Hard-Rock hand- 
drilling contest, a really old-time thrilling competition 
revived — and for the championship of the West. Also 
an Internatoinal Redwood Log-Sawing contest never 
seen before in any metropolis. Admission 50 cents. 



2:00 P.M. — Tennis Exhibitions, Golden Gate Park Courts. 

6:00 P.M. — Reception to U. S. Fleet and Representatives 
of Visiting Nations by the Army-Navy Club. 

8:00 P.M.— ILLUMINATED NIGHT PARADE. From 
Van Ness Ave. and Union, north on Van Ness to Fran- 
cisco ,west to Franklin, north to Bay, west to Buchanan, 
thence north to Marina Boulevard to Crissy Field. More 
than 100 gorgeous floats, 100 bands — marching units, 
soldiers, sailors, marines — the whole line of march ILLU- 
MINATED. Passing in review at Crissy Field and end- 
ing in a most spectacular display of fireworks. Admission 
to grandstands $1.00. All seats reserved. 

10:00 P.M. — Grand Labor Ball. Civic Auditorium, with Al 
Jolson, Parkyarkarkas, Victor Young, Thelma Leeds, 
Tiny Ruffner and Walt Roesner. Given for the families 
of those who died that the Bridge might be built. Under 
auspices of the Fiesta Committee and Golden Gate 
International Exposition. Proceeds to go to bereaved 
families of workers. Admission $2.50 and $1.00. 

10:00 P.M. — Illumination by Fleet. 

10:00 P.M. — International Night. San Francisco's world 
famed, glamorous, colorful foreign colonies to entertain 
with songs, dances and suppers in their individual char- 
acteristic national style. Everyone welcome. 

SUNDAY, MAY 30 

All Day — Russian Yarmarka. Sigmund Stern Grove. 

All Day — Pacific Coast Invitational Handball Tournament 
Finals, Olympic Club. 

All Day — Championship Bowling Tournament, 115 Jc.nes 
Street. 

8:00 A.M. — Championship Pistol Shoot. Chairman- — Cap- 
tain of Police Charles Goff; Fort Funston Pistol Range, 
off Skyline Boulevard one-half mile south of Fleish- 
hacker Pool. Police Department, Navy and Army Teams 
competing. Prizes — Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta Plaques 
and gold, silver and bronze medals. The crack marks- 
men of the West in competition for first honors. 
Admission free. 

9:00 A.M. — Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta Skeet and Trap 
Shooting Championship, Lake Merced, off Skyline 
Boulevard 1 mile south of Fleishhacker Pool. The 
world's champion shot gun experts vie for valuable 
prizes and highest honors. Chairman, Joseph Springer. 
Prizes, silver and gold, silver and bronze medals. 

A.M. and P.M. — U. S. Navy Inter-Ship Baseball Cham- 
pionship. 

10:00 A.M. — Yacht Races for smaller classes. In San Fran- 
cisco Bay off Marina. Entries from the entire Pacific 
Coast vie for valuable prizes. Can be seen from shore- 
line of both sides of bay. Chairman, Clifford Smith. 

10:00 A.M. — Northern California Horse Shoe Pitching 
Championship, Golden Gate Park. Men and women 
contestants. Prizes Fiesta Silver Cup Trophies. Chair- 
man, A. F. Heuer. 

10:30 A.M. — Massed Air Flight of Los Angeles Sheriff's 
Posse Squardon and Los Angeles Women's Auxiliary 
Corps and San Diego Sheriff's Air Posse. 

11:00 A.M. — Special Worship. All Churches. Army-Navy 
participation. 

1 1 :00 A.M. — California Cup Competition Soccer Games, 
Ewing Field, Masonic Avenue near Geary Street. 
Douglas Aircraft of Los Angeles versus Union Espanola 
of San Francisco. Don Cameron, Chairman. 

12 Noon to 12 Midnight — Industrial and Manufacturers' 
Exposition. Dreamland Auditorium, Post and Steiner 
Streets. 

12 Noon — Gala Yacht Parade in San Francisco Bay, off 
Marina. 

1 :00 P.M. — California Soccer Championship Cup Games, 
Ewing Field, Masonic Avenue near Geary Street. 

1:30 P.M. — Baseball, Seals vs. Oakland. Double header. 
Seals Stadium, Sixteenth and Bryant Streets. 



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(Continued on Page 16-A) 



15-A 



The Sport Thrill of the Fiesta!! 

MIDGET 
AUTOMOBILE RACES 

(on America's fastest short track) 

aL} 

MOTORDROME 

MONDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 31st 

2:30 P. M. 



12 EVENTS INCLUDING THE 

MAIN EVENT OF 50 LAPS 

Crashes ! Smashes ! Thrills ! 

Cream of the Pacific Coast Big Track Drivers In a Terrific 
Duel for the Championship of the Fiesta 

DONT MISS THIS EVENT! 



Reserved Seats 

75' 

Phone Reservations Now to Motordrome, VAlencia 9676 

By street car — take Municipal "H" or White Front car No. 25. 

By auto — South on Tenth street to Potrero, south on Potrero to Jerrold, left on Jerrold 
to Motordrome. 





ADMISSION PRK 


Bleachers 


Grand Stand 


Adults 25/ 


Adults 55^ 


Children lO/ 


Children %5/ 



16 



2:00 P.M. — Memorial Services honoring the memory of 
those men killed in building the Bridge — a ceremony 
of religious character, with children from all the schools 
in San Francisco and representatives of Organized 
Labor participating. 

(a) Ceremonies at Crissy Field. 

(b) Unveiling of plaque. 

(c) Prayer for dead on Bridge. School children will 
drop garlands into the waters flowing under the 
Bridge. 

2:00 P.M. — Pacific Amateur Association Individual Swim- 
ming Races. Chairman, Gus Rissman. Fleishhacker Pool 
at Ocean Beach, south of Golden Gate Park. Swimming 
Races for men and women. Special races for Navy men. 
Diving exhibition by Miss Marjorie Gestring, 1936 
Olympic Games Women's Low-Board Diving Cham- 
pion, and Miss Ruth Jump, Women's National High- 
Board Champion. 

2:45 P.M. — California Soccer Championship Cup Ties, 
Ewing Field, Masonic Avenue near Geary Street. 

3:00 P.M. — Marin Music Chest, Forest Meadows, San 
Rafael. The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, Pierre 
Montoux conducting, and the glorious voice of John 
Charles Thomas, baritone. 
00 P.M. — Illumination by Fleet. 
00 P.M. — Massed Band Concert, Civic Auditorium. 

8:30 P.M. — Final Performance of the Dramatic Pageant, 
"The Span of Gold," in Redwood Grove Theatre at 
Crissy Field, with JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, MAR- 
GARET O'DEA and cast of 3000. 

10:00 P.M. — Gorgeous Fireworks Display and Illumina- 
tion of Bridge. 

MONDAY, MAY 31 

All Day — Pacific Coast International Handball Tourna- 
ment. 

All Day — Pacific Coast Championship Bowling Tourna- 
ment, 115 Jones Street. 

All Day — United States Navy Inter-Ship Baseball Cham- 
pionship. Continuing games at city playgrounds at 
7th and Harrison Streets, Chestnut and Buchanan 
Streets and 17th and Carolina Streets. 

9:00 A.M. — Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta Skeet and Trap 
Shooting Championship, Lake Merced, off Skyline 
Boulevard, one mile south of Fleishhacker Pool. 

9:30 A.M. — Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta Marathon Relay. 
Starting at Court House, San Rafael, Marin County, 
over Golden Gate Bridge and finishing about 1 1 A.M. 
at Crissy Field, San Francisco. Teams consist of 5 run- 
ners each. Distance 18 miles. Prizes: Golden Gate 
Bridge Fiesta gold, silver and bronze medals. Chairman, 
A. Maggiora. 

All Day — Russian Yartnarka (Russian Fair), Sigmund 
Stern Grove, Sloat Boulevard and Nineteenth Avenue. 
A picturesque spectacle of old Russian life and costumes. 
Take No. 17 or No. 12 cars. 

10:00 A.M. — Decoration Day Parade by United States 
Veterans and Decoration of Graves at Presidio. Line of 
march from Van Ness Avenue via Lombard Street to 
National Cemetary at Presidio. Committee Chairman, 
James B. McSheehy. 

10:00 A.M. — Northern California Championship Horse 
Shoe Pitching, Golden Gate Park. 

10:00 A.M. — Pacific Coast Championship Rowing Regatta. 
Course of race: Golden Gate Bridge to St. Francis 
Yacht Club at the Marina. Best club crews in the West 
participating. Prizes: Pacific Oarsmen Association tro- 
phies and medals. Chairman, Henry Kantner. 

10:00 A.M. — Golden Gate Invitational Swim. Starting at 
Lime Point, Marin County. Finishing about 10:30 A.M. 
Fort Point Presidio, San Francisco. Distance about one 
mile. Fourteen best local open-water swimmers compet- 
ing. Prizes: Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta fold medal to 
each swimmer finishing the race. Chairman, George 
Lineer. 



10:15 A.M.— Junior Colleges and High School 12-Oar 
Cutter Pulling Races. Course: Golden Gate Bridge at 
St. Francis Yacht Club at the Marina. Prizes: Golden 
Gate Bridge Fiesta bronze medals. Chairman, W. 
Lenhart. 

11 A.M., 1 P.M., 2:45 P.M.— California Soccer Champion 
Cup, Ewing Field, Masonic Avenue near Geary Street. 

12 Noon — Firing of National Salute at Presidio. 

12 Noon to 12 Midnight — Industrial and Manufacturers' 
Exposition. Dreamland Auditorium, Post and Steiner 
Streets. 

1:30 P.M. — Baseball, San Francisco Seals vs. Oakland. 
Double header. Seals Stadium, Sixteenth and Bryant Ste. 
Walter Mails, Master of Ceremonies. 

1:30 P.M. — Grand Military Parade. The Eleventh Cavalry 
from the Presidio at Monterey consisting of 500 mounted 
soldiers — officers and enlisted men from the Fleet — the 
largest naval marching unit ever seen in San Francisco 
— colorful National Guard battalions — California Grays, 
Boy Scouts, Sea Scouts, semi-military organizations pass 
in review before Crissy Field grandstand. Line of march 
from Van Ness Avenue and Union Street, north along 
Van Ness to Francisco, west to Franklin, north to Bay 
Street, west to Buchanan, north to Marina Boulevard, 
and thence west to Crissy Field to reviewing grand- 
stands. Admission free to grand-stands. 

2:30 P.M. — Midget Motor Races at Motordrome, Bayshore 
Boulevard and Army Street. All the thrills and spills of 
auto racing. Popular prices. 

3:00 P.M. — United States Navy 12-Oar and 8-Oar Cutter 
Pulling Races. Man-of-War Row, San Francisco Bay 
south of Ferry Building. Crews from battleships and 
cruisers. Prizes: Olympic Club Trophy for 12-oar bat- 
tleship crews; Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta Trophy for 
8-oar cruiser crews. Chairman, Joseph Hickey. 

8:00 P.M. — Illumination by Fleet. 

8:30 P.M. — Professional Prize Fights. Feature bouts. Civic 
Auditorium. 

TUESDAY, JUNE I 

All Day — Pacific Coast Championship Bowling Tourna- 
ment, 115 Jones Street. 
All Day — U. S. Navy Inter-Ship Baseball Championship, 

City Playgrounds. Admission free. 

12 Noon to 12 Midnight — Industrial and Manufacturers' 
Exposition. Dreamland Auditorium, Post and Steiner 
Streets. 

2:30 P.M. — Children's Spring Festival, Crissy Field at the 
Presidio. Under auspices of San Francisco Recreation 
Commission. 15,000 children in gala, colorful, inspiring 
Folk Songs, Dancing, Music and Sparkling Entertain- 
ment. Adults 25 cents, children 10 cents. 

4:00 P.M. — Presentation of Plaque of General Liggett to 
the City of San Francisco by Army and Navy Club (City 
Hall). Presented by Commodore George Bauer, presi- 
dent, Army and Navy Club. Received by Mayor Angelo 
J. Rossi. 

6:30 P.M.— Dinner to Warrant Officers of U. S. Fleet, 
St. Francis Yacht Club, Yacht Harbor. 

8:00 P.M. — World's Championship Badminton Match; 
Jack Purcell versus Gerry Reed, Burke's Gymnasium, 
2350 Geary Street. 

9:00 P.M. — Enlisted Men's Ball, Civic Auditorium. San 
Francisco's tribute to those who served their country. 
Two orchestras. Uniformed men free — many thrilling 
features and entertainment. General admission $1.00. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2 

All Day — Pacific Coast Championship Bowling Tourna- 
ment, 115 Jones Street. 

All Day — U. S. Navy Inter-Ship Baseball Championship. 

9:30 P.M. — Formal Military and Naval Ball. To do honor 
to two branches of the Nation's Armed Defense. Elks' 
Club, Post Street, near Powell. 

12 Noon to 12 Midnight — Industrial and Manufacturers' 
Exposition. Dreamland Auditorium, Post and Steiner Sts. 



JUULOJUUUUULfiJLojuLOJl^^ 



16- A 



CALIFORNIA REDWOOD SEQUOIA BIG TREES 




World Famous Dining Room where guests from all of the forty-eight stales and from twenty-five to thirty foreign countries dine every year 

HE CUT of the dining salon does not do it justice. Many world travelers have told us that it was 
the most beautiful and outstanding thing that they had seen during their entire trip around the 
world. Someone described it as a "poet's dream of a place to eat." The mountain brook that runs 
through the dining room is fed by mountain springs, and the song it sings gives you restful and peaceful 
environment. A thousand natural ferns, some higher than you can reach, nestle in the banks close to the 
water. The dining room is enclosed with the Redwood in its natural state. View of Dining Room available 
to Diners only. 

RECREATION AMID SCENES OF NATURES BEST OFFERINGS 

THE LODGE has just completed several very modern cabins with bed room, dressing room and bath and cottages 
with living room with fireplace, bed room, dressing room and bath and shower. All of the new cottages are equipped 
with Beauty Rest mattresses and each has an individual porch. . . . The dance floor is large and roomy, a maple spring 
floor adding to the charm of the dance. The ball-room has a large fireplace built of natural boulder rock and the lighting 
arrangement is alluring. . . . Can you imagine anything more exhilarating than a dip in the beautiful swimming pool 
located on the grounds? The atmosphere, warm and delightful, impels a plunge. The pool is filled with clear as crystal 
mountain water. Patrons swim in this pool every day during the season. It is free to our guests. . . . Tennis courts are 
available on the grounds of BROOKDALE LODGE. . . . Great mountain trails for horseback riding. Seventyfive miles 
of these trails invite you. Saddle horses are available and riding instructors are at your disposal. Regulation charges for 
both horses and instruction. . . . Tennis, hunting and four golf courses are easily accessible over beautiful scenic paved 
highways. . . . OPEN ALL YEAR. 

Correspondence invited from fraternal, social, educational and civic organizations who are seeding a place well equipped for outings. 



Cottages and Rooms all heated and modern. 
RATES: American Plan (Room and Meals in- 
cluded), from $5.00 to $10.00 each. Weekly rates. 
Also European Plan. On S. P. Bus Line to door. 



BROOKDALE LODGE 

Brookdale, California Phone Boulder Creek 13 
DR. F. K. CAMP, Managing Owner 



HERE ABOUNDS ETERNAL SUNSHINE •• SOFT REFRESHING BREEZES •• NATURAL BEAUTY 



17 



"THE SPAN OF GOLD" 

^A Pageant of The Golden Gate Bridge 

MAY 27—28 — 30 — 8:30 P.M. 
At Redwood Grove Theatre, Crissy Field, Presidio 

Musical Score By Book and Lyrics By 



CHARLES HART 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 



Soloists 



WILBUR HALL 
MARGARET O'DEA 



Staged By 
WILLIAM H. SMITH, JR. 



(Note: Historical accuracy, costumes and chronology have been modified to meet stage and acting 

requirements.) 

Production Manager 
KENDRICK VAUGHAN 



Director of Pageantry 

James J. Gill 

James C. Morgan 



Stage Management 
Robert L. Rose, William C. Todt 



Personnel Direction 
William J. Varley 



Donald A. Breyer 
R. K. Hunter 



Speaking Cast 
Varnum Paul 
Stanley G. Breyer 



Jack Moyles 
Paul Speegle 



Tradition 



PRELUDE 

VOICES OF AN UNSEEN CHORUS 

Charles Keenan Achievement Dwight Curo Promise 

Each of the following episodes is announced by Tradition. 



Charles Mason 



EPISODE I — INDIAN LIFE 

1. The Medicine Dance. 
(Arranged by Le Barrie Studio.) 

2. The Summons to a Council of the Chiefs. 



EPISODE III — DAYS OF THE DONS 

1. The Guests arrive for a Fiesta. 

2. Traders display their goods. 

3. A Bolero is danced. 
(Arranged by Le Barrie Studio) 



The Chief Leslie Black 4. Fremont Arrives and is Greeted by the Don. 

The Don Edward Couvarubias 

Fremont John Buttomer 

5. Song, "La Culpa" 
Margaret O'Dea 

6. The Fandango. 
(Arranged by Le Barrie Studio) 



The Messenger Gerald McGavran 

3. The Tribe Departs. 



EPISODE II— THE CONQUISTADORES 

1. The Cross is Raised in the New Land. 

2. Ayala Reports to Rivera and Serra. 

Ayala Edward Scharetz 

Rivera Edward Jacobson 

Serra John Charles Thomas 

3. Song, "Prayer of Father Serra.' 

John Charles Thomas 

4. The March of the Missions Chorus, Federal 
Theatre Project. 



EPISODE IV — THE RUSSIANS— FORT ROSS 

1 . A Settlement is Growing. 

2. The Envoy announces the failure of his Plea. 

The Envoy Michael Vajenoff 

The Priest ..Serge Donskoy 

A Russian Anatole Kanshin 

3. Songs of the Fatherland. 

(Excerpt from "Sadko" arranged by 
Paul Shulgin) 

4. Spain Commands them to Leave. 



(Continued on Page 18-A) 
iJUULSUUUUUUlSUUUULajl^ 

17-A 




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OF CALIFORNIA 



PAINTING BY IRVING SINCLAIR 




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Gate Bridge in full color, on heavy 
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325 Minna Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 




SODIUM VAPOR LUMINARIES 

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and the 

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GENERAL m ELECTRIC 



"THE SPAN OF GOLD" -Continued 

^A Pageant of The Golden Gate Bridge 



EPISODE V — THE BEAR FLAG REBELLION 

1. Mission Bells sound an early service and Vallejo 
salutes the Flag. 

2. The Immigrants arrive and are welcomed by 
Vallejo. 

Vallejo _ Burt Bishop 

Immigrant Edward J. McLean 

3. The Children's Dance. 

(Arranged by Lucille Byrnes Studio) 

4. The California Republic is proclaimed. 

5. Song, "Bull Team Man" 

John Charles Thomas 

6. Arrival of American soldiers from Monterey. 

EPISODE VI — GOLD 

1. A Mill is built for Sutter. 

2. Marshall finds gold in the race and tells Sutter. 

Marshall John Deasy 

Sutter Milton Burgkart 

3. The workmen overhear the story. 

4. The March of the Gold Seekers. 



EPISODE VII — THE BUILDERS 

1. Crowds in a San Francisco Street await the 
arrival of a Steamer. 

2. A Carriage drives past and the Stage arrives. 

3. The Major tells a Citizen the news. 

The Major Emmet McFarland 

A Citizen Ralph Castberg 

4. Statehood. 

5. The Town Celebrates. 

EPILOGUE 

The Message of Tradition. 
The Message of Achievement. 
The Message of Promise. 
The Hymn of the Rainbow. 

John Charles Thomas and Chorus 
Illumination of the Bridge. 

Stage Lighting Effects by 

Laurence D. Lewis 

Chas. J. Holzmueller 

William Kimball 



Properties by 
William C. Todt 

Designer of Costumes 
Kenneth G. Hook 

Settings and Scenery Effects by 

Edgar P. Nelson, Design 

Nelson, Green & Co. 

Bridge Lighting Effects by 

Tirey L. Ford 

John B. Worden 

Chas. T. Lucas 

Direction of Indian and Spanish Dances 

Le Barrie Studio of the Dance 

Direction of Children's Dance and Children 

Lucille Byrnes Studio of the Dance 

Director of Chorus 
E. P. Fulton, Federal Music Project 

Director of Russian Chorus 
Paul Shulgin 




Sound Equipment Supervision 
Carl Langevin Company 

Sound Technician 
O. A. Arrigoni 

Stage and Auditorium Plans and Construction by 
Clyde Healy and Chas. T. Magill 

Redwood Trees Construction by 
J. L. Stuart Manufacturing Co. 

Concert Master and Assistant Orchestral Director 
Eugene Heyes 

The Orchestra is directed by the Composer 

Stage Crew from 
I. A. T. S. E. Local 16 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

To Sherman, Clay & Co. for the Hammond Organ. 
To Dohrmann Hotel Supply Co. for properties. 
To Blindcraft for baskets. 
To Railway Express for the Stage Coach. 



18-A 



Say "GEAR-AR-DELLY" to the Vendor 




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May 31st (Monday) 

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Baden Kennel Club, South San Francisco. 



June 1st (Tuesday) 

8:15 P.M. Greyhound Racing Baden Kennel Club. 

June 2nd (Wednesday) 

8:15 P.M. Greyhound Racing Baden Kennel Club. 



19 



INDIAN LIFE 

Messrs. 
Billerbeck 
Rincon 
Garrett 
Velez 
Analla 
Bailey 
O'Shea 

Castile de Oro 
Farnsworth 

Thelma Abbott 
J. A. Alliguie 
Alvin Allstead 
F. Ruth Anderson 
Olga Anderson 

E. G. Bean 
Peter Bernard 

F. L. Blank 
Edward Borba 
Louis Borba 
Juanita Bose 
Vivian Bose 
Lillie Brill 
M. Burgkart 
George J. Cabus 
Frances Cavagnaro 
Lillie Cavagnaro 
Audrey Chavis 
Rose Cirghino 



Privates: 
O. R. Alexander 

A. V. Anderson 
William Booth 
Philip Braemer 
Jimmie Bonnot 
Frank C. Benson 
Private Bull 

H. P. Blanks 
Thuron Bursell 
Richard Berdusco 

B. C. Crowder 
Cecil C. Callins 

C. E. Crothers 
Isadore Cohen 
Private Carr 

Joe M. Casteldeoro 
H. Corning 
Maxie Cary 
Private Dowdell 
Lowell E. Davis 
T. F. Druke 
A. H. Desantel 
J. W. Driggers 
T. G. DeAtley 
J. W. Driggers 
Private Daulton 



Police Officers: 
Seil 

Hawkins 
Larsen 
Casillas 
Hanley 
Loss 
Allen 
Inspector Merchant 

Misses: 
Claypool 
Garrett 
Smith 
Post 



"THE SPAN OF GOLD" 

PARTICIPANTS 

EPISODE I. 



Lillian Compagno 
June Crawford 
Irma Cresei 
Ed Castiau 
Jack Creedon 

C. Colin 
E. Colin 

Galliano Daneluz 
Irene Daneluz 
James H. Daniels 
Howard Dimich 
Pearl Dimich 
Lillian Donovan 

D. Dowrick 
Linda Dowrick 
William E. Drayton 
Henry G. Eierman 
Hattie A. Elder 

W. Elligeroth 
Jack Ellis 
S. A. Emlay 
John English 
Elsie M. Epting 
W. H. Fahlbusch 
John Fambrini 
Catherine Frank 
Mamel Frahm 
A. O. Field 
Mary Garvey 
Marion Georgi 



Frank Ghilardi 
Cecelia Gibbons 
L. H. Gilmour 
Marie E. Green 
Linda H. Gross 
L. F. Guedet 
Alexina Hachette 
Leila Hachette 
John Halloran 
Georgiana Harmon 
Ellen Hart 
Eva J. Hartig 
Jeanette Hartig 
Mary Hennessy 
Mabel Henry 
Joe Henwood 
Marian Henwood 
Charles Hickley 
Robert Kitchens 
Geojean Ingham 
Marguerite Irish 
Melba Irish 
Marge Irish 
Clara Irish 
Ray Janetti 
Louis Jenson 
Loretta Johnson 
Katherine Keating 
J. H. Koss 
Anna G. Kriner 
Bill Kruse 



Emile Labataille 
Joe Laboviz 
Mr. Laclergue 
Edmond Lasalle 
Helen Litzeblad 
Mrs. M. Lyons 
Emerald Madsen 
Rose Manford 
Carl Mantz 
Joe Marshall 
Al Martina 
Lena Mau 
Joe Murray 
Claire Medeiros 
Jean Mildred 
Albert Mialocq 
Charlotte Mialocq 
Joe Milson 
Sophie Moeller 
Irene McCartney 
Bertie McConnell 
F. McGavian 
Lottie McSaughlir 
Thomas McLaughlin 
James McNulty 
Frank McPartland 
Emily Nealon 
James F. Nelson 
Bessie Neuman 
Bertha Peters 
Karl Peters 



EPISODE II. — Conquistadores 

Soldiers from Sixth Coast Artillery, Fort Winfield Scott 



Stover Delberto 
Don Donovan 
Ernest J. Dunbar 
Ray Eldon 
J. W. English 
M. E. Foster 
Lewis E. Frizell 
George Fulton 
Private Funk 
Private Freemon 
H. G. Fritz 
W. Gammons 
Private Greathaune 
Joe Gosselin 
Fremont C. Harrington 
Private Hedwall 
Private Hoge 
Private Hopkins 
Private Horsley 
Glenn Henderson 
John Hilbert 
John W. Huff 
J. G. Johnson 
Private Jelton 
V. J. Johnson 

D. E. Jones 

E. W. Kohla 



S. Korecki 

G. Kruger 

Edwin Kuhn 

Private Kissinger 

Ray Klassen 

D. E. Lee 

Robert W. Leerer 

L. Lavagnino 

H. Long 

John F. Lambert 

A. McGovern 

Nanford McMullen 

Edward Mattoon 

Herman J. Merry 

Julius Mathi 

C. C. Miller 

A. Muscarelle 

Private Moser 

W. J. McClain 

P. W. McCulley 

Edwin Matoon 

John P. McNulty 

Eli Mazick 

Frank J. Miltenberger 

Private Moncrief 

W. E. Nutting 

John L. Nowlen 



James J. Ohrel 
Henry W. Owens 
Pat O'Connor 
Tom J. Pawl 
Robert Pluck 
E. Powers 
Harry Porter 
M. Pradevico 
Lawrence Pritchett 
Private Pluck 
Private Peterson 
Warren Probstein 
John H. Quinn 
Robert Richards 
Eugene Reed 
Jim Rochford 
E. A. Reed 
Private Raney 
William Ragsdole 
Burt Radon 
W. O. Smith 
H. W. Smith 
Norman Settle 
Private Sitter 
A. R. Smith 
R. C. Smith 
Private Seiple 




EPISODE III.— Days of the Dons 



Dell 

McLaughlin 

Hartman 

Maprenga 

West 

Stan Adams 

J. Alvarado 

Mrs. R. H. Allen 

Bill Anderson 

Frieda Anderson 

Olga Anderson 

June Anderson 

Mrs. M. J. Archibald 



E. Arena 
Catherine Balech 
Andy Banchero 
Inez Basso 
A. B. Baumann 
Lillian Bear 
Charles Blake 
Thomas Beggs 
Freda Blum 
Louis Bonati 
Mary Bottarini 
Jim Brooke 
Bob Brown 



Harry Brown 
George H. Bairman 
Henriette Brown 
W. Branigan 
Mrs. A. Brunner 
Dorothy Buehler 
Miss M. Burke 
William E. Bull 
Lloyd Burman 
Miss A. Burnett 
Evelyn Burns 
John Buttonier 
John Calamoneri 



Carmelita Diedericksen 

H. Peters 

E. Peters 

Emma Rasmussen 

John Rausch 

Mary Reed 

Myrtle Rose 

Lucille Ross 

Robert Sanders 

Joe Satariano 

Frank W. Schmiedel 

Joe Shaylor 

Kate Shaylor 

Hattie Small 

Anna Smith 

Rose Smith 

Hazel Treanor 

Geraldine Thorpe 

Harvy Tobelman 

G. Tobelman 

Arthur Verduzco 

Laura Verna 

Elizabeth Wohlfahrd 

A. J. Wohlfahrd 

Lizzie Woodworth 

Jessine Woodworth 

Retta Woodworth 

Jack Williams 

Leona Yakel 

Ray Zanetti 

Jean Zipse 



Delbert O. Stover 

Jack Shaw 

R. E. Sukow 

P. Smilko 

Corp. Gustave Schmidt 

C. H. Thompson 

William Triejillo 

L. E. Town 

Private Thompson 

C. D. Tyler 

Otaway Thomas 

C. H. Thompson 

Private Vasquez 

H. W. Vickery 

Donald J. Wickland 

Voitil Wheat 

Edmond C. Webb 

Charles Ward 

Private Wilson 

R. Wilson 

C. R. Williams 

Arthur R. Wickens 

L. A. Winter 

John W. Wilson 

Ralph Wilson 

F. C. Youngs 



Charles L. Calhan 
Edward Calhan 
Edna Calhan 
Violet Calhan 
C. G. Calverley 
J. F. Calverley 
Mrs. Carey 
Don Cam 
joe Chickamagua 
J. M. Castelli 
Ed Castian 
Bob Cavender 
Viola Christenon 



. LP_q_q-q.p_p.p_fl " a _a a b j uuu u uu BPPPPPPPPg ggBBB BBfiaBfiBBa ggggggg B BBBBBB gppppppppqppp 

19-A 




o 

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EPISODE III— (Continued) Days of the Dons 



Harold Cicerone 
Tom J. Cleary 
Coleman Clayton 
Laurel Cofer 
Bernice Cohn 
Mrs. M. F. Coll 
Lenore Coll 
Ken Collings 
Jack Connolly 
Thomas Connolly 
Bill Conry 
Miss M. Cooke 
Miss M. Corcoran 
Clara Corradetti 
Vivian Covanubias 
Mary Cronin 
Mr. Crutchfield 
Tom Davis 
Mrs. Elma DeLucchi 
Agnes Dempsey 
LeRoy Ed Diebins 
Jack Downey 
Alan Duff 
Louis Duden 
Frances Elkington 
Bernice Ericksen 
Constance Eriksen 
Mrs. K. Eriksen 
S. L. Ellis and Family 
Miss M. Fahy 
Mrs. M. Fahy 
Camille Fontanel 
Daisy Fick 



Rina Fillipi 
Al Fillipi 
Mrs. J. Firpo 
Angela Firpo 
Frank Freetas 
Craid Gasney 
Clarice Giannini 
Mrs. Jane Giardina 
Jack Giessler 
Marjorie Goessel 
Marie Gorla 
Mrs. Joseph L. Gould 
Miss K. Gleavy 
Miss M. Grealish 
Miss E. Glennon 
Herman Gustenkorn 
Mrs. A. L. Gorla 
Helen Harlan 
Clayton Harrison 
H. P. Harrison 
John Harrison 
Wm. H. Harrison 
Miss M. Norton 
Eva Haverlock 
Julius Hons 
Don Horan 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Hart 
Allen Hayer 
Mrs. E. Hutchinson 
Miss A. Heany 
Don Helvig 
Miss M. Hession 
Ben Hiller 



Robert Irwin 
Russell Jaillite 
Ed Jensen 
Charles Johnson 
Fred Johnson 
Gordon Jones 
Paul Keane 
Vincent Kelly 
Marion Kemble 
Milton Klotz 
Bob Koklas 
Gail Konkel 
Gertrude Kozlowski 
Pete Kristovich 
Mrs. H. C. Krueger 
Jerry Ladley 
Olive Lammen 
Helen Landro 
Grace Larkins 
Ken Lee 
Bill Lewis 
Mrs. Joe Longren 
Otto W. Loreson 
Thomas Lydan 
Ann M. Lynch 
Agnes Lyman 
Mary MacGowan 
John Maguire 
W. Marchington 
John Mattucci 
Mrs. E. Metz 
James Meyers 
Eleanor Mikkelson 
Mrs. A. J. Milly 



Cecelia Milly 
Mrs. Milly 
Alex J. McDonald 
Grace McDonald 
Miss M. McDonough 
Viola McEvoy 
George McKeaver 
Mrs. M. McShane 
Viola McWilliams 
Bernard Naughton 
Esther C. Neuman 
M. Oncina 
John O'Hara 
John Ord 
Mrs. Osdowski 
Dan O'Toole 
E. H. Peterson 
Ellis H. Porter 
Marion G. Porter 
Henry Primbusch 
Lee Puncochar 
Roy Quanstrom 
Estelle Quilici 
Miss Sulina Ratto 
Harry Redell 
Margaret Riordan 
Mrs. Robb 
Frank Robb 
Michael Roddy 
Doris Roseberger 
Louis Ross 
Walter A. Ross 
John J. Ryan 
T. Ryan 



Sal Sanfilippi 

W. Schimmel 

Charles Sciaroni 

Jack Shalabba 

Marie Shannon 

Larry Shehan 

Miss W. Sheridan 

Miss M. Shoneff 

Gladys Sisco 

Anita Stamer 

Doris Staner 

Arthur Stanler 

P. G. Stevens 

Mrs. George Stevens 

George W. Stevens, Jr. 

Jewel Strie 

Dave Swope 

Gloria Swanson 

Kenneth Tichenor 

Bob Valez 

Andrew Waechter 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Walker 

June Warshawski 

Henry Warshowski 

Maxine Warshowski 

Miss E. Welsh 

Mrs. H. Widmer 

Mrs. E. Wilkinson 

Bessie Willard 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Willett 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Leonard 

Ruth Winter 

Mrs. Emma Wolfe 

Emma Woll 



EPISODE IV.— Fort Ross— Russian Period 



Vera Minoff 
Virginia Martinez 
Vera Sedloff 
Colette Bowers 
Connie Lukachevach 
Alex Lukachevach 
Peter Lukachevach 
Pete Tontolmin 
Jaco C. Pargacherky 
Alex Klimenka 
George Urick 
Hayle Drobshoff 
Rita Boxer 
Mary P. Gustus 
Marie M. Skluroff 
Gennada Bajenoff 
Vladimir Sisin 
Anatole Petroff 
Anna Gemenenko 
Alice Borroff 



Officers : 
Cassidy 
Stone 
Fitzgerald 
Chamberlin 
Allen 

Marie M. Aritta 
Katherine Aster 
Delores Bailey 
Ed Baron 
Ed F. Bass 
Mrs. Ed F. Bass 
Lillian Bear 
Dorothy Bechthold 
Audrey Becker 
Louise Benedetti 
J. W. Berg 
George Berthold 
Mavis Berry 
K. Besterfeldt 
Bert Bishop 
Claire E. Bolman 
Carl Boegershausen 
Roberta Boegershausen 
Florence Bodeman 
Myrtle Bottini 
Ruby Bried 
Edna Brilliant 
Ida Brodie 
Arthur W. Brooks 
Virginia Brooks 
Pearl Brooks 



Elizabeth Goorin 
Marie Suhanoff 
Olga Afanasieff 
P. M. Alexeieff, Soloist 
Milo Kimmerle, Dancer 
Eugen Zomi, Dancer 
Rita J. Boxer 
Rita A. Boxer 
Zoia Petroff 
Olga Affanasieff 
Anna Semonenko 
Elizabeth Soorin 
Vera Minoff 
Marie Sfflaroff 
Virginia Martinir 
Marie Gustus 
Hazel Drobshoff 
Nini Kiyachenko 
Natalie Kiyachenko 
Klavis Affanasieff 



Marie Suhanoff 
Vladimar Sokolnikoff 
George Till 
Reia McGillivray 
Ronald Blam 
Harry Lee 
Frank Lee 
E. Leplin 

Jacob Pargachewsky 
Geo. Gerasimoff 
Nicholas Minoff 
A. Semononko 
Nicholas Skliaroff 
Peter Lukashewich 
G. Bajenoff 
Anatoly Gavrilov 
Gregory Golubeff 
George Boxed 
Anatoly Petroff 
Waldamar Lissin 



Peter Affanasieff 
Raymond Vessell 
Mathew Boxer 
Eugene Kiaschenko 
Vladimer Fedoloff 
Nicholas Solovieff 
Paul Olenin 
Paul Seakoff 
Michael Cosigin 
Boris Koodrin 
Peter Alexoff 
George Wilson 
Wayne Burkmishaw 

Chorus 
Mrs. A. M. Kovaleff 
Mrs. O. N. Erdiakova 
Mrs. O. S. Lazareff 
Mrs. A. White 
Mrs. V. A. Popova 
W. Pafnutieff 



EPISODE V.— Bear Flag 



Genevieve Brown 
Eunice Bullwinkel 
Alvina Burkhardt 
Lilly Buschman 
Dorothy Camuffo 
C. Carriere 
Louise Cases 
Alice Chisum 
Charles Clark 
Helen E. Clifton 
Lil Connell 
Dolores Cosbie 
Robert E. Curley 
Irene Veronica Clark 
Helen Cunningham 
Ann Davis 
Elvira Davies 
Frank DeMartini 
Delia Denning 
Beverly Denning 
Audrey Denning 
Marie Derby 
Angelo Devencinzi 
Marian Devine 
LeRoy Lorenzette 
V. W. Dickieson 
Ed Didier 
Ann S. Dippel 
John Dondero 
Henrietta Drusedom 
Ann Duddy 
Mildred Ehlert 



Frank Englander 
Katherine Esteleta 
Terresa Esteleta 
Charles Farrington 
Henry Feil 
Dorothy R. Finn 
Nan Fitzpatrick 
Thelma Flake 
Charles Flint 
John Flower 
Joan Flowers 
Dorothy Foppiano 
Delia Furlong 
Paul Gallagher 
Lillian Gandolfe 
Eileen Gassman 
Carol Granfield 
Patricia Granfield 
Paul Guisti 
James Hart 
Mary Hart 
Catherine Hartley 
John Hauser 
James H. Hayes 
Soila Harmola 
Verna Hearne 
Dot Hegerhorst 
Lydia Henrichs 
Charlie Higueres 
Stephanie Holod 
Dick Hoots 
A. Hughes 



Daisy Hunter 
Ella Hurd 
Edith Hutchinson 
Vincent C. Iacona 
Charles Israel 
John Jehl 
Mary W. Jordan 
Helena Joy 
Eunice Kanager 
Kathleen Lagrave 
Agnes Larin 
Mario Lavorni 
Burt Lewis 
Frances Lewis 
Marian Lewis 
Virginia Lewis 
Claire Louis 
Gino Lucchesi 
E. Lucett 
May Lucett 
Victoria Lucett 
Mary Luhr 
Walter MacDonald 
D. A. MacKinnon 
Robert Magner 
Louise Maguire 
Marie Maguire 
Betty A. Michie 
Elizabeth Miller 
Joseph L. Minaker 
Barbara Modesti 
I. R. Monti 



Mrs. E. O. Shulgin 
Mrs. A. V. Golubeva 
Mrs. L. A. Solovieff 
N. N. Hkromoff 
I. von Raaben 
V. A. Satrapinskaya 

D. M. Altshuler 
C. Hange 

O. P. Masinkoff 

G. Jurik 

N. Hkromoff 

R. Braun 

A. Klimenko 

W. Novikoff 

P. Lushnikoff 

E. Phillips 
N. Shulgin 
V. Valiansky 
E. Potiomkin 



Rosa M. Moller 
Joe Monte 
Arnelico Muhlback 
Emelia Muhlback 
Marie Murphy 
Thelma Murphy 
David McCarthy 
Helen McCarthy 
Timothy McCarthy 
Ethel McDaniel 
George McDonald 
Elizabeth McEvoy 
W. McGown 
Louise McGuire 
Niles McKannay 
Harriet McLean 
E. J. McLean 
Louise Nau 
Nina Nelson 
Edith O'Connor 
Nellie O'Dendy 
Chas. T. O'Kane 
James O'Keefe 
June O'Keefe 
May O'Keefe 
Lillian O'Leary 
Emma O'Meara 
Muriah Pabst 
Al Payne 
E. W. Perry 
Richard H. Peters 
Ethel Phelan 





EPISODE V '.—{Continued) Bear Flag 




% Paul P. Phelan 


Arthur R. Russell 


Kay Schwenger 


Mary Tavolara 


Betty Walker o 


James Pierson 


Mildred Rutherford 


Grace Semaria 


Minnie Thai 


Dolores Warren o 


Ruth Pronty 


E. Ryan 


Herb Sigrand 


Isobel Thiebout 


Mary E. Waters © 


Festus Pust 


Betty Ryan 


Roberta Stafford 


Nellie Thlendorf 


Florine Webster © 


o Gilbert Pust 


Mary Ryan 


Lee Stanfel 


A. Thruesen 


M. Welch o 


o Henry Puttaert 


Ruby Ryan 


Charles Stanley 


Mary Tornich 


Sarah Welch © 


o Mariette Potter 


Joseph Sala 


F. C. Stanton 


Lurline Tweedate 


Norma Wendt © 


o Helen Reading 


Regina Scanlon 


W. Stohlman 


Genevieve Ubhaus 


Charles Wester © 


o Frank Regan 


Helen Scannell 


Jerry Struckerk 


Dolly Grace Vannucci 


Bessie Wester © 


o Frank Richardson 


Tessie Schimelpfenig 


Mrs. A. Sveningsen 


Anthony Virgilio 


A. Westing © 


o Marguerite M. Riordan 


Joseph G. Schunk 


Jeanne Tavolara 


John Vitalie 


W. A. Wilkie ° 


o Margaret Ritzan 


Eilzabeth Schmidt 


Vincent C. Tacona 


Salvatore Vitalie 


Belle Williams o, 


o C. H. Romick 


Jenny Schumacher 


Eileen Taube 


Robert T. Wagner 


Fred W. Zimmerman Jr. ° 


o Barbara Rose 


Jeanne Schwarz 


George Tapin 








EPISODE VI. 


— Gold 




° John Deasy 


M. J. Burgh 


art Chris. 


Maggini Joe 


Balzer _l 


° Geo. Glover 


Anita McGavran Lloyd 


Copertini Catherine Tufts ^ 




EPISODE VII.- 


-Builders 




° George Adams 


Kathleen Conroy 


LaVerne Henschel 


Barbara McAlpine 


Mildred Seiler 


Virginia Adams 


Les Dean 


Lydia Hinrichs 


Sophie McClellan 


Bob Selmer 


Mary Aiello 


Harriet Decker 


Harold Hansen 


Bob McCourty 


Bill Shannon 


Blanche Allen 


Dorothy Dettner 


Alice Hamilton 


Beth McCrone 


Elaine Shenson o 


Marilyn Allen 


Grace Dillon 


Silvia Herbert 


Charlotte McGillicuddy 


John Siri © 


° Mildred Allen 


Mary Duffy 


Helen Houston 


Julia McKenny 


Margaret Slattery o 


Edith Alpers 


George Duste' 


Lillian Holt 


Catherine McLean 


Ralph Smith © 


Florence Anderson 


Rae Duste' 


E. Hughes 


Ed Nelson 


Arthur Thompson o 


Marjorie Anderson 


Carolyn Ellis 


Hazel Hunst 


Ed Nelson 


Doris Thompson o 


J. Armento 


Marjorie Escher 


Louise Johnson 


Ed Palmer 


Elsie W. Thompson o 


Jean Atkins 


Edward Evensen 


Ray Kaudelberg 


W. Portello 


Betty Thornton © 


Audrey Berman 


Ann Erker 


Bob Kelly 


William Praul 


Gerhard F. Uhlig o 


o Burt Bishop 


Leonard Faber 


Bud Kinzy 


John Prevalas 


S. Unsworth o 


o Florence Berman 


Ann Fay 


Louis Klein 


Eleanor Price 


Viola Vogel o 


o Tom Benton 


Erna Feyling 


Emily Lasbough 


Genevieve Price 


Stella R. Vought © 


o Gertrude Black 


Esther Fisher 


Valerie Laurent 


Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Prici Helen Wake o 


o Mary Bottarine 


Joan Flowers 


Eleanor Lehi 


Dorothy Quinn 


Barbara Wake © 


a Anita Burch 


Walter S. Flowers 


Margaret Lehi 


T. Quinn 


Tom Wake © 


o Scott Bradley 


George Friedlander 


Walter Lehigh 


Thelma Quinn 


Lillian Weatherly © 


o A. Burke 


Barbara Fuller 


Walter P. Lehjgh 


F. Queiser 


Marjorie Weatherly © 


a M. Burke 


Elizabeth Galvin 


Alline Lehigh 


F. Reardon 


Evelyn Wiersbeck ° 


o Geo. Butler 


C. Gardner 


Ruddy Lenich 


Mary Roberts 


Engborg Willetts ° 


o Joe Cadero 


Charles Gilligan 


Josephine Limbi 


Victor E. Robinson 


Capt. Margie Welsh ° 


o Dolores Canty 


Lois Gilligan 


G. Linser 


Frank Rojas 


Shirley Weiner ° 


o Bob Chadanta 


Evely Gilligan 


Mildred Lovett 


Bob Rooney 


Wallace Thompson ° 


o Jean Church 


Doris Goldstein 


Patricia Lundberg 


Horace Rose 


Harriet Decker ° 


o Claire Clark 


Verna Green 


Nellie Marquez 


Jean Rouse 


Elaine Shenson ° 


o Adaline Coates 


Joseph Grisler 


Charles Mason 


Tom Rutherford 


Less Dean ° 


o George Coates 


George Godfrey 


Cecile Mathewson 


Lavina Samuel 


Florence Berman ° 


° Harriet Cohen 


Robert Grinton 


Henry Mesa 


Suzanne Samuel 


Barbara Wake ° 


° Charlotte Collins 


Irene Hailand 


Neal Moore 


Marie Sanders 


Gladys Schlegel ° 


° Evely Connors 


Norma Hall 


Thomas Moore 


Winter Schall 


George Schlegel 


° June Connors 


Lillian Hall 


Barbara Moser 


G. Schlegel 


Adyline Coates 


° Lizzie Cornelius 


Henrietta Haines 


Mary Masson 


L. W. Schmitt 


Thomas Puinn 


° Otis P. Cosbie 


Lillian Hansen 


Marie E. Murphy 


Bob Seiler 


G. Coates 


° Mike Cirami 


Myna Hazlehurst 


Emelia Muhlbach 






j 




EPILOGUE 




% C. F. Aylworth 


Olivier Fazzio 


A. W. Mulborn 


N. O. Slate 


Margaret Jeanne Ramirez o 


Madeline Asmussen 


Dorothy R. Finn 


R. J. Marticmoli 


Joe Steach 


Joyer Roberts © 


Annabelle Bryan 


Walter R. Flowers 


Hazel McFadden 


C. J. Sullivan 


Barbara McAlpine o 


Eileen Burns 


Joan Flowers 


Jeannette McGarrity 


Ada Smith 


George Wake o 


o Claire Barrie 


Leo E. Gassman 


Ethel McDaniell 


Martha Stice 


Helen Wake © 


o Anne Branchi 


Dewall Dickey 


Marie Murphy 


Jack Schimelpfenig 


Patricia Sundberg o 


o P. Beck 


Eileen Gassman 


Margaret O'Donnell 


Marie Tuffanti 


Mary Roberts o 


o M. Blarney 


Vernice Hill 


Charles Polevka 


Isobel Thiebout 


Dorothy Wieland o 


o Mrs. Scott Bradly 


Cecilia Haran 


E. Prevost 


Olinto Vanucceca 


Dolores Canty o 


o Ed. Babcock 


Ed. Harriman 


Eleanor Praul 


Dolly Vanucci 


Beverly Peters o 


o Louis Blackmer 


James Hart 


Mariette Potter 


Ruth Watters 


Katherine Roeckel © 


o Laurine Connors 


William Johnson 


Paul Phelan 


Edna Woods 


Mildred Spinner © 


o W. Cooper 


Dorothy Jorgensen 


Miss L. Peterson 


Geneivne Wood 


Edith Smith © 


o Jack Carter 


Amos Jeraldine 


Marie Rollan 


W. Walker 


Miriam Dunn © 


o Frank Cauper 


Mildred Johnson 


V. E. Robinson 


W. M. White 


Flora Meek © 


o Edith Citrina 


Velma Kehoe 


Arthur N. Russell 


Constance Longan 


Helen Houseton Or 


o C. Carriere 


Virginia Kelly 


Mrs. A. F. Ramirez 


Glennette Allen 


Katherine Conroy ° 


o Beverly Doyle 


Geo. Lapin 


A. F. Ramirez 


Jane Barry 


Elinor Lehr ° 


o lone Doyle 


Bob Lamayson 


Margaret Ritzan 


Anna Klein 


Margaret Lehr ° 


o A. W. Dickieson 


Betty Morehouse 


Josephine Steach 


Mrs. A. Sonles 


Helen Braziosi ° 


o Mabel Edwards 


Doris Markstrom 


Marie Snyder 


Dorothy Mack 


L. J. Gilbert ° 


o Ursula Fitzgerald 


Jean MacHeller 


Rose Camilla 


Margaret Iver 




!iJLOJL&JLOJL2JL2JLfi-G- 


a a o oe q q BJLa_a_a_aj2. 


ojMLajLajLajLajLajLaj 


LajLajUL2JL»JL0JLBJ}JLttJLajlJ^^ 



20-A 



Geo. E. Billings Co. 

312 CALIFORNIA STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

AND 

Cosgrove & Company, inc. 

343 SANSOME STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Associate Insurance Brokers 

for Golden Gate Bridge and 

Highway District 



PACIFIC STATES 
FIREWORKS CO. 

Day and Night Phone Los Gatos 42o 

OFFICIAL 
PYROTECHNISTS 

TO THE 

GOLDEN GATE 
BRIDGE FIESTA 
CELEBRATION 



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DUCHESS 

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WHETHER for cocktail time — tea-bridge or 
any social entertaining in the afternoon or 
evening, the smart hostess within reach of the 
phone, may have on short notice an appetizing vari' 
ety of delicious canapes — crisp cheese rolls or dainty 
triangular closed party sandwiches. 

FOR serving six — sixty or six hundred, luncheons, 
cocktail parties or midnight suppers are made 
more perfect with— FAMOUS DUCHESS SAND- 
WICHES. 

For your next party, big or small, call PRospect 
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serve your most exacting requirements intelligently 
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PRICES QUOTED 

DUCHESS SANDWICH CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
1438 CALIFORNIA ST. 

PRospect 2131 



OAKLAND 

2403 GROVE ST. 

HIgate 1927 



21 




Beauty of the Golden Gate Bridge is exemplified in these artistic photographs. Upper left, cloud effects and cable 

workmen. Left center, looking out the Golden Gate in the moonlight. Upper right, an idea of the massiveness 

of the South tower by night. Lower, an artistic view from the San Francisco shore. 



21-A 



innnnrsireinnnrsini 



FIESTA DAY PARADE 

THURSDAY, MAY 27, STARTING TIME 10 a. m. 

W. H. MOULTHROP 

Parade Director 
Assistant Parade Directors Adjutants 



Seth L. Butler Edward L. Siller Cyrus Voorhies 

Chief Aides 
Harry Ridgway E. J. Guidotti 

MARCHING CONTINUITY 



Harry Voorhies 



DIVISION NO. 1 
Staff Officer, William J. Quinn 
Section A — 

Police Band 

Police Drum Corps 

Chief of Police Wm. J. Quinn, Mounted 

Mounted Police Color Guard 

Mounted Police Company 

Company of Foot Policemen 

Parade Director W. H. Moulthrop, Mounted 

Parade Staff, Mounted 
Section B — 

Official Fiesta Band 

San Francisco SherifFs Mounted Posse 
In Automobiles 

Governor Frank F. Merriam, Mayor Angelo J. Rossi 

General Chairman Arthur M. Brown, Jr., Chief Engineer 
J. B. Strauss, and Wm. P. Filmer, President Golden 
Gate Bridge and Highway District 

Rear-Admiral A. St. Clair Smith, USN and Aide 

Major General Geo. S. Simonds, USA and Aide 

Brig. General Douglas C. McDougal, USMC and Aide 

Parade Staff Radio Car 

DIVISION NO. 2 
Staff Officer, C. C. Bradley 
Section A- — 

6th Coast Artillery Band 

6th Coast Artillery Battalion 

11th Cavalry Band (Monterey) 

11th Cavalry Battalion (Monterey) 
Section B — 

1 59th Infantry Battalion, National Guard 
Section C — 

Staff Officer, C. W. Kriens 

Union Band 

Golden Gate Bridge Workers 

Golden Gate Bridge Workers Equipment 
Section D — 

California Grays, Band 

California Grays, Marching Unit 

QUEEN'S FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 3 
Staff Officer, Jack Simmons 
Section A — 

Kitsilano Boys' Band, Vancouver, B. C. 

DENVER, COLORADO, FLOAT 
Section B — 

Provo, Utah, High School Band 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, FLOAT 
Section C — 

The Town House, Reno, Nevada, Mounted 

1st Battalion Canadian Scottish Band, Victoria 

RENO CITY FLOAT 

Reno Rodeo Color Bearers 

RENO RODEO FLOAT 

Reno Rodeo Uniformed Mounted Troop 
Section D — 

Seattle, Washington Drum Corps 

Seattle, Washington Drill Team 
Section E — 

Oregon Participation 



DIVISION NO. 4 
Staff Officer, Ed. W. Boney 
Section A — 

REDWOOD EMPIRE ASSN. MARKER 

San Francisco Polo Association, Mounted 
Section B — 

Tamalpais High School Band 

MARVELOUS MARIN, INC. FLOAT 

San Rafael High School Band 

California Nautical School Marching Unit 

SAUSALITO NEWS FLOAT 

Joan of Arc Institute Y.L.I. Drum Corps 

San Rafael Institute Y.L.I. Drill Team 

THE LANG REALTY CORPORATION FLOAT 
Section C — 

Sonoma County Band 

SONOMA COUNTY FLOAT 

Order of Redmen — Indian Costume Guard 

Sonoma County High School Band 

BEAR FLAG MONUMENT FLOAT 

Mounted Riders in Costume 

RUSSIAN RIVER RECREATIONAL REGION 
FLOAT 

Santa Rosa Canton I.O.O.F. Drill Team 
Section D — 

Rincon tf Gabrielle Parlors N.S.G.W. Drum Corps 

NAPA COUNTY FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 5 
Staff Officer, John W. Pettit 
Section A — 

Hopland High School Band 

MENDOCINO COUNTY FLOAT 

Willits High School Drum Corps 

Mounted Troop of Cowboys and Cowgirls 
Section B — 

South San Francisco Parlor Drum Corps 

LAKE COUNTY FLOAT 
Section C — 

Fortuna High School Band 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY FLOAT 

Areata High School Band 

GARBERVILLE C. OF C. FLOAT 
Section D — 

Genevieve Parlor N.D.G.W. Drum Corps 

DEL NORTE COUNTY FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 6 
Staff Officer, Eddy Martin 
Section A — 

Shasta-Cascade Wonderland Participation 

Klamath Falls American Legion Drum Corps 

Craters from Medford 

Mounted Cowboys and Cowgirls, Lassen County 
Section B — 

Los Angeles Police Department Band 

Los Angeles County SherifFs Mounted Posse 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY FLOAT 
Section C — 

Santa Barbara "Columbia" Band — Spanish 

El Rodeo Riding Club, Orange County 

PASADENA TOURNAMENT OF ROSES ASSO- 
CIATION FLOAT 



Binnnnnnnnri 



Section D — 

Jos. P. McQuaide Post V.F.W. Drum Corps 
SACRAMENTO C. OF C. FLOAT 

Montie Montana's Mounted Troop, North Hollywood 

DIVISION NO. 7 
Staff Officer, W. Earl Messenger 
Section A — 

Sonora Union High School Band 

Kern County Rangers, Mounted 

SOLANO COUNTY FLOAT 
Section B — 

Gustine Chamber of Commerce Drum Corps 

Gustine Drill Team 

STOCKTON FLOAT 
Section C — 

Union Band 

SANTA CRUZ CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FLOAT 
Section D — 

Independent Order of Foresters Drum Corps 

Independent Order of Foresters Drill Team 

Independent Order of Foresters Ladies Drill Team 

Juvenile Drill Team 

SAN JOSE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FLOAT 

Louis Oneal's Mounted Troop 

DIVISION NO. 8 
Staff Officer, Burr Moulthrop 
Section A — ■ 

Sequoia Union High School Band 

Old Glory Post V.F.W. Drill Team 

SAN MATEO COUNTY FLOAT 
Section B — 

Piedmont High School Bagpipe Band 

CITY OF BERKELEY FLOAT 
Section C — 

San Francisco Boys' Club Band 

HOTEL CLAREMONT FLOAT 
Section D — 

Twin Peaks Parlor Drum & Bugle Corps 

CITY OF OAKLAND FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 9 
Staff Officer, Herbert Benjamin 
Section A — 

Alhambra High School Band, Martinez 

Contra Costa Sheriff's Mounted Posse 

GREATER SAN RAMON VALLEY CHAMBER OF 
COMMERCE FLOAT 
Section B — 

Richmond High School Band 

Pittsburg Junior Traffic Patrol 

ANTIOCH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FLOAT 
Section C — - 

Union Band 

Blessed Amelda YLI Drill Team 

Castro Family, Mounted 

MOUNT DIABLO CEMENT CO. FLOAT 
Section D — 

91st Division A.E.F. Drum Corps 

LAFAYETTE BUSINESS MEN'S ASSOCIATION 
FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 10 
Staff Officer, J. Thos. McFadden 
Section A — 

Boy Scouts Scottish Drum Corps 
Mounted Troop No. 90 
Colonial Boy Scout Drum Corps 
Massed American Colors 
Boy Scout Drum & Bugle Corps 
BLINDCRAFT FLOAT 
Section B — 

Staff Officer, Ross Wright 
Mounted Chinese Color Guard 
Chinese Band 



Two Processions of Lanterns 
One Procession of Banners 
Three Processions of Parasols 
Two Processions of Gongs 
CHINESE FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 1 1 
Staff Officer, Robert Gray 
Section A — 

Olympic Club Band 

CALIFORNIA OIL 8C GAS ASSOCIATION FLOAT 
Section B — 

Carmen's Union Division No. 1004 Drum Corps 

INTERNATIONAL LONGSHOREMEN'S ASSN. 
FLOAT 
Section C — 

The Salvation Army Band 

The Salvation Army Marching Unit 

PEACE BALLOT COMMITTEE FLOAT 
Section D — 

Municipal Railway Drum Corps 

Gaucho Club Mounted Troop 

RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY, INC. FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 12 
Staff Officer, Eddie Love 
Section A — 

Southern Pacific Club Band 

SLAVONIC ALLIANCE FLOAT 

Potrero Hill Marchers 
Section B — 

I.O.O.F. Girls Drum Corps 

Patriarchs Militant 

I.O.O.F. FLOAT 
Section C— 

Columbia Park Boys' Club Band 

PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC CO. FLOAT 
Section D — 

West of Twin Peaks Post No. 233 Algerian Patrol 

FILIPINO COMMUNITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 13 
Staff Officer, Louis Goldstein 
Section A — 

Sunset Post American Legion Drum Corps 

Sunset District Mounted Troop 

SUNSET DISTRICT FLOAT 
Section B — ■ 

Union Band 

A. CARLISLE & CO. FLOAT 
Section C — 

Gruppo Giovanile Band 

Italian Marching Unit 

FEDERATION OF ITALIAN SOCIETIES FLOAT 
Section D — 

Mission Parlor N.D.G.W. Drum Corps 

Mission Parlor Drill Team 

SAFEWAY STORES, INC. FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 14 
Staff Officer, Joseph Harowitz 
Section A — 

San Francisco News Carriers Band 
NEGRO BUSINESS ASSOCIATION FLOAT 
Section B — 

Utopia Drum Corps, South of Market 
Marina Merchants Mounted Troop 
MARIN DELL MILK CO. FLOAT 
Section C — 

Girls High School Drum Corps 
Girls High School Drill Team 

OTTO GREULE TUMBLING STUDIO FLOAT 
Section D — 
Union Band 

WARRENCRAFT BOAT COMPANY FLOAT 
REAR POLICE GUARD 
FINIS 



22-A 




[Copyright 1957 Moulin] 




1— Redwood Grove Theatre at Crissy Field, 
Presidio (Setting for "The Span of Gold," 
Pageant — Parade Reviewing Stands). 

2 — Crissy Field Parking Areas. 

3 — Marina Approach to Golden Gate Bridge. 

4 — Lyon Street Outlet from Bridge. 

5 — Palace of Fine Arts. 

6 — Golden Gate Bridge Toll Plaza. 

7 — Marin Approach to Bridge. 

8 — Yacht Harbor. 



BOYES 

HOT 

SPRINGS 

For Cure For Rest 

For Pleasure 



Two blocks from Sonorrn Mission Inn 

and other moderately priced resorts 

NATURAL HOT RADIO ACTIVE WHITE SULPHUR 

MINERAL WATER 

A Natural Al\alizer for Super-Acidity 

Recommended for Nervous Disorders, Arthritis, 

Neuritis, Rheumatism, Gout, Etc. 

Graduate Swedish Masseur and Masseuse 

Swim in World's Largest Mineral Water Plunge 

DANCING SODA FOUNTAIN BAR 

Boyes Springs Mineral Water, Carbonated and bottled 

is the All-American Mixer 

Phone Sonoma 216 



EDWARDS 

WIRE 

ROPE 



SAN FRANCISCO 




TkeBickag?d fence 

CALIFORNIA REDWOOD ASSOCIATION 

405 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO • 832 WEST FIFTH STREET, LOS ANGELES 

24 




Upper left — Bridge from above Old Fort Winfield Scott. Upper center — Massiveness of the giant towers. 
Upper right — San Francisco tower. Below — General view, showing San Francisco anchorage during course of 
construction, in the foreground, with the South pylons, start of work on South tower, and Marin tower in distance. 



24-A 



ANCHOR TAVERN 

A. H. Albertson, Prop. 

Open from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. 

2280 Chestnut St. — End of F Car Line 

We Aim to Please Phone Fillmore 9520 



A. Que& H. Lew 



Phone CHina 1633 



Montgomery Garage 

DAY & NIGHT STORAGE & REPAIR 

All Worl{ Guaranteed - Reasonable Charges 

528 Jackson St. 831 Montgomery St. 



Compliments 

PRESSROOM WEEKLY 



THE SURF 

at the 

Beach 

702 La Playa Avenue 



LOWRIE PAVING CO. 



1540 — 16th Street 
San Francisco 



JOHN OLSEN 



FLORIST 
1702 Divisadero St. Phone WEst 0633 



LIVE at 

South 
San Francisco 

The Industrial City 



Beautiful Home Sites 
and Factory Sites 



"Talk of the Town" 25th Ave. and Clement St 

"LITTLE CORNER" 

and our famous 
TEMPTATION ICE CREAM 

WE MAKE IT also Lunches 



H. V. CARTER CO., Inc. 

Farm, Garden and Golf Course Equipment 
52 BEALE ST., San Francisco 



PACIFIC PIPE CO. 

201 FOLSOM ST. 



THE GREB-BIE SHOP 

DRESSES - COATS - HATS 
At Lowest Modern Prices 

Specializing in Large Sizes 



PERSONAL SHOPPING ON 
APPROVAL 

• 

515-517 POST ST. FRavklin 3055 



Neptune Meter Company 
Thomson Meter Corp. 

50 West 50th Street 
New York City, N. Y. 

Manufacturers of 

TRIDENT AND LAMBERT 
WATER METERS 

NEPTUNE LIQUID METERS 

Oil - Gasoline - Syrup 

Hot Water 

• 

Pacific Coast Branches 

320 Market St. 701 East Third St. 

San Francisco Los Angeles 

1519 N. W. Johnson St. 

Portland, Oregon 



/..- // True 

WHAT THEY SAY 
ABOUT 



Finocchio's?? 

ALWAYS SOMETHING 
DIFFERENT 



406 Stockton Street 
DOuglas 9222 



Compliments 



ED KENNY 



Cervelli's Cocktail Lounge 




3309 Fillmore Street, near Lombard 



25 



^Bridging the Golden Gattj 

THE STORY BEHIND THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE SPAN 



AN AGE-OLD challenge to the genius of man 
and engineering science has been answered in 
completion of the Golden Gate Bridge. 

From time to time during the past century 
dreamers have suggested the feasibility of a bridge 
across the famous harbor entrance. In 1869 San 
Francisco's own "Emperor Norton" in one of his 
proclamations "commanded" that a bridge be built 
across the Bay of San Francisco, not specifying 
where. 

It was not until 1917 that the proposal gained 
real momentum. The late M. M. O'Shaughnessy, 
then city engineer of San Francisco, invited Joseph 
B. Strauss, builder of hundreds of bridges through- 
out the world, to tackle the problem. 

Together they estimated the cost within a prac- 
tical range and capacity would be $25,000,000 to 
$30,000,000, and concluded that the main span 
necessary would be at least 4000 feet. 

Edward Rainey, then secretary to the late Mayor 
Rolph, became interested, and secured support of 
Supervisor Richard J. Welch, now a San Francisco 
Congressman. 

The following year Strauss made his original 
reconnaissance. 

Welch introduced a resolution in the San Fran- 
cisco Board of Supervisors August 25, 1919, pro- 
viding that the City and County of San Francisco 
undertake preliminary surveys to furnish Strauss 
with information necessary for a more definite study. 

Further studies by Strauss followed, and findings 
were printed in a booklet issued jointly over the 
signatures of Strauss and O'Shaughnessy. 

After lengthy studies, Strauss submitted a pre- 
liminary sketch and estimates in June 1921. The late 
Mayor Rolph showed his enthusiasm by issuing a 
call for a mass meeting at Santa Rosa January 13, 
1923, to consider ways and means of carrying the 
project forward. 

Representatives of 21 counties attended, and the 
Bridging-the Golden-Gate Association was formed. 

A bill was introduced in 1921 in the California 
Legislature, creating an incorporated bridge dis- 
trict to finance, construct and operate the project 
as a public toll bridge. State Assemblyman Frank 
L. Coombs of Napa was the author of the bill, 
which became a law the same year, and was 
amended in 1925 and again in 1931. 

In the spring of 1924 San Francisco and Marin 
Counties made a joint application to the govern- 
ment for a permit to bridge the Golden Gate. 

The Army Engineers held a hearing in San Fran- 
cisco May 16, 1924. 



On December 20, 1924, Secretary of War John 
W. Weeks notified the committee of the War 
Department's approval of the project. Actual in- 
corporation of the Golden Gate Bridge and High- 
way District was delayed by litigation instigated by 
opposing interests until December 1928. 

Boards of Supervisors of the various counties 
whose citizens had voted to become a part of the 
District appointed directors who held their first 
meeting January 23, 1929, and organized. 

Proposals were invited from eleven of the 
Nation's leading bridge engineering firms. After 
an analysis Joseph B. Strauss of Chicago was se- 
lected on August 15, 1929, as chief engineer. 
Leon Moisseiff and O. H. Ammann of New York 
and Prof. Charles Derleth, Jr., of the University of 
California College of Engineering were named as 
consulting engineers. 

The engineering board met in San Francisco 
shortly afterwards and determined upon the basic 
design of the bridge. Subsequently, in accordance 
with provisions of the bridge act, a three cent tax 
was levied on taxpayers and later a two cent tax. 
This was used to cover preliminary engineering, 
legal and other work. 

A field staff was organized by Strauss and speci- 
fications made for diamond drill borings to deter- 
mine conditions for piers and anchorages. Bids for 
mine conditions for piers and anchorages. 

On February 12, 1930, the engineering board 
met and passed on borings and presented them to 
the board of directors with a preliminary report of 
the geologist, Prof. Andrew Lawson of the Univer- 
sity of California. 

On April 15, 1930, application was made to the 
Secretary of War for approval of the approach 
road plans through the two military reservations. 
On May I application for approval of the bridge 
clearances for navigation were filed. 

Shipping interests asked a special hearing on the 
clearances, which was held by the Army Engineers 
June 30, 1930. On August I I the same year the 
War Department issued the final permit fixing the 
clearances. 

In November 1930, the proposal for a $35,000,- 
000 bond issue was submitted to the voters of the 
counties comprising the district, and the issue car- 
ried overwhelmingly. Bidding plans were prepared, 
and first bids received in July 1931. A taxpayers 
suit followed before the work was awarded, and a 
final court decision favoring the district was given 
in July 1932. 

On January 5, 1933, actual construction of the 
Bridge was begun. 



I 



I 






21 -A 



FIESTA NIGHT PARADE 

SATURDAY MAY 29, STARTING 8 p. m. 

PARADE COMMITTEE 
W. H. Moulthrop Parade Director 
Assistant Parade Directors Adjutants 

Seth L. Butler Edward L. Siller Cyrus Voorhies Harry Voorhies 

Chief Aides 
Harry Ridgway E. J. Guidotti 

MARCHING CONTINUITY 



DIVISION NO. 1 

Staff Officer, William J. Quinn 
Section A — 

Police Band 

Police Drum Corps 

Chief of Police Wm. J. Quinn, Mounted 

Mounted Police Color Guard 

Mounted Police Company 

Company of Foot Policemen 

Parade Director W. H. Moulthrop, Mounted 

Parade Staff, Mounted 
Section B — 

Official Fiesta Band 

San Francisco Sheriff's Mounted Posse 
In Automobiles 

Governor Frank F. Merriam, Mayor Angelo J. Rossi 

Chief Engineer J. B. Strauss, Wm. P. Filmer, Pres. Golden 
Gate Bridge and Highway District 

General Chairman Arthur M. Brown, Jr. 

Admiral A. J. Hepburn, USN and Aide 

Rear-Admiral A. St. Clair Smith, USN and Aide 

Major General Geo. S. Simonds, USA and Aide 

Brig. General Douglas McDougal USMC and Aide 

Parade Staff Radio Car 



DIVISION NO. 2 

Staff Officer, C. C. Bradley 
Section A — 

6th Coast Artillery Band 
6th Coast Artillery Battalion 
11th Cavalry Band (Monterey) 
11th Cavalry Battalion (Monterey) 

Section B — 

United States Navy, Battleships and other units 
Section C — 

Staff Officer, Major J. B. Wilson 
12th Battalion Marine Corps, Reserve Band 
12th Battalion Marine Corps, Reserve Unit 

Section D — 

California Grays, Band 
California Grays, Marching Unit 
QUEEN'S FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 3 
Staff Officer, Jack Simmons 
Section A — 

Kitsilano Boys' Band, Vancouver, B. C. 
DENVER, COLORADO, FLOAT 
Section B — 

Provo, Utah, High School Band 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH FLOAT 



Section C — 

1st Battalion Canadian Scottish Band, Victoria 

CITY OF RENO, NEVADA FLOAT 

Reno Rodeo Color Bearers 

RENO RODEO FLOAT 

Reno Rodeo Uniformed Mounted Troop 
Section D — ■ 

Seattle, Washington Drum Corps 

Seattle, Washington Drill Team 
Section E — 

Oregon Participation 

DIVISION NO. 4 
Staff Officer, Ed. W. Boney 

Section A — 

Fresno State College Band 

REDWOOD EMPIRE ASSN. MARKER 

Section B — 

Tamalpais High School Band 
MARVELOUS MARIN, INC. FLOAT 
San Rafael High School Band 
California Nautical School Marching Unit 
SAUSALITO NEWS FLOAT 
Sea Point Parlor N.S.G.W. Drum Corps 
Lagan Institute Y.L.I. Drill Team 
Tamelpa Parlor N.D.G.W. Drum Corps 
THE LANG REALTY CORP. FLOAT 
St. Vincent's Unit CYO Drum Corps 

Section C — 

SONOMA COUNTY FLOAT 

Redman Order — Indian Costume Guard 

Castro Parlor N.S.G.W. Drum Corps 

Sonoma County Mounted Troop 

Precita Parlor N.S.G.W. Drum Corps 

RUSSIAN RIVER RECREATIONAL REGION 

FLOAT 

Joan of Arc Institute YLI Drum Corps 

NAPA COUNTY FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 5 
Staff Officer, John Pettit 
Section A — 

Hopland High School Band 

MENDOCINO COUNTY FLOAT 

Willits Drum Corps 
Section B — 

LAKE COUNTY FLOAT 
Section C — 

Fortuna High School Band 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY FLOAT 

Eureka High School Band 

Eureka American Legion Drum Corps and Band 

GARBERVILLE C. OF C. FLOAT 
Section D — 

Service Post No. 97 Drum ii Bugle Corps 

DEL NORTE COUNTY FLOAT 



JL&iLSLRJlJLgJLOJUULOJ^^ 

26 



DIVISION NO. 6 
Staff Officer, Eddy Martin 
Section A — 

Shasta-Cascade Wonderland Participation 
Section B — 

San Francisco County Council American Legion Band 
Los Angeles County Sheriff's Mounted Posse 
West of Twin Peaks Post No. 233 Algerian Patrol 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY FLOAT 

Section C — 

Angels Boosters Club Band 
Kern County Mounted Rangers 

Section D — 

Stanislaus County Boys Band 
SOLANO COUNTY FLOAT 

Section E — 

Lodi Union High School Band 

Loyal Order of Moose Drill Team 

Women of the Moose Drill Team 

Lodi Post American Legion Drum Corps 

LODI GRAPE &. WINE FESTIVAL INC. FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 7 

Staff Officer, W. Earl Messenger 

Section A — 

Santa Cruz Fraternal Order of Eagles Drum Corps 

Fraternal Order of Eagles Drill Team 

SANTA CRUZ CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FLOAT 

Section B — 

MacFarlane Nut Company, Bagpipe Band 
CITY OF ALBANY FLOAT 

Section C — 

Nevada City High School Band 

Old Glory Post V.F.W. Drill Team 

San Mateo County American Legion Auxiliary Drill Team 

SAN MATEO COUNTY FLOAT 
Section D — 

Emeryville Industrial Post No. 1010 V.F.W. Drum Corps 

Emeryville Post Auxiliary Drill Team 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY FLOAT 
Section E — 

Toto's Pup Tent No. 8 M.O.C. Drum Corps 

Gen. Jacob Smith Post No. 83 Auxiliary Drill Team 

Louis Oneal's Mounted Troop 

DIVISION NO. 8 

Staff Officer, Burr Moulthrop 

Section A — 

Piedmont High School Bagpipe Band 

CITY OF BERKELEY FLOAT 
Section B — 

Berkeley Post American Legion Drum Corps 

HOTEL CLAREMONT FLOAT 

Section C — 

Canadian Legion Drum 6? Bugle Corps 

San Francisco Hussars 

CITY OF OAKLAND FLOAT 
Section D — 

Alhambra High School Band, Martinez 

MT. DIABLO CEMENT CO. FLOAT 
Section E — 

Fraternal Order of Eagles Drum Corps, Crockett 

Castro Family Mounted Troop 
Section F — 

Livermore Eagles Cowboy Drum Corps 

LIVERMORE CITY FLOAT 

(Continued on 



DIVISION NO. 9 
Staff Officer, Ross Wright 
Section A — 

Mounted Chinese Color Guard 

Two Processions of Lanterns 

Chinese Band 

50 Chinese Girls in Costume with Lantern 

Two processions of Gongs 

CHINESE FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 10 
Staff Officer, Robert Gray 
Section A — 

Olympic Club Band 

CALIFORNIA OIL &. GAS ASSN. FLOAT 
Section B — 

91st Division A.E.F. Drum Corps 

91ST DIVISION FLOAT 
Section C — 

Union Band 

McKinnon Institute YLI Drill Team 

Carmel Institute YLI Drill Team 

Carmen's Union Division No. 1004 Drum Corps 

INTERNATIONAL LONGSHOREMEN'S FLOAT 
Section D — 

Columbia Park Boys Club Band 

Columbia Park Boys Military Unit 

PACIFIC GAS 8C ELECTRIC CO. FLOAT 

DIVISION NO. 11 
Staff Officer, Frank Field 
Section A — 

Islam Temple Shrine Band 

ISLAM TEMPLE BANNER 

Islam Temple Patrol 

Islam Temple Chanters 

Islam Temple Arabians 
Section B — 

The Salvation Army Band 

Junipero Serra YLI Drill Team 

BLINDCRAFT FLOAT 
Section C — 

San Francisco Sciots Band 

San Francisco Sciots Libyan Guard 

Golden Gate Patrol No. 150 AHEPA 

Rincon-Gabnelle Parlors N.S. fe? N.D.G.W. Drum Corps 

NEGRO BUSINESS ASSN. FLOAT 
Section D — 

Mission Parlor N.D.G.W. Drum Corps 

Mission Parlor N.D.G.W. Drill Team 

Phil Sheridan Council YMI Drill Team 

Mission Parlor N.S.G.W. Drum Corps 

San Francisco Mounted Troop 

DIVISION NO. 12 
Staff Officer, Herbert Benjamin 
Section A — 

San Francisco News Carriers Band 

United Irish Societies 

Ulster Ladies Drill Team 

Cork Ladies Drill Team 

I. R. A. Pipers Band 

RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY, INC. FLOAT 

Section B — 

Gruppo Givvanile Band 

Italian Uniformed Marching Unit 

Sacramento Branch No. 29 Italian Catholic Federation 
Drum Corps 

Italian Catholic Federation Drill Team 

FEDERATION OF ITALIAN SOCIETIES FLOAT 
Next Page) 



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26-A 



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NIGHT PARADE (Continued) 
Section C — 

Union Band 

Gabriel Institute YLI Drill Team 

Del Mar Institute YLI Drill Team 

FILIPINO COMMUNITY OF S. F. FLOAT 
Section D — 

Improved Order of Redmen Drum Corps 

Degree of Pocohantas Drill Team 

San Francisco Elks Drill Team 

Green Valley Grove Druids Drum Corps 

San Francisco Mounted Troop 

DIVISION NO. 13 
Stag Officer, Louis Goldstein 
Section A — 

San Francisco Boys' Club Band 

Patriarchs Militant Drill Team 

Theda Rho Girls Club Drum Corps 

INDEPENDENT ORDER ODD FELLOWS FLOAT 

Section B — 

Independent Order of Foresters Drum Corps 
Independent Order of Foresters Drill Team 
Independent Order of Foresters Ladies Drill Team 
Independent Order of Foresters Juvenile Drill Team 
OTTO GREULE TUMBLING STUDIO FLOAT 

Section C — 

Presidio Parlor N.S.G.W. Drum Corps 
Presidio Parlor N.D.G.W. Drill Team 
Commandery Chapter Order DeMolay Drill Team 
Guadalupe Parlor N.S. ii N.D. Drum Corps 
A. CARLISLE & CO. FLOAT 



mnnsmnr, 



MANAGER 




ERIC CULLENWARD 

General Manager 

Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta 



DIVISION NO. 14 
Stajjf Officer. Joseph Harowitz 

Section A — - 

Jos. P. McQuaide Post V.F.W. Drum Corps 

Jos. P. McQuaide Post V.F.W. Auxiliary Drill Team 

San Francisco Chapter Order DeMolay Drill Team 

Municipal Railway Drum Corps 

MARIN DELL MILK COMPANY FLOAT 

Section B — 

Utopia Drum Corps 

Job's Daughters Bethel No. 26 Drill Team 

Job's Daughters Bethel No. 37 Drill Team 

Genevieve Parlor N.D.G.W. Drum Corps 

WARRENCRAFT BOAT COMPANY FLOAT 

Section C — 

Twin Peaks Parlor N.S.G.W. Drum Corps 
Twin Peaks Parlor N.D.G.W. Drill Team 
Alberian Institute YLI Drill Team 
South San Francisco Parlor N.S.G.W. Drum Corps 
SAFEWAY STORES INC. FLOAT 
REAR POLICE GUARD 
FINIS 



The line of march for all parades will be: 
From Van Ness Avenue and Union Street, along 
Van Ness Avenue to Francisco Street, west to Frank- 
lin Street, north to Bay Street, west to Buchanan 
Street, north to Marina Boulevard, west to Crissy 
Field at the Presidio, where it will pass the grand- 
stand in review. 



PUBLICITY 




JAMES ADAM 

Publicity Director 

Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta 



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27 



winnnnnnnreTrinrGinrTririnrr^^ 



The Golden Gate Bridge Is Opened 



(Continued 

with California's glamorous Southland, and of the 
final link the Bridge makes in a smooth, unbroken 
highway between Canada and Mexico. 

Future generations will see with astonishment the 
full effect of the Goden Gate Bridge on the devel- 
opment of San Francisco and California and all 
Western America, and the cementing of amity and 
good will between three nations, the United States, 
Canada and Mexico. 

To its builders and the engineers and especially 
to the man who conceived and designed it, Chief 
Engineer Joseph B. Strauss, is owed a debt that can 
never be repaid. 

Completion of the Golden Gate Bridge de- 
manded a celebration of size and scope commen- 
surate with the Titanic structure. This, months ago, 
San Francisco decided to hold, an unprecedented 
festival of triumph and rejoicing — the Golden Gate 
Bridge Fiesta. 



from Page 9) 

Confronted with San Francisco's long record of 
festivals, world famous festivals of gaiety and joy, 
a Citizens Fiesta Committee, appointed by Mayor 
Angelo Rossi, undertook the task of making this 
celebration of the completion and opening of its 
spectacular Golden Gate Bridge, the most spec- 
tacular ever held in the West. 

Under the general chairmanship of Supervisor 
Arthur M. Brown, Jr., the committee devoted to its 
task the spirit, courage, genius and indomitable 
will that is God's gift to San Francisco and San 
Franciscans. 

Much more than a civic celebration, however, is 
this Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta. It was planned to 
be and is a giant community celebration in which 
the people of the entire Pacific Coast join. 

How well the Citizens Fiesta Committee has 
done its task may be seen and heard by the innum- 
erable eyes and ears of all who will. 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY BRIDGES COMPARISON 

Golden Gate Bridge S.F.-Oakland Bay Bridge 

Authorization : Popular vote Legislative act 

Control District Board State Commission 

Finance by District Bonds Federal loan 

Total cost $35,000,000 $77,200,000 

Length, abutment to abutment 8981 feet 23,000 feet 

Length, with approach roadways 7 miles 12 miles 

Longest single span 4200 feet 2310 feet (2) 

Cantilever span None 1 400 feet 

Height of towers 746 feet 518 feet average 

Deepest pier, below water 118 feet 242 feet 

Largest pier 155x300 feet 92 x 197 feet 

With fender wall 

Number of piers Two main, 29 others 51, all types 

Vertical clearance (Min.) 220 feet 200 feet 

Vertical clearance (Max.) 246 feet 220 feet 

Cable length, maximum 7760 feet (2) 5732 and 4972 feet 

Diameter of cables 36 inches 283,4 inches 

Weight of cables 22,000 tons 18,500 tons 

Wires per cable 27,572 17,464 

Cable wire lenth, total 80,000 miles 70,815 miles 

Tension per cable 63,000,000 pounds 42,000,000 pounds 

Structural steel used 80,000 tons 1 52,000 tons 

Concrete 330,000 cubic yards 1 ,000,000 cubic yards 

Paint 60,000 gallons 200,000 gallons 

Excavation 51 1 ,000 cubic yards 6,038,000 cubic yards 

Employment, man hours 25,000,000 54,850,000 

Vehicle facilities Motor vehicles only Vehices and electric trains 

Travel lanes Six and 2 sidewalks Six on upper deck 

Two on lower deck 

Work started January 5, 1933 July 9, 1933 

Bridge opened May 27, 1937 November 12, 1936 

27-A 



nrcnnrinrinnririririnnnri^^ 




REDWOOD EMPIRE 

ALL-YEAR PLAYGROUND 

LINKED BY GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 

ANOTHER dream comes true: The Golden Gate Bridge for- 
ever links the Northbay Redwood Empire counties with 
San Francisco — Southern Gateway to the Redwood Empire. 

The completion of the $35,000,000 Golden Gate Bridge 
crystallizes a new era of progressive development and expan- 
sion throughout San Francisco and Northbay counties (Red- 
wood Empire). 

For years, daring and adventurous leaders in this region, 
with the clear vision and courageous determination of their 
Western pioneer forefathers, spent freely of their time, effort, 
energy, thought and funds — to crystallize sentiment in favor 
of the Golden Gate Bridge project, which finally resulted in the 
formation of the Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District. 

The Officers and Directors of the Bridge District, together 
with the Chief Engineer and staff, have brought this huge 
project to successful conclusion, with the support of the Boards 
of Supervisors, taxpayers and others in the six Bridge District 
counties. 

Leaders, comprising the personnel of the Redwood Empire 
Association (official highway negotiating agency for the nine 
counties) have been a vital factor in obtaining millions in State 
and Federal highway appropriations for the construction of the 
Redwood Empire System of Highways, serving the Golden 
Gate Bridge. 

Difficult engineering feats characterized construction of 
these highways. Streambeds were moved, rock cliffs and 
mountains were blasted, deep canyons and wide rivers were 
bridged, big trees were felled and acres of dense forest 
undergrowth were hewn. 

The Redwood Empire is duly grateful to State and Federal 
officials and engineers for these improvements. 

The ever-increasing volume of tourist and vacationist traffic, 
built up over a period of years by the Redwood Empire Asso- 
ciation's publicity and advertising schedules, "earns" the high- 
ways construction appropriations requested by the counties. 

This already built-up traffic volume will contribute materially 
to the financial success of the Golden Gate Bridge, which is 
dependent upon toll-paying traffic. 

The Golden Gate Bridge forever eliminates the last major 
water barrier in the Redwood Empire System of Highways, an 
important network in the Pacific Coast System of Highways 
between Canada and Mexico. 

The Golden Gate Bridge and connecting highways will 
carry millions of visitors to an extraordinary variety of natural, 
scenic and historic attractions and recreational areas through- 
out the Redwood Empire. 

The Redwood Empire embodies these nine counties: San 
Francisco, Marin, Sonoma, Napa, Lake, Mendocino, Humboldt 
and Del Norte (California), and Josephine County (Oregon). 

San Francisco — Southern Gateway to the Redwood Empire — 
is a gay, cosmopolitan community, yet the dominant financial 
metropolis of the West. It is a city of beautiful homes and 
gardens, where all outdoor sports are enjoyed the year around. 

Sightseers enjoy numerous points of scenic and historic inter- 
est, as well as the scintillating night-life of this colorful and 
romantic city. 

28 



nnrsinnnnnnnnrinrinrinnrin^^ a a a o"o'o'o~o"o~oinrmnnro a'a'a a fi - a'fl'o'o~fl~a"oTnnr' 



REDWOOD EMPIRE 

ALL-YEAR PLAYGROUND 

SAN Francisco is noted for its many attractive scenes, its 
great stores and colorful bazaars. San Francisco's foreign 
quarters offer intriguing interest. 

A tour of the Redwood Empire is like a trip around the 
world! 

You will be inspired by tall massive redwoods, old when 
Christ was born — the oldest living things on earth. One million 
five hundred thousand acres of enormous evergreen redwoods 
(97% of the world's supply) stand in the Redwood Empire. 
They are the Sequoia Sempervirens — "ever-living". 

Imagine driving over improved hard-surfaced highways, 
through 100 miles of these mighty forest monarchs! These 
graceful big trees reach a height of 364 feet (tallest tree in the 
world), a diameter of 25 feet and an age exceeding 2500 years! 
Miles of picturesque seashore, dotted with recreational 
beaches, border the Redwood Empire — along the shoreline of 
the cool Pacific. 

Fertile valleys, rolling foothills, colorful orchards, vineyards 

and fields, and dominant 
mountains add variety to 
Redwood Empire trips and 
tours. Two national monu- 
ments and hosts of state and 
county parks await you. 

The Redwood Empire is 
an all - year playground — 
comfortaly cool in the sum- 
mer, crystal clear and a riot 
of multi-colored autumn tints 
in the fall; evergreen in the 
winter; a profusion of deli- 
cately colored blossoms, 
greenery and forest verdure 
in the spring — when hillsides 
are covered for miles with 
rhododendrons, oxalis aza- 
eas and other wild flowers. 

The Redwood Empire of- 
fers coolest summer routings 
between San Francisco and 
Oregon, Washington and 
British Columbia — by high- 
way, rail or motor coach. 

All types of hotels, resorts, 
auto courts and camps are 
available, to suit all tastes 
and purses — from the great 
metropoitan hotels of San 
Francisco and the deluxe re- 
sorts of the Northbay — to 
the smallest resort or camp. 
The mineral springs resorts 
of the Redwood Empire rival 
the famous spas of Europe in 

y -^ ^ curative qualities and recre- 

RgDnOoD SfrtPiiRg 3g$o&£Bp}J a tional features. 

28-A 



'RgrurooD 6W 

'~* — , — >, 




SAN^ FRJNrfSCO 




SUUULSLSLSJLaJU 




^4 

84/A Year in San Francisco 

BULLOCK & JONES 

COMPANY 

340 POST ST. 

• 

Custom-made 

and 
Ready-to-Wear 

MEN'S CLOTHES 

FURNISHINGS - HATS - LUGGAGE 



Only Complete Theatrical Service 
in America 

DANCE ART CO. 

25 TAYLOR ST. - Ph. PRospect 1643 
San Francisco, Calif. 




"Headquarters for Everything Fiesta" 

DECORATIVE FABRICS, TRIM- 
MINGS, POSTERS, ACCESSORIES, 
FLOATS, NOVELTY HATS, 
COSTUMES, Etc. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Visit our Booths at the Industrial & 

Manufacturers Exposition, Dreamland 

Auditorium, May 26th-June 3rd. 



EIGHTH AND FINAL WEEK 
Positively closes June 5th 

SWING PARADE 

Directed by Max Dill 
Smashing Musical Success 



75 



IN THE 
CAST 



75 



Evenings at 8:30 . . 25^ to 55^ 
Matinees at 2:30 . . 25^ to 40/ 



ALCAZAR 



260 O'Farrell 



SU 5368 



AL'S SMOKE SHOP 

WINES - LIQUORS - SANDWICHES 

Alvino J. Mesa, Prop. 

1 Vi Miles South of Palo Alto 



GOODWIN CORSET SHOP 

Anna S. Hunt 

• 

494 POST ST. - 514 MASON ST. 

SUtter 7924 San Francisco 



Phone DOuglas 2416 

VENETIAN BAKING CO. 

ITALIAN -FRENCH BREAD and ROLLS 

Panettoni Special 

2200 POWELL ST. San Francisco 



Mrs. C. E. Brown Pauline Ghione 

MODE-ART 

FASHIONABLE DRESSMAKING 
2067 Chestnut St. Phone WAlnut 8024 



Roma Products Excel for Over 60 Years 
Quality Since 1875 

Roma Macaroni Factory 

THE HOUSE WITH A COMPLETE LINE 

Francisco Street and Grant Ave. 
DOuglas 2071-2072 - - San Francisco 



J. W. Glenn Phone ORdway 3881 

Glenn-Rowe Vending 
Machine Co 

CIGARETTES 
1031 POLK STREET San Francisco, Cal. 



JOE GERRICK & COMPANY 



STEEL CONSTRUCTION 



648 Call Bldg. 



5an Francisco, Calif. 



USE 

POSTAL TELEGRAPH 

for 
TELEGRAMS - CABLEGRAMS 

RADIOGRAMS 
Fast - Accurate - Dependable 



REDWOOD CITY Hiway 101 Alt. 

IDEAL AUTO COURT 

A CLEAN PLACE for CLEAN PEOPLE 
Phone 1196 F. & A. Tracy 



29 



DISTILLERS 

DISTRIBUTING 

CORPORATION 

Importers, Rectifiers 
Manufacturers 

of 

Fine Whiskeys, Gins 
and Cordials 



414 Brannan St. G Arf ield 1277 
San Francisco, Calif. 



THE CLOVER LEAF 
CLUB 

ORCHESTRA EVERY NIGHT 



De Luxe Dinner $1.50 

EXCELLENT CUISINE 
No Cover Charge 



3 Miles South of Palo Alto 
101 ALTERNATE 



MILLER & LUX 



INCORPORATED 



FARM LANDS 



San Joaquin Valley 
and Kern County 



1114 Merchants Exchange Building 
San Francisco 



s 



I 



: 




pnrtnnnnnnnnnrsTnnr^ 

A Fiesta, An Island and A Promise 

Buena shoals and charted them; they were noted 
merely as unsafe for navigation. 

At this time the Pacific empire, even in its primi- 
tive state, lay far beyond Don Manuel's ken — al- 
though its elements were there. 

Now a 400-acre island, largest ever built by man, 
has appeared on the Yerba Buena shoals. It came 
there through the spouting discharge pipes of 
gigantic dredges and it will be there forever, as a 
central airport after the World's Fair has ended its 
288 days of gorgeous vitality in 1939. 

A fitting place for a Pageant of the Pacific, a 
Pacific that did not exist when Don Manuel was 
here sixteen decades ago. An alert, alive empire of 
the Pacific, roaring with commerce and luring the 
outlander with siren songs of vacation-land. 

Who can know all about this Golden Gate Inter- 
national Exposition on Treasure Island, v/hen a 
goodly number of its marvels are not quite invented 
just yet? Some things are known — it will be a 
$40,000,000 Fiesta, bathed in mystic light that will 
paint the Island as a scintillating jewel from this 
Bridge across the Golden Gate, yet break the 
jewel into a million facets. 

Facets that will epitomize Western and Pacific 
progress in industry and the Fine Arts; in commerce 
and in recreation; in methods and in results, in 
facts and in fun. 

It will be a World's Fair for specialists, and for 
the superficial who will be adequately delighted by 
the spectacle without troubling to understand the 
specialties. A World's Fair, in a word, for everyone. 

In it the unity of the eleven western states will © 
be bound up within a single spacious exhibit palace, 
a concentration of their industrial, agricultural and 
vacation treasures. Unity of the Pacific trade 
empire will fill the Island to its granite sea-wall. 

Mechanical progress, while fully represented, will 
not be allowed to overshadow the portrayal of this 
new culture of recreation which began in the West 
and is most at home here. 

Concrete, steel and wood are mounting jpward 
on Treasure Island today, toward the World's Fair 
skyline to come. There are twenty months still ahead 
before the Fair opens on February 18, 1939, and 
every day will see further concentration of the 
wonders available in the Western Hemisphere. 
Eleven Western States, British Columbia and all the 
Pacific nations are enlisted. 

So the Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta, a brilliant 
celebration of a brilliant accomplishment, is a 
glamorous prelude and a promise to the greater 
Fiesta in 1939 — the Pageant of the Pacific, which 
will transfer an enlarged emphasis from the Con- 
struction of a bridge into its Destiny and its 
Achievement. 



NOTHING in the Western world is more highly 
significant this week than the final, spectacular 
scaling of a barrier that has, since time began, 
defied the passage of man by land — so that he 
might enter from the sea. 

Here, now, the Golden Gate has become truly 
three-dimensional, welcoming man and speeding 
him along his way — by sea, by air, or by land. 

Realization of this significance pervades even 
the gaiety of our Fiesta, for it is plain that this 
utilitarian spider-web spun across the Golden Gate 
in laborious realization of the Redwood Empire's 
dream is primarily a promise, rather than a com- 
plete fulfillment. The Bridge is here; its benefits 
are to come. 

Similarly this joyous Fiesta is a promise — a shrill 
of trumpets hailing the onrush of 1939 and its 
Golden Gate International Exposition, which will 
entertain an anticipated 20,000,000 visitors on its 
"Treasure Island" in San Francisco Bay. 

This World's Fair will carry on — past the struc- 
tural achievement of the Golden Gate Bridge, 
past the steel glory of its mighty brother that spans 
the Bay from San Francisco to Oakland. 

It will symbolize the meaning of these Bridges to 
the Western and Pacific empire that surrounds 
them. Three great spectacles in one great harbor! 

Even to its foundations the Golden Gate Exposi- 
tion will present a perfectly-assembled picture, 
material as well as symbolic, of vVestern progress. 
Glance for a moment back into the year I 775, when 
Don Manuel de Ayala sailed his tiny "San Carlos" — 
the first vessel ever to pass through the Golden 
Gate — into this safe harbor. He located the Yerba 



OLOJUULSULOJLOJULSUULO 

29-A 




THE BRIDGE BUILDERS 
Here we see a few interesting photos of the Bridge builders. No. I, Steel workers riveting the deck supports. 
2. Another steel worker is busy high above the Golden Gate. 3. A painter on the job 700 feet in the air. 
4. Time out for lunch. 5. Placing reinforcing bars for deck paving. 6. Binding one of the many cable strands. 



30 



irsinnnrtrsirirsTnririnnririr^ 



Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District 

WHO'S WHO AMONG THE OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 



° 



I 



i: 



WILLIAM P. FILMER, San Francisco — 
President of Board of Directors. Native of 
New York State; resident of San Francisco 
more than sixty years; educated in San 
Francisco schools. President of Filmer 
Bros. Electrotype Company since 1900, 
and secretary of the Cooperative Bindery 
Company since 1909. 

Appointed director December 1928, 
elected president of board at first meeting, 
and has served continuously since. Ex-offi- 
cio member of all committees; chairman of 
conciliation committee; member of public 
meeting attendance, celebration, and rules 
and policy committees. 

ROBERT H. TRUMBULL, Novato, Mann 
County— Vice-president of Board of Direc- 
tors. Native of California. Spent number 
of years in San Francisco in marine in- 
surance and shipping business; past 30 
years engaged in lumber, real estate and 
farming operations in Marin County. Active 
in various agricultural organizations, banks 
and other groups. 

Appointed director December 1928, 
elected vice-president of board. Chairman 
of bond and finanee and celebration com- 
mittees, member of employment and con- 
ciliation committees. 

ARTHUR M. BROWN JR., San Francisco 
— Native of Alameda; educated in Alameda 
schools and University of California; vice- 
president of Edward Brown & Sons, Pacific 
Coast general agents for several large 
American insurance companies. Member of 
San Francisco Board of Supervisors, serv- 
ing second term. 

Appointed director December 1934. 
Member of building, public meeting at- 
tendance, auditing, and celebration com- 
mittees. 

THOMAS MAXWELL, Napa, Napa 
County — Native of England; resident of 
Napa for more than 50 years. Member of 
Napa Board of Supervisors for more than 
20 years, and chairman for part of time. 
Engaged in nursery business at Napa. 

Appointed director January 1929. Mem- 
ber of building committee, and chairman 
of same since January 1937; also member 
of highways, roads and traffic, legislation 
and public relations, Sausalito lateral com- 
mittees, and chairman of committee to 
procure right-of-way for road between 
Napa-Sacramento "Y" and Black Point 
Cutoff. 

HUGO D. NEWHOUSE, San Francisco- 
Native of San Francisco, educated in 
schools and Hastings College of Law, 
University of California. Engaged in legal 
profession; in charge of Red Cross athlet- 
ics 1919 to 1923; president of Temple 
Emanu-El Men's Club; director University 
of California Club. 

Appointed director December 1933 to 
succeed George T. Cameron, resigned. 
Chairman of safety committee, member of 
finance, military replacements, bond and 
special committees. 




RICHARD J. WELCH, San Francisco- 
Native of California; educated in public 
schools; entered public life early and served 
as wharfinger on waterfront, State Sena- 
tor, and member of the Board of Super- 
visors for many years; elected Congress- 
man from Fifth District in 1926 and has 
served since. 

While member of the Board of Super- 
visors, on November 12, 1918, introduced 
original resolution providing for a survey 
towards bridging the Golden Gate, first 
official public declaration on the project. 
Later served as one of five members of the 
Citizens' Golden Gate Bridge Committee 
which secured passage of legislation author- 
izing creation of the Golden Gate Bridge 
and Highway District. 

Appointed director December 1928. 
Chairman of committee on military re- 
placements, and member of bond, and 
World's Fair site committees. 

A. R. O'BRIEN, Ukiah, Mendocino County 
— -Native of Iowa. Educated in St. Mich- 
ael's and Santa Clara University; entered 
newspaper field and worked in Cuba, Mex- 
ico and Alaska; returned to California and 
now publisher of Ukiah Republican Press; 
member of State Board of Prison Directors. 
Appointed director December 1928. 
Chairman of highways, roads and traffic 
and printing committees, and member of 
auditing, conciliation, and celebration com- 
mittees. 

FRANK P. DOYLE, Santa Rosa, Sonoma 
County — Native of Petaluma, educated in 
Petaluma, Cloverdale, Santa Rosa and San 
Francisco. President of Exchange Bank, 
Santa Rosa, since 1916. Served five years 
as president of Santa Rosa Chamber of 
Commerce, member of Petaluma and State 
Chambers; treasurer of Redwood Empire 
Association for 15 years. Operates fruit and 
dairy ranches. 

Appointed director December 1928. One 
of first supporters of bridge project. Mem- 
ber of auditing, bond, highways, roads and 
traffic, finance committees, and committee 
to procure right-of-way for road between 
Napa-Sacramento "Y" and Black Point 
Cutoff to connect with Bridge. 

JOSEPH A. McMINN, Healdsburg, So- 
noma County — Native of Sonoma County, 
parents having crossed plains with ox 
teams. Operated stock and fruit ranches in 
Sonoma County until retirement from ac- 
tive ranch life; served as city trustee and 
later mayor of Healdsburg; 14 years as 
county supervisor, and an unexpired term 
as sheriff. Chairman of Sonoma County 
Board of Supervisors when original peti- 
tion for formation of district was circu- 
lated. 

Appointed director December 1928. 
Member of finance and highways, roads 
and traffic committees and committee to 
procure right-of-way for road between 
Napa-Sacramento "Y" and Black Point 
Cutoff. 

JUUUU 
30-A 



WARREN SHANNON, San Francisco- 
Native of San Francisco; educated in pub- 
lic schools; entered father's printing busi- 
ness; appointed San Francisco Supervisor 
in 1919 and has served continuously ever 
since. Now president of Board of Super- 
visors. 

Appointed director December 1928. 
Chairman of auditing, employment, public 
meeting attendance, conciliation, Sausalito 
lateral, and rules and policy committees; 
member of highways, roads and traffic and 
printing committees. 

HARRY LUTGENS, San Rafael, Marin 
County — Native of San Francisco. Resided 
and educated in San Francisco, Marin and 
Sonoma Counties. Publisher of San Rafael 
Independent; president of Redwood Em- 
pire Association for two years; secretary 
California Press Association; State Director 
of Institutions. 

Appointed director November 1930. 
Chairman of legislation and public rela- 
tions committees, member of employment, 
printing, building, and special committees. 

JOHN P. McLAUGHLIN, San Francisco- 
Native of San Francisco; educated in San 
Francisco public schools; secretary of Local 
No. 85, Brotherhood of Teamsters, and 
president of Joint Council of Teamsters; 
secretary-treasurer of Highway Drivers' 
Council of California; member of San 
Francisco Public Utilities Commission; 
former U. S. Collector of Internal Rev- 
enue, 1921 to 1933, and State Labor 
Commissioner, 1910 to 1933. 

Appointed director January 1934. Mem- 
ber of building, safety, auditing, bond, 
conciliation, highways, roads and traffic, 
and special committees. 

WILLIAM D. HADELER, San Francisco- 
Native of California; educated in grammar 
and private schools, business schools and 
University of California; State secretary of 
California Retail Grocers and Merchants 
Association; president of San Francisco 
Grocery Company; president of Northern 
California Trade Executives' Association; 
executive chairman of Alliance of Retail 
Trade Associations; president of Certified 
Food Trade Press of America and editor of 
California Retail Grocers' Advocate. 

Appointed director December 24, 1936. 
Member of celebrations, Sausalito lateral, 
safety, and finance committees and alter- 
nate member of auditing committee. 

HENRY WESTBROOK JR., Smith River, 

Del Norte County — Native of Del Norte 
County; educated in public schools of Ala- 
meda and University of California; en- 
gaged in sheep and dairy farming in Smith 
River Valley since. 

Appointed director December 1928, 
served four years, and reappointed in 
December 1936 for another four years. 
Member of employment and conciliation, 
rules and policy, and legislation and public 
relations committees, and alternate mem- 
ber of auditing committee. 









Daly City Merchants Assoc. 
DALY CITY, CALIF. 

Ernest Milo, President 
Albert H. Boynton, Business Manager 



David Willard Johnsen-III 



Occidental Hotel 

SANTA ROSA, CALIF. 

Famous for its hospitality and 
new moderate priced Coffee Shop 



Rooms with bath or shower_ 



42.50 



Rooms without bath-J1.50 and $2.00 



W. W. MADISON 
Manager and Owner 



Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 



Official Costumers 

— to — 

Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta 

• 

GOLDSTEIN 
& CO. 

989 MARKET STREET 
GArfield 5150 
San Francisco 



All costumes designed and produced 
in San Francisco 

"68 Years in San Francisco" 




MASSIVENESS! 

San Francisco Tower Rising 746 Feet 

in Air. 



Vanderbilt Hotel 

Luxuriously Furnished 
AND 

Club Vanderbilt 

in connection 

Finest Liquors - Foods 
Entertainment 



Telephone ORdway Q500 
Mason and Eddy Sts. San Francisco 



31 



HOME HUNTING? 




Don't tire yourselves Home 
Hunting blindly 



Let 



GRACE PEREGO 

Conserve your Time and Effort 

• 

176 Sutter Street GA 7840 

Branch Office- EMPORiUM-Third Floor 



On Your Way to Bay Meadows 
STOP AT 

OLIVER'S CHARCOAL 
BROILER 

ITALIAN DINNERS 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



South San Francisco 



otel (anftabiol 



r T| AM PflflLOlfl\ 



[ Jflfl PfleL07flV£.AT20THJTftE£T 

lAKLAND 
Calif. 



Town 




Central 



A Home /Jway From Home 

Completely Renovated --r 
- - - and Redecorated 

RATES 

With detached bath from*l.25 daily 
With Bath • - - -from*l.75dail/ 

• FREE • ifrL NEW MODERN 
GARAGE UprftfCOFFEE SHOP 

DIRECTIOMS- TO HOTEL. 

jtay on 9flain Highway 

(San Pablo Jivenue) 
directly to 20th.Street 

management- • Harry B. Strang 



H AZ«MOR E 

SCHOOL OF DRESS 

Pattern Cutting, Grading, Designing, 

Dressmaking, Tailoring, Power 

Machine Operation. 

DAY AND EVENING CLASSES 



117» MARKET ST. 



UNderhill 4176 



PARMETT.Inc. 

5c TO $1.00 STORE 
2123 POLK ST. Bet. Broadway & Vallejo 



JAMES L. CALLAN 

JEWELERS 
209 POST STREET - San Francisco, Cal. 

JOE Dl MAGGIO'S 
GROTTO 

• 

FISHERMAN'S WHARF 



Verne Lasley Ralph Glover 

ORdway 3803-PAones-BAyview 632S 

Fifth Avenue Beauty Shops 

Specializing in 

HAIR DESIGNING and 

PERMANENT WAVING 

1643 POLK STREET 324 CLEMENT 



ORdway 0721 ORdway 0722 

Old Nob Hill Fruit Market 

FANCY FRUITS AND PRODUCE 
D. Birnbaum & Co. 
1630-36 POLK ST. San Francisco 



ORdway 1342 



ORdway 0721-22 



Old Nob Hill Market 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL BUTCHERS 

A. Bottaro & Co. 

1630-36 POLK ST. San Francisco 



Main Office: 

Phone HEmlock 1017 



Factory: 

530 Gough St. 



WEST PAINT COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

SNO BOY PAINTS 

Paints, Varnishes. Wall Paper & Brushes 

1612 MARKET ST. 



Drive a While and Dine with a Smile at the 
FRESH SEA FOODS 

MIRAMAR FISH GROTTO 

Private Booths for Parties 
Specialists in Lunch and Fish Dinners 
Also a la Carte — Open Until 12 P.M. 
2739 TAYLOR STREET PRospect 5367 

Fishermen's Wharf SAN FRANCISCO 



New California Market 

Grocery, Fruits and Vegetables, Meats 
2284 Union Street WEst 5236 



Golden Gate 

Bridge and 
Highway District 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

JAMES REED, San Francisco — General 
Manager. Native of Ohio; graduate of 
U. S. Naval Academy; following sea duty 
selected for Naval Construction Corps; spe- 
cial courses at Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology; shop superintendent at Phila- 
delphia and Bremerton Navy Yards, and in 
various other capacities; naval attache in 
South America; superintendent of new con- 
struction at Mare Island Navy Yard in 
connection with building of tankers, de- 
stroyers, and the battleship California; on 
leave as assistant director of public works 
for City of Philadelphia. 

Resigned from Navy in 1920, and held 
various executive industrial positions since. 
Appointed general manager January 1933, 
and served continuously since. 

W. W. FELT JR., San Francisco— Secre- 
tary of the Board of Directors. Native of 
Kansas; resident of California 44 years; 
educated in Santa Rosa schools; railroad 
man for number of years; entered public 
life as deputy county recorder of Sonoma 
County, serving eight years, then elected 
county clerk, and served 16 years. 

During war conducted both draft regis- 
trations in Sonoma County, also acted as 
Federal fuel administrator. Federal super- 
visor of explosives, member of County 
Council of Defense, and participated in 
Liberty Bond campaigns. 

Early campaigner for Golden Gate 
Brndge; drafted ordinance placing Sonoma 
County behind Bridge; secretary of first 
automobile club in Sonoma County, and 
served in various public groups. Appointed 
secretary March 1929, and served continu- 
ously since. 

GEORGE A. HARLAN, Marin County- 
Attorney for District. Native of San Fran- 
cisco; educated in San Francisco and Mariu 
County, and University of California, and 
Hastings College of Law; began practice of 
law in San Rafael in 1903; later elected to 
State Assembly for one term; attorney for 
Marin Municipal Water District. 

Acted as advisor in organization move- 
ment for Bridge District, and aided in 
drafting the act under which the District 
was created, and appointed attorney for 
the District in 1928, and served continu- 
ously since, handling litigation, contracts, 
and other matters. 

ROY S. WEST, San Francisco — Auditor. 
Native of New Mexico; educated in schools 
there and Stanford University, graduating 
from Stanford Graduate School of Busi- 
ness; active in Lion's International as 
district secretary, Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce and other groups. Appointed assist- 
ant auditor of District in February 1936, 
and promoted to auditor in June the same 
year, following death of John R. Ruckstell, 
the first auditor. 

31-A 



Compliments of . . . 

H. F. McMAHAN 

with 
INDEPENDENT LAUNDRY 

Route "A" 



Quality Pork and Sausage Co. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH CLASS SAUSAGE AND MEAT 
SPECIALTIES 



&o*e (P'Prten 

WOMEN'S DRESSES 

For all occasions, priced from $6.95 

to $25.00. Outstanding Values. 

All Sizes. 

140 Geary St., Second Floor DO. 80£? 



DELRAY CORPORATION 

FINE FOODS 
600 BRYANT STREET 



DINE and DANCE 

Lena's Buon Gusto Hotel 

BEER, CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS 

Special Italian Dinners 

509 Adams Street, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Cross Tracks at Depot Telephone 397 



GArfield 5403 - Phones - GArfield 9493 

NOONDAY CLUB 

LUNCH AND DINNERS 

CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS 

Paul Masoni, Prop. 

450 Market Street - San Francisco, Cal. 



BROWN CHEVROLET CO. 

AT THE BRIDGE 

Near Everything 

7th and HARRISON STS. 
MArket 8668 



Office: 758-760 Phelan Bldg. 

760 Market St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone KEarny 4044-4045 



THE FAY IMPROVEMENT 
COMPANY 



PAVEMENT CONTRACTORS 

HIGHWAYS, STREETS 

AND SUBDIVISIONS 



nnrirsiiinnnnrsirsinrrtnnnn^ a-e-a'a'a a a a a a ir\ 

COMMITTEES OF THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE FIESTA 



MAYOR ANGELO J. ROSSI, Honorary Chairman 
ERIC CULLENWARD, General Manager 



ARTHUR M. BROWN, JR., General Chairman 
JAMES ADAM, Publicity Director 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



William P. Filmer 
Robert H. Trumbull 
A. R. O'Brien 



Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District 

Frank P. Doyle 
Francis V. Keesling 
Joseph B. Strauss 

Redwood Empire Association 



Warren Shannon 
Thomas Maxwell 
Clay Bernard 



Gail D. Apperson 
H. G. Ridgway 



A. J. Cleary 

Chief of Police Wm. J. Quinn 

Rear Adm. A. St. Clair Smith 

Maj. Gen. George Simonds 

Lt. Col. H. R. Oldfield 

Major John B. Wilson 

Col. John H. Skeggs 

Maj. Gen. James Breckinridge 

W. L. Hughson 



Arthur E. Connick 
Frank P. Doyle 
William Filmer 
Earl Fisher 
Reed Funsten 



A. E. Connick 
Carl W. Bahr 

City and County 
Philip Landis 
Leonard Leavy 
Thomas L. Chambers 
George W. Baker 
Col. Carlos Huntington 
Lieut. B. S. Copping 
Walter H. Duane 
Capt. Lewis Mesherry 
Commodore George Bauer 
Harold J. 



Ernest L. Finley 
Richard W. Costello 

of San Francisco 

John J. O'Toole 

Edward D. Vandeleur 

George D. Smith 

Harvey M. Toy 

Lt. Com. Ralph Skylstead 

Albert Schwabacher 

George H. Roos 

Marshall Hale 

Nathan Danziger 
McCurry 



FINANCE 



Nion Tucker, Chairman 
Louis R. Lurie Daniel J. Murphy 

H. R. Gaither George H. Roos 

Jesse McCargar Albert Schwabacher 

Parker S. Maddux George D. Smith 

Daniel C. Murphy Jesse Steinhart 



Clyde Edmondson 



B. I. Graves 
Charles Page 
Paul Verdier 
James Bradley 
John F. Shelley 
William H. Adams 
Earl Fisher 
Fred Pabst 
James Adam 



Harvey M. Toy 
R. H. Trumbull 
Dean Witter 
Clay Bernard 



Cliff Anglim 
George Creel 



W. P. A. FINANCES 

Clyde Healy, Chairman 
Frank Hennessy 
Walter Hood 

EVENTS 



William R. Lawson 
William Maoser, Jr. 



Andrew Gallagher 



Marshal Hale, 
Leon E. Morris 



Chairman 
Dr. A. S. Musante 



Albert A. Rhine 



Yacht Racing 
Commodore Clifford A. Smith 
Frank A. Cressey, Jr. 
Phil Finell 
Leon F. de Fremery 
Warren H. McBride 

Parade 
W. H. Moulthrop, Chairman 
Seth Butler 
Edgar P. Nelson 
W. Lansing Rothschild 
Cy Voorhies 

Fireworks 
Roland Oliver 
Wm. P. Bear 

Entertainment 
R. A. McNeill 



Pageants 
William Smith, Jr. Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan, Manager 
Arthur M. Brown, Jr. 
Gardner Dailey 
Tirey Ford 
Wilbur Hall 
Charles Hart 
Clyde Healy 
Kenneth Hook 
Ted Huggins 
Wm. Lawson 
Edgar P. Nelson 
Roland Oliver 
Wm. H. Smith, Jr. 
Floats 
Kendrick Vaughan 
Karl Eber 
Ernest E. Wiehe 



Newspapermen Sports Committee 
Harry Borba Pat Frayne William 

Owen Merrick Al Santoro 



Sports 
Wm. M. Coffman, Chairman 
Al Katchinski, Secretary 
Gus Brown 
W. Brandt 
Harry Benton 
Walter Christie 
Roy J. Cronin 
Roderick Chisholm 
Ray Daugherty 
John Downey 
J. Dearing 
L. Dinkelspiel 
Al Earle 
Frank Foss 
Frank Geis 
Ed. Garrigan 
Joe Gaddini 
Chas. Hunter 
Brutus Hamilton 
H. Ingwersen 
Lincoln Johnson 
Howard Kinsey 



Chesley Bonestell 
Arthur M. Brown, Jr. 
Gardner Dailey 
Peter A. Ilyin 



ART and DECORATIONS 

Haig Patigian, Chairman 

Hugo D. Newhouse Edgar A. Brown 

J. Dwight O'Dell Frank A. Cressey, Jr. 

W. H. Smith, Jr. James Farley 

J. L. Stuart Julius Girod 



Frank Keneally 
Dr. L. Linehan 
J. Lineras 

0. Lindeke 
H. A. Loomis 
Malrolm MacDonald 
Al Masters 

E. P. Madigan 

P. Maloney 

Frank Needles 

Kenneth Priestley 

Phil Patterson 

Rev. Leo Powelson 

L. Stanford 

John Shannon 

R. Schwerin 

Al Sandell 

M. Sweeney 

L. T. Shaw 

R. L. Templeton 

Hoyt Wood 

D. Watson 

1. Weinstein 



Otis R. Johnson 
Lawrence J. Klein 
Capt. B. P. Lamb 



Earl Fisher 
J. B. Worden 



Edward Baron 
A. M. Bowles 
Karl Eber 



LIGHTING 

Tirey Ford, Chairman 
Larry Lewis 
Paul J. Ost 

MUSIC 

Emmet Hayden, Chairman 
Sam Levin 
William G. Merchant 
Selby Oppenheimer 
Cliff Work 



Ralph Wiley 
Kendrick Vaughan 



John Pettit 
Alfred Roncovieri 
Phil Sapiro 



r^nnnnnnnnnr 



tr ? ~c rtnrsinnrinnrsirsinnnrsTnr^ 

INVITATIONS and RECEPTION 



= 



William P. Filmer, Chairman 



Warren Shannon, Vice-Chairman 



Miss Lotus Coombs, Secretary 



Gail D. Apperson 
Commodore George Bauer 
Fuller Brawner 
Jess Brilliant 
Arthur M. Brown, Jr. 
Frank P. Doyle 



E. S. Ciprico, Jr. 
Richard Costello 



Sheppard French 
Maurice A. Galo 
Capt. Charles Goff 
W. D. Hadeler 
Francis V. Keesling 
Leonard Leavy 



Harry Lutgens 
Thomas Maxwell 
John P. McLaughlin 
Joseph McMinn 
Capt. Lewis Mesherry 
Hugo D. Newhouse 



CONCESSIONS 

W. A. Hargear, Jr., Chairman 
Joseph Cumming M. J. Lawley 

Capt. C. N. Dolan William J. Quinn 



Chief Wm. J. Quinn 
Thos. J. Riordan 
Wm. G. Shackleton 
Leslie C. Tubbs 
Richard J. Welch 
Henry Westbrook, Jr. 



Harry Ross 



PUBLICITY 

A. R. O'Brien, Chairman James Adam, Secretary Al Joy, Vice-Chairman William O. Leachman, Program Bus. Mgr. 



George North 
Irvin Keeler 
Henry Budde 
Frederick Wagner 



Harold P. Deal 
Ted Huggins 
Fred Pabst 
Preston Allen 
Ralph Brunton 
Lyn Church 



Matthew Brady 
Judge Alden Ames 
Sol A. Abrams 
Melbert B. Adams 
Wm. J. Ball 
Russell A. Bergemann 
Bill Berk 
Isador Botasof 
Judge C. R. Boden 
Jack L. Blaine 
Robert E. Burns 
Melvin Belli 
Robert H. Bolander, Jr. 
Nora Blichfeldt 
Lewis F. Byington 
Henry C. Clausen 
George N. Crocker 
John D. Costello 
J. Emmet Chapman 
Judge Frank Deasy 
Joseph Deering 



W. N. Burkhardt 

George Cameron 

W. W. Chapin 

Bobs Purcell, Program Editor 

RADIO 



Charles W. Collier 
Clyde Edmondson 
Ernest L. Finley 
John L. Leberthon 



William Adams, Chairman 



Robert Dumm 
H. P. Drey 
Harry Elliott 
Don Gilman 
Hugh Gilmore 
Phillip Lasky 



William McGill 
J. C. Morgan 
William Pabst 
M. E. Roberts 
Milton Samuels 
Don Thompson 



Clarence Lindner 
Harry Lutgens 
Richard Norton 
Morris A. Penter 



Lloyd Yoder 
Jack Burroughs 
Herb Caen 
Darrell Donnell 
Bob Hall 
Bill Holmes 
Claude La Belle 



SPEAKERS 9 BUREAU 



Earl Fisher, Chairman 
George Thomas Davis 
Arthur B. Dunne 
Elliot Epsteen 
Karl Eber 
V. Estcourt 
Letitia Farber 
Earl Fisher 
Bruce Fratas 
Rose Fanucchi 
Robert Miller Green 
I. M. Golden 
Sidney Hulsizer 
Naomi Hammond 
Jerome P. Herst 
Doris Hoffman 
Jerry Hills 

Col. Carlos W. Huntington 
Judge Walter Perry Johnson 
Eneas J. Kane 

Mrs. Edward Dexter Knight 
Edward J. Kenny 



Judge Thos. M. Foley, Director 



Gerald J. Kenny 

L. M. Lalanne 

Al Lobree 

Robert Littler 

Felix Lauricella 

Ben K. Lerer 

Leland Lazarus 

W. LaViolette 

Fred Mahr 

Harding J. McGuire 

Judge Theresa Meickle 

William M. Malone 

Mary J. Moran 

Frank J. McCarthy 

Dr. Joseph G. Mayerle 

E. F. Maryatt 

Judge Twain Michelson 

Wayne R. Millington 

Walter Mails 

T. C. Meagher 

John T. McCarthy 

Marie M. Nilson 



PARTICIPATION 



Pacific Cavalcades Waldo Dedication 
H. G. RIDGWAY, General Chairman 

Chairman Events Committee Redwood Empire Assn. 
Ted Huggins, Chairman Mobilization and Routings 
E. J. Guidotti, Chairman Redwood Empire Association 

Parade Coordination 
Harry N. Christensen, Chairman Waldo Arrangements 

President Marvelous Marin, Inc. 
Carl Bahr, Chairman International California Redwood 

Log-Barrier Sawing Contest 
Fred Weddleton, Chairman, San Francisco Cavalcades 

Procession Committee 
Clyde Edmondson, Executive Officer 
C. O. Dunbar, Chairman Waldo Reception Committee 
Gail D. Apperson, Chairman Marin County Participation 

Chairman Marin County Board of Supervisors and 

President Redwood Empire Association Supervisors Unit. 
COUNTY CHAIRMEN 
Redwood Empire Parade Participation 
Clyde Healy, San Francisco 
W. D. Fusselman, Marin 
Thomas Peryam, San Rafael 
J. P. Kelly, Sebastopol, Sonoma County 
W. D. Butler, Napa, Napa County 
Ed. Haehl, Cloverdale, Mendocino County 
Norman Buhn, Mendocino Couinty 
L. C. Barnard, Kelseyville, Lake 
Earle Mills, Eureka, Humboldt 
V. K. Meedom, Crescent City, Del Norte 
H. S. Morgan, Grants Pass, Josephine 
H. S. Bullock, Chief Big Horn, Oregon Cavemen, Inc., 

Grants Pass, Oregon 
Andrew Gallagher George W. Hall 

J. Emmet Hayden Judge William Z. Tiffany 



Edward Vandeleur 
E. L. Barnett 
Denis Donohoe 
Fred Hohweisner 
Lansing G. Hurd 
Sigmund Kahn 
James Reed 
Charles M. Reinking 
George Roos 

Schools 

C. Harold Caulfield, Chairman 

Archie J. Cloud 

Joseph P. Nourse 

Miss Edith Pence 

Mrs. Mildred Prince 

Dr. A. C. Roberts 

Federal 
William H. McCarthy 

State 
P. W. Meherin 

Fraternal 
Dr. A. C. Carlton, Chairman 
Henry Boyen 

Army 
Captain Lewis Mesherry 

Navy 
Commodore George Bauer 



Clifford J. Peters 

Joe Pape 

George Reilly 

John T. Regan 

Hal Rushton 

Harry E. Speas 

David E. Supple 

Austin Shean 

Robert H. Schaefer 

Robert W. Scott 

Sanborn H. Smith 

M. C. Symonds 

James A. Toner 

Vern Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Thuesen 

Frank Turner 

Russ Westover, Jr. 

W. A. Worthington 

Leonard Worthington 

Mildred Woloski 

P. E. Wilcox 

B. O. Selbach 

George Stein 



Labor 
John O'Connell 

Marine Corps 
Maj. Gen. James Breckinridge 

Coast Guard 
Capt. C. C. McMillan 

Veterans 
Eldon Spofford 

Pioneers 
I. M. Peckham, Chairman 
Miss Kathryn L. Cole 

Civic 

Harold Boyd, Chairman 

Andrew Gallagher 

P. J. Kelly 

Dr. A. T. Leonard 

Delevan Sherwood 

A. de Urioste 

Pedestrian Day Souvenir 
Ticket 

Geo. H. Roos, Chairman 

Haig Patigian 

James Reed 

Clyde Edmondson 

Richard Costello 

Walter Reimers 

Paul Verdier 

W. A. Hargear, Jr. 

James Adam 



<^"TTuTmmmnnmro~^^ a a e- 



Lionel B. Samuel 



GRANDSTAND TICKETS 

Leonard S. Leavy, Chairman 
Selby C. Oppenheimer Peter D. Conley Wren Middlebrook 



Joseph R. Hickey 



TRANSPORTATION and COMMUNICATIONS 



Fred Boeken 
Lyle Brown 
T. J. DeLasaux 
Harry Fialer 
J. R. Hayden 



Fred Pabst, Chairman 

W. L. Hughson Wm. J. Mulpeters 

Samuel Kahn John Pettit 

Felix S. McGinnis W. L. Rothschild 

W. H. Moulthrop W. E. Travis 

POLICE. FIRE and HEALTH 



Aviation 
Brig. Gen. Wm. E. Gilmore, 

Honorary Chairman 
K. A. Kennedy, Chairman 
Warren Burke 
Burke Smith 
S. A. Stimpson 



Warren Shannon, Chairman 

Fire Chief Charles Brennan, Vice Chairman 

Chief of Police William J. Quinn, Vice Chairman 

Sheriff Daniel C. Murphy 

HEALTH Dr. Lloyd Reynolds TRAFFIC 

Dr. J. C. Geiger, Chairman Dr. Russell C. Ryan Capt. Charles Goff, Chairman 

Dr. Aubrey Rawlins E. Raymond Cato 

MINERS' HARD ROCK RAMI l»lt II I l\<. CONTEST 



Bert C. Austin 



James Bradley, Chairman 
John Donnelly, Executive Secretary 

Frank A. Dromgold Walter W. Bradley 

Charles H. Segerstrom Archie Stevenot 



*« 



REDWOOD EMPIRE ASSOCIATION 

Executive Board and Members 1936-1937 



George P. Anderson, President 

Elliot M. Epsteen, Attorney 



Mo. Goldman, Junior Past President Frank P. Doyle, Treasurer 

Clyde Edmondson, General Manager and Secretary 



County Vice-Presidents 
E. H. Maggard, San Francisco Harold Rosenberg, Sonoma J. J. Caylor, Mendocino 

W. D. Fusselman, Marin Andrew McNair, Napa-Lake Paul E. Mudgett, Humboldt 

S. F. Flynn, Del Norte H. S. Morgan, Josephine 

Executive Board Members at Large 
Gail D. Apperson, President Supervisors Unit J. P. Kelly, President Chambers of Commerce Unit, 

Harry Lutgens, Chairman Publicity and Advertising Com. Sevastopol 

IT ' '. , „i_ ■ r- j ai . t ^ Mark Fenton, President Garage and Service Station Unit, 

H. G. Ridgway. Chairman Events and Celebration Com. g an R a f ae ] 

Leo Lebenbaum, President Hotel Resort Conference J. K. Shireman, President Auto Camp-Auto Court Unit, 

F u re \\ 3 
E. L. Finley, President Newspaper Publishers Unit, w F Whitney, President Realtors' Unit, Willits 

Santa Rosa R. A. Thompson, President Shoreline Directorate, Novato 



Gate Bridge opening celebration. 



Gate Bridge Fiesta realizes the high expectatior 



To all who contributed, in whatever degree, to felt at the beginning of its work and that all who 
the expense of the Fiesta; to the newspapers and have labored on it have done their work well, 
other publications of San Francisco, of California Thank you all. 






■8 



THANK YOU! 

SAN Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta Citi- and the Nation; to the radio broadcasting stations ° 

zens Committee of which Mayor Angelo J. Rossi which have contributed so liberally of their time; °i 

is honorary chairman; Supervisor Arthur M. Brown, and to all who have worked indefatigably within, 

Jr., chairman; Eric Cullenward, general manager, and outside the headguarters organization, very 

and James Adam, publicity director, extends its special thanks is extended together with congratu- 

sincerest thanks to every individual and organiza- lations upon the success of their efforts, 
tion assisting in arranging and staging the Golden The Citizens' Committee feels that the Golden 



ELCERRITO 



BERKELEY 




SAN 
MATEO 



TO THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 

the achievement of centuries 

FROM 

The Longest Highway Bridge in the World 
The Connecting Link to the Valleys 

SAN MATEO BRIDGE 



33-A 



Phone WAlnut 2416 

PIOMBO BROS. & CO. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
and HAULING 

1571 Turk Street San Francisco 

Pacific Coast Blue Print Co. 

PHOTOSTAT COPIES 

Monadnock Building 

681 Market Street — Room 281 

Phone DOuglas 1527 San Francisco, Cal. 

SUNNYVALE TAVERN 

Half Way to Santa Cruz 
EL CAMINO REAL AT 
SANTA CRUZ TURNOFF 

H. P. GARIN COMPANY 

Growers, Shippers and Car Lot 

Distributors of 

CALIFORNIA VEGETABLES 

64 Pine Street San Francisco, Calif. 



Let's Go Spanish 

SAN CARLOS TAMALE CAFE 

On Fillmore Just Off Chestnut 
3347 FILLMORE ST. Phone WAlnut 3534 



HOTEL ALTA MIRA 


SAUSALITO - Phone 166 


A Bit of the Riviera 


Beside the Golden Gate 




I. C. WALKER 


Managing Owner 



RADIOS 



ELECTRICIANS 



The Sign 

B Y 

of Service 



I \ «. T O \ 

ELECTRIC CO. 



1809 Fillmore Street — San Francisco 

Phone WAlnut 6000 Service from 8 a. m. to 10 p. m. 

ELECTRICAL WIRING, FIXTURES AND REPAIRS 



THE BARREL INN 

139 ELLIS STREET 



Maggini Motor Car Co. 

123 JACKSON ST. GArfield 0145 



SAFEWAY JOINS IN 
THE THRILL OF 
A LIFETIME 



The opening of the Golden Gate Bridge will be the spark 
that touches off a full week of thrills. A week crammed 
with gaiety, joy and gorgeous spectacles on land and sea. 
Let's all join in celebrating this mighty engineering achieve- 
ment uniting San Francisco and the beautiful Redwood Empire. 




Life Begins at . 


. . . . MONA'S DOuglas 9736 




^A Rendezvous for Discriminating Bohemians 


Mona Sargent 


140 Columbus Ave., San Francisco 



PACIFIC 


COAST 


AGGREGATES, 


INC. 


CRUSHED ROCK 

We furnished all of the concrete used 
83 SECOND STREET, 


Producers of 

. . . SAND . 

in the construction 
5AN FRANCISCO 


. GRAVEL 

of the Golden Gate Bridge. 
CALIFORNIA 



34 




m 



A 



S. Takazawa & Co. 

Dealers of 

ORIENTAL WEARING APPAREL 

and NOVELTIES 

662-670 Grant Avenue 

Chinatown 

SAN FRANCISCO - CALIFORNIA 

GArfield 5849 



SAKAKI'S 

KIMONOS and PAJAMAS 
Chinatown Souvenirs 



627 Grant Avenue 



GArfield 3483 



Th^j 



DAIBUTSU 




DEALERS of 
ORIENTAL 

Art Objects 



501 Grant Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 








I aM |l-~ w 



MARIN APPROACH TO BRIDGE 



CONCRETE 

Concrete used on the Golden 
Gate Bridge project totaled 254,690 
cubic yards. 

This would equal the displacement 
of 10 first-line battleships of 33,000 
tons each. 

It would be sufficient to build two 
10-foot sidewalks on sides of the 
highway from Chicago to Omaha. 



The Bridge is three times the length 
of the Brooklyn Bridge. 



The two approach spans of the 
Bridge are I 125 feet long, each, com- 
pared to side-spans of 610 and 550 
feet on the George Washington 
Bridge, New York, next largest sus- 
pension span. 




'In the Heart of Chinatown'' 



Take Home a True Oriental Gift 

You will find here, the largest exclusive Oriental art and dry 
goods house in America— a fascinating and practical gift to 
take home to your family and friends. We cordially invite 
you to visit this Oriental Bazaar — it will be one of the 
pleasant memories added to your visit to the Golden West 

T. IWATA & CO. 



Established 1901 
701 Grant Avenue Phone DOuglas 5463 

953 Market St. (Bet. 5th and 6th Sts. . . BRANCHES . . 



35 



San Francisco, Cal. 

347 Grant Ave. (near Bush) 




Leading 

Hair Stylist 

of 

San Francisco 



Distinctive 

beauty work 

in all branches 



SU. 6154 



VANNESSI'S 



498 Broadway at Kearny 



'FAMED FOR THE FINEST OF 
ITALIAN FOODS" 



Dine in the beautiful Cardinal 
Richelieu Room 

Enjoy your cocktails at the 

famous Venetian Bar in the 

Venetian Room. 



Open All Night 



GArfield 0891 



Congratulations, San Franciscans! 

An Achievement worthy of 

"The City That Knows How" 



SUTTER CAB 
COMPANY 

Like the Golden Gate Bridge 

Our Service — 

RELIABLE - SAFE - DEPENDABLE 

Sutter Cab Company 

Phone SUtter 3000 - Day and Night 



FIESTA WEEK IN 
MARVELOUS MARIN 



May 29-30— Elks Club, No. I 108, San 
Rafael, "20 Years After" Open 
House San Anselmo Post, Ameri- 
can Legion, Open House, Legion 
Log Cabin, San Anselmo. 

May 29 — Richardson Bay Yacht Club, 
Marin Day, Regatta for small sail- 
ing boats of bay district on Rich- 
ardson's Bay. 

Hamilton Field, Army Bombing 
Base, Open House. 

May 30 — Mill Valley, Open House, 
all day, Old Mill Park. 

Musical Chest Concert at For- 
est Meadows, San Rafael, 3 p. m. 
John Charles Thomas, tenor. 

May 3 I — Memorial Day Exercises, 
Court House, San Rafael, 10 a. m. 
Mill Valley Chamber of Com- 
merce, Open House All Day. 



WESTERN UNION TELEGRAM 
BRIDGES EVERY PROBLEM 

In the gay panorama of modern 
living, the little yellow telegraph 
blank has an important position in the 
procession. 

After almost a century of experi- 
ence in adapting itself to every bus- 
iness and social need, the Western 
Union telegram knows how to keep 
in step. It has become definitely a 
part of the people's daily life. It 
weeps or smiles or laughs or says 
"Thank You" or congratulates, or 
does whatever the public wants it to 
do. And it wears an appropriate 
dress for any special occasion, de- 
signed to fit into the modern picture, 
he it an anniversary, "Commence- 
ment Day", a Bon Voyage greeting 
or what not. 

To the increasing distinctiveness of 
the social telegram, Western Union 
has now added low cost. Twenty-five 
or thirty-five cents anywhere in the 
United States, and only twenty cents 
locally, is today's price for the gay 
little social telegram, which in a flash 
of time spans any distance! — Adv. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

The Golden Gate Bridge Fiesta 
Citizens' Committee expresses its 
appreciation for use of photographs 
used in this official program to: 

Standard Oil, Company, Associ- 
ated Oil Company, Redwood Empire 
Association, Joseph B. Strauss, Chief 
Engineer, Golden Gate Bridge and 
Highway District. 

36 



CLUB RIO 

Invites you to mingle with 
the moderns and celebrities 
in the easy, informal atmos- 
phere of this distinctive 
Club 

Walter Jennings, Manager 

465 Geary St. 

Next Curran Theatre 



Photographer of Mem 



ARTHUR RACICOT 



SAN 



FRANCISCO 



Many Fine Prints on exhibition 
at the Studio. Visitors are wel- 
come between 3:30 and 5 p. m. 
Private showings may be ar- 
ranged at other hours. 



41 GRANT AVENUE 
Telephone SUtter 3870 



BEEDLE PAINT 
PRODUCTS CO. 

501 SIXTH ST. at Bryant 
Phone SUtter 1209 

• 

MANUFACTURERS 
OF GOOD PAINTS 



On Your Way to the Bay Bridge 
Visitors Welcome 




YAM ATO 

SUKIYAKI IN REAL JAPANESE 
ATMOSPHERE 

Both Corners of 
GRANT AVE. and CALIFORNIA ST. 



Do Not Fail to Visit 

THE QUAINT AND BEAUTIFUL 

JAPANESE TEA GARDEN 

GOLDEN GATE PARK 



AOKI TAISEIDO 

1656 POST STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Post Salcaya 

SUKIYAKI 

1699 POST ST. - San Francisco, Cal. 

KASHU HOTEL 

1701 LAGUNA 
San Francisco, Cal. 



SHUN-GETSU-DO CO. 

JAPANESE CONFECTIONERY 



1766 Buchanan St. 



WEst 1428 



DREW 

SCHOOL 



ACCREDITED TO U. of CAL. 

Special 2-YR. course accredits 
to Junior, State and other 
Colleges. Time-saving ELE- 
MENTARY course. 

DAY, NIGHT; for BOYS, GIRLS. SUMMER 
course begins JUNE 21. OPEN TO ADULTS. 
ARMY, NAVY prep.: Brilliant success, 29 yrs 

2901 California St.. San Francisco, WEst 7069 




The giant 36-inch cables of the Golden Gate Bridge were "squeezed" 

together by powerful machines. Photo shows workmen removing spinning 

apparatus preparatory to binding with final wrapping. 



EXCAVATION 

Earth and rock, above and below 
water, excavated to permit construc- 
tion of the Golden Gate Bridge and 
its approaches aggregated 553,000 
cubic yards. 



^Announcing . . . 

Again a surprise for you in the 
heart of San Francisco's world 
famed Chinatown — 

The Chinese Pagoda 
Cocktail Lounge 

takes its place in the sun, — as a 
smart rendezvous, distinctly of 
the modern manner, but coupled 
with the Mystery of the Orient 

• 

Opening May 25 th 
THE CHINESE PAGODA 

830 Grant Avenue 



37 



DRINK 



MISSION 
ORANGE 

The Juice of the Fruit 



The Twin Dragon 

invites you to vssit 

The 
Dragon Throne Room 



WAVERLY PLACE 
CHINATOWN 



Lucca Delicatessen 

ITALIAN SAUSAGES AND RAVIOLI 
Made in Our Own Kitchen 



2120 Chestnut St. 



San Francisco, Calif. 



Day and Night Service 

Golden Gate Garage 

Filbert and Fillmore Sts. 
WAlnut 9659 



EDGEMONT LODGE 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

On Your Way to Santa Cruz 

Beautiful Mountain Scenery 



SALARY LOANS 

J. D. BODELL 

703 Market Street 
Room 311 DOuglas 1979 



EXPOSITION 
FISH - GROTTO, Inc. 

FISHERMAN'S WHARF 
ORdway 9565 San Francisco 

New San Francisco 
Auto Court 

6925 MISSION STREET 
RAndolph 5850 



FEDERAL 

APPAREL AND HOME NEEDS 

Liberal Pay Terms 

"It's Easier to Pay the Federal Way" 

377 Geary - - - 2565 Mission 

Modern Cottages Deluxe 

Wright's Motor Court 

LOS GATOS, CALIF. 

214 Saratoga Ave. - Phone 409 

"California's Paradise" — Open All Year 



LEW'S COFFEE CUP 



SAN RAFAEL 



STEEL Made Possible Our Great 
GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 



A. M. CASTLE 

COMPANY 



Always a dependable source 
of supply of Iron and Steel 



A. M. Castle Company 

OAKLAND SAN FRANCISCO 

Hlgate 4224 ATwater 6920 

59th & Doyle 20th& Indiana 



Free Delivery 

FINE ARTS MARKET 

Cor. Broderick and Lombard 
Phone Fillmore 7280 

• 
The Marina's Leading Delicatessen 

Marina Economy Food 
Shop 

Cor. Scott and Chestnut Sts. 

Open Evenings until 12 o'clock 

Everything for Your Picnic or Outing 



Fine Arts Complete Market First and 

Last Coming and Going Over the 

Golden Gate Bridge 



FON TANA'S 




— the macaroni in the factory 
sealed package made with 
100% pure Durum Semo- 
lina, for finer flavor and for 
more delicious meals. . . . 



also Font ana's Spaghetti 
and Fontana's Egg Noodles 




O'CONNORS TAVERNS 

Cocktails Served to Suit You 

DOMESTIC and IMPORTED LIQUORS 

2262 Chestnut 1002 Post 



gfojt'J&ato<& 



LTD. 



Manufacturers of 

WATER HEATERS and FURNACES 

Oakland - San Francisco 



MORTON & COMPANY 

Commercial Photographers 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF DISTINCTION 

515 Market St. - San Francisco, Calif. 



Phone ORdway 2300 Stall No. 7 

Finest Wines and Liquors Served 

CASTAGNOLA BROS. 

CRAB - SHRIMP - LOBSTER 

OYSTER COCKTAILS 

Live and Cooked Crabs Daily 



We Welcome You 

New San Francisco Auto Camp 

6925 Mission Street 

Mission Auto Court 

6843 Mission Street, Daly City 



FRASER & JOHNSON CO. 

Manufacturers and Jobbers 

AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT 

Phone SUtter 0512 525 6th St. 

San Francisco 



Alioto Fish Company, Ltd. 

CRAB AND SHRIMP COCKTAILS 
a Specialty 

8 Fisherman's Wharf - Foot of Taylor St. 

Phone ORdway 0184 San Francisco 



IZZY GOMEZ 

848 PACIFIC ST. 



Jacopetti's Sandwich Shop 

No. 1 Columbus Ave., Near Washington 

Offer CONGRATULATIONS 
"A Great Achievement by a Great City" 



E. Jacopetti 



J. Casinelli 



38 



Gambarotta World's Finest Liqueurs 
Founded in 1832 

RICHARD L ROSSI CO., Inc. 

Distributors of 

G. B. GAMBAROTTA & CO., S.A.-LIQUEURS 

140-142 Davis St., S.F. DOuglas 0960 



Golden Gate & Veteran's 
Transfer Co. 

MOVING, STORAGE, PACKING, SHIPPING 

Dependable Service 
385 Taylor St. Phone PRospect 7211 



GIRARD'S 

FRENCH RESTAURANT 
65 Ellis Street 
Lunch 35c - Dinner 50c 
Chicken Dinner, Served Daily, 55c 

Under Same Management 

JOHN'S GRILL 

63 Ellis St. - Since 1908 

GOOD STEAKS - OYSTERS - FISH 

Special Dinner $1.00 

Compliments oj 

Globe Social Club 

434 BROADWAY 



TERRACE TEA ROOM 

LUNCHEON AND DINNER 

Served in an Oul-of-Doors Atmosphere 

Hours 11-2:30, 4:30-7:30 Sunday 4-7 

334 SUtter St. DOuglas 9413 



World Wide Sports and General News Service 

TELEFLASH 

LOUDSPEAKER CORPORATION 

1054 Mills Tower 

GArfield 0686-7 San Francisco, Cal. 



J. Aron & Company, Inc. 

COFFEE IMPORTERS 
141 California St. San Francisco 



Compliments 

S. H. KRESS STORES 

939 MARKET STREET 



360 Geary St. SUtter 6448-9309 

DISTINCTIVE GOWNS 

BETTE FRANCIS 
Model French Laundry 

1467 PINE STREET 
Phone GRaystone 6909 San Francisco 




CHUTES TAVERN 



Next to Merry-Go-Round 
At The Beach 



FAMED FOR GOOD FOOD AND 
REFRESHMENTS 



The Hermann 
Safe Co. 

HOWARD and MAIN STS. 
San Francisco 



Manufactured and Installed 

Cashiers' Vaults 

Toll Booth Safes, Etc. 

. . for . . 
GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 



OTTO ANDERSON WM. A. ROWE 

ANDERSON 
&ROWE 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTORS 

21 



45 BELCHER ST. 



San Francisco 



Royal Quality 

GAMBAROTTA 




VERMOUTHS 

MiUiVWJfl for Smooth Cocktails 



VINO 

[VERMOUTH]! • 




Sole Distributors 

Richard L. Rossi, Inc. 

140 DAVIS STREET 
San Francisco 



HANCOCK BROS. 

Expert Ticket 
Printers 



ROLL TICKETS 

RESERVED SEAT TICKETS 

ILLUSTRATED 
COLLEGE FOOTBALL TICKETS 



25 Jessie Street, near First 
DOuglas 2191 




FOR SALE 

At Leading 

Furniture and Department Stores 



THE MATTIES* THAI 



39 



WILLIAMS BROTHERS & 
HAAS, Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Oil - Gas - Gasoline 
Water Pipe Lines 



11 04 Merchants Exchange Building 
San Francisco 



Specialist in 

Cadillac, LaSallc, Buick, Olds, Chev. 

Authorized Distributor 

Standard Stations, Inc., United Motors 

Merwin, Holtzen & Fiora 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 

SERVICE AND 

RECONSTRUCTION 

Cor. Pacific and Polk Sts. 
Phone ORdway 3767 



E. M. HUNDLEY 

BUILDING HARDWARE 
SPECIALIST 



662 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco 

Phones DOuglas 6386 - 6387 



SAN RAFAEL 
FRENCH BAKERY 

F. Bordenave, Prop. 

-GENUINE BRENCH BREAD 
OUR SPECIALTY" 



1055 Fourth St. Ph. San Rafael 97 
SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



BILL SHORE 

BILLIE'S 



Phone ORdway 9987 

MARKET 



CHOICE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Italian Swiss Colony Wines 

Highest Quality at Lowest Prices 

Sells for Less — Free Delivery 50c or Over 

1553 Polk St. - Near Sacramento St. 



SCHIRMER 
STEVEDORING CO. 

PIER 41 
KEarny 4100 San Francisco 



PHOENIX HOSIERY 



AT YOUR 
FAVORITE STORE 



A. ARMBRUSTER, Prop. Ph. ORdway 9733 
SCHWARZ DELICATESSEN 

1621 POLK ST., Bet. Sacramento and Clay 

San Francisco 

IMPORTED <* DOMESTIC DELICACIES 

Wines and Liquors - Home Cooking 



ORdway 6030-6031 

PAUL GOURSAU 

Wholesale - SELECT MEATS - Retail 

Hotel and Restaurant Business Solicited 

REX MARKET — 1814 POLK ST 

Bet. Washington and Jackson San Francisco 



TOPS in Drinks and Sociability 

THE RANCHO 

1741 POLK STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. J. Herzog PRospect 9608 



WM. J. HORSTMANN 

FERTILIZERS - OILS - POULTRY 

and STOCK-FEEDS 

Kohl Building 

Phone EXbrooI( 0282 San Francisco 



The Brightest On the Peninsula 

Cinnabar Cocktail Lounge 



ORIGINAL 

1327 BROADWAY 



James Boasso, Prop. 
BURLINGAME 




Jedco 
Mattress Mfg. Co. 

501-507 SEVENTH ST. 
Market 4488 - San Francisco 



Sacramento Valley Market 

FRESH FRUITS and VEGETABLES 
. . . DAILY . . . 



Printed by Reynard Press. S. F. 



40 



King George Hotel 

fireproof 

ALL ROOMS HAVE PRIVATE BATH 

All Rooms Have Pleasant 

Outside Exposure 

• 

$2 AND $2.50 PER DAY 

Twin Beds and Corner Rooms $3 

Monthly Discount on Above Rates 

GARAGE SERVICE 



Centrally Located - To Downtown 
Shopping, Theatre District 



A. B. Smith 



Benton Smith 



MASON below GEARY STREET 
334 Mason Street - San Francisco 



MORCK PAINT 
BRUSHES 

Painted the Golden Gate 



YES, and the San Francisco-Oak- 
land Bay Bridge, too. For over 
three generations MORCK has 
built brushes for every painting 
job. Ask your dealer for MORCK 
high-quality paint brushes and 
your painting will be a success. 



MORCK BRUSH MFG. CO. 
238 - 8th Street - San Francisco 



BRADLEY'S 

5 and 10 



Down Town Store 
80 TURK ST. 



Longest Bar in the World 
1633 FILLMORE ST. 



Steel Stretches! 



When an engineer makes that statement, his listeners are skeptical. 
But it does, according to the Bridge engineers. 

They will tell you that due to the constanty varying winds and 
temperature at the Bridge site, the Bridge is always moving. 

Take the cables for example. Engineers say if they were detached 
and laid out on the ground they would be 21 feet shorter than their 
hanging length. That measurement is the "stretch" caused by the 
immense load they support. 

These factors were an important element in the designing of the 
Bridge, and the elements enter into them. 

If temperature dropped from the San Francisco normal of 70 
degrees to 30 degrees, the cables will contract. This would "pull" the 
giant towers closer to each shore, and the roadway of the span would 
be automatically raised in the center of the span where the cables 
reach down to support the center. 

The maximum rise under such conditions would be ten feet, it is 
estimated. With a high temperature and a full load of traffic, the 
roadway would drop ten feet at the extreme. Therefore, the 220 foot 
clearance at the center of the span as required by the War Depart- 
ment was raised to 236 feet to fill requirements. 

And while motorists crossing the span won't be able to feel it, 
engineers say wind pressure and other elements are capable of swing- 
ing the Bridge deck at its center sideways as much as 21 feet. 

This "giving" or elasticity gives strength to the whole structure 
and absorbs stresses and strains. 



% 



Gallons of Paint 

Paint , great guardian of science against rust and corrosion of steel, 
has played an important part in the completion of the Bridge, and will 
continue to serve through the ages. 

Approximately I 10,000 gallons of paint, of a color specially de- 
signed in the bay district, and known as "international orange," was 
required to paint the Bridge with the necessary coats. 

Permanent crews of painters will be kept busy constantly on the 
gigantic span, working up and down the sky-high towers and truss work 
— any place where there is steel, to keep the painting program up to 
date and prevent actions developed by the salt air, and other unusual 
weather conditions which prevail at the Bridge site. 

41 



WELCOME! 



^Beauty ^Arts Studio 

{La France, Tozier) 
Featuring the "1937" HAIR STYLES 

AND 

HAIR TINTING — EYELASH DYEING 



Quality Service by 
Expert Beauty Specialists 



ZOTOS 

240 STOCKTON ST. SUtter 5538 
Suite 701-704 San Francisco 



GALLI'S 

Famous 
Italian Dinner 

A Place to Eat 
Not a Cabaret 

AT IGNACIO 

6'/4 Miles North of San Rafael 

(Loo\ for Neon Sign) 



On The Redwood Highway 

Travelers 
Hotel 

Under Same Management 
as Farley's Cafe 



FEATURING COMFORT AND 
HOSPITALITY 



Fifth and A Streets Telephone 2398 
Santa Rosa, Calif. 




The Church of our Lady of Mount Carmel — the "Church 
Shaped like a Barrel" — nestling among the vineyards. 



WINE LOVERS 

ARE CORDIALLY 
INVITED TO VISIT 
OUR ASTI WINERY 

On the Redwood Highway between Clov- 
erdale and Healdsburg, is picturesque Asti. 
In this "Village in a Vineyard" nestled 
among the vine-clad hills in northern So- 
noma County, is the world-famous ITALIAN 
SWISS COLONY winery. Wine Lovers, vis- 
iting the Bay Counties for the celebration of 
the world-famous Golden Gate Bridge, are 
cordially invited to visit the winery at Asti. 



ITALIAN SWISS COLONY 



f ornla \oolyies at their Jjesl 

Vineyard and Winery — Asti, California 



Ualifo 



General Offices — San Francisco 



Compliments 
SCAVENGERS PROTECTIVE ASSN. 



SUNSET SCAVENGERS' COMPANY 



42 



A. GERSKE, Owner 



Phone DOugla3 1631 



Pacific Bridge Painting Co. 

Bridges, Buildings and Structural Steel 



SHARON BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Lights 



As the sun watches over our Golden Gate during 
daylight hours, so will the lighting system of the 
great Bridge watch and guard travelers across it at 
night. 

Every possible emergency that might arise has 
been cared for in planning the lighting system, and 
the Bridge, through a dual system, is assured of 
never being in darkness under normal conditions. 

A power sub-station has been installed near the 
South, or San Francisco tower, which will receive a 
line carrying 11,000 volts from the Pacific Gas & 
Electric Company. Transformers will "step-down" 
this voltage to 2300 volts and transmitted to the 
Bridge lighting system. 

Should any emergency arise which would stop 
the flow of the regular power, the "load" will auto- 
maticaly be taken over by an emergency system. 
This plant is operated by a gasoline engine at the 
Bridge site. 

In addition to the vast array of sodium vapor 
lights on the Bridge roadway, current is also needed 
for the aerial beacon light atop the San Francisco 
tower, and the lighthouse at the base of the tower, 
which replaces the historical old Fort Point Light. 



Wind Pressure 



When it comes to wind, the Golden Gate Bridge 
can take it, according to engineers. 

While the highest recorded wind velocity at the 
Golden Gate is 64 miles per hour, the Bridge is 
designed to resist a 90-mile per hour wind, or a 
force of 30 pounds per square foot of exposed 
surface. 

Also, if an unusual wind should develop, the 
Bridge would be promptly "unloaded" of all traffic, 
and resistance increased tremendously. 



Military Construction 

National defense had prominent consideration in 
the building of the Bridge. 

Because its roadways pass through two military 
reservations, it was necessary to obtain permits 
from the War Department. The Golden Gate 
Bridge and Highway District, representing the peo- 
ple, promised to pay for the replacement of military 
facilities moved because of its routing. 

A modern, bomb-proof powder magazine was 
built at a cost of $125,000, a fire control station for 
the Coast Artillery, repair shops, some quarters 
replaced, and a rifle range moved. Also, rerouting 
of a railroad line serving the Presidio was necessary, 
as well as changes in other lines of communication 
involved in the national defense. 



.... 



■•••••••••*••••"•«•••••••*••—•—•-• 



Comparisons 

For purposes of comparison with widely 
known existing structures, the towers of the 
Golden Gate Bridge are: 

191 feet taller than the Washington Monu- 
ment. 

313 feet taller than the Russ Building, San 
Francisco's tallest skyscraper. 

179 feet lower than Mount Davidson, San 
Francisco's highest point. 

239 feet lower than the Eiffel Tower in 
Paris. 



AT SANTA ROSA- 


-On 


the Redwood Highway 




TRAVELERS HOTEL 


• 


. FARLEY'S 


CAFE 


UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 




Featuring Comfort and Hospitality 




Select & Carte Service — Finest Wines & Liquors 


Fifth and A Streets 




419 Fourth Street 



43 



PICKWICK 
. HOTFX . 

NEAR EVERYTHING 

Close to shops, theatres, restaurants — just 
half a block from Market Street at Fifth, 
where the Bay Bridge approach swings into 
San Francisco. 

New cocktail lounge, excellent restaurant 
(now under our own management) . . every 
convenience and comfort. Fireproof. Ga- 
rage in basement. 

Rates $2.50 to $4.00 

R. A. CONKLIN, Manager 

5th and Mission San Francisco 

Also . . San Diego, Kansas City 



%aces 

BAY 
MEADOWS 

San Mateo, Calif. 
On Bayshore and 101 Highways 



Spring Season 
Closes Saturday, May 29 

Featuring the 
12,500 San Mateo Handicap 

8 RACES DAILY 




Light a Lucky 



Luckies give you a soothing smoke 
—a milder, better-tasting smoke 



pyri*nt 1935, Tht- Am, r c .n Tobacco Company 



44 




Greetings to the Fiesta 



ROBERTS 

GENERAL ELECTRIC SUPPLIES 
1687 HAIGHT STREET HEmlock 3392 



DR. MILES E. WALTON 

DENTIST 
702 MARKET STREET EXbrook 0329 



III III :> Furs 

Importers : Designers : Storage 

52 Foubourg Montmarte, Paris, France 

3S2 POST ST.. San Francisco KEarny 5873 

Chop Suey Packed to Take Home 

THE ASIA CAFE 

Chinese - American Dishes 
474 O'Farrell St., S. F. Phone ORdway 1765 



Bicycle Rentals 

1823 Haight St. : : 



. . Fisher 

SKYLINE 6617 



K. H. BURNETT, Pres. Phone S. R. 1070 

Marin County Abstract Co. 

Established 1880 

Affiliated with 

Title Insurance and Guaranty Co. 

539 FOURTH ST. San Rafael, Calif. 



SKyline 3485-86 - Free Delivery - WEst 9963 

A. E. HARRIS 

WINES AND LIQUORS 



443 Clement St. 
at Sixth Ave. 



1561 Fillmore St. 
at Geary St. 



Fredericksen Hardware 



3029 Fillmore St., near Union 



Phone WAlnut 9818 



San Francisco 



Phone MIssion 0863 

ENTERPRISE 

FOUNDRY CORPORATION 
2902 - 19th Street San Francisco 



FRANK EEIIK A.VTI'S 

Telephone 036 Winchester Road 

LOS GATOS, Calif. R.F.D. No. 1, Box 214 



Phone ORdway 0595 Free Delivery 

BLUE * STAR 

Wines - Liquors : All Standard Brands 
508 O'FARRELL ST., San Francisco 



E. F. Minahan 



A. D. McQuaid 



PALL MALL "Good Mixers" 

1568 HAIGHT ST. MAarket 9132 

GARDEN SHACK 

JULIA ALLENDER, Prop. 
1784 HAIGHT ST. San Francisco 



The Lodge Cocktail Bar 

TERRY BOYLAN 
1736 HAIGHT ST. : EVergreen 9635 



Compliments of — 

HOWARD O. KINSEY 

CALIFORNIA TENNIS CLUB 



Scott & Bush St. 



WEst 9827 



Atlas Furniture Co. 




1793 


HAIGHT 






BAyview 


3876 


Choice FRESH 


MEATS of All Kinds 


Mission 


Pork Store 




J0 16- 16th St. 


Next to Calif. Nat 


Bank 



GOLDEN GATE GARAGE 

2169 Filbert Street 
WAlnut 9659 San Francisco 



WM. L HUGHSON CO. 

Since 1903 

FORD V-8 — LINCOLN ZEPHYR V-12 

Market and Eleventh 
UNdcrhill 4380 San Francisco 



Ben C. Gerwick, Pres. Phone SUtter 8454 

BEN C. GERWICK, Inc. 

CONTRACTORS : ENGINEERS 
112 Market Street San Francisco 



MOSSE Linens 

478 Post St., San Francisco GArfield 6322 

Gertrude P. Ayles 750 Fifth Avenue 

Manager New York 



Friendly Auto Court 

ON BAYSHORE HIGHWAY 101 
Between Redwood City and Palo Alto, Calif. 
Just 27 Miles to Civic Center, San Francisco 

Corner Bayshore and March Road 
W. A. FUNK. Prop. Phone Redwood 494RX 



Visit "The Sweetest Place this side of Heaven' 

Pit of Cnglanb 

1448 Burlingame Ave. 
BURLINGAME 

The Peninsula's Most Distinctive 
Cocktail Lounge 



Compliments - - 

Hines 8C Needham 

Compliments - - 

Jake Hines 

You Will Be "Sitting Pretty" in a New 
RADIO EQUIPPED PLYMOUTH 
Sedan or Coupe - U Drive - Low Rates 

Ace Auto & Truck Rental Co. 

INC. 
25-llth St. HEmlock 1261 



Paulsen's Confectionery 

2830 BAKER ST. Phone Fillmore 1335 



AGNES JAGER 

PEASANT DRESS SHOP 

Peasant Blouses and Dresses 

547 SUTTER ST., S. F. DOuglas 4481 



Superb Fish & Poultry Market 

1660 HAIGHT ST. HEmlock 7870 



Miss Beatrice Hayman 

WEARING APPAREL 
177 Post St., Suite 804, Liebes Bldg. EX. 6145 



Luncheon - Tea - Dinner - Cocktail Lounge 

Oak Tree Qarderu> 

Third Avenue at El Camino Real 

SAN MATEO 

CHAS. QUARTERMAINE, Chef, Mgr. 

: The Peninsula's Finest Cafe : 



FRATES 8c LOVOTTI 

Professional Prescription Pharmacists 

True to the Ethical Tradition 

450 SUTTER ST. Suite 809 Flood Bldo. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Pierce-Rodolph Storage Co., Ltd. 

STORAGE : MOVING : PACKING 

SHIPPING 

1450 Eddy Street : Phone WEst 0828 

San Francisco, Calif. 



EASTMAN 



LITTLE FOLK SHOP - Ladies' Hosiery 
454 Sutter St., San Francisco GArfield 7899 



LESSM ANN'S 

PRACTICAL BUSINESS SCHOOL 
461 Market Street EXbrook 5523 

45 



MODE O'DAY 
FROCKS 

HOSIERY : LINGERIE 
2224 Chestnut Street - WAlnut 2110 



Compliments to the people who have mad* 

possible the Golden Gate Bridge 

Californians Know How 

GLYNN'S CIGAR STORE 

SAN FRANCISCO 

C EC I L E 

GOWNS - MILLINERY 
133 Geary Street Suite 709-710 



San Francisco's NEWEST . . . 

THE MAYFAIR 

LUNCHEON 
DINNER 

Popular Prices 

• 

Our Daily Feature 

Chicken Pot Pie 

with oar 

Delicious Mayfair Salad Bowl 

50c 

• 

116 MAIDEN LANE 

Third Floor GArfield 3884 

"In a Select Atmosphere" 



Phone EXbrook 1055 - All Departments 

W. R. Ballinger & Son 

Incorporated.-.Established 1852 

SAFE MOVING : DRAYING : RIGGING 

Heavy Long Distance Hauling 

Boat Hauling and Launching 

50 HAWTHORNE ST. San Francisco 

Off Howard, bet. 2nd and 3rd Sts. 



Compliments from 

The Millers of Globe "A" Flour 



TRAUTMAN'S 

DISTINCTIVE FOOD 

featuring 

Steak - Chicken - Ham Dinners 65c 

525 California St. Phone GArfield 8872 



Malott & Peterson 

ROOFING - FLOORING - TILING 

Phone ATwater 1600 

20th and Harrison Sts. San Francisco 



CASTILIAN TAMALE 
COMPANY 




925 SEVENTH ST., Oakland, Cal. 
Joseph Draco, Mgr. Ph. HIgate 3111 

Supplying for Over 30 Years 

Restaurants Buffets Clubs Lodges 

Confectionaries Butcher Shops 

Hotels Delicatessens 

Oakland, San Francisco, San Jose, 

Sacramento, Stockton, and all 

cities in Northern California 

Special prices given to Social Parties 

at all Occasions. 

Any quantity can be had at a 

48 Hours' Notice. 

All our products are very carefully 

made under sanitary conditions, with 

the best ingredients obtainable. 



GOLDEN GATE 



The Golden Sate Bridge gives a bird's-eye view from the tower 
tops of twenty-seven and one-half miles. 

• • 

The roadway of the Bridges is as high above the water as a 23 to 25 
story building, depending on temperature and tides. 

• • 

A string of automobiles reaching from the Mexican border to the 
Oregon line can be accommodated on the six-lane roadway of the 
Bridge, moving at a speed of 23 miles an hour, engineers estimate. 

• • 

Clearances of the Bridge are greater than any other suspension 
span in the world, measuring 4200 feet from center to center of the 
main towers, or 700 feet, 20 per cent, longer than the George Wash- 
ington Bridge across the Hudson River at New York. Vertical clear- 
ances vary from 210 feet at the towers with normal high water to 220 
feet in the center under the same conditions, or 236 feet at low tide 
and temperature. 

• • 

The Bridge is the first one in the world to span the outermost 
entrance to a great harbor. 

• * 

The two 36 inch cables of the Bridge weigh I 1 ,000 tons each, 
and contain 25,572 separate wires each. 

• • 

Concrete paving of the Bridge roadways and sidewalks covers 
723,000 square feet, with an additional 273,000 square feet in the 
Presidio viaduct. 

• • 

New inlets and outlets to an area heretofore comparatively inac- 
cessible, and one of the richest in the world, the Redwood Empire, are 
provided by the Bridge. 



Qvic Center 
^Beauty Salons 

Bessie M. Evans, Proprietor 



We cordially invite you to visit our 
beautiful and modernly styled Beauty 
Salon. Efficiently equipped for all types 
of beauty culture, including the latest 
facial methods. 

All Types of Permanents 
$1.95 to $10.00 

Special Gold Band Permanent Wave 

$5.00 

including haircut and fingerwat/e 

by high class hair stylist 



UNderhill 4814 



187 Market St. 



E. K. WOOD 
LUMBER CO. 

"GOODS OF THE WOODS" 



SAN FRANCISCO 

OAKLAND 

LOS ANGELES 

CALIF. 



46 



BRIDGE FACTS 



Estimated time saving for motorists using the Bridge compared 
to ferry schedules is 53 minutes per round-trip for commuters between 
Marin County points and San Francisco. 

• • 

The Bridge makes motorists independent of fog and other weather 
changes, eliminating traffic tie-ups, and gives them more leisure time. 

• * 

Increased property values alone will pay the entire cost of the 
Bridge in the area it serves, experts declare. 

• • 

One of the most impressive marine promenades and driveways in 
the world across a great body of water is provided by the Bridge. 

• * 

The Bridge will distinguish San Francisco's great harbor entrance to 
a larger degree than the Statue of Liberty does New York harbor. 

• • 

The Bridge will aid navigation into the harbor with a lighthouse and 
fog-signals on the structure. 

• • 

Designated as a direct aid to military operations between the two 
military reservations at either end of the Bridge, it is the only project 
of its kind connecting two such reservations. 

• • 

Thorough research of geologists fully provide for earthguake stresses 
on the Bridge. 

• • 

Scenic splendor unsurpassed is provided by views from the Bridge 
and its approaches through two military reservations. 



Street Decorations, Stage Settings and 

Effects used in connection with the 

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE FIESTA 

were built by 

NELSON, GREEN and 
COMPANY 

Exhibit Engineers 
1120 HOWARD ST., San Francisco 



Exposition advertisers are cordially 

invited to consult 

Nelson, Green and Company 

regarding design and construction 

of their exhibits. 



Buck & Stoddard 



Incorporated 



Oil Field Products 



555 South Flower Street 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

19 Rector Street 
NEW YORK CITY 

47 



Ph. Palo Alto 7632 Adjoining Stanford Umiv. 

GROVE AUTO COURT 

San Francisco Highway 

U. S. Hiway Alternate 101 

PALO ALTO, CAL. 

Modern Cabins Moderate Prices 



COBB'S TOURIST COURT 

101 Bayshore Hiway 

At SAN MATEO — 20 Minutes from S. F. 

30 New Ultra Modern Cabins 



On Bayshore Blvd. - at So. San Franci 

OLIVER'S 

CHARCOAL BROILER 
and Cocktail Lounge 



Italian Dinners 



Dancint 



CONKLIN BROS., INC. 

Established 1880 

CARPETS - ARMSTRONG'S LINOLEUMS 

2400 Geary St. Phone Fillmore 0835-fc 

M. A. FINNILA, Prop. Phone MArket 483EI 

FINNISH BATHS 

: For HEALTH and REDUCING : 

Open 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Daily 

2284 Market Street Near Sixteenth 

San Francisco, Calif. 



San Francisco 



Oakland 



Los Angel »s> 



Lumber SMITH Company 

CHANNEL at FOURTH 



San Francisco 



MArket 0103 



DOuglas \i25--Day or Night 

G. W. Thomas 

Drayage and 

Ri gg™g Co. 

incorporated 

GENERAL DRAY IN G 

SAFE AND MACHINERY MOVING 

LONG DISTANCE HAULING 

RIGGING 

586 Howard St. Sam Francisco, Cal. 



Not much of an artist 



but 



His picture-writing survives to tell us how he lived— what 
he ate. And scientists point out that these old savages' 
rough, primitive fare kept their teeth well exercised, healthy 
and strong. We moderns eat softer foods — give our teeth 
too little healthful exercise. 




DENTYNE HELPS KEEP TEETH HEALTHY, 

LUSTROUS! Try Dentyne — notice how its 
specially firm consistency starts you chewing 
more vigorously — exercises mouth and teeth 
and makes your mouth feel 
cleansed and refreshed! 
Helps keep your teeth 
stronger, whiter! 

HELPS KEEP TEETH WHITE 

DENTYNE 




ITS SPICY FLAVOR'S RIGHTLY POPULAR! 

One taste — and you know why thousands 

cheer for Dentyne's delicious flavor! Slip a 

package into your pocket or purse — its 

flat, convenient shape is 

an exclusive feature of 

Dentyne's. 



..MOUTH HEALTHY 

DELICIOUS 
CHEWING 

GUM 



48 



There's No Delay The Gate Bridge Way 

No Waits - No Inconvenience 

The Direct Route to the Redwood Empire, Sacramento 
Valley and Pacific Northwest 

TOLL RATES 

AUTOMOBILES. . . . taxis, hearses, commercial or light delivery automobiles (weighing less than 3000 lbs. 

unladen), with driver and not to exceed four passengers $ -50 

Additional passengers, each 05 

COMMUTE Passenger automobiles only, with driver and not to exceed four passengers. Thirty (30) 

one way trips in any sixty (60) day period, including date of sale 11.00 

Additional passengers, each 05 

TRAILERS drawn by automobiles .50 

Passengers riding trailer, each .05 

MOTORCYCLES. . . .° r passenger tricars, with driver and one additional passenger .25 

Additional passengers, each 05 

PEDESTRIANS including bicycle, each way 05 

GENERAL RULES 

The Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District has erected signs, indicating each entrance to the Golden 
Gate Bridge. Any vehicle which passes such signs becomes immediately liable for the prescribed toll for such vehicle 
Commutation books may be purchased at the toll booths or at the office of the District at the San Francisco 
Toll Plaza. The coupons of any one book, when presented by driver of a car at the toll gate, whether or not he is 
the original purchaser of such book, will be honored to cover transit of the car he is driving at the time and no 
other car that may be accompanying him. The book of issue must be shown at the time of passage. 

Commutation books may be redeemed at the office of the District at the San Francisco Toll Plaza at their 
sale price, less used coupons, if any, computed at 50 cents each, if presented by original purchaser for redemption 
within 60 days from their date of expiration. 

The following charges will be made for special services not included in the toll rate: 

Tow charge on Bridge #1.50 

Tire change 1.00 

Gas Delivery .50 first gallon. 

.30 each additional gallon 

Truck and bus pickup and tow 4.50 per how- 
Extra work on bus or truck 1.50 per hour 

Inspection of vehicle subject to permit: 

At Toll Plaza, San Francisco Free 

Within 10 miles of Toll Plaza £5.00 

More than 10 miles from Toll Plaza Actual cost as determined by Golden Gate 

Bridge and Highway District. 
All disabled cars will be picked up immediately and towed to San Francisco Toll Plaza by the District's 
emergency towing service. Such pickup service will be charged for at the foregoing rates. After disabled carst 
have been brought to the Toll Plaza, the owner may employ outside services if he so desires. 

SPECIAL TRAFFIC RULES 
THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE is a PUBLIC HIGHWAY and the provisions of the VEHICLE CODE 
and other laws relating to public highways are applicable thereto. 

EMERGENCY PHONES have been installed along the roadway. When putting through a call, announce 

the number of the call box you are using. 
BICYCLES will be permitted only on the Bridge sidewalks, where they may be pushed, not ridden. 
VEHICLES must not cross center line strip, as indicated by reflector markers. 
NO "U" TURNS shall be made on Bridge except with permission and under direction of the California 

Highway Patrol, or uniformed employee of the Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District. 
TIRE CHANGES and repairs shall not be made on the Bridge except when authorized by a member 

of the California Highway Patrol and done in his presence. 
SLOW-MOVING VEHICLES must keep to the extreme right side of the roadway. 
NO VEHICLE MAY leave the Bridge or its approaches and enter upon army reservations except by 

special authority granted by the Commanding General of the Ninth Corps Area. Locked gates and 

guards are maintained on the reservation roadways to prevent violation of this clause. 

Drive Carefully Enjoy the Bridge Yourself and Help Others Enjoy It 



DOUBLE R 
COLA 



is the Fiesta drink!! 



THE 

SURPRISE DRINK 

OF THE YEAR 




DRINK UP r 

AND 

WAKE Ul 



A GREAT 

RINK- 
MIGHTY 
*"" / FLAVO 




DOUBLE QUICK 
ENERGY 



DOUBLE 
tO LA 




Served fee Cold at all 

GOLDEN GATE 

BRIDGE FIESTA 

Stands 



A Qie*U 2»u*t£-/? Mighty QIojm*.