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Full text of "Official record of the Holston Annual Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, ninety-first session, held at Bristol, Tenn.-Va., October 14-20, 1914"

INDEX 

PAGE 

Appointments ........ 59-64 

Boards and Committees . . . . . 151-152 

Care of Conference Funds ..... 153-154 

Chronological Roll 144-145 

Directory of Holston Conference .... 146-149 1 

General Church Information .... 10-32 

Holston Information ...... 2-10 

Journal of Proceedings . . . . . 33-53 

Memoirs 100-109 I 

Minute Questions ...... 54-59 

Reports 66-99 

Statistical Tables ...... 110-143 

No. 1 — Membership, Church Property, Women, etc. 
No. 2 — Epworth Leagues, Sunday Schools, etc. 
No. 3 — Finances. 



EXPLANATORY 



In the statistical tables cents have been omitted, though they were 
counted in the additions. The figures in all of the tables were put through^ 
an adding machine and ought to be correct. 

The pictiire of the Conference group was too pale for a good half-tone 
plate, so the engraver said. 

The price of the Annual remains at 25 cents. Let each preacher sell 
the copies sent him and order more. Eemittances should be promptly sent 
to the Chattanooga Savings Bank, with plain directions as to what it isj 
for, name of charge, etc, 

JAMES A. BURROW. | 



I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/officialrecordof1914meth 



THE HOLSTON ANNUAL 
1914 

OFFICIAL KECORD 

OF THE 

HoLSTON Annual Conference 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
NINETY-FIRST SESSION 



Bristol, Tenn.-Va., October 14-20, 1914 



Bishop R. G. Waterhouse ....... President 

Rev. J. A. Burrow Secretary 

Rev. E. a. Shugart Assistant Secretary 

Rev. J. S. French Assistant Secretary 

Rev. J. H. Umberger Statistical Secretary 

Rev. C. W. Dean Statistical Secretary 

Rev. G. L. Lambert Statistical Secretary 



Edited by J. A. Burrow, Secretary 

Merner - Pf eif f er Library 

Tennessee V/:3£^^'/in Cjuege 

Athens, Tennessee 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

SESSIONS OF THE HOLSTON ANNUAL CONFERENCE FROM 
1824 to 1914. 



Place of Sessions 



Date of 

Beginning 



President 



Secretary 



Knoxville, Tenn 

Jonesboro, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Jonesboro, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Ebenezer Co., Tenn. 

Athens, Tenn 

Evansham, Va.. 

Kingsport, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Abingdon, Va 

Reem's Creek, N. C, 
Madisonvllle, Tenn... 

Wytheville, Va 

Greenevllle, Tenn 

LaPayette, Ga 

Rogersville, Tenn. .. 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Reem's Creek. N. C. 

Athens, Tenn 

Wytheville, Va 

Jonesboro, Tenn 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Athens, Tenn 

Asheville, N. C 

Wytheville, Va 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Jonesboro, Tenn 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Marion, Va 

Chattanooga, Tenn.. 

Abingdon. Va 

Asheville, N. C 

Greeneville, Tenn. ... 

Athens, Tenn 

Wytheville, Va 

Bristol, Tenn 

Marion, Ye. 

Asheville, N. C 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Wytheville, Va 

Morristown, Tenn 

Chattanooga, Tenn... 

Marion, Va 

Asheville, N. C 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Bristol, Tenn 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Morristovra, Tenn... 

Wytheville, Va , 

Asheville, N. C 

Chattanooga, Tenn... 

Bristol, Tenn 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Asheville, N. C 

Morristown, Tenn... 

Bristol, Tenn 

Chattanooga, Tenn.. 

Wytheville, Va 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 



Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dee. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct, 

Oct. 

Nev. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

0<!t. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct, 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct, 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct, 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 



1824 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 
1846 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



21 
20 
11 
11 

2 

7 
29 
12 
14 
14 
22 
22 

6 
26 
17 

9 
15 

7 
19 
14 
10 
23 

2 
22 

5 
18 

5 
15 
14 
20 
18 
25 
23 
28, 
20 
26 
25 
10 
22 
21 
28, 

5 

3 

2, 1889 

1. 1890 
30. 1891 
12, 1892 
11, 1893 
24, 1894 



Bishop Roberts 

Bishops Roberts and Soule 

Bishop Soule..... 

Bishop Roberts 

Bishop Soule 

Bishop Soule 

Bps. McKendree and Soule 

Bishop Hedding 

Bishop Emory 

Bishop Roberts 

J. Henninger, . 

Bishop Andrew 

Bishop Capers 

Bishop Morri s 

Bishop Andrew 

T. K. Catlett 

Bishop Morris 

S.Pattoii 

Bishop Waugh 

Bishop Morris 

Bishop Janes 

Bishop Andrew 

Bishop Capers 

Bishop Andrew 

Bishop Paine 

Bishop Andrew 

Bishop Andrew 

Bishop Capers 

Bishop Andrew 

Bishop Paine 

Bishop Pierce 

Bishop Paine 

Bishop Andrew 

Bishop Early 

Bishop Andrew 

Bishop Early 

Pishop Paine 

Bishop Andrew 

Bishop Early 

Bishop Early 

Bishop Early 

Bishop Early 

Bishop MeTyeire 

Bishop Wightman 

Bishop Wightman 

Bishop Doggett 

Bishop Kavanagh 

Bishop Pierce 

Bishop Doggett 

Bishop Keener 

Bishop Doggett 

Bishop MeTyeire 

Bishop Wightman 

Bishop Doggett 

Bishop Kavanaugh 

Bishop Pierce 

Bishop MeTyeire 

Bishop MeTyeire 

Bishop Wilson 

Bishop MeTyeire 

Bishop Keener 

Bishop Keener 

Bishop MeTyeire 

Bishop MeTyeire 

Bishop Hargrove 

Bishop Wilson 

Bishop Keener 

Bishop Galloway 

Bishop Fitzgerald 

Bishop Duncan 

Bishop Granbery 



John Tevis 
T. Stringfield 



E. F. Sevier 
E. F. Sevier 
E. F. Sevier 
E. F. Sevier 
E. F. Sevier 
T. Stringfield 
L. S. Marshall 
L. S. Marshall 
L. S. Marshall 
L. S. Marshall 
L, S. Marshall 
L. S. Marshall 

D. R. McAnally 

E. F. Sevier 
E. F. Sevier 
E. F. Sevier 
E. F. Sevier 
E. F. Sevier 
C. D, Smith 
C. D. Smith 
C. D. Smith 

C. D. Smith 
E. F. Sevier 

D. R. McAnally 
D. R. McAnally 

C. D. Smith 
W. C. Graves 
W. C. Graves 
W. C. Graves 
W. C. Graves 
W, O. Graves 
J. N. Huffaker 
J. N, Huffaker 

D. Sullins 

J. H. Brunner 
J. H. Brunner 

E. E. Wiley 
J. W. Dickey 
J. W. Dickey 
J. H. Brunner 
J. H. Brunner 
R. N. Price 
R. N. Price 
R. N. Price 
R. N. Price 
R. N. Price 
R. N. Price 

F. Richardson 
F. Richardson 
F. Richardson 
F. Richardson 
F. Richardson 
F. Richardson 
B. W. S. Bishop 
B. W. S. Bishop 
B. W. S. Bishop 
W. 0. Garden 
W. C. Garden 
W. C. Garden 
W. C. Garden 
W. C. Garden 
W. C. Garden 
W. C. Garden 
W. C. Garden 
W. 0. Garden 
W. C. Garden 

J. A. Burrow 
J, A. Burrow 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



Place of Sessions 



Date of 
Beginning 



Secretary 



Tazewell, Va 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Bristol, Tenn 

Morristown. Tenn... 

Bluefleld, W. Va 

Chattanooga, Tenn.. 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Wytheville, Tenn.... 

Morristown, Va 

Abingdon, Va. 

Bristol, Tenn.-Va.... 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Bluefleld, W. Va 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Johnson City, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn.. 
Morristown, Tenn... 

Abingdon, Va 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Bristol, Tenn.-Va. .. 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct, 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 



16, 1895 

7, 1896 

6, 1897 
12, 1898 

11, 1899 

10, 1900 
9, 1901 

8, 1902 

7, 1903 

12. 1904 

11, 1905 
10, 1906 

9, 1907 
7, 1908 
6, 1909 
5, 1910 
4, 1911 
2, 1912 
1, 1913 

14, 1914 



Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 
Bishop 



Duncan . ... 
Galloway.... 

Key 

Hargrove.... 

Wilson 

Granbery.... 

Heudrix 

Morrison.... 

Hoss 

Smith 

Duncan 

Galloway.... 
Morrison.... 

Hoss 

Hoss 

Candler 

Kilgo 

Kilgo 

Denny 

Waterhouse 



J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 
J. A. 



Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 
Burrow 



OUR SAINTED DEAD 

"And I heard a voice from Heaven saying unto me, Write, Blessed are the dead which 
die in the Lord, from henceforth ; Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors ; 
and their works do follow them." — Rev. xiv: 13. 



Names 



Admitted on 
Trial 



Where Buried 



^,M 



Moses Black 

George Atkin 

James G. H. Spear 

John Henninger 

Thomas Wilkerson 

Mitchell Martin 

EliK. Hutsell 

Ira Falls 

John Bowman 

O. P.Cunningham 

David Fleming. 

James Y. Crawford.. .. 

James Dixon. 

Ransom M. Moore 

John Barringer 

Leander W. Wilson 

David Adams 

Samuel Patton 

Washington Boring.... 

Ulrich Keener 

George E akin 

Jesse Cunningham 

JohnM. Kelly 

John M. Varnell 

A. M. Goodykoontz 

Thomas Stringfleld 

Charles Mitchell 

Andrew Gass 

Robertson Ganaway... 

Creed Fulton 

William K. Foster 

Elbert F. Sevier 

Samuel A. Miller 

W. W. Smith 



1769 
1793 



1796... S. Carolina. 



1822., 
1811., 



.Tennessee . . 
Western 



10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35| Rufus M. Stevens. 

36 James R. Ballew.. 

37 George M.Profat. 

38 H. B. Swisher 

39 Edwin C. Waxier. 



1773 
1813 



1816 
1798 
1797 
1822 
1810 



1789 
1802 



1813 
1796 
1814 
1792 
1780 



1828 



1814 
1808 
1836 



1837. 
1835. 
1832. 
1812 
1834. 
1824. 
1823. 
18U. 
1849. 
1827. 
1836. 
1821., 
1819- 
1851. 
1825., 
1811., 
1811., 
1828., 
1849., 
1838., 
1816.. 
1851.. 
1843 , 
1827., 
1823. 
1853. 
1823., 
1836. 
1851. 
1859. 
1860. 
1858. 
I860., 
1850. 



.Western 

.Holston 

.Holston 

-Tennessee.. 
-Tennessee.. 

.Holston 

.Tennessee.. 

.Western 

.Holston 

• Holston 

.Holston 

.Tennessee.., 
Tennessee.., 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Western 

.Western 

.S. Carolina . 

.Holston 

.Baltimore.... 

.Tennesee 

Holston 

■ Holston.. 

.Holston 

.Tennessee .., 

.Holston , 

.Tennessee .., 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 



1809 
1827 
1833 
1838 



1839 
1843 
1844 



1850 
1850 



1851 
1851 
1853 
1854 
1854 
1856 
1856 
1856 
1867 
1857 
1858 
1858 
1859 
1859 
1860 
1851 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1865 



Abingdon, Va. 



Cleveland, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Charleston, Tenn 

Sulphur Springs, N. U.... 

Roane Co., Tenn 

Rheatown, Tenn 

Wheeler's Chapel, Tenn. 

Kingston, Tenn 

Rogersville, Tenn. 



Abingdon, Va. 



Strawberry Plains, Tenn. 

Kingsport, Tenn 

Sullivan Co., Tenn 

Jackson Co., N. C ... 

Uriel, Tenn 

Mt. Harmony, Tenn 

Tazewell, Tenn 

Calhoun, Tenn 

Clear Branch, Va 

Strawberry Plains, Tenn. 

CarroUCo., Va 

Dandridge, Tenn 

Smyth Co., Va 

Emory, Va 

New Hope, W. Va 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Lee Co., Va 



Covington, Ky... 
North Carolina . 



Greensville, Tenn.. 
Alabama 



23 
6 

23 
7 

17 

22 
7 
9 

14 

15 
6 

15 

12 
9 

17 
3 
4 
4 

11 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



OUR SAINTED DEfKD—Co7itinued. 



Names 



Admitted on 
Trial 



Where Buried 



=« s is £ 

qj CD TO y 



100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 



John D. Wagg 

Jesse G. Swisher 

Daniel R. Reagan 

Thomas K. Catlett 

James K. Stringfield... 

Thomas K. Miiusey 

Joseph L. McGrhee 

Samuel B. Harwell 

Samuel Alexander 

Edward F. Lyons 

E. Waverly Marsh 

Jacob Brillhart 

John M. Crjsmond 

George W. Martin 

Daniel C. Carter 

James D. Dickey 

John Reynolds 

Wiley B. Winton 

William W. Neal 

Can-oil Long 

L. W. Thomson 

Francis A. Farley 

W. M. Crawford 

Samuel S. Grant 

Elbert L. Barrett 

William Hicks 

Joseph Haskew 

William H. Barnes 

Henry B. Avery 

H. G. Blankenbeckler. 

William B. Pickens 

John H. Robeson 

Archibald T. Brooks . 

James K. P. Ball 

John D. Baldwin 

Timothy Sullins 

William M. Bellamy... 
Larkin W. Crouch — 

James T. Smith , 

David R. Smith 

John S. Bourne 

William L. Turner .... 
Samuel D. Gaines.. . . 

George W. Renfro 

Samuel R. Wheeler... 

David C. Home 

George Stewart 

Andrew J. Frazier 

George W. Miles , 

James N. S. Huffaker 

Thomas J. Pope 

William W. Witcher. 

John M. McTeer , 

Ephraim E. Wiley 

Tobias F. Smythe 

John L. M. French 

Rufus W. Kite 

George W. K. Greene 
Emory B. Robertson . 

John R. Bellamy 

Riley A. Giddins .... 
Benj. W. S. Bishop... 

G. M. P. Hampton 

Sewell Phillips 

Philip Sutton.. 

James R. Chambers.... 
Fleming D. Crumley.. 

Jefferson D. Akers 

James A. Davis 

Henry P. Waugh 



1835 
1803 
1834 
1798 
1839 
1816 
1844 

1836 
1836 
1847 
1908 

1821 
1803 
1829 
1797 
1812 
1824 
1833 
1849 



1842 
1839 



1811 
1797 
1812 
1839 
1850 
1845 
1818 
1817 
1844 
1818 
1812 
1847 



1819 
1835 
1856 
1811 
1811 
1823 
1816 
1857 
1821 
1836 
1829 
1827 
1817 
1815 
1824 
1814 
1837 
1838 
1858 
1831 
1855 
1866 
1818 
1834 
1850 
1830 
1823 
1850 
1829 
1868 
1825 



1858 
1844 
1859 
1825, 
1858 
1840 
1869 
1819 
1860 
1866 
1869 
1848 
1847 
1863 
1827 
1852 
1819. 
1833 
1846. 
1845 
1872 
1873 
1873 
1858 
1873. 
1833 
1827 
1838 
1860 
1877 
1877 
1870 
1871 
1870 
1850 
1832 
1878 
1846 
1847 
1868 
1881 
1837 

1847 
1861 
1885 
1851. 
1860 
1854 
1840 
1854. 
1849 
1847. 
1840 
1860 
1861 
1884 
1859 
1878 
1891 
1848 
1856 
1879 
1851 
1854 
1887 
1860 
1891 
1867 
1855 



1866 
1866 

1867 
1867 
1870 
1872 



Holston . 

.Holston . 

.Holston . 

• Holston.. 

.Holston.. 

.Holston 

.Holston J1873 

.Tennessee.... 1874 

.Missouri [1874 

.Tennessee 1874 

1874 

1874 

1875 

1875 

1876 

1876 

1876 

1878 

1878 

1878 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1881 

1882 

1882 

1882 

.1882 

1883 

1883 

1885 

1885 

1 

1885 

1885 

1886 



.Holston 

.Kentucky 

.Holston 

.Holston.. . 

• Holston 

Holston 

• S. Carolina... 

.Holston 

.Holston 

• Holston 

• Holston 

• Holston 

.Holston 

• Holston 

.Holston 

• Holston 

.Holston 

• N. Carolina.. 
.Mississippi... 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.N. Carolina.. 

.Holston 

.Holston 

Holston 

.Holston 

• Holston.. 

Holston 

.Holston 

• Holston 

.Holston 

Holston 

.Holston 

• Holston 

• Holston 

.Hclston 

.Holston ' 

.Holston 11892 

.Holston Il892 

1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1893 
1893 
1893 
1894 



1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1889 
1899 
1890 
1890 
1891 



.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

• Holston 

.Holston 

• Holston 

• Holston 

• Holston 

• Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

• Holston 

.W. Virginia. 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston 

.Holston , 

.Holston 



1894 
1894 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1897 
1898 
1898 



Hillsville, Va 

Calhoun, Teun 

Georgia 

Abingdon, Va 

Asheville, N. C 

Calhoun, Tenn 

Sweetwater, Tenn. ... 

Kingston, Tenn 

Marion, Va . 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Rhea Co. Tenn 

Sweetwater, Tenn.... 
Liberty Hill, Tenn.... 

Bakersville, N. C 

Liberty Hill, Tenn... 

Clear Branch, Va 

Asheville, N. C 

Springfield, Mo 

Rhea Springs, Tenn. 

Wesleyana, Tenn 

Floyd, Va 

Jonesville, Va 

Boone, N. C 

Jacksboro, Tenn 

Shiloh, Tenn 

Bluff City, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 

Princeton, W. Va — 



Greeneville, Tenn 

Ducktown, Tenn 

Buncombe Co. N, C... 

Falls Mill, Va 

Spring Creek, Tenn. . 

Sneedville, Tenn 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Scott Co., Va 

Calhoun, Tenn 

Asheville, N. C 

Rogersville, Tenn. 

Spring Valley, Va 

Jonesville, Va 

Bristol, Tenn 

Harriman, Tenn 

Alderson, W. Va 

Rockwood, Tenn 

Wythe Co. Va 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Marion, Va 

Knox Co^, Tenn 

Vernon, Texas 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Wytheville, Va 

Emory, Va. 

Near Emory, Va 

Wythe Co., Va 

Bristol, Tenn 

Bland Co.. Va 

Dalton, Ga 

Elizabethton, Tenn 

Cleveland, Tenn 

Emory, Va 

Riceville, Tenn 

Eagle Furnace, Tsnn. 

Princeton, W. Va 

Blountville, Tenn 

Fall Branch, Tenn...., 
Montgomery Co., Va. 

Emory Va 

Morristown, Tenn 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 
OUR SAINTED DEAD— Continued. 



Admitted on 
Trial 



Where Buried 



03 O 






110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
558 
159 
160 
161 
162 



John H. Kennedy.... 
John R. Cunningham.. 
W. G. E. Cunnyngham; 

John Alley 

Joseph F. Wampler. 

James K. Wolfe 

Wm. H. Henderson. 
Edward W. Walker, 
William L. Jones ... 

John H. Keith 

William H. Dawn... 
Eufus M. Hickey.... 

Elbert S. Bettis 

Jones F. Hash 

Alex. B. Woodward- 
John W. Robertson. 

Enoch W. Moore 

Francis M, Grace.. . 
Rush F. Jackson .... 
William P. Doane... 
William Robeson.... 

John R. Stradley 

William M.Dyer 

Samuel S. Weatherly.. 

William H. Bates 

James S. Kennedy 

James Malioney 

Qharles H. Fogleman 

Joseph B. Davis 

John 0. Runyan 

James M. Jimison 

James E. Swecker 

John D. Hickson 

Robert E. Smith 

John Bornig 

Milton J. Butcher 

Jacob R. Payne.. 

John Woolsey 

William H. Kelly 

John B. Carnes 

William W. Pyott. 

George B. Draper 

Frank Richardson 

John P. Dickey 

James O. Straley. 

James W. Belt 

Henry C. Neal 

Joseph A. Darr 

James R. Hunter 

Robert A. Hutsell 

William C. Faris 

Charles K. Miller 

John H. Brunner 



1848 
1844 
1820 
1825 
1848 
1847 
1846 
1866 
1853 
1839 



1820 
1859 
1870 
1832 
1850 
1833 
1832 
1849 
1883 
1822 
1825 
1857 
1857 
1821 
1826 
1828 
1875 
1833 
1845 
1877 
1861 
1835 
1846 
1827 
1873 
1840 
1851 
1824 
1858 
1846 
1855 
1831 
1844 
1864 



1872. 
1875. 
1843. 
1845. 
1876. 



1895 
1889. 
1882. 
1870, 
1872 
1845, 
1893. 
1891, 



..Holsten.. 

.Hols ton.. 

.Holston. 

.Holston.. 

.Holston.. 

..Holston.. 

.Holston.. 

.Holston . 

.Holston.. 

.Holston 

..Holston.. 

.Holston.. 

.Holston . 

.Holston.. 



1875, 
1860. 
1853. 
1884. 
1859. 
1844. 
18.56. 
1885. 
1873. 
1846. 
18.52. 
1859 
1902. 
1874. 
1871. 
1905. 
1890. 
1875. 
1870. 
18.51. 
1896. 
1861. 
1888. 
1848. 
1888. 
1888 
1889 
1854. 
1871. 
1884. 



1829 
1847 
1864 
1847 
1856 
1832 
1825 



1862. 
1887. 
1889. 
1872, 
1880 
1860. 



Holston.. 
.Holston . 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Virginia, 
.Holston . 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston . 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 

Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
•Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 
.Holston.. 

Holston.. 
■Holston.. 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1901 
1902 
1902 



1902 
1903 
19b3 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1907 
1097 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 



1912 
1912 
1912 



1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 

1913 
1914 



Morristown, Tenn 

Wheeler's Chap)l, Tenn. 

Nashville, Tenn 

Dulap, Tenn 

Shell Mound, Tenn 

New Providence, Tenn... 

Decatur, Tenn 

Graham, Va. 

Morristown, Tenn 

Asheville, N. C 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Morristown, Tenn 

Emory, Va 

Grayson Co., Va 

Tate Springs, Tenn 

Jasper, Tenn 

Independence, Va, 

Owenton, Ala 

Emory, Va 

Friend's Station, Tenn .. 

Blountville, Tenn 

Hiwassee College, Tenn. 

Emory, Va 

Emory, Va 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Wallace, Va 

Russell Co., Va 

Emory, Va , 

Pleasant Grove, Tenu 

Emory, Va 

Wythe Co., Va , 

At'ten, Tenn 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Surgoinsville, Tenn 

Telford, Tenn 

Powell's Station, Tenn.. 

Tazewell, Va , 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Emory, Va 

Gate City. Va 

LaFollette, Tenn 

Los Angeles, Cal 

Emory, Va 

Speer's Ferry, Va 

Abingdon, Va 

Jasper, Tenn 

St. Elmo, Tenn 

LaFollette, Tenn 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Rural Retreat, Va 

Hiwasse College, Tenn... 



27 15 



24 



LOCAL PREACHERS OF HOLSTON. 

Note— (E) means Elder; (D) means Deacon. 



BLUBFIELD DISTRICT. 
r:Wm. H. Ayers (D), Bluefield, W. Va. 

2 J. H. Honaker (E), Montcalm, W. Va. 

3 M. W. Davis, Rock, W. Va. 

4 B. C. Wise (D), Matoka, W. Va. 
5; J. D. Wright, Rock, W. Va. 

6;Dan A. Atkins (D), Keystone, W. Va. 
7 Henry D. Justice, Williamson, W. Va. 
8*^Lorenzo D. Trent, Wilmore. W. Va. 
9 J. W. Laird, Bluefield, W. Va. 



10 B. W. Fitch (E), Mullens, W. Va. 

11 W. J. Blankenship, Thacker, W. Va. 

12 Ellis C. Jessie, Matewan, W. Va. 

13 J. A. McKinney, McDowell, W. Va. 

14 J. H. Kizer, Grumpier. W. Va. 

15 T. A. Nicewander, Cooper, W. Va. 

16 W. A. McCormick, Marytown, W. Va. 

17 D. S. Lee, Berwind, W. Va. 

18 Samuel P. Bratton, Sand Lick, W. Va. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



RADFORD DISTRICT. 

1 Chas. A. Brown (E^ Narrows, Va. 

2 Landon C. Taylor (E), Snowville, Va. 

3 Jno. B. Peery (E), Floyd. Va. 

4 H. C. Thompson (E), Ivanhoe, Va. 

5 E. Johnson (D), Radford, Va. 

6 D. B. Corner (D), Floyd, Va. 

7 E. F. Cooper, Athens, W. Va. 

8 H. W. Bird, Pride, W. Va. 

9 E. C. Williams, Galas, Va. 

10 C. Aug. Smith, Fancy Gap, Va. 

11 Jas. A. Turner, Poster Falls, Va. 

12 Preston Fowler, Poplar Camp, Va. 

13 G. B. Halstead (D), Princeton. W. Va. 

14 J. C. Plinchum (D), Pulaski, Va. 

15 W. C. Shrewsherry (D), Lerons. W. Va. 

16 C. D. Gutridgo (D), Pipestem, W. Va. 

17 Henry L. Dean, Ivanhoe, Va. 

18 Ethelbert Weeks, Willis, Va. 

19 W. A. Warner (D), Oakvale, W. Va. 

20 A. H. Gentry (E), Radford, Va. 

21 T. H. Kinser (El. East Radford, Va. 

22 Marcus Leftwich, Willis, Va. 

23 Henry E. Albright, Willis, Va. 

24 W. D. LaRue, Galax, Va. 

25 Major Carieo, Edmonds, N. C. 

26 Samuel D. Bartle,* Pulaski, Va. 

Died during the year— Phillip P. Kinzer 
and Douglas Morgan. 

TAZEWELL DISTRICT. 

1 George Buston (E), Tazewell, Va. 

2 Robert Cross (E), Castlewood, Va. 

3 W. K. Neel (D), Showers Mill, Va. 

4 W. A. Boyd (D), Davenport, Va. 

5 J. W. Bowling (D), N. Tazewell, Va. 

6 Gabriel Davis (D), Grundy, Va, 

7 P. R. Suitar (D , Cove Creek, Va. 

8 W. A. Gass, lager, W. Va. 

9 E. G. Smith, Maxwell, Va. 

10 T. A. Repass, Tazewell, Va. 

11 C. W. Street, Deskins, Va. 

12 T. H. Short, Burk's Garden, Va. 

13 E. M. Boyd, Boyds, Va. 

14 Jefferson Davis, Grundy, Va. 

15 W. A. Reynolds, Graham, Va. 

16 Vance Gibson, Castlewood, Va. 

17 0. Wiley Johnson, Elk Garden, Va. 

18 T. N. Shook, Carrie, Va. 

19 G. L. Kelly, Lebanon, Va. 

20 W. J. Goff, Castlewood, Va. 

21 John Russell, Indian, Va. 

22 Oi'ville Johnson, Hanoker, Va. 

23 Hubbard Nelson, Grundy, Va. 

24 Holland M. Boyd, Davenport, Va. 

25 Wiley Yost, N. Tazewell, Va. 

Died during the year — J. W. Holbrook (E), 
Bailey, Va. 

WYTHEVILLE, DISTRICT. 

1 T. C. Vaughn (B) , Spring Valley, Va. 

2 J. R. Pinion CE), Spring Valley, Va. 

3 R. L. Newberry (E) , Mechanicsburg, Va. 

4 W. P. Miller (E), Mechanicsburg, Va. 

5 J. P. Boyd (E), Cripple Creek, Va. 

6 Levi Brown (D), Atkins, Va. 

7 W. A. Leonard (D), Groseclose, Va. 

8 S. V. Morris (D) , Holly Brook, Va. 

9 W. M. Shuler (D), Atkins, Va. 

10 H. J. Crowgey, Wytheville, Va. 

11 J. A. Fisher, Wytheville, Va. 

12 G. A. Callahan, Wytheville, Va. 

13 J. R. Pugh, Elk Creek, Va. 

14 B. A. Poole, Independence, Va. 

15 J. K. Shuler, Flat Ridge, Va. 

16 W. E. Williams, Stevens Creek, Va. 

17 J. M. Sheppard, Mechanicsburg, Va. 

18 F. M. Radford. Holly Brook, Va. 



19 S. T. Hale, Rural Retreat, Va. 

20 G. W. Slagle, Rural Retreat, Va. 

21 G. W. Hudson, Max Meadows, Va. 

22 T. R. Fulton, Summerfield, Va. 
28 R. L. Wiley, Independence, Va. 

24 A. T. Lowery, Rural Retreat, Va. 

25 G. F. Thomas, Grant, Va. 

26 E. B. Groseclose, Crocketts, Va. 

27 C. W. Umberger, Ceres, Va. 

28 C. G. Eastwood, Wytheville, Va. 

29 R. W. Stone, Elk Creek, Va, 

30 E. G. Wagner, Mechanicsburg, Va. 

31 John K. Dean, Max Meadows, Va. 

32 Comet B. Cox, Independence, Va. 

Died during the year— R. F. Repass (D), 
Holly Hrook, Va. 

ABINGDON DISTRICT. 

1 W. R. Gale (E), Vinton, Va. 

2 E. C. Rodifer (E), Bristol, Tenn. 

3 B. O. Davis (E), Abingdon, Va. 

4 J. A. Pendergrass (E), Blountville, Tenn. 

5 D. 0. Clendeuen (E), Bluff City, Tenn. 

6 D. M Graybeal (E), Damascus, Va. 

7 John R. Smith (E), Bristol, Tenn. 

8 W. B. Scarboro (D), Bristol, Tenn. 

9 T. G. Neel (D), Alvarado, Va. 

10 W. W. Bush (D), Meadow View, Va. 

11 S. B. Pickle (D(, Blountville, Tenn. 

12 P. H. Stringer, Meadow View, Va. 

13 W. E. Jessee, Bristol, Tenn. 

14 G. A. Callahan, Wyndale, Va. 

15 J. A. Turner, Emory, Va. 

16 Homer Henry,* Emory, Va. 

17 P. P. Tabor.* Crandon, Va. 

18 W. H. White, Bristol, Tenn. 

19 R. P. Carroll, Emory, Va. 

Died during the year— J. W. Louthian. 

BIG STONE GAP DISTRICT. 

1 W. W. Woodward (E). Jonesville, Va. 

2 J. E. Graham (D), Jonesville. Va. 

3 T. P. Graham (E), Jonesville, Va' 

4 R. L. Graham (D). Jonesville. Va. 

5 H. K. Hillman (E), Herald. Va. 

6 W. N. Baker (D), Clinchport, Va, 

7 R. L. Debusk, Rose Hill, Va. 

8 W. J. Crab tree (D), Dorchester, Va. 

9 C. C. Brooks (D), Hogan, Va. 

10 Worley Hillman (D), Nickelsville, Va. 

11 S. W. McConnell (D), Nickelsville, Va. 

12 H. J. Kelly, Nickelsville, Va. 

13 P. H. Lamur, Pennington Gap, Va. 

14 W. H. Wampler (D). E. Stone Gap, Va. 

15 H. P. Nixon, Tom's Creek, Va. 

16 S. M. Jennings, Jonesville, Va. 

17 J. E. Evans, Dungannon, Va. 

18 T. F. Suthers (D), Norton, Va. 

19 J. T. Smith, Pennington Gap, Va, 

20 J. H. Russell, Hubbard Springs, Va. 

21 J. A. Clemens, Wise, Va. 

22 J. W. Ely, Jonesville. Va. 

23 Ray F. Kilbum, Appalachia, Va. 

24 W. C. Averitt, Stonega, Va. 

25 Milvin Legg, Stonega, Va. 

26 Roy L. Osborne, Clinchport, Va. 

27 B. M. Francisco, Nickelsville, Va. 

28 James Polk Breach, Keeokee, Va. 

29 Henry J. Kelly. Nickelsville, Va. 

30 N. Monroe Bloomer, Dorchester, Va. 

31 C, C. Rowtie, Ewing, Va. 

32 Hawley D. Walter,* Norton, Va. 

MORRISTOWN DISTRICT. 

1 A. J. Bruner (E), Morristown, Tenn. 

2 W. C. Wampler. Morristown, Tenn. 

3 J. B. Cross (D), Ohuckey, Tenn. 



• Licensed this year. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



4 M. G. Price (E) Mosheim, Tenn. 

5 W. G. Fagala, Dandridge, Tenn. 

6 W. H. Miller (E), Leadvale, Tenn. 

7 B. H. Talley (D), White Pine, Tenn. 

8 Marvin L. Talley, White Pine, Tenn. 

9 C. R. Vinson, Newport, Tenn. 

10 D. T. Kirk (D), Newport, Tenn. 

11 James Young (E), Tampieo, Tenn. 

12 N. W. Bellamy, Surgoinsville, Tenn. 

13 iD. P. Wilcox (E), Elizabethton, Tenn. 

14 C. H. Williams, Duektown, Tenn. 

15 E. Nessus Logan, Strohl, Tenn. 

16 Q-. W. Osborne (D), Bristol, Tenn. 

17 C. W. Williams, Tate, Tenn. 

18 T. C. Moore, Bybee, Tenn. 

KNOXVILLE DISTRICT. 

1 R. B. Parsans (E), Bearden, Tenn. 

2 J. H. Sensabaugh (E), Knoxville, Tenn. 

3 Josiah Portner, Knoxville, Tenn. 

4 D. H. Groover (D), Etowah, Tenn. 

5 J. M. Bell, Fountain City, Tenn. 

6 Lee M. Coward, Byington, Tenn. 

7 P. S. Moody, Unitia, Tenn. 

8 O. L. Stradley (E), Madisonville, Tenn. 

9 Frederick Gordon, Sweetwater, Tenn. 

10 J. H. Lowery (E), Madisonville, Tenn. 

11 Claude Curtis, Maryville, Tenn. 

12 Frank Forkner, Sweetwater, Tenn. 

13 R. H. Jewell (E), Etowah, Tenn. 

14 A. N. Jackson (E), Louisville, Tenn. 

15 J. E. McCampbell (E), Townsend, Tenn. 

16 O. E. Householder, Knoxville, Tenn. 

17 E. T. Estes, Knoxville, Tenn. 

18 Wiley B. Peck, Madisonville, Tenn. 

19 William A. Roberts, Knoxville, Tenn. 

20 C. R. Cline, New Tazewell, Tenn. 

21 J. C. Kinzer (E), Tazewell, Tenn. 

22 Chas. H. Williams, Duektown, Tenn. 

23 W. T. Roby (E), Knoxville, Tenn. 

24 A. L. Broyles, Madisonville, Tenn. 

25 Arch Buchanan, Tazewell, Tenn. 

26 J. H. Smith (D), Knoxville, Tenn. 

27 Roy E. filalock, Turtletown, Tenn. 

28 G. W. Bell, Louisville, Tenn. 

29 C. G. Sellers, Knoxville Tenn. 

30 J. W. Ault, Knoxville, Tenn. 

31 H. A. Norman, Knoxville, Tenn. 

32 O. H. Logan, Maryville, Tenn. 

33 Geo. Franklin Car,* Knoxville, Tenn. 

34 W. Austin White,* Knoxville, Tenn. 

CHATTANOOGA DISTRICT, 
1 B, M. Alexander, Chattanooga, Tenn. 



2 H. K. Allison (D), Rossville, Ga. 

3 L. J. Biggers (E), St. Elmo, Tenn. 

4 J. T. Booth, Trenton, Ga. 

5 W. J. Cannon, Rising Fawn, Ga. 

6 D. C. Carn (D), Niota, Tenn. 

7 J. A. Cline, Tellieo Plains, Tenn. 

8 J. H, Drinnon, Lookout Mountain, Tenn. 

9 W. S. Eddings (E), Chattanooga, Tonn. 

10 I. F. Fisher (D), Apison, Tenn. 

11 J. E. Fogleman, Cleveland, Tenn. 

12 Elza Forrester, Rising Fawn, Ga. 

13 C. B. Hall, Tyner, Tenn. 

14 J. D. Hardaway (D), Rising Pawn, Ga. 
25 J. R. Hatfield (E), Mt. Vernon, Tenn. 

16 J. T. Hibberts, Benton, Tenn. 

17 T. M. Hicks, Benton, Tenn. 

18 P. H. Horner, Elizabeth town, Tenn. 

19 J. F. Ledford, Rossville, Ga. 

20 W. P. Lindsey, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

21 John Massingale, Athens, Tenn., R.P.D. 

22 T. B. MeCurdy (E), Mt. Vernon, Tenn. 

23 J. R. McB'arland (D), Rossville, Ga. 

34 C. L. Padgett (E), Chattanooga, Tenn. 

25 W. H. Patterson (E), Cleveland, Tenn. 

26 E. S. Payne, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

27 J. B. Sexton, Athens, Tenn., R.F.D. 

28 J. Melvin Smith (D), Mt. Vernon, Tenn. 

29 A. M. Tomlinson (D), Athens, Tenn. 

30 H. A. True (E), St. Elmo, Tenn. 

31 W. A. True, 

32 W. R. Walker,* Calhoun, Tenn. 

23 J. T. Williams (D), Chattanooga, Tenn. 

24 J. H. Witt, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

35 J. S. Young (E), Chattanooga, Tenn. 

HARRIMAN DISTRICT. 

1 H. B. Taylor, AUardt, Tenn. 

2 J. D. Taekett, Evansville, Tenn. 

3 G. E. Eriyin, Calhoun, Tenn. 

4 C. P. Ramsey, Banner Springs, Tenn. 

5 R. C. Knight, Dayton, Tenn. 

6 F. M. Shirley (D), Whitwell, Tenn. 

7 J. H. Reynolds (D), Harriman, Tenn. 

8 J. G. Irwin (D), Andersonville, Tenn. 

9 J. M. Woodson. LafoUette, Tenn. 

10 Samuel Tollett, Crossville, Tenn. 

11 C. J. Shafer, Petros, Tenn. 

12 J. S. Baker, Crab Orchard, Tenn. 

13 Jacob W. Madewell,* Jamestown, Tenn. 

14 William L. Tate,* Dunlap, Tenn. 

15 Richard F. Ball,* Spring City, Tenn. 

16 William H. Long,* Pin Hook, Tenn. 

Died during the year— Samuel D. East, 
Evansville. 



* Licensed this year. 



HOLSTON COLLEGES. 



Emory and Henry College, Emory, Va. Rev. C. C. Weaver, President. 

Martha Washington College, Abingdon, Va. Rev, S. D. Long, D.D., 
President. 

Sullins College, Bristol, Tenn.-Va. Rev. W. S. Neighbors, D.D., 
President. 

Centenary College, Cleveland, Tenn. Rev. Barney Thompson, President. 

Hiwassee College, Sweetwater, Tenn., R. F. D. Rev. J. E. Lowry, 
President. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



LAY DELEGATES TO ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF 1914. 



BLUEFIELD DISTRICT. 
J. E. Wagner. Bluefield, W. Va. 
J. Will Bailey, Kimball, W. Va. 
R. P. Bolen, Bramwell, W. Va. 
J. B. Saunders, Williamson, W. Va. 

TAZEWELT. DISTRICT, 

J. H. Sluss, Graham, Va. 

Dr. N. E. Hartsook, Honaker, Va. 

E. S. Finney. Lebanon, Va. 

T. J. Smith, Elk Garden, Va. 

RADFORD DISTRICT. 
W. S. Dangerfield, Princeton, W. Va. 
R. M. Copenhaver, Dublin, Va. 
Rev. C. A. Brown, Narrows, Va. 
T. B. King, Poplar Hill, Va. 

WYTHEVILLE DISTRICT. 
JTrank L. Saunders, Chilhowie, Va. 

E. Green Wagner, Meehanicsburg, Va. 

F. A. Cornett, Spring Valley, Va. 
J. S. Brown, Rural Retreat, Va. 

ABINGDON DISTRICT. 
H. D. Hawk, Blountville, Tenn., R. F. D. 
Geo. E. Penn, Esq., Abingdon, Va., 
H. G. Peters, Esq., Bristol. Tenn. 
Prof. J. L. Hardin, Emory, Va. 



BIG STONE GAP DISTRICT. 
J. N. Hillman, Coeburn, Va. 
W. P. Beverly, Dorchester, Va. 
W. N. Baker, Clinchport, Va. 
J. W. Orr, Jonesville, Va. 

MORRISTOWN DISTRICT. 
P. M. Bewley, Morristown, Tenn. 
E. S. Earley, Newport, Tenn. 
J. C. Keller, Mosheim, Tenn. 
S. B. White, Jonnson City, Tenn. 

KNOXVILLE DISTRICT. 
Jno. L. Brown, Sweetwater, Tenn. 
Dr. A. D. Albright, Knoxville, Tenn. 
T. J. Bondurant, Fountain City, Tenn. 
Prank Murphy, Sevierville, Tenn. 

CHATTANOOGA DISTRICT. 
B. F. Pritts, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Frank Steffner, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
J. M. Cantrell, Rising Fawn, Ga. 
W. T. Roberts, Athens, Tenn. 

HARRIMAN DISTRICT. 
Rev. S. D. East, Evansville, Tenn. 
S. J, Hornsby, Pin Hook, Tenn. 
W. B. Allen, Dayton, Tenn. 
M. S. Holoway, Spring City, Tenn. 



DISTRICT CONFERENCES OF 1915. 

Bluefield District — Keystone, W. Va. 
Tazewell District — Graham, Va. 
Radford District — Athens, W. Va. 
Wytheville District — Cedar Springs, Va. 
Abingdon District— Glade Spring, Va. 
Big Stone Gap District — Dungammon, Va. 
Morristown District — White Pine, Tenn. 
Knoxville District— Sevierville, Tenn. 
Chattanooga District — Athens, Tenn. 
Harriman District — Whitwell, Tenn. 



DISTRICT LAY LEADERS. 

Bluefield District — J. R. Hutcheson, Bluefield, "W. Va. 
Tazewell District— Rev. C. R. Brown, Tazewell, Va. 
Radford District — Rev. G. B. Halstead, Princeton, W. Va. 
Wytheville District — R, L. Dickenson, Spring Valley, Va. 
Abingdon District — Prof. J. L. Hardin, Emory, Va. 
Big Stone Gap District — C. Q, Counts, Coeburn, Va. 
Morristown District — P. M. Bewley, Morristown, Tenn. 
Knoxville Distriet^ — Edgar S. Lotspeich, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Cleveland District— B. F. Fritts, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Chattanooga District — Luther N. Brown, Whitwell, Tenn. 



HOLSTON EPWORTH LEAGUE CONFERENCE. 

President — J. D. Lea, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Vice-President — H. F. Potts, Abingdon, Va. 

Secretary— R. K. Carr, Bluefield, W. Va. 

Treasurer— J. F. Good, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Junior Superintendent — Walter Neal, Chattanooga, Tenn. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



SENIOR DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 



Bluefield— (Not yet filled.) 

Tazewell— Rev. R. B. Piatt, Jr., Tazewell, Va. 

Radford— Swift Waugh, Galax, Va. 

Wytheville — William Vernon, 

Abingdon — W. O. Henley, Bristol, Va. 

Big Stone Gap — Miss Minnie Winegar, Gate City, Va. 

Morristown — J. M. Massingill, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Knoxville— S. M. Felts, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Chattanooga — Wm. Eubanks, N. Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Harriman — Miss Laura Gamble, Clinton, Tenn. 

JUNIOR DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Bluefield— Mrs. R. K. Carr, Bluefield, W. Va. 
Tazewell— Rev. R. B. Piatt, Jr., Tazewell, Va. 
Radford — Miss Susie Waugh, Dublin, Va. 
Wytheville — Mrs. J. B. Brown, Marion, Va. 
Abingdon — Miss Catherine Perry, Bristol, Tenn. 
Big Stone Gap — Miss Alice K. Bruce, Big Stone Gap, Va. 
Morristown — Thomas R. McMurray, Johnson City, Tenn. 
Knoxville — Miss Hattie Perkins, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Chattanooga — Miss Vinnie Fricks, East Lake, Tenn. 
Harriman — Miss Edith Tindall, Harriman, Tenn. 

The next Conference meets in June at Johnson City, Tenn. 



HOLSTON WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Mrs. P. L. Cobb, President, 208 Bailey Ave Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Mrs. A. N. Jackson, First Vice-President Louisville, Tenn. 

Mrs. Hugh Potts, Second Vice-President Abingdon, Va. 

Mrs. W. B. Sullins, Corresponding Secretary Knoxville, Tenn. 

Miss Bettie Browder, Treasurer Sweetwater, Tenn. 

Mrs. Carrie F. Alderson, Recording Secretary Wise, Va. 

Mrs. F. C. Beverly, Supt. of Mission Study and Christian 

Stewardship Bluefield, W. Va. 

Mrs. Wm. Knabe, Supt. of Social Service Knoxville, Tenn. 

Mrs. O. C. Lee, Supt. of Publicity Jonesville, Va. 

Mrs. R. L. Bruner, Supt. of Literature. ..803 Fourth Ave., Knoxville, Tenn. 

Mrs. W. C. NaflE, Supt. of Supplies, 610 Walnut Ave Knoxville, Tenn. 

Mrs. S. B. Cook, Supt. of Fifth Sunday Collections Chattanooga, Tenn. 

DISTRICT SECRETARIES. 

Abingdon District — Mrs. J. A. Lyons, Glade Spring, Va. 
Big Stone Gap District — Mrs. J. W. Dobyns, Kingsport, Tenn. 
Bluefield District— Mrs. E. Henson, Bluefield, W. Va. 
Chattanooga District — Mrs. L, D. Webb, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Harriman District — Miss Vera Shirley, Whitwell, Tenn. 
Knoxville District — Mrs. L. A. Haun, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Morristown District — Mrs. J. F. King, Greeneville, Tenn. 
Radford District — Mrs. J. H. Barnett, East Radford, Va. 
Tazewell District — Mrs. D. P. Hurley, Tazewell, Va. 
Wytheville District — Mrs. A. B. Hendricks, Rural Retreat, Va. 

OFFICERS TO WHOM MONEY SHOULD BE SENT. 

Miss Bettie Browder, Sweetwater, Tenn. — Dues, conference expense fund, 
life membership dues, week of prayer offering, all funds from the Baby and 
Junior Divison and young people's societies and all assessments collected. 



10 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

Mrs. S. B. Cook, 15 Duncan Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn. — All funds from 
the Fifth Sunday collections. 

Mrs. W, C. Naff, 610 Walnut Ave., Knoxville, Tenn. — All money for 
purchasing supplies for the Holston Industrial Home and School at 
Greeneville, Tenn., the amount of same to be sent to the District Secretary. 

Rev. S. S. Kreger, Greeneville, Tenn. — All boxes of supplies, same to be 
reported to the District Secretary and Mrs. W. C. Naff; also boxes contain- 
ing clothing. Value of same should be enclosed, and a duplicate sent to the 
District Secretary. 

Mrs. A. N. Jackson, Louisville, Tenn. — All names for Baby Roll and 
Junior Division, funds for same to be sent to Miss Bettie Browder, Sweet- 
water, Tenn. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF GREENEVILLE INDUSTRIAL HOME AND SCHOOL. 

Rev. J. A. Burrow, President Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Mrs. W. B. Speer, Secretary Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Mr. F. A. Carter, Treasurer Sweetwater, Tenn. 

Mrs. A. J. Patterson Greeneville, Tenn. 

Mrs. G. A. Nash St. Elmo, Tenn. 

Mrs. S. C. Williams Johnson City, Tenn. 

Rev. J. A. Baylor Wytheville, Va. 

Rev. S. S. Kreger, Manager Greeneville, Tenn. 



GENERAL CHURCH INFORMATION 



COMMISSION ON WASHINGTON CITY CHURCH. 

Bishop W. A. Candler, Bishop J. H. McCoy, Bishop J. C. Kllgo, Rev. 
W. F. McMurry, Rev. Geo. S. Sexton. 



ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE OF NEXT GENERAL CONFERENCE. 

Rev. J. H. Eakes, of the North Georgia Conference; Rev. U. V. W. Dar- 
lington, of the Western Virginia Conference; Judge W. Erskine Williams, 
of the Central Texas Conference; B. C. Clark of the West Oklahoma Con- 
ference; Mr. F. M. Weaver, of the Western North Carolina Conference; 
Virgil P. Smith, Esq., of the Kentucky Conference; Mr. E. Frank Storey, 
of the Virginia Conference. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

For eight years: Rev. B. F. Lipscomb, of the Virginia Conference; 
Rev. A. F. Watkins, of the Mississippi Conference; Rev. J. A. Burrow, of 
the Holston Conference; Judge E. S. Vaught, of Oklahoma City; Mr. F. M. 
Jackson, of Birmingham, Ala. For four years: Mr. D. C. Scales, of Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

GENERAL BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Bishop E. E. Hoss, Nashville, Tenn., President; Bishop James Atkins, 
Waynesville, N. C, Vice-President; Rev. Andrew Sledd, Greensboro, Ala., 
Secretary; Rev. Stonewall Anderson, Nashville, Tenn., Corresponding Sec- 
retary; D. M. Smith, Nashville, Tenn., Treasurer; J. C. Kilgo, James Can- 
non, Jr., I. W. Cooper, G. W. Read, James Kilgore, W. A. Shelton, H. N. 
Snyder, C. O. Jones, J. L. Clark, R. L. Flowers, J. M. Henry, R. P. Tay- 
lor, L. S. Barton, J. R. Bond, J. W. Robbins, P. D. Maddin, H. H. Sher- 
man. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 11 

GENEEAL SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

Bishop James Atkins, J. B. Wadsworth, Rev. R. E. Dickenson, A. L. 
Hutchins, Rev. H. P. Hamill, Rev. J. A. B. Fry, Rev. G. S. Roberts, Rev. 
J. M. Outler, Rev. C. H. Greer, J. Heard Ledyard, Rev. M. T. Haw, W, 
B. Cooper, W. P. Few, J. D. Boxley, Rev. J. O. Wilson, J. R. Pepper, 
Rev. J. C. Orr, B, M. Burgher, C. H. Nichols, Rev. V. A. Godbey, H. E. 
Barrow. 

GENERAL EPWORTH LEAGUE BOARD. 

Bishop J. H. McCoy, D. D., President, Birmingham, Ala.; Rev. Paul B. 
Kern, Vice-President, Murfreesboro, Tenn. ; Rev. John W. Shackford, Rich- 
mond, Va. ; Rev. Ivan Lee Holt, Cape Girardo, Mo. ; Mr. Gus W. Thomason, 
Dallas, Texas; Hon. R. N. Roddy, Oklahoma City, Ok.; Mr. E. O. Harbin, 
Louisville, Ky. ; Dr. F. S. Parker, Nashville, Tenn.; Rev. J. Marvin Cul- 
breth, Nashville, Tenn.; Miss Ada Trawick, Nashville, Tenn.; Dr. E. H. 
Rawlings, Nashville, Tenn.; Mrs. Hume R. Steele, Nashville, Tenn. 



GENERAL BOOK COMMITTEE. 

J. B. Morgan, Nashville, Tenn.; W. C. Dibrell, Nashville, Tenn.; J. H. 
Fall, Nashville, Tenn. ; W. R. Odell, Concord, N. C. ; D. H. Linebaugh, 
Muskogee, Okla.; A. V. Lane, Dallas, Tex.; C. W. Hardwicke, Richmond, 
Va. ; Rev. J. S. Frazer, Mobile, Ala.; Rev. E. V. Regester, Alexandria, 
Va. ; Rev. W. C. Lovett, Atlanta, Ga.; Rev. W. B. Taylor, Pulaski, Tenn.; 
Rev. George A. Morgan, Nashville, Tenn.; Rev. G. S. Hardy, Hamlin, Tex. 



COMMITTEE ON APPEALS. 

J. M. Bareus, of the Central Texas Conference; M. E. Lawson, of the 
Missouri Conference; T. D. Ellis, of the South Georgia Conference; J. A. 
McCullough, of the South Carolina Conference ; W. P. Lovejoy, of the North 
Georgia Conference ; Ocie Speer, of Central Texas Conference, and J. D. 
Simpson, of the North Alabama Conference. 

LAYMEN'S MOVEMENT— EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

J. R. Pepper, T. S. Southgate, C. F. Reid, F. M. Daniel, Charles H. 
Ireland, P. H. Enochs, R. S. Munger, W. Erskine Williams, and R. F. 
Burden. 

MEMBERS OF FEDERAL COUNCIL OF METHODISM. 

Bishop A. W. Wilson, Baltimore, Md. ; Bishop E. E. Hoss, Nashville, 
Tenn. ; Bishop Collins Denny, Richmond, Va. ; Rev. Frank M. Thomas, D. 
D., Louisville, Ky. ; Rev. W. J. Young, D. D., Atlanta, Ga. ; Rev. John M, 
Moore, D. D., Nashville, Tenn.; Mr. M. L. Walton, Woodstock, Va. ; Dr. 
H. N. Snyder, Columbia, S. C. ; Mr. Percy Maddin, Nashville, Tenn. 



COMMISSION TO INVESTIGATE CHARTERS. 

Bishop James H. McCoy, Rev. W. F. McMurry, F. M. Boyles, Rev. T. 
D. Ellis, Judge E. C. O'Rear, W. W. Hughes, Esq., Col. E. C. Reeves, J. 
A. MeCulloch, W. H. Thomap. 



COMMISSION ON EDUCATION. 

John O. Willson, R. E. Blackwell, R. S. Hyer, C. R. Jenkins, P. H. 
Linn, J. D. Simpson, J. H. Reynolds, F. N. Parker, J. J. Tigert, W. P. 
Few. 



12 H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

EDITORS. 

Rev. Gross Alexander, S.T.D., Book Editor and Editor Quarterly Review, 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. Thomas N. Ivey, D.D., Editor Christian Advocate, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. J. S. Chadwiek, D.D., Assistant Editor Christian Advocate, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

Rev. E. B. Chappell, D.D., Sunday School Editor, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. L. P. Beaty, D.D., Assistant Sunday School Editor, Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Rev. F. S. Parker, D.D., Editor Epworth Era, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. J. M. Culbreth, Assistant Editor Epworth Era, Nashville, Tenn. 



SECRETARIES. 

Rev. W. W. Pinson, D.D., Secretary Board of Missions, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. Ed. F. Cook, D.D., Secretary Foreign Department, Board of Mis- 
sions, Nashville, Tenn. 

Mrs. J. B. Cobb, Secretary Foreign Department, Board of Missions (for 
the women), Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. John M. Moore, D.D., Secretary Home Department, Board of Mis- 
sions, Nashville, Tenn. 

Mrs. R. W. MacDonell, Secretary Home Department, Board of Missions 
(for the women), Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. E. H. Rawlings, D.D., Educational Secretary, Board of Missions, 
Nashville, Tenn 

Miss Mabel Head, Educational Secretary, Board of Missions (for the 
women), Nashville, Tenn. 

Mrs. A. L. Marshall, Editorial Secretary, Board of Missions (for the 
women), Nashville, Tenn. 

J. D. Hamilton, Treasurer Board of Missions, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. W. P. McMurry, D.D., Secretary Board of Church Extension, 
Louisville, Ky. 

Rev. Stonewall Anderson, D.D., Secretary Board of Education, Nashville, 
Tenn. 

W. E. Hogan, Assistant Secretary of Education, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. F. S. Parker, D.D., Secretary Epworth League, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. J. M. Culbreth, Assistant Secretary Epworth League, Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Rev. C. P. Reid, D.D', Secretary Laymen's Missionary Movement, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

D. E. Atkins, Assistant Secretary Laymen's Missionery Movement, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 



AGENTS, SUPERINTENDENTS, ETC. 

D. M. Smith, Publishing Agent, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. A. J. Lamar, D.D., Publishing Agent, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. John R. Stewart, D.D., Agent Superannuate 's Fund, Nashville. 

Rev, H. M. Hamill, D.D., Superintendent Sunday School Training Work, 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Mrs. H. M. Hamill, Primary Assistant, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. C. D. Bulla, D.D., Superintendent Wesley Adult Bible Class De- 
partment, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. W. F. Quillian, Superintendent Methodist Training School, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

Rev. R. H. Bennett, Director Correspondence School, Nashville, Tenn. 

Rev. James Cannon, D.D., Superintendent Southern Methodist As- 
sembly, Waynesville, N. C. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



13 



GENERAL BOAED OF CHURCH EXTENSION. 

T. L. Jefferson, Esq., President, Louisville, Ky. ; W. W. Ball, Esq., 
Vice-President, Maysville, Ky. ; Rev. W. F. McMurry, D.D,, Cor. See'y, 
Louisville, Ky. ; J. Adger Stewart, Esq., Treasurer, Highland Park, Ky. ; 
R. B. Gilbert, M.D., Louisville Ky. ; P. H. Tapp, Esq., Louisville, Ky. ; 
Rev. N. L. Linebaugh, D.D., Holdenville, Okla.; Rev. W. J. Young, D.D., 
Atlanta, Ga. ; Rev. J. B. Cochran, El Paso, Tex.; Rev. James Thomas, 
D.D., Pine Bluff, Ark.; Rev. Sam R. Hay, D.D., Houston, Tex.; Rev. R. 
E. Staekhouse, Spartanburg, S. C; Rev. H. B. Johnston, D.D., Memphis, 
Tenn. ; Rev. D. B. Price, Helena, Mont.; Rev. L. T. Mann, Statesville, N. 
C; Rev. B. P. Jaco, Winona, Miss.; Rev. J. H. Eakes, D.D., Rome, Ga. ; 
Rev. R. H. Cooper, Montgomery, Mo.; Rev. W. J. Carpenter, D.D., Jack- 
sonville, Fla. ; Rev. S. H. C. Burgin, D.D., San Antonio, Tex.; Rev. J. A. 

Baylor, ; R. O. Randle, Esq., Monroe, La.; C. W. Ray, Esq., 

Washington, D. C. ; J. H. Wilson, Esq., Lincoln, Ala. 



GENERAL BOARD OF MISSIONS. 

Mr. John R. Pepper, Pre!?ident; Bishop W. R. Lambuth, Vice-President; 
Rev. W. W. Pinson, General Secretary; Rev. Ed F. Cook and Miss Mabel 
Head, Secretaries for the Department of Foreign Missions; Rev. J. M. 
Moore and Mrs. W. R. MacDonell, Secretaries for the Department of Home 
Missions; Rev. E. H. Rawlings and Mrs. Hume R. Steele, Educational Sec- 
retaries; Mr. J. D. Hamilton, Treasurer; Mrs. F. H. E. Ross, Assistant 
Treasurer; Rev. J. W. Perry, Holston Conference, Bristol, Tenn.; Rev. O. 
E. Brown, Missouri Conference, Nashville, Tenn. ; Rev. R. P. Howell, Los 
Angeles Conference, Los Angeles, Cal. ; Rev. A. F. Watkins, Mississippi 
Conference, Jackson, Miss. ; Rev. G. C. Rankin, North Texas Conference, 
Dallas, Tex. ; Rev. A. J. Weeks, West Texas Conference, San Angelo, Tex. ; 
Rev. U. V. W. Darlington, Western Virginia Conference, Huntington, W. 
Va. ; Rev. H. K. Boyer, Western North Carolina Conference, Winston- 
Salem, N. C; Re.v. W. A. Christian, Virginia Conference, Richmond, Va. ; 
Rev. J. J. Stowe, Tennessee Conference, Franklin, Tenn. ; Mr. J. B. Greene, 
Alabama Conference, Opelika, Ala. ; Mr. W. R. Cole, Tennessee Conference, 
Nashville, Tenn. ; Mr. A. B. Ransom, Nashville, Tenn. ; Mr. J. L.McWhorter, 
Nashville, Tenn. ; Mr. Bruce R. Payne, Nashville, Tenn. ; Mr. Perry S. Rader, 
Southwest Missouri Conference, Jefferson City, Mo.; Mr. F. M. Daniel, 
White River Conference, Mammoth Springs, Ark. ; Mr. R. F. Burden, South 
Georgia Conference, Macon, Ga. ; Mr. G. G. Johnson, West Texas Confer- 
ence, San Marcos, Tex.; Mr. R. H. Johnson, Florida Conference, Braden- 
town, Fla. ; Miss Belle H. Bennett, Richmond, Ky. ; Miss M. L. Gibson, 
Kansas City Mo.; Mrs. J. B. Cobb, Nashville, Tenn.; Mrs. L. P. Smith, 
Henrietta, Tex.; Mrs Luke G. Johnson, Gainesville, Ga. ; Mrs. E. B. Chap- 
pell, Nashville, Tenn. ; Miss Mary N. Moore, Athens, Ala ; Miss Daisy 
Davies, East Point, Ga. ; Mrs Lee Britt, Suffolk, Va. ; Mrs. F. P. Stephens, 
Columbia, Mo. ; Ex-ofiieio members — all of our Bishops. 



Church membership, 1910 

1914 

Sunday School Pupils, 1910 

1914 

Students in school & col., 1910.. 

1914 

Contributions, 1910 

1914 

Value of Church prop'y, 1910 ... 

1914 



2,388 

4,377 

3,274 

6,710 

1,770 

3,05u 

$ 4,319 

8,410 

654,948 

643,943 



Japan 



1,861 

2,244 

5,720 

*5,6.30 

1,350 

2,170 

$ 4,721 

14,721 

289,594 

303,523 



4,657 

6,292 

4,105 

6,948 

1,417 

1,982 

i 4,329 

6,594 

145,977 

262,242 



5,715 

7,021 

3,663 

4,527 

1,164 

2,448 

$ 19,855 

22.373 

404,950 

469,253 



7,386 

6,935 

5,663 

5,105 

3,391 

4,164 

! 6,515 

6,235 

640,408 

638,010 



3,203 

3,686 

2,202 

2,685 

595 

552 

$ 13,140 

18,127 

291,576 

372,790 



25,210 

30,585 

24,627 

31,605 

9,687 

14,366 

I 52,879 

66,460 

2,427,454 

2,689,761 



*1913, latest available. fEstimated. 



14 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

The income for the quadrennium, not counting that for woman's work, 
was: Foreign, $2,371,352.78; home, for the three years' separate assess- 
ment, $241,892.53. Total, $2,613,245.31. This is an aggregate increase 
over the preceding quadrennium of $385,898. From all sources the income 
was follows: 

Foreign : 

General Woman's Total 

For 1910-13 $2,359,394.79 $1,101,614.21 $3,461,009.00 

For 1906-09 2,277,249.00 924,531.44 3,201,780.44 



Gain $ 82,145.79 $ 177,082.77 $ 260,228.56 

Home: 

For 1910-13 $ 240,456.97 $ 902,962.62 $1,143,419.59 

For 1906-09 No assessment 622,279.91 622,279.91 



Gain $ 240,456.97 $ 279,682.71 $ 521,139.68 

Grand Totals: 

1910-13 $4,604,428.59 

1906-09 3,824,060.35 



Total increase for quadrennium $ 780,368.24 



In 1910, the year of the union with the Board of Missions and the 
Woman's Board of Home Missions, the Woman's Board of Foreign Missions 
had 98,422 members and collected $264,562.46. 

RECEIPTS. 

From March, 1610, to March, 1911 $280,153.07 

From March, 1911, to December, 1911 244,952.44 

From January, 1912, to December, 1912... 293,823.95 

From January, 1913, to December, 1913... 282,868.75 --$1,101,798.21 

Amount expended for buildings during 

this quadrennium $ 109,626.00 

RECEIPTS. 

From 1910 to 1913 $1,101,798.21 

From 1906 to 1910 924,531.44 

From 1904 to 1906 546,704.76 

Present number of members in auxiliaries 125,329 



This department has work in China, Korea, Brazil, Mexico, and Cuba. 
There are 124 missionaries in these fields, assisted by 342 native helpers 
and Bible women. Missionaries accepted during the quadrennium: 

China Korea Brazil 

1910 4 2 2 

1911 3 6 6 

1912 7 3 4 

1913 5 3 2 



Mexicc 


) Cuba Total 


Salaries 


Outfit and 
Travel 


3 
3 
3 

2 


11 

18 

17 

1 13 


$ 8,550 
14,400 
13,350 
10,050 


$ 4,400 
7,200 
7,800 
5,200 



19 14 14 11 1 59 $46,350 $24,600 

Total salaries and outfit, $70,950. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 15 

The Woman's Work of the Home Department has every reason to rejoice 
in the progress of the past four years. There has been gratifying gain in 
membership, and when we recall that the union of the two bodies with such 
different methods of work was effected in the quadrennium, which entailed 
some confusion, we are indeed grateful to be able to report even financial 
gain. 

This department is now represented by: 

Number. Members. 

Adult Auxiliaries 3,678 89,082 

Young People's Auxiliaries 888 14,949 

Junior Auxiliaries 1,461 35,067 

Tolal 6,027 139,098 

This makes a gain of 2,078 auxiliaries and 44,076 members. The gain 
has been among young people and children, though there are 17,013 more 
adults than were listed in 1910. 

COLLECTIONS. 

The total collections in this department for eonnectional work were as 
follows : 

Remitted by Voucher 
Cash Remittances for City Missions Total 

1910-11 $152,209.39 $ 54,303.06 $205,512.45 

1911-12 141,687.41 46,851.33 188,438.74 

1912-13 181,461.42 59,677.45 241,138.87 

1913-14 198,277.11 69,569.19 267,873.30 



$673,736.33 $230,428.03 $902,963.86 

This shows a gain of $280,683.45 over the reports for the quadrennium 
ending 1910. The auxiliaries have expended $1,387,124.65 for local Church 
work. 



"Whitaker's Almanac," published in London, is regarded as authority on 
this subject. The following figures — except those for Taoism and Shintoism, 
which are furnished by M. Fournier de Flaix — are from that publication rep- 
resenting "followers" but not communicants: 

Christianity 494,250.000 

Confucianism .S40.000,000 

Hinduism 220,000,000 

Mohammedanism 200,000,000 

Polytheism 110,000,000 

Taoism 43,000,000 

Shintoism 14,000,000 

Judaism 10,000,000 



THE METHODIST SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY, ATLANTA, GA. 

Bishop Warren A. Candler, Chancellor of the University; Eev. H. C. 
Howard, D.D., Professor of Systematic Theology; Eev. W. J. Young, D.D., 
Professor of Homiletics and Pastoral Theology; Rev. W. A. Smart, B.D., 
Professor of Biblical Theology; Rev. W. A. Shelton, D.D., Professor of He- 
brew and Old Testament Literature; Rev, Andrew Sledd, D.D.. Professor of 
Greek and New Testament Literature; Rev. Plato T. Durham, D.D., Pro- 
fessor of Church History. 



16 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



PLAN OF EPISCOPAL VISITATION, 1914-1915. 



Date 



Conference 



Place 



July 2, 1914.. 
Aug. 19, 1914. 
Aug. 19, 1914. 
Aug. 26, 1914. 
Aug. 27, 1914. 
Aug. 27, 1914. 
Sept. 2, 1914.. 
Sept. 2, 1914.. 
Sept. 3, 1914.. 
Sept. 3, 1914.. 
Sept. 9, 1914.. 
Sept. 16, 1914. 
Sept. 17, 1914. 
Sept. 23, 1914. 
Sept. 23, 1914. 
Oct. 1, 1914... 
Oct. 7, 1914... 
Oct. 14, 1914.. 
Oct. 14, 1914., 
Oct. 14, 1914., 
Oct. 15, 1914.. 
Oct. 20, 1914.. 
Oct. 21, 1914.. 
Nov. 4, 1914.. 
Nov. 4, 1914.. 
Nov. 11, 1914. 
Nov. 11, 1914. 
Nov. 11, 1914. 
Nov. 11, 1914. 
Nov. 18, 1914. 
Nov. 18, 1914. 
Nov. 18, 1914. 
Nov. 18, 1914. 
Nov. 18, 1914. 
Nov. 18, 1914. 
Nov. 25, 1914. 
Nov. 25, 1914. 
Nov. 25, 1914. 
Nov. 26, 1914. 
Dec. 2, 1914... 
Dec. 2, 1914... 
Dec. 2, 1914... 
Dec. 9, 1914.., 
Dec. 9, 1914.., 
Dec. 9, 1914... 
Dec. 9 1914.., 



' I 

I 

Brazil |Juiz de Fora, Brazil. 

Korea Mission jWonsan, Korea 

Montana | Butte, Mont 

Illinois Odin, 111 

Denver Trinidad, Colo 

South Brazil jAlegrete, Brazil 

Missouri |St. Joseph, Mo 

Kentucky IWilmore, Ky 

East Columbia Weston, Oregon 

Japan Mission | Arima, Japan 

Western Virginia |St. Albans, W. Va. 

Southwest Missouri .... 

Columbia 

St. Louis 



Clinton, Mo. 
Tangent, Oregon . . 
Caruthersville, Mo. 



Louisville |Louisville, Ky. 



German Mission . 
Tennessee . . 
New Mexico. 

Holston 

Los Angeles. 

China 

Pacific 



San Antonio, Tex. 

Pulaski, Tenn 

Pecos, Tex 

Bristol, Tenn 

Los Angeles, Cal.. 
Shanghai, China. . 
Stockton, Cal 



I West Texas I Austin, Tex. 



Jan. 14, 1915. 
Jan. 28, 1915. 
Feb. 11, 1915., 
Mar. 24, 1915. 



Sylacauga, Ala. . 

Paris, Tenn 

Portsmouth, Va.. 

Ada, Okla 

Hillsboro, Tex.. . 

Shelby, N. C 

Marietta, Ga 

Chickasha, Okla. 



North Alabama. 

Memphis 

Virginia 

East Oklahoma 

Central Texas 

Western North Carolina. 

North Georgia 

West Oklahoma 

Texas Mexican Mission (Austin, Tex. 

North Carolina [Washington, N. C 

Texas |Bay City, Tex 

North Arkansas I Batesville, Ark 

South Georgia Dawson, Ga 

Little Rock |Little Rook, Ark 

South Carolina | Sumter, S. C 

Pacific Mexican Mission INogales, Ariz 

Alabama Andalusia, Ala 

North Mississippi Starkville, Miss 

North Texas jDenison, Tex 

Louisiana I Shreveport, La 

Mississippi Columbia, Miss 

Northwest Texas | Sweetwater, Tex 

Florida j Arcadia, Fla 

Congo Mission Wembo Niama, Africa. 

Cuba Mission |Pinar Del Rio, Cuba.. 

Central Mexico I Guadalajara, Mexico . . , 

Mexican Border | Chihuahua, Mexico. . . . 

Baltimore I 



Bishop 



Lambuth. 

Atkins. 

Mouzon. 

Kilgo. 

Hendrix. 

Lambuth. 

Hendrix. 

Kilgo. 

Mouzon. 

Atkins. 

Kilgo. 

Hendrix. 

Mouzon. 

Hendrix. 

Kilgo. 

Waterhouse. 

Murrah. 

Morrison. 

Waterhouse. 

Mouzon. 

Atkins. 

Mouzon. 

McCoy. 

Denny. 

Murrah. 

Kilgo. 

Murrah. 

McCoy. 

Waterhouse. 

Denny. 

Murrah. 

Lambuth. 

Waterhouse. 

McCoy. 

Morrison. 

Candler. 

Morrison. 

Denny. 

Lambuth. 

Candler. 

Waterhouse. 

McCoy. 

Candler. 

Denny. 

McCoy. 

Morrison. 

Lambuth. 

Candler. 

Lambuth. 

Lambuth. 

Candler. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINISTERIAL SUPPLY AND TRAINING. 



1st 2d 3d 4th 

1912-13 Adm. Year Year Year Year Grad. Total 

On roll April 1, 1912 71 234 188 178 153 55 879 

Enrolled since April 1, 1912 131 243 186 151 157 141 1,009 

202 477 374 329 310 196 1,888 

Total on roll during year 197 455 364 321 307 195 1,839 

Completing the course 68 118 106 112 85 35 524 

Completing part of course 33 97 63 58 61 18 330 

115 232 187 182 158 63 937 

On roll April 1, 1913 82 223 177 139 149 132 902 



"1 




E0L8T0N ANNUAL 
CHRONOLOGICAL ROLL OF BISHOPS, 1846-1914. 



17 




Entered 
Ministry 



Ordained 
Bishop 



Bemarks 



Joshua Soule 

James Osgood Andrew 

William Capers 

Robert Paine 

Henry Biddleman Bascom. , 

George Foster Pierce , 

John Early 

Hubbard Hinde Kavanaugh. 
William May Wightman 



Aug. 
May 
Jan. 
Nov. 
May 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



Enoch Mather Marvin [June 12 

David Seth Doggett [Jan. 23 

Holland Nimmons McTyeire.|Ju'y 24 

John Christian Keener JFeb. 7 

Alpheus Waters Wilson JFeb. 5 

Linus Parker |Apl. 23 

John Cowper Granbery |Dec. 5 

Robert Kennon Hargrove. .. |Sept. 18 
William Wallace Duncan. .. |Dec. 20 

Charles Betts Galloway ISept. 15 

Eugene Russell Hendrix |May 17 

Joseph Staunton Key I July 18 

Atticus Greene Haygood |Nov. 19 

Oscar Penn Fitzgerald I Aug. 24 

Warren Akin Candler [Aug. 23, 

Henry Clay Morrison |May 30 

Elijah Embree Hoss |Apl. 14 

Alexander Coke Smith |Sept. 16 

John James Tigert |Nov. 25 

Seth Ward |Nov. 1 

James Atkins |Apl. 18 

Collins Denny |May 28 

John Carlisle Kilgo |July 22, 

William Belton Murrah JMay 19 

Walter Russell Lambuth. . . |Nov. 10 
Richard Green Waterhouse. [Dec. 25 

Edwin DuBose Mouzon |May 19 

James Henry McCoy I Aug. 6 



1781 
1794 
, 1790 
, 1799 
, 1796 
, 1811 
, 1786 
, 1802 
, 1808 
, 1823 
, 1810 
, 1824 
, 18191 
, 1834 
, 1829 
, 1829 
, 1829 
, 1839 
, 1849 
. 1847 
, 1829 
, 1839 
, 1829 
, 1857 
, 1842 
, 1849 
, 1849 
. 1856 
, 1858 
, 1850 
, 1854 
1861 
, 1852 
. 1854 
, 1865 
, 1869 
, 1868 
I 



1799 
1812 
1808 
1818 
1813 
1831 
1807 
1823 
1828 
1841 
1829 
1845 
1843 
1853 
1849 
1848 
1857 
1859 
1868 
1869 
1849 
1859 
1854 
1875 
1865 
1866 
1872 
1877 
1881 
1870 
1880 
1882 
1874 
1876 
1878 
1889 
1889 



1824 
1832 
1846 
1846 
1850 
1854 
1854 
1854 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1870 
1882 
1882 
1882 
1882 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1890 
1890 
1898 
1898 
1902 
1902 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 



Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Res., 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Died 
I Res., 
Res., 
Died 
Died 
Res., 
Res., 
Res., 
Died 
Died 
Died 
Res., 
Res., 
Res., 
Res., 
Res., 
Res., 
Res., 
Res., 



March 6, 1867. 
March 2, 1871. 
January 29, 1855. 
October 19, 1882. 
September 8, 1850. 
September 3, 1884. 
Nov. 5, 1873. 
March 19, 1884. 
February 3, 1882. 
November 26, 1877. 
October 27, 1880. 
February 15, 1889. 
January 19, 1906. 
Baltimore, Md. 
March 6, 1885. 
April 1, 1907. 
August 3, 1905. 
March 2, 1908. 
May 12, 1909. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Sherman, Tex. 
January 19, 1896. 
August 5, 1911. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Leesburg, Fla. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
December 27, 1906. 
Nov. 21, 1906. 
September 20, 1909. 
Waynesville, N. C. 
Richmond, Va. 
Durham, N. C. 
Jackson, Miss. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Emory, Va. 
San Antonio, Tex. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



GENERAL CONFERENCES SINCE THE SEPARATION 



Year 


Place 


Bishop Elected 


1846 
1850 
1854 
1858 


Petersburg, Va 

St. Louis, Mo 

Columbus, Ga 

Nashville, Tenn 


Capers and Paine 

Bascom 

Pierce, Early, Kavanaugh 

No one 


1862 
1870 


New Orleans, La.. 

Memphis, Tenn 


Wightman, Marvin, Doggett, McTyeire 
Keener 


1874 
1878 
1882 
1886 
1890 
1894 
1898 


Louisville, Ky 

Atlanta, Ga 

Nashville, Tenn 

Richmond, Va 

St. Louis, Mo 

Memphis, Tenn 

Baltimore, Md 


No one 

No one 

Wilson, Parker, Granbery, Hargrove 

Duncan, Galloway, Hendrix, Key 

Haygood, Fitzgerald 

No one 

Candler, Morrison 


1902 
1906 


Dallas, Tex 

Birmingham, Ala 


Hoss, Smith 
Tigert, Ward, Atkins 
Denny, Kilgo, Murrah, Lambuth, Water- 
house, Mouzon, McCoy 
No one 


1910 
1914 


Asheville, N. C 

Oklahoma City, Ok 



18 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS. 



confeekncks 
Reporting 



Name of Institution 



PapilB 



Endow- 
ment 



Value of 
Property 



Alabama, North 

Alabama 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

Ark.. L. R.. W. R.... 
Ark., L. R., W. R.. . . 
Baltimore, Va 

Baltimore, Va 

Baltimore, Va 

Baltimiore, Va 

Baltimore, Va 

Baltimore, Va 

Baltimore, Va 

Brazil 

Central Mex. Mis 

Central Mex. Mis. . . . 
Central Mex. Mis.... 
Central Mex. Mis. . . . 
Central Mex. Mis.... 
Central Mex. Mis. . . . 
Central Mex. Mis.... 

Central Texas 

Central Texas , 

Central Texas , 

Central Texas 

Central Texas 

Central Texas 

China Mission 

China Mission , 

Columbia 

Cuba Mission 

East Columbia 

East Oklahoma 

Fla., N. Ga., S. Ga... 
ria„ N. Ga., S. Ga... 

Florida 

German Mis., Tex., N 

Tex., N. W. Tex. 

W. Tex 

Holston 

Holston 

Holston 

Holston 

Holston 

Japan Mission 

Japan Mission 

Japan Mission 

Japan Mission 

Kentucky 

Korea Mis. (1912). .. 
L. R., Ark., W. R.. . . 
L. R., Ark., W. R.. . . 

Little Rock 

Louisiana 

Louisiana 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Memphis 

Mexican Border Mis., 
Mississippi, North . . . . 

Mississippi 

MiEsissippi 

Mississippi 



Southern University 

Woman's College of Alabama.. 

Downing Industrial School .... 

Gentry-Hendrix Academy .... 

Hendrix College 

Galloway Female College 

Randolph-Macon College, Ash- 
land, Va 

Randolph-Macon Woman's Col- 
lege, Lynchburg, Va 

Randolph-Macon Academy, 
Front Royal, Va 

Randolph-Macon Academy 
Bedford, Va 

Randolph-Macon Institute 
Danville, Va 

Alleghany Collegiate Institute, 
Alderson, W. Va 

Southern Seminary, Buena 
Vista, Va 

Twenty-two colleges and schools 

Colegio Wesleyano (all reports 

J for 1912) 

Colegio Ingles 

Institute Colon 

Mary Keener Institute 

Trueheart School 

Evangelica School 

Benito Juarez School 

Southwestern University 

Polytechnic College 

Central Texas College 

Meridian College 

Granbery College 

Weatherford Training School 

Nine schools and colleges 

Thirty-nine day schools 

Calumbia Junior College 

Five schools 

Columbia Junior College 

Oklahoma Methodist College.. 

Emory College 

Wesleyan Female College 

Southern College 



100 
182 
126 



78,000 

16,000 

9,000 



170 
576 
163 
203 

228 



118 
1,818 

19 

137 

195 

398 

20 

20 

15 



285,000 
382.000 



6 
7 
111 
87 
11 
32 
12 



101 

156 

75 

103 

1.430 

1,362 

114 

473 

139 



23 



Southwestern University . . 
Emory and Henry College. . 
Martha Washington College, 

Sullins College , 

Centenary College 

Hiwassee College 

Kwansei Gakuin 

JLambuth Bible Training School 

Palmore Institute 

Hiroshima Girls' School 

Kentucky Wesleyan College . . . 

Anglo-Korean School 

Hendrix College 

Galloway College 

Henderson-Brown College .... 

Centenary College 

Mansfield College 

Logan Female College 

I Lindsay-Wilson Train. School 
Vanderbilt Training School . . . 

Four schools 

Laurens Institute 

Millsaps College 

Whitworth Female College .... 
Port Gibson Female College . . 
Conference Training School . . . 



217 
181 
244 
183 
123 
680 

10 
336 
743 
100 
225 
255 
195 
228 

70 
149 
120 
2001 
100 
447 
283 



6,036 



67,195 



250.000 
6,000 



17 



202 

75 
268 



1.000 

6.0001 

3,000 

10.000 



500 



150,000 

290.961 

39.500 

13,000 



192,000 
424,000 
100,000 
110,000 
115,000 
13.000 
100.000 



34.000 
63.000 
75,000 



37,250 
55,000 
27,000 
46,000 



75.000 
100.750 

75.000 
150.000 



200,000 



150,000 

125.000 

130.000 

125.000 

25.000 

121.493 

3.900 

17.000 

60.386 

100.000 



90.300 

114.500 

125.000 

135,000 

50,000 

75.000 

2.7000 

45,000 

142,000 

85,000 



125,000 
30,000 
20,000 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



19 



EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS (Continued). 



CONrEKENCES 

Reporting 



Name of Institution 



Pupils 



Endow- 
ment 



Value of 
Property 



N. Ga., S. Ga., Fla. . . 

N. Ga., S. Ga., Fla. . . 

North Georgia 

North Georgia 

North Georgia 

North Georgia 

N. Miss., Miss 

North Mississippi .... 

North Texas 

North Texas 

N. Tex., Tex., M. \V. 
Tex., W. Tex.. Ger- 
man Mis 

N. W. Mex. Mis 

N. W. Mex. Mis 

Northwest Texas 

Northwest Texas 

Northwest Texas 

Northwest Texas 



Emory College 

Wesleyan Female College .... 
La Grange Female College . . . 

Young Harris College 

Reinhart Normal College 

Fairmount College 

Millsaps College 

Grenada Female College 

North Texas Female College. . 
Wesley College 



Southwestern University 

Seth Ward College 

School at El Paso, Tex. . , 
Southwestern University 

Polytechnic College 

Stamford College 

Clarendon College 



Northwest Texas i Seth Ward College . 



Pacific 

South Brazil 

South Carolina 

South Carolina 

South Carolina 

South Carolina 

South Carolina 

South Carolina 

S. Ga., N. Ga., Fia... 
S. Ga., N. Ga., Fla... 

South Georgia 

South Georgia 

South Georgia 

South Georgia 

South Georgia 

S. W. Mo., Mo., St. L. 
S. W. Mo., Mo., St. L. 



Missouri . . , 
S. W. Mo. 
S. W. Mo, 
S. W. Mo. 



Pacific Methodist College 

Eight schools 

Wofford College 

Columbia Female College 

Cokesbury Conference School. 

Carlisle Fitting School 

Lander College 

Textile Industrial Institute. . . 

Emory College 

Wesleyan Female College . . . . 

Andrew Female College 

South Georgia College 

Sparks Collegiate Institute. . . 

Warthen College 

Pierce Collegiate Institute.... 

Central College 

Central Female College 

Three colleges 

Central College 

Central College for Women. . 

Marvin College 

Martin College 



Southwest 
St. L., Mo. 
St. L., Mo, 
St L., Mo, 

Tennessee 

Tex., N. Tex., N. W. 

Tex., W. Tex., Ger. 

Mission (Southwestern University . 

Texas | Southern Methodist University, 



Texas 



Texas 

Virginia, Baltimore . . 
Virginia, Baltimore . . 

Virginia, Baltimore . . 

Virginia, Baltimore . . 

Virginia 

West Texas (1912). .. 

We&t Texas 

W. Tex., Tex., N, 
Tex., N. W. Tex., 
German Mission 

W. N. C, N. C 

W. N. C, N. C 

W. N. Carolina 

W. N. Carolina 

W. N. Carolina 

Western Virginia 

Western Virginia 

White River 

W. R.. L. R., Ark.... 

W. R., L. R., Ark.... 



Chapel Hill Female College 
(1912) 

Alexander Collegiate Institute. 

Randolph-Macon College 

Randolph-Macon Woman's Col- 
lege 

Randolph-Macon Academy . 

Randolph-Macon Institute . 

Blackstone Female Institute. 

Coronal Institute 

San Antonio' Female College 



Southwestern University 

Trinity College 

Trinity High School 

Weaverville College 

Rutherford College 

Davenport College ....... 

Morris Harvey College . . . 
Sandy Valley Seminary . . 
Sloan-Hendrix Academy . 

Hendrix College 

Galloway College 



Total : 45 Con [ 175 schools and colleges. 



56 



267 
412 
155 
475 
365 



311,711 
84,000 
24,602 



274 
136 
400 
140 



1,140 



506,836 



623 
326 
243 
219 



630 

507 

287 

30 

72 

275 

50 



130 
401 
163 
230 

240 



312 



232 
195 



110 



112 
265 



412 
205 
200 



120 
135 
104 



197 
50 



207,720 



9,000 
5,000 



185,000 



1,000 
5,000 
4,400 
6,500 



30,000 



15,000 



275,000 

442,400 

209,000 

60,000 

70,000 

8,000 

664,386 

80,000 

125,000 

100,000 



600,000 



325,000 
150,000 
115,000 
100,000 

15,000 

20,000 

600,750 

245.900 

6,000 

75,000 
148,800 

56,500 



100,000 
85,000 
75,000 
40,500 
60,000 



496,000 



92,000 
56,000 



1,250,000 



20,000 
80,000 



110,000 
125,000 
125,000 



36,000 
12,500 
65,000 
112,000 
55,000 
25,000 



1,902 26,068 $2,897,242 $13,472,525 



20 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES 



SUMMARY FOE 1913 



DENOMINATIONS 



Adventists (6 bodies) 

Baptists (15 bodies) 

Brethren (Dunkard, 4 bodies) 

Brethren (Plymouth, 4 bodies) 

Brethren (River, 3 bodies) 

Buddhist (2 bodies) 

Catholic Apostolic (2 bodies) 

Catholic (East. Orthodox, 7 bodies) 

Catholics (Western, 2 bodies) 

Christadelphians 

Christians 

Christian Catholic (Dowie) 

Christian Scientists 

Christian Union 

Churches of God (Winebrennarian) 

Churches of the Living God (Col- 
ored, 3 bodies) 

Churches of the Nevsr Jerusalem (2 
bodies) 

Communistic Societies (2 bodies)... 

Congregationalists 

Disciples of Christ (2 bodies) 

Evangelical (2 bodies) 

Faith Associations (9 bodies) 

Free Christian Zion Church 

Friends (4 bodies) 

Friends of the Temple 

German Evangelical Protestant 

German Evangelical Synod 

Jewish Congregations 

Latter-Day Saints (2 bodies) 

Lutherans (21 bodies) 

Scandinavian IJvangelical (3 bodies) 

Mennonites (12 bodies) 

Methodists (16 bodies) 

Moravian (2 bodies) 

Non-sectarian Bible Faith Churches. 

Pentecostal (2 bodies) 

Presbyterians (12 bodies) 

Protestant Episcopal (2 bodies).... 

Reformed (4 bodies) 

Reformed Catholic 

Salvationists (2 bodies) 

Schwenkfelders 

Social Brethren 

Society for Ethical Culture 

Spiritualists 

Theosophical Society 

Unitarians 

United Brethren (2 bodies) 

Universalists 

Independent Congregations 



1,179 

42,808 

3,446 

"224 

15 

33 

291 

18,377 

l",i29 
35 

2,460 
308 
509 

101 

137 

6,150 

7,692 

1,539 

241 

20 

1,476 

3 

59 

1,051 

1,084 

3,560 

9,194 

629 

1,413 

41,529 

146 

50 

725 

13,740 

5,527 

2,168 

7 

2,790 

6 

15 

7 



531 

2,264 
702 
267 



Churches 

2.547 

57,364 

1,291 

403 

105 

74 

24 

331 

14,717 

70 

1.182 

17 

1,230 

272 

595 

68 

157 

22 

6,100 

11,725 

2,600 

146 

15 

1.167 

3 

66 

1,345 

1,769 

1.520 

16.010 

857 

736 

61,523 

143 

204 

648 

16.286 

7,899 

2,763 

6 

889 

6 

17 

6 

2.000 

145 

477 

4,166 

709 

879 



98,822 

5,924,662 

119,460 

10,566 

4,903 

3,165 

4,927 

438,500 

13,099.534 

1.412 

102.902 

5.865 

85.096 

14,807 

41,475 

4,286 

9.601 

2,272 

748.340 

1,519,369 

187,045 

9,572 

1,835 

124,216 

376 

34,704 

261,488 

143,000 

356.000 

2,388.722 

72,900 

57,337 

7,125,069 

20.463 

6.396 

23.937 

2,027,598 

997,407 

463,686 

3,250 

27,474 

1,000 

1,262 

2.450 

200,000 

4,189 

70,542 

328.099 

61,716 

48,673 



NET GAINS FOE 1913 



Min- Communi- 

isters Charches cants 



7 
85S 
*38 



28 
404 



13 



13 



454 
*3 



*204 



25 3,014 

388 64,608 

62 *184 



57 4,500 
381 213,027 



35 



902 



25 36 

*362 *742 

16 *27 



19 



5,314 

21.824 

2.179 



2.577 



200 100 3,500 

165 1,455 36,120 

18 9 2,400 



496 219,974 
493 



2 42 680 

164 *490 45,649 

11 95 16,556 

55 110 4,580 



129 
69 



7.139 



Grand Total for 1913 175,637 223.294 37,280,370 1,841 2.032 655.908 



Grand Total for 1912 173,796 

•Decrease. 



221.262 36,624,462 1,901 1,102 528,777 



SUNDAY SCHOOL EDITORS 



1870. A. G. Haygood 

1874. A. G. Haygood 

1878. W. G. E. Cunnyngham 

1882. W. G. E. Cunnyngham 

1886. W. G. E. Cunnyngham 

1890. W, G. E. Cunnyngham 

1894. W. D. Kirkland 



1896. James Atkins (committee, 

June^ 

1898. James Atkins 

1902. James Atkins 

1906. E. B. Chappell 

1910. E. B. Chappell 

1914. E. B. Chappell 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



21 



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447,774 
735,560 
11,750 
472,898 
264,550 
904,142 
18,666 
911,865 
773,525 
766,980 
690,250 
692,291 
1,675,728 
395,538 
484,835 
705,000 
294,800 
238,880 


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2,775.00 
8,541.50 
9.312.75 
4,550.00 

512.00 
13.00 

865.00 

1,020.00 

3,723.00 

24,426.00 


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16,626 

3,272 

11,445 

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36,530 

25,374 

17,276 

10,786 

16,894 

52,819 

20,671 

21,533 

20,936 

7,018 

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308,725 
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202,710 
140,200 
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15,862 
581,540 
447,210 
245,260 
288,055 
344,225 
589,800 
133,950 
285,050 
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135,509 

13,053 

52,126 

1,160 

209,398 

107,239 

23,123 

44,883 

171,427 

188,217 

101,595 

177,690 

91,530 

89,053 

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1,633,271 

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838,200 

730,450 
1,518,610 
50,830 
2,504,825 
2,014,255 
1,458,180 
1,775,305 
2,153,280 
3,250,275 

605,875 
1,004,040 
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32,390 
49,683 

1,245 
28,372 

7,822 
31,355 

1,377 
70,975 
54,412 
27,618 
51,512 
51,210 
87,008 
23,691 
33,010 
78,756 
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3,026 
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110 
2,504 

833 
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5,997 
4,936 
3,052 
4,621 
4,562 
9,603 
2,111 
2,910 
2,753 
3,116 
2,154 


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H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



27 



APPOETIONMENT OF GENERAL ASSESSMENTS 

The commission whose duty it is to apportion the general assessments has com- 
pleted its work and announces the following as the official apportionment for the en- 
suing Conference year: 



NAME OF CONFEEENCE 



10. 

11. 

12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 



Alabama 

Baltimore 

Brazil Mission 

Central Mex. Mission 

Central Texas 

China Mission 

Columbia 

Cuba Mission 

Denver 

East Columbia 

East Oklahoma 

Florida 

German Mission .... 

Holston 

Illinois 

Kentucky 

Korea Mission 

Little Rock 

Los Angeles 

Louisiana 

Louisville 

Memphis 

Mexican Border Miss 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

New Mexico 

North Alabama 

North Arkansas .... 

North Carolina 

North Georgia 

North Mississippi . . . 

North Texas 

Northwest Texas . . . 

Pacific 

Pacific Mexican 

St. Louis 

South Brazil Mission. 

South Carolina 

South Georgia 

Southwest Missouri . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Texas Mex. Mission . . 

Virginia 

West Oklahoma 

West Texas 

Western N. Carolina. 
Western Virginia . . . 

Totals 



.0360 
.0318 
.0025 
.0008 
.0417 
.0014 
.0012 
.0010 
.0015 
.0017 
.0175 
.0220 
.0010 
.0342 
.0034 
.0163 
.0018 
.0230 
.0037 
.0199 
.0261 
.0338 
.0009 
.0270 
.0262 
.0010 
.0052 
.0434 
.0276 
.0389 
.0542 
.0288 
.0340 
.0210 
.0069 
.0002 
.0204 
.0007 
.0483 
.0458 
.0218 
.0329 
.0388 
.0005 
.0574 
.0159 
.0234 
.0427 
.0143 



$ 18,000 

15,900 

1,250 

400 

20,850 

700 

600 

500 

750 

850 

8,750 

11,000 

500 

17,100 

1,700 

8,150 

900 

11,500 

1,850 

9,950 

13,050 

16,900 

450 

13,500 

13,100 

500 

2,600 

21,700 

13,800 

19,450 

27,100 

14,150 

17,000 

10,500 

3,450 

100 

10,200 

350 

24,150 

22,900 

10,900 

16,450 

19,400 

250 

28,700 

7,950 

11,700 

21,350 

7,150 



$ 6,760 

5,088 

400 

128 

6,672 

224 

192 

160 

240 

272 

2,800 

3,520 

160 

5,472 

544 

2,608 

288 

3,680 

592 

3,184 

4,176 

5,480 

144 

4,320 

4,192 

160 

832 

6,944 

4,416 

6,224 

8,672 

4,528 

5,440 

3,360 

1,104 

32 

3,264 

112 

7,728 

7,328 

3,488 

6,264 

6,208 

80 

9,184 

2,544 

3,744 

6,832 

2,288 



$ 10,800 

9,540 

750 

240 

12,510 

420 

360 

300 

450 

510 

6,250 

6,600 

300 

10,260 

1,020 

4,890 

540 

6,900 

1,110 

5,970 

7,830 

10,140 

270 

8,100 

7,860 

300 

1,560 

13,020 

8,280 

11.670 

16,260 

8,490 

10,200 

6,300 

2.070 

60 

6,120 

210 

14,490 

13,740 

6,540 

9,870 

11,640 

150 

17,220 

4,770 

7,020 

12,810 

4,290 



$ 3,420 
3,021 

238 

76 

3,961 

133 

114 
95 

143 

162 

1,662 

2,090 

95 

3,249 

323 
1,549 

171 
2.185 

352 
1,890 
2,479 
3,211 
86 
2,565 
2.489 
95 

494 
4.123 
2.622 
3,695 
6,149 
2,688 
3,230 
1,995 

656 

19 

1,938 

67 

4,588 

4,351 

2,071 

3,125 

3,686 

48 

5,453 

1,511 

2,223 

4,056 

1,358 



3,240 
2.862 

225 

72 

3.753 

126 

108 
90 

135 

153 

1,575 

1,980 

90 

3,078 

306 
1.467 

162 
2.070 

333 
1,791 
2,349 
3.042 
81 
2.430 
2.358 
90 

468 
3,906 
2,484 
3,501 
4,878 
2,547 
3,060 
1,890 

621 

18 

1,836 

63 

4,347 

4,122 

1,962 

2,961 

3,492 

46 

5,166 

1,431 

2,106 

3,843 

1.287 



1.0000 



$500,000 I $160,000 



$300,000 



$95,000 



$90,000 



GENERAL SECRETARIES OF EDUCATION 



1894. 


W. W. Smith 


1902. 


1896. 


R. J. Bingham (Board of 


1906. 




Education) 


1910. 


1898. 


W. B. Murrah 


1910. 


1898. 


J. D. Hammond (Board of 






Education) 


1914. 



J. D. Hammond 

J. D. Hammond 

J. E. Dickey 

Stonewall Anderson (Board of 

Education) 
Stonewall Anderson 



Merner-Pfeiffer Library 
Tennessee Wesley an College 



2S 



EOLSTON ANNUAL 



MISSIONARY DIRECTORY 



MISSIONARIES EMPLOYED BY THE BOARD OF MISSIONS, 
M. E. CHURCH, SOUTH 



A 

< 


Name 


Address 


Home Conference 


1914 


CHINA 
Rev. Sid R. Anderson 


(Going in 1914) 




1901 


Changchow, China 

Soochow, China 

Sungkiang, China 




1912 

1S87 


Rev. Sterling G. Brinkley... 
Rev. W. B. Burke 


North Georgia 
South Georgia 


1897 


Rev. .7. W. Cline 


Little Rock 


1906 


Rev. W. A. Estes 


Kennedy School of Mis- 
sions, Hartford, Conn. 

Dzaughing, China 

Shanghai, China 

Soochow, China 




1912 




China 

North Georgia 
Mississippi 
South Carolina 


1895 
1901 


Rev. J. B. Pearn, M.D 

Prof. N. Gist Lee 


1905 


Rev. John C. Hawk 


Changchow, China 

Shanghai, China 


Holston 


1S90 


Rev. T. A. Hearu 


Little Rock 


1888 




Texas 


1913 


Prof E. V. Jones 






1880 


Rev. George R. Loelir 






1890 


Alto, v'a 




1909 
1896 


Dr. F. P. Manget 


Hucliow, China 




Rev. W. B. Nance 


Soochow, China 




1882 


W. H. Park M D 


North Georgia 

Missouri 

Western N. Carolina 

North Alabama 


1875 
1914 
1913 
1S95 


Rev. A. P. i'arker, D.D. ... 

Rev. R. J. Parker 

Rev. L. D. Patterson 

Rev E Pilley 


Shanghai, China 

Shanghai, China 

Sungkiang, China 

Huchow China 


1912 


Mr. Charles W. Rankin.... 
Rev. R. D. Smart 






1903 


Soochow, China 




1910 


Rev W M Smith 




1909 


Dr J. A. Snell 






1898 
1899 


Rev. J. A. G. Shipley 

Rev. Joseph Whiteside 


Shanghai, China 


Baltimore 


1901 


Changchow, China 

Soochow, China 

810 Broadway, Nash- 
ville Tenn 


Mississippi 
North Alabama 

Texas 


1884 
1892 


Miss Virginia Atkinson 

Miss Mildred B. Bomar 

Miss Annie Clare Bradshaw 
Miss Elizabeth Claiborne — 

Miss Bessie Belle Combs 

Miss Nell D. Drake 

Miss Eva Forman 


1911 




Virginia 
Memphis 


1905 


21 Hankow Rd., Shang- 


1911 
1907 
1913 


Sungkiang, China 

Sungkiang, China 


Missouri 
Mississippi 


1912 


Miss Alice Green 


Changchow, China 

Sungkiang, China 


North Carolina 


1892 






1912 


Miss Edith Haves 


North Alabama 


1911 


Miss Madge Hendry 

Miss Llora Herudou 


Soochow, China 


China 


1912 


Soochow, China 


North Georgia 


1905 


Sungkiang, China 




1906 


Miss Emma S. Lester 

Miss Ella D. Leveritt 


North Georgia 


1896 
1910 


Changchow, China 


North Georgia 
Mississippi 


1910 






Missouri 


1909 




Shanghai, China 

Sungkiang, China 


South Georgia 


1906 


Miss Nettie Peacock 


South Georgia 


1912 


Dr. Ethel Polk 


South Georgia 


1892 


Miss Martha Pyle 


Soochow, China 


Southwest Missouri 


1878 




810 Broadway, Nash- 
ville Tenn 






Miss Helen L. Richardson.. 

Miss Margaret Rogers 

Miss Mittie Shelton 


Memphis 
St. Louis 
Texas 


1890 
1904 


Shanghai, China 


1911 




Northwest Texas 


1910 




Virginia 


1894 


Miss Clara Steger 




Southwest Missouri 


1899 


Miss Mary M. Tarrant 

Miss Nina Troy 




Texas 


1912 


Huchow, China 


Western N. Carolina 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 
MISSIONARY DIRECTORY— Continued 



29 



n 
ft 
ft 

•< 


Name 


Address 


Home Conference 


1909 
1912 


Miss Leila Judson Tuttle... 

Miss Theodosia Wales 

Miss Julia Wasson 

Miss Janie Watkins 


Shanghai, China 


Western N. Carolina 


1908 




North Mississippi 
Mississippi 

South Georgia 
Memphis 


1904 


Soochow, China 

Care of Mrs. J. B. Cobb 
Monteagle, Tenn 


1909 
1892 


Miss Mary Culler White — 

Miss Alice G. Waters 

Miss Mary Lou White 

JAPAN 

Rev. W. J. Callahan 

Rev W. A Davis 


1906 


Norfolk, Va 


1891 


Beppu, Oita Ken, Ja- 
pan 


North Georgia 


1891 


Kyoto, Japan 


Missouri 


1889 
1912 


Rev. T. W. B. Demaree 

Rev. J. W. Frank 


Matsuyama, Japan 


Kentucky 
North Carolina 


1895 


Rev. T. H Haden 




Virginia 


1893 


Rev. S E. Hager 




Kentucky 
Southwest Missouri 


1913 


Rev. H P Jones 


Hiroshima, Japan 


1897 


Rev. W. K. Matthews 


Tennessee 


1893 


Hiroshima, Japan 

East Seattle, Wash.... 
Kobe, Japan 


Baltimore 


1887 


Rev. C B. Moseley 




1888 


Rev. J. C. C. Newton 

Rev. N. S. Ogburn, Jr 

Rev. James Oxford 


Virginia 


1912 
1910 


Matsuyama, Japan 


North Carolina 


1914 


Mr. J. Grover Sims 






190(5 


Rev S A Stewart 


(In United States) 


Western N. Carolina 
St. Louis 


1S88 


Rev. S. H. Wainright 

Rev. B. W. Waters 

Rev. W. R. Weakley 

Rev. W. A. Wilson 

Miss Nellie Bennett 

Miss Maud Bonnell 


1887 


Roanoke, Va 


Baltimore 


1895 


Osaka, Japan 


Missouri 


1890 
1910 


Okayama, Japan 

Kobe, Japan 


Western N. Carolina 
Virginia 


1899 






1903 
1889 


Miss Margaret M. Cook — 
Miss N. B. Gaines 


Hiroshima, Japan 


North Georgia 
Florida 


1913 
1901 
1908 
1912 


Miss Ethel Newcomb 

Miss Ida L. Shannon 

Miss Katherine Shannon... 
Mjiss Ka;therine Triesch- 


Hiroshima, Japan 

Hiroshima, Japan 

Hiroshima, Japan 

Hiroshima, Japan 


St. Louis 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Little Rock 


1910 


Miss Annie Bell Williams. 
Miss Ida M. Worth 


South Carolina 


1896 




St. Louis 


1910 
1911 


KOREA 

Rev. L. C. Brannan 

Dr. Newton H. Bowman... 
Rev. C. T. Collyer 


Choon Chun, Korea... 


Alabama 
Texas 


1896 






1M4 


Rev. H. Grady Cowan 

Rev. W. G. Cram 


(Going in lbl4) 




1902 




Kentucky 


1910 


Mr. Carl H. Deal 




1908 


Rev. F. K. Gamble 

Rev. J. L. Gerdine 


SongdOj Korea 


North Alabama 


1905 






1898 


Rev. R. A. Hardie, M. D... 


Seoul, Korea 


Canada 


1907 


Rev. J. W. Hitch 


Wayeross Ga 


South Georgia 


1899 


Rev. J. R. Moose 






1907 


Rev. E. D. Peerman 




Virginia 

Southwest Missouri 

Kentucky 

Kentucky 

Western N. Carolina 


1913 
1907 


Rev. Bert A. Powell 

W. T. Reid, M. D 


Choon Chun, Korea 


1900 


J. B. Ross, M. D 




1907 


Rev. M. B. Stokes 


Wonsan Korea 


1907 
191?, 


Mr. J. A. Thompson 

Rev. V. R. Turner 


(In United States) 


Illinois 

Virginia 

Arkansas 


1905 


Rev. A. W. Wasson 

Rev. C. N. Weems 


Songdo, Korea 


1909 




Kentucky 


1906 


T. H. Yun 




1909 


Miss Hallie Buie 




Mississippi 
Los Angeles 


1887 


Mrs. J. P. Campbell 

Miss Kate Cooper 


Seoul, Korea 


1908 


Douglasville, Ga 

Choon Chun, Korea — 
Songdo, Korea 




1909 
1905 


Miss Laura Edwards 

Miss Cordelia Brwin 


Northwest Texas 
Memphis 



30 



EOLSTON ANNUAL 
MISSIONARY DIEECTORY— Continued 




Address 



Home Conference 



1911 
■1910 
1911 
1906 
1906 
1910 
1912 
1912 
1911 
1910 
1912 
1911 
1911 
1904 



1913 
1907 
1907 
1890 
1910 
1913 
18S8 
1881 
1889 

1895 1 
1911 
1913 
1913 
1901 
1883 
1888 
1896 
1907 
1911 
1903 
1892 
1911 
1908 
1911 
1894 
1912 
1909 
1902 
1910 
1912 
1912 
1901 
1895 
1898 
1908 I 
1908 I 
1911 I 

1896 I 
1911 I 
1910 
1896 
1909 



Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 



Ida Hankins 

Gilberta Harris 

Carrie Jackson 

Mary D. Meyers — 
Lillian E. Nicliols... 
AHce Dean Noyes — 

Bessie Oliver 

Mae Owings 

Lillie Reed 

Bertha A. Smith.... 
Laui'a V. Summers. 

Hortense Tinsley 

Bertha Tucker 

Ellasue Wagner 



BRAZIL 



Rev 
Rev 
Rev 



Rev. H. F. Bailey 

Rev. S. A. Belcher 

Rev. W. G. Borchers 

Rev. J. L. Bruce 

Rev. Paul E. Buyers 

J. W. Clay 

Rev. M. Dickie 

Rev. J. L. Kennedy 

Rev. Johu M. Lander, M. D, 

Rev. W. B. Lee 

Rev. Charles A. Long 

Frank M. Long 

Rev. F. S. Love 

Rev. G. D. Parker 

Rev. J. W. Tarboux 

E. A. Tilly 

H. C. Tucker 

E. E. Vann 

Miss Clare Beverly Cain... 

Miss Emma Christine 

Miss Amelia Elerding 

Miss Lelia F. Epps 

Miss Minnie Feuley 

Miss Lydia Ferguson 

Miss Layona Glenn 

Miss Lucy Henderson 

Miss Helen Hickman 

Miss Blanche Howell 

Miss Virginia O. Howell — 

Miss Eva Louise Hyde 

Miss Rachel Jarrett 

Miss Helen Johnston 

Miss Eliza Perkinsou 

Miss Mary Pescud 

Miss Daisy Pyles 

Miss Trulie Richmond 

Miss Sophia Schalch 

Miss Ida Shafter 

Miss Margaret Simpson 

Miss Miriam Steel 

Miss Lillie A. Stradley 

Miss Sara E. Warue 



SOUTH BRAZIL 



1914 1 Rev. J. W. Daniel. 
1894 I Rev. E. E. Joiner. 

1907 
1904 
1899 
1911 
1906 
1912 



Rev. J. W. Price 

Rev. C. L. Smith , 

Rev. J. M. Terrell 

Prof. C. Anderson Weaver. 

Miss Elizabeth Lamb 

Miss Maggie Lee Kenuey.. 



Seoul, Korea 

Songdo, Korea 

Choon Chun, Korea. 

Seoul, Korea 

Seoul, Korea 

Wonsan, Korea 

Choon Chun, Korea. 

Seoul, Korea 

Songdo, Korea 

Seoul, Korea 

Barnesville, Ga 

Songdo, Korea 

Wonsan, Korea 

Songdo, Korea 



Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

Birmingham, Ala 

Juiz de Fora, Brazil.. 

Capivary, Brazil 

Juiz de Fora, Brazil.. 
Juiz de Fora, Brazil.. 

Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Bello Horizonte, Brazil 

(In United States) 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 
Juiz de Fora, Brazil.. 
Juiz de FOra, Brazil.. 

Petropolis, Brazil 

Union Springs, Ala 

Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 
Juiz de Fora, Brazil.. 
Bello Horizonte, Brazil 
Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. 

Mobile, Ala 

Juiz de Fora, Brazil.. 
Bello Horizonte, Brazil 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 
Bello Horizonte, Brazil 

Minter, Tex 

Long Island, N. Y 

Piracicaba, Brazil 

Juiz de Fora, Brazil.., 
Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. 
Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. 

Petropolis, Brazil 

Petropoiis, Brazil 

Juiz de Fora, Brazil.., 

Ennis, Tex , 

I'iraeicaba, Brazil 

Trinidad, Colo 

Rio de Janeiro, Bi'azil., 
Bello Horizonte, Brazil, 

Sweetwater, Tenn 

Juiz de Fora, Brazil... 



(Going in 1914) 

Porto Alegre, Brazil 
Uruguayana, Brazil. 
Porto Alegre, Brazil 

Alegrete, IJrazil 

Uruguayana, Brazil. 
Porto Alegre, Brazil 
Porto Alegre, Brazil 



Western N. Carolina 
Little Rock 
Memphis 
South Georgia 
Florida 

North Georgia 
South Georgia 
South Carolina 
Oklahoma 

Southwest Missouri 
North Georgia 
South Georgia 
North Georgia 
Holston 



Tennessee 

South Georgia 

Missouri 

Virginia 

North Georgia 

^orth Carolina 

V'irginia 

Holston 

South Carolina 

North Carolina 

Texas 

Louisiana 

North Carolina 

Louisiana 

South Carolina 

Holston 

Tennessee 

North Alabama 

Louisville 

St. Louis 

Illinois 

South Carolina 

Brazil 

North Texas 

North Georgia 

South Georgia 

Northwest Texas 

Western N. Carolina 

Little Rock 

Missouri 

Texas 

Louisiana 

Missouri 

North Carolina 

Brazil 

Northwest Texas 

Brazil 

Missouri 

Little Rock 

Northwest Texas 

Holston 

Los Angeles 



West Texas 
Louisville 
Tennessee 
South Carolina 
Western N. Carolina 
North Georgia 
North Carolina 
North Carolina 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 
MISSIONAEY DIRECTORY— Continued 



31 



Name 



Address 



Home Conference 



MEXICO 



Rev. D. W. Carter 

Rey. J. F. Corbin 

Rev. J. B. Cox 

Rev. R. C. Elliott 

Rev. J. H. Fitzgerald 

Dr. J. G. Harrison 

Rev. J. P. Lancaster 

Rev. N. E. Joyner 

Rev. D. Macune 

Rev. L. B. Newberry 

Rev. F. S. Onderdonk.... 

Rev. J. A. Phillips 

Rev. Laurence Reynolds.. 

Rev. Joseph Thacker 

Miss Ellen Alfter 

Miss Liflnie Barcroft , 

Miss ' Virginia Booth 

Miss Rosa Brooks 

Miss Esther Case.. 

Miss Annie Churchill 

Miss Sharley May Cunning- 
ham 

Miss Lillie Fox 

Miss Lucy Harper 

Miis Frankie Hooper 

Miss Mary E. Massey 

Miss Fannie B. Molins 

Miss Fannie Montague 

Mrs. Nellie O'Beirne 

Miss Edith Park 

Miss Lelia Roberts 

Miss Ellie B. Tydings 

Miss Minnie Varner 

Miss Bessie Lee Wilson 

Miss Lizzie Wilson 

Miss Laura V. Wright 



Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 

Rev. 
Rev. 

Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 

Rev. 
Rev. 
Rev. 

Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 



CUBA 



H. W. Baker 

H. B. Bard well.. 
B. E. Clements.. 
J. F. Caperton... 
John C. Elkins.. 
B. F. Gilbert... 

B. O. Hill 

O. K. Hopkins.. 
M. M. Marshall. 



A. H. Moore, Jr 

W. M. Mullen 

S. A. Neblett 

R. J. Parker 

Lemuel H. Robinson. 

Henry Smith 

M. M. Stewart 

R. L. Whitehead.... 
Hattie G. Carson... 

Belle Markey 

Bessie Stubbs 

Rebecci Toland 



AFRICA 

Dr. D. L. Mumpower. 

Rev. C. C. Bush 

J. A. Stock well 



Georgetown, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Monterey, Mexico 

Mexico City, Mexico.. 

El Paso, Tex 

Agricola, Ga 

Shawmut, Ala 

Monterey, Mexico 

Corpus Christi, Tex... 
Guadalajara, Mexico.. 
Corpus Christi, Tex... 

San Antonio, Tex 

Corpus Chi'isti, Tex. . . 

Miazatlan, Mexico 

San Luis Potosi, Mex. 

Tupelo, Miss 

Guadalajara, Mexico . . 

El Paso, Tex 

Mexico City, Mexico.., 
El Paso. Tex - 



Holston 
West Texas 
West Texas 
West Texas 
Western N. Carolina 
North Georgia 
Denver 
Louisiana 
Northwest Texas 
West Texas 
West Texas 
'West Texas 
North Texas 



San Luis Potosi 

San Antonio, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Saltillo, Mexico 

Guadalajara, Miexlco . . 
San Luis Potosi, Mex. 

El Paso, Tex 

New Orleans, La 

El Paso, Tex 

Bonham, Tex 

Tallahassee, Fla 

Guadalajara, Mexico.. 
Murfreesboro, Tenn... 

El Paso, Tex 

Kansas City, Mo 



(In United States)... 

Havana, Cuba 

Havana, Cuba 

Nipe, Cuba 

Havana, Cuba 

Santa Clara, Cuba... 

Camaguey, Cuba 

Santiago, Cuba 

Santa Barbara, Isle of 

iPines 

Omaja, Cuba 

Guantanamo, Cuba 

Matanzas, Cuba 

Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Camaguey, Cuba ., 

Plnar del Rio, Cuba... 
Santa Fe, Isle of Pines 

Havana, Cuba 

Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Matanzas, ' Cuba 

Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Matanzas, Cuba 



Lusambo, Africa. 
Lusambo, Africa. 
Lusambo, Africa. 



Missouri 
Mississippi 
West Texas 
Kentucky 
\Vhite River 
Northwest Texas 

North Carolina 

North Texas 

Northwest Texas 

Missouri 

North Mississippi 

Missouri 

Memphis 

Louisiana 

Texas 

North Texas 

Florida 

Alabama 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Baltimore 



Holston 

South Georgia 

South Georgia 

Northwest Texas 

Pacific 

Tennessee 

Texas 

South Georgia 

South Georgia 

Alabama 

Tennessee 

Holston 

Western N. Carolina 

West Texas 

White River 

Tennessee 

South Georgia 

South Georgia 

Florida 

South Georgia 

Texas 



St. Louis 
Baltimore 
Louisiana 



32 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



CONNECTIONAL OFFICERS FROM THE SEPARATION 

EDITORS CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 



1846. 


J. B. McFerrin 


1886. 


0. P. Fitzgerald 


1850. 


J. B. McFerrin 


1890. 


E. E. Hoss 


1854. 


J. B. McFerrin 


1894. 


E. E. Hoss 


1858. 


H. N. McTyeire 


1898. 


E. E. Hoss 


1866. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1902. 


G. B. Winton 


1870. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1906. 


G. B. Winton 


1874. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1910. 


T. N. Ivey 


1878. 


0. P. Fitzgerald 


1914. 


T. N. Ivey 


1882. 


0. P. Fitzgerald 








BOOK 


EDITORS 


1850. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1886. 


W. P. Harrison 


1854. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1890. 


W. P. Harrison 


1858. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1894. 


J. J. Tigert 


1866. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1898. 


J. J. Tigert 


1870. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1902. 


J. J. Tigert 


1874. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1906. 


Gross Alexander 


1878. 


Thomas 0. Summers 


1910. 


Gross Alexander 


1882. 


W. P. Harrison 


1914. 


Gross Alexander 




MISSIONARY 


SECRETARIES 


1846. 


E. W. Sehon, who at once 


1886. 


I. G. John 



declined 
1846. Edward Stevenson 
1850. E. W. Sehon 
1854. E. W. Sehon 
1858. E. W. Sehon 
1866. E. W. Sehon 
1870. J, B. McFerrin 
1874. J. B. McFerrin 
1878. A. W. Wilson 
1882. R. A. Young 

(Note. — Shortly after the election of A. 
man Potter was elected in his place.) 



1890. I. G. John, A. Coke Smith and 

H. C. Morrison 
1894. H. C. Morrison and W. R. 

Lambuth 
1898. W. R. Lambuth and J. H. 

Pritehett 
1902. W. R. Lambuth 
1906. W. R. Lambuth 
1910. W. W. Pinson 
1914. W. W. Pinson 
Coke Smith as Secretary he declined, and Wey- 



1894. S. A. Steel 
1898. H. M. DuBose 
1902. H. M. Du Bose 



EPWORTH LEAGUE SECRETARIES 

1906. H. M. Du Bose 
1910. F. S. Parker 
1914. F. S. Parker 



SECRETARIES OP CHURCH EXTENSION 



1882. 
1886. 
1890. 
1894. 
1898. 

1846. 
1850. 
1854. 
1858. 
1866. 
1870. 
1874. 
1878. 
1882. 
1886. 
1887. 

1890. 



David Morton 
David Morton 
David Morton 
David Morton 
P. H. Whisner 



1902. P. H. Whisner 
1906. W. F. McMurry 
1910. W. F. McMurry 
1914. W. F. McMurry 



PUBLISHING AGENTS 



John Early 

John Early 

Stephenson and Owen 

J. B. McFerrin 

A. H. Redford 

A. H. Redford 

A. H. Redford 

J. B. McFerrin 

J. B. McFerrin 

J. B. McFerrin 

J. D. Barbee (Book Commit- 
tee, July) 

J. D. Barbee, Senior Agent; 
D. M. Smith, Assistant Agent 



1894. J. D. Barbee, Senior Agent; 

D, M. Smith, Assistant Agent 
1898. J. D. Barbee, Senior Agent; 

D. M. Smith, Assistant Agent 

1902. R. J. Bigham, Senior Agent; 

D. M. Smith, Assistant Agent 

1903. D. M. Smith, Senior Agent; D. 

M. Smith, Assistant (Book 

Committee, July) 
1906. D. M. Smith and A. J. Lamar 
1910. D. M. Smith and A. J. Lamar 
1914. D. M. Smith and A. J. Lamar 



CO 

Q 
•J 

Q 

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O 

02 
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JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS. 



EIEST DAY. 



Wednesday, October 14, 1914. 

The Holston Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, met in its ninety-first annual session, in our State Street 
Church, Bristol, Tenn.-Va., with Bishop Richard G. Waterhouse 
in the chair. After singing "Come, thou fount of every blessing/' 
the Conference was led in prayer by D. S. Hearon. "Eock of Ages" 
was sung by the Conference. Bishop Waterhouse read a Scripture 
lesson from the first chapter of Colossians, commenting on the 
same. The Conference hymn, "And are we yet alive," was sung 
with great fervor, after which Bishop Waterhouse led in prayer. 
"Praise God from whom all blessings flow" was sung. The secre- 
tary of the last Conference called the roll chronologically, and 
the following persons answered to their names : 

D. Sullins, R. N. Price, Jacob Smith, J. T. Frazier, J. S. W. Neel, 

D. H. Carr, L. L. H Carlock, W. D. iMitchell, G. D. French, T. R. 
Handy, W. C. Garden, J. A. Bilderback, E. H. Bogle, S. T. M. 
McPherson, W. H. Price, J. W. Smith, D. S. Hearon, W, W. Hicks, 
J. G. Bays, J. W. Games, J. R. Walker, R. A. Owen, G. W. 
Summers, R. A. Kelly, R. G. Waterhouse, J. L. Prater, L. M. Cart- 
right, S. S. Gatron, R. T. McDowell, T. G. Schuler, S. K. Byrd, 
J. W. Browning, J. A. Burrow, J. B. Simpson, F. Alexander, A. B. 
Hunter, J. G. Orr, E. H. Gassidy, J. A. H. Shuler, W. R. Snider, 
S. H. Hall, J. B. Simpson, G. W. Kelley, J. H. Duvall, W. S. 
Neighbors, J. E. Lowry, T. J. Eskridge, I. P. Martin, I. N. Munsey, 

E. L. Addington, E. W. Mort, W. I. Fogleman, M. P. Garico, G. iM. 
Moreland, D. P. Hurley, J. W. Perry, J. A. Baylor, J. D. Dame, 
C. E. Steele, W. L. Sorrell, J. E. Spring, W. M, Morrell, J. M. 
Garter, J, W, Repass, R. M. Walker, G. E. Painter, J. B. Ward, 
S. W. Bourne, W. G. Crockett, G. A. Garner, J. E. Wolfe, J. A. 
Early, E. A. Shugart, J. W. Rader, J. P. Jones, J. T. Guy, B. W. 
Lee, J. L. Mullens, K. W. Cox, J. R. Brown, C. G. Hounshell, 
G. G. Rector, T. Priddy, E. E. Wiley, W. Hodge, N. R. Gartright, 
S. P. Douglas, J. M. Crowe, S. V. Morell, J. F. Barnett, J. W. 
Helvey, J. R. King, W. M. Ellis, D. T. Miles, R. C. Camper, E. H. 
Cole, J. H. Wagner, L. W. Pierce, D. F. Wyrick, L. D. Yost, J. G. 
Logan, W. S. Hendricks, C. H. Varner, S. S. Boyer, W. B. Belchee, 
J. B. Ely, H. B. Brown, G. S. Wood, J. N. Smith, G. W. Dean, 
K. G. Munsey, R. B. Piatt, Jr., W. R. Carbaugh, J. W. Stewart, 
R. M. Standifer, N. iM. Watson, J. A. Ellison, I. T. Cameron, J. A, L. 
Perkins, J. S. Henley, S. A. McCanless, A. B. Moore, C, A. Pangle, 
S. S. Kreger, G. L. Lambert, F. M. Buhrman, G. G. Weaver, 
W. N, Wagner, G. T. Jordan, H. S. Hutsell, W, G. Thompson, 



34 EOLSTON ANNUAL 

J. L. Scott, F. M. Reynolds, C. N. Kennedy, J. H. Umberger, 
W. H. Walker, J. F. Benton, H. E. Bradshaw, Barney Thompson, 
T. R. Wolfe, W. D. Farmer, F. R. Snavely, S. D. Lambert, S. L. 
Browning, C. K. Wingo, C, R. Jones, E. M. Ritchey, French 
Wampler, C. T. Gray, D. H. Coman, J. W. Moore, G. T. Bond, 
G. K. Patty, R. G. Reynolds, L. S. Reynolds, Carlock Hawk, E. L. 
McConnell, H. E. Kelso, Marion Quessenberry. 

Lay Delegates — J. E. Wagner, J. W. Bailey, J. N. Hillman, J. H. 
Sluss, R. M. Copenhaver, F. A. Cornett, J. L. Hardin, H. D. Hawk, 
H. G. Peters, E. S. Early, J. E. Keller, Frank Murphy, B. F. Fritts, 
J. M. Cantrell. 

Transfers — Question 6 — "Who are received by transfer from 
other Conferences?" J. S. French, from the Tennessee Confer- 
ence; E. K. Triplett, from the East Oklahoma Conference. 

Organization — J. A. Burrow was re-elected secretary, with the 
following corps of helpers : Assistant secretaries, E. A. Shugart, 
J. S. French and E. F. Kahle; statistical secretaries, J. H. Um- 
berger, C. W. Dean, G. L. Lambert; agent for the Holston Annual 
Fund, J. W. Browning; Conference post master, K. W. Cox. The 
"Bar" of the Conference was made to include seven pews around 
the auditorium. The hour for meeting was fixed at 9 a. m., and 
the hour for adjournment at 12. 

Resolution — The following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, First, That the Presiding Elders be constituted a com- 
mittee to nominate the various quadrennial Boards and Committees 
of Examination, according to the Discipline, and to report the 
same to this Conference, not later than Saturday morning, for 
confirmation. 

Secondly, That it shall be the duty of the first named on each 
of the Boards to call a meeting of the same at some hour Saturday 
afternoon for permanent organization. 

Thirdly, That the officers of each Board shall be elected by 
ballot, and when elected the secretary of each Board shall report 
the organization, together with the names of all the members of 
each Board, giving also the post office address of each layman on 
each Board to the Secretary of the Conference for enrollment in 
the minutes and for publication in the Annual; and that this be 
done not later than noon Monday. 

T. C. SCHULER. 

C. E. PAINTER. 

J. W. PERRY. 

W. M. MORRELL. 

J. M. CARTER. 

Committees — The Presiding Elders nominated the following 
standing committees, and the nominations were adopted : 

Public Worship — J. A. Baylor, G. D. French, J. N. Huntsman. 

Spiritual State of Church — W. H. Troy, W. N. Wagner, T. J. 
Houts, J. A. Baylor, I. N. Munsey, M. J. Wysor, S. J. Hornsby, 
E. S. Early, E. S. Finney. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 35 

Social and Economic Interests — G. R. Stuart, J. M. Crowe, George 
E. Penn, J. N. Hillman, J. E. Keller, H. M. Winslow, J. A. Bllder- 
back. 

Books and Periodicals — T. C. Schuler, Frank Jackson, D. S. 
Hearon, R. M. Standifer, French Wampler, G. S. Wood. 

Sabbath Observance — W. S. Neighbors, A. B. Hunter, E. H. 
Cole, T. P. Jimison, B. W. Lee. 

District Conference Records — C. W. Dean, S. D. Lambert, J. F. 
Barnett, S. B. White, J. W. Repass, J. L. Scott. 

Memoirs — R. N. Price, P. L. Cobb, T. J. Eskridge, G. D. French, 
J. A. H. Shuler, S. S. Catron, D. P. Hurley, W. H. Price, J. E. 
Spring. 

Resolution — The following resolution was adopted: 
Resolved, That a committee be appointed by the Bishop whose 
duty it shall be to consider all questions pertaining to the handling 
of the Conference funds and to report recommendations to the 
Conference for its adoption. 

Our ISTew University — A communication was read from 
Bishop Warren A. Candler, chairman of the Commission on 
Education, concerning- our new Methodist University at Atlanta, 
of which he is Chancellor. The communication was referred to 
the Board of Education. 

HoLSTON History — By request of Dr. R. N. Price, J. W. 
Perry read a report from Dr. Price, our Historian, which was 
ordered to record. See supplement "A." 

Our Veterans — Dr. Price made brief remarks concerning the 
History. Dr. D. Sullins, at the head of our "honor roll," made 
a touching talk concerning his relations to the Conference, at 
the conclusion of which the Conference tenderly sang, "0, how 
sweet it will be in that beautiful land." The names of D. Sullins 
and E. N. Price were referred to the committee on Conference 
Relations. 

Miscellaneous — A resolution asking for an increase of the 
assessment for Conference Claimants was referred to the Joint 
Board of Finance. 

Resolutions which had previously passed, fixing hours of anni- 
versaries of our Conference Boards, were reconsidered, and referred 
to the Committee on Public Worship. 

Introductions — The following persons were introduced to the 
Conference: Dr. J. S. Hunter, of our branch Publishing House 
at Richmond, Va.; Rev. B. C. Horton, of the Kentucky Confer- 
ence; W. J. Maybe, of the Virginia Children's Home Society; 
Rev. J. L. Rosser, pastor of the First Baptist Church, Bristol; 



36 E0L8T0N ANNUAL 

Eev. J. D. McAlister, of the Virginia Conference and of the 
Anti-Saloon League of Virginia. 

Emoey and Heney — E. K. Sutherland announced that ar- 
rangement had been made for special reduced railroad rates 
Thursday afternoon, the 15th, to Emory and Henry College, and 
that the Conference was invited to visit Emory and inspect the 
new main building. The invitation was accepted. 

Conference Funds — Bishop Waterhouse announced the special 
committee on care of Conference funds as follows : E. P. Purse, 
T. J. Eskridge, J. B. Ward, E. E. Wiley, J. W. Perry. 

Presiding Elders — The following Presiding Elders passed 
examination of character and made brief report of their several 
Districts: J. B. Ward, D. P. Hurley, E. H. Cassidy, G. D. 
French, I. P. Martin, J. C. Orr, T. J. Eskridge, J. A. Burrow, 
and E. A. Shugart. 

Miscellaneous — A paper from the officers of the Laymen's 
Missionary Movement was read, and referred to the Committee 
provided for by the new Discipline. 

The Committee on Public Worship made the following an- 
nouncements : Preaching at 3 this afternoon by S. B. Vaught ; 
Educational address at 7:30 p.m., by Dr. Stonewall Anderson, 
our General Secretary of Education. 

After other announcements, the Conference was dismissed with 
a prayer by Frank Jackson, in which Eev. E. F. Kahle's daughter, 
Mrs. Emory Widener, now critically ill at her home in Abingdon, 
Va., was remembered by request. 



SECOND DAY. 

Thursday, Oct. 15, 1914. 

The Conference met at 9 o'clock a. m., with Bishop E. G. 
Waterhouse in the chair. "A charge to keep I have" was sung. 
Jno. E. Stewart read a lesson from the first chapter of 2 Timothy, 
briefly commenting on the same, after which he led in prayer. 
The minutes of the first day's session were read and approved. 

EoLL Call — The roll call of absentees showed the following 
additional arrivals : 

B. F. Nuckolls, C. T. Carroll, K. C. Atkins, J. H. Parrott, J. C. 
Bays, J. I. Cash, J. A. Lyons, R. S. Umberger, T. D. Strader, 



EOLSTON A^NVAL 37 

W. E. Bailey, J. M, Paxton, J. M. Maiden, M. J. Wysor, W. H. 
Troy, H. S. Johnston, H. S. Hamilton, G. W. Simpson, W. M. Patty, 
T. J. Houts, A. M. Quails, L. J. Williams, G. S. Wagner, J. V. Hall, 
P. L. Cobb, Z. D. Holbrook, W. H. Briggs, S. A. McGhee, C. R. 
Brown, K. C. Atkins, B. N. Waterhouse, J. F. Benton, G. R. Stuart, 
G. O. Ganoway, S. B. Vaught. 

IJaymen — Dr. N. E. Hartsook, E. S. Finney, W. S. Dangerfield, 
Rev. C. A. Brown, J. S. Brown, J. N. Hillman, W. P. Beverly, 
W. N. Baker, P. M. Bewley, S. B. White, T. J. Bondurant, S. J. 
Hornsby. 

Alternates — J. M. Butt, of the Abingdon District, takes the place 
of Geo. E. Penn; G. L. Hardwick, of the Chattanooga District, 
takes the place of Frank Steffner. 

Further calling of the roll was dispensed with. 

Admitted on Trial — Question 1 — "Who are admitted on 
trial?" The following persons, having passed all of the required 
examinations, were admitted into the traveling connection on 
trial: Bluefield District — James M. Wysor; Eadford District — 
Marion A. Stevenson, Samuel E. Jones, Lorenzo D. Maberry; 
Tazewell District — George W. Fo'x; Wytheville District — Walter 
Price Eastwood, Bradley Talmage Sells, Elmer AViley Dean, 
Walton Matthews Bunts; Abingdon District — Eobert E. Greer, 
John G. Helvey, James A. Johnson, Oscar Livingston Simpson, 
Zenas Buford Eandall, Henry Austin Carlton, Eobert P. Carroll; 
Morristown District — Eoy Edward Morrison; Chattanooga Dis- 
trict — Walter G. Porter; Harriman District — Eobert Lee Evans. 

Endowment Fund — John E. Stewart, Secretary of our Gen- 
eral Superannuates' Endowment Fund, was introduced, and ad- 
dressed the Conference in the interest of this great fund. 

Class Advanced — Question 2 — "Who remain on trial?" The 
following persons passed examination of character and of studies, 
and were advanced to the class of the second year : Jesse Wilhelm 
Morris, Sumpter H. Austin, James Clark Cornett, James Harle 
Lotspeich, Eichard "WUngfield Watts, Glenn Carswell Emmett, 
Eobert Hughes Ballard, Ernest Eoy Eoach. 

The following persons passed examination of character, but 
not having been before the committee on studies, were continued 
in the class of the first year: Carl H. Wright, Thomas P. 
Jimison, and Charles G. McKay, the last named being already 
in Elder's Orders from the Congregational Church. 

Passage of Character — Question 22 — "Are all of the preach- 
ers blameless in their life and official administration?" The fol- 
lowing persons passed examination of character, most of whom 
were present and made brief report of their work: E. E. Wiley, 



38 H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

J. M. Carter, T. C. Schuler, T. J. Houts, S. W. Bourne, W. S. 
L3^ons, J. F. Benton, J. B. Simpson, J. A, Dnvall, G. A. Carner, 
L, W. Pierce, I. T. Cameron. 

Methodist University — Dr. A. J. Lamar, of our Publishing 
House in Nashville, and member of the Commission on Education, 
appointed at our last General Conference, spoke in behalf of our 
new Methodist University at Atlanta, Ga. 

Introductions — Dr. John M. Moore, one of our General Sec- 
retaries of the Department of Home Missions, and Dr. Stonewall 
Anderson, General Secretary of Education, were introduced. Dr. 
Anderson addressed the Conference briefly in the interest of gen- 
eral education. 

Pesolution — The following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That we, the Holston Conference, extend to iMr. Asa 
Candler, of Atlanta, Ga., an expression of our hearty appreciation 
of his generous gift of $1,000,000 to our Church in the establishment 
of a Methodist University. FRANK JACKSON. 

J. A. BURROW. 

EUGENE BLAKE. 

Referred — The following persons passed examination of char- 
acter, and were referred to the Committee on Conference Rela- 
tions: C. R. Brown, W. H. Price, J. A. Lyons, G. W. Jackson, 
J. W. Smith, J. I. Cash, D. McCracken, C. A. Beard, C. R. 
Melton, G. W. Simpson, J. E. Bruce, L. C. Delashmit, H. S. 
Hamilton. 

The Committee on Public Worship announced that John M. 
Crowe would preach at 3 o'clock p. m., and that a missionary 
anniversary would be held at 7 :30 p. m., to be addressed by Dr. 
John Stewart French, who comes back to us from the Tennessee 
Conference, and by Dr. John M. Moore, of the secretarial force of 
our General Board of Missions. 

After announcements, the Conference adjourned with the dox- 
ology and benediction. 



THIRD DAY. 

Friday, Oct. 16, 1914. 

The Conference convened at 9 o'clock a. m., with Bishop 
"Waterhouse in the chair. After a hymn, John R. Stewart read 
from Matthew x., and commented on the same. George R. Stuart 
led in prayer. 



HOLS TON ANNUAL 39 

The minutes of yesterday's session were read and approved. At 
his own request, the name of D. Sullins was withdrawn from the 
Committee on Conference Relations. 

Eefeered — Under question 23 the following persons passed ex- 
amination of character, and were referred to the Committee on 
Conference Eolations : D. H. Carr, W. E. Barnett, L. K. Haynes, 
C. M. James, W. D. Mitchell, J. M. Maiden, M. L. Clendenen, 
W. C. Carden, A. D. Stewart, M. P. Swaim, E. S. Umberger, J. C. 
Maness, E. H. Bogle, L. M. Neel, A. Kincaid, B. F. Nuckolls, 
J. W. Carnes, F. Alexander, Jacoh Smith, G. A. Carner, C. T. 
Carroll, J. N. liobbs, J. C. Bays, J. H. Parrott, H. C. Clemens, 
W. C. Hicks, C. A. Maiden. 

The names of J. H. Brunner, C. K. Miller, and W. C. Faris 
were referred to the Committee on Memoirs. 

Introductions — The following persons were introduced to the 
Conference: Eev. C. D. Bulla, Corresponding Secretary of our 
General Sunday School Board; Miss Mamie Bays, daughter of 
Dr. W. W. Bays, formerly of the Holston Conference; Mrs. 
W. B. Sullins, of Knoxville, a special messenger from the Holston 
Woman's Missionary Society; Mrs. J. D. Hammond, wife of Dr. 
J. D. Hammond, of our Paine College for colored preachers and 
teachers at Augusta, Ga. 

Miscellaneous — The new Sunday School Board for the next 
quadrennium was announced and elected, the names of which will 
come in with the other Boards when reported by the Presiding 
Elders. 

A hat collection of $40.00 was taken for one of our honored 
superannuates, E. H. Bogle. 

J. W. Orr, lay delegate from the Big Stone Gap District, took 
his seat. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

We rejoice that both the members of the class admitted on trial 
at the session of the Conference in 1865 are still alive. Therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That we request Dr. C. T. Carroll and Rev. J. T. 
Frazier to preach at the next session of our Conference a semi- 
centennial sermon, and we hereby request the Committee on Public 
Worship to make arrangements for these services. 

J. W. PERRY. 

E. H. CASSIDY. 

E. A. SHUGART. 

J. A. Bilderback passed examination of character, and was left 
effective. 



40 H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

The Orphanage — Mrs. W. B. Sullins, presented a petition 
from the Holston Woman's Missionary Society asking the Holston 
Conference to provide for the salary of the Manager of the Greene- 
ville Industrial Home and School. A committee consisting of 
J. W. Moore, J. E. Brown, G. A. Maiden, T. E. Handy and G. E. 
Stuart, was appointed to take the petition under advisement, and 
report a recommendation to the Conference. 

The Negroes — Mrs. J, D. Hammond addressed the Conference 
in the interest of the colored people of the South. Bishop Water- 
house and George E. Stuart exhorted, after which a collection 
was taken, amounting to $528.07. 

Sunday Schools — The Sunday School Board made report. 
The time for adjournment was extended fifteen minutes to hear 
Eev. C. D. Bulla, Corresponding Secretary of our General Sunday 
School Board, who addressed the Conference in the interest of 
our Wesley Adult Bible Class work. The report was adopted. 
See supplement "B." 

T. B. King, lay delegate from the Eadford District, took his 
seat. 

The Committee on Public Worship made the following an- 
nouncements : Preaching at 3 p. m., by Luther B. Bridges, evan- 
gelist; at 7:30 p.m., an evangelistic service, to review the work 
of the past year. 

After other announcements, the Conference adjourned with the 
doxology, and a prayer by J. T. Frazier, remembering those for 
whom special intercession had been asked. 



FOUETH DAY. 

Saturday, Oct. 17, 1914. 

The Conference convened at 9 o'clock a. m., with Bishop 
Waterhouse in the chair. The devotional service was conducted by 
George E. Stuart, who made a spirited talk on the work of soul- 
saving. D. S. Hearon led in prayer. After a hymn, the minutes 
of yesterday's session were read and approved. J. B. Saunders, 
delegate from the Bluefield District, and Geo. E. Penn, delegate 
from the Abingdon District, took their seats. 

Elected Deacons — The following persons, having passed ex- 
amination of character and of studies, were elected to Deacon's 
Orders, and advanced to the class of the third year: Samuel 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 41 

Clemens Beard, William L. Dykes, James Henry Watkins, Allen 
James Thomas, Onnie Carless Wright, Joseph Arnold Henderson. 

Charles T. Gray and Thomas E. Brooks passed examination of 
character and of studies, being already in Deacon's Orders. 

Eohert IST. Havens, Elbert W. Fisher, and Lee M. Burriss, 
passed examination of character, but not having been before the 
committee on studies, were continued in the class oi the second 
year. 

Elected Eldeks — Question 14 — "What traveling preachers are 
elected Elders?" The following persons, having passed exam- 
ination of character, and of studies, were elected to Elders Orders : 
Samuel David Lambert, William Edward Browning, Chapman 
Kelly Wingo, Charles Eobert Jones, French Wampler, Henry 
Ernest Bradshaw, William Hicks Walker, Francis Marvin Buhr- 
man, William B. Belchee, Grover Tilden Bond, Samuel Luther 
Browning. 

Silas A. McGhee passed examination of character and of studies, 
being already in Elder's Orders. 

Charles N. Kennedy, Harry S. Hutsell, and Charles E. Melton 
passed examination of character, but not having been before the 
committee on studies, were continued in the class of the fourth 
year. 

Question 13 — "What local preachers are elected Deacons?" 
From the Eadford District — Charles D. Gutridge, William C. 
Shrewsberry, Lorenzo Dow Maberry; Wytheville District — Elmer 
Wiley Dean; Abingdon District — James E. Turner, Zenas B. 
Eandall, Eobert Paris Carroll, James A. Johnson, Sumpter H. 
Austin, Oscar L. Simpson, John Granville Helvey, John Byron 
Coan; Knoxville District — Fred Gordon. 

Question 16 — "What local preachers are elected Elders?" From 
the Wytheville District — Walton Matthew Bunts. 

Question 9 — "Who are the Deacons of one year?" The fol- 
lowing persons passed examination of character and of studies, 
and were advanced to the class of the fourth year : Graydon K. 
Patty, Eufus G. Eeynolds, Luther S. Eeynolds, Carlock Hawk, 
Bascom Waters, Hugh E. Kelso, George 0. Ganoway, Marion 
Quessenberry, James H. TJmberger, John W. Stewart. 

The following persons passed examination O'f character, but not 
having passed the examination on studies were continued in the 
class of the third year : Enoch L. McConnell, Newton F. Walker, 
Frank E. Suavely, Ernest M. Eitchey, Andrew M. Quails. 



42 H0L8T0N AlfNVAL 

Question 5 — "Who are readmitted?" Answer, no one. 

Miscellaneous — The special committee on Care of Conference 
Funds made report, the consideration of which was temporarily 
postponed. 

Eev. E. Iv. Hardin briefly addressed the Conference in the 
interest of our connectional church at Washington City. 

S. D. Long, President of Martha Washington College, who has 
been kept away by sickness, arrived and took his seat. 

Quadrennial Boards — The Presiding Elders nominated the 
Committees and Boards for the next quadrennium, which were 
adopted as follows : 

Admissions — J. W. Perry, W. S. Neighbors, T. C. Schuler. 

Trial Committee for Admission — S. D. Long, W. M. Patty, J. E. 
Lowry. 

First Year — R. K. Sutherland, R. C. Camper, J. M. Paxton. 

Second Year — W. N. Wagner, G. W. Summers, G. L. Lambert. 

Third Year — E. N. Woodward, J. B. Ely, W. H. Briggs. 

Fourth Year — D. S. Hearon, J. M. Crowe, T. R. Wolfe. 

Conference Relations — W. M. Morrell, J. T. Guy, C. E. Steele, 
C. E. Painter, J. E. Spring, E. H. Cole, G. C. Rector, J. H. Wagner, 
C. H. Varner. 

Bible Society Board — W, S. Lyons, J. I. Cash, N. R. Cartright, 
G. T. Jordan, E. W. Mort, F. M. Buhrman, W. C. Thompson, J. A. 
Ellison, K. W. Cox, J. M. Cantrell. 

Sunday School Board — F. A. Carter, W. H. Briggs, S. S. Boyer, 
Thomas Priddy, R. A. Owen, H. B. Vaught, W. M. Ellis, J. A. 
Early, D. T. Miles, C. R. Brown, L. W. Pierce, S. C. Douglass, 
J. H. Barnett, T. C. Smith, G. A. Lambert, H. G. Peters, C. Q. 
Counts, D. A. Pless, T. F. Sparks, Hugh Martin. 

Church Extension Board — T. C. Schuler, Z. D. Holbrook, B. N. 
Waterhouse, Walter Hodge, E. F. Kahle, C. W. Dean, M. J. Wysor, 
H. B. Brown, S. S. Catron, W. R. Snider, L. E. Wood, Wier Rich- 
ardson, T. J. Bondurant, S. B. White, H. D. Hawk, W. B. Ford, 
Thomas Greer, W. S. Dangerfield, J. H. Sluss, W. T. Roberts. 

Board of Missions — W. S. Hendricks, P. L. Cobb, B. W. Lee, 
J. C. Logan, S. B. Vaught, H. E. Kelso, J. R. King, C. K. Wingo, 
J. E. Wolfe, J. M. Carter, C. C. Bailey, iM. H. Jackson, Guy Delph, 
J. L. Hardin, J. N. Hillman, J. W. Weeks, R. P. Purse, R. C. 
Miller, J. D. Lea, N. E. Hartsook. 

Joint Board of Finance — T. S. Hamilton, S. W. Bourne, E. L. 
Addington, J. H. Umberger, J. D. Dame, A. B. Moore, R. M. 
Standifer, W. L. Sorrell, J. M. Walker, Creed F. Bates, Rufus 
Kelly, J. H. Reynolds, P. M. Bewley, E. C. Quillain, S. W, Keys, 
R. E. L. Huddle, W. H. Shuff, R. E. Lazenby, R. M. Copenhaver. 

Epworth League Board — J. F. Benton, J. F. Jones, J. W. Helvey, 
A. B. Hunter, G. M. Moreland, E. L. McConnell, S. C. Beard, R. A. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 43 

Kelly, C. A. Pangle, W. D. Farmer, C. S. Kincaid, Henry L. Trent, 
E. B. Koger, W. C. Wallace, J. W. Ashworth, E. C. Hamilton, 
T. J. B. Sharitz, T. B. King, R. K. Carr, George Kelley, John R. 
Walker. 

Trustees of Conference Funds — Jesse Bosang, T. J. Eskridge, 
T. C. Vaughn, S. D. Long, W. E, Brock. 

Midland Methodist Commission — Creed F. Bates, N. M. Watson, 
E. E. Wiley. 

Board of Education — E. E. Wiley, J. S. French, J. L. Mullens, 
N. iM. Watson, R. K. Sutherland, J. W, Rader, W. M. Morrell, E. N. 
Woodward, J. W. Moore, J. R. Brown, S. D. Long, W. S. Neighbors, 
Barney Thompson, C. C. Weaver, J, E. Lowry, George L. Hard- 
wick, E. S. Finney, G. F. Mellen, R. L. Jordan, W. B. Allen. 

Dr. T. ]Sr. Ivey, editor of the ISTashville Christian Advocate, was 
introduced, and addressed the Conference in the interest of our 
connectional organ. 

The special committee appointed a year ago to investigate the 
advisability of starting a new Conference paper made report, the 
consideration of which was temporarily postponed. 

Orphanage — The special committee to consider a petition from 
the Woman's Missionary Society of Holston made report, which 
was adopted, as follows: 

Your committee to* whom was referred the matter pertaining 
to the Industrial Home and School at Greeneville, Tenn., would 
recommend that a board of seven be elected by this Conference 
to co-operate with the Woman's Missionary Society of the Holston 
Conference in the management of said institution. Your com- 
mittee would nominate the following persons to constitute said 
board: J. W. Moore, George R. Stuart, Stewart French, R. B. 
Piatt, L. M. Thomas, Sam Keys, and M. H. Jackson. 

Your committee would further recommend that James A. Bur- 
row, J. A. Baylor and Fred Carter be elected to represent the 
Conference in the Board of Directors. 

We recommend that the Conference shall raise for the Orphanage 
a sum equal to the salary of the Superintendent. 

We further recommend that the Bishop appoint the Rev. S. S. 
Kreger as the Superintendent for another year, 

J. W. MOORE, Chairman. 
T. R. HANDY, Secretary. 

Full Connection — Question 4 — "Who are admitted into full 
connection?" The following persons, having met all of the re- 
quirements of the Church, were called before the chancel, addressed 
by Bishop Waterhouse, propounded the Disciplinary questions, and 
then, by vote of the Conference, were received into full connection : 
Samuel C. Beard, William L. Dykes, James H. Watkins, Allen J. 
Thomas, Onnie C. Wright, Joseph A. Henderson, Thomas E. 
Brooks. 



M HOLSTON ANNUAL 

HoLSTON Annual — The following report was read and sent to 
record : 

James A. Burrow, Secretary, in account with the Holston Con- 
ference. 

RECEIPTS. 

Amount on hand $ 44.18 

From preachers-in-charge for 1913 660.75 

From preachers-in-charge for 1914 135.30 



$840.23 
DISBURSEMENTS. 

Dr. Cr. 

Estimate on 3,750 copies $500.00 

Extra pages (12) 24.00 

Electrotypes, etc 56.00 

Express and postage 121.13 

Telephone, telegraph, blanks, etc 7.75 



$708.88 
Paid to Times Printing Company: 

Nov. 6, 1913 $100.00 

Nov. 14, 1913 400.00 

Nov. 19, 1913 100.00 

Nov. 24, 1913 97.38 

Jan. 17, 1914 7.75 

March 19, 1914 3.75 



$708.88 
Amount now in bank $131.35 $131.35 



$840.23 



Miscellaneous — Under Question 23 the following persons 
passed examination of character: E. B. Piatt, W?. W. Hicks, 
J. E. Spring, H. B. Brown, M. P. Carico, J. L. Mullens, H. S. 
Johnston, S. H. Hall, B. N. Waterhouse, S. V. Morell, C. E. 
Brown, A. B. Hunter. 

Public Worship — The Committee on Public Worship made the 
following announcements : 

State Street Methodist Church. 9:00 a.m., Love Feast — J. S. W. Neel 

This will be in the main auditor- 
ium of the church. The main 
Sunday School will meet as 
usual at 9:45 in the Sunday 
School rooms. The Baraca 
Class will meet at the Virginia 
Court House at 10 a. m. Many 
visitors are expected. 
State Street Methodist Church. 11:00 a. m.. Bishop R. G. Waterhouse 

Followed by ordination of Deacons 
State Street Methodist Church . 3 : 00 p. m.. Conference Memorial 

Session; Conference Trio will sing 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



45 



State Street Methodist Church, 

Anderson Street Methodist. . . 
Anderson Street Methodist. . . 
Mary Street Methodist Church . 
Mary Street Methodist Church . 



7:30 p. m. 



11:00 a. m 

7:30 p. m 

11:00 a. m 

, 7:30p.m 



Virginia Avenue Methodist 

Virginia Avenue Methodist 

M. E., Seventh and Anderson. 11:00 a. m. 

M. E., Seventh and Anderson. 7:30 p.m. 

First Presbyterian Church. . . 

First Presbyterian Church . . . 

Central Presbyterian Church. 

Central Presbyterian Church. 

Windsor Avenue Presbyterian. 11: 00 a. m. 

First Baptist Church il:00a. m. 

First Baptist Church 7:30 p.m. 

Second Baptist Church 11 : 00 a. m. 

Second Baptist Church 7:30 p. m. 

Lutheran Church 11:00a.m. 

Lutheran Church 7:30 p. m. 

First Christian Church 11:00 a. m. 

First Christian Church 7:30 p. m. 

Central Christian Church 11:00 a. m. 

Central Christian Church 7:30 p. m. 

Sullins College 7:30 p. m. 

Lee Street Baptist, Colored. . .11:00 a. m. 
Lee Street Baptist, Colored. . . 7:30 p. m. 
Lee Street Methodist, Colored. 11:00 a. m 
Lee Street Methodist, Colored. 7:30 p.m. 

Abingdon 11 : 00 a. m. 

Abingdon 7:30p.m. 

Appalachia 11:00 a. m. 

Emory 11:00 a. m. 

Erwin 11:00 a. m 

Erwin 7:30p.m. 



7:30 p. m., R. M. Standifer, D. D. 
Followed by ordination of Elders 
11:00 a. m,, J. E. Wolfe 

7:30 p. m., B. C. Horton 
11:00 a.m., Thos. Priddy 
7:30 p.m., Luther B. Bridges 
Fred A. Carter will address the 
Wesley Bible Class at 9:30. 
11:00 a. m., J. R. Brown 

S. S. Catron 

W. M. Morrell 

E. E. Wiley 

S. B. Vaught 

J. M. Carter 

J. W. Moore 

I. P. Martin 

R. B. Piatt 

J. Tyler Frazier 

J. D. McAlister 

R. A. Kelly 

G. C. Rector 

I. P. Martin 

T. J. Eskridge 

W. N. Wagner 

J. E. Lowry 

J. E. Naff 

T. C. Schuler 

Rev. C. G. Hounshell 

J. B. Ward 

W. R. Snider 

,, C. E. Steele 

G. A. earner 

N. M. Watson 

C. R. Brown 

L. M. Cartright 

J. S. French 

J. L. Prater 

J. L. Prater 



Centenary, Chattanooga morning and evening, John M. Crowe 

After other announcements the Conference adjourned with the 
doxology and the benediction. 



MEMOEIAL SESSION. 

Sunday, Oct. 18, 1914. 

The Conference met in memorial session at 3 o'clock p. m., with 
Eugene Blake in the chair by appointment of the Bishop. After 
singing "My soul, be on thy guard," Dr. W. H. Price led in 
prayer. The Conference then sang "I would not live always." 

A memoir of Rev. William C. Paris was read by P. L. Cobb. 

A memoir of Rev. Charles K. Miller was read by J. A. H. 
Shuler. 



46 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

A memoir of Dr. John H. Brunner, prepared by Dr. E. IT. 
Price, but not being at hand on account of the sickness of Dr. 
Price at this session, will be printed in the Holston Annual. The 
Conference trio sang "Just a little while." 

Bishop E. G. Waterhouse came in and took the chair. 

A memoir of Mrs. John Wesley Smith was read by Dr. W. H. 
Price. 

A memoir of Mrs. S. L. Browning was read by T. J. Eskridge. 

A memoir of Mrs. J. T. Smith was read by J. E. Spring. 

A memoir of Mrs. William Eobeson, written by Dr. E. N". 
Price, was read by John C. Orr. 

The Conference trio, J. C. Orr, Eugene Blake and A. B. Hunter, 
sang "We'll never say goodbye in heaven." 

A memoir of Mrs. Lee M. Burriss was read by G. D. French. 

For fourteen years Eev. Phillip P. Kinzer was a member of the 
Holston Conference. Though a local preacher at the time of his 
death, it was deemed fitting that a memoir of his life be read by 
B. F. Nuckolls. 

Samuel D. East, a supply on the Evansville Circuit, was killed 
in an automobile accident recently. On motion of T. C. Shuler, 
the Secretary was directed to make mention of this worthy brother, 
and that hereafter the names of our "supplies" who fall on sleep 
be included in the memorial list. 

Bishop Waterhouse asked Dr. D. Sullins to speak to the memory 
of Dr. John H. Brunner, who has stood for a number of years at 
the head of our chronological roll. Dr. Sullins responded in words 
of tender appreciation of the good and great Dr. Brunner. D. H. 
Carr and J. T. Frazier made brief remarks of appreciation. 

The Conference trio sang "Anywhere with Jesus I can safely 
go." Bishop "V\%,terhouse added a few words of deep feeling, the 
Conference sang "Praise God from whom all blessings flow," and 
then adjourned with the benediction by D. H. Carr. 



SIXTH DAY. 

Monday, Oct. 19, 1914. 

The Conference convened at 9 o'clock a. m., with Bishop 
Waterhouse in the chair. The devotional service was conducted 
by S. S. Catron, who read and commented on the Sermon on the 
Mount. E. A. Owen led in prayer. 

The minutes of Saturday's session were read and approved. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 47 

Eeferred — The names of D. Sullins, J. S. W. Neel and G. S. 
Wagner were referred to the Committee on Conference Eelations. 
J. S. W. Neel made a touching talk on his retirement from an 
active itinerant service of forty-nine years. A free-will offering 
of affectionate appreciation was taken, amounting to $75.16. 

New Board — The Presiding Elders reported the names of the 
new Board of Education, which report was adopted. See complete 
report. 

Eesolution — The following resolution was adopted: 

Whereas, we are deeply sensible of the duty resting upon this 
Conference to do all in its power to quicken the intellectual life 
of our ministry, especially our younger brethren and the under- 
graduates, therefore, be it resolved. 

That the Board of Education be instructed to appoint a com- 
mission to wait upon the Western North Carolina Conference and 
such other Conferences as may wish to join us in the enterprise, 
looking to the establishment of a Summer School of Theology 
at Lake Junaluski, or at some other feasible point, in accordance 
with plans adopted by other of our Annual Conferences, the said 
Commission to report to us at the next session of the Holston 
Conference. 

J. W. MOORE. 

E. F. KAHLE. 

T. S. HAMILTON. 

G. C. RECTOR. 

J. W. STEWART. 

BARNEY THOMPSON. 

Eeadmitted — The credentials of J. H. Montgomery were re- 
stored. At a later hour he was readmitted into the Conference 
under Question 5. 

Conference Funds — The report of the special committee on 
care of Conference funds, postponed from Saturday, was taken up. 
After discussion by E. P. Kahle, T. C. Sehuler, G. A. Maiden, 
J. E. Wolfe, and G. L. Hardwick, the report was amended and 
adopted. See supplement "C." 

Eeconsidered — The adoption of the report of the Presiding 
Elders on Conference Boards and Committees was reconsidered, 
and the report was recommitted for some alterations. 

Passage of Character — Under Question 22 the following per- 
sons passed examination of character, some of whom made brief 
report of their work: 

J. W. Rader, J. M. Crowe, Z. D. Holbrook, J. E. Wolfe, N. R. 
Cartright, J. R. Walker, C. E. Painter, T. D. Miles, K. G. Munsey, 
J. F. Jones, E. L. Addington, I. N. Munsey, H. C. Thompson, T. D. 
Strader, A. S. Thorn, J. R. Brown, J. R. King, J. A. H. Shuler, 



4S HOLS TON ANNUAL 

F. Jackson, J. A. Early, C. E. Steele, S. A. McCanless, J. M. 
Paxton, G. T. Jordan, J. W. Helvey, J. V. Hall, W. C. Crockett, 
W. H. Troy, Walter Hodge, S. K. Byrd, S. T. M. McPherson, J. T. 
Frazier, S. B. Vaught, W. M. Patty, J. A. Baylor, R. T. McDowell, 

G, M. Moreland, T. R. Wolfe, J. W. Repass, J. T. Guy, T. R. 
Handy, J. L. Prater, J. E. Naff, J. A. Lyons, E. W. Mort, L. D. 
Yost, J. D. Dame, H. B. Vaught, C. C. Weaver, R. K. Sutherland, 
S. D. Long, W. S. Neighbors, L. L. H. Carlock, G. W. Summers, 
E. P. Kahle, D. H. Coman, I. P. Martin, W. N. Wagner, C. W. 
Dean, E. H. Cole, E. N. Woodward, D. S. Hearon, J. E. Lowry, 
W. C. Thompson, W. M. Ellis, J. N. Smith, L. J. Williams, D. F. 
Wyrick, A. B. Moore, J. C. Logan, W. R. Carbaugh, R. M. Walker, 
R. A. Owen, G. L. Lambert, J. A. Duvall, W. M. Morrell, W. I. 
Fogleman, M. J. Wysor, A. H. Towe, R. M. Standifer, W. E. 
Bailey, J. A. Ellison, J. S. Henley, G. R. Stuart, N. M. Watson, 
Thos. Priddy, B, W. Lee, W. L. Sorrell, K. C. Atkins, J. F. 
Barnett, K. W. Cox, G. W. Jackson, J. W. Browning, J. H. Wagner, 
J, A. L. Perkins, R. A. Kelly, H. B. Atkins, E. Blake, J. B. Frazier, 
J. W. Moore, T. S. Hamilton, S. S. Catron, J. W. Smith, L, M. 
Cartright, P. L. Cobb, S. S. Boyer, S. S. Kreger, J. L. Scott, C. A. 
Pangle, W. R. Snider, J. B. Ely, C. A. Beard, G. C. Rector, G. S. 
Wood, S. P, Douglas, J. W. Perry, B. Thompson, S. A. Neblett, 
C. G. Hounshell, F. M. Reynolds, W. H. Briggs, M. G. Maiden, 
W. S. Hendricks, J. M. Walker, W. D. Farmer, R. C. Camper, 
J. W. Stewart, C. H. Varner, J. L. James, J. H. Summitt, J. I. 
Cash, W. T. Evans. 

Credentials Surrendered — The name of W. D. Dew was 
stricken from our roll, he having surrendered his credentials under 
report of immorality. 

Eeceived by Transfer — Question 6 — "Who are received by 
transfer from other Conferences?" W. L. Patton, from the Los 
Angeles Conference, who was referred to the Committee on Con- 
ference Eelations. 

Board of Education — The Board of Education made report, 
which was discussed by Barney Thompson, G. L. Hardwick, G. E. 
Stuart, and Wl. T. Eoberts. In connection with the report the 
following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Conference assume the thirteen thousand 
dollars ($13,000) unprovided for on Centenary College, and that 
we appoint a commission of seven to arrange for raising the 
same. 

Auditing Committee — Bishop Waterhouse appointed J. B, 
Ward, G. L. Hardwick and F. A. Carter the auditing committee 
provided for in a report adopted this morning. 

The Committee on Public Worship announced that Frank 
Jackson would preach at 3 o'clock this afternoon. 

Centenary College — Bishop Waterhouse announced the fol- 
lowing commission to arrange for raising the debt on Centenary 




w 

= H 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 49 

College: J. C. Orr, J. A. Burrow, G. C. Eector, Gr. E. Stuart, 
G. L. Hardwick, Thos. Pruden, R. A. Kelly. 

After announcements, the Conference adjourned with the dox- 
ology and benediction, to meet at 7 :30 p. m. 



NIGHT SESSIO^^. 

The Conference convened at 7 :30 o'clock, with Bishop Water- 
house in the chair. The devotional service was conducted by 
IsT. M. Watson, who read and briefly commented on the 19tli Psalm. 
Hymn 393, "Am I a soldier of the cross," was sung, after which 
Bro. Watson led in prayer. The minutes of Monday morning's 
session were read and corrected. 

Question 7 — "Who are received from other churches as local 
preachers?" David M. Graybeal, an Elder from the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and John E. Smith, an Elder from the Freewill 
Baptist Church. 

Question 8 — "Who are received from other churches as travel- 
ing preachers?" No one. 

Questions 11, 13, 15 and 17 were called and properly answered. 
See Minute Questions, 

Leave of absence was granted I. P. Martin, who is called to 
the bedside of his sick father. 

Athletics — The following resolution was adopted: 

Answering a memorial of the students of Emory and Henry 
College, relating to intercollegiate football, we beg to submit the 
following resolutions: 

Resolved, First, That we express our confidence in the godly 
judgment of the Faculty and the Board of Trustees; 

Second, That in our judgment the Board of Trustees and the 
Faculty should have entire control of their athletics. 

FRANK JACKSON. 
J. W. PERRY. 
J. A. BAYLOR. 
C. G. HOUNSHELL. 
J. T. FRAZIER. 

Eepoets — The Board of Education made report No. 2, which 
was discussed briefly and recommitted for amendments. 

The Committee on Social and Economic Eeforms made report, 
which was discussed by J. D. McAlister, and then adopted. See 



50 H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

supplement "E." In connection with this report the following 
resolution was adopted : 

Because of the $24,000 indebtedness of the Anti-Saloon League, 
brought on by the recent campaign in Virginia, therefore, 

Resolved, That we request the Presiding Elders who are in 
Virginia to set apart the second Sunday in November as a praise 
Sunday, at which time an offering may be taken to liquidate this 
debt, allowing Presiding Elders in any part of the Conference to 
obey the request. 

FRANK JACKSON, 
R. K. SUTHERLAND, 
T. C. SCHULER. 

Honor Eoll — The Committee on Conference Relations made 
report, which was amended, and adopted as follows : 

For the Superannuate Relation — J. S. W. Neel, R. N. Price, J. E. 
Bruce, L. C. Delashmit, H. S. Hamilton, D. H. Carr, L. K. Haynes, 
C. M. James, W. D. Mitchell, J. M. Maiden, M. L. Clendenen, W. C. 
Garden, A. D. Stewart, M. P. Swaim, J. M. Wolfe, R. S. Umberger, 
J. C. Maness, E. H. Bogle, A. Kincaid, B. F. Nuckolls, L. M, Neel, 
J. W. Carnes, F. Alexander, Jacob Smith, C. T. Carroll, J. N. 
Hobbs, J. C. Bays, J. H. Parrott, H. C. Clemens, W. C. Hicks, 
W. R. Barnett, D. Sullins, Geo. S. Wagner. 

For the Supernumerary Relation — G. A. Maiden, J. A. Lyons, 

C. R. Brown, W. H. Price, G. W. Jackson, J. W. Smith, J. I. Cash, 

D. McCracken, C. A. Beard, C. R. Melton, G. W. Simpson, G. A. 
earner, W. L. Patton. 

Laymen — The District Lay Leaders made report, which was 
adopted, B. F. Fritts, of Chattanooga, being nominated and elected 
Conference Lay Leader. See supplement "F." 

Next Session — Question 52 — "Where shall the next session of 
the Conference be held?" Broad Street, Knoxville, and Grace 
Church, Bluefield, were placed in nomination. After spirited dis- 
cussion, a standing vote was taken, and the count showed a tie. 
The Conference adjourned in due form with the question pending. 



SEVENTH DAY. 

Tuesday, Oct. 20, 1914. 

The Conference convened at 9 o'clock a. m., with Bishop Water- 
house in the chair. The devotional service was conducted by 
W. C. Carden. The minutes of Monday night's session were read 
and approved. On motion of N. M. Watson, 10 o'clock was fixed 
as the hour for considering the pending question. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 51 

Eeports — The Committee on District Conference Records made 
report, which was adopted. See supplement "C" 

The Committee on Sabbath Observance made report, which was 
adopted. See supplement "H." 

The Sunday School Board made report, which was adopted. See 
supplement "B." 

The Board of Education made report, which was adopted. See 
supplement "D." 

New Peeachers — Question 24 — "How many have been licensed 
to preach during the year?" etc. Answer, 21. Their names have 
been sent to the Department of Ministerial Supply and Training. 

Question 25 — "How many candidates for the ministry are 
there?" etc. Answer, 17. 



Eeports — The Committee on Spiritual State of the Church 
made report, which was adopted. See supplement "I." 

The Board of Church Extension made report, which was adopted. 
See supplement "J." 

The Treasurer of the Board of Education made report, which 
was adopted. See supplement "D." 

The Joint Board of Finance made report, which was slightly 
amended and adopted. See supplement "K." 

Centenary College — The following report was adopted : 

Whereas, the Conference has assumed the thirteen thousand 
dollars ($13,000.00) of the amount yet to be subscribed on the 
debt of thirty thousand dollars ($30,000.00) of Centenary Col- 
lege, we, your commission appointed to devise ways and means for 
raising this money, recommend. 

First, That Rev. Barney Thompson and Mr. Thomas Pruden 
be appointed the committee to raise this amount. 

Second, That the pastors of the Holston Conference do hereby 
pledge themselves to co-operate with these agents, whenever they 
come into their pastoral charges, opening their pulpits, and giving 
them the most favorable access to their people. 

(Signed) JOHN C. ORR. 

J. A. BURROW. 
GEO. R. STUART. 
THOMAS PRUDEN. 
G. L. HARDWICK. 
G. C. RECTOR. 
BARNEY THOMPSON. 

The Board of Missions made report regarding evangelism, which 
was adopted. See supplement "L." 



52 H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

jSText Conference — The special order of the day having arrived, 
Grace Church, Bluefield, was withdrawn in favor of Broad Street, 
Knoxville, with a plea that Bluefield be unanimously chosen next 
year. Broad Street was then chosen without opposition. 

Reports — The Treasurer of the Joint Board of Finance made 
report, which was, adopted. See supplement "K." 

The statistical minute questions were called and properly an- 
swered. See Minute Questions. 

The Bishop and Presiding Elders retired, and J. S. W. Neel, 
by request of the Bishop, took the chair. 

R. K. Sutherland made some statements regarding the Emory 
and Henry subscriptions. 

Frank Jackson read the report on Books and Periodicals, which, 
after amendment and discussion, was adopted. See supple- 
ment "M." 

The Board of Missions made report No. 2, which was adopted. 
See supplement "L." 

The following resolution was adopted: 

Whereas, T. C. Schuler has been in charge of our paper for 
seven years, and has rendered most valuable service to the Con- 
ference and the whole Church by his able editorials that have 
greeted us from week to week, and have been of great benefit to 
us as a Conference, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we express to him our heartiest thanks for the 
faithful service rendered, and assure him of our unfailing confidence 
and love. And while we regret his going out as editor, we will 
ever hold him in affectionate remembrance. 

THOS. PRIDDY. 
R. M. STANDIFER. 

Bro. French Wampler read the report of the Epworth League 
Board, which was adopted. See supplement "IST." 

The President of the Bible Board read report, which, after 
discussion by J. W. Perry, T. C. Schuler, J. W. Orr, W, L. Lyons, 
Gr. A. Maiden, J. W. Eader, IST. R. Cartright and Eugene Blake 
was adopted. See supplement "0." The following resolution pre- 
vailed : 

Resolved, That the resolution passed by this Conference one 
year ago regarding the keeping of any part of the collection for 
the American Bible Society being retained by this Conference be 
and the same is hereafter rescinded. 

T. C. SCHULER. 

J. W. PERRY. 

J. A. Baylor called attention to the Junaluska Conference and 
urged a larger attendance, and was followed on the same subject 
by Geo. R.^Stuart. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 53 

The following resolution of thanks was adopted hy a rising vote : 

Since this Conference has been such a helpful and happy occa- 
sion, due largely to the generous hospitality of the people of this 
city, therefore, 

Resolved, That we extend our sincere gratitude to all those who 
have contributed in any way to this gracious experience, and 
that we promise to bear them on our hearts in prayer. 

FRANK JACKSON. 

J. M. CARTER. 

R. M. STANDIFER. 

E. E. WILEY. 

Eeport 'No. 3 of the Board of Missions was read by the Secretary 
of the Board and adopted. See supplement "L." 

Eeport ISTo. 4 of the Board of Missions was read and adopted. 
See supplement "L." 

On motion^ the time was extended to read the appointments. 

After various announcements, the Conference sang Hymn No. 
564, "God be with you till we meet again;" J. M. Crowe led in 
prayer, the Bishop made some appropriate remarks and read from 
1st ' Cor., xiii, then asked and answered question 53, "Where are 
the preachers stationed this year?" and the Conference adjourned 
sine die with the benediction. 





y^ijui^JLsy^z^-.^ 






MINUTE QUESTIONS. 



1. Who are admitted on trial? 

Walter Price Eastwood, Bradley Talmage Sells, Elmer Wiley 
Dean, Eobert E. Greer, John G. Helvey, Eohert P. Carroll, Roy 
Edward Morrison, Walter G. Porter, Eohert Lee Evans, George 
W. Fox, Marion A. Stevenson, Samuel E. Jones, Lorenzo D. 
Mayberry, Oscar Livingston Simpson, Zenas Buford Eandall, James 
M. Wysor, Henry Austin Carlton, Walton Matthews Bunts. 

Eemaining in class of first year — Carl H. Wright, Thomas P. 
Jimison, Charles G. McKay, 

2. Who remain on trial? 

Jesse Wilhelm Morris, Sumpter H. Austin, James Clark Cornett, 
James Harle Lotspeich, Eichard Wingfield Watts, Glenn Caswell 
Emmett, Eobert Hughes Ballard, Ernest Roy Roach. 

Remaining in class of second year — Robert Neel Havens, Elbert 
W. Fisher, Lee M. Burriss. 

3. Who are discontinued? 
No one. 

4. Who are admitted into full connection? 

Samuel Clemens Beard, William L. Dykes, James Henry Wat- 
kins, Allen James Thomas, Onnie Carless Wright, Joseph Arnold 
Henderson, Thomas E. Brooks. 

Remaining in class of this year — Enoch L. McConnell, Newton 
F. Walker, Frank R. Suavely, Ernest M. Ritchey, Andrew M. 
Quails. 

Deacons in this class from other churches — Charles T. Gray and 
Thomas E. Brooks. 

5. Who are readmitted? 
James Henry Montgomery. 

6. Who are received by transfer from other Conferences? 

J. S. French, from the Tennessee Conference; R. K. Triplett, 
from the East Oklahoma Conference; W. L. Patton, from the Los 
Angeles Conference. 

7. Who are received from other Churches as local preachers? 
David M. Graybeal, an Elder from the M. E. Church; John R. 

Smith, an Elder from the Freewill Baptist Church. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 55 

8. Who are received from other Churches as traveling preachers ? 
No one. 

9. Who are the Deacons of one year? 

Graydon K. Patty, Rufus G. Eeynolds, Luther S. Eeynolds, 
Carlock Hawk, Bascom Waters, Hugh E. Kelso, George 0. Gano- 
way, Marion Quessenberry, James H. Umberger, John W. Stewart. 

Remaining in this class — Charles IST. Kennedy, Harry S. Hutsell, 
Charles R. Melton. 

10. What traveling preachers are elected Deacons? 

Samuel Clemens Beard, William L. Dykes, James Henry Wat- 
kins, Allen James Thomas, Onnie Carless Wright, Joseph Arnold 
Henderson. 

11. What traveling preachers are ordained Deacons? 

Samuel Clemens Beard, William L. Dykes, James Henry Wat- 
kins, Allen James Thomas, Onnie Carless Wright, Joseph Arnold 
Henderson. 

12. What local preachers are elected Deacons? 

Elmer Wiley Dean, Lorenzo Dow Mayberry, John Granville 
Helvey, William C. Shrewsberry, Clarence D. Gutridge, Fred Gor- 
don, Oscar L. Simpson, James A. Johnson, Sumpter H. Austin, 
Robert Paris Carroll, Zenas B. Randall, James A. Turner, Jno. 
B. Coan. 

13. What local preachers are ordained Deacons? 

Elmer Wiley Dean, Lorenzo Dow Mayberry, John Granville 
Helvey, William C. Shrewsberry, Clarence D. Gutridge, Fred Gor- 
don, Oscar L. Simpson, James A. Johnson, Sumpter H. Austin, 
Robert Paris Carroll, James A. Turner, John B. Coan, James 
Columbus Flinchum. 

14. What traveling preachers are elected Elders? 

Samuel David Lambert, William Edward Browning, Chapman 
Kelly Wingo, Clarence Robert Jones, French Wampler, Henry 
Ernest Bradshaw, William Hicks Walker, Francis Marvin Buhr- 
man, William B. Belchee, Grover T. Bond, Samuel Luther Brown- 
ing. 

15. What traveling preachers are ordained Elders? 

Samuel David Lambert, Chapman Kelly Wingo, Charles Robert 
Jones, French Wampler, Henry Ernest Bradshaw, William Hicks 
Walker, Frances Marvin Buhrman, William B. Belchee, Grover T. 
Bond, Samuel Luther Browning. 



56 HOLS TON ANNUAL 

16. What local preachers are elected Elders? 
Walton Matthew Bunts. 

17. What local preachers are ordained Elders? 
Walton Matthew Bunts. 

18. Who are located this year? 
No one. 

19. Who are supernumerary? 

G. A. Maiden, J. A. Lyons, C. E. Brown, W. H. Price, G. W. 
Jackson, J. W. Smith, J. I. Cash, D. McCracken, C. A. Beard, 
C. E. Melton, G. Wl. Simpson, G. A. Garner, W, L. Patton. 

20. Who are superannuated? 

J. S. W. Neel, E. N. Price, J. E. Bruce, L. C. Delashmit, H. S. 
Hamilton, D. H. Carr, L. K. Haynes, C. M. James, W. D. Mitchell, 
J. M. Maiden, M. L, Clendenen, W. C. Garden, A. D. Stewart, 
M. P. Swaim, J. M. Wolfe, E. S. Umberger, J. C. Maness, E. H. 
Bogle, A. Kincaid, B. F. Nuckolls, L. M. Neel, J. W. Carnes, 
F. Alexander, Jacob Smith, C. T. Carroll, J. N. Hobbs, J. C. 
Bays, J. H. Parrott, H. C. Clemens, W. C. Hicks, W. E. Barnett, 
Geo. S. W'agner, D. Sullins. 

21. What preachers have died during the past year? 
W. C. Paris, C. K. Miller, J. H. Brunner. 

22. Are all the preachers blameless in their life and official 
administration ? 

Their names were called in open Conference one by one and 
their characters passed. 

23. What is the number of local preachers and members in the 
several circuits, stations and missions of the Conference? 

Local preachers, 221; members, 77,917; total, 78,138. 

24. How many have been licensed to preach during the year, 
and have their names and addresses been furnished to the De- 
partment of Ministerial Supply and Training? 

Twenty-one. Names have been furnished. 

25. How many candidates for the ministry are there, and have 
their names and addresses been furnished to the Department of 
Ministerial Supply and Training? 

Seventeen. Names have been furnished. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 57 

26. How many infants have been baptized during the year? 
814. 

37. How many adults have been baptized during the year? 
3298. 

28. What is the number of Epworth Leagues? 
118. 

29. What is the number of Epworth League members ? 
3,938. 

30. What is the number of Sunday schools ? 
773. 

31. What is the number of Sunday school officers and teachers? 

5,808. 

32. What is the number of Sunday school scholars enrolled 
during the Conference year? 

71,025. 

33. What amount was assessed by the last Conference foir the 
superannuated preachers, and the widows and orphans of preachers ? 

$10,192.00. 

34. What has been collected on the foregoing account, and how 
has it been applied? 

$8,717.00. See report of Joint Board. 

35. What has been contributed for Missions ? 

Foreign, $12,089.00; specials of $1,444.00, making $13,529.00; 
Home and Conference, $16,692.00; specials of $209.00, making 
$16,901.00. 

36. What has been contributed for Church Extension? 
$7,255.00. 

37. What has been contributed for Education? 
$6,937.00. 

38. What has been contributed for the American Bible So- 
ciety ? 

$884.00. 



58 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

39. What has been contributed for the support of presiding 
elders and preachers in charge? 

Presiding elders, $22,690.00; preachers in charge, $151,171.00. 

40. What has been contributed for the support of Bishops ? 
$2,522.00. 

41. What is the number of societies, and of houses of worship 
owned by them? 

E'umber of societies, 846 ; number of houses of worship, 759. 

42. What is the value of houses of worship, and what is the 
amount of indebtedness thereon? 

Value, $1,987,150.00; indebtedness, $70,448.00. 

43. What is the number of pastoral charges, and of parsonages 
owned by them? 

Pastoral charges, 214; number of parsonages, 171. 

44. What is the value of parsonages, and what is the amount 
of indebtedness thereon? 

Value, $473,170,00; indebtedness, $29,626.00. 

45. What is the number of districts, and of district parson- 
ages ? 

Number of districts, 10; number of district parsonages, 11. 

46. What is the value of district parsonages, and what is the 
amount of indebtedness thereon? 

Value, $16,000.00; indebtedness, . 

47. What number of churches have been damaged or destroyed 
during the year by fire or storm, and what was the amount of 
damage ? 

]!«3'umber of churches damaged, 6; amount of damage, $3,125.00. 

48. What are the insurance statistics? 

Insurance carried, $688,495.00; losses sustained, $1,010.00; pre- 
miums paid, $3,125.00; collections on losses, $2,115.00. 

49. What are the educational statistics? 

5 colleges, 78 teachers, 929 students; value, $755,000.00; en- 
dowment, $25,000.00. 

50. How many copies of the General organ and of the Con- 
ference organ are taken? 

General organ, 781; Conference organ, 4,341. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 59 

51. Who is elected Lay Leader, and what is the report from 
the Committee on Lay Activities? 

Lay Leader, B. F. Fritts, Chattanooga, Tenn.; see supplement 
for report. 

52. "Wlhere shall the next session of the Conference be held? 
Broad Street Church, Knoxville, Tenn. 

53. Where are the preachers stationed this year? 

NOTE. — The parentheses classify the undergraduates. For in- 
stance "cl. 1, e" means class 1, elder, etc. The figure at end of 
each line means number of years on the charge. 

BLUEFIELD DISTRICT* — J. B. Ward, P. E 3 

1 Bluefield — Bland Street* . . E. E. Wiley 2 

2 Bluefield — Grace Church* .J. M. Carter 3 

3 Bramwell and Cooper* . . . .T. C. Schuler 2 

4 Big Sandy and Marytown. .W. A. McCormick, supply 

5 Berwind H. M. Boyd, supply 

6 Coal wood and Premier . . .Elbert W. Fisher . . . . (cl. 2 ) . . 1 

7 Chattaroy Oscar L. Simpson . . . (cl. Id).. 1 

8 Davy and Twin Branch. . .Robert N. Havens . . (cl. 2 ) . . 1 

9 Eckman and Keystone* . . S. W. Bourne 1 

10 Gary* S. A. McCanless 1 

11 Glenalum and Panther. . . E. G. Smith, supply 

12 Jaeger and English J. B. Simpson 1 

13 Jenkin Jones and Pageton. W. S. Lyons 1 

14 Kimball C. E. Painter 1 

16 Maybuery and Coaldale* . . J. F. Benton 2 

15 McDowell and Grumpier. . W. A. Gose, supply 

17 Mate wan D. S. Lee, supply . . ' 

G. A. earner, Sup'n'y 

18 iMatoka* Carl H. Wright (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

19 Mora James M. Wysor .... (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

20 Mullens B. C. Wise, supply 

21 North Fork and Crozier . .Walter P. Eastwood . . (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

22 Naugatuck J. D. Wright, supply 

23 Pineville* . Jesse W. Morris . . . . (cl. 2 ) . . 2 

24 Pond Creek D. L. Smith, supply 

25 Rock* ..Charles N. Kennedy. . (cl. 4 ) . . 2 

26 Welch* T. J. Houts 2 

27 Williamson* L. W. Pierce 4 

28 Winding Gulf Thomas E. Brooks . . (cl. 3 ) . . 2 

29 Miss'y to Italians I. T. Cameron 

Conf. Sec. of Education. . . E. E. Wiley 

TAZEWELL DISTRICT* — D. P. Hurley, P. E 3 



1 Belfast* , 

2 Burke's Gd'n and Taz 

3 Castlewood* . . 

4 Cedar Bluff* . , 

5 Dickensonville* 

6 Elk Garden* . , 

7 Graham* 

8 Graham Circuit* 



. . S. V. Morell 1 

. . J. E. Spring 1 

. . J. L. Mullens 4 

. . F. M. Buhrman 1 

. . W. J. Goff, supply 

. . H. B. Brown 3 

. . M. P. Carico 1 

. . E. H. Cole 1 



♦Has a parsonage. 



60 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



9 Grundy . . . , 

10 Honaker* . , 

11 Lebanon* , . 

12 Maxwell* . . , 

13 Pocahontas* 

14 Richlands . 

15 Rocky Gap* 

16 Tazewell* . , 



.John G. Helvey (cl. Id).. 1 

.J. R. Walker 1 

.N. R. Cartright 1 

.Robert B. Greer . . . . (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

.D. T. Miles 1 

. B. N. Waterhouse 1 

. A. H. Towe 1 

. R. B. Piatt, Jr 2 

C. R. Brown, Sup'n'y. 



RADFORD DISTRICT* — E. H. Cassldy, P. E 3 

1 Athens* J. F. Jones 1 

2 Aubern W. B. Belchee 1 

3 Blue Ridge Lorenzo D. Maberry . . (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

4 Dublin* J. T. Guy 1 

5 Draper* Marcus Leftwich, supply 

6 East Radford* Thomas Priddy 1 

7 Eggleston* K. G. Munsey 4 

8 East River* W. A. Warner, supply 

9 East Princeton S. D. Lambert 1 

10 Fries A. H. Gentry, supply 

11 Floyd* W. R. Carbaugh 1 

12 Galax* A. B. Hunter 1 

Chas. R. Melton, S'n'y. (cl. 4 ) . . 

13 Hillsville* Bradley T. Sells (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

14 Hylton Mission* Samuel E. Jones .... (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

15 Lead Mines* I. N. Munsey 1 

16 Mercer and Summers ....James H. Watkins . . (cl. 3 ).. 1 

17 New River* Marion Quessenberry (cl. 4 ) . . 2 

18 Pulaski* W. M. Morrell 1 

19 Pearisburg* Z. D. Holbrook 2 

20 Princeton* J. E. Wolfe 2 

21 Radford* las. H. Montgomery . (cl. 3 ).. 1 

22 Staffordsville* S. H. Hall 1 

Prof, in Mont. State Nor. . . A. S. Thorn 

District Evangelist ...... E. L. Addington 



WYTHEVILLE DISTRICT — J. A. Baylor, P. E 1 

1 Bland* Walter Hodge 4 

2 Cedar Springs* J. V. Hall 2 

3 Ceres* S. K. Byrd 2 

4 Cripple Creek* J. W. Helvey 4 

5 Chilhowie* C. E. Steele 2 

6 Coveton T. D. Strader 1 

7 Elk Creek* G. T. Jordon 2 

8 Grant* H. S. Johnston 1 

9 Independence* J. M. Paxton 3 

10 Marion* Frank Jackson 2 

11 Marion Circuit* J. A. Early 3 

12 Mechanicsburg* James H. Umberger. . (cl. 4 ).. 2 

13 Max Meadows* W. H. Troy 4 

14 Rural Retreat* J. A. H. Shuler 2 

15 Spring Valley* W. C. Crockett 4 

16 Sugar Grove S. T. M. McPherson 2 

17 Wytheville* J. W. Rader 1 

18 Wytheville Circuit* .J. R. King 2 

Temp. Work in Colleges. . Walton M Bunts . . . . (cl. 1 e) . . 1 

•Has a parsonage. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 61 

ABINGDON DISTRICT* — G. D. French, P. E 4 

1 Abingdon* S. B. Vaught 3 

G. A. Maiden, Sup'n'y. 

2 Abingdon Circuit* W, M. Patty 3 

3 Bristol — State Street* ... J. S. French 1 

W. H. Price, Sup'n'y 

4 Bristol — Mary Street* . . . , G. M. Moreland 2 

5 Bristol — Anderson Street* . T. R. Wolfe 4 

6 Bristol — Virginia Ave. . . . Lee M. Burriss (cl. 2 ) . . 1 

7 Bristol Circuit* J. W. Repass 1 

8 Blountville Circuit* J. E. Naff 1 

9 Bluff City Circuit* J. D. Dame 3 

10 Benham Circuit* G. S. Wood 1 

11 Damascus Circuit* L. D. Yost 4 

12 Emory Ct. and Chaplaincy. J. T. Frazier 1 

13 Glade Spring Circuit* .... J. L, Prater 1 

J. A. Lyons, Sup'n'y 

14 North Holston T. R. Handy 1 

15 Mountain City Circuit* . . . H. B. Vaught 2 

16 Rich Valley Circuit* . . . . E. W. Mort 3 

17 Saltville Circuit* C. K. Wingo 1 

Pres. E. and H. College. . .C. C. Weaver 

Treas. E. and H. College. .R. K. Sutherland 

Pres. Wartha Wash. Col. . . S. D. Long 

Pres. Sullins College W. S. Neighbors 

Vice.-P. Sullins College. . .L. L, H. Carlock 

Vice. -P. iM. W. College. . . .Eugene Blake 

Sec. Children's Home Soc. .B. F. Kahle 

Prof, in Sullins College . . . G. W. Summers 

Student to E. and H. CoL.Zenas B. Randal .... (cl. Id).. 
Student to E. and H. Col. . Sumpter H. Austin . . (cl. 2 d) . . 
Teacher in Konnarock H.S.Robert P. Carroll. . . . (cl. Id).. 

Conf. Missionary Sec J. W. Perry 

Conference Evangelist . . . R. T. McDowell 

BIG STONE GAP DISTRICT* — I. P. Martin, P. E 3 

1 Appalachia L. J. Williams 2 

2 Big Stone Gap* W. N. Wagner 3 

3 Blackwood W. H. Walker 1 

4 Clinchport* Enoch L. McConnell . (cl. 3 ) . . 1 

5 Clintwood* John W. Stewart .... (cl, 4 ) . . 1 

6 Coeburn* W. C. Thompson 1 

7 Cumberland Gap* W. M. Ellis 4 

8 Fort Blackmore* W. N. Baker, supply 

9 Gate City* D. S. Hearon 3 

10 Jonesville Circuit* E. N. Woodward 2 

11 Kingsport* A. B. Moore 2 

12 Mingo Mission To be supplied 

13 Nickelsville* Andrew M. Quails . . (cl. 3 ).. 3 

14 Norton* Hugh E. Kelso (cl. 4 ) . . 2 

15 Norton Mission Richard W. Watts . . (cl. 2 ) . • 1 

16 Pennington Gap* W. W. Hicks , 1 

17 Powell's Valley* James C. Cornett . . . (cl. 2 ).. 2 

18 St. Charles C. C, Brooks, supply 

19 Stickleyville* J. N. Smith 2 

20 Stonega To be supplied 

21 Tom's Creek Robert H. Ballard . . (cl. 2 ) . . 1 

*Has a parsonage. 



62 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

22 Wise* C. W. Dean . 

Student to Hiwassee Col. . . F. R. Snavely 



MORRISTOWN DISTRICT* — J. C. Orr, P. E 4 

1 Afton Glen C. Emmett (cl. 2 ) . . 2 

2 Bull's Gap* J. A. Ellison 1 

3 Elizabethton* Pat Horner, supply 

4 Erwin* R. A. Owen 2 

5 Fall Branch* N. F. Walker (cl. 3 e) . . 4 

6 Greeneville* M. J. Wysor 1 

7 Hawkins* Elmer W. Dean (cl. Id).. 1 

8 Jefferson City* J. R. Brown 1 

9 Johnson City* J. M. Crowe 1 

10 Johnson City Circuit W. I. Fogleman 4 

11 Jonesboro* Marion A. Stevenson (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

12 Limestone* J. C. Logan 1 

G. W. Simpson Sup'n'y 

13 Mooresburg* C. W. Williams, supply 

14 Morristown* R. iM. Standifer 3 

15 Morristown Circuit* W. E. Bailey 2 

16 Mosheim* W. E. Browning 1 

17 Newport* C. H. Varner 1 

18 Parrottsville* Roy E. Morrison (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

19 Rogersville* Samuel C. Beard . . . . (cl. 3 ) . . 3 

2 Rutledge P. P. Tabor, supply 

21 Surgoinsville* J. S. Henley 2 

22 Greeneville Orphanage . . . S. S. Kreger 

Conference Evangelist . . .T. P. Jimison (cl. 1 d) . . 

KNOXVILLE DISTRICT* — T. J. Eskridge, P. E 4 

1 Andersonville* William L. Dykes . . . (cl. 3 ) . . 2 

2 Coal Creek* Ernest M. Ritchie . . (cl. 3 ) . . 1 

3 Clinton* W. H. Briggs 3 

D. McCracken, Sup'n'y 

4 Harriman J. B. Ely 1 

5 Harriman Circuit* J. A. L. Perkins 1 

6 Habersham To be supplied 

7 Jacksboro* R. C. Camper 4 

8 Knoxville — Broad Street* . N. M. Watson 4 

9 Knoxville — Centenary* . . . C. W. Kelley , 1 

10 Knoxville — Ch. St.& Mis.* . G. R. Stuart 3 

Jas. H. Lotspeich . . . (cl. 2 ) . . 1 

11 Knoxville — East Park* . . . B. W. Lee 3 

12 Knoxville — Emerald Ave.. .Henry A. Carlton .... (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

13 Knoxville — Epworth* . . . . W. L. Sorrell 2 

14 Knoxville — Fount'n City* .French Wampler 3 

lo Knoxville — Lincoln Park. . K, C. Atkins 4 

16 Knoxville — Virginia Ave. . . Graydon K. Patty . . . (cl. 4 ).. 4 

17 Knoxville — Wash. Pike . . . C. H. Williams, supply 

18 Knoxville — W. Lonsdale. . W. T. Roby, supply 

19 Knoxville Circuit H. E. Bradshaw 3 

20 La Follette* Carlock Hawk (cl. 4 ).. 1 

J. H. Summit, Junior 1 

21 Luttrell C. R. Cline, supply 

22 Macedonia* S. L. Browning 1 

23 Rockwood* Harry S. Hutsell .... (cl. 4 ) . . 4 

24 Robertsville* Robert L. Evans .... (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

♦Has a parsonage. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 63 

25 Sevierville* J. A. Duvall 1 

26 Straw Plains* D. F. Wyrick 1 

27 Tazewell* Geo. W. Fox (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

Conference Evangelist . . . Bascom Waters (cl. 4 ).. 

Chaplain U. S. Navy . . . . J. B. Frazier 

St'd'nt Theo. Schl., Atlanta . Luther S. Reynolds . . (cl. 4 ) . . 

CLEVELAND DISTRICT* — E. A. Shugart, P. E 1 

1 Athens* G. L. Lambert 1 

2 Carlock Walter G. Porter .... (cl. 1 ) . . 1 

3 Cleveland* G. C. Rector 4 

4 Cleveland Circuit* J. E. Fogleman, supply ........ 

5 Charleston* Allen J. Thomas . . . . (cl. 3 ) . . 2 

6 Concord Rufus G. Reynolds . . (cl. 4 ) . • 4 

7 Ducktown To be supplied 

8 Etowah W. S. Hendricks 1 

9 Lenoir City* K. W. Cox 4 

G. W. Jackson, Sup'n'y 

10 Louisville S. A. McGhee 2 

11 Little River C. H. Logan, supply 

12 Madisonville* R. M. Walker 1 

13 Maryville* J. W. Browning 4 

14 Mt. Vernon* J. R. Hatfield, supply 

15 New Hope* W. L. Tate, supply 

16 Ooltewah* Charles G. McKay . . . (cl. 1 e) . . 2 

17 Philadelphia* J. H. Wagner 2 

18 Riceville S. P. Douglas 1 

19 Sweetwater* R. A. Kelly 2 

Pres. Centenary College . . Barney Thompson 

Assoc. Pres. Cent'n'ry Col. .D. Sullins 

Pres. Hiwassee College. . .J. E. Lowry 

CHATTANOOGA DISTRICT* — J. A. Burrow, P. E 3 

1 Aetna* J. A. Bilderback 1 

2 Chattanooga — Centenary* .J. W. Moore 2 

3 Chattanooga — Dod'n & M. . Joseph A. Henderson (cl. 3 ).. 3 

4 Chattanooga — East Lake . . C. A. Pangle 2 

5 Chattanooga — Highl'd Pk. . P. L. Cobb 4 

6 Chattanooga — King Mem. . R. K. Triplett! 1 

7 Chattanooga — N. Chatta. . J. L. Scott 1 

8 Chattanooga — Ridgedale . . S. S. Boyer 3 

9 Chattanooga — St. Elmo* . . S. S. Catron 3 

J. W. Smith, Sup'n'y. 

10 Chattanooga — Trinity* . . . T. S. Hamilton 3 

11 Chattanooga — Whites'e St. . L. M. Cartright 2 

12 Chattanooga — Rossville* .C. R. Jones 1 

13 Dayton* J. F. Barnett 1 

14 Decatur Circuit* J. M. Walker 2 

15 Dunlap*' W. D. Farmer 2 

16 Dayton Circuit To be supplied 

17 Evansville* F. M. Reynolds 1 

18 Hixson* George O. Ganoway. . (cl. 4 ) . . 1 

19 Jasper and Whitwell* . . . . W. R. Snider 1 

20 iMelvin Circuit G. M. Shelley, supply 

21 Pikeville* F. K. Suddeth, supply 

22 Rising Fawn* W. J. Cannon, supply 

23 South Pittsburg E. Roy Roach (cl. 2 ) . . 1 

♦Has a parsonage. 



64 H0L8T0N AlfNUAL 

24 Sequatchie* W. T. Evans 3 

25 Spring City Charles T. Gray .... (cl. 3 e) . . 1 

J. I. Cash, Sup'n'y 

26 Trenton* J. T. Booth, supply 

Missionary to Cuba S. A. Neblett 

Trav. Sec. S. V. Movem't. . C. G. Hounshell 

Student to E. &H. College, .Onnie C. Wright .... (cl. 3 ) . . 
Editor Midland Methodist . J. A. Burrow 

*Has a parsonage. 

TRANSFERRED. 

Grover T. Bond — To the Los Angeles Conference. 

H. B. Atkins — To the West Texas Conference. 

J. L. James — To the North Alabama Conference. 

M. G. Maiden — To the North Texas Conference. 

I. W. Keithley — To the Tennessee Conference, and 
stationed at Bon Air. 

D. H. Coman — To the Western North Carolina Con- 
ference. 

James A. Johnson — In the class of the first year, to 
the New Mexico Conference. 

CHANGES IN BOUNDARY LINES OP PASTORAL CHARGES. 

Bluefield District — Absorb Knox Creek and Thacker, and put 
Thacker and Vulcan to Matewan. Put Delorm and Freeburn with 
Glen Alum. Take English and Bradshaw from Berwind and put 
to laeger. 

Tazewell District — Take Davis Chapel from Cedar Bluff and put 
to Richlands. Absorb the Whitewood Mission, and add Whitewood 
to Richlands. Take Kinzer's Chapel from Tazewell and Burke's 
Garden and put to Rocky Gap. Take Pine Grove from Rocky Gap 
and put to the Bland Circuit, in the Wytheville District. 

Radford District — Take Glenwood from Draper Circuit and put 
to Lead Mines Circuit. Take Peak Creek and Newbern from the 
Dublin Circuit and put to Draper Circuit. Take Sylvatus from the 
Hillsville Circuit and put to the Draper Circuit. Take Painter's 
Chapel from Mercer Mission and put to Athens. Add Spanishburg, 
a new appointment, to Athens. Take Oak Chapel from Draper and 
add to Dublin. 

Wytheville District — Add Fairwood to Sugar Grove Mission. 
Take Bastian and Pine Grove from the Rocky Gap Circuit and put 
to the Bland Circuit. Add Summit to the Cedar Springs Circuit. 

Abingdon District — Glade Spring Circuit to be as follows: He- 
bron, Mahaneim, Glade Spring, Kelley's Chapel, Mt. Olivet and 
Washington Springs. Saltville Circuit and Mission as follows: Mc- 
Crady's Chapel, Cedar Branch, Madam Russell, Perryville, Quarry, 
Palmertown. North Holston Circuit as follows: Blackv/ells, Yellow 
Springs, Tumbling Creek, Hyter's Gap and Wesley's Chapel. Emory 
Circuit and Chaplaincy to Emory and Henry College: Emory, 
Meadow View, Antioch and Smith's Chapel. Mt. Olivet goes from 
Damascus to Glade Spring, and Laurel Bloomery from Mountain 
City to Damascus. Take from Virginia Avenue, Rosedale, Paper- 
ville and Sinking Springs and put to the Bristol Circuit. 

Big Stone Gap District — Make a Jonesville Circuit as follows: 
Jonesville, Pleasant Hill, Camp Ground, Hurricane, Merriam, Mil- 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 63 

lers and Bowling. Make a Powell's Valley Circuit as follows: 
Wesley's Chapel, Mt. Moriah, Kincaids, Steep Rock, Green Leaf, 
Speaks, Batners, McClures, Masonic Hall, Russells. This absorbs 
the Hubbard Springs Mission. Let Blackwood charge be com- 
posed of Blackwood, Pardee and Roaring Fork. Take Prospect 
from Gate City and put to Kingsport. Take Thomas from the 
Jonesville Circuit, in the Big Stone Gap District, and put to the 
Tazewell Circuit, in the Knoxville District. Establish a Mingo 
Mission. 

Morristown District — Take Glendale from the Surgoinsville Cir- 
cuit and put to the Rogersville Circuit; also put Campbell's School 
House in the Rogersville work. Absorb the Del Rio Mission in the 
Parrottsville Circuit. Put Watauga Point to Elizabethton, also Cen- 
tral and Watauga to Elizabethton, out of the Johnson City Circuit. 

Knoxville District — Make West Lonsdale a pastoral charge. 

Chattanooga District — Take Blevins Chapel out of the Decatur 
Circuit, in the Harriman District, and put to the Riceville Cir- 
cuit, in the Chattanooga District. Take Rocky Mt. from the Rice- 
ville Circuit and put to the Athens Station. Take Battle Creek 
from Jasper and put to South Pittsburg. Take Chestua from the 
Charleston Circuit and put to the Cleveland Circuit. 

Haridman Circuit — Add Whitewell to Jasper, and call it "Jasper 
and Whitwell." Change name of Stony Point Circuit to Melvin Cir- 
cuit, and add Wesley's Chapel from Pikeville. 



CONFERENCE REPORTS. 



A 

HOLSTON HISTORY. 

I have been as busy during the past year as my health would 
permit. I have been collecting material for a continuance of the 
history by the Historical Society, whenever it shall see cause to 
resume it. I have material enough, some assorted and some un- 
assorted, for a sixth volume, which would literally bring the history 
to the present date. By correspondence I have been manipulating 
the sale of the volumes already published and collecting accounts. 

During the year I have paid Smith & Lamar $500, leaving a 
balance in their favor of $1,399.60. Part of this balance is for 
503 copies of Vol. V. of Holston Methodism, a second edition issued 
during the year. To pay this balance we have accounts against 
preachers and others amounting to $616.67; also books in stock, 
1,331, which, if sold at jobbers' rates and paid for, would be worth 
$1,131.35. Our assets may, therefore, be put down at $1,748.02; 
balance in our favor, $349.42. But the figures against us are certain 
figures, and those in our favor are more or less uncertain. After 
frequent and urgent statements, I have collected on accounts dur- 
ing the year $202.45, leaving the balance due as stated above. 

I thought it best not to attempt to attend the District Confer- 
ences during the year, but I was represented at them by Dr. Perry 
and others, who procured a number of small orders only. The small- 
ness of these orders grew partly out of the fact that considerable 
shipments of both Vols. IV. and V. were made to the preachers last 
year, and they claimed that those had not all been disposed of. 
Yet the smallness of these orders is a discouraging omen. Does 
it mean that the preachers are tired of selling the books, and are 
determined to drop the enterprise? Since we have at considerable 
cost electrotyped the work, and since our people are by no means 
generally supplied, it is to be hoped that the question is to be an- 
swered in the negative. 

Of the five volumes there have been published 10,000 copies 
(in round numbers), or an average of 2,000 copies to the volume. 
In a membership of nearly 80,000, as reported at the last Confer- 
ence, 10,000 copies is only one copy to every eight members, or a 
full set to every forty members. This ratio is distressingly great. 
I am sure that this state of affairs ought to be remedied. It seems 
to me that measures should be taken to place a full set of the his- 
tories in every Methodist family as well as in many nonnMethodist 
families. This, I believe, would conduce to the popularity of Meth- 
odism and to the increase of the piety of its membership, not because 
of any skill, ability or piety in the author, but because of the rich- 
ness in incident of the material and the brilliance in talents and 
accomplishments together with the profound spirituality and joy- 
ful experience of many of the men and women sketched in the 
volumes. If a plan for the accomplishment of this desirable result 
can be suggested and adopted, I am willing to do my part in work- 
ing it. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 67 

There has been less complaining of my work as an author than 
I had expected or deserved; but many may have thought that the 
story of Holston should have been condensed into one or two vol- 
umes. But this could not have been done without the mere categor- 
ical mention of many excellent men and women, and the total ex- 
clusion of many important incidents. Descending in many cases to 
particulars has rendered the page more lifelike than would have 
been done by a dry schedule of names and events. Drs. McFerrin 
and Redford wrote the histories of the Tennessee and Kentucky 
Conferences, respectively. These histories embraced about the same 
period as the Holston history as far as they went, and each author 
wrote three volumes of about the same size as the Holston volumes. 
McFerrin's work came down to 1840, and Redford's to 1832. My 
work, comprehending five volumes, comes to 1897. Reckoning each 
history really to begin in 1783, McFerrin covers fifty-seven years 
and Redford forty-nine — nineteen years to the volume for Mc- 
Ferrin and sixteen and one-third to the volume for Redford. Reck- 
oning the Holston history to begin at the same time, it covers a 
period of 114 years, or nearly twenty-three years to the volume. 
So it will be seen that the Holston volumes have been decidedly 
more terse and economical of space than the Tennessee or Kentucky 
volumes. Besides, no such interest and importance attach to the 
introduction and perpetuation of Methodism in any other section 
of the Union as attach to its beginning and progress in Holston, 
Here it contended with impassable mountains and pathless wilds, 
grappled with savage beasts and more savage Indians to a degree 
experienced in no other section. Here it was more torn and rent 
by political divisions and animosities, lawless bushwhacking, robbing 
and killing, family and neighborhood feuds and estrangements, 
church disruptions and ecclesiastical plunderings during and after 
the Civil War than in any other section. 

If our history, because of its local and personal interest, has 
inspired or shall inspire the reading spirit where it was or is de- 
ficient, or if it has excluded to any extent the cheap and sensational 
trash of the popular novel, it will have accomplished enough good 
to justify all the outlay of literary work, mechanical labor, can- 
vassing activity and financial cost, that have been involved in its 
publication. 

John Wesley, that mighty seer, whose mental grasp took in the 
past with its lessons and the future with its possibilities, was fully 
alive to the power of the press. Hence he said "spread the books." 
He was himself a writer of books and tracts on a variety of topics; 
and during his life he took in as the result of the sale of his writ- 
ings $2 00,000. The press is more and more becoming the chief 
factor in molding the opinions and directing the actions of man- 
kind. If you will tell me what people read, I will tell you what 
they believe and what they are. If I had the power to put Roman 
Catholic literature exclusively into the hands of the American peo- 
ple for a hundred years, I would show you a nation solidly Catholic. 
If I could put infidel literature into the hands of the same people 
for a hundred years, or less time, I would show you a people solidly 
infidel with Christian churches converted into theaters, the Ten 
Commandments repealed, and the Christian Sabbath only a holiday. 

The Methodist Church in all its branches is perhaps the richest, 
most influential and most spiritual church in the nation; but it can 
only hold its lofty position by the diligent circulation of religious 
literature in the form of Methodist books and tracts, reviews, mag- 
azines and newspapers. Stop the Methodist press for a century 
and Methodism would be "numbered among the things that were 
before the flood" — a mere memory buried with the dead past. 



68 H0L8T0TSI ANNUAL 

And what more powerfully influences the opinions of men than 
history, which is only "philosophy teaching by examples"? 

In circulating the modest volumes of Holston Methodism, 
brethren, you are not simply putting a few shekels into the pockets 
of the author and the agents who manufacture and sell it, but you 
are aiding in perpetuating the primacy already attained by South- 
ern Methodism amid the lofty heights, beautiful hills and pic- 
turesque vales of this "Switzerland of America" from New River 
to Chattanooga and from the Kentucky line to the Blue Ridge, and 
in helping to preserve this primacy you are helping to promote the 
cause to which you were called by the head of the Church, namely, 
the rescue of the perishing and the edification of believers. No 
man can read a true and faithful Methodist history without be- 
coming a better and more useful man, more thoroughly rooted and 
grounded in the love of God and more sure of a crown and a harp 
at the right hand of God. 

The preachers who have bought and sold the volumes of Holston 
Methodism have not served God for naught. I have allowed them 
32 per cent, of the retail price, which, if they had handled the 
10,000 volumes, would amount to $4,000; but this compensation 
to agents is not worthy to be compared with the intellectual and 
spiritual good that the history is intended to do. But even finan- 
cially the work of selling the books will pay liberally; the reading 
of Methodist history will engender loyalty to the Church, increased 
attendance upon its ordinances, greater liberality in support of its 
Institutions and in the end more liberal pastoral salaries. 

I beg leave again to remind the brethren that this is a Confer- 
ence, not an individual, enterprise. As an individual enterprise it 
could not have been otherwise than a disastrous failure. Our field 
is too circumscribed, and even in the bounds of the Conference 
our constituency is too partial to allow of a large sale of the vol- 
umes of the history, whatever may be its merits, without great 
and general effort. If we had published it and depended upon sim- 
ply advertising it, it would have been stillborn. Everything de- 
pends on drumming. Indeed ministers of the gospel are nothing 
but drummers sent forth to drum men into the Kingdom. The 
preachers in their pastoral rounds must carry the books to the 
families and personally press them upon their consideration. You 
would do well so far as the written history is concerned to make the 
most of it; for it is not likely that it will be rewritten in the next 
hundred years. 

I have been gratified with the favor with which the preachers 
and people of the Holston Conference and elsewhere have received 
the volumes as they came from the press; all the comments which 
I have heard or heard of, and all the written or published notices 
which I have read have been eulogistic, except one discordant 
from a distance, which pronounces the fifth volume "a disap- 
pointment," averring that "the edge of my splendid genius is dulled 
by age and infirmity," and that I have not dealt justly with those 
with whom I came in collision in early life. I am glad to say that 
the universal verdict, with this single exception, is the contrary of 
this opinion. I plead guilty to the soft impeachment of writing 
kindly of those whom I have loved as intimated in the unfavorable 
criticism to which I refer; but my conscience is clear of having set 
down aught in malice toward those with whom I have come in col- 
lision in the past, or of treating them with intentional neglect. 
Bishop Waterhouse, in his introduction to the fifth volume, speaks 
of my "spirit of fairness;" Dr. Schuler, editor of the Midland Meth- 
odist, says that I have written "without giving my views, feelings 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 69 

and prejudices;" referring to tlie unfavorable comment mentioned 
above, Dr. John H. Brunner, now in heaven, wrote me: "I have 
not detected any unfairness or injustice in your treatment of the 
brethren." Bislaop Hoss, referring to the same unfavorable criti- 
cism, wrote me: "As far as the particular Vol. V. is concerned, I 
think I told you that I thought it to be the best and most inter- 
esting of the five. If it showed any slightest diminution of intellect- 
ual vigor on your part, I am utterly unable to see it." These are 
only a few notices among a considerable number of the same kind. 

There were some important omissions in Vol. V. that no one 
regrets more than I. A number of our best men were cut off from 
the Holston Conference in the setting off of the Western North 
Carolina Conference in 189 0, and most of these failed on that 
account to receive biographical mention in Vol. V. — men such as 
W. W. Bays, G. C. Rankin and James H. Weaver. When I dis- 
covered the omissions I would have made the amende honorable, 
but enough had been written to make a large volume and they 
were laid over for a future volume. 

A regret has been expressed that Vol. V. docs not contain a 
biographical notice of Bishop Hoss; but my plan, which I have 
departed from only occasionally, has been to reserve biographical 
notices till the location, the transfer to foreign missions or to other 
Conferences, or death of the men. My story of Holson ends in 1897, 
and Bishop Hoss was not promoted to the episcopacy till 1902. I 
have been collecting material relating to him, and would rejoice in 
the privilege of writing up this many-sided man, this Admirable 
Crichton of Southern Methodism — scholar, teacher, preacher, editor, 
bishop and loving, affable Christian gentleman. 

Pardon me for adding that through life I have courted poverty 
and won it; sought pardon and peace and found them. Amid 
much unfaithfulness and many backslidings, I have enjoyed many 
refreshings from the presence of the Lord, yea, many deep, joyful 
experiences, which the world knows not of; and through the aton- 
ing blood of the Lord Jesus Christ I hope by and by to join my 
brethren and friends that have gone before in a world of happi- 
ness, activity and progress. "Ye see how large a letter I have 
written unto you with mine own hand." 

R. N. PRICE. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

The Church at large has had faithful warning against the dan- 
ger of secularized institutions of learning and a godless education. 
The vital necessity of counter activity on the part of loyal church- 
men has been strenuously emphasized. Southern Methodism has 
just emerged from a mighty struggle for possession of Vanderbilt 
University; millions of dollars are in demand for Atlanta and Dal- 
las; the rights of the Church in our various colleges are the subject 
of rigorous investigation. In the sphere of "higher education" 
there is no lack of interest or of the activity of financial agencies 
in that behalf. 

But what of the elementary instruction in which all higher edu- 
cation is rooted? Plainly, the Protestant Church has surrendered 
that vast realm to state control. The Roman Catholic Church is 
still stubbornly contesting the claims of the state to the care of her 
children. The reason is clear and, from her viewpoint, entirely valid. 



70 HOLSTON A]^NUAL 

The activity of the state in perfecting its educational system and 
methods is in evidence from Maine to Texas and from Hatteras to 
the Golden Gate. Under this system the state assumes control of 
our children thirty hours of each week, and in many common- 
wealths attendance is compulsory, while the teaching of religion is 
strictly forbidden — even the reading of the Bible in the hearing 
of pupils being prohibited. 

Now here is a most significant fact strangely ignored; namely, 
that the only specific agency remaining under control of the Church 
for the systematic education of children and youth in morals and 
religion is the Sunday School. Granting all that may be legiti- 
mately claimed for the Epworth League — thwarted of its noble 
objective solely through lack of efficient local leadership and of 
the pulpit — which often disqualifies itself by its choice of obscure 
themes and university methods in the presentation of them, the 
fact remains that the vast majority of the young people of our day 
are dependent on the Sunday School for a religious education. 
When we consider the isolation of its units, the deficiency of its 
equipment, its unpaid, untrained officers and teachers, its voluntary 
and ofttimes desultory attendance, and then remember that its mar- 
velous achievements are the result of a weekly gathering of one 
hour — only half of this, or less, being devoted to instruction — we 
cannot escape the conviction that God is its founder and patron; 
that its title and trusteeship is clearly in the Church, and that with 
teachers by the hundreds of thousands and with many millions of 
students, the Sunday School as a power which makes for righteous- 
ness, is more indispensably necessary to the Church than its col- 
leges and universities. Let those who doubt or deny this state- 
ment put it to this extreme test: if the Church were forced to 
choose between closing its Sunday School or its colleges and uni- 
versities, which could it better afford to surrender? 

That the Kingdom of God cometh without observation, the 
growth of the Sunday School conclusively proves. For long it was 
accorded scant courtesy in ecclesiastical sanhedrims. An epoch was 
recorded in the acts of the General Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, in the year of our Lord 1914, when, for 
the first time, its Sunday School received recognition in anything 
like approximately adequate legislation. Up to that time its con- 
stituency of over a million and a half of souls masqueraded in 
our discipline under a little hotch-potch section of thirteen para- 
graphs. Contrast, in passing, the voluminous laws of the state 
in support of a school system, often characterized as "secular and 
godless." 

At last this greatest of all our Church schools is accorded a 
whole chapter in five sections and thirty orderly paragraphs — 
which, by the way, must be regarded as only a hopeful sign of bet- 
ter things to come. As an incitement to a careful study of this 
advanced legislation a brief resume is presented. 

In Section 1 we find the General Board increased from six to 
twenty-six members — its chairman a bishop — with provision for fur- 
ther additions. Thus the board becomes fairlj' representative of 
a great Church with powers enlarged and clearly defined. 

In Section 2 the Conference Board emerges from the primor- 
dial formless fog clothed with powers which suffice to cover its 
previous condition of extreme nakedness. Its orbit is assigned and 
erraticism of movement from centrifugal force carefully counter- 
balanced by centripetal checks. 

Section 3 provides for organization and management of the local 
school after a more thorough fashion than heretofore prevailing. 
Pastors who have been depending on the school to tide them over 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 71 

the assessment shoals will find some mighty interesting reading 
in this section. 

Section 6 contains six paragraphs, each opening v/ith these 
words, "It shall be the duty of the preacher in charge," and is of 
special significance for any who have generously conceded to the 
superintendent all of the responsibilities and part of the revenues. 
Reporting one, or more, school, or schools, "well attended and 
doing good work" will not hereafter be recognized as either ortho- 
dox in principle or safe in practice. 

Section 5 consists of three paragraphs, each beginning with this 
ominous language, "It shall be the duty of the presiding elder." 
This is something new under the sun. 

Enlargement of vision, of hope and of purpose is certified in the 
Report of the General Board to the Annual Conferences in which 
(1) a better adjustment of lesson helps, the issue of books treat- 
ing of religious education, the enlargement of existing periodicals 
and the launching of new ones is promised; (2) the progress and 
outlook of teacher training classes — 130,000 members — are indi- 
cated; (3) employment of field secretaries is provided for; (4) a 
ten-point revised standard of efficiency is announced. 

Our Conference statistics for 1913 gave our Sunday School en- 
rollment as 6,251 in excess of Church members. In this compar- 
ison only one Conference in all Southern Methodism — the West 
Virginia — excelled Holston. With a reported decrease of 2,123 in 
the school and an increase of 2,742 in the Church for 1914, the 
school membership is over 1,000 less than that of the Church. 
While rejoicing in this large addition to the Church — made possible 
by the unheralded service of its Sunday School workers — we must 
repudiate the idea that it is easier to get members into the Church 
than the school. By reasonable diligence we may soon regain the 
prominence to which our opportunities invitingly point. 

Since the functions of this board, as now constituted, cease by 
statute of limitation with the reading of this report, we do not pre- 
sume to anticipate, even by suggestion, the policy of our successors. 
But we venture to urge, as heretofore in various ways, the impor- 
tance of district organization which the General Board indorses 
"as furnishing the most effective means for reaching the rank and 
file of the Church." 

In conclusion, we express our heartfelt gratitude to all our 
brethren who have concurred with us in our sincere efforts for the 
advancement of the Kingdom of God through Sunday School 
agencies and our profound regret that much of our labor was lost 
because of the indifference of some to our most earnest and per- 
sistent appeals for help. We congratulate the incoming board on 
the greatly increased facilities afforded it through progressive leg- 
islation for the provision of its work, and bespeak for it such gen- 
erous co-operation as will assure to its labors the most abundant 
success. 

J. A. LYONS, Chairman. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand from last year $701.82 

J. A. Lyons, refund on expense account 1.15 

Children's day from schools 414.35 

R. P. Purse, Conference teller 252.29 

$1,369.61 



72 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

Disbursements, 
Paid Smith & Lamar, agents, for literature and 

supplies $103 . 58 

Rev. E. B. Chappell, Sunday School work in 

west 100.00 

Sundry incidental expense in administering the 

work of the board during the year 155. 16 

Fifty per cent, of collections to General Sunday 

School Board 333.36 

$692.10 



Balance on hand, Oct. 19, 1914 $677.51 

S. S. BOYER, Treasurer. 



CARE OP CONFERENCE FUNDS. 

Your committee appointed to submit a plan for handling the 
finances of the Holston Annual Conference, Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, recommends that the American Trust and Banking 
Company, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, be designated as the deposi- 
tory of all the benevolent and trust funds of the various boards of 
the Conference. All the money coming to the Conference, regardless 
of the board to whom it finally goes, shall be paid direct to the 
American Trust and Banking Company, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, 
as general treasurer. The present rule of the Conference is that 
all receipts should be paid to the teller. Now the said trust com- 
pany will act as teller in receiving the funds and be responsible 
for same. 

We recommend that in establishing the office of general treas- 
urer, all present treasurers of the several Conference boards and 
trustees of Conference funds are instructed to immediately turn 
over to the American Trust and Banking Company, Chattanooga, 
Tennessee, all moneys and securities in their hands, as soon as they 
have been thoroughly audited by a committee of three to be ap- 
pointed by the presiding bishop, which committee is authorized to 
secure such aid as may be needed in making the audits. Tlais 
committee is authorized to act as agents of the Holston Annual 
Conference in effecting the transfer of said funds and securities, 
and to make a report to the chairman of each board and the trustees 
of Conference funds. Any necessary expense incurred by said com- 
mittee in having an audit made shall be borne by the particular 
board involved. 

The American Trust and Banking Company will recommend in- 
vestments for any surplus or trust funds under the control of any 
of the several boards or trustees, such investments to be made by 
them only upon the written approval of the executive officers of 
the board or trustees to whom the fund belongs. Statements in 
detail of all investments made and securities held will be submitted 
to each session of the Holston Annual Conference or oftener If 
desired. 

When all collections are in at the close of the Conference year, 
and the general treasurer's books are closed at the Annual Confer- 
ence, each treasurer of the several hoards will be notified of the 
amount of funds to the credit of such board, which amount shall 
be subject to check, according to the rules prescribed by each board. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 73 

The treasurer of each board will be provided with a check book, 
the check itself being in such form that it will show plainly what 
it is issued for. 

A statement of each fund will be prepared for the Conference 
for its Mid-year and Annual Meetings. These statements shall show 
in a complete, comprehensive and detailed manner the financial 
affairs of the Conference and each district and charge and fund. 

The statement for the Annual Conference will be in such form 
that it may be printed in the "Annual," relieving the financial sec- 
retary of such work. 

Statements at frequent and regular intervals will be made to 
the Presiding Elder of each District, and, when requested, a state- 
ment will be sent to any pastor. 

Statements of any particular fund or board will be submitted 
to proper authorities at any time upon request. 

The trust company will have at the Annual Conference sufficient 
responsible clerical force to handle all necessary work. 

All the funds required to be remitted to anyone will be remitted 
promptly, as required by the Conference. 

The American Trust and Banking Company will perform all 
services noted above and any other reasonable services connected 
with same for the sum of $600 per year, payable quarterly, plus 
the cost of necessary stationery and postage. 

The expense to be divided as follows: 

Board of Church extension 12 i/^ per cent. 

Board of education 12% per cent. 

Joint board of finance 25 percent. 

Board of missions 50 per cent. 

J. W. PERRY, Chairman. 
T. J. ESKRIDGE, Secretary. 
J. B. WARD, 
R. P. PURSE, 
E. E. WILEY, 

Committee. 

The following amendment was adopted: 

Resolved, That a commission consisting of F. A. Carter, J. A. 
Burrow, W. G. M. Thomas, G. L. Hardwick and R. P. Purse be 
and are hereby appointed to complete all contracts and arrange- 
ments with the American Trust and Banking Company, provided 
they find after investigation that a satisfactory contract can be 
made, and are satisfied with the institution; but should they find 
that more satisfactory arrangements can be made with some other 
bank they are hereby given full power to make such arrangement 
and contract for the Holston Conference. 

ADVANTAGES OF A TRUST COMPANY. 

1. Its thorough responsibility. Undertaking the work for pay, 
it asks no indulgence. Every detail of the work must be punc- 
tually, thoroughly and systematically discharged. It expects to be 
held to strict account. 

2. Its thorough and prudent accounting. The church funds 
pass through bonded hands, under careful eyes. No looseness or 
carelessness. No delay in making payments and accounting. 

3. Its perpetuity. It does not die or fall sick in the middle of 
its work. When one of its officials is ill or dies, another trained 



74 H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

man is in liis place. There are no misplaced accounts or account 
books to be sought for at any time. All are safely kept in the 
company's Are and burglar-proof vaults. There is no trouble or 
annoyance in selecting some deceased officer's successor. The suc- 
cessor to every officer of a trust company is already selected and in 
training, waiting for advancement. Individual treasurers are often 
sick at Conference time. No one is familiar with their affairs. No 
one can properly report for them. The trust company will always 
have an experienced, capable man at Conference to report, suggest 
and advise concerning every detail of the finances. 

4. Its safety. Trust companies have ample capital and surplus 
to protect patrons from loss. They are frequently and rigidly 
audited by the state bank examiners. Their officers and employes 
are under heavy bonds. 

5. Its frequent and comprehensive reports. It expects to be 
asked about the church affairs often — figures the extra work this 
entails into its compensation and keeps its accounts so methodically 
that reports can be quickly made. 

6. Its co-ordination of Church accounts. You vv^ould not have 
to collect fragments of information from various treasurers. You 
could write to one office for all the information you want, and get 
it promptly — compiled so you would comprehend it at a glance. 

7. Its capacity to invest. Its loans of surplus funds, made upon 
a strictly business basis, safeguarded by its wide experience and 
knowledge of financial affairs, will be safe and sure. It will pro- 
duce money when it is needed again for Church purposes. 

8. Its conformity to rules. It does not expect rules bent or 
broken to suit its personal or private convenience. It will do what 
it is told to do and do it promptly. 

9. The fact that it is a business institution working for pay. 
Nobody will hesitate to ask for statements. Nobody will hesitate 
to ask for prompt, efficient work. Nobody will hesitate to criticise 
or ask for explanations. 



D 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Report No. 1. 

Your Board of Education begs leave to submit the following 
special report: 

Upon careful investigation of the title of Centenary College, lo- 
cated at Cleveland, Tennessee, we find that this institution is duly 
chartered under the general laws of the State of Tennessee and is 
secured to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, by a deed of 
transfer which, in our judgment, fully meets the disciplinary require- 
ments of the General Conference. 

This deed has been recorded in the register's office of Bradley 
county, Tennessee, in Deed Book "B," pp. 193, 194, 195. 

In view of the title and ownership of the Church in this prop- 
erty, we commend the institution to the patronage of our people 
and to their liberal support in the campaign now in progress to free 
it from a burden of debt. 

R. K. SUTHERLAND, Vice-President. 

E. E. WILEY, Secretary. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 75 

Report No. 2. 

The work of education within the bounds of the Holston Con- 
ference has been carefully looked into by your board, and v/e find 
it to be in a healthy, progressive state. All of our schools have 
opened under favorable conditions, giving promise of a prosperous 
and successful year. 

Hiwassee College, now under the management of Rev. J. E. 
Lowry, has the largest enrollment in many years. We recommend 
it to the General Board of Education for classification as a Junior 
College. 

Sullins College, under the management of President W. S. Neigh- 
bors, has a large enrollment and is enjoying an era of financial pros- 
perity and growth. 

Martha Washington College is now classified as an "A" grade 
college, and was never, perhaps, in a more prosperous and healthy 
condition than under the management of President S. D. Long. 

Emory and Henry College, standing at the head of our educa- 
tional work in Holston, is, we feel sure, about to enter upon an 
era of enlarged usefulness. The new administration building, val- 
ued at $65,000, has just been completed, and marks a great advance 
in material progress and equipment. Another building for use as 
an astronomical observatory and physical laboratory is in process 
of construction, and will be ready for use by January 1, 1915. 
This building will stand as a memorial to Creed Fulton, whose 
daughters, Mrs. M. P. Preston and Miss Sallie Fulton, have con- 
tributed largely to its erection. A central heating and electric light 
plant is being erected and will be ready for use in a few weeks. 

The future for Emory and Henry College is bright with hope. 
But in order to secure in full the promised contribution of $50,000 
from the General Educational Board of New York and the $25,000 
from Mr. Carnegie, it is vitally important that all notes and prom- 
ises now due, or maturing, should be paid in cash at the earliest 
date possible, certainly not later than the thirtieth day of June, 
1915. We urge all our preachers and laymen to note this fact and 
help the college to make these collections in full. 

The student body at Emory and Henry College at this time is 
large and full of enthusiasm. A goodly company of young men are 
there preparing for the ministry. It has been, and will be for many 
years to come, the place to which Holston must look for trained men 
for the ministry. In this connection we call attention to the fact 
that the General Board of Education has recommended the estab- 
lishment of a chair of religious education at Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, by the Board of Education, the Board of Missions and the 
Sunday School Board of this Conference. Your Board of Educa- 
tion recommends that, if possible, such a chair be established at 
the beginning of the session of 1915, or as soon thereafter as pos- 
sible. 

Complying with the requirements of the new discipline, E. E. 
Wiley was elected Conference Secretary of Education for the ensuing 
quadrennium. 

We recommend the confirmation of R. K. Sutherland as a 
trustee of Emory and Henry College. 

We recommend the confirmation of F. A. Carter as a trustee 
of Centenary College. 

We recommend the appointment of Rev. Luther S. Reynolds 
as a student in our new Theological School at Atlanta. 

We recommend the appointment of O. C. Wright, S. H. Austin 
and Z. V. Randall as students at Emory and Henry College; A. S. 
Thorn, principal of Montgomery State Normal; F. R. Suavely as 



76 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



a student in Hiwassee College; R. P. Carroll, principal of Konna- 
rock High School, and J. H. Montgomery, principal of Damascus 
High School. 

We call attention to the new education standard for admission 
on trial as set forth in paragraph 731 of the discipline. We recom- 
mend that all candidates for admission on trial, and all members 
of the various Conference classes, be required to meet the various 
examining committees on the day preceding the opening of the 
Annual Conference, prepared to stand a written examination. 

A committee consisting of Rev. J. W. Moore, Rev. E. E. Wiley, 
Mr. George L. Hardwick was appointed to confer with other like 
committees of the Carolina Conferences in regard to a theological 
institute at Lake Junaluska or elsewhere. 

The educational assessment for the year is $9,717, divided as 
follows: Bluefield District, $753; Tazewell District, $848; Radford 
District, $956; Wytheville District, $1,185; Abingdon District, 
$1,045; Big Stone Gap District, $765; Morristown District, $1,000; 
Knoxville District, $1,176; Chattanooga District, $1,326; Cleveland 
District, $663. Total, $9,717. 





Teach- 
ers 


Students 


Value 
Property 


Endow- 
ment 


Indebtedness 


Emory and Henry . . . 


13 
19 
19 
19 

8 


222 
195 
186 
184 
142 


$250,000 

200,000 

130,000 

150,000 

25.000 


$25,000 




Martha Washington. . 
Sullins 


$ 8,113.83 
17 000 00 


Centenary 


30,000.00 


Hiwasse 









E. E. WILEY, Secretary. 



R. K. SUTHERLAND, Chairman. 



Treasurer's Report. 

Districts. Ass'd. 

Bluefield $ 700.00 

Tazewell 798.00 

Radford 906.00 

Wytheville 1,135.00 

Big Stone Gap 715.00 

Abingdon 995.00 

Morristown 950.00 

Knoxville 1,285.00 

Chattanooga 1,285.00 

Harriman 445.00 

Total $9,214.00 

Total assessments $9,214.00 

Total receipts 

Remaining in treasury from last year 

Total 

Disbursements. 

Paid parent board $2,451.77 

Paid to Emory and Henry College 3,766.29 

For professorship Hiwassee College 850.00 

Remaining in bank for expenses of board. . 100.00 

Total 



Paid. 
$ 700.00 
506.00 
832.00 
736.00 
457.00 
857.00 
551.50 
1,096.00 
959.00 
318.83 

$7,017.77 



$7,017.77 
150.29 

$7,168.06 



$7,168.06 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 77 

Increase over last year's collections $ 751.04 

District paying 100 per cent, of assessment: Bluefield. 
Total amounts received after Conference, 1912-13 and 

paid to financial agent Emory and Henry College. ... $ 357.00 

J. L. MULLENS, Treasurer. 



MORAL AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. 

The first and paramount vi^ork of the Church of God is un- 
doubtedly the calling of sinners to repentance; but second to this, 
and of extreme importance, is the creation and conservation of the 
moral, social and economic conditions under which, and in which, 
converts may live and grow, and all the fruits of the gospel may 
be conserved. Next of importance to the birth of a lamb in a fold 
is its preservation from destructive agents and elements, and the 
furnishing of food and environment necessary to its growth and 
development. 

We put first in our list our most destructive and dangerous foe. 
Judged by the fruits, the manufacture, sale and use of alcoholic 
drinks furnish to the Church its greatest enemy. Alcoholic drink 
is the greatest enemy to the Church itself, in that it produces dis- 
sipation, fosters every variety of crime and immorality and paralyzes 
efforts to save mankind. It is the greatest enemy of the home, in 
that it creates the largest percentage of divorces, produces widow- 
hood and orphanage, strips the home of every comfort, robs it of 
every joy, and, worse than all, thrusts out into posterity an idiotic, 
feeble-minded, epileptic, blind and generally deficient offspring. It 
is the greatest enemy of the state, in that it corrupts the ballot, 
subsidizes the makers and executors of law, and creates a debauched 
and immoral citizenship, who are enemies to good government. It 
is the greatest enemy to business, in that it diverts money from 
legitimate businesses, destroys the man, who is the unit of labor, 
and is the mother of accident, disorder and general lack of efficiency 
in working classes wherever it touches. The calamitous crime of 
our civilization has been that this gigantic enemy has been legalized 
and for many long years actually aided by the government in its 
nefarious and destructive work. 

As past victories are stimulants to future battles, we call your 
attention, first, to the progress made. We bring you the good tid- 
ings that the nations of the world are awaking and are beginning 
to realize the power of this enemy. The actions of the commanders- 
in-chief of the great and horrible European war in prohibiting alco- 
holic drinks, on the ground of efficiency; the action of the generals 
in Mexico, making it a penalty of death for any man to furnish to 
a soldier drink, or for any soldier to be found intoxicated, on account 
of the demoralization and destruction of efficiency in the army; the 
recent action of Russia, Germany and other nations in the prohibi- 
tion and limitation of this great evil; the movement in almost every 
nation of the globe in the past decade, by which in official conduct 
and statement of governmental leaders, in discussions and decla- 
rations from conventions of bodies of highest medical, social and 
economic authority, and in the enactment of civil laws, by which 
alcoholic drink has been put under the ban as a common evil — all 



78 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

furnish unmistakable evidence of this awakening. The action in 
recent years of our own government, first, in the passage of the 
Webb-Kenyon bill over the president's veto; second, in the passage 
of the Jones-Works bill, reducing the saloons in the District of 
Columbia one-half, entirely prohibiting saloons in all residence dis- 
tricts, and prohibiting a saloon within 400 feet of any school or 
church; third, the measure insuring the continuance of prohibition 
of the canteen in national and state soldiers' homes; fourth, an 
appropriation for the enforcement of the anti-liquor laws in Alaska; 
fifth, a bill defeating the effort to reinstate the beer canteen in 
the army; sixth, an appropriation to pay the expenses of the dele- 
gates to represent the United States in the International Congress 
against alcoholism, appointed to be held in Milan, Italy, in Sep- 
tember, 1913; seventh, the elimination of wine from all official 
banquets by the Secretary of State; eighth, the recognition of the 
committee of one thousand citizens, recently gathered at the cap- 
ital for the purpose of requesting national legislation, and the set- 
ting apart in both houses hours for the consideration of the great 
question they represented. All these, and many other things, com- 
ing from the world and our own national capital, are significant 
of the fact that the traffic is reaching its final doom. 

To bring our victories nearer home, we call your attention, 
first, to recent elections in Virginia and West Virginia, by which 
these states gave such overwhelming and, to the enemy, unex- 
pected majorities — Virginia giving a majority of 30,000 and West 
Virginia 92,000; second, the recent local option elections in Ken- 
tucky, by which nine out of twelve counties in which elections were 
held were carried dry, leaving only fourteen counties in the state 
of 120 counties in which alcoholic liquors can be legally sold; third, 
to the splendid character of officials and official conduct, by which 
the prohibition laws in West Virginia have been so enforced as to 
create such marvelous changes in morals, prison life and industrial 
conditions as to make that state an actual demonstration by ex- 
ample to every state in the Union of the beneficial effects of state- 
wide prohibition; fourth, to the improved conditions in Tennessee, 
under which laws have been more efficiently enforced against the 
illegal sale of liquor in the hitherto rebellious cities of Memphis, 
Nashville, Chattanooga and Knoxville; fifth, the immense figures 
sent up from police stations, prisons and court records, showing 
throughout all the dry states of the South the wonderfully improved 
conditions in crime and its costs and results, making the whole 
South a shining example to the nation of the good influences of 
prohibition; sixth, to the planks in the platforms of both parties 
in the state, pledging to maintain our present state-wide law and 
to favor the enactment of such laws as are necessary to make 
them efficient; seventh, to victories in every state in the Union, by 
which prohibition territory has been enlarged and saloons elim- 
inated. All these things point with no uncertain finger to the 
speedy overthrow of this gigantic evil as a legalized enemy in our 
nation. 

We offer another message of good cheer in the recent enactment 
of laws prohibiting the sale of hurtful drugs, such as opium, 
absynthe, cocaine and morphine; the state law against cigarettes, 
and the advanced step of our own Church in its legislation on the 
general use of tobacco among its ministry; the laws of pure foods 
and pure medicines; the laws regulating labor, preserving our boys 
and girls from commercialism and opening up better facilities and 
opportunities for their education; the laws against the white slave 
trade and other specific vices, together with the general improved 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 79 

conditions of factories, work .shops, tenement houses and city 
slums, in which better conditions of life are offered to the laboring 
poor. All these things tell of the success of the Gospel of Jesus 
Christ and of the fruits of the labors of all those who are apostles 
of the doctrine, whose fundamental tenet is, "Love the Lord thy 
God with all thy mind, soul and strength, and thy neighbor as 
thyself." We urge that our preachers study the social and economic 
questions so that they may render intelligent and efficient aid, not 
only in proper legislation, but in general enlightenment of the 
people. 

With this message of cheer, we beg to call your attention further 
to future work and future dangers. First, to make efficient and 
successful the excellent laws now upon our statute books, it will be 
necessary for every Christian minister to advocate from his pulpit 
and every Christian citizen to urge the necessity of electing such 
men to our legislative and executive offices as will guarantee to us 
the maintenance and proper execution of our laws, and if neces- 
sary the enactment of such additional laws as will render our 
present laws efficient. 

We recommend most heartily that we continue our support to 
the Anti-Saloon League, as the non-sectarian and non-partisan agent 
which has so greatly aided us by organized effort in the work 
hitherto done, and we recommend that our preachers and laiety, 
especially in Virginia, give their financial support in aiding to reduce 
the debt recently incurred in the great moral fight in Virginia. 
We recommend that we continue our co-operation, as heretofore, 
with the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, and such other or- 
ganizations for benevolent and temperance work as have by their 
fruits shown themselves worthy. 

¥/e recommend most highly the work of our brother, J. D. 
McAlister, as superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of Virginia. 

We commend most heartily the work of the ministry of our 
Church, who fearlessly and unreservedly threw themselves into the 
fore front of the great battle in Virginia for state-wide prohibition. 

As alcoholic liquors have been prohibited in all our territory, 
we may expect other hurtful drugs, by sinful commercialism, to be 
offered as a substitute, and the many hurtful drinks and drugs now 
offered for sale to be offered more abundantly; we urge careful 
watchfulness and fearless denunciation of all these subterfuges. 

We call attention to the exciting to debauchery from music 
halls, realistic plays, certain kinds of moving picture shows, dance 
halls and the modern novel — which have recently taken on new 
and suggestive features. We urge that a strict censorship be de- 
manded of this new and marvelously powerful agent, the "picture 
show." 

As the Methodist Church has from its origin emphasized mod- 
esty of apparel, we call attention to the fact that the attire of our 
women has not, in the memory of men now living, been more 
immodest and suggestive than now. We call upon our preachers 
to sound a note of warning to parents. The morality of our race 
rests upon our women; no nation ever rises higher than its mothers 
in morality; the morality of woman rests upon the preservation of 
her modesty. 

Last, we beg to sound this note of v/arning. This is a period 
in America especially of reform movements and reform propa- 
gandists. Reform societies on all subjects are organized and being 
organized. Reformers, male and female, are peopling the rostrums 
of our country and seeking our pulpits for every species of propa- 
ganda; books, pamphlets and periodicals are being scattered. We 



80 HOLSTON Al^fNUAL 

urge that the liberality and enthusiasm peculiar to Methodists be 
not used to draw us into extreme positions and connect us with 
unwise and fanatical movements, which will impair our usefulness 
in wise and essential reform movements. We urge upon our 
preachers the necessity of careful study and intelligent investiga- 
tion before adopting and endorsing new reform movements. 

GEORGE R. STUART, Chairman. 
J. M. CROWE, Secretary. 



F 

LAY ACTIVITIES. 

Your Conference Leader in the Laymen's Missionary Movement 
begs permission to report in accordance with requirements of the 
General Conference held last May in Oklahoma City. Mr. B. F. 
Fritts, of Chattanooga, Tenn., has been elected Conference Lay 
Leader for the ensuing year. The following is a list of District 
Lay Leaders as elected at the last District Conference: 

District Lay Leader Post Office Address 

Bluefield . . 
Tazewell . . 
Radford . . . 
Wytheville . 
Abingdon 
Big Stone Gap 
Morristown 
Knoxville . . 
Chattanooga 
Harriman 



.J. R. Hucherson Bluefield, W. Va. 

. C. R. Brown Tazewell, Va. 

. Geo. B. Halstead Princeton, W. Va. 

. R. L. Dickenson Rural Home, Va. 

. J. L. Hardin Emory, Va. 

. C. Q. Countz Coeburn, Va. 

• P. M. Bewley Morristown, Tenn. 

. E. S. Lotspeich Knoxville, Tenn. 

.B. F. Fritts Chattanooga, Tenn. 

.L. N. Brown Whitwell, Tenn, 



Six of the above members are present at this Conference. 

I am pleased to report that the District Lay Leaders desire to 
work in harmony with the Presiding Elders, giving assistance 
wherever they can to the best interests of the Conference. There 
appears to be about 124 churches in the Conference which have 
active Missionary Committees; from this number thirty-odd have 
made an every-member canvass, and about 22 are using the duplex 
envelope, or that form of envelope, for raising benevolences. 

It is very gratifying to report that wherever the Church Lay 
Committees have been properly organized and the "Every-member 
canvass" taken, and the duplex envelope system used, it has proved 
successful. In many cases the success was beyond the expectation 
of those who put it into effect. This plan not only looks after 
the financial end of the Church, but also brings the officers in 
direct contact with the entire church membership, getting a true 
report of the spiritual welfare and condition of each member, 
which enables the pastor to more effectively do his pastoral work, 
know his congregation, and where his attention is needed most. 

Where the financial plans for Methodists have been put into 
effect, in a majority of cases we have only praise for its successful 
working. First, it nearly always raises the needed funds; second, 
it giv^es the laymen of the church something to do, bringing them 
in contact with the church, and develops them as church workers; 
but the greatest benefit received therefrom is the spiritual uplift, 



o 

Q 

.Eh 

<: 

CO 

o 




HOLSTON ANNUAL 81 

giving them a new vision and new knowledge of the work of our 
Lord. Therefore, we earnestly request that every minister in the 
Holston Conference take into his confidence the laymen of his 
charge, encourage them to assist him in the upbuilding of the 
church. It is the desire of this Board of Lay Activities during the 
coming year to thoroughly organize the laymen in church work 
throughout the entire Conference. 

W. W. HURT, 
Retiring Conference Leader. 

In answer to paragraph 52, question 51, who is elected Con- 
ference Lay Leader? — B. F. Fritts, Chattanooga, Tenn. 



G 

DISTRICT CONFERENCE RECORDS. 

Your Committee on District Conference Records submits the 
following report: 

Nine of the ten district Conference records were presented to 
the committee for examination. 

The Tazewell District record is incomplete in that the supple- 
ments are missing, and that the date does not appear at the top 
of each page. The recorded minutes, while good, show some errors 
in spelling, and carelessness in punctuation. 

The Bluefield record is in good form, but is deficient in arrange- 
ment and punctuation. The signatures of the president and 
secretary do not appear on the record. 

The Radford record is splendid in arrangement and good in 
composition and penmanship. 

The Wytheville record is exceptional for its legible and artistic 
penmanship, and its correct and attractive form. 

The Abingdon record is original, but ideal, in its system. How- 
ever, it shows minor errors in spelling, and a number of typo- 
graphical errors. The committee commends this excellent type- 
written, loose-leaf system, and suggests that other districts con- 
sider it with reference to its adoption. 

The neatness and correctness of the Big Stone Gap record is 
marred only by the slight omission of the date from the blank 
at the top of each page. 

With the exception of a few blots, the Morristown record is 
commendable for neatness and form. 

Typographical corrections greatly mar the appearance of the 
Knoxville record. The system used, the thin, typewritten page, 
pasted in scrapbook fashion, is far from ideal. It is preferable to 
have the minutes recorded upon the pages of the book, which can 
be done by the use of a book machine. 

The Harriman record is very good, but abbreviations are used 
in many places where it would have been better to have written 
in full. Some blots also detract from its appearance. 

Through an oversight, the Chattanooga record was not brought 
to the seat of the Conference, but upon the statement of Dr. 
Burrow, the Presiding Elder, it is in excellent condition. 

COMMITTEE. 



82 H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

H 

SABBATH OBSERVANCE. 

The legal world boasts of Roman law; but back of the Roman 
law is the iMosaic law, and in the very heart of the Mosaic law 
is the law of the Sabbath; and the law of the Sabbath is given 
almost as much space and emphasis as is devoted to all the other of 
the Ten Commandments. 

In these latter materialistic and entertainment days we fre- 
quently hear the Sabbath day referred to as ancient and out of 
date. If it is, the other nine are out of date; it is no longer wrong 
to steal and lie and kill; if one of the ten is obsolete, so are the 
other nine. 

We frequently hear people speak of our Lord's words, "The 
Sabbath was made for man, and not man for the Sabbath," as if 
such words were meant to annul the law of the Sabbath. The 
Master was striking at the Pharisaic idolatry of the Sabbath — that 
observance that was taking the very heart out of it; but the Master 
never meant that the Sabbath had no longer a place among the 
fundamental laws of life and morals. Water was made for man, 
and not man for water; but he had better be careful how he deals 
with it, or he will get drowned. Fire was made for man, and not 
man for fire; but he had better be careful in its use, or he will 
get burnt. 

As the Holy Sabbath is fundamental to all of our institutions, 
as attested by revelation and history, therefore your committee 
would urge: 

1. That the preachers preach Sabbath observance to all their 
congregations. 

2. That the Sunday schools teach it to all their classes. 

3. That parents bring it before their children. 

4. That while we are glad to welcome and encourage every 
organization looking to the preservation of the Sabbath, let us 
not forget that the Church of God is its best friend. 



A. B. HUNTER, Secretary. 



W. S. NEIGHBORS, Chairman. 



SPIRITUAL STATE OP THE CHURCH. 

From the reports made by the Presiding Elders of the several 
districts of the Conference we feel that there is cause for profound 
gratitude to God for His manifest presence in the Church during 
the year that has passed. Almost all of the charges in the Con- 
ference have been blessed with gracious revivals, some of which 
have been accompanied with great power, resulting in deep con- 
viction and salvation for many sinners. The backsliders have been 
reclaimed, the Church encouraged and strengthened. We are glad 
to note that many of these revivals have been conducted by the 
pastors. These reports show that there have been more than 12,500 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 83 

conversions, and about 8,000 accessions to the Church, Surely 
the Lord has been with His people. 

We believe these glorious results have come in answer to much 
prayer. But while we rejoice in the success of the past we should 
remember that there remains much to be done. The success of the 
past should give us clearer visions of the opportunities before us, 
and produce in us a spirit of deeper consecration, more earnest 
prayer, and a stronger faith in the Gospel of Christ as the power 
of God unto salvation. We should not forget the fact that, with 
these gracious results, there comes to us tremendous responsibilities. 
These new converts are only babes in Christ. They must be fed 
and cared for, and to whom can they look for instruction and help 
but to the Church? 

We are glad also to note that there are many homes in which 
there are family altars, but we believe that there should be in 
every Methodist home a daily religious service. God alone can 
tell what we have lost by by the neglect of this Christian privilege. 

We are not forgetful of the fact that there are strong tendencies 
to worldiness, and that the ways of vice and wickedness are open 
on every hand, so the preachers of the gospel of Christ should 
give no uncertain sound as to the dangers that confront us. We 
believe that one of the most effective powers to combat and stay 
the tide of worldliness is the home. 

Therefore, be it resolved. That we will go to our several fields 
of labor and do what we can to encourage and establish family 
altars in the homes of our people. 

W. H. TROY, Chairman. 



J 

CHURCH EXTENSION. 

We have completed thirty-two years of organized Church Ex- 
tension. The year closing with the session of the General 
Conference last May was the best in our history, and the last 
quadrennium was by far the best. Receipts for the past quadren- 
nium exceeded those of the previous quadrennium by $228,051.52 
on assessment, $54,317.33 on specials, and $78,602.59 on contri- 
butions to the Loan Fund. The outlook for the future usefulness 
of the Board of Church Extension was never brighter. 

The total Loan Fund capital of the General Board is now 
more than $560,000.00, and the goal has been set at $1,000,000.00. 
May this goal soon be attained! There are, in addition to this, 
42 Conference Loan Funds, with a capital of more than $60,000.00. 
Our own fund, the Sullins-Price-Richardson Loan Fund, has a 
capital of $2,776.35. It is our earnest desire to increase this fund 
as rapidly as possible. 

We would again call the attention of presiding elders and pastors 
to the fact that the General Office provides free literature, and 
would urge them to take advantage of this opportunity of inform- 
ing themselves concerning the workings of Church Extension. 

Receipts on assessment amount to more than $600.00 in excess 
of receipts for the previous year. 

The assessment levied by the General Board for the ensuing 



M H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

year amounts to $10,260.00. This amount is apportioned to the 
various districts as follows: 

Bluefield $ 920.00 Big Stone Gap $ 950.00 

Tazewell 950.00 Morristown 975.00 

Radford 950.00 Knoxville 1,470.00 

Wytheville 975.00 Cleveland 625.00 

Abingdon 975.00 Chattanooga 1,470.00 

Donations and loans have been made to fourteen churches and 
three parsonages as follows: 

Church and Charge District Donation Loan 

Mt. Ephraim — Wytheville. . . .Wytheville $150.00 $ 

Mill Creek — Grant Wytheville 100.00 

Glade Spring — Glade Spring. .Abingdon 200.00 

Virginia Avenue — Va. Ave. . . .Abingdon 250.00 

Clintwood — Clintwood Big Stone Gap. . . . 250.00 250.00 

Mt. Carmel — Cumberland Gap. Big Stone Gap. ... 75.00 

Bybee — Parrottsville Morristown 100.00 

White Pine — Morristown Ct. . .Morristown 100.00 200.00 

Radford — Radford .Radford 125.00 

East Radford — East Radford. . Radford 400.00 600.00 

Grundy — Grundy Tazewell 350.00 

Harmon Memorial — ^Matoaka. .Bluefield 250.00 

East Lake — East Lake Chattanooga 100.00 200.00 

LaFollette — LaFollette Harriman 250.00 

Parsonages. 

Matoaka — Matoaka Bluefield 150.00 

Cripple Creek — Cripple Creek. Wytheville 200.00 

Whitwell — Whitwell Harriman 50.00 



The donation to Cripple Creek parsonage and the donation and 
loan to Clintwood Church are conditional. 

S. B. VAUGHT, President. 
WALTER HODGE, Secretary. 

TREASURER'S REPORT, 1913-1914. 

E. F, Kahle, Treasurer, Church Extension Society Holston Con- 
ference, M. E. Church, South. 

Oct. 1, 1913, to balance on hand $ 635.00 

Oct. 7, 1913, to Amt. R. P. Purse, Teller 6,181.36 

Oct. 11, 1913, to Amt. Mrs. Mary Sparks, 

S. P. R. Loan Fund 1.00 

Dec. 10, 1913, to Amt. R. P. Purse, Teller... 233.00 — $7,050.79 

Credit. 

Oct. 7, 1913, by W. Hodge for postage $ 4.00 

Oct. 7, 1913, by R. P. Purse, Teller 2.00 

Oct. 8, 1913, by J. B. Ward for North Fork. . . 252.00 
Oct. 15, 1913, by W. F. McMurry, Gen. Secy., 

1912 3,090.68 

Oct. 15, 1913, by W. F. McMurry, Gen. Secy., 

S. P. R 325.00 

Oct. 29, 1913, by L. D. Yost, for Ch., Damascus 100.00 
Oct. 29, 1913, by W. D. Mitchell, Ch., Radford 275.00 
Nov. 4, 1913, by W. M. Patty, parsonage, Ab- 
ingdon 100,00 



HOL8TON ANNUAL m 

Nov. 4, 1913, by W. F. McMurry, Gen. Secty. 

S. P. R $726.00 

Nov. 12, 1913, by C. H. Varner, Ch., LaFollette 250.00 

Nov. 12, 1913, by W. Hodge, Secretary 1.50 

Nov. 12, 1913, by J. A. Earley, Ch., Greenwood 100.00 

Nov. 12, 1913, by R. G. Reynolds, for Ch., Zion 50.00 

Nov. 21, 1913, by Jno. M. Skeen, Ch., Clintw'd 250.00 
Dec. 2, 1913, by J. M. Stewart, parsonage, 

Jamestown 75.00 

Dec. 2, 1913, by J. F. Ledford, Ch., Whiteside 50.00 

Dec. 10, 1913, by H. B. Atkins, Ch. Ritchies Chi 100.00 

Dec. 18, 1913, by R. H. Ballard, Ch. Crossville. 50.00 

Dec. 19, 1913, by C. R. Jones, Par., Whitwell. . 75.00 
Dec. 19, 1913, by W. F. McMurry, Secy,, half 

of $233.00 116.50 

Dec. 29, 1913, W. B. Belchee, Interest, Eckman 40.00 

Jan. 7, 1914, by J. E. Fogleman, Par., Clevel'd 50.00 

Jan. 7, 1914, by J. L. Mullins, Ch., St. Paul. . 100.00 

Jan. 7, 1914, by W. E. Browning, Ch., Bybee. . 100.00 

Jan. 20, 1914, by J. I. Cash, Par., Spring City. 75.00 

Jan. 31, 1914, by D. P. Hurley, Ch., Mt. H'mon 75.00 
Jan. 31, 1914, by H, C. Stowers, Ch., Green 

Valley 50.00 

Jan. 31, 1914, by W. Hodge, secretary 3.50 

March, 1914, by midyear meeting — 

S. B. Vaught $ .80 

E. F. Kahle 50 

E. F. Kahle, dinner for six 1.50 

W. Hodge 10.70 — 13.50 

April 1, 1914, by telegram to W. F. McMurry 

about Eckman Church .86 

Aug. 4, 1914, by J, B. Ward, Ch., Matewan. . 100.00 

Oct. 1, 1914, by postage. Treasurer 1.00 — $6,601.54 

Oct. 16, 1914, by W. Hodge, Secretary 4.60 

Oct. 16, 1914, by Zion Church, Ceres Ct 75.00 



$6,681.14 



On hand $ 369.65 

Amt. in Treasurer's hands 2,364.70 



K 

JOINT BOARD OF FINANCE. 

The Joint Board of Finance has eighty-two names on its roll. 
Mrs. W. M. Dyer, Mrs. A. J. Frazier, Mrs. J. R. Stradley, Mrs. 
E. E. Wiley, Mrs. R. A. Giddens, M. L. Clendenen, R. N. Price, 
J. M. Wolfe, J. E. Bruce and J. C. Maness belong to the honorary 
roll and receive no money. 

The following beneficiaries receive the amount opposite their 
names: 

D. Sullins $100.00 Duncan Walker $ 75.00 

J. S. W. Neel 250.00 James Swecker 50.00 

H. C. Clemens 150.00 D. H. Carr 250.00 

W. C. Hicks 100.00 W. C. Garden 200.00 



86 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



Mrs. G. B. Draper . . . .$150.00 

Mrs. Frank Richardson 50.00 

Mrs. W. B. Pickens . . . 50.00 

Mrs. E. B. Robertson, 160.00 

Mrs. J. W. Robertson. 160.00 

Mrs, J. F. Walker . . . 125.00 

Mrs. H. P. Waughn , . . 100.00 

Mrs. S. S. Weatherly, . 175.00 

Mrs. S. R. Wheeler . . . 75.00 

Mrs. A. E. Woodward. 100.00 

Mrs. J. D. Hickson . . . 125.00 

Mrs. J. E. Swecker . . . 85.00 

Miss Ollie Swecker ... 100.00 

Miss Susue Chambers. 100.00 

Henderson children . . 50.00 

Mrs. W. L. Jones .... 50.00 

Mrs. J. H. Keith 100.00 

Mrs. R. W. Kite 150.00 

H. S. Hamilton 100.00 

Mrs. R, E. Smith 150.00 

Mrs. M. J. Butcher . . . 50.00 

J. W. Games 50.00 

L. M. Neel 175.00 

Mrs. P. S. Sutton 100.00 

Mrs. J. B. Games .... 150.00 

G. S. Wagner 250.00 

J. G. Bays 125.00 

J. M. Romans 50.00 

Mrs. R. A. Hutsell . . . 175.00 

B. F. Nuckolls 50.00 

Mrs. J. O. Straley .... 250.00 

Mrs. G. K. Miller 75.00 



The board recommends the following assesments: Gonference 
Historian, R. N. Price, $1,200.00; Superannuate endowment fund, 
$1,000.00; Gonference claimants, $14,000.00; Superintendent of the 
Greeneville Industrial Home and School, $900.00. 

With reference to the paper referred to us, recommending that 
the Joint Board of Finance double the assessment on the Gonfer- 
ence for our Gonference claimants, we beg to submit that, while 
in hearty sympathy with any movement set on foot to alleviate the 
needs of the claimants on this board, we feel that it will be wiser, 
and perhaps productive of better results, to take a middle course, 
and have made an increase in assessment of $4,500.00, making our 
present assessment $14,000.00, instead of $9,500.00, which was the 
assesment last year; and in view of this conclusion, therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That, as a Gonference, we require the preachers to 
make exactly the same earnest effort to secure the amounts appor- 
tioned to their charges that they use to secure any other benevolent 
collection ordered by the Annual Gonference, and that they do not 
discriminate against this fund by giving any collection precedence 
over it, and we earnestly urge all pastors to give the people in 
the public congregations a chance to contribute to this cause. 



Mrs. W. W. Pyott . . . . 


$100.00 


Mrs. E. W. Moore . . . . 


150.D0 


Mrs. W. E. Muncey. . . 


100.00 


E. H. Bogle 


225.00 


G. T. Garroll 


175.00 


Mrs. J. A. Darr 


125.00 


L. C. Delashmit 


125.00 


Mrs. J. P. Dickey . . . . 


100.00 


Frank Alexander . . . . 


100.00 


W. R. Barnett 


150.00 


M. P. Swaim 


140.00 


R. S. Umberger 


200.00 


Mrs. W. G. Faris 


150.00 


Avers Kincaid 


75.00 


Mrs. W. H. Bates . . . . 


100.00 


Mrs. J. R. Bellamy . . . 


125.00 


Mrs. W. M. Bellamy . . 


150.00 


Mrs. E. S. Bettis 


100.00 


Mrs. J. R. Gunningham 


100.00 


Mrs. W. H. Dawn . . . . 


75.00 


Mrs. W. P. Doane . . . . 


125.00 


J. H. Parrott 


100.00 


Mrs. F. M. Grace 


125.00 


Mrs. J. H. Hash 


150.00 


Mrs. R. F. Jackson . . . 


100.00 


Mrs. John Woolsey . . . 


140.00 


L. K. Haynes 


125.00 


J. N. Hobbs 


50.00 


G. iM. James 


75.00 


J. M. Maiden 


100.00 


W. D. Mitchell 


200.00 


Jacob Smith 


150.00 


A. D. Stewart 


100.00 



G. E. STEELE, Secretary. 



W. W. HIGKS, Ghairman. 



The Ghaffin Emory Fund of last year, on account of the lateness 
of the hour at which it was paid, Emory paying off the full amount, 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



■m 



we failed to get it in our report, but the amount was appropriated 
with the rest of our fund. Half of the interest of the Watson fund 
failed to reach us until after Conference last year, and part of 
which was our only emergency fund. 
We have paid out the following: 

R, P. Purse, Teller, expense $ 15.00 

J. A. Bilderback, balance appropriation 50.00 

Mrs. R. E. Smith. 10.00 

H. C. Clements 10.00 

Holston History, R. N. Price 830.00 

Bishop's Fund, Smith and Lamar 2,543.80 

General Conference Expense Fund 5.00 

Superannuate Endowment Fund to J. R. Stewart 821.46 

Conference Claimants 8,935.00 

Emergency fund on hand $650 

J. WESLEY SMITH. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Received. 

From John R. Stewart on Sup. En. Fund $ 330.00 

From the Wall fund 285.00 

From Lizzie Watson fund 303.00 

From L. L. H. Carlock on Taylor fund. 46.90 

From L. L. H. Carlock on Chafin-Emory fund 78.50 

From E. C. Reeves on iMcAnally fund 36.00 

From Smith & Lamar on Calvin fund 24.00 

From Publishing House fund 536.00 

From R. P. Purse for Holston History 830.95 

From R. P. Purse for Bishop's fund 2,543.80 

From R. P. Purse for Conference Claimants 8,078.74 

From R. P. Purse for Gen. Conf. Ex 5.00 

From R. P. Purse for Sup. En. fund 821.46 

From Sunday collection 34.62 



ASSESSMENTS FOR 1914-1915. 





II 

o 

W 


-2 

<B a 

ga 

a 




Ad 

O 3 
5 


<s 

03 

a 
o 


Bluefield 


$ 92 
104 
126 
126 
120 
120 
120 
157 
77 
157 


$1,055 
1,260 
1,330 
1,460 
1,443 
1,443 
1,443 
1,820 
914 
1,822 


$ 75 
85 
105 
105 
100 
105 
100 
130 
65 
130 


$228 
275 
323 
323 
365 
323 
306 
374 
187 
374 


$ 68 


Tazewell 


77 


Radford 


95 


Wytheville 


95 


Big Stone Gap 


90 


Abingdon 


90 


Morristown 


90 


Knoxville 


117 


Cleveland 


58 


Chattanooga 


117 







J. WESLEY SMITH, Treasurer. 



88 



EOL8T0N ANNUAL 



BOARD OF MISSIONS. 
No. 1 — Evangelism. 

The work of the Committee on Evangelism has not been greatly 
different this year from other years. As in the past, we have sought 
in every possible way to stress the importance of saving men, and 
to emphasize the Scriptural means — prayer, the preached Word, 
dependence upon the Holy Spirit. Through the Presiding Elders 
and the Secretary of Missions this work was stressed in all the 
District Institutes. We have strongly urged the reading of Pas- 
toral and Personal Evangelism, by Goodell, Finney's Autobiography, 
and Wesley's Journal. Quite a number of the preachers have 
bought and read these books, and in almost every case these men 
have shown great zeal and usefulness during the year. Many re- 
markable meetings have been held. The Conference Evangelists 
have been active and successful, but the larger number of meetings 
have of necessity been held by the pastors themselves. The results 
throughout the Conference are indicated below: 





a 
o 
o 


2| 


a 
'3 
O 

e 




«1 

a>» o 


Family Altars 


Bluefield 

Radford 

Tazewell 

Wytheville 

Big Stone Cap . . . 

Abingdon 

Morristown 

Knoxville 

Chattanooga . . . 
Harriman 


1,300 
1,400 
1,000 
1,200 
1,300 
1,443 
1,347 
2,000 
600 
1,200 


1,096 

1,006 

426 

644 

619 

1,083 

644 

1,189 

1,117 

413 


371 
819 
241 
165 
309 
1,029 
221 
600 
391 
* 


76 
40 
32 
60 
59 
42 
50 
46 
50 
60 


178 weeks 
80 weeks 
56 weeks 
98 weeks 
68 weeks 
68 weeks 
84 weeks 
96 weeks 
88 weeks 
78 weeks 


more than 226 
230 
79 
166 
130 
129 
160 
200 
150 
66 


Totals 


12,790 


8,237 


4,105 


515 


894 weeks 


1,536 



* Harriman District, decrease of 51. 

These results fill our hearts with joy. To God be all the praise! 
The revival in Holston is not a mere temporary spasm of zeal, 
but a steady growth in evangelical fervor and New Testament evan- 
gelism. 

Your committee would strike one single note, that note. Evan- 
gelism the one work of the Church. The Church like Martha is 
sometimes in danger of being cumbered with much serving, whereas 
but one thing is needful. If with holy singleness of purpose she 
pursues this, all else will follow. Evangelism, and Pastoral Evan- 
gelism especially. Why do we say this? To discriminate against 
the evangelist, or to disparage his work? Nay, God knoweth. But 
because there are so many more pastors than evangelists, because 
the evangelist can never do what the great army of pastors ought 
to do, and because we would In every possible way combat the 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 89 

idea that there can be any true ministry of Jesus Christ that is 
not intensely and whole-heartedly evangelistic. Our motto from 
the beginning has been, "Every pastor an Evangelist." 

If we make any great progress in swinging our Methodism back 
into line as a great evangelistic force, it is our earnest conviction 
that a new standard of efficiency needs to be set up in the Church. 
No man should be hailed as a successful preacher who does not 
succeed in securing the salvation of souls. This is the end of all 
preaching, and the only indisputable evidence of a Divine call. It 
should be the business of church editors, bishops, connectional 
boards and church leaders, generally, to keep this standard in 
sight, and let all Methodist preachers understand that by it they 
are going to be measured. 

And this standard of efficiency ought to apply to the Church 
as well as the ministry. There is such a thing as an efficient 
Church, and if the New Testament is taken as our guide, thero 
can be no doubt as to what constitutes an efficient Church. It 
must be a church that loves men, and in which souls are saved. 
Is this unreasonable? Think of a factory running full time, blow- 
ing its whistle morning, noon and night, meeting a full pay-roll 
every week, and yet turning out no products. But think of a 
great Church, running full time the year round with officers and 
members and an expense budget running up into thousands of 
dollars, and yet adding no souls to the Lord's Kingdom. The 
whole organization of the Church should be with this high end in 
view, and all other things subordinated to it. The evangelistic 
motive should enter into all of our work and dominate it. Paul 
said, "The love of Christ constraineth us." No less motive should 
lead us in all we do. Securing the collections is a very important 
thing. We believe in securing the collections, and much larger 
than we have ever secured, but it should be from genuine love of 
souls and not to get an honor mark at Conference. It should be 
in the spirit of Christ and not in the spirit of a contest. It should 
be love of Christ, and not fear of the bishop or the board. Souls, 
instead of success, should be the goal. 

If this sufficient emphasis is to be placed upon evangelism, 
administrators and leaders in the Church must consistently and 
constantly put it forward. It must be clearly seen that winning 
souls is the highest success possible. It deserves highest commenda- 
tion, and should have it. No other success should be allowed to 
excuse or cover up failure here. Annual Conference sessions should 
be so planned and conducted that the salvation of souls will be kept 
in the forefront; the salvation of souls should occasion the highest 
joy there; and every preacher should go away deeply impressed that 
If he would please the Church, the bishop and his Divine Lord, he 
must save souls. 

Deeply impressed with the necessity for stirring the revival fires 
in the Church everywhere, we call attention to the recommendations 
and legislation bearing upon this subject by the last General Con- 
ference, and offer the following for adoption as the sense of this 
Conference. 

Resolved, That we as a Conference heartily accept and endorse 
the recommendations of the General Conference calling us as a 
Church to a more intense evangelism, and that we urge upon the 
Department of Home Missions of the General Board of Missions 
an early announcement of plans for carrying out the will of the 
General Conference for promoting revival work throughout the 
Church. 

J. A. BAYLOR, Secretary. 



90 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

No. 2. 

After prayerful consideration of the matter we present for your 
approval the following recommendations: 

1. That we conduct an every-member canvass for contributions 
to all our benevolent causes in every church within our Confer- 
ence during the week of January 9-15, 1915. Provided that any 
Church may conduct such a canvass earlier, and we trust that 
very many will do so, all such joining in during this week by 
making a supplementary canvass and reporting the results of both 
in the totals. 

2. That each pastor and lay leader report immediately at the 
close of the week to the Presiding Elder and District Lay Leader 
for his District, giving the total number of subscribers, and the to- 
tal amount pledged in each Church. The work will be most suc- 
cessful in that charge which secures subscribers equal in number, or 
most nearly so, to the membership, and that District will be the 
banner District which secures the largest number of subscribers 
or contributors in proportion to the number of members. The 
Presiding Elders and District Leaders will in turn report to the 
Conference Missionary Secretary and Conference Leader, who shall 
publish the results. 

3. That a preliminary campaign of preparation be made. The 
Conference Missionary Secretary shall prepare a special edition of 
the Conference Organ, giving emphasis to the importance of the 
work and publicity to the plans and aims. The Secretary and 
Conference Leader are further requested to prepare a short ad- 
dress to all Charge and Church Leaders, giving some detail of 
plans to be distributed by the District Leader in each District. 

4. That an institute be held in each District in the Conference 
for Pastors and Lay Leaders, and that the District Lay Leaders 
are urged to co-operate with the Presiding Elders in making ar- 
rangements for these meetings and in securing the attendance of 
the laymen. If agreeable to the Presiding Elders, we suggest the 
following dates for these Institutes: 

Bluefield, Nov. 16, 17. Tazewell, Nov. 19, 29. 

Radford, Nov. 23, 24. Wytheville, Nov. 26, 27. 

Abingdon, Nov. 30, Dec. 1. Big Stone Gap, Dec. 3, 4. 

Morristown, Dec. 7, 8. Knoxville, Dec. 10, 11. 

Chattanooga, Dec. 14, 15. Cleveland, Dec. 17, 18. 

5. That all our people be urged to consider the advantages of 
using the duplex envelope, the simplest and most convenient device 
yet invented to aid our people in making their offerings. 

6. That every pastor preach at least one sermon on missions 
or Christian stewardship before the canvass begins, and that the 
whole church be urged to pray for the work and workers. 

7. That in the District Institutes emphasis be given to the work 
of Laymen in Evangelism and in Social Service. 

8. That at some season during the year, preferably the season 
closing with Easter, a period be observed as a time of special self- 
denial and prayer, and that the people be given opportunity to 
make a self-denial offering to be forwarded as a free will offering 
from the charge sending it to be used for Home and Conference 
and Foreign Missions. 

9. That in fixing our goal, wherever it is possible we leave 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 91 

the offering of the Sunday School to be a surplus, an offering of 
love for the King. 

J, M. CARTER, Chairman. 
P. L. COBB, Secretary. 

No. 3. 

Another quadrennium closes with this Conference. It has 
marked the beginning of a new day in our efforts to evangelize 
the world. A notable advance has been made, the most marked, 
possibly, in the history of the board. Two facts are conspicuous: 
First, the work of our Conference Missionary Secretary; second, 
the enlistment of the laymen, through the lay leaders, in an organ- 
ized campaign that promises at last to enlist the entire membership 
of the Church. A new day has dawned with the recent legislation 
of the General Conference for the Layman's Missionary Movement. 

The General Board reports an advance in special contributions 
and lays emphasis on what our Conference has always urged, the 
payment in full of all assessments for missions. At this point we 
want to give credit to the splendid leadership of our presiding 
elders and their hearty and efficient co-operation in all the efforts 
of the board. Following this leadership, the preachers and laymen 
have, in the face of a great financial stringency, increased the total 
payments to missions nearly four thousand dollars. 

Untiring efforts at evangelism, which have placed us among the 
leading Conferences in our yearly increase of membership, has 
shown marked results in every department of our Church life. 
The employment of Ward and York in a former quadrennium fol- 
lowed by the Conference-wide campaign, launched four years ago 
with our efficient secretary of evangelism, Brother Baylor, aided by 
our Conference evangelists and the pastor evangelists, has made 
our Conference known as a leader in the Church-wide revival inau- 
gurated by the Church fathers four years ago, and emphasized at 
our recent General Conference. 

We are grateful to God for the best report made in any year 
since the Italian Mission was enterprised. Brother Cameron, in 
co-operation with the Nurse and Deaconess, placed in the coal 
field by the Woman's Missionary Society of the Conference, has 
the hearty indorsement of the District Conference in which he 
labors, and the enthusiastic support of his Presiding Elder. Forty 
professions of conversion among a foreign people in one year give 
us great comfort as to the future of the Mission. 

During the year we have lost by resignation the services of 
that untiring promoter of Christian education. Rev. Eugene Blake, 
who for so many years has wrought successfully as the president of 
Hiwasse College. In his stead we elected Rev. J. E. Lowry, who 
reports the largest enrollment in the history of the college. 

We call attention here to the simultaneous canvass already pre- 
sented to the Conference and urge every charge to take advantage 
of it. 

The first Sunday in each month is recommended for Missionary 
Day in the Sunday School, on which a suitable program should be 
carried out. 

The following apportionments have been made to the districts 
of the Conference: 

Home and Conf . Foreign 

Radford $ 2,224 $ 1,750 

Bluefield 1,868 1,412 

Tazewell 1,947 1,532 



92 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



Wytheville 

Abingdon 

Morristown 

Big Stone Gap 

Knoxville 

Chattanooga 

Cleveland 

Total $21,900 



Home and Conf . 


Foreign 


$ 2,618 


$ 2,033 


2,295 


1,803 


2,177 


1,640 


1,739 


1,365 


2,563 


2,006 


2,921 


2,329 


1,548 


1,230 



$17,100 



We nominate for election the following Committee on Evangel- 
ism: Rev. P. L. Cobb, Rev. S. B. Vaught, Rev. J. M. Carter. 

We recommend for appointment by the bishop: Rev. J. A. 
Baylor, Secretary of Evangelism; Rev. J. W. Perry, Conference 
Missionary Secretary; Rev. Bascom Waters, Rev. E. L. Edington, 
Rev. R. T. McDowell, Rev. T. P. Jimison, Conference Evangelists; 
Rev. I. T. Cameron, Missionary to the Italians; Rev. J. E. Lowry, 
President Hiwassee College; Rev. C. G. Hounshell, Traveling Sec- 
retary, S. V. M. 

The assessment from the General Board for Home Missions is 
$5,472 and for Foreign $17,100. The assessments for Conference 
Missions is placed at $16,428. During the past year the board has 
had the care of seventy-two mission charges. For the coming year 
we have made appropriations to sixty-nine missions as follows: 



Aetna $100 

Afton 125 

Appalachia 100 

Berwind 100 

Belfast 100 

Blue Ridge 100 

Clintwood 200 

Coveton 200 

Coalwood and Premier. . 100 

Chattaroy 100 

Church St. Mission.... 300 

Concord 750 

Carlock 150 

Coal Creek 150 

Ducktown 100 

Dodson Ave. and MainSt. 300 

Draper 100 

Dunlap 100 

Elizabethton 100 

Etowah 150 

Emerald Ave 100 

East Lake 100 

East Princeton 300 

East River 125 

Ft. Blackmore 100 

Fall Branch 100 

Fries 250 

Floyd 100 

Grundy 300 

Glen Alum 100 

Hillsville 150 

Hylton 100 

Honaker 150 



Hixon $150 

Harriman Ct 150 

leager 150 

Jonesboro 200 

Johnson City Ct 100 

Knoxville Ct 100 

Kimball Ct 300 

Lincoln Park 100 

Little River 100 

Luttrell 50 

La Follette 150 

Mullens 100 

Mt. Vernon 100 

Mountain City 200 

Mercer 200 

Norton Mission 150 

North Holston 100 

Nangatuck 150 

New Hope 750 

Pound Creek 150 

Pineville 100 

Parrottsville 150 

Rutledge 175 

Robertsville 150 

Radford 200 

Sugar Grove 300 

Saltville 100 

South Cleveland 200 

Stonega 100 

Sequatchie 100 

Tom's Creek 200 

Tazewell, Tenn 100 

Virginia Ave., Knoxville 100 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 93 

Virginia Ave., Bristol. . $200 Salary J, W. Perry, Conf. 

Winding Gulf 150 Mission Sec'y $2,500 

Washington Pike 100 Expense Fund of Board . 500 

Italian Mission 900 Expense Fund Conf. Mis- 
Rev. J. E. Lowry, sal- sionary Sec'y 300 

ary, president Hiwasse 1,200 

No. 4 — Holston Board's By-Laws. 

1. The Officers of the Conference Board of Missions shall be a 
President, Vice-President, Secretary, Assistant Secretary and Treas- 
urer, to be elected by ballot quadrennially, who shall perform the 
duties usually attaching to these offices. 

2. The Officers of the Board shall constitute the Executive Com- 
mittee, which shall be charged with the duty of enforcing all 
rules and regulations of the Board and of acting for the Board 
in all matters of administration in the interim of the Board meet- 
ings. They shall make a full report of their acts to the Board 
for its approval. 

3. A committee on estimates shall be elected by the Board, to 
whom shall be referred all requests for aid. They shall make a 
careful estimate of the amounts to be appropriated, of the sum 
needed by the Board for its work, and of the apportionments to 
be made of the same, together with the assessments of the General 
Board of Missions to the several Districts of the Conference, and 
report to the Board for final action; provided that, the Board may, 
at its pleasure, consider the estimates in committee of the whole. 

4. An auditing committee of three members of the Board of 
Missions, appointed for the quadrennium, shall employ an expert 
accountant to examine annually the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer. 

5. The Board shall hold its annual meeting during the session 
of the Annual Conference, at which all appropriations for aid to 
pastoral charges shall be made. These appropriations shall not 
in any year exceed 90 per cent, of the income for the year ended, 
until the reserve shall reach $8,000, after which the appropria- 
tions shall not exceed 95 per cent. 

6. A Mid-year Meeting with the Presiding Elders and District 
Lay Leaders shall be held annually in the month of February, the 
time and place to be fixed by the Executive Committee, who shall, 
in co-operation with a Presiding Elder appointed by the Presiding 
Elders, prepare a program for the meeting. The purpose of this 
meeting shall be to make any necessary readjustments in the appro- 
priations, provided the amount appropriated at the Annual Meet- 
ing is not exceeded; to discuss work, and advise ways and means 
for making it effective. All new enterprises to be projected and 
new missions to be established should be presented for considera- 
tion at this meeting. 

7. The policy of the Board shall be to reduce appropriations to 
the different missions each year when at all practicable. The 
Board will continue the policy of making appropriations condi- 
tioned on the amount paid for pastor's salary by the charge re- 
ceiving aid. 

8. The Board will not grant appropriations when it is evident, 
after careful investigation, that an adjustment of the work could 
be made so as to avoid the necessity for an appropriation. 

9. The Board will decline to make appropriations in the absence 
of satisfactory information, and in order to obtain this information 
will insist that the blanks furnished by the Board be filled and 
returned by the Presiding Elder for new missions, and by the 



94 EOLSTON ANNUAL 

Quarterly Conference and Presiding Elder for charges to be con- 
tinued as missions. 

10. All Church treasurers of benevolent funds, whether laymen 
or pastors, shall remit to the Conference teller the first day of 
each month all mission funds on hand. 

11. Any District, Church, Sunday School, Epworth League or 
person may assume, in whole or in part, the support of a missionary 
or mission, established by the Conference Board. Their contribu- 
tions shall be applied to the support of such objects, provided the 
funds be sent to the Treasurer of the Board. 

12. The Secretary of the Board shall issue drafts for the sal- 
aries of the missionaries in its employ, quarterly, payable Jan- 
uary 15, April 15, July 15 and on the first day of the session of 
the Annual Conference; provided, that no draft shall be issued 
to pay the salary of a missionary until he has sent a report of 
his work for the quarter, to the secretary, which report is to be 
made on blanks furnished by the Board. 

13. All Conference Evangelists shall report quarterly on blanks 
to be furnished by the Board. 

14. The Treasurer of the Board will pay funds only on drafts 
signed by the Secretary and endorsed by the payee. 

15. Whenever one pastor shall be appointed to serve two 
charges to which appropriations have been made, the Secretary 
shall issue to him drafts for the amount appropriated to the charge 
receiving the larger sum only. Whenever a pastor appointed to a 
mission charge has already received aid from one of the Confer- 
ence Boards, the Secretary shall issue no drafts, except for such 
amount as the appropriation to the mission may exceed the amount 
he has already received. 

16. The Board shall appropriate out of its funds to pay the 
expenses of the Mid-year Meeting of the Executive Committee and 
of the officers of the Board in discharge of their duties as officers. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 
Foreign Missions, 1913-1914. 

Receipts. 
Specials. 
Morristown District, Morristown Station, 

Africa $ 1.00 

Chattanooga District, Cleveland Station, 

Hunchow 25.00 

Chattanooga District, Centenary Station. . . . 600.00 
Wytheville District, Wytheville Station, G. S. 

Bruce, Korea 100.00 

Wytheville District, Sugar Grove Station. . . 5.00 
Abingdon District, State Street Station, 

African Mission 137.46 

Radford District, Lead Mines Station 60.41 

Radford District, Princeton Station 32.00 

Knoxville District, Fountain City Station. . . 48.33 
Knoxville District, Etowah S. S. Special. . . . 21.00 
Knoxville District, Church St, S. S., Gran- 
berry College 91.82 

Big Stone Gap District, North Mission 10.00 

Holston Epworth League Conference 75.00 

$ 1,207.02 



Received on assessments , 11,803.35 



Total $13,010.37 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 95 

Foreign Missions, 1913-1914. 

Disbursements. 

To J. D. Mamilton, Treasurer General Board of Missions $ 8,550.00 
Amount transferred to Conference Mission Fund to re- 
imburse for salary of Conference Missionary- 
Secretary 1,700.00 

Overpaid J. D. Hamilton, Treasurer, 1912-1913 62.00 



Total $10,312.00 

Balance due J. D. Hamilton, Treasurer 2,698.37 



Total $13,010.37 

Domestic Missions, 1913-1914. 

Receipts. 
Specials. 

Holston Epworth League $ 75.00 

Knoxville District, Philadelphia 12.00 

Radford District, Lead Mines 11.83 

Wytheville District, Sugar Grove 1.25 

Chattanooga District, Carlock 1.25 

Chattanooga District, Highland Park 120.44 

Chattanooga District, Cleveland Ct 6.58 

Chattanooga District, Centenary 125.00 

Chattanooga District, Highland Park 19.70 

Chattanooga District, Highland Park S. S. . 68.70 
Big Stone Gap, Norton Station, Clintwood 

Mission 53.00 

Tazewell, Graham Station 18.25 

Big Stone Gap, Etowah 2.77 

Received from J. D. Hamilton, General 
Board of Missions on account Italian 

Mission 920.00 

Received on assessments 16,901.29 

Interest 186.65 

Amount transferred from Foreign Fund to 
reimburse for salary Conference Mis- 
sionary Secretary 1,700.00 

$20,223.71 

Balance from last year 7,920.20 



Total $28,143.91 

Dishitrsements. 

To Italian Mission $ 1,500.00 

Hiwassee College 1,200.00 

J. W. Perry, Conference Missionary Sec'y. . 2,500.00 

J. W. Perry, expenses 277.20 

J. M. Browne, Treasurer, expenses 55.90 

R. P. Purse, Treasurer, expenses, postage 

and stationery 13.00 

Expenses mid-yearly meeting 244.59 

Expenses auditing former treasurer's books 291.50 
Paid J. D. Hamilton to correct mistake 
made 1912-1913, crediting State St. 
special to Domestic instead of Foreign. 25.00 
J. A. Baylor, Evangelistic Secretary's ex- 
penses 49.72 



96 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



J. L. Mullens, sundry collections $ 155.00 

I. P. Martin, order of S. W. McConnell 100.00 

Secretary's expense 20.00 

P. L. Cobb, secretary expense 40.00 

Quarterly appropriation to J. W. Repass. . 43.75 

J. D, French, draft 1.00 

To miscellaneous missions by draft of 

secretary 8,587.44 

To J. D. Hamilton, treasurer, for home 

assessment 3,834.00 

To Italian Mission, 1913-1914 assessment. 650.00 

$19,588 

Balance on hand 8,555 

Total $28,143 

Balance to credit Foreign Missions $ 2,698 

Balance to credit Conference Missions 8,555 

Total $11,254 

Balance on deposit with American Trust and Banking 

Company $ 8,254 

Due from R. P. Purse, Conference Teller 3,000 

Total $11,254 

R. P. PURSE, Treasurer, 
By American Trust and Banking Co. 
By D. H. Griswold, Cashier. 



10 
81 



91 
37 
81 



.18 
.00 



18 



RECAPITULATION BY DISTRICTS. 



Districts 



Foreign 



Domestic 



Radford 

Bluefleld 

Tazewell 

Wythevllle 

Abingdon 

Big Stone Gap 
Morristown . . . 

Knoxville 

Harriman 

Chattanooga . . 



I I 

1$ 1,346.001$ 1,335.00 $ 92.41 " 

1,009.00 1,009.00 

1,178.00 964.00 

1,641.00 1,551.25 

1,8S7.00 1,339.00 

1,046.00 846.50 

1,315.00 1,002.60 

1,809.00 1,706.17 
756.00 668173 

1,809.00 1,455.04 625.00 



105.00 

137.46 

10.00 

1.00 

161.15 



1 
$ 1,853.00 ' 
1,390.00 
1,622.00 
2,259.00 
1,912.00 
1,428.00 
1,814.00 
2,491.00 
1,043.00 
2,491.00 



1,828.00 
1,390.00 
1,444.00 
2,126.00 
1,780.00 
1,226.30 
1,471.83 
2,382.03 
911.87 
2,266.57 



$ 11.83 



18.25 
1.25 



55.77 
' '12.06 
341! 67 



$13,296.00|m.877.29|$l, 132.02 
I I 



$18,303.00 



$16, 827. 35 [$440.77 



SPECIALS RECEIVED FROM THE HOLSTON CONFERENCE 
SINCE THE LAST SESSION, 1913. 

By J. D. Hamilton, Treasurer. 
1913. 

Nov. 13, J. Dale Stentz, Knoxville, Meth. Training School. .$ 25.00 

Dec. 4, Union Sunday School, Princeton, W. Va., undirected 5.01 

Dec. 17, Epworth League, Rhea Springs, Tenn., Cuba. . . . 1.00 

Dec. 31, George R. Stuart, Knoxville, building fund 100.00 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 97 

1914. 

Jan. 6, Mrs. R. H. Miller, Rural Retreat, Va., bldg. fund.$ 10.00 

Jan. 15, Men's Class S. S., Fountain City, Tenn., Korea. . . . 200.00 

Feb. 9, J. A. Lyons, Glade Spring, Va., Woman's Work. . . . 25.00 

Feb. 9, J. A. Lyons, Glade Spring, Va., China 25.00 

Feb. 9., J. A. Lyons, Glade Spring, Va., Congo 50.00 

Feb. 9, J. A. Lyons, Glade Spring, Va., undirected 42.00 

Feb. 13, Union S. S., Princeton, W. Va., undirected 7.86 

Mar. 11, J. A. Patten, Chattanooga, Tenn., Meth. Tr. School 250.00 

April 10, Shiloh S. S., Mechanicsburg Ct., Korea 50.00 

April 23, Lee J. Majet, Strav/ Plains, Tenn., Korea 100.00 

April 28, B. W. Akers, Knoxville, Tenn., Korea 25.00 

May 14, Epworth League, Anderson St. Holston, Cuba. . . . 5.00 

June 18, Sunday School, Crossville, China 25.00 

June 18, Epworth League, Gate City, Va., Cuba 2 0.00 

June 20, M. H. Honaker, Abingdon, Va., building fund. . . . 50.00 

July 2, Sunday School, Crab Orchard, Tenn., Congo 2.15 

July 8, Junior League, Hixson, Congo 1.00 

July 11, Davy and Twin Branch Charge, W. A., Korea. . . . 100.00 

Aug. 21, Sunday School, Crab Orchard, Tenn., Congo. . . . .93 

Sept. 3, A Friend, Wytheville, Va., Korea 100.00 

S«pt. 7, Epworth League, Anderson St., Bristol, Cuba. . . . 5.00 

Sept. 14, Epworth League, Harriman, Tenn., China 50.00 

Sept. 14, J. Dale Stentz, Knoxville, Meth. Train. School. . 25.00 

Sept. 23, Sunday School, Crab Orchard, Tenn., Congo .26 

Oct. 5, Shiloh S. S., Mechanicsburg Ct., Korea 50.00 

Oct. 5, E. B. McLain, Greenville, Home Department 1.34 



Total $1,351.55 

The above items did not pass through the hands of the Treas- 
urer of the Board of Missions of Holston Conference, but were 
sent direct to the Treasurer of the General Board of Missions. 



M 

BOOKS AND PERIODICALS. 

Your committee beg to magnify the function of the press. As 
of old, God speaks not only through the lips of the prophet or 
preacher, but through the pen of the writer. Evangelism calls as 
truly from the press as for the pulpit. 

Our publishing house, in its branches at home and abroad, still 
prospers in every way — sale of books has been unprecedented and 
progress enjoyed in every way. We give praise to God. We ex- 
press appreciation of the service done the Church in keeping open 
the best and safest market for good books, the classics of the past 
generations of authors, and the best of the new publications. We 
rejoice in the growing popularity of the books, Holston History. 
The volumes written grow upon our appreciation, both because of 
the wonderful story they tell and the happy art with which the story 
is told. We hope the next volumes will be soon forthcoming. 

We rejoice in the efficiency of all the editors of our organs — 
The Christian Advocate, Midland Methodist, Epworth Era, Mis- 
sionary Voice, Sunday School Literature and Review. We ear- 
nestly request our preachers and people to help our editors by 
sending proper locals from their charges. 



98 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

The Midland Methodist, our Conference organ, has a larger 
circulation now than ever before in the Conference. We commend 
the editorial work of Rev. T. C. Schuler during the past year, and 
heartily indorse the election of Dr. J. A. Burrow as editor for the 
ensuing year. We urge the brethren to redouble their efforts to 
Increase still further the circulation of the Conference organ and 
place a copy of the paper in every Methodist home in our territory 
wherever possible. 



FRANK JACKSON, Secretary. 



T. C. SCHULER, Chairman. 



N 

EPWORTH LEAGUE BOARD. 

Oar boys and girls today are the leaders of the church tomorrow. 
Their power and efficiency as leaders will depend upon their early 
training. The Epworth League was organized to conserve the young 
life of our churches — to train our boys and girls for strong and 
efficient leadership. That the purpose of its organization has been 
abundantly realized there is no longer any doubt. The Epworth 
League is here to stay. Hosts of strong men and women all over 
our connection without hesitation attribute their power and useful- 
ness in the church to their early connection with the Epworth 
League. And yet this great agency for the training of our young 
life is only partially utilized by our churches. Many of our pastors 
do not seem to realize the vital usefulness of the organization. 
While they are absorbed in their concern for the adult membership 
of their churches, the young people are allowed to drift. It ought 
to be the foremost concern of every pastor in the Holston Con- 
ference to organize Junior and Senior Chapters whenever possible; 
when no leaders are immediately available, to train leaders; to 
give close and sympathetic attention to all the operations of these 
chapters, and to emphasize the development of the League mem- 
bership along all the four departments, not only devotional, but 
social, literary and missionary. Especially does the department 
of missionary work offer to the church her supreme opportunity 
to make a future membership tremendously valuable to our mis- 
sionary duty and opportunity. Be it resolved: 

First, That our pastors, wherever possible, organize both Junior 
and Senior Chapters of the Epworth League. 

Second, That our pastors give more of their personal attention 
to the maintenance of all departments of the League Chapters in 
their charges. 

Third, That we commend the General Epworth Board for the 
excellence of the Epworth Era, and urge our pastors to increase, 
in every possible way, the circulation among our young people of 
this valuable monthly. 

Fourth, That we recommend to the Committee on Public Wor- 
ship at future sessions of the Annual Conference that they provide 
for the anniversary celebration provided for in paragraph 3 09 of 
the Discipline: The Conference Epworth League Board shall, in 
connection with the Conference Committee of Public Worship, 
arrange for the holding of an anniversary in the interest of its 
work at each session of the Conference. 

THOMAS PRIDDY, Chairman. 
HUGH KELSO, Secretary. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



99 



AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY. 

The American Bible Society is in the ninety-eighth year of its 
existence, and the annual report shows a healthy growth in the 
translation and distribution of the Bible. The Bible will soon be 
printed in all the languages of the world. The translation and 
distribution of the word of God has kept pace with and in many 
instances has gone before the missionaries, and prepared the soil 
for the planting of the gospel. Wherever the Bible has been given 
to individuals or nations it has broken the shackles of slavery and 
superstition and given liberty and freedom. It is the eternal truth 
of God, that maketh free. 

The American Bible Society is the commissary department that 
furnishes the supplies for the equipment of our missionaries who 
are engaged in the conquest of the nations of the world, that they 
may become kingdoms of our Lord. If our missionaries are to be 
supplied with the Bible in the languages of the people to whom 
they are preaching, if agencies are to be established throughout 
the mission fields of the world, the American Bible Society must 
keep pace with the rapid increase of the missionary forces at home 
and abroad. 

There is an imperative demand for a constant enlargement of 
the necessary equipment and agencies for Bible translation and 
distribution. The gifts of the churches to the Bible Society must 
keep pace with the ever increasing gifts and assessments made for 
the increase of our missionary forces. Our last General Conference 
recommends that an assessment of 2 cents per capita of our entire 
membership b© made for the Bible cause. This would, in our 
Conference, mean an increase in our assessment from $800.00 to 
$1,450.00. Owing to the present business depression and un- 
certainty on account of the war it would be unwise to make such 
a large increase at one time. Therefore your Board recommends 
that our assessment for the Bible cause for the coming year be 
$1,000; that we make this the minimum. And we recommend 
that every pastor make an effort to raise his contribution to 2 cents 
per member. We rejoice to find that on an assessment of $800.00, 
$894.61 has been paid, giving us a surplus of $94.61. The Board 
decided to appropriate only one-fourth, rather than one-half, as 
per our report of last year, for use in our own Conference. 

The assessment for the American Bible Society is proportioned 
as follows: 



Bluefield District. . 
Radford District. . 
Tazewell District . 
Wytheville District 
Abingdon District . 



> 75.00 
100.00 
80.00 
125.00 
110.00 



W. S. LYONS, Secretary. 



Big Stone Gap District. $100.00 
Morristown District. . . 110.00 

Knoxville District 125.00 

Chattanooga District. . 125.00 
Cleveland District 50.00 

N. R. CARTRIGHT, Chairman. 



MEMOIRS 



WILMAM C. FABIS. 

Fifty-eight years ago, the 13th of this month, there was born 
into the home of Samuel Faris, near St. Clair, Hawkins County, 
Tennessee, the subject of this sketch. From boyhood he was in- 
tensely religious. "He was born," some one said, "with his face 
in the right direction, and never stopped going." At an early age 
he came into a conscious experience of communion with God, 
through the influence of the country Sunday school which he 
attended. Soon after this he joined the church. When he was 
eighteen years of age, under the powerful and soul-searching preach- 
ing of Rev. H. P. Waugh, he was deeply convicted. While in this 
state God unexpectedly to him revealed the fact that he must 
preach. As he says, "I wanted religion, but God said, 'Be a 
preacher;' I wanted pardon for my sins, but God said, 'Preach.' 
The very moment I was willing to preach all was well with my 
soul." 

He was given license as a local preacher July 7, 1877, at St. 
Clair, Rev. W. R. Barnett being the preacher in charge, and Rev. 
Grinsfield Taylor conducting the Quarterly Conference in place of 
Rev. Carroll Long, who could not be present. His first efforts were 
not, from a sermonic standpoint, notable successes, but his neigh- 
bors believed in him, and loved him, and came to hear him preach. 
Even in those early days he averaged about fifty sermons each 
year. 

In the short sketch of his life which he wrote he gives the 
following interesting account of one of his first revival efforts: 
"Our pastor, W. R. Barnett, asked me to preach on Friday night 
of his meeting. After having been released from study by Prof. 
Broyles, I spent the afternoon with God in prayer so as to be 
ready for the night service to be held in the St. Clair Academy. My 
text was, 'What shall I do to be saved,' and the answer, 'Believe 
in the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved, and thy house.' 
At the conclusion of the sermon about thrirty-three persons came 
to the altar and were saved in a few moments. This success 
stimulated my vanity as well as drove me to my knees. Oh, for 
such soul-winning power now." 

He joined the Annual Conference at Morristown, Tennessee, 
in October, 1880, and served the following charges: Grassy Cove, 
two years; Hixson, two years; Dunlap, three years; Scarboro, one 
year; Andersonville, two years; Louisville, three years; Fineastle, 
three years; Greeneville Circuit, three years; Whiteside Circuit, 
two years; Trenton, three years; Jasper, one year; Ooltewah, three 
years, and Hixson, one year. 'These were, from the standpoint of 
salary, among the poorest in the Conference, but who shall say 
from the standpoint of opportunity they were not among the best? 
We rate our preachers and their work often by artificial standards, 
but God's standard is far different from ours. 

He was somewhat slow in his movements and very deliberate 
in speech. His power of expression was not equal to the character 
and movement of his thought. However, there were times when, 
under Divine influence, he seemed to leap over all these barriers 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 101 

and sweep his congregation with him. His early education was 
limited, but he overcame this largely by the constant companionship 
of good books. For his opportunities, I counted him a man well 
educated and of good general information. His favorite study was 
astronomy. He told me one night, as we stood under the shining 
stars, that he knew his way among the constellations as well as 
he knew the country about his boyhood home, and demonstrated 
his statement by pointing out numerous stars, giving their names 
and the groups to which they belonged. 

As a Christian he belonged to that pure, ethical and deeply 
spiritual type which impresses and influences men by kindness 
and love. In the Highland Park Church, which he attended with 
his family, his name was like ointment poured forth. His loss 
was felt as a sore bereavement. 

The final test of a man's power for good is measured by his 
impress on his own family. Judged by this standard, Bro. Faris 
was a success. With his faithful, loyal and consecrated wife, Hattie, 
the daughter of a Methodist preacher. Rev. Wm. R. Rush, of Grassy 
Cove, Tenn., he reared a family of five children: two daughters — 
Bell and Mrs. Mamie Neighbors; and three sons — Fred, Robert and 
Dean, of splendid character, devoted to God and the Church. How 
they gave the daughters a collegiate education, put the oldest boy 
in the University, kept the younger ones in high school and paid 
for a comfortable home is beyond the ken of any but the good God 
who filled the widow's barrel with meal, and who still lives and 
reigns in the world. 

When the time came for his superannuation it was a trying 
ordeal. But he adjusted himself to the changed conditions, taking 
advantage of every opportunity to preach and to witness for his 
Lord. For two years before his death he went regularly every 
Sunday afternoon to the county work house at Orchard Knob, 
preaching to the negro men in chains, many of whom, under his 
loving ministry, were released from the capitivity of the great 
enemy of our souls. Could any ministry be more acceptable than 
this to our Lord, whose claim as the One to come was based on 
the fact that the poor had the gospel preached unto them? 

The end came December 19, 1913, so suddenly that few of 
us were aware of the serious and insidiously fatal malady that 
years before had laid hold on him. His testimony was clear and 
ringing, with no uncertain sound. We laid him to rest in Forest 
Hills to wait the coming of his Lord. 

P. L. COBB. 



JOHN H. BRUNNER. 

John Hamilton Brunner, son of Joseph and Elizabeth Brunner, 
of Greene County, Tenn., was born March 12, 1825. December 10, 
1850, he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Key, of Monroe 
County, Tennessee, Rev. Jesse Cunnyngham officiating. He died 
of heart failure at his home near Hiwassee College February 18, 
1914, aged eighty-eight years, eleven months and six days, his 
wife having preceded him one year and fifteen days, at the ripe 
age of eighty-seven years. The children numbered seven, all of 
whom are dead save Mr. A. T. Brunner, of Hiwassee College, Mrs. 
Ralph Hunt, of Philadelphia, Miss., and Mrs. R. C. Humphreys, 
of Whiting, Ind. 

Dr. Brunner was president of Hiwassee College about thirty- 
three years, though not continuously. He devoted the greater part 



102 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

of his life, energies and means to helping indigent young men secure 
an education. His mind and faculties were clear and bright to 
the end of his life. He told his son, iMr. A. T. Brunner, the night 
before he died, that the end was near, but that he was ready and 
willing to go, that he had no fear and longed to be with his loved 
ones who had gone on before. 

Dr. G. C. Rankin said of him, in the Texas Christian Advocate: 
"The life of such a man is worthy of more than a passing notice. 
He came upon the stage of action in the years when Methodism was 
comparatively young in the hill country and no man contributed 
more to its success and progress than he. When this writer was 
an infant. Dr. Brunner traveled our circuit in East Tennessee, and 
one of his regular preaching appointments was in our grandmother's 
house. Church buildings were scarce in those days. He and the 
writer's father were warm and cordial friends, though the latter 
has been dead fifty-two years. 

"Dr. Brunner was a preacher of the old school, rather terse 
and sententious in style, but lucid and comprehensive. He was a 
learned man, well read in all sorts of literature and history, and 
a teacher of renowned ability. Nearly fifty years ago he identified 
himself with Hiwassee College and here is where he did his most 
important work. He made it his business to see to it that no 
aspiring and worthy boy was ever turned down in his effort to obtain 
an education. Forty years ago, poor and without influential friends, 
this writer applied to him for entrance into that well-known school. 
He gave us his warmest welcome and at no time did he ever suggest 
to us the financial part of it. We sat at his feet until we had 
finished his course and then entered the Holston Conference. His 
love and confidence have followed us like that of a father from 
that day till his translation. Our love for him was like that of 
a son for a father. He stands out in memory today as the most 
valued counselor and friend we have ever had outside of the home 
circle. 

"Throughout the extent of our country there are those in all 
the honorable walks of life to rise up and call him blessed. The 
last time we had the pleasure of visiting him he said to us, 'My 
chief pleasure is found in my communion with the Master and 
calling to mind the hundreds of my boys through whom I am still 
living and working in the varied pursuits of life. When my 
earthly pilgrimage closes I will still be active in the lives they 
are living. Among them all you stand very close to my heart.' 
What a blessing that we ever fell under his molding influence! 
Throughout all these years of toil and struggle his short, fatherly 
letters have come to us with the regularity of the weeks. 

"He lived and wrought to great advantage. He had an iron 
constitution, a large, well-developed physical frame, tremendous 
head and a most benign face. To look at him was to see a man 
born to do great things. He would have been noticed in a gathering 
of thousands. He had a transparent heart, and a countenance 
frank and open. He was a judge of human nature. He knew 
how to size up character at a glance. When a boy once found his 
way into Dr. Brunner's heart he was fixed, but woe betide the 
fellow who took advantage of his confidence and deceived the trust 
placed in him. He knew how to love and how to confide. He 
knew how to punish with his keen displeasure when punishment 
was deserved. He made himself one with his students. There 
was no chasm between him and them; yet no boy ever became so 
familiar with him as to lose respect for his authority. Had he 
been ambitious he might have shone in the wide circles of the 
Church. He had the brain and the training. But he was content 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 103 

to select a smaller sphere and devote his life to helping those who 
needed his tuition and accomplishment. Hence, amid the scenes of 
old Hiwassee, embowered amid its Arcadian groves and undulating 
hills, he lived and wrought and died. From there his influence 
has gone out almost without limit, and a score of the States of 
this Union are the beneficiaries of his self-sacrificing toil and devoted 
labor. May the clods rest lightly o'er his dust and may the flowers 
bloom perennially around his tomb! Father in Israel, adieu!" 



CHARLES K. MILLER. 

Charles K. Miller was born on Walker's Creek, in Bland County, 
Virginia, September 7, 1832, and died at his home in Rural Retreat, 
Va., December 31, 1913, aged eighty-one years. He was the son 
of Charles and Mary McNeil Miller, of Bland County, Virginia, and 
is survived by one brother, Alexander Miller, of Mechanicsburg, Va. 
There are three brothers and one sister deceased. He was happily 
married to Miss Amanda Young, of Grayson County, Virginia, on 
May 5, 1865. Six children came to bless this union, four of whom, 
together with the sorrowing wife, survive him. 

When a boy of fifteen Brother Miller was converted and joined 
the iMethodist Episcopal Church, South, at Hoge's Camp Ground, in 
Bland County, Virginia. He was licensed to preach by the Quar- 
terly Conference of the Mechanicsburg Circuit, at Newberry's Chapel, 
on Dec. 5, 1857, his license being signed by E. C. Wexler, Presiding 
Elder, and G. W. K, Green, Secretary. He was received on trial 
into the traveling connection at Asheville, N. C, October 17, 1860, 
and was ordained Deacon at Athens, Tenn., October 17, 1862, by 
Bishop Early, and by him was ordained Elder at Marion, Va., 
September 14, 1865. He served faithfully and well the following 
charges: Wytheville Circuit, Virginia, as junior preacher; Inde- 
pendence Circuit, in Grayson County, Virginia; Lebanon, Russel 
County, Virginia; Jefferson Circuit, North Carolina; Morristown 
and Jacksboro, in Tennessee; Elk Creek, Va. ; Rural Retreat, Va. 
The Rural Retreat Circuit was his last charge. In the fall of 1884 
he was superannuated on account of ill health, which relation he 
held until death. 

Brother Miller was a strong and forceful, yet logical, preacher, 
and his messages were simple and plain. He believed in the power 
of the Gospel, which he preached to save men from sin. He pos- 
sessed a passion for souls. Few men of his time in active ministry 
saw more people converted and received into the Church. He was 
once heard to say to J. T. Guy, his pastor, that there were more than 
five hundred professions of conversions during his pastorate of two 
years on the Lebanon Circuit. He did not court the plaudits of 
the world. His highest delight was to know what was the will of 
God, and then endeavor to do it at any cost. He loved God and 
God's ministry and people. The fires of the true itinerant continued 
to burn in his soul during the long years of his superannuation. 
He took a deep interest in all the affairs of the Church. He never 
became sour or morose, but maintained a cheerful and patient spirit. 
No bitter speech, no unkind word, was heard to fall from his lips. 
He grew old nobly. 

As a father and husband he was kind and considerate; an hon- 
ored and beloved citizen, whose counsel was respected by all. And 
withal he was truly a man of God. His faith grew stronger and 
his prospect brighter as he approached the end of life's journey. 



104 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

He loved to talk of heaven, and seemed to anticipate an abundant 
entrance into the everlasting kingdom of his heavenly Father. 
No one doubts that he was ready. His pure, devout and noble spirit 
is gone up to join the hosts of the Church triumphant; and that 
is not death, that is victory — victory over death and over the grave. 
It is a blessed promotion. A glorious transition from the com- 
panionship of physical weakness and pain and sorrow of earth, to 
the fellowships of heaven. 

"Forever with the Lord, 

Amen, so let it be; 
Life from the dead is in the Word, 
'Tis immortality." 

May the God of All Grace comfort and bless with His gracious 
presence the faithful companion of his life in the loneliness of 
her widowhood, and the children in this their great loss. 

J. A. H. SHULER. 

J. T. GUY. 

J. S. W. NEEL. 



MRS. JOHN WESLEY SMITH. 

Lucy Jordan, daughter of Crockett I. and Ellen Miller Jordan, 
of Pulaski County, Virginia, was born April 2 9, 1853, and died 
at the home of her son, in Chicago, December 14, 1913. She was 
married to Rev. J. Wesley Smith on October 2, 1883, and to them 
was born one son, Paul J. Smith, now a preacher of Chicago. 
She was converted at old Thorn Spring Church, Pulaski County, 
Virginia; joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in early 
youth, and ever afterwards she was a devout and active Christian 
worker. Her ideal of the Christian life was drawn from the 
Word of God, and the practice of her life was in keeping with 
that ideal. She was educated, refined, unassuming, and, best of 
all, deeply pious, which adorned her life in all its relations. 

It v/as my fortune to have been her pastor seven years, and I 
must say that she was universally beloved because of the splendid 
traits of character that won all wlio knew her. She was always 
bright and cheerful, true and faithful, lifting the burdens from 
many a troubled heart as she went by. In God she trusted and 
took great delight in associating with His people. Being gifted 
with a melodious voice, she consecrated it to the service of her 
Lord in singing the songs of Zion, to the joy of many a soul. 
With a noble and self-sacrificing spirit, her life was filled with 
words and deeds of helpfulness to others. In the Church and 
its societies, where she was an active and earnest v/orker, her 
presence and holy influence will be sadly missed. In the wide 
circle of relatives and friends, who knew her only to love her, 
her departure is greatly mourned. To her own household as an 
affectionate, faithful and devoted wife, and as a devoted and loving 
mother, her death came as an almost unbearable sorrow. 

The last two years of her life were spent in Chicago with her 
husband, keeping house for her preacher son. There, upon Thurs- 
day evening, returning from holding a bazaar to raise funds for 
a church, pneumonia began its fearful work, and the following 
Sunday at 1 p. m. her sweet spirit went home to God. "Absent 
from the body, present with the Lord." A light has gone out 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 105 

that gave joy and happiness here in the home and in the Church. 
Let the bereaved find comfort in the fact that she has heard the 
welcome, "Well done, good and faithful servant," and entered the 
house of many mansions. 

Services were conducted both in Chicago and Chattanooga. 
Dr. Foster, Dean of the University of Chicago, and Dr. Aikin, of 
the Methodist Church in Chicago, held services in Chicago; Rev. 
J. A, Burrow, Rev. James W. Moore, and all the Southern Meth- 
odist pastors of Chattanooga, took part in the service in Chatta- 
nooga. Her body sleeps in Forest Hills, under the shadow of 
Lookout Mountain. ^^ jj PRICE 



MRS. LEE M. BURBIS. 

Nellie Jordon Callahan, daughter of Rev. George A. and Mrs. 
MoUie E, Callahan, was born at Dublin, Pulaski County, Vir- 
ginia, August 5, 1892, and departed this life at Coal Creek, Tenn., 
October 17, 1913, being only a little over 21 years old. She 
was converted and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
under the ministry of Brother Burris, October 7, 1906, at the 
tender age of 14 years. When a child her father moved from the 
place of her nativity to Wythe County, Virginia, where she grew 
to womanhood and where she acquired a good common school 
education. But school did not complete her development. She 
thought fully and carefully, read good books, good literature in 
general, especially the Bible. Her intellectual development was 
very marked, if not marvelous. In fact, she grew rapidly in all 
the graces of Christian womanhood. 

As a child she was sweet-spirited and kind, having a smile 
and kind word for all with whom she came in contact. This 
spirit, sweetened by the presence of the Holy Spirit, made her 
a faithful and devoted wife and mother, and a zealous worker 
for the oncoming of the kingdom of God. She was happily married 
to Rev. Lee M. Burris, of the Holston Conference, by Rev. W. M. 
Morrell, October 19, 1907. To this couple were born two children, 
one boy and one girl. The little boy preceded the mother to the 
better country. The little girl remains to cheer the lonely life 
of the husband and father. 

Sister Burris was a woman of charming personality, with a 
high degree of intellectual and spiritual development, who presided 
like a queen in her home and gave herself without reserve to all 
of the difficult and delicate tasks imposed on her as the wife of 
an itinerant Methodist preacher. Though the charges which 
Brother Burris served demanded almost niggardly economy, she 
did not complain, but gladly bore all, and gave herself to further 
the work of her husband and her divine Lord. All who knew 
her loved her. In those charges served by her husband she num- 
bered her friends by the score. How well the writer of these 
lines remembers sharing the hospitality of their parsonage home! 
How sweetly and simply it was dispensed by her hand! But that 
gentle spirit went away, when she was just ready to take charge 
of the little parsonage of the Bristol Circuit at Wallace, Va. 
What a void her departure made in the work of the circuit, and 
especially in the heart of her husband! 

Her body was tenderly brought back to the home of her child- 
hood, in Wythe County, Virginia, where, after appropriate services. 



106 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

conducted by Dr. M. P. Carico, it was laid to rest to await the 
resurrection of the just. May God in his mercy comfort the hus- 
band and tenderly care for the little orphan. 

GEORGE D. FRENCH. 



MRS. S. L. BROWNING. 

Mattie J. Hancher was born in Washington County, Tennessee, 
December 22, 1881, and departed this life from the parsonage 
at Madisonville, of which charge her husband was pastor, August 
14, 1914, after an illness of many weeks. She was the daughter 
of W. A. and Emma Hancher, and a granddaughter ot Rev. 
James A. Hancher, of the English Lutheran Church. 

She was married to Rev. Samuel L. Browning October 7, 
1900. To this happy union five children were born — Helen, Charles, 
Ethel, Margaret and Stephen, all of whom survive, and all of 
tender age, the eldest twelve years and the youngest three months 
old at the time of the mother's death. 

Sister Browning v/as a devoted Christian from her childhood. 
When nine years of age she attended revival services in a United 
Brethren Church near her home and, yielding her heart to her 
Savior, was happily converted. She immediately united with the 
Lutheran Church and remained a consistent member of the same 
until after her marriage, when she became a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. She was a woman v.'ho pos- 
sessed, to a rare degree, those old-time, tried virtues of wifehood 
and motherhood, which have entered into and helped to fashion 
all that is noble and beautiful in the Christian home. To her 
husband she was a helpmeet indeed. Often by her loving counsel 
and encouragement did she open up a clear way that led out 
from perplexity and doubt. To her children she was a firm, 
yet tender and devoted, mother. Hers was a well ordered home. 
There was law, but the law was love. She considered her children 
an heritage of the Lord, and to bring them up in His nurture and 
admonition was her constant endeavor. She was a woman of 
prayer and taught her children to pray. In the absence of the 
husband and father she regularly conducted family worship. 

With her hands thus full of the holy calling of motherhood, 
although not in robust health, she was nevertheless devoted to the 
church, manifesting a keen interest in its welfare. She taught a 
class in the Sunday school, and was a worker in the Woman's 
Missionary Society, never failing to be present when her strength 
permitted. She fitted well into the place of an itinerant preacher's 
wife. By the simplicity of her life and her devotion to the church 
she endeared herself to the hearts of God's people. Without 
ostentation, possessed of a quiet and peaceable spirit, of equable 
temper, self-controlled and patient, she won and kept the con- 
fidence and esteem of all who knew her. She appreciated her 
parsonage home, and enjoyed the life of a Methodist preacher's 
wife. Speaking of this she often said, "I am so thankful that 
the Lord gave me such a place in life." 

On a cloudless Sabbath morning, August 16, her funeral was 
conducted by her Presiding Elder, assisted by Rev. J. M. Knight, 
of the United Brethren Church, a childhood companion and friend 
of both Brother and Sister Browning, in the M. E. Church, South, 
at Madisonville, Tenn. Every church in the charge was represented 
in a vast concourse of sympathetic friends, many of whom could 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 107 

not find even standing room in the church. Her body was laid 
to rest in the Madisonville Cemetery, there to await the "general 
resurrection in the last day, and the life of the world to come, 
through our Lord Jesus Christ." rp j eSKRIDGE 



ELIZABETH JANE SMITH. 

Elizabeth Jane Smith, daughter of Peter and Letitia Kelly 
Morrison, was born near Kingsport, Tenn., February 24, 1834. 
At the age of ten years, at a camp meeting conducted at Brush 
Creek Camp Ground by Revs. Nat Taylor, William G. Brownlow 
and her uncle, Samuel Patton, she definitely sought and found the 
more abundant life in Christ. This supreme fact of her earthly 
experience she never doubted. Her life, redeemed from the power 
and dominion of sin, became, in Christ, a redemptive force, and 
many of her associates were, through the beauty, strength and 
exemplary character of that life, won to the life that is in Him. 

On November 4, 1857, she was married to Rev. James T. 
Smith, of the Holston Conference, and for thirty years she shared 
with him the varying experiences of the life itinerant. Three 
children were born to brighten and bless their home, all of whom 
reached maturity. Only one of that number now remains on this 
side of the river — Sister Hunter, wife of Rev. A. B. Hunter, of 
our Conference. 

Sister Smith knew most of the older preachers of the Con- 
ference, now living, and especially enjoyed having read the "History 
of Holston Methodism," having known, personally, many of those 
whose experiences and achievements are therein recounted. The 
writer, while not intimately acquainted with the subject of this 
sketch, desires to record his appreciation of a life lived faithfully, 
unassumingly and well. 

It seemed, even to a casual acquaintance, that in her face 
there slept the warmth and brightness of balmier skies. There 
was pictured there the calmness of an unshaken faith in God and 
in the promised life of heaven. The illusions and tragedies of an 
experience running through more than four-score years disturbed 
not the even tenor of that life; and when, on July 21, 1914, near 
set of sun, in the station parsonage at Graham, Va., surrounded 
by those whom, in life, she had loved best, the final summons came, 
she met it without a struggle or a fear, and the gentle spirit of 
this mother in Israel, "leaving its outgrown shell by Life's un- 
resting sea," began to live the life triumphant. 

JAMES E. SPRING. 



MRS. WILLIAM ROBESON. 

Adaline Patton was born February 8, 1832, at the home of 
her father, Vincent Easley, in Sullivan County, Tennessee, and 
died at her home near Morristown, Tenn., November 11, 1913, 
at the ripe age of eighty-one years, nine months and three days. 
She was of a historical Methodist family. Her paternal great- 
grandfather was Stephen Easley, of English blood, who, in the 
year 1782, came from Halifax County, Virginia, and entered land 
on Horse Creek at its junction with Holston River. This home 
was one of Bishop Asbury's favorite stopping places in his annual 



108 HOLSTON ANNUAL 

missionary rounds, and one of the strongholds of early Methodism. 
Mrs. Robeson's maternal great-grandparents were Timothy AcufC 
and Anna Leigh, who were early settlers of Sullivan County. Mr, 
Acuff entered land in that county in 1773. He also was a friend 
of Asbury, and often entertained him. He gave from his farm 
the land upon which was erected Acuff's Chapel, the first Methodist 
meeting house in Tennessee. 

Vincent Easley was a Methodist, as were his forefathers. He 
was a leading citizen of his section, and a man of unusual intelli- 
gence and information. Even at that early day he had an excellent 
library, and, although a newspaper was a rarity in his time and 
section, files of his old newspapers are still kept by his descend- 
ants, among which is the Washington City "National Intelligencer" 
covering the period of the Mexican War. His daughter, Mrs. 
Robeson, inherited his breadth of mind. Her education received 
due attention, and she is said to have attained a remarkable pro- 
ficiency in her studies, especially in mathematics. As a young lady 
she was much beloved and admired. On January 21, 1851, at 
her father's residence, she was married to the Rev. William Robe- 
son, of the Holston Conference, whose successful itinerant career 
on stations, circuits and districts extended from 1844 to his super- 
annuation in 1874. To this union were born eight children. The 
surviving children are Mrs. Felicia Robeson Weaver, of Arizona, 
and Hon. W. A. Robeson and Prof. J. M. Robeson, of Morristown, 
Tenn. 

Mrs. Robeson was left in the weeds of widowhood May 2 9, 
1905, after which she removed from her home at Highland Mills, 
near Blountville, Tenn., to her home near Morristown, Tenn. Of 
her it may truthfully be said that she had the mind of a philosopher, 
combined with the modesty, gentleness and tenderness of the true 
woman. In deliberation she was able to place a just estimate on 
the arguments on both sides of a question, giving to each its due 
weight. This ability, coupled with her absolute integrity, made 
her a just and impartial judge as she solved the problems which 
so often came before her in her long life of care and service. Her 
love was generous. She gave herself in love; and the gift was 
not belittled by the thought of recompense. How glad and spon- 
taneous was her love of little children! How profound was her 
love for the great and the good of earth! Many sought her 
counsel and her sympathy, and she did not disappoint them. She 
loved with all her heart the good and the pure. She passionately 
loved Christianity and her Church and she loved God supremely. 
Her home life in the relations of mother and wife gave the highest 
expression of her true greatness. Her efficiency was of a high 
order. Cheerfulness, industry, watchfulness, faithfulness and uni- 
form kindness marked her daily life. She knew the "soft answer," 
but she never gave the answer of fear or of improper compromise. 

Mrs. Robeson joined the Metliodist Church at Horse Creek 
Camp Ground, having been baptized in her infancy by Rev. Thomas 
Wilkerson. She was rich in the Christian virtues of patience and 
loving kindness; but her faith, transcendant among her Christian 
graces, covered all things whatsoever and answered for her every 
question of time or eternity. To say "Thy will be done" is the 
highest triumph of Christian faitli. Those close to her have heard 
her say it, but far better, they have seen her when with all the 
power of her soul she was showing her complete and glad sub- 
mission to God's will and therefore her exalted faith. 

Her last years were years of affliction, but she was uniformly 
uncomplaining and indeed cheerful. Hers was the death of the 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 109 

righteous, and she went in peace to her incorruptible reward. One 
who was with her at the last wrote of her: "Her going away 
was a stately departure." She had truly dignified and ennobled 
every state or condition of life into which she had ever come; 
she dignified and ennobled death. There were no formal farewells, 
but there were brief words of love and appreciation for those about 
her. Then, while yet with us, she entered with One who was 
nearer to her than any other into a communion whose blessedness 
we can not know; but we heard the low words of her victory and 
assurance: "Tho' I walk through the valley of the shadow of 
death, I will fear no evil; for thou art with me; thy rod and thy 
staff, they comfort me." „ ^ 




110 



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H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



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HOLSTON ANNUAL 



131 



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132 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



TABLE No. 3— FINANCE. 



NAME OF CHARGE 



Presiding 
Elder 



Preacher in 
Charge 



3ishops' 
Fund 



Conference 

Claimants 

and Super- 

annu3te En- 

downiont 

FLnd 



Foreign 
Missions 



BLUEPIELD- 



1 Berw i)id 

2 Big Sandy 

3 Bland Street 

4 Bramwell and Cooper 

5 Chattaroy 

6 Coalwood and Premier. . , 

7 Davy and Twin Branch., 

8 Eckman and Keystone... 

9 Gary 

10 Grace Cburch , 

11 leager and Glen Alum.., 

12 Knox Creek and Thaeker. 

13 Matewan 



14 Matoaka 

15 Maybeury and Coaldale. 

16 McDowell 

17 Mora 

18 Mullins Mission 

19 North Fork and Crozier. 

20 Pageton 

21 Pineville 

22 Pond Creek 

23 Rock 

24 Welch and Kimball 

25 Williamson 

26 Winding Gulf 

Total 

Total last year 

Increase 

Decrease 



; 83 

100 
333 

250 

40 

60 

150 

167 

167 

300 

1001 

40 

60 

85 

150 

134 

67 

50 

100 

70 

70 

10 

90 

150 

167 

30 



$3023 
3012 



11 



87 

89 
333 
^0 

45 

69 
130 
167 
167 
301 
100 

45 

70 
101 
128 
125 

69 

56 
128 

74 

44 

10 
108 
1661 
1671 1000 

56 200 



580 
600 
2000 
1500 
300 
420 
900 
1000 
1000 
1800 
700 
300 
450 
525 
900 
800 
500 
425 
700 
500 
425 
100 
560 
900 



$3085 $19085 
2891 18271 



1941 814 







72 


$ 74 


150 


144 


120 


129 


90 


85 


100 


84 


144 


144 


144 


144 


144 


143 


72 


75 


75 


58 


172 


172 


86 


80 


144 


144 


90 


82 


100 


96 


216 


216 


SO 





583 

2000 

1500 

270 

437 

785 

1000 

1000 

1806 

600 

304 

430 

618 

900 

750 

415 

450 

772 

407 

260 

102 

652 

lOOO 

1016 

337 



$18993 
17797 



$ 2 


$ 2 


$ 11 


$ 11 


3 


3 


13 


13 


36 


35 


137 


137 


25 


25 


113 


113 


2 


2 


5 


5 


9 


2 


9 


9 


10 


10 


21 


21 


12 


12 


50 


m 


12 


12 


.50 


50 


.30 


30 


130 


130 


6 


6 


15 


15 


1 


1 


3 


1 


2 


2 


7 


7 


5 


5 


16 


16 


12 


12 


36 


36 


12 


12 


18 


18 


5 


5 


17 


17 


2 


2 


3 




9 


9 


23 


23 


5 


5 


16 


16 


2 


2 


5 


5 


1 


1 





2 


10 


10 


11 


10 


14 


14 


50 


50 


12 


12 


22 


22 


1 


1 


2 


2 


$332 


$233 


$ 785 


$ 779 


227 


227 


78b 


V84 



25 

15 

200 

95 

6 
12 
60 
50 
50 
100 
20 

2 
15 
20 
50 
50 
20 

5 
30 
20 
15 

2 
40 
50 
50 

2 



$1004 
1009 



11961 51 5|. 



100 



$ 261$.. 

15 
200 

95 
6 

12 

60 

50 

50 
100 

20 
5 

15 

20 

50 

50 

20 



$1007 
1012 



$100 



TAZEWELL— 



Paul, 



1 Belfnst 

2 Burks Garden 

3 Castlewood and St. 

4 Cedar BluCf 

5 Dickensonville 

6 Elk Garden 

7 Graham 

8 Graham Circuit ... 

9 Grundy 

10 Honaker 

11 Lebanon 

12 Maxwell 

13 Pocahontas 

14 Richlands 

15 Rocky Gap 

16 Tazewell 

17 Whitewood 

Total |$1949|$1870l 

Total last year | 2026| 1977| 

Increase 

Decrease 771 107 



500 

1050 

80O 

650 

700 

1000 

1000 

1000 

500 

50O 

1200 

600 

1000 

615 

700 

1500 

225 



5161$ 
1020 

901 

600 

600 
1000 
1000 
1000 

500 

406 
1200 

571 
1000 

575 

671 
1500 

200 



$13540|$13360|$279 $180 
143351 139611 274 188 



795 



701 



37$ 

70 

42 

41 

49 

62 



75 
33 
36 
66 

45 
64 
47 
41 
114 
35 



5 
57 
21 
64 
21 
41 
114 



$ 45 
96 
56 
50 
75 
77 

110 
96 
44 
45 
75 
45 
90 
42 
57 

137 
39 



24 
95 

56 
25 
20 
77 
110 
96 



20 
75 
45 
90 
30 
50 
137 



93511 
9331 



671 $1178 
1178 



950 
975 



25 



18 



34 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



133 



TABLE No. 3— FINANCE 



























h 


















>> 








03 




Home and 


^ 








Education and 


American 


o 


c; 




(N 






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Church Extens 


on 


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Society 








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4 

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7 
S 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
2S 



20 


$ 20 


$..| 


1ft 


15 




300 


3O0|...i 


15(> 


150 




5 


5 




8 


8 




60 


60 




75 


75 




80 


80 




1»5 


185 




20 


20 




S 


3 




15 


15 




20 


201... 


75 


75 ... 


40 


40 ... 


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18... 


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35 


35... 


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15 




15... 


4 


4 ... 


60 


60 . . . 


75 


75 ...I 


75 


75 401 


5 


5 


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20 
15 
110 

100 
5 
9 

22 
55 
41 
109 
20 
5 

20 
20 
321 
32 
35 
10 
32 
25 
12 
1 
10 
41 
501 
li 



20 


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15 






110 






100 


... 




b 






9 






22 






55 






41 






109 






20 


... 




y 






20 






20 






32 


... 




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25 


... 




32 






25 






12 






1 






10 






41 






50 






1 


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15 
15 

110 
83 
5 
10 
10 
45 
40 

116 
12 

9 

15 
16 
331 
251 
19 

51 
10 

8 
15 

1 

15 
45 
27 

1 



15 

15 
110 
85 
5 
10 
10 
45 
40 
116 
12 
1 
151 
161 
331 
251 
19 



? 4 



$4$. 
2 .. 
13 

7 



2 
1 
II 
2 
2 
.|....(. 



140 

200 

5 

12 



305 
2346 

10 



2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


1 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


8 


8 


r. 


7 


6 


6 


2 


5 


2 


2 


1 


2 



55 
332 
121 
12 
12 



$ 4901$ 1279 



25 
265 

16 
4 

60 

15 
489 1 

101 



1101 

35721 

800 

lOOl 

2SI 

7731 

33811 

1006 

33911 

1481 

3251 

340! 

10401 

2601 

2861 

2631 

I 

2231 
200 
7371 
5| 
563 
13261 



925 

9266 

3525 

649 

588 

2118 

4850 

2815 

9050 

963 

690 

997 

2285 

1852 

1398 

93S 

572 

1400 

1258 

1132 

137 

1506 

29^ 



1048t 3148 
40| 461 



1$ 13901$ 13581140 
I 13901 13901... 



8221$ 8091$ 
7411 741J. 



7001$ 
7001 



6941$ 
7001 



1001$ 961$ 
lOOl 991., 



91$ 54221 
...I 119221 



204521$ 56794 
61538 



81 



161. 



4744 



1 
2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 



61 

130 

84 

73 

100 

103 

153 

117 

60 

611 

1031 

76( 

120 

52 

81 

195 

54 



40 
120 

84 

73 

25 
1031 
1531. 
1171. 

601. 

501. 
103 

76 . 
120 . 

40 

80!. 
195 
5 



34 
63 

42 
37 
72 
55 
511 
681 
341 
321. 
551 
51 ( 
58! 
371 
331 
103 
37|. 



12 
63 

42 
15 

6 
561 . 
511. 
30 . 
341. 

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551 
201 
581 
15 
20 
103 



$ 10$ 61$ 1 



60 
32 
12 

71 
•531 
661 

221 



41 
531 
101 
541 
10 i 
151 
921 



$ 2 
7 
2 



$ 1 
10 
5 



7 

6 101 
10! 101. 



7 
7 
6 
5 

71 

71 

7| 

31 

61 

7| 

21 

9| 9l 6! 10 

61 41.. ..!.... 

61 41 31 3 

41 41 3i 4 

31 !....[.... 



410 



71 10 



1251 



169 
96 
514 
313 
235 
825 
7251 
2231 

13071 
3061 
6591 

1085 

1743 

185 

38 

6674 
15 



1912 
1936 
1088 

799 
2815 
2640 
1751 
2011 

990 
2592 
1581 
3452 
1039 
10-31 
9368 

220 



1622 
1622 



$ 1444 
1326 



832 



579 
570 



793 



$ 5001$ 981$ 56 
520! 1001 63 



53 



651$ 



ft50 
3424 



$ 151121$ 36121 
.1 49247 



1181.. 
321.. 



SOI 



16 



4744 



134 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



TABLE No. 3— FINANCE. 



NAME OF CHARGE 


Presiding 
Elder 


Preaclier in 
Charge 


Bisliops' 
.Fund 


Conference 
Claimants 
and Super- 
annuate En- 
dowment 
Fund 


Foreign 
Mission! 




1 
to 

< 


'3 


T3 


"2 
"3 
CM 


13 


2 
"3 

Oh 




n3 


< 


2 
■3 
(1. 


•3 

1 
02 


RADFORD— 
1 Athens 


$ 134 
117 

70 

50 

167 

200 

67 

67 

100 

83 

50 

167 

67 

36 

100 

50 

100 

167 

250 

250 

84 

117 


$134 

116 

72 

50 

167 

200 

57 

40 

94 

71 

50 

167 

62 

38 

100 

43 

100 

167 

250 

250 

62 

117 


$ 800 

700 

430 

300 

1000 

1200 

400 

400 

600 

500 

300 

1000 

400 

225 

600 

300 

600 

1000 

1500 

1500 

5(X) 

700 


$ 800 

700 

429 

300 

1000 

1200 

344 

200 

563 

428 

30O 

lOOO 

380 

225 

60O 

258 

600 

1000 

1500 

1500 

370 

700 


$ 20 

15 

6 

6 

26 
2.6 
8 
2 
14 
4 
8 

IS 
6 
2 

18 
4 
10 
24 
40 
40 
10 
20 


I 20 

15 

6 

6 

26 

26 

8 

2 

14 

4 

8 

15 

6 

2 

18 
4 
10 
24 
40 
40 
10 
20 


i 57 

48 
14 
17 
88 
91 
21 
6 
54 
17 
27 
55 
21 
10 
52 
7 

26 
82 
110 
112 
24 
66 


$ 57 
48 
14 
17 

88 

91 

21 

6 

54 

15 

27 

55 

11 

10 

52 

7 

26 

82 

110 

112 

24 

66 


$ 85 

60 
30 
30 
100 
110 
35 
10 
65 

35 
70 
30 
15 

70 
26 
32 

100 
150 
150 
30 

78 


$ 85 

60 
30 

30 

100 

110 

35 

10 

65 

24 

35 

70 

30 

15 

136 

20 

33 

100 

182 

150 

30 

78 


$ 


2 Aubern 




3 Blue Ridge 




4 Draper 




5 Dublin 




6 East Radford 




7 East River 




8 East Princeton 




9 Eggleston 




10 Floyd 




11 Fries 


? 


12 Galas 




13 Hillsville 




14 Hylton 


g 


15 Leadmines 




16 Mercer and Summers 

17 New River 




18 Pearisburg 




19 Princeton 




20 Pulaski 




21 Radford 




22 Staffordsville 




Total 


$2493 
20S2 


$2407 
2063 


$14955 
12496 


$14396 
12403 


$327 
322 


$327 
322 


$10051$ 993 
10051 941 


$1346l$1427 
13461 1306 


$ 10 


Total last year 


.... 


Increase 


411 


344 


2459 


1993 


5 


5 





52 




121 




Decrease 


. . . 






1 


I""" 














WYTHEVILLE- 
1 Bland 


$ 113 
120 

lOO 
91 
36 
136 
130 
105 
130 
180 
120 
127 
105 
150 
112 
58 
195 
135 


$ 113 

117 
100 
80 
36 
135 
130 
105 
120 
ISO 
120 
118 
105 
150 
lOO 
58 
195 
1351 


$ 7501 
800 
620 
610 
209 
90O 
870 
700 
800 

1200 
800 
850 
7001 

1000 
7501 
388 

130O 
900 


$ 750 
775 
620 
540 
204 
950 
870 
700 
800 

1200 
800 
795 
700 

1000 
680 
388 

1300 
900 


$ 10 
oo 

15 
11 



22^ 
22 
15 
22 
34 
22 
22 
10 
24 
15 
2 
34 
23 


$10 

22 

4 

11 

"22 
10 

"is 
34 

5 
11 
10 

24 
10 
2 
34 
23 


$ 39 
70 
52 
39 
10 
64 
64 
52 
64 
94 
62 
64 
44 
70 
52 
10 
106 


$ 42 
70 
25 
39 

■"76 

20 

■■■50 
106 
31 
46 
44 
70 
50 
10 
106 


$ 65 

104 

82 

65 

22 

105 

104 

83 

104 

165 

104 

104 

65 

105 

82 

15 

165 


$ 55 

104 

82 

65 

22 

105 

104 

82 

100 

165 

104 

104 

65 

105 

70 

15 

166 

102 


$ 


2 Cedar Sprinsrs 








4 Ceres 




5 Coveton 




6 Chilhowie 




7 Elk Creek 




8 Grant 








10 Alarion 




11 Marion Circuit 




12 Max Meadows 




13 Mechanicsburg 


100 


14 Rural Retreat 




15 Spring Valley 




16 Sugar Grove 


fi 


17 Wytheville 




18 Wytheville Circuit 


711 71 1 1021 




Total 


$2132 
2097 


$20971 
19971 


$14147) 
139981 


$13972 
13525 


$327 
322 


$247 
245 


$1027 $ 850 
1095 847 


$1640 
1641 


$1614 


$106 


Total last year 


1598' 




Increase 


35 


100 


1491 


447 


5 


2 


31 

68 1 


""i 


161 ... . 




1 .. 






1 r'"i 






1 


1 





HOLSTON ANNUAL 



135 



TABLE No. 3— FINANCE. 





















>> 


^ 










Home and 


^ 






Education and 


American 










M 


Ix 




Conference 


.- 


Church Extension 


Education 


Bible 


m 


fl 


oj'd 








Missions 








Exter 


sion 


Society 







1? f^ 


EH 


=2 






1 

















m.=! 


!2;m 


a 
g 






r3 




■d 






T3 




,- 




^ 




(D 




c 








(B 










tS c 


w © 








IS 


_o 


"5 




.2 
'3 


ID 




(D 


TS 


W 


^5 


§2 


a 








































C3 






C3 


p. 




C3 




C3 















< 


Ph 


^ 


■< 


(^ 


zo 


<JJ 


Ph 


< 


Ph 


P4 


fe 





EH 





1 


$ 105 


$ 105 


$.. 


$ 60 


$ 60 


$.. 


$ 55 


$ 55 


$ 4 


$ 4 


$ 5 


$ 2 


$ 100 


$ 688 


$ 2233 


2 


85 


85 




4C 


40 




44 


44 


5 


5 


4 


6 


84 


217 


1564 


« 


4(1 


40 




30 


3fl 




15 


15 


2 


2 


1 


2 




900 


1590 


4 


55 


55 




10 


10 




25 


25 


5 


5 


7 


10 


23 


202 


812 


5 


125 


125 




60 


60 




56 


55 


8 


8 


10 


8 


250 


1128 


3210 


« 


IfiO 


161 




50 


50 




85 


85 


4 


4 


5 


7 


514 


10371 


12972 


7 


45 


45 




15 


15 




20 


20 


1 


1 


4 


6 


128 


67 


851 


S 


13 


13 




6 


6 




5 


5 


1 


1 


1 


2 




181 


675 


9 


85 


85 




60 


60 




45 


45 


4 


4 


2 


4 




112 


1191 


10 


45 


45 




10 


10 


... 


30 


30 


5 


5 


3 


10 




77 


792 


11 


55 


55 




25 


25 




30 


30 


1 


1 


2 


8 


164 


244 


1004 


12 


110 


1101 . . . 


48 


48 




50 


60 


5 


5 


4 


6 


100 


408 


2^1 


1.^ 


m 


351... 


18 


10 




24 




2 


2 


1 


1 


500 


568 


1656 


14 


20 


20 




3 


31... 


5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


2 


51 


325 


712 


15 


100 


HI 




40 


40 




45 


45 


6 


6 


2 


5 




359 


1474 


IH 


20 


26 




10 


10 




10 


10 


2 


2 


3 


8 


62 


354 


839 


17 


60 


60 




25 


25 




30 


30 


10 


10 


6 


4 


50 


395 


1368 


18 


m 


135 




70 


70 




68 


68 


8 


8 


8 


5 


485 


645 


2952 


1J> 


200 


200 




100 


100 




100 


100 


12 


12 


15 


15 


1417 


2001 


6260 


20 


2(K) 


200 




100 


50 




85 


35 


fi 


fi 


8 




340 


794 


3760 


21 


40 


40 ... 


20 


20 




30 


30 


1 


1 


5 


8 


42 


6475 


7159 


22 


105 


105 




50 


50 




50 


50 


6 


6 


6 


6 


60 


692 


2006 




$ 1853 


$ 1856 


$.. 


$ 850 


$ 7921$.. 


$ 906 


$ 832 


$ 100 


$ 100 


$103 


$125 


$ 4370 


$ 27203 


$ 57331 




1853 


1848 




750 


733 


... 


910 


795 


100 


85 






3090 




50763 






8 




100 


59 




4 


37 




15 




.... 




6568 


1 


$ 89 


$ 80 


$.. 


$ 30 


$ 30 


!F.. 


$ 39 


.$ 29 


$ 6 


.$ 3 


? 3 


$ 8 


$ 165 


$ 256 


$ 1593 


2 


142 


142 




55 


55 




72 


72 


6 


6 


6 5 




448 


1962 


« 


114 
89 


114 
89 




50 
29 


25 ... 
29 ... 


68 
39 


11 
39 


7 
6 






100 
5 


440 
104 


1631 


4 


fi 


51 5 


1099 


5 


31 
145 


31 ... 


10 

57 






10 
72 


■■■"72 


1 
10 




1 




30 

2637 


373 


6 


145 




57 




10 


6 


15 


62 


4411 


; 


142 


142 




57 


12 




73 


10 


7 


4 


fi 


2 


100 


142 


1652 


s 


114 
142 


114 
100 




49 
57 






67 

74 


""38 


1 

8 


""5 


5 
fi 


■•■4 


25 


1148 
313 


2265 


9 


32 




1683 


10 


225 


225 




82 


82 


20 


107 


107 


11 


11 


12 




1110 


5708 


9624 


11 


142 


142 




58 


25 




72 


15 


8 


3 


fi 


5 


61 


2214 


3371 


12 


142 


142 




56 


20 




73 


18 


7 


4 


4 


2 


38 


1703 


3009 


18 


89 


89 




30 


30 




39 


39 


6 


6 


5 


8 


* 10 


111 


1422 


14 


145 


145 




57 


57 




75 


75 


9 


9 


fi 


15 


255 


513 


2710 


15 


114 


70 




49 


40 




67 


35 


5 




5 




150 


147 


1457 


IB 


24 


24 




9 


9 




9 


9 


2 


2 


1 


5 


20 


191 


793 


17 


225 


225 




82 


82 




107 


107 


11 


11 


12 


20 


736 


1119 


4478 


18 


145 


145 




58 


58 




72 


60 


9 


9 


6 


7 


145 


2719 


4491 




$ 2259 


$ 2164 


$.. 


$ 875 


$ 643 


$20 


$ 1135 


$ 736 


$ 120 


$ 89 


$ 94 


$101 


$ 2972 


$ 19943 


$ 4S024 




22i>9 


2010 




850 


600 




74o 


485 


118 


92 




.... 


2526 




59470 






154 




25 


43 




3901 


251 


2 






1 1 






3 






1446 














1' 1' f 


1 1 i 





136 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



TABLE No. 3— FINANCE. 













Conference 
Claimants 










Presiding 


Preacher in 


Bishops' 


and Super- 




Foreign 






Elder 


Charge 


Fund 


annuate En- 
dowment 




Missions 




NAME OP CHARGE 








Fund 








^ 




13 1 


^ 




TS 




■^ 










o 




IB 


a 




(B 








si 






o 




sses 
aid 


a> 


2 

'3 


O 


'3 


« 


"2 
"S 


s 

n 






< 


!^ 


< 1 Ph 


< 


Oi 


< 


Ph 




PM 





ABINGDON— 
1 Abingdon Station 


$ 225 
105 
150 

75 
135 
105 

90 
120 
150 
150 

80 
120 
225 

30 
300 

90 


$ 226 

90 
150 

60 
150 
100 

61 
120 
146 
150 

71 
112 
155 

10 
300 

50 


$ 1500 
700 
lOOO 
500 
900 
700 
510 

soo 

lOOO 
lOOO 

583 

SfM) 
1500 

200 
2O0O 

600 


$ 1500 
680 

1000 
395 
900 
700 
412 
800 

1000 

lOOO 
478 
745 

1063 
130 

2000 
348 


$ 36 
18 
17 

8 

25 
15 
14 
16 
23 
25 
12 
21 
25 

5 
60 

7 


$ 36 
10 
17 

8 

25 
15 
14 
14 
23 
25 
12 
12 
25 

1 
60 

4 


$121 
54 

70 
19 
84 
50 
20 
46 
80 
78 
28 
67 
85 
10 
205 
28 


$ 121 

27 
70 
13 
84 
50 
20 
40 
80 
78 
28 
45 
85 
1 
205 
15 


$ 160 
70 

n 

33 

107 
65 
51 
64 

103 

107 
50 
90 

105 
8 

274 
29 


$ 160 
50 
71 
33 

107 
67 
51 
55 

103 

107 
50 
80 

105 
6 

274 
22 


$... 






4 Benhams 




5 Blountville 




6 Bluff City 




7 Bristol Circuit 








9 Emory 




10 Mary Street 




11 Mountain City 




12 Rich Vallev 




13 Saltville 




14 Shady Mission 




15 State Street 

16 Virginia Avenue 




Total 

Total last year 


.$3150 
1989 


$1900 $14292 
18.36 13285 


$13150 
ia533 


$337|$301 
3221 257 


$1046 
1025 


$ 963 
860 


$1387 
1395 


$1341 
1208 




Increase 


161 




114 


1007 


618 


5 44 


20 


102 


■■■'s 


133 




Decrease 


























BIG STONE GAP— 
1 Appalachia 


$150 

167 
85 
91 

184 

125 
83 

117 
40 
86 

100 
85 

116 

150 
78 

116 


$ 129 

167 

61 

78 

184 

135 

53 

117 

29 

48 

85 

85 

1C6 

150 

51 

116 

18 

66 

100 

117 

142 


$ 900 
lOOO 
500 
650 
1100 
750 
500 
700 
241 
515 
600 
510 
7O0 
900 
470 
700 

■ ■ "497 
60O 
700 
858 


$ 771 
lOOO 
370 
558 
1100 
750 
339 
700 
175 
381 
500 
510 
629 
900 
S09 
700 
107 
400 
600 
450 
858 


$ 19 
29 
11 

6 
20 
20 

6 
18 


$ 10 
25 
11 

6 

20 
20 

6 
18 


$ 66 
75 
40 
23 
63 
62 
23 
68 


$ 66 
75 
26 
23 
63 
63 
17 
68 


$ 64 
83 
42 
23 
67 
67 
23 
64 


$ 50 

70 
30 
23 
67 
67 
18 
64 


$.,, 


2 Big Stone Gnp 




3 Clinchport 












6 Cumberland Gap 

7 Fort Blackroore 




8 Gate City 








10 Jonesville Circuit 


16 
17 

8 

17 
29 

8 
18 

6 

11 
13 
16 
17 


16 

17 
8 
7 

29 
3 

15 

3 

6 
17 


46 
60 
32 
48 
90 
34 
68 
17 
39 
41 
16 
55 


33 

60 
32 
48 
90 
15 
60 

2 
18 

8 
20 
55 


67 
50 
26 
67 
83 
32 
64 
10 
50 
41 
50 
63 


63 
50 
26 
67 
83 
11 
56 




11 Jonesville Station 

12 Kingsport 




13 Nickellsville 




14 Norton 


8 


15 Norton Mission 




16 Pennington Gap 




17 St. Charles ...„ 




18 Stickleyville 


83 
100 
117 
142 


24 
8 

22 
63 




19 Stonega 




20 Tom's Creek 




21 Wise 




Total 


$2215 
2198 


$2026 
2023 


1 $13391 
1 13205 


1 $12097 
1 13376 


!$305 
1 SOO 


$243 
257 


$ 996 
1028 


$ 841 
780 


i$1036 
1 1046 


$ 862 
888 


f 8 


Total last year 




Increase 


17 


3 


186 


"'i79 


5 






61 




1.... 


Decrease 


14 


22 
1 


10 


261 - 




i I 







HOLSTON ANNUAL 



137 



TABLE No, 3— FINANCE. 















j 






& 


>> 






!3 




Home and 


^ 






Education and 


American 


o 


o 




e-i 


>* 




Conference 


'S 


Church Extension 


Education 


Bible 


"S 


fl 


m a) 




u 




Missions 


P. 

02 






Extension 


Society 




a 




C3 


'a 






1 

03 














^ 


n " 


'^rt 


a 






"d 




Ti 






■o 




ri 




^ 










0) 






(D 










<a c 










m 




o 






cs 






M 




M 


far S 


"S o 


rt 


t3 




a) 


'n 


» 


S 


-d 






■d 




■d 




•-^ 


•"■S 






yi 




•^ 




03 




u? 


cS 


tc 


C3 




nCJ 


■^ ^ 


o 






< 


f^ 


fd 


< 


p^ 


m 


<! 


^ 


< 


{M 


p^ 


h 


o 


H 


ct 


1 


$ 202 


$ 202 


$. . $ 97 


$ 97 


.f.. 


$ 110 


$ 110 


.f 18 


$ 13 


$11$... 


$ 


$ 6760 


$ 9664 


2 


91 


50 


42 


15 


... 


46 


5 


6 


2 


5 


6 


235 


432 


1687 


^ 


102 
47 


102 

47 


43 


43 
14 




53 
23 


33 

15 


6 
3 


6 
3 






lOS 
124 


720 



2480 


4 




22 


2 




724 


5 


148 


148 




72 


72 




7S 


78 


9 


» 


9 


11 




250 


1893 


6 


86 


87 




36 


35 




47 


47 


6 


6 


4 


7 


57 


296 


1546 


7 


72 


72 




32 


32 




39 


39 


5 


5 


4 5 


4 


1357 


2083 


8 


87 


74 




46 


37 




48 


40 


6 


6 


4 6 


400 


706 


2551 


<) 


143 


143 




71 


71 




77 


77 


8 


8 


.... 11 


277 


4771 


6935 


30 


154 


154 




63 


63 




70 


70 


9 


9 


9 .... 


2023 


350 


2369 


11 


71 


71 




28 


28 




31 


31 


3 


3 


2 5 


455 


209 


1443 


12 


130 


80 




54 


30 




69 


20 


8 


4 


5 


4 


110 


126 


1448 


n 


147 


147 




71 


71 




86 


86 


8 


8 


9 


n 




500 


2864 


14 


8 
373 


6 
373 




9 

166 


1 




3 

190 


1 

190 


2 

25 


1 

25 








8 
4594 


165 


15 


1661... 


IS 


27 


1452 


9902 


16 


61 


25 




23 


13|... 


25 


15 


3 


2 


1 


.... 




1250 


1793 




$ 1922 


$ 1781 


$.. 


$ 875 


$ 7881$.. 


$ 995 


$ 855 


$ 125 


$ no 


•l! 83 


$93 


$ 5245 


$ 22329 


$ 49547 




1924 


1596 




850 


686|... 


995 


736 


lliO 


98 






6043 





41603 













2 


185 


;;: 


25 


1021... 


1 119 


5 


2 




....1 i 


7944 


1 


$ 85 


$ 75 


$.. 


$ 53 


$ 53 


$.. 


$ 28 


$ 21 


? 6 


$ 6 


$ 6 


$ 5 


$ 125 


$ 158 


$ 1590 


2 


100 


75 




76 


40 




63 


4? 


10 


1(1 


10 


5 


200 


3681 


5501 


3 


61 


4( 




35 


2C 




33 


IC 


4 


2 


2 




10(1 


294 


1066 


4 


33 


32 




21 


21 




19 


IS 


3 


3 


3 




5 


983 


1754 


5 


95 


95 




55 


55 




m 


m 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5C 


728 


2557 


6 


96 


9() 




54 


54 




5C 


50 


6 


6 


fi 


6 


425 


581 


2373 


7 


33 


25 




21 


15 




19 


15 


2 


2 


3 


3 


45 


571 


1159 


8 


95 


95 




65 


55 




28 


28 


6 


6 


6 


5 


36(1 


383 


2009 


» 




























10 
361 


214 


10 


76 


68l... 


34 


5 




34 


5 


4 


4 


3 




75 


1052 


11 


76 


76].. . 


35 


2( 




34 


2( 


A 


4 


51.... 


1223 


197 


1802 


la 


45 


45 




3(1 


3C 




25 


25 


4 


4 


4 


5 




501 


1365 


13 


85 


85 




42 


21 




34 


14 


4 


4 


3 


5 


45 


126 


1309 


14 


lOfl 


IOC 




76 


76 




63 


63 


1(1 


10 


10 


5 


417 


91C 


3119 


15 


56 


TA 




32 


15 




25 


IC 


4 


2 


2 


1 




14C 


635 


1« 


95 


83 




55 


48 




28 


2A 


6 


4 


4 




314 


147 


1671 


17 


21 
69 






20 
35 






19 
35 


■ ■ ■ '15 


2 
3 








21 
100 


■ ' ■ '425 


175 


18 


33 




15 




? 


? 


4 


1135 


1» 


57 


5C 




36 


8 




43 


8 


5 


2 


? 


1 


600 


85 


1525 


20 


66 


27 




35 


15 




35 


15 


4 


2 


P 


1 




147 


899 


21 


85 


85 




42 


42 




22 


22 


6 


6 






201 


956 


2553 




$ 1528 


$ 1198 


$.. 


$ 842 


$ 606 


$.. 


$ 687 


$ 457 


$ 98 


$ 84 


$78 


$ 51 


$ 4306 


$ 11384 


$ 35463 




1439 


1244 




846 


625 




702 


483 


98 


83 






4723 




39030 




89 


1...I 1 










1 














461. --1 4 


19 




15 


26 












3567 






1 



















138 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



TABLE No 


. 3— 


FINANCE. 












NAME OF CILiRGE 


Presiding 
Elder 


Preacher in 
Charge 


Bishops' 
Fund 


Conference 
Claimants 
and Super- 
annuate En- 
dowment 
Fund 


Foreign 
Missioni 




1 




13 

1 
< 


"2 


IS 

to 

IB 


"2 

Oh 


n3 

ID 
1 


S 
'3 


13 

< 




"3 

1 
p. 
m 


MORRISTOWN— 
1 Afton 


$ 50 

102 

35 

120 

133 

55 

150 

83 

200 

300 

93 

66 

120 

71 

350 

139 

85 

116 

75 

85 

40 

68 


$ 44 
93 
33 

84 
133 

55 

150 

66 

178 

300 

80 

58 

93 

71 

250 

134 

85 

100 

72 

85 

38 

56 


$ 300 
618 
215 
720 
800 
335 
900 
500 
1200 
1800 
562 
40O 
720 
431 
1500 
833 
515 
700 
445 
515 
240 
412 


$ 267 

556 
202 
506 
826 
336 
900 
398 
1071 
1800 
481 
353 
558 
431 
150O 
792 
515 
700 
434 
515 
229 
338 


$ 9 
13 

5 
10 
14 

8 
15 
15 
16 
40 
10 
10 
12 
11 
39 
22 
12 
10 
10 
13 

6 
10 


$ 4 
5 
2 
1 

14 
5 

15 
6 

"40 

5 

3 

12 

11 

39 

15 

8 

10 
10 
7 
6 
4 


$ 23 
44 
13 
45 
44 
29 
52 
50 
56 

134 
37 
31 
38 
33 

127 
71 
38 
37 
37 
45 
19 
37 


$ 10 

12 
11 

5 
44 

9 

52 
19 

"'i34 
35 
15 
34 

18 
127 
65 
29 
37 
34 
16 
19 
15 


% 35 

55 
17 
54 
60 
36 
66 
65 
67 

169 
45 
40 
50 
40 

161 
90 
50 
45 
40 
55 
30 
45 


$ 16 
65 
17 
10 
60 
30 
66 
41 


% 


2 Bulls Gap 




3 Del Rio 




4 EUzabethton 




5 Erwin 




6 Fall Branch 




7 Greeneville 




8 Hawkins 




9 Jeflerson City 




10 Johnson City 


169 
43 
20 
40 
16 

161 
65 
30 
45 
40 
15 
30 
15 




U Johnson City Circuit 

12 Jonesboro 




13 Limestone 




14 Moorpsburg 








16 Morristown Circuit 

17 Mosheim 




18 Newport 




19 Parrottsville 




20 Rogersville 




21 Rutledge 




22 Surgoinsville 










Total 


$2436 
2364 


$2258 
2247 


$H671 
14137 


$13706 
13506 


$310l$222 
3051 232 


$1040 
1040 


$ 740 

788 


$13151$ 984 
13151 1080 


$... 


Total last year 


Increase 


72 


11 


514 


200 


5 














Decrease 


10 




48 




96 




KNOXVILLE— 
1 Broad Street 


$ 234 

456 

224 
49 
80 

117 
78 
91 
91 

130 
45 
78 

110 
35 
85 
25 
84 
91 

130 
40 

104 
91 
78 

156 
45 
65 
33 


$ 234 

455 

224 
47 
80 

117 
78 
91 
91 

130 
25 
78 

110 
27 
85 
20 
84 
91 

130 
10 

115 
91 
70 

156 
25 
65 
33 


$ 1800 
3500 
1600 
453 
600 
900 
600 
700 
700 
1000 
370 
600 
850 
280 
650 
200 
646 
700 
1000 
315 
80O 
700 
600 
1200 
350 
500 
250 


$ 1800 
3500 
1600 
453 
620 
90O 
600 
700 
708 
1000 
210 
600 
850 
216 
650 
120 
646 
700 
1100 
226 
900 
700 
560 
1200 
280 
500 
264 


$ 40 
80 
35 

4 

4 
12 

3 
10 

5 
13 

5 

4 
14 

5 
13 

9 

13 
10 
14 
4 
13 
13 
15 
24 
4 
4 
2 


$ 40 
80 
35 

4 

4 
12 

3 
10 

5 
13 

""4 
14 

■'13 

■"is 

7 
14 
3 
13 
13 
15 
24 
2 
4 
2 


$ 142 
289 
122 
17 
15 
41 
12 
39 
18 
44 
17 
16 
43 
16 
44 

7 
47 
37 
54 
15 
49 
47 
55 
85 
14 
16 

8 


$ 142 
289 
122 
17 
15 
41 
12 
39 
18 
44 

1 
16 
39 

2 
35 

3 

47 
33 
54 

4 
49 
47 
13 
86 
10 
16 

8 


$ 200 
400 
172 
24 
20 
55 
18 
53 
21 
62 
24 
22 
60 
22 
60 
10 
63 
52 
75 
18 
65 
65 
74 
120 
22 
21 
11 


$ 200 
400 
172 
24 
20 
55 
18 
53 
21 
62 

3 
22 
60 

3 
51 

4 

30 
52 
75 

9 
65 
65 
74 
120 
16 
21 
11 


$ 


2 Church Street 


100 


3 Centenary 




4 Concord 




5 Ducktown 




6 East Park 




7 Emerald Avenue 




8 Epworth 




9 Etowah 


97 


10 Fountain City 

11 Knoxville Circuit 

12 Lincoln Park 

13 Lenoir City 

14 Little River 


448 






16 Lutrell 




17 Macedonia 




18 Madisonville 




19 Maryville 




20 New Hope 




21 Philadelphia 




22 Sevierville 




23 Straw Plains 


100 


24 Sweetwater 




25 Tazewell 




26 Virginia Avenue 




27 -Washington Pike 




Total 


'?2S53 


$2762 
2631 


$21864 
19398 


$21603 
19680 


$365 
363 


$347 
339 


$1310 
1310 


$1192 
1217 


$18091 
18091 


$1706lSfi'7f^ 


Total last yeor 


2706 


16421 





Increase 
Decrease 



147) 1311 2466) 1923) 2| S) 



64) 



H0L8T0N AlfNVAL 



139 



TABLE No. 3— FINANCE. 



Home and 

Conference 

Missions 



Church Extension 



Education and 
Education 
Extension 



American 

Bible 
Society 





>. 














o 


O 




IN 








o 


s 


2 




■§ 




hi 








a 






o 


-S- 


^^ 


a 

o 


o 

w 


(3 o 
^1 


52 


CM 


o 


n(.J> 


,Q ^ 


o 


fR 


fe 


o 


&H 



50 
75 
24 
73 
80 
45 
96 
83 
91 
234 
64 
45 
70 
55 
220 
124 
70 
65 
60 
76 
40 
65 



234 
53 
45 
60 
35 

220 
75 
40 
65 
60 
20 
40 
50 



25 
35 
12 
33 
SO 
27 
45 
40 
52 

110 
33 
29 
36 
29 

104 
62 
34 
33 
19 
34 
23 
30 



110 
12 

5 
28 

5 
104 
23 
25 
33 
19 
10 
23 

5 



32 

40 
13 
39 
40 
25 
49 
43, 
47( 

135 
31 
30 
36 
31 

117 
65 
37 
31 
26 
42 
21 
30 



125 

8 

5 

18 

5 

117 

15 

20 

31 

26 

20 

21 

5 



$ 2 



26 



61 
120 

72 

35 
180 

54 
342 



320 
104 
50 



1198 
60 



38 



256 



330 
141 
393 
716 

318 
436 
104 
848 

3655 
620 
260 
416 
102 

2463 

2933 
200 

3716 

290 

64 

93 

182 



642 
1396 

528 
1120 
3171 

617 
2204 

692 
2105 
8992 
1570 

916 
1274 

697 
5493 
4131 
1340 
4901 
1044 

814 

850 

823 



$ 1805); 
18141 



136513 
15341 . 



8751: 
8501 



5031, 
5111 



|§ 9301$ 



5201$ lOOili 
4vS5l 1051 



75| 



671$ 761$ 28901$ 184681: 
...I. ...I 68371 1 



45320 

44851 



1691 . 



.I...I 



.1 71. 



.J....J. 



1 


$ 280 


$ 280 


$.. 


$ 155 


$ 155 


$.. 


$ 140 


$ 140 


$ 13 


$ 13 


$ 12 


$ 18 


$ 176 


$ 3207 


$ 8110 


a 


553 


553 




315 


315 




285 


285 


26 


26 


25 


40 


4156 


7491 


18133 


3 


232 


232 




138 


138 




123 


123 


11 


11 


11 


17 


5200 


1341 


10225 


4 


32 


32 




20 


20 




17 


17 


2 


2 


2 


2 




1185 


1705 


5 


28 


28 




16 


16 




14 


14 


1 


1 


1 


2 


300 


526 


1677 


6 


76 


76 




43 


43 




38 


38 


4 


4 


2 


6 


280 


510 


2284 


7 


24 


24 




14 


14 




12 


12 


1 


1 


2 


2 


51 


298 


1206 


8 


75 


75 




41 


41 




38 




4 


4 


3 


3 




632 


1670 


9 


28 


35 




17 


17 




15 


15 


2 


2 


2 


2 


375 


1022 


2420 


10 


88 


88 




50 


50 




47 


47 


4 


4 


3 


7 


244 


747 


3034 


11 


31 


4 




20 


1 




18 


1 


2 




1 


1 


5 


325 


597 


1?^ 


28 


28 




IS 


18 




15 


15 


3 


8 


9 


o 




455 


1316 


13 


80 


80 




46 




45 


39 


39 


5 


5 


4 




59 


603 


2107 


14 


28 
86 


4 

'55 




17 
47 


1 


'15 


15 
45 


1 
16 


3 
6 






i 

7 


20 


121 

231 


403 


15 


3 


2 


1152 


16 


15 
87 
73 


7 
87 
73 




9 
48 
42 






6 

47 
38 


'""'29 


1 
6 
4 








5 


IS 
150 
325 


177 


17 






6 
3 






1067 


18 


37 




3 


4 


305 


1702 


19 


102 


102 




58 


58 




50 


50 


6 


6 


6 


7 


50 


1083 


2824 


'0 


25 
89 


11 
89 




14 
51 






13 

48 


""•'48 


2 
6 










168 
428 


436 


21 


51 




6 


5 


7 


150 


2038 


'A'Z 


89 


89 




51 


51 




46 


46 


fi 


6 


4 


V 




346 


1529 


23 


104 


104 




57 


10 




53 


10 


5 


■o 


3 


4 


571 


170 


1814 


?,4 


164 


164 




92 


92 




83 


83 


8 


S 


8 


12 




1947 


4085 


25 


30 


SO 




17 


12 




16 


12 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1212 


1657 


26 


29 


29 




18 


18 




16 


16 


2 


2 


2 


■> 


17 


383 


1150 


27 


15 


15 


... 


9 


9 




8 


8 


1 


1 


1 


i 


179 


160' 


838 




$ 2471 


$ 2394]$.. 


1$ 14231$ 1167 $60 


? 1285 


$ 1065 


$ 135 


$ 122 


$105|$155 


$ 12143 


$ 25084 


$ 75365 




2491 


230l|... 


1 14001 120O... 


1285 


1041 


135 


115 


....!.... 


13761 





72356 






931... 


1 231 531... 
1 1... 




24 




7 



1 






3009 


1 


20 








....!.... 









140 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



TABLE No. 3— FINANCE. 



NAME OF CHARGE 



Presiding 
Elder 



Preaclier in 
Charge 



CHATTANOOGA- 



1 Athens 

3 Aetna 

3 Carlock 

4 Centenary 

5 Charleston 

6 Cleveland 

7 Cleveland Circuit 

8 Dodson Ave. & Main St. 

9 East Lake 

10 Highland Park 

11 Hixson 

12 Jasper 

13 King Memorial 

14 Mt. Vernon 

15 North Chattanooga 

16 Ooltewah 

17 Rlce^ille 

18 Ridgedale 

19 Rising Fawn 

20 Rossville 

21 St. Elmo 

22 South Pittsburg 

23 Trenton 

24 Trlnitr 

25 Whiteside Street 

Total 

Total last year 

Increase 

Decrease 



25 
27 

653 
66 

218 
13 
22 
48 

240 
33 
62 
95 
29 
78 
70 
66 
84 
45 
70' 

166 
90 
45 

165 

110 



f260O 
260O 



801$ 800 
181 250 



19 

653 

66 

218 

13 

22 

29 

240 

£9 

62 

95 

18 

70 

67 

49 

84 

39 

70 

166 

75 

29 

165 

110 



225 

3000 

7401 

13001 

210 

450 

600 

1700 

400 

700 

800 

400 

800 

700 

60O 

800 

455 

800 

lOOO 

600 

470 

2100 

1000 



225 
160 

3000 
740 

1300 
210 
450 
411 

1700 
357 
700 
800 
247 
700 
646 
446 
80( 
381 
SOS 

lOOO 
547 
450 

2100 

10001 



Bishops' 
.Fund 



Conference 
Claimants 
and Super- 
annuate En- 
dowment 
Fund 



^ I 



Foreign 
Missions 



$ 16 

"'s 

79 
5 

20 
1 
3 
8 

30 
2 
2 

14 

"5 

12 
6 

16 
4 
2 

18 
5 
5 

15 



46 
13 
16 

312 
35 

120 
7 

11 
23 

126 
17 
35 
47 
16 
41 
38 
35 
45 
23 
36 
85 
45 
21 
84 
60 



46 
12 
16 

312 

^ 

89 

7 

11 
23 

126 
11 
13 
47 
7 



$ 56 


$ .56 


17 


9 


17 


17 


450 


450 


47 


22 


152 


110 


9 


9 


15 


15 


33 


.32 


170 


170 


23 


10 


47 


6 


60 


(S> 


18 


14 


54 


45 


.50 


50 


47 


9 


61 


61 


31 


24 


48 


46 


117 


117 


62 


40 


31 


SI 


114 


86 


76 


35 



60O 



$2486 1 $2j 
25121 20057 



261 843 7681 1381 811 



192141 



$365 1 $279 1 
2271 198' 



$1337|$ni5|$lS09l$1529l$607 
13701 12041 18091 15161... 



I I 



33 89 



13. 



HARRIMAN— 



1 AndersonvlUe 

2 Clinton 

3 Coal Creek 

4 Crossville 

5 Dayton 

6 Decatur 

7 Dunlap 

8 Evansville 

9 Habersham 

10 Harriman 

11 Harriman Circuit 

12 Jacksboro 

13 LaFollette 

14 Pikeville 

15 Rockwood 

16 Rohertsville 

17 Spring City 

18 Sequatchie 

19 Stony Point 

20 Whitwell 

Total 

Total last year 

Increase 

Decrease 



I I 



$ 64 
117 
90 
72 
144 
108 
117 
108 



152 

58 

lOS 

117 

108 

108 

38 

75 

70 

76 

126 



41 
117 

90 
65 
144 
108 
117 
90 
31 



$ 3531$ 232 
650| 650 
600 



400 
800 
600 
650 
600 
350 
1381 1000 
541 



lOS 
1171 
97 
91 
19 
67 
61 
76 
126 



600 
650 
600 
600 
250 
500 
385 
500 
700 



.l$1857$1668l$11110 
,| 1874 18131 11095 



171 1451 



15 



377 
800 
600 
650 
510 
151 
902 
305 
600 
650 
537 
503 
111 
375 
335 
424 
700 



$ 41$ 20 

8 38 

10 38 



f 967711 
106061 



;201l$144|$ 
2121 1241 



712|$ 574 
7351 469 



735 

756 



627! 



929 



20 



231. 



106 



211 



42 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



141 



TABLE No. 3— FINANCE. 



Home and 

Conference 

Missions 



Chorcli Extension 







-C! 






o 




crt 










■tf 


o 










C3 


p, 




CU 


Oi 


<! 



Education and 
Education 
Extension 



American 

Bible 
Society 





>. 














o 


Q 




c^ 


M 


o 


.-4 +j 


2 


















o 




^1^ 


a 
g 


o 
H 


C3 O 




Is 

-.J 




nU 


-c ^ 


o 


h 


ta 


o 


^ 



$ 84 


$ 84 


$.. 


$ 50 


$ 50 


$.. 


$ 45 


$ 45 


$ 6 


$ 6 


$ 6$ 7 


$ 358 


$ 359 


24 
25 


12 




13 

15 






10 
13 


' ■ ■ 'is 


1 

1 










4050 
92 


15 




1 


1 


1 


48 


620 


620 




352 


352 




333 


333 


34 


34 


33 


52 


11533 


3039 


60 
210 


60 

200 




36 
120 






30 
110 


' ■ ■ 'so 


4 
10 


4 
4 








352 
541 


90 




10 


3 


802 


12 


12 




7 


7 




7 


7 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1383 


22 


22 




12 


12 




10 


10 


1 


1 


1 


1 


221 


472 


42 


42 




24 


24 




24 


24 


2 


2 


2 


2 


66 


149 


240 


240 


20 


128 


128 




120 


120 


12 


12 


12 


18 


140 


5944 


30 


12 


... 


18 


4 




18 




2 


1 


1 


1 


55 


58 


67 
90 


13 
90 


... 
... 


36 

50 


7 
50 




34 
44 


7 
44 


2 
4 


1 
4 


1 
4 






334 
1225 


8 


141 


24 
74 
67 


17 
59 
67 




14 
41 
37 


3 
18 
34 




15 
3S 
32 


2 
14 
30 


1 
5 
4 










42 
922 
173 


2 
4 








3 


3 


102 


60 
81 


18 

81 




36 

52 






30 

44 


■ ■ ■ '27 


4 

5 










157 
402 


45 




5 


4 




78 


4tA 


30 




24 


5 




22 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 


22 


167 


63 


58 




39 


12 




37 


5 


3 




2 




132 


2669 


162 


162 




90 


90 




80 


80 


8 


8 


8 


1?, 


4 


674 


86 


55 




52 


18 




40 


16 


3 


3 


41 4 


152 


264 


43 


43 




25 


14 




19 


14 


2 


2 


21 1 




132 


162 


150 




94 


71 




SO 


60 


7 


5 


61 8 


369 


1541 


100 


48 




60 


21 




50 


20 


6 


1 


5 


.... 


50 


849 



2044 
4326 

413 
23855 
1369 
3667 
1667 
1339 

870 
10189 

552 
1146 
2450 

S49 
1860 
1308 

714 
1755 

694 
3920 
2541 

991 

803 
4981 
2518 





$ 2491 $ 2230|$20|$ 14251$ 1070!$. 
2491 21631... 1 14001 10941.. 


1$ 12851$ 7561$ 1301$ 103|$107l$123l$ 142731$ 259901$ 76321 
1 12851 9751 135| 121] . . . .1. . . .| 204S2I 1 74600 




1 671. ..I 251 1.. 


1 1 




1 




1721 


1 ...[ 1 241.. 


1 1 219 


5 


181 















1 


$ 25 


$ 10 


$.. 


$ 8 


$ 3 


$.. 


$ 12 


$ 4 


$ 2 


$ 2 


$ 1 


$... 


$ 10 


$ 518 


$ 876 


a 


53 


53 




24 


12 




24 


14 


4 


2 


2 




278 


623 


1958 


3 


40 


40 




21 


21 




21 


21 


5 




4 


4 


255 


210 


1280 


5 


100 


100 




35 


35 




35 


35 


5 


8 


9 


5 


200 


910 


2779 


5 


100 


100 




35 


25 




35 


35 


8 


8 


9 


5 


200 


910 


2779 


6 


55 


55 




27 


27 




32 


32 


5 


5 


5 


2 




809 


1773 


7 


56 


'56 




24 


24 




24 


24 


4 


4 


2 




27 


314 


1398 


8 


50 


50 




24 


10 




22 


3 


5 




1 


i 


30 


123 


890 


<) 


20 
75 






10 
32 






1 
34 


""34 


1 

3 












154 


10 


75 




32 




3 


5 


7 


85 


444 


1838 


n 


'50 


50 




26 


20 




21 


20 


3 


2 


4 


2 


32 


966 


1535 


n 


60 


60 




16 


16 




14 


14 


4 


4 


2 


4 


70 


1402 


2350 


13 


55 


55 




25 


25 




26 


26 


5 


5 


4 


6 


61 


1574 


2780 


14 


67 


67 




24 


19 




24 


19 


5 


5 


4 


4 


90 


194 


1159 


15 


85 
20 
60 


33 
10 
60 




28 

8 

16 


5 

2 

17 




34 
11 
26 


3 

1 
26 


3 
3 

5 


3 


1 






496 
45 
836 


1193 


Ifi 






208 


17 


9 


4 


4 


97 


1681 


18 


34 


15 




31 


12 




13 


7 


5 


2 


2 


1 


26 


131 


617 


19 


49 


49 




22 


5 




24 


10 


4 




1 


1 


78 


92 


806 


20 


53 


53 




25 


25 




20 


20 


1 


1 


2 


5 


3d 


289 


13S3 




$ 1013 


$ 9121$.. 


1$ 441 


$ 2981$.. 


1$ 434 


$ S22 


$ 78 


$ 56 


$54 


$ 45 


$ 1348 


$ 100831$ 26S47 




1 1043 


8751.. 


1 425 


2171... 


1 445 


227 


75 


51 






1656 


1 34174 




■■■■36 


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81 






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3 


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142 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



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HOLSTON ANNUAL 



143 



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144 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 



CHRONOLOGICAL ROLL OF MEMBERS, 1914. 

Clerical Members in the order of their admission into full connection. The 
year of admission on trial, and the year of ordination as Elder are also given. 



6 


Name 


a 






u 

3 

■6 
u 




d 

12; 


Name 


[3 

a 



a a 


1^ 


(S 

2 

u 



1 


David SuUins 


'50 
•50 
•53 

'56 
'58 
'61 
'61 
'61 
'65 
'65 
•66 
'67 
'67 
'67 
'68 
'6S 
'68 
'69 
'69 
'70 
71 
•71 
•72 
•69 
"72 
'72 
'72 
'72 
'70 
'72 
'72 
'75 


1852 
1852 
1865 
1858 
1860 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1867 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1870 
1870 
1870 
1871 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1875 
1877 
1877 
1877 
1S78 
1878 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1880 
1880 
ISSC 
1SS0 


'55 
'54 
'57 
'60 
'62 
'65 
'65 
'65 
'69 
'70 
'72 
'73 
'71 
'71 
'72 
'72 
•74 
'73 

'74 
'76 

'77 
'76 
'76 
'76 
'76 
'76 
'76 
•76 
'76 
•79 
•79 
•79 
•79 
'81 
'80 
'81 
'82 
'81 
'82 
'83 
•82 
'85 
'86 
'83 
'84 
'86 
'87 
'87 
'87 
'87 
'87 
'88 
'89 
'88 
'89 
'89 

'90 
'90 
•90 
•94 
'90 
'90 


65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
SO 
81 
82 
S3 
84 
85 
86 
87 
8S 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 


Samuel H. Hall 




1888 . - . 


•> 


Richard N Price 


John B. Simpson 


'85 
'87 
'86 
'86 
'86 
'75 
'87 
'88 


1889 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1890 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1893 
1893 
1893 
1893 
1894 
1894 
1901 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1S95 
1895 
1896 
1S96 
1896 
18% 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1897 
1897 
1897 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1903 


'94 


^ 


Mitchell P. Swaim 

Landon C. Delashmit 

Absalom D. Stewart 

Levi K. Haynes 




'91 


4 


Charles W. Kelley 

Alfred H. Towe 


'93 


f; 


John H. Duvall 


'91 


7 


Benjamin F. Nucliolls 

Jacob Smith 






s 


William S. Neighbors — 

Joseph E. Lowry 

Samuel D Long 


'91 


<» 


Charles T. Carroll 


'93 


10 


J Tyler Frazier 




11 


John S. W. Neel 


Thomas J. Eskridge 


'89 
•89 
•88 

'89 
'90 
'90 
'90 
'88 
'89 
'91 
'91 
'91 
'91 
'92 
'92 
'92 
'93 
'90 
•91 
•93 
'92 
'94 
'93 
'94 
'94 
'94 
'94 
'94 
'90 
'92 
[-94 
'95 
'95 
'93 
'95 
'94 
'95 
'96 
'94 
'90 
'96 
'97 
'93 
'95 
•98 
'97 
'98 
'98 
'98 
'98 
'99 


'93 


1? 


Kennerly C. Atkins 

Daniel H Carr 


'93 


1"^ 


Isaac N. Munsey 

Elbert L. Addington .... 

Charles R. Brown 

Tyler D. Strader 

William E. Bailey 

Edward W. Mort 

William I. Fogleman 

John M. Romans 

John M. Paxton 


'93 


14 
15 
16 
17 
IS 


Milton L. Clendenen 

Lemuel L. H. Carlock 

E. Embree Hoss 

William D. Mitchell 

George D. French 


■'94 
'94 
'95 


19 

20 
'^1 


Thomas R. Handy 

William C. Carden 

John H. Parrott 


'94 
'95 


22 
23 
94 


William R. Bamett 

Joseph A. Bilderback 


Martin P. Carico 

George M. Moreland 


'95 
'99 
'% 


25 


Stephen T. M. McPherson 

William H. Price 

J. Weslev Smith 


David P. Hurley 

John W. Perry 


•96 

'9?; 


?7 


Pharoah L. Cobb 

Joseph A Baylor 


'04 


"8 


John M. Wolfe 


'97 


9q 


James I. Cash 




'00 


30 
31 


Daniel S. Hearon 

Ayers Kincaid 


Elbert N. Woodward .... 

Charles B. Steele 

Will L. Sorrell 


'97 
'97 


V 


Charles M. James 


'^7 


R"^ 


William W. Hicks 


Michael J. Wysor 


'99 


?4 


James A. Lyons 


'75 
'76 

'76 

'77 
'77 
'77 
•78 
'76 
•78 
'78 


'99 


^5 


John W. Carnes 


Wheeler M. Morrell 

.Toel M. Carter . 


'98 


?ri 


John R. Walker 


'9<? 


S7 


Robert A. Owen 


Sidney B. Vaught 

James W. Repass 

Roby K. Sutherland 


'9S 


38 
39 
40 


George A. Maiden 

George W. Summers 

Eugene Blake 


'10 

'99 

'99 


41 

42 
43 
44 
45 


John C. Bays 


Robert M. Walker 

Charles E. Painter 

Jack B. Ward 


'98 


Richard A. Kelly 

Richard G. Waterhouse. . 

George W. Jackson 

John L. Prater 


'99 
'99 


'7811880 
'79 1881 
'80 1882 
•80 1SS2 


Stephen W. Bourne 

William C. Crockett .... 

William H. Troy 

Gasper A. Carner 


'99 
'07 


David McCracken 




47 


John E. Naff 


'07 


48 


Lemuel M. Cartright 

Stephen S. Catron 

Henry C. Clemens 

Robert T. McDowell 

Thomas C. Schuler 

Samuel K. Byrd 


'81 
'83 
'83 
'83 
'83 
'84 
'84 
'84 
'85 
'85 
'85 
'86 
'86 
'86 
'85 
•86 
'83 


1884 
1885 
1885 
1885 
1885 
1886 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1888 
1888 
1888 
1888 


'03 


41 


.Tohn A. Early 


'Oft 


.50 
51 


William C. Hicks 

John B. Frazier 


'oi 


52 
53 


Edward A. Shugart 

Hugh S. Johnston 

John W Rader 


'00 

'0? 


54 


James E. Bruce 


'01 


55 


John W. Browning 


John F. Jones 


'03 


5fi 




Caughey A. Beaxd 


'0? 


57 


Elijah F. Kahle 


'0? 


5S 






'0?l 


59 
fiO 


Robert S. Umberger 

Alfred B. Hunter 


James L. Mullens 


'02 
'03 


61 


John C. Orr 


James B. Brown 

Charles G. Hounshell 

Hale S Hamilton 


'03 


62 
63 


Euffene H. Cassidy 

Tnmps A H Shnlpr 


'05 


64I Willinm R. Rnlder 










1 










1 





H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



14^ 



CHRONOLOGICAL ROLL OF MEMBERS, 1914— Continued, 



Name 



a a 
o o 



Name 



a a 
o o 



129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 



George W. Simpson** 

Thomas Priddy 

Edward E. Wiley .... 

Walter Hodge 

N. Rhea Cartright .. 
Samuel P. Douglas* 

John M. Crowe** 

Samuel V. Morell 



137 Thomas S. Hamilton 

138 James P. Barnett ... 

139| John W. Helvey 

1401 J. Rutledge King ... 
141i Wiley M. Ellis 



142 David T. Miles 

143 Lyle M. Keel 

144 Richard C. Camper .. 

145 Elbert H. Cole 

146 William S. Lyons 

147 William M. Patty .... 

148 James H. Wagner 

149 Lewis W. Pierce 

150l Thomas J. Houts 

15li Andrew M. Quails ... 

152 David F. Wyrick 

153! Lorenzo D. Yost 

154 James C. Logan 

155] Leonard J. Williams . 
156! Walter S. Hendricks... 
1571 Charles R. Melton ... 

158 George S. Wagner 

159 Sterling A. Neblett .. 

160 Carroll H. Vamer* ... 

161 Sanders S. Boyer (c). 
1621 William iB. Belchee... 

1631 Joseph B. Ely 

164| James M. Walker 

1651 Jerome V. Hall 
166' Hugh B. Brown 
167 " - — - 

168 
169 



George S. Wood 

John N. Smith 

Charles W. Dean 

170' James H. Summitt (f). 
1711 Zech D. Holbrook* .... 
1721 Kemper G. Munsey ... 
1731 Robert B. Piatt, Jr. .. 
1741 William B. Carbaugh 
175! John W. Stewart 

176 Rufus M. Standifer**. 

177 N. M. Watson* 

178 Newton F. Walker (c) 

179 James A. Ellison* 

1801 Isaac T. Cameron* ... 
1811 Arthur D. Thorn** 



182 
183 

184 
185 



James A. L. Perkins**. 

John S. Henley 

Samuel A. McCanless. 
Arthur B. Moore 



1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 



1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 



'03 1905 
1905 



1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 '09 



1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 



1907 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1907 



1907 1 '11 
1907 '09 
1907 '09 



1908 
1908 
1908 



1889 
1909 
1909 
1909 



186 
187 
18S 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
1971 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
21S 
219 i 
2201 
221 1 
2221 
223! 
2241 
2251 
2261 
227 
228 
229! 
2301 
2311 
232! 
2331 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 



Charles A. Pangle 

Sanders S. Kreger 

George L. Lambert 

Francis M. Buhrman* .. 

Charles C. Weaver* 

William N. Wagner* .... 

William H. Briggs 

George T. Jordan 

Harry S. Hutsell 

William C. Thompson . . . . 
Silas A. McGhee (d) .... 

John L. Scott (b) 

Frank M. Reynolds 

Charles N. Kennedy .... 

James H. Umberger 

William H. Walker 

Bruce N. Waterhouse 

Jesse F. Benton 

Harry E. Bradshaw 

William T. Evans 

Barney Thompson* 

Thomas R. Wolfe* 

Washington D. Farmer(b) 

Frank B. Snavely(e) 

Samuel D. Lambert 

Samuel L. Browning 

William E. Browning.... 

Chapman K. Wingo 

Charles R. Jones 

Ernest M. Ritchey 

French Wampler 

Charles T. Gray (e) 

George R. Stuart** 

Herbert B. Vaught* 

James W. Moore* 

Charles G. McKay (a).... 

Graydon K. Patty 

Rufus G. Reynolds 

Luther S. Reynolds 

Carlock Hawk 

Enoch L. McConnell 

Bascom Waters 

Hugh E. Kelso 

George O. Ganoway 

Marion Quessenberry 

Samuel C. Beard 

William L. Dykes 

James H. Watkins 

Allen J. Thomas 

Onnle C. Wright 

Joseph A. Henderson 

Thomas E. Brooks 

.1. Stewart French* 

Rufus K. Triplett* 

William L. Patton* 

J. Henry Montgomery**.. 



1909 
1909 
1909 



1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 



'12 



1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 



1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 



14 



1913, 

1913, 

1913, 

1913, 

1913, 

1913, 

1913, 

1913, 

1913, 

1914, 

1914 , 

1914 , 

1914. 

1914 

1914, 

1914 



•Transfer. 
•♦Readmitted. 

(a) From the Congregational Church. 

(b) From the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

(c) From the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. 

(d) From the United Brethren Church. 

(e) From the Baptist Church. 

(f) Prom the Lutheran Church. 



146 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 
CONFEEENCE DIRECTORY, 1914-1915. 



Name 


Post Office 


Appointment 


1 Afldlngton, E. L* 


Radford Va 


District Evangelist 
Superannuate 


2 Alexander F.* 


Indian Springs, Tenn 

Knoxville, Tenn 


3 Atkins, K. C* 


4 Bslley W. E.* 


Morristown, Tenn 

Davton, Tenn 




6 Bamett, J. F.* 


Dayton 
Superannuate 


6 Barnett, W. R.* 


Knoxville, Tenn 


7 Baylor, J. A.* 


Wytheville, "Va 


Wytheville District 


8 Bays, J. C* 


Valley Head, Ala 

Athens, Tenn 


Superannuate 

Supernumerary 

Rogersvllle 


9 Beard, C. A 


10 Beard, S. C* 


Rogersvllle, Tenn 


H BeJchee W. B 


Riner, Va 


Aubern 


12 Benton, J F* 


McDowell, W. Va 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Abingdon, Va 


McDowell 


13 Bllderback, J. A.* 

14 Blake, Eugene* 


Aetna Circuit 

V.-Pres. M. W. College 

Superannuate 


15 Bogle E. H.* 


Bristol, Tenn 


16 Bourne, S. W.* 


Eckman, W. Va 


Eckman and Keystone 
Ridgedale 


17 Beyer, S. S.* 




18 Bradshaw. H. E.* 

19 Brlggs W H* 


Powell's Station, Tenn 

Clinton Tenn 


Knoxville Circuit 
Clinton 


20 Brooks T. E.* 


Winding Gulf, W. Va 


Winding Gulf 


21 Brown, 0. R.* 


Supernumerary 


22 Brown H. B.* 


Blaf'kford Va 


Elk Garden 


23 Brown J R* 


Jefferson City, Tenn 

Marvville, Tenn 


Jefferson City 

Maryvllle 


24 Browning, J. W.* 


25 3"ownini? S L.* 


Knoxville, Tenn., R. 6 

Mosheim, Tenn 


Macedonia 


26 Browning, W. B.* 


Mosheim 


27 I'rnce, J. E 


Bland Va 


Superannuate 


28 Biihrman. F. M.* 


Cedai* Bluff, Va 


Cedar Bluff 


29 Burrow J A* 


Chattanooga, Tenn 

Cerog, Va 


Chattanooga District 


SO Byrd, S. K.» 


Ceres 


31 Cameron, I. T 


Welch, W. Va 


Missionary to Italians 


32 <^an2per R C* 


La Follette, Tenn 

Floyd, Va 


Jacksboro 


33 Cnibaugh. "W. R.* 


Floyd 


34 harden, W. C* 


Alton Park, Tenn 

Graham, Va 


Superannuate 


35 Carlco, M. P 


Graham 


36 Carlock, L. L. H 


Bri'jtol, Va 


V.-Pres. Sullins College 


37 Garner, G. A.* 


Princeton, W. Va 

Fountain City, Tenn., R... 
Pocahontas Va 


Supernumerary 
Superannuate 


38 Cqrnes J. W.* 


39 Carr, D. H.* 


Superannuate 


40 Carroll C. T.« 


MoL'rlstown". Tenn 

Bluefleld W Va 


Superannuate 


41 Carter, J. M.* 


Grace Church 


42 Cartright, L. M.* 

43 Cartright, N. R 


Ch.Tttanooga, Tenn 


Whiteside Street 
Lebanon 


44 Cash, J. I.* 


Spring City, Tenn 

Radford, Va 


Supernumerary 


45 Oapsidy, E. H.* 


Radford District 


46 Catron, S. S.* 


St. Elmo, Tenn 


St. Elmo 


47 Clemens H C 


.Tohnson City, Tenn 

Bristol, Tenn 


Superannuate 


48 Clendenen, M. L 


Superannuate 


49 Cobb, P. L/.* 


Chattanoosa, Tenn 

Graham, Va 


Highland Park 


60 <^ole, B H.* 


Graham Circuit 


Bl Coi K W.* 


Lenoir City, Tenn 

Spring Valley. Va 

.Johnson Cltv. Tenn 

Bluff Citv, Tenn 


Lenoir City 


B2 'l^rockett. W. C* 

53 Crowe J M* 


Spring Valley 
.Johnson City 
Bluff City 


54 Dame J. D.* 


55 Dean C. W.* 


Wise, Va 


Wise 


56 Dolashmit, L. C 


Portland, Ore 


Superannuate 


57 Douglas, S. P 




Ricevllle 


58 Duvall J. A.* 


Sevierville, Tenn 


Sevierville 


59 Dykes, W. L.* 


Andersonville, Tenn 

Marion Va 


Andersonville 


60 Early J A.* 


Marion Circuit 


61 Ellis, W. M.* 


Cumberland Gap. Tenn 

Bull's Gap, Tenn 


Cumberland Gap 


62 I5Ulson, .7. A.* 


Bull's Gap 


63 Ely J. B • 




Harriman 


64 Eskrldge. T. J.* 

65 FJvans W T* 


Fountain Citv, Tenn 

Sequatchie Tenn 


Knoxville District 
Sequatchie 


66 Farmer, W. D.* 




Dtinlap 


67 Fo«cleman. W. I.* 

68 Frazier J. B.* 


.Tohason City, Tenn 

Cavete, Philippine Islands. 
Chllhowie, Va 


.Johnson City Circuit 
Chaplain In U. S. Navy 
Emorv and Chaplain 


69 Frazier J. T 


70 French G D.* 


Abingdon Va 


Abingdon District 









•Member of (Brotherhood. 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 



147 



CONFERENCE DIRECTORY, 1914-1915— Continued. 



■Name 


Post Office 


Appointment 


71 French J. S.* 


Bristol, Tenn 


State Street, Bristol 


72 Ganowav G O 


Hixson, Tenn 


Hixson 


73 Gray C. T * 


Spring City, Tenn 

Dublin, Va 


Spring City 
Dublin 


74 Guy J T* 


75 Hall, J. v.* 


Cedar Springs, Va 

Bane, Va 


Cedar Springs Circuit 


76 Hall S H * 


Staff ordsville Ci'cuit 


77 Hamilton H S 


Sweetwater, Tenn 

Chattanooga. Tenn 

Emory, Va 


Superannuate 


78 Hamilton, T. S.* 

79 Handv T R * . . 


Trinity 

North Holston 




La Follette, Tenn 


LaFollette 




Emory, Va 


Superannuate 
Gate City 
Cripple Creek 


82 Hearon, D. S.* 

83 Helvey, J. W.* 


Gate City, Va 


Cripple Creek, Va 

East Chattanooga, Tenu... 
Etowai, Tenn 


84 Henderson, J. A.* 

85 Hendricks W S ♦ 


Dodson Ave. and Main 
Etowah 


86 Henley, J. S.* 


Surgoinsville, Tenn 

Morristown, Tenn 

Pennington Gap, Va 

Morristown, Tenn., R . . 

Bland Va 


Surgoinsville 


87 Hicks, W. C* 


Superannuate 


88 Hicks, W. W.* 

89 Hobbs, J. N 


Pennington Gap 
Superannuate 


90 Hodge Walter* 


Bland 


91 Holbrook Z D 


Pearisburg, Va 


Pearisburg 

Bishop 

Trav. Sec. Stu VoL M'v't 


92 Hoss E E * 


Nashville, Tenn 


93 Hounshell, C. G 


Chattanooga, Tenn 

Welch, W. Va 


94 Houts T J * 


Welch 


95 Hunter A. B* 


Galax, Va 


Galax 


96 Hurley D P * . ... 




Tazewell District 


d7 Hutsell H S * ... 


Rockwood Tenn 


Rockwood 








99 Jackson, G. W 


Lenoir City, Tenn 

Mt. Vernon, Tenn 

Grant, Va 


Supernumerary 
Superannuate 


100 James, C. M 


101 Johnston H S ♦ ... 


Grant 


102 Jones C R * 


Rossville, Ga 




103 Jones, J F.* 


Athens, W. Va 




104 Jordan G T * . . 


Elk Creek, Va 


Elk Creek 


105 Kahle E F * 


Abingdon, Va 


Sec. Children's Home So 


106 Kelley, 0. W.* 


Knoxville, Tenn 


Centenary 


107 Kelly, R. A.« 

108 Kelso H E.* 


Sweetwater, Tenn 






109 Kennedy, C. N.* 

110 Kincaid, A.* 


Sand Lick, W. Va 


Rock 


Cleveland, Tenn 




Ill King, J R * 


Wytheville, Va 


Wvtheville Circuit 


112 Kreger, S. S.* 


Greeneville, Tenn 


Manager Orphanage 


113 Lambert, G. L.* 




Athens 


114 Lrfimbert. S. D.* 

115 Lee, B. W 


Princeton, W. Va 

Knoxville, Tenn 


East Princeton 
East Park 


116 Logan, J. C 


Limestone, Tenn 


Limestone 


117 liOng, S. D 




Pres. M. W. College 


118 Lowry, J. E.* 


Sweetwater, Tenn., R 

Glade Spring, Va 


Pres. Hiwassee College 


119 Lvons, J. A.« 


Supernumerary 


120 Lyons, W. S.* 


Jenkin Jones, W. Va 


Jenkin Jones & Pageton 


121 Maiden, G. A.* 


Supernumerary 


122 Maiden, J. M.* 


Glenford, Va 


Superannuate 


123 Maness, J. C 


Decatur, Ga 


Superannuate 


124 Martin, I. P.* 


Big Stone Gap, Va 

Gary, W. Va 


Big Stone Gap District 


125 McCanless, S. A 


Gary 


126 McConnell, E. L.* 




Cliuchport 


127 McCracken, D.* 


Surgoinsville, Tenn 

Bristol Tenn 


Supernumerary 


128 McDowell, R. T.* 


Conference Evangelist 


129 McGhee. S. A.* 


Louisville, Tenn 


Louisville Circuit 


130 McKay, C. G 


E. Chattanooga, Tenn., R. 


Ooltewah Circuit 


131 McPherson, S. T M.*.. 


Sugar Grove 


132 Melton, C. R 


Galax, Va 


Supernumerary 


133 Miles, D. T.* 


Pocahontas, Va 

Radford, Va 


Pocahontas 


134 Mitchell, W. D.* 


Superannuate 


135 Montgomery, j. h 

13« Moore, A. B 

137 Moore, J. W.* 


Damascus, Va 


Radford 


Bloomingdale, Tenn 

Cliattanooga, Tenn 

Bristol, Va 


Kingsport Circuit 
Centenary 


138 Moreland, G. M.* 


Mary Street 


139 Morell, S. V.* 


Belfast, Va 


Belfast 


140 Morrell, W. M.* 


Pulaski City Va 


Pulaski 









♦Member of iBrotherhood. 



148 H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

CONFEEENCE DIRECTORY, 1914-1915— Continued. 



Name 



Post Office 



Appointment 



141 Mort, B. W.* 


Saltville, Va., R. 1 

St. Paul, Va 


'Rich Valley Circuit 


142 Mullens J L • .... 


143 Munsey I. N.* 


Foster Falls, Va 




144 Munsey, K. G.* 

145 Naff J E ♦ 




Eggleston 
Blountville 


Blountville, Tenn 


146 Neblett, S. A.* 

147 Noel J. S. W.* 


Cardenas, Cuba 

Wytheville, Va 


Missionary 

Superannuate 

Superannuate 

Pres. Sullins College 

Superannuate 


148 Neel L. M.* 


Bloomiugdale, Tenn 

Bristol Va 


149 Neighbors, W. S.* 

150 Nuckolls B. F 




151 Orr, J. C* 




152 Owen R A • 




Erwia 

Kimball 

East Lake 

Supernumerary 

Virginia Avenue 

Abingdon Circuit 

Superannuate 

Independence 

Harriman Circuit 

Conf. Missionary Sec. 

Williamson 

Tazewell 

Glade Spring Circuit 

Holston Historian 

Supernumerary 


153 Painter C E* 


Kimball, VV. Va 


154 Tangle, C. A.* 

155 Patton, W. L. 




Grassy Cove, Tenn 

Knoxville Tenn 


156 Patty G K * 


157 Patty W M * 




158 Parrott, J. H.» 


Morrli^;town, Tenn 


159 Paxton, J. M.* 

160 Perkins, J. A. L.* 

161 Peiry J W * 






162 Pierce L W.* 


Williamson, W. Va 


163 Piatt, R. B., Jr.* 

164 Prater, J. L.* 

16t Price R N * ... 


Glade Spring, Va 


Ififi Price W H 


Bristol Va 


167 Priddy Thos.* 


East Radford, Va 


16S Onnll'!' AM* . .. 




169 Quessenberry, M.* 

170 Rader J W * 


New River Depot, Va 

Wytheville, Va 


New River 
Wytheville 
Cleveland 
Bristol Circuit 


171 Rector GO* ... 


Cleveland Tenn 


172 Repass J W * 


Bristol, Tenn 


173 Reynolds, F, M 

174 Reynolds, L. S.* 

175 Reynolds, R. G.* 

176 Ritchey, E. M.* 

177 Romans J M 




Evansvilla 
Student 




Concord, Tenn 

Coal Creek Tenn 


Concord 
Coal Creek 




Superannuate 

Bramwell 

North Chattanooga 


178 Schuler.'T. G.* 

179 Scott J L* 


Bramwell, W. Va 

Noi-th Chattanooga, Tenn.. 

Sweetwater, Tenn 

Rural Retreat, Va 

JonesborOj Tenn 


180 fehugart, E. A.* 


181 Shuler, J. A. H.* 

182 Simpson G W 


Rural Retreat 

Supernumerary 

leager and English 

Superannuate 

Stickleyville 

Supernumerary 

Student at Hiwassee Col. 

Jasper and Whitvvell 

Epworth 

Morristown 

ChilhoM-ia 


183 Simpson, J. B.» 

184 Smith Jacob . . ... 


leager, W. Va 


Wytheville Va 


185 Smith J N.* 


Dot. Va., R. F. D 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Sweetwater, Tenn., R 

Jasper, Tenn 


186 Smith' J W 


187 Snavely, F. R.* 

188 Snider W. R.* . 


189 Sorrell W. L* 




190 Standifer, R. M.* 

191 Steele. C. E.* 


Morristown, Tenn 

Chilhowie, Va 


192 Stewart A. D 


Duniap, Tenn 


Superannuate 


193 Stewart J W.* 


Clintwood, Va 


194 Strader T D 


Wytheville, Va 


Covetou 
Church Street 


195 Stuart G R * 


Knoxville, Tenn 


196 Sullins D* 




Superannuate 

Prof In Sullins Col 


197 Summers G W 


Bristol Va 


198 Summitt ' J H.* 


LaFollette, Tenn 




199 Swaim, M. P 


Morristown, Tenn 




200 Spring J. E 




Burke's G'dn and Taze. 


201 Sutherland, R K* 


Bristol, Va 


Fin. Agt. E. & H. Col. 
Charleston 


202 Thomas A J* 


Charleston, Tenn 


203 Thompson, Barney 

204 Thompson, W. C 

205 Thorn A. S 


Cleveland, Tenn 


Pres. Centenary College 




Athens, W. Va 


Prof, in State Normal 


206 Towe A. H 


Rocky Gap, Va 


Rocky Gap 
King Memorial 


207 Triplett, R. K 


East Chattanooga, Tenn... 

Max Meadows, Va 

Mechanlcsburg, Va 

Athens, W. Va 


208 Troy, W. H.* 


209 Umberger, J. H.* 

210 Umberger, R. S.* 


Mechanlcsburg 
Superannuate 





♦Member of Brotherhood. 



HOLSTON ANNUAL 
CONFERENCE DIRECTORY, 1914-1915— Continued. 



149 



Name 


Post Office 


Appointment 


211 Varner, C. H.* 


Newport, Tenn 


Newport 
Mountain City 


212 Vaught, H. B 


Mountain City, Tenn 


213 Vaught S B* 


Abingdon 

Superannuate 

Philadelphia 


214 Wagner G S * 


Montgomery, Va 


215 Wagner J. H.* 


Philadelphia, Tenn 

Big Stone Gap, Va 


216 Wagner, W. N.* 

217 Walker J M * 


Big Stone Gap 


218 Walker J R * 


Honaker, Va 


Honaker 


219 Walker, N. F.* 


Fall Branch, Tenn 

Madlionville, Tenn 


Fall Branch 


220 Walker, R. M.* 


Madisonville 


221 Walker W H * 




222 Wampler, French* 

223 Ward, J. B.* 


Fountain City, Tenn 

Bluefleld, W. Va 


Fountain City 
Bluefleld District 


224 Waterhouse B N* 


Richlands, Va 




225 Waterhouse R G * 


Emory, Va 


Bishop 

Conference Evangelist 


226 Waters Bascom 




227 Watkins J. H* 


Mercer, Va 


228 Watson N. M* 






229 Weaver C C 


Emory, Va 


Pres. E. and H College 


230 Wiley E E • .... 


Bluefleld, W Va 


Bland Street 


231 Williams L J * 




Appalachia 
Saltvilla 


232 Wingo C K.* 


Saltvilie, Va 


233 Wolfe, J. B.* 


Princeton, W. Va 

Dryden, Va 


Princeton 


234 vVolfe J M * 


Superannuate 
Anderson Street 


235 Wolfe, T. B 


Bristol, Tenn 


236 Wood G. S.* 


Benham Va 


Benham 


237 Woodward E N* 


Jonesville Va 


Jonesville 


238 Wright, 0. C* 




Student 


239 W J rick, D. F.* 


Straw Plains, Tenn 

Greeneville, Tenn 


Straw Plains 


240 Wysor, M. J.* 


Greeneville 


241 Yost, L. D.* 


Damascus, Va 


Damascui 



♦Member of Brotherhood. 



PREACHERS ON TRIAL. 



Name 


Post Office 


Appointment 


1 Austin, S. H.* 


JSmory, Va 


Student 


2 Ballard, R. H.* 


Tom's Creek, Va .-. . 


Tom's Creek 


3 Bunts, W. M.* 


Emory, Va 


Temp. Work in Colleges 


4 Burriss L. M.* 


Bristol Tenn 


Virginia Avenue 


5 Carlton', H. A 






6 Carroll, R. P 




Prin High School 


7 Cornett, J. C* 


Jonesville, Va 


Powell's Valley 


8 Dean, E. W.* 


Church Hill, Tenn 

North Fork, W. Va 

Afton, Tenn 


9 Eastwood, W. P.* 

10 Emmett, G. C* 


North Fork and Crozier 

AftOQ 


U Evans, R. L.* 


Robertsville, Tenn 

Coalwood, W. Va 

Tazewell, Tenn 




12 Fisher, E. W.* 


Coalwood and Premier 


13 Fox, G. W.* 


Tazewell 


14 Greer, R. E.* 






15 Havens, R. N.* 


Davy, W. Va 


Davy and Twin Branch 


16 Helvey, J. G.* 




Grundy 

Conference Evangelist 

Hylton 


17 Jimison, T. P.* 


Jefferson City, Teun 

Hylton, Va 


38 Jones, S. E.* 


19 Lotspeich, J. H* 




20 Maberry, L. D.* 


Galax, Va 


Blue Ridge 


21 Morris, J. W.* 


Pineville, W. Va 

Parrottsville, Tenn 

Etowah, Tenn 

Emory, Va 


22 Morrison, R. E.* 

rs Porter, W. G 


Parrottsville 
Carlock Circuit 


24 Randall, Z. B 


Student 


25 Roach, E. R.* 


South Pittsburg, Tenn. .. 
Hillsville Va 


South Pittsburg 
Hillsville 


26 Sells, B. T 


''7 Simpson, 0. L 


Chattaroy, W. Va 


Chattaroy 


28 Slevenson, M. A 


Jonesboro 


29 Watts, R. W.* 




Norton Mission 


;^0 Wright, C. H.* 


Matoka, W. Va 




31 Wysor, J. M 


Mannering, W. Va 


Mora 



♦Member of Brotherhood. 



150 



H0L8T0N ANNUAL 
SUPPLIES. 



Name 


Post Oflace 


Appointmen 


1 Baker, W. N 


Fort Blackmore, Va 

Berwind, W. Va 




2 Bcyd, H. M 




3 Brooks C. G 


St. Charles Va 


St. Charles 




Rising If awn, Ga 


Rising Fawn 


5 Cline C R 


Tazewell, Tenn 


Luttrell 






Cleveland Circuit 


7 Gentry, A. H 


Fries, Va 


Fries 


8 Goff W. J 


Dickensonville, Va. 

McDowell, W. Va 

Mt. Vernon, Tenn 

Elizabethton, Tenn 

Matewan, W. Va 


Dickensonville 


9 Gose, W. A 


McDowell and Grumpier 
Mt. Vernon 


10 Hatfield, J. R 


]1 Horner, Pat 


Elizabethton 


12 Lee, D. S 


Matewan 


33 Leftwich M 


Draper, Va 


Draper 


14 Logan, C. H 


Louisville, Tenn., R. 2.... 

Big Sandy, W. Va 

Knoxville, Tenn 


Little River 


15 McCormlck, W. A 

16 Roby, W. T 


Big Sandy and Maryton 
West Lonsdale 


17 Shelley, G. M 


Melvin, Tenn 


Melvin Circuit 


18 Smith, D. L 


Stone, Ky 


Pond Creek 


19 Smitu, E. G 


Glenalum, W. Va 


Glenalum and Panther 


20 Suddetli F. K 


Pikeville, Tenn 


Pikevilla 


21 Tabor, P. P 


Rutledge, Tenn 


Rutledge 


22 Tate, W. L 


Sweetwater, Tenn 

Oakvale, W. Va 


New Hope 


23 Warner, W. A 


East River 


24 Williams, C. H 


Knoxville, Tenn 


Washington Pike 


25 AVilli^tms, C. W 


Mooresburg, Tenn 


Mooresburg 


26 Wise, B. 


Mullens W. Va 


Mullens 


27 V/right, J. D 


Naugatuck, W. Va 


Naugatuck 







BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



Admission — J. W. Perry, W. S. Neighbors, T. C. Schuler. 

Trial Committee tor Admission— S. D. Long, W. M. Patty, J. E. 
Lowry. 

First Year — R. K. Sutherland, K. C. Camper, J. M. Paxton. 

Second Year— "W. N. Wagner, G. W. Summers, G. L, Lambert. 

Third Year— E. N. Woodward, J. B. Ely, W. H. Briggs, 

Fourth Year— D. S. Hearon, J. M. Crowe, T. K, Wolfe. 



Cole, Rev. E. H. 
Guy, Rev. J. T. 
Morrell, Rev. W. M. 



Conference Relations 

Painter. Rev. C. E. 
Rector, Rev. G. C. 
Spring, Rev. J. E. 



Steele, Rev. C. E. 
Varner, Rev. C. H. 
Wagner, Rev. J. H. 



Bible Board 



Cantrell, J. M., Rising Fawn, Ga. 

Cartright, Rev, N. R. 

Cash, Rev. J. I. 

Cox, Rev. K. W. 

Buhrman, Rev. F. M., Treasurer 



Ellison, Rev. J. A. 

Jordan, Rev. G. T. 

Lyons, Rev. W. S., President 

Mort, Rev. E. W. 

Thompson, Rev. W. C, Secretary 



Board of Church Extension 



Bondurant, T. J., Fountain City, Tenn. 

Brown, Rev. H. B. 

Catron, Rev. 8. S. 

Dangerfield, W. S., Princeton, W. Va. 

Dean, Rev. C. W. 

Ford, W. B., Norton, Va. 

Greer, Thomas, Marion, Va. 

Hawk, H. D., Blountville 

Hodge, Rev. Walter, Secretary 

Holbrook, Rev. Z. D. 



Kahle, Rev. E. F., Treasurer 
Richardson, W. W., La Follette 
Roberts, W. T., Athens, Tenn. 
Schuler, Rev. T. C, President 
Sluss, J. H., Graham, Va. 
Snider, Rev. W. R. 
Waterhouse, Rev. B. N. 
White, S. A., Johnson City 
Wood, L. 
Wysor, Rev. M. J., Vice-President 



Board of Education 



Allen, W. B., Dayton, Tenn. 
Brown, Rev. J. R., Secretary 
Finney, E. S., Lebanon, Va. 
French, Rev. J. S., President 
Hardwick, G. L., Cleveland 
Jordan, R. L., Radford, Va. 
Long. Rev. S. D. 
Lowry, Rev. J. E. 
Mellen, G. F., Knoxville 
Moore, Rev. J. W., Fice-Pres. 
Morrell, Rev. W. M. 



Mullens, Rev. J. L., Treasurer 
Neighbors, Rev. W. S. 
Rader, Rev. J. W. 
Sutherland, Rev. R. K. 
Thompson, Rev. Barney 
Watson, Rev. N. M. 
Weaver, Rev. C. C. 
Wiley, Rev. E. E. 
Woodward, Rev. E. N. 
Winslow, H. M., Harriman 



152 



HOLSTON ANJSIUAL 



Epworth League Board 



Ashworth, J. W., Bristol 
Beard, Rev. S. C. 
Benton, Rev. J. F. 
Carr, R. K., Bluefield 
Farmer, Rev. W. D. 
Hamilton, E. C, Abingdon 
Helvey, Rev. J. W. 
Hunter, Rev. A. B. 
Jones, Rev. J. F. 
Kelly, George 



Kelly, Rev. R. A. 
King, T. B., Poplar Hill, Va. 
Kincaid, C. S., Knoxville 
MeConnell, Rev. E. L. 
Moreland, Rev. G. M. 
Pangle, Rev. C. A. 
Sharitz, T. J. B., Wytheville 
Trent, H. L., Straw Plains 
Walker, Rev. J. R. 
Wallace, W. C, Chattanooga 



Joint Board of Finance 



Addington, Rev. E. L. 

Bates, Creed F., Chattanooga 

Bewley, P. M., Morristown 

Bourne, Rev. S. W. 

Copenhaver, R. M., Marion, Va. 

Dame, Rev. J. D. 

Hamilton, Rev. T. S. 

Huddle, R. E. L. 

Kelly, Rufus, Henry's Cross Roads 

Keys, S. W, 



Lazenby, R. E. 

Moore, Rev. A. B. 

Quillian, E. C. 

Reynolds, J. H., Harriman, Tenn. 

Shuff, W. H., Pulaski, Va. 

Sorrell, Rev. W. L. 

Standifer, Rev. R. M. 

Umberger, Rev. J. H. 

Walker, Rev. J. M. 



Board of Missions 



Bailey, C. C. 

Carter, Rev. J. M., Secretary 

Cobb, Rev. P. L., President 

Delph, Guy 

Hardin, J. L., Emory, Va. 

Hartsook, N. E. Honaker, Va. 

Hendricks, Rev. W. S. 

Hillman, J. N., Coeburn, Va. 

Jackson, M. H., Wytheville, Va. 

Kelso, Rev. H. E. 



King, Rev. J. R. 

Lea, J. D., Knoxville 

Lee, Rev. B. W. 

Logan, Rev. J. C. 

Miller, R. C. 

Purse, R.P., JVmsMrer, Chattanooga 

Vaught, Rev. S. B., Vice-Pres. 

Weeks, J. W. 

Wingo, Rev. C. K. 

Wolfe, Rev. J. E., Ass't Secretary 



Sunday School Board 



Barnett, Rev. J. H. 
Boyer, Rev. S. S., Treasurer 
Briggs, Rev. W. H. 
Brown, Rev. C. R. 
Carter, F. A., Sweetwater 
Counts, C. Q., Coeburn, Va. 
Douglass, S. C. 
Early, Rev. J. A. 
Ellis, Rev. W. M. 
Lambert, Rev. G. L. 



Martin, Hugh, Evansville, Tenn. 
Miles, Rev. D. T. 
Owen, Rev. R. A. 
Pless, D. A., Morristown 
Peters, H. G., Bristol, Va. 
Pierce, Rev. L. W., President 
Priddy, Rev. Thomas 
Sparks, T. F., See'y, Chattanooga 
Smith, T. J., Elk Garden, Va. 
Vaught, Rev. H. B. 



Trustees of Conference Funds 



Bosang, Jesse, Pulaski, Va. 
Brock, W. E., Chattanooga 
Eskridge, Rev. T. J. 



Long, Rev. S. D. 

Vaughn, Rev. T. C, Spring Valley 



Midland Methodist Commission — Creed F. Bates, Chattanooga; Rev. 
N. M. Watson, Rev. E. E. Wiley 



Depository of All Conference Funds — Chattanooga Savings Bank 



CARE OF CONFERENCE FUNDS. 



Chattanooga, Tennessee, November 4, 1914. 

To the Commission of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, con- 
sisting of Messrs. F. A. Carter, J. A. Burrow, G. L. Hardwick, 
R. P. Purse and W. G. M. Thomas, appointed by the Holston 
Annual Conference of said Church, at its recent session of 1914: 

Gentlemen: 

To you, and through you, to the Holston Conference of your 
Church, and the interested Trustees and Boards, we beg to pro- 
pose the following, which we believe you will find to cover and in- 
clude, in a formal manner, the offer which we informally laid be- 
fore you at your meeting today: 

If you shall see proper to select and appoint our Bank the de- 
pository and General Treasurer of the benevolent and trust funds 
of the various boards of the Holston Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, we will accept the trust, and perform it 
in full accordance with the letter and spirit of the document which 
is attached hereto, marked exhibit "A," and made a part hereof. 

Other terms of this proposal are: 

1. That we shall receive no compensation. 

2. That we are to be repaid the expense incurred for neces- 
sary stamps, stationery and printing used in adminis- 
tering the trust and office. 

3. That, during the 1915 session of the Annual Conference 
we will furnish free of charge a competent employee, 
or employees, who will go to the Annual Conference and 
remain there through the session — we to be repaid the 
cost of the railway fare and hotel bills. 

4. That on all funds in regular Savings Account we will 
pay four per cent. (4%) interest per annum compounded 
semi-annually; and on Certificates of Deposit issued for 
either six (6) months or twelve (12) months, four per 
cent (4%) interest to be paid. 

5. That, on checking account, we will pay three per cent. 
(3%) interest per annum on minimum monthly balances, 
to be credited monthly; it being our intention on the first 
day of each month to transfer, so far as possible, the 
amounts on hand to the Savings Account, keeping on 
hand in the checking account merely enough to cover 
the current payments of that month. 

6. That in addition to the regular interest, any profit to 
us, arising from a charge, a fee, a commission, or other- 
wise, on any investment or loan of the funds made by 
us, such profit shall belong, and go to the Board whose 
funds were invested or loaned. All such profits we 
agree to donate for the benefit of the Church, save only 
that, from the same, we will be repaid any actual ex- 



1Q4 H0L8T0N ANNUAL 

penses incurred by us growing out of making and caring 
for the loan or investment. 

7. That, without any expense to you, the Conference, or 
the interested Trustees or Boards, we are to keep all 
necessary books, records, etc., and carry on such corre- 
spondence, make such reports, and do all such other 
things as rshall comply fully with said exhibit "A" 
hereto. 

8. That there shall be no charge made by our Bank for 
collection of checks coming in from other Counties or 
States. 

9. That, this contract shall remain in force until the closing 
of the 1915 Session of the Holston Annual Conference 
of your Church, and until after the year's accounts shall 
have been closed, and the statistical reports prepared 
and furnished as per exhibit "A." 

10. That your Commission shall be the guiding, advisory, 
and controlling authority with respect to the formality 
and the administration by us of this office and trust, 
unless otherwise instructed by the constituted authori- 
ties of the Church. 

Your acceptance of this proposal shall constitute a contract be- 
tween us; and this communication, and your acceptance will be 
executed in duplicate. 

Respectfully submitted, 
CHATTANOOGA SAVINGS BANK, 

By W. A. Sadd, President. 
Attest: 

R. W. Barr, Cashier. 



To the Chattanooga Savings Bank, 

Chattanooga, Teun. 

Gentlemen: 

By virtue of the authority vested in us by resolution of the 
Holston Annual Conference, we hereby accept your above proposi- 
tion; and you are selected and appointed the depository and Gen- 
eral Treasurer accordingly. 

We wish to thank you for your proposal, which we consider 
fair to our Church, and liberal and generous on your part; and 
we trust your business relations with the Conference, its Boards, 
ministers and laymen, may be pleasant and satisfactory to all con- 
cerned. 

This November 4, 1914. 

Very respectfully yours, 

F. A. CAR'tER. 

G. L. HARDWICK. 
W. G. M. THOMAS. 
J. A. BURROW. 

R P. PURSE. 
Commission appointed by the Holston Annual Conference.