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Full text of "Official records of the Union and Confederate navies in the war of the rebellion : ser. I, v. 1-27, ser. II, v. 1-3"

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
AT LOS ANGELES 




56TH CONGRESS, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, j DOCUMENT 
ion. \ I No. 735. 



1st Session. 



OFFICIAL RECORDS 



OF THE 



UNION AND CONFEDERATE NAVIES 



IN THE 



WAR OF THE REBELLION. 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 

The Hon. JOHN D. LONG, Secretary of the Navy, 

BY 

PROF. EDWARD K. RAWSON, U. S. NAVY, 

SUPERINTENDENT NAVAL WAR RECORDS, 
AND 

MR. CHARLES W. STEWART. 



BY AUTHORITY OF AN ACT OF CONGRESS APPROVED JULY 31, 1894. 



SERIES I VOLUME 10. 

NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING^ SQUADRON 

FROM MAY 6, 1864, TO OCTOBER 27, 1864. 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 
1900. 



. /O 



CONTENTS OF PRECEDING VOLUMES. 



VOLUME 1. 

Operations of the cruisers from January 19, 1861, to December 31, 1862. 

VOLUME 2. 

Operations of the cruisers from January 1, 1863, to March 31, 1864. 

VOLUME 3. 

Operations of the cruisers from April 1, 1864, to December 30, 1865. 

VOLUME 4. 

Operations in the Cnlf of Mexico from November 15, 1860, to June 7, 1861. Opera- 
tions on the Atlantic Coast from January 1 to May 13, 1861. Operations on the 
Potomac and Rappahannock rivers from January 5 to December 7, 1861. 

VOLUME 5. 

Operations on the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers from December 7, 1861, to 
July 31, 1865. Operations of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron from April 4 to 
July 15, 1861. 

VOLUME 6. 

Operations of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron from July 16 to October 29, 1861. 
Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from October 29, 1861, to 
March 8, 1862. 

VOLUME 7. 

Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from March 8 to September 

4, 1862. 

VOLUME 8. 

Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from September 5, 1862, to 

May 4, 1863. 

VOLUME 9. 

Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from May 6, 1864, to October 

27, 1864. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page. 

List of illustrations ix 

Preface xi 

Order of compilation of Series I xvn 

List of vessels of North Atlantic Blockading Squadron xix 

Calendar, May-October, 1864 xxm 

North Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 
Principal events 
Union reports 

Capture of the British steamer Young Republic, May 6, 1864 6-8 

Destruction by torpedo of the U. S. S. Commodore Jones, May 6, 

1864 9-16 

Attack upon Federal vessels off New Inlet, North Carolina, by 

theC. S. ram Raleigh, May 6-7, 1864 18-25 

Capture and destruction of the U. S. S. Shawsheen in James 

River, May 7, 1864 26-31 

Letter of the Secretary of the Navy to the House of Representa- 
tives transmitting correspondence regarding the construction 

oftheC.S.ram Albemarle 37-39 

Capture of the steamer Minnie, May 9, 1864 40, 41 

Capture of the British steamer Greyhound, May 10, 1864 42, 43 

Capture of the steamer Tristram Shandy, May 15, 1864 60, 61 

Order of the Secretary of the Navy regarding persons found on 

blockade runners 61 

Convoying by naval vessels of army forces in York and Pamnn- 

key Rivers, May 20-23 84 

Appearance of the C. S. ram Albemarle in Albemarle Sound, May 

24, 1864 86 

Joint operations against Confederate attack on Wilson's Wharf, 

Va., May 24, 1864 87-92 

Expedition from the U. S. S. Wyalusing for torpedo attack on 

C. S. ram Albemarle, May 25, 1864 95,96 

Capture of the British steamer Caledonia, May 30, 1864 106-108 

Chase and destruction of the steamer Georgiana McCaw, June 

2, 1864 114,115 

Capture of the steamer Thistle, June 4, 1864 120 

Capture of the steamer Siren, June 5, 1864 121 

Correspondence concerning obstructions in Trent's Reach 129- 

133, 149-151, 193-196, 290, 300, 464, 465 

Destruction of blockade runner Pevensey, J nne 9, 186 1 136-138 

Cooperative attack on Fort Clifton, Va., June 9, 1864 138, 139 

Cooperative engagement of the U. S. S. Commodore Perry with 

Fort Clifton, Va., June 16, 1864 152,153 

Joint expedition in Pungo River, N. C., June 16, 1864 154, 155 

Cooperative engagements in Pamunkey River, June 20-21, 1864. 165, 168 
Unsuccessful joint expedition for cutting Wilmington and 

Weldon Railroad, June 20-24, 1864 169, 175 

v 



VI TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

North Atlantic Blockading Squadron Continued. Page. 

Principal events 
Union reports 

Engagement of Federal fleet with Confederate ironclads and 

shore batteries at Hewlett's, Va., June 21, 1864 176, 193 

Reconnoissance by Lieutenant Cushing, U. S. Navy, in Cape 

Fear River, June 23-24, 1864 202-207 

Engagement of Federal vessels with Confederate battery at Four 

Mile Creek, Virginia, June 29, 1864 215, 216, 225 

Capture of the British steamer Rouen, July 2, 1864 223, 224 

Operations of Federal vessels in James River, July 4-5, 1864 227-230 

Capture of the steamer Little Ada, July 9, 1864 245, 246 

Engagement of Federal vessels with Confederate battery on 

Malvern Hill, July 14,1864 268,269 

Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, regarding move- 
ments of North Atlantic Blockading Squadron for the defense 

of Washington, D. C 272 

Engagement of U. S. S. Mendota with Confederate battery at 

Four Mile Creek, Virginia, July 16, 1864 276 

Engagement of Federal vessels with Confederate battery on 

Malvern Hill, Va., July 16, 1864 277,278 

Joint expedition in Chowan River, N. C., July 2S-29. 1864 319-322 

Engagement of Federal vessels with Confederate batteries near 

Wilcox's Wharf, August 3, and near Harrison's Landing, 

August 4, 1864 329-335 

Expedition to Cox's Mill, Va., August 3-4, 1864 335,336 

Appearance of the C. S. ram Albemarle at the month of the Roa- 

noke River, August 6, 7, 1864 339, 341 

Loss of the U. S. S. Violet, August 7, 1864 343 

Engagement of the U. S. steamers Agawam and Hunchback 

with Confederate batteries in James River, August 13, 1864.. 348-350 
Attack upon Federal forces at Dutch Gap by the Confederate 

fleet and batteries, August 13, 1864 350-357 

Naval operations in connection with the advance of Federal 

forces at Dutch Gap and Deep Bottom, Virginia, August 16- 

18, 1864 366-368 

Chase and capture of the steamer Lilian, August 24, 1864 388-395 

Chasing ashore of a blockade runner near Fort Caswell by the 

U. S. S. Vicksburg, August 23, 1864 400-402 

Enquiries and reports concerning defenses, channels, coast, etc., 

in the vicinity of Wilmington, N. C 419, 441-444, 459-461, 516-521 

Capture of the steamer Elsie, September 4, 1864 421-427 

Capture of the steamer A. D. Vance, September 10, 1864 453-456 

Rear- Admiral Porter, U. S. Navy, ordered to assume command of 

the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron 473, 530 

Driving ashore and destruction of the steamer Lynx, September 

25,1864 478^182 

Destruction of the British steamer Night Hawk, September 29, 

1864 492-501 

Engagement of the U. S. S. Valley City with Confederate forces 

in Scuppernong River, North Carolina, September 29, 1864 501, 502 

Reconnoissance near Wilmington, N. C., for the examination of 

its defenses 507-511 

Capture and destruction of U.S. picket bont No. 2, Octobers, 

1864 539-541 

Loss of the U. S. tug Aster, October 8, 1864 541-544 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. VII 

North Atlantic Blockading Squadron Continued. Page. 

Principal events 
Union reports- 
Chase and capture of the British steamer Bat, October 10, 
1864 547-551,553 

Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, relieved of command of 
the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron by Rear-Admiral 
Porter, U. S. Navy, October 12, 1864 554,557 

General blockading instructions of Rear- Admiral Porter, U. S. 

Navy 579-583 

Engagement of Confederate fleet and naval batteries with Fed- 
eral army batteries near Signal Hill,Va., October 22, 1864 584-592 

Capture of tho Confederate steamer Hope, October 22, 1864 592-594 

Destruction of the C. S. ram Albemarle, at Plymouth, N. C., by 
an expedition under Lieutenant Gushing, U. S. Navy, October 

27-28,1864 610-624 

Confederate reports 

Attack upon Federal vessels off New Inlet, North Carolina, by 
the C. S. ram Raleigh, May 6, 7, 1864 24,25 

Capture and destruction of the U. S. S. Shawsheen in James 
River, May 7,1864 30 

Engagement of Federal fleet with Confederate ironclads and 
shore batteries at Hewlett's, Va., June 21, 1864 185-193 

Reconnoissance by Lieutenant Cushing, U. S. Navy, in Cape Fear 
River, June 23-24, 1864 206,207 

Attack upon Federal forces at Dutch Gap by Confederate fleet 
and batteries, August 13, 1864 351-357 

Naval operations in connection with the advance of Federal forces 
at Dutch Gap and Deep Bottom, Virginia, August 16-18, 1864 . . 367, 369 

Engagement of Confederate fleet and naval batteries with Fed- 
eral army batteries near Signal Hill,V:i., October 22, 1864 586-592 

Destruction of the C. S. ram Albemarle at Plymouth, N. C., by 
an expedition under Lieutenant Cushing, U. S. Navy, October 
27-28,1864 624 

Flag-Officer Forrest, C. S. Navy, relieved of command of naval 
forces in James River by Flag-Officer Mitchell, C. S. Navy, 
May 7, 1864 624,625 

Passage of the C. S. steamers Fredericksburg, Virginia, and 
Richmond through the obstruction at Drewry's Bluff, Va., 
May 23 and 24, 1864 649,653 

Cooperative attack proposed by Flag-Officer Mitchell, C. S. 

Navy, upon Federal fleet in James River, May 30, 1864 666-668 

Correspondence regarding proposed offensive operations against 
the Federal fleet in Trent's Reach 689-697 

Sinking of Federal obstructions in Trent's Reach 703 

Correspondence concerning proposed expedition from Wilming- 
ton, N. C., for the purpose of releasing and arming Confed- 
erates imprisoned at Point Lookout, Md 713,714,717,721,722 

Major-General Whiting, C. S. Army, requests naval cooperation 
in the defense of Wilmington, N. C., September 27, 1864 751 

Operations in connection with :irmy forces against Fort Harri- 
son, Chaffiii's farm, September 29-October 1, 1864 752-765 

Miscellaneous reports, orders, and correspondence, May 6 to 
October 27,1864 624-805 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page. 

dialling's torpedo launch Frontispiece. 

Sketch showing the place and method of destruction 01 the United States 

Steamer Commodore Jones, May 6, 1864 13 

United States Steamer Commodore Barney 45 

Sketch of the defenses of New Inlet, North Carolina, by Acting Ensign 

F. P. B. Sands, U. S. Navy 125 

Sketches of injuries received by the United States Steamer Saugus in engage- 
ment in Trent's Reach, June 21, 1864 180,181 

Sketches showing proposed system of catching blockade runners 312, 313 

United States Steamer Agawam 348 

Sketch of chase by the United States Steamer Nereus of a blockade runner, 

August 10, 1864 382 

Sketch of the chase of the steamer Elsie 424 

Blockade runner A. D. Vance '. 453 

Sketch of obstructions in Trent's Reach 465 

Diagram showing position of vessels at the time the blockade runner Lynx 

was sighted, September 25, 1864 480 

Sketch showing roads, etc., in the vicinity of Wilmington, N. C 509 

Sketch of chase of a blockade runner by the United States Steamer Santiago 

deCuba 535 

Cushing's torpedo launch, outline drawing 623 

Torpedo used by Lieutenant Gushing in the destruction of the Confederate 

States Ram Albemarle : 623 

Sketch of James River in the vicinity of Trent's Reach, May 28, 1864 661 

Sketch of proposed Confederate fire vessels 696 

Sketch of Federal vessels below Howletts, Va., June 15, 1864 700 

Sketch showing position of Confederate and Federal vessels and batteries 

near Trent's Reach, August 6, 1864 730 

Sketch of device used on Confederate ironclads for protection against tor- 
pedoes 791 



PREFACE, 



The work of preparing for publication the Official Records of the 
Union and Confederate navies, which was begun July 7, 1884, was 
organized under the superintendency of Prof. J. R. Soley, U. S. Navy, 
at that time librarian of the Navy Department, afterwards Assistant 
Secretary of the Navy. 

In August, 1890, the work of collecting these records and their clas- 
sification was ably continued by his successor, Lieutenant-Commander 
F. M. Wise, U. S. Navy, who, having received orders to sea, was relieved 
by Lieutenant-Commander Richard Rush, U. S. Navy, in May, 1893. 

The long-delayed publication was finally authorized by act of 
Congress approved July 31, 1894, and begun by Mr. Rush. The 
first five volumes were published under his efficient administration, 
and the important duty of organizing the office for the distribution 
of these volumes was accomplished. 

In March, 1897, Mr. Rush, having been ordered to sea, was succeeded 
by Professor Edward K. Rawson, U. S. Navy, as superintendent. 

No change is contemplated at present in the outline of the plan of 
publication as approved by the Department. This plan includes only 
the use of such material as may be certified to be contemporaneous 
naval records of the war, which is divided into three series, in the 
following order of arrangement: 

I. The first series embraces the reports, orders, and correspondence, 
both Union and Confederate, relating to all naval operations on the 
Atlantic and Gulf coasts and inland waters of the United States 
during the war of the rebellion, together with the operations of 
vessels acting singly, either as cruisers or privateers, in different 
parts of the world. These reports are accompanied by occasional 
maps and diagrams. 

In this series the papers are arranged according to squadrons and 
flotillas, chronologically; and, as far as possible, the Union reports 
of any events are immediately followed by the Confederate reports. 

XI 



XII PREFACE. 

If. The second series embraces the reports, orders, and correspond- 
ence relating to 

1. The condition of the Union Navy in 1861, before the com- 
mencement of hostilities, and to its increase during the progress 
of the war, including the annual and special reports of the 
Secretary of the Navy and chiefs of the various bureaus. 

2. The construction and outfit of the Confederate Navy, includ- 
ing privateers, setting forth also the annual and special reports 
of the Confederate Secretary of the Navy and chiefs of bureaus. 

3. Statistical data of all vessels, Union and Confederate, as 
far as can be obtained. 

4. Returns of naval and military property captured by the 
navies of both sides during the war. 

5. Correspondence relating to naval prisoners. 

This series is also arranged chronologically in each of the above 
sections, as far as practicable. 

III. The third series embraces all reports, orders, correspondence, 
and returns of the Union and Confederate authorities not specially 
relating to the matter of the first and second series. 

It is the intention of the Department to introduce throughout the 
volumes of the different series illustrations of each class or type of 
vessels referred to, in order to preserve the identity of these ships 
as they actually appeared during the war. These cuts have been 
reproduced either from photographs of the vessels themselves or 
from the carefully prepared drawings made from official sources. 

Much difficulty has been found in collecting the records, for, while 
the official reports of commanders of fleets and of vessels acting singly 
are on file in the Navy Department, it is found that the correspondence 
between flag officers and their subordinates is frequently missing. 
Without this squadron correspondence the historical value of the work 
would necessarily be impaired, and the Department therefore has 
spared no pains to secure the letter books and papers of the chief actors 
on both sides. These papers have for the most part been obtained, and 
they have been copiously used in the compilation of the work. The 
reports of the Union commanders are full and fairly complete. It is to 
be regretted, however, that the Confederate records are not equally 
complete, due to the great difficulty found in collecting them, and also 
to the fact that a large part of the archives of the Confederate Navy 
Department was burned at the close of the war. Frequent careful 



PREFACE. XIII 

searches throughout various parts of the country, conducted by a 
special agent of the Department, have brought to light many dupli- 
cates of these papers, found among the personal files of participants. 
It is hoped that the publication will revive the interest of participants 
in the events referred to, and lead them to bring to the notice of the 
Department the whereabouts of any papers bearing upon naval opera- 
tions in the civil war of which they may have knowledge. 

The ninth volume of the records (Series I, vol. 9), which has 
recently been published by the Department, gives the operations of the 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from May 5, 1863, to May 5, 1864. 
The present volume (Series I, vol. 10) gives the operations of this 
squadron from May 6, 1864, to October 27, 1864. 

The reports and correspondence are placed chronologically, with a 
distinct heading for every paper. In the record of events in which 
both sides took part ? the Confederate reports (where they could be 
obtained) immediately follow the Union reports, while the miscellane- 
ous Confederate correspondence is placed at the end of the volume. 
Reference to the table of contents will show the context of these Con- 
federate papers. It is believed that the chronological arrangement of 
the records, in connection with the full and complete index to each vol- 
ume, will afford ample means of reference to its contents without other 
subdivision or classification. In reports of special or single events, 
in which the papers bear specific relation to those events, the chrono- 
logical order has been somewhat modified, and such documents have 
been placed together in the compilation. 

EDWARD K. RAWSON, 
CHARLES W. STEWART, 

Compilers. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, 

Washington, D. C., May, 1900. 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE. The official reports of the pursuit, destruc- 
tion, seizure, or capture of vessels violating the blockade are arranged 
in chronological order. It is proposed to give further details relative 
.to adjudication and disposal of prizes and prisoners in future volumes 
of Series II. 

The blockade by the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron extended 
from the mouth of the Piankatank River, Ya., to the southern bound- 
ary line of the State of North Carolina, excepting the ports of Norfolk, 
Va., and Beaufort, N. C. Norfolk was occupied by Union Army forces 
and trading was permitted to supply military necessities. Beaufort, 



XIV PREFACE. 

N. 0., was occupied by Union army forces and was open to trade by 
virtue of a Presidential proclamation dated May 12, 1862. 

The headquarters of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron was 
on board the IT. S. S. Malvern. A fleet of Federal gunboats and iron- 
clads in cooperation with army forces held James River from its mouth 
to Dutch Gap. Confederate navy and army forces held James River 
from Eichmond to Dutch Gap. A squadron of small, light-draft ves- 
sels was employed in the inland waters of North Carolina, and larger 
vessels blockaded the seacoast inlets. 

The double coast begins a little south of Cape Henry and extends as 
far as Wilmington. This peculiar conformation consists of a long, nar- 
row belt of sand projecting seaward at three points Cape Hatteras, 
Cape Lookout, and Cape Fear. The sand belt is broken at intervals by 
shallow inlets. Within it lie the sounds, extensive sheets of water, 
upon whose tributary rivers are a number of towns. An intricate net- 
work of channels affords ready means of communication by small water 
craft. 

The town of Wilmington, N. C., is on Cape Fear River, about 28 
miles from its mouth. There were two entrances to the river, one from 
the eastward, called New Inlet; the other from the southward at the 
river month, sometimes called the Western Entrance and Western Bar 
Channel. 

The entrances were 6 miles apart, in a straight line, but between the 
two lay Smith's Island, a long strip of sand and shoal, with Cape Fear 
projecting far out at its southern extremity. Continuing the line of 
Cape Fear the dangerous Frying Pan Shoals extended out southeast- 
erly for 10 miles, making the distance by sea between the two entrances 
about 40 miles. Each channel was protected by strong works. Fort 
Fisher, on Federal Point, commanded New Inlet. Similarly, Fort Cas- 
well commanded the mouth of the river. 



NOTE. The following is an extract from the law governing the dis- 
tribution of the sets comprising the publication (act of Congress 
approved July 31, 1894) : 

* * * Of said number, six thousand eight hundred and forty 
copies shall be for the use of the House of Representatives, two thou- 
sand one hundred and twelve copies for the use of the Senate, and one 
thousand and forty-eight copies for the use of the Navy Department 
and for distribution by the Secretary of the Navy among officers of the 
Navy and contributors to the work. The quotas herein authorized of 
said publication for the Senate and House of Representatives shall be 
sent by the Secretary of the Navy to such libraries, organizations, and 
individuals as may be designated by the Senators, Representatives, and 
Delegates of the Fifty- third Congress, it being the purpose of this dis- 
tribution herein provided for to place these records in public libraries, 
and with permanent organizations having libraries, so far as such 
libraries may exist in the several States and Territories. Each Senator 
shall designate not exceeding twenty-four and each Representative and 



PREFACE. XV 

Delegate not exceeding nineteen of such addresses, and the volumes 
shall be sent thereto from time to time, as they are published, until the 
publication is completed ; and all sets that may not be ordered to be 
distributed as provided herein shall be sold by the Secretary of the 
Navy for cost of publication, with ten per centum added thereto, and 
the proceeds of such sale shall be covered into the Treasury. If two 
or more sets of said volumes are ordered to the same address, the 
Secretary of the Navy shall inform the Senators, Eepresentatives, or 
Delegates who have designated the same, who thereupon may desig- 
nate other libraries, organizations, or individuals. The Secretary of the 
Navy shall inform distributees at whose instance the volumes are sent. 

The following joint resolution regarding the distribution of the work 
was approved January 30, 1896 : 

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled. That the Secretary of the Navy 
be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed 1o send the undistributed 
copies of the Official Eecords of the War of the Rebellion, both of the 
Union and of the Confederate navies, to such libraries, organizations, 
and individuals as may be designated before the meeting of the next 
Congress by the Representatives in the Fifty-fourth Congress of the 
districts whose Representatives in the Fifty third Congress failed to 
designate the distributees of their quota of said Official Records, or 
any part thereof, as authorized by the act of Congress approved July 
thirty-first, eighteen hundred and ninety-four, and the joint resolution 
approved March second, eighteen hundred and ninety-five, to the extent 
and in the manner and form provided in said act. 

The following is an extract from the act of Congress of May 28, 1896, 
which increased the edition from 10,000 to 11,000 copies: 

* * * For printing, binding, and wrapping one thousand addi- 
tional copies of series one, volumes one, two, three, and four, for sup- 
plying officers of the Navy who have not received the work, two 
thousand four hundred dollars. 



ORDER OF COMPILATION OF NAVAL WAR RECORDS. 



SERIES I. 



1. Operations of the Cruisers, 1861-1865. 

Union cruisers. 

West India (Flying) Squadron, under Acting Rear- Admiral Wilkes, U. S. N., 1862-1863. 

"West India (Flying) Squadron, under Acting Rear-Admiral Lardner, U. S. N., 1863-1864. 
Confederate cruisers and privateers. 

2. Operations in the Gulf of Mexico, January to June 7, 1861. 

Surrender of the Pensacola Navy Yard. 

Cooperation of the Navy in the relief of Fort Pickens. 

3. Operations on the Atlantic Coast, January to May 13, 1861. 

Cooperation of the Navy in the attempts to relieve Fort Sumter. 
Abandonment and destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard. 
Home Squadron, under Flag-Offieer Pendergrast, U. S. N. 

4. Operations on the Potomac and Rappahanuoek Eivers, 1861-1865. 

Potomac Flotilla, under Commander Ward, U. S. N., 1861. 
Potomac Flotilla, under Captain Craven, TJ. S. N., 1861. 
Potomac Flotilla, under Lieutenant Wyman, U. S. N., 1861-1862. 
Potomac Flotilla, under Commodore Harwood, U. S. N., 1862-1863. 
Potomac Flotilla, under Commander Parker, TT. S. N., 1863-1865. 

5. Atlantic Blockading Squadrons, 1861-1865. 

Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Flag-Officer Stringham, U. S. N., May 13 to Sept. 23, 1861. 

"West India Squadron, under Flag-Officer Pendergrast, U. S. N., 1861. 

Naval Defenses of Virginia and North Carolina, under Flag-Officer Barron, C. S. N. 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Flag-Officer Goldsborough, TJ. S. N., 1861. 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-Admiral Goldsborough, U. S. N., 1861-1862. 

Naval Defenses of Virginia and North Carolina, under Flag-Officer Lynch, C. S. N. 

James River Squadron, under Flag-Officer Buchanan, C. S. N. 

James River Squadron, under Flag-Officer Tattnall, C. S. N. 

James River Flotilla, under Commodore "Wilkes, TJ. S. N., 1862. 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear- Admiral Lee, TJ. S. N., 1862-1864. 

James River Squadron, under Flag-Officers Forrest and Mitchell, C. S. N. 

* Naval Defenses Inland "Waters of North Carolina, under Commander Pinkney, C. S. N. 

* Naval Defenses Cape Fear River, North Carolina, under Flag-Officer Lynch, C. S. N. 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear- Admiral Porter, TJ. S. N., 1864-1865. 

James River Squadron, under Flag-Officers Mitchell and Semmes, C. S. N. 

* Naval Defenses Cape Fear River, North Carolina, under Flag-Officer Pinkney, C. S. N. 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear- Admiral Radford, U. S. N., 1865. 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-Admiral Du Pont, U. S. N., 1861-1863. 

* Naval Defenses of South Carolina and Georgia, under Flag-Officer Tattnall, C. S. N. 

* Naval Defenses of Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, under Flag-Officer Ingraham, C. S. N. 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, TJ. S. N., 1863-1865. 

* Naval Defenses of Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, under Flag-Officer Tucker, C. S. N. 
Naval Defenses of Savannah, Ga., under Flag-Officers Hunter and Tattnall, C. S. N. 

* The Confederate material under this head is very scant. It is therefore hoped that those who 
have any Confederate naval documents upon the subject will communicate with the Office of Naval 
War Records, Navy Department, "Washington, D. C. 

XVII 
N W R VOL X II 



XVIII ORDER OF COMPILATION OF NAVAL WAR RECORDS. 

6. Gulf Blockading Squadrons, 1861-1865. 

Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Flag-Officer Mervine, U. S. N., 1861. 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Flag- Officer McKean, U. S. N., 1861-1862. 

* Mississippi River Defenses, under Flag-Officer Hollins, C. S. N. 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Flag-Officer McKean, U. S. N., 1862. 

East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Acting Bear- Admiral Lardner, TJ. S. N., 1862. 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear- Admiral Bailey, IT. S. N., 1862-1864. 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Captain Greene, U. S. N., 1864. 
East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear- Admiral Stribling, U. S. N., 1864-1865. 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Flag-Officer Farragut, U. S. N., 1862-1863. 

Mortar Flotilla, under Commander Porter, U. S. N., 1862. 

Lower Mississippi River Defenses, under Commander J. K. Mitchell, C. S. N. 

* Mobile Defenses, under Flag-Officer Randolph, C. S. N. 
Trans-Mississippi Marine Department, under Major Leon Smith, C. S. A. 

"West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Commodore Bell, U. S. N. (ad interim), 1863. 
"West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Rear- Admiral Farragut, U. S. N., 1864. 

* Mobile Defenses, under Admiral Buchanan, C. S. N. 

"West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Commodore Palmer, U. S. N., 1864-1865. 
"West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear- Admiral Thatcher, U. S. N., 1865. 

* Mobile Defenses, under Flag-Officer Fan-ami, C. S. N. 

7. Operations on the Western Rivers, 1861-1865. 

Naval Forces on "Western Waters, under Commander Rogers, TJ. S. N., 1861. 
Naval Forces on "Western "Waters, under Flag-Officer Foote, U. S. N., 1861-1862. 

* Mississippi River Defenses, under Flag-Officer Hollins, C. S. N. 
Naval Forces on "Western Waters, under Flag-Officer Davis, U. S. N., 1862. 

* Mississippi River Defense Fleet, under Captain Montgomery, C. S. A. 

* Mississippi River Defenses, under Commander R. F. Piukney, C. S. N. 

* Mississippi River Defenses, under Flag-Officer Lynch, C. S. N. 
Mississippi Squadron, under Rear- Admiral Porter, U. S. N., 1862-1864. 
Mississippi Squadron, under Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. N., 1864-1865. 

* Naval Defenses of Red River, Louisiana, under Lieutenant J. H. Carter, C. S. N. 

* The Confederate material under this head is very scant. It is therefore hoped that those who 
have any Confederate naval documents upon the subject will communicate with the Office of Naval 
War Records, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 



LIST 

OF 

UNITED STATES VESSELS OF WAR SERVING IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC 
BLOCKADING SQUADRON, MAY 6 TO OCTOBER 27, 1864. 



Name. 


Kate. 


Tonnage. 


Class. 


Crew. 


Guns. 




Third.... 


974 


Side- wheel steamer 


145 


10 




Third 


1,264 


do .. 


144 


10 




Fourth . . . 


200 


Schooner 


22 




Alert 


Fourth . . . 


65 


Screw steamer 


15 


2 


Althea 


Fourth ... 


72 


do 


15 


I 




Fourth 


156 


do 


30 


4 




Third 


820 


do 


90 


7 


Arietta . 


Fourth ... 


199 


Mortar schooner 


39 


2 




Third 


974 


Side-wheel steamer 


102 


10 


Aster 


Fourth ... 


285 


Screw steamer 


30 


3 




Third 


1,006 


Ironclad steamer j 


145 


4 




Third 


1,310 


Side-wheel steamer 


162 


10 




Fourth 


533 


do . 


60 


3 




Fourth ... 


55 


Screw steamer 


12 




Belle 


Fourth ... 


60 


do 


24 


2 


Ben Morgan 


Fourth 


407 


Ordnance ship 


35 






Fourth . . 


163 


Screw steamer .. .... 


35 


4 




Fourth . 


321 


do 


41 


3 


Brandy wine 


Second 


1,726 


Storeship 


72 


1 


Britannia 


Fourth ... 


"495 


Side- wheel steamer 


75 


5 




Second ... 


2,070 


Screw steamer 


367 


26 




Fourth . 


176 


Side- wheel steamer 


32 


3 




Fourth 


630 


Screw steamer 


70 






Third ... 


858 


do 


96 


10 




Third 


1,034 


Ironclad steamer 


85 


2 




Fourth 


144 


Screw steamer 


42 


2 




Fourth 


362 


SuBolv shin 


23 


1 




Fourth 


606 


Screw steamer 


92 


6 


Chicopee 


Third 


974 


Side- wheel steamer 


72 


10 


Chippewa 


Fourth . . . 


507 


Screw steamer 


64 


6 


Clematis 


Fourth . . 


296 


do 


46 


3 


Clinton 


Fourth . 


50 


do 


16 






Fourth . 


100 


do 


12 


2 


Colorado ..... 


First 


3,425 


do 


626 


52 




Fourth . 


513 


Side- wheel steamer 


96 


7 




Fourth 


376 


do 


68 


6 






542 


.do 


88 


6 




Fourth 


532 


do 


88 


6 




Fourth. 


513 


do 


29 


6 


Connecticut 


Second 


1,800 


do 


166 


11 




Fourth 


545 


Screw steamer 


79 


7 




Third 


997 


Screw sloop 


147 


8 


Dawn... 


Fourth .. 


391 


Screw steamer 


60 


4 



* Afterwards known as Beta or Tug No. 2. 



XIX 



XX 



LIST OF UNITED STATES VESSELS OF WAR. 



List of United States vessels of war serving in the North Atlantic Hlocltadiny Squadron, 
May 6 to October 27, 1864 Continued. 



Name. 


Kate. 


Tonnage. 


Class. 


Crew. 


Guns. 




Fourth . . . 
Fourth . . . 
Fourth ... 
Fourth ... 


682 
357 
700 
350 
344 
955 
699 
1,261 
900 
1,770 


Screw steamer 


57 
68 
96 
70 
53 
135 
73 
150 
137 
194 


8 
3 
4 
8 
3 
10 
3 
7 

11 




Side- wheel steamer 




do 




Screw steamer 


Eolus 


Fourth ... 


Side-wheel steamer 


Eutaw 
Fahkee 


Third 
Fourth . . . 
Third 
Third . .. 


do 


Screw steamer 


Florida 


Side- wheel steamer 




do 




Second 


do 












Fourth . . . 
Fourth . . 


726 
80 
1,244 
886 
1,200 


Side- wheel steamer 


96 
14 
170 
112 
201 
15 
68 
24 
18 
50 
69 
55 
6 
99 
76 
29 
164 
30 
62 
120 
30 
160 
108 
163 
17 
63 
85 
145 
92 
68 
111 
9 
141 
145 
96 
144 
121 
134 
540 
150 
110 
96 


7 




Screw steamer 


Glaucus 


Third 
Third 
Third 


do 
do 


11 
6 
11 
1 


Grand Gulf 


do 




Fourth . . . 
Fourth . . 
Fourth 


75 
75 
238 
108 
261 
301 
397 
19 
517 
507 
224 
974 
133 
593 
1,151 
180 
1,240 
593 
1,364 
129 
630 
295 
974 
1,034 
627 
786 
35 
974 
974 
593 
974 
776 
730 
3,307 
994 
787 
655 
William G 






Screw steamer 




Side- wheel steamer 


1 
1 
3 
2 
4 




Fourth . . . 
Fourth ... 
Fourth ... 
Fourth 
Fourth ... 
Fourth ... 
Fourth ... 
Fourth . . . 
Third 






Schooner 


Hetzel 




Screw steamer 


Hoyt 


do 






7 
6 
2 
10 
2 
3 
9 
3 
10 
8 
10 
2 
2 
5 
10 
2 
3 
6 


Huron 
Hydrangea 
losco 




do 


Side-wheel steamer. 


Isaac N. Seymour 


Fourth ... 
Fourth ... 
Third 
Fourth ... 
Second 
Fourth . . . 
Third 
Fourth . . . 
Fourth . . . 
Fourth ... 
Third 
Fourth . . . 
Fourth ... 
Third 
Fourth . . . 
Third 
Third 
Fourth ... 
Third 
Third 
Third 
First 
Third 
Third 
Fourth ... 
*See' 


... do 


Tsonomia 


do 


James Adger 
John L. Lockwood 
Jnniata 


do .' 
do 




Kansas 


do 


Keystone State 
Lilac 
Lilian 
Louisiana 

Mn/>.lrin^,w ... 












Mahopac 
Mai vern 
Maratauza 
Martin 
Massasoit 






do 






10 
10 
6 
10 
9 
8 
48 
10 
6 
3 


Mattabesett 


do 


M :u i nice 




Mendota 




Mercedita . 




Miami 




Minnesota 




Mohican 




Montgomery 


do 


Monti eel lo 


do 




Putnam. 



LIST OF UNITED STATES VESSELS OF WAR. 



XXI 



List of United Status vessels of war serving in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
May 6 to October 27, 1864 Continued. 



Name. 


Rate. 


Tonnage. 


Class. 


Crew. 


Guns. 




Fourth . . . 


513 


Side- wheel steamer 


78 


6 




Fourth 


625 


Screw steamer 


50 


5 


Mount Washington 


Fourth 


500 


Side- wheel steamer 


40 


1 




Fourth ... 


541 


Screw steamer 


65 


7 




Fourth . . . 


340 


Side-wueel steamer 


63 


4 




Third 


1,244 


Screw steamer 


164 


11 




Fourth . . . 


948 


do 


92 


6 




Fourth 


475 


do 


70 


9 




-Fourth 


593 


do 


118 


8 




Second . . . 


1,250 


Ironclad steamer 


130 


4 




Third 


974 


Side-wheel steamer 


145 


10 




Third 


974 


do . . 


145 


10 




Third 


974 


do 


189 


12 




Fourth 


593 


Screw steamer 


130 


12 


Phlox 


Fourth . . 


317 




32 




Pink 


Fourth . 


184 


Screw steamer 


24 


1 




Fourth 


93 


do 


20 


2 




First 


2,415 


Side-wheel steamer 


266 


18 


Quaker City 


Second.... 


1,600 


do 


163 


9 


R. R. Cuvler 


Third 


1,202 


Screw steamer 


154 


12 


Release 


Fourth . . . 


327 


Bark 


85 


3 






80 


Schooner 






Rhode Island 


Second .... 


1,517 


Side-wheel steamer.. . . 


157 


12 


Roanoke .. 


First 


3,435 


Ironclad steamer 


246 


6 


Roman 


Fourth . . . 


350 


Storeship 


9 


1 


Rose. 


Fourth . . 


96 


Screw steamer . 


17 


1 


Sabiue 


Second 


1,726 


Sailing frigate 


328 


36 


St. Lawrence 


Second 


1,726 


do 


118 


12 


Samuel Rotan 


Fourth 


212 


Sailing schooner 


29 


4 


Santiago de Cuba 


Second 


1,567 


Side-wheel steamer 


143 


11 


Sassacus 


Third 


974 


do 


145 


10 


Saugus 


Third 


1,034 


Ironclad steamer 


81 


2 


Seneca 


Fourth ... 


507 


Screw steamer 


90 


6 


Shamrock 


Third 


974 


Side-wheel steamer 


160 


11 


Shawsheen 


Fourth 


180 


do.. 


40 


3 


Shenandoah 


Second 


1,378 


Screw steamer 


171 


10 


Shokokon 


Fourth 


700 




112 


6 


State of Georgia 


Third 


1,204 


do 


113 


8 


Stepping Stones 


Fourth 


226 


do 


21 


5 


Susquehanna 


First 


2,450 


do 


306 


16 


Tacony 


Third 


974 


do 


145 


10 


Tallapoosa 


Third 


974 


do ... 


202 


10 


Tecumseh 


Third 


1,034 


Ironclad steamer . ... 


81 


2 


Tristram Shandy ...... 


Fourth 


444 




80 


3 


Tritonia 


Fourth ... 


202 


do 


26 


2 


Tug No. 1 (Alpha) 


Fourth 


55 




9 




Tug No. 2 (Beta)* 


Fourth 


55 


do 


12 




Tug No. 3 (Gamma) 


Fourth 


55 


do 






Tug No. 4 (Delta) 


Fourth . 


50 


do 


4 




Tug No. 5 (Epsilon) 


Fourth ... 


55 


.. do 


10 




TugNo. 6 (Zeta) 


Fourth 


60 


do 


5 




Tnscarora . . . 


Third... 


997 


...do... 


172 


10 



* Found in this volume as the Bazely and J. E. Bazely. 



XXII 



LIST OF UNITED STATES VESSELS OF WAR. 



List of United States vessels of war serving in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
May 6 to October 27, 1864 Concluded. 



Name. 


Rate. 


Tonnage. 


Class. 


Crew. 


Guns. 


TJnadilla 


Fourth . . . 


507 


Screw steamer 


81 


6 


Unit 


Fourtli . . . 


56 


do 


20 




Valley City 


Fourth . . . 


190 


do 


48 


6 


Vanderbilt 


First 


3,360 




209 


17 




Third 


886 




122 


7 


Victoria 


Fourth ... 


254 


do 


44 


3 


Violet 


Fourth . . . 


166 


do 


20 


3 


Wabash 


First 


3,274 


do 


550 


46 


Whitehead 


Fourth ... 


139 


do 


45 


4 


Wilderness 


Fourth ... 


390 


Side- wheel steamer 


41 


4 


William Badger 


Fourth ... 


334 


Sailing ship 


29 


1 


William G. Putnam * 


Fourth ... 


149 


Side- wheel steamer 


32 


4 


Wvalusinfir 


Third 


974 


do 


145 


14 


Wyandotte 


Fourth . . . 


458 




68 


5 


Tantic 


Fourth 


593 


do 


113 


8 


Young America 


Fourth . 


173 


do 


13 


2 




Fourth 


418 


do 


85 


5 


Zouave 


Fourth . . . 


127 


do 


25 


2 















* Found in this volume as General Putnam. 



> - 


- 1864:. 


MAY. 


AUGUST. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 




1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 
16 
23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 
















JUNE. 


SEPTEMBER. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat 








1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 










1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 

24 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 






JULY. 


OCTOBER. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat. 

2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat 












1 
8 
15 
22 
29 














1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 

19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
1!) 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 

























NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

FROM MAY 6, 1864, TO OCTOBER 27, 1864. 



N W R VOL 10 1 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



FROM MAY 6, 1864, TO OCTOBER 27, 1864. 



Report of Acting Hear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, regarding the landing 
of the army at City Point and Bermuda Hundred, Va. 

FLAGSHIP ]^ORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, May 6, 1864 2:40 p. m. 

SIR: I informed the Department this morning of the successful land- 
ing of the army at City Point and Bermuda Hundred last night. 

The army movement was admirably planned and executed. Contra- 
bands say that there are no rebel troops in the vicinity and that within 
the last two days all the troops from Kichmond have been sent to Lee. 
I transmit enclosed a copy of my order* of 4th instant, under which 
the naval part of the movement was made. 

I deeply regret to report that the Commodore Morris^ Lieutenant 
Commnnding Fyffe, has just been blown up by a torpedo and utterly 
lestroyed near Four Mile Creek, opposite Jones' Neck. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Aetg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

P. S. Later contraband intelligence represents that there are many 
troops near the lett bank of this river. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Glitz, U. 8. 
Nary, regarding the disposition of vessels for the protection of the army 
at City Point and Bermuda Hundred. 

FLAGSHIP MALVEBN, 

Bermuda Hundred, May 6, 1864 9 : 30 a. m. 

Eutaic will relieve the Osceola above Bermuda Hundred and Osceola 
will take the Entails present position oft ('ity Point. The Pe< t uot, when 
she arrives, will take up 'position with the Eutaw to protect the land- 
ing at Bermuda Hundred. The Shokokon and Putnam are to occupy 
thr Appomattnx below Point of Hocks. 

The object of thisdisposirion is to protect the occupation of the army 
and its landings at City Point and Bermuda Hundred. 

* See Vol. 0, pp. 724-7 6. 

t Tbe U. S. S. Commodore Jones was destroyed, not the U. S. S. Commodore Morris; 
see p. 9. 

3 



4 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The senior officer present will keep this order and communicate to 
the other commanding' officers as soon as practicable. 
Eespectfully, etc., 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GLITZ, 

U. 8. 8. Osceola. 

P. S. Notify the Saugus to join me when she arrives. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Simmons, U. 8. Navy, regarding 
the capture of a signal station in the James River. 

U. S. S. DAWN, 

Off Wilson's Wharf, May 6, 1864. 

SIE : I have the honor to report that at the request of General Wild 
I this morning took my vessel about 7 miles down the river and cap- 
tured the principal signal station at this part of the river, killing 5 of 
the enemy and capturing the mail, which I delivered to General Wild. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. SIMMONS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. S. S. Dawn. 

Acting Bear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Detailed report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Simmons, IT. 8. Navy, 
regarding capture of signal station in James River, May 6, 1864. 

U. S. S. DAWN, 
Off Wilson's Landing, Va., June 30, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, dated 
June 27, 1864, ordering me to send you a circumstantial report of the 
capture of the principal signal station near Wilson's Wharf, on May 
6, 1864. 

In obedience to that order, I respectfully report that on Friday, May 
6, at the request of Brigadier-General Wild, I took on board a small 
detachment of soldiers and proceeded down the river and landed the 
soldiers about 2 miles above the signal station. I then proceeded with 
this vessel to Sandy Point, where the signal station was located, and 
anchored for the purpose of covering the landing of my boats. I 
then sent the second cutter, with 10 men armed, in charge of Acting 
Ensign E. T. Sears, accompanied by Acting Assistant Paymaster R. 
C. Peirce. Before landing, the enemy was plainly seen by the officers 
in charge of the boat, but could not see anything of our soldiers, who 
had not yet come up. The boat was pushed rapidly to the shore; the 
men landed and at once started to capture, if possible, the enemy and 
their property. The enemy retreated to a small piece of woods. Act- 
ing Ensign Sears left one of his men to guard the boat and took the 
rest and pushed on toward the woods where the enemy had retreated. 
As Mr. Sears neared the woods he saw a body of men approaching. 
He supposed them to be a party of rebels, and wishing to finish his 
work before the advancing party could come up to their assistance, he 
made a bold push and was just about commencing the attack when he 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 5 

heard a volley of musketry, and then learned that the advancing party 
were our own men. By this volley 3 men were killed and 2 wounded 
and captured. The other 2 were killed as they were retreating by 
another party of our soldiers who were advancing from another direc- 
tion. Upon the landing of the second cutter, Acting Assistant Pay- 
master Peirce, who knew my great desire to capture the rebel signal 
flag and code, at once started for the house above. As he neared the 
house the rebel officer retreated on horseback. Mr. Peirce captured 
the signal flag and code, which I forwarded to you. At this time, leav- 
ing the ship in charge of Acting Master J. A. Jackaway, who had been 
shelling the woods in the rear of the signal station, I proceeded on shore 
and gave orders to have the dead buried, which was done by Mr. Sears 
and Mr. Peirce. I had the wounded and prisoners brought on board 
and embarked the troops and returned to my station off Wilson's Wharf. 
I take pleasure in reporting to you that Acting Master Jackaway per- 
formed his duty in his usual cheerful and cool manner, placing him very 
high in my estimation as an officer and seaman. 

The conduct of Acting Ensign E. T. Sears was deserving of great 
credit, charging as he did in the face of what he supposed was a rein- 
forcing party of the enemy, for the purpose of carrying out the orders 
lie received from me. The conduct of Acting Assistant Paymaster R. 
C. Peirce was truly brave and gallant in the extreme, charging as he 
did alone toward the house, that he might capture the signal officer 
with the flag and code, thus accomplishing the object of the expedi- 
tion. The signal flag and spyglass captured by me are on board this 
vessel at present, in use. I should have sent them to you, but supposed 
I was to keep them on this vessel until the end of the cruise and deliver 
them with my other nautical instruments. 

I can not close this report without making mention of S. F. Patten, 
quartermaster, and Robert Braid, coxswain, and Patrick Kelley, lands- 
man, attached to this vessel, for very good conduct at the time Mr. 
Sears was about making the charge. They were all three close to him, 
and by their conduct set an example to the other men which had a very 
good effect. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. SIMMONS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. 8. 8. Dawn. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Endorsement.] 

Acting assistant paymaster is an applicant for a regular appointment, 
and is well known to me as a most worthy man. 

Fox. 



Letter from, the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. 
Navy, responding to request regarding lights in the James River. 



DEPARTMENT, May 6, 1864. 
SIR: The Light House Board has been requested to give immediate 
attention to the matter of lighting up the light houses mentioned in 
your letter of the 3d instant. 

Very respectfully, etc., GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Klockadiny /Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



6 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Capture of the British steamer Young Republic, May 6, 1864. 
Beport of Commander Ransom, TT. S. Navy, commanding TI. S. S. Grand Gulf. 

U. S. S. GRAND GULF, 
Off Wilmington, N. C., Western Bar, May !), 1864. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to report that this vessel, after a chase of six 
hours and thirty initiates, on the morning of the Oth instant, overhauled 
and captured the English steamer Young Republic (blockade runner), 
fourteen hours from Wilmington, N. C., bound to Nassau, New Provi- 
dence. I had left New Inlet, off Wilmington, the evening of the 5th 
instant, to report, in obedience to an order of the senior officer, for duty 
off Western Bar. 

At 4 : 40 a. m. a steamer was reported from the masthead, bearing S/V. 
I stood in chase. At 11: 10 a. m., after 37 shots from the 100-pounder, 
and 3 shots from the 30 pounder Parrot t guns, the stranger turned 
around and surrendered in latitude 3-' 10' N., longitude 78 40' VV. 

The Young Republic is a new side wheel steamer of 775 &- tons (gross), 
English, and she is a valuable prize. Her cargo consists principally of 
cotton and tobacco. In the chase she tlnew overboard several hundred 
bales of cotton, of which, with the aid of ihe prize, I have succeeded 
in picking up from the sea 31*J bales, besides a quantity of loose cotton, 
amounting to several bales. 

She had cut away her anchors and thrown her chains overboard. She 
had cut away two of her boats, which were recovered. She had no 
manifest, no clearance, no bill of health, nor muster roll of ship's com- 
pany. The chronometer, charts, and nautical instruments had all been 
thrown overboard by the captain. She did not show any colors at any 
time. No other vessel was in sight at the time of the capture. I have 
retained, for their better preservation, on board of this vessel one com- 
mon deck spyglass and one marine opera glass. The former had been 
thrown overboard, and was picked up from the sea; the latter was found 
in possession of one of her crew. I have also retained a small boat for 
the use of this vessel. 

In obedience to your order of March 10, 1804, I have instructed the 
officer in charge of the prize, Acting Ensign Charles H. Krisbie, to 
report to you at Hampton Koads or off Newport News, Va., leaving 
blanks as to the prize court to which the prize is to be sent, also in the 
report to the Department and the district judge. 

1 detailed an acting third assistant engineer, 2 acting master's mates, 
and a prize crew consisting of 10 men, leaving on board of her, also, 
her captain, purser, doctor, chief mate, and an assistant engineer. 

I have received on board of this vessel 42 prisoners, of which 1 trans 
mit herewith a descriptive list in duplicate. 

I find that her captain is a master in the rebel Navy. 

It appears from her log book, which was picked up from the sea, and 
which 1 have forwarded by the officer in charge of the prize to the judge 

of the U. S. district court at , that this steamer, Young Republic, 

was formerly called the Conqueror, of New York. 

I enclose herewith two letters addressed to persons in Nassau, New 
Providence, which were found in possession of one of the prisoners. 

I enclose herewith a duplicate list of the officers and crew of this 
vessel who are entitled to share in whatevei may accrue ol prize money 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 7 

from this capture, the original being enclosed to the honorable Secre- 
tary of the Navy. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE M. HANSOM, 

Commander. 
Acting Kear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding, etc. 



Letter from Commander Ransom, TT. S. Navy, to the judge of the U. S. district court. 

U. S. S. GRAND GULF, 
At Sea, off Wilmington, N. C., May 6, 1864. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to report the circumstances attending the 
capture by this vessel of the English steamer young Republic (blockade 
runner), this day, as follows: 

The steamer was reported in sight from the masthead at 4:40 a. m., 
bearing S. W., and immediately I stood in chase. At 11 : 10 a. m., after 
many shots from the 100 pounder Parrott gun, the stranger turned 
around and surrendered in latitude 32 10' N., longitude 78 49' W., 
and proved to be the English steamer Young Republic (blockade run- 
ner), about fourteen hours from Wilmington, N. (_)., bound to Na sau, 
New Providence. She did not show any colors at any time from the 
commencement of the chase to the time. that she surrendered as a prize. 

No other vessel was in sight at the time of the capture. In the 
chase the Young Republic threw overboard many bales of cotton, boxes, 
trunks, etc., and the only paper found on board of her was the certifi- 
cate of British registry, herewith enclosed, and dated April 23, 1864. 
She had no manifest, no clearance, no bill of health, nor muster roll of 
ship's company. 8he had cut away her anchors and thrown the chain 
cables overboard. She had cut away two of her boats, which were 
recovered. The chronometer, charts, and nautical instruments had all 
been thrown overboard by the captain. 

I have instructed Acting Ensign Charles H. Frisbie, U. S. Navy, 
under whose charge she will arrive, to deliver her and the persons 
retained as witnesses to the judge of the U. S. district court or to the 
U. S. prize commissioners at . 

I forward to you also by this officer in charge, her log book, which 
was picked up from the sea, by which it appears the steamer Young 
Republic was formerly called the Conqueror, of New York. 

The persons retained and to be delivered as witnesses are as follows, 
viz: 

F. M. Harris, master (in the rebel Navy); Thomas Foley, surgeon; 
William Kainey, purser; Albert lloberts, third assistant engineer; 
Dan. Shaw, chief mate. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE M. KANSOM, 

Commander, U. M. Navy. 

Hon. JUDGE OF THE U. S. DISTRICT COURT. 



Report of Captain Sands, U. S. Navy, transmitting captured letter. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 

Off Western Ear, Cape Fear River, May 10, 1864. 
DEAR SIR: I enclose a late paper from Wilmington, w r hich may be 
interesting to you, which an officer obtained from prize steamer Young 



8 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Republic, captured by the Grand Gulf, and in looking for papers a letter 
was found, partly written, from the captain of the Young Republic to 
his owner, a copy of which I also enclose. 
Eespectfully and truly, yours, etc., 

B. F. SANDS, 
Captain, U. 8. Navy, Senior Officer, etc. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

[Enclosure.] 

STEAMSHIP YOUNG EEPUBLIC, 
Off Wilmington Bar, May 9, 1864. 

DEAR SIR: I crossed the bar at 8:25 p. in. on the night of the 5th 
instant, and made a number of vessels cruising off the bar, which 
delayed me until 11 : 30 p. m., when I shaped my course, the ship run- 
ning about 9 miles per hour, perfectly smooth water. At 4: 30 a. in. on 
the following morning made a steamer astern and at once made all 
steam to get away from her. At 5 a. m. commenced to heave overboard 
cotton. After heaving over more than one-half of our cargo and throw- 
ing overboard anchors, chains, and in fact everything that was movable 
above deck, I headed the ship in for land, distance about 68 miles. 
This was about 10 a. m., the steamer in chase firing all the time. I 
found that the steamer would overhaul us in the course of an hour, we 
making, with from 38 to 45 pounds of steam, only 10 miles per hour; in 
fact, the damned steamer is not, and never was, worth a cent. The 
officers and crew of this ship did their duty, and finding that it was 
impossible to either get away from the enemy or to make the land, and 
the enemy throwing their shots over and alongside of the ship, to save 
the lives of the crew (not caring whether they even destroyed the vessel 
or not), has compelled me to surrender the steamer. Everything about 
the vessel was destroyed. 

On our inward passage, the second day out, it was as much as I 
could do to keep this steamer from breaking into pieces with us all; in 
fact, she stove in all the bulwarks forward and aft, started her coal 
bunkers, boilers leaking, the bolts in the hog braces snapping, and wood- 
work working about 4 inches. But with the blessing of God we man- 
aged to weather it through. The steamer, I believe, is to be taken to 
Boston. 

After capturing us they put a prize crew on board and both steam- 
ers commenced to pick up the cotton, and the weather has been per- 
fectly smooth for the last seventy hours; in fact, they were over sixty 
hours in picking cotton ; how much they got I hope I will be able to 
tell you some other time. 

As you are aware, when leaving N[assauf] I was quite unwell, and 
from the exposure of the inward trip I had to lay up in Wilmington, 
and I can assure you that I am anything but a well man either in body 
or mind. We are treated very kindly by the officer in command of this 
steamer at present, and I am in hopes that as soon as possible after 
our arrival at Boston they will let me go home, and I will see you in 
Liverpool, as you can telegraph me as soon as you arrive at South- 
ampton, 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 9 

Destruction by a torpedo in the James River of the U. 8. 8. Commodore 

Jones, May 6, 1864. 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVEEN, 
In James River, May 6, 1864 5 p. m. 

Since sending my dispatch* I learn that the Commodore Jones was 
destroyed, not the Commodore Morris. Two previous verbal reports 
had stated it to be the latter. 

List of killed and wounded not received.t Commanding officer 
badly wounded. Vessel blown into fragments. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. G. WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 

[Endorsement.] 

Above received at Fort Monroe 10 p. in., May 7. Do not know cause 
of delay. 

[GK D.J SHELDON. 



Report of Commander Beaumont, TJ. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Mackinaw. 

U. S. S. MACKINAW, 

Deep Bottom, James River, Virginia, May 6, 1864. 
Sre : In obedience to orders from Fleet Captain Barnes, I proceeded 
up the river with the Commodore Morris and Commodore Jones, follow- 
ing at a safe distance boats from the different vessels which were drag- 
ging for torpedoes. When within about 500 yards of the position of 
some torpedoes, as informed by the contrabands, I anchored, ordering 
the Morris and Jones not to approach nearer the boats, explaining to 
them both the danger to be anticipated by so doing. While endeavor- 
ing to get a more convenient berth farther down the river, and occu- 
pied by the movements of my own vessel, the" Jones, disregarding the 
repeated orders she had been given, ran over a torpedo, which exploded 
instantly and totally destroyed her. 

I am unable at this time to furnish the names or number of those 
who were lost in this disastrous occurrence. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. BEAUMONT, 

Commander. 
Acting Hear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Bear-Admiral Lee, TJ. S. Navy, transmitting reports of Fleet Captain Barnes 
and Commander Beaumont, U. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 

James River, May 13, 1864. 

SIR: I transmit enclosed the following reports in relation to the tor- 
pedoes in the James River: (1) From Fleet Captain J. S. Barnes, giv- 
ing information received from two prisoners taken at Deep Bottom after 

* See p. 3. t The total reported casualties number 69. COMPILERS. 



10 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

the destruction of the Commodore Jones on the 6th instant, in regard 
to the positions of the torpedoes, etc.; (2) from Commander J. C. 
Beaumont, U. S. S. Mackinaiv, with its enclosures, reporting the dis- 
covery of the galvanic batteries used to explode the torpedo that 
destroyed the Commodore Jones, with a tracing showing relative posi- 
tions, and a plan of the battery, which the reports fully explain. 

I send in a separate parcel specimens of the rope and insulated wire 
connected with this battery. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear Admiral, Comdy. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure 1.] 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, May 10, 1864. 

SIR : Immediately after the U. S. S. Commodore Jones was destroyed 
by the explosion of the torpedo at Jones' Point on the 6th instant, a 
party of marines and sailors from the Mackinaw landed at the point and 
discovered three galvanic batteries sunk in pits in the ground, to which 
wires were attached to one or more torpedoes which were not exploded 
and were still lying in the channel. 

The body of the man who had been shot by the coxswain of one of 
the, boats employed in dragging was found lying near the tirst galvanic 
battery, shot through the head. In the third battery were captured 2 
men who were ready to explode another torpedo should anyof our vessels 
pass over it. The names of these men a ; e P. W. Smith, who represents 
himself as an acting master in the Confederate Submarine Battery Serv- 
ice, under the command of Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, of the boat 
torpedo, and Jeffries Johnson, a private in the same service. From 
Smith 1 learned that tliere were many more torpedoes in tin- river, but 
he would not communicate their location or any facts connected with 
them. Johnson stated that he was forced into the rebel army as a con- 
script, and procured his exchange into the service as it would keep him 
near his home, which was at Deep Bottom, opposite Jones' Point. 

At first he was not communicative and evaded, on the grounds of 
ignorance, the questions put to him, but being placed in the forward 
gunboat employed in dragging for torpedoes and given to understand 
that he would share the fate of the boat, he signified his willingness to 
tell all he knew about them. He stated that the torpedo which was 
exploded was put down last fall; that it contained 2.000 pounds of 
powder; that there are several more near a place called McGn ire's, 
above Aikeifs Landing, and others at Os'oorne's; that there m;iy be 
others of which he knows nothing; that these are all of which he has 
any knowledge; that he has heard there were many in the river a' ove 
Osborue's. He states that there are several kinds, but that the smallest 
of those exploded by means of a galvanic battery contains about 400 
pounds of powder. The small ones are floating, and are exploded by 
contact or a line from shore. 

The large torpedoes can be put down and arranged in a day by the 
boat torpedo, which is prepared for that particular service under the 
command of Lieutenant Hunter Davidson, formerly f the U. S. Navy, 
who, with 12 men, was on the opposite shore when the Commodore Jones 
was destroyed, having gone ashore there from his vessel a few hours 
before our vessels came up. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 11 

I enclose the enlisting articles of those employed in this service, a 
telegram from Mr. Mallory to Lieutenant Davidson, and various tele- 
grams announcing the approaches of our vessels from the signal stations 
along the river, all found upon the persons of those captured and the 
man who was killed. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN S. BARNES, 
Fleet Captain, North Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[ Subenclosu res. ] 
Enlisting articles, C. S. Naval Submarine Battery Service. 

We, the undersigned, for and in consideration of the sums set opposite 
our names, do agree, individually 

Ar icle 1. To enter the C. 8. ^Naval Submarine Battery Service. 

Article "2. To do our duty in said service loyally and faithfully. 

Article 3. To obey all lawful orders of those set over us in authority. 

Article 4. Under no circumstances, now or hereafter, to make known 
to any one not employed on this service, anything regarding the methods 
used for arranging or exploding the submarine batteries, excepting only 
by permission of the honorable Secretary of the Navy or the command- 
ing officer of said service. 

This agreement to remain in force whilst its articles are adhered to, 
or until the expiration of thirty days from the date on which we may 
give the commanding officer of this service written notice of our desire 
to be discharged. The certificate of employment to be returned before 
the discharge is delivered. To all of which we hereunto subscribe 
ourselves. 



RICHMOND, May [5?]. 

Four monitors, the Atlanta, 5 gunboats, 2 ironclads, 59 transports 
[are] coming up the river; also 3 rafts have passed Fort Boykin. 

S. R. MALLORY, 

Secretary Navy. 
Lieutenant H. DAVIDSON. 

TURKEY ISLAND, May 5. 

Mr. Bingley reports 3 gunboats in sight of Presqu'isle. 
Respectfully, 

T. H. FRIEND. 
Mr. SMITH. 



TURKEY ISLAND, May 6. 

We can see no movements of the enemy this morning, but suppose 
from the sound of their drums they are marching up on the other side 
of the river. 

Captain DAVIDSON. 



12 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Enclosure 2.] 

U. S. S. MACKINAW, 
James River, Fa., May 12, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to transmit the enclosed reports from First 
Assistant Engineer in Charge Jefferson Young, and Acting Master's 
Mate J. F. Blanchard, of this vessel, of their observations of the rebel 
torpedoes at Deep Bottom, opposite Sturgeon town, James River. The 
sketch by Mr. Young shows the exact locality of the galvanic batteries 
and the position of the unexploded torpedo. 

I deem it proper to state that the connecting wires from the battery 
to the water were found just beneath the surface of the earth. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. BEAUMONT, U. S. Navy. 
Acting Eear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

U. 8. Flagship Malvern, James River, Virginia. 

[Subenclosure.] 

U. S. S. MACKINAW, 
James River, May 12, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to submit a sketch of the galvanic batteries 
(known as the Point submarine batteries), showing their positions on 
the bank of the river and the direction by which the wires were con- 
nected to torpedoes. 

The galvanic batteries were formed of nine zinc cups each, one bat- 
tery or set of cups being placed on shelves directly over the other. In 
each zinc cup was placed a porous clay cup. In the zinc cup and out- 
side the porous cup was placed the sulphuric acid and water, and inside 
the porous cup was placed the nitric acid. The zinc of one cup was con- 
nected to the cast iron of the other by a clamp and thumbscrew. The 
negative wires led directly to the torpedoes (one to each). 

The positive wires ran along near a footpath parallel with the river 
for about 200 feet and terminated at a subbattery. 

In this subbattery were two large wooden plugs, with a hole about 
one-half inch diameter in each, these holes being filled with mercury, 
the positive wires connecting from the torpedoes to the bottom of these 
plugs, the positive wires from the charged batteries being inserted in 
the mercury at the top of its respective plug to form the connection and 
explode the torpedoes. The wires from the river bank to the torpedoes 
were supported by a 3-inch rope, being stopped to rope about every 
4 feet. 

At a distance of every 15 feet of the rope were some 5 or 6 feet of 
three-quarter link chain to assist in keeping it on the bottom. 

The wires were covered with gutta-percha about one-quarter inch 
thick. 

The battery used is generally known as the Bunsen battery. 

Kespectfully submitted. 

JEFFERSON YOUNG, 
First Assistant Engineer, U. 8. Navy, in Charge. 

Commander J. C. BEAUMONT, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Mackinaw. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



13 




14 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

U. S. S. MACKINAW, 
James River, May 11, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully report that in obedience to your order I landed 
with an armed boat's crew on the right bank of the river just above 
Four Mile Creek to look for wires and galvanic batteries. I proceeded 
at once to search the buildings on shore I had only searched two when 
the explosion took place. I immediately returned to the boat in order 
to save the wounded and drowning. I had tilled my boat just as a man 
was seen running on the opposite shore. Several shots were fired at 
him and he fell. I lauded and found the battery. It was one of Bun- 
sen's simplified batteries. There were two distinct batteries arranged 
on shelves and both fully charged. From each end of the box were two 
wires. I closed the box and reported to you on board. I then received 
an order from you to accompany Mr. Young on shore and trace the 
wires. I went immediately to the battery and disconnected the wires 
from the box containing the battery and followed them down the river 
for about 75 yards, then turned directly to the river. I here captured 
the two prisoners. They were concealed in a small box inserted in the 
ground. It was about 4 feet square. On close examination I found in 
two corners of the box aping, with a wire in each of them. By these 
wires the torpedoes were exploded. The two wires running down the 
river bank were the charged wires. They ran into this pit. The tor- 
pedo was exploded by applying one of the wires leading through the 
plug to the charged wires, thereby emitting a spark. Mr. Young taking 
the prisoners on board, I proceeded to examine the wires directly under- 
neath the river bank. I found the wires attached to a hawser. I traced 
the hawser to the water's edge. It here branched oft', one leading to 
the exploded torpedo; the other we traced in the boat about 150 yards. 
We found it too heavy to lift with the boat. We cut the wires and 
hawser, buoyed it, and returned on board. 
Very respectfully, 

J. F. BLANCHARD, 
Acting Mauler's Mate. 

Commander J. C. BEAUMONT, 

Commanding U. S. S. Mackinaw, James River, Virginia. 



Beport of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Wade, U. S. Navy, commanding TJ. S. S. Commodore 

Jones. 

U. S. NAVAL HOSPITAL, 
Norfolk, Va., May 13, 1864. 

SIR: It becomes my painful duty to inform you of the total loss of 
the U. S. gunboat Commodore Jones on the Oth instant, off Deep Bot- 
tom, James River, Virginia, as follows, viz: 

While dragging for torpedoes and covering the boats, which were 
also searching for them, a torpedo was exploded directly under the ship 
with terrible effect, causing her destruction instantly, absolutely blow- 
ing the vessel to splinters. Of the loss of crew I am unable to inform 
you, as the rescued were distributed among the fleet and sent to the 
naval hospital, being seriously wounded myself and unable to attend 
to duty. 

The officers and crew are loud in their praise of the gallant officers 
and crews of the several ships for their kindness. Although they h;ive 
lost everything, their only i egret seems to be in the absence Iroiu me 
fight now going on in the tieet. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 15 

Justice demands that I should specially call to notice the gallant con- 
duct of Acting Ensign George W. Adams, executive officer, who, 
although severely wounded, rescued several from death, myself among 
the number. 

The paymaster [Acting Assistant Paymaster Edward T. Chapman] 
having been killed and the accounts of the ship lost, and as there was 
a draft of men transferred to the vessel from the army without accounts, 
etc., a few days previous, Mr. J. G. Barn urn, jr., paymaster's clerk, now 
at the naval hospital, will respectfully wait the orders of the Depart- 
ment. 

The Department will please excuse my not making out a report sooner, 
as the injuries that I received prevented me from doing so. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. F. WADE, U. S. Navy, 
Acting Vol. Lieutenant, late Gomdg. U. 8. S. Commodore Jones. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, concerning the gallant conduct of Acting 

Ensign Adams, U. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Off Wilmington, N. C., August 30, 1864. 

SIR: At the time of the destruction of the Commodore Jones by a 
monster torpedo on May 0, ultimo, Acting Ensign George W. Adams, 
her executive officer, though injured by the explosion, saved his com- 
manding officer from drowning and recovered the ensign before he was 
himselt taken from the water. 

lie deserves promotion for his conduct and services on this occasion, 
and I would respe -tfnlly recommend his advancement to the grade of 
acting master. His present address is Gloucester, Mass. 1 am unaware 
whether or not he has recovered from his injuries. 

1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Abstract log of the U. S. S. Commodore Morris. 

May 5, 186i. At anchor off Harrison's Bar. All boats called away 
to drag for torpedoes. At 4:20 p. m. our troops landed at (Jity Point 
and took possession. 

May 6. At 8:20 a. m. weighed anchor with the fleet and proceeded 
up the river. From 12 to 4 p. in. : Off Jones' Neck ; sent second cutter 
to search for torpedoes. Admiral came up on the Shawshcen, trans- 
ferred his flag to the Malvern. At 2 p. m. U. S. S. Commodore Jones 
was blown up by a torpedo. Immediately lowered all boats to save 
lives. As nearly as could be estimated there were about 40 lives lost. 
A boat from this vessel and one from the Mackinaw landed and found 
the body of a rebel, evidently the one who exploded the torpedo 
Discovered the battery and destroyed it, by order of the admiral. 

May 8. At 2: 15 p. m. an officer from the Mackinaw came on board 
with P. W. Smith, who styles himself an acting master in the so-called 



16 NOKTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

C. S. Navy. He was captured in the act of exploding a torpedo, after 
having blown up the Commodore Jones. Sent Jeffries Johnson, a pris- 
oner who was captured at the same time that Smith was, on board 
the Mackinaw. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Braine, U. S. Navy, commanding 
U. 8. 8. Vicksburg, regarding the chase of a suspicious vessel. 

U. S. S. VICKSBURG, 
Beaufort, N. C., May 6, 1864. 

SIR : I enclose you the abstract log of this ship for the month of 
April. By it you will perceive I had a chase on April 30, while off- 
shore. Had I had three hours more daylight I feel confident I could 
have captured her, as in a chase of five hours I gained at least 10 
miles, and only lost owing to the night coining on. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. L. BRAINE, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Acting Ensign Osborn, U. 8. Navy, regarding boat expedition 

to Bogue Sound. 

U. S. S. VICKSBURG, 
Beaufort, N. (7., May 6, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your order, I 
last night took charge of the launch of this vessel with a crew of 16 
men, fully armed and equipped, with two days' rations. 

I proceeded up Bogue Sound until I came a little to the westward of 
the outer fortifications of Morehead City, and then came to anchor, 
keeping the howitzer (loaded with canister and primed) trained up the 
sound. 

I observed frequent flashes of lights along the shore within our 
lines, which I took to be from our pickets. 

At about 3 a. in. a rocket was exploded from a point at or near picket 
station No. 4, on Bogue Island. 1 immediately got underway and 
stood slowly up and down the sound, keeping the howitzer trained to 
the westward and my crew with their arms ready for action. 

At daylight I proceeded to return to this vessel, and when abreast 
of the fortifications above referred to was hailed from the shore. I laid 
on my oars and answered the hail with, "This is an armed boat from 
the United States steamer Vicksburg on picket duty. Do you wish the 
countersign?" 

1 was ordered to come nearer, and at once put about, stood inshore, 
and while so standing in was fired upon from the direction of the hail, 
the ball passing very near us. 

I repeated my answer, got ready for immediate action (in case it might 
prove the enemy), trailed oars, and hoisted my colors. On doing so 
they hailed from on shore, "All right; you may go home." 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

P. G. OSBORN, 

Acting Ensign. 
Lieutenant-Commander D. L. BRAINE, 

Commanding U. S. S. Vicksburg. 



NOETH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 17 

Report of Commander Davenport, U. 8. Navy, regarding the siege of New 

Berne by the enemy. 

U. S. S. HETZEL, 
Of New Berne, N. C., May 6, 1864. 

ADMIRAL : New Berne is besieged by the enemy in force. Our pick- 
ets were driven in Wednesday evening. Yesterday they took posses- 
sion of the railroad between this place and Beaufort and attempted to 
erect a battery on tbe Neuse Biver, near the old blockade. I sent the 
Lockwood down to patrol the river, and on the enemy making his 
appearance, sent the Barney and Louisiana to drive him away from the 
river bank, which they succeeded in doing. This morning the rebel gen- 
eral [R. F.] Hoke, sent a verbal message to General Palmer, informing 
him that he had possession of the railroad and command of the river, 
and demanding the surrender of the place. The general, I understand, 
declined to receive a verbal message, and the flag of truce returned. 

I have here the Tacony, Louisiana, Commodore Barney, Lockwood, 
and Hetzel, and shall do all in my power to defeat the enemy. 

Captain Smith directed me to write directly to you, sending him 
copies of my letters. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

P. S. 6 p. m. : I have just received a letter from Captain Smith 
directing ine to send the Barney to him. 

I learn that there has been heavy firing heard in the direction of 
Plymouth yesterday evening. 

P. S. May 7, 1. p. m. : Everything is quiet here to-day, but I learn 
that the enemy is in force between this place and Kinston. 

I have just received a dispatch from you for Captain Smith marked 
immediate. I will forward it by first conveyance. 



Letter from Commander Davenport to Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regard- 
ing U. 8. steamers Commodore Barney and Tacony. 

TJ. S. S. HETZEL, 
Off New Berne, N. C., May 6, 1864 

SIR : Yours of the 4th instant has just been received, and I send the 
Commodore Barney to report to you. 

The commanding officer will inform you of the state of affairs here. 
As to the Tacony, I beg leave to say that she can move at any moment. 
I enclose copy of a letter from the chief engineer. 
I also send copy of a letter to the admiral. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 

Commander, U. 8. Navy. 
Captain M. SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Naval Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

N w R VOL 10 2 



18 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Commander Davenport, U. 8. Navy, to Acting Volunteer Lieu- 
tenant Williams, U. 8. Navy, commanding 'U. 8. 8. Commodore 
Barney. 

U. S. S. HETZEL, 
Off New Berne, N. C., May 6, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed without delay with the U. S. S. Commodore Barney 
under your command to Albemarle Sound and report to Captain M. 
Smith, senior naval officer in sounds of North Carolina. 
Respectfully, yours, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 
Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Volunteer Lieut. J. M. WILLIAMS, U. S. NAVY, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Commodore Barney. 



Attack upon United States vessels off New Inlet, North Carolina, by the 
C. S. 8. Raleigh, May 6 and 7, 1864. 

Beport of Lieutenant-Commander Watmough, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Kansas. 

U. S. S. KANSAS, 
Off 'New Inlet, North Carolina, May 7, 1864. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to make the following report: 

Last night whilst lying at my station (No. 2), at 8: 20 p. m., saw 
a rocket and heard a guu fired, bearing S. W. by W. At 8:25 p. m. 
heard another gun and saw a second rocket on same bearing. Stood 
off to the southward and eastward to intercept any blockade runner 
that might be coming out. Seeing nothing turned inshore again. 

About twenty minutes before 9 saw a blue light and heard the report 
ot two more guns bearing S. W. by S. Maintained our station until 
2 a. m., when, seeing a Coston light to the southward and eastward, 
stood for it and spoke the Britannia. At daylight saw the Mount 
Vernon, Hoicquah, and Nansemond tiring at a rebel ironclad, which was 
lying off the bar; the Tuscarora and Britannia standing in from !ea- 
ward, and the Niphon and Fa-likee bearing down from their stations (4 
and 0) toward the scene of firing. 

At once stood toward the ironclad and fired two shots from the 150- 
pounder rifle, both of which we had the mortification to see turn over 
and fall short. 

The ironclad was in all respects similar to the Atlanta, as far as 
appearance went, though accounts present her as a more formidable 
vessel as regards strength and plating. After moving about between 
the bar and buoy at No. 1 station, advancing and retiring for about 
an hour, she returned over the bar at 7 a. m. The atmosphere was 
hazy and prevented our seeing if a red flag she hoisted on her return 
over the bar was an English ensign or common battle flag. Several 
of the commanders believe the former. 

As she neared Fort Fisher a salute of, I think, nine guns was fired 
by the lort. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

FEND. G. WATMOUGH, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 

Commander WILLIAM A. PARKER, 

Senior Officer Present, off New Inlet, North Carolina. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 19 

Beport of Commander Parker, U. 8. Navy, transmitting reports of the commanding officers of 
the U. S. steamers Mount Vernon and Howquah. 

U. S. STEAM SLOOP TUSCARORA, 
Off New Inlet, North Carolina, May 7, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report that an ironclad ram came out over the bar at 
about 8 o'clock (at high water) last night and engaged the Nansemond 
and Britannia, stationed at the bar, but without doing any damage. 

At daylight this morning she was discovered standing out toward 
the buoy, which marks the day anchorage oft' the bar. 

Sbe was engaged by the Mount Vernon, Kansas, Howquah, Nanse- 
mond, and Britannia. 

The Tuscarora had the outer station about 6 miles to the eastward of 
the buoy, and we did not see her till after sunrise. We stood for her to 
reconnoiter, but did not get within fighting distance. At a little before 
7 o'clock the ram returned and went over the bar. The smokestack of 
the Hoicquah was struck once about two thirds of the way up from the 
deck with a rifled shot, which made a hole about '23 inches by 16 inches, 
and which appeared to be an 8-iiich rifled shot; the ram being about 
1 miles distant by estimation. 

The Hoicquah [fired] sixteen 30-pounder Parrott rifled shot, and 
struck the ram twice. It is believed that none of the other vessels hit 
the ram. There were three other steamers in sight inside the bar, but 
only one was ironclad, apparently. 

A blockade runner ran out over the bar last night at the same time 
that the ram came out, and was chased by the Nereus stationed just 
outside the buoy. 

This ram appeared to be about the same size and model as the 
Atlanta, and was a most formidable and dangerous looking vessel. 

There was a house on deck, arched over, but with a flat top and slop- 
ing sides; and she carried three guns on each side and one at each 
end, either 8-iuch or 10 inch rifled guns. 

If she comes out to-niffht I shall engage her with the Tuscarora. 

I enclose herewith reports from Acting Volunteer Lieutenant James 
Trathen and Acting M aster J. W. Balch. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. A. PARKER, 

Commander. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. MOUNT VERNON, 
Off New Inlet, North Carolina, May 7, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that at 6:30 p.m. yesterday we 
observed in New Inlet, behind Fort Fisher, which bore by compass 
N. W. by W., distant 3 miles, four steamers, two of which appeared to 
be for river service, and two seagoing, one of the former having the 
appearance of an ironclad rebel ram. At 6: 45 p. m. we steamed down 
to our night station No. 5, end of woods on Bald Head, bearing W. N. 
W. At 8: 30 p. m. saw two rockets thrown from the vicinity of Fort 
Fisher in a S. S. E. direction, and saw the flashes of five guns. Steamed 
ahead under full speed, steering to the southward and eastward in 
order to intercept any vessel trying to escape from New Inlet; after 
having run 8 miles and seeing nothing, we returned to our night 
station. Everything remained quiet until 12:15 a. m. of this date, 



20 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

when we heard the report of seven heavy guiis and saw the flashes of 
six more. Called all hands to quarters and cleared ship for action and 
steamed toward Fort Fisher to ascertain the cause. After arriving at 
the station usually occupied by the senior officer, seeing nothing, and 
everything appearing quiet, we returned slowly to our night station. 
At 4 a. m. as day began to break we steamed toward Fort Fisher 
again, and at 4: 45 a. m. saw U. S. steamers Howquah and Nansemond 
bearing N. by W. The U. S. S. Howquah fired a shot and hoisted her 
ensign ; the shot was returned by a vessel in toward the shore. Hoisted 
our colors and started ahead toward them, and cleared ship for action. 
At 5 a. m. discovered the strange vessel to be a rebel ironclad ram, 
flying the Confederate flag aft and English red ensign forward, and 
engaged with the Howquah. We then steamed down close to the How- 
quah>s port quarter to draw the fire of the ram from her, and opened 
fire on her with the 100- pounder Parrott rifle and IX-inch guns. About 
the same time U. S. S. Kansas also opened fire on her. At sunrise U. 8. 
steamers Tuscarora and Britannia in sight, coming in to the anchorage. 
At 6:30 a. m. the ram steered toward Fort Fisher, accompanied by two 
other steamers, one apparently an ironclad gunboat, and the other a 
tugboat; she was pursued by the U. S. steamers Howquah, Kansas, 
NipJwn, Nansemond, and this ship. At 7 a. m. she crossed New Inlet 
bar and entered the river, and was saluted by the different batteries as 
she passed in. 

This' ram resembles very much the Atlanta, captured from the rebels, 
but is much larger than that vessel. 

Sir, I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES TRATHEN, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Commander WILLIAM A. PARKER, 

Comdg. U. S. Steam Sloop Tuscarora and Senior Officer Present. 



U. S. S. HOWQUAH, 
Off New Inlet, May 7, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report while cruising on our station (No. 7), 
between 5 and 6 fathoms of water, at 8 : .'30 p. in. of the 6th instant, saw 
the flash of two gun;} bearing N. N. E., and three rockets fired to the 
southward and eastward; I supposed a blockade runner running in 
that direction, and ran E. S. E. to head him off. Stood out as far as 
the buoy. At 9:10 p. m., while standing back to our station, made a 
steamer bearing N. E. by E. Stood for and challenged her with night 
signals. Not bting answered, fired the 30-pounder rifle at her; stood 
for and spoke her. She proved to be the U. S. S. Nansemond. At 9 : 30 
p. m. saw a white or blue light (not certain which), saw flash, and 
heard report of three guns, but from rockets being thrown, supposed a 
blockade runner to be running out. Stood out to cut her off, if possi- 
ble. At 11 p. m., not seeing anything, stood in for our station. At 
midnight saw Coston signal and a white or blue light; saw the flash 
and heard the report of three guns bearing N. E. by E. \ E. Stood for 
it, but could see nothing, and returned to our station. At 2:35 saw a 
rocket thrown from the N. N. E. to the S. S. E. ; stood out, but could 
see nothing, and returned again to our station. At 4:25 a m., of the 7th 
instant, U. S. S. Nansemond bore E. by N., distant I miles, at the same 
time saw a strange steamer bearing N. W. by N., in line with Fort Fisher 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 21 

(burning soft coal), distant 1^ miles. She proved to be the rebel iron- 
clad rain North Carolina [Raleigh], with Confederate ensign Hying, 
accompanied by one armed steamer and two tugboats. There were no 
other blockaders in sight at this time except the U. S. S. Nansemond. 
Called all hands to quarters, the ram making toward us fast (good 6 
knots per hour). Wore ship, head offshore, and commenced firing at 
her, our shot striking near her. She returned the fire with her bow 
gun, the shell exploding close to our starboard quarter. We moving 
slowly toward the buoy, the ram following and firing from her bow and 
broadside guns. W r e kept within range, and fighting him out as far as 
the buoy (on station No. 1). At 5 a. m. TJ. S. S. Mount Vernon in 
sight, bearing S. S. E-. and steaming to our assistance. At 5:20 the 
U. S. steamers Fahkee and Niphon in sight, coming from stations to the 
northward. At 5:30 U. S. S. Mount Vernon fired four shells at the 
ram, all falling short. 

At 5:50 made the U. S. steamers Tuscarora, Kansas, and Britannia, 
bearing to the eastward. 

At 6 a. m. the ram near the buoy fired at us her fifth and last shot, 
going through our smokestack about two-thirds of the way up (appar- 
ently an 8-iuch rifle shot). 

We fired 14 30-pounder solid shot, 'J 30-pouuder percussion shells, 
and 3 shells from 12 pounder howitzer, two of our shots striking him. 
At 6:15 U. S. S. Kansas came in and fired two shells, both falling 
short. Earn steaming toward the bar with English ensign at the fore. 
At 6:45 came to aucnor near the buoy, the ram going in over the bar. 

They fired a salute of nine guns from the batteries. The rebel ram 
North Carolina [Raleigh] is a facsimile of the ram Atlanta (larger if 
anything). She has three ports on a side and one at each end, with 
a torpedo on her bow, such as the Atlanta had. Fleet anchored at 
8:15. 

This ship was the last to leave her station, and the first on it. We 
were not out of sight of the buoy at any time this morning. The offi- 
cers and crew under my command deserve much credit. I submit the 
above report. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. BALCH, 
Acting Master, Commanding U. S. S. Hotcqua-h. 

Commander W. A. PARKER, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer Present. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Huse, U. 8. Navy, commanding TJ. S. S. Britannia. 

U. S. S. BRITANNIA, 

Off New Inlet, North Carolina, May 8, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report to you that on the evening of 6th instant, on 
going in on Station No. 1, 1 noticed a suspicious looking vessel, which 
I took to be one of the rebel ironclad rams inside the bar. 1 accord- 
ingly ran in closer than usual, and the fact that we were not fired on, 
though it was still quite light and we were within easy range tended to 
confirm my suspicions. Red, green, and white lanterns were used in a 
manner quite different from anything ever noticed there before. I 
managed to keep sight of the suspected vessel and saw her creep cau- 
tiously ii]) toward Fort Fisher, preceded by these lights as guides. At 
about 8:30 she turned directly for this ship, in company with another 



22 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

vessel, and ran at full speed. I fired several rockets and fired my 30- 
pounder Parrott at her, but as she kept on directly after us I ran for 
the buoy, firing at her with 24-pounder howitzer. She then commenced 
firing at us; the first shot put out our binnacle lights and the next 
went a little over the starboard paddle box, sounding very like a LOO- 
pounder Parrott shot when it tumbles. We now burned a blue light, 
when the enemy fired again. Our course was changed three times, 
hoping to elude him, but he followed and gained on us considerably, 
being within about 600 yards when we passed tbe buoy, at which time 
we hauled up short N". E. and think he went on E. S. E., as we shortly 
after heard a gun in that direction. I laid between 1 anil 2 miles to 
eastward of the buoy and burned several Coston signals, wishing to 
communicate with other ships of the fleet. At about midnight saw a 
blue light and heard a gun from near the buoy. Shortly afterwards fell 
in with the Kansas, and was desired by Lieutenant-Commander 
Watmough, commanding her. to find the Tuscarora as soon after day- 
light as possible and communicate the facts to the senior officer. 
When day broke we made the enemy about W. S. W., engaging the 
Nansemond and Howquah. Shortly after the Mount Vernon and Kansas 
steamed toward her and commenced firing. On making the Tuscarora 
I proceeded to her, reported to Commander Parker, and returned with 
him toward the fleet. By this time the enemy, accompanied by two 
other boats, had steamed in and was under the guns of the fort. 

The vessel which had accompanied the ram out steered off to the 
northeast when the firing commenced. I think she was a blockade 
runner, though we then supposed her to be a gunboat. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SAMUEL HUSE, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Captain Sands, TT. S. Navy, transmitting report of the commanding officer of the 

II. S. S. Nansemond. 

TJ. S. S. FORT JAOKSON, 
Off Western Bar, Cape Fear River, May 8, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose herewith a report from Acting Ensign J. H. Porter, 
commanding U. S. S. Nansemond, of having exchanged shots with the 
ironclad ram North Carolina [Raleigh] on the night of the 6th instant 
off ^ew Inlet. 

She seems to have been satisfied with her exploit in keeping away 
the small vessels that were stationed on the bar, and steamed away 
inside \\*-, the prospect of encountering heavier metal in the light of the 
day. 

Commander Parker, whom I left senior officer on that side, sent the 
Nansemond on this side yesterday to report the affair, and to warn the 
vessels here. The Quaker City was here transferring some men to the 
different vessels, and I deemed it my duty to detain her for the pres- 
ent, or until other vessels arrive to strengthen the blockade and to 
meet our new enemy. 

Upon arriving here on the oth instant, I directed the Grand Gulf to 
be sent this side in place of the Vicksburg, which had left for outside 
cruising, and she was accordingly ordered that evening, but has not 
yet made her appearance; probably on a chase outside. I am coaling 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 23 

the Dacotah from day to day until the arrival of the Grand Gulf or 
Maratanza, which is coaling at Beaufort, and as soon as there is suffi- 
cient force here to admit of my leaving- this side, I will proceed again 
to New Inlet, as I think that bar is the most available for the use of the 
ram in the prevalence of the S. W. sea breezes, which, on this side, 
render Western Bar temporarily rough. And here I may bring to your 
notice the condition of the Tuscarora and Dacotah, which, although 
otherwise formidable vessels, are, from defective boilers, inefficient to 
encounter such vessels as ironclads, which we now know the enemy can 
get outside the bar. 

The principal object, it seems to me, after the result of the enemy's 
ironclad experiment of the night before last, is for her to aid the out- 
going and incoming of the runners by driving off the vessels stationed 
on and near the bar, for which the light recently erected upon the 
Mound Fort is an excellent aid as a leading mark for the night. 

Last night was quiet; we heard only one gun about 10 o'clock, the 
moderate S. W. breeze possibly making the bars rough, or they may 
be satisfied with the first trial for a few nights. When she comes 
again we will try to give a good account of her. 

Very respectfully, etc., your obedient servant, 

B. F. SANDS, 
Captain, U. 8. Navy, /Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. NANSEMOND. 
Off Wilmington, N. C., May 7, 1864. 

SIR: By direction of Commander Parker, I submit the following 
report of the occurrences of last night and this morning off New Inlet. 

At 8: 20 p. in., while on Station No. 3, in (i fathoms of water, saw a 
rocket thrown Iroin the northward and in an easterly direction, and 
saw the flashes of two guns, followed soon after by other rockets 
and the flash and reports of two guns. Thinking a blockade runner 
had passed out, I steamed a short distance N. E. and saw the U. S. S. 
Britannia running offshoie, but seeing no other vessel, and believing 
it unsafe to leave the bar uuwatched, returned to our station. Shortly 
after saw a blue light, burned apparently near the buoy. 

At 9:30 p. in. exchanged signals with and spoke the U. S. S. How- 
quah. After this nothing unusual occurred until 11:*45 p. in., when 
we discovered a sail beating E. by S., apparently lying still. Steamed 
up toward her and made the challenge light, which was answered by 
one flash of a white light, and at the same the strange vessel started 
ahead steering N. E. and crossing our bow. Put our helm hard a 
starboard to prevent collision, and challenged again, which was 
answered by a steady red light, the vessels now steering directly for 
us. Challenged a third time with the Coston signal for the night; not 
being answered, opened fire on her from 24 pounder howitzer aft. She 
immediately replied by a shot which passed over and near our walking 
beam. The vessel at this time not over 500 yards from us; could see 
the outline of her hull and the white water from her propeller. Fired 
another shot from the 24 pounder, which was returned, the shot again 
passing over us. 

The vessel coming up with (going, I should judge, from 6 to 7 knots), 
put on more steam to get out of range, and tired a blue light; which she 
tired at while burning, but without doing any damage. After burning 



24 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

the blue light we suddenly lost sight of her until daylight this morn- 
ing, when we discovered her lying near inshore in a W. 8. W. direction 
from the buoy. At the same time sighted the Howquah a short dis- 
tance to the southward of us. As soon as she could distinguish us, the 
vessel started out and fired four shots at the Howquah, one going 
through her smokestack near the top. Howquah replied, but think 
her shot fell short. Strange vessel then altered her course, steering 
for this vessel, and fired one shot, which burst before reaching. 
Beturued fire with 24-pounder, but out of range. The Mount Vernon 
and Kansas coming up, fired and received several shot, without injury 
on either side. At 7:15 a. m. she turned and steamed in toward the 
bar, and at 8:30 passed inside accompanied by two small tugboats, 
which had lain outside during the morning. 

The II. S. steamers Tuscarora and Britannia arrived from the east- 
ward, and the Niphon and FahTcee from the northward, just after she 
started in. 

The appearance of the vessel is like a large vessel cut down to the 
water line, and a house built on and plated. The sides of the house 
are arched, and having three ports on a side and one in each end. She 
has one smokestack and a small flag post aft. Goes, I think, G to 7 
knots, and turns very quickly. The guns fired at us during the night 
were not heavier than 30-pounders, but this morning she used much 
heavier ones; some think 10 inches. 

She flies the rebel flag, and is to all appearances a very formidable 
craft. I learned this morning that the Britannia was chased oft' by 
her at 8 : 30 last night, and escaped with some difficulty, fortunately 
without being hit, though several shot came very near her. I was not 
able to learn the extent of the damage to the Howquah, but think it 
trifling. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. H. PORTER, 
Acting ^Ensign, Commanding Nansemond. 

Captain B. F. SANDS, 

Senior Officer, off Wilmington, Western Bar. 



Extract from the Report of the Secretary of the Navy of the Confederate States, November 5, 

1864. 

On the 7th of May last, Flag-Officer William F. Lynch, in command 
of the ironclad Raleigh, crossed the Wilmington Bar and attacked the 
enemy's fleet, driving his vessels to sea. In returning to port, his ship 
got ashore and was fatally injured, her guns, equipments, iron, etc., 
being saved. A court of enquiry was ordered upon the disaster, whose 
report is annexed. 

Report of the court of enquiry in the case of the loss of the C. S. S. Raleigh in Cape 

Fear River. 

AT WILMINGTON, N. C., June 6, 1864. 

The court having enquired into all the facts connected with the loss 
of the G. S. S. Raleigh in the waters of North Carolina, have the honor 
to report the same, together with our opinion upon the points in which 
it is required by the precept. 

In the opinion of the court, the loss of the Raleigh can not be attrib- 
uted to negligence or inattention on the part of anyone on board of 
her, and every eftbrt was made to save said vessel. AVe further liiid 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 25 

that tbe Raleigh could have remained outside the bar of Cape Fear 
River for a few hours with apparent [safety], but, in the opinioii of the 
court, it would have been improper; and, in view of all the circum- 
stances, "her commanding officer was justified in attempting to go 
back into the harbor when he did." 

It is further the opinion of the court that the draft of water of the 
Raleigh was too great, even lightened as she had been on this occasion, 
to render her passage of the bar, except under favorable circumstances, 
a safe operation, particularly as her strength seems to have been insuffi- 
cient to enable her to sustain the weight of armor long enough to per- 
mit every practicable means of lightening her to be exhausted. 

GEORGE N. HOLLINS, 

Captain and President. 

J. W. B. GREENHOW, 

Surgeon and Judge- Advocate. 



Report of Acting Master Eldridge, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. 
Delaware, regarding contrabands received on that vessel. 

U. S. S. DELAWARE, 
James River, Virginia, May 7, 1864. 

SIR : I beg leave to report that on the night of the 6th instant a small 
boat was discovered approaching this vessel. After hailing her I found 
she contained contrabands, and permitted her to come alongside. 

They wished to be taken on board, and as the steamer was at that 
time aground I did not dare to send them away, fearing they might 
communicate with the enemy on shore. 

There are 2 men, 1 woman, and 2 small children. One of the men 
seems to be intelligent, and has but recently come from Richmond, and 
may be able to give valuable information. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. H. ELDRIDGE, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, 
regarding the raising of articles from icrecks in Albemarle Sound. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 7, 1864. 

SIR : The Department has received a letter from Mr. George W. Lane, 
dated Fortress Monroe, April 30, 1804, in which he offers to attempt to 
raise the guns, shells, ammunition, and such other articles as he can 
raise from the wrecks belonging to the Government in Albemarle Sound 
and vicinity for 50 per cent, of the value of the property, to be appraised 
by you. There is no objection to your having the property raised on 
the above-mentioned terms, and you are authorized to make arrange- 
ments with reference thereto. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia. 



26 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Capture of U. 8. S. Shaw sheen in James River May 7, 1864. 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP, 

Curies Neck, May 7, via Fort Monroe, 12 m., May <v, 1864. 

Yesterday about 12 in. a large torpedo which dragging had failed to 
discover was exploded under the Commodore Jones near Four Mile Creek 
and utterly destroyed the vessel, and about half her crew were killed 
and wounded. One of the torpedo men was killed and the other two 
captured. Three coal vessels having afterwards come up, dropped 
down last evening under the bluff to Curies Neck, where we are now 
coaling the monitors. 

Contrabands from Richmond this a. ra. report that Lee was danger- 
ously wounded yesterday and that our army fell back a whort distance. 

This morning the tug gunboat Shawsheen, while looking fora torpedo 
near Turkey Bend, of which a contraband had given information, was 
destroyed by a rebel battery and most of the officers and men captured. 
1 hurried to her assistance, on hearing the tiring, with the Commodore 
Morris, and shelled the enemy, who soon retreated. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear Admiral. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Report of Paymaster's Steward Smith, TJ. 8. Navy, forwarding list of prisoners captured. 

LIBBY PRISON, 
Richmond, Va., May 8, 1864. 

SIR : The following is a list of prisoners taken on board U. S. S. 
Shaw sheen on James River: 

Charles Hickey, acting third assistant engineer; H. C. Marrow, act- 
ing third assistant engineer; William Rush more, acting master's mate; 
\\ illiam Cromack, acting master's mate; E. D. Smith, paymaster's stew- 
ard; William Boucher, gunner's mate; W. C. Farley, otlicer's steward; 
L. Larkin, ship's cook; Joseph P. Crowell, quartermaster; George 
Whitteborn, quartermaster; James C. Pinkham, seaman; Richardson 
Brown, seaman; Maurice Kennedy, ordinary seaman; Thomas Colbert, 
ordinary seaman; Edward Fitzpatrick, landsman; Patrick Fitzgerald, 
landsman; John Jack.ou, seaman; William Hatchard, landsman; 
James Walsh, coal heaver; Edward O'Donnell, second class fireman; 
D. Murtland, landsman; George Graenger, landsman; Charles Woods, 
ordinary seaman; William Peele, first-class boy; John Green, first- 
class boy; Charles Thomas, first class boy; also Jeremiah Evans, pilot, 
who was slightly wounded in the leg and sent to the hospital in an 
ambulance. 

By having the above named published you will greatly oblige us. 
The captain, Charles Ringot, acting ensign, was wounded in the water 
and drowned. John Harrington killed on board; also Michael Murphy, 
Most respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. D. SMITH, 
Paymaster's Steward. 
Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 27 

Report of Commander Parrott, U. 8. Navy, regarding the recovery of the body of Acting Ensign 
Ringot, U. 8. Navy, late commanding. 

U. S. S. CANONICUS, 
Turkey Bend, James River, May 11, 1864. 

SIR: To day the body of Acting Ensign Charles Ringot, who was in 
temporary command of the Shaicsheen when she was destroyed by the 
rebels, was found floating near us, and interred in the family burial 
ground of Mr. Watkins, at Watkins' Landing. al>out a mile above. 

Acting Master H. A. Phelou, of this vessel, who was his late com- 
mander on board the Shaicsheen, took charge, at his own request, of the 
funeral and read the services. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster William J. Healey, another friend of 
the deceased officer, wa.8 also present. 

Owing to the lateness of the hour and the necessity of remaining at 
our posts, the attendance from the vessel was small, but the army offi- 
cers at Watkins' Lauding with great kindness assisted on the occasion 
and their men fired a volley over the grave. 

Mr. Phelon has in his possession the ring and other mementoes of 
the deceased. 

It will be a consolation to his family to learn that friends attended 
his body to the grave, and I know that it will hereafter be their pride 
to remember that he fell faithfully serving his country. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. G. PARROTT, 

Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Rear-Amiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, regarding the recovery of the bodies of Acting 
Ensign Ringot and Seaman White, U. 8. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, May 10 [11], 1864. 

SIR: To-day the body of Acting Ensign Charles Riugot, late tem- 
porarily in command of the Shaicsheen. was found in the river near Tur- 
key Bend, and was buried by direction of Commander Parrott, 
commanding Canonicus, near Flaskins 1 [Watkins'] farm, in Curies Neck. 
The body of William White, late seaman of the Commodore Jones, of 
Lowell, Mass., recently transferred from Company F, Seventh Con- 
necticut Regiment of the U. S. Volunteers, was also found in the river 
and buried under directions of Acting Master [J. H.] Eldridge, com- 
manding the U. S. S. Delaware. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Second Assistant Engineer Anderson, U. S. Navy, transmitting list of 

officers and crew. 

TJ. S. NAVAL HOSPITAL, 

Portsmouth, Fa., May 18, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to your orders of 
the 7th instant the U. S. S. Shaicsheen proceeded to Turkey Bend in 



28 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

search of torpedoes. We dropped anchor at about thirty minutes after 
1L o'clock and, the tide being ebb, swung across the river. While in 
this position, and the men were at dinner preparatory to going on shore, 
a battery of light artillery suddenly made its appearance on the north 
bank and opened on us with shot and shell from 12-pounder guns, as 
near as I could judge, accompanied by a sharp fire from riflemen. We 
instantly beat to quarters and tried to get up the anchor, but owing to 
the murderous fire of the enemy could not keep men at the chain. 
Seeing the impossibility of saving the anchor, 1 threw off' the chain 
from the bitt and, the bell ringing to back, stepped into the engine room 
to a: tend to it. While backing her some person threw the chain around 
the bitt again, and, swinging around, we backed ashore on the south 
bank. The second shell fired pierced the steam pipe in the engine 
room, and by the powder of the exploding shell and the escaping 
steam the left side of my face, neck, and head were severely scalded. 
I then went aft to assist in getting the after gun to bear on the enemy. 
As I reached the quarter-deck Acting Ensign Charles Ringot, com- 
manding, and 7 men jumped overboard, Mr. Ringot having been scalded 
at the same time with myself. As he struck the water I heard him say, 
' k For God's sake send a boat." I then jumped overboard, and when 
halfway. to the shore saw the flag of the Shawsheen hauled down and a 
white one hoisted in its place. After reaching shore I proceeded up 
the river about 1 mile and was taken off' on board the Commodore 
Morris, in one of her boats; arrived there I saw the Shaicsheen in 
flames and shortly after her magazine blew up. During the whole 
time, from the firing of the first shot, the enemy kept up a constant 
and murderous fire of shell, grape, canister, and rifle balls at short 
range, completely riddling our boat and rendering any effort fast 
aground as we were to save her entirely useless. The body of Acting 
Ensign Riugot was picked up in the river some days after. He had 
been killed in the water by a rifle ball, which entered the right eye. 

Enclosed please find list of officers and crew of the Shaicslieen, as 
obtained from the storeship Brandywine at Gosport navy yard. All 
the officers and crew, except myself, Mr. Riugot in command, and 7 men, 
are in the hands of the enemy as prisoners; doubtless many of them 
killed or wounded. Those known to have escaped are so marked on 
the list. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

RICHARD ANDERSON, 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer, in Charge. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 
List of the officers and crew of the U. S. S. Shawsheen. 

Officers. Charles Ringot, acting ensign, commanding, killed; Rich- 
ard Anderson, acting second assistant engineer, in charge, escaped; 
Charles Hickey, acting third assistant engineer; Henry Clay Marrow, 
acting third assistant engineer; William Rushmore, acting master's 
mate; one acting master's mate, name unknown. 

Crew. Edward D. Smith, paymaster's steward; George Whitteborn, 
quartermaster; Thomas S. McLean, first-class fireman, escaped; William 
W. Squires, first-class fireman, escaped; Edward O'Donnell, second- 
class fireman; Joseph P. Crowell, quartermaster; William Boucher, 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 29 

gunner's mate; William C. Farley, officer's steward; Mark Whitehouse, 
seaman, escaped; Alex. Williams, ordinary seaman; Theodore Rey- 
nolds, first class boy, escaped; William G. Peele, first-class boy; Charles 
Thomas, first-class boy ; George Graenger, landsman ; John O. Green, 
first-class boy ; Richardson Brown, seaman ; Levitt Larkins, ship's cook ; 
Charles Woods, ordinary seaman; Thomas Colbert, ordinary seaman; 
Maurice Kennedy, ordinary seaman; Michael Meehan, landsman, 
escaped; Patrick Fitzgerald, landsman; Edward Fitzpatrick, lands- 
man; Michael Murphy, landsman, escaped; James Walsh, coal heaver; 
William Hatchard, landsman; Daniel Murtlaud, landsman; Eugene 
Bauer, officer's cook, escaped; James C. Pinkham, seaman; John Jack- 
son, seaman; John Harrington, seaman. 



Report of Acting Master's Mate Rushmore, U. 8. Navy. 



YORK, November 19, 1864. 

SIR : The commanding officer of the U. S. S. Shaicsheen having been 
killed, it devolves upon me to report the loss of that vessel. 

On the 7th day of May, 1864, the Shawsheen, under command of 
Acting Ensign Charles Ringot, left the flagship Malvern at 10:3U a. in., 
2 miles above Chaffin's Bluff, on the James River, under orders from 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. Lee to proceed to Chaffin's farm to search 
for and destroy torpedoes supposed to be in that locality. At 11:20 
a. m, anchored off the farm in 6 feet of water, we drawing 5 feet 6 
inches; sent all hands to dinner preparatory to going on shore to 
search for torpedoes. At 11 :40 a. m. a field battery of four Napoleon 
guns and two 24-pounder howitzers, with four companies of infantry, 
suddenly opened fire on us from the woods on the cliff. All hands 
were called to quarters and the guns trained on the enemy, but they 
drove us from them. We succeeded in unshackling the chain 20 
fathoms, when the captain jumped overboard and swam for the south 
bank. I then backed the vessel until nearly out of range of the 
enemy's guns, when a 24-pounder shot penetrated the steam drum and 
another one struck the walking beam; most of the crew then jumped 
overboard to escape the scalding steam. The captain was now seen 
swimming toward the vessel, wounded in the head. He hailed and 
ordered me to haul down the ensign and to hoist a white flag on the 
walking beam, the flagstaff having been shot away. I sent a boat for 
him, but he sank before it could arrive. 

The enemy fired seven shots through the white flag before they 
ceased. The vessel was now aground, completely riddled with shot. 
Eight or ten of the crew jumped overboard and attempted to escape by 
swimming to the south bank; many were killed in the water; the 
remaining, including 4 officers and 21 men, were made prisoners. 

The rebels now came on board and set fire to the vessel. The officers 
and crew made every exertion possible to save the vessel, but the 
elose and heavy firing and the shallowness of the water rendered all 
our attempts fruitless. 

I remain, very respectfully, 

WILLIAM RUSHMORE, 
Acting Master's Mate, U. S. Navy. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington. 



30 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Abstract log of the TJ. S. 8. Commodore Morris. 

May /, 1864. The New York passed up the river with rebel prisoners. 
At 11:30 a. ra. heavy firing heard from the left bank of the river. At 
10 captain returned with a rebel prisoner. At 12:10 p. m. Admiral Lee, 
Captain Barnes, and signal officer came on board, started down the 
river in the direction of the firing. At 12:20 U. S. S. Shaicsheen dis- 
covered on fire and a rebel battery on shore. Beat to quarters and 
opened on the battery with 100 pounder Parrott. Fired 10 shell, also 
fired 2 shell from the forward 30 pounder Parrott. Sent a boat in and 
picked up men who escaped from the Shatrsheen. Steamer attacked 
while at anchor; first shot went through her steam pipe. The tire was 
so severe that they were not able to return it. Mostof the men jumped 
overboard under tire of the enemy's sharpshooters. Captain was cap- 
tured. Enemy went off in a boat and set tire to her. At 1 p. in. started 
back to station; met the monitor on the way down. They were all 
ordered back to station. The Morris collided with the monitor Tecum- 
seh; machinery slightly injured; anchored to repair damages. At 1:15 
Shawsheen exploded. At 2:15, engine reported repaired, weighed 
anchor and went up the river. 



Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Elliott, C. S. Army. 

CAMP 25TH BATTALION VA. VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, 

Chaffing Farm, May 7, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that the expedition organized by the 
commanding general, composed of a detachment of artillery under 
Major Stark, and a detachment of four companies from my command, 
in support of the same, proceeded on the errand assigned it Friday 
evening, and that the whole have returned to camp, having as far as 
possible accomplished the object of the expedition. 

About 12 m. to-day the command encountered the gunboat Shaw- 
sheen, off Turkey Island, she having either incautiously or defiantly 
approached the position taken by the command, dropping anchor at a 
point within easy range for effective execution by the artillery and 
cooperating infantry, which opened upon her with such telling effect as 
to drive the gunners from their pieces and prevented resistance after 
the first discharge of the same. Very speedily the vessel was com- 
pletely disabled by the excellent fire of Major Stark's artillery, and 
though reluctantly, she nevertheless hauled down her colors and dis 
played the white flag in token of surrender. A boat was dispatched to 
enforce the delivery of the prisoners on board, the enemy's boats being 
made available to bring them off. The officer was also instructed to 
tire the vessel, which was effectively done, the tire quickly reaching 
the magazine, exploding it, consigning all to the wind and waves. The 
immediate approach of two ironclads, against which we were not pre 
pared to contend, prevented the removal of anything from the vessel 
save the prisoners. 

During the engagement many jumped overboard and attempted to 
escape to the opposite side of the river, the larger portion of whom 
were killed by the infantry tiring among them, it is thought Ensign 
Kin got, commanding, being of the number. Not more than tive made 
their escape. The number of prisoners taken is 27, one of them being 
slightly wounded and now in brigade hospital. The crew is reported to 
have numbered between 40 and 50. She carried three guns one 30 and 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 31 

one 20-pounder Parrott and one 12-pounder howitzer (Dahlgren). It 
may be counted a matter of satisfaction that the vessel was so sum- 
marily and effectually destroyed, since we had information deemed sat 
isfactcry that it was a party from this vessel who had an hour before 
fired the barn and corn houses of Mr. Kobert Taylor, adjoining. 

It affords satisfaction to report that in this affair the troops engaged 
under my command were fully equal to the requirements of the occa- 
sion, and 1 desire especially to commend the excellent performance of 
the artillery under Major A. W. Stark, who did everything which the 
occasion demanded of them with energy an I promptness. There is 
occasion also for thankfulness that in this affair we sustained no loss 
whatever. 

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. M. ELLIOTT, 
Lieutenant- Colonel, Commanding. 
Captain C. F. LINTHICUM, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Commander Davenport, U. 8. Navy, 
regarding the U. S. 8. Commodore Barney. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Off Roanolce River, May 7, 1864. 

SIR : You will send the steamer Barney to this place without the least 
delay after the receipt of this order. Commander Kenshaw will take 
pa>sage in her. 

The Sassacm is totally disabled; the Whitehead can not be trusted 
on picket duty even, without a vessel to accompany her, and the Miami 
is by no means sufficient. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 

Captain. 
Commander H. K. DAVENPORT, 

Senior Officer at Neic Berne. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding the condition and dis- 
position of vessels in the sounds. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 

Albemarle Sound, May 7, 1864. 

SIR: I would respectfully inform yon, in reply to your letter of the 
2Sth ultimo, which reiterates your order of the '_'5th ultimo to "send 
the Barney to Beaufort if she can possibly be spared," would, in view 
of the precarious state of affairs here, be exceedingly injudicious, and, 
in consequence of the disabled condition of the Sassacus, reported to 
me last evening, I have ordered the Commodore Barney to proceed to 
this place without delay, as I must have three vessels with heavy guns 
to meet the ram, should he make his appearance again. 

There is a large nominal naval force under my command, but very 
few efficient vessels. 

The Hetzel and Lockicood are reported to me as worthless ; the Lou- 
isiana and Tacony are repairing boilers; the Whitehead may at any 



32 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

moment lose her rudder and can not be trusted for any duty unless 
accompanied by another vessel ; the Mattabesett is obliged to work by 
hand after reversing engine; the Wyalusing can use but one of her 
rudders, and the Miami requires very extensive repairs on boiler, 
engine, and engine frames. 

The Hetzel, Tacony, Lockwood, and Valley City are at New Berne for 
the protection of that place, the commanding general having written 
me as follows: 

We are now being harassed some here by the enemy, and I think they have cut off 
our communication with Morehead City. However, I still think it is merely a raid 
011 the, railroad, and even if we are cut off for a few days we can hold our own. 

I am of opinion that the Southfield will be raised and accompany 
the Albemarle, if another expedition is fitted out at Plymouth, and 1 
have to assist me in repelling an attack from these vessels the Matta- 
besett, Wyalusing, Miami, Ceres, Whitehead, and the Barney, which I 
trust is on her way here, and which I trust will not be considered too 
large a force for an iron vessel and a very formidable wooden one, and 
if there did not appear to be a great scarcity of vessels, I should feel 
it my duty to ask for two vessels capable of ramming in addition to my 
force. If they were heavy and without guns I would be satisfied. 

In reply to the paragraph contained in your letter of the liOth in rela- 
tion to the withdrawal of the Mattabesett and Wyalusing, I would state 
most emphatically that they could not be withdrawn from the sound 
under existing circumstances. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

r Endorsement. ] 

Captain Smith was, in compliance with a suggestion to me by the 
Assistant Secretary of the Navy when at Fortress Monroe, consulted 
as to whether or not one or two of the four additional double enders, 
which had lately been sent to the sounds, could be withdrawn for the 
James River Expedition. The events which occurred in the sounds 
subsequent to this, and preceding his reply, abundantly justified the 
opinion he has here given. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Davenport, U. S. Navy, regarding the forwarding 
of dispatches and torpedoes. 

U. S. S. HETZEL, 
Off New Berne, N. C., May 7, 186-1. 

SIR: I send the Lockwood to you with torpedoes and dispatches. I 
have heard unofficially of your tight with the ram. The Barney will 
have informed you of the state of affairs here. 
Please send the Lockwood back at once. 
Very respectfully, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 

Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Captain M. SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Naval Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 33 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master Shel- 
don, U. 8. Nary, commanding U. S. S. Shokokon, 1o cooperate icith the 
army in the Appomattox River. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 

James River, May 8, 1864. 

SIR: The army will make a movement up both sides of the Appo 
mattox at daylight to-morrow. I wish the Shokokon and Putnam to 
cooperate as far up and as effectively as practicable. 

General Graham, with his army gunboats, will accompany you with a 
signal officer on board, from whom you can learn the movements of the 
army. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master W. B. SHELDON, 

U. S. S. ShoJcokon. 



[ Telegram. 1 

JAMES RIVER, 

9 a. m., May 8, via Fortress Monroe, May 9, 1864. 
I have just seen General Butler, who informed me that there was no 
military necessity for the naval vessels to go up to North Reach, as the 
height of the land there was such that they could render him no 
assistance, and that the occupation by the navy of Curies Neck Reach 
will afford the army all the protection that it requires, from which my 
communications can easily be kept open. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral, Flagship Malvern. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Report of Acting Master Sheldon, U. S. Navy, regarding condition of 
affairs in the Appomattox River. 

TJ. S. S. SHOKOKON, 
At Point of Rocks, Appomattox River, Virginia, May 8, 1864. 

SIR : I would respectfully inform you of the state of affairs at this 
point. Everything is now quiet. I communicated with General Smith 
yesterday morning; he wishes me to lay at this point to protect his 
lines of pickets on the south bank of the river. There was a rumor of 
an artillery force of rebels coming down to fire on the transports pass- 
ing up from City Point here, but I can't learn anything more. I have 
sent scouts ashore They only met a tew scattered cavalry. I think I 
can easily hold this point with the assistance of the General Putnam 
against any force that the enemy will bring down. I have nothing fur- 
ther to add. If there should be any force come down to attack us, I 
will immediately inform you. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. SHELDON, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
N W R VOL 10 3 



34 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Commander Dove, U. 8. Navy, transmitting information regard- 
ing the withdrawal of the enemy from before New Berne. 

U. S. NAVAL STATION, 

Beaufort, N. C., May 8, 1*64. 

SIR: The news? brought up by the Fahkee was communicated to 
Colonel [James] Jourdan, commanding this district, and to Colonel 
[Jones] Frankle, commanding Fort Macon, and lias put us on the lookout 
seaward. 

As an offset to it I have the pleasure of enclosing Colonel Jourdan's 
note, by which you will see that the enemy have retired irom before New 
Berne, and that communication will be opened with it to morrow. 

We have been keeping a good lookout here, picketing the approaches 
with boats every night in Core and Bogue Sounds and toward Newport 
lliver, carrying out your instructions of May 2. 

The vessels now in port are the Olaucus, Monticello, Vicksburg, Mara- 
tanza, and Emma. 

Necessary repairs detain the Olaucus, Monticello, and Emma, but the 
Maratanza and Vicksburg will leave to-day or to-morrow. 

[B. M. DOVE, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy.\ 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

( Enclosure.] 

SUB DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS, May 8, 1864. 

COMMANDER: Your dispatch this moment came to hand. I regret 
to learn that the enemy has succeeded in completing two such formi- 
dable vessels. I am very thankful to you for your kindness in so 
promptly sending me the information and your offer to send dispatches 
by one of your vessels, which is rendered unnecessary from the fact that 
I am pleased to inform you that the enemy has retired from before New 
Berne. Communication is opened with that place and men at work 
repairing the little damage done to railroad and telegraph. I think a 
train \\ill be down to-morrow. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. JOURDAN, 
Colonel, Commanding. 
Commander DOVE, IT. S. Navy, 

Commanding. 



Report of Commander Davenport, U. S. Navy, regarding movements of 
vessels off New Berne, N. C. 

U. S. S. HETZEL, 
Off New Berne, N. C., May 8, 1864. 

SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 7th instant. The Barney 
was sent immediately on receipt of your order of the 4th instant. 

In company with Captain French came Acting Volunteer Lieutenant 
Henry Eaton with orders from the Department to assume command of 
the Louisiana. I have therefore ordered French to return and report 
to you for further orders. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 35 

The Valley City arrived from Pamlico River this morning with 30 
refugees. Acting Master Brooks reports the enemy burning the prop- 
erty of all citizens who have traded within the Union lines. 

I shall send her back immediately. I think it advisable to keep the 
Louisiana here until the Lockwood returns. 

From reliable information the enemy expected the Roanoke Kiver 
ram here when they made their attack the other day. All is quiet at 
present. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 

Commander, U. 8. Navy. 
Captain M. SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Naval Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 



Order of Lieutenant- Commander Roe, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master's 
Mate O'Hara to take command of prize steamer Bombshell. 

U. S. S. SASSACUS, 

Albemarle Sound, Bluff Point, May 8, 1864. 

SIR : You are hereby detached to take command of the prize steamer 
Bombshell, of four guns, and prize crew of 10 men is furnished you from 
this vessel, together with coal heavers, and one very capable fireman 
who can take care of your machinery. Organize your men into watches 
and station them at quarters for action, and be ready at all times to 
receive an attack or to make one. You have plenty of ammunition, 
coal, and provisions on board. 

You will accompany the Sassacus as soon as she gets underway, ready 
to take a bow line to assist in towing her head around, for the Sasxacus 
can not be steered on ace mut of injuries received in the engagement of 
the 5th. Keep along in company so that you may always be within 
hailing distance, to render us any assistance in your power. 

Proceed at once to make out for me a careful inventory of all pro- 
visions, ammunition, arms, and other property found on board and now 
there. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

F. A. R-E, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Acting Master's Mate H. W. O'HABA, 

Commanding Steamer Bombshell. 



Abstract log of the U. S. S. Canonicus. 

May 9, 1864. A 7 a. ra. dropped anchor at Turkey Bend. At 10 dis- 
covered rebel pickets prowling about a house on shore abreast of us. 
At 1 : 15 p. m. put the battle hatches on. Called all hands to general 
quarters. The gunboat Commodore Perry, Captain Foster, reported 
earthworks being thrown up on shore abreast of him. We immediately 
commenced shelling them out. Fired 5 XV inch shell. Loaded 2 
shrapnel and grape. At 5 the admiral went down the river and was 
fired upon by guerrillas. 

May 10. At 10 a. ra. heard firing up the river. At 11 saw the Mal- 
veni and Hunchback shelling the woods. At 6 : 30 the Commodore Perry, 



36 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Hunchback, and ShokoJcon shelling the woods as they came down the 
river. 

May 13. At 5 p. m. the Commodore Perry shelled the woods while 
she sent a boat on shore for torpedoes. At C : 30 the commander of the 
Commodore Perry came alongside with 7 torpedoes, which were found 
on shore. They consisted of 7 cans from 60 to 75 pounds each of pow- 
der. They were destroyed by order of Captain Parrott. 

May 14. At 2 p.m. discovered cavalry on shore, Grant's army, Gen- 
eral Sheridan. 

May 15. At 9 : 30 a. m. sent a boat in charge of Acting Master D. S. 
Murphy up to Turkey Creek to reconnoiter for boats and torpedoes. 
At 10 the boat was seen coming out of the creek with a canal boat in 
tow. Orders were given to destroy her, which was done by setting lire 
to her, meantime Acting Master Murphy proceeded back up the creek 
in further search of boats. At 1 p. in. sent the dingey under the com- 
mand of Acting Ensign Harris in search of contraband articles. At 
1 : 15 dingey returned. Sent dingey on shore again for same purpose 
under command of Lieutenant McCook. At 1:30 p. in. second cutter 
returned, having in tow a number of boats, flat bottoms, which were 
destroyed. At 2 p. m. Lieutenant McCook returned with the dingey, 
bringing on board a lot of cotton and a barrel of shad fish. 

May 22. At 4:30 p. m. the admiral's tug came alongside with orders 
to get underway and proceed up the river and take up position between 
the Tecumseh and Saugus. We anchored in 3 fathoms water. At 8 
p. m. the Tecumseh commenced firing; finished at 10, when we com- 
menced with our left gun, firing every half hour up to 1 o'clock in the 
morning. 

May 23. At 1:30 a. in. ceased firing. At 2:10 the Saugus com- 
menced firing. 10:30 p. m. commenced tiring every half hour. 

May 24. Fired 2 XV-inch loaded shell up to 1 o'clock a. m.; the 
Tecumseh then commenced firing. At 2 a. m. heard heavy musketry 
firing on shore. 

May 27. At 9 : 30 a. m. commenced firing at rebel batteries on Mount 
Sympathy; fired 1 10-secoud shell. From 12 to 4 p. m. fired every 
half hour during the watch. At 3 p. in. the pilot of the Saugus came 
with orders from the admiral to cease firing while he sounded out the 
channel. At 3:30 p. m. orders came from the admiral to continue 
firing; fired 4 shell and shrapnel. From 4 to 6 p. m. commenced 
firing; continued to do so every half hour, using 3 10-second shell and 
1 shrapnel during the watch. 

May 28. At 4:20 a. m. the picket boats returned. Fired every 
half hour at a rebel fort building on Mount Sympathy. At 10 ceased 
tiring; fired 3 10-second shell during the watch. From 4 to 6 p. m. 
sent the first cutter to assist in laying a hawser across the river. 



Report of Commander Parker, U. 8. Navy, requesting an additional iron 
clad for the blockade off Wilmington. 

U. S. STEAM SLOOP TUSCARORA, 

Off Wilmington, N. C., May 9, 1864. 

SIR: I would respectfully suggest that an ironclad should be added 
to the force of the blockading squadron off this port, as 1 doubt the 
ability of any wooden vessel on this station to contend successfully 
with the rebel ram which appeared in the midst of this squadron on 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 37 

the morning of the 7th instant. My report of the affair was sent on by 
a previous mail, and I enclose herewith the report* of Lieutenant- 
Commander Watmough, of the Kansas. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. A. PARKER. 

Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to the Speaker of the House of 
Representatives, transmitting correspondence regarding the construction 
of the Confederate ram Albemarle. 



DEPARTMENT, May 9, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the resolution 
of the House of Eepresentatives, passed on the 2d instant, directing 
the Secretary of the Navy to furnish the House u with all the informa- 
tion in his possession concerning the construction of the rebel ram 
which participated in the recent rebel attack on the United States 
forces and vessels at and near Plymouth, also to inform the House why 
the construction of said ram was not prevented; whether any steps 
were taken to prevent the same, or to guard against the action of said 
ram; also what action was taken in relation to the subjects of this 
enquiry, and why the same was not effective." 

In conformity with the requirements contained in the foregoing reso- 
lution, I transmit herewith copies of correspondence on the files of this 
Department relative to the construction of the rebel ram referred to 
and other matters connected therewith. I also subjoin a schedule of 
ironclad gunboats of light draft in the process of construction, which, 
iu anticipation of the state of things which now exist, were designed 
for service in the sounds and rivers of North Carolina and the shallow 
interior waters elsewhere on the coast. These boats were contracted 
for as soon as it was possible to do so after the necessary appropri- 
ations for their construction were made by Congress, and it will be seen 
by the lata given that most of them were to have been completed last 
year, some of them as early as September. Not one has yet been 
delivered, and it will be some weeks before one can be made available 
for service. 

I felt it my duty on repeated occasions to call the attention of Con- 
gress to the necessities for a yard and establishment where iron and 
armored vessels could be constructed for the Government, but the pre- 
liminary steps for such an establishment have not yet been taken. In 
the meantime the Department and the Government are wholly depend- 
ent on contractors, who, if they have the will, do not possess the 
ability to furnish these vessels promptly. Conflicting local controver- 
sies in regard to the place which shall be selected and benefited by the 
proposed in.portant national establishment for an iron navy, such as 
the present and future necessities of the Government require, have 
contributed to delay action on this important subject. Having in view 
economy as well as the public necessities, I have at no time recom- 
mended that the number of our navy yards should be increased on the 
Atlantic coast, but it is my deliberate opinion that no time should be 

* See p. 18. 



38 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

wasted in establishing at a proper place a suitable yard where iron 
ships can be made and repaired. We feel its necessity in the emer- 
gency which has called forth the present enquiry, and not a single con- 
tractor is able to meet his engagements even for one of this class of 
small vessels. In the event of a foreign war with one or more of the 
principal maritime powers, our condition would be most unfortunate 
with no Government establishment for the construction or repair of 
armored vessels, such as modern science and skill are introducing. 

The omission to make provision for such an establishment on which 
the Government can always rely is to be regretted. Had we such an 
establishment at this time I should not have been compelled to make 
this exhibit of a want of light-draft armored boats for such an exigency 
as that which now exists in the waters of North Carolina, nor is it 
probable that the exigency would have occurred. 

Such incidental aid as the Navy could render the Army was cheer- 
fully and earnestly given at Plymouth, as it ever has been given always 
and at all times when its aid and cooperation could be useful. It has 
been less effective than it would have been even with such boats as we 
have in consequence of the unfortunate legislation of the last Con- 
gress, which, in its enrollment law, ignored the Navy, subjected sea- 
men to military draft, tendered large bounties to such as became 
soldiers, but allowed no bounty to those who entered the naval service, 
and would not even permit naval recruits to be credited on the quotas 
required to be drafted. 

The remedial legislation of the present Congress has thus far effected 
comparatively few transfers. Some suggestions, which I had the honor 
to submit to the Senate in March last in answer to an enquiry, <; What 
further legislation is necessary to supply any deficiencies of men for 
the naval service," have not, that I am aware, been reported upon, and 
many of our vessels, some of which would have been ordered to the 
sounds of North Carolina, are still without crews. 

The correspondence of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee and the naval 
officers is evidence that there has been no neglect or inattention on 
their part at Plymouth or elsewhere in that quarter. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Hon. SCHUYLER GOLF AX, 

Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. FLAGSHIP MINNESOTA, 
Off Newport News, Va., April 17, 1863. 

GENERAL: Permit me to renew my previous suggestions in favor of 
abandoning the occupation of so many points in the sounds and the 
razing of the enemy's abandoned defenses. Our present policy of 
occupying detached posts struck me last fall, and more so now than 
then, as being expensive, insecure, and subjecting us to attack in 
detail; whereas, if we occupied one good position, the concentration of 
our land and naval forces would better enable us to act our part of 
prosecuting the war. Naval movements necessarily follow army policy 
in this matter, as we can not withdraw our assistance whilst you need 
it in th<* occupation of a place. Matters are taking the same critical 
turn here as in the sounds. The enemy are tryi g to cut off our posi- 
tions in detail, and to reoccupy their abandoned works. Our policy of 
scattered occupation is certainly bad and can not too soon be aban- 
doned. I have assigned to Lieutenant "Commander Flusser the charge 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 39 

of naval operations at Washington, and have directed Commander 
Davenport to send him the Miami. 

I hope you will soon get back your troops and transportation from 
South Carolina. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. It ear -Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General J. G. FOSTER, U. S. Army, 

Commanding Department of North Carolina, Washington, N. C. 

P. S. April 18 j p. m. I am glad to learn from Commander Town- 
send that your troops have returned. Your success may now be antici- 
pated and will g.ve immense satisfaction. 

S. P. L. 

[For other enclosures, see 

Report June 15, 1863, Lee to Welles. 

Report June S, 1863, Flusser to Lee. 

Report August 8, 1863, Lee to Welles. 

Report September 10, 1863, Lee to Welles. 

Order July 22, 1863, Lee to Flusser. 

Report August 21, 186 i, Flusser to Lee. 

Letter September 17, 1863, Welles to Stauton. 

Letter September 19, 1863, Stanton to Welles. 

Letter November 13, 1863, Peck to Lee. 

Report November 24, 1863, Lee to Welles. 

Report March 4, 1864, Lee to Welles. 

Report, April 24, 1864, Lee to Welles. 

Tabulated statement of light draft monitors under construction 
Report of Secretary of the Navy, 1864, p. 117.] 



Order of Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Spicer, 
U. 8. Navy, regarding Jive prisoners from the schooner Indian. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, Virginia, May 9, 1864. 

SIR : The Department having directed that British blockade violators 
be detained, as well as citizens of the United States, you will send to 
the commandant of the New York navy yard the five prisoners from 
the schooner Indian, brought up by the Cambridge, with this letter, on 
which endorse the names and citizenship of each, of wuich send me a 
copy and report your action in the premises. 

Respectfully, yours, S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander SPICER, 

Commanding U. S. S. Cambridge. 



Unofficial letter from Lieutenant Gushing, U. S. Navy, to Acting Rear- 
Admiral Lee, U. S. Nary, proposing to engage the enemy's vessels, and 
giving results of offshore cruising by the U. *S'. S. Monticello. 

U. S. S. MONTICELLO, 

Beaufort, N. C., May 9, 1864. 

SIR : I write unofficially to you to say that, having just learned the 
particulars of the moitifying affair off Wilmington, 1 deem it my duty 



40 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

to leave for the point of danger at once. I feel very badly over the 
affair, sir, and would have given my life freely to have had the power 
of showing my high regard for you and the honor of the service by 
engaging the enemy's vessels. If they are there when I arrive, I shall 
use the Monticello as a rain, and will go over her or to the bottom. If 
they are inside, I shall send in a written petition to carry the ram by 
boarding in the harbor. I enclose a copy of application and plan of 
operations.* I trust that the success of this insulting bravado of tlie 
enemy will not lead you to distrust us all; I am confident that Captain 
Braine and myself can sink the ironclad. 

My offshore cruising thus far has resulted in one chase, in company 
with the Connecticut, on the 12th of April. Just before black smoke 
was sighted my main valve stem got bent and it was eighty minutes 
after we saw it before my cut-off could be detached, giving the English- 
man a chance to get to windward of me. I then chased for over 100 
miles, but, with full stroke, could only keep up enough steam to go 11 
knots. The vessel cliased escaped from the Connecticut. 

On the 22d of April I picked up the English schooner James Douglass 
outside the Gulf Stream, dismasted, and with no one on board. She 
had feet of water in the hold, and a cargo of cocoanuts and bananas, 
which 1 hove overboard. Finding that she was a fine schooner of about 
150 tons, and that she was sound and without a leak, I towed her in 
and will forward her, making a claim for at least 80 per cent, salvage. 

I think that the blockade runners have given up the direct route and 
go more to the southward. 

There is no doubt but that my vessel can overtake the majority of 
those vessels, and I trust that you will not cancel my permission to 
cruise outside after this ram business is settled. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, 

W. B. GUSHING. 

Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia. 

[Letter of same date and like tenor to Gaptain Sands, U. S. Navy, 
senior officer off Wilmington, N. G.J 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting report of 
Commander Almy, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. S. Connecticut, re- 
garding the capture of the blockade running steamer Minnie. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, May 10, 1864. 

SIR : I transmit enclosed the report of Commander J. J. Almy, dated 
9th instant, of the capture of the blockade running steamer Minnie on 
that date. 

I would call the attention of the Department to the opinion expressed 
by Commander Almy that the Minnie will be found a good vessel to 
take into Government service as a cruiser. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

* See letter of Gushing to the Secretary of the Navy, May 21. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 41 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. CONNECTICUT, 
At Sea, Lat. 34 N., Long. 75 28' W., May 9, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report the capture to day by this steamer 
under my command of the Anglo-rebel blockade runner steamer Minnie, 
Captain G. S. Gilpin, after an active and exciting chase of four hours 
and a quarter. 

At 11 : 30 a. m., when in latitude 23 22' N., longitude 75 40' W., 
115 miles E. by S. from Cape Fear, the Minnie was discovered to the 
northward and westward, distant about 5 miles, the atmosphere being 
quite hazy, and steering toward Bermuda, whither she was bound. 
She was captured and taken possession of at 3 : 45 p. m. in latitude 34 
N., and longitude 75 US' W., after a chase of four hours, in which it 
was necessary to fire five 100-pounder rifle shot to make her heave to 
and stop. She threw overboard about 40 bales of cotton to endeavor 
to avoid capture, but it was of no avail. 

The Minnie is a very fine iron screw steamer, built at Glasgow last 
year, and her gross tonnage is 355. She is therefore nearly new, and 
ttis was her second trip to Wilmington. The quantity of cargo now 
remaining and now on board is said to be 540 bales of cotton, 25 tons 
of tobacco, and 1 2 barrels of turpentine. 

She left Wilmington last night at high water (9:30 p. m.); showed 
English colors during the chase, which were kept up until hauled down 
by Lieutenant Kempff, U. S. Navy, executive officer of this steamer, 
upon his boarding and taking possession of her. 

She had on board as passenger Lieutenant Lincoln C. Leftwich, 6f 
the Confederate Navy, who showed me his commission, and whom I 
now have a prisoner on board this steamer. 

I have placed officers and a prize crew on board of the Minnie and 
ordered her to Boston in charge of Acting Ensign Francis Wallace, 
with Acting Master's Mate E. P. Blague and Acting Assistant Engineers 
William W. McGrath and Charles H. Lawrence. 

No other United States vessel than the Connecticut was in sight at 
the time to claim a share in the prize. 

About $10,000 in gold, equal to about $17,500 Government currency, 
were found on board in a secret drawer, which is sent in the vessel in 
charge of the prize master. 

I am of the opinion that the Minnie, after examination and survey, 
will be found a good vessel to be taken into the service as a cruiser. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN J. ALMY, 

Commander. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 10, 1864. 

For the present make daily reports by telegraph of all the informa- 
tion you can obtain from Richmond and the operations within your 
knowledge. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic blockading Squadron, James River. 



42 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Lynch, 
U. S. Navy, regarding the transfer of submarine armor from the store- 
ship Roman. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, Virginia, May 10, 1864. 

SIR: Transfer to Commodore Livingston at the Norfolk navy yard 
the submarine armor now on the Roman, with a list of articles and 
condition. 

Please direct Acting Master Studley, of the guard ship Young Rover, 
to forward to the Department through the senior officer present a 
duplicate report of arrivals and departures. 
Very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander D. LYNCH, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. St. Lawrence, Hampton Roads. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Quackenbush, U. S. Navy, regarding the protection of the army occupa- 
tion of Fort Powhatan. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 

James River, May 10, 1864. 

*~ SIR : You will remain for the protection of the army occupation of 
Fort Powhatan until further orders. Your best position will probably 
be above the fort, the Atlanta between Fort Powhatan and Wilson's 
Wharf, and the Dawn above or below the latter, as circumstances may 
require. 

Respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pequot. 



Report of Commander Almy, U. S. Navy, regarding the capture by the 
U. S. S. Connecticut of the British steamer Greyhound. 

U. S. S. CONNECTICUT, . 
At Sea, Lat. 30 3' N., Long. 7.5 55' W., May 10, 1864. 

SIR: Yesterday I had the pleasure of reporting to you the capture of 
the Anglo rebel blockade runner steamer Minnie, from Wilmington, 
bound to Bermuda, with a very valuable cargo on board, comprising 
540 bales of cotton, 25 tons of tobacco, and 12 barrels of turpentine. 
Sent her to Boston. 

To-day I have the additional satisfaction of reporting to you that at 
noon, when in latitude 3.5 25' N., longitude 75 48' W., discovered a 
suspicious looking steamer to the southward and westward steering to 
the eastward toward Bermuda, whither she was bound. Immediately 
stood tor her and gave chase. At 2 p. m. got within gunshot range, 
and after firing a couple of shot at and over her, she having English 
colors, she hauled them down, stopped the engine, and surrendered. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 43 

This occurred in latitude 33 3' 1ST., longitude 75 55' W., 109 miles E. 
by S. of Cape Fear. 

Upon boarding; her she proved to be the Anglo-rebel blockade runner 
steamer Greyhound, built at Liverpool in December, 1863. She left 
Wilmington and ran through the blockade last night, bound for Ber- 
muda. She has a very valuable cargo on board, comprising 800 bales 
of cotton, 35 tons of tobacco, and 25 casks of turpentine. She threw 
overboard 20 bales of cotton in endeavoring to avoid capture. 

The captain represents himself as George Henry, but his real name 
is George H. Bier, whom I formerly knew as a lieutenant in the U. S. 
Navy, and his name appears in the Confederate Navy Register as a 
lieutenant in that service. 

I have placed officers and a prize crew on board of the Greyhound 
and ordered her to Hampton Roads to report to you. Acting Ensign 
Samuel Harding, jr., is in charge of her, who will give you any further 
information in detail which you may require. 

I have left the place of the U. S. district judge blank, in his address, 
in the communications which I have written to him for you to till up, 
though I would respectfully suggest Boston as the best port to send 
the Greyhound. 

I shall follow on, and be in Hampton Roads the day after the Grey- 
hound reaches there, if nothing unforeseen occurs. This is rendered 
necessary by the large number of prisoners (80) whom I have on board, 
and rather a desperate set they are, too. 

Having 4 engineers, 2 ensigns, and 2 master's mates, with 10 firemen 
and coal heavers, and 20 sailors away in prizes, so reduces my force as 
to render the Connecticut inefficient for present cruising. 

The forecastle pivot gun of this steamer, 32-pounder rifled Parrott, is 
cracked, and another required. 

The Greyhound may need coal to take her to Boston. I hope that 
she may be detained at Hampton Roads until 1 arrive, as myself and 
the paymaster have some unfinished business with the vessel and the 
prize crew. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN J. ALMY, 

Commander. 

Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Breck, U. 8. Navy, commanding 
U. S. 8. Niphon, regarding the chase of a blockade runner. 

U. S. S. NIPHON, 

Off New Inlet, North Carolina, May 10, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the morning of this date, at 
4: .50 a. m., while close in to the beach half a mile south of the entrance 
to Masonboro Inlet, saw a steamer heading about S. W., going fast, 
the Niphon heading S S. W. D.iy was just breaking. The steamer 
saw us at the same time, put his helm hard astarhoard, we doing the 
same, our distance apart being about 2 miles. We immediately threw 
up rockets and opened on her with all our guns, only one of which 
struck her at the paddle box. The chase then headed N. E. by E. aud 
commenced throwing cargo overboard. It was nearly calm, and 
remained so for two hours; in that time there was no difference in 



44 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

speed. At 9 a. m. a breeze sprung up from the south ; chase steered 
S. E. by E. and gained on us. At 10 a. m. was some 4 miles off. Kept 
him at the same bearing- until 11 a. m., he throwing cargo overboard all 
the time. After 11, gained on us still more, heading S. S. E. At 12 
o'clock noon some 6 or 7 miles ahead. At 1 : 30 p. m. lost sight of him, 
the weather being hazy. The blockade runner was a large, long, side- 
wheel steamer, painted a greenish white; two smokestacks, wide apart, 
placed fore and aft; two masts; appeared very much like the Robert E. 
Lee. After losing sight of him, stood back to our station. The 
Niphon j s speed during the chase averaged 12 knots by patent log, with 
90 revolutions. We were moving slowly when the steamer was first 
seen, and it took some ten minutes to get our steam up. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. B. BRECK, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. 8. S. Niphon. 

Commander W. A. PARKER, 

Senior Officer Present. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Dove, 
U. S. Navy, regarding the U. 8. 8. Nansemond. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 

James River, May 10, 1864. 

SIR: If the Nansemond is now at Beaufort detain her for the defense 
of the harbor while the necessity for her presence lasts. If she is not 
there, ask the senior officer off Wilmington to send her to you. 
Respectfully. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander B. M. DOVE, 

Beaufort. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Smith, U. S 
Navy, regarding the retention of vessels in the sounds. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, Virginia, May 10, 1864. 

SIR: Yours of 2d instant is received. You can retain all the vessels 
in the sounds as long as their presence there is absolutely necessary, 
but as the retention of Beaufort Harbor is of very great importance to 
the Navy, I desire that you send two vessels there as soon as they can 
be spared. 

The Ceres and Lockwood would do very well for this purpose. Neither 
the Valley City nor Louisiana, with which you are blockading the 
approaches to Washington would be suitable. 
Coal has been written for to supply your wants. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Officer in Sounds of North, Carolina. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 45 

Report of Commander Davenport, U. S. Navy, regarding the disposition 
of vessels of his command. 

U. S. S. HETZEL, 

Off New Berne, N. C., May 10, 1864. 

ADMIRAL: I have the hoiior to make the following semimonthly 
report of the disposition of vessels in the sounds for term ending at 
date: 

April 26. Commodore Barney and Sassacus arrived from Hampton 
Koads. 

April 27. Commodore Barney sailed for Washington; Seymour 
arrived from Eoanoke Island. 

April 28. Tacony acrived from Roauoke Island; Sassacus sailed for 
Albemarle Sound. 

April 29. Mattabesett arrived from Hampton Roads. 
April 30. Valley City arrived from Washington. 
May 1. Commodore Barney and Commodore Hull arrived from Wash- 
ington ; Commodore Hull sailed for Albemarle Sound; Valley City sailed 
for Pamlico River; Louisiana arrived from Washington. 
May 2. Mattabesett sailed for Albemarle Sound. 
May 6. Commodore Barney sailed for Albemarle Sound. 
May 7. Lockicood sailed for Albemarle Sound. 
May 8. Valley City arrived from Pamlico River. 
May 10. Valley City sailed for Pamlico River. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 

Commander, U. 8. Navy, Senior Officer Present. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

P. S. Captain Smith directed me to keep on as usual. I have accord- 
ingly made out the above report, which comprises all the changes that 
have come to my notice. 



Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. S. 
Navy, regarding submarine operators. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 11, 1864. 

SIR: Messrs. Hayden and Maillefert, submarine operators, have 
offered their services in connection with the operations of the fleet in 
James River. Are you in want of such assistance? 

Very respectfully, etc., GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Acting Master Savage, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Gen- 
eral Putnam, regarding the operations of that vessel in the Appomattox 
River. 

U. S. S. GENERAL PUTNAM, 
Appomattox River, Virginia, May 11, 1864. 
SIR: I respectfully make the following report of my proceedings 

while in this river: 

Wednesday, May 4. Received orders from you at 8 p. in. to enter the 

mouth of this river and remain on picket. * Was unable to find the 

channel until daylight. 



46 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

May 5. Proceeded up the river, dragging and examining carefully 
for to pedoes. At 11 a. m. communicated with the U. IS. S. 8ho1cok&n 
and received orders from you to remain in this river and cooperate 
with General Graham and our army forces. 

May 6 and 7. -iiemaiued in the river between the mouth and Point 
of Rocks. 

May 8. Received information from a citizen that the enemy were 
scouting the woods on the left bank of the river and moving artillery 
down from Petersburg. Shelled the woods in the rear of the river 
banks. At 7:30 p. m. received (5 of the enemy on board as prisoners 
of war, the receipt for which is enclosed. 

May 8 [9]. At 9 a. m. moved up the river in company with army 
gunboats; came to anchor off Gilliam's Bar. At 1 p. in. proceeded up 
the river. At 1:30 p. m. opened fire with 20-pounder Parrott rifle 
on the enemy's battery, which was covered from view by a sharp bend 
of the river. 1 was unable to get into position in sight of the battery, 
as the army gunboat Ghamberlin grounded just ahead of us, where there 
was no room to pass in the channel. I assisted the Ghamberlin all in 
my power, towing her into the channel and dropping down to give her 
room, by order of General Graham. The army gunboat Brewster hav- 
ing been disabled by the enemy's fire and abandoned, unmanageable, 
received orders from General Graham to cease firing and retreat, which 
I did. At 2: 45 p. m. came to anchor at Gilliam's Bar. 

May 10. Reconnoitei ed the river below Gilliam's Bar in obedience to 
General Graham's orders. 

May 11. At 5 a. in. proceeded to City Point and coaled ship. Com- 
municated with U. S. S. Osceola, Commander Clitz; received change of 
signals from him, with orders to return to my station and communicate 
the change of signals to the commanding officer of the U. S. S. Shokokon. 
On the way up the river communicated with boat from Shokokon and 
army gunboat General Jesup, who informed me that the enemy's pickets 
bad come down in force as far as Gilliam's Bar and that our vessels had 
retreated to Point of Rocks. Proceeded there; went on board General 
Graham's boat for orders, but found that he was on shore. Communi- 
cated the change of signals to Acting Master Sheldon, commanding 
the U. S. S. Shokokon. I then proceeded up the river to ascertain the 
position and force of the enemy, if possible. Went to Gilliam's Bar 
and shelled the woods above thet point and in direction of the enemy's 
battery, which I received no reply from. I then proceeded to the bend 
of the river, which covered the battery, backing up the river stern 
first, in the best of the water. Shelled the woods, driving the enemy's 
sharpshooters out, who were received by our pickets on the right bank 
of the river, opened a hot fire on the enemy's battery as soon as we 
saw it and got the range, which they replied to with a rifled piece and 
short range gun. At their fourth fire a shell from my starboard 
24 pounder howitzer exploded in the embrasure of the rifled gun which 
the enemy were working on us, when they ceased firing and ran from 
their guns. Not thinking it prudent to proceed farther, as the water 
was getting too shoal to handle my vessel, I proceeded down the river. 
When below Gilliam's Bar I received orders from you to return. 

Sir, I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. H. SAVAGE, 
Acting Master, Commanding, U. 8. Navy. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 47 

Additional report of Acting Master Savage, U. S. Navy, commanding 

U. IS. S. General Putnam, regarding the operations of that vessel in the 

Appomattox River. 

U. S. S. GENERAL PUTNAM, 
Off Point of Rocks, Appomattox River, Virginia, May 11, 1864. 

SIR : In obedience to your order, I would most respectfully make the 
following explanation of my proceedings to-day: 

On my return from coaling ship this a. in., I found that all the ves- 
sels had retreated down the river to Point of Rocks, it having been 
reported that the enemy's pickets were coining down in force at our 
former station, Gilliam's Bar. I went on board General Graham's ves- 
sel for orders, but found that he had gone on shore; I then reported to 
Acting Master Sheldon, commanding the Shokohon. Wishing to ascer- 
tain the position and force of the enemy, I stated my wishes to Acting 
Master Sheldon, who directed me to be careful in my movement. Gen- 
eral Graham not returning, I proceeded cautiously up the river, with 
my men at quarters and everything ready for immediate action. When 
off Gilliam's Bar, I communicated with one of our pickets, who informed 
me that there was none of the enemy in that vicinity on that side of 
the river. 1 then proceeded to ascertain if- there was any force in the 
woods al>ove. Backing up the river in the most cautious manner, I 
engaged the enemy's battery and silenced it at their fourth tire (my 
report of this date will give you the details of the engagement). I 
then returned down the river. I hope, sir, that my conduct will meet 
your approval, as no disrespect was intended to my superior officers. 

Sir, i have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. H. SAVAGE, 
Acting Master, Commanding, U. 8. Navy. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Endorsement.] 

MAY 13, 1864. 
Respectfully forwarded. 

Since Captain Savage has cooperated with me his conduct has been 
meritorious, and in action that of a prudent and brave officer. 

CHARLES K. GRAHAM, 

Brigadier- General. 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Lamson, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Gettysburg, to proceed to the block- 
ade off Wilmington, N. C. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, James River, May 11, 1864. 
SIR: After receiving coal and other supplies at Beaufort and deliv- 
ering the mail proceed to the blockade off Wilmington and report your 
arrival to the senior officer there present. 

On the return of the Vicksburg from outside cruising under her 
orders of the 23d ultimo, you will till up with necessary supplies at 
Beaufort and proceed thence to cruise on the outside line of blockade. 

Respectfully, S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Lieutenant R. H. LAMSON, 

U. S. S. Gettysburg. 

P. S. Touch at Norfolk navy yard to repair cathead. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 



48 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from Commander Davenport, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Smith, U. S. 
Navy, regarding general matters pertaining to his command. 

U. S. S. HETZEL, 
Off New Berne, N. C., May 11, 1864. 

SIR: The Lockwood arrived this morning, bringing the prisoners and 
yonr dispatches. The prisoners have been placed in charge of the pro- 
vost marshal and await your orders. The navy supply steamer New 
Berne is due at Beaufort on her return trip, going north, on the 7th and 
21st of each month. Your requisitions will be filled as far as possible 
and the articles sent by first conveyance and the repairs made on the 
Whitehead as rapidly as our facilities will admit. 

We have always procured fresh beef from the Commissary Depart- 
ment when possible. No other arrangement has ever been made for 
supplying the sound squadron. 

The only returns I have been in the habit of making as senior officer 
is a semimonthly return, on the 10th and 25th of each month, of the 
disposition of vessels in the sounds. The usual quarterly returns from 
each vessel are forwarded to the admiral, with the exception of quar- 
terly returns of expenditures and quarterly requisitions, which, after 
being approved by the senior officer, are sent to Acting Assistant Pay- 
master E. Mellach, in charge of stores at this place, "to enable him to 
make his estimates and requisitions for the nuarter." 

I enclose you a copy of the admiral's instructions in regard to the 
discharge of men. 

I also enclose a copy of a le:ter from Mr. Patterson, of the Coast 
Survey, as I understand you require the Seymour in Albemarle Sound. 

MAY 12. 

The Whitehead arrived with the coal schooner in tow this morning. 
I shall load the schooner with coal immediately, and will use my 
best endeavors to get the repairs on the Whitehead completed without 
delay. 

Since the Barney left me I have kept only the Valley City cruising 
in Pamlico River. As soon as some necessary repairs are made on the 
Lockicood's engine, I shall send another boat there. 
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 

Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Captain M. SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Naval Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, May 12, 1864 6 p. m., 

(Via Fortress Monroe, May 13.) 

No information from Richmond. Guerrillas keep contrabands from 
coming in. No change of situation unless the army moved forward 
this morning from its line between Point of Rocks, on the Appoinattox, 
and Trent's Reach, in James River. Raining last night and to-day. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 49 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant Lamson, 
U. S. Navy, assigning him to command the torpedo and picket division. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, Virginia, May 12, 1864. 

SIR : You are hereby assigned to the command of the torpedo and 
picket division. The Stepping Stones, Delaicare, and Tritonia, several 
extra officers and 45 men, are detailed for this service The left bank 
commanding' our vessels should be picketed day and night to prevent 
surprise. Both banks must be thoroughly examined for torpedo lines 
(the trigger kind), torpedo wires, and magnetic batteries. The river 
should be dragged for torpedoes in the channel and for the wires or 
lines leading between them and from them to both banks. By night 
keep picket vessels and boats ahead and underway with alarm signals 
to prevent surprise from rebel river craft, rams, torpedo "Davids," 
and fire rafts. 

Euu down the torpedo craft; grapple and tow ashore by rowboats 
and small steamers the fire rafts. The double-enders will cover your 
operations, and each will furnish one or more boats when needed by 
you. All boat parties to be armed, and great vigilance to be observed. 
Organize and practice your division. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant E. H. LAMSON. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding a reconnoissance in the 
vicinity of Plymouth, N. C. 

U. S S. MATTABESETT, 
Albemarle Sound, May 12, 1864. 

SIR : I have to report the result of a reconnoissance made yesterday 
in the vicinity of Plymouth by Acting Ensign John E. Peacock and a 
boat's crew belonging to the late steamer Southjield. 

Mr. Peacock ascended the Middle Eiver about 6 miles, crossed the 
island, and reached a place of observation on the opposite side at 5 
o'clock p. m., after a most difficult and fatiguing tramp through the 
swamp, which occupied him four hours to accomplish. 

He reports the ram lying at the coal-yard wharf, lower end of the 
town, with smokestack down and a number of men engaged upon the 
repairs. The vessel seems to have been lightened, as he appears much 
higher out of water forward and aft than when we engaged him in the 
sound, but the sides of his casemates are even now touching the 
water. 

Mr. Peacock was not more than 200 yards oif, and could not see that 
the roof plating was at all broken or displaced, and nothing of the 
stack of the Southfield, which would have been visible if the vessel had 
not been raised or her smokestack removed to supply one for the 
Albemarle. The last suggestion seems to be most probable. 

A free colored man was captured on the way down, and just from 
Plymouth by the way of the Eoanoke Eiver, who states that he heard 
from an engineer of the Albemarle that one of the large guns was split 
N w R VOL 10 4 



50 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

open by one of our shot, and that there was a great quantity of water 
in the cabin on the arrival of the vessel at Plymouth. 

His roofing and casemates are covered with narrow plates of iron. 
He states that there are only two regiments at Plymouth, three hav- 
ing left for Virginia last week. 

Commander Renshaw has arrived to take command of the Miami and 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant French has been sent back from New 
Berne, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Eaton having been ordered by 
the Department to the Louisiana. 

No changes have been made in disposition of vessels under my com- 
mand since my last report. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Kear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Commander Davenport, U. S. Navy, to Brigadier- General 
Palmer, U. S. Army, regarding the presence of the U. S. S. Valley City 
in Pamlico River. 

U. 8. S. HETZEL, 
Off Neic Berne, N". C., May 12, 1864. 

GENERAL : In reply to your letter of this date I beg to inform you 
that there is one gunboat, the Valley City, cruising in the Pamlico 
River, to look out for the enemy and to bring away any refugees she 
may be able to pick up. 

As soon as some necessary repairs shall be completed on the Lock- 
wood, I shall send another boat there. 

I expect the Valley City to return here in a few days to bring me 
intelligence. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, and Senior Officer Present. 

Brigadier-General I. N. PALMER, 

Commanding District of North Carolina. 



[Telegram.; 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Birdcage Reach, James River, May 13, 18(i4 6 p. m. 

(Via Fortress Monroe, 5 p. m., May 15th.) 
General Butler asks for monitors above Trent's Reach. 
Torpedoes commanded by rebels on the left bank, which commands 
our decks, and shoal water by chart by several feet less than the 
monitors draw, make difficult the advance which I shall push to-morrow 
morning. 

We have discovered another kind of torpedo of which the enemy is 
making much use. No news from Richmond. General Butler had 
yesterday advanced near Drewry's Bluff. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hou, GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Nav$. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 51 

Letter of Major- General Butler, U. S. Army, to Acting Rear-Admiral 
Lee, U. 8. Navy, requesting that Navy gunboats cover the landing of 
army supplies at Hoicletfs. 

MAY 13, 1864. 

I think it would be of great public service if you can put your boats 
so as to cover my landing for supplies at Hewlett's house. 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE. 



*."' [Telegram.] 

IN THE FIELD, 
Near Dreicry's Bluff, May 13, 1864 9 a. m. 

Would it not be possible for you to bring up the gunboats, monitors, 
opposite Dr. Howlett's, so as to cover our flank on the river and relieve 
a considerable body of iny troops? Both sides of the river there are 
low and flat, and it is an excellent point for the gunboats to lie. 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 

Major- General. 
Bear- Admiral LEE, 

Commanding. 



Letter from Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, IT. 8. Navy, to Major-General 
Butler, U. S. Army, urging the necessity of army cooperation in the 
James River. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, May 13, [1864] 12:10 p. m. 

GENERAL : Your dispatch dated near Drewry's Bluff, May 13, 9 a. m., 
is just delivered by Major Ludlow. Owing to the shoal water in Trent's 
Reach, as shown by the Coast Survey chart, the draft of the monitors, 
the torpedoes in the river, and the occupation by the enemy of the high 
left bank, it will be very difficult if not impracticable, at present, to get 
the gunboats and monitors up to the point you indicate, opposite Dr. 
Howlett's, above Trent's Reach. 

To remove the torpedoes we must drag the river and search the 
banks for wires lines by which they are exploded. This requires that 
we should occupy or control the left bank of the river. The number 
and kind of gunboats are barely sufficient to cover your communications 
at Wilson's Wharf, Powhatan Reach, City Point, in the Appomattox, 
and at Bermuda Hundred, and our communications to this point. 

The enemy are now occupying in considerable force the high bank on 
the left side of the river, over the narrow channels around Jones' Neck, 
and protecting their torpedoes there, and the same difficulties will be 
found in the reach under the high left bank at and below the lower 
side of Dutch Gap. It requires many more than the small number of 
gunboats 1 have above Turkey Bend to clear and control the left bank 
in the absence of military occupation of controlling points in the reaches, 
so as to keep open our communications and get our supplies, especially 
of coal, of which the monitors carry but ten days' supply, and without 
which they can not breathe nor turn their turrets. 



52 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The explosion of the gunboat Commodore Jones by a torpedo shows 
that the river most be cleared of them before we can ascend, and the 
quick destruction of the gunboat Shairsheen just in our rear in Turkey 
Bend by a rebel battery shows that considerable naval force will be 
necessary to keep open our communication even it we can clear out the 
torpedoes, and by lightening the monitors, with the aid of transports, 
reach the point indicated in the absence of military occupation of <--v 
tain points on the left bank. I greatly need the military forces on the left 
bank, for which I have heretofore applied. Our crews are barely suffi 
cient to man the guns. When more gunboats arrive, I have to protect 
my communications, and I shall meanwhile endeavor, though greatly 
needing army aid. to clear the high banks and to open the channel in 
Jones" Reach. 1 ought to have a cooperating army force to occupy 
such points in the reaches, on this narrow river with overhanging 
banks, as Wilson's Wharf and Powhatan Reach, to aid us to clear out 
the river, open and keep it open. 

Can not you cooperate! In the meantime I will protect you from 
rebel operations in the river. 

Very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. Xorth Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-Geueral BENJ. F. BUTLEB, 

Commanding Department of Virginia and Sorth Carolina. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. JVary, to Acting Volunteer Lieu- 
tenant Foster, U. S. -Vary, commanding U. 8. 8. Commodore Perry, 
regarding convoy duty. 

FLAGSHIP MALVEBN, 

James Rirer, May 13, 1864. 

SIB: Hereafter, when any transport or light-armed vessel is passing 
to and from the tieet and Bermuda Hundred, you will get underway 
and convoy such vessel or vessels around Turkey Bend without further 
orders, the Hunchback to come up as far as Turkey Creek and the Perry 
to come down to a point within easy and convenient shelling distance 
from the bluff on the northern bank of that creek, so as to cover with 
cross fire the banks on the left bank of James River. When the con- 
voy coming up shall have passed the Perry, the Hunchback will fall 
back to her station, and when the convoy coming down the river passes 
the Hunchback the Perry will return. 

In convoying, the gunboats will have all hands to quarters and keep 
then- guns pointed upon suspicious points on the bank which may afford 
lurking places to sharpshooters. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE. 
Actg. Bear-Admiral, Comdg. Sorth Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant AMOS P. FOSTEB, 

f. '. S. 8. Commodore Perry, per Canonicu*. 

Duplicate to the Hunchback, per Lieutenant-Commander Blake, 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 53 

Report of Commander Parrott, U. S. Navy, regarding the securing of tor- 
pedoes in the river. 

U. S. S. CANONICUS, 
Turkey Bend, James River, May 13, 1864. 

SIR: Captain [A. P.] Foster, with my permission, first shelled the 
beach (which was the firing you heard) and then landed near the wreck 
of the Shawsheen, where he told me he had seen torpedoes and where 
he found seven large ones and brought them off. 
They were all loaded and rigged, ready for launching. 
Four others have been found afloat to-day near Bermuda Hundred, 
one of which was exploded without injuring anyone. I think an extra 
lookout would be well -to-night, and that the left bank in this vicinity 
should be thoroughly examined, which could be best done with the aid 
of the army. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. G. PARROTT, 

Commander. 
Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Memorandum of Commander Parrott, U. 8. Navy, regarding torpedoes. 

[MAY 13.] 

I send two torpedoes with their friction primers not yet exploded. 
They are floated by two small floats, and a slack line made fast to one 
of the floats leads to the wire attached to the primer. I do not think 
they would certainly explode by floating against a vessel, but a vessel 
underway would set them off". 

Two contrabands came off this morning; one is from a farm near, 
and stupid; the other, a Virginia negro, was captured from us at 
Harper's Ferry and has since been with the rebels. He says a negro 
who knows where torpedoes are placed was on the point of coming off 
with him, but was afraid there would be no boat. I think of sending 
him to-night for this man, if you do not disapprove. 

There is said to be a collection of canoes in Turkey Creek, which I 
would like to get when I can see my way clear. 
Respectfully, 

E. G. PARROTT, 

Commander. 

Admiral LEE. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Blake, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports 
regarding the discovery and explosion of a torpedo. 

U. S. S. EUTAW, 

Off Bermuda Hundred, May 13, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to enclose the report of Acting Master John W. 
Dicks, of the U. S. S. Pink, concerning the discovery and explosion of 
a torpedo near his vessel this morning. During the night I had two 
boats from 200 to 300 yards abead of the vessels, with directions to 
critically examine every floating object. This torpedo appears to have 



54 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

escaped their notice, as it reached us about slack water flood. I am 
now examiiiiug every floating object that passes, in order to prevent 
any disaster from them. Since writing the above another torpedo has 
been taken out of the water by a boat from the U. S. S. Hunchback. 
Enclosed is Acting Master R. G. Lee's report respecting the same. 

The officer commanding the pickets on shore reported a number of 
rebel cavalry reconnoitering the right bank of the river. I fired a few 
shell at them, whereupon they retired from the locality. I am informed 
that a dispatch boat arrives daily from Fortress Monroe at 4 o'clock. 
I shall have a boat at (he dock on her arrival to receive any dispatches 
which she may have for you, and will forward them to you by an officer 
over the land, except you may be pleased to direct otherwise. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HOMER C. BLAKE, 
Lieutenant- Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. PINK, 

Off Bermuda Hundred, May 13, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that this morning about 5 o'clock the 
officer of the deck had his attention directed to a piece of board drift- 
ing toward this vessel. It was about '2 feet long and 1 foot in width, 
evidently having something attached to it. We threw a small fishing 
line over it, and held it until we lowered a boat and made a small line 
fast to it and towed it about 30 feet from this vessel, when it exploded, 
without injury to this vessel or the boat. The torpedo was of tin, about 
15 or 18 inches in diameter and about 2 feet in length, and in shape 
much like a milk can. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN W. DICKS, 

Acting Master, U. 8. Navy, Commanding U. JS. 8. Pink. 
Lieutenant-Commander H. C. BLAKE, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Eutaw. 



U. S. S. HUNCHBACK, 

Off City Point, James River, Virginia, May 13, 1864. 
SIR: I have the honor to report to you the success of capturing a 
large torpedo in this river as it was floating down in a direct line for 
this vessel. 

The can contained about 75 pounds of fine rifle powder, which was in 
a perfectly dry state when the can was opened. 
I send you the can, together with a sample of powder in it. 
I would particularly call your attention to Acting Master's Mat<> 
Carleton A. Trundy, of this vessel, he being the ofh'cer in charge of om 
third cutter at the time the torpedo was taken from the river, his 
coolness and caution being a fine example for others engaged iu taking 
up these infernal machines. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ROBERT G. LEE, 
Acting Master, Commanding U. 8. 8. Hunchback. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 55 

Order of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Renshaw, U. 8. 
Navy, regarding plan of attack upon the C. 8. Earn Albemarle. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Albemarle Sound, May 13, 1864. 

SIR: I shall drop down to-inorrow with the Wyalusing to the mouth 
of the Perquimans Eiver, for the purpose of deceiving the enemy as to 
our effective force, and leave you to guard the entrance of the Roanoke 
and Cashie rivers with the Miami, Commodore Barney, Commodore 
Hull, and Ceres. 

Should the Albemarle make his appearance, you will commence 
retreating until you get sight of our vessels, that the ram and his con- 
sort may be enticed -into the sound, where we will have room to 
maneuver. 

Do not on any account attempt to engage in the river, as his guns 
[are] as heavy as yours and are equal in range, and it is already proved 
to our satisfaction that our shot can not injure him very materially at 
close quarters. 

His next effort will perhaps be to outgeneral us by slipping by in the 
night from the mouth of the Cashie, which must be strictly guarded, 
particularly at night. 

I will send a coal vessel up as soon as one arrives, and you will dis 
charge her with all possible dispatch, endorsing her bills of lading so 
soon as her hold is swept, enclosing one to the paymaster at New Berne. 

A plan of attack in the event of the Albemarle 9 s making her appear- 
ance is herewith enclosed. 

After making a second reconnoissance, endeavor to place the fish net 
above the torpedoes. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Commander E. T. EENSHAW, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Miami. 

[Enclosure.] 
First position. 

Mattabesett. 

Wyalusiug. 

Tacouy. Ram. 

Miami. 

Commodore Barney. 

Ceres. 

The first line is to fire once when ram is forward of beam and once 
when right abeam. 

The second line in passing is only to fire when the ram is abeam and 
once after passing forward of beam. 

Second position. 
Mattabesett. 
Wyalusing. 
Tacony. 

Miami. 
Earn. Commodore Barney. 

Ceres. 
Smaller steamers to attack ram's consort, Hull and Ceres. 



56 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Near Bermuda Hundred, May 14, 1864 3 p. m. 

(Received 1:30 a. in. 15th.) 

The cavalry corps of Major-General Sheridan of the Potomac army 
has just arrived at Turkey Island, left bank. They left with 17,000 
men ; lost heavily on the way, and came from Mechanicsville yesterday. 
Their timely appearance will relieve us from sharpshooters and facili 
tate our operations now in progress for clearing out torpedoes. 

S. P. LEE, 

Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Parrott, 
V. S. Navy, acknowledging memorandum regarding torpedoes. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 

James River, May 14, 1864. 
SIR : Your memorandum (no date) is received. 

Break up the canoes in Turkey Creek and any other boats you uiay 
find. If you can bring off the negro who has information about tor- 
pedoes, do so. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander E. G. PARROTT, 

U. S. S. Canonicus. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Parrott, 
U. S. Navy, regarding a search for torpedoes. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, Virginia, May 14, 1864. 

SIR: The arrival of our troops on the left bank affords an excellent 
opportunity to search the shore of Turkey Bend, Turkey Creek, and 
the left bank thence to Bermuda Hundred for torpedoes, boats, etc., all 
of which should be destroyed. The five torpedoes found in that vicin- 
ity were doubtless placed in the river there by boats, and the seven 
torpedoes found at Turkey Island wharf by the Perry were, no doubt, 
intended to be used in the same way. 
Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain PARROTT, 

U. S. S. Canonicus. 

P. S. Send particulars, if you have them, from General Sheridan's 
corps. Malvern remains to protect ordnance and coal schooners in 
Curies Reach. My flag is on Agawam. The Tecumseh and Onondaga 
follow up to-morrow morning. We are moving up, fishing out torpedoes 
as we go. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 57 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Quackenbush, U. 8. Navy, regarding 
the position of vessels for the protection of Fort Powhatan. 

U. S. S. PEQUOT, 

Off Fort Poichatan, James River, May 14, 1864. 

SIR : Your communicatioii of the 10th instant, directing me to remain 
in the position assigned by you for the protection of the army occupa- 
tion of Fort Powhatan, has been received. The Dawn is stationed off 
Wilson's Wharf, but the distance thereto is too great for signals to be 
distinguished and read. As you, perhaps, were not fully aware of the 
distance between the two places, 1 will not remove the Dawn from her 
present position until I receive further orders from you. The present 
stations occupied by th.e vessels here for the protection of Fort Pow- 
hatan and Wilson's Wharf are as good as can be selected. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant Gushing, 
U. *S. Navy, regarding proposed operations against the C. 8. 8. Raleigh. 

U. S. FLAGSHIP MALVERN, . 

James River, May 14, 1864. 

SIR: Your communication of the 9th instant was received last night. 
I applaud the spirit manifested by you and heartily approve your 
purpose to destroy the ram as the opportunity may ofl'er. 

Apply to the senior officer present, to whom show this communica- 
tion, to furnish you with volunteers to make, with your own crew, the 
number of 100 men you require for making the attempt in the harbor. 
As to the outside operation, if the rani can be toled out and under 
favor of rough weather one of her ends mounted by a vessel with a 
sloping stem, I think the ram would sink. 

I enclose you a copy ot my instructions to Captain Smith respecting 
fighting the ironclad ram Albemarle, which would suit propellers better 
than side-wheel gunboats. 

Wishing you complete success, I am, 
Respectfully, vours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant W. B. GUSHING, 

7. 8. 8. Monticello. 



Report of Acting Master Foster, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Geres, 
regarding an expedition to Alligator River. 

U. S. S. CERES, 
Albemarle Sound, May 14, 1864. 

SIR : In obedience to your order I proceeded on the 12th instant with 
the U. S. S. Ceres under my command to the mouth of the Alligator 
River, where 1 anchored at 6: 30 p.m. On the 13th instant, at 4: 45 



58 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

a. in., I was joined by the steamer Rocldand with 100 soldiers on board ; 
we proceeded in company to Simmoud's Mill, on the Little Alligator, 
5 miles from its mouth. I there found the schooner Ann S. Davenport, 
of 45 tons, of Plymouth, N. C., said by the persons living at the mill to 
belong to Samuel S. Simmonds, of Columbia, N. C., whom I understand 
to be a notorious rebel, having taken the oath of loyalty to the U. S. 
Government and violated the same. There were about 7,000 feet of 
yellow pine lumber in the vessel; we could find no papers belonging to 
her. 

I landed with a party of men, accompanied by 40 soldiers, for the 
purpose of disabling the mill, as I learned from the miller that they had 
lately been engaged in grinding corn for the rebels. I removed por- 
tions of the engine to the steamer Rockland, to be taken to lloanoke 
Island. I caused about 100 bushels of corn to be taken from the mill 
and put on board the schooner. I destroyed one large flat used for 
transporting grain. I sent the Rocldand with the schooner in tow to 
the mouth of the river, and followed down shortly after; anchored the 
schooner at the mouth of Little Alligator in charge of 30 soldiers and 
started for Gum Neck, in company with the Rocldand, where wo arrived 
at (5 p. m.; found Gum Neck Landing and warehouse destroyed by the 
rebels. The captain in charge of the soldiers desired to return. As we 
could hear nothing of the barges mentioned by you in your order, I 
came to the conclusion that they were in the canal (leading to Fairfield 
from the Alligator), which is too narrow to admit this vessel. I returned 
to the mouth of the Alligator, found the weather too hazy to cross the 
shoal; came to anchor there. At 4:30 this morning got underway, 
joined the fleet, and reported to you. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. II. FOSTER, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 

Captain MELANCTON SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Naval Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



[Telegram.] 

DEEP BOTTOM, JAMES RIVER, May 15, 1864 Noon, 

(Via Jamestown loth. Received 7 : 20 p. m.) 

Please send submarine operators, prepared with divers and other 
apparatus and means for removing obstructions and raising torpedoes 
weighing upward of a ton, or blowing them up. 

VVe are busy taking up torpedoes. Gettysburg left several days since. 
Lieutenant Lamsou detained and has charge of my picket and torpedo 
division. The Grand Gulf has captured the Young Republic on her 
first trip out of Wilmington. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. G. WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AG-AWAM, 

Deep Bottom, via Bermuda Hundred, May 15, 180 i 10 a. m. 
Your telegram received. Flag-of-truceOfficer Norris, from Richmond, 
told Lieutenant Lamson, Navy, their ironcla<ls would be down in a few 
days with great ramming power. Shall be ready for them. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 59 

We find many torpedoes here. We> want to follow up the torpedoes 
by the wires, so don't break them if you can [not] explode them. 

Richmond extra, of 2 p. m. Saturday, 14th instant, says General 
Grant fought them a great battle on Thursday last. Never before such 
vim and bravery on our part on Virginia soil. We captured prisoners 
and artillery from them and had the most killed and wounded, as they 
were behind breastworks and we fought in the open field. This is their 
account; they only claim _J,000 of our wounded captured at the Wilder- 
ness. No other prisoners. They say our men bayoneted theirs behind 
their breastworks. 

I think they have lost largely in prisoners. It was great fighting on 
the p.irt of our Army. They say General Grant is intrenched before 
them and will not fall back. No fighting Friday. 
Yours, truly, 

S. P. LEE. 

General BUTLER. 

We are working up the river hard. 

L. 



[Telegram.] 

DEEP BOTTOM, JAMES RIVER, May 15, 1864 12 m. 
(Via Fortress Monroe, 1 p. in., 10th Received 1 : 30 p. m.) 
Major-General Butler, who, I hear, is attacking Fort Drewry, informs 
me tiiat the rebels are removing their obstructions above Drewry's 
Bluff. Rebel flag-of- truce officer told Lamson yesterday afternoon the 
rebel ironclads, well fitted for ramming, would be down in a few days. 
Three ironclads here and Canonicus coming from Turkey Bend. Com- 
mand in fine spirits. 

S. P. LEE, 

Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Foster, U. S. Navy, regarding the 
destruction of boats in Turkey Greek. 

TJ. S. S. COMMODORE PERRY, 
James Ricer, Virginia, May 15, 1864. 

SIR : In obedience to your order I sent two cutters at 9 a. m. this day, 
with 11 men in each cutter, up Turkey Creek for the purpose of destroy- 
ing or bringing out all the boats that might be found there. 

The boats were under the charge of Acting Ensign James W. Turner, 
the executive officer of this vessel. 

Mr. Turner went as far up the creek as possible and found twenty- 
six small boats (some of them with rowlocks muffled) and one large 
decked barge, about 150 tons, and one large raft. 

He also found a boat building establishment in which were seven 
boats building. 

Three of these boats were just framed and others were nearly com 
pleted. 



60 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Mr. Turner deemed it expedient to destroy all these crafts by breaking 
them up, which he did very effectually. 
The large barge he destroyed by lire. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

AMOS P. FOSTER, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Commander E. G. PARROTT, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. Ironclad Canonicus, James River, Virginia. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Watmough, U. S. Navy, regarding the 
capture of the blockade runner Tristram Shandy. 

U. S. S. KANSAS, 

At Sea, May 15, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report the capture of the British blockade 
runner Tristram Shandy this morning at 4 : 15 a. m. in latitude 34 6' 
N., longitude 77 21' W., after a chase of two hours. At about 2 a. m. 
we were standing inshore on station No. 2, off New Inlet. The night 
was dark, rendered more so by the approach of a heavy squall from the 
S. W. During the flashes of lightning I saw the column of smoke 
from a steamer turning over the bar and judged she intended standing 
along the beach to the northward. I endeavored to cut her off, running- 
parallel to the shore, but owing to the intense darkness could not dis- 
cover her. Being in doubt as to her course after leaving the bar, I 
stood out at full speed E. by N. At the end of an hour and a half I had 
the satisfaction to discover her black smoke on port beam, and as day 
broke found she was within range. One shot from our forecastle pivot 
falling near, she stopped. On boarding her we found that the steam 
valve stem was disabled. The chief engineer from this vessel went on 
board and reported that her fires would have to be hauled before it 
could be repaired, so I determined to tow her to Beaufort, being 20 
miles on the way. She has a cargo of 500 bales of cotton, 111 boxes 
tobacco, and 5 barrels turpentine. Her log shows runs by the day of 
12.4 and 13 knots per hour, and the captain claims he is the fastest of 
the new steamers. The Connecticut and Niphon have chased her on 
different occasions, and she bears the mark in her guard of a bolt from 
a 30- pounder of the Niphon. 

BEAUFORT, May 16. We arrived here last night with our tow and I 
hope to complete the repairs on her valves and dispatch the steamer to 
Boston by the 20th. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PEND. G. WATMOUGH, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy, Washington. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Watmough, U. 8. Navy, regarding engi- 
neers/or the Tristram Shandy. 

U. S. S. KANSAS, 
Beaufort, N. C., May 1(1, 186-1. 

SIR : Having heard that foreigners caught in prizes were being 
released upon their arrival at the North, I determined to send David 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 61 

Houston, first engineer of the Tristram Shandy, home in her, he being 
an Englishman and having signed an agreement to serve faithfully on 
condition that he be discharged on his arrival at Boston. I did this, 
as I did not want to strip this vessel of engineers, having sent one 
in her. 
Hoping this will meet the approval of the Department, 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PEND. G. WATMOUGH, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Hear- Admiral Lee, U. S. 
Navy, transmitting copy of instructions regarding persons found on 
blockade runners. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 16, 1864. 

SIR: I have received your No. 302, relative to 5 persons captured in 
the schooner Indian. 

The order to detain all British blockade violators is revoked, and you 
will be guided by the instructions in the enclosed copy of a letter to 
Kear- Admiral Farragut, dated the 9th instant. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Eear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

[Enclosure.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 9, 1864. 

SIR : The following instructions will hereafter be observed with 
regard to the disposition of persons found on board vessels seized for 
breach of blockade : 

1st. Bona fide foreign subjects captured in neutral vessels, whether 
passengers, officers, or crew, can not be treated as prisoners of war 
unless guilty of belligerent acts, but are entitled to immediate release. 
Such as are required as witnesses may be detained for that purpose, and 
when their testimony is secured they must be unconditionally released. 

2d. Foreign subjects captured in vessels without papers or colors, or 
those sailing under the protection and flag of the insurgent Govern- 
ment or employed in the service of that Government, are subject to 
treatment as prisoners of war, and if in the capacity of officers or crew 
are to be detained. If they were passengers only, and have no interest 
in the vessel or cargo and are in no way connected with the insurgent 
Government, they may be released. 

3d. Citizens of the United States captured either in neutral or rebel 
vessels are always to be detained, with the following exceptions : If they 
are passengers only, have no interest in vessel or cargo, have not been 
active in the rebellion or engaged in supplying the insurgents with 
munitions of war, etc., and are loyally disposed, they may be released 
on taking the oath of allegiance. The same privilege may be allowed 
to any of the crew that are not seafaring men, of like antecedents, and 
who are loyally disposed. 

4th. Pilots and seafaring men, excepting bona fide foreign subjects, 
captured in neutral vessels are always to be detained. These are the 



62 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

principal instruments in maintaining the system of violating the block- 
ade and it is important to hold them. Persons habitually engaged in 
violating the blockade, although they may not be serving on board the 
vessels, are of this class and are to be likewise detained. 

5th. When there is reason to doubt that those who claim to be foreign 
subjects are in reality such, they will be required to state under oath 
that they have never been naturalized in this country, have never exer- 
cised the privileges of a citizen thereof by voting or otherwise, and 
have never been in the pay or employment of the insurgent or the 
so-called Confederate Government. On their making such statement 
they may be released, provided you have not evidence of their having 
sworn falsely. The examination in cases that are doubtful should be 
rigid. 

6th. When the neutrality of a vessel is doubtful, or when a vessel 
claiming to be neutral is believed to be engaged in transporting sup- 
plies and munitions of war for the insurgent Government, foreign sub- 
jects captured in such vessel may be detained until the neutrality of 
the vessel is satisfactorily established. It is not advisable to detain 
such persons under this instruction unless there is good ground for 
doubting the neutrality of the vessel. 

7th. Parties who may be detained under the foregoing instructions 
are to be sent to a Northern port for safer custody, unless there is a 
suitable place for keeping them within the limits of your command, 
and the Department furnished with a memorandum in their cases, 
respectively. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Bear- Admiral D. G. FARRAGUT, 

Commanding West Gulf Blockading Squadron, New Orleans. 



[Telegram sent.] 

U. S. FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

Above Aiken's, James River, Virginia, May 16, 18<i4 2 p. m. 
We have taken up torpedoes in Deep Bottom and Dutch Gap, and 
are removing, not placing, obstructions in the rivers. 

Heavy firing near Drewry's Bluff from 2 to 8 o'clock this morning. 
Sheridan's cavalry are crossing from left to right bank to join Gen- 
eral Butler. 
All well. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

/Secretary of the Navy. 



[Telegram received.] 



FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Above AiJcen's Landing, James River, May 16, 1864 2 p. m. 

(lieceived at Washington 4 p. m., May 18.) 

We have taken up torpedoes in Deep Bottom and Dutch (lap, and 
are removing, placing obstructions in the river. Heavy firing near 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 63 

Drewry's Bluff from 2 a. in. to 8 a. m. this morning. Sheridan's cav- 
alry are crossing from left to right bank to join General Butler. All 
well. 

S. P. LEE, 

Acting Hear -Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Upshur, U. 8. Navy, regarding marines for picket duty in the James 
River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, May 16, 1864. 

SIR: Send me all the marines from the Minnesota, retaining a ser- 
geant's guard for the use of the Minnesota, in charge of the young 
marine officer, and with good noncommissioned officers. Have them 
armed and equipped for picket duty. 

Send me also about 50 of the transferred array men to do duty as 
pickets, drawing for them the improved short Sharps rifle from Captain 
Lynch. 

Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear -Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander J. H. UPSHUR, 

U. 8. 8. Minnesota. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, requesting to be supplied 
with facilities for ramming. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

Aikerfs Landing, James River, Virginia, May 16, 1864. 
SIR : Captain Smith earnestly asks that a fast tug with an improvised 
prod be sent to him for the purpose of destroying the ram with less 
expense and sacrifice than by wooden gunboats. 

I request that a half dozen of these prodders be fitted for this squad- 
ron two for the sounds and the rest for James River and Wilmington. 
Captain Smith also asks for two good vessels, capable of ramming, 
even if without guns. I hope these will be sent to him, and one or two 
more double-enders. Earns are of great importance; such as that of 
the Keokuk, or other improved under-surface prod. Please send me 
some rams. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE. 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, 



64 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Acting Bear-Admiral Lee, If. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Cressy, U. S. Navy, commanding U. IS. IS. Malvcrn, regard- 
ing duty to be performed by that vessel. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, Virginia, May 17, 1864. 

SIR: When the ordnance and coal schooners are removed you will 
take a favorable position below Tilman's [Tilghman's] Wharf to enable 
you to assist in covering the reach around Jones' Neck. When the 
Eutaw comes up she will be in this reach above Deep Bottom. You 
must keep pickets out and be ready to move and light quick and not 
be surprised in anyway. 
.Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. K. CRESSY, 

U. S. S. Malrern. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, requesting reimburse- 
ment for loss to the officers and men late of the U. S. S. Commodore 
Jones. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, May 17, 1864. 

SIR: I would respectfully call the attention of the Department to 
the case of the officers and men late of the U. S. S. Commodore Jones, 
which was destroyed by a torpedo on the 6th instant. 

A very large proportion of them were wounded and are now in hos- 
pital at Norfolk. They lost all their personal effects, and I request that 
measures may be taken when practicable to reimburse them for these 
losses. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trent's Reach, May 17, 1864 6 p. m. 

(Via Fortress Monroe, 5 p. in., May 21. Keceived 5: 40 p. m.) 
Nothing special in Richmond papers of yesterday. General Butler 
last night reoccupied his line from this reach to Appoinattox. Moni- 
tors on his right flank. 

Navy advance division searched for torpedoes until they came under 
fire of the rebel earthworks about Chaffin's Bluff. The new tugs need 
efficient batteries. More vessels with effective batteries needed to 
keep open my communications, Sheridan's cavalry having withdrawn 
from left bank. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 65 

Letter from Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Major- General 
Butler j U. 8. Army, requesting an opinion as to a military and naval 
advance in James River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trent's Reach, May 17, 1864 9 a. m. 

GENERAL: Your note, dated 13th, was received by me last uight. 
The gunboats are now off Hewlett's and at lower Dutch Gap, dealing 
with torpedoes, of which we are discovering many large ones. The 
only difficulty about landing your supplies at Hewlett's house will be 
keeping open the river communication from attack from the left bank 
on Turkey Island Eeach, Jones' Neck, and Lower Dutch Gap. A point 
over these reaches should be occupied, as at Wilson's and Powhatan, or 
picketed, and in either event flanked by gunboats. The bushes along 
the bank which serve to conceal the enemy should be cut down. In 
this way the two services will support each other, each performing its 
appropriate part, and our communications can be kept open. 

The late heavy rains have made a freshet in the river, as indicated 
by the discolored water and drift which came down yesterday. In the 
afternoon we discovered the torpedoes above the bar in Trent's Beach, 
and sounded that bar and found enough water for the monitors to pass 
over in the x>resent state of the river. 

Hearing that we are now above your right flank, I desire to know 
your views as to a military and naval advance, as I prefer not to place 
the monitors above the bar in Trent's Reach until the freshet subsides 
and the usual depth on the bar can be ascertained, unless there is 
meanwhile a necessity for doing so. 

Permit me to suggest that it will promote the public service if you 
can conveniently keep up communication with me and apprise me of 
your movements. 

I send this to General Terry's headquarters, with the request to have 
it forwarded at once to you. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General B. F. BUTLER. 



Report of Lieutenant Lamson, U. 8. Navy, regarding a search for torpe- 
does near Howletfs Battery. 

U. S. S. STEPPING STONES, 

Off Cox's Wharf, James River, Virginia, May 17, 1864 5 p. m. 
SIR : I have the honor to report that I got underway with the tor- 
pedo division at daylight this morning, in obedience to your orders, 
and proceeded to raise the torpedoes found in the narrow channel 
opposite Hewlett's. 

The wires from these torpedoes led to the right bank of the river, 
where the galvanic battery by which they were to be exploded was 
placed. 

We succeeded in raising one torpedo, containing 1,000 or 1,200 pounds 

of powder, but the line parted while raising the second, and it sunk 

again to the bottom. The wires, however, had been detached close to 

it, and as it sunk in 8 fathoms of water, where it would be perfectly 

N w R VOL 10 5 



66 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

harmless, I moved up to clear the reaches above, knowing your great 
desire to get the fleet up as fast as possible. I searched the banks and 
dragged the bed of the river carefully, but found no evidence of tor- 
pedoes till we reached a point about 3 miles below Chapin's [Chaffin's] 
Bluff (Fort Chapin), where, in a ravine on the right bank, there had 
evidently been a torpedo station, and an old negro informed me that 
the torpedoes were still somewhere in that reach. 

While searching for them the enemy opened fire on us from a line of 
heavy earthworks on a high ridge above us and distant about 2,000 
yards. 

The first shell passed directly over this vessel and fell in the water; 
the second burst over the vessels, wounding one man on board the 
Tritonia. Their firing was very accurate, almost every shell bursting 
over the boats. 

Soon after 1 received an order from Commander [Ed. T.j Nichols, of 
the Mendota, to drop the light vessels of my division out of range, and 
while this was being done I proceeded up nearly half a mile farther 
with the small boats, searching for the torpedo lines, but without 
success. 

A party of the enemy's cavalry moving to cut off my picket party 
ashore, which was some distance in advance of the boats, I recalled 
them and took them down to the vessels. 

From the best information I can get, and from the position, I am 
quite confident there are torpedoes in the reach commanded by this 
battery, but feel quite sure we can get them or destroy the lines by 
which they are to be exploded. These earthworks are on the high 
ground below Fort Chapin [Chaffm?], with their right on the left bank 
of the river, and extending back nearly at a right angle to it. From 
the nearest view obtained six gnus were visible, but there were sev- 
eral more embrasures. The parapets seemed to be quite heavy and the 
guns 8-inch siege guns or long 32s. 

The torpedo raised this morning is like those found yesterday at 
Dutch Gap. 

My officers and men have shown the most commendable zeal in the 
laborious duty assigned them. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. H. LAMSON, 
Lieut., Comdg. Torpedo and Picket Division, James River Fleet. 

Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Lamson, 

U. 8. Navy, regarding the distribution of additional force for the picket 

division. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trent's Reach, James River, May 17, 1864. 

SIR: Captain Sanderson, Third Pennsylvania Artillery, will report 
herewith to Commander Nichols for duty in your picket division with 
a command of 120 men, detailed to this squadron for picket duty. 

Distribute these men equally upon the Stepping Stones, Delaware, 
Tritonia, and Commodore Morris, and employ them on the service for 
which they are intended. Send back by the Pink the marines belong- 
ing to the various vessels, unless you require them. I do not contem- 
plate a further movement until I have heard from General Butler, and 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 67 

the advance can either remain working at the torpedoes at upper Dutch 
Gap or drop down here by night, as Commander Nichols and you may 
think best. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant LAMSON, U. S. Navy, 

James River Torpedo Fleet. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Glitz, 
U. S. Navy, regarding positions of vessels in the James River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trent's Reach, James River, May 17, 1864. 

SIB : Take the Eutaw's place and desire Lieutenant-Commander Blake 
to choose a position to command the left bank around Turkey Island 
Beach, say about or above where the Canonicus was. The Commodore 
Perry is now in that reach. The Hunchback should be somewhere 
between the Osceola and Commodore Perry. All four vessels should 
have pickets ashore night and day, to keep concealed as much as pos- 
sible and to retire to their boats and vessels and give alarm, warning 
by preconcerted signals of the approach and character of the enemy. 

If the vessels are not underway all night, holding position under 
steam, they should be so immediately on notice of the approach of the 
enemy. 

I wish you to see that 3,000 tons of coal are kept at City Point. 
Write to Captain Gansevoort about it, and say I want him and the 
fleet paymaster, who is on the Minnesota, to send it up promptly, and 
to communicate by telegraph with the Bureau and Commodore Adams 
and keep up the supply. 

Send the Pink to Captain Gansevoort for her armament, as I ordered 
several days since, and desire him to send her back as soon as she gets 
it, and if it is not ready, to use her meanwhile to tow up supplies. 

I shall send for the ordnance schooner at Newport News and the one 
at City Point. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Stockading Squadron. 

Commander J. M. B. GLITZ, 

U. S. 8. Osceola. 

P. S. I will send Mr. Evans to pilot the Pequot up, and instructions 
for Commander Quackenbush to relieve the Eutaw, when Lieutenant- 
Commander Blake will proceed to cover Jones' Neck Reach with the 
Eutaw and Malvern. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trent's Reach, May 18, 1864 4 p. m. 

(Received 5: 40 p. m., May 19.) 

At daylight this morning the enemy were seen intrenching the heights 
at Howlett's house, commanding Trent's Reach. They persevered vig- 



68 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

orously under gunboats' fire, and will erect guns to-night. Monitors 
can not reach them. Beauinont, commanding Mackinaw, reports his 
pickets driven in at Dutch Gap Height, lower side, and rebel artillery 
getting into position there. Eutaw, Blake commanding, from City 
Point, reports army pickets driven in there. My communications much 
threatened. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear -Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

MAY 18, 1864. 

Can you not put your guns on the right of our line, just this side of 
Hewlett's house, so as to get a tire on the enemy in case of an advance? 

B. F. BUTLER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 
llear-Admiral S. P. LEE. 



[Telegram.] 

GUNBOAT SIGNAL STATION, 
James River, May 18, 1864 1:15 p. m. 

I am firing on the house and barn. They are covered from the gun- 
boat tire, and it will take land artillery to attack them. 

LEE, 

Admiral. 
General GILLMORE. 



[Telegram.] 

U. S. S. AGAWAM, 

James River, Trent's Reach, May 18, 1864 3:30 p. m. 
Your dispatch answered by signal corps. Enemy vigorously intrench- 
ing on the heights at Hewlett's under a destructive tire from gunboats. 
They will doubtless mount guns to-night to command Trent's Reach ; 
only a land attack can dislodge them, lii ver tailing; careful soundings 
to-day show the monitors can not cross the bar. 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 
Major-General B. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department Virginia and North Carolina. 

P. S. 4 p. m.: The rebel artillery has appeared on the heights at 
Dutch Gap. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 



[Telegram.] 

FIRST DIVISION SIGNAL STATION, 

May 18, 1864 4 p. m. 

The enemy are working on intrenchmeuts near Hewlett's house, with- 
out our gunboats disabling their men. They will mount guns to-night. 

S. P. LEE. 
General BUTLER. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 69 

[Telegram.] 

MAY 18, 1864. 
(Received 5:35 p. m.) 

The naval pickets were driven in at Lower Dutch Gap. and the rebel 
artillery is getting in position there. 

. LEE, 

Admiral. 
Generals BUTLER and GILLMORE. 



MAY 18, 1864. 
(Received 5:35 p. m.) 

Can not the enemy be prevented from mounting- guns at Hewlett's 
to-night by a land attack? 

LEE, 

Admiral. 
Generals BUTLER and GILLMORE. 



Report of Commander Glitz, U. 8. Navy, transmitting information regard- 
ing the advance of the enemy and order issued in view thereof. 

U. S. S. OSCEOLA, 

Turkey Bend, James River, May 18, 1864. 

ADMIRAL: I herewith enclose yov. a communication from Brigadier - 
General Graham, U. S. Army, and a copy of my orders to [Acting] 
Volunteer Lieutenant A. P. Foster, commanding U. S. S. Commodore 
Perry. 

I hope my action in the matter will meet with your approval. 
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

J. M. B. GLITZ, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 

[Enclosures.] 

ON BOAHD PARKE, May 18, 1864 12:30 p. m. 

CAPTAIN: The rebels are advancing to attack Brigadier-General 
Hinks on the City Point side. The gunboats have bee:i shelling their 
batteries. It is probable a spirited tight will take place later in the 
day. 

The Shokokon is almost out of coal and has only one rudder. I under- 
stand that a new one to replace it has been sent to you. If you agree 
with me, [ would suggest that she be relieved by the Commodore Perry 
immediately. Am I not right in supposing that the Perry's battery is 
the heaviest? 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHARLES K. GRAHAM, 

Brigadier- General. 
Commander J. M. B. GLITZ, 

U. 8. 8. Osceola. 



70 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

U. S. S. OSCEOLA, 

Turkey Bend, James River, May 18, 1864. 

SIR: You will proceed immediately up the Appomattox River and 
relieve the U. S. S. Shokokon; the Shokokon to fill up with coal at once 
from the coal schooner off City Point, and when coaled to take the 
station now occupied by the Commodore Perry at Bermuda Hundred. 

On your arrival iu the Appomattox you will communicate with Briga- 
dier General Graham, U. S. Army. 

Please show this order to the commanding officer of the Sliokokon. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. M. B. GLITZ, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant A. P. FOSTER, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Commodore Perry, Bermuda Hundred. 



Order of Commander Davenport, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer Lieu- 
tenant Graves, U. 8. Navy, to proceed on a tour of inspection to 
Pamlico River. 

U. S. S. HETZEL, 

Off New Berne, N. C., May 18, 1864. 

JSiR: Proceed with the U. S. S. Lockicood under your command to 
the Pauilico River, inspecting as you proceed the various creeks aud 
bays on the route. On your arrival there you will cruise up and down 
the river, picking up such refugees as may desire to come to New Berne, 
aud doing your best to prevent the enemy from erecting batteries. 

Run no unnecessary risk, and, if nothing of importance occurs, 
remain there until relieved. 
Respectfully, yours, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy, and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant G. W. GRAVES, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Lock-wood. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Roe, U. S. Navy, regarding completion 
of repairs to the U. 8. 8. Sassacus. 

U. S. S. SASSACUS, 

Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina, May 18, 1864. 

SiE: I respectfully report that I have this day been able to start fires 
and get steam into the port boiler of this vessel. All the repairs that 
can be made outside of a navy yard are completed. The port boiler is 
tender, but I think it may take me north in safety, with care. By order 
of Commander Davenport I am discharging the schooner 8. C. Grove 
into a light-draft one from New Berne, and will dispatch her to you at 
the earliest moment. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. A. ROE, 

Lieutenant- Comm ander. 
Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Commanding Naval Forces, Albemarle Sound, North Carolina. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 71 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trends Reach, May 19, 1864 4 p. m. 

(Via Fortress Monroe, Va., May 21 Received 4:40 p. in.) 
Two monitors practicing on rebel earthworks at Hewlett's. Enemy 
intrenched before our army line here. A man from Richmond to day 
reports no fighting beyond Richmond. Great scarcity of provisions 
there. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Lieutenant-Commander Braine, U. S. Navy, of arrival at 
Beaufort, N. G., towing the U. S. schooner Oliver H. Lee. 

U. S. S. VlCKSBURG, 

Beaufort, N. C., May 19, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that on May 17, whilst cruising 
100 miles south of Frying Pan Shoals, in latitute 31 46' N., longitude 
77 40' W., I fell in with the U. S. mui\ar schooner Oliver H. Lee, com- 
manded by Acting Ensign Douglass F. O'Brien. He was from Pensa- 
cola, bound to JSew York. I found he was leaking badly from the 
effects of an old shot hole, he having experienced a heavy gale of wind. 
As he deemed himself in want of assistance and feared to proceed 
upon his voyage, at his request I towed to this port. 1 avail myself of 
tliis opportunity to remedy some slight defects of machinery and return 
immediately to complete my cruise. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. L. BRAINE, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, 
U. S. Navy, responding to a request for facilities for ramming. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 20, 1864. 

SIR: Your dispatch, dated May 10, Aiken's Landing, James River, 
Virginia, is received, asking for one fast tug with an improved prod 
for Captain Smith; also six similar ones for your squadron; also two 
good vessels for ramming for Captain Smith, even without guns, niid 
one or two double-euders and some rams for yourself. 

The Ordnance Bureau has nearly ready ten torpedoes, which can 
easily be applied to any tug, and these will be sent to you. The Depart- 
ment has no rams especially as such, though the bow of the monitors 
is fitted especially for that purpose. A double ender striking an object 
at 13 knots speed has a momentum equal to a solid 800-pound shot 
going 1,300 feet per second, but it must be a fair blow. You have all 
the tugs belonging to Rear- Admiral Farragut, also all his ironclads 
and double-enders, and must reinforce the sounds from this force. 



72 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

In tbe early part of the war the Department prepared a cigar boat, 
which has been copied by the rebels, but, as you are aware, the officers 
could make no use of it, although it had a speed of 7 knots and barely 
showed above water. There was also prepared at nearly $100,000 
expense a large number of torpedo rafts, some of which are now lying 
at the Norfolk navy yard, which experimentally performed most suc- 
cessfully, though they could not be kept on the bow of a vessel in a 
seaway. All these appliances are thrown aside at great expense and 
calls made for other machines, although the Department has conferred 
full authority upon commanders of squadrons to construct and prepare 
anything of the kind they deem necessary or advantageous, and in the 
sounds of North Carolina your dispatches show that considerable 
progress was made relative to the preparation of torpedoes. 

A telegram has been sent to New York to tit a vessel with a prow 
under water to be sent to Captain Smith. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Letter from Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Major- General 
Butler, U. S. Army, requesting a conference regarding the situation 
in the James River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trends Reach, May 20, 186410 a. m. 

GENERAL : I leave now to inspect my lines, hence to Bermuda Hun- 
dred, where I propose to wait a while in hopes of meeting you. A con- 
ference appears to be desirable, in order that a full understanding may 
be had as to the present and probable situation and proper plans made 
therefor. 

I send this to the commanding officer of the picket force at General 
Terry's late headquarters, with the request to send it to you by mounted 
messenger. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major General B. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department Virginia and North Carolina. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding the practicability of 
raising guns, etc., from the wrecks of Albemarle Sound. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 

Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, May 20, 1864. 
SIR: Your letter of the 10th instant in relation to the practicability 
of raising the guns, etc., from the wrecks in Albemarle Sound is 
received. 

In reply, I would state that the boilers and engines of the steamer 
Underwriter, sunk oft' New Berne, are said to be valuable, and could be 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 73 

raised without much difficulty and without any risk to the parties 
employed. 

There is uo other sunken vessel except the Southfield that I have any 
knowledge of, and she lies under the guns of the batteries at Plymouth. 

In my report of the 12th ultimo of a reconnoissance made in the 
vicinity of Plymouth, I stated on the authority of Mr. Peacock, the 
officer detailed for the service, that the stack of the Southfield could 
not have been seen and had propably been used to supply one for the 
ironclad Albemarle, which was lying at the coal-yard wharf without a 
smokestack. I made another reconnoissance on the 17th and the officer 
reports that the Southfield is lying where she was sunk, the upper deck 
just awash and smokestack standing, and that the smokestack of the 
ram has been repaired and replaced. Men could be heard at work 
upon the vessel, and "no damage could be observed on the starboard 
side, which was the one presented to view. 

Earthworks had been lately thrown up on Stewart Hill, 2 miles 
below Plymouth, and two brass guns were in position. Several boats 
were also seen on the river, apparently doing picket duty. 

The U. S. S. Wyalusing is at present commanded by Acting Master 
W. R,. Hathaway, Lieutenant Commander Queen having been allowed 
to go north on the recommendation of a medical survey. Should Act- 
ing Volunteer Lieutenant French return to this station, in obedience 
to his instructions (a copy of which is herewith enclosed), I would 
respectfully suggest that he be ordered to the Miami, and Commander 
Eenshaw to the Wyalusing. 

I enclose herewith a report of the condition of the boiler and engine 
of the U. S. S. Geres, which vessel will be sent to New Berne for repairs 
on the return of the WMtehead, which is daily expected. 

The Miami has been several days at Eoanoke Island undergoing 
necessary repairs, and her boilers and engines are reported to be in a 
very bad condition. Chief Engineer Stewart recommends that she be 
sent north and thoroughly overhauled. 

I respectfully request that a second and third assistant engineer be 
ordered to the Wyalusing and a third assistant to the Ceres, to complete 
complement of officers allowed them. 

The Ceres leaves to-day for New Berne. The WMtehead arrived on 
the 19th partially repaired. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant Com- 
mander BabcocJc, U. 8. Navy, censuring the commanding officer of the 
U. S. S. Mystic for carelessness in Potopotank Greek. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, May 20, 1864. 

SIB : The Department, under date of the 17th instant, acknowledges 
the receipt of your report* of the 8th instant, enclosing Acting Master 
Wright's, of a boat from the Mystic being fired on near Potopotauk 

* See Series I, vol. 9, pp. 726, 727. 



74 NOETH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Creek, and one of the boat's crew being killed, and adds: "The affair 
seems to have been one of unpardonable carelessness." You will inform 
Acting Master Wright accordingly. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander C. A. BABCOCK, 

U. S. S. Morse. 



[Telegram.] 

OFF YORKTOWN, May 20, 1864 12: 30. 

Colonel Biggs, quartermaster at Fort Monroe, informs me that Gen- 
eral Sheridan's command is at White House without supplies. He 
requests me to convoy transportation as near to them as possible. I 
have informed him I will go as far as West Point, but no farther with- 
out orders from you, as I am quite sure the Pamunkey River is filled 
with torpedoes. We leave this p. in. with Mystic in company, leaving 
a boat's crew to do guard duty at this place while absent. Will return 
with the transports as soon as General Sheridan receives his supplies. 
Respectfully, etc., 

CHAS. A. BABCOCK, 

Lieutenant, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral LEE. 



Letter of congratulation from Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to 
Commander Ransom, U. S. Navy, on the capture of the blockade runner 
Young Republic. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, May 20, 1864. 

SIR: I have received your report of the capture of the blockade run- 
ner Young Republic on the 6th instant, and desire to congratulate you 
on your success. Every capture made by the blockadere deprives the 
enemy of so much of the "sinews of war," and is equal to the taking 
of a supply train from the rebel Army. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander G. M. RANSOM, 

U. 8. 8. Grand Gulf. 

[Similar letter to Lieutenant-Commander Watmough, TJ. S. Navy, 
concerning the capture of the Tristram Shandy.} 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Woodward, U. S. Navy, regard- 
ing a Confederate attack upon Fort Powhatan. 

U. S. IRONCLAD STEAMER ATLANTA, 
Off Fort Powhatan, James River, May 21, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that a squadron of rebel cavalry 
made an attack on the outer works and drove in the pickets in front of 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 75 

the iutrenchments at this post at 11 : 45 a. m. to-day. As soon as I ascer- 
tained the nature of the attack, I immediately made signals for the 
TJ. S. S. Dawn to come up from the lower station and awaited the sig- 
nal from on shore to open fire. Soon as the Dawn arrived up, I sent 
her to take a position above the fort to operate on the right flank, the 
Atlanta being already in a position to protect the left. The signal for 
assistance from the gunboats was made at 12:30 p. m., when I imme- 
diately communicated it to the Dawn, and both vessels opened fire, 
shelling on the right and left. The firing was very satisfactory. I 
tired two rounds from each of the pivot guns and two from one of the 
broadside guns. The Dawn fired about ten rounds, when the signal 
was made to cease firing, the enemy having disappeared, and up to the 
present time of writing (midnight) all has remained quiet. The com- 
mandant of the post reports 3 men irissing. The Dawn is still above 
the fort, for fear an attack should be made during the night. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. J. WOODWARD, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Acting Master Lee, 
U. S. Navy, to proceed to Curies Neck Reach and assume command of 
the U. 8. 8. Commodore Morris. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trent's Reach, James River, May 21, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed with the Hunchback to Curies Neck Reach and report 
to Lieutenant Fyffe, commanding Commodore Morris. Upon your re- 
porting you will consider yourself detached from the Hunchback and 
will relieve Lieutenant Fyffe in command of the Commodore Morris. If 
Lieutenant Fyffe desires it, you will take your executive officer and 
pilot with you to the Morris. Push forward the repairs upon the boiler 
of the Commodore Morris with all possible dispatch, and when com 
pleted resume with the Morris the position occupied by you in the 
Hunchback. 

Transfer to the Tritonia from the Commodore Morris a 30-pouuder 
rifled gun as soon as possible. 
By order of the admiral : 

JOHN S. BARNES, 

Fleet Captain. 
Acting Master LEE, 

Commanding Hunchback. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant Fyffe, 
U. 8. Navy, transferring him from the U. 8. 8. Commodore Morris to 
the U. 8. S. Hunchback. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trent's Reach, James River, May 21, 1864. 

SIR : You are hereby detached from the command of the Commodore 
Morris and will relieve Acting Master Lee in command of the Hunch- 
back. Transfer to the Hunchback the picket force of the Commodore 



76 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Morris and, if you so desire, exchange executive officers and pilots, 
taking yours with you. With the Hunchback under your command, 
resume the position at Deep Bottom heretofore held by the Morris and 
guard closely that point as before. 
By order of the admiral: 
Respectfully, yours, 

JOHN S. BARNES, 

Fleet Captain. 
Lieutenant JOSEPH P. FYFFE, 

U. 8. 8. Commodore Morris. 



Order of Acting Bear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Wiggin, U. 8. Navy, to proceed down the James River as 
bearer of dispatches. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trent's Reach, James River, May 21, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed with the Tritonia down Jauies River and deliver the 
accompanying dispatches to the commanding officers of the Commodore 
Morris and Hunchback, the former at Curies Neck Reach and the latter 
in Turkey Bend. After delivering the dispatch to the Hunchback, 
return with that vessel to the Commodore Morris and receive from the 
latter vessel a 30-pounder rifled gun in exchange for the one you now 
have. When this is effected, return with all dispatch to your present 
station and duties. 
By order of the admiral : 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN S. BARNES, 

Fleet Captain. 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant GEORGE WIGGIN, 

Commanding Tritonia. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, May 21, 1864 1:30 p. m. 
(Via Fortress Monroe, 24th. Received 1 p. m. 25th.) 
No change in situation. No news from Richmond. The statement 
by the special correspondent of the Tribune, professedly admitted from 
General Butler's headquarters, that General Butler sent his aid, Major 
Ludlow, to ask me to cooperate in the attack on Fort Darling, is 
entirely untrue. 

General Butler never gave me any notice of his intended movement 
against Fort Darling, and never asked me for any cooperation against 
Fort Darling. To day General Butler ga.ve me to understand that his 
attack on Fort Darling was a feint. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 77 

Letter from Commodore Adams, U. S. Navy, to the senior officer off New 
Berne, N. C., regarding the shipping of coal supply. 

OFFICE OF COAL SHIPMENT FOR II. g. NAVY, 

No. 323 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, May 21, 1864. 
SIR : In reply to your letter of the loth instant, I have to inform you 
that vessels can not just at this time be found able or willing to go to 
Xi-w Berne, but I am shipping a supply of coal to Hatteras Inlet, where 
I suppose it can be distributed to the cruisers in the sounds. A vessel 
with about 500 tons will sail for that point to-day or to-morrow, and 
more will be promptly forwarded. I wish you would make a requisition 
in form of how much coal will be required monthly, and which will be 
the best points of delivery. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. A. ADAMS, 

Commodore. 
Commander H. K. DAVENPORT, 

Senior U. S. Naval Officer, New Berne, N. C. 

It will be better if in the future all communications on this subject to 
me should be from yourself, and not from any pay or other officer. Your 
merely forwarding them is not in order. Strictly, they should all come 
through the admiral, but I do not insist on that, only on proper decorum. 



Report of Lieutenant Gushing, U. 8. Navy, submitting a plan for the cap- 
ture of the G. S. S. .Raleigh. 

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 21, 1864. 

SIR: Deeming it possible to capture the rebel ironclad Raleigh at 
Wilmington, N. C., I submit the following plan, respectfully asking 
that it may receive your favorable consideration: 

Selecting a time when the ram is anchored at Smithville, I can, as I 
have often done, take boats by the forts and up to the anchorage, and, 
covered by the darkness, approach to within a short distance of the 
enemy. The Raleigh's low, flat decks are very favorable to boarders, 
while there are but two small hatches communicating with officers' 
quarters and berth deck. The lookouts can easily be swept away and 
these hatches guarded, while the main force, rushing through ports and 
hatch, will secure the unprotected gun deck, which will give us the 
engine room and magazine hatch. 

Objections have been made that after gaining the de'ck we could no 
more get at the lower portion of the vessel and the crew than they 
could get at us. To settle this point, I propose to take in the boats a 
dozen long- fuzed shell and a piece of slow match. One shell down each 
hatch would be likely to bring all hands to terms. 

Having captured the ironclad we might bring her out or destroy her, 
as circumstances dictated. 

With my knowledge of the harbor and of the ironclad, I am confident 
that I would succeed. 

I have the honor, sir, to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. GUSHING, 
Lieutenant, U. 8. Navy, Commanding Monticello. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



78 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Tarr, U. S. Navy, of the arrival 
at Hampton Roads of the U. 8. 8. Queen. 

U. 8. S. QUEEN, May 22, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report the arrival of the above-named vessel, 
under my command, having left New York 20th instant, 4 p. m. 
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EGBERT TARR, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGA.WAM, 
Farrar's Island, May 22, 1864. 

(Via Fortress Monroe, 5 p. m., 24th. Received 6 p. m.) 
Monitors practice at Hewlett's battery, firing XV-iuch shell with 
great accuracy, but no chance of stopping the progress of this com- 
manding rebel work. 

The XV-inch is a great gun truly. Last night the enemy attacked 
the army and were handsomely repulsed. Navy was in position to 
fire, if desired, by signal from army, but no signal was made by army, 
as the direction of firing must be uncertain over high hills and woods. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. G. WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Report of Acting Ensign Penfield, U. S. Navy, regarding the supposed 
desertion of landsmen in a reconnoissance of Dutch Gap. 

TJ. S. S. MACKINAW, 

Off Dutch Gap, James River, Virginia, May 22, 1864. 
SIR : I have the honor to report to you that on the afternoon of the 
19th instant I was sent on shore, in charge of the dingey and 4 men, 
for the purpose of giving information in event of an approach of the 
enemy toward this portion of the river. Wishing to make a recounois- 
sance on the upper side of Dutch Gap I posted John Hunter and John 
Fitzgerald, landsmen, to act as pickets and give an alarm in case an 
enemy approached. I was wholly out of their sight for half an hour 
and upon returning did not find them in the place they were stationed, 
nor could they be found by searching thereabouts, nor would they 
answer my hail to them, and I was compelled to come on board ship 
without them, supposing them to have deserted. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. PENFIELD, 
Acting Ensign, U. S. Navy. 

Commander J. 0. BEAUMONT, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. S. Mackinaw. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 79 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, May 22, 18647: 30. 

Your dispatch of 20th just received. Do all that you can to assist 
the army. It would be proper to examine the Painunkey for torpedoes 
in advance of the steamers. To do this you must drag with boats 
with heavy grapnels near the bank and have a picket ahead on both 
sides examining the bank for galvanic batteries by which one kind, 
and lines by which another kind are exploded. You ought to do this 
ascending, and examine suspicious places descending, taking care to 
capture all the boats you fall in with on your way up, else they may 
place torpedoes after you have gone up to be exploded on your return. 
I will request the Department to send several boats from the Potomac 
Flotilla to assist you to" keep the Painunkey open. 

I send Acting Master's Mate Blanchard, of the Mackinaw, who 
knows how to search the banks for torpedoes. Send him back when 
services are not needed. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander C. A. BABCOCK, 

U. S. S. Morse. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Hays, U. 8. Navy, regarding the 
seizure of the schooner Isaac L. Adkins. 

TJ. S. S. CRUSADER, 
Yorktown, Va., May 22, 1864. 

SIR: This morning at half past 1 o'clock I discovered a schooner 
near the mouth of Severn Eiver, heading for the entrance to it. I 
immediately got underway, and upon Hearing her fired a shot across 
her bow. She not paying any attention to it, I fired a second shot at 
her, the shell exploding under her stern. She hove to, and proved to 
be the schooner Isaac L. Adkins, loaded with corn and oats (1,600 
bushels corn and 150 bushels oats), and representing herself as being 
from Accomac, eastern shore, Va., and bound to Baltimore. The cap- 
tain further informed me the man at the wheel was steering the wrong 
course without his knowledge. 

The action of the vessel in heading for Severn Eiver, with York 
Spit light and landmarks visible, and in not heaving to at my first shot, 
looked to me very suspicious. 1 have brought her in here and ask for 
instructions. Her papers are in form, with the exception of her having 
no consignee. 

Please let me hear from you at your earliest convenience. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PETER HAYS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[First endorsement.] 

[May] 30. Directed, in Lieutenant-Commander Babcock's absence, 
to make full investigation and report. If master of schooner was evi- 
dently acting in good faith release him. Letter from Commodore 
Dornin on subject referred to him. 



80 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



[Second endorsement.] 



June 4. Enclosures returned by Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Hays, 
with report and statement of master of schooner. Has released him. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 23, 186 i. 

Shenandoah ordered to Hampton Koads to report to you. Have 
orders ready for her. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

James River, Virginia. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGA.WAM, 
Farrar's Island, May 23, 1864. 
(Via Fortress Monroe, 24th. Received 4: 25 p. m.) 
All quiet last night, except occasional firing from monitors at 
Hewlett's. 

General Meigs arrived last night and returned by the river to visit 
General Butler. Unofficial intelligence from Wilmington reports, on 
contraband authority, the ram ashore on Zeek's Island with broken 
back. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actcj. Rear -Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Report of Commander Beaumont, U. S. Navy, regarding the capture of 
marines from the U. S. S. Mackinaw. 

U. S. S. MACKINAW, 
James River, Virginia, May 23, 1864. 

SIR: I regret to inform you that on the afternoon of the 22d instant, 
while on picket duty on the left bank of this river, near Dutch Gap, 
Sergeant Henry Meredith, Corporal William H. Worley, and Privates 
Daniel Coll, John Dill, William Fox, and Edward Bradley, belonging 
to the marine guard of this vessel, were surprised and captured by a 
body of rebel infantry. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. BEAUMONT, 

Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blkdg. Squadron, James River, Virginia. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 81 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Cushman, U. S. Navy, commanding 
U. S. 8. Onondaga, regarding the expenditure of ammunition in target 
practice. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, May 33, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that this ship expended on the 21st 
instant in the practice upon rebel locality on right bank of the river, 
near Trent's Reach, .16 XV-inch charges, 35 pounds; 17 8-inch rifle 
charges, 16 pounds; 16 XV-inch shell; 17 8-inch rifle shell. The 
ammunition was immediately replaced by an invoice from ordnance 
vessel. 

Everything worked satisfactorily except the inconvenient recoil of for- 
ward XV-inch gun, which stripped the guide brasses on carriage again 
in the same manner, though not to the same extent, as before reported 
at Hampton Roads. A want of sufficient elevation is plain in the after 
XV-iuch, but this can not be remedied, as it is as much as was intended, 
or has been obtained in any of the guns with boxed muzzles. 

The injury to the guide brasses of forward XV-inch is repaired, and 
steps taken to insure a more perfect compression. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. H. CUSHMAN, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Order of Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Sands, U. S. 
Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Fort Jackson, to return to blockade duty. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM. 

James River, May 23, 1864. 

SIR : Having taken in your supplies and got ready for sea, you will 
return to the blockade and cruise offshore between S. by E. from 
Frying Pan Shoals and E. by N. from New Inlet, timing your position 
at dawn of day by the tides and the outcoming of the runners at high 
water so as to intercept them. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain B. F. SANDS, 

U. 8. S. Fort Jackson. 



Report of Captain 8ands, U. 8. Navy, regarding a proposed, attack upon 

Fort Fisher. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 
Hampton Roads, May 23, 1864. 

DEAR SIR: Yesterday when I left New Inlet the Kansas had just 
arrived from Beaufort, having on board Colonel Jourdau, who came,/ 
there for the purpose of recounoiteriug Fort Fisher, which he proposes 
N w R VOL 10 6 



82 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

to surprise by landing some 1,200 men, to be brought from Beaufort by 
our vessels that may be there coaling at the time it should be thought 
feasible during the approaching dark nights. I put the Niphon at his 
disposal for his purpose of gaining information. He wished to make 
some definite arrangement, which 1 could not do without your orders, 
but promised any aid that was in our power should the affair appear 
feasible. It would have to be a perfect surprise, and the question is 
about the manner of accomplishing it with the boats that would be 
required to land such a body of men; and all the boats of the vessels 
that may be assembled at the time could not land the men proposed, 
and towing other boats from Beaufort would at once excite suspicion. 

The fort is doubtless weak now by depletion to reinforce Lee and 
Beauregard, but if it could be surprised could possibly be taken. I 
think the colonel saw from my vessel's beam pillow block that it was 
stronger than he had anticipated. He says he has General Palmer's 
consent, though the general thinks it a very hazardous expedition; 
and when I told him I would advise you of the matter, he remarked 
that he was afraid if it was suggested to headquarters it would not 
be approved. I would be glad to know from you how I shall act in 
the matter. 

I am here for coal, and shall fill up immediately and return to the 
blockade. I arrived at 8 o'clock this evening, twenty-six hours from 
New Inlet, requiring some 450 tons or more. 

B. F. SANDS, 
Captain, U. S. Navy. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 

NOTE. Marked private and not read immediately, owing to pressure 
of official engagements. My mail was then received irregularly. My 
rule is to postpone attention to private matter coining with a large 
official mail. 

L. 

Received May 31. Directed to afford all aid in his power. (See 
correspondence with General Butler, June 4 and 5.) 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Breck, U. 8. Navy, regarding 
information obtained from parties on shore. 

U. S. S. NIPHON, 

Off New Inlet, North Carolina, May 23, 1864. 

SIB,: I have the honor to report that last night sent in two boats 
under the command of the executive officer to gain information. The 
man we wish to see will meet us to-night. I enclose to you papers and 
letters found buried on the shore at the place agreed and chosen by the 
parties on shore. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. B. BKECK, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. S. S. Niphon. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 83 

[Enclosure.] 

[No date.] 

DEAR FRIEND : We, a few evenings since, bad the pleasure of read- 
ing a few lines from you, and now in reply to your kind message we 
state that there are no pickets on mainland between Montgomery's 
Landing and Gatlin's battery, and but tew at either of those places; 
in fact, there are but few soldiers anywhere around Wilmington. 

In regard to the raid made on Morrison's State salt works, we think 
it takes very well with most of the citizens and we know it does with 
the salt hands. There are four Hats already regularly running on the 
sound and there will be some more soon. 

Will you come after us? If so, land just above the place where you 
landed on the night of the 22d April, and you can get a full load. We 
can not get to you, for we have no boats. Bring me a Harper's Weekly, 
and much oblige, your 

FRIEND. 



[Telegram sent.] 

U. S. FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, May 24, 1864 9 p. m. 

Inspected my line to-day. A tug arrived to day. Monitors practice 
at Howlett's battery. Enemy seems to have stopped working on it. 
Monitors also practiced yesterday to get range to protect right flank 
of army. Generals Meigs and Barnard here. 

No change in the situation. Monitors need fresh provisions. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acty. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



[Telegram received.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, May 24, 1864 9 p. m. 

(Via Fortress Monroe, 5: 20 p. m. 25th. Received 6: 20 p. m.) 
Otsego arrived to-day. Monitors practice at Howlett's battery. 
Enemy seem to have stopped working on it. Monitors also practiced 
yesterday to get range to protect right flank of army. 

Generals Meigs and Barnard here. No change in the situation. 
Monitors need fresh provisions. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear -Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Cressy, U. 8. Navy, regarding a 
Confederate attack upon a picket guard. 

U. S. S. MALVERN, 

Off Tilman's [ Tilghman's] Wharf, Jones 7 Neck, Va., May 24, 1864. 
SIR: I have the honor to report to you as follows: On the 23d May, 
at 9 p. m., heard firing of musketry inshore. Soon after the sergeant 



84 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

(Augustus Phin) commanding picket guard came on board, reporting 
that two or three rebel soldiers had entered a house on shore, and tried 
to gain information concerning the location of our pickets, etc. I sent 
him immediately on shore again to gain further information. At 9: 30 
p. m. heard several muskets fired in quick succession. Almost imme- 
diately after the picket guard came down to the boats, firing volleys of 
musketry; one volley was fired after the men were all in the boats. 
On coming on board the sergeant reported that he had been attacked 
by the enemy in considerable force and was obliged to retreat. At 10 
p. m. opened fire upon the banks of the river, occasionally throwing a 
shell inland. Continued firing at intervals until midnight, when, see- 
ing no enemy, ceased firing. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. K. CRESSY, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. 8. 8. Malvern. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading /Squadron, Flagship Agawam. 

[Endorsement.] 

Ammunition expended on board this ship on the evening of 23d of 
May, 1864: 

Twenty eight 20-pouuder Schenkle shells, 27 time fuze; 1 20-pouuder 
Dahlgren shell; 23 heavy 12-pounder canister; 10 heavy 12-pounder 
shrapnel; 7 heavy 12-pounder shell. 

W. K. CRESSY, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. 8. 8. Malvern. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, regarding Confederate 
attack upon Fort Powhatan. 

FLAGSHIP AOAWAM, 

James River, May 24, 1864. 

SIR: Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Woodward, U. S. S. Atlanta, 
reports on the 21st instant that a squad of rebel cavalry attacked the 
outer works of Fort Powhatan at about noon on that (lay, driving in 
the pickets. 

The Atlanta and Dawn fired on the enemy, and they soon disap- 
peared. 

I had already sent the Pequot to reinforce this position, though her 
services could be hardly spared from her position farther up the river. 
1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Babcock, U. 8. Navy, regarding expe- 
dition to White House, Pamunkey River, convoying transports for the 
army. 

U. S. S. MORSE, 

Off Yorktown, Va., May 21, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully report that, having telegraphed to yon on the 20th 
instant at the request of Colonel Biggs, quartermaster at Fortress Mon- 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 85 

roe, I was about to proceed up the river to West Point with this vessel 
and Mystic for the purpose of convoying transports with supplies for 
Major-G-eneral Sheridan's command, who were encamped at White 
House Lauding, and who were greatly in need of them. At 7:30 p. in. 
the same evening got underway with this vessel, three transports, a 
schooner, and Mystic bringing up the rear, and proceeded up the river. 
Arrived at West Point at 10:30 p. m.; found the wharf entirely 
destroyed by fire since the recent expedition to that place. One of the 
transports having on board a cavalry guard of 30 men, ordered her 
close in to the beach and sent boats' crews from this vessel to assist in 
lauding the cavalry ; succeeded ir. doing so without any accident, swim- 
ming the horses on shore with a line attached to them. The cavalry 
guard immediately proceeded up the peninsula for the purpose of com- 
municating with Major General Sheridan, informing him that I had 
arrived at West Point with two gunboats and four transports with for- 
age and subsistence for his command. At 1 p. m. on the 21st instant 
the cavalry guard returned to West Point with a colonel from Major- 
General Sheridan, urgently requesting me to proceed as far up the river 
as possible, as his command were suffering for want of forage and sub- 
sistence, and not being able to cross the bridge at White House Laud- 
ing without previously repairing it. 

I immediately determined to proceed to White House, if possible; 
got underway with the transports and Mystic and proceeded up the 
Pamunkey Eiver. Found no impediments or obstructions in the river. 
When up to Cumberland Bar, it being very low water, and the Mystic, 
on account of her draft, not being able to cross the bar, left her there 
and proceeded on with the transports, giving Acting Master Wright 
orders to follow when possible. When abreast of Indian Town had a 
great deal of trouble in passing up the river on account of the very low 
tide. At 9 : 30 p. m. succeeded in reaching the White House safely with 
the transports. I immediately communicated with Major-General Sher- 
idan, informing him of my arrival. On Sunday, the 22d instant, two 
transports arrived from Fortress Monroe with pontoons for the army, 
but by this time General Sheridan's command had succeeded in repair- 
ing the bridge and did not need them. 

On the evening of the 22d instant Acting Master Wright came up the 
river in his boat and reported to me that in trying to come up the river 
he had run hard aground on Indian Town Bar. Immediately sent the 
steamer Star to her assistance, giving orders to Acting Master Wright 
that when afloat he should remain there in deep water until further 
orders from me. On Sunday evening received on board this vessel for 
delivery to military authorities at Yorktown, by request of Major- 
General Sheridan, 7 prisoners of war (2 officers and 5 privates) and 2 
deserters from General Butler's army, all captured the day previous by 
General Sheridan's command. 

At 11 a. m. on the morning of the 23d instant, the army being on the 
move and transports being all discharged, gave them orders to get 
underway and proceed to Yorktown. When within sight of the Mystic, 
ordered her to get underway and take the lead, bringing up the rear 
with this vessel. 

All arrived safely at Yorktown at 10: 30 p. m. last night, and deliv 
ered the prisoners to the military authorities on shore. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHARLES A. BABCOCK, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Eear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



86 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, regarding the appearance of the 
C. 8. 8. Albemarle in Albemarle Sound. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, May 24, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report that the ram made his appearance to-day tor 
the first time since the engagement of the 5th instant. He came down 
in sight of the picket boats stationed oft' the mouth of the Roauoke 
River with head upstream, and was accompanied by a rowboat that 
pulled several times diagonally across the river as if dragging for tor- 
pedoes. 

The Whitehead tired a shell which exploded near his stern, when the 
Albemarle immediately steamed up the river. 

I have heard from contrabands and refugees direct from Plymouth 
that the plating of the ram was much injured; that four of our shot 
penetrated his outer armor, and that the concussion caused by our tire 
was so severe that it was found impossible to keep a light burning, and 
that one of the guns was rendered useless. What repairs have been 
made is not known. 

I am of the opinion, from intelligence received from Plymouth, that 
they are evacuating the place. 

Several guns have been sent up the river, and large loads of furni- 
ture are being towed up by every steamer. The guns of the Southjield 
have been raised ; one has been sent away, and two are on the wharf 
ready for transportation. 

I have informed the commanding general at New Berne of the state 
of affairs at Plymouth, and signified my desire to cooperate with him 
in retaking the place if he could spare the necessary force, as I have 
heard from a reliable source that they have but 200 men and the ram 
to guard it. 

1 have with me here the Mattabesett, Wyalusing, and Tacony (the lat- 
ter with steam on one boiler), the Barney and Whitehead, that are serv- 
iceable, the Hull, 3 miles below, with tires hauled, repairing, and the 
Miami at Koanoke Island, broken down, being unable to get steam on 
account of leaky boilers. The only use I can make of her is to have 
her towed to Hatteras Inlet when an opportunity offers and employ her 
crew in unloading coal from the heavy draft coal vessels and sending it 
here. The disposition of the other vessels is the same as at the last 
report. 

I am. very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Commander Davenport, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer Lieu- 
tenant Eaton, U. S. Navy, to cruise in Pamlico River. 

U. S. S. HETZEL, 

Off New Berne, N. C., May 24, 1S64. 

SIR: Proceed with the U. S. S. Louisiana under your command to 
the Pamlico River, inspecting as you proceed the various bays and 
creeks on the route. On your arrival there you will cruise up and down 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 87 

the river, picking up such refugees as may desire to come to New Berne, 
and doing your best to prevent the enemy from erecting batteries. 

Run no unnecessary risk, and if nothing of importance occurs, remain 
there until relieved. 

Respectfully, yours, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant HENRY EATON, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Louisiana. 



Combined operations against Confederate attack upon Wilson's Wharf, 

May 34, 1864. 

Eeport of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports of commanding officers 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

Farrar's Island, James River, Virginia, May 28, 1864. 
SIR: The copy of my order of May 23 to Lieutenant-Commander 
Quackenbush, and the original reports of that officer and the command- 
ing officers of the Dawn and Young America, will inform the Depart- 
ment as to the good service rendered by the navy in cooperating with 
the troops under General Wild in repulsing the attack made by the 
enemy in force at Wilson's Wharf on the 24th instant. 

Believing that the enemy had intrenched himself in front of the army 
position here, I judged that he would next attack our positions in the 
rear at Wilson's Wharf and Fort Powhatan, especially as the colored 
troops stationed there offered the temptation of prize to him, and a late 
Richmond paper, captured by our navy pickets, commented with bitter- 
ness on the presence of such troops there. 

Hence I dispatched the Pequot with a respectful warning to General 
Wild, and to strengthen our means of defense there. Under other 
orders from me the Pequot was stationed above Fort Powhatau, the 
Dawn below Wilson's Wharf, the Atlanta (ironclad) and the tug Young 
America between the two. 

I respectfully congratulate the Department upon the success of the 
naval dispositions which the force put at my disposal enabled me to 
make. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdy. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Ovder of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush, U. S. 

Navy. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

Trent's Reach, James River, May 23, 1864 1 o'clock a. m. 
SIR: At daylight this morning get underway and proceed without 
delay to Fort Powhatan. So dispose of the naval forces at that point 
as to best guard the approaches to Fort Powhatan and Wilson's Wharf 
by a cross tire from the gunboats and Atlanta, 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Communicate with the army officer in command and respectfully 
admonish him from me [of] the probabilities of an attack upon those 
important points. 

Bespecttully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Pequot, Turkey Bend, James River. 



First report of Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush, U. S. Navy, commanding IT. S. S. Pequot. 

II. S. S. PEQUOT, 
Fort Powhatan, James River, Virginia, May 25, 1864. 

SIR : I have to report that at 12 : 30 p. m. yesterday, while on shore at 
Fort Powhatan, a message was received by the colonel commanding 
from the general at Wilson's Wharf, stating that the enemy were 
attacking the latter place. 

it was supposed that the attack on Wilson's Wharf was a feint to 
draw our forces from this place while an attack should be made here in 
force, as communication by signal was interrupted. The Young Amer- 
ica had her blow valve broken and steam blown off, and consequently 
could not move. I sent Acting Ensign William F. Chase in the trans- 
port Mayflower down to Wilson's Wharf to learn from the general if 
the attack was in force, and if the Dawn needed aid. I also sent the 
army tug Johnson to tow the Young America to the scene of action in 
order that her guns might be used if needed. 

The Mayflower was fired into by sharpshooters in the bushes on the 
banks just before reaching the Dawn, and her captain and pilot both 
severely wounded. Acting Ensign Chase then took charge of her and 
hailing the Daicn, learned that she wanted assistance. He then went 
on shore and was informed by the general that he had signali/ed 
repeatedly to Powhatan for the gunboats, and that he needed help at 
once. The Mayflower was taken possession of for the use of the 
wounded, and Mr. Chase could not return until 6 p. m., when I imme- 
diately got underway and proceeded to Wilson's Wharf. The enemy 
had disappeared about an hour before my arrival. I learn that Acting 
Volunteer Lieutenant [J. W.j Simmons, of the Dawn, rendered most 
efficient help, his shells sweeping through the enemy's column with 
terrible effect. I take especial pleasure in mentioning the gallant con- 
duct of Acting Ensign William F. Chase, of this vessel. When the 
captain and pilot of the Mayflower were struck down helpless with 
wounds at his side he took the wheel, went in to the wharf, and went 
on shore in obedience to orders, although a storm of bullets was rained 
on the vessel and wharf from the enemy's line near by. 

I have this morning returned to my anchorage above Fort Powhatan. 
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 
Lieutenant- Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Acting Rear Admirnl S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 89 

Second report of Lieutenant-Commander Q'iackenbush, U. S. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 

Pequot. 

U. S. S. PEQUOT, 
Fort Powhatan, James River, Virginia, May 26, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your orders of 23d instant I left my anchorage 
at Turkey Bend and proceeded to this place. 1 at once communicated 
with the commanding officer of the post and admonished him from you 
of the probability of an attack on this post by the enemy. 

After having ascertained the best position tor the Pequot to take, I 
went to Wilson's Wharf and communicated with General Wild, com- 
manding that post. I also made an examination of the best position to 
be occupied by the gunboats in the event of an attack. In conse- 
quence of the information which I gave to General Wild, arrangements 
were immediately made which I understand tended in a great measure 
to the repulse of the enemy. 

I was informed by General Wild that the Dawn and Young America 
did most excellent service during the attack. 

The gallant conduct of Acting Ensign W. F. Chase in taking the 
wheel and command of the tug Mayflower when the captain and mate 
were shot down, and in taking her alongside the wharf under a sweep- 
ing fire of the enemy's bullets, and his strict compliance with the orders 
given him by ine, are deserving of your most favorable notice. 
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Lieutenant-Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Report of Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush, IT. 8. Navy, transmitting report of the engineer 

of the TJ. S. S. Young America. 

U. S. S. PEQUOT, 
Fort Powhatan, James River, May 25, 1864. 

SIR : Enclosed I hand you the report of the engineer of the U". S. S. 
Young America, stating the reasons why the vessel was unable to move 
when ordered. I have not yet received the report of Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Simmons, of the Dawn, but will forward it as soon as 
received. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 

[ Enclosure, j 

U. S. S. YOUNG AMERICA, 

Off Fort Powhatan, James River, Virginia, May 25, 1864. 
SIR: 1 most respectfully submit the following report concerning this 
vessel being without steam on the 24th instant: 

About 11 o'clock a. m. the blow cock on the boiler gave way and 
begun to leak to such an extent that it was impossible to keep water 
in the boiler, and as we had to break some joints to get to the valve, it 



90 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

was impossible to repair it without hauling fires and blowing water out 
of the boiler. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHARLES E. JONES, 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer in Charge. 

Lieutenant-Commander 8. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

U. 8. 8. Pequot, Off Fort Powhatan, James River. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Simmons, TJ. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Dawn. 

U. S. S. DAWN, 
Off Wilson's Wharf, May 25, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report that at 1 : 30 p. m. yesterday, the 24th, 
the United States forces under General Wild, at this point, were very 
suddenly attacked by the enemy in heavy force under General Fitzhugh 
Lee. On hearing the alarm, I at once got underway and commenced 
shelling the woods on our left flank. 

The enemy got possession of a small piece of woods above the fortifi- 
cation and the transport steamer Mayflower coming by at the time, they 
opened a galling fire of musketry on the Mayflower and this vessel, 
badly wounding the captain and pilot of the transport. I at once 
opened on the woods and succeeded in driving them out. The firing 
having almost ceased on our left and increased on our right flank, I 
altered the position of this vessel, and commenced shelling the enemy 
just as they were making a charge, which drove them back, and, as 
General Wild tells me, thus ended a sharp action of five and a half 
hours. I very respectfully report that if I had two 32-pounders in 
addition to my present battery, I could do much more service, having 
now no smoothbore guns to throw grape and canister. The bolts and 
ports are already on the vessel ready to put the extra guns in position 
at once, this vessel having carried them on the last cruise in addition 
to her present battery, and she can carry them now with ease. My 
ammunition is very nearly out, and I am anxious to get a supply as 
soon as possible, as I have only 17 rounds remaining, and herewith I 
send requisition for your approval. The officers and crew behaved 
finely, Acting Ensigns William B. Avery, E. T. Sears, and P. W. Mor- 
gan serving their different guns with great coolness and energy, 
although the enemy's sharpshooters were throwing musket shot over 
and at us continually. I take great pleasure in reporting to you the 
noble and gallant conduct of my executive officer, Acting Master J. A. 
Jackaway, in shifting my position to follow the enemy. This vessel got 
very near a shoal in the river and was compelled to turn by backing for 
the purpose of getting my guns to bear on the sharpshooters, who were 
completely showering us with musketry. 

Mr. Jackaway did the duties of pilot, thus getting the vessel in posi- 
tion, and eventually driving the enemy away and saving that flank of 
our troops. I do think he deserves promotion if noble and gallant 
conduct and strict attention to duty merit such a reward. 

1 am happy to report no casualties on board. I annex a report of 
ammunition expended during the action. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. SIMMONS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding Dawn. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic IHockauiny Squadron, 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 91 

[Enclosure.] 
Report of ammunition expended. 

100-pounder rifle: 46 rounds percussion shell. 
20-pounder rifle: 34 rounds percussion shell, 1 10-second shell. 
Rifled 12-pounder howitzer: 11 rounds percussion shell, 21 rounds 
5-second shell, 3 rounds canister, 2 rounds grape. 
Making in all 118 rounds expended. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. SIMMONS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding Dawn. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Additional report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Simmons, U. 8. Navy, commanding II. S. S. 

Pequot. 

U. S. S. DAWN, 

Off Wilson's Wharf, Va., May 25, 1864. 

SIR: I take great pleasure in reporting to you the gallant conduct of 
Acting Ensign William F. Chase, at present attached to the TJ. S. S. 
Pequot. The first I saw, Mr. Chase was on the Mayflower, steam trans- 
port, endeavoring to communicate with me. On the Mayflower passing 
the woods above me, where the enemy's sharpshooters had got pos- 
session, they poured a murderous volley of musketry on the Mayflower, 
badly wounding the captain and pilot of the boat, leaving her com- 
pletely at their mercy. Mr. Chase at once jumped to the wheel and 
brought the boat safely through the terrific fire poured at him. His 
conduct is also reported to me by General Wild. I do think he 
richly deserves promotion for gallant conduct. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. SIMMONS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Lieutenant- Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Pequot. 



Eeport of Acting Ensign Chase, U. 8. Navy, of the U. S. 8. Pequot. 

U. S. S. PEQUOT, 

Off Fort Poichatan, James River, Virginia, May 25, 1864. 
SIR: In obedience to your order of yesterday, I proceeded down to 
Wilson's Landing in the steam tug Mayfloicer. Just before communi- 
cating with the U. S. S. Daicn, at Wilson's Lauding, the Mayfloicer was 
tired into by rebel sharpshooters, severely wounding the captain and 
pilot. I then took command of the vessel and communicated with the 
captain of the Dawn, and asked him if he needed assistance; he said 
he did. 1 also informed him that the captain and pilot of the tug were 
wounded. I then ran the vessel into the wharf, went ashore, and com 
municated with the commanding officer and asked him if the attack 
was in force and if he needed assistance; he replied he did, and that 
he had signalized to Fort Powhafan an hour and a half before, and 
that he was out of ammunition for his artillery. 



92 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The tug was taken by the adjutant- general of the post for the use of 
the wounded, making it impossible for me to obey Lieutenant-Com- 
mander S. P. Qnackenbush's order for immediate return lor three 
hours, when I succeeded in obtaining a passage on the transport 
steamer J. Johnson and reported to you. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. F. CHASE, 
Acting Ensign, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Commanding 17. S. 8. Pequot. 



Report of Lieutenant Lamson, U. S. Navy, giving description of torpedoes 
secured in the James River. 

U. S. S. STEPPING STONES, 
James River, Virginia, May 25, 1864. 

SIR : In obedience to your directions, I have had the torpedoes secured 
by this division prepared for transmission to the Bureau of Ordnance, 
and respectfully submit the following account of them and of the means 
used to find them and raise them from the river: 

We have thus far found four kinds of these submarine defenses, viz: 

First. Tin cylinders in wooden cases, with long tin chimneys extend- 
ing above the water and fitted for ventilation. In this chimney is a piece 
of slow match, extending down to the magazine. These torpedoes con- 
tain from 50 to 100 pounds of powder and are evidently intended to fioat 
down the stream. 

Second. Tin cylinders of the same size as above, to be exploded by 
means of a friction primer pulled from the shore or by a vessel's wheels 
or propeller getting foul of the lanyard. These torpedoes have a board 
float and are suspended some 6 or 8 feet below the surface. 

Third. Copper cylinders with spherical ends, on one of which are four 
nipples for percussion caps, and on the other a long, stout socket for a 
staff. These were undoubtedly intended for the use of the torpedo boats. 

Fourth. Cylindrical tanks with conical ends, made of half-inch boiler 
iron and securely riveted. These are anchored at the bottom in the 
deepest water (7 and 8 fathoms), and each has two insulated copper 
wires running from the center of the torpedo through a composition 
plug screwed into one end and connecting with a galvanic battery on 
shore, by means of which they are exploded. In the center of the tor- 
pedo these copper wires are connected by a thread-like platinum wire, 
running through a short quill filled with phosphorus ami fulminating 
powder. The largest one of this kind found contained about 1,950 
pounds of powder, and the smallest about 1,040 pounds. 

We always found two near each other and connected with the same 
battery. 

Between the 14th and 17th instant we found 15 torpedoes of the 
various kinds. 

The force assigned to this duty consists of the Tritonia, Acting 
Volunteer Lieutenant George Wiggiu; the Stepping Mono*, Acting 
Master D. A. Campbell; the Delaware, Acting Master J. H. Eldridge; 
eleven armed cutters from the different vessels, and 175 sailors, marines, 
and soldiers as skirmishers and pickets to drive back the small bodies 
of rebels along the left bank and enable the boats to pursue their search 
unmolested. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 93 

The skirmishers ashore searched the banks thoroughly down to the 
water's edge; the small boats pulled close along either shore, dragging 
the bottom carefully with grapnels, and the three vessels above named 
followed in the channel, dragging grapnels and covering and protecting 
the boats and parties ashore. 

All the grapnel lines were long enough to allow the torpedo caught 
by the grapnel to explode without injury to the boat or vessel. 

Some of the large torpedoes were found by tracing the wires from 
the battery on shore and some by catching the wires with the grapnels. 

In this manner we proceeded without accident to within 3 miles of 
Fort Chaffiu, where we were opened on by rebel batteries, as detailed 
in my report of the 17th instant. 

These torpedoes (galvanic) are constructed with great ingenuity and 
scientific skill, and when taken from the water were in as good a state 
of preservation as when first put down, except one, in which the com- 
position screw through which the wires passed had not been coated 
with red lead and tallow, as had the others. 

I can not speak too highly of the untiring care and zeal displayed 
by the officers and men under my command in this service. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. H. LAMSON, 
Lieutenant, Commanding Torpedo Division, James River Fleet. 

Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant BrecTc, U. 8. Navy, giving infor- 
mation obtained by a reconnoissance in Masonboro Sound. 

U. S. S. NIPHON, 

Off New Inlet, North Carolina, May 26, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report that on the evening of the 25th took 
gig and second cutter, with the crews well armed, and proceeded up 
Masonboro Sound for the purpose of gaining information as to the ene- 
my's forces and blockade runners at Wilmington. We succeeded in 
getting into the rear of the troops at Masonboro (Colonel Young's regi- 
ment of 700 men, State militia), gained what information we wished, 
received some Wilmington papers, and took off with us 4 conscripts 
namely, Madison Erviu, 19 years; John Armfield, 20; E. N. Oakley, 21; 
N. P. Henley, 34 and 1 mulatto, they having been employed at the 
salt works. In regard to the forces in this district: At Wilmington, 
350 men; at Half Moon battery, one company of artillery (Captain 
Dudley's), 70 men; at Fort Fisher, 1,000 men. Colonel Lamb, com- 
manding Fort Fisher, has 38 guns mounted, of which 16 are on the sea 
face, 16 on the northern and eastern side, commanding the beach, and 
6 on the south end. The rear of the fort on the river side is all open 
and entirely exposed, the road from Wilmington leading directly into 
the fort on its northwestern side and only 2 guns that will command 
the road. All cavalry pickets are withdrawn from the beach, two com- 
panies, one of South Carolina and one of Georgia cavalry, having left 
yesterday. The Mound fort is 60 feet high, mounting 2 large guns 
which can be trained in any direction; also has a small wooden tower 
built on the top of the Mound, 20 feet high, for a signal light. There 
are at Wilmington at present nine blockade runners, one of which, the 



94 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Alice, has a large amount of gold on board (upward of $1,100,000) going 
to Europe. They will all sail in the coining dark nights. I wish to 
bring to your notice Acting Ensigns H. S. Borden and E. N. Semou and 
Pilot J. J. Orrell, who have become accomplished scouts. They have, as 
well as myself, visited almost every part of the country from Fort 
Fisher to Masonboro. I have a weekly communication with the shore 
and can obtain any information that you require. On our return la.st 
night we were discovered by the pickets and hailed. They did not fire, 
but threw down their rifles and ran. At the entrance to the sound dis- 
covered the enemy's picket boat, but could not capture it, as they pulled 
on shore and escaped in the marsh. There are about 150 conscripts at 
work near the shore inside the sound erecting new salt works. They 
can be easily captured, if required, by delaying the matter until they get 
over their scare of last night. Do you wish the newspapers we receive 
from the shore forwarded to you? The ironclads are both on shore. 
One of them, the Raleigh, is badly injured. Neither is expected to be 
got off. I enclose a rude tracing of the fort sent me from the shore. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. B. BRECK, 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. S. S. Niphon. 
Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Master Savage, U. S. Navy, of the expenditure of ammu- 
nition by the U. S. S. General Putnam. 

U. S. S. GENERAL PUTNAM, 
Appomattox River, Virginia, May 25, 1864. 

SIR: I would respectfully make the following report of expeudituies 
of ammunition on board this vessel, with the dates and circumstances: 

May8. Eleven shell and 7 shrapnel from 24-pounder howitzer; 15 
shell from 20-pounder Parrott rifle. Shelling the woods on the left bank 
of the river; enemy approaching. 

May 9. Nineteen shell from 20-pounder Parrott rifle. Engaged with 
the enemy's battery at Fort Cliitou in company with army gunboats. 

May 11. Fifteen shell and 18 shrapnel from 24-pdimder howitzer; 9 
shell and 17 shrapnel from 12-pounder howitzer; 16 shell from 20-pounder 
Parrott rifle. Engaged with the enemy at Fort Clifton. 

May 18. Twenty -one shrapnel from 24-pounder howitzer; 12 shrap- 
nel from 12-pounder howitzer; 6 shell from 20-pouuder Parrott rifle. 
Engaged with the enemy that attacked our forces on the left bank 
above Point of Rocks. 

May 20. Thirty-two shell and 2 shrapnel from 24-pounder howitzer; 
30 shell from 20-pouuder Parrott rifle. Shelling the woods near Port 
Walthall, the enemy having advanced with artillery. 

May 21. Twenty-six shell and 4 shrapnel from 24-pounder howitzer; 
2 shrapnel from 12 pounder howitzer; 13 shell from 20-pounder Parrott 
rifle. At the attack of the enemy on our forces on right bank of river 
on the night of the 21st instant. 

Total expenditures of ammunition. 
24-ponnder howitzer: 

Shell 84 

Shrapnel 52 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 95 

12-pounder howitzer: 

Shell 9 

Shrapnel ; 31 

20-pounder Purrott rifle : 

Fuze shell 99 

2-pound charges 99 

Sir, I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. H. SAVAGE, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Acting Bear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, regarding a boat expedition from 
the U. 8. 8. Wy aim ing for the purpose of destroying the C. 8. 8. Albe- 
marie. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, May 30, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report that an effort was made on the 25th instant at 
1 1 o'clock by five volunteers from the steamer Wyalusing to destroy 
the ironclad A Ibemarle. 

The party left at 2 o'clock p. m. of the 25th (having made a recon- 
noissauce two days before) and ascended the Middle Itiver in the Mat- 
tabesetfs dingey with two torpedoes, each containing 100 pounds of 
powder and their appendages, which they transported on a stretcher 
across the island swamp. Charles Baldwin, coal heaver, and John W. 
Lloyd, coxswain, then swam the lioanoke Kiver with a line and hauled 
the torpedoes over to the Plymouth shore above the town. They were 
then connected by a bridle, floated down with the current, and guided 
by Charles Baldwin, who designed to place them across the bows of 
the ram, one on either side, and Alexander Crawford, who was sta 
tioued on the opposite side of the river in the swamp, was to explode 
them upon a given signal. 

Everything had worked favorably from the time of starting until the 
torpedoes were within a few yards of the ram, when Baldwin was dis- 
covered and hailed by a sentry on the wharf. Two shots were then 
fired and a volley of musketry followed, which induced John W. Lloyd, 
who heard the challenge and report of small arms, to cut the guiding 
line, throw away the coil, and swim the river again to join John Laverty, 
who was left in charge of his clothes and arms. 

These two men, with the boat keeper, Benjamin Lloyd, returned to 
the ship the morning of the 27th, after an absence of thirty-eight hours 
in the swamp, encountering the additional discomfort of a rainy day 
and night. 

Two days' unsuccessful search was made for Baldwin and Crawford, 
both of whom made their appearance on Sunday, the 29th instant, much 
fatigued by travel and somewhat exhausted from the loss of food. No 
traces of their intended designs were left behind them. 

I can not too highly commend this party for their courage, zeal, and 
unwearied exertion in carrying out a project that had for sometime 
been under consideration. The plan of executing it was their own, 
except in some minor details, and although defeated in their purpose 
(by accidentally fouling a schooner), I deem it my imperative duty to 
recommend that Alexander Crawford, fireman, and Charles Baldwin, 
coal heaver, be promoted to a higher grade, and that all receive the 
pecuniary reward awarded by act of Congress for distinguished services. 



96 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Four deserters from the rebel ram Albemarle were brought oft' by the 
picket boat yesterday, but can not, without detaining the army boat, 
communicate the intelligence they bring. They state, however, that 
the Neuse is afloat and in all respects ready for service. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Abstract log of the U. S. S. Wyalusing. 

May 26, 1864. At 11:30 a. m. John W. Lloyd, coxswain; Charles 
Baldwin, coal heaver; Alexander Crawford, second-class fireman; John 
Laverty, first class fireman; Benjamin Lloyd, second-class fireman, 
went on an expedition to destroy the ram. 

May 28. At 9 a. m. all the expedition returned but two men, Bald- 
win and Crawford. 

May 29. At 8 p. m. the Commodore Barney came alongside and 
brought Alexander Crawford and Charles Baldwin from the expedition 
of the 26th. 



[Telegram.] 

FARRAR'S ISLAND, JAMES RIVER, May 26, 1864. 

(Via Fortress Monroe 28th. Received '> p. m.) 

The naval situation remains unchanged. Will the Department please 
order the Chicopee, intended for this squadron, direct to the sounds? 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. G. WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, FARRAR'S ISLAND, 

May 26, 1864 10 a. m. 

(Via Fortress Monroe 28th. Received 11:05 a.m.) 
Ko change in the situation since my dispatch of yesterday. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Foster, U. S. Navy, transmitting 
report of engagements with the enemy and attendant expenditure of 
ammunition. 

TJ. S. S. COMMODORE PEERV, 

May 26, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your order on May 24,1 have the honor to sub- 
mit the following report of the expenditure of ammunition aboard this 
vessel from May 20 to May 26, and also the object of that expenditure. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



97 



At 8:30 o'clock p. m. of the 20th instant I received a note from a sig- 
nal officer at headquarters of the army, informing: me that about 50 
rebels were inarching through the bushes in the direction of this 
steamer, and that he could see them plainly with his glass. After 
ascertaining the whereabouts of the enemy, I opened on them with my 
IX inch guns and 100-pounder Parrott. 

W hile tiring an officer came on board, said he was from General Smith, 
and requested me to load my guns with grape, train them up a ravine, 
and be ready to fire them when notified. I complied with his request. 

This officer had scarcely left the vessel when another officer came on 
board, who said he also was from General Smith and requested me to 
fire immediately up the ravine mentioned, and which I did. 

After firing the ammunition (a list of which you will please find 
enclosed), and hearing aothing from General Smith, I ceased tiring. 

On the morning of the 21st instant I saw Brigadier-General Charles 
K. Graham, who was very much incensed at my having fired the night 
before. During the day I received a communication from Brigadier- 
General Graham, ordering me to make" a written report to him of the 
amount of ammunition expended and the object of it. 

This I refused to do on account of having been ordered by my superior 
officer not to do so. 

On the night of the 21st instant, finding the enemy were firing on our 
earthworks, I expended five 10-second shells, which 1 afterwards learned 
did good execution. 

On the night of the 23d, finding the enemy (a small force) were in the 
bushes alongside the vessel, I expended three IX-iuch grape. 
I am. sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

AMOS P. FOSTER, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 

[Enclosures.] 
Report of ammunition expended from May 20 to May 26, 1864. 



Date. 


IX-inch guns. 


100-pounder Par- 
rott. 


12-pounder 
howitzer. 


Remarks. 


May 20 

May 21 


5 10-second shell. 
5 5 -sen UK! shell. 
9 grape. 
3 shrapnel. 
3 canister. 

5 10-second shell. 


5 percussion shell. 
2 shrapnel. 
3 15-second shell. 


12 shrapnel . . . 


At 8 :30 p. m. received a note from the 
signal officer at headquarters signed 
P. W. Einman (a copy of which 
please fliid enclosed), telling me the 
enemy was near me. About 9.30 
p. m. received a request from a staff 
officer of General Smith's staff to 
fire grape and canister. 
The eneuiv attacked our earthworks 


Mav 23 


3 sraDe . 






with artillery. Our shells struck 
in the midst of them. 










hushes alongside of the vessel. 



Respectfully submitted. 



AMOS P. FOSTER, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 



N w R VOL 10- 



98 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

SIR: About 50 rebels are marching through the bushes in the direc- 
tion of your boat. I could see them plainly through my glass. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

P. W. EINMAN. 
To the COMMANDER OF THE GUNBOAT. 



Commendatory letter from Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to 
Lieutenant- Commander Babcock, U. S. Navy, commanding U. A'. S. 
Morse. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

Farrar's Island, James River, May 27, 1864. 

SIR: Your No. 85 of 24th instant received reporting your convoying 
transports to White House. 

The service was an important and hazardous one and well performed. 
You were fortunate in receiving no injury from torpedoes. 
Very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander C. A. BABCOCK, 

U. 8. 8. Morse. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to the commanding officer 
of the U. 8. S. Cohasset, to report to Lieutenant Commander Babcock. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, May 28, 186 i. 

SIR : Fill up with ammunition to your full capacity from the ordnance 
vessels at City Point, and, after coaling at Newport News, proceed to 
report to Lieutenant-Commander Babcock at Yorktown or wherever 
else he may be. 
Show these orders to Captain Gansevoort. 

Kespectfully, yours, S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commanding OFFICER, 

U. 8. 8. Cohasset. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Gansevoort, 
U. S. Navy, regarding the U. 8. 8. Cactus. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, May 28, 1864. 

SIR: Place the battery of the Cactus on board, have her ammunition 
filled up to her full capacity, and send her to report to Lieutenant- 
Commander Babcock at Yorktown or wherever else he may be. Use 
all practicable dispatch. 
Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain GUERT GANSEVOORT, 

Roanoke. 

Send two small colliers to Lieutenant-Commander Babcock and keep 
him supplied with coal. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 99 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master Shel- 
don, U. 8. Navy, regarding the U. S. S. Shokokon. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, May 28, 1864. 

SIR: Fill up with ammunition to your full capacity from the ordnance 
vessel at City Point, and, after coaling at Newport News, proceed to 
report to Lieutenant Commander Babcock at Yorktown or wherever 
el>e he may be. 

Show these orders to Captain Gansevoort. 
Kespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear-Admiral^ Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Acting Master W. B. SHELDON, 

Commanding Officer, U. 8. S. Shokokon. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Babcock, U. 8. Navy, regarding a search for torpedoes in the 
Pamunkey River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, Virginia, May 28, 1864. 

SIR: Do all you can to assist the army under General Smith. It 
would be proper to examine the Painunkey for torpedoes in advance of 
the steamers. To do this you must drag with boats with heavy grap- 
nels near the bank and have a picket ahead on both sides examining 
the banks for galvanic batteries, by which one kind, and lines, by 
which another kind are exploded. You ought to do this ascending, 
and examine suspicious places descending; take care to capture all the 
boats you fall in with on your way, else they may place torpedoes after 
you have gone up to be exploded on your return. I have sent you 
Acting Master's Mate Blanchard, of the Mackinaw, who knows how to 
search the banks for torpedoes. Send him back when his services are 
not needed. 

Kespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander C. A. BABCOCK, 

U. S. 8. Morse. 

P. S. I will instruct C.ommander Lynch to have spare ammunition 
ready for you. Can you arrange for its transportation with the 
quartermaster 1 I have directed Captain Gansevoort to send you two 
small colliers and to keep you supplied with coal. Send to or telegraph 
to these officers for supplies, giving exact lists. Keep up a supply of 
provisions for the vessels with you. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Lynch, 
U. 8. Navy, regarding spare ammunition for the vessels in York River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, Virginia, May 28, 1864. 

SIR: The Mystic, Morse, Shokokon, Cactus, and Cohasset are to be 
employed at present on York River. You will please have spare 



100 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

ammunition prepared for their batteries, to be sent to them when it is 
needed. Try to make arrangements with the quartermaster at Fort- 
ress Monroe so that you can forward ammunition by his conveyances, 
and when you send ammunition, send an officer to accompany and 
deliver it. 

Kespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander D. LYNCH, 

Commanding U. S. Ship St. Lawrence. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. 
Navy, to send the U. S. S. Tecumseh to sea. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 28, 1864. 

SIR : Send the Tecumseh to sea as early as practicable with theenclosed 
sealed orders, which her commander will not open until he has dis- 
charged his pilot. Let one of the double enders be placed under Com- 
mander Craven's orders as an escort, but do not send the Osceola. 
These vessels are going down the coast and will not return. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Commander Craven, U. S. Navy, 
commanding U. S. S. Tecumseh, to proceed to Pensacola, Fla. 

Confidential.] NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 28, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed with all practicable dispatch with the steamer under 
you command to Pensacola, Fla., and report by letter to Kear- Admiral 
Farragut and the senior officer off Mobile. 

Acting Kear Admiral Lee has been directed to place one of the double- 
enders under your orders as an escort or tow. 

After completing this duty you will direct her commander to report 
to Hear Admiral Farragut for duty. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commander T. A. M. CRAVEN, 

Commanding Ironclad Tecumseh, James River, Virginia. 



Report of Commander Crosby, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Keystone 
State, regarding the impaired condition of that vessel. 

U. S. S. KEYSTONE STATE, 

Beaufort Harbor, May 28, 1864. 

SIR: I regret to say that upon examination of the hull of this vessel 
in the port bilge abreast of the port boiler that the ceiling is found to 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 101 

be completely rotten and destroyed, and the outside planking to extent 
of over five-eighths of an inch, and the timbers, too, are also a good 
deal decayed. 

The carpenter of this station thinks there is no danger in smooth 
weather, but thinks it unsafe in bad weather. 

One of the beams over the shaft is settling on it and will require 
stanchioning up. I think it would be advisable to take her to Norfolk 
lor such repairs as can be made. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PEIECE CKOSBY, 

Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding Novth Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, May 28, 1864 7 p. m. 
(Via Fortress Monroe, 8 p. m., 30th. Received 8: 10 p. m.) 
Picked up several torpedoes, each containing 70 pounds powder, 
floating around the monitors this morning. Two deserters came in this 
morning and report that three rebel ironclads have been below Drewry's 
Bluff for several days. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

Farrar's Island, James River, May 27, 1864 10 p. m. 
(Via Fortress Monroe, fi p. m., 2J)th. Received 6: 30 p. m.) 
No change in the naval situation. Nothing new to communicate. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, May 2!), 1864 10 p. m. 

(\ia Fortress Monroe, 6 p. m., 30th. Received 7: 20 p. in.) 
Went to Fort Powhatan and Wilson's Wharf to day. The Pequot, 
Atlanta, Dawn, and Young America will effectually aid the troops. One 
colored regiment at each place to hold against great odds these impor- 
tant positions, which the army is fortifying. 

General |E. A.] Wild had 900 colored troops at Wilson's Wharf and 
two 'JO-pounder Parrotts and no other artillery when he was attacked. 



102 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

He says the enemy used no artillery, and were, he thinks, 2,000 strong. 
He stated to me that the gunboats were of great assistance to him in 
repelling their attack. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Letter from Major- General Butler, V. 8. Army, to Acting Rear- Admiral 
Lee, U. 8. Navy, requesting transportation for agent of the secret 
service. 

Confidential.] 

HDQBS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, 

Fort Monroe, May 29, 1864. 

The bearer, Mr. Symington, is on secret service of the United States. 
Will you have him put ashore on the opposite side of the James, so as 
not to excite suspicion? 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral LEE, 

Commanding, etc. 



[Telegram.] 

FORT MONROE, VA., May 29, 1864. 

I have been requested by Major- General Smith, through Brigadier- 
General Ames, to cooperate with the troops which go to West Point, 
[Ya.], this afternoon. I have telegraphed General Ames that I will be 
happy to cooperate with him. Shall be obliged to go alone, as the boiler 
of the Mystic is undergoing repair. 
Eespectfully, etc., 

CHAS. A. BABCOOK, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North A tlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Babcock, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. 
8. Morse, of the convoying of army transports, May 29-30, 1864. 

U. S. S. MORSE, 
Off White House, Pamunkey River, Virginia, June J, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report in relation to the 
part taken by this vessel in cooperating with and convoying transports 
with troops under command af Major General Smith, which arrived at 
this place on the 30th ultimo. 

After telegraphing you on the 29th that General Smith requested my 
cooperation I got underway at 5 p. m. of that day and, followed by two 
transports, proceeded to West Point, coming to anchor at 9:30 p. m. 
During the night several transports filled with troops arrived from 
Yorktown. On the following morning I was informed by Brigadier- 
General Ames that all the transports with troops were going to the 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 103 

White House, and requested me to convoy them. I immediately got 
underway and, taking the lead, proceeded up the Pamunkey River, 
arriving at this place with transports and troops safely at 11 :30 a. m. 
on the 30th ultimo. I saw nothing of the enemy, and found no obstruc- 
tion whatever in the river. I have stationed the Shokokon off Cumber- 
land, with orders to protect the transports from the enemy should they 
make their appearance. The Cohasvet is at anchor off the White 
House and this vessel at the railroad bridge [Richmond and York Kiver 
Railroad]. The Mystic still remains at Yorktown. At present all the 
vessels 1 have with me are fully supplied with ammunition, coal, and 
provisions. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

OHAS. A. BABCOCK, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdy. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Watmough, U. S. Navy, commanding 
U. S. S. Kansas, regarding the chase of tico suspicious steamers. 

U. S. GUNBOAT KANSAS, 
Off New Inlet, North Carolina, May 29, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the night of the 27th, at 
11 : 45 p. in., this vessel being on No. 5 night station, a steamer bearing 
N. N. E., standing seaward, was discovered. 

She was challenged, but no answer being made, a gun and a rocket 
were fired and chase began on an E. S. E. course, ending in a S. by E. 

For four hours until daylight we held her in plain sight and gained 
on her, making upward of 11 knots, but owing in great measure to the 
wretched quality of coal last supplied, a large proportion being slate, 
our steam now failed and it was found impossible to increase it. 

Our speed fell to 9, and the chase began to gain on us. I authorized 
the expenditure of 2 barrels of pork for the furnaces, as there were 
grounds for supposing the chase to be the successful runner, the Lucy, 
having on this trip a large amount of bullion for Europe, but the expe- 
dient failed. Every exertion was made by trimming ship; shot, etc., 
being brought aft, to overhaul the stranger, but at 8 a. m. she had 
gained so much, just being in sight, that I turned for our station. 

We reached latitude 32 55', longitude 76 55'. 

The chase was a single-stack, two-masted propeller, and not very 
large. 

At about meridian a large double-stack, side- wheel runner was dis- 
covered to the S. W., standing to the northward. Chase was ordered, 
but to my mortification I was informed by the engineer in charge that 
it would take an hour to get up steam. 

Orders had been given early in the morning to prepare the fires and 
boiler for their best work. 

The engineer of the watch, Mr. [I. R.] Oakford, had failed to comply 
with these orders, and ere his neglect could be remedied the chase ran 
away from us. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PEND. G. WATMOUGH, 

Lieutenant Commander. 

Acting Reai -Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding Sorth Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



104 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Commander Caldwell, commanding U. 8. 8. Glaucus, of injury 

to that vessel by fire. 

U. S. S. GLAUCUS, 
Off Western Bar, May 29, 186-1. 

SIR: I have respectfully to report that yesterday evening, at 9 
o'clock (Bald Head light-house, bearing N. by E., distant 13 miles), 
this vessel was discovered to be on fire. The first intimation we had 
of the accident was a thick volume of smoke bursting out of the engine- 
room hatch, followed immediately by a column of flame that shot up as 
high as the top of the smokestack and spread across the deck, envelop- 
ing the starboard waist boat. The crew was immediately called to fire 
quarters and every effort made to subdue the flames. For some time 
no impression seemed to be made, although the steam and force pumps 
were at work throwing three powerful streams, and all the available 
men with buckets kept up a constant dashing of water down the engine 
room. Believing it to be impossible to save the ship, and that in a very 
short time all communication between the two extremities of the vessel 
would be stopped, I gave the order to drown the magazine and shell 
room (both forward), to lower the boats, drop them astern ready for 
use, fire a gun, throw up a rocket, and make the Coston signal, "Fire, 
this ship is on." The fire, in the course of an hour, was extinguished 
in the engine room, but raged with great fury in and about the coal 
bunkers, under the berth deck and over the boilers, until alter 2 in the 
morning. At that time it was under control and gradually subsided 
until 10 a. m., when the last outbreak was entirely subdued. 

In the midst of the fire (but fortunately not until it was confined 
below) a violent squall of wind and rain from the 1ST. W. struck the 
ship, hauling round to the N. E., and ending in a moderate gale. This 
added much to our work, as the vessel lay in the trough of the sea 
(which was fast rising) and rolling very heavily with 4 feet of water 
in the forward hold and fire room. The after hold (the ship being 
divided into three water-tight compartments) was very easily kept free, 
but the pumps forward became choked almost as fast as cleared by 
the beans and other provisions which had been emptied into the hold 
by the bursting of the barrels. It was not until 8 o'clock that we got 
the ship free of water. 

During the whole of this appalling disaster the officers and men 
worked in the most admirable manner from 9 in the evening till 10 the 
next morning. Executive Officer Lieutenant Gillett, Acting Master 
Redding, and Acting Ensign Holloway were particularly active on the 
gun deck, where they were constantly deluged with water and almost 
suffocated with smoke. 

A few hours before the fire broke out I left the station to overhaul 
two vessels some distance in the offing. It was on our return that it 
was discovered. I have not been able to learn its cause. It seems to 
have commenced below the berth deck and in the vicinity of the forward 
ends of the boilers, and to have been some time burning before bursting 
out. 

The result of the fire is the serious injury of the ship; the loss of 
4,000 pounds of powder; the probable damage of several hundred 
shells, and the loss of a considerable quantity of provisions. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. H. B. CALDWELL, 

Commander, Commanding. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE. U. S. Navy, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 105 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

Farrar's Island, James River, May 30, 1864 4 p. m. 
(Via Fort Monroe, 1 :30 p. m., 31st. Received 2 : 30 p. m.) 
A deserter from rebel vessel of war Hampton reports to-day that the 
enemy have now below Drewry's Bluff three ironclads, six small gun- 
boats, plated with boiler iron, each mounting two guns of 6 inch and 
4-inch bore, all fitted with torpedoes, and nine fire ships fitted with 
combustible material, with which they propose to attack the fleet in 
James River at as early a moment as practicable by sending down 
their fire ships first, closely followed by the ironclads and other vessels. 
The deserter says that the vessels have been ready for one week and 
that their crews were" supplied by men from Lee's army. Will the 
Department please send with dispatch by special messenger to Com- 
mander Lynch the torpedoes now ready? 
Can the Department speedily supply six or eight steam barges? 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Major- General 
I littler, U. S. Army, regarding the Confederate force beloic Drewry's 
Bluff. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, May 30, 1864. 

GENERAL : I have information from a deserter from the rebel vessel 
of war Hampton that the enemy have now below Drewry's Bluff three 
ironclads, six smaller gunboats, plated with boiler iron, each mounting 
two guns of 6 inch and 4 inch bore, all fitted with torpedoes, and nine 
fire ships filled with combustible material, with which they propose to 
attack the fleet on James River at as early a moment as practicable by 
sending down the fire ships first, closely followed by their ironclads 
and other vessels. The deserter says that the vessels have been 
ready since Monday, a week ago; that the crews of the vessels were 
supplied by men from Lee's army. Information received previously 
from deserters intimated that the rebel land forces were intended to 
cooperate with the attack of the rebel naval vessels. If an attack of 
the nature of the above is made upon this fleet, it would at the time of 
attack require all the force at my disposal to meet it. I would respect- 
fully suggest the probability of a simultaneous movement against you. 
I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major General B. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 



106 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADhON. 

Order of Acting Hear -Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Gansevoort, 
U. S. Navy, to forward launches and cutters from the U. 8. S. Minne- 
sota for use in James River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM. 

Farrar's Island, James River, May 30, 1864. 

SIR : I wish the two launches and two largest cutters of the Minnesota, 
with their howitzers and good crews from that vessel, sent to me in 
tow of the Pink or Mount Washington with dispatch. Send with them 
two very reliable officers, the best you can find, taking them from the 
Minnesota, and, if necessary, some of them from the guard and ord- 
nance vessels. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain GUEET GANSEVOOET, 

U. S. Ironclad Roanolce. 



[Telegram.] 

HEADQUAETEES IN THE FIELD, May 30, 5 : 20 p. m. 
Admiral LEE: Your dispatch relating to fire ships and enemy's 
naval force received. In view of the torpedo boats and fire ships, hud 
you not better anchor your obstructions at least, if not sink them, in 
your front, leaving a channel for pursuit. 
They are awaiting your orders. 
Can Graham aid >ou? 

General Grant is now across the Pamunkey, at Hanovertown, 15 
miles from Richmond. As for the land attack, let them come on. 
Most truly, yours, 

BENJ. F. BUTLEE, 
Major- General, Commanding. 



Capture of the British steamer Caledonia. 
Eeport of Commander Crosby, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. KEYSTONE STATE, 
At Sea, Lat. 32P 57' N., Long. 77 54' W., May 30, 1864. 

SIE: I have the honor to report the capture of the British steamer 
Caledonia, 185 tons burden, of and from Bermuda, at 6 p. m. to day, in 
company with the supply steamer Massachusetts, Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant William U. West, commanding. 

This vessel chased her three hours and fired 21 shots at her before 
she hove to. She showed no colors, and had thrown overboard all of 
her cargo, which consisted of, according to her manifest, boxes and 
cases of bacon, medical stores, and leather. I send Acting Master 
C. H. Corser, of this ship, with a prize crew, in charge of the Caledonia, 
with orders to report to you at Hampton Koads for further instructions. 

The crew of the Caledonia I transferred to the Massachusetts for a 
passage north, with the exception of Captain Charles Nelson, Chief 
Engineer Thomas Case, and John Nelson, steward, who were retained 
to be sent north in the prize steamer as witnesses. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 107 

I also forward you the prize list of this ship's crew who are entitled 
to share in whatever may accrue of prize money for the capture. 

I have also shipped by the Caledonia 4 bales of cotton, which were 
picked up at sea to day by this vessel, no other ship being in sight at 
the time. 

I have also the honor to report that I left Beaufort on the 28th instant, 
and stood on the Bermuda route about 70 miles. At daylight the next 
morning sighted a large three masted propeller, burning black smoke, 
distant about 10 miles, and steering south. I immediately gave chase 
and gained rapidly until meridian. She was then distant about 5 miles. 
She threw overboard 237 bales of cotton, which we counted, besides a 
number of barrels. This lightened her sufficiently to keep her distance 
until dark, when we lost sight of her. I then followed back in her 
track, picked up 4 bale's of cotton, and, while hunting for the rest, saw 
black smoke, started in chase, and captured the Caledonia, of which the 
foregoing is a report. 

During the chase I had to throw overboard a quantity of coal in order 
to lighten the ship and increase her speed, the bunkers being too full 
to allow her to run at full speed. 

The crew of the Caledonia had destroyed her compasses, which had 
been adjusted for the vessel, besides doing whatever they could to 
destroy vessel and machinery during the chase, and on this account I 
have taken her in tow until daylight. 

As you directed, I have left the name of district judge and port 
blank. 

Accompanying this report I send a list of the crew of the Caledonia 
transferred to the Massachusetts. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PEIRCE CROSBY, 

Commander. 

Acting Eear- Admiral S. P. LEE, TT. S. Navy, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

P. S. I think that the captain of the Caledonia is an American. 

PEIRCE CROSBY, 

Commander. 



Report of Acting Master Corser, U. S. Navy, of the passage of the prize steamer to New York 

City. 

U. S. PRIZE STEAMER CALEDONIA, 

Brooklyn Navy Yard, June 8, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report that I left Newport News at 5 p. m. on the eve 
of the 5th instant with the prize, having received on board 78 bales of 
cotton from the U. S. S. Vicksburg, with an officer in charge of same. 
[ anchored just inside Cape Henry during the night to repair connec- 
tions and to get clear of pilot. At daylight of the 6th instant (Monday) 
proceeded to sea, shaping course to clear Nantucket Shoals. On the 
7th instant (Tuesday), 2 p. in., in latitude 39 15' N., longitude 72 30' W., 
wind blowing strong from N. E. and a sharp sea running, the first 
engineer, Mr. McMurtrie, who had given up in the morning, reported 
himself disabled for duty, and also two of his firemen prostrated and 
unfit for further service, and the remainder rapidly becoming so. Third 
assistant, Mr. Smith, had been on duty twenty hours in the engine 



108 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

room, reported to me that it was impossible for him to stand it more 
than twenty-four hours longer, at same time expressing his willingness 
to do all in his power. Being forty-eight hours from Boston, at the rate 
of then steaming, besides finding that the coal was very short of the 
engineer's calculation, for the safety of the vessel and cargo, 1 deemed 
it my duty to steer for the nearest port for assistance. I therefore put 
for New York, where I arrived at noon of the 8th (Wednesday), and 
immediately reported to the commandant of the U. S. navy yard, mak- 
ing a requisition for an engineer, two firemen, and 25 tons of coal, which 
he promptly complied with, and I shortly leave for Boston, and, by his 
advice, through the sound. Shall leave in an hour (10 a. in., 9th, 
Thursday). 

I have to say that First Assistant McMurtrie made a strong applica- 
tion to Captain Gansevoort to be relieved, or to have another engineer 
sent on board, but Captain Gansevoort told him that he must do the 
best he could, as he could not give him a man. 

The estimate of coal on board was overrated by the engineers and 
firemen, and their consumption was greater than they calculated. Mr. 
Smith has done nearly all the duty, night and day, since leaving Cape 
Henry, and is nearly used up. A more indefatigable man I never saw. 
I herewith enclose engineer's report made to me on 7th instant. 

The prisoners are safe and peaceable. I regret very much that cir- 
cumstances have compelled me to delay my passage so long, and to 
increase the expense of it, but hope that my course will meet with your 
approbation under them. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. H. CORSER, U. S. Navy, 

Prize Master. 

Commander PEIRCE CROSBY, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. S, Keystone State. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar j s Island, May 31, 1664 1: 45 p. m. 
(Via Fortress Monroe, 8:30 p. in. June 1. Received p. in.) 
Heard considerable cannonading for one hour last evening and four 
hours this morning in the direction of Richmond. A deserter to the 
army says they are mounting one 200-pouuder at Hewlett's, and that 
the rains were to have come down last night. 

These torpedoes and tire rafts will probably be down soon. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Bear- A dm ira L 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Report of officers regarding the burning of buildings near Four Mile Creek. 

U. S. S. MENDOTA, 
James L'iver, May 31, 18(>i. 

SIR: Having thoroughly investigated the matter submitted to us by 
your order of the 24th instant, we beg leave to report that the large 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 109 

house and the buildings on the point by Four Mile Creek were burned 
by order of Captain J. W. Sanderson, Third Pennsylvania Heavy Artil- 
lery, the former being used as a rendezvous and shelter by the enemy, 
from which the}' occasionally fired upon our pickets, and the latter con- 
taining forage liable to seizure by the rebels. 

The other buildings were burned without authority by the picket 
guard and men belonging to boats of this ship and the U. S. S. Hunch- 
bad'. 

We are unable to fix the act upon any individual. 
Respectfully submitted. 

H. W. MILLER, 

Lieutenant, U. 8. Navy. 
LOTHROP WIGHT, 

Acting Ensign. 
Commander EDWARD T. NICHOLS, 

Commanding U. M. 8. Mendota, James River. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Foster, U. S. Navy, regarding an 
engagement with the enemy in James River, May 31, 1864. 

TJ. S. S. COMMODORE PERRY, June 1, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that at 9 o'clock a. m., May 31, the 
enemy opened on this vessel with four guns. I immediately returned 
the fire, and at 11 o'clock a. m. succeeded in driving them away. 

Having expended all my ammunition I dropped down the river jmd 
sent a steamer to City Point, which brought up the ammunition 
required. 

The vessel was struck six times, and no one was injured. 
A man on board the U. S. S. (General Putnam had his foot injured by 
the recoil of a gun. Acting Assistant Surgeon J. E. Gregory deemed 
it necessary to amputate the foot and did so, and I sent him on board 
the U. S. S. Osccola. 

Enclosed you will please find a report of the ammunition expended 
May 31. 

1 am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

AMOS P. FOSTER, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 

[Enclosure.] 
List of ammunition expended on board U. S. S. Commodore Perry, May 31, 1864. 





100-pdr. Parrott. 


IX-inch gun. 


12-pdr. 
howitzer. 


Charges 


10 


80 10-pound 


2 


Shell 




/HlOsec 




Shrapnel 




\55 5 HCC 
15 













Respectfully submitted. 

AMOS P. FOSTER, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 



110 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Master Savage, IT. 8. Navy, of the expenditure of 
ammunition in engagement with the enemy. 

U. S. S. GENERAL PUTNAM, 
Appomattox River, Virginia, May 31, 1864. 

SIR: I would respectfully report the following expenditures of 
ammunition on board this vessel, in an engagement with the enemy's 
artillery on the left bank of river off Gilliam's Bar this day: 
20-pouuder Parrott rifle: 39 shell time fuze. 

24-pounder howitzer: 13 shrapnel, fixed ammunition; 1 shell, fixed 
ammunition. 

12-pounder howitzer: 19 shrapnel, fixed ammunition; 2 shell, fixed 
ammunition. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

H. H. SAVAGE, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Commander J. M. B. GLITZ, 

Comdg. U. S. S. Osceola, Senior Naval Officer off City Point, Va. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Braine, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. 
Vicksburg, regarding cotton picked up by that vessel at sea May 31, 1864. 

U. S. S. VICKSBURG, 
Off Newport News, Va., June J, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on May 31 and June 1, I picked 
up at sea 78 bales and 2 half bales of cotton, which were thrown over- 
board by a vessel I chased on the 31st of May. By order of Captain 
Guert Gansevoort, I have just shipped it per the prize steamer Cale- 
donia to Boston, and sent a prize officer, Acting Ensign John H. Harris, 
in charge of the same, to deliver it to the prize commissioners at that 
port. 

I enclose you a list of the officers and crew entitled to share in the 
above prize cotton. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. L. BRA INK, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from Brigadier- General Palmer, U. 8. Army, to Gommanaer 
Davenport, U. S. Navy, regarding the transportation of refugees. 

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA, 

New Berne, N. C., May 31, 1864. 

SIR: I have long intended to carry out your request to send a 
steamer to the vicinity of Washington, N. C., for the purpose of bring- 
ing in such refugees as may be found, but owing to the heavy drain 
upon my quartermaster's department for water transportation of all 
kinds made by Major-General Butler, it has been impossible for me to 
carry out my instructions. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. Ill 

There are several men in town who desire to go up for their families, 
and I would suggest that you send them up on the first gunboat that 
goes in the neighborhood of Washington and bring back the families. 
If you will be kind enough to inform me when the first boat goes I will 
send the men whenever you may say. 

1 am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

I. N. PALMER, 

Brigadier- General, U. 8. Army, Commanding. 
. Commander H. K. DAVENPORT, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Hetzel. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Nary, regarding specimen of 
torpedo used by the Confederates in James River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 1, 1864. 

SIR : I send by express a specimen of the copper torpedoes used by 
the rebels in James River. 

The plan of its construction is excellent, and I request that the Depart- 
ment will furnish me with a number of the same description, as early 
as practicable, with fuzes such as were found on board the Atlanta. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting statements 
of a refugee and deserters. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 1, 1864. 

SIR : I transmit enclosed, for the information of the Department, three 
statements of refugees and deserters, as follows: (1) May 30, statement 
of John Loomis, deserter from rebel steamer Hampton; (2) June 1. of 
Archy Jenkins, colored, a refugee from Richmond; (3)* of Augustus 
Freeman, colored deserter. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosures.] 

Statement of John Loomis, a white deserter from C. S. S. Hampton, at Richmond, who 
came on board the U. S. S. Hunchback at Deep Uottom. 

MAY 30, 1864. 

The rebels have now below Fort Darling the ironclads Virginia, 
Captain Mitchell; Richmond, Pegram; Fredericksburg, Gardner; also 
six wooden gunboats, partially plated with boiler iron, all armed with 
torpedoes, fitted to their bows. The ironclads have each two 10-inch 

* Omitted as not necessary to publish. 



112 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

columbiads, and two 7-inch rifles. The wooden vessels one 0-inch and 
one 4 inch rifles. The Virginia draws 14 feet, the Richmond and Fred- 
ericksburg about 13 feet. The former steams 7 or 8 knots; the others 
5 or 6 knots. The crews number 150 men each, drawn from Lee's army. 
They are plated with 8 inches railroad iron, rolled out and bolted 
together, upon 3 feet of oak backing; the bolts go through and set up 
with nuts. There are also six fire ships, or schooners, tilled with com- 
bustible material: two more fitting out at Richmond. 

They intend attacking the Federal fleet as soon as practicable, in the 
night: first sending down the tire ships, and following with the rebel' 
craft when we are disconcerted by the fire rafts. (The fire rafts are old 
schooners prepared for this service.) 

The ironclads came through the obstructions on Sunday last (a week 
ago yesterday) and have been ready ever since. 



Statement of Archy Jenkins, colored, a refugee from Richmond, Va. 

JUNE 1, 1864. 

I am a free man, stevedore. I was employed on the Konita. 1 left 
Richmond Monday. I gave a colored man $10 to show me the batteries, 
past the pickets. I crawled through the bushes and came down to 
Hill Carter's place. 

The firing was about 7 miles from Richmond, out toward Boar Swamp; 
the firing was rapid and heavy. The mate of the Bonlta said Lee was 
5 miles from Richmond and Grant about 7 miles. Opinion is divided 
as to Grant's getting to Richmond. They are putting two barges and 
a sloop lashed together, filled with shavings and pitch and with tor- 
pedoes, which they intend to set on fire, and when it reaches the fleet 
it will blow up and destroy the fleet. There is a vast quantity of pow- 
der in it. There are six others, small steamers Nansemond, 2 guns; 
Raleigh, 2 guns; Hampton, 2; Beaufort, 1; Torpedo, 2; Patrick Henry; 
they said she was too big an object and they would not bring her out. 
All are fitted with torpedoes on long poles. The ironclads: Virginia, 
about 14 feet; Richmond, about 14 feet; Fredericksburg, about 14 feet, 
I guess; I don't know exactly. They were lightened over Warwick 
Bar. You can carry with good tide 12 feet. You can carry about 15 
feet good tide over Trent's Reach. 

There is a freshet now, a little; there is about 6 or 7 inches more than 
usual high water. 

1 don't think they will have any trouble in bringing their ironclads 
over Trent's Reach ; there is plenty of water close over to the left bank. 
They must come at high water. I am no man for steering a boat, but 
1 know where the bars and deep water [are|. I have been running on 
the river five or six years, off and on. They all say they know "they 
can whip you all; they are certain of it." They believe in their torpe- 
does in preference to everything. They all say you haven't sense to 
make a good torpedo; they reckon on them more than all else besides. 
They say that all that they are afraid of, that you have a string of tor- 
pedoes all across at Cox's and Trent's reaches, and that the river is 
otherwise obstructed, and that when they come on you will fall back 
and lead them on over the torpedoes and blow them all up. They say 
that is all they care about. 

They are very hard up for provisions at Richmond. If you took 
Petersburg "they could not fight another week. They must give 
right up." 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 113 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Barnes, U. S. 
Navy, regarding stone ballast. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, June 1, 1864. 

SIR : I desire that you obtain stone ballast to be placed in tbe schoon- 
ers and bark that you will bring up. I understand that it can be pro- 
cured at the ballast wharf at Bermuda Hundred, discharged there by 
vessels coining up for cargo. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Fleet Captain J. S. BARNES. 



[Telegram.] 

FARRAR'S ISLAND, 

On James River, June 1, 1864 4 : 30 p. m. 
(Via Fort Monroe, 5 : 30 p. m., 2d. Received 7 : 20 p. m.) 
The concurrent testimony, which seems reliable, of deserters from 
the rebel Army and Navy, and contrabands from Richmond, is that 
enemy meditate an immediate attack upon this fleet with tire rafts, tor- 
pedo vessels, gunboats, and ironclads, all of which carry torpedoes, and 
that they are confident of being able to destroy the vessels here, prin- 
cipally by their torpedoes. 

I have not here, and am unable to fit torpedoes which are at all 
reliable, and would urge the Department to forward me, with all dis- 
patch, torpedo barges and torpedoes, the latter with percussion fuzes 
similar to those found on the Atlanta. 

In view of the novel attack contemplated, I should regard it as 
imprudent to send the Tecumseh to sea now, and would request that 
one or more ironclads could be added to my force here, considering the 
importance of this river to the armies of Generals Grant and Butler. 

S. P. LEE. 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, Farrar's Island, June 2, 1864. 
(Via Fort Monroe, Va., 5:30 p. m., 4th. Received 11 a. m., 5th.) 
No change in the naval situation, except that I have received here 
from General Butler the vessels he had provided at City Point, as part 
of his plan of campaign, for obstructing James River. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

N w R VOL 10 8 



114 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Chase and destruction of the steamer Georgiana McCaw, June 2, 1864. 

Report of Lieutenant-Commander Haxtun, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Maratanza. 

U. S. S. MARATANZA, 
Off Western Bar, Wilmington, N. C., June 5, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that at 3 a. in., June 2, Acting 
Master Alfred Everson, commanding the U. S. S. Victoria, discovered 
a paddle steamer running in. He gave chase, opened fire on her, and 
drove her ashore. 

He immediately dispatched two boats, in charge of Acting Master's 
Mate William Moody and Acting Third Assistant Engineer Thomas 
llineline, with orders to fire her, which they successfully accomplished, 
capturing 20 persons. 14 having escaped. 

At daylight Fort Caswell and the adjacent batteries opened with 
shot and shell on the boats and they withdrew. 

She proved to be the Oeorgiana McCaw, of Liverpool, from Nassau, 
this being her first trip, with 60 tons of cargo. 

She ran ashore on the last of the flood, going 12 knots. 

Since then we have had considerable wind and sea from the south- 
ward and westward, and to day she is reported to be bilged. 

The enemy boarded her at 10 a. m. and extinguished the fire. She 
lies in 10 feet of water within easy range of Fort Caswell, Western 
Battery, and Battery Cameron [Fort Campbell]. 

Captain Everson speaks favorably of the energy and gallantry of 
the officers commanding the boats, and appears himself to have 
displayed considerable judgment and dash in the affair. 

I transmit herewith all the papers and an inventory of the instru- 
ments captured, which are retained subject to your orders. 

Last night two steamers attempted to run out and were driven back. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. HAXTUN, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. MARATANZA, 

Off Western Bar, Wilmington, N. C., June 5, 1864. 
SIR: List of articles captured from the blockade runner Georgiana 
McCaic, and held subject to your order: 

Two chronometers, one barometer, one sextant, one marine clock. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. HAXTUN, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Keport of Acting Master Everson, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Victoria. 

U. S. S. VICTORIA, 

Off Western Bar, Wilmington, N. C., June 2, 1864. 
SIR: 1 have the honor to report that at 3 a. in., of this date, and 
while drifting in 3 fathoms water, Bald Head light bearing east, saw 



NORTH . ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 115 

white water near the beach to the south and westward, which I sup- 
posed to be a steamer. I immediately steamed ahead at full speed 
toward the beach in order to cut her off. 

On near approach I discovered her to be a side-wheel steamer steer- 
ing 1 1 or the bar. 

As he crossed my bow I rounded to in his wake and discharged at 
him my starboard VHI-inch gun, loaded with one 5-second shell and 
stand of grape, and kept firing my 30-pound rifle as I continued the 
chase, until 3:30 a. m. she struck on the bar. I immediately ordered 
the first and second cutters to board and tire her, the former under 
command of Acting Master's Mate William Moody, the latter under 
charge of Acting Third Assistant Engineer Thomas W. Hineliue. 

On arrival on board-they found that two boats, with their crews, bad 
escaped to the shore. 

They, however, succeeded in capturing 29 of the crew, including the 
captain and most of the officers, together with 3 passengers. 

They fired her in several places, and she continued to burn until 10 
a. m., when she was boarded from the shore. At daylight Fort Caswell 
and the adjacent batteries opened tire on our boats with shot and shell, 
which compelled them to return without accomplishing her destruction. 

She proved to be the Georgiana McCaw, of Liverpool, 700 tons burden, 
from Nassau, bound to Wilmington, N. C. 

Her cargo consists of about (>() tons provisions, etc. 

I would add, sir, that too much credit can not be awarded to Acting 
Master's Mate William Moody and Acting Third Assistant Engineer 
Thomas W. Hiueline for their perseverance and energy displayed, and 
their cool and gallant conduct while under fire of the enemy. 
1 am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ALFRED EVERSON, 
Acting Master, Commanding U. S. 8. Victoria. 

Lieutenant-Commander M. HAXTUN, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Maratanza and Senior Officer Present. 



Report of Commander Nicholson, U. S. Navy, commanding TJ. S. S. State of Georgia. 

U. S. S. STATE OF GEORGIA, 

Off Western Bar, June 13, 1864. 

SIR: It affords me pleasure to report that the blockade runner 
Georgiana McCaw (which steamer was run ashore by the Victoria on 
the morning of the 3d instant) is a complete wreck. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. NICHOLSON, 

Commander and Senior Officer Present. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Captain -Smith, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Davenport, U. S. 
Navy, to send the schooner Ann 8. Davenport to obstruct the Roanolce. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 

Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, June 2, 1864. 
SIR: You will please send tht schooner Ann S. Davenport up to me 
as soon as you can have her tov ed here. 



116 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

I wish to use her for sinking iu the cut-off between Middle and Roa- 
uoke rivers, so that we may have perfect command of Middle River. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Commander FI. K. DAVENPORT, 

Senior Officer, New Berne, N. C. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 3 12 : 45 p. m. 

(Via Fort Monroe, 5:30 p. m., June 4. Received 11 a. m., 5th.) 
From six to a dozen steam barges, which 1 suppose may be easily 
obtained in the Northern cities, will be of great advantage to me here, 
if torpedo-fitted and rifle screens enough to protect its few apertures. 
I respectfully request the favorable consideration of the Department 
to this subject. 

8. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander BanMead, 
U. 8. Navy, to proceed to duty in the sounds of North Carolina. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, June 3, 1864. 

SIR : Immediately upon receipt of this order proceed with all practi- 
cable dispatch direct to the sounds of North Carolina, stopping only to 
leave your pilot on the Roanoke, and report on your arrival to Captain 
M. Smith, senior officer present. There is coal at Hatteras Inlet. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander J. P. BANKHEAD, 

U. S. S. Otsego. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. 
Navy, regarding the disposition of the U. S. S. Tecumseh and her 
consort. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 4, 1864. 

SIR : Your telegram of June 1 is received. Twelve steam barges have 
been purchased and go without fittings, as two mouths would be required 
if they are altered. Six torpedoes prepared by the Orduance Bureau 
leave in the Baltimore this morning. You have the six best ironclads 
in the Navy, and Admiral Farragut, threatened by a larger force than 
is opposed to you, has not a single one. Let the Tecumseh and her con- 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 117 

sort go, as ordered, as soon as six of the twelve barges ordered reach 
James River. Has confidential letter of Department, dated May 20, 
been received? 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Eoads. 



Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. 
Navy, regarding additional tugs as picket boats for his command. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 4, 1864. 

SIR : The Department has directed twelve small tugs, as picket boats, 
to be forwarded at once to your command. Six from Philadelphia have 
already sailed. Six acting ensigns to command these boats will be sent 
by Commodore Stribling and also such engineers as he can obtain, it 
being the intention of the Department that two third assistants should 
be assigned to each, if qualified firemen are not available. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 4, 1864 10 p. m. 

(Received June 5, 1864 9: 20 p. m.) 

No enemy's armed vessel has been seen since we came up this river. 
A bark and four schooners, provided by and at the expense of the 
Army, are here to-night, ready with shingle ballast for sinking in 
Trent's Reach, at the locality designated by General Butler, who recom- 
mends the measure. 

This will be done, if a diminution of my force or controlling military 
considerations require it, previous to the arrival of the torpedo fitted 
decked steam barges, which I hope soon to receive. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Gansevoort, 
U. S. Nary, regarding the preparation of the U. S. steamers Governor 
Buckingham and Wilderness. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, June 4, 1864. 

SIR: When the Governor Buckingham returns from Baltimore, pre- 
pare her for sea with all dispatch and send her to rejoin the blockade 



118 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

off Wilmington. There should be no delay about the Wilderness. 
When will she be ready? 
Kespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain G. GANSEVOORT, 

U. IS. IS. Roanoke. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Roe, U. 8. Navy, to proceed to duty at City Point, James River. 

FLAGSHIP AGA.WAM, 

Jamett River, June 4, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed with the Sassacus under your command to City Point, 
James Eiver, choosing favo'rable weather, and report to me. 

If the condition ot the vessel renders it necessary, endeavor to 
obtain the convoy of a vessel corning up from the blockade or of an 
army transport. 

Kespectfully, yours, 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander F. A. BOB, 

U. 8. 8. Sassacus. 



Report of Commander Crosby, U. 8. Navy, regarding the disposition of 

prize cotton. 

U. S. S. KEYSTONE STATE, 

Beaufort, N. C., June 4, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report that I picked up at sea 88 bales of 
cotton, which I have shipped as prize cotton in the hermaphrodite 
brig Alfred, of. Baltimore, bound to Philadelphia, with orders to deliver 
it to the U. S. marshal at that port. I have also sent an officer, Acting 
Ensign J. C. Murphy, with the cotton as prize master of the same. I 
enclose, prize lists of the ship in duplicate. 

My reason for sending the cotton direct to Philadelphia is because 
the Alfred is bound to that port and is the only vessel ready to leave 
for the North; there being no place here to store it, and it being in the 
way on board this vessel, I took the earliest moment to get rid of it. 
The greater part of it I picked up off Cape Lookout, and it is a part of 
the cotton thrown overboard by the blockade runner chased by this 
vessel on the 29th ultimo. 

On the 2d instant, at 4 a. in., I chased a blockade runner to the east- 
ward. At 11 a. m. I gave up the chase, the blockade runner having 
run out of sight of the ship; the Keystone State was making over 12 
knots per hour during the chase. The Fort Jackson was also in chase, 
and kept on. 

-I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PEIRCE CROSBY, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Acting Hear- Admiral S. P. LEE, U. S. Navy, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 119 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Braine, 17. S. Navy, requesting instruc- 
tions regarding the disposition of cotton. 

U. S. S. VICKSBURG, 
Off Fortress Monroe, Va., June 4, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the 31st of May and 1st of 
June I picked up 79 bales of cotton, which were thrown overboard by 
a vessel I chased on the 31st of May. 

Please inform me what are your orders for its disposition. Shall I 
ship it to Philadelphia or Boston to the care of the U. S. prize commis- 
sioners, subject to the adjudication of the prize courts! I have been 
compelled to come here for repairs required to defective machinery, 
which could not be done at Beaufort, N. C. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. L. BRAINE, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

FARRAR'S ISLAND, June 5, 1804 10 p. m. 

(Via Fort Monroe, Va., June 6.) 

If General Grant swings round to James Kiver, a dredging machine 
to deepen the channel heretofore cut through Trent's Keach Bar will 
be wanted immediately, to enable the monitors to pass up. Nothing 
new. 

S. P. LEE, 

Acting Hear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Commander Corbin, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. S. Augusta, 
regarding the arrival of that vessel in Hampton Roads. 

U. S. S. AUGUSTA, 

Newport Neics, Va., Sunday, June 5, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to orders, dated 25th April, 1804, from the honor- 
able Secretary of the Navy, a copy of which is herewith enclosed, I 
reached Hampton Roads last evening at dusk, and this morning 
anchored oft' this place, where I reported to the senior officer, Captain 
G. Gansevoort, commanding the U. S. ironclad RoanoTce. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. G. CORBIN, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy, Commanding U. S. S. Augusta. 

Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



120 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

WEST POINT, June 5, 1864. 

A number of boats loaded with men have been seen crossing from 
nortli to south side of Mattapony River. A small gunboat would be of 
great service. 

H. H. OLEY, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 
Brigadier- General ABERCROMBIE. 

[Endorsement.] 

HEADQUARTERS, 

White House, Fa., June 5 7:15 p. m. 

Respectfully referred to the commander of the naval forces, with a 
request that his immediate attention be given to the above. 

J. J. ABERCROMBIE, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 



Report of Captain Sands, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Fort Jackson, 
regarding the capture of the steamer Thistle. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 
Blockade off Wilmington, N. C., June 5, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report to you the capture by this vessel of 
the blockade runner, iron side- wheel steamer Thistle (new), of Glasgow, 
on the night of the 4th instant (yesterday), in latitude 32 38' N., 
longitude 75 55' W. 

At 2: 20 p. m. discerned from the masthead a steamer about 12 miles 
to the southward, heading westward. We gave chase, when she 
changed her course to the southward and eastward, burning black 
smoke. After a chase of 70 miles and firing eleven times from the 
forward 30-pounder rifle and nineteen times with the 100-pounder rifle, 
at 8:20 p. m. she showed lights as signal of surrender, when we came 
up alongside and sent boats to take possession of her, transferring her 
captain, officers, and crew to this vessel. Her cargo, with the excep- 
tion of a cotton press, was thrown overboard during the chase. We 
passed casks of oil and several broken cases that had evidently con- 
tained muskets. The saptain informed me the muskets were of very 
inferior quality, put on board as freight. She had no papers, the cap- 
tain (as he informed me) having burned and destroyed them previous 
to the capture. She is a fine, iron, side-wheel steamer, with superior 
engines, and very strong, costing in Glasgow 22,000. The captain 
tells me she is the same vessel that was run on the Federal Point Shoal 
in the March gales, and laid there so long, which we supposed was the 
Will o' the Wisp. She must be a very strong vessel to have stood that 
gale aground, as she was for several days, and with no apparent injury. 
She is fast, going 12 knots while we were going 13.0 and 14 knots. 
Her captain's name is Alex. Hord, a British subject, and all the crew 
claim to be, and seem to be, British subjects. I have sent her to Bos- 
ton for adjudication in charge of Acting Master William E. Dennisou 
of this vessel. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

B. F. SANDS, 
Captain, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 121 

P. S. I enclose duplicate prize lists of the crew of this vessel at the 
time of capture. 

B. F. S. 



Report of Commander Crosby, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. 8. Keystone 
State, regarding the capture of the steamer Siren. 

U. S. S. KEYSTONE STATE, 
Beaufort, N. C., June 5, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that I captured the British steamer 
Siren (propeller) to day at 12:30 p. in., no other vessel being in sight 
during the chase or af the time of the capture. 

I chased her an hour, fired two shots at her, when she hove to and 
hoisted English colors, after using all means to escape. She is loaded 
with hoop iron, liquors, and merchandise. She is 87 tons, total register 
tonnage. 

1 have sent Acting Ensign C. M. Bird in charge of the prize, with a 
prize crew, to report to you at Hampton Roads for further orders. 

I came into this port yesterday, shipped the cotton picked up at sea 
by the hermaphrodite brig Alfred, and left here this morning in com- 
pany with the Alfred, when I captured the Siren and returned. 

The Siren was from Bermuda and cleared for Nassau. At the time 
of her capture she was 17 miles from the outer buoy off Beaufort 
Harbor. 

Her manifest shows that she was bound to Wilmington, N. C. In 
consequence of shortness of engineers, I was obliged to send Acting 
Chief Engineer Eddowes, detached from this vessel to-day, as engineer 
of the Siren. 

The Siren draws about 4i feet of water, and made about 6 miles per 
hour. I send the captain, chief engineer, and steward of the Siren in 
her as witnesses, the remainder (1(5), whose names are enclosed in 
duplicate, are on board the storeship William Badger, awaiting trans- 
portation north. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PEIRCE CROSBY, 

Commander. 

Acting Kear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Commander Davenport, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Hetzel, 
in view of his detachment as senior officer at New Berne, N. C. 

U. S. S. HETZEL, 
Off New Berne, N. C., June 5, 1864. 

SIR : I am in receipt of my orders detaching me from the Hetzel. 
1 send you a few articles and papers which 1 was directed by the 
admiral to turn over to my successor. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster E. Mellach has charge of stores, includ- 
ing masters' and engineers' stores and coal. He also has the accounts 
of all boats that have no paymaster. He makes requisitions for all 
stores, including coal, subject to the approval of the senior naval officer. 



122 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Carpenter Mark W. Paul has charge of the repair shop, and gener- 
ally keeps a few workmen hired, who are paid only when at work. 

Gunner E. A. McDonald lias charge of ordnance stores. 

The schooners Albemarle, James Norcom, Renshaic, Flusser,aud Susan 
Ann Howard are used as ordnance and store vessels. 

In sending officers and men north under orders, discharged, etc., it 
is not necessary to wait for the supply steamer outside; a simple request 
from the senior officer to the quartermaster will always secure them Gov- 
ernment transportation on army transports. 

The Sassacus, Hetzcl, Ceres, Lockwood, and Bombshell are at New Berne. 
The repairs on the Ceres and Bombshell are nearly completed. 

The Valley City left for Pamlico Eiver yesterday to relieve the Lou- 
isiana. Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Henry Eaton will be relieved 
of the command of the Louisiana by Acting Volunteer Lieutenant 
F. M. Green on her arrival h'ere. I have been in the habit of relieving 
the vessel in Pamlico River every two or three weeks. 

The Granite is at Hatteras Inlet. As I previously wrote you, her bot- 
tom requires cleaning. 

A vessel will be required at Ocracoke Inlet to act as guard ship. 

On my departure Lieutenant-Commander Roe will be left as senior 
officer present. I have informed him that the Ceres is to be sent to 
Albemarle Sound as soon as repaired, and recommended that she tow 
the Ann 8. Davenport up. 

There are two small prize vessels here, the Jeff. Davis and M. O'Neil. 
The former has been taken for Government use; the latter I have taken 
for Government use as a coal lighter. As yet my action has not been 
approved by the Department. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. K. DAVENPORT, 

Commander, U. 8. Navy. 

Captain M. SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Naval Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Eaton, U. 8. Navy, regarding affairs 
in the vicinity of Washington, N. C. 

U. S. S. LOUISIANA, 
Off New Berne, N. C., June 5, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your orders of May 24, I proceeded to Pamlico 
River, North Carolina, and have the honor to report as follows: 

There are no batteries erected or being erected below Castle Island, 
near Washington. On Castle Island, I was informed, are mounted two 
32s, and one 08 on Fort McKibbin, at Washington, with a force of about 
140 men. 

The river is clear of torpedoes as far as known. I have received on 
board and transferred 19 men and women and 22 children for New 
Berne and Portsmouth. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HENRY EATON, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Commander H. K. DAVENPORT, 

Senior Officer Present. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 123 

Correspondence relative to a proposed joint attack upon Fort Fisher, N. C. 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Clary, U. S. Navy, transmitting 
copy of confidential letter to the senior officer off Wilmington, N. C. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, June 5, 1864. 

SIR : I transmit enclosed a copy of a confidential letter addressed by 
me to Captain Sands, or the senior officer present off Wilmington, 
on the 31st ultimo, which probably was not received by him before he 
went on the outside blockade. 1 desire that you proceed to carry out 
the directions contained therein immediately by putting yourself in 
communication with General Palmer. In the absence of Lieutenant 
Gushing, give a pronifuent part in the enterprise to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Breck, and such other capable officers as you may select. 

I understand from General Butler that the army has light-draft boats, 
the use of which will greatly facilitate the undertaking. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander A. G. CLARY, 

U. 8. 8. Dacotah. 

[Enclosure.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, May 30, 1864. 

SIR: I have your private note stating that Colonel Jourdan proposes 
to attack Wilmington. Lieutenant Gushing some time since advanced 
the same idea. Other occurrences have hitherto delayed the attempt, 
which the full occupation of the enemy here and his probable depletion 
there encourages. 

Inform Colonel Jourdan that I have desired you to give the army 
every aid and encouragement in your power to cooperate against Wil- 
mington, and do so. Lieutenant Gushing should have a prominent post. 
Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain B. F. SANDS 

(Or Senior Officer Present], off Wilmington. 



Letter from Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Major-General Butler, U. 8. Army. 

U. S. S. AGAWAM, 
James River, June 5, 1864. 

GENERAL : I now make further reply to your communication of yester- 
day, containing General Palmer's dispatch of the 31st ultimo, in which he 
complains of a want of navy cooperation in a coup de main against 
Wilmington, meditated by him, about which he at the same time 
remarks, "I have no complaints to make as I do not know that there 
is any blame to be attached to anyone." 

About a week since I received a note marked "private" from Captain 
Sands, from which it appears that on the 22d ultimo Colonel Jourdan 



124 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Lad come from Beaufort in the Kansas (Lieutenant-Commander Wat- 
mough) to reconnoiter Fort Fisher, which the colonel proposed to sur- 
prise by landing 1,200 men, to be brought from Beaufort in the block- 
aders returning thence after coaling, and to be landed by the small 
boats of the blockading vessels. Captain Sands, doubting if such a 
body of troops could thus be landed so as to make a surprise, answered 
that he would ask for instructions, and meanwhile promised all practi- 
cable aid, and put the Niphon at Colonel Joui dan's disposition for the 
purpose of gaining information, that vessel having some refugees on 
board who keep up a communication with the shore. 

Colonel Jourdau told Captain Sands he had the consent of General 
Palmer, who considered it a very hazardous enterprise, and it further 
appears, from the colonel's remarks to Captain Sands, that the scheme 
was of local origin and to be so conducted. This view also appears in 
the opening paragraph of General Palmer's communication to you. 

Hearing nothing from you on the subject, to save time and to aid the 
army, 1 instructed Captain Sands to give the army all the aid and 
encouragement in his power, and so inform Colonel Jourdan. 

The Fort Jackson, which Captain Sands commands, is of too deep 
draft to pass Beaufort Bar to coal, hence Captain Sands comes to 
Hampton Roads for supplies, and he had left there for the blockade 
before my instructions reached him. 

These, however, were also directed to the senior officer present off Wil- 
mington, and I now send to Commander Clary a duplicate of the same, 
with instructions, in case of the absence of Captain Sands, to put him- 
self in communication with our military authorities in North Carolina 
and cooperate to the best of his judgment in the proposed surprise of 
some of the enemy's works at Wilmington. 

Just subsequent to my instructions to Captain Sands to aid the army 
detachment to land and surprise Wilmington, you informed me that 
you had seen in the rebel papers that our troops were evacuating New 
Berne, which you could only understand as meaning a movement 
against Wilmington. I then communicated to you what information I 
had and the action I had taken on the subject. 

It is best that plans for cooperation should be understood in time and 
arranged between us. 

I enclose two sketches of Fort Fisher, etc., and some information since 
received of the forces at Wilmington. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. JV 'orth Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General B. F. BUTLER, 

(Commanding Department Virginia and North Carolina. 



Report of Commander Howell, IT. S. Navy, transmitting letter from Brigadier-General Palmer, 
V. S. Army, to Captain Sands, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. NEREITS, 
Off New Inlet, June 6', 1864. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to enclose herewith a letter addressed 
to Captain B. F. Sands, or senior officer off Wilmington, by General I. N. 
Palmer. 

On my way to Beaufort for coal I stopped off Masonboro Inlet at 1 
o'clock a. m. of the 24th May, and received on board from the Niphon, 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



125 



Rebel Ram on the Rip 1 ? 
aground. 



126 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Colonel Jourdan, commanding Sub-District of Beaufort, N. C., and his 
aid, who had been to the fleet oft' New Inlet to reconnoiter and gain 
information. The reconnoitering was confined to an outside view of the 
forts, and an attempt to communicate by boat from the Niphon with 
some so-called Union Confederate officer, who was to play traitor and 
give information, but who failed to appear at the rendezvous on the 
beach near Masonboro Inlet. Colonel Jourdan, before leaving at Beau- 
fort, told me I would probably hear from him before the Nereus sailed. 
I was four days at anchor, but heard nothing from or of the colonel. 

On the afternoon of June 2, instant, Colonel Jourdau again made his 
appearance. He came as far as Masonboro in the army transport Jo hn 
jFarnWjthen went on board the Niphon, which vessel steamed down the 
coast, passed the batteries just outside of range, and drew their fire. 
It was a very dashing looking affair, although tolerably safe, but, in a 
military point of view, under the circumstances, I think ill judged. 

To the rebel officers of Fort Fisher the whole affair must have 
appeared as a reconuoissance. A reconnoissauce is, of course, made 
with a view to ulterior operations, and, necessarily, the rebels were 
induced to be more vigilant, and possibly to double pickets, etc. 

The advent of a steamer painted black, her communicating with the 
fleet (she hung on to our stern by a hawser), and her almost immediate 
return to Beaufort, were also suspicious circumstances calculated to 
put the rebels on their guard. 

Colonel Jourdan came on board the Nereus after his reconnoissauce, 
and said that he wished to take Fort Fisher by surprise, and that if he 
could land 1,500 men on the beach without being discovered, between the 
hours of 11 p. m. and 1 o'clock a. m., he thought he might succeed. He 
also .presented the accompanying letter. 1 made a calculation that 
with all the boats of the vessels present I might (with a smooth sea) 
land, exclusive of boats' crews, about three hundred and fifty men. 
The colonel professed that this would not do; that unless he could land 
one-half of his force at once the expedition must be given up. To land 
750 men was simply an impossibility. Our boats are small merchant 
ship boats. I so informed the colonel, and he left for Beaufort to con- 
coct some other more feasible scheme for harasvsiug the enemy. I was 
at great pains to assure Colonel Jourdau of the earnest desire of the 
navy to cooperate with, assist, further the ends of General Palmer in 
every possible way. I offered to make any diversion he would suggest, 
to do anything but impossibilities. I pointed out to him that large 
numbers of surf boats intended expressly for lauding soldiers on beaches 
had been built, and, doubtless, could be had at Fortress Monroe, and, 
in fact, did everything to manifest to him that we were as desirous as 
he could be to strike, or assist in striking, a blow at the enemy. You 
will be able to judge as well or better than I what measure of success 
an attempted surprise of Fort Wisher would have met. I only know 
that on dark nights the whole beach is alive with signal lights. I 
should like some instructions in case the colonel should renew the 
attempt, and am, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. HOWELL, 
Commander, Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Eear- Admiral 8. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 127 

[Enclosure.] 

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA, 

New Berne, N. C., May 30, 1ML 

CAPTAIN : A few days since I addressed you a communication, which 
was to have been delivered to you by Colonel Jourdau, commanding 
the Sub- District of Beaufort, in which I begged your cooperation in a 
movement to be made in the vicinity of Wilmington, by the forces 
under my command, and which expedition was to be commanded by 
Colonel Jourdati. 

This letter the colonel tells me was not delivered to you as he had an 
opportunity of seeing you when you were last off Beaufort. He informs 
me, however, that he has informed you of the intended movement and 
that he supposed you were ready to give such assistance as was in your 
power. 

The force designated for this affair has been for some days waiting 
at Morehead [Cityj, but for some cause the movement has been delayed, 
and I fear it will not take place as we desired, unless you will place 
one or two vessels at the disposition of Colonel Jourdan for the purpose 
of transporting troops, and give us assistance in landing them. 

I only ask, captain, that we may have this assistance, and if the 
thing should prove a success you will have everything to gain, for if 
Fort Fisher should be captured we could, with your assistance, hold it. 
If we fail you have nothing to lose. Our men can either retire to the 
boats or they may be able to come through to this place by land. 

We know tolerably well the position of the enemy's force about Wil- 
mington, and the strength of it. Even if we can not make a good 
thing of it, we hope to do some good by diverting some of the rebel 
force from Virginia and thus help the cause. 

I beg, therefore, that you will seriously consider this matter, and that 
you will inform me at the earliest possible moment whether I may count 
upon your cooperation. Colonel Jourdau knows all the plans, and any- 
thing he may say in regard to this matter, please regard as coming 
directly from myself. 

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

I. N. PALMER, 
Brigadier- General, Commanding. 

Captain B. F. SANDS, U. S. Navy 
(Or to the Senior Naval Officer], Blockading Fleet off Wilmington. 

[Endorsement.] 

Told Colonel Jourdan that I could laud 350 men at outside in the 
boats of the squadron. He thought it not feasible to attempt the sur- 
prise of the fort under the circumstances. 

J. C. HOWELL, 

Commander. 



Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. 

Navy, expressing approval of the attempted destruction of the C. 8. ram 

Albemarle. 

NAV/ DEPARTMENT, June 6, 1864. 

SIR : Your several telegrams have been received, viz, one of the 2d, 
two of the 3d, and one of the 4th, instant. 

The Chicopee leaves New York to-day for the sounds of North Caro- 
lina direct. The Shamrock, with a ram on her bow, also leaves for the 
sounds direct. 



128 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Twelve steain barges are on the way to join you and the torpedoes 
have also gone. If rifle screens were put on these barges, at the North, 
there would be a detention of two months. You will recollect the time 
required to fit out Hear- Admiral Farragut's light- drafts, which are now 
with you. 

The Department approves the gallant attempt to blow up the Albe- 
marle. Lieutenant William B. Cushiug has proposed a scheme with 
regard to another ironclad which it would be well to encourage, and 
you will please instruct the senior officer oft' Wilmington to thai effect. 
Risks to accomplish an important object ought to be undertaken 
without hesitation, and will never be disapproved by the Department 
if well arranged and intrusted to good officers. 

There must be no delay in sending oft' the Manhattan with a double- 
ender after the arrival of as many as six steam barges in the river. 

Have Commander Davenport's orders been delivered? He has not 
yet reported. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 

Acting Hear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Cressy, IT. S. Navy, transmitting 
enclosure regarding a reconnoissance in James River. 

U. 8. S. MALYERN, 

James River, off Tilman's \Tilghman' s\ Wharf, June 7, 1864. 
SIR: I enclose a copy of a report from Orderly Sergeant G. E. Phent, 
commanding my picket guard on shore, sent me yesterday at 7 : 30 p. m. 
At 1 : 30 p. in. to day a party of the enemy were again visible in the same 
place, about 2 miles distant in the direction of Turkey Bend. I 
examined them carefully with a glass, and 12 men were seen (part 
negroes) with several horses; but no signs of rifle pits or earthworks 
were seen. I sent word to the commanding officer of the gunboat sta- 
tioned at Turkey Bend, that the enemy alluded to were in his vicinity. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. K. CRESSY, 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. S. S. Malvern. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Flagship Agawam. 

[Enclosure.] 

ON PICKET INSHORE, 

Near Tilman's [Tilghman > s\ Wharf, June 6, 18(14. 
SIR: This afternoon I sent a corporal and three privates to the mill 
to reconnoiter. They report having seen about twenty of the enemy's 
cavalry in the direction of Turkey Bend. They had been there all day, 
and appear to be making rifle pits or throwing up earthworks, where 
they could surprise vessels passing up or down the river. A French- 
man living in the vicinity says these cavalry are in the same place where 
the party who fired upon the U. S. S. Shaicsheen came from. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. E. PHENT, 

Orderly Sergeant, Commanding Picket Guard. 
W. K. CRESSY, 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. S. S. Malvern. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 129 

Correspondence regarding obstructions for James River. 
Eeport of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, IT. S. Navy, transmitting enclosures. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 7, 1864 p. m. 

SIR: I transmit enclosed a copy of the correspondence between 
General Butler and my self relative to sinking obstructions in the river, 
which the Department will recollect was a part of his original plan of 
campaign. 

The Department will appreciate the reluctance I have felt to adopt 
this course. The ironclad force at my command is better than was 
originally expected. General Grant asked for the cooperation of two 
ironclads. There are four here now, and there will be three left when 
the Tecumseh, now under your order for other service, shall leave. The 
Navy is not accustomed to putting down obstructions before it, and the 
act might be construed as implying an admission of superiority of 
resources on the part of the enemy. The object of the operation would 
be to make the river more secure against the attempts of the enemy 
upon our vessels by fire and explosive rafts, followed by torpedoes and 
ironclad vessels and boats. 

General Grant seems to be expected by our military men and by the 
enemy (see Richmond paper of June 7) to cross the James River and 
operate against Richmond on the south side, and I understand it would 
be of vital importance to the success of the campaign that the river 
should be held secure against the casualties of a novel naval engage- 
ment. 

Of course myself and officers desire the opportunity of encountering 
the enemy, and feel reluctant to discourage his approach, but the point 
of embarrassment with me is the consequences that would follow a 
failure of the campaign should the novel plans of the enemy succeed 
in crippling the monitor force. 

I therefore lay the subject before the Department, which, understand- 
ing the views of General Grant, will best comprehend the extent and 
the locality of the cooperation he may desire and be able to instruct me 
on the subject, if thought necessary. 

I am more disposed to the reference since the receipt of the Depart- 
ment's dispatch of 4th instant. The water here is too shoal and narrow 
for maneuvering the monitors, and they occupy a position for support- 
ing the flank of the army, from which they must engage at anchor, and 
to keep their turrets upstream are moored head and stern. Even our 
tugs can not cross the middle ground in this reach at low water, and 
there is no room for the longer wooden vessels, which are stationed to 
keep open our communications, which, however, the enemy can inter- 
rupt at pleasure, especially at Deep Bottom, should General Grant leave 
the left side of the James. 

I am inclined, in view of all the circumstances, to obstruct the shoaler 
parts of this reach so as to prevent the convenient approach of the 
enemy's smaller torpedo vessels and limit his approach to the channel 
way, which is narrow and under the control of the monitor fire. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, 1). C. 

N W R VOL 10 9 



130 KORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Endorsement.] 

Left to discretion of admiral in command, in whom the Department 
has confidence. 

[WELLES.] 

[Endorsement on margin.] 

Mooring head and stern seems to me very risky and entirely unnec- 
essary. 

F[ox]. 

[Enclosure No. 1 .] 

GENERAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, 

May 11, 18H1 9: 45 a. m. 

The bark Franklin and five schooners are at your disposal to obstruct 
the channel of the river. 
I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

B. F. BUTLER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure No. 2.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, James River, June 1, 1864. 
GENERAL: Will you please send to me here at once, that they may 
be at hand for use if necessary, the bark and schooners provided by 
you for obstructing the river? 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General B. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 

Note by Admiral LEE June 1. Written in consequence of the 
opinion of monitor commanders, Commander lihind and Lieutenant 
Lamson, to have those obstructions ready, but like me they were averse 
to the sinking, and sustained my views on the subject at a council held 
on board the Tecumseh this day. 

L. 

[Enclosure No. 3.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, James River, June 1, 1864. 
GENERAL: I thank you for sending the two contrabands to me; 
their information is useful. I desire that the bark and schooners may 
be sent me for immediate use. 
I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General B. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 

[Enclosure No. 4.] 

JUNE 1, 18043:30 p. in. 

Yonr envelope enclosing letter to French consul in Richmond, and 
request for the bark and schooners for obstructions, is received. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 131 

Orders have gone out to Chief Quartermaster C. E. Fuller to send 
them up at once, with a tow. 

B. F. BUTLER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

Admiral LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure Ko. 5.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 2, 1864. 

GENERAL: Can you ride over this morning with General Weitzel 
and arrange for sinking the vessels which you have obtained and appro- 
priated for obstructing the navigation of James River, in such places 
as will add to the security of the army communications? Jt must be 
your operation, not mine, as I have not consulted the Navy Depart- 
ment on the subject, and the Navy Department alone can find vessels 
for this purpose, if it approves of so using them. I have no authority 
to employ or use vessels for this purpose, but can give such assistance 
to your engineers as may aid you in accomplishing the object proposed 
in your plan of campaign. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major- General B. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 

[Enclosure No. 6. ] 

HEADQUARTERS IN FIELD, June 2, 1864. 

ADMIRAL: Your communication, dated June 2, in regard to the 
obstructions, is received. The five vessels sent up were procured by 
my order for the purpose of being used as obstructions to the river, if, 
in the judgment of the naval commander, they would add to the 
security of his fleet. I have no difficulty as to the point at which we 
desire to secure the river. It is the right of my line, near Curtis' 
house, at the ravine, but whether the river should be secured by 
obstructions or by vessels, or a disposition of your obstructions or 
of the vessels of your navy, neither myself nor my engineers have any 
right to feel ourselves confident to give our opinion. The vessels are 
wholly at your service, but upon your good judgment, and not mine, 
must rest their use. 

In accordance with your request, as I informed your officer, I will 
visit you this afternoon and designate the spot we desire to be held, 
but whether by means of obstructions, or by your ships, or by both 
combined, must be solely for you to determine. 

While I know you would not undertake to give directions to my 
engineers as to the situation of our earthworks on laud, so we ought 
not to presume to advise you as to your means of defending the water. 

I have not consulted the War Department upon the question whether 
I should procure these obstructions. I supposed that was fairly within 
my discretion, and I venture respectfully to add that the question 
whether you should use them is entirely within yours. The Navy 
Department can not know the exigencies as you know them, and I am 
certain must leave that question to the good judgment of the rear- 
admiral commanding the fleet. 



132 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

I ain aware of the delicacy naval gentlemen feel in depending upon 
anything but their ships in a contest with the enemy, and if it were a 
contest with the enemy's ships alone I certainly would not advise the 
obstructions, even at the great risk of losing the river. But in a con- 
test against such unchristian modes of warfare as fire rafts and torpedo 
boats I think all question of delicacy should be waived by the para- 
mount consideration of protection for the lives of the men and the 
safety of the very valuable vessels of the squadron. 

Pardon me if I have overstepped any line of duty or courtesy in this 
latter suggestion. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure No. 7. ] 

Confidential.] FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

Farrar's Island, June 3, 1864. 

GENERAL : The system of naval expenditures is so entirely different 
from the army system, being controlled and directed by the Navy 
Department alone, that, to prevent future misunderstanding, I desire 
now to be assured by you, in writing, whether the cost of the vessels 
placed by you at my disposal for obstructing the river can be made a 
charge or liability, present or contingent, upon the Navy Department, 
if, under my directions, they are used for the purpose indicated, or 
whether I am to understand that the entire cost and expenditure for 
the vessels is borne by the War Department. 

Without explicit authority from the Secretary of the Navy, I should 
not ieel justified in incurring any pecuniary liability in connection with 
this matter. 

In reply to that part of your communication of yesterday, which I 
have now the honor to acknowledge, which refers to the lives of the 
men and the safety of the very valuable vessels under my command 
as being the primary reason for obstructing the river, I would wish to 
be understood as regarding the loss of life and material as incidental 
to the contest which would occur should the enemy make an attack on 
us, whatever the result should be. The first consideration with me is 
the necessity, as heretofore represented by you to me, of holding this 
river beyond a peradventure for the great military purposes of Gen- 
eral Grant and yourself. In consulting my own desires, I would do 
everything to induce and nothing to prevent the enemy from trying to 
assert their strength in a pure naval contest, which, in my opinion, 
would give us a naval victory. The only contingency of such a battle 
is the unknown effect of the novel instruments of war torpedo ves- 
sels which are to be employed by them, and which, as the attacking 
party, give them, perhaps, an advantage, which might possibly balance 
our certain superiority in all other fighting material. 

Please return to me the topographical sketch which you gave me and 
afterwards borrowed. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General B. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department Virginia and North Carolina. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 133 

[Enclosure No. 8.1 

Confidential.] HEADQUARTERS IN THE FIELD, 

June 3, 18641: 30 p. m. 

SIR: I beg leave to assure you in writing, as I have heretofore 
verbally, that the obstructions furnished you by me will in no way be 
any charge or cost to the Navy Department, unless it chooses volun- 
tarily to assume the expenses. 

I have neither doubt nor hesitation upon the subject. If the expend- 
iture of the few thousands for these vessels will save one monitor from 
torpedo or fire raft, or the lives of ten of the men I have sent to the 
Navy, I should make it at once. You will judge of the efficiency of the 
obstructions. The expense has already been assumed by the Army, 
although 1 can not appreciate the difference. One treasury, one nation, 
one cause, all are served alike if one is served. 

Respectfully, BENJ. F. BUTLER. 

Major- General, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral LEE, 

Commanding, etc. 

[Enclosure No. 9.] 

Confidential.] FLAGSHIP N. ATLANTIC BLOCK. SQUADRON, 

James River, June 7, 1864. 

GENERAL: I desire to keep the schooners ready for sinking when I 
am advised that a controlling military necessity requires that it be 
done. 

Judging from the tenor of a dispatch received from the Navy Depart- 
ment last evening, no such precautionary measure seems to be contem- 
plated. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General B. F. BUTLER, 

Comdg. Military Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 

[Enclosure No. 10. Telegram.] 

IN THE FIELD, June 7, 1864 2: 45 p. m. 

(Received 6: 30 p. m.) 

Your note relative to the sinking of the obstructions is received by 
hand of Captain Clarke. The necessity of holding our positions here is 
an overwhelming military one. But how you are to hold yours on the 
river is, of course, wholly for you to determine. 
Respectfully, yours, 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 
Admiral LEE, 

Commanding, etc. 



(/. <u/- of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Lamson, 
U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. 8. Gettysburg, to proceed to blockade 
duty off Wilmington. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, June 7, 1864. 

SIR: On receipt of this order proceed with the Gettysburg under your 
command to cruise offshore to intercept blockade runners to and from 



134 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

the port of Wilmington, N. C., first going to Beaufort, if necessary, to 
take in coal and other supplies. 
Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant R. H. LAMSON, 

U. 8. 8. Gettysburg. 



Report of Commander Howell, U. 8. Navy, relative to condition and 
operations of the vessels off New Inlet, North Carolina. 

U. S. S. NERETJS, 
Off New Inlet, June 7, 1864. 

ADMIRAL : I have the honor to enclose herewith iny abstract log to 
June 1. 

On the night of the 4th instant, at 8 o'clock p. m., the Hoicquah fired 
into and chased a blockade run er, coming out. I chased off east, but 
could not discover her. Spoke the Fort Jackson in the morning, and 
am glad to announce that she had, on the previous evening, captured 
the Thistle, side wheel steamer, of about ^50 tons. The Thistle had 
thrown overboard all her cargo (she was bound in) except a cotton 
press. (So reported to me. I have just seen Captain Sands, who says 
she has some cargo; does not know what.) 

The large side wheel steamer, before reported as having been run on 
shore, coining out (supposed by Hoicquah), is still lying under the 
Mound. She has slewed considerably and the sea breaks over her. 1 
think she is certainly bilged. 

The ram, I believe, is almost entirely broken up. An intelligent 
(really) contraband avers that he has seen her, broken in two. He 
also says that five were killed by the Howquah's tire, and here let me 
bear witness to the excellent conduct of Acting Master J. W. Balch, 
of the Howquah. His gallantry in engaging the ram, his exertions on 
the bar, night after night, the constant danger he runs of being sunk 
or injured, for they fire at him frequently, his cheerfulness and alacrity 
in thie performance of his duties at all times, merit some substantial 
recognition. I am confident Captain Sands, were he present, would 
join me in recommending him for promotion. I speak of Acting Master 
Balch only from what I have seen and heard on the blockade. I know 
nothing of his previous character. 

I would respectfully state that we are very short of men on this 
blockade. The Hoicquah and Namemond both need men, and the times 
of the crew of the Howquah will nearly all expire in July and August. 
I have been obliged to loan the Nansemond three men from my crew, 
and 1 myself have not a full complement. 

I have been told that there was quite a number of men in New York. 
I would respectfully state, admiral, that the blockade would be much 
more effective if we had a few more small, swift vessels. If the hon- 
orable Department would purchase and send here the blockade runners 
caught, and not allow our engineers to meddle with the machinery, 
except so far as to adapt the furnaces for hard coal, I don't see why we 
could not capture almost every vessel we see coming out. Such large 
vessels as the Nercns, Merceditu, Florida, and Grand Gulf can be seen 
so far at night that the runners easily avoid them. My steamer is 
rather fast. I have run steadily 1 1 knots, occasionally getting up to 
12, for hours, but 1 am not fast enough to catch some of the blockade 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 135 

runners, neither is the Fort Jackson. I write in haste, as the New 
Berne leaves this evening. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. HOWELL, 

Commander, Senior Officer Present. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, June 8, 1864. 

(Via Fort Monroe, 5 a. in., 9th. Received 2 : .'iO a. in., 10th.) 
Can the Department tlispatch several gunboats from the Potomac to 
York River to answer calls from that quarter? 
No change in the naval situation here. 

S. P. LEE, 

Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 

[Endorsement.] 

Attended to. W. F. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant 
\Yilliams, U. 8. Navy, regarding measures for forcing the Confederate 
ram out of the Roanoke River. 

TJ. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Albemarle Sound, June F, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed up the Middle River to-morrow morning with the 
Commodore Barney and Whitehead and shell the lower battery on 
Roanoke River, for the purpose of bringing down the ram. 

Before commencing, the Whitehead will enter the Roanoke at the 
cut off, turn and deliver her tire, and join you in the Middle River. 

On the appearance of black smoke at Plymouth you can return to 
your station and leave the ram in the hands of the operators below. 

By stationing boats at the cut-off you can regulate your tire on the 
battery by signal, so as to get the proper range. 
The river chart will give you the distance. 

Before entering the cut off with the vessels you will drag for torpedoes. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer, etc. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant J. M. WILLIAMS, 

Commanding U. S. S. Commodore Barney. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Williams, U. S. Navy, regarding 
the laying of torpedoes in the Roanoke River. 

U. S. S. COMMODORE BARNEY, 

Albemarle Sound, June 8, 1864. 

SIR: In accordance witli your request of this date I very respectfully 

submit the following a.s the manner in which the torpedoes were laid in 

the Uoanoke River, North Carolina, on the morning of the 7th instant: 

The torpedoes were laid in the river about 200 yards above the first 



13G NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

creek on the port side going up, in water at a depth of between 16 and 
24 feet, the torpedoes being sunk about 9 feet from the surface, straight 
across the river, at a distance of about 12 feet apart, a lock string 
extending from each to the swamp on the right-hand side of the river 
going up. 

A line was first run for 72 feet across the narrowest part of the river 
and anchored at each end. The torpedoes were then laid by fastening 
first one to the line at a distance of 12 feet from the end, and anchoring 
it; a lock string was then carried from that, the first laid, to the shore. 
Another torpedo was then laid, at a distance of about 12 feet from the 
first, and anchored, and a lock string carried ashore as from the first. 
The other two were laid at the same distance and in the same manner, 
each torpedo having an independent [anchor] and being separately 
anchored in addition to the anchors at the end of the line, to which all 
were made fast. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES M. WILLIAMS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 
Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 



General Order regarding information furnished to the press by naval 

officers. 

GENERAL ORDER.] FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

James River, June 9, 1864. 

The attention of all officers, petty officers, seamen, and marines of 
this squadron is called to the recent violations of the Department's 
orders prohibiting giving information to the press regarding naval 
operations. The effect and the fault are the same if this is done directly 
or through private sources. Information useful to the enemy is given 
and partial statements are made violating the discipline of the Navy 
and injurious to the public interests. 

It is the duty of all good officers, petty officers, and men promptly to 
expose those who are guilty of such misconduct. 

Each commanding officer will, on the receipt of this order, assemble 
the officers and men of his command and read it to them, and he will 
earnestly endeavor to ascertain the offenders, if any, in his command, 
and promptly report them in writing for punishment. 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Destruction of the blockade runner Pevensey, June 9, 1864. 
Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Harris, IT. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. NEW BERNE, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, June 16, 1861. 

SIR: I have the honor to report the stranding, on the 9th instant, of 
the blockade runner Pevensey (named Penversey in the extracts April 
16, 1864), under the following circumstances: 

3:30 a. in., steering N. E. by N., Beaufort 45 miles distant, made a 
steamer bearing N. E. by E., 4 miles distant, running slow and heading 
E. N. E.; she being to the eastward did not immediately discover this 
vessel. Hauled up E. N. E., when, gaining on her within 2 miles, 
she made all speed, steering E. Opened fire and stood E. by N. The 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 137 

secoiid shot carried away the forward davit of her quarter boat. She 
immediately changed her course, steered N., and struck the beach 9 
miles west of Beaufort at 8 : 05 a. m. Her crew took to the boats at 
once, this vessel at the time being 1 miles distant. Ban into 3 fath- 
oms, and when within 100 yards of the strand, she blew up. 

Sent in three boats, boarded her, and found her engines and boilers 
completely blown out. Plugged up the pipes; anchored in 3 fathoms, 
and made arrangements to pull her off. 9 a. m., tug Violet came down 
from Beaufort and anchored on the quarter. 9 : 30 a. m., Commander 
B. M. Dove arrived in the Cherokee, came on board and said he would 
take charge of the wreck, and the New Berne would proceed to Beau- 
fort, it being then high water, to save the tide in. Recalled boats and 
arrived at Beaufort at 11 a. m., anchoriug outside too late for the tide. 

One prisoner was found on board the vessel, unharmed from the 
explosion, who proved himself to be an escaped prisoner from Johnson's 
Island, of Morgan's guerrillas. One body was found upon the beach, 
and 35 prisoners were captured on shore by the cavalry, three of whom 
are supposed to be Confederate officers, one of them adjutant- general 
to Magruder. She was loaded on Confederate account, cargo consisting 
of arms, blankets, shoes, cloth, clothing, lead, bacon, and numerous 
packages marked to individuals. She had been chased on the 7th 
instant by the Quaker City, and had thrown overboard, by log book, 30 
tons lead and 20 tons bacon; was 543 tons, of English register; no 
manifest of cargo found. Gunner S. D. Hines has discovered seven 
Whitworth tompions tied together, bright, and in good condition, which 
suggests the possibility of that number of guns being under the musket 
boxes. 

The prisoners captured ashore were held in Fort Macon, and the one 
secured on board was transferred there by order of Commander Dove. 
I understood that after the army authorities had satisfied themselves 
with regard to the identity of the prisoners they were to be transferred 
to this [place], per Keystone State. 

I have learned since leaving Beaufort that the reputed mate is the 
real captain ; that he is a Captain Long, the outdoor agent of Major 
Walker (the Confederate agent at Bermuda), a citizen of New York, 
and having formerly commanded a ship from there. The reputed cap- 
tain (an Englishman) was merely the paper or clearing captain. Of 
these facts I have informed Captain Gansevoort. 

It will not now be possible to get the vessel oft', but a large amount 
of the cargo can be saved, if properly guarded 

Had the after 30-pound Parrott,for which the requisition was approved 
by you April 22, been furnished, his chances of reaching the shore 
would have been reduced. He evidently was ignorant of his position, 
as the first question asked was, " How far is it to Fort Caswell?" 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. A. HARRIS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Kear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Washington, D. C., July 14, 1864. 

SIR: Enclosed I forward to the Department a list of those of the 
cre\v of the blockade runner Fevemey, which ran on shore and was 



138 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

destroyed by her crew near Beaufort, N. C., on the 9th ultimo, wlio are 
now detained at Camp Hamilton, Fort Monroe, and at Point Lookout. 
The late master of the Pevensey was detained by Captain Gansevoort as 
a witness, he supposing that a portion of the cargo of the blockade 
runner was saved and would be sent North as prize. 

The others are detained as habitual violators of the blockade under 
the instructions of the Department, dated May 9, 1804, to iiear-Adminil 
Farragut, forwarded to me for my information May 10, 1804. 

The examination of these men took place in presence of Commander 
Peirce Crosby and Lieutenant-Commander Chester Hatfield. The chief 
officer of the Pevensey, Joseph Brown, is detained at Camp Hamilton :is 
an habitual violator of the blockade; all the others are detained at 
Point Lookout. I have requested the commandant of the post at Fort 
Monroe to discharge the master of the Pevemey, as there is no longer 
any reason for detaining hirn, the vessel and cargo having proved a 
total loss. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Foster, U. 8. Navy, regarding a 
cooperative attack upon Fort Clifton, Virginia, June 9, 1864. 

U. S. S. COMMODORE PERRY, June 10, 1864. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to report that, in compliance with a request 
from Major-General Butler, I cooperated with the land forces on the 
morning of the 9th instant. 

At 8: 30 a. m. I opened on Fort Clifton, [Virginia], and at 11 : 15 a. m. 
had dismounted one of the enemy's guns and had struck another, scat- 
tering the pieces over the fort. 

At 2 p. m. the enemy had left the fort. 

The shots they fired at me all fell short, I having dropped down the 
river [Appomattox] out of range early in the morning. 

Enclosed you will please find a list of ammunition expended. 
The enemy have been hard at work repairing the fort. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

AMOS P. FOSTER, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Jamts Hirer. 



Abstract log of the U. S. S. Commodore Perry, June 9-10, 18f>4. 

June 9. At 9 a. m. opened fire on Fort Clifton ; dropped down the 
river 200 yards and continued firing with 100 pounder Parrott; the 
enemy replied with their batteries. From 12 to 4 p. m. engaged in 
bombarding Fort Clifton; at p. m. ceased firing. Expended 22 
rounds IX inch shell, 144 rounds 100-pounder Parrott shell. 

June 10. At 2 p.m. dropped down the stream a short distance, so as 
to bring our guns to bear upon the enemy, and opened fire. Expended 
3 100-pouuder rifle shell, 11 rounds of IX-inch shell. 

June 11. Fired a IX-inch gun at rebel battery; no reply. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 139 

Report of Acting Master Savage, U. S. Navy, regarding expenditure of 
ammunition in the attack upon Fort Clifton, Va., June 9-10, 1864. 

IT. S. S. GENERAL PUTNAM, 
Appomattox River, Virginia, June 12, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully report to you the following expenditures of 
ammunition: 

June '.). In the engagement with the enemy at Fort Clifton, 20- 
pounder Parrot rifle, 77 shell; 77 2-pound charges. 
June 10. Parrott rifle, 3 shell; 3 2 pound charges. 
Total, 80 shell ; 80 charges. 
June 10. 2 t-ponuder howitzer, 2 shell. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. H. SAVAGE, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Commander J. M. B. CLITZ, 

Comdg. U. S. S. Osceola, Senior Naval Officer, off City Point, Va. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrars Island, June 9 10 p. m. 

(Via Fort Monroe, 10th, 4 p. m. Received 2 : 30 a. m., llth.) 
A flag of truce tug came this afternoon to deliver a letter from Mr. 
Child to Major Mulford. 

The army lookout on the hill near us has several times reported see 
ing the smokestacks of the rebel steamers above Chafiin's Bluff. 

S. P. LEE, 

Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 10, 1864. 

Boats can not be spared from Potomac. Steam dredging machine 
can be had at Norfolk. 

GIDEON* WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 
Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Hampton Roads, Care Captain Gansevoort. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 10, 1864 10 p. m. 
(Received Washington 12:15 p. m., June 12.) 
No change in naval situation. 
Five of the tugs have arrived. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secret a ry Na i~y. 



140 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Chief Engineer Faron, U. S. Navy, regarding the Ericsson 

torpedoes. 

U. S. S. TECUMSEH, 
James River, June 10, 1864, 

SIR: In obedience to your order of the 7th instant, to proceed to the 
hulk Charles Phelps, Fortress Monroe, and Norfolk navy yard, and, 
if practicable, make arrangements for bringing up complete oue or 
two of the Ericsson torpedoes, I have the honor to report: 

On board the hulk Charles Phelps, off Newport News, I found six- 
teen shells (thirty two pieces), the gum washers and connecting tubes, 
a large number of iron straps for securing the air vessels, and three 
imperfect boom derricks. 

At Fortress Monroe a number of pieces of heavy timber for floating 
the shells was pointed out to me as belonging to them. 

In the Norfolk navy yard, 1 found the copper air vessels, some rig- 
ging, and a number of imperfect boom derricks. 

I was informed by the gunner of the ordnance depot at the fortress 
that two devils or bootjacks had been removed from there by Inspector 
Griffin, and I was informed also, by Commodore Livingston, that 
Inspector Griffin had removed from the Norfolk navy yard, by order 
of Admiral Gregory, several things belonging to the torpedoes. 

The articles required to complete the torpedoes are the parallel bars 
and locks, the devils, or bootjacks, the side booms, and some portion 
of the rigging. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN FARON, 
Chief Engineer, U. 8. Navy. 
Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Endorsement.] 

On account of the doubt expressed by the admiral about these 
machines, the Department will take no further action. 

(" WELLES. J 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. 
Navy, regarding obstructing the James River. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, 

June 11, 186-1. 

SIR: I have received your No. 325,* enclosing copy of correspond- 
ence between General Butler and yourself, relative to sinking obstruc- 
tions in James River. 

Action in this matter is left to the discretion of the admiral of the 
squadron, in whom the Department has confidence. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 

* See p. 129. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 141 

Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, urging that a steam tug be placed 
at his disposal for use in the sounds. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Albemarle Sound, N. C., June 11,. 1864. 

SIR: I have to report that officers aiid men from the First and 
Second North Carolina regiments are making their appearance almost 
daily in small numbers for a passage to Beaufort, via Eoanoke Island, 
to join their regiments, and, as I have no trausportation for them, or 
any means of communicating with New Berne, I have applied to the 
commanding general for one of the army transport steamers to keep 
up the communication. 

A steam tug is much needed here, in fact is indispensable under the 
present condition of affairs, and the expense would be more than paid 
by the demurrage allowed to sailing vessels in the transportation of 
coal from Hatteras, which are sometimes twelve days in transit. The 
Hull and Barney draw too much water for this service, and the 
Whitehead is the only vessel that could be used, and her services are 
required to cruise in the Perquimans and Alligator rivers to prevent 
the traffic that is carried on across the sound, and in the Chowan to 
cut off supplies sent to the rebel force at Plymouth. 

I have destroyed a number of flats and boats on the Chowau, where 
a small steamer should be employed night and day patrolling the river, 
and captured a boat in the sound with a small quantity of pork, which 
I can use to feed the contrabands escaping from Plymouth and desir- 
ing to be sent to Eoanoke Island. 

I ordered a boat to be sent on the afternoon of the 8th, from the 
Maitabexett, with an officer and ten men to destroy a distillery in the 
creek near the town of Edenton, a resort for the guerrillas who infest 
that neighborhood, to the great discomfiture of many good Union 
citizens residing there. The boilers were cut, brick foundations 
destroyed, mash tubs broken up, 5 barrels of whisky stove in, and 
still-worms removed. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Instructions from Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Commander Bankhead, 
U. S. Navy, in case of the appearance of the C. S. ram Albemarle. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Albemarle Sound, N. C., June 11, 1864. 

SIR : I shall leave here to-morrow for New Berne, and I leave you 'M 
guard the entrance of Koanoke and Cashie rivers with the Otsego, Wya- 
lusing, Tacony, Commodore Barney, Commodore Hull, and Whitehead. 

Should the Albemarle make his appearance, you will commence re- 
treating until you draw him well out into the sound, where you will 
have room to maneuver. The Whitehead and Hull to take care of his 
consort, if any should accompany him. 

Do not on any account attempt to engage in the river, as his guns 
are as heavy as yours and are equal in range, and it is already proved 
to our satisfaction that our shot can not injure him very materially at 
close quarters. 



142 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

His next effort will perhaps be to out-general us by slipping by in the 
night from the mouth of the Cashie, which must be strictly guarded, 
particularly at night. 

A plan of attack in the event of the Albemarle's making his appear- 
ance, which will be varied according to circumstances, and at your dis- 
cretion, is herewith enclosed, and a torpedo boat is prepared for the 
Wyalusing to take in tow, and that vessel has been experimenting with 
boats and can bring it in contact with the ram and explode it at the 
proper moment. 

There are also three heavy torpedoes placed near the first bend of the 
river, and are watched during the day by an officer and four men, two 
of the latter to be relieved every second day (by the double-enders) and 
furnished with their rations. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Commander J. P. BANKHEAD, 

Commanding U. S. S. Otsego. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Roe, U. S. Navy, regarding the presence 
of Confederate troops at Goldsboro, N. C., and the completion of the 
C. S. S. Neuse. 

U. S. S. SASSACUS, 
Off New Berne, N. C., June 11, 1864. 

SIR: I send the Ceres to you to-morrow. Commander Davenport left 
me orders to let her tow up the schooner Davenport. I send you mail, 
and dispatches also, by the Ceres. 

There is a report to day that Beauregard is at Goldsboro with 30,000 
men. I do not know how reliable it is. From a Union man, recently 
escaped from the rebels near Kiuston, I learn that the ram there is in 
perfect order to come down. They have dammed the river below her 
to raise the water. Whether she can get through or not, I can not say. 
She will doubtless accompany the rebel army when they come. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. A. HOE, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Captain M. SMITH, 

Comdg. Naval Forces, Sounds of North Carolina, Albemarle Sound. 



Report of Captain Gansevoort, V. S. Navy, transmitting report of the 
rescue of schooner Mary Steadman, loaded with U. S. ordnance stores. 

TJ. S. IRONCLAD ROANOKE, 
Newport News, Va., June 12, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to forward the reply of Acting-Master 
M'Gloin, of the Gettysburg, that arrived here to-day, in relation to an 
ordnance vessel picked up by him off New lulet, and brought in here. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GUERT GANSEVOORT, 

Captain and Senior Officer. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, 1). C. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 143 

[Endorsement.] 

JUNE 16, 1864. 

The Bureau of Ordnance has directed the schooner Mary Steadman 
to be refitted and dispatched to New York, first lauding at Fort Mon- 
roe all the army freight she has on deck, or which can be easily reached 
below, without breaking out, and thus detaining the vessel; and this 
at the request of the Ordnance Office, War Department. 

II. AULICK, 

Assistant Chief Bureau. 

[Enclosure.] 

TJ. S. S. GETTYSBURG, 
Hampton Roads, June 12, 1864. 

SIR: On June 9 I received orders from Commander Howell, U. S. S. 
Nereus, senior officer at New Inlet, Cape Fear, N. C., to cruise outside, 
and sailed from thence at 8 30 p. m., steering E by N., as per orders, 
until I arrived at a point where blockade runners might be supposed 
to be at daylight, leaving New Inlet one hour before high water and 
running l!i knots an hour. 

At 7 a. in., June 10, in latitude 34 N., longitude 76 30' W., I fell in 
with the schooner Mary titeadman, from Port Koyal for Philadelphia, 
deeply laden with United States ordnance stores. 

She was completely disabled, having lost her foremast head and 
sprung her mainmast; she was also leaking badly when this ship fell 
in with her. The wreck of her spars, sails, etc., were lying on deck, or 
towing over the side, just as they fell, and the crew were at the pumps. 
I sent an officer and men to assist in clearing away the wreck, and also 
a boat for the master, who came on board with his papers, on examining 
which I found he had a valuable cargo belonging to the U. S. (Joveru- 
ment, which 1 felt it was my duty to save if possible. 

Alter the wreck was cleared up I took her in tow for Hampton Roads, 
knowing that if I had taken her into Beaufort she would have been 
sent north iu tow, as there is no means of discharging her heavy guns 
in that port. 

I am aware that in leaving the station assigned me I assumed a 
responsibility which the urgent necessity of the case really demanded. 
The cargo was very valuable in United States property, and had I 
taken the master and crew from her and abandoned her, some foreign 
steamer might possibly have fallen in with her, and her cargo used 
against us at some future time, unless I destroyed the schooner, which 
I felt I had no right to do while there was a chance of saving her. 

Owing to the state of the weather, the sea being very rough and the 
wind blowing half a gale most of the time, I found it necessary to steam 
very slowly during the passage. 

Enclosed please find a copy of the schooner's manifest. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. M'GLOIN, 

Acting Master. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

/Secretary of the Navy. 



144 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



[Subenclosure.] 
Copy of manifest of Schooner Mary Steadman. 



2 XV-inch gnns. 
10 Xl-inch guns. 
2 150-pounder gnns, rifled. 
2 100-pounder gnns, rifled. 
2 30-pounder guns, rifled. 
2 XV-inch elevating screws. 
2 XV-inch locks. 
2 XV-inch breech sights. 

2 XV-inch front sights. 

3 Xl-inch bronze saddles. 

3 150-pounder bronze saddles. 



^ -, , 
On deck " 



1 XV-inch columbiad. 

1 XV-inch barbette. 

1 XV-inch chassis. 
150 X\-inch columbiad shells. 
148 XV-inch columbiad battering shot. 
14 boxes ordnance stores. 

1 platform for XV-iiich columbiad com 

plete. 
25 pieces deck plank ; 5 pieces on deck. 

2 XV-inch columbiad battering shot. 



Report of Commander Frailey, U. S. Navy, regarding the cruise off Frying 
Pan /Skoals of the U. S. 8. Quaker City. 

U. S. S. QUAKER CITY, 

Beaufort, N. C., June 12, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully report the return of this steamer to-day to this 
port to recoal and effect some slight repairs to machinery, after an 
unsuccessful cruise of thirteen days off the south side of Frying Pan 
Shoals in search of vessels attempting to run the blockade. 

On the 1st, 4th, 7th, and 9th large and swift side-wheel steamers were 
seen, and though at long distances were immediately given chase to, 
as will be seen on reference to the abstract log herewith sent, but regret 
to add that all our efforts to effect a capture of either were rendered 
fruitless by their superior speed, although at the time, with a very infe 
rior article of coal on board from Norfolk navy yard, this steamer was 
making 11 and 11^ knots per hour. 

The steamer chased on the 1st was outward, while those on the 4th, 
7th, and 9th were inward bound, the one on the 7th relieving herself of 
a considerable portion of her cargo in boxes, through which we passed. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAS. MADISON FRAILEY, 

Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Acting Rear Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, transmitting a report 
regarding the placing and trial of torpedoes for defense against the C. IS. 
ram Albemarle. 

Confidential.] FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 

Farrar^s Island, June 12, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose a communication from Captain M. Smith, dated Gth 
instant, reporting experiments with torpedoes, and referring to the 
probable movements of the Albemarle, and I ask the attention of the 
Department to Captain Smith's remark as to floating batteries build- 
ing on the Eoanoke. 

If not inconsistent with the views of the Department, I would 
respectfully suggest that it may be beneficial to the public service if a 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 145 

portion of the light-draft monitors should be fitted either as submarine 
prodders or as torpedo vessels, relieving them, if necessary, for this 
purpose, of their guns and a part of their turrets. 

I have the honor to to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosure.] 

Confidential.] U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 

Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, June 6, 1864. 
SIR: I made an experiment to-day to foul a boat that was east adrift 
in the sound by towing another astern of the Wyalusing with a torpedo 
in it. The second trial succeeded, and both the old boats were blown 
to atoms. I shall continue the practice, and prepare one immediately 
to operate on the ram. 

I am, with the assistance of an engineer officer, Lieutenant [ W. R.] King, 
of the Army, placing torpedoes in the Roanoke Uiver, to be exploded by 
friction matches. The trigger wires to be watched by selected men 
during the day, as it is believed that the ram will never attempt to 
conie down the river at night, for fear of getting aground, and I have 
no idea he will make his appearance in the sound until the floating 
batteries that are building at Weldon are ready to cooperate. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Lamson, 
U. S. Navy, enjoining vigilance against meditated attack of the enemy 
in James River. 

FLAGSHIP A G AW AM, 
James River, June 13, 1864 5 p. m. 

SIR: The signal corporal ashore reports a rebel gunboat lying close 
to the brick house at Dutch Gap. 

5: 30 p. m. The last report from the signal station is that a battery 
of six pieces is seen at Chaffin's farm. 

The enemy meditate some movement against our communications on 
the river, or against our occupation here. 

The advance pickets must be vigilant against surprise to-night. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant R. H. LAMSON, 

U. S. S. Delaware. 

P. S. Captain Barnes just from signal station (Crow's Nest) reports 
the firing is from the rebel gunboat's 100 pounder near Cox's house 
Dutch Gap. No battery seen from there. 

N w R VOL 10 10 



146 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 13 10 p. m. 

(Via Fort Monroe, 14th, 9 p. in. Received 2:35 a. in. 15th.) 
Deserters from rebel ironclads confirm previous information. 
Rebel tug from bend above tired a shot or two in this direction this 
afternoon. . 

S. P. LEE, 

{Acting] Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Order of Acting Bear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Foster, U. 8. Navy, enjoining vigilance against surprise 
by the enemy. 

FLAGSHIP A G AW AM, 
James River, June 13, 1864. 

SIR : These three deserters from the rebel ironclads who surrendered 
to our pickets this morning say that a boat expedition is talked of 
against our gunboats in the Appomattox. Communicate this informa- 
tion to the Putnam. 1 have informed General Butler of it. 

The Perry and Putnam should keep in supporting distance of each 
other, and be very vigilant and prepared against surprise and attack 
from the enemy. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant A. P. FOSTER, 

U. S. S. Commodore Perry. 



Report of Commander Clary, U. S. Navy, regarding conference with 
Colonel Jourdan, U. 8. Army. 

U. S. S. DACOTAH, 
Beaufort, N. G., June 13, 1864. 

SIR: lam this day in receipt of your communication of the ">th 
instant, enclosing a confidential letter of 81st ultimo to Captain Sands. 
I have conferred with Colonel Jourdan in the matter, but at present he 
is making a diversion in another direction, as he has every renson to 
believe his first plans are suspected, if not too well understood. 

Colonel Jourdau will apprise the senior officer of the station when to 
cooperate. 

Your obedient servant, 

A. G. CLARY, 
Commander. U. S. Navy. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads, 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 147 

Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. 
Navy, regarding the senior officer at Hampton Roads. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 14, 1864. 

SIR : It is important that the senior officer in charge of naval mat- 
ters about Hampton Roads should be at Hampton Roads instead of 
Newport News, and you will give directions accordingly. The busi- 
ness of the anchorage is not properly attended to. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 

Acting Bear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Nichols 
U. S. Navy, in view of the probable proximity of the enemy. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, June 14, 1864 12 m. 

SiE: Meet Captain Barnes has just returned from headquarters of 
Major General Gillmore, to whom he communicated the intelligence 
conveyed in your note of yesterday evening, that cavalry and four 
pieces of artillery had been seen in your vicinity and that musketry 
was heard by you in , northeast direction last night at or about 
p. m. General Gillmore states that he knows nothing of any of 
Grant's forces in yonr vicinity, but that he knows that some of Grant's 
force were at Wilcox's Wharf. General Butler replied to a telegram 
from General Gillmore on this subject, that he has no knowledge of 
any of our forces being in your neighborhood, and from their descrip- 
tion judges they are the enemy's forces. You will not permit any 
force to approach your position without being fully satisfied beyond all 
question that they are our own people. It is their business to make 
themselves known if they are our own troops. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
A ctg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander E. T. NICHOLS, 

U. S. S. Mendota. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 14 10 p. m. 

(Via Fort Monroe, 6 p. m., 15th. Received 7: 15 a. m., 16th.) 
No change in the naval situation. I learn unofficially that General 
Grant was at General Butler's headquarters to-day; that "Baldy" 
Smith's corps is here, and that the Army of the Potomac is crossing 
James River at Wilcox's to-day. 

S. P. LEE, 

Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



148 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Babcock, U. 8. Navy, giving the location 
of certain United States vessels. 

U. S. S. MORSE, 

Off White House, Va., June 14, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully acknowledge the receipt of your communication 
dated the l()th instant, also a communication for the Crusader. The 
Cactus arrived yesterday, and the commanding officer reported in 
obedience to your orders. The Cohasset is at West Point, [York River], 
I communicate with the commanding officer every day by telegraph. 
The Shokokon is still at Cumberland Heights, the Brinker at a point 2 
miles above, and the Cactus is at anchor off the White House. The 
report is that our forces will evacuate this place in two or three days. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. A. BABCOCK, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Oar- 
field, U. 8. Navy, to proceed to duty in Himpton Eoads. 



DEPARTMENT, June 14, 1864. 
SIR: Proceed with the U. S. S. Banshee to Hampton Roads and 
report to Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, or the senior officer present, 
for duty in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. H. GARFIELD, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Banshee, New York. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Commander Macoml), U. S. Navy, 
to proceed to duty in the sounds of North Carolina. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 14, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed with the U. S. S. Shamrock to the sounds of North 
Carolina direct, and report for duty to Captain Melanctou Smith, 
senior officer there. You will also report by letter on arriving there to 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. Lee, Hampton Roads, as a part of the 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Very respectfully, etc., GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commander WM. H. MACOMB, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. S, Shamrock, New York. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Beau- 
mont, U. S. Navy, to cooperate with General Butler. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, June 15, 1864 5: 45 a. m. 

SIR: General Butler asks for a gunboat to aid in crossing General 
Grant's army near Fort Powhatan. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 149 

There are three gunboats near Powhatan besides the Atlanta. Assist- 
ance may be needed at some other point. Proceed without delay imme- 
diately with the Mackinaw and ascertain where your services are needed 
near or below Bermuda Hundred and there render them. 
Respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander J. C. BEAUMONT, 

U. S. S. Mackinaw. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar's Island, June 15, 1864 11 p. m. 

(Via Fort Monroe, 10 a. m., 17th. Keceived 4: 15 p. m., 17th.) 
Early this morning General Butler signaled me that he would sink 
his obstructions to day, ordering Commander Craven to assist the army 
engineers to sink their obstructions where and as they wished. I went 
to see General Grant, who informed me that he had several days ago 
ordered General Butler to do so. Five vessels were, according to the 
plan of campaign, sunk to day under the direction of the army engineers 
on Trent's Reach Bar, which will, to some extent, add to the security 
of the military situation. 

General Meade's army is crossing on pontoons at Wilcox's Wharf. 
The operation will take two or three days. To-night Smith's and Han- 
cock's corps are attacking Petersburg. The enemy appear to be cross- 
ing on their pontoons above Drewry's Bluff to day. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, with enclosures, relative 
to the proposed obstruction of James River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Farrar^s Inland, June 16, 1864. 

SIR: The Department's dispatch of June 11, replying to my No. 325, 
enclosing the correspondence between General Butler and myself on 
the subject of sinking the vessels he had provided, wherewith to obstruct 
James River, and leaving action on the subject to my discretion, was 
received on the J3th instant. 

I took no action on the subject. 

I enclose copies of two dispatches received yesterday morning from 
General Butler, my reply to the last, and the instructions which I gave 
Commander Craven (Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4). 

Last evening I saw General Grant at City Point, who informed me 
that several days before his arrival here he had ordered General Butler 
to sink these obstructions, and that finding his order had not been 
received he had renewed it. 

I understand that the army considers it a military necessity to make 
the river secure by every available means as vital to the success of 
the campaign and the cause. 



150 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Sab- Assistant Bradford, of the Coast Survey, has, at ray instance, 
been resurveying Trent's Keach since his arrival, about theGth instant. 

His work shows 10 feet at low tide with 3 feet rise and fall, indicating 
that at the present stage of water, on a spring tide, with an easterly 
wind (which makes full tide in this river), the monitors, if lightened, 
may cross the bar. 

The sunken vessels in the deepest water can be easily pumped out 
and removed. It would be very desirable to have an Andrews pump in 
a light-draft steamer for this and other use in this squadron. I hope 
the Department will approve of purchasing one; also a dredging 
machine, which would be useful here in deepening the old artificial 
channel. 

With this preparation we could, should the movements and policy of 
the army admit of it, be ready to cross this bar safely and cooperate. 
The pump-boat and dredging machine, besides being useful for squadron 
purposes, would also be of good service at the Norfolk navy yard. Pur- 
chasing would be preferable to hiring the dredging machine at Norfolk. 

I respectfully request the Department's favorable consideration of 
this proposition. The expense will be inconsiderable, I suppose. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral. Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, I). C. 

[Endorsements. ] 

The Bureau of Yards and Docks has not an Andrews pump. A 
powerful pump is at the Norfolk navy yard, owned by contractors for 
raising sunken vessels, I believe, which could probably be hired at a 
high rate of compensation. 

BUREAU YARDS AND DOCKS, June 22, 18(14. 

An old army dredge and two scows have been turned over to the 
Navy and now under repairs at Baltimore, to be sent to Port Royal. 
I do not know when they will be ready. The repairs are extensive and 
costly. 

J. S. 

[Enclosure 1.] 

SIGNAL STATION, June 15 5 a. m. 
(From General Butler's Headquarters, June 15, 4 a. in.) 
Can you temporarily spare a gunboat to aid in crossing of Grant's 
army near Fort Powhatan f If so, please send one. I will send to 
morrow, and with your aid put down obstructions in such spot as you 
may designate. 

General BUTLER. 
Acting Rear- Admiral LEE. 

[Enclosure 2.] 

SIGNAL STATION, June 15 9:30 a. m. 
I have just received the following from General Butler: 

General Grant left here yesterday for Fort Powhatan. Tell the admiral that Gen- 
eral Butler proposes to sink obstructions to-day, and will waut his assistance. 

Colonel SllAFKER, 

Chief of Staff. 
General TERRY. 
Actin" Rear Admiral LEE. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 151 

[ Enclosure 3.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, June 15, 1864 10:30 a. m. 
GENERAL TERRY: Commander Craven will in my absence give the 
engineer the assistance General Butler desires for sinking his obstruc- 
tions. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 

[Enclosure 4.] 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
" James River, June 15, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose a message just received from General Butler's chief of 
staff', through General Terry. 

In General Butler's dispatch of the 2d instant he said that the point 
at which he desired to secure the river is the right of his line, near 
Curtis's house, at the ravine. 

I am going to Fort Powhatan. Give the army all the assistance it 
may ask, in securing its flank and communications, with engineering 
devices in the river. 

Should you have any notice of the approach of the enemy (for which 
you will arrange a lookout), send a tug to bring up the Jfendota and 
Hunchback. 

Kespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander T. A. CRAVEN, 

U. 8. S. Tecumseh. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. IS. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Cressy, U. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, June 16, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed with the Malvern under your command to report to me 
in Trent's Reach on the 18th instant. 
Kespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. K. CRESSY, 

U. S. 8. Malvern. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding the disposition of United 
States vessels in the sounds of North Carolina. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Off New Berne, N. C., June 16, 1864. 

SIR : The Sassacus leaves to-day in obedience to your order of June 4, 
received on the 15th instant, and an order has been sent to the com 
mander of the Commodore Barney to proceed to City Point in compliance 
with your instructions this day received. 

The Ceres has just completed her repairs and left to-day, in company 
with an army steamer, upon an expedition up the Pungo Kiver (Pamlico 



152 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Sound), for the purpose of breaking up an organized band of rebels who 
have been collecting boats and schooners to make a descent upon the 
lights in the sound. I consider the services of the Ceres very important 
here on account of her light draft, and the information that her com- 
mander has of all the rivers and creeks in these waters. 

If the Miami can be repaired in accordance with the instructions of 
Chief Engineer Stewart, she will be useful at Ocracoke Inlet, where 
there is nearly as much water on the bar as at Hatteras, and where a 
vessel should, in my judgment, be stationed. 

The Chicopee arrived on the 15th instant, and reported to me at 
Roan ok e Island, and I ordered her to the mouth of the Roanoke River 
to await my arrival at that place, when one of the double-enders will 
be sent here. The Tacony, Otsego, \Vyalusing, Ghicopee, Commodore 
Hull, and Whitehead are stationed off Roanoke River. 

The Louisiana and Valley City relieve each other in cruising up Pam- 
lico Sound. 

The Bombshell I have ordered to Hatteras Inlet to relieve the sloop 
Granite, the bottom of that vessel requiring cleaning and painting, and 
the Mattabesett, Hetzel, and Lockwood are here, the two latter vessels of 
no use anywhere and can not get north unless towed there. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in the Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

P. S. I received from Commander Davenport merely an abstract of 
your instructions to him as senior officer in the sounds, and would 
request a copy of any communication in reference to returns, etc., [to] 
which you may find it necessary to call my attention. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Foster, U. S. Navy, commanding 
U. S. S. Commodore Perry, of engagements with Fort Clifton in coopera- 
tion with army forces June 16, 1864. 

U. S. S. COMMODORE PERRY, June 16, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that I was requested by Major- 
Ceneral Butler to cooperate with his forces, then near Petersburg, and 
was asked to direct my fire on Fort Clifton, which request I complied 
with. 

I fired 47 shots from the 100-pounder Parrott, which did good execution. 
Enclosed please find list of ammunition expended. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

AMOS P. FOSTER, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 
List of ammunition expended on board U. S. S. Com.nodore Perry, June 16, 1864. 

100-ponnder rifle charges 47 

100-pounder percussion shell 47 

Respectfully submitted. 

AMOS P. FOSTER, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 153 

Second report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Foster, U. 8. Navy, regard- 
ing engagements with Fort Clifton. 

U. S. S. COMMODORE PERRY, June 23, 1864. 

SIR : In answer to your endorsement on my report of June 16, I 
would respectfully beg leave to report that Acting Ensign Arnold 
Harris, in command of army gunboat Chamberlin, came on board this 
vessel at 6:30 a. m. of the 16th instant, and said that General Butler 
requested me to open tire as soon as possible on Fort Clifton. 

At 7 o'clock a. m. 1 moved the steamer across the stream, and at 9 
a. m. opened fire upon the fort. 

At 5 p. m. I ceased firing, having expended 47 charges and 47 per- 
cussion shells, all of which did good execution. 

At 7 p. m. Acting Ensign Arnold Harris and Lieutenant Bullard, of 
Brigadier-General Graham's staff, came on board of this steamer. 

Lieutenant Bullard had been ordered by General Butler to come on 
board and request me, early on the morning of the 17th instant, to open 
fire on the battery to the rear and left of Fort Clifton. This request I 
complied with. 

I commenced firing on the 17th instant at 6 a. m. The first shot fired 
entered the battery; at the second shot the 100-pounder Parrott burst, 
killing John Wilson (seaman) instantly, and wounding Joseph Webb, 
Alfred N. Brown, Salvador Emanuel, Franklin W. Morgan (seamen), 
and Gilbert Young (ordinary seaman). 

John Wilson was buried in the hospital burying ground at the Point 
of Eocks. 

Four of the wounded men were transferred to the TJ. S. S. Osceola, 
and two were retained on board this vessel. 

One of those transferred to the Osceola (Joseph Webb) has since died. 

The two men remaining on board this vessel are improving rapidly. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

AMOS P. FOSTER, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 

[Endorsement.] 

Respectfully referred to the admiral commanding North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, James River, Virginia. 

J. M. B. GLITZ, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 



Abstract log of the U. 8. 8. Commodore Perry. 

June 16, 1864. At 9 a. m. commenced to shell Fort Clifton with 100- 
pounder Parrott, firing at intervals of seven minutes during the watch. 
From 12 to 4 p. m.: Engaging the enemy all the watch, firing at inter- 
vals of seven minutes. At 5 ceased firing. Expended 49 rounds of 
100-pounder shell and 4 rounds IX-inch shell. From 4 to 8 p. m. : Opened 
fire on Fort Clifton. At 7:40 cast off from wharf and dropped down 
stream. 

June 17. At 6 a. m. opened fire with 100-pounder rifle on Fort Clif- 
ton. At the second discharge the gun burst, killing 1 man and wound- 
ing 5, completely destroying cabin bulkhead and other woodwork on 
the starboard side of vessel. At 5:15 p. m. steamed up James River 
and came to, off Bermuda Hundred. 



154 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Graves, U. S. Navy, of joint 
expedition in Pungo River, North Carolina, June 16-21, 1864. 

U. S. S. LOCKWOOD, 
Off New Berne, N. C., June 23, 1H64. 

SIR: I have the honor to report as follows: On the afternoon of the 
16th I left this place in the army transport Ella May, with a detach 
merit of rneii from the U. S. S. Louisiana, 15 men from the army, and 
the U. S. S. Ceres. Arrived at Mount Pleasant, Hyde County, and cap- 
tured five schooners, but owing to the low water could only briny three 
away, viz, Iowa, Mary Emma, and Jenny Lind; the other two I burned. 
There were no papers on board. 1 then proceeded to the Pungo River 
with the Valley City, she having in tow the Ceres, Avith her engines out 
of order. On the morning of the 10th took a detachment from the 
Valley City and Ceres and proceeded up Slade's Creek to Sladesville, 
where we found a force of guerrillas, who were soon routed with a few 
shots from the howitzer; landed and searched for stores, but finding 
none 1 returned to the vessels, and finding the Louisiana had arrived, 
1 returned her men. Having received information that the enemy were 
crossing stores at Leech ville, on the Pungo, I got underway at lo p. m. 
of the 10th, and landing at Saterwaite's Point with 70 men and officers, 
marched across the country about 4 miles to Leechville, hoping to pre- 
vent their escape. The vessels proceeding up the river, surrounded the 
place, but found they had just passed out, having been informed of our 
approach by mounted courier. I find that they keep a regular system 
of lookouts on all prominent points, making it almost impossible to sur- 
prise them. The vessels having arrived, I concluded to wait a fe\v 
hours and recounoiter. In the meantime employed the men in loading 
the schooners with shingles, a large quantity of which were on the 
landing. On the morning of the 21st, seeing nothing of the enemy, I 
returned to New Berne, arriving at 1 :30 a. m. this day. f regret that 
the negro guide upon whom I mainly depended is missing. 1 gave 
him permission to visit his family, and 1 fear he has been captured. 

In all 1 was zealously supported by Acting Masters Brooks and Fos- 
ter and Acting Master's Mate E. S. Austin, who, for courage, compe- 
tency, and good conduct, deserve promotion. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. W. GRAVES, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

MELANOTON SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Captain and Senior Naval Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Graves, U. S. Navy, giving list of 
captures in Pungo River. 

U. S. S. LOCKWOOD, 
Off New Berne, N. C., July 6, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to submit the following list of vessels, boats, 
etc., captured by me in the late expedition to Hyde County and Pungo 
River : 

Schooner Jenny Lind, sails and anchors. 
Schooner Mary Emma, no sails, one anchor. 
Schooner Iowa, neither sails nor anchors. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 155 

Six canoes (dugouts), one with sails and mast. 
One yawl boat belonging to Jenny Lind. 

Eighty-four thousand cedar shingles, 54,000 of which were turned 
over to the army; the remainder of them are stowed in the navy stoie- 
house yard. 

I enclose prize lists. 
Yery respectfully, 

G. W. GRAVES, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Commander A. DAVIS HAREELL, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer Present, U. S. 8. Chicopee, New Berne, N. C. 

[Endorsement.] 

These schooners were decided not to be lawful prizes and were 
returned to their owner, who was certified by General Palmer to be a 
lawful trader and a good Union man. 

[W. H. MACOMB.J 



Report of Acting Rear Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, regarding the station 
of the senior officer in Hampton Roads. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, Virginia, June 17, 1864. 

SIR: The Department's communication of 14th instant is received, 
and I have, as therein directed, ordered Captain Gansevoort, senior 
naval officer near Hampton Roads, to remove the Roanoke from New- 
port News to Hampton Roads. Newport News was the station I had 
occupied, until very recently, since first assuming command of this 
squadron, as the Norfolk navy yard and the roads were both protected 
from this point. 

Since the occupation of .James River by our vessels, it was no longer 
important in this consideration, but as it was connected with Fortress 
Monroe and Norfolk by telegraph., and Captain Gansevoort would, as 
senior officer, be embarrassed by visits of foreign officers to whom he 
is forbidden to show the ironclad he commands, and as he had a tug at 
his disposal, i allowed the Roanoke to remain at her old anchorage, 
where all navy transports stop to communicate in passing up and down 
the liver. 

Yet Hampton Roads will certainly be a more convenient station for 
the senior officer. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Captain Gansevoort, U. S. [Navy, regarding the movement of 
United States vessels in Hampton Roads. 

U. S. IRONCLAD ROANOKE, 
Neicport News, Va., June 17, 1864. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to reply to your communication of June 
14, in relation to the R. R. Cuyler and Alabama. 



156 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The R. R. Cuyler arrived here on tbe 12th instant with orders from 
the Navy Department to report to you for duty in the squadron. She 
is now at Baltimore, in obedience to your orders. 

The Alabama arrived here on the 13th instant with orders to report 
for duty in this squadron, and as she was all ready for sea, I sent her 
to Wilmington to report to the senior officer present for duty, in 
obedience to verbal orders from you to send the vessels to the blockade 
as soon as practicable. 

The Augusta left here on the 15th for Port Royal, with two coal ves- 
sels in tow, in obedience to a telegram from the Secretary of the Navy. 

The Nipsic left on the 14th witli one coal vessel for Charleston. 

My means are so limited for communicating with you and the rest of 
your squadron, that it would, in my opinion, greatly facilitate matters 
if you would send me one of your clerks, or writers, to assist me, as I 
have only my clerk and myself to do all the correspondence. I will 
make his stay on board of this ship as comfortable as lies in my power. 

I sent all the prisoners brought here by the New Berne north in that 
vessel. 

The steamer Keystone State arrived here this morning wanting 
repairs. I will have a survey held upon her, and send her to the yard 
for repairs. 

I expect the Wilderness here from the yard in a day or two. 

The Washington will tow up two coal vessels. She has on board 
some plates for the Saugus. 

The Keystone State brought in a small prize steamer. I have sent an 
intelligent officer to examine the prisoners. 

There are fourteen vessels here with 3,000 tons of coal. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GUERT GANSEVOOBT, 

Captain and Senior Officer. 

Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. 
Navy, to forward information regarding the British schooner James 
Douglass. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 17, 1864. 

SIR : A communication has been addressed to tlte Secretary of State 
by Lord Lyons, relative to the schooner James Douglass,* which was 
abandoned in March last, picked up at sea by the Monticello, Lieuten- 
ant dishing, and taken to Beaufort, N. C., and Lord Lyons has 
requested, in behalf of the owner, the release of the schooner. 

No report concerning this vessel appears to have been received nt 
the Department. Will you please furnish it with all the facts in the 
case. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



'See May 9, letter of dishing to Lee. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



157 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, giving the stations of 
the vessels of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

FL.AGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, Virginia, June 17, 1864. 

SIR : The following is the disposition of vessels comprising the North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 



Name. 


Station. 


Remarks. 


St. Lawrence . . 


Hampton Roads. Virginia . . 


Ordnance ship. 



Minnesota ... 
Youiiii Rover . 



.do 
.do 









do 


Violet 


do 


Tug No 2 


do 


Mystic 


York and Pamunkey rivers and 




Chesapeake Bay. 
do 




...do 




. do 




do 




do 




do 




do 




James River, above Newport 




News, 
do 




do 




do 


Osceola 


do 




do 




do 




do 




.. do 




James River above Wilson's 


Mackinaw 


Wharf, 
do 


Agawam 


...do ... 




do 




. . do 




do 


Saugus - 


do 




... do 


Tritonia 


do 


Stepping Stones 


do 


Hydrangea 


. do 


Alt lieu 


do 


Alert 


...do ... 


POPDV . . 


... .do 


Rose 


do 


Mount Washington . 


do 


Pink 


do 


Tug 1 


... do 


Tug 3 


do 


Tug 4 


do 


Tug 5 


... do 


Tug6 


do 






General Putnam 


do 


Arietta 
Release '. 


Beaufort, N. C 
do 


William Badger 


do 


Lilac 


do 


Mattabesett 




Wyaliismg 


do 


Tacony.... 


do 


Otsego 


do ... 


Chicopee 


do 


Shamrock 


do 


Sassacus 


do 


Miami 


.. do . 


Louisiana 


. . do 


Hetzel 


do 


Commodore Hull 


do 


Lock wood 


.. do .. 



Recruiting; crew mostly discharged. 

Guard ship. 

Tug; without battery, in orduauce 

service. 
Ironclad. 
Coal hulk. 
Tug. 

Guard ship. 



Side-wheel tug. 

Tug. 

At Wilson's Wharf. 

Tug; at Wilson's "Wharf. 
Off Fort Powhatan. 

Do. 

Off City Point. 
Off Bermuda Hundred. 
Turkey Bend. 

Off Tilman's [Tilghman's] Wharf. 
Deep Bottom. 
Above Hunchback. 

Lower Dutch Gap; now covering 

army at Wilcox'a Wharf. 
Flagship, Trent's Reach. 
Trent's Reach. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Advance guard duty ; Trent's Reach. 

Do. 

Do. 

Tug; mail boat. 

Tug; temporary torpedo boat, tender 
and ram to ironclads. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Transport. 

Transport, waiting for guns. 
Unarmed ; fitting with torpedoes. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



Ordnance ship. 
Storeship. 

Do. 
Tug; to move colliers, etc. 



Reported coming. 
Ram ; reported coming. 
Ordered up James River. 
Worn out; ordered up for repairs. 
Guard ; Washington, N. C. 



158 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Name. 


Station. 


Remarks. 


Valley City 


Sounds of North Carolina 






do 






do 


Ordered up for repairs. 


Whitehead 


... do 






do 


Ordered tip in James River. 




... do 


Storeship. 




do 






do 


Guard; Hatteras Inlet. 




Off Wilmington N.C 






do 






do 






do 




State of Georgia 


do 






.do 






.. do 






do 






do 






do 






do 






do .... 






..do 






do 






do 


Transport. 




do 






do ... 




Florida 


...do .. 






do 




Fort J ackson 


Outside cruisin ' off Wilming- 






ton, 
do 




Keystone State 


... .do 




Grand Gulf 


do 




Monticello 


do 




Gettysburg 


do 






Norfolk, Va 


Guard ship. 




do 


Ordnance hulk. 




do 


Do. 




...do 


Repairing. 


Kinina 


. ...do 


Do. 


Mount Veruon 


do 


Do. 


Vicksburg 


do 


Do. 




do . 


Do. 


"W ilderness 


do 


Fitting for supply steamer. 


R. R. Cuyler 


...do . . 




Governor Buckingham 
Daylight .. 


Northern ports 
do 


Baltimore. 
Do. 


Zouave 


do 


Do. 


James Adger 


do 


Philadelphia. 


Glaucus 


do 


Do. 


Tuscarora 


do ... 






. 





I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear '-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Extract from the journal of Commander J. C. Beaumont, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. MACKINAW, 
James River, June 17, 1862. 

Calm and pleasant; air 72 to 88. At about 4:30 p. m. steamer 
Winans came down the river and reported having been fired into from 
near Wilcox's Wharf. A t 4 : 35 the rebels opened upon us. Got under 
way and steamed up to Wilcox's and soon dispersed them. Pontoon 
bridge taken up. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 159 

Report of Commander Beaumont, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Macki- 
naw, regarding transport duty performed by that vessel. 

U. S. S. MACKINAW, 
Off Wilcox's Wharf, James River, June 18, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully rep'ort that I left ray anchorage abreast the head- 
quarters of the cominandiiig general before sunset last evening to 
convoy the transports past a point on the river from which the enemy 
h.id fired into one, after which I returned to my old anchorage to cover 
the crossing of the rear guard of the army. By midnight the troops 
had all crossed to the right side of the river. At daylight I took up 
my present position to see the fleet of transports safely by. After the 
fleet has passed J shall proceed to City Point to ascertain where this 
vessel is most required", and await further orders. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. BEAUMONT, 

Commander. 
Acting Rear-Adiniral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Beaumont, 
U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. S. Mackinaw. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, Virginia, June 18, 1864. 

SIB: You will upon the receipt of this order proceed with the Macki- 
n<tir under your command and take your station oft' Aikeu's Wharf, 
James River, previously occupied by you. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander J. C. BEAUMONT, 

U. S. 8. Mackinaw. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Quackenbush, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Pequot. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, June 1$, 1864. 

SIR: As the Mackinaw has resumed her station, you will closely 
observe the vicinity of Wilcox's Wharf, whence an army transport was 
recently fired on. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

U. 8. S. Pequot. 



160 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, June 18, 1864 lip. m. 
(Via Fort Monroe, 6 p. m., 19th. Received 8 p. m.) 
Canonicus broke a long screw of XV-iuch guns by elevated firing 
required here. Teeumseh is only monitor with short and reliable screws. 
Shall I not detain her, in the present state of affairs, until short screws 
are received for the other monitors? 
It is doubted if the long screws will stand the increased charges. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 

. [First endorsement.] 

BUREAU ORDNANCE, June 20, 1864. 

None of the monitors except the Teeumseh have been fitted with short 
screws to their guns. This arrangement of short screws requires a 
special fixture to the carriage, which will require time. Spare long 
screws can be sent if required. 

B. AULICK, 
Assistant Chief Bureau. 

[Second endorsement.] 

Send the above endorsement. The Teeumseh must not be delayed. 

F. 



Report of Commander Clary, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. S. Dacotah, 
regarding the operations of that vessel on the blockade. 

U. S. S. DACOTAH, 
Off Wilmington, N. C., June 18, 1864. 

SiR: I think it quite important that you should be advised of the 
condition of this ship, her speed and uselessness on this or any seagoing 
station. (I enclose you the chief engineer's report of her boilers, etc). 
En route here made a trial of her speed, smooth sea, light air ahead, 
18 pounds steam; made 6 knots per second hand of a watch and 7 
per glass, the knot 47 feet. We are neither in condition to run away 
from a ram nor run at one. 

We sighted black smoke and one of our cruisers in chase the morning 
of the 17th instant, off Frying Pan Shoals, but as our speed was but 6.6 
at the time and under fore and aft sail, it was utterly useless even to 
head in that direction. 

I wish to furnish you with some information relative to the speed of 
blockade runners as experienced during the temporary command of the 
U. S. S. Keystone State and while passenger in her to join this ship. 

There were nine chase* in all, in about thirty days; of these, two 
captures and 92 bales of cotton picked up. Three or four were com- 
pelled to throw their cargo overboard. In one of these chases where 
the Connecticut joined (and beating her), the Keystone State, going at 
the speed of nearly 13 knots for the best part of a day, was compelled to 
give up the chase. The speed of these contraband steamers is beyond 
all precedent of late. I have never experienced anything like it. Our 
12 and 13 knot cruisers may gain on them in the early part of the chase, 
but as soon as they lighten of their cargoes they outspeed them. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 161 

I think two or three fast steamers, cruisers, with the speed of 13 or 
13i, aud could be worked up to 14 knots offshore, would contribute to 
more captures than all our present squadron. 

The runners are making double trips now. I think there were some 
sixteen sighted and chased during the last month. 

There were four lying near Fort Fisher on the 16th instant, and three 
here on the 17th instant, in readiness to leave. 

It is reported that the Gettysburg can speed 15 or 16 knots. If she 
can attain 14 under the most favorable circumstances, I should be 
pleased to have temporary command of her, or appointed to another 
and more efficient command, exchanging this ship's officers and crew 
to one awaiting men now at our navy yards north. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. G. CLARY, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Commander Macomb, U. 8. Navy, 
commanding U. S. S. Shamrock, to proceed to a station off Roanoke 
River. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Off New Berne, N. C., June 18, 1864. 

SIR : You will proceed with the Shamrock to join the gunboat stationed 
in Albemarle Sound oft' the Eoanoke River. 

Communicate with Colonel Wardrop on your arrival at Roanoke 
Island, and request him to prevent all communication with the main- 
land on the arrival of the ironclad Chimo. 

Order the Chimo to proceed up the sound without touching at Roanoke 
Island and to anchor (where he can not be seen from the south shore) 
not higher up than the Perquimans River. 

You will tow up the schooner Ann S. Davenport, if she is repaired 
on your arrival at Roanoke Island. 
Very respectfully, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Commanding U. S. S. Shamrock. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Farrar>8 Island, June 19, 1864 11 p. m. 
(Via Fort Monroe, 6 p. m., 20th. Received 7 : 50 p. m.) 
Grant was here to-day. Three rebel ironclads and three gunboats 
appeared abreast of Chaffin's farm to-day, returned, came down again, 
and were off Chaffin's, as reported from armysignal station, at sundown. 

S. P. LEE. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 

N w R VOL 10 11 



162 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Farrar's Island, June 20, 1864 10: 30 p. m. 

(Received 7 p. m., 21st.) 

No change in the naval situation. Eeport from the army lookout that 
the rebel irouclatLs are taking on board sand in bags. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Report of Commander Macomb, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. 8. Sham- 
rock, of the arrival of that vessel at Hatteras Inlet. 

TJ. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Hatteras Inlet, June 20, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to orders from the Navy Department, I have the 
honor to report tlie arrival of this vessel here for service in the sounds 
of North Carolina and also as a part of the North Carolina blockading 
squadron. I shall also, in compliance with the same orders, report as 
soon as possible to Captain Melancton Smith, who is now at New Berne. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 

Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Green, U. S. Navy, regarding two 
schooners seized in Goose Creek. 

U. S. S. LOUISIANA, 
Pamlico River, June 20, 1864. 

SIR : I send to New Berne, in charge of William Donaldson and three 
men, two schooners which I took from the mouth of Goose Creek this 
morning. I waited there some time to give their owners an opportunity 
to claim them, but no one appeared. I respectfully request that the 
crew may be placed on board the Valley City unless opportunity offers 
to return them to this ship. I also send William Ayers, a refugee, 
picked up this morning in Pamlico River. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. M. GREEN, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Captain M. SMITH, 

Commanding Naval Forces, Sounds of North Carolina. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 168 

Report of Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting correspond- 
ence in the matter of permit to trade granted to G. W. Lane. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, Virginia, June 20, 1864. 

SIR: I transmit enclosed a communication from Captain Smith, of 
15th instant (1), with its enclosures, viz, copy of a letter from General 
Butler to the President of the United States, dated March 19, recom- 
mending that G. W. Lane be allowed to take a cargo of plows, etc., to 
Chowau County, N. C., on which the President's approval is endorsed; 
and a copy of a permit from General Butler to G. W. Lane, dated May 4, 
to trade as recommended; (2) my answer, dated 19th instant, to Cap- 
tain Smith's letter; and (3) letter from Captain Smith, of 15th instant, 
stating that the copy of the President's approval was omitted on the 
letter from General Butler and giving a copy of it. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure 1.] 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Off JRoanoke Island, June 15, 1864. 

SIR : The steam tug Philadelphia, of Baltimore, I find here on my 
arrival with an assorted cargo, and permits from General Butler, 
endorsed by the President of the United States, to trade with loyal cit- 
izens in Chowau County. 

These permits were granted on March 19 last and before the capture 
of Plymouth, and although there are many loyal persons residing at 
Edeuton, the port to which the steamer proposes to go, and our navy 
vessels are lying off that place, I do not consider that this county is 
within our lines, and have detained her to await your instructions. 

There are many articles on the manifest that would afford comfort to 
the enemy if not properly distributed, viz, dry goods, groceries, and 15 
barrels of whisky, but I cannot send a copy of the manifest, as the mail 
boat is about leaving. 

Mr. Lane, the master and owner of the steamer, has $45,000 in North 
and South Carolina current funds and $5,000 in greenbacks for the pur- 
chase of cotton. 

I enclose herewith copies of the most important papers governing the 
movements of the steamer. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina,. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Subenclosures.] 

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, 
DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, 

Fortress Monroe, March 19, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to state that I believe the public interests will 
be promoted if George W. Lane, esq., shall have permission to go 



164 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

through the Currituck Canal and Albemarle Sound to Chowan County, 
N. C., with cargoes of plows, harrows, trace chains, ropes, twine, and 
such supplies as can not be of use to an army, and to bring back return 
cargoes of cotton, tobacco, and other products of the country, all to be 
subject at all times to military supervision at this post. 
I have evidences of Mr. Lane's loyalty and trustworthiness. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, 

President of the United States. 

Endorsed : 

I approve the object of the within. 

A. LINCOLN. 
MARCH 21, 1864. 



HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, 
DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, 

Fortress Monroe, May 4, 1864. 

George W. Lane, esq., has permission to pass through the Currituck 
Canal and Albemarle Sound, in Chowan County, IS". C., with cargo of 
plows, harrows, trace chains, ropes, twine, and such supplies as can 
not be of use to an army, and to bring back return cargo of cotton, 
tobacco, and other products of the country. 

This permit is given on the express condition of forfeiture of goods 
if found in any way affording aid or comfort to the enemy, except by 
trading with peaceable inhabitants in goods not contraband of war or 
of use to the army. 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

[Enclosure 2.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, June 18, 1864. 

SIR : Your No. 36, of 15th, is just received. The President's permit 
to Mr. Lane must be respected. The papers will be forwarded to the 
Department. 

Very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Naval Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

[Enclosure 3.] 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Off Roanoke Island, June 15, 1864. 

SIR: In my hurry to get my dispatch No. 30, of to-day's date, off in 
the mail, I omitted to put the following endorsement on the copy of the 
letter of General Butler to the President of the United States, dated 
March 19, 1864, viz: 

I approve the object of the within. 

A. LINCOLN. 
MARCH 21, 1864. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 165 

Will you be pleased to have the above endorsement made upon that 
letter. 

Very respectfully, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Rear Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports of 
cooperative engagements in Pamunkey River, June 20-21, 1864. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, June 29, [18G4J. 

SIR: On the 29th of May, Lieutenant-Commander Babcock, U. S. S. 
Morse, by General Smith's request, proceeded to White House with the 
Morse, Shokokon, and Cohasset to cover the landing of supplies and 
protect the army communications. I subsequently sent the Cactus and 
Henry Brinker to his support. These vessels remained at White House 
until its evacuation on the 23d instant, rendering most efficient service, 
and then returned to Yorktown, convoying the transports. 

I enclose a report from Lieutenant-Commander Babcock of 25th 
instant, of an engagement on the 20th instant, with three rebel batter- 
ies near White House, which had been posted on the edge of the wood 
during a thick fog, and on its lifting opened fire on the wagon trains. 
The tire from the Morse and Cactus dislodged them in about three hours. 
Deserters afterwards reported that a force estimated at 10,000 of Wade 
Hampton's and Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry intended attacking our trains, 
but were deterred from the attempt by the fire of the gunboats. On 
the 21st a party of rebel cavalry fired on the transport Eliza Hancox, 
but were driven oft* by the Shokokon's fire. 

Lieutenant-Commander Babcock encloses the following reports, etc. : 

(A) June 20th, Acting Master Graham, commanding Cactus, reports 
engagement of 20th. 

(B) Copy of General Abercrombie's General Orders, No. 10, of 20th, 
instant, tendering his thanks to Lieutenant-Commander Babcock and 
the officers of the Navy for the efficient aid and support rendered in the 
engagement of the 20th. 

(C) June 21st, Acting Master Sheldon, commanding Shokokon, report- 
ing engagement of 21st. 

(D) June 24th, Acting Master Sheldon, general report of his move- 
ments since arriving at White House. 

I should not fail to call attention to the hearty, efficient, and success- 
ful service which Lieutenant-Commander Babcock has rendered to the 
army in opening and protecting its communications and in repelling 
the assaults of the enemy. He is a modest and meritorious officer and 
deserves the especial notice of the Department. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



166 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. MORSE, 
Off Yorktotrn, Va., June 25, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the morning of the 20th 
instant, while lying oft' White House, Pamunkey River, during a thick 
fog, at 6:30 a. in., some firing was occasionally heard on shore, at some 
distance off from this vessel, but after a short time ceased. At 9 a. m., 
the fog clearing up, three rebel batteries intrenched at the edge of 
the woods opened a brisk artillery lire on our wagon trains on shore, 
also on this vessel and Cactus. At once took position with this vessel 
and Cactus, opening lire on them, and by noon succeeded in driving 
them entirely from their position out of range of our guns. The 
wagon trains retreated slowly across the river. Made excellent 
shots both from this vessel and Cactus, and was informed afterwards 
from accounts of prisoners who were taken that Fitzhugh Lee and 
Wade Hampton's Legion, consisting of 10,000 rebel cavalry, were 
intending to make an attack on our wagon trains, and that had it not 
been for the gunboats they would certainly have accomplished their 
purpose. At 5 p. m. General Sheridan's command arrived, and at once 
followed up the rebel cavalry. 

Expended from this vessel the following ammunition: One 40-second, 
1 30-second, and 35 20- second shell from 100-pouuders ; 30 20-second shell 
from IX-inch Dahlgrens; 37 10-pound, cartridges for 100-pounder Par- 
rotts; 30 10-pound cartridges for IX-inch Dahlgrens. 

On the morning of the 21st instant a party of these rebel cavalry fired 
on the transport steamer Eliza Hancox off Cumberland Point, but the 
Shokokon succeeded in driving them handsomely. 

On the morning of the 23d instant, at 10 a. in., White House being 
entirely evacuated by our forces, gave orders to get underway and 
proceed down the river, bringing up the rear with this vessel. When 
down to West Point stopped there a short time and found that all our 
forces had left that place also; proceeded to Yorktown and arrived 
safely at 1 a. m. yesterday morning. At 9 a. m. dispatched the Shoko- 
kon, Cactus, Henry Brinker, and Gohasset to Hampton Roads with order 
to report to Captain Guert Gansevoort for further orders. 

During the firing from this vessel on the morning of the 20th instant, 
at the second fire of my after 100-pounder Parrott, the socket of the 
elevating screw broke; afterwards worked the gun bed and quoin. 
The breeching of the 100-pounder Parrott parted, but caused no acci- 
dent whatever. 

Too much praise can not be given to the commanding officers of the 
Shokokon, Cactus, Henry Brinker, and Gohasset for the very efficient aid 
and support they afforded me at all times. Their officers and crews 
behaved well, also the officers and crew of this vessel. 

I respectfully forward you the enclosed reports from the Shokokon 

and Cactus, also a copy of a letter received by me from General 

Abercrombie, who commanded the land forces at White House during 

the attack of the 20th instant, before the arrival of General Sheridan. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. A. BABCOCK, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 167 

[Subenclosure A.] 

U. S. S. CACTUS, 
White House, June 20, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that at 9 o'clock, by your order, I 
commenced firing my rifled 30-pounder upon the rebel batteries that 
were attacking our laud forces at this place. I expended 28 30-pounder 
shell with 15-second fuzes, and 3 12-pound percussion shell, at an ele- 
vation of 10 degrees. At 11 o'clock I proceeded down the [Pamunkey] 
Kiver to Cumberland Heights, as directed, to give notice to the U. S. S. 
Shokokon. At 12 : 30 o'clock started for White House again. On my 
way up I expended 3 30-pounder shell, 5, 10, and 15 second fuzes, upon 
a body of cavalry. At 3 o'clock came to anchor at White House. 

Amount of ammunition expended: 31 30-pounder shell, 3 12-pounder 
percussion shell, 29 15-second, 1 10-second, 1 5-secoud fuzes, 31 3^-pouud 
cartridges, 3 1-pound cartridges. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

N. GRAHAM, 
Acting Master, Commanding Cactus. 

Lieutenant-Commander C. A. BABCOCK, 

Commanding U. S. S. Morse, Senior Officer Present. 

[Subenclosure B.] 

GENERAL ORDERS, ) HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, 

No. 10. } White Rouse, Va., June 20, 1864. 

The undersigned hereby relinquishes the command of the troops at 
thi.s station to Brigadier-General George W. Getty. 

In doing so he avails himself of this opportunity of expressing his 
high appreciation of the services of his staff in their respective posi- 
tions; tendering his sincere thanks to Captain Charles A. Babcock and 
the officers of the Navy for the very efficient aid and support to the 
land forces in the persistent attack on the post <>f to-day by the enemy. 

J. J. ABERCROMBIE, 

Brigadier- General. 

Captain CHAS. A. BABCOCK, II. S. Navy. 

[Subenclosure C.] 

TJ. S. S. SHOKOKON, 
Cumberland, Va., June 21, 1864. 

SIR: I would respectfully submit the following report: 
This morning, 8:30 a. m., just after a thick fog had cleared away, 
the transport steamer Eliza Hancox passed up. When abreast of 
Cumberland Point, 1 mile above where this vessel was lying, she was 
fired on by a party of rebels, who were concealed on the bank of the 
river. I immediately opened fire with our forward battery, and slipped 
the chain, steamed up to the point where the fire proceeded from, the 
most of our shell exploding near and among them. They soon fell back 
under cover of the woods out of sight. Shelled the woods, but could 
not get any reply. Kept in the position near the point until 12 o'clock 
m. 1 learned from a man whom I called down to the beach that the 
enemy were a party of dismounted avalry, numbering about 150; that 
they had fallen back toward New Kent Court-House. He reported that 
they had some wounded, but could not tell whether there were any 



168 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

killed. I also learned from him that they dismounted about a mile 
back and came down to the river during the fog. Nothing more has 
been seen or heard from them up to this, G p. m. Enclosed I will send 
report of ammunition expended. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. SHELDON, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 

Lieutenant-Commander CHAS. A. BABCOCK, 

Senior Officer, Commanding U. 8. 8. Morse, White House, Va. 

Expenditure of ammunition, U. S. S. Shokokon, June 21, 1S64. 

Rounds. 

5-second 30-pound Parrott shell 5 

10-secoiid 30-pound Parrott shell 5 

5-secoud 30-pound Parrott case shot 1 

24-pounder shrapnel 5 

24-pounder canister 1 

Total 17 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. CRAFTS, 

Executive Officer. 

[Snbenclosure D.] 

U. S. S. SHOKOKON, 
Off Yorktoicn, June 34, 1864. 

SIR. In obedience to orders from Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. Lee, May 
28, 1864, to report to you at Yorktowu, or wherever you might be, I 
reported to you at White House, May 31, 5 o'clock a. m. ; was ordered 
by you to proceed down the Pamunkey and take position off Cumber- 
land, to protect the transports passing up and down. In compliance 
with your orders, I took position where I could command Cumberland 
Point and an old earthwork formerly held by the enemy, on the right 
bank of the river. Nothing occurred of note until the 6th of June, when 
a small force of the One hundred and seventy-ninth New York Volun- 
teers came down to occupy the heights. I gave all assistance they 
required in landing and getting their stores ashore. Everything 
remained quiet until the morning of the 21st instant, when a party of 
about 150 rebel cavalry (dismounted) came down to Cumberland Point 
during a thick fog and fired from the bank of the river at one of the 
transports passing that point details as per report of that day. On 
the evening of the 22d the force occupying the heights evacuated and 
passed down the river. I rendered them all assistance possible in 
getting on board the transport. 

On the 23d instant, 2:45 p. m., was ordered by you to proceed down 
the river in company with the other gunboats, arriving off Yorktown 
at 11:15 p. m., June 23, 1864. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. SHELDON, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 

Lieutenant-Commander CHAS. A. BABCOCK, 

Senior Officer, Commanding U. 8. 8. Morse, Off Yorktown, Va. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 169 

Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports 
regarding an unsuccessful joint expedition for the purpose of cutting 
the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, June 20-24, 1864. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, July 11, 1864. 

SIR: Commander Dove reports under date of 1st instant that a joint 
army and navy expedition left Beaufort on the 20th ultimo for the pur- 
I osc of cutting the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, consisting of a 
detachment of the Ninth Vermont Volunteers, landed and protected by 
the Calypso and Nansemond, near New River, designed to meet and 
cooperate with a force operating inland. This former part of the plan 
was carried out, but the enemy had received notice of the expedition 
and were in too great force to make the attempt on the railroad practi- 
cable, and the vessels returned to Beaufort on the 23d, the detachment 
of the Ninth Vermont returning in lighters by Bogue Sound. There 
were no casualties in the naval part of the expedition. The Twelfth 
New York Cavalry, meeting the Ninth Vermont, unfortunately mistook 
them for the enemy, fired on them, killed 1 man and wounded 2. 

Commander Dove had heard nothing from Colonel Jourdan, who was 
in command of the military force, and had been sick since his return, 
so could not give the particulars of his movements. 

I enclose Commander Dove's report with the accompanying reports 
of Acting Master Stuart and Acting Ensign Porter, and the sketch of 
New Eiver Inlet made by Acting Master Stuart. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. NAVAL STATION, 

Beaufort, N. C., July 1, 1864. 

SIR : I have been waiting for some days to hear from ColonelJourdan 
before reporting the expedition for the purpose of cutting the Wilming- 
ton and Weldon Railroad, but he has been quite unwell since his return 
and can not write. 

It was at first entirely an army affair, and the steamer to be used was 
the John Farron, a small army transport. She, however, was found 
impracticable, and, on being informed of the impossibility of her taking 
part, I offered the Nansemond, although she, too, was not very strong. 

For that reason, and to make our part sure, I directed Captain Stuart, 
with the Calypso, to assist her. 

The great point in the organization was secrecy, and the Nansemond 
went out from here with the lighters and surfboats in tow, in the after- 
noon, as if going to work on the wreck, near which she tarried until 
near night. 

The Calypso stood out to sea, with orders to come in off New River 
in the morning, as if from the southward, and meet the Nansemond there. 

So far as we were concerned the arrangement was perfect; none of 
the commanders in port even knew anything of it. I am sorry to say, 
though, that the expedition was a failure from a "leak" in New Berne. 

The colonel told me that the Confederates had two days' notice of his 



170 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

approach and knew all his plans. Two trains filled with troops at Kins- 
ton were ready to start as soon as the whereabouts of ours was tele- 
graphed. The country was all alarmed and in arms, and the men could 
get nothing beyond the rations they carried with them. 

The inland party did not get near the railroad, nor did it reach the 
coast at all; and the Calypso and Nansemond, after waiting the allotted 
time, returned to this port with the prisoners they had captured. 

The two lighters, with some of the troops from the Nansemond, returned 
by Bogue Sound, and the surfboats were towed up by the steamers. 
There are no casualties with us to report. 

Enclosed are the reports of Captains Stuart and Porter, with a sketch 
by Captain Stuart. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

BENJAMIN M. DOVE, 

Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

[Subenclosnres.] 

U. S. S. CALYPSO, 
Beaufort, N. C., June 24, 1864. 

SIR : I beg leave to report that in obedience to your orders of the 20th 
instant, I proceeded to sea that evening with the Calypso, and having 
arranged with the commanding officer of the Nansemond to meet him 
early the next morning off New River Inlet, I cruised during the night to 
the southward and westward some distance from the land so as not to 
be seen from the shore, especially in company with the Nansemond, tow- 
ing the lighters and surfboats, which might arouse a suspicion of our 
intended movements. 

The Nansemond, as Captain Porter's report will inform you, reached 
New River Inlet about 11 : 30 p. m., the first point in the programme to 
be visited. Captain Kelley, of the Ninth Vermont, and his men (100 in 
all) had been put on board of the surfboats, and when abreast of the 
inlet the boats cast loose ana ueaded for the shore, the Nansemond, with 
the lighters, passing along to the southward and westward. The boats, 
however, did not enter the inlet until near daylight, when, as was after- 
wards learned, they proceeded without hindrance or molestation up 
as far as Swan Point, where they lauded and the surf boats returned to 
the Nansemond. At daylight of the 21st I made the Nansemond near 
New River Inlet, and soon joined her. 

Both vessels came to anchor off the bar, and with two cutters from 
the Calypso and the four surfboats, an expedition was fitted out to cooper- 
ate with Captain Kelley. No time was lost in getting the boats ready. 
The first cutter of the Calypso was provided with a 12 pounder rifled 
howitzer. At noon a party left for the shore with written instructions 
from me; succeeded in crossing the bar and were soon out of sight. 

It appears that Captain Kelley, with his men, had, as per agreement, 
proceeded up the river about 8 miles, and took possession of Snead's 
Ferry, capturing a number of the enemy's pickets, but meeting with no 
opposition. Our boats found him at the ferry, and as his position was a 
secure one and there appeared to be no signs of rebels in force about, 
he decided that all the boats should return to the vessels with the under- 
standing that a supply of provisions should be sent to him on the follow- 
ing day. Accordingly the boats descended the river again. One of the 
Calypso's cutters and the surf boat, manned by a crew from the Calypso, 
remained inside the inlet all day; the other boats came off. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 171 

On the following day, 22d, at daylight, the boats were again dispatched 
to the shore, and as the message from Captain Kelley was indefinite, 1 
directed Captain Porter to take charge of the party. 

At noon all the boats returned, having left Captain Kelley and his men 
secure for the time being. On their way down the river they were fired 
at from Swan Point, but suffered no injury. (Mr. Sluyter's report will 
give particulars.) 

This state of things made me feel apprehensive for the safety of Cap- 
tain Kelley and his men, for there could be no doubt but that the rebels 
had taken possession of Swan Point and might be in considerable force, 
perhaps with artillery, which would prevent the boats from reascendiug 
the river. I, however, determined that every effort should be made to 
bring Captain Kelley and his men oft', when the time arrived for him 
to leave. With that view a plan had been arranged whereby we could 
be made a ware, of his situation and wishes. Thus matters rested until 
near midnight, when a fire was seen on the beach abreast of our anchor- 
age (previously in the early part of the evening two rockets were seen 
in the direction of Captain Kelley's camp). A boat was at once dis- 
patched from the Calypso and Xansemond. The NansemoncPs boat soon 
returned and reported that a sergeant and four men were on shore with 
a message from Captain Kelley to the effect that he wished his men 
brought off to the ship at once, being apprehensive of an attack. The 
Calypso's boat entered the inlet and gave Captain Kelley's men protec- 
tion until the boats passed up the river to the rescue of him and his men. 

No time was lost in preparing the boats for the expedition, and at 
1:35 a. m. 23d, they left with orders to bring Captain Kelley and his 
men off at all hazards. At noon, to my great delight, the boats (six of 
them) appeared, and the whole party under Captain Kelley with our 
men and a number of prisoners were safely received on board. 

From information received from Captain Kelley I had reason to 
believe that our services might be required at or near Swausboro, 
Colonel Savage with a part of the land forces who met Captain Kelley 
at the ferry, as will be seen by Captain Porter's report, having determ- 
ined to return to this place through or near Swansboro, where he feared 
he might meet with a formidable opposition. I accordingly got under- 
way with the Calypso and Nansemond and proceeded to Bogue Inlet. 
Here both vessels anchored at 3 : 30 p. m. yesterday, and after putting 
a 12 pounder howitzer with a crew of eight men from the Calypso on 
board the lighters (two of them) to work the vessels and guns. Captain 
Kelley left in them with his command, arranging to go to Beaufort 
through the sound, if nothing occurred to prevent, and of course if 
nothing was heard from Colonel Savage and his party. 

At sunset the proper signals were made indicating Captain Kelley's 
intention to pass through the sound, and that our services would be no 
longer needed. 

I concluded to spend the night in cruising, and accordingly left the 
Xansemond at anchor at 9 p. m. and proceeded seaward. 1 met the 
Xansemond outside the harbor this morning and both vessels entered 
and anchored about 8 a. m. 

I deem it proper to state that a part of the programme made by Colonel 
Jourdan required our presence at New Topsail Inlet on Thursday 
morning; accordingly, 1 made arrangements to that effect. But events 
proved that Colonel Jourdan had given up that part of his expedition, 
and our presence was not required there. That you may be apprised 
of my plans to serve the army and promote the interests of the expedi- 
tion at all points, I enclose a ropy of my orders to Captain Porter, who 



172 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

1 had determined to send to New Topsail Inlet. I also enclose a sketch 
which I made of New River Inlet, giving all the points of interest and 
Captain Kelley's position and the approaches to it. 

I also enclose Acting Ensign Sluyter's report,* my executive officer 
who was in command of the Calypso's first cutter; also the reports* of 
Acting Ensign Jennings and Acting Master's Mate Thompson, who had 
charge of boats on separate expeditions. 

I have on board 13 prisoners, 7 rebel soldiers and 6 citizens; also 4 
of the Ninth Vermont Regiment, sent by Captain Kelley as a guard. 
What shall I do with the prisoners? My 12-pounder howitzer and 8 
men are on board the lighters which have just reached this place. I 
need some 30 tons of coal. 

In conclusion permit me to say that 1 think Captain Kelley and his 
men acquitted themselves admirably; all that was desired to accom- 
plish was attained. 

Captain Porter and his officers and men, and the officers and men 
under my immediate command, who participated (and all desired to do 
so) in the operations at New River Inlet deserve great credit for the 
interest they manifested in the work in which they were engaged, and 
for the prompt and efficient mariner [in which] they carried out my 
orders. 

I ain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

FRED. J). STUART, 
Acting Master, Commanding Calypso. 

Commander B. M. DOVE, II. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer Present, North Atlantic JUockadinfi fiquariron. 



U. S. S. NANSEMOND, June 23, 18G4. 

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report: 

In accordance with your order, I left Beaufort with the Nansemond 
at 3: 30 p. m., on the 20th instant, having on board one company of 100 
men of the Ninth Vermont Regiment, under the command of Captain 
Kelley, two lighters and four surfboats in tow. Proceeded toward New 
River Inlet; arrived off that place 11: 30 p. m., and with much difficulty 
succeeded in landing the troops and capturing every man of the guard 
without firing a gun or causing any alarm. Captain Kelley then 
marched to Snead's Ferry, 3 miles above, took all but 2 of the guard 
there, secured the ferryboat, and crossing the river intrenched himself 
on the east bank. The prisoners captured (3 privates of the Confed- 
erate cavalry and 3 citizens, supposed to have been in the employ of 
the rebel Government) were brought on board the vessel. 

On the arrival of the U. S. S. Calypso at 5:30 a. m., on the 21st, I 
reported to Acting Master F. D. Stuart, commanding, and with his con- 
currence and the assistance of his boats, communication by the river 
with Captain Kelley was secured and signals arranged. 

On the 22d, I again consulted with Captain Stuart, and with his 
approval, proceeded up the river with supplies for Captain Kelley in 
the boats of both vessels. On our return from the ferry this p. m., our 
boats were attacked by rebel pickets, at a point 3 or 4 miles below, on 
the right bank of the river. Believing that they were supported by 
artillery, who would dispute our return past the point, we landed to 



* Not necessary to publish. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 173 

cut them off and capture their guns, but found no artillery, and owing 
to the thick undergrowth and marshes we succeeded in taking but one 
prisoner, a rebel soldier. 

At 8 p. in. we observed the signal indicating an attack upon Captain 
Kelley, and prepared boats for his assistance. At 11 p. m., learned by 
dispatch from him that the attack was made by a detachment of the 
Twelfth New York Cavalry, and unfortunately, before the mistake was 
discovered, 1 of the cavalry was killed and "2 slightly wounded. Boats 
were immediately sent up to the ferry, and as Captain Kelley's object 
at this point was accomplished he returned to this vessel with his men, 
bringing with him Captain [Daniel j Marshall, of the Twelfth New York 
Cavalry (wounded by the falling of his horse) ; the body of the sergeant, 
killed in the engagement; 8 prisoners and 4 contrabands. 

Learning from Captain Kelley that we should not meet Colonel 
Jourdan at New Topsail Inlet, as at first arranged, and that the retreat 
of Colonel [James W.I Savage with the New York Cavalry might be 
cut off at Swausboro, both vessels left New River at 1 : 30 p. m. to-day, 
by order of Captain Stuart, and steamed up to Bogue Inlet and sent 
the two lighters, one carrying a 12-pounder howitzer and 8 men, from 
the Calypso, to convey Captain Kelley's command and render any 
assistance possible at Swansboro. At 8 p. m. we learued by signal 
that Captain Kelley, with the two lighters, had gone to Beaufort through 
Bogue Sound, and it being too late for us to reach there in time to enter 
the harbor before morning, we stood along the beach on blockade duty 
for the night. 

I beg leave, in conclusion, to testify to the ability and energy of 
Captain Kelley, of the Ninth Regiment Vermont Volunteers. He has 
been untiringly at work ever since his first landing, and though more 
than once in difficult positions, has managed his part of the expedition 
with perfect success. 

For my own officers and men I can only say that, although they have 
been employed constantly on boat service, rowing long and hard against 
a strong current and through difficult channels, day and night, 1 have 
heard no word of complaint, but an earnest desire to assist the enter- 
prise in every possible way. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. H. PORTER, 
Acting Ensign, Commanding. 

Commander B. M. DOVE, 

Commanding Naval Station, Beaufort, N. C. 



U. S. S. CALYPSO, 
Off New River Inlet, June 21, 1864. 

SIR: You will take charge of the first and second cutters of this 
ship, each manned with ten men, and a surfboat, furnished by the 
\ansemond, to be manned by nine men from this ship, and, in company 
with three armed boats from the Nansemond, will enter the New River 
Inlet and proceed up the river as far as what is known as the Ferry, 
about 8 miles from the entrance, where you will meet with Captain 
Kelley, of the Army, who, with his company, are somewhere in that 
neighborhood. 

The object of this expedition is to render Captain Kelley such assist- 
ance as he may require, and to cooperate with him in any demonstra- 
tion he may make. 



174 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The first cutter will be armed with a 12-pounder howitzer on a boat- 
carriage; a lield carriage for the howitzer will be placed in the second 
cutter. Each man will be armed with a musket or a pi.stol, or both, 
and a cutlass. Ten rounds for the howitzer will be sufficient, and 
great care must be taken not to expend ammunition without a good 
reason for so doing. 

You will bear in mind that you are to traverse the waters of an ene 
my, and that you and your men will be exposed to danger at every 
point; be vigilant, therefore, and see that no indiscretions are com- 
mitted by anyone. Do not land until you fall in with Captain Kelley, 
who will direct your movements after you meet him. As soon as youj 
services are no longer required return to your command to the ship. 

I give you a rough sketch of the river, which will serve to guide you 
to your destination. 

Captain Porter's officers have been up the New liiver Inlet and are 
in possession of information which will be useful to you. Act in per- 
fect unison with the officers of the Nansemond. who have, so far, acted 
successfully within the orders of Captain Porter. 

Should any accident befall you, lose no time in acquainting me with 
the facts. 

A careful lookout will be kept for signals from you or Captain Kel- 
ley, either by firing guns or rockets. 

Wishing you success, 1 am, your obedient servant, 

FRED. D. STUART, 
Acting Master, Commanding Steamer Calypao. 

Acting Ensign S. G. SLTTYTER, 

Calypso. 



U. S. S. CALYPSO, 
Off New River Inlet, June 22, 1M4. 

SIR: From information furnished by yourself, based upon observa- 
tions made and experience gained by your visit to Captain Kelley at 
the Ferry [Snead's] to-day, it seems to be absolutely necessary that 
either the Calypso or Nansemond should remain at this point, at any 
rate for some days, to render such aid to our forces on shore as they 
may need, and as we may be able to afford, while the other vessel 
should repair to New Topsail Inlet to await Colonel Jourdan's arrival 
there as per agreement. 

From the fact that your boats were fired at from Swan Point on 
your passage down the river, there is every reason to believe that that 
point is occupied by the rebels, and, it may be, in considerable strength. 
This cuts off our intercourse with Captain Kelley by water for the 
present. 

As Swan Point is on the right bank of the river, and Captain Kel- 
ley with his men are on the left bank, he may be able, should it become 
necessary for him to abandon his present position before he is rein- 
forced to reach the coast in safety, which from your statement he will 
no doubt try to do somewhere near Cedar Point. His retreat inust be 
covered, if in our power, and his men must be speedily embarked 
should they appear. 

Having more men at my disposal, and greater facilities for the prompt 
and efficient execution of such duties as may devolve upon the vessel 
left, I will remain with the Calypso and take charge of the lighters and 
surfboats, with the exception of one of the latter, which you will keep, 
as it may be required to assist in transporting Colonel Jourdan's men 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 175 

to your vessel. You will therefore proceed with the Nansemond to New 
Topsail Inlet, and be ready at the proper time to render Colonel 
Jourdan any assistance he may need, should he make his appearance. 

As you have seen and conversed with Captain Kelley, and know how 
he is situated and what his plans are, you will be better able to explain 
the condition of things at this place to Colonel Jourdan than I can 
verbally or by letter. 

From what you informed me, I may expect to hear from Captain 
Kelley any moment, either for good or for bad, but should no intelli- 
gence reach me from him, I will certainly not leave this place, unless 
stress of weather drives me to sea, until alter Sunday next; perhaps 
not then. 

Should you hear nothing from Colonel Jourdan up to Sunday next 
you will repair to this place. If I am not here, take it for granted that 
I have gone to Beaufort, and repair yourself with the Nansemond to that 
harbor. 

You will send all the prisoners you have from the shore on board of 
this vessel, together with the guard sent by Captain Kelley. With 
them send a list of their names, and, if any, what effects they have. 
Wishing you success, 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

FRED. D. STUART, 
Acting Master, Commanding Calypso. 

Acting Ensign J. H. PORTER, 

Commanding Steamer Nansemond. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Smith, 
U. 8. Navy, for the transfer of his command in the sounds. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, June 21, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed without delay to resume command of the Onondaga in 
James Kiver. 

Turn over the command in the sounds to Commander Bankhead, 
delivering to him all unexecuted orders and post him on the situation 
and your views. 

Send the Miami, Sassacus, and Commodore Barnes/here as soon as prac- 
ticable, choosing favorable weather and taking a convoy if necessary. 
The two former will answer to protect points in James River. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Naval Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 



Report of Captain Sands, U. S. Navy, naming the vessels on the outside 

blockade. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 
Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va., June 21, 1864. 

SIR: Iii reply to your communication of the 13th instant, I have to 
state that the following vessels are on outside blockade, viz, Fort 



176 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Jackson, Keystone State, Quaker City, and Gettysburg, and I suggest 
that the Mount Vernon and Nereus, being fair steamers for speed, might 
advantageously also be employed for outsiders. 

Very respectfully, etc., your obedient servant, 

B. F. SANDS, 
Captain, U. 8, Navy. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Order of Acting Hear- Admiral Lee, TT. S. Navy, to Captain Glisson, U. 8. 
Navy, regarding blockade duty. 

FLAGSHIP MALVEHN, 
James River, June 21, 1864. 

SIR: When ready for sea you will cruise with the Santiago de Cuba 
under your command off' Wilmington on the outside blockade, to inter- 
cept blockade runners to and from that point. Regulate as far as 
practicable and proper the quantities of coal, etc., so far as to preserve 
the best trim of your vessel for speed. 

Send steam prizes to Boston, except that the first cotton prize here- 
after taken should lie sent to Providence, R. I., to which port I wish to 
send one prize, and that the first one taken, whichever cruiser may 
take it. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain O. S. GLISSON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Santiago de Cuba. 

(Same to Commander Downes, commanding U. S. S. R. R. Cuyler; 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Trathen, commanding U. S. S. Mount 
Vernon, and Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Breck, commanding U. S. S. 
Niphon.} 

P. S. If the Santiago de Cuba can not enter Beaufort Harbor, come 
to Hampton Roads when in want of coal and supplies. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 



Engagement of Federal Jleet with Confederate ironclads and shore batteries 
at Howletfs, June 31, 1864. 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Farrar'tt Island, June 21, 1&64 11 p. m. 
(Via Fort Monroe, 4 : 30 p. m., 22d. Received (5 : 45 p. in.) 
About noon enemy opened fire from Hewlett's Battery and from 
his ironclads and gunboats, which were concealed from view above 
Dutch Gap. 

Saugus's deck, before turret, was injured by one X-inch shot. A 
number of 1-inch iron plates required immediately to protect weak and 
cover wounded places; also spare screws for XV-iuch guns. The 
enemy seems determined to control this part of the river. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 177 

Instead of withdrawing the Tecumseh, it is necessary to largely 
increase the ironclad force here. 

S. P. LEE, 

Acting Hear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Letter from Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, IT. S. Navy, to Major-General Butler, U. S. Army. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, Virginia, June 21, 1864. 

GENERAL: The enemy operates against us with heavy guns from the 
battery at Hewlett's and from their vessels in Dutch Gap. Our wooden 
vessels can not remain in Trent's Reach under their cross fire, and they 
are very much exposed by it in the reach below, and the ironclads can 
not maintain a protracted fire for the purpose of silencing Hewlett's 
Battery. The life of the guns, the endurance of the men, and the 
supply of XV-iuch ammunition and fuel will not admit of a protracted 
firing on the battery. 

These vessels, unless to support and cooperate with some army move- 
ment, must be reserved for the rebel ironclads. 

I would respectfully suggest such batteries of heavy guns, to be 
placed in the most commanding positions, as will keep Hewlett's Bat- 
tery in subjection. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear -Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General B. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 



Letter from Commander Clitz, U. S. Navy, to Commander Lynch, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. OSCEOLA, 

Off City Point, James River, June 21, 1864. 

DEAR CAPTAIN : Be pleased to send to this place with all dispatch 
the following articles, viz, 200 XV-inch shells, 150 35 pounds plain 
chamber charges to be put in new cylinders, 500 5-second fuzes. 

Our ironclads are having a smart time of it with the rebel ironclads 
and a fort, said to be formidable, unmasked to-day. 
Yours, very truly, 

J. M. B. CLITZ, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Commander DOMINICK LYNCH, 

Comdg. U. S. Frigate St. Lawrence, Hampton Roads, Virginia. 



Letter from Lieutenant-Commander Barnes, U. S. Navy, to Commander Clitz, U. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, June 21, 1864. 

SIR: We are having smart work here and desire that the Rose, 
which carries this, may be filled up to her capacity for carrying with 
N w R VOL 10 12 



178 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

XV-incli and 150 pounder ammunition and dispatched with all speed 
on her return. 

I have already sent the Hydrangea on the same errand. Let the 
proportion be one third of 150-pouuder to the XV-inch. 

The ironclads (rebel) are shelling us from the bend and the batteries 
from Hewlett's are doing their best. No casualties that I know of as 
yet. 

Yours, respectfully and truly, 

JNO. S. BARNES, 

Fleet Captain. 
Commander J. M. B. CLITZ, 

Commanding Osceola, City Point. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Loe, IT. S. Navy, transmitting reports of engagement. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, Virginia, June 24, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose reports of our engagement on the 21st instant with 
the battery which the enemy that day mounted at Hewlett's. Their 
ironclads and gunboats, lying concealed in the reaches above the bar, 
participated in the action. 

The firing from the monitors was good. One of the enemy's guns 
was dismounted. 
We met with no casualties. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosures.] 

1. Report of Commander Craven, Tecnmseli, June 23. 

2. Report of Commander Colhoun, enclosing Chief Engineer Peake's 
report and sketches, showing injury to vessel (8augus), date, June 23. 

3. Report of Lieutenant-Commander Cushman, Onondaga. 

4. Report of Commander Parrott, Canonicus, June 23, enclosing Chief 
Engineer Macomb's report. 

5. Report of Commander Rhind, Agawam. 

[Endorsement.] 

Craven's and Parrott's reports sent June 29; Captain Errick's to be 
returned. 

Fox. 

[Enclosure 1.] 

U. S. IRONCLAD TECUMSEH, 

James River, June 23, 1864. 

SIR: In compliance with your order I have to report the part this 
vessel took in the engagement of the 21st instant: 

Early in the morning of the 21st we discovered that the enemy had 
during the night felled some trees to the north of Hewlett's barn and 
exposed a new line of works there. These works were covered with 
brush. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 179 

At 10:30 a. in., observing a gang busily occupied on the right of 
this new battery, I threw into it five XV-inch shells, two of which 
exploded in the right place, destroying a platform, throwing the plank 
and timber in every direction. At 11 : 30 the enemy commenced mov- 
ing the brush and unmasked a battery of six embrasures, in four of 
which guns were mounted. 

] immediately renewed my fire on the battery and ordered the Canon- 
icy ft and Suugus also to open, on your previous instructions. 

The enemy opened his fire upon us at meridian with four guns, two 
of them heavy caliber, and at 12:30 some ironclads near Dutch Gap 
commenced a wild Cross fire which we would not reply to, as they were 
concealed by the trees. 

Our fire was delivered slowly and with great precision, most of our 
shells exploding within the works of the enemy. At 1:30 p. m. I 
ceased firing and gave my crew a half hour to rest and eat their din- 
ner. At 2 recommenced and continued firing slowly until 4 p. m., our 
last shell silencing one gun, the shell having traversed through the 
embrasure and disabled it. The estimated distance was 2,000 yards. 
This ship expended forty-six XV-inch shells, and was not hit. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. AUGS. CRAVEN, 

Commander. 

Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure 2. 1 

U. S. IRONCLAD STEAMER SAUGTTS, 

Trent's Reach, James River, June 23, 1864. 

SIR: In the engagement with the enemy's battery near Hewlett's 
house, on the 21st instant, the Saugusw&s struck only once by a round 
shot, near the center of the deck, a few feet from the turret; thence 
glancing, it struck the turret, breaking six bolts, and fell into the water. 
1 think it was a X inch shot. In obedience to your order, I have 
directed Acting Chief Engineer John L. Peake to make a report of the 
injury to the deck and turret. His report is herewith enclosed. 

We were engaged for three hours. The rebel ironclads gave us a 
cross fire, their shot sometimes coming quite near. I paid no attention to 
them, as they were out of sight. We fired thirty-six shell with 35-pound 
charges of powder and 10 second fuzes. 

Estimated distance of the battery, 2,100 yards. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EDMUND R. COLHOUN, 

Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Subenclosure.] 

TJ. S. S. SAUGUS, 
James River, Va., June 23, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to orders, I herewith submit report and sketches 
of the position of the wound and effects produced by shot received 
[from] enemy's guiis June 21 ? 1#04, at Trent's Reach, James River. 



180 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Sketch No. 1 is a section of tbe deck and turret, forward side. A is 
where shot first struck deck, passing; along deck, sinking at center of 
wound 2f inches, then taking an upward direction, leaving tlie deck 
after having passed along it 20 inches, then striking the turret at I), 
3 feet 10 inches above the deck, making an indentation of seven-eighths 
inch on the outside of turret. 





No. 1. IT. S. S. Sauyus, James River, June 21, 1864. 

Beam E, directly under where shot struck, was driven down so as to 
slightly fracture the paint on it and remaining three fourths inch below 
its original position. One plank (oak) was broken and splintered badly, 
piece of which I enclose. The beam E is started from the deck 18 feet 
athwartships. 



^A >/ B +-,,-* sfgr* 
OOOO O*OjfO Q 




No. 2. \'. S. S. Savtjuit, James Kiver, June 21, 1864. 



Sketch No. 2 is plan of top of deck and turret, showing the line of 
shot -and the plates and bolts started, the figures in red ink giving the 
height they are lifted from their former places. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



181 



No. 3 is sketch of inside of turret, showing the number of bolts 
loosened, broken, and heads thrown off. The bolt shown broken on this 
sketch was broken off 1\ inches from inside of turret (the bolt accom- 
panies this report), consequently in the place where it was expected 
it would upset and be strongest, that sheet (the third from outside of 
turret) being left larger than the others to allow it to fill up in riveting 
the bolt to form shoulder, to prevent its driving through on the inside. 

Five bolts have their heads thrown off, one of which I send. Thirty- 
eight are loose, some of them no doubt broken, but none of them started 
in, making in all forty four bolts more or less affected by this shot. The 
broken bolt was started in from 2 to 3 inches, not thrown entirely out. 

The deck plates are fractured, but show much tenacity, and are of good 
quality of iron. The indentation on outside of turret shows no frac- 
ture; on inside, shows a fracture of 3 inches in length and shaped as 
per sketch. 



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/ Bolt out. 


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Top ofase Ring. 



Xo. 3. F. S. S. Sauyvs, Jauics River, Juno 21, 1864. 

The iron in bolts I send samples of, and call it good quality. The 
broken bolts show it to have been overheated where broken, and not 
having fitted the hole, as its shape will show, or formed a shoulder in 
large sheet, as claimed it would have done. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN L. PEAKE, 

Acting Chief Engineer. 
EDM'D H. COLHOTJN, 

Commander, U. S. 8. Saugus, James River, Virginia. 

[Enclosure 3.] 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, Virginia, June 23, 1864. 

Sill: In obedience to your order, 1 submit the following report of the 
part taken by this vessel in the exchange of fire between the rebel 
battery near Hewlett's house and the ironclads of this squadron. 

At 12 : 45 p. m., June 21, went to quarters in obedience to signal and 
opened fire on the battery with both rifle guns and forward XV-inch. 
At .1 :30 ceased tiring with after rifle and forward XV-inch. At 3:30 



182 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

ceased firing with forward rifle and opened fire with after rifle. At 
5 p. m. ceased fire altogether. 

Expended 2 XV-iuch charges, 45 pounds; 2 XV-inch shell, 10-second; 
39 16-pound charges, 8 inch rifles; 39 percussion shell, 8-inch rifles. 

The 45-pound charge in XV-inch was just able to reach over the 
battery; distance, say, 2,300 yards. Elevation of battery, say, 90 feet. 

The rifles reached with about 7 degrees elevation, and all the pro- 
jectiles fell near or at their mark, many with excellent effect. 

The battery appeared much cut up by the fire of the ironclads. 

The return fire from the battery, and also that from the direction of 
Cox's Landing, supposed to be from the rebel ironclads, came near, but 
was not of importance. 

Neither this vessel nor any of those on board were injured. 

Some projectiles struck quite near, and one exploded near enough to 
throw pieces on deck, but beyond this the vessel was not struck. 

Everything worked to my entire satisfaction and the vessel was 
comfortable. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. H. CUSHMAN, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Actiug Hear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 

[Enclosure 4.] 

U. S. S. CANONICUS, 
James River, Virginia, June 24, 1864. 

SIR: On the 21st instant, near noon, the rebels unmasked near Hew- 
lett's a battery of four guns, whose completion we had been for some 
time endeavoring to prevent or retard by occasional shots, and opened 
a tire upon us and the vessels in our vicinity, which was kept up until 
dark. They had a large smoothbore, a large rifle, and two smaller 
guns. As soon as they commenced unmasking, we opened on them 
with our two XV-inch guns, firing rapidly at first, but afterwards only 
occasionally, to economize ammunition. 

One of their guns was dismounted by a shell from the ironclads, and 
another shell was seen to traverse an embrasure, but the distance, 
2,200 yards, was large for firing at single guns. 

We were struck twice. The efl'ect of these shot is described in the 
accompanying report of Chief Engineer Macomb. The injury is slight. 
We fired forty shells with 35-pound charges. Everything stood well 
about the guns and gun carriages. The rebel ironclads came down the 
river, but not in sight, and opened upon us a random fire, over the 
trees, which hit nothing, and which, I believe, was not noticed. 

The batteries have since continued silent and their guns are again 
masked. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient .servant, 

E. tr. PARROTT, 

Commander. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 

[Subenclosure.] 

U. S. IRONCLAD STEAMER CANONICUS, 

James River, June 23, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your order, I have to make the folio wing report 
in relation to the effect and position of the shot upon the deck and 
smoke pipe (they being the only parts struck) of this vessel : 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 183 

The indentation in the deck plating was made by a solid shot from a 
7 or 8 inch rifle gun, as the groove from the rifle can be plainly discerned 
upon the plating. The position on the deck of the place struck is 45 
inches from the side of the vessel, being 40 inches from the outside of 
bulwark timbers, the shot striking nearly in the center of an 18-inch 
by 12-inch beam, where three beams of 12 inches by 12 inches, 18 inches 
by 12 inches, and 12 inches by 12 inches are bolted together, 6 feet for- 
ward of the center line of smoke pipe, and in a line with starboard main 
boiler, but not over it, being just between the line of hull proper and 
the boiler. There are two deck plates injured, as the shot struck where 
they butted, the indentation extending fore and aft 25 inches, 7i inches 
ath wartships, and 1 inches deep in the center. There are six slight frac- 
tures in the plates, five in one and one in the other. There were 38 deck 
plate bolts loosened in the two plates, from slightly loose to three eighths 
of an inch up from deck, but these were driven down again by a slight 
blow from a sledge. There are no perceptible fractures of the beams, 
or starting of bolts in the beams, or planking underneath the deck. 
The plate iron of deck seems to be of good quality, or else I judge it 
would have been fractured much more than it is. The deck under the 
plating where it has been struck does not leak. 

The shot hole through the smoke pipe is about 8 inches in diameter, 
the shot passing through both sides about 2 feet from the top or upper 
edge, being 22i feet from the deck. The fragments which were detached 
from the hole on front side were driven with such force that they went 
through the other side of the pipe, making three ragged holes about 2 
feet from the shot hole in the port side. The upper tier of pipe is made 
of quite thin iron, only full one eighth inch thick, and was put up 
merely to prevent water from coining down while at sea. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

DAVID B. MACOMB, 
Chief Engineer, U. S. Navy. 

Commander E. GL PAREOTT, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. Ironclad Canomcus. 

[Enclosure 5.] 

U. S. 8. AGAWAM, 
James River, June 23, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully present the following report of the participation 
by this vessel in the firing on the 2Lst instant with the rebel battery at 
Hewlett's Bluff and vessels stationed, as near as we could judge, in the 
reach at Cox's place. 

At li : 50 a. m. the enemy opened fire from Hewlett's and about the 
same time from their vessels. Signal being made from the flag vessel 
to prepare for action, we went to quarters at 12:30 and commenced fir 
ing deliberately, using the forward guns on the battery at Howlett's, 
and the after toward the enemy's vessels. As the firing had to be 
directed from aloft, the objects aimed at not being in sight from the 
deck, we discontinued it at 2 : 30 p. in. The fire of the enemy was kept 
up till near sunset. This vessel was not hit. I enclose a report of the 
ammunition expended. 

Kespectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. C. RHIND, 

Commander. 
Acting Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding Xorth Atlantic lilockading Squadron. 



184 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Subenclosure.] 

U. S. S. AGAWAM, 
James tiiver, June 23, 18<>4. 

Report of expenditures and firing on board of the 1 r . S. S.Ayawam, James River, Ji<ne^l,1864. 

100-pounder short percussion shell 11 

100 pounder 15-secoud shrapnel 1 

100-pounder 10-secoud shrapnel 1 

IX-iuch 5-second shell 1 

IX-inch 10-second shell 2 

IX-inch 15-second shell 2 

18 10-pound charges of powder = 180 pounds. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HENRY F. DUNNELS, 
Acting Gunner, U. 8. Navy. 
Coimmuider A. C. KHIND, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Agawam, James River, Virginia. 



Letter from Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant-General Grant, U. S. Army. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, June 23, 1864. 

GENERAL: In the engagement day before yesterday with the rebel 
battery at Hewlett's, in which their ironclads, out of view in a reach 
above, participated, we silenced one of the guns at Hewlett's, but 
expended a good deal of our heavy and expensive ammunition. 

One of the monitors was injured by a X-iuch solid shot from the 
battery at Hewlett's. 

The XV-inch gun has a short life, so far as it has been proved, and 
it is difficult to replace it in the turret of a monitor. We have to lire 
it at extreme elevation to reach Hewlett's battery, which increases the 
strain on the gun and breaks its long screws. 

As it was arranged yesterday between Assistant Secretary Fox and 
yourself to increase the obstructions already placed by the army in 
Trent's Reach, so that two monitors would be sufficient here for the 
present, leaving the Navy Department to withdraw the other two, one 
of which is now under orders for sea for more pressing service else- 
where, I respectfully suggest that the cheapest and most convenient 
control of rebel battery at Hewlett's, of Trent's Beach, and its obstruc- 
tions, and of Dutch Gap, would be by mounting a few heavy guns at 
the lower end of the reach. This would allow the ironclads to drop 
around the point, withdrawing a few hundred yards, where they could 
keep their hatches off in hot weather, whence they could in a few min- 
utes return and engage the rebel ironclads, should they appear in the 
upper part of the reach or interfere with the obstructions. 

Our naval resources would thus be reserved for their ironclads and 
not exhausted on their earthworks. 

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-General U. S. GRANT, U. S. Army, 

Commanding Forces in the Field. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 185 

Special order of Flag-Officer Mitchell, C. S. Navy, commanding Jamea River Squadron. 

0. S. IRONCLAD VIRGINIA, 
Flagship James River Squadron, off Graveyard, June 21, 1864. 

Battery Uautzler, at Hewlett's house, will open on the enemy's 
vessels in Trent's Beach to-day at noon. 

The ironclads Virginia, Richmond, and Fredericksburg will be placed 
in position and be in readiness to open fire at the same time on any of 
the enemy's vessels within reach of their fire, whether in Trent's 
lieacl) or Variua Beach, using shells and cast-iron bolts. The wrought- 
iron belts are not to be used except within point blank range and 
against the monitors. 

Before getting underway, every preparation will be made for battle 
on board of each vessel, which will have to be anchored in her proper 
position, using light anchors and kedges carried out on lines run to the 
river bank from the bows or quarters, to steady and spring ship as 
required. These lines or kedges should be placed in boats before get- 
ting underway, in readiness to run out the moment the positions are 
reached, the inward ends under the shields, or other cover, so as to 
avoid exposing the men on deck as much as possible. 

Some eligible height in the vicinity will be selected and used as a 
station for one of the signal corps from each ironclad, who will give 
information as to the flight of the projectiles. 

After reaching their positions, each vessel will immediately use every 
effort and means to determine the line of tire and establish ranges for 
any of the enemy's vessels (especially his gunboats and transports) 
within range, but fire will not be opened until it is commenced by 
Battery Dantzler, or to return the fire of the enemy, unless expressly 
ordered. 

Great care should be taken in dropping down to avoid noises of any 
kind to attract the attention of the enemy, especially in letting off 
steam, which can be distinctly seen and heard at a great distance. The 
bell is not to be struck. 

Particular attention should be given to a plentiful supply of water 
in buckets and tubs for extinguishing fires below, as well as for the use 
of the crew. 

The gunboat Dreicry will keep within signal distance oi'the flagship, 
but out of the line of fire of the enemy as much as possible, and be 
ready to use her gun if ordered, or whenever it can be done with effect, 
and to render such assistance to other vessels as may be required. 

The other gunboats will keep out of the line of fire of the enemy, 
and at the same time, if possible, keep within signal distance and be in 
readiness to render such assistance as may be required by any of the 
vessels, in towing, carrying out kedges, hawsers, etc. They will be 
prepared for action and use their guns should they be brought within 
effective range of the enemy. When out of signal distance they will 
be under the orders of the senior officer present, who will be governed 
by these instructions. 

All the vessels in the squadron will be underway by a. m., and will 
move down in open order. 

The position assigned the Fredericksburg is in the vicinity of the 
lerry, with her tender (the Nansemond) within signal distance above her. 

The positions assigned the Virginia and the Richmond are near Dutch 
Gap, so as to command as much as possible the lower part of Trent's 
Beach and Varina Beach. 



186 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Steam will [be] kept np so as to enable new dispositions to be made 
at any moment they may be required. 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 
Commanding James River Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant Gardner, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Beaufort. 

C. S. S. BEAUFORT, 
James River Squadron, June 21, 186 J. 

SIR: I am happy to report that this vessel has not been injured in 
the slightest degree to-day. I expended nine rounds, giving between 
44 degrees and 5 degrees elevation, and always aiming at the Hash of 
the enemy's guns, which could be distinctly seen from the masthead. 

I am well satisfied with the conduct of the officers and men under my 
command, and am confident that they will retain their presence of mind 
when brought to close action with the gunboats of the enemy. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. M. GARDNER, 
Lieutenant , Commanding. 
Flag-Officer JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP VIRGINIA, June 21, 1864 7 p. m. 

At 12 : 15 to-day the Virginia and Frederickfiburg took up position," the 
former below Cox's Landing and the latter at the ferry, with the gun- 
boats Hampton, Namemond, Roanoke, Beaufort, and .Dreicry, and opened 
fire on the enemy's wooden vessels in the lower part of Trent's lieach 
and Varina lieach. 

The Richmond parted her wheel rope, which fouled her propeller, and 
she remains disabled. She goes up near the obstructions to-night to 
have it cleared. I was about proceeding lower down the river, near 
Hewlett's, when the piston was discovered to be out of order. The 
cylinder was removed and a chisel found in the cylinder. The engine 
is now in working order again. This vessel, the Fredericksburg, and 
the gunboats have directed their fire to-day again-st the enemy's wooden 
vessels in Trent's lieach and Varina Reach. 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 
Commanding James River Squadron. 
Hon. S. K. MALLORY, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Flag-Officer Mitchell, C. S. Navy, commanding James River Squadron. 

C. S. IRONCLAD VIRGINIA, 

Flagship James River Squadron, off Graveyard, June 22, 1864. 
SIR: On Monday morning, the 20th, it was arranged with Major- 
General Pickett that Battery Dautzler, at Hewlett's, should open tire 
on the enemy's monitors in Trent's lieach at noon yesterday, and that 
the forces under my command would be in position to act simultane- 
ously. It was also understood that Brigadier-General G. W. C. Lee 
would, on the north side, so far as practicable, operate against the eue- 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 187 

my's wooden vessels below Varina (or Aiken's) with a force of artillery, 
and to drive in any pickets he might have out. 

At noon, or very soon after, Battery Dantzler opened on the enemy, 
with what results I have been unable to learn. 

A few minutes after noon the Virginia, in a position near Cox's Land- 
ing, and the Frederlcksbury, near the ferry, together with the gunboats 
Hampton, Xansemond, Drewry, Roanoke, and Beaufort, opened with 
shell upon the enemy's wooden gunboats in Trent's [Reach] and Varina 
Reach, and continued their fire till near sunset. As the distance of 
the enemy was generally near the extreme range of our guns, and the 
fire was directed over high intervening banks, the aim could only be 
determined by the smoke of the enemy's guns or by directions from 
lookouts on elevated positions on shore. It probably did little damage 
to the enemy; certainly none that we could discover. A double ender 
at Aiken's was driven by the fire of the gunboats from her position to 
one lower down, apparently covered by Aikeu's house. The fire from 
the enemy in Trent's Reach appeared to be directed chiefly, if not 
entirely, at Battery Dantzler, and that directed at our squadron was 
mostly from the double -euder near Aiken's. His fire was without 
effect in the squadron, from which there is no damage or casualties to 
report. 

The ironclad Richmond, in getting underway, parted her wheel chain, 
which fouled her propeller, and the vessel remains disabled. She has 
been towed up near the obstructions, or Chaflfin's Bluff, where it is 
hoped the propeller will be cleared. 

I invite your attention to the report (a copy enclosed) of Lieutenant 
Commanding Parker for the particulars of the accident, showing also, 
as it does, the creditable efforts he made to cooperate with the rest of 
the squadron and the part taken by him. 

This ship (the Virginia) was about proceeding to take a more eligible 
position near Hewlett's, when it was discovered that the piston was 
deranged; on removing the cylinder head a chisel was found in the 
cylinder, which, but for the timely discovery, might have caused serious 
damage. The engine was in good condition for service again in the 
afternoon, but too late as to time and tide for taking up the desired 
position. 

The marine guard and a division of small-arms men were landed at 
Cox's to picket the high ground close to Dutch Gap; no force of the 
enemy was discovered on shore. The marine guard fired into one of 
the enemy's transports passing down the river. 

The bow gun of the Nansemond burst on the first fire near the muzzle, 
without other damage, fortunately, of any kind. A full report of the 
accident has been made to the office of ordnance and hydrography by 
Flag- Lieutenant Minor, ordnance officer of the squadron. The Nanse- 
mond will be sent up to land her burst gun, when she will return to 
the squadron till another is ready for her or the burst one rendered 
serviceable. 

A commendable spirit and energy were displayed by the officers and 
crews of the command, which afford a gratifying assurance that their 
best efforts may be relied upon whenever an opportunity for a more 
close and serious action shall occur. 

I was informed by Major Smith, commanding Battery Dantzler, last 
evening that the battery was to be masked last night and that it would 
not be ready to open on the enemy again for two or three days. 

The gunboat Hampton will be sent to Richmond to day for the pur- 
pose of being taken on the ways for the examination of her shaft, which 



188 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

seems to be deranged, supposed to be caused by the propeller striking 
a log. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 
Commanding James River Squadron. 
Hon. S. R. MALLORY, 

Secretary of the Navy, Richmond, Va. 



Memorandum of movements of the C. S. S. Virginia. 

Tuesday, June 21, 1864. Arrived abreast of Signal Tower at 12: 15; 
first gun, No. 3, fired at 12: 30; second gun, No. 1, fired at 12: 35; third 
gun, No. 1, fired at 1 : 30; fourth gun, No. 1, fired at 1 : 40; fifth gun, No. 

1, fired at 1:45; sixth gun, No. 3, fired at 1:50; first shot from the 
enemy at 1:52; seventh gun, No. 1, fired at 1:5<J; eighth gun, No. 3, 
fired at 2; second shot from the enemy at 2; third shot from the enemy 
at 2 : 05 ; fourth shot from the enemy at 2 : 09 ; fifth shot from the enemy 
at 2:10; sixth shot from the enemy at 2:12; seventh shot from the 
enemy at 2 : 14 ; anchored with kedge below Cox's Mill at 2 : 20 ; weighed 
kedge at 2:30; filing heard on shore, supposed to be between the 
marine guard, under Lieutenant Gwynn, and the enemy's sharpshooters, 
and small-arms men sent ashore under Lieutenant Hall, at 2:40; dis- 
covered piston rod to be out of order at 3; dropped kedge and ran a 
line ashore below Cox's Mill at 3 ; ninth gun, No. 2, fired at 3 : 22; eighth 
shot from the enemy at 3 : 2G; ninth shot from the enemy at 3 : 28; tenth 
shot from the enemy at 3:29; a few musket shots on shore at 3:30; 
eleventh shot from the enemy at 3:30; tenth gun, No. 2, fired at 3:34; 
twelfth shot from the enemy at 3:45; eleventh gun, No. 2, fired at 
3:55; twelfth gun, No. 2, fired at 4: 05; thirteenth gun, No. 2, fired at 
4:13; fourteenth gun, No. 2, fired at 4:25; fifteenth gun, No. 2, fired 
at 4:34; sixteenth gun, No. 2, fired at 4:45; seventeenth gun, No. 2, 
fired at 5; eighteenth gun, No. 2, fired at 5:10; thirteenth shot from 
the enemy at 5 : 14 ; nineteenth gun, No. 2, fired at 5 : 18 ; fourteenth shot 
from the enemy at 5:25; twentieth gun, No. 2, fired at 5:38; fifteenth 
shot from the enemy at 5:41; sixteenth shot from the enemy at 5:42; 
seventeenth shot from the enemy at 5: 44; twenty-first gun, No. 2, fired 
at 5 : 45 ; eighteenth shot from the enemy at 5 : 48 ; nineteenth shot from 
the enemy at 5:52; twentieth shot from the enemy at 5:54; twenty 
second gun, No. 2, fired at 5:55; twenty-first shot from the enemy at 
5 : 57 : twenty-second shot from the enemy at G ; twenty-third gun, No. 

2, fired at 6:01; twenty-third shot from the enemy at G: 02; twenty- 
fourth shot from the enemy at G:05; twenty-fifth shot from the enemy 
at G : 08; twenty-fourth gun, No. 2, fired at G : 10; twenty sixth shot from 
the enemy at 6 : 11 ; made signal to the squadron to cease firing at G: 22. 

At G:30 received a message from Major Smith, commanding Battery 
Dantzler, stating that the enemy's monitors have dismounted and burst 
the bands of a 7-iuch rifle gun, and that there are five monitors lying 
in Trent's Keach, three of them 2,100 yards from Hewlett's, and'two 
400 yards lower down, just in the bend, and that our shots fell short. 

Report of Commander Rootes, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Fredericksburg. 

IRONCLAD FREDERICKSBURG, 
James River Squadron, June 22, 1864. 

SIR: On the 21st, at 11 a m., got underway, in company with the 
squadron, and stood down the river. At 12 : 30 came to a short distance 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 189 

below Hewlett's upper bouse, with the port anchor, in 5 fathoms water, 
head downstream, kedge astern ; line to the shore from the starboard 
quarter; swung ship as required. At 1:0,3 p. in. the battery at Hew- 
lett's lower house having commenced firing on the enemy's squadron at 
anchor in Trent's Reach, opened the battery from the starboard side of 
this ship, one 7-inch rifle, one 6.4 rifle, and one X-iuch smoothbore. 
Sent one of the signal men on the shore at Hewlett's to see and inform 
me how the shot struck; also Acting Master Minor and Midshipman 
Goode were sent on the same duty. Sent Midshipman Goode to lower 
Hewlett's to see and inform me how our shot and those of the other 
vessels of the squadron struck. He informed me that a greater num- 
ber fell short. During the evening I fired from the two rifle guns. 

At 1 a. in., the 22d, got underway from Hewlett's upper quarter, a 
short distance below the house, and stood up the river. At 1: 30 a. in. 
came to a short distance below the graveyard in 4 fathoms of water. 
Steamers Nansemond and RoanoJce catne up and took their stations. 

The following ammunition was expended : 

X-incli gun : 

15-pound charges 4 

20-pound charges 14 

- 18 

10-second shell 8 

5-second shell . 1 

15-secoud shell 2 

Shot 7 

- 18 
7-inch rifle: 

12-pound charges 17 

14-pound charges 3 

10-pound charges 6 

G.4 12-pound charges 8 

- 34 

Cast-iron bolts 16 

Percussion shell 14 

Shrapnel 4 

34 

6.4-inch rifle: 

12-pound charges (used for 7-inch rifle) 8 

10-pound charges 8 

8-pound charges 21 

37 

12-pound charges (used for 7-inch gun) 8 

29 

Percussion shell 12 

Cast-iron bolts 17 

29 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. R. ROOTES. 

Flag-Officer JNO. K. MITCHELL, Provisional Navy C. S., 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant Wall, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Drewry. 

C. S. S. DREWRY, 

James River Squadron, June 22, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your orders of this date I have the honor of 
reporting to you the part borne by this vessel in the shelling of the 
enemy's fleet and batteries in and on James River June 21, 18G4. I 
got underway at 11 a. in.; proceeded down the river to obtain the posi- 
tion specified in your special order of yesterday's date. Dropped into 



190 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

my position astern of Hampton at 12 o'clock. The firing from the bat- 
tery at Hewlett's about this time commenced. Soon after from the 
Virginia; she was followed by the Hampton and other vessels of the 
fleet. Thinking that my gun could be used with effect at a distance of 
3,000 yards with a 10-second shell and 10-pound cartridge, 1 had the 
gun trained and poinied; the shell exploded beautifully. I kept up 
the firing until ordered to cease by the flag-officer. The gun on board 
of the JJreicry is a 6.4 Brooke rifle. The character of projectile used 
was 10-second shell and the charge 10 pounds. The number of shots 
fired by this vessel was four. The number of shots could easily have 
been augmented had I seen the effect of my firing. A great portion of 
the afternoon I spent in towing down the Richmond. The enemy fired 
occasionally from a boat near Aiken's, which had our range very well. 
The enemy seemed inclined not to shell from their laud battery, so far 
as I could ascertain. 

I have no casualties, either accidental or by the enemy. The crew 
behaved very gallantly and with coolness. 1 am much indebted to 
Signal Officers Williamson and Burchette for their valuable assistance. 
The pilot, Acting Master's Mate Skinner, showed great skill in han- 
dling the vessel while in action. I found the engineers, Messrs. Beams 
and Ahern, worked the engine knowingly and exerted every means in 
their power to handle the vessel quickly. This vessel was engaged from 
dark until this morning at 5 o'clock in towing the Richmond to Chaffiu's 
Bluff. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. H. WALL, 
Lieutenant, Commanding Dreicry. 

Flag-Officer J. K. MITCHELL, Provisional Navy C. S., 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant Maury, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Hampton. 

0. S. S. HAMPTON, 

James River Squadron, June 22, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor of stating that in company with the squadron, 
by a signal, this vessel got underway and steamed down the river. At 
11:30 at Cox's Wharf we commenced shelling the enemy's batteries 
and gunboats at intervals varying from ten minutes to thirty minutes. 
We fired 11 shell from the forward rifle, 32-pounder, as follows: 2 
10-second, 1 15-second, and 8 percussion shell. From the aft 8-inch 
shell gun we fired 8 shell, as follows: 1 10-second and 7 15-second 
shell. We continued our fire until 5:30, when we received orders to 
cease firing and moored into the north bank of the river; got underway 
at 7 : 30 and proceeded up the river to our old anchorage. We received 
no injury to the vessel, nor was there anyone on the vessel hurt. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. S. MAURY, 
Lieutenant. Commanding. 
Flag-Officer J. K. MITCHELL. 



Report of Lieutenant Benton, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Roanoke. 

C5. S. S. ROANOKE, June 22, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that yesterday at 12:50 p. in. I com- 
menced firing at the enemy in the lower part of Trent's Keach from my 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 191 

position just above Signal Tower. After firing a few times from this 
position, using 15-second shell and two percussion shell, I was con- 
vinced that my shell were doing no good, and moved up to the ferry, 
whence I fired 1 percussion shell, but as the range was too great for 
my gun and there was no indication of the presence of gunboats, I 
dropped down to a position opposite Cox's Mill. From this position at 
4:55 I opened on a gunboat lying near Aikeirs, firing 1 10-second 
shell and 11 percussion shells. In obedience to a signal from the 
flagship, at 6: 20 ceased firing. The lookout at the masthead reported 
these shells as falling near the enemy, two apparently striking him. 

I am happy to report no casualties, as none of the enemy's shot 
struck us. 

My men and officers were in excellent spirits all day, displaying a 
spirit which promises well should they ever be placed in a position 
where there is warm work and real fighting. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. M. BENTON, 
Commanding Roanoke. 

Flag-Officer JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant Hays, C. 8. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Nansemond. 

C. S. S. NANSEMOND, 
James River, June 22, 1864. 

SIR: In compliance with your general order of the 21st instant this 
vessel weighed anchor at 1 p. m. and proceeded in company with the 
fleet down the river. 

At 2 p. m. I was directed by Commander Eootes to return up the 
river and signalize the Richmond to join the flagship as soon as prac- 
ticable. After executing tnis order I returned with a written communi- 
cation from Lieutenant Commanding Parker, after delivering which in 
person to you and delivering your orders to the Drewry and Beaufort 
to proceed to the assistance of the Richmond, I anchored this vessel in 
the position designated near the Fredericksburg. As this position was 
2,700 yards from the enemy we were necessarily compelled to remain 
silent, as it was beyond the range of our guns. This vessel while near 
Cox's Wharf fired but three guns, and I regret to report that the rifled 
32 pounder burst at the muzzle ring at the first fire. I know not [to] 
what to attribute this accident; the gun was properly loaded, and every 
precaution taken to prevent accident. I respectfully request that this 
gun be replaced by another of improved make. 1 think it unsafe to 
use it in its present condition, and it can not be fought by the gun's 
crew with any degree of confidence and security. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. W. HAYS, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 
Flag-Oflicer JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant Read, C. S. Navy. 

HOWLETT'S, June 22, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report the occurrences of yesterday observed 
from my station near the battery, which opened on the enemy's fleet at 



192 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

, 12 m. yesterday. The monitors commenced shelling our works at 11 : 30 
a. rn.; our battery struck the monitors several times, but without injur- 
ing them materially. The enemy's battery fired at our fleet; the moni- 
tors did not direct their shots at our ironclads. A great many of the 
shots from our ships did not reach the monitors, but some of them struck 
near the enemy's lower battery. The last shell fired from the Fml- 
ericJcsburg exploded over the enemy's battery and seemed to be a very 
effective shot. The position of the enemy's fleet remains unchanged up 
to dark last evening. 
Eespectfully submitted. 

W. W. BEAD, 
Second Lieutenant, Provisional Navy C. S. 

Flag-Officer JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



Report of Flag-Officer Mitchell, C. S. Navy, giving information obtained from deserters. 

C. S. FLAGSHIP VIRGINIA, 
James River Squadron, June 29, 1864. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to lay before you the following- information, 
obtained from deserters from the enemy's squadron in the river below 
Hewlett's : 

Lakey (seaman), deserted from the U. S. S. Stepping Stones 

about the 23d instant and reports that four schooners have been sunk 
in Trent's Reach and a boom composed of their spars laid across the 
channel way. These vessels have only the usual quantity of sea bal- 
last and are moored head and stern. The line stretched across the 
river and buoyed by casks has a net attached to it and is intended to 
catch floating torpedoes. Eight torpedoes, and among them some of 
the large ones captured by the enemy, have been planted in the channel 
way just above the monitors and are worked by a galvanic battery 
located on the left shore under a sort of bombproof abeam of the 
monitors. 

Two launches and two cutters, each armed with 12-pounder howitzers, 
picket the river to a point near Hewlett's from just after dark to early 
daylight, and during the same time twelve sailor pickets are stationed 
on the north bank nearly opposite to Hewlett's. 

The shore battery near Baldwin's mounts four guns (30 and 24 pounder 
Parrotts), and during the action of the 21st one of them was dismounted, 
probably by the Fredericksburg. 

When the firing commenced the wooden gunboats were ordered to 
drop down the river out of danger. One of the monitors had a piece of 
iron plating knocked off by a shot, probably from Battery Dant/ler, 
striking just above her port. He further reports that some of the Third 
Pennsylvania Regiment of artillery are doing duty in the squadron as 
marines and that they picket the north shore at night just above 
Aikeii's house. 

O'Halloran and Hamilton deserted from the II. S. S. Delaware about 
noon on yesterday, and their reports tend generally to confirm the state- 
ments made by Lakey. They say that one of the monitors was struck 
squarely about a foot above the deck, the ball splitting the iron plates 
off the turret for 3 feet, and the same vessel had a beam broken by a 
X-inch projectile (probably from one of the ironclads) falling upon her 
deck, and she has since gone to Norfolk for repairs. Our fire was said 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 193 

to be very good, the shells bursting near the vessels, but as they were 
sheltered by lying close under the bank very little damage was done, only 
two of the wooden vessels being struck and but two men in the squad- 
ron wounded. 

The Northern papers are reported as criticising Admiral Lee quite 
severely for fortifying his position in the river and for planting torpe- 
does to ward off an attack from our naval forces when he should steam 
directly to Kichmond or else admit the monitors to be a failure. It was 
said that preparations were about to be made to remove the obstructions 
to enable the monitors to proceed up the river. 

They report 800 vessels of all kinds, including canal boats, at Ber- 
muda Hundred. 

Hamilton thinks that eight torpedoes have been planted in the river, 
though he is only certain of there being two, as he assisted in laying 
that number. 

Five monitors and the Atlanta were reported in the river above City 
Point, but since the disaster to the one on the 21st instant there are 
but four left. The gunboats are generally within signal distance from 
Trent's Keach to Bermuda Hundred. 

I do not place much reliance upon the above information, except so far 
as it tends to confirm the impression derived from our own observations. 
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 
Commanding James River Squadron. 

Hon. S. E. MALLORY, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Flag-Officer Mitchell, C. S. Navy, regarding rumored removal of obstructions by the 

Federals. 

FLAGSHIP VIRGINIA, 
Graveyard, June 30, 1864 9 p. m. 

The following is a copy of an endorsement made on a communication 
referred to me by General Heth, from General Lee to Brigadier-General 
G. W. C. Lee. 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 
Commanding James River Squadron. 

Respectfully returned to Major-General Heth, with the information that I have 
just returned from a visit to Biittery Dantzler and to General Pickett at his head- 
quarters. At Hewlett's I saw no indication of any intention on the part of the enemy 
to remove the obstructions, and I discredit the report communicated to me by the 
two Yankee deserters on the 28th, that Admiral Lee was about to have it done. 
Major Smith informed me that on the 28th a tug (in the daytime) visited one of the 
sunken vessels, placed some men on board, but, on being tired upon from Battery 
Dantzler, she precipitately dropped below beyond the reach of its fire. If the enemy 
should, however, make any attempt to remove the obstructions it is hoped that he 
may not be interrupted. 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 
Flag-Officer, Commanding James River Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Off Trends Reach, June 32, 1864, 10 p. m. 

(Received 12 :30 p. in., 24th.) 

The President, with Assistant Secretary Fox, visited us to day, and 
left City Point this afternoon for Washington. Enemy threatening 

N w R VOL 10 13 



194 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

army position at Deep Bottom this evening. I bear from Philadelphia 
that this squadron is likely soon to suffer seriously for want of coal. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 

[Endorsement.] 

JUNE 15. 

Tons. 

Hampton Roads 3, 448 

Navy yard 713 

4,161 

Ten vessels in James River. 



[Telegram.] 

JAMESTOWN ISLAND, June 22, 1864. 

(Received at Washington 9: 10 p. m.) 

We shall be in Washington at 4 p. m. to-morrow. Grant is envelop- 
ing Petersburg without fighting. A little firing of monitors yesterday 
of not much account. The river is closed above our monitors. 

G. V. Fox, 

[Assistant Secretary of the Navy. \ 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports 
relative to the sinking of obstructions in James River. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

James River, Virginia, June 22, 1864. 

SIR: I transmit enclosed a copy of a letter, with its enclosures, from 
Commander Craven, of the 20th instant, relating to the sinking of 
obstructions in James River by the army. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

TJ. S. IRONCLAD TECUMSEH, 

James River, June 20, 1864. 

SIR: During your absence (on 15th instant) I was called upon by 
General Weitzel, who gave me a note from General Butler, which is 
hereto appended and marked "A." 

In compliance with the request of General Weitzel, I have sunk in 
the main channel four hulks furnished by him, and have also stretched 
across the channel a heavy boom, supporting a chain cable, well secured 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 195 

at each end. Across the flats I have extended a heavy boom, which is 
secured by six anchors; and in the channel along the right bank I have 
sunk a schooner, from which a short boom is to he extended to the flats. 
The obstructions were all complete on the 18th. I enclose you here- 
with a note received from General Weitzel on 16th, together with copy 
of my reply. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. AUGS. CRAVEN, 

Commander. 
Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE. 

[Subenclosures.] 

A. 

JUNE 15, 1864. 

I am directed by General Grant to sink the obstructing vessels in 
such place as I can protect them by my guns. I should be glad if you 
would aid in so doing, upon a conference with my chief engineer, General 
Weitzel, designating the spot which will appear the best aid to your 
fleet. General Grant will this evening have his headquarters at City 
Point. 

BENJ. F. BUTLER, 
Major-General, U. 8. Army. 
Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding, etc. 



JUNE 16, 9: 40 a. in. (Received 10: 45 a. m.) 

MY DEAR SIR: General Butler approves of the plan adopted for 
obstructing the river, and has ordered up another schooner to fill up 
the 11-foot channel. It will be up, I think, by evening. 

He desires me to thank you for your zealous cooperation, and asks 
you (as all our men are needed to day to follow the enemy, who has left 
our front) that you may complete the obstructions with men from the 
fleet. 

In haste, truly, yours, 

G. WEITZEL, 
Brigadier- General and Chief Engineer. 

Captain CRAVEN, 

Commanding Ironclad Tecumseh, James River. 

General Smith carried two lines of rebel works, capturing 17 cannon 
and 300 prisoners. He, with Hancock, has now a position overlooking 
Petersburg. Another corps will join them at 10 o'clock. Everything 
looks well. The negro troops under General Hinks fought most gal- 
lantly. On two charges they captured 8 out of the 17 guns above 
mentioned. 

G. W. 



U. S. S. TEOUMSEH, June 16, 186411 a.m. 

MY DEAR SIR: Yours of 9:40, this date, just received. It will 
improve your plan to sink two more hulks in addition to the one you 
propose to send. There may be some old colliers nearly empty; they 
can be had at low rates, and will do as well as more valuable vessels. 



196 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

They should all be well ballasted with stone, and will be sunk as soon 
as received. The sails of the bark were not taken away last evening, 
as those of the schooners were, and are ready for you as soon as you 
send for them. 
Thank you for the good news of the day. 

Yours, truly, T. AUGS. CRAVEN, 

Commander (for Admiral Lee). 

[Brigadier-General WEITZEL, U. S. Army.] 



Report of Commander Nichols, U. S. Navy, regarding an anticipated 

attack of the enemy. 

U. S. S. MENDOTA, 
Deep Bottom, June 22, 1864. 

ADMIRAL : General Foster's forces captured a prisoner this afternoon 
from the enemy's forces on the left bank. The prisoner reported himself 
as of Cooke's Division, Hill's Corps, and that the corps left Peters- 
burg last night and crossed the river this morning; that General Lee 
was sending to Richmond troops from Petersburg; and further that a 
brigade had crossed from Hill's Corps to the south side of Deep Bottom, 
or Four Mile Creek. Two regiments of cavalry and several of infantry 
have shown themselves in front of our position, and are engaged in 
throwing up rifle pits, etc. 

General Foster anticipates an attack from them to night. I am at 
present throwing 15-second shells to the front of our left, by desire of 
General Foster. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 

Commander. 
Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Letter from B. Maillefert, esq., to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, 

regarding torpedoes. 

U. S. GUNBOAT TRITONIA, 
James River, Virginia, June 22, 1864. 

SIR: I have received the last invoice of ten torpedoes from Wash- 
ington, and proceeded immediately to till them. This size and shape 
seem to answer my expectations very well, with the exception of the 
socket, which is not proportionate to the weight it is to carry. The 
size of this socket should not be less than 4 inches at the smallest end 
and G inches at the mouth; it should also be made of stouter copper. 
As it is, the socket will not be strong enough to sustain the weight <f 
both can and powder out of water. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

BN. MAILLEFERT, 

Submarine Engineer. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 197 

Report of Captain Ridgely, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Shenandoah, 
of the return of that vessel to Hampton Roads in a disabled condition. 

U. S. S. SHENANDOAH, 
Hampton Roads, June 22, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report that I left Hampton Roads on the 
5th instant in obedience to your orders. 

I crossed the Gulf Stream on the line between Wilmington and Ber- 
muda and cruised to the eastward. 

I saw nothing suspicious until 3 : 30 p. m. on the afternoon of the 16th 
instant, when we made a long, low, paddle-wheel steamer steering 
toward Bermuda. We gave chase, and the first hour we came up with 
her; after that the runner held her own until we lost sight of her in the 
darkness. During the chase we discovered that the condenser of the 
engine was disabled and the main steam valves ont of order. The 
moon not being favorable to blockade running and the engine requiring 
repairs, I deemed it most prudent to return to this place, as we were 
liable to break down at high speed at any moment. 
I am, very respectfully, etc., 

DANL. B. RIDGELY, 

Captain, U. 8. Navy. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

NEWPORT NEWS, June 22, 1864. 

(Received at Washington, 6:40 p. m.) 

SIR : I spoke the ironclad Manhattan in tow of the Bienville yesterday 
at 4 p. m., about 20 miles north of Hatteras. Sea smooth, weather 
pleasant, and all well. 

Very respectfully, 

F. A. ROE, 
Lieutenant- Commander, U. 8. Navy, U. 8. 8. Sassacus. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Trent's Reach, June 23, 1864 10 p. m. 

(Via Fort Monroe, 4: 40 p. m., 24th. Received 12: 40 a. in., 25th.) 
No change in the naval situation. Tecumseh and jEutatc, with Admiral 
Fan agut's four tugs, Tritonia, Pink, Rose, and Altliea, leave to-morrow 
for Hampton Roads. Eutaic will convoy Tecumseh if Augusta does not 
arrive in time, or if Department does not send a convoy from the North. 
Captain Gansevoort ordered to repair and equip tugs and send them to 
their destinations. Please give him or them additional instructions, if 
necessary. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Xavy. 



198 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVEEN, 
Trent's Reach, June 23, 1864 10 p. m. 

(Via Fort Monroe, 4 : 30 p. m., 24th. Received 12 : 25 a. m., 25th.) 
It will be necessary to send stone ballast in the hulks to be sunk. 

S. P. LEE, 

Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, IT. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Babcock, U. S. Navy, regarding operations in the Pamunkcy River. 

Confidential.] U. S. S. MALVEEN, June 23, 1864. 

SIB: I understand from General Grant that General Sheridan is 
expected to come here from the White House, and that after that there 
will be no need for our gunboats up the Pamuukey River, etc. 

You were sent up the York and Pamunkey to cooperate with the 
Army, and when this is no longer necessary withdraw the gunboat force 
there. 

Be vigilant at all times against surprise from the enemy's boats. The 
recent capture of the Water Witch, which had the usual boarding net- 
tings up, impresses the necessity of having wire nettings and wire 
ridge ropes for them, as used in the Potomac Flotilla, and these you 
are authorized to require for your permanent vessels. Single vessels 
are very subject to assault. 

The gunboats should be kept in supporting distance, as near as 
practicable. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander C. A. BAKOOCK, 

U. S. S. Morse, York River. 



Order of Acting Rear Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Craven, 
U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Tecumseh, to proceed to sea under 
sealed orders. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
In James River, June 23, 1864. 

SIE: Proceed to sea as soon as practicable with the Tecumseh under 
your command, and with the Eutaw to convoy you to your destination, 
if the Augusta or Alabama, in case the Department makes no other 
detail for this service, does not arrive in time to do so. 

Enclosed are sealed orders from the Department to be opened when 
you discharge your pilot. 

On your arrival at the roads send back Pilot Tilby (James River 
pilot), with his accounts, to be sent here from the Roanoke. If the men 
from the Army now on board the Tecumseh are necessary to give her 
efficiency, and can not be exchanged ior men from the Roanoke, about 
whose accounts there is no embarrassment, take them with you, but 
send a report to the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, giving their 
names, and reporting that their accounts with the Army have not been 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 199 

closed, if such is the case, about which you can learn from Lieutenant- 
Commander Upshur, of the Minnesota. 

It is desirable that you should reach your destination as soon as prac- 
ticable, and you can, in your judgment, lighten and trim the Tecum- 
seh and choose the weather most favorable to the success of your passage. 

Transfer your superfluous ammunition, if any, which your escorts can 
not take, to the ordnance schooners at City Point. 

The Augusta or Alabama, in preference to the Eutaw, will convoy you 
to your destination, if either is at Hampton Roads when you are ready 
for sea. Otherwise the Eutaiv will convoy you, and her commander 
may, if you and he think it absolutely necessary to do so, apply by tel- 
egraph to the Department for authority to leave a part of her battery 
at Norfolk; but it Should be borne in mind that she will not return 
here. The Tritonia also will accompany you. On reaching her desti- 
nation order her to report to Admiral Farragut. 

Wishing you a pleasant passage and regretting very sincerely to 
part with you and your efficient command, 
I am, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander T. A. CRAVEN, 

Commanding U. S. Monitor Tecumseh. 



Report of Commander Downes, U. S. Navy, regarding the Wilmington 

blockade. 

U. S. S. E. E. CUYLER, 
Blockade off Wilmington, June 23, 1864. 

SIR: The Grand Gulf leaves the blockade for Beaufort to-day for 
coal. 

The force present on the north side of the shoal after her departure 
will consist of the following vessels, viz, R. R. Cuyler, Mercedita, Kan- 
sas, Florida, Cherokee, and Niphon. 

I arrived here at 1:30 p. m. of the 21st instant, and finding myself 
senior officer on this side of the shoal, and Commander Eansom's 
departure for Beaufort imminent, liave remained here, where 1 shall 
await the arrival of Commander Howell or Captain Sands. 
Everything has been quiet since my arrival. 

******* 

The Cambridge has just arrived. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN DOWNES, 
Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Roe, U. S. Navy, regarding the safe 
arrival of the U. S. >S. Sassacus in the James River. 

U. S. S. SASSACUS, 
James River, Virginia, June 23, 1864. 

SIR : It gives me no ordinary pleasure that I am permitted by Divine 
Providence to report the safe arrival of the Sassacus at this place, in 
obedience to your order of June 4. 



200 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

It is especially gratifying to me that I bring her to you in safety after 
the severe treatment she lias received in the Albemarle. It has been 
an anxious and careful duty. She has fulfilled her duty with fidelity 
and fully justifies the principle of her construction. A single-bowed 
ship could never have returned. I have run her stern first, as she could 
not be trusted to a pressure from the sea on her stem. Fortunately 
the rudder was not destroyed, though wrenched and twisted. 

I avail myself of this opportunity to pay a feeble tribute of gratitude 
to her men and officers for their patience, skill, and courage, and while 
I congratulate the Department on her preservation and safety, I would 
acknowledge the obligations I owe to them for the happiness of bring- 
ing her to you, although sadly yet honorably mutilated. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. A. EOE, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Master Gleason, U. 8. Navy, regarding the loss of the 
U. S. 8. Lavender and the rescue of officers and crew. 

U. S. S. SASSACUS, 
James River, Virginia, June 23, 1864. 

SIR : It is my painful duty most respectfully to report to you the 
loss of the U. S. S. Lavender. 

I left the Capes of Delaware on the llth instant at 10 a. m., being 
bound to Charleston, S. C. ; strong breeze from N". E. ; sky hazy. On the 
12th, at 1 p. m., made Hatteras light-house, bearing S. by W. W., 
distance 12 miles At 3 p. m. Cape Hatteras light bore N., distance 5 
miles, from which I took departure to clear Cape Lookout Shoals, steer- 
ing S. W. by S. until 6 p. m., the vessel going at the rate of 8 miles per 
hour. I then changed the course to S. W. S., which, according to my 
judgment, should have brought the vessel clear of all danger. At 10 : 30 
sounded 9 fathoms of water; wind now heavy from N. E., with rain 
squalls. At 11 made breakers ahead and on both bows. The vessel was 
immediately stopped and the engine reversed, but before she lost her 
headway she struck on the reef. I then steamed ahead, intending to 
drive her over into deep water if possible, but at this time a heavy sea 
washed over the vessel, staving in the sides of the house and filling the 
engine room with water, putting the fires out. We were now left 
entirely helpless, and about an hour later the vessel was a perfect 
wreck. Officers and crew took refuge on the top of the house, standing 
by to launch the boats. When gradually the forward and after part of 
the house were washed away we launched the boats, but they were 
immediately swamped. We now sought shelter in the wheelhouse, 
which was situated near the forward part of the ship. This was carried 
away during the next day, and we were now obliged to retreat to the 
forecastle, which alone was out of water. During the succeeding night 
four men were washed overboard and drowned. During the 14th five 
men died from exhaustion. 

On the morning of the 15th a large lead-colored, side-wheel steamer, 
apparently a man-of-war, hove in sight, approached us to a distance of 
3 miles, stopped, and blew off steam. We made signals with shirts 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 201 

and blankets; the steamer, however, did not notice them, but steered 
about ten minutes later to the southward. 

At about 10 a. m. we sighted another steamer, which took notice of 
our signals and came to our rescue. She was the army steamer John 
Far ron, Captain J. F. Smallman. They took us on board, provided 
kindly for our wants, and conveyed us to New Berne, N. C.. where we 
arrived on the morning of the 16th. After reporting to Captain M. 
Smith we were transferred to the U. S. S. Sassacus for transportation 
to Hampton Koads, with orders to report to Admiral S. P. Lee. 

I am unable to give the names of the nine deceased men, as all my 
papers and the ship's records have been lost. 

I have the honor to enclose here a list of the rescued officers and 
crew. 

The suffering of all'on board was most fearful; we had nothing to eat 
nor to drink from the 12th to the time of our rescue by the John Farron, 
as all our stores were under water. The rescued officers and crew are 
now, however, slowly recovering their health. 

I am conscious of having fulfilled all my duties to the best of my 
ability, and of having tried all available means to save the Lavender; 
but it was beyond all human possibility to combat the force of the 
elements. 

I am sorry that I could not find an earlier opportunity for reporting 
this sad event, but that, owing to my state of health and the want of 
communication, I had to delay it until now. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. H. GLEASON, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Endorsement.] 

JUNE 25, 1864. 

Forwarded Navy Department. I have sent the sick to the hospital, 
and the remaining officers and crew are to be distributed to vessels in 
this squadron. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acig. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 
List of surviving officers and crew of U. S. S. Lavender. 

* Acting Master J. H. Gleason, command- ' Acting 3d Assistant Engineer Saml. B. 

ing. Roane. 

Acting Master's Mate James H. McClune. Acting 3d Assistant Engineer James Fitz- 
Acting Master's Mate Henry J. Derby- j patrick. 

shire. 
Acting 3d Assistant Engineer Thomas 



Foley. 

Crew. 



Owen McGuire, seaman. 
A. B. Sheldon, ordinary seaman. 
Win. S. Lunt, ordinary seaman. 
John White, ordinary seaman. 



Henry Drinker, landsman. 
George Thompson, landsman. 
Alexander Rogers, landsman. 
* Charles White, 2d class fireman. 



Respectfully, 

F. A. ROE, 
Lieutenant-Commander. 

* Not fit for duty. All the rest of officers and men are, or will he soon. 



2C2 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Reconnaissance in Gape Fear River, June 23-2-1, 1864. 
Report of Lieutenant Gushing, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. MONTICELLO, 

Off Wilmington, N. (7., July 2, ISfit. 

SIR: In consequence of permission received from you to attempt the 
destruction of the ironclad rain Raleigh, I proceeded to the blockade at 
that point with the intention of doing so. Judging it prudent to make 
a thorough reconuoissance, first, to determine her position, I left this 
ship on the night of the 23d, in the first cutter, with two officers (Act- 
ing Ensign J. E. Jones and Acting Master's Mate William Iloworth) 
and 15 men, and started in for the Western Bar. I succeeded in pass- 
ing the forts, and also the town and batteries of Smithville, and pulled 
swiftly up the river. 

As \ve nearedthe Zeek's Island batteries, we narrowly escaped being 
run down by a steamer, and soon after came near detection from the 
guard boat, but evading them all we continued our course. 

As we came abreast of the Old Brunswick batteries, some 15 miles 
from the starting point, the moon came out brightly and discovered us 
to the sentinels on the banks, who hailed at once, and soon commenced 
firing umskets and raising an alarm by noises and signal lights. We 
pulled at once for the other shore obliquely, so as to give them to 
understand that we were going down, but as soon as I found that we 
were out of the moon's rays we continued our course straight up, thereby 
baffling the enemy and gaining safety. When within 7 miles from 
Wilmington, a good place was selected on the shore, the boat hauled up 
and into a marsh, and the men stowed along the bank. 

It was now nearly day, and I had determined to watch the river, and, 
if possible, to capture some one from whom information could be gained. 

Steamers soon began to ply up and down, the flagship of Commodore 
Lynch, the Yadlcin, passing within 200 yards. She is a wooden pro- 
peller steamer of about 300 tons ; no masts, one smokestack, clear deck, 
English build, with awnings spread fore and aft, and mounting only 
two guns. Did not seem to have many men. Nine steamers passed in 
all, three of them being fine, large blockade runners. 

Just after dark, as we were preparing to move, two boats rounded 
the point, and the men, thinking it an attack, behaved in the coolest 
manner. 

Both boats were captured, but proved to contain a fishing party 
returning to-Wilmington. 

From them I obtained all the information that I desired, and made 
them act as my guides in my further exploration of the river. 

Three miles below the city I found a row of obstructions, consist- 
ing of iron pointed spiles, driven in at an angle, and only to be passed 
by going into the channel left open, about 200 yards from a heavy bat- 
tery that is on the left bank. A short distance nearer the city is a ten- 
gun navy battery and another line of obstructions, consisting of 
diamond-shaped crates, tilled and supported in position by two rows of 
spiles, the channel in this instance being within 50 yards of the guns. 
A third row of obstructions and another battery complete the upper 
defenses of the city. The river is also obstructed by spiles at Old 
Brunswick, and there is a very heavy earthwork there. 

Discovering a creek in the Cypress Swamp, we pulled or rather poled 
up it for some time, and at length came to a road, which, upon being 
explored, proved to connect with the main roads from Fort Fisher and 
the sounds to Wilmington. Dividing my party, I left half to hold the 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 203 

cross-road aud creek, while I marched the remainder some 2 miles to the 
main road and stowed away. 

About 11:30 a. m. a mounted soldier appeared with a mail bag and 
seemed much astonished when he was invited to dismount, but as I 
assured him that I would be responsible for any delay that might take 
place he kindly consented to shorten his journey. About two hundred 
letters were captured, aud I gained such information as I desired of the 
lortification and enemy's force. As an expedition was contemplated 
against Fisher by our army about this time, the information was of 
much value. 

There are 1,300 men in the fort, and the unprotected rear that our 
troops were to storm is commanded by four light batteries. I enclose 
rebel requisitions aud report of provisions on hand. 

I now waited for the courier from the other direction, in order that 
we might get the papers that were issued at 1 p. m. in Wilmington, 
but just as he hove in sight a blue jacket exposed himself and the fellow 
took to instant flight. My pursuit on the captured horse was rendered 
useless from lack of speed, and the fellow escaped after a race of some 2 
miles. In the meantime we captured more prisoners aud discovered 
that a store was located about 2 miles distant, and being sadly in 
need of some grub, Mr. Howorth, dressed in the courier's coat and hat, 
and mounted upon his horse, proceeded to market. 

He returned with milk, chickens, and eggs, having passed everyone, 
in and out of service, without suspicion, though conversing with many. 

At 6 p. m., after destroying a portion of the telegraph wire, we rejoined 
the party at the creek and proceeded down, reaching the river at dark. 

In trying to laud our prisoners upon an island a steamer passed so 
close that we had to jump overboard and hold our heads below the 
boat to prevent being seen. As we had more prisoners than we could 
look out for, I determined to put a portion of tbein in small boats and 
set them adrift without oars or sails, so that they could not get ashore 
in time to injure us. This was done, and we proceeded down the river, 
keeping a bright lookout for vessels in order to burn them, if possible. 
None was found, but I forced the pilot to take nie to where the ram 
Raleiyli was said to be wrecked. She is, indeed, destroyed, and noth- 
ing now remains of her above water. 

The ironclad North Carolina, Captain Muse, commanding, is in com- 
mission, and at anchor off the city. She is but little relied upon, aud 
would not stand long against a monitor. 

Both torpedo boats were destroyed in the great cotton fire some time 
since. One was very near completion. 

As I neared the forts at the East Bar, a boat was detected making its 
way rapidly to the shore, and captured after a short chase. It con- 
tained six persons, four of whom were soldiers. Taking them all into 
my boat, I cut theirs adrift, but soon found that 20 persons were more 
than a load. By questions I discovered that at least one guard boat 
was afloat, containing 75 musketeers, and situated in the narrow pas- 
sage between Federal Point and Zeek's Island. As I had to pass them 
1 determined to engage the enemy at once, and capture the boat if 
feasible. The moon was now bright, and as we came near the entrance 
I saw what we supposed to be one large boat just off the battery, but 
as we prepared to sail into her, and while about 20 yards distant, three 
more boats suddenly shot out from that side, and five more from the 
other, completely blocking up the sole avenue of escape. I immediately 
put the helm down, but found a large sailboat filled with soldiers to 
windward and keeping us right in the glimmer of the moon's rays. 



204 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

In this trying position both officers and men acted with true coolness 
and bravery. Not the stroke of an oar was out of time; there was no 
thought of surrender, but we determined to outwit the enemy or light 
it out. Suddenly turning the boat's head, we dashed oft' as if for tlie 
Western Bar, and by throwing the dark side of the boat toward them 
were soon lost to view. 

The bait was eagerly seized, and their whole line dashed off at once 
to intercept us. 

Then again turning, by the extraordinary pulling of my sailors I 
gained the passage of the island, and before the enemy could prevent, 
put the boat into the breakers on Caroline Shoals. 

The rebels dared not follow, and we were lost to view before the guns 
of the forts trained on the channel could be brought to bear upon our 
unexpected position. Deeply loaded as we were, the boat carried us 
through in flue style, and we reached the Cherokee just as day was break- 
ing, and after an absence from the squadron of two days and three 
nights. I am now posted in regard to the city land and water defenses, 
and everything that it will interest the Department to know. I beg 
leave to call your attention, sir, to the fact that Acting Ensign J. E. 
Jones and Acting Master's Mate William Howorth are the same officers 
who accompanied me to Smith ville some months since, and whom I select 
because of their uniform enterprise and bravery. 

All the men did well, but my coxswain. David Warren, is deserving of 
a medal of honor for marked bravery in every critical moment. I would 
also mention Ordinary Seaman John Sullivan and Yeoman William 
Wright, the latter having volunteered upon every expedition of danger 
since this ship has been in commission, in this instance procuring his 
discharge from the sick list in order to do service. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. B. GUSHING, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Endorsement.] 

JULY C, 1864. 

I submit this important reconnoissance to the Department with my 
hearty approval of the skill and gallantry displayed by Lieutenant 
W. B. Gushing and the good conduct of the officers and men serving 
under him. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosures.] 
Jieport of provisions on hand at Fort Fisher, N. C., June 23, 1864. 

RESERVED SUPPLY. 

Rations. 

Pork ...... . ......................................................... 10,000 

Beef ................................................................ 9)000 

Rations. 
19,000 

36,000 
Vegetable food ...................................................... 39 ) 994 

""' """"""""""" """""" ' 



29,000 
Hard oread .................................. 7 

"" 



__ ....... ... 30,000 

Soap ...................................................................... 30,000 

balt ....................................................................... 30,000 



NOKTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 205 

FOR ISSUE. 

Rations. Rations- 
Bacon 10,000 

Rye meal 3,000 

Corn meal 1, 500 

Flour 1,750 

6,250 

Salt 8,000 

Soap 8,000 

Rice 8,000 

Respectfully submitted. 

L. E. MlLLARD, 

Commissary- Sergeant. 

Consolidated provision return for garrison at Fort Fisher for seven days, commencing July 
9, 1864, and ending July 16, 18641,300 men. 

Rations. 

Bacon : 9, 100 

Corn meal 9,100 

Soap 9,100 

Salt 9,100 

Respectfully submitted. 

L. R. MlLLARD, 

Commissary- Sergeant. 

The acting commissary of subsistence will issue on the above return. 

WM. LAMB, 
Colonel, Commanding Post. 



Letter of commendation from the Secretary of the Navy to Lieutenant Cashing, U. S. Navy. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 14, 1864. 

SIR: The Department has received, through Acting Rear- Admiral 
Lee, your report of the 2d instant of your reconnoissance of the harbor 
of Wilmington, N. C. 

The boldness exhibited by you on this reconnoissance and the success 
attending it are most gratifying to the Department. While expressing 
its thanks to you, the Department does not forget that you are much 
indebted for your success in this, as on your recent previous reconnois- 
sance, to the brave officers and men who accompanied you and were 
under your command. Please make known to Acting Ensign J. E. 
Jones and Acting Master's Mate W. L. Howorth, whom you commend 
for enterprise and bravery, the Department's appreciation of their 
conduct. 

To your coxswain, David Warren; William Wright, yeoman, and 
John Sullivan, seaman, medals of honor will be awarded. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Lieutenant WM. B. GUSHING, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Monticeilo, Off Wilmington. 



Abstract log of the U. S. S. Monticello, Lieutenant Gushing, U. S. Navy, commanding. 

June 20, 1864. Ship lying to anchor off the shoals. At 8 p. m. got 
underway and stood in to Fort Caswell. At 9: 35 p. m. Captain Gush- 
ing, accompanied by Acting Ensign Jones and Acting Master's Mate 



206 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

William Howorth, and 15 men with cutlasses, rifles, and pistols left the 
ship on an expedition. At 10 the batteries opened fire upon the ship. 
Stood out and anchored with kedge. At 12, first cutter returned to 
the ship. 

June 23. At 8:40 p. in. Captain Gushing and Acting Ensign J. E. 
Jones and Acting Master's Mate W. L. Howorth, with 15 men, went in 
on a boat expedition, with two days' rations beef, pork, bread, etc. 
with 11 revolvers, 7 pistols, 6 Sharps rifles, and ammunition. 

June 26. At 12 : 20 p. in. the steamer Cherokee arrived from the north 
side, having in tow our first cutter. At 2 : 20 p. m. first cutter returned 
to the ship, they having succeeded in getting within 4 miles of Wil- 
mington. Had possession of the main road Saturday. They captured 
the mail carrier and mail. Cut the telegraph wire. The prisoners 
brought to the ship. 



[Telegram.] 



SMITHVILLE, [ June 25, 18(>4.} 

About sixteen Federals are said to be on the Cape Fear River, and 
some think they are yet. Keep a close watch out on the bay. 

Captain HAEDEMAN. 
Colonel TAIT. 



[Telegram.] 



SMITHVILLE, [June 27, 1864.] 

Examine the beach immediately and see if there are any tracks of 
the enemy from Buzzard Bay or Cape Creek. 

Captain HARDEMAN. 
Colonel TAIT. 



[Telegram.] 

[JUNE 27, 1864.] 

No traces of the enemy have yet been discovered, but Captain Barnes 
reports that a sentinel posted near the head of Cape Creek last night 
challenged a man, who ran oft' and made his escape. He is supposed 
to have been one of the party lurking about the river. 

I have taken steps to have the creek and Middle Island thoroughly 
scoured. 

Major HOLLAND. 
Captain HARDEMAN, 

Smithville. 



[Telegram.] 

[JUNE 27, 1864.] 
Two companies, in skirmishing order, made a thorough search of 

Middle Island to-day, without rinding any trace of the enemy. 
The boats have not returned from Buzzard Bay yet. I will report if 

they bring any news. 

Colonel TAIT. 
Captain HARDEMAN. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 207 

[ Telegram. ] 

[JUNE 27, 1864.] 

The men have just returned from the search ordered by Major Hol- 
land. Nothing of the enemy. 

Colonel TAIT. 
Captain HAKDEMAN, 

Smithville. 



SMITHVILLE, [June 28, 1864.} 

It is reported that the enemy are still inside. Please continue search 
of the islands, and where you suspect them. 

General HEBERT. 
Colonel TAIT. 



[Telegram.] 

[JUNE 28, 1864.] 

A boat expedition sent out to-day has returned. No traces of the 
enemy. The laud party has not yet returned. 

Colonel TAIT. 
Captain HARDEMAN, 

Smithville. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 24, 1864. 

Send immediately to the senior officer in the sounds of North Caro- 
lina an order forbidding George W. Lane to trade in Chowan County 
with the tug Philadelphia. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

/Secretary Navy. 
Captain GUERT GANSEVOORT, 

Senior Officer, Hampton Roads, Virginia. 



[Telegram.] 

JAMES RIVER, VIRGINIA, June 24, 1864. 
(Received at Washington, 6: 45 p. in., June 25.) 

You probably have, and will be good enough to use, the means to 
correct the injustice which the files of the Department will show has 
been done me by the editorial attack in the New York Herald of the 
_J3d instant, and which, if not publicly corrected, will be prejudicial to 
the public interests. 

The bar in this reach, which is at the head of monitor navigation 
until it shall be dredged out, was obstructed according to the military 
phm of campaign. 

The obstructions furnished by the army are of a temporary charac 
ter and can be readily removed when the progress of the army makes 
naval cooperation higher up the river necessary. At present, as here- 
tofore, the navy is only needed to protect the communication of the 
army. You know that for more than a mouth I took the responsibility 



208 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

of resisting the sinking of these obstructions. It was finally done 
under an army order. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. G. V. Fox, 

Assistant Secretary Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to commanding officers 
of vessels in James River, in view of the approach of General Sheridan. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, Virginia, June 21, 1864 1 p. m. 

The following dispatch has just been received : 

General Sheridan is expected at General Foster's pontooii bridge. Don't mistake 
him for the enemy. 

C. J. PAINE, Colonel and Aid-de-Camp. 
Admiral LEE. 

Commanding officers of vessels in James River will exercise due cau- 
tion upon the approach of any cavalry force on the north bank of the 
James. 
By order of the admiral. 

JOHN S. BARNES, 
Fleet Captain North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commanding officer of the Althca will show this to each command- 
ing officer in James River as he passes down. 



Report of Captain Gansevoort, U. S. Navy, regarding affairs at Hampton 

Roads. 

U. S. IRONCLAD ROANOKE, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, June 24, 1864. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to state that I have removed this vessel 
to this place in obedience to your orders. The Seymour has arrived, 
she having been aground off the mouth of Princess Anne [Albemarle 
and Chesapeake] Canal. 

The coal vessels are still at Newport News. All the navjil vessels 
have left that place. 

The Aries went to sea on the evening of the 23d, and the Santiago de 
Cuba on the morning of the 23d. The Connecticut will leave to-day or 
to-morrow. 

The Banshee has arrived here from New York with orders to report 
to you. 

She is in a bad condition. I have ordered a survey upon her. 
The papers in relation to the Seymour will follow in the Mount Wash 
ington, as she is in a bad condition. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GUERT GANSEVOORT, 

Captain and Senior Officer. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 209 

Letter of thanks from Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to the chief 
inspector, U. S. Sanitary Commission. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
James River, June 25, 1864. 

SIR: I desire to tender my thanks to yourself and the commission 
which you represent, for the very acceptable supplies which you have 
furnished to the vessels in James River, under my command. 
I am, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Dr. A. MCDOWELL, 

Chief Inspector U. S. Sanitary Commission, 

Department Peninsula and Norfolk. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Babcock, U. S. Navy, of the evacuation 
^ of White House, Va. 

U. S. S. MORSE, 

Of Yorktown, Va., June 25, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your confiden- 
tial communication of the 23d instant, and would respectfully state 
that the gunboats, being no longer needed in the Pamunkey River, I 
ordered the Sliokokon, Cactus, H. Brinker, and Cohasset to proceed to 
James River yesterday and report to Captain Guert Gansevoort for 
further orders. 

I also respectfully acknowledge the receipt of applications for 
detachments from the Shokokon and Samuel Rotan, and return the one 
for the Shokokon, as she is now in James Eiver. 

At 10 a. m. on the 23d instant White House was entirely evacuated 
by our forces. I then left with the other gunboats and conveyed all 
transports safe to Yorktown, bringing up the rear. 1 will make out 
my official report as soon as possible. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. A. BABCOCK, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



[Telegram.] 

TRENT'S REACH, June 26, 186410 p. m. 
(Via Fort Monroe, 5 : 30 p. m., 27th. Received 6 : 45 p. m.) 
The enemy is strengthening his works at Hewlett's. Our army is 
mounting some heavy guns to bear on Hewlett's. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 

N W R VOL 10 14 



210 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 26, 1864. 

Land your IX-inch guns and return immediately to James River 
after the Tecumseh reaches her destination. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary. 
Lieutenant-Commander HOMER C. BLAKE, 

Commanding V. 8. 8. Eutaw, Norfolk, Va. 



Report of Commander Corbin, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. 8. Augusta, 
regarding the chase by that vessel of a suspicious steamer. 

U. S. S. AUGUSTA, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, June 2(1, 1864. 

SIR : In obedience to the enclosed order from Captain Gansevoort, 
senior officer, I took in tow on the morning of June 15 two coal ves- 
sels, proceeding direct to Port Eoyal, where 1 reported with them to 
Captain De Camp, senior officer present, on the morning of June 19. 

I also enclose a copy of an order from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren direct- 
ing me to proceed forthwith to Hampton Roads with dispatches to the 
honorable Secretary of the Navy, in obedience to which I arrived here 
this afternoon. 

I have the honor to report that on my way hither, about 30 miles to 
the southward and eastward of Frying Pan Shoals, in latitude 33 20' 
N., longitude 78 03' W., I discovered, distant some 10 miles to the 
eastward, a long, low, lead-colored, side-wheel steamer, having two 
smoke funnels, two lower masts, no topmasts or yards, and burning 
black coal. This ship immediately gave chase and continued it for 
nearly three hours, making 10J knots per hour and 13 revolutions per 
minute, under 20 pounds of steam, yet, despite the most favorable con- 
ditions of sea, breeze, and trim, I am sorry to state that the manifest 
superiority of the stranger's speed, together with the Augusta's infirm- 
ities, rendered a continuance of the chase utterly hopeless. It was 
necessary to abandon this brief pursuit in consequence of the heating 
of the crank pin and other complaints of the engine, which subse- 
quently much retarded my return to this place. 

I herewith enclose a report on the condition of the engine and its 
appurtenances, from the chief engineer of this ship, and one by a board 
of officers attached to this vessel, whom I directed to search for and 
to examine a troublesome leak in her hull. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. G. CORBIN, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, Commanding U. 8. S. Augusta. 

Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Bankhead, U. S. Navy, of a reconnoissance in the 
Roanoke River, to gain information regarding the C. S. 8. Albemarle. 

U. S. S. OTSEGO, 
Off Roanoke Rirer, June 2(i, 1864. 

SIR : In the absence of Captain Smith at New Berne, I deem it proper 
to inform you at once of such information as I have concerning the 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 211 

ironclad Albemarle. I sent a reconnoitering party up on the 24th 
instant, which returned yesterday. That party penetrated the swamp 
on the left bank of the river and reached a point immediately opposite 
to Plymouth and where the Albemarle lay. 

The officer in charge of the party reports that " the work upon her 
appeared to be completed; her smokestack replaced by that of the 
Southfield; guns mounted and in all respects ready for work." A 
refugee from Plymouth reports that Captain Maffitt is at present in 
command. 

Captain Smith is expected back from New Berne in a few days. All 
well with this squadron. The dysentery and diarrhea prevails quite 
extensively among the crews. The heat excessive. 
Respectfully, .your obedient servant, 

J. P. BANKHEAD, 
Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Hear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 27, 1864. 

After seeirg the Tecumseh safe to her destination, return and report 
to Acting Eear-Admiral Lee for duty. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commander T. G. CORBIN, 

Commanding U. S. S. Augusta, Hampton Roads, Virginia. 



Report of Lieutenant Lamson, U. S. Navy, transmitting sketch showing 
position of obstructions in Trent's Beach. 

U. S. S. DELAWARE, 
Trent's Reach, James River, June 27, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to forward herewith a sketch* showing the 
position of the obstructions, torpedoes, and vessels placed in Trent's 
Eeach. 

The vessels were all ballasted with sand, coarse gravel, and stone, 
and the following memoranda of the position of the holes will be of 
assistance in raising them again. 

The bark Franklin, near the left bank, has twelve 1^-inch holes on 
the starboard side, abreast the main hatchway and about 6 feet below 
the deck knees, all in the same plank. 

The schooner Haxall has six holes on the port side, abreast the 
mainmast, and one on the starboard side opposite. 

The schooner Mist has six holes on the starboard side of center-board 
trunk, 2 feet from the bilge, and three through the starboard side 
directly opposite, and 2 feet below the deck frames. 

The schooner E. W. Ben-ton has five holes in starboard side of center- 
board trunk, and two through starboard side, abreast of them. 

The schooner Julia A. Whitforcl has six holes through bilge, on port 
side, abreast of the fore-hatch, and two through water line on port side 
opposite. 

"See report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, September 16, 1864. 



212 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The schooner Colonel Satterly is sunk in the south channel. She lias 
seven holes through port side below light-draft line, abreast fore-hatch. 
All the holes are 1^ inches in diameter. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. H. LAMSON, 
Lieutenant, Commanding Torpedo and Picket Division. 

Hear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Endorsement.] 

JULY 5, 1864. 

The vessel obstructing the passageway over that part of the bar can 
be easily removed. Our diver can quickly plug the holes, and the 
pumpboat required could pump out the water in a very short time. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 



Report of Captain Glisson, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. S. Santiago de 
Cuba, regarding the chase by that vessel of a strange steamer. 

U. S. S. SANTIAGO DE CUBA, 
Off Wilmington, N. C., June 27, l^iil. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the 2<>th instant, 11.30 a. in., 
we discovered a steamer four points on our starboard bow, we steering 
west. The strange steamer steering to the southward, with fore an d- 
aft sail set; at 11:40 she took in all sail and hauled up S. S. W. .} W. 
At this moment we discovered a large steamer in chase astern of the 
strange steamer. The Santiago de Cuba was then under a full head of 
steam and gaining rapidly on the chase, the large steamer astern 
dropping very fast. At 1 : 30 the chase altered her course to S. E. and 
set fore-and-aft sail and attempted to cross our bows; fired five shot at 
her from our forward rifle cannon, all of which fell short. At this time 
we were about 4 miles from her. At 2 p. m. the chase took in sail 
and hauled up S. W. and commenced throwing overboard her cargo, 
consisting of cotton. I should think she threw overboard from 80 to 
100 bales. From this moment she began to leave us, and at 9 p. in. 
she was entirely out of sight, but we continued in chase until the next 
day at noon, when we were in the latitude 28 N., and the longitude 
of 78 05' W., and then we altered our course to N. K. W. for the 
Frying Pan Shoals. The steamer that was astern of the chase is 
supposed to be the Quaker City, and she not being able to keep up 
with us she commenced picking up cotton at 3 p. m., and I am in hopes 
that she got nearly all that was thrown overboard. The Santiago <lc 
Cuba worked well, running at the rate of 12 miles per hour, and at one 
time was going 13 miles. As soon as our firemen get a little more 
experience, I am in hopes that we shall be able to keep up to this speed. 
Every exertion was made on our part, and much credit is due to the 
chief engineer, Mr. Farrer, for the exertions he made during the chase; 
he stood at the furnaces all the time, superintending the inexperienced 
firemen of the vessel, until he was nearly exhausted. The Santiago de 
Cuba is the fastest vessel on the blockade, and it can not be many days 
before we pick up a prize. There are but few blockade runners that go 
less than 14 miles per hour, so you see that it requires fast vessels for 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 213 

the blockade. Few guns are mounted; speed and men are all that are 
required to check the blockade runners in a very short time, and I 
would earnestly recommend that one or two vessels that can run 15 
or 16 miles per hour should be obtained with as little delay as possible 
for the blockade off Wilmington. I have been in chase almost every 
day since I arrived off this port. The offshore blockade is of the most 
importance, and it is the only one that the blockade runners dread. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

O. S. GLISSON, 

Captain, U. 8. Navy. 
Rear-Admiral SAML. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron* near Richmond. 



Memorandum from Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, giving location of vessels 
in the sounds of North Carolina, and regarding unfinished business. 

U. S. S. MATTABESETT, 
Roanoke Island, June 27, 1864. 

SIR : I send below a list of the vessels in the sounds of North Caro- 
lina, with their disposition, and a memorandum of all unfinished 
business : 

At New Berne. Chicopee, Valley City, Hetzel, Lockwood, and Ceres 
and Granite, repairing. Schooners Albemarle, Renshaw, Plusser, and 
Susan Ann Howard, ordnance vessels. Prize schooners, Jeff Davis, 
M. O'Neil, Pet, Mary L. Bryant, Iowa, Mary Emma, and Jenny Lind. 

Pamlico River. Louisiana, to be relieved Saturday next by the 
Valley City. 

Hatter as Inlet. Bombshell, Master's Mate O'Hara, commanding, to 
be relieved by the Granite when repaired. 

Roanoke Island. Miami, repairing; ordnance vessel, Carstairs, and 
prize schooner Ann 8. Davenport, repairing. 

Mouth of Roanoke River. Otsego, Wyalusing, Tacony, Commodore 
Hull, Whitehead, and ordnance schooner Jos. Norcom, sent with stores 
for the vessels in the sounds. 

The Ceres I intended to send to Albemarle Sound when repaired for 
a picket boat. The schooner Ann 8. Davenport is being calked at 
Roanoke Island for a coal vessel, or to transport provisions and stores 
from New Berne to the squadron. 

A vessel ought to be stationed at Oeracoke Inlet, as there is nearly 
as much water on that bar as at Hatteras. The commanding general 
intends placing a force there also. 

To detect blockade runners passing through the sound, orders have 
been given for all navy and army vessels bound to New Berne or 
Roanoke Island to wear their colors. Vessels disregarding this order 
should be overhauled. 

A roll of charts and map of North Carolina received from the 
admiral are herewith forwarded, and " Upton" and a set of uniform 
drawings turned over from Commander Davenport. 

All information concerning the ram and my plan for his capture have 
been communicated to Commander Bankhead. 

Coal will be required for the vessels in Albemarle Sound very soon. 
Light-draft schooners at Hatteras had better be ordered up. Commo- 
dore Adams has been informed that 400 tons per month will keep up 



214 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

the supply necessary for the sounds. The returns from vessels will 
show the daily consumption with hanked fires and full steaming. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster E. Mellach has charge of stores, includ- 
ing master's, engineer's stores, and coal, for which he makes requisi- 
tions and submits them for your approval. 

Carpenter Mark W. Paul has charge of the repair shop. 

Gunner E. A. McDonald, now on his way to Albemarle Sound, has 
charge of ordnance stores. 

The blacksmith's shop (at New Berne) recently occupied by the 
Navy, has been claimed under the President's proclamation, and 
returned to the owner. I have requested Acting Assistant Paymaster 
Mellach to ascertain at what rent it can be obtained. 

In sending officers and men north it is not necessary to wait for the 
supply store vessel Xew Berne, which touches at Beaufort. A simple 
request from the senior officer to the quartermaster at New Berne, 
Captain G. W. Bradley, acting quartermaster, will always secure them 
Government transportation on army transports. 

There are two small prize vessels at New Berne, the Jeff". Damn and 
M. O'Neil. They have been taken for Government use, but Com- 
mander Davenport's action iu the case of the latter has not yet 
received the approval of the Department. 

Fresh beef can be procured from the acting commissary of subsist 
euce twice a week, if required, with potatoes only for the vessels off 
Eoanoke River. 

See returns for vacancies on board the vessels in the sounds. 

A coal vessel should be ordered up from Hatteras to supply the 
Albemarle Sound squadron. If none can cross the Swash on account 
of draft of water, you can order one from New Berne. 

I send a number of blanks and official envelopes printed by the 
Army without any expense. 

There being no room in the naval hospital at New Berne for more 
patients, I had a survey held upon the chronic cases there, with a view 
of sending the severe cases to the hospital at Norfolk to make room for 
others. The reports of the surveys are herewith forwarded for your 
action. 

Eeturns are to be made to the admiral on the 10th and 25th of each 
month, of the disposition of all the forces, coal vessels, and ordnance 
vessels in the sounds. 

The boarding returns sent from Hatteras Inlet are to be forwarded 
in duplicate to the admiral. 

The admiral has directed the Miami to be sent to him. The order 
has not been given. 

Very respectfully, 

MELANCTON SMITH. 

Captain. 

Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Commanding U. S. S. Shamrock. 

N- B. There were five captures made in Pamlico Sound, two by the 
Louisiana and three by an army and navy expedition. These have not 
been reported to the Secretary of the Navy. When satisfied that they 
are legal captures, should be reported and the necessary steps taken 
for their condemnation. 

[Endorsement.] 

^ Write to Harrell to ask the general if Mount Pleasant and Goose 
Creek, the positions where the Louisiana and expedition captured 
prizes, are without the army lines; I'uugo River also. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 215 

[Telegram,] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, June 28, 1864 11 p. m. 
(Received at Washington, 11 p. ID., June 30.) 

Hewlett's Battery fired twice at a tug which went to the obstructions 
this afternoon. Monitors replied. No casualties. Instructed Captain 
Gansevoort to-night that Augusta must convoy Tecumseh, as preferred 
by Assistant Secretary. If her repairs, which I suppose are slight, 
can be made in time, unless otherwise ordered by Department. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Trent's Reach, June 29, 1864 11 p. m. 
(Via Fort Monroe, 5 p. m., 30th. Received 11 p. m.) 
This morning the rebels opened a four gun battery, situated 2,000 
yards up Four Mile Creek, at Deep Bottom, and commanding the river 
in open view between the army iutreuchments there. An army tug 
was crippled. Saugus and Hunchback fired without silencing the bat- 
tery. Two double-en ders will attack it to-morrow. A deserter reports 
that the enemy are mounting many heavy guns at Hewlett's. 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



Report of Acting Ensign Rogers, U. 8. Navy, regarding an engagement 
with Confederate battery at Four Mile Creek. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

June 29, 1864. 

SIR : As the U. S. S. Hydrangea, under my command, was passing 
the gap at Four Mile Creek, a battery of four guns opened on her. One 
shot passed a few feet ahead of her, one passed just over her, one fell 
a few feet short of her, and the other was out of range altogether. 

The battery was situated on the banks of the creek about 1,500 yards 
from the river and in plain sight. The U. S. S. Hunchback was under- 
way and engaging the battery. 1 fired one shell from a 20-pouuder 
Parrottgun. 

Commander Nichols, of the Mendota, informed me that the battery 
first opened about 7 o'clock this a. m. and that they were apparently 
18 and '24 pounder rities. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHARLES W. ROGERS, 

Acting Ensign, U. S. Navy. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S P. LEE, 

Commanding. 



216 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Commander Nichols, U. 8. Navy, regarding condition of affairs 

near Four Mile Creek. 

U. S. S. MENDOTA, June 30, 7: 30 p. m. 

MY DEAR CAPTAIN: I have no time to write and copy an official dis- 
patch to the admiral, but I wish you would inform him that since the 
Agawam went up, matters have changed a little. Rhind doubtless has 
informed him of the report brought off by the Frenchman living near 
the Malverri's old berth. I sent Fyffe down there to see if there was 
any truth in the story, with orders to remain down there if there were 
any rebels about. He opened fire about fifteen minutes since and was 
responded to by the rebels, though the sound of their shell came 
toward, and the shell appeared to explode in the neighborhood of, Gen- 
eral Foster's camp on the downstream side of Four Mile Creek. I am 
lying below the bridge, where I command the place of yesterday's bat- 
tery, but directly stern on to where the rebels are now. If I bring to 
bear on that bluff, I lay nearly across stream, which is narrow, and 
stop all navigation, and have my end bearing on yesterday's position, 
where they are just as likely to return as to go anywhere else. The 
only guns I can bring to bear anywhere near ahead or astern, are my 
howitzers, and in firing my rifle howitzers to-day, they jumped so as to 
stave my hurricane deck. We are bound to have trouble in this part of 
the river, I am afraid. I do not like to leave this neighborhood, as it 
leaves General Foster's position entirely unprotected. I am below the 
bridge, but have told the general I shall remain here to-night unless 
my services are wanted above, when I shall try to go through. What 
kind of a fist we can make of it in the night, with our imperfect steer- 
ing, I don't know. I wish we had a few more ferryboat vessels, for 
these double-euders are a most unsatisfactory kind of craft for this 
kind of work. 

Yours, in haste, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 

Commander. 

Fleet Captain J. S. BARNES. 

P. S. Everything is quiet just at present, 7 :25 p. in. 



Report of Lieutenant Fyffe, U. S. Navy, commanding If. 8. S. Hunchback, 
regarding the engagement of that vessel ivith Confederate battery. 

U. S. S. HUNCHBACK, 

Deep Bottom Creek, James River, June 30, 1864. 
SIR: I have respectfully to submit the following report: 
At 6: 15 a. m. on the 29th instant a rebel battery of four Parrot rifles 
opened on this vessel. Went to quarters at once and shelled them, 
silencing two of their guns. A percussion shell struck the port wheel- 
house, burst, and fractured the iron plating, doing no other damage. 
At 7 : 30 a. m. went above out of range, but in a few moments went 
down again and engaged the enemy, their shells coining directly over 
us but mostly too high. At 9 a. m. stood up river again, and found 
they had our range exactly, but fired too high as before: their firing 
was very rapid. At 10:30 a. m. again engaged the enemy for half an 
hour. Our shell, IX-inch, 10-second, seemed to drop directly in their 
works, which was at this time increased to four guns, the two disabled 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 217 

having been replaced by others. There is a heavy smoothbore gun to 
the right of this battery; it fired only twice, doing no execution, one 
shell falling short, and the other bursting in the air. Besides the shell 
in port wheelhouse we were struck only twice, one shell cutting away 
a boat's fall, another burst before reaching us, the fragments striking 
on port side amidships, doing no damage. 

At 2 o'clock p. m. the ironclad Saugus took up our position in front 
of the battery. 

At 6 : 30 p. m, Saugus steamed up river. I then engaged the battery 
again, going down the river, and fired 15 10- second IX-inch shell, 
all of which seemed to land directly in the enemy's battery. They 
returned our fire with only three shell, two falling short and one going 
far over us. The firing from our guns at this last engagement was very 
rapid, but none the less effective, and I have every reason to believe 
from the fact of their not firing since that we silenced the battery. 
The enemy were driven from their works three times and by the excite- 
ment manifested while our shell were dropping in their works, 1 think 
we must have caused them severe loss of life. I estimate the number 
of shells fired at us to be about 150. 

I think that some of their guns were 30-pounders, none less than 
20-pounders, rifled. 

Total expenditure of ammunition, 84 IX-iuch, 10 second. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Jos. P. FYFFE, 
Lieutenant, Commanding U. S. S. Hunchback. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Major-General 
Butler, U. S. Army, urging the necessity of holding the position at Deep 
Bottom, James River. 

FLAGSHIP AGAWAM, 
Trent's Reach, James River, June 30, 1864. 

GENERAL: Two deserters who will be sent to your headquarters 
report that the enemy are putting a number of heavy guns in battery 
at Hewlett's. 

At 7 a. m. yesterday the enemy opened fire from four guns on Four 
Mile Creek, commanding a clear view of the river just below the 
pontoon bridge. Their guns are scattered and are distant about 2,000 
yards from the river. The gunboat Hunchback and the Saugus, mon- 
itor, were unable to silence them. Commander Nichols reports that 
Lieutenant Fyffe, commanding the Hunchback, hears the enemy at 
work in the woods east of Four Mile Creek. A covered battery there 
would enable them to enfilade the army works at Deep Bottom, the 
pontoon bridge, and the river just above it. 

The Army has four small guns at Deep Bottom, which are on the 
west side of the creek, whence the rebel battery can not be seen. The 
importance of having some heavy guns in position to answer or silence 
Hewlett's Battery has been brought to your notice and is, I believe, 
being attended to. 

The importance of holding our position at Deep Bottom is obvious. 
Without doing so our communications are cut there, and our wooden 
vessels can not remain above that point, and the monitors would be 



218 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

alone and exposed to the enemy's light torpedo craft from above and 
out of Four Mile Creek. The enemy could then plant torpedoes there 
to prevent the monitors passing by for supplies. 

I respectfully suggest, therefore, such action in the matter as your view 
of the importance of the position may demand and your means allow. 
I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major- General JB. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department Virginia and North Carolina. 



Letter from Lieutenant- Commander Barnes, U. S. Na,vy, to Captain 

Graves. U. 8. Army, regarding naval howitzer in use on board the 

U. S. 8. Commodore Morris. 

U. S. S. MALVERN, 
Flagship, James River, June 30, 1864. 

Sin: Your communication of the 29th instant has been received. 
Your previous communication on same subject, of the 10th, was received 
some days after it was written, and was referred to Lieutenant Fyffe, 
commanding Hunchback, for information on the subject. He has 
recently returned it with the statement that a naval howitzer mounted 
on a field carriage was turned over to him by the colonel of the Twenty- 
third Massachusetts Regiment, who stated that he had found it in a 
house hard by Day's Point, and that if Lieutenant Fyffe did not take it 
he would abandon it. 

Lieutenant Fyffe accordingly sent on shore and took possession of the 
gun, taking it on board the Commodore Morris, where it now is as a part 
of the battery of that vessel. 

I am otherwise informed that the gun belongs to the Navy, having 
been loaned for temporary service on the Smith Briggs, captured and 
destroyed at Smithfield. 

The admiral desires to retain the gun as part of the armament of the 
M orris. 

I am, captain, very respectfully, yours, 

JOHN S. BARNES, 
Fleet Captain, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

CHARLES H. GRAVES, 

Capt. and A. A. G., Naval Brigade, Army Gunboat Chamberlin. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Nichols, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Mendota, regarding operations near 
Jones 7 Neck Reach. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 

James Rivei , Virginia, June 30, 1864 8:30 p. m. 
SIR: In reply to your note of 7 :30 p. m., to-day, the Mackinaw will go 
down in the morning to assist you to clear out the woods, etc , on the 
left bank, around Jones' Neck Reach. The Mendota and Hunchback 
should be sufficient, ordinarily, for that part of the river, but before 
moving down to and by Tilghman's Wharf, you are authorized to send 
your tug to desire the Mackinatc to drop down during your absence to 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 219 

strengthen General Foster's position. Whenever other aid is necessary 
to clear out a battery send up a report by your tug. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg, Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron 

Commander B. T. NICHOLS, 

Commanding U. S. S. Mendota. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, June 30, 1864 11 p. m. 
(Via Fort Monroe, 5 p.m. Keceived 9:55 a. m., July 2.) 
The enemy removed his battery from Deep Bottom last night, thus 
avoiding the heavy gunboat fire which opened on his position early 
this morning. This evening he opened a battery lower down, which 
the Hunchback drove away. Am enquiring about the canal boats. 
Deserters report that the rebels are strengthening Hewlett's Battery. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



Report of Commander Frailey, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Quaker 
City, regarding the cruise of that vessel off Wilmington, N. C. 

U. S: S. QUAKER CITY, 
Off Wilmington, N. C., June 30, 1864. 

SIR : I respectfully report that while cruising since leaving Beaufort 
on the 22d instant to the southward of Frying Pan Shoals to date, I 
have fallen in with and chased two large and fleet side-wheel steamers, 
each with two masts and having two smokestacks, one being met with 
a little before 6 p. m. on the evening of the 25th instant, inward bound, 
in latitude 32 40' N. and longitude 78 15' W., distant about 10 miles, 
but which was soon afterwards lost sight of. 

While chasing exchanged numbers with IT. S. ship of the line New 
Hampshire and U. S. S. Santiago de Cuba, both standing to the south- 
ward and westward, the latter making No. 939, to which I answered 
with boat code 280. Having lost sight, however, of the chase from 
aloft, weather thick and hazy, hove to and communicated with the 
Santiago de Cuba, and in company ran down toward the New Hampshire, 
which had hove to, but which ship filled away ere she was reached. 
Stood on our course. 

On the following morning at 4: 30 a. m. latitude 32 45' N. and longi 
tude 78 15' W., discovered another large side wheel two masted 
steamer, with two smokestacks, to the northward, distant some 10 
miles, and standing to the southward and westward. Immediate chase 
was given and by 9 a. m. had gained rapidly upon chase, when her 
master commenced throwing overboard bales of cotton, amounting in 
number to upward of 200, we passing through the field over two hours. 
The steamer then dropped me as rapidly as I had gained upon her 
previously, during which time the Santiago de Cuba hove in sight from 
the eastward and took up the chase. At 2 p. m. we again came up 
with another lot of cotton, numbering 41 bales in sight, and the chase 



220 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

evidently gaining, I deemed it unadvisable, at 3 p. m., on reaching that 
point, latitude 31 42' N. and longitude 78 12' W., to pursue the chase 
any longer, particularly as the Santiago de Cuba was in pursuit, but 
with but slight hopes, I think, of overtaking her, the chase appearing 
to pursue her onward course with great swiftness. I then turned my 
steamer's head to the northward and eastward, lowered my boats and 
with slow speed stood in that direction until near dark, gradually 
securing 30 bales, the outer roping of which had all been cut ere cast 
overboard, in hopes of destroying and preventing its being again 
secured. On the following day I cruised in the vicinity in expectation 
of falling in with the mass of that which had been thrown overboard, 
but without avail, but yesterday while chasing a steamer, which proved 
to be the Santiago de Cuba, fell in with 8 additional bales, 3 of which 
had been cut, while the others were in good condition, iron bound. 
These 8 bales were picked up in latitude 32 40' !N. and longitude 77 
40' W. Should I meet the U. S. S. Neir Seme I will avail myself of 
the opportunity of sending it north in her; otherwise endeavor to 
charter a schooner bound to the north. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAS. MADISON FRAILEY, 

Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Acting Kear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads, Va. 



Letter from Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Ma- 
comb, U. S. Navy, regarding the fitting of tugs with torpedoes for use in 
the sounds. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, Virginia, June ,'J(>, 1861. 

SIR: In reply to communication of 26th instant from Commander 
Baukhead, informing me of the reconnoissance to the rebel ram Albe- 
marle and her apparent readiness for another onset, I would state that 
I have ordered four tugs to be fitted with torpedoes and sent you at 
the earliest practicable moment. The Bureau of Provisions and Cloth- 
ing also informs me by the next trip of the New Berne it will forward 
for use of crews of vessels in sounds considerable quantities of vege- 
tables and provisions. 
Very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Senior Officer in Sounds, North Carolina. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 

Off City Point. James River, July 1 11 p. m. 
(Via Fort Monroe, 11 : 45 a. m., 8th. lieceived 1 : 45 p. m.) 
Six canal boats can be got for about $1,500 each, and four other ves- 
sels at from $J,000 to $2,500. No Navy news. Captain Smith has 
arrived. 

S. P LEE 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 221 

[Endorsement] 

JULY 8, 1864. 

LEE: Twelve boats have been purchased in Philadelphia and are on 
the way to Baltimore. 

[Fox.J 



Report of Lieutenant Fyffe, U. S. Navy, of an engagement icith Confeder- 
ate battery in James River. 

TJ. S. S. HUNCHBACK, 
Off Tinman's [Tilghman's] Wharf, James River, July 1, 1864. 

SIR: I have the konor to make the following report: 

About 2 o'clock p. in. on the 30th ultimo I received information from 
a Frenchman living on Allen's farm that the enemy had a battery of 
four pieces just before this place, with which they intended to annoy our 
transports as they passed up and down this river. I immediately 
dropped down to my present position from off Deep Bottom Creek 
[Three Mile Kunf, and getting range, fired several shells at a barn about 
1 miles from the river bank. The range proved a good one, as the 
rebels replied to our fire by two shots, both of which fell short. This 
morning the Frenchman reports that our shell struck one of their guns, 
and the rebels abandoned it until 10 o'clock last night, when they suc- 
ceeded in taking the piece away. 

I have every reason to believe this information to be reliable. 

Expenditure of ammunition as follows: Two 15-second IX-inch shells; 
nine 10-second IX-inch shells. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Jos. P. FYFFE, 
Lieutenant, Commanding U. 8. 8. Hunchback. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, requesting the prepara- 
tion of swift vessels for the blockade. 

FLAGSHIP MALYERN, 
James River, Virginia, July 1, 1864. 

SIR: I have forwarded to the Navy Department numerous reports of 
unsuccessful chases by the fastest steamers on the blockade of the new 
class of steamers now employed in blockade running. Commander 
Clary, TJ. S. S. Dacotah, calls my attention to the want of experienced 
vessels able to outrun them. 

He states that our 13-knot cruisers may gain on them during the 
early part of the chase, but after they lighten by throwing overboard 
part of their cargo "their speed is unprecedented." Owing to this 
lecent great revolution in the blockade running business, it is of pri- 
mary importance that several vessels of equal or superior speed to the 
runners should be provided, and I request that the Department will 
prepare a number of swift chasers as soon as practicable. Lieutenant- 
Commander Braine, in a note forwarded yesterday to Assistant Secre- 
tary Fox, mentions a vessel at New York which he thinks could be 
obtained and would be suitable. 

The rebel Government has taken the blockade running business into 
its own hands and provided these vessels of unexampled speed, and it 
appears necessary that our Government should take counter measures. 



222 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The outside cruisers alone are effective. The large vessels blockading 
inside can readily be eluded. 

Since July 24, 1863, forty-two steamers have been captured or 
destroyed by the blockaders of this squadron. Taking the average ton- 
nage of these vessels at 300 tons, and assuming the capacity of an army 
wagon at 1 ton, there has been a loss inflicted on the rebel supply sys- 
tem equivalent to the capture or destruction of a train of 12,000 wagons. 
1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actq. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GTDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



[Telegram.] 

FORT MONROE, July 2, 1864. 

Immediately upon receipt of Department's telegram of June 24 I 
sent a boat with an order to Captain Smith to stop Mr. Lane from 
trading in Chowan County. Captain Smith informs me that upon the 
receipt of your order he stopped him. 

GUERT GANSEVOORT, 

Captain, Senior Officer. 
Hon. G. WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 2, 1864. 

It seems impossible to obtain any replies from you to the Depart- 
ment's telegrams. 

Did you send the Department's message into the sounds of North 
Carolina? Did you transfer the required engineers to the Tecumseh? 
Did you arrange with regard to the Eutaw towing the Tecumsehf Did 
you receive the telegram about Admiral Farragut's tugs? What ves- 
sels of war are lying in the roads? Have the Slienandoah, Comet, and 
Santiago de Cuba sailed? Report every telegram as soon as received, 
as required by regulations. Report all information which the Depart- 
ment ought to know, as is customary in the service, and inform the 
Department the reasons for these constant and persistent omissions. 
Send a copy of this telegram to Acting Rear-Admiral Lee and answer 
it fully at daylight to morrow morning. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary. 

Captain GANSEVOORT, 

Senior Officer, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, regarding bounties and 

reenlistment. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, Virginia, July 2, [1864]. 

SIR: The men whose terms of service are expiring on the blockade 
off Wilmington represent that their principal reason for desiring their 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 223 

discharge is that they may go home and reenlist and obtain the 
bounties there offered for such enlistment. It is asked if it could not 
be so arranged that these men or any portion of them could reenlist 
where they are, selecting their State and district, be credited to the 
quota of that State and district, and receive the bounty there paid. 
It is thought that such an arrangement Avould save to the service and 
to the ship where they are most needed valuable petty officers and 
men. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 

Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Pickering, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Fort Donelson. 

FLAGSHIP MALVEBN, 
In James River, July 3, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed with the Fort Donelson under your command to the 
blockade off Wilmington and report for duty to the senior officer 
present. 

Very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant THOS. PICKERING, 

Commanding U. S. S. Fort Donelson. 



Report of Commander Crosby, U. S. Navy, regarding the capture of 
the British steamer Rouen. 

U. S. S. KEYSTONE STATE, 
At Sea, Lai. 33 5V N., Long. 75 46' W., July 2, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report the capture of the British steamer 
Rouen, blockade runner, by this vessel, to day at 5 p. m., in latitude 
32 50' N., longitude 75 4(5' W., after a chase of four hours. 

I have sent her to Boston in charge of Acting Ensign J. O. Murphy, 
with instructions to deliver her to the United States prize commissioner 
at that place. 

I fired twenty-two shots at her before she would heave to, all of them 
falling quite near and some directly over her. 

All of her papers were destroyed, and cargo thrown overboard with 
the exception of a few boxes. She is reported to be a 15-knot steamer, 
but that one of her engines was out of order at the time of her capture. 
She is about 230 tons, American measurement, and a beautiful steamer. 

I have understood that officers and crew absent in prizes are not 
entitled to share in a prize taken during their absence, and, in conso 
quence of this, I have not allowed the names of those absent in prizes 
to be placed on this prize list. Previous to learning this, the names of 
those officers and men absent in the Caledonia were placed on the list 
of the Siren, and 88 bales of cot ton picked up at sea. Will you please 



224 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

instruct me how to act, as there appears to be some doubt in such cases. 
I have forwarded through the admiral a prize list for the Rouen. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PEIRCE CROSBY, 

Commander. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, J). G. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. 8. 
Navy, to make a personal examination of the blockade to insure greater 
vigilance. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 2, 1864. 

SIR: When Captain M. Smith returns to his vessel (it being under- 
stood that he is now on the way from the sounds) it is desirable that 
you should visit Hampton Roads, Beaufort, and the blockade, unless, 
after consultation with Lieutenant-General Grant, he should desire you 
to remain in James River. 

Five steamers containing 6,300 bales of cotton have arrived within one 
week at Bermuda, and it is of great importance that a careful exami- 
nation of the blockade should be made by yourself, and such new 
arrangements devised as will insure greater vigilance. 

You can return after a short absence and continue to visit, alter- 
nately, the different points of your squadron. 

Send the Roanoke to some convenient anchorage above Newport 
News, and direct the commanding officer of the Minnesota to make 
reports to the Department; and to him, in your absence, information 
and orders from the Department will be directed. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Hear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, July 2, 1864. 
(Via Fortress Monroe, 3d. Received 9 p. m.) 

No change in naval situation. I will be in Hampton Roads Monday 
on the business of the blockade off Wilmington. Please send me the 
Tristram Shandy just as she is. Captain Forbes reports she is in fine 
order and can go to sea in a week. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

IRONCLAD ROANOKE, 
Hampton Roads, July o, 1864. 

Your telegram of July 2 was not received until 7 a. m., July 3. Imme- 
diately upon the receipt of the Department's telegram I dispatched 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 225 

a boat to the south with an order to Captain Smith to stop Lane 
from dealing there. I telegraphed Department having done so. I 
ordered two engineers to the Tecumseh, one from this ship, and Third 
Assistant Engineer Guy Samson from the Minnesota. Last night I 
received Department's telegram ordering me to detail another officer, 
which I did. I have got everything ready for the Eutaw to tow the 
Tecumseh. 

She is now waiting for her to come down from the navy yard. I tele- 
graphed the Department in relation to her, and what vessels were here. 

Yesterday I received Department's telegram in relation to Admiral 
Farragut's tugs. I have had them examined, and they are now at the 
navy yard undergoing repairs. The Roanoke, Minnesota, St. Lawrence, 
Young Rover, Alabania, Governor Buckingham, Ino, Britannia and Fah- 
~kee are the only American men-of-war lying here. 

There is an English frigate and French corvette here. 

The Santiago de Cuba and Connecticut have gone to sea. The Shen- 
andoali is at the navy yard. I am informed she will not be ready until 
the Sth of July. 

I always endeavor to carry out the Department's wishes. I have but 
one clerk to assist me in my correspondence, and if I have made any 
omission it was not done intentionally, as 1 have a great deal to do. 
1 \vill send a copy of Department's telegram to Admiral Lee by the 
first conveyance. 

Telegram received in relation to Ino. I will inspect her to-day. The 
Tecumseh has just arrived from Norfolk at 8:30. 

GUERT GANSEVOORT, 

Captain and Senior Officer. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Commander Nichols regarding an engagement with a Confed- 
erate battery in Four Mile Creek, James River. 

U. S. S. MENDOTA, 
James River, July 3, 1864. 

ADMIRAL, : I have the honor to make report of the following pro- 
ceedings in and about Four Mile Creek within the past few days. 

At about 7 o'clock a. in. on the 31st [liOth] ultimo the enemy opened 
fire on the U. S. S. Hunchback, Lieutenant Fyfle commanding, with a 
battery of five guns located on Four Mile Creek about 2,000 yards 
from the river. Lieutenant Fyffe immediately returned the fire and 
kept it up for some time, when the battery was apparently silenced. 
During the engagement the Hunchback was struck once in port wheel- 
honse, but no damage done. 

About noon the monitor Saugus, Commander Colhoun, came down 
and took position and opened fire. The battery fired only two or three 
shots at the Saugus, but opened rapidly and spitefully whenever any 
wooden vessels showed in front. A number of vessels were fired on 
in this manner in the course of the day, notwithstanding the presence of 
the SauguN, but only one was struck an army tug, of which the chief 
engineer was severely wounded. On the morning of the 1st instant, in 
company with the Agairam, this vessel took position to bring a cross 
fire to bear on the position of the battery, and both vessels opened, but 

K AY R VOL, 10 15 



226 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

without eliciting any reply; neither could anyone be seen in the neigh- 
borhood. After firing about twenty shell I ceased, and there has been 
no demonstration in this immediate vicinity since. On the afternoon 
of the 1st, information was received from a French resident that the 
enemy had moved some of their guns farther down the river, with a 
view "to annoying passing vessels, and to shell the camp of General 
Foster, below Four Mile Creek. I therefore directed Lieutenant Fyffe 
to proceed down the river below Tilghmaifs Wharf, and if the enemy 
were about, to remain there. 

About 7 p. ni. Lieutenant Fyffe fired again, which was immediately 
responded to by the rebels, their shell bursting in the neighborhood of 
General Foster's camp. Their fire soon ceased and it was ascertained 
by Lieutenant Fyffe the next morning that one of his shell fell among 
the rebels, whereupon they abandoned one of their guns and did not 
return for it until after 10 p. m. Since then everything has been quiet 
about here. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 

Commander, U. 8. Vary. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James Hirer. 

! Endorsement.] 

JULY 9, 1864. 

The engagement and movements referred to in this report of Com- 
mander Nichols were in pursuance of immediate instructions from me. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Clitz, U. 8. Navy, regarding coal vessels in the 

James Rirer. 

U. S. S. USCEOLA, 

Off City Point, James River, July 3, 1864. 

SIR: Your letter of the 2d instant has been received, and in reply 
have to state that there are at present lying near City Point seven ves- 
sels, coal loaded, containing 1,316 tons. 

The schooner H. Dilatush is up the river, and I am informed will 
probably be purchased by the Government. The schooner Daniel Mor- 
ris was sent down the river in tow of steamer Mount Washington on 
June 30. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

J. M. B. CLITZ. 
Commander, f. >. Xary. 
Captain GUEET GANSEVOORT, U. S. Xavy, 

Commanding Ironclad Steamer Roanoke, Newport Neir*. Va. 



Report of Acting Master Lee, U. 8. Navy, regarding the loss by capture 

of tiro pickets. 

I". S. s. COMMODORE MORRIS, 

HaxaWs Landing, July 4, 1W1. 

SIB: I most respectfully make the following report, that on the night 
of July 1. at 10 o'clock p. in., my pirkets were attacked by the enemy. 
and two of my men were captured. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 227 

Their names are Joseph Ferdinand, ordinary seaman ; George Smith, 
seaman. 

The above men were transferred from the Army. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. G. LEE, 

Acting Master, Commanding. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting report* of 
operations in James River, July 4, 5, 1864. 

FLAGSHIP KORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, July 9, 1864. 

SIR : I transmit enclosed three reports from Captain Smith, of 4th, 
5th, and 6th instant, as follows: 

1. Enclosing report from Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush of the 
capture by a boat's crew from the Pequot of three Confederate prisoners. 
A large body of cavalry approaching after the capture, the Pequot and 
Commodore Morris opened fire and drove them off. The prisoners had 
little information. 

2. Sixth instant, enclosing copies of two telegrams, A and B, dated 
4th and 5th instant, from General Weitzel to General Foster, warning 
him of a probable attack by a rebel force of about 5,000, which the second 
dispatch states is probably meant as a feint to cover a heavy attack on 
Meade's left; also a dispatch (C)* from General Butler, of 5th instant, 
requesting the assistance of the naval vessels in destroying the enemy's 
forage and grain in their vicinity. 

3. Of Gth instant, reports the destruction of a considerable amount 
of hay aud grain on Aiken's farm, and an attempt to capture the rebel 
guard stationed to protect the reapers. They escaped, however, their 
arms, ammunition, and clothing only being taken. 

Acting Master Lee, commanding Commodore Morris, reports to Cap- 
tain Smith that while destroying a field of wheat near Turkey Bend, 
an escaped Union prisoner, John H. Bond, who had been sent from 
Eichmond to aid in cutting the grain, claimed his protection and stated 
that there were seven other prisoners sent with him for the same pur- 
pose. Eichard D. Lee, justice of the peace for Warwick County, Va., 
was taken prisoner at the same time, and turned over to General But- 
ler. Captain Smith also reports that he is informed that the man 
Aiken, upon whose premises the grain was destroyed, had assisted a 
party of five to escape to the rebel lines. This man gave a strict pledge 
of neutrality when our forces first went up the river. This report also 
encloses the statement of three deserters from the rebel ironclad Vir- 
ginia, who came off on the 5th. They furnish no new information. 

There has been no change in the naval situation, aud all was quiet at 
the last date. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear- Admiral. Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron* 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

" Not found. 



228 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Enclosure No. l.J 

U. S. IRONCLAD ONONDAGA, 

James River, July 4, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose herewith a report just received from Lieutenant- 
Commauder S. P. Quackenbush, of the TJ. S. S. Pequot, of the capture 
of three of the enemy. 

The following is all the information obtained from the prisoners: 
They state that they t>elong to Ewell's corps and were cutting forage 
on the bank when they were captured by the Pequofs men, and that 
they had been cutting forage for the last fortnight. 

They say they do not know the number of troops with Ewell, but that 
there are two battalions of artillery, one with 19 guns and the other 
with 8, and a brigade of cavalry. They are stationed near Malveru 
Hill, about 2 miles from the river. 

I have directed Lieutenant-Commander Qnackenbnsh to destroy the 
quantity cut and burn the field if he can do so. 
The prisoners will be sent to General Butler. 
No change in the situation of affairs at this point. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

LSubenclosore.] 

U. S. S. PEQUOT, 

James River, Virginia, July 4, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report the capture of three Confederate 
prisoners taken by a boat's crew from this vessel, under the charge of 
Acting Ensign A. Smalley. 

From the statement made by the prisoners, they belong to General 
Ewell's corps and had been sent to obtain provender for their horses. 
After their capture had been effected a large body of cavalry approached 
within range of our guns, which we drove oft* with some loss on their 
part, I think, as the shells of the Commodore Morris and this vessel fell 
directly in their midst. 

I send you the prisoners, who give their names as Samuel B. Tanner, 
Johu E. Wood, and Martin V. Warburton, all privates, belonging to the 
First Virginia Artillery. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Acting Rear Admiral [S. P.] LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure Ifo. 2.] 

U. S. IRONCLAD ONONDAGA, 
On Picket, Beloic Barricade, July 5, 1864. 

SIR: I have just received a communication from Commander Nichols 
informing me that everything is quiet at Deep Bottom, and no unusual 
movement of the enemy has been discovered. 

The Mackinaic has been sent to Commander Nichols, and the Agawam 
will take her station off Aiken's Lauding. 
Nothing has occurred in this vicinity worthy of mention. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 229 

I send a copy of a telegraphic dispatch, the substance of which was 
communicated to me last night about 3 o'clock, at which time the Mack- 
inaw and Agawam were dispatched. I send you a copy of two others 
this moment received, and shall carry out the suggestions in relation to 
the destruction of forage and grain in the vicinity of our boats. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Sabenclosure A. Telegram. 1 

GENBRAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, July 4, 1864. 
I think it beyond a doubt, from information received, that you will 
be attacked in the morning by about 5,000 rebels. General Butler 
thinks so too. Be prepared. 

G. WEITZEL, 

Brigadier- General and Chief of Staff. 
Brigadier-General FOSTER. 

[Snbenclosure B. Telegram.] 

GENERAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS, July 5, 1864. 
Dispatch received. The general thinks that an attack is coming; he 
supposes they did not get ready by this morning. He believes that the 
attack on you will be a feint to cover a heavy attack on Meade's left. 

G. WEITZEL, 

Brigadier- General and Chief of Staff. 
General R. S. FOSTER. 

Received 0:45 a. m. and forwarded by request of General Foster. 
Kespectfully, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 

Commander. 

[Enclosure No. 3.] 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
On Picket, Below Barricade, July 6, 1864. 

SIR : The man Aiken, upon whose premises the grain was burned yes- 
terday, is, from information received this morning, a great rascal. In a 
conversation with John Williams, ordinary seaman, belonging to the 
Minnesota's launch, Aiken informed him that he had assisted a party of 
five in making their escape, and pointed out the road to the rebel lines 
and the situation of the pickets. 

Lieutenant [David W.| Chambers was sent last night to Aiken's 
premises with 35 men assigned to the Navy by General Graham to 
capture a guard of rebels placed there to protect the reapers. The 
laborers and soldiers escaped, but their arms, ammunition, and clothing 
were secured, all the forage destroyed, and about 10 acres of grain 
burned. 

Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush reports that he lauded 30 men 
yesterday and destroyed 10 stacks of hay and a quantity of wheat in 
the field. Walter W. Ingalls, landsman, one of the party, accidentally 
shot himself with his ride and the wound is considered fatal. 

I am informed by Acting Master Lee that in destroying a field of 
wheat at Turkey Bend John H. Bond, an escaped Union prisoner, who 
was sent down from Richmond by the authorities of that place to cut 



230 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

grass for the rebel Government, claimed protection of his men, and 
stated that there were seven other prisoners sent with him for the 
same purpose. 

Richard D. Lee, justice of the peace for Warwick County, Va., was 
taken prisoner at that time and has been sent to General Butler. 

Three deserters came oft' yesterday, two from the rebel ram Virt/inia 
and one from Hewlett's Battery. 

The first two made the statement* which is herewith enclosed, and 
the latter was sent to General Butler for examination, his information 
being all of a military character. 

Everything is quiet here, and no dispatches have been received for 
you from Washington except those marked private, which have already 
been forwarded. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 5, 1864. 

Buy what boats you require to make the bar secure against the 
descent of the enemy, and sink them, leaving some of the vessels to be 
easily raised. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 
Acting Eear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July J, 1864. 

Efforts are being made to get some of the North River boats 
strengthened for service off Wilmington. Some of the gunboats with 
Xl-inch guns should relieve some of the double enders in the sounds, 
and let them go outside after landing all their large guns, giving orders 
to use 30 pounds of powder and solid shot. Too small charges were 
used in the last fight. The double enders, if you can put on board two 
XI inch guns instead of their present battery, and two XI im-h gun- 
boats ought to take care of the sounds, and would thereby increase the 
blockade, which is now suffering. The double enders could have tlieir 
decks shored up. It is certain that the IX-inch with 13 pounds, and 
the 100-pounder rifle with 10 pounds of powder effect nothing. The 
Department is confirmed in its previous opinion that ramming at full 
speed was the best course. If you change to Xl-inch guns and use the 
full charge, ramming, except with the Shamrock, is not so important. 
Fighting should be touching each other. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

*Not necessary to publish. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 231 

Order of Captain Smith, V. S. Navy, to Commander Rhind, U. S. Navy, 
commanding U. S. S. Agaicam, in view of anticipated attack from the 
enemy. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

James River, July 5, 1864. 

SIR : Get underway immediately and report above the pontoon bridge 
to Commander Nichols, of the Mendota, at or near Jones' Keach, who will 
assign you a position to repel an anticipated attack from the enemy. 

If your services are not required, return and take the station of the 
MacMnaic in the vicinity of Aikeu's Landing. 

Very respectfully, etc., M. SMITH, 

Captain and Senior Officer Present. 
Commander A. C. T&HIND, 

Commanding U. S. S. Agaicam. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander Quacken- 
bush, U. S. Navy, regarding the destruction of grain. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
Dutch Gap, James River, July 5, 1864. 

SIR: You will, with the Commodore Morris, destroy all the grain and 
forage in the vicinity of the two stations. 
Very respectfully, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pequot. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master Campbell, U. S, 
Navy, commanding U. S. S. Stepping Stones. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

James River, July 5, 1864. 

SIR: Get underway without delay and take the station of the Macki- 
naic in the vicinity of Aiken's Landing, and on the return of the 
Mackinaw or the arrival of the Agawam resume your station. 
Very respectfully, 

M. SMITH, 

Captain and Senior Officer Present. 
Acting Master D. A. CAMPBELL, 

Commanding U. S. S. Stepping Stones. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Braine, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Vicksburg, to proceed to the 
blockade off Wilmington, N. C. 

FLAGSHIP MALVEEN, 

Norfolk, July 5, 1864. 

SIR: As soon as repairs on the Vicksburf/ are completed take in 
your necessary supplies, coal in the roads, or at Newport News, if more 



232 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

convenient, and get ready for sea with all practicable dispatch, and 
when so ready proceed to the blockade off Wilmington, reporting your 
arrival to the senior naval officer there present. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander D. L. BRAINE, 

Commanding U. S. S. Vicksburg. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, acknowledging the Depart- 
ments order regarding a personal inspection of the blockade. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Norfolk Navy Yard, July 6, 1864. 

SIR: The Department's communication of the 2d instant is received, 
informing me that it is desirable that I should visit Beaufort and 
Wilmington, and directing that I return after a short absence and con- 
tinue to visit alternately the different points of this squadron. I 
understand this last part of the Department's instructions as authoriz- 
ing my absence from the James River on squadron duty, whilst the 
obstructions are down and no movement on the river is anticipated. 

I have instructed Captain Gansevoort and Lieutenant-Commander 
Upshur, as directed by the Department, in this same communication. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting copies of 
instructions regarding measures for the protection of the monitors in 
James River. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Norfolk Navy Yard, July 6, 1864 12 m. 

SIR: The Department's telegram of 5th instant is received, authoriz- 
ing the purchase of such boats as are required to make the bar secure 
against the descent of the enemy. 

I beg leave to enclose a copy of my instructions to Captain Smith on 
the subject, of this date, and also a copy of my instructions to him of 
the 3d instant, therein referred to. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosures.] 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Norfolk Navy- Yard, July 6, 1864. 

SIR: Referring to my instructions of 3d instant, in respect to sinking 
additional obstructions in Trent's Reach for the purpose of making the 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 233 

monitors secure, as determined by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy 
when there on 22d ultimo, you are authorized to buy what boats you 
require for this purpose, and sink them, leaving some of the vessels to 
be easily raised, and to approve bills on the Navy Department for pay- 
ment for the same. 

I expect to leave on Thursday evening, or possibly not until the next 
night, for Beaufort and Wilmington. 
Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain M. SMITH, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Onondaga and Senior Officer in James River. 



Memorandum for Captain Smith. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
James River, Virginia, July 3, 1864. 

The Atlanta, ironclad, is just above Fort Powhatan, the gunboat 
Daicn just below Wilson's Wharf, and the well-armed tug, Young 
America, communicates between them and City Point. Fort Powhatan 
and Wilson's Wharf are occupied by the army and are well fortified. 
These vessels are to assist in the defense of these points and vicinity. 
The Osceola, double-ender, Commander Glitz, is stationed oft' City Point, 
where are four small ordnance vessels, a small provision vessel, and the 
navy colliers, the whole in charge of Commander Clitz. 

There is a gunner in immediate charge of these ordnance stores, with 
one petty officer or seaman on board of each of the vessels. 

The supply of provisions is kept up by the fleet paymaster, ordnance 
stores by the ordnance officer, with the aid of Commander Lynch and 
the gunner, and Commander Clitz communicates with Captain Ganse 
voort and keeps up the supply of coal at City Point of from 1,000 to 
1,500 tons, and a weekly addition of 700 tons per week to meet the 
average daily consumption, which is about 100 tons. The Mount Wash- 
ington, transport, runs constantly, tows the full supply vessels up and 
the empty ones down, transports the sick, etc. The Wilderness, trans- 
port, comes up every Tuesday and Friday with fresh provisions and 
vegetables for the crews, etc. 

The ferryboat Commodore Perry and the small gunboat General Put- 
nam are in the Appomattox, just above the pontoon bridge at Point of 
Rocks. These should, as soon as possible, be supplied with wire board- 
ing nettings. Commander Clitz looks after them, also the Sassacus, 
double ender, and ferryboat Commodore Morris, which are between Ber- 
muda Hundred and the lower part of Turkey Bend. 

The Pequot is in the upper part of Turkey Bend. The ferryboat 
Hunchback and double ender Meudota are in Jones' Reach, assisting in 
the defense of the army position at Deep Bottom, which is one of great 
importance, and is at present rather weakly fortified. The Mackinaic, 
double-euder, is in the vicinity of Aiken's Landing, and with the double- 
ender Ayaicam, which is in Farrar's Island Beach, must be always 
ready to command the bluff at and below Dutch Gap, which the enemy 
must not be allowed to occupy. 

The army has a pontoon bridge at Deep Bottom, a landing for sup- 
plies in the southeast end of Curies Neck Reach, and another about 
halfway between Deep Bottom and Dutch Gap. The latter is subject 



234 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

to attack from the enemy's field batteries placed in the vicinity of 
Tilghman's Wharf, and firing across Jones' Neck. I have asked Gen- 
eral Grant for a battery on the heights on our side abreast of Dutch 
Gap and on the heights south of Jones' Neck, the latter to cover the 
army landings when the gunboats are above it or otherwise occupied, 
and the former to prevent an occupation by the enemy of Dutch Gap, 
w hich would be exceedingly annoying to our ordnance vessels between 
it and Trent's Reach. 

' The enemy have a battery at Hewlett's (head of Trent's Reach), 
which deserters report they are extending and mounting heavy guns 
to command the reach. 

The army has a small battery on the first hill near the upper signal 
station at the lower end of Trent's Reach. I think there should be 
more heavy guns on the next ridge above it, so that our batteries may 
be sufficient to silence that of the enemy at Hewlett's, and command 
the obstructions on Trent's Reach bar, thus avoiding the exposing of 
the monitors to casualty from the battery at Hewlett's and straining 
their guns and screws by firing at extreme elevation as they are obliged 
to do, and save the waste of ammunition. 

The army is placing a 100-pounder Parrott at Curtis' house, to bear 
on Hewlett's, also a Sawyer gun, and two light mortars at the lower 
signal station to play on Dutch Gap. 

Trent's Reach bar, below which two of the monitors lie by night and 
one by day, is at the head of monitor navigation unless dredging is 
resorted to, as shown by the recent survey of Sub- Assistant Bradford, of 
the Coast Survey. Above the monitors in the artificial channel on the 
left bank are sunk one bark and four schooners, and in the small chan- 
nel on the right bank another schooner is sunk. One or two of these 
are very good vessels, almost new; they were furnished by the army 
and sunk under the superintendence of its engineer, according to the 
original army plan of campaign communicated to me by General Butler 
at Fortress Monroe in April last, in a conference at which the Assist- 
ant Secretary of the Navy was present and approved this measure for 
keeping the river secure. The sinking of these obstructions was 
deferred on my responsibility until June 15, when they were sunk as 
described under an order from General Grant, first given before his 
army arrived on James River. 

The Assistant Secretary of the Navy, when here on June 22, deter- 
mined, on conference with General Grant, to have additional vessels sunk 
on Trent's Reach bar, and notified me that the Department would obtain 
and direct me to send to Washington or Baltimore for (en or twelve 
coal barges for this purpose. I have since been informed, in answer to 
enquiry from the Department, that vessels for this purpose can be 
obtained in James River and expect instructions to purchase them. 
When this is done, you will have them sunk by night to the best advan- 
tage, taking care to retain and report a memorandum showing their 
positions and the positions of the holes bored to sink them. Enclosed 
is a copy of Lieutenant Lamson's report, giving this information as to 
the vessels now sunk. There is a boom secured in part by a chain and 
lashed to the bows of the vessels (which are upstream) and anchored 
head and stern. The cables of all the sunken vessels should be made 
fast in such a manner that if the vessels were set on fire they could not 
get adrift. This boom is continued by anchors across the middle 
ground to the right bank. 

Ahead of the vessels and boom is a buoyed hawser with a weighted 
net attached and secured by a number of small anchors and kedges up- 
stream. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 235 

In the channel near the left bank, just above this net, I have sunk 
two of the heavy rebel torpedoes, taken up as we came up the river, 
the largest of which contains about a ton of powder. To these insu- 
lated wires are attached, leading to a magnetic battery in a slight 
bombproof on the narrow bank on the left side the river just below the 
sunken vessels. These torpedoes were planted before the channel was 
obstructed and are perhaps unnecessary now. The rebel recruit from 
Point Lookout, who deserted recently to the enemy, has probably 
informed them as to these torpedoes. When the additional vessels are 
sunk, which are designed to arrest torpedoes, fire rafts, and other tor- 
pedo vessels, the connection between their bows by a boom must be 
made quite secure, and the whole line of obstructions kept protected 
by day a::d closely guarded by our picket boats and vessels, when prac- 
ticable, by night. 

Captain Sanderson, of the Army, with about 120 men assigned to the 
Navy by General Graham for picket duty, are encamped near the Crow's 
Nest. He has a post night and day at the magnetic battery and keeps 
a strong picket by night along the left bank up to the turn and some- 
times above it. 

I have been keeping picket boats above the obstructions, and the 
light-draft double-euder Stepping Stones, which can cross the middle 
ground at any time of tide, moving to and fro below them, when the 
night is not so light as to draw the fire of the battery. The tug Alert, 
with her stern upstream, so as to bring her 24-pounder howitzers to 
bear, has been anchored just above the monitors and below the obstruc- 
tions to prevent an attack on the torpedo battery, in which two of the 
howitzer boats stationed above the battery on picket cooperate. 

The Delaware, Stepping Stones, and Agawam, besides their crews, 
accommodate the men sent up from the Minnesota for picket duty 
(before the obstructions were sunk), with her boats, two launches, and 
two cutters, with a howitzer in each. 

When the obstructions are completed you will, perhaps, find your 
self able to return to the Minnesota at least two of her boats with their 
crews, as she is very short of men, and as I do not wish to expose any 
more men than necessary for picket duty. 

Professor Maillefert and Mr. Hayden, electro- magnetic and torpedo 
operators, with their diver and his apparatus, are here in the employ 
of the Navy Department. They have just fitted five of the new 
unarmed tugs with torpedoes sent from Washington, containing 150 
pounds of powder. The sockets of these torpedoes are weak, and 
others of proper strength have been asked for. When these are 
received those now in use had better be carefully returned to Wash- 
ington for alteration. Ascertain the fitness of these torpedoes for 
service, and when the tugs are employed on it see that they are com- 
manded by reliable officers, of cool and controlling spirit. You are 
authorized for this purpose to make such changes as are necessary. 
These tugs are unarmed, the torpedoes are unshipped, but on board of 
them, and the rest of the torpedo fixtures are on board of the ordnance 
vessels at City Point. Enclosed is a list of the whole. 

Lieutenant Lamson, of the Gettysburg, has had charge of the torpedo 
and picket division. I think Acting Master Campbell, of the Stepping 
Stones, will be a good officer to have charge of the picket vessels, and 
Acting Master Eldridge, of the Delaware, of the picket boats and 
pickets. 

Dutch Gap should be picketed. Commander Beaumont, of the Mack- 
inaic, found some difficulty in keeping pickets there. 



236 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

I some time since asked the Department for a dredging machine, and 
after the obstructions were sunk, for a pump boat. When Hewlett's is 
ours, the holes in one or two of the schooners in the channel can be 
quickly plugged by the diver, and they can be pumped out and removed 
within a few hours. The dredging machine can then deepen the old 
artificial channel over the bar so as to allow the monitors to cross with 
their supplies in. 

There is a tug at Deep Bottom to bring intelligence from that point. 
The tug Hydrangea makes two trips daily to City Point, carrying mails 
and towing supply vessels. Part of the torpedo tugs, which should be 
examined and kept in good order, are available for other necessary 
local service. 

Supplies for all the vessels of ammunition, provisions, and fuel are 
constantly kept up. 

All the vessels on the river are expected to protect the army and 
navy transports against attacks by field batteries. 

My orders have been to engage the enemy as soon as practicable 
when they appear, without waiting for signals. 

Exercise your discretion as to the day and night positions of the 
monitors and the other vessels. Enclosed is Lieutenant Lamson's 
memorandum of the picket outposts, but subject to such modifications 
as you may prefer. Send me a daily report of the situation. 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Naval Officer in James River. 

P. S. From City Point, Va., July 4: A boat picket has been kept to 
prevent the enemy from putting over torpedo boats from Dutch Gap. 

Have a strong boom, well secured by chains and heavy anchors, put 
across the mouth of Four Mile Creek to prevent the enemy from getting 
torpedo boats or boats out there. 

Make arrangements for clearing the monitors' decks should the 
enemy attempt a surprise to them by boarding from boats with which 
they can pass the obstructions as at present arranged. 

If you should need the Minnesota's two cutters, carrying howitzers, 
write to Lieutenant-Commander Upshur and order them up. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[ Sabencloaure.] 
Signals for picket division. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

July 3, [1864.] 

Eed lantern Suspicion of danger, 
lied Coston Certain danger. 

Rocket thrown up by picket on shore indicates that the enemy's ves- 
sels are coming down the river. 

Muskets or howitzers to be fired from the boats to attract attention 
to the signals. 

Position of picket boats. 

The picket boats have been stationed, one boat with howitzer on left 
bank to guard approaches to torpedo station; one boat with howitzers 
to guard approaches to break in the obstructions; two small boats far- 
ther up the river to give alarm, their distance from Hewlett's Battery 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 237 

regulated by the light of the night. Six sailors and three soldiers are 
on duty at the torpedo station, in three reliefs of two sailors and one 
soldier each, to watch and guard the torpedoes and galvanic battery 
and to explode the torpedo at the proper time. 

The sailors have been instructed by Mr. Hayden in the use of the 
battery, and either himself or Mr. Burn [Berueyj is there to direct it. 

R. H. LAMSON, 
Lieutenant, Commanding Torpedo and Picket Division. 



Report of Acting Master Josselyn, U. S. Navy, regarding the capture of 
a torpedo sparty from the U. 8. S. Commodore Null. 

U. S. S. COMMODORE HULL, 
Off Rofinoke River, North Carolina, July 6, 1864. 
SIR: I have the honor to report that the torpedo party which left 
this vessel on the 4th instant at the usual hour did not return at night. 
On the morning of the 5th instant 1 sent an armed boat up the river 
as far as their station. Nothing was seen of them, but the boat in 
which the men left this vessel remained in the place where they always 
left it before taking canoes. 

I have to-day learned from refugees that six men answering their 
description were captured by the enemy on the 4th instant. I sent up 
to-day and brought away the boat, and have sent their personal effects 
on board the Wyalusing. 
Very respectfully, 

FRANCIS JOSSELYN, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 

Commander W. H. MACOMB, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



Abstract log of the U. 8. S. Wyalusing. 

July 4, 1864. Arms being lost this day by our pickets being captured 
on the Roanoke River: Three revolvers, two carbines, belts, frogs, and 
cartridge boxes. 

July 6. At 12:30 p. m. made signal to the picket boats off Roanoke 
River. Received from the steamer Commodore Hull five refugees and 
the bags and hammocks of Acting Master's Mate Charles Baldwin and 
George Bagnall (second class fireman), who were taken prisoners while 
on picket duty on the Roanoke River July 4. 



Abstract log of the U. S. 8. Commodore Hull. 

July 4, 1864. At 6:30 p. in. hove up anchor and ran up to the mouth 
of the Roanoke River for the picket boat. Lay to until 8 p. m., and as 
the boat did not come down we ran off a short distance from the river. 

July 5. At 4:30 a. m. anchored off the mouth of the Roanoke River. 
Xo signs of the picket boat; we fear they are captured; also, John 
Latham and Sylvester McCullough. At 10 a. m. sent the first cutter 



238 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

and dingey ashore and brought off' 17 refugees. The U. S. S. Shamrock 
came up the sound ; sent the refugees on board of her. From 12 to 4 p. m. : 
Sent a boat up the Koanoke River to try and find out what has become 
of the picket boat. Crew found the boat but saw nothing of the men. 
j u ly Q, From 8 to 12 meridian: Took off five refugees from Wash- 
ington County; also brought off the dingey from the Roanoke River, 
our pickets having been captured. 



Letter from, the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. 
Navy, regarding the maintenance of the blockade. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 7, 1864. 

SIR : I have received your No. 366 * and enclosures in reference to the 
steamer Thomas Powell. 

The Department approves of your letter to Major-General Butler. 
It is presumed that the order of the latter is not intended to cover the 
cases of transports of the Army approaching the blockaded coast, or 
entering blockaded waters, or passing guard vessels. The Army and 
Navy are independent commands. The one can not command the other, 
but all orders pertaining to the maintenance of the blockade must be 
enforced, and it is not doubted that they will be duly observed by trans- 
ports of the Army. 

Very respectfully, GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Kear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, James River. 



Letter from Commander Macomb, U. S. Navy, to the Secretary of the Navy, 
requesting information regarding trading limits. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Albemarle Sound, July 7, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully request the Department to inform me Avhether 
persons having permits from the special agents of the Treasury are to 
be allowed to trade without the military lines. 

I have reason to believe that many such persons are violating their 
permits. I have taken the liberty to forward this direct to the Depart- 
ment, so that the persons awaiting the decision may not lose time and 
money. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretarg of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Endorsement.] 

I know of no authority that transcends the law and regulations on 
this subject. Trade and free communication are inconsistent with 
blockade. 

W[ELLES]. 

* Not necessary to publish. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 239 

Report of Commander Macomb, U. 8. Navy, regarding the disposition of 
the vesssels in the sounds of North Carolina. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Off Perquimans River, Albemarle Sound, July 7, 1864. 

SIR, : On the 28th ultimo Captain Melancton Smith turned over to me, 
as senior officer, the command of the vessels in the sounds of North 
Carolina, and placed in my hands the papers in relation thereto, and 
also documents and letters concerning storehouses, coal vessels, etc. 

The present disposition of the squadron under my command is as 
follows : 

In Albemarle Sound. Shamrock, Otsego, Mattabesett, Wyalusing, and 
Tacony, and on picket duty at mouth of Eoanoke Eiver, Commodore 
Hull and Whitehead, coal schooner E. Wolf, and one coal lighter. 

N. B. The coal schooner Maggie Van Dusen left this station for Phil- 
adelphia on the 5th instant. 

At New Berne. Chicopee, Hetzel, and Lockwood, and Ceres repairing; 
and on blockade and reconnoitering duty in Tar River, Louisiana and 
Valley City. The armed sloop Granite is also at New Berne repairing. 
She and the Ceres are expected to be ready every day. I have ordered 
the Ceres here to relieve the Commodore Hull, which vessel is in want 
of repairs. The schooners Albemarle, Renshaw, Flusser, and Susan Ann 
Howard (ordnance); prize schooners Jeff Davis, M. O'Neil, Pet, Mary 
L. Bryant, Iowa, Mary Emma, and Jenny Lind. 

At Hatteras Inlet. Bombshell, to be relieved by the Granite as soon 
as repaired. 

At Roanoke Island. Miami (repairing), ordnance schooner Carstairs, 
prize schooner Ann S. Davenport, repairing to receive coal (if she can 
be made tight). 

I changed the position of the large vessels of this squadron from off 
Edenton to this point on the 2d instant, because I considered this the 
more advantageous position to fight the rebel ram, on account of the 
greater depth of water and breadth of the sound at this place. 

The position and duties of the picket boats have not been changed, 
they being still at the mouth of the Eoanoke Kiver. One of the squad- 
ron communicates with them every day. 

On the 2d instant an officer of tbe Tacony returned from a reconnois- 
sance of the country along the river as far up as Plymouth. He went 
up the Eastmost Eiver through the surrounding marshes, and into the 
Eoanoke Eiver. He reports that he saw nothing of the ram, though he 
[heard] the bell of a vessel strike, which, as he supposed, belonged to 
the ram, as the other rebel steamer has no bell. 

On the night of the 2d instant another officer was sent up from the 
steamer Whitehead. He ascended the Cashie as far as the point where 
it connects with the main river, but saw nothing of the ram nor of any 
launches. 

I suppose that the rebel ironclad ram Albemarle is at Plymouth, but 
hauled up close alongside a wharf and screened so as to be invisible 
from the opposite side of the river. The general impression is that she 
is ready for service again. 

The torpedoes are in the Eoanoke Eiver, all in the same position as 
reported by Captain Smith. 

I have formed a plan for attacking the ram, in which the command- 
ing officers of the squadron coincide, some of them having made some 
important additions, which I have accepted. 

I received information yesterday, which has been confirmed today, 
that the party in charge of the torpedoes in Eoanoke Eiver has been 



240 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

captured by the rebels. The party consisted of Acting Master's Mate 
Baldwin, from the Wyalusing, and 4 men. The boat had been detained 
a day and a night, and a boat was dispatched from the Commodore 
Hull in search of them, and to find out the cause of their detention. 
This party found the boat belonging to the first party in its usual place, 
but could find no traces of the men, and since then news has been 
received by the Wyalusing and Mattabesett, which have been up to 
communicate with the picket boats, and also from refugees, confirma- 
tory of the report of their capture. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Kear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

I make this report to-day instead of the 10th, because the oppor- 
tunities for sending letters from here are so uncertain. 

W. H. M. 



Report of Commander Macomb, U. S. Navy, regarding the progress on 
Confederate vessels under construction in the Roanoke River. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Albemarle Sound, July 7, IMl-l. 

SIR : I have received reports from intelligent refugees, of whom many 
are delivering themselves to the squadron, that the rebel ironclad Albe- 
marle is lying at Plymouth ready for service, and that Captain Maffitt, 
late of the U. S. Navy, has command. 

The new ironclad vessel at Halifax, [N. O.J, will be ready in three 
weeks or a mouth. 

The floating battery building at Rainbow Bluff is finished also, they 
say. It is supposed that they will operate together (the Albemarle and 
the battery). 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer in Sounds North Carolina. 

Acting Kear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Commander Macomb, U. S. Navy, regarding the rumored trans- 
portation of grain for the Confederate Army. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Albemarle Sound, July 7, 1864. 

SIR: I have learned to-day, through intelligent refugees, that large 
quantities of grain are being transported across the Scuppernoug River 
at Columbia for supplying the rebel army. 

The grain crop of the eastern counties of this State is said to be suf- 
ficient to supply the rebel troops in North Carolina for twelve months. 
As I had no vessels of a draft light enough to go up the river as high 
as the place of transportation, 1 have written to the commanding officer 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 241 

at Roanoke Island to have this matter attended to, and if he had not 
sufficient force, to forward my communication to the general. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia. 



Letter from Lieutenant- Commander Adams, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- 
Commander Upshur, U. 8. Navy, regarding salutes. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Norfolk, Va., July 8, 1864. 

SIR : The admiral expects to be in Hampton Roads this evening or 
to morrow morning, and wishes to be ready to answer any salutes that 
may be tired for him by the foreign men-of-war in the harbor. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

H. A. ADAMS, 
Acting Fleet Captain. 
Lieutenant-Commander J. H. UPSHUR, 

Minnesota. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Williams, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Emma, to pro- 
ceed to blockade duty. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Norfolk Navy Yard, July 8, 1864. 

SIR : You will proceed without delay to Hampton Eoads and receive 
coal and men ordered from Minnesota, after which you will proceed to 
the blockade of the entrance to Cape Fear, reporting on your arrival to 
senior officer present for duty. 
Respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant J. M. WILLIAMS, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Emma. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, regarding the burning of grain on 

the James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

On Picket, Below the Barricade, James River, July 8, 1864. 
SIR : Commander Nichols, of the Mendota, reports that at 3 a. m. yes- 
terday morning the enemy in small force charged upon a picket post of 
our line, but not finding anyone there, it being only occupied by our 
forces in the daytime, soon left. Yesterday afternoon General Foster 
sent 100 men down to Major Allen's farm, where Lieutenant Command- 
ing Fyffe reported there was a large quantity of corn. They secured 
some 300 bushels, shelled, leaving about 1,200 bushels, and 300 men 
from Kautz's cavalry (dismounted) were sent over to secure it. Very 
heavy fires were seen last night on Curies Neck, presumed to be from 
N w R VOL 10 10 



242 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

burning grain and barns. All the grain in his immediate neighborhood 
has been destroyed by General Foster. 

The field of grain which is being harvested by the rebels, next south 
of Aiken's, was fired yesterday in several places, but a shower coming on 
soon after, it was extinguished. Another attempt to destroy it will be 
made to-day. 

Five deserters came off yesterday from Hewlett's Battery, and four 
soldiers from the same command were captured on the harvest field. 

So soon as I can obtain the necessary information, I will require for 
the anchors and chains to obstruct the mouth of Four Mile Creek in 
obedience to your instructions. 

Everything being quiet here I have not communicated to the Depart- 
ment the unimportant operations in this vicinity. 

Kegarding it as your intention to leave for the blockade on your 
departure from here, I have endorsed and torwarded, as senior officer 
present, all of the quarterly returns that have been sent in. 

Major-General Butler, Brigadier-Generals Weitzel, Foster, and Gra- 
ham, with several staff officers, Members of Congress, and a party of 
ladies were on board yesterday. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Captain Sands, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Fort Jack- 
son, regarding the capture of the British steamer Boston. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 
Blockade off Wilmington, N. C., July 8, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report to you the capture, by this vessel, 
of the blockade runner (English), side-wheel steamer Boston, of Ber- 
muda, this morning at 11 : 30 a. in., she having broken down in endeav- 
oring to escape in latitude 30 19' N"., longitude 75 35' W. 

I took possession of her, her captain acknowledging that he intended 
to run the blockade of Wilmington. She was built at Quebec, in 1852; 
side- wheel lake boat; 334 tons; register tonnage, 224; cargo, 24 bar- 
rels copperas, 465 sacks of salt, 108 boxes of soap. 
I send her to Boston for adjudication. 

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

B. F. SANDS, 
Captain, U. S. Navy. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington City. 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Smith, U. 8. 
Navy, regarding the obstruction of Four Mile Greek. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, July 9, 1864. 
SIR: Your No. 47, of 8th instant, is received. 

You can obstruct Four Mile Creek in whatever way you think best, 
f you need anchors, there are some on the ordnance vessels at City 
Point, which you can obtain and use. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 243 

As the enemy have fortified Malvern Hill, a torpedo or other attack 
from Turkey Creek [Turkey Island Creek] is possible, and it might be 
well to place obstructions at its mouth, to use special care in guarding 
and picketing the vicinity. 

Respectfully, yours, S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Captain M. SMITH, 

U. S. S. Onondaga. 



Report of Captain Glisson, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Santiago 
de Cuba, regarding the chase of a steamer. 

U. S. S. SANTIAGO DE CUBA, 

At Sea, July 9, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the 8th instant, in the longi- 
tude 70 10' W., latitude 33 57' N., at 2 p. m., we discovered a steamer 
two points on our starboard bow, hauled up for her and soon discovered 
black smoke. The Santiago de Cuba was soon under a full pressure of 
steam, going 12 miles per hour. No wind, consequently the draft not 
good, much difficulty in keeping up steam. The chase was a large, 
side-wheel steamer, painted nearly white, with walking beam and two 
smoke pipes. At sunset the chase was nearly out of sight, and at 7.30 
p. m. we lost sight of 1 he chase entirely. Our coal being nearly out, 
we steered for the capes of Virginia. 

During the chase we were heading N. E. by E. and when we last 
saw her, she was heading E. J X 1 . When first discovered it is sup- 
posed she was steering for Wilmington, X. C., and as soon as she 
discovered us she wore ship and stood to the northward and eastward. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

O. S. GLISSON, 

Captain, U. S. Navy. 
Acting Bear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Instructions of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Glisson, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. 8. Santiago de Cuba, regarding blockade 
duty. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 9, 1864. 

SIR: When the Santiago de Cuba is ready for sea you will proceed in 
her to the station hereby assigned to you between the courses E. by X . 
and E. from Cape Fear, and to a sufficient distance from that cape to 
include the run of a fast steamer out of New Inlet entrance to Wilming- 
ton between the time of half tide at night and daylight next morning. 

A radius of 80 or 90 miles (see sketch herewith) would expose the 
position of a runner passing out just after sunset at this season of the 
year, when the chaser would have a view of the blockade runner's 
smoke 15 miles farther seaward. Your necessary distance from Cape 
Fear depends, therefore, upon the time of tide on the bar at Wilming- 
ton, and upon the length of the night when p. m. twilight is between 
half tide and high water on the bars, as then the runner, if of light 
draft, has the whole night to run off the coast. 

Keep accurate tables posted up in your pilot house showing the time 
of high water on these bars, the rising aud setting of the moon at night, 



244 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

and the rising and setting of the sun. The object is to capture block- 
ade runners to and from Wilmington. At first these blockade runners 
ran as nearly direct as practicable to and from Nassau and Bermuda, 
but now they are supposed to make a circuitous course. Keep your vessel 
in good trim for chasing, and do not allow officers and men to crowd 
forward during a chase. When you need supplies obtain them at 
Hampton Roads. 

Try so to arrange the time of coaling that you will only be absent 
from your station during the light of the moon, and select the best coal 
lor chasing. Regulate the quantity of supplies received so as not to 
impair the speed of your vessel. The supply of ammunition, however, 
must be full. You have already received the squadron papers. Until 
further orders send your prizes to the port of Boston, except sailing 
vessels, those steamers and small vessels unfit to make the passage; 
these you will send to Washington. 

Prepare duplicate prize lists in case of capture, sending the original 
in your report to the Department, and the duplicate in that to me. 

Send me your abstract of the Santiago de Cuba's log, which I desire 
you to keep written up daily, by every opportunity. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. T. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain O. S. GLISSON, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Santiago de Cuba. 

[Order of same date and like tenor to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant 
Tratheu, commanding U. S. S. Mount Vernon.\ 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, advising the construction 
of additional ironclads. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 9, 18(>4. 

SIR: Referring to the Department's telegram, dated July 5, in the 
transmission of which there are some mistakes, I propose, when the 
torpedo boats reach the sounds, to send two of the double-enders from 
there to the Washington navy yard to be fitted as the Department pro- 
poses with two XI inch guns. I suppose some additional mechanical 
device will be necessary to resist the recoil from the use of 30 pounds 
of powder and solid shot. 

1 have no Xl-inch gunboats, and the best draft of water on the swash 
at Hiitteras Inlet and in Croatan Sound is about Si feet. 

I have informed the Department that according"to the reports from 
the sounds the rebels are building additional ironclads there. Will it 
not be well to build several ironclads of the turtle-back variety, some- 
what on the principle of the first western ironclads or the Merrimack 
style? I suppose that these might be built of light draft with scow 
bottoms, and in a very short time, say ninety or one hundred days, and 
with a few torpedo boats would constitute a certain defense of the 
sounds and secure our naval ascendency there. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 245 

Capture of the steamer Little Ada, July 9, 1864. 
Eeport of Acting Master M'Gloin, U. S. Navy, commanding TT. S. S. Gettysburg. 

U. S. S. GETTYSBURG, 
Lat. 32 30' JV., Long. 78 W ., July 9, 1864. 

SIR : This ship, after a chase of four hours, brought to and seized the 
steamer Little Ada, of Savannah, a Clyde-built iron boat of 94 tons, 
English, or 208 tons American measurement. She has an assorted 
cargo, and was bound to Charleston from Nassau, [Kew Providence]. 
She is one year old and very fast for a small vessel. I send her to 
Boston in charge of Acting Ensign A. S. Laighton, who, on his arrival, 
will forward this communication to you. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. M'GLOIN, 

Acting Master, Commanding pro tern. 
Acting TCear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Off Wilmington, N. C., August o, 1864. 

SIR: On the 15th ultimo I informed the Department by telegraph of 
the capture of the Little Ada by the Gettysburg. The report of this 
capture furnished by Acting Master M'Gloin, temporarily in command 
of the Gettysburg, being very meager, I directed a circumstantial state- 
ment to be furnished. This report, dated 31st ultimo, is enclosed. It 
appears from it that on the 9th instant, after a chase of about four 
hours, during which three shots were tired at the chase, the Gettysburg 
captured the Little Ada, of Savannah, from Nassau, with an assorted 
cargo, consisting principally, as far as could be ascertained, of pig lead 
and potash; $20 in American half dollars were found, with the ship's 
name on the package, which was forwarded to the prize commissioner 
at Boston. 

She had no flag or papers. It afterwards appeared that these were 
Confederate and had been burned in the furnaces before she was 
boarded. 

The prize was sent to Boston for adjudication. She is an iron vessel 
of 208 tons, American measurement, and was built in Scotland a year 
ago. She had a crew of 22 officers and men, 9 of whom were sent to 
Boston and the remaining 13 turned over to Commander Dove, at Beau- 
fort. They were subsequently sent to Hampton Roads by the Maratanza, 
which arrived on the 27th, the day preceding my departure for Beaufort. 
I directed Lieutenant-Commander Haxtun to examine these persons, 
in strict accordance with the Department's instructions of May 9, ultimo, 
and to turn them over to the provost- marshal at Fortress Monroe to be 
released or detained, according to the result of the examination. The 
result of that examination has not yet reached me, but under the new 
aspect of the case, as drawn from the report of capture now forwarded, 
I should suppose that, being captured in a vessel without colors or 
papers, the officers and crew of Little Ada are subject to detention as 
prisoners of war, particularly as, from the return of her cargo, the 



246 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

vessel was in the employ of the rebel Government by furnishing muni- 
tions of war. 

I have notified the U. S. marshal at Boston of the facts above reported. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. GETTYSBURG, 
Beaufort, N. C., July 31, 1864. 

SIR: A sail was reported from the masthead at 6:15 a. m. July 9, 
bearing S. E. This ship immediately gave chase, but having no wind, 
it was impossible to generate more than 18 pounds of steam, though 
with a good draft we have had 23 pounds. In consequence of this the 
Gettysburg did not make more than 11 knots per hour, but gained on 
the chase so much that at 10 a. m. she stopped, distant about 2 miles, 
we having tired three solid shot from our 30-pouuder rifle, which dropped 
quite near her. On boarding her she proved to be the Little Ada, of 
Savannah, with an assorted cargo, from Nassau, without flag or papers 
of any kind. It was afterwards ascertained that both flag and papers, 
which were Confederate, were burned in the furnaces before she was 
boarded. 

A letter was found in possession of one of the men, written by the 
captain to the owner, detailing the annoyances he experienced in 
obtaining his officers and crew, and also the amount of wages paid the 
officers. This letter was handed to Captain Lamson. The cargo was 
principally lead in pigs and potash, and it was suspected by the boarding 
officer that she had more cargo than the captain would acknowledge. 
Twenty dollars in American silver half dollars were found, having the 
ship's name on the package, which was forwarded by the vessel to the 
prize commissioner at Boston. The ship's position at meridian was lati- 
tude 32 21', longitude 77 51' W. The vessel herself is a strongly and 
beautifully built iron boat of 208 tons, American measurement, built in 
Scotland one year ago. 

She had a crew of 22 officers and men, 9 of whom were sent to Boston 
and 13 brought to this port and transferred to Captain Dove. Her 
engines are direct-acting inverted cylinders, 25 inches diameter and 
22-inch stroke, about 100 indicated horsepower. She has one boiler, 
two fires, and can carry 70 tons of coal. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. M'GLOIN, 

Acting Master. 
Lieutenant R. H. LAMSON, 

Commanding. 



Report of Commander Macoml), U. S. Navy, regarding the sale of supplies 

to Confederate agents. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Albemarle Sound, July 9, 1864. 

SIR: I have been informed by a citizen of Edentou, N. C., who is 
considered a reliable Union man. that large quantities of bacon and 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 247 

other supplies have been sent to South Mills, at the southern end of 
the Dismal Swamp Canal, on the Pasquotank River, and are there sold 
to rebel agents tor the supply of the rebel Army. 

It is said that this bacon, etc., is sent from Norfolk by permit from 
United States authority in that district. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer, Sounds North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, transmitting confidential 
communication regarding proposed attack upon the C. S. ram Albe- 
marle. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 10, 1864. 

SIR : I enclose herewith my confidential communication, No. 305, to 
the Department, Lieutenant Gushing having sailed this morning in 
pursuit of the Florida. 

I respectfully refer to my Nos. 398 and 399 for information received 
from the sounds. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosure.] 

Confidential.] FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC 

BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 9, 1864. 

SIR: Lieutenant Gushing arrived here on the 5th instant, bringing 
his report of his recounoissance near Wilmington. I suggested his 
making an attempt to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle at Plymouth. 
He at first proposed an attack on the ram with our gunboats at Ply- 
mouth, or a boat expedition, led by himself, with 80 men. 

I concur in Captain Smith's opinion that it would be inexpedient to 
fight the ram with our long double-endcrs in that narrow river. I pro- 
posed to Lieutenant Cushing a torpedo attack, either by means of the 
india-rubber boat heretofore applied for, which could be transported 
across the swamp opposite Plymouth, or a light-draft, rifle-proof, swift 
steam barge, fitted with a torpedo. 

In the meantime delay ensued from the Monticello getting ashore in 
the Elizabeth River. The enclosed letter from Lieutenant Gushing 
contains his mature views on the subject. The Monticello will return 
to the blockade as soon as Lieutenant Kempff arrives, who is hourly 
expected, and Lieutenant Cushing, who desires to superintend the fit- 
ting of the boats he may have, is instructed to report to the Department 
and deliver this communication. I have enjoined secrecy and discretion 



248 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

upon him. He is entirely willing to make an attempt to destroy the 
ram, and I have great confidence in his gallantry. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, 7). C. 

[ S u I ic 1 1 < 1 " - 1 1 n . ] 

Confidential.] U. S. S. MONTICELLO, 

Hampton Roads Virginia, July 9, 1864. 

SiR: Deeming the capture or destruction of the rebel r&m Albemarle 
feasible, I beg leave to state that I am acquainted with the waters held 
by her, and am willing to undertake the task. 

If furnished with three low-pressure tugs, one or more fitted with 
torpedoes, and all armed with light howitzers, it might be effected, or, 
if rubber boats were on hand to transport across the swamp to a point 
immediately abreast of Plymouth. If detailed for this work, J would 
like to superintend the outfit of the boats, and would be glad to see 
Lieutenant Kempff, of the Connecticut, in charge of the Monticcllo dur- 
ing my absence. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. CUSHING, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Smith, r. S. 
Navy, regarding precautions against attacks by torpedoes in James 
River. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 10, 1864. 

SIR: The Department has telegraphed (received this morning) me 
urging the necessity of additional precautions against attacks by tor- 
pedoes upon the vessels in James River. Such additional measures, 
besides those already employed, as in your judgment will assist in 
meeting or preventing such attacks, will be adopted by you immedi- 
ately, and the utmost watchfulness and vigilance must be enjoined 
upon the officers and men in the river. 
Acknowledge receipt. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Officer in James River. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, July 10, 1864. 

Captain Smith instructed, under telegram* 8th, just received. 
Tecumseh sailed 9.45 a. m., 5th instant, with Augusta and Eutaic. 

*For instructions, see preceding order. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 249 

Guardship at [Hampton] Roads sends daily reports of arrivals and 
departures of public vessels to Department. Now dispatch two tugs 
to Baltimore for the canal boats. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Upshur, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Minnesota. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, July 10, 1864 Midnight. 

SIR : Proceed without delay with the Minnesota to Point Lookout and 
report your arrival there to the Navy Department by telegraph. 
Respectfully, etc., 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander J. H. UPSHUR, 

U. S. 8. Minnesota. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Gushing-, 
U. S. Navy, commanding the U. S. S. Monticello, to proceed to sea in 
pursuit of the C. S. S. Florida. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 10, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed to sea with Monticello under your command, in com- 
pany with the Mount Vernon, Lieutenant-Commander Adams tem- 
porarily commanding, to pursue and capture the Florida, or other rebel 
steamer referred to in the enclosed statement from the master of the 
tug America. 

The Monticello and Mount Vernon will keep in convenient signal dis- 
tance of each other day and night, cruise together, and on finding 
the Florida will make a vigorous joint attack upon and capture her. 
The Florida has probably gone to the northward and eastward to put 
herself in the track of the commerce of our Northern cities. Keep a 
record of your proceedings and report from time to time to Depart- 
ment and myself when convenient, and return to this port for coal when 
you need it. Keep so close to the Mount Vernon, at night especially, 
as to avoid all chance of separation, and consider yourself under the 
immediate command of Lieutenant-Commander Adams during this 
cruise. 

Respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant WM. B. GUSHING, 

Commanding V. S. S. Monticello. 

P. S. Economize your fuel during the search, which will be made 
under easy steam. 



250 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Adams, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Mount Vernon, to proceed to 
sea in pursuit of the C. 8. 8. Florida. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Va., July 10, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed to sea in temporary command of the Mount Vernon, 
accompanied by the Monticello, Lieutenant Cushiug, to pursue and 
capture the Florida, or other rebel steamer referred to in the enclosed 
report from the master of the tug America. 

The Mount Vernon and Monticello will keep in convenient signal dis- 
tance of each other day and night, cruise together, and on finding the 
Florida will make a vigorous joint attack upon and capture her. 

The Florida has probably gone to the northward and eastward to put 
herself in the track of the commerce of our Northern cities. 

Keep a record of your proceedings and report from time to time to 
Department and myself when convenient, and return to this port for 
coal when you need it. 

Lieutenant Gushing is instructed to keep so close to the Mount Ver- 
non, at night especially, as to avoid all chance of separation, and to 
consider himself under your immediate command during this cruise. 

Economize your fuel during the search, which will be made under 
easy steam. 

You may get information from vessels you may speak. Exercise your 
discretion as to the course you should take. 
Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander H. A. ADAMS, Jr., 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Mount Vernon. 

P. S. As cruisers will probably be dispatched from Northern ports, 
you will not, unless it be rendered absolutely necessary by positive 
intelligence you may receive, go to the northward and eastward of 
Nantucket. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 



Order of Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant French, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. S. Ino, to proceed to 
sea in pursuit of the C. 8. S. Florida. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 10, 1864. 

SIR: You will proceed to sea immediately in tow of the tug America, 
sent with this, which will give you a good offing. When at sea, pro- 
ceed in search of the vessel of war Florida, reported to be on our 
coast last night, as you will see by the enclosed statement. 

Obtain information from vessels at sea and use every exertion to 
find and capture the Florida. Disguise the Ino, her battery, officers, 
and crew, and play the merchantman in appearance so as to entice her 
alongside, when you, being prepared, will open upon her suddenly and 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 251 

effectually. The information that you can acquire of passing vessels 
will aid you in the pursuit. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant C. A. FRENCH, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Ino. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Ridgely, 
U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Shenandoah, to cruise off the capes of 
Virginia in search of the supposed C. 8. S. Florida. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 10, 1864. 

SIR : Enclosed is the statement of the master of the tug America, 
made this morning, of the burning last evening of a naval collier by a 
rebel vessel about 50 miles to the eastward of Cape Henry. 

Cruise off the capes of Virginia with the Shenandoah in search of 
the enemy. Do not extend your cruising ground north of the capes 
of Delaware or south of Cape Lookout, unless you receive information 
making it necessary. Report your proceedings when practicable to 
the Department and myself, and return here for supplies. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain D. B. RIDGELY, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Shenandoah. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Dove, 
U. S. Navy, to inform the blockaders regarding the presence of the 
C. S. 8. Florida. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, July 10, 1864. 

SIR : I enclose a statement received this morning from the master of 
the tug America, reporting that the Florida burned a vessel last night 
50 miles E. by S. from Cape Henry. I have sent vessels in pursuit 
of her. Communicate this intelligence to all the blockaders. 

The Fort Donelson will land the Keystone State's crew, fill up with 
coal, and proceed to her station. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander B. M. DOVE, 

Commanding Naval Station, Beaufort. 

[Similar letter to Commander Clary, commanding U. S. S. Dacotah.] 



252 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 10, 1864. 

It is desirable to send to Washington three or four of your gunboats. 
Let one of them be a double-euder and one the Atlanta without delay. 

GIDEON WELLES. 
Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 10, 1864. 

Let the Roanoke remain at Hampton Roads. Send the Minnesota to 
Point Lookout, mouth of the Potomac, to report by telegraph. One of 
the gunboats ordered up to day may go direct to Annapolis. You will 
remain at Hampton Roads for the present. 

GIDEON WELLES. 
Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 10, 1864. 

(Received 1:20 a. m., llth.) 

New Berne passed Tecumseh, Augusta, and Eutaic on Thursday after- 
noon, 7th instant, off Frying Pan Shoals, going south, doing well, with 
fine weather. 
The afternoon Fort J)onelson dispatched to outside blockade. 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July ll, 1864. 

Several very important telegrams were sent you yesterday, but have 
not been acknowledged or acted upon so far as advised. The Florida 
burned several vessels off Cape May this a. m. 

GIDEON WELLES. 
Acting Eear- Admiral LEE, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia. 



[Telegram.] 



FORT MONROE, July 11, 1864. 

(Received 1 a. m., July 12.) 

Operator at Cherrystone says he saw yesterday's Department order 
to send three gunboats to Washington. Steam tug bringing it from 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 253 

Cherrystone has mysteriously disappeared. Will send Vicksburg* and 
Morse to Washington; Emma to Annapolis; Cuyler to Point Lookout 
until Minnesota can clear her moorings foul of other anchors. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to the commanding officer 
of the U. S. 8. Wilderness, for the delivery of enclosed orders to officers. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 11, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed with all practicable dispatch with the Wilderness under 
your command to deliver the enclosed communications to the command- 
ing officers of the Atlanta and Mackinaw and to Captain Smith, in their 
order, as you pass them up the river, and after communicating with 
Captain Smith return immediately and report to. me here, when you 
will take in the fresh provisions and return. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

COMMANDING OFFICER U. S. S. WILDERNESS. 

[Enclosures.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 11, 1864. 

SIR : By direction of the Navy Department I have ordered the Atlanta 
and Mackinaw to Washington. Wilderness to return immediately. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 



FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 11, 1864. 

S:R: Proceed without delay with the Atlanta under your command 
to report to me here. Use all practicable dispatch. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant T. J. WOODWARD, 

Commanding U. S. S. Atlanta. 



* The U. S. S. Ficksburg was ordered to Annapolis. 



254 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 11, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed without delay with the Mackinaw under your command 
to report to me here. Use all practicable dispatch. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander J. C. BEAUMONT, 

U. 8. S. Mackinaw. 

P. S. Take the Atlanta in tow when you overtake her. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Babcock; U. S. Nary, commanding U. S. S. Morse, to proceed to Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 11 8 p. m. 

SIR: Proceed with all practicable dispatch with the Morse under 
your command to Washington, [D. C.], reporting your arrival to the 
Department. Telegraph me from Yorktown, order obeyed, giving day 
and hour. If it is entirely impossible for the Morse to go, owing to the 
state of her boilers, inform me by telegraph, naming the earliest date 
at which she can leave. Do not mention your destination in your 
dispatch. 

Caution Acting Master Wright to keep vigilant watch against torpedo 
and boat attacks. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander C. A. BABCOCK, 

Commanding U. S. S. Morse. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Braine, U. 8. Navy, to proceed to Annapolis, Md. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Road*, Virginia, July 11, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed with all practicable dispatch with the Vicksburf/ under 
your command to Annapolis, reporting your arrival to the Department. 
Send me daily reports of the situation. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander D. L. BRAINE, 

U. S. S. Vicksburg. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 255 

Circular order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding a night patrol of 

the James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 11, 1864. 

The commanders of the vessels herein named will send an armed 
boat from their vessel to patrol the river from sunset to daylight 
between the points designated below. The object of this patrol is to 
observe the movements of the enemy and to prevent them from placing 
torpedoes in the river. 
Mackinaic to Dutch Gap. 
Agawam to sight the Mackinaw. 
Mendota to the Hunchback. 
Hunchback to the army landing. 
Pequot to the Commodore Morris. 
Commodore Morris to the Pequot. 
Sassacus to Haxall's Landing. 
Respectfully, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

The utmost watchfulness and vigilance must be enjoined upon the 
officers and men assigned to the above duty. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander Quacken- 
lnish,U. S. Navy, for the obstruction of Turkey Creek, James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 11, 1864. 

SIR : You will, as soon as possible after receipt of this, obstruct the 
mouth of Turkey Creek by felling trees across the channel in such a 
manner as to make it difficult, if not impossible, for the enemy to float 
torpedoes out of the creek or attack you by boats. The utmost watch- 
fulness and vigilance must be exercised by the officers and men under 
your command, as there is a large rebel force in your vicinity. 

After the mouth of the creek is well secured, you will report to me the 
manner in which it has been executed. 
Very respectfully, etc. 

[MELANCTON SMITH,] 

Captain and Senior Officer. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pequot, James River. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding measures of precaution 

in the James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

On Picket, Below the Barricade, James River, July 11, 1864. 
SIR: I am instructed by Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, under date of 
10th instant, to acknowledge a telegraphic dispatch from the Depart- 
ment in relation to additional precautions against attacks by torpedoes 
upon the vessels in James River. 



256 NOETH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Orders have been given to obstruct Four Mile Creek and Turkey 
Creek, and steamers are stationed on the river in the vicinity of every 
point known to be occupied by a rebel force. All of these vessels have 
been directed to send out picket boats at night to patrol the river and 
keep up communication with each other. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, IT. 8. Navy, to Commander Spicer, 
U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Cambridge. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 11, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed with the Cambridge to Beaufort and assume command 
of that station during Commander Dove's absence, keeping the Cam- 
bridge in the harbor. 

Eespectfully, yours, 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander W. F. SPICER, 

U. 8. 8. Cambridge. 



Report of Commander Almy, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Connect- 
icut, regarding the chase of a blockade runner, July 11, 1864. 

U. S. S. CONNECTICUT, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 19, 1864. 

SIR: I hereby report that on the llth instant, at 4:30 a. m., while 
cruising in this steamer under my command on the oft'shore Wilming- 
ton blockade, and in latitude 33 20' N., longitude 76 50' W., 70 miles 
S. E. by E. of Cape Fear, N. C., discovered the black smoke and masts 
of a blockade runner steamer to the northward, hull down, and sup- 
posed to be distant 15 miles. Immediately gave chase and got up addi- 
tional steam; discovered that one of our cruisers (supposed to be the 
Keystone State] to the northward and eastward was also in chase of the 
strange steamer, and nearer to her by 6 or 8 miles than the Connecticut; 
both continued in chase. At 6 : 30, perceiving that we were not gain- 
ing upon the chase, and the Keystone State, by her being so much nearer, 
stood a better chance for the capture, gave up the chase and moderated 
steam. Soon after found ourselves in the midst of a quantity of bales 
of cotton floating, turned the steamer to the westward, stood along 
slowly, until we reached the end of it. At 7 : 30 a. m. the Keystone 
State and chase both out of sight; at 8 a. m. lowered the boat and com- 
menced picking up the cotton and getting it on board, which amounted 
to 90 bales, and supposed to be thrown overboard from the vessel 
chased in order to facilitate her escape. 

This cotton I have transshipped from Hampton Koads to Philadel- 
phia in the brig Joseph Baker, James Kickerson, master, consigning it 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 257 

to the TJ. S. prize commissioners there, and placing Acting Ensign 
William M. Swasey, of this steamer, as prize master in charge of it, as 
prize property to be adjudicated by the TJ. S. district court there. I have 
addressed a communication to the judge, giving him full particulars. 

There was no United States or any other vessel in sight when this 
cotton was picked up. I presume, therefore, that the usual share of 
prize money falls to the Connecticut alone. 

A prize list will be transmitted to the Department as soon as prac- 
ticable. 

I have made a report to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee similar in tenor 
to this. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN J. ALMY, 

Commander. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Commander Crosby, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. S. Keystone 
State, regarding the chase of a blockade runner, July 11, 1864. 

U. S. S. KEYSTONE STATE, 

At Sea, August 1, 1864. 

SIR: I beg leave to report that on the llth ultimo, at daylight in the 
morning, in. latitude 33 22' N., and longitude 75 51' W., I sighted a 
blockade runner bearing west of this ship, and distant about 4 miles. 
I immediately gave chase and endeavored to cut her off, as she was 
outward bound from Wilmington, N. C., and standing to the eastward, 
making her course toward Bermuda; at the same time I discovered a 
steamer south of us, resembling the U. S. S. Connecticut following up 
astern, and about 8 miles distant, and in the wake of the blockade 
runner, but without attempting to cut her off. 

The blockade runner, finding herself closely pressed by this ship, and 
almost within range of our guns, immediately commenced throwing 
overboard cotton to lighten the ship in order to escape. I soon found 
that we could not equal her in speed, but considered it my duty to do 
all the damage I could by continuing the chase and forcing her to sur- 
render her cargo and possibly by accident to capture the vessel ; in this 
way I continued the chase until we were hull down astern. 

We were making 12 knots per hour during the chase, and passed a 
large quantity of cotton which she threw overboard during the first 
two or three hours. So soon as she found she could outrun us, she 
hoisted the rebel flag and kept it flying during the time we were in 
sight of her. 

At noon I gave up the chase, finding there being no longer any pros- 
pect of our catching her, and returned to pick up the cotton which she 
had thrown overboard in order to escape from this ship, thinking we 
might get some of it; although it was evident that the steamer, which I 
have since learned was the Connecticut, had stopped to pick up the 
cotton so soon as she got up to where the chase commenced throwing 
it overboard, as we left her very rapidly at that time, which was about 
one hour after we commenced chasing. When we arrived in the vicin- 
ity of where the cotton had been thrown overboard I found that it had 
all disappeared, and as I have learned subsequently was picked up by 
the Connecticut and sent in as a prize to Philadelphia. 

N w R VOL JO 17 



258 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

We passed in plain view of the cotton thrown overboard, and could 
easily have returned and picked it up at the time, but as accident might 
have disabled the blockade runner I deemed it my duty to continue 
the chase and do all the damage possible, and while thus chasing the 
Connecticut stopped and picked up the cotton surrendered to this ship 
and has sent it in as a prize, thus reaping the benefit of the work done 
by this vessel. 

Thinking we would not be allowed to share in the prize, I had con 
eluded on that account not to send in a prize list for a share in the 
cotton picked up by the Connecticut, but as there appears to be some 
dissatisfaction in regard to it by the others interested, I have decided 
to make a claim and send in regular prize lists, and hope that our case 
will be favorably considered. 
I herewith enclose the prize lists. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

PEIRCE CROSBY, 

Commander, U. 8. Navy. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting reports 
regarding the violation of trading permits, and requesting instruc- 
tions. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 11, 1864. 

SIR : Commander Macomb, senior officer in sounds of North Carolina, 
reports under date of 7th instant, that having been informed by the 
Treasury agent at Koanoke Island that R. Overman was trading with 
the rebels at Elizabeth City and supplying the rebel army, he directed 
Lieutenant-Commander Truxtun, U. S. 8. Tacony, to arrest the man 
and seize his goods, and will deliver him with the goods to the mili- 
tary and Treasury authorities at lioanoke Island. Mr. Overman denies 
having dealings with the rebels. Four barrels of whisky were found 
among his stores, however, which renders the whole liable to confis- 
cation. 

Commander Macomb asks if persons are to be allowed to trade with- 
out the military lines; and if so, under what circumstances. There is 
great reason to suppose, he states, that some of these traders are 
engaged in smuggling and otherwise violating their permits. Since the 
Department's order forbidding Mr. Lane to trade with the Philadelphia 
Commander Macomb has stopped all such vessels. 

I enclose his two communications on these subjects, dated 7th instant, 
and request instructions if any are necessary beyond those contained 
in the Treasury Eegulatious, with which I have furnished Commander 
Macomb. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Hear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading 8quadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 259 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Albemarle Sound, July 7, 1864. 

SIR: Having received information from the special agent of the 
Treasury Department at Eoanoke Island that E. Overman was trading 
at Elizabeth City with rebel agents and supplying the rebel army, I 
sent Lieutenaut-Coinmauder Truxtun with the steamer Tacony up the 
Pasquotank Eiver, who, by my orders, arrested Mr. Overman, seized 
his goods, and brought him and them here. 

I shall deliver him over to the military and Treasury authorities at 
Eoanoke Island, together with the seized goods, although he denies 
having sold anything to the rebels. 

Four barrels of wftisky were found among his stores, which will 
render the whole of them liable to confiscation. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Eear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Albemarle Sound, July 7, 1864. 

SIR : I respectfully request to be informed whether persons are to be 
allowed to trade without the military lines in this State; and if so, 
under what circumstances. 

Since the order from the Secretary of the Navy stopping the trading 
of the tug Philadelphia, 1 have thought it iny duty to stop all such 
vessels, as Mr. Lane's (captain of the Philadelphia} permit was signed 
by the President of the United States and several persons in high 
authority, both civil and military. 

Moreover, there is great reason to suppose that some of these men 
are engaged in smuggling and in other ways violating their permits. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Eear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 12, 1864. 

Send Tristram Shandy to Eear- Admiral Lee as she is, without fitting. 
Supply necessary officers from station. 
Thistle to be fitted at navy yard. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Eear- Admiral S. H. STRINGHAM, U. S. Navy, 

Commandant Naval Station, Boston. 



260 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Beaumont, 
U. S. Navy, to proceed icith the U. 8. steamers Machinate, Atlanta, and 
Commodore Barney to Washington, D. C. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 12, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed to Washington with the Mackinaw, Atlanta, and Com- 
modore Barney, aiid 011 arriving there report promptly to the Department. 
The Mackinaw and Barney will tow the Atlanta, if they cau expedite 
her passage. I send the pilot of this vessel to pilot these three vessels 
up, with orders on your arrival at Washington to return immediately 
by first army transport. Provide the Maclcinaic, Atlanta, and Barney 
with Potomac pilots at Washington as soon as practicable. 

I now send you a set of Potomac charts, which are to be returned to 
my flag lieutenant when you are done with them. 

Unless it is smooth in the bay, the Barney had best not join the tow 
until you get into the Potomac. 
Kespectfully, yours, 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockadin;/ 8<inadron. 

Commander J. C. BEAUMONT, 

U. S. S. Mackinaw. 

[Commanding officers of the above vessels ordered to report in person 
to the Navy Department.] 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Down?*, 
U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. R. R. Cuyler, to proceed to the mouth 
of the Potomac River. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Road*, Virginia, July 12, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed without delay to Point Lookout, mouth of Potomac 
River, and report upon arrival there to the Navy Department by tele- 
graph. Unless otherwise directed, will return to Hampton Roads upon 
the arrival at Point Lookout of the frigate Minnesota. 

You will receive herewith a chart of Chesapeake Bay, which you will 
return to me before leaving these waters. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander JOHN DOWNES, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. R. R. Cuyler. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 12, 1864. 

(Received 10:50, July 13.) 

Your telegram of 10th instant to send gunboats received by tug 
from Cherrystone last evening. Atlanta and Mackinaw, immediately 
sent for, have just arrived, and are leaving now with Barney for Wash- 
ington. About noou to-day Morse left Yorktowu for Washington and 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 261 

Vicksbury hence for Annapolis. The promptest possible attention has 
been given to Department's instructions. Delay occasioned by tele- 
graph line from Fort Monroe to Cherrystone being out of order. Your 
telegram of llth instant about Florida's ravages off Cape May received 
after Cherrystone steamer left. I have strong hopes of capturing 
Florida. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acty. Rear-Admiral, Gomdy. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to the commanding officer 
of the U. S. /S. Shokokon to proceed to Yorktoicn, Va. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 12, 1864. 

SIR: The commanding officer of the Shokokon will proceed to York- 
town and report to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Peter Hays, senior 
officer in that vicinity, for duty in York River. 

Keep your vessel underway at night; be watchful and vigilant against 
boat and torpedo attacks. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actff. Rear- Admiral, Comdy. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

COMMANDING OFFICER, 

U. 8. 8. Shokokon. 



[Telegram.] 

WASHINGTON, July 12, 1864 11 a. m. 
The order was one gunboat to Annapolis. 

The Florida lias gone up the coast about 50 miles distant. I hope 
the Shenandoah will catch her. Juniata and Ticonderoga are on this 
line, but if the Shenandoah went off the Delaware capes she has the 
best chance. 

Silver Spring is in the enemy's possession, but not burned yet. 

G. V. Fox, 

Assistant Secretary of the Navy. 
Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding a joint expedition to 
Cox's Wharf, and destruction of seven buildings. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 12, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report that I sent the force detailed from the army, 
with 50 additional men assigned me by General Butler, across Dutch 
Gap to Cox's Wharf for the purpose of destroying the mill and gran- 
aries at that point. 



262 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

They destroyed the mill, blacksmith shop, and seven other buildings. 
Captured 1 lieutenant, 1 sergeant, and 11 men, also a large quantity of 
arms, ammunition, and camp equipment, and 1 galvanic torpedo bat- 
tery. Destroyed all the machinery and burned the grain. 

The expedition was a complete success, and the work accomplished 
without the loss of a man. 
Everything quiet in this vicinity. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Cajrtain and Senior Officer in James Hlr^r. 

Rear- Admiral S. 1*. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding the examination of Mr. 
Aiken, accused of secession proclivities. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

On Picket, Below the Barricade, James River, July 12, 1864. 
SIR : I enclose herewith some evidence given by one of the crew of 
the Minnesota's launch of the secession proclivities of Mr. Aiken. 

Upon the testimony (after confronting the parties) Mr. Aiken was 
sent to General Butler. He was there subjected to a second examina- 
tion, and the proof against him appears to have been ample, as he has 
been sent to Fortress Monroe. 

I have no means of ascertaining whether the party to whom Aiken 
pointed out the road were deserters from the Army or Navy. 

Commander Colhoun reports that three men deserted from his vessel 
on the night of the 10th instant. His report was returned to him that 
a descriptive list might be furnished. 

The Army has two mortars in position at the Crow's Nest, one on the 
upper line of works, and a 100-pounder in battery at the Signal Sta- 
tion. The ranges of the two first have been tried, but the fall of the 
shells could not be seen from my position. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Nichols, U. S. Navy, regarding the obstruction of 

Four Mile Creek. 

U. S. S. MENDOTA, 
James River, July 12, 18CL 

SIR: After cutting trees to obstruct the mouth of Four Mile Creek, 
I placed them in position last evening temporarily, but they unfortu- 
nately sunk. I have now a gang on shore cutting stakes, and propose 
to make a fence across for the present, until a proper boom and chains 
can be procured, in case a more permanent obstruction should be deter- 
mined upon. The creek is about 220 feet across from high water mark, 
and the depth does not exceed 6 feet at high water. At low water it is 
only about a foot. By staking it across and securing branches to the 
stakes, it will be so obstructed that nothing can pass up or down, and 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 263 

being immediately under oar light and that of the camps on shore, no 
removal could be effected without its being known. If convenient, I 
would be pleased to have you look at the place before deciding upon 
anything of a permanent character. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 

Commander. 
Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Officer, James River. 



Letter from Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Major-General Butler, U. 8. 
Army, regarding precautionary measures employed in James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 12, 1864. 

GENERAL: I enclose herewith a copy of a letter* just received from 
Commander Nichols, suggesting that a picket of twenty-five men be 
stationed on Allen's place, Jones' Reach, for reasons already stated in 
his communication, and I would respectfully request that such a detail 
may be made if the necessity in your judgment demands it. 

The Department has telegraphed urging the additional precautions 
against attacks by torpedoes upon the vessels in James River, and I 
have in consequence issued orders for all the armed steamers to send 
out picket boats to patrol the river at night, which makes it necessary 
to withdraw their usual pickets from the shore. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Major-General BENJAMIN F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Detcey, U. S. Nary, 
commanding U. S. S. Agaicam. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 12, 1864. 

SIR: Upon the receipt of this order you will proceed in the Agaicam 
and take up your station at Aiken's Landing. 
Very respectfully, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Lieutenant GEORGE DEWEY, 

Commanding pro ttmpore U. S. S. Agaicam. 



Report of Commander Macomb, U. S. Navy, regarding the removal of 
torpedoes from the mouth of the RoanoJce River. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, July 12, 1864. 

SIR : After the capture of the party in charge of torpedoes at the 
mouth of Roanoke River on the Gth instant, and when several unsuc- 
cessful searches had been made for them, 1 thought it best, to prevent 

* Not found. 



264 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

the torpedoes from falling into the hands of the enemy, to have them 
removed, as the parties attending them are so liable to capture. 
Accordingly, on the 10th instant, I sent Lieutenant-Commander English 
[commanding U. S. S. Wyalusing] to have them taken up, or in case 
this could not be done to explode them. He therefore detailed an armed 
party with a launch mounting a howitzer, in command of Acting Ensign 
Fossett, and the cutters of the Whitehead and Hull, in charge of Acting 
Ensign Barrett, who were to perform the duty. 

They proceeded up the river and attempted to raise the torpedoes by 
the line attaching them to the shore, but this had lain so long under 
water as to become rotten, and parted under the strain. After repeated 
dragging it was found impossible to raise them in that way, and they 
were therefore obliged to explode them. Of the two first attempted one 
trigger wire pulled out with the primers attached, and the other broke 
off; the third one exploded properly. 

This was all of that line of torpedoes. The other line (which explode 
by the contact of passing vessels) were left in their places, they requir- 
ing no attendance. Captain English says that while at Edenton he 
learned that the rebels were constructing another ram, to be ready by 
the first of September, 1864, engines and plating being sent from Wil- 
mington, taken from the ram that was wrecked there. The concussion 
torpedoes referred to above are those at the mouth of the river. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Commander Macomb, U. 8. Navy, regarding a joint expedition 
in Scuppernong River, July 12, 1864. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Albemarle Sound, July 13, 1864. 

SIR : On the 12th instant I sent an expedition, consisting of the Ceres 
and Whitehead, under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Earl 
English, for the purpose of cooperating with a force of about 80 men 
under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Clarke, from Koanoke Island, 
who was under orders from General Palmer to ascend the Scuppernong 
Eiver as far as Columbia and burn the bridge at that place, in order 
to prevent the rebels irom transporting supplies to their army at 
Plymouth. The expedition was successful. 

Much credit is due to Lieutenant-Commander English and the com- 
manders of the Ceres and Whitehead for their prompt and efficient 
manner of performing their duty. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 

[Acting Bear- Admiral LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.] 

P. S. I enclose for your information a copy of my orders to Lieu- 
tenant-Commander English, and his report to me of the result of the 
expedition. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 265 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, July 13, 1864. 

SIR: You will take command of the naval part of the exoedition 
which is to proceed to Columbia, on the Scuppernoug River, for the 
purpose of destroying the bridge at that place and capturing grain 
which is being transported across that river. 

You will cooperate with Lieutenant-Colonel William W. Clarke, who 
goes up with the expedition on the Ella May, in command of the troops, 
protecting his landing and embarkation and otherwise forwarding the 
objects of the expedition. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 

Lieutenant-Commander EARL ENGLISH, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Wyalusing. 



U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Albemarle /Sound, July 13, 1864. 

SIR : In obedience to your order of the 12th, I took command of the 
naval part of the expedition, consisting of the Whitehead and Ceres, 
and accompanied the steamer Ella May, under command of Lieutenant- 
Colonel William W. Clarke, up the Scuppernong River as far as Colum- 
bia, where they landed and effectually destroyed by burning the bridge 
which crosses the river. They likewise disabled the large grist mill at 
that place. 

We did not meet with any resistance. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EARL ENGLISH, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Commanding V. 8. Naval Squadron, Sounds of North Carolina. 



[Telegram.] 

ANNAPOLIS, July 13, 1864 11: 30 p. m. 

I arrived at Annapolis morning of 13th. Communication cut off 
between that point and Washington. The colonel commanding has no 
troops save invalids. 
Please send light- draft ferryboat. Place threatened. 

D. L. BRAINE, 

Lieutenant-Commander, U. 8. Navy. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 13, 1864 12 noon. 

(Received 11:15 p. m., 13th.) 

I leave here now to look after Potomac Division of my squadron. 
Fleet captain remains here. 

S. P. LEE, 

Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



266 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, regarding the obstructing of Turkey 

Creek, James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

James River, Below Barricade, July 13, 1864. 

SIR: Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush reports that he has par- 
tially obstructed Turkey Creek and will make it more secure to-day by 
sinking a large scow in the channel and putting up another line of 
obstructions. He also states that his pickets were attacked on the 
12th instant, but sustained no loss. His shells did fearful execution, 
falling, as he says, in the midst of a force of about 100 men, and saw 
from aloft 7 either killed or wounded borne oft' of the field. One with 
his foot blown oft' was captured, and another killed near him. 

I would respectfully recommend that another vessel be stationed at 
Jones' Reach. The Agawam, which was sent there when General Fos- 
ter's force was threatened, has been ordered to Aiken's Landing to take 
the station of the Mackinaw. 
All quiet here. 

1 send enclosed the report* of Commander Colhoun of three deser- 
tions from that ship. Descriptive lists of the men are annexed. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. PEQUOT, 

Off Turkey Creek, James River, Virginia, July 12, 1864. 
SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to your orders I 
have placed the first line of obstructions across the mouth of Turkey 
Creek. 

The line formed consists of two lines of stakes with logs laid between 
them from the bottom to the surface. 

To-morrow morning I intend sinking a large scow and putting up 
another line of obstructions similar to the one mentioned, which 1 think 
will effectually block up the creek. A detachment of men from the Mor- 
ris, in charge of two officers, assisted in the work. Our pickets were 
attacked. No loss was sustained on our side, and one man killed on 
theirs. One of the officers of the Morris in the affair had his coat cut 
by one of the enemy's balls, but the rent can be covered by shoulder 
strap. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Lieutenan t- Com m an der. 
Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Senior Officer, Commanding in James River, Virginia. 



Instructions from the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, 
U. S. Navy, regarding trading regulations. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 13, 1861. 

SIR: I have received your No. 402,t enclosing communications from 
Comma nder Macomb, senior officer in the sounds, in reference to trade 
without the military lines. 

* Not necessary to publish. t See page 258. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 267 

I know of no authority that transcends the law and regulations on 
this subject. No trading is to be permitted except in strict conformity 
with law, instructions, and trade regulations. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Major- General Butler, U. S. 
Army, transmittingjreport of Lieutenant Chambers, U. S. Army, regard- 
ing expedition to Cox's Wharf. 

U. S. IRONCLAD ONONDAGA, 

James River, July 14, 1864. 

SIR: I herewith enclose a very modest report of Lieutenant Cham- 
bers of his operation in this vicinity on the morning of the 12th instant, 
witli a force assigned to the navy for picket duty, and 50 additional 
men detailed by your order to cooperate. 

It only remains for me to speak of the gallantry displayed by Lieu- 
tenant Chambers and the force under his command, and the good judg- 
ment exercised by him in the accomplishment of the object desired. 

The disposition manifested by him to share the credit of his achieve- 
ments with the subordinates associated with him I also consider very 
creditable. 

I send you herewith a sketch of the captured torpedo. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

[MELANCTON SMITH,] 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Major-General B. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 

[Enclosure.] 

NAVAL PICKET STATION, 3D PA. ARTILLERY, 

James River, July 12, 1864. 

SIR: In accordance with your orders, I have the honor to report that 
I proceeded last evening at 10 o'clock with 70 men of Company G, of 
the Third Pennsylvania Artillery, and 50 men of the Tenth Connecti- 
cut Volunteers, Lieutenants [James H.] Linsley and [Albert F.] Sharp 
in charge of the latter, to a point on James Eiver below Dutch Gap, 
and from thence to Cox's farm and there destroyed the signal station, 
together with two barns, two mills, a blacksmith shop, and outbuild- 
ings and a large quantity of grain and agricultural implements, cap- 
turing 1 lieutenant, 1 sergeant (wounded), and 12 men with arms and 
accouternients complete, with one torpedo, 200 pounds of powder, and 
the galvanic battery. 

The gunboat Stepping Stones, Captain Campbell, carried me to the 
point of lauding and there awaited my return, protecting my rear, 
Acting Ensign Lawrence serving as a guide to the expedition. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. W. CHAMBERS, 
First Lieutenant, Third Pennsylvania Artillery. 

Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Senior Officer in Command, James River Fleet. 



268 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports 

regarding an attack upon United States vessels by Confederate buttery 

near Malvern Hill, July 14, 1864. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 17, l^liL 

SIR: I enclose the report* of Captain Smith, dated loth instant, (I) 
of an attack on the Pequot and Commodore Morris by a rebel battery 
near Malveru Hill, with its enclosures, (2) report of Lieutenant -Com- 
mander Quackenbush, Pequot, and (3) of Acting Master Lee, Commo- 
dore Morris, both dated 15th instant. From the former it appears tbat 
at 1:10 p. in. on the 14th a battery of one gun opened on the Pequot 
from Malvern Hill, the first shot taking off a man's leg and doing some 
injury to the vessel, which was lying to the ebb tide and could not 
return the fire until she had moved up and turned, several shots strik- 
ing in close proximity while this was being done. When in position a 
number of shots were fired by the Pequot without reply, when she 
returned to her anchorage. 

Acting Master Lee reports that a battery of 20-pounder rifles opened 
on the Commodore Morris from the direction of Malvern Hill on the 
14th; he steamed up to within 1,000 yards of the enemy and returned 
the fire with his 100-pounder Parrott; the shell from that failing to 
explode, he turned his vessel round and used his IX-iuch guns; the 
enemy retreated to Malvern Hill, and again opened fire, when the 
Morris moved farther up the river and returned it. 

The enemy ceased firing at 5 p. in. No damage was sustained by the 
Commodore Morris. 

Captain Smith also states that deserters from Hewlett's report that 
a battery of eight guns is being mounted in the clearing to the left. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant French, commanding the Wilderness, 
reports (verbally) that the Mendota yesterday (16th) engaged a battery 
near Deep Bottom, which ranged upon the pontoon bridge, and lost 2 
men killed and wounded. 

The Commodore Morris was also engaged at the same time with a 
battery near Malvern Hill, and received a shell in her magazine, which 
passed through 3 barrels of powder, lodging in the shot locker, without 
exploding. 

The Wilderness was obliged to pass down in the night, the batteries 
being still in position. She brought 2 of the wounded to the Norfolk 
hospital. 

1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, I). C. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. PEQUOT, 

Turkey Bend, James River, July 15, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that at 1: 10 p. in. on the 14th 
instant a battery of one gun on Malvern Hill opened tire on this vessel, 
the first shot taking off a man's leg and doing some injury to the vessel. 
At the time I was unable to return the fire, in consequence of our lying 
to the ebb tide. I was therefore obliged to get underway and move up 
where the channel was sufficiently wide for me to turn round. In the 

* Not necessary to publish. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 269 

meantime several shots were fired at me, all of which struck in close 
proximity. After rounding to, I at once proceeded down to a position 
\vliere my guns could be used effectively. After tiring a number of 
times and eliciting no response, I returned to my anchorage. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Senior Officer Present, Commanding in James River, Virginia. 



U. S. S. COMMODORE MORRIS, 
OffHaxalVs Landing, James River, July 15, 1864. 
SIR: I most respectfully submit the following report: 
At 1 o'clock p. m. yesterday the rebels opened fire on the Commodore 
Morris from the direction of Malveru Hill with a masked battery of 20- 
pouuder rifles. I immediately got underway, steamed up river a quarter 
of a mile to within 1,000 yards of the enemy, and opened fire with the 
100-pounder Parrott rifle. Finding the shell from the rifle did not 
explode, I turned the vessel around and opened on them with shell 
from the IX-inch Dahlgren, firing to where I saw the flash of the 
enemy's guns, and soon drove them from their hiding place. 

They then retreated to Malvern Hill, from which place they opened 
fire on us. I then steamed higher up river, so I could use my 100- 
pounder rifle, which I did, only one shell in six from the rifle exploding. 
I also used the 30 pounder. At f> p. m. the enemy ceased firing. I then 
returned to my anchorage off Haxall's, sustaining no damages. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. G. LEE, 

A cting Master, Commanding. 
Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Senior Officer, James River. 



[Telegram.] 

FORT MONROE, July 14, 1864 9 a. m. 

Minnesota sailed yesterday afternoon; the Montgomery and Emma 
this morning. The vessels with barges in tow left Baltimore yesterday ; 
have not yet arrived. Wind fresh in the bay from eastward. New 
Berne passed up the bay at daylight this morning with 400 seamen for 
fortifications at Baltimore. Bazely and Unit not yet arrived from navy 
yard. 

JOHN S. BARNES, 
Fleet Captain North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Navy Department. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Braine, U. 8. Navy, regarding measures 
for the protection of Annapolis. 

TJ. S. S. VICKSBURG, 
Annapolis, Md., July 14, 1864. 

SIR : Upon my arrival here Wednesday [13th] morning I found all 
on shore awaiting anxiously and fearfully the approach of the rebel 



270 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

forces, who occupy the junctioii. Of course I was welcomed. I find 
the place defended by invalids from the hospital, about 300 in all. 
Everybody fearful of the approach by the way of the Severn River. I 
placed the Vieksburg above the town to occupy a commanding Hanking 
position, and telegraphed you concisely affairs and wants, which tele- 
gram I sent by Mr. Hill, the governor's private secretary; he was to 
send it from Baltimore. Communication with Washington is cut oft'. 
I communicated with Colonel Root, commanding, and find he has a line 
of rifle pits ready, with four guns, which he thinks he can defend 
successfully against a raiding force. 

The steamer Daylight arrived yesterday evening. I stationed her on 
the other side of the town, so now the works erected for the protection 
of the town can be covered by the guns of the two gunboats. I placed 
my light 12 pounder howitzer with crew upon a tug here, and she will 
picket up the creek on the line of the rifle pits. 

I feel assured we can give the rebels a warm reception and protect 
the town. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. L. BRAINE, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Rear Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Braine, U. S. Navy, transmitting report 
of the seizure of small craft in South River. 

U. S. S. VlCKSBURG, 

Annapolis, Md., July 14, 1864. 

SIR: On Wednesday night I sent up the South River and took pos- 
session of some scows used for ferrying across that river, also a schooner 
and a number of boats. This was done to prevent the rebels crossing 
in rear of our line of rifle pits. I enclose the report of Acting Ensign 
F. G. Osborn, the officer commanding. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. L. BRAINE, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. ViCKSurRG, 
Annapolis Harbor, July 14, 1864. 

SIR: I beg leave to respectfully report that in obedience to your 
orders, in the afternoon of the 13th instant, I took charge of the tug- 
bout Grace Titus, manned by an armed crew of ten men, and on which 
was mounted a 12-pounder howitzer, fully supplied with ammunition. 

I proceeded up South River, about 10 miles from its mouth, landed 
with an armed force at Taylors ville, also at a small settlement above, 
and at the lower ferry. I also scoured the shores of the river on both 
banks in a small boat in search of scows and other craft which might 
be used by the enemy in transporting troops. I seized and took in tow 
all such scows, boats, vessels, and other means of transportation which 
I saw, consisting of the following, and which, in obedience to such 
orders, I have brought into this harbor and anchored near this vessel: 

The schooner Well Done, commanded by Levi Wilson, and claimed 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 271 

to be owned by him. She has no cargo on board except a tierce of 
bacon, which the master says belongs to a farmer at Taylorsville. 

I have brought the master and his crew of three men down in the 
schooner. 

Two large scows, or flatboats, also claimed to be owned by Levi Wil- 
son; one old scow, or flatboat, said to be owned by Stephen L. Lee, 
Taylorsville ; three small boats said to belong to his sous ; one large scow, 
or ferryboat, said to belong to John Davis, of the same town ; one scow, 
or ferryboat, and two small boats, said to belong to Samuel Duvall, of 
Taylorsville, and Colonel Walton, of Annapolis. 

I have the pleasure, sir, in being able to report that in obedience to 
your instructions, the expedition was conducted with the utmost qui- 
etude. My precautions in this respect, combined with the lateness of the 
hour, enabled me to perform all my duty and return without the knowl- 
edge of anyone up the river. 

I am much indebted to Acting Assistant Paymaster Theo. E. Smith 
for the able assistance which he rendered me. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. G. OSBORN, 

Acting Ensign. 

Lieutenant-Commander D. L. BRATNE, 

Commanding U. S. S. Vicksburg. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 14, 1864. 

Proceed to Hampton Eoads and report to Acting Kear Admiral Lee. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commander JNO. DOWNES, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. S. R. R. Cuyler, Point Lookout, Md. 



Report of the commandant of the navy yard, Washington, regarding the 

arrival of vessels. 

NAVY YARD, WASHINGTON, July 14, 1864. 

The gunboat Morse arrived at this yard yesterday evening, and the 
Commodore Barney and Mackinaw arrived this morning. 
The monitor [sic] Atlanta is off the arsenal. 

J. B. MONTGOMERY, 

Commandant. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

Immediate.] NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 14, 1864. 

Eeturn to Hampton Eoads. There is no necessity of your presence 
in the Potomac. 
Answer. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary. 
Acting Eear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

On Board Frigate Minnesota, off Point Lookout. 



272 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

POINT LOOKOUT, July 14, 1864. 

(Received 11:35 a. m.) 

Bear- Admiral Lee proceeded up the Potomac last night at 11 : .30 p. m. 
in his flag- steamer Malvern. 

JOHN DOWNES, 

Commander, etc. 
Hon. SECRETARY OF NAVY. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 14, 1864. 

The Department disapproves your leaving your station without orders 
in an emergency like the present. Return to Hampton Eoads without 
anchoring your vessel. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Acting Eear- Admiral S. P. LEE, U. S. Navy, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Washington, D. C. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, justify ing his movement, 
without orders, for the protection of the capital. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Potomac River, Below Washington, July 14, 1804 p.m. 

SIR: Returning on board this afternoon after having reported my 
arrival in person at the Department, I received the Department's tele- 
gram of this date informing me that the Department disapproves my 
leaving my s*tation without orders in an emergency like the present, 
and directing me to return to Hampton Roads without anchoring. 

I am deeply concerned at this censure of the Department and beg 
leave to state the circumstances which appear to excuse my coming to 
assist in the defense of the capital. 

It was known that a large rebel force was in Maryland and before 
Washington; that our forces had been defeated when attempting to 
repel this advance of the enemy; that the important military supplies 
at Baltimore and Annapolis had all been embarked ready for removal 
beyond the reach of the enemy; that the governors of States were try- 
ing to get out the militia for the defense of the national capital; that 
the communications had been cut off by the enemy between Washing- 
ton, Baltimore, and Philadelphia, and that the telegraph was not work- 
ing. The Department's telegram of the 10th instant was not received 
by me at Hampton Roads until 6 p. m. of the llth instant. 

The defenses of Washington, 30 or 40 miles in length, owing to the 
reinforcements sent thence to the Army of the Potomac, were, it was 
understood, to depend upon a small garrison mostly of green troops. 
This defense had been strengthened by a detachment from the Wash- 
ington navy yard, and as represented in the public prints, by a detach- 
ment from the New York navy yard also, sent to man the fortifications 
around Washington. 

1 had just sent a division of this squadron, consisting of four steamers 
with heavy batteries, to Washington, one of which was an ironclad. 

In James River and Hampton Roads all was quiet. Obstructions 
were down in the river and the ironclads and gunboats were watching 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 273 

them and protecting, as for two months past, the communications of the 
army. 

I had done all that was practicable to send cruisers from the roads 
after the Florida ; also to dispatch the blockaders which had come in 
for coal and repairs to their stations off Wilmington. 

I respectfully submit that the emergency appeared to be not there, 
but here at the national capital. I did not know until my arrival here 
that large reinforcements had come opportunely from New Orleans, 
owing to the fortuitous circumstance that the orders for their leaving 
found them already embarked for an operation in another direction. 

Under these circumstances, but for the disapprobation expressed by 
the Department, I should have always felt that I had acted well in the 
matter. >/* 

The Malvern is now underway for Hampton Roads, where the other 
vessels from the squadron under my command are returning. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Report of the commandant of the navy yard, Washington, regarding the 
departure of vessels from that station. 

NAVY YARD, WASHINGTON, July 15, 1864. 

The gunboat Morse left the yard at 3 : 15 p. m., and the Commodore 
Barney at 3 : 25 p. m. yesterday. 
The Atlanta also left the arsenal point at 4 p. m. yesterday. 

J. B. MONTGOMERY, 

Commandant. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

OFFICE ANNAPOLIS TELEGRAPH Co., July 15, 1864. 
Return with the Vicksburg to Hampton Roads, Virginia. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Lieutenant-Commander I). L. BRAINE, 

U. S. S. Vicksburg, Annapolis, Md. 



[Telegram.] 

ANNAPOLIS, July 15, 1864 9:35 a. m. 

Dispatch received. I sail to-night, leaving the U. IS. S. Daylight 
here. 

D. L. BRAINE, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Hon. G. WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

N w R VOL 10 18 



274 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Lieutenant-Commander Barnes, U. S. Navy, regarding naval 
affairs at Hampton Roads and vicinity. 

U. S. S. EOANOKE, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 15, 1864. 

MY DEAR ADMIRAL: The Cuyler arrived this morning from Point 
Lookout, and reports all quiet there. The Minnesota arrived there yes- 
terday p. in. Downes says she draws too much water to be of any great 
assistance. The Monticello and Mount Vernon arrived at 8 o'clock this 
morning. Captain Adams's report* is in your dispatches forwarded by 
Mr. Cooper. They saw and heard nothing of the Florida, but passed 
two burning wrecks Sunday night. They are now coaling and will be 
ready to morrow to start out again in compliance with your directions. 
The Fort Jackson also arrived this morning. Captain Sands reports 
that he captured the British blockade runner Boston, inward bound, 
and that the Gettysburg captured the Little Ada some days since. 

I fear that the Mount Washington is having a bad time of it. The 
weather ever since she started from Baltimore has been very boisterous 
with a heavy sea in the bay. 

The Tritonia arrived this morning and reports that the Mount Wash- 
ington left before her with the six barges in tow, but that she was not 
seen by her. One of the barges, very old and rotten, tilled and went 
down. Captain Wiggin cut her adrift, and with difficulty arrived here 
with the others; one of them is in a sinking condition. I got her in 
the "Hole "and sent a large party to pump her out, but the water 
gained upon them and they had just time to get her ashore, where she 
now is. We will try to fix her up, so that when the wind goes down 
she can be sent up. The other two will go up this evening to Captain 
Smith. 

The Unit will leave at 2 o'clock for Washington, following an army 
tug to Point Lookout, where I have directed her to follow any army 
transport bound to Washington. 

The Bazely twisted her rudderhead off just as she was starting. 
Commodore Livingston writes that he hopes to have her ready 
to-morrow; none of the other tugs have come from the yard, except the 
Rose, which, under your previous orders, awaits favorable weather to 
go to sea to join Admiral Farragut. The tug Juniper arrived just now 
from New York, bound to Washington. Through the abominable care- 
lessness of her engineers, she this morning, off the light-boat, had her 
cylinder head smashed, and she is now being surveyed by Mr. Fithian. 
The Poppy has broken down completely, and we have now no tug here 
in a serviceable condition, except the Rose, which, as she has just been 
put in a condition for her long voyage, I am loath to use. Can we not 
keep the Bazely when she comes down? If I do not hear from you, 
however, I will send her to you as you have directed. 

Captain Sands is coaling and will go to the yard for his guns. I do 
not know that they will be of much use to him unless his crew can be 
increased; he reports 30 men short of his reduced complement for the 
guns now mounted. You know how short we are. Can not the 400 
men sent to Baltimore be sent here for distribution when the rebel 
raid is over"? 

Commodore Livingston writes that there are fears expressed in 
Norfolk that Fitzhugh Lee is about to make a raid there and asks for 
double enders and ferryboats. We have nothing to send him. The 
State of Georgia is there, and he can tow her to a position to flank the 

* S-e Series I, vol. 3, p. 106. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 275 

yard. The Santiago de Cuba is also there under orders from you. 
There seems to be no ground for apprehensions, save vague rumors. 
Captain Trathen, of the Mount Vernon, has returned. Captain 
[Lieutenant-Commander] Adams is very ill and will probably go to 
the hospital. I have advised Captain Gansevoort to direct Tratheu 
to retain his command. There is no news from up the river. The 
Wilderness went up this morning with two colliers. We shall want 
coal soon. Captain Adams will be telegraphed to day. There is a 
good supply up the river, but here the supply is short. These large 
vessels take so much that a different supply will be needed if they all 
come here for supplies after active cruising. Some arrangement must 
be made to supply Point Lookout and Annapolis if we keep vessels 
there. 

The prisoners captured in the Boston are being examined in accord- 
ance with the orders of the Department. Some are citizens of the 
United States, and others habitual blockade violators. They will be 
released or detained in accordance with rules of the Department. Cap 
tain Sands thinks some of them are the M organ raiders, as the Boston 
came from Quebec. The Fort Jackson will be ready in four or five 
days, but before that time I earnestly h6pe you will have returned. 
We hear that the raiders have departed with their plunder and that 
Silver Spring was spared, upon which I sincerely congratulate you. 
The accumulation of dispatches here and the uncertainty of your 
precise whereabouts or intentions have caused us to dispatch Mr. 
Cooper with your papers, to go on board the Malvern anywhere in the 
river. I have telegraphed you twice yesterday and once to-day the 
main points of the situation here. 

The Cuyler is here, ready for any emergency. 

Hoping soon to see you, I am, admiral, very truly and respectfully, 
yours, 

JOHN S. BARNES, 

Fleet Captain.. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Washington, D G. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 15, 1864 4 p. m. 

Can not the 400 seamen sent to Baltimore by the New Berne be 
transferred to this squadron when their services are no longer needed 
there? They are urgently needed here, many vessels having but half 
their complement and being unable to man their batteries. 

S. P. LEE, 

Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Nickels, U. S. Navy, commanding 
U. S. 8. Cherokee, regarding the striking of that vessel upon a wreck. 

U. S. S. CHEROKEE, July 15, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report that on the night of the 13th, at 10: 50 o'clock 
we struck what we supposed to be the wreck of the Feterhoff, the Mound 
light bearing by compass N. i W., and Bald Head light S. W. 3 w. 



276 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The shock was sufficiently severe to awaken most on board, but we 
do not know of any damages. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. NICKELS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Comdg. U. 8. 8. Cherokee. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE. 

[Endorsement.] 

Will instruct captain to send Cherokee to be docked at Norfolk if 
any disability is discovered making this proper. 

S. P. LEE. 



Report of Commander Nichols, U. 8. Navy, regarding an engagement with 
Confederate battery below Four Mile Creek. 

U. S. S. MENDOTA, 
James River, July 16, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report that about 7 o'clock this morning a rebel bat- 
tery opened tire on this vessel and General Foster's camp. The ship 
moored head and stern, I could bring but one gun to bear. Slipped 
and dropped down, opening fire with all the guns as they would bear. 
The rebels have not fired now for over an hour; whether driven oft' by 
our guns or not I can not say. The battery is located in the edge of 
the wood, below Four Mile Creek, in a very commanding position. I 
regret having to report the following casualties from the bursting of a 
rebel 20-pounder shell, which came through the bulwarks among the 
crew of No. 1 gun: Four men severely wounded (one since dead, and 
two others doubtful); two men and one officer slightly wounded. I 
have directed the captain of the Wilderness not to pass down until 
night, and I shall detain the Hydrangea below the bridge, sending 
anything she may have for you across the point to my tug. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy. 
Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Comdg. U. 8. 8. Onondaga, Senior Officer, James River. 

Litt of casualties on board U. S. S. Mendota by shell from rebel battery, July 16, 1864. 

Thomas Kennedy, landsman; dangerously; since dead. 
William F. Pottle, ordinary seaman ; dangerously in leg and groin ; 
can not recover. 

Charles W. Taylor, quarter gunner; dangerously in head; doubtful. 
Hugh Walsh, landsman; severely in leg; doing well. 
Patrick Flaherty, landsman; slightly in finger and leg; doing well. 
Otto Eichberg, landsman; slightly in chest; doing well. 
Acting Master's Mate McDonald; slightly in leg; on duty. 
Very respectfully, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 

Commander. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 277 

Report of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, transmitting report of engagement 
with Confederate battery on Malvern Hill, July 16, 1864. 

TL S. IRONCLAD ONONDAGA, 

On Picket below Barricade, James River, July 16, 1864. 
SIR : I have the honor to enclose a report* from Commander Nichols, 
of the Mendota, stationed oft' Four Mile Creek, m relation to the tem- 
porary interruption of the navigation on the river, with accompanying 
list of casualties on board that vessel. 

1 have ordered the Agawam from Aiken's Lauding to assist in dis- 
lodging the enemy, and have restricted all communicatiou about that 
point by unarmed vessels until nightfall. 

The Pequot was fired upon yesterday from a one-gun battery, 20- 
pounder Sawyer, near Malvern Hill, the shell striking her, mortally 
wounding one man and doing some slight damage to the vessel. 

I enclose herewith a communication from Lieutenant-Commander 
Quackeubush, giving the particulars of an engagement with the ene- 
my's battery at Malvern Hill to day. 

General Butler telegraphed this afternoon that the communication 
for Mr. Mallory, at Richmond, has been sent and that his flag of truce 
has not yet returned. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 

Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. PEQUOT, 
James River, Virginia, July 16, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to inform you that at 9 : 25 a. m. to-day the 
battery of one gun on Malvern Hill opened fire on this vessel. 

I at once got underway and proceeded down the river to a position 
abreast of the battery and fired at it with all the effective guns on port 
side. Although our firing, as well as that of the Commodore Morris, 
was remarkably good, our shells falling and exploding at and about the 
battery, yet the means which the enemy had of safely secreting them- 
selves rendered our firing abortive. 

Two of their shot struck this vessel; one carrying away an iron 
stanchion on the forecastle and the other splintering the maintopmast. 

One shot or shell passed through the magazine of the Commodore 
Morris in close proximity to two men therein engaged, splintering two 
barrels containing powder without causing further injury. At 3 p. m. 
1 returned to a position some 400 yards above my usual anchorage, find- 
ing it useless to expend more ammunition without obtaining a satisfac- 
tory result. I enclose herewith an account of the ammunition used 
during the time I was engaged in endeavoring to silence the battery 
previously mentioned. 

Since writing the above, another gun has been placed in position on 
Malvern Hill, and I have also discovered another mark of the enemy's 
shot on the foregaff. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Lieutenant Commander, U. 8. Navy. 
Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Senior Officer Present, Comdg. U. S. Naval Fleet in James River. 

* See preceding. 



278 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



TJ. S. S. COMMODORE MORRIS, 

Off HaxalTf Landing, July 18, 1864. 
SIR: I most respectfully submit the following report: 
At 10 o'clock a. in. OH Saturday, July 16, in compliance with a signal 
from the TJ. S. gunboat Pequot, I lifted my anchor and steamed up river to 
the Pequoi, which was then being fired on by the enemy with a 12-pouuder 
Whitworth rifle from the top of Malvern Hill. They also fired on the 
Morris on the way up river, the shot going over and beyond. I imme- 
diately opened fire on the enemy with shell from IX-inch Dahlgreu gun, 
and 100-pouuder Parrott rifle, also 30-pounder rifle, with a range of 200 
yards, the enemy having greatly the advantage, as he would fire and 
then change his position. At 1 o'clock p. m. I was running short of 
ammunition. I was advised by Commander Quackeubush to go down 
to the TJ. S. S. Sassacus and borrow some ammunition, which I did. After 
which I returned to my station. In the engagement the Morris was 
struck once by a 12-pound rifle shot; the shot entered the side 1 foot 
above the water line, passed through the sail room, tearingup the scuttle 
and coamings of the after magazine, passed through 2 barrels powder 
and lodged in the magazine passage. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. G. LEE, 

Acting Master, Commanding. 
Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Senior Officer, James River. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Commander Nichols, U. S. Navy, 
for the temporary restriction of navigation in the James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 16, 1864. 

SIR: You will allow no vessels to pass up or down until after dark 
until it has been ascertained that the enemy have been removed or dis 
lodged. If you get sight of the enemy again you will of course open 
fire upon them and endeavor to disperse them. I regret that I have 
not another steamer to send to assist you. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

M. SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Commander E. T. NICHOLS, 

Commanding U. S. S. Mendota. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Deicey, U. S. Navy, io 
proceed to Four Mile Creek for the purpose of dislodging the enemy. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 16, 1864. 

^ SIR: You will immediately proceed with the Agawam to Four Mile 
Creek and report to Commander Nichols for the purpose of assisting 
him in dislodging the enemy, who have a battery in position near the 
edge of the woods in that vicinity. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 279 

You will return to your station after it becomes dark and take up 
your position as before in the morning. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Lieutenant GEORGE DEWEY, 

Commanding pro tempore U. 8. 8. Agaicam. 



Report of Captain Sands, U. S. Navy, regarding the disposition of cotton 

picked up at sea. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 
Off Craney Island, Virginia, July 16, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report to you that on the 30th of June and 
on the 7th of July, 1864, I found adrift upon the ocean a quantity of 
cotton, loose and in bales, which was picked up by this vessel under 
my command, amounting to 4 bales, 3 large bags, 143 smaller bags, 
and 6 small bags of damaged cotton, which I have brought into port 
and sent to the judge of the United States district court at Philadel- 
phia for adjudication. 

I have the honor to be, respectfully, etc., your obedient servant, 

B. F. SANDS, 
Captain, U. S. Navy. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington City, D. C. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Devens, U. S. Navy, regarding 

cotton picked up at sea. 

U. S. S. ARIES, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 16, 1864. 

SIR: I would respectfully report that on my passage up I picked up 
82 bales of cotton in latitude 34 10' N., longitude 76 25' W., on the 
13th and 14th day of July. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EDWARD F. DEVENS, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant. 

Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, regarding telegraphic 

communication. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, July 17, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose a note* received yesterday from the manager of the 
military telegraph line at Fortress Monroe, which will explain the 

* Not found. 



280 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

delay in the receipt of the dispatches referred to, and the uncertainty 
of telegraphic communication by this line, the originals having been 
lost overboard from the tug at Cherrystone; copies were sent at 8:30 
a. m. yesterday (16th). Two of the dispatches were addressed to the 
Department, dated 2:30 and 4 p. m. of 15th. Mr. Sheldon informs me 
that the tug for Cherrystone leaves Fortress Monroe with dispatches at 
the following hours: 2, 8, and 11 a. m. and 2 and 10 p. m. 
Telegrams are also sent by the regular Baltimore mail boat at 5 p. m. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June [July] 17, 1864. 
Proceed immediately with the U. S. 8. Mackinaw to Hampton Koads. 

G. V. Fox, 

[Acting] Secretary of Navy. 
Commander J. C. BEAUMONT, 

Commanding U. S. S. Mackinaw, Navy Yard, Washington. 



Instructions of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Quackenbush, U. S. Navy, regarding operations in the James River. 

U. S. 8. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 17, 1864. 

Snt: You will return to your former anchorage, as it appears to be 
a better position than the one you now occupy. Open fire upon any 
point where you consider they are erecting batteries, and shell any 
building calculated to screen an enemy. If the mouth of the creek 
above you can be obstructed, it had better be done immediately. Prvt- 
ceed to City Point and fill up your ammunition and return to your 
station without delay. Direct the Commodore Morris to get underway 
and patrol the river from her station to a short distance above yours. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
jtain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pequot. 



Report of Commander Almy, U. 8. Navy, regarding the cruise of the 

U. S. S. Connecticut. 

U. S. S. CONNECTICUT, 
Hampton Roads, July 17, 1864. 

SIR: Herewith I transmit the abstract log* of this steamer under 
my command, during the late oftshore cruise from June 25 to July 17 
instant. 

* Omitted as not necessary to publish. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 281 

It will be seen that upon this cruise the Connecticut has chased three 
different blockade runners, viz, June 28, July 6, and July 11, but they 
were all unsuccessful, as they proved to be too fast for the Connecticut. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN J. ALMY, 

Commander. 
Hear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

"HAMPTON ROADS, July 17, 18649:15 p. m. 

(Received 6 a. m., 18th.) 

Connecticut arrived this afternoon. Her battery is eight guns of VIII- 
inch, one 100-pounder and two 30-pounder Parrotts. 

Shall she now be sent to New York for repairs as directed by Depart- 
ment on 1st instant? 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 

[Endorsement.] 

Cruise ten to fifteen days for the Florida from Chesapeake to the 
northeast, then go into Boston for final repairs. 

[W.J 
Commander J. J. ALMY, 

U. S. S. Connecticut. 



[Telegram.] 

WASHINGTON, July 18, 1864 10 p. m. 

It is stated by refugees to the senior military officer at Point Lookout 
that Lieutenant Wood and 800 men have left Richmond for Wilmington 
to take two armed vessels and attempt the release of their prisoners at 
Point Lookout. The naval force at that point is sufficient to defeat any 
such attempt, but the mouth of the Chesapeake should be guarded night 
and day for the present by tugs, with the Fort Jackson within signal 
distance, and if you deem it advisable you can increase her battery. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Letter from Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Brigadier- General Graham, U. S. 
Army, regarding the strengthening of picket guard at Cox's farm. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 18, 1864. 

GENERAL: I herewith enclose a communication* from Captain J. W. 
Sanderson in relation to the effective force available for picket duty at 

* Not found. 



282 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

this place; and as it is very desirable to strengthen the picket guard at 
Cox's farm in close proximity to the small wooden gunboats, tugs, and 
coal vessels, I would respectfully urge that an additional force may be 
sent him if they can be spared from the naval brigade. 

Lieutenant Chambers, the bearer, will explain more fully the necessity 
for this detail. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Brigadier-General CHARLES K. GRAHAM, 

Commanding Naval Brigade. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant Dewey, U. S. Navy, 

regarding a search for torpedoes placed by the Confederates in James 

River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 18, 1864. 

SIR: I have just received information that torpedoes have been 
placed in the James Biver one in the Swash and one in the main 
channel of Harrison's Bar, and one in the vicinity of Wilcox's Wharf. 

You will proceed to the point designated in the Agairam and make 
thorough search for them, communicating with Acting Master [It. G.j 
Lee, of the Commodore Morris, on your way down, and ascertain if any 
measures have been taken by him to ascertain their locality. If proper 
measures have been inaugurated for raising them, which shall, from 
the information, appear to be satisfactory, you will return to your day 
station and proceed to Aiken's Landing to-night. 

It is thought that you can place the Agaicam in a position to protect 
your boats while dragging, and it is presumed that a sufficient army 
force can be procured at City Point to laud and search for the torpedo 
connections. I send you below a memorandum this moment received 
from refugees. Benjamin Koach, who resides at Charles City Court- 
House, states that on the 15th two 6-horse wagons, loaded with three 
torpedoes about the size of a hogshead, fitted with wires for explosion, 
and two pontoon boats for placing them, went past his house to place 
their torpedoes on Harrison's Bar. 

On the 16th Delaware Clark, private, of Charles City Cavalry, told 
his sister one had been planted in the Swash and one in the main 
channel on Harrison's Bar. 

Also understands that a party went down to plant torpedoes in the 
channel at Wilcox's Landing or Wharf. 

I send Benjamin Roach to you, who thinks that he can point out to 
you the position of the torpedoes and the locality of the operations. 

I will have your awnings surveyed as soon as you return to Dutch Gap. 
Very respectfully, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Lieutenant GEORGE DEWEY, 

Commanding U. S. S. Agawam. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 283 

Report of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, regarding Confederate operations 

in the James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
On Picket, Below Barricade, James River, July 18, 1864. 

SIR: Major-General Butler sent last night at 12 o'clock to inform me 
that there was a probability of a combined attack from the enemy on 
the river, but without communicating from which direction it might be 
looked for, or any other particulars. 

The necessary steps were taken to prevent our vessels from being 
surprised, -and the ironclads were ready for any service where they 
might be wanted. This morning at 4 o'clock rapid firing from musketry 
was heard in the vicinity of Hewlett's, but the occasion of it has not 
transpired. 

Two refugees sent up this morning from the Commodore Morris report 
that at Malvern Hill are Hampton's Legion and Gary's Mounted 
Infantry, say from 3,000 to 4,000 men, guarding that point, and to do 
what damage they can to the gunboats. That a battery of light artil- 
lery, 12 pieces, moves up and down the river firing upon the gunboats, 
and is the same that fired upon the Pequot&nd Mendota. Also that on the 
15th two six-horse wagons passed, having two torpedoes, 1,000 pounds 
of powder each, fitted with electric wires and battery, and two pontoon 
boats for planting them, in charge of J. U. Parker, of the Navy, and 
that on the 16th his sister was told by a private of the Charles City 
Cavalry they had been placed, one on the Swash and one in the main 
channel at Harrison's Bar, and say that Lee has gone from the south 
side, leaving Longstreet and Beauregard there, and that a force has 
gone with him, some think into the valley and others to assist John- 
ston in Georgia. The above particulars have been communicated to 
General Butler. 

I have sent the Agaicam to make a search for the torpedoes, and the 
party giving the information, who thinks he can point out their position 
and the locality of the operators, also goes in the Agaicam. 

The movement of the rebel force from Cox's farm to Malvern Hill 
and the report that a battery has been placed at Wilcox's Wharf, taken 
in connection with the torpedo party, would seem to explain the com- 
bined attack referred to by Major General Butler. 

General Butler informs me, in answer to information I communicated 
this morning, that Captain [Amaya L.j Fitch, of the armed transport 
Reno, captured 12 torpedoes yesterday, which were all that could be 
found at Harrison's Bar. He requests, however, that I will send down 
and drag in that vicinity. The Agawam was sent this morning for that 
purpose. 

The Mount Washington has arrived with five canal boats for the 
obstructions, but without suitable anchors or chains, but I maybe able 
to procure them from the ordnance vessel at City Point. 

Will more vessels be purchased to supply the places of the eight lost 
on their passage here? Or shall I arrange these without reference to 
the number first proposed? 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANOTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 

Acting Eear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



284 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Bear -Admiral Lee, U. 8. 

Navy, expressing disapproval of Ms movement, without orders, to Wash- 
ington, I). C. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 19, 1864. 

SIR : I have your dispatch of July 14, No. 416, stating the reasons 
which induced you to leave your station and proceed to Washington, 
not only without permission, but contrary to the telegraphic order of 
the Department of July 10, directing you to remain at Hampton Roads. 

Your reasons for the course pursued are not satisfactory. Washing- 
ton was menaced, possibly in some danger, but the principal object of 
the rebels was undoubtedly to create a panic, and by withdrawing our 
forces or a portion of them, to raise the siege of Petersburg. Lieu tenant- 
General Grant seems to have understood the object and was immov- 
able, but the naval commander, yielding to the panic that was created, 
and listening to the exaggerated and groundless rumors that were put 
afloat, left his station and proceeded to the capital, where neither him- 
self nor his dispatch vessel could be of any service under any circum- 
stance, while his absence from his post in a great emergency might 
have compromised the action and efficiency of the squadron intrusted 
to him and brought disaster upon the country. 

There was telegraphic communication to Point Lookout, and thence 
to Hampton Roads is but some hours. The wishes of the Department 
had been explicitly expressed, and those should have governed you 
rather than the sensational rumors and exaggerated statements that 
were put in circulation, many of them for mischievous purposes, and 
with a design of inducing our officers to leave their posts and withdraw 
our forces. When you reached Point Lookout you were in instant com- 
munication with the Department, but without an enquiry by telegraph 
you hastened on to Washington. 

Your course in this matter is not approved. Fortunately no immedi- 
ate bad results, other than the example, have followed. To stand firm 
in such an exigency is important, and I regret that the rebels, or the 
rumors, should have moved you at such a time or led you to leave your 
post. 

The blockade just now requires your vigilant attention, and you will, 
as early as you deem your presence can be spared from the roads, visit 
Wilmington and the different points under your command. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



[Telegram.] 

HAMPTON ROADS, July 19, 1864 4 p. m. 

(Received 6:50 a. m., 20th.) 

Telegram received. Santiago de Cuba, Monticello, and Cohasset sent 
to mouth of Chesapeake Bay until Fort Jackson is repaired. 

y. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 285 

[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, July 19, 1864 p. m. 

At least 2,000 men are needed to fill the complements of the vessels of 
this squadron. Many of them are lamentably short of their complement. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, regarding matters per- 
taining to the general interests of his command. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 19, 1864. 

SIR: I transmit enclosed (1) a copy of my instructions of July 18, to 
Captain O. S. Glisson, assigning him to duty as divisional officer for the 
blockade of New Inlet entrance, etc., accompanied by (2) a list of ves- 
sels assigned to the division. 1 issued a similar order of the same date 
to Captain B. F. Sands, and enclose (3) a list of the vessels assigned to 
his division. 

Both officers are now here. Captain Glisson will leave as soon as the 
gale is over. A scarcity of coal and light nights and the new arrange- 
ments which I have been making under the recent prize law, and the 
Department's order of 2d instant for promoting the efficiency of the 
blockade, and the present gale of wind have caused and will cause a 
few days necessary and proper detention of the Santiago de Cuba and 
some others of the blockaders. The Fort Jackson is coaling and is 
detained under the Department's order, but, as Captain Sands is divi- 
sional officer, I respectfully suggest that the Department allow the Fort 
Jackson to be dispatched when ready for sea. 

I regret to say that neither the Santiago de Cuba nor the Fort Jackson 
can pass the bar at Beaufort for coal and other supplies. It is very 
desirable that the divisional officers should either be immediately off 
the bars at Wilmington, or not longer and further absent than to take 
in the supplies at Beaufort, which is the depot for supplying the block- 
aders off Wilmington, except the few whose draft does not permit them 
to cross the bar there. 

As the army had sunk obstructions (on June 15) in the James Eiver, 
and was detained besieging Petersburg, there seemed no probability of 
an early movement toward Richmond. 

I therefore, on June 21, recalled Captain Smith from the sounds to 
resume his command on board the Onondaga. 

On his arrival I left him in charge of the James Eiver division, and 
came down the river to look after squadron matters in this vicinity, 
and especially in connection with the blockade of Wilmington. There 
was then quite a number of outside blockaders and others vessels of 
the squadron here for supplies or repairs or both, and others expected 
for similar purposes. The recent raids, especially that of the Florida 
on the coast, of which I had notice on the 10th instant, caused some 
unavoidable delay in dispatching the blockaders to their stations, as 
some of them were sent in pursuit of the Florida. 

The recent arrival of Captains Glisson and Sands, senior officers on 
outside blockade duty, the instructions of the Department of the 2d 



286 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

and 10th iustant, and the receipt of the recent prize law have induced 
and enabled me to make the arrangements shown by the enclosed 
orders, to promote the efficiency of the blockade of Wilmington which 
has become somewhat impaired during my protracted occupation in 
James River, in part by the want of permanent senior officers oft' the bars, 
and especially in view of the fact that the rebel Government, which 
has taken charge of the blockade-running interest, has established 
lights to the two entrances to Wilmington and encouraged or procured 
the use of a number of very superior steamers for the purpose of run- 
ning the blockade. In a few days most of tbe blockaders now here 
may be profitably dispatched to their stations. I anticipate good 
1 results from the recent arrangements, but it would be much better if 
the division officers had commands which could enter Beaufort, as their 
occasional presence there would doubtless give dispatch to the supply 
and temporary repairing of their vessels at that point. My earnest 
attention during my detention here, required by the Department's dis- 
patch of the 10th iustant, has better and sooner promoted the efficiency 
of the blockade than if I had gone direct from James River to that 
point. 

I respectfully propose, unless otherwise instructed by the Depart- 
ment, when the blockaders shall have left to return up James River, 
look at the situation there and confer with General Grant, when I shall 
know whether my presence is most needed there or off Wilmington, 
and act accordingly. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral. Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosures.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 18, 1864. 

SIR: You are hereby assigned to the command of the division of this 
squadron detailed for the duty of blockading New Inlet entrance of 
Cape Fear River and the adjacent inlets to the northward, composed of 
the enclosed list of vessels, viz (A). 

Use every effort to make this part of the blockade as effective as possible 
with the means at your command, guided by the squadron instructions 
when not inconsistent with this order. 

The main object is to keep a close and effective blockade of New Inlet, 
which will require your immediate and personal supervision when not 
necessarily absent for supplies. For the purpose of capturing such 
blockade runners as may have eluded the inner blockading line, or who 
may be approaching the coast for the purpose of violating it, you are 
authorized to station not exceeding two-fifths of the number of the 
vessels which are now or may hereafter be assigned to this division to 
cruise .offshore on an outer line of blockade included between a line 
drawn from Cape Fear, touching Cape Lookout Shoals, and a southeast- 
by-south line bearing from Cape Fear at such a distance as will inter- 
cept the run of a fast steamer coming out of the inlet at half flood tide, 
making 12 or 13 knots an hour till daylight. The arc between the 
above lines of bearing is to be divided equally between the number of 
vessels assigned to this duty. 

The necessary distance from New Inlet depends on the interval of 
time between half flood tide on the bar and daylight, multiplied by the 
speed of the vessel running out. It is, therefore, a variable distance, 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 287 

which should be shown on an accurate table for each night, calculated 
for a mouth in advance. The table* should show the time of high water 
on the bar, the rising and setting of the sun, and the rising or setting 
of the moon at night. Each outside cruising block ader should be kept 
in good trim for chasing, and when chasing, officers and men are not 
to crowd forward. 

Be particular that no unnecessary chasing is done, and no unneces- 
sary expenditure of fuel made. Try so to arrange the expenditure of 
fuel that the coaling may be done in the lightest time of the moon, and 
that the blockade may be in its fullest strength during the dark nights. 

Each vessel must carry her complement of ammunition, but the other 
supplies may be judiciously diminished so as not [to] impair her speed 
unnecessarily. 

Prepare duplicate prize lists in case of capture, giving the name and 
official designation of the officer commanding the squadron, the fleet 
captain, and the senior officer commanding the division to which the 
vessel is attached, sending the original in your report to the Depart- 
ment and the duplicate in your report to me. 

.Report particulars of the capture, destruction, or escape of each 
blockade runner chased, and send me a semimonthly abstract of the log 
of each blockader, which should be intelligently and neatly kept. 

The number of vessels on the immediate blockade of the bar neces- 
sary for an effective blockade must always be kept in preference to 
outside cruising. 

Much of the efficiency of the blockade will depend on the zeal and 
attention of the divisional officer, and the Navy Department requires 
that this important part of the blockade should be most faithfully kept. 
Very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain O. S. GLISSON, 

U. S. S. Santiago de Cuba, Divisional Officer off New Inlet, N. C. 

A. Blockaders of Neio Inlet Division. 

Santiago de Cuba. Governor Buckingham. Howquah. 

State of Georgia. Mercedita. Britannia. 

Keystone State. Kansas. Victoria. 

Quaker City. Alabama. Gettysburg. 

Grand Gulf. Niphon. Daylight. 
Monticello. 

Slockaders of Western Bar Division. 

Fort Jackson. Vicksburg. Banshee. 

Florida. Cambridge. Fort Donelson. 

E. E. Cuyler. Emma. Violet. 

Calypso. Maratanza. Aries. 

Nereus. Montgomery. Cherokee. 
Mount Vernon. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Sands, U. S. 
Navy, enjoining vigilance against possible attack of raiders under 
Lieutenant Wood, C. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 19, 1864. 

SIR: The Department and the commanding officer of the Minnesota 
advise me to-day by telegraph, dated 18th instant, that refugees report 



288 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

that Lieutenant Wood, of the rebel Navy, left Richmond for Wilming- 
ton on the 7th or 8th instant with 800 sailors to man two armed blockade 
runners and attempt the release of the prisoners at Point Lookout. 

It may be that these raiders will make an attack on the blockading 
vessels off Wilmington, and great vigilance is therefore necessary. 
Respectfully, yours, 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear -Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain B. F. SANDS, 

U. 8. 8. Fort Jackson, Divisional Officer off Western Bar. 

P. S. The Violet is torpedo- fitted, and leaves in the morning, accom- 
panied by the Mount Vernon, for Western Bar. See the orders to the 
commanding officer of the Violet and the enclosed printed directions* 
about torpedoes, of which he has a copy. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Ensign 8toth- 
ard, U. 8. Navy, for the transportation of a torpedo to the Western 
Bar Inlet. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 19, 1864. 

SIR : Apply to Commander Lynch for a torpedo and necessary fuzes, 
and when obtained proceed in company with the Mount Vernon to the 
blockade off Western Bar and report to the senior officer there present 
for duty. 

The enclosed copy of confidential instructions shows the great care 
necessary in handling the torpedo and its fuzes. It is not to be shipped 
until you have occasion to use it, which will be only on a rebel ironclad 
or other men-of-war making an attack on the blockade. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Ensign THOS. STOTHARD, 

Commanding U. 8. Tug Violet. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Trathen, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Mount Vernon, 
to proceed to blockade duty off Wilmington, N. C. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 19, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed with the Mount Vernon under your command, in com- 
pany with the Violet (under moderate steam to economize fuel), to 
Western Bar, off Wilmington, and report to the senior officer there pres- 
ent for duty on the blockade of the bar. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, JAS. TRATHEN, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Mount Vernon. 

* See p. 293. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. ' 289 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Downes, 
U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. R. R. Cuyler, to proceed to blockade 
duty off Wilmington, N. G. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 19, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed with the R. R. Cuyler under your command (under 
moderate steam to save fuel) to Western Bar, off Wilmington, and in 
the absence of Captain Sands report to the senior officer present for 
duty and deliver to him the enclosed communication. 
Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander JNO. DOWNES, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. R. R. Cuyler. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Glisson, 
U. 8. Navy, to protect the entrance to Chesapeake Kay against possible 
attack of raiders under Commander Wood, C. 8. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, July 19, 1864. 

SIR: The Department informs me by telegraph of 18th that refugees 
state that Lieutenant Wood with 800 men have left Richmond for Wil- 
mington to take two armed vessels and attempt the release of the pris- 
oners at Point Lookout. The commanding officer of the Minnesota 
sends me the same information by telegraph of same date (both received 
to-day), stating that it is reported that these sailors left Richmond on 
the 7th or 8th. 

You will proceed with the Santiago de Cuba, Monticello, and Cohasset 
to the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, which you will guard until 
relieved by the Fort Jackson, when you will proceed direct to your 
station off New Inlet with the Santiago de Cuba and Monticello. Send 
me any necessary information in the meantime by the Cohasset. 

These raiders may design an attack on the blockaders off the bars; 
great vigilance will therefore be required. 

The Fahkee will bring coal from Beaufort to supply the smaller ves- 
sels off each bar. 

Add the Cherokee to the list of blockaders off New Inlet, accidentally 
omitted. 

Send the Victoria and Howquah separately, when they can be spared 
(awaiting the return of the first sent), to be fitted with torpedoes. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain O. S. GLISSON, 

U. S. S. Santiago de Cuba, Divisional Officer off New Inlet. 

N W R VOL 10 19 



290 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding various matters pertain- 
ing to his command. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

On Picket, Below Barricade, James River, July 20, 1864. 
SIR. I herewith enclose a copy of a letter* to the honorable Secretary 
of the Navy, the only communication forwarded direct since your sup 
posed departure for the blockade. I much regret that it had not your 
endorsement as that would probably have insured the object desired. 

In relation to the supply of vegetables mentioned in your letter of the 
18th instant, I would state that a very moderate quantity was obtained 
on the 7th instant from the sanitary tugboat, but it was not understood 
as being a donation from any particular source. 

The papers called for in your letter with a report t received to-day 
from Acting Master Lee, detailing his cooperation with the steamer 
Pequot in the engagement of the 16th instant, are herewith forwarded. 
The barricade was strengthened last night by the sinking of the five 
hulks, and a sketch with all other particulars will be transmitted by 
the next opportunity. 

Lieutenant Dewey, of the Agawam, has made a thorough search for 
the torpedoes at Harrison's Bar, landing the marines and dragging the 
channel, but nothing was discovered. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Smith, U. S\ 
Navy, regarding obstructions for Trent's Reach Bar. 

HAMPTON ROADS, July 20, 1864. 

SIR: Your No. 56, of 18th instant, is received. 

You have already received five of the twelve barges ordered by the 
Department for the purpose of being sunk on Trent's Reach Bar. Of 
the twelve that left Baltimore, three sunk on the way and two immedi- 
ately 011 arrival here. One was taken back to Baltimore in tow of the 
Cactus, disabled, and one is still here and will be sent to you. You 
will thus have six and probably seven altogether. If this number 
shall prove insufficient, notify me and I will endeavor to procure more. 
If sufficient, distribute and sink them as you judge best. 

I have sent the Mount Washington to the navy yard for old chain 
cable, which, if procured, will be sent to you. 

I send the ShoJcokon to be stationed in the vicinity of Harrison's Bar 
and Wilcox's Wharf, with directions to her commanding officer to 
report by letter to you and in person to Commander Glitz on arrival. 

Whenever a gunboat attack is made on the enemy's field batteries it 
should be made in sufficient strength to silence them with the least loss 
to us. 

The dispatch of Mr. Merriam from General Foster's headquarters, 
published in the Herald of the 19th, informs the enemy of the injury 

* Not necessary to publish. t See p. 278. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 291 

done by their firing to the gunboats at Deep Bottom. Such precau- 
tions should be taken, as you and Commander Nichols can take, and as 
you can induce General Foster or the military authorities to observe, 
ito prevent these injurious publications. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Officer, James River. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Dewey, U. 8. Navy, 
commanding U. 8. S. Agawam, to proceed to Four Mile Creelc. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, July 20, 1864. 

SIB : So soon as you have finished coaling, proceed with the Agawam 
and report to Commander Nichols, who will assign you a station in the 
vicinity of Four Mile Creek, for the protection of a working party 
belonging to General Foster's command. 
Very respectfully, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Lieutenant GEORGE DEWEY, 

Commanding pro tempore U. S. S. Agawam. 



Report of Commander Glitz, U. S. Navy, transmitting request from Brig- 
adier-General Weitzel, U. S. Army, in relation to Wilcox's Wharf. 

U. S. S. OSCEOLA, 

Off City Point, James River, July 20, 1861. 

SIR: I herewith enclose you a telegram from Brigadier-General G. 
Weitzel, U. S. Army. 
The request has been attended to. 

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. M. B. GLITZ, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Senior Officer present, Comdg. U. S. Ironclad Onondaga. 

[Enclosure. Telegram.] 

HEADQUARTERS OF GENERAL BUTLER, July 17, 1864. 
The commanding general directs me to request you to keep all naval 
vessels away from Wilcox's Wharf until further orders, unless our 
transports are fired into. This request is made because lie is prepar- 
ing an expedition to capture the whole rebel force there. 

G. WEITZEL, 
Brigadier- General and Acting Chief of Staff. 

Commander J. B. M. GLITZ, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Osceola. 



292 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Actiny Ensign Chad 
wick, U. 8. Navy, commanding If. 8. S. Harcourt, to proceed to duty 
at the mouth of Chesapeake Bay. 

HAMPTON ROADS, VIRGINIA, July 20, 1864. 

SIR : Proceed iii the Harcourt under your command and report to 
the senior officer at the mouth of Chesapeake Bay for duty as dispatch 
boat at that point. A watch officer will be temporarily attached to 
your vessel from the vessel of the senior officer there when necessary. 
When the duty at that point is over, you will proceed to Yorktown and 
report to Lieutenant Commander Babcock, commanding U. S. S. Morse, 
commanding the Seventh Division of the North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, for duty in that division. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Aetg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Ensign J. A. CHADWIOK, 

Commanding Tug Harcourt. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Garjield, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Banshee. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 20, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed with the Banshee under your command to the blockade 
of Western Bar, oft' Wilmington, and report to Captain B. F. Sands, 
commanding the Second Division, or in his absence to the senior officer 
there present for duty of the blockade of that bar. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. H. GARKIELD, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Banshee. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Braine, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. 8. Vicksburg. 

HAMPTON ROADS, VIRGINIA, July 20, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed with the Vicksburg under your command to Western 
Bar and report to Captain Sands, divisional officer, for duty. 

When the tugs Glance. Belle, Hoyt, and Martin are ready give them 
convoy to Hatteras Inlet. 

The Nansemond will accompany you on her way to Beaufort. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander D. L. BRAINE, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Vicksburg. 

P. S. Proceed with the Nansemond and the tugs, which are not yet 
ready. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 293 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Macomb, 
r. 8. Navy, regarding torpedo boats and torpedoes, with instructions for 
their use. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 20, 1864. 

SIR : I send you the tug Bazely for general use, and the tugs Belle, 
Martin, and Hoyt, appropriately fitted for torpedo boats; two torpedoes 
are sent with each, making six in all. Enclosed are six copies of con- 
fidential instructions in regard to their use. 

The VicJcsburg, Lieutenant-Commander Braine, will convoy them to 
Hatteras Inlet. Make such changes in their officers, especially in those 
of the torpedo boats, as you may find necessary to promote their effici- 
ency, reporting the changes so made, and in other cases also. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear -Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Shamrock, Neic Berne, N. C. 

P. S. Great care will be necessary to keep these (especially torpedo 
boats) tugs in an efficient state. It is therefore important to ascertain 
that their engineers and firemen are competent and careful. Do not 
allow the torpedo boats to be hacked by tug duty. 

S. P. LEE. 

[Enclosure.] 
Description of torpedo and its mode of action. 

This form of torpedo is intended to explode on impact, and to be 
placed on a pole or rod projecting not less than 15 feet, and if possible 
20 feet, beyond the vessel using it. It contains 150 pounds of powder. 

It is fitted with four fuzes projecting 6 inches from the anterior 
extremity at different angles. The fuze is composed of a glass tube 
filled with sulphuric acid and then hermetically sealed, inserted in a 
leaden pipe, and surrounded by a mixture of two parts of chlorate of 
potash and one part of loaf sugar by weight, mixed with twice its bulk 
of dry sawdust. Bending the pipe breaks the tube and causes the 
explosion in about two tenths of a second. The object of the sawdust 
is simply by its mechanical interposition to temper off the violence of 
the explosion and cause a rush of flame into the torpedo without burst- 
ing the tube. If it is too quick or too slow it is very easy to tear off 
the cap, remove the tube, and sift out or add more sawdust. 

Chlorate of potash and loaf sugar in the above-mentioned proportions, 
without any tempering substance, explodes with extreme violence, 
like fulminate, on being touched with acid. 

They are made very delicate, and the fuzes must be handled with 
care, whether in or out of the torpedo. A gutta-percha washer is placed 
under the head of the fuze and the screw top to the filling hole, but it 
is advisable to lute the joints with red lead or beeswax. 

The fuzes are quite delicate, requiring an effort equal to 30 pounds 
suspended from the extremity to break the tube and cause the ex- 
plosion. Experiments have been made which show their certainty of 
action. 

Too much care can not be used in handling the torpedo after the 
fuzes are placed, whether loaded or not. 



294 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The fuzes should be kept in a place out of the sun, and on no account 
to be placed in the magazine. It is impossible to make these fuzes 
quick and certain without a corresponding increase of danger from 
handling. 



Order of Acting Hear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Macomb, 
U. 8. Navy, assigning him to command in the Sounds of North Carolina. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 20, 1864. 

SIR: You are hereby assigned to duty as divisional officer in com- 
mand of the division of the squadron in the sounds of North Carolina, 
which will be numbered 3 and consist of the following vessels: 

Shamrock. Mattabesett. Chicopee. 

Tacony. Wyalusing. Louisiana. 

Commodore Hull. Valley City. Ceres. 

Whitehead. Hetzel. Lockwood. 

Renshaw. Granite. Albemarle. 

Tug Glance and torpedo boats Belle, Martin, and Hoyt. Miami has 
bee:: ordered here. 

Respectfully yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral. Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Commanding U. S. S. Shamrock, 

Divisional Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Truxtun, II. S. Navy, regarding the 
safety of the U. S. S. Valley City. 

U. S. S. TACONY, 
New Berne, July 20, 1864. 

SIR: The Louisiana returned last night, reporting the Valley City all 
safe. She also reports that the cavalry force in the vicinity of Wash- 
ington, [N. C.],has been greatly increased, and that the Valley City has 
been employed shelling them for the past day or two, which no doubt 
gave rise to the report of her destruction. 

The boilers of the Commodore Hull are entirely gone. They are said 
to be in such a condition that it will be impossible to get up steam in 
them. I have, at the request of the captain, ordered a survey, the 
result of which I will send you as soon as it is made out. 

Refugees report that torpedoes have been placed in the river below 
Washington, N. C. 

The continued wet weather has prevented my finishing the decks, 
but I still think I shall be able to leave here by Tuesday. I wish you 
would be kind enough to inform me if you desire me [to] wait the 
arrival of a relief, or if I shall leave as soon as ready. With the great 
number of u lame ducks" now here, there should be one good vessel to 
look out for them. 

Very respectfully, your obedient, 

W. T. TRUXTUN, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Senior Naval Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 295 

Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. 
Navy, regarding cooperative expeditions. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 21, 1864. 

SIR: Your dispatch (No. 409) of the llth instant, with enclosures 
relative to the joint army and naval expedition fitted out for the pur- 
pose of cutting the Wilmington and Weldon Eailroad, but which failed 
in the attempt, has been received. 

While the Department is gratified at the manner in which the expe- 
dition was conducted, it prefers that the blockade should first be 
attended to before any cooperating or inland movements are under- 
taken. 

Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Acting Hear- Admiral 8. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



/Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 21, 1864. 

Send the Fort Jackson to the blockade. When did the Connecticut 
leave in obedience to last order? 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Kear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 21, 1864. 
Send the Connecticut directly to Boston. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Acting Eear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton. Roads. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Gushing, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Monticello. 

HAMPTON EOADS, July 21, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed with the Monticello under your command, now ready 
for sea, to the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, and report for duty to (Jap- 
tain O. S. Glissou, U. S. S. Santiago de Cuba, senior officer there present. 
Kespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant W. B. OUSHING, 

U. S. S. Monticello. 



296 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. 
Navy, regarding the withdrawal of ironclads from James River. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 22, 1864. 

SIR: You will inform this Department whether any of the ironclads 
attached to your command can be withdrawn, having due regard to the 
exigencies of the public service within the limits of your command; 
whether they are absolutely essential to the holding possession of James 
Eiver or other waters of Virginia, and whether the military forces can 
maintain their positions in Virginia, assisted and protected by wooden 
vessels only, in case the ironclads should be withdrawn, or with the 
assistance and protection of wooden vessels and a portion of the iron- 
clads. Answers to these questions and such other information bearing 
upon the subjects of enquiry as your judgment may dictate can be fur- 
nished at your leisure. 

The opinion of Lieutenant-General Grant upon the points indicated 
would be valuable, and the Department would be gratified if you could 
obtain it. 

Very respectfully, etc., GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Rear-Admiral S, P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Letter from Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to the Chief of the 
Bureau of Ordnance, forwarding description of floating torpedo cap- 
tured at Cox's farm. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 22, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose a description and drawing received from Captain 
Smith of the torpedo designed to float and explode by clockwork, cap- 
tured at Cox's farm, above Dutch Gap, on the night of the 12th instant. 
Commander Lynch will forward this torpedo to the Bureau by the 
first opportunity ; also two boxes of powder with the marks of the rebel 
arsenals on them, which were captured at the same time, and were 
intended for loading the torpedo. 

Captain Smith thinks that the design of the rebels was to put this 
afloat from the left bank below the obstructions to blow up a monitor. 
Besides a boom and a hawser with a net I kept a picket on that bank 
and picket boats above and below the monitors to prevent any such 
attempt. . 

Very respectfully, yours, S. P. LEE, 

Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Commander H. A. WISE, 

Bureau Ordnance. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting a survey of 

Trent's Reach. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 22, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose a recent survey* by Sub- Assistant Bradford, of the 
Coast Survey (attached to my staff by the indulgence of Superintendent 

* See report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, September 16, 1864. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 297 

Bache), of Trent's Reach, showing the depth of water on the bar in that 
reach just before the army obstructions were sunk, the position of these 
vessels, and the position of the torpedoes, boom, hawser, and network 
put down by ine. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Smith, U. S. 
Navy, regarding the obstructions in James River. 

FLAGSHIP MALVEBN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 22, 1864. 

SIR : Please inform me if any more canal barges are needed to com- 
plete the obstructions, also whether the boom stretched entirely across 
the river. If it does not, I think it advisable to continue it close over 
to the bank, making it so that a section can be swung aside for a pas- 
sage way. The boom should be arranged for moving it to another 
position when the monitors, etc., change their position. When another 
movement is made, the hawser and net will also be removed and 
replaced. 

Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Captain M. SMITH, 

Senior Officer up James River. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, transmitting report of Commander 
Nichols, U. S. Navy, and information received from a deserter. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

On Picket, Relow the Barricade, James River, July 22, 1864. 
SIR : I have ordered the Sholcokon to Turkey Bend until the army 
has made the demonstration referred to in the telegraphic dispatch 
sent you yesterday, after which she will take her station at Harrison's 
Bar, anchoring oft' Wilcox's Wharf occasionally. 

I enclose herewith a letter from Commander Nichols, of this date, 
with a statement of a deserter. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. MENDTA, 
James River, July 22, 1864. 

SIR: I send up a deserter, who came in to the pickets of the Hunch- 
back this morning. I send also the copy of a report from the command- 
ing ofticer of the Hunchback. The deserter appears to be intelligent, 



298 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

bat I have not been able to gain any more information from him than 
is contained in the letter of Mr. Valentine. Colonel Hill has been out 
all the morning, and is still out, but sends word that the army is too 
strong for him to maintain the position, and he will have to fall back. 
There has been some lively skirmishing along his lines. I send the 
ShoJcokon up to you according to your wish, as expressed by Mr. Cush- 
man this morning. The Sangus has done but little firing, as I wished to 
spare her guns and ammunition, but what she has done has been well 
done, as is suid by the officer on shore. If not incompatible with your 
views, I think, on account of the operations at present going on here, 
it would be well to allow the Saugus to remain here until the additional 
troops expected are here, and the disputed territory secured to our use 
instead of the enemy's. Her moral influence is considerable. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Captain M. SMITH, 

Comdg. U. 8. 8. Onondaga and Senior Officer James River. 

[Subenclosure.] 

U. S. S. HUNCHBACK, 
James River, Virginia, July 22, 1864. 

DEAR SIR : A deserter has Just come into our pickets, and I send him 
to you. He says he belongs to the Hampton Legion of cavalry; also 
that there are about 2,000 troops back of us. He says that your shell- 
ing on Saturday last dismounted one gun, and they immediately vacated 
the premises and went to Malvern Hill and opened on the Morris and 
Pequot; also that they have three fieldpieces in the woods back of us, 
and five at Turkey Bend. 

1 am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. K. VALENTINE, 
Acting Ensign, Commanding. 
Commander E. T. NICHOLS, 

U. 8. 8. Mendota, James River, Virginia. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 22, 1864 5 p. m. 

Have dispatched Connecticut directly to Boston, agreeably to tele- 
graphic order of 21st. After sending telegram of this date, received 
Bureau's letter stating that men would be sent by New Berne. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear -Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to the Secretary of War, trans- 
mitting information regarding the sale of supplies to Confederate agents 
for the use of the army. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 22, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to enclose herewith a copy of a letter from 
Commander W. H. Macomb, senior officer in the sounds of North Caro- 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 299 

lina, relative to the manner iu which large quantities of bacon and 
other supplies are sent from Norfolk and sold to rebel agents at the 
southern end of the Dismal Swamp Canal for the supply of the rebel 
army. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Hon. E. M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War. 



Report of Commander Macomb, U. 8. Navy, regarding affairs in sounds 

of North Carolina. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, July 22, 1864. 

SIR: By reports received from Edenton yesterday I learn that the 
rebels have got their floating battery ready and have sent up the river 
to tow it down to Plymouth; and also that they have raised the South- 
Jield and intend fitting her out. 

It is also reported that they are constructing another (the third) 

ironclad ram at Halifax, which will be ready for service by September. 

There is also a report that Bragg has marched from Weldon with 

15,000 troops they say for New Berne. It is possible that they may 

be intended to reinforce Johnston at Atlanta. 

These rumors are not confined to Edenton, but the same reports exist 
in other counties. 

A reconnoitering party has been sent up to learn more about the 
Southfteld. 

Bacon and other articles are still being supplied to the rebel army 
from Norfolk by way of the Dismal Swamp Canal and South Mills. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding the sinking of five oarges 

in the James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

On Picket, Below the Barricade, James Ricer, July 23, 1864. 
SIR: I enclose herewith an accurate sketch of the position of the 
hulks at the barricade, obtained from measurement, which alters very 
materially the supposed security of the position. 

I would therefore recommend that three barges be sent, and one 
larger vessel for the channel, where there is a space of 05 feet, and 14 
feet water. 

******* 

Very respectfully, etc., 

MELANCTON SMITH, 

Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 
Acting Kear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



300 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Lieutenant- Commander Roe, U.S. 
Navy, declining to acton certain recommendations for promotion. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 23, 1864. 

SIR: Your letter of the 25th ultimo, addressed to Acting Rear- 
Adiniral Lee and recommending to notice Samuel Gordon, coxswain, 
Peter Kelly, seaman, and Peter Hoyt, seaman, for gallantry in the 
engagement of May 5, 18(>4, has been referred to the Department. 

You are informed that no recommendations for promotion will be 
acted upon that were not made at the time of the report of the 
engagement. 

Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Lieutenant-Commander F. A. ROE, U. S. Navy, 

Comdg. U. S. S. Sassacus, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy, regarding the obstructions in the 

James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

On Picket, Beloic the Barricade, James River, July 23, 1864. 
SIR : I think that two more barges, one to be placed alongside the 
wreck in the south channel and the other at the termination of the 
7-foot line of soundings, for the purpose of securing the boom, will be 
sufficent to render the obstructions as secure as could be desired, and 
the boom can then be so arranged to allow the passage of boats if 
necessary. 

Four more anchors of 400 pounds each will be required for two ves- 
sels now here and the two to be sent. All the kedges of less than 700 
pounds that were on board of the ordnance vessel have been expended. 
A deserter reports that Hewlett's Battery will be completed on the 
26th, when they intend to open fire upon the gunboats and drive them 
out of this reach [Trent's]. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Senior Officer in James River. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Ensign Rogers, U. S. Navy, 
commanding U. S. S. Hydrangea. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 23, 18C>1. 

SIR: Proceed with the U. S. S. Hydrangea under your command off 
Charleston, S. C., and report to Rear- Admiral Dahlgreu. 

If your promotion to the grade of acting master is recommended by 
Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, it will be made. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Acting Ensign C. W. ROGERS, 

Commanding U. S. S. Hydrangea, James River. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 301 

Letter from Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Glisson, 
U. 8. Navy, regarding complaints received by the Department of the 
inefficiency of the blockade of Wilmington. 

HAMPTON EOADS, VIRGINIA, July 23, 1864. 

SIR : The Department lias sent me a dispatch from the U. S. consul 
at Liverpool, received at the State Department, referring to matters 
connected with the blockade, in which the writer states that he is con- 
stantly told that many vessels succeed in violating the blockade because 
the blockaders do not fire on them, being anxious to secure prizes and 
unwilling to run the risk of sinking or injuring these vessels, and that 
if our cruisers would jadopt the course of firing into them it would almost 
break up the business. 

This he gives as report merely, but adds, " It is a little remarkable 
that so few of these frail vessels have been destroyed by shot and shell. 
I do not remember to have seen where any of the crews of these vessels 
running the blockade have been killed by our guns." 

The first object of the blockade is to weaken the enemy by preventing 
his cruisers from going out or in, cutting off his supplies from abroad 
and preventing his sending cotton out, which is the sole means of sus- 
taining his credit abroad. If the enemy's supply vessels are kept from 
entering or leaving Wilmington or run ashore by them in the attempt 
to pass the blockade, this object is accomplished. It is plain that the 
important part of the blockade is that of the inlets. The object of 
having outside cruisers is to capture those swift vessels who may, under 
favor of very dark nights, very thick weather, or superior speed, elude 
the blockaders off the bar running out, or who maybe approaching the 
coast for the purpose of running*in under cover of night. 

Great complaints are made to the Department as to the inefficiency 
of the blockade of Wilmington. I trust that your appointment as senior 
officer, and the care and vigilance which you will exercise, will restore 
the efficiency of the blockade of New Inlet, to which you will give your 
constant personal attention. 
Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain O. S. GLISSON, 

Divisional Officer, New Inlet. 

[Same to Captain Sands, divisional officer, off Western Bar.] 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, denying assertions made 
regarding the inefficiency of the blockade of Wilmington. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 24, 1864. 

SIR : I return to the Department the dispatch No. 308, from the U. S. 
consul at Liverpool, relating to not firing on blockade runners. 

I believe that there is no foundation in fact for these assertions and 
inferences, and refer to the enclosed extracts from abstract logs in sup- 
port of this belief. The class of small vessels referred to pass the 
blockaders under cover of darkness, and at a speed which, even if they 
were seen, would make it almost impossible to fire on them with effect. 



302 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

These facts are not sufficiently taken into consideration by persons 
ignorant of the situation, who, judging only from the result that a num- 
ber of low, swift, light-colored steamers succeed in violating the block- 
ade, infer that they do so through the neglect of proper measures on 
the part of the blockaders. 

1 will call the attention of the divisional officers off Wilmington to 
the statements above referred to, and direct reports to be made in rela- 
tion to the matter, which will be forwarded to the Department when 
received, and I would respectfully suggest that, as this charge has been 
made officially, it should be denied officially through the proper channels. 

The enclosed extracts, containing minute information respecting the 
positions of the blockading force, are designed only for the information 
of the Navy Department. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, responding to the Depart- 
ment's enquiry regarding the withdrawal of ironclads from the waters of 
Virginia. 

Confidential.] FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 

Hampton Roads, July 24, 1864. 

SIR: The Department's dispatch of 22d instant received to-day asks 
my opinion as to the withdrawal of the ironclads from James Kiver, and 
suggests that I obtain General Grant's opinion on the same subject. 

1 have directed the Fort Jackson, Captain Sands (reported ready for 
sea to-day), to leave this afternoon for the Western Bar division of the 
Wilmington blockade, and have directed Captain Glisson, commanding- 
New Inlet division of the same blockade, to return from the mouth of 
Chesapeake Bay, fill up with coal, and proceed to his station. 

I am now under the Department's orders to proceed off Wilmington as 
soon as practicable. I received authentic intelligence this morning that 
General Grant would make an important movement in a few days. The 
Department's instructions of July 2, directing me to consult with Gen- 
eral Grant before leaving the river, were not received until my arrival at 
Hampton Eoads, and I have since had no opportunity for personal con- 
sultation with him. I propose, if the Department should approve it by 
telegraph, which could reach me by Tuesday, to go up the river and 
confer with him before going down the coast, both as to this movement 
and as to his opinion about the withdrawal of the ironclads; and I 
desire, if the movement requires naval cooperation, to be present when 
it is made. 

The new arrangement respecting divisional officers will, I think, admit 
of my deferring my visit to Wilmington, in view of the proposed army 
movement. 

1 respectfully request an early reply by telegraph. 

1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear -Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 303 

Report of Acting Master Foster, U. 8. Navy, regarding measures employed 
in view of the possible appearance of the C. 8. ram Albemarle. 

TJ. S. S. CERES, 

Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, July 24, 1864. 
SIR: I have been informed by Mr. E. J. Johnson that the commander 
of the ram is inclined to slip out some dark night and (if possible) cap- 
ture our picket boats. I think the only sure method of preventing him 
from coming out on a dark night without our knowledge is to station a 
boat at the mouth of the river with a light so arranged that it can be 
seen by us only; when answered by the vessels the boat to make her 
way to a place of safety. We are then certain that the ram can not get 
between us and the" fleet unobserved. Acting upon this idea, I sent a 
boat into the mouth of the river last night. Will you please signify 
whether this step meets with your approval or not ? 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. H. FOSTER, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Commander W. H. MACOMB, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Naval Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 25, 1864. 

When the Juniata reaches Hampton Roads, where she is to remain 
unless some sudden emergency arises, you can send oft' the Santiago de 
Cuba. The Connecticut, being required for service, is not to have her 
crew or ofticers reduced. Four hundred men go to you by the Kensing- 
ton. Send the Roanoke to Point Lookout, then withdraw the Minnesota. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports of 
Commander Nichols, U. S. Navy, regarding measures to prevent the 
erection of Confederate battery at Deep Bottom, James River. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 25, 1864. 

SIR : I transmit enclosed reports received to-day from Captain Smith, 
showing the situation at Deep Bottom, where the enemy appear to be 
erecting a battery which would interfere with" our communications. I 
suppose that the Army will be able to prevent the accoinplishmentof this. 
Enclosures: 1, July 21, Commander Nichols, Mendota, reporting the 
capture of a lieutenant and four privates engaged in erecting this bat- 
tery, and the capture of the position ; 2, from same, same date, later, 
reporting that a brigade of the enemy having advanced, our force 
retired; 3, July 23, from, same, reporting the operations of our trooos as 
not altogether successful, some ground having been lost. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Nary. 



304 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. MENDOTA, 
James River , July 21, 1864. 

SIR: Unusual noise having been heard last night in the direction of 
the place from which the battery opened on this vessel on the L6th 
instant, a scouting party was sent out this morning to see what was 
going on. The officer in charge reported that the enemy were engaged 
in erecting a permanent earthwork for a battery. A prisoner was cap 
tured by the scouting party, but he would give no information. At I 
p. m. General Foster sent across the creek a portion of the Eleventh 
Maine Regiment to endeavor to capture the position and hold it. Up 
to this time, 5 p. m., I have heard nothing from them, and presume they 
will wait for darkness. I trust that our forces may [succeed in 'their 
object, for a permanent battery there would prove a very ugly and 
uncomfortable customer. 

This morning I dropped a hundred yards or more below my usual 
position while taking in coal, and directed the Ayaicam to drop down 
and take my place while so engaged. She will resume her place in the 
morning if nothing happens to prevent. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Captain M. SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding Officer of Naval Forces, James River. 

P. S. 6 p. m. : Some scattering musketry has been heard in the direc- 
tion of our troops that are out, but I know not the cause. 
Respectfully, 

B. T. NICHOLS. 

P. S. No. 2. 6 : 30 p. m. : Lieutenant Dewey has just come from Gen 
eral Foster's headquarters and informs me that the enemy's position has 
been captured by our troops ; also a lieutenant and four privates. They 
were erecting a battery. 

E. T. N. 



U. S. S. MENDOTA, 
James River, July 21, [1864] 11 p. m. 

SIR : Since my letter of this evening affairs have taken such a change 
that 1 feel justified in at once making it known to you. I learn from 
the colonel who captured the position this afternoon that he has been 
compelled to fall back from it by a superior force and that the enemy 
again occupy it with an entire brigade and are probably working upon 
their battery. The colonel does not anticipate an attack to-night, and 
we will try to shell them at daylight, though from present appearances 
we shall have a foggy morning. General Foster has but about 2,()()u 
men altogether, so it is impossible for him to reinforce \ 'olouel Hill as 
he ought to be. If the Hydrangea comes down in the morning I would 
suggest that she come before daylight. 

v ery respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 

Commander. 
Captain M. SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding Naval Forces, James River. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 305 

[Endorsement.] 

JULY 221 o'clock. 

Communication just received. Have ordered the fihokokon up, and 
if they open fire in the morning shall send the Sangus down. 
Respectfully, 

M. SMITH. 



U. S. S. MENDOTA, 
James River, July 23, 1864. 

SIR: I send up two prisoners belonging to Company G, Thirty- 
seventh Regiment North Carolina. They were captured by the pickets 
of the Hunchback this afternoon. They do not seem disposed to give 
any information. The operations of our troops to-day have not been 
so successful as they were yesterday and the day before. They have 
not been able to advance to the position of the battery, and in fact have 
been obliged to yield some of the ground occupied by them this morn- 
ing. I am in hopes that with the help of the new troops we shall be 
able to hold and occupy the debatable ground. The new troops, or a 
portion of them, will cross this evening. Our men have been skirmish- 
ing briskly all day. Casualties, so far as I have heard, 2 killed and 4 
or 5 wounded. The enemy have shown a stronger force to day and 
better men than before. The shelling by this vessel and the Saugus 
has been of great service, I am told. I shall have to send down by 
the Hydrangea in the morning for ammunition to make good my 
expenditure. If our assistance is required tomorrow, 1 shall call the 
Agawam below the upper bridge to render it, and give my men and 
officers a rest. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ED. T. NICHOLS, 

Commander. 

Captain M. SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding Naval Forces, James River. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Wiggin, U. IS. Navy, to proceed to the West Gulf Squadron 
in command of tugs. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, July 25, 1864. 

SIR: Choosing favorable weather, proceed with the Tritonia, Rose, 
Althea, and Pink to West Gulf Blockading Squadron, reporting on 
arrival to Rear Admiral Farragut. 

Have a general supervision over the tugs, keep them together, and 
take every precaution against accident of any kind, and deliver them 
in the best possible condition. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdy. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant GEO. WIGGIN, 

U. S. S. Tritonia. 

N W R VOL 10 20 



306 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Commander Macomb, U. 8. Navy, transmitting report ofrecon 
noissance near Plymouth, N. C., July 25, 1864. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, 
Albemarle Sound, August 1, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose the report of a reconnoissauce by Acting Master's 
Mate John Woodman, of the U. S. 8. Ceres. 

The man Henry Hatch, whom he mentions as lost, has since been 
picked up by boats sent for that purpose. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. 1*. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. CERES, 
Albemarle Sound, July 26, 1864. 

SIR : Having been ordered by yourself to proceed toward Plymouth on 
a reconnoissauce, I left this vessel on the 25th instant at 12:30 a. in. in 
the cutter with a crew of three men. I lauded on the swamp opposite 
Plymouth on the Middle River. I came out opposite to where the 
Southjield lies. I found her in about the same condition as when she 
was sunk by the ram, though her hurricane deck appeared to be about 
3 feet higher out of the water than when 1 saw her in May last, when 
on a previous reconnoissauce. Her smokestack, lookout ladder, and 
forward pilot house were standing. 

There was an iron barge of about 500 or GOO tons on her starboard 
side and a schooner of 150 or 200 tons on her port side. I could see 
no purchase rigging on these vessels for raising the Soutlifield, neither 
were there any persons at work on her, though it was nearly 10 o'clock 
in the morning. I then proceeded up the river till 1 came abreast of 
the ram lying at the wharf near the steam sawmill. I could observe 
110 one at work on her. I saw the quartermaster on the top of the 
casemate house, who was the only person 1 saw on her. 

The towu appeared very quiet; very few persons were moving about; 
I could hear the blacksmiths and carpenters at work in the town near 
the river. 

I could not perceive any alterations in the fortifications about the 
town, as it was very hazy, and the grass and foliage were rank and 
thick. 

I am very sorry to report that Henry Hatch, who accompanied me 
across the island, either lost his way or was captured. 1 gave him 
orders to follow me closely. When I obtained a position opposite the 
ram, I turned to ask him for my glass and I missed him. I waited 
there for half an hour, and as he did not join me, I thought he had 
returned to the boat. I returned then and found him not there. I 
waited four hours for him, and as he did not appear, and I felt very 
unwell, I started to return to the vessel. I left two days' rations for 
him, with a message where to wait till we came for him. 

My reason for taking Hatch with me was that I was very unwell, 
and afraid of breaking down on the trip, and I thought I might require 
assistance to enable me to return. 

I am, sir, etc., JNO. WOODMAN, 

Acting Master's Mate. 

Captain [H. H.J FOSTER, 

Of the Geres. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 307 

[ Telegram. 1 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 26, 1864. 

The consul at Halifax, [Nova Scotia], telegraphs that Lieutenant Kell 
and several of the crew of the Alabama left there on last steamer for 
Bermuda, with intention to run blockade at Wilmington and procure 
a vessel in place of the Alabama. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 26, 1864. 

In reference to dispatch 446, confidential, you can visit General 
Grant as proposed. It is not anticipated that you can be required to 
remain, but if there is a naval engagement to take place, remain. 
Orders of to day move your headquarters to Beaufort. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

/Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Bear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. 
Navy, regarding the divisions of his command. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 26, 1864. 

SIR: The Department approves the establishment of two divisions 
of your squadron for blockade purposes. Two more are required to 
render it efficient one for James Eiver and the other for the sounds of 
North Carolina. 

Let Captain Melaucton Smith command the James Eiver division, 
with his headquarters up and down the river as required. The Minne- 
sota to remain in the roads and attend to the current business of that 
point, under Captain Smith's supervision. On the arrival of the Roa- 
noke at Point Lookout she will be considered as on special service and 
detached from your command. 

Hereafter the headquarters of the North Atlantic Blockading Squad- 
ron will be Beaufort, N. C., and you will visit Hampton Eoads only 
when the public emergency requires it, giving your principal attention 
to the blockade, which has latterly become very inefficient. 

Eecominend to the Department such directions as to leaves of absence 
and other matters connected witli the vessels which go to the Norfolk 
navy yard as you consider necessary to be given to Commodore Living- 
ston, and let your departure for the blockade be as early as practicable. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Eear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



308 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to the commandant 
navy yard, Norfolk, regarding the forwarding of the india-rubber boat. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Off Norfolk Navy Yard, July 26, 1864. 

COMMODORE: I send to the Brandyicine an india-rubber boat packed 
in a box, and request tbat it may be kept on board that vessel (in a dry, 
cool place) and held subject to the requisition of Lieutenant W. J3. 
Gushing, commanding Monticello. 
Very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Gomdy. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commodore J. W. LIVINGSTON, 

Commandant Navy Yard, Norfolk. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Nary, regarding orders issued 
to certain vessels of his command. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 26, 1864. 

SIR: The Department's telegram of 25th instant was received at 6 
this a. m., and I have given orders as therein directed for the Roanoke 
to relieve the Minnesota at Point Lookout, the latter then to return 
here. 

The Santiago de Cuba will be dispatched to her station off New Inlet 
when she has finished coaling. 

I am here hastening the departure of the tugs for the sounds, with 
which there has been constantly recurring trouble. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Ridgely, U. 8. 
Navy, commanding U. S. S. Shenandoah, to proceed to Wilmington, N. G. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Norfolk Navy Yard, July 26, 1864. 

SIR: The Department by telegram received this morning revokes the 
order for the Shenandoah to cruise. You will, therefore, when you have 
completed coaling, proceed under easy steam (carry canvas as much as 
practicable) to report for duty to Captain O. S. Glisson, commanding 
the first division of the blockade off Wilmington. 
Eespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain D. B. KIDGELY, 

Commanding U. S. S. Shenandoah. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 309 

Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Gushing, 
U. 8. Navy, commanding U, S. 8. Monticello. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Norfolk Navy Yard, July 26, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed to Washington and report in person to the Navy 
Department, referring to my No. 395 of 9th instant. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant W. B. OUSHING, 

Commanding Z7. S. S. Monticello. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Smith, U. 8. Navy, of having 
passed, off the Florida coast, a monitor in tow of the U. S. S. Eutaw. 

U. S. S. BERMUDA, 
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, July 27, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report to the Department that on the 20th 

instant at 1 p. m., I passed the U. S. S. Eutaw with a single- turreted 

monitor in tow, 10 miles S. S. W. of Carysfort light-house; the wind at 

the time was east and fresh and the weather fine. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. SMITH, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 27, 1864. 

SIR: Upon the arrival of the Roanoke at Point Lookout, you will 
proceed to Hampton Roads and report to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee 
for duty. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Lieutenant Commander J. H. UPSHUR, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Minnesota, Point Lookout, Md. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting reports 
regarding the obstructing of James River. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 27, 1864. 

SIR: Captain Smith reports,* under date of 23d instant, that on 
examination and measurement he finds that more vessels are neces- 
sary to make the obstructions secure, and recommends that three 

* See date. 



310 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

barges be sent and one larger vessel for the channel, where there is, he 
states, a space of 05 feet with 14 feet of water. 1 enclose his report ( 1 ) ; 
the sketch mentioned appearing inaccurate, 1 sent Sub Assistant Brad- 
ford, TJ. S. Coast Survey, to-day to examine the locality and make a 
correct sketch. 

I enclose also Captain Smith's report* of the 20th instant (2) of the 
sinking of the five barges sent him, enclosing a sketch of their posi- 
tions. 

As one barge has reached Captain Smith since the date of his 
report, but two in addition appear to be needed besides the larger ves 
sel to sink in the channel to complete the obstructions, as required by 
the Department, unless Mr. Bradford's report, which will be sent to 
the Department when received, should show a necessity for more. 

Captain Smith reports in another dispatch of 23d instant that 
deserters state that the battery at Hewlett's would be completed on 
the 26th instant; would then open on the gunboats and endeavor to 
drive them out of the reach [Trent's]. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Master Sheldon, If. S. Navy, regarding engagements 
with the enemy at Turkey Bend, James River. 

TJ. S. S. SIIOKOKON, 
Turkey Bend, James River, July 37, 1864. 

SIR,: I would respectfully submit the following report: 

Yesterday morning, 2Gth, about 10 o'clock, our pickets on shore were 
attacked by a small party of rebel sharpshooters. I opened on them 
from the ship with our starboard battery. They fell back a short dis- 
tance to a ravine which sheltered them from our fire. 1 then sent a 
force of 10 men, in charge of Acting Ensign P. C. Assersonand Acting 
Master's Mate 6. W. Lane, to attack them in the rear and cut them off 
if possible by landing some distance below them. They discovering 
our intentions, fell back to the edge of the woods, crossing Turkey 
Creek before our men could come up with them, they returning our fire. 
Owing to the bad condition of our Enfield rifles, we were not able to 
do them any material damage, but succeeded in driving them from our 
immediate vicinity. 

We had one man wounded, but not very severely. Mr. Asserson 
and Mr. Lane fulfilled the duty assigned them in a very creditable 
manner. 

This morning, July 27, at 0:30, an engagement commenced between 
our forces and the enemy on the north side of the river. 1 immedi- 
ately sent Acting Master S. P. Crafts on shore with Acting Master's 
Mate G. W. Lane to ascertain, if possible, the situation and position of 
the enemy. They soon ascertained their position to be at the edge of 
the woods, about 2,500 yards distant. Opened fire with both 30 
pounder Parrott guns, got the exact range the second fire, continued 
shelling them for about half an hour, when the rebel battery stopped 

* See date. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 311 

firing, our shells flanking them. I afterwards learned from one of the 
officers engaged in the action on shore that our shells fell directly 
inside their works, killing and wounding several, and causing a great 
deal of confusion, also preventing them from using their guns on our 
forces, and finally [forcing them] to leave their works. 

The officers of the divisions deserve credit for their accurate and 
rapid firing; also the officers of the powder divisions for keeping a 
supply of ammunition ready for use. Both officers and men used their 
best efforts to inflict as much damage on the enemy as possible. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. SHELDON, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Senior Officer, Commanding James River. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Acting Ensign Porter, 
U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Nansemond, to proceed to Hatteras 
Inlet, towing tugs. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 27, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed in company with the Monticello, towing the tugs Hoyt, 
Martin, Belle, and Bazely to Hatteras Inlet, where you will deliver the 
tugs to Commander Macomb, divisional officer, and then proceed to 
report to the commandant of the Beaufort naval station agreeably 
to your orders of 8th instant. 

Pilot Thomson, of the Young Rover, who is acquainted with the 
Swash Channel, Cape Hatteras, through which you should go with the 
tugs, will accompany you and return to his vessel after their delivery. 
Bespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Ensign J. H. PORTER, 

U. 8. 8. Nansemond. 



Report of Commander Crosby, U. 8. Navy, suggesting a system for catch- 
ing blockade runners. 

Unofficial.] U. S. S. KEYSTONE STATE, 

At Sea, July 27, 1864. 

DEAR ADMIRAL: I am now on my way to Beaufort for repairs, after 
an absence of only three days, including the day we left. I regret to 
say that the Keystone is falling off rapidly in her speed owing to want 
of extensive repairs. We had just given her twelve days' repairs in 
Beaufort, but even that proved inadequate. Our present repairs will 
require about two days, when I hope to be off again for the rest of this 
moon. 

The boilers are getting very bad, not trustworthy in chase or bad 
weather. They have given out four times since leaving Norfolk. Yes- 
terday they gave out in chase, also to-day, and lost both vessels in con- 
sequence, though we picked up yesterday 02 bales of cotton, the result 
of our work; to-day we get nothing. 



312 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



To-day, within the space of half an hour, we saw four blockade run- 
ners; three were in sight at the same time and all within a circuit of 
10 miles. 

The first chase of five or six hours carried me up to the other three, 
when our port boiler gave out. With one boiler I then steamed toward 
another vessel lying still, but he immediately got up steam and ran oft' 
south ; the third did the same and the fourth stood to the north. Find- 
ing it necessary to return for repairs, we kept him company under one 
boiler. In the meantime a temporary patch was put on and we chased 
him oft' for the night. Although not successful in catching any I have 
found their rendezvous and their course both in and out of Wilmington, 
which seems to be a rule observed by them all. I will send you a chart 
showing all of my chases within the last two months, sixteen in all, and 
you will see the course they take. From my experience I feel satisfied 
that by a certain system we can catch their fastest vessels, and during 
the rainy season will catch one almost daily. The system is this: Take 
eight or ten vessels and place them in the form of the letter V with apex 
toward Wilmington for the inward-bounders and the reverse for the 
outward-bound vessels. I will make a sketch, with explanations, and 
hope you will approve of it, or let it be tested, as it seems to me the 

'No.5. 



No. 4. 





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only way the vessels of our speed can manage to do anything with them. 
When we catch some of their smartest vessels we can add them to our 
list. During the sixteen chases only two were participated in by our 
other cruisers. 

Naturally enough, I have wished for a faster vessel, for I am satisfied 
we could have made many captures. At present it is aggravating to 
see them escape so regularly. I believe 14 knots would take the most 
of them. 

The blockade runners very seldom make black smoke except when 
chased; they are almost always reported as sails, and only make smoke 
as we near them. I will make a sketch on the other page of the man- 
ner I think we might entrap them. 

This plan is for ten vessels. No. 6 to lay E. S. E. from Frying Pan 
Shoals ; Nos. 5 and 7, 30 miles each side of No. 6, and in a N. E. and 
S. W. direction. No. 1 lays on the E. S. E. line, the other vessels to lay 
between Nos. 1 and 5 and 1 and 7, 10 miles distant. No. 6 will lay far 
enough off to allow 11 knots an hour from the commencement of the 
dark night, say from 8 p. m. to 4 a. m., 88 miles, and the other vessels 
to act accordingly. No. (5 will always allow the chase to get to the east- 
ward of her before chasing, then drive her toward the No. 1 station. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 313 

An hour after daylight Nos. 5 and 7 will run toward one another and 
half an hour after that 4 and 8 will run toward one another. Nos. 1, 2, 
and 10 will run toward Xo. 6, and in this way any vessel within their 
lines would be captured; for the inward-bounder the plan will be 
reversed. 

ffo.6. 

Ko.S. 

No. 4. 




The position for inward-bound vessels to be taken according to the 
rising or setting of the moon, or according to the location they will 
occupy at noon previous to running in. 

I can see no other plan for catching the fast vessels, as they can out- 
run us, and I have given my experience and ideas on the subject for 
your consideration. 

I am, very truly, yours, 

PEIRCE CROSBY, 

Commander. 
A ctiug Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

P. S. I have not given the advantages in detail of this plan, as I 
think they will suggest themselves to you when your attention is drawn 
to the system proposed. 

Should we conclude to make the experiment, the senior officer of the 
party ought to take his station at sundown for the coming morning 
and all the vessels accordingly, with instructions to each one to make 
the same allowance for current and wind the current varying much, 
according to the direction and force of the wind. 

With this plan vessels will be better able to preserve their stations, 
as their chases will almost always be short ones, and little coal 
expended. At present, from experience, I find it exceedingly difficult 
after a chase to get my position before the following afternoon, thereby 
losing one night. Then again, all the cotton thrown overboard will be 
picked up by our cruisers instead of losing it or merchant vessels 
getting it. 

I have spoken of this plan to four or five of our commanders and 
they have all expressed their strong belief in its success, particularly 
with the experience I have had, and hoped that I would lay it before 
you. I feel so sanguine about it that I am exceedingly anxious to see 
it tried, for I think many of those blockade runners flaunting their 
secesh flags in our faces would see themselves entrapped, and Mr. 
Maffitt with the Lilian humbled. 

Our repairs will detain us until Sunday, I am sorry to say, but as I 
hear yon are expected here daily I may have the pleasure of seeing 
you and explaining better my ideas on the subject. 
Yours, very truly, 

PEIRCE CROSBY. 



314 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Smith, U. S. Navy, commanding 
U. S. S. Alabama, regarding the chase of a blockade runner. 

U. S. S. ALABAMA, 
Lat. 33 10' N., Long. 76 45' W., July 27, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report: 

Last evening at 8 p. m. I anchored in 5| fathoms, just to southward 
of station No. 6, off Old Inlet Bar. At 10 p. in. rockets were observed 
to the westward, followed by a succession of guns among the squadron 
on the other stations between that hour and midnight (the time of 
moon's rising). 

At 12:20 a.m. a steamer was discovered to the eastward crossing 
the moon's glim, running out along the edge of the shoal. The night 
being very calm, I had previously heard her paddles, with an increas- 
ing sound, approaching. As soon as I made her out distinctly I slipped, 
fired a rocket, and steamed ahead S. by E., to endeavor to keep the run- 
ner close to the shoal till I had a trial of speed with him, but 1 lost 
sight of him before we obtained much headway. I at once trimmed 
ship for a chase by running the guns all in, lowering all the boats below 
the batteries and dousing all wind sails. At 1 p. ra. found the wake of 
the runner crossing my course to the S. S. W. I steered by it and hove 
the log four several times in succession, three casts giving 13 knots 6 
fathoms, and the fourth 13 knots 4 fathoms. The log line had been 
carefully marked and measured and the glass timed both before and 
after. At 1 : 30 a. in. lost sight oi the vessel's wake, having overrun his 
turning point, but judging he would haul to the eastward around the 
shoal, 1 hauled to S. S. E. At 2 a. m. I hauled up southeast and ran on 
that course till daylight, making about 13 knots. At 4 : 30 p. m. sighted 
the steamer's smoke bearing S. E. by S. and at daylight found him 
hull out about 8 miles off. 'Jhe chase then commenced in earnest 
and I found he was very fast, yet we appeared to draw on him in 
the increasing light. About 5: 30 he hauled to the eastward across my 
bow. I hauled up also to head him off and soon after discovered 
another vessel to the S. S. E. in chase, but she soon dropped astern. 
The runner then turned his stern to us and ran to the eastward. I 
kept the chase up till 8: 30 a. in., in hopes some of our offshore cruisers 
would be found on his track to head him oft', but finding then that he 
was leaving us, I was compelled to give up the chase for want of coal. 
Finding myself by observation on the meridian of Beaufort, I shaped 
my course for that place. 

Commander Clary, the senior officer present off the bar, intended 
that I should leave therefor Beaufort this evening for a supply of coal, 
but the chase leading me to a point quite as near Beaufort as the bar, 
I deem it proper (and hope you will approve of it) to make my way 
with all speed to that port, as I am now reduced to 15 tons of coal in 
the bunkers. 

The steamer I chased is a very long, low, side-wheel vessel, with two 
smokestacks and two masts. 

I have no hesitation in pronouncing her a 14-knot vessel. While it 
was calm, the Alabama, could keep way with her, but a breeze springing 
up from the southward at 8 a. m. it gave his fires draft, and the moment 
he turned head to the wind, his speed increased amazingly. 
I am, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, 

FRANK SMITH, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 315 

Order of the Secretary of the Navy 1o Lieutenant Gushing, U. 8. Navy, to 
proceed to Neic York for the purchase of india-rubber boat. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 28, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed to New York and report to Rear- Admiral Gregory, 
who will assist you in the purchase of a suitable tug and india-rubber 
boat. 

Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Lieutenant WM. B. GUSHING, U. S. Navy, 

U. 8. 8. Monticello, Present. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, requesting a change of 

flagship, 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 28, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully request that a man-of-war-built steamer, with 
efficient steam and battery power, may be allowed as flagship to this 
squadron. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, regarding the departure 
of steam tugs for the West Gulf Squadron. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 28, 1864. 

SIR: The stcain tugs Tritonia, Pink, Althea, and Rose left this harbor 
on the 20th instant in company, under orders to report to Rear- Admiral 
Farragut, commanding West Gulf Blockading Squadron. These ves- 
sels, having been in service during the operations in James River, were 
repaired and overhauled carefully at the Norfolk yard, and previous to 
their departure the Althea and Rose were each fitted with the torpedo 
arrangement and furnished with three torpedoes each, which I judged 
would be acceptable to Admiral Farragut. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Smith, U. S. 
Navy, assigning him to duty as divisional officer in James River. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 28, 1864. 

SIR: You are hereby assigned to duty as divisional officer in com- 
mand of the division of this squadron in James River, which will 



316 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

consist of the following vessels, viz: Onondaga, Saugns, Delaware, 
torpedo boats (tugs) 1, 3, 4, 5, 6; Mendota, Hunchback, tiassacus. Com- 
modore Perry, Canonicus, Stepping Stones, Atlanta, Commodore Morris, 
Osceola, General Putnam, Agawam, Alert, Mackinaw, Peqitot, Eutaw, 
Commodore Barney, Young America, Dawn; Mount \\axln tujton, Wil- 
derness, transports and supply vessels. 

Your headquarters will be up and down the river, as circumstances 
may require. The Minnesota will remain in the roads and attend to 
the current business at that point, under your supervision. 

My headquarters will hereafter be at Beaufort, for which place 1 
leave to-day. 

Keep ine regularly informed of the situation, as heretofore directed, 
and make reports to the Department direct if necessary. 

If any emergency should occur or be likely to occur within the limits 
of your division, take measures to inform me as soon as possible, 
liespectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain M. SMITH, 

Divisional Officer, James River. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, acknowledging Depart- 
ment's orders regarding a change of headquarters. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 28, 1864. 

SIR: The Department's communication of 26th instant, directing the 
headquarters of this squadron to be removed to Beaufort, and giving 
directions for the establishment of other divisions, is received; its tel- 
egram of the same date, referring to the same subject, was also duly 
received. 

I issued an order on the 20th instant placing Commander Macomb in 
charge of the division in the sounds of North Carolina and have 
to day placed Captain Smith in command of the James River division. 
I leave this afternoon for Beaufort and Wilmington, in compliance 
with the Department's order of 26th instant, received to-day. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of. Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, regarding measures for 
the capture of a party from the C. S. S. Alabama, under command of 
Lieutenant Kell, C. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 28, 1X64. 

SIR: Tbe Department's telegram of 26th instant, informing me of 
the reported design of Lieutenant Kell, with several of the crew of the 
Alabama, to run into Wilmington and obtain a vessel in her stead, was 
received on that date, and I have communicated the information to the 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 317 

divisional officers off' Wilmington, with instructions to observe especial 
vigilance and mnke every effort to capture this party. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Graves, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Miami. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 28, 1864. 

SIR: Proceed with the Miami under your command to report for 
duty to Captain M. Smith, divisional officer in James Kiver. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant G. W. GRAVES, 

U. S. S. Miami. 

[Order of same date and like tenor to Acting Master George B. Liv- 
ingston, commanding U. S. S. Commodore Barney.] 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant White, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. State of Georgia, to prepare for tea. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 28, 1864. 

SIR : As the State of Georgia will have completed coaling by mid- 
night, you will, at daylight to-morrow (29th), proceed to Hampton 
Roads, having made the vessel ready for sea; and it Commander Nich- 
olson does not return by the Baltimore or Washington boat of to-morrow 
morning you will forthwith proceed to report for duty on the blockade 
of Wilmington to Captain O. S. Glisson, commanding first division. 
Respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant G. B. WHITE, 

U. S. S. State of Georgia. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master Sheldon, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Shokokon. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 28, 1864. 

SIR: Choosing favorable weather, proceed with the Shokokon under 
your command to Beaufort, N. C., reporting for duty on arrival to the 
senior officer present. 

Respectfully, yours, S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master W. B. SHELDON, 

U. S. S. Shokokon. 



318 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Captain Sands, U. S. Navy, regarding the vessels of Ms 

command. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 
Off Western Bar, Cape Fear River, July 28, 1864. 

SIR: Upon iny arrival here I found tbe following vessels present: 
The Dacotah, Mount Vernon, Montgomery, Emma, Banshee, Victoria, and 
Violet; the Ji'. R. Cuyler outside cruising. I also send the Mount Vernon 
outside to-night. 

The Montgomery, from foul bottom, is now so slow that the utmost 
which can be got out of her is 10 knots, and she will not do for outside 
cruising. The Fort Donelson will be outside as soon as she can take in 
her coal at Beaufort, where she now is. You will perceive that we are 
poorly off for speedj r vessels for outside cruisers. The best vessels are 
on the New Inlet division. 

The Dacotah goes for coal to-morrow. The Maratanza has gone to 
Norfolk for repairs ; the Nereus also. The Florida's rudder is out of 
repairs, so much as to endanger her safety, and can not be fixed here. 
The Calypso and Aries now in Norfolk. The Vicksburg expected here 
to-morrow from Beaufort. 

The Violet's torpedo arrangement is so slight that wo must try some 
other plan or the torpedo will be more dangerous to her than to the 
enemy. It might do for smooth water or river work, but will not stand 
for this rough sea, and the outrigger should be so arranged as to bring 
the torpedo over the forecastle to be filled, or fixed upon the pole, and 
to be let down under water when required for service. 

The Victoria will be sent for her arrangement as soon as we can spare 
her, when some other one of the vessels that are being repaired returns. 
She is a very useful vessel here. 

Very respectfully, etc., your obedient servant, 

B. F. SANDS, 
Captain, U. S. Navy, Commanding Division off Western Bar. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Hampton Roads. 

[Enclosure. Newspaper clipping.] 

The Bermuda Royal Gazette of the 12th instant says : 

The steamer Little Hattic, which arrived at St. George yesterday morning, was 
pursued to the "Wilmington bar on Thursday last by a Federal blockader. On cross- 
ing she was again met by another, which chased her for two days. The H. ran 50 
miles north of Cape Hatteras. The Federal vessel made 16 knots throughout the 
chase. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Frem-h. U. S. Navy, regarding an 
engagement at Four Mile Creek. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

July 28, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report to you that on the 27th instant, 
while on my passage up the James River in this vessel, I was stopped 
at a place known as Four Mile Creek, between two pontoon bridges, 
and compelled to remain about twelve hours in consequence of troops 
crossing the bridges. While there I witnessed an engagement between 
our forces and the enemy. The U. S. gunboat Mendota also was 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 819 

engaged shelling the rebels. The fight lasted about two hours, and it 
was reported to me by an army officer that we had beaten them badly, 
captured four guns and a number of prisoners. On my passage down 
I could see our troops occupying the heights at Four Mile Creek and 
Malvern Hill. 

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES S. FRENCH, 

A ding Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. 8. S. Wilderness. 
[Captain M. SMITH.] 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding the shelling of the enemy 
by the U. #. steamers Agawam and Mendota, across Four Mile Creel:, 
July 28, 1864. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
O^i Picket, Below Barricade, James River, July 29, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that the Mendota and Agawam were 
engaged all day on the -!8th shelling the enemy across Four Mile Creek, 
where they had been very busy throwing up works and maneuvering 
large bodies of men, supposed to be nearly all of Longstreet and Hill's 
corps. 

The enemy made a demonstration on General Foster's front and the 
Agaicam opened tire, but with what effect it has not been ascertained. 

Commander Nichols, of the Mendota, reports that he fired at inter- 
vals of seventeen minutes and that General Hancock informed him that 
his shelling was very effective and of great assistance to his operations. 
He had the misfortune, however, to disable his after 100-pouiider pivot, 
the rifles being the only guns that would reach the position occupied by 
the enemy. 

The gun was fractured from the forward edge of the reinforce band 
on the breech to a point forward of the center of the trunnion, but from 
the report of Commander Nichols, forwarded this day to the Bureau of 
Ordnance, the gun was properly served and every ordnance requirement 
complied with. 

A confidential communication from General Weitzel, received this 
afternoon, states that in view of a military movement ordered by Gen- 
eral Grant all the troops excepting General Foster's original command 
will be moved to-night from Deep Bottom, and requests all the assist- 
ance I can render him. All the naval force that can operate to advan- 
tage at that point has been sent. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Divisional Officer in James River. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Joint expedition in Chowan River, N. C., July 28, 29, 1864. 
Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Beaufort, N. C., August 18, 1864. 

SIR: Commander Macomb reports, under date of the 31st ultimo 
(received on the 3d instant), that he sent the Whitehead on the 28th 



320 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

ultimo ou an expedition up the Chowan Kiver to cooperate with a mili- 
tary force sent up on the steamers Thomas Colyer and Maasasolt. The 
expedition proved successful, capturing the steamer Arrow, at Gates- 
ville, and 90 bales of cotton and 80 boxes of tobacco, at that place and 
at Winton. When the Whitehead was ready to return John Kenny, 
boatswain's mate, was missing. After waiting half an hour the vessel 
proceeded down the river. Commander Macomb encloses Acting 
Ensign Barrett's report, and recommends him strongly for promotion, 
which recommendation I approve. 

Commander Macomb also reports that a body of United States 
cavalry and some pieces of artillery have arrived at Eden ton, probably 
from a raid through southern Virginia, and that they have captured 
the rebels who have been reported as carrying on a contraband trade 
through the Dismal Swamp Canal. 

I enclose Commander Macomb's report with its enclosure. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, July 31, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the 28th instant, in compli- 
ance with a request of General Palmer, I sent the U. S. S. Whit-dicmi to 
convoy and cooperate with an expedition sent by the general up the 
Chowan River, consisting of the Thomas Colyer and MlMMUoit. with a 
detachment of troops under command of Lieutenant [G. F.] Ward of 
his staff. 

The expedition was entirely successful, bringing away IK) bales of 
cotton and 80 boxes of tobacco. 

1 enclose a copy of Acting Ensign Barrett's report to me on the 
subject. 

I take great pleasure in recommending Acting Ensign Barrett for 
promotion. He has been in these sounds ever since we have had a 
squadron in them. I have sent him with every expedition since my 
arrival here, and to judge by the efficient manner in which he performs 
his duty he must have been sent frequently on such service by other 
commanding officers of the squadron. 

The Whitehead has just arrived at this station on her way to New 
Berne for repairs, and reports that a body of cavalry and some pieces 
of artillery (United States) have arrived at Edeuton. He thinks they 
have been on a raid through southern Virginia. 

1 shall go up to Edeuton to-day to communicate with them. 

Captain Barrett also says that these troops have captured the rebels 
whom I mentioned as carrying on a contraband trade through the Dis 
mal Swamp Canal, in a previous communication (No. G). 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander and Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 321 

[Subenclosure.] 

U. S. S. WHITEHEAD, 
Albemarlc Sound, N. (7., July 29, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your orders, I 
weighed anchor on the morning of the 28th and proceeded up the Chowan 
Kiver in company with the army steamers Thomas Colyer and Massasoit. 
We arrived off Win ton at 11 : 30 a. m., when a company of soldiers were 
lauded and captured 3 bales of cotton, 100 boxes of tobacco, - 
pounds of bacon, and also destroyed a quantity of salt. We then pro- 
ceeded up the river with the Thomas Colyer and Massasoit as far as 
Barton's Mill, where a search was made for contraband goods, but with- 
out success. At 2: 30" p. in. we started down the river and arrived oft' 
Gatesville [Gates'] Ferry at 4: 30, where we stopped, and a detachment 
of soldiers was landed from the Massasoit. The troops marched to 
Gatesville and captured the steamer Arro?v and 10 bales of cotton. I 
sent an officer from this vessel with the pilot and a quartermaster to 
bring her down the creek, which they succeeded in doing. The follow- 
ing morning (29th) I took the Arrow in tow and proceeded down to 
Colerain, where I arrived at 8:30 a. m., and landed a working party of 
25 men from this vessel to load the steamer Thomas Colyer with cotton. 
We succeeded in getting all the cotton, consisting of 90 bales, and also 
80 boxes tobacco safely on board by 7 p. m. \Vhen ready to leave, one 
of the crew of this vessel, John Kenny, boatswain's mate, was missing, 
and, after a fruitless search for him of half an hour, we proceeded down 
the river and arrived and anchored near the U. S. S. Mattabesett, off the 
mouth of the Chowan Kiver, at 11 : 30 p. m. During the expedition the 
rudder of this vessel became disabled, owing to the shoe breaking or 
becoming detached from the iron sternpost, thus leaving no support to 
the heel of the rudder. It is now in a very unsafe condition and not 
to be depended on in an emergency. 

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. W. BARRETT, 
Acting Ensign, Commanding. 

Commander WM. H. MACOMB, 

Senior Naval Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



Letter from Brigadier-General Palmer, U. S. Army, to Commander Macomb, U. S. Navy. 

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH. CAROLINA, 

New Berne, N. G., August 4, 1864. 

CAPTAIN: I desire to return many thanks for the assistance ren- 
dered in the recent expedition up the Chowan. It was very successful, 
and Lieutenant Ward speaks in the highest terms of the manner in 
which the officers and sailors assisted in getting the cotton and tobacco 
on our vessels. 

A few more expeditions of this sort would quite set the Government 
up in the way of these supplies. 

To-day the steamer Pilot Boy runs up to the fleet, and as I hear of 
several refugees up the Chowau who desire to be brought away I wish 
her to run up there. If you can send a gunboat as escort I will thank 
you to do so. They will not go far up the river. 

Confidential. As I wish to make another attempt to get cotton and 
other products soon, I think it best that no landing by the forces should 
N w R VOL 10 21 



322 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

be made other than the small boats to bring away the refugees. If 
small parties go on shore to look around I fear that they (the people) 
will become frightened and remove all the products from our reach. 
Very respectfully, yours, 

I. N. PALMER, 

Brigadier- Genera L 
Commander W. FT. MACOMB, 

Senior Naval Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



Report of Acting Master Phelon, U. S. Navy, of the arrival of the U. S. 
steamers Monticello and Nansemond, with tugs, at Hatteras Inlet. 

U. S. S. MONTICELLO, 
Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina, July 29, 1864. 

SIB : I have the honor to report our safe arrival stt this place, together 
with the Nansemond and the four tugs. We left Fortress Monroe on 
the evening of the 27th instant, \\\QNanscwond towing the Belle and 
Bazely ; this ship, the Hoyt and Martin. The weather was tine, and 
continued so until the next morning, when the breeze freshened up 
from the southwest and the sea became so rough that we were obliged 
to slow down our engines in order to tow the tugs in salety : as it was, 
they had considerable difficulty in keeping tree of water. Toward 
evening the wind and sea increased, and affairs began to assume a 
serious aspect. I sent the second cutter and several spare hands to 
assist in bailing, etc.; they were supplied with life preservers and Cos- 
ton signals, and precautions were taken for almost any emergency that 
might arise. At 9:30 p. in. I was hailed by the Martin, and they 
informed me that she was sinking; this seemed to me very improbable, 
as I had towed her quite comfortably during the day, and there seemed 
to be no danger up to that time (9: 30 p. in.). I immediately lowered the 
first cutter, and sent her on board, under the charge of Acting Ensign 
Charles A. Pettit, executive officer of this ship. While lowering away 
our boat, the captain and crew of the Martin abandoned their vessel, 
and took to our second cutter (that had been left with them some time 
before). They were ordered immediately back. Upon going on board 
Mr. Pettit reported to me that she had some 14 inches of water in her 
hold; the boat's crew set to work and soon had her clear; we then pro- 
ceeded on our course. During the middle and morning watches the 
tugs broke adrift three times, and we were delayed several hours in 
picking them up. At 4 : 30 a. in. everything was secured, and at 8 a. in. 
we arrived at Hatteras Inlet. The Nansemond will start at high water 
(1 p. in.) with all the tugs in tow, and report as per orders. 1 can not 
close this report without expressing my appreciation of the services of 
my officers and crew, who cheerfully assisted me during the whole 
night. The pilot sent by you on board this ship did his duty in a 
satisfactory manner. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HENRY A. PHELON, 
Acting Master, Commanding, 

Acting Bear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 323 

Report of Captain Glisson, U. 8. Navy, regarding the movements of a 
steamer near Federal Point carrying troops, July 29-30, 1864. 

TJ. S. S. SANTIAGO DE CUBA, 

Off New Inlet, August 3, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report tliat on the evening of the 29th July, 1864, we 
discovered a large steamer near Federal Point, painted black, and 
filled with men; there could not have been less than 600 or 700 men 
on board. At daylight the next morning she was not to be seen. My 
impression at the time was that they were sending men away or were 
receiving reinforcements. In the afternoon of the 30th July, about 6 
p. m., we discovered the same steamer in the same place filled with 
men. Since that time we have not seen the steamer with the men on 
board. 

My impression is that large numbers of men have been sent from 
this point to reinforce other places. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

O. S. GLISSON, 
Captain and Divisional Officer. 
Acting Rear- Admiral SAML. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Macomb, U. 8. Navy, regarding the disposition of 
vessels in the sounds of North Carolina. 

TJ. S. S. SHAMROCK, July 30, 1864. 

SIR: The following is the disposition of the vessels in the sounds of 
North Carolina: 

A t New Berne. The Tacony, Hetzel, Loclcwood, Commodore Hull, Loui- 
siana, and Valley City. The two latter are employed, as picket boats in 
tlie I'amlico River, relieving each other by turns. The Commodore 
Hull and Hetzel are repairing. The Tacony has taken the place of the 
Cliicopee on this station. 

In Albermarle Sound. The Shamrock, Chicopee, Otsego, Mattabesett, 
and Wyalusing. These vessels lie about 4 miles southwest of Perqui- 
mans Kiver. The Ceres and Whitehead are on picket duty off the 
mouth of Roanoke River. The Wyalusing is on her way to New Berne 
to relieve the Tacony. As it is necessary to have an experienced officer 
and one of the large vessels to superintend the affairs of the squadron 
in Pamlico Sound,, I have made the arrangement of sending one of the 
double enders to New Berne at short intervals, relieving the one previ- 
ously there, which allows them to make any slight repairs that may be 
necessary with greater facility than they could be done here. 

The Miami is on her way to James River with orders to report to the 
admiral. 

To save coal I have stationed one for the double euders off' the mouth 
of Roanoke River, relieving twice a week instead of sending one up every 
day, as I had previously done. My reason for sending a vessel up to 
the pickets is that any important intelligence may thus be communi- 
cated to me without removing the picket boats from their stations. 

In conclusion, I beg leave to call your attention to the defective condi- 
tion of the following steamers, viz: The Commodore Hull, Hetzel, Lock 
icood, Whitehead, and Bombshell. The boilers of the Hull are very old and 
require frequent repairs; she is now repairing and will probably not be 



324 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



completed in less than two weeks. The valves of the HetzeVs engine 
have been so ground down by frequent repairs, in consequence of long 
and continuous service, that they are available for but little steaming. 
The Bombshell (at Ocracoke Inlet blockading) leaks badly, and is ordered 
to New Berne for repairs. The sloop Granite is at Hatteras Inlet, as 
guard vessel and for superintending the supplying of coal for this 
squadron. 

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. II. MACOMH, 
Commander and Senior Officer Sounds, North Carolina. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, giving stations of vessels 
of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Beaufort Harbor, North Carolina, July 31, J8<>1. 

SIR: The following is the disposition of vessels composing the Xorth 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, viz: 



Name. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Beaufort, N. C 


Flagship. 

Repairing at Norfolk. 
Coaling at Beaufort. 
Do. 

Repairing at Norfolk. 
Do. 
Do. 
Coaling at Beaufort. 
Coal transport for both divisions. 
Tugboat. 




First Division, oft' New Inlet, 
JS.C. 
do 






do 




... do 




do 


State of Georgia 


do 


Monticello 


do 


Howquah 


do 




do . ... 




... do 




... do 


Quaker City 


do 


Mercedita 


do 


Niphon 


do 


Britannia 


do 


Cherokee 


do 


Fort Jackson 


Second Division, off Western 
Bar. 
do 


R.R.Cuyler 


Mount V ernon 


do 


Cambridge 


..do .... 


Montgomery 


do 


Maratanza 


do 


Calypso. ... 


rln 


Aries dn . 


Banshee 


do 


Fahkee 


do 


Violet 


do 


Florida 


do 


Nereus 


do 


Vicksburg 


do 


Emma 


do 


Fort Donelson 


do 


Shamrock 


Third Division, sounds of 
North Carolina. 
do 


Tacony 


Chicopee 


do 


Louisiana 


do 


Valley City 


do 


Lock wood 


do 


Ceres 


do 


Mattabesett 


do 


Wyalusing 


do 


Otsego 


...do... 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



325 



Name. 


Station. 


Remarks. 


Commodore Hull 


Third Division, sounds of 




Hetzel 


North Carolina. 
do 




Whitehead 


do 






do 






do 


Stores. 


liazelv No 2 


... do 


Tug 




do 


Torpedo tu". 




do 


Stores. 


Hovt 


do 


Torpedo boat. 


Belie 


do 


Do. 


Arietta 


Beaufort N C 






do 


Stores. 


Lilac 


do 


Tugboat. 


William Badger 


do 


Stores. 


Nansemond 


do 




Onondaga 


Fourth Division, James Kiver, 




Saugus 


etc. 
do 






do 




Osceola 


do 




Commodore Morris ... 


do 




Mendota 


do 




Agawam 


do 




Stepping Stoues ............. 


do 




Alert 


do 


Tug. 


Picket boat No 1 ... 


do 




Picket boat No. 3 


do 




Picket boat No. 4 


do 




Picket boat No. 5 


do 




Picket boat No. 6 


... .do 




Atlanta 


do 


Uej>airing at Norfolk. 


Miami 


do 


Do. 




do 




Dawn 


do 




Pequot 


.do 




Sassacns 


.. .do 




Hunchback.. 


do 






do 




Delaware 


.do 




Shokokon 


do 


Ordered to Beaufort. 


Henry Brink er 


do 


Repairing at Norfolk. 


Commodore Perry . 


do 




Mount Washington 


do 


Inside transport. 


Wilderness 


... .do 


Do. 


Minnesota 


do 




Young Rover 


do 


Guard. 


Heliotrope 


do 




General Putnam . 


do 




St. Lawrence 


do 


Ordnance. 


Daylight 


. . do 




Charles Phelps 


do 


Coal depot, Cranev Island, in charge 


Clinton 


...do ... 


of colliers. 
Hampton Roads, tug. 


Unit 


do 


Do. 


PoDDV 


do 


Do. 


Cohasset 


do 


Ordered to Beaufort. 


Zouave 


do 


Do. 


Mystic 
Crusader 


York River, Virginia 
. . . do - 




Glance 


do . 


Tug. 


Harcourt 


: do . 


Ordered to Beaufort, N. ( '. 


Morse 


.do 




Samuel I lot an 


do 




Grand Gulf 


Northern ports 


New York. 


Cactus 


do 


Baltimore. 


Isaac N. Seymour 


do 


Do. 


James Adger 


.do 


Philadelphia. 


Glaucua 


do 


Do. 


Connecticut 


do 


Boston. 


Dacotah 


do 


Do. 


New Berne 


Miscellaneous .. 


Supply steamer. 









I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Acty. Rear- Admiral, Comdy. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



326 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, regarding United States 
vessels at Beaufort, N. C. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Beaufort Harbor, North Carolina, August 1, 1864. 

SIR: I arrived in this harbor on the afternoon of the 30th ultimo, and 
found here eight blockaders, coaling and making slight repays. 

These 1 caused to coal that night and the following day, and have 
dispatched six of them to their stations, one, the Grand Ou1f,to New York 
for repairs, and the Dacotnh will leave for Boston to-morrow at daylight. 

The arrival of the New Berne this evening will detain me here until 
daylight to morrow, when 1 will proceed to the blockade of Wilmington 
and use every exertion to carry out the Department's views. 

The Malvern, as a tender to the flagship, while very convenient on 
account of the office accommodation for the staff officers, which no 
man-of-war of convenient size could supply, is, from want of steam and 
battery power, unsuitable for a flagship. 

I understood recently that a man of war had been built outside the 
navy yard at New York, which may perhaps supply the want in this 
respect referred to in my No. 4~>i>, of 28th instant. 

I have requested Naval Constructor Hanscom, who is going north to 
examine the pump vessel, to make exact enquiries on the subject. 

I propose, after making the best practicable disposition of the inside 
blockade, to inspect the offshore vessels on their stations, and for this 
purpose the Department will see that the flagship I ask for will, when 
it is convenient and practicable to the Department to furnish it, be very 
useful on this and other accounts. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Commander Upshur, U. S. Navy, 
forwarding list of vessels in James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, August 1, 1864. 

SIR: As soon as I have a little leisure I will see what I can do for 
you in relation to the tugs. At present I have two broken down and 
repairing and have to rely upon the others to keep the vessels up here 
supplied with provisions, stores, and coal. Below I send a list of the 
vessels in James Kiver, in accordance with your request: 
Agawam. General Putnam. Saugus. 

Alert. Hunchback. Stepping Stones. 

Commodore Perry. Mendota. Young America. 

Commodore Morris. Mackinaw. Eutaw. 

Canonicus. Osceola, Tugs (torpedo division) 

Commodore Barney. Onondaga. Nos. 1,3,4,5, and 0. 

Dawn. Pequot. 

Delaware. Sassacus. 

Very respectfully, M. SMITH, 

Captain and Divisional Officer. 

Lieutenant-Commander J. H. UPSHUR, 

Commanding U. S. S. Minnesota. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 327 

Report of Captain Sands, U. S. Navy, regarding the firing upon blockade 
runners by the vessels off Wilmington, N. C. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 
Off Western Bar, Cape Fear River, August 1, 1864. 

SIR : In reply to your communication of the 23d ultimo, just received, 
quoting consular correspondence with the State Department in regard 
to the vessels of the blockade off Wilmington not firing into vessels 
attempting to violate the blockade, I have to state that, as far as my 
experience of nearly two years upon this blockade will testify, that the 
statement therein made, that the blockade runners are not fired into 
by our vessels because of the " anxiety to secure prizes and unwilling- 
ness to run the risk of sinking or injuring those vessels," is greatly 
exaggerated, if not entirely erroneous. 

There is scarcely a night when blockade runners are seen that they 
are not fired at, and when they get in without being fired at it is the 
exception and not the rule. 

The night before my arrival upon this station, Commander Clary 
(then senior officer present) informed me that two vessels going out 
were fired at several times, but which escaped in the dark and through 
superior speed, of whi.-h 1 suppose you already have his report. 

Only a few weeks ago (the last dark of the moon) a blockade runner 
was tired into by one of our vessels, and shrieks were heard on board 
as if from persons wounded by the shells. 

On the New Inlet side it was a common occurrence for vessels to be 
fired into, and those which did not experience such ordeal must have 
escaped unseen by our vessels. We do know occasionally of vessels 
coming suddenly upon our vessels in the dark and escaping without a 
shot, by superior speed, before the guns could be trained, as was the 
case recently, I am informed, with the. Governor Buckingham on the 
New Inlet division. In spite of all our vigilance, which I assure \ou is 
unabated, such occasions will occur in the very dark nights, and double 
our force will not prevent it. 

If the consular correspondent were present upon the blockade for a 
few weeks in the dark nights, to see for himself the difficulties we have 
to contend with, he would place less reliance upon such irresponsible 
reports, and it would not seem to him " so remarkable that so few of these 
frail vessels have been destroyed by shot and shell, "and "so few of the 
crews of those vessels killed by our guns," and would learn that firing a 
gun in the dark is not always sure of hitting the mark, especially in 
the hurry and excitement of a rapid chase. 

The marks of the Xiphon's shot upon the Tristram Shandy and the 
shrieks of the wounded in the case mentioned above, and in the Emily, 
or flee, I think it was, a man was killed and his body burned in her 
destruction, and in the Venus several men were wounded; and there 
are other instances where personal injury has been done to the crews 
by the fire of our vessels, shewing that all the vessels do not go free 
from our shot. 

The destruction of several vessels on this side of the reef in one month, 
under your own eyes, and of several on the north or New Inlet side, 
where I was senior officer at the time, in the month succeeding, will 
show the falsity of such reports. The wrecks that strew the beach 
north and south of Frying Pan Shoals testify that the blockaders off 
Wilmington are not so " unwilling to run the risk of sinking or injuring 
those vessels, "and the number of captures show that our vigilance is not 
relaxed. If the blockade is inefficient it is not because of the want of 



328 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

vigilaiice of the officers, for I have seen much to commend and but very 
few instances for reproof in the many mouths that I have been senior 
officer here; but it may be mainly due to fortuitous circumstances of 
dark nights and fogs, and the construction and superior speed of the 
vessels employed in violating it. 

Very respectfully, etc., your obedient servant, 

B. F. SANDS, 
Captain, U. S. Navy, Commanding Division off Western Bar. 

Acting Rear-Admhal S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Flagship Malvern. 



Report of Commander Nicholson, U. 8. Navy, regarding the chase of a 
blockade runner off New Inlet, North Carolina, August 1, 1864. 

U. S. 8. STATE OF GEORGIA, August 8, 1864. 

SIR: I have to report that at daylight on the morning of the 1st 
instant, New Inlet bearing west, distant 24 miles, made a strange 
steamer bearing west, making black smoke and standing to the east- 
ward. We immediately gave chase at full speed, steering to head her oft'. 
Without changing her course she crossed our bow. When nearest to us 
we fired the 100-pouiuler Parrott at her, but the shot fell short. We con- 
tinued the chase until 7:30 a. m., when the stranger was hull down and 
rapidly leaving us. We were about 5 miles from her. She had three 
smokestacks, one mast forward, painted the usual blockade-running 
color, very long, and appeared to have both side- wheels and propeller. 
The most speed that we could get out of this ship (burning wood part 
of the time) was less than 8 knots. 
Respectfully submitted. 

S. NICHOLSON, 

Commander. 
Captain O. S. GLISSON, 

Camdg. New Inlet Division North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Endorsement.] 

Chaser had no speed, but will do for blockading, having a very good 
battery, but needs extensive repairs. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regard- 
ing tugs for the squadron. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, August 2, 1864. 

SIR: Acting Rear- Admiral Lee has forwarded to the Department 
your communication dated the 30th ultimo, addressed to him. relative 
to the insufficient number of tugs in the squadron. The number which 
have been assigned to the squadron already will not admit of others 
being sent at present. The steamer Wilderness was purchased for the 
purposes for which you desire a steamer. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 
Captain MELANCTON SMITH, 

Senior Officer, James River* 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 329 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander English, U. 8. Navy, regarding readi- 
ness to repel attack of Confederate boats in Neuse or Trent River. 

TJ. S. GUNBOAT WYALUSING, 

New Berne, N. C., August 2, 1864. 

SIR: I am getting aloiig as fast as possible with all the repairs that 
can be made on the ship at this place. 

We are undergoing the customary ten days' excitement. "A most 
reliable gentleman has come in with information" that a large number 
of boats are collected up the Neuse or Trent rivers with the determina- 
tion of capturing one or all the gunboats. I have made all necessary 
arrangements to repel them. 

The Hetzel will be under steam this afternoon, Commodore Hull in a few 
days; so all the "lame ducks' 7 will be in a moving condition at least. 
The weather is painfully hot. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EARL ENGLISH, 
Lieutenant Commander. 
Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Comdg. U. S. Naval Squadron, Sounds of North Carolina. 

Engagements with Confederate batteries near Wilcox's Wharf, August 3, 
and near Harrison's Landing, August 4, 1864. 

Report of Commander Glitz, U. S. Navy, transmitting request of Major-General Butler, U. 8. 

Army. 

TJ. S. S. OSCEOLA, 

Off City Point, James River, August 3, 1864. 

SIR: 1 enclose you a telegram from Major-General Butler, TJ. S. 
Army. I got at once underway with this vessel under my command, 
and when a short distance below Light-House [Jordan's?] Point met the 
TJ. S. S. Miami, and gave her commanding officer orders to proceed to 
the point referred to and to remain there as long as it is necessary; 
also to communicate with the commanding officers of the TJ. S. steamers 
Daicn and Young America, and direct them to take their stations off 
that place and aid our transports, should they be again attacked. 

The commanding officer of the Miami informs me that he had quite 
a smart action with the battery referred to, lasting about an hour and 
a half, when he finally drove the enemy off. She (the Miami) lost 1 
man killed and 1 wounded. 

I did not go with this vessel, as it is not prudent to run her except 
in cases of necessity. 

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

J. M. B. GLITZ, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy. 
MELANCTON SMITH, 

Captain and Divisional Officer, 

Commanding U. S. Ironclad Onondaga, James River. 

[ Enclosure Telegram. ] 

HEADQUARTERS OF GENERAL BUTLER, August 3, 1864. 
There is a rebel battery at Wilcox's Wharf firing on transports. 
Will you please send a gunboat down? 

BENJAMIN F. BUTLUR, 

Major- General, Command in;/. 
SENIOR NAVAL OFFICER, 

Off City Point, [ Va.\. 



330 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Beport of Acting Eear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Beaufort, N. C., August 22, 1864. 

SIR: Captain Smith, under date of 5th instant, reports operations in 
James .River on the 3d, 4th, and 5th instant, for which the following is 
a summary : 

At about 3:30 p. m., the 3d, a battery near Wilcox's Wharf opened 
on some passing transports. The tiring being heard on the Miami, then 
passing up the river, she went ahead and engaged the battery, and 
alter an hour's sharp firing dislodged the enemy and then shelled the 
banks for some distance above and below. Acting Volunteer Lieuten- 
ant Graves states that the battery consisted of six riHed 12 pounders. 
The Miami had 1 man killed and 1 wounded, arid received some dam- 
age, being struck by two shot, which tore away some of the woodwork 
and steering gear and two outside planks for a distance of several feet, 
causing her to make some water during the action. 

About 11 a. in., on the 4th, a battery opened on army transports 
near Harrison's Landing. The Osceola and Miami proceeded down the 
river and opened tire, when the enemy immediately abandoned the 
position. These vessels then shelled the bank, tiring some at houses 
and other prominent points for 2 or 3 miles above and below the land- 
ing. A contraband brought oft' by the Osceola (and who was injudi- 
ciously permitted to return ashore) stated that the battery consisted of 
from ten to fifteen guns, supported by an infantry force of 2,000, under 
Ewell. 

The steamer Brooks, belonging to the sanitary commission, was tired 
on by sharpshooters above Turkey Creek on the afternoon of the 4th, 
killing 1 man and mortally wounding 2. The Pequot and Commodore 
Morris shelled the spot where the enemy were supposed to be con- 
cealed, but saw nothing of them. 

About C p. in., on the 5th, the battery at Hewlett's opened on General 
Butler's works, the whole line soon becoming engaged, and keeping up 
a heavy fire until nearly 8 o'clock. The ironclads were not engaged. 

Captain Smith has stationed the Saugus so as to be shut in from the 
battery at Hewlett's, and considers this the best position for the iron- 
clads, as they can move up in a few minutes and engage the rams, if 
they appear, and at the same time need not be subjected to the morti- 
fication of dropping out of range when Hewlett's Battery opens. 

He has stationed the Miami at Harrison's Landing and the Dawn at 
Wilcox's Wharf to protect and convoy passing transports; which dis- 
positions L have approved. 

I enclose (1), Captain Smith's report of August 5; (2), August 3, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Graves (commanding Miami), reporting 
engagement on the 3d; (3), same, reporting engagement on the 4th; 
(4), Commander Clitz (commanding Osceola), reporting same; (5), 
August 4,* Lieutenant Commander Quackenbush (commanding Pequot), 
reporting the tiring on the steamer Brooks. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

* See p. 337. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 331 

[End sure Xo. ].] 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
On Picket, Below the Barricade, James River, August .-}, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your order of the 16th ultimo, I herewith 
enclose a report from Commander Clitz, of the Osceola, in relation to 
his shelling the enemy in the vicinity of Harrison's Landing, and two 
reports from Acting Volunteer Lieutenant G. W. Graves, of the Miami, 
in relation to an engagement with the rebels at Wilcox's Wharf on the 
3d instant, in which he lost 1 man killed and 2 slightly wounded, and 
of his shelling at Harrison's Landing in company with the Osceola on 
the following day. 

1 also enclose a report* from Lieutenant-Commander S. P. Quacken- 
bush, in relation to an attack by sharpshooters on the sanitary steamer 
Brooks, at Turkey Creek, in which 1 man was killed and 2 mortally 
wounded. 

.1 have directed Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush to clear the 
bank as far as practicable of all trees and underbrush calculated to 
conceal an enemy, and have sent him the Minnesota's launch and crew 
to assist in the performance of that duty. 

I have directed the Miami to take her station at Harrison's Landing, 
to afford protection to our transports passing up and down the river, 
and to make a recoimoissance with his marines at that place, when he 
shall consider it prudent, and have ordered the Daicn to take her 
station at Wilcox's Wharf and convoy passing transports until they 
are protected by the guns of the Miami. 

Hewlett's Battery opened about 6 o'clock this afternoon upon General 
Butler's works, which was returned, and a regular fire kept up from 
the Curtis house, Signal Tower, and Crow's Xest batteries until near 
8 o'clock, a large number of our shells grazing the crest of the enemy's 
works and exploding inside. The rebels fired at long intervals and 
without much accuracy. From the time of the discharge of the first 
gun, the whole line opened and a heavy cannonading by both parties 
was kept up until near 8 o'clock. 

The tiaugus was on picket, but so stationed as to be shut in from the 
battery at Hewlett's, which position I think it most advisable for 
the ironclads to occupy, as they can move up in a few moments to pro- 
tect the obstructions, should the rams desire to participate in any gen- 
eral attack on General Butler's lines, and would not be subjected to 
the mortification of dropping out cf range if fired upon from Hewlett's 
Battery. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain, and Divisional Officer in James River. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding ^forth Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Enclosure No. 2.] 

U. S. S. MIAMI, 
James River, August 3, 1864. 

SIR: T have the honor to submit the following report of my engage- 
ment with a rebel battery this p. m. : 

At 3:30 ]). m., while passing up the river, I heard firing above me on 
the starboard hand. Upon turning the bend I discovered a battery 

* See p. 337. 



332 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

stationed at Wilcox's Landing, firing upon some unarmed transports 
which were passing down. I immediately went to quarters and pro- 
ceeded to the place of action as fast as the disabled state of my 
machinery would permit. I engaged the battery at about 1,200 yards 
distance. After about an hour's sharp firing, I succeeded in dislodging 
the enemy and drove them off. I then shelled the banks above and 
below the position for a short time, and proceeded up the river until I 
met the U. S. S. Osceola, Commander Clitz, who ordered me to return 
and remain for the night. 

The battery consisted of six 12-pounders, two of them Whitworth 
rifles, projectiles from which struck us several times, inflicting some 
damage, killing 1 man and wounding 1. I enclose reports of casualties, 
ammunition expended, etc. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. W. GRAVES. 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Captain M. SMITH, U. S. NAVY, 

Divisional Commander, James River. 

[Subenclosnres.] 

U. S. S. MIAMI, 

James River, Virginia, August 3, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report the following casualties in the 
engagement with the rebel battery near Wilcox's Landing: 
Killed. Mathew Callahan, marine. 

Wounded. Michael 3. Donnelly, coal heaver; sustaining slight injury, 
with loss of middle finger of right hand; William H. H. Davis, coal 
heaver ; slight splinter wound of hand. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. H. MARVIN, 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, U. 8. Navy, U. S. 8. Miami. 

G. W. GRAVES, 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. 8. S. Miami. 



U. S. S. MIAMI, August 4, 1864. 

SIR: I respectfully submit the following report of damage received 
by this vessel in hull, etc., during the engagement with a rebel battery 
posted on the bluffs at Wilcox's Landing, James River, on afternoon 01 
3d instant. 

One shell passed through port bends just abaft paddle wheel, tearing 
away waterways, engine room hatchway, and division arms chest and 
steering gear. One shell passed through the starboard after covering 
board, bursting, tearing out two outside planks for several feet. The 
ship made considerable water during the action. 

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

HENRY S. BUCKLESS, 

Carpenters Mate. 
G. W. GRAVES, 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. 8. 8. Miami. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 333 

U. S. STEAM GUNBOAT MIAMI, August 4, 1864. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of ammunition 
expended on the 3d instant in the action with the rebel battery on the 
high bluffs opposite Windmill Point, James Eiver, Virginia: 

5-second IX-inch shell 5 

10-second IX-inch shell 13 

15-second IX-inch shell 23 

Solid IX-inch shot 2 

Stand IX-inch grape 1 

Shrapnel, IX-inch, Bormann fuze 12 

Can canister, 24-pounder howitzer (fixed ammunition) 1 

Percussion shell, 6-inch Parrott, 100-ponnder rilie 7 

20-second shell, 6-inch Parrott 4 

10-second shell, 6-inch Parrott 4 

Solid shot, 6-inch Parrott 1 

13 pound cartridge, IX-inch Dahlgren gun 2 

10-pound cartridge, IX-inch Dahlgren gun 54 

10-ponnd cartridge, 6-iuch Parrott 100-pounder rifle 16 

Percussion primers ". ... 100 

Your obedient servant, 

WM. N. WELLES, 
Acting Master and Executive Officer. 

Actg. Vol. Lieut. G. W. GRAVES, U. S. NAVY, 

Commanding U. S. S. Miami. 



[Enclosure No. 3.] 

U. S. S. MIAMI, 
Off City Point, August 4, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to submit the following report: 
At about 11 o'clock this a. m., while lying at this place taking in am- 
munition and burying my dead, the rebels opened fire upon our trans- 
ports from a battery at or near Harrison's Landing. 

In obedience to orders from Commander Glitz, commanding Osceola, 
1 got underway and followed him down the river. The rebels left at 
our approach, so I followed the example of Commander Glitz and shelled 
the left bank of the river for a distance of 2 to 3 miles above and below 
the lauding, dropping an occasional shell about the houses. I returned 
to my anchorage about dark. 

I append a list of ammunition, etc., expended. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. W. GRAVES, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Captain M. SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Divisional Commander, James River. 

[Subenclosure.] 
Report of ordnance stores consumed on board U. S. S. Miami August 4, 1864. 

Powder: 

Cartridges of 10 pounds, IX-inch, or 270 pounds 27 

Cartridges of 10 pounds, 6-inch Parrott. or 50 pounds 5 

Shell: 

IX-inch shells of 10 seconds 27 

6-inch percussion shell, Parrott rifle 5 

Percussion primers for same 40 

Very respectfully, 

JOHN B. WRIGHT, 

Gunner's Mate. 



334 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Enclosure No. 4.] 

U. S. S. OSCEOLA, 
Off City Point, James River, August 1, 1864. 

SIR: I have to submit the following report: 

This morning at about 7:30 the tJ. S. S. Miami returned to this 
anchorage and reported all quiet down the river. 

At about 11 a. ra. we discovered the enemy firing from a battery at 
or near Harrison's Landing. 

I immediately got underway with this vessel under my command, 
followed by the U. S. S. Miami. When near Harrison's Landing the 
Miami and this vessel opened fire upon all the houses and prominent 
points until our arrival at Wilcox's Wharf, where we remained until 
5 : 30 p. m., when the Miami and this vessel got underway and pro- 
ceeded to City Point. 

While at anchor off' Wilcox's Wharf, sent a boat ashore in charge of 
Lieutenant and Executive Officer [John] Weidmau to bring off' to the 
vessel a contraband, who was there signalizing. Information derived 
from the contraband leads us to believe that the battery consisted of 
from ten to fifteen guns, supported by an infantry force of 2,000, under 
the command of General Ewell. 

Doubtful information was received from the residents of the neigh- 
borhood on shore that tbe battery and supporting infantry force returned 
to camp. 

The contraband, not wishing to remain, was again landed under charge 
of Lieutenant Weidman. 

I shall detain the Miami at this point until she can fill up her defi- 
ciencies of ammunition, when she will proceed up the river and report to 
you, as directed by his (Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Commanding 
Graves's) orders. 

1 saw nothing of the battery either going or returning. I think it 
important that a sufficient force should be kept in the immediate vicinity 
of Harrison's Landing and Wilcox's Wharf, with discretion to the dif- 
ferent commanding officers to patrol the river when required, to protect 
our transports from this battery, which, in my opinion, is a field one. 

I herewith enclose you a return of ammunition expended to-day. 
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

J. M. B. CLITZ, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 

MELANCTON SMITH, 

Captain and Divisional Officer, Commanding 

U. 8. Ironclad Onondaya, James River. 

[ Subeiiclosn re. J 

U. S. S. OSCEOLA, 

Off City Point, Va., August 4, 186 L 

SIR: I respectfully submit the following report of ammunition ex- 
pended, together with the damage sustained in the gunner's depart 
inent during the firing to day in the vicinity of Harrison's Lauding: 

Shell and shrapnel : 

Shells loaded, IX-inch 5-second 35 

Shells loaded, 100-pounder 5-second 7 

Shells loaded, 100-poimder percussion 25 

Shells loaded, 12-pounder rifle 10-second 11 

Shrapnel, 12-pounder smooth 5 

Total shell and shrapnei ... 83 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 335 

Powder : 

67 10-pound charges powder pounds.. 670 

16 1-pound charges powder do ... 16 

Total amount of powder 686 

During the firing the elevating screws of both pivots gave way. 
There were also 15 fixed 12 pounder charges damaged by water. 
Very respectfully, 

J. C. BBESLYN, 

Acting Gunner. 
J. M. B. GLITZ, U. S. Navy, 

Commander, Commanding U. 8. S. Osceola, City Point, Va. 



Expedition to Cox's Mill, James River, August 3-4, 1864. 
Letter from Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Major-General Butler, U. S. Army. 

U. 8. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, August 3, 1864. 

GENERAL,: In reply to your enquiry* just received, I have to state 
that the only move that appears to be practicable would be to land a 
sufficient force at Dutch Gap after dark to capture the ''detachment." 
My boats are available for this service. Without removing a portion 
of the barricade I could do nothing with boats above the obstructions, 
and the time would be too limited to effect that. 

Should you decide to send a force, you will notify me in season to 
have my boats in readiness. The distance across is only a mile, and 
Captain Sanderson will undertake it with 100 additional men. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Divisional Officer, Commanding in James River. 

Major-General BENJ. F. BUTLER, 

Commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina. 



Letter from Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Captain Sanderson, TJ. S. Army. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, August 3, 1864. 

SIR: It would be well, I think, to send but a few men forward after 
landing to endeavor without noise to capture one of the enemy's pickets, 
from whom you might get information of the force at the mill. Should 
there be only a small force, try and secure the party. 

The toipedo should stand upon its bottom and be placed under the 
crossheads and slides. When in position, insert the friction primers 
and lead the match string through the window or door, and a quick 
jerk will explode it. The work should be properly done and done 
quickly. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Divisional Officer in James River. 

Captain SANDERSON, 

Third Pennsylvania Artillery. 



* Not found. 



336 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, transmitting report of Captain Sanderson, U. S. Army. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 

On Picket, Below the Barricade, James River, August 4, 1864. 
SIR: I herewith enclose a report from Captain [J. W.l Sanderson, 
commanding naval picket force, of another expedition to Cox's mill to 
destroy an engine, which General [R. S.] Ewell proposed to send a detach- 
ment of men to remove, and enquires by telegraph "if Flag-Officer 
Mitchell sends picket boats below the wharf," which dispatch was read 
by our operators and communicated to me by General Butler. 

I have not considered it of sufficient importance to make any report 
of the matter to the Department. Everything quiet in this vicinity. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Divisional Officer in James River. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 

CAMP OF NAVAL PICKET DETACHMENT, 

James River, Virginia, A it gust /, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations 
last. night: 

I proceeded with 40 of my own men on the U. S. S. Stepping Stones 
(Acting Ensign [John] Barrett) to the pontoon bridge at General [R. S.J 
Foster's command, where I received 100 additional men under com- 
mand of Captain [E. A.] Nickels, Eleventh Maine. Returning, we 
landed at a point near Aiken's Landing, known as the "Branch," and 
at about 2 o'clock this morning I advanced with the forces to Cox's 
farm for the purpose of destroying such machinery, etc., as might be in 
the mill and on the premises 

Upon nearing the point a small squad of the enemy fired on us, with- 
out, however, doing any harm. 1 immediately ordered my men to move 
forward in quick time, at the same time sending a firing party, under 
charge of Lieutenant [D. W. j Chambers, to the mill. No machinery 
could be found. The building is an utter wreck, and its contents 
removed; the walls alone are standing. Upon attempting to fire the 
torpedo the fuzes were discovered to be deficient, and the effort to 
destroy what was left of the walls therefore failed. 

The object of the expedition having, as far as possible, thus been 
accomplished, I returned to the Stepping Stones and embarked the 
troops. 

1 have to report the loss of 2 men, Private Wattson, Company G, 
Third Pennsylvania Artillery, and ! private (name unknown) of the 
Eleventh Maine, who strayed away from the command. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. SANDERSON. 
Captain, Third Pennsylvania Artil : <rij. 

Captain MELANCTON SMITH, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer, James River. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 337 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Quackenbush, U. 8. Navy, commanding 
U. 8. 8. Pequot, of an attack upon the steamer F. E. Brooks, near 
Turkey Creek, Virginia. 

U. S. S. PEQUOT, 

James River, Virginia, August 4, 1864. 

SIR : As the sanitary boat F. E. Brooks was passing a wooded bluff 
a short distance above the mouth of Turkey Creek she was fired into 
by a party of the enemy, five or six in number, killing 1 and mortally 
wounding 2 others on board. The Commodore Morris and this vessel 
immediately got underway and proceeded to the point at which the 
attack was made, firing a few shot in the spot the rascals were sup- 
posed to be ambushed. They evidently did not wait for our approach, 
leaving, no doubt, as soon as they had accomplished their purpose. 
The Brooks had up the sanitary flag, and there were ladies on board; 
in fact, the miscreants fired directly among them. The boat was on 
her way to your vessel, the party on board intending to visit Dr. 
Franklin. I think with another boat and a strong picket guard of 
soldiers the banks in this vicinity could be kept entirely clear. Above 
General Pickett's house, or Jones' Landing, I have felled the trees, and 
the Morris has cleared the bank for some distance below Turkey Creek. 
The intermediate space consists of wooded bluffs. I intend, to-morrow, 
to send a gang on shore and clear it. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBTJSH, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
[Acting Hear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.] 

[Endorsement.] 

U. S. S. MALVERN, 
Beaufort, N. C., August 20, 18fi4. 

When we first went up the river I asked General Butler to have a 
detail made to picket the bank for the gunboats, and I recommended 
to the general to have some clearing made on the left bank. The clear- 
ing required was considerable, and as the army did not do it, I gave 
verbal orders to the gunboats to clear as much as they could, and con- 
siderable clearing was so done in some places. 

Alter some delay the army, or rather General [C. K.] Graham, fur- 
nished a picket force of about 125 officers and men. More have been 
required, and I recommend that now, as marines can be got, that these 
should be supplied to each gunboat. 

S. P. LEE, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Davis, U. 8. Navy, of an attack upon 
the enemy at Bermuda Hundred. 

U. S. STEAM GUNBOAT SASSACUS, 
Bermuda Hundred, James River, Virginia, August 6, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that rebel pickets showing them- 
selves at 9 a. in. to-day about 1 miles from this vessel, I opened fire 
and drove them out of sight. 

I have the honor to be very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN L. DAVIS, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Captain MELANOTON SMITH, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Onondaga and Senior Officer Present. 

N w R VOL 10 22 



338 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, regarding the chase of 
blockade runners, and submitting suggestions for the approval of the 
Department. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BJOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Off Western Bar, North Carolina, August 6, 1804. 

SIR: Lieutenant-Commander Magaw, U. S. S. Florida, reports, under 
date of 31st ultimo, that about 2 a. in. of that date a steamer was dis- 
covered standing across his bows inshore. The Florida gave chase 
and threw up a rocket, when the steamer headed down the coast and 
was lost sight of in a few minutes. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant MacDiarmid reports seeing at about 
the same time and place the wake of a steamer, probably of that chased 
by the Florida. The Governor Buckingham followed the track, but 
could not see the runner. At 3:30 a. m. another track was seen and 
followed, and at daylight two vessels were seen inside the harbor. The 
Governor Buckingham stood close to Federal Point shoals while pur- 
suing them, and her commander thinks they must have passed inside 
the shoal. Captain Glisson, divisional officer off New Inlet, in forward- 
iugthese reports, states that both officers appear to have been vigilant, 
and that these steamers were not seen by any other vessel, although 
all were on the alert. 

Acting Master Phelou, temporarily commanding the Monticello, re- 
ports on the 1st instant that he sighted at daylight a large, low steamer, 
with three smokestacks (probably one of the recently built steamers 
reported to make from 20 to 22 miles an hour) which he chased until 11 
a. m. unsuccessfully, the chase standing out to sea. 

Acting Master [Alfred] Everson, commanding Victoria, reports on 
the 4th instant, that on the evening of the 3d, while close inshore, he 
saw white water, apparently the track of an outward bound vessel, 
and followed it up at full speed, but it soon disappeared, when he threw 
up two rockets in its supposed direction and returned to his station. 

Captain Glisson reports on the 5th instant, that a low propeller 
steamer, with two smokestacks, got in the previous night (which was 
very dark) without being seen by any of the blockaders. He says in 
reporting this, I hardly know how we are to stop them. You may rest 
assured that we will do everything that men can do to stop this block- 
ade running. 

The blockade breakers have now facilities for running the blockade 
which they have never had before. Their vessels have great speed 
and are very low in the water, so that only their wake is sometimes seen 
on dark nights. They have now the advantage of a light-house for 
each inlet, of range lights and of army signal lights along the coast, 
and each runner is understood to carry a signal officer. I am credibly 
informed that many of these blockade runners are commanded by offi- 
cers belonging to the British navy, on account of their superiority in 
skill and boldness to the men formerly employed in this service. 

The Howquali is found to be one of the most useful vessels here for 
watching the bars. Six or eight more vessels somewhat of her class, 
turning quickly, of light draft and of better speed than the Howquah, 
would be very useful for the two bars. 

The first object of the blockade is to prevent anything from passing 
into or out of Wilmington. However great the exposure, labor, and 
vigilance exercised to effect this, which none but practiced professional 
men can appreciate, the experience of this war shows that it is impracti- 
cable to make a perfect blockade against steamers built expressly for 
the purpose of breaking the blockade. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 339 

The force present before the port constitutes the unquestioned legal 
blockading force, upon which devolves all the severe duty of the block- 
ade, with but little remuneration as compared to the outside line for 
prize money, except in the case of the divisional officers. 

The divisional officers therefore should be present oif the bars; and 
the fastest vessels, while we have but few, as at present in good order, 
should be outside for day chasing, as night chasing is seldom successful. 
I proposed to Captain Glisson to take the State of Georgia, a slow 
steamer with a better battery than that of the Santiago de Cuba, and to 
Captain Sands to take the Florida instead of the Fort Jackson. I 
pointed out to them what 1 thought were the public advantages of this 
arrangement, among them, that of taking in supplies at Beaufort. To 
this suggestion the former was much opposed, and the latter was will- 
ing to consent. Unfortunately, the State of Georgia and the Florida 
will soon need considerable repairs. 

If these views, which are respectfully submitted for the considera- 
tion of the Department, meet its approval, and the Department can 
conveniently supply divisional vessels of suitable battery and draft of 
water, i believe the result would be beneficial to the blockade. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, I). C. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, 
in the matter of the detention of captured persons. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, August (>', 1864. 

SIR : Your No. 453 was received, in which you ask to be instructed 
as to the course to pursue in the case of persons captured on board 
vessels which have no papers to show their neutral character. 

The second paragraph of the general instructions of May 9, 1864, 
authorizes the detention of foreign subjects captured in vessels without 
papers or colors, and the sixth section authorizes the detention of such 
subjects, where the neutrality of a vessel is doubtful, until the neutral 
character of the vessel is satisfactorily established, but that it is not 
advisable to detain such persons unless there is good ground for doubt- 
ing the neutrality of the vessel. 

in these cases you must exercise your best judgment under the general 
instructions. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Beaufort, N. C. 



Report of Commander Harrell, V. S. Navy, of the appearance of the C. S. 
ram Albemarle at mouth of the Roanoke River. 

U. S. S. CHICOPEE, August 6, 1864 5 a. m. 

SIR: I have to inform you that the ram made its appearance this 
morning at a few minutes before 4 a. m. It advanced as far as the 



340 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

mouth of the river and halted. I slipped and stood out slowly, with the 
picket boats, with the expectation that it would follow. It is yet in 
the river. From the number of people in sight on the beach, no doubt it 
was expected that an engagement would ensue. Under the circum- 
stances, I have detained the boats which were to ascend the river until 
I hear from you. The ram can capture them, should they do so, if she 
pleases. Besides, the Geres is absolutely necessary here to do- duty 
as picket. The ram is now lying in the river blowing off steam. I do 
not think, however, that she will advance. Should she do so, however, 
I will endeavor to draw her down toward the fleet. I shall now pay 
my respects to those gentlemen on the beach in the shape of a few 
shells. In haste. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. D. HAERELL, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Senior Officer, Sounds of North Carolina. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, August 7, 1864. 

Fit out as early as practicable two of the picket boats for Lieutenant 
W. B. Cushing. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Nn /// 
Ivear- Admiral F H. GREGORY, U. S. Navy, 

New York. 



Report of Lieutenant Casey, U. S. Navy, Commanding U. S. S. Quaker City, 
regarding the chase of a blockade runner by that vessel August 7, 1864. 

U. S. S. QUAKER CITY, 
Beaufort, N. 0., August 17, 1864. 

SIR : About sunset on the evening of the 7th instant. Cape Fear then 
bearing W. 4 S., distant 126 miles, saw a steamer steering apparently S. 
1 stood for her at once, and soon after the vessel altered her course and 
stood down directly toward this ship. From this circumstance and the 
fact of her being a long, side-wheel steamer, with two smoke pipes and 
two masts with topmasts set, I concluded it was the Gettysburg. On 
approaching more closely 1 hove to and challenged with signal lights, 
which not being immediately answered, burned the Coston signal for 
that day, when he immediately started off at full speed. I at once 
opened fire on him with the 30 and 100 pounder Parrotts, with what 
etfect I am unable to tell. The shells exploded quite close to him, so 
as to render him distinctly visible, but he continued on at full speed 
and was soon lost in the darkness of the night. During the time I was 
challenging with the lights, which did not occupy more than a minute, 
the steamer, I think, was hove to. She was not more than 300 yards 
distant near enough to see distinctly her rig, which is precisely like 
that of the Gettysburg. My opinion concerning the character and iden- 
tity of this steamer at the time was shared by nearly all the officers of 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 341 

this vessel, who were closely watching her during the whole time of her 
approach toward us. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SILAS CASEY, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Gomdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Beaufort, N. C. 

P. S. Since writing the foregoing I have learned that there were 
some on board who thought the steamer was a propeller. If their sup- 
positions are right, I think, in view of facts now ascertained, it is 
extremely probable that it was none other than the new rebel steamer 
Tallahassee. 

SILAS CASEY, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 



Report of Lieutenant Lamson, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S.Gettysburg, 
regarding the chase by that vessel of a suspicious steamer, August 7, 186 j. 

U. S. S. GETTYSBURG, 
Beaufort, N. C., August 22, 1864. 

SIR: About 5 p.m. on the evening of the 7th instant, New Inlet 
bearing W. by S., distant about 120 miles, I sighted a strange steamer 
with two masts, two smokestacks, and to all appearances a blockade 
runner, bearing S. W. from us. My boats were picking up cotton at 
the time, but I recalled them as soon as possible, and gave chase with 
all the steam we could raise. 

The stranger lay to till we approached within 4 or 5 miles, when he 
set his jib and turned his head toward us for a few minutes; but soon 
hauled it down and stood off S. E., making black smoke. I pursued, 
and lost sight of him at dark ; but continued on the same course, and 
about 8 : 30 saw a dim light ahead, and soon after seven or eight signal 
lights were seen in the same direction ; they were white and brilliant 
lights, continuing but for an instant, and apparently thrown up from 
the deck. 

I went to quarters, and continued so till we lost sight of the light, 
about 9:30 p. m., after which we saw nothing more. 

I should have reported this occurrence before, but this is the first 
opportunity I have had of communicating with the flagship. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. H. LAMSON, 
Lieutenant Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander T*uxtun, U. S. Navy, of observations 
made while on picket duty, August 7-9, 1864. 

On Sunday morning, the 7th instant, at 2 : 25, the rebel ram Albemarle 
was discovered by the Ceres outside the buoy at the mouth of the river. 

It is my impression that these nightly expeditions on the part of the 
ram are made with the hope of picking up one of the small picket boats, 



342 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

or ramming one of the double-enders and then returning. So far the 
ram has, in every case, turned back as soon as she was discovered, 
which looks as if she did not at present mean fight; would suggest that 
both torpedo boats be put in order and sent after dark to the mouth of 
river to blow up the ram. This morning the Ceres, by keeping close in 
to the southern shore, succeeded in passing this vessel, though we 
were at quarters and underway, with a hundred pair of eyes looking in 
all directions for the enemy. This shows how easily the ram might 
approach. I have therefore dropped down for a night station to a point 
where I will be out of the shadow of the laud. I do not think the 
torpedo boats can be safe or useful up here, unless they are to attack. 
If they are to fall back, they will only be an embarrassment and dan- 
gerous, should it become necessary to tow them. 1 sent the Belle away 
on Saturday night because I could not get her in working order before 
dark; very fortunate I did so, as I was obliged to be underway for 
several hours in the dark. The present inside picket work is too much 
for one bout. No commanding officer or crew can stand the strains. 
There should be at least three picket boats. 

Sunday night, 6: 20 p. m., a fire was discovered on the south bank of 
the mouth of the Chowan River. It appeared just after a very heavy 
squall of wind and rain. . t about 6 : 50 a large fire was started on the 
south shore of the bay about 3 miles east of the mouth of Roanoke River. 
Got the ship underway and laid knocking around till 8: 15; dropped a 
200 pound kedge. At 10 p. m. larger fire near mouth of Hoanoke renewed. 
All night signals were being made from Chowaii to Roanoke rivers. 

Monday morning at 5 a. m. Ceres fired two guns in rapid succession; 
got underway and boxed about. Ceres in mouth of Chowau River in 
chase of two boats. At 6 a. m. anchored with the kedge. So far have 
had a horrid time. At 10 a. m. Mr. William Atkinsoncaineon board; had 
permission from the commander at Plymouth to visit Eden ton; detained 
him for some time and then gave him permission to pass. Ram will 
come down frequently and endeavor to pick up one of us, or will risk 
an engagement with two double-enders. A boat expedition is to be 
sent to Edenton of two launches, containing about fifty men each. Saw 
floating battery at Halifax three weeks ago. Have never heard of 
another ram at Halifax. A steamer is building there, to run on the 
Roanoke River, but is not to be ironclad ; that's what Atkinson says. 
At 8 p. m. enemy making signals from Chowan River, south side; got 
underway. At 9 suddenly discovered the torpedo boat under our bow ; 
thought she was the ram. Went ahead four bells, just missed the tor- 
pedo and just missed firing into the tug. A narrow escape for both. 
So far had a beautiful time. 

Tuesday morning. Officer in charge of torpedo tug reports her dis- 
abled. At 7 a. m. send him back to the fleet. 10a.m., Basely just 
arrived. Much obliged for the beef. I want to send in to Edenton for 
news, but since I have been obliged to send away the tug (torpedo) I 
am afraid to leave the river uuwatched, lest the ram might catch us in 
Edenton Bay. 

Very truly, 

W. T. TRUXTUN, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Commander MACOMB. 

There are no general signals up here. I send a proposition,* which I 
think will meet the case. 

* Not necessary to publish. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 343 

Report of Acting Ensign Stothard, U. 8. Navy, regarding the loss of the 

U. 8. 8. Violet. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 
Off Western Bar, N. 0., August 8, 1S64. 

SIR: I have to report that last evening I proceeded to my inshore 
station, close to the shoal off the bar, and after giving my personal 
supervision to the ship until 9:30 p. in., I went to my room, leaving 
orders to be called if anything occurred, and at 10:30 p. m. at any 
rate, in the meantime to keep the vessel in 4 fathoms water as near 
as possible, moving in a circle. In about ten minutes I felt her 
strike. I instantly went forward and stopped the engines and backed, 
asking the leadsman what water he had. "Quarter less four," said he, 
" last cast," and was then hauling in the line. I took the line and 
sounded around the vessel, finding from 8 to 9 feet water, and directly 
forward of the stem 7 feet. By backing she moved a little astern and 
swung around, seeming to hang amidships as I backed. Fearing that 
she would forge farther on the shoal I let go my starboard anchor and 
as she moved veered to 15 fathoms. I had previously sent an officer to 
the Vicksburg, then in sight, to inform Lieutenant-Commander Braine 
of my situation and ask for assistance, whicli was sent in good time, 
boat, men, hawsers, and an anchor, though when they arrived it was 
high water, and in my opinion, too late to be of any service, the tide 
and sea having set her on the shoal into 6 feet water, hard on, and the 
propeller immovable, although I had 40 pounds of steam. My boat 
returned and I went personally about 12, midnight, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Braine to inform him of my condition, when he advised me to 
prepare to destroy my vessel as effectually as possible. After all prep- 
arations for sending officers, crew, and ship's effects off in boats that he 
and Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Williams, of the Emma, had sent, all 
of which I did, sending property, a list of which you will find enclosed, 
also a list of crew, I made preparations for her destruction as follows : 1 
put a lighted slow match to a powder tank in the magazine and closed the 
door, then filled a large, fine drawer with shavings and straw taken from 
pillows and mattresses, partially covered it with another, and sprinkled 
two quarts of spirits of turpentine over all and on the woodwork around 
it; hungup an oilcloth from the table, one corner hanging in the shav- 
ings, which 1 touched with a lighted match (in the wardroom), after 
all the boats, but mine in waiting, had left the side, and I -followed 
about 2 o'clock a. in. this morning. The explosion of the magazine con- 
taining about 200 pounds of powder occurred within half an hour after- 
wards, and by daylight she was effectually consumed. One 12-pounder 
was thrown overboard, one left on the forecastle, spiked with rat-tail 
file, and the 24-pouuder was directly over the magazine aft when it 
exploded, so that it was thrown into the sea. 
Your obedient servant, 

THOS. STOTHARD, 
Acting Ensign, Late Commanding Violet. 

Captain B. F. SANDS, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Fort Jackson, Off Western Bar, JV. C. 



344 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Rear -Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting the pro- 
ceedings of a court of enquiry on the loss of the U. 8. 8. Violet, August 
8, 1864. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Off Wilmington, N. C., August 10, 1864, 

SIR : 1 transmit enclosed the proceedings of a court of enquiry <>n the 
loss of the Violet, Acting Ensign Thomas Stothard, commanding, on 
the nights of the 7th and 8th instant, on the shoals near Western Bar 
Inlet to Cape Fear Kiver. 

Acting Ensign Stothard is a very intelligent and efficient officer, not- 
withstanding this casualty. I therefore respectfully recommend that 
no further action be taken. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

8. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Dev- 
ens, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Tristram Shandy. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, August 8, 1864. 

SIR : As soon as the U. S. S. Tristram Shandy is ready for sea, proceed 
with her to Beaufort, N. C., and report to Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. 
Lee for duty in the squadron under his command. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant EDWARD F. DEVENS, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Tristram Shandy, Boston. 

[Order of same date and tenor to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Henry 
J. Brown, commanding U. S. S. Dumbarton.] 



[Telegram.] 

FORTRESS MONROE, August 9, 1864. 

Double-ender Eutaw arrived here yesterday, from Peusacola August 
1. No news ot importance. She is in quarantine by post regulations. 

J. H. UPSHUR, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Hon. SECRETARY OF THE NAVY. 



L Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, August 9, 186-i. 

Land all Eutaw's guns but those on the hurricane deck and send her 
to Acting Hear- Admiral Lee, off Wilmington. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary. 
SENIOR OFFICER IN HAMPTON ROADS, 

On Board Frigate Minnesota. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 345 

Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, regarding affairs in the James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
Below the Barricade, James River, August 9, 1864. 

SIR : I received a letter a day or two since from the Bureau of Con- 
struction, etc., authorizing the purchase of two more vessels for James 
River, informing me also that there was another at Baltimore ready to 
be sent forward, which I have written for. When these are placed I 
shall consider the work finished, and will send you a tracing of the 
position of the booms and vessels. 

General Butler has decided to cut a canal across Dutch Gap and will 
break ground to morrow morning at 5 o'clock. 

About 1,500 laborers were sent over to-day with a large picket force; 
many implements for excavating are on the ground, and horses, carts, 
and barrows are constantly arriving. The time estimated for complet- 
ing the work by the engineer is six weeks, but General Butler says it 
will be finished in three. The depth is to be 15 feet below low- water 
mark, 40 feet wide below and 60 feet above. It is not supposed that 
the laborers will be allowed to prosecute their work at first without any 
annoyances and interruptions by the enemy. I trust I shall be able to 
protect them as soon as I can get my ranges of the upper reach. 

Since my last communication there has been no interruption to the 
navigation, no firing from sharpshooters except a few shots from Dutch 
Gap at one of the tugs yesterday. 

A terrific accident occurred at City Point about meridian to day, by 
which about forty persons were killed and a large number wounded. 
It was occasioned by the explosion of an army ordnance barge lying at 
tlie wharf, causing the destruction of several small vessels and doing 
very considerable damage to buildings in the vicinity. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Divisional Officer in James River. 

[Acting Rear- Admiral LEE, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.] 

N. B. August 10: At about 1: 30 this morning six shells were fired, 
supposed to be from the rams, one exploding in the water below Dutch 
Gap and another striking the bank on the opposite side of the river, 
but doing no damage. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Commander Macomb, 

U. S. Navy, in view of another engagement with the C. 8. ram Albe- 

marle. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Off Wilmington, N. C., August ,9, 1864. 

SIR: I notified you on the 6th instant that the Mattabesett and 
Chicopee were to receive at the Norfolk navy yard two Xl-inch guns, 
fitted so as to be fired with 30 pounds of powder and solid shot, instead 
of their present battery. 

The Department is of the opinion that too light charges of powder 
were used in the engagement of May 5 with the Albemarle, and that 
the IX-inch gun with 13 pounds and the 100-pounder rifle with 10 
pounds of powder can effect nothing, and that even using Xl-inch 
guns the vessels should touch the ram while engaging her and the Xl- 
inch guns be fired with 30 pounds of powder and solid shot. The 
Department still is of the opinion that ramming at full speed is the 



346 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

best course, but if Xl-iuch guns with the full charge are used, ramming, 
except witli the Shamrock, is not so important. 

These views are furnished for your guidance in case of another 
engagement with the ram, and I desire that you will, as far as may be 
practicable in that event, carry them out. 
llespectfully. yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Senior Officer in Sounds of North Carolina. 



Order of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master Livingston, U. S. 
Navy, to proceed to Harrison's Landing for the protection of transports 
passing in the James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, August 10, 1864. 

SIB : Upon receipt of this order you will proceed with the Commo- 
dore Barney under your command to Harrison's Landing and take 
your station off that point to afford protection to transports passing 
up and down the river. Shell every force you see and capture every- 
body you can. Move down occasionally to Williams' Wharf. Twelve 
torpedo boats have been taken up in that vicinity, and it will be neces- 
sary for you to keep a bright lookout to see that no others are placed 
there. 1 would advise you to clear the banks of trees and underwood, 
if practicable. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

[MELANCTON SMITH], 
Captain and Divisional Officer in James River. 

Acting Master GEORGE B. LIVINGSTON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Commodore Barney, Newport News. 



Report of Commander Clitz, U. S. Navy, transmitting report regarding a 
reconnoissance at Harrison's Landing, James River. 

U. S. S. OSCEOLA, 

Off City Point, James River, August 10, 1864. 

SIR: I herewith enclose you a letter from Acting Volunteer Lieuten- 
ant Graves, commanding U. S. S. Miami. Also a letter* from a Mrs. 
Harrison. 

I would respectfully state that we have now on hand at this point 
less than 400 tons of coal. 

An army ordnance barge exploded yesterday at City Point. The 
second cutter was on shore at the time of the explosion. Four of the 
crew were wounded. One received a severe scalp wound, while another 
suffered from an internal injury, to what extent it is impossible to deter- 
mine as yet. The remaining two were of no serious import. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. M. B. CLITZ, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 
MELANCTON SMITH, 

Captain and Divisional Officer, 

Commanding U. S. Ironclad Onondaga, James Rircr. 



*Not necessary to publish. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 347 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. MIAMI, 

Off Harrison's Landing, August 9, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose proceedings of a court-martial held on board this ves- 
sel. Will you be kind enough to forward to Captain Smith. I also 
enclose a note from Mrs. Harrison. 

I made a reconnoissance on shore yesterday. Saw a small force or 
patrol of the enemy, six in all. They were at the rear of the brick 
house. An old negro told me that there were six pieces of artillery 
and 2,000 men at the landing the other morning, but they had but one 
piece in position. 

My boiler is leaking badly and I am out of provisions. 
Very respectfully, 

G. W. GRAVES, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Commander J. M. B. CLITZ, 

Commanding U. S. S. Osceola, City Point. 



[Telegram.] 

NAVY DEPARTMET, August 11, 1864. 

SIR : As soon as guns are out of Ascutney and she is coaled, order her 
to proceed off Wilmington and report to Admiral Lee. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commodore J. B. MONTGOMERY, 

Commandant Navy Yard, Washington, J). C. 



Order of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, to Captain Sands, U. S. 
Navy, regarding measures for protecting the blockade from surprise. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Off Wilmington, N. C., August 11, 1864. 

SIR : Care must be observed when sending vessels to cruise outside, or 
off their stations for iepairs or supplies, that a sufficient number of men 
and weight of metal be always kept to protect the blockade from sur- 
prise from without or within, or both. 

When the divisional officer finds it to be judicious and proper to 
change any part of the instructions given him for the conduct of the 
blockade, he is authorized to do so, but he will immediately make a 
written report of what he has so done and his reasons for so doing. 
Have a good arrangement for learning when an inside blockader needs 
to be towed out. 

Very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Captain B. F. Sands, 

Divisional Officer, off Western Bar. 

P. S. Let all blockaders going to and coming from Norfolk touch at 
Beaufort to deliver or receive mails. 

Same to Captain O. S. Glisson, [divisional officer, off New Inlet]. 



348 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Master Keyser, U. S. Navy, commanding r. .S'. 8. 
Victoria, regarding the chase of a blockade runner. 

U. S. S. VICTORIA, 
Off New Inlet, August 12, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the 12th instant, at 1.30 a. in., 
being in 6 fathoms water, with the Mound light bearing N. W. by \\ . 
and Bald Head light S. W. by W. i W., we discovered a large side- 
wheel steamer standing to eastward. He discovered us at the same 
time and turned to westward; we turned also and fired our starboard 
broadside gun at him, and a rocket to southward and westward. He 
then turned to the eastward again; we turned also and fired our pivot 
gun at him, and two rockets to southward and ea-tward. Owing to a 
squall which passed over us at that time, we lost sight of him and 
returned to our station. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

K S. KEYSER, 
Acting Master, Commanding r. <V. 8. Victoria. 

Captain O. S. GLISSON, 

Divisional Officer, off New Inlet, North Carolina. 



Report of Commander Rhitid, U. S. Navy, regarding engagement* icith 
three Confederate batteries in James River, August 13, 18HI. 

U. S. S. AGAWAM, 
Deep Bottom, August 14 [15\, 1M>4. 

SIR: On the 13th instant, shortly after 2 p.m., rebel batteries at 
three different points opened fire on this vessel. One w;is placed on 
Four Mile Creek and consisted of light rifled pieces. The other two bat- 
teries, containing heavy guns or mortars, were to the westward of the 
creek, in a position not visible from our deck or mastheads, owing to 
the intervening woods. The creek battery was partly covered by houses, 
but in sight from the forward deck. We engaged them as soon as their 
position was determined and continued the action until about 0.30 p. in., 
when, finding our ammunition running sh'trt, having expended ~"2S 
charges, we weighed anchor and dropped down to order the Hunchback 
up. She advanced about sunset and fired a few rounds, when the bat- 
teries ceased at dark. We filled up with ammunition that night and 
resumed our station off Four Mile Creek next day, opening on the rebel 
lines that afternoon, I am informed with good effect. We commenced 
firing again this morning to cover the advance of our troops. 

I enclose the report of the gunner and the medical officer's report of 
casualties on the 13th, which were slight, considering the fire we were 
subjected to. The vessel sustained no damage other than a lew 
scratches. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. C. RHIND, 

Commander. 
Captain M. SMITH, 

Divisional Officer, James River. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 349 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. AGAWAM, 
James River, August 14, 1864. 

SIR: I have respectfully to report the following killed and wounded 
in the action of yesterday: 

Killed John Williams, ship's corporal; W. Burke, ordinary sea- 
man; W. Wilson, ordinary seaman. 

Wounded. William Winter, seaman, severe, leg; Henry Dedoll, 
ordinary seaman, severe, hip, left arm amputated; John Scott, boat- 
swain's mate, slight, nip; William Schuyler, ordinary seaman, leg and 
hand. 

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HEMAN P. BABCOCK, 
Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Navy. 
Commander A. C. KHIND, 

Commanding Steamer Agawam. 



U. S. S. AGAWAM, 
James River, August 13, 1864. 

SIR: The following is a list of expenditures in the gunner's depart- 
ment for this day, viz : 

5-secoud IX-inch shell 31 

10-second IX-inch shell 59 

10-second IX-inch shrapnel 12 

5-second IX-inch shrapnel 1 

100- pounder Scheukle fuzed shell 42 

100-pounder Parrott fu/ed shell 22 

100-pouuder 10-second shrapnel 25 

100-pomider 10-second shell 36 

Powder pounds . . 2, 270 

Percussion primers 240 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HENRY F. DUNNELS, 

Acting Gunner, U. S. Navy. 

Commander A. C. RHIND, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Agawam, James River, Virginia. 



Letter of commendation from the Secretary of the Navy to Commander 
Khinti, r. 8. Navy, for gallantry in engagement icitk three Confeder- 
ate batteries in James River, August 13, 1864. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, September 7, 1864. 

SIR: The Department is gratified in transmitting to you the accom- 
panying copy of a dispatch from Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, commend- 
ing your gallantry and endurance and that of the officers and men 
under your command, in the engagement with three rebel batteries on 
the 13th ultimo on James River, and expresses its thanks for the serv- 
ices and energy displayed on the occasion referred to. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Commander A. C. RHIND, 

Commanding U. S. S. Agaicam, James River. 



350 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Enclosure. ] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Beaufort, N. C ., August 25, 1864. 

SIR : I take great pleasure in calling the attention of the Department 
to the gallantry and endurance displayed by Commander Rhind, of the 
Agaicam, and the officers and men under his command, in the engage- 
ment with three rebel batteries on the 13th instant, reported to the 
Department by Captain Smith, divisional officer in James River. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Nary. 



Attack upon Union forces at Dutch Qap by Confederate Jleet and batteriex, 

August 13, 1864. 

Beport of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
Below the Barricade, James River, August 13, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to inform the Department that at 5 a. m. 
to-day two rebel rams opened fire on our land forces and laborers 
employed at Dutch Gap, and have maintained a moderate fire during 
the day. 

In addition one or more gunboats or ram gunboats dropped, down to 
Cox's Reach, and, together with the battery at Signal Hill on Cox's 
farm and that on the hill at Hewlett's house, took part in the attack. 

A movement of some kind had been anticipated, and the steamers 
Mackinaw and Delaware were stationed to command Cox's Reach and 
also sweep Cox's farm in the event of an attack by infantry, which was 
regarded as most probable, as two divisions of the enemy were known 
to be in the immediate vicinity. 

After one round from this vessel, operations upon the enemy's iron- 
clads were found to be impracticable from their great distance from us, 
except for the possible annoyance to people on their decks, and this 
contingency was so remote, and the means of directing or observing 
the effect of our fire so limited, that it was not deemed advisable to 
strain the large guns with the high elevation and heavy charges 
necessary to reach. 

The battery at Hewlett's being readily silenced by the army battery, 
no attention was paid to it from the vessels. The Saugus was therefore 
later in the day added to the Mackinaw and Delaware, making all the 
force able effectively to operate from that point, and had, with those 
two, maintained a regular fire until dark. Their fire also was dependent 
upon direction from the masthead, and its effect uncertain, but it is 
hoped may have been to some extent effective. 

From the position of this vessel and the Canonicus, it was impossible 
to aid them without greatly endangering our own forces, and they have 
therefore remained without other action than preparation for any change 
that may enable them to operate effectively. 

General Butler's loss as far as ascertained, 30 killed and wounded. 

Captain Rhind, of fas Agaicam, reports that his vessel and the Hunch- 
back were attacked this afternoon at 2 p. m. by two rebel batteries, one 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 351 

at Four Mile Creek and the other more to the northward; the first bat- 
tery containing two 20-pounder rifles, the other a heavy gun, supposed, 
from the fragments of shell, to be a X inch and a 20 pounder fieldpiece. 

The casualties reported on board the Agawam are 2 killed, 1 mortally 
wounded, and 3 more or less severely. 

I have sent the Saugus to assist in dislodging the battery at Four 
Mile Creek. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Divisional Officer in James River. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Savy, Washington, 7). G. 



[Telegram.] 

AUGUST 13, 1864-12:05 a. m. [p. m.J 

The gunboat Mackinaw keeps the Signal Hill battery pretty quiet; 
our monitors not firing. The Onondaga tired a few shots some time 
since. Two of the rebel rams fire occasionally, aud the 100-pounder at 
Battery Sawyer. The 100-poimder at Dutch Gap was fired twice. 
One ram lirs down nearly to Dutch Gap; another is behind the group 
of houses at Cox's Ferry. A number of wounded have been brought 
over. 

G. S. DANA, 

Captain, etc. 
Captain [LEMUEL B.J NORTON. 



Letter from Flag-Officer Mitchell, C. 8. Navy, to Major-General Field, C. S. Army. 

C. S. IRONCLAD VIRGINIA, 
FLAGSHIP JAMES RIVER SQUADRON, 

Off Boulware^s Landing, August 12, 1864. 

GENERAL: Your communication of this date has just been received, 
and I have to state in reply that the vessels under my command will 
be in position at the appointed time to-morrow morning to cooperate 
with you in the proposed attack on the enemy at Dutch Gap. 
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Flag-Officer, Commanding James River Squadron. 
Major- General CHAS. W. FIELD, C. S. Army, 

Chaffiii's Bluff. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP VIRGINIA, August 13 1:30 p. m. 

How long do you propose to continue firing! Our supply of ammuni- 
tion is limited, and 1 do not like to expend it without satisfactory 
results, which I fear is not the case, as we can not see the objects 
tired at. 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Flag- Officer. 
General FIKLD. 



352 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Telegram.] 

AUGUST 13, 1864. 

Firing has been going on all day from our gunboats and the battery 
of light artillery in position at Signal Hill (Rockbridge Battery) on the 
enemy at Dutch Gap. Our firing was warmly returned by the enemy's 
gunboats, assisted by the shore batteries at Baldwin's. I am happy to 
say no casualties yet on our side. The Rockbridge Battery of light, 
artillery did great execution among the enemy's works at Dutch (in p. 
The only damage done us by the enemy was a large shell, which passrd 
through an officer's bed, tearing up the floor and passing out of the 
back part of the house. No one inside at the time. 
Very respectfully, 

G. F. SMITH. 
Captain DAVIDSON. 



Report of Hag-Officer Mitchell, C. S. Navy. 

0. S. IRONCLAD VIRGINIA, 
FLAGSHIP JAMES RIVER SQUADRON, 

Salt Reach, August 14, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to inform yoi. that, in pursuance of an arrange- 
ment with General Field, I took up positions on the river with the three 
ironclads, the Virginia, Richmond, and Fredericksburg, and three gun- 
boats, the Hampton, Nansemond, and Drewry, extending from Bishop's 
to a point about a mile below, near Signal Tower. We opened fire at 
6 a. m., which was kept up until 6 p. m., firing during that time at average 
intervals of about 20 minutes from each of the ironclads and the gun- 
boats. Our fire was returned by all the enemy's land batteries, his 
monitors, and gunboats, and kept up with spirit until we ceased firing. 

No casualties occurred in the squadron. The Fredericksbury was 
struck several times, one shot passing through her smokestack. 
Although our vessels were within three-quarters to a mile of the enemy, 
it is believed that our fire did them but little, if any, damage, being 
directed by signals from the shore, as we could not see the position of 
the enemy from the vessels, but it appeared to be pretty accurate, our 
shells exploding near their supposed position. Our smokestacks fur- 
nished a good mark for the enemy's batteries, giving him a great 
advantage. He kept up a steady fire all day upon Colonel Carter's 
battery, established near Signal Tower, which, I am informed, received 
no damage, nor did any casualties occur among his men. 

I feel perfectly satisfied from the day's experience that no serious 
effect was produced by our fire upon the enemy, and that it was a use- 
less expenditure of ammunition. I have therefore returned to our 
present anchorage. 

There is no abatement of the sickness in the squadron. On the con- 
trary, the effect upon the crews of the ironclads from being shut, up for 
twelve hours yesterday, has increased it; almost all the officers, and a 
majority of the men, still suffering, though on duty, from recent attacks 
of the fever so prevalent at this time on the river. 

I, myself, am now, and have been for three days, sick with this fever, 
which I hope will be regarded as an excuse for any want of complete 
ness which may be discovered in this report. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 
Flag-Officer , James River Squadron. 

Hon. S. R. MALLORY, 

Secretary of the Navy, Richmond, Va. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 353 

Report of Commander Pegram, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Virginia. 

C. S. S. VIRGINIA, 

James River Squadron, August 15, 1864. 

SIR : In compliance with the instructions contained in article 7, chap- 
ter 7, of the Navy .Regulations, I have the honor respectfully to submit 
the following report of the part performed in the action of the 13th 
instant by the C. S. S. Virginia, under my command: 

At 10 a. m. caine to and anchored opposite Sailors' Tavern, and 
about 700 yards below the Fredericksburg ; opened fire from our forward 
7-inch gun and port broadside; moored ship and brought our stern gun 
(X-iuch) to bear on the camp of the enemy at Dutch Gap (distant about 
1,900 yards or less), from which I kept up a fire at intervals of ten, 
twenty, and sixty minutes, until dark, at which time got underway, and 
stood up the river and came to anchor below Chaffin's Bluff. 

The ship sustained no injury in the action, and her condition is 
unimpaired. 

The conduct of the officers and crew during the day gave me, from 
their zeal and efficiency (though many of them are inexperienced), the 
gratifying assurance that, should they ever be called into close action, 
the honor of the flag might be safely intrusted in their hands. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. B. PEGRAM, 

Commander, Provisional Navy C. S. 
Flag Officer JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Commanding James River Squadron, Flagship Virginia. 



Letter from Flag-Officer Mitchell, C. S. Navy, to Major-General Field, C. S. Army. 

C. S. IRONCLAD VIRGINIA, 
FLAGSHIP JAMES KIVER SQUADRON, 

Salt Reach, August 14, 1864. 

GENERAL : I moved down the river yesterday morning with the three 
ironclads and the three wooden gunboats, and took up positions extend- 
ing from Bishop's to a point near Signal Tower. We opened fire at C 
a. m. and continued it until G p. m. Feeling satisfied that we did the 
enemy no damage, as we were compelled to direct our fire by signals on 
shore, it being impossible to see the position of the enemy from our 
vessels, and that we were merely wasting ammunition, I returned last 
night to our present anchorage. I am the more strongly led to this 
conclusion from the fact that the enemy, although possessing the advan- 
tage of being able to see both Colonel Carter's battery and the smoke- 
stacks of our vessels, inflicted no damage upon either beyond striking 
the Fredericlcsburg several times without doing any material injury. 

It will afford me much pleasure to cooperate with you in any move- 
ment affording a reasonable prospect of injuring the enemy or retarding 
his operations. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. K. MITCHELL, 
Flag Officer James River Squadron. 

Major-general C. W. FIELD, C. S. Army, 

Chaffirfs Farm. 

P. S. Has my dispatch from Signal Tower, dated yesterday, reached 
you ? I should have informed you of my withdrawal from Dutch Gap 
last night, had I not been suffering from a severe attack of fever. 

J. K. M. 

N W R VOL 10 Jo 



354 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Commander Bootes, C. S. Navy, Commanding C. S. S. Fredericksburg. 

IRONCLAD FREDERICKSBURG, JAMES KIVER SQUADRON, 

Near Chaffirfs Bluff, August U, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your order I got the Fredericksburg underway 
between the hours of 2 and 3 o'clock a. m. on the morning of the 13th, 
and stood down the river for the purpose of taking the ship's station, 
which had been selected the day before, a short distance below Cox's 
house, on the south side of the James Kiver. Commander Pegram 
informed me, when getting near the Virginia, that he had a hawser 
stretched across the river. We had to use all the steam power to back 
and keep clear. The Fredericksburg grounded on the north side of 
James Itiver; got her off with a kedge and hawser, when she again 
struck on the south side of the river; no damage to the ship. Came 
to with a kedge astern, at about daylight. Weighed the kedge and 
stood down the river at 5 : 30 a. m. Came to with starboard anchor in 5 
fathoms water a little below Cox's house, ship's head upstream, kedge 
astern, lines forward and aft on port side; made fasten shore to spring 
ship as required. About 6 a. m. opened fire on Dutch Gap, by the 
bearings, from our X-inch smoothbore, our 04 rifle, and our 7-inch 
rifle. Was informed the shot, or most of them, fell in or near Dutch 
Gap. Had a signal officer at Cox's house, and he made about the same 
report. The enemy soon found out the true range of the Fredericks- 
burg, and struck her six times. One 6.4 rifle shell or bolt went through 
the smokestack. One 100 pounder Parrott shell struck a kedge anchor 
on the port side of the forecastle, broke the stack, and bent the shank. 
Fragments of shell cut away two after braces of smokestack, bent flag- 
staff, struck the ship in other places, doing little or no damage. Am 
pleased to say no officer or man was injured. So soon as I found the 
enemy had the direct range on the ship, and as I was using our guns on 
Dutch Gap, and the enemy taking deliberate aim and firing on the 
Fredericksburg, hauled the ship about one length ahead. He continued 
to use the same range, and threw his shot and shell a short distance 
from us. In changing the position of the Fredericksburg, I still 
retained bearings on Dutch Gap, which were used. The enemy struck 
the Fredericksburg three times in five shots. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. E. EOOTES, 
Commander, Provisional Navy C. S. 

Flag-officer JNO. K. MITCHELL, Provisional Navy C. S. 

Commanding James River Squadron. 

Shot and shell fired August 13, 1864. 

X-inch smoothbore : 

15-pound charges 22 

10-second shell 14 

5-second shell 5 

Round shot 3 

7-inch rifle : 

10-pound charges 24 

8-pound charge 1 

7-inch shrapnel 12 

7-inch percussion shell .13 

6.4 rifle: 

8-pound charges 25 

Percussion shells .24 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 355 

One incendiary shell, passed up by mistake, cap taken off and, to 
provide against any accident, was afterwards tired. 
Respectfully, etc., 

THOS. It. BOOTES, 

Commander. 

At about 7:30 p. in. got underway and stood up the river, Virginia, 
in company. About 9 p. in. came to anchor near Chaffin's Bluff. 
Respectfully, etc., 

T. R. R. 



Report of Lieutenant Maury, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Richmond. 

C. S. S. RICHMOND, JAMES RIVER SQUADRON, 

James River, Virginia, August 15, 1864. 

SIR: I have the following report to make concerning the operations 
of the vessel under my command on Saturday, August 13, 1864: 

At 4 o'clock a. in. I got underway and proceeded down the river, and 
when about 300 yards below the Bishop house took the position pre- 
viously assigned to this vessel, mooring ship head upstream. At 5:52 
a. in. I opened fire QU the enemy with shrapnel; finding them bursting 
far short, however, the projectile was changed to time-fuzed shell; this 
being changed, also by your order, percussion shell were fired for the 
rest of the day. Mr. White, the signal operator attached to this vessel, 
being sent on shore to mark the effect of our shots, telegraphed they 
were for the most part very accurate, but that, as far as he could see, 
only about one out of five of the percussion burst. We suffered no dam- 
age whatever from the tire of the enemy, only a few fragments of shell 
striking the ship. The firing from this vessel, rapid for the first hour 
of the engagement, was slackened, and one shot every five minutes was 
ordered to be fiied. This was changed to once every ten minutes, then 
to once every fifteen minutes, and finally, during the latter part of the 
afternoon, to once every twenty minutes. At G o'clock a. m., according 
to instructions, we ceased tiring, having fired in all 67 times 3 shrapnel, 
3 time fuzed shell, and 61 percussion shell. We ceased firing on three 
occasions, once for breakfast, once for dinner, and twice to swing ship 
in order to bring the guns to bear. At 8 o'clock p. m. we got underway 
and proceeded up the river, and when just above the Graveyard we 
grounded twice and were about one hour getting off. At 10: 30 p. in. 
came to anchor in open order below the flagship. Enclosed you will 
find the report of the gunner and the requisitions which were directed 
to be made ont. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. S. MAURY, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 



Report of Gunner Williams, C. S. Navy. 

C. S. S. RICHMOND, 

Off Chaffiri's Bluff, Virginia, August 15, 18(J4. 

SIR: I am directed by Lieutenant Commanding J. S. Maury to make 
out and forward to you the following report: 

At the beginning of the action on Saturday last, we had on board 206 
percussion, 25 10-second and 15 second time shell, 12 shrapnel, 127 VI- 
inch stands of grape, and 42 Vl-inch stands of canister. 



356 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Of these we used Cl percussion shell, leaving 145 in locker; 3 time 
shell, leaving 22 ; and three shrapnel, leaving 9. Captain Maury designs 
filling up the complement of projectiles to 200 percussion shell, 75 time 
shell, and 25 shrapnel. To this end 1 have filled up the enclosed requi- 
sition with the number requisite. 

The grape and canister, being Vl-inch, are deemed unserviceable, and 
I have therefore made requisition for the same number, respectively, of 
Vll-inch in their place. 

1 would further observe, sir, that the "lead-bottom " shell used in the 
treble-banded rifle gun in nearly every instance were seen and heard to 
tumble. This 1 suppose, sir, was caused by the nonexpansion of the 
saucer, the metal being too hard to fill the grooves properly. 

The 5-second shrapnel, which a table of distances and time of flight 
directed to be used at 1,750 yards, burst far short of that distance. 

The greatest elevation that can be given the gun of this ship is 
5 30', throwing its projectile 2,200 yards. In consequence the 15- 
second time shell are unsuitable and will be returned. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EUGENE M. WILLIAMS, 
Gunner, Provisional Navy C. S. 

Commander JNO. M. BROOKE, C. S. Navy, 

Chief Bureau Ordnance and Hydrography. 



Report of Lieutenant Wall, C. 8. Navy, commanding C. 8. 8. Drewry. 

C. S. GUNBOAT DREWRY, 
James River Squadron, August 14, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your verbal order, I have the honor of submit- 
ting to you the following report of the part borne by this vessel in 
shelling the enemy at Dutch Gap, James River, on the 13th of August, 
1864. At 5:30 a. m. I took position as directed near a point known as 
Sailors' Tavern, keeping underway all the time. As soon as the iron- 
clads opened I commenced firing at an elevation of 2,500 yards. Being 
informed from the battery at the Signal Tower that my shots were in 
good line, but falling short, I directed that the elevation be increased 
to 3,000 yards. This elevation, the battery informed me, threw the 
projectiles about the right distance. Having but a limited supply of 
time fuzes on board, I was soon compelled to use my percussion iShell. 
The Virginia came down and supplied me with a requisition of ord- 
nance that I failed to obtain the day previous. This I soon exhausted 
and at the time of the order "Cease tiring," I was out of ammunition. 

By your order I left my position to carry an order to the steamers 
Hampton and Nansemond, returning, however, as soon as delivering 
the order was over, and took position between the Virginia and Cox's 
Wharf to await your orders. The number of shots fired during the 
action is as follows, viz : 

Percussion shell 18 

15-second shell 4 

10-second shell 10 

5-second shell 2 

8-pound charges 32 

10-pound charges used with 5-second shell 2 

making a total of 34 shots. The gun used was a Brooke 6.4-inch rifle. 

I am pleased to record that, although exposed to the fire of the 

enemy all the time, no casualties occurred, and take much pleasure 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 357 

in stating that every one on board behaved in a manner perfectly sat- 
isfactory. The continual change of my position no doubt prevented 
my vessel being struck. 

I am, sir, with much respect, your obedient servant, 

WM. H. WALL, 
Lieutenant, Commanding C. 8. Gunboat Dretcry. 

Flag-Officer JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



Additional report of Lieutenant Wall, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Drewry. 

C. S. S. DREWRY, 

James River Squadron, August 15, 1864. 

SIR : In obedience to General Orders No. 16, 1 have the honor of sub- 
mitting to you the following report, called for in Chapter VII, Article 
VII, page 59, Navy Begulatious: 

The conduct of the officers attached to this vessel was all that could 
be desired. The signal operators attached to this vessel rendered 
great assistance in directing the line of tire, being situated in a promi- 
nent position on shore. 

The condition of the vessel after the engagement was the same as 
before she entered into action. I will mention that her shell, both per- 
cussion and time fuzes, were expended in the engagement, and her 
supply of coal limited. 

I will also state that the flame from the discharge of the gun set fire 
to the bulwark and caused me to knock away a slight portion of it 
without materially injuring the efficiency of the vessel. 

Since the engagement the vessel has been supplied with coal and 
ammunition and is now in every respect ready for action. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. H. WALL, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Flag-Officer JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant Hurdaugh, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. 8. Hampton. 

G. S. GUNBOAT HAMPTON, 
James River Squadron, August 14, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor respectfully to report that, in obedience to 
your order, I yesterday took position about 150 yards above the Con- 
federate ironclad Richmond and opened tire on the enemy's working 
party at Dutch Gap. I tired 33 shell, nearly all of which burst at or 
near the gap. One percussion shell exploded immediately after leav- 
ing the gun. Some of the percussion shell failed to explode. At 
12:30 I ceased firing and withdrew from action. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. MURDAUGH, 

Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Flag-Officer JNO. K. MITCHELL, 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



358 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Lieutenant Lamson, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Gettys- 
burg, regarding cotton picked up at sea. 

U. S. S. GETTYSBURG, 
Norfolk, Va., August 13, 1864. 

SIR : 1 have the honor to report that on the 7th August, 18G4, in 
latitude 33 56' N., longitude 75 33' W., this vessel picked up a quan- 
tity of cotton, estimated at 30 bales. 

The cotton is supposed to be the same thrown overboard by a blockade 
runner chased on the morning of that day by this vessel, the U. S. S. 
Shenandoah, and the U. S. S. Santiago <le Cuba. 

I send it to New York to-day in charge of Acting Ensign M. C. Keith, 
in the steamer Continental. 

Enclosed is the prize list of this vessel for this capture, at which time 
there was no other vessel in sight. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

K. H. LAMSON, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secre ary of the Navy, Washington. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, transmitting reports 
regarding the chase of blockade runner*. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

In Beaufort Harbor, August 13, 1864. 

SIR : The enclosed reports from Captains Glisson and Kidgely of the 
8th and 10th instant describe a remarkable and interesting chase of a 
new blockade runner, with three funnels, of the fleet Falcon class, from 
New Inlet on the 6th and 7th instant. 

The large number of steamers of great speed recently built abroad 
for the express purpose of eluding the blockade, and favored by the 
rebel system of light houses, makes it absolutely necessary to have, in 
addition to vessels of battery power to protect the blockade, two. other 
classes of vessels, one adapted to the close blockade of the bar, the other 
of great speed for chasing, together with reasonable capacity for sup- 
plies. A half dozen small steamers for each inler, of light draft, turning 
quickly, and with stability allowing of accurate tiring, with a transport 
collier for each inlet, would admit of a reasonably close and effective 
blockade of the bar. 

One swift chasing steamer, always present off each inlet to follow up 
vessels seen to run out at night, and a half dozen very swift steamers, 
capable of making certainly 14 to 15 knots, to chase on the Her mud a 
and Nassau routes, would soon put a stop to the violation of the 
blockade and its attending bad consequences. 

Enclosed is a description of the Ilowquah, which is found to be one 
of the best vessels for inshore service. 

I enclose also a report just received of a chase yesterday (12th instant) 
by the Mount Vernon of a steamer with three funnels, supposed to be 
the Falcon, as the New York papers of the 9th report that she had left 
Halifax on the 8th. 

1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 359 

[Enclosure Xo. 1.] 

U. S. S. SANTIAGO DE CUBA, 

Off New Inlet, August 8, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that on the night of the 6th August, 
at 9 : 15 ]>. 111., saw two rockets thrown up from the picket boats near the 
bar to the southward and westward. At this time we were heading S. 
S. W.; went ahead fast. At 9:35 p. m., believing that the blockade 
runner would change his course, I wore ship and headed N. ST. E. and 
put the ship under a full pressure of steam, and beat to quarters. At 
9: 50 j). m. saw white water and black smoke bearing N. by W., distant 
three fourths mile. This smoke was about three points on our port 
bow. Fired five shots from the 20-pouuder rifle, and one shot from the 
30-pouuder rifle, and one shot from the 32-pounder. Having kept the 
ship off, so that the guns would bear upon the chase, hauled up and 
stood for the chase; it is impossible for me to say whether the shot 
struck or not. By this time she was out of reach of our guns, steering 
from E. to E. by S., and we under a full pressure of steam steering for 
the chase. At midnight, chase bearing E., black smoke plain in sight 
from deck ahead, we using every means to keep up our steam. The 
highest rate of speed during the first watch was 12.6. At 1 a. m. a 
large steam transport passed between us and the chase with all her 
lights up, and many lights showing in her staterooms. At one time I 
was fearful that I would have to keep away to clear the transport, but 
fortunately she passed clear of us and I did not lose anything, and kept 
sight of the black smoke all the time. Much of the time we could see 
a dim light, supposed to be a light in a cabin window of the chase. At 
4 a. m., chase bearing E. f S.; much difficulty in keeping up steam. 
At this time the chief engineer reported that his firemen were nearly 
exhausted; there being no wind, found it almost impossible to keep up 
steam. At daylight the chase a little on starboard bow, about 4 miles 
off, often varying her course. At 5 a. m. saw two steamers on our port 
bow standing for the chase. At 5: 15 a. m. exchanged signals with the 
Shenandoah and Gettysburg-, at this time" the chase changed her course 
to the southward and commenced throwing overboard cotton, and 
dropping us very fast. At 6:50 a. m. the Shenandoah and Gettysburg 
had dropped in between us and the chase; finding that we could not 
keep up with the chase and the other two men-of-war, we gave up the 
chase and commenced picking up cotton, the Shenandoah and Gettysburg 
continuing the chase. During the day we picked up 43 full bales of 
cotton and a quantity of loose cotton, which I shall endeavor to put up 
in packages, marking the weight on each. When the chase commenced 
throwing her cargo overboard we were in the longitude 75 50' W., 
latitude (observed) 34 05' N. This blockade runner was the three- 
pipe steamer that you saw while at anchor on this side, and this chase 
was one of the most beautiful chases that I ever saw, and it is but 
seldom that any of our vessels have been able to keep sight of one of 
these swift steamers during the night. That steamer, I do not think, 
can make more than 13 miles per hour, loaded as she was. I was aver- 
aging over 12 miles with a log line marked 52 feet for a28-second glass, 
with plenty of stray line. 

Enclosed you will find the report of Acting Master E. S. Keyser, 
commanding II. S. S. Victoria, by which you will see that another 
steamer came out at the same time, was driven back crippled, and the 
other chased by me was compelled to throw overboard about 200 bales 
of cotton to avoid capture. We are doing everything that officers and 



360 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

men can do to break up this blockade running. Your present arrange- 
ment for night cruising is a very great improvement. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

O. 8. GLISSON, 
Captain and Divisional Officer. 

Acting Rear- Admiral SAML. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Subenclosure.] 

U. S. S. VICTORIA, 

Off New Inlet, North Carolina, August 8, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to report that on the 6th instant, at 9 : 40 p. m., 
being in 5 fathoms water, with the Mound light bearing W. S. W. and 
Bald Head light S. W., I saw a blockade runner steering about east. I 
steamed toward him at full speed. As soon as he discovered us he 
changed his course to southward. I fired two rockets in that direction, 
and fired our 30 pounder rilie at him, loaded with a percussion shell, at 
2 degrees depression, and distinctly saw the shell strike him and 
explode. He then changed his course to westward and stood for Fort 
Fisher. I fired a rocket to northward. In a short time he came to 
anchor under the fort and blew off his steam. Near daylight he got 
underway and went in to westward of the Mound and anchored. At 
noon of 7th he went up the river. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. S. KEYSER. 
Acting Master, Commanding U. S. 8. Victoria. 

Captain O. S. GLISSON, 

Divisional Officer off New Inlet. 

[Enclosure Ko. 2.] 

U. S. S. SHENANDOAH, 
Off Beaufort, N. C., August 10, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that we left Craney Island at day- 
light on the morning of the 29th instant for the Wilmington blockade. 
The next morning at 10 a. m., latitude 34 21' N. and longitude 76 
00' W. made out a steamer burning black smoke, about 12 miles dis 
tant to the S. W. She ran to the S. W., as the wind was blowing 
from that direction. We kept the chase up until 4 p. m., when we lost 
sight of her, steering S. W. At 4 p. m. made another blockade run- 
ner in latitude 33 34' N. and longitude 76 33' W., steering to the 
northward and westward. We made chase and overhauled her quite 
fast; she only escaped by darkness and running into shoal water; when 
we gave up the chase Cape Lookout light bore N. E. by E. We fired 
140 shots at her, and I think some of them took effect. He was a bold 
blockade runner and flew the rebel flag as long as we could see him. 
At daylight on the morning of the 7th instant, we made a blockade 
runner with three smokestacks with the Santiago de Cuba in chase. 
We came up with him the first two hours when lie commenced throw- 
ing over bales of cotton. After he had lightened, the blockade runner's 
speed increased very much and he gained on the chasing vessels. The 
Santiago de Cuba gave up the chase at about 7 o'clock a. m., the Gettys- 
burg at 8: 30 a. m. The Quaker City hove in sight from the south and 
eastward at 7 o'clock. The Quaker City and this ship chased him until 
12:30 o'clock, when we lost sight of him, steering for Bermuda. The 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 361 

blockade runner was the Falcon, I think, from the description given in 
the consular extracts. 

Yesterday during a chase, we broke some of the rollers in the main 
steam valve, which prevents our chasing. The repairs can not be 
made here. 

I came off this port to communicate with you in obedience to your 
verbal orders. 

I shall proceed to Norfolk and make the repairs while coaling. 
I am, very respectfully, etc., 

DANL. B. RIDGELY, 

Captain. U. 8. Navy. 
Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure No. 3.] 

U. S. S. MOUNT VERNON, 
Beaufort, N. C., August 13, 1864. 

ADMIRAL : I have the honor to report that on the 12th instant at 
1:30 p.m., in latitude 34 N., longitude 77 11' W., a strange vessel 
was discovered bearing X. N. W., steaming west. The fires were imme- 
diately spread and the yards sent aloft, and all sail set, and we started 
in full chase after her, steering N. W. by N. At 2 p. m. we seemed to 
gain a little on her. She was a very long, light lead-color painted 
steamer, with three smokestacks and one mast forward. We could 
distinctly see her at 2 p. m. throw several boxes overboard from for- 
ward. The stranger then altered her course and steered N. N. E., 
apparently trying to cross our bar; we altered our course at the same 
time to N. by E. We were now going 10 knots. At 2:45 p.m. the 
stranger was getting across our bow very fast; we then altered our 
course to U. E. by N.; our speed at this time was 11 knots. At 3 p. in. 
altered our course to N. E. by E. At 3: 15 p. ni. the chase was right 
ahead and gaining on us very fast. At 3 : 30 he was 8 miles ahead. 
At 4 p. m. he had gained on us so much that we could scarcely see his 
smoke. At 4:30 he was out of sight. When we were going 11 knots 
the chase must have been going 15 knots at least. The U. S. S. 
Monticello was right astern of us during the whole chase. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES TRATHEN, 
Acting Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, TJ. S. Navy, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Captain Sands, U. S. Navy, regarding various vessels of his 

command. 

U. S. S. FORT JACKSON, 
Western Bar, off Wilmington, August 14, 1864. 

SIR: The Florida has to go for coal and repairs this evening, and I 
have ordered her to report to you at Beaufort for further orders. The 
Fort Jackson will leave here to-morrow or next day. We will coal the 
Victoria to-morrow from this ship, and the Montgomery from the Fahkee, 
so as to keep up a respectable force here, though the light nights have 
now set in. 

If the Cambridge could come she would add to the appearance of 
force and might tend to keep shut up the seven double-pipe and one 



362 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

single-pipe steamers now assembled inside of Smith ville and which 
have been there for the last three days, and having now lost the dark 
nights will have to remain for their return. 

1 have heard that the Fort Donelson does not turn out as fast as was 
expected, and as she may be now at Beaufort for coal, I would request 
that she be sent to us for inside service. 

The present plan of stations seems to have blocked the game for a 
while as there are no excitements since you left. A few more vessels 
to strengthen them, such as a flanking vessel east and west of the bar 
tenders to guard the shore and reef approaches, an additional sup- 
porting vessel, and one more just outside of them K. W. and S. E. from 
Big Hill to the shoals, will make it still more difficult, and we can do 
it when the vessels return from repairs. 

Very respectfully, etc., your obedient servant, 

B. F. SANDS, 
Gapt.j U. 8. Navy, Comdg. Division Western Bar, off Wilmington. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Comdg North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Beaufort, N. C. 



Report of Acting Master Phelon, 17. 8. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Mon- 
ticello, regarding the chase of blockade runners. 

U. S. 8. MONTICELLO, 

Off Beaufort, N. C., August U, 1864. 

SIB: I have the honor to report that on the 10th instant, at 5.20 a. m., 
in latitude 33 4 1' N., longitude 76 38' W., discovered a steamer to the 
southward and westward burning black smoke. I immediately gave 
chase under a full head of steam. Soon after I made out the U. S. S. 
Alabama, on our starboard beam, also in chase. The steamer was a 
long, low vessel, and was standing directly across our bows, steering to 
the eastward. We were closing on him rapidly. When within 4 miles of 
him our shaft bearings became heated and we were obliged to stop to 
cool off. When we started ahead again we found lie had gained con- 
siderably on us and had changed his course, showing us now his stern. 
At 9 a. in. our masthead lookout reported two steamers on our port 
bow (to windward of the chase) ; soon made them out to be the U. S. 
steamers Mount Vernon and R. R. Cuyler. The latter was coming up 
very rapidly and the chase again changed his course to the westward. 
The Alabama was on our starboard beam. We were astern of the chase 
and the Mount Vernon and R. R. Cuyler to windward of him. He com- 
menced throwing over his deck load of cotton and left us very fast. At 
9 : 40 we could only see the black smoke on the horizon, the R. R. Cuyler 
and the Alabama still in chase. Finding it impossible for us to keep 
with them, we commenced picking up the cotton (the Mount Vernon 
doing the same) ; at 1 p. in. we had on board about 30 bales and then 
stood on our course. 

August 12, latitude 33 44' N., longitude 77 15' W., while in sight of 
the Mount Vernon, discovered black smoke bearing N. E. by E. E. 
Gave chase at once, sent up yards and topmasts, and made sail; at 4 
p. m. lost sight of the smoke and gave up the chase. The same date, 
at 9 p. in., Cape Lookout light bearing about N. N. E., distant 30 miles, 
saw a long, side- wheel steamer to the southward of us heading about 
west; I gave chase under full steam. He was heading direct for New 
Inlet; at 10:20 p. m. lost sight of him; kept in chase, however, in the 
direction last seen. At 2 a. m. sent up a rocket in the direction of the 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 363 

fleet and continued doing so at short intervals until 2.30 a. m., when 
we made Bald Head light bearing W. by S. ; stopped the ship and sent 
up a rocket. At 2.35 a. in. saw the flashes and heard the reports of 
heavy guns, and a rocket sent up in the same direction (to the south- 
ward and westward); let the ship drift until daylight, when I stood in 
for the fleet. At 7 : 15 a. m., August 33, I went on board the U. S. S. 
Mate of Georgia (senior officer's ship), the commander of which informed 
me that he had seen my signals, and that the firing we heard was from 
Fort Fisher and the beach. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HENRY A. PHELON, 
.Acting Master, Commanding U. 8. S. Monticello. 

Acting Bear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Captain Smith, U. S. Navy, referring to land operations against 
the enemy at Deep Bottom, James River. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
James River, August 15, 1864. 

SIR : I herewith enclose copies of two letters to the Department, one* 
containing an account of the operations on the river from daylight until 
dark on Saturday, and the other requesting that the Sassacus might be 
detained. 

In consequence of the removal of the Osceola from City Point, I have 
been compelled to order the Miami to that place to guard and distribute 
the provisions and ordnance stores, and have stationed the Commodore 
Barney at Harrison's Landing, regarding that a more important point 
to occupy than Newport News. I shall send another vessel to occupy 
the latter station so soon as the rebels are less troublesome. 

On Saturday, the 13th instant, General Butler communicated to me 
his intention to cross 10,000 men under General Birney during the night 
at Deep Bottom, between Four Mile Greek and New Market road, and 
15,000 under General Howard [Hancock! at the bend opposite Malveru 
Hill. 

I understand that General Birney's forces succeeded in crossing, and 
the fighting yesterday was sharp and stubborn, and our losses consid- 
erable. Our success as far as known was the capture of four guns. 

I regret that the want of official courtesy on the part of the army 
prevents me from communicating any details or any valuable informa- 
tion. 

Active land operations are still going on against tbe enemy at Deep 
Bottom, but nothing has been heard from there to-day that is of any 
importance. The enemy have not molested us at this point since the 
attack on Saturday. 

I enclose the official report t of Commander Ehind, which also includes 
the operations of yesterday, of which the Secretary has not yet been 
informed. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Divisional Officer in James River. 

Acting Eear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

* See p. 350. t See p. 348. 



364 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
Below the Barricade, James River, August 15, 1864. 

SIR : I have the honor to represent that the enemy take advantage 
of every prominent point on the river, not guarded by our gunboats, to 
erect batteries, and I have not at present a larger force than is neces- 
sary to insure its safe navigation. I would therefore request that the 
Sassacus be allowed to remain until some vessel can be sent to relieve 
her. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Divisional Officer in James River. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Garfield, U. S. Navy, regarding 
the chase of a blockade runner. 

U. S. S. BANSHEE, 
Off Wilmington, N. C., August 15, 1864. 

SIR: In conformity with your order of the 26th ultimo, I would 
respectfully beg leave to make the following report in regard to the 
escape of a blockade runner, chased by this vessel on the 9th instant: 
At 5: 15 p. m., on the 9th instant, in latitude 32 41' N., longitude 77 
18' W., wind W. S. VV. (2), and smooth water, while drifting about in the 
Gulf Stream, with the engines stopped and the fires banked in front, 
we saw black smoke bearing S. E. and standing to the westward. Think- 
ing it the smoke of a blockade runner, we started our engines and 
gave chase. At 5 : 45 p. m. he raised his masts and smokestacks. The 
runner, seeing us at the same time, changed his course and stood S. by 
E., we following in his track, and gaining upon him rapidly, so much 
so that at the end of an hour's chase we could plainly see his hull, 
paddle boxes, etc. It was a long, low, and narrow steamer, with two 
masts and two smokestacks, very rakish build, and smokestacks painted 
a light lead color, nearly white. She resembles this vessel in every 
respect. 

At : 50 p. m. the clouds and mist shutting down thick to the south- 
ward and eastward, the runner stopped burning black smoke, and we 
lost sight of her in the mist. Not deeming it prudent to continue the 
chase, I gave it up and stood to the northward and westward. Had I 
seen his smoke in season to have had two or three hours more day- 
light, I am positive that we would have captured him, as we were 
gaining on him very fast. We were steaming 13 knots, and our steam 
increasing. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. GARFIELD, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

Acting Rear- Admiral S. P. LEE, IT. S. Navy, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 365 

Report of Commander' Macomb, U. 8. Navy, regarding the disposition of 
vessels of the Third Division, under his command. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, August 15, 1864. 

SIR : The following is the disposition of the vessels of the Third Divi- 
sion North Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 

In Albemarle /Sound. The Shamrock, Chicopee, Wyalusing, and Tacony, 
the picket boat Ceres, and the tugs Belle and Martin (torpedoes), and 
J. E. Bazely. The coal schooner Biven has just arrived. The coal 
schooner Marina N. left here for Hatteras three days ago. These ves- 
sels have moved up to within 10 miles of the pickets. 

At New Berne. The Otsego, Valley City, Hetzel, Louisiana, Lockwood, 
Commodore Hull, Whitehead, tug Hoyt (torpedo), the last three repair- 
ing, and the Bombshell, being surveyed. 1 am informed that three coal 
schooners have just passed the Swash on their way to New Berne. 

At Roanoke Island. The ordnance schooner Carstairs. I have 
ordered a master's mate, I. A. Peirce, of the Mattabesett, to take charge 
of the stores on board her. 

The steamer Mattabesett left here yesterday for Hampton Eoads, in 
obedience to your orders of the 6th instant. The Tacony is still here, 
but will be sent up as soon as the Otsego arrives from New Berne, where 
she is now making some slight repairs. She is ordered to return here 
as soon as possible. 

In compliance with your directions, I have to report the following 
changes of officers on board these vessels: 

Acting Ensign Thomas S. Russell luis been transferred from the Belle 
to the Ceres, the command of the Pelle being assigned to Acting Gunner 
William Peterkin, of this vessel, who has taken a great interest in these 
torpedoes, and shown himself capable of managing them. He volun 
teered for service of this kind, and 1 am sure will act fearlessly. 

Acting Master's Mate William White, recently arrived here for this 
vessel, has been also attached to the Ceres, she having very severe duty 
(being the only picket boat) and being short of officers. 

The sloop Granite is still at Hatteras Inlet in charge of the navy coal 
at that place. Acting Master Boomer, commanding, reports 1,720 tons 
of coal now there. 

******* 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Commander, Comdg. 3d Div. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, regarding general 

affairs in James River. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Beaufort Harbor, August 16, 1864. 

SIR : Captain Smith informs me, under date of 9th instant, that when 
he has received and placed the three additional boats provided by the 
Bureau of Construction (two to be purchased by him in the river and 
one to be sent from Baltimore) he shall consider the obstructions fin- 
ished, and will forward a tracing of their positions. 



366 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

He reports also that General Butler has decided to cut a canal across 
Dutch Gap, and would break grouud on the following morning (10th), 
a large force of laborers with the necessary implements being already 
oi the ground. The engineer estimates that the work will be completed 
in six weeks, but General Butler says that but three will be required. 
The depth is to be 15 feet below low-water mark, 40 feet wide below, 
and 00 above. Captain Smith hopes to be able to protect the laborers 
if annoyed by the enemy, as they probably will be. 

Navigation is uninterrupted, except that a few shots were fired by 
sharpshooters from Dutch Gap on the 8th instant at a tug. 

In a postscript dated the 10th, Captain Smith reports that at 1:30 
a in. six shells were fired, it was supposed from the rams, across Dutch 
Gap, doing no damage. 

1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear-Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Faval operations in connection with the advance of Federal forces at Dutch 
Gap and Deep Bottom, James River. 

Report of Captain Smith, U. 8. Navy. 

U. S. S. ONONDAGA, 
Below Barricade, James River, August 17, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that at 3 p. in. yesterday I was 
requested by Major-General Butler to cooperate in a movement of the 
troops then at Dutch Gap, and a force from Deep Bottom, whose object 
was to recouuoiter northeastwardly from Aikeu's house, divert the enemy 
in the front and on the left of our troops in the vicinity of New Market 
road, and take advantage of any opportunity that might otter for a 
further advance. 

The operations of the vessels in this vicinity were more particularly 
connected with the force moving from Dutch Gap. 

The plan proposed was to move this force of some 800 available men 
to Aikeu's Landing, and there form in line for advance upon the crest 
of the hill directly in rear, then stretching out to the right to form a 
junction with General [D. B.] Birney's forces at Deep Bottom, or to move 
toward the left, beyond the rebel battery at Signal Hill. The Mount 
Washington was detained to transport the troops from Dutch Gap to 
Aiken's, and to lie off that point and use her 32-pounder, holding her- 
self in readiness to reembark the troops if necessary. Just above her 
the Delaware, a little farther above the Mackinaw, and at the bend of 
Dutch Gap the Canonicus were stationed to cover the advance by shell- 
ing the enemy's line, the Canonicus also devoting attention to Signal 
Hill battery. 

This vessel was held ready for operations upon the rebel rams if 
opportunity should offer by their descent within range. 

I am pleased to say that the plan was successfully and handsomely 
carried out. 

The Mount Washington took the troops, convej^ed them to Aiken's 
and disembarked them with a dispatch and good order creditable to 
her commanding officer, and immediately took her position for shelling. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 367 

At about 5 p. rn. the troops advanced, and as soon as their movements 
were observed from the Mackinaw she opened fire, which was continued 
with marked effect from all the vessels, until the movement, taking the 
direction to the left, advanced so far as to compel the gunboats to cease 
tiring to avoid injuring our own troops, this vessel meanwhile throwing 
an occasional shell in the direction of Cox's farm. 

At 7 p. in. the action of the vessels ceased by request of General 
Butler, which closed their share in the movement. 

I am informed indirectly that the troops advanced so as to occupy 
Cox's farm, the Signal Hill battery, and the rebel lines thence toward 
the rear of Aiken's. 

The officers of the land forces express themselves as most pleased at 
the assistance afforded by the vessels. I am informed at this moment 
that the movement, having effected its object, the troops from Dutch 
Gap will fall back to that point this evening. 

This afternoon at 5 o'clock the rain came down in the second reach 
above and opened fire on the picket line established yesterday at Cox's 
farm. The battery at Hewlett's house opened at the same time and 
was replied toby General Butler's batteries, but the ironclads and gun- 
boats did not participate. The cannonading was kept up with spirit 
for some time, all firing ceasing at dark. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

MELANCTON SMITH, 
Captain and Divisional Officer in James River. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



[Telegram.] 

HEADQUARTERS ARMY NORTHERN VIRGINIA, 

August 17, 18649 a. m. 

The enemy is on Signal Hill, fortifying. Please try and drive him 
oft'. Our picket line is reestablished with the exception of Signal Hill. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

K. E. LEE, 

General. 
Commodore MITCHELL, 

Commanding James River Fleet. 



Report of Lieutenant Johnston, C. 8. Navy, commanding C. S. S. Virginia. 

C. S. S. VIRGINIA, 
Chaffirfs Bluff, August 19, 1864. 

Sir: In obedience to your order of this date, and in the absence of 
Commander K. B. Pegrain on duty, I make the following report of the 
part the Virginia took in the action against the enemy at Signal Hill 
on the 17th inst. 

At 11:30 a. m. got underway from this place and stood down the 
river. At 2 : 10 anchored in Devil's Reach, moored ship head and stern 
between the overseer's house on Hewlett's farm and the bend of the 
river just above Signal Hill, so as to bring the X-inch gun to bear out 
of the port quarter port. At 3:14 commenced firing with the X-inch 
gun at Signal Hill, using shell with 5 second fuzes; continued tiring 



368 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

at intervals of five, ten, fifteen, and twenty minutes until 6: 45 p.m. 
After firing two or three times, found the distance to be 1,100 yards, 
the shell bursting well at this range with the 5-second fuzes. At 6: 45 
commenced firing at intervals of forty-five minutes and continued it 
during the night until 7 a. in. yesterday, when your order was received 
to cease firing. 

About the same time a scout from shore came oft' and informed us 
that the enemy had abandoned their position at Signal Hill, and that 
our pickets occupied it. 

Your order to return to this place was received early in the forenoon 
yesterday, but the tide did not serve until 1:40, when we came up, 
anchoring at about 3 o'clock. 

Though the hatches and scuttles were necessarily kept on for over 
twenty-four hours, the heat below being almost insupportable, the 
officers and crew performed their duties with cheerfulness and 
alacrity. 

Many of the enemy's shot and shell passed and exploded very near 
us, though no damage was done. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

O. F. JOHNSTON, 
Lieutenant and Executive Officer, Commanding pro tern. 

Commander THOS. R. ROOTES, Provisional Xavy C. S., 

Commanding James River Squadron pro tern. 



Report of Lieutenant Maury, C. S. Navy, commanding C. S. 8. Richmond. 

C. S. IRONCLAD RICHMOND, 
Off Chaffing Bluff, August 20, 18<>'4. 

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the opera- 
tions of the vessels under my command during Wednesday and Thurs- 
day, the 17th and 18th instant: 

At 12: 50 p. m., August 17, got underway and moved down the river. 
Anchored at 2 : 10 p. m. off Bishop's house at the head of Devil's Reach. 
At 3: 30 p.m. opened fire upon the enemy between Signal Hill and 
Cox's with shrapnel and time shell, which I used until all were 
expended, when I used percussion shell. The number of projectiles 
fired were: Shrapnel 9, time shell 20, and percussion shell 2; total, 31. 
At 8:30 a.m., August 18, ceased firing and made preparations for 
getting underway, which we did. At 1 p. m. stood up the river, and at 
1:30 p. m. anchored off Chaffin's Bluff. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. S. MAURY, 
Lieutenant, Commanding. 
Commander T. R. ROOTES, Provisional Navy C. S., 

Commanding James River Squadron. 



Report of Commander Macomb, U. S. Navy, transmitting information 
regarding Confederate operations in the RoanoJce River. 

U. S. S. SHAMROCK, August 17, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose this letter from Colonel Wardrop. commanding Sub- 
District of Albernarle, which contains information with regard to the 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 369 

rebels on Eoanoke Eiver which, I think, the Department should be 
advised of. 

As the admiral is at present visiting the vessels on the blockade, and 
on account of the uncertainty of letters reaching him, I have taken the 
liberty to seud this direct to the Department. 
1 am, sir, very respectfully, 

W. H. MACOMB, 
Comdr., Comdy. Third Division North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

HEADQUARTERS SUB DISTRICT OF ALBEMARLE, 

Roanoke Island, North Carolina, August 15, 1864. 
SIR : I have received information from parties heretofore reliable that 
the enemy have been fitting up some of their boats with torpedoes, and 
are intending to attack the fleet in conjunction with the ram on Tues- 
day next. It is also confidently reported that the second ram will be 
done in a fortnight. They are very busy on the Roanoke River, but it 
is very difficult to learn what is being done, and a larger amount of 
travel between Plymouth and the towns up the river has been going 
on for some time, and there does not seem any necessity for it unless 
there is something there that they are trying to keep to themselves. 

It is a very difficult matter to know whom to believe, so many stories 
are told, but of this part I am sure, that they have got light-draft boats 
that will carry about fifty men ; these have been provided with torpe- 
does and are meant to attack you, but I do not think they will be used 
until a combined attack occurs. 

I have thought it my duty to inform you of what I believe to be facts. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. W. WARDROP, 

Colonel, Commanding. 
Commander W. H. MACOMB, 

Commanding U. S. Squadron in Sounds, U. S. S. Shamrock. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, regarding the disposition 
of the vessels of his command. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Beaufort, N. C., August 17, 1864. 

SIR: The following is the disposition of vessels composing the North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron : 



Name. 


Station. 


Remarks. 








Arietta 


do 




Release 


do 




William Badger 


do 


Do. 


Shokokon 


do 


Harbor defense 


Uaiisemond 


do 




Lilac 


do 




Cohasset 


do 


Do. 


Harcourt 


do 


Pilot tug. 


V w -R vr 


T in 0,1 





370 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Nuuifc. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




First Division oft' New In- 
let, North Carolina. 
do 


Coaling ut Hampton Roads. 

Do. 
Coaling at Beaufort. Must soon go in for 
much repair. 
Leaks badly ; needs repairs. 
Bad boiler; requires extensive repairs. 
Coaling at Beaufort. 
Coaling and repairing at Beaufort. 

Repairing at Norfolk. 
Injured by collision with Cherokee. 

Repairing at Norfolk. 
Always repairing or complaining. 
Norfolk, coaling. 

Do. 
Do. 

Going novth for extensive repairs. 
Norfolk, repairing. 

Needs docking and repairs. 
Leaks from collision with Cherokee; needs 
repairs. 
Repairing at Norfolk. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Coal transport for both bars; does not suit 
from too deep dm ft for Beaufort. Want ot 
proper boats, very slow delivery of coal 
and can not serve 'both sides efficiently. 

Ordered to Hampton Roads to report to De- 
partment for instructions where to go to be 
fitted for and receive Xl-inch guns. 
Do. 

Ordnance. 
Tug. 
Torpedo boat. 
Do. 
Do. 

Ordered to Gosport for repairs; to leave 
heavy guns and go off Wilmington. 

To be sent to Philadelphia for repairs when 
services can be spared. 
Repairing at Norfolk. 
Do. 






do 




. do 




.. do 




do 




do 




...do 




...do 




do 




do 




do 




do 




do 




do 




do 




Second Division, oft' West- 
ern Bar. 
.do 




R. R. Cuyler 


do 


Florida.. 


do 




do 




do 


Emma ... . ... 


do 




do 




do 


Victoria 


do 


Aries 


...do ... 


Calypso 


do 


Maratanza 


do 


Mount Vernon 


do ... 


Fahkee 


do.. 


Shamrock 


Third Division, Sounds of 
North Carolina. 
do 


Chicopeo 


Otsego 


.. do 


Wyalusiug 


do 


Mattabesett 


do 


Tacony 


do 


Louisiana* 


do 


Lock wood* 


do 


Commodore Hull* 


do 


Valley City* 


... do 


Granite* 


.do . 


Ceres" 


do 


Hetzel* 


do 


Whitehead* 


do 


Renshaw 


do 


Ba/elv, No. 2 


do 


Martin 


do 


Hovt 


do .. 


Belle 


do 


Onondaga 


Fourth Division, James 
River. 
do 


Saugus 


Canonicus 


do 


Osccola 


do 


Sassaeus 


...do ... 


Mackinaw 


do 


Mendota 


do 


Agawam 


do 


Pequot 


do ... 


Commodore Morris 


do 


Hunchback 


do 


Miami 


do 


Atlanta 


...do ... 


Henry Brinker 


do 


Dawn 


do 


Delaware 


do . 


Commodore Perry 


do 


General Putnam 


do 


Commodore Barney 


do 


Stepping Stones . . . 


...do... 



* Several of these need extensive repairs. Surveys will bo held on them. 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



37L 



Name. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Fourth Division, James 






Kiver. 
do 




Alert 


do 




Picket No 1 


. .do 


Torpedo boat. 


Picket No 3 . 


.do 


Do. 


Picket No. 4 


do 


Do. 




do 


Do. 


Picket No. 6 


...do 


Do. 




do 


Transport. 




do 


Do. 




do 


Hampton Roads. 




... do 


Hampton Roads, guard. 


Charles Phelps 


do 


Coal hulk, Cranev Island. 


Eutaw 




Waiting Department's orders as to place to 




do 


he repaired. 




.... do 




Unit 


do 






do 




Zouave 


do 


Repairing at Norfolk. 




York River Virginia. 


Guard. 


Morse . 


do 






.... do 




Samuel Rotan 


... do 






.. do 




Wyandotte 


Norfolk, Va 
do 


Guard. 
Ordnance. 


Ben Morgan 


do 


Do. 




do 


Do. 


Dacotah 


Repairing at northern ports . 


At Boston. 


Grand Gulf 


do 


New York. 




do 


Do. 




. .. do 


Philadelphia. 


Isaac N. Seymour 


do 


Baltimore. 


New Berne 


Miscellaneous 


Supply steamer from New York. 



1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Acty. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. Navy, giving his opinion 
regarding the withdrawal of the ironclads from the James River. 

FLAGSHIP NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON, 

Beaufort, N. C., August 17, 1864. 

SIR : The Department's communication of July 22, instructing me to 
report whether any of the ironclads within the limits of my command 
can be withdrawn from James Kiver or other waters of Virginia, with 
due regard to the exigencies of the public service, and desiring me to 
obtain the opinion of Lieutenant-General Grant with reference to the 
ability of the army to maintain its position in Virginia, supported and 
protected by wooden vessels only, or by these and a part of the iron- 
clads, was received on the 24th ultimo. On that day I wrote to Lieu- 
tenant General Grant on this subject (copy enclosed, 1), and enclosed 
to him a copy of the Department's dispatch* above mentioned. 

The original reply of the lieutenant-general, dated 9th instant, is 
herewith enclosed (2), in which he says, "Whilst I believe we shall 
never require the armored vessels to meet those of the enemy, 1 think 
it imprudent to withdraw them. At least two such vessels, in my 
judgment, should be kept in the upper James River. They stand a 

*See p. 296. 



372 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

constant threat to the enemy, and prevent him taking the offensive. 
There is no disguising the fact that if the enemy should take the offen- 
sive on the water, although we probably would destroy his whole James 
River navy, such damage would be done our shipping and stores, all 
accumulated on the waters near where the conflict would begin, that 
our victory would be dearly bought." 

However prudent and politic it may be, I must regret the indicated 
plan of the able lieutenant general, that our ironclads will never be 
required to meet those of the enemy on James River, which 1 have 
always hoped that we would have the opportunity of doing when the 
army should get around or by Petersburg, and take Hewlett's Battery 
at the head of Trent's Reach, as then the bar in that reach might 
quickly be cleared of one of the sunken vessels, and easily be deepened 
with the dredging machine for which I applied to the Department, *o 
as to admit of the passage and cooperation of the ironclads against 
the enemy's defenses on land, and the capture of their navy. 

In the Mexican war, our Government, having to land an army in 
Mexico, preferred to take Vera Cruz by land attack rather than cap- 
ture the Castle of San Juan de Ulua by a sea attack, as the French 
had done. In that case the enemy had no navy. 

The ironclads in my command are the two monitors, Canonicus, and 
Saugus, the Quintard two-turreted battery Onondaga, and the prize 
Atlanta, on the Merrimack pattern, now repairing at Gosport. The 
Roanolie has been detached and sent to Point Lookout. 

The Onondaya, Canonicus, and Saugus are on the east side of Far- 
rar's Island, above wliich are the enemy's three ironclads, his gunboats 
and steam barges, all torpedo fitted, and between these besides Far- 
rar's Island, is the bar in Trent's Reach, on which the water at high 
tide is just the load draft of the monitors, though the published Coast 
Survey chart shows even less water there than the monitors draw. 

The army authorities have been understood to hold that the success 
of the campaign and the cause of the country depend on the security of 
the communications of the army on James River. Hence the barricade 
on the bar, begun by the army md perfected by the Navy Department, 
which protects the ironclads from torpedo attacks, and the gunboats 
and army transports and pontoons from tire rafts. 

The application of a few torpedoes would clear a passage through 
the barricade, and then if the draft of the rebel ironclads allows them 
to pass the bar in Trent's Reach, what would become of the communi- 
cations of the army if our ironclads were withdrawn? 

I always endeavored to impress upon the army authorities the policy 
of making their communications secure as far as practicable against 
interruptions by the rebel artillery, by a reasonable provision of artil- 
lery in position on the favoring banks on our side of the river, but 
General Butler's engineer, General Weitzel, resisted this method, on 
the ground that in case of a retreat it would be difficult to take away 
heavy artillery, which, he said, should therefore be on shipboard. 

I never entertained the idea of retreating, and it is clear that guns 
in battery ashore are more economically and safely placed than on 
shipboard, whilst my suggestion provided for such contingencies of 
service as the Department now seems to have in view, and to allow of 
the occasional and temporary withdrawal of some of the gunboats, 
etc., for other service, as, for instance, in the recent case of the rebel 
movement against the capital, and threatened raid to release the pris- 
oners at Point Lookout. Besides this convenience and the security 
afforded to the army communications by a few pieces of good artillery 



NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 373 

well placed, such, protection of that part of the river admitted of mov- 
ing the gunboats to cooperate in the advance which I expected up 
James River, when the line of communications to be covered would 
become larger and otherwise require more naval force than we then 
had. 

In conclusion, I respectfully report to the Department that in my 
opinion it would be unwise and hazardous to withdraw any part of the 
ironclads permanently from James River, and thus expose the com- 
munications of the army, and the campaign against Richmond, to 
great peril if not certain reverse. 

Looking at the matter in a navy light, I would be glad to see the 
ironclad force on James River so increased that when the time for an 
upward movement comes, it will, after allowing for losses from the 
enemy's torpedoes, secure a Union triumph in an ironclad contest on 
James River. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear- Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosures.] 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, July 24, 1864. 

GENERAL : I enclose a copy of a communication received to-day li-om 
the Navy Department relative to the expediency of withdrawing the 
ironclads from James River. 

I request the favor of an early reply, giving your views on the subject. 
I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours, 

S. P. LEE, 
Actg. Rear -Admiral, Comdg. North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lien ten ant-General U. S. GRANT, 

Commanding U. S. Forces in the Field. 

Please address your reply to me at Beaufort, N. C. 



HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES, 

City Point, Va., August 9, 1864. 

DEAR SIR: Your letter of the 24th instant, enclosing communica 
tion relative to the withdrawal of ironclads from the James River, was 
duly received. Owing to my absence from here most of the time since 
the receipt of your letter it has not been answered earlier. 

Whilst I believe we will never require the armored vessels to meet 
those of the enemy, I think it would be imprudent to withdraw them. 
At least two such vessels, in my judgment, should be kept in the upper 
James. They stand a constant threat to the enemy and prevent him 
taking the offensive. There is no disguising the fact that if the enemy 
should take the offensive on the water, although we probably would 
destroy his whole James River navy, such damage would be done our 
shipping and stores, all accumulated on the waters near where the con- 
flict would begin, that our victory would be dearly bought. 

I have the honor to be, admiral, very respectfully, yours. 

U. S. GRANT. 
Admiral S. P. LEE. 



374 NORTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. 8. Navy, regarding the seizure 
and release of the steamer Dacotah. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Beaufort, N. C., August 17, 1864. 

SIR: The Dacotah, formerly the prize steamer Juno, arrived here at 9 
a. in. in charge of Acting Ensign [V. J.] Young and a pri/ecrew, sent in 
by Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Pickering, commanding the Fort Don- 
elson, with the three enclosed reports* (1, 2, and 3), and two small bags 
containing sealed letters, some with U. S. post-office stamps affixed, which 
do not appear to have gone through the post-office at New York, and some 
sealed letters without stamps. All these letters are addressed to par- 
ties in Havana, Matanzas, and Santiago de Cuba. 

It appears from the enclosed reports above referred to that the Dacotah 
was boarded by the Fort Donelson in about latitude 32 40' N., longitude 
78 W., on the morning of the 15th instant, and was detained and sent 
in for adjudication by Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Pickering, com- 
manding the Fort Donelson, because Ler mails had uot passed through 
the post-office at New York and because of the admission of the master 
of the Dacotah that there were liquors on board not entered on the 
steamer's manifest. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Pickering further reports that the 
Dacotah changed her course frequently when pursued by him, and that 
all her officers and crew were very much inebriated when he took pos- 
session of her. 

The prize master, Acting Ensign Young, uot having brought the 
Dacotali's papers on board, was called on for a report and made the 
enclosed report (No. 4). At the same time I dispatched Fleet Captain 
[J. S.] Barnes to inspect the Dacotah'' 8 papers and to make proper exami- 
nations on board of her. His report (5) enclosed shows that there was 
no cause for the detention of the Dacotah, which had regular papers and 
was carrying U. S. mails from New York to Havana, having also passen- 
gers with regular passports. 

On the receipt of the fleet captain's verb