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Full text of "Official records of the Union and Confederate navies in the war of the rebellion : ser. I, v. 1-27, ser. II, v. 1-3"

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
AT LOS ANGELES 




OFFICIAL RECORDS 



OF THE 



IN THE 



WAR OF THE REBELLION. 



PUBLISHED UNDEK THE DIRECTION OF 

The Hon. WILLIAM H. MOODY, Secretary of the Navy, 

BY 

MR. CHARLES W. STEWART, 

Superintendent Library and Naval War Records. 



BY AUTHORITY OF AN ACT OF CONGRESS APPROVED JULY 31, 1894. 



SERIES I VOLUME 16. 



SOUTH .A/nj^HSTTIC BLOCKADING- SQUADRON 

FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO AUGUST 8, 1865. 

BLOCKADING- SQUADRON 

FROM JUNE 7 TO DECEMBER 15, 1861. 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 
1903. 



7 



V. I 



CONTENTS OF PRECEDING VOLUMES. 



VOLUME 1. 
Operations of the "cruisers from January 19, 1861, to December 31, 1862. 

VOLUME 2. 
Operations of the cruisers from January 1, 1863, to March 31, 1864. 

VOLUME 3. 
Operations of the cruisers from April 1, 1864, to December 30, 1865. 

VOLUME 4. 

Operations in the Gulf of Mexico from November 15, 1860, to June 7, 1861. Opera- 
tions on the Atlantic coast from January 1 to May 13, 1861. Operations on the 
Potomac and Rappahannock rivers from January 5 to December 7, 1861. 

VOLUME 5. 

Operations on the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers from December 7, 1861, to 
July 31, 1865. Operations of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron from April 4 to 
July 15, 1861. 

VOLUME 6. 

Operations of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron from July 16 to October 29, 1861. 
Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from October 29, 1861, to 
March 8, 1862. 

VOLUME Y. 

Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from March 8 to September 

4, 1862. 

VOLUME 8. 

Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from September 5, 1862, to 

May 4, 1863. 

VOLUME 9. 

Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from May 5, 1863, to May 

5, 1864. 

in 



IV CONTENTS OF PRECEDING VOLUMES. 

VOLUME 10. 

Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from May 6 to October 

27, 1864. 

VOLUME 11. 

Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from October 28, 1864, to 

February 1, 1865. 

VOLUME 12. 

Operations of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron from February 2 to August 3, 
1865. Operations of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron from October 29, 
1861, to May 13, 1862. 

VOLUME 13. 

Operations of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron from May 14, 1862, to April 

7, 1863. 

VOLUME 14. 

Operations of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron from April 7 to September 30, 

1863. 

VOLUME 15. 

Operations of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron from October 1, 1863, to 

September 30, 1864. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page. 

List of illustrations ix 

Preface xi 

Order of compilation of Series I xv 

List of vessels of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron xvn 

List of vessels of the Gulf Blockading Squadron xx 

Calendar xxi 

South Atlantic Blockading Squadron: 
Principal events 
Union reports 

Z/itish steamer Flora chased ashore at Fort Moultrie, October 

22,1864 29-32 

Operations of the naval brigade under Commander Preble, U. S. 

Navy, in combined expedition for cutting the railroad near 

Pocotaligo, S. C., November 27-December 30, 1864, including 

the battles of Honey Hill and Tulifinny Crossroads 66-111 

British steamer Beatrice chased ashore off Charleston, S. C., 

November 27, 1864 112-114 

Communication established between South Atlantic Blockading 

Squadron and Army of Major-General Sherman, near Savan- 
nah, Ga., December 12, 1864 126-131 

Evacuation of Savannah announced December 21, 1864. . 137, 140-142, 363 
Federal boats' crews captured at Charleston, S. C., December 22 

and 31, 1864 138-141 

U. S. S. Patapsco destroyed by torpedo in Charleston Harbor, 

January 15, 1865 171-180 

U. S. S. Dai Ching captured in Combahee River, South Caro- 

. lina, January 26, 1865 190-200 

U. S. S. Pawnee and other vessels engaged Confederate batteries 

in Togodo Creek, South Carolina, February 9, 1865 *. 225-230 

Federal naval operations in Stono and Folly rivers, February 

9-14, 1865 230-237 

Joint expedition to Bull's Bay, South Carolina, February 12-17, 

1865 , 237-241 

Steamer Deer captured at Charleston, S. C., February 18, 1865. . 253-255 
Charleston, S. C., occupied by Federal naval forces February 18, 

1865 257-259 

Georgetown, S. .C., and Battery White occupied by Federal 

naval forces, February 25, 1865 272-278 

U. S. S. Harvest Moon destroyed by torpedo in Winyah Bay, 

South Carolina, March 1, 1865 283-285, 371 

Confederate steamer Amazon captured by U. S. S. Pontiac, in 

Savannah River, March 2, 1865 284-286 

Coast-Survey steamer Bibb injured by torpedo in Charleston 

Harbor, March 17, 1865 295 



VI TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

South Atlantic Blockading Squadron Continued. Page. 

Principal events Continued. 
Union reports Continued. 

United States flag raised on Fort Sumter, April 14, 1865 314-316 

Arrival of President Davis, prisoner at Port Royal, S. C., May 

16, 1865 333, 334 

Rear-Admiral Dahlgren relieved of command of South Atlantic 

Blockading Squadron 343, 347, 348, 374 

Diary of Rear-Admirial Dahlgren from October 2, 1864, to June 

17, 1865 t... 357-374 

Reports and correspondence relating to obstructions and defenses 

of Charleston Harbor 374-429 

Detailed report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren regarding operations 

of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron against defenses 

of Charleston, S. C 429-455 

Confederate reports 

Miscellaneous reports and correspondence, October 3, 1864, to 

May 1, 1865 455-516 

Reports and correspondence relating to obstructions and 

defenses of Charleston Harbor 409-429 

Evacuation of Savannah by naval forces 481-483, 487, 492, 502 

Journal of Flag-Officer Hunter, C. S. Navy, December iO-25, 

1864 485-488 

Gulf Blockading Squadron : 
Principal events 
Union reports 

Flag-Officer Mervine assumed command of Gulf Blockading 

Squadron, June 7, 1861 530-532 

British ship Perthshire seized June 9, 1861 534-540 

Blockade of Apalachicola announced 532, 544 

Prize vessels recaptured by Confederates, July 2, 1861 566-568 

Engagement of Federal vessels with Confederate batteries on 

Ship Island, July 9, 1861 580-583 

Cutting out of a schooner by Federal boats' crews near Pensa- 

cola navy yard, August 3, 4, 1861 610-612 

Reports of conference regarding defenses of Gulf of Mexico. 618, 651, 680 
Flag-Officer Mervine relieved of command of Gulf Blockading 

Squadron by Flag-Officer McKean 660, 684-686 

Confederate privateer Judah destroyed at Pensacola navy yard 

by boat expedition from U. S. S. Colorado, September 14, 1861 . 670-675 
Evacuation of Ship Island by Confederate forces, September 17, 

1861 677-679 

Reconnoissance in Mississippi River to the Head of the Passes, 

September 19, 1861 682-684 

Occupation of the Head of the Passes, October 2, 1861 696, 697 

C. S. S. Ivy attacked Federal vessels at Head of the Passes, 

. October 9, 1861 699, 700, 724 

Federal squadron driven from Head of the Passes by attack of 

Confederate vessels, October 12, 1861 703-730 

Engagement between Confederate steamer Florida and U. S. S. 

Massachusetts near Ship Island, October 19, 1861 739-745 

Capture of the Confederate privateer Royal Yacht off Galves- 

ton, November 7, 8, 1861 ..." 755-762 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. VII 

Gulf Blockading Squadron Continued. Page. 

Principal events Continued. 
Union reports Continued. 

Joint attack of Federal forces upon Fort McRee, near Pensa- 

cola, Fla., November 22, 23, 1861 775-787 

Case of the British schooner Telegraph, seized near Indian Key, 

Florida, November 30, 1861 797-800 

Confederate vessels engaged U. S. S. Montgomery off Horn 

Island Pass, near Mobile, December 4, 1861 808, 809 

Confederate vessels exchanged shots with U. S. S. New London 

off Mississippi City, Miss. , December 7, 1861 810-812 

Confederate reports 

Engagement of Federal vessels with Confederate batteries on 

Ship Island, June 9, 1861 581-583 

Confederate privateer Judah destroyed at Pensacola navy yard 

by boat expedition from U. S. S. Colorado, September 14, 1861 . 675 
Evacuation of Ship Island by Confederate forces, September 17, 

1861 679 

Federal squadron driven from Head of the Passes by Confeder- 
ate vessels, October 12, 1861 725-730 

Engagement between Confederate steamer Florida and U. S. S. 

Massachusetts, near Ship Island, October 19, 1861 744, 745 

Capture of the Confederate privateer Royal Yacht off Galveston, 

November 7, 8, 1861 759-762 

Joint attack of Federal forces upon Fort McRee, near Pensa- 
cola, Fla., November 22, 23, 1861 .* 783-787 

Confederate vessels engaged U. S. S. Montgomery off Horn 

Island Pass, near Mobile, December 4, 1861 809 

Confederate vessels exchanged shots with U. S. S. New London, 

off Mississippi City, Miss., December 7, 1861 811, 812 

Miscellaneous, reports and correspondence, May 4 to December 

14, 1861 820-869 

The yacht Gypsy seized by U. S. S. Brooklyn, June 12, 1861 .. 822-825 
Commander Hunter, C. S. Navy, assigned to command of works 

for defense of the coast of Texas 835 

Log of the C. S. S. Bayou City and journal of Commander 

Hunter, C. S. Navy, September 26 to December 14, 1861 859-869 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page. 

United States steamer Philadelphia Frontispiece. 

Map of Broad River and tributaries, South Carolina, showing scene of opera- 
tions of naval brigade, November and December, 1864, 66 

United States steamer Harvest Moon 282 

United States steamer Bibb 295 

Sketches of Confederate torpedoes and obstructions in Charleston Harbor, 

South Carolina 374, 383, 390-398, 410, 411 

Sketch of Confederate torpedo taken from piling in Ogeechee River, GeoTgia. 395 

Confederate Stateb steam torpedo boat David 399 

Confederate States ram Columbia, elevations, plan, and cross section 400, 401 

Sketch of the Mississippi River above the Head of the Passes 636, 637 

Sketch of the ironclad Turtle, probably the Confederate States ram 
Manassas .* 747 

IX 



PREFACE. 

The work of preparing for publication the Official Records of the 
Union and Confederate navies, which was begun July 7, 1884, was 
organized under the superintendency of Professor J. R. Soley, U. S. 
Navy, at that time librarian of the Navy Department, afterwards 
Assistant Secretary of the Navy. 

In August, 1890, the work of collecting these records and their clas- 
sification was ably continued by his successor, Lieutenant-Commander 
F. M. Wise, U. S. Navy, who, having received orders to sea, was 
relieved by Lieutenant-Commander Richard Rush, U. S. Navy, in 
May, 1893. 

The long-delayed publication was finally authorized by act of Con- 
gress approved July 31, 1894, and begun by Mr. Rush. The first 
five volumes were published under his administration, and the impor- 
tant duty of organizing the office for the distribution of these volumes 
was accomplished. 

In March, 1897, Mr. Rush, having been ordered to sea, was succeeded 
by Professor Edward K. Rawson, U. S. Navy, as superintendent. 
Professor Rawson was detached and ordered to the U. S. Naval Acad- 
emy September 20, 1902, and was succeeded by Mr. Charles W. 
Stewart. 

No change is contemplated at present in the outline of the plan of 
publication as approved by the Department. This plan includes only 
the use of such material as may be certified to be contemporaneous 
naval records of the war, which is divided into three series, in the 
following order of arrangement: 

I. The first series embraces the reports, orders, and correspondence, 
both Union and Confederate, relating to all naval operations on the 
Atlantic and Gulf coasts and inland waters of the United States during 
the war of the rebellion, together with the operations of vessels acting 
singly, either as cruisers or privateers, in different parts of the world. 
These reports are accompanied by occasional maps and diagrams. 

In this series the papers are arranged according to squadrons and 
flotillas, chronologically; and, as far as possible, the Union reports of 
any events are immediately followed by the Confederate reports. 

XI 



XII PEEFACE. 

II. The second series embraces the reports, orders, and correspond- 
ence relating to 

1. The condition of the Union Navy in 1861, before the com- 
mencement of hostilities, and to its increase during the progress 
of the war, including the annual and special reports of the 
Secretary of the Navy and chiefs of the various bureaus. 

2. The construction and outfit of the Confederate Navy, includ- 
ing privateers, setting forth also the annual and special reports 
of the Confederate Secretary of the Navy and chiefs of bureaus. 

3. Statistical data of all vessels, Union and Confederate, as far 
as can be obtained. 

4. Returns of naval and military property captured by the 
navies of both sides during the war. 

5. Correspondence relating to naval prisoners. 

This series is also arranged chronologically in each of the above 
sections, as far as practicable. 

III. The third series embraces all reports, orders, correspondence, 
and returns of the Union and Confederate authorities not specially 
relating to the matter of the first and second series. 

It is the intention of the Department to introduce throughout the 
volumes of the different series illustrations of each class or type of 
vessels referred to, in order to preserve the identity of these ships 
as they actually appeared during the war. These cuts have been 
reproduced either from photographs of the vessels themselves or 
from the carefully prepared drawings made from official sources. 

Much difficulty has been found in collecting the records, for, while 
the official reports of commanders of fleets and of vessels acting singly 
are on file in the Navy Department, it is found that the correspondence 
between flag-officers and their subordinates is frequently missing. 
Without this squadron correspondence the historical value of the work 
would necessarily be impaired, and the Department therefore has 
spared no pains to secure the letter books and papers of the chief actors 
on both sides. These papers have for the most part been obtained, and 
they have been copiously used in the compilation of the work. The 
reports of the Union commanders are full and fair!} 7 complete. It is to 
be regretted, however, that the Confederate records are not equally 
complete, due to the great difficulty found in collecting them, and also 
to the fact that a large part of the archives of the Confederate Navy 
Department was burned at the close of the war. Frequent careful 



PREFACE. XIII 

searches throughout various parts of the country, conducted by a 
special agent of the Department, have brought to light many dupli- 
cates of these papers, found among the personal files of participants. 
It is hoped that the publication will revive the interest of participants 
in the events referred to, and lead them to bring to the notice of the 
Department the whereabouts of any papers bearing upon naval opera- 
tions in the civil war of which the}' may have knowledge. 

The fifteenth volume of the records (Series I, vol. 15), which has 
recently been published by the Department, gives the operations of the 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron from October 1, 1863, to Sep- 
tember 30, 1864. The present volume (Series I, vol. 16) gives the 
operations of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron from October 1, 
1864, to August 8, 1865; and the operations of the Gulf Blockading 
Squadron from June 7 to December 15, 1861. 

The reports and correspondence are placed chronologically, with a 
distinct heading for ever}- paper. In the record of events in which 
both sides took part, the Confederate reports (where they could be 
obtained) immediately follow the Union reports, while the miscellane- 
ous Confederate correspondence is placed at the end of the volume. 
Reference to the table of contents will show the context of these Con- 
federate papers. It is believed that the chronological arrangement of 
the records, in connection with the full and complete index to each 
volume, will afford ample means of reference to its contents without 
other subdivision or classification. In reports of special or single 
events, in which the papers bear specific relation to those events, the 
chronological order has been somewhat modified, and such documents 
have been placed together in the compilation. 

CHARLES W. STEWART, 

Compiler. 
NAVY DEPARTMENT, 

Washington, D. C., May, 1903. 

NOTE. The following is an extract from the law governing the dis- 
tribution of the sets comprising the publication (act of Congress 
approved July 31, 1894): 

* * * Of said number, six thousand eight hundred and forty 
copies shall be for the use of the House of Representatives, two thou- 
sand one hundred and twelve copies for the use of the Senate, and one 
thousand and forty-eight copies for the use of the Navy Department 
and for distribution by the Secretary of the Navy among officers of the 
Navy and contributors to the work. The quotas herein authorized of 
said publication for the Senate and House of Representatives shall be 



XIV PREFACE. 

sent by the Secretary of the Navy to such libraries, organizations, and 
individuals as may be designated by the Senators, Representatives, and 
Delegates of the Fifty-third Congress, it being the purpose of this dis- 
tribution herein provided for to place these records in public libraries, 
and with permanent organizations having libraries, so far as such 
libraries may exist in the several States and Territories. Each Senator 
shall designate not exceeding twenty-four and each Representative and 
Delegate not exceeding nineteen of such addresses, and the volumes 
shall be sent thereto from time to time, as they are published, until the 
publication is completed; and all sets that may not be ordered to be 
distributed as provided herein shall be sold by the Secretary of the 
Navy for cost of publication, with ten per centum added thereto, and 
the proceeds of such sale shall be covered into the Treasury. If two 
or more sets of said volumes are ordered to the same address, the 
Secretary of the Navy shall inform the Senators, Representatives, or 
Delegates who have designated the same, who thereupon may desig- 
nate other libraries, organizations, or individuals. The Secretary of the 
Navy shall inform distributees at whose instance the volumes are sent. 

The following joint resolution regarding the distribution of the 
work was approved January 30, 1896: 

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the 
Navy be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to send the undis- 
tributed copies of the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion, 
both of the Union and of the Confederate navies, to such libraries, 
organizations, and individuals as may be designated before the meet- 
ing of the next Congress by the Representatives in the Fifty-fourth 
Congress of the districts whose Representatives in the Fifty-third 
Congress failed to designate the distributees of their quota of said 
Official Records, or any part thereof, as authorized by the act of Con- 
gress approved July thirty -first, eighteen hundred and ninety -four, 
and the joint resolution approved March second, eighteen hundred 
and ninety -five, to the extent and in the manner and form provided 
in said act. 

The following is an extract from the act of Congress of May 28, 
1896, which increased the edition from 10,000 to 11,000 copies: 

* * * For printing, binding, and wrapping one thousand addi- 
tional copies of series one, volumes one, two, three, and four, for sup- 
plying officers of the Navy who have not received the work, two 
thousand four hundred dollars. 



ORDER OF COMPILATION OF NAVAL WAR RECORDS. 



SERIES I. 



1. Operations of the Cruisers, 1861-1865. 

Union cruisers. 

West India (Flying) Squadron, under Acting Rear- Admiral Wilkes, U. S. N., 1862-1863. 

West India (Flying) Squadron, under Acting Rear-Admiral Lardner, U. S. N., 1863-1864. 
Confederate cruisers and privateers. 

2. Operations in the Gulf of Mexico, January to June 7, 1861. 

Surrender of the Pensacola Navy Yard. 

Cooperation of the Navy in the relief of Fort Pickens. 

3. Operations on the Atlantic Coast, January to May 13, 1861. 

Cooperation of the Navy in the attempts to relieve Fort Sumter. 
Abandonment and destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard. 
Home Squadron, under Flag-Officer Pendergrast, U. S. N. 

4. Operations on the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers, 1861-1865. 

Potomac Flotilla, under Cemmander Ward, U. S. N., 1861. 
Potomac Flotilla, under Captain Craven, U. S. N., 1861. 
Potomac Flotilla, under Lieutenant Wyman, U. S. N., 1861-1862. 
Potomac Flotilla, under Commodore Harwood, U. S. N., 1862-1863. 
Potomac Flotilla, under Commander Parker, U. S. N., 1863-1865. 

5. Atlantic Blockading Squadrons, 1861-1865. 

Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Flag-Officer Stringham, U. S. N., May 13 to Sept. 23, 1861. 

West India Squadron, under Flag-Officer Pendergrast, U. S. N., 1861. 

Naval Defenses of Virginia and North Carolina, under Flag-Officer Barren, C. S. N. 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Flag-officer Goldsborough, U. S. N., 1861. 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-Admiral Goldsborough, U. S. N., 1861-1862. 

Naval Defenses of Virginia and North Carolina, under Flag-Officer Lynch, C. S. N. 

James River Squadron, under Flag-Officer Buchanan, C. S. N. 

James River Squadron, under Flag-Officer Tattnall, C. S. N. 

James River Flotilla, under Commodore W T ilkes, U. S. N., 1862. 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear-Admiral Lee, U. S. N., 1862-1864. 

James River Squadron, under Flag-Officers Forrest and Mitchell, C. S. N. 

* Naval Defenses Inland Waters of North Carolina, under Commander Pinkney, C. S. N. 
*Naval Defenses Cape Fear River, North Carolina, under Flag-Officer Lynch, C. S. N. 

North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-Admiral Porter, U. S. N., 1864-1865. 
James River Squadron, under Flag-Officers Mitchell and Semmes, C. S. N. 

* Naval Defenses Cape Fear River, North Carolina, under Flag-Officer Pinkney, C. S. N. 
North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear-Admiral Radford, U. S. N., 1865. 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-Admiral Du Pont, U. S. N., 1861-1863. 

* Naval Defenses of South Carolina and Georgia, under Flag-Officer Tattnall, C. S. N. 

* Naval Defenses of Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, under Flag-Officer Ingraham, C. S. N. 
South Atlaatic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. N., 1863-1865. 

* Naval Defenses of Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, under Flag-Officer Tucker, C. S. N. 
Naval Defenses of Savannah, Ga., under Flag-Officers Hunter and Tattnall, C. S. N. 

*The Confederate material under this head is very scant. It is therefore hoped that those who 
have any Confederate naval documents upon the subject will communicate with the Office of Naval 
War Records, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 

N W R VOL 16 II XV 



XVI ORDER OF COMPILATION OF NAVAL WAR RECORDS. 

6. Gulf Blockading Squadrons, 1861-1865. . 

Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Flag-Officer Mervine, U. S. N., 1861. 
Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Flag-officer McKean, U. S. N., 1861-1862. 

* Mississippi River Defenses, under Flag-Officer Hollins, C. 8. N. 

East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Flag-Officer McKean, U. S. N., 1862. 

East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear-Admiral Lardner, U. S. N., 1862. 

East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear- Admiral Bailey, U. S. N., 1862-1864. 

East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Captain Greene, U. S. N., 1864. 

East Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear-Admiral Stribling, U. S. N., 1864-1865. 

West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Flag-Officer Farragut, U. S. N., 1862-1863. 

Mortar Flotilla, under Commander Porter, U. S. N., 1862. 

Lower Mississippi River Defenses, under Commander J. K. Mitchell, C. S. N., 1862. 

* Mobile Defenses, under Flag-Officer Randolph, C. S. N. 
Trans-Mississippi Marine Department, under Major Leon Smith, C. S. A. 

West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Commodore Bell, U. S. N. (ad interim), 1863. 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Rear-Admiral Farragut, U. S. N., 1864. 

* Mobile Defenses, under Admiral Buchanan, C. S. N. 

West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Commodore Palmer, U. S. N., 1864-1865. 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, under Acting Rear-Admiral Thatcher, U. S. N., 1865. 

* Mobile Defenses, under Flag-Offieer Farrand, C. S. N. 

7. Operations on the Western Eivers, 1861-1865. 

Naval Forces on Western Waters, under Commander Rodgers, U. S. N., 1861. 
Naval Forces on Western Waters, under Flag-Officer Foote, U. S. N., 1861-1862. 

* Mississippi River Defenses, under Flag-Officer Hollins, C. S. N. 
Naval Forces on Western Waters, under Flag-Officer Davis, U. S. N., 1862. 

* Mississippi River Defense Fleet, under Captain Montgomery, C. S. A. 

* Mississippi River Defenses, under Commander R. F. Pinkney, C. S. N. 

* Mississippi River Defenses, un(ier Flag-Officer Lynch, C. S. N. 
Mississippi Squadron, under Rear-Admiral Porter, U. S. N., 1862-1864. 
Mississippi Squadron, under Acting Rcar-Admiral Lee, U. S. N., 1864-1865. 

* Naval Defenses of Red River, Louisiana, under Lieutenant J. H. Carter, C. S. N. 

*The Confederate material under this head is very scant. It is Hierefore hoped that those who 
have any Confederate naval documents upon the subject will communicate with the Office of Naval 
War Records, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 



UNITED STATES VESSELS OF WAR SERVINO IN THE SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING 
SQUADRON, OCTOBER 1, 186U, TO AUGUSTS, 1865. 



Name. 


Rate. 


Tonnage. 


Class. 


Crew. 


Guns. 


A Houghton 


Fourth ... 


326 


Bark 


27 


2 


Acacia 


Fourth ... 


300 


Screw steamer. ... 


58 


4 


Amaranthus * 


Fourth ... 


182 


do 


40 


3 


Arethusa 


Fourth ... 


195 


do 


32 


2 


Azalea. .. 


Fourth ... 


220 


do 


42 


2 


Bibb 






Coast-survey steamer 


35 




Braziliera . . . 


Fourth ... 


540 


Bark 


68 


6 


C. P. Williams 


Fourth ... 


210 


Mortar schooner 


45 


3 


Calvpso 


Fourth . . . 


630 


Screw steamer 


70 


7 


Cambridge . 


Third 


858 


do 


% 


10 


Camelia 


Fourth 


198 


do 


40 


2 


Canandaigua . 


Second 


1,395 


do 


163 


11 


Canonicus 


Third 


1,034 


Ironclad steamer 


85 


2 


Carnation 


Fourth ... 


82 


Screw? stfiftmpr 


19 


2 


Catalpa 


Fourth . . . 


160 


do 


37 


3 


Catskill 


Third 


844 


Ironclad steamer 


74 


2 


Cecilia 






Tender . 




1 


Chatham 


Fourth ... 




Side-wheel steamer 


26 





Chenango 


Third 


650 


do 


171 


10 


Chippewa . 


Fourth ... 


507 


Screw steamer . 


85 


4 


Cimarron 


Third 


860 


Side- wheel steamer 


122 


10 


Clover 


Fourth . . . 


128 


Screw steamer 


19 


2 


Columbine 


Fourth ... 


133 


do 


24 


2 


Commodore McDonough 


Fourth ... 


532 


Side- wheel steaTnpr . , 


75 


6 


Conemaugh 


Third 


955 


do 


125 


g 


Daffodil 


Fourth . . . 


160 


do 


28 


2 


Dai Ching 


Fourth ... 


520 


Screw steamer 


83 




Dandelion 


Fourth ... 


111 


do 


22 


2 


Dan Smith . . 


Fourth ... 


150 


Mortar schooner 


33 


5 


Dbnegal 


Fourth ... 


1,124 


Side-wheel steamer 


80 


4 


E.B. Hale 


Fourth ... 


192 


Screw steamer 


50 


5 


Emma 


Fourth ... 


350 


do 


70 


8 


Ethan Allen 


Fourth ... 


556 


Bark 


87 


9 


Fahkee 


Fourth ... 


699 


Screw steamer 


73 


3 


Fernandina 


Fourth ... 


297 


Bark . . . 


79 


6 


Flag 


Third 


963 


Screw steamer 


140 


g 


Flambeau 


Third 


900 


do 


92 


5 


G. W. Blunt 


Fourth ... 


121 


Schooner 


16 


1 


Gemsbok 


Fourth . . 


622 


Bark 


101 


7 


George Mangham 


Fourth ... 


274 


Mortar schooner 


26 


5 


George W. Rodgers 


Fourth 


87 


do 


24 


2 


Geranium 


Fourth ... 


222 


Side-wheel steamer 


45 


3 


Gladiolus 


Fourth 


81 


Screw steamer 


25 


3 


Harvest Moon 


Fourth . . . 


546 


Side-wheel steamer 


72 


3 


Home 


Third 


713 


Screw steamer 


88 


3 


Hope . . . 


Fourth .. 


134 


Schooner . . . 


13 


1 



XVII 



XVIII 



LIST OF UNITED STATES VESSELS OF WAR. 



UNITED STATES VESSELS OF WAR SERVING IN THE SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING 
SQUADRON, OCTOBER 1, 1861., TO AUGUST 6, 1865 Continued. 



Name. 


Rate. 


Tonnage. 


Class. 


Crew. 


Guns. 




Second . . . 


1,240 


Screw steamer 


160 


13 




Fourth ... 


507 


do 


76 


4 




Fourth 


224 


do 


29 


2 


Iris 


Fourth ... 


159 


do 


34 


2 




Third 


1,161 


Side- wheel steamer 


120 


8 




Fourth 


401 


Bark 


62 


c 




Third 


700 


Ship . . . 


118 


8 


John Griffith 


Fourth ... 


246 


Mortar schooner. . 


44 


3 




Fourth ... 


90 


Screw steamer. . ..; 


15 


2 


Juniata 


Second . . . 


1,240 


do 


160 


14 




Fourth . . . 


450 


Bark 


95 


5 




Fourth ... 


180 


Screw steamer 


29 




Larkspur 


Fourth ... 


125 


do 


26 


, 


Lehigh 


Second ... 


844 


Ironclad steamer 


80 


2 




Fourth . . 




Schooner 


(*1 




Lodona . 


Third 


SCO 


Screw stftnmpr 


97 


7 


Madgie 


Fourth 


218 


do 


45 


3 


Mahaska 


Third . 


832 


Side-wheel steamer 


145 


6 


Mahopac 


Fourth 


1,034 


Ironclad steamer 


92 


2 


Mail 


Fourth 




Schooner 


(*) 




Malvern 


Fourth ... 


627 


Side-wheel steamer 


115 


12 


Marblehead 


Fourth ... 


507 


Screw steamer 


81 


4 


Mary Sanford 


Third 


757 


do 


60 


3 


Memphis 


Third 


791 


do 


100 


7 


Midnight 


Fourth 


386 


Bark 


70 


7 


Mingoe 


Third 


974 


Side- wheel steamer 


146 


10 


Mohawk 


Fourth 


459 


Screw steamer 


5 


8 


Mohican 


Third 


994 


do 


150 


10 


Monadnock 


Third 


1,564 


Ironclad steamer. 


146 


4 


Montauk 


Third 


844 


do 


67 


2 


Nahant 


Third 


844 


do 


76 


2 


Nan tucket 


Third 


844 


do 


85 


2 


National Guard 


Fourth 


1 046 


Ship 


85 


5 


New Hampshire 


First 


2 633 


do 


125 


10 


New Ironsides 


First 


3,486 


Screw steamer 


449 


20 


Nipsic 


Fourth 


593 


do 


91 


5 


Norfolk Packet.. 


Fourth 


349 


Mortar schooner 


40 


4 


Norwich 


Fourth 


431 


Screw steamer 


80 


6 


O. M. Pettit 


Fourth ... 


165 


Side-wheel steamer 


30 


2 


Oleander 


Fourth ... 


~ 246 


do 


35 


2 


Orvetta 


Fourth 


171 


Mortar schooner 


25 


3 


Ottawa 


Fourth 


507 


Screw steamer 


90 


5 


Para 


Fourth ... 


190 


Mortar schooner 


34 


3 


Passaic 


Third 


844 


Ironclad steamer 


70 


2 


Patapsco . . 


Third 


844 


do 


72 


2 


Paul Jones . . . 


Third 


863 


Side-wheel steamer 


148 


9 


Pawnee 


Second 


1 289 


Screw steamer 


151 


11 


Percy Dray ton 


Fourth ... 




Sloop 


(*) 




Perry . . . 


Fourth 


280 


Brig 


f>7 


9 


Philadelphia 


Fourth 


500 


Side-wheel steamer 


24 


1 


Pontiac 


Third 


974 


.do 


172 


14 


Pntrvmskn. 


Fourth 


287 


Screw steamer 


77 


5 


Preston 


Fourth 


428 


do 


(*) 




Racer... 


Fourth . . 


252 


Mortar schooner. . . 


36 


3 



* No rolls. 



LIST OF UNITED STATES VESSELS OF WAR. 



XIX 



UNITED STATES VESSELS OF WAR SERVING IN THE SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING 
SQUADRON, OCTOBER 1, 1361,, TO AUGUST 6, 1S65 Continued. 



Name. 


Rate. 


Tonnage. 


Class. 


Crew. 


Guns. 




Fourth ... 


Ill 


Screw steamer 


20 


1 


St Louis 


Third 


700 


Ship 


183 


18 




Third. . . 


844 


Trrmr>lrl stPflmpr , 


85 


2 


Santiago de Cuba ... 


Second ... 


1,567 


Side- wheel steamer 


143 


11 


Sarah Bruen 


Fourth ... 


233 


Mortar schooner 


36 


3 




Third . . 


882 


Ship. .. . 


182 


22 


Sea Foam 


Fourth ... 


264 


Brig 


25 


2 




Fourth 


507 


Screw steamer 


84 


4 




Second 


1,378 


do . . 


171 


10 


Sonoma 


Third ... 


955 


Side-wheel steamer r .. 


165 


7 


Sophronia 


Fourth ... 


217 


Mortar schooner 


32 


4 


South Carolina .. 


Third 


1,165 


Screw steamer 


105 


8 


State of Georgia 


Third 


1,204 


Side- wheel steamer 


113 


g 


Stettin 


Fourth ... 


600 


Screw steamer 


72 


5 


Supply 


Fourth ... 


547 


Ship 


88 


7 


Sweet Brier . . 


Fourth 


240 


Screw steamer 


37 


2 


Swift 


Fourth ... 




Tender 


(*) 




T. A. Ward 


Fourth ... 


184 


Mortar schooner.. . .. 


29 


5 


Thunder 


Fourth ... 




Tender 


(*) 




Ticonderoga . 


Second 


1,533 


Srrew stpmpr 


163 


18 


Tuscarora 


Third 


997 


do 


172 


10 


Unadilla 


Fourth 


507 


do 


90 


6 


Valparaiso 


Fourth .. 


402 


Ship 


36 




Vanderbilt 


First 


3,360 


Side-wheel steamer 


209 


17 


Wabash 


First 


3,274 


Screw steamer 


568 


48 


Wamsutta 


Fourth 


270 


do 


75 


5 


Waudo 


Fourth ... 


645 


Side-wheel steamer 


86 


3 


Water Witch 


Fourth ... 


378 


do 


73 


3 


Weehawken . 


Third 


844 




72 


2 


Wildcat 


Fourth .. 


30 


Schooner 


52 


1 


Winona 


Fourth ... 


507 


Screw steamer 


93 


6 


Wissahickon 


Fourth ... 


507 


do 


80 


4 















* No rolls. 



CAX-EETDA.!*. 


1865. 


JANUARY. 


FEBRUARY. 


MARCH. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat. 


I 

15 

22 
29 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 

28 








1 
8 
15 
22 


2 
9 
16 
23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
26 






1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 

14 
21 
28 
































1 
























APRIL. 


MAY. 


JUNE. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat. 


Sun. 


M. T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


Sat. 














1 




1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 

IB 
28 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 
27 










1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


8 
15 
22 
29 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


18 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 
















































JULY. 


AUGUST. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. W. T. 


F. 


Sat. 


Sun. 


M. 


T. 

1 

8 

15 
2-2 
29 


W. T. 


F. 


Sat. 














1 






2 3 
9 10 
16 17 
23 24 
30 31 


4 
11 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


456 
11 12 13 
18 19 20 
25 26 27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


8 
15 
22 
29 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 

28 























SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON 

FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO AUGUST 8, 1865. 



N W R VOL 16 1 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO AUGUST 8, 1865. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

October 7, 1864. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Murrell's Inlet 




Potomsku 


Georgetown .... 




Do 


Cape Romain 




*Mangham 


Bull's Bay 




Adger 


Charleston . 


Outside the bar 


Pawnee 


do 


Do 


Flambeau 


do... 


Do. 


Pontiac 


do 


Do. 


Mingoe 


do 


Do. 


Nipsic 


do 


Do. 


Acacia 


do. ... 


Do. 


Wamsutta . . 


do 


Do. 


Azalea... 


... .do 


Do. 


Geranium 


.do 


Do. 


Catskill 


do 


Inside the bar. 


Sangamon 


do 


Do. 


Nantucket . . . . 


do 


Do. 


Lehigh 


do 


Do. 


Home 


do... . 


Do. 


*Adams... . 


. ..do 


Do. 


Clover 


.do "... 


Do. 


Amaranth us 


do 


Do. 


Dandelion 


do 


Do. 


Catalpa 


do 


Do. 


Montauk 


do 


Repairing. 


McDonough 


Stono 




*Smith 


do 




Stettin 


North Edisto 




*Percy Dray ton 


do 


Tender. 


*Saratoga 


St. Helena 




*Williams 


do 




*Wild Cat 


do. . . 


Tender. 


*New Hampshire . 


Port Royal . . . . 




Cimarron 


do 




Philadelphia.. 


. ...do . . .. 




Arethusa 


.do 




Chatham . 


do 




Pettit . 


do 




Larkspur . 


do 




*Norfolk Packet 


do 




*Bruen 


do 




*Houghton 


do 


. 


South Carolina 


Tybee Island 




Memphis 


do ... 




*Swift 


do 


Tender. 


Passaic 






Wissahickon : 


do... 




*Thunder 


do 


Tender. 


Flag 


Ossaba w . 




Canandaigua 


do 




Sonoma 


do.. 




Jonquil 


do 




*Fernaiidina 


St. Catherine's . 




Lodona 


Sapelo . . 




*Allen 


Doboy . 




Griffith... 


Altamaha .. 





4 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, October 1, 1864 Con- 
tinued. 



Vessel. 



Station. 



*Braziliera ............................. St. Simon's 

Sanford ................................ St. Andrew's 

*Perry ................................. Fernandina 

Ottawa ....................... '. ......... St. John's 

Norwich .................................... do 

Hale ........................................ do 



Mosquito [Inlet] 
yal ..... 



Remarks. 



Repairing. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Repairing; tender. 
Repairing. 
Hospital ship. 

do ! Health ship. 

Relieve and communicate. 
Special duty. 

Do. 

Southern stations with stores. 
North. 
North for repairs. 

Do. 



Patapsco Port Roy 

Nahant do 

Dai Ching do 

Winona do 

*Racer do 

*Para do 

*Hope do 

Sweet Brier I do 

Daffodil do 

Gladiolus do 

Camelia do 

Hydrangea do 

Laburnum ' do 

Carnation do 

^Lightning i do 

*George W. Rodgers ,,. do 

* Valparaiso ' do 

*Ward 

Iris 

Harvest Moon 

*Blunt 

Oleander 

Wabash 

Marblehead 

Mohawk 

Seneca Do. 

Huron Do. 

Unadilla I Do. 

Chippewa Do. 

Rescue Do. 

New Ironsides Do. 

*Midnight ' ! Do. 

Paul Jones ' Do. 

Mahaska : > Do. 

*Supply Do. 

Weehawken Sunk or stranded. 

Housatonic Do. 

*Kingfisher Do. 

Madgie Do. 

Water Witch Captured. 

Columbine . . . Do. 



* Sailing vessels. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

The vessels marked "tenders" are little craft, manned by two or 
three men, and used to communicate with depot. The P. Drayton 
is an exchange. 

J. A. D. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to commanding officers 
to drill crews for operations on shore. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., October 1, 1864. 

B}" an order of August 8 I directed the commanders of vessels to 
select and drill certain portions of their crews for landing. 

They will now detail all of such as can properly leave the vessel 
for a limited period and organize them into sections of 20 men, half 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 5 

companies of 40 men, and companies of 80 men. Howitzer crews 
detailed and drilled, ready for landing. 

These are to be commanded by the officers who have most aptitude 

for such duty, and by petty officers acting as sergeants and corporals. 

The arms of all kinds are to be carefully looked after every day, 

and the boats kept in readiness, so that at the least notice the landing 

force may leave in a time not exceeding one hour. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Corndg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Semmes, U. 8. Navy, commanding 
U. S. S. Lehigh, regarding additional means of exit from the pilot 
house of that vessel. 

U. S. S. LEHIGH, 

Off Morris Island, South Carolina, October 1, 186Jf.. 
SIR: As there are no means of exit, when necessary to do so in a 
hurry, from the pilot house of these vessels, I respectfully request 
permission to cut a manhole in the top of this vessel's pilot house. 

A hole 18 inches by 16 would be sufficiently large, I should think, 
and the work could be very readily done by our own people. 

The top of the pilot house is thicker than any other horizontal sur- 
face (composed entirely of iron) on board; and of the two chances, I 
would prefer that by shot to that by drowning, in the event of being 
sunk by a torpedo. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. A. SEMMES, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Repoi*t of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, giving information 
regarding the draft over Charleston Bar during spring tides. 

No. 488.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., October 2, 1864. 

SIR: The Department asks me, " What is the greatest possible draft 
that can be taken over the bar at Charleston during the spring tides?" 

Captain Boutelle tells me that he has twice had 19 feet, in a period 
of five months. Once when the Ironsides crossed with Admiral 
Du Pont. 

The chief pilot says 21 feet. 

The latter I believe to be exaggerated, and the former only occurred 
twice. 

The average depth at spring tides may be set down at 18 feet, and 
it is an extraordinary circumstance when this is exceeded certainly 
not to be counted on. 

The easterly winds which swell the tides also create a sea on the 
bar, and the concurrence of a spring tide with an easterly wind that 
leaves a smooth bar is evidently to be hoped for, rather than expected. 



6 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The Iron-sides drew not fully 16 feet when I crossed in July, 1863, 
and the chief pilot allowed two or three days of the spring- tide to pass 
before he would venture. I think it was needlessly cautious; still, 
even with an ordinary swell on a bar in the open sea it is safe to have 
a foot to spare under the bottom of a vessel, especially if she has a 
screw. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. 8. Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, II. S. Navy, regarding the delivery 
of confidential order f 01* Rear- Admiral Farragut, U. S. Navy. 

No. 492.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal, October 3, 1864. 

SIR: The Department's confidential communication of the 22d* Sep- 
tember was received by me late on the 28th, and in twenty-four hours 
afterwards the Wabash sailed for Hampton Roads. 

The confidential order for Rear- Admiral Farragut will be delivered 
to him as soon as he reaches this place, and I am awaiting his arrival 
for that purpose. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of the Secretary of tlie Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, to transmit chart awing latest information regarding Confed- 
erate works and obstructwns in Charleston Harbon\ 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, October 3, 1864- 

SIR: The Department desires you to mark on the Coast-Survey chart 
of Charleston Harbor all the latest information of the rebel works of 
all descriptions, including everything relative to obstructions, and 
transmit it to the Department with any suggestions on the subject that 
j^ou may deem proper to make. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, 8. C. 

* For correspondence of Navy Department with Rear-Admiral Dahlgren relative 
to his aiding Rear-Admiral Farragut in the proposed attack upon defenses of Wil- 
mington, N. C., dated September 9 and 22 and October 17, 1864, see Series I, volume 
10, pp. 449, 472, and 569. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 7 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Stillwell, U. 8. Navy, regarding the sunken steamer 
Sumter. 

FLAG-STEAMER ! HILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. 6*1, October 3, 1864. 
SIR: I am in receipt of j-ours* of 27th ultimo, and say in reply: 
If you are unable to raise the sunken steamer Sumter, then let 
General Hatch do so; we have had the opportunity for six months. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Sear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieut. Commander JAMES STLLLWELL, 

Comdg. U. S. S. Ottawa, Senior Officer in the St. John's. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master 
Crosby, U. S. Navy, to assume command of the U. S. S. Harvest 
Moon. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., Odder 5, 1864. 

SIR: You are hereby detached from the U. S. S. Cimarron and will, 
without delay, assume command of the U. S. S. Harvest Moon. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master JOHN K. CROSBY, U. S. Navy, 

U. S. IS. Cimarron. 



Repoi^t of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Swann, U. 8. Navy, giving 
information obtained from deserters. 

U. S. S. POTOMSKA, 

Winyah Bay, October 5, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I send to Charleston, by 
the Laburnum, Sergeant James A. Crinnian, Company I, Seventh 
Pennsylvania Cavalry, and Private Isaac Ferguson, First Brigade band, 
Second Cavalry Division, Army of the Potomac, who effected their 
escape from the enemy. I also send 11 privates, Company B, German 
Artillery (rebel), who deserted from Battery White. From them I 
gain the following information and send you a chart showing the posi- 
tion of the forces around Georgetown : The deserters report great dis- 
satisfaction among the troops, particularly the Germans, who, the}' 
say, would desert without an exception were they not so strictly 
guarded. I find the river so strongly picketed I can give them very 
little assistance. At Battery White there are ten guns; the position 
and caliber are given in chart. In rear of battery there is a section of 
artillery consisting of two rifled 12-pounders; the remainder of the 
company, commanded by Captain Gaillard, is at McClellanville. Two 

*Not found. 



8 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

companies of cavalry, commanded by Captains Kirk and Walker, are 
directly in rear of Battery White (see chart). There are but 25 men in 
Georgetown doing picket duty, and two companies of cavalry on Wac- 
camaw Neck. There are 400 men encamped 6 miles from the town 
cavalry and infantry. General Trapier is in command. One of the 
Germans (who was in Charleston a short time since) says there are 
four large quaker guns in battery at Mount Pleasant. A schooner 
ran out from Georgetown about three weeks since, and the parties are 
daily expected to return in a steamer and run either into the Santee 
River or Georgetown. I shall keep a bright lookout for her. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. P. SWANN, 
Actg. Vol. Lieut., U. S. Navy, Comdg. 17. 8. S. Potomska. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Master Lee, U. S. Navy, regarding the discovery of 
a sunken steamer near tJie wrecks of the Georgiana and Mary Bower* , 
off Charleston. 

U. S. S. WAMSUTTA, 
Of Charleston, October 6, 1864. 

SIR: At daylight this morning, while lying at anchor on my station 
in 2 fathoms water, the inner buoy on Rattlesnake Shoal bearing S. 
i W., distant about half a mile, 1 discovered a strange steamer sunk 
near the wrecks of the Georgiana and Mary Bowers. She has two 
masts, two smokestacks, and side wheels. 

I immediately went in a boat to examine her, but as she is completely 
submerged in about 3 fathoms water I could ascertain nothing about 
her except that she is a Clyde-built vessel, of the class of the Mary 
Bowers, and was evidently bound in. 

My opinion is that she struck the wreck of the Georgiana and put 
her wheel hard astarboard to clear it, thus bringing her head offshore 
and sinking so suddenly that she barely had time to take to her boats. 
She lies about 250 yards from and outside of the wrecks of the Georgi- 
ana and Mary Bowers. 

If divers could get to work on her before she breaks up no doubt 
but that most of her cargo, if she has an} r , could be saved. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. W. LEE, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Commander T. H. PATTERSON, 

Commanding Outside Blockade off Charleston. 



Repwt of Commander Patterson, U. 8. Navy, giving positions of ves- 
sels on the outer blockade. 

U. S. S. JAMES ADGER, 
Of Charleston Bar, Octobor 7, 1804. 

SIR: I regret to learn that two steamers escaped the blockade last 
night, though it was a favorable night for blockade- running purposes. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 9 

I think the outside blockading vessels are now stationed to the best 
advantage, and herewith send you the position of each vessel: 

Flambeau, south of Swash Channel about \\ miles, in latitude 32 
43' N., longitude 79 48' 25" W. 

Azalea, short distance north of North Channel, in about latitude 32 
44:' 20" N., longitude 79 48' 50" W. 

Laburnum, 1 miles or less (according to the darkness of the night) 
off Breach Inlet, in about latitude 32 45' N., longitude 79 48' 10" W. 

rontiac, li miles or less (according to the darkness of the night) 
southeast of Breach Inlet, in about latitude 32 45' 35" N., longitude 
79 47' 12" W. 

Wafrnsutta, in about latitude 32 46' N., longitude 79 46' 10" W. 

Nipsic: Her former cruising ground was from west end of Rattle- 
snake Shoal to the southward and westward until Ilousatonic bore S. 
nearly 1 mile. Last night she was anchored in about latitude 32 44' 
15" N., longitude 79 46' 15" W. To-night she will move nearer to 
Rattlesnake Shoal. 

Pawnee, since she has been disabled, has remained at anchor near 
the Ilousatonic. 

Mingoe keeps underwa} 7 , and has cruised from a little to the north- 
ward of the Housatonic to the Flambeau, and thence skirting the shoal 
to the southward one-half mile and back. 

James Adger keeps underway, and has cruised from the 'Ilousatonic 
toward the center of Rattlesnake Shoal and back, bringing the Housa- 
tonic to bear N. E. by N. 

I enclose a rough tracing* showing the position of vessels. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. H. PATTERSON, 
Commander and Senior Officer off Charleston Bar. 

Captain J. F. GREEN, 

Senior Officer off Charleston. 



Report of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, regarding movements of blockadc- 
. runners and the condition of the sunken steamer Constance. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN T ADAMS, 
Off Morris Island, South Carolina, October 8, 186 '4- 

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that on the 6th instant I trans- 
ferred, agreeably to your instructions, the rebel paroled prisoners, 
and delivered all letters and packages in my possession authorized by 
you to be delivered to the enemy under a flag of truce. 

Night before last we had two alarms of attempts to run the block- 
ade. On the first a steamer outward bound was turned back by the 
inside blockade. On the second, from the best information I have at 
present obtained, a large propeller ran in and a side-wheel steamer 
ra'n out. Neither were seen by the outside blockading vessels. 

Last night a signal was made for a steamer running out, but I think 
it will prove to be a false alarm, as no guns were fired. 

By an intercepted rebel dispatch we learn that the steamer discov- 
ered sunk off Long Island on the 6th instant was named the Constance. 

* Not found. 



10 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

She is completely submerged, preventing the character of her cargo 
from being ascertained. 

I enclose herewith Acting Master Lee's report respecting her.* 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, II. S. Navy, to Major- General 
Foster, U. S. Army, regarding list of ordnance stores loaned to the 
Army. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., October 8, 1864. 

GENERAL: I herewith enclose a list of ordnance stores loaned by the 
navy to the army. 

Concerning the six 100-pounder Parrott rifles, the Bureau of Ord- 
nance, under date of August 16, 1861, writes: 

The Bureau is of opinion that it will be better for Major-General Foster to inform 
the war office of the transfer having been made, and request that directions may be 
given Mr. Parrott to furnish the Navy with an equal number of 100-pounders. 

Be pleased, therefore, to suggest this course of proceeding to Major-General Fos- 
ter. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General J. G. FOSTER, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Headquarters, Hilton Head. 



Order of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, to Commander Patterson, U. S. 
Navy, to ascertain the cause of the inefficiency of the outer blockade. 

U. S. SHIP JOHN ADAMS, 

Off Morris Island, South Carolina, October 9, 1864- 
SIR: About half past 1 o'clock last night one side-wheel steamer suc- 
ceeded in running in, another made the attempt and was turned back, 
both in Maffitt's Channel. The latter will probabty try again to-night. 
No gun was fired or signal made outside of an attempt to violate the 
blockade. 

Please enquire particularly in regard to the position of the vessels 
stationed off the entrance of MafBtt's Channel and that vicinity, and, 
if possible, ascertain why vessels running in or out are so seldom seen 
by them. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Office)' off Charleston. 

Commander THOS. H. PATTERSON, 

Comdg. U. S. S. James Adger, Senior Officer Offshore Blockade. 

* See October 6. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING 'SQUADRON. 11 

Report of Commander Patterson, U. S. Navy, denying any knowledge 
of inefficiently on the part of the vessels on the outer blockade. 

t 

U. S. S. JAMES ADGER, 
Off Charleston Bar, October 9, 1864. 

SIR: All the commanding officers expressed themselves as confi- 
dent that nothing could have passed in or out last night without being 
discovered, until 1 informed them of the fact as stated in your letter 
of this date. 

The Mingoe occupied the station suggested by you, between the 
west buoy of Rattlesnake and Long Island. 

The Wamsutta was to the eastward of the wreck, well in toward 
Long Island, with a picket boat between her and the beach. 

Lieutenant-Commander Luce informs me that when the moon went 
down he moved the Pontiac nearer to the beach, and never has been so 
near it as last night, tnough he has always taken a station well in. To- 
night and hereafter he will have a picket boat inshore of him. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Cavendy, south of the Swash, is 
equally confident that he could have discovered anything passing the 
Flajnbeau. 

The Laburnum and Azalea occupied the stations as reported to you, 
and the commanding officers state that they had the beach clearly in 
sight all night. 

For myself I can only state that I did my best, eager and anxious, 
not only as the commander of a blockading vessel, but as senior officer 
outside, that nothing should escape us. 

I am satisfied from my experience on blockading duty that vessels 
can not be discovered without good glasses; this ship has two, and one 
of these is in the picket boat. 

Very respectfully, } T our obedient servant, 

T. H. PATTERSON, 
Commanded* and Senior Officei* off Charleston Bar. 

Captain J. F. GREEN, 

Senior Officei* off Charleston. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, announcing the arrival 
of the U. S. schooner Orvetta. 

No. 506.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal, S. C., October 11, 1864. 

SIR: I have to announce to the Department that the U. S. schooner 
Orvetta, Acting Master William Fales, commanding, has arrived on 
this station and has been assigned duty in the squadron as a store 
vessel. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



12 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Rear- Admiral DaMgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Green, 
U. 8. Navy, senior officer off Charleston, enjotning vigilance against 
an attack on monitors by boarding. 

FLAG- STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., October 12, 1864. 

SIR: I desire you to put the monitors on their guard against any 
attempt to get large bodies of rebels on the deck of the one in advance, 
at night. 

It is rumored that a very large number of boats are building in 
Charleston, and the desperate condition of the rebel affairs would 
justify any risk of life to obtain an advantage. It would be well if the 
hawsers on the extreme of thp fenders were exchanged for a light 
chain. 

There should also be boarding nettings on each monitor, and the 
hatches well watched. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain J. F. GREEN, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer off Charleston. 



Letter from, the Secretary of the Navy to the Secretary of State, regard- 
ing/ French subjects desiring to leave the Confederate States. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, October 12, 1864. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letters of 
the 7th and llth instant, with their respective enclosures from Mr. 
Geofroy, the charge d'affaires of France, relative to the request for 
permission to send in one or two French vessels of war to Charleston 
for the purpose of receiving such French subjects as may be disposed 
to leave the insurrectionary States. 

Some other port would be preferable at this time for carrying out 
the proposed arrangement. 

Charleston is under constant fire and neutral vessels might be sub- 
jected to danger and inconvenience there. We could not well suspend 
our operations for the purpose of allowing the French men-of-war to 
enter and French subjects to embark. Mobile is a more desirable port 
for the accomplishment of the object in view. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Hon. WM. H. SEWARD, 

Secretary of State. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the condi- 
tion of the monitors. 

No. 510.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., October 12, 1864. 

SIR: I transmit for the information of the Department two samples 
of tubes taken from the boilers of the Nahant. They will best show 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 13 

the Department the nature of the difficulty that has nearly disabled 
every one of the monitors. That it should not have been so is evident 
from the fact of its being overcome, but to effect this my own time 
and personal attention has been requisite. One of the tubes referred 
to is closed entirely by deposit, and eleven such have occurred so far. 

The diameter of the other tube, and this represents the back tubes of 
the boilers, has been reduced by the scale to a mean of 0.916 inch, hav- 
ing been originally 1.75 inches, so that the area of the section is about 
two-fifths of what it was. 

The Patapsco has just left, having her tubes scaled entirely, except 
two or three hundred in front. 

The shot-proof of the stack has been removed, having been badly 
damaged by a shell from the Patapsco 1 s own XV-inch gun in the 
engagement with the forts, September 8, 1863. The shell penetrated 
one side entirety, and burst with severe effect on the other side. 

As an instance of the capacity of shell to penetrate heavy thick- 
nesses of iron, I transmit the old shot-proof smoke pipe to Philadel- 
phia, and would suggest that it be sent to the ordnance yard, Washing- 
ton, for the naval school, or such other disposition as the Department 
may think most proper. 

A new shot -proof was got in place, and the deck beam, that had set- 
tled considerably, supported by a heavy iron stanchion. It was a 
heavy piece of work for this small establishment, and the engineers 
(Dan by and Young) deserve credit for the execution with such limited 
means. 

The Nahant will have about two-thirds of her tubes scaled when she 
leaves. 

The Montauk (quite as bad) has been on duty but two or three 
weeks since May. She has now one boiler cleaned, and is beginning 
on the other. 

The Sangamvn and Nantucket will follow in turn. The Passaic and 
Catskill are not so bad, having been scaled to some extent. 

The frequent changes in the commanders and engineers of the mon- 
itors have, no doubt, contributed largely to this state of things by 
dividing the responsibility, and making it almost impossible to fix it 
anywhere. 

The foulness of the bottoms was another evil which concurred with 
the diminished steam power to reduce the speed, so that some of the 
monitors barely moved against the tide. 

This, too, is being mastered rapidly b} 7 the new arrangements. The 
corps of divers that I have created makes it certain that a bottom can 
be cleaned in a week, and so I hope that no more will be heard of this 
trouble. 

The party that worked by contract was entirely unable to overcome 
the difficulty by cleaning with sufficient rapidity, and cost $1,500 per 
month; doubling the force makes it $3,000 per month. 

The new corps consists of one acting volunteer lieutenant and two 
acting masters, all experienced divers, with six men, whose pay I fixed 
for the time at $60 per month, making about $700 per month, or one- 
fourth the contract price. 

So far as I can now judge, the measure gives every promise of the 
greatest advantage at low cost. 

Still I do not propose to make any recommendation for the decision 
of the Department until the whole matter has been thoroughly tested 
by further experience; it is too important to be dealt with hastily. 



14 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

All I can say is that I hope to have the monitors beyond the risk of 
disability very soon. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGKEN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, II. S. Navy, regarding plan of 
torpedo and its trial. 

No. 511.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C., October 13, 1864. 

SIR: I am able to say that after much personal attention to the sub- 
ject a plan of torpedo has been arrived at which promises to work 
well, certainly better than any that I have seen. The trial was made 
with a torpedo of 100 pounds, and a huge column of water was thrown 
up so high that it wet those who were in my barge, as well as the boat 
that made the discharge. 

In order to have some of these fit for use without delay, and not 
finding suitable material here for a rapid production of a number, I 
have dispatched an officer to New York for a few da^ys in order to 
obtain some parts of the more important detail. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dalilgren, U. S. Navy, stating cause of delay 
^n forwarding information regarding Confederate works and obstruc- 
tions in Charleston Harbor. 

No. 514.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal, October 13, 1864. 

SIR: The directions* of the Department in relation to the batteries, 
etc. , about Charleston Harbor were duly received, but there has not 
been time at the departure of this (the first) steamer to prepare fully 
the information required. 

I have remained here to await the arrival of Rear-Admiral 
Farragut, so as to deliver to him the confidential communication of 
the Department. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGPJEN. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

*See October 3, 1864, Welles to Dahlgren. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 15 

Report of Captain Green, U. 8. Navy, senior office?' off Charleston, 
regarding a Confederate torpedo boat seen near Fort Moultrie. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 

Off Morris Island, South Carolina, October 13, 186 1^. 
SIR: General Harclee communicated by flag of truce yesterday, 
declining to make the exchanges offered by Ensign Dichman on the 
llth instant, and wishes hereafter to have exchanges made at Port 
Royal Ferry, according to agreement. 

On the night of the llth instant a torpedo craft was seen by our 
picket boats off Sullivan's Island, near Fort Beauregard, and was also 
seen by the lookout at Gregg, at daylight on the following morning, 
steaming up to and around Moultrie Point. 

******* 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 

Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C. 



Report of Acting Master Gillespie, U. S. Nairy, commanding U. S. 
bark Braziliera, regarding expedition up White Oak Creek and in 
Satilla River, Georgia, October 13-15, 1864.. 

U. S. BARK BRAZILIERA, 

/St. Simon's Sound, Georgia, October W, 1864- 

SIR: On the night of the 13th instant I went in charge of an expe- 
dition nip the White Oak River [Creek], with two boats from my vessel 
and one from the Mary Sanford. We succeeded in securing 50 
negroes belonging to J. Morrison, a planter. During the time two of 
my men, in some manner, became detached from me. I waited, and 
sent two officers to search for them, as long as I considered it prudent. 
I then proceeded with the boats to the Mary Sanford, which was 
lying at Penniman's Mills, Satilla River, and while proceeding up the 
river the rebels tired on the steamer, killing Peter Collins, my pilot. 
On the 15th I returned to the bark. 

On the 17th Edward Sheridan, one of the men, returned and 
reported Charles Thompson, the other man, a prisoner in the hands of 
the Confederates. The cause of this misfortune originated in these 
two men having found some liquor. When Thompson became intoxi- 
cated he went back to the house after plunder. Sheridan made the 
best of his way to the vessel in a canoe he found on the marshes. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. T. GILLESPIE, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



16 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Master Kempton, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S, 8. 

Mary Sanford, regarding expedition in Satilla River, Georgia, 

October 13-15, 1864. 

U. S. S. MARY SANFORD, 
/St. Andrew's Sound, Georgia, October 16, 1864- 

SIR: I respectiull} 7 report going up the Big Satilla River with my 
command on the evening of the 13th instant, drove the pickets from 
Penniman's Mills, and anchored for the night at that place to wait for 
the return of Acting Master Gillespie, commanding the U. S. bark 
Braziliera, who had gone up the White Oak River [Creek] with two 
boats and 20 men from his command and 1 boat and 2 officers and 10 
men from this vessel, to take the negroes from Captain John Morri- 
son's plantation that were harvesting corn at that place for the Con- 
federate soldiers stationed in that neighborhood. 

Captain Gillespie returned in safety to this vessel on the morning of 
the 14th instant, bringing with him all the negroes from the Morrison 
plantation, forty-seven in number. Having learned that there was a 
large quantity of corn and rice stored at the town of Jeffersonton, on 
the river 12 miles above Penniman's Mills, in transit to Savannah, for 
the Confederate Government, taking with me Captain Gillespie, his 
pilot, men, and boats, at 2:30 p. m. got underway and proceeded up 
the river. While passing Yellow Bluff was h'red upon by a company 
of cavalry that was secreted behind trees and in the grass. They were 
driven from their hiding place in five minutes with canister and shrap- 
nel, and as they were not over 200 yards from our guns they must 
have been punished severely. I regret to state that the fourth shot 
fired at us instantly killed Peter Collins, our pilot, the ball passing 
through his bod} 7 near the heart. The killing of Mr. Collins is the 
only casualty that happened during the fire of the enemy. We passed 
above the bluff about a mile. Having lost our pilot, 1 was obliged to 
abandon further proceedings and return down the river. While pass- 
ing Yellow Bluff the enemy did not show themselves. We anchored 
for the night at the mouth of W T hite Oak River [Creek]. On the morn- 
ing of the 15th instant we returned down the river, and round to St. 
Simon's, landed the contrabands at that place, and buried the corpse of 
Mr. Collins in due form. Mr. Collins was a brave officer, and died at 
his post. His death is very much lamented by the officers and crew of 
the U. S. bark Braziliera and this vessel. 

My officers, men, and myself are all anxious for a pilot, so that we 
can raid on these rivers when an opportunity offers. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Z. KEMPTON, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



17 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

October 15, 1864. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Murrell's Inlet 




Potomska 


Georgetown 




Do .. 


Cape Remain 




* Mangham 


Bull's Bay 




Canandaigua 


Charleston 




Pontiac 


do 


Do. 


Mingoe 


do 


Do. 


Flambeau 


do 


Do. 


Acacia 


do 


Do. 


Wamsutta 


do 


Do. 


Azalea 


do 


Do 


T.in.hiirniini . ... ... 


.do 


Do 


Patapsco 


.. ..do ... 


Inside the bar. 


Sangamon 


do. 


Do 


Nantucket . ... 


do 


Do 


Lehigh 


...do 


Do. 


Homo 


do 


Do 


* Bruen 


do 


Do. 


* Adams 


do 


Do. 


Clover 


do 


Do. 


Dandelion 


do 


Do 


Geranium 


do 


Do 


Gladiolus 


do ... 


Do 


Catalpa . 


do 


Do 


Montauk 


do 


Inside the bar' repairing 


McDonough 


Stono 




*Smith 


do 




Stettin 


North Edisto 




* Percy Dravton 


do 


Tender. 


* Saratoga 


St. Helena 




* Williams 


... .do 




*Wild Cat 


.do. 


Tender. 


*New Hampshire . . 


Port Royal 




Philadelphia 


do 




Pettit 


.. do. 




Larkspur. 


do 




Arethusa 


...do... 




Chatham 


...do... 




* Hough ton 


do 




*Orvetta 


do 




Carnation 


... .do 




South Carolina . 


Tybee Island 




Memphis 


... do 




* Swift .. 


do 


Tender. 


Passaic 


Wassaw Sound 




Wissahickon 


do 




* Thunder 


do 


Tender. 


Flag 


Ossabaw 




Winona 


do 




Jonquil 


do 





* Fernandina . .. 


St. Catherine's 




Lodona 


Sapelo 




* Allen .. 


Dobov 




* Griffith 


Altamaha 




*Braziliera 


St. Simon's 




Sanford 


St. Andrew's 




* Perry 


Fernandina 




Ottawa 


St. John's 




Norwich 


do 




Hale 


do 






Mosquito [Inlet] 




Catskill . . . 


Port Royal 


Repairing. 


Nahant . 


do 


Do. 


Pawnee . 


do 


Do. 


Dai Ching 


do . . .. 


Do. 


Nipsic. 


.do 


Do. 


Sonoma 


do 


Do. 


* Racer 


do 


Do. 


*Para 


do 


Do. 


Sweet Brier 


...do... 


Do. 


Daffodil 


do 


Do. 


Amaranthus 


...do... 


Do, 


Camelia 


do 


Do. 


Hydrangea 


...do... 


Do. 


* Lightning 


do 


Repairing; tender. 


* George. W. Rodgers 


do 


Repairing. 


* Ward 


do 


Do. 


Cimarron . . 


...do... 


Disabled. 



* Sailing vessels. 



N W R VOL 16- 



18 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron October IS, 1864 

Continued. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Port Royal 


Coaling. 


* Valparaiso 


...do . .. 


Hospital ship. 




do 


Health ship. 






Relieve and communicate. 


Harvest Moon 




Special dutv. 


* Hope 




Do. 


Oleander 




Southern stations with stores. 






North. 


Marblehead 




North for repairs. 






Do. 


Seneca 




Do. 






Do. 


Unadilla 




Do. 


Chippewa 




Do. 


Rescue 




Do. 






Do. 


* Midnight . ... 




Do. 


Paul Jones 




Do. 


Mahaska 




Do. 


* Supply 




Do. 


Weena'vken 




Sunk or stranded. 


Housa tonic 





Do. 


* Kingfisher 




Do. 


Madgie 




Do. 


Water Witch 




Captured. 


Columbine... 




Do. 



* Sailing vessels. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral^ Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from tlie /Secretary of the Navy to commanders of squadrons 
regarding tlie proposed importation of foreigners for the Confederate 
Army. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, October 17, 1864,. 

SIR: It is reported that an agreement has been effected between the 
rebel Government and some European power (Poland, it is intimated), 
by which 30,000 soldiers from abroad are to be added to the rebel 
Army, and that the rebel Government are making arrangements for 
having built in England some tifty swift steamers, similar to the 
Colonel Lamb, for the purpose of running these soldiers through the 
blockade. 

The Department places little confidence in rumors regarding a 
scheme so impracticable in almost every feature, and should such be 
contemplated, we will, without doubt, hear something reliable of it 
hereafter. In the meantime, however, I communicate the report to 
3 T ou for your information. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blkdg. Squadron, Port Royal, 8. C. 
Rear-Admiral D. D. PORTER, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blkdg. Squadron, Hampton Roads. 
Rear- Admiral D. G. FARRAGUT, 

Comdg. West Gulf Squadron, Mobile Bay. 
Acting Rear- Admiral C. K. STRIBLING, 

Comdg. East Gulf Blkdg. Squadron, Key West. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 19 

Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Porter, U. S. 
Navy, regarding the U. S. S. Cambridge. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, October 18, 1864. 

SIR: Order the U. S. S. Cambridge* to proceed off Charleston and 
report to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren for duty in the South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Rear- Admiral D. D. PORTER, 

Comdg. North Atlantic Blkdq. Squadron, Hampton Roads. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master Crosby, 
U. S. Navy, to proceed to Savannah River and adjacent sounds for 
the collection of sailors' 1 votes. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, October 19, 186 J,. 

SIR: You will proceed with the U. S. S. Harvest Moon under your 
command to Savannah River, Wassaw, Ossabaw, Sapelo, and Doboy, 
and communicate with the vessels there, in order to collect the " sailors' 
votes" already distributed for that purpose. A number of ballots 
will be given you, in order to enable the men to vote. 

The commanders of vessels will give you every facility, and endorse 

on your order the time of your arrival and departure at each station. 

No detention must occur, as the time is short. It is supposed you 

can accomplish this purpose in two days or three at the furthest, but 

sooner if possible. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master J. K. CROSBY, 

Comdg. U. S. S. Harvest Moon, Port Royal Harbor. 



Detailed report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, of latest infor- 
mation regarding the Confederate works and obstructions in Charles- 
ton Harbor. 

No. 520.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C., October 19, 1864. 

SIR: Conformably to the wishes of the Department, I transmit here- 
with a Coast-Survey planf of Charleston Harbor, upon which are 
marked positions of the several rebel batteries, so far as I am informed. 

There is no uncertainty as to their positions, except those of two or 
three small works that lie near the shore on the left hand (going up), 
beyond Fort Johnson. 

*The U. S. S. Cambridge did not leave the Norfolk navy yard until Februarys, 
1865. She arrived off Charleston, S. C., February 12, 1865". 
t For map of approaches to Charleston see Series I, volume 14. 



20 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

They are not seen from any of our vessels, and there are no means, 
therefore, of verifying the different reports, but they are placed with 
as much correctness as the information admits of. All the batteries 
noted by yellow labels are derived from the examination of deserters 
and refugees, and coincide with those marked on a chart for me in 
December, 1863, by Major Abert, chief engineer of this department, 
except the battery at Haddrell's Point and the battery at Chisolm's 
Mills, on the Ashley River, and that at the foot of Calhoun street, on 
the Cooper River. 1 have omitted the battery on that part above 
James [Island] Creek, as I never heard of it, and have placed that at 
Wappoo farther back. Major Abert has a battery at a wharf next 
above White Point, which is probably intended for the English gun. 

The armament of the different works is variously reported as to 
caliber and even number, but not beyond what ma} 7 be reasonably 
expected from uneducated observers not too much interested at the 
time in what is before their e} r es. Taken together, they fix the num- 
ber and kind of guns quite as well as soldiers or sailors usually do, and 
furnish a fair representation of the force to be encountered. 

The following may be accepted as my own impressions from the best 
accounts of the defenses of the harbor, forming one well connected 
whole, but divisible into three groups, each consisting of a principal 
work and its accessories: the outer batteries, the middle batteries, and 
those of the city. 

The outer defenses. 

The west portion of Sullivan's Island looks directly upon the main 
channel as it bends up from the roads (where our ironclads anchor) and 
passes into the lower harbor. This is strongly fortified and its heav}' 
batteries occupy the whole ground. 

First, at the extreme inner end of the island, is Battery Bee, which 
mounts seven cannon, all heavy. One is said to be an Xl-inch and 
the others columbiads (of course Vlll-inch or X-inch guns). 

Fort Moultrie is placed at the angle of the island, where it juts out 
farthest into the channel, and has a free sweep of the water in almost 
any direction that is accessible to large vessels. It is said to mount 
eighteen cannon, rifled and smoothbore. What is their exact caliber 
I am not informed. I have been under their fire several times and 
know them to be very heavy. 

The distance between Battery Bee and Fort Moultrie is from 600 to 
700 yards, and they are connected by a continuous parapet, behind 
which are batteries at two points. The first of these is just outside of 
Fort Moultrie and has three mortars. 

Farther on, toward Battery Bee, is a battery, which some deserters 
say is called Batteiy Marion, the caliber of which I have not heard 
from good authority. 

Next to Fort Moultrie, eastwardl}*, is a battery said to be called 
Rutledge. It has four guns, two Vlll-inch columbiads and one X-inch 
cqlumbiad, and also one X-inch columbiad said to be rifled and throw- 
ing a shot of 300 pounds. 

Fort Beauregard, about 1,500 yards east of Fort Moultrie; one face 
extends across the island and looks along it to the eastward, as if to 
defend it from any attack in that direction. There is only a 2-i-pounder 
on this front, and that near the rear beach. There is a front seaward, 
where are mounted seven cannon, calibers heavy, but only a 7-inch 
rifle and an Vlll-inch howitzer that are remembered. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 21 

There are no batteries in the rear of the site of the Moultrie House, 
but the space between the Moultrie House and Fort Moultrie is chiefly 
occupied by Battery Rutledge, which has live heavy guns. One is a 
10-inch rifle (shot said to weigh 300 pounds), and another is an VIII- 
inch columbiad. The other ones are not known. A platform is said 
to be in construction for the 700-pounder now in the city. 

Between Battery Rutledge and Fort Beauregard are two or three 
siege guns, and there is a battery of two mortars between Fort Moul- 
trie and Battery Rutledge. 

The works from Fort Beauregard to the east end of Sullivan's 
Island I do not consider as having any important bearing on the 
approaches to the harbor by the main Ship Channel, but they control 
the channel leading along Sullivan's Island and prevent our boats and 
light steamers from effecting a perfect blockade there, and also pre- 
vent our landing on the east end of the island and engineering the 
rebels out of their works on the western end. 

Battery Marshall, which is located at the easterly extreme of Sul- 
livan's Island, defends it on three sides from light-[draftj vessels 
which alone can approach it. It has ten guns; two are VHI-mch 
columbiads, two are rifled 32-pounders, and the remainder are of 
small caliber, but are sufficient to keep boats and light vessels from 
approaching seaward or by Breach Inlet, or the interior channels. 

Between Battery Marshall and Fort Beauregard, at regular inter- 
vals of 600 or 700 yards, are four small batteries, each mounting two 
32-pounders, smoothbore. 

The works which may be considered as immediate auxiliaries of 
those on Sullivan's Island in defending the main channel are 

First. A battery on Mount Pleasant which has two. 10-inch guns. 
These would enfilade vessels in front of and attacking Battery Bee. 

Second. The ruins of Fort Sumter, which, if the concurrent testi- 
mony of five or six intelligent deserters can be relied on, has three 
or four heavy cannon on the channel front in the embrasures of the 
lower casemates nearest the angle. On the 21st July General Foster 
and myself made as good an examination as was possible at a distance 
of 1,500 3 7 ards from the deck of a monitor; two open embrasures 
were visible on the lower tier near the north angle, but no cannon. 
If they were mounted, they must have been run in. The work has 
generally had a garrison of 250 men. By means of musketry and 
field guns they could keep the monitors' decks clear as they passed, 
or prevent the men from making any effort to clear away light obstruc- 
tions which might otherwise foul the propellers, and they would also 
make it difficult to navigate the channel by keeping the leadsmen and 
pilots as well as the officers engaged in maneuvering the monitors. 

Fort Johnson and its contiguous batteries constitute the 

Middle group of defensive works. 

Fort Johnson is represented by deserters to consist of two batter- 
ies, Tynes and Hoteten [Harleston], each mounting four cannon. The 
former has two X-inch columbiads and two rifles, one 8-inch and the 
other 10-inch. Battery Holsten [Harleston] has three X-inch colum- 
biads and a 7 or 8 inch rifle. 

On the right of Fort Johnson runs out toward Morris Island a long, 
narrow spit of sand, on which are three small works, known as Battery 



22 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Simkins. The armament of these has been variously stated. 1 have 
it as four mortars, one 7-inch rifle, and two 32-pounders, with a 7 or 8 
inch rifle in a small adjacent work. 

One thousand yards to the rear of Fort Johnsort is Battery Cheves. 
Its force I do not know. 1 presume it looks right and left of Fort John- 
son and also upon it. Hitherto it has been used to flank our batteries 
on Morris Island. 

In front of Fort Johnson, distant about 1,700 yards, and on the 
other side of the channel, is Fort Ripley, a small work on the shoal 
with two heavy guns, columbiads. 

Along the shore to the left of Fort Johnson, and before reaching the 
city, are certainly two works. 

The first is Battery Wampler, with two X-inch columbiads. The 
next is Battery Glover, with one rifle and two smoothbores. The 
exact location of Batteries Wampler and Glover is derived entirely 
from reports of deserters. They can not be seen from any of our 
positions on the water. 

There is also said to be a third battery farther on, but this side of 
the city, the accounts of which are so indefinite that I can do no more 
than state its probable locality. 

The city batteries constitute the remaining defenses of the place. 

The principal work is Battery Ramsay, at White Point, the extreme 
angle of the city, where the two rivers (Cooper and Ashley) unite. 

All accounts of refugees and deserters concur that the armament of 
this work is considerable, but they differ as to the number and caliber 
of the guns, as follows, which will also exemplif}^ the variety of state- 
ments made in respect to other batteries: 



U. S. gun. 


1 Xl-inch. 


1 Xl-inch. 


1 Xl-inch. 


1 X-inch. 


1 X-inch. 


1 8-inch rifle. 


4 columbiads. 


1 rifle. 


1 VUI-inch. 


4 X-inch columbiads. 


2 X-inch columbiads. 


3 VHI-inch columbiads. 


3 X-inch columbiads. 








1 8-inch rifle. 






6 


7 


6 


7 



In the main, these accounts agree as well as can be expected from 
such sources, and with sufficient accuracy for all practical purposes. 

One of the English 700-pounders was placed here, but gave way 
under a few discharges, and was dismounted. 

On the left of the White Point battery, about 1,000 yards up the 
Cooper River, at Frazier's Wharf, foot of Cumberland street, is the 
other 700-pounder (13i-inch rifle). 

At the wharf of Laurens street is a battery which, according to one 
person, has one X-inch columbiad, and according to another, has four 
guns. 

At the wharf of Calhoun street is a battery which, according to one 
person, has one X-inch columbiad, and according to another, some 
rifled 32-pounders. 

In the northerly extreme of the city, looking upon Cooper River, 
but not immediately upon it, is another battery, generally spoken of 
by deserters as the Half Moon battery. It is said to mount two 
columbiads. 

On the Ashley River, first above White Point, is a battery atChisolm\s 
Kills, foot of Tradd street. It is spoken of as Battery Waring, and 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 23 

has two "columbiads, both of X-inch, or one of VHI-inch and one of 
X-inch. 

Farther up, where the bridge crosses the river, above the Savannah 
Railroad, are said to be batteries; one in the city, commanding the 
bridge, and another on the opposite side of the river, at the railroad 
terminus. 

The third work is placed at Wappoo Creek. The information in 
regard to these three batteries is very scanty and general. 

Castle Pinckney is in more immediate connection with the works on 
the Cooper side of the river. It was originally very weak, but it is 
said to be much improved. Its armament is said to be one X-inch, one 
IX-inch, and one 42-pounder, but this and its state of defense is 
imperfectly known. 

A work has been erected on the northerly side of the harbor, at 
Haddrell's Point, 2^400 yards northeast of Castle Pinkney. This is 
well seen from our positions, with its single gun, which is said to be 
a rifled 32-pounder. 

In the foregoing I have placed before the Department the informa- 
tion upon which I should act in attacking the city or harbor, so far as 
the batteries are concerned. 

Ironclads. 

The rebel ironclads must be considered as movable batteries, and as 
such necessarily constitute a part of the defenses of Charleston and its 
harbor. 

The choice of positions lies, of course, with the enemy, and no antici- 
pation can be formed of the exact position where they may choose to 
use them. There are three actually in commission: the Chicora, 
Palmetto State, and Charleston, all of the same model, in which they 
resemble the Merrimack, Atlanta, and Tennessee. The accounts of 
those who have served in them generally concur in essential points. 

The Charleston is the best, and is said to be about the size of the 
Atlanta. She is similarly plated, and can go 6 or 7 knots. She has 
six guns, two 8-inch rifles and four rifled 42-pounders, with a crew 
of 140 men. 

The Chicora is smaller; goes 4 knots with a clean bottom, and has 
four guns, one 8- inch rifle forward and one aft, with a IX-inch Dahl- 
gren on each side, and a crew of 60 men. 

The Palmetto State is somewhat better than the Chicora in size and 
speed, with the same style of battery. 

There is a fourth ironclad, called the Ashley, or Columbia, and said 
to be a finer vessel than the Charleston, preparing for service, and 
nearly ready. 

Torpedo boats. 

The rebels are said to have a number of these in Charleston, and the 
possible use of them should not pass unconsidered in the confusion of 
a general attack. 

Obstructions. 

In this sort of defense I would include all kinds of booms, nettings, 
rafts, etc. 

The information which has been obtained in regard to them is more 
uncertain, because they can be made and placed, so as to avoid the 
common eye, and all knowledge of them which is valuable is limited to 
a few persons. 



24 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The only obstructions which were ever plainly in view were the 
piles extending in a row across the middle ground opposite Fort John- 
son. The buoys of the submerged rope nettings, between Forts 
Sumter and Moultrie, were also distinctly visible for some time after 
the capture of Morris Island, and on the d&y that I first entered with 
the ironclads a small vessel was seen busily occupied between the forts, 
no doubt in placing these obstructions. 

Our scout boats gradually removed the buoys and the nettings, but 
it is reported that some obstructions have again been extended from 
Fort Sumter partially across the channel. 

The heavy boom of railroad iron that existed in the harbor was 
never well understood until the winter freshets washed away parts of 
it, and they floated down the channel among the vessels, where they 
were towed or drifted ashore on Morris Island. 

I never had an adequate idea of their character until I saw these 
fragments, nor do I believe anyone else had, excepting those who were 
immediately concerned in their construction and use. 

They consisted of bars of railroad iron connected at the ends by 
massive links. Each bar was about 21 feet long, and was cased nearly 
its whole length in 8 or 10 large logs, squared and well bound together 
by iron bands. If I remember rightly, as many as thirty of these 
bars went ashore on Morris Island, and I was present when a number 
of them were drawn up on the beach, still linked together. The whole 
formed a barrier nearly submerged, perfectly articulated by means of 
the links, and not only difficult to overcome, but dangerous to strike 
at full speed. 

I knew generally that there were obstructions in the channel beyond 
those of rope, near Sumter, but 1 never could obtain the least particu- 
lar which would give an idea of what these barriers really were in 
their construction, nor where they were placed, and I have never seen 
anyone from the rebel side who knew as much of them as we saw 
after they were washed away, nor have I seen any person to this day 
who knew where those obstructions had been placed. 

Of the construction of the torpedoes employed by the rebels we 
are well informed, but where they have been placed, or are now placed, 
no one could ever give any information, except a squad of men who 
fled to our picket monitors one night last February. 

The} r haa belonged to the special department who are charged with 
this business, and had assisted in placing the torpedoes in the harbor 
and laying down the wires for the galvanic battery in one fort or 
another, but it was night when the work was done, and they could 
form no precise idea of the spot where the torpedoes were laid, and 
they differed so much among themselves in this respect that no useful 
facts could be obtained from their testimony. 

They were only certain that steam boilers containing 1,000 and 2,000 
pounds of powder were sunk in different places and the wires taken 
ashore, and that all kinds of torpedoes were changed frequently on 
account of deterioration by dampness. 

Besides these heavy torpedoes, which are exploded by galvanic 
wires, there are smaller magazines made of barrels, with a fuze at the 
upper bilge, and conical shells attached to the arms of a floating cross 
and to frames tilted upward on one end from the bottom and placed 
6 or 10 feet below the surface, exploding when struck by a heavy 
object, such as a vessel. 

I think the Department will be satisfied upon a view of the locality 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 25 

and its various defenses just enumerated, that when an attack on 
Charleston harbor is made, it should be made in full force. 

To pass the rire of Sullivan's Island at 1,000 yards is only the pre- 
liminary; the real battle is to begin after this has been done, and it is 
almost indispensable that the result should be so favorable as to allow 
the fleet to remain in the harbor, otherwise no permanent resuU would 
be achieved, and the vessels must once more run the gantlet of fire 
from Sullivan's Island, this time less able to bear it and return it than 
before. 

To enter, therefore, should mean to be entirely successful so far as 
regards the inner batteries. For which reason I would suggest that 
the attack be made in full force. 

Last year the Department had but 12 ironclads available or expected 
to be. Now it has 11 of one turret and 4 of two turrets, besides the 
Ironsides, leaving the Roanoke, Onondaga, and Atlanta to keep the 
James say 46 guns in all. 

In order that an attack should be productive of the utmost advantage, 
it should be made simultaneously by land and sea. The ironclads can 
not spare a man to secure any advantage they may gain by their fire. 

Considering the very reduced number of the rebel troops and 
the strength of the works, together with the need we have of all our 
force elsewhere, I was under the impression that 10,000 men (veter- 
ans) might suffice; but an officer of our Army, just escaped from 
Charleston, thinks 15,000 troops would be needed, and as he has had 
an opportunity of traversing the city and its vicinity in rebel uniform, 
his opinion is more reliable. 

In making these suggestions, I am entirely at a loss to shape them 
by the views which the Department may have formed on the subject, 
but I think the Department will find that they will stand the test of 
the event. 

In conclusion, the Department may be assured that when it shall 
decide on the attack, it will be my earnest desire to leave no effort 
untried to realize its utmost wishes and my own. 

I have the honor to be, very respectf ully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral^ Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Acting Ensign 
Noyes, U. S. Navy, to assume command of U. S. S. Catalpa. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., October 20. 1864. 

SIR: You are hereby detached from the U. S. S. Daffodil and will 
proceed by the first conveyance to the anchorage off Charleston, and 
on your arrival you will report to the senior officer present for com- 
mand of the U. S. S. Catalpa. relieving Acting Ensign Edgren. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Ensign A. K. NOTES, U. S. Navj, 

U. S. S. Dafodil, Port Royal Harbor, S. C. 



26 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Coiiimander Thomp- 
son, U. S. Navy, to proceed to duty as senior officer in Stono Inlet. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., October 21, 1864. 

SIR: You will proceed by the first conveyance to Stono Inlet, and 
on your arrival assume command as senior officer at that place, 
relieving Lieutenant-Commander J. C. Chaplin, commanding U. S. S. 
Commodore McDonough, to which vessel you will be temporarily 
attached. 

It will be important to keep a watchful eye on any movements or 
preparation that the rebels may make, so that if at any time a move is 
contemplated in that direction the best information may be obtainable. 
This will only be perfectly done when not known to the rebels. Let 
the boats scout at night, and let scouts be landed occasionally on John's 
Island and pass up above Grimball's house, along the wood above it, 
where a good view is had of Battery Pringle. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander EGBERT THOMPSON, U. S. Navy, 

U. S. Ship New Hampshire. 



Order of Captain Green, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander Luce, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Pontiac, to perform duty as con- 
voy to army transport carrying prisoners of war. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 
Off Morris Island, S. C., October 21, 1864. 

SIR: You will be pleased to convoy an army transport, with prisoners 
of war on board, from this anchorage to Fort Pulaski, and from thence 
proceed to Port Royal and report to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, or in the 
event of his absence to the senior officer present, for repairs. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. B. LUCE, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pontiac, off Charleston, S. C. 



Letter from Hear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to collector of cus- 
toms, Hilton Head, S. C. , regarding the exchange of the prize schooner 
Julia for the sloop Jerry Angel. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., October SI, 186 4. 

SIR: The schooner Julia was rigged and fitted up by the U. S. gun- 
boat Paul Jones last year, having been one of the numerous small prizes 
captured in this squadron (date unknown). She has been in the pos- 
session of the United States naval forces for over a year, having been 
used as a dispatch boat between different stations. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



27 



On the 23d September, 1864, she was exchanged for the sloop Jerry 
Angel at North Edisto, of which John Newman was owner, because 
the latter was better suited for the particular service of dispatch. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

T. C. SEVERANCE, Esq., 

Collector, etc., Custom -House, Hilton Head. 



Distributifm of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

October 22, 1864. 



Vessel. - 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Murrell's Inlet 




Potomska 


Georgetown 




Do. 


Oape Romain 




*Mangham 


Bull's Bay 




Adger 


Charleston 


Outside the bar 


Wamsutta 


do 


Do. 


Sonoma 


do 


Do. 


Flambeau 


do 


Do. 


Mingoe . . 


do 


Do. 


Laburnum . 


. .do 


Do. 


Acacia ... 


.do.. 


Do. 


Azalea . 


do 


Do. 


Patapsco 


do 


Inside the bar 


Sangamon 


...do... 


Do. 


Nantucket 


do 


Do. 


Catskill ^. 


do 


Do. 


Home 


do 


Do. 


* Bruen 


do 


Do. 


* Adams 


do 


Do. 


Clover 


do 


Do. 


Dandelion 


do 


Do. 


Geranium 


..do . .. 


Do. 


Gladiolus 


do 


Do 


Catalpa 


.do 


Do 


Amaranthus 


... .do ... 


Do. 


Hydrangea 


do 


Do. 


Montauk 


do 


Repairing. 


McDonough 


Stono 




*Smith '. 


do 




Stettin 


North Edisto 




* Percv Drayton 


do 


Tender. 


*Saratoga 


St. Helena. 




* Wild Cat 


do 


Tender. 


* New Hampshire 


Port Royal 




Philadelphia. . . 


do 




Pettit . . 


do 




Arethusa .... 


do 




Carnation 


do... 




* Houghton 


...do... 




*Orvetta. 


do 




South Carolina 


Tybee Island 




Memphis 


do... 




* Swift 


do 


Tender. 


* Williams 


do 




Passaic 


Wassaw Sound 




Wissahickon 


do... 


. 


* Thunder 


do 


Tender. 


Flag 






Winona 


do... 




Jonquil >. 


do 




* Femandina 






Lodona , 


Sapelo 




* Allen 


Doboy 




*Griffith 


Altamaha 




*Braziliera 


St. Simon's 




Sanford 


St. Andrew's 




* Perrv 


Femandina 




Ottawa 


St. John's 




Norwich . . 


do 




Hale 


.do 






Mosquito flnletl . . 





* Sailing vessels. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, October 22, 1864 

Continued. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Port Royal . ... 


Repairing 




...do ... 


Do. 


Pawnee 


do 


Do. 




...do... 


Do. 


Canandaigua 


... .do .... 


Do. 


Dai Ching 


do 


Do. 


Pontiac 


do... 


Do. 


* Para 


do 


Do. 


Sweet Brier 


...do... 


Do. 


Daffodil 


do 


Do. 


* Racer . 


...do... 


Do. 




do . 


Do. 


Larkspur . 


do 


Do. 




do. 


Repairing; tender 


Camelia 


do 


Repairing. 




do 


Do. 


* Ward . . 


... .do 


Do. 


Cimarron 


...do... 


Disabled. 


* Valparaiso 


.. ..do. 


Hospital ship. 


* Norfolk Packet 


do 


Health ship. 


Iris 




Relieve and communicate 


Harvest Moon 




Special duty. 


* Blunt 




Do. 


* Hope 




Do. 


Oleander 




Southern stations with stores 


Wabash 




North. 


Marblehead 




North for repairs. 


Mohawk .... 




Do. 


Seneca 




Do. 


Huron . 




Do. 


Ilnadilla 




Do. 


New Ironsides 




Do. 


* Midnight 




Do. 


Paul Jones 




Do. 


Mahaska 




Do. 


Chippewa 




Do. 


Rescue 




Do. 


* Supply 




Do. 


Weehawken 




Sunk or stranded 


Housatonic 




Do. 


* Kingfisher 




Do. 


M adgie 




Do. 


Water Witch 




Captured. 


Columbine 




Do. 









* Sailing vessels. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading SqiKtdron. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, acknowledging the 
delayed arrival of the Departments confidential dispatch, " 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, October %%, 1864. 

SIR: I have to inform the Department that only last evening I 
received the confidential dispatch dated the 9th September. It is 
marked on the envelope, via Bermuda, and mailed Key West, October 
8. As the Bermuda was off Charleston on the 14th September with a 
draft of men, I presume the document went with her by mistake to 
Key West. 

However, I only received it last night, and it is said to have come 
by the revenue cutter Tioga, which left New York on the 15th October 
and arrived yesterday. 

The Department may be assured that nothing transpires from me 
of the intended movement, as no one but myself has seen the docu- 
ments of the Department and the replies are written by myself. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 29 

Rear-Admiral Farragut has not arrived here yet, and to avoid delay 
in meeting him I remain at this place. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. G. WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Stone, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Cimarron, to 
assume command of the Savannah blockade. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., October %%, 1864. 

SIR: You will proceed as soon as the weather permits, with the 
Cimarron under your command, to Savannah River and take charge of 
the blockade at that place. 

You will obtain from the senior officer present all the information 
that will be useful in carrying on this duty and in keeping a vigilant 
eye on the movements of the enemy and the condition of his defenses. 
Send scouts to the front to observe the state of the same. 
You will forward to me all deserters and information without delay. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander E. E. STONE, 

Commanding U. S. S. Cimarron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Chasing ashore of the British steamer jfrlora, off Fort Moultrie, Octo- 
ber n, 1864. 

Report of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren. U. S. Navy, transmitting additional information. 

No. 550.] FLAG -STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Charleston Roads, November 5, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose for your information a report in regard to the destruc- 
tion of a British blockade runner, said to be the Flora, on the night of 
the 22d, marking a passage as confidential, which it is important should 
not be known to the rebels. 

Since that, another vessel attempting to come out was driven back 
by the inside blockade. 

I do not recognize in the consular dispatches any account of the 
above vessel. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



30 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, senior officer off Charleston. 

U. S. SHIP JOHN ADAMS, 
Off Morris Island, South Carolina, October 31, 186 J^. 

SIR: I have respectfully to report that the blockade runner which 
was run aground off Moultrie on the night of the 22d instant by the 
picket launches was the Flora, with an assorted cargo, which was 
mostly lost, according to an intercepted rebel telegraphic dispatch.* 

The proceedings of the outside blockade to intercept her are stated 
in the accompanying reports of Commander Patterson and command- 
ing officers of vessels who saw her on her passage in. 

The Mingoe, the fleetest vessel on the blockade, failed to fire a gun 
or to slip her cable to go in pursuit of her. 

The inside picket launches discovered her in good season and opened 
fire on, and causing her to run aground on the southern bank of 
Maffit's Channel; up to this time everything was well done by the 
inside blockade. 

Immediately after she grounded, Acting Master Ricker proceeded 
to the Patapsco and informed Lieutenant-Commander Madigan, com- 
manding the advance picket monitor, of the fact of the steamer being 
aground. She remained aground until daylight unmolested, when the 
advanced monitors opened fire upon her and were soon after followed 
by the batteries on Morris Island. 

I endeavored to have her set on fire, but failed to accomplish it, 
owing chiefly to the shallow and rough water on the bar where she 
was grounded. I also directed that an attempt should be made to 
capture a rebel boat which, 1 learned from an intercepted rebel dis- 
patch forwarded to me by Brigadier-General Scammon, intended 
visiting the wreck on the night of the 25th instant. This project also 
failed. 

From the best information 1 can obtain, I am of the opinion that 
Mr. Gitford did his whole duty in a highly creditable manner, and that 
if he had had the cooperation of five or six men like himself more 
would probably have been accomplished. 

1 would not recommend any further investigation of the proceedings 
of the inside blockade, as this was the first experience of the parties 
in an affair of this kind, and I have no doubt they will do better on 
the recurrence of a similar opportunity. 

I also enclose herewith reportsf from Lieutenant-Commanders Mad- 
igan and Barrett. Lieutenant-Commander Lewis omitted, previous 
to his departure from this anchorage, to forward to me his report 
agreeably to my directions, and I would suggest that he may be directed 
to forward it to you. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 

Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

*It is very important that the rebels should not [know] that we intercept their 
telegrams. J. A. D. 
t Not found. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 31 

Report of Commander Creighton, IT. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Mingoe. 

U. S. S. MlNGOE, 

Off Charleston, 8. C., October 24, 1864. 

SIR: On the evening of the 22d, about 9 o'clock, off to the north- 
ward of the inner buoy of Rattlesnake Shoal, a gun was fired by the 
Wamsutta at a blockade runner. She passed us so quickly inshore 
that before I could slip or get my broadside to bear she was out of 
sight. This being the first blockader we had seen at night, it created 
confusion, which dela} r ed the promptness which would have otherwise 
effectually stopped her. The officer then in charge of the deck was 
Acting Master Talknan, had only reported the day previous for duty, 
and was inexperienced in regard to the details of orders regarding 
blockade runners. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. BLAKELEY CREIGHTON, 

Commander. 
Commander T. H. PATTERSON, 

Senior Officer Offshwe Blockade. 



Report of Commander Patterson, U. S. Navy, senior officer off Charleston Bar. 

U. S. S. JAMES ADGER, 
Off Charleston Bar, October 25, 1864. 

SIR: In reply to your communication of the 24:tb instant, about 9 
p. m. of the 22d instant the Wamsutta discovered a blockade runner 
going inward. She immediately slipped, fired at her, and made the 
signal indicating a vessel going outward, which, though very soon recti- 
fied by her picket boat, created some confusion and uncertainty as to the 
course of the stranger. After firing our broadside at the blockade 
runner she was not seen again by the Wamsutta, being obscured by 
the smoke from the guns of the latter until she had run out of sight. 

The Mingoe, the next vessel to the westward, saw but did not fire 
at the strange steamer, and Commander Creighton says in his report, 
" She passed in so quickly inshore that before I could slip or get my 
broadside to bear she was out of sight." 

The Laburnum, lying in 2 fathoms to the westward of the Mingoe, 
and heading at the time N. W., discovered right ahead the spray from 
the paddles of a steamer, without being able to distinguish the vessel; 
fired her port bow gun at, and then lost sight of her, slipped, stood 
inshore, and after standing in a short distance brought the strange 
steamer out from under the land and saw her for a moment bearing 
W. S. W. 

The Geranium, to the southward and westward of the Laburnum, 
seeing the signal made by the Wamsutta and hearing the guns, weighed 
her anchor, stood inshore, and immediately after the Laburnum fired 
discovered the blockade runner on her port bow; fired two shots at, 
and then lost sight of her. 

The Sonoma, with every preparation made, was at anchor to the 
southward and westward of Breach Inlet, with a picket boat inside of 
her, neither of which saw anything of the blockade runner. 

The Acacia slipped and stood inshore, but failed to discover any- 
thing, and fired several shots at random. 



32 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The Azalea* the most western vessel, when the proper signal was 
made indicating a vessel "going inward," slipped, and after standing 
in a short distance discovered what appeared to be the spray from 
the paddles of a steamer and opened fire, but did not chase, as the 
object fired at was too far past her to cut her off. 

About 10: 30 p. m. signal was made by the Wamsutta^s picket boat, 
vessel "going outward," but it was a false alarm, she having mistaken 
the Geranium^ which was underway in the vicinity, for a vessel run- 
ning the blockade. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. H. PATTERSON, 
Commander and Senior Officer Present off Charleston Bar. 

Captain J. F. GREEN, 

Senior Officer off Charleston. 



Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Ames, TJ. S. Army, Third Rhode Island Artillery, Chief of 
Artillery, Department of the South. 

OFFICE CHIEF OF ARTILLERY, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, 

Morris Island, South Carolina, October %4-> 186 Jf.. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that at daylight on October 23 a 
large side- wheel iron steamer, with two smokestacks, was discovered 
ashore opposite Battery Rutledge, Sullivan's Island, she having run 
on a shoal at that point during the night. This vessel was painted 
lead color, was very long, and appeared to be of light draft. She is 
probably of about 700 tons burden. The first shot fired at her was 
from the picket monitor; Fort Putnam opened at the same time with 
two 30-pounder Parrotts, striking her on the quarter at the second shot. 
This was the first shot that struck the blockade runner from either 
army or navy. Batter} 7 Chatfield opened with a 300-pounder Parrott; 
the third shell from this gun passed through the starboard wheelhouse 
into the vessel and exploded, tearing the wheel and wheelhouse all 
away and breaking up a large portion of her works amidships. Fort 
Strong opened with three 100-pounders, striking her many times in 
the hull and on her decks. The navy also kept up a fire upon the 
vessel from two monitors, doing'the steamer much damage. 

The name of this vessel was the flora; she was, no doubt, running 
into Charleston at the time of getting aground. She now lies a com- 
plete wreck. This vessel was distant from Fort Putnam 2,700 yards, 
from Battery Chatfield 2,600 yards, and from Fort Strong 3,500 yards. 

The following amount of ammunition was expended in destroying 
that steamer: Fort Putnam, 30-pounder shell, 38; 24-pounder shell, 
22. Battery Chatfield, 300 pounder shell, 7. Fort Strong, 100-pounder 
shell, 77. Total, 144. Ninety -eight of these shell struck the vessel. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. AMES, 
Lieutenant- Colonel Third Rhode Island Art'tlh ry, 

Chief of Artillery, Department oftJie South. 

Lieutenant THOMAS J. ROBINSON, 

Acting Assistant Adjutant- General. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 83 

Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the com- 
pletion of Confederate torpedo boat at Savannah and the forward- 
ing of the same to Mobile. 

No. 533.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., October, %4, 1864. 

SIR: Deserters recently arrived from Savannah report that a torpedo 
boat has just been finished at that place and immediately sent to Mobile 
by railroad, which it may be well to know there. 

Also that the Union prisoners have been removed 18 miles from 
Savannah. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, } T our obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Or dei' of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, to commanding officers of moni- 
tors regarding night signals furnisfied to the army. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 

Off Mofrw Island, South Carolina, October 27, 1864. 
The established night signals for "rams in sight and near" and 
"blockade runners going out" have been furnished to the army, 
which, in the event of either being seen at night, will be signalized 
from Cumming's Point to the advance monitors. 

The commanding officer of each monitor will take a copy of this 
order. 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 

COMMANDING OFFICERS OF MONITORS. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Green, 
U. S. Navy, to furnish list of vessels that have passed or attempted to 
pass the blockade since August 1, 1864- 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, October %7, 1864. 

SIR: 1 send you the Iris,' the Sweet Brier will follow by sunset. 
There is information of a gunboat in the Pedee nearly ready to come 
down to Georgetown with at least two heavy guns. Warn the flam- 
beau not to be surprised. 

I shall send up there the Canandaigua or Pawnee as soon as either 
is ready, which may not be before Sunday next. 

Please to send me a list of all vessels that have passed the blockade 
or have been prevented from doing so by being driven back or run 
ashore since August 1 last. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain JOSEPH F. GREEN, 

Senior Office?* Present off Charleston. 

N W R VOL 16 3 



34 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Commander Crelghtwi, II. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 
Mingoe, regarding casualties to that vessel during a gale. 

U. S. S. MiNGOE, 

Off Charleston, S. C., October 28, 1864. 

SIR: Last might, at 9:30, while at my station to the northward of 
Rattlesnake Shoal, in '6 fathoms of water, with a stormy wind from the 
southward and westward, with a heavy sea breaking where I laid, 
finding the ship drifting, I hove up my anchor to shift my berth in 
deeper water. While catting the anchor, a sea washed overboard the 
captain of the forecastle. I stopped, and while lowering a boat, struck 
heavily on the bottom. I succeeded in getting off and rescuing the 
man, but on the boat's return to the vessel she capsized and was lost, 
but the crew and all were got on board. Not knowing what damage I 
might have sustained, and [realizing] that my anchors were too light 
for the gale then blowing, 1 concluded to keep underway, and toward 
morning found my tiller was broken off from the rudder, to which it is 
joined by iron bands cast to the rudder. I succeeded in steering her 
with the iron tiller on the spar deck, but that broke. I have another, 
but with the iron tiller she steers so wildly that I do not think it safe, 
and, like the others, it may break at any moment. The engineer 
reports also that the working of the ship last night strained the expan- 
sion joint, scalding one of the men, and by the working of the hurri- 
cane deck broke the whistle pipe. The whole frame of the engine is 
loose. A further report from the engineer will be sent as soon as it 
can be made out. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. BLAKELEY CKEIGHTON, 

Commander. 

Commander T. H. PATTERSON, 

/Senior Officer Outside Blockade. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding general 
matters pertaining to his command. 

No. 543] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C., October 29, 1861>. 

SIR: I beg leave to acknowledge having received the Department's 
communication of the 6th instant, enclosing copy of a dispatch* to the 
State Department, dated the 24th ultimo, relative to the arrival and 
departure of blockade runners at and from the blockaded ports, in 
which I observe that Charleston is included. 

I regret to say that this represents about the best that can be done 
with the present force, when taken in connection with the blockade 
runners that have been driven back or destroyed. The Prince Albert, 
Mary Bowers, and the Constance have been stranded and sunk, as well 
as a fine large steamer which was driven ashore on the shoal side of 
the channel opposite Sullivan's Island on the 22d instant. The latter 
was principally effected by the picket boats. 

I have been compelled for the want of something better to organize 
two divisions of these, and they, with the tugs, run close in by the 
batteries at night, at the risk of being pelted with grape. 

*See Series I, volume 10, p. 477. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 35 

The tug Amaranthus has just been sent down for repairs, an 8 or 
10 inch shot having passed through her, and not far from her boilers. 

in this connection I have also to acknowledge the receipt of the com- 
munication in regard to a design for passing in troops to reinforce the 
rebels. 

I beg leave to say that the blockade of some of .the ports south of 
Ossabaw is very weak, such as St. Catherine's, Doboy, Altamaha, and 
St. Simon's, where the main channels are each held by a single sailing 
vessel, as the Department will see by the semimonthly returns, while 
on each side is a wide scope of water, accessible to light-draft steamers, 
such as run into Charleston. At Sapelo and St. Andrew's are steamers. 

The blockade at Charleston monopolizes all the best vessels, and the 
continued service there keeps many of them under repair. 

At this time, when most needed, four of the finest steamers are here 
in the hands of the mechanics: The Canandaigua, Pawnee, Pontiac, 
and Nipsic; also the Dai Ching and three large tugs, Amaranthus, 
Sweet Brier, and Camelia. The Laburnum has broken a fan of her 
propeller; and when these return, others demand attention. 

The Cimarron is doing duty with one boiler, and when the James 
Adger goes I lose the best seagoing steamer, nearly as fast as the 
Pontiac and Mingoe, but capable of keeping the sea in any weather, 
and can carry at least thirty days' coal. 

Georgetown will also require more force, as I have information that 
a gunboat is building in the Pedee, and may be expected down before 
long, said to carry eight guns, two of them heavy; so the Pawnee or 
Canandaigua must go there to blockade her. 

1 had contemplated a move on the Georgetown batteries, and had 
examined the locality with a view thereto, but Commander Colvoco- 
resses, whom I had designed to bear a chief part, and had made the 
preliminary examination, being withdrawn, and then the Wabash with 
her large crew, I found it beyond my means. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgr en, U. S. Navy, to Commander Patter- 
son, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. James Adger, to proceed to 
duty at Wilmington, N. C. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, October %9, 1864. 

SIR: The Navy Department informs me that the Cambridge* has 
been ordered here for duty. 

When relieved by that vessel, you will, by order of the Navy 
Department, proceed without delay to the coast off Wilmington, N. C., 
and report to the senior officer present for duty in the North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander T. H. PATTERSON, 

Senior Officer Present off Charleston Bar, Outer Blockade. 

* The U. S. S. Cambridge arrived off Charleston February 12, 1865. 



36 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Harri- 
son^ U. /S. Navy, enjoining vigilance against the escape of Confeder- 
ate gunboat from the Pedee River. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C\, October <29, 1864. 

SIR: You will proceed with the Canandaigua under your command 
to the entrance of Winyah Bay and relieve the Pawnee, handing Com- 
mander Balch the enclosed order. 

I have been informed that the rebels have built a gunboat on the 
Pedee, which may be expected to come down as soon as the river is 
high enough. She is said to be of light draft and to carry eight guns, 
of which two are X-inch. 

The accounts may be exaggerated, but it is well to be prepared. 
You will take position in the channel and prevent the vessel from 
getting out to sea. 

I wish you to send a boat occasionally to scout the shore to the 
Santee, and observe if any attempt is made to fortify North Island or 
South Island and inform me thereof by the first opportunity. 

You will direct the Flambeau to return to Charleston and report for 
duty there, first receiving her pilot. 

There is a fisherman on North Island who has given useful informa- 
tion, and may continue to do so; give him a ration if he is serviceable 
in this way. 

You may rate the pilot, Prince Coit, at $60 per month. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander N. B. HARRISON, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. 8. 8. Canandaigua. 

[Enclosure.] 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, October W, 1864. 

SIR: On the reporting of Commander Harrison, commanding the 
Canandaigua, you will transfer your pilot to that vessel and proceed to 
Charleston and report to the senior officer present for blockade duty 
there. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comd-g. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander G. B. BALCH, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pawnee. 



Detailed report of Captain Green, U. S. Navy^ senior officer off 
Charleston, regarding vessels that have passed or attempted to pass 
the blockade since August, 1864- 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 

Off Morris Island, /South Carolina, October 31, 1864- 
SIR: In compliance with your order of the 27th instant, I respect- 
fully submit the following statement of vessels that are known to have 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 37 

passed the blockade of this port or have been prevented from doing 
so since the 1st of August last: 

August 9. At daylight a propeller steamer was discovered aground 
off Moultrie. She was set on fire and destroyed by shells from the 
Catskill and batteries on Morris Island. .She proved to be the Prince 
Albert, bound in. 

August 31. The side-wheel steamer Mary Bowers, running in, struck 
the wreck of the Georgians off Long Island and sank. She was dis- 
covered by the outside fleet at daylight. 

September 3. A large side- wheel steamer ran out through Maffitt's 
Channel. She was fired upon by the picket boats with musketry, and 
signal made inside "Blockade runner going out," but she was not seen 
by the outside vessels. 

September 5. Steamer, outward bound, headed off and obliged to 
put back. 

September 8. Deserters from Charleston report blockade runners 
Druid, Syren, Fox, and Stag inside. 

September 9. Steamer ran out. She was fired upon repeatedly by 
the Amaranthus inside and by the Azalea outside and escaped. 

October 5. A side-wheel steamer attempted to run out and was 
turned back by the picket launch. 

October 6. At daylight a large side-wheel steamer was discovered 
sunk near the wreck of the Georgiana, off Long Island. She proved 
to be the Constance, and was bound in. 

October 6. A side-wheel steamer attempted to run out and was 
driven back b}" the picket boats. A large screw steamer ran in and 
afterwards a side- wheel steamer ran out; neither were seen by the 
outside blockade. 

October 8. A side-wheel steamer ran in and another was driven 
back by the picket launches; neither were seen outside. 

October 1 9. A blockade runner made her appearance near Sumter, 
evidently with the intention of running out, and went up the harbor 
just before the moon rose. 

October 22. A large side-wheel steamer, running in, was driven 
aground off Moultrie by the picket launches and the next day destroyed 
by shells from the monitors and the batteries on Morris Island. She 
proved to be the Flora. A steamer also attempted to run out, but 
turned back. 

October 24. A steamer attempted to run out, but turned back. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston,. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Swann, U. S. Navy, to assume command of the U. S. S. 
Lodona, at Sapelo. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. ., October 31, 1864. 

SIR: You are hereby assigned to the command of the Lodona, now 
at Sapelo, and will repair thither by the first convenient opportunity. 

1729,'iK 



38 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



You will expedite as much as possible the work of cleaning her 
bottom, now being performed by the divers. 

Be vigilant in observing the rebel movements in the vicinity, and 
any attempt on the Lodona by torpedoes. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Hear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant R. P. SWANN, 

Commanding U. /S. &. Potoinska, Port Royal Ifarbor, S. C. 



Distribution, of Vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

November 1, 1864. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Murrell's Inlet 




Canandaigua 


Georgetown 




Do 


Cape Romain 




* Mangham ... 


Bull's Bay 




Pawnee 


Charleston .. 


Outside the bar 


Adger 


do..... 


Do. 


Dai Ching 


...do... 


Do 


Pontiac 


do 


Do. 


Wamsutta.. 


...do... 


Do 


Sonoma 


.do 


Do 


Flambeau . 


do 


Do 




. . .do 


Do 


Laburnum . 


do 


Do 


Acacia 


do... 


Do. 


Azalea .. ... 


do 


Do 


Patapsco 


do... 


Inside the bar. 


Sangamon 


do 


Do 


Catskill 


do... 


Do. 


Nahant 


do 


Do 


Home 


...do... 


Do 


*Bruen 


.. .do 


Do 


* Adams ." 


do 


Do 


Clover 


do... 


Do. 


Dandelion 


do 


Do 


Geranium 


...do... 


Do. 


Gladiolus . .... 


.do. 


Do 


Catalpa 


do 


Do. 


A 1 1 i;t rn Ji 1 1 M is 


...do 


Do. 


Hydrangea 


do 


Do 


Sweet Brier 


...do .. 


Do. 


Iris 


do 


Do 


Montauk 


do 


Repairing. 


McDonough .. . 


Stono 




* Smith 


do 




Stettin . .... 


North Edisto 




* Percy Drayton 


.. ..do 


Tender. 


* Saratoga 


St Helena 




* Wild Cat 


.do 


Tender. 


New Hampshire 


Port Royal 




Philadelphia 


.do 




Pettit 


...do... 




Arethusa 


do.. 




Carnation 


...do... 




* Houghton 


do 




* Orvetta 


do 




*Sea Foam 


do 




Cimarron 


Tybee Island .... 




Memphis 


...do ... 




Swift 


do 


Tender. 


^Williams 


do 




Passaic 


Wassaw Sound 




Wissahickon 


do 




* Thunder 


do 


Tender. 


Flag 


Ossabaw 




Winona 


do 




Jonquil 


do.: 




* Fernandina 


St. Catherine's 




Lodona 


Sapelo 




* Allen 


Doboy 




* Griffith 


A 1 In HIM! i;i 




*Braziliera... 


St. Simon's... 





* Sailing vessel. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



39 



Distribution of Vessel? of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, November 1, 1864 

Continued. 



Vessel. 



Station. 



Remarks. 







Sanf ord . 


St. Andrew's 


Repairing. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Repairing, tender. 
Repairing. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Hospital ship. 
Health ship. 
Relieve and communicate. 
Special duty. 
Do. 
Do. 
Southern stations with stores. 
North. 
North for repairs. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Sunk or stranded. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Captured. 
Do. 


*Perrv 


Fernandina 


Ottawa ' 


St. John's. 


Norwich 


.do. ... 


Hale 


do 




Mosquito [Inlet] . . 


Lehigh 


Port Roval . 


Nantucket 


do 


Potomska 


do 


Nipsic 


do 


South Carolina 


do 


*Para 


do 


Daffodil 


do 


Chatham 


do 


Larkspur 


. . do 


* Racer 


.. .do 


* Lightning 


do 


Camelia 


do 


* Geo. W. Rodgers 


do 


* Ward 


do 


Oleander 


do 


* Valparaiso 


do 


*Norfolk Packet 


do 






Harvest Moon . 




* Blunt .... 




* Hope . . ... 








Wabash 




Marblehead 




Mohawk 




Seneca 




Huron 




Unadilla 




Chippewa 




Rescue 




New Ironsides 




* Midnight . 




Paul Jones .. 




Mahaska . 




*Supply 




Weehawken 




Housatonic 




* Kingfisher 




Madgie 




Water Witch 




Columbine 









* Sailing vessel. 



JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, suggesting movements 
f(/r the occupation of the territory between the Pedee and Santee 
rivers as a base foi % further operations. 

Confidential.] U. S. FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Charleston Roads, November* 2, 1864- 

SIR: This will be handed to the Department by Mr. Ward, who has 
very recently fled from his home in South Carolina. He represents to 
me that he lived at Kingstree (Williamsburg County), on the North- 
eastern Railroad, leading north from Charleston, and has considerable 
property there in land and otherwise; states that he has always been a 
Union man and has now abandoned home and property rather than 
serve in the rebel Army, which was about to be forced on him by con- 
scription. He has taken the oath of allegiance, and his acquaintance 



40 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

with the country where he resided may be turned to good account if 
the Government is disposed to the undertaking. Mr. Ward states that 
the rebel armies derive large supplies from his neighborhood in cattle 
and other food. It is notorious that Georgetown is a principal rice 
district, and the crop is yet on the ground. Quite recently the boats 
of the Potoniskci destroyed a large quantity in the stack on the Santee. 

By passing up the Santee the [Northeastern] Railroad, which crosses 
it, can be severed, for which boats will be chiefly used in connection 
with a small party of cavalry ascending the Pedee and its banks with 
a mixed force. The [Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta] Railroad, 
leading to Wilmington, is to be cut at Mars Bluff, [S. C.]. 

These movements, executed rapidly, will prevent all aid from Charles- 
ton or Wilmington and permit the occupation of the territory between 
the two rivers, which may serve as a base for further operations. The 
Santee is open. To enter the Pedee, Georgetown will be first occupied, 
which can certainly be done without incurring much detention, its 
channel being defended by a battery of ten guns, two of which are 
X-inch. 

This I can venture an opinion upon, having already given it much 
attention and had a reconnoissance made with the view chiefly to 
destro}*- the gunboat said to be building up the Pedee, as well as to 
ascertain how Florence could be reached in case the Government had 
any idea of making an attempt to release the Union soldiers held there 
as prisoners. 

Mr. Ward's familiarity with the country and its roads offers an 
unexpected facility which might be turned to good account at this 
season, and, if successful, might develop even better results than those 
which appear at first sight. 

One thing 1 would urge earnestly that entire secrec} r be observed. 
It may be set down as equal to half the force necessary otherwise. I 
believe all the information that regards roads is in possession of Mr. 
Ward, and I have what is required to enter the Santee and George- 
town. 

The season is propitious if the action is prompt. I give Mr. Ward 
a few lines of introduction merely, and have the honor to be, 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear -Admiral Dahlgr en, U. S. Navy, regarding th^ arrival 
at Port Royal, 8. C., of the U. 8. Ship St. Z,ouis. 

No. 547.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Charleston Roads, S. C. , November 3, 186 Jf. 

SIR: I have to inform the Department that the U. S. ship St. Louis 
arrived at Port Royal on the 2d instant for duty in this squadron, and 
I enclose reports showing the condition of the ship. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, } 7 our obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 41 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Chaplin, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. S. Dai Ching, to 
proceed to St. Andrevfs Sound. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Charleston Roads, S. C. , November 4, 186 J^. 

SIR: You will proceed with the Dai Ching to St. Andrew's, [Ga.], 
and relieve the U. S. S. Mary Sanfwd, receiving her pilot, if she has 
one, and any information that he may have to communicate. 

I wi.sh that activity may be encouraged among the officers and crew 
by judicious expeditions into the inland waters that are contiguous. > 
****** * 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Slocking Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander J. C. CHAPLIN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. /S. Dai Ching. 



Repwt of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, transmitting report 
maste 
arbw. 



- 

of Assistant Paymaster Tuttle, U. S. Navy, regarding the obstructions 
m Charleston Ha 



No. 548.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Charleston Roads, 8. C. , November 4., 186 4-. 

SIR: Since transmitting to the Department a reply in regard to the 
obstructions in the harbor of Charleston, I have received the enclosed 
from Assistant Paymaster Tuttle. 

This gentleman has long been engaged in the astronomical depart- 
ment of Cambridge and is a practiced observer. With my permission 
he went to New York to procure a very powerful instrument, at his 
own cost, and with which he observes the rebel positions whenever the 
atmosphere permits. 

There have been rumors that obstructions were in progress near Fort 
Sumter, but they were so indefinite as to require confirmation. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. IRONCLAD CATSKILL, 
Charleston Roads, S. C., November #, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your order I have the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing brief report of the obstructions in Charleston harbor, seen by 
me on Sunday afternoon last. 

The obstructions extended from the walls of Sumter to within a short 
distance of Battery Bee, and for the first 200 yards from Sumter con- 
sisted simply of logs, which have been frequently observed by me 
during the past summer. Commencing near the extremity of the logs 
are a succession of rafts and buoys about 4 rods apart and extending 
to Battery Bee. These rafts and buoys were attached to obstructions 



42 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

below the water and between them, as could be plainly seen from the 
ripple on the surface of the water. 

Some 400 yards seaward of buoy No. 3 I observed an object resem- 
bling the head of a large barrel and having a conical object affixed to 
its center. Some of the officers on this vessel are of opinion that it is 
a buoy placed there by the Lehigh in 1863. 

Two objects seen by me on the 13th of August last were not visible 
on Sunday. These were reported to you by Captain Harrison, and one 
consisted of the wheelhouse of a steamer, and the other, apparently, of 
a steam boiler in a vertical position. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HORACE P. TUTTLE, 

Assistant Paymaster. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron.. 



Report of. Lieutenant- Commander Madigan, U. S. Navy, commanding 
77. S. /S. Patapsco, regarding the destruction of a beached doop ojf 
Fort Moultrie. 

U. S. IRONCLAD STEAMER FATAPSCO, 
Off Fort Wagner, Charleston Harbor, /S. C., November 5, 1864. 

SIR: In obedience to your signal at 9 a. m. of this day, I opened fire 
upon the small sloop that was on the beach in front of Fort Moultrie. 
As I was at anchor at the time, and lying stern toward the sloop, I 
commenced firing with the 12-pounder Dahlgren howitzer, hitting 
twice in thirteen shots. We were then about 2, 700 yards distant from 
the sloop. I concluded the 150-pounder rifle would make shorter work 
of the destruction in view, on account of the size of its projectile, so I 
got underway and steamed around to bring the 150-pounder rifle into 
play and commenced firing with it at the sloop. I was now fired upon 
by Fort Moultrie, the enemy using shells and shot which would cer- 
tainly have hit this vessel had she not been continually changing her 
position by steaming and drifting; one shell burst nearly over us and 
two pieces struck the vessel, doing no damage beyond staving the gig 
slightly and bruising one of the torpedo spars. Finding us so hard to 
hit the enemy ceased after firing a few shots. When I had fired ten 
shots with the 150-pounder rifle I anchored at my station, in obedience 
to signal, having struck the sloop once and set her on fire. All our 
shots were good line shots, but being in a strong tidewa}' it was diffi- 
cult to keep the vessel steady so as to preserve our aim. 

The destruction of the sloop by burning will be perfect. She seems 
to have had a cargo of cotton and turpentine. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN MADIGAN, 
Lieutenant- Commander, Commanding U. S. S. Patapsco. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Endorsement.] 

In communicating the above I beg leave to say to the Department 
that the work was so well done that the conflagration made a consid- 
erable appearance at night. The batteries from Gregg had been firing 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 43 

without effect, when I signaled to the Patapsco to open fire, which 
was done as above related. 

Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear Admiral, Commanding., etc., off Charleston, November 5. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Thomp- 
son, U. 8. Navy, sen.ior officer in the Stono River, regarding proper 
location of buoys in view of changes in the channel. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Charleston Roads, S. C. , November 5, 1864- 

SIR: I sent the chief pilot to examine the channel at Stono, and he 
reports to me that it lias changed entirely in direction and has increased 
in depth. 

I wish you to send a competent officer to look into this and to the 
proper location of the buoys. 

The pilot stationed there seems to have overlooked the change 
entirely, which, by the way, at North Edisto, has just cost the Gov- 
ernment $30,000 in the loss of a coal vessel. 

You will perceive that my General Order No. 75 requires attention 
to such matters. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander EGBERT THOMPSON, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer in the Stono. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Stillwell, U. S. Navy, regarding continued cooperation with 
the army in St. John's River. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 7, 1864. 

SIR: I have received yours of the 3d, stating that General Foster 
had given orders for the evacuation of Magnolia, [Fla]. 

I have no communication from General Foster on the subject. 
The operation in the St. John's was purely military, and had no 
naval object beyond assisting the troops. 

You will therefore continue to render the general such aid as you 
can in maintaining his positions and his communications, which, I pre- 
sume, will not place the vessels in advance of military position; but if 
the question arises, refer to me. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander JAMES STILLWELL, 

Comdg. U. S. 8. Ottawa, Senior Officer Present in the St. John's. 



44 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Green, 

U. S. Navy, urging readiness for repelling attack upon picket boats 

by Confederate launches. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, November 7, 1864- 

SIR: Yours of the 31st was received. I notice the statements of 
deserters that the rebels are fitting or have fitted ' ' four launches for 
the purpose of capturing our picket boats." 

Please to make this known to the officers and men of our boats, and 
say to them that I shall be grievously disappointed if this design is 
not made to recoil on the rebels. 

We have four launches and five other boats. Let care be taken to 
have them well manned and officered; have the howitzers loaded with 
grape and the muskets with buckshot. Keep the four launches well 
in support of each other, and the lighter boats so placed as to prevent 
any surprise, not to bear the brunt of the shock, but when the boats 
are engaged to close and use their buckshot with effect. 

The tugs should have 24-pounder howitzers for the occasion, loaded 
with canister, and endeavor also to run over the rebel boats. Rifle 
guns are of no use in such a melee. 

If the attack is made, and our men win, I should value it above all 
things. 

With the canister and buckshot should go the bowie knife; rifles, 
shells, and swords are less useful for such an occasion. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain JOSEPH F. GREEN, 

Senior Officer Present off Charleston. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting sample 
of rope cut from a buoy taken up in Port Royal Harbor. 

No. 556.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C., Novembw 8, 1864. 

SIR: I transmit a sample of rope cut from a buoy just taken up. 

I had gone out of the roads to examine more closely the locality and 
track whereby the blockade runners pass and was near to one of the 
wrecks, close into Long Island, when a floating object was perceived 
which looked like a torpedo. It was picked up, and on examination 
found to be precisely similar to the floating torpedoes, but had neither 
fuze nor powder, which puzzled me as to its purpose. 

On cutting the rope attached to it there was found a wire rope 
within, from which was taken the inclosed sample; it is evidently 
intended to convey a galvanic current and was floated by buoys. 

It must have required a great force to part this rope, and was 
probably done by some steamer passing out of the usual course. 

Under the circumstances it is to be presumed that the communica- 
tion was with some one of the fixed torpedoes, and if so, most probably 
with one that is said to have been lately put down near Sumter. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 45 

The telegraphic wires are all sunken on the bottom, as reported by 
deserters who have had to do with them. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding a system of 
escape for Union prisoner*. 

No. 557 Confidential.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

-Part Royal Harbor, S. C., November 8, 1864. 

SIR: Three of our officers and one noncommissioned officer have 
just reached this squadron from Charleston. Ten refugees came with 
them. 

It appears that a regular system of escaping is organized for those 
who can pay. Several persons are concerned who procure papers of 
various kinds and clothes, which not only get the favored parties from 
among the prisoners at some convenient opportunity, but even protect 
them against conscription, and finally they are brought away in boats. 
I have seen the papers and it is evident that they are excellent forger- 
ies, or else some officials are concerned. Sentinels on picket must 
connive too. 

The sum paid by each was $250. 

At this time there are some forty more on hand to come, and all are 
out of prison. These just escaped agree that if they got off safely 
four shells should be fired into the town in rapid succession to-night 
between 8 and 9 o'clock, which will be done. 

It is all important to those who are to escape that this should be 
strictly secret, and I have therefore marked this confidential. 

I enclose a paper of the 4th instant. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Coindg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. Ship St. Loui?, to proceed to duty 
in North Edisto. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C. , November 8, 1864. 

SIR: Your orders of the 3d instant to proceed to Doboy and relieve 
the Ethan Allan are hereby revoked, aud you will proceed to North 
Edisto with the St. Louis under your command and relieve the U. S. 
S. Stettin, receiving from Lieutenant Van Alstine any information 
which may be useful to you in doing blockade duty at that place. 

On your arrival off the bar at North Edisto, you will receive on 
board Fleet Pilot Haffards, who will pilot your vessel inside. If he is 



46 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

not there, anchor and wait for him, or keep underway, as your judg- 
ment may best direct. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. Ship St. Louis. 



Report of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, regarding the escape of a block- 
ade runner into Charleston, November 7, 1864- 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 
Off Morris Island, Smith Carolina, November 8, 1864. 

SIR: I have respectfully to inform you that a large side-wheel steamer 
ran into the port of Charleston on the 7th instant at about 1 o'clock 
a. m. She was seen and fired upon by several of the outside block- 
ading vessels, and also by the launches inside. The latter fired forty- 
one shot at her, many of them at a distance not exceeding 100 yards, 
and were heard to strike her. 

The picket monitors and tugs, so far as I have learned, did not fire 
a gun. 

The reports of commanding officers in relation to their proceedings 
on the occasion will be forwarded to you as soon as they are received. 

I enclose herewith Lieutenant-Commander Luce's report * of a shell 
fired from Battery Marshall yesterday morning, which struck and 
exploded on board of the Pontlac, killing and wounding several of his 
crew, and slightly damaging the vessel. 

Also Carpenter Thomas's report \ of the damages sustained by the 
Pontiac. 

I do not think the injury as serious as Carpenter Thomas represents, 
but it will be necessary for the Pontiac to go to Port Royal as early as 
convenient to have her deck and hawse hole repaired, and to have a 
guard put on the cutwater in lieu of the displaced casting, and in the 
meanwhile a new casting should be ordered from the North. There is 
a spare hawse hole in good condition on the same side as the one that 
is injured. 

A torpedo craft was seen from Cummlng's Point this forenoon, 
moving about in the vicinity of Castle Pinckney. 

The brig J. W. Spencer, of and from Philadelphia, with 495 tons of 
coal for the navy, arrived off the bar yesterday. Her rudder is 
damaged, and I shall have her brought inside for discharge when the 
bar will admit of it. 

The rudderhead of the Gladiolus is split, and I shall be obliged to 
send her to Port Royal to have it repaired, although her services here 
are very much needed. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer off CJtarleston. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 

* See p. 51. t See p. 52. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 47 

Order of the Secretary of the Navy to the commandant of the navy 
yard, New 1 ork, regarding the U. /S. bark Gemsbok. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, November 9, 1864- 

SIR: Direct the U. S. bark Gemsbok to proceed to Port Royal, S. C., 
and report to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren for duty, taking any stores that 
she can cany for that squadron. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral HIRAM PAULDING, 

Commandant Navy Yard, New York. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Major- General 
Foster, U. S. Army, regarding the removal of obstruction in Savan- 
nah River, to facilitate the transfer of sick and wounded soldiers 
from the North. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 9, 1864. 

GENERAL: I have received yours of the 7th instant, requesting that 
Captain Stone be instructed to remove the chain cable that is now 
across the Savannah River, in order to avoid the time and trouble of 
transferring the sick and wounded soldiers, who are expected from the 
North, etc. 

I shall send an order to Captain Stone to that effect; at the same 
time I wish to draw 3 T our attention to the advisableness of doing noth- 
ing that, by inference or otherwise, can enlighten the rebels as to the 
nature of the obstructions that remain there, or the facility with which 
they may be passed; because it is with difficulty that I am able to 
blockade the different entrances along the coast, and the force at Savan- 
nah River would be quite insufficient without the obstructions, which 
may be much less real than supposed. 

I should have recommended the use of the Wilmington River and 
St. Augustine Creek for the purpose of exchange, which are quite as 
convenient for access by water to Savannah. There the blockade is 
made strong by an ironclad, and will bear any notice which the rebels 
might have an opportunity of bestowing. 

The steamers could meet at Wilmington Island. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General J. G. FOSTER, U. S. Army, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Headquarters, Hilton Head. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Stone, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Cimarron, for the 
removal of chain cable in the Savannah River. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 9, 1864. 

SIR: General Foster wishes to have the chain cable removed which 
is now across the Savannah River above Fort Pulaski, in order 



48 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

that the "steamer daily expected from the North, with sick and 
wounded soldiers for exchange, may pass up that river, thus saving the 
time and trouble of transferring the soldiers to light-draft steamers." 
You will therefore proceed, with such means as you have from the 
Cimarron, Memphis, and Williams, to remove the chain referred to 
by General Foster, and cause the channel to be buoyed through the 
obstructions. 

I desire to have no more done than is absolutely indispensable to the 
passage of our steamers, as I consider the obstructions useful to our- 
selves, particularly as the force which I can spare for the Savannah 
River is not strong, and the rebels have an ironclad above. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander E. E. STONE, 

Comdg. U. S. S. Cimarron, /Senior Officer Present, Tybee. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Mahan, 
U. S. Navy, to assume temporary command of the U. S. S. Potomska 
and proceed off Charleston. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harboi*, S. C. , November 10, 1864.. 
SIR: You will, without delay, assume temporary command of the 
U. S. S. Potomska and proceed immediately to the anchorage off 
Charleston and, on your arrival, report to the senior officer present 
for duty. 

On being relieved of the command of the Potomska by Acting Master 
Montell,you will consult with Lieutenant-Commander Matthews, com- 
manding the naval battery, relative to the supplies necessary, and 
furnish such as can be procured at Charleston, after which you will 
return to this anchorage and report your arrival to me. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Lieutenant A. T. MAHAN, U. S. Navy, 

Flag -Steamer Philadelphia. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Green, 
U. 8. Navy, regarding the examination and disposition of wrecks of 
blockade runners off Long Island. 

FLAGSHIP, 

Port Royal, S. C., November 10, 186 4. 

SIR: Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Churchill will report to you in 
order to examine the wrecks of the blockade runners off Long Island. 

If it is possible to raise or bring away any one of these, let it be done; 
if not, let such of their contents be secured as may be worth it. 

Please to give the diving vessels a tow when asked for and such aid 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 49 

as may be needed. I should wish the divers to report their progress 
at the earliest date. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. /South Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 
Captain JOSEPH F. GREEN, 

/Senior Officer off Charleston. 



Letter from. Secretary of the Navy to Bear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, transmitting information regarding Fort McAllister. 

9 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, November 10, 1864- 

SIR: I enclose herewith a copy of a letter,* dated the 29th instant, 
addressed to the Department by 0. W. Thompson, esq., 32 South 
street, New York, giving the reports of two members of his family, 
who have recently arrived from Georgia, regarding the military forces 
at certain points near Savannah. Mr. Thompson is unknown to me. 
A few months since he announced that he himself had escaped from 
Georgia and communicated to the Department information as to matters 
about Savannah. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear-Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding plans for 
joint operations against the defenses of Charleston. 

No. 558.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, 8. C. , November 10, 1864- 

SIR: In transmitting the plan and description of the defenses of 
Charleston the departure of the mail did not allow of further remarks 
at the time; otherwise I should have referred to a previous suggestion 
contemplating another form of attack. 

The city of Charleston is entirely under the control of James Island, 
which is not only fortified by water toward the harbor, but in all other 
directions is also strongly entrenched and garrisoned. 

For this reason it was under consideration at one time by General 
Gillmore and myself to operate there, he moving from Morris Island 
against the nearest corner of the island, where is Fort Johnson, and 
the vessels cooperating on the same point. The possession of the works 
must have led to a gradual advance along the island. 

But attack is also feasible on the opposite side of the harbor. The 
occupation of Mount Pleasant by our forces would compel the abandon- 
ment of Sullivan's Island by mere blockade, and would also command 
the site of the city more promptly than by an advance on James Island, 
because there are no works there except one toward Sullivan's Island 

*Le*ter states that Fort McAllister is without a garrison and suggests its capture. 
N W R VOL 16 4 



50 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

and another at Haddrell's Point, both near the water and looking only 
that way, without any bearing inland at all. 

With a moderate land force only this last would be most advisable. 
Part of the troops could be landed at Bull's Bay, whence there is a good 
road for some 15 miles; part would enter the inlet seaward of Sullivan's 
Island, seize Long Island, and, with the aid of the navy, land in the 
rear of Sullivan's Island, join the force coming from Bull's Bay, and 
occupy Mount Pleasant. 

This would cut off Sullivan's Island by land. The ironclads would, 
do the same by water, while the principal part of the land and naval 
force would advance toward the city, keeping them on that side of the 
harbor. 

A few days must lead to the possession of the city, and then James 
Island being accessible at its narrowest part, by the Wappoo, both 
from the Ashley and Stono rivers, must sooner or later compel the 
retirement of the rebels from James Island, or else risk the loss of 
their troops, as well as of the island. 

This operation would require 30,000 to 50,000 good men, because it 
is reasonable to admit that the present small force of the rebels would 
receive large additions. 

Still, we have the unquestioned advantage of being able to bring here 
additional forces more promptly in the present position of the main 
armies. Hood must pass around Sherman in order to give any aid, 
and General Grant equally obstructs the road from Richmond. 

The present time is in every way favorable; and if the winter is to 
keep the men in the lines to the northward, it appears to me that no 
more judicious or effective campaign could be devised than might be 
carried on here, for its success would enter a wedge between the two 
extremes of what is left of the rebellion and develop possibilities that 
might be improved by General Sherman into a great advantage. 

Limiting the view to Charleston, I feel confident that the result 
would be satisfactory, and would therefore advise the operation. 
What action might afterwards be most advisable would appear subse- 
quently. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Hear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports 
regarding casualties on the U. S. S. Pontiac from explosion, of shell 
jiredfrom Battery Marshall, Sullivan's Island. 

No. 560.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Eoyal Harbor, /S. C. , November 10, 1864. 

SIR: I have to inform the Department that the day after I left 
Charleston for this place the l^ontiac received a shell forward, the 
explosion of which killed 5 men and wounded 1 others slightly, one of 
whom has since died. I enclose the reports of Lieutenant-Commander 
Luce and Acting Assistant Surgeon J. W. Sherfy, which state the 
details at length. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 51 

I also enclose the report of Carpenter Thomas, showing the extent 
of damages, which I am informed are probably not so great as repre- 
sented; still, it will be necessary for the Pontiac to come to Port 
Royal to repair, which gives me some concern at this time, as there 
are now here four of the best blockaders for the^same purpose, and at 
least one more that needs repair. 

The Department will perceive by the above that the attempts to 
effect the close blockade here unavoidably expose our vessels to casual- 
ties from the enemy's shot, striking in shoal water, and even fouling 
propellers, but that the vessels that go in to violate the blockade will 
not succeed without great risk. 

On the same night that the Pantiac was struck, a large side-wheel 
steamer ran the blockade about 10 o'clock, taking advantage of the 
obscurity caused by the weather. 

She was fired upon.by several of the outside blockading vessels, and 
also by the launches inside. The latter are reported to have tired forty- 
one shot at her, many of them at a distance not exceeding 150 yards, 
and were heard to strike her. 

I am glad to say that this boat organization is rendering good serv- 
ice. They are pushed up well in advance and are supported by tugs, 
which, in this instance, however, failed to fire a gun. 

I have had some difficulty in collecting the number of large boats 
which are assigned to this duty, because steamers are not generally 
provided with the largest class of launches. 

The two which were last sent me by the Bureau are highly spoken 
of as most excellent boats, but four others which were required have 
not reached me yet. I wish very much that 1 had a dozen such, with 
men sufficient to man them: 

If 1 had a thousand well-disciplined marines I would occupy Long 
Island, which is next to Sullivan's Island, and thereby reduce the 
chances of blockade runners getting in to a very low figure. 

It is reported to me that a torpedo craft was seen from Cumming's 
Point this morning, moving in the vicinity of Castle Pinckney. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. PONTIAC, 
Off Charleston, S. <7., November 7, 1864. 

ADMIRAL: It is with painful regret that I find myself obliged to 
inform you that, while engaged this morning in picking up our anchor, 
slipped to go in pursuit of a blockade runner, Battery Marshall opened 
fire on us, and a shell from a rifled gun exploding on the forecastle, 
killed -t of the crew and wounded 7 others, besides 1 officer slightly. 

Observing the first few shells to explode far short, I took no fur- 
ther notice of the battery, but continued my efforts to get the end of 
our chain. We got hold of the buoy rope, when suddenly a shell 
from the battery struck the bow just over the port hawse pipe. It 
penetrated the bulwarks, struck the forecastle deck, and exploded, 
scattering destruction on every side. Fragments of the iron hawse 
pipe and two hand grenades (the latter exploded by the concussion) 



52 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

lent their aid to increase the sad mortality. These grenades had been 
placed in a rack on the forecastle bulwarks for the convenient use of 
the forward lookouts. Striking- the deck, the shell knocked a hole 
through into the yeoman's storeroom, throwing fragments of the plank 
and shell below, but causing no material damage. Our buov rope was 
cut away, and with it the end of the chain lost. Not deeming it prudent 
to remain longer exposed to the fire of the battery, I steamed down 
for the outside squadron and anchored. 

Just about the time we were struck a rain squall passed over, which 
shut out the land from view, so I am in hopes the enemy did not see 
anything of the effects of his shot. 

On examining the bows to ascertain the amount of damage, the 
metal casting which forms the gripe of the stem and acts as a guard to 
the forward rudder was discovered to be broken; how or in what 
manner it became so, I have not yet been able to determine. 

Mr. Thomas has made an examination of the injuries, and will, I 
presume, report through Captain Green. 

1 enclose herewith the surgeon's report of casualties. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. B. LUCE, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding /South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



U. S. S. PONTIAC, 

Off Charleston, November 8, 1864-. 

SIR: The following is the list of killed and wounded resulting from 
the fire of Battery Marshall, on Sullivan's Island, upon this vessel at 
7 o'clock a. m. yesterday: 

Killed. James McLaughlin, boatswain's mate, and his body lost 
overboard; Matthew J. Summers, first-class boy; L. F. Brown, John 
McDaniel, Edward Lynch, landsmen. Total, 5. 

Wounded. Charles Nelson, captain of forecastle, very severely, died 
this morning; Thomas Connor, seaman, contusion over the right 
scapula, with fracture thereof, and lung implicated, severe; John 
McDonough, landsman, seriously in the right leg, compound fracture; 
Richard Ervingham, ordinary seaman, not severe, contusion inside the 
right thigh; Tneo. [E.] Lawton, ensign, contusions on the right leg, 
not severe; William Andrews, ordinary seaman, contusion left hand 
and left side, not severe; D. G. Johnson, landsman, contusion right 
shoulder, not severe. Total, 7. Whole number 12, injured and 
killed. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. W. SHERFY, 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, TJ. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. B. LUCE, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Pvntiac. 



MORRIS ISLAND, SOUTH CAROLINA, November 6 [7], 1864- 
In compliance with your order, I have examined the damage done to 
the gunboat Pontiac by a shell from Fort Marshall, S. C. , and find 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 53 

that the shell entered the port hawse hole and exploded at the instant 
it did so, thereby destroying the hawse pipe and tearing up the thick 
work of the deck amidships, and injuring the bulwarks and main rail 
on the starboard bow. I also find the casting that connects the stem 
to the keel broken and the lower part gone. The damage is serious, 
and, in my opinion, the vessel will have to be docked in order to prop- 
erly repair it. 

Very respectfully 

J. G. THOMAS, 
Carpenter, U. S. Navy. 
Captain J. F. GREEN, 

Senior Officer off Charleston, S. C. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Coin- 
mander Lewis, U. 8. Navy, to assume command of naval forces in 
Tybee Roads. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Part Royal Harbor, 8. C., November 12, 1864. 
SIB: You will proceed to Tybee Roads in thelJ. S. S. Harvest Moon 
and assume the command of the naval forces stationed there, carrying 
out any unexecuted orders which may have been transmitted to Cap- 
tain Stone and receiving from him such information as may be use- 
ful while doing duty there. 

On the arrival of Lieutenant-Commander A. W. Johnson you will 
give him all the necessary information and transfer the command 
to him. After which you will return in the Harvest Moon to this 
anchorage and resume your duties on the Nantucket. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander R. F. R. LEWIS, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. Ironclad Nantucket. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, in the matter of the 
removal of the chain across the Savannah Rwer for the passage of 
Confederate prisoners for exchange. 

No. 567.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor ^ 8. C., November 13, 1864. 

SIR: A number of large steamers arrived here on the llth instant, 
conveying sick and wounded rebels to exchange at Savannah for our 
own soldiers who were prisoners. 

A few days previously General Foster informed me that an exchange 
was about to take place in Savannah River and asked me to give 
orders for the removal of the chain that connects the obstructions. I 
did so, but apprised him that it would have been advisable to exchange 
in Wassaw, by wa}^ of Wilmington River and St. Augustine Creek, 
[Ga.], as the rebels would learn from the passage of the obstructions 
that they were not now a very effective barrier, and give trouble, as I 
could not keep a strong force there and they had an ironclad above. 



54 



SOUTH ATLANTIC ' BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Our force now there is the Cimarron, with a disabled boiler; the 
Memphis, with a poor batter y, and a mortar schooner. 

I would recommend that the navy be consulted on such occasions as 
that mentioned above. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGBEN, 
12 ear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic. Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of tlie Navy. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

November 15, 1864,. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Murrell's Inlet 






Georgetown 




Do 


Cape Romain 




*Mangham 


Bull's Bay 




Pawnee . . . 


Charleston . 


Outside the Bar 


Adger 


do... 


Do. 


Wamsutta . . . 


do . 


Do 


Pontiac 


...do... 


Do. 


Sonoma 


do... 


Do. 


Flambeau ... 


do . 


Do. 


Potomska 


do... 


Do. 


San ford 


do 


Do. 


Laburnum 


do 


Do. 


Azalea 


"do 


Do. 


Patapsco . 


do 


Inside the bar. 


Catskill 


do... 


Do. 


Montauk 


do. . . 


Do. 


Ndhant 


...do... 


Do. 


Home 


do 


Do. 


*Bruen 


do 


Do. 


*Adams 


do 


Do. 


*Orvetta 


do 


Do. 


Geranium 


...do... 


Do. 


Amaranthus 


. ...do 


Do. 


Catalpa 


...do... 


Do. 


Hydrangea 


...do 


Do. 


Daffodil.. 


...do... 


Do. 


Iris 


...do 


Do. 


Clover . 


. ..do 


Do. 


Sangamon 


do 


Inside the bar, repairing. 


McDonough . 


Stono 




*Smith 


do 




Sweet Brier 


do 




*Williams. . . 


do 




Si. Louis 


North Edisto . 




Percy Drayton . ... 


do 


Tender. 


*Saratoga 


St. Helena 


Ordered to relieve Allen. 


Stettin 


do 




*WildCat 


do 


Tender. 


*New Hampshire 


Port Royal 




Philadelphia 


...do... 




Pettit ... . 


do 




Arethusa 


do 




Carnation 


Port Royal 




Houghton 


do 




Cimarron . . 


Tybee Island 




* Racer 


do 




*Swift 


do 


Tender. 


Passaic 


Wassaw Sound 




Wissahickon 


do 




* Lightning 


do 


Tender. 


Flag 


Ossabaw 




Winona 


do 




Jonquil 


do 




* Fernandina 


St Catherine's 




Lodona 






* Allen 


Doboy 




*Gnffith 






* Braziliera 
Dai Ching 


St. Simon's 
St. Andrew's 




* Perry... 


Fernandina .. 





* Sailing vessels. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



55 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, November 13, 1864 

Continued. 



Vessel. Station. 


Remarks. 


Ottawa 


St. John's . . 


Repairing. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do.' 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Repairing: tender. 
Hospital snip. 
Health ship. 
Loading with stores forsouth. 
Relieve and communicate. 
Special duty. 
Do. 
Special duty; divers. 
Southern stations, with stores. 
North. 
North for repairs. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Sunk or stranded. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Captured. 
Do. 




Hale do 




Mosquito [Inlet] 




Port Roval . . 




...do/.. 




Mingoe . do 


Nipsic do 


Acacia do 


*Para do 


Chatham . do 


Gladiolus do 


Larkspur 


do 


*George W. Rodgers 


do 


Camelia " 


.. do 


* Ward 


do . 


Oleander 


do 


Dandelion 


. . do 


*Thunder 


do 


* Valparaiso 


do . 


* Norfolk Packet 


do 


Memphis 








Harvest moon 




*Blunt 




* Hope 




*Sea Foam 




Wabash 




Marblehead 




Mohawk 




Seneca 




Huron 




Unadilla 




Chippe wa 




Rescue 




New Ironsides 




* Midnight '< 


Paul Jones 


Mahaska 


*Supplv 


Weehawken 


Housatonic 


* Kingfisher 


Madgie ' 


Water Witch L . 


Columbine 









* Sailing vessels. 



JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, regarding the U. S. ship St. Louis. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, November 21, 1864- 

SIR: Your No. 547, enclosing report of survey on the sloop of war 
St. Louis, was received. 

The St. Louis is a very old vessel and not worth repairing at much 
cost. Let her be patched up as well as possible and perform service 
in the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdy. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron off Charleston. 



56 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding proposed 
attack upon the defenses of Savannah, Oa. 

No. 578.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, November 21, 1864- 

SIR: The Department's communication enclosing another from Mr. 
C. W. Thompson, of No. 32 South street, New York, has been received. 

I lost no time in communicating with General Foster on the subject, 
with a view to his opinion, and cooperation if he deemed it advisable 
to act. 

Fleet Captain Bradford had a personal interview with General Foster, 
and reports as follows: 

In obedience to your verbal order, I have had an interview with the general com- 
manding regarding the movement referred to within. 

The general did not favor the movement at present, because the information is not 
reliable. The general does not believe the surprise and capture of Fort McAllister 
possible with the available force here or in the Department. 

He estimates the number of troops defending Savannah and its approaches at 
4,000, a little over one-third of which are regular troops; 5,000 defend Charleston, etc. 

Three rivers unite and form Ossabaw Sound the Big Ogeechee, the 
Little Ogeechee, and the Vernon. The channel of each is barred by 
forts and batteries, McAllister, Rosedew, and Beaulieu, respectively; 
the position, construction, and force of each have been given at various 
times by persons directly from them. 

Fort McAllister is the work which was attacked in January, 1863, 
by Captain Worden with the M<mtauk (monitor), Seneca, WissahicJcon, 
Dawn, and a mortar schooner, resumed a few days afterwards by the 
same vessels, and early in March by Captain Drayton with the moni- 
tors Passaic, Patapsco, and Nahant, gunboats Seneca, Wissahickon, 
and Dawn, and three mortar schooners, all of which is fully reported 
in the report of the Department, December, 1863, and Department's 
report on armored vessels. 

The Department will perceive from the reports of the different offi- 
cers that there is reason to believe from their results that the work is 
not reducible by any naval force which can approach it, and must be 
assailed simultaneously by a land force. 

Beaulieu is more heavily armed than McAllister, and would proba- 
bly require the aid of a land force for its reduction. 

Rosedew is inferior to either, but is reported less accessible to ves- 
sels of any draft. 

These works are chiefly of importance because they guard the 
approach from the south to Savannah; the roads leading from these 
turn all the heavy works that defend the city from the direction of 
Wassaw and Savannah rivers, and the Department will readily con- 
ceive the improbability of this being neglected, as stated, by an enemy 
so vigilant and so much interested in the positions occupied. 

The Water Witch now lies above Beaulieu, just as the Nashville lay 
above McAllister, with the difference that she is entirely beyond the 
reach of our guns. 

South of these outworks to the defense of Savannah there is no 
force of any consequence; the boats of the squadron have entered the 
water courses in that quarter and fired upon a few companies, which 
they dispersed or captured. 

There is a great variety of reports arriving constantly, and it is only 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 57 

by comparison with each other and what we know that the probable 
state of things can be arrived at. 

My own scouts have been in full view of Beaulieu, and deserters 
coming in regularly from it, McAllister, and Rosedew have stated 
their armament and condition at the times they left. 

Acting Master Durand was captured in a scout, intended to examine 
the rear approaches to Beaulieu. 

My scouts have also been repeatedly on the north end of Elba Island, 
in view of the rebels, but unsuspected, and quietly surveyed the city 
and the forts near it. 

The true attack is upon Savannah or Charleston, in force, while a 
column severs the communication connecting them by passing up any 
of the streams which run up from the sea and intersects the railroad. 

If General Sherman comes from inland and follows this plan he will 
certainly take both Cities with little effort, and a force from the sea- 
board could do this for him as he approaches. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 

Navy, in view of Major- General Sherman* 8 approach to Savannah, 

Ga. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, November ##, 1864. 

SIR: Major-General Sherman, with about 50,000 men, left Atlanta, 
Ga., on the 16th instant, with the intention of reaching the Atlantic 
coast somewhere in the vicinity of Savannah. He may be expected 
about the middle of December, and the Department directs that you 
will be prepared to give him any needed cooperation that may be in 
your power. 

It is desirable to obtain information respecting the nature of the 
weather in Georgia between this and the probable time of General 
Sherman's arrival on the coast, so that some idea may be formed of 
obstacles that he ma} 7 encounter in the way of rain and swollen streams. 
If in any way you can keep yourself advised on this point and inform 
the Department, please do so. 

Very respectfully, etc., GIDEON WELLES, 

/Secretary of the Navy. 

Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, off Charleston. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Oomm.ander Preble, 
U. S. Navy, regarding proposed operations. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 8, 1864. 
SIR: Yours of the 2ist instant has been received by the Hydrangea, 
and in reply to your query, when any of our officers and men escape 



58 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

to the St. Louis, if they are in need of clothing 1 , you are authorized 
to issue to them by requisition of the master's department on the pay- 
master. The}' are also to have a ration. 

I am sure I need not say a word to commend these, our suffering- 
comrades, to the officers and men of the /St. Louis. Those who have 
arrived here speak of their reception in the sloop in terms most grate- 
ful. We can not do too much for these gallant men. 

The refugees are a different set of people. They have lived in rebel- 
dom as long as they could, and now leave it from necessity, not from 
regard to the Union. 

You will put them on the oath of allegiance and give them a ration. 
Feelings of humanity will indicate what further should be done. 

As regards your own movements, strike when you can, but let it be 
done effectively. 

The great desideratum is to cut the railroad above you; the army 
has tried it repeatedly and failed. 

When you have all the necessary information, if you think it feasible, 
I will send you 100 marines and 200 seamen, which is about as much 
as I can muster I mean more than I could afford to lose. But every- 
thing will depend on secrecy and celerity. Give the rebels time and 
they will have force to stop you, but if you can get there before them 
you will do it and hold it. 

Perhaps Towles would assist, if promised some place. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Hear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, U. S. Navy, 

Comdg. U. S. Ship St. Louis, Senior Officer North Edisto. 



Order of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, to Commander Patterson, U. S. 
Navy, in vieib of the escape of a blockade runner through Swash 
Channel. 

U. S. SHIP JOHN ADAMS, 
Of Morris Island, 8. C., November n, 1864. 

SIR: A large side- wheel steamer ran in at 8 o'clock last night through 
Swash Channel. 

Please have some vessels stationed in the vicinity of Swash Channel, 
between it and the light-ship near the bar. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 

Commander T. H. PATTERSON, 

Comdg. U. S. S. James Adger, Senior Officer Offshore Blockade. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren^ U. S. Navy, regarding a thorough 
system of scouting in the vicinity of Port Royal, S. C. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Ilarboi^, 8. C., November 22, 1864. 

Vessels on blockade will be careful to scout thoroughly the rivers 
or estuaries where they may be, and as far as it is possible to do so; 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 59 

the object being to keep advised of the rebel positions and forces, also 
to gain all early information from deserters and refugees of move- 
ments elsewhere, whether of our own forces or the rebels. 

Anything new in relation to the movements of the Union forces 
under General Sherman, or generally important, will be immediately 
transmitted to me. There is no difficulty in doing so at Tybee, or 
Wassaw, or Ossabaw, as a vessel can always be sent for the purpose to 
Port Royal. South of Ossabaw the communication will be transmitted 
to Ossabaw by boats, and thence to Port Royal by tug. 

North of Port Royal the communication is frequent between Edisto, 
Stono, and Charleston, and access to Port Royal by tender is easy from 
St. Helena. 

The picket boats are to be out invariably after dark, and officers and 
men are to be encouraged in scouting by land or water. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Patterson, U. 8. Navy, transmitting report of 
the commanding officer of the U. S. S. Potomska, regarding the escape 
of a blockade runner. 

U. S. S. JAMES ADGER, 
Off Charleston Bar, November 23, 1864. 

SIR: Acting Master Montell reports having discovered last evening, 
between the hours of 7 and 8, a steamer coming from toward Maffitt's 
Channel, with sails set and square-rigged forward; made the usual 
signal and lired three times. The Azalea coming up under the port 
bow of the Potomska, and not answering her challenge, "caused much 
confusion by drawing our attention away from the strange steamer." 
The signal was repeated by this vessel, at that time near the Housatonic. 
The Potomska occupied a station about 1| miles N.W. i N. of the 
Housatonic. 

The strange steamer was not seen by any other vessel of the outer 
blockade, and when last seen by the Potomska was steering N. by W. 
I herewith forward a copy of Acting Master Montell's report, a 
copy of which I have also sent to Acting Master Strong, with direc- 
tions to make an explanation, etc. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. H. PATTERSON, 

Commander and Senior Officer Present off Charleston Bar. 
Captian J. F. GREEN, 

Senior Officer off Charleston, S. C. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. POTOMSKA, 

Blockading off Cliarleston, November 23, 1864- 

SIR: I beg respectfully to inform you that between the hours of 7 
and 8, on the evening of the 22d, saw a steamer coming from toward 
Maffitt's Channel, with sail set and square-rig forward; burned a Cos- 
ton signal and sent up rocket and fired No. 1 gun at the vessel, fol- 
lowing with No. 2 and pivot. 

The U. S. S. Azalea coming up under our port bow at the time, and 
not answering our challenges, caused much confusion by drawing our 



60 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

attention away from strange steamer, who, when last seen, was steer- 
ing N. by W., and out of reach of our guns. I feel confident that the 
vessel must have returned, as, during the night the guns' crews were 
kept to quarters and a most vigilant lookout was kept between the 
shore and ourselves. The Azalea failed to answer our challenges, 
which were made frequently during the night. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. M. MONTELL, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Commander THOS. H. PATTERSON, 

Senior Officer Outside Blockade. 



Extract from report of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, senior officer off 
Charleston, regarding general affairs. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 
Off Morris Island, South Carolina^ November 23, 1864' 

SIR: * * * A large side- wheel steamer, with two masts and two 
smoke pipes, ran in night before last at about 8 o'clock through the 
Swash Channel. She was seen and fired upon by two of the picket 
launches, one of which, lying in 9 feet of water, was obliged to cut 
her cable to avoid being run down by the steamer. She was not seen 
by the outside blockade. 

The night was ver}^ dark and boisterous. I enclose herewith Lieu- 
tentant-Commander Stone's and Acting Master Kicker's reports of the 
circumstances, and also Acting Ensign Seaman's respecting the station 
occupied by him on the occasion. 

The schooner Althea arrived here with provisions day before yester- 
day (the 21st instant), and I dispatched her yesterday to Port Royal. 

* * * * * * * 

A large launch, coppered, with oars, rowlocks, and rudder, com- 
plete, was picked up this morning at about 4 o'clock off Drunken Dick 
Shoal by one of the picket tugs. She had in her several 30-pound 
shot and a coffin containing the corpse of a colored man. 

* * * * * * # 

Two United States officers who escaped from Charleston and reached 
Morris Island a day or two since state that the rumor prevails in 
Charleston and vicinity that Sherman is marching in this direction. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 

Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, D. $. Navy, regarding the arrival 
of refugees and escaped Union prisoners. 

No. 582.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, November 23, 1864. 

SIR: Refugees continue to come out in various numbers to our ves- 
sels; just now as many as thirty or fort} r have arrived from Edisto, a 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 61 

few from Georgetown, [S. C.], among them some Union officers and 
soldiers, just escaped. Eight Union officers came in a few days ago, 
and subsequently two more. The agency is chiefly that of the person 
before mentioned, in which others appear to be concerned. How he 
can carry on his business without detection is not easy to understand. 
His fee is $250 in rebel currency. 
I enclose a list of the last arrivals. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Major- General 
foster ', U. S. Army, transmitting extract of report from senior naval 
officer in Stono River regarding the work of the enemy in that 
vicinity. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, November 24, 1864. 

GENERAL: The following is extracted from a communication by 
the senior naval officer at Stono: 

I have visited the water line in our front and find the enemy are active. They are 
repairing the bridge leading on John's Island, and appear to be at work back in the 
woods on the island. 

Their pickets have been also strengthened along the water front. Last night one 
of our picket boats discovered a large boat of the enemy near the mouth of Kiawah 
River. They retreated as soon as discovered. I have pulled up the creek, on the 
north side of Cole's Island, to the fort, and sounded the creek, as I passed up, at half 
tide. I found from 5 to 2 fathoms of water all the way. At the mouth, in Folly 
River, 13 feet. 

I see nothing to prevent the enemy, with ordinary sagacity, using the creek. Our 
fort is mounted with small smoothbore guns, so near a bend in the creek the enemy 
would be close on them before discovered on a dark night. 

My force there now is much weaker than I like, but it is the best I 
can do, as the work off Charleston requires every steamer I can muster, 
and more too; the wear and tear of incessant service keeps so many 
under repair. 

The vessels now in Stono are the McDonough (engine not usable, 
being under repair), a small steamer (Sweet Brier), and a mortar 
schooner. Another mortar schooner is on the way to Stono. 
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 

Major-General J. G. FOSTER, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Headqrs. , Hilton Head. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Na/oy, to Commander Preble, 
U. /S. Navy, to report for special duty. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., November %4, 1864. 

SIR: You are hereby temporarily detached from the U. S. sloop St. 
Louis, and will report to me without delay for special duty. 



62 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 

You will bring with you all your marines, 20 selected seamen, and 2 
officers. The executive officer of the /St. Louis will remain in com- 
mand during your absence, and you will give him all necessary infor- 
mation to enable him to enforce the blockade of Edisto and the proper 
care of the coal vessels. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A, DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Sqiiadrmi. 

Commander GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 

Commanding U. S. Sloop of War St. Louis. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgr en, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Stoddard, 
U. S. Marine Corps, to assume command of marines assembling at 
Bay Point, South Carolina. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, November %4-> 1864,. 

SIR: You are hereby temporarily detached from the U. S. ship New 
Hampshire, and will assume command of the marines who may assem- 
ble at Bay Point, [S. C.]. 

You will see that they are all properly equipped for service in the 
field, while performing battalion drill. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

First Lieut. GEORGE G. STODDARD, U. S. Marine Corps, 

U, S. Ship New Hampshire. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Green, 
U. S. Navy, for the dispatching of marines by th# U. S. S. Pontiac 
to Port Royal, South Carolina. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 24, 1864. 

SIR: You will collect all the marines on board of the different vessels 
at the anchorage off Charleston and send them here without delay, and 
all the Plymouth muskets available except those that may be in use on 
the ironclads. They are to be brought here in the Pontiac. 

Lieutenant Hayward to bring her to this place, in obedience to pre- 
vious orders, supposing the courts have not concluded in which Cap- 
tain Luce is engaged. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 

Captain JOSEPH F. GREEN, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer off Charleston. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 63 

Order of Rear- Admiral. Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Rey- 
nolds^ U. S. Navy, regarding arrangements for marines assembling 
at Bay Point. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, November 25, 1864.. 

SIR: A force of seamen and marines is to be assembled at Bay Point 
as quickly as possible for organization and drill. 

Please to give every facility to the officers in charge of the men for 
their accommodation, provision, cooking, etc. 

And you will detail forty contrabands to attend as cooks, so that not 
a man may be taken from his musket for any fatigue duty whatever. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

^ J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Commanding Naval Depot. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Green, U. S. 
Navy, to send to Port Royal, S. C. , the men from the naval battery, 
Morris Island. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 25, 1864. 

SIR: Send to this anchorage, in charge of Lieutenant-Commander 
Matthews, Lieutenant Hayward, and Acting Ensign Edgren, all the 
men at the naval batter} T . 

Assign Lieutenant Wiltse, of the James Adger, to command the 
battery and T. A. Ward temporarily, and to look out for baggage, 
etc. Thirt} 7 men from the Ward will do duty at the battery until 
further orders. 

Send four smoothbore howitzers, heavy, on field carriages, also the 
two new launches, with their guns' crews and everything complete. 
Direct Captain Creighton to report here with the Mingoe, and Lieu- 
tenant McGlensey to return to his vessel, as the court of enquiry is 
necessarily suspended for a while. 

The Pontiac was ordered yesterday to report here. Captain Luce 
will rejoin her. 

Direct Lieutenant Whitehead, of the Paum.ee, and Lieutenant 
O'Kane, of the Sangamon, to report to me without delay, and also 
Acting Gunner Binnix, at present on board the ordnance schooner on 
Light-House Inlet. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain JOSEPH F. GREEN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding, etc., off Charleston. 

In this and the orders sent yesterday there is urgent need for 
instant compliance. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 



64 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S.Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Scott, U. /S. Navy, for the organization of a shore battery. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal, S. C., November 25, 1864. 

SIR: You will, without delay, organize a battery of six pieces of 
light artillery, to be composed of four smoothbores and two rifles, all 
heavy; Lieutenant Mahan and Ensign Dichman, with 50 men from 
the south Carolina, 20 men from the Camelia, 15 men from the New 
Hampshire, will report to you for duty. 

This duty is temporary and until you are relieved by Lieutenant- 
Commander Matthews. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander R. W. SCOTT, 

Commanding Sonoma, Port Royal. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Johnson, II. /S. Navy, regarding the 
rumored transfer of the machinery and battery from the steamer 
Water Witch. 

U. S. S. ClMARRON, 

Savannah River, Georgia, November 25, 1864. 

ADMIRAL: It is reported by refugees from rebeldom that the 
machinery and battery of the Water Witch have been removed, with 
the intention of transferring the same to a ram now in construction 
at Savannah, and which will probably be ready for service in about 
six weeks. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. W. JOHNSON, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Comdg. S. Atlantic Blockdg. Fleet, Flag -Steamer Philadelphia. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Grreen, 

U. S. Navy, to keep a record in detail regarding escaping bhckade 

runners. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, November 25, 1864- 

SIR: Please to have a record kept of the vessels that escape the 
blockade of Charleston, stating, in columns, the day of the month, the 
day of the moon, state of the weather, and time of high water at night. 
Name the vessel, if known, and description, as far as perceived; by 
what vessel seen and fired at; remarks. Let this be extended as far 
back as possible, with an} r details, if not all, and sent to me up to the 
20th November last. 

Afterwards let a similar return be made to me on the 8th and 22d 
da} r of every moon. 

A refugee gave the following information to Captain Preble 
November 21 : 

During the last dark moon, seven steamers ran our blockade into Charleston, viz: 
The General Whiting, side-wheel, walking-beam; Chicora, alias Let Her Be, side- 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 65 

wheel; Fog, side- wheel; Julia, of Glasgow, side-wheel; Stag, side-wheel; Coquette, 
screw; Syren, side-wheel. 

The three last named succeeded in running out again; the remainder are waiting 
for the next dark moon to slip out. The General Whiting has 700 bales of cotton OP 
board. The Coquette carried out 1,500 bales. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain JOSEPH F. GREEN, 

Senior Officer Present off Charleston, 8. C. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, "regarding the need of 
additional vessels for measures of cooperation in establishing connec- 
tion with Major- Geiieral Sherman. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal, November 26, 1864. 

SIR: The information that reaches us from rebel sources shows that 
the army of General Sherman was this side of Milledgeville a few days 
since, and it is inferable that his course is this way. 

General Foster and myself will do what our forces allow to assist in 
establishing a connection with General Sherman. 

General Foster proposes to move on the night of the 28th for this 
purpose. 

I am to cover his landing and furnish a battery of six howitzers to 
march with his troops. 

On such an emergency I feel sensibly the want of force. 

The only gunboats of the squadron whose drafts are light enough 
to ascend far are the Pontiac, Mingoe, Sonoma, and Cimarron. 

The Pontiac has lost her after rudder. The Sonoma is under repair. 
Cimarron has but one boiler. The Pawnee, Winona, and Wissah^ckon 
will aid, but require 2 feet more of water, and every inch tells in these 
rivers. 

Three tugs will be added, and one monitor. 

Four monitors are on duty at Charleston, one at Wassaw, and two 
under repair. 

Could the Department spare me four or five double-enders, a few 
side-wheel tugs of 5 or 6 feet draft, and some ironclads in case General 
Sherman should attack Savannah or Charleston ? 

I need hardly say that time is very important. 

Please let me have some men who have been in a man-of-war. 

The complement of the squadron is not full, and most of the men 
are very green. 

I enclose a Savannah paper of the 24th November, and have the 
honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. G. WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

N W R VOL 16 5 



66 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Major- General 
Foster, U. 8. Army, regarding naval battery on Morris Island. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., November 26, 1864. 

GENERAL: In order to man the howitzers properly for service I 
have been obliged to detach the men from the naval battery on Morris 
Island and supply their places by other men fewer in number and less 
^experienced. 

As I have no intimation that you propose to open fire from the 
island, I suppose this will not be of consequence. 

If, however, you consider the battery on Morris Island as of more 
consequence, please to let me know. 

The squadron is shoVthanded and a large number of the men entirely 
inexperienced, so that it is difficult to get up a detached force and 
organize it decently. 

I shall, however, be ready at the time named. 

1 am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Major-General J. G. FOSTER, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Headquarters, Hilton Head. 



Letter from Captain Green, O. S. Navy, to Brigadier- General Hatch, 
U. S. Army, acknowledging the courtesy of the hitter in offering 
assistance. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN AD VMS, 

Off Morris Inland, South Carolina, November 26, 1864- 
SIR: 1 have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communi- 
cation of yesterdaj 7 accompanj'ing a cop3'of an order issued by you on 
assuming command of the north district, Department of the South, 
and to express my thanks for your courteous tender of assistance to 
myself or command. 

Very respectfully your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 

Captain and Sen,ior Officer off Charleston. 
Brigadier-General J. P. HATCH, 

Commanding Nortliern District, Department of 

the South, Headquarters, Morris Island. 



Operations* of the naval brigade under Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, 
in combined expedition for cutting the railroad near Pocotaligo, S. C. , 
November %7-l)ecember 30, 1864, including battles at Tulifinny Cross- 
roads and Honey Hill. 

Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, TT. 8. Navy, to assume 
command of the naval forces. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 26, 1864. 

SIR: You will proceed to Ba} 7 Point by to-morrow (Sunday) morn- 
ing at 7 o'clock and take command of all the naval forces now at that 
place for special duty in the field. 

* For reports of Army operations see Official Records of the Union and Confederate 
Armies in the War of the Rebellion, Series I, Volume XLIV. 



MAP OF 
BROAD RIVER 

AND 

TRIBUTARIES 

SHOWING SCENE OF OPERATIONS OF 
NAVAL BRIGADE 
Nov. & Dec. _ 1864. 




SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 67 

Lieutenant-Commander Scott has been ordered to transfer the com- 
mand to you. Keep account in your log of the number of officers and 
men who report for this duty. 

Very respectfully , your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral. Uomdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, U. S. Navy, 

Flag- Steamer Philadelphia, Port Royal. 



General instructions of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, II. S. Navy, regarding organization of the 

naval force. 

FLAG- >TEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 26, 1864. 

With a view to probable contingencies, a corps of howitzers and 
seamen and marines will be organized without delay. 

The seamen will be formed into a battalion of artillery and one of 
skirmishers. The marines will constitute the third battalion. 

The artilleiy will be commanded by a lieutenant-commander or lieu- 
tenant, the skirmishers by a lieutenant-commander or lieutenant, and 
the marines by the senior officer of the marines. 

The whole under command of a commander. 

My views in regard to the proper organization of such a body have 
already been made known in the order dated August 8 and in order 
No. 82. 

Each howitzer will be in charge of a section (20 men), 13 of whom 
will be assigned solely to the service of the howitzer; the other 7 will 
be armed with the Plymouth muskets. 

The battalion of skirmishers will be formed into sections, half com- 
panics, and companies, armed with Plymouth muskets. 

The marines will be divided into companies of 50 men. 

Fatigue parties will be attached to each howitzer and each section, 
whose duties it will be to attend to all connected with .the cooking, 
camping, pioneering, etc. , so as to leave the men under arms solely to 
that duty. 

Each howitzer and company will also have its pioneers, two to each 
section and four to a howitzer. 

A paymaster will be detached to provide supplies of all kinds and 
supervise the duty of the camp. He will have a detail of men for the 
purpose. 

The drill of the men is to be as simple as possible. They should be 
taught (1st) to load and fire, (2d) order of march, (3d) action. 

The evolutions will be simply from the order of march to action, and 
the reverse. 

In general, the final order for action will be to break and take cover, 
with howitzers and musketry. 

Each seeking its appropriate shelter, the pioneers will clear and level 
a space for the howitzer to which they belong, throwing the earth in 
front of it as a sort of breastwork, and they will also fell trees and 
branches to lay in front. The fire of skirmishers is to assist that of 
the howitzer, or to protect it if in danger. 

Each seaman of the artillery will carry one round of ammunition in 



68 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

a pouch, as directed in the boat armament, and the reserve ammuni- 
tion will be carried in small hand wagons by fatigue parties under 
charge of a gunner and quarter gunner. 

Each howitzer is to have a captain, first and second loader, and the 
drill of the pieces will be that already known to the Navy, and drawn 
up by myself some years ago. 

The marines are to be drilled as skirmishers, and will always form 
on the artillery in action. 

On the march they will be thrown out to the front and flanks as 
skirmishers. 

Commander Preble, of the St. Louis, is assigned to the command of 
these battalions. 

Lieutenant-Commander Matthews, of the navy battery, will com- 
mand the howitzers. 

Lieutenant O'Kane, of the Sangamon, will command the battalion 
of navy skirmishers. 

Other officers will be detached as the organization proceeds. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Stockading Squadron. 



Letter from Rear-Admiral Dahlgren. TI. S. Navy, to Major-General Foster, TJ. S. Army, 
regarding horses for transportation of howitzers. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbw, November 27, 1864. 

SIR: The horses you are so good as to offer will be very acceptable. 
The trouble will be for forage, unless an order is given to that effect 
from the army supplies. I would also ask for drivers or teamsters, 
having no persons aboard familiar with the care of horses. 

When the seamen are landed with the howitzers it will be impos- 
sible for the vessels to ration them. Can an order be given to your 
commissariat for rations while ashore? 
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General J. G. FOSTER, 

Comdg. Department of the S<mth, Headquarters, Hilton Head. 



Letter from Major-Oeneral Foster, U. S. Army, to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, 
offering to furnish drivers and forage with the horses. 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, 

Hilton Head, S. C. , November 28, 1864. 

ADMIRAL: I have just received your favor of the 27th instant. 
Horses will be supplied for the naval howitzers from the quarter- 
master's department, with a proper amount of forage. Teamsters 
will also be furnished by the quartermaster of the department. The 
chief commissary will issue rations to the detachment from the Navy 
while they are on shore, and, if necessaiy, receipts can be passed at 
some future time. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 

Major- General, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 69 

Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, TT. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, regard- 
ing the embarkation of the naval force. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 28, 1864. 
SIR: You will be ready to embark the force under your command, 
artillery, marines, and infantry, at 4:30 p. m. The Pontiac will 
receive the artillery, Mingoe infantry, Sonoma the marines. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic* Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEORGE H. PREBLE, 

Commanding Forces at Bay Point. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, to report 
for duty to Major-General Foster, U. S. Army. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., November %8, 1864. 

SIR: You will report to Major-General J. G. Foster, commanding 
Department of the South, with the forces under your command for 
such duty as he may assign you. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 

Commanding Forces, Bay Point, [/S. C.]. 



Instructions of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the movement of the 
steamers up Broad River, South Carolina. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., November 28, 1864. 

The steamers about to pass up the Broad River are to cover the 
advance and landing of the troops. 

And to land a naval detachment under Commander Preble, con- 
sisting of a howitzer battalion and two battalions of seamen and 
marines. 

The vessels will form line in the following order: 

Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Harvest Moon (flag), Pawnee, Winona, 
and Wissahickon. 

The tugs Pettit and Daffodil will act as guides. 

Pilot Jenks will be on board the leading steamer or tug. 

Chief Pilot Hatfards will be on board the Pawnee. 

The steamers will steam slowly, not exceeding 4 or 5 knots the hour, 
and will preserve a distance as open as compatible with certain posi- 
tion of the vessel ahead, which is not to be less than two or three cables' 
length. 

In passing along a channel known only to our pilot, care must be 
taken to avoid grounding; but above all to avoid running into a vessel 
that is aground. 



70 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Each vessel will show a light below her rail to her second astern, 
but be very careful that it shall not be seen in any other direction. 

In the event of getting aground, or stopping the engine from any 
cause, this light is to be shut off, and relighted when all is right again. 

So soon as a steamer suspects from this, or any other reason, that 
her second ahead is aground, she will stop the engine and back until 
the way of the vessel is entirely checked, putting her helm so as to 
avoid striking the vessel ashore. 

Every precaution is to be used to conceal the movement from the 
rebels. 

The troops will enter the river about 2 o'clock, and the gunboats 
must reach the landing before daylight. 

The vessels will anchor with their broadsides clear to each other 
and command the river banks. 

The squadron battalions will not be landed until signal is made. 
Fleet-Captain Bradford is charged with the communication of this 
order and the execution of the various details. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren. IT. S. Navy, regarding signals. 

Local signals distinguished by Rogers' "Answering Pennant." 



At 



night by two red lights, horizontal. 

BROAD RIVER, S. C. , Novemle)- 29, 1864. 



Flags. 



No. 1. 1st repeater. 
No. 2. 2d repeater. 



Pawnee, No. 5. 
Pontiac, No. 6. 
Mingoe, No, 7. 
Sonoma, No. 8. 



1. Open fire. 

2. Cease firing. 

3. Anchor. 

4. Get underway. 

12. Move higher up. 

13. Move lower down. 

14. Close order. 
21. Open order. 

23. Land skirmishers. 

24. Land howitzers. 

31. Embark skirmishers. 

32. Embark howitzers. 

34. Picket boats take position. 
41. Attention to signals. 



No. 3. 3d repeater. 
No. 4. Cornet. 



Temporary ships' numbers. 



Wissahickon, No. 9. 
Winona, No. 10. 
Daffodil, No. 11. 
Pettit, No. 15. 

Signals. 

42. Careful be, not to injure our own 

troops. 

43. Your fire is dangerous to our own 

troops. 

123. Fuzes, your, are too short, 

124. Fuzes, your, are too long. 

132. The admiral expects a prompt and 
exact execution of signals. 

134. Orders, immediate execution is re- 
quired. 

142. Shot, your, are going over. 

143. Shot, your, are falling short. 
231. Signals not understood. 
241. Aground, I am. 



JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

N. B. Care is to be taken to avoid the exhibition of all lights not 
absolutely necessary. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 71 

Order of Brigadier-General Hatch, U. S. Army, to Commander Preble, TT. S. Navy, direct- 
ing him to report to Brigadier-General Potter, TT. S. Army. 

DIVISION HEADQUARTERS, November 29, 1864- 

The brigadier-general commanding directs me to inform you that 
Brigadier-General Potter has been ordered to the front instead of 
Colonel Hartwell. 

You will therefore report to him. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

LEONARD B. FERRY, 
first Lieutenant and Actg. Asst. Adjutant- General. 

Commander PREBLE. 

P. S. The Thirty-second U. S. Colored Troops have been ordered 
to report to you until* the arrival of General Potter, to whom you are 
directed to report in person. 

L. B. PERRY, 

Lieutenant and Actg. Asst. Adjutant- General. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren. U. S. Navy, to Commander Balch, U. S. Navy, to assume 
command as senior officer, off Boyd's Landing, Broad River. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off BoycTs Landing ', Broad River, S. C., November 29, 1864- 
SIR: The naval battalion, artillery, skirmishers, and marines, were 
all landed about U o'clock and are now advanced well to the front, in 
skirmishing order, at least a mile from the landing. 

The troops are landing, and I waited to see General Hatch, but he 
has not landed. 

1 leave you here as senior officer with the Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, 
and Sonoma; also the tugs Pettit and Daffodil. 

I see no present necessity for the Winona and Wissahickon, nor the 
tugs Catalpa and Carnation, which are wanted elsewhere. 

You will communicate with General Hatch and render all possible 
aid to the army. 

Keep up communication with the squadron battalion and supply 

them. You will keep me advised promptly of any incident of interest. 

There are two divisions of boats here, under Acting Master Furber 

and Acting Master Gillespie, which you will use in picketing the river 

and for any other purpose you deem advisable. 

There is a scow here, which you will see to and prevent from being 
damaged. You will also render any assistance to the naval battalion 
that they may require. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Commanding. 

Commander G. B. BALCH, U. S. Navy. 

Commanding U. S. S. Pawnee. 



72 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 

Order of Brigadier-General Hatch, TJ. 8. Army, to Commander Preble, IT. 8, Navy, regarding 
the disposition of Ms command. 

HEADQUARTERS GENERAL HATCH'S DIVISION, 

November 30, 186 J,. 

SIR: It being necessary to leave some artillery at the forks of the 
road until the battery shall have arrived from Beaufort, the general 
commanding wishes your two smallest guns left at that point. 

He would suggest that the crews of these guns may be selected from 
the men least fitted to march. 

Please move up with the remainder of your command as soon as a 
battalion directed to be furnished by Colonel Hartwell shall arrive as 
a garrison at the crossroad. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

LEONARD B. PERRY, 
First Lieutenant 55th Massachusetts Vols. , Act. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 

Commander PREBLE, 

Commanding Brigade. 



Detailed report of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, TJ. S. Navy. 

No. 582.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, November 30, 

SIR: My cooperation having been requested by General Foster in an 
attack to assist the movement of General Sherman, I lost no time in 
contributing all the force that I could withdraw from the blockade. 

The night of the 28th was appointed for directing our forces up the 
Broad River and into one of its forks, when a short march led directly 
to the railroad connecting Savannah with Charleston, marked on sketch 
accompanying this, per Fulton. 

Accordingly, I ordered the Pawnee, Mingoe, and Pontiac from 
Charleston, the Wmona from Ossabaw, the Wissahickon from Wassaw, 
and the Sonoma from under repair. 

General Foster had also desired to have the aid of a navy field bat- 
tery. I organized two, of four pieces each, especial!} 7 for the occasion, 
and supported it with four half companies of sailor skirmishers and 
four companies of marines, the whole force not exceeding 500 men, 
but as carefully drilled as the brief space of time allowed, and this was 
only rendered possible by the untiring efforts and fine ability of the 
officers selected Lieutenant-Commander Matthews for the artillery, 
Lieutenant O'Kane to command the battalion of sailors, Lieutenants 
Whitehead and Hay ward assisting, together with many volunteer 
officers, Lieutenant Kennison, Acting Master Gillespie, and numerous 
others whose names I will take another opportunity to mention; the 
marines under the command of the only marine officer here, Lieutenant 
G. G. Stoddard. Nor should I omit to speak of the men themselves; 
they went to the difficult task with a fidelity and earnestness that is 
worthy of all commendation. 

On the evening of the 28th the guns and men of the naval battalions 
were embarked in the Mingoe, Pontiac, and Sonoma, but when the 
hour arrived the fog being so thickly over this side of the bay that it 
seemed impossible to move, especially as there were so many vessels 
and but one pilot 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 73 

About 4: a. m. it was not quite so thick and I determined to make 
the attempt. 

Feeling about in my flagship, skillfully directed by Flag-Captain 
Bradford, the several vessels were collected, and with two very light- 
draft steamers we commenced to feel the channel. 

Fleet-Captain Bradford succeeded in taking the vessels through the 
shoals at the entrance of the river, and the pilot was then sent ahead 
in the Pontiac. 

The squadron of nine vessels continued to grope along in a fog so 
thick that the nearest shore was only visible when quite close to it, 
and most of the time the vessels nearest ahead and astern of me were 
indistinct; the tugs Daffodil and Pettit feeling their way on each 
side. 

Twenty miles were thus achieved up a river, where not an officer or 
man of us had been before save the pilot, and by 8 o'clock I had the 
satisfaction of finding n^self, with five of the six steamers, at the 
landing designated Pawnee, Commander Balch ; Mingoe, Commander 
Creighton; IPontiac, Lieutenant-Commander Luce; Sonoma, Lieuten- 
ant-Commander Scott; Winona, Lieutenant -Commander Dana. The 
Wissahickon, Lieutenant McGlensey, grounded soon after entering 
the river and did not succeed in joining me. 

But not a sign of the troops was visible, and I began to fear some 
mistake had been made, when a transport was seen coming up with 
General Hatch's flag (blue broad pennant). 

In less than half an hour the two batteries of the navy howitzers, 
with the nine companies of sailors and marines were landed, formed 
and advanced under Commander Preble in skirmishing order, guns 
and men. 

Meanwhile other transports with troops arrived and began to de- 
bark. 

I advanced with the navy battalions, and remained ashore for a 
couple of hours, when I left them to return to my duty afloat. They 
were then halted about a mile in the front, the troops still forming at 
the landing. 

General Foster arrived about 2 p. m., having been misled in the fog, 
and transports continued to arrive with troops and artillery through 
the day. 

The rebels seemed to be entirely surprised. While approaching the 
landing I had heard a loud whoop or halloo ashore, which I supposed 
to proceed from our own men, but in a few minutes a glimpse through 
the fog showed the impromptu habitation of a picket, who had thus 
sounded the alarm. 

General Foster returned to Port Royal about 4 p. m., and as the 
naval part had been completed, and other matters below required at- 
tention, I also left in the evening, ordering back two or three vessels 
which were not needed up the river any longer. 

The double-enders, with the Pawnee, lay in line close up to the bank, 
presenting a line of heavy cannon that nothing but a regular work 
could have endured, and illustrating very happily the fine adaptation 
of the double-enders to river work. 

No swinging was allowed, but an anchor at each end absolutely 
secured them head and stern, allowing them to trip and move up or 
down as required with perfect ease. 

The entire line of guns amounted to one Xl-inch, twelve IX-inch, 



74 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

and six 100-pounders, or nineteen very heavy cannon, and 16 howit- 
zers in a continuous broadside. The completing in such numberless 
details of organization a force at so short notice was due to the 
untiring attention and energies of Fleet-Captain Bradford; and the 
excellent service rendered by my young and only aid, Ensign Dichman, 
also deserves my particular mention. 

I have only to add that the success of the troops is anxiously looked 
for, though for one, I feel not a doubt that we snail be in connection 
with General Sherman before long. 

Just before leaving the landing I heard from an qfficer that he had 
left Captain Preble with the navy howitzers and men some 4 miles up 
the country, which I immediately made known to General Foster, so 
that they might have proper support. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Commander Freble, U. S. Navy, stating the strength of his command. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, 

In the Field, December 2, 1864. 

GENERAL: I have to report the following as the strength of this 
command on the morning of the 30th of November: 

OFFICERS. 

Staff 8 

Battalion of artillery ( blue jackets) 9 

Battalion of infantry (blue jackets ) 9 

Battalion of marines.. 3 



Total . . 29 



Battalion of artillery ( blue jackets} 145 

Battalion of infantry (blue jackets) . 156 

Battalion of marines 156 

Ambulance (contrabands) 6 



Total . . .463 



Grand total 492 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE. 
Brigadier-General HATCH. 



Order of Brigadier-General Hatch, TJ. S. Army, to the troops of his command. 

HEADQUARTERS COAST DIVISION, December 2, 1864- 
The troops of this command will stand to arms at 5 o'clock a. m. 
each day and will remain in line until daylight. 
By order of Brigadier-General John P. Hatch: 

LEONARD B. PERRY, 
Lieutenant and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 75 

Order of Brigadier-General Hatch, TT. S. Army, to Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, to report 
operations at Honey Hill, S. C. 

HEADQUARTERS COAST DIVISION, 
Near Grrahamville, 8. C. , December 3, 186 '4. 

CAPTAIN: The brigadier-general commanding directs me to request 
that you furnish these headquarters with a report of the part taken bv 
your command in the action at Honey Hill, S. C. , on the 30th Novem- 
ber, the casualties to be reported by name. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. T. BENNETT, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Chief of Staff. 

Commander GEORGE H. PREBLE, 

Commanding Naval Brigade. 



Order of Brigadier-General Hatch, U. S. Army, to Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, to 
report to Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy. 

HEADQUARTERS COAST DIVISION, 

In the Field, December 3, 1864. 

CAPTAIN: You will at once prepare your command to move, with its 
baggage, to the landing, to report to Admiral Dahlgren. 
Wagons will be here very soon. 
By order of Brigadier-General Hatch: 

WM. T. BENNETT, 
Lieutenant- Colonel and Chief of Staff. 

Commander G. H. PREBLE, 

Commanding Naval Brigade. 



Letter from Major-General Foster, U. S. Army, to Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, 
regarding signals to be used by recounoitering party. 

STEAMER NEMAHA, December 4, J864- 

SIR: I have directed General Hatch to send out this morning a recon- 
noissance with artillery on the Bee's Creek road to fire on the enemy's 
battery on that road. The reconnoitering party will take with them 
rockets, which they will fire as signals to the navy. 

One rocket means, "The enemy are in front; do not fire to the left 
of this." 

Two rockets (rockets fired together) mean, " You are firing too far to 
the left." 

Three rockets (tired together) mean, "Shots fall too short." 
Four rockets (fired together) mean, "Shots fall too far over." 
I am, admiral, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 

Major- General. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



76 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Keport of Commander Preble, TT. S. Navy, regarding the part taken by the naval force in 
the action at Honey Hill, S. C. 

HEADQUAKTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, 
In Camp on Gralianwille Road, S. C., December 4, 186 J^. 

GENERAL: In obedience to your order of yesterday I have the honor 
to report the part taken by the naval force under my command in the 
action at Honey Hill, S. C., on the 30th November, instant: 

After landing the artillery battalion on the morning of the 29th, at 
9 a. m., it was advanced under command of Lieutenant-Commander 
E. O. Matthews, U. S. Navy, about 2 miles along- the road, supported 
on the right by the sailor battalion of infantry, under command of 
Lieutenant J. O'Kane, U. S. Navy, and on the left by the battalion of 
marines under command of First Lieutenant of Marines George G. 
Stoddard, thrown out in advance as skirmishers. At the forks of the 
road I halted the command and brought our artillery into a defensive 
position. Having no guide or map to refer to, and not satisfied that 
the crossing was the one designated as our halting place, from the road 
not continuing beyond, as shown me on your map at the landing, 
Lieutenant-Commander A. F. Crosman, acting adjutant of the brigade, 
with myself and 15 of the sailor infantry, went out along the road to 
the right and discovered the enemy's cavalry and infantry pickets 
watching our movements. 

A few rifle shots were exchanged, when we fell back to the main 
command, and at 4 p. m. I moved to the right, or north, about 2 miles, 
where we were intrenching our camp, when Brigadier-General Potter 
rode up and informed me that we were on the wrong road. I returned 
with the command to the fprks of the road and encamped for the night, 
by his order, to refresh our men, who had been dragging the field- 
pieces all day, General Potter continuing with his forces his route to 
the left. 

At 7 a. m. on the 30th we were on the march again along the south- 
ern road. At 7:45 a. m., on receipt of your order, the two lightest 
12-pound howitzers were sent back to the forks of the road we had left 
to defend that point until the arrival of a battery from Beaufort. 
Acting Ensign J. A. Edgren was detailed to take charge of these 
pieces. Their arrival was timely, and repulsed a party of cavalry and 
infantry who were advancing on our right. At 9 a. m. I reported to 
you in person at your headquarters at the church. At 9:30 a. m. my 
brigade was formed in the rear of the first brigade as the reserve, and 
was kept in the rear during the whole advance. About 11 a. m. the 
firing in front became quite heavy and continuous. At 3:30 
Lieutenant-Commander E. O. Matthews was ordered to take a section 
of heavy 12-pound howitzers to the front and relieve a section of New 
York artillery as soon as their ammunition was out. At 3:40 they 
opened fire and continued firing until 6: 30 p. m., when the troops were 
withdrawn, and he covered the withdrawal until relieved by a section 
of horse artillery under Lieutenant-Colonel Ames. 

The remainder of the artillery battalion returned, next in advance of 
the heavy artillery, with the retiring columns, as ordered, to the forks, 
where it had previously encamped, and where it was joined by the sec- 
tion under Lieutenant-Commander E. O. Matthews, when the whole 
battery was placed in a defensive position to guard the roads until 
morning. I was greatly indebted to you for furnishing horses for the 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 77 

artillery, as the long march had greatly fatigued our men. Two com- 
panies of the battalion of sailor infantry did good service in assisting 
at the drag ropes of the artillery, which could not have been brought 
up without their assistance. 

The remaining companies assisted in turning back stragglers from 
the front; otherwise, much to the reluctance of its commanding officer, 
it was compelled to remain inactive in reserve, waiting your orders to 
move to the front. About noon the battalion of marines was ordered 
to advance, which they did by the right flank, led by Acting- Adjutant 
Lieutenant-Commander A. F. Crosman, U. S. Navy, and commanded 
by Lieutenant G. G. Stoddard, U. S. Marine Corps, to the roads, 
where a battery was in action. They filed to the right about 500 
yards, then to the left, coming on the line of battle in the rear of the 
Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers. They then filed to the right, and came 
by the left flank into line of battle, taking position to the right, and a 
little in advance, of the line previously formed, in a position pointed 
out by yourself on the field. 

The last mile and the coming into line was done on the double quick. 
As soon as formed in line fire was opened on the enemy, who seemed 
to be in force on the left. At 2 p. m. Acting Ensign [Woodward] 
Carter, acting as major of the battalion, was sent with 20 men to 
deploy and advance on the right flank; he proceeded for 200 yards 
without finding the enemy. At 3: 30 p. m., the line having fallen back 
on the left, compelled the marine battalion to retire as the enemy 
advanced, which was done in good order, and a new position taken on 
the crossroads, still on the right of the line. This place was held by 
the marine battalion until about 6 p. m., when, in obedience to orders, 
it was marched to the rear and took up its position at the forks on the 
left of the naval battery. Lieutenant Stoddard calls attention to the 
gallant conduct of Sergeant J. Cogley in bringiriglip ammunition to 
the front under heavy fire, and thus enabling the battalion to hold its 
position. With the exception of one man wounded in the battery, all 
the casualties in my command were among the marines. Considering 
that the marines were taken from the vessels of the squadron, scat- 
tered on the blockade, and had been formed into a battalion only two 
days previous, and that all the commanding officers were sergeants, I 
think their conduct creditable to the Corps. 

Assistant-Surgeon W. J. Bowdle, U. S. Navy, my senior medical 
officer, at the request of Surgeon George S. Burton, U. S. Army, 
chief medical officer of the military force, was detailed to the church 
hospital in the rear, and from 9 a. m., the 30th, until 2 p. m., December 
1 , was constantly employed in attending to the wounded brought from 
the front, and has since and is still employed at Boyd's Landing in 
that service. Assistant- Surgeon E. M. Corson and Acting Assistant- 
Surgeon H. L. Gibbs were at the front and rendered constant and 
efficient service to our own and the wounded of the army. 

As the casualties in my brigade were fortunately slight, the service 
of all those surgeons was principally given to the military. The medi- 
cal supplies of the Army not having arrived, those intended for this 
command, and happily at hand, were consumed for the wounded of 
the army. 

Herewith I transmit Assistant-Surgeon Bowdle's report of killed, 
wounded, and missing, by name, as required by your order.* 

* Shows 1 man killed, 6 men wounded, and 14 men missing. 



78 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Henry Kittering, ordinary seaman, reported as missing, has since 
returned to the command. 

In conclusion, I congratulate you, general, on the brave troops you 
command. I am sure a more cheerful and reliant spirit or greater 
bravery could not have been displayed by any body of men; and it 
was only that the enemy was in too strong force and position for the 
limited force at your control that we did not carry his works. 

I take this occasion to express my grateful appreciation of the 
many kind attentions received by myself and officers from our military 
brethren in arms. It has been and shall be my endeavor to cordially 
cooperate with the military forces. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy, Commanding Naval Brigade. 

Brigadier-General.I. P. HATCH, IT. S. Army, 

Commanding Coast Division, U. S. Army. 



Report of Commander Freble, U. S. Navy, transmitting duplicate of report sent to 
Brigadier-General Hatch, IT. S. Army, commanding expedition. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, 

In Camp on Grahamville Road, S. C. , December 5, 1864. 
SIR: Herewith I transmit a duplicate of my report to Brigadier- 
General J. P. Hatch, U. S. Army, of the part taken in the action of 
Honey Hill on the 30th ultimo by this brigade. 

At the earliest possible moment I shall furnish a more full and special 
official report to yourself, accompanied with the reports of the battalion 
commanders not yet rendered. 

Officers and men have been so constantly on service, night and day, 
since the landing, and our arrangements for camping and writing so 
incomplete, it has been impossible to write these reports sooner. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy, Comdg. Naval Brigade, 

South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

U. S. Navy, Comdg. South, Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Detailed report of Commander Preble, TJ. S. Navy, regarding the entire operations. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, 
In the Held, Soya's Neck, S. C. , December 5, 1864- 
SIR: Agreeably to your orders of November 25, I left the St. Louis 
at North Edisto on the 26th, in temporary command of Lieutenant 
William F. Stewart, my executive officer, and accompanied by 20 sail- 
ors, 19 marines, and 2 acting masters, proceeded to Port Royal in the 
Harvest Moon and reported to you the same even ing for special service. 
The following morning (the 27th), at 7 a. m., I relieved, by yourorder, 
Lieutenant-Commander Scott, in command of the naval forces assem- 
bled on Bay Point for an expedition. That day (Sunday) and the next 
was spent in organizing the command and exercising the men at the 
artillery. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 79 

On the evening of the 28th (Monday) this naval brigade, consisting 
of 492 officers, seamen, and marines, with 8 pieces of artillery, assem- 
bled from the several ships of the squadron, was embarked on the 
U. S. steamers Pontiac, M^ngoe, and Sonoma. At 4: 30 a. m., the 29th, 
all the vessels of the expedition got underway and proceeded up the 
Broad River under cover of a dense fog. At 8:30 a. m. the brigade 
was landed at Boyd's Landing, and immediately pushed forward on 
the road in advance of the military forces about 2 miles, to what was 
supposed at the time to be the crossroads, where we were ordered to 
halt, but since known as the Forks. The artillery was advanced up the 
road, [and] with the battalion of marines and sailor infantry, deployed 
to the right and left and in advance of the skirmishers. 

Before landing, General Foster not having arrived, I reported myself 
and command to Brigadier-General J. P. Hatch, the militar}^ com- 
mander of the expedition. Without pilots, and having had but a 
hasty look at his chart, I halted at w r hat I thought was the crossroads, 
designated by him as the spot where I was to wait the arrival of the 
military. Here we brought our pieces into a defensive position to 
resist attacks, and threw an abatis across the road on each fork. 
Being without a guide or proper map of the country, and not feeling 
sure that we were halted at the right place, the road not continuing to 
the front as I had expected, accompanied by my adjutant, Lieutenant- 
Commander Crosman, and 15 men, I proceeded up the right-hand road 
some two or more miles to reconnoiter. On this scout we saw several of 
the enemy's cavalry and infantry pickets, watching our movements, 
and our skirmishers exchanged shots with them. On my return to the 
command, I advanced it to another crossroads about a mile and a half, 
which seemed to better answer the description of that I was directed 
to halt at. A colored regiment, which came up to the forks as we were 
starting, accompanied us. We were intrenching our new camp, when 
Brigadier-General E. E. Potter rode up, leading the army forces, and 
we decided, after some consultation, that neither of our halting places 
was the crossing intended, but still another, supposed to [be to] the left. 
Our tired and hungry battalions, after dragging at the artillery all day, 
and skirmishing through woods, were again put en route to the left, 
but were finally encamped for the night at 11 o'clock at the forks we 
had left. 

General Potter, as I afterwards learned, took the wrong road for 6 
miles, was forced to return, and encamped on the crossroads marked 
by a church, afterwards used as a hospital for our wounded. 

At 7 a. m., the 30th, my command was again in motion, and at 8 
a. m. arrived at the church, where General Hatch had established his 
headquarters. I here reported to him in person, and halted by his 
order on the left of the column. While on the road 1 received an 
order to send back my two lightest howitzers to the forks, which I 
did, tinder command of Acting Ensign Edgren; his arrival with the 
pieces was timely, for he was immediately attacked by the enemy's 
sharpshooters; a few discharges of canister caused them to cry out 
"cover" and "retreat." During the afternoon he accompanied, with 
his gun, a regiment on a reconnoissance up to the road to the right, and 
discovered a battery in position to defend it. 

At 8:15 a. m. the army moved on up the Grahamville road leading 
to the right of the church, and at 8:30 a. m. the enemy opened fire 
from a pounder Brooke rifle placed on the road. 



80 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The Napoleon 12-pounders of Colonel Ames replied; the enemy was 
driven back, firing in his retreat. A skirmish fire was also kept up 
for several miles, until the head of our column reached a turn of the 
road at Honey Hill, where it was opened on by four guns in position 
behind an earthwork. A sharp engagement ensued, which lasted until 
sundown, and in which our loss was severe. 

Our force was then withdrawn to this position, where we have since 
intrenched. Two of the heavy howitzers of the naval artillery, under 
command of Lieutenant-Commander E. O. Matthews, covered the rear 
of our retiring columns and fired the last gun at the enemy. The nature 
of the action did not require that all the forces should be put in at the 
same time, and the naval brigade was mostly kept in reserve. . About 
12 meridian the marine battalion was ordered into the line on the right, 
in the rear of the Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers. Lieutenant Stod- 
dard, of the Corps, commanding the battalion, was accompanied by my 
Acting Adjutant Lieutenant-Commander Crosman as a volunteer. 

At 3:30 p. m., the rest of the line falling back, the marine battalion 
retired in good order with it as the enemy advanced; and a new posi- 
tion was taken on the crossroads, still to the right of the line, and 
held by the marine battalion until about 6 p. m., when, in obedience 
to orders, it was marched to the rear with the army and took position 
at the forks of the road to support the naval battery, which was 
placed in position at that point, for its defense throughout the night. 
With the exception of one man wounded at the battery, all the casual- 
ties I have to report are among the marines. Considering that the 
marines composing the battalion were gathered in tens and twenties 
from the vessels scattered on the blockade, and had been only formed 
into a battalion two days before the fight, and that all the commissioned 
company officers were sergeants, acting as such, I think their conduct 
in this action very creditable to the Corps. Lieutenant Stoddard calls 
attention to the gallant conduct of Sergeant J. Cogley in bringing up 
ammunition to the front under a heavy fire, and so enabling the bat- 
talion to maintain its position. The sailor infantry, under Lieutenant 
O'Kane, was, much to his regret, not called into action. 

Two companies did good service in assisting at the drag ropes of 
the artillery, which could hardly have been brought up without such 
assistance. The remaining companies assisted in turning back strag- 
glers from the front. The reports of commanding officers of battalions 
will inform }^ou of the particulars of all the service performed by their 
commands. Assistant Surgeon W. J. Bowdle, senior medical officer 
of the brigade, with Acting-Assistant Surgeons E. M. Corson and 
H. L. Gibbs, rendered efficient service in the rear, and as our casual- 
ties were light, they were able to aid their overtasked brethren of the 
army. 

Our medical stores were also, as Doctor Bowdle reports, expended 
for the army, their own not being at hand. There was no oppor- 
tunity for a display of individual acts of bravery, but all in the brig 
ade, both men and officers, performed their duty well. 

I have to thank you, admiral, for assigning as my assistants in my 
somewhat novel duties such able and intelligent officers as my acting 
adjutant and the battalion commanders. Accompanying this report is 
a map* of the route of the naval brigade from Boyd's Landing to 

* Not found. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 81 

Honey Hill, with the position of the brigade in the intrenched camp 
occupied by the United States forces on Boyd's Neck after the action. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, Commanding Naval Brigade. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Instructions from Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the embarking of the 

naval brigade. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Broad Rive?*, South Carolina, December 5, 1864- 

The naval brigade will prepare to embark with its guns immediately 
on receiving this order. 

Vessels will be detailed for the purpose. 

General Foster kindly offers the use of scows and horses for the 
convenience of landing and removing the howitzers. 

The naval brigade will land on the west bank of the "Tulifinnv," at 
a point designated. I am informed by General Foster that all the 
white regiments of the Department now here are to land at the same 
time. 

The Mingoe will prepare to leave for the site of operation. 

The Mingoe and Sonoma will advance as far as possible up the stream 
to cover the landing and advance. 

They will be preceded by the Daffodil, Pettit, and other tugs, keep- 
ing their guns ready for instant use. 

The howitzers will be landed after the squadron infantry, and under 
cover of the gunboats, and are to cooperate in advance of the troops. 

The commissary of the brigade will see that the men are properly 
provisioned. 

The boat division will be towed up to precede the steamers, sounding 
at each bow of the advance, and giving timely notice of obstructions in 
the channel. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Creighton, IT. S. Navy, com- 
manding TJ. S. S. Mingoe, to cover the landing of troops in Tulifinny Biver. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, December 6, 1864.. 

SIR: I wish you to pass up the Tulifinny River and cover the land- 
ing place of the troops. 

It is supposed that you can go as far as the landing of the picket 
station. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN. 
Commander CREIGHTON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Mingoe. 

The commander of the Bibb will assist you in the channel. 
N,W R VOL 16 6 



82 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 

Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Creighton, U. S. Navy, 
regarding supplies of ammunition and provisions for the naval brigade ashore. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Broad River, December 6, 1864- 

SIR: It is very important that the supplies of ammunition and pro- 
visions for the squadron brigade now ashore should be regular and 
sufficient, and be assured of being properly forwarded. I desire, 
therefore, that you will maintain a communication with Captain 
Preble regularly each day and have an officer sent to me at least once 
a day, stating the condition of these supplies. 

The boat division under Captain Gillespie will, every night, main- 
tain a vigilant observation of the Tulifinny and its banks, and he will 
report to me every morning the occurrence of the previous night. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 

Commander CREIGHTON, 

Commanding Mingoe. 



Detailed report of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding operations from 
November 30 to December 7, 1864. 

No. 588.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Broad River, South Carolina, December 7, 186^. 

SIR: My dispatch of the 30th ultimo informed the Department of 
the movement at Boyd's Creek, [South Carolina], by the forces under 
General Foster and myself. 

Everything seemed to look well on Tuesday evening. On Wednes- 
day (30th) the advance was made directly upon and toward the rail- 
road above Grahamville. 

The rebels had, however, by this time collected in force and were 
impeding the march of the troops by musketry and a few small pieces, 
but the advance continued and before long General Hatch, who com- 
manded, found farther progress barred by a work which looked upon 
the road, and was covered on the flanks by heavy woods and other 
obstructions. 

I have not yet sufficient exact information to convey a correct idea 
of the conflict or its locality, but our understanding of the matter is 
that the General assaulted the work and was repulsed with heavy loss. 

The fleet brigade did its duty fully, and rendered good service with 
its boat howitzers as well as musketry. 

I have not yet received any official reports to me, and am unable 
therefore to transmit them, but will do so at the first opportunity. 

The rebels did not attempt to come out from their position, and 
General Hatch drew off at his leisure, and fell back to a more conveni- 
ent position, where he remained. 

On Sunday General Foster, with a few tugs, one of them the Daffo- 
dil (Navy), and two or three hundred men, went into Whale Branch, 
ascended nearly to Port Royal Ferry, surprised a small work of two 
or three light pieces, the guard running away, evidently surprised. 

At the same time I passed to the head of Broad River and into the 
Coosawhatchie with the Pawnee and Sonoma, where a small work with 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 83 

a couple of small guns was placed so as to bar the passage; the stream 
was too winding and narrow to get nearer than a couple of thousand 
yards, and the rebels, after firing a few shots, retired to the near 
woods and let us pound away. 

At the same time General Hatch pushed out a light column from his 
right, and the Pontiac sent her boats up the creek from Boyd's Land- 
ing, the whole affair being merely a reconnoissance made to assume 
the appearance of a demonstration, and thus also mislead the rebels 
and divide their forces. 

The general view of the site led General Foster and myself to a 
more complete reconnoissance next day (December 5), the firing being 
renewed as usual to give the idea of a move that way, while in fact we 
were regarding a stream on the right (Tulifinny), going in another 
direction, and, with the Coosawhatchie, forming a peninsula or island, 
over which the railroad [Charleston and Savannah] passed b} T two 
bridges at no great distance from each other. 

I had always looked to the general configuration of the ground here 
as very favorable for cutting the railroad, and was .glad to find that 
the general was of the same opinion. We agreed, therefore, to make 
it the object of a move the next day. 

Wherefore, on Tuesday, the 6th, leaving Boyd's Landing to be held 
by General Hatch with some troops and the Pontiac, we moved very 
early up Broad River with gunboats and transports and reached the 
entrance of the Tulifinny about 8 o'clock a. m. The fog somewhat 
obscured our approach, and but for the low tide we would have dis- 
embarked instantly, but this compelled a resort to boats; quickly the 
water was alive with them pulling for the landing, soldiers and sailors 
in every variety of floating things. 

In the lead was a launch of the boat division, Acting Master E. G. 
Furber. The fleet brigade with its guns soon got ashore with its 
military commanders, and the whole moved quickly up the single road 
that leads up between the rivers. 

The Department will notice in the sketch annexed * how favorable 
was the ground when once we gained a footing, the width of the island 
being well adapted to the front of a small force, and each flank covered 
by a stream. Once there our men could not be ousted easily. 

The rebels appear to have been completely deceived by the previous 
demonstration toward the Coosawhatchie and its battery, and when 
they perceived the real direction, sent a force with all dispatch to 
dispute the landing, one of the regiments a veteran regular. 

But our men had a fair field and asked no favors, so when the 
enemy came down on them they were gradually pushed back toward 
the railroad. 

I can now only give a very general and hearsay report, as there is 
no time for the officers engaged to write. 

Among other statements made to the general in my presence was 
that our advance had been gathered upon thickly, and, to quote the 
expression, "things looked squally," when our blue jackets came up 
at a round pace with their howitzers and opened fire. 

The rebels then gave way, still resisting the advance, and still 
receding before our men. 

By evening a report came that the bridge of the county road had 

* Not found. 



84 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

been destroyed, a very important result. Only a little farther is the 
railroad and bridge. 

Now, as I write, matters are reported as going- on favorably; the 
sound of the howitzers and musketry is lively. 

It is impossible to ascertain with exactness the distance of the rail- 
road, but the cars are well heard and seen. 

Nothing could be more satisfactory than the behavior of the fleet 
brigade; the officers and men go to the work with a zeal and vigor that 
is deserving of all praise, and makes me regret that my force is too 
limited to permit a stronger detachment, for I have more howitzers. 

As soon as I have the official dispatches they will be transmitted. 

Meanwhile I transmit a list of casualties in the action at Boyd's 
Creek on the 29th ultimo, and here on the 6th and 7th instants. 

These amount to 23 men. I will fill them up from the squadron, 
and will be compelled to draw off the few marines of the Donegal, 
which I hope the Department will permit. 

The blockade remains insufficient, and I learn now that a steamer 
had passed into Georgetown, [S. C.], the first occurrence of the kind, 
but I fear it may be repeated, as I have no more force to spare for 
that place. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAIILGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdff. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

P. S. Just after closing this dispatch I received the annexed 
report from Commander Preble, commanding fleet brigade, and writ- 
ten under the disadvantages of the battlefield. 



Report of Commander Freble, U. S. Navy, commanding naval brigade. 

HEADQUARTERS FLEET BRIGADE, 

In the Field, Decembei^ 7, 186 '4- 

SIR: Yesterday, after landing, we dragged the howitzers through the 
swampy ground and hurried them forward with the marine battalions. 

The sailor infantry landed above with the army and advanced with 
it. As we hurried on we heard sharp firing of musketry in the 
advance, and hurried up to reach the field just as the rebels had been 
driven from it with loss. 

Our sailor infantry fought well, and had 13 or 15 wounded out of 110. 

As soon as the howitzers came up one was placed in the road and 
scattered an attacking column, while the other pieces shelled the woods 
to the left. The marines skirmished through the woods, and there was 
more or less firing until night. 

The rebels had a battery on the left, and they played upon us down the 
crossroads, and another on the right of the same road. A regiment of 
infantry was sent by General Potter to the right, which destroyed a 
bridge and prevented the rebels flanking us. 

The rebels appeared to be in good force and to receive continual 
reinforcements, . We drove the enemy and encamped on the field of 
battle. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 85 

This morning the firing was renewed by the enemy from the woods 
in front and on the right. 

One howitzer shelled the woods to the right and prevented the enemy 
from closing on us in that direction. Sharpshooters were in the trees 
in front, when the tiring had ceased in a measure, and four pieces were 
withdrawn as a reserve to the rear, to occupy the position we are now 
intrenching. 

Two heavy howitzers are still at the front for the night, under Lieu- 
tenant Hayward. 

For the night I am located at General Hatch's headquarters, which 
is in close proximity to our brigade. One company of marines was 
thrown forward last night on the left front as a skirmish line, and was 
withdrawn with the line this morning, and reached camp about noon. 
I have 1 corporal wounded and 1 private missing. 

The two remaining companies of marines have been out on picket 
all day, and were not relieved until sundown. 

Twenty-five men and 1 officer reported to me to-day. 

Adjutant Stanley and Lieutenant Whitehead were sent to the rear 
sick, together with some men. 

I have been in battle or on the move all day, and it has been raining 
hard. 

Captain Bradford retained my aid on board the Philadelphia. 1 
have all my baggage, including stationery, at the landing. I could 
not have taken care of it had it been here before to-night. 

I presume, as we are intrenching our lines, we are to remain here, 
but I can not tell where or when I am to move again. 

I sent 3^cu a list of wounded, as far as I know, this p. m. ' 

I have already directed the boat commanders to give me their reports, 
which they will do as soon as possible. 

Had we landed the howitzers where the army landed, at [James] 
Gregory's, [Tulifinny Creek], we would have been able to have kept 
them up with the advance column. 

I sent you yesterday a rebel rifle shell, 10-pounder, which struck 
the field near me; also some picket papers found at the lower Gregory's 
house, which I hope you got. 

The rebels left a good man} T dead on the field; Lieutenant-Commander 
Matthews buried 5 within his camp last night. 

I write this by the camp fire, and hope you will understand and 
excuse all informalities. 

1 believe the battlefield of yesterday is called Tulifinny Crossroads. 

The sailors and marines behave admirabl} 7 in camp and in battle. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, Commanding Fleet Brigade. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 
List of killed, wounded, and missing, naval brigade, December 2, 1864. 

Killed. Knapp, sergeant marines, Mingoe. 

Wounded. Clancy, corporal marines, Pontiac; Young, corporal, 
Canandaigua; Mallory, private, Canandaigua; Neilly. private, 
Sonoma; (mortally) Walker, private, Pawnee; Wilson, private, 
Mingoe. 



86 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

Missing. Joy, private, Mingoe ;^ O'Neill, private, Mingoe; Drake, 
George C., Saratoga; Henry Kittering, private (reformed rebel), 
Memphis. 

8ick.- Pat Kiernan, Company C, St. Louis, on Mingoe; George C. 
Lincoln, Company C, on Bay Point; Thomas Kiernan, Company C, 
on Bay Point; Horace Chew, Company C, Geranium, in rear. 

Wounded in action December 6, 1864, as far as known. 

Edward Birch, ordinary seaman, Sonoma; Patrick Gleason, lands- 
man, /Sonoma: Patrick Hayes, landsman, /Saratoga; James Northrop, 
landsman, Memphis; Michael Lynch, landsman, /Sonoma; Thomas 
Mullen, marine, Mingoe; George Groth, ordinary seaman, St. Louis; 
Thomas McDonald, ordinary seaman, Saratoga; Charles Honor, lands- 
man, Saratoga; Horace Thompson, seaman, New Hampshire; Morti- 
mer Tower, landsman, Saratoga; Robert Wilson, St. Louis; Charles 
Miller, Geranium. 

December 7, 1864. 

Corporal Ed. Kemmerer, Pontiac; Brandt, private, missing, 

Sonoma. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, TJ. S. Navy, to Acting Master Bowers, TT. 8. Navy, com- 
manding TJ. S. S. Cimarron, to send the marines from that vessel. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Broad River, South Carolina, December 7, 1864- 
SIB: You will send without delay all the marines of the U. S. S. 
Cimarron to this place for duty in the naval brigade commanded by 
Commander George H. Preble. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master WILLIAM L. BOWERS, 

Commanding U. S. S. Cimarron. 



Eeport of Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, regarding expedition in Tulifinny Eiver. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, 

Talbird^s House, Deveaux's Neck, S. C. , December 8, 1864' 
SIR: I have to report that, agreeably to orders from the command- 
ing general, the forces under my command were withdrawn on the 
evening of the 5th from the position on the Grahamville road, at 
Boyd's Neck, and proceeded to Boyd's Landing, where, under your 
instructions, it was embarked, with the exception of the two rifled 
howitzers, on board of steamers, and at daylight the following morning 
proceeded up the Tulifinny River, and was disembarked at Gregory's 
Landings. A portion of Lieutenant James O'Kane's infant^ battalion 
was put on shore at the upper landing, and proceeded on at once with 
the army force under General Potter, landing at that point. The 
remainder of the infantry, the marines, and the artillery were disem- 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 87 

barked, under direction of Fleet-Captain Bradford, at the lower land- 
ing, which proved marshy. Boards and timber were thrown down to 
make a road for it, and the guns had to be dragged through the swamp 
with great labor, which occasioned some delay. I, however, hurried 
the force forward as soon as it was landed, and as we proceeded heard 
sharp firing in front. This inspirited the men, and they hurried up 
the pieces. On reaching An open field we found the engagement still 

foing on, though after a stubborn contest the enemy had already been 
riven from it and were firing musketry from the woods in front and 
to the left, and from a battery also on the left. Our arrival was 
timely, for the army had advanced without horses or artillery, and 
was short of ammunition, one of the colonels reporting to General 
Potter, as I joined him, that his supply for his regiment was exhausted 
and he must use the bayonet. 

Wheeling the howitzers into position on the field, we opened a fire 
upon the left, which soon silenced the enemy's musketry. Planting 
another of the howitzers in the road to rake the crossroads, we dis- 
charged it against an advancing column of the enemy, which quickly 
disappeared. Continuing this fire at intervals, a battery of the enemy, 
near the Coosawhatchie, occasionally replied from 12-pounder smootn- 
bore and 10-pounder Brooke rifle. 

The sailor infantry under Lieutenant O'Kane behaved well, and 
received merited applause for their bravery from the army. Out of 
110, it counted 15 wounded. 

The capture of a rebel battle flag from the Fifth Georgia Regiment 
was disputed between the One hundred and twenty -seventh and Fifty- 
sixth New York regiments, while the honor of shooting the color 
bearer is claimed by one of our sailors. 

That night we camped on the battlefield, and had a picket disturbance 
about midnight. 

The loss of the enemy must have been severe. Lieutenant- 
Commander Matthews buried 5 of the enemy within the circuit of the 
camp of his artillery. 

The next morning, the 7th, about 9 a. m., the enemy opened a 
skirmish fire from the woods in front and to the right of our line. 
Our howitzers opened fire to- the right, and, driving them back at 
every discharge, prevented their getting round on the flank, while 
they assisted the musketry fire in front, which dispersed them. A few 
shots were fired from a rebel battery on the right, across the field. 
Soon after this firing, I received orders to move my command and to 
throw up intrenchments in our present position, leaving two heavy 
howitzers in the field in charge of Lieutenant Hay ward. In this brush 
with the enemy we had one man, a corporal of marines, wounded. 

The weather .turned very inclement and rainy, which probably 
hastened the retiring of the rebels. 

During the night my men were hard at work intrenching our camp, 
and completed the work before morning. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. S. JVavy, Commanding Naval Brigade. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



88 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Kear-Admiral Dahlgren, IT. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, regarding 
distinguishing pennants for the naval brigade. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Coosawhatchie River, 8. C. , December 9, 186^. 

SIR: I send you three distinguishing pennants for the battalions of 
the fleet brigade red for the howitzers, blue for the skirmishers, and 
white-blue for the marines, marked with an anchor. 

It will be well not to let our sailors and marines forget the habits to 
which they have been accustomed, for they may lose this without 
acquiring those of the soldiers, and 1 must confess to a preference for 
the more exact and respectful training of the Navy. 

It is by no means necessary to cause them discomfort, but they 
should never be allowed to omit the usual acknowledgments of the 
presence of their officers. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral* Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEORGE HENRT PREBLE, 

Commanding Fleet Brigade. 



Report of Commander Freble, TJ. S. Navy, regarding engagement of the enemy at Deveaux's 

Neck. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, 
Talbird's House, Deveaux's Neck, 8. C. , December 10, 186 4. 

SIR: Yesterday morning at daybreak, by order of the commanding 
general, the marine battalion, under command of First Lieutenant 
Marines G. G. Stoddard, was sent to the front intrenchments to report 
to Colonel Silliman and form the extreme right of a line of skirmishers 
in an expected action with the enemy. My acting adjutant, Lieuten- 
ant-Commander A. F. Crosman, volunteered -to accompany them, and 
did so. At the same time the sailor infantry, under Lieutenant James 
O'Kane, U. S. Navy, was sent to report to Brigadier-General E. E. 
Potter, to form on the extreme right of the line of battle. 

The battery of heavy 12-pounder howitzers, consisting of guns Nos. 
1, 3, 6, and 8, under Lieutenant-Commander E. O. Matthews, who 
had orders to report to Lieutenant-Colonel Ames, was placed in the 
field from which the enemy was driven on the 6th, in position to shell 
the woods in front before the advance of our troops and the right 
flank, after they had entered the woods. The two light howitzers 
were left in position near these headquarters to protect the left flank 
of our intrenchments. 

To myself was assigned by General Hatch the command of the 
reserves, consisting of the Thirty-second, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty- 
fifth U. S. Colored Infantry. 

The forces being in position, at 9 a. m. the artillery, in all ten 
pieces army and navy opened a rapid fire in front to clear the 
woods, which was. continued for ten minutes. On its ceasing, the skir- 
mish line, commanded by Colonel Silliman, of the Twenty-sixth Col- 
ored Regiment, and consisting of the One hundred and twenty-seventh 
and One hundred and fifty-seventh New York and our marine battalion, 
in all about 600 strong, entered the woods in front and was followed 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 89 

by the main line of battle, consisting of the One hundred and forty- 
fourth and Fift3'-sixth New York, and One hundred and second Col- 
ored regiments, and the sailor battalion of infantry, in all about 1,100 
strong. This line was followed by, and designed to protect, the 
Twenty -fifth Ohio with axes, who had orders to cut a road 100 feet 
wide through the woods, to open the Savannah and Charleston Rail- 
road to the fire of our batteries on the right. 

As the troops advanced our artillery commenced and continued to 
shell the woods with shrapnel on the right and left flanks, and kept up 
the fire during the whole advance, the signal of recall being the cessa- 
tion of the artillery fire. 

At 9:55 a. m. the skirmish fire commenced, and the musketry fire 
continued until near sundown. 

At 11:30 a. m. the Thirty-fourth Colored Regiment of the reserve 
was ordered to the front to report to General Potter. 

At 3 p. m., the Tw'enty -fifth Ohio having done its work, the artil- 
lery ceased fire, and, our lines beginning to retire, the enemy advanced 
with yells and volleys of musketry. 

At p. m. the One hundred and forty-fourth New York, having 
expended all its ammunition, returned; and at 4:15 the Thirty-second 
Colored of the reserves was ordered to the front, when the One hun- 
dred and forty-fourth New York reported to me and took its place in 
the intrenchments. 

The enemy throughout the day continued a fire of grapeshot and 
shell from a battery on our right. 

About sundown the firing ceased on both sides, and our forces hav- 
ing driven back the enemy withdrew in good order and returned to 
their intrenchments, the cutting through the woods, which was the 
intent of the attack, having been accomplished. 

Our loss in the naval brigade was, as far as ascertained, 2 killed, 18 
wounded, and 3 marines missing and probably drowned. I forward 
the surgeon's report of these casualties. 

It is needless to add that officers and men behaved with gallantry 
and spirit. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, Commanding Naval Brigade. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Beport of Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, regarding explosive balls used by the Confeder- 
ates in engagements in Tulifinny Eiver. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL, BRIGADE, 
Talbird's House, Deveauafs Neck, 8. C. , December 11, 1864. 

SIR: I wish to add to my reports of the engagements near the Tuli- 
finny River that the rebel sharpshooters used explosive balls against 
us, known by their peculiar sound and explosion when they struck 
the timber; also from having been picked up unexploded on the*field. 

Doctor Burton, the chief medical officer of the army, has one of 
these explosive bullets in his possession. It is a conical ball in shape, 
like an ordinary rifle bullet. The pointed end is charged with a ful- 
minate. The base of the ball separates from the conical end, and has 



90 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 

a leaden standard or plunger. The explosion of the charge drives the 
base up, so as to flatten a thin disk of metal between it and the ball, 
the leaden plunger is driven against the f ulmtnate, and it explodes the 
ball. Colonel [William] Silliman was wounded by one of these balls, 
and the wound, which from an ordinary bullet might have been man- 
ageable, is in consequence likely to prove fatal. It seems to me the 
use of such a missile is an unnecessary addition to the barbarities 
of war. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 

Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, IT. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Preble, TT. S. Navy, urging the need of an additional marine 

officer. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, 
Talbird's House, Deveauxs Neck,, December 11, 1864,. 
SIR: I think it necessary to represent to you that if these forces are 
to be long organized it is indispensable that the marine battalion 
should have at least another officer of its Corps attached to it. In the 
last fights Acting Adjutant Stanley was too unwell to accompany the 
battalion into the field. I considered it unsafe to risk the battalion in 
the skirmish line with but one officer, and was only relieved from the 
dilemma by Lieutenant-Commander Crosman volunteering to accom- 
pany it. By every rule of rank he was entitled to assume the com- 
mand of the battalion, but refrained from doing so out of consider- 
ation for the feelings of the first lieutenant of marines commanding 
the battalion, and the disorganizing effect it would have with the men 
for him to have assumed the command on the eve of battle. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, Commanding Naval Brigade. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. 



Keport of Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, requesting two rifled howitzers from Boyd's 

Landing. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, December 11, 1864- 
SIR: I have telegraphed, by order of General Hatch, to have the 
two rifled howitzers now at Boyd's Landing sent up without delay 
with ammunition complete. He desires them for a battery to the left 
of our present position to shell the railroad from. 
Our men are at work cutting a road up to the place. 
If desirable, two of the smoothbores can be returned. 
. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, Commanding Naval Brigade. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 91 

Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, TJ. S. Navy, to Commander Creighton, TJ. S. Navy, in 
connection with the duty of the latter as senior officer in Broad River. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, December* 12, 1864.. 

SIR: The communication with the army of General Sherman else- 
where obliges me to withdraw the Pawnee and Sonoma, which leaves 
you as senior officer in Broad River, with the Mingoe in the Tulifinny 
and the Pontiac at Boyd's Creek. 

You also have two tugs for communication and other purposes. 
This change you will at once make known to General Hatch, and 
say it is made by agreement with General Foster. 

Do all in your power to assist the army, and if Boyd's Neck is 
evacuated, the Pontiac will join you unless otherwise ordered. 

Communicate with Commander Reynolds for supplies of coal and 
provisions, if you should need them. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander J. BLAKELEY CREIGHTON, U. S. Navy, 

Comdg. U. S. S. Mingoe, Senior Officer, Tulifinny River. 



Order of Brigadier-General Hatch, IT. S. Army, to Commander Preble, TT. S. Navy, to 

furnish two howitzers. 

HEADQUARTERS COAST DIVISION, December 18, 1864- 
CAPTAIN: You will cause two naval howitzers, properly manned, to 
report at these headquarters at 5 o'clock p. m. to-day for guard at left 
batteries. 

By order of Brigadier-General Hatch: 

LEONARD B. PERRY, 
First Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant- General. 

Commander PREBLE, 

Commanding Naval Brigade. 



Eeport of Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, regarding successful practice fire at the railroad. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, 

Talbird's House, December 19, 1864,. 

SIR: Since the action of the 9th instant not a shot has been fired by 
the enemy. Our army guns, Parrotts and Napoleons, have had daily 
practice at the railroad, and, it is believed, with some success. Yes- 
terday one of our rifled howitzers was put into a battery 1,150 yards 
from the railroad bridge and opened fire for the first time. Two are 
to be run out again to the battery to-day. 

Two of our howitzers are in battery at the front of our lines, two 
near these headquarters on the left of these lines, and two in the rear 
and on the left, for the support of the two 30-pound Parrotts. Rest 
and good weather have improved the health of the camp. It is near 
four weeks since the command was assembled, and I would again 
urgently represent the importance of providing the men with a change 
of clothing from their ships. 



92 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The men wb.ose times are out are anxious to go North on the next 
trip of the supply steamer. I believe the infantry and marines of the 
brigade might be spared further service with the expedition, but the 
howitzers will be required as long as the army occupies this point. 
There is still some grumbling about insufficient rations, though we get 
along better than at first. 

The army ration supplied does not suit our jacks so well as their own. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 

Commander, TJ. S. Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgrcn. TJ. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, TJ. S. Navy, regarding 
transfer of men whose terms of service have expired. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Tybee Roads, December 25, 186 '4- 

SIR: I am in receipt of your communication of the 19th instant, 
reporting the operations of the fleet brigade under your command. 

In reference to the men attached to the brigade whose terms of 
service have expired, you will transfer them to their respective ves- 
sels at the first practicable opportunity. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Camdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEO. H. PREBLE, 

Com,manding Naval Brigade. 



Memorandum for Commander Reynolds. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Savannah River, December 26, 
The fleet brigade will report to you. 

The marines, except those belonging to the New Hampshire, are to 
land and remain on Bay Point, [S. C.J, for the present. 

The seamen belonging to the artillery and infantry are to be quar- 
tered on vessels at Port Royal and sent to their several vessels when 
a suitable means of conveyance offers. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Hear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, TJ. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, TJ. S. Navy, to 
prepare for the return of his command to the squadron. 

FLAG- STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

/Savannah River, December 26, 1864- 

SIR: On the receipt of this you will prepare to return with the fleet 
brigade to the squadron. 

This is, 1 believe, the understanding with General Foster, and I 
presume has been made known to General Hatch. You will, of course, 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 93 

see the general on the subject, and ascertain if this is the case; if not, 
you will not leave until you hear from me further, or General Hatch 
consents. 

You will convey to the fleet brigade my appreciation of the service 
it has rendered. 

The detailed reports from the commanding officers will be trans- 
mitted to the Navy Department, and will contain the full accounts of 
the service rendered, and of the names of the officers engaged. 

I can not omit to bear my own testimony to the fidelity and zeal with 
which the officers of the different battalions, artillery, seamen, and 
marines endeavored to train their men in the few days which the 
urgency of circumstances permits. 

Commander Reynolds has instructions as to the disposition of the 
officers and men composing the brigade on their arrival at Port Royal. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Hear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Commander GEO. HENRY PREBLE, 

Commofiding Naval Brigade. 



Report of Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, regarding the project for the capture of battery 

at Dawson's Point. 

HEADQUARTERS NAVAL BRIGADE, 

Talbird's House, December 28, 1864,. 

SIR: Since my report of the 19th nothing has been done by the 
naval brigade requiring a special report. 

The howitzers have been in occasional use at the swamp and other 
batteries for the annoyance of the enemy, but without eliciting a 
return fire. Lieutenant-Commander Matthews condemns the rifled 
howitzers as inaccurate in their aim and uncertain in their range. It 
was planned for Lieutenant O'Kane, with 120 sailors and marines to 
take the two-gun battery at Dawson's Point on the morning of the 
26th, assailing it from the rear. On examination the marsh was 
found impassable and the project had to be abandoned. 

During the recent heavy rains the brigade has suffered much from 
want of a change of clothing. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy, Comdg. Naval Brigade. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Ensign Lee, U. S. Navy, command- 
ing IT. S. S. Geranium, for the transportation of the naval brigade from Tulifinny. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, December 26, 1864' 

SIR: You will proceed to Tulifinny and report to Commander G. H. 
Preble for the purpose of transporting the fleet brigade to the New 
Hampshire at Port Royal. 



94 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

After this service is accomplished you will report to me at this 
anchorage or elsewhere. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

Acting Ensign DAVID LEE, 

Commanding U. S. S. Geranium. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren. U. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, TJ. S. Navy, regard- 
ing the transportation of the naval brigade from Tulifinny. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, December 26, 1864- 

SIR: The Geranium will report to you for the purpose of trans- 
porting the fleet brigade from Tulifinny [River] to the New Hampshire. 
After having performed this service, she will return to this anchorage 
and report to me here or elsewhere. 

very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blkdg. Squadron. 

Commander GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 

Commanding Naval Brigade. 



Report of Commander Freble, IT. S. Navy, regarding the embarkation of the naval brigade 

at Tulifinny. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 

Port Royal, December 29, 1864. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to inform you that yesterday morning the 
commanding officer of the Geranium reported to me at the headquar- 
ters of the naval brigade at Deveaux's Neck and showed me his orders 
to transport the brigade to the New Hampshire. 

I immediately communicated the fact to Brigadier-General Potter, 
commanding, in the absence of General Hatch, and with his consent 
embarked the brigade on board the Geranium and Daffodil, with the 
exception of two howitzers and 57 men, under command of Lieu- 
tenant Hay ward, left at the front by General Potter's request. Orders 
have since been sent for the withdrawal of this force. The remainder 
of the command reached Port Royal about 11 p. m., but, owing to the 
gale, no transfers were made until this morning. This morning the 
marines have been landed at Bay Point, and the sailors transferred to 
their own ships, if in the harbor; if not, to this ship to await transfer, 
agreeably to your order of the 26th, received this morning. I expect 
to leave this afternoon in the Geranium, with the officers and men of 
the St. Louis for North Edisto. 

VeBy respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. S. Navy, Commanding Naval Brigade, 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South A tlantic Blockading Squadron, 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING 8QUADEON. 95 

Letter from Rear-Adiniral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, TJ. S. Navy, regard 
ing withdrawal of naval brigade from Tnlifinny. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off Charleston, December 30, 186 '4. 

SIR: I have received your report of the 29th, from which it appears 
that you left your post with the military command at Deveaux's Neck 
before receiving any orders to that effect. 

If I am correct in this understanding of your report, then I entirely 
disapprove of your having done so. 

The orders of the commander of the Geranium were merely to pro- 
ceed and receive the fleet brigade. This constituted no ground for 
your action. 

The men and guns under your orders were attached to the division 
of the Army by an arrangement between General Foster and myself 
and could be property withdrawn only by a joint understanding 
between us. 

It was due to the general in command that he should be duly 
informed of the intention, and even exercise a discretion, if, in his 
opinion, it was necessary to retain the fleet brigade. 

The irregular course you pursued lays me under the unpleasant 
necessity of satisfying the general that the proper course was intended 
by me. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEO. H. PREBLE, 

Commanding U. S. Ship St. Louis, North Edisto. 



Eeport of Commander Preble, TJ. S. Navy, announcing his return to duty in the squadron. 

U. S. SLOOP OF WAR ST. Louis, 

North Edito River, South Carolina, December 30, 1864- 
SIR: 1 have the honor to report that I have returned to and resumed 
the command of this ship, agreeably to orders of Commander Reynolds. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 

Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. . 



Letter from Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Brigadier-General Potter, TJ. S. Navy, 
explaining the premature withdrawal of the naval brigade. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Charleston Roads, S. C. , December 31, 186 Jj,. 

GENERAL: I have just learned from Commander G. H. Preble, com- 
manding fleet brigade, that he withdrew it from your command before 
receiving any orders from me to that effect. 

For this reason you were not made acquainted with the purport of 
that order. 



96 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The portion relating to the withdrawal ran as follows: 

On the receipt of this you will prepare to return with the fleet brigade to the squad- 
ron. This is, I believe, the understanding with General Foster, and I presume has 
been made known to General Hatch. You will, of course, see the general on the 
subject and ascertain if this is the case; if not, you will not leave until you hear 
from me further, or General Hatch consents. 

You will perceive that the withdrawal of the brigade was contingent 
on your own consent, supposing that you had been so authorized by 
General Foster, and that I never designed to give any authority to 
Commander Preble to withdraw otherwise, because, to my mind, this 
would have been a violation of all military and naval propriety. 

I have signified to Commander Preble my disapproval of his course, 
and that he acted without any authority in leaving your command 
before receiving my directions in the matter, which, with the extract 
of my order above given, will no doubt satisfy you that the irregular 
proceeding referred to was not authorized or intended by me. 
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Brigadier-General E. E. POTTER, 

Commandmg Division, etc., Near Coosawhatchie. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren. U. S. Navy, transmitting list of casualties in the naval 

brigade. 

No. 1.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, January 1, 1865. 

SIR: I enclose herewith a list of casualties occurring in the fleet 
brigade whilst engaged in recent operations. 

The list is not yet completed, and more recent information will be 
transmitted when received. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosures. 1 

Inst of killed, wounded, and missing, fleet brigade, November 30, 1864, in action at Boyd's 

Neck, S. C. 

Killed. Philip Knapp, first sergeant, Company B, marines, Mingoe. 

Wounded. James Walker, private, Company A, marines, Pawnee, 
in neck, mortally; Philip Clancy, second sergeant, Company B, marines, 
Pontiac, in ankle; Patrick Neilly, private, Company A, marines, 
Sonoma, in finger; William Wilson, private, Company B, marines, 
Mingoe, in finger; Michael Malloney, private, Company A, marines, 
Canandaigua, in head; John Young, corporal, Company B, marines, 
Candndaigua, in thigh; James O'Neill, ordinary seaman, gun No. 1, 
artillery, Camelia, in head. 

Missing. Robert Joyce, private, Company B, marines, Mingoe,' 
G. C. Drake, private, Company C, infantry, Saratoga. 

Sick,, failed to go. Patrick Kiernan, St. Louis; G. C. Lincoln, 
Bay Point; Thomas Kiernan, Bay Point; H. Chew, Geranium. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC ^ BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 97 

In action at Tulifinny Crossroads, December 6, 1864- 

Wounded. Edward Birch, ordinary seaman, Company B, infantry, 
Sonoma, in left ankle; Patrick Gleason, landsman, Company B, infan- 
try, Sonoma, in right foot; Patrick Hayes, landsman, Company C, 
infantry, Saratoga, left wrist; James Northrop, landsman, Company 

A, infantry, Memphis, left arm; Michael Lynch, landsman, Company 

B, infantry, Sonoma, left arm; Thomas Mallon, private, Company B, 
marines, /Saratoga, left breast, on duty; George Groth, ordinary sea- 
man, Company B, infantry, St. Louis, right shoulder; Thomas McDon- 
ald, ordinary seaman, Company C, infantry, Saratoga, left breast; 
Charles Hanan, landsman, Company C, infantry, Saratoga, left side; 
Mortimer Tower, landsman, Company C, infantry, Saratoga, left 
shoulder; Charles Wilson, ordinan r seaman, Company D, infantry, 
Geranium, right foot; Robert Wilson, Company B, infantry, St. Louis, 
right arm; Horace Thompson, seaman. Company D, infantry, New 
Hampshire, left arm. 

In action at Tulifinny Crossroads, December 7, 1864. 

Wounded. Edgar Kemmerer, fourth sergeant, Company C, marines, 
Pontiac, left side. 
Missing. Charles Brandt, private, Company C, marines, Sonoma. 

In action at Tulifinny Crossroads, December 9, 1864- 

Killed. Warren Boynton, Company C, infantry, Saratoga. 

Wounded. Christopher Lutz, sergeant, acting first lieutenant, Com- 
pan} r B, marines, New Hampshire (mortally), left on the field; Robert 
Kellon, private, Company B, marines, New Hampshire, left lung; 
Thomas Quinn, private, Company B, marines, New Hampshire, thigh; 
P. W. Flood, private, marines, Donegal, left thumb; James Gorman, 
private, Company A, marines, James Adger, abdomen; William Gor- 
don, private, Company B, marines, Pontiac, left fore linger (accidental); 
R. C. Bates, second sergeant, Company A, marines, St. Louis, arm; 
William McMurray, corporal, Company C, marines, Flag, left hand; 
James Frynn, private, Company B, infantry, Sonom,a, left shoulder; 
William Poole, landsman, Company A, infantry, Memphis, right 
breast (mortally); Peter Wilson, private, Company C, infantry, Sara- 
toga, left arm; Henry Smith, seaman, Company C, infantry, Saratoga, 
head (slightly); William Edmonds, private, Company C, infantry, 
Saratoga, left forearm; John Anderson, private, Company C, infantry, 
Saratoga, contusion (spent ball); Joseph Wallace, ordinary seaman, 
Company C, infantry, Saratoga, left hand; George Gallagher, private, 
Company D, infantry, Camelia, scalp; James Garner, private, Com- 
pany D, infantry, Saratoga, head (slight); Bernard Quinn, landsman, 
first sergeant, Company A, infantry, Mem,phis, contusion right foot; 
Denby Smith, private, Company C, infantry, Saratoga, head (slight). 

Reported missing, December 10 (supposed to be droumed). 

John Keating, private, Cimarron: Bernard Dyer, private, Com- 
pany C, marines, St. Louis; Manuel de Jesus, private, Company C, 
marines, St. Louis. 

N w R VOL 16 7 



98 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Preble, U. fe. Navy, to furnish 
a combined and condensed report of operations. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, January #, 1865. 

SIR: You will, at the earliest opportunity, forward to me a report, 
combining and condensing the matter of all previous reports, of the 
operation of the naval brigade lately under your command. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEO. H. PREBLE, 

U. S. Sh'ty St. Louis, North Edisto River. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, TJ. S. Navy, to Lieutenant Wiltse, U. S. Navy, to main- 
tain the organization used by naval brigade. 

FLAG- STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Savannah River, South Carolina, January 3, 186;~>. 
SIR: You will make a return of the men who left the naval battery 
on Morris Island and of those who returned, together with the dispo- 
sition made of those who did not return. 

You will retain the organization used by the fleet brigade and con- 
tinue to drill the men to the howitzers as before, when they are not 
necessarily occupied with the heavy guns, and send me a list of the 
force now present at the battery. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdf/. /South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant G. C. WILTSE, 

Naval Battery, Morris Island. 



Explanatory report of Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, regarding the matter of the with- 
drawal of the naval brigade from Tulifinny. 

U. S. SLOOP OF WAR ST. Louis, 
North Edisto River, South Carolina, January j, 1865. 
SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 
the 30th ultimo, and regret that you see occasion to disapprove of my 
too .prompt obedience of your orders. The Geranium brought mo 
orders, addressed to her captain, to transport the brigade to the New 
Hampshire, with further orders to report to you at Savannah or else- 
where on completing that duty. I thought it an informal way of con- 
veying an order to me, but, with your squadron order of August 8, 
1863, repeated June 18, 1864 (No. 40), of which the following is a copy, 
I felt bound to remove the brigade as directed: 

It is hereby directed that any officer who may be concerned in the execution of an 
order will act upon any writing bearing my signature, addressed to another officer, 
precisely as if it had been addressed to himself, and will report to me his performance 
of the part that came within his power. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 99 

I could not know what importance might attach to the Geranium, 
being detained from carrying out your further instructions. 

Before removing the brigade, however, 1 advised with and obtained 
the consent of Brigadier-General Potter, in the absence of General 
Hatch, the commanding general, to its removal, leaving, at his request 
and for want of sufficient transportation, two of the howitzers and their 
crews, in charge of Lieutenant Hay ward. 

It was not until I had been on board the New Hampshire twelve 
hours tLat 1 received the orders addressed to me. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 

Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Gommcmding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Detailed report of Lieutenant Stoddard, TJ. S. Marine Corps, regarding the operations of 
the battalion under his command. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
Pcn*t .Royal, S. C. , January 5, 1865. 

SIR: I give you herewith a description of the doings of a battalion 
of marines of which I have had' the honor to have the command for 
the past six weeks. On the 25th of November I received an order 
from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren to assume command of a battalion of 
marines, composed of the guards of the ships in this squadron, to be 
assembled at Bay Point on the 26th. The battalion was composed as 
follows: St. Louis, 19; Pawnee, 20; Canandaigua, 17; Flag, 12; 
New Hampshire, 29; Sonoma, 11; Mingoe, 14; P<mtiac, 13; Saratoga, 
11; and James Adger, 11; total, 157; reinforced December 8 by 
guards of Ciman^on, 11; Donegal, 14; total, 182. 

Acting Ensign Woodward Carter, of the New Hampshire, was 
ordered to assist me as acting major, and Admiral's Clerk J. R. 
Stanley as acting adjutant. I divided the men into three companies 
and officered them as follows: 

Company A. Captain, Sergeant Thomas A. Buckley, Canandaigua; 
first lieutenant, Sergeant William Porter, St. Louis; first sergeant, 
Sergeant Charles O. Sullivan, Pawnee. 

Company B. Captain, Sergeant C. Stewart, Pontiac; first lieuten- 
ant, Sergeant C. Lutz (wounded and missing December 9), New Hamp- 
shire; first lieutenant, Sergeant Gallagher, Donegal; first sergeant, 
Sergeant Philip Knapp, Mingoe (killed at Honey Hill, November 30); 
first sergeant, Sergeant Henry Albert, Mingoe. 

Company C. Captain, Sergeant William P. Smith, St. Louis; first 
lieutenant, Sergeant William Cogley, Pawnee; second lieutenant, 
Sergeant Robert McClure, Cimarron; first sergeant, Sergeant James 
Doddrill, New Hampshire. 

Noncommissioned staff. Aid, Sergeant C. L. Boren, James Adger; 
sergeant-major, Sergeant John Crowley, Sonoma; commissary-ser- 

eant, Corporal H. Hanley, New Hampshire; quartermaster-sergeant, 
ergoant J. Cogley, Canandaigua; color-sergeant, Corporal Philip J. 
Smith, Cimarron. 

The battalion was a part of a naval brigade composed of eight how- 
itzers and crews, commanded by Lieutenant-Commander Matthews; 



100 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

four companies of sailor infantry, commanded by Lieutenant O'Kane; 
and the marines, the brigade commanded by Commander George H. 
Preble, of the St. Louis. The guards did not all land until the even- 
ing of the 27th; the 28th was taken up by organizing and drilling the 
skirmishers. At dark we embarked on board the U. S. S. Sonoma, 
and at daylight were at Boyd's Neck, Broad River. The battalion 
landed in boats, and I deployed company A as skirmishers to cover 
the landing of the howitzers. About 7.30 a. m. commenced to 
advance, companies A and B deployed each side of the road, C in 
reserve, howitzers and sailors in the rear. Advanced some 6 miles, 
driving in the pickets with some firing; found we were on the wrong 
road and fell back at dark to a crossroads about 3 miles from the 
landing; here the army came up under command of Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Hatch. The morning of the 30th we took position on the left 
of the naval battery, advancing some 5 or 6 miles. The battle of 
Honey Hill commenced about 10 a. m. About noon the word was 
passed for the marines to advance. General Hatch ordered me to 
take position on the right of the advance line, relieving the One 
hundred and forty-fourth New York. This we did, advancing nearly 
a mile through the woods and swamps and coming into line on the 
double-quick under a heavy fire of canister. We immediately opened 
fire on the enemy and continued it unfil about 3 p. m., when the whole 
left of the line having fallen back, and being unsupported, we were 
obliged to follow their example. We then took up a position on the 
right, on a crossroads three-fourths of a mile in the rear of the first 
position, opened fire on the pursuing enemy, and drove him back. 
This position we held till about 6 p. m., when, in obedience to orders, 
we marched to the rear and took up our original position on the left 
of the battery; during the night we returned to the crossroads, where 
we had spent the previous night, and covered the movements of the 
army. The next morning, December 1, we occupied a hill half a 
mile to the left of the crossroads, and during the next two days were 
busy throwing up fieldworks and doing picket duty. The 3d, 4th, and 
5th were spent in camp duty and drill. Soon after dark on the 5th 
I received orders from the admiral to form my battalion and proceed 
on board the flag-steamer Philadelphia for an expedition up the Tuli- 
finny River. Embarked about midnight; orders to land the next 
morning, cover the landing of the artillery, and advance on the enemy. 
Owing, however, to our boats going ashore, the army landed first. 
The battle opened about 9 a. m. We advanced on the right of the 
naval battery and came under fire about 11 a. m. ; deployed the whole 
battalion as skirmishers on the right and advanced into the woods 
beyond Tulifinny Cross Roads, driving the enenty before us. After- 
wards moved across the front of the line and took position on the 
extreme left, where the enemy were pressing us; held the ground 
under a heavy fire until dark, then left Company C on picket under 
Acting Major Carter, and the balance moved to the center, where we 
remained during the night, supporting, an army battery. At da}dight 
the 7th the enemy attacked in force, first on the center, then on the 
right and left at once. A body of colored troops on the left gave way 
and Company C was in great danger of being captured, but Major 
Carter finally brought them off in good order, with the loss of but one 
man. About noon, the fighting having ceased, the naval brigade 
moved to the left and rear, taking up a position at Talbert's [Talbird's] 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 101 

house, protecting- the left flank. Here at dark the men received some 
bean soup sent from [the] Mingoe, the first food they had received for 
thirty-six hours. We had hot cofi'ee on the Philadelphia at daybreak on 
the 6th and nothing from that time until this soup arrived; besides, the 
men were ordered to leave their coats and blankets behind under a 
guard and had slept all night on the field of battle in a heavy rain 
without any cover. Certainly the men deserve a great deal of praise 
for their good conduct under such hardships. At 10 p. m. sent Com- 
pany A out on picket at midnight; Companies B and C turned out and 
worked throwing up rifle pits until morning. The 8th was spent in 
working on the fortifications. At daybreak on the 9th the battalion 
was formed and moved to the front on the extreme right. Here 
deployed as skirmishers and waited for the battle to commence. At 
9 o'clock a. m., the artillery opened a heavy fire along the whole line; 
this continued fifteen minutes and then the skirmish line of 600 ad- 
vanced, supported by a reserve of 1,000. The marines had the right 
of the line. We soon met the enemj^'s pickets and drove them before 
us for some half a mile, through a dense swamp from knee to waist 
deep. It was so thick that you could not see a man three or four paces 
from you. The marines advanced to within 50 yards of the rebel 
works under a heavy fire of canister, when the regiment on their left 
was ordered to fall back (One hundred and twenty-seventh New York 
Volunteers). This order was not passed to us and I was preparing 
to charge when the rebels advanced in force after the retiring line, 
doubling up our left, and I found myself unsupported and nearly cut 
oft'. 1 faced my men about, but having no means of telling the proper 
direction kept too much to the right (now our left) and struck the 
Tuli finny River. This turned out to be fortunate, as the enemy had 
pursued our left to and through the river, taking several prisoners. 
We kept the bank of the river, and by the time we had arrived at that 
spot the rebels had retired a short distance and we were enabled to 
pass before they turned on us. After this we returned to the cross- 
roads, from which we started in the morning, and then, by orders 
from General Potter, took up a new position on the left of the line of 
battle. About 3 p. m., the object of the expedition having been 
accomplished (cutting a road through the woods so as to see the rail- 
road), the line commenced to withdraw. While this was being .done 
the enemj 7 attacked along the whole line with superior numbers. Our 
line was immediately reformed and the enemy repulsed, but only for 
a time; charge after charge was made, up almost to our line, but 
every time they were driven back with heavy loss; at sundown they 
withdrew and about 7 p. m. we returned to our camps. After this we 
had no serious fighting, though the battalion went out through the 
swamp on our left with the naval battery several times to shell the 
railroad, the balance of the time being taken up with camp duties and 
drill. December 27 we received orders to return; embarked at sunset 
and landed at Bay Point at 7 a. m., the 28th. To-day the battalion 
has been broken up and most of the guards have returned to their 
ships. We have lost in killed, wounded, and missing 23, a list of 
whom I send herewith. The noncommissioned officers and privates 
have all behaved in a most gallant manner and I am sure that by their 
bravery the} r have added both with the Navy and Army to the high 
reputation the Corps already enjoys. In closing, I must express my 
thanks for the able assistance I received from Messrs. Carter and 



102 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Stanley. I could not have done without them, for, although sergeants 
make good acting officers, still, in action, they do not feel the respon- 
sibility; neither do they have that moral effect on the men that a com- 
missioned officer does. In this connection, please allow me to call 
your attention to the fact that with 200 marines in this squadron 
there is but one officer. If you should send any officers, you will con- 
fer a great favor on me by sending my juniors. I have commanded 
the battalion in this expedition in a manner most satisfactory to the 
admiral and as there will probably be others during the spring, I 
should like to continue the senior officer. 

Please remember me to your family, and believe me. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. G. STODDARD, 

U. S. Marines. 
Col. J. ZEILIN, 

Commandant U. S. Marine Corps, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosure.] 
Killed, wounded, and missing, Honey Hill, S. C., November SO. 

Killed. Orderly Sergeant Philip Knapp, Mingoe. 

Wounded. Corporal Philip Clancy, Pontiac, leg; Corporal J. W. 
Young, Canandaigua, thigh, serious; Private Michael Neilly. Son&nia; 
Private Michael Malloney, Canandaigua; Private William H. Wilson, 
Mingoe, since dead; Private James Walker, Pawnee, jaw; Private 
Thomas Joy, Mingoe, missing, reported dead by deserters. 

Tulifinny Crossroads, December 6. 
Wounded. Private Thomas Mallon, Mingoe. 

Tulifinny Crossroads, December 7. 
Wounded. Corporal E. Kemmerer, Pontiac, shoulder. 

Tulifinny Crossroads, December S. 
Wounded. Private William Gordon, Pontiae, finger. 

Tulifinny Crossroads, December 9. 

Wounded. Sergeant C. Lutz, New Hampshire, leg, missing; Cor- 
poral Robert C. Bates, St. Louis, arm; Corporal William McMurray, 
Flag; Private James Gorman, James Adger, side; Private Robert 
Kellon, New Hampshire, since dead; Private Thomas Quinn, New 
Hampshire; Private P. Flood, Donegal, hand; Private J. Brubaker, 
Canandaigua, chest. 

Missing. Private J. Keating, Cimarron; Private M. de Jesus, St. 
Louis; Private B. Dyer, St. Louis. 

Tulifinny Crossroads, December 26. 
Wounded. Orderly Sergeant T. P. Doane, Flag, accident. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 103 

Letter from Major-General Foster, U. S. Army, to Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, TT. S. Navy, 
requesting additional means of transportation for the military force under Brigadier- 
General Hatch, U. S. Army. 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, 

Hilton Head, S. C. , January 9, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: 1 have the honor to request that you will furnish one or 
two armed tugs, in addition to the gunboat, at Tulifinny Landing, to 
cover the embarkation of General Hatch's force. This embarkation 
will take place between two and five days from this time. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 

Major- General, Commanding. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, 17. S. Navy, to Major-General Foster, IT. S. Army, 
regarding means for covering the embarkation of Brigadier-General Hatch's forces. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, January 9, 1865. 

GENERAL: Conformably to your request, the Dai Ching has been 
ordered to assist the Mingoe and Dandelion in covering the embarka- 
tion of General Hatch's forces. 

I wish that I were able to send you the tugs, but between increased 
demands and need of repair I am often puzzled to find one for any 
unexecuted service. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General J. G. FOSTER, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Headquarters, Hilton Head. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, IT. S. Navy, to Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin, U. S. 
Navy, commanding U. S. S. Dai Ching, to cover the embarkation of troops. 

FLAGSHIP, 

Port Royal, S. C. , January 9, 1865. 

SIR: I have been requested by General Foster to send one or two 
vessels to Tulifinny Landing to cover the embarkation of General 
Hatch's force. 

This embarkation will take place in from two to five days. 
You will, therefore, proceed up Broad River and report to Com- 
mander Creighton, of the Mingoe, to assist him in the above duty. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander J. C. CHAPLIN, 

Commanding Dai Ching. 



104 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

General report of Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, commanding naval brigade. 

U. S. SLOOP OF WAR ST. Louis, 
North JEdisto River, January 10, 1865. 

SIR: In compliance with your order of the 2d instant, I submit the 
following report of the operations of the fleet brigade under my com- 
mand, from November 20 until it was disbanded on the 29th December 
at Port Royal. 

Agreeably to your orders I reported to you for special service at Port 
Royal on the evening of the 26th November, and the next morning at 
7 a. m. received command of the forces assembling at Bay Point, for 
an expedition, said forces consisting of a battalion of naval artillery 
under command of Lieutenant-Commander E. O. Matthews, a battalion 
of sailor infantry, under command of Lieutenant James O'Kane, and 
a battalion of marines under command of First Lieutenant G. G. 
Stoddard, United States Marine Corps, in all, 30 officers and 463 men, 
with eight 12-pounder howitzers (two rifled.) 

The 27th (Sunday) I was occupied in organizing and exercising this 
force. 

The 28th in exercise under your inspection. 

In the evening the brigade was embarked on board the Pontiac, 
Sonoma, and Mingoe, the artillery in launches in tow of the steamers. 

At 4: 30 a. m., the 29th, all the vessels of the expedition got under- 
way and proceeded up the Broad River under cover of a dense fog. 
At 8:30 a. m., the brigade landed atBoyd's Landing, and was immedi- 
ately pushed forward on the road in advance of the military forces, 
about 2 miles. 

The artillery was advanced up the road, with the battalion of marines 
and sailor infantry deploj'ed to the right and left, and in advance as 
skirmishers. 

Before landing, Major-General Foster not having arrived, I reported 
myself and command to Brigadier-General J. P. Hatch, the military 
commander of the expedition, and was directed by him to halt at the 
crossroads and wait the arrival of the army forces. Without a guide 
or map of the country, and not sure that we had halted at the right 
place, the road not continuing in front as was expected, accompanied 
by my adjutant, Lieutenant-Commander Crosman, and 15 men, I 
reconnoitered the right-hand fork for 2 or more miles, and saw several 
of the enemy's cavalry and infantry pickets watching our movements, 
our skirmishers exchanging shots with them. 

On my return to the command I advanced it about a mile and a 
half to another road crossing, which seemed better to answer the 
description of that I was directed to halt at. A regiment of colored 
troops came up and camped with us at this halting place. We had got 
our artillery in a. defensive position and were intrenching our new 
camp when Brigadier-General E. E. Potter rode up, leading the main 
army force. He decided that the roads were wrongly laid down on 
the maps and that neither of our halting places could be the right one, 
but there must be another, the right, crossing somewhere on the left- 
hand fork. By his direction, therefore, our tired and hungry battal- 
ions, which had been dragging at the artillery or skirmishing through 
the swamps and woods all day, were again marched to the left, and at 
11 p. m. camped for the night at the first forks. General Potter con- 
tinued on with his force, took the wrong road for 6 miles, and finally 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 105 

camped at the crossing near the church, afterwards used as a hospital 
for the wounded. 

At 7 a. m., the cfOth, the brigade was again in motion, and at 8 a. m. 
joined the army at the church, where Brigadier-General Hatch had 
established his headquarters. I have again reported to him, and halted 
the brigade, by his order, on the left of the column. 

While coming up the road I received an order to send back my two 
lightest howitzers to the forks we had left, and immediately dispatched 
them under command of Acting Ensign Edgren. His arrival with 
those pieces was timely, for he was immediately attacked by the enemy's 
sharpshooters and skirmishers, when a few discharges of canister 
caused to cry out, "cover" and "retreat.'" During the afternoon he 
accompanied, with his guns, a regiment sent up the road to the right 
on a reconnoissance, which resulted in discovering a battery of the 
enemy in position to defend it. 

At 8: 15 a. m. the army moved on up the Grahamville road leading 
to the right of the church, and at 8:30 a. m. the enemy opened fire 
upon the head of one column from a movable piece of rifled artillery 
placed in the road. This was replied to by one 12-po under Napoleon; 
a skirmish fire of musketry ensued, and the enemy was driven back, 
tiring as he retreated. As the head of our column reached the turn of 
the roads at Honey Hill, it was opened on by a battery placed in posi- 
tion behind a strong earthwork. A sharp and stubbornly contested 
fight ensued, which lasted until sundown, when, as it was found impos- 
sible to drive the enemy from his position, our troops were withdrawn 
in good order. Our total loss in killed, wounded, and missing amounted, 
as officially reported, to 740. 

By direction of Brigadier-General Hatch, my brigade brought up 
the rear of the column on the march, and was mostly in reserve at the 
commencement of the action. At meridian, however, the marine bat- 
talion was ordered into the line of battle on the right, in the rear of 
the Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, and was continued in line and under 
fire until called out by orders from the general. At 6 p. m. my acting 
adjutant, Lieutenant-Commander Crosman, accompanied the battalion 
into line as a volunteer, and remained with it through the day. At 
3:30 p. m. Lieutenant-Commander E. O. Matthews was ordered to 
bring up two of his heavy howitzers to the front and relieve a section 
of New York artillery, whose guns were heated and ammunition nearly 
exhausted. At 3:40 he opened fire from these guns, and continued to 
keep up a slow fire, as ordered, until 6:30 p. m., when he fired the last 
gun at the enemy and covered our retiring column until relieved by a 
section of horse artillery under Lieutenant-Colonel Ames. 

The battalion of sailor infantry, under Lieutenant O'Kane, much to 
his regret, was not called to the front. Two companies did good serv- 
ice, however, on the march at the drag ropes of the artillery, and the 
remainder of his command assisted under orders in turning back strag- 
glers to the front. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon W. J. Bowdle, senior medical officer of 
the brigade, with Acting Assistant Surgeons E. M. Corson and H. L. 
Gibbs, rendered efficient service in the rear, and as our own casualties 
were light they were able to aid their overtasked brethren of the army; 
our medical stores were also expended for the army, their own not being 
at hand. 

The casualties of the brigade were 1 killed and 9 wounded. 



106 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

There was no opportunity in this action for a display of individual 
acts of bravery, as all in the brigade, both men and officers, performed 
their duty. It was approvingly marked by the army officers that there 
were no stragglers from it. 

During the night following the battle our artillery took up, by order, 
a defensive position at the forks of the road, supported by the infantry 
of the brigade, and the Thirty-fourth and Thirty -fifth regiments of 
colored troops ordered to report to me for that purpose. 

The next morning, December 1, the brigade was ordered into a 
position on the Grahamvrlle road, where it subsequently intrenched 
and remained until the evening of the 5th, when it was withdrawn by 
order of the general to Boyd's Landing and embarked under your 
instructions for an expedition up the Tulifinny. 

While in this intrenched camp the enemy remained quiet and no for- 
ward movement was made. Lieutenant Hayward, in charge of one of 
the howitzers, accompanied a regiment on a reconnoissance up the road, 
and the rifled howitzers on one or two occasions tried their range at the 
church, which, on being abandoned by our army, was occupied by the 
enemy. 

On the 5th of December, at 9 p. m. , I received orders from General 
Hatch to withdraw the brigade from its intrenchments on Boyd's Neck, 
and proceeded to Boyd's Landing, where it was embarked under your 
instructions, with the exception of two rifled howitzers on board of 
steamers, and at daylight the following morning proceeded up the 
Tulifinny River and was disembarked at Gregory's Landings. 

A portion of Lieutenant O'Kane's infantry battalion was put on shore 
at Greenwood, the upper landing, with the army forces under Brigadier- 
General E. E. Potter, landing at that point, and advanced with them. 
The remainder of the infantry, the marines, and the artillery were 
disembarked under the direction of Fleet Captain Bradford at the 
lower landing, where the ground proved marshy and the guns had to 
be dragged through the swamp with great labor, which was the occa- 
sion of some delay. I, however, hurried the forces on, and as 'we pro- 
ceeded heard sharp firing in front. Inspirited by the sound, the men 
hurried up the pieces. On reaching an open field the road we advanced 
on was raked by a piece of artillery, and we found the engagement 
still going on, though the enemy had been driven from the field by the 
advance force, with the loss of a battle flag. They were still keeping 
up a rapid fire of musketry from the surrounding woods and with shot 
and shell from a battery near the Coosawhatchie on the left. Our 
arrival was very opportune; the army had advanced without horses or 
artillery and was already short of ammunition. Wheeling the howitzers 
into position in the field, we opened a fire into the woods on the left, 
which soon silenced the enemy's musketry. Planting another howitzer 
in the middle of the crossroads it was discharged at a column of the 
enemy which quickly disappeared. The Coosawhatchie battery replied 
from a 12-pounder smoothbore and a 10-pounder Brooke rifle. 

The sailor infantry under Lieutenant O'Kane behaved well. Out 
of 110 engaged in action he had 15 wounded. The capture of the rebel 
battle flag, belonging to the Fifth Georgia Infantry, was disputed 
between the One hundred and twenty-seventh and Fifty -sixth New 
York regiments, and assigned to the latter, though there is scarcely a 
doubt the standard bearer was shot by one or more of Lieutenant 
O'Kane's command. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 107 

That night wo camped on the battlefield; during the night a skir- 
mishing fire from the picket line drew the whole force out under arms. 
The next morning, the 7th, the enemy attacked our skirmish line from 
the woods in front and to the right of our line; our howitzers firing 
to the right prevented his getting around on that flank, while they 
assisted the musketry in front to disperse them. In this attack the 
enemy tired a few shots from a battery on the right that had not before 
been heard from. In this affair we had 2 wounded. 

After the enemy had been repelled, I received orders to move the 
brigade back to Talbird's house [Deveaux's Neck] and intrench, leaving 
two howitzers on the field in charge of Lieutenant Hay ward. During 
the night the men were kept at work intrenching their camp, and fin- 
ished their task before daylight. The 8th was passed in inaction and 
in improving and strengthening the intrenchments. 

On the 9th a forward movement was ordered by the commanding 
general, in which the'brigade participated. At daybreak the marine 
battalion was sent to the front intrenchments under command of Lieu- 
tenant kStoddard, to report to Colonel Silliman, to form the extreme 
right of a line of skirmishers, and was accompanied by my acting adju- 
tant. Lieutenant-Commander Crosman, who volunteered for the service. 
At the same hour the sailor infantry, under Lieutenant James O'Kane, 
was sent to report to Brigadier-General Potter, to form on the extreme 
right of the line of battle. 

Guns Nos. 1, 3, C, and 8, under Lieutenant-Commander Matthews, 
who had orders to report to Lieutenant-Colonel Ames, were placed in 
the field from which the enemy had been driven on the 5th, in position 
to shell the woods in front, previous to the advance of our troops, and 
ou their right flank after they had entered the woods. The two light 
howitzers were left in position at the intrenchment of the brigade for 
the protection of our left flank. 

To myself was assigned by Brigadier-General Hatch the command 
of the reserves, consisting of the Thirty-second, Thirty-fourth, and 
Thirty -fifth U. S. Colored Infantry. The forces being in position, at 
9 a. m. the artillery, in all ten pieces, army and navy, opened a rapid 
fire in front to clear the woods, which was continued ten minutes. On 
its ceasing, the skirmish line, commanded by Colonel Silliman, and 
consisting of the One hundred and twenty -seventh and One hundred 
and fifty -seventh New York, and our marine battalion, in all about 450 
strong, entered the woods in front, and was followed by the main line 
of battle, consisting of One hundred and fort} r -fourth and Fifty-sixth 
New York, and One hundred and second Colored regiments and the 
sailor infantry. This line was followed by and designed to protect 
the Twenty-fifth Ohio, with axes, who had orders to cut a road 100 
feet wide through the woods to open the railroad to the fire of our 
batteries on the right. 

As the troops advanced all our artillery commenced and continued 
to shell on the right and left flanks and kept up the fire during the 
whole advance, the signal of recall being the cessation of the artillery 
fire. 

At 9:55 a. m. the skirmish firing commenced, and the musketry tire 
was continued until near sundown. 

At 11: 30 a. m. the Thirty-fourth Colored Regiment of the reserves 
WHS ordered to the front to report to General Potter. 

At 3 p. m. the Ohio Twenty-fifth having done its work the artillery 
fire ceased. 



108 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

At 4 p. m. the One hundred and forty-fourth New York, having 
expended all its ammunition, returned, and at 4: 15 the Thirty -second 
Colored was ordered to the front, and the One hundred and forty- 
fourth New York reported to me, and took its place in the intrench- 
ment. 

The enemy throughout the day continued a fire of grapeshot and 
shell from a battery on the right. 

About sundown the firing on both sides ceased and our forces with- 
drew in good order, the Twenty-fifth Ohio having made the cutting 
which was the intent of the attack. 

Our loss in the fleet brigade was 1 killed, 18 wounded, and 3 missing. 

It is needless to add that officers and men behaved with gallantly 
and spirit. 

After the actions on Deveaux's Neck of the 6th, 7th, and 9th of 
December, no forward move was attempted, and the brigade remained 
in its intrenchments near Talbird's house until permanently withdrawn. 
Two of the howitzers, however, were posted in a battery at the front, 
and two at the 30-pounder Parrott battery, on the extreme left of the 
lines, for its support. 

On the 18th and 19th, two rifled howitzers, which had been brought 
up in place of the two light howitzers, sent to the rear, were placed 
in the swamp battery, and opened fire upon the railroad at a distance 
of 800 yards, doing it some damage; the enemy did not return the fire. 

On the morning of the 26th it was planned for Lieutenant O'Kane, 
with 120 sailors and : larines, to take the two-gun battery at Dawson's 
Point, assaulting it in flank. The morning proved very rainy, and on 
his making the attempt, the intervening marsh was found to be impas- 
sable, and the enterprise was reluctantly abandoned. 

Early on the morning of the 28th the commander of the Geranium 
brought me orders for transporting the brigade to the New Hampshire. 
Consulting with General Potter, left in command in the absence of 
General Hatch, at his request, I left two of the howitzers with their 
crews in command of Lieutenant Hay ward, and embarked the remain- 
der of the brigade at sundown on the Geranium and Daffodil and 
proceeded to Port Royal, where I reported to Commander Reynolds 
on board the New Hampshire, who, agreeably to his instructions, 
directed the landing of the marine battalion at Bay Point and the 
distribution of the sailors to the vessels they belonged to. 

On the 30th I returned to the command of this vessel. 

The total casualties of the brigade during the month's campaign 
amounted to 51. 

Very respectfully,. your obedient servant, 

GEO. HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Brigadier-General Hatch, TT. S. Army, 
acknowledging the commendation bestowed upon the naval brigade. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, February 7, 1865. 

GENERAL: Your communication of the 3d has just reached me. 
As the fleet brigade had been directed to report to you for duty 
with your division, it was proper that its detachment should have 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 109 

been properly announced to you, and I would not have you think 
that the Navy was ignorant or unmindful of what was due to military 
usage. 

It will give me pleasure to make known to the brigade the kind 
terms in which you are pleased to express your appreciation of their 
earnest desire to do their duty near their comrades of the Army. 

From a veteran and well tried commander like yourself, the com- 
mendation you bestow will sink deep in their remembrance. 

You may be assured, general, that no feeling exists amongst us of 
the Navy beyond an honest desire to bear our burden in the duty 
which our common country requires of her sons, and we always gladly 
recognize the service of our Army as contributing to the support of 
law and Constitution. 

With my best wishes for your success, I am, very truly, yours, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Brigadier-General J. P. HATCH, 

Comdg. Coast Div., Dept. of the South, Hdqrs. Pocotaligo. 



General order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, IT. S. Navy, quoting letter of commendation 
from Brigadier-General Hatch, U. S. Army. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., February 7, 1865. 

It affords me pleasure to say to the officers and men of the late fleet 
brigade that General Hatch, with whose division they bore a part in 
the recent expedition up Broad River, has been pleased to write me 
concerning them as follows: 

I only regretted that by leaving during my absence I was deprived of the oppor- 
tunity of informing them of the high estimation in which they were held, not only 
by myself, but the entire command. 

You will confer a favor on me by announcing to the brigade that its gallantry in 
action and good conduct during the irksome life in camp won from all the land 
forces with which it served the highest praises. The officers, for their gentlemanly 
bearing and strict attention to duty, received from all the credit justly their due. 

The harmony that prevailed throughout the command proved that if any jealousy 
had previously existed between the different branches of the service all that was 
wanting to efface it was a better knowledge of each other. 

To Commander Preble, Lieutenant-Commanders Matthews, O'Kane, Crosman, 
and Lieutenant Stoddard, with whom I was myself more intimately brought in 
contact, I give the warmest thanks for the support rendered me. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN P. HATCH, 
Brigadier-General, Commanding. 

I am well assured that no idle compliment is here meant. The manly, 
Straightforward character of General Hatch assures you and me that 
every word said is fully intended. It will always be a subject of 
unmixed satisfaction to you all that you had the opportunity of draw- 
ing such commendation from the gallant veteran who, in his person, 
was your witness. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading 8quadro r ii. 



110 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

General order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, giving condensed statement of 
operations of the naval brigade, with, roll appended. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, May 9, 1865. 

After much unavoidable delay the muster roll of the fleet brigade 
has been completed, and 1 am thus enabled to make due mention of 
the expedition to which it belonged. 

This was undertaken in order to prepare for the arrival of General 
Sherman, who was known to be marching for the coast. 

The naval part was composed of the Harvest Moori (flag), Pawnee, 
Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, Pettit, and Daffodil, on board 
which was embarked the fleet brigade, under the command of Com- 
mander Preble. 

The vessels first reached the landing at Boyd's Neck November 29, 
and the fleet brigade was put ashore, with its infantry and howitzers 
deployed in skirmishing order. It soon advanced with the troops 
under General Hatch and shared in the hard fighting near Graham ville. 

With its howitzers the brigade afterwards held the extreme left of 
an intrenched position until December 6, when the army moved to the 
Tulitinny, the fleet brigade in company. 

After a successful feint by the Pawnee and the gunboats command- 
ing the rebel position on the Coosawhatchie, a landing was promptly 
made in the Tulifinny. Severe fighting followed, in which the officers 
and men of the fleet brigade did their full share and lost heavily. 

The commanding general has since handsomely acknowledged this 
good service, which I have made known in a squadron order. 

The roll of the brigade is now appended, and I regret the limits of 
a squadron order do not permit me to give a detailed statement of the 
part they bore. The reports of the officers have been forwarded, 
however, to the Navy Department, and it only remains for me to 
thank Commander Preble, the commanders, and their executives of 
battalions, Lieutenant-Commanders Matthews and Crosman, Lieuten- 
ants O'Kane, Whitehead, Hayward, Kennison, and Lieutenant of 
Marines Stoddard, the officers, sailors, and marines of the brigade, 
for the creditable manner in which they fulfilled the task assigned 
them. 

Also Commanders Balch, Creighton, Luce, Fillebrown, and Dana, 
commanding the gunboats, for their services on the occasion. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Officers of the fleet brigade of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, attached to the 
Coast Dhrision of the United Statesforc.es under command of Major- General J. G. Foster, 
U. S. Army, November 27 to December 30, 1864. 

Commander George Henry Preble, U. S. Navy, commanding brigade. 

Staff officers. Lieutenant-Commander A. F. Crosman, Wissahickon, 
acting ad]utant; Acting Assistant Surgeon William J. Bowdle, U. S. 
Navy hospital; Assistant Surgeon E. M. Corson, U. S. monitor Nan- 
tucket; Acting Assistant Surgeon H. L. Gibbs, Norfolk Packet; Flag 
Captain's Clerk C. Barton, Philadelphia, acting aid-de-camp (rejoined 
his ship December 5); Paymaster's Clerk P. H. Fraser, Wissahickon, 
acting clerk to adjutant (returned to his ship December 2). 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. Ill 

Battalion of naval light artillery. 

Officers. Lieutenant-Commander E. O. Matthews, commanding 
naval battery; Lieutenant G. W. Hay ward, naval battery; Acting 
Master George Cables, U. S. ship St. Louis; Acting Ensign M. J. 
Daly, U. S. S. Sonoma; Acting Ensign Charles Boyer, U. S. S. South 
Carolina; Acting Ensign J. A. Edgren, U. S. naval battery; Acting 
Master's Mate \\ illiam F. Sard, U. S. S. South Carolina; Acting Mas- 
ter's Mate A. F. Taff'e, U. S. S. Catalpa; Acting Master's Mate H. A. 
Rogers, U. S. ship New Hampshire. 

Battalion of sailor infantry (armed with Plymouth rifles). 

Lieutenant James O'Kane, of the Sangamon, commanding battalion; 
Lieutenant William Whitehead, of the Pawnee, acting first lieutenant. 

Company A. Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. W. Kennison, South 
Carolina, acting captain; Acting Ensign Seth W. Cowing, Memphis, 
acting first lieutenant. 

Company B. Acting Master Joshua N. Rowe, St. Louis, acting 
captain; Acting Master A. Leach, Camelia, acting first lieutenant. 

Company C. Acting Master C. H. Baldwin, Saratoga, acting cap- 
tain; Acting Master's Mate B. Russell, Saratoga, acting first lieutenant. 

Company D. Acting Ensign Henry A. Green, Nipsic, acting 
captain. 

U. S. marine battalion. 

First Lieutenant George G. Stoddard, U. S. Marine Corps, com- 
manding battalion; Acting Ensign W. Carter, New Hampshire; Admi- 
ral's Clerk J. R. Stanley, flagship, acting adjutant. 

Addition to the brigade while in the field, December 7. 

Acting Ensign Samuel Merchant. Reported for duty and was 
assigned to the infantry. Assigned to the naval artillery. 

Recapitulation of the force of the brigade. 

Commander of brigade 1 

Staff officers 7 

Officers of naval artillery 10 

Officers of marine battalion 3 

Officers of naval infantry 9 

Total officers. . 30 



Number of men in naval artillery (8 guns) 140 

Number of men in naval infantry 155 

Rank and file, marine battalion 157 

Hospital stewards and nurses 11 

Total number of men . . 463 



Grand total, officers and men 493 



112 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Chasing ashore of the British steamer Beatrice, off Charleston, S. C., 

November 87, 1864. 

Eeport of Captain Green, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 
Off Morris Island, South Carolina, November 28, 1864- 

SIR: I take great pleasure in informing you that a blockade runner, 
an iron side-wheel steamer of about 200 tons (English), named the 
Beatrice, from Nassau, was run aground and destroyed last night 
between 11 and 12 o'clock. 

She was sighted, signalized, and fired upon bj r the outside vessels, 
who struck her twice, and finally was fired upon, boarded, and cap- 
tured by Acting Master Gifford with the scout boats, and afterwards 
assisted by one [two] of the picket launches. 

Immediately after being boarded she grounded on Drunken Dick 
Shoal, near the old neck. 

The captain, first officer, pilot, and purser and about eight other 
persons escaped to the shore in a boat. The remainder of her crew, 
amounting to thirty persons, who are sent by the Daffodil, and a list 
of their names herewith, were taken off, the vessel set on fire and 
abandoned. 

She is a total wreck. She had an assorted cargo and is a new vessel, 
this being her second voyage. 

General Hatch requested yesterday a steamer to take him to Port 
Royal. 

I detailed the Mary Sanford to proceed to Stono for the purpose, 
but observed that she had returned to the outside blockade last night 
about sunset. 

I have received no report from Acting Master Kempton of the 
cause of his return. 

I enclose herewith letters and papers found among the effects of the 
crew of the blockade runner. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 

Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

P. S. The Sangamon has finished scaling the tubes of one boiler 
(excepting about 100) and has commenced scaling the other boiler. 

J. F. GREEN, 

Captain, etc. 



Additional report of Captain Oreen, U. S. Navy. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 

Off Morris Island, South Carolina, December 1, 1864. 
SIR: I enclose herewith reports relating to the proceedings of the 
in and outside blockade on the night of the 27th ultimo, which resulted 
in the capture and destruction of the steamer Beatrice, a blockade 
runner, inward bound. 

I desire to correct a statement made in my report to you of the 
circumstance of the 28th ultimo. Instead of one, two picket launches 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 113 

boarded the steamer after the scout boats. Both launches previously 
fired upon her repeatedly with their howitzers. One of them, the 
Pawnee's launch, in charge of Acting Master's Mate Kemp, promptly 
pulled toward her for the purpose of boarding, but was delayed some 
time by grounding. 

Acting Master Gifford, in charge of the scout boats, and Coxswain 
Oliver O'Brien, in charge of one of them, merit, in my opinion, spe- 
cial notice for their prompt and energetic conduct. 

Will you please inform me what disposition shall be made of the 
articles recovered from the steamer, viz, 1 chronometer, 1 octant, 1 
barometer, 1 artificial horizon, 1 box of blue lights, 1 salinometer, 1 
binnacle, and 2 boats. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 

Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGBEN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy. 

No. 583.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor. S. C., December 1, 186 '4* 

SIR: 1 have to inform the Department that the English steamer 
Beatrice was destroyed near midnight of the 27th ultimo in attempting 
to run the blockade. 

The account derived from the second mate exhibits so well the con- 
duct of the blockading force that I have caused it to be taken down, 
and transmit it for the information of the Navy Department. 

The Beatrice is an iron steamer, built in Glasgow, and this is her 
second trip, having already run the blockade at Wilmington once. 

She is a side-wheel vessel, of about 200 tons, draft 6 feet 2 inches 
and 6 feet 8 inches, forward and aft, can make 26 revolutions and 14 
knots for a short time, and can run steadily about 12 knots. 

She made the land at night to the southward of Charleston, and saw 
lights (probably about Stono), and soon after saw the light-ship at 
Charleston Bar, bearing nearly north; steered for it, then kept away 
a little to pass around it outside, slowed down and steered directly for 
the land (probably Long Island), kept on until in 8 feet of water (the 
vessel drawing 6 feet 8 inches). 

The steamer was now headed around, and steered along the shore for 
Sullivan's Island Channel. 

About this time the Beatrice was discovered by one of our steamers 
and fired at repeatedly, but was not struck; could not make out what 
kind of a steamer it was, merely saw a vessel. 

The Beatrice was now running at her utmost speed, and got away 
from the chasing steamer, but soon fell in with another one of our 
steamers, which chased and fired at her; one shot went through her 
below decks, and abaft the wheelhouse. The speed of the Beatrice, 
however, carried her away from this vessel too, and she passed into 
Sullivan's Island Channel. When well in she touched a shoal on the 
starboard hand, backed off immediately and went ahead again, but soon 

N w E VOL 16 8 



114 . SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

found herself .suddenly .surrounded by a large number of our barges, 
which opened a heavy tire of musketry and boat howitzers. 

In the confusion caused by this incident it appears that the Bif ,-><, 
got on the shoal again. 

The boats promptly ran alongside and boarded her, taking possession 
of her. 

The captain, pilot, and four or five officers jumped into a light boat 
and made their escape. 

The remainder of the crew, thirty in number, were taken and are 
now in my hands. 

One of the mates, who gave this statement, 1 have released on that 
account, as it conveys an intelligent outside view of the transaction, 
and the manner of proceeding. 

The Department will perceive from it that if these fellows get in it 
is from no want of good will and effort, and 1 think it is a rare occur- 
rence to find a boat division playing so important a part in an open sea 
blockade of a seaport. 

The duty is severe beyond what is imagined. In the launches the 
men may be said to lire in the boats, and all of them are, in these long 
nights, exposed to every hardship of sea, wind, and weather; in the 
stormiest nights they are cruising around close in to the rebel batteries. 

I think them deserving of all commendation for their conduct in this 
matter, not narrated by our own lads, but by an officer of the vessel 
captured, a cool, hardy-looking man, and I recommend that a month's 
pay be given to each man of the boats' crews engaged, for we destroy, 
and do not capture. 

It is also reported to me that a blockade runner was discovered by 
the Acacia near the light-ship soon after her arrival off Charleston 
from Port Royal, on the night of the 28th ultimo; she was fired at, 
stood off to the eastward, and was not seen afterwards. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rea/r- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Captain Green, U.. S. Navy, to Commander Patterson, U. S. 
Navy, regarding offshore cruising in search of blockade runners. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 

Off Morris Inland, S(suth Carolina, November 9, 186^. 
SIR: The steamer Beatrice, which was captured and run ashore night 
before last near Drunken Dick Shoal, was off this port all of the pre- 
ceding day about 30 miles distant. 

Please keep one at least of the fastest outside vessels in the offing 
cruising or at anchor, just within signal distance of the Ad.ger, for the 
purpose of discovering blockade runners, scrutinizing passing vessels, 
and obtaining news, and to return to her station at night. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 

Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 
Commander T. H. PATTERSON, 

Comdg. U. S. S. James Adger, Seni.or Officer Offshore Blockade. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 115 

L< n, i' f rn in the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgrev, U. S. 
Navy, transmitting proclamation of the President opening Southern 
ports. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, Novemljer 30, 1864- 

SIR: I transmit herewith for your information and guidance an 
official copy of the proclamation* of the President, issued on the 19th 
instant, opening the ports of Norfolk, Fernandina, and Pensacola to 
commercial intercourse from and after the 1st of December next, on 
the conditions therein set forth. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear-Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, off Charleston. 



Report of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, senior officer off Charleston, 

S. C., regarding the entrance of two blockade runners into Charleston, 

November 30, 1864. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 
Off Morris Island, South Carolina, December, 1864. 

SIR: On the night of the 30th ultimo two steamers succeeded in 
passing the blockade and entered the harbor, one at about 9 and the 
other at 11. They were discovered and tired at by the outside block- 
ade and met with a warm reception from the inside picket launches, 
but were not arrested in their progress inward. 

I am satisfied that the smoothbore howitzer shells do not penetrate 
these steamers and shall substitute rifled howitzers for them as soon 
as it is in my power to do so. 

I would suggest also placing percussion torpedoes in Maffitt's Chan- 
nel, and, if } T OU can furnish them, I will have them placed. 

Moultrie opened fire savagely in the direction of our boats after 
each steamer had passed, and the steamers were encouraged by people 
on the beach to go ahead, that they would soon pass our fire. 

The Amaranthm received a spent X-inch snot in her starboard 
counter, which rendered it necessary to take her into the inlet for 
repairs. The repairs have been made and she is on service again. 

I enclose herewith reports from commanding officers of vessels and 
boats which participated in the efforts made to capture the blockade 
runners. 

Last night (the 1st instant) there were two alarms of a violation of 
the blockade outside, one at about 7:30 and the other at 10:30. 

The reports of Commander Patterson and Acting Masters Montell 
and Strong relating thereto are also enclosed herewith. No vessel 
was known to have passed in or out by the inside blockade, and I do 
not think any passed in, although one may have passed out early in 
the evening before the picket boats reached their stations, they being 
delayed by a fresh head wind. 

The advance monitor, Lehigh, and scout boats were well up and 
saw no vessel going in or out. 

*See Series I, volume 11, p. 109. 



116 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Unfortunately the Lehigh received a shot in her turret port, which 
struck the XV-inch gun. I have ordered a survey of the gun and 
shall forward the report as soon as received. I do not think the gun 
is seriously injured. Lieutenant-Commander Sommes' reports of the 
circumstances are forwarded herewith. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Settlor Officer off Charleston. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



JZeport of Commander Patterson, U. S. Nam), regarding attempted 
violations of the blockade of Charleston, December 1, 1864.. 

U. S. S. JAMES ADOER, 
Off Charleston Bar, December 2, 1864. 

SIR: At 7:45 last evening the Azalea, off the north channel buoy, 
discovered a blockade runner close by and inshore of her, running 
out of Maffitt's Channel. 
Acting Master Strong says, in his report: 

She apparently saw us as soon as I saw her, as she sheered off inshore at once, 
running about north, quite fast. I immediately slipped cable and gave chase, mak- 
ing the alarm signal, and commenced firing, but being momentarily blinded by the 
glare of the signal lights and flashes of guns I lost sight of her. After running north 
until I shoaled up on the bank, and seeing nothing more of the vessel, I returned to 
my station. * * * 

The evening was very dark and hazy and vessels could be seen but 
a short distance. 

The Azalea kept underway near her station, and about 10 p. m. 
saw the alarm signal for blockade runner going in, and heard guns 
from an E. N. E. direction, apparently from the Potoumka. She 
stood in north a short distance and in a few moments discovered white 
water from paddle wheels inside of her and well inshore; fired and 
chased in that direction to the N. W., but soon lost sight of the 
luminous water, which, no doubt, was the spray from the wheels and 
bow of a steamer running rapidly through the water. 

The Azalea then returned to her station and recovered her anchor. 

At 10.15 p. m. the Potomska, about 2^ miles N. W. f N. of the wreck 
of the Housatonic, discovered a steamer approaching her from S. S. E. 
and heading about N. W. 

Not receiving any answer to the challenge, got underway and made 
the usual signal, when the chase altered her course to the 8.W.; tired 
at her three stands of grape from 32-pounder and one shell from rifle 
pivot. Attempted to chase, but found it useless, the stranger running 
out of sight before the Potomska had moved more than about three 
times her length. The Potomska then resumed her station. 

The blockade runner seen by the Potomxka is the same that was seen 
by the Azalea running in, of which the Potomska gave the first warn- 
ing. The signals made by the Azalea and Pot<nn*k<i w'iv immediately 
repeated by this vessel. 

The Acacia returned to her station, If miles N. f W. of the wreck 
of the Housatonic, shortly before 10 p. m. The Potomska and Azalea 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 117 

occupied their regular stations, otherwise the vessels were stationed 
as per tracing sent with yesterday's report. 

Neither of these blockade runners were seen by any of the outside 
blockaders except the two mentioned in this report. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. H. PATTERSON, 
Commander and Senior Office Present off Charleston Bar. 

Captain J. F. GREEN, 

Senior Officer off Charleston, S. C. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Johnson, U. S. Navy. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, December 3, 1861^. 

SIR: I send you the Wissahickon, which you will take command of 
and continue the present duty at Tybee. 
The Cimarron is to return here for repairs. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander A. W. JOHNSON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Cimarron, Senior Officer, 

Savannah River. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master 
Heath, U. S. Navy, to assume command of U. S. schooner Para. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, December 3, 1864. 

SIR: You are hereby detached from the command of the U. S. 
schooner Hope, and you will, on receipt of this, assume the command 
of the U. S. schooner Para. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master D. P. HEATH, 

Commanding U. S. Schooner Hope, Port Royal. 



Report of Commander Patterson, U. S. Navy, regarding an attempted 

breach of blockade. 

U. S. S. JAMES ADGER, 
Off Charleston Bar, December 5, 1864,. 

SIR: At 1:15 a. m. of this date, a blockade runner was discovered 
by the Watnsutta attempting to run in, but was turned off by her and 
not seen again. 

I herewith enclose the report* of Acting Master Lee, commanding 
the Wamsutta. 

* Not found. 



118 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The blockade runner was not seen by any other vessel of the outside 
blockade. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

T. H. PATTERSON, 
Commander and Senior Officer Present off Charleston Bar. 

Captain J. F. GREEN, 

/Senior Officer off Charleston, /S. C. 



Report of Acting Master Pennell, U. S. Navy, regarding the search for 
escaped Union prisoners. 

U. S. BARK ETHAN ALLEN, 
St. Simorfs Sound, Georgia, December 5, 1864. 
SIR: I have the honor to submit to you the following report: 
On the 30th instant a contraband came on board from Brunswick, 
[Ga.'J, with the intelligence of the escape of about 300 Union prisoners 
from the cars while in transit from Savannah to station No. 7, three of 
whom had been recaptured that morning while at a house getting 
breakfast. Our tender (the schooner Mary) being at St. Andrew's 
Sound delivering stores to the U. S. S. Dai Ching, I immediately sent 
the intelligence I had received to Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin, 
commanding that vessel. He immediately dispatched the schooner, 
his launch, and 16 men from his ship, in charge of Acting Ensign W. 
Walton, to assist in rescuing any which might have gotten to the coast. 
Arriving here at 10 p. m. , everything being in readiness, 1 left the 
ship on the first of next flood tide with 50 men and 3 officers from this 
vessel, the schooner, launch, with howitzer, first and second cutters, 
with the officers and men in the launch of the Dai Ching, and another 
small boat, arriving at Belle Point soon after daylight. On landing 
we discovered the pickets making a hasty retreat into the woods. We 
advanced cautiously, leaving Acting Ensign McCart in charge of the 
boats and howitzers, skirmishing with a detachment of cavalry for 3 
miles, when we came to a house, where some women informed us that 
four Union soldiers were recaptured that morning while partaking of 
some refreshments at that house. The woods in the vicinity were 
infested with rebel cavalry, apparently in search of the escaped pris- 
oners, and our party had some sharp skirmishing without being checked 
in our advance. Finding the enemy collecting in considerable num- 
bers in the woods, we retired to the cover of the boats, and threw some 
shell which dispersed them. Having become satisfied that we could 
render no assistance to any of the escaped prisoners at that point, we 
returned to the boats and proceeded up the South Altamaha River. It 
being perfectly calm, we had to tow the schooner with the boats, and 
our guides, not knowing the depth of water in the creeks, we were 
aground several times, and therefore somewhat detained. We arrived 
at Hopeton Landing, about 30 miles up the river, on the morning of 
the 3d, before daylight, not seeing any of the escaped prisoners on the 
way. We landed, marched up the dyke through the deserted rice 
fields to Hopeton plantation and villa, owned by one Mr. Corbin, said 
to be now in Europe. Here we found a Mr. Poncell, a cripple, and 
his two sons, one of them a rebel soldier on furlough, whom 1 arrested; 
the other being but 10 years old, I left him with his father. Not 
being able to gain any information from Poncell, 1 sought and learned 



SOUTH ATLANTIC HL(K KADING SQUADRON. 119 

from a few old negroes that had been left on the plantation that there 
was a large number of cavalry sent down from station No. 7, to assist 
the coast guard in recapturing the escaped prisoners, and were 
encamped at Waynesville. None of the escaped prisoners had been 
seen at that place, or in that vicinity. We returned to the ship, 
arriving at 4 p. m. on the 4th. 

The prisoner Poncell I shall forward to you by the first conveyance. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, 3 7 our obedient servant, 

1. A. PENNELL, 
Acting Mastei\ Commanding. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, to Commander Patterson^ IT. S. 
IVavy, restricting communication by flag of truce. 

U. S. SLOOP JOHN ADAMS, 
Off Morris Island, S. C., December 6, 186 4.. 

SIR: In compliance with instructions received from Rear-Admiral 
Dahlgren, I have directed that there shall be no communication with 
the enemy under flag of truce, excepting off Breach Inlet. 

You will be pleased to detail one of the vessels of the outside fleet 
to meet the enemy's flag of truce when sent out, observing the condi 
tion specified in the Department's General Order No. 13, dated April 
8, 1863. 

I sent you a message a few days since that an agent of the calcium- 
light party would report to you to place a light on one of the outside 
vessels for the purpose of assisting in the discovery of blockade run- 
ners. 

The matter is postponed for the present until the agent can make an 
agreement with the admiral as to terms, etc., for furnishing the light. 
In the meantime I wish you would think over the matter. It appears 
to me the light can only be useful in discovering vessels inward bound. 
Should it be used for vessels coming out of Charleston it would dis- 
close to the enemy the position of our vessels. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer off Charleston. 

Commander T. H. PATTERSON, 

Commanding U. S. S. James Adger, 

Senior Officer Offshore Blockade. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding general 

matters. 

No. 588.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Broad River, South Carolina, December 7, 1864- 

SIR: The Department's communication of the 22d November reached 
me on the 3d by the Don>-(jl. 

My dispatches, which have by this time reached the Department, 
will show that time has not been lost in doing what the small force 



120 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

here permits. As soon as General Sherman does arrive, I will bring 
every available vessel, including the ironclads, to his aid. 

As regards the weather that may be expected subsequent to this it 
would be difficult to judge. Nothing could have been finer than the 
recent weather to this date, so far as the effects on roads are con- 
cerned, but to-day it rained heavily for a few hours, probably not 
enough to affect the roads or the streams, which are not yet swollen in 
this vicinity, nor elsewhere probably at the coast, within this com- 
mand. 

The new steamer building in the Pedee is awaiting a rise to come 
down, and has not yet done so. At the same time, I have just 
enquired of a deserter, who is a native, and he says that about Atlanta 
the streams begin to rise about November. 

The temperature here is very mild, and not cold enough to be 
healthy, differing entirely from the purer air of the sea along the coast 
outside. 

I do not perceive any natural obstacle in the path of the army. 

General Sherman can connect very easily by any of the principal 
streams and take this squadron as his base. It would be very for- 
tunate if ho should happen about this vicinity, as he would come upon 
Savannah on its weak side, which is the interior. 

Looking seaward, it is very strong, not fortified as carefully as 
Charleston, but still well suited to the narrow water courses by which 
vessels approach. 

I can not conceive, however, that anything here could check a vet- 
eran army like that of General Sherman. If he has any trouble, it 
will be from the force gathering on his footsteps. 

His best base would be from this to the Stono, having no less than 
four fine estuaries to connect with the squadron, viz, Broad River, the 
rivers emptying into St. Helena, North Edisto, and Stono, giving him 
ample means of supply, conveniently distributed, with the flank of 
Charleston on one hanfi and that of Savannah on the other, with the 
choice of falling on either. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
12 ear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron,. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgreti, U. 8. Navy, to the Chief of 
Bureau of Construction and Repair, requesting six additional 
launches for use in the squadron. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Broad River, South Carolina, December 7, 1864' 
SIR: The number of boats now engaged in picket and scouting duty 
is so inconsiderable as to cause much wear and tear, and also requires 
boats of more capacity than is usually found in vessels like those of 
this squadron. 

1 therefore request that six launches, exactly like those sent me 
from New York, may be forwarded to me with all dispatch. 

Our present operations with the army also increase the necessity. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 121 

The two launches sent me proved to be admirably adapted to the 
service required. 

I would also ask for a steam launch, and hope that the Bureau will 
be able to meet these requests at the very earliest moment. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

JOHN LENTHALL, Esq., 

Chief Bureau Construction. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting^ Master 
Crosby, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Harvest Moon, to pro- 
ceed in search of information regarding the movements of farces 
under Major- General Sherman, U. S. Army. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Broad River, South Carolina, December 8, 186 4-. 
SIR: You will proceed with the Harvest Moon to Ossabaw, Sapelo, 
Doboy, and St. Simon's, and enquire at each place if any direct infor- 
mation or knowledge of the army under General Sherman has reached 
either of these places. You will return directly and inform me 
whether this is so or not. 

You will leave the enclosed orders as directed. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master J. K. CROSBY, 

Commanding U. S. S. Harvest Moon. 

[Order of same date for the Larkspur to proceed to St. Simon's, the 
Dandelion to proceed to Ossabaw, and report the first notice of the 
approach of Sherman's army.] 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding tlte approach 
of the army under Major- General Sherman, U. 8. Army. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Broad River, South Carolina, December 8, 1864,. 
Commanders of vessels will use every exertion to obtain information 
of the approach of the army under General Sherman in this direction, 
and will apprise me thereof at the earliest moment, sending a boat to 
the nearest steamer, if in command of a sailing vessel. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



122 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from Major- General Howard, U. 8. Army, to Rear-Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. 'S. Navy, regarding the approach of Shaman's army. 

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE, 
Near Savannah Canal, Georgia* December 9, 1<%4- 
SIR: We have met with perfect success thus far. Troops in line 
spirits and nearb} T . 
Respectfully, 

O. O. HOWARD, 

Major- General, Commanding Rigid Wing of Army. 
COMMANDING OFFICER U. S. NAVAL FORCE, 

In the Vicinity of Savannah, Ga. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, requesting instruc- 
tions regarding the exchange of sick and wounded prisoners of war 
under flag of truce. 

No. 593.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C., December 10, 1864. 

SIR: On the 3d instant Lieutenant-Colonel Mulford called on me to 
say that the exchange of sick and wounded prisoners of war which he 
had been authorized to conduct had been interrupted at Savannah by 
pending military operations, and that he desired to remove the 
exchange to Charleston; that General Foster had consented to the 
measure, and to suspend tiring while the exchange was going on. 

He desired my permission also. 

I had no instructions whatever on this subject, particularly from the 
Department, and could, therefore, go no further than warranted b} r an 
ordinary flag of truce, which I informed him would be done. 

But 1 drew his attention to the fact that, in maintaining the block- 
ade, firing was frequently resorted to upon runners, or even on the 
batteries that protected them, and neither in this nor in other respects 
was the blockade to be affected. 

He assented to the necessity of this, and said he would make it per- 
fectly understood to the rebel commander. 

I therefore addressed a letter to Captain Green, senior officer at 
Charleston, b} 7 which you will perceive that no discretion was given 
beyond facility to the commissioner and the ordinary consequences of 
a flag of truce. 

The blockade will therefore continue as rigid as my means allow, 
and the firing will, as usual, be restrained only so far as needed for the 
exchange. 

I enclosed a communication to Captain Green restating my views in 
full, so that this may not be misunderstood, principally on account of 
the mistake of a commander of an advance vessel in reptying to a flag 
of truce while in presence of a senior officer. 

1 would be very much obliged, however, if the Department would 
be pleased to instruct me as to its wishes on occasions like this, wherein 
our Department is active, and my action is required in matters not 
included in the general conduct of affairs. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 123 

[Enclosures.] 

FLAG -STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

BoycTx Landing, 11 road River, 8. C., December 3, 1864.. 
SIR: Colonel Mulford, who is charged by the United States Govern- 
ment with the exchange of prisoners, desires to conduct the business at 
Charleston. 

You will afford him every facility that he may desire for the purpose. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain JOSEPH F. GREEN, U. S. Navy, 

Senior Officer off Charleston. 



FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, December 10, 1864. 

Yours of the Tth have been received in relation to the flags of truce 
for the exchange of prisoners of war. 

Under date of the 3d, I apprised you that Colonel Mulford, who 
was authorized to conduct the exchange, desired to carry it into effect 
off Charleston, and you were directed to furnish him with every 
facility for that purpose. 

I presumed this was all that was necessary, because the operation 
of a flag of truce is perfectly understood everywhere. 

It simply suspends the active military operations so far as may be 
requisite for the safety of the parties who bear the flags of truce. 

Colonel Mulford informed me that General Foster had ordered a sus- 
pension of firing during the flag of truce, and I stated my willingness 
to cooperate to that extent. 

I suggested to Colonel Mulford that some difficulty might arise in 
this respect to a perfect execution of the blockade, and that I wished 
him to make it known to the rebel officer who met him that nothing 
whatever would be relaxed that had been resorted to for this purpose. 

Vessels passing the blockade must still be subjected to every pro- 
ceeding that will stop, capture, or destroy them, chasing them, and 
firing at them as far as may be practicable to maintain the blockade. 

I presume you read my letter of the 3d literally, and limited your- 
self to facility, and the usual meaning of a flag of truce. 

Neither I nor any officer under my command has a right to lessen 
the operation of the blockade in the least degree. It is the order of 
the United States Government, and no inferior authority can do lees 
than maintain it to the best of his ability. 

This you will cause to be perfectly understood. 

You will also apprise the rebel commanding officer that I have pre- 
viously made known to him my willingness to receive such flags of 
truce at Breach Inlet, and by that it was to be understood that his flag 
of truce was to come from that inlet or its immediate vicinity, and 
that my flags of truce would also approach from the same direction. 

Subsequently General Jones, under date of August 16, in a letter 
very unworthy of any person in a responsible position, signified to 
me that future communications by flags of truce would be received 
by way of Port Royal Ferry. 

This, of course, annulled all arrangements elsewhere. 



124 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

You will now signify this understanding to the rebel commander at 
Charleston, and say that I am willing, as before, to meet his flag of 
truce coming from Breach Inlet, and that if he prefers any other place 
he will please to signify it to me, and it will be considered. 

In regard to the action of the commander of the Montauk, you are 
entirely correct. He should not even have hoisted a flag of truce on 
the Montauk, but have brought to the rebel flag at a proper distance 
and notified you of its presence. 

The senior officer present alone had the power to act, and that action 
would be limited to existing instructions. 

Your instructions of December 5 are approved and will be modified 
by the present instructions. 

In general I wish also that flags of truce shall be limited strictly (so 
far as your actions are concerned) to what humanity may demand for 
the rebel prisoners, and the wants and comforts of the Union prison- 
ers, or to communications addressed to myself, unless, indeed, any 
surrender is contemplated. 

If Captain Stone was not in possession of the Department's order, 
or of the squadron's order, he would have found the Articles of War 
(article 3, section 3) very explicit. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain JOSEPH F. GREEN, 

Senior Officer off Charleston. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commands Fillebrown, U. S. Navy, regarding 
the lack of information concerning Major- General Sherman, U. S. 
Army. 

U. S. S. PASSAIC, 
Wassaw Sound, December 11, 186 %. 

SIR: I very much fear that my scout has been captured by the 
enemy. He left the ship last Sunday (4th) with the intention of get- 
ting near the Thunderbolt battery. He expected to be absent three 
nights, but up to to-day he has not returned. He may possibly have 
gotten through to Ossabaw. 

His name is George Anderson, gunner's mate, an excellent and 
intelligent man, a native of New bury port, and is by trade a trapper. 
I promised him that, in the event of his capture, you would do what 
could be done to effect his exchange. 

Of General Sherman I have heard nothing. Everything has been 
very quiet in the vicinity of Savannah until this morning. We hear 
firing which sounds like volleys of artillery, very distant, and in the 
direction of Beaulieu battery. 

We have had a very severe northeaster, which has washed away 
some of the buoys, and the coal vessel Abby Allen is ashore. She will 
be gotten off at high tide. 

Very respectfully , your obedient servant, 

THOS. SCOTT FILLEBROWN, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



125 



Report of Acting Master Crosby, U. 8. Wavy, regarding the reported 
whereabouts of Major- General Sherman, U. 8. Army, and his com- 
mand. 

U. S. S. HARVEST MOON, 

Doboy, December 11, 1864. 

SIR: I learn from a contraband taken from the U. S. ship /Saratoga, 
escaped yesterday, that General Sherman's men, numbering 2,400, 
consisting of cavalry, were at Taylor's Creek, [Georgia], 15 miles from 
Ogeechee Bridge, and about 12 miles from the Gulf Railroad. 

Captain Williamson, of the U. S. flag, reports that he has heard 
heavy firing in the direction of the Ogeechee all the morning. Cap- 
tain Brodhead, of the Saratoga, reports firing bearing N. W. and N.W. 
by N. from him. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN K. CROSBY, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

December 12, 1864. 



Vessel. 



Station. 



Remarks. 



Nipsic 

Do 

*Mangham 

Adger 

Winona j do 

Wamsutta... ...do 



Murrell's Inlet 
Georgetown . . . 
Cape Remain.. 

Etui's Bay 

Charleston j Outside the bar. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



Flambeau 


do... 


Do. 


Acacia . 


do.. 


Do. 


Potomska . . . 


. ...do 


Do. 


Sanford 


. . .do . . . 


Do. 


Laburnum 


do 


Do. 


Azalea . . 


do 


Do. 


Patapsco . 


do 


Inside the bar. 


Montauk 


do 


Do. 


Nahant 


do... 


Do. 


Lehigh.. 


do... 


Do. 


Home 


do 


Do. 


*Bruen 


do 


Do. 


*Adams 


. do 


Do. 


*Orvetta 


do 


Do. 


Gladiolus 


do 


Do. 


Amaranthus 


do 


Do. 


Catalpa . 


do 


Do. 


Hydrangea 


.do.. 


Do. 


Ins 


....do 


Do. 


*Ward 


do 


Do. 


Catskill 


do 


Repairing. 


McDonough 


Stono 




*Smith . 


do 




*Williams 


do 




*St. Louis 


North Edisto 




*Percy Dsayton 


. ...do 


Tender. 


Stettin . . . 


St. Helena 




*Wild Cat . . . 


do 


Tender. 


*New Hampshire 


Port Royal 




Philadelphia 


do 




*Houghton 


do 




Sangamon 


Tybee Island 




Pawnee 


do 




Canandaigua 


. .do 




Wissahickon 


do 




Oleander 


do 




* Racer. .. 


...do... 





* Sailing vessels. 



126 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Distribution of vessels of the South Atl.'i/i<- l!fo<-kinlhi</ H<i>in<lr<nt, Di'irniln-f /..', 1864 

Continued. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks 


* Norfolk Packet 


Tybee Island 




*Para 


do 




Passaic 


Waseaw Sound 




Jonquil 


do 




* Lightning ... ... 


...do 


Tender. 


Flag 


Ossabaw 




Sonoma . . 


do 




Dandelion 


do 




* Fernandina 


St. Catherine's 




Lodona 


Sapelo 




Saratoga 


Doboy 




* Griffith.. 


AltftTnnhn. 




* Allen 


St. Simon's . . 




Larkspur _ 


do 




South Carolina 


do 




Dai Ching 


St. Andrew's 




* Perry 


Fernandina . . 


Not blockaded. 


Ottawa 


St. John's . . . 




Norwich 


do. 




Hale 


do 






Mosquito [Inlet] 




Nantnckot 


Port Royal 


Repairing. 


Cimarron 


do 


Do. 


Chatham 


... do 


Do. 


Arethusa 


...do... 


Do. 




do 


Do 


Camelia .\ . 


...do... 


Do. 


Clover ... 


do 


Do. 


* Swift 


do ... 


Do. 


*Braziliera 


...do... 


Do. 


* George W. Rodgers . ... ... 


do 


Do. 


Sweet Brier 


.. .do 


Do. 


*Thunder 


...do... 


Repairing, tender. 


Carnation 


.do . . 


Repairing. 


* Valparaiso 


do 


Hnlk. 


Mingoe .... 


Broad River 


Expedition. 


Pontiac 


do 


Do. 


Daffodil 


do 


Do. 


Pettit 


do 


Do. 






Relieve and communicate. 


Harvest Moon 




Special duty. 


* Blunt 




Do. 


* Hope 




Special duty, divers. 


* Sea Foam 




Northern stations with stores, 






thence north. 



* Sailing vessels. 



JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

PORT ROYAL HARBOR, December 12, 1864 10 a. m. 

(Received December 14 10 p. m.) 

I have just received a communication from Sherman's army. It ia 
a few miles from Savannah, and in fine spirits. I shall bring all rny 
available force into connection with the army. 
A dispatch is forwarded with this. 
Very respectfully, 



Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Acting It ear- Admiral. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 127 

Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to the President of 
the United States, announcing the approach to Savannah of Major - 
General Sherman, U. 8. Army. 

Private.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Part Royal Harbor, S. C., December 12, 1864. 

MY DEAR SIR: I have the great satisfaction of conveying to 3^011 
information of the arrival of General Sherman near Savannah, with 
his army in fine spirits. 

The news was brought by Captain W. Duncan, Fifteenth Illinois 
Cavalry, and two scouts, Sergeant Myron J. Emmick and Private 
George W. Quinby. 

This memorable event must be attended by still more memorable 
consequences, and I congratulate you most heartily on its occurrence. 
I am, with high-regard, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

His Excellency A. LINCOLN, 

President of the United States. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, announcing the open- 
ing of communication with Major- General Sherman, U. /S. Army, 
near Savannah. 

No. 596.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harlw, 8. C., December 12, 1864. 

SIR: It is my happiness to apprise the Department that General 
Sherman, with his army, is near Savannah, and I am in communication 
with him. 

In view of his probable arrival I had stationed several steamers at 
different points, and had come down from the Tulifinny yesterday in 
order to be at hand. I had not to wait many hours. 

This morning about 8 o'clock the Dandelion arrived with Captain 
Duncan and two scouts, Sergeant Myron J. Emmick and George W. 
Quinby, bearing the following lines from General Howard: 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF ARMY OP TENNESSEE, 

Near Savannah Canal, Georgia. 

SIR: We have met with perfect success thus far. Troops in fine spirits and near by. 
Respectfully, 

O. O. HOWARD, 
Major-General, Commanding. 
COMMANDER OF U. S. NAVAL FORCES, 

Viwnity of Savannah, Ga. 

Captain Duncan states that our forces were in contact with the reb- 
els a few miles outside of Savannah. He says they are not in want of 
anything. 

Perhaps no event could give greater satisfaction to the country than 
that which I announce, and I beg leave to congratu 'ite the United 
States Government on its occurrence. 

It may, perhaps, be exceeding my province, but I can not refrain 
from expressing the hope that the Department will commend Captain 



128 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Duncan and his companions to the honorable Secretary of War for 
some mark of approbation for the success in establishing- communica- 
tions between General Sherman and the fleet. 
It was an enterprise that required both skill and courage. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GiDEon WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Rear- Admiral DaJdgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Wil- 
liamson^ U. 8. Navy, to inform Major- General Sherman, U. S. Army, 
regarding immediate steps taken for cooperation. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., December 12. 1864. 

SIR: I send the Dandelion to Ossabaw to bring me any information 
from General Sherman which you may have received. 

In the event of receiving any information from General Sherman 
during the absence of the Dandelion, you will send it to Wassaw, to be 
brougnt to me without delay by the Jonquil. 

You will make known to the nearest commanding officer, for the 
information of General Sherman, that the naval force will be collected 
as rapidly as possible to cooperate with him. 

The Sangamon (ironclad) is just now leaving for Tybee and other 
orders have been issued. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander J. C. WILLIAMSON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Flag, Ossabaw. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Balch, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Pawnee. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, December 12, 1864. ' 

SIR: You will proceed with the Pawnee under your command to 
Savannah River, for duty at that place. 

Very respectfulty, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEO. B. BALCH, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pawnee. 

[Sonoma ordered to Ossabaw; Canandaigua, Oleander, Larkspur, 
Iris, C. P. Williams, John Griffith, and Para ordered to Savannah 
River.] 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 129 

Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Major- General 
Sherman. U. S. Army, regarding measures for establishing a con- 
nection betvieen them. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Tybee Roads, S. C., December 13, 1864- 

GENERAL: Captain Duncan reached me on the 12th at 8 a. m. 
I have two ironclads at Wassaw, and a force of gunboats at Ossa- 
baw and Savannah River; will await your movements to establish a 
connection. 

The best may be by the Ogeechee; this is guarded by Fort McAllis- 
ter, which has always resisted attack by water, but would be easily 
reduced from the rear. The rebels have no force of consequence 
south of the McAllister. 

The Vernon is guarded by Battery Beaulieu; the Little Ogeechee 
by Rosedew, both able to keep vessels from passing the narrow chan- 
nels, but of no force landward. 

The island [Deveaux's Neck] formed b}' the Coosawhatchie and 
Tulifinny, head of Broad River, is crossed by the railroad, and is now 
occupied south of the railroad by General Foster, whose batteries will 
reach it. 

I think you will find the rivers going into Ossabaw convenient for 
communication. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. 
[Major-General SHERMAN.] 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mande?' Fillebrown, U. S. Navy, for a vigilant watch in Wassaw 
Sound, in view of condition of affairs in Savannah. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Tybee Roads, S. C., December 13, 1864. 

SIR: The desperate state of rebel affairs in Savannah renders greater 
vigilance than before requisite to guard Wassaw. 

The rebel ironclads may thus be driven to an attack on the Passaic, 
as the least of evils. 

You have, therefore, every reason to keep a vigilant eye to her 
movements, and be prepared in time for them. 

1 did intend to send the Sangamon to act with you, but that would 
entirely prevent any move here, and 1 desire to make some trial to 
aid the Arm}*. 

Keep your tug well advanced up the river, and picket boats ahead 
of her. 

If she moves, it will be at high water, and I think it would be better 
to draw her entirely outside in the open sea, where she will not work 
so well as the monitor, and also will give the Sangamon a chance to 
get out and ensure her capture. 

The Nantucket can not be ready for several days, but will then be 
here. 

Look out for signals from the light-house here; a trial will be made 
to-night. 

N w R VOL 16 9 



130 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The Pawnee will join you to-night, and remain until something more 
can be done. I rely much on the Passaic. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

It ear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander T. SCOTT FILLEBROWN, 

Comma/Hiding Ironclad Passaic, Wassaw [Sound]. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Scott, 
U. S. Navy, to proceed to duty as senior officer off Charleston. 

FLAG- STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Tybee Roads, S. C., December 13, 1864. 

SIR: Conformably to the order of the Navy Department, you will 
proceed to relieve Captain Green in command of the Canandaigua. 

When you have done so, I desire you to take charge of the force off 
Charleston, as senior officer. 

Captain Green will turn over to you all the instructions, general and 
special, relating to the duty, and will communicate also the informa- 
tion that will assist you in carrying it on. 

At this time it is particularly important that a vigilant eye should 
be kept on the rebel ironclads; their affairs are becoming desperate 
and they might be tempted by the least prospect of advantage to risk 
an attack. 

I have no fear whatever of the result if they do so, and only hope 
it may occur while I am present. At this time the important business 
of cooperating with General Sherman requires me to be here, but you 
will not fail to apprise me instantly of any unusual move made by the 
rebels. 

While you are acting as senior officer it will be impossible, with 
the reduced force of the squadron, to retain the Canandaigua inside, 
or even at Charleston. You will therefore temporarily take quarters 
in any of the vessels inside that you may prefer. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain G. H. SCOTT. 

Instructions from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy , to Lieutenant- 
Commander Young, U. 8. Navy, regarding measures for facilitating 
communication with the army. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Tybee Roads, S. C., December 13, 1864. 

SIR: You will proceed with the Sangamon to Wassaw. 

In order to facilitate communication with the army of General 
Sherman and to prepare necessary information for a movement by 
water, as well as to observe the enemy and keep the channel clear, you 
will have the waters thoroughly scouted every night, using the tug 
when not otherwise employed. 

It is important that the entrance and departure of vessels at Ossa- 
baw should be made with ease, by night as well as by day. The outer 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 131 

buoy should therefore be lighted, and a fixed light be kept steadily on 
some point ashore. 

A communication by signal should be established without delay 
between Wassaw and Tybee and Ossabaw. 

A tug is provided at Wassaw for communicating. 
Strict attention is to be paid to any movements of the enemy, par- 
ticularly of his ironclads; and you will always dispatch the tug to me 
instantly on receiving any communication from the army, or in the 
event of an occurrence that may seem to be of sufficient importance. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander JONATHAN YOUNG, 

- Commanding U. S. S. Sangamon. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Young, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Sangamon. 



SAVANNAH RIVER, December 14,, 
Just now I have word that communication is open with General 
Sherman at Ossabaw, and I shall go there by way of the Creek to 
Wassaw. 

Let the pilots be active in placing the buoys to go up the river and 
keep a vigilant eye on the movements of our troops and the enemy. 
Respectfully, yours, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 



FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Wassaw /Sound, Ga., December 14, 1864.. 

SIR: You will proceed with the Sangamon to Wassaw and report to 
the senior officer present for duty. 

You will instruct Captain Johnson to draw the chain across the 
Savannah River, and to still continue the survey as far up as possible; 
also instruct Captain Johnson to drop down below the fort. 

You will send the Pawnee's boats down through the creek in charge 
of a competent officer. 

Pilot Haffards will bring you down. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squaajron. 

Lieutenant-Commander JONATHAN YOUNG, 

Commanding Ironclad Sangamon. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the arrival of 
Major- General Sherman, U. S. Army, and requesting reinforcements 
for aggressive cooperation. 

WASSAW, December 14, 186 4. 
SIR: I write this in the same cabin with General Sherman. He came 

round here with General Foster to meet me. 



132 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

I was engaged in buoying Savannah River to push up an ironclad to 
assist in attacking Savannah by water, and left this morning to visit 
this place, where I have the Passaic and Pawnee; then to Ossabaw, 
where are the Flag and Sonoma, in the hope of communicating with 
General Sherman. Meanwhile he had just walked over the Fort 
McAllister that guards the Ogeechee and descended to the Flag. 
General Foster came in afterwards and brought him here. 

The mail steamer starts soon and General Foster does me the favor 
to take this with him to Hilton Head. 

I have no time to say more than the above, as General Sherman pro- 
poses to consult immediately on measures. 

May I entreat the Department to reinforce me so as to meet the 
wishes of the Department, some more ironclads for Charleston, some 
more double-enders for the rivers. 

I can not express to the Department my happiness in witnessing and 
assisting in the glorious movement, so acceptable to our great country. 

My only wish now is to do my part. 

Most respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockad^ng Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Captain Green, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Commander Dana, 
U. S. Navy, for tlie delivery of a letter by flag of truce to the mili- 
tary authorities in Charleston. 

U. S. SHIP JOHN ADAMS, 

Off Morris Island, South Carolina, December 14, 1864- 
SIR: Please have the accompanying letter delivered by a flag of 
truce off Breach Inlet. 

Give directions for the flag-of -truce boat to approach the inlet no 
nearer than 1 or 2 miles, there to anchor and await the arrival of a 
rebel flag-of -truce boat. 

The vessel from which the boat is sent, as well as the boat, should 
show a flag of truce. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain and /Senior Officer off Charleston. 

Lieutenant-Commander W. H. DANA, 

Comdg. U. S. S. Winona, Senior Officer Offshore Blockade. 

.nclosure.] 

U. S. SHIP JOHN ADAMS, 
Of Charleston, S. C., December 14, 1864. 

SIR: 1 am instructed by Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, commanding 
South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, to inform you that he has pre- 
viously made known his willingness to receive flags of truce off 
Breach Inlet, and by that it was understood that your flags of truce 
were to come from that inlet or its immediate vicinity, and that his 
flags of truce would also approach in the same direction. 

Subsequently, General Jones, under date of August 16, last, signi- 
fied to the admiral that further communications by flags of truce 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 133 

would be received by way of Port Royal Ferry, which annulled all 
arrangements elsewhere. 

Rear-Admiral Dahlgren is willing, as heretofore, to meet your 
flags of truce coming from Breach Inlet, but if you prefer any other 
place, and will communicate your preference to him, it will be duly 
considered. 

Very respectfully,- your obedient servant, 

J. F. GREEN, 
Captain, U. S. Navy, and Senior Officer off Charleston. 

Major-General R. RANSOM, 

Commanding Military District, Charleston, 8. C. 



Report of Acting Ensign Walton, U. 8. Navy, of the 77. $. 8. Dai 

Ching, regarding boat expedition in Big Satilla River, December 

15-17, 1864. 

U. S. S. DAI CHING, 
St. Andrew's Sound, Georgia, December 22, 1864- 

SIR: 1 have the honor to report that, in obedience to your order of 
the 15th ultimo, I left this ship, with three of the ship's boats and two 
boats from the U. S. bark Ethan Allen, in charge of Acting Ensign 
Bunting, and proceeded up the Big Satilla River, arriving at Crow 
Harbor at 3 a. m. next day. 

The men being fatigued, and the tide not answering, we disem- 
barked and cooked rations, after which, the tide having turned, and 
the boat's crews sufficiently rested, we again embarked and stood up 
the river, arriving at the Satilla Mills at 10 a. m. , landed without opposi- 
tion, and marched up and surrounded the mills and Mrs. Penniman's 
house. From Mrs. Penniman I obtained a map of the river, and also 
information to the effect that thq enemy's pickets were not, as usual, 
stationed at that place, but that three pickets were kept posted at Yel- 
low Bluff, 3 miles farther up the river. Forty rifle pits were counted 
on the bluff by the mills. After making a thorough examination of 
the adjoining buildings and grounds, we proceeded toward the boats, 
when one of the Ethan Attends men was accidentally shot through the 
fleshy part of the right shoulder by one of our crew. 

The wound did not appear to be very serious; however, I irnmedi- 
atel} 7 dispatched the first cutter and had the wounded man conveyed 
to the ship for surgical treatment. The remainder of the boats were 
headed downstream, when w T e landed at Cow [Crow] Harbor to wait for 
the flood tide and to cook rations, after which we again embarked and 
stood up White Oak Creek, passed Red Bluff without interruption, 
and landed at a supposed picket station (12 miles from the entrance of 
the creek). Leaving Acting Ensign Bunting in charge of the boats 
and howitzer, we marched -1 miles to the house of Mr. Morrison, but 
found no picket there. After examining the premises we returned to 
the boats, bringing two able-bodied contrabands away with us, and 
stood down the river, arriving at the ship at 1.30 p. m., 17th ultimo. 

Hoping this rough report may be satisfactory, 

I am, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WALTER WALTON, 
Acting Ensign, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant-Commander J. C. CHAPLIN, 

Commanding U. S. 8. Dai Ching, St. Andrew's Sound, Ga. 



134 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Commendatory letter from, Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, V. S. Navy, to 
Lieutenant- Commander Chaplin, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 
Dai Ching, regarding boat expedition December 15-17, 1864. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, January %, 1865. 

SIR: 1 have received the report of an expedition from your vessel 
up the Big Satilla River on the 22d ultimo, and am always gratified at 
such instances of activity. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Sear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander J. C. CHAPLIN, 

Commanding U. S. S. Dai Ching, St. Andrew's Sound, Ga. 



Memorandum of instructions from Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, to Captain Scott, U. S. Navy, regarding operations in Vernon 
River. 

VERNON RIVER, [GEORGIA], December 17, 1864. 

1. The firing from the /Sonoma will be continued at Beaulieu, the 
distance regulated by your judgment. 

2. The Griffith will assist with her mortar, firing very deliberately, 
bursting two shells overhead and lodging the third, to burst at the rate 
of twenty per day, and intervals of fifteen minutes. 

3. Land one, two, or more rifled howitzers on Green Island, nearest 
to Beaulieu, and fire at high elevation. They will range 3,500 to 4,000 
yards. 

4. Have the shoal marked where the Harvest Moon touched, and 
any other marks that may be convenient for pushing a monitor up 
toward Beaulieu. 

5. The river should be carefully scouted well up and into Burnside 
[River]. If possible, picket boats all night. 

Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear-Adm iral. 

Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren , U. S. Navy, to Commander Rey- 
nolds, U. S. Navy, commanding at Port Royal, S. C. , regarding ilie 
forwarding of vessels. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Vernon River, Georgia, December 19, 1864. 
SIR: The Pettit is sent to you for service at Port Royal. 
The general order to send all vessels here as soon as repairs are 
completed is annulled, and you will only send those specially ordered. 
When a vessel with mortar ammunition is ready in every respect 
you may send her to Ossabaw in tow. 

You will open communications addressed to me, marked "Requisi- 
tions," and supply requirements according to your judgment. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding. 
Commander WM. REYNOLDS, 

Commanding Naval Depot, Port Royal. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 135 

Report of Commander Thompson, U. S. Navy, senior officer ^n Stono 
Inlet, regarding Confederate operations in that vicinity. 

U. S. S. COMMODORE McDoNouan, 
Stono Inlet, South Carlina, December 20, 186 J^. 

SIR: Some of the new works which the enemy are erecting on John's 
Island have been and are being discovered, and I send you herewith 
a sketch of their position, so far as it is known. These works appear 
to be very formidable, and have, no doubt, heavy guns, as large work- 
ing gangs with teams of twenty-four horses, have been seen moving 
ordnance over the bridge which connects James with John's Island. 

Both sides of the Stono above the piles are strongly picketed near 
the water. Acting Master Meyers, of this vessel, who passed up the 
river recently under cover of night as far as Grimball's house, heard 
the pickets conversing unintelligibly to him. Owing to the darkness 
nothing could be discovered as to the operations of the enemy, who 
build no fires at their picket posts at night and withdraw their pickets 
from observation by day. It is said that the approaches inland on 
John's Island are guarded by trained bloodhounds. 

On the Kiawah side of John's Island a house not far distant from 
our anchorage in which lights had been seen, indicating its occupancy 
by the enemy's pickets at night, was burned about the first of this 
month by Acting Master Meyers, accompanied by Acting Ensign 
Dexter, of the Sweet Brier. On a second reconnoissance in the same 
direction Mr. Meyers discovered a number of the enemy partially 
concealed in the grass, whose design was evidently his capture. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. THOMPSON, 
Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Block. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Repwt of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, UTS. Navy, transmitting report 
regarding expedition in Altamaha River, Georgia, December W, 1864. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, January 2, 1865. 

SIR: I enclose for the information of the Department the report of 
Acting Master I. A. Pennell, commanding the Ethan Allen. 

The general efficiency of Acting Master Pennell, and his activity, as 
exemplified, induce me to recommend him to the notice of the Navy 
Department for promotion. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. BARK ETHAN ALLEN, 

St. Simon's Sound, Geoi^gia, December 22, 1864. 
SIR: I have the honor to make the following report: 
Having learned from a contraband that there was a picket station at 
Troop's plantation, 20 miles up the Altamaha River, I fitted out an 



136 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

expedition and left the ship at dark on the evening of the 20th instant, 
with launch and howitzer and other boats, with 3 officers and 40 men. 
Arriving at the plantation at 2 a. m., sent my guide for an old negro, 
who, I had been informed, could lead me to the camp. He soon came 
down to the boats, and informed me that they were encamped at a 
house about 2 miles inland, and offered to lead me to them, which duty 
he performed faithfully. We arrived at the house about 3 a. m., and 
surrounded it, captured 7 of the picket men with 7 horses, and their 
arms, consisting of 5 rifled and 1 old flintlock musket; a corporal 
and one man that was on guard escaped. I also captured a Mr. Saw- 
yer, at one time first lieutenant of the company, but said he had 
resigned. Finding an old scow at the head of the canal, I concluded 
to wait for high water to float it out and bring off the horses, which I 
succeeded in doing. While waiting, the whole force of the county, 
with Captain Hunter's company of cavalry, about 60 men, came down 
on us and attempted to drive us off; we had some sharp skirmishing 
with them for four hours. Soon as the tide flowed enough to float the 
launch within range, I threw shell and grape into the houses in which 
they were secreted, causing them to fall back to the woods, out of 
range. At high water 1 succeeded in floating the scow out of the canal 
and embarked with the prisoners and horses, also 7 contrabands; one 
of them, the old negro who piloted me to the camp, and returned on 
board at 1 a. m., on the morning of the 21st instant. The prisoners I 
will forward to you by the first opportunity. As regards the horses, 
I await your orders. I regret to state that one of my men was slightly 
wounded in the foot by the accidental discharge of one of the captured 
muskets while passing it into the boats. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

I. A. PENNELL, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Commendatory letter from Hear- Admiral Dahlgren, IT. 8. Navy, to 
Acting Master Pennell, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. bark Ethan 
Allen, for expedition in Altamaha River \ Deceniber #0, 1864,. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Savannah River, South Carolina, January 2, 1865. 
SIR: I have received your report of an expedition by you on the 20th 
ultimo. 

The proceeding is highly creditable to you and the officers and men 
concerned. 

I have therefore written favorably of you to the Navy Department. 
You will read this on your quarter-deck to all hands. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master I. A. PENNELL, 

Commanding U. 8. Bark Ethan Allen. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Abstract log of the U. S. 8. Winona, Lieutenant- Commander Dana, 
U. S. Navy, commanding. 

December W, 1864- Ossabaw Sound. Commences to 4 a. m. Ship 
at anchor in Vernon River. Second and third cutters away on picket 
duty. At 12: 30 a. m. ship swung to ebb tide. At daylight picket 
boats returned. At 6:30 a. m. flagship went to sea and stood to the 
N. E. From 8 to meridian : Pawneecame in and anchored near the Flag. 
At 11: 10 a. m. batteries opened on the Sonoma; fire was returned. 
At 1:30 p. m. got underway and proceeded up the river. At 3:30 
came to anchor and moored ship head and stern in Vernon River, near 
the Sonoma, about 2f miles from Fort Beaulieu. Captain went on 
board the Sonoma and returned. Commenced firing upon Fort Beau- 
lieu with 30-pounder Parrott rifle. At 5 p. m. ceased firing, having 
fired 3 rounds. From- 6 to 8 p. m. sent picket boat out ahead. 

December 21. At 8:30 a. m. got underway, dropping up with the 
flood tide. Commenced shelling the fort with rifle Xl-inch pivot and 
latterly with howitzers. Expended 11 Xl-inch shell, 19 30-pounder 
Parrott percussion, 6 howitzer shells. At 10 a. m. called away all 
boats, manned and armed them for assaulting. At 10: 05 saw the 
American ensign flying on Fort Beaulieu. Ships cheered; captain left 
in the gig and proceeded up to the fort. Gunboat Geranium went 
inside the obstructions and anchored near the forts. At 10: 30 we 
anchored near the forts; the Geranium went up the river and shelled 
the woods. At 11:30 saw the American ensign flying on Battery 
Rosedew. At 12:15 p. m. the Sonoma got underway and proceeded 
up the river a short distance and anchored near the obstructions near 
the forts. Sonoma made signals to us, boat code; we replied. The 
Geranium proceeded up the creek and communicated with flag of 
tru.ce. From 4 to 8 p. m. admiral's flag was seen on mortar schooner. 
Schooner made signals to us, boat code; we repeated them to the 
Sonoma. Geranium passed with the admiral on board, with orders to 
get ready for sea. At 8 p. m. proceeded down the river. 



Letter from Major- General Howard, U. S. Army, to Rear- Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, announcing the capture of Savannah, Ga. 

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, 

In the Field, Savannah, Ga. , December %1, 1864- 
SIR: Savannah is ours, with upward of sixty heavy guns and a large 
quantity of public property, cars, cotton, etc. In the absence of 
General Sherman, General Howard requests you to clear away the 
torpedoes and other obstructions in the Savannah River channel. 
I am', sir, with respect, 

L. M. DAYTON, 

Aid-de- Camp. 
Admiral DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. 



138 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Captures of Federal boats' crews, December 22 and 31, 186 4.. 

Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren. U. S. Navy, transmitting reports. 

No. 18.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, January 9, 1865. 

SIR: I regret to inform the Department of the two mishaps, in a 
small way, that have occurred recently.' 

One is the absence, and probable capture, of two of the picket 
launches off Charleston. 

On the night of the 30th December they occupied their custom- 
ary post in advance of the picket monitor and tugs. Toward morning 
the wind increased to a gale from the .southward, with considerable 
sea. Before daylight the other boats pulled or were towed in, but 
the launches were missing, and were supposed to be last seen inside of 
Sumter. 

Nothing has been heard of them since, and there is hardly a doubt 
that they have been captured by the rebels. 

The other event alluded to is just reported to me. 

Two boats left the Dai Ching on the 21st December (under order 
No. 97,* copy enclosed); three refugees acted as guides. 

According to their accounts, in approaching a certain point where a 
rebel force was suspected, two of them landed to reconnoiter, advising 
the officer of the boats not to go farther until they had examined. 

They did BO, descried a rebel force, and returned to give intelligence. 

Meanwhile the officer in the boats continued to go ahead, and was 
quickly under fire. 

The refugee who remained in the boat states that the boats were 
surrendered without resistance, and that when only two or three of 
our men had been wounded. 

It is impossible, of course, to arrive at a correct decision without 
hearing from our own men, and this will not be practicable for some 
time. 

If the accounts of the refugees are correct, the conduct of the officer 
has been very censurable. 

I herewith enclose copies of reports. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdy. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Captured December 31, 1864: In Wabastts launch, Acting Master's 
Mate A. F. Rich and 4 men of the Mary Sanford, 5 of the Nipsic, and 
3 of the Flambeau; in Pawnee's launch, Acting Master's Mate Fitz- 
gerald and 5 men of the Pontiac, 5 of the Sonoma, 2 of the John 
Adams, and 1 of the Wamsutta. 

Captured December 22, 1864: Acting Ensign Gus. A. Steins, 2 
boats and crews of 12 men from the U. S. S. Dai Ching. A letter on 
file in the Navy Department contains a statement that this capture was 
made near Red Bluff, S. C., by a party of 25, under Captain Nathan 
Brown, Fourth Georgia Cavalry, after a stout resistance by Steins, in 
which he was severely wounded. Union casualties 9, Confederate 1. 
COMPILERS.] 

*See order dated November 22, 1864. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 139 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. SHIP JOHN ADAMS, 
Of Charleston, S. C., January 2, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to your order, I respectfully submit the following 
report: 

On the morning of the 31st December, 1864, the picket boats were 
recalled at 4:30 a. m., earlier than usual, on account of the strong 
flood tide and wind from S. S. W., which was steadily increasing. 
The tug Gladiolus was directed by the commanding officer of the 
advance picket monitor Nahant to go and assist the boats, which he 
did, and succeeded in getting fast to six of them; two were missing, 
and not to be seen. I requested Acting Ensign Boughton, of the tug, 
to tow the boats to the monitor, and then we returned and stood, as 
far up the channel as was thought advisable by Captain Boughton and 
myself. Saw the boats near Fort Sumter, too far off to render them 
any assistance, and rapidly drifting up the harbor. We then returned 
to the monitor; the Gladiolus took the remaining boats in tow, and 
stood down to the fleet. Great credit is due to Acting Ensign Bough- 
ton, commanding Gladiolus, for the skill and energy he displayed in 
saving the remaining boats, which, but for his assistance, would have 
inevitably been lost. Enclosed is a list of officers, men, arms, and' 
equipments of missing boats. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHARLES C. KICKER, 
Acting Master, U. S. Navy, in Charge of Picket Boats. 

Captain J. F. GREEN. 

Additional report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting report. 

No. 43.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal ffarbor, January %9, 1865. 

SIR: I enclose a report just received from Acting Master's Mate 
A. F. Rich, which verifies' the previous conjecture of the capture of 
the launch commanded by him. It is necessarily restricted in its 
terms, but I infer from the phrase that "A portion of its equipments 
were captured" that he had the judgment to throw overboard the 
howitzers and other articles which it was important should not fall 
into the hands of the rebels. 

How far Acting Master's Mate Rich may have acquitted himself 
properly, I can not say; but he has done good service before in scout- 
ing duty, and there is no reason, therefore, to believe that he has 
fallen short in this instance. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear -Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

CHARLESTON, January 11, 1865. 

SIR: I have the painful duty to inform you that myself, crew, boat, 
and a portion of its equipments were captured upon the evening of 
the 31st of December in the harbor of Charleston, S. C. 



140 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

I made every attempt that lay in my power to work the boat off 
shore; but all of my efforts proved unsuccessful. 

My crew were sent to Florence upon the 4th of January. 
Although a prisoner, 1 am happy to inform you that I have been 
very kindly treated and received every attention from the hands of 
my captors that a prisoner could possibly expect. 

I hope that I soon may have an opportunity of giving you a more 
definite statement of the affair. 

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. F. RICH, 

Acting Master's Mate, U. /i$T Navy. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Reynolds, U. S. Navy, commanding at Port 
Royal, fomvarding mails and sending congratulations on the fall of 
Savannah. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 

Port Royal, December %3, 1864. 

SIR: I have just learned that you are at Pulaski (from General Foster) 
and send the Pettit with your mails received per steamer Cassandra. 

General Foster desired another gunboat up Broad River. There is 
none here to send, and I should think the two double-enders are enough. 
I sent the Arethusa to Charleston last night on receiving the fleet 
captain's letter (or copy of it) to General Foster about TattnalFs inten- 
tion to run out with the Savannah with the news to Captain Scott. 
She has not yet returned. 

I have only the Chatham now. Will you let the Pettit return? I 
have not had any repairs made to her as yet. 

Now for Charleston. Should you meet the general, will you add 
my congratulations on the fall of Savannah. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. REYNOLDS 
Commander, Commanding Naval Depot. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding events 
^mmediately preceding the occupation of Savannah l)y the Union 
forces. 

No. 597.] FLAG-STEAMER PAWNEE, 

Near Savannah, Ga. , December 23, 1864- 

SIR: The departure of a mail steamer enables me to convey to the 
Department the latest information to date. Where the narrative of 
events ended with my last dispatch I am unable to say. The necessity 
of moving rapidly and the want of a suitable flagship compels me to 
shift from one vessel to another, and leave clerks, documents, and 
records behind. Until I knew exactly where General Sherman would 
prefer to establish communications with me and connect his operations 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 141 

I had to be prepared at the different points between which a choice 
laid. The force I could collect was therefore distributed at Savannah 
River, Wassaw, Ossabaw, St. Catherine's, and even as low as Bruns- 
wick. 

On meeting General Sherman I drew in my force on the first three 
places, placing two ironclads at Wassaw, to insure the detention of 
the rebel ironclads, and one in the Savannah River in order to move 
up near the obstructions and assist directly in the movement of the 
army on the city of Savannah, some gunboats being left in the Ossabaw 
for the communications. 

On the 13th General Sherman advanced with his army toward the 
city, enveloped it and all its outworks south of the river, and, in 
seeking to connect with my force, fell in with Fort McAllister, located 
on the south bank of the Ogeechee; promptly a division was moved 
to the assault and carried it. This enabled General Sherman to com- 
municate with me in person, and a direct attack was contemplated on 
Beaulieu, defending the Vernon and Burnside rivers, by which a 
better communication would be established and a nearer approach 
made to the city. General Howard made a personal reconnoissance 
with Fleet Captain Bradford to decide on the direction a column 
should take to the rear, whilst my forces moved on the front. To this 
end I brought round the ironclad from Savannah River, which, with 
the Pawnee, Sonoma, Winona, and three mortar schooners, were all 
that I could draw off from other places for the purpose. 

On the 18th General Sherman came on board the flagship, having 
fully invested Savannah on the land side, while the navy held every 
avenue by water. General Sherman sent a summons to surrender, 
which was declined by General Hardee, on the ground that he held 
his two lines of defense and was in communication with his superior 
authority. General Sherman therefore prepared to attack. His army 
was gradually drawing closer on Savannah River, and in order to cut- 
off the escape of the rebel forces he concluded it would be better to 
send a division to reinforce the troops of General Foster up Broad 
River, and make a serious attack there in the direction of the railroad, 
whilst that on Beaulieu would be limited to the naval commander, 
which I must not omit to mention had been begun and continued with 
deliberation by Lieutenant-Commander Scott in the Sonoma, assisted 
for a day or so by the mortar of the Griffith, Acting Master Ogilvie. 
To insure the exact concurrence of the several forts, the general 
went with me to Hilton Head in my steamer and General Foster was 
made fully acquainted with the design. . Late on Monday I put to 
sea, but to avoid detention from the increasing gale the pilot preferred 
to follow the interior passage, and, when near Ossabaw, my steamer 
grounded. We started in the barge to pull and were nearly in the 
waters of Ossabaw when a tug came along with the following telegram 
for General Sherman: 

FROM STATION, NEAR HEADQUARTERS, December 21, 1864 m. 

General Howard reports one of General Leggett's brigades near Savannah, and no 
enemy. Prisoners say the city is abandoned, and enemy gone to Hardeeville, [S. C.]. 
Woods captured 6 guns, Slocum got 8 guns, and is moving on the city. 

DAYTON, Aid-de-Camp. 
General SHERMAN. 

It was now about 3 p. m. General Sherman hastened to his head- 
quarters, and I to the division of vessels lying in front of Beaulieu. 



142 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The facts of the case were soon apparent. Captain Scott, of the 
Sonoma, was in possession of Forts Beaulieu and Rosedew. I landed 
at the former and after giving some brief directions was on my way 
from it, when I received a note from General Sherman, dated 6:30 
p. m., with two telegrams from General Howard, one saying: "Tatt- 
nall intends to run the blockade tonight." The other: "Rebel boat, 
Savannah, with Tattnall in, is just out of our reach." 

I did not apprehend that this intention to escape could be carried 
into effect. 

The two ironclads which I had at Wassaw blocked the best way out, 
and I did not believe that the rebel ram could be brought over the 
shallows of the Savannah River, save under the most favorable cir- 
cumstances of a high tide and an easterly wind. At this time it was 
blowing a gale from the northwest. 

Still it did not seem proper to allow the public interests to incur the 
least risk that was avoidable in a matter so important, so I ordered the 
Pawnee to tow the Nantucket to Savannah River, and her commander 
being too ill to be on deck, Fleet-Captain Bradford volunteered for the 
duty. 

It was 3 o'clock in the morning of the 21st when I laid down for a 
few hours' rest, and as my steamer was still aground, got into my 
barge at 7 a. m. , pulled to Wassaw, then across that sound into the 
pass to the Savannah River, and had nearly reached the Savannah 
River, when a tug came along, which relieved the faithful seamen of 
their severe labor in a heavy gale, wet to the skin as they were. I 
arrived about noon, hoisted my flag on the Wissahickon, Captain John- 
son, and proceeded up the river with the Winona, Captain Dana, and 
two tugs. 

About 4 p. m. the obstructions across the channel near the head of 
Elba Island compelled me to anchor a short distance below the city. 

This hasty and off-hand narrative will give the Department some 
idea of the events, as seen from my standpoint, that immediately pre- 
ceded the occupation of Savannah by the Union forces. 

The glorious flag of the Union once more waved over the ramparts 
of the forts and the city, and the vessels of the Navy, on the water. 

Savannah has been taken in the only way, probably, that it was 
assailable. In every other the defenses were complete and powerful, 
extending over every approach, and including the rivers that traversed 
the country to the southward, so that an attack in those quarters could 
not have succeeded. 

It is one of the first fruits, of the brilliant campaign commencing at 
Atlanta, and of that fine conception, the march through Georgia, but 
is not the last, and General Sherman has but to follow out his plans in 
order to reap still greater advantages for the country and renown for 
himself. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 143 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Quackenbush, U. S. Navy, to assume command of the U. S. S. 
Patapsco. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Savannah River, Georgia, December 23, 1864' 

SIR: You will proceed to Charleston and report to Captain G. H. 
Scott, senior officer at that place, to relieve Lieutenant-Commander 
Madigan in the command of the ironclad Patapsco. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren y U. S. Navy, transmitting report 
regarding the capture of the steamer Julia, off Alligator Creek, 
South Carolina, December 23, 186 '4- 

No. 604.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off Charleston, December 30, 186 1^. 

SIR: I enclose herewith reports stating the capture of the English 
blockade runner Julia, a vessel of some notoriety in the business. 

She was towed into Port Royal on the 28th instant for repairs to 
her engines, which were disabled and not in motion. 
She will be sent north when in condition for sea. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. ACACIA, 
Of Charleston, S. C., December 25, 1864. 

SIR: I have the honor to report the capture at the mouth of Alliga- 
tor Creek, South Carolina, of the blockade runner Julia, of Glasgow. 

She has a valuable cargo of cotton, and was captured under the fol- 
lowing circumstances: 

On the morning of the 23d instant, while on my way from Charles- 
ton Bar to Georgetown, with provisions for the U. S. S. Canandaigua, 
after passing Cape Romain Shoal, I altered my course to N. by E. $ E. , 
when two white smokestacks close inshore were reported from the 
masthead. A steamer was apparently blowing off steam. I immedi- 
ately altered my course, and on closing in toward the bar, discovered 
her to be a side-wheel steamer of perhaps 400 tons. No colors could 
be seen. As we approached nearer, her decks appeared crowded with 
men, her boats were lowered, and apparently preparations were made 
to abandon her. 1 ran in as near as the depth of the water would 
admit (which was about 2 miles distant), and fired a shell over her. At 
the same time I hoisted the American ensign. As this met with no 
response, I lowered the only two serviceable boats I had, and armed 
them for boarding. I fired another shell and a solid shot over my 



144 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

boats, when the steamer displayed white flags at her masthead and in 
the fore-rigging, and 1 ceased firing. My boats were now rapidly 
nearing her, the gig in charge of Acting Ensign H. T. Blake, with 
Acting Second Assistant Engineer Thomas D. Crosby, Acting Assist- 
ant Paymaster Joseph Foster, Acting Master's Mate William J. McFad- 
den, and 8 men; the third cutter in charge of Acting Master's Mate 
Fuller, with 6 men. The last boat was seen pulling from the steamer 
when my boats were not a quarter of a mile distant. The boats 
boarded simultaneously and took possession of the steamer without 
opposition, not a soul remaining on board. The American ensign was 
hoisted at the fore at 12:20 p. m. As soon as I saw this I went on 
board of her myself in my dingey, taking with me Acting Third 
Assistant Engineer J. K. Wright, who afterwards rendered efficient 
service in his department. I found the steamer aground, but believ- 
ing that she could be got off, I ordered the attempt made by kedging. 

Acting Second Assistant Engineer Thomas D. Crosby now reported 
to me that her engines had been purposely disabled by her engineers 
(see his accompanying report). I requested him to repair them if 
possible. He at once set about this task with an energy which insured 
success, and he was ably assisted by Acting Third Assistant Engineer 
J. K. Wright. 

The attempt to kedge her off proved partially successful under the 
active superintendence of Acting Ensign H. T. Blake, and she was 
moved about one-eighth of a mile. At 4 p. m. temporary repairs 
were completed, enabling the engines to be worked, but the falling of 
the tide prevented her from coming off. Finding it useless to try to 
get her afloat at that stage of the tide, I sent my gig to the ship in 
charge of Acting Ensign H. T. Blake, with instructions to sena me 
more men, more muskets, and ammunition, and arranged with him 
concerted signals by which I could call assistance if attacked. 

The boat returned in charge of Acting Ensign A. S. Rounds, jr., 
who sounded out the channel on his way in. 

When he arrived on board, 1 rigged boarding nettings and armed 
the men to resist any attack that might be made from the shore. I 
also sent in two boats to reconnoiter, and if possible to capture the 
Julia's boats, but in this they were unsuccessful, as they nad been 
taken up Alligator Creek. At 1 a. m. on the 24th, it being half tide, 
the Julia floated, and I got underway and stood out to the ship and 
anchored. 1 now returned to my vessel, leaving Acting Ensign A. S. 
Rounds, jr., in charge of the Julia, with a prize crew. 

I gave orders, when the Julia was first seen, that a bright lookout 
should be kept for other vessels from which we might obtain assist- 
ance, but no vessel came in sight or within signal distance. 

At daylight on the 24th I towed the prize farther offshore, that I 
might leave her with safet}^, and proceeded to Georgetown in obe- 
dience to the orders of the senior officer off Charleston. 1 left on her 
Acting Ensign Andre S. Rounds, jr., commanding, Acting Second 
Assistant Engineer Thomas D. Crosby, in charge of her engines, Act- 
ing Second Assistant Engineer J. K. Wright, Acting Master's Mate 
G. W. Fuller, and 9 men, with instructions to come to anchor until 
my return from Georgetown, and to continue the repairs upon the 
engines. On my return to the Julia at 4 p. m. , and finding the neces- 
sary repairs not completed, and my officers and men worn out by their 
constant and unusual exertions, 1 came to anchor for the night for the 
purpose of giving them rest, and completing the repairs. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 145 

At daylight on the morning of the 25th I got underway, the Acacia 
taking the Julia in tow, as there was still much difficulty in starting 
her engines. At 8 a. m. cast off the hawser from the Acacia and pro- 
ceeded toward Charleston Bar, the Acacia keeping within hailing dis- 
tance to render any assistance that might be required. Arrived off 
Charleston Bar at 11:30 a. m. and reported the capture to the senior 
officer. 

From papers found on board I judge that the Julia, left Charleston 
on the 20th instant. Her topgallant forecastle and forward bulwarks 
were stove in, indicating that she had met with heavy weather and had 
put into the mouth of Alligator Creek for a harbor; also for fuel, for 
her decks were strewn with wood, which had apparently just come on 
board. The ship's log of a previous voyage was found on board ; also 
the chief officer's log from August 30 to November 3, 1864. The lat- 
ter shows that she sailed from Glasgow September 3 and arrived at 
Nassau October 22, 1864, where she took on board Captain Swan Cap- 
tain Embleton, who had brought her out, returning to England. She 
took in a cargo on the 29th of October and sailed about November 1 
to run the blockade. 

I enclose copy of a list of her crew and passengers when she ran out 
of Charleston. These books and papers will be forwarded with the 
prize to the prize commissioners. 

The Julia is an iron vessel, of 117 tons, English measurement. 

She was built at Renfrew, Scotland, in 1863. Her draft, when loaded, 
is 8 feet aft and 7 feet forward. 

Her engines are new and powerful. 

The greatest speed indicated in her log is 12 knots. I found on her 
two English ensigns, a burgee, with the name Julia, and a Confederate 
States flag. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM BARRYMORE, 
Acting Master, Commanding U. S. S. Acacia. 

Hon. GIDEOX WELLES, 

Secretary of the Nary. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Wil- 
liamson, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Flag, to perform guard 
duty in Vernon River. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Savannah River, South Carolina, December % %, 1864' 
SIR: You will move the flag up to Green Island and act as guard 
ship, and will keep a lookout for Rosedew and Beauheu batteries. 
You will forward all inventories and reports to me as soon as received. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding. 

Commander J. C. WILLIAMSON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Flag. 

N w R VOL 16 10 



146 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from Assistant Boutelle, U. S. Coast Survey, to Major- Gen- 
eral Slierman, U. S. Army, recommending that Thunderbolt Battery 
he used as a depot for large vessels 

THUNDERBOLT BATTERY, 
Saturday, December 24, 1864, 18:30 p. m. 

GENERAL: Vessels drawing 15 feet and under can come up to this 
place now, entering at Wassaw Sound. The river has been dragged 
for torpedoes and none have yet been discovered. The monitors Sanya- 
mon, Captain Young, and the Passaic, Captain Fillebrown, are now 
close beside the work at Turner's Rocks, and will be at anchor at this 
place in a few hours. I have my vessel at work sounding and putting 
up marks for navigation, and will anchor here to-night. I respectfully 
recommend making this place your present depot for large vessels. A 
short wharf, 100 feet long, will suffice for vessels of deep draft, and 
materials for its construction are near at hand. 

CHAS. O. BOUTELLE, 
Assistant, Coast Survey, Commanding U. S. /S. Bihh. 

Major-General W. T. SHERMAN, U. S. Army, 

Comdy. Army of the Military Division of the Mississippi. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren^ U. S. Navy, transmitting copy of 
an order to he issued in conformity to the President's proclamation 
raising the blockade of Fernandina, Fla. 

No. 598.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, December %5, 1864. 

SIR: I enclose herewith a copy of an order which I propose to issue 
for the better execution of the President's order, and would draw the 
attention of the Department to the clause marked in red, which seems 
to be necessary to avoid fraud in evading the blockade, and is con- 
sistent with the rules commonly admitted in such cases. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosure.] 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, South Carolina, December 11, 186 Jj. 
The Navy Department has transmitted to me for my information 
and guidance an official copy of the proclamation of the President of 
the United States, which declares mat the blockade of the port of 
Fernandina 

Shall so far cease and determine from and after the 1st day of December next, 
that commercial intercourse with said port, except as to persons, tilings, and informa- 
tion contraband of war, may from that time be carried on, subject to the laws of 
the United States, to the limitations, and in pursuance of the regulations, which may 
be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, and to such military and naval regu- 
lations as are now in force or may hereafter be found necessary. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 147 

The commanders of vessels in this squadron will take notice thereof, 
and will not fail to respect and comply with this order of the President 
of the United States. 

Therefore, whenever a trading vessel is encountered, bound to the 
port of Fernandina, she is to be suffered to continue her voyage, pro- 
vided the conditions of the proclamation are complied with. 

In the case of vessels sailing from a port in the United States there 
can be no difficulty in ascertaining that the intent of the voyage is legal, 
but vessels from abroad, professing to be bound to Fernandina, even 
with regular papers, will always be justly liable to suspicion if found 
in the vicinity of other blockaded ports of this command, and in that 
case they will be subject to seizure and adjudication by the proper 
courts. 

This provision is in pursuance of that part of the proclamation which 
makes the commercial intercourse of Fernandina subject, among other 
conditions, to such naval regulations as may hereafter be found neces- 
sary. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding measures 
for checking the continued breach of blockade. 

No. 600.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah Rivei\ December 5, 1864- 

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of the Department's 
communication of 3d December, enclosing copy of a document stating 
vessels that had succeeded in passing the blockade. 

This has only been effected by the construction of a special class of 
vessels, very fast, and having a draft not greater than the rise and 
fall of the tides, so that at high water, which is the chosen time, they 
can pass over the shoals, nearly bare at low water, which no vessel in 
the squadron of any force can do. 

I have two plans in view for checking this, but the prospect of a 
shorter and perfect result, by a combined operation of the army and 
navy, will be likely to stop this nefarious work altogether. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from. Majar- General Sherman, U. S. Army, to Rear- Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding measures for getting seagoing ves- 
sels to the Savannah wharves. 

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION or THE MISSISSIPPI, 

In the Field, Savannah, December 26, 186 J^. 

ADMIRAL: Your note of this date is received. Captain Boutelleand 
Captain Fillebrown had already reported to me night before last to the 
same effect that the Wilmington River was the best channel, and navi- 
gable up to Thunderbolt for vessels of 15-feet draft; but I had not 



148 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

heard further from them. 1 will refer your letter to General Easton, 
who is instructed to arrange so as to get seagoing vessels up to the 
city wharves, which, if possible, I am very anxious to do, even at con- 
siderable expense of labor and money, as I desire to avoid lightering 
and transshipment, if possible. I am informed by the Quartermaster- 
General from Washington that six light-draft steamers are now en 
route to us from the Chesapeake. We had a very pleasant Christmas; 
I trust you had the same. 

Very truly, yours, W. T. SHERMAN, 

Major- General. 
Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Squadron, Near Savannah, Ga. 



Order of Fleet Captain Bradford, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Fillebrown, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Passaic, in 
view of situation off Charleston. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River ; South Carolina* December 27* 1864. 
SIR: The admiral desires you to take position low down in Wassaw 
Sound, so as to be ready for going to sea without a moment's delay 
after consulting the safety of your vessel. Our forces off Charleston 
are threatened by the rebel rams and torpedo boats. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Jos. M. BRADFORD, 

Fleet Captain. 
Lieutenant- Commander T. SCOTT FILLEBROWN, 

Commanding U. S. Ironclad Passaic 



Order of the Secretary of tfie Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, regarding additional vessels foi 1 hi* command. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, December 27, 1864' 

SIR: The side- wheel prize steamer Wando, Acting Master Fredk. T. 
King, and the new side-wheel steamer Lenapee, Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Samuel Magaw, have been ordered to report to you for duty. 
Very respectfully, etc. , 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. S. Atlantic Blkdg. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Scott, U. S. Navy, commanding 
U. S. S. Sonoma, regarding the occupation of Beaulieu Battery, 
after the evacuation by tJie enemy. 

U. S. S. SONOMA, 

Off F<wt Bemdteu, Vernon River, Ga., December 27, 1864. 
SIR: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your orders, I 
left the Coosawhatchie River, South Carolina, on the 12th inatant and 
proceeded to Ossabaw Sound, Georgia, to cooperate with the army of 
Major-General Sherman, which had arrived near that point. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

On the morning of the 14th, I pushed up the Vernon River to feel 
the Rosedew and Beaulieu batteries (Fort McAllister having been 
taken by the forces of Major-General Sherman the evening before), 
and at 1:30 p. m. came within range and opened tire on Fort Beaulieu 
and found the works to be very strong and their practice good; con- 
tinued the fire from the rifles and Xl-inch gun until taking possession 
of the works on the morning of the 21st. 

The mortar schooner John Griffith and gunboat Winona arrived 
on the 17th and 20th, respectively, and opened fire on the enemy, 
doing good work. At 1:30 p. m. on the 20th, the enemy opened with 
a mortar battery from Rosedew Island, which was replied to by the 
Griffith and this ship. On the morning of the 21st, at 6 a. m., a 
deserter arrived on board from Rosedew and reported that the works 
at that point and Beaulieu were being evacuated by the enemy. I imme- 
diately got underway,, accompanied by the Winona-, and stood up the 
river, and at 9:35 sent Acting Master Merrill, executive of this ship, 
with six boats from the Sonoma, Harvest Moon, Winona, and Griffith, 
to take possession and hoist the flag of the United States on Fort 
Beaulieu. 

The tug Geranium having arrived, I directed Lieutenant-Commander 
Dana, of the Winona, with Chief Pilot Haffards, to proceed in her to 
the Rosedew battery, by the Vernon River, take possession, and hoist 
the United States flag on the works, after which to continue up the 
river to White Bluff, where I heard the Water Witch was, and, if 
possible, to recapture and bring her down. The report of Lieutenant- 
Commander Dana is herewith enclosed,* also an inventory of the prop- 
erty captured, including 15 heavy guns and large quantities of ordnance 
stores. 

It affords me great pleasure to state that I was most ably supported 
by Captain Dana, of the Winona, and Acting Volunteer Lieutenant 
Haffords, who rendered me the greatest assistance; also Acting Flag 
Lieutenant Dichman, of your staff, and Acting Master Avery, of the 
Philadelphia. 

1 nave the honor to be, very respectfully, 

R. W. SCOTT, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Instructions of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- 
Commander Scott, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Sonoma, regard- 
ing duty in the Savannah River. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Off Morris Island, South Carolina, December 29, 1864,. 

SIR: You will proceed to the Savannah River and take position below 
and near the obstructions of Elba Island, convenient for communica- 
tion with the army. 

It may be necessary to command the shore of the river above and 
opposite to the city, so as to dislodge rebel marauders by your fire. 

Let your boats pass down St. Augustine Creek and keep you advised 
of what is going on there. 

Keep in communication with any United States vessel in Wassaw. 

*Xut round. 



150 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Be regular in keeping me informed of proceedings in your vicinity. 
YOVL can always send communications by boat to Port Royal, through 
Skull Creek, and also by army transports. 

Obtain and report full information of the channel obstructions, 
openings for passing, etc. 

There should always be a coal vessel in Savannah River, and you will 
notify Commander Reynolds when you are in want. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander R. W. SCOTT, 

Commanding U. S. /S. Sonoma. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Phinney, U. S. Navy, to assume command of U. S. ship 
John Adams. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off Charleston, December 29, 1864. 

SIR: You will proceed to this anchorage and report to Captain G. 
H. Scott on board the U. S. sloop John Adams for the command of 
that vessel. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant ALVIN PHINNEY. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Crosman, U. S. Navy, to assume command of the U. S. S. 
Commodore McDonough. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off CJiarleston, December 29, 1864. 

SIR: On the receipt of these orders you will proceed to Stono and 
relieve Commander Thompson in the command of the U. S. S. Com- 
modore McDonough. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander A. F. CROSMAN. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Thomp- 
son, U. S. Navy, to assume command of the U. S. S. Cimarron. 

FLAG -STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off Charleston, December 29, 1864. 

SIR: You are hereby detached from the command of the U. S. S. 
McDonough, and will assume the command of the U. S. S. Cimarron 
at Port Royal. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander EGBERT THOMPSON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Commodore McDonough. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 151 

Report of Acting Master Winchester, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. 
bark Gemsbok, regarding the sailing of that vessel for Port Royal, 

s. a 

U. S. BARK GEMSBOK, 
New York Bay, December %9, 1864. 

SIR: In accordance with orders received December 24, 1864, from 
Rear-Admiral Paulding, to proceed to Port Royal and report to 
Admiral Dahlgren, or senior officer present, with this ship, as soon as 
she was, in all respects, ready for sea, I am now passing out to sea 
with wind W. N. W. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. F. WINCHESTER, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Washington, D. O. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgrcn, U. S. Navy, regarding the necessity 
for repairs to the monitors off Charleston. 

No. 602.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off Charleston, 8. C., December %9< 1864. 

SIR: I left Savannah River on the 27th on receiving a dispatch from 
the senior officer at this place, stating the probability of a move by the 
rebels (derived from an intercepted telegram), and suggesting my 
presence. 

They are said to have four ironclads, with five torpedo boats, but I 
see no 'reasonable chance for them if the} 7 venture out, especially as 
there are seven monitors now here. 

I regret to say, however, that more than one of these monitors is 
represented to need more repairs than the present emergency permits 
to be done. 

It is not two years since the Passaic was put in service; the Montauk 
and others have endured nearly as much, and it may well be that this 
continued wear should occasion a necessity for much repair. 

In the course of the next month or two months the operations here 
will be of great interest, and the ironclads will be expected to play 
their part. An immediate relief may enable the needed repair in 
time, otherwise there is no small risk that one or two may become 
unserviceable. To prevent such an occurrence I hope it may be con- 
venient to send some relief at an early day. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEOX WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



152 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Brigadier- 
General Schimmelfennig, U. 8. Army, regarding operations about 

Savannah and Charleston. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Off Morris Island, December 30, 1864.. 

GENERAL: Your communication* of the 29th was duly handed to 
me by your aid, Lieutenant Schauffler, who no doubt conveyed to you 
my verbal reply. 

I was unable at the time to answer in writing, being engaged in 
receiving reports in person from the commanding officers of vessels. 

You no doubt learned, as they transpired, the interesting events of 
the last two weeks. 

General Sherman nearly enveloped Savannah, and completed his 
communication with me by storming McAllister on the 13th. Soon 
after he demanded the surrender of the city, which was refused by the 
rebel general on the ground that he held his two nearest lines and was 
in communication with his superior authority. 

General Sherman prepared to assault, and I was returning with him 
from Hilton Head where the operation was to begin, when he learned 
by telegram that the rebels had evacuated Savannah. 

The General informed me that Commodore Tattnall was preparing 
to rush out with his ironclads, but I was prepared for that, and he 
destroyed them. 

1 parted with General Sherman two days ago in Savannah. The 
city is in better order and property more secure than it has been under 
rebel rule. 

It is to be presumed that our army will not remain in Savannah 
longer than is necessary to make its tenure certain. 

I came here on the suggestion of Captain Scott that the rebels were 
on the move. Though I felt no apprehension as to the ability of the 
force here to maintain control of tne anchorage, and even capture the 
rebel ironclads if they ventured out, yet, as 1 might be drawn in some 
other direction at the time, it seemed due to the perfect security of 
General Sherman's base that no means should be omitted. 1 have, 
therefore, reinforced the division, so that there are now seven monitors 
here, which I think places the question beyond doubt. 

What may be your capacity for defense ashore 1 do not know, but 
think it should be equal to the concentration which the rebels are 
likely to effect under existing circumstances and to the efforts which 
the desperation of their cause may lead to. 

The vessels will, of course, heartily cooperate with you in case of 
attack. 

In case the ironclads venture out, my plan will be to draw them as 
low down this anchorage as they will come, so as to make sure of the 
capture of the whole by making a retreat impossible. 

In such an event, will you please to cause some of your heavy guns 
to be turned seaward, and scour the water with grape so as to clear 
out the torpedo boats which might be troublesome when engaged with 
the rams. 

The rebels will, no doubt, endeavor to increase the obstructions in 
the harbor, and some grape or mortar shells at night from your guns 
near [Fort] .Johnson and the Middle Ground would stop them. The 
naval battery will assist in this if you think proper. 

*Not found. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 153 

After seeing the works about Savannah and the obstructions in the 
rivers (Savannah, Tybee. Vernon, and the Ogeechee), I am satisfied it 
was impregnable to any force in any direction save where it was 
assailed by General Sherman. 

With my best wishes for your health, which I hear is improving, 
1 am, general, with great regard, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Brigadier-General A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 

Commanding Northern District, Headquarters, Morris Island. 



Memorandum of instructions from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, TJ. S. 
Navy, to Captain Scott, U. S. Navy, senior officer off Charleston, in 
view of expected attack by the enemy. 

OFF CHARLESTON, December 31, 186 1^. 

1. There are now seven monitors at this anchorage, Patapsco, Mon- 
tauk, Nahant, Lehigh, Catskill, Nantucket, and Passaic. 

2. It is absolutely essential that this force should act together in 
case of any attempt by the rebels. In such an event their object will 
be to surprise and damage any smaller number of monitors separated 
from the main body before they can receive assistance. 

3. The seven monitors must therefore be kept well in hand, so as to 
unite at very brief notice. 

4. At night, if the weather is suitable, four monitors are to be pushed 
in advance, the other three in reserve at a convenient distance, and two 
of them may be allowed to draw fire under one boiler at a time to clean 
and repair, but even these vessels should be made available if an attack 
is made. 

5. There should be a vigilant lookout kept from the naval battery 
on Morris Island upon all movements in the harbor, and proper sig- 
nals arranged for giving the commanding officer afloat speedy 
intelligence. 

6. The boats are to observe and disturb all attempts to place torpe- 
does or other obstructions, and the tugs in motion at night to keep off 
torpedo boats. 

7. Should the rebels see fit to come out, they will rely much on 
some occasional blow by a torpedo boat; the monitors should, there- 
fore, scour the water with grape at intervals, and the batteries on the 
island should do the same. 

8. Communicate with the general commanding on Morris Island and 
request that his guns may be specially prepared for a sortie by the 
rebel ironclads and torpedo boats, so as to operate on them more or 
less before we come in contact. 

9. It will be an object to draw them as much as possible under the 
fire of our land batteries, and to avoid exposing the monitors to their 
batteries. 

10. The lower down the channel they can be drawn into action the 
less probable it will be that any escape. If high up and beaten, they 
will find protection under their own land batteries on Sullivan's Island, 
South Carolina. 

11. When the weather is bad, no monitor should remain in advance 
of the main body, for assistance becomes difficult if needed, and sig- 
nals by day are not very distinguishable, by night impossible. 



154 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



12. Some of the monitors are in need of immediate repair; one or 
two of these can be put under repair. Fleet engineer, now here, will 
examine and determine which these shall be. He will also bring up 
a suitable force to do the work with dispatch, and should be here to 
look after it at least three da} T s in each week. Daily report of all 
work done will be sent me just as they are in Port Royal. 

13. Besides the above, I refer to the printed orders already issued 
by me for the monitors while on duty here. 

14. Captain Scott will cause a copy of the above to be taken by each 
commander of monitor. 

15. The distinguishing marks on the pipes of the monitors must not 
be changed; this has been in some instances and I am unable to recog- 
nize the vessels. 

Very respectfully, 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 



Distribution of vessels of tJie South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

January 1, 1865. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Murrell's Inlet 




Canandaigua . 


Georgetown 




Do 


Cape Romain 




*Mangham 


Bull's Bav 




Chambers . . 


.do...' 




Adger 


Charleston 


Outside the bar. 


Wamsutta 


...do 


Do. 


Nipsic. 


do 


Do. 


Sanford .. 


do 


Do. 


South Carolina 


do 


Do. 


Flambeau 


do 


Do. 


M em phis 


...do... 


Do. 




. . do 


Do. 


Laburnum 


do 


Do. 


Azalea 


...do 


Do. 


Sweet Brier . 


do 


Do. 


Patapsco 


do 


Inside the bar. 


Montauk 


do 


Do. 


Nahant 


do 


Do. 


Passaic 


...do 


Do. 


Nantucket 


..do 


Do. 


Lehigh 


...do... 


Do. 


Home 


do 


Do. 


*Bruen . . . 


...do... 


Do. 


*Adams 


...do 


Do. 


*Orvetta 


. ...do 


Do. 


*Sea Foam 


...do 


Do. 


Gladiolus 


do 


Do. 


Catalpa 


...do... 


Do. 


Hydrangea 


...do 


Do. 


Jonquil 


.do 


Do. 


Geranium 


...do 


Do. 


Oleander. . . .... 


do 


Do. 


Catskill 


do 


Repairing. 


*Ward 


Light-House Inlet 






Stono 




McDonough 


do 




*Smith 


do _ 




* Williams 


do 




*St. Louis ... 


North Edisto 




Percv Dray ton 


.... do 


Tender. 


Stettin . 


St Helena 




*Norfolk Packet 


do 




*New Hampshire 


Port Roval 




Philadelphia 


do 




Pawnee 


do 






do 




Carnation . ... 


do 




Larkspur 


... .do 




Pettit 


.do 




*H ought on .. 


...do... 





* Sailing vessels. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



155 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, January 1, 1865-^ Con- 
tinued. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 




Port Royal 




Sonoma . 


Savannah River 




*Racer . . . . 


do 




*Thunder 


do 


Tender. 


'Griffith 


Wassaw Sound 




*Lightning 


do 


Tender. 


Flag 


Ossabaw 




*Para 


do 






St Catherine's 




Lodona .. 


Sapelo 




Saratoga .. 


Doboy 




Altamaha 






*Allen 


St. Simon's 




Dai Ching 


St. Andrew's 




*Perry 


Fernandina . 




Norwich * 


St. John's . ... 




Hale 


do 






Mosquito [Inlet] 


No vessel. 


Sangamon . . . 


Port Roval 


Repairing. 


Cimarron ... 


do." 


Do. 


Ottawa 


do 


Do. 


Winona 


do 


Do. 


Acacia 


.. do... 


Do. 


Amaranthus 


do 


Do. 


Iris 


do 


Do. 


Camelia . ... 


do 


Do. 


Clover 


do 


Do. 


*George W Rodgers . 


do 


Do. 


*Braziliera 


.do 


Do. 


*Wild Cat 


do 


Tender. 


*Swift 


do 


Do. 


*Valparaiso 


do 


Hulk. 


Mingoe . 




Expedition, Broad River. 


Pontiac 




Do. 


Daffodil 




Do. 


Dandelion 




Do. 


Harvest Moon 




Special duty. 


*Blunt 




Do. 


*Hope 




Do. 









* Sailing vessels. 



JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, IT. 8. Navy, to Acting Master 
Ifowers, U. S. Navy, to assume comma?id of U. S. schooner James 
S. Chambers. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. 61 , January 1, 1865. 

SIR: You are hereby detached from the U. S. S. Cimarron and will 
assume the command of the U. S. schooner James S. Chambers. 

You will carry into execution any orders which may have been 
addressed to Acting- Master Watson and are not fulfilled. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, . 

J.' A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master WM. L. BOWERS, 

U. /S. S. Gimarron. 



15C) SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of the Secretary of the Navy to the commandant, navy yard, 
Philadelphia, for the fitting of the IT. S. S. Donegal. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, January 3, 1865. 

SIR: Have the Donegal fitted with a light battery, without altering 
her present arrangement of quarters, and direct her to proceed to Port 
Royal and report to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren for duty. She is to 
relieve the South Carolina, which vessel Admiral Dahlgren has been 
instructed to send to Philadelphia, where she will be fitted as a trans- 
port and supply vessel. 

Very respectfully, etc., GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commodore J. B. HULL, 

Commandant Navy Yard, Philadelphia. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Chaplin, U. S. Navy, for a reconnoissance in St. Helena 
Sound. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, January 3, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed without delay to St. Helena, [S. C.], with the 
vessel under your command, and when there will lose no time in exam- 
ining by scouting the rebel position and ascertain how you can com- 
municate with and assist the operations of the army. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander J. CHAPLIN, 

Commanding U. S. S. Dai Ching. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlqren, U. S. Navy, regarding condition 

J? JV J I. j. V ^ > / 

oj affairs in ana about Savannah. 

No. 6.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, January 4, 1865. 

SIR: I have already apprised the Department that the army of Gen- 
eral Sherman occupied the city of Savannah on the 21st December. 

The rebel army, hardly respectable in numbers or condition, 
escaped by crossing the river and taking the Union Causeway toward 
the [Savannah and Charleston] Railroad. 

I have walked about the city several times, and can affirm that its 
tranquillity is undisturbed. The Union soldiers, who are stationed 
within its limits, are as orderly as if they were in New York or 
Boston. 

The resolutions herewith enclosed, passed by a meeting of citizens 
on the 28th, at which the mayor presided, are not exceeded in interest 
by any similar proceedings, and may be accepted as a true sample of 
the sentiment which is beginning to exhibit itself, and it is to be 
hoped will continue to do so whenever any portion of the people of 
Georgia are permitted to express their real sentiments. 

One effect of the march of General Sherman through Georgia has 
been to satisfy the people that their credulity has been imposed on 
by the lying assertions of the rebel Government, affirming the inabil- 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 157 

ity of the United States Government to withstand the armies of rebel- 
dom. They have seen the old flag 1 of the United States carried by its 
victorious legions through their State almost 'unopposed and placed 
in their principal city without a blow. 

Since the occupation of the city, General Sherman has been occupied 
in making arrangements for its security after he leaves it for the 
march that he meditates. 

My attention has been directed to such measures of cooperation as 
the number and quality of my force permits. 

On the 2d I arrived here from Charleston, whither, as I stated in 
my dispatch of 29th December, I had gone in consequence of infor- 
mation from the senior officer there, that the rebels contemplated 
issuing from the harbor, and his request for my presence. 

Having placed a force there of seven monitors, sufficient to meet 
such an emergenc}^, and not perceiving any sign of the expected raid, 
I returned to Savannah to keep in communication with General Sher- 
man and be ready to render any assistance that might be desired. 

General Sherman has fully informed me of his plans, and so far as 
my means permit, they shall not lack assistance by water. 

On the 3d the transfer of the right wing to Beaufort was begun, 
and the only suitable vessel I had at hand (the Harvest Moon) was sent 
to Thunderbolt to receive the first embarkation. This took place 
about 3 p. m. and was witnessed by General Sherman, General Bar- 
nard (U. S. Engineers) and myself. The Pontiac is ordered around 
to assist, and the army transports also followed the first move by the 
Harvest Moon. 

I could not help remarking on the unbroken silence that prevailed 
in the large array of troops; not a voice was to be heard as they 
gathered in masses on the bluff to look at the vessels. The notes of a 
solitary bugle alone came from their midst. 

General Barnard made a brief visit to one of the rebel works (Caus- 
ton's Bluff) that dominated this water course, the best approach of the 
kind to Savannah. 

I am collecting data that will fully exhibit to the Department the 
powerful character of the defenses of the city and its approaches. 

General Sherman will not retain the extended limits they embrace, 
but will contract the line very much. 

General Foster still holds the position near the Tulifinny; with his 
concurrence I have detached the fleet brigade, and the men belonging 
to it have returned to their vessels. 

The excellent service performed by this detachment has fully real- 
ized my wishes and exemplified the efficiency of the organization, 
infantry and light artillery handled as skirmishers. The howitzers 
were always landed as quickly as the men, and were brought into 
action before the light pieces of the land service could be got ashore. 

I regret very much that the reduced complements of the vessels 
prevent me from maintaining the force in constant organization. 
With 300 more marines and 500 seamen I could frequently operate to 
great advantage at the present time, when the attention of the rebels 
is so engrossed by General Sherman. 

It is said that they have a force at Hardeeville, the pickets of which 
were retained on the Union Causeway until a few days since, when 
some of our troops crossed the river and pushed them back. Concur- 
rently with this I caused the Sonoma to anchor so as to sweep the 
ground in the direction of the causeway. 



158 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The transfer of the right wing (30,000 men) to Beaufort will so 
imperil the rebel force at Hardeeville that it will be cut off or dis- 
persed, if not moved in -season. 

Mean-while I will send the Dai Ching to St. Helena to meet any 
want that may arise in that quarter, while the Mingoe and Pontiac will 
be ready to act from Broad River. 

The general route of the army will be northward, but the exact 
direction must be decided more or less by circumstances which it may 
not be possible to foresee. 

My cooperation will be confined to assistance in attacking Charleston 
or in establishing communication at Georgetown in case the army 
pushes on without attacking Charleston, and time alone will show 
which of these will eventuate. 

The weather of the winter, first, and the condition of the ground in 
the spring, would permit little advantage to be derived from the 
presence of the army at Richmond until the middle of May. So that 
General Sherman has no reason to move in haste, but can choose such 
objects as he prefers, and take as much time as their attainment may 
demand. 

The Department will learn the objects in view of General Sherman 
more precisely from a letter addressed by him to General Halleck, 
which he read to me a few days since. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 
From the Savannah Republican, December 29, 1864. 

Pursuant to a call of Mayor Arnold, a large meeting of influential 
citizens was held at the Masonic Hall at 12 m. yesterday for the pur- 
pose of taking into consideration "matters relating to the present and 
future welfare of the city." 

On motion, Dr. Arnold was unanimously called to the chair, and 
addressed the meeting as follows: 

Fellow-citizens of Savannah: At the request of the aldermen of the city of Savan- 
nah and a large number of the citizens, I have convened you together this day for you 
to give expression to your views and sentiments in the trying state of affairs in which 
you are now placed. It is for us no longer a crisis. The crisis is past, and it is for 
you to decide upon the particular line of action each and all of you may determine 
to pursue. 

Our action is to be determined solely by our situation, as we have no authority or 
power to speak for others outside of our limits. But we are the judges of our own 
situation, can speak for ourselves, and" ought so to do, by all the considerations of 
prudence, and, I will say, common sense and humanity, to mitigate, if we can, the 
effects of the heavy blow which has fallen upon us. 

Our city contains 20,000 inhabitants, without food, without fuel, without any 
remunerative industrial pursuits, without any place of refuge, cut off from all con- 
nection with the country. The heart sickens at the picture thus presented. 

It is our duty to mitigate, as we can not avert, the terrible suffering by all the 
means which reason and common sense may dictate, regardless of all abstract views. 
I have weighed the matter anxiously and have arrived at a positive conclusion that 
there is but one course to pursue. But it is not my province at calling the meeting 
to say more at present. When the city was taken, through me, as chief magistrate, 
you asked protection. You all know that it was granted to you, and we all feel 
deeply indebted to Brigadier-General Geary for his conduct as commandant of this 
city. Having convened you and expressed, in part, my views, it remains for you to 
appoint a chairman of this meeting. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 159 

A. S. Hartridge and Robert Erwin were appointed secretaries. 

The following gentlemen were appointed a committee to report 
resolutions expressive of the sense of the meeting, viz, Colonel Rock- 
well, Alderman Lippman, D. Willis, Alderman Villalonga, Martin 
Duggan, J. G. Millis, W. D. Weed, Alderman Lachlison, and Alder- 
man O'Byrne, and, after a brief absence, reported the following 
resolutions, which were unanimously adopted: 

Whereas, by the fortunes of war and the surrender of the city by the civil author- 
ities, Savannah passes once more under the authority of the United States; and, 
whereas, we believe that the interests of the city will be best subserved and pro- 
moted by a full and free expression of our views in relation to our present condition, 
we, therefore, the people of Savannah, in full meeting assembled, do hereby resolve: 

1st. That we accept the position and in the language of the President of the United 
States, seek to have "peace by laying down our arms and submitting to the national 
authority under the Constitution," "leaving all questions which remain to be adjusted 
by the peaceful means of legislation, conference, and votes." 

2d. That, laying aside all differences, and burying bygones in the grave of the past, 
we will use our best endeavors once more to bring back the prosperity and commerce 
we once enjoyed. 

3d. That we do not put ourselves in the position of a conquered city, asking terms 
of conqueror, but we claim the immunities and privileges contained in the proclama- 
tion and message of the President of the United States, and in all the legislation of 
Congress in reference to a people situated as \ve are, and while we owe on our part a 
strict obedience to the laws of the United States, we ask the protection over our per- 
sons, lives, and property, recognized by these laws. 

4th. That we respectfully request his Excellency the governor to call a convention 
of the people of Georgia, by any constitutional means in his power, to give them an 
opportunity of voting upon the question whether they wish the war between the two 
sections of the country to continue. 

5th. That Major-General Sherman, having placed as military commander of this 
post Brigadier-General Geary, who has, by his urbanity as a gentleman and his uni- 
form kindness to our citizens, done all in his power to protect them and their prop- 
erty from insult and injury, it is the unanimous desire of all present that he be 
allowed to remain in his present position, and that, for the reason above stated, the 
thanks of the citizens are hereby tendered to him and the officers under his command. 

6th. That an official copy of these resolutions be sent to the President of the United 
States, the governor of Georgia, General Sherman, and to each [of] the mayors of 
Augusta, Columbus, Macon, and Atlanta. 

The secretaries were directed to furnish Brigadier-General Geary 
with a copy of the resolutions. 
On motion, the meeting was adjourned. 

RICHARD D. ARNOLD, 

Chairman. 
A. S. HARTRIDGE, 
ROBERT ERWIN, 

Secretaries. 



fieport of Rear- Admiral. Dahlgren , U. S. JVavy, forwarding state- 
ments of deserters regarding the Confederate works on Sullivan's 
Island. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah Rivei\ January 4, 1865. 

SIR: I enclose for the information of the Department a copy of a 
paper* just received from the headquarters on Morris Island, con- 
taining the statements of deserters in regard to the rebel works on 
Sullivan's Island and their armaments. 

* Omitted as not necessary to publish. 



160 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



The following abstract exhibits a comparison of this, with the 
statement which I forwarded to the Department 19th October last: 



Name of works. 


Old account Oct. 19, 1864. 


Number 
of guns. 


New account Dec. 27, 1864. 


Number 
of guns. 


Bee 


Xl-inch 


1 


10-inch rifle 


1 




VIII and X inch . . 


6 


X-inch smooth 


5 








Xl-inch 


1 




Not known 





X-inch smooth 


2 








8-inch rifle 


1 








Brooke rifles 


4 


Moultrie 


Cannon, calibernot known. 


18 


X-inch smooth 


4 








8-inch rifle . 


1 










1 








32-pounder rifle 


1 










1 




10-inch rifle 


1 


X-inch smooth . 


3 




X-inch smooth 


1 


10-inch rifle 


1 




VHI-inch smooth 


2 


X-inch mortars 


2 




Not known 


1 








Mortars 


3 


X-inch mortars . . ; 


2 








X-inch seacoast 


1 








24-pounder rifle 


1 


Mortar Battery No. 2 . 


Mortars . 


2 


X-inch seacoast 


2 








VHI-inch 


1 


Beauregard 


7-inch rifle 


1 


X-inch smooth 


1 




VHI-inch howitzer 


1 




2 




Other cannon 


5 


7-inch rifle 


1 








VHI-inch howitzer 


1 








32-pounder rifle 


1 








24-pounder 


1 


Marshall 


VIH-inch smooth 


2 


VHI-inch smooth 


2 




32-pounder rifle 


2 


7-inch rifle 


1 




Small guns ... . 


6 


8-inch rifle 


1 








VHI-inch shell guns 


2 








V-inch 


1 








24-pounder .... 


1 








Small guns 


4 
















52 




54 


Between Beauregard 
and Marshall. 


Four small batteries of 2 32- 
pounders each. 


8 


Four 2-gun batteries, 24- 
pounders 


8 













The Department will perceive that these two accounts agree sub- 
stantially in an aggregate of more than 50 cannon, the principal 
difference being that, in the former account, the forces of Moultrie 
and Marion are blended, while in the recent statement they are 
separated. 

The entire metal bearing on vessels from Sullivan's Island will be: 
Columbiads, 2 10-inch rifled, 15 X-inch smooth, 2 8-inch rifled, 
3 V Ill-inch smooth 22. Five 7-inch rifles (Brooke), 1 Xl-inch 
Dahlgren, 2 32-pounder rifles, 8 mortars; total, 38 heavy pieces. 

The most powerful concentration is Battery Bee, and its obv r ious 
purpose is to bear on the starboard quarters of vessels that have passed 
Sumter and are keeping away for Fort Johnson. 

In the batteries about Savannah, there are found more heavy cannon 
than were reported by deserters and others. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron.. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 161 

Order of the Secretary of^ the Navy to Commander Stanly, U. 8. Navy, 
commanding U. /S. 8. /State of Georgia. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, January 7, 1865. 

SIR: Proceed with the U. 8. S. State of Georgia to Port Royal, S. C. , 
and report to Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren for duty in the South 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commander FABIUS STANLY, 

Commanding U. 8. S. State of Georgia, New York. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, of the arrival at Port 
Royal of the U. 8. 8. Wando. 

No 12.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, January 7 , 1865. 

SIR: I have to announce to the Department that the U. S. S. Wando, 
Acting Master Frederick T. King, commanding, arrived in the harbor 
of Port Royal on the 5th January, instant, pursuant to orders- from 
Rear-Admiral Stringham. 

I enclose the report of her commanding officer. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, transmitting letter 
from Major- General Sherman, IT. 8. Army, regarding proposed 
operations. 

No. 16.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, Ga., January 7, 1865. 

SIR: I enclose extract of a note to me from General Sherman, which 
will advise the Department of the latest information which I have in 
regard to General Sherman's movements. 

The positions which the army occupies, or is moving to occupj^, are 
two corps at Savannah, two at Port Royal Ferry, General Foster's 
forces (5,000) at the Tulifinny, and a regiment at Boyd's Neck. 

I presume the first point where the two wings from Savannah and 
Port Royal Ferry will meet will be at Branchville, and the march 
thence to Florence and so on, following the railroad. 

I have no expectations that an attack on Charleston is embraced in 
this plan, as General Sherman has not suggested any arrangements for 
a cooperation with the Navy. 

At the same time the circumstances might determine the General to 
such an operation. 

N w R VOL 16 11 



162 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

Whatever forces the rebels have been able to collect in this quarter 
are, no doubt, posted in the direction of Charleston, prepared to 
occupy the city or otherwise, according to its strength. It can not be 
sufficient to stand right in the way of our array, but may operate on 
its flanks and rear as the opportunity may offer. 

It will always be convenient for General Sherman to attack Charles- 
ton until he passes the Santee; after that the swampy land would 
interfere. 

Charleston being left behind, there remains but a single occasion 
when the army may communicate with the squadron, that is by way 
of the Santee or Georgetown; and I shall hardly look for this except 
as an incident from the extension of the foragers on the right wing, as 
it would be very little further to communicate with the North Atlantic 
Squadron at Wilmington and convenient to the forward march of the 
army. 

It is with great regret that the conclusion is forced on me that the 
work marked out here will not include Charleston. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, 

In the Field, Savannah, January 7, 1865. 

DEAR ADMIRAL: The letter you send me is from Admiral Porter, at 
Beaufort, N. C. I am not certain that there is a vessel in Port Royal 
from Admiral Porter, or I would write him. If there be one to 
return to him I beg you to send this, with a request that I be advised 
as early as possible as to the condition of the railroad from Beaufort, 
N. C., back to New Berne, and so on, toward Goldsboro; also all maps 
and information of the country above New Berne; how many cars and 
locomotives are available to us on that road; whether there is good 
navigation from Beaufort, N. C., via Pamlico Sound, up Neuse River, 
etc. I want Admiral Porter to know that I expect to be ready to 
move about the 15th; that I have one head of column across Savannah 
River at this point; will soon have another at Port Royal Ferry, and 
expect to make another crossing at Sister's Ferry. I still adhere to 
my plan submitted to General Grant, and only await provisions and 
forage. 

The more I think of the affair at Wilmington the more I feel ashamed 
of the army there; but Butler is at fault, and he alone. Admiral 
Porter fulfilled his share to admiration. I think the admiral will feel ' 
more confidence in my troops, as he saw us carry points on the Mis- 
sissippi where he had silenced the fire. All will turn out for the 
best yet. 

I am, with respect, yours, truly, 

W. T. SHERMAN, 

Major- General. 
Admiral DAHLQREN, 

Savannah River. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 163 

Report of Reo.r- Admiral Dajdgren, U. S. Navy, regarding various 
matters connected with the evacuation of Savannah. 

No. 15.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, January 8, 1865. 

SIR: Among the articles found here after our troops entered was a 
torpedo boat, which I have received from General Sherman and sent 
to Port Royal. As yet it is only the unfinished wooden shell; no 
machinery was found about the place, but may be among some that 
was thrown overboard. 

There is also another torpedo boat in the yard of the builder, not 
finished, which I may be able to secure. 

Some drawings and models were found in the shipyard where the 
torpedo boats were built, of torpedo boats and ironclads, which will 
hardly be considered as an accession to the skill and knowledge of our 
builders. I transmit them, however. 

When the rebels evacuated, the forts, Rosedew and Beaulieu, on the 
Ogeechee and Vernon rivers, were occupied by the Sonoma's men, 
and were afterwards turned over to General Sherman, at his request, 
as he desired to dismantle them. 

Among articles of private property abandoned in the neighborhood, 
was a lot of silver plate, which was taken to the Sonoma. I will direct 
it to be transferred to the special agent of the Treasury, as required 
by law. 

A party from the squadron has been at work endeavoring to clear 
the obstructions from the South Channel, which has the deepest water, 
and connects with St. Augustine Creek. 

A steam tug, with the divers and boats with men from the vessels 
present, have only been able to clear a passage of 75 to 100 feet, 
though they have worked hard for a week. Very little idea can be 
formed of this barrier without examining it. 

So far as the communication by water is concerned, I am inclined to 
the opinion that the best channel to the city by the Savannah River 
is through the North Channel. But that more water (not less than 10 
feet at low water) can be had by entering Wassaw, going up Wilming- 
ton River and St. Augustine Creek, into the South Channel. 

Probably the true course would be to build a wharf at Thunderbolt, 
whence a railroad of 3 miles would reach the city, 10i miles by water. 

These are questions which the mercantile community will best solve 
by the sure test of profit and loss. 

But the United States has also an interest in the matter, because the 
defenses of the city lie along Wilmington River and St. Augustine 
Creek, and the channel should therefore be marked so that it can be 
used day or night. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



164 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Instructions from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- 
Commander /Scott, U. S. Navy, regarding affairs in Savannah 
River. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, January 8, 1865. 

Sm: The senior officer at this place will be careful to keep in com- 
munication with the military authorities and render all the aid in his 
power to facilitate the military operations, keeping me advised of 
important events as they occur, and of the ordinary course of things, 
once a week. 

The torpedo boat in the yard is to be launched when fit, and, with 
all its appurtenances, transferred to the naval commandant at Port 
Royal. 

The divers will work at the obstructions in the South Channel (the 
North is said to be under contract) and at the raising of the steam 
machinery of the torpedo boats, reported to have been sunk oft' the 
wha'rf. 

You can communicate with the quartermaster on shore regarding 
the obstructions in the North Channel, and should he ask for any 
assistance with them, the divers may aid him when they can be spared 
for the purpose. 

The scows, and whatever other articles you may pick up, which are 
of use you will take good care of, and, when not further required 
here, will be sent to Port Royal. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander ROBT. W. SCOTT, 

Commanding U. S. S. Son.oma. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander 
Williamson, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Flag. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Savannah River, January 8, 1865. 

SIR: I have been requested to have forwarded to Port Royal the 
small boat in which Captain Duncan came down the Ogeechee. 

You will put it on board the Daffodil for that purpose, and give all 
necessary directions for its being well taken care of. 

It is rumored that the rebel pirate, Shenandoah, chased the Fulton 
off Charleston. You will cruise for a while outside, between Tybee 
and St. Catherine's, overhauling any suspicious vessel that comes in 
sight. Direct the Lodona, when her steam is ready, to do the same 
from St. Catherine's to St. Simon's. 

The boat is to be directed to First Lieutenant J. E. Sprague, Acting 
Assistant Adjutant-General, Hilton Head, to be forwarded to Wash- 
ington. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander J. C. WILLIAMSON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Flag. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 165 

Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the arrival 
at Port Royal, S. O. , of the U. S. hark Gemsbok. 

No. 17.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Port Royal Harbor, January 9, 1865. 

SIR: I have to report the arrival here, on the 8th instant, of the 
U. S. bark Gemsbok, in good order. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Master freeman, U. S. Navy, transmitting report 
regarding expedition January 10-18, 1865, for the capture of the 
records of Nassau County, Fla., transmitting additional report. 

U. S. BRIG PERRY, 
Fernandina, Fla. , January 19, 1865. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to report having organized, on the llth instant, 
an expedition for the purpose of capturing the county clerk of Nassau 
County, together with the records, etc., of said county. 

The tax commissioners of the State of Florida, finding it difficult to 
proceed with their work without the assistance of the records, etc., 
applied to me for aid in obtaining them. Knowing the documents to 
be of much value to the Government, I made enquiries of the refugees 
and deserters from that section and ascertained that one Higgin- 
botham, living near Callahan, held the position of count} T clerk and 
had all the records, etc:, in his possession. 

Having completed my arrangements, I started an expedition under 
the command of Acting Ensign Fred Elliott. Mr. Elliott succeeded 
in capturing Mr. Higginbotham, who, without hesitation, delivered 
into his hands all the books, deeds, and records in his possession. The 
documents were hidden in a swamp, about 1 mile from his house, in a 
place which would have escaped detection without the aid of Mr. 
Higginbotham, who, I must say, acted in the most honorable manner, 
guiding the party through the woods to the boat by a much shorter 
route. He said he had always been a decided Union man, which state- 
ment was authenticated by Judge Alsop, who knew him well. He 
expressed his willingness to take the oath of allegiance, but said it 
would cause him to be burned out of house and home, and as we could 
afford no protection either to himself or family (13 in number) I 
thought it best not to administer it. After extracting such informa- 
tion from Mr. Higginbotham as desirable, he was allowed to return to 
his home. The documents captured are invaluable to the Government 
and commissioners in prosecuting their work. 

I enclose a letter from the judges, as also a report from Mr. Elliott, 
whom I recommend to your favorable notice as an energetic, trust- 
worthy, and reliable officer. 



166 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Trusting I have done that which will meet your approbation, I have 
the honor to be, admiral, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. N. FREEMAN, 
Acting Master, Commanding U. S. Brig Perry. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. BRIG PERRY, 
Fernandina, Fla. , January 18, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to report, in obedience to orders received 
from you, I took command of 16 men, one howitzer, arms and ammu- 
nition, and placed them on board prize schooner Shell, lying in Nassau 
Sound. 

On the 10th instant, after having completed my arrangements, I 
started up Nassau River at 6:30 p. m., and at 8 o'clock anchored otf 
Seymour's Point. 

At 3 o'clock a. m. I got underway and proceeded up the river. 
Arrived off Holmes' Mill on the 12th instant, in the evening, and care- 
fully reconnoitered the shore, but saw no signs of the enemy. The 
buildings at this place are all in good condition, but no furniture or 
mill fixtures remain. 

On the 13th, anchored off Gassway Creek, which is situated about 
40 or 50 miles from Nassau Sound. Reconnoitered the shore carefully, 
and landed at 10 o'clock a. m., leaving Acting Master's Mate T. H. 
McDonald in charge of the schooner. I was accompanied by Messrs. 
Grisham and Lewis (who acted as pilots) and four men, and immedi- 
ately started for the interior. At 12:30 p. in. reached the house of 
Mr. Sheffield, having crossed the railroad track, and at 3 o'clock p. m. 
we started on our route, which was directly down the Florida Railroad. 
Crossed bridge over Boggy River at 4:30 and stopped for night to 
close in. At 6:30 again commenced our journey, and at 8 o'clock 
reached the town of Callahan, situated on the track. Reached our 
destination (Mr. Higginbotham's, county clerk of Nassau County) at 
9:30 and made him a prisoner, with his official books and papers, and 
started on our return. Passed through Callahan at 11:30 p. in., the 
bridge at 2 o'clock, and at 4 o'clock of the 14th instant arrived at Mr. 
Sheffield's house, having traveled a distance of 50 miles in thirteen 
hours. On the whole journey I was gratified to find that every one of 
the party strove earnestly to do their duty, and although much fatigued 
and worn out, exerted themselves to make the expedition successful. 
I would recommend particularly the four men who accompanied me to 
your favorable notice. 

At 10 o'clock a. m. of the 14th instant we returned on board the 
schooner and I immediately dispatched Mr. McDonald with the pris- 
oners and documents to Fernandina. On our return down the river I 
landed at several places, but saw no signs of the enemy. In accord- 
ance with your instructions 1 shelled the high bluffs on the way, and 
expended thirty -six rounds. 

We arrived at Talbot Island at 11 o'clock p. m. on the 16th instant, 
and anchored until January 17, when, in obedience to your order, I 
started with the schooner for Fernandina, where we arrived at 4 o'clock 
a. m. of the 18th instant. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 167 

I am well satisfied no force of the en Q my exists nearer than Bald- 
win, except occasional scouting parties in search of deserters. 

I am much indebted to Messrs. Grisham and Lewis for their kind 
assistance and unflinching endurance throughout. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

FRED ELLIOTT, 
Acting Ensign, U. S. Navy. 
Acting Master S. N. FREEMAN, 

Commanding U. /S. Brig Perry. 

[Endorsement.] 

JANUARY 29, 1865. 

The within is transmitted for the information of the Department, 
and is of interest, as it shows how completely the country there is 
stripped of its fighting men, when boats' crews can traverse as these did. 
Very respectf ully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Hear- Admiral. 



Commendatory letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to 
Acting Master Freeman, TL S. Navy, regarding expedition to Nassau 
County, Florida, January 10-18, 1865. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 
Port Royal, S. C., January 29, 1865. 

SIR: 1 am in receipt of your report enclosing one from Acting 
Ensign Frederick Elliott, of the Perry, giving an account of the cap- 
ture of the county clerk of Nassau County, [Fla.], together with the 
records of that county. 

The expedition is highly creditable to yourself and the officers and 
men of your vessel who were engaged in it. 

Copies of your report and that of Acting Ensign Elliott will be 
forwarded to the Navy Department. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master S. N. FREEMAN, 

Commanding Pei^ry, Fernandina.. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Commander Wil- 
liamson, U. S. Navy, fw the destruction of Confederate works in 
Ossabaw Sound. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, January llf., 1865. 
SIR: You will return to your anchorage in Ossabaw for the present. 
The commander of the Para appears to be apprehensive of the bat- 
teries being reoccupied. They were delivered to the army, which was 
to dismantle them. Whether they have done so is not reported. 

On arriving you will proceed personally to the battery and ascertain 
the state of the case. 

My impression [is] that the army has completed or is completing 
the destruction of the work. If not, and the work is not proceeding, 



168 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

you will have the guns spiked and dismantled, the carriages removed 
or destroyed, the powder and shot or shell removed, and the bomb- 
proofs and magazines blown up. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral . 
Captain WILLIAMSON, 

Commanding Flag. . 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Luce, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. 8. Pontiac, to report 
for special duty to Major- General Sherman, U. S. Army. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Savannah River, January 13, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed to this place, with the Pontiac under your 
command, without delay, after receiving one month's provisions and 
a supply of coal. 

It is indispensable that } r ou should be here, and report early on 
Monday to General Sherman for special service with the column of 
Major-General [Jefferson C.] Davis. 
But the sooner the better. . 

Veiy respectf ulty, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. B. LUCE, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pontiac. 

[Endorsement.] 

All right. I will send General Slocum to consult with you, and 
beg you to escort aqy boats he may have to send up to Sister's Ferry, 
on the Savannah. 

General Easton will find any pilots you may want. 

W. T. SHERMAN, 
Major- General, Comm anding. 



Confidential memorandum from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, 
to Commander Reynolds, U. S. Navy. 

1. The Pontiac is ordered to report to General Sherman for special 
duty with a column on the Savannah River. 

2. The Mingoe is to cooperate with General Foster's force, if she is 
needed; if not, she will take post in the Coosaw or contiguous rivers 
and operate as well as possible near the course of the troops from 
Beaufort at the crossings, etc. 

3. The Dai Ching will operate in the Coosaw or nearest rivers to 
assist the advance of the troops. The Sonoma likewise. 

A tug will keep near these vessels so as to connect them and 
communicate. 

Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN. 
Commander REYNOLDS. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



169 



Confidential instructions from. Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, 
to commanding officers of monitors, in mew of proposed cooperation 
with Sherman? s army in the Carolinas. 

JANUARY 15, 1865. 

1st. General Sherman's army will soon be in motion moving north- 
ward, but inclining from the seacoast. 

2d. He asks that the attention of the rebels be drawn from his opera- 
tions by such demonstrations as possible by the United States naval 
and land forces of this quarter, most particularly at Charleston. 

3d. General Foster will collect as many troops as he can, and I 
desire to assist to the full extent that my force admits of. 

4th. I learn from the Navy Department that Admiral Porter is 
directed to send here all the ironclads in his squadron as soon as the 
present operations at Wilmington are over. 

I see no reason to silppose that they will not be here very soon. 

5th. General Sherman will begin to move to-morrow or Tuesday, but 
will not be in a position where our demonstration will be most effec- 
tive for a week or more. 

6th. This, then, will be the period for preparation, and the first 
measure will be to examine the channel and make sure of the ob- 
structions, their nature and position. 

7th. As the impression of the commanders of monitors is that a 
range of obstructions extends from Suuiter, these will be the first 
object, and the commanders of the advance monitors of the loth, 
Patapsco and Lehigh, are charged with this duty for the night, and 
so on, in succession. The scouts, all boats, tugs, etc., will report to 
them to assist. 

8th. The preliminary to removal will be by explosion. Topedoes 
may be used and boats filled with powder floated up with the tide. 

Floats with grapnels or hooks attached may be floated up to catch 
and mark objects below water. 

9th. To protect against floating torpedoes long, slender pine poles, 
30 to 50 feet, may be lashed in pairs in the middle, so as to form an 
X, into which enters the bow at one end, heels secured, and from the 
other depends a net, the whole to float. 

10th. Captain Scott will see to the prompt and sufficient supplies of 
men, boats, tugs, poles for torpedoes, boats, powder, and other requi- 
sitions to carry out the above. 

llth. It is expected that each day and night will furnish its share 
of results. 

J. A. DAHLGKEN. 

Rear- Admiral. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

January 15, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


Acacia 


5 


Screw tug . . 


-fttg. Master Jos. E. Jones 


Off Charleston.. 


Adger 


g 


Side-wh eel 


Comdr. Thos. H. Patterson 


Do. 


*Adams 


8 


steamer. 
Ship . . 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. Alvin Phinney. 


Do. 


* Allen 


9 


Bark 


Actg. Master I. A. Pennell 


St. Simon's. 


Amaranthus 


43 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master E. O. Adams . . 


Off Charleston. 


Arethusa 


j-3 


do 


Actg. Ensign J. V. Cook 


Port Royal. 


Azalea... 




...do... 


Actg. Master F. W. Strong . . . 


Off Charleston. 



* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



170 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, January 15, 1865 

Continued. 



Vessel. 


No. of 

guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Bruen ... 


2 

8 


Schooner, 
stores. 
Bark 


Actg. Master W. F. Redding 

Actg. Master W. T. Gillespie 
Actg. Ensign G. G. Curtis 
Comdr. N. B. Harrison 


Off Charleston. 

St. Andrew's. 
Special duty (divers). 
Off Georgetown. 
Port Royal (repair- 
ing). 
Off Charleston. 
Port Royal (repair- 
ing). 
Port Royal. 
Port Royal (repair- 
ing). 
Port Royal. 

Bull's Bay. 
Broad River. 
Do. 
Savannah River. 

Cruising. 
Off Charleston. 

St. Catherine's, Ga. 
Off Charleston. 

Port Royal. 
Off Charleston. 
Wassaw Sound. 

Port Royal (fitting 
out). 
Off Charleston. 

Special duty. 

Off Charleston. 
Port Royal. 

St. John's River. 
Savannah River (div- 
ers). 
Port Royal (repair- 
ing). 
Off Charleston. 
Do. 
Do. 
Sapelo. 
Off Charleston. 
Port Royal (repair- 
ing). 
Wassaw. 

Off Charleston. 
Expedition, Broad 
River. 
Stono. 
Southern stations, 
with stores. 
Port Roval (repair- 
ing). 
Off Charleston. 
Do. 
Do. 
Port Royal. 
St. John's. 
Ossabaw. 

Port Royal (repair- 
ing). 
Off Charleston. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Transporting troops. 

Port Royal (repair- 
ing). 


*Braziliera 


*Blunt. 


Schooner 
Screw sloop . . 
Side-wheel 
gunboat. 
Screw tug 
do 

.do 




8 

8 

1 

t2 

12 


Cimarron 


Comdr. E. Thompson 


Catalpa 


Actg. Ensign Allen K. Noyes 
Actg. Ensign David B. Hawes. . . 

Actg. Ensign William Boyd 
Actg. Ensign Frank S. Lech 

Actg. Master's Mate George W. 
Post. 
Actg. Master W. L. Bowers. . .'. . . 


Camelia 




Clover 


do 

Side-wheel 
tug. 
Schooner 
Screwgnnboat 
Screw tug 
Side-wheel 
tug. 
Screw steamer 
do 

Bark 
Side-wheel 
tug. 
Bark 
Screw tug 
Sc noon er, 
mortar. 
Schooner 

Screw steamer 
(hospital). 
Side-wheel 
steamer. 
Screw tug 
Bark (con- 
demned). 
Screw steamer 
Schooner 

Screw tug 
do 


Chatham 


*Chambers 


6 

7 

7 
5 

9 

N 

"T 

13 

t3 
t 

ft 

6 

6 
1 

12 

1 
2 

7 

V 


Dai Ching . . 


Lieut. Comdr. J. C. Chaplin 


Dandelion 


Actg. Ensign G. W. Williams .... 
Actg. Master William H. Mallard 

Comdr. J. C. Williamson 


Daffodil 


Flag 


Flambeau .... 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. Edward Caven- 

dy. 

Actg. Master Lewis West 
Actg. Ensign David Lee .^ 


*Fernandina . . 


Geranium 


*Gemsbok 

Gladiolus 


Actg. Master J. F. Winchester. . . 
Actg. Ensign N Boughton 


*Grimth 


Actg. Master James Ogilvie 
Actg. Master L. G. Emerson 
Actg. Master Benjamin Dyer . . . 
Actg Master J K Crosbv 


*G. W.Rodgers 


Home 


Harvest Moon 


Hydrangea 


Actg. Master Charles W. Rogers. 
Actg. Master E G. Furber 


*Houghton 


Hale 


Actg. Master C F Mitchell 


*Hope 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. L.Churchhill 

Actg. Ensign William H. Ander- 
son. 
Actg. Ensign Charles H. Hanson 
Lieut. Comdr. Edward Barrett . . 
Lieut. Comdr. Alex. A. Semmes. . 
Actg. Vol. Lieut. R. P. Swann .... 
Actg. Ensign Sturgis Center 
Actg. Master's Mate John 
O'Connor. 


Iris 


Jonquil 


Catskill 


Monitor . . . 
do . . 


Lehigh 


Lodona 


Screw steamer 
Screw tug 
do 


Laburnum 


Larkspur 


*Lightning 


Schooner (ten- 
der \ 
Monitor 
Side-wheel 
steamer. 
do 


Montauk 


2 
11 

6 
11 

7 

2 
2 
8 
10 
6 
6 

5 


Lieut. Comdr. E. E. Stone 
Comdr. J. Blakely Creighton ... 

Lieut. Comdr. A. F. Crosman . . . 
Actg. Master Robert O. Patter- 
son. 
Actg. Master John Collins 


Mingoe 


McDonough 


Memphis 


Screw steamer 
Schooner 

Monitor 
do 


*Mangham 


Nan tucket 


Lieut. Comdr. R. F. R. Lewis... 
Lieut. Comdr. William K. Mayo. 
Lieut. Comdr. E. W. Henry 
Comdr. William Reynolds 
Actg. Master William H. DeWolf 
Actg. Ensign G. W. Wood 


Nahant 


Nipsic . . . 


Screwgunboat 
Ship, store 
Screw steamer 
Schooner, 
mortar. 
Screwgunboat 

Schooner, 
stores. 
Side- wheel tug 
Monitor 
do 


*New Hampshire 
Norwich 


*Norfolk Packet 
Ottawa 


Lieut. Comdr. James Stillwell . . 
Actg. Master William Fales 

Actg. Master R. P. Walter 
Lieut. Comdr. T. S. Fillebrown . 
Lieut. Comdr. S. P. Quackenbush 
Comdr. G B. Balch 


*Orvetta 


Oleander 


f8 

2 
2 
14 
11 

6 


Passaic 


Patapsco 


Pawnee 


Screw sloop . . 
S i d e-w heel 
gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Pontiac 




Potomska 


Actg. Master F. M. Montell 





* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



171 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, January 15, 1865 

Continued. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 




+1 


Side-wheel 


Actg. Master G. H. Averv 


Flag-steamer. 


Pettit 


f2 


steamer. 
Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Ensign Charles Grieve 


Port Roval (repair- 


*Para 


7 


tug. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master 1). P. Heath 


ing)- 
Ossabaw. 


*Perry 


9 


mortar. 
Brig 


Actg. Master S. N. Freeman 


Fernandina. 






Sloop, tender. 




North Edisto. 


*Racer 


3 


Schooner, 


Acting Master E. G. Martin 


Savannah River. 


gangamon 


4 


mortar. 
Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. Jonathan Young. 


Port Royal (repair- 




s 


Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. R. W. Scott 


ing). 
Savannah River. 




18 


gunboat. 
Sailing sloop . 


Comdr. G. H. Preble 


North Edisto. 




22 


do 


A V. Lt. Comdr. E. Brodhead . 


Doboy. 


S Carolina 


8 


Screw steamer 


A. V. Lt. Wm. W. Kennisoii . . . 


Off Charleston. 


Sanford 


t5 


. .do 


Actg. Master Z. Kempton 


Do. 


Stettin 


+5 


do 


Act. Vol. Lt. C. J. Van Alstine . 


St. Helena. 


Sweet Brier 


+5 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign J. D. Dexter 


Off Charleston. 


*Smith 


T -> 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master B. Van Voorhis . . 


Stono. 


*Sea Foam 




mortar. 
Sc hooner , 


Actg. Master E. C. Healy 


Ordered North. 


*Swift 




stores. 
Sc h oon er, 






*Thunder 




tender, 
do 






*Valparaiso 




Hulk (hospi- 


Actg. Master H. S. Blanchard . . 


Port Roval. 


Wissahickon. 


5 


tal). 
Screwgunboat 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Johnson... 


Stono. 


Winona 


6 


do 


Lieut. Comdr. William H. Dana. 


Transporting troops. 


Wamsutta 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Charles W. Lee 


Off Charleston. 


Wando 


3 


Side-wheel 


Actg. Master Frederick T. King. 


Port Roval (repair- 


*Williams [C. P.] .... 
*WildCat 


6 


steamer. 
Schooner, 
mortar. 
Schoon er , 


Actg. Master G. W. Parker 


ing). 
Stono. 

Port Royal. 


*Ward [T A ] 


5 


Render, 
do 


Actg Master R. T. Wyatt 


Light-House Inlet. 













* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



Destruction by a torpedo, in Charleston Harbor, of the U. S. ironclad 
Patapsco, January 15, 1865. 



Report of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, TT. S. Navy. 



No. 24.] 



FLAGSHIP HAEVEST MOON, 
Charleston Roads, January 16, 1865. 

SIR: I regret to inform the Department of the destruction of the 
U. S. monitor Patapsco by a torpedo last night about 8 o'clock near 
the entrance to the lower harbor of Charleston. 

At the time of the occurrence this vessel was the picket monitor of 
the night, and was underway engaged in covering the scout and picket 
boats that were* searching the channel for obstructions and torpedoes. 

A court of enquiry has been ordered, to ascertain all the circum- 
stances connected with this disaster, and the result will be laid before 
the Department when arrived at. 

Meanwhile, for the present satisfaction of the Department, I will 
narrate some of the events that immediately preceded or were con- 
nected with the loss of the Patapsco, and such of the incidents attend- 
ing it as have come to my knowledge or were under my observation. 

I parted from General Sherman at Savannah on the afternoon of 
Friday, the 13th, with an understanding as to the movements he was 



172 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

to make, and a request that General Foster and myself should make as 
much impression on Charleston as our force permitted, but the general 
did not desire that they should go so far as to commit my vessels to a 
decisive attack on the batteries. 

As the period when this was likely to occur left me very little time 
for preparation, I hastened to Charleston, stopping at Port Royal only 
the afternoon of Saturday for the purpose of leaving directions for the 
steamers that might assist in the movements of General Sherman while 
near the waters in the vicinity. 

It was about 8 o'clock on the morning of the 15th when I reached 
Charleston, and immediately called on board Captain Scott, the senior 
officer, and the commanders of the monitors, in order to apprise them 
of what was likely to occur and of the necessity for hastening such 
preparations as might be necessary, or the time allowed. 

The morning passed in conversing on the subject, and a free expres- 
sion of opinion was entered into and given by Captain Scott and all the 
captains of the monitors, Captains Quackenbush, Semmes, Lewis, 
Barrett, Stone, Mayo, and Fillebrown. Fleet Captain Bradford was 
also present. 

I drew to their attention the different modes of operating with the 
ironclads, liom a mere demonstration upon Sullivan's Island to the 
decisive measure of forcing their way to the city. 

This, however, was left to be decided by the arrival of the iron- 
clads from the North Atlantic Squadron, which might be expected, and 
by the strength of the cooperating force under General Foster, and by 
the circumstances that might arise in the course of events. 

1 desired, as a preliminary measure, that the channel at the entrance 
of the harbor should be thoroughly examined; and to make this more 
sure required the commanders of the advanced monitors to give their 
personal attention to the duty, which hitherto had been intrusted to the 
scout boats. 

There were representations from various quarters that obstructions 
had been laid across the channel from Sumter, and it was important to 
know if this were true, and, if so, their nature and extent, with direc- 
tions for their removal by explosion. 

Captain Scott was directed to furnish all the facilities in his power 
for the service. Steam tugs, boats, men, grapnels, hawsers, etc., and 
other orders were given, so as to prepare as well as possible all the 
means at disposal for the cooperation with General Sherman. 

After a long and full interview with the naval commanders, as above 
mentioned, I went ashore, accompanied by Lieutenant-Commander 
Matthews, and, with General Schimmelfennig, visited the works at the 
extreme of Morris Island, in order to possess myself of a full view of 
the channel and rebel works from tnat direction and to note any 
important changes. 

All was quiet and undisturbed. Within near range was Sumter, and 
a little farther the heavy batteries of Johnson and Sullivan's Island, 
and in the distance the dwellings and spires of the city, but not a ves- 
sel or living thing was to be seen on the waters of the harbor nor about 
the batteries. Outside lay the Union fleet quietly at anchor. 

Returning late, the evening passed away in business of the squadron, 
and then, much fatigued with continued exertion night and day for 
several days, I fell asleep, from which I was aroused about 11 o'clock 
by the entrance of Captain Quackenbush and his first lieutenant, who 
announced the loss of the Patapsco. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 173 

The advanced duty of the night had devolved on the Patapsco and 
Lehigh. The latter was at anchor in the advance at the reserve sta- 
tion. The Patapsco got underway and proceeded up the harbor about 
dark for duty as picket monitor of the night, and passed on to the 
usual station some 500 yards farther than the Lehigh. Here she rounded 
to, head downstream and to the flood tide. 

From this point Captain Quackenbush suffered the Patapsco to 
drift with the tide, as the best mode of controlling the vessel and 
covering the operations of the boats. 

Three scout boats, with grapnel drags, were now slowly pushed on, 
while two tugs steamed about the bows of the Patapsco and six or 
seven picket boats were pulling on her quarters or beam. 

In due time the Patapsco found herself so far up as to be nearly on 
a line drawn from Sumter to Moultrie, when she steamed down to the 
vicinity of a buoy, known as the Lehigh, because it marked a project- 
ing shoal where the Lehigh, had grounded about a year ago. 

Here the engines were stopped, and the Patapsco again drifted up. 
When near the former position she steamed back, approached the 
Lehigh buoy, stopped engine, and again drifted up. When near Sum- 
ter Captain Quackenbush steamed down once more, and for the last 
time. While approaching the Lehigh buoy, there was a shock, a 
sound of explosion, a cloud of smoke on the port side, and in less than 
half a minute the Patapsco's deck was under the surface. 

Captain Quackenbush and his first lieutenant were standing on the 
top of the turret looking to the course of the vessel, for she had 
grounded once already on the shoal near the Lehigh buoy when stand- 
ing down the first time. They saw and heard only what is stated 
above. 

The captain gave the order to start the pumps and lower the boats, 
but scarcely a whole minute was allowed for the least effort. 

Five officers and 38 men were saved; 62 officers and men are miss- 
ing. The survivors were those who happened to be on deck, and 2 
men from the windlass room, 3 from the berth deck, 1 from the turret 
chamber, and nearly all those who were in the fire room. Their 
names are annexed. 

From such accounts as I can gather in so short a time as has elapsed, 
it would seem that the explosion occurred on the port side under the 
wardroom, blowing it up, so as to drive up the table and three officers 
who were sitting about it. The spar deck was not blown through, but 
the lookout on the port side, and some 10 feet from the edge of the 
deck, was thrown up suddenly and fell back with such force as to be 
nearly senseless. His rifle exploded and he was aware that the ball 
passed near him. 

A man in the windlass room saw a flash and heard a sound like that 
of a shell near him. The lamp was extinguished; he heard the water 
coming in, and escaped up the hatch on deck. 

It appears also that there was no disrupture of the vessel at the 
berth deck nor farther aft; that no water came in there save at the 
hatches, as the Patapsco settled in the sea, and that her bow went 
down first, throwing the stern high up for an instant, so that a man 
standing there had to grasp at something to keep upright. 

It is believed that the berth-deck ladder was dislodged by the shock 
and in the panic could not be replaced, hence no men there were saved 
except those who rushed aft into the fire room. 



174 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The Lehigh had got underway when the Patapsco passed, and fol- 
lowed her movements in drifting and steaming, but did not go so far 
up and retained her position assigned as a support. 

She anchored near the Lehigh buoy about 7:45, and some twenty or 
twenty-five minutes later heard an unusual but not very loud report, 
saw a cloud of smoke, lost sight of the Patapsco, which previously 
had been dimly visible through the obscurity of the night, then heard 
men's voices as if from the water, and fearing something wrong, sent 
her boats to the Patapsco and weighed anchor. The disaster soon 
became known. 

The top of the Patapsco 1 s smoke pipe is seen above the water, but 
as yet there has not been leisure to determine the precise position 
relatively to other objects. It is stated as 600 to 800 yards from 
Sumter and below it. 

The Patapsco had her torpedo fenders and netting stretched as usual 
around her. Three boats with drags had preceded her, searching to 
some depth the water they had passed over, while steam tugs and sev- 
eral boats were in different positions on the bow beam and quarter. 

No one who has not witnessed it can appreciate the harassing nature 
of the never-ceasing vigilance with which the monitor duty is sus- 
tained in this harbor, no matter what the weather may be amid the 
heat of summer and the cold of winter, or the heavy gales and bad 
weather which so often visit this anchorage. 

Most minute instructions have been given and repeated in regard to 
rebel torpedoes, and nothing more can be done to bar the chance of 
accident, save permanent torpedo catchers, substantially made and 
attached to the bows, so as to be entirely submerged and thus not to 
be exposed to shot in action. 

This can not be done here, and it may be that the fruitful invention 
of Mr. Ericsson may supply the desideratum. 

Objects on the water, supposed to represent the obstructions, are 
reported to me to-day as extending across from Sumter. 

Three rebel ironclads are just reported to me as distinctly seen in 
the Cooper River, while the fourth has a large number of men busy 
about her, and smoke is said to issue from her pipes as if steam were 
up. This is stated to appear much larger than the other three. 

Four torpedo boats are said by deserters to be ready for service, 
and upon them, in the confusion of action, as well as the torpedoes in 
the water and at the bows of the ironclads, the rebels are said to rely 
chiefly. 

It may be their intention, if Charleston must fall, to try the chances 
of battle, as rather more respectable than blowing them up. 

Of the six which I have here, one or two are always under some 
repair, and the Sangamon, now at Port Royal, can not be ready before 
the 31st. 

Nothing further has reached me of the actual movements of General 
Sherman, but he will not remain in present position much longer. 

I would draw to the attention of the Department the fact that there 
is no need now of vessels to maintain the blockade at Ossabaw, Was- 
saw, and Savannah River, yet that our positions at Wassaw and Savan- 
nah will have to be maintained and the blockade at Ossabaw resumed 
as soon as our forces move, for our line rests at the left on Thunder- 
bolt, and when the army moves, leaving a garrison to hold Savannah, 
the rebels may be expected to show themselves on the front. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 175 

More effective vessels must therefore be maintained al those places 
than heretofore. 

I write hastily, so as to use the opportunity offered by the departure 
of a steamer of Admiral Porter's fleet. 

Will the Department please to order a few more tugs for service in 
this squadron, as well as a few more launches ? They are much needed. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

P. S. I am now able to transmit the report of the commander and 
first lieutenant of the Patapsco, and to say tnat the boats succeeded last 
night in cutting away a part of the obstructions laid from Sumter that 
was nearest the water. 

It consists of a stout hawser, buoyed to the surface by floats and 
anchored at one end; between each float hangs down about 5 fathoms 
of 7-inch rope, doubled by twisting, and the ends spliced around the 
hawser on the surface. There are a number of these, each independ- 
ent of the other. 

It is said that chain is attached below, but as yet this is not ascer- 
tained to be a fact. 

The position of the Patapsco was approximated to-day to be about 
800 yards from Sumter and 1,200 yards from Moultrie, exactly in a 
line due north, tangent to extreme course of low-water mark on Mor- 
ris Island. 

The court of enquiry meets to-morrow. 



Report of Lieutenant-Commander Quackenbush, U. S. Navy, commanding IT. 8. S. Patapsco. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 
Charleston Roads, 8. C. , January 16, 1864- 

SIR: I have the honor to submit to you a report of circumstances 
connected with the loss of the ironclad Patapsco under my command, 
at 8:10 p. m. the 15th instant, by a torpedo. On the evening of the 
15th instant we cast off from our buoy at the lower anchorage and 
proceeded up to our usual station, as advance monitor. W T e rounded 
to, and 1 immediately called alongside the officers in charge of picket 
and scout boats. I directed them to select as many boats as had grap- 
nels and to push them up the harbor, using every effort to discover 
torpedoes or obstructions; the remaining boats to take position on our 
beams and quarters, keeping within 100 or 200 yards of the vessel. 
The commanding officers of the tugboats were ordered to keep about 
the same distance ahead and on each bow. The object in assigning 
these positions was to avoid observation by the enemy and drawing 
their fire. I then allowed the Patapsco to drift up with the tide until 
nearly in a line from Sumter to Moultrie, the boats and tugs keeping 
in their respective positions. From this point, which was the highest 
point attained, we steamed down to within a few 3 r ards of the Lehigh 
buoy; then stopped and allowed the vessel to drift up, keeping in sight 
of the before-mentioned buoy. On proceeding down the third time, 



176 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 

and when within between 200 or 300 yards of the buoy, we struck and 
exploded a large torpedo, or torpedoes, about 30 feet from the bow 
and a little on the port side. The instant I discovered that we had 
been struck, I gave the order to start the pumps. In an instant more 
1 discovered that the whole forward part of the vessel was submerged, 
and, there being no possible chance to save the vessel, I then gave the 
order to man the boats, but before even an effort could be made to do 
so the vessel had sunk to the top of the turret. The boat which hung 
at the port davits abaft the turret was afloat before Acting Ensign A. 
P. Bashford and the quartermaster of the watch, who were with me 
on the port side of the turret, could get into the boat to clear the falls. 
It was by great exertion that Mr. Bashford and the quartermaster 
succeeded clearing the boat from the head of the davits. When I left 
the turret to get into the boat 1 could discover nobody on board, and 
the water was at the time ankle deep on the turret. My first thought 
after this Providential escape was the safety of such of the survivors 
as we could pick up. I had the good fortune of saving eleven of the 
crew. Owing to the disposition of the boats and tugs, which I had 
previously made to provide against accidents, all those persons who 
had escaped up from below and those that were on deck were rescued 
to the number of 43 5 officers and 38 men. I would respectfully state 
that at no time did I apprehend any danger whatever from torpedoes, 
as it was generally supposed that they were sunk above the line from 
Moultrie to Sumter, and therefore did not conceive that the safety of 
the vessel or the lives of those on board were being jeopardized. In 
conclusion, I would state that the cool intrepidity displayed by Lieu- 
tenant Sampson, my executive officer, and Acting Ensign Bashford, the 
only two officers belonging to the ship who came under my notice, 
deserves the highest praise. 1 have since been informed that the third 
assistant engineer, D. G. Davis, remained nobly at his post when the 
ship went down. 

Accompanying this report I send you the statement of Lieutenant 
W. T. Sampson, executive officer. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACKENBUSH, 

Lieutenant- Commander, U. S. Navy. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Report of Lieutenant Sampson, TT. S. Navy, executive officer of the U. S. S. Patapsco. 

U. S. IRONCLAD CATSKILL, 
Charleston Roads, 8. C., January 16, 1865. 

SIR: Upon me, as one of the fortunate, devolves the sad duty of 
reporting to you the destruction, by a large torpedo, of the monitor 
Patapsco while on picket duty. 

In obedience to your orders, the Patapsco, on the night of the 15th 
instant, was. rounded to at the usual station of the advance monitor, 
but not anchored. Two or three picket boats, with what grapnels could 
be obtained from the Patapsco and Lehigh, were sent up the channel 
to drag for torpedoes, and if possible learn the nature and position of 
any obstructions placed in the channel by the rebels. To protect the 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 177 

boats while thus engaged, the Patapsco was allowed to drift up the 
channel, taking the precaution to keep her head to the strong flood tide, 
that she might be under better command in case our movements drew 
the rebel fire. 

To avoid unnecessary risk of life, the picket and scout boats not 
engaged in dragging were ordered by you to pull off on either beam 
and quarter, but remain in sight of the vessel. The two tugboats, for 
the same reason, were ordered to keep down channel of us, but near 
at hand. The Patapsco drifted up the west side of the channel, going 
ahead slowly at times, to keep her head to tide and in the channel. 
When we had reached a point between Sumter and Moultrie and about 
500 yards from the former, we steamed down the channel under one 
bell until we had passed the Lehigh buoy, placed on the extreme end 
of the point making out from Morris Island. While steaming down, 
the vessel struck upon the point, but owing to the strong tide was soon 
afloat. The monitor Lehigh was then in plain sight and some 300 or 
400 yards from us. The Patapsco was again permitted to drift up 
channel, keeping her in 5 or 5 fathoms of water. This time we 
reached a point in the line joining the rebel signal station on the south- 
west point of Sullivan's Island and Fort Sumter. In the meantime the 
picket boats were astern of us dragging. Being engaged in piloting 
the vessel, I did not notice whether they were in sight or not. Intend- 
ing to make our advances up the harbor gradual, and give the boats 
time to learn the locality of any torpedoes or obstructions, we again 
steamed down, going fast part of the time, until we had passed the 
Lehigh buoy. We again drifted up to the place, from which we started 
down the second time. We again steamed down channel and were going 
four bells when the vessel struck the torpedo and sunk in about fifteen 
seconds. The last cast of the lead, given a moment before she struck, 
was 5 fathoms. We were then about 300 yards to the northward of 
the Lehigh buoy. 

The torpedo struck the vessel on the port side, and just abreast the 
bitts, and appeared to raise the deck, through which the smoke issued. 

My first impression on hearing the report was that a shot had struck 
the overhang just below the water; but the column of smoke and water 
which immediately shot upward convinced me of the real nature of the 
explosion. 

The order to start the pumps was immediately given by you down 
through the turret. So impracticable did the execution of the order 
appear the next instant that I did not repeat it. You immediately 
afterwards gave the order to man the boats. Although these orders 
were given in rapid succession, only the oflicer of the deck, who stepped 
from the turret into the boat, and one man, had time to obey the last 
order before the boat was afloat at the davits. 

Owing to the wise precaution of having the picket boats near at 
hand, all those who were on deck at the time were saved. None escaped 
from below except the engineer and fireman on watch and one man 
who passed from the berth deck through into the fireroom and up the 
hatch. From my position on top of the turret I was able to form a 
correct opinion of the movements and positions of the vessel the whole 
time. The foregoing report, I think, contains all the main points 
which came under my immediate notice. I would further add that at 
no time, to my knowledge, were we within sight of any obstructions. 

K W R VOL 16 12 



178 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

From my position on the ridge rope round the turret, while conning 
the vessel, I was not able to avail myself of your order to man the 
boats. I was soon picked up by one of the picket launches and imme- 
diately ordered the officer in command to pull up the harbor in the 
hope of picking up others. 
Very respectfully, 

WM. T. SAMPSON, 

Lieutenant. 
Lieutenant-Commander S. P. QUACKENBUSH. 



Report of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting report of proceedings of a 

court of enquiry. 

No. 4A.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C., January 29, 1865. 

SIR: I transmit herewith the proceedings of a court of enquiry in 
the case of the Patapsco^ and a copy * of my confidential minute, which 
exhibits the views that I expressed to the captains of the monitors on 
the 15th, and, as such, copies were to have been issued to all of them 
as soon as they could be made. 

That evening the disaster to the Patapsco occurred, and it seemed 
proper to stay any further exposure of the monitors for the time, 
leaving the removal of the obstructions to be effected by the boats 
and tugs. 

I will transmit by the Massachusetts a sample of the obstructions 
removed by one of the boats, which were so arranged that they would 
not only impede the propeller of a vessel, but would actually anchor 
her under fire. I just learn from a negro, who was a slave of the 
officer employed in the work, that 200 anchors were put down. 

The Department will recognize the almost impossibility of removing 
obstructions and torpedoes from channels under fire; when not under 
fire, there is no difficulty. 

Some arrangement should be made for protecting the monitors, and 
it might be done, but not here; there is not the material, the time, nor 
the labor to spare, and, to do it properly, it might be necessary to 
haul them out of water. 

Prongs, like the cowcatcher of a locomotive, could be attached, but 
should be under the overhang, so as to be protected from fire. This 
would require the monitor to be out of water, and beaching might not 
do for so long a time. 

I have the nonor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the JVavy. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. SHIP JOHN ADAMS, 
Charleston Roads, S. C. , January 24, 1865. 

The court, after mature deliberation, from the evidence adduced, 
find the following facts, viz: 

I. That the U. S. ironclad Patapsco was sunk about 8 o'clock aud 
ten minutes, the night of the 15th January, 1865, in 5 fathoms water. 

*See p. 169. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 179 

II. That her sinking was caused by a torpedo exploding under her 
port side, about 35 feet from the stem. 

III. That at the time of this explosion she was steaming from the 
direction of Fort Sumter and was about TOO yards distant from it, on 
the west side of the channel. 

IV. That she was there to protect picket and scout boats employed 
to find obstructions. 

V. That she was above the regular picket station by order. 

VI. That she sank almost immediately after the explosion. 

A list of the survivors, marked "B," and of the lost, marked "C," 
are herewith appended. 

G. H. SCOTT, 
Captain and Senior Member of the Court. 

W. F. A. TORBERT, 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, Judge-Advocate. 
(B.) 

Officers and men saved from U. .8. ironclad Patapsco. Lieutenant- 
Commander S. P. Quackenbush, Lieutenant W. T. Sampson, First 
Assistant Engineer Reynolds Driver, Acting Ensign A. P. Bashford, 
Third Assistant Engineer John J. Ryan; Isaac Barnes, boatswain's 
mate, in charge; William Nolan, boatswain's mate; -Michael McCaffery, 
gunner's mate; Peter Nolan, chief quartermaster; Joseph Rodgers, 
captain forecastle; James Miller, quarter gunner; Richard Cunning- 
ham, coxswain; Andrew Lawson, Edward I. Eden, George W. Wing, 
seamen; Andrew Fenton, Hugh McGowan, James Murphy, Edward 
Blake, ordinary seamen; Henry Wiegel, George A. Becker, Michael 
Sergeant, Robert K. Brown, JPeter Ross, Joseph Johnson, Edward 
Gannaley, Michael Douland, James M. Thomas, George Caldwell, 
landsmen; James H. Mulhearn, Edward Bogan, James H. Burke, first- 
class boys; John H. Sikes, first-class fireman; Edward Goulden, 
Thomas Bache, James O. Gorman, John McCarty, James O'Brien, 
James J. Brady, second-class firemen; John Larkin, Wayne Weest, 
Thomas Shea, Thomas Pyne, coal heavers. 

The above is a correct list of all the enlisted men saved from the 
Patapsco the night of the loth of January. 

In addition to the above, the captain, executive officer, chief engi- 
neer, engineer of the watch, and Ensign Bashford were saved. 

A. A. SEMMES, 
Lieutenant- Commander, Commanding U. S. S. Lehigh. 

JANUARY 16, 1864. 

(C.) 

Officers and men lost in the U. 8. ironclad Patapsco. John W r hite, 
acting master; Samuel H. Peltz, assistant surgeon; William S. Cree- 
vey, acting assistant paymaster; James C. Brown, Joseph S. Johnson, 
acting ensigns; George L. Palmer, acting second assistant engineer; 
DeWitt G. Davis, Benjamin R. Stevens, third assistant engineers; 
Benjamin B. Nay lor, pilot (not found); Aaron C. Fifield, master-at- 
arms; William Peterson, captain of forecastle; Thomas Brown, cox- 
swain; William H. Miller, Samuel Keiniston, quartermasters; Michael 
Fitzgerald, gunner's mate; James F. Hathaway, yeoman; William H. 
Bissington, paymaster's steward; John Woelfkens, surgeon's steward; 



180 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Jacob H. Funk, captain of the hold; Edward A.Williams, ship's cook; 
Samuel Macra, wardroom cook; Alexander Davis, wardroom steward; 
John Smith, carpenter's mate; Alexander Black, captain'^ steward; 
Martin Morley, ship's writer; Alfred Taylor, sick nurse; Albert Dun- 
bar, James Stevens, captains of after guard; John Francis, coxswain; 
Hiram Whiter, quarter gunner; Joseph Goodall, Alexander Arm- 
strong, seamen; Lorenzo C. Blaisdell, Lewis K, Plummer, Evan M. 
Hopkins, ordinary seamen; William Moore, James Moyle, Michael 
Barrow, John McGinley, Charles O. Washburne, John Manning, 
James Dwyer, Bernard Corregan, Henry Williams, landsmen; Eugene 
Cone, Seth Brinkley, first-class boys; Frank Albertson, John Bradley, 
first-class firemen; Thomas Murphy, second-class fireman; John Mason, 
first-class fireman; Patrick Hawkins, second-class fireman; Edwin 
Gibbs, first-class fireman; James Nielan, William M. Roouand, Wil- 
liam P. Burbeck, David Haggett, second class firemen; John Farron, 
Thomas Cain, Samuel M. Davenport, William Gordon, coal heavers. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Thomp- 
son, IT. 8. Navy, to assume temporary command of the U. 8. S. 
Sonoma. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off Charleston, January 17, 1865. 

SIR: Upon the arrival of the U. S. S. Sonoma at Port Royal you 
will assume the temporary command of that vessel for special service 
for a few days. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander EGBERT THOMPSON, 

Commanding IT. 8. 8. Cimarron. 



Letter from Major- General Sherman, U. S. Army, to Rear-Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding plans of operations. 

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION or THE MISSISSIPPI, 

In the Field, Savannah, January 17, 1865. 

DEAR ADMIRAL: I have this moment received your note of the 16th 
instant, with the letter and roll of charts from Admiral Porter. I 
send you herewith a letter* to Admiral Porter, which I beg you will 
send him at your earliest convenience, but it is not of enough impor- 
tance to detach a ship. I regret exceedingly the loss of the monitor 
Patapsco, especially that she carried down so many valuable lives. 
Admiral Porter thinks he and General Terry can take Fort Fisher, or 
at all events occupy the peninsula above it and cut it off from Wilming- 
ton. Of this we shall hear soon, as he proposed to renew the attack 
on the 13th or 14th, and in case of taking Fort Fisher he would send 
to Charleston all his fleet, save enough to blockade Wilmington and 
keep up communications for the troops on shore. Otherwise he could 
hold on there to engage the attention of the enemy about there, to keep 

*See Series I, vol. 11, p. 612. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 181 

them from me. You will have heard that we took Pocotaligo on the 
15th, according to my plans, and we now have the Seventeenth Corps, 
General Blair, strongly intrenched on the railroad. 1 would by this 
time also have had my left wing at Sister's Ferry, but have been, and 
still am, delayed by the nonarrival of our stores necessary to fill our 
wagons. I will get all the army in motion. The first installment of 
General Graver's division, which is to garrison Savannah, has just 
arrived, and all will be in to-morrow. I would prefer you should run 
no risk at all. When we are known to be in rear of Charleston, about 
Branch ville and Orangeburg, it will be well to watch if the enemy lets 
go of Charleston, in which case Foster will occupy it, otherwise the 
feint should be about Bull's Bay. We will need no cover about Port 
Royal; nothing but the usual guard ships. 1 think that you will con- 
cur with me that, in anticipation of the movement of my army to the 
rear of the coast, it will be unwise to subject your ships to the heavy 
artillery of the enemy or his sunken torpedoes. 1 will instruct Foster, 
when he knows I have got near Branchville, to make a landing of a 
small force at Bull's Bay, to threaten, and it may be occupy, the road 
from Mount Pleasant to Georgetown. This will make the enemy 
believe I design to turn down against Charleston and give me a good 
offing for Wilmington. I will write you again fully on the eve of 
starting in person. 
Your friend, 

W. T. SHERMAN, 

Major- General. 
Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Squadron, of Charleston. 



Letter from Colonel Kozlay, IT. S. Army, to Lieutenant- Commander 
Johnson, U. S. Navy, requesting a demonstration in front and 
rear of Legareville, 8. C. 

HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES FORCES, 

Folly Island, 8. C., January 19, 1865. 

SIR: By direction of the general commanding district 1 have the 
honor to request you ' ' to proceed up Stono and Kiawah rivers and 
shell the front and rear of Legareville, to see whether the enemy has 
new or old batteries there, to discover their strength, make a great 
noise, woriy them, and cause them to believe we are strong." 

I most respectfully request to be informed whether the above can 
be complied with, that I may so state to the general commanding. 

1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient 
servant, 

E. A. KOZLAY, 
Colonel Fifty-fourth New York Yols., Comdg. Post. 

Lieutenant-Commander A. W. JOHNSON, 

Senior Officer, Commanding Fleet at Stono Inlet. 



182 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Belknap, U. 8. Navy, regarding measures of protection 
against Confederate torpedo boats. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Charleston Roads, January 19, 1865. 

SIR: You will lose no time in securing the Canonicus against the 
possible action of the rebel torpedo boats; temporary fenders must be 
used until permanent fixtures can be provided. 

Boat patrol must be used with vigilance, and such other measures 
resorted to as are in common practice here, and which you will best 
become acquainted with by visiting the monitors that have been 
stationed here. 

It is presumed your anchors and chains are in good condition and 
sufficient for such weather as may be expected here at this season. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN. 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander GEORGE E. BELKNAP, 

Commanding U. S. S. Canonious. 

[Order of same date and like tenor to Lieutenant-Commander A. 
W. Weaver, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Mahopac. Order 
dated January 20, 1865, of like tenor, to Commander Enoch G. Parrott, 
commanding U. S. S. Monadnock.} 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Balch, 
U. $. Navy, com,manding U. S. S. Pawnee, to proceed to duty in 
North Ed^sto River. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Charleston Roads, January 19, 1865. 

SIR: After towing the Montauk to Stono, which you will do when 
the weather is favorable, you will proceed to North Edisto without 
delay and join the Sonoma in controlling the river. 

Keep me advised of your movements, and also those of the enemy. 
Knock down any of the enemy's batteries in reach of your guns. 
Be careful not to encounter torpedoes. 

A report has reached me that the rebel advance has fallen back to 
Adams Run before General Howard. 
A copy of the Sonoma's orders is herewith enclosed. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander GEORGE B. BALCH, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pawnee. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Thomp- 
son, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Sonoma, for a reconnaissance 
in the North Edisto Rivei\ 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Charleston Roads, S. C., January 19, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed to Edisto and feel your way up the river so 
far as it may be judicious to do so, in order to ascertain where are the 
present positions of the rebels. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 183 

Your boats should sweep well for torpedoes in advance of the 
steamer. 

If you encounter any force that can be disposed of by your fire, 
do so. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAIILGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander E. THOMPSON, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Sonoma. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding vessels 
recently arrived from the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

No. 35.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Charleston Roads, S. C., January W, 1865. 

SIR: The monitors Canonicus and Mahopac arrived here yesterday; 
also the Shenandoah, Juniata, Ticonderoga, Tuscarora, and State of 
Georgia. 

The Mohican has arrived at Port Royal. 

To-day arrived the Monadnock and Keystone State. 

The Canonicus is in good order, but the Mahopac has a XV-inch 
burst, which can not be replaced here; her decks are reported to leak 
badly. 

The Ticonderoga and Juniata are reported in immediate need of 
much repair in the steam department; they are now in this harbor, 
and orders have been given to place them in serviceable condition. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Rolando, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Keystone State, to tow the U. S. 8. 
Montauk to Wilmington, N. C. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 
Charleston Roads, January 21, 1865. 

SIR: Conformably to the request of Admiral Porter, you will tow 
the monitor Montauk to him at Wilmington as soon as she is ready, 
provided it can be done safely, in your opinion. 

If you encounter a heavy sea on the passage, I should advise not to 
tow the monitor against it if she complains, but let her cast off and 
run with the sea quarters, and a few turns of the screw for steer- 
age way. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 
Commander ROLANDO, 

Commanding Keystone State. 



184 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Rear- Admiral 
Porter, U. S. Navy, regarding the loan of a light-draft monitor. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Charleston Roads, January 21, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: Captain Rolando, of the Keystone State, handed me yours* 
of the 19th yesterday about 2 p. m., just as a northeaster had set in, 
and it was too late that day to cross the bar with the swell that was on. 
1 can very illy spare a monitor at this time, having lost the Patapsco* 
and received three more, one with only a single gun, instead of tour, 
and the Ironsides. 

This may reduce my force too low to make the impression I should 
desire on the rebel batteries, if General Foster will undertake his 
part of the attack I have in view, and which I feel sure will succeed. 
But I also entertain a deep interest in your concluding what you 
have so well begun, and therefore send one of the lightest draft moni- 
tors that I have, on the condition, however, that you will guarantee 
her return to me in one week, or sooner, if I send for her. 

I have also to ask that you will apprise the Navy Department of 
this, and that you will answer for my compliance with your request. 

The Secretary of the Navy informed me that he had ordered you 
to send me all the vessels you could spare. The Brooklyn has not 
arrived. Will } 7 ou please to dispatch her to me, and any other good 
broadsides you may have, together with some double-enders. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Rear- Admiral DAVID D. PORTER, 

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding need of 

naval stores. 

No. 32.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, January 2, 1865. 

SIR: The naval storekeeper finds the stores on hand so much reduced, 
and the consumption so much increased by the arrival of additional 
vessels, that it seems expedient to apprise the Department forthwith, 
in order that the pressing necessity may be met as soon as possible. 

There are other requisitions which require attention. Additional 
vessels and guns have arrived, but they have expended their ammuni- 
tion largely, and supplies are needed for the purpose. 

For these reasons, I send a special steamer to convey the requisi- 
tions to the proper bureaus. 

The time for active operations is rapidly approaching, and General 
Sherman may be expected to move in a few days. 

His right wing has been transported by water from Thunderbolt to 
Beaufort, and the heads of columns are on the railroad above Poco- 
taligo. 

The left wing will soon push out from Savannah, and the whole 
army will then advance on its intended line of march. 

* See Series I, volume 11, p. 615. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 185 

Savannah will be held by a garrison of about 5,000 troops in the 
works extending from Thunderbolt on the left to the Savannah River 
on the right. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Hear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, regarding proposed 
measures of cooperation with Major- General She?*man, U. S. Army. 

No. 33.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST- MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, January %%, 1865. 

SIR: The Department is already advised by my previous letters, and 
no doubt more fully by intelligence from the War Department, of the 
precise object of General Sherman's operation. 

To assist in this a diversion is to be made upon Charleston, though 
General Sherman is directly opposed to any direct attack from sea- 
ward upon the harbor or upon James Island. 

General Foster will not, therefore, engage in anything of the kind, but 
will, conjointly with me, undertake such a move along the approaches 
to Mount Pleasant from Bull's Bay as to embarrass the rebel general 
as to the real design. 

The force I have is not equal to anything more than a cooperation 
with the army, and is therefore limited to what the generals may elect. 

Assuming, however, that the rebel garrisons will be reduced to a 
minimum, I have proposed to General Foster an attack on a portion 
of their works, which I am very hopeful of. At the same time it relies 
very much more on the presumed reduction of the rebel force by 
General Sherman's interior operation than on our own strength. 

General Foster has it now under consideration, and is so far well 
inclined to it that he only wants the sanction of General Sherman. 

I can not, however, avoid comparing the force at my disposal with 
that which has been assigned to other admirals. I have not a single 
good broadside even of one deck; the Pawnee is the heaviest, 8 guns. 

I hope, therefore, the Department may be able to dispatch some 
vessels of the kind with a draft not exceeding 15 feet, and as much 
lighter as may be. 

I find that the monitors which come here bring no ammunition with 
them, and thus rendering my stock per gun too low. 

I send a steamer to inform the Bureau of this, and ask that a supply 
of XV-inch ammunition may be sent with all possible dispatch. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



186 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding proposed 
operations against Georgetown, S. C. 

No. 37.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, January 24, 1866. 

SIR: I have received the paper enclosed l>y the Department in rela- 
tion to the harbor of Georgetown. 

The subject has not escaped my attention. The Department will find 
in a previous dispatch (23d September, No. 471) an observation to the 
effect that the detachment of Captain Colvocoresses had interfered 
with the execution of some plans. This referred more immediately to 
a raid on Georgetown, designed to capture the battery in that harbor 
and effectually close it. Captain Colvocoresses had been sent up, and 
made a full reconnoissance of the ground, and the preparations were 
going on. It is not every naval officer who has a taste for such matters, 
and 1 was entirely at a loss at the time for an officer of sufficient rank 
and experience to be entrusted with 500 sailors away from the ships, 
and to ensure a perfect concert with the -vessels. 

Soon after (September 29) the Wabash was detached, and that deprived 
me of at least 300 men that I had counted on, and could not replace. 
So I had to postpone the design for the time. 

Since that time I have kept as good a vessel off the port as could 
be spared. 

The Department's communication of the 13th instant has been so far 
anticipated that on the arrival of fresh vessels from the North Atlantic 
Squadron I sent there the State of Georgia, and ordered the Tusca- 
rora, also the Mingoe, as soon as she could be spared from action with 
the division of General Foster on the Tulifinny. 

When the diversions and demonstrations asked for by General Sher- 
man have been concluded by his advance, I may have to give some 
attention to Georgetown, in order to meet any contingency dependent 
on his desire to communicate. 

I observe that Admiral Porter, in one of his squadron orders, says 
that he can land 2,000 men and not feel it. 

If I could do that, many effective enterprises might be conducted 
on this coast. But the squadron is now 600 men short, and even the 
detail for the fleet brigade, 500 men, was the cause of continued appeals 
to me from the vessels. 

I will reorganize the brigade again as soon as it is possible, and 
hope that it may be convenient to fill the complements of ships at an 
early date. 

If sailors are organized" they will stand fire ashore just as well as 
soldiers; and no better duty was done by any regiment in the expedi- 
tion of Broad River than by the sailors and marines of the brigade. 
They never gave way. 

I gave my personal attention to the organization and drill for three 
days, and went ashore with them at Boyd's Neck, where they landed 
and pushed well up ahead before a regiment was ashore; the sailors, 
marines, and howitzers deployed as skirmishers over an extended 
front. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. Mouth Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 187 

Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting letter 
from Major- General Sherman, W. S. Army, requesting a naval dem- 
onstration in the Edisto or Stono River. 

No. 38.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, January %4-> 1865. 

SIR: The enclosed copy of a note from General Sherman conveys 
the latest information to this date of the state of things here. 

I have the Dai Ching and a tug in the Combahee to assist the move 
at that ferry. 

The Sonoma is in the North Edisto, and the Pawnee leaves at early 
light with a tug for the Ashepoo, where a battery and obstructions 
are reported. 

The orders of all are to drive in the rebel pickets and knock down 
his batteries where tjie} 7 can be reached. 

The Tmcarora, Mingoe, State of Georgia, and Nipsic are at George- 
town, with orders to prevent the erection there of any batteries. 

The Pontiacis in the Savannah River, at Purysburg, advancing with 
General Sherman's extreme left. The demonstration desired by Gen- 
eral 'Sherman at Charleston may be said to be begun by the collection 
there of so many ironclads. 

When Admiral Porter sent the Monadnock he apprised me that her 
draft was too great for his purpose, and requested that I would send 
him one of the lightest draft monitors in exchange. His words were: 
"There are one or two forts on the river that I can not wind up with- 
out an ironclad." If I could have asked the instructions of the De- 
partment I should have done so. As it was, an important object 
required me to act, and I did as I believed the Department would have 
me do. I ordered the Nontauk to be sent to Rear- Admiral Porter, 
on the condition, however, that it was for a week only. It was a great 
exertion of self-denial, for I believed and hoped there would be as 
great need here for all the force I could command, and what I had 
received fell far short of my expectations. 

The Department will no doubt credit me, therefore, with a strong 
persuasion that I was doing the best for the public interests. 

It would be very advantageous if more light-draft vessels were sent 
here. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, 

In the Field, Beaufort, S. C. , January 24, 1865. 
DEAR ADMIRAL: Weather is now fine and promises us dry land. I 
will go to-day to Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie. To-morrow will dem- 
onstrate on Salkehatchie and would be obliged if you would fire up 
Edisto or Stono, just to make the enemy uneasy on that flank, and to 
develop if he intends to hold fast to Charleston and Columbia, both. 

It will take five days for Slocum to get out of the savannas of Savan- 
nah, and during that time I will keep Howard seemingly moving direct 



188 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRCN. 

on Charleston, though with no purpose of going beyond the Salke- 
hatchie. 

Yours, 

W. T. SHERMAN, 

Major- General. 
Admiral DAHLGREN. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Major- General 
Sherman, U. 8. Army,, acceding to request for cooperation,. 

HILTON HEAD, January 24, 1865 4. p. in. 

This northwest wind will dry up the roads and drain the swamps. 
The Sonoma is in the North Edisto. The Dai Ching in the Combahee, 
with orders to annoy the rebels as much as possible, to land and drive 
in their pickets. The Pawnee is just leaving for the South Edisto. 
I hear that a battery and obstructions have been felt on the Ashepoo, 
and much alarm at our reconnoissance. The Pawnee will go there 
and try to knock it down. It is said to be 20 miles up the Ashepoo. 
If General Howard's men feel that way, it might prove of interest. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, U. S. Navy. 
Major-General SHERMAN. 



Order of Rear -Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Scott, 
U. 8. Navy, senior officer, inner blockade of Charleston, to search 
for torpedoes. 

FLAGSHIP, 

Port Royal, S. C. , January &, 1865. 

SIR: I wish to have the water well searched for torpedoes on a 
line nearly parallel to the beach of Sullivan's Island, and about 800 or 
1,000 yards from it, from opposite Moultrie and ranging out seaward 
as far as the shoal allows, being nearly a continuation of a line passing 
through Johnson and Sumter. 

This must be done by the boats at night, covered by tugs as well as 
possible. 

Do not move the monitors from their usual position in such work. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Captain G. H. SCOTT, 

U. S. Ship John Adams, Senior Officer, Inner Blockade. 



Report of Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, regarding a reconnoissance 
in North Edisto River. 

U. S. SLOOP OF WAR ST. Louis, 

North Edisto River, South Carolina, January $4, 1865. 
SIR: Understanding you were desirous of ascertaining if the enemy 
had any force in this neighborhood, I sent the launch and gig up river 
to-day on a reconnoissance in charge of Lieutenant Stewart, and here- 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 189 

with enclose his report.* He was fired upon in Togodo Creek by the 
enemy's pickets, and returned their fire, bursting a shell in the house 
in which they were lodged. 

Veiy respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 

Commander. 
Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Abstract log of the U. S. S. Pontiac, Lieutenant- Commander Luce, 
U. S. Navy, commanding. 

January $4., 1865. Steaming up Savannah River, at 11:37 a. in., 
came to with stern anchor 100 yards below Sister's Ferry Bluff, Mor- 
rall's Landing, in 3 fathoms water. At 1 p. m. sent second cutter and 
crew ashore scouting, in charge of the executive officer. At 4:45 p. m. 
cleared ship for action for the night. Mr. Winslow returned to the 
ship with a prisoner, John Gay lord. Took possession of the bluff 
overlooking landing and occupied it for a picket station. At 5:30 
sent a boat into the landing to do picket duty for the night. 

January 25. Kt 7 a. m. sent second cutter to the landing. At 7:30 
a. m. second cutter and dingey returned, bringing James M. Fleet- 
wood, J. A. Ganaan, and J. B. Metzger, prisoners of war. At 10 
sent a scouting party ashore, in charge of Executive Officer G. F. 
Winslow. At 11 got underway and steamed up the river, but finding 
the bluff too high to range our guns, returned to our former position. 
Mr. Winslow and party returned to the ship. At 1:30 p. m. sent boat 
ashore, in charge of Executive Officer Winslow, to erect rifle pits for 
our pickets on the bluff. 

January 26. At 10 a. m., Third Assistant Engineer C. A. Uber, 
accompanied by Acting Gunner C. F. Adams and 4 men, went on a 
reconnoissance on shore. At 5:30 p. m. a contraband came on board 
and reported 4 of our men being captured by the rebels. At 11 p. m. 
pickets on shore hailed a boat with something in tow, steering toward 
the ship; receiving no answer, fired two rounds of canister and one 
shell. 

January 27. At 11 a. m. sent a party on shore to erect a flagstaff. 
Sent Second Assistant Engineer H. F. Bradford and John Hynds, fire- 
man, to communicate with the enemy under flag of truce, by order 
of the commanding officer. Returned to ship at 7, having communi- 
cated with rebel pickets. 

January 28. From 4 to 8 a. m. Second Assistant Engineer H. F. 
Bradford went on shore to communicate with the enemy under flag of 
truce, by order of commanding officer. Sergeant of marines and 2 
privates went on shore to communicate with the advance of the Four- 
teenth Corps. At 10 a. m. General Slocum's command came in on the 
Georgia bank. Withdrew pickets from shore, got underway and 
steamed up Savannah River. At 11 came to anchor off Sister's 
Ferry. At 11:30 J. T. Tappan came alongside, a deserter from the 
rebel gunboat Macon, at Augusta. 

January 29. At 1:30 p. m. embarked a detachment of the Second 
Ohio Brigade; got underway and dropped anchor off Old Sister's 
Ferry; disembarked troops. 

*Not found. 



190 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 

Fetouary?. At 1 p. m. embarked 20 men of the Twenty-fourth Illi- 
nois Regiment and steamed up the river. At 2 ran onto a sand bar. 
Dingey and life boat, with troops under command of Colonel Pearce, 
went up the river to reconnoiter. At 3:30 backed off the bar. At 
5:40 p. m. weighed anchor and steamed down the river to Sister's 
Ferry and took a position to command the Georgia heights during the 
withdrawal of our troops. 

February 8. The last of the rear guard of the left wing of General 
Sherman's army having withdrawn from the Georgia side, the pontoon 
removed and no more transportation required, in short, there being no 
further need of the presence of a gunboat at this point, at 6:15 a. m. 
got underway and steamed down Savannah River, with transports 
Fountain and Naushon in company. At 7:45 p. m. came to anchor off 
city of Savannah. At 8 sent on shore five prisoners of war to be 
transferred to the military authorities. 



Loss of the U. 8. S. Dai Ching, during an engagement with Confed- 
erate battery in Combahee River, South Carolina, January 26, 1865. 

Eeport of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, TT. S. Navy. 

No. 50.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, January 31, 1865. 

SIR: It is with great regret that I have to inform the Department of 
the loss of the U. S. S. Dai Ching, which having grounded in the 
Combahee under the fire of a rebel battery, was defended for seven 
hours, and being then much cut up, and her guns disabled, was fired 
by her commander. 

All the officers and crew, wounded or not, were brought off safely, 
except one officer and four men in a boat, who, were fired upon by the 
rebel pickets and surrendered. 

The enclosed report of Captain Chaplin will communicate the details 
of this occurrence, and a court of enquiry will elicit all the facts for the 
action of the Department. 

The Dai Ching was proceeding up the Combahee, the Pawnee up the 
Ashepoo, the Sonoma up the North Edisto, and the Wissahickon, 
McDonough, etc., in the Stono, in order to menace the flank of the 
rebel position, while subjected to General Sherman's operations in 
front. 

On the 24th the General wrote me: "To-morrow I will demonstrate 
on Salkehatchie and will be obliged if you will feel up Edisto or Stono, 
just to make the enemy uneasy on their flank, and develop if he intends 
to hold fast to Charleston and Columbia, both," etc. 

Besides this there was another reason for the action of the Dai 
Ching in the Combahee. 

That vessel being at the head of Broad River, operating with the 
troops, an intimation was received by Captain Chaplin from General 
Howard that the Dai Ching would be of service to the right flank if 
that vessel could ascend the Combahee River as far as the ferry. 

The vessels were in position in good time, and it appears from the 
report of Captain Chaplin, that the Dai Ching was proceeding up the 
Combahee on the 26th, when she suddenly came upon a rebel battery 
and was fired on. 

While maneuvering to gain a better position, the Dai Ching grounded, 
in conseqtience of the pilot's deserting his duty, and the disaster became 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 191 

decisive when the commander of the little steamer (the Clover) that 
attended failed so shamefully in his duty to assist the Dai Ching off. 

For seven hours the Dai Ching was courageously defended, and 
when reduced to a wreck and her heavy gun disabled, all hands were 
brought off, except the live already mentioned. 

The court of enquiry now in session will elicit and record all the 
facts of the case, but I feel confident from Captain Chaplin's invariable 
character for courage and conduct, that the loss of the Dai Ching will 
be found to belong to the proper risks of war, and are well vindicated 
by the courage and constancy that are called forth by the occasion. 

The Department will perceive by inspecting the map that the Com- 
bahee leads directly to the flank of the Salkehatehie, where our troops 
were to attack, and that any impression by the navy would be of more 
consequence there than elsewhere. 

1 consider it, therefore, incumbent on me to use every exertion to 
meet the wishes of the general. 

This is the first vessel of the squadron that has been lost in action 
under my command since I came here in July, 1863, unless the little tug 
Columbine, with her guns, is accounted a vessel of war. 

The Dai Ching was the least valuable in many respects of the light- 
draft gunboats, her speed under steam being less then 5 knots, and her 
only heavy gun a 100-pounder. 

Of course I would not risk even that much without sufficient reason. 

On the 26th I was off Stono at day light and went in to see personally 
to the state of affairs there. In the afternoon steamed to South Edisto, 
expecting that the Pavmee might have reached there. After a brief 
stay, came out, heard nothing, though the action of the Dai Ching must 
have been going on at the time and the wind was fair. 

Next morning I was in Port Royal to communicate with the army, 
and learning from General Foster that he would move on North Edisto, 
I sent a message to the Pawnee to leave the Ashepoo and go to North 
Edisto to assist the Sonoma, having no other vessel to send. 

After dark of that day came Captain Chaplin with the loss of the 
Dai Ching. In a couple of hours I left that night and steamed around 
to look at matters myself, and went first into South Edisto. In coming 
out the captain ran his vessel on a bank not 60 yards from the beach, 
and I was tied up for the day. One or two light field guns would have 
destroyed the Harvest Moon. 

I sent a detachment ashore to hold the road, but the rebels had too 
much to do elsewhere. 

Late in the evening the Harvest Moon floated, and I came here to see 
what vessels I could get from those under repair and also to hear of 
General Sherman's movements. 

As soon as the gunboat can be got ready 1 will send her around to 
watch the Combahee and prevent the rebels from plundering the wreck 
of the Dai Ching. 

The heavy vessels that have arrived lately are very acceptable, for 
they will be of use outside, but some more light-draft gunboats would 
be very useful inside. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



192 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin, TJ. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Dai Ching. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
Port Royal Harbor, 8. C, , January %8, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to your order of the 24th instant, I proceeded to 
St. Helena, where I procured a pilot from the U. S. S. Stettin and 
proceeded up the Combahee River. At 5 o'clock p. m. we anchored, 
as the pilot was afraid to go up after dark. At 6 a. m. the morning 
of the 26th, I came on deck to get the ship underwa}^ and proceed on 
up the river, but seeing a boat manned by white men coming down, 
delayed getting underway until I could ascertain her character. The 
boat went alongside the tug Clover, which was in company with us, 
and soon after Acting Ensign Leach, commanding the tug, came on 
board and reported the boat to be from the schooner Coquette, loaded 
with 74 bales of cotton, and tying about 2 miles below the batteries at 
Tar Bluff, about 5 miles above where we lay. We immediately got 
underway and proceeded up the river, the tug following. At 7:30 a. m. 
we went to quarters, the earth works on Tar Bluff being in sight, though 
no guns or men could be seen with a glass from the masthead. We 
were now about 2 miles from the works, and nearly up to the schooner. 
Acting Master George Ho worth was sent with an armed crew in the 
first cutter to take possession of the prize, and the tug was ordered to 
take her in tow, and follow us on up the river. When within a mile 
of the earthworks, and while training the 20-pounder rifle upon it, the 
rebels opened upon us with three guns, one shot falling short, the 
other two going over our deck. The engines were immediately 
reversed, the ship turned and headed down the river, with the inten- 
tion of engaging them in the reach below, where we would be less 
exposed to rebel fire. While turning a very sharp bend, the wind 
blowing fresh down the river, with a strong ebb tide, I perceived that 
the ship would run into the bank on our starboard bow, and discov- 
ered that the pilot had deserted the bridge. 1 immediately rang three 
bells, but before the ship could be backed, she forged ahead into the 
bank, where she remained fast. Our howitzers and after 20-pounder 
were now at work, being the only guns we could bring to bear. Sig- 
nals were made for the tug to come to our assistance, and the main 
rail was being cut away, so that the 100-pounder could be trained, 
which soon commenced playing on the enemy, doing good execution. 
The tug came up, and while attempting to take our line, got in be- 
tween the ship and the bank, and with great difficulty we succeeded 
in springing her out. She then took our line, which parted, and instead 
of returning and taking a hawser, which was ready, she stood on down 
the river. Mr. Howorth was ordered to proceed down the river, and 
communicate with the U. S. steamers Pawnee and Stettin. Signals 
were again made recalling the tug, and though only a half mile below 
us, she took no notice of them. Acting Ensign Duncan was now 
sent with four men in the second cutter, with orders to bring her 
back, but just before the boat reached the tug she started down the 
river. The tide having fallen considerably, the ship settled down by 
the stern, where she had 6 fathoms of water. Our battery was worked 
vigorously all the while. The Dai Ching had now been struck more 
than 30 times, her decks were shot through in six or seven places, one 
shot going through the reinforce deck, lodging in the berth deck. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 193 

The launch Was shot away and the masts and smokestack were hit in 
several places. One shot penetrated the hull below water line. Our 
100-pounder was the only gun we could now use, as the ammunition 
for the 20-pounders was expended. The crew, except enough to work 
the 100-pounder and pass ammunition, were now ordered to jump on 
the marsh and keep close under the bow, clear of the enemy's fire, 
which was now very accurate, the projectiles being mostly shell, 
apparently from Brooke rifle. At 2:30 p. m. our 100-pounder was 
struck by a solid shot, cutting away the forward hurter, smashing the 
eccentric, thus disabling our only hope, and wounding 4 men. The 
ship was now a perfect wreck, and we could make no reply to the 
enemy, who were playing on us with terrible effect. A consultation 
was now held, and it was deemed advisable to fire and leave the ship, 
as there was no hope of saving her. The small arms were passed to 
the men in the marsh". The chronometer and paymaster's books were 
placed in the gig, the only remaining boat. Acting Ensign Walton was 
sent in charge of her, taking 2 of the wounded men who were unable to 
walk. At 3 p. m. the ship was fired aft, and all the officers now took 
to the marsh, and all hands proceeded in the direction of the mouth of 
the river. At 3:30 p. m. the ship was in flames, and main and mizzen 
mast fell over the side with colors flying. After walking 4 miles in 
the marsh, and wading several creeks, we saw the tug and made sig- 
nals to her, when she came to our assistance and took us off. Acting 
Ensign Walton had in the meantime arrived on board the tug, and 
reported having been fired into by a picket of 12 men, and having seen 
the second cutter ashore with several bullet holes in her, crew and 
officer gone, being probably captured while conveying orders to the 
tug. We now proceeded down the river, and at 11 p. m. arrived on 
board the Pawnee, where we were all kindly cared for. Acting Mas- 
ter's Mate Bryant, of the Clovei*, was sent on board of the prize when 
she was captured, and had in the meantime taken her to the mouth of 
the Combahee and anchored. It is my opinion that bad they come to 
our assistance when ordered, and taken our hawser, the ship would 
have been saved, as sluing her stern a very little would have brought 
the tide on our inside quarter, which would have swept the ship off. 

I would particularly call your attention to the coolness and gallantly 
of Acting Master William McKendry and Acting Ensign Walter Wal- 
ton, the former fighting the 100-pounder for seven hours and the latter 
the i ; i '-pounder till the ammunition was expended, when he went below 
and filled shells for the 100-pounder, and afterwards took charge of 
the gig with the wounded men and brought them off safely, though 
fired upon by rebel pickets all along the bank of the river. Every 
officer and man did his duty. 

I herewith enclose the surgeo .'s report of the wounded. 

I have neglected to mention, if it had not been for Acting Ensign 
Walton arriving at the Clover the time he did, we woul^ have been 
compelled to remain in the marsh all night, as Acting Ensign Leach 
had given orders to get underway and proceed down the river, disre- 
garding the orders of Acting Master Howorth to return to the Dal 
('/'>}$. and it was onl by ositive command that Mr. Walt 



positive command that Mr. Walton could 
make him proceed up the river for a short distance in search of the 
officers and men in the marsh. 

N w R VOL 16 13 



194 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

I would respectfully request that the loss of the U. S. S. Dal Ching 
be further examined into by a court of enquiry. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. CHAPLIN, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
Port Royal Harbor, 8. C. , January 28, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: 1 hereby respectfully submit to you a list of the wounded 
men on board the U. S. S. Dai Ching while engaging a rebel battery- 
on the Combab.ee River, South Carolina, on the 26th January, 1865: 
John H. Fulcher, acting third assistant engineer; slightly wounded. 
W. C. Chaplin, captain's clerk; slightly wounded. 
William Winchester, boatswain's mate; slightly wounded. 
Peter Faley, boatswain's mate; wounded in the face. 
Albert Loring, coal heaver; wounded in hand. 
Roger Toner, quartermaster; wounded in back. 
Hugh King, landsman; wounded in head. 
John Sheppard, second-class fireman; wounded in head. 
Thomas Goodwin, second-class fireman; severely wounded in the 
back. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN R. RICHARDSON, 

Acting Assistant Surgeon. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, forwarding names of those captured from 

the U. S. S. Dai Ching. 

No. 62.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. 61, February 6, 1865. 

SIR: I herewith enclose the names of the persons attached to the 
U. S. S. Dai Ching who were captured while conveying orders to 
the U. S. S. Clover on the 26th January, in the Combahee River. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

Names of persons captured belonging to the U. S. 8. Dai Ching. 
Acting Ensign Charles D. Duncan; Charles Brown, Alex. Venant, 
George Washington, landsmen; Thomas Chambers, nurse. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 195 

Keport of Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin, U. S. Navy, transmitting report of a conference 
with Major-General Howard, U. S. Army, regarding the need for the U. S. S. Dai Ching 
in the Combahee River. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
Port Royal Ila-rbw, 8. C. , January 31, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I herewith forward Acting Ensign Walton's report of 
the conversation addressed to him by Major-General Howard, relative 
to the service that might be rendered by the U. S. S. Dai Ching at 
the point designated. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. 0. CHAPLIN, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Bear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
Port Royal Harbot^, S. C. , January 31, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to state that in obedience to your orders of 
the 21st of January, 1865, I proceeded to Beaufort, S. C. , to find the 
commanding officer of the army in the vicinity, and ascertain where 
the Dai Ching would be of most service, as the Dai Ching had been 
ordered to cooperate with the army. I arrived in Beaufort on the 22d 
of January, and had an interview with Major- General Howard, to 
whom I stated your message. The general informed me that the Dai 
Ching could not be of any possible service to him at Port Royal Ferry, 
but would be a great protection to his right flank, if the Dai Ching 
ascended the Combahee River as far as Combahee Ferry, as he intended 
sending troops there to prevent the rebels from crossing at that point. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WALTER WALTON, 
Acting Ensign, U. S. Navy. 
Lieutenant-Commander J. C. CHAPLIN, U. S. Navy. 



Eeport of Commander Balch, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Pawnee. 

U. S. STEAM SLOOP PAWNEE, 
St. Helena Sound, S. C., January 27, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: 1 have the honor to submit the following report: 

On the morning of the 25th 1 left Port Royal and crossed the bar at 
St. Helena, and* at the proper time of tide attempted to cross the bar 
at the mouth of the Ashepoo, but found it impossible, and, night com- 
ing on, I was compelled to anchor off Otter Island. 

On the morning of the 26th instant I got underway and proceeded 
up the Ashepoo to the head of navigation for the Pawnee and anchored, 
intending- to cany out your instructions in regard to scouting the river 
and its vicinity. I went up in the Daffodil as far as she could go at 
that time of the tide, and fired at Fort Chapman some twenty or thirty 
rounds, but elicited no reply. We observed only a few rebels at a 
picket station in that vicinity, which we also shelled. 

On my way up the river I took on board a contraband, whom I have 
thought might give you some information as to the obstructions in 



196 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

Charleston Harbor, as he has been employed in that work. He left 
Charleston on Sunday last with a pass from his master, who signs 
himself "Engineer of the harbor obstructions." 

This contraband also reports that troops were at Willstown, on the 
South Edisto, with a battery of six or seven guns. This battery is on 
a bluff, and he further states that he thinks they were about moving 
it and the troops; but I should regard that, as doubtful, under the 
circumstances. You will be able to get full information from him, 
and I therefore send him to you. 

At 5 p. m., whilst at anchor up at the head of navigation for the 
Pawnee, a boat came up the river from the Dai Ching, with the report 
that she was then on shore and under a heavy fire of a rebel battery, 
and was then being badly cut up and only able to reply with her 
100-pounder. I immediately proceeded down the Ashepoo, intending, 
if it were possible, to go up the Combahee to the assistance of the Dai 
Ching; the Pawnee came down the river, and, although it was dark, 
we succeeded in crossing the bar without difficulty; and whilst near 
the Stettin we received a boat from the Clover, in -charge of the pilot 
(Small), reporting that the Dai Ching had been burned and her officers 
and crew on board the Clover. I dispatched the Daffodil without 
delay to the Clover for the purpose of bringing all hands to this ship 
where the wounded could be cared for, and the officers and crew of 
the Dai Ching made more comfortable. 

Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin informs me that the rebels had two 
7-inch Brooke rifles and a smoothbore, and that the Dai Ching had, at 
the time he left her, first setting her on fire, been under fire some seven 
hours, and that the rebels had the exact range, all his ammunition 
being expended, and he was compelled to leave the vessel, there being 
no hope of saving her. 

While regretting the loss of this very efficient vessel, I am glad to 
state that she was only given up when the last hope was gone, and that 
she was gallantly defended and deserved a better fate. 

I intend to proceed up the Combahee in the Pawnee as soon as I can 
do so, and hope to be able to shell the rebels out of the battery; but 
from what 1 can learn from Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin, I can do 
no more without troops, as a vessel to get to the battery has to go 
"head on" for 2,100 yards. My 100-pounder would, of course, reach 
this battery, but 1 should be in danger of being raked, and more* likely 
to be hit than the Dai Ching from our great size. I shall endeavor to 
bring my broadside guns to bear, which, if I could do, will enable me, 
I think, to silence the battery. To take it, I am satisfied, will require 
a combined attack. 

I have not dispatched the Daffodil* as I shall tako, her with me up 
the river as a tender. She is now getting in coal from the Stettin, as 
also the Clover. The latter vessel will take the officers and crew of 
the Dai Ching to Port Royal without delay, and I shall then proceed 
up the Combahee for the purpose of shelling the battery as above 
indicated. 

From Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Van Alstine, who went up the 
Ashepoo with me, I have received all the aid in his power. I had no 
pilot, but with the assistance of a contraband, and the Daffodil going 
ahead and sounding, we were enabled to get up without much difficulty. 
The river is exceedingly narrow in places, and the current exceedingly 
swift. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 197 

I should mention that the Combahee is very strongly picketed; but 
the navigation is no more difficult than the Ashepoo. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. B. BALCH, 

Commander, U. 8. Navy. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Elockdg. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, TT. S. Navy, for a court of enquiry. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 
Port Royal, S. C. , January 30, 1865. 

SIRS: You are hereby appointed a naval court of enquiry to ascertain 
the facts attending th'e loss of the U. S. S. Dai Ching, and report them, 
with your opinion thereon. 

Your attention will be particularly directed to the conduct of the 
commanding officer of the U. S. tug Clover, and how far that influenced 
the final loss of the Dai Ching. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster J. T. Lee, of the Oimarron, will act as 
judge-advocate. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander JOHN J. ALMY, 

Juniata. 
Commander EGBERT THOMPSON, 

Ci/marron. 
Lieutenant-Commander GEORGE B. WHITE, 

Ticonderoga. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting the finding of the court of 

enquiry. 

No. 66.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbar, February 10, 1865. 

SIR: The court of enquiry in the case of the Dai Ching has closed 
its proceedings and I enclose herewith a copy of its finding, as the 
original record may yet be wanted here and is too bulky for the 
clerical force of the staff to copy in time for the mail. 

Conformably to the recommendation of the court further proceed- 
ings will be had in regard to the commanding officer of the Clover, 
and a court-martial will be convened as soon as other previous require- 
ments of the service will permit. 

As Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin has been some time on this 
station, and has lost all his clothes and effects, I may give him a short 
leave, with permission to apply to the Department for its extension. 

I sent the Ottawa and Winona into the Combahee to observe the 
rebel movements and prevent their making any use of the wreck of 
the Dai Ching. 

Captain Stillwell, of the Ottawa, reports that he anchored within 
200 yards of the Dai Ching, sent boats, and found she had been 
burned to the water's edge. 



198 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

A spirited reconnoissance was then made with boats, from which a 
landing was effected, and the country traversed for several miles. 

Captain Stillwell reports that he could see troops in the battery, 
and our party saw small squads of cavalry as they pulled down the 
river and fired into them. 

He also reports that, in his opinion, he had done all that can be 
accomplished for the present. 

I expect to leave for Stono in a few hours, having ordered two or 
three monitors there upon a call from the commanding general at that 
place. 

I have'the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

4 

Copy of the finding of a court of enquiry, organized to ascertain tJie circumstances attendant 
upon the loss of the U. S. S. Dai Ching. 

The court, being in possession of all the requisite evidence in the 
case, find the following facts established, viz. : 

That, on the morning of the 26th day of January, 1865, the U. S. S. 
Dai Ching, under the command of Lieutenant-Commander J. C. 
Chaplin, U. S. Navy, in steaming up the Combahee River, South Car- 
olina, encountered a battery of three guns (two of them Brooke 7-inch 
rifles), which pointed down and commanded a long reach in the river, 
and opened on the Dai Ching as soon as she came within range, to 
which the Dai Ching replied, and turned around with the view of 
entering a bend or opening in the river, in order to flank the battery 
and get a better position without being so much exposed to the 
enemy's fire. 

Soon after she turned around she got aground on the right bank of 
the river, with her bow high up and 7 fathoms of water under her 
counter and stern. 

It appears that the cause of the Dai Ching^s getting ashore was the 
cowardly conduct of the pilot, Stephen Small, a colored man, who fled 
below into the fire room when the first shot from the enemy's battery 
flew over the decks. 

The Dai Ching got ashore about 8 a. m. , and the U. S. tug Clover, 
commanded by Acting Ensign F. S. Leach, was near by, underway 
and afloat. Soon after the Dai Ching got ashore, the Clover came to 
her assistance, took a line from her to pull her off, but the line parted, 
when the Clover dropped down the river a quarter of a mile and 
anchored, and never after came to the assistance of the Dai Ching, 
although a signal was constantly flying from the Dai Ching for her to 
do so. 

The Dai Ching had not a boat sufficiently large to carry out an 
anchor. 

The enemy's battery kept up a constant fire on the Dai Ching, fre- 
quently hitting her and wounding some of her crew; the Dai Ching 
returned the fire to the best of her ability. She careened toward the 
enemy's battery as the tide fell, and the position in which she lay 
aground prevented the use of all the guns except the 100-pounder rifle. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 199 

At 3 p. m., after being under the enemy's fire for about seven hours, 
with her ammunition nearly exhausted, a shot hitting the gun-carriage 
of the 100-pounder rifle rendered it unserviceable and made it impos- 
sible to fire another shot. Nothing was left for Lieutenant-Commander 
Chaplin to do, but to set fire to his vessel and abandon her, which was 
done to prevent her falling into the hands of the enemy. 

The court are of the opinion that no blame can be attached to Lieu- 
tenant-Commander Chaplin for the loss of his vessel, that he used every 
exertion, as far as lay in his power, to get the Dai Ching afloat, and he 
fought her with spirit and bravery as long as it was possible to do so. 

It appears in evidence that the fault of the Dai Ching's getting 
aground was the cowardice of Stephen Small (colored), the pilot, who 
fled below at the first fire of the enenry's battery on the vessel. 

The court finds by the evidence that after the tug Cloverh&d parted 
the line from the Dai Ching in attempting to pull her off, that she 
dropped down the river a quarter of a mile below the Dai Ching, and 
remained there in the most inexcusable manner three-quarters of an 
hour, without attempting to come to her assistance, although the sig- 
nal for the Clover was all the time flying from the Dai Ching, which 
might have been got off had the Clover come promptly to her assist- 
ance. 

The court further finds that when the Clover got underway from this 
anchorage and proceeded down the river with Acting Master Ho worth, 
of the Dai Ching, to the prize schooner Coquette, and she was ordered 
to return up the river immediately to the assistance of the Dai Ching, 
her commander, Acting Ensign F. S. Leach, went up only a part of 
the way, with the masts of the Dai Ching just in sight, and about 3 
miles from her, when he anchored under pretence, as is alleged, that 
at that stage of the tide there was not sufficient water for the Clover 
to go up any farther. Whereas it is in evidence before the court that 
the pilot on board said that there was water enough if the steamer was 
kept in the channel, and that the Clover could go up. From all the 
information which the court were enabled to obtain, they are of opin- 
ion that there was sufficient water. 

The court find that when the Clover was tying at anchor at this 
place, the Dai Ching had the cornet flying at the fore, and which was 
seen from the Clover, as a signal for all boats to come to her. 

The court also find that while the Clover was at anchor at this time 
and place, the Dai Ching was observed to be on fire, and it was sup- 
posed that of course the officers and crew had abandoned her. Acting 
Ensign Leach, instead of going up to the rescue of his comrades in the 
service, or at least to see what had become of them, got underway, 
turning his back to the Dai Ching and all who had been defending her, 
and started down the river. 

When spoken to about it by one of his officers he remarked, "Oh ! 
they have taken to the woods, I suppose, and will march to Beaufort." 

A few moments after one of the boats of the Dai Ching was seen 
coming down the river from above, and it was only then that Acting 
Ensign Leach was induced to turn about and steam up the river toward 
the boat, when he found the officers and crew of the Dai Ching in the 
marshes, who were enabled to get on board the Chver, and were taken 
to the U. S. S. Pawnee, then lying in St. Helena Sound. 

The court are of the opinion that Acting Ensign F. S. Leach 
neglected his duty in the highest degree, disobeying orders by not 



200 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

complying with the signal to come to the assistance of the Dai Ching 
after he had put the provisions on board the Coquette. 

The court are further of the opinion that Acting Ensign F. S. Leach 
displayed great negligence and withdrew and kept out of danger to 
which he should have exposed himself, and did not afford the practic- 
able relief and assistance to a vessel of the United States when she was 
ashore and attacked by an enemy's battery. 

The court are of the opinion that further proceedings are highly 
necessary in the case of the said Acting Ensign Leach. 

The court are of the opinion that Stephen Small (colored), acting as 
pilot of the Dai Ching, behaved in a most cowardly manner in desert- 
ing his post when the first shot was fired at the Dai Ching, causing 
her to go aground, and that steps should be taken to bring him to 
punishment. 

It appears to the court in evidence that when the Clover was 
anchored a quarter of a mile below where the Dai Ching was ashore, 
that Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin ordered Acting Master Howorth 
to take a boat and go down the river to the U. S. steamers Pawnee 
and Stettin and inform them of his situation. 

Acting Master Howorth took a boat, went on board the Clover, and 
told her commander that he wanted him to take him (Howorth) down 
the river in the Clover past the sharpshooters to the prize schooner 
Coquette, which was there. 

This taking the Clover down the river was done without the author- 
ity or consent of Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin and while the signal 
was up for the Clover to come to the assistance of the Dai Ching. 

The court are of the opinion that Acting Master Howorth is highly 
reprehensible for such proceedings. 

Having concluded the proceedings in this case the court adjourned. 

JOHN J. ALMY, 
Commander and President of the Court. 

JOHN T. LEE, 
Acting Assistant Paymaster and Judge- Advocate of the Court. 



Capture* of the schooner Coquette, January 26, 1.865. 
Report of Acting Ensign Leach, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Clover. 

U. S. TUG CLOVER, 
Port Royal, S. C\, January 29, 1865. 

SIR: I very respectfully make the following report: On the morn- 
ing of January 26, whilst lying in the, Combhee River, South Caro- 
lina, a boat came alongside with five men in her, stating they were the 
crew of the blockade-running schooner Coquette, then lying in the 
river about 2 miles ahead. 1 immediately stated the above to the cap- 
tain of the Dai Chi.ng, and got underway and went alongside the 
schooner with the Clover and took her in tow. Enclosed is the prize 
list of officers and crew of the Clover at time of capture. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. S. LEACH, 

Acting Ensign, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

*See also report of Chaplin, p. 192. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 201 

Report of Acting Master's Mate Bryant, U. S. Navy, executive officer of the U. S. S. Clover. 

U. S. STEAM TUG CLOVER, 
Port Royal, 8. C., January 28, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to report the capture of the blockade-running 
schooner ( 1 oquette, of Charleston, on the 26th of January, 1865. 

The following are the circumstances connected with the capture: On 
the 25th of January, 1865, we entered the Combahee River, in com- 
pany with .the U. S. S. Dai Ching, and anchored about 5 p. m. 12 
miles from the mouth of the river. 

At 7 a. m. on the 26th, the crew of the schooner, numbering 5 men, 
came alongside this vessel and reported the schooner deserted by the 
captain and mate. At 7:30 1 got underway and proceeded up the 
river in company with the Dai Ching. At 7:45 we ran alongside the 
schooner. Acting Master's Mate flames Hagan, of this vessel, and 
Acting Master Howorth, with a boat from theDai C'hing, boarded and 
took possession of her. Found her to contain cotton. Left Acting 
Master's Mate S. H. Bryant in charge of the prize, and on the 27th 
she arrived in Port Royal in tow of the Clover. 
The above is respectfully submitted. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. HERBERT BRYANT, 

Acting Master's Mate and Executive Officer. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Eeport of Lieutenant-Commander Chaplin, TT. S. Navy. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C. , February 3, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to report that on the morning of the 
26th of January 5 men came in a boat to where the U. S. S. Dai 
Ching and U. S. S. Clover were lying, near the mouth of the Com- 
bahee River, and gave themselves up, stating that they belonged to the 
blockade-running schooner Coquette. We got underway and about 
7:30 a. m. took possession of her. She had 74 bales of cotton. The 
U. S. S. Clover tow r ed her to this harbor. The master carpenter, 
John [M.] Davies, examined her and reports her unfit to go north at 
this season of the year. 

The following are the men who claim to have belonged to her: John 
Stansluff, William Ormandy, Samuel Taylor, Frank Joseph, William 
Chuston. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. CHAPLIN, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



202 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Beport of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, TJ. S. Navy. 

No. 64.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., February 7, 1865. 

SIR: The cargo of the schooner Coquette, prize to the U. S. S. Dai 
Ching, is sent north for adjudication, by the U. S. S. Massachusetts, 
as the schooner is not-deemed seaworthy. 

Acting Master George Howorth, prize master, goes north with it, 
and has the customary letter of instructions. 

I have the honor to be. very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

WASHINGTON, January 27, 1865. 

Put immediately on board the State of Georgia, Captain Stanly, as 
many XV-inch projectiles as she can carry for the South Atlantic 
Squadron and inform Captain Stanly that more will be sent from 
New York per steamer Queen. Answer. 

H. A. WISE, 

Chief Bureau. 
Commander LYNCH, U. S. Navy, 

U. S. Ship St. Lawrence, off Norfolk. 



Report of Mai or- General Foster. U. S. Army, regarding the distribution 

V 7 7_? J.' J J. J." 

of naval vessels for cooperative aemonstratwn. 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, 

Hilton Head, S. C. , January 27, 1865. 

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that Admiral Dahlgren informs 
me that in obedience to your request, by telegram, he has sent the 
following vessels to make the demonstrations requested by you, viz: 
To the Combahee River, the gunboat Dai Ching and one armed tug; 
to the South Edisto, the Pawnee and one armed tug; to the North 
Edisto, the Sonoma; to the Stono, the Wissahickon, the McDonough, 
and two mortar schooners. In addition, I have directed General Potter 
to proceed to Edisto Island and, with the Twenty-second U. S. Colored 
Troops already landed there, to make a strong demonstration toward 
Willstown, on the South Edisto River, cooperating with the navy. 
I will, if required, reinforce him as far as necessary. The enemy 
have always kept a force at Willstown guarding the roads to Adams 
Run and Jacksonboro. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 

Major- General of Volunteers. 
Major-General W. T. SHERMAN, 

Comdg. Military Division of tlie Mississippi, Pocotaligo. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 203 

Letter from Major- General Sherman, U. S. Army, to Sear-Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the opening of the campaign in 
the Carolinas. 

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, 

In the Field, Pocotaligo, January 27, 1865. 

DEAR ADMIRAL: I have now reconnoitered all the country from the 
Salkehatchie bridge back to and including Coosawhatchie. The enemy 
had fortified eveiy path leading from the various landings to the rail- 
road, and could have bothered us a good deal had we not got Pocotal- 
igo in the way we did by the several divisions and the quick, prompt 
attack. From here we will find no trouble in getting an offing. 

I have official reports that Slocum got off for Sister's Ferry on the 
25th and he should be thefe to-morrow. 

It will take him till Monday or Tuesday to cross over, load his 
wagons, and rendezvous at Robertsville, when we will be off. I hope 
this cold, clear weather will last for that time, as the roads here would 
cut to the hub after an hour's rain. 

I have been feeling the Combahee Ferry and also at the bridge, but 
the river is over its banks and fills the swamps for a mile back, too 
deep at points to wade and too shallow at others to use boats. I can 
only see a few rebels on the other bank, but a prisoner captured says 
there is a brigade back a short distance and a considerable force about 
Green Pond, 10 miles east of this. We find no enemy this side of 
the Salkehatchie, except cavalry, which is simply watching us, but 1 
will clear it away in a hurry when we are ready to move. I will be 
sure to let } T OU know the moment we are off, and will leave Hatch's 
division, of Foster's command, here to cover our movements. 
I am, with great respect, yours, truly, 

W. T. SHERMAN, 

Major- General. 
Admiral DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Squadron 



Memorandum from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander 
JBalch, U. S. Navy, regarding intended movements of troops. 

JANUARY 27, 1865. 

A detachment of troops is about to operate by the North Edisto. 
The Sonoma is there. 

Take round the Pawnee and Daffodil, and with the Sonoma assist 
the troops all you can. 

Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 
[Commander BALCH.] 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Johnson, U. S. Navy, regarding a 
reconnaissance in Stono River. 

U. S. S. WlSSAHICKON, 

Stono Ri/ver, South Carolina, January 28, 1865. 
ADMIRAL: A scout was sent up the creeks of John's Island last night, 
and the Stono thoroughly examined to-day. There have been no new 



204 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 

batteries erected since the expedition up the river in July last. Bat- 
tery Pringle has been considerably strengthened and the McDonough 
drew its tire in the reconnoissance of this afternoon. Her shell burned 
two of the remaining houses above Legareville, and the vessels are now 
anchored farther up the stream, as ordered, in positions to annoy and 
repulse the enemy should he make his appearance. No torpedoes have 
been discovered in the river. 

The channel to this inlet was sounded yesterday, and the entrance 
buoy marked as you directed. At high water, full and change, 14 feet 
can be carried through it to the anchorage inside. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. W. JOHNSON, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senioi* Officer Present. 

Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Cmnmanding South Atlantic Blockading Fleet. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Crosman^ U. S. Wavy, regarding a 
reconnoissance in Stono River, and engagement with J^ort Pringle. 

U. S. S. McDONOUGH, 

Stono River, January 29, 1865. 

SIR: Yesterday, with the permission of Lieutenant-Commander A. W. 
Johnson, senior officer present, I went up this river as far as the point 
of woods about 3,000 yards from Fort Pringle, with which work I 
exchanged numerous shots. 

Most of my shell fell inside of the work, and Pringle replied with 
but two heavy guns, which 1 am confident were smoothbore. Not a 
shell exploded near me, though some of the enemy's shot were very 
fairly directed. They were all, I think, solid shot. 

Feeling the woods occasionally as I moved up with shell and grape, 
I sent a boat's crew ashore and burned successively Legare's house and 
the house and outbuildings on the wooded point in whose vicinity the 
Pawnee lay last July. 

I did not bring my vessel within range of the batteries opposite to 
Pringle, as 1 did not think it necessary. 

I am convinced there are no new works on John's Island, and also 
that Fort Pringle is not so formidable as it was in July last. No tor- 
pedoes are in the river }^et, as 1 went up purposely at dead low water 
to endeavor to discover them. 

I expended on this reconnoissance 12 IX-inch shell and 2 stand of 
grape; 12 100-pounder Parrott shell, 1 shrapnel, 1 100-pounder canis- 
ter; 24 50-pounder Dahlgren rifle shell; 1 24-pounder howitzer canister. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. F. CROSMAN, 
Lieutenant- Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Rear-Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 205 

Report of Commander Frailey, U. S. Navy, regarding affairs in 

G-eorgetown Harbor. 

U. S. S. TUSCARORA, 

Off Georgetown, S. ., January 29, 1865. 

SIR: I respectfully report the arrival of the Tuscarora off George- 
town on the forenoon of the 25th instant, and my finding the Mingoe, 
Nipsic, and Gemsbok at anchor in the offing. t)n the following day 
Commander Creighton proceeded with the Mingoe into the inner har- 
bor, but owing to the very fresh winds blowing from the northward 
and westward, and the draft of water of the Nipsic, the pilot, Upte- 
grove, declined taking the latter in until yesterday, when she was 
safely taken over the bar, and both vessels are at anchor in the river. 

The night previous to my arrival the pilot had just returned from a 
scout of a couple of days, having approached to within a few miles of 
Georgetown, and bringing with him on his return two Charleston and 
two Wilmington papers, which are herewith forwarded to you. Cap- 
tain Creighton informs me he has reported the result of his observations. 

Yesterday I sent Acting Ensign S. L. Griffin, of this vessel, into 
the inner harbor in my first cutter, with an armed boat's crew, who, 
on his return, reported everything quiet in the vicinity; and from the 
top of the light-house had a fine view of both North and South islands, 
[Winyah Bay], on neither of which could be perceived any move- 
ments of men or of earthworks being erected. Two picket boats from 
the inside vessels are sent up the river nightly, and from Commander 
Creighton I learn that a torpedo was found washed up on the beach, 
and from which the scouts removed the powder, which was wet and 
damaged. 

1 am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. MADISON FRAILEY, 
Commander, U. 8. Navy, Senior Officer Present. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Major- General 
Sherman, U. S. Army, regretting inability to cooperate as fully as 
desired. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal, January 29, 1865. 

DEAR GENERAL: I was very glad to hear bv your note of the 27th, 
just received, that everything was going so much to your satisfaction. 
I wish I "could say so for myself, but first the Patapsco would be 
blown up by a torpedo, and now the Dai Ching gets foul of a battery, 
gets aground, can't get off, and is destroyed. One thing was right; 
she was defended for seven hours and abandoned to the flames only 
when her pivot gun was disabled by a shot. All the officers and men 
brought off, but four captured in a boat by pickets, so the rebels did 
not gain much. A contraband from Charleston saj's they have drawn 
off nearly all the troops from about the city toward Branchville, 
where they look for "Mr. Sherman." I had no gunboat to replace 
the Dai Ching in the Combahee, and sent the Pawnee from the 
Ashepoo to North Edisto, because I understood General Foster was 



206 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

sending a detachment there for a diversion. The Sonoma was there 
already. Very sorry, general, that I can not do any more for you, 
but the consolation is that you do not need it. The cipher is all right, 
and its chief merit seems to me that when once written it may be 
inscrutable to everybody. 

With my heartiest wishes, dear general, I am, most truly yours, 

J. A. DAHLGREN. 
General SHERMAN, 

Commanding, etc. 

P. S. When you get to Richmond I wish to be there, for 1 have 
yet to bury my boy. 

Report of Commander Balch< U. S. Navy, Commanding U. 8. S. 

Pawnee, regarding an expedition into the North Edisto River, in 

cooperation with the army. 

U. S. STEAM SLOOP PAWNEE, 
Noi'th Edisto, South Carolina, January 30, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to report that this ship entered the 
North Edisto on the evening of the 28th instant, and at daylight of the 
29th proceeded up the river and anchored off White Point, where I 
found the Sonoma. Lieutenant-Commander Fillebrown has been 
actively engaged in scouting with his boats in this vicinity. 

I called upon General Potter, who has command of the troops, and 
expressed the opinion that a move by way of White Point in the direc- 
tion of Adams Run would be better than in the direction of South 
Edisto, and in accordance with this opinion General Potter changed 
his base from Edisto Island to White Point last evening. The Pawnee 
and Sonoma gave every aid in our [their] power in landing the troops, 
having taken position to protect the flank. 

At 8 a. m. this morning, at General Potter's request, we opened fire 
for an hour, at the expiration of which time his troops advanced, 
accompanied by a light 12-pounder of the Sonoma. There has been 
occasional firing from the howitzer and the infantry, but not heavy 
enough to lead one to suppose that the enemy is in strong force. It 
is contemplated by General Potter that the force will fall back by 
night to White Point. 

The troops advanced, I am told by General Potter, till the}'' came to 
a battery, strongly posted, and which replied to his fire. It would 
require a much heavier force than he has to assault it, and he is now 
(7 p. m.) embarking his troops, and they will return to their former 
post on Edisto. 

I sent the Daffodil up the Dawho River, but nothing of importance 
was discovered. I had yesterday, before the troops came, a recon- 
noissance made in the direction of Adams Run, and some rebels were 
found and shots exchanged. Boats from the Sonoma had been up the 
Wadmelawand discovered some few rebels; she went up in that direc- 
tion yesterday and fired her howitzer occasionally. I believe this 
movement of General Potter will have a good effect in worrying the 
enemy. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. B. BALCH, l 
Commander. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 207 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Johnson, U. S. Navy, regarding the 
purpose for a further reconnoissance in the Stono and Kiawah 
Rivers. 

U. S. S. WlSSAHICKON, 

Stono River, South Carolina, January 31, 1865. 
ADMIRAL: In obedience to your verbal order, received this forenoon 
through commanding officer of the Oleander, I have to inform you 
that nothing further has been discovered on the shores of these rivers 
since my report of the 28th instant. 

The "McDonough, the C. P. Williams, and this vessel are anchored 
at the intersection of the Stono and Kiawah, and so soon as more 
reliable information is obtained from our scouts, I purpose to again 
reconnoiter these streams with the two gunboats. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. W. JOHNSON, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Fleet. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Luce, U. S. Navy, commanding 
U. S. S. Pontiac, regarding an expedition in the Savannah River 
for cooperation with the army. 

U. S. S. PONTIAO, 

Sisters terry, Savannah River, Georgia, January 31, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: In obedience to your order of the 13th instant, I 
reported on the 15th instant to General Sherman, at Savannah, and 
was by him referred to General Slocum for special instructions. 

Agreeably to such instructions, we left Savannah on the afternoon 
of the 18th, in company with the army transport Robert E. Lee, and 
arrived at Purj^sburg, about 20 miles up the river, on the afternoon of 
the 19th, where we found a portion of the Twentieth Corps, General 
[Alpheus S.] Williams. Kemained at Purysburg until the 22d, when 
we proceeded up the river, and on the 24th anchored at Morrall's 
Landing, at the lower end of Sister's Ferry Bluffs, about 41 miles from 
Savannah. Here, on the high banks which overlook the river, we 
established a picket station with a view to keep a lookout for the 
advance of our own army, and to see that the enemy did not bring 
artillery to bear on us. our own guns not being available for such an 
elevation. 

With a view to ascertaining the position and strength of the rebel 
pickets, and for information generally, small scouting parties were 
sent out with orders to run no risk of being cut off, and cautioned 
particularly against the detached bodies of Wheeler's cavalry known 
to be in the neighborhood. Notwithstanding this warning, on the 
morning of the 26th a party from this ship, engaged on a scouting 
expedition, were surprised and captured by a body of Wheeler's men, 
numbering about 20. The following are the names of those taken: 
Third Assistant Engineer Carl ton A. Uber; Acting Gunner Charles F. 
Adams; Americus Brinton, ordinary seaman; Gustavus Dahl, ordinary 
seaman; John Owens, landsman; James Walters, coal heaver. 

Previous to this we had taken the following prisoners: John Gay 
lord, citizen, but suspected guerrilla; James M. Fleetwood, late of 



208 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

rebel gunboat Macon and branch pilot of Savannah; John Ganaan, 
J. B. Metzger, Thirty-first Georgia [Fourth Cavalry?], all of whom 
were turned over to the provost-marshal. 

On the evening of the 27th the scouts of General Davis's column 
reached here, and soon after the rest of the Fourteenth Corps. They 
had been delayed by the very bad roads and the great amount of 
corduroying to be done. The movements of this wing are greatly 
impeded by the late freshets, but officers and men are working with 
great energy and perseverance, and will no doubt overcome all diffi- 
culties. 

This ship is now anchored about a mile above the pontoon bridge, 
or at the old ferry, on the lookout for the enemy's gunboats, the 
last information of which showed them to be 80 or 90 miles above us. 

On our way up, owing to the very strong current caused by the 
freshet and the many and very sharp turns in the river, we were occa- 
sionally swept in among the trees on the river's bank, getting some 
scratches, but nothing of a serious nature. 

I am, admiral, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. B. LUCE, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Detailed report of Rear- Admiral DaMgren, U. S. Navy, regarding 
the Savannah defenses. 

No. i9.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, S. C., January 31, 1865. 

SIR: I am now able to convey to the Department a more complete 
account of the works that defended Savannah than was before in my 
power. 

The sketch annexed shows the city to be approachable from sea- 
ward directly by the Savannah River and Wilmington River, and 
indirectly by roads from the Vernon and Ogeeehee rivers. 

The heavy barriers that were laid across the Savannah River at the 
head of Elba Island have been found sufficiently difficult of removal, 
even when our possession enabled steam tugs and divers to work with- 
out interruption. 

There was a double line of cribs extending entirely across; each of 
these was made of heavy timbers, 18-inch to 20-inch, stoutly framed 
together, with platforms at each tier, on which were placed piles of 
brick. Their tops were about level with high water and in the dif- 
ferent parts of the South Branch must have had a height of 30 to 35 
feet from the bottom. 

The party from the navy, consisting of a corps of divers and a 
steam tug, were occupied two or three weeks in removing two or 
three of these, which opened a passage of not more than 100 to 125 
feet. 

In the North Branch the divers who contracted effected a similar 
opening in less time, as the water was little more than half the depth 
of the South Branch. 

1st. The first battery from above that commanded these obstructions 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 209 

was Fort Lee, a strong earthwork, at 1,500 yards; it had 10 guns, of 
which 2 were 10-inch and 3 were 8-inch columbiads. 

2d. Fort Jackson, at 2,000 yards, has 5 guns; of which 2 are 
8-inch columbiads. 

3d. Battery Lawton, at 2,000 yards, 5 cannon; of which 2 were 
10-inch columbiads; one was an 8-inch columbiad. 
. 4th. Water battery, at 2,000 yards, 6 guns; of which 2 were 10-inch 
columbiads and 1 an 8-inch columbiad. 

About 1,500 yards above these obstructions was another row of 
similar cribwork, extending from Fort Lee to Battery Lawton, on an 
island directly across the channel, the channel being under the fire of 
these works, at ranges varying from 200 to 600 yards. 

Piles were also driven and obstructions sunken at different parts of 
the channel where it presented an intricacy. 

So long, therefore,. as the rebels held these batteries, they covered 
these obstructions by the fire of 26 cannon, of which 13 were colum- 
biads. 

As the Savannah River is lined with marshes to the line of obstruc- 
tions, no troops could operate on either side, and the vessels that 
approached could have no cooperation, while they were also under the 
fire of the battery of 14 guns on Whitemarsh Island, at a range of 
- yards. 

Savannah could, however, be approached by landing troops in St. 
Augustine Creek, whence roads led directly to the city, the distance 
not exceeding 3 miles, which was also easy rifle range, and permitted 
the destruction of the city. 

The navigation from the sea is better by this route than by Savan- 
nah River. 

To guard against this danger there were several batteries. 

1st. Turner's Rocks, 6 guns, 4 of them 10-inch columbiads and 1 
8-inch columbiad. 

2d. Thunderbolt, 12 guns; of which 1 was a 10-inch columbiad and 
4 were 8-inch columbiads. 

3d. Bartow, with its outpost, Causton's Bluff. 16 guns; of which 1 
was a 10-inch columbiad and 3 were 8-inch columbiads. 

Obstructions of various kinds were sunk in different parts of the 
narrow channel. 

The heavy cannon on this line were 6 10-inch columbiads and 8 8-inch 
columbiads, looking upon a deep, but narrow, and crooked channel. 

Just in the midst of this network of defenses lay Whitemarsh 
Island. Our landing and intrenching here was prevented, first, by 
the battery of Turner's Rocks, second, by a battery on its east side of 
14 guns, which, with obstructions, closed the passage by the Little 
Ty bee; third, by an intrenchinent, extending diagonally across the 
bland, with small fieldworks at intervals; fourth, by the guns of 
Thunderbolt enfilading these intrenchments; fifth, by the guns of 
Bartow. 

The whole of this powerful assemblage of works were open, how- 
ever, to being taken in reverse, and turned or passed by troops landing 
on the Vernon and Ogeechee. 

To prevent this, the Vernon was closed by obstructions and com- 
manded by Fort Beaulieu, with 9 cannon, of which 2 were 10-inch 
columbiads and 1 was an 8-inch columbiad. 

N w R VOL 16 14 



210 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 



Big Ogeechee was closed by obstructions and Fort McAllister, having 
24 guns, of which 3 were 10-inch columbiads and 1 was an 8-inch 
columbiad. 

Little Ogeechee was defended by Rosedew, with 6 guns, of which 
3 were 10-inch columbiads. 

All of these streams were so narrow, at the location of these works 
that a steamer would turn with difficult}^ if at all. 

Batteries were also placed on the roads leading to the city from 
these places. 

The whole number of cannon in the works enumerated above on the 
water courses was 113, of which 20 were 10-inch columbiads and 19 
were 8-inch columbiads. 

Besides these there were 116 cannon of less caliber in the land works 
immediately around the city and on the roads leading to it, making a 
total of 229 cannon defending Savannah by land and water. 

1 think it clear from this that the city was not reducible in any of 
these directions, save by the united exertions of a competent land and 
sea force. 

If General Gillmore had 40,000 men, which I heard after he left 
that he had had, I think the place might have been captured. 

But the shortest and best way was to take it as did General Sherman, 
by entering from the direction of the interior, where no attack was 
expected and no works had been previously prepared. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Summary from, the report of Captain D. II. Bud, chief of ordnance 
department, Army of the Tennessee, and Captain T. G. Baylor, chief 
of ordnance, Military Department of the Mississippi. 





10-inch 
columbiads. 


8-inch 
columbiads. 


Others. 


Total. 


To Savannah, by Wilmington River and St. Augus- 
tine Creek: 
No. 1. Turner's Rocks 


4 


1 


1 


6 


2 Thunderbolt 


1 


4 


7 


12 


3. Bonaventure 










4. Causton'sBUiff 










5. Bartow 


1 


3 


12 


16 


6. Fort Lee 


2 


3 


6 


10 


7. Fort Jackson . ... .... 




2 


3 


6 


8. Lawton battery , 


2 


1 


2 


6 


9. Water battery 


2 


1 


3 


6 












Tybee was closed by Grimball's Point battery 


12 


15 
2 


33 
12 


60 
14 


Ossabaw was closed by McAllister(Great Ogeechee) . 
Rosedew (Cittle Ogeechee) 


3 
3 


1 


20 
3 


24 

6 


Beaulieu (Vernon River) 


2 


1 


6 


9 


Road trom Ossabaw: 
Brown 




1 


6 


7 


Boggs 






8 


8 












In and around Savannah 


20 


20 


88 


128 
101 












Total 








229 













SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 



211 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

February 1, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


Acacia 


5 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master Joseph E. Jones 


Off Charleston 


Adger 


8 


Side- wheel 


Comdr. T. H. Patterson 


Do. 


*Adams 


8 


steamer. 
Storeship 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. A. Phinney 


Do. 


*Allen 


9 


Bark 


Actg. Master I. A. Pennell 


St. Simon's 






Screw tug 


Actg Ensign Wm R Cox 


Off Charleston 


Arethusa 


lg 


.do .. 


Actg. Ensign J. V. Cook 


Port Royal 




2 


do 


Actg. Master F W Strong 


Off Charleston 


*Bruen 


2 


Schooner store 


Actg Master W F Redding 


Do 


*Brazilieni 


8 


Bark 


Actg Master W T Gillespie 




*Blunt 




Schooner 


Actg. Ensign G. G. Curtis. 


Special duty divers 


Canandaigua 


8 


Screw sloop 


Comdr. N. B. Harrison 


Off Charleston 


Cimarron 


8 


Side -wheel 


Comdr E Thompson 


Port Roval repairing 


Canonicus 


2 


gunboat. 
MQnitor 


Lieut Comdr G E Belknap 


Off Charleston 


Catalpa 




Screw tug 


Actg Ensign A K Noves 




Camelia 


j~2 


do 


Actg. Ensign D. B. Hawes 


Off Charleston. 




r2 


do 




Port Royal 


Clover 


2 


do 


Actg. Ensign B Mitchell 


Off Charleston. 


Chatham 




Side-wheel tug 


Actg AI aster's Mate G W. Post 


Port Roval 


*Chambers 


6 


Schooner 


Actg Master W L Bowers 


Bull's Bay 


Dandelion .... 


+2 


Screw tug 


Actg Ensign G W Williams 


Port Royal repairing 


Daffodil 


f> 


Side-wheel tug 


Actg Master W H Mallard 




Flag 


7 


Screw steamer 


Comdr J C Williamson 


Ossabaw. 


Flambeau 


5 


. . .do 


Actg Vol Lieut E Cavendy 


Off Charleston. 


Fernandina 


9 


Bark 


Actg Master Lewis West 


St Catherine's, Ga. 


Geranium 


+4 


Side-wheel tug 




Off Charleston 


Gemsbok 


7 


Bark 




Off Georgetown 


Gladiolus 


t3 


Screw tug 




Off Charleston 


Griffith 


3 


Mortar scnoon- 


Actg Master J Ogilvie 


Wassaw Sound. 


G W Rodgers 


f-2 


er. 




Do 


Home 


t3 


Screwsteamer 


Actg Master B Dyer 


Off Charleston. 


Harvest Moon 


t 5 


hospital. 
Side- wheel 


Actg Master J K Crosby 


Port Royal 


Hydrangea 


f2 


steamer. 
Screw tug 


Actg Master Chas W Rogers 


Off Charleston 


Houghton 


6 


Bark con- 


Actg Master E G Furber 


Port Royal 


Hale 


6 


demned. 


Actg Master C F Mitchell 




Hope 


1 




Actg Vol Lieut W L Churchill 




Iris 


f-2 








Juniata 


13 


Screw sloop 


Comdr J J Almy 


Do. 


Jonquil 


t2 


Screw tug 


Actg Ensign Chas H Hanson 


Off Charleston 


Catskill 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut Comdr E Barrett 


Do. 


Lehigh . 


2 


do 




Do 


Lodona 


7 






Sapelo 


Laburnum 


t4 






Off Charleston 


Larkspur 


to 


do 


Actg Master's Mate J O'Connor 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Lightning 




Tender 




Wassaw. 


Montauk 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut Comdr E E Stone 


Wilmington 


Mingoe 


11 


Side- wh eel 


Comdr J B Creighton 


Off Georgetown 


McDonough 


6 


gunboat. 
Side -wheel 


Lieut Comdr A F Crosman 


Stono 


Memphis* 


11 


steamer. 


Actg Master R O Patterson 


Port Royal 


Mangham 


7 








Mohican 


8 


Screw sloop 


Comdr Daniel Ammeii . . 


Off Charleston. 


Mahopac 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Weaver 


Port Roval, repairing. 


Monadnock 


4 


do 


Comdr. E. G Parrott 


Off Charleston. 


Nan tucket 


2 


do 


Lieut Comdr R F R Lewis 


Do. 


Nahant 


2 


do 


Lieut. Comdr. W. K. Mayo 


Do. 


Nipsic 


8 


Screwgunboat 


Lieut Comdr E W Henry 


Off Georgetown 


*New Hampshire 


10 


Storeship . . 


Comdr. Wm. Reynolds 


Port Royal. 


Norwich. 


6 




Actg Master W H DeWolf 


St John's River 


*Norfolk Packet 
Ottawa 


6 
5 


Schooner 
Screw gunboat 


Actg. Master G. W. Wood 
Lieut Comdr J Stillwell 


Ossabaw. 
Port Royal, repairing. 


*0rvetta 




Store schooner 


Actg Master Wm Fales 


Off Charleston. 


Oleander 


t2 


Side-wheel tug 


Actg Master R P Walter 


To Edisto with stores. 


Passaic 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut Comdr R W Scott 


Off Charleston. 


Pawnee 


14 


Screw sloop 


Comdr G B Balch 


North Edisto. 


Pontiac 


11 


Side - wheel 


Lieut Comdr S B Luce 


Savannah River. 


Potomska 


c 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg Master F M Montell 


Off Charleston. 


Philadelphia 


j-1 


Side - wheel 


Actg. Master G H Avery 


Stono. 


Pettit 


> 


steamer. 


Actg Ensign Chas Grieve 


Port Royal 


*Para 


7 




Actg Master D P Heath 


Ossabaw 


*Perry... 


9 


er. 

Brig . . 


Acts. Master S. N. Freeman . . 


Fernandina. 



'Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



212 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, February 1, 1865 

Continued. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Percy Dravton 




Tender 




North Edisto 


*Racer. 


3 


Mortarschoon- 


Actg. Master E. G Martin 


Savannah River 


Sangamon 


2 


er. 

Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr J Young 


Off Charleston 


Sonoma ... 


8 


Side - wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. T. S. Fillebrown . 


North Edisto. 


*St. Louis 


18 


gunboat. 
Sailing sloop . 


Comdr. G. H. Preble 


Do. 


*Saratoga 


22 


do 


Actg. Lieut. Comdr. E. Brodhead 


Doboy Sound. 


Shenandoah 


8 


Screw sloop . 


Capt. D B Ridgelv 


Off Charleston. 


State of Georgia 


8 


Side - wheel 


Comdr. F. StanTy 


North for supplies. 


South Carolina 


8 


steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. W. Kennison 


Off Charleston. 


San ford 




do 


Actg Master Z Kempton 


Do 


Stettin. 


T5 


.. do 


Actg. Vol. Lieut C J Van Alstine 


St. Helena. 


Sweet Brier 


t3 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign J. D. Dexter 


Port Royal, repairing. 


*Smith Dan 


5 


Mortarschooi - 


Actg Master B Van Voorhis 


Stono 


*Swift 




er. 
Tender 




St. Helena. 


*Thunder . 




do 




Savannah River. 


Ticonderoga 


15 


Screw sloop 


Capt. Charles Steedman 


Port Roval, repairing. 


Tuscarora 


10 


do 


Comdr J M Frailev 


Georgetown 


*Valparaiso 




Hospital . . 


Actg. Master H.S. Blanchard . . 


Port Royal. 


Wissahickon 


5 


Screw gunboat 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Johnson 


Stono. 


Winona 


6 


do 


Lieut Comdr. W. H. Dana 


Port Roval, repairing. 


Wamsutta . 


6 


Screw steamer 


Aetg. Master C. W. Lee 


Off Charleston. 


Wando 


3 


Side - wheel 


Actg. Master Fredk. T. King 


Do. 


*Williams 


6 


steamer. 


Actg Master G W Parker 


Stono 


*Wild Cat .. 




er. 
Tender . 




Port Roval. 


*Ward 


5 


Schooner 


Actg. Master R. T Wyatt . 


Off Morris Island. 






stores. 







* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Preble, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. ship 
St. Louis, regarding affairs in North Edisto River. 

U. S. SLOOP OF WAR ST. Louis, 
North Edisto River, South Carolina, February 1, 1865. 

SIR: In compliance with your verbal instructions to me through the 
commanding officer of the Oleander, I have to report that the Pawnee, 
Sonoma, and Daffodil are at anchor at and above White Point, throw- 
ing a shell into the woods occasionally. The Pawnee came down yes- 
terday to coal, and from Captain Balch I learned that a small army 
force, under General Potter, landed on Monday at White Point under 
cover of a fire from the gunboats, and advanced up the road toward 
Adams Run. Some 5 miles up the road they found, and were fired upon 
by two strong batteries of the enemy, and not having force sufficient 
to assault, fell back to the landing place, reembarked, and returned to 
their encampment on Edisto Island, Steamboat Creek. One of our 
navy howitzers accompanied this reconnoissance. N The army force 
under Colonel Baird is still at Steamboat Creek. General Potter went 
to Port Royal yesterday morning in the Anna Maria, and has probably 
communicated with you. 

I sent dispatches by him, and among them a familiar letter to me, 
from Captain Balch for your information. I understood him to say, 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 213 

yesterday, that, with the Daffodil and boats, he intended to scout the 
Wadmelaw. He wished me to report to } T OU if opportunity offered, 
that he was "active." I loaned this ship's launch and its gun to the 
Sonorna for any purpose that might be required. 

The army seems to be burning the stubble and negro huts all around 
and about Edisto. It is reported to me that in one of the houses on 
- Creek, there is from 1,000 to 2,000 pounds of unginned sea- 
island cotton of good quality; for want of men and of bags to pack it 
in, I have not sent for it; besides I believe, after all our trouble, such 
abandoned property would not be prize, but would have to be turned 
over to a treasury agent. Shall I take it out of the house and burn it? 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE HENRY PREBLE, 
Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Hear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Batch, U. S. Navy, giving information obtained 
from an escaped Union prisons regarding Confederate affairs. 

U. S. STEAM SLOOP PAWNEE, 
Off White Point, North Edisto, S. C., February 1, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to report that during the night a Union 
prisoner (of the Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry) was brought on board 
the Daffodil by a contraband. From him we get some interesting- 
intelligence of affairs in Dixie. Among other items he expressed the 
opinion that the rebels are evacuating Charleston, and he heard that 
they were removing heavy guns from Sullivan's Island and James 
Island. He tells me that there are the headquarters of three generals 
at Adams Run; and that the battery encountered by General Potter 
is manned by the junior reserves, and since the movements in this 
direction there has been great anxiety felt by the rebels that we might 
flank them and get on to the railroad. 

He also informs me that Hardee, in a speech in Charleston, expressed 
the opinion that they could not hold the city, and was "turned out of 
the chair.' 1 This prisoner says they talked, in the event of having to 
fall back, of falling back on Summerville, distant 22 miles from Adams 
Run. B\~ the atlas you will see that Summerville is on the South 
Carolina Railroad, and in the direction of Branchville. I am of the 
opinion, from all that I can learn, that a move in this direction, with 
a heav}^ force, would result in the destruction of the railroad and.a 
great damage to the rebels. I, however, send this prisoner to } r ou, 
that you may inform yourself of the real state of affairs in this vicinity. 
The contraband I have on board, and will, if occasion offers, permit 
him to return and bring off his family. His wife is employed in 
washing at the rebel hospital at Adams Run, and has been enjoined to 
bring all information of affairs there. Evidently the move in this 
direction has been a good one, but more force is needed to gain success. 
The Sonoma has to-day sent boats on a reconnoissance up the Wadme- 
law Sound [River], and your order in regard to being active has been 
fully carried out by the naval forces here. Should it be deemed un- 
necessary to make another move in this direction, I should think one at 



214 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

least of the three vessels here could be spared for service elsewhere. 
I, therefore, await your order. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. B. BALCH, 
Commwider, U. S. Navy. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, to order the U. S. S. Memphis to New York. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, February 3, 1865. 

SIR: Order the U. S. S. Memphis to proceed to the navy yard, New 
York. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander 
Ammen, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Mohican, to proceed to 
duty in Ossabaw Sound. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 
Port Royal, S. C., FJn-uary 3, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed with the Mohican to Ossabaw and relieve the 
Flag. 

Commander Williamson will hand you his instructions and give 
you other necessary information. 

It is desirable that you keep as high up as may be judicious, so as 
to observe any movements of the rebels in the Big and Little Ogee- 
chee. 

It is understood that our army has removed all the cannon from 
McAllister, but left untouched the bombproof s and magazines; these 
should be blown up. 

Of Rosedew, I have no very recent information. 
Beaulieu is yet occupied by our troops. 
Station the vessels on Ossabaw as you find proper. 
The piles in the river should be removed. 
Some rebel cavalry are reported to be at King's Bridge. 
The buo}'s are to be replaced if washed away. 

Keep me informed of events from time to time as they transpire if 
important, and take in a good supply of coal. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander D. AMMEN, 

Commanding Mohican, Port Royal. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 215 

Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, IT. 8. Navy, to Major- General 
Sherman, U. /S. Army , announcing the sending of an escaped Union 
prisoner to give information regarding Coiifederate affairs. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal, February 3, 1865. 

DEAR GENERAL: I have not heard from you since the 27th ultimo, 
and suppose that [you] are getting out of "pen-shot" of this place. I 
send you one of the Illinois cavalry, just escaped from Charleston, 
whom you may like to see and hear. 

Everything being drawn in your own direction, leaves little of interest 
here. The Pontiac is at Sister's Ferry, Pawnee and Sonoma- in the 
North Edisto, firing and scouting. 

With best wishes, most truly, 3 7 our friend, 

J. A. DAHLGREN. 
General SHERMAN, 

Comdg. Southern Army of Georgia and South Carolina. 



Letter from Brigadier- General Hatch, U. S. Army, to Rear- Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, requesting the services of a tug in Broad 
Rivei\ 

HDQRS. COAST DIVISION, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH, 

Pocotaligo, S. C., February 3, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: If you can spare a tug or two launches, to cruise in upper 
Broad River during the stay of this command near here, it would be 
of service to us. Night before last three of our boats were stolen, 
and I fear some scamps in the vicinity of Boyd's Neck or Bee's Creek 
are preparing to attempt to capture some of our transports. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. P. HATCH, 

Brigadier- General, Commanding. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mandei* Stillwell, U. S. Navy, commanding 17. S. S. Ottawa, to 
proceed to St. Helena for purposes of cooperation with the army, and 
protection of the wreck of the U. 8. S. >ai Ching. 



FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Port Royal Harbor, February 3, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed to St. Helena with the Ottawa, in order to 
cooperate with the army, if wanted or requested to do so. It is desir- 
able to prevent the rebels from making use of any portion of the wreck 
of the Dai Ching or its contents, and you will prevent it, if you can 
do so, without endangering your own vessel or those with you. 

As a preliminary to this, or cooperation with the army, scout the 
river first with boats and remove torpedoes and other impediments 
and keep picket boats on guard day and night. 



216 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

When you are satisfied that there is a necessity for going up with 
the Ottawa, and that it can be done judiciously, } T OU will ascend as far 
as your boats have examined, but no farther than is needed to cooper- 
ate or to bring the wreck within distant range of the pivot gun. 

Let a boat precede the Ottawa and steam slowly, so as to be certain 
of not grounding. 

Clear the wreck of rebel pickets by firing grape. 

Have a kedge over the stern ready to let go and use it in winding 
the ship. 

When you start, let it be at the first of the flood; the channel is then 
best defined, and if you touch, the vessel will soon float. Cease to 
ascend after the tide is two-thirds flood. 

If you should find it necessary to dismantle the wreck any further, 
you can do so by deliberate practice with the pivot gun; but for this 
purpose it will not be necessary to approach the wreck nearer than 
2,000 yards, and you will not approach that near if the Ottawa is 
thereby exposed to the firing of the battery. 

The pilot 1 send you (Chuverton) will take the oath of allegiance, 
and may be rated as a pilot at $60 per month. Keep a close eye on 
him; he has been in the rebel service, and it remains to be seen how 
far he can be trusted. He will, no doubt, be useful, as he says he 
knows the river and all the roads leading to it. 

The pilot who was in the Dai Ching can not be depended on, as his 
alarm under fire was the cause of the vessel's grounding. 

It is not necessary to remain all the time in the Combahee, but only 
to keep it under observation. 

Look out for your boarding nets, and keep the torpedo fenders 
rigged out. 

If 3 7 ou should leave there, these orders are to be transferred to the 
senior officer who may remain. 

Report to me events of interest, and use the Stettin to support you 
if no other vessel joins you. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Sear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander JAMES STILLWELL, 
Commanding U. S. S. Ottawa. 

[Order of like tenor, dated February 4, 1865, to Lieutenant-Com- 
mander W. H. Dana, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Winona.~\ 



Report of Captain Ridgely, U. S. Navy, regarding the burning of a 
grounded blockade runner near Breach Inlet. 

U. S. S. SHENANDOAH, 
Off Charleston, February ^, 1865. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to report that at daylight this morning a 
blockade runner was discovered by the Wamsutta and Potomstca, 
stationed at the north, aground a short distance to the eastward of 
Breach Inlet. They stood toward the blockade runner, when she was 
abandoned and set on fire, and made quite a conflagration until late in 
the da} r . At 11 a. m. the crew attempted to return in the boats, and 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 21 7 

were shelled away by the Potomska and Wamsutta. The blockade 
runner is a complete wreck and burned out inside, the hull being iron. 
She lies in about 6 or 7 feet of water. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

DANEL. B. RIDGELY, 
Captain and Senior Officer Outside Blockade. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. 



Report of Acting Master Emerson, U. S. Navy, regarding unsuccessful 
expedition for the capture of guerrillas at White Ehuff. 

U. S. SCHOONER G. W. RODGERS, 
Little Ogeechee River, Geoi*gia, February 4, 186 4. 
SIR: I have the honor to report that last evening, at about 8 o'clock, 
this vessel was hailed from the shore (close by Rosedew battery) by 
a man whose name is Wall (a citizen), who requested me to send on 
shore an armed force to capture a partj r of -i guerrillas, whom he said 
were committing depredations of nearly every description upon the 
inhabitants of White Bluff (5 miles from here). After satisfying 
myself of the truth of his statements, I sent 8 men from this vessel 
and 6 men from the Norfolk Packet, in charge of Acting Master's 
Mate Adelbert Truesdale, with orders to capture them, if possible, and 
if they refused to be taken and showed any fight, to shoot them. But 
when our party arrived at the scene of their exploits the rascals had 
left. Therefore our party returned to their vessels. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. G. EMERSON, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squardron. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Lieutenant- Commander Morris, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Chenango. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, February 4, 1865. 

SIR: Proceed with the U. S. S. Chenango on* Charleston, S. C., and 
report to Rear- Admiral J . A. Dahlgren for duty in the South Atlantic 
Squadron. 

Veiy respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Lieutenant-Commander GEO. U. MORRIS, 

Commanding U. S. S. Chenango, New York. 



218 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Ensign Bennett, U. S. Navy, requesting instructions 
regarding permits to parties engaged in cotton traffic. 

U. S. BARK BRAZILIERA, 

St. Andrew" 1 * Sound, Georgia, February 4, 1865. 
SIR: There are now certain parties at Fernandina, Fla., who pro- 
pose to come by the inside passage from Fernandina to St. Andrew's, 
thence to St. Simon's, and from there up Turtle River to Cabbage 
Bluff', for the purpose of purchasing cotton. 

They have permits signed by the President and the Secretary of the 
Treasury to bring this cotton out at any open port, but in no case is 
there to be a violation of any blockade line. They wish to take their 
steamers to Cabbage Bluff for the purpose of effecting their object. 

Shall I permit her to pass through this sound on her way to that 
place? 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. H. BENNETT, 
Acting Ensign, Commanding (per interim). 

Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding removal of 
obstructions in waters adjacent to Savannah. 

No. 57.] FLAGSHIP, 

At Sea, February 5, 1865. 

SIR: The Department will perceive from the enclosed report (D) of 
the squadron divers that they are actively engaged in recovering arti- 
cles sunk by the rebels who evacuated Savannah. 

The hull of one torpedo boat has been taken to Port Royal, and if 
the machinery can be gotten it may be possible to turn it to some 
account, but this must be a work of some time. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Captain Ridgely, II. S. Navy, regarding the unsuccessful 
attack and chase of a blockade runner off Charleston. 

U. S. S. SHENANDOAH, 
Off Charleston, February 6, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that a blockade runner attempted 
to run into Charleston this morning at 3 o'clock. The Wamsutta gave 
him her broadside at a distance of 50 yards and heard the shot strike 
against his sides. 

The Poiomska gave him twelve guns, and the commanding officer is 
sure that he struck him more than once. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 219 

He turned around and ran out to sea, when he was lost in the 
darkness. 

At daylight the Wando saw him offshore and chased him to the south- 
ward and eastward unsuccessfully. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

DANL. B. RIDGELY, 
Captain and Senior Officer Outside Blockade. 

Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic 



Repwt of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding operations 
of his command in cooperation with SnerrMirtfs army. 

No. 60.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal, S. C., February 6, 1865. 

SIR: My dispatches of the 24th and 31st [ultimo] conveyed the most 
recent intelligence to those dates in relation to affairs here. 

1 have just returned from visiting North Edisto and Stono, where 
the gunboats have been busy with such demonstrations as their force 
admitted of. 

The latest intelligence which I have of General Sherman's army is 
to the 2d, stating that General Blair had carried, with ease, Rivers' 
Bridge, on the Combahee, and thus secured a crossing, the headquar- 
ters being at a store about 10 miles southwest of the bridge. 

The left wing had not cut loose from the Savannah, which was to 
be crossed at Sister's Ferry, but its advance was at Robertsville, some 
8 or 9 miles farther. 

Meanwhile General Hatch, of General Foster's command, was to 
cross the Combahee at the ferry, 8 or 10 miles south of the railroad, 
operating as far as he was able. 

I dispatched the Ottawa and Winona (repairs just completed) into 
the St. Helena Sound, to take the place of the Dai Ching in such 
cooperation as their force was equal to. 

At Georgetown the Mingoe and Nipsic are inside the harbor, and 
find no new works on North or South islands, as was reported. 

The battery higher up is, however, maintained by the rebels, and 
their gunboat is said to be ready to come down the Pedee, carrying 
two rifled 32-pounders and one Whitworth. 

On the 30th a body of our troops landed at White Point (North 
Edisto) under cover of the fire of the Pawnee and Sonoma, marched 
some 4 miles, came on two batteries, but were not in sufficient force 
to assault and reimbarked, the chief object being to demonstrate. 

Yesterday the Pawnee and Sonoma pushed up the Wadmelaw and 
shelled some light batteries vigorously. 

They landed 70 or 80 men, who Avent within 400 yards, but were 
not in sufficient force to venture on an attack. 

Meeting General Foster's steamer at sea on his way up from Port 
Royal, I had a conference with him, and agreed generally on the 
movements which General Sherman asked to have executed. 

Attempts to violate the blockade continue, but not always with suc- 
cess. On the night of the 3d a steamer ran ashore near Breach Inlet 
and was fired by her own crew. 



220 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 

I enclose a communication from the officer blockading at Doboy, 
which conveys news by no means improbable. 1 wish much it were 
in my power to send some light-draft steamers to assist this inclina- 
tion, but they are employed. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squaclron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. SHIP SARATOGA, 
Doboy Sound, February 3, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to inform you that Mr. Theodore P. 
Pease, residing at Thicket, near Darien, stated to the officer of the 
boat which I sent up there to-day that a Union meeting was held near 
that place yesterday and adjourned to meet again at Blackshear to-day, 
when delegates from different counties were to be appointed to confer 
with General Sherman. 

Mr. Pease also stated that the rebel General Wheeler was at the 
Ogeechee with his force, en route for Savannah, buc unable to cross 
in consequence of the bridge having been carried away by the high 
water. 

These delegates will, therefore, probably apply to be forwarded to 
General Sherman by sea. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EDGAR BRODHEAD, 
Actg. Vol. Lieutenant- Commander, Commanding Saratoga. 

Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Fleet, etc. 



Cipher letter from Major- General Shwman, U. S. Army, fo Near- 
Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding possible change in plan 
of campaign. 

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, 

Lowry's, February 7, 1865. 

ADMIRAL DAHLGREN: We are on the railroad at Midway, [S. C.], 
and will break 50 miles from Edisto toward Augusta and then cross 
toward Columbia. Weather is bad and country full of water. This 
cause may force me to turn against Charleston. I have ordered Foster 
to move Hatch up to the Edisto about Jacksonboro and Willstown; 
also to make the lodgment about Bull's Bay. 

Watch Charleston closely. I think Jeff Davis will direct it to be 
abandoned, lest he lose its garrison as well as guns. 
We are all well, and the enemy retreats before us. 
Send word to New Berne that you have heard from me, and the 
probabilities are that high waters may force me to the coast before I 
reach North Carolina, but to keep Wilmington busy. 
Yours, 

W. T. SHERMAN, 
Major- General, U. S. Army, Commanding. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 221 

Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, requesting to be 
relieved from his present command in case of the assignment of 
Major- General Gillmore, U. S. Army, to duty at Port Royal. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal, February 7, 1865. 

SIR: 1 beg leave to inform the Department that Major-General Gill- 
more arrived here yesterday, and it is rumored to take command of 
the military forces here. 

I have no official information of the fact, as General Foster is absent; 
but if it is so, may I ask the Department to be so good as to relieve 
me in the command of this squadron ? 

I feel assured that the Department will readily conceive the reasons 
which lead me to this request and that its knowledge of past transac- 
tions will justif} T me* with the Department in making it. 

I have the honor to be, with much respect, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Commanding, etc. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from Major- General Foster, U. 8. Army, to Rear-Admi/ral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, announcing his temporary withdrawal from 
command at Port Royal, 8. C. 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, 

Hilton Head, 8. C., February 8, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: J have the honor to inform you that I have received a 
leave of absence from the War Department, and that Major-General 
Q. A. Gillmore, U. S. Volunteers, has arrived here from the North, with 
instructions to relieve me temporarily of the command of this depart- 
ment, in consequence of which I regret to state that 1 shall not be able 
to meet you according to appointment during the demonstration. 

I am requested by Major-General Gillmore to say that he will do 
himself the honor of making you an official visit as soon after assum- 
ing command as he possibly can. If you are not in this harbor at the 
time, he will follow you to Charleston Harbor. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. G. FOSTER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Endorsement.] 

Delivered to me by Ensign Neil, temporarily attached to army duty, 
Stono, February 11, 1865, 10 a. m. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 



222 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Luce, U. S. Navy, regarding pro- 
tection afforded to troops crossing the Savannah River at Sisters 
Ferry. 

U. S. S. PONTIAC, 

Off Savannah, Ga. , February 9, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to inform you that, agreeable to General 
Davis's directions, a copy of which is enclosed (marked "A"), I dropped 
down to Sister's Ferry on the evening of the 7th instant and occupied 
a position to command the heights on the Georgia side with our guns. 
By 10 p. m. the last of the rear division, the regiment on picket duty, 
was withdrawn without molestation from the enemy and placed on the 
South Carolina side. 

Remained in position until daylight the following morning (the 8th) 
to ascertain if any stragglers had been left behind, when, finding none, 
started down the river, preceded by two army transports. Arrived 
here at 8 p. m. and called on General Grover, who, in the course of 
conversation, stated that just at this time he considered it necessary 
that a naval vessel should be in this river above the town. Thinking 
I would only be anticipating your wishes, I consented to remain, and 
will occupy a position 2 or 3 miles above the town, and there await 
your further instructions. 

I enclose a copy of General Grover's letter (marked "B") received 
this morning. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. B. LUCE, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron,. 

[Enclosures.] 

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS, 

Sister's Ferry, February 7, 1865 1% m. 

CAPTAIN: All the transports will, by this afternoon or evening, be 
unloaded and ordered to return to Savannah. General Morgan, com- 
manding the rear division, has been ordered to withdraw his pickets on 
the Georgia shore of the [Savannah] river as soon as the transports 
have passed the lower landing. The general commanding requests 
that you assist and cover the crossing of these troops. 

The general commanding takes this opportunity to express to you 
and your officers his thanks for your efficient cooperation during our 
stay and movements at this point. 

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, etc., 

A. C. McCLURG, 
Asst. Adjt. Gen., Lieutenant- Colonel, and Chief of Staff . 

Captain S. B. LUCE, 

Comdg. Steamer Pontiac, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, 
District of Savannah, February 9, 1865. 

SIR: Understanding that you have in view leaving this station, I 
would respectfully request that, if it be consistent with your instruc- 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 228 

tions, you would remain here until such time as you can 'be relieved 
by some other naval vessel, as I consider it quite necessary that there 
should be at least one gunboat here at all times. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. GROVER, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

Lieutenant-Commander S. B. LUCE, 

Commanding Gunboat Pontiac. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Stillwell, U. S. Navy, transmitting 
reports regarding a reconnoissance in Combahee River. 

U. S. S. OTTAWA, 
Combahee River, South Carolina, February 9, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to your order of the 3d instant, I had this river 
dragged on the 7th, and started up, with the Winona in company, 
yesterday; at 11:30 a. m. anchored and sent two boats to the old bat- 
tery on Field's Point. At 2 p. m. got underway, firing occasionally 
into the banks; 3:30 p. m. anchored within 200 yards of the Dai China; 
sent boats and found she had been burned to the water's edge, the 
rebels having been at work on her, but with little success, judging from 
what they worked with. I sent two boats last night in charge of Acting 
Master William H. Winslow, the executive officer of this vessel, and 
Acting Master E. H. Sheffield, the executive officer of the Winona, 
who landed a short distance below the battery and went back 4 miles, 
and were fortunate to pick up two Union prisoners, whom I send to 
you by the Carnation. These two officers report that it would be 
entirely unsafe for such a vessel as this to go any farther up the river, 
as between this place and the battery the river is not much wider than 
the length of this vessel; where I am now at anchor it is one and a 
half times the ship's length. 

Mr. Winslow reports they saw about 40 cavalry last night and fired 
at them about twenty minutes; why the rebels did not return the fire 
I am unable to state. 

We can see the troops in the battery this morning, but I have no way 
of judging their number. 

I also sent a scout from the Winona last night down to Field's Point; 
he reports the two roads leading from the point in good order, but did 
not see anyone. 

I will send Mr. Winslsow's report to me by the next mail. 

In my opinion, we have done all that can be accomplished for the 
present. 

It gives me much pleasure to state that all the officers and men have 
performed their duty to my entire satisfaction. 

Pilot Chuverton I send by the Carnation, he being still very sick. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES STILLWELL, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



224 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. OTTAWA, 
St. Helena Sound, February 9, 1865. 

SIR: According to orders, the Winona's boat, with Acting Master 
Sheffield and myself and the pilot, in our first cutter, well armed and 
manned, proceeded past the wreck of the Dai Ching up the Combahee. 
My boat being ahead, I discovered a rebel picket boat, as I thought, 
and approaching carefully with rifles in hand, took two escaped Union 
prisoners from a slight raft, which they were paddling down. We 
then landed below Tar Bluff, and leaving a boat guard, scouted along 
the high bank about 2 miles, discovering fresh horse trails and foot- 
prints, a high-water battery with 3 casemates, a bombproof and sentinel 
shield, there being no guns mounted. We proceeded back by a main 
road 3 miles to a negro settlement and communicated with three negroes. 
They said 30 cavalry ran from our fire upon the bluff and passed at 
noon, going to Chiselville [Chisolm], 15 miles back, to return in a day 
or two. That the fort above was still armed and manned, though the 
principal force had left. We returned to the river bank, and there 
being no road to the Dai Ching fort without going 5 miles into the 
interior, we embarked and pulled cautiously by the bluff. After get- 
ting near the old mill, the second picket station, and about 2 miles by 
water from the garrisoned fort, we heard several calls on the bank, 
and at the same time saw men upon shore moving in the shadows in 
skirmish line. 

We found the enemy were alert, and turning around floated and 
pulled rapidly down the tide, discharging our rifles as fast as possible, 
driving the scouts back. 

The river here was 100 yards wide, with the place abreast of the 
bluff about 60. As we passed we distinctly saw a squad of about 20 
cavaliy drawn up under the trees, and we fired two or three volleys at 
them as they turned and rode away. Two of the rebels were either 
killed or severely wounded, as they gave painful yells after we fired, 
and one other went off of his horse and down, without a sound. We 
were soon below, out of danger, and returned aboard at 3 o'clock a. m. 
A singular part of the affair is that they did not fire at us. We sup- 
pose we drove in a small picket when we first landed, which went for 
reinforcements and returned too late to cut us off, and that they did 
not fire because they feared some other force was near, or else hoped 
we might land again, so they could get us at a disadvantage. 
I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

W. H. WINSLOW, 
Acting Master and Executive Officer. 

Lieutenant-Commander J, STILLWELL, 

Commanding U. S. S. Ottawa. 



U. S. S. WlNONA, 

Conibahee Ri/ver, South Carolina, February 9, 1865. 
SIR: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your orders, I 
left this ship last night at 8 p. m. in company with Acting Master 
W T inslpw, of the U. S. S. Ottawa, with two boats' crews, on a recon- 
noitering expedition up the Combahee River. We proceeded cau- 
tiously up the river about one-half mile, when we discovered two men 
on a raft, who proved to be escaped Union prisoners, one belonging to 
the Fourth Massachusetts and the other to the Fourth New Hampshire 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 225 

Regiment. They informed me they had been taken care of for a num- 
ber of days by negroes who live about a mile from where we then 
were. After a consultation with Mr. Winslow, I determined to march 
out and see what information I could gain from them. We landed a 
short distance below what is called Tar Bluff, and soon struck the main 
road, when I discovered footprints of both horses and men, but being 
satisfied that there were not over three of them and knowing that our 
force was able to contend with a much larger party, I continued to 
advance, and arrived at their huts at 12 o'clock, the distance being, 
instead of 1 not less than 3 miles. They seemed to be very friendly, 
and informed us that about 30 cavalry had left there that day and gone 
back 15 miles. I asked if they had also left the fort, but could not 
get any satisfactory information. Our pilot not seeming to know the 
roads to the fort, I thought it advisable to return to our boats and 
advance up by water.^ Being satisfied both from the testimony of the 
negroes and from a careful reconnoissance that there was no one to 
molest us at Tar Bluff, we pulled up slowly, keeping the left bank of 
the river aboard, and when within 1 miles of the fort Mr. Winslow 
and myself thought we could see men about 20 j-ards from us on the 
bluff watching us, but were not certain until we saw two of them run 
behind the trees. I was then satisfied we had been discovered, and 
expected we would have to fight our way back. I cautioned the men 
to take good aim and fire rapidly, letting their shots go just above the 
bluff. Both boats immediately commenced firing, and I have every 
reason to think our shots took effect, as we heard screams such as men 
would give when badly wounded; we then pulled rapidly down the 
river. When abreast of the last opening of the woods I saw mounted 
men drawn up under the trees, apparently ready to give us a volley to 
stop our progress down the river, but our fire was so rapid that they 
sought cover among the trees. This being the termination of the harid 
ground, and knowing they could molest us no further, we ceased firing 
and pulled toward the ships, arriving alongside the Ottawa at 3 a. m., 
delivering to Lieutenant-Commander Stillwell the escaped prisoners 
we had in our possession. 1 would state that thej T informed me that 
the negroes say that the officers and boat's crew of the Dal Ching were 
captured and not killed, as was supposed. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. H. SHEFFIELD, 

Acting Master. 
W. H. DANA, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 



Engagement with Confederate batteries on Togodo Creek, February 9, 
:' 1865. 

Beport of Commander Balch, U. S. Navy, commanding IT. S. S. Pawnee. 

U. S. S. PAWNEE, 

North Edisto River, South Carolina, February 9, 1865. 
ADMIRAL: I have the honor to submit the following report of an 
engagement with three of the enemy's batteries to-day on Togodo 
Creek: 

At 9 a. m. I dispatched the Daffodil, with boats from this ship and 
the Sonoma, to drag for torpedoes, and, finding by signal from the 

N w R VOL 16 15 



226 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Daffodil that the channel was clear, I got underway, followed by the 
Sonoma, and anchored in Togodo Creek, running a hawser to a tree 
for a spring. 

At 9:50 we opened fire on the rebel troops, followed by the Sonoma; 
the rebels did not reply, and at 12:30 p. m. we ceased firing, both 
vessels by this time having taken the ground. 

At 2:40 p. m. opened on the enemy, our fire being replied to from 
one battery of six pieces, one of four, and one of two pieces of artil- 
lery, the enemy using shot and shell very freely, and having a cross 
fire on the vessels. As the tide came in we were enabled to spring 
this ship round so as to bring our broadside guns to bear, and by a rapid 
fire of snell and shrapnel, well directed, we had at 4 p. m. completely 
silenced the batteries, and not a rebel was to be seen. The Sononia 
delivered her fire in a very effective manner. The rebel batteries, 
connected by rifle pits, were at distances varying from 1,000 to 2,000 
yards. 

The Pawnee was struck ten times, the Sonoma and Daffodil twice, 
respectively; nobody hurt on either vessel. A shot struck on the 
deck of the Pawnee, passing through an arms chest, setting it on fire, 
and going out througn the ship's side. 

My thanks are due to Lieutenant-Commander T. S. Fillebrown, 
commanding the Sonoma, for the efficient aid rendered b}' him, his 
officers, and crew. You would have been pleased to have witnessed 
their firing, and it affords me great pleasure to bring to your notice 
the admirable behavior of all under command of, Lieutenant- 
Commander Fillebrown. 

The Daffodil, Acting Master W. H. Mallard, rendered valuable 
services, and used her guns in a spirited manner till ordered b\ r me to 
drop downstream, fearing she might be disabled. 

The bearing of the officers and crew of the Pawnee merits my warm- 
est commendation; for their admirable gunnery, coolness, and strict 
attention to orders, I desire to bear my testimony to the commander in 
chief. 

I deem it my duty to call your attention to the very efficient services 
rendered by Lieutenant William Whitehead, the executive officer. He 
is an officer of great merit, cool and brave, and of excellent judgment. 
Acting Masters J. C. Champion and Thomas Moore, Ensign Henry 
Glass, and Acting Master's Mate Charles H. Poor, jr., commanding 
the gun divisions, served their guns in the most efficient manner, and 
their splendid gunnery elicited my warmest commendation. 

Acting Master Edmund A. Magone, commanding powder division, 
assisted by Acting Master's Mate Thomas L. Fisher, performed their 
duties in the most efficient manner. No complaints were made as to 
the supply of ammunition for the battery, and I desire to testify my 
thanks for their services, and also to Gunner James Hayes, who has 
always performed his duties to my entire satisfaction. 

Boatswain James Brown rendered valuable assistance in springing 
the ship whilst under a hot fire. 

My clerk, Mr. George V. Balch, rendered good service by taking 
notes of the action, and by pointing out the position of a battery 
which had a cross fire on us. 

1 enclose detailed reports from Lieutenant-Commander Fillebrown 
and Acting Master Mallard, as also reports of damages to this vessel, 
and expenditure of ammunition. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 227 

At 5:20 p. ra., this ship and the Sonoma being afloat, we got under- 
way and stood down the creek, but, owing to the extreme narrowness 
of it we grounded, were towed off by the Daffodil, and at 7:30 p. m. 
anchored off White Point, our usual station. 

I am, verj r respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. B. BALCH, 

Commander, U. S. Navy, Senior Officer Present. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdy. South Atlantic 'Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. STEAM SLOOP PAWNEE, 

North Edisto River, South Carolina, February 9, 1865. 
SIR: There was expended in the action of to-day with the enemy's 
battery the following in the gunner's department, viz: 

IX-inch shell, 5-second and 10-second 189 

IX-inch shrapnel, 5-second Bormann fuze 124 

100-pounder Schenkle shells, percussion 44 

100-pounder Parrott shells 9 

100-pounder Parrott shrapnel 2 

12-pounder rifle howitzer shell, percussion 14 

Cannon powder (IX-inch) : pounds.. 3, 130 

Rifle powder ( 100-pounder) do 550 

Rifle powder ( 12-pounder howitzer) do 14 

Cannon primers 500 

IX-inch breechings 3 

Cartridge boxes and belts 10 

Bayonets 10 

Rounds of buck cartridges 400 

One thousand percussion caps were destroyed by a shot passing 
through the arms chest.. 
Very respectfully, 

JAMES HAYES, 

Gunner. 
Commander GEO. B. BALCH, U. S. Navy. 



U. S. S. PAWNEE, 

North Edisto River, South Carolina, February 10, 1865. 
SIR: I have the honor to report the following damages to the rig- 
ging of this vessel sustained during the action of Togodo Creek, Feb- 
ruary 9, 1865, viz: 

Port mizzen topmast backstay shot away. 
Starboard mizzen topmast shroud shot away. 
Spanker and brails cut away by a shot. 
Port spanker boom topping lift stranded by a shot. 
Port ridgerope stranded by a shot. 
Respectfully submitted. 

JAS. BROWN, 
Boatswain, U. S. Navy. 
Commander GEO. B. BALCH, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pawnee, North Edisto River, S. C. 



228 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

U. S. S. PAWNEE, 
North Edisto River, February 10, 1865. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to submit the following report of injuries 
experienced by this vessel in action with the rebel batteries on Togodo 
Creek during the afternoon of the 9th instant. 

On the port bow, 10 feet abaft and below the bill port, the outside 
planking was pierced and torn away for a space of 18 inches by the 
explosion of a shell; immediately below this, and on the water line, is 
the mark of a glancing shot. In the port waist, near the gangway, a 
12-pound shell struck and exploded in one of the spar-deck scuppers. 

Five feet forward of the port mizzen rigging, and 3 feet above the 
water line, is the mark of a glancing shot. On the starboard side near 
the mizzen topmast backstaj 7 , and ]ust above the spar deck, the side 
was pierced by a rifle bolt from the inside, out. 

The smoke pipe was struck by a shell, which exploded inside, the 
fragments tearing the iron considerably on their exit. 

The port mizzen topmast backstay was cut by one shot, and the 
starboard mizzen topmast shroud by another. 

The ridgcrope was cut by a shot immediatelv over the 100-pounder 
rifle. 

The spanker was cut by a shot and, being furled, was badly damaged. 

In all we were struck ten times in the null five times; in the smoke 
pipe once; in the rigging three times; in the sails once. 
Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, 

WM. WHITEHEAD, 
Lieutenant, U. S. Navy. 

Commander GEO. B. BALCH, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pawnee. 



Report of Acting Master Mallard, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Daffodil. 

U. S. S. DAFFODIL,, 
Nfyrth Edisto River, S. C., February 10, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the part 
taken by this vessel in the attack of yesterday upon the batteries on 
the Togodo River. 

In obedience to your order, 1 proceeded up the river with two 
launches, one from the Pa/wnee and one from the Sonoma, to drag for 
torpedoes. At 10 a. m., finding the river clear, I made signal to that 
effect and opened fire with my rifled 20-pounders on the batteries up 
the river, but as they fell short I ceased firing. In the meantime the 
Pawnee and Sonoma came up and commenced firing on the batteries. 
They then ceased tiring, and, the vessels having grounded, we lay 
waiting for flood tide. 

At 2:40 p. m. the Pawnee opened with her 100-pounder rifle on 
some troops in the upper battery, arid immediately the action became 
general. ,At 3 p. m. received orders from Captain Balch to drop out 
of range, and in doing so received a rifle shot in our port bow, crush- 
ing in the deck, but, striking and parting the chain cable, it ricochetted 
over our starboard bow. Another shot struck our smokestack, but 
did no damage. At about 4 p. m. silenced the enemy's batteries. At 
5 p. m. firing ceased, the tide having risen sufficient for the vessels to 
withdraw. The Pawnee, in endeavoring to turn around, grounded; we 
then backed down to her, took her hawser, and towed her off. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 229 

I expended in ammunition the following, viz: 20-pounder Parrott 
shell, 20; 20-pounder Dahlgren -shell, 10. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. H. MALLARD, 
Acting Masten\ Commanding. 
Commander G. B. BALCH, 

Commanding IT. S. S. Paivnee. 



Report of Lieutenant-Commander Fillebrown, TJ. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Sonoma. 

U. S. S. SONOMA, 
Off King's Creek, South Carolina, February 9, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part 
taken by the $onoma in the engagement with the rebel batteries on 
the Togodo to-day: 

We got underway at 9: 40 a. m. and steamed up the Togodo and 
anchored near the house of Colonel James King. On anchoring, 
opened a slow tire in the direction of the batteries, only one of which 
was visible from this vessel, without eliciting any reply. At 12 
o'clock we ceased firing in obedience to your order. At 2:45 the 
enemy opened a brisk tire from the battery ahead of the Pawnee, and 
immediately from the other batteries, also from field artillery in the 
woods on our port beam and bow. We returned the tire immediately 
and drove the artillery from their position and the rebels to their bomb- 
proofs, completely silencing them. Only two shot struck this vessel, 
one of which cut away the ventilator to the fire room and dropped on 
deck. This was a cylindro-conoidal shot, 3i inches in diameter; the 
other shot struck and broke two of the coal-scuttle plates and passed 
through a port. At 6 ceased firing and got underway, the tide having 
raised sufficiently to float the vessel, and returned to our anchorage at 
the mouth of King's Creek. 

I may as well mention that the Sonoma was on the bottom during' 
the whole action. I also submit my opinion that to capture these bat- 
teries requires the assistance of troops. 

In conclusion, I must testify to the conduct of the officers and crew 
of this vessel. They all performed their duty in a manner nighty 
creditable to themselves and to the honor of the flag. 

I enclose herewith the report of damages and amount of ammunition 
expended. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. SCOTT FILLEBROWN, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 

Commander GEO. B. BALCH, 

Senior Officen % off White Point, North Edisto River. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. SONOMA, 
North Edixto, February 10, 1865. 

SIR: There was expended yesterdaj" at the rebel batteries the fol- 
lowing amount of ammunition and projectiles: 

XI-inch shell 54 

XI-inch shrapnel, 5 and 10 second 10 

XI-inch stands grape 8 



230 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

IX-inch shell, 5, 10, and 15 second 89 

IX-iuc-h shrapnel, 5 and 10 second 17 

IX-inch stands grape 55 

100-pounder Parrott Schenkle shell 23 

Cannon primers 300 

Respectfully, 

JAMES M. HOGG, 

Gunner. 
Lieutenant-Commander T. SCOTT FILLEBROWN. 



Naval operations in Stono and Folly rivers, February 9-1^ 1865. 

Report of Captain Scott, U. S. Navy, transmitting request for cooperation of two monitors 

in Stono River. 

U. S. SHIP JOHN ADAMS, 

Off Morris Island, South Carolina, February 8, 1865. 
SIR: I herewith enclose communications just received. 
1 have replied, saying neither the weather nor tide would admit of 
their going this evening, and if it did, 1 was not authorized to move 
the monitors from this anchorage without your orders. 
A tug has been sent, as desired. 

Very respectf ulh r , your obedient servant, 

G. H. SCOTT, 
Captain and Senior Officer. 

Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic BIJfdg. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 

[Enclosures.] 

HDQRS. NORTHERN DISTRICT, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH, 

First Separate Brigade, Morris Island, Fibruary 8, 1865. 
CAPTAIN: I am requested by Brevet Brigadier-General Hartwell 
(through his aid), now commanding U. S. forces, Folly Island, South 
Carolina, to ask you, if possible, to send two monitors to Stono with- 
out delay, for cooperation with the land forces. General Schim- 
melfennig is on his way to Stono at present, and can not be referred 
to in the matter, but I feel fully justified in asking you in his name 
to accede if possible to this request. I have the nonor to forward 
copy of the dispatch just received for your information. If possible, 
please send one of your tugs to Stono without delay, to facilitate the 
transportation of light artillery. 

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant, 

J. VV. DICKINSON, 
Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant- General. 

Captain G. H. SCOTT, 

Commanding Fleet o/ Charleston. 



[Telegram.] 

STONO, Februarys, 1865 1:50 p. m. 

Please request Captain Scott, commanding fleet, to send two moni- 
tors to Stouo this afternoon, as soon as possible. After consulting 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 231 

with Captain Johnson, commanding fleet at Stono, it is deemed of the 
utmost importance that two monitors should be sent to cooperate with 
us. The general is very desirous that they should be sent. Send word 
to Captain Scott the quickest way possible. Reph T as to your actions. 

J. M. WALTON, 
Captain and Atd-de- Camp. 
Captain DICKINSON, 

Acting Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, IT. S. Navy, to Captain Semnies, U. 8. Navy, 
commanding IT. S. S. Lehigh. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal, February 9, 1865. 

SIR: On the receipt of this you will proceed to Stono at the earliest 
moment that the weather and tide permit, and take position there to 
cooperate with the army. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 
Captain SEMMES, 

Commanding Lehigh. 



Report of Lieutenant-Commander Semmes, U. S. Navy, regarding naval cooperation in the 

Stono and Folly rivers. 

U. S. S. LEHIGH, 
Stono Inlet , February 11, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to your order of the 9th instant, I left Charleston 
Roads with this vessel at the earliest possible moment, and arrived here 
at 9 a. m. the 10th. Immediately upon my arrival Lieutenant-Com- 
mander A. W. Johnson informed me of the disposition of the naval 
force here, which, being the best that could be made, I did not meddle 
with. It was as follows: The McDonough, Lieutenant-Commander 
A. F. Crosman, and the Dan Smith, bomb vessel. Acting Master 
Van Voorhis, with the Geranium as tender, were up Folly River; the 
Wissakickon, Lieutenant-Commander Johnson, and the C. P. Williams, 
Acting Master Parker, up the Stono. The two former covered the 
right and front of our troops, the two latter the left. With this 
vessel I took position a little farther up this river than the other 
vessels. 

When I arrived the vessels were keeping up a fire suitable to the 
object in view. 

In the afternoon I directed some shells to be thrown to the left of 
our troops, and some also on John's Island, to feel the batteries. 
There was no reply. 

Two arnw officers, aids to the commanding officer in the field, came 
off during the day to make arrangements and establish signals relative 
to our fire. 

A fire of one shell every fifteen minutes was kept up by the vessels 
in the Stono from 8 p. m. the 10th to 6 this morning, to the left of 
our line. 



232 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

This forenoon small squads of rebels showing themselves on the way 
from Battery Pringle toward our forces, I hastened their movements 
by one or two well-directed shells. 

Learning about 4 p. m. that the army had withdrawn, and feeling 
there was no necessity for remaining above the junction of the Stono 
and the Kiawith, I ordered the other vessels below and took the lead 
myself. 

We expended the following ammunition on board this vessel: 150- 
pounder Schenkle percussion shells, 11; 12-pounder Schenkle percus- 
sion shells, 13; 12-pounder Hotchkiss percussion shells, 33. 

Lieutenant-Commander Crosman remained up the Folty River until 
notified there was no further necessity, and then resumed his former 
station at the junction of the Kiawah and Stono. 

I judge, from the direction of the fire and from its rapidity, particu- 
larly in the Folly River, that the naval cooperation was satisfactory. 
I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. A. SEMMES, 
Lieutenant- Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. 8. Nav} r , 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Master Parker, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. schooner C. P. Williams, 
regarding naval cooperation in Stono River. 

U. S. SCHOONER C. P. WILLIAMS, 

Stono Inlet, February 12, 1865. 

SIR: I beg leave to report that, in obedience to orders received from 
Lieutenant-Commander A. W. Johnson, of the Wiasahickon, Feb- 
ruary 9, 1 got this vessel ready to go into action. Came up Avith fore 
rigging, unbent foresail; saw everything clear for using the mortar. 

At 9: 30 p. m. U. S. tug Azalea came alongside. At 3 o'clock a. m. 
on the morning of the 10th, hove up anchor and proceeded up Stono 
River in tow of the tug Azalea. At 4:20 came to anchor just below 
the obstructions. At 8: 30 a. m. the tug moved us farther up the river; 
came to anchor about one-quarter of a mile above the obstructions. 

At 9 a. m. opened fire with the mortar on a clump of woods and 
some houses near the woods, as directed by Captain Johnson; kept up 
fire with the mortar at intervals of ten minutes till 4 o'clock p. m., at 
which time ceased firing with mortar. At 8 p. m. opened fire with the 
20-pounder rifle, as directed by Lieutenant-Commander A. A. Semmes, 
of the U. S. S. Lehigh, tiring every fifteen minutes. At 12 p. m. broke 
the screws to the lock plate of the rifle. Opened fire with the 
32-pounder broadside gun in place of 20-pounder rifle. At (3 a. m. 
February 11 ceased firing. 

At 4:45 p. m., in obedience to orders from Captain Semmes, of the 
U. S. S. Lehigh, was taken in tow by the U. S. tug Clover and pro- 
ceeded down the river to our former anchorage. 

Enclosed please find list of ammunition expended on the 10th and 
llth on board of this vessel. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE W. PARKER, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 233 

Keport of Lieutenant-Commander Johnson, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Wissahickon, 
regarding naval cooperation in the Stono and Folly rivers. 

U. S. S. WISSAHICKON, 

Stono -River, South Carolina, February 12, 1865. 
ADMIRAL: On the 10th instant, at early daylight, and after a personal 
interview with Brigadier-General A. Schimmelfennig, commanding this 
district, as to his proposed demonstrations against the defenses of the 
enemy on James Island, I ordered the U. S. S. McDonough, Lieuten- 
ant-Commander A. F. Crosman, with the U. S. S. Geranium as a 
tender, up the Folly River beyond the position now occupied by the 
mortar schooner Dan Smith, to support the landing of the right wing 
of the infantry, and proceeded up the Stono River in this vessel, 
accompanied by the mortar schooner C. P. Williams, in tow of the 
U. S. D. Azalea, to an anchorage commanding the enemy's rifle pits, and 
cleared the way with shell for the advance of the left wing of the land 
forces. During the forenoon of the same day the U. S. S. Lehigh, 
Lieutenant-Commander Semmes, arrived in the stream, and her com- 
mander being the senior officer, I informed him of all that had been 
done, and transferred the direction of future operations to him. 

Enclosed is the amount of ammunition expended from this vessel 
while on this service. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. W. JOHNSON, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading fleet. 



Detailed report of Lieutenant-Commander Crosman, U. S. Navy, commanding TJ. S. S. 
Commodore McDonough, regarding cooperation with the army in the Folly River. 

U. S. S. COMMODORE MCDONOUGH, 
Stono Inlet, Smith Carolina, February 13, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations 
on Folly River on the 10th instant: 

Upon the 9th instant 1 went on board the Wissahickon by order of 
Lieutenant-Commander A. W. Johnson', senior officer present, where 
I met Colonel Hartwell, commanding United States forces on Folly 
Island, and there received instructions in regard to an expedition or 
reconnoissance in force to be made the next day on James Island. 

Captain Johnson assigned to my command the mortar schooner Dan 
Smith, the tug Geranium, and the army transport Augmta (tin clad), 
which last vessel would report to me after landing troops at the right 
battery on Cole's Island, and I was directed to place my vessels in such 
a position as in my opinion would best effect the purpose desired. 

At this time my boiler had just been repaired, and at the moment 
of leaving my vessel 1 expected steam in a short time, and had left 
orders to my executive officer to bring the McDonough down to an 
anchorage near the WissahicJeon as soon as possible. 

By Captain Johnson's permission, I took the Geranium up the river 
beyond Cole's Island, at the place selected for the landing of troops, 
and carefully sounded out the channel, selecting positions for the 
different vessels. 



234 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

While up at .the front I directed the commanding officer of the Dan 
Smith (anchored there) to take position in a bight of the river pointed 
out, before daybreak, and to open fire with his battery at certain 
designated points, by daybreak, as the army were to move across at 
daylight, having his broadside sprung for that purpose. 

As the Geranium was needed by the army to transport horses dur- 
ing the night, I directed her commanding officer to report to the Dan 
Smith as soon as that duty should be finished, whose captain would 
indicate to him the place I wished him to take. 

I communicated with Colonel Hartwell on Folly Island, comparing 
my watch with his, regulating my ship's time with that of the army, 
and, as he was in command of the bridge, ascertaining from him the 
nature, time, and exact place of the proposed operations. 

Upon returning to my ship I found another leak had sprung out in 
the boiler, which, through the assistance of a machinist kindly sent me 
by Lieutenant-Commander Johnson, was stopped by 9:30 o'clock p. m. 

At 10 o'clock the chief engineer reported to me another leak, in a 
place in such a position that the shell of the boiler would have to be 
cut through to get to it. 

This dashed my hopes of having steam on my vessel by the next 
morning. 

I gave orders to bring the Geranium alongside as soon as possible, 
when the captain of that vessel came on board himself to inform me 
that an army pilot had put him hard and fast on shore, at top high 
water, so that he would be unable to get off before 7 o'clock the next 
morning. 

Directing him to take all proper steps for floating his vessel, and 
when possible to join me at the right battery, I sent an officer to 
Lieutenant-Commander Johnson, requesting the loan of the tug 
Azalea by 4 o'clock, stating my position and that of the G(?ranium. 

I also communicated with Colonel Hartwell, who came off in the 
Augusta at 2 a. m. 

The Azalea had to tow. the mortar schooner C. P. Williams up the 
Stono River, and therefore could not come at once. 

There was no pilot on board the Augusta, and I sent my executive 
officer on board, directing him to take the McDonough in tow and 
proceed up the river. Hardly had we got fairty underway, when he 
hailed me to say the Augusta would not steer, and as a shoal was under 
my lea, I let go my anchor, when to my great jo} 7 the tug Azalea was 
discovered steaming down toward us. 

Directing Acting Master Knapp to follow in my wake in the tin- 
clad Augusta, I went aboard the tug, took the McDonough in tow, 
and piloted both vessels up the river. 

The Geranium, getting off about this time, took her position astern 
of all. 

We arrived at the point of disembarkation at daylight; slowed down 
to load with coal. Hartwell and his staff took our positions and 
opened fire with our batteries. 

The Azalea 1 directed to return to Captain Johnson up the Stono. 

My executive officer, Acting Master Knapp, placed the Augusta in 
the best position for landing her troops, and then put her near the 
bridge, where her sharpshooters would be serviceable, after which he 
joined me on board the McDonough. 

The vessels had their broadsides, sprung so as to protect the whole 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 285 

front of our troops, while the latter advanced and formed line of 
battle in the old rifle pits occupied by our forces in July, 1864, pre- 
venting the enemy from molesting them, also while laying- the bridge, 
and a vigorous tire was kept up throughout the day. 

The fferamrumwas sent down by me at about noon for a new supply 
of ammunition, and appended 1 send the list of that used up and 
received. 

The WissaJiickon and C. P. Williams, and subsequently the monitor 
Lehigh, kept up a fire from the Stono River, which crossed our own, 
making it uncomfortable for the enemy in their lines. 

In the afternoon a very handsome advance was made by our troops, 
who received the enemy's fire and went in with the bayonet, captur- 
ing the first line of intrenchments and some 20 prisoners. 

At about 10 o'clock p. m. Colonel Hartwell sent Adjutant Dewhurst 
on board to thank me for the services of the vessels in Folly River, 
expressing at the same time his appreciation of those in Stono, and 
to inform me of the withdrawal of our forces from James Island. 

I therefore kept a 24-pounder howitzer, firing shell once an hour 
during the night, the Geranium and Dan Smith firing also occasion- 
ally, that no attempt might be made to annoy our" men at work remov- 
ing the bridge between Cole's and James islands. 

At about 9:30 a. m. of the llth, our troops being all withdrawn, I 
directed the Geranium to follow in my wake, the Dan Smith to retake 
her old position in a line with the front of the right battery of Cole's 
Island, got imderwa} T , proceeded down Folly River, and reported in 
person to you on board the Harvest Moon. 

Acting Master Avery, commanding the Philadelphia, and Acting 
Ensign George Edwards, also of that vessel, volunteered to accom- 
pany me, and were of great assistance throughout the day. 

I also recommend my executive officer, William Knapp, acting 
master, to whose good judgment is due the timely arrival of the 
transport Augusta, as he was the only pilot who could be spared. 

Accompanying is a list of ammunition received and expended. 

I dare not carry more than 10 pounds of steam upon this vessel's 
boiler, after such a chapter of accidents. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. F. CROSMAN, 
Lieutenant- Commander, U. S. Navy. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 



Report of Acting Master Parker, TJ. S. Navy, commanding TT. S. schooner C. P. Williams, 
regarding operations of that vessel in Stono River. 

U. S. SCHOONER C. P. WILLIAMS, 

Stono River, February 15, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to orders, received from Lieutenant-Commander 
A. A. Semmes, U. S. S. Lehigh, senior officer present, on the after- 
noon of the 13th came up with fore rigging of this vessel and got read} 7 
to use Xlll-inch mortar. 

On the morning of the 14th, at 4:45 a. m., the U. S. S. lT7xsW//V^w?, 
Lieutenant-Commander A. W. Johnson, came alongside and towed 



236 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

this vessel up the Stono River. At 8:20 a. m. came to anchor about 
one-fourth of a mile above obstructions. At 8:35 opened fire with the 
mortar, as directed by Captain Semmes, firing at intervals of eight to 
ten minutes until 4:40 p. m. , when I ceased tiring by orders of Captain 
Semmes. 

At 5:20 a. m. of the 13th, U. S. S. Wissahickon. Lieutenant- 
Commander A. W. Johnson, came alongside and towed us down the 
river to our former anchorage. 

Enclosed please find list of ammunition expended on board this vessel 
on the 14th. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. W. PARKER, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear-Admiral^ Comdg. Smith Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron,. 



Report of Lieutenant-Commander Johnson, U. S. Navy, commanding IT. S. S. Wissahickon, 
regarding operations of that vessel in Stono River. 

U. S. S. WISSAHICKON, 

Stono River, South Carolina, February 15, 1865. 
ADMIRAL: On the 14th instant, by direction of the senior officer 
present, Lieutenant-Commander Semmes, I got underway in this 
vessel at daylight, and with the mortar schooner C. P. Williams in 
tow, steamed up the Stono River to the position assigned her, and 
after taking our own, commenced shelling me rifle pits of the enemy, 
agreeably to instructions. 

The report of expenditure of ammunition on that service is herewith 
enclosed. 

1 am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. W. JOHNSON, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Fleet. 



Report of* Lieutenant-Commander Semmes, U. S. Navy, regarding combined demonstration 
against Confederate works on James Island. 

U. S. S. LEHIGH, 
Stono Inlet, South Carolina, February 16, 1865. 

SIR: At daylight, the 14th instant, the vessels in this inlet moved to 
the stations assigned them for cooperation with the army in another 
demonstration against the rebel works on James Island, the Lehigh, 
Wissahickon, and C. P. Williams up the Stono, covering the left of 
our troops, and the McDonougli and Dan /Smith up the Folly River, 
covering the front and right. 

From 8 a. m. to 6 p. m., the 14th, one shell w r as fired every five 
minutes by the vessels in the Stono, whilst a suitable fire was kept up 
by those in the Folly River. 

These positions were maintained until the following morning, when 
the vessels resumed their former blockading' stations. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 237 

The following ammunition was expended on board this vessel: 
12-pounder Hotchkiss shells, percussion, 38; Schenkle shells, per- 
cussion, 3. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. A. SEMMES, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer. 

Rear-Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgr en, U. S. Navy, regarding certain vessels. 

No. 67.] FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

At Sea, February 12, 1865. 

SIR: I beg leave to state for the information of the Department that 
the U. S. S. Merrimac has touched at Charleston, bound for the East 
Gulf Squadron; also that the Cambridge has arrived at Port Royal, 
and will be assigned to duty in this squadron, and in conformity with 
the Department's order contained in its communication ' to me of 
October 18, 1864, that the James Adger will be dispatched to the North 
Atlantic Squadron, with orders to report to the flag-officer command- 
ing, as soon as the repairs necessary to the efficiency of that vessel 
shall have been completed. Her cylinder rings have been so much 
worn and broken that Fleet Engineer Danby has found it necessary to 
require for a new set from the North, not being able to supply them 
here. 

Commander Patterson's orders will be duplicated when the Adger is 
ready for sea. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Expedition to Bull's Bay, South Carolina, in cooperation with the 
army in creating a diversion at Charleston, February 12-17, 1865. 

Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, TT. S. Navy, to Lieutenant-Commander Stillwell, U. 8. 
Navy, commanding U. S. S. Ottawa. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Port Royal Harbor, February 10, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed with the Ottawa under your command to 
Bull's Bay with all dispatch and report to the senior officer present for 
cooperation with the army. 

Endeavor to be there in the morning. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant -Commander JAMES STILLWELL, 

Commanding U. S. S. Ottawa. 



238 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Memorandum from Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Ridgeley, TJ. S. Navy, 
transmitting instructions for vessels from the outside blockade. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off Charleston, February 11, 1865. 

Assemble all the vessels on the outside blockade, and communicate 
to them their orders for the expedition to Bull's Bay, as indicated in 
the enclosed memorandum. 

[Enclosure.] 
Memorandum for Butt's Bay. 

FEBRUARY 11, 1865. 

1. The vessels of heavy draft, such as Shenandoa/i, Canandaigua, 
Juniata, Georgia, etc., will lay close off the entrance of the channel. 

2. The light-draft vessels, such as Pawnee, Sonsnna, Ottawa, Winsma, 
Potomska, etc., will enter, the lightest draft leading, and will take the 
best positions for shelling the shores when the troops land and wher- 
ever rebel troops can be seen. 

3. All boats will be prepared to go alongside the transports as soon 
as they are near the anchorage, and take in the troops with the utmost 
expedition. 

4. Four launches will pull as close as possible to the appointed land- 
ing and be prepared to clear the banks where it may be needed. 

5. Three light howitzers will be manned by seamen from Morris 
Island naval battery and will land with the troops. 

6. Captain Ridgely will command division outside. Captain Balch 
will command inside division. Captain Stanly will command division 
of boats for disembarkation. 

7. All the vessels detailed for the duty will be underway in their 
respective divisions as soon as it is dark enough not to be noticed by 
the rebels ashore, and will proceed to Bull's Bay. 

8. All lights must be extinguished and no signals made, particularly 
as the rebels understand our signals. 

9. It will be best to got a short offing before steering up along the 
coast, so as to give no notice of movement ashore. 

10. The boats should have as few men to pull as may be convenient, 
so as to carry most troops. There should be at least one officer from 
each ship. 

The vessels detailed are Shenandoah, Canandaigua, Juniata, Georgia, 
Pawnee, Sonoma, Ottawa, Winona, Potomska, Wando, the tugs Gera- 
nium, iris, Clover, Catalpa. 

The divisional commanders will communicate with the commanders 
of the troops, so as to accomplish the landing with the utmost expedi- 
tion and completeness. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 



Order of Bear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Ridgely, TT. S. Navy, to assume 
direction in the cooperative operations during the temporary absence of the former. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

[Off Bull's Bay, S. C.,} February 12, 1865. 

SIR: I am called away by a telegram from General Sherman that 
may require coaction with General Gillmore, now at Port Royal. 

You are therefore in charge of the vessels no.w here to cooperate 
with General Potter. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 239 

Send in every boat that can be spared, and yon had better go in 
yourself, leaving the Shenandoah outside, as her draft is too heavy. 

The object is to assist the army movement as much as possible, and 
every exertion is to be made for that purpose. 

1 leave the tugs Geranium and Iris with you. Send the Catalpa to 
Captain Scott at Charleston to-night. 

Send Oleander to Port Royal as soon as discharged. 
Lieutenant Mahan is here, ordnance officer of squadron, with ammu- 
nition; see him. 

As soon as the troops withdraw and leave this place take all the 
vessels to Charleston, except Pawnee and Ottawa. Send them to Port 
Royal; the Chambers will remain. 
Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN. 

Rear- Admiral. 
Captain RIDGELY, " 

S&n-ior Officer Present. 



Report of Captain Ridgely, TJ. S. Navy, regarding protection afforded to troops while land- 
ing at Owendaw Creek. 

U. S. S. SONOMA, 

Bull's Buy, South Carolina, february 19, 1865. 
SIR: I have the honor to inform you that the troops under General 
Potter effected a landing at Owendaw Creek, on the evening of the 17th 
instant (about 750 men), under cover of the launches' howitzers. The 
remainder of the command were disembarked yesterday at the same 
place, without opposition, and are marching toward Charleston by 
the way of Mount Pleasant. I expect to leave here to-morrow to 
report to you at Charleston. The Ottawa is on the bar. The tug 
Geranium is coaling from the Ottawa; she has only one day's coal. 
She will leave to-night with the launches for the Santee, in obedience 
to your orders. 

I congratulate you, admiral, on the evacuation of Charleston. 
Commander Stanly, the commanding officer of the landing party, 
will report to you in detail the part performed by the navy. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

DANL. B. RIDGELY, 

Captain, U. 8. Navy. 
Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding /South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Stanly, U. S. Navy, commanding expedition. 

BULL'S BAY, February 19, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to orders from Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, I 
entered Bull's Bay, South Carolina, on the 12th instant, in command 
of the expeditionary force composed of the Pawnee, Sonoma, Ottawa, 
Winona, Potomaka, Wando, J. S. Chambers, three armed tugs, thirty- 
three boats, and thirteen pieces of artillery, to cooperate with Briga- 
dier-General E. E. Potter, with troops and several army transports, 
against the rear of Charleston. 

The 12th instant was employed in seeking for a channel to Anderson- 
ville; the 13th in passing through one of the straits that runs from 



240 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 

this bay through a marsh that forms Bay Sewee on the north (Ander- 
sonville being on the southern shore of Bay Sewee 1-t miles from 
Charleston) and in engaging the forts at Andersonville. 

On the 14th we entered a second strait leading to Bay Sewee and 
engaged another fort with 18-pounders, a shot from one of which dis- 
mounted one of our howitzers. We silenced this fort, but found it 
impossible to cross the shoals and Muddy Bay in our launches. 

General Potter, myself, Acting Master John McGo wan, jr. (survey- 
ing officer), and Acting Master C. C. Ricker, commanding armed 
launches, were frequently under fire, sounding in advance for a chan- 
nel. Heavy weather kept us still the 15th. On the 16th, with your 
approbation, the Ottawa and Wando were sent off Andersonville, 
through another strait in the marsh, found by Acting Master McGowan, 
and engaged a third fortification to the eastwara of Andersonville, 
while the launches engaged a fort at that place. Finding it impossible 
to approach Andersonville in front, I left a strong force there, and 
half the army to keep up appearances, and dashed off with General 
Potter to the northwest shore of this (Bull's) bay through a channel 
discovered by night work by Acting Master McGowan, and drove the 
enemy from a strong earthwork on Graham's Point and effected a land- 
ing without the loss of a man. Acting Master's Mate Jacob Kemp, 
with an armed launch, dashed up the creek in advance and drove the 
enemy from their rifle pits. Acting Master William F. Redding was 
the first to land. Acting Master John Collins, in command of the 
field artillery, was soon at the front, and en route to Andersonville, 
which was soon occupied by our army. Ensign McGregor accom- 
panied the Thirty-second Colored Regiment with a fieldpiece and 
destroyed bridges in the rear, and received Colonel Hartwell's thanks. 
Acting Ensign Mitchell, with a fieldpiece, accompanied the army in 
their march toward Charleston, General Potter will account for the 
prisoners captured. 

General Gillmore had paid us a special visit on the 17th, assuring us 
that Charleston would surrender on our obtaining a firm foothold here. 
1 have no doubt but that our doing so added much to the fear caused 
by General Sherman, which has caused the abandonment of Charleston 
on the 18th. 

The officers and men of the expedition behaved with gallantry and, 
amidst depression and fatigue, going for two days on short rations 
and working for two nights in boats with their clothing wet through, 
displayed energy and endurance worthy of the cause in which we are 
engaged. 

General Potter expressed on the beach his thanks for our exertions 
throughout. I found him all that a man should be in courtesy, daring, 
and ability. 

1 find the country here full of every kind of stock. I also find large 
numbers of slaves, but every one of them refused our offers to accom- 
pany us or the army. I am happy to be able to state that all private 
property has been respected, except horses, beeves, and meal, which 
our necessities demanded. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. STANLY, 
Commander, Commanding Expedition in JBulVs Bay. 

Captain D. B. RIDGELY, 

Senior Officer Present. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 241 

Additional report of Captain Ridgely. U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Shenandoah. 

U. S. S. SHENANDOAH, 
Off Charleston, S. C., February W, 1865. 

SIB: I have the honor to report the return to this place of the 
remainder of the vessels, launches, and boats detailed by you for the 
Bull's Bay expedition. I am confident that the expedition to Bull's 
Bay embarrassed the rebels from the number of men-of-war inside 
and outside of the bay and the great number of boats provided by the 
navy to disembark a large land force. 

The rebels signaled our movements to Charleston day and night 
and threw up intrenchments at every point where boats could land. 

During the evacuation of Charleston, the rebels disappeared from 
Bull's Bay, and I am of the opinion that the evacuation of Charleston 
was hastened by the ^demonstration made by the army and navy at 
that point in strong force. 

I am, respectfully, etc., 

DANL. B. RIDGELY, 

Captain, U. S. Navy. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadran, Charleston, S. C. 



Detailed report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding 
naval cooperatum in the opening of the campaign of the Carolinas. 

No. 69.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal Harbor, 8. C., February 13, 1865. 

SIR: I take advantage of the departure of a steamer to-night to 
apprise the Department of the state of affairs here. 

The arm}' of General Sherman may now be considered as having 
begun its movement northward from Savannah. 

The Department has been informed in my previous communications 
that the right wing having been moved from Savannah to Beaufort, 
by water, advanced gradually, driving in the rebel forces near Poco- 
taligo, and finally inclining to the left found itself about the 2d ready 
to cross the Combahee at Rivers' Bridge, on the confines of the 
Barnwell district. 

Here it necessarily awaited the left wing under General Slocum, 
which had been delayed in passing up along the banks of the Savannah 
by the effect of the freshets on the roads, which, in many places, 
required to be corduroyed. 

I have sent the Pontiac to cover these troops and their crossing at 
Sister's Ferry, 41 miles from the city, where this vessel arrived on 
the 24th January, about three days in advance of the column of 
General Davis. 

By the 7th of February the last man of the rear division was over, 
without molestation, and the Pontiac dropped down the river, anchor- 
ing near the city by reason of a request from the general, to the effect 
that he considered the presence of some vessels of war necessary. 

As the left wing had about 35 miles to march for its position with 
the army, it is fair to presume that by the 10th or llth General Sher- 
man had his whole force in hand and ready to move on Branchville, 

N w R VOL 16 16 



242 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

some 20 miles distant from Rivers' Bridge, and making due allowance 
for the Edisto River and its swamps may be there at this date, unless 
he shall have inclined to the left, more toward Augusta, in order to 
avoid swampy ground. 

Meanwhile, by way of diversion, as requested by General Sherman, 
the Ottawa and Winona were feeling their way in the Combahee on 
the 8th and 9th, the Pawnee and Sonoma pound the battery on the 
Togodo and Wadmelaw on the 10th and llth, while the monitors 
Lehigh, Wissahickon, McDonough, Smith, and Williams were shelling 
the works in the Stono. 

On the 12th and 13th came the demonstration at Bull's Bay, which 
is all that could be done by this squadron to assist the army of Gen- 
eral Sherman. 

It is now fairly launched on its great enterprise, and will no doubt 
soon consummate the first, results so confidently looked for. 

If any further communication is resumed with my command, it may 
be expected in the vicinity of Georgetown. But in view of the great 
effect that must be produced by the army recently landed at Wilming- 
ton, it is reasonable to infer that General Sherman will advance rapidly 
to a junction with it, and neither seek nor need further communica- 
tion with the sea whilst in South Carolina. 

Yesterday, while engaged in operations at Bull's Baj T , I received a 
dispatch in cipher from General Gillmore, which he had just received 
from General Sherman, asking me to decipher it. Upon which I 
steamed down to Hilton Head in order to be in immediate communica- 
tion with General Gillmore. Then I found a cipher dispatch for me 
from General Sherman, and I enclose copies of both, so that the 
Department may be able to inform the President of the last news 
here in regard to General Sherman. 

Though General Sherman gave me a key to the cipher, I regret to 
say that the explanations are not sufficient to enable me to use it. 1 
will, therefore, thank the Department to request fuller explanations 
from the War Department, so that similar difficulties may not again 
occur. 

I have the honor to be, very respectful^, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from, Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Major- General 
Gillmore, U. S. Army, forwarding cipher dispatch from Major- 
General Sherman, U. S. Army. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Port Royal, February 13, 1865. 

GENERAL: I received by your aid a dispatch in cipher from General 
Sherman, and send you by my fleet captain the key to the cipher sent 
me by General Sherman. 

As it was given under injunction of strict confidence, I have to 
request that you will not permit any but yourself to see it, that no 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 243 

copy of it will be taken, and that it will be returned to me by Fleet 
Captain Bradford. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 
Major-General GILLMORE, 

Commanding Department of South. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Major- General 
Gillmore, U. S. Army, responding to a request for a naval demon- 
stration in the Edisto River. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C. , February 14, 1865. 
SIR: I have just received your communication of the 14th, stating 
that a naval demonstration up the Edisto would aid General Hatch, 
and might open communication with him if made to-morrow or next 
day. 

You ask if it will be in my power to afford any cooperation in that 
quarter. 

With little exception, the only vessels of the squadron that could 
ascend the Edisto so far as to give the appearance of reality to any 
demonstration are now absent at Bull's Bay, cooperating with your 
detachment at that place. 

When you will inform me that they can be spared from that service, 
I will direct them to the Edisto without delay. 

The Pontiac, now remaining at Savannah by request of General 
Grover, could also be used if she could be spared. 

The present weather will unavoidably retard all naval movements 
whilst it lasts. 

I send herewith for your information a deciphered copy of General 
Sherman's dispatch* to me. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Stockading Squadron. 

Major-General Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Comdg. Department of the South, Headquarters Hilton Head. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, requesting permission 

to withdraw his application for relief from command of South 

Atlantic Squadron. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

February 14, 1865. 

SIR: When I applied on the 7th to be relieved, the latest communi- 
cation from General Sherman informed me that he had no design at 
all to attack Charleston, but would follow an interior line to the North. 

The cipher letter to me, which I forwarded on the 13th, intimates 
the possibility of his being forced to turn against Charleston. When 
I sent it the contents were entirely unknown to me or to General Gill- 
more, as we could not decipher it, though having the key. 

* See p. 220. 



244 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



To-day General Gillmore's operator has been able to read the cipher 
letter of General Sherman, and thus I learned the possible change in 
his plans. 

I beg leave, therefore, to withdraw my application for relief, so as 
to have an opportunity of cooperating with General Sherman in the 
capture of Charleston, when he shall undertake it. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. /S. 
Navy, responding to request for instructions regarding permits 
granted to parties engaged in cotton traffic. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, February 14, 1865. 

SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of the letter of Acting 
Ensign J. H. Bennett, commanding Brazdiera, dated the 4th instant, 
referred by you to the Department, relative to certain parties at Fer- 
nandina, Fla., who have permits signed by the President of the United 
States and the Secretary of the Treasury to bring purchased cotton 
out at any open port, and who propose to take the inside passage from 
Fernandina to St. Andrew's, thence to St. Simon's, and up Turtle 
River to Cabbage Bluff, to purchase cotton. 

The question is asked whether the parties shall be permitted to pass 
through the sound on their way to Cabbage Bluff with their steamer. 
The permits appear to authorize the parties to bring out cotton from 
an open port, and provide that there shall be no violation of any 
blockade line. They do not warrant them to proceed within the 
blockaded lines or into blockaded waters to effect their object. They 
should not, therefore, be permitted to pass beyond such lines or into 
such waters. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

February 15, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


Acacia 


5 


Screw tug 


Actg Master Jos. E. 'Jones 


Off Charleston. 




8 


Sid e-wh eel 


Comdr Thos H Patterson 


Port Royal repairing. 


*Adaras 


8 


steamer 
Ship 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. A. Phinnev ... 


Off Charleston. 


Allen 


9 


Bark 


Actg Master I A Pennell 


Off St Simon's. 


Amaranthus 
Arethusa 


t 3 
f3 


Screw tug 
do 


Actg. Ensign W. R. Cox 
Actg. Ensign J V Cook 


Off Charleston. 
Port Rovai. 


Azalea 


t? 


do 


Actg. Master F. W Strong 


Off Charleston. 


*Brueii 


2 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master W. F. Redding 


Do. 






stores. 







* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



245 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, February 15, 1865 

Continued. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Braziliera 


8 


Bark 


Actg. Master W. T. Gillespie 
Actg. Ensign Geo. G. Curtis 


St. Andrew's. 
Special duty, divers. 
Off Charleston. 
St. Helena. 
Off Charleston. 
Port Royal. 

Off Charleston. 
Do. 
Port Royal. 
Dispatch. 
Port Royal. 

Bull's Bav. 
Port Roval. 
Do.' 

North, special duty 
Off Charleston. 
St. Catherine's. 
Bull's Bay. 

Port Royal. 
Off Charleston. 
Wassaw Sound. 
Ossabaw Sound. 
Off Charleston. 

Stono. 

Off Charleston. 
Port Royal. 
St. John's River. 
Savannah River, div- 
ers. 
Stono. 
Off Charleston. 
Do. 
Do. 
Stono. 
Sapelo. 
Off Charleston. 
Do. 
Wassaw. 

Off Charleston. 
North Atlantic Squad- 
ron. 
Off Charleston. 
Georgetown. 

Ossabaw. 
Stono. 

Port Royal. 
Do. 
Off Charleston. 
Do. 
Georgetown. 
Port Royal. 
St. John's. 
Ossabaw. 

Bull's Bay. 
Off Charleston. 

Port Royal. 
Do. 
South Edisto. 
Savannah River. 

Off Charleston. 
Stono. 

Port Royal. 
Ossabaw. 
Fernandina. 


Blunt 


Schooner 


Cambridge 




Canandaigua 


8 
2 
8 

t3 
12 

1 


Screw sloop... 
Monitor 


Comdr. N. B. Harrison 


Canonicus 


Lt Comdr G E Belknap 


Cimarron 


Side-wheel 
gunboat. 
Screw tug 
...do 


Comdr E Thompson 


Catalpa 




Camelia 


Actg. Ensign D B Hawes 


Carnation 


.do 


Actg Ensign Wm Boyd 


Clover . 


do 
Side-wheel 
tug. 
Schooner 
Screw tug 
S Ld e-w heel 
tug. 
Screw steamer 
do 


Actg. Ensign B. Mitchell 
Actg. Master's Mate Geo. W. 
Post. 
Actg. Master W. L. Bowers 
Actg. Ensign G. W. Williams ... 
Actg. Master W. H. Mallard 

Comdr T C Williamson 


Chatham 


*Chambers 


6 
1-2 

|2 

7 
5 
9 

t4 

7 
t3 
3 

H 

t 

t2 
6 
6 
1 

13 

2 
2 
7 




Dandelion 


Daffodil 


Flag 


Flambeau 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. E. Cavendy . . . 
Actg. Master Lewis West 


Fernandina 


Bark . . . 


Geranium ... 


Sid e-w heel 
tug. 
Bark 


Actg. Ensign David Lee 


*Gemsbok 


Actg. Master J. F. Winchester . . 
Actg. Ensign N. Bough ton 


Gladiolus 


Screw tug 
Mortar sch'r.. 
Schooner 
Screw steam- 
er, hospital. 
Sid e-w heel 
steamer. 
Screw tug 
Bark 


*Griffith 


Actg. Master Jas. Ogilvie 


*G. W. Rodgers 


Actg. Master L. G. Emerson 
Actg Master Benj. Dyer 


Home 


Harvest Moon 


Actg Master J K Crosby 


Hvdrangea 


Actg. Master C. W. Rogers 


*Houghton . . 


Actg. Master E. G. Furber 


Hale 


Screw steamer 
Schooner 

Screw tug 
do 


Actg. Master C. F. Mitchell 


*Hope 


Actg. Vol. Lieut.W. L. Churchill. 
Actg Master J E Stickney 


Iris 


Jonquil 


Actg. Ensign Chas. H. Hanson. . . 
Comdr. J. J. Almy 


Juniata 


Screw sloop . . 
Monitor 


Catskill 


Lieut. Comdr. E. Barrett 


Lehigh 


do 


Lieut. Comdr. A. A. Semmes 
Actg. Vol. Lieut. R. P. Swann 
Actg. Ensign Sturgis Center 
Actg Ensign Wm Nelson 


Lodona 


Screw steamer 
Screw tug 
do 


Laburnum . 


Larkspur 


* Lightning 


Schooner 
(tender). 
Monitor . 




Mahopac 


2 
2 

4 
11 

8 
6 

11 
7 
2 
o 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Weaver 
Lieut. Comdr. E E Stone 


Montauk 


do. 


Monadnock 


do 


Comdr E G Parrott 


Mingoe 


Sid e-w heel 
gunboat. 
Screw sloop . . 
Sid e-w heel 
gunboat. 
Screw steamer 
Schooner 
Monitor 
do 


Comdr. J. B. Creighton 


Mohican 


Comdr. Danel Ammen 


Me Donough 


Lieut. Comdr. A. F. Crosman 

Actg. Master R. O. Patterson 
Actg. Master John Collins 
Lieut. Comdr. R. F. R. Lewis 
Lieut. Comdr. W. K. Mavo 


Memphis 


Mangham 


Nan tucket. . 


Nahant 


Nipsic 


8 
10 
6 
6 

5 


Screw gunboat 
Store ship 
Screw steamer 
Mortar schoon- 
er. 
Screwgunboat 
Schooner, 
stores. 
Screw tug 
Monitor 
Screw sloop . . 
Side-wheel 
gunboat. 
Screw steamer 
Side-wheel 
steamer. 
Sid e-w heel 
tug. 
Mortar schoon- 
er. 
Brie... 


Lieut. Comdr. E. W. Henry 


New Hampshire 
Norwich 


Comdr. Wm. Reynolds 


Actg. Master W. H. DeWolf 
Actg. Master G. VV. Wood 


Norfolk Packet... 


Ottawa 


Lieut. Comdr. J Stillwell 


Orvetta.. 


Actg Master Wm. Fales 


Oleander . 


t2 
2 
14 
11 

6 

n 

t2 

7 
9 


Actg. Master R. P. Walter 
Lieut. Comdr. R. W. Scott 
Comdr. G. B. Balch 
Lieut Comdr S B Luce 


Passaic 


Pawnee 


Pontiac 


Potomska 


Actg. Master F. M. Montell 
Actg Master G H Avery 


Philadelphia 


Pettit 


Actg Ensign C Grieve 


*Para. 


Actg Master D. P Heath 


Perrv . . . 


Acts:. Master S. N. Freeman . . 



* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



246 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, February 15, 1865 

Continued. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Percy Drayton 




Sloop (tender) 
Mortar schoon- 
er. 
Monitor 




North Edisto. 
Tybee. 

Off Charleston. 
Bull's Bay. 

North Edisto. 
Bull's Bay. 

Doboy. 

Bull's Bay. 
Off Charleston. 
Supply vessel. 
St. Helena. 
Port Royal, repairing. 
Stono. 

Port Royal, repairing 
Do. 
Georgetown. 
Port Roval, repairing. 
Port Royal. 
Stono. 
South Edisto. 
Off Charleston. 
Do. 

Stono. 

St. Helena. 
Light-House Inlet. 


*Racer 


2 

8 

18 
8 

22 

8 
8 

1 

T3 


Actg. Master E. G. Martin 
Lieut. Comdr. J. Young. 


Sangamon 


Sonoma 


Sid e-w heel 
gunboat. 
Ship 


Lieut. Comdr. T. S. Fillebrown . . 
Comdr. G. H. Preble 


*St. Louis 


State of Georgia 
*Saratoga 


8 i a e-w heel 
steamer. 
Ship 


Comdr. Fabius Stanly 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. Comdr. C. E. 
Brodhead. 
Capt. D. B. Ridgely 


Shenandoah 


Screw sloop... 
Screw steamer 
do 
do 


South Carolina 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W.W. Kennison. 
Actg. Master Z. Kempton 
Actg. Vol. Lieut. C. J. Van Alstine 
Actg. Master W Bailey 


Sanford 


Stettin 


Sweet Brier . 


Screw tug 
Mortar schoon- 
er. 
Tender . 


*Dan Smith 


Actg. Master B. Van Voorhis 


*Swift 


Ticonderoga 


14 
10 


Screw sloop . . 
do 
Tender 


Capt. C. Steedman 


Tuscarom 


Comdr. J. M. Frailey 


*Thunder 






Hospital 


Actg. Master H. S. Blanchard . . . 
Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Johnson . . % . 
Lieut. Comdr. W. H. Dana 


Wissahickon 


5 

6 
6 
3 

6 


Screwgunboat 
do 


Winona 




Screw steamer 
Side-wheel 
steamer. 
Mortarschoon- 
er. 
Tender 


Actg. Master C. W. Lee 


Wando 


Actg. Master F. T. King 


C P.Williams 


Actg. Master G. W. Parker 


Wild Cat .. 




Ward 


5 


Schooner, 
ordnance. 


Actg Master R T Wvatt 







* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



Report of Acting Ensign Center, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 
laburnum, regarding tJie 'reception on board that vessel of men from 
tfte stranded blockade runner Sylph. 

U. S. TUG LABURNUM, 
Off Charleston, February 15, 1865. 
SIR: I have the honor to make the following 1 report: 
At 2 o'clock this morning, while doing- picket duty on the advance, 
discovered a boat coming from Sullivan's Island with 7 men in her. 
Hailed her and took them on board. The}^ report themselves from 
the blockade runner Sylph, which ran on shore on Sullivan's Island 
on the evening before while attempting to run the blockade out of 
Charleston. 

The following is a list of their names: Edward Manner, mate; G. 
W. Cessell, French; Charles Kelly, T. McManner, - - White, 
- Sherry, soldiers; M. Barby, escaped prisoner. 
Very respectfully, } 7 our obedient servant, 



Captain G. H. SCOTT, 

Senioi* Officer off Cliarleston. 



S. CENTER, 
Acting Ensign, Commanding. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 247 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, IT. S. Navy, to Commander Batch, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. /S. /S. Pawnee, for a demonstration in 
the Edisto River. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

BuWs Bay, 8. C., February 16, 1865. 
SIR: You will proceed with the Pawnee to South Edisto. 
I am informed by General Gillmore that General Hatch was on the 
Combahee on the 14th with orders to push forward to Edisto, and that 
a naval demonstration up the Edisto would aid him, and might open 
communication with him if made on the 15th or 16th. General Hatch 
will try to reach Jacksonville [Jacksonboro, S. C.] and Willstowri. 

Your object will be to make such demonstration as may be in your 
power. The McDonough is ordered to the South Edisto, and you will 
be followed b} r one of the gunboats now here, and some tug. 
Lookout for torpedoes and feel your way carefully up the river. 
Keep me informed of your progress. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Pear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 

Commander GEORGE B. BALCH, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Pawnee. 



Order of Pear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Captain Scott, 
U. S. Navy, in view of the expected evacuation of Charleston. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Stono, Fetouary 17, 1865. 

SIR: There are rumors in circulation that the rebels are about to 
evacuate Charleston, and I have a telegram from the headquarters, 
Morris Island, stating that the rebel telegrams (intercepted) indicated 
preparations for such an event. 

When the Nahant comes here, you will still have in Charleston 
Roads six monitors, one of which is double-turreted. 

I desire, therefore, that the movements of the rebels at all points of 
the harbor shall be closely and vigilantly watched, and that measures 
be immediately taken to apprise me by signal of the first appearance 
of any abandonment of the city or harbor defenses. 

It may be advisable to draw the fire of Moultrie occasionally, in order 
to verify the condition of things there. This may be done at sufficient 
intervals by the monitor on picket at the advance station, which, by 
order, is 2,300 yards distant. 

The boats must be very alert in observing the rebels, and one or 
two should pull out from the island between Johnson and Sumter. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Pear- Admiral. 
Captain SCOTT, 

Senior Officer, etc. 



248 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Rear- Admiral Daklgren, U. /S. Navy, to Captain Scott, 
U. 8. Navy, to open fire upon Sullivan's Island. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Folly River, February 17, 1865. 

SIR: You will direct the naval battery of Xl-inch guns on Morris 
Island to open on Sullivan's Island, directing at least half the tire to 
the bridge from Sullivan's Island to Mount Pleasant. 

The firing should be deliberate, say a shot every five minutes from 
the battery. 

To cease or continue or fire faster, as circumstances may require. 
It may be well to fire occasionally on Fort Johnson, if the guns will 
bear. 

The general is under the impression that the rebels are about to 
evacuate, and that they may begin to-night. 

I had intended to come around, but it is reported as blowing a gale, 
and too rough on the bar for my steamer. 

Say to the commanding officer on Morris Island that the naval bat- 
tery opens by arrangement with General S. 
Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 
Captain SCOTT, 

Senior Officer. 

The state of the weather must control the use of the monitors. Do 
not push them up to fire, if they ought to be down. 



Memorandum from Rear- Admiral Dalilgren, U." S. Navy, for Lieu- 
tenant- Commander Semmes, U. S. Navy, in view of the anticipated 
abandonment of James Island by the Confederate forces. 

STONO, Febniary 17. 

The general anticipates the abandonment of James Island by the 
rebels, and will feel tnem strongly to-night on the line from the Stono 
toward Seceshville [Secessionville]. 

It is desirable that a fire from the vessels shall assist by covering 
the flanks of his force. 

The Leldgli, WissahicJcon, and the mortar schooner will operate 
from the Stono at a position about that to which the Lehigh advanced 
a few days since. 

The McDonough will join the mortar schooner in the branch of the 
Folly River, near our position on Cole's Island, so as to reach Secesh- 
ville at long range, and cover our right flank, the latter being the 
main purpose. 

If the general finds James Island evacuated, he is to signal to the 
Charleston vessels inside. 

I expect to leave for Charleston Roads, where keep me informed. 
V ery respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 

[Lieutenant-Commander SEMMES.] 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 249 

Report of Acting Master Jones, U. S. Navy, commanding If. S. S. 
Acacia, regarding, the chase of a steamer off CJiarleston. 

U. S. S. ACACIA, 

Off Charleston, February 17, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that while at anchor last evening, 
about 9:30 p. m. , in 3i fathoms, with the wreck of the Housatonic 
bearing S. by W., the north buoy on Rattlesnake Shoal N. E. by N. 
1 mile, I discovered a large steamer, distant about 1,200 yards, appar- 
ently covering our bows, we heading at the time S. by W. I chal- 
lenged him, but received no reply. I slipped and stood toward him, 
and at the same time tired my forward pivot 30-pounder at him, the 
shell striking and passing through him. I then opened on him with 
every gun I could bring to bear, but failed to disable him. I con- 
tinued the chase until 11 p. m. He being out of sight, I gave up the 
chase and went back to my station and anchored at 12:30 a. m. 

The following is the amount of ammunition expended during the 
chase: 30-pounder Parrott, 5 3i-second shell; Dahlgren 12-pounder 
rifle, 1 3-second shell. 

I have also to report that in purchasing the anchor that 1 slipped, 
the buoy rope parted and 1 have as yet been unable to find it, but 
shall drag for it again to-night on the first favorable opportunity. 
1 am, very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

J. E. JONES, 
Acting M aster, Commanding U. S. S. Acacia. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Rebellion Roads, Charleston Harbor, February 18, 1865. 
(Received 7 p. m., February 20, via Fort Monroe, Va.) 
SIR: Charleston was abandoned this morning by the rebels. I am 
now on my way to the city, and have the honor to be, 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FORTRESS MONROE, VA., February W, 1865 6 p. m. 
SIR: 1 have the honor to report my arrival at Fortress Monroe on 
the U. S. S. State of Georgia, Lieutenant Manley in command, with 
dispatches from Admiral Dahlgren. Having forwarded the dispatch, 
my orders are to return to Charleston as soon as the ship can coal, 
unless the Department directs otherwise. Awaiting further orders 
from the Department, 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. ORVILLE MATTHEWS, 
Lieutenant- Comm.ander and Aid to Admiral. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Seci'etary of the Navy. 



250 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, announcing the 
evacuation of Charleston. 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 
City of Charleston, February 18, 1865. 

SIR: I have already sent you a brief dispatch by Captain Matthews 
with tidings of the abandonment of this place by the rebels. 

As the Fulton is announced off the bar. I send this brief announce- 
ment of what has occurred. 

Not a shot was fired for the place, not a blow struck. 
I will report more fully to the Department as soon as the various 
particulars reach me. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Bear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Rear- Admiral 

Porter, U. S. Navy, regarding the occupation of Charleston l>y the 

Union forces. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 
Off the City of Charleston, February 18, 1865. 

MY DEAR PORTER: Your very acceptable letter of the 28th January 
reached me duly, and was very gratifying. 

In return you will see by the date of this that the navy's occupation 
has given this pride of rebeldom to the Union flag, and thus the rebel- 
lion is shut out from the ocean and foreign sympathy. 

They went from it unheralded by a shot, and to-day I quietly steamed 
up to the wharves and walked through the town. 

Conformably to the orders of the Department, I am to send you 
monitors of the Passaic class; one I have already sent you; another 
will leave soon. 

I have just walked over the city; every house shut up; the few per- 
sons in the streets were foreigners and negroes. 

As they have made their beds, so let them lie. 

General Sherman desires me to let 3 T ou know that I had heard from 
him. He was at Midway on the 7th February, 10 miles east of Branch- 
ville, and the evacuation of Charleston shows that he must have 
pressed them very hard since, in advance on some point that they 
deemed vital. 

Enclosed is a copy of his dispatch* as deciphered. 

At Georgetown I have two gunboats inside and the Tuscarora 
outside. 

You have indeed struck a glorious blow at Wilmington, and no one 
will rejoice more in your having done so than myself. 
With my best wishes, I am, most truly, yours, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadi'on. 

Rear- Admiral D. D. PORTER, 

Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. 

*See page 220. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 251 

of Lieutenant- Commander Semmes, U. S. Navy, regarding 
operations in the Stono River. 

U. S. S. LEHIGH, 
Stono Rvver, South Carolina, February 18, 1865. 

SIR: At dusk } T esterday I took position to cover our troops, at the 
same time issuing directions as to station and direction of fire to the 
other vessels, in accordance with memorandum furnished by yourself. 

A steady fire was kept up from the WissahicJcon and this vessel from 
8 p. m. to 2 a. m. in this river. I have not heard from the McDon- 
ough and Dan Smith yet. The schooner C. P. Williams, unfortu- 
nately, grounded and could not be gotten into range. A sharp artillery 
fire was going on on James Island during this time. At daylight this 
morning, being in want of ammunition, I went down to Folly River, 
and whilst there called on board the Harvest Moan to report to you 
verbally what came under my observation during the night. Whilst 
there, Lieutenant-Commander Johnson sent me word of the evacuation 
of James Island, which I immediately ordered the officer to report to 
you. 

Shortly after you left for Charleston I again went up the Stono in 
my boat to the Wissahickon, directed that vessel and the 61 P. Wil- 
liams to be moved farther up, and then pushed on in my boat to Fort 
Pringle, then in possession of our troops. Battery Tynes and the 
other batteries on John's Island had been abandoned by the rebels. 
Pringle mounts seven bona fide guns, VI and VIII inch smoothbores, 
old 32s and 42s rifled, and one X-inch. A small earthwork on its left 
had two 32s and a mortar. The usual quantity of projectiles kept 
ready in fortifications for a day's work were found by the guns. 
The powder was destroyed by throwing it into mud puddles. The 
gun equipments generally were left ready for use. I was informed 
by an orderly sergeant of the U. S. Colored Troops that seventy tor- 
pedoes had been planted in the channel. Boats are now out dragging 
for them, so as to clear the channel in case we should want to use 
this river. 

The NaJiant arrived this afternoon and her commander has reported 
on board. 

Ammunition expended last night: 150-pounder Schenkle percussion 
shell, 15; 16-pound charges, 15; 12-pounder Hotchkiss percussion shell, 
40; 12-pounder Schenkle percussion shell, 2; 13-ounce charges (rifle 
howitzer), 42; cannon primers, 50. 

February 19. Boats succeeded in picking up three torpedoes last 
night. More were found, but not landed; four were caught at one time; 
two of them landed and one exploded. They are made of wood, with 
two fuzes, and contain each about one-fourth of a flour barrel of powder. 

I will leave the Naliant and two mortar schooners to clear the chan- 
nel to Fort Pringle. These torpedoes were found in the bend where 
the wooden vessels fired from last summer, about 400 yards from my 
present anchorage. I unloaded one on deck, the powder and fuzes of 
which were perfect. They were anchored with mushroom anchors. 
I will send the McDonough to South Edisto as soon as possible. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. A. SEMMES, 
Lieutenant- Commander, Senior Officer. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding /So-nth Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



252 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, transmitting reports 
regarding tlie capture of the steamer Syren, off Charleston, February 
18, 1865'. 

No. 73.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, 8. C., February 22, 1865. 

SIR: I herewith enclose reports of the capture in Charleston Harbor 
of the blockade runner Gyrene, or Syren, prize to the Gladiolm and 
others, on the 18th day of February instant. 

I have directed Acting Master J. E. Jones to proceed to Boston with 
the prize for adjudication. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, ^Washington, I). C. 

[Enclosures.] 

U. S. S. GLADIOLUS, 

Charleston Harbor, S. C., February 18, 1865. 

SIR: I would most respectfully submit the following report of the 
seizure of the blockade steamer Syren this forenoon by myself and 
boat's crew, in obedience to your instructions. I pulled in the direc- 
tion the steamer was said to lie and discovered her on tire. 1 got on 
board of her as soon as possible, found the flames gaining rapidly, the 
hatches broken open, and about twenty negroes engaged in loading 
their boats from the cargo. With the assistance of Mr. Williams, 
third assistant engineer, who accompanied me, I organized the negroes 
into a tire party and set them at work putting out the fire, which we 
succeeded in doing after a while. 1 also had the hatches put on and 
did all in my power to preserve the cargo and vessel. 1 found the 
vessel making water very fast, and on examination the injection pipes 
of the engine were found to be cut. I reported the fact to you, and 
she was towed by you into shoal water, where she now lies. Third 
Assistant P^ngineer G. W. Beard has succeeded in stopping the leak, 
and the prospect of saving both vessel and cargo is very favorable. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

SYDNEY W. BYRAM, 

Acting Master's Mate, U. S. S. Gladiolus. 
Acting Ensign NAPOLEON BOUGHTON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Gladiolus. 



U. S. S. GLADIOLUS, 
Charleston Harbor, February 18, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report in regard to this 
vessel going up to Charleston City : 

At 10:30 I steamed ahead from Fort Moultrie with two boats ahead 
to feel the way, as I had heard that there were obstructions in the 
channel, but went up clear. Arrived off the city at 11. One of my 
boats landed at Castle Pinckney, hoisted the stars and stripes, and 
brought off a rebel flag, the same 1 sent to you. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 253 

On going ashore at the city I was informed that the blockade runner 
Syren ran in last night and was lying up the Ashley River near the 
bridge. I immediately went up there; found her on fire and some of 
her pipes cut belonging to her engine; she was partly full of water. 
I went alongside with the tug and sent a number of men aboard to put 
the fire out with the tug's hose to assist. We soon got the fire out and 
towed her ashore, as she was filling fast with water. The engineers 
partly stopped the pipes from leaking. We went to work to get the 
water out of her, there being 3 feet in the fire room and forehold. 

When I arrived alongside of her, boats were all around her carrying 
away her cargo as fast as possible, she being loaded with what is 
termed a general cargo. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

N. BOTJGHTON, 
Acting Ensign, Commanding. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
P. S. I took the liberty to destroy all the liquor I found, as my 
men were getting intoxicated. 



Capture of the steamer Deer, off Charleston, February 18, 1865. 

Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren. IT. S. Navy, transmitting reports. 

No. 77.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, S. C. , February 85, 4865. 

SIR: I herewith enclose report of the capture in Charleston Harbor 
of the blockade runner Deer, prize to the Monadnock and others, on 
the 18th day of February instant. I have directed Lieutenant R. S. 
McCook to proceed to Boston with the prize for adjudication. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navg. 



Report of Lieutenant-Commander Belknap, TJ. S. Navy, commanding TT. S. S. Canonicns. 

U. S. S. CANONICUS, 
Charleston Harbor, S. C., February 19, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to report that at about 8:30 p. in. on 
the night of the 18th instant, I went on shore at Sullivan's Island with 
Captain Barrett, of the Catskill, for the purpose of ascertaining if 
the signal lights which had been established by your order were 
properly attended to, and to watch for any runners that might attempt 
an entrance into the harbor. 

We had been on shore not more than half an hour when a steamer 
was reported coming in through Maffitt's Channel. We immediately 
ran down to the beach and found a steamer aground nearly abreast of 
Fort Beauregard. The vessel was ordered to send a boat ashore, 



254 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

which she did very promptly. Captain Barrett in the meantime 
jumped into his gig, pulled alongside, boarded and took possession of 
the stranger, which proved to be the English blockade runner Deer, 
from Nassau. 

As soon as the runner's boat reached the beach, I jumped into her, 
in company with Assistant Pa3 7 master Tuttle, of the Catskill, and Mr. 
Mix, of the Monadnock, and pulled for the prize, getting alongside 
about a minute after Captain Barrett had taken possession. 

After communicating with Captain Barrett I took the CatskiWs gig, 
pulled up for this ship, and ordered the tug Jonquil to go with me to 
the prize and try and pull her off into the channel. 1 also took with 
me Chief Engineer D. B. Macomb and two of his assistants to take 
charge of the runner's engines. 

Our efforts to get the ship afloat that night were unsuccessful, and 
at about 5 o'clock I left the prize, Captain Barrett remaining on board, 
and returned to this ship. Mr. Macomb and his assistants were 
directed to remain on board to perform any duty that might be 
required of them. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. E. BELKNAP, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 

Rear- Admiral, JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant-Commander Barrett, U. S. Navy, commanding IT. S. S. Catskill. 

U. S. IRONCLAD CATSKILL, 
Off Cliarleston, 8. C., February 20, 1866. 

SIR: In obedience to section 5 of article 25 for the government of 
the Navy of the United States, I respectfully report that on the night 
of the 18th of February, 1865, in obedience to your orders to assume 
the direction of the blockade signal lights, to be made from the former 
rebel steamers on Sullivan's Island, I repaired on shore and did so. 

At 9 o'clock, or thereabouts, of the same night an English blockade 
runner came in and ran ashore off Colonel Rhett's late headquarters. 
I immediately had my boat launched and in company of " Acting 
Ensign Frederick Elliott repaired on board and captured her. She 
proved to be the Deer, commanded by Captain Wyllie, who surren- 
dered her, remarking, "Well, we give it up; she is your prize. 
Strange we did not smell the rat, as we could not make out your 
signal on Fort Marshall." The steward, captain, mate, and passen- 
gers all asserted she was a blockade runner, and only asked to have 
their private property respected. 

1 have reason to believe that the captain's name is not Wyllie, as he 
hesitated to tell it, and the same hesitation and prevarication were 
observed on the part of the officers of the vessel. 

A few minutes after I reached the vessel's deck and she had been 
surrendered to me by her captain, Lieutenant-Commander George E. 
Belknap and Assistant Paymaster Horace P. Tuttle came on board. I 
afterward saw Acting Ensign Mix, Chief Engineer Macomb, and the 
pilot of the Canonicm; there were other officers on board whose names 
I do not know. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 255 

I worked on the Deer all night endeavoring to get her off, and at 
6 a. m. transferred the command to Lieutenant Charles [W.] Tracy, 
who in the course of the day got her off.* 

1 can not state the names of the vessels inside of the bar at the time 
of the capture. 

Respectfully, } T our obedient servant, 

EDWARD BARRETT, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South, Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
1 beg leave to state that the Deer's papers were destroyed by the 
captain as soon as our boat was seen. The captain admits he is a law- 
ful prize. 



Report of Acting* Ensign Elliott, IT. S. Navy, of the U. S. S. Catskill . 

U. S. IRONCLAD CATSKDLL, 
Of Charleston, S. C., February 20, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of my share in 
the capture of the English blockade-running steamer Deer, of Liverpool : 

On the evening of the 18th of February I was ordered by Lieuten- 
ant-Commander Barrett, commanding U. S. ironclad Catskill, to take 
four men and proceed on shore at Sullivan's Island to arrange the 
signals formerly used by the rebel forces at this point. I was accom- 
panied by Assistant Paymaster Tuttle, of this ship, and landed about 
7 o'clock at or near Fort Beauregard, and at once placed the lights or 
signals at the proper points. At or about 10 o'clock a steamer was seen 
coming along the beach, and I immediately rushed to the water's edge 
and launched the cutter belonging to the Catskill. Here I was joined 
by Lieutenant-Commander Edward Barrett, who took charge of the 
boat. I went up the side of the steamer at the command of my 
superior officer, who followed me, and took formal possession of the 
prize, which was then aground. I endeavored implicitly to obey every 
order which was given me, and exerted myself to the utmost to get 
the ship afloat, carrying out a kedge anchor myself, with the assist- 
ance of the crew, who volunteered to aid me, but failed to start her. 
At or about 12 o'clock I was ordered on shore by Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Barrett to attend the signals, and remained at that duty all 
night until 7 o'clock in the morning of the 19th instant. The facts 
stated above can be substantiated by the officers and men present at 
the time. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

FRED ELLIOTT, 
Acting Ensign, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant-Commander EDWARD BARRETT, 

Commanding U. S. Ironclad Catskill. 

* The list of names of officers and men who boarded the Deer is omitted. 



256 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 

Capture of the stranded blockade runner Celt, with valuable cargo of 
cotton, February 18, 1865. 

Report of Lieutenant-Commander Barrett, IT. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Catskill. 

U. S. IRONCLAD CATSKILL, 
Charleston Harbor, S. C., February W, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to report that on the morning- of the 18th 
instant I ordered an officer to board and hoist our colors on the 
blockade runner Celt, which had run ashore near the breakwater off 
Sullivan's Island two or three days before the evacuation of this place. 
The runner has a valuable cargo of cotton, but the vessel is in too bad 
condition to be serviceable. 1 am of the opinion that she can not be 
floated off without danger of sinking, and advise that the cotton may 
be removed. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

EDWARD BARRETT, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlcmtic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgreri. TT. S. Navy, transmitting report of board of survey. 

No. 99.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, Harboi*, March 10, 1865. 

SIR: I send north by the U. S. S. South Carolina 190 bales of cot- 
ton, which is part of the cargo of the blockade runner Celt, which 
vessel was run ashore a few nights before the occupation of this place 
by our forces. 

A survey has been held upon the vessel (copy enclosed) and the 
judge of the district court at Philadelphia notified. 

The remaining portion of the cargo will be sent north as soon as it 
can be recovered from the wreck. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Adm.iral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of board of survey on the hull, boilers, and machinery. 

U. S, S. SONOMA, 
Charleston Harbor, 8 C., March 9, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to your order of the 8th instant, we have held a 
strict and careful survey upon the hull, boilers, and machinery of the 
prize steamer Celt and respectfully report: 

The Celt lies stranded on the beach at Sullivan's Island, back broken, 
and full of water, and decks ripped up. The machinery is in an irrep- 
arable condition; some few pieces might be removed and be of serv- 
ice. Boilers are mostly below water, but judging from the condition 
of those parts visible, we are of the opinion they are not worth the 
expense of removing. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 257 

We therefore report the hull, boilers, and machinery of the steamer 
Celt as unavailable for service or use to the Government of the United 
States. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servants, 

THOS. SCOTT FILLEBROWN, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 

W. T. GlLLESPIE, 

Acting Master. 
ROBERT MULREADY, 
Acting First Assistant Engineer. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Barrett, U. S. Navy, regarding the 
raiding of the flag over the wrecks off Sullivan's and Long islands 
February 18, 1865. 

U. S. S. CATSKILL, 
Off Charleston, June 14, 1865. 

I respectfully state that on the 18th February, 1865, the day of 
the evacuation of Charleston, I caused the flag to be hoisted over all 
the wrecks off Sullivan's Island and Long Island. They were taken 
possession of in the name of the Nav} T . 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. BARRETT, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order' of Rear- Admiral Dahlqren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Ensign Lee, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. 8. Geranium, to proceed on scouting 
expedition to Santee River. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Off Charleston, Febimary 19, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed at once on the receipt of this to the Santee, 
and anchor within its entrance if there is water enough for your 
vessel. 

You will tow the launches Lilly and Eva there and use them to 
mark the channel and buoy it for the McDonough. When the latter 
heaves in sight, send word to her commander of the state of the bar, 
and whether it is passable by the McDonough. 

Your business will be to scout the river and ascertain the practicabil- 
ity of ascending it. You will not, however, pass any batteries, or 
attack them until ordered to do so. Your general operations will be 
directed by the McDonough, or, if that steamer can not enter, by the 
senior officer at Georgetown. 

I am told that the snags are very bad; look out for them. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron. 

Acting Ensign DAVID LEE, 

Commanding U. S. S. Geranium. 

N W R VOL 16 17 



258 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Belknap, 17. S. Navy, regarding the 
surrender of Charleston. 

U. S. S. CANONICUS, 
Charleston Roads, S. C. , February 19, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to report that on the night of the 17th 
instant I had the advance picket duty at the entrance of the harbor 
with the vessel under my command. 

Throughout the night our batteries on Cumming's Point shelled the 
rebel works on the western end of Sullivan's Island, the enemy reply- 
ing with an occasional shot from Fort Moultrie during the first watch. 

During the mid and morning watches heavy. fires broke out in the 
city, and heavy explosions were heard now and then in the direction 
of the town, as well as on James Island. 

At daylight I put the ship underway and steamed up toward Moul- 
trie, but the air was so full of haze and smoke that nothing could be 
seen until after 7 o'clock a. m. 

At about 7:45 a. m. the sun cleared the atmosphere a little, and 
approaching within long range of Moultrie, 1 threw two shells into 
that work. Eliciting no response, I dispatched a tug to the John 
Adams to inform Captain Scott that I could discover no movements 
on the island. 

The rebel flag was still flying, however, on Moultrie as well as on 
Castle Pinckney and in the city. At this time, also, a magazine blew 
up in Battery Bee. 

Believing from these facts that a part} T of the enemy were still on 
the island, destnmng their stores, magazines, etc., I did not deem it 
prudent to risk a boat's crew on shore; nor, with the recent fate of 
the Patapsco before our eyes, did I think it proper to risk the ship in 
a simple reconnoissance bv standing farther up the channel. 

In the meantime the J&thopctc, the supporting monitor, weighed her 
anchor and came up the channel near this ship. 

After sending the tug to communicate with Captain Scott, I steamed 
slowly down toward Wagner buoy. When abreast of the buoy a 
boat was observed to push off from Cumming's Point and pull toward 
Sumter, and a few minutes later a boat showing a white flag was 
discovered pulling over from Sullivan's Island. 

I immediate^ put the ship about, steamed up the channel at full 
speed, and sent an armed boat in charge of Acting Ensign R. E. Anson 
to land at Moultrie and take possession. 

The army boat, and one from the Malwpac, had, in the meantime, 
communicated with the boat from the island, and were now pulling in 
for the fort also. 

The army boat having the start reached the shore first, when Mr. 
Anson kept away and pulled down to Battery [Fort] Beauregard, 
landed, and hoisted the flag upon that work. The Mahopads boat 
taking the opposite direction, soon put the national colors upon Bat- 
tery Bee. 

About 9 o'clock a. m. I boarded and took possession of the English 
blockade runner Sylph, or Celt, which ran ashore abreast of Moultrie 
on the night of the 14th instant, coming out of the harbor with a cargo 
of cotton. I did not deem it necessary to hoist a flag upon her. 

There are in Fort Beauregard eleven guns, of the following classes 
and calibers, viz: One X-inch, three VHI-inch, and three Vl-inch 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 259 

smoothbore, one 8-inch and two 6i-inch rifled guns. All these guns 
are in serviceable condition, except the 8-inch rifle and one 6i-inch 
rifle, which are spiked. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. E. BELKNAP, 
Lieutenant- Commander 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Brigadier- General Schimmelfennig, U. S. Army, to 
Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, requesting the temporary 
services of naval officers for transport duty. 

HDQRS. NORTHERN DIST., DEPT. SOUTH, 

FIRST SEPARATE BRIGADE, 
Charleston* S. C., February 19, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have taken possession of two small steamers lying up 
the Ashley and Cooper rivers, respectively. There also is a damaged 
steamboat lying off Johnson's Point. I am badly in want of transpor- 
tation, but have not the engineers and officers to manage them. You 
would greatly oblige me if you could furnish sufficient number of 
engineers, etc., to bring these steamers to the dock and ply them for 
a day or so, when I can relieve them. 

The enemy, I learn, have retired to the other side of the Santee 
River, leaving scouting parties in their rear to bring up cattle and 
stragglers. 

We have discovered a large amount of property in the city, but I 
believe much remains yet concealed. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 

Brigadier- General, Commanding. 
Rear-Admiral DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Master Montell, II. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 
l^otomska, regarding position assumed for the support of army 
picket. 

U. S. S. POTOMSKA, 

Cooper River, above Magnolia Bend, February 19, 1865. 
SIR: 1 beg most respectfully to inform you that in obedience to 
orders I moved up here last night for the purpose of supporting the 
advance picket line of the Federal Army, where I shall remain until 
further orders from you. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. M. MONTELL, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



260 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Master Montell, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 
Pbtomska, regarding shots exchanged at Magnolia Bend, Cooper 
River. 

U. S. S. POTOMSKA, 

Magnolia Bend, Cooper River, S. C. , February 20, 1865. 
SIR: I beg most respectfully to inform you that this morning at 
3:45 a volley of musketry (numbering as near as we could judge of 
about 40 muskets) was fired into us from a plantation on the bank of 
the river. The battery being all ready and the guns' crews at quarters, 
we immediately discharged our port broadside guns (32-pounders of 
57 hundredweight) and our rifle (20-pounder Parrott) aimed in the 
direction from which the volley was fired. We discharged several 
stand of grape and a few 5-second shell. This plantation was deserted 
yesterday morning at 11 o'clock. The slaves, as I understand, were 
herded together the night previous for the purpose of being trans- 
ported to Georgetown by the way of the Georgetown and old ferry 
road, but several succeeded in escaping from their masters. From 
the unintelligibility and seeming unwillingness on their part to impart 
much information, I have been unable to procure the information 
desired, but will endeavor to ascertain during the day the full partic- 
ulars. This plantation belongs to one Colonel Singleton, a rank 
secessionist, and who has often boasted of going on Long Island and 
shooting our pickets. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. M. MONTELL, 
Acting Master, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 

Navy. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, February W, 1865. 
SIR: Order the Monadnock to proceed to Hampton Roads. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Letter from Major- General Gillmore, U. S. Army, to Rear- Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, requesting a recwinoissance by gunboats in 
the Santee River. 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, 

Charleston, S. C. , Febi^uary 21, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I am moving a force out on the Northeastern Railroad 
toward the Santee River, in order to have supplies there for General 
Sherman, should he require them. If it be practicable to ascend the 
Santee River with transports, it would cover my movement and open 
up even a better line for sending supplies on than the railroad. Could 
you send some gunboats upon a reconnoissance, in order to get informa- 
tion as to the character of that stream ? Deserters report the battery 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 261 

at Georgetown to be abandoned by the enemy. 1 hope to be able to 
send a few hundred men there to-morrow, and request, if convenient, 
that a couple of gunboats be detailed to accompany them. Will you 
please inform me if this can be done? 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. /South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Charleston, 8. C. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Major- General 
Gillmore, U. 8. Army, responding to his request for cooperation in 
Santee Rivei*. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Off Charleston, 8. C., February %%, 1865. 

GENERAL: I am just in receipt of your communication of to-day, 
stating that }-ou are about to move a force toward the Santee River, 
and asking if I could send some gunboats on a reconnoissance in that 
river. 

In reply I am able to inform you that with a view to a communica- 
tion with General Sherman I had already placed two gunboats inside 
the harbor of Georgetown, and have ordered other vessels there to be 
in readiness for any movement that might be of use to General 
Sherman. 

The Santee has but little depth at its bar, and I am therefore obliged 
to send such vessels as can enter. 

The Geranium, a tug of about 6 or 7 feet draft, was sent there with 
two howitzer launches to pioneer the way for the McDonough and to 
examine the channel, as well as the road to Georgetown. 

I just learn that the Geranium finds it too rough, and is now at 
Georgetown awaiting an opportunity to get into the Santee, but she 
will no doubt obey the orders as soon as it is possible to do so. 

Am I to understand that the gunboats are to accompany the troops 
from this place to Georgetown, or after they reach that place? Orders 
for either will be given, if you will please to let me know what you 
desire. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Major-General Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Commanding Department of tlie South. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Creigh- 
ton, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Mingoe, inweiv of the reported 
abandonment of the hattei^y at Georgetown, S. C. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Off Charleston, 8. C., February %%, 1865. 

SIR: I am informed by General Gillmorethat the battery at George- 
town has been abandoned; if so, I have no doubt you are in possession 
of it. 



262 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

If not, I send you 150 marines, which, with some seamen, may be 
able to get into the fort, unless it is held by a superior force. 

In this, 3 7 ou will use your judgment. The Pawnee is on the way up. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

Commander J. B. CREIGHTON, 

Commanding II. /& S. Mingoe. 



Order of tlie Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, for a survey and report of the obstructions in Charleston 
Harbor. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, February 22, 1865. 

SIR: Have a careful and accurate survey made of all the obstruc- 
tions in Charleston Harbor, and report the result to the Department, 
forwarding with your report diagrams and descriptions, so that the 
position and nature of the obstructions may be understood. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Charleston, S. C. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Williams, U. fS. Navy, for measures of protection against 
expected raids of tJie enemy at Mount Pleasant, Charleston Harbor. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, February 22, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed with the detachment of men from the Shen- 
andoah, Sonoma, and Chenango on board the Harvest Moon, to the 
mouth of Hog Island Channel, [Charleston Harbor]. Land the men 
as near as possible to Mount Pleasant for the protection of that place 
to-night. 

It is reported that the enemy intends making a raid to-night; 100 
men have been detailed from the three vessels. Get the pilot from 
the Mahopac. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander E. P. WILLIAMS, U. S. Navy. 



Detailed report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding 
naval operations in Bull's Bay, and the evacuation of Charleston, 
S. C. ' 

No. 72.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, S. C., February 22, 1865. 

SIR: In my last report I informed the Department of the naval 
operations that were going on in the Combahee, Togodo, Wadrnelaw, 
and Stoiio. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 263 

The expedition to Bull's Bay was merely announced as having begun. 

On the night of the llth of February I left Charleston Roads and 
arrived off Bull's Bay about 2 o'clock in the morning of the 12th, 
having assembled a large force of steamers to assist with their cannon, 
boats, and men in the movement, such as the Shenandoah, Juniata, 
Canandaigua, State of Georgia, with the Pawnee, Sonoma, Ottawa, 
Winwia, Wando, Geranium, and Iris, and launches, with howitzers, to 
cover the landing, and a number of boats were brought along with a 
detachment of sailors and three howitzers for field service. 

The arrangements were all so complete and well timed that by day- 
light the steamers and the detachment of troops in transports under 
General Potter steamed along the channel and anchored in Bull's Bay. 

The naval force was in three divisions to facilitate the work. Cap- 
tain Ridgely had the division of heavy steamers, which remained 
outside and sent in boats and men. 

Captain Stanly had the division that included the boats and howitzers 
afloat and ashore. Captain Balch had the division of light steamers 
inside. 

The shoalness of the water, and the inability to procure any guides, 
interposed the first obstacle. If any channels did exist they were to 
be discovered and marked. General Potter and Captains Stanly and 
Balch set about this task with zeal and energy. 

I was soon compelled to leave in consequence of the arrival of an 
aid-de-camp from General Gillmore, then at Port Royal, stating that 
dispatches had arrived from General Sherman, which, being in cipher, 
General Gillmore could not read, and he supposed I should be able to 
do so, as I had the key from General Sherman. It seemed better for 
me to meet General Gillmore, so as to be able to make, without delays 
any arrangements which General Sherman might have called for. I 
therefore steamed to Port Royal, leaving Captain Ridgely in charge 
of the naval operations at Bull's Ba} 7 . 

On the 13th was at Port Royal, and communicated with General 
Gillmore; the attempts to decipher the dispatches were not effectual 
until next day. 

On the 15th I reached Charleston and found no change in the appear- 
ance of the rebel positions there. 

On the 16th I was at Bull's Bay. Persevering efforts had not 
yet been able to find a channel to the landing even for boats. The 
Ottawa had contrived to work up a narrow and shallow passage so that 
her pivot cannon could reach a line of works near the water, and the 
launches had got near enough to make their howitzers tell, one of 
which was disabled by a rebel shot striking its carriage. 

I now dispatched the Pawnee and Winona to South Edisto to estab- 
lish communications with General Hatch, who was moving upon 
Willstown. 

On the 17th February I was in Stono, where another movement was 
to be made upon the rebel position. In the afternoon General Schim- 
melfennig came on board and the operations for the night were 
agreed on. 

The ironclad LeJiigh, gunboat Wissahickon, and a mortar schooner 
were sent up the Stono to press the rebel right flank, and the gunboat 
McDonough, with a mortar schooner, up the Folly branch to bear on 
their left flank, while General Schimmelfennig, with his column, 
moved on their front from his position on Cole's Island. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

I also dispatched an order to Lieutenant Hayward, commanding the 
naval battery of Xl-inch guns at Cumming's Point, to open on Sulli- 
van's Island and tire continually through the night. The contiguous 
batteries were likewise put in operation by General Schimmelfennig. 

The advance monitors were directed to tire on Moultrie, but a heavy 
gale made such a surf that my aid did not deem it safe to pass a boat 
through it. 

During the night our cannonading was sharp and continuous, the 
rebels replying from Moultrie with a few guns, but ceased as the 
night wore on. In fact the main body had left the island about 8 
o'clock, except a party of 150 men, who were to keep up a tire, and 
thus delay our knowledge of the evacuation. 

On the morning of the 18th the keen anticipations of a retreat by 
the rebels found strong confirmation in appearances, and at early light 
a boat from Morris Island and another from the vessels realized the fact. 

The rebel garrisons had gone, and there was nothing to be done but 
to pass from one work to another and find it deserted. 

The scouting officer (Acting Master Gifford) and the two tugs on 
duty entered the harbor, touching at the various fortified points and 
at Mount Pleasant, where the mayor of that place tendered the submis 
sion of himself and coadjutors to the Union. 

As writing materials formed no part of the equipment of a scout, 
this acknowledgment was written in pencil on the back of a small 
pocket map of Virginia which Mr. Gifford had picked up in Sumter, 
quite as valid as if emblazoned on the fairest parchment. The words 
ran thus: 

The intendant and wardens of Mount Pleasant desire to say that they acknowledge 
the authority of the United States, and ask protection for their persons and property. 

HENRY S. TARR, Intendant. 
F. GREGORIE, 
L. A. EDMOJTD. 
Rev. J. K. FALL. 
Rev. D. McUcHEM. 
SAHL. TOOASTIE. 

Castle Pinckney was also first entered by a naval officer, and I trans- 
mit the rebel standard taken from it by him. 

I was at Stono, a few miles distant, occupied with the movement 
upon James Island, when a telegram reached me about 11 o'clock, 
stating that there were signs of an evacuation, upon which the flag- 
ship was steamed around to Charleston Roads, passed between Sumter 
and Moultrie, and up the harbor to the city batteries on Cooper River, 
under the guidance of a mate captured from a blockade runner a few 
nights since, who professed to know the course that would take the 
steamer clear of all impediments. 

The powerful and compact defenses on Sullivan's Island, the shape- 
less but still formidable ruins of Sumter, the ample and numerous 
batteries clustered about Fort Johnson, Castle Pinckney, so recently 
converted into a sandwork, and the heavy water batteries that lined 
the wharves of the city were all deserted by the rebel forces, leaving 
behind them the greatest prize of all, Charleston itself, to the care of 
the flag, the presence of which now betokened constitutional and right- 
ful rule once more restored to this stronghold of the rebellion. 

As the flagship passed along through the fleet the captains of the 
various vi-<fls had come on board, and after anchoring we landed 
and walked along some of the principal streets. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 265 

The houses were all closed, and save some foreigners of the labor- 
ing class and a few negroes the streets were deserted. But there was 
nothing to indicate the ravages of war, save here and there where a 
rifle shot from our distant batteries had scarred some dwellings. 

General Schimmelfennig had been occupied during the night of the 
17th in pressing the rebel position on James Island, and had been 
resisted with pertinacity, but it was not until daylight that he advanced 
on perceiving that the enemy had retreated. Then he marched on 
across the island and finally reached the Ashley River opposite the 
west front of the city, where he crossed. 

The Government of the Union is therefore once more restored over 
this quarter, after a protracted resistance of nearly four years. 

Why the city was abandoned by the rebel leaders at this time I am 
unable to perceive. The army of General Sherman is at Columbia, 
and still manifestly bent on following its march on an interior line; 
there was no probability of its turning to fasten on Charleston, and it 
had passed the point where such a deviation was to be expected. 
There was no well-grounded apprehension, therefore, of being cut off 
and captured by that army. 

In the front the land forces of this Department that could be brought 
against this city did not probably exceed 6,000 men; while the rebels 
had about 10,000* in the various defenses of the city, the harbor, and 
the approaches. There was certainly no reason to suppose that they 
could not continue to maintain their almost impregnable works as they 
had done. 

The fear of being cut off from supplies of food should not have pro- 
duced such a result, for I learn incidentally that the country immedi- 
ately around still contained sufficient rice and other supplies to have 
sustained the rebel force until General Sherman had passed, when the 
more remote regions of Georgia and South Carolina would again be 
accessible at least by the county roads. 

To say that Charleston would be abandoned in order to save a garri- 
son of 10,000 men, which, however effective to hold strong works 
would be of small account in the field, seems to be placing the value of 
the city at a low standard in all points of view, political, military, and 
financial. 

To me the fall of Charleston seems scarcely less important than that 
of Richmond. It is the last seaport by which it can be made sure that 
a bale of cotton can go abroad. Hence the rebel loan and credit are 
at ah end. Our own credit must improve accordingly. Then the fall 
of the city enables the Navy Department to reduce its force afloat to 
such an extent as to reduce the public expense materially. 

From the outer world the rebellion is effectually isolated, leaving 
not the shadow of a pretext for the interference or even notice of any 
foreign power; the trouble is purely domestic. Finally, the fiction of 
belligerent powers and of a neutrality which excludes the United 
States vessels of war from foreign ports ends also, together with the 
pretext that the piracies on the ocean can any longer be admitted as 
the exercise of a belligerent right; that is, as privateering. And this 
admits of an immediate understanding with the powers that have 
allowed this strange proceeding. 

I have thus given the Department a rapid and brief sketch of the 
events that immediately attended the possession o* Charleston by the 

*I understand this to be the opinion of General Schimmelfennig. 



266 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 

Union forces, without sufficient leisure to make it as full and complete 
as the Department might desire. 

With this paper I transmit such of the reports * from commanding 
officers as have been received. They will exhibit to the 'Department 
the exertions of the officers and their commands to carry out my wishes. 
Jt is needless for me to say how faithfully this has been done, and I 
have only to bestow my hearty commendation on these gentlemen and 
their crews for the untiring zeal and energy which they have given to 
their duties. 

The gale of Friday night alone prevented the monitors from bestow- 
ing their parting compliments to the retreating rebels. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGKEN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

/Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. /S. 
Navy, naming vessels to be sent north. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, February 23, 1865. 

SIR: Order the Mohican to New York and the Shenandoah and Ticon- 
deroga to Philadelphia. 

Very respectfully, etc.. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Squadron, Charleston, S. C. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, in pursuance of infor- 
mation from the Department regarding the expected approach of the 
C. S. ram, Stonewall. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, Harbor, S. C. , february 23, 1865. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, 
Washington, February 11, 1865. 

SIR: The Department hastens to advise you that information has been received of 
the transfer to the rebels of the ram built at Bordeaux. 

The dispatch from the consul at Nantes communicating this information is dated 
the 28th ultimo. The ram was then at the island of Houat, and preparing to leave 
immediately. Her destination is doubtless some point on our coast, and it behooves 
you to be prepared against surprise, as she is represented to be formidable and capable 
of inflicting serious injury. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

In pursuance of this information from the Navy Department, the 
Monadnock will be directed to take post in Wassaw, the Canonicus 
and Mahopac in Port Royal, and the Catskill and Nantucket will remain 
in Charleston. 

* Placed in chronological order. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCK ADI NG SQUADRON. 

Steamers will be detailed to cruise along the coast and communicate 
the first intelligence of such a vessel. Should it make its appearance, 
it is not to be lost sight of by the vessels of the squadron, but must be 
followed by as many of them as can be collected and attacked when it 
can be done properly. Word must be sent to the nearest monitors, 
and they will steam out as soon as possible, in order to capture the 
ram. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Btockdg. Squadron. 



Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, giving extract from private letter regarding C. /S. ram Stone- 
wall. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, February 2Ji, 1865. 

SIR: The following has been communicated to me by the Secretary 
of State as an extract from a letter dated the 2d instant from an Amer- 
ican lady in Europe, it having reference to the rebel ram to which 
your attention has been called and which at the last dates was at Ferrol, 
in Spain: 

You must look for trouble soon. The rebels have bought and paid the money 
down for a splendid screw steamer, built at Nantes, and she has sailed, manned and 
equipped, to raise the siege of Charleston. Our old friend Barron is here, as the 
agent of the rebel Navy, and he told Edward this yesterday, and he told me inad- 
vertently. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron, Charleston, 8. C. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, in relation to the Departments proposed reduction of expenses 
in maintenance of the Navy. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, February $4., 1865. 

SIR: The Department is of opinion that the fall of Fort Fisher and 
Charleston will enable it to reduce the expenses of the maintenance of 
the Navy. 

You will therefore send north such purchased vessels as appear by 
surveys to require very extensive repairs and such as are, in your 
opinion, the most inefficient and all those no longer required. 

These will probably be sold or laid up. You will also send home 
any stores that are not required. Further requisitions must be care- 
fully examined before approval, and the commanders of squadrons are 
expected to use every possible exertion and care to reduce the 
expenses of their squadrons. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron, Charleston, S. C. 



268 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Commander Creighton, U. S. Navy, regarding the evacuation 
of Fort White, Pedee River, South Carolina. 

U. S. S. MlNGOE, 

Off Fort White, Pedee River, S. <?., February % 4, 1865. 

SIR: The deserters from the rebel camp informed me yesterday 
morning of the evacuation of Fort White. I got underway and stood 
up the river, moving very slowly, for I had no other guide than a con- 
traband that had been upon the river here, Prince, my pilot, being 
with the Geranium for the purpose of sounding out Santee bar. 
After getting within 1 miles of the battery I sent my boats out for 
the purpose of feeling for torpedoes. Finding none, I pushed on and 
came up abreast of the fort. I fired three rounds into it and found no 
response. I manned all boats and sent them to the fort in charge of 
my executive officer, Mr. Congdon. He returned in about two hours, 
reporting that the fort had been evacuated and was a very large one, 
containing fifteen guns, three of which are X-inch colurnbiads, two 18- 
pounders, four 32-pounder Brooke rifles, five 24-pounder smoothbore, 
and one 12-pounder, and that there are large quantities of shell and 
shot, but no powder. The guns were found spiked when he landed 
with three-cornered files. Some other deserters came on board and 
say that some of General Sherman's arni} T are about 12 miles from 
here on the Black River. It is my intention to dismantle this fort by 
burning the gun carriages and firing all the woodwork about, and 
sweep for torpedoes. After that is accomplished I shall move UD to 
Georgetown, unless otherwise directed by you. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. BLAKELEY CREIGHTON, 

Commander. 

Captain H. S. STELLWAGEN, 

Commanding U. 8. S. Pawnee. 

P. S. 1 have 15 deserters now on board and they are very much in 
my way. I woulu like them to be sent to you for transportation to 
the admiral; also 2 contrabands. 

J. B. C. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, regarding the dis- 
patching of monitors to Rear- Admiral Porter, U. S. Navy. 

No. 79.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, S. C., February 25, 1865. 

SIR: Agreeably to instructions contained in the Department's com- 
munication of February 8, "to send two of the Passaic class of moni- 
tors to Rear-Adrniral Porter," 1 would respectfully state that the 
Sangamon left this port on the 23d instant, with orders to report to 
the senior officer off Wilmington. 

The Montauk left here at the request of Admiral Porter, of which 
the Department was notified. The departure of the Sangamon, there- 
fore, fulfills the directions of the Department. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 269 

If I am mistaken in this respect, another monitor will be dispatched 
on hearing the views of the Department. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, } 7 our obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdy. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, announcing the arrival 

of the U. S. 8. Chenango at Charleston, S. C. 

No. 78.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, 8. C., February 85, 1865. 

SIR: I have to announce to the Department the arrival at this port 
on the 20th instant of the U. S. S. Chenango, Lieutenant-Commander 
George U. Morris, commanding, and have assigned her to duty in this 
command. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Repoi*t of Acting Master Watson, U. S. Navy, regarding the destruc- 
tion of salt works on Palmetto Point, Bull's Bay. 

U. S. SCHOONER JAMES S. CHAMBERS, 
Bull's Bay, South Carolina, February 25, 1865. 
SIR: I have the honor to report that I sent an expedition from this 
vessel on the 23d instant to Palmetto Point, on the mainland, in charge 
of Acting Master William L. Bowers, and destroyed and rendered 
useless for further operation three extensive salt works. 

The result of the expedition was the destruction of 100 pans and 
boilers, a large quantity of salt, brine vats, two windmill pumps, and 
numerous sheds and outbuildings. 

Hoping the above will meet with your approval, 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. WATSON, 

Acting Master, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Letter from Brigadier- General Schimmelfennig, U. S. Army, to the 
commanding naval officer in Charleston Harbor, requesting coopera- 
tion in the protection of the railroad trestle, Santee River. 

HDQRS. NORTHERN DISTRICT, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH, 

Charleston, S. C., February 25, 18653 a. m. 

SIR: I have received information to the effect that the main force of 
the rebel army has not yet crossed Santee River, and that the exten- 
sive trestlework of the railroad bridge over the river and through the 
marsh has not yet been destroyed. 



270 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

By following up the enemy very rapidly, we may perhaps yet save it. 

1 have given orders to General Potter to do so, although the 
enemy's force is five times as large as his. 

I shall send one of the tinclads (Savannah], with the proper num- 
ber of men, at 9 o'clock a. m. to-morrow up Cooper River to the 
head of navigation (Santee Canal, Monk's Corner). This is very near 
to where the trestlework commences. 

As General Potter has but one section of artillery with him, I would 
beg you for the cooperation of one or two gunboats to follow the tin- 
clad, and to open fire in an easterly direction whenever the tinclad 
opens. This is merely to make a noise, alarm the enemy, and hasten 
his retreat. 

The river has between 6 and 7 feet of water at the point of destina- 
tion (the head of navigation). 

I have secured the services of a good pilot (Mr. Anderson), who 
will be with the tinclad Savannah. 

I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, your obedient 
servant. 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 

Brigadier- General, Commanding District. 

COMMANDING OFFICER, U. S. NAVAL FORCES, 

Charleston Harbor, S. C. 



Letter from Hear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Brigadier- General 
Schimmclfennig , U. S. Army, acceding to request for cooperation 
of gunboats in Santee River. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, February %5, 1865. 

GENERAL: I am just in receipt (7 a. m.) of your communication of 
3 a. m. this morning, stating that you will sencl troops up the Cooper 
River, and requesting that one or two gunboats may accompany them. 
The time fixed is 9 a. m. to-morrow (Sunday, 26). 
The Chenango and Sonoma will be ordered. They draw about 8 
feet. 

1 am, general, with much respect, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Commanding. 
General SCHIMMELFENNIG, 

Commanding District, etc. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Fillebrown, U. S. Navy, to cooperate with Brigadier- General 
Schimmelfennig, U. S. Army, in Cooper River. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, February 25, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed with the Sonoma and Chenango up the Cooper 
River. 

General Schimmelfennig intends to send up some troops in a light- 
draft transport (Savannah) in order to follow up the rebel forces, and 
these two vessels are to give them all assistance in so doing. 

You will keep in communication with the commanding military 
officer, and learn from him what is desired. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 271 

I understand the purpose to be more as a demonstration than other- 
wise. You will therefore use your cannon freely. 

There is said to be a good pilot in the transport, and 6 or 7 feet of 
water at the point to be reached. 

Take proper precautions against torpedoes, and give a copy of this 
order to Captain Morris. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding. 
Captain FILLEBROWN, 

Commanding Sonoma. 

For the present the gunboats will advance a short distance only, so 
as [to] move promptly with the troops. They are now embarking and 
will soon be after you. 

Report of Lieutenant- Commander Fillebrown, U. S. Navy, command- 
^ng TJ. /S. /S. /Sonoma, regarding cooperative expedition to Cooper 
River, February 25, 1865. 

U. S. S. SONOMA, 
Charleston, March 1, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your order 
of the 25th of February, I proceeded with this vessel and the Chenango 
up the Cooper River to assist the troops sent by General Schimmel- 
fennig in the army transport Savannah. 

We proceeded as far as a place called Hagan, about 40 miles, above 
which the pilot declined to take us. The Savannah, with 100 troops, 
proceeded some 10 miles farther, when Captain Jackson landed and 
communicated with General Potter, who sent me a message to the 
effect I could be of no assistance to him, and that the rebel troops had 
all crossed the Santee, burning the bridge behind them. 

Finding I could be of no assistance, 1 returned to this anchorage 
yesterday afternoon. 1 visited two or three of the plantations where 
the Cooper River forks to the east and west, and find there is a con- 
siderable quantity of rice stored in the barns, a schooner load of which 
was captured by the launch of the Chenango,' the report of Lieutenant- 
Commander Morris in reference thereto is herewith enclosed. There 
is also an abundance of wood, both pine and hard, corded on the banks 
of the river, easy of access if it is required for the use of the squadron. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. SCOTT FILLEBROWN, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports 
of capture of the sloop Elvira, February %5, 1865. 

No. 104.] U. S. FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, March 11+, 1865. 

SIR: I herewith enclose copy of the report and survey upon the 
sloop fclvira, prize to the U. S. S. Chenango. 

The cargo is sent north for adjudication, in charge of Acting Master's 
Mate H. M. Page, by the Massachusetts. 



272 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The judge of the court has been notified of the capture and furnished 
with copy of survey. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Cwndg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. GUNBOAT CHENANGO, 
Charleston, S. C., February 25, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your order of 
yesterday, I proceeded to Dewees Inlet with three of the boats belong- 
ing to this vessel, in search of a sloop reported to be there waiting to 
run the blockade. Not finding her at Dewees Inlet, I continued down 
to Bull War [Bullyard] Sound, where I discovered, took possession of, 
and brought her near this place. She has, as near as I can ascertain 
from the two men on board at time of capture, from 50 to 60 bales 
of cotton and 6 or 7 boxes of tobacco. They report she left Charles- 
ton on the 9th instant to run the blockade, bound to Nassau; had 
attempted to get out of the pass, but had to put back on account of 
the breakers being too heavy. 

I would respectfully -state that in my opinion the .sloop Elvira is not 
fit to proceed north at this season, and request a survey may be held 
on her. 

I have the honor to be, very respectf ully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. U. MORRIS, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Occupation by naval forces of Battery White and Georgetown, S. C. , 

February 25, 1865. 

Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy. 

No. 80.] FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Georgetown, S. C. , February 26, 1865. 

SIR: I have the satisfaction to report that this town and its defenses 
have been occupied by the forces under my command, and that the 
authorities have made their submission to theUnited States. 

The town is held by six companies of marines under Lieutenant 
Stoddard, and the battery (15 guns) by one company of marines under 
Lieutenant Breese. 

The Mingoe flanks the town and commands it with her guns. 
As soon as the land forces arrive 1 will turn the place over to them. 
I will forward more detailed accounts by the next mail. 
Nothing is heard here direct from General Sherman. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear-Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 273 

Detailed report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, IT. S. Navy, regarding the occupation of 
Georgetown, S. C., transmitting reports of commanding officers. 

No. 82.] FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Georgetown, S. C. j February *28, 1865. 

SIR: Under date of the 26th instant I apprised the Department 
that the naval forces under my command had taken possession of 
Georgetown. 

As soon as the occupation of Charleston left my thoughts and means 
at liberty i gave my attention to this point as likely to be the prefer- 
able communication for General Sherman, in case such become desir- 
able to him before entering North Carolina. Accordingly, I soon 
began to collect a suitable force from other stations. 

The McDonough, Geranium, and two launches were ordered into 
the Santee, being the only class of vessels whose draft admits of 
passing the bar of the fiver. 

Qn the 22d instant the Pawnee was ordered to Georgetown, and all 
the marines I could collect were embodied in a battalion. Detach 
ments of seamen were also directed, the object being to pass up the 
Santee with this body of men, take the road to Georgetown, which 
traverses the rear of the rebel work, and assault it while the vessels 
attacked in front. This infantry was to be under the command of 
Commander Stanly, assisted by Lieutenant-Commander Williams. 

On the 23d February the Pawnee crossed the bar and joined the 
Mingoe and Nipsic within, upon which the rebels abandoned the work 
(Battery White) and the Mingoe steamed up the bay and took posses- 
sion. The marines were landed, and the municipal authorities ten- 
dered their submission to the Government of the Union. 

The battery was found to be a well-constructed and formidable work, 
mounting 15 guns, of which 2 are X-inch columbiads. 

The previous accounts of this battery had varied so much as to ren- 
der our knowledge of it uncertain. Generally, it had been much 
underrated and supposed to be unable to resist the attack of a single 
vessel or a few men. But we can now understand that it was well 
placed, well constructed, and strongly armed, so that we should, have 
had some trouble to reduce it if well manned. 

I desire to bring First Lieutenant Stoddard to the notice of the 
Department. He did good service in the field with the marines of the 
fleet brigade at Boyd's Neck and the Tulifinny, and now has the com- 
mand of the largest force of marines that has been collected for some 
time. He has always acquitted himself with credit. I would respect- 
fully suggest a brevet. 

Captain Stanly necessarily lost the opportunity that promised, and 
which, from the energy and vigor which he displayed in the operations 
at Bull's Bay, he would have improved. 

I enclose the reports of commanding officers and also a copy of the 
submission of the authorities of Georgetown. 

This has exhibited every indication of a flourishing place, and though 
with less than 2,000 inhabitants, is the third town of the State. 

The rice and cotton and lumber of a large scope of country is floated 
here by the rivers that flow together at its site, the Pedee, Black, 
Sampit, and Waccamaw, with their tributaries. 

N w R VOL 16 18 



274 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

There was a rumor that General Sherman was not far distant, but 
no tidings have reached direct from himself or his arm3 T . 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Stockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Wavy. 

[Enclosures.] 

GEORGETOWN, S. C., February 26, 1865. 

For the better maintenance of the authority of the United States 
and the preservation of order, the following are announced to the 
inhabitants of Georgetown, now occupied by the naval forces under 
my command: 

First. Conformably to the laws of the United States, slavery no 
longer exists within the limits of the Union. Persons residing here 
who thus become freedmen will, in future, enjoy the fruits of their 
own labor; but as a reasonable provision for their inability to provide 
for themselves immediately, their former owners will furnish each 
one of them with sixty days' food of the usual description. Any freed- 
man desiring to enlist in the military service of the United States will 
apply to the military commandant of the district, or can join the col- 
onists on the sea islands, if he desires to do so. 

Second. Those inhabitants who have remained in the place and are 
not excluded from the benefits of President Lincoln's amnesty are 
invited to return to their ordinary pursuits as peaceable citizens. 

Third. Martial law exists in the city of Georgetown. The wardens 
and intendant will discharge so much of the usual civil functions as 
may be required of them. 

Fourth. Such laws of the place as are in harmony with the laws of 
the Union will remain in force. 

Fifth. The intendant and wardens will furnish the provost-marshal 
with an account of the inhabitants of the place, and of those who left 
with the rebel troops. They will cause the churches to be opened and 
served as usual; but no clergyman will be allowed to omit the cus- 
tomary prayers for the President and authorities of the United States 
which are enjoined by the canons or practice of his church. 

Sixth. The intendant and wardens will provide a list of all inhabit- 
ants who may be destitute of food, and of those who are able to con- 
tribute to their relief, who will be accordingly assessed for the 
purpose. 

Seventh. The sale or gift of all spirituous liquors is strictly forbid- 
den, and any inhabitant offending, when a sailor or marine is concerned, 
will be punished by fine or imprisonment. 

Eighth. The inhabitants of Georgetown will remember that their 
own authorities have placed them under the protection of the United 
States. They will be careful, therefore, to avoid all participation with 
the enemies of the United States, and will be dealt with severely for 
offenses of this kind. 

Signal lights have been observed. In future such will be fired at 
from the cannon of the nearest vessel. 

Ninth. The commanding naval officer present is charged with the 
execution of the above, and the commanding marine officer will act as 
provost-marshal. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 275 

Tenth. Whenever any military officer duly authorized by the mili- 
tary authorities shall take post in the town, the commanding naval 
officer will turn over to him the entire command and withdraw all the 
seamen and marines from the town. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. 



COUNCIL CHAMBER, 

Georgetown, S. C. , February %5, 1865. 

SIR: Whereas the Confederate forces have evacuated this town, the 
undersigned, intendant and wardens, in council assembled, agreeable 
to your demand, do hereby surrender the town of Georgetown to the 
United States forces under your command, pledging ourselves, upon 
honor, in our official capacity, as far as lies in our power, to prevent 
any act inimical to the United States forces garrisoned here, claiming 
such protection of persons and property as is usually accorded to 
communities in our situation. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servants, 

R. O. BUSH, 

Intendant. 
G. F. B. LEIGHTON, 
S. R. CARR, 
W. K. HESTON, 
F. N. MACUSKER, 

Wardens. 
Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding the U. S. Naval Forces at Georgetown, S. C. 



Report of Captain Stellwagen, U. S. Navy, senior officer present. 

U. S. S. PAWNEE, 
Off North Island, South Carolina, February %4, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to report the capture and occupation of Fort 
White and Georgetown yesterday, the enemy having evacuated on 
our approach. The Pawnee, under my command, arrived yesterday, 
and after receiving on board the detachment of marines brought up 
by the Flambeau, I crossed the bar as soon as the tide served. 

Commander Creighton, being advised of the intended evacuation, 
signaled for permission to advance, and with all proper precautions 
approached the fort, which he found hastily deserted, containing fif- 
teen guns. I enclose herewith his reports. 

I have directed him to proceed carefully up the Black River, and 
have dispatched the tug Catalpa, with Lieutenant-Commander Henry 
and Ensign Glass, prepared to open communication by the army code 
of signals with Major-General Sherman, who is said to be some 12 
miles off. 

I have sent a detachment of 50 marines, under Lieutenant Breese, 
U. S. Marine Corps, to occupy the fort. Commander Balch is charged 
with general superintendence, and accompanies the parties, having also 



276 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

the small steam launch to keep up communication. This vessel and 
the Nipsic proceed up as soon as tide permits, 

V ery respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. S. STELLWAGEN, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron, Charleston, S. C. 



Report of Commander Creighton, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Mingoe. 

U. S. S. MINGOE, 

Off Fart White, Pedee River, S. C., February % 1866. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to receive your dispatch of 22d instant, 
and it finds me in possession of Fort White. 

Yesterday morning I was informed by some deserters that they had 
evacuated, or were evacuating, Fort White, near Georgetown. I 
immediately got underway without a pilot, Uptegrove being on board 
Pawnee, outside, and Prince on the Geranium, off Santee Bar, and on 
my approaching the battery 1 sent my boats sweeping for topedoes. 
Finding none, I steamed past the battery, firing four rounds at it, with 
no response. Anchored and sent armed boats ashore and took posses- 
sion. My executive officer, Mr. Congdon, in charge, found the bat- 
tery abandoned a short time previous to landing, and guns spiked, six- 
teen in number, of the following caliber: One 6-pounder smoothbore, 
two X-inch columbiads, one 18-pounder long siege gun, three 32- 
pounder rifles, one 24 pounder rine, six 24-pounder smoothbores, one 
12-pounder siege gun (smoothbore), with three-cornered files. Found 
a large quantity of shot and shell, and the fort to be of large dimen- 
sions, well constructed, and very formidable. We have dismantled it 
by dismounting the guns, breaking the carriages, etc. 

I swept this morning, but have not found any torpedoes. I will 
continue to examine and see if any can be found. I have 13 rebel 
deserters, and 2 by the names of Henry Shinifin and Henry Schlond- 
ruff, who gave themselves up on the boats landing at the fort, and 
several contrabands, all of which I send down. 

I shall continue my way up the river, in company with the Nipsic, 
slowly, unless otherwise directed by the senior officer, Captain 
Stellwagen. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. BLAKELEY CREIGHTON, 

Commander. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

P. S. The Nipsic could not accompany me, owing to the iow tide, 
and Captain Henry being on board the Pawnee, where I had sent him 
to report. 

Report of Acting Ensign Noyes, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Catalpa. 

U. S. S. CATALPA, 
Georgetown, February %5, 1865. 
SIR: I have the honor to make the following report: 
Agreeable to the order of Captain Stellwagen, senior officer present, 
I started up the river with this vessel toward this place (Georgetown) 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 277 

and arrived at 6:35 a. ni. this day. As I was passing up by the town, 
I espied a squad of rebel horsemen. As soon as I got alongside the 
dock I sent ten armed men to scout the town to see if they could see 
the horsemen. In the meantime I asked the civic commandant of the 
town, Mr. Rush, for the keys of the town hall, to enable me to raise 
the stars and stripes over the above-named place. I then sent Acting 
Ensign Thompson and two men to raise the flag; the men, Boatswain's 
Mate Kennedy and Ordinary Seaman W. Christopher. They climbed 
the dome of the above-named hall, and raised the flag with three cheers 
and a volley of six muskets. As soon as the flag was raised, the rebel 
horsemen made a dash in the town, and engaging the men of this 
vessel sent by me to scout the outskirts of the town, after some fifteen 
minutes fighting, they captured one man, Morris Sullivan, ordinary 
seaman. As soon as the alarm was given, the boats of this vessel and 
the Mingoe were called, away and armed, and sent on shore and drove 
the enemy out of the town. 

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant, 

ALLEN K. NOTES, 
Acting Ensign, Commanding U. S. 8. Catalpa. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, II. S. Navy, giving detailed description of Battery 

White. 

No. 83.] FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 

Off Battwy White, Winy ah Bay, February 28, 1865. 

SIR: Very soon after closing my dispatch (82), I had occasion to 
anchor near this place and went ashore to visit the work. 

The accounts in the reports fail to convey a correct idea of its 
character. The site was admirably selected, not only commanding 
the channel, but the various roads to the town above. 

The principal battery looks directly on the water, well planned and 
executed carefully, not only with reference to a cannonade by ships, 
but also to an assault from the water. 

The carriages were all new, and probably brought here recentty, as 
man} 7 old carriages were piled away in the rear. 

The water battery mounted twelve guns, two of which were X-inch 
columbiads, three rifled 32-pounders (banded), four 24-pounders, two 
rifled 12-pounders (banded), making eleven guns looking on the water. 
The ditch was flanked by a 6-pounder. The work had ample trav- 
erses and magazines. The approach to the right flank over the low 
beach was swept by one 24-pounder in a separate battery and by a 
12-pounder also in a detached work. The rear of the position was 
defended by a formidable rampart and ditch, extending 300 yards 
and looking on the several roads leading to Georgetown. It was not 
entirely finished and had a 24-pounder mounted at each flank; inter- 
vening places were designed for field guns. 

The ground occupied by these works might be 100 acres, beautifully 
woodea with live oak. 

The huts for the men were numerous and well constructed, with 
ranges of nice stalls for horses. 



278 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

If the works had been sufficiently manned, it would have required 
good troops to take the work. 

As soon as a plan of the battery and the site can be prepared I will 
send a copy to the Department. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear-Adm iral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Lieutenant-Commander Matthews, IT. 8. Navy, regarding the guns in Battery 

White. 

HARVEST MOON, 

Winyah Bay, off Foi-t White, February 28, 1865. 
SIR: I would very respectfully report that I found the following 
guns in the forts here: 

Fort White. Three 32-pounder (6.4 inches) rifles (hooped), 2 
X-inch columbiads, 4 24-pounders (smooth), 2 12-pounders rifled 
(hooped), 1 3f-inch (smooth), left flank; total, 12. 

In small works to theright. One 24-pounder (smooth), 1 12-pounder 
(smooth). 

In Fort Wool. Two 24-pounders (smooth). 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. ORVILLE MATTHEWS, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Captain Stellwagen, IT. 8. Navy, to transfer 
the command at Georgetown to Colonel Brown, U. 8. Army. 

FLAG-STEAMER NIPSIC, 
Georgetown Roads, March 1, 1865. 

SIR: Colonel Brown, commanding the One hundred and fifty-seventh 
New York, has been sent here by General Hatch to occupy George- 
town and the posts near it. 

You will therefore transfer to him the posts ashore held by the Navy, 
unless he should desire any to be retained until other forces arrive. 

You will render any assistance that ma3 T be desired by the military 
forces, and it is particularly desirable that the rivers emptying into 
the bay should be scouted thoroughly, and I wish the utmost activity 
to be used in this respect, night and day, rain or shine. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Oomdg. Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Captain STELLWAGEN, 

Senior Officer, etc. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON, 279 

Instructions from Hear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Captain 
Stellwagen, U. S. Navy, senior officer, Georgetown, 8. C. 

FLAG-STEAMER HARVEST MOON, 

Georgetown, 8. C. , February 28, 1865. 

SIR: I leave here for Charleston, and you remain the senior officer. 

The only object in occupying this place, as I do, is to facilitate com- 
munication with General Sherman, if he desires it here, or by the 
Santee. 

When the Chenango and Sonoma arrive, station one in each river 
by the town to assist the force ashore; one vessel should be near the 
fort and one at the light-house to look for communication with me. 

Keep up information from the Santee by a courier over the Santee 
road or by water. I leave you three tugs, the Sweet Brier, Catalpa, 
and Clover, with a dispatch boat. 

Let parties be pushed out by land and water, to feel the rebel posi- 
tions, and drive back his scouts and pickets. 

The commanding officer of marines will furnish you with orders 
regulating affairs ashore, my clerical force being too small for copies. 

Let the utmost activity be maintained. Give each commanding 
officer a copy of these instructions, and send me information by a tug 
every other day of the course of matters, and immediately, if any 
tidings come of General Sherman's army. 

There is some lumber, coal, and other property of the rebel Govern- 
ment, which should be collected for naval use. Let it be put in some 
of the scows that are about. The channel should be buoyed. 

Another tug has been ordered here; if she arrives, send her to report 
to me. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain H. S. STELLWAGEN, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pawnee. 



Report of Lieutenant O'Kane, U. S. Navy, regarding a reconnaissance 
in Santee River, February 28 to March 6, 1865. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, March 7, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to your orders of the 27th ultimo, directing me 
to proceed in the steam launch to the Santee River, and with the 
steamer Geranium and two launches then in the river, ascend as far 
as possible, in order to communicate with any bodies of troops that 
might be on the river. I have the honor to report that on the morn- 
ing of the 28th I took the launches in tow and started up the river. 

On reaching the railroad bridge I found it destroyed, and not hear 
ing of our troops, continued the ascent 40 miles farther up to Gail- 
lard's plantation. I there learned that a brigade of General Potter's 
troops was encamped at [Saint] Stephen's Depot, some 5 miles distant 
from the railroad bridge. I at once returned to that point and sent out 



280 SOUTH ATLANTIC 1 BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

a party to communicate, and found that the troops the day before had 
taken the road up the river toward Pineville. I again returned to 
Gaillard's, above Pineville, but was unable to communicate with Gen- 
eral Potter. I, however, fired guns, and sent up rockets which were 
answered by the army at Pineville. After remaining here about 
eight hours, and being short of provisions, I started down the river, 
and reached the mouth of the North Santee yesterday morning. On 
the way down I heard of a company of cavalry at a plantation on the 
north bank above the railroad near Murray's Ferry, in charge of a 
drove of 1,500 cattle. I concluded to land a force and capture the 
cavalry, if possible, and disperse the cattle. I succeeded in the latter 
object, but in the former I regret to say was unsuccessful. While 
moving around to their rear, as I supposed undiscovered, they made 
an attempt to seize the launches, but a few discharges of shrapnel 
from the howitzer drove them back, and when the land force came up 
in their rear, they scattered in all directions, leaving several horses 
and muskets, a wagon and all their baggage. 

1 lost no opportunity of picking up information at the different 
plantations on both banks of the river and am satisfied there is no 
organized rebel force to the southward of the Santee, and but few 
troops south of the Black River. I met no one who knew anything 
of Sherman's whereabouts. 

The river is full of short turns, with a very rapid current, and a 
good depth of water above the junction of the two rivers to Gaillard's 
plantation. Below the junction there are bars with not more than 8 
feet of water. 

I find the negroes on many of the plantations have ceased to work, 
and are helping themselves to hogs, cattle, etc. 

The Geranium grounded several times on the way up on account of 
the shortness of the bends, and at one time had to be lightened. On 
going on board I found she had one day's coal, but sooner than suffer 
any delay, determined to burn wood. I find the plantation rails make 
excellent fuel. 1 used them in the furnaces for six days. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES O'KANE, 
Lieutenant, U. S. Navy. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Endorsement.] 

Transmitted for the information of the Department. 
The point reached was nearly where the southern line of Orange- 
burg District touches the Santee, and just above Black Oak Island. 
The orders have been carried out very creditably. 
Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Bear- Admiral. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



281 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron 

March 1, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


Acacia 


5 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master Wm. Barrymore 


North Edisto 


Adger 


8 


Side- wheel 


Comdr. T. H. Patterson 




* \dams 


8 


steamer. 
Sloop of war 


Actg Vol. Lieut A Phinney 




*Allen 


10 


Bark 


Actg Master I A Pennell 




Aiiuiranthus 




Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign W. R Cox 


Charleston 


Arcthusa" 


2 


do 


Actg. Ensign J V Cook 


Port Royal 


Azalea 


in 


... .do 


Actg. Master F W Strong 




*Bruen 


2 


Schooner 


Actg. Master W. F. Redding . 


Charleston stores 


*Braziliera 


8 


Bark 


Actg. Ensign J. H Bennett 


St Andrew's 


*Blunt . . 


2 


Schooner 


Actg. Ensign G G Curtis 




Canandaigua 


8 


Screw sloop 


Capt G H Scott 


St Helena 


Ciraarron 


5 


Side-wheel 


Comdr. Egbert Thompson 


Port Royal repairing 


Catalpa 


3 


gunboat. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign A. K Noyes... 


Georgetown [SCI 


Camelia 


2 


..". .do 


Actg. Ensign David B Hawes 




Carnation 


+2 


do 


Actg Ensign William Boyd 


Port Royal 


Clover 


t 


do 


Actg. Ensign Benj Mitchell 


Charleston 


*Chatham 




Side-wheel 


Actg. Master's Mate Geo W Post 




*Chambers 


7 


tug. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master Wm Watson 


Bull's Bay 


Canonicus 


7 


Monitor 


Lieut Comdr G E Belknap 


Port Royal 


Cambridge 


10 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. J. F. Nickels 




Chenango 


10 


Side-w heel 


Lieut. Comdr. G. U. Morris 


Do. 


Dandelion .... 




steamer. 
Screw tug 


Actg Ensign G W Williams 


Port Royal 


Daffodil 


Lg 


Side-w heel 


Actg. Master Wm. H. Mallard 




Donegal 


2 


tug. 
Side-w he e 1 


Actg. Vol. Lieut G D Upham 


Do 


Flag 


7 


steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Comdr. J. C. Williamson 


North with convoy 


Flambeau .... 


5 


do 


Actg Vol Lieut Ed Cavendy 




*Fernandina 


8 


Bark, store- 


Actg. Master Lewis West 




*Gemsbok 


7 


ship. 
Bark 


Actg. Master J F Winchester 


Port Royal 


Geranium 


1-3 


Side-w heel 


Actg. Ensign David Lee 


Charleston 


Gladiolus 


|3 


tug. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign N. Boughton 


Do 


*Griffith 


3 


Schooner, mor- 


Actg. Master Jas Ogilvie 




*Geo. W. Rodgers 
Harvest Moon 


2 

5 


tar. 
Schooner 
Side-w heel 


Actg. Master L. G. Emerson 
Actg. Master J. K. Crosby 


Ossabaw. 


Home 


|3 


steamer. 
Screw steamer, 


Actg Master Benjamin Dyer 




Hydrangea 


2 


hospital. 
Screw tug 


Actg Master Chas W Rogers 


Do 


*Houghton 


6 


Bark, con- 


Actg. Master E. G. Furber 


Port Royal 


Hale 


6 


demned. 
Screw steamer 


Actg Master C F Mitchell 




*Hope 


1 


Schooner . 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. L. Churchill 




Iris 


2 


Screw tug . . 


Actg. Master J E Stickney 




Juniata 


13 


Screw sloop . 


Comdr. J. J. Almy 


Charleston 


Jonquil . ... 


2 


Screw tug 


Actg Ensign C H Hanson 


Do 


Catskill 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. Edward Barrett 


Do 


Lehigh 


2 


.do 


Lieut. Comdr A A Semmes 


Ston Inlet 


Lodona 


7 


Screw steamer 


Act Vol Lieut R P Swann 




Laburnum 




Screw tug 






Larkspur 




... -do . 


Actg. Ensign William Nelson . 


Do 


*Lightning 




Screw tender 






Mingo e 


11 


Si de-wheel 


Comdr J B Creighton 




McDonough 


6 


steamer. 
do 


Lieut. Comdr. A. F. Crosman 


Stono Inlet 


Mangham 


7 


Schooner . 


Actg Master John Collins 


Port Royal repairing 


Mohican 


8 


Screw sloop 


Comdr Daniel Ammen 




Mahopac 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut Comdr A W Weaver 




Monadnock 


4 


do.... 


Comdr. E. G. Parrott 


Wassaw. 


Nantucket 


2 


do 


Lieut Comdr R. F. R. Lewis 


Charleston. 


Nahant 


2 


. . .do . . 


Lieut Comdr W K Mayo 


Stono Inlet. 


Nipsic 


8 


Screwgun- 


Lieut Comdr E W Henry 


Georgetown 


*New Hampshire 


10 


boat. 
Ship, store. . 


Comdr. Wm. Reynolds 


Port Royal. 


Norwich 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg Master Wm H De Wolf 


St. John's. 


*Norfolk Packet 
Ottawa 


6 
5 


Schooner, 
mortar. 
S c r ew g u n - 


Actg. Master Geo. W. Wood 
Lieut Comdr Jas Stillwell 


Ossabaw. 
Port Royal repairing. 


*Orvetta 




boat. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master Wm. Fales 


Charleston, stores. 


Oleander 


f2 


Side-wheel tug 


Actg. Master R. P. Walter . 


Carrying stores. 


Passaic . . . 


2 




Lieut Comdr R W Scott 


Port Royal repairing 


Pawnee .. 


18 


Screw sloon... 


Cat>t. H. S. Stellwasren. . . 


Georgetown. 



* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



282 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron March 1, 1865 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


Pontiac 


11 


Sid e-w heel 


Lieut Comdr S B Luce 




Potomska 


6 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg Master F M Montell 




Philadelphia 


fl 


Sid e-wh eel 


Actg. Master W. T. Gillespie 


Charleston flag- 


Pettit 


2 


steamer. 
Side-wheel tug 


Actg. Ensign Chas Grieve 


steamer. 
Port Royal 


*Para 




Schoone r, 


Actg. Master D. P. Heath 


Ossabaw. 


*Perry . . 


9 


mortar. 
Brig 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. G. W. Brown . . . 


Fernandina. 


*Percy Dray ton 




Sloop, tender . 




North Edisto. 


*Racer 


3 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master E. G. Martin 


Savannah River. 


Sonoma 


g 


mortar. 
Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. T. S. Pillebrown . 


Charleston. 


State of Georgia 


8 


gunboat. 
Sid e-w heel 


Comdr. Fabius Stanlv 


Do. 


Shenandoah 


8 


steamer. 
Screw sloop 


Capt. D. B. Ridgelv 


Do. 


*St. Louis 


19 


Sailing sloop.. 


Comdr. G. H. Preble 


North Edisto. 


South Carolina 


8 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. Wm. W. Ken- 


Charleston. 


Saratoga. 


9 


Sailing sloop 


nison. 
Actg. Vol. Lieut Comdr. E. Brod- 


Doboy. 


Sanford 




Screw steamer 


head. 
Actg. Master Z. Kempton 


Port Royal repairing 


Sweet Brier 


ra 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master Wm.Bailev 


Georgetown. 


Stettin 


TO 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut C. J VanAlstine 


St Helena 


*Smith 


TO 


Sc hoo ne r 


Actg. Master Barker Van Voor- 


Stono Inlet. 


*Swift 




mortar. 
S c h oon e r 


hfe. 




*Thunder . . 




tender. 
Sloop, tender 








15 




Capt Chas Steedman 


Port Royal 


Tuscarora . 


10 


do 


Comdr J M Frailev 


North, to tow Sanga- 


Valparaiso 




Hulk hospital 


Actg Master H S. Blanchard . 


mon. 
Port Royal. 


Wissahickon 


5 


Screwgunboat 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Johnson 


Stono Inlet. 


Winona 


6 


do 


Lieut Comdr Wm H Dana 


Charleston 


Wamsutta 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Chas. W. Lee 


Do. 


Wando 


3 


S id e-w heel 


Actg. Master Fredk. T. King 


Do. 


^Williams 


6 


steamer. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master Geo. W. Parker 


Stono Inlet. 


*WildCat... 




mortar. 
Tender , 




Port Royal. 


Ward 


5 


Mortar 


Actg. Master R. T. Wyatt 


Light-House Inlet. 













* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the loss of 
the U. S. S. Harvest Moon by the explosion of a torpedo. 

No. 84.] FLAG-STEAMER NIPSIC, 

Georgetown Roads, March 1, 1865. 

SIR: My latest dispatches (Nos. 82 and 83) had been closed, and not 
hearing anything of General Sherman at this place, I was on my way 
to Charleston, but was interrupted for the time by the loss of my flag- 
ship, which was sunk by the explosion of a torpedo. 

This took place at 7:45 a. in. to-day, and the best information I now 
have is from my own personal observation. What others may have 
noticed will be elicited by the court of enquiry which 1 shall order. 

The Harvest Moon had been lying near Georgetown until yesterday 
afternoon, when I dropped down to Battery White, 2 or 3 miles below, 
intending to look at the work and leave the next day. 

Accordingly, this morning early the Harvest Moon weighed anchor 
and steamed down the bay. She had not proceeded far when the 
explosion took place. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 283 

It was nearly 8 o'clock, and I was waiting breakfast in the cabin, 
when instantly a loud noise and shock occurred, and the bulkhead 
separating the cabin from the wardroom was shattered and driven in 
toward me. A variety of articles lying about me were dispersed in 
different directions. 

My first impression was that the boiler had burst, as a report had 
been made by the engineer the evening before that it needed repair 
badly. The smell of gunpowder quickly followed and gave the idea 
that the magazine had exploded. 

There was naturally some little confusion, for it was evident that the 
vessel was sinking, and she was not long in reaching the bottom. 

As the whole incident was the work of a moment, very little more 
can be said than just related. But one life was lost, owing to the singu- 
larly fortunate fact that the action of the torpedo occurred in the open 
space between the gangways and between the ladder to the upper deck 
and the wardroom, which is an open passageway, occupied by no one, 
and where few linger save for a moment. 

Had it occurred farther aft or forward the consequences would have 
been fatal to many. 

A large breach is said to have been made in the deck just between 
the main hatch and the wardroom bulkhead. 

It had been reported to me that the channel had been swept, but so 
much has been said in ridicule of torpedoes that very little precautions 
are deemed necessary, and if resorted to are probably taken with less 
care than if due weight was attached to the existence of these mis- 
chievous things. 

As 1 close this communication Colonel Brown has arrived here with 
a portion of the New York One hundred and fifty-seventh, and I have 
directed all the posts ashore at Georgetown held by the Navy to be 
turned over to the Army. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGKEN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Abstract log of the U. 8. 8. Harvest Moon, Acting Master Crosby, U. S. 

Navy, commanding. 

March _/, 1865. /*.t 1 a. m. saw a light in the direction of Battery 
White. At 6:30 a boat from the Pawnee came down the river and 
landed at Battery White. At 7 the Pawnee fired a gun. At 7:15 got 
underway and proceeded down the river through Marsh Channel, tug 
Clover in company. At 7:45 a. m., when about 3 miles from Battery 
White, we ran on a torpedo. It blew a hole through the starboard 
quarter, tearing away the main deck over it, which caused this ship to 
sink in five minutes in 2^ fathoms water. Tug Glover immediately 
came to our assistance. The admiral and staff went on board Clover, 
the ship's officers remaining on board to save everything possible. 
Sent gig in charge of Acting Ensign D. B. Arey to the Pawnee for 
assistance. Sent three boats up the river to drag for torpedoes. John 
Hazzard, wardroom steward, missing, supposed drowned, he being in 



284 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

the hold at the time of the explosion. From 8 a. m. to midnight: 
Ship sank in Swash Channel, Winyah Bay, 3 miles S. E. by E. from 
Battery White, in 2 fathoms water. At 9 a. m. tug Clever cast off 
and proceeded down the river, the officer and crew remaining by the 
ship to save the furniture, etc. Boats returned without finding the 
torpedoes. 

March 2. Several men employed in dragging the .ship's hold for 
the body of John Hazzard, wardroom steward; was killed by the 
explosion. At 10:30 a. in. succeeded in finding his body. 

April 21. At 2 p. m. abandoned the wreck and moved to Battery 
White. 

Report of a court of enquiry regarding the loss of U. S. 8. Harvest 

Moon, March 1, 1865. 

A naval court of enquiry, composed of Lieutenant-Commanders 
Quackenbush and Dana and Acting Master Congdon, of which Acting 
Assistant Paymaster Cable was judge-advocate, convened on board the 
U. S. S. Mingoe, April 27, 1865, by order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, 
to enquire into the sinking of the U. S. S. Harvest Moon, doth report: 

That said vessel was .sunk by a toipedo and that no blame attaches 
to any of her officers. 

Seizure fy the U. S. 8. Pontiac of Confederate steamer Amazon, in 
Savannah River, Georgia, March 2, 1865. 

Report of Lieutenant-Commander Luce, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. 8. Fontiac. 

U. S. S. PONTIAC, 

Savannah Ri/ver, Georgia, March 2, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to inform you that the rebel steamer 
Amazon, lately employed by the rebel Government, steamed down the 
river this morning and gave herself up. 

She is in charge of David R. Dillon, who claims to be her owner; 
she has on board T5 or 80 bales of cotton, also claimed by him. 

Mr. Dillon assumes to be a citizen of Savannah and a Union man, 
and has embraced this the first opportunity to escape to the Union 
lines. 

I have taken possession of the Amazon and placed an officer' and 
prize crew on board, and will await your further orders. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. B. LUCE, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting statement of Lieutenant- 
Commander Luce, TT. S. Navy, and report of board of survey. 

No. 177a.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, May 1, 1865. 

SIR: The cargo of the prize steamer Amazon, captured on the 
2d March in the Savannah River by the U. S. S. Pontiac, is sent north 
by the Massachusetts for adjudication. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 285 

Enclosed is a copy of survey and appraisement, and statement of 
facts in relation to her capture, so far as they have reached me. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Statement of facts regarding the prize. 

U. S. S. PONTIAC, 

Savannah River, Georgia, April 17, 1865. 

On the morning of the 2d of March, 1865, the Pontiac then lying a 
few hundred yards above the city of Savannah, a steamer was dis- 
covered making her way down the Savannah River. 

Under the supposition that she bore a flag of truce, a gun was fired 
to bring her to, and a boat dispatched, in command of executive officer, 
Acting Master Winslow, under flag of truce to communicate with her. 

The stranger, who subsequently proved to be the Amazon, in 
obedience to the signal gun, stopped some distance above the army 
picket lines, and was there boarded by Mr. Winslow. 

Ascertaining the object of the captain of the Amazon to be the giving 
up of himself and boat to the Federal authorities, Mr. Winslow sent 
his boat back with that explanation, and the request to bring the 
steamer down. This request was granted, and the Amazon was 
anchored close to the Pontiac. 

The Amazon proved to be a steamer quite recently used as a rebel 
transport, and to have on board 81 bales of cotton; both vessel and 
cargo claimed to be owned by her captain, one David Dillon, a citizen 
of Savannah. 

The Amazon was taken possession of by me, an officer and prize 
crew placed in charge, and the case reported to the admiral. 

There is reason to believe that the Amazon has been in the employ 
of the rebel Government for the three years last past, and that the 
cotton brought down by her was stolen from the rebel Government. 

S. B. LUCE, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 



Report of board of survey. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
Port Royal Harbor, S. C., April 27, 1865. 

SIR: Jn obedience to your orders of April 24, 1865, we have held a 
strict and careful survey upon the prize steamer Amazon and respect- 
fully make the following report: 

She is a high-pressure steamer, built for carrying cotton. The hull 
is iron, and in good condition, as are also the engine and boilers. She 
was built in 1856; draft of water, 2 feet. She is not fit to go to sea or 
to steam with salt water. ' 



286 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

We appraise her value at $8,000 and recommend that she be sent to 
Savannah River to preserve her hull and boilers. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servants, 

T. E. BALDWIN, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant. 
R. B. HINES, 

Acting Master. 
JOHN M. DAVIES, 

Master Carpenter. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Captain Pickering, U. S. Navy, 
commanding U. .S. S. Vanderbilt, to proceed to Norfolk, towing tht 
C. S. S. Columbia. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 5, 1865. 

SIR: Proceed to Charleston with the Vanderbilt, and on arriving 
there report to Rear- Admiral Dablgren for the purpose of towing the 
ram Columbia to Norfolk. Use every possible care in the execution 
of this duty. 

Very respectfully, etc'., 

G. WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Captain C. W. PICKERING, 

Commanding U. S. S. Vanderbilt, New York. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, responding to the 
Department's letter regarding the C. S. ram Stonewall. 

No. 86.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, March 5, 1865. 

SIR: I have received the Department's communication of the 24th, 
in relation to the rebel ram purchased at Nantes, in France, and beg 
leave to enclose copy of the squadron order on the subject in order to 
apprise the Department of the steps taken to meet its wishes. 

The principal object of such a vessel would be the destruction of 
public property at Port Royal, to meet which I ordered there the 
Canonicus and Mahopac. 

The former is now there ; the latter has been detained by the reported 
disability of the Nantucket. 

It is hardly possible that the rebel ram would attempt to enter this 
place or to remain in sight long enough for a monitor to get out. 

Savannah will be difficult on account of its long channel and obstruc- 
tions. 

The Monadnock occupied the best channel to the city, and if the 
ram entered Tybee would quickly block her and capture her, assisted 
by the Canonicus. 

I had intended to throw out some of the larger vessels to cruise, but 
as they are to go elsewhere others will be selected. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Acting Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 287 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Frailey, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. S. Tuscarora, regarding a super- 
vision of the defenses in Ossabaw Sound. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, S. C. , March 5, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed with the Tuscarora to Ossabaw and relieve the 
Mohican, now on duty there. Captain Ammen will hand to you the 
instructions that have been given to him. 

You will anchor as near the forts as possible, and by means of your 
boats observe and prevent any efforts of the rebels to renew a lodg- 
ment at McAllister, Rosedew, or Beaulieu. 

It was intended to remove all the guns, shot, etc., and to render the 
works untenable by destroying the bombproof, magazines, etc. You 
will take all the coal ahd provisions your vessel can carry, stopping at 
Port Royal for the purpose. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Hear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commander J. M. FRAILEY, 

Commanding U. S. S. Tuscarora. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- Com- 
mander Barrett, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Catskill. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harboi*, March 7, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed with your vessel in tow of the Shenandoah to 
Fortress Monroe, and upon your arrival there report to the senior 
naval officer present. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Gomdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant-Commander EDWARD BARRETT, 

Commanding U. S. S. Catskill. 

[Order of same date to Commander Parrott, U. S. Navy, command- 
ing U. S. S. Monadnock, to proceed to Hampton Roads, accompanied 
by U. S. S. Mohican. Order of 8th instant to Lieutenant-Commander 
Weaver, commanding Mahopac, to proceed to Hampton Roads in tow 
of U. S. S. Cambridge.] 



288 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Hear- Admiral Dahlgren, II. S. Navy, acknowledging the 
Department's directions regarding disposition ofveseels. 

No. 92.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, 8. C., March 8, 1865. 

SIR: The directions of the Department have been received ordering 
the Shenandoah, Ticonderoga, Mohican, and Monadnock north and 
the Juniata to Brazil. 
They will be dispatched without unnecessary delay. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Morris, U. S. Navy, commanding 
U. S. S. Chenango, regarding a reconnoissance in Slack River. 

U. S. GUNBOAT CHENANGO, 
Georgetown, S. C. , March 9, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to your order, I left Georgetown on the evening 
of the 7th instant for the purpose of making a reconnoissance and to 
try and find a small steamer said to be up Black River. I had to 
anchor at night, the river being in many places much narrower than 
the length of my vessel, with continuous short bends. On the 8th 
instant reached the plantation of Mr. Perkins, about 45 miles up the 
river, when the pilot decided the steamer could go no farther. Landed 
and 1 learned from the negroes that the little steamer I was in search 
of had been carried 30 miles farther up the river, and that upon our 
approach to his master's plantation, about 30 mounted cavalry, armed 
with rifles, left there to attack our boats, should they be sent farther 
up; they also reported that a company of mounted troops was at 
Brown's Ferry, which we had passed in the morning. Believing their 
report to be true, I decided to return and vis'it the plantations as I 
went by; kept all hands at general quarters from the time of starting. 
Upon our reaching the vicinity of Brown's Ferry the enemy opened 
upon us from behind a levee or bluff with rifles. We immediately 
responded with broadside guns and riflemen stationed in the tops 
The bend was too short and the tide too strong to stop abreast of them, 
but my officers who were aloft think we must have hit some of them. 
One of my men, Charles Wilson, seaman, was badly wounded in the 
shoulder. 

I have brought down a deserter, William I. Gore, formerly a lieu- 
tenant in Ward's Light Battery. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. U. MORRIS, 
Lieutenant- Commander. 

Captain H. S. STELLWAGEN, 

Commanding Naval Forces, off Georgetown, S. C. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 289 

Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Churchill, U. S. Navy, re- 
garding operations of the divers in Savannah River. 

U. S. SCHOONER HOPE, 
Savannah River, Georgia, March 11, 1865. 

SIR: I would most respectfully submit the following report of 
operations since the date of my last: 

One part of my force have been employed, when it was possible for 
a diver to work, in getting machinery out of the sunken scow in Neuse 
River; a large quantity of machinery has been recovered, some of it 
very valuable. 

I have examined the wreck of the ram Savannah. She appears to 
have been entirely destroyed by the explosion of her magazines; I may 
recover her guns. 1 have also found and raised a large rilled gun of 
about T-inch bore, has_ seven grooves and two reinforce bands; these 
are made and shrunk on to the gun in rings of about 6 inches broad, 
the upper bands breaking joints over the lower ones; the gun is of cast 
iron, not scaled; the trunnions are cast on to the gun forward of the 
bands; it is apparently of American construction. The vessel upon 
which it was mounted was burned; some of the rings of the reinforce 
bands have become loose. There is another heavy gun in the same 
wreck. From the diver's description I judge that it is a IX or X inch 
shell gun. I shall, if possible, raise this gun to-day. 1 have slung the 
wreck in which they were found. She has good engines, quite new, 
and 1 think are very little injured; she has probably a quantity of shot 
and shell on board. 

There is a large quantity of property in the river, and in case my 
services should be required elsewhere I would respectfully suggest 
that I leave a party here in charge of Mr. Hartshorn to prosecute the 
work. I have found and raised a vessel (the one mentioned in a former 
report) used by the rebels as a floating battery. She is built like the 
one which I have been using; they will be of great use to me in car- 
rying on operations; they are strongly built, of very light draft, and 
in fact are what were needed for raising vessels, or, from their peculiar 
build, for any kind of work. 

I have also recovered some anchors and chains, but need them for 
moorings, as the river is subject to sudden freshets, during which the 
current does not change, but runs out on the flood as well as the ebb 
tide. 

The weather has continued very unfavorable; the river has been 
very high for the past two weeks, and it has been almost impossible 
much of the time to work. In obedience to the order of Commander 
Patterson, the submarine apparatus of Mr. C. H. Sanborn has been 
thoroughly tested and- duplicate reports forwarded. The apparatus is 
on board this vessel awaiting your decision. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. CHURCHILL, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

N W R VOL 



290 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Master Vaughan, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 

Jonquil, regarding expedition in Wando River and the capture of a 

sloop in Deer Creek. 

ORDNANCE BOAT PARAMOUNT, 

Charleston Harbor, March 11, 1865. 

SIR: In obedience to orders received from Fleet Captain J. M. Brad- 
ford, I proceeded (February 25, 1865) on an expedition up the Wando 
River in the U. S. S. Jonquil, accompanied by three armed boats from 
the U. S. ship John Adams. At 10 a. m. I discovered a sloop up Deer 
Creek, about 18 miles from this harbor. I came to anchor and sent 
an armed boat in charge of Acting Ensign Charles H. Hanson up the 
creek to bring the sloop out. At 11 : 30 a. m. the sloop was brought 
alongside of the Jonquil. She had 6 bales of sea-island cotton on 
board. There was no name on the sloop. I then started on my 
return with the sloop in tow. The tide rises and falls in the Wando 
and its creeks about 5 or 6 feet, and by remaining until low water I 
should have been delayed for want of sufficient water for the Jonquil 
to get down before the next flood tide. 

In obedience to orders received from Captain D. B. Ridgely, senior 
officer, I started again on the 27th of February, with the Jonquil and 
the same boats, up the Wando River in search of a sloop loaded with 
cotton, which sloop I had heard of in my previous expedition. She 
was captured by our boats about 3 miles up Silver CreeK and brought 
alongside the Jonquil about 1 p. m. the 27th. 

She had 14 bales of sea- island cotton on board. She had no name 
on her. I have had the cotton on both sloops marked as follows: 
"J.&J. A." 

Silver Creek is about 12 miles above this harbor. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

HENRY VAUGHAN, 
Acting Master, Commanding Expedition. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of tJie Navy. 



Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Commander Batch, U. 
Navy, transmitting copy of a 
Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy 



#/ / */ 7 

Navy, transmitting jiopy of a commendatory letter from Rear- 

. Navy. 



NAVY DEPARTMENT, March 11, 1865. 

SIR: The Department takes great pleasure in transmitting herewith 
copy of a communication from Rear- Admiral John A. Dahlgren, testi- 
fying to your important and meritorious services whilst in command 
of the U. S. S. Pawnee, attached to the South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron. 

Very respectfully, 

G. WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 
Commander GEORGE B. BALCH, 

U. S. Navy, Washington, D. C. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 291 

[Enclosure.] 

FLAGSHIP HARVEST MOON, 
Georgetown, S. C., February 87, 1865. 

SIR: I take the occasion of Captain Balch's detachment to express to 
the Department my appreciation of the services of this officer. 

He has held command of the Pawnee during the whole period of my 
command of this squadron, since July, 1863, and always discharged 
his responsible duties in action and otherwise with alacrity, judgment, 
and success. 

This is not the first of my acquaintance with Captain Balch, as he 
sailed on the U. S. ship Plymouth, under my command, in 1857. 

I desire, therefore, to commend Captain Balch to the notice of the 
Department for meritorious service in the face of the enemy, and hope 
that if advancement js extended to any officers beyond the usual 
course, he may be included in the number. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Bear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the reduction 
of the force under his command. 

No. 101.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, [S. <?.], March 12, 1865. 

SIR: In pursuance of the orders of the Department, the following 
vessels have been detached from this squadron and have left: 

Monadnock, Lehigh, Montauk, Mahopac (monitors), Mohican. 

The following are under orders and are detained in preparing: 

Juniata, Ticonderoga, St. Louis. 

The following will probably be sent north under the general order 
of the Department: 

Canandaigua (tubes so bad that most of them need to be replaced; 
under survey), Perry, Fernandina, Braziliera, Stettin (insufficient for 
various reasons, which will be reported), Saratoga (large crew; too 
expensive for the work done). 

Others will follow as rapidly as their condition can be ascertained 
and reported. 

All private vessels under charter will be discharged as fast as their 
cargoes can be transferred to suitable vessels of the squadron or sent 
home if not wanted. 

The number of hands in the workshops reduced; all extra work is 
stopped already, and, in fact, as great and rapid diminution of the force 
and expense of the squadron as may be possible. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



292 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Report of Commander Parrott, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 
Monaanock, of the arrival of that vessel at Hampton Itoads with 
U. 8. /6 r . Mohican in tow. 

U. S. IRONCLAD MONADNOCK, 

Hampton Roads, March ll^, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to report our arrival here to-day. We left 
the anchorage off Charleston on the morning of the 12th instant. 

The engine of our convoy, the Mohican, became disabled when off 
Cape Hatteras. We took her in tow and have brought her here at 
the rate of 7 knots. She was still, however, enabled to assist us by the 
superiority of her compasses and otherwise to aid our navigation. 

Owing to the urgency of our orders we did not stop at Beaufort, 
N. C., for our launches and their davits, or for topmasts and other 
articles belonging to the Mohican, all left there before the attack on 
Fort Fisher. 

As directed, I have enclosed copies of the orders under which I have 
acted. 

Fogs and a heavy sea on the bar prevented our leaving Wassaw until 
the evening of the 10th instant. 

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. G. PARROTT, 

Commander. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

March 15, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


Acacia 


5 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master Wm. Barrvmore . . . 


North Edisto. 


Adger 


8 


Side - w heel 


Comdr. Thos. H. Patterson 




*Adams 


g 


steamer. 
Sloop of war 


Actg Vol. Lieut. A. Phinney . . 




*Allen 


10 


Bark 


Actg. Master I. A. Pennell. 


St. Simons 


Amaranthus 




Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign W. R. Cox 


Port Royal. 


Arethusa . . . 


la 


.do 


Actg. Ensign J. V. Cook .. . . 


Do 


Azalea. 


T2 


do 


Actg. Master F. W. Strong 


Port Royal, repairing 


*Bruen 


2 


Schooner 


Actg. Master W. F. Redding 


Charleston, stores 


*Braziliera 


8 


Bark 


Actg Ensign J. H. Bennett... 


St. Andrews [Ga ] 


*Blunt. 


2 


Schooner 


Actg. Ensign G. G. Curtis 


Savannah, divers 




8 


Screw sloop 


Capt. G H.Scott 


St Helena 


Cimarron 


5 


Side- wheel 


Comdr. Egbert Thompson . . 


Charleston. 


Catalpa 




gunboat. 
Screw tug 


Actg Ensign Allen K.Noyes 


Georgetown. 


Camelia 


t'2 


do 


Actg. Ensign David B. Hawes 


Charleston. 


Carnation 


la 


do 


Actg Ensign Wm. Boyd 


Port Royal repairing 


Clover 


2 


do. ... 


Actg. Ensign Benj. Mitchell.. 


Charleston. 


Chatham 




Side- wheel tug 


Actg. Master's Mate Geo.W. Post. 


Port Royal, repairing. 


*Chambers 


7 


Schooner 


Actg Master Wm. Watson 


Bulls Bay. 


Canonicus 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. G. E. Belknap. . . . 


Port Royal. 


Cambridge 


10 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. J. F. Nickels . . . 


North, special dutv. 


Chenango ... 


10 


Side- wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. G. U. Morris 


Georgetown. 


Dandelion . 




steamer. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign G. W. Williams 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Daffodil 


2 


Side-wheeltug 


Actg. MasterWm. H. Mallard 


Do. 


Donegal 


3 


Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. Geo. D. Upham 


Do. 


Flag . . 


7 


steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Comdr. J. C. Williamson 


North, convoy. 


Flambeau 


5 


.. do 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. E. Cavendy 


Carrying stores. 


*Fernandina 


8 


Bark .. 


Actg. Master Lewis West 


St. Catherine's, [Ga.]. 


*Gemsbok 


7 


do 


Actg. Master J. F. Winchester . . . 


Doboy. 


Geranium 


|3 


Side-wheel tug 


Actg. Ensign David Lee 


Santee River. 


Gladiolus 


3 


Screw tug 


Actg Ensign N. Boughton 


Charleston. 


*Griffith 


3 


Schooner 


Actg. Master James Ogilvie 


Wassaw Sound. 


*G. W. Rodgers 


t2 


mortar. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master L. G. Emerson 


Ossabaw Sound. 



* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



293 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, March 15, 1865 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 




t5 


Side-wheel 


Actg Master J K Crosby 








steamer. 
Screw steam- 


Actg. Master Benj . Dyer 


Charleston. 


Hvdrangea 


f^ 


er, hospital. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Master Chas. W. Rogers 


Do. 


*Houghton 


6 


Bark, c o n- 


Actg. Master E. G. Furber . 


Port Royal 


Hale 


6 


demned. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master C. F. Mitchell 


St. John a. 


*Hope 


1 


Schooner 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. L. Churchill 


Savannah, divers. 


Iris 


+2 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master J. E. Stickney 


Charleston. 


Juniata 


13 


Screw sloop . . 


Comdr. J. J. Almy 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Jonquil 




Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Chas. H. Hanson . . 


Charleston. 


Catkill 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. Ed. Barret 


Charleston, repairing 


Lodona 


7 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. R. P. Swann 


Sapelo Sound. 


Laburnum 


H 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Sturgis Center 


Charleston. 


Larkspur 


r 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Wm. Nelson 


Port Royal, repairing. 


*Lightning 




S-c hoone r, 




Port Royal. 


Mingoe 


11 


tender. 
Side-wheel 


Commander J. B. Creighton 


G eorgeto w n . 


McDonough 


6 


steamer, 
.do 


Lieut. Comdr. A. F. Crosman 


Stono. 


*Mangham 


7 


Schooner 


Actg. Master John Collins 


Port Roval. 


Nantucket 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. R. F. R. Lewis 


Charleston, repairing. 


Nahant 


2 


do 


Lieut Comdr E P Williams 


Stono repairing 


Nipsic . 


8 


Screw gunboat 


Lieut. Comdr. E. W. Henrv 


Charleston, repairing. 


*New Hampshire 
Norwich 


10 

6 


Store ship 
Screw steamer 


Commander Wm. Reynolds 
Actg Master Wm. H. DeWolf 


Port Royal. 
St. John's. 


*Norfolk Packet 


6 


Sch oon er, 


Actg Master G. W. Ward 


Ossabaw Sound. 


Ottawa 


5 


mortar. 
Screwgunboat 


Lieut Comdr Jas Still well 


St. John's. 


*Orvetta 


2 


Schooner 


Actg Master Wm Fales 


Charleston 


Oleander 




stores. 
Side-wheel 


Actg. Master R. P. Walter 


Carrying stores. 


Pawnee 


18 


tug. 
Screw sloop 


Captain H. S. Stellwagen 


Georgetown. 


Passaic 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. R. W. Scott 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Pontiac 


11 


Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. S. B. Luce 


Savannah River. 


Potomska . 


6 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master F. M. Montell 


Charleston. 


Philadelphia ... 


fl 


Side-wheel 


Actg Master W. T. Gillespie 


Charleston flag- 


Pettit 




steamer. 
Side-wheel 


Actg Ensign Chas Grieve 


steamer. 
Port Royal 


*Para 


7 


tug. 
Schoon er , 


Actg. Master D. P. Heath 


Ossabaw Sound. 


*Perrv 


9 


mortar. 
Brig 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. G. W. Brown . . . 


Fernandina 


*Percy Dravtbn 




Sloop, tender . 




North Edisto 


*Racer 


3 


S c hoo n e r , 


Actg Master E. G. Martin 


Tybee. 


Sonoma 


8 


mortar. 
Side-wheel 


Lieut Comdr T S. Fillebrown 


Charleston 


State of Georgia . 


8 


gunboat. 
Side-wheel 


Commander Fabius Stanly 


Port Royal 


*St. Louis 


19 


steamer. 
Sailing sloop 


Commander G H Preble 




*Saratoga 


9 


do 


Actg Vol Lieut Comdr E 




Sanford 




Screw steamer 


Brodhead. 
Actg. Master Z. Kempton 


Port Royal repairing. 


Sweet Brier 


t2 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master Wm. Bailev 


Georgetown 


Stettin 


is 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. C. J.Van Alstine 


St. Helena 


*Smith 


5 


Sc hoone r , 


Actg. Master B. Van Voorhis .... 


Port Roval repairing 


*Swift 




mortar. 
S c boon e r 






*Thunder . . 




tender. 
Sloop tender 




- 


Tuscarora 


10 


Screw sloop 


Commander J M Frailev 




*Valparaiso 




Hulk, hospital 


Actg Master H S Blanchard 


Port Royal 


Wissahickon . 


5 


Screwgunboat 


Lieut Comdr A W Johnson 




Winona 


6 


do 




Port Royal 


Wamsutta . 


6 


Screw steamer 




Do 


Wando . 


3 


Side-wheel 


Actg Master Fredk T King 




*\Villiams 


6 


steamer. 
Sc hoo n e r, 


Actg. Master G W Parker 


Stono 


*WildCat 




mortar. 
Sc boon e r 




St Helena 


*Ward 


5 


tender. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master R T Wyatt 


Light-House Inlet 






mortar. 







* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 

J. A. DAHL.GBEN, 

Rear- Admiral. 



294 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 

Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Swann, U. S. Navy, command- 
ing U. S. S. Lodona, regarding the destruction of salt works in 
Mclntosh County* Ga. 

U. S. S. LODONA, 
Sapelo Sound, March 16, 1866. 

SIB: I have the honor to report the destruction of an extensive salt 
work on Broro Neck, Mclntosn County, Ga. 

The boilers, of which there were twelve, were supplied with water 
by a small steani engine. As the engine was nearly new and in good 
condition, I brought it off, and will send it to Port Royal by the first 
opportunity. 

I have burned ten buildings, a large quantity of firewood and hewn 
timber, 100 bushels of salt, and a number of new barrels and staves. 

The command of the expedition was intrusted to Acting Ensign L. B. 
Brigham. He was accompanied by Acting Third Assistant Engineer 
James Mollineaux. Mr. Brigham did his work quickly and thoroughly. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. P. SWANN, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding U. S. S. Lodona. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Commander Creigldon, U. S. Jiavy, commanding U. S. S. 
Jtfingoe* regarding expedition into Waccamaw River in search of 
marauders. 

U. S. S. MINGOE, 
Georgetmcn, S. <?., March 16, 1866. 

SIR: In obedience to your order I proceeded up the Waccamaw with 
the vessel under my command for the purpose of capturing some 
marauders who were stealing grain and provisions from the plantations 
on the river. 1 went as far as the junction of Bull's Creek and Wac- 
camaw, and sent my boat up the river and succeeded in capturing the 
flatboat with the articles stolen, but the men made their escape into the 
swamp, with the exception of one old man and a boy, who, upon exam- 
ining them, found they were rather pressed into service; that they had 
come down in a small boat to buy rice, and came across this flatboat. 
The man was old and sickly, and the boy not more than 13 years of age. 
I let them go home. The provisions captured were given back to the 
plantations. There were some 30 in number on board the flatboat, 
armed, and were deserters from the rebel Army, and represent them- 
selves as starving. They took the provisions, but did not harm any of 
the people. Mr. Buck, a planter on the river, thinks that the appear- 
ance of the gunboat and tnis capture will prevent any further trouble 
of the same kind, and if there is any, he will inform you. 
Very respectfully your obedient servant, 

J. BLAKELEY CREIGHTON, 

Commander* 
Captain STELLWAGEN, 

Pawnee, Senior Officer Present. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 295 

Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, IT. 8. 
Navy, to send mortar schooner to Key West. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, March 17, 1865. 

SIR: Send one of the schooners of your squadron, formerly mortar 
vessels, to Acting Rear-Admiral Stribling at Key West. He is much 
in need of a suitable sailing vessel to carry coal, provisions, etc. , to the 
stations of his command. No armament, excepting a howitzer, would 
be needed. 

Very respectfully, etc., 

G. WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Assistant Boutelle, U. S. Coast Survey, regarding injuries 
to Coast Survey steamer Bibb, resulting from the explosion of a tor- 
pedo in Charleston Harbor, March 17, 1865. 

U. S. S. BIBB, 
Charleston Harbor, March 18, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: Yesterday afternoon, as this vessel was returning to the 
city after making surveys upon the bar, we struck a sunken torpedo, 
which exploded under our port bow about midway between the port 
guard and the fore channels. 

The shock was very severe, the sensation being that of striking a 
rock, being lifted by it, and passing over it into deep water beyond. 
The column of water thrown up by it nearly filled the second cutter 
and unhooked it from the forward davit. Sixty fathoms of studded 
mooring chains, l^-inch diameter, coiled upon the port side of the ves- 
sel forward, were thrown across the deck. The knees upon the port 
side are started out, and the joiner work shows signs of the blow 
received. The surface blow pipes are broken on both sides. 

Fortunately for us, the blow was upon the side. To this fact and 
the great strength of the vessel may be ascribed our escape from seri- 
ous injury. The very strong and heavy rolling sponsons bolted to the 
strip at the water line also contributed to save us. 

I propose to put the vessel on shore at the coming spring tides to 
ascertain what injury her hull and copper has sustained. No timbers 
or planks are broken, and we shall be ready in three days to resume 
our duties. 

Angles taken half a minute before the explosion fix our position at 
the time. The new light east of Fort Moultrie, on Sullivan's Island, 
bore north 85 east, distant 1,530 yards, and the flagstaff at Battery 
Bee bore N. 27 east, distant 744 yards. The depth of water was 25 
feet at mean low water. The explosion occurred at 5:25 p. m., when 
the tide had not risen over 6 inches. As our position was directly in 
the track over which many vessels have passed, I infer that the torpe- 
does must have been placed low in the water where vessels of ordinary 
draft would pass over it at high tide. The Bibb draws 10 feet at the 
point where she struck the torpedo. 

I respectfully request that all vessels be cautioned to pass close to 



296 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Sullivan's Island, between its western end and Fort Moultrie, until 
the channel has been cleared of all hidden dangers. 
Yours, respectfully, 

CHARLES O. BOUTELLE, 

Coast Survey, Commanding U. S. S. Bibb. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant- Commander West. U. S. Navy, 
commanding U. S. S. Massachusetts, regarding the striking of a tor- 
pedo by that vessel in Charleston Harbor. 

U. S. S. MASSACHUSETTS, 

Off Stono, March 20, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that yesterday, afternoon com- 
ing out of Charleston we struck a torpedo; fortunately it did not 
explode. The keel must have torn it from its moorings, for it struck 
the ship heavily under the starboard quarter and came up to the sur- 
face from under the propeller cut in two. 1 endeavored to pick it up, 
but before the boat reached it it had sunk. We were at the time about 
50 yards S. S. E. from the buoy on the Patapsco wreck. 
I am, very respectfully, etc., 

W. H. WEST, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant- Commander, Commanding. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Charleston. 



Report of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding torpedoes 
in Charleston Harbor. 

No. 115.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, March 21, 1865: 

SIR: Since my last, men have been employed with tugs and boats 
searching for torpedoes. 

Those alluded to at the close of my dispatch of the llth (No. 102) 
were at the entrance of the Ashley River; the} T were of cast iron, and 
placed on the ends of heavy timbers, framed together. There were 
four frames across the river, having fifteen torpedoes in all. 

The Jonquil had secured one of these frames, and was towing it to 
shoal water to destroy it. Not too careful in so doing, it is supposed 
that the frame capsized, one of the torpedoes struck the bottom and 
exploded, but too far from the tug to do any material injury, though 
several men were knocked overboard and some jumped over. 

On Friday evening the Bibb was marking the course for vessels 
passing between Moultrie and Sumter, when she struck a torpedo, and 
it exploded, fortunately at the bow, where the sharpness is so consider- 
able as to permit the explosion to glance upwards. 

The vessel was much jarred, however, and the report of Captain 
Boutelle is enclosed. 

There is no doubt that this is one of the sixteen put down at this 
place, and which every exertion has been made to raise for several 
days, but without success, as they slip from the sweep. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 297 

The men who put them down say that General Hardee gave the 
orders a few nights before the disaster to the Patapsco, and that they 
finished that very night, which is further confirmation of the state- 
ment that these devices were reserved until a move by us was expected. 

They also state that some torpedoes were prepared for the Charleston 
(ironclad), which she was to drop if chased by us. 

In the building where torpedoes were prepared a number were 
found ready for use, and others not completed. 

The divers are now here and will endeavor to raise the boiler 
torpedoes. 

I am inclined to the belief that many of the floating torpedoes have 
been carried to the bottom in cutting away the rope obstructions. 

It is reported that other torpedoes will be found at other places, but 
it requires time to find them by sweeping in such deep water. 

I have received copies of part of the official correspondence of Mr. 
Gray, charged with this business, from which it appears that he had 
generally 35 men at work in making and fitting torpedoes, etc. 

As soon as the different reports and drawings can be made out, the} 7 
will be forwarded. 

The Massachusetts just reports having struck a torpedo in going out; 
fortunately it did not explode. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. /South Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

/Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Acting Master's Mate Newton, U. S. Navy, regarding the 
capture of Federal naval officers in Cooper River. 

U. S. S. JONQUIL, 

Cooper River, South Carolina, March 22, 1865. 
SIR: On the morning of the 22d instant, at 10 a. m., Charles H. 
Hanson, acting ensign, commanding; William H. Barclay, acting third 
assistant engineer; Henry Lynch, acting master's mate, of the U. S. S. 
Jonquil, and Richard Williams and John Ryan, acting third assistant 
engineers, of the U. S. S. Philadelphia, went on shore for the purpose 
of assisting some of the white families against the negroes at Lewis- 
field [Lewisville ?]. At 4:30 of the same day two gentlemen, Mr. 
Maloney and Mr. Caine, came in to Lewisfield and reported to Captain 
Montell that four officers belonging to the Navy were captured by a 
party of mounted men, about 30 strong, in the vicinity of Ebough's 
Mills, 3 miles from Lewisfield. Captures, Charles H. Hanson, acting 
ensign, commanding tug Jonquil; William H. Barclay, acting third 
assistant engineer; Henry Lynch, acting master's mate, and John 
Ryan, acting third assistant engineer, of the Philadelphia, which was 
communicated to Captain Montell, of the Potomska, who ordered me 
to proceed down the river after embarking his men, who he had with 
him. 

Respectfully, yours 

THOMAS NEWTON, 

Acting Master's Mate, Commanding. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding /South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



298 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Acting Ensign Hanson, U. 8. Navy, regarding the capture 
of Federal naval officers in Cooper River, March 2%, 1865. 



U. S. S. JONQUIL, 
Charleston, May 10, 1865. 

SIR: I have respectfully to report concerning the capture of myself 
and the officers under rny command, viz, Acting [Master's] Mate Henry 
Lynch, Third Assistant Engineers William H. Barclay and John Ryan. 
On the 21st of March, 1865, at the time of the said capture, we were 
within 3 miles of my vessel. I was proceeding to the plantation of one 
Mr. E bo ugh to restore order amongst the negroes on his farm, and at 
the fork of the road leading to his house 1 met the pickets of the enemy, 
and succeeded in driving them back to their main force, and we were 
obliged to retreat and take cover behind the trees on the roadside, 
where we made a stand until we were completely surrounded, the force 
numbering 23, and I am sorry to say that after four years of lighting, 
I was obliged to surrender myself a prisoner of war to the so-called 
Confederate States of America. We marched to Orangeburg, where 
the citizens proposed hanging us, but were prevented by the guard. 
On the morning of the 24th we started for Aiken, [S. C.], and arrived 
on the 26th; left Aiken for Augusta, [Ga.], on the 27th, arrived 6 p. in. 
and were confined in prison, at which place we remained until the 1st 
of May, when we were sent to our lines as paroled prisoners of war. 
In conclusion, I would state that our treatment throughout has been of 
a shameful nature. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHARLES H. HANSON, 
Acting Ensign, U. 8. Navy. 
[Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockadiny Squadron.] 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Frailey, 
U. S. Navy, regarding fortifications in Little Ogeecfi<:e and Vernon 
rivers. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, March 23, 1865. 

SIR: In reference to the forts Rosedew and Beaulieu and the bat- 
teries on Green Island, [Georgia]: Destroy the bombproof s and mag 
azines, after removing the shot and shells. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding. 

Commander JAS. MADISON FRAILEY, 

Comdg. U. S. S. Tuscarora, Senior Officer Present, Ossabaw. 



Repwt of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the tempo- 
rary transfer of naval engineer for refitting of tinclads for army -u^e. 

No. 125.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, March &4, 1865. 

SIR: The commanding general of the district has represented to me 
that the services of Chief Engineer G. B. N. Tower, of the U. S. S. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 299 

Canandaigua, are indispensable to the refitting two light-draft tinclads 
in the army employ. 

I have consented to Mr. Tower being so engaged, subject to the 
Department's approval. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant 
Garfield, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Calypso, for duty in 
the South Atlantic Squadron. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, March 27, 1865. 

SIR: Proceed with the U. S. S. Calypso to Port Royal, S. C., and 
report to Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren, or the senior commanding 
officer present, for duty in the South Atlantic Squadron. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

G. WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. H. GARFIELD, 

Commanding U. S. S. Calypso, New York. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the U. S. 
schooner George Mangham. 

No. 128.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, March 27, 1865. 

SIR: In conformity with the directions contained in the Department's 
communication of 17th instant, this day received, 1 have ordered the 
schooner Geoi^ge Mangham to report for duty to Admiral Stribling at 
Key West. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Captain Stellwagen, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 
Pawnee, regarding expedition to Conwayboro, in Waccamaw- River. 

U. S. STEAM SLOOP PAWNEE, 
At Sea, near Charleston, S. C., March 27, 1865. 
ADMIRAL: 1 have the honor to report the return of another expedi- 
tion of four days' duration up the Waccamaw River some 50 miles, to 
Conwayboro. 

Having heard that threats of a visit in force had been made by the 
guerrillas against the plantations and settlements, in view of which 



300 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

great alarm was felt on the whole route by blacks and whites, I dis- 
patched the Mingoe, having in tow some ten armed boats, to proceed 
as high as Buck's Mills, and leaving it discretionary with Lieutenant- 
Commanders G. U. Morris and William H. Dana to proceed the 
remaining distance by boats or land. The arrival of the steam launch 
and two large row launches from the Santee enabled me to follow with 
them, and the steam tug Catalpa determined to ascend as far as- the 
water would permit. I found the Mlngoe ashore near her destination, 
towed her off, and caused her to drop to a point where she could 
anchor. The shore expedition had gone on, and I took the remainder 
of boats in tow as far as practicable, then causing them to row. After 
incredible labor and difficulty, succeeded in getting to Conwayboro at 
nightfall, just after the marching division. No enemies were encoun- 
tered, but it was reported many small parties fled in various directions 
on our approach by river and land. 

The people of the town were glad to see us; even those having rela- 
tives in the arnry professed their joy at being saved from the raiding 
deserters. They assure us that the penetration of our parties into 
such distances, supposed to be inaccessible to our vessels, has spread a 
salutary dread, and that our large force of Catalpa, 4 large launches, 
and 10 boats, with about 300 men in all, at the highest point, presented 
such a formidable display, with 7 howitzers, that they thought they 
would be completely prevented returning to that neighborhood. I 
permitted several Union people to come down to Georgetown; met 
many negroes coming down in flats. 

I encouraged blacks and whites to prosecute planting and to recom- 
mend all others to do the same, for their preservation in the coming 
time, as it is now the height of the season. They are at work in 
most places, and even along the coast, most of which has only been 
commenced since the officers have on all occasions since my arrival 
strenuously urged on them the danger of a famine. I think I may say 
that these efforts may be the means of saving hundreds of lives. 

I passed through Bull Creek to the Pedee with the tug and four 
launches, and destroyed the ferries at Bull Creek Feny and at Ya- 
hany Ferry, where Steele's cavalry have been taking horses across 
lately, which will entirely prevent their crossing. The river running 
4 knots an hour can not be swum by animals. The hands of all sorts 
fled for fear of being cut off, and will continue in dread along the 
route. This route is the richest, thickest settled with blacks, and the 
most insalubrious part of the South. They say the news has spread 
into North Carolina, and these lawless hordes are much impressed by 
our swift and distant trips. 

William O'Brien, landsman, was accidentally shot by his own gun. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. S. STELLWAGEN, 

Captain. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 301 

Letter from Major- General Gillmore, U. S. Army, to Rear- Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, requesting cooperation in seeking the best 
route to Sumterville and Florence, S. C. 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, 

March 27, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: General Hatch, commanding at Charleston, informed me 
on the 20th instant that he had requested your assistance in examin- 
ing the Santee River and some of the streams flowing into Winyah 
Bay with a view to the selection of the best route for an expedition to 
reach Sumterville and Florence, S. C. Brigadier-General Potter will 
command the expedition, and I respectfully request for him such 
cooperation as you may be willing and able to afford. General Potter 
has been directed to confer with you upon this matter. 
1 am, sir, respeqtfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major- General of Volunteers. 
Rear-Admiral DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Major- General Gillmore, U. S. Army, to Rear- Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Nam/, requesting cooperation of gunboats in Altamaha 
River for protection of prisoners. 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, 

March 27, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have to inform you that on or about the 8th of next 
month I expect to receive over 5,000 prisoners at Darien, Ga., and if 
not incompatible with the interests of the naval service on this coast 
I would like to have a couple of gunboats in the Altamaha River near 
Darien at that time. 

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major- General of Volunteers. 
Rear-Admiral DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting reports 
regarding affairs in Cooper River. 

No. 132.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, March 28, 1865. 

SIR: I transmit for the information of the Department certain com- 
munications just received. They refer to the Cooper River. 

The best information that I have from that quarter, the Santee, 
Pedee, and Waccamaw rivers, leads me to believe that the rebels have 
no military force near the coast, nor perhaps any in this State nor 
Georgia, except a small force of cavalry. There are, however, bands 
of marauders, who take advantage of the absence of a military force 
to prey on all who have property, and it is doubtful whether they or 
the cavalry are most dreaded by the residents. 

Our own military force is generally limited to the city lines. The 
gunboats are advanced up the Cooper River, and the officers use their 
efforts to preserve order as well as they can and to extend the United 
States laws to white and black. 



302 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The State is completely on its back, and two or three movable col- 
umns of a couple of thousand men each would suffice for a general 
recognition of the free Union. 

The chief danger is from probable lack of food; the season for 
planting is at hand, and the freedmen have not generally agreed on 
terms with the landowners. I learn recently, however, that on some 
of the plantations the work is going on. 

The negroes have generally proved docile and well disposed, and a 

little judicious action would put the new system into full movement. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. S. ClMARRON, 

Cooper River, South Carolina, March <28, 1865. 

SIR: I enclose the report of Acting Master Montell, of the U. S. S. 
Potomska, of the result of the expedition which was sent out under 
my orders to rescue, if possible, the officers of the Jonquil, recently 
captured by a small rebel force, whether regular or marauding, I know 
not certainly, in the vicinity of Monk's Corner. 

I also enclose a report of Acting Master Montell, touching the con- 
dition of the country on and contiguous to the Western Branch of the 
Cooper River, and the remedial means necessary to its improvement, 
and to regularity and good order among the people. As to the 
requirements which he respectfully suggests and the authority with 
which he asks to be clothed, I have no comments to make, but as to so 
much of the report as is based on so-called information, I beg leave to 
say that inasmuch as it is based entirely on mere rumor and hearsay, 
it should be received with abundant caution. I have conversed with 
intelligent persons from the Santee country, who came voluntarily to 
take the oath of allegiance, and who, I am well satisfied, were loyal to 
the Union always, and they brought intelligence widely differing in 
many respects from Acting Master Montell's information. These per- 
sons, who are not of the gentry of the land, but plain, industrious 
farmers, of strong common sense and good information, reside in St. 
Stephen's Parish, in this (the Charleston) district, within 3 or 4 miles 
of the Santee River. That is the farthest point inland from which 
information, other than mere hearsay, has reached me from any 
source. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. THOMPSON, 

Commander. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

[Subenclosure.] 

U. S. S. POTOMSKA, 

Strawberry Ferry, Cooper River, March 27, 1865. 

SIR: I beg most respectfully to inform you that on the evening of 

the 23d instant I left this vessel with 15 marines and 35 sailors from 

the Cimarron, and 50 sailors from the Potomska for the purpose of 

retaking the officers captured from the'U. S. tug Jonquil. At 6 p. m., 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



303 



dark, I started the Potomskds men in boats up the river, and with the 
Cimarron's men I marched up to Keating Simon's place, 15 miles from 
here, and there made a junction with the Potomska's men and remained 
there the rest of the night and following day. At dusk I started for 
Hog Swamp, about 15 miles distant, where the band of guerrillas 
were camped, but after surrounding the house I found that they had 
gone into the woods. After threats, I succeeded in capturing a Mr. 
DeHay and Edward Dennis, brother of the Captain Dennis. Fearing 
an attack, I at once made good my way to Keating Simon's, where the 
tug lay. Shortly afterwards a flag of truce came to me from the band 
of robbers, who stated that they were willing to return our officers, 
and hereafter allow no further interference in our duties of Christian- 
ity, and I have allowed live days to effect the exchange, three of which 
have now elapsed, but I hope that my purpose will be effected, and 
no difficulty will again. arise from that quarter. 

Captain t)ennis says the officers were not taken by his command but 
by General Ferguson's, and when he can see the general and explain 
the matter all will be satisfactory, and the officers of the Navy will be 
allowed to proceed as usual in doing good. 

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. M. MONTELL, 
Acting Master, Commanding U. S. S. Potornsha. 

Rear- Admiral JNO. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

April 1, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station . 


Acacia. 


5 


Screw tug 




North Edisto 


Adger . 


g 


Side- wheel 


Comdr Thos H Patterson 




*AdftTns 


8 


steamer. 
Sloop of war 




Port Royal 


*Allen 


10 


ordnance 
stores. 
Bark 


Actg Vol Lieut I A Pennell 




Amaraiithus 




Screw tug . . 


Actg Ensign W R Cox 


Charleston 


Arethusa 


In 


do... 


Actg. Ensign J V Cook 


Port Royal. 


Azalea 


In 


.do. 


Actg Master F W Strong 


Ossabaw 


*Bruen 


2 


S c h oon er 


Actg Master W F Redding 


Charleston 


*Braziliera 


8 


stores. 
Bark 


Actg Ensign J. H Bennett 


St Andrew's 


*Blunt 


f2 


Schooner 


Actg Ensign G G. Curtis 


Charleston 


Cimarron . 


P 


Side-wheel 


Comdr Egbert Thompson 


Do 


Catalpa 




gunboat. 
Screw tug 


Actg Ensign A K Noyes 


Georgetown. 


Camelia 


2 


do 


Actg Ensign David B Hawes 


Charleston repairing 


Carnation 


T2 


do 




Port Royal repairing 


Clover 


|2 


do 


Actg. Ensign Benj. Mitchell . .. 


Charleston. 


Chatham 




Side- wheel tug 


Actg. Master's Mate Geo. W. Post 


Port Royal, repairing. 


*Chambers 


7 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master Wm. Watson 


Port Royal. 


Canonicus . 




ordnance 
stores. 
Monitor 


Lieut Comdr G E Belknap 


Do 


Cambridge 


10 


Screw steamer 


Comdr G H Preble 


Ossabaw Sound. 


Chenango 


10 


Side- wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. G U. Morris 


Georgetown. 


Dandelion . . . 


+2 


steamer. 






Daffodil 


ta 


Side-wheel tug 


Actg Master Wm H Mallard' 




Donegal 


3 








Flambeau 


5 


steamer, 
do 




Do 


*Fernandina 


8 


Bark . 


Cavendy. 
Actg Master Lewis West 


St Catherine's. 


*Gemsbok 


7 


do 






Geranium 


t3 


Side- wheel tug 




Port Royal repairing. 


Gladiolus . . . 


t3 


Screw tue . . 


Actff. Ensism N. Bouerhton . . 


Do. 



* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers, 



304 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, April 1, 1865 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Griffith ..,. 


3 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master James Ogilvie 


Wassaw Sound. 


*G. W. Rodgers 


f2 


mortar. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master L. G. Emerson 


Ossabaw. 


Harvest Moon 




Side- wheel 


Actg. Master J. K. Crosby 


Georgetown wreck 


Home 


t3 


steamer. 
Screw steam- 


Actg. Master Benj. Dyer 


Charleston 


Hydrangea 


ts 


er, hospital. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Master Chas. W. Rogers . . . 


Georgetown. 


"Houghton . 


6 


Bark, con- 


Actg. Master E. G. Furber 


Port Royal. 


Hale 


6 


demned. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master C. F. Mitchell . . . 


Do. 


*Hope 


}1 


Schooner 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. L. Churchill 


Charleston. 


Iris 


1 


Screw tug .... 


Actg. Master J. E. Sticknev 


Charleston, repairing. 




3 




Comdr. J. J. Almv . 


Port Royal repairing 


Jonquil 


t2 


Screw tug . . . 


Actg. Master's Mate Thos. New- 


Charleston. 


Catskill 


2 


Monitor 


ton. 
Lieut. Comdr. Ed. Barrett .. . 


Do. 


Lodona 


7 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. R. P. Swann 


Sapelo Sound. 


Laburnum 


f-4 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Sturgis Center 


Port Royal 


*Lightning . . 




Schooner, 






Larkspur 


t2 


tender. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Wm. Nelson . . . 


Port Royal repairing. 


Mingoe 


11 


Sid e-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. Wm. H. Dana 


Georgetown. 


McDonough 


6 


steamer. 
do 


Lieut. Comdr. A. F. Crosman 


Stono. 


*Mangham 


7 


Schooner 


Actg. Master John Collins 


North Edisto 


Nantucket 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. R. F. R. Lewis 


Charleston. 


Nahant 


2 


do 


Lieut. Comdr. E. P. Williams 


Stono. 


*New Hampshire 
Norwich 


10 

6 


Ship (stores).. 
Screw steamer 


Commander Wm. Reynolds 
Actg. Master Wm. H. De Wolf. . . 


Port Royal. 
St. John's. 


*Norfolk Packet 


6 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master G. W. Wood 


Ossabaw Sound. 


Ottawa 


5 


mortar. 
Screwgunboat 


Lieut. Comdr. Jas. Stillwell 


St. John's. 


*Orvetta 




S c h oo ner, 


Actg. Master Wm. Fales. 


Charleston. 


Oleander 


f2 


stores. 
Sid e-wheel 


Actg. Master R. P. Walter 


Carrying stores. 


Passaic 


2 


tug. 
Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. R. W. Scott 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Pawnee .... 


18 


Screw sloop . . 


Captain H. S. Stellwagen 


Charleston. 


Pontiac 


11 


Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. S. B. Luce 


Savannah River. 


Potomska 


6 


gunboat 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master F. M. Montell 


Cooper River. 


Philadelphia 


1 


Side -wheel 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. T. Gillespie 


Charleston flag- 


Pettit 


t 2 


steamer. 
Side-wheel 


Actg Ensign Chas. Grieve 


steamer. 
Port Royal 


*Para 


7 


tug. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master Geo. Ashburv 


Ossabaw Sound. 


*Perry 


9 


mortar. 
Brig 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. G. W. Brown . . . 


Fernandina. 


*Percy Drayton . . . 




Sloop tender 




North Edisto. 


*Racer 


3 


S c h oo n er 


Actg. Master E. G. Martin 


Tybee. 


Sonoma 


8 


mortar. 
Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. T. S. Fillebrown . . 


Charleston. 


State of Georgia 


g 


gunboat. 
Side- w heel 


Comdr. Fabius Stanly 


Do 


*St. Louis 


19 


steamer. 
Sailing sloop 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. J. F. Nickels . . . 




*Saratoga 


9 


do 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. G. E. Welch 


Do. 


San ford 


5 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Z. Kempton 


Carrying stores. 


Sweet Brier 


|2 


Screw tug .... 


Actg. Master Wm. Bailev 


Georgetown. 


*Smith 


5 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master B. Van Voorhis 


Port Roval. 


*Swift 




mortar. 
S c h oo ner, 






*Thunder 
Tuscarora 


io 


tender. 
Sloop, tender. 
Screw sloop . . 


Commander J. M. Frailey . 


Charleston 


*Valparaiso 




Hulk, hospital 


Actg. Master H. S. Blanchard . . . 


Port Royal. 


Wissahickon .. 


5 


Screwgunboat 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Johnson 


Stono. 


Winona 


6 


do 


Actg. Master E.H. Sheffield 


Georgetown. 


Wamsutta 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Chas W Lee 


Port Royal. 


Wando 


3 


Side-w heel 


Actg. Master Fredk. T. King 


Charleston. 


*Williams 


6 


steamer. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master G. W. Parker . ... 


Stono. 


*Wild Cat 




mortar. 
S c h oone r , 




Pilot boat at Charles- 


*Ward 


5 


. tender. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master C. C. Ricker 


ton. 
Light-House Inlet. 






mortar. 







* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 

J. A. DAHGLREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 305 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Nickels, U. S. Navy, to assume command of the U. S. S. 
Cambridge. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, S. C., April 1, 1865. 

SIR: You are hereby detached from the U. S. ship St. Louis, and, 
on receipt of this, you will again assume command of the U. S. S. 
Cambridge. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant J. F. NICKELS, 

Commanding U. S. Ship St. Louis. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. /S. Navy, to Major- General 
Gillmore, U. S. Army, responding to request for the cooperation of 
gunboats in the Santee River. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, S. C. , April 1, 1865. 

SIR: I received this morning yours of the 27th, requesting the coop- 
eration of such naval force as 1 may be able and willing to afford 
General Potter, who is to command. 

You are probably aware that the bar of the Santee prevents the 
entrance of any but the lightest draft tugs of the squadron. My 
ability, therefore, will be very limited, but such vessels as are suitable 
will be sent into the river. These will be one or two tugs and some 
launches carrying howitzers. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atllantic Blockading Squadrtm. 

Major-General Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Headquartei's Hilton Head. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Major- General 
Gillmore, U. S. Army, responding to request for cooperation of gun- 
hoots in the protection of prisoners. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA. 
Charleston Harbor, April 1, 1865. 

SIR: I received this morning yours of the 27th, stating that an 
exchange of prisoners is to take place at Darien, Ga., on the 18th, and 
requesting that a couple of gunboats may be in the Altamaha at the 
time, near the town. 

Your request will be attended to. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Commanding. 
Major-General Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Comdg. Dept. of the South, Headquarters Hilton Head. 

N w R VOL 



306 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant O*Kane, 
U. 8. Navy, to proceed to Santee River in command of launches for 
cooperation with, the army under General Potter, U. 8. Army, 

FLAG- STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, 8. C., April 2, 1865. 

SIR: Proceed to Georgetown, and on your arrival there report to 
the senior officer present for the purpose of obtaining the two launches 
recently sent there. They are to be manned from the crews of the 
Mingoe and ^Winona. The officers and crew now in them are to be 
returned to their vessels, respectively. 

After obtaining the launches, proceed to the Santee River and place 
yourself in communication and cooperation with the army, affording 
all assistance in your power. 

On the arrival of Commander F. Stanly, you will transfer the com- 
mand to him and return to this anchorage, reporting your arrival 
to me. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant JAMES O'KANE, 

Flag- Steamer. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Thomp- 
son, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Cimarron, to proceed to Alta- 
maha River for the protection of prisoners for exchange. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, April 2, 1865. 

SIR: You will proceed with the Cimarron to the Altamaha, to be 
present during an exchange of prisoners which is to take place at 
Darien. 

When your cooperation is not longer needed you will return and 
report to me here. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Commanding. 
Commander EGBERT THOMPSON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Cimarron. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master 
nell, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. bark Ethan Allen, enjoining 
vigilance. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, S. C. , April 3, 1865. 

SIR: Your communication* of the 28th ultimo, in reference to the 
Fourth Georgia Cavalry making their appearance at that point, has 
been received. In reply, it is necessary that you should be vigilant, 

* Not found. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 307 

and let your boats continue to patrol the creek, etc., reporting all mat- 
ters of interest to me. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master I. A. PENNELL, 

Comdg. U. S. Bark Ethan Allen, /St. /Simon's /Sound. 



Report of Rear- Admiral ,Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding tlie depar- 
ture from Charleston oftheu.S. steamers Canandaigua and State of 
Georgia. 

No. 144.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

... : Charleston Harbor, April 4, 1865. 

SIR: I have to inform the Department that, in obedience to orders, 
the Canandaigua left Port Royal on the 26th of March for Boston. 

The State of Georgia left this anchorage on the 2d instant to carry 
into execution the orders * given to Captain Preble* while in the com- 
mand of the St. Louis. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to colored citizens 
of Charleston, acknowledging resolutions. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, S. C., April 6, 1865. 

MY FRIENDS: I have received the resolutions passed at your recent 
meeting, and thank you for your appreciation of my effort to carry 
out the laws of the Union in your behalf. 

Your race is now free, never to be enslaved again within the limits 
of the Union. 

But you will have a more severe ordeal in your sudden prosperity 
than in past adversity. I hope your people will pass through success- 
fully. 

The immediate danger, as I learn from the section of the country 
where my gunboats penetrate, is the probable scarcity of food, arising 
from the cessation of labor. Meet this evil at once. 

Return to your occupation cheerfully and earnestly, for you now 
work for yourselves. 

Respect the Sabbath and keep it faithfully. I shall always do what 
I can to further your real interests. 

With my best wishes for your prosperity and happiness, 
I am, very truly, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

To the MEETING OF THE COLORED CITIZENS OF CHARLESTON. 

*See Series I, volume 3, p. 428. 



308 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the reduc- 
tion of the naval force under his command. 

No. 147.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, S. C., April 7, 1865. 

SIR: Conformably to the views of the Department, the number of 
vessels in this squadron has been much diminished, and may be brought 
to a much lower and more economic standard by the substitution of a 
few more ironclads. 

In the present state of affairs, and assuming that the reduction of 
the rebellion progresses as it has done, the purpose of the naval force 
maintained here will be purely conservative. 

No class of vessel will be found better adapted to this than the 
monitors. 

The number of men and officers they require when fully manned 
does not exceed 100. 

The wear and tear lying at anchor in smooth water will be very 
trifling; their steam machinery is of a very enduring character, as may 
be perceived from the present condition of those that have gone 
through the hard service of this station for two years. 

Their boilers will wear very little, as no steam will be habitually 
needed on one, and only banked fires on the other, or, at least, no 
more than will suffice for the ventilating apparatus. 

They will serve as impregnable forts wherever the}- ma} r be placed, 
and with the aid of a steam tug will command the interior streams 
beyond range of their guns. 

I would therefore recommend to the Department, until affairs are 
entirely settled, that a monitor be placed in Georgetown, two in 
Charleston, two at Port Royal, one in the Savannah, one in Ossabaw, 
one in St. Simon's, and one in the St. John's, with a steamer for each. 

Making nine monitors, of which a portion should be of a lighter 
draft than those of the Passaic class, if con venient f or the Department 
to send such. These would require nine tugs to be with them con- 
stantly, and the remaining nine would serve to visit the ports lying 
between the monitor stations, so as to maintain a constant communica- 
tion from one end of the line to the other. 

This, I would term the permanent force for police and other pur- 
poses, withdrawing the otner vessels. 

The workshops and mechanical means now at Port Royal, with a cor- 
responding number of hands, would be ample to keep these vessels in 
perfect repair. 

The divers should also be retained, to keep clean the iron bottoms, 
and the monitors should be so interchanged as to have the benefit of 
the fresh water, which can be reached at Savannah and other stations. 

The monitors should all have a plank deck over the iron deck, and I 
see no reason why a light suite of apartments, with a mess room, 
should not be put up forward of the turret for the officers, and a per- 
manent awning and curtains aft for such of the men as preferred to 
sling their hammocks on deck. 

If circumstances should render it necessary, two or three double- 
enders might be added, and a cruiser or two of the Nipsic class. 

Charleston will always be secure against outside attack by means of 
the ironclads, Moultrie, and Sumter; isolating Moultrie by removing 
the bridge and maintaining the communication by water alone. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 309 

The guns at Johnson should be removed, and a series of strong lines 
maintained, but their armament preserved afloat in a store vessel to 
meet contingencies. 

The works in the city should be leveled; they are unnecessary for 
the purposes of the United States. 

I have the honor to be. very respectfully , your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Stillwell, U. S. Navy, regarding 

the capture of a party of naval officers from the U. S. S. Ottawa, in 

St. John's River. 

U. S. GUNBOAT OTTAWA, 
Off Jacksonville, Fla., April 7, 1866. 

SIR: It becomes my unfortunate duty to report the capture by the 
rebels of Second Assistant Engineer George H. White, Acting Assist- 
ant Surgeon Lewis H. Willard, Lewis S. Smith, coal heaver, and 
Andrew Farley, ship's nurse, of this vessel, under the following cir- 
cumstances: 

Dr. Willard has been attending Mrs. Douglass, a sick lady, on Mr. 
Reed's place near Mandarin, on the west bank of the St. John's River, 
and left my vessel yesterday morning in a small boat, accompanied by 
the persons mentioned above. As they did not return last night, I left 
this morning and proceeded up to Mr. Reed's wharf and sent a boat, 
armed, in charge of Acting Ensign Walter N. Smith, with orders to 
see Mr. Reed and make enquiries as to what had become of the party. 
It appears by the report of Mr. Smith that they left his place at 4 
p. m. yesterday, and on their way down were not able to keep far 
enough off from the west bank of the river, and were captured by a 
party of the Second Florida Cavalry in a boat that must have been 
waiting for them. It appears that no shot was fired on either side, and 
that our party were taken completely by surprise. The only arms lost 
belonging to the Government was one revolver; the boat was of but 
little value, and private property. 

After finding all the information 1 could, I proceeded down the river 
to this place to communicate with Colonel B. C. Tilghman, now the 
commanding officer here, as Brigadier-General E. P. Scammon left 
last night for Hilton Head. Colonel Tilghman will send out a scouting 
party to Mr. Reed's place to get a letter from him, stating the cir- 
cumstances of Dr. Willard being at his place, as he wishes to send ft 
to General Samuel Jones, the Confederate general, commanding the 
Department of Florida, for the purpose of getting him released, on the 
ground that the doctor was on a visit of humanity. 

Mrs. Douglass is the mother-in-law of Judge Burritt, and has been 
living in Jacksonville until a short time since, when General E. P. 
Scammon gave her permission to reside for a short time with her 
other son-in-law, Mr. A. H. Reed. Unfortunately, Judge Burritt left 
here last night on his way to Washington, in company with General 
Scammon. 

I am obliged to leave for the bar this afternoon, as the Massachu- 
>s is due to-morrow, and the army here have no steamer to let me 



810 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

have to communicate with her. Colonel Tilghmun will keep me 
informed if he receives any intelligence. He had a flag of truce out 
this morning and communicated with the enemy while we were up the 
river, and will send one out on Saturday, when I trust to hear that 
the captured partj r will be released. 

It is with deep regret I am obliged to make the above report, still 
I must do it, and place myself on your clemency. It has been the 
habit of all commanding officers to have communication with Mr. 
Reed's family since we have occupied this river, but at the same time 
I feel as if I had made a mistake in allowing the party to leave so 
unguarded. 

I will inform you at the earliest opportunity of all 1 can hear of the 
prisoners. 

Refugees are still coming in large numbers; 40 arrived this day. 

Mr. Bennett has commenced on the sunken steamer Maple Leaf, but 
as yet with but little success. 

We have no sickness on board at present, but as we are having quite 
warm weather 1 respectfully request that a doctor may be sent to this 
vessel. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES STILLWELL, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Assistant Surgeon Willard, U. S. Navy, regarding the 
release of Naval officers captured in St. John's River. 

U. S. S. OTTAWA, 

Off Jacksonville, April 10, 1865. 

SIR: It becomes my unpleasant duty to inform you of the capture 
of Second Assistant Engineer G. H. White, Andrew Farley (nurse), 
Lewis S. Smith (coal heaver), and myself, in the small dingey, by a 
party of Confederate scouts. 

We had been to Mr. Reed's, on the west bank of the St. John's 
River. As you are aware, it was a strictly professional visit, having 
been asked by General Scammon to attend them, as a portion of the 
family were sick. Mr. White accompanied me as a companion. I had 
made the visit and was returning, when off Black Point we saw a 
small boat going, it seemed, to Mandarin. We paid no attention to it, 
as we thought it was from Jacksonville, it being in the middle of the 
river, but soon as they got well on our quarter they edged toward us. 
We were then sailing and pulling against the tide, so had no chance to 
get away, and having only one pistol could not make resistance. The} 7 
ordered us to surrender, which we did, as there were 5 armed men in 
their boat and 10 on shore, ready to fire into us in case we made resist- 
ance. They immediately carried us on shore, where I explained to 
the officer in command our situation, but he could do nothing. W r e 
were then marched to Baldwin, where we arrived the next morning at 
9 o'clock. We were presented immediately to Colonel C. Smith, com- 
manding forces at Baldwin. To him I stated the circumstances of our 
capture. He said he could not act in the matter, but that he expected 
Major-General Jones in a few hours, when it would be referred to him. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 311 

The general arrived at 12 m. On hearing the case, decided imme- 
diately that 1 should be released; that the object of my visit was a suf- 
ficient guarantee any where, and that the remainder of the party should 
have been released if the two scouts captured two months ago by the 
army had been given up, as promised by General Scammon in two 
official communications. He said further that when the scouts were 
returned he would assure me the same would be done with Mr. White 
and men. 

In the evening the two scouts were returned by a flag of truce from 
our side, but the general had gone, and Colonel Smith said he could 
not act in the matter, but felt satisfied that when he had seen the gen- 
eral, Mr. White and the two men would be released. The colonel gave 
me permission to send anything to Mr. White and men to make them 
comfortable, and that they would be kept at Baldwin until he had com- 
municated with General Jones. He also assured me that Mr. Reed 
had nothing to do with our capture; that he never came back in the 
country. 

A flag of truce was detailed to bring me in, I am happy to assure 
you that while in the enemy's hands we received the kindest atten- 
tion. Hoping my conduct has met your approbation, I have the honor 
to be, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. H. WILLARD, 

Acting Assistant Surgeon. 
Lieut. Commander JAS. STILLWELL, 

Commanding Naval Forces, St. John's River. Florida. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, giving list of vessels 
detached from the squadron under his command. 

No. 155.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, April 10, 1865. 

SIR: For the information of the Department, I have to state that 
to this date the following vessels have been detached from this squad- 
ron and sent north or elsewhere under the special orders of the Depart- 
ment or under the general discretion to reduce the force: 

Ironclads Montauk, Sangamon, Mahopac, Lehigh, Monadnock; 
I 1 lag, February 8; Memphis, February 19; South Carolina, March 
10; Stettin, March 24; Canandaigua, March 26; JVipsic, March 28; 
Perry, April 3; Femandina, April 3; Saratoga, April 4; Braziliera, 
April 5; State of Georgia, April 6, sent north; George Mangham, 
April 8, south. 

Three have been destroyed, the Patapsco and the Harvest Moon by 
torpedoes, and the Dai Ching in action with a rebel battery. 

1 have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. /South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



312 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Letter from Brigadier- General Schimmelfennia , U. S. Army, to Rear- 
Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, expressing appreciation of the 
hearty and continuous cooperation of the navy. 

CHARLESTON, S. C., April 10, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: Being obliged to leave the department on account of 
ill health, 1 beg you to allow me before parting to express to you and 
to the officers under your command my high esteem and my sincere 
thanks for the uniform courtesy and invaluable cooperation 1 have 
received at your hands. 

I have had the honor to be intrusted with the command before 
Charleston for nearly a year past, and have been stationed in front of 
Charleston for over twenty months. During this period I myself, as 
well as the other officers in the district, have been thrown into almost 
daily contact with the officers of the Navy, and the most pleasant 
relations have always existed between the two branches of the service; 
good feeling and true comradeship were the invariable rule; not a sin- 
gle instance of discord ever came to my knowledge. 

My command in front of Charleston could at no time be considered 
in any other light than as a landed force serving to render the blockade 
more effective; varying in numbers between 3,000 and 6,000 effective 
men, it could scarcely be called a corps of observation. 

I was not, however, satisfied with holding my position against the 
superior numbers of the enemy and with being always well informed 
of his doings, but made it my further object to oblige the enem} T at 
all times to maintain in his strong position a force nearly double my 
own. By harassing him continually and by attacking him whenever 
he was about to reduce his force, 1 fully attained these results. 

When General Grant forced the enemy back from the Rappahannock 
to Richmond, troops in my front received marching orders. I imme- 
diately attacked; these troops were not sent north, and the command- 
ing officer in Charleston called for reinforcements from Virginia. 

When General Sherman fought his battles before Atlanta, I again, 
under orders from General Foster, attacked the enemy, and the result 
was that troops were sent from Atlanta to Charleston, though the 
enemy already outnumbered us two to one. 

Once more, when General Sherman was about to force his way over 
the North Edisto River, I attacked and harassed the enemy continually 
for a week. Not a man was detached from Charleston, and when 
General Hardee finally evacuated the city he had a force nearly double 
to that of all the troops operating against Charleston under General 
Gillmore. 

1 mention these facts, admiral, merely in order to add that I should 
never have been able to attain these results without the hearty and 
most efficient assistance of the fleet under your command. 

Day or night, for whatever purpose, I never applied in vain to you 
or to any of your officers. 

More than once I was she/ft of means of transportation; your gun- 
boats took my troops on board, accommodated batteries, horses, and 
all on their decks, and risked their vessels in running up narrow and 
winding creeks. 

When my troops advanced on to the enemy's ground, your gunboats 
and ironclads went up the rivers and creeks, covering my flanks, 
entirely regardless of the enemy's fire within most effective range. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 313 

The artillery practice of your vessels was always excellent and elicited 
my unqualified admiration. 

Under its cover 1 safely retreated, when necessar} 7 , over marshes 
and creeks without losing a man. 

It is not my personal opinion alone, admiral, that I am giving 
expression to. I believe myself empowered to say that it is, and 
always was, equally the opinion of those commanding under me, and 
as a proof of it I beg to add a few lines from the report of the James 
Island affair of last February, by Brevet Brigadier-General Hartwell, 
one of the best and bravest soldiers in the department. General 
Hartwell says: 

Of Lieutenant-Commander Johnson, senior naval officer present, and his next in 
command, Lieutenant-Commander Crosrnan, too much can not be said, and I would 
respectfully request the brigadier-general commanding to cause the admiral to be 
informed of the hearty and effective cooperation of these two officers. 

With my best wishes for }^our welfare, admiral, and for the wel- 
fare of those under your command, 

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 

Brigadier- General Volunteers. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter of acknowledgment from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, 
to Brigadier- Genei'al Schimmelfennig, U. S. Army. 

FLAG- STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, April 11, 1865. 

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
communication of the 10th instant, and have to say in return that its 
expressions of good will and honest appreciation of your comrades of 
the squadron will sink deep in the memory of myself and the officers 
of my command. 

We will always recognize in it the hearty and frank utterance of a 
brave and tried soldier, whose eminent services to the cause of the 
flag we have witnessed and admired, of one who has never hesitated 
to lead his batteries in the attack. 

Your unceasing activity and skillful dispositions have indeed allowed 
little repose to the rebel enemy and in July had almost placed Fort 
Johnson (the key of the harbor) in our possession, when the fall of 
Charleston must have followed not long after. 

I lament, general, the cause of your departure, and hope earnestly 
that the power who holds the lives of men, as well as the destiny of 
battles in His hand, will restore you to health and to the usefulness 
which, as a general and a citizen, has always characterized your career. 

I am gratified in having the opportunity of tendering you the best 
accommodation homeward that me Massachusetts will afford. 

You will carry with you the best wishes of your naval comrades, 
which you are so well entitled to. 

I am, general, with all respect, your friend, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. 

Brigadier-General A. SCHIMMELFENNIG, 

Command !-ng Defenses of Charleston, etc. 



314 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 

Raising of the United States flag on Fort Sumter, April H, 1865. 

Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Bear -Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting 
general order of the War Department regarding ceremonies. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, March 28, 1865. 

SIR: I herewith enclose a copy of an Executive order relative to the 
raising of the flag of the United States upon the ruins of Fort Sumter 
by Brevet Major-General Anderson, on the 14th of April next. The 
honorable the Secretary of War, in pursuance of the aforesaid order, 
communicates the invitation to the naval forces at Charleston and 
their commander on that station to participate in the ceremonies of 
the occasion, and has asked the aid of this Department in directing the 
respective parts which shall be taken by the naval and military forces. 
Ihe Department intrusts to you, the commanding officer of the 
naval forces at Charleston, to adopt befitting measures for the occasion 
in question. You will confer with the commanding officer of the 
Department and unite with him in carrying out the orders of the 
President of the United States for raising the old flag upon the walls 
of Sumter. 

Very respectfully, etc. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron, Charleston, S. C. 

[Enclosure.] 

WAR DEPARTMENT, 
Washington City, March 28, 1865. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to transmit to you a copy of the President's 
order in relation to raising the flag of the United States upon the ruins 
of Fort Sumter by Major-General Anderson, on the 14th day of April 
next. You will observe that the President directs that the naval force 
at Charleston and their commander on that station be invited to par- 
ticipate in the ceremonies of the occasion. It gives me pleasure, 
through you, to communicate that invitation, and I shall be happy to 
confer with you in regard to the ceremonies befitting that occasion, 
and to have your aid in directing the respective parts which shall be 
taken by the naval and military forces. For that purpose I will have 
the honor of calling upon you in a half hour from this time. 
Your obedient servant, 

EDWIN M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Subenclosure.] 

GENERAL ORDERS, ) WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, 

No. 50. \ . Washington, March 27, 1865. 

Ordered, First. That at the hour of noon, on the 14th day of April, 
1865, Brevet Major-General Anderson will raise and plant upon the 
ruins of Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, the same United States 
flag which floated over the battlements of that fort during the rebel 
assault, and which was lowered and saluted by him and the small force 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 815 

of his command when the works were evacuated on the 14th day of 
April, 1861. 

Second. That the flag, when raised, be saluted by one hundred guns 
from Fort Sumter. and by a national salute from every fort and rebel 
battery that fired upon Fort Sumter. 

Third. That suitable ceremonies be had upon the occasion, under 
the direction of Major General William T. Snerman, whose military 
operations compelled the rebels to evacuate Charleston, or, in his 
absence, under the charge of Major-General Q. A. Gillmore, command- 
ing the Department. Among the ceremonies will be the delivery of a 
public address by the Reverend Henry Ward Beecher. 

Fourth. That the naval forces at Charleston and their commander 
on that station be invited to participate in the ceremonies of the 
occasion. 

By order of the President of the United States: 

EDWIN M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War. 



Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to the Secretary of War acknowledging the receipt 

of general order. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, March 28, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 
this date, enclosing an Executive order relative to raising the flag on 
Fort Sumter, and, in pursuance thereof, extending an invitation to 
the naval forces at Charleston and their commander on that station to 
participate in the ceremonies of the occasion. 

Rear-Admiral Dahlgren has been advised of the invitation extended, 
and has been authorized as the commander of the naval forces at 
Charleston to confer with the commander of the department and to 
unite with him in honoring the occasion in question. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Hon. E. M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War. 



Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, S. C. , Api*il 5, 1865. 

By order of his Excellency President Lincoln, the flag of the Union 
that was hauled down at Fort Sumter on the 14th of April, 1861, is to 
be restored to its place by Major-General Anderson on the next anni- 
versary of that event. 

The naval forces at Charleston, and myself, are invited to par- 
ticipate. 

Conformably to the above, the United States vessels Pawnee, Tus- 
carora* Sonoma, Passaic, Catskitt, Adams, and such others as can be 
spared, will take position as hereafter directed, near Fort Sumter, by 
6 o'clock the morning of the 14th. 

As soon as the ceremony begins in the fort, each vessel will dress 
full, in colors. 



316 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

When the flag is hoisted on Sumter, each vessel will man yards or 
rigging, if without yards and then give three cheers; then lay in and 
down, which having been done, each vessel will fire a salute of 100 
guns, beginning with the senior ship's first gun, and not continuing 
after her last gun. 

A body of seamen and marines will be landed under the command 
of Lieutenant-Commander Williams, who is the only officer present of 
those who led the assault on Sumter, which 1 ordered, September 9, 
1863, and will, therefore, represent the officers and men of that 
column. 

The various details will be regulated by Fleet Captain Bradford. 

All the officers of the squadron who can be spared from duty are 
invited to be present and to accompany me to the Fort on that 
occasion. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, C&mdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Major-General Oillmore, TJ. S. Army. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, April 10, 1865. 

SIR: In a communication from you of the 6th instant, 1 am invited 
to appoint a chaplain of the Navy to offer the closing prayer at Fort 
Sumter on the 14th instant, and Chaplain Blake has accordingly been 
designated. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- A dmiral, Commanding. 
Major-General QUINCT A. GILLMORE, 

Commanding Department of the South. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Commander Thomp- 
son, tT. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Ctmarron, to perform duty 
connected with the exchange of prisoners at Darien, Oa. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, April 15, 1865. 

SIR: 1 am informed by General Gillmore that the rebel authorities 
failed in their engagement for exchange at Darien, [Ga.], on the 8th, 
and he therefore requests that the Cimarron may remain there a few 
days and report the arrival of the Union soldiers if an} 7 arrive. 

You will therefore remain near Darien for ten days after the receipt 
of this, and in case of the arrival of the prisoners for exchange you 
will immediately proceed to the commanding-general at Port Royal. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Commanding. 
Commander EGBERT THOMPSON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Cimarron. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



317 



Letter from Rear- Admiral Dahlgrcn, U. 8. Navy, to Major- General 
Gilimore, U. 8. Army, regarding measures of cooperation in the 
defense of Fernandina. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor. April 15, 1865. 

SIR: I have received yours of the 13th instant, stating that an attack 
was expected at an -early day on Fernandina, and asking that a gun- 
boat be stationed at that place. 

I have ordered the Sonoma to Fernandina to assist in the defense of 
the place, and remain, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Sear-Admiral, Commanding. 
Major-General Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Commanding Department of tJie South. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

April 15, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


Acacia 


5 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master W. Barrymore 


Charleston, repairing. 


*Adams . 


8 


Sloop-of-war 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. Alvin Phinney. 


Do. 


*Allen 


10 


(ordnance). 
Bark 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. I. A. Pennell 


St. Simon's. 


Amaranthus. 




Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign W. R. Cox 




Arethusa 


t2 


do . .. 


Actg. Ensign J. V. Cook 


Port Royal. 


Azalea 


2 


do 


Actg. Master F. W. Strong 




*Bruen 


2 


Schooner 


Actg Master W F Redding 


Charleston. 


*Blunt 


2 


(stores). 






Cimarron . . 


5 


do 

S ide-whee 1 


Actg. Ensign G. G. Curtis 
Comdr. Egbert Thompson 


Charleston divers. 
Altamaha. , 


Catalpa 


ts 


gunboat. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Allen K. Noyes 


Georgetown. 


Camelia 


t2 


do 


Actg. Ensign David B. Hawes 


Charleston. 


Carnation 


t 9 


do 


Actg E n sign Wm. Boyd 


Port Royal. 


Clover. . 


f2 


. .. do 


Actg Ensign Ben j. Mitchell 


Charleston. 


Chatham 




Sid e-wheel 


Mate Geo. W. Post 


Port Royal. 


*Chambers 


7 


tug. 
S c h oon e r 


Actg. Master Wm. Watson 


Do. 


Canonicus 


2 


(ordnance). 
Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. G. E. Belknap 


Do. 


Cambridge 


10 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. J. F. Nickels . . . 


Ossabaw, disabled. 


Chenango 


10 


S ' d e-w h ee 1 


Lieut. Comdr. G. U. Morris 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Dandelion 


*2 


steamer, 
bcrew tug ... 


Actg Ensign G W. Williams 


Charleston. 


Daffodil . 


t'' 


Side-whee 1 


Actg Master Wm H. Mallard . 


Santee. 


Donegal 


3 


tug. 
Sid e-wheel 


Actg Vol Lieut. Geo. D.Upham. 


Charleston. 


Flambeau . 


5 


steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Actg Vol Lieut Ed Cavendy . 


Port Royal. 


*Gemsbok 


7 


Bark 


Actg Master J F Winchester 


Doboy Sound. 


Geranium 


f3 


Sid e-w heel 


Actg Ensign David Lee 


Charleston. 


Gladiolus 


t3 


tug. 
Screw tug 


Actg Ensign N Boughton 


Do 


*Griffith 


3 


Schooner 


Actg. Master James Ogilvie 


Wassaw Sound. 


*G. W. Rodgers 




(mortar). 
Schooner 


Actg. Master L. G. Emerson 


Ossabaw Sound. 


Harvest Moon 




Side-w heel 


Actg Master J. K. Crosby 


Georgetown, wreck. 


Home 


f3 


steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Sanford S Miner 


Charleston. 


Hydrangea 


2 


(hospital). 
Screw tug 


Actg Master Chas W. Rogers 


Georgetown. 


*Houghton 


6 


Bark (c o n- 


Actg Master E G Furber 


Port Roval. 


*Hope 


1 


demned). 
Schooner 


Actg Vol Lieut W. L. Churchill 


Charleston divers. 


Iris 


t2 


Screw tug 


Actg Master J E Sticknev . 


Charleston. 


Juniata 


13 




Commander J J Almy 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Jonquil 


f2 




Mate R Williams 


Charleston. 


Catskill 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut Comdr Ed Barrett 


Do 


. Laburnum . . 


M 


Screw tue . . 


Acts. Ensira Stureis Center ... 


Do. 



* Sailing vessels. 



f Howitzers. 



318 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, April 15, 1865 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer, 


Present duty or station. 


Larkspur 


fa 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Wm. Nelson 


Port Royal. 


*Lightning 




Schooner 




Wassaw. 


Mingoe 


11 


(tender). 
Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. S. P. Qupcken- 


Georgetown. 


McDonough 


6 


steamer. 
do 


bush. 
Actg. Master Wm. Knapji 


Stono. 


Mab 




Sid e-w heel 




Charleston captured 




2 


(tender). 
Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. R. F. R. Lewis. . 


Port Roval repairing 


Nahant 


2 


do 


Lieut. Comdr. E. P. Williams... 


Do. 




10 


Ship, stores 


Comdr Wm. Reynolds 


Port Royal. 




6 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Wm. H. De Wolf 


St. John's. 


*Norfolk Packet 


6 




Actg. Master G. W. Wood 


Ossabaw. 


Ottawa 


5 


mortar. 
Screw g 11 n- 


Lieut. Comdr. James Stillwell .. 


St. John's. 


*Orvetta 




boat. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master Wm. Fales 


Charleston. 


Oleander ... . 


f2 


stores. 
Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Master R. P. Walter . ... 


Carrying stores. 


Passaic 


2 


tug. 
Monitor 


Lieut. Smith W. Nichols 


Charleston. 


Pawnee 


18 


Screw sloop . . 


Lieut. Wm. Whitehead 


Do. 




11 


Side-whee 1 


Lieut. Comdr. S. B. Luce . . 


Savannah River. 


Potomska 


6 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master F. M. Montell... 


Cooper River. 


Philadelphia 


fl 


Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. T. Gillespie. 


Charleston, flag- 


Pettit 


2 


steamer. 
Side-wh eel 


Actg. Master Chas. Grieve 


steamer. 
Port Roval. 


*Para 


7 


tug. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master Geo. Ashburv 


Ossabaw. 


*Percy Drayton 




mortar. 
Sloop, tender . 




North Edisto. 


*Racer 


3 


Schooner 


Actg. Master E G Martin 


Tybee. 


Sonoma 


8 


mortar. 
Sid e-w heel 


Lieut. Comdr. T. S. Fillebrown . 


Charleston. 


Sanford 


5 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Z. Kempton 


Carrying stores. 


Sweet Brier 


f2 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master Wm Bailey 


Georgetown. 


*Smith 


5 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master B. Van Voorhis 


Charleston. 


*Swift 




mortar. 
Schooner 




Port Royal. 


*Thinider 




tender. 
Sloop, tender 




Tybee. 




10 




Comdr J M Frailev 


Charleston. 


*Valparaiso . . 




Hulk (hospi- 


Actg. Master H. S. Blanchard 


Port Royal. 


Wissahickon 


5 


tal). 
Screw gun- 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W Johnson 


Stono. 


Winona 


6 


boat, 
do 


Actg. Comdr. Wm. H Dana 


Georgetown. 


Wamsutta 


6 


Screwsteamer 


Actg. Master Chas. W. Lee 


Charleston. 


Wando 


3 


Side-wheel 


Actg. Master Fredk T King 


Do. 


*Williams 


6 


steamer. 
Schooner 


Actg Master G. W Parker 


Do. 


*Ward 


5 


mortar, 
do 


Actg. Master C C JRicker 


Light-House Inlet. 


*VVild Cat 




Schooner 




Transferred to the 


Adger 


8 


tender, 
Sid e-w heel 


Comdr. T. H. Patterson 


Army. 
Ordered North. 


Hale 


6 


steamer. 
Screwsteamer 


Actg Master C. F. Mitchell 


Do. 


Lodona 


7 


.... do 


Actg. Vol. Lieut R P. Swann . . 


Do 


*St Louis 


19 


Sailing sloop 


Actg. Master Benj Dyer 


Do. 













1 Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



J. A. DAHLGREN. 

Rear -Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



General order No. 39 of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, 
announcing the death of President Abraham Lincoln. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Horlor, S. C., April 19, 1865. 

A grievous affliction has fallen upon the nation President Lincoln 
has been assassinated. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 319 

The vessels of this command will wear their colors half-mast until 
further orders. 

On the receipt of this order twenty-one minute guns will be fired 
from every vessel in the squadron, beginning with the senior vessel, 
each vessel following in the order of seniority. The minute guns will 
be repeated at sunset. 

The officers will also wear crape on the left arm. 

Other orders will be issued by the Navy Department. The sorrow 
we all feel for our loss indicates the above as the first proper mani- 
festation. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Major- General Gill/more, U. S. Army, to Rear- Admiral 
Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, announcing a general suspension of hos- 
tilities. 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT or THE SOUTH, 

Hilton Head, S. C., April 21, 1865. 

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to inform you that I have received dis- 
patches from Major-General Sherman, dated the 19th instant, inform- 
ing me that he has entered into a convention with General Johnston, 
whereby all the Confederate armies are to be disbanded, and a general 
suspension of hostilities is agreed upon until terms are approved at 
Washington. I am directed by him to cease all further destruction 
of public and private property, and to make dispositions looking to a 
general peace. General Sherman was, at the date of his dispatches, 
at Raleigh, N. C. 

very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Q. A. GILLMORE, 
Major- General, Commanding. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Repoi^t of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding regula- 
tions observed on receipt of the news of the death of President 
Abraham Lincoln. 

No. 163. J FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, April #0, 1865. 

SIR: The mail by the Fulton reached me on the 19th, with tidings 
of the atrocious murder by which the country has lost its Chief 
Magistrate. 

It is needless for me to say that it produced a sensation of indigna- 
tion and grief as universal as it was profound and sincere, far exceed- 
ing anything I have before witnessed. 

Not having the regulations of the Department in relation to such an 
event, I caused the colors to be half-masted and twenty-one minute 
guns to be fired from each vessel present, beginning immediately on 
receipt of the intelligence. 

I now perceive that this has been in excess of the regulations, but 
on such a melancholy occasion it seemed that hardly any manifesta- 



320 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

tion would express what was felt. We were, moreover, in presence 
of the place where the rebellion had its origin and most intense devel- 
opment. Wherever minute guns have not been fired the directions 
will, however, be carried out exactly. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgrm, U. S. Navy, regarding the arrival 
of the U. S. S. Calypso at Charleston, S. C. 

No. 166.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, April , 1865. 

SIR: I have to announce the arrival here of the U. S. S. Calypso, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Stodder, commanding. 

She has been assigned to duty on this station, conformably to your 
orders. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear -Admiral Daltlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding Confederate 
vessels appropriated for naval use upon the occupation of Charleston. 

No. 167.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, April &, 1886. 

SIR: The following-named vessels, found here upon the occupation 
of this place by the Union forces, are now in use by the Navy: 

The Transport, a new light-draft vessel, high pressure engine, 
probably 40 tons burden. 

The Lady Davis, a very good iron-hulled vessel, no engine, suitable 
for stores; and the Mob, a very small steamer, comparatively worthless 
for important purposes, both in hull and engines, but useful in various 
small wa} r s. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of 'Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, to Lieutenant Hay ward, 
U. S. Navy, regarding transfer of command. 

APRIL 25, 1865. 

SIR: You are hereby detached from the naval battery, and will take 
temporary charge of the ironclad Columbia. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 321 

Acting Master Jos. E. Jones has been ordered to report to you for 
duty on that vessel. 

Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Lieutenant GEORGE W. HAYWARD, 

Commanding Naval Battery. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the further 
reduction of the squadron und^r his command. 

No. 176.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, April &5, 1865. 

SIR: In addition to the vessels reported to the Department as having 
been sent north or elsewhere under the special or discretionary orders 
of the Department, I have to report that the Adger, April 19, St. Louis, 
April 21, Acacia, April 2i, have sailed for Philadelphia. 

The Fahkee, Acting Master Webb commanding, arrived here this 
morning and has been assigned to duty on this station. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Confidential order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Lieu- 
tenant- Commander Luce, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Pontiac* 
to assume a position on the Florida coast to prevent the escape of 
President Davis. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, S. C., April 27, 1865. 
SIR: I have ever} 7 reason to believe that Jeff. Davis aad Cabinet 

will attempt to escape from the Florida. coast to Cuba. 

You will therefore proceed thither and be vigilant in examining 

the coast allotted to you, to ascertain the presence of any vessel that 

could serve the contemplated purpose. 

The station of your vessel will be from to - . Other 

vessels will be ordered to watch the same limits. The senior officer 

will take charge of all having such orders and distribute them so as to 

ensure success, if it is possible. 

I need hardly point out to you the interest that attaches to the duty. 

Catch the rascal, alive if you can, but he must not escape. 
Allow no foreign vessel to give shelter to him. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Captain LUCE, 

Commanding U. S. S. Pontiac. 

[Endorsement.] 

Coal, etc., can be procured at Fernandina, when needed. 

J. M. BRADFORD, 

Fleet Captain. 
N w R VOL 16 21 



322 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting 
I In in! I ton, U. 8. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Emma, to jyroceed to Key 
]V<xt as bearer of dispatcher. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, April 28, 1865. 

SIR: Proceed with the Emma, with all dispatch, to Key West and 
deliver the enclosed dispatch to Rear- Admiral Stribling. 

After which resume your station, reporting to the officer from whom 
your tirst orders were received. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 
Acting Master JAMES A. HAMILTON, 

Commanding U. S. S. Emma. 



Repoi^t of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding vessels 
captured by the United States forces upon the occupation of 
Charleston. 

No. 173.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor , April 28, 1865. 

SIR: When the naval forces under my command occupied this 
harbor several rebel vessels were captured, as follows: 

1st. The rebel ram Columbia, which was all ready for service, armed, 
manned, and steam up, but had grounded in coming out of dock, 
January 12, and was saved by us after much effort, has been floated 
on the 26th of April. She is 209 feet long (extreme), beam 49 feet, 
has a casemate 65 feet long, pierced for six guns, one on each side and 
one at each of the four corners, pivots to point ahead or astern and to 
the side. 

She has two engines, high pressure, and plated on the casemates 
with 6 inches of iron in thickness, quite equal, it is believed, to the 
best of the kind built by the rebels. 

2d. A cigar-shaped steamer 160 feet long, and said to be able to 
carry 250 to 300 bales of cotton, new, and may be ready for sea in 
two weeks. 

3d. Thvee torpedo boats, one of which is in steaming order, and the 
others will be so soon. 

ith. A light-draft side-wheel steamer, very convenient for carrying 
stores in harbor service and from place to place in the inland navi- 
gation. 

5th. A very little side-wheel boat (Queen Mob) fit for shoal water. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 323 

Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, enjoining vigilance in view of the rumored approach of the 
C. & & Stonewall. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, April %8, 1865. 

SIR: Information has been received from the U. S. consul at Tene- 
viffe to the effect that the rebel ram Stonewall left that place, where 
she obtained a supply of coal, April 1 at 6 p. m., and steamed away 
rapidly to the south. Her destination is believed to be some point on 
our coast, and everv precaution should be taken by you to guard 
against surprise and to prevent her inflicting serious injury should 
she make her appearance anywhere within the limits of your com- 
mand, and the best means in your power used to capture or destroy her. 
Very respectfully, 

G. WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear-Admiral Jxo. A. DAHLGREN, 

L 'omdg. South Atlantic Squadron, Charleston, S. C. 



Ord^r of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, 
U. S. Navy, to use every means to prevent the escape of President 
Davis. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, April 28, 1865. 

SIR: Lieutenant-General Grant telegraphs to the War Department 
under date of the 26th instant, from Raleigh, N. 0., that Jeff. Davis, 
with his Cabinet, passed into South Carolina with the intention, no 
doubt, of getting out of the country, either via Cuba or across the 
Mississippi. All the vigilance and available means at your command 
should be brought to bear to prevent the escape of those leaders of 
the rebellion. 

Very respectfully, 

G. WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 
Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdcj. South Atlantic Elockdg. Squadron, Charleston, S. C. 



Report of Rear-Admired Dahlgren^ U. S. Navy, transmitting copy of 
dispatch from Major- General Sherman, U. S. Army, ana, request- 
ing Departments instructions regarding measures for the capture of 
President Davis. 

No. 172.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, April 28, 1865. 

SIR: Yesterday about noon I received a dispatch in cipher from 
General Sherman, dated 25th instant, at Raleigh, a copy of which is 
annexed. 

And presuming that it would be agreeable to the Department that 
the object of that dispatch should be accomplished, I sent such vessels 
as could be spared for a while from the blockade in the direction indi- 
cated, viz, Flambeau, Calypso, Potomska; the Wando, Iris, Gladiolus, 
and Azalea will follow shortly, and also the Winona and Pontiac, mak- 
ing nine steamers in all. 



324 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Will the Department please to instruct me whether it desires further 
measures to be taken, or these to continue? 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosure. Translation of cipher.] 

HDQKS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, 

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April %5, 1865. 

I expect Johnston will surrender his army to-morrow. We have 
had much negotiation, and things are settling down to the terms of 
General Lee's army. Jeff. Davis and his Cabinet, with considerable 
specie, are making their way toward Cuba. He passed Charlotte, 
going south, on the 23d, and I think he will try to reach Florida coast, 
either Cedar Keys or lower down. It would be well to catch him. 
Can't you watch the east coast and send word round to the west coast? 

W. T. SHERMAN, 

Major- General. 
Admiral DAHLGREN, 

Charleston. 

Order of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to -Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant Upham, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Donegal, to 
cru'ise for first tidings of the approach of the C. S. S. Stonewall. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Cftarleston Harbor, April 29, 1865. 

SIR: Proceed to sea with the Donegal and cruise from Bull's Bay to 
the Savannah River. 

Keep under eas} r steam, and pass just so far from land as to see and 
make out the character of vessels passing inshore. 

The rebel ram Stonewall is at sea, and your object is to obtain the 
first tidings of her being on this coast and to make it known at Port 
Royal and here. 

She is said to go 10 knots, and be careful, therefore, not to get within 
her range, in case you make her out. 

When off Port Royal, go in, but stay no longer than needed to com- 
municate. As you pass up, and arrive at this bar, come in to report 
and be ready to go to sea immediately. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant GEORGE D. UPHAM, 

Commanding U. S. S. Donegal. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding informa- 
tion received regarding the movements of the U. S. /S. Stonewall. 

No. 176.] U. S. FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, April %9, 1865. 

SIR: I received yesterday a communication from the U. S. consul- 
general at Havana, that he had certain information that the rebel ram 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 325 

Stonewall, after leaving- Lisbon, went into Teneriffe, Canary Islands, 
on the 31st of March, and left on the 1st April, instant, destination 
unknown. 

We may next hear of her at some one of the Windward Islands, and 
then her course may lie toward our coasts. 

I have five monitors, but one of them is under repair (No-Kant), 
and the Canonicus has but one serviceable gun. Two are in this port, 
Catskill and Passaic, two at Port Royal, Canonicus and Nawtueket. 

There is no apprehension of the Stonewall venturing within range 
of either of these places, but if her speed is what it is reported to be, 
no one of these vessels could go out to sea and chase her about the 
coast. As it is generally believed that the rebel leader will try to 
escape from some part of the Southern coast, it is not improbable that 
the purpose of the Stonewall may be to receive him on board. 

The ram could always find a harbor at Havana or other port near 
the coast (ours), unless, indeed, there should be an apprehension of an 
aggressive movement on our part as a remedy. Under existing cir- 
cumstances, the United States would have little trouble in landing an 
army corps in Cuba, if it were deemed advisable. 

I have the honor to be. very respectf ully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Rep(wt of Rear- Admiral Dalilgren, U. S. Navy, transmitting copies 
of squadron orders enforcing the President's proclamation* regarding 
the closing of Southern ports. 

No. 175.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harlxw, April 29, 1865. 

SIR: I enclose herewith copies of squadron orders enforcing the 
recent proclamation of the President in relation to closed ports and 
foreign vessels of war, which last can not have, in my opinion, any 
business at these ports, and under existing circumstances should be 
restrained by motives of delicacy from making visits for other rea- 
sons, especially at Charleston and Savannah. 

In order to remove the ordinary pretext of desire to communicate 
with their consuls, 1 would suggest a revocation of the exequatur, as no 
trade can be carried on, the ports being closed, and the foreign sub- 
jects can communicate with the consuls of the nearest open ports. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, 3 T our obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[Enclosures.] 

GENERAL ORDER, ) FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

No. 44. \ Charleston Harbor, S. C., April 27, 1865. 

Whereas His Excellency the President of the United States has, by 
his proclamation of llth April, 1865, ordered that certain ports which 



326 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



have been temporarily relieved from blockade shall now be closed, and 
that all right of importation thereto shall cease; and further orders 
that while the said ports are so closed, any ship or vessel from beyond 
the United States, or having on board any articles subject to duties, 
shall attempt to enter such port, the same, with its tackle, apparel, 
furniture, and cargo shall be forfeited to the United States; 

And whereas the proclamation names the ports of Charleston, 
Georgetown, and Beaufort, in South Carolina, and of Savannah, St. 
Mary's, Brunswick, and Darien, in Georgia, and of St. John's and 
Jacksonville, in Florida, as included in the list of closed ports. 

And as all of these ports are within the limits of this command, 
therefore, all commanding officers of vessels in this squadron will see 
that the terms of the President's proclamation are strictly complied 
with, and will seize all vessels attempting to violate the provisions of 
the said proclamation. 

Vessels having supplies for the Army or Navy or other depart- 
ments of the Government will be required to exhibit proper evidence 
thereof. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN. 
Rear- Admiral, Coindg. South Atlantic Blockading /Squadron. 



GENERAL ORDER, ) FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

No. 45. j Charleston Harbvr, S. C., April 29, 1865. 

In case any foreign vessel of war should arrive near one of the 
ports closed by the Presidential proclamation and desire to enter, the 
senior officer will signify to the commander thereof that the port has 
been closed to all trade or external communication, save for naval or 
military purposes; and therefore no vessel, whether of war or com- 
merce, can enter or communicate except with the consul of the nation 
to which the vessel belongs, and that by a letter which will be for- 
warded, if placed in the hands of the United States senior officer 
present, for that purpose. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Distribution, of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

May 1, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Adams 


8 


Sloop of war, 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. A. Phinney . 


Charleston. 


*Allen 


10 


ordnance. 
Bark 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. I. A. Pennell . . . 


Ordered North. 


Amaranthus. 


}2 


Screw tug . 


Actg Ensign W R Cox 


Port Royal repairing 


Arethusa 


2 


do 


Actg. Ensign J. V. Cook 


Port Royal. 


Azalea 


2 


do 


Actg. Master F. W. Strong 


Cruising. 


*Bruen 


2 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master W. F. Redding 


Charleston. 


*Blunt 


2 


stores. 






Cimarron 


5 


Side-wh eel 


Commander Egbert Thompson . 


Do 


Calypso 




gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. L. N. Stodder 


Cruising. 


Catalpa . . 


-j-3 








Camelia 


|2 


do . 


Actg Ensign David B. Hawes 


Charleston. 


Carnation 


|2 


do 




Port Royal 


Clover. . . 


t'2 


...do... 


Acts:. Ensign Beni. Mitchell .. 


Charleston, repairing. 



* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



327 



Distribution of mirk of the Snntli .[thiiif!/- r>li><-};<;<l'n><j Sfjnndron, May 1, 1865 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


So. of 

guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 






s i dr-whce 1 


Mate Geo. W. Post 


Port Royal 




_ 


tug. 
Schooner, ord- 


Actg Master \Vm. Watson 


Do 




2 


nance. 

Monitor . 


Lieut Comdr G E Belknap 


Do 


Cambridge 


10 


Screw steam er 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. J. F. Nickels . . . 


Port Royal, disabled. 


Chenango 


10 


Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. G. U. Morris 


Port Roval, repairing. 


Dandelion . 


|2 


steamer. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign G. W. Williams 


Charleston. 


Daffodil 


|2 


Si de-wheel 


Actg. Master W. H. Mallard 


Port Roval, repairing. 


Donegal 


3 


tug. 
Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. G. D. Upham 


Cruising. 


Fahkee 


6 


steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Aetg Master F R. Webb 


Charleston. 


Flambeau 


5 


do 


Actg Vol Lieut E Cavendv 


Cruising 






Bark 


Aftg Master J F Winchester 


Doboy Sound 


Geranium 


t3 


S i d^e-w heel 


Actg. Ensign David Lee 


Charleston. 


Gladiolus 


|3 


tug. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign X. Bough ton 


Cniising. 


*<iriffith 


*j 


Schooner, 


Actg. Master James Ogilvie 


Wassaw Sound. 


G W Rodgers 




mortar. 
Schooner 


Actg Master L. G. Emerson 


Cruising 


Harvest Moon 




Sid e-w nee 1 




Georgetown wreck. 


Home 


fs 


steamer. 
Screw steam- 


Actg. Master S. S. Miner 


Charleston. 


Hydrangea. .. 


o 


er, hospital. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Master Chas. W. Rogers. . 


Port Royal, repairing. 


*Houghton . . 


6 


Bark (con- 


Actg. Master E. G. Furber 


Port Roval. 


*Hope . 


1 


demned). 
Schooner 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. L. Churchill. 


Charleston, divers 


Iris . 


f~ 


Screw tug 


Actg Master J. E. Sticknev .. 


Cruising. 


Juniata 


13 


Screw sloop 


Corodr J. J. Almv 


Port Roval repairing 


Jonquil 


f2 


Screw tug 


Mate Richard Williams 


Charleston repairing- 


Catkill 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut Comdr Ed Barrett 


Charleston. 


Laburnum 


t4 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign S. Center 


Do. 


larkspur 


f2 


do 


Actg. Ensign Wm. Nelson 


Port Royal. 


Liidv Davis 








Charleston, light-boat. 


*Lightning 
Mingoe 


]1 


Schooner, 
tender. 
Sid e-w heel 


Lieut. Comdr. S. P. Quacken bush 


Wassaw. 
G eorgeto w n . 


McDonough 


c 


steamer. 
do. 


Actg Master Wm Knapp 


Stono Inlet 


Mab 




Side-wheel 




Charleston repairing 


Xantucket 


r 


tender. 
Monitor 


Lieut Comdr R F R Lewis 


Port Roval repairing 


Nahant 


2 


do 


Lieut. Comdr. E. P. Williams... 


Do. 


*N~i-v. Hampshire 


10 


Ship, stores/. 


Comdr. Wm. Revnolds 


Port Roval. 


Nonvich 




Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Wm. H. De Wolf 


Ordered north. 


*N'orfolk Packet. . 


6 


S c h oon er, 


Actg. Master G. W. Wood 


Ossabaw. 


Ottawa 


5 


mortar. 
Screw gun- 


Lieut Comdr. James Stillwell 


St. John's. 


*Orvetta . 




boat. 
Schoone r, 


Actg Master Wm Fales 


Charleston. 


Oleander 


|2 


stores. 
Sid e-whee 1 


Actg Master R P Walter 


Carrving stores 


I 'as-air 


9 


tug. 
Monitor 


Lieut Smith W Nichols 


Charleston . 


Pawiici' 


18 


Screw sloop 


Lieut Wm Whitehead 


Do. 


I'ontiae 


11 


Side-w heel 


Lieut Comdr. S. B Luce 


Savannah River. 


Potomska 


6 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg Master F M Montell 


Cruising 


Philadelphia 


+1 


Side-wh eel 


Actg Vol Lieut W T Gillespie 


Charleston flag- 


Pettit.. 


r> 


steamer. 
Side- wheel 


Actg Master Chas Grieve 


steamer. 
Sunk in Savannah 


*Para.. 


r, 


tug. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master Geo. Ashburv 


River. 
Coast survev duty 


*Pi-rcv Dravton 




mortar. 
Sloop, tender 




North Edisto 


*Raoer. 


3 


Schooner 


Actg Master E G Martin 


Tvbee 


Sononm . 


8 


mortar. 
Side- wheel 


Lieut Comdr T S Fillebrown 


Fernandina 


SamYinl 


5 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg Master Z Kempton 


Port Roval 


Sweet Brier . 


t2 


Screw tug 


Actg Master Wm Bailey 


Georgetown 


*Smith ... 


\ 


Schooner 


Actg Master B Van Voorhis 


Charleston 


*Supplv 




mortar. 
Ship supplies 


Actg Master David G McRitchie 


Port Royal 


*Sophronin ... 




Schooner 


Ordered to West Gulf Squadron 


Do 


*S\Vllt 




Schooner 




Do 


*Thunder 




tender. 
Sloop tender 




Tybee 


Tuscarora .. 


10 


Screwsloon... 


C'ommander J. M. Frailev .. 


Charleston. 



* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



328 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, May 1, 18f>5 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Valparaiso 




Hulk, hospital 


Actg. Master H. S. Blanchard . . 


Port Royal. 


Wissahickon 


5 


Screw gun- 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Johnson 


Port Rovul, repairing. 


Winona 





boat. 
do 


Lieut. Comdr. Wm. H. Dana 


Georgetown. 


Wamsutta 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Chas. W. Lee 


St. Simons. 


VVando 


3 


Side-wh eel 


Actg. Master Fredk. T. King ... 


Cruising. 


*VVil)iams 





steamer. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master Geo. W. Parker 


Charleston. 


*Ward 


5 


mortar. 
do 


Actg. Master C. C. Rickcr 


Light-House Inlet. 













* Sailing vessels. 



J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Lieutenant- Commander de Krofft, 
U. S. Navy, commanding 17. S. S. Conemaugh. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 1, 1865. 

SIR: Proceed to sea with the U. S. S. Conemaugh and report to Rear- 
Admiral John A. Dahlgren for duty in the South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron. 

Very respectfully, 

G. WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 
Lieutenant-Commander J. C. P. DE KRAFFT, 

Comdcj. U. 8. 8. Conemaugh, Navy Yard, Philadelphia. 



Order of Commander Reynolds, U. S. Navy, to Acting Ensign Lawton, 
U. S'. Navy, to proceed to Savannah, Oa., in command of the prize 
steamer Amazon,. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, May 1, 1865. 

SIR: You will receive on board Pilot Crane, and as soon as your 
wheels are repaired so that you can move (without waiting for comple- 
tion of joiner work) proceed direct to Savannah, reporting first to Lieu- 
tenant-Commander Luce and then to General Grover, commanding that 
department, for such service as General Sherman may require of you, 
on the completion of which you will carry out your previous orders. 
Respectfully, 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Commander. 
Acting Ensign LAWTON, 

Prize Steamei' Amazon. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding matters con- 
nected with the escape of President Davis, and the rumored approach 

of the C. S. S. Ston,ewall. 

No. 181.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harhor, May 3, 1865. 

SIR: The U. S. S. Rhode Island has just arrived here, bringing to me 
two dispatches from the Department dated 28th April. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 329 

The Department has no doubt by this time received my dispatch, No. 
172, dated 28th April, containing information respecting 1 the rebel 
leader, similar to that transmitted by the Department; and also that I 
had detailed several steamers to cruise off the east coast of Florida and 
prevent escape in that direction. 

I also conveyed to Rear- Admiral Stribling, at Key West, the infor- 
mation I had received and the measures taken. 

On the same day, but too late for the mail steamer, information came 
to me by the Sanford from Havana that the rebel ram had left Tene- 
riffeon 1st April, and 1 submitted some suggestions as to her probable 
course. 

If the movements of this ironclad have any connection with those 
of the rebel leader, she will seek him at some place least liable to sus- 
picion, as far from an ironclad force as possible, and will probably leave 
as soon as the object is'accomplisbed. 

If, however, her object is merely to commit depredations in an}' of 
the ports in the United States, the place offering the greatest induce- 
ments would be Port Royal, where there is such a large amount of 
public property. 

The two monitors now there should certainly defeat that purpose, 
though neither of these vessels is in the effective condition that I 
should desire, if such an opportunity should occur. 

At Charleston there are two monitors. 

The fifth one is not now fit for service, being in the hands of the 
mechanics. 

Unless, therefore, the Department has more need elsewhere of the 
newer ironclads, I would suggest an exchange for some that are here. 

The navigation of the Savannah River is rendered difficult by the 
obstructions which are there, and the lower part is defended by the 
guns of Pulaski. 

1 should hardly expect, therefore, that the ram would venture in 
there, particular!}' as the ironclads at Port Royal are in very conven- 
ient distance. 

The vessels of the squadron which have not been detailed for the 
coast of Florida are distributed at various points, in order to have 
notice of the appearance of the ram, and to communicate the intel- 
ligence. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Nam/, to Commander Thomp- 
son, (I. S. Navy, senior office^ 1 " off Charleston, enjoining vigilance 
during the temporary absence oftheform,er. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, May 4, 1865. 

SIR: I shall be absent for a few days at Port Royal, which leaves 
you senior officer at this place. 

The inclosed order (48) will inform you of a contingency which it is 
proper to guard against. 



330 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

The two monitors should take a convenient position at the entrance 
between Sumter and Moultrie, and the Ctmarron will have a better 
view of vessels approaching if anchored off Cumin ing's Point, or even 
lower down. 

Be vigilant and allow no surprise; keep me informed of any impor- 
tant occurrence. 

Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding. 
Captain E. THOMPSON, 

Commanding Ctmarron . 

[Enclosure.] 

GENERAL ORDERS, { FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

No. 48. J Charleston. Harbor, S. C., May 3, 1865. 

The Navy Department again informs me of the movements of the 
rebel ram Stonewall, and adds: 

Her destination is believed to be some point on our coast, and every 
precaution should be taken by you to guard against surprise, and to 
prevent her inflicting serious injury should she make her appearance 
anywhere within the limits of your command and the best means in 
your power used to capture or destroy her. 

The Department further informs me that the rebel leader, Jeff. 
Davis, with his Cabinet, passed into South Carolina, with the inten- 
tion, no doubt, of getting out of the country, either via Cuba or 
across the Mississippi. All the vigilance and available means at your 
command should be brought to bear to prevent the escape of those 
leaders of the rebellion. 

The commanders of vessels stationed along the coast will use every 
means in their power to communicate to the ironclads at Port Royal 
and Charleston the earliest intelligence of any vessel approaching the 
coast resembling the StonewaU, and to prevent the escape of the rebel 
leader and his accomplices, It is difficult to fix upon any precise point 
where this vessel might be expected; but once seen, every effort should 
be made to spread the information among the squadron, and to bring 
the monitors within range of her, particularly to keep sight of her, 
so as to retain a knowledge of her locality. The Canonicus and Nan- 
tucket are at Port Royal, the Passaic and Catskill at Charleston. 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Commander Reynolds, U. S. Nairy, to Acting Ensign Tlad- 
field, U. 8. Navy, to proceed in command of steamer Governor Troupe, 
for transportation oj stores from Savannah to Augusta, Ga. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, May G, 1866. 

SIR: You will, as soon as the weather permits, proceed to Savannah, 
and report to General Grover for transporting stores, etc. , to Augusta. 
Keep the men from the Gemsbok on board the Governor Troupe; take 
good care of her, and retain the command until you are relieved of it 
by competent naval authority. 



SOPTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



331 



Report your proceedings to the admiral by every convenient oppor- 
tunity, under cover to ine. 

You can procure rations from the army, should you need them. 
Respectfully, 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Commander. 
Acting Ensign Jos. HADFIELD, 

In charge of Steamer Govern* Troupe. 



Order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to Acting Master 

Parker, U. S. Navy, commanding U. 8. schooner C. P. Williams, 

to proceed up the Coopei* River to restrict plundering of private 

property. 

CHARLESTON HARBOR, May 14, 1865. 

SIR: Proceed up Cooper River and anchor at a suitable place to 
observe and examine all vessels passing up and down. 

You will be careful to permit no plundered property of any kind to 
pass your vessel. If any such is found on board of vessels, you will 
seize it and return it to its lawful owners. 

Be careful to notify all vessels going up the river that they will be 
examined on their return, and must be prepared to satisfy you that 
they are engaged in a lawful trade, and must be furnished with a 
license from the military authorities. Should you be in doubt about 
the character of any of these traders, send them here in charge of an 
officer, with a statement of the reasons which induced you to do so. 

You must be vigilant and use your utmost power to stop the illegal 
plundering now going on in the river, and which is so disgraceful to 
all who are concerned. 

To preserve the health of your vessel, anchor as near the center of 
the river as practicable. Keep a watch on deck at night; do not permit 
the men to lie down or sleep on deck. Keep your awnings spread day 
and night. Keep your men out of the sun and rain, and expose them 
as little as possible to the night dews. 

You will be furnished with quinine, etc., which will be administered 
as the fleet surgeon will direct. 

Keep me advised of your movements. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Acting Master G. W. PARKER, 

Commanding U. S. Schooner C. P. Williams. 



Distribution of vessels of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron,, 

May 15, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Adams 


S 


Sloop of war* 


Actg. Vol. Lieut Alvin Phinney 


Charleston 


*Allen . . 


10 


ordnance. 
Bark 


Actg Vol. Lieut I A. Pennell 


Port Royal' preparing 


Amaranthus 


f2 


Screw tng 


Actg Ensign W R Cox 


to go north. 
Charleston. 


Arethusa .. . 


|2 


do 


Actg Ensign J V Cook 


Port Royal. 


Azalea 


t2 


do 


Actg. Master F. W. Strong 


Cruising. 



* Sailing vessels 



+ Howitzers. 



332 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Distribution of vessels of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, May l, r >, 1865 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Bruen 


) 


Schooner, 


Acting Master W. F. Redding. . . 


Charleston. 


*Blunt 


>> 


stores. 
do 


Actg. Ensign G. G. Curtis 


Charleston, divers. 


Cimarron 


5 


Side-wheel 


Comdr. E. Thompson 


Charleston 


Calypso 




gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Act. Vol. Lieut. L. N. Stodder.. 


Cruising. 




|3 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign A. K Noyes. 


Georgetown 


Camel i a 


t2 


do 


Actg. Ensign Wm. H. Bullis 


Charleston. 




} 2 


do 


Actg Ensign Wm Boyd 


Port Royal 


Clover 


f2 


do 


Actg. Ensign Benj. Mitchell. 


Charleston. 


Chatham 




Side- wheel 


Mate George W. Post 


Port Roval 


*Chambers 




tug. 
Schooner, 


Actg Master Wm Watson 


Do 


Canonicus 


o 


quarantine. 
Monitor 


Lieut Comdr G. E Belknap 


Do. 


Cambridge 


10 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. Comdr. J. F. 


Ordered north dis- 


Columbia. 




Ironclad 


Nickels. 
Lieut. Geo. W. Hayward . . 


abled. 
Charleston. 




10 


Side-wheel 




Ordered north 




t2 


steamer. 
Screw tug 


Actg Ensign G R Bailey 


Charleston 


Daffodil 


g 


Side-wheel 


Actg. Master John C. Hamlin. 


Port Royal, repairing 


Donegal . 


3 


tug. 
Side-wheel 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. Geo. D. TJpham 


Charleston. 


Fahkee 




steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Francis R. Webb.. 


Cruising. 


Flambeau 


5 


do 


Actg Vol Lieut. E. Cavendy 


Port Royal disabled' 


*Gemsbok 


7 


Bark 


Actg. Master J. F. Winchester 


preparing to go 
north. 
Do. 




|3 


Side-wheel 






Gladiolus 


t3 


tug. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign N. Boughton 


Cruising. 


*Griftith 


3 


Schooner 


Actg. Master James Ogilvie 


Wassaw Sound 


*G. W. Rodgers 




mortar. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master L. G. Emerson 


Cruising. 


Home 


|3 


Screw steam- 


Actg. Master Sanford S. Miner 


Charleston, light ship. 


Hydrangea 


f2 


er, hospital. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Master Chas. W. Rogers 


Port Roval, repairing. 




6 


Bark con- 


Actg Master E G Furber 


Port Royal 


*Hope . . . 


1 


demned. 
Schooner 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. L. Churchill. 


Charleston, divers. 


Iris 


|2 


Screw tug . . 


Actg. Ensign David B. Hawes 


Charleston repairing 


Juniata 


13 


Screw sloop 


Capt. J. J. Almy 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Jonquil 


f-2 


Screw tug 


Mate Richard Williams 


Charleston 


Catskill 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. E. Barrett 


Do. 


Larkspur 


t2 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Wm. Nelson 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Laburnum 


t4 


do 


Actg. Ensign Sturgis Center 


Charleston. 


Lady 








Charleston (light- 


*Lightning 




Schoone r , 




boat) . 
Wassaw Sound. 


Mingoe 


11 


tender. 
Side-whee 1 


Lieut. Comdr. S. P. Quacken- 


Georgetown. 


McDonough 


6 


steamer. 
do 


bush. 
Actg. Master Wm. Knapp 


Stono Inlet. 


Mab 




Side-w heel 




Charleston. 


Nantucket 


2 


tender. 
Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. R. F. R. Lewis... 


Port Royal. 


Nahant 


2 


do 


Lieut. Henry F. Picking 


Port Royal, repairing. 




10 


Ship, stores 


Comdr William Reynolds 


Port Royal. 


Norwich 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Wm. H. De Wolf . 


St. John's River; pre- 


*Norfolk Packet 
Ottawa ... 


6 



Schooner, 
mortar. 

Screw gun- 


Actg. Master Geo. W. Wood 
Lieut. Comdr. James Stillwell . . 


paring to go North. 
Ossabaw. 

St. John's River. 


*Orvetta.. 




boat. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master Win. Fales 


Charleston. 


Oleander 


t2 


stores. 
Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Master R. P. Walter 


Carrying stores. 


Passaic . 


2 


tug. 
Monitor . . . 


Lieut. Comdr. E. P. Williams 


Charleston. 


Pawnee 


18 


Screw sloop. . . 


Lieut. William Whitehead 


Do. 


Pontiac 


11 


Sid e-w heel 


Lieut. Comdr. S. B. Luce 


Cruising. 


Potomska 


6 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master F. M. Montell 


Do. 


Philadelphia 


fl 


Side-whee 1 


Actg Vol Lieut. W. T. Gillespie. 


Charleston, flagship. 


Petti t 


t 2 


steamer. 
Si d e-w heel 


Actg Master Chas. Grieve 


Port Royal. 


*Para 


6 


tug. 
Schooner 


Actg Master Geo. Ashbury 


Coast-survey duty 






mortar. 







* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 



333 



Distribution ofvexselx of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, May 15, 1865 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


No. ol 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*Percv Dravton 




Sloop, tender . 




Port Roval. 


*Racer 


3 


Schoon er, 


Actg. Master E. G. Martin 


Tvbee. 


Sonoma 


8 


mortar. 
Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. T. S. Fillebrown. 


St. Andrew's. 


San ford 


5 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Z. Kempton 


Carrying stores. 


Sweet Brier 


|2 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master Wm. Bailey 


Georgetown. 


*Smith'. . 


5 


Sc boon er, 


Actg. Master B. Van Voorhis 


Charleston. 


*Supply . 


6 


mortar. 
Store ship 


Actg. Master D. G. McRitchie. . . 


Port Royal. 


*Sophronia 




Schooner 


(Ordered to W. Gulf Squadron). 


Port Roval, repairing. 


*Swift 




Schr . Hend- 




Port Royal. 


*Thunder 




Sloop . / ers. 


{::::::::::;"":':::::::::::::::: 


Tybee. 


Transport 




Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Ensign J. A. Edgren . 


Charleston. 


Tuscarora 


10 


tug. 
Screw sloop 


Comdr. J. M. Frailey 


Cruising. 


*V r alparaiso 




Hulk hos- 


Actg. Ensign Wm. Brown 


Port Royal. 


Wissahickon 


5 


pital. 
Screw gun- 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Johnson 


Sapelo. 


Winona 


6 


boat. 
do 


Lieut. Comdr. Wm. H. Dana 


Cruising. 


Wamsutta 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master C. W. Lee 


St. Simon's. 


Wando 


3 


Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Master Fredk. T. King 


Cruising. 


*Williams . . 


6 


steamer. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master G. W. Parker 


Cooper River. 


*Ward . 


5 


mortar. 
. .do. ... 


Actg. Master C. C. Ricker. 


Light-House Inlet. 













* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



of Commander Reynolds, U. S. Navy, announcing the capture 
of President Davis and party. 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, May 16, 1865. 
SIR: I have just had this information by signal from Hilton Head: 

Jeff. Davis, wife, and three children; C. C. Clay and wife; Reagan, General 
Wheeler, several colonels and captains, Stephens (late Vice-President), are now at 
Hilton Head, having been brought here from Savannah this afternoon. 

They were captured by 130 men, Fifth Michigan Cavalry, 120 miles south of 
Macon, Ga., at Irwinville. They had no escort, and made no resistance. Jeff, looks 
much worn and troubled; so does Stephens. They go north in the Clyde as soon as 
she obtains rations. 

Captain [JESSE] MERRILL, 

Chief Signal Officer. 

I send up the Hydrangea with this intelligence, also with a Herald of 
the 13th instant, received from steamer Cosmopolitan, just arrived. 
The Stonewall arrived at Nassau, [New Providence], on the 6th May, 
and coaled. See Herald. The Chenango and Cambridge left this a. m. 
before the orders for them arrived. I return them. 

The Flambeau has got her propeller off, but will not come off the 
beach at this high water. 
Respectfully, 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS 

Commander. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



334 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 

Report of Captain Pickering, U. 8. Navy, regarding the assignment 
of the U, S. S. Tuscarora to act as convoy to the steamer William. P. 
Clyde in transporting President Davis and party. 

MAY 16, 1865. 

SIR: This morning, after the arrival of Jefferson Davis and A. H. 
Stephens and others at Hilton Head, Captain Kelly, quartermaster, 
enquired if he could have convoy for the Clyde while conveying those 
persons north. 

Commander Reynolds, commanding naval depot, referred this ques- 
tion to me, and considering the importance of securing a speedy 
transit of these captures to Washington, whither they are to go, I 
have directed the Tuscarora to proceed upon that service, and enclose 
a copy of the orders to Commander Frailey. 

I hope this course will meet with your approval. 

C. W. PICKERING, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 

Rear- Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Order of Captain Pickering, U. S. Navy, to Commander Frailey, 
U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. Tuscarora, to proceed as convoy 
to the steamer William P. Clyde. 

U. S. S. VANDERBILT, 

Port Royal Harbor, South Carolina, May 16, 1865. 
SIR: You will proceed with the Tuscarora under your command to 
convoy the steamer Clyde, having on board Jefferson Davis and family, 
A. H. Stephens, C. C. Clay, John H. Reagan, and other parties. 

The Clyde is bound to Washington. Convoy her up the Potomac 
River as far as your draft of water will permit. 

Report by telegraph and by letter to the honorable Secretary of the 
Navy by the earliest opportunity, and unless otherwise ordered return 
to this station and report to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren on your arrival. 
Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. W. PICKERING, 
Captain and Senior Officer Present. 

Commander JAS. MADISON FRAILEY, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. S. Tuscarora. 



Memorandum of 'instructions from Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, 
in view of the reported arrival at Havana, Cuba, of the C. S. raw 
Stonewall. 

CHARLESTON, May 20, 1865. 

I have just learned that the piratical ram Stonewall had arrived at 
Havana on the llth May. How long she may remain is not known, 
nor her probable direction when she leaves, but it is surmised that this 
may be along the Florida.coast. 

Two of the fastest light drafts will therefore return to that station 
and cruise so as to obtain the earliest notice of the presence of the 
ram there. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 335 

The Wnndo and Pimtiac are selected, one off the Jupiter Inlet, the 
other off Cape Florida, as the senior officer may find best, cruising 
toward each other. 

Should the Stonewall appear, the fastest vessel will keep her in view 
and watch her while the other steams directly for Port Royal, making 
course so as to fall in with the squadron cruisers, and give notice to 
them, which will then join in the observation of the Stonewall, taking 
care not to be overhauled by her. 

Off Port Royal send in word, if there are means to do so. Early 
information is to be sent me. 

The object will be to get her in reach of the monitors as soon as 
possible. Lieutenant-Commander Matthews will take charge of these 
vessels. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral. 



of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding certain 
vessels of his command. 

No. 198.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, Nay %1, 1865. 

SIR: The Conemaugh arrived and reported for duty, having a case 
of confluent smallpox on board; will be quarantined. 

The Emma has just arrived and reported. 

The Flambeau, Allen, Gemsbok, and Orvetta are about to leave for 
the north, and others unfit for service or needing much repair will 
follow. 

The Tuscarora left Port Royal on the 16th instant as a convoy to the 
U. S. transport Clyde, which last conveyed the captured rebel Presi- 
dent, Davis, his family, and other U. S. Government enemies to the 
north. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEOX WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



[Telegram.] 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, Nay Z%, 1865. 
(Received 8:20 p. m., May 25, via Fort Monroe.) 
SIR: The Columbia leaves here to-day in tow of Vanderbilt for 
Hampton Roads, as directed by the Department. I hop3 she will 
arrive safely. 

Rear-Admiral Godon arrived here on the 20th and left for Port 
Royal that evening. I gave him an order for the Canonicus and a ves- 
sel to tow her. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary Navy. 



336 



SOUTH ATLANTIC? BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlyren, U. S. Navy, regarding the Con- 
federate ironclad Columbia, in comparison with the Atlanta and 
Tennessee. 

No. 200.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, May 22, 1865. 

SIR: Conformably to the orders of the Department I send the rebel 
ram Columbia north, in tow of the Vanderbm. 

The pipes which had been cut and removed were replaced by yester- 
day evening. 

1 commend to the Department the care which Fleet Engineer Dan by 
bestowed on the vessel; first, in fitting the pumps to raise her, and 
then, in refitting her steam department. 

The master carpenter, Mr. Davies, and the divers under Lieutenant 
Churchill were very useful. 

On the solid judgment of Lieutenant-Commander Matthews 1 very 
much relied in the general charge of the operations. 

The Columbia appears to be a finer and larger vessel than any of 
the rebel rams. 

She is larger than the Tennessee, and had her casement clad with 
6-inch plating all around. 

The following are the general dimensions, etc. : 



Vessel. 


Extreme 
length. 


Extreme n^r* 
breadth. | Draft - 




Guns. 


Plating. 




204 

209 
216 


*41 

48 
51-1 


U| 

14 
in 


,/2 7-inch 


, 




1232-inch 




r f'27fiiich 


1 j 


Columbia 


\46-inch. .. . 




6 


6-inch 










Vessel. 


Casemate. Ports. 


Cylinders. 


Long. 


Wide, 
inside. 


End. 


Side. 


Diameter. 


Stroke. 


Atlanta 


130 

78f 
77 


30 
2SJ 
37 


6 
4 


6 
4 
6 


I 
1 
1 


9 inches 30 inch 


es surf, conducting, 
lonconducting. 
es nonconducting. 


Tennessee 


4 inches 7 feet i 











The appraised value of the ram is $282,675, and I hope she may 
afford some prize money to the monitors and others who have borne 
such labor in hard and continuous blockading with little of that pecun- 
iary consolation to relieve them. 

As the worms are said to have effected an entrance at the bilge 
when she grounded, 1 would advise that she be docked at once, or else 
sent farther north to prevent greater damage. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Commanding. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 337 

Report of Commander Reynolds, U. S. Navy, regarding the departure 
of certain vessels from Port Royal, S. O. 

9 

U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 

[Port Royal], May %3, 1866. 

SIR: Acting Rear- Admiral S. W. Godon left this p. m. in the /Sus- 
tjuehanna with the following vessels: Chippewa, Monticello, Monad- 
nock, Canonicus, Fahkee. 

He likewise left orders for the Wando to follow him as soon as she 
had coaled. 

The Conemaugh also left to-day for Sapelo. 
Respectfully, 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Commander. 
Rear- Admiral J. A. L)AHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding vessels 
acquired on the evacuation of Charleston. 

No. 225.] FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, - 

Charleston, S. C., May 23, 1865. 

SIR: I herewith enclose originals of survey and appraisement on the 
rebel ram Columbia, steamer Transport, cotton boat Preston, tugboat 
Lady Davis, and steamer Mob, all of which vessels were taken with 
the city of Charleston by the United States forces after its evacuation 
by the rebels in February last. 

These cases have been reported to the United States commissioner at 
Boston, and duplicates of the reports of survey and appraisement of 
the several vessels forwarded for his information. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



Report of Acting Master Strong, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. S. 
Azalea, regarding the seizure of the British brig Sarah M. Newhall. 

U. S. S. AZALEA, 
Tybee Sound, Georgia, May %3, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I have to-day seized as 
prize inside Tybee light-house, the British hermaphrodite brig Sarah 
M. Newhall, while attempting to run the blockade of Savannah, Ga. 

The S. M. Newhall cleared from Inagua, West Indies, on the 13th 
of May, 1865, ostensibly for New York, with a cargo of salt and West 
India produce. I enclose herewith a copy of the invoice of her cargo. 

In conversation with her captain, he stated to me that the report 
being current at Inagua that the southern ports of the United States 

N w R VOL 16 22 



338 8OUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

were open to commerce, he applied to the American consul at that 
place for a permit to clear for Savannah. The consul told him that 
he had.no official information of the fact or authority to do so, and he 
therefore cleared for New York, and ran in here upon his own responsi- 
bility. 

The 8. M. Newhall is of 133 T 8 /o tons register, apparently well found, 
built at St. Mary Bay, Nova Scotia, in 1858, and owned in Dig-by, 
Nova Scotia. 

Her cargo is invoiced as follows: Four hogsheads sugar, 3 barrels 
sugar, M barrels tamarinds, 130 hides, 9 puncheons molasses, 26 dozen 
goatskins, 10 tons iron, 5,000 bushels salt. 

Total value of invoice, $1,269. I have placed her in charge of a 
prize crew, with orders to proceed to Boston, Mass., unless otherwise 
ordered by Rear- Admiral Dahlgren. 

1 am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. W. STRONG, 
Acting Master, Commanding U. IS. S. Azalea. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, J). C. 

P. S. I should have added that the U. S. schooner Racer and U. S. 
S. Oleander were within signal distance at the time of the capture. 

F. W. STRONG. 



Report of Captain Pickering, U. 8. Navy, regarding the arrival at 
Ham/pton Roads of the Confederate ram Columbia, towed by the 
U. S. 8. VanderUlt. 

U. S. S. VANDERBILT, 
Hampton Roads, May 25, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to report the arrival of the U. S. S. Vander- 
~bilt at Hampton Roads with the rebel ram Columbia in tow. 

The Vanderbilt left Charleston Bar 8 a. m. of the 23d and arrived 
off Cape Henry at 3 p. m. of the 25th. 

Herewith I respectfully enclose a copy of my instructions from 
Rear-Admiral Dahlgren. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. W. PICKERING, 

Captain. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, requesting instruc- 
tions ^n the case of the British brig Sarah M. ATewhall, seized by the 
U. 8. 8. Azalea. 

No. 210.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, May 26, 1865. 

SIR: The Azalea has seized the British brig S. M. Newhall, from 
Inagua, whence she cleared for New York. 

The Savannah River being yet closed for foreign tirade, it is stated 
that the U. S. consul had refused a permit for that reason. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADKON. 339 

The captor put on board a prize crew with orders for Boston, which 
have changed to New York, that being the port for which she cleared. 
Will the Department give such orders as the case may require? 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Conidg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Letter from Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to the Superin- 
tendent Naval Academy, forwarding memorials of Confederate 

warfare from Charleston. 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, May 27, 1865. 

SIR: I have directed the Pontiacto deliver to you, for the collection 
of the Academy, several memorials of rebel warfare at this place, viz, 
a torpedo boat, being one of nine found here, and one of two that 
were raised by the squadron divers from the bed of the Cooper River, 
where they had been sunk just before we entered. It was such a 
boat as this that exploded a torpedo under the Ironsides on the night 
of the 10th of October, 1863, and afterwards menaced our vessels 
constantly. When ready for service it is immersed, so that only the 
upper part near the hatches is above water. 

The copper torpedo sent with it is carried on the end of an outrigger 
from the bow. It has several fuzes at the outer end, one of which is 
sent with it. The leaden cap is sufficient to resist an accidental con- 
tact, but is crushed by the impact of the torpedo boat under full way. 
Beneath the leaden cap is a large fulminating primer, called by the 
rebels "a sensitive tube," the lower end of which is in close proximity 
to a little charge of fine powder. 

The cast-iron shell is a sample of the torpedoes mounted on the end 
of heavy timber frames placed on the bottom of shallow channels 
obliquely to the approach of vessels. 

Several of the interior passages in this harbor were so defended. 

The fuze on this is precisely similar in principle to that just described. 

The barrel torpedoes were the most common and the most troubler 
some of all, because they were put down with such extreme facility. 
When filled with powder they float, but are kept down to a suitable 
position below the water by a sinker. The fuze is also similar to that 
described, and the impact of a heavy body like a ship striking or 
dragging over them suffices to explode them. 

The monitor Patapsco was sunk by one of them, and went down 
instantly, with more than half her crew. My own flagship was sunk 
in the same way. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commodore GEORGE S. BLAKE, 

Supt. and President Naval Academy, Newport, [S. /.]. 



340 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 



Order of the Acting Secretary of the Navy to Hear- Admiral Dahlgren, 
U. S. Navy, for a reduction in the number of vessels of the squadron. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, May 31, 1865. 

SIR: Reduce the South Atlantic Squadron to the following number 
of vessels with all possible dispatch, viz, 6 tugboats, 15 other steamers. 

You can have, in addition, such store vessels as may be required in 
connection with this force. 

Select the most efficient vessels for retention, and send to the Depart- 
ment a list of them. Send all the others to Philadelphia, New York, 
Boston, and Portsmouth, the monitors to Philadelphia. Several light- 
draft monitors will soon be sent to the South Atlantic Squadron. 

Fill up the vessels that remain as the fixed force of the squadron 
with their complement of officers and men. Retain for this purpose 
good volunteer officers, so far as possible those who wish to continue 
a while longer in the service, and send north all other volunteer offi- 
cers, for the purpose of being mustered out of the service. Of the 
men, send home those who have the least time to serve. 

In forwarding to the Department a list of the vessels retained, send 
with it lists of the officers of each and complete muster rolls of their 
crews, the latter to the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting. 

All property hitherto belonging to the rebel Naval Department, or 
that was under its control, will be taken possession of by you, and an 
account taken, with an estimate of the value thereof, and forwarded 
to this Department. If such property is in possession of the United 
States military forces, make a written request for it, and report your 
action to this Department, that the necessary orders may be given by 
the War Department for its delivery to the Navy. 

Economize in the use of coal, and give directions to all vessels to 
keep steam down, except in an emergency, of which the senior officer 
shall ]udge, under directions of the commander of the squadron. 

The title of the squadron under your command will hereafter be the 
"South Atlantic Squadron." 
Very respectfully, etc., 

G. V. Fox, 
Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

Rear-Admiral Jonx A. DAHLGREN, 

Comdg. South Atlantic Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

June 1, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns 


Class, 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


*[John] Adams 
Amaranthus 


8 


Sloop of war, 
ordnance. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. A. Phinney 
Actg Ensign W R Cox 


Charleston. 
Do 


Arethusa 


T2 


do 






Azalea 


T2 


do 


Actg. Master F W Strong 


Tybee. 


* [Sarah] Bruen 

*[G. W.] Blunt 
Conemaugh 


2 
2 


Schooner, 
stores. 
Schooner 
Side-wh eel 


Actg. Master W. F. Redding 

Actg. Ensign G. G. Curtis 
Lieut Comdr J P C de Krafft 


Charleston. 

Charleston, divers. 
Ossabaw 




5 


gunboat, 
do 


Commander E. Thompson 


Charleston. 


Calvnso . . 


7 


Screw steamer 


Acts. Vol. Lieut. L. N. Stodder. . . 


Port Roval. 



* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



341 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, June 1, 1865 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty or station. 


Catulpa 


13 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign A. K. Noves 




Oamelia 




do 


Actg. Ensign Wm. H. Bullis 


Port Royal 


Carnation 


tS 


do 


Actg. Ensign Wm. Boyd 


Do 


Clover 


K 


do 


Actg. Ensign Benj. Mitchell 


Charleston 


Chatham 




Sid e-w heel 


Mate Geo. W. Post 


Port Roval 


*Chambers 


7 


tug. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master Wm. Watson 


Do. 


Dandelion . 


n 


quarantine. 
Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign G. R. Bailev 


Charleston. 


Daffodil 


f2 


Side-wheel 


Actg. Master J. C. Hamli'n 


Savannah River 


Donegal 


3 


tug. 
S id e-w he el 


Actg. Master Geo. H. \verv 


Savannah flagship 


Emma 




steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master J. A. Hamilton 


Georgetown. 


Geranium 


+3 


Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Master Henry Pease . . 


Savannah 


Gladiolus 


3 


tug. 
Screw tug . 


Actg. Ensign N. Boughton 


Charleston 


*|John] Griffith 
* [George W.] Rodg- 


3 


Schooner, 
mortar. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master James Ogilvie 
Actg. Master L. G. Emerson 


Wassaw Sound. 
Fernandina 


ers. 
Home 


-f-3 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master S. S. Miner 


Charleston light ship 


Hydrangea 


f2 


Screw tug 


Actg. Master C. W. Rogers . . . 


Charleston 


*Hope 




Schooner 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. W. L. Churchill 


Charleston divers 


Iris 


t2 


Screw tug .... 


Actg. Ensign D. B. Hawes 


Charleston 


Juniata 


13 


Screw sloop . . 


Capt. J. J. Almy 


Port Roval, repairing 


Jonquil 


f2 


Screw tug 


Mate Richd. Williams 


Charleston. 


Catskill 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. E. Barrett . . . 


Do. 


Laburnum . 


|4 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Sturgis Center . 


Do. 


Liarkspur 


f2 


Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign Wm. Nelson 


Port Roval 


Ladv 








Charleston light-boat 


*Lightning 




Schooner, 




Wassaw 


Mingoe 


11 


tender. 
Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. S. P. Quackenbush 


Port Roval. 


[Com ] McDonough 


6 


steamer, 
do. 


Actg. Master Win Knapp 


Stono 


M.-i 1 j ' . 




Side-w heel 




Charleston 


Nan tucket 


2 


tender. 
Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. R. F. R. Lewis 


Port Roval repairing 


Nahant 


2 


...do 


Lieut. Henry F. Picking 


Do 


*New Hampshire 


10 


Ship, stores... 


Comdr. Wm. Reynolds 


Port Roval. 


Norwich. 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Wm H DeWolf 


Do 


*Norfolk Packet 


6 


Schooner, 


Actg. Ensign S. A. Dayton . 


Ossabaw. 


Ottawa 


5 


mortar. 
Screwgunboat 


Lieut. Comdr. J. Stillwell 


St, John's River 


Oleander 


f-2 


Side-wheel 


Actg. Master R. P. Walter 


Carrving stores 


Passaic 


2 


tug. 
Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. E. P. Williams 


Charleston 


Pawnee 


18 


Screw sloop 


Lieut. Wm. Whitehead 


Do 


Potomska 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg. Master F M Montell 


Do 


Philadelphia 


fl 


Side-wheel 


Actg. Vol Lieut W T Gillespie 


Do 


[O. M.] Pettit 


t2 


steamer. 
Side-wheel 


Actg. Master Chas. Grieve. 


Port Roval. 


*Para 


6 


tug. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Master Geo. Ashbury 


Do 


*Percy Dravton 




mortar. 
Sloop, tender . 




Do. 


*Racer 


3 


S c h oo n e r, 


Actg. Master E. G. Martin 


Tvbee 


Sonoma 


8 


mortar. 
Si de- wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. T. S. Fillebrown 


Port Royal 


[Mary] San ford 


5 


steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master Z. Kempton . 


Charleston. 


Sweet Brier .. 


t2 


Screw tug 


Actg Master Wm Bailey 


Do 


*[Dan] Smith 




Schooner 


Actg Master B Van Voorhis 


Do 


*Supply 


6 


mortar. 
Storeship 


Actg Master D G McRitchie 


Do 


*Sophronia 




Schooner 


Ordered to West Gulf Squadron 


Do 


*Swift 




Schooner, 




Port Roval 


*Thunder 




tender. 
Sloop, tender 




Tybee 


Transport 




Side-wheel 


Actg. Ensign J A Edgren 




Valparaiso 




tug. 
Hulk, hospital 


Actg. Master H S Blanchard 


Port Royal 


WiR.-3fthickr>Ti 


5 


Screwgunboat 


Lieut. Comdr A W Johnson 


Do 


Wamsutta 


6 


Screw steamer 


Actg Master C W Lee 




*[C.P.] Williams .... 
*[T.A.]Ward 


6 
5 


Schooner, 
mortar. 
Schooner . . 


Actg. Master F. W. Partridge 
Actg. Master C C Ricker 


Charleston. 
Light-house Inlet 













* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



342 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Detached to special squadron. Canomcus, Wando, Falikee. 
Preparing to go North. Bruen, Mingoe, Norwich, Polomxku 
ford, Pasmic, Sonoma, Smith, Supply, Wtlliams. \V!x>ili!ckon. 

Gone north since the 15th of May. Allen, CJienango, Cambridge, 
Columbia, Flambeau, Gemsbok, Iloughton, Orvetta, Pontiac, Winona. 
Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockdg. Squadron. 

[Hon. GIDEON WELLES.] 



Order of the Acting Secretary of the Navy to the commandant navy 
yard, New York, regarding the dispatchtng of the U. S. S. Squando 
for duty in South, Atlantic Squadron. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 2, 1865. 

SIR : Rear- Admiral Stringham has been instructed to send the 
Squando to New York. When she arrives, and is ready for the 
voyage, direct her to proceed to Port Royal, and order the Vanderbilt 
to accompany -her, giving her tow if necessaiy. The Squando will 
report to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren for duty in the South. Atlantic 
Squadron. Direct the Vanderoilt, after performing the duty above 
indicated, to report to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren for the purpose of 
accompanying to Philadelphia any o : the monitors to be sent to that 
port. 

Very respectfullv, etc. 

G. V. Fox, 

Acting Secretary Navy. 
Commodore CIIAS. H. BELL, 

Commandant, Navy Yard, New York. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the arrival 
at Port Royal of the U. S. S. Tristram Shandy. 

FLAG-STEAMER PHILADELPHIA, 
No. 222.] Charleston Harbor, June 5, 1865. 

SIR: Under date of June 4, Commander William Reynolds, com- 
manding naval depot at Port Royal, reports the arrival at that station, 
for coals, of the U. S. S. Tristram Shandy, from Fort Pulaski, whither 
she had conveyed Judge Campbell and R. M. T. Hunter. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the depar- 
ture from Charleston of certain vessels of his command. 

No. 228.] FLAGSHIP, 

Charleston Harbor, June 6, 1865. 

SIR: I beg leave to inform the Department that the U. S. S. Mingoe, 
Lieutenant-Commander S. P. Quackenbush, with a torpedo boat in 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 343 

>\v. and the mortar schooner S?nith, left the harbor this morning for 
the port of Philadelphia, and that I have dispatched the Sarah 
Bntenwith part of the armor plating of the ram Columbia to Fortress 
Monroe. The Bruw will sail to-day. 
I have the honor to he, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretai*y of the Navy. 



ear- Admiral Daldqren, U. S. Navy, regarding the wrecking 
of steam launch on St. Helena shoals. 

No. ^35.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor*, June 8, 1865. 

Sre: I regret to report to the Department the loss of the steam 
launch No. 3, attached to this squadron, and which was picked up off 
Wilmington, N. C., by the Flanibeau; she was wrecked on St. Helena 
shoals. A copy of the report of the officer in command is enclosed. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of tlie Navy. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. 
Navy, regarding the transfer of command of the South Atlantic 
Squadron. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, June 9, 1865. 

SIR: When your squadron is reduced to the number of vessels desig- 
nated in the order of the Department dated May 31, you are author- 
ized to proceed north, turning over the command of your squadron to 
the next line officer in rank to yourself, unless Acting Rear- Admiral 
Radford should arrive previous to your leaving, in which case you 
will turn over your command to him. A copy of his orders* are here- 
with enclosed. 

Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Seci^etary of the Navy. 

Rear- Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Squadron, CJiarleston, S. C. 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Nawi, advising the sale of 
certain prize vessels and others in Chf $ton Harbor. 

No. 236.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston Harbor, June 9, 1865. 

SIR: 1 forward the names of a number of small craft, prizes and 
others, which are no longer of any service in this squadron; in fact, 

*See series I, volume 12, p. 157. 



344 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

the preservation of them will become an expense. They might be 
sold here to advantage, viz: 

Swift, prize to the Patapsco; Coquette, prize to Dai Ching and 
Clover; Mail, divers' schooner; Percy Drayton, tender; Lightning, 
tender; Wild Cat, received from Admiral Du Pont; iLlvira, prize to 
the Chenango; Transport, Mai), captured with city of Charleston. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. 



Report of Lieutenant- Commander Quackenbush, U. S. Navy, regarding 
the loss of torpedo boat off Cape Hatteras. 

U. S. S. MlNGOE, 

Philadelphia Navy Yard, June 9, 1865. 

SIR: I regret to inform you that a torpedo boat which I took in tow 
at Charleston, S. C., sunk off Cape Hatteras at 6 p. m. on the 7th 
instant, in consequence of her ballast having shifted and her hatches 
not being calked in a manner to prevent her becoming filled with 
water. Had she been perfectly tight I would have had no difficulty 
in bringing her into port, but under the circumstances it was impos- 
sible to preserve her. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. QUACK ENBUSH, 

Lieutenant- Commander. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C, 



Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding the assign- 
ment of the captured vessel Lady Davis to the use of the Light-House 
Board. 

No. 242.] FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 

Charleston, S. C., June 14, 1865. 

SIR: The captured vessel reported as the Lady [Davis] has been 
turned over to the light-house inspector, at his request, for the use of 
the Light-House Board. 

She lias on board some 40 tons of shot and shell as ballast; this latter 
was also captured in Charleston. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfulty, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 

Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of tlie Navy, Washington, D. C. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



345 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 

June 15, 1865. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Class. 


Commanding officer. 


Presentduty or station. 


*Adams 


8 


Sloop-of-war, 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. A. Phinnev . . 


Charleston 


Amaranthus 


t2 


ordnance. 
Screw tug ... 


Actg Ensign W. R. Cox 


Do. 


Arethusa 


J2 


do 


Actg. Ensign J V Cook . 


Port Royal. 


Azalea 


|2 


do 


Actg Master P W Strong 


Port Royal, repairing 


*Blunt 


2 


Schooner 


Actg. Ensign G. G. Curtis 


Charleston, divers. 


Conemaugh 


<J 


Side-wheel 


Lieut. Comdr. J. C. P. de Krafft. 


Charleston. 


Canonicus. 


2 


gunboat. 
Monitor 


Lieut. Comdr. G. E. Belknap 


Port Roval. 


Cimarron 


5 


Sid e-w heel 


Comdr. E. Thompson 


Fernandina. 


Calypso . 


7 


gunboat. 
Screw steamer 


Actg Vol Lieut. L. N. Stodder 


North, special service. 


Catalpa 


j-3 


Screw tug . 


Actg Master W. L. Howorth 


Charleston. 


Camelia 


t'2 


do 


Actg Ensign Wm H Bullis 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Carnation 


t2 


..^..do 


Mate Albion Burnham 


Port Royal. 


Clover 


t2 


. ...do 


Actg. Ensign Benj. Mitchell 


Charleston. 


Chatham ... 




Side-wheel 


Mate Geo. W. Post 


Port Royal. 


*Chambers 




tug. 
Schooner 


Actg Master Wm. Watson 


Port Royal, quaran- 


Dandelion 


t2 


Screw tug 


Actg Ensign G. R. Bailev 


tine. 
Port Royal, repairing. 


Daffodil 


t'2 


Side-w heel 


Actg Master J C Hamlin 


Charleston. 


Donegal 


3 


tug. 
Side -w heel 


Actg Master G H Averv 


Do 


Emma 


8 


steamer. 
Screw steamer 


Actg. Master J. A. Hamilton 


Do. 


Fahkee 


5 


. .do. 


Actg. Master F. R. Webb 


North, special service. 


Geranium 


t-8 


Sid e-w heel 


Actg. Master Henry Pease 


Charleston. 


Gladiolus 


t3 


tug. 

Screw tug 


Actg. Ensign N. Boughton .... 


Fernandina. 


*Griffith . 


3 


Schooner 


Actg Master Jas. Ogilvie 


Wassaw Sound. 


*G. W. Rodgers 




mortar. 
Schooner 


Actg. Master L. G. Emerson 


Fernandina. 


Home 


t3 




Actg Master S. S. Miner 


Charleston light-ship 


Hydrangea 


tl 


Screw tug 


Actg Master C. W. Rogers 


Georgetown 


*Hope 


] 


Schooner 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. Wm. L.Church- 


Charleston, divers. 


Iris 1 


|2 


Screw tug 


ill. 
Actg. Ensign D. B. Hawes . . . 


Charleston. 


Juniata 


14 


Screw sloop 


Capt J J Almy 


Port Royal repairing 


Jonquil 


t2 


Screw tug 


Actg Ensign O H Hanson 


Charleston 


Catskill 


2 


Monitor 


Lieut Comdr E Barrett 


Do 


Larkspur 


|2 


Screw tug . . 


Actg. Ensign Wm. Nelson 


Port Royal, repairing. 


Laburnum . . 


f I 


do ... . 


Actg Ensign Sturgis Center 


Do. 


*Lady 








Charleston, light-boat. 


*Lightning 




Schooner, ten- 




Was-aw. 


McDonough . . . 


6 


der. 

Sid e-wheel 




Port Royal , repairing. 


Mab 




steamer. 
Sid e-w heel 




Charleston. 


Nahant 


2 


tender. 
Monitor 






*New Hampshire 
*Norfolk Packet 


10 

6 


Ship, stores... 
Schooner, 


Commander Wm. Reynolds 
Actg. Ensign C. Flood 


Port Royal. 
Do. 


Ottawa 




mortar. 


Lieut Comdr Jas Still well 




Oleander 


2 


boat. . 
Sid e-wheel 


Actg Master R P Walter 


Carrying stores. 


Preston 




tug. 
Cigar steamer 


Actg Ensign Wm Thomes 


Port Royal 


Pawnee 


18 


Screw sloop 


Lieut. Wm Whitehead 


Charleston 


Philadelphia 


f 1 


Side-w heel 


Actg Vol Lieut W T Gillespie 


Charleston flagship 


Pettit 


f-2 


steamer. 
Sid e-w heel 


Actg Master Chas Grieve 


Port Royal 


*Para 


6 


tug. 
Schooner 






*Percv Dravton 




mortar. 
Sloop, tender . 




Port Royal. 


*Racer 


3 


Schooner 


Actg Master E G Martin 


Tvbee 


Sweet Brier 


f 2 


mortar. 
Screw tug 






*Sophronia 




Schooner 


Ordered to the West Gulf Squad- 


Do 


*Swift 




Schooner 


ron. 




*Thunder 




tender. 
Sloop, tender . 




Tybee. 


Transport 




Side -w heel 


Mate C S Everdean 




*Valparaiso 




tug. 
Hulk hospi- 


Actg Master H S Blanchard 


Port Royal 






tal. 







* Sailing vessels. 



t Howitzers. 



346 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADEON. 

Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic, Blockading Squadron, June 15, 1865 Cont'd. 



Vessel. 


No. of 
guns. 


Clan. 


Commanding officer. 


Present duty orstation. 


Wissahickon 


5 


Screw gun- 


Lieut. Comdr. A. W. Johnson 


Charleston. 


*Ward 


5 


boat. 
Schooner, 


Actg. Vol. Lieut. C. C. Kicker 


Port Royal. 


Wando 


3 


mortar. 
Side- who el 


Aetg. Master Fredk. T. King 


North Edisto. 






steamer. 







* Sailing vessels. 



Preparing to go north. Norfolk Packet, T. A. Ward^ Ottawa, 
Pawnee, Iris, Canonicus, Azalea, Para, Preston, Wissahickon, Gera- 



II HI III. 



Gone north since the 1st of June. Bruen, Mingoe, Nantucket, Nor- 
wich, Passaic, Potomska, Sonoma, Sanford, Smith, Supply, Wamsutta, 
Williams. 

Preparing for foreign service. Juniata. 
Very respectfully, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, ^Commanding South Atlantic Squadron . 

[Hon. GIDEON WELLES.] 



Report of Acting Master Montell, V. S. Navy, regarding cotton found 
on the schooner Charlotte, captured in Cooper River. 

U. S. SHIP JOHN ADAMS, 
Charleston Harbor, /S. C. , June 15, 1865. 

SIR: I would most respectfully report that, while doing duty up 
Cooper River in March last, I captured the schooner Charlotte, loaded 
with wood, and sent her down to Charleston to Captain Ridgely, then 
senior officer present. 1 have since ascertained that there was found 
on board of her about 3 bales of cotton, which was shipped north per 
U. S. S. Massachusetts. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

F. M. MONTELL, 
Acting Master, U. S. Navy. 

Rear-Admiral JOHN A. DAHLGREN, 

Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 



Letter from Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, to the prize com- 
missioner at Boston, regarding the steamer Transport. 

. FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, S. C. , June 16, 1865. 

SIR: I herewith enclose for your information duplicate receipt of 
Lieutenant Henry Hagens, acting assistant quartermaster, U. S. 
Army, for the Northern District of the Department of the South, for 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 347 

tlio >toamer known as the Transport, captured on the evacuation of 
Charleston, and heretofore reported for adjudication. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear- Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 

Commodore JOHN POPE, 

Prize Commissioner, Boston, Mass. 



Report of Commander Reynolds, U. S. Navy, transmitting copy of 
order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. 8. Navy, transferring the com- 
mand of tlie South Atlantic Squadron. 

U. S. S. DONEGAL, 
Charleston, S. C. , June 18, 1865. 

SIR: I enclose herewith a copy of an order from Rear- Admiral John 
A. Dahlgren, transferring to me the command of the South Atlantic 
Squadron. 

I shall return to Port Royal this p. m. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. REYNOLDS, 

Commander and Senior Officei* Present. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosure.] 

FLAGSHIP PHILADELPHIA, 
Charleston Harbor, S. C. , June 17, 1865. 

SIR: Conformably to the authority given by the Navy Department, 
in case of the nonarrival of Rear- Admiral Radford. I transfer to you 
the command of the South Atlantic Squadron. 

The number of steamers had been reduced below the number fixed 
by the Department before I received its order; but the number of tugs 
will require further reduction. 

1 will take with me the Pawnee, Geranium, and Iris. 
Enclosed is a list of the squadron, showing what vessels remain, and 
their stations, together with the disposition contemplated of the 
surplus tugs. 

Muster rolls of the officers are also enclosed, and are to be forwarded 
to the Navy Department: those of the men require more time, and 
should be ready by the time Rear-Admiral Radford arrives; they are 
to be forwarded to the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting. 

An enquiry has been ordered to ascertain the propert}^ that belonged 
to the rebel Navy Department, in order to comply with the directions 
of the Navy Department. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, Commanding. 
Commander WM. REYNOLDS, 

flagship. 



348 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADBON. 

Report of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, U. S. Navy, regarding matters 

pertaining to the South Atlantic Squadron at the time of his with- 
drawal from command. 

FLAGSHIP PAWNEE, 
Of Washington City, June 21, 1865. 

SIR: Conformably to the authority granted by the Department's 
communication of the 9th of June, I left Charleston on the 17th June 
and arrived here to-day. 

The Department's direction of the 31st only reached me on the 14th 
June, witn those of the 9th. 

Under a previous order to send home vessels that needed much 
repair, or were inefficient, I had sent home so many vessels (list 
annexed A) that the force was reduced below the number of steamers 
(15) fixed by the Department. 

Under the orders of the Department to approve of all volunteer res- 
ignations, and to allow those to return who did resign, it may not have 
been possible to preserve to the remaining vessels their exact comple- 
ment of officers, but they are not probably very far from what they 
should be. 

There is no deficiency of men in the squadron at present, but the 
return of those having only three months to serve, and of tho.se whose 
times are out and will be condemned by medical survey, will soon leave 
none to supply deficiencies. 

A list of vessels remaining on the station is annexed (B), from 
which the Department will perceive that the number of tugs remain- 
ing exceeds that designated by the Department. 

I bring home two, Geranium and Iris, as samples of those which 
have proved most useful for the squadron service Geranium (side- 
wheel) and Iris (screw) and commend them to the notice of the 
Department. 

The least efficient of the other tugs will be sent north as soon as 
they can be refitted, some needing much repair even for the trip. 

In order to comply with the directions of the Department respecting 
the property that may have belonged to or controlled by the rebel 
Navy, it was necessary to institute an enquiry, which 1 have done; it 
will report when it has concluded. What was on the water I have 
already taken; but there is believed to be some ashore. 

The Department will perceive by order No. 58 that I began to 
economize the use of coal at an early date. 

As the Pawnee required extensive repairs and my own flagship was 
not seaworthy, I shifted my flag to the Pawnee, in order to return 
north. 

The following officers of 'my staff accompany me: 

Fleet Captain J. M. Bradford, Fleet Surgeon William Johnson, 
Fleet Engineer Robert Danby; Aid, Lieutenant-Commander Mat- 
thews; Aid, Ensign E. J. Dichman; Fleet Pilot William Haffards, 
Acting Assistant Paymaster Charles Cowley, Admiral's Secretary 
H. L. Peterson, Acting Ensign Walter Cooper, Acting Ensign John 
McNally, Fleet Captain's Clerk C. W. Ames. 

Fleet Paymaster Watmough has been ordered to Philadelphia, with 
instructions to report to the Department for further orders, and Flag 
Lieutenant James O'Kane has been ordered to Boston in connection 
with the proceedings pending at the prize court there. He will report 
to me at this place when he has concluded. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



349 



Of these, all appointments made by me cease when my flag is hauled 
down. 

The other gentlemen desire such leave as it may please the Depart- 
ment to grant. 

As Rear- Admiral Radford had not arrived on the 17th, eight days 
after the date of his orders, and as the number of steamers had been 
reduced much below the limit assigned by the Department, and as 
some delay in repairs would be necessary in order to reduce the num- 
ber of tugs, I availed myself of the permission given by the Depart- 
ment and turned over the command to Commander Reynolds, the next 
line officer in rank to myself. 

A copy of the orders given to him is annexed. 

I enclose copies of my last general orders to the Department, Nos. 
64 and 65. 

I have the honor to be, .very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. DAHLGREN, 
Rear-Admiral, U. S. Navy. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Squadron, July 1, 1865. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 


Hydrangea .. .... 


Georgetown 




Catskill 


Charleston Harbor ... 




Calypso . . 


do 




Philadelphia 


do 




*Adams 


do... 




*Blunt 


do 




*Hope 


do 




Catalpa . 


do 




Mab 


.do 




Jonquil 




Preparing to go north. 


Clover 




Do. 


Home 




Quarantine and light vessel 


*New Hampshire 


Port Royal 




Conemaugh .... 


do 




Wando 


. ...do. 




Daffodil 


do 




Arethusa 


...do... 




Amaranthus 


do 




Laburnum 


do 




Three Newport boats 


do 




*Chambers 


. . do 


Quarantine vessel. 


*Racer 


Tybee 




Thunder 


do 


Tender. 


Griffith 


Wassaw Sound 




Lightning 


do 


Tender. 


Donegal 


Savannah River 




Cimarron 


Fernandina 




George W. Rodgers 


do 




Gladiolus 
Nahant .. .. 


St. John's 
Port Royal 


Repairing. 


Emma . . 


do 


Do. 


Sophronia... 


do 


Repairing, East Gulf Squadron. 


Preston 


do 


Repairing. 


Para . . 


do 


Do. 


McDonough 


do... 


Do. 


Pettit . 


do 


Do. 


Ottawa 


...do... 


Do. 


Chatham 


do 


Do 


Valparaiso 


do 


Hulk. 


Swift 


do 


Laid up. 


Percy Drayton 


... .do 


Do. 


Coquette . . . 


do 


Do. 


Mail 


do 


Do. 


Oleander 




Supply stores. 


Fahkee . . 




North, to tow monitor. 



* Sailing vessels. 



350 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Squadron, Julij 1, 1865 Continued. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 






With Rear-Adminil Dahlgron De- 


Wissahickon 




tached and sent north since last list. 
Do. 


Carnation 




Do. 


Larkspur 




Do. . 


Geranium 




Do. 


Iris 




Do. 


Canonicus . 




Do. 


Azalea , 




Do. 


Sweet Brier 




Do. 


Norfolk Packet 




Do. 


Ward 




Do. 


Dandelion 




Do. 


Camelia 




Do. 




Port Royal 


Preparing to go north. 


Para 


...do ... 


Do. 


Preston 


....do 


Preparing to go north to dredge. 




do 


Do. 


Juniata 




Left for other squadrons. 






. Do. 


Transport 




Transferred to Army. 









WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Commander and Senior Officer Present. 



U. S. SHIP NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
Part Royal Harbor, S. 6'., July 1, 1865. 

SIR: The following vessels have left for the north since the depart- 
ure of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren : 



Vessel. 


Date. 


Port left. 


Destination. 




June 19 


Port Royal, S. C 


Philadelphia Pa in tow of U S S 


Norfolk packet 
Azalea 


June 23 
June 27 


...do... 
do... 


Connecticut. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Boston, Mass. 




do... 


do 


Philadelphia Pa 




do 


.do 


Do 


T A. Ward 


June 30 


do. 


Portsmouth N H 




June 27 


do 




Camelia . 


July 1 


. .do 


New York 


Dandelion 


do... 


do 


Do. 











Very respectfully, 3 r our obedient servant, 

WM. REYNOLDS, 

Commander and Senior Officer Present. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Order of the Secretary of the Wavy to Acting Rear- Admiral Radford, 
U. S. Navy, regarding the further reduction of the Atlantic Squad- 
ron under his command. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 7, 1865. 
SIR: The Atlantic Squadron under your command will be reduced, 

with as little delay as possible, to ten vessels in all, which number is 

to embrace tugs, storeships, etc. You can select that number and send 

all others north. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 



351 



The workshops at Port Royal will be discontinued and all hired 
employes paid off and discharged. A passage north may be afforded 
to those wno desire it. 

The New Hampshire may be kept at Port Royal as a receiving and 
store ship. 

The men of the squadron must be used for putting such repairs on 
the vessels as they may need and which can be made without sending, 
them to a navy yard. 

The storehouses at Beaufort, N. C., will be discontinued. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

G. WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Rear-Admiral WM. RADFORD, 

Commanding Atlantic Squadron, Port Royal. 
Duplicate sent on the 10th instant. 



Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear- Admiral Radford, 
U. S. Navy, regarding a reduction in the number of the officers under 
his command. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, July 8, 1865. 

SIR: When the Atlantic Squadron is reduced to ten vessels, as 
directed by the Department in its instructions to you yesterday, or 
sooner if the services of those officers can be dispensed with, you will 
send home all fleet staff officers, except the following, which you. can 
retain on your staff, together with your secretary and clerk, viz, a fleet 
captain, a fleet lieutenant, and an acting ensign. 
Very respectfully, 

G. WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 
Acting Rear-Admiral WM. RADFORD, 

Uomjnanding Atlantic Squadron, Pm't Royal, S. C. 



Distribution of vessels of tlie South Atlantic Squadron, July 15, 1865. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 


Hydrangea 


Georgetown S C 




Calvpso . 


Charleston Harbor 




Conemaugh 


do 




*Blunt 


do 




Amaranthus 


do 




Catalpa 


do 




*Hope 


do 




Home 


do 


Repairing. 


Jonquil 


do 


Preparing to go north. 


Clover 


do 


Do. 


*Adams 


do 


Quarantine and light vessel. 


Mab 


do 


Surveyed and condemned. 


New Hampshire 


Port Roval 


Store vessel. 


Philadelphia 


do. I 




Wando 


do 


Leakv: surveyed and recommended 


Daffodil 


...do... 


to go north. 


Arethusa 


do 




Donegal 


do 




Laburnum 


...do 




Pettit 


do 




Three Newport bouts . 


do 





Chambers . . . 


...do... 


Quarantine vessel. 



* Sailing vessels. 



352 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Distribution of vessels of the South Atlantic Squadron, July 15, 1865 Continued. 



Vessel. 


Station. 


Remarks. 


*Racer ... ... 


Tybee 




*Thunder 


do 


Tender. 


*Griffith 


Wassavv Sound 




^Lightning . 


do 


Tender. 


Cimarron 


Fernandina . . 




*George W Rodgers 


do 




Gladiolus 


St. John's 




Emma 


Port Royal 


Repairing. 


*Sophronia 


do 


Repairing; East Gulf Squadron. 


McDonough . . . 


do 




Ottawa 


...do... 




Chatham 


do 


Repairing. 


Valparaiso . 


do 


Hulk. 


*S wift 


do 


Laid up. 


*Percy Drayton 


do 


Do. 


*Coquette 


do 


Do. 


*Mail 


do 


Do. 


Oleander 




Supply stores. 


Fahkee 




North to tow monitor. 


Catskill 




Detached and sent north since last 


*Para 




list: in tow of Connecticut. 
Detached and sent north since last 


Nahant 


Port Royal 


list. 
Preparing to go north. 


Preston 


do 


Do. 


Patapsco 


do 


Preparing to go north; dredge. 









* Sailing vessels. 



WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Commander and Senior Office?' Present. 



Letter from Acting Rear -Admiral Radford, U. 
General Gillmore, U. S. Army. 



Navy, to Major- 



PORT ROYAL HARBOR, July 26, 1865. 

GENERAL: By order of the honorable Secretary of the Navy I have 
assumed command of the Atlantic Squadron. The limits of the com- 
mand are from Cape Florida on the south to York River on the north. 
In consequence of the reduction of the squadron, lately ordered, I 
am constrained to withdraw the quarantine schooner Chambers from 
her station. She is to be sent north. 

I trust I need not assure you of my desire to cooperate with } 7 ou on 
all occasions when the service of the squadron under my command can 
in any way conduce to the public good. 

1 am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. RADFORD, 
Acting Rear- Admiral, Commanding Atlantic Squadron. 

Major-General Q. A. GILLMORE, 

Hilton Head. 



Order of Acting Rear- Admiral Radford, U. S. Navy, to Lieutenant- 
Commander de Krafft, U, S. Navy, regarding sunken property in 
Charleston Harbor. 

PORT ROYAL, July 26, 1865. 
SIR: You are authorized to make an agreement with Mr. M. M. Gray 

for raising sunken property belonging to the rebel Government in 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 353 

Charleston Harbor on a salvage of the net proceeds of the sale at 60 
per cent. 

You will be careful to see that private property is not interfered 
with; only such as the Government has a full claim to. 
Very respectfully, etc., 

WM. RADFORD, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 

Lieutenant- Commander J. C. P. DE KRAFFT, 

Commanding Con&rnaugh. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Radford, U, /S. Navy, regarding the 
number and condition of the vessels of his command. 

U. S. FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Port Royal, S. C., July. 27, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to state that I find a list of forty-four vessels 
(of all classes) in the late South Atlantic Squadron. 

But four steamers, the Calypso, Conemaugh, Donegal, and Emma 
(under repairs), and some of the tugs, are fit for service. The steam- 
ers above named (except Calypso) will be retained in the squadron. I 
am collecting the vessels as rapidly as possible at this place, when they 
will be ordered to fill up with all the provisions and ordnance stores 
they can stow and then be dispatched north. 

The Home, Chambers, and John Adams will take with them all the 
stores they can carry. 

The South Carolina (storeship) is being loaded with paymaster's 
stores for Philadelphia. The dredge Patapsco will go north in tow 
of the Hydrangea (tug); the boiler and crane will be ent in another 
vessel. 

I doubt if the Preston can be sold here. I think she was appraised 
far beyond her value, commercially. If not sold, she will be towed to 
Hampton Roads. 

The Philadelphia, side-wheel river boat, is represented as not sea- 
worthy; the Commodore McDonough as having her bottom where the 
copper is off badty eaten by worms; the 0. M. Pettit, side-wheel tug, 
as unsea Worthy; the Chatham, a prize steamer, of 2 feet draft, as 
unseaworthy. 1 would respectfully recommend the sale of these 
vessels at Savannah, where, in consequence of the scarcity of light- 
draft river steamers, I am under the impression better prices could 
be obtained for them than at a Northern port, and the risk and expense 
of sending them north would be avoided. 

The sloop Percy Drayton, a small vessel of about 20 tons, might be 
sold here; to send her north she would require a new mast. 

The hulk Valparaiso has been used as a smallpox hospital. She 
leaks badly, and is of no service at present. 

The Wando will be dispatched to New York to-morrow. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. RADFORD, 
Acting Rear Admiral. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

There are three Newport boats here which might be sold. For one 
have been offered. 

N W R VOL 16 23 



354 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

Report uf Acting Rear-Adaniral Radford, U. S. Navy, transmitting 
report regarding wrecks of blockade runners sunk in Charleston 
Harbor. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Port Royal, S. C., July 27, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to enclose herewith the report of Acting 
Volunteer Lieutenant William L. Churchill, in relation to wrecks of 
blockade runners sunk in Charleston Harbor. 

By the endorsement of Lieutenant-Commander de Krafft it appears 
that he considers it a waste of money to further pursue the work. 
Shall I break up the organization and order Acting Volunteer Lieu- 
tenant Churchill north ? 

By direction of the Bureau of Construction the senior officer at 
Charleston has been authorized to enter into an agreement with M. 
M. Gray, of Charleston, to raise sunken vessels, etc., on a salvage of 
60 per cent. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. RADFORD, 
Acting Rear-Admiral. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

[Enclosure.] 

U. S. SCHOONER HOPE, 
Charleston Harbor, 8. C., July 15, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have recovered everything of 
value from the wreck of the Beatrice and the wreck lying near her 
name unknown. I have also examined the wrecks of the Minlio and 
Prince Albert; find them sanded so badly that nothing can be recov- 
ered. There is still another wreck on Drunken Dick, said to be 
outward bound and loaded with cotton. She has been there a long 
time and her cargo is probably worthless. I have looked at her, but 
am not fully satisfied as to her cargo. Have made a partial examina- 
tion of the wreck of the Rattlesnake, lying near Breach Inlet. She 
is in the surf, and can not be worked to any advantage. 
Very respectful ly, your obedient servant, 

W. L. CHURCHILL, 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, Commanding. 

[Acting Rear-Admiral WM. RADFORD. J 



Report of Acting Rear-Admiral Radford, U. S. Navy, regarding 

propositions for raising sunken Confederate property in Charleston 

Harlor and its tributaries. 

FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 
Po7-t Royal, S. C., August 2, 1865. 

SIR: I have the honor to enclose herewith the proposition of M. M. 
Gray for raising sunken rebel property in Charleston Harbor and its 
tributaries, together with additional articles, to which Mr. Gray 
agrees. 

If these propositions should meet the views of the Department, will 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 355 

it be pleased to return them to me, and I will immediately enter into 
a contract with Mr. Gray for raising the sunken property. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. RADFORD, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 
Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, I). C. 

[Enclosure.] 

CHARLESTON, July 31, 1865. 

HON-ORED SIR: I Jaeg leave to renew my application and agreement 
to raise the obstruction in Charleston Harbor and tributaries that is: 
I agree to raise all rebel sunken property, 3 sunken rebel rams, Charles- 
ton, Chicora, Palmetto State, and 1 gunboat; 7 blockade runners, 2 of 
which are on Long Island Beach, 4 opposite Fort Moultrie, the other 
alongside Northeastern Railroad wharf; chain and boom obstruction 
from Moultrie to Sumter and Hog Island Channel; 3 bull tor- 
pedoes on Rebellion Road, on the following terms and conditions: I 
will furnish all the means and appliances for doing said work, giving 
the United States Government 40 per cent of the net proceeds, and 
reserving 60 per cent for myself. The sunken property raised to be 
sold from time to time as the commanding naval officer may deem most 
to the interest of the parties concerned, in order to enable me to prose- 
cute the said work. 1 agree to commence the work between the date 
of this agreement and the loth August, 1865, and complete it by the 
15th August, 1866. I also claim protection, as far as the Navy Depart- 
ment has the right to give, from all interference and intermeddling of 
all and any other person or persons in my prosecution of the within 
contract and profits arising therefrom. 

With considerations of great respect, } r our obedient servant, 

M. M. G RAY. 

Rear- Admiral RADFORD. 

[Endorsement.] 

JULY 31, [1865.] 

It is not to be understood that Mr. Gray expects or binds himself 
to raise any vessel entire, but to recover iron, machinery, and such 
property as can be recovered from them. 

J. C. P. DE KRAFFT, 
Lieutenant- Commander and Senior Officer Present. 

[Second endorsement.] 

The proceeds of the sale will be received by the agent of the Gov- 
ernment, who will pay amount to the value 60 per cent of the net 
proceeds of the sale, the remaining 40 per cent to be deposited in the 
public Treasury in the manner the Department may direct. 



Additional articles proposed by me, to which Mr. Gray agreed, 
July 31, 1865: 

That all property recovered is to be stored in a secure place, with- 
out cost of any kind to the Government, in charge of competent 
watchmen. The Government agent to have free access at all times, 



356 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

and to be kept supplied with lists of all property stored or recovered, 
and to be informed of all proposed sales. 

Bills of all expenses incurred in this work to be at all times open to 
inspection of Government agent, that he may be satisfied of the return 
of net proceeds. 

Government agent to be kept informed of all work in hand wnen 
it is completed in any locality and when any change of locality is 
proposed. All agreements for sale must be in presence of this agent, 
and previous to all sales notice must be published in a responsible 
paper in this city [Charleston, S. C.] for ten days in advance of sale. 
No sale to be valid unless in presence of the Government agent, who 
will certify to each sale, amount and kind of property sold, and amount 
of proceeds. 

The amount accruing to the Government from each sale to be 
deposited by the purchaser to the credit of the Navy Department, in 
such bank as may be designated (there being no public depository in 
this city) in presence of the Government agent, before the deliveiy of 
goods. 

In event of failure to comply with any of the articles of agreement, 
or diligently prosecuting it, the work to be suspended and this agree- 
ment annulled at the pleasure of the commander in chief, and all goods 
or property on hand to remain in the possession of the Government. 

J. C. P. DE KRAFFT, 
Lieutenant- Commands and Senior Officer Present. 



Report of Acting Rear- Admiral Radford, U. S. Navy, regarding 
general affairs of tlie squadron. 

No. 119.] ' FLAGSHIP MALVERN, 

Port Royal, 8. C., August 8, 1865. 

SIR: 1 have the honor to report that theU. S. S. Donegal and Emma 
have both been ordered north to tow the Philadelphia and Preston. 

I shall be one vessel short of my complement should neither of these 
steamers return, and I would respectfully request that the Department 
would be pleased to send me a moderate draft regular war steamer, to 
whose commander 1 might give the supervision of the southern por- 
tion of my command, from Savannah to Cape Florida. 

The bitter feeling known to exist between the white and black races 
at present, especially in the neighborhood of the seacoast, renders it 
expedient that a man-of-war should show herself along the coast at 
short intervals, and the commanding officer ought to be one in whose 
discretion confidence could be placed. 

The U. S. S. McDonougli, has been employed in raising anchors and 
buoys in the inlets and harbors. 

The machine and carpenter shops were closed August 7 and the men 
sent to New York in the U. S. S. Home. 

The machine shop at Charleston has also been closed. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. RADFORD, 
Acting Rear- Admiral. 

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 357 

Extract from diary of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren, 1864-66. 

October 2, 1864.. Foster offers to evacuate Fort Seward. 1 accept 
the offer. 

October 7. Eleven deserters (German) from Georgetown, [S. C.], 
give accurate account of Battery White; heavy, 10 guns, 2 of X-inch, 
well looked out for; negro statements erroneous; would have led to 
disaster. 

October 8. I wish Farragut would come. I ought to be at 
Charleston. 

October 11.- Captain Fox escaped from Charleston in rebel uniform; 
says that 15,000 or "25, 000 men could take it in the rear; too strong in 
front. Says yellow fever is bad in Charleston. 

October 22. Pontiac came in; had convoyed rebel officers from 
Morris Island to Pulaski, the Union officers being removed from tire 
in Charleston. 

October 26. Two persons arrived who had fled rebeldom to avoid 
conscription. They report the vessel in the Pedee as a gunboat, but 
not able to get down yet; want of water. The army has at last taken 
its last man from Bay Point. 

October 31. Rapid tiring in the outside blockade [Charleston]; heard 
next morning that the Pawnee had mistaken the Dai Ching for a 
runner. 

November 1. The monitors all in place and another wreck added to 
the ornaments of the channel, said to be the Flora. 

November 5. In the afternoon I ran out in the Harvest Moon to 
take a view of the outer blockading ground. Picked up a buoy and 
found it sustained part of a connection for some sunken torpedo; a 
rope enclosing a wire rope, with copper wire, insulated by gutta- 
percha, then wound with rope yarn, then overlaid with wire, form- 
ing a rope. 

November 6. About 2 p. m. reached Edisto River. Channel narrow 
but deep. This river is viewed as an important road to Charleston. 
Admiral Du Pont so reports it, and in the Revolution Lord Howe 
passed up it with his forces and took Charleston. 

November 2Jf.. About 3 arrives a note, confidential, asking if I will 
aid in a movement to assist Sherman. Certainly I will, and before I 
sleep the orders are issued to collect the light artillery, sailors, and 
marines the vessels, too, are assigned. 

November 25. Harvest Moon went up at 3 a. m. for marines, and Pon- 
tiac, Captain Preble, etc. About 10 a. ui. another letter from General 
Foster asks two to six gunboats to cover and six naval howitzers to 
assist, to be ready Monday evening. Start the Bibb off for Mingoe 
and men; send south for Winona and men; very busy with the detail. 

November. 27. Very foggy. Mingoe got in last night. No Sabbath 
to-day for us. The naval detachment must move to-morrow night 
with the troops, and they are very raw, so we must drill on Sunday. 
The officers are clever, and with zealous men, so we get on. The bat- 
tery will have six 12-pounders, two of -them rifled. The sailor skir- 
mishers, about 160, in four half companies, and the marines, 180, in 
-companies. Very difficult to get the officers into the idea of 
light drill and open order; they will mass the men. Wissahickon. and 
Winona came in. I was ashore morning and afternoon looking oni 
Broad River is to be the scene of action. 



358 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

November 88. Port Royal. Ashore in the rooming; got all parts 
together and had a grand drill. Gave them some notion of my idea. 
They scampered through bushes and over sand hills with howitzers. 
In the afternoon all getting ready to embark. At sundown the gun- 
boats Pontiac and Mingoe were brought to the wharf and took in 
sailors, marines, and howitzers. 

November 29. At 4 o'clock a. m. I looked out; there was a low fog 
hanging over the water, through which vessels might be glimpsed for 
two or three hundred yards; the stars clear above. As signals were 
uncertain and inexpedient, the Harvest Moon had to steam round and 
order each of six steamers to get underway, so that daylight was 
relieving the horizon as the party was steering for Broad River, I 
ahead, for Bradford is a good natural pilot. It was a bitter reflection 
that the arm}' must be far ahead and the gunboats not ahead to cover. 
The fog had thickened, so that the shores were just seen dimty and 
only the vessel ahead and astern. I ordered the P<mtiae to lead. At 
last, about 8 : 30, the pilot announced that we were at the landing. Not 
ten minutes before I had heard one or two loud halloos, and supposed 
they came from some of our soldiers; but there was not a soldier nor 
a steamer but my own, nor a sign of life, but there was a little hut 
under a tree for a picket, and the fire was still burning, and the said 
picket had been suddenly astonished by the sight of many large steam- 
ers, seen like ghosts in the fog; so close, too. He was at his break- 
fast, for the sweet potatoes were found on the fire; gave a }'ell for 
some one and was off. And here I was, not a sign of the troops; they 
had left at 2 o'clock, three hours before me, and were somewhere in 
the river. The pilot was sure of the name of the place, and the fleet 
captain was sure of the spot on the sketch. Perhaps the army had 
gone elsewhere. I lingered for a moment in doubt, and was turning 
downstream to make sure of the place when a solitary transport was 
descried moving up. It was all right, so in a twinkling the howitzers 
were put ashore, and the men. I landed on the relics of a wharf. A 
beautiful spot, truly, woodland and uncultivated fields, but silent as 
the grave. The sailors moved quickly, and the lesson of yesterday 
was put in practice, howitzers and men advancing to the front in skir- 
mishing order. .1 walked up the farm road with the foremost men, 
and it was hot as summer. Leaving the boys at a halt about a mile 
from the river, I went back. It was about 11 o'clock. A few compa- 
nies of colored troops were near the shore, some formed in companies 
and others about loose not a sign of a move, but rather like a colony 
about to settle. Some were building fires, as if for a meal. Many 
transports were arriving, some with black troops, some with white. 
About 2 p. m. Major-General Foster appeared, denoted by a square 
blue flag with two stars. This is the new arrangement, to correspond 
with the navy flags. About 3 a master's mate came from Captain 
Preble, saying he had advanced about 4 miles, but the army as yet 
had only a company between him and the shore. So I sent the master's 
mate to General Foster, who replied that General Hatch was hurrying 
the troops ashore. Got to Port Royal about 8, and returned to the 
Philadelphia a wiser man than when I left. 

November 30. The mail steamer leaves at noon and I must send a 
word to the Secretary. So I was occupied till noon, when I left for 
Broad River, for the sound of cannon had been heard during tlje morn- 
ing. General Foster went up about 10 o'clock. Took the IVdladelphia 



SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 359 

this time. It was 4 o'clock when I got into the creek. Did not get 
up to the landing; got ashore. General Foster a little higher up, and 
left soon after I arrived. Captain Balch came on board, said all was 
going well; the troops near Grahamville, and had some fighting with 
the rebels, but drove them. Navy howitzers doing well. I started to 
return about p. m. 

December 1. I started at 11 a. m. for Broad River; got to Boyd's 
Landing and was grieved to hear that the fighting had been going 
on yesterday very unfavorably to us. The rebels had retired to a 
strong position on our road to Grahamville. General Hatch assaulted 
the work and was repulsed with heavy loss; he then fell back to a 
crossroads some 3 miles from the landing. 

During the day General Foster was absent reconnoitering and got 
back in the evening. I went to see him; unfortunate that he is crippled 
by an old wound and moves only with a crutch. His course of remark 
amounted to the men not fighting hard, which also seemed very evident 
to me through all my experience here. He wanted to look around to 
see if he could get in at any other place. 

December %. Thick and foggy. Sound of field guns from 7:30 for 
an hour. General Foster sent a telegram from Hatch saying the 
rebels were gathering in our front and firing from two fieldpieces, 
but it was not serious enough to answer. The general was going to 
reconnoiter Whale Branch to Port Royal Ferry; wanted Balch and the 
tugs to go along. Last night I found that we had not a single picket 
boat out, nor a single feeler on our right and left. I had both done. 
Started at 3 p.m. to reconnoiter the Coosawhatchie; tug grounded in the 
Broad River a mile and a half above Boyd's Creek ; could not get off 
and I went back in a boat At 7 p. m. returned to Port Royal in the 
Ph iladelphia. 

December 3. The same fine weather, but too warm to be seasonable. 
Gave directions about affairs and at 10 : 30 went up Broad River. 
Foster ahead. Sent the fleet captain to the general to say that if he 
wished the batteries in the Coosawhatchie attacked I would send vessels, 
but it would be to no purpose if there were no troops to hold them. 
The general wished to have them attacked and I might have my 
brigade and then he would not ask it officially. 1 told Balch to be 
ready. 

The Harvest Moon came up about 9 p. m. with 4 deserters from 
Beaulieu, real native Georgians, who had been conscripted and would 
not stand it. They report Beaulieu very strong and that Sherman was 
coming on. 

In the afternoon Colonel Mulford, the agent for exchange, came to 
see me. He said that the exchange at Savannah was interrupted by 
present operations and he desired to go on at Charleston. General 
Foster had given leave; would I? Certainly. 

December 4- Sent the Pawnee and Sonoma to Coosawhatchie with the 
launches. The general started off with some small steamers and a 
regiment for Whale Branch. About noon I started after them only to 
look on. Found the Pawnee and Sonoma very busy pounding a small 
battery not far up the Coosawhatchie; it fired a few snots and was soon 
shut up. General Hatch was reconnoitering in force on the left, and 
the boats of the Pontiac which I had ordered up Boyd's Creek peeped 
out of the marsh on the left. 

December 5. Started with General Foster up Broad River. Stopped 
off the confluence of the Coosawhatchie and Tulifinny rivers; the latter 



360 SOUTH ATLANTIC BLOCKADING SQUADRON. 

was reconnoitered and I sent up for a few negroes that appeared on 
the shore. Meanwhile the steamers were pelting the little battery on 
the Coosawhatchie as a feint. Got three very decrepit old cuffeys, but 
their information was valuable for the operation which the general 
and I had agreed on up the Tulifinny to-morrow. We go in force and 
hope to reach the railroad. 

December 6. Soon after light the troops and steamers began to 
move from Boyd's Creek. We got to Tulifinny about 8, dead low 
water, and it looked as if we were not to get in. General Potter, 
who was to command, came on board and said General Foster doubted 
if it were not best to wait for the tide. What did I say ? Go ahead 
off hand. General Potter concurred in my reasons, and soon was the 
water covered with the boats filled with the soldiers and sailors and guns. 
No opposition, not a rebel visible. Our men got ashore and were soon 
lost in the woods. In the afternoon word came in that we met the 
rebels and were driving them. In the evening learned that several of 
my men had been wounded. The Pontiac sent me half a dozen pris- 
oners, just nabbed, all Georgians. One said he was at the battery we 
tired at on the Coosawhatchie, and they had 600 men in ambush wait- 
ing for us; so I was right; if the boats had landed I should have lost 
heavily. 

After dark some heavy and continued firing was heard in a direction 
north of Savannah and some rockets seen. Hoping it might be Sher- 
man I had guns fired and rockets thrown up. 

December 7. Firing ashore. The brigade of the fleet has lost about 
20 men here and at Boyd's Creek. I went ashore to the upper land- 
ing to look at the wounded sailors. Firing steadily, heard it was only 
skirmishing, rebels trying to force our position. We have cut the 
county road bridge on the right and can see and hear the cars. 

Decembe)' 8. Little or no firing, the rebels quiet and our lines cer- 
tainly near the railroad. Our casualties swell to 23 in all. 

December 9. As I understood yesterday from the general, to-day 
the eftort was made to open the view to the railroad through the dense 
wood in front of our position. Accordingly 500 axm