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Full text of "Official souvenir program, McLean County Centennial, Aug.27,28,30,l930"

Q. 977. 359 
M223 






McLEAN COUNTY CENTENNIAL' 

A (1130) 






UNIVERSITY OF 

ILLINOIS LIBRARY 

AT URZANA-CHAMPAIGN 

ILL HIST. SURVEY 



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Prompt, Just, Liberal Claim Settlements 

HAVE MADE THE 




The Fastest Growing 

Accident Insurance Company 

In The World 



Special Policies 

for 
Farm Hands 
Farm Tenants 
Farm Owners 




Preferred Policies 

for 
Business and Pro- 
fessional Men and 
Women. 



Policeis For All Other Occupations Except 
Those Classified As Extra Hazardous 

CONTRACTS THAT PROTECT YOUR ABILITY 
TO EARN— YOUR GREATEST ASSET. 

INDUSTRIAL CASUALTY 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

^ Cars Bearing These Signs ~^- 

Are Driven by Our 

REPRESENTATIVES 





Bloomington, Illinois 



Bloomington, Illinois 



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McLEAN COUNTY CENTENNIAL 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

OFFICERS 

Ei gene Funk President 

I'm i p. Beich Vice-President 

\l I Callahan Secretary 

Russell Shearer Treasurer 

Win. in I'.. Wade Manager 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
\i;Tiiri; S. Smith. Chairman 

Perry LaBounty C. VV. Orcutt 

Ai. Ulbrich W. E. Richardson 

Davis Mkkwin Lloyd Kyer 

P. D. E. Babcock 
|. L. Hasbrouck Harold U. Lang 



Hi m^ Nierstheimeb 

\ II Beltz 

Walter Armbruster 

Bi vke IIolton 
[oi Meany 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

BLAKE I [OLTON, Chairman 

Arthur S. Smith Russeli Shearer 

PARADE COMMITTEE 
Lloyd E. Eyer, Chairman 

Commercial Floats 
I. W. Rodgers, Jr. Ed. Lebkuecher 

Civic Floats 
Ai I [ale George Stautz 

Fraternal Floats 
Will Shelper 

Music 
Mark EthELL 

Organization 
E. C. Butler Harry Hall 

Traffic 

l\. |. Rl'TII BRFORD 



HOME COMING COMMITTEE 
Mrs. W. W. TildEn, Chairman 

MUSIC COMMITTEE 
George Marten, Chairman 

CONCESSION COMMITTEE 

HAROLD Lang, Chairman 

< >scar Mum. 

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 

M. I. < ai.i am an. Chairman 

HISTORICAL DATA COMMITTEE 

I I.. Mashrouck, Chairman 



M rs. I. II. Cheney 



Wm. B. Brigham 



E vri Bach 



Relics 

l ISCAR I [OOSE 



Sam Livingston 



RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE COMMITTEE 
REV. C. E. I 'it TIT'. Chairman 
And Ministerial Association 

SOUVENIR PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

1 1 VROLD I.am.. Chairman 

Arthur Kane Jake Ward 

PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE 

I li u ia MONTGOM ERY, ( hairman 



HISTORICAL RELICS COMMITTEE 
Wm. B. BriGIIAM, Chairman 

I. I.. Hasbrouck Sam Livingston 

< Iscar I [oose E vrl Ba( h 

HISTORICAL PAGEANT COMMITTEES 

Ticket Committee 

William f. Wade, Chairman 

Paui [epeerson Walter Armbruster 

Bi vke I [olton Ai. Grabbs 

Grounds Committee 

M. M. Donovan. Chairman 

Perry LaBounty [ames Buti er 

Property Committee 
Wm, |. 1 I I'LL. ( 'hairman 

Talent Committee 

Harold D. Surer. Chairman 

Mrs. Porter Phillips, Choii Leadet 

Kenneth Bradshaw, Orchestra 

RECEPTION COMMITTEE 
Mayor Ben S. Rhodes and Cm Officials 



\ihii i-iiii- l*r«»;rii»« 

#*#•/<•«■ !£.% Cent! #•-'«»•/! 



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ARRIVING IN McLEAN COUNTY IN 1830 



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Is it any wonder that we call those who conquered the ele- 
ments to settle McLean County in 1830. "The Hardy Pio- 
neers"? There are few men today who could suffer such 
hardships as these "I lardy Pioneers" did, but fortunately few 
men of today ha\ e to. 

Perhaps no other one factor has played as important a part 
in the prosperity of McLean County as have the Banks. For 
eleven years the LIBERTY STATE BANK has been of con- 
stant service to its thousands of customers who live in 
Bloomington and McLean County. 

We believe it will be to your advantage to be among them. 



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LIBERTY STATE BANK 

BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 



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is (fpageant 
^Dedicated 

cfo the Pioneers of ITlcLean County, 
those sturdy men and courageous -I 
women u?ho founded this rich and 
prosperous country and whose 
deeds will always remain enshrin^ 
ed in our hearts and memoru. 



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<gj}£> One Hundred Years 

Shoe Comply an ^ EteiUJty! 



tCaMt Side SQuar** 



McLEAN 
COUNTY 



- - I s really 
very young 



We are happy and proud to be 

identified with this celebration. 




YATES CO. 

¥ 

We Invite You 

To Inspect 

The 

NEW CHRYSLER 



701 N. Main 



Phone 649 
For Demonstration 



Wei co m e Visitors 



Store Your Car in a Safe and Fireproof 

Garage — Centrally Located — 

24-Hour Service. 



Washing and Greasing 

~Njght and Day 
Cars Called For and Delivered 



RAY METTE, Inc. 

DEALERS IN 

DODGE BROTHERS 

MOTOR CARS AND TRUCKS 

216 East Grove St. Phone 147 

"WE NEVER CLOSE" 



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31 IEE]&=OD 



EARLY HISTORY OF McLEAN COUNTY 



l'.\ COURTESY OF J. I.. HaSBEOUCK 

and 
Tin: Daily Pantagraph 







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First Court House, Built in 1832. 

Two airplanes whirred over Central Illinois, 100 
years apart in time. Of course, the first of these 
was purely mythical, for there were no airplanes in 
the world a hundred years ago. 1 hit let imagina- 
tion serve as pilot, and when the plane hovers over 
the territory which is now Mel. can county, we can 
picture in ■ >nr minds the scene as the flesh and blood 
pilot would have seen it a century ago. 

As far as the eye could see, only stretches of 
prairie, broken here and there by the thread-like 
line of streams and the darker patches of woods or 
groves. 

lust at the edge of Blooming drove could be seen 
a curling column of smoke from the cabins of the 
firs! half-dozen families who had settled there. 
More distant, another column of smoke from the 
wigwams of the Kickapoo Indians at the edge of 
what we call ' >ld Town timber. 

Perhaps up toward the Mackinaw river might 
have been seen faint outlines of the camp of the 
Delaware's, last remnants of their tribe, and to the 
northwest the last camp of the Pottawattomies. 

\uaits White Man's Coming 
No road or highway crossed the vast stretches of 
the prairies, but sloughs or ponds at intervals 
marked the undrained depressions in the landscape. 
Wild animals roamed at large, but over the scene 
brooded a strange silence, as of expectation of the 
coming of the white man to take charge of this 
domain. 

The second airplane, pausing in mid-air in the 
summer of l<"Wf). the pilot saw nestling beneath him 
beautiful and bustling Bloomington, count} seal of 

a populous and well-cultivated county. Just north 

lay embowered Normal, and as the eye of the pilot 

explore! the more distant scene, he saw clusters of 

bouses marking the sites of the many villages and 
towns -Hudson to the north, Danvers and Carlock 
west. Shirley and McLean to the southwest. H 
worth to the south, Downs and LeRoj southeast, 
Saybrook and Anow-smith to the east. Cooksville 
and Colfax to the northeast, and Chenoa, Lexing- 
ton and Towanda to the farther north. 



iing the scene at main- places were the well- 
defined roads, main of them paved, along which 
rolled hundreds of motor cars. Twin lines of rails 
marked the i out and electric railro 

along which trains passed at frequent intervals. Be- 
tween the railroads, highways and towns, lay hun- 
dreds of farms, with their golden grain 1i.it 
just read) for the reapers, with their Hocks and 
herds browsing in the pasture lands. Large bams 
and comfortable houses denoted the habil 
a well-fed rural population, and schoolhouses at in- 
tervals indicated the means of their enlightenn 

In making a sharp turn of the head of his plane. 
the pilot saw glistening in the distance among 
trees and forming an irregular course along the 
valley, a sparkling body of water -the surface of 
Lake I'd lington, the beautiful. 

The pilot also caught the whirr of other planes 
as they circled and dipped over the- face of the I 
scape and alighted in their home port just to the 
north of Normal. 

The whole picture was that of a contented and 
prosperous empire where once the wilderi 
spread in wild and useless luxuriance. 

BEFORE WHITES CAME 

Illinois had been a member of the union of states 
for only four years when the fust white settlers 
drifted northward from down in the Sangamon 
country and built their cabins at the grove four 
miles southeast of the present site of Blooming! 

The Mate itself had been known as the "Illinois 
country" for nearly a hundred years prior to that 
time. The name was derived from the Algonquin 
Indian tongue. Inini. meaning "the men." The 
French settlers euphemized it to fllini, with the 
suffix "-ois," signifying "tube," Roughly, the Illi- 
nois country was the territory lying between the 
Mississippi river, the Wabash and the < >hio. From 
the "Illinois country" was carved out the state of 
Illinois, admitted to the union in 1818, when its 
population was about 15,000, and the state ran 
twenty-third among the then members of the union. 

The Spanish, French and English bad struggled 
for control of the Illinois country for many years, 
and the English had control at the time when the 
revolution swept the seacoast colonii 
Rogers Clark, a young \m.i 
seven companies of men and was given $6,000 for 
nses b) Gov. Patrick I [enrj of Virginia in 
1778. Guided by hardy hunters, he swept down on 
Kaskaskia and captured the then larg n in 

Illinois without hi ished. Then he proceeded i 

and took Vincennes. Thus the Illinois i ounti \ 
• ame in fact oi Virginia and continued 

territorial status until 1818, when it was madi 
state. 

1 1 rsTom \i re un M 
In the short time from the admission of the state 

into the union until white men first located in 



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Compliments 
of 

Union Gas & Electric Co. 



lEEl&OD 



Hloomington, III. 



SIXTY YEARS 

of 

DAIRY SERVICE 

rendered to residents of 
McLEAN COUNTY 

is the record of 

W. D. SNOW 

Now President of 
The Snow & Palmer Company 

recently merged with a hundred dairy plants into 
tin- Beatrice Creamery Co., for the more efficient 
production and marketing of Quality Dairy 
Products. 

"Experience Plus Technical Training" 

Snow & Palmer Co. 

PHONES 642-170 



^G^ftd^" 



BURKLUND'S 

INC. 

SMART IUCPI 

Jcvvelers==l>iy lists 
DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES for the HOME 



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McLean county, Illinois had made much history. 
The capita] had been removed from Kaskaskia to 
Vandalia, slavery had caused many bitter j>- >lit ical 
lights in the legislature, Edward Coles was elected 
governor, Daniel P. Cook, member of congi 
from Illinois, defeating John McLean, for whom 
this county was afterward named. 

What were the physical aspects of the country to 
which tlu- llendrix and Dawson families came in 
their migration from Sangamon counts- in the 
spring of 1822? 

The land was mostl) gently rolling prairies, 
dotted here and there with groves of many kinds of 
tiers. There were Indians here. Scattered hands 
of Kickapoos, Pottawattomies and Delawares 

roamed the prairies and w Hands. They had 

already agreed to deed their lands to the govern- 
ment, but they lingered long afterward. They 
were friendly red men, and nol in all the history oi 
the county is it recorded that any white man was 
killed by an Indian. 

Streams Numi roi - 

In the groves were many kinds of oak trees, 
maple, hickory, black walnut, ash. butternut, buck- 
eye, sassafras and a variety of other smaller 
growths. Much of the prairie land was swampy, 
especially where the surface was nearly level. The 
groves seemed to provide the first settlers shelter, 
fuel, protection from the blasts of winter and tin- 
heat of summer. The land near the groves, also. 
was more easily broken up with the crude imple- 
ments of that time than was the tough prairie sod. 

There wen- many streams traversing the territory 
afterward called McLean county. ( >f these, the 
Mackinaw river was the largest, with its many trib- 
utaries in the north and northwestern part. Sugar 
creek with its several branches drained the central 
portion, while the upper waters of the Sangamon 
river and of KickapOO creek traversed the south and 
southeast sections. All the streams run in a gen- 
eral southwestern course. 

The soil was mostly of a silty material, highly 

fertile when properly drained. The subsoil is a 

clayey silt. Deep down under the surface of most 

of McLean county were strata of sandstone and 

les, buried by many feet of glacial drift. 

Prairie Fires Constant Menace 
Upon the water-soaked prairies grew up ever) 
summer rank masse- of grasses, wild flowers and 

weeds. In tin- autumn, when these became dry and 
tangled, a spark of tire would set the whole prairie 
ablaze, hence prairie fires were a constant menace 
t( ' the first settlers. 

There were some natural ridges running across 
the count) when white men came. The highest 
point in the count) is 913 feet above sea level, the 
lowest, 650 feet; hence the surface is generally 
level. A profusion of wild flowers blossomed upon 
the prairies in their season, main of them since 
having become extinct or killed OUt. 

Wild animals were plentiful in the woods and 
prairies deer, some hear, wolves, foxes, rabl 
with many varieties of wild fowl, turkeys, g© 
and ducks, quail, prairie chickens, and numerous 
sour, birds. 



O MING I »F PALEFACES 

Into the wilderness as described in the preceding 

section, in the springtime of the -'-' came 

two white men's families. The families of John 
llendrix and John W. Dawson had in the pieced 
ing autumn migrated from < >hio and temporarily 
stopped in Sangamon county considerably south of 
tlir present boundaries of McLean county. When 
they moved northward and decided to locate at the 
grove southwest of the pi. of Bloomington, 

they formed the only white settlement between 
Springfield neighborhood and Wisconsin. Mr. and 
Mis. llendrix at once built a log cabin, hut Daw- 
son, having left his family in Sangamon county, 
turned for them. A man named Segar was also m 
the party. 

Reports of the favorable location obtained here 
by the Hendrixes and Dawsons drifted hack to the 
older settlements farther south, and others joined 
the colony here. Gardner Randolph and his family 
came in December of the same year and located at 
what became known as Randolph's Grove. John 
Benson, a soldier "f the war of 1812, came in the 
spring of 1823, The Stringfield family, a widow 
and two sons. Severe and Alfred, settled in the 
Randolph vicinity. 

Laac and Absalom Funk arrived in 1 S J4 and 
picked out another grove, since known as Funk's 
Grove. William and Thomas Orendorff joined the 
little colony at Blooming Grove. It is said that 
Mis. William < trendorff gave the grove its name. 
owing to its man) blooming plants. 

Foundations Laid 

( Ither pioneers located farther west in the pres- 
ent area of McLean county — the Quaker, Kphraim 
Stout, at the grove afterward called Stout's Grove. 

Robert Stubblefield and Thomas ( i. Rutledge were 
Other newcomers at that time. Tin- year L825 saw 
main others coming in — Jonathan Cheney locating 
at the grove called in his honor, now Savhrook vi- 
cinity J William Evans and two preachers, Ebenezer 
Rhodes and James Stringfield. 

The years 1823 to 1830 witnessed many founda- 
tions laid for later communities. The Trimmer 
family settled at the woodland afterward called 
Smith's Crove. to the northeast of Blooming 
Grove. Jacob Spawr located in tin- same vicinity in 
1826, and lived to Ik- more than KK> years old. In 
1S_>7. Stephen Webb, William McCord, and 

facob llmshaw came to the county, Matthew Robb 
and Robert McClure joined the Stout'- Grove 
settlement. Francis Laniard and the Henline 
family settled north of the Mackinaw river. The 
Conger family located near Stout's Grove. Jesse 
Havens and Benjamin Wheeler set up the first 
cabins in the Hudson neighborhood. 

Most of these first settlers weie men and \\ i men 
of serious, religious characters. Consequently, they 
soon began to find ways and means, even in the 
hard life of that day, for establishing a church and 
a school. The impress of the high character of the 

first settlers may he said to have been left upon the 
charactei of the population of McLean county 

down to this day. 

Life Was Simpi r 

Life was simple in these earl) settlements. There 
was much hard wink in wringing a sustenance from 



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Coffee Shop 



GOOD FOOD 

SERVED RIGHT 

AT MODERATE PRICES 



Freese & Jefferson, he. 

INSURANCE 

SURETY BONDS 



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I 




205 West Jefferson St. 
Telephone 2201 



ScottysfPlace 

Famous for Chili 

and 

Tamales 



Dist.— 

HAMMS WINDSOR CLUB 

— Real Beer Taste 



PHONE 2607-J 
216 W. WASHINGTON 



Over 37 Ye a r s 



JOHN A. 

ECK 

'company 

Funeral Directors 



B 



Packard Motor Cars 

Ambulance Lady Assistant 

Chapel Services 

PHONE 268 



Louis E. Wollrab Mrs. John A. Beck 

Clarence K. Jacobssen 



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31 E^IE 



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Ell IE3ESQH 



the virgin -oil amid the dangers of the wild life 
around them — wild beasts and wild men. 

The Kickapoo Indian-, who wore found here 
when the first white- came made some pretense of 
sition to the settlement, warning tin- Blooming 
Grove colonists that they must depart when the 
leave- fell in autumn. But the white settlers ig- 
! the warning, and no Indian ever attempted 
to enforce his threat. Machina, or Ma-seen-a, the 
chief, was friendly, learned to speak English, and 
often visited the white settlers. 

The settlement- in and near Blooming < '.rove 
were the only Ones west of Danville and east of 
Peoria for the tir-t few years. Settler- had to take 
their grain as far as Attica. Ind.. to have it ground. 
and to get food suppl 

Get Thkik own Meat 

Much if not all the meat the settler- had to eat 
was that which they obtained by their guns when 
hunting, deer, wild turkey, duck- and geese, quail 
and prairie chicken. There were many other wild 
animal- which had to he killed for protection— 
wolves, foxes, wildcats, etc. 

There were few amusements for the younger 
people of the settlement, hut dancing, footracing 
and horse racing were occasionally indulged in. 
drawing people from many miles around. 

■•"arming was the only husiness or industry of the 
earh settlers. But they had to find ways in their 
home- of supplying their own needs in many way-, 
hence they -pun their own wool, ground their own 
flour and meal in many instances, made their own 
candles for lighting. 

Then- were many pests to plague the settlers — 
rattlesnake- in the prairie grass, mosquitos and 
other insects, malaria and ague to rack their bodies 
and oftentimes to bring early death. Prairie fires 
often swept the country and threatened their 
home-. 

O IUNTY ORGANIZATION 

The political unit of McLean county had its germ 
in earlier units. While 40 or 50 families were living 
in the neighborhood by 1824, the settlement was 
over 100 miles from Vandalia, then county seal of 
Fayette county, of which this region was a part. 
Xo election precinct existed in 1*24 and no 
was cast here, when slavery wa- the issue in the 
st.ate. The people wanted a voting precinct a- the 
election of 1826 drew near. Permission was ob- 
tained, and Orendorff election precinct became the 
nucleus of the future county of McLean. It in- 
cluded all of Fayette county north of town-hip 17. 
and William Orendort'f. John Benson and James 
I.atta wen- named election commissioners; William 
See and W. II. I lodge, clerks. It wa- a big pre- 
cinct, including all of the present McLean county, 
part of DeWitt and Piatt, and extending north to 
Wisconsin. 

In 1SJ7. Tazewell count} wa- formed from part 
of Sangamon and Fayette. The western tier of 
town-hip- in the present county were made a part 
of Tazewell a- l"ir-t formed. In June the Ta/.ewell 
board authorized the formation of Blooming Grove 
election precinct comprising all of the territory east 
of the third principal meridian. The first election 
in that precinct was held at the house of John Ben- 



son. There were -t. showing the 
steadily rising population. 

Mackinawtown wa- the county -eat of Tazewell, 
hut it wa- too distant for the convenience of the 
Blooming Grove settlei nsequently the agita- 
tion for the formation of a new county from the 
eastern part of Tazewell. 

James Allin Co 

Then came James Allin. lie had lived in Sanga- 
mon county and wa- count) commissioner tl 
Consequently he knew the people of Blooming 
Grove settlement and had heard of their desire for 
formation of a new county. Allin. seeing a chance 
to make the movement a mean- of profit to himself, 
came here, obtained a tract of land and boosted the 
movement for a new county, with the county seat 
located on his land. lie wa- a fore-runner of the 
modern real estate promoter. Already there 
lure a post office, a church, a -tore, a blacksmith 
-hop. a mill, one or two doctor- and a preacher ami 
teacher — pretty good -tarter for a county seat. 
Many good farm- were also in cultivation 
farm- then were. 

Petition- were prepared addressed to the legisla- 
ture, Allin being the main spirit in the move. But 
he was ill in December, 1830, when the paper was 
to he sent to Vandalia, hence he gave James Latta 
ami Thomas Orendorff letter- to some of the li 
lators and sent them to the capital. The petition 
specified that the count) -eat wa- to he named 
Bloomington and wa- to he located by the commis- 
sioners. Tim- Bloomington had a name before it 
even had a pain-r exist 

McLean Suggested, Accepted 

Several days elapsed after the arrival of Latta 
and Orendorff in Vandalia before they could get a 
hearing in tl hire for their petition to form 

a new county. Finally, the speaker of the house, 
W. I.. I). Ewing, sent for them and asked them 
what name they would apply to tin- county. The 
name of Hendricks wa- suggested, after a promi- 
nent Indiana state-man. But Kwing said it was 
dangerous to name a county for a man -till living, 
and he suggested John McLean, former member of 
legislature, representative in congress and first 
United State- senator from Illinois, who had died 
only a few months prior. The name was accepted. 
The hill organizing the county passed the house in 
the morning and the senate in the afternoon of 
Christmas 'lav. 1830. 

A bronze tablet to the memory of John McLean 
i- now -et in the wall- of the courthouse, having 
Keen put there in 1898 by the historical society. 

The boundaries of the county as tir-t fixed ex- 
tended we-t to the Illinois river, hut many cuts 
from it were afterward made. 



Governed by Comm 
The fir-t government of the 
posed of three commissioners 
Timothy B. Hoblit and Ji 
first on March 16, 1831. Isaac 
lerk. Thomas I ►rendorff 
urer. The tir-t county tax lew 
percent, hive voting precincts 

county. Most of the business 
missioners for the first few j 



ISSIONERS 

count] wa- com- 
- Jonathan Cheney, 
Haven-. They met 
Baker was appoint - 
was the first treas- 
nc--h.il t of one- 
were created for the 
of the county com 
•.as the laying 



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EHS=0Q 



We recognize the fact that everyone cannot be satisfied 

with the same book — song — hat — automobile or movie. Nor is it possible to please the 

palate of all the people with one kind of 

COFFEE 

TASTES ARE DIFFERENT— Therefore: 



PAL-O-MINE COFFEE 

Our best quality, and distinctly in a class by 
itself. Noted for its outstanding goodness. 
Packed only in one pound tins. 

INCA MAIDEN COFFEE 

Truly, a pleasing economy. This Coffee 
enjoys a tremendous sale, and for that rea- 
son we have placed it on the market packed 
in beautifully lithographed four pound pails. 
It is also sold in one pound cans. 



ROSY MORN COFFEE 

Ili.yh grade and immensely popular. This 
choice blend is the result of 25 years of ex- 
perience on the part of our Coffee Expert. 
Sold in one pound tins and four pound pails. 

MAINSTAY COFFEE 

Your money's worth in every bag. This is 
our latest blend and was placed on sale to 
meet an insistent demand for a good drink- 
ing coffee packed in one pound parchment- 
lined bags. 



JfaveW 



THE 

COFFEE CO.Jnc. 

BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 



Distributors of 

PAL-O-MINE BRAND SPICES AND FLAVORING EXTRACTS 

YOUR GROCER CAN SUPPLY YOU 



The best we can do on 
each job — not how quick 
can we get it out, is the 
secret that satisfies the 
customers of our lubrica- 
tion service. 



S. J. REEDER 

MOTOR FUELS AND LUBRICATING 
SERVICE 

140 East Beaufort Street 
Normal, Illinois 

Quality Products Throughout 



Lee De Vary Co. 

NORMAL, ILL. 



d?&?*c£> 



Sales 

and m 

Service 



PHONE 



6 °73 



FOR 



DEMONSTRATION 

Visit OUR USED CAR Lot 



DCSIBI 



31 IE]tB= 



10 



oul of roads. The total county revenues the firsl 
year were $1,061.89. 

i ommissioners continued to govern the count) 
until 1857. Between 1850 and '?/. three separate 
elections were held on the question of adopting the 
township form of government. It failed twice and 
was adopted the third vote. The firsl board of su 
pervisors, chosen bj townships, mel Ma) 17, 1858. 

C< tUNTY SEAT ESTABLISHED 

The Fourth of July, 1831, was a great day foi 
Bloomington. The town bad up to then a papei 
existence, but no visible lots, streets or boundaries. 

People living in t lit- log cabins around Blooming 
Grove, Cheney's Grove, Stout's Grove and the 
other woodlands of this vicinity <lid not hear of the 
formation of McLean county until several we 
after il happened, for the committee, < Irendorff and 
l.aita. wne detained at Vandalia b) a snowstorm 
which sel in shortly after the legislature had passed 
the act of incorporation of the county on Dee. 25, 
1830. Tins snowstorm became historic as the "deep 
snow," being one of the most severe in the historj 
of the county. Because of lack of mads the snow 
made travel impossihle. hence the men who took the 
petition from here to Vandalia did not get home 
until fanuary. 

The legislature appointed Lemuel Lee and [saac 
Pugh a- commissioners to locate the county seat of 
the new count v. They came up from Vandalia in 
the early spring of 1831, and selected 22 acres of 
land owned by James Allin, who had promised to 
donate it for the new town site. 

Isaac Baker was employed by the county com- 
missioners t" survey and plat the site, and sale of 
the lot- was advertised for July 4. following. Pari 
of the block hounded by Washington, Center, Jef- 
ferson and Main streets was reserved for a court- 
house; two corner lots on Jefferson were -old. hut 
afterward repurchased, so that the whole block 
finallv became the courthouse site. 

Lot Prices Small 

The auction sale of lots on the Fourth of July 
must have been a lively affair, hut prices were ex- 
tremelv -mall, compared with values of today. 
Prices ranged from $10 for two lot-, up to $52 for 
the highest priced lot sold, it being hid off to A. 
Gridley, being the lot at the northwest corner of 
Front and Main street-. Each block of the town 
plat wa- divided into 12 lots. 

For -even vears after the village was laid out. 
there was no legal government except that of the 
voting precinct and the county commissioners 

The first courthouse wa- erected in the year 
1832, tin- first year after the platting of the i ity of 
Bloomington. Court had been held at the home ol 
lames Allin prior to the construction of tin i ourt- 
house. Several important cases were tried in 
Allin house, in at least one of which Abraham Lin- 
coln had a part. The first jury trial wa- also held 
in the Allin hou-e. and the first divorce case. A 
tablet erected b) the Daughter- of the American 
Revolution chapter mark- the site of this old build- 
ing, at East and ('.rove streets. 

One Li nching Recorded 
The first courthouse erected on the public square 
wa- a one-story frame building, 18 by 30 feet, di- 



vided into t ! in-. It wa- built by Asahel 

Gridlej for $332.25. It was also used hool 

and all public gatherings at first. In 1836, a brick 
courthouse, two storii ontaining five rooms, 

was built. I.eander Mim-ell 175 for the 

building. It stood for 30 i public uses. It 

lived through th< Civil war and -aw the mustering 




Second Court House, Built in 1836. 

of mam companies of soldiers. Mam noted judges 
presided ovei urts in that building, including 

David Davis, Samuel II. Treat. T. I. vie Dickey. 
I - In: M. Scott and other-. Many famous lawyers 
tried cases, including Abraham Lincoln. Leonard 
Swett, Robert G. Ingersoll, fohn T. Stuart. Sir 
phen T. Logan and lame- Shield-, afterwards 
senator. 

Two other courthouses followed this one the 
third erected in 1868, and the present -tincture in 
1901 when fire had destroyed the previous building. 
McLean county ha- had four jail-, including 
present one at Madison and Monroe. In the "old 
jail." -till standing at Market and t enter, the onl) 
lynching ever held in McLean county took place in 
1881, when Frank Pierce was lynched for killing 
the jailor. Tedd) Frank. 

.\ First Mayor 

In 1843, the citizens of Bloomington voted for 
incorporation with a hoard of trustees a- the I 
erning body. The first trustees were Matthew 11. 
I lawk-, president; Baile) II. Coffey, John Ma 
goun, lame- T. Walton and William Gilles] 

Population of Bloomington wa- listed at 800 peo- 
ple in 1845, ami had 1,500 in 1850, and in the next 
live years ^rew to 5 ui hi 

In 1850, the legislature gave Bloomington a spe- 
cial charter, and the city elected it- first mayor in 
Rev. David I. Perry. 

Two war- and several business panic- disturbed 
the earl) history of the city. Recruit- went out of 
this county to the Black I lawk war in 1S.^_' and to 
the Mexican war in 1845 \6. The commercial 



11 



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panics of 1837 and 1857 had distinct effect in slow- 
ing up the stead} growth of the citv and county. 

ALLIN 

Mosquito Grove was the original name for Allin 
township. That was one of three groves in the 
township, the other two being Brown's and Brooks' 
gToves. In 1867 the name of the township was 
changed to Allin in honor of James Allin, pioneer 
nf the county. There were 1.4(H) aires of wood- 
lands in the townships when white settlers came. 
Miles Brooks was the first settler, followed by Wil- 
liam Brown, Robert Stubblefield, and others. A 
family named Reddon, which had headquarter 
the neighborhood in the early days, was nm out by 
the self-respecting neighbors. 

Stanford is the incorporated town, which was 
laid out by John Armstrong in 1867. This town 
with a population of 450 is a thriving business 
place, with good schools, a bank, a newspaper and 
man} stores and elevator. It maintained a local 
fair for main years. The population of Allin 
township is 1,1 !l "' 

ANCHt >R 

Then- i~ very little natural woodland in Anchor, 
situated on the branch of the Illinois Central rail- 
road in the northeastern pan of the county. R. M. 
Rankin entered the first government lands in this 
township in 1850; Robert Cunningham followed 
next year. Robert Stackpole in 1853 bought 2,500 
acres. 

Anchor was at first part of Cropsev. hut in 1877 
was divided. After the Civil war many new settlers 
came, including |<>hn Ingram, A, S. Dart. Henry 
Gilstrap, M. H. Knight, R. II. Arnold. Daniel B. 
Stewart. F. M. Anderson and others. A large num- 
ber of Germans were among the early settlers. 

The town of Anchor was laid out after the Illi- 
nois Central railroad was built through that section. 
The Mackinaw river has its source in this township. 
The township and town of Anchor are substantial 
parts of the county. Anchor township has a popu- 
lation of 763. 

ARROWSMITH 

Much Indian historv is connected with Arrow- 
smith township. Its name honors its first super- 
visor. Ezekial Arrowsmith. An old Indian town 
and burial ground are supposed to have existed in 
the township prior to white settlement. Jonathan 
Chene} and John Dawson first explored the vicin- 
ity, learned much of the Indian historv and took up 
-"tne of the land. 

Near the source of the Sangamon river is a 
mound snp|H.sed to have been built by the Indians. 
Many relics of Indians have been found on the 
und in section 24. Traces ,,f old fortifications 
are also found. The McLean Count} Historical 
Society under Capt. J. II. I'.urnham made extensive 
explorations of the Indian sections and the site of 
the supposed Indian battle, either between two hos- 
tile trihes or between the Indians and a detachment 
of French soldiers sent out from Fort Chartres. 

The village of Arrowsmith was laid out in the 
7n's when the Lake Erie railroad was built through. 
First Settlers of the town were Anderson Young. 

(onas*Fry, James Cross,,,,, m. I'llmer. R. S. Cram, 
Larimer & [ones, S. E. (line. The village was in- 
corporate'! in 1890, and now ha- a population of 
300; the township, 900. 



BELLFLOWER 
lied Prairie township, the name was 
changed to Bellflower in 1858, by James Richards, 
fust supervisor. The land is all prairie, and is the 
most southeasterly j n the county. It contained 
much swamp land when first settled, and the hoard 
ot supervisors donated hundreds of acres of this 
land to obtain money for helping locate the Nor- 
mal university in 1857. 

Jn 187] the township voted io(MKX) in bonds to 
obtain a branch of the Illinois Central, this being 
its only railroad. it huilt the first township high 
school in the county, in 1905, at a COSl of $''.000. 
The schools of Bellflower have always been among 
the best. The village of Bellflower was laid out b} 
George X. Black, who owned much land tl 
Early husiness men of the town were R. K Mor- 
land, A. and A. J. Henry. John Nichols, A. I.ihairn. 
T. I'.. Groves, I. W. Eyestone, E. I.. Rush. Hiram 
Rush and C. \Y. Stokes. 

Bellflower has always been a good grain market, 
with schools ami churches. Its population is 442; 
that of the townhsip, 1.200. 

BLOOMINGTi IN 

The township ,,f BloomingtOn as distinguished 
from the city of Bloomington comprises territory 
lying south and west of the city. It originally in- 
cluded the city, hut in 1911 the city was organized 
as a township with coextensive boundaries. 

Jn Bloomington township as now comprised is 

the site of the first settlement of the county, at 
Blooming Grove. The history of that settlement is 
told elsewhere. The township of Bloomington has 
it- own township government, with school trustees 
and road commissioners. The population of the 
township in 1930 is 2.2(H) and the number of farms 
reported in the census is 262. 

BLUK MOUND 

A ridge running through this township m section 
2S gave it its name. The mound can hardly he dis- 
tinguished now. The rest of the township is pra 
land and generally good farming land. Thomas 
Arnold first settled in the township in 1858. J. S. 
Stagner, W. I.. Burton, lames II. Doyle, David 
Wheeler and others followed. Doyle and Wheeler 
wcie first and second supervisors. 

Two villages were started when the branch of the 
Illinois Central railroad was huilt in 1884, th,'. 
being Cooksville and Fletcher. Cooksville was in- 
corporated in 1901, The upper reaches of Money 

creek are in this township. Cooksville now ha- a 
population of 324; the whole tow,, ship, 1.025. 

CHENEY'S GRI AT. 

From 1825-29, Jonathan Cheney and his family 
were the only white persons living in the township 
which had taken the name of Mr. Chene} and 
named Cheney's Grove. Chene} had entered 3.000 
acres of land, having moved out from Blooming 
('.rove in 1825. James t.'. Van Scoyoc and Robert 
Cunningham were followed by the Means, My 
Riggs and Rail families. 

Located at the headwaters of the Sangamon 
river, the farms of this township contain mote roll- 
ing land and clav -,'il than other sections. The p 
ofl'ux' established in 1831 as Chcnev's ('.rove was 
changed in 1865 to Saybrook. When the Lak< 



13 



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Erie railroad was buill through this place, il 
enced a boom. The town lm<l given S50,(HK.) in 
bonds and the township y.-ivt- $10,0<X) to help Imihl 
the road. 

Saybrook has a newspaper, good schools and 
churches, and main modem social and civic organi- 
zations. 

The town has been visited bj several seriou 
during its history, but in spite of them has made a 
substantial growth. The population of Saybrook 
i- 75(i and of the township, 1.379. 
CHENi lA 

Matthew T. Scott, an earl) settler of this town- 
ship, came from Kentucky whose Indian name was 
Chenowa. Sett wanted to name his new home by 
thai name, but il was entered on the government 
records as Chenoa, and thus remained. 

Settlers began to locate here after the Chicago & 
Alton railroad was constructed about 1854. Scotl 
and W. M. Hamilton started rival settlements, both 
near where the Alton road would cross what is now 
tli, T. P. & W. J. B. Lenny and his brother-in-law, 
[ohn Bush, both erected buildings on the site of 
Chenoa about 1854-56. The town was incorporated 
in 1864 and Lenney was first president. 

In 1873 it was organized under the general law 
as a i-it \ and C. R. Snyder became first mayor. The 
citj had a stead) if not rapid growth, with many 
churches, lodges and a newspaper, now the Clipper- 
times, edited by W. II. Hawthorne. In 1917, the 
city of Chenoa adopted the commission form of 
government, with W. A. Chapman as first mayor, 
and Jacob Balbach, B. F. Elfrink, L. L. Silliman 
and T. W. Weatherwax, commissioners. 

The farming country in Chenoa township is 
mainly in large tracts. Carl Vrooman manages a 
large tract formerly belonging to the estate of Mrs. 
Vrooman's mother. Mrs. M. T. Scott. The popu- 
lation of Chenoa city is 1,325 and of the whole 
township, 2.000. 




Third Court House, Built in 1868. 
Destroyed by Fire in 1900. 



CR< IPSEY 

This township has the area of onl) half an ordi- 
nary township, being reduced by the cutting off of 
Anchor in 1877. The township and village were 
named for Col. A. J. Cropsey, who settled there in 
1864. Cropse) at one time tried p> obtain legal con- 
nection with Ford county, but the proposition was 
voted down. Daniel B Stewart and other residi 
donated $10,000 to obtain the Kankakee branch of 
tin- Illinois Central railroad, which passed through 
Colfax and Anchor, and later to Bloomington. 

The town of Cropse) is almost on the county line 
between McLean and Ford, and is a trading center 
for many people in Ford. A village called Potosi, 
started in anticipation of the coming of a railroad, 
hut dwindled when the road passed another way. 
The township's population is 500. 

DALE 

Mak' township was first settled shortly after the 
original white settlement in Blooming Grove. Rob- 
ert Johnson made his home there in 1828, and Wil- 
liam Beeler in 1830. There air several tracts of 
woodland in the township, Twin Grove, Hougham's 
Grove, and other smaller groves near Sugar creek, 
which flows through it. 

Shirley and Covell are the two incorporated 
towns in the township, both supplied with stores, 
churches ami elevators. The population of the 
township i- 906. 

DAN VERS 

This township contains 45 square miles, being 
larger than others, and it has several woodland 
tracts. Ephraim Stout, the first settler, lift his 
name for the most important grove. < 'tlicr early 
settlers who came in tin- 20's were Matthew Robb, 
Robert McClure, Jonathan Hedges, Ebeni 
Mitchel and others. The first farmers raised 
wheat, and Stout built a mill to grind it. I me of 
the earliest schools in the county was in this town- 
ship. Matthew Robb was school treasurer, just 
of the peace and member of the legislature. 

Dameis was the carle home of Joseph W. Fifer, 
who afterward became governor of Illinois. The 
village of Danvers was first called Concord, named 
by Israel W. Hall, who came from Concord. X. H. 
Danvers is one of the towns in the county which 
lias a paved street, It has man) stores, several 
churches, waterworks, steam and electric rail si 

and g I schools. The population i- 601 ; that 

of the township. 1,400. 

I) \\VS< >.\ 
This township, first called Padua, was renamed 
in hono'- of John Wells Paws, .n. one of the first 
settlers of the county. Indians occupied the terri- 

ton "f Dawson when Mr. Dawson first settled 
there in 1826. < >ld Town timber, one of the fii 
woodlands in the county, is located in this town- 
ship; parts of it originally extending into < 'Id 
Town, I '"wiis. Empire and West 

Dawson residents voted $30,000 in bonds t" aid 
the Lake Erie in building through there. The 
tions of Ellsworth and Padua in this township v 
located on this road. Ellsworth took its name in 
honor of Oliver Ellsworth, but is located on land 
donated b) Jonathan • hene) and A, B. Ives. 

\ village called Benjaminville was established by 
a numbei of Quaker families, whose descendants 



15 



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still live there. From 1885 for 20 years ih<- Old 
Settlers' society held its annual meetings al Bel 
park, south of Ellsworth. Simeon II. West, a 
prominent citizen of earlier times, donated a tract 
of 20 acres of timber to the county for a perma- 
nent park. The Sangamon river and Monej creek 
arise in this township, and farming lands are more 
or less broken. Ellsworth's population is 262; that 
<it' the township is 1 ,042. 

I>( >WNS 

Savanna was the name first given to this terri- 
torj when townships were organized in 1858. It 
finally took the present name in honor of Lawson 
Downs, who settled there in 1828. Other earl) 
settlers were Henr) Jacoby, Thomas Toverca and 
Sylvester Peasley. The latter served as supervisor 
for man) years and was a prominent and influential 
citizen. 

John Cusey, a cattle raiser and compatriot of 
Isaac Funk, was another pioneer. Sevier String 
held and John Rice built sawmills along the Kick 
apoo creek in the earl) days. The village of Downs 
was platted in 1870, and has had a solid growth. It 
is now an incorporated town with a population of 
_'S_'. The whole township has a population of 
1,127. 

DRY GR< >VE 

This is one of the few townships which has no 
incorporated town or village. William McCullough 
and his sun Peter first settled in the township in 
1826. It was named for the grove located in the 
southwestern part. McCullough afterward became 
the first circuit clerk of the county. He served in 
the Black Hawk and Civil war-, being killed in 
battle in 1862. Henr) Van Syckle, lames Garton, 
Wilton Williams and Matthew Harbord were other 
earl) settlers. A mill built by a Mr. King was a 
landmark for mam years. Stephen Webb, William 
McCord, George and Jacob fiinshaw were char- 
acters among the pioneers. 

EMPIRE 

This i- one of the most largely populated and im- 
portant township-, containing the city of LeRoy. 
John Buckles settled there in 1827, and a grove of 

8,700 acre- took his name. Michael Dicker-on and 



In- sons, Henr) and Frank, were leading citizens 
alter 1830. Henr) and David Crumbaugh w 
other pioneers Hiram Buck located here in 1837 
and became first postmaster of LeRoy. lie was 
also justice of the peace and member of the county 
court in the 50"s. Mahlon Bishop was an early 
settler and wi I to the legislature. William 

lohnson taught the tii at Clearwater 

school. David Phillips and Isaac Williamson built 
a mill on Salt creek. With the coming of the rail- 
road, now known as the Big Four, a new era 
dawned for this town-hip. Later a branch of the 
Illinois Central was extended from Rantoul to 
LeRoy. The village of LeRoy was platted b) Asa- 
hel Gridley and Merritt Covell in 1835, hut hard 
time- delayed its growth. Hiram John W. Bad- 
derly and Amos Neal wen- LeRoy's l"n -t mer- 
chants; other- wen- Baker, Greenman, the Parke 
brothers, Morehouse and Barnett. Joseph Keenan 
was merchant and hanker. 

Modern LeRoy has two mile- of paved streets, 
several good churches, a hank, a new-paper, a 
branch of the Bloomington Canning company, a 
pretty park in the center of town, several frater- 
nity lodges, a post of the American Legion, a com- 
mercial cluh and many organizations of women. 
For mam years a successful agricultural fair was 
conducted at LeRoy. The population of Empire 
township i- 2,400 and of LeRoy, 1.000. 
FUNK'S GROVE 

This township was named for its first settlers, 
Isaac and Absalom Funk, who came in 1824. The) 
picked one of the finest groves in the county. Early 
they entered into the business of cattle raising. 
William Brock, an early associate of the Funks, 
died on his way to market with cattle. The Funks 
buill the first log cabin, 12 b) 14 feet, and in this 
building eight persons lived in 1824-25. Funk 
bought his first land with $2,000 of 1m irrowed 
money. He made mone) In selling cattle and in- 
vested it in land, acquiring _'(),(hki .-,, 

Isaac and Cassandra hunk had a family of eight 
children, the third generation of the family being 
now numerous in McLean county. Isaac Funk was 

a friend and hearty booster of Lincoln. Funk him- 
self was elected to the state senate, and dud while 



» \- 



" f « 

■ ■ 




4J, 




Lincoln Memorial Meeting, Bloomington, 1865. 



17 



I 



A Golden 
A nn iversary 



I88O- 



The telephone, one of the greatest gifts 
of science to the service of mankind has 
reached its 50th anniversary in Bloom- 
ington. The first telephone exchange in 
the city was opened by the Bell Tele- 
phone Company with but very few tele- 
phones. It was constructed by Fred 
Beckman in the year of 1880. Mr. Beck- 
man came here from St. Louis where he 
had just learned the rudiments of the 
crude commercial telephone, as a line- 
man. 

The Bell Telephone Company owned the 
only telephone system 
in Bloomington until 
1895 when James B. 
Taylor and H. S. 
Bower organized an 
independent company 
called "The Home 
Telephone Company" 
with a limited number 
of telephones. After 
three years John T. 
Lillard, John J. Pitts, 
C. P. Soper, Lyman 
Graham and V. E. 
Howell furnished add- 
ed capital and ac- 
quired the system and 
owned it until 1902, 
when A. B. Cotton and 
Hart F. Farwell purchased the system. 
Mr. Farwell soon sold his interest to 
Mr. Cotton. About 1905 A. B. Cotton 
sold the Home Telephone system to a 
group who are still the principal owners 
and who then formed the new corpora- 
tion, the present Kinloch-Bloomington 
Telephone Company. 




In 1912 The McLean County Telephone 
Company which had been conducting an 
independent business sold its toll lines 
to Kinloch - Bloomington Telephone 
Company and in January, 1920, the Bell 
Telephone Company sold their local 
plant to Kinloch - Bloomington Tele- 
phone Company retaining its toll lines 
and long distance traffic. From 1905 to 
date the list of subscribers has grown 
from 1,200 to over 11,000 which makes 
Bloomington a city with one of the 
highest percentage of telephones per 
capita in the country. 
In 1920 the telephone 
company purchased 
the 3-story building 
and basement at 513- 
515 North Main 
Street. The building 
was rebuilt for their 
use, new switch boards 
and apparatus were 
installed and under 
ground conduits and 
cables were con- 
structed. 

The Kinloch - Bloom- 
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18 



holding that position. Man) of the other Punks 
have served in public positions. Thousands of acres 
of tin- lands acquired by Isaac Funk are -till owned 
bj the family. The township's population is K00. 

GRIDLEY 

This is the largest township in the county, located 
in the northwest corner. There is much timber in 
the township, bordering the Mackinaw river. The 
first settlers came in 1835, James Bigger, Reuben 
and Taylor Loving. .1" Sloan and John B. Mes 
came about the same time. 

The village of Gridley was plaited by Thomas 
Carlyle and George W. Kent on land they boughl 
from Asahel Gridley. The T. P. & W. railroad 
ran through the town in 1858. The firsl school was 
built in 1859, and the village was incorporated in 
1869. Main of the farmer- in the vicinity of Grid- 
ley are Mennonites, one of the churches in the town 
being of tha( denomination; others being Methodisl 
and Congregational. Drum brothers, residents of 
Gridley, were noted hunters. The town of Grid- 
ley's population is 709; township. I.mhi. 

HUDSt >\ 

The town and township of this name were given 
the same name as Hudson. \. Y.. by men from that 
state who colonized the settlement. Among the 
earlu-st settlers were Jesse Havens, Richard Goss, 
Cross, Mosby Harbert, Hiram Havens and David 
Trimmer. A colonization company in 1836, of 
which Horatio X. Pettit, John Gregory and George 
F. Durkitl were directors, took up much land in 
this neighborhood. But some of the colonists be- 
came dissatisfied and left. In addition to those 
named, others who remained were John Magoun, 
lames II. Robinson, Oliver March, James and 
[oseph Gildersleeve, Jacob Burtis and Samuel I'. 
Cox. [esse Havens became one of the firsl three 
county commissionei s. 

A saw mill sel up soon after the firsl settlement 
furnished lumber for building the firsl houses. A 
grisl null was also established on the Mackinaw 
river. The Wheelers. Hinthrons, Priest, Messer 
and Turnipseed wen- among the early settlers. The 
village of Hudson was platted by Horatio Petit, 
extra wide streets being provided. The Illinois 
Central went through the village in the 50's. Just 
west of Hudson j-, sel up a boulder to mark the last 
camp in McLean county of the Pottowattomie In- 
dians. Hudson's population is 325; township. 
1 .050. 

I. WVXDM.K 
This is another township without a town or vil- 
lage. Its lands are prairies of much fertility. Its 
first located in the 50's. John Cassed; 

early resident, became a member of the legislature. 
John Henline settled here in 1S_'S. and Henline 
k is named for him. Residents of that pari oi 
the* count) in the Black Hawk war handed together 
and built a block house for protection against hos- 
tile reds. Indians who had formerl) lived in this 
county had by that time removed to t (liver's Grove 
in Livingston county. Colfax, located just beyond 
the boundaries of Lawndale, is the trading c< 
of that township. Anchor and Lexington are also 
near by. Population of the township is 650. 



LEXINGTON 

Indians still had their wigwams in this township 
when the first white settlers came in 1828. Ixick- 

a] s were at Sehna and I lelawares farther up the 

Mackinaw. The first whites were Conrad Flesher, 
fohn llaner and his thn and [saac and 

Joseph Brumhead. John Patton came the follow 
ing spring. Indians helped Patton build hi- hou 
which long stood as the oldest house in McLean 
county. Patton's house was used as a fort during 
the Black Hawk war to guard againsl an) surprise 
attack of reds. Mills were built along the Macki- 
naw river in the early days. Gen. Bartholomew, a 

hero of the Indian wars in Indiana, came here very 
earl\. and acted as envo) to the Indians in Liv- 
ingston counts- in '32 to assure the whites of their 
peaceful intentions. Janus k. Dawson, an earl) 
settler, became count) commissioner in 1845. 

\ town was laid out at Pleasant Hill in 1840 by 
[saai .-makes, hut when the C. \ A. railroad 

pissed it by, it went into a decline, i ml) two build- 
ings now stand. 

The town of Lexington was laid out in 1837, 
being named for Lexington, Ky. James Brown 
and A. Gridley were its founders. It suffered a 
backset by the panic of that year ami la) dormant 
for many years. Jacob Spawr, horn in Pennsyl- 
vania, settled in the township in 1826, and lived to 
he over inn wars old. dying in 1902. Spawr's tav- 
ern was a noted landmark. When the C. & A. rail- 
road was built, it gave Lexington a boom. Noah 
Franklin and his bride rode to Bloomington on the 
liis! train passing Lexington. William M. Smith. 
one of the earliest members of the legislature from 

the count), lived here. He became speaker of the 

house. Bernard J. ( laggett, a later resident, was 
once candidate for state treasurer. W. II. Claggett 
was superintendent of the Soldiers' Orphans' home. 
Lexington township built the earliest gravel roads 
in the counts. Lexington city is well supplied with 
business places, churches and schools, and a good 
public library, the population of the city is 1,300; 
township, 2,040. 

MARTIN 
Thi~ township was named for Dr. I'.. Martin of 
Bloomington, who owned 1,700 acres in the town- 
ship. There was much timber in the earls days. 
Among the earliest settlers were William and I.. R. 
Wiles, Curtis and Martin Batterton, and \\ . G. 
Anderson. The Kankakee branch of the Illinois 
Central sva- built through tin- township, its termi- 
nus being at ( olfax for a few scars, then being 
'ended to Bloomington. There was a coal mine 
here which was worked intermittently for mans 
sears. The village of Colfax ssa* incorporated in 

1880 and had a Stead) growth. It was one of the 

town- which excluded saloons in the das- when 

the) were licensed in man) places Colfax has 
varied htisiness interests and one newspaper, The 
Press. The population is 850; Martin township, 
1 .500. 

M< >XKY CREEK 
The creek of that name gave the township its 

designation. It has much g 1 farm land, with 

some timber along the creek and the Mackinaw 
river. Lewis Sowards was the firsl settler in 1825; 

Jacob Harness and Jacob Spawr at about the 

time. Gen. Bartholomew ma me in this 



19 



n^=ir=i r=l i I I -ii 31 =i [=^g^EE][ ^= ir^^^E5^]I=£E][=]E5=0El 



1 




J May, ^ioomington and ITlcLean County 
— their business men — their farmers — all their citi- 
zens, continue to progress in the future as theu haue 
in the past. 

t 



J. W. RODGERS SHOE CO. 
GERHART SHOE CO. 

GOOD FOOTWEAR FOR HALF A CENTURY 



Growing With Bloomincjlon 
Business Since 1865! 

For (Two-Thirds of a Century — 

This bank has enjoyed the confidence and patronage of a large portion of the citizens of 

this community. 

WE GROW — WITH THE CITY — AS WE SERVE 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

AND 

First Trust and Savings Bank 

Complete Banking Facilities and a Progressive Policy 



Member 

Federal Reserve 

System 



OLDEST and LARGEST 
Bank In McLean County 



Combined 
Resources 
$5,500,000 



g^^ir=ir=i r= ir= I I - I I : ir HI =H ^=^^]r^^[=][5=OE1 

20 



township after his arrival in 1830. He laid ou( the 
village of Clarksville in 1836. After his death in 
1840, the village declined. Gen. Bartholomew is 
one of the soldiers of the American Revolution 
buried in this county. The village of Fifer is in 
tlii— township. 

Money Creek is of late famous as the site of 
Lake Bloomington, made by the damming of 
Money creek one mile above the outlet of the i 
into the Mackinaw. Part of the lake is in Hudson 
township. 

MT. IK IPE 

This township was colonized by a band of 
sett'ers from Rhode Island in 1835. They entered 
14.(xhi acres of land and platted the village of Mt. 
Hope, each settler receiving a share of the land. 
Bui hard times and troubles of pioneering discour- 
aged mosl of the colonists and they returned east. 
When the C. & A. railroad was built, the village of 
Mt. Hope was abandoned and the town of McLean 
located a few miles away on the railroad. William 
Johnson, one of the early settlers, became county 
commissioner. Others of the first settlers included 
Philip Cline, Ezra Kenyon, John and Robert Long- 
worth, Daniel Darnell, Jacob Moure, the Wheelock 
brothers, W. II. Wood, and John Goodhue, the first 
postmaster of McLean. C. C. Aldrich established 
an elevator in 1868, to which his son. Frank W. 
Aldrich, succeeded. Moore's mill, built on Sugar 
creek in this township, was a landmark of early 
times, now destroyed. The dairying interests of 
McLean county have their center in Mt. Hope 
township. The village of McLean has many stores, 
a hank, a community high school, and a fine little 
park. It has one newspaper. The Lens, published 
by Crihfield Brothers, Atlanta. Population of the 
township is 1,600; McLean, 700. 

N< >RMAL 

The township grew up around the Illinois State 
Normal university, established in 1857 hv the en- 
terprise of Jesse W. Fell and others. The site was 
known a> North Bloomington when the school was 
established. The state normal school is still the 
chief interest of the town of Normal, it being the 
oldest teachers' training school in the west. An- 
other state institution in this township i- the Illinois 
Soldiers' Orphans' home, founded in 1869. |c.--e 
Fell also had much to do with getting this institu- 
tion for Normal. The chief industries of the town 
and township aside from those mentioned were the 
nurseries and the horse barns. Nurseries were nu- 
merous and famous in the early times, and several 
still flourish. Several firms engaged in importing 
and breeding draft horses flourished here main 
years, but with the motor age. the draft horse busi- 
ness declined. 

The town of Normal was incorporated in 1865. 
Some 20 years ago an era of extensive public im- 
provement- was inaugurated under Mayor Man- 
chester, resulting in many miles of pavement, a 
municipal waterworks and a part in the establish- 
ment of a modern -ewage disposal plant for the 
Normal-Bloomington sanitary district. Normal 
now has a modern business district. Population of 
the town. 6,768; of the town-hip. 8,200. 
• d.h T< »WN 

This township got its name from the location of 
an old Indian village at the edge of the timber 



21 



which stands there. The grove was at the hi 

water- of the Kickapoo. William Evans was the 
first white settler. John and William Bishop, John 
Hendrix and Lewis Case were anion- the othi 
I ase established the firs) school. The village of 
Holder was laid out in this town-hip after the Lake 
Erie railroad was constructed. The village of 
Cillum is in the sOUthwesI part. I'.en jaminville, 
with it- Quaker meeting house, is another feature 
of t lii— township. 

R.W'lx )LI-II 

Gardner Randolph settled here in 182.L the year 
following the Dawson-I lendrix settlement at 
Blooming Grove. Randolph spent his later life and 
died in California. Other settlers who joined Ran- 
dolph in the 30's were Jesse Funk, ('apt. John Karr 
ot Revolutionary fame, the Rust family, the 
Nobles, Stewart-, the W'akefields and Van Ord- 
Strands. Many mills were set up in this township 
along the Kickapoo creek. Michael Dickerson, 
William Hampton and Martin L. Bishop were early 
millers. John Baldwin was founder of the village 
of Lytleville, which once aspired to be the county 
seat. When the Illinois Central railroad was built, 
Heyworth arose and Lytleville declined. The vil- 
lage of Heyworth was laid out by Campbell Wake- 
field in 1858 and incorporated in 1869. The town 
has become one of the best in the county, with 
paved streets, many business houses, excellent 
schools, churches and lodges. It has one news- 
paper, The Star, and a post of the American Le- 
gion. Population of the township i- 2,075. 
TOWANDA 

This i- a township composed mostly of prairie 
land, only one timber, known as Smith's Cirove, 
being in the township. John Trimmer and family 
located here in 1826, and other early settler- were 
William Halterman, Elbert Dickerson, David 
Trimmer, and John Pennel. Peter Baldeau and 
Jesse Fell laid out the village of Towanda in 1854. 
Charles Roadnight, treasurer of the Alton, estab- 
lished his "estate" at Towanda and it flourished 
several years, but later fell into decay. Hour mills 
ran for a few years, then disappeared. Barnes and 
Merna and two other villages are in the township. 
Population of the township is 1,200. 
WEST 

The name of this township was changed several 
times and finally was called West in honor of 
Henry West, who took 2,500 acre- from the gov- 
ernment and was first supervisor, lie served dur- 
ing the Civil war and led the county's activities in 
providing for soldiers' families. West retained its 
school lands many years after other town-hips .sold 
theirs, and the income from these lands supported 
the schools. Two notable Indian landmark- are in 
We-t. an Indian fort and the site of a village, 'flu 

McLean County Historical Society in 1906 set up 
a stone marker for the site of the fort. Simeon ||. 
West and George P. Davis paid for the marker. 
People of West township gave money to help build 
the Big Lour and a branch of the Illinois Central 
railroads through the town-hip. The villages of 
Weedman, Sabina and Glenavon are in or near this 
township. Simeon II. West, son of the firs! settler, 
served on the board of supervisors and in the legis- 
lature lie gave to the county a grove of 20 acres 
for a perpetual park. It is called West park. Pop- 
ulation .if the township is '*00. 



BO=gi=]l IE 

i 

ID 



31 IE3E=0B 

i 
i 




We have featured 
"Neighborly Service" for 
almost a third of a century 

The cold impersonality often associated with "business" 
has no place in this bank. Here you will find the officers to 
be experienced and authoritative financial counselors, and at 
the same time neighbors who have your individual interests 
at heart. 

No matter if your financial problem is large or small — 
bring it to us and receive the benefit of our years of experi- 
ence — freely and without obligation. 

We would like to get better acquainted with you. 

McLEAN COUNTY BANK 

CAPITAL. SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS OVER $400,000.00 



I 



0C=£]EE]E 



HOME OF McLEAN COUNTY'S OLDEST CHRISTMAS SAVINGS CLUB J 

^ ^=1 1=^=1 l==1P= l l=l[=l[B=OB 



3E 



3E 



3E 



3E 



22 



WHITE I »AK 
This is the smallest township in the county, half 
the -.i/r of the standard. It- peculiar shape was 
due i" the quarrel between the Benson and the ' 
lock families, one wanting to be in Woodford, the 
other in Mel. can county. Smith Denman settled in 
the township in 1829, other early settlers being 
Elisha Dixon, John Brown, Samuel and Robert 
Phillips, John, 
Jainc- and \\ il 
Ham Bensi m. < >ak 
Grove, a village 
established in this 
township, 1 a i e r 
disappeared. The 
town of Carlock 
succeeded it. be- 
ing laid out in 
isss. Carlock 
has several stores, 




a bank and good schools. Population of the town- 
ship i- 700. 

VATES 
This township is the farthest northeast in the 
county. The firsl entries "i land here were in 
1855-56. Yates was cut off from Chenoa when it 
was organized. Mosl of its inhabitant came in 
after the Civil war. The township still owns some 

of it- original 
granl of school 
lands. The T. 
P. & W. rail- 
road crosses this 
township, and thi.* 
town of Weston is 
a station on it. It 
laid mi! Ii\ 
Nelson Buck in 
1 1 w a s 
incorpo- 
The pop- 
of the 



1868. 

ii e \ c r 
rated, 
ulatii m 

township 



is 



750. 



Present Court House, Built in 1902. 



OC=3BE 
ft 



31 IEIE 



I 

I 



AFTER THE PAGEANT 

Visits 



BON-GO PARK 

"The Shrine of Danceland" 

Bloomington, Illinois 

Route 2 South Main St. 



LARGEST DANCE FLOOR IN 

THE COUNTRY 

ALWAYS FEATURING THE BEST 

ORCHESTRAS 

Dancing Thursday, Saturday and 

Sunday Nites 

SWIM and PLAY 

IN THE 
SPRING-FED WATERS OF 

LAKE BON-GO 

Bloomington's Outdoor 
Recreation Center 



If You Want 

to look your best on 

all Occassions 

Try 

"The MODEL WAY" 



PHONE 362 



LAUNDRY CO. 



Est. 1892 



□ C=E3BC 



23 



D«=araE 



E3E 



iQE^O 



Frank A. Howell, 

President 



O. P. Skaggs, 

Vice-President 

H. E. DuMars, 
Asst. Cashier 



Price N. Jones. 
Vice-President 

D. A. Havden, 
. Isst. C ashier 



C. R. McElhenv, 
Cashier 







DIRECTORS: 

George H. Cox Frank A. Howell C. R. McElhenv O. P. Skaggs 

H. D. Hanger Price N. Jones James E. O'Neil A. D. Shaeker 

Ralph J. Heffernan W. D. Alexander J. W. Probasco 



Corn Belt bank 



Bloomington, Illinois 



CAPITAL STOCK 

SURPLUS 

UNDIVIDEDPROFITS 



$100,000.00 
$200,000.00 
$100,000.00 



Organized under the 

jaws of Illinois 
December 2nd, 1891 





TELEPHONE 2160 
PEOPLES BANK BLDG. 



□ o=ac 



EJBE=OD 



24 



"PAGEANT CAST 



In Order of Appearance 



Voice of McLean County Dr. Harry Howell 

PAGES 

ELLSWORTH 
Eloise Miller. Julia More I a ml, Esther Skeen, Lillian 
Peterson, Helen Coale, Theliha Bremer. 

QUEENS 

Centennial Queen Lucille Ward, Colfax 

Official Hostess Evelyn Bye. Bloomington 

ATTENDANTS 

Edith Henrietta Heldt, Bloomington; Lelah Jane 
White, Bloomington; Mildred I. Daglcy, Bloomington; 
Crystal Pointer, Bloomington; Esther L. Haynes, Nor- 
mal; Catherine McCraig, Bloomington; Clara Belle 
Pepple, Normal; Florence Larkin, Bloomington; 
Frances Kingery, Bloomington; Lillian Houston, Nor- 
mal: Vauna E. Hutson, Normal; Mahle B. Blunk, Nor- 
mal. 

TOWNSHIPS 

Esther Genzel, Gridley; Irene Siron, Lexington; 
France- Stubblet'icld. Mt. Hope; Opal Hotchki--, Dale; 
Helen Marie Kin-ell. Cheney's drove; Mildred Wein- 
heimer, Dry drove; Naomi Murphy. Allin; l.ncile 
Wissmiller, Bine Mound; Camilla Hardy, Anchor; 
Hilda Moore. Downs; Juanita Folger, Danvers; Vir- 
ginia Carlock, White Oak; Vera Lobdell, Lawndale; 
Doris Yordy, Randolph; Nelva Margaret Weber, 
Arrowsmith; Bernice Woliung, Bellflower; Mae Jordan. 
Chenoa; Beulah Cox, Cropsey; \'era Stanger, Dawson; 
A^nes Thomas, Old Town; Elverta Erdman, Yates; 
Olga B. Flesher, Money Creek; Fern I'rahm, Hudson; 
Helen Smith, Funk's Grove; Alice Strayer, Empire; 
Mary Vanneman, Towanda. 

INDIANS 

[MPROVED ORDER OF REDMEN— DEGREE 

OF POCAHONTAS 

Shabona No. 18, Tonawanda No. 48, Decawanda 

No. 80, Minnehaha No. 1 

Chief Machina W. A Wells 

■ of the Tribe H. H. McCond 

Seoul on Horse L. W. Lawyer 

Religions Scout Kaanakuck W. C. Lawyer 

M inister C. Hayden Foster 

SCOUTS— J. E. Powell, A. N. Shumaker, C. H. 
Lawyer, Ralph Condon. 

BRAVES A. E. King. Leo Fischer, M. A. Klawit- 
ter, H. d. Brewer. F. L. Teas, P. R. Busick, Maurice 
Busick, William Radley, R, M Ploense, S. F. Miller. 
Ben Swart/, S. A. Wishard. William Brewer, V. B. 
Lhamon. \Y. M. Ploense, Pete < Ittes, ( \. Vnderson, 
Robert Catlow, Arthur Zook, 10. C. Ploense, \\el E. 
Olson, Richard 1.. Cook, Bus Lawyer. 

s<ji\\\.s WD CHILDREN Mrs. J. i: Powell, 
Freida Butler. Ann Butler, Rose Lawyer. Maggie 
Smith. Evelyn Cook. Pansy Cook, Ethel Shultz, Ellen 



Schwartz, Iri- Sharf, Amy Busick, Hazel Lacey, Edith 
Sears, I. eon., Hendrix, Callie Miller, Tillie Wittmuss, 
Ruth lea-, Ruthie Teas, Selma dravitt, Dorothea 
Gravitt, Essie Stuckey, Hilda Eery, Evelyn [ery, Ina 
Ross, Emilia Arnold, Margaret Novacek, Alma I 
tain. James Arnold. 



FIRST SETTLERS 

RANDi H.l'll I i IWNSH! I' 

Oren Orendorff, Mrs. Abbie Robinson Orendorff, 
John Weiting, Mrs. Blanche Rhodes Weiting, Carl 
Riley, Mrs. Anna Alexander Riley. Everett E. Rust, 
Mr-. Grace Hollis Rust, Walter Weishaar, Mrs. Nor- 
ma Brock Weishaar, Wilmer Weishaar, Elmer H. 
Orendorff. Mrs. Caroline Cruikshank Orendorff, G. 
Corwin Cruikshank, Mrs. Ida Orendorff Cruikshank, 
June E. Cruikshank, Albert M. Reed, Mrs. Elsie Oren- 
dorff Reed, C. Hayden Foster, Mrs. Zcna Orendorff 
Foster, d. Stanley Downs, Mrs. Alta Orendorff Down-. 
Dorothy Riley, Donald Rust, Fern Riley, Jena Lea 
Riley, Dean Riley, Wallace Weiting. Kenneth Weiting. 

FIRST SCHOOL 

CARLOCK 

readier Ruth Conger 

PUPILS- Dorothy Hamilton, Verda Stahly, Roberta 
Hayslip, Mahle Wasnak, Betty Wheeler, Marguerite 
McDonald. Bernice Crump, Catherine Zimmerman, 
Bernadine Miller, John Slauffer, Donald Carlock, Lary 
Stahly. Billy Bedell. Willard Bedell. 

FIRST WEDDING SCENE 
OLD-FASHIONED FOLKS 

COMMUNITY SOCIAL CLl I. 

Minister Mr. E. M. Fox 

Bride Margaret Shad 

Groom J aim- Yeagle 

Mr-. Harry Yeagle. Mr- II, II. KoehKr, Mr-. Har- 
vej Feasley, Mollie McGreevey, Mr-. \V. I.. Rauney, 
Mr-. Will Haker, Mrs. Leonard Barnard. Mr-. Warren 
Dod-oii, Mr-. John Burrows, Mr-, (ha- \nderson, 
Mr-. II. Lenime, Mrs. George Sweeney, Mi-- \. 
Gossman, Mr-. G. R. Womack, Mi-- Mildred Moon, 
II d. Feasley, II. H. Koehler, W. L. Rauney, Dan 

Shad. Will Haker. Harry Yeagle, F. L. Barnard. J. M. 
Burrow-. H. l.emnic, Cha-. Vnderson, Warren Dodson, 
Silas Shad. Geo. Sweeney, Ben ( )tti-. Raj Woui.uk. 
Harold Feasley, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Campbell. 

RAILROAD BUILDERS 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA No 110 

Bosses William Hull and ["nomas Ball 

Water Boy James Lyle Horn 

Charles Ball, Floyd Burnamier, Ernes) Ball. Fred 
Ingle. Paul Ploense, Albert Shank-. James M. Harn, 
Orville Harper. Harley Greene, Jess lien iii.in. Marion 
Young. William llarke. 



25 



r i^^=i r =i r =i l =1 1 ■■■ II ==] [===i===]l========]l 3I^BB^>B 



WILLIAMS 

OIL-O-MATIC 

is making 

the second century 

even more prosperous 



THE Williams Oil-O-Matic Heating Corporation is proud to do its 
part in making McLean County's second century even more pro- 
gressive and prosperous. Nearly 3,000 dealers in 44 countries sell Oil- 
O-Matic oil burners and Ice-O-Matic electric refrigerators. Each week 
hundreds of Williams employees receive thousands of dollars in sal- 
aries. This money is spent with Bloomington merchants, who, in turn, 
spend the money for McLean County products. 

Williams Oil-O-Matic burners and Ice-O-Matic refrigerators are made 
right in Bloomington — and making good in their home town. Hun- 
dreds of McLean County homes are healthier and happier because of 
these two greatest modern improvements. 

While you are here for the Centennial Pageant, be sure to visit the 
Williams factory. See how carefully these famous products are built. 
You will thoroughly enjoy seeing this most up-to-date plant which was 
built from the profits of these McLean County products which add so 
much to the world's healthful comfort. 



WILLIAMS OIL-O-MATIC HEATING CORPORATION 

BLOOMINGTON 
ILLINOIS 

26 



CIVIL WAR 

M> >UNT H< >PE, FUNK'S GR( C\ E, DALE 
1 < IWNSHIPS 

The Ballet 

NORTHERNERS— Jane Stubblefield, Ada Wil- 
liams, Hazel Berger, Edna I Hit/. Virginia Nichols, 
Jean Canfield, Eloise Moberly, Normadel Tabner, Myr- 
tle Bode, Rachel Stubblefield, Vivian Beers, Annabel) 
Longworth. 

SOUTHERNERS Helen Barker, Helen Paulsen. 
Frances Outlaw, Helen Moberly, Alice Romans, Ruth 
Kidwell, Wonell Pitts, Kathryn Mount, Harriet Bry- 
ant. Eleanor Dodgson, Lavon Kinsey, Mao Dodgson. 

SPIRITS OF WAR— Frances Berger, Frances 
Mount, Dons Bode, Melba Foster. 

SPIRITS OF PEACE— Marj Paulsen, Alice Pitts, 
Mildred Quinn, Helen Dislier. 

Lincoln Mr. Fred Strehle 

Southern Soldier Mr. Frank Crickenberger 

Northern Soldier 

Slave 

THE LIVING FLAG 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL— Mary Underwood, Erma 
Donahue, Charlotte Dethart, Jeanette Dethart, Jean 
Vandervart, Betty Jane Tibbitts, Helen Webb. Sara 
Mae Mommcn. Helen Alverson, Marjory Hartenbower. 

Elizabeth Bluemke, Nancy Hamilton, Effie Lou Crane, 
Dorothy Ann Clark. Jane Ellen Warrick, Elsie Singley, 
Dorothy English, Charlotte Ratcliffe, Helen Broughton, 
June Bardwell, Olive Hopper. 

WASHINGTON SCHOOL - Sherillyn Saurer, 
Claire Wilson, Fay Wilson. Ruth Mary Heffernan, Jean 
Jeffrie-. Florence Berner, Betty Jane Con, Margaret 
Pixley, Harriet Fuller. Virginia Young, Helen Meeker, 
Marilyn Bieneman, Chreeln Waterson, Rosemary John- 
son, Shirley Ray, Mary Welch. Eleanor Pearson, Helen 

Mary Pearson. Mars Jane Fike. Helen Daly. 

LINCOLN SCHOOL— Margaret Hayes. Audrej 
Callaway, Betty Jean Cox, Betty lungerich, Ellen Dry- 
bread, Lou Ann Lloyd, Dorothj Hurst, Bertha Meara, 
Marjorie Meara, Dorothy Bonke. Hilda LaBounty, 
Charlotte Gerling, Mignon Gerling, Gladys Kuhn, Mar 
garct Johnson, Gloria Popendick, Marj Fryer, Bettj 
Woodward. Dorothy Dornaus, Barbara Blose, Bettj 
Lou Protzman. 

EDWARDS SCHOOL — Betty Scharf, Ereline 
Smith, Eugenia Weatherford, Doris Culbertson, Lucille 
Garling, Edith Garling, Bettj Lou Morrison. Edna 
Davis. Mildred Uptegrove, Alice Sharfenberg, Helen 
Linton. Marjorie Woll, Maxitic Berger. Gene Ann 
Gore, Lelia Mae Philip, Thelma Enlow, Evalyn Neu- 

bauer. Louise P.ittner. Lucille Presley, Helene Herder. 
Betty Henderson. 

HORATIO BENT SCHOOL— Kosalee Meents, 
Dorothj Kelley, Margaret Kelley, Dorothj Hall. Daisj 
Hall. Man. Cooney, Fern Green, Virginia (raw lord. 

SHERIDAN Si HOOL— Virginia Roeske, Ccraldine 
Schroeder, Pauline Reichter, Lorraine Reichter, Anna 
Kettenring, Alice Kettenring, Dorothy Taylor, Nelle 
Taylor, Lorene Burnett, Charlotte t ruze, Eleanor Siz< 

more. 



WESTON— Elizabeth McKinney, Ruth II 

NORMAL— Mary Anna [mig. 

11 i N SCHOOL Mario,, Grace 

Mary Katherine Schuler, Virginia Jones, Katherine 
Erickson, Bettj Griesheimer, Helen J. Read. Evelyn 
Silgar. Barbara Lou Hill. Margaret Barrows, Marie 
Lorraine Hoeft. 

EMERSON SCHOOL Dorothy Jaspers. Mabel C. 

Hendryx, Viva Lanham, Louise Quanstrom, Dorothy 
Heinecke, Esther Wilson, Mabel Shelley, Margaret 
Henly, Martha Hallett. Nelda Dodson, Catherine Dod- 
son. 

IRVING SCHOOL— Norma June Nuckles, Bi 
\un Bradshaw, Virginia Freedlund, Lorene Hagood, 
Virginia Leininger, Bernadine Hopper, Bettj Hopper. 
Rose Man. Holland, Doris Holland, Clara Mae I '■ 
Weese, Marlyn Frank, Faye Frank, Hazel Butler, 
Charlotte Beatty, Doris Vanterstrand, lone Rhymer, 
Bettj Warmbier, Alice Olson, Betty Bartley. 

RAYMOND SCHOOL— Anna Paul, Mable Mink. 
Dorothy Snyder, Neva Aldridge, Martha Estam, Ethel 
Olsen, Frances Weakly, Bernadine Wright, Mary I -a 
bell Anderson, Winnifred Arnold, Margery Snyder. 

Marjory Land. 

WASHINGTON DISTRICT — Dorothy Wilson. 
Mildred Wilson, Jean Hildebrandt. 

INDUSTRIAL HOME— Edna Carter. Frances 
Lewis, Doris Crouder, Virginia Meyers, Myra Joesting, 

Bessie Mann, Hittie Cottrell. 

OLD TOWN HOME BUREAU (Holder)— Mary 
Helen Kinnions, Helen Percy, Margaret Doyle, Ros 
zella Barry, Mary Doyle, Anna Benjamin. 

THE HARVEST BALLET 

CORN (Chenoa, Yates, and Lexington Townships 
— Ruth Gillespie, Ferae Strcid. Nelta Sandham, Bernice 
Harms. Irma Sandmyer, Luella Yaughan, Bessie Leek. 
Virginia Streid. lean Jones. Mary Lankcr, Beulah Blak- 
ney, Nora Smith, Ruth Ann Lauber, Mozelle Garrett, 
Bernadine Heins, Ruth Crum, Mildred Crum, lone 
Brandt, Helen Tobin, Birdella Marie Johnson. Ruth 
Dringenberg, Blanche Elliott, Pauline Baumer. Mar- 
garet Vaughan. 

RAIN (Blue Mound Township)— Ruth Phipps, Mil- 
dred Wikowsky, Helen Kinsella, Clarice Wills, Mar- 
garet Houser, Beatrice Blagg, Gertrude Kerber, Doris 
Martin, Elizabeth Wissimiller, Regina McClellan, Eva 
Kerber, Maurine Wissimiller. 

TOILERS I Martin and Lexington Townshi| 
Bernadine Kite. Dorothy Lobdell. Alice Arnold. Lucille 

Jenkins. Garnet Hasty, Udine Miller. Dori- Wright, 
Edna Downey, Kathryn Messer, Maxine Steele, Evelyn 
Bane, Helen Grubb. 

PONIES I Martin and Lexington Townshi 

Bethel Weeks. Annabelle Scrogin, Dorothj Kinsella, 
Georgia Cheever, Doris Fuller, Lorraine Arramy, 
Frances Rigg, Verneil Garrett, Virginia Dale, Mar- 
garet Gilmore, Harriet Kimball, Madeline Kinsella, 

RAINBOW (Cropsey Township) Imoj Meeker, 

\\ ihua McClure, Maurie Wood, Edith Elliott, Ella Mae 
McCIure, Beryl Thomas. Helen Brucker, Margaret 
Elliott, Lois Elliott, Emma Louis.- Cox, Bettj Meeker, 

Wihna Thompson 

I'll E SIN Lavon Kinsej 



27 



□ »sg|=][^=] | _|[ E)l 31 II ==][==S^=]E=====][==][=1EB=0 

! 

The Public Utility's 
Community Interest 

I^kJ other business in a community has a greater 
^ interest in that community than the public 
utility which serves it. The growth of its business de- 
pends directly upon the growth of the community. 

The better the community serves its community, the 
more likely it is to help that community along the path 
of growth and development. Thus, each depends upon 
the other for its welfare and prosperity. 

This company tries to do its part in this community. 
Sharing in these responsibilities, through its assist- 
ance in community affairs, this utility contributes its 
part to the general welfare. It believes that these are 
part of its duties as a citizen. 

A citizen wherever we serve. 



I 



Illinois 

Power and Light 

Corporation 



28 



WORLD WAR HEROES AND 
RED CROSS NURSES 

LOUIS DAVIS POST \< i 56 

FIRE BALLET 

WIND — Bernadine Benson, Ruth Watson, Catherine 

Donaldson, Alice Wilson, Eleanor Whitehouse, Char- 
leen Davies. Alice Beyer. Trunetta Keys, Marj Lou 
Johnson, Louise Temple. 

SMOKE— Mildred Peard, Mary Ellen Recce. Myra 
Anne Peairs. Mary Louise Bargcr, Laverne Riddle 
Betty Bliss, Helen Campbell, Josephine Walker. Alice 
McGuire, Joy Sylvester, Juanita Biddle. 

FIRE — Elene Welsh, Mildred Landis. Catherine 
Thomson, Helen Ayers, Sena Sampson. Marjorie Mar- 
tin. Arbutus Frink. Annabelle Innis, I.aurene Zabel. 
Hildretl Sampson. Alice Blum. Lillian Sage. Nancy 
Evans, Maurine Blum. Mary Fern Martin. Sarah 
Walker, Ruth Calville, Frances White. 

Spirit of Progress Marjorie Wilson 

BOY SCOUTS 

Bull Robb. John Ball. Leo Broughton. Page Proctor. 
Bill Fraenkle. Wayne Piery, James Chrisman, Edgar 
Moore, Ogden Shutes, Charles Mercier, Buck Manskey, 
Lyle Graham, Max Hersey, Charles Steel. John Yarbe. 
Maurice Vincent. Edward Sheney. 

MUSIC 

STANFORD 
Leota Thompson, Yelma Mullinax. Winifred Lee. 
Dorene Murphy. Elsie Kaufman. Bessie Harbert. Beryl 
Rhodovi, Effie Ferel. 

GOLD AND SILVER 

HEY WORTH 
Dorothy Barnes, Eleanor Barnes. Mary Jane Fogler, 
Marguerite Holderly. Winifred Iseminger. Gladys 
Wiseman. Marie Liscom. Ruth Sutter, Inez Allen. 
Marjorie Lambert, Inez Bishop. Eunice Yordy. 

AVIATION 

LEROY 
Louise Lamont, Yiolet Webb, Marjorie Cline, Vir- 
ginia Strayer, Betty Phares, Doris Jones, Rachel Bar- 
num, Jane Barnhart, Virginia Sigler, Margradell Doo- 
ley. Louise Banner. Winifred Banner. Pauline White- 
sell, Ellen Skillman. Yera Humphrey. Blanche Bleavins. 

DANCE 
GRIDLEY 

Marguerite Boies. Alberta Kaufman. Aldene Brown. 
Vesta Andrews. Aldene Hoobler, Kathryn Taylor, 
Helen Froelich, Angela Hayes, Grace Boies, Dorothj 
Schramm, Lovada Graton, Aleda 1'rey. 

MANUFACTURING 

MOUNT HOPE, FINKS GROVE, DALE 
1 I IWNSHIPS 
Mary Helen Briggs, Beulah Dodson, Betty June 
Mas. .u. D,,ris Van Ness. Edith Tindall, Dorothj Smith. 



Jam- Eva LongWOrth, Adell Bode, Martha Jane Hutchi- 
son, Imogene Sweringen, Beverly Dewhurst, Virginia 
Quinn, Eileen Hilligan. 

TENNIS 

DANVERS 
I. eta Mae Cooke, Vivian Nowling, Ronalda Nowling, 
Harriet Ayers, Mary Ellen Schertz, Jane Risser, Louise 
Deal, Irene Meeks, June Ayers, Virginia Otto, Loretta 

Melil. Fay < 'wen. 

GOLF GIRLS AND CADDIES 

1 ' 'WANDA 

Mildred Eincham, Lucy Dell Lyms, Marcella Wise, 
Virginia Orendorff, Lucille Cary, Alice Cummins. Mar- 
jory Stapleton, Mable Alice Hirst. 

Clifton Allen Haines, Harold Tyler, Clinton Ross 
Vanneman, Robert Ray Bryant. Billy Special. Ramond 
Henrj Quinsel, Joseph Special, Buddy Peden. 

SWIMMING 

LAKESIDE COUNTRY CLUB 

Elsa Raisbeck, Annie Mae Brazelton, Carroll Costi- 
gan, Ann Lowry, Martha Humphreys, Helen Sansoni, 
Mary Elsie Humphreys, Doris Worsham, Mary Ann 
Costello, Rachel Zweng. Nancy Raisbeck, Louise 
Tobias. 

Albert Beich. Jr., Tommy Trenkle, Franklin Tobias. 
Paul Keller, Clair Staler. Bob Dunn, George Hatzen- 
buhler. Jimmy Gardner, Jimmy Worsham. Billy Bur- 
ling. Eugene Behr, Robert Morse, Dick Bridge. Jimmy 
Schnepp. 

SCIENCE 

W. J. Cash. Towanda; S. M. Elkins, Bloomington: 
Varner Longworth. McLean; J. E. Smith. Bellflower. 

COMMERCE 

LEROY 
Pauline Amlong. Dorothy Bailey, Elba Clear. Leona 
Dolly, Lucille Godsell. Alta Gassner, Marcella Kinder. 
Eloise Bonnett, Novella McKinley, Mildred O'Neill, 
Alice Russell. Lillie Sartain. Yerna Wasman, Wallace 
Wesley. Hazel Wesley. Ruth Wiedner, Gertrude Rat- 
liff, Margie Brown. Marjorie Ball, Nellie Hosier, Helen 
Brining. 

CENTENNIAL CHOIR 

Leader Mrs Porter Phillips. Bloomington 

Soprano S. .1. .i -t Lela Mayer Long, Bloomington 

Baritone Soloist Harold Dale Saurer, Bloomington 

Mrs. Walter Anderson. Ethel Bucholz. Mabel Buc- 
holz, Mrs. Litta Braman. Mrs. (I. W. Bedell. Helen 
Bardenhagen. Vivian Beeler, Mrs. Herbert Bird. Mrs. 
Jacob Brown, Colete Bradshaw, Mrs. W. S. Bunn. 
Ruth Bedell, Maude Builta. Peggy Coekill, Genevieve 
Carlock, Mrs. H. B. Carlock, Louise Combs, Ruth Carl- 
son. Bernice Cooper, Anna Cook, Anna Mae Bova, Ma) 
Curley, Mrs. George Drexler. Ruth Drexler, Jane 
Dornaus, Marjorie Dornaus, Dorothy Davis, Jean Dal- 
rymple, Mabel Driscoll, Martha Eades, Holly Foley. 
Beverly FYederickson, Ruth Felton. Hulda Greenburg. 
Mrs. lames Gassaway, Helen Granabeck, \'iolet 
Gnuschke, Mrs. Fred Hughes, Dorothy Hayner, Ruth 



29 



Bte=nr=i i i p 



I ALEXANDER LUMBER CO< 



Lumber 



31 11=1153=013 



Building: Material 



C=S3[=: EZ]t==0 



Consult Our Plan Service Department 



C=3[=1[=1E=0 



Phone 5504 



PROMPT SERVICE 

Courteous Treatment 



MILK 

That's 'Better 

PASTEURIZED 
DAIRY PRODUCTS 

H 
Friendly Service 

§-§ 

NORMAL SANITARY DAIRY, INC. 

Phone 5698 



Bloomington 

Battery Service 

Company 



302 E. Grove St. 



Automotive Battery and Electrical Service 







KELLY SPRINGFIELD TIRES 

SPEEDOMETER SERVICE 
FOR ALL CARS 

Phone 83 



n<-=^nr=ii IP 



:e3Cs=oq 



30 



Hurd, Edith M. Hurd, Dorothy Homuth, Lois Hovey, 
Mabel Holland, Emma Hughes. Nellie Hathaway. Mr- 
Charlea Halting, Miriam Havighurst, Mildred Home, 
Charlotte Haynes, Mr- Joe tnstone, Mr- Charles Ives, 
Cora John-on. Doris Johnson, Mary Lois Klineau, 
Charlotte Klitzing. Mrs. Clara Koos, Buelah Kimes, 
Clara Knecht, Lillie Knecht. Margaret Kendall. Jose- 
phine I.ewler. Grace Loefiler. Mr-. I'.. M. Lebkuecher, 
[Catherine Lunin, Vera Lindgren, Kitty Lawbaugh, 
Bernadine Lederer, Lela Long. Mr- R. V Myei 

Mabel Murray. Helen Meyer, Mr-. Harry Miller. 
Frances Meyer. Lois Meyers, Cecil McCraw. Faye 
Ma-t. Helen Millard. Frances Osman, Margaret 
O'Brien, Theresa O'Neill, Margaret O'Neill. Mrs A. 
G. OrendortT. Virginia Osborn, Mrs. Guy Palmer. Man 
rine Palmer, Pauline Palmer, Eleanor Palmer. Mr- 
Wm. Pleines. Mrs. Carl Petlow, Mildred Powell, Mr- 
Rev. Wm. J. Parker. Mildred Polite. Alice Porterfield, 
Mary Quast, Maxine Ross, Elsie Rhinehart, Rubj 
Roust. Ruth Rife. Edna Rossman, Mrs. R. L. Sleeter, 
Mrs. T. C. Slattery, Mrs. E. E. Spencer, Lois Shake 
speare. Mrs. John F. Smith. Ruth Stephens. Ella Syl- 
vester, Betty Sylvester, Mrs. Wilbur Stewart. Mabel 
Stewart, Grace Scott Schultz, Grace Audclle Schultz, 
Pauline Simmons, Marjorie Simmons, Mrs. Mabel 
Smock, Dorothy Stone, Alice Stone, Mrs. A. Toman. 
Mrs. George Thomas, Frieda Trimmer. Frances Van 
Huss, Esther Whitmer, Margaret Van Winkle. Eva 
Van Winkle. Lela Van Winkle. Mrs. Roland Wood. 
Estella Wullenwaber, Mrs. Homer Wright, Mary 
Louise Wright. Louise Warton, Dorothy Walters. Lil- 
lian Wilcox. Nellie Webber, Anna Webber, Florence 
Westen, Mrs. L. E. Witt, Carrie Webber, Faye Zenor, 
Roy Atkinson, Clarence Adkins. Guy W. Bedell. Jacob 
H. Brown. Raymond Baugh, Glen Dornaus, George 
Drexler. Dwight Drexler, R. Frederickson. George 
Goelzer, Martin Homuth, W. H. Kerrick. Bert Kinne. 
Richard Lanham. E. M. Lebkuecher, Dewitt Miller, 
Clarence Marshall, Oren Meeker, James McKee, 
Fielder Meyer-. Wm. Orendorff, Rev. Wm. J. Parker. 
Dave Ryden, E. D. Robb, Ted Riggen. Robert Read 
Wilbur Stewart. I. J. Stewart, Harry Stone, Peter 
Somers, Eugene Stretch, T. C. Slattery. Harold Saurer. 
Dr. Chas. Shultz, D. W. Shilley, R. S. Sleeter. W. J. 
Sayer-. Geo. Thomas. John Van Huss. Emil J. Wich- 
man. Mr-. Jerry Jager. Mrs. Arthur Breneman, Doro- 
thy Long. Sylvia Goddard, Janice Meece, Mr-. Ed. 

Duesing, Mr-. John JontZ, Lucille Sylvester, Betty Syl- 
vester. Frances Goddard, Bernice Balke. Lillian Hogan. 
Mr-. Jeanette Miller. Mrs. W. Anderson, Mrs. Otto 
Johnson, Helen Campbell, Virginia Osborn. Ruth Pep- 
low. Elvera Lindgren. Mary Slattery. Mr-. Arthur 

Pearson, Faye Ma-t. Mr-. Agnes Clutz. 

ORCHESTRA 

Piano-Director K. W. Bradshaw 

Violins: Porter Phillips, Arthur Dornaus, Hen 
Orendorfl Bass: Fred Burke. Flute: Fred Schroeder. 
Clarinets: Walter Ewing, Vincent Dornaus. Trumpets: 
Fred Erdman, E Burke. Trombone: William Piter- 
son. Drum- and Tympani: Albert Grabbs. 

PAGEANT TALENT COMMITTEE 

HAROLD DALE SAURER, Chairman 

Carlock— Mrs. Bruce Hamilton, Mr-, C. R. McDon- 
ald. Mr-. (",. W. Bedell. Mr. G. W Bedell. J. K. Esh. 

Colfax — Mr-. Daisy Plott. Mr-. Duboise Marquis, 
Mr. Prank Espey, Mr-. Dr. Mcintosh, Mrs. W Ken- 
neth Harris, Mr. James Fielding. 



31 



Cooksville— Mr-. Ed, McClellan, Mrs. <> I. Wright 
Mr-. I.L.yd Richardson. 

Covell-AIrs. Homer Johnson, Mrs. .1 F. Diet/, Mr- 
Chas. Nichols. Mrs. Orin Stubblefield. 

Chenoa — Mayor Schultze, Mr-. Chas. Elliott, Mr. J 

\ rwardock, Mr-. Prank Thayer. Mr, and Mr-. D. M. 

Stutzman. 

Cropsey— Mrs. Walter Elliott, Mrs. Chas. Crumps- 
ton. Mrs. J. \Y. McCulloUgh, Mr. H. L. Meeker, Mr- 
Merle Hall. 

Vrrowsmith— Mrs. W. K. Kauffold, Mr. and Mrs. 
Raymond Webber. Mr. Ed. School. 

Bcllflower— Mr. W I Rose, Mr. J. E. Smith. Mr. 
Loren R. Lewi-. Dr. Copenhaver. 

Danvers — Mr. and Mr-. Walter K. Voder. Miss Jen- 
nie Zook. Prof. R. J. William-, Mr-. I.oui- Strehle. 

Down- — Mrs. Geo. Honor, Miss Nell Dooley, G. L. 
Clark. Lym Lanier, Arthur Dooley, F. R. Cole. 

Ellsworth — Mrs. Harry Millay. Mr. Carl Kreitzer, 
Mr-. Florence VanGundy, Miss Gladys Bane. Mrs. Ed 
Bramer. 

< iridley — W. H. Boies, Mrs. Verna Moss. 

Holder — Mrs. Ben Coale, Mrs. Melvin Hopt, Mrs. 
Earl Percy, Mrs. Floyd Campbell, Mrs. Harry Bower. 

Hudson — Miss Nina May Johnson, Mrs. James B. 
Ambrose, Mrs. A. C. Helleman. 

LcRoy — Mrs. C. D. Jones, Mr. C. E. Joiner, Mrs. 
Ray Whitesell, Joe Eden, Miss Obe Dooley, Mr- 
lame- Wilson. 

McLean — Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Baker, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Palmer. Chas. Vancy, Paul McFarland. 

Randolph — Mrs. Corwin Cruikshank, F. L. Wake- 
field, Miss Maudela Baylcs, Tony Kwashlgroh. 

Saybrook — Mayor D. C. Haines. E. F. Ring, Mrs. 
Marion Weakman, Mrs. Arthur Woolev. Miss Minnie 
Martins. E. M. Merritt, Miss Mabel Easterbrook. 

Shirley — Mrs. Charles Disher. 

Stanford — Mrs. Elmer Naffziger, Ceo. L. Morris, \ 
R. Wet/el. 

Towanda — Mrs. D. E. Henderson, Wilbur Cash, 
Hans Sachs, Mr. and Mrs. Simon Moon, Miss Lucylei 
Jameson. Mrs. Haider Burrows. 

Hex worth — Mrs. Walter Wieshaar. Miss Hazel Ry- 
burn. 

Lexington — Florence E. Wright. Mrs. Harry Blue. 
Mr-. W. H. Welch. C. L. Heiser. Mr. and Mr-. E \ 
Reddiger, Mrs. Nettie B. Dement. 

Weston — Lewis Heins, Mrs. Orland Kriedner, Mrs 
Ed Erdman, C. E. Graves, Mrs. Fred Jacobs. 

Bloomington and Normal— Mrs. Robert Wilson, Mrs 
Porter Phillips, Mr-. P. Johnson, Rev. Frank L. Breen, 
Mrs. Dr. Piears, Mr. Adolpb Mols, Miss Frances Kess- 
ler. Mi-- Cecil McCraw, Mr-. R C. Baldwin. Mr. Ar- 
nold Lovejoy, Mr. Dewej Montgomery, Mr. Richard 
O'Connell, Mr. Wm. Hull. Mr. 1.. Wellmerling, Mr. J. 
II Judy, Mr. W \. Wells, Mr-. V I). McKinney, Mis- 
ciara Brian, Mr. and Mr- Clarence Ropp, Mrs 
Thomas J. Lancaster, Mr. and Mr-. Sam I'.lkins. 

LIVING FLAG COMMITTEE 

MRS. ROBERT WILSON, Chairman 
Mr-. E. L. Linton. Mrs. Broughton, Mr-. P.. K 

Del'ew. Mr-. E. 1''. Kcllex. Mr-. Paul Roeske, Mrs 

II (. raylor, Mr- fohn Hurst, Mrs. E Meeker. 
Mr- II Rodger-. Mr-. Dalrymple, Mrs. J. Rodgers, 
Mr-. W. .1. Read. Mr-. W. C. \nder-on. Mrs. I 
Setchell, Mrs. P. M Lebkuecher, Mr- Pen Kraft. Mrs 

Mverson, Mrs. Ceo Johnson, Mr- Bienneman, 
Mrs. Frank C. Wilson, Mrs. Joe Hallett, Mr- D \\ 
Shelley, Mr-. Harry Henley. 



g<=g3[=H IE 



31 IE3E=OD 



i 



19 



s 



Some Day 

you will have a camp at 
Lake Bloomingtoii 

Why Wait? 

The beauty of Wisconsin resorts — 
The water sports of Michigan 
are at your door ^D 




PUMPING AND FILTERATION PLANT 
LAKE BLOOMINGTON 



All lots are underpriced. Another season should see material ad- 
vances in lease privileges. Now is the time to plan 
a "week-end" or "permanent" camp 
at Lake Bloomin&ton. 



BLOOMIINCTON WATER CO. 

ROOM VMM. MOMCOi; HUM.. 



! 



n/ ^=if=ii i r 






PROGRAMME 



^V^- 



McLean County Historical Pageant 

of Progress 



Written, Rehearsed and Staged 

by the 

HARRY MILLER CO. 

71 West 45th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 

$* 

STAFF FOR THE HARRY MILLER CO. 

Centennial Manager and Director Weldon B. Wade 

Pageant Master H. E. Hill 

Stage Manager Murray Gibson 

Wardrobe Mistress Edna A. Mill 



Trumpeters announce arrival of Miss BloomiiiK- 
ton-Normal and attendants. 

Address of Welcome — Mi" Bloomington- 
Xnrmal : 

"Fellow Citizens "t Bloomington ami McLean Coun- 
ty: In the name of the inhabitants of this goodlj citj 
and in honor of our celebration this evening, 1 bid you 
a most cordial welcome: 

"When the dreams and romances of the early thirties 
find their culmination in the seemingly prosaic but no 
less romantic present, a storj i- presented having po- 
tentialities for interest tar above tin- average tale of 
in Hon. Unt when in addition, this story i- enacted by 
the -on* ami grandsons, daughter- and grand-daughters 

of the sturdy men and courageous women, the pioneers 
of Ml 1 ear i OUnty, there is that golden link which adds 
I,, thi ; tOUCh of appeal. The McLean County 

Historical Pageant of Progress is just that story. 

"Whether you were horn within this County; 

whether you have departed from your home in some 
; country; whether you are a native of some other 
count), town, -tate. ,.r country and have come t" join 
with u- in our celebration, in the name of the Citj of 
Bloomington and the Count] of McLean. I hid you a 

in. .-I . ordial w el( ome." 

Trumpeters announce the arrival of Miss 
McLean County, followed by her 30 Townships. 

Mi-- McLean County : 

"Welcome. Welcome, Miss McLean Count) and you, 
her daughter-, hair Townships, Welcome to Blooming- 
ton and to thi- Historical Pageant." 
Response of Mi-- McLean County: 

"Miss Bloomington-Normal, in the name of McLean 
• ounty and her Fair ["ownships, I acknowledge this 

your welcome. It i- fitting and proper thai we pau-e 
here for a few in ents t" turn back the page- ol our 

histor) and refresh our mind- with tin deeds of those 
-turdy men and courageous women who here began a 
march of progress the direction of which ha- ever been 
forward. Ma) FORWARD he your watchword your 
goal, perfection. We are happy tonight I" l» ., pari of 
thi- great assemblai 



INTERLUDE ONE 

THE VOICE OF McLEAN COUNTY 
"( tut of the mist primeval of legend and romance 
The West enrolled in glory, sublime iii it- expanse; 
h- endless grass-grown prairie- waving in the hreeze, 
It- rock-ribbed shining hillsides girdled by lordly trees. 
It- wide and verdant valleys where mighty river- (low 
It- valleys treasure laden, it- minaret- of -now — 
These and a thousand wonder- that poet may not tell 
Greeted the tribes of Red Man— lived by their magic 

-pell." 

EPISODE ONE 

Till-'. 1X1)1. \.\— 1800-USJJ 
INDIAN CAMP LIFE AND PRIMITIVE 

OCCUPATK iXS 
When the land was first explored it was inhabit- 
ed by the Red Man where they came from in the 
beginning, how long the) dwelt in North America, 
what people- the) replaced, is a matter of much 
dispute. 

The Indians in McLean County were mostly 
Kickapoos, though main belonged to the Delaware 
and Pottawattomie tribes. The) cultivated the soil 
ver) little and depended almost entirel) upon the 
chase. Hunting, fishing and dancing constituted 
their enjoyment. Their great interest in life was 

to procure food and devour it and tO Subdue their 

enemies. 

We depict the primitive life of the Kickapoo. 

INTERLUDE TW< i 
Till \ I lit i I I] \L LEAN i 

"From home- in eastern cities the) turn towards the 

West; 
None but the brave and buoyant; onl) the very best. 
With heart strong and undaunted, with nerve to live or 

(lie. 



33 



BO»-°ai=ll IE 



= r i r=ir==an 



^MJLBRICH 

a ^JEWELRY CO. 



S "* J ( WEST SIDE SQUARE ) 



USE OUR DIGNIFIED CREDIT PLAN 




^Be sure to see 

our Special display 

during Centennial Week 



31 IE3 E=»D 



□ Q=SJEE]I IE 



s 



(I HE Association of Commerce representing the industrial, commercial 
*• and professional interests of the city extends a welcome to each Cen- 
tennial visitor, as well as to all visitors at any time. 

We are yours to command insofar as our activities extend. 

If you desire information about Bloomington or its resources a letter 
addressed to the organization will receive prompt attention. 

ASSOCIATION OF COMMERCE 

115-117 E. Monroe Street 



□ C=S]E3E 



3E3&OB 



34 



They risk the unknown journey, no •hart but -tar In 

sky 
By toilsome slow approaches the "Prairie Schooner 

moves. 
<>\ir the untrod highways, oul of the beaten grooves 
And when at eve, in splendor the sun Milk- in the west, 
\!„.iit the blazing camp lire, they bivouac for rc-t 

KIMS' IDE TW< ' 
OUR FIRST SETTLERS 

Down the river-, over the lakes, across the coun 
trv came the pioneers, the first settlers of oui 
country and state, bringing only greatly needed 
household comforts. They came in Covered 
Wagons, "ii foot and in carts, driving their cattle 
and sheep, pushing ahead against any and all diffi- 
culties; perhaps wet, cold, and weary, pushing ever 
onward to the coveted and beautiful groves of 
McLean County. They knew not where they were 
going, or the healthfulness of the county, depending 
on Mich information a- could be gathered on the 
wa\. They could not know who would be their 
neighbors. " If they bought government land the) 
knew nothing of who would own adjoining tract-. 
They could not know if churches, school houses or 
towns would lie conveniently near. 

Almost everything they wished to knew must be 
learned by seeing what the future might bring forth 
— they must be brave and cheerful. 

The firsl -cttlers to arrive in the territory t" be 
later known as McLean County, arrived in 1822. 
They settled in Blooming Grove (then called Keg 
Grove) and were John W. Dawson and family. 
fohn llendrix and family and a man named Segar. 
He later sold his claims to William Orendorff who 
came in 1823 with hi- wife and son Thomas. In 
1S_>4 Mr. Goodman and \V. II. Hodge settled at the 
Grove and about the same time William Walker 
and family. 

A friendly chief of the Kickapoos, named Chief 
Machina, visited Dawson and his hand shortly after 
their arrival and with sign language told him the) 
were not wanted. However, he and his followers 
were not hostile and later hecame friendly. 

Hunting — horse racing — wrestling — card playing 
and spelling bees constituted their amusement-. 
Their social life was simple and unaffected. All 
dressed ver) much alike, lived much alike, attended 
the same church; had few book — usually nothing 
more than the Bible and their Church Hymnal, 
-Mine having only an almanac; but while most un- 
learned in hooks, they were learned in a thousand 
things in the art of living of which we todaj are 
profoundly ignorant. 

We depict the arrival •<( the First Settlers and 
their dealings with the Indian. 

INTERLUDE THREE 

1 III \ i Hi K OF McLEAN COUNTY 
"M..ri than its prized possessions; more than its wealth 

untold, 
I- found in the life of it- children, filled with that spirit 

bold. 
That guided it- -talwart leader- along the trackless 

way. 
That ha- made US and -till keep- us, mat< hie-- and 

peerless today." 

EPISi »DE THREE 
!•'( IRMING ( IF McLEAN < '< IUNTY 
In 1830, James Allin entered into the plan- of 
the earh settlers and it was decided to form a new 



county. Mr. Thomas Orendorff and Mr. James 

Latta were the committee who carried the petition 

to Vandalia, Mr. Allin being in i r health and un- 

able t" travel. Me however furnished the commit- 
tee with letters to prominent politicians at Vandalia 

whom he knew to 1«- in favor of the project. 

< hi the 25th da) of December 1830 the hill was 
passed by the Legislature and tin- count) was named 
for lion, fohn McLean, who wa- 1". S. Senator for 
several years. Mi- death occurred a few months 
prior -,o the application of the Blooming drove 
Committee, hut hi- popularity wa- such that the 
Legislature cheerful!) gave hi- name to our county 
through the advice of lion. W. I.. I). Ewing. 

speaker of the House. The) arrived home with 
their good new- after a hard long trip during the 
dead of winter. 

//'(• depict their reception and the ceremonies 
attending their return. 

INTERLUDE F( »UR 
THE VOICE < IF McLEAN ( OUNTY 

"School days, school days, dear old golden rule day-. 
Readin' and 'ritin' and 'rithmetic 
raught to the tune of a hickory -tick. 
You were my Queen of Calico 
I wa- > our hashful barefoot beau — 

You wrote on my -late — "I love you. Joe" 
When we were a couple of kid-." 

EPISODE FOLK 
THE FIRST SCHOOL 

The first school in this county wa- opened in 
1825 in a private house, the home of John W. Daw- 
son and Miss Delilah Mullins was the teacher. It 
was an elementary school and intended mainly for 
-mall children. There were about 16 pupils. Later 
came Dr. Trabue, a Frenchman, and W. W 
Hodge who were both very successful. 

We depict a scene showing the early school room 
in the home of John Dawson. 

INTERLUDE FIVE 
THE VOICE OF McLEAN COUNTY 

"And hail to those Sturdy Red Men — no martial music 

played 
Nor flaunting banners led them; nor cheering voice 

gave aid 
Hungry and cold and weary, unnoticed and unsung, 
They failed not. nor yet faltered but to their faith they 

clung." 

EPIS* IDE FIVE 
INDIANS AND RELIGII IN 
With the arrivals of the early white settlers an 
Indian from the Kickapoos, named Kaanakuck was 

converted into the belief of Christ ianitv and hecame 
famous for his religion- work among hi- fellow 
tribesmen. So important wa- this turning point in 
his religious belief that his influence spread and 
even to this day the tribes of the Kicka] now liv- 
ing in Kansas are embracing his word and his 
teachings. 

A pioneer minister, named William Walker, vis- 
ited the Indians at their camp situated at Kickapoo 

Grove in the year 1832. He held regular services 
every Sabbath. Their prayer hook- consisted of 

walnut hoards upon which certain hieroglyphics 
were painted and carved -uniform in size and held 
very -acred during tin- services. 

A public dinner wa- given to all members of the 
tribe, old and voting alike sharing in the fe.i-t A 
lire was kindled in the center of the tribesmen and 

while the minister preached the go-pel to these un- 



35 



n<^ni— ii if 



31 ir=ir=s=>>n 



72 Years of Service 

in 

HARDWARE 



1 



I 



FURNACES — PAINT — STOVES 



I 



G.H. Read&Bro. 



Established in 1858 
110 West Front 



CHASo L. MILLER 

'"Bloomington's Oldest Reliable Jeweler" 



I 
i 



113 W. FRONT ST. 



Tavannes 
Watches 



"Diamonds 



Yourex 
Silverware 



Our 41 Years Reputation for Good 
Jewelry is Your Guarantee 



cMOORE'S 

Lu&ga&e SKop^ 

ESTABLISHED 1851 



We wish to thank our friends of McLean 
County for their patronage and confidence. 

For 79 years we have sold 

Quality 1 Lu&&a&e 

and 

Leather Goods 

to thousands of satisfied customers. 



"Smart Styles 
for Men 



ULBRICH6* KRAFT 

For Young Men and 
Men Who Stay Young 



114 Center St. 



Bloomington, 111. 

If 



□ 0=31=11 IE 



31 |[=HS=OEl 



36 



tutored men and women they sat and listened atten- 
tively. Usually the) were divii men on one 
side and the squaws on the other. 
//'<• depict tin- above scene. 

INTERLUDE SIX 

i in VOICE ( >i M« l.i. \.\ COUN I J 

"All hail l" those hoar] pilgrims tramping on thru 

nun I 
Their glorj never waning; their vision was sublime. 
No historj tells a grander tale. No marble slab 01 

bronze 

Can make the fame more lasting of those enduring 

OIK's." 

KIMS' IDE SIX 
ABRAH \M LINO »LN 
Abraham Lincoln more nearly presented ;i reali- 
zation of the ideal American than an) other man in 
cur history. He possessed courage; tenacity of 
purpose; was fair minded; strong but humane; 
"the patient foreseeing man." 

Early in his life as a lawyer. Mr. Lincoln first 
commenced "riding the circuit" by traveling on 
horse-back with his papers and clothes in his 
saddlebags. 

No lawyer tried as man) cases on the Circuit as 
did Mr. Lincoln. In three-fourths of the jury eases 
he appeared on one side or the other. This was 
due to his greal personal popularity, to his suc- 
cesses with the juries and to the small fees he 
charged, always leaving the lion's -.hare to the local 
att< irney. 

The must important case he ever tried in our 
court was the "Illinois Central Railroad vs. The 
County of McLean." 

We dipici Mr. Lincoln "riding the circuit" and 
addressing the court at Bloomington on September 
12. 1854. 

INTERLUDE SEVEN 
THE VOICE OF McLEAN COUNTY 
"And so tin sound of whistles resound thru the air, 
Waking the echoes and startling the wild beast from 

his lair. 
Hanging low o'er the valleys the long black sn 

i li ■in! lies, 
Telling where Inm Charger, "ti tracks of commerce 

flies 
Hundreds and hundreds of people in city, hamlet and 

vale. 
\re dwelling in peace and plenty where pioneers blazed 

the trail." 

EPISt >DE SEVEN 
THE FIRST RAILRI IAD 
i in September 30, 1850, a law passed b) Con- 
;s donating to the State of Illinois for the use of 
the Illinois Central Railroad, nearly two and one- 
half millions of acres of public land. It was de- 
cided that the Company must perpetuall) pay into 
the Illinois State Treasur) "'. of tin' gross receipts 
of the road when finished. This is now over a mil- 
lion dollars annually. 

It was through tin- foresight of General A 
Gridley that the general direction of the railroad 
would he so near to Decatur. Clinton and I 'doom 
ington that it could not well miss these points. 
The completion of the railroad was about tin- first 

of May, 1853. Cars began running during this 
month and b) this time Mi l.i.in County was on the 
high road to prosperity. 

We depict the actttal laying of a section of the 
Illinois Central Railroad mill the ceremonies that 
attended. 



INTERLUDE EIGHT 

nil \ . in i i ii \i, i.i \\ t > iUN i v 

"Bj the flow "i the inland river. 
Whence the fleets of iron hath tied, 

Where the blades ol the nr.tw t;i;i~- quiver, 
\ sleep are the rant lead. 

i tin- so.l and the dew, 
Waiting the judgment daj 

I thl on. the blu< 

I nder the . ither the graj . 

No in' 'le shall the \\ ar i rj 
< )r the winding rners be red 
Thej banish our anger iore\er 

When thej laurel the graves of our di 

EPISt IDE EIGHT 

THE CIVIL WAR 
War began to he talked of during the Lincoln- 
Douglas campaign of 1858. Both men were resi- 
dents of this state and the campaign was one of 

most intense excitement, hut public sentiment in 
.McLean Count) was almost unanimously against 
secession. The Republican part) was pledged not 
to interfere with slavery. The Democrats con- 
scientious!) believed that slaver) was allowed b) 
tin- National Constitution; however, there was little 
difference between their actual position. 

Each party organized marching chilis and rallied 
its voters in torch light processions of prodigious 
magnitude. They were called "Douglas Invinci- 
bles" and "Wide Awakes." The) learned march- 
ing movements and fancy drills which, in 1861, 
went far to facilitate the organization of volunteer 
companies. 

I in April 12, 1861, Fort Sumter was fired upon. 
War was declared. At a public gathering at Phoe- 
nix Hall, McLean County united in spirit with the 
rest of the loyal North by offering to pour out 
it- best blood in defense of the Union. 

i m the 18th of April, onl) three days after the 
President's call, 113 volunteers left Bloomington 
for Springfield under ('apt. Harvey. The heart of 
McLean Count) went to the front with these men. 

Ballet of the Civil War. 

We depict the meeting at Phoenix Hall and the 
call for volunteers. They muster for action and 
depart for tear. 

The Dance of the South -The Cra\s. 

The I lance of the North — The Blues. 

"Clouds of War" rise and the pcacefulness of the 
dance is broken by the lifted "Veils of War." They 
struggle fur supremac) onl) to fall wounded and 
maimed upon the battlefield. 

"The Spirits of Peace" appear in the distance 

lift the fallen ones and in union and perfect har- 
mony they dance together. 

TABLEA1 
Lincoln, The Emancipatoi 

« ieneral < '.rant 
( Senei al Le 

The Slave 

INTERLUDE NINE 

THE \ I IICE i IF M. LE \.\ C< IUNTY 

"1 pledge allegiance to my flag; of the United States 

\inl to tin- Republic for which it stands 

line nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice tor All." 

EPISt IDE NINE 
Till'. HUMAN FLAG 
Mere is shown the Stars and Stripes formed by 
200 box s and girls doing attractive drills. 



37 



Firt=ir=ii if= 



EJI IE][5=oa 



For one hundred years UlcLeari County 
has been a good place to Hue — It still is. 
S haue tried it for ouer a half century 
and 1 am still sold on it... I always will be. 




i 



1 congratulate the people who hue here 
that they can point with pride to a century 
of proqress and happiness. 



HOITIER ID. HALL 

Representatiue in Congress 
nth District 



□ 0==)[=JC 



38 



INTERLUDE TEN 
I11I-: \ I (ICE OF McLEAN ( I >UN IA 
"The clouds consign their beauty to the fields, in loud 
profusion the sunt wind steals and softly shaking on 
the dimpled pool prelusive raindrops the earth to cool 
["hen beautiful Rainbow— all woven in light, there's 
not in thj tissue one shadow of night. Heaven surely 
has opened when thou dosl appear. 
"And bending over them the angels draw mar and 

tin- Rainbow'— the "Rainbow.' 
"The smile of I iod is here." 

EPISODE TEN 

HARVEST FESTIVAL 

Following the Civil War. phenomenal growth 
took place in the city and county and state. A 
wealth of natural resources were developed. A 
countrj which was once a prairie and wilderness, 
within the memory of many of those here tonight, 
became one of the garden spots of the United 
Stale-. 

Prosperous farms now dot the country and the 
soil produces some of the finest crops in the world, 
dairying is carried on in a large scale and coal min- 
ing is a big industry. From a wide and open 
prairie. McLean County has sprung into a flourish- 
ing modern county within the memory of one gen- 
eration. 

Mere we compare the early farm machinery with 
that of today. 

THE BALLET OF THE HARVEST 

The Toilers sow the grain. 

The Spring rains come and the field begins to grow. 

Toilers again appear to cultivate the soil. 

The Sun appears to ripen King Corn. 

Lastly, the Rainbow hursts forth. 

THE GOLDEN HARVEST. 

INTERLUDE ELEVEN 
THE VOICE OF McLEAN COUNTY 

"In Flanders Fields the poppies blow- 
Between the crosses row 
They mark our place and 
The larks still bravely singing, fly 
Scarce heard amid the guns below. 
Take up our quarrel with the Foe 
To you from falling hands we throw the torch. 
If ye break faith with us who die 
We shall not sleep where poppies blow — in Flanders 
Fields." 

EPIS< IDE ELEVEN 
"W< IRLD WAR" 
This episode will be devoted entirel) to the 
"World War" 1917-1918 and by a series of tab- 
leans and march and drill formations will show the 
World War Heroes 

They Leave their Cherished Ones at Home 
The Red Cross Nurses 
The Liberty Loans 

INTERLUDE TWELVE 

I HE VOICE OF McLEAN COUNTY 
"And then in the shadowed darkness the blasting 

whistles cry 
Startling the timid night things as a warning that they 

must fly 



A flash of flames awaki ike in -piral 

-oar 
And through the street- of Bloomington the red fire 

engine- I 
I he startling i I ire" is heard — 'tis shrieked about 

the town. 
\ml soon the flames have spread until no power can 

hold them down. 
But when the -tore- and factories are leveled to the 

dust 
A newer, better Bloomington is placed within our 

trust." 

EPIS< IDE TWELVE 
THE FIRE ( >F l'>no 

The most disastrous fire in the history of the 
county occurred June 1'', l'KK). 

An alarm of fire at midnight, the shrieking of 
whistles, the hurrying of fire engines, the gathering 
of excited crowd- watching the bursting of flames 
from many buildings. In spite of the efforts of the 
firemen, the dame- spread, more buildings catch fire 
and fall in ruin- hour after hour. Appeal is made 
li\ the mayor (Thomas) to Peoria and Springfield 
for departments, who arrive with steam pumpers, 
hose, etc. At last as dawn breaks, conflagration is 
controlled, and the heart of the city is a heap of 
smoking ruins. Then comes the era of rebuilding, 
with new structures rising phoenix-like from the 
ruins. It is the signal for the coming of a bigger 
and better city and county seat of McLean County. 
The new court hou-e typifies all the other modern 
structures. 

INTERLUDE THIRTEEN 
THE VOICE OF McLEAN COUNTY 

"High o'er the waves of memory when other stars have 

set 

A grateful people still shall see their beacon- yet. 

And a- you now lift up our praise through all the com- 
ing years, 

The children of our Illinois will bless the pioneers." 

EPISi IDE THIRTEEN 

CENTENNIAL JUBILEE 
Wealth ami Progress have come to McLean 
County to stay. Ours has been a steady develop- 
ment and we find evidence on every hand of a more 
prosperous county for the wind- of sorrows, dis- 
appointments, hardships and sufferings have 
pas-eel. Ahead, we see peace, prosperity and happi- 
ness. May it alw.t\ - he so. 

To Miss McLean and Miss Bloomington here 
will In- presented characters in group formations 
Music, Gold, Silver. Aviation, Racing, Dance, 
Manufacturing, Commerce, and Science, Motoring, 

S]Hirts, etc. ending with the 

EPISODE Fi IURTEEN 
LIVING \\ HEEL OF PRl iGRESS 

Which will he a grand spectacle involving the 
services of every participant from first settler to 
the la-t appearing soldier. 



39 



nft=s=i r=ir= y ir= 11= i f= =! [ = i[ i cr i r= =Jl=]E=OEI 

ft 



ETHELL MOTOR CO. 

SALES and SERVICE 
••• 



Willys-Knight 
and Whippet 



WILLYS 

Straight 

"8" 



We Never Close General Repairing 

EXPERT MECHANICS-DAY AND NIGHT 

Phone 257 



□ /y^=1l=ir=ir==i r= ii— ir 11= 11= IC ir=1 1=]EB=an 

40 



IN APPRECIATION 




Citizens and Friends oi McLean County: — 

We arc n«nv closing our .\KI. ran Count) Centen- 
nial. I am sure that ever) man, woman and child 
agrees with me that 1 1n- has b 

reatesl celebration ever held 
in tlii— pari "t the state, h has 
been more than McLean O iunt) 's 
centennial, it has been more than 
tin commemoration of the lives ol 
those » li. i lived and sai t ifi< ed in 
our count) during the past one 
^. ^k hundred years, it has been Mi 
Lean County's love feast, it has 
been McLean County's good will 
meeting. Never have I seen ex- 
emplified over the entire county 

such a fine spirit ol | 1 will, 

possibli b) tlir generous co- 
operation of the people in every 
township of the county. 

\t tlii— time, in behalf of the Executive Committee 
and myself, I desire to express our thank- to the people 
of each township in the count) for their loyal d 
tii hi 

I want each one of the 1,000 members in the pag 
■ cast to know that we realize and appreciate the 
effort which you have made to depict the progress of 
the count) during the past one hundred years. This 
pageant will be remembered as one of the finest ever 
Staged in this part of Illinois and I extend to each 
member of the east our heartfelt thanks. 

I want to thank the members <>i the General Com- 
mittee, which include- all members of the County 
Hoard of Supervisors and the Mayors of the cities and 
villages of the county. Yonr loyalty ha- greatly con- 
tributed to the -ncce-- of the Centennial. 



Arthur S. Smith 



Tile record of the tir-t one hundred war- i- dosed 

Through the pageant we have been enabled to "count 

our blessings, name them one b) one' and more fully 
"see what Cod hath done." We are now entering upon 

• mil'-, ,,i another hundred year- with our thoui 
turn., I toward thi second mile-tone. It i- thi 

■ hi General Chairman, and I am -nrr I bespeak 
the same for all members ol the Executive I ommittei 
that the prophec) ol Isaiah concerning that 

righteousness -hall permeate all men'- mind-, shall be 

otir aim: that we as a people -hall Strive to make the 
brotherhood of man a reality; that we -hall strive to 
make the principle- for which our Saviour lived and 

died -o real m the lives ol men ii -hall he possible 

P. symbolize them, thus: With the wolf ami the lamb 

lying down together and being led b thi humility of 

a little child. 

I want to personall) thank the members of the 
Executive Committee, composed of the following: 
Eugene Funk, President; Paul F. Beich, Vice-Presi- 
dent; M. J. Callahan, Secretary; Russell Shearer, 
Treasurer; Henry Nierstheillier, \ II Belt, Walter 

Vrmbruster, Perry LaBounty, \l. Ulbrich, Davis Mer- 

win, Joe Meaney, F. D. E. B I \\ Orcutt, W. 

E. Richardson, .1. 1.. Hasbrouck, liar. .Id Lang, Lloyd 
Eyer, Blake Holton. 

Yonr Executive Committee will endeavor to assem- 
ble the records of tin- Centennial ami place them in 
an iron box, securely sealed, for delivery to the Execu- 
tive Committee ol Mi Lean County's Second Centen- 
nial, one hundred years hence. 




Chairman of McLean Count) Centennial 



D c=^ir=i r i r= 

ft 



3E 



51 leEDGB^q 



GREETING CARDS 

for 

ALL OCCASIONS 



SCHOOL BOOKS 

AND SUPPLIES 

FOR McLEAN 

COUNTY 

The Only Book Store 

Open Labor Day 

in the Two 

Cities 

USED TEXTS 



HOOK \OOK 

FORMERLY McKNIGHTS 
NORMAL. ILL. 



A. T. JACKSON 

GOOD FURNITURE 
RUGS 



Every article marked in plain figures and each 
and every price tag carries a special low price, 
prices that are made possible only by low cost of 
operation. 

JACKSON'S GOOD FURNITURE 
I- being placed in some ol the finest home- in 
Central Illinois, for the reason that this store i 

ig to the thrift) buyers who appreciate fine 
furniture of guaranteed quality when it i an be 

bought here lower in price than is ordinarily 
a-ked for .heap eye value furniture. 

MAKE COMPARISON 
t )r a-k any one of our hundred- of Satisfied CUS- 

whose patronage has made this 
in less than one year into one of the most 
popular furniture -tore- m Central Illinois. 

Broadway, Normal Telephone 6095 

Open Evenings for Your Convenience 



1 



□ <33E3E 



3E 



3E 



3E 



41 



3E 



3E3G=OD 



□ <=3QE 



3SE=on 



Edward A. Hayes, decatur, Commander 

Arthur Poorman, Chicago heights, Senior 
Vice Commander 

Vice Commanders — 
Joseph F. Novotny, Chicago 
Thomas O'Meara. Ottawa 
David M. King, rock island 
Harry Moses, Georgetown 
John Stelle. McLeansboro 




David L. Shillinglaw, Chicago, National 
Exei utive Committeeman 

Wm. C. Mundt, bloomington, Adjutant 

Lester R. Benston, Chicago, Service Officer 

Grover E. Whimsett, LL. D., glenn ellyn, 
Chaplain 

Erwin Albee, bloomington - , Child Welfare 
Officer 



I 



<r 



ae 



c7)mericdn Region 

^Department of Illinois 



f 



» 



Edward A. Hayes, Commander, decatur 
Arthur Poorman, Sr, Vice-Commander, 

CHICAGO HEIGHTS 

Joseph F. Novotny, Vice-Commander, 

CHK AGO 

Thomas O'Meara, Vice-Commander, 

OTTAWA 

David M. Kim,, Vice-Commander, 
ROCK island 

Harry Moses. Vice-i. ommander, Georgetown 

John Stelle. Vice-Commander, 
McLeansboro 

David L. Shillinglaw, National Executive 

Committeeman, Chicago 

William C. Mundt, Adjutant, bloomington 
Lester R. Benston, Service Officer, CHICAGO 



Grover E. Whimsett, LL. D., Chaplain. 

glen ellyn 
Henry Rhode. Sgt.-at-Arms. lake forest 
Erwin Albee, Child Welfare Officer, 

BLOOMINGTON 

Robert E. Hafff,y, Chief Clerk, 

BLOOMINGTON 

Lyle K. Snavei.y, Asst. Org. Officer, 

BLOOMINGTON 

Dr. \Ym. H. Evans, Department Surgeon, 

murphysboro 
Service Office, 160 N. LaSalle St., Chicago 
Claims Section (Speedway Hospital). Hines. 

Illinois 
Contact Officer, Jacksonville 
Contact Officer, Elgin 
Contact Officer. Danville (Soldiers' Home) 



Service 
without obligation 

to tbe^ 
Ex-Service mails 



State Headquarters. 1 


JLOOmillQTOn, 


ILL. Ik 


wiii 


1 


■P 


YOU 


1 BELONG IN 
aAJullRulD 








3Qrs=OQ 



42 



RESUME of 1930 
DEPARTMENT of ILLINOIS 

The AMERICAN LEGION 




Nineteen-thirty has been a wonderful year in 
The American Legion, Departmenl of Illinois; in 
services rendered, membership attained, and finan- 
cial solicity assured. The Department maintains a 
Service < •fHce in Chicago with a personnel of eight ; 
at Speedway Hospital, I lines. Illinois, is a Claims 
( (fficer, and we have three other Assistant Service 
i (fficers, in East St. Louis, Danville and in Bloom- 
ington, who look after all Service Claims in the 
State; in addition, we have a Child Welfare < " ; 
in Bloomington who supervises Claims, and the 
activities of Child Welfare work in Illinois. This 
office and its personnel is supported through the 
poppies sold on .Memorial Day. This year a mil- 
lion poppies were made by the disabled buddies in 
Illinois hospitals and were in turn sold to the Posts 
and I 'nits of the Auxiliary, who in turn sold them 
to the public. The net revenue to the State was 
over $42 .000.00, every cent of which is used for 
service work in Illinois. Chicago Service < Iffice in 
the period from August 1, 1929, to August 15th, 
1930, handled over sixteen thousand claims of vari- 
ous nature, including compensation, death claims, 
lost discharges, etc. In fact the amount ><i recov- 
eries for the ex-service men in the State of Illinois 
amounted to approximately $10.00 secured for 
every dollar extended in the Service Department. 

The Department Rehabilitation Committee has 

accomplished a great deal in lessening claims of all 
kinds, and has kept a careful check in the various 
bureaus and the hospitals in Illinois. 

< Iver ninetv counties of the one hundred and two 
ill Illinois have active functioning organizations and 
have helped materially in holding together the 691 
Posts in Illinois. 

The official Close o| the Looks on August 15th 

showed a membership of 7<>,(KHi, the highest in the 
history of the Legion in Illinois, or any other he 
partment in the United States. We have 432 Posts 
I'M)' , or better over last year. All records from a 
membership standpoint have been shattered. 

Early in the year a Service Survey was conduct- 
ed among the several thousand individual ix service 



men in the State of Illinois, some eight or nine 
thousand names being secured. Many of these men 
have had claims, compensation and recoveries have 
been seemed. 

I' malices ,,! the Department were nevei better. 
In 1922 the Department faced a deficite of approx- 
imately $7.i.i)i k i in i Through accurate budgeting 

and keeping check of the expenditures it has heen 
built up with net assets of $l<)?.000.f)0 and all hills 
paid. 

A great deal of credit for the success of the De- 
partment of Illinois goes to some prominent Bloom 
ington men. Mr. Oscar Moose served on the I •■■ 
partment Finance Committee when there was a 
large deficit to be overcome. Mr. T. !•". Harwood, 
served as Senior Vice-Commander of Illinois, and 
during the year 1930 served verv effectively as 
Chairman of Child Welfare Committee. Mr. Ferre 
C. Watkins, formerlj of Bloomington, now of Chi- 
cago, served as Judge Advocate, Department Com- 
mander and member of the Department Executive 
Committee, and last year was honored by being the 
Chairman of the National Legislative Committee. 
Mr. I'M. Donnelly, a lawyer, acted as Division 
Judge Advocate under Mr. Ferre C. Watkins. Our 
genial Postmaster, Mr. Gene lliser, was a member 
of the State Rehabilitation Committee. Mr. Earl 
Bach, attorney, served as the 4th Division Judge 
Advocate. Mr. J. I',. Murphy, 17th District Com- 
mander, lias served through his two year term as a 
Chairman of one of the most important commit- 
tees, the Finance Committee. Mr. Rogers Hum- 
phreys has served tor two years as a member of 
the Department Aviation Committee. Mr. Erwin 
Mb. ■ who is Child Welfare Officer, has had a 
great deal to do with the efficient cooperation at the 
( irpha'is' I lome. 

There are plans which will be presented at the 
Aurora Convention to be held on September 8th 

and 9th, which will greatly increase the service 
work to our disabled in the State of Illinois. In 
all it has been a most successful and active year. 

Wm. ( '. MUNDT, 

Department Historian. 



43 



n<^^n=i i i r= 



31 IEll5=oa 



FUNK BROS. SEED CO. ' 



FUNK FARMS ESTABLISHED 1824 



Si •r-5L*^^£«!Mfe 



■~' r -*as&CL 



Come In 

And See 

US 




• j. • 



MS h 





' 



We are located on the hard road West Washington St., V% mile west of 
Union Depot, one mile from the Square 

BLOOMINGTON, ILL. 



There is only one way in 
which you can get a clear 
and complete idea of how 
wonderfully w e 1 1- 
equipped this seed house 
is, and that is to go 
through it in person. Do 
that. Come around when- 
ever you can. We'll be 
glad to show you through. 
Then you will feel that 
this plant of ours is a 
real asset to your farm, 
because what we do for 
you will be clone better 
than you can do it your- 
self. 




□ «=S]QI 



3QESOD 



44 



Complete 'Programme 

McLean County Centennial Week 



Tuesday, August 26th 
Evening 

7:30P.M. Count) w i>I«.- Religious Observ- 
ance Meeting at Pageant Field, 
Highland Park Municipal Golf 
i ourse. Speaker, Rev. Edgar De 
\\ iit ones. 



Wednesday, August 2'/th 
Morning 

8:30A.M. 9:30A.M. Band Concert at Court 
I louse Square. 

9:30A.M.-10:00A. M. Free Acts and Music 
at O iurt J louse Square. 

10:OOA.M.-1 1:00 A.M. Speeches by Hon. 
Mayor I '.en Rhodes, Congressman 
Homer llall. General Frank Dick- 



son, Mel ,ean ( i int) Supen is< >r 
J. E. Smith. Federal Judge Louis 
FitzHenrj at Court House Square. 

11 on \ M.-12:00A.M. Coronation of Queens 
on Float at Reviewing Stand at 
• nit I [i iuse Square, by O 
man 1 lomer 1 [all. 

Afternoon 

1:00 P.M. -3 :00 P.M. Historical Parade Re 
view bj M< Lean Count) Board of 
Supervisors, Mayoi Ben Rhodes, 
Udermen, Congressman Homer 
llall, General Frank Dickson, and 
Federal Judge Louis FitzHenry. 

4:00P.M. Free Acts and Music, at Court 
I [i mse Squat e. 

5:00 P.M. Band Concerts at Court House 
Square. 



n<^=ir=i i i r 



31 IE]E=oa 



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HEATING SYSTEMS 

CLEAN HUMIDIFIED AIR 
CIRCULATED IN YOUR HOME 



P. H. MaGIRL FOUNDRY 
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Factory and Showroom 

Phone 2840 401-13 East Oakland 

BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 



K[pt So Old 

But a Centenarian in 

Luncheonette 

and 

Fountain 

Service 

\\ 

GCEEN , 
CDLIN ^ 



Bud 



Sweet Shop 

Dick 



i 



31 IEE=QQ 



45 



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CENTENNIAL 

FIREWORKS 

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46 



Evening 

7:00P.M. Free ^cts and Music at Court 
I louse Square. 

8:00 P.M. McLean Count) Historical Pag 
cant of Progress at Highland I 'ark 
Municipal < iolf Coui se. 

Thursday. August 28th 
Morning 

9:00A.M. Band Concert at Court House 
Square. 

9:30A.M. Ball Game at III League Park- 
Mi I. can Count] Farm Bureau vs. 
Livingston Count] Farm Bureau. 

10:30 \.M. Band Concert at Miller Park. 

Noon 
12 '.'cluck Dinner at .Miller Park. 

Afternoon 

1 :00 P. M. Band Music at Miller Park. 



1 :30 P. M. Speei hes at Miller Park. 

2:30P.M. Games and Contests ducted by 

Mr. C. I ». ( iurtis and Mrs. Spei 
Ewing at Miller I'ark. 

Evening 

i ', M. Free \< t- and ' fusi< al I iourt 
1 [i iuse Square. 

8:00 P.M. Mcl.cn Count) Historical ray- 
cant of Progress al Highland Park 
Municipal Golf Course. 

Friday, August 29th 
Morning 

9:30 \.M. Band Concerts at Court Mouse 
Square. 

10:30 \. M. Free Acts at Court House Square. 

Afternoon 

1 :<ki I'. M.-2:u<) I'. M . Band Concerts at Court 
I louse Square. 



n<s==ir=i i > r= 

ft 



3 1 i r=ir^=^n 

ft 




What Is IT? 

You will never want it 
until you need it. 

You never know when you WILL need it. 

When you do you will need it bad. 

Get it now and have it when you need it. 



A FRIEND in need is a FRIEND indeed. 



GORDON B. KAZAR. Mgr. 

CHICAGO MOTOR CLUB 

MEMBERSHIP SERVICE INSURANCE 

Telephone 812 
222 W. Jefferson Bloomington, 111. 



ESTABLISHED 1894 



STERN'S 



0=3E3[=]E=^ 



Lowest Prices On 

FURNITURE 

STOVES 

RUGS 

504-06 N. MAIN ST. 
BLOOMINGTON. ILL. 



qcglBl IE 



j 

! 
3E3E=*Q 



47 



□ C=Sir£E]G 



ft 



The 

1STORY 

B E I C H 

CAN DIES 




1830 

McLean County Founded. 



Business now known as Paul F. 
BEICH COMPANY established. 



PAUL F. BEICH COMPANY in- 
corporated. 



2 



Seventy-five years of candy manu- 
facturing and merchandising, for 
PAUL F. BEICH COMPANY and 
predecessors. 




Seventy-six years for PAUL F. 
BEICH COMPANY and One Hun- 
dred years for McLean County. 



BEICH 

CANDI ES 



Are fresh candies, being made in 
two modern daylight sanitary plants, 
located at Bloomington and Chicago. 




no=?iF=i i i r= 



3E 






48 



2 P. M.-3 :00P.M. Free \. is at Court 

I [i mse Square. 

3:00 P. M S 00 P. M. Air Derby at Blooming- 
ton \it]inrt. 

Evening 

5:30P.M. Free \>t> and Music at Court 
I louse Square. 

7:00P.M. Grand Parade of Industrial. Com 
mercial, Club, Fraternal and Civic 
< li ganizatii >ns. 

8:30 P. M. McLean Count) Historical Pag 
eant of Progress at Highland 
Park Municipal Golf Course. 

Saturday, August 30th 
Morning 

9:00 \ M. Concert at Lake Bloomington. 
10:00 \..M. Free Acts at Lake Bloomington. 



11:00 V M. Motor Boat Races at Lake Bloom- 
ington. 

Noon 
12 o'clock— Dinner at Lake Bloomington. 

Afternoon 

1 :i«i P. M. Foi mal I ledication of Lake Bloom- 
ington. 

2:00P.M. Concert al Lake Bloomington. 

3:00P.M. Boat Racing at Lake Bloomington. 

Evening 

5:30 P. M. Daj Fireworks at Miller Park. 

6:00 P. M. Supper at Miller Lark. 

7:00P.M. Concert at Miller Lark. 

8:30P.M. Nighl Fireworks at Miller Lark. 

9:30 P. M. Concert at Miller Park. 

10:00P.M. Dance— Court House Square. 



n<^=ir=i i i r= 



E3E 



31^3[3E=OD 



Not One Hundred Years Old Hut" 

Still mm tmrou*inu with Hloominutonr"' 

64 YEARS IIO COUNT! 

.... in the buying confidence of the public which 
help us celebrate this "Centennial of McLean 
County" and the continued growth of Blooming- 
t< m's i ildest st< ire. 

But 64 years makes no difference t'> us We 
surge forward into our 65th year with the same 

enthusiasm that we would enter a new era 

Knowing that continued public confidence depends 
only upon our ability to meel your modern and 
ever varied demands — 

This Has Always Been Our Aim 




□ 0=3]QG 



3 



4" 



□ «=£1E 



IQE=Q □ 




One of the First Meadows Washers 



The Meadows Manufacturing Company 

♦ ♦ 

Thirty-one years ago near the little town 
of Meadows,' McLean County, Illinois, 
John Rocke conceived the idea of building 
a mechanical device which would elevate 
grain and corn into the crib, thus supplant- 
in- the old, slow and laborious method of 
scooping. He put his ideas into practical 
shape, and made his first grain elevator, 
using it on his own farm. This first grain 
elevator proved to he quite a sensation. 
Mr. Rocke's neighbors were struck with 
the convenience and practical value of such 
a machine, and besieged him with requests 
thai he build duplicates for them. Farmers 
from every section traveled many miles to 
see one of the first grain elevators work. 

Thus encouraged, Mr. Rocke started in 
the business of building grain elevators, 
ami improved on his original invention. 
The continued demand for these elevators 
grew very rapidly, outgrowing five fac- 
tories before the present plant at Bloomington. Illinois, was built in 1920. 

In 1903 the name "Meadows" was adopted as a trade mark and the company took on the 
development of other ingenious devices. The first of these was the Meadows power wash- 
ing machine which was the first power washing machine equipped with a power driven 
wringer arranged so that it was of the 
moving, reversible type. This was an orig- 
inal pioneer invention in the washing ma- 
chine industry, and controlling patents on 
this device were obtained. 

Since the original invention on the 
wringer was conceived and patented, the 
Meadows Company has been continuouslv 
active in the development and improvement 
of its washing machines. All other lines of 
manufacture have been discontinued. Over 
fifty patents have been issued to the c<>m- 
pany, mainly through the inventive genius 
of its founder. Mr. John Rocke. 

In the upper left hand corner is a repro- 
duction of one of the original washing ma- 
chines manufactured by The Meadows 
Manufacturing Company. In the lower 
right hand corner is a picture showing the 
latest Meadows Model V Select-a-Speed 
washer, which represents today the highest 
development in the washing machine in- 
dustry. 

Meadows washers are distributed 
throughout the United States and Canada, 
and in many foreign countries, where they 
are recognized as of the highest quality and 
in the front rank of the industry. 




The Latest Type— Meadows Select-A-Speed 
"World's Finest Washer" 



□ o=ar=]E 



3E3ESOD 



50 



^Announcing th^ 

BIG ANNUAL PICNIC 

for ALL FARM FAMILIES IN McLEAN COUNTY 



SPONSORED BY 



FARM BUREAU and HOME BU REAU 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 28, 1930 

MIL LER PARK-BLOOMINGT ON 
Come to the Season's Big Event 

ALL DAY PROGRAM 



9:30 — Baseball, McLean County vs. Livingston 
County. Bloomington III ball park, South 
Main Street. 

Basket dinner at Miller Park. 
12:00 to 1:30 — Band concert by Bloomington 
Band. 



1 :30 — Vocal solo and community sing, led by 
Harold D. Saurer. 

1 :45 — Address, Chas. A. Ewing, Pres. National 
Livestock Marketing Assn. 



o=3Ei[^i ^^i = ir^^=^=j[^^^^ ::=^= it^:^EE^=]r= i r= i f = ir =ir=^ 



Way back 

when — 

McLean County grandads 
looked like this — - 

Suen Thetis 

no finer quality was known to the in- 
dustry than was found in 

Diamond Tires 

CLAY DOOLEY 

"THE TIRE MAX" 
210-212 W. Eront St. Phone 835 




no==ii — I I ii i r= 






51 



□ «=3!t=]C 



A wonderful combination 

LITTLE GIANT Chainless Bucket Elevator 
and 

Ventilated Concrete Stave 
Corn Crib 




Also Little Qiant Galvanized Steel 
Portable Elevators 



I 



MANUFACTURED AND 
BUILT BY 



PORTABLE ELEVATOR MFG. CO. 

BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 
In Business Here 3 o Years 



□ «=S]E]E 



:t=][s=»D 



52 



THE FIRST I'l.i »\\ 
Charles Newbold of Burlington, New Jersey, 
took out the first U. S. patent on a plow made of 
iron in 1797, Farmers said the iron would poison 

the soil Vlthough he showed splendid fields 

of grain grown on land he had plowed, and spent 
.SSm.(KK) in hi-. (-(Torts— he finally gave up in disgust. 



GRAIN HEADER USED IX V D. 70 
Pliny describes :i grain header used A. D. 70 bj 
the barbarians of Gaul — a two-wheeled, box-bod) 
cart fitted with a sharp knife on the front end. It 
was pushed through the field by an "x. the operator 
walking beside the cart, striking the grain over the 
knife with a stick. The heads fell into the box and 
the straw was left standing for cattle to graze upon. 



CORN FIRST GROUND IN A. D. 79 

In the time of Pompeii (A. D. 7 C >) corn was 
ground by revolving one heavy stone upon an- 
other, the power for doing the work being supplied 
by the toil-strained muscles of slaves chained to the 
apparatus. Today flour is manufactured l>v a simi- 
lar process of grinding, but tireless, efficient, me- 
chanical power i- used ami the slave is free! 



I l 'T'l'i IN GIN INVENTED IN 1792 
Eli Whitney, a farm boj from Westborough, 

Mass.. invented the cotton gin in 17 c '_' while visit- 
ing a plantation in Georgia. At that time the 
United States produced 189,316 pounds of cotton 
annually. Toda) production amount- to ., 
billion pounds. . . . Whitney's invention undoubt- 
edlj did more to increase the nation's production 

of cotton than any other single factor. 




□ <s=^ir=i i i f 

i 



ssr==OQ 



While 
Bloomingtou-> 



VISIT 




112-114 MAIN ST. 

Newly Remodeled and Stocked with 
New Fall Clothing 



Bloomington's Largest 

Radio and Electric 

Store 

Guay^ Trimble 




Electric Co., 

3^nogtiniSs£P<S**s. 

TTTV 



The Home of Dependable Household Appliances 



Electric Wiring — Fixtures — Lamps 
Electric Appliances — Radios — Supplies 



107 E. Front St. 
Bloomington, 111. 



fi 



QO=3Q[^3E 



Phone 1829 

Connecting 

All Department' 

3t^BE=s>D 



53 



tDte^nr=i i i i ii ir= i n ir= 1 1 — i r= n i r=nt^~s s 



ALONE^) 

One cannot do very much. 

TOGETHER^) 

We can solve the larger problems. 

The Farm Bureau is the largest general 
farm organization in the country. It 
elects its own officers and shapes its 
own policies. 

The Farm Bureau is an organization of 
farm people grouped together to ac- 
complish collectively what cannot be 
done individually. 

©| Co-operation <JVlakes Strength fs 

McLEAN COUNTY SERVICE 
COMPANY 

FARM BUREAU SUBSIDIARY OIL COMPANY 

"RAT? A/f W OWNED AND 
rAKMlllV CONTROLLED 

QUALITY Our FIRST CONSIDERATION 

Tetroleum Products at Cos! to Members 

McLEAN COUNTY FARM BUREAU 

CORNER MONROE AND CENTER STREETS 

Subsidiaries of Farm Bureau: 

McLEAN COUNTY MILK PRODUCERS ASSN.—FARMERS MARKET. 

McLEAN COUNTY PRODUCE MARKETING ASSN. — INSURANCE DEPARTMENT. 

U , , „ , 

ne==nr=i i ir= 11 ii ir= = i r= u = n n 1 1 — ir==^>n 

54 




McLEAN I I lUNTY FARM BURE VI 
The McLean Count) Farm Bureau is an organi- 
zation of farmers banded togethei for the purposi 
of promoting more successful agricultural methods 
and for the purpose of helping to place the agri- 
cultural industry on the plane of importance which 
it deserves among other industries. It is organized 
for the purpose of doing things collectively that 
cannot be done individually. The members of the 
organization an- leading farmers in their communi- 
ties who arc striving to do their work more effi- 
ciently than in the pa-t I >y studying heller agricul- 
tural business methods. They believe thai it is just 
as important to save a dollar in cost of production, 
through the use of better methods, a* in getting a 
dollar more on the sale of a product. 

I I ISTilNY 

'['In McLean County harm Bureau was organ- 
ized fourteen years ago. April 1, 1915, and is now 
in it- fifteenth year of work and service and. judg- 
ing from the response and interest of the members 
in the membership renewal campaign which was 
conducted last fall, is in a strong and thriving con- 
dition. The membership renewal campaign was 
conducted almost entirely by local men and our 
membership at the present tune represents over 
17(H) leading farmers in McLean County. 

The McLean Count) Farm Bureau is a member 
of the Illinois Agricultural Association, which was 
organized for the purpose of assisting to solve 
problems too large for a county organization. The 
state organization is in turn federated with forty- 
five other state farm bureaus which comprise the 
American Farm Bureau Federation with over 
1.5(10,000 members in the United States. I )ur Illi- 
nois \gricultural Association is conceded to be the 
strongest and most influential state organization in 
the United States. It has seventeen different serv- 
ice departments set up to serve its members along 
the following lines: legislation, taxation, collection 
of claims, transportation and railroad rates, dair) 
marketing, grain marketing, livestock marketing. 
produce and cream marketing, fruit and vegetable 
marketing, a full line of reliable insurance at cost. 
co-operative auditing, serum purchasing, gas and 
petroleum products, limestone and phosphate, or- 
ganization, and information. 

Local < Organization 
The organizaiton is financed through membership 
due- of $15.00 per vcar. $5.00 of which goes to the 
Illinois Agricultural .Association as dues to that or- 
ganization and 50 cents of which goes to the Amer- 
ican Farm Bureau Federation as dues. The local 
organization is governed b) an executive hoard con- 
sisting of ten men who meet monthly and look after 
the detailed business affairs of the organization 
Each township is represented by a director, whose 
official name is "governor." The governor is a leg- 
islative officer for the members of the township and 
he attends meetings with other governors and casts 
a vote for the members of his unit. 

The activities of the organization are outlined at 
the beginning of each year in the form of a pro- 
ed program of work, setting forth the majoi 
projects, the minor projects and the service proj- 
ects, or, in other words, the activities to be accom 
plished. Most of the results of our organization's 
program ol work are accomplished through demon- 
stration meetings conducted by the farm advisers. 



The organization caters entire!) to it- members and 
because of its wide program of work and varied in- 
terests the McLean ( ounty harm Bureau has some- 
thing of interest and value for ever) farmer in tin 
county and can render service of sufficient value to 
warrant every farmer belonging to the only farm- 
ers' organization representing his interest to the 

fullest extent. 

What The F vrm Bi read Is 

The Farm Bureau is a cooperative association. It 
has for it- object the well-being of agriculture eco- 
nomically, educationally and socially. Its member- 
ship i- composed of those directly or indirectly con- 
nected with farms and farming who have paid their 
harm Bureau membership fees in support of Farm 
Bureau service. 

Its purpose is to assist in making the farm busi- 
ness more profitable, the farm home more comfort- 
able and attractive and the community a better 
place in which to live. Besides co-operating with 
the agricultural, educational and other agencies of 
the county, State and nation, it also provides an or- 
ganization of farmers through which they may 
render for themselves man) lines of harm Bureau 
service, including legislation, taxation, transporta- 
tion, good roads, group insurance, auditing, rela- 
tionship between public utilities and farmers, aid to 
co-operative marketing and purchasing group-, and 
main other lines of service to the members. 

It brings to the federal department of agriculture 
and the agricultural college the farmer's viewpoint 
and likewise serves as an agenc) through which the 
services of these and other great public institutions 
can be made readily available to the people. It 
serves to develop and popularize the best known 
practices in agriculture and home economics. 

The Farm Bureau is a non-partisan, non-secret 
organization representing the whole farm popula- 
tion, men. women and children. As the organiza- 
tion has developed, the need and ini|>nrtance of the 
more active participation of women as well as men 
in every phase of Farm Bureau work has grown. 

The harm Bureau is for the purpose of bringing 
to the entire rural population, in the freest possible 
manner, all of the latest information from public 
sources, as well as affording an organized channel 
through which the farmers may attempt other serv- 
ice projects of their own. 

In structure the harm Bureau is built upon a fed- 
eration of local, county and state Farm Bureaus, all 
federated under the American Farm Bureau Fed- 
eration. In many respects the Farm Bureau may 
be likened to the Chamber of Commerce, except 
that it serves agriculture primarily — having its 
roots in the country — whereas the Chamber of 

Commerce serves primarily the interests of com- 
merce with it- opening centers in the towns and 

cities. 

The Farm Bureau is the largest general farm 
organization in the country. It elect- it- own 
officers and shapes its own policies. 

The national organization i- entering it- eleventh 
year. Some of the fort) five state harm Bureau 
Federations that go to make up the national fed- 
eration have been formed considerably longer. 

The earliest of the 1,800 County Farm Bureaus 

were -et up as far back as 1911. Mam new com 

munity and township harm Bureaus are added each 

year until there are now over IJJXhi throughout 

the land. 



55 



nfez?=ir=i i i f= 



l&OB 



You'll like our J^aundry 

WHERE EVERYTHING IS WASHED IN LUX" 

Delivery and Pickup Service 




CLEANERS and LAUNDERERS 

1626 Phones— 6000 
Bloomington, 111. Normal, 111. 



Q0=£][=]E= 

□ <=S]EE]I IE 



DB[==0Q 



EJI IEE][B=OD 



LANG -PULLER 

PRINTING COMPANY 

MADISON IT. ^^^» 



m endc 



J 



Our organization endeauors to ai 
in the establishment of qood design 
in all forms of printing 



1 J 



PRINTING 



iJlNIINi 



□ 0=S3 EE] C=1E 



office SUPPLIED 

Creators and Printers of this Souvenir Proa ram 



56 



DO=3t=lE=1E 



m ir=ip==an 



J 



I 



Say Purity Ann to your 
Grocerman 



i 






ARTHUR S. f Babe; SMITH 
OWNER 



25,000 Loaf Daily Capacity 

•ss //. 

No Substitutes Used in Our Baking 

uor -ss- 

Purity Ann baking Co. 

BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 



"We Invite Your Inspection Any linn" 






nc==ir=ii ir= 



=1' \r=\r==or\ 



A McLEAN COUNTY INSTITUTION 



That is Klational in Scope of Service 

The 

State Farm Insurance 
Companies 

Will Continue to ^Protect and Serve you and Succeeding Generations 
THROUGH THE CENTURIES TO COME 




Home Office Building Owned 

and Occupied Exclusively 

by the 

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES 

Blooming/on • Illinois 

Legal Reserve Insurance— 

automobile 

CARGO 
LIFE 
j^ggg^ ACCIDENT 

MORE THAN 7900 POLICIES IN FORCE IN McLEAN COUNTY 




-I 



4 

r 



r 






UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 




3 0112 031878280