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Full text of "Oglethorpe College Catalogue, 1965-1966"

©glEthorpe College 
Catalogue 




OGLETHORPE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Founded 1835 
ATLANTA • GEORGIA 



VISITORS 

We welcome visitors to the campus throughout the year. 
Those without appointments will find an administrative office 
open from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on weekdays and from 9 to 
12 on Saturdays. Student guides will be available at these 
times, and also on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. 

To be sure of seeing a particular officer, visitors are urged 
to make an appointment in advance. All of the offices of the 
College may be reached by calling Atlanta (Area Code 404), 
231-1441. 




CORRESPONDENCE 

Letters of inquiry concerning the operation of the College 
should be addressed to Dr. Paul R. Beall, President, Ogle- 
thorpe College, Atlanta, Georgia. 



Oglethorpe is a fully accredited, four-year liberal arts college 
under the standards of the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools, and is a member of the Association of American 
Colleges. It is also fully approved for teacher education by 
the Georgia State Department of Education. 



Vol. 48 August 1965 No. 2 

Published seven times a year in July, August, September, October, 
January, April and May by Oglethorpe College, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Second Class postage paid in Atlanta, Georgia. 



©Slethorpc Colltge 
JSullEtin 

Twentieth Edition 
1965-1966 




OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Founded 1835 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 



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CALENDAR 

FALL TERM, 1965-66 

October 1-2 Final Registration for Fall Term 

October 4 Classes Begin 

November 26-28 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 18-January 3 Christmas Holidays 
January 26-February 2 Final Examinations 



February 7-8 
February 9 
February 1 2 
April 9-17 
May 25 -June 1 
June 5 



SPRING TERM, 1966 

Final Registration for Spring Term 

Classes Begin 

Oglethorpe Day 

Spring Holidays 

Final Examinations 

Commencement 



SUMMER TERM, 1966 

June 6-7 Final Registration for Summer Term 

June 8 Classes Begin 

June 19 Summer Short Sessions Begins 

July 30 Summer Short Session Ends 

August 30-September 6 Summer Vacation 

September 21-28 Final Examinations 



October 3-4 



FALL TERM, 1966-67 

Final Registration for Fall Term 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

College Calendar 3 

Board of Trustees 7 

The Faculty 9 

The Administration 14 

History I7 

The Oglethorpe Idea 20 
General Information: 

The Trimester System 23 

The Curriculum 23 

The Evening Program 25 

Admission to the College 27 

Fees and Expenses 28 

The Curriculum: General 30 

The Curriculum: Majors Programs 32 

Courses of Study : Description 43 

Student Life 75 

Academic Regulations 82 

Index 85 




ROBERT L. FOREMAN 
Chairman of the Board 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS 

Robert L. Foreman, Chairman 
J. Arch Avary, Jr., Vice-Chairman 
Howard G. Axelberg, Secretary 
Morton L. Weiss, Treasurer 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

Norman J. Arnold, President 

The Ben Arnold Company, Columbia, South Carolina 

J. Arch Avary, Jr., Executive Vice President 
The Trust Company of Georgia Associates 

Howard G. Axelberg, Executive Vice President 

Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsay, Inc. 

Mitchell C. Bishop, former Vice Pres. and General Manager 
Tri-State Tractor Company 

Thomas L, Camp, Judge 
Civil Court of Fulton County 

Allen Chappell, Vice Chairman Emeritus 
Georgia Public Service Commission 

M. D. Collins, State Superintendent of Schools Emeritus 

Charles S. Daley, President 

Fourth National Bank, Columbus, Georgia 

R. E. Dorough, Owner 
R. E. Dorough Real Estate 

Robert L. Foreman, former General Agent 
Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company 

Arthur Garson, President 

The Lovable Company, New York City 

George E. Goodwin, Senior Vice President 
Bell and Stanton, Inc. 

Arthur Howell, Partner 
Jones, Bird & Howell 

Ira Jarrell, Past Superintendent 
City of Atlanta Schools 

Harold R. Lilley, Vice President 
Frito-Lay, Inc. 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



Albert I. Love, President 
Foote & Davies 

Virgil W. Milton, Assistant to the Vice President 
Sears, Roebuck and Company 

Louis A. Montag, Partner 
Montag & Caldwell 

William C. Perkins, Vice President 
Atlanta Brush Company 

George C. Powell, Vice President 

Allstate Insurance Companies, Chicago, Illinois 

Stephen J. Schmidt, President 
Dixie Seal & Stamp Company 

James M. Sibley, Partner 
King & Spalding 

Robert R. Snodgrass, President 
Atlas Finance Company, Inc. 

Nelson Weaver 

Real Estate & Mortgages, Birmingham, Alabama 

Morton L, Weiss, President 
Montag, Inc. 

EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 

Paul R. Beall, President, Oglethorpe College 

E. Pendleton Jones, Jr., President 

National Alumni Association of Oglethorpe College 

COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 

Executive Committee — Mr, Foreman, Chairman 

Endowment and Investment Committee — Mr. Howell, Chair- 
man 

Finance Committee — Mr. Weiss, Chairman 

Curriculum and Library Committee — Mr. Goodwin, Chair- 
man 

Buildings and Ground Committee — Mr. Perkins, Chairman 

Pubhc Relations: Alumni, Students and Community Commit- 
tee — Mr. Axelberg, Chairman 

Personnel: Faculty and Administration Committee — 
Mr. Powell, Chairman 

Development Committee — Mr. Dorough, Chairman 



THE FACULTY 

Martin Abbott 

Professor of History 

A.B., Presbyterian College; A.M., Ph.D., Emory University 

Lucile Q. Agnew 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Furman University; A.M., Duke University 

Arthur Bieler 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A.B., New York University; A.M., Middlebury College; Docteur 
de rUniversite (Paris) 

Leo Bilancio 

Associate Professor of History 

A.B., Knox College; A.M., University of North Carolina 

Joseph M. Branham 

Associate Professor of Biology 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University 

Vandall K. Brock 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Emory University; A.M., M.F.A., State University of low^a 

Wendell H, Brown 

Professor of Humanities 
A.B., University of Puget Sound; A.M., Columbia University 

Constantine Cappas 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
A.B., Berea College; Ph.D., University of Florida 

Billy W. Carter 

Director of Physical Education 

A.B., Oglethorpe College; A.M., George Peabody College for 
Teachers 

Cheever Cressy 

Professor of International Relations 

A.B., Tufts University; A.M., Ph.D., Fletcher School of Law and 

Diplomacy 

Elaine G. Dancy 

Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., A.M., University of South Carolina 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 10 

Harry M. Dobson 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Institute of Musical Arts, N. Y.; Study in Berlin, Fontainebleau, 

London 

H. Randall Dosher 

Assistant Professor of History 
A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina 

William A. Egerton 

Professor of Business Administration 

Roy N. Goslin 

Professor of Physics and Mathematics 
A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; A.M., University of Wyom- 
ing 

J. Kennedy Hodges 

Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Wofford College; A.M., Duke University; Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina 

Patricia A. Hull 

Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 
A.B., M.S., Auburn University 

Mohamed Kian 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.S., M.S., Utah State University 

Robert W. Loftin 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Oglethorpe College; A.M., Florida State University 

Elgin F. MacConnell 

Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., Allegheny College; A.M., New York University 

James R. Miles 

Professor of Business Administration 

A.B., B.S., University of Alabama; M.B.A., Ohio State University 

Ken Nishimura 

Instructor in Philosophy 

A.B., Pasadena College; B.D., Asbury Theological Seminary 

Philip F. Palmer 

Associate Professor of Government 
A.B., A.M., University of New Hampshire 



11 THE FACULTY 

Garland F. Pinholster 

Associate Professor of Physical Education; 

Director of Athletics 

A.B., North Georgia College; A.M., George Peabody College for 

Teachers 

Richard M. Reser 

Professor of Sociology 

A.B., King College; A.M., George Peabody College for Teachers; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Beverly K. Schaffer 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
A.B., Wilson College 

George C. Seward 

Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Amherst College; Ph.D., Tubingen University 

Harold M. Shafron 

Associate Professor of Economics 
A.B., A.M., University of Alabama 

Edithgene B. Sparks 

Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S. in Ed., Oglethorpe College; M.Ed., Emory University 

George F. Wheeler 

Associate Professor of Physics 

A.B., Ohio State University; A.M., California Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Lois F. Williamson 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
A,B., M.Ed., Oglethorpe College 

PART-TIME FACULTY 

E. Virginia Bowers 

Instructor in Biology 
A.B., M.S., Emory University 

Frances D. Douglas 

Instructor in Education 

A.B., Oglethorpe College; A.M., Columbia University 

Robert A. Ermentrout 

Instructor in History and Government 

A.B., University of Illinois; A.M., University of Georgia 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 12 

Thomas L. Erskine 

Instructor in English 

A.B., Bowdoin College; A.M., University of Kansas 

Duane E. Hanson 
Instructor in Art 
A.B., Macalester College; M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Raymonde Hilley 

Instructor in French 

Diplomee de I'Ecole Libre de Science Politique, Universite de 
Paris 

Bernice R. Hilliard 

Instructor in Mathematics 
A.B., M.Ed., Oglethorpe College 

George O. Kunkle 

Instructor in Philosophy 
A.B., St. John's College 

Irwin M. Levine 

Instructor in Business Law 

B.B.A., University of Georgia; LL.B., Emory University; LL.B., 

Woodrow Wilson College of Law 

Inge Manski Lundeen 
Instructor in Voice 
Indiana University; Curtis Institute; Metropolitan Opera Company 

Peter N. Mayfield 

Instructor in Psychology 

A.B., Emory University; A.M., Duke University; Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina 

Theodore R. McClure, Jr. 
Instructor in English 

A.B., Marshall College; A.M., George Peabody College for Teach- 
ers 

Ignacio Merino-Perez 
Instructor in Spanish 

B.S.&A., Instituto No. 1 de la Habana; Ph.L.D., Universidad de 
la Habana 

Georgia O. Moore 

Instructor in Business 

B.B.A., M.B.A., Georgia State College 



13 THE FACULTY 

Caroline R. Pinholster 

Instructor in Physical Education 
B.S., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Grady L. Randolph 
Instructor in History 

B.S. in Ed., Auburn University; LL.B., Woodrow Wilson College 
of law; A.M., University of Chicago 

Maria de Noronha Shafron, F.R.S.A. 
Instructor in Art 
A.B., Hunter College; Art Students League, N. Y. 

Samuel Sternberg 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B.Ch.E., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S., Carnegie Institute 

of Technology 

William A. Strozier 

Visiting Lecturer in French 

A.B., Emory University; A.M., University of Chicago 

Elizabeth Z. Sturrock 

Visiting Lecturer in German 

B.S. in Ed., A.M., Kent State University 



THE ADMINISTRATION 

Paul R. Beall President 

A.B., Grinnell College; A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University 

George C, Seward . . Academic Vice President and 

Dean of the College 
A.B., Amherst College; Ph.D., Tiibingen University 

James E. Findlay . Vice President for Business Affairs 
B.S., Northern Michigan College of Education; A.M., Notre 
Dame University 

Garland F. Pinholster . Director of Development and 

Assistant to the President 
B.S., North Georgia College; A.M., George Peabody College for 
Teachers 

Jeanne B. Cressy . . . Secretary to the President 
A.B., College of William and Mary; A.M., Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy 

Office of the Academic Vice President 

George C. Seward . . Academic Vice President and 

Dean of the College 
A.B., Amherst College; Ph.D., Tiibingen University 

Martin Abbott Assistant Dean 

Marjorie M. MacConnell Registrar 

Elgin F. MacConnell Dean of Men 

A.B., Allegheny College; A.M., New York University 

Bernice R. Hilliard Dean of Women 

A.B., M.Ed., Oglethorpe College 

Robert J. Mohan . Director of Admissions Counsellors 
A.B., Oglethorpe College 

Betty J. Huddleston .... Secretary to the Dean 

Glenda J. Balowsky .... Assistant Registrar 
B.S., Oglethorpe College 

Joan E. Barton Assistant Registrar 

Ava H. Sheffield .... Admissions Counsellor 

Dolores Reiser Secretary 

14 



15 THE ADMINISTRATION 

Office of the Vice President for Business Affairs 

James E, Findlay . Vice President for Business Affairs 
B.S., Northern Michigan University; A.M., Notre Dame University 

Carol G. Tucker Bursar 

June H. Conley Cashier 

Mildred M. Jacob Bookkeeper 

Kathleen H, Albright Receptionist 

Elizabeth M. Cheatham Secretary 

Ruth F. Lovell .... Manager of Book Store 

and Post Office 

John W. Otting .... Superintendent of Buildings 

Donald C. Hawkins . . . Superintendent of Grounds 

Sewell P. Edwards . . . Campus Security Officer 

Office of the Director of Development 

Garland F. Pinholster . . Director of Development and 

Assistant to the President 
B.S., North Georgia College; A.M., George Peabody College 

Charles Cash .... Director of Public Relations 

Joyce B. Minors Alumni Director 

A.B., Oglethorpe College 

Iris A. Magid Secretary 

Martha L, Smith Secretary 

Health Services 

C. A. N. Rankine College Physician 

M.D., New York University (Bellevue Medical School) 

Lenora T. Baldwin College Nurse 

R.N., Woodlawn Infirmary, Birmingham, Alabama. 

Library 

Thomas W. Chandler, Jr Librarian 

A.B., M.Lib., Emory University 

Dorothy G. Richardson . . . Assistant Librarian 
A.B., University of Tennessee; B.S. in L.S., University of Illinois 

Ruth L. Osteen Library Assistant 

A.B., University of Oklahoma. 




PRESIDENT PAUL R. BEALL 



HISTORY OF OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Oglethorpe's history dates back to 1835 when a group of 
Georgia Presbyterians, influenced by the example of Princeton 
University, secured a charter for the operation of a church- 
supported university in the academic pattern of the nineteenth 
century. Actual operations commenced in 1838 at Midway, a 
small community near Milledgeville, at that time the capital 
of the state. 

For nearly three decades after its founding, the university 
steadily grew in stature and influence. Its president during 
most of that time, Samuel K. Talmage, provided gifted leader- 
ship and, at the same time, gathered about him a faculty of 
unusual ability, at least two of whom would achieve real dis- 
tinction: James Woodrow, an uncle of Woodrow Wilson and 
the first teacher in Georgia to hold the Ph.D., and Joseph Le- 
Conte, destined to world fame for his work in the field of 
geology. 

Oglethorpe alumni went forth in those years to play roles 
of importance in various fields. Perhaps the best-known of her 
graduates was the poet Sidney Lanier, a member of the Class 
of 1860, who remarked shortly before his death that the great- 
est intellectual impulse of his life had come to him during his 
college days at Oglethorpe. 

But the life and service of the school were suddenly cut 
short in the 1860's as Oglethorpe became a casualty of war. 
Her students marched away to become Confederate soldiers; 
her endowment at length was lost in Confederate bonds; her 
buildings were converted to military use as a barracks and 
hospital. In a sense, her fate became bound up with that of 
the Lost Cause. 

After the close of the conflict an effort was made to revive 
the institution, first at Midway and then by re-location in At- 
lanta. However, the ravages of war, together with the disloca- 
tions of Reconstruction, posed obstacles too great to overcome, 
and in 1872 Oglethorpe closed its doors for a second, and 
seemingly final, time. 

But three decades later, thanks largely to the determined 
energy and vision of Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, the school was 



17 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 18 

revived, chartered in 1913, and moved to its present location 
on the northern edge of metropoHtan Atlanta. The cornerstone 
of the first building was laid in 1 9 1 5 in a ceremony witnessed 
by members of the classes of 1860 and 1861; symbolically, 
thus, the old and the new were linked. 

From then until his resignation in 1944, President Jacobs 
became and remained the guiding spirit of the endeavor. He 
developed a number of ideas and enterprises which brought 
national, and even international, recognition to the school. 
Most notable among these were the establishment of a campus 
radio station as early as 1931, and the completion in 1940 of 
the Crypt of Civilization to preserve for posterity a cross- 
section of twentieth-century life. 

Still a new era opened in the history of Oglethorpe in 1944 
when Dr. Philip Weltner assumed the presidency and, with a 
group of faculty associates, initiated a new and exciting ap- 
proach to undergraduate education called the "Oglethorpe 
Idea." As described more fully in a subsequent section, the 
new departure was founded on the conviction that education 
should encompass the twin aims of making a life and making 
a living, and that toward these ends a program of studies 
should be developed which made sense from first to last and 
which meaningfully hung together. 

The last twenty years of Oglethorpe's history have revolved 
around the central issue of finding more effective means of 
answering the challenge posed by these fundamental purposes. 
At the same time, though the College remains sympathetic 
toward all religions and encourages its students to affiliate with 
a local church or synagogue of their own choosing, all formal 
support from church bodies was discontinued. Today Ogle- 
thorpe stands as a wholly private and non-sectarian institution 
of higher learning. 

In 1965 began still another chapter in the history of the 
school. As part of its steadfast aim to become "a small col- 
lege, superlatively good," the institution formally changed its 
name from Oglethorpe University to Oglethorpe College — a 
change more precisely reflecting its nature as well as its pur- 
poses. In addition, it adopted a reorganization of its academic 
year from a system of quarters to one of three equal semesters, 
effective with the fall term of 1965. Under the new trimester 



19 



HISTORY OF OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



system, the College will operate year-round, enabling students 
to graduate in less than three calendar years if they choose to 
do so. 

Today, then, Oglethorpe stands on the threshold of a new 
era in her history, determined to build an even more secure 
academic structure on the foundations laid so patiently and so 
well by those who have gone before in the one hundred and 
thirty years since her creation. 




THE COLLEGE HOME 
OF THE PRESIDENT 



THE OGLETHORPE IDEA 

The Oglethorpe idea, in a few words, is to forge the strong- 
est possible link between the "academic" and "practical," be- 
tween "human understanding" and "know-how," between 
"culture" and "proficiency," between past and present. We are 
persuaded that there is ultimately no contradiction between 
the concepts represented in each of these usually divorced 
pairs. The liberal arts are practical arts; the cultured have no 
quarrel with the truly proficient; human understanding is not 
in a realm by itself and set apart from genuine know-how; 
properly understood the past can instruct the present and 
future. 

Another way to interpret the Oglethorpe idea is to under- 
stand what is common, from a point of view of higher educa- 
tion, to the student's real needs and interests. There can be no 
basic disagreement among educators and laymen about these 
common elements. In summary they are to learn as much as 
possible about the principles, forces, and laws influencing or 
governing Nature, including human nature and human asso- 
ciations; to learn to take account of these not only for their 
own sake but for growth, guidance and direction for himself 
and others; to express his deepest individuality in the work or 
calling most appropriate to his talents; and to discover his 
proper place, role, and function in the complex relationships 
of modern living. 

Perhaps a simpler way to put this is to say that work is not 
an escape from living; living should not be an escape from 
work. Education should therefore encompass the twin aims 
of making a life and making a living. But there is more to 
education than even the happiness and progress of the indi- 
vidual. Inescapably he is part and parcel of society. He fulfills 
himself by the measure in which he contributes to the happi- 
ness and progress of his fellows. Education, as an institution 
of society, has a social obligation. It cannot neglect either the 
individual or the community without damage to both. The 
social order at its best is best for the individual; the individual 
at his best is best for society. The business of education is to 
strive for this optimum. 

What difference should an education make? There are peo- 

20 



21 THE OGLETHORPE STORY 

pie, deficient in formal schooling, who are happy and useful. 
They understand and get along well with their neighbors. They 
are an influence for good in their community and earn a living 
by honest effort. Any truly educated man displays the same 
traits. The difference is in degree rather than in kind. 

Whereas it is usual for people to understand their fellows, 
how much wider should be the sympathies of the educated 
man! His contacts go beyond the living and embrace the seers 
of all the ages, who as his companions should inform his mind 
and enlarge his vision. 

With the onrush of the Atomic Age the social order becomes 
of increasing concern. Democracy is the great unfinished item 
of business on the agenda of civilization. Prejudice, ignorance, 
and cynical indifference alike are dangers to a democratic so- 
ciety. Where else than to the educated man should we look for 
that broad intelligence which is capable of the long view that 
personal advantage is irrevocably bound up with the general 
good! 

Never before have people been so alive to the necessity of 
mastering rather than being mastered by the economic forces 
at work in our world. Creative brains and individual initiative, 
tempered by a strong sense of social responsibility, are the only 
sources of payrolls compatible with a free society, an improv- 
ing living standard, and a better way of life. Where else can we 
look for this creative urge than to adequate education of quali- 
fied talent! 

We make no claim that formal education inevitably bestows 
these benefits. We insist that it can. If that be true, how may 
the mark be reached? We shall always have to remind ourselves 
as teachers that education is a difficult art. The pitfalls we 
would shun are hard to escape. Of all people, the teacher must 
remain the most teachable. The quest for wisdom is never- 
ending. We, too, must continually grow in order to stimulate 
growth in those who come to us to learn. We shall also have 
to remind ourselves that subjects are merely the means; the 
objects of instruction are the persons taught. We must for- 
ever be mindful that education, in order to be true to itself, 
must be a progressive experience for the learner, in which 
interest gives rise to inquiry, inquiry is pursued to mastery, 
and mastery at one point occasions new interests at others. 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 22 

The cycle is never closed, but is a spiral which always returns 
upon itself at some higher level of insight. Growth in every- 
thing which is human must remain the dominant objective for 
the individual and for society. 

We therefore stand for a program of studies which makes 
sense from first to last, which hangs together, and which pro- 
motes this desired result. Not only in vocational training but 
also in the education of human personality, the materials of 
instruction must have a beginning, point in a definite direction, 
and prepare for all that ensues. We necessarily make provision 
for and give scope to diversified talents in preparation for 
careers as varied as commerce, industry, law, medicine, science, 
education, literature, the fine arts, social welfare, and govern- 
ment. But this much we all have in common: each man has to 
live with himself and all have to live with their fellows. Living 
in community, with human understanding, involves arts in 
which we all are equally concerned. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE TRIMESTER SYSTEM 

Beginning with the fall term of 1965, Oglethorpe will in- 
stitute the trimester system under which the academic year 
will be organized into three equal semesters or terms of six- 
teen weeks each. The fall semester begins in early October and 
ends in January; the winter semester begins in February and 
ends in May; and the summer semester, of equal length, be- 
gins in June and ends in September. 

Since the trimester schedule is closely related to the sched- 
ule of high schools, preparatory schools, and other colleges, 
and since most of the courses in Oglethorpe's basic program 
are to be offered during each term, it is readily possible for 
a student to enter the college at the beginning of any one of 
the three. Moreover, the trimester system enables the student, 
by attending full-time, to graduate in approximately three 
years rather than the usual four, if he chooses to do so. 

THE CURRICULUM 

Under the trimester system, Oglethorpe's curriculum has 
been redesigned so that all the courses carry a credit of three 
or four semester hours each. For the full-time student, the 
normal academic load will consist of five courses for each of 
the eight terms. 

Forty courses (or their equivalents for transfer students) 
are necessary for graduation. Of these, twenty specified courses 
comprise the core or general-education program required of all 
students; they embrace the areas of English, history, foreign 
languages, humanities, philosophy, government, economics, 
international relations, mathematics, natural sciences, and be- 
havioral sciences. The remaining twenty courses are selected 
by the student, normally from a majors program and fields 
of allied interest. 

With certain variations for some programs, the student 
ordinarily will spend his first four semesters completing the 
core program and then, with the beginning of his junior year, 
the last four completing the requirements for the majors pro- 
gram he has selected. Presently, majors are offered in biology, 

23 



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THE ACADEMIC PROCESSION 



25 GENERAL INFORMATION 

business administration, chemistry, economics, education, Eng- 
lish, foreign languages, history, mathematics, physics, political 
studies, pre-medicine, psychology, and sociology. 

THE EVENING PROGRAM 

As a service to the community, Oglethorpe maintains an 
evening program throughout the year. A sizeable number of 
the regular courses are given in the evening, thereby enabling 
those who find it impossible to attend classes in the daytime 
to work toward a college degree. Courses offered in the even- 
ing are taught by either regular faculty members of the College 
or by other quahfied instructors. 

Inquiries concerning the nature of the program or the 
courses offered during each semester should be addressed to 
the Director of the Evening Program at the College. 




CLASSES IN SESSION 




ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

Throughout its history, Oglethorpe has welcomed as candi- 
dates for degrees students from all sections of this country as 
well as from abroad. The Committee on Admissions selects 
the applicants who present the strongest evidence of purpose, 
maturity, scholastic ability, and potential for college work. In 
arriving at its decision, the Committee considers the nature of 
the student's high school program, the grades received, the 
recommendations of counsellors and teachers, and the results 
of aptitude tests. 

The candidate for admission must present a satisfactory 
high-school program which includes as a minimum four units 
of English, three in mathematics and science, three in social 
studies, and two in foreign languages. In addition he must 
submit satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test, in- 
cluding the writing sample, of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. It is to the candidate's advantage to take this test 
as early as possible during his senior year in high school. De- 
tails concerning the program can be obtained from high-school 
counsellors, or by writing the C. E. E. B., Box 592, Princeton, 
New Jersey. 

The Oglethorpe application form contains a list of the 
material which must be submitted by the applicant; no appli- 
cant will be considered until all of this material has been re- 
ceived. Applications will be considered in order of completion, 
and the applicant will be notified of the decision of the Com- 
mittee on Admissions as soon as action has been taken. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

The College invites those students who have taken the Ad- 
vanced Placement examinations of the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board to submit their scores for possible considera- 
tion toward college credit. The case of each candidate will be 
judged upon its own merits. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A limited number of applicants for transfer from other 
recognized institutions of higher learning will be accepted by 

27 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 28 

the College. They must follow the regular admissions pro- 
cedures and produce evidence that they are in good standing 
at the institution last attended. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

All correspondence concerning admission should be ad- 
dressed to the Director of Admissions, Oglethorpe College, 
Atlanta, Georgia. After receiving the application form, the 
applicant should fill it out and return it with an application 
fee of $10.00; this fee is not refundable. After he has received 
notification of acceptance, he should forward an advance de- 
posit of $50.00 by the date specified in his letter of acceptance. 
This deposit is applicable toward his tuition charge, but it is 
not refundable. In addition, an advance deposit of $25.00 
must be made by the date specified in the letter of acceptance 
by those desiring dormitory space. This deposit is applicable 
against room charges for the term, but it is not refundable. 

FEES AND COSTS 





Fall 


Spring 


Summer 


Tuition 


$420 


$420 


$420 


Activity Fee 


30 


30 


30 


Room* 


150 


150 


150 


Board 


250 


250 


250 



$850 $850 $850 

*Includes hospital and accident insurance. 

Special Fees 

1. Damage deposit $25.00 

This is required of all resident students to cover any 
damage to college property by the students. It remains 
on deposit during the residence; the unexpended bal- 
ance is refunded when the student withdraws or is 
graduated. 

2. Late registration fee $ 5.00 

This is charged in all cases where the student does not 
complete his registration in the prescribed period or 
changes his course registration by his initiative after 
the registration period. 



29 ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

3. Laboratory Fee (per course) $ 5.00 

This is charged in case of all science and language 
courses in which there is a laboratory for the use of 
materials. 

4. Graduation fee $15.00 

This includes rental on caps and gowns. 

5. Transcript fee $ 1 .00 

After the first complete transcript a charge is made for 
each additional copy. All financial obligations to the 
school must be met before a transcript is issued. 



THE CURRICULUM 

ORGANIZATION 

Oglethorpe's curriculum is arranged into four general Di- 
visions: Humanities, Social Studies, Science, and Education 
and Behavioral Sciences. Academic areas included within each 
are the following: 

Division I: The Humanities 

Art Literature 

English Music 

Foreign Languages Philosophy 

Division II: Social Studies 

Business Administration History 
Economics Political Studies 

Division III: Science 

Biology Mathematics 

Chemistry Physics 

Division IV: Education and Behavioral Sciences 

Education Psychology 

Physical Education Sociology 

GENERAL COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS 

HUMANITIES 24 hours 

English: 6 hours 

All students are required to complete two courses in English 
110 and 111, Speech and Writing. Entering students are 
sectioned according to placement tests. 

Humanities: 6 hours 

This is a general requirement to be met by taking Humanities 
210, The Classical World, and Humanities 211, The Western 
World. 

Foreign Language: 6 hours 

Each student is required to take one academic year of a for- 
eign language offered at Oglethorpe: French, German, or 
Spanish. 

30 



31 THE CURRICULUM 

Philosophy: 6 hours 

This requirement is to be met by taking courses 266, Intro- 
duction to Philosophy, and 267, Ethics. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 21 hours 

History: 6 hours 

All students are required to complete two courses in History 
120 and 121, Western Civilization. 

Government: 6 hours 

This is a general requirement to be met by taking one course 
in 123, Government of the United States, and another in 223, 
Comparative Government. 

Economics: 6 hours 

Each student is required to take two courses in economics: 
220 and 221, Principles of Economics. 

International Relations: 3 hours 

326, International Relations, is required of all students. 

SCIENCE 11 hours 

Science: 8 hours 

One academic year of work in the field of science is required 
of all students. The requirement can be met by taking 130 
and 131, Principles of Science, or by taking two semesters 
of work in biology, chemistry, or physics. 

Mathematics: 3 hours 

One course in mathematics is required of all students. 

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 6 hours 

Psychology: 3 hours 

All students are required to take 140, General Psychology. 

Sociology: 3 hours 

A three-hour course in 141, Introduction to Sociology, is re- 
quired of all students. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION hours 

Two semesters of physical education are required, except for 
those excused on medical grounds. 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 32 

MAJORS PROGRAMS 

In additional to completing the core program, students nor- 
mally are expected, no later than the beginning of their junior 
year, to choose a majors program and to fulfill the departmen- 
tal regulations for that program. With some variation accord- 
ing to professional departmental requirements, most students 
will take the core program during their freshman and sopho- 
more years, and a majors program during their junior and 
senior years. * 

The following are suggested programs of majors. In addition 
to the required core program, most of them include three 
levels of other courses: those prescribed for the major, directed 
electives recommended as immediately related to the major, 
and free electives allowed to enable the student to widen his 
intellectual interests. Variations of each program are possible, 
according to the particular needs of the student. 

*During the transitional year of 1965-1966 it will not be possible to offer 
all the elective courses listed; only those most immediately necessary to 
serve the needs of students can be given at this time. 



MAJORS PROGRAMS 
BIOLOGY 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Zoology 4 Zoology 4 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Mathematics 3 Mathematics 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

General Chemistry 4 General Chemistry 4 

Embryology 4 Government of the U. S 3 

Botany 4 Botany 4 

Junior 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 Organic Chemistry 4 

Beginning Physics 4 Beginning Physics 4 

Microbiology 4 Genetics 4 

Comparative Government 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Senior Seminar 2 Ecology 4 

Quantitative Analysis 4 Quantitative Analysis 4 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Physiology 4 Physiology 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Foreign Languages 3 Foreign Language 3 

Comparative Government 3 Insurance 3 

Junior 

Accounting 3 Accounting 3 

Business Law 3 Conceptual Foundations 4 

Statistics 3 International Relations 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Senior 

Marketing Principles 3 Finance 3 

Human Relations in Business .... 3 Principles of Management 4 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

33 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 34 

CHEMISTRY 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civihzation 3 Western CiviUzation 3 

General Chemistry 4 General Chemistry 4 

General Psychology 3 Mathematics 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Beginning Physics 4 Beginning Physics 4 

Organic Chemistry 4 Organic Chemistry 4 

Calculus 3 Calculus 3 

Comparative Government 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Junior 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Quantitative Analysis 4 Quantitative Analysis 4 

Physical Chemistry 4 Physical Chemistry 4 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Senior 

Differential Equations 3 International Relations 3 

Advanced Topics 4 Advanced Topics 4 

Chemical Literature 3 Chemical Seminar 2 

Atomic and Nuclear Physics 3 Directed Elective 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

ECONOMICS 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Comparative Government 3 Elective 3 

Junior 

Intermediate Economic Theory ... 3 Labor Economics 3 

Money and Banking 3 Public Finance 3 

American History 3 American History 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Elective 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Dev. of Economic Doctrines 3 International Economics 3 

Comparative Economic Systems . . 3 Current Dev. in Economics 3 

Statistics 3 Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



35 MAJORS PROGRAMS 

EDUCATION— ELEMENTARY 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Comparative Government 3 Introduction to Education 3 

Junior 

Elementary Curr. and Methods ... 6 Elementary Curr. and Methods ... 6 

American History 3 American History 3 

Child & Adolescent Psychology ... 3 The Community 3 

Elective 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Student Teaching 12 Educational Psychology 3 

Special Topics in Elem. Edu 3 Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

EDUCATION— SECONDARY 

English 
Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

American Literature 3 American Literature 3 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Comparative Government 3 Introduction to Education 3 

Junior 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Secondary Curriculum 3 Secondary Methods & Materials . . 3 

Romantic Literature 3 Victorian Literature 3 

Advanced Grammar 3 History of the English Language . . 3 

Child & Adolescent Psychology ... 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Student Teaching 12 Educational Psychology 3 

Special Topics in Secondary Edu. . 3 The Community 3 

Shakespeare 3 

Understanding Poetry 3 

Elective 3 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 36 

EDUCATION— SECONDARY 

Mathematics 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Elementary Mathematics 3 Elementary Mathematics 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Mathematical Analysis 3 Mathematical Analysis 3 

General Psychology 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Advanced Geometry 3 Introduction to Education 3 

Junior 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Child & Adolescent Psychology ... 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Directed Elective 3 Mathematical Probability 3 

Secondary Curriculum 3 Secondary Methods & Materials . . 3 

Comparative Government 3 Directed Elective 3 

Senior 

Student Teaching 12 Educational Psychology 3 

Special Topics in Secondary Edu. . 3 The Community 3 

International Relations 3 

Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 

EDUCATION— SECONDARY 

Science — (Biology Concentration) 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Zoology 4 Zoology 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 3 Mathematics 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Botany 4 Botany 4 

General Psychology 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Directed Elective 3 Introduction to Education 3 

Junior 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Child & Adolescent Psychology ... 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Secondary Curriculum 3 Secondary Methods & Materials . . 3 

General Chemistry 4 General Chemistry 4 

Comparative Government 3 Embryology 4 

Senior 

Student Teaching 12 Educational Psychology 3 

Special Topics in Secondary Edu. . 3 The Community 3 

Genetics 4 

Beginning Physics 4 

International Relations 3 



37 MAJORS PROGRAMS 

EDUCATION— SECON DAR Y 
Science — (Chemistry Concentration) 

Freshman 

7^/ Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

General Chemistry 4 General Chemistry 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 3 Mathematics 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 Organic Chemistry 4 

General Psychology 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Mathematics 3 Introduction to Education 3 

Junior 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Child & Adolescent Psychology ... 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Secondary Curriculum 3 Secondary Methods & Materials . . 3 

Beginning Physics 4 Beginning Physics 4 

Comparative Government 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Student Teaching 12 Educational Psychology 3 

Special Topics in Secondary Edu. . 3 The Community 3 

Quantitative Analysis 4 

Zoology 4 

Elective 3 

EDUCATION— SECONDARY 
Science — (Physics Concentration) 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Chemistry 4 Chemistry 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 3 Mathematics 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Beginning Physics 4 Beginning Physics 4 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Education 3 

Junior 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Child & Adolescent Psychology ... 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Secondary Curriculum 3 Secondary Methods & Materials . . 3 

Electricity and Magnetism 3 Light and Optics 3 

Comparative Government 3 Directed Elective 3 

Junior Physics Laboratory 1 Junior Physics Laboratory 1 

Senior 

Student Teaching 12 Educational Psychology 3 

Special Topics in Secondary Edu. . 3 The Community 3 

Zoology 4 

International Relations 3 

Elective 3 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 38 

EDUCATION— SECONDARY 

Social Studies 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Comparative Government 3 Introduction to Education 3 

Junior 

Secondary Curriculum 3 Secondary Methods & Materials . . 3 

American History 3 American History 3 

European History 3 European History 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Child & Adolescent Psychology ... 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Student Teaching 12 Educational Psychology 3 

Special Topics in Secondary Edu. . 3 Directed Elective 3 

Directed Elective 3 

Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 

ENGLISH 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

American Literature 3 American Literatvu-e 3 

Junior 

The English Novel 3 Understanding of Poetry 3 

Romantic Literature 3 Victorian Literature 3 

Advanced Grammar 3 History of English Language 3 

Comparative Government 3 International Relations 3 

Creative Writing 3 Creative Writing 3 

Senior 

Modern Literature 3 Modern Literature 3 

Shakespeare 3 Shakeseare 3 

Medieval Literature 3 1 7th- 1 8th Century Literature 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



39 MAJORS PROGRAMS 

FRENCH 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

Elementary French 3 Elementary French 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Foreign Language II 3 Foreign Language II 3 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Junior 

French Culture & Civilization .... 3 History of the French Language . . 3 

Survey of French Literature 3 Survey of French Literature 3 

Renaissance and Reformation .... 3 History of English Language 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Comparative Government 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

French Literature Period 3 French Literature Period 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

English Literature 3 English Literature 3 

Elective 3 History of Absolutism 3 

Elective 3 Applied Linguistics 3 

HISTORY 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Comparative Government 3 The Middle Ages 3 

Junior 

Renaissance and Reformation .... 3 History of Absolutism 3 

American History 3 American History 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Directed Elective 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Europe In the 19th Century 3 Europe Since 1918 3 

Civil War and Reconstruction .... 3 American Character 3 

Directed Elective 3 Chinese Culture 3 

Directed Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 40 

MATHEMATICS 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Chemistry 4 Chemistry 4 

General Psychology 3 Mathematics 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Mathematics 3 Mathematics 3 

Beginning Physics 4 Beginning Physics 4 

Comparative Government 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Junior 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Differential Equations 3 Vector Analysis 3 

Advanced Mechanics 3 Advanced Mechanics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Advanced Geometry 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Advanced Algebra 3 Advanced Algebra 3 

Advanced Calculus 3 Advanced Calculus 3 

Mathematical Probability 3 Elementary Computers 3 

Mathematics Seminar 1 Statistics 3 

Directed Elective 3 Mathematics Seminar 1 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

PHILOSOPHY 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Comparative Government 3 Formal Logic 3 

Junior 

History of Philosophy 3 History of Philosophy 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Philosophy of Science 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Philosophy of Religion 3 Interpretation of History 3 

Epistemology 3 Metaphysics 3 

Directed Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Existentialism 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



41 MAJORS PROGRAMS 

PHYSICS 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

General Chemistry 4 General Chemistry 4 

General Psychology 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Mathematics 3 Mathematics 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Calculus 3 Calculus 3 

Beginning Physics 4 Beginning Physics 4 

Comparative Government 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Junior 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Differential Equations 3 Light and Optics 3 

Advanced Mechanics 3 Advanced Mechanics 3 

Electricity and Magnetism 3 International Relations 3 

Junior Laboratory 1 Junior Laboratory 1 

Senior 

Atomic and Nuclear Physics .... 3 Atomic and Nuclear Physics 3 

Advanced Calculus 3 Advanced Calculus 3 

Heat and Thermodynamics 3 Special Topics 3 

Advanced Mathematics 3 Vector Analysis 3 

Senior Physics Laboratory 2 Senior Physics Laboratory 2 

Physics Seminar 1 Physics Seminar 1 

POLITICAL STUDIES 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

General Psychology 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Comparative Government 3 State and Local Government 3 

Junior 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Languge 3 

European Political Thought 3 American Political Thought 3 

American History 3 American History 3 

Diplomacy of the U. S 3 Diplomacy of the Far East 3 

American Political Parties 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Constitutional Law 3 International Law 3 

Nationalism 3 Public Administration 3 

Europe in the 19th Century 3 Europe since 1918 3 

Anthropology 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 42 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Western Civihzation 3 Western CiviUzation 3 

Biology 4 Biology 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

General Psychology 3 Statistics 3 

Comparative Government 3 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Junior 

Experimental Psychology 3 Psychology of Learning ; . 3 

Child & Adolescent Psychology . . 3 Theories of Personality 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Directed Elective 3 International Relations 3 

Senior 

Abnormal Psychology 3 Social Psychology 3 

Psychometrics 3 History and Systems 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Directed Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

SOCIOLOGY 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Speech and Writing 3 Speech and Writing 3 

Biology 4 Biology 4 

Western Civilization 3 Western Civilization 3 

Mathematics 3 Government of the U. S 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Sophomore 

The Classical World 3 The Western World 3 

Principles of Economics 3 Principles of Economics 3 

Comparative Government 3 General Psychology 3 

Introduction to Sociology 3 Social Problems 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 Ethics 3 

Junior 

Child & Adolescent Psychology . . 3 International Relations 3 

The Family 3 Intergroup Relations 3 

Cultural Anthropology 3 Social Psychology 3 

Elective 3 Statistics 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Senior 

The Community 3 History of Sociological Thought . . 3 

Theories of Personality 3 Seminar 3 

Criminology 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



COURSES OF STUDY 

In the following section, the courses are listed alphabetically 
by area within their respective divisions. Numbers from 100 
to 199 designate courses especially for freshmen; those from 
200 to 299, courses especially for sophomores; 300 to 399, 
courses especially for juniors; and those from 400 to 499, 
courses especially for seniors. Each level of offerings assumes 
the earlier completion of necessary prerequisites. The number 
of hours refers to the semester hours credit per term allowed 
for the course; the designation "3 + 3" or "4 + 4" indicates 
that the course carries 6 or 8 semester hours of credit, re- 
spectively, for two semesters of work. 



43 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

Professor Brown, Chairman 

Arthur Bieler, Professor of Modern Language 
Wendell H. Brown, Professor of Humanities 
George C. Seward, Professor of Philosophy 

Lucile Q. Agnew, Assistant Professor of English 
Vandall K. Brock, Assistant Professor of English 
Elaine G. Dancy, Assistant Professor of English 
Harry M. Dobson, Assistant Professor of Music 
Robert W. Loftin, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

*Thomas L. Erskine, Instructor in English 
*Duane E. Hanson, Instructor in Art 
*Raymonde Hilley, Instructor in French 
*George O. Kunkle, Instructor in Philosophy 
*Inge Manski Lundeen, Instructor in Voice 
*Theodore R. McClure, Jr., Instructor in English 
*Ignacio Merino-Perez, Instructor in Spanish 
Ken Nishimura, Instructor in Philosophy 
* Maria de Noronha Shafron, Instructor in Art 
*William A. Strozier, Guest Lecturer in French 
*Elizabeth Z. Sturrock, Guest Lecturer in German 



^Part-time. 



Areas Embraced Within the Division 

Art Literature 

English Music 

Foreign Languages Philosophy 



44 



45 ART; ENGLISH 

ART 

160, 161. Basic Art Structure 3 + 3 hours 

A study of the fundamentals of the visual arts. Under indi- 
vidualized attention the student participates in a study of the 
elements of design and drawing, the plastic arts of ceramics and 
sculpture, an introduction to painting and special projects using 
materials and methods creatively. 

162, 163. Introductory Painting 3 + 3 hours 

A course for beginners which will include assignments and 
individual projects in drawing and painting. Instruction includes 
discussion and disciplines in color, design, fundamentals, perspec- 
tive, drawing techniques, and others. 

ENGLISH 

110, 111. English: Speech and Writing 3 + 3 hours 

The first of a two-semester sequence providing exercise in 
fundamental principles of correct writing, clear logic, and effec- 
tive speech. Practice in writing and speaking is co-ordinated with 
diversified readings in traditional and contemporary literature. 

210. The Classical World 3 hours 

A two-semester sequence designed to compare the modern 
world with its background. Studies in some depth will be made of 
the Greek world of Homer, of Sophocles and the Parthenon, and 
of the medieval world of Dante, Aquinas, and the great cathedrals, 
in comparison with each other and with the 20th century. 

211. The Western World 3 hours 

A continuation of 211, which is a prerequisite. 

212. Advanced Grammar 3 hours 

A course using both the classical and linguistic approaches to 
English grammar. 



ENGLISH 46 

213. American Literature 3 hours 

An examination of the shape of our national Hterature from 
its beginnings to the 1850's, with special emphasis on Hawthorne 
and Melville. 

214. American Literature 3 hours 

Principally a study of Whitman, Dickinson, James, Howells, 
and Crane. 

310. Literature of the 17th and 18th Centuries 3 hours 

The English Neo-Classical spirit as seen through the works of 
its major writers from 1680 to 1800. 

311. Romantic Literature 3 hours 

A course dealing with prose and poetry of the early 19th cen- 
tury as inspired by nature and man's inmost feelings. 

312. Victorian Literature 3 hours 

A study concerned with the fact that the writers of the 19th 
century after 1832 first faced the problem of our day — a world 
confused by the dominating surge of science and industry. The 
literature shows all from the cry of despair to unbounded hope. 

313. The English Novel 3 hours 

A study of the English novel from the 17th through the 19th 
centuries, with reading and discussion of works by such novelists 
as Fielding, Austin, and Hardy. 

314. 315. Creative Writing 3 + 3 hours 

Theory and technique of writing poetry and fiction. Emphasis 
will be on the improvement of the student's own work through 
constructive criticism and an increased awareness of the imagina- 
tive and technical qualities of superior literature. Though students 
attend classes, arrange consultations with the instructor and read 
both generally and specificially, the requirements are fulfilled only 
by writing. 



47 ENGLISH; FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

316. History of the English Language 3 hours 

A course showing the development of our most expressive art 
from the early Old English period to the present as affected by 
historical and linguistic forces. 

410. Medieval Literature 3 hours 

A study of the major writers in Middle English, with em- 
phasis on Chaucer. 

411, 412. Readings in Shakespeare 3 + 3 hours 

Shakespeare and his time studied through the plays and other 
Renaissance literature. 

413. Modem Literature 3 hours 

A study of 20th century English and American poets, short 
story writers, dramatists, and novelists to 1941. 

414. Modem Literature 3 hours 

A continuation of the examination of English and American 
literature, beginning with World War II novels and poetry. 

415. Understanding Poetry 3 hours 

An examination into the reason for poetry and some of the 
techniques used. It is believed that a consciousness of these will 
develop a better understanding on the part of the student. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
French 

112, 113. Elementary French 3 + 3 hours 

A course in beginning college French designed to present a 
sound foundation in understanding, speaking, reading and writing 
contemporary French. The student spends three hours in the 
classroom and a minimum of one hour in the laboratory. 

215, 216. Intermediate French 3 + 3 hours 

A short review of grammar and usage accompanied by read- 
ings in 20th century literature. Opportunity for aural-oral training is 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 48 

furnished in the classroom and laboratory. The students spends 
a minimum of one hour in the laboratory and three hours in the 
classroom per week. 

317. A Short History of the French Language 3 hours 

A course consisting of lectures and discussion periods acquaint- 
ing the student with the development of the French language from 
its pre-Latin origins to its modern form. 

318. French Culture and Civilization 3 hours 

A study of the geographical, historical, economic, social, and cul- 
tural factors that make an understanding of France and its civiliza- 
tion possible. Carefully selected topics will serve as a basis of 
classroom discussion. 

360, 361. Survey of French Literature 3 + 3 hours 

A study of French literature from the 17th century to the 
present. Readings from representative authors are analyzed in the 
context of their respective literary and historical periods with 
special emphasis on the 20th century. 

416. Seventeenth Century Literature 3 hours 

A study of the classical period with special emphasis on the 
plays of Corneille, Racine, and Moliere. 

417. Eighteenth Century Literature 3 hours 

A study of the Age of the Enlightenment, with special emphasis 
on Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Marivaux. 

418. Nineteenth Century Literature 3 hours 

A course consisting of a series of lectures and discussions 
stressing the works of Stendhal, Flaubert, and Balzac against the 
background of the major literary movements of the century. 

419. Applied Linguistics and Methods 

of Language Teaching 3 hours 

A brief study of the morphology, phonology, and syntax of the 
French language and of the application of the linguistic principles 
to language teaching. Instruction is provided in the use of the 
laboratory and in the preparation of materials. 



49 FOREIGN LANGUAGE; MUSIC 

(This course, open to all students with a thorough preparation in 
French, is designed mainly for those who want to go into language 
teaching. It will be given under the joint auspices of the lan- 
guage and education departments.) 

German 

114, 115. Elementary German 3 4-3 hours 

A course in beginning college German designed to develop the 
ability to understand, speak, read, and write contemporary Ger- 
man. The student spends three hours in the classroom and a 
minimum of one hour in the laboratory. 

217, 218. Intermediate German 3 + 3 hours 

A thorough review of the basic principles of German coupled 
with an introduction to 20th century literature. Student expression 
in the foreign language will be stressed in writing and reading. 

Spanish 

116, 117. Elementary Spanish 3 + 3 hours 

An elementary course in understanding, reading, writing and 
speaking contemporary Spanish, with emphasis on Latin American 
pronunciation and usage. 

260, 261. Intermediate Spanish 3 + 3 hours 

A short review of grammar and usage accompanied by selected 
readings in Spanish literature. Aural-oral training is emphasized. 

Music 

118, 119. Music in Western Civilization 3 + 3 hours 

A survey of the fundamental principles of all music, designed 
to prepare the music student for future work and the layman for 
the appreciation of what music really is. 

169. Choral Ensemble 1 hour 

A course designed to put choral singing on an academic basis. 
Choral study and performance of major works from various pe- 



MUSIC; PHILOSOPHY 50 

riods are supplemented by an historical review of music for the 
voice. (A maximum of four hours credit may be earned for Choral 
Ensemble.) 

262. Wagner and the Music Drama 3 hours 

A study of the life and times and complete compositions of 
Wagner, and an analysis of the scores of his operas and music 
dramas at the piano and with recordings. 

263. History of the Opera 3 hours 

A course studying the major operatic works from the 17th 
through the 19th centuries. 

264. History of the Symphony 3 hours 

An analysis of the important symphonies from Haydn through 
Shostakovich. 

265. History of the Music of Spain 3 hours 

A study of the music of Spain, sacred and secular, beginning 
with the Renaissance and continuing through the first quarter of 
the 20th century. The art and literature of Spain shall be presented 
parallel to the music. 

PHILOSOPHY 

266. Introduction to Philosophy 3 hours 

Introduces the student to the most basic terms, concepts, and 
methods of the philosophical enterprise. Especial emphasis is 
placed on the inconsistent character of most "common sense" 
belief systems. 

267. Ethics 3 hours 

A systematic treatment of the more important ethical systems 
of the past and an attempt to provide the student with a framework 
for attacking the pressing ethical questions of our time. 

362, 363. History of Philosophy 3 + 3 hours 

A study of the major philosophical systems of the Western 
world, from the pre-Socratics to Russell and Whitehead. 



51 PHILOSOPHY 

364. Philosophy of Science 3 hours 

An attempt to delineate the major problems of scientific 
methodology and an examination of the presuppositions of scienti- 
fic inquiry. 

365. Formal Logic 3 hours 

Provides the student with the basic methods of differentiating 
between valid and invalid argument forms. Both the traditional 
techniques and the newer "symbolic" methods are introduced, 

460. Philosophy of Religion 3 hours 

An inquiry into the general subject of religion from the philo- 
sophical point of view. The course will seek to analyze concepts 
such as God, holy, salvation, worship, creation, sacrifice, eternal 
life, etc., and to determine the nature of religious utterances in 
comparision with those of everyday life, scientific discovery, 
morality, and the imaginative expression of the arts. 

461. Interpretation of History 3 hours 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the concepts 
and problems of the understanding of historical events. Classical 
systems will be reviewed and the student will be encouraged to 
develop his own method of approach. 

462. Metaphysics 3 hours 

A survey of the major metaphysical systems and the root 
problems which give rise to each. 

463. Existentialism 3 hours 

An interpretative and critical analysis of the philosophy of 
"Existenz." The reading of writings by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, 
Heidegger and others is accompanied by interpretive discussion 
and the consideration of related philosophical questions. 

464. Epistemology 3 hours 

A study of the origins, structure, and validity of knowledge, 
and an attempt to clarify the relationship of epistemology to logic, 
metaphysics, and psychology. 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 52 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

Professor Cressy, Chairman 

Martin Abbott, Professor of History 
Cheever Cressy, Professor of International Relations 
James R. Miles, Professor of Business Administration 
William A. Egerton, Professor of Business Administration 

Leo Bilancio, Associate Professor of History 

Philip F. Palmer, Associate Professor of Government 

Harold M. Shafron, Associate Professor of Economics 

H. Randall Dosher, Assistant Professor of History 
Beverly K. Schaffer, Assistant Professor of Economics 

* Robert A. Ermentrout, Instructor in History and Government 

* Irwin M. Levine, Instructor in Business Law 
*Georgia O. Moore, Instructor in Business 
*Grady L. Randolph, Instructor in History 



*Part-time. 



Areas Embraced Within the Division 

Business Administration History 

Economics Political Studies 



53 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

270. Insurance 3 hours 

A study of the principles and practices pertaining to personal 
and property insurance. Emphasis is upon the formation of the 
insurance relation; concealment, warranties, waiver, and estoppel; 
incontestability; the respective interests of the beneficiary insured, 
insurer, assignee, and creditor, 

370. Principles of Accounting 3 hours 

An introduction to basic bookkeeping procedures related to the 
journal, ledger, financial statements, and the uses of accounting 
data, 

371. Principles of Accounting 3 hours 

A continuation of the study of basic procedures with the 
emphasis upon partnership and corporate forms of accounting, 
and the analysis of financial statements, 

372. Statistics 3 hours 

A course dealing with the methods of gathering data through 
polling, sampling, the questionnaire, and the professional inter- 
view; the evaluating and summarizing of the data; and the pres- 
entation through reports, charts, and studies. Only an elementary 
basic knowledge of the statistical method is encompassed. How- 
ever, factors of error, percentage of accuracy, and the place of 
statistics in the scheme of management receive attention. An 
actual survey is chosen and run by the class, 

373. Business Law 3 hours 

A course designed to give the student an awareness of a limited 
area of those aspects of the law which he will most likely need to 
carry on in his day-to-day dealings with the problems of business. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the law of contracts, agency, 
negotiable instruments, and business associations. 

375. Conceptual Foundations and Government 

Regulation of Business 4 hours 

A course giving the student some of the historical background 
that has influenced present business life. It deals with the subjects 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION; ECONOMICS 54 

of authority and power, constitutionalism, pluralism, and the 
proper use of time, and the reasons for government regulation. 
The last half of the course acquaints the student with the field 
of labor law, including wages and hours, the Taft-Hartley Act, 
and the Civil Rights Act. 

470. Marketing Principles 3 hours 

A course concerned with the policies and problems involved 
in the operation of market institutions. Emphasis is upon the 
functions, commodities, and middlemen involved in the marketing 
of goods and services. 

471. Human Relations in Business 3 hours 

A course designed to emphasize the importance of people 
in business, and the psychological understandings that are neces- 
sary for successful management. Detailed teaching and discussion 
are directed toward motivation, leadership, delegation, manage- 
ment development, creativity, and the direction of people. 

472. Finance 3 hours 

An investigation into the nature of business finance and its 
relation to economics, accounting and law; capital, capitalization, 
and financial plan; initial financing; refinancing; working capital; 
expansion; internal and external financial relationships of the firm. 

473. Principles of Management and Decision Making 4 hours 

A course concerned with the fundamentals of management 
that have become well established and which lead toward the 
recognition of management as a profession. Such functions are 
taught in this course and are also practiced in classroom discussion 
of cases taken from actual business situations. Included in the 
course are the more modern techniques of decision-making — with 
experience in application and discussion. 

ECONOMICS 

220, 221. Principles of Economics 3 4-3 hours 

A study of the principles of economics and their application 
in analyzing and understanding the contemporary economic en- 
vironment in business, government, and current world affairs. 



55 ECONOMICS 

376. Intermediate Economic Theory 3 hours 

An analysis of the relationship between economic theories and 
their practical application. The course includes an intensive study 
of the behavior of the consumer and the firm, problems of pro- 
duction and distribution, and the structure of markets. 

377. Money and Banking 3 hours 

A study of the nature and development of money and monetary 
standards in the U.S. Special consideration is given to the activities 
and functions of financial institutions, commercial banking, the 
Federal Reserve System, and to monetary theory and practice. 

378. Labor Economics 3 hours 

The role of the labor movement in the economic development 
in the U.S. An intensive survey of the trade union as an economic 
institution is followed by the study of the principles and problems 
of union-management relationship found in collective bargaining 
and governmental policies affecting labor. 

379. Public Finance 3 hours 

An analysis of the impact of Federal, state, and local govern- 
mental expenditures, revenues, debt management, and budgeting 
on the allocation of resources, the redistribution of income, and 
the stabilization of income. 

420. Development of Economic Doctrine 3 hours 

A study of the major writers and school of economic thought 
considered in relationship to the economic, political, and social 
institutions of their times. Emphasis is placed on medieval, mer- 
cantilistic, Physiocratic, Classical, Utopian, Socialistic, Neo- Classi- 
cal, Keynsian and post-Keynsian schools. 

421. International Economics 3 hours 

A study of the importance of international trade and com- 
merce. The principles underlying regional specialization, national 
commercial policies, international investments, balance of pay- 
ments, foreign exchange, foreign aid policies, and the E. C. M. 
are evaluated. 



ECONOMICS; HISTORY 56 

422. Comparative Economic Systems 3 hours 

A comparative study of alternative economic systems, includ- 
ing capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism. Particular 
emphasis is on the United States, the Soviet Union, Great Britain, 
Yugoslavia, and China. 

423. Current Developments in Economics 3 hours 

A senior seminar giving detailed analysis to current domestic 
and foreign problems. A study of the philosophies of the people 
who shape current economic policies will be included. 

HISTORY 

120, 121. Western Civilization 3 + 3 hours 

A course tracing the political, social, economic, and cultural 
developments of Western Civilization from its Graeco-Roman 
origins to the present. The first semester deals with the story from 
the beginnings to 1715; the second, from 1715 to the present. 

222. Europe in the Middle Ages 3 hours 

An investigation and analysis of the major political, social, 
economic, and religious institutions and issues of medieval civiliza- 
tion from the decline of Rome to the Renaissance, with emphasis 
on the roles of the Church and the Holy Roman Empire. 

320. The Renaissance and Reformation 3 hours 

A study of the significant changes in European art, thought, 
and institutions during the period from about 1300 to about 1600. 

321. The Age of Absolutism and Revolution 3 hours 

A course examining European society between the Reforma- 
tion and the Napoleonic era. It will concern itself with the rise 
of the modern state, the economic revolution, constitutional mon- 
archy, the Enlightenment, the Era of Revolution, and the Age of 
Napoleon. 

322. Europe in the Nineteenth Century 3 hours 

A study observing and analyzing the domestic and foreign 
policies of the major European powers in the period between the 



57 HISTORY 

Congress of Vienna and the Paris Peace Conference following 
World War I. 

323. Europe since 1918 3 hours 

An examination of European history since World War I, giving 
particular attention to the rise of the Communist, Fascist, and 
National Socialist movements in Russia, Italy, and Germany. It 
will also treat of World War II and its aftermath. 

324. American History to 1865 3 hours 

A survey from colonial times to 1865, concerned mainly with 
the major domestic developments of a growing nation. 

325. American History Since 1865 3 hours 

A survey from 1865 to the present, concerned with the chief 
events which explain the growth of the United States to a position 
of world power. 

424. The Civil War and Reconstruction 3 hours 

A course for advanced history students giving detailed atten- 
tion to the chief features of the wartime period and the major 
changes ushered in by it. 

425. The American Character 3 hours 

An undergraduate seminar designed to explore the major 
questions relating to how the national mind and character came 
to be formed. 

426. Introduction to the History of Chinese Culture 3 hours 

A course which, though presented in a chronological frame- 
work, will examine the enduring and characteristic elements of 
the culture of the Chinese which are distinct in the modern era, 
with special emphasis on persistent social problems raised by 
economic development, social change, and political conflict. The 
approach will be comparative, designed to identify both the con- 
trasts and similarities to Western culture. It will also be analytic, 
focusing on problems and trends rather than upon chronology. 



POLITICAL STUDIES 58 

POLITICAL STUDIES 

123. Govemment of the United States 3 hours 

A study of the characteristics and functions of the American 
poUtical process, including a brief examination of state and local 
government. 

223. Comparative Govemment 3 hours 

An historical and analytical study of the political traditions 
and the modern institutions of selected foreign countries, follow- 
ing logically a similar study of the government of the United States. 
The governments of Britain, France, and the Soviet Union will be 
given special emphasis. 

224. State and Local Government 3 hours 

A survey of the origin, development, and continuing problems 
of state and local government, with specific focus on Georgia and 
Atlanta. 

326. International Relations 3 hours 

An examination of the major elements and persistent problems 
of world affairs, as well as the influences that bear upon them, 
within both the historical and contemporary setting. 

327. American Political Parties 3 hours 

A study in depth of the development of party alignments in 
the United States, together with an analysis of their sources of 
power, including political opinion. 

328. American Political Thought 3 hours 

A descriptive analysis of American political development from 
its roots in Europe to the present, drawing substantially from 
primary sources, including the writings of eminent political theo- 
rists and leaders, the great documents, laws, and judicial decisions. 

329. European Political Thought 3 hours 

An examination of the continuing developijient of political 
theory from the time of Machiavelli to that of Edmund Burke, 
based on the writings of major political thinkers during that period. 



59 POLITICAL STUDIES 

427. Nationalism in Asia, the Middle 

East and Africa 3 hours 

A study of nationalism as a motivating force among the peoples 
of Asia, the Middle East, and Africa, with the objective of under- 
standing both its local and international consequences. 

428. Diplomacy of the United States 3 hours 

A study of the growth of the United States as a major factor 
in world affairs, beginning with the Spanish-American War. Signifi- 
cant developments in earlier related American policies will be 
covered. 

429. Diplomacy of the Far East 3 hours 

A course concentrating on the relations between Western and 
Far Eastern states from the 19th century to the present. The study 
seeks to lay a basis for understanding the conflicts of power in- 
terests in the realm of East Asia. 

474. Constitutional Law 3 hours 

A study of the circuitous development of our organic law 
through an examination of the Supreme Court and its leading 
decisions. 

475. International Law 3 hours 

A course employing both case and descriptive materials in 
presenting the development of international law as well as its 
present use. Students are acquainted with the principles and prac- 
tices of international law in a realistic context. 

476. Public Administration 3 hours 

A survey of the basic principles and practices of public admin- 
istration at the national, state, and local levels of government, with 
emphasis on personnel management, financial administration, ad- 
ministrative law and regulations, and administrative responsibility. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 60 

DIVISION OF SCIENCE 

Professor Goslin, Chairman 

Roy N. Goslin, Professor of Physics and Mathematics 
J. Kennedy Hodges, Professor of Chemistry 

Constantine Cappas, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Joseph M. Branham, Associate Professor of Biology 
George F. Wheeler, Associate Professor of Physics 

Lois F. Williamson, Assistant Professor of Biology 

*E. Virginia Bowers, Instructor in Biology 
*Bernice R. Hilliard, Instructor in Mathematics 
Patricia A. Hull, Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 
* Samuel Sternberg, Instructor in Chemistry 



*Part-time. 



Areas Embraced Within the Division 

Biology Mathematics 

Chemistry Physics 



61 SCIENCE; BIOLOGY 

SCIENCE 

130, 131. Principles of Science 4 + 4 hours 

A laboratory course for non-science majors stressing the sig- 
nificant ideas common to all the sciences. The first semester deals 
with the general topics of the methods of science and the particle 
nature of matter and energy. The second semester introduces the 
general concept of Organization, starting with the atom and pro- 
ceeding through increasingly complex non-living and then living 
systems, ending with man and the universe as examples of organi- 
zation. 

The course level is appropriate for students with a good back- 
ground in algebra but minimal one in other sciences. Students with 
excellent preparation in all the sciences should elect one of the 
regular sequences in science. 

BIOLOGY 

132, 133. Zoology 4-1-4 hours 

An introduction to the animal kingdom. The course includes 
the basic principles of animal biology with an emphasis on func- 
tional anatomy and phylogenetic relationships. Lectures and lab- 
oratory. 

230, 231. Botany 4 -H 4 hours 

An introduction to the plant kingdom, with an emphasis on 
structure, function, phylogenetic relationships and classification. 
Lectures and laboratory. 

330. Genetics 4 hours 

An introduction to the study of inheritance. The classical pat- 
terns of Mendelian inheritance are related to the control of 
metabolism and development. Lectures and laboratory. 

331. Embryology 4 hours 

An intensive study of embryonic development of selected 
vertebrate types, from gamete formation and conception to the 
basic organization of the complex animal. Lectures and laboratory. 



BIOLOGY; CHEMISTRY 62 

332. Microbiology 4 hours 

An introduction to the biology of viruses, bacteria, yeasts, and 
moulds, with an emphasis on biochemistry. Lectures and labora- 
tory. 

430. General Physiology 4 hours 

A detailed analysis of the life functions common to both plants 
and animals. The emphasis is on cellular structure and function 
as related to metabolism. Lectures and laboratory. 

431. Animal Physiology 4 hours 

A detailed analysis of animal functions that deals primarily 
with the interactions involved in the operation of complex animal 
systems. Lectures and laboratory. 

432. Senior Seminar 2 hours 

An introduction to the biological literature. Through reading 
and reporting original papers, the student is led through the de- 
velopment of selected ideas basic to biology. Lectures. 

433. Ecology 4 hours 

A course dealing with the relationships between individual 
organisms and their environments. The emphasis is on the de- 
velopment of populations and interactions between populations 
and their physical environs. Lectures and laboratory. 

CHEMISTRY 

134, 135. Genera] Chemistry 4 + 4 hours 

A study of the basic principles and theories of chemistry and 
the properties of elements and their compounds. In the second 
semester part of the lecture time and all of the laboratory time is 
spent on qualitative analysis. 

232, 233. Organic Chemistry 4 + 4 hours 

An introductory course in the principles and theories of organic 
chemistry. Laboratory work involves the preparation of simple 
compounds and the identification of functional groups. 



63 CHEMISTRY; MATHEMATICS 

333, 334. Quantitative Analysis 4 + 4 hours 

A course devoted to the theory and practice of volumetric and 
gravimetric analysis. Topics in instrumental analysis are included. 

335, 336. Physical Chemistry 4 + 4 hours 

A comprehensive study of the physico-chemical properties of 
matter. The course includes a critical examination of the laws of 
thermodynamics, kinetics, and electrochemistry as applied to chem- 
ical reaction. 



434, 435. Advanced Topics in Chemistry 4 + 4 hours 

Advanced work consisting of special topics adapted to the 
needs of the student. Research problems are included. 

436. Chemical Literature 3 hours 

A course devoted to the general sources of chemical literature. 
It includes problems in literature search and the mechanics of 
formal chemical writing. 

437. Chemistry Seminar 2 hours 

A seminar in which papers will be presented dealing with 
various phases of chemistry and selected topics. 

MATHEMATICS 

136. General Mathematics 3 hours 

A study of the basic ideas of mathematics. Emphasis is placed 
on the origin, logical structure, and meaning of mathematics, as 
well as on the development of modern technical skills. 

137, 138. Elementary Mathematics 3 + 3 hours 

An intensive review of elementary mathematics, together with 
an introduction to the basic content, methods, and applications of 
the most important classical and modern branches of mathematics. 
Included are the basic algebraic structure of the real number 
system; functions; and theory of solutions of equations. 



MATHEMATICS 64 

234, 235. Mathematical Analysis 3 + 3 hours 

A course studying the basic ideas of analytical geometry, dif- 
ferential and integral calculus of functions, including the ideas of 
function, hmit, continuity, the derivative, and the integral. 

337. Differential Equations 3 hours 

Theory, methods of solution, and application of ordinary dif- 
ferential equations, along with an introduction to partial differential 
equations. 

338. Vector Analysis 3 hours 

Theory, methods of solution, and applications of Vector Analy- 
sis. Included is an introduction to vector differential geometry. 

438, 439. Advanced Calculus 3 + 3 hours 

A rigorous treatment of the foundations of differential and 
integral calculus, using modern notations. Included are multiple, 
line surface integrals, infinite series and sequences, and improper 
integrals. 

480, 481. Advanced Algebra 3 + 3 hours 

A course with emphasis on algebraic structure, including 
groups, rings, fields, integral domains, matrices, and linear trans- 
formations. 

482. Advanced Geometry 3 hours 

Introduction to topology, projective, and non-Euclidean geome- 
try. 

483. Mathematical Probability 3 hours 

A basic study of the mathematical theory of probability. 

484. Elementary Computers 3 hours 

An elementary study of the theory of computers and their 
application in the solving of problems, 

485. Mathematics Seminar 1 hour 

A seminar providing the opportunity to practice preparing and 
delivering talks on mathematical subjects. 



65 PHYSICS 

PHYSICS 

280, 281. Beginning Physics 4 + 4 hours 

A beginning course in physics concentrating on the funda- 
mental aspects of mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, and 
modern physics. 

282. Electricity and Magnetism 3 hours 

An intermediate level course dealing with electric charge, 
fields, potential, D.C. and A.C. circuits, magnetic phenomena, 
and electromagnetic effects. 

283, 284. Mechanics 3 + 3 hours 

An intermediate level course developing the fundamental 
concepts and principles of mechanics using calculus and vector 
notation. 

380. Light and Optics 3 hours 

A descriptive and mathematical study comprising fundamental 
principles of physical and geometrical optics. 

381. Junior Physics Laboratory 1 hour 

Selected experiments from Physics. 

382. Heat and Thermodynamics 3 hours 

A descriptive and mathematical treatment of the fundamental 
heat concepts, gas laws, and thermodynamics. 

383. 384. Atomic and Nuclear Physics 3 + 3 hours 

An intermediate level study of atomic and nuclear structure 
and the behavior of atomic and nuclear particles. 

486. Classical Topics in Theoretical Physics 3 hours 

Selected topics in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian concepts, quan- 
tum mechanics, etc. 

487, 488. Senior Physics Laboratory 2 + 2 hour; 
Selected experiments from modern physics. 



PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL 66 

489. Senior Physics Seminar 1 hour 

A seminar providing the opportunity to practice preparing and 
delivering talks on scientific subjects. 

PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL 

Students interested in preparing for medical or dental school 
should consult a pre-medical advisor in planning their curriculum. 
In general, medical schools are interested in exceptionally good 
students and recommend a broad liberal arts education rather than 
a narrowly-oriented science program. 

Good academic performance and strong recommendations help 
assure admission into medical schools, A close liaison with a pre- 
medical advisor helps in obtaining a strong recommendation. The 
general curriculum which pre-medical students should complete 
includes a broad coverage of non-science and liberal arts areas, as 
well as selected courses in chemistry, mathematics, physics, and 
zoology. 



67 DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

DIVISION OF EDUCATION AND 
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

Professor Reser, Chairman 

Richard M. Reser, Professor of Sociology 

Garland F. Pinholster, Associate Professor of Physical 
Education 

Mohamed Kian, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Elgin F. MacConnell, Assistant Professor of Education 
Edithgene B. Sparks, Assistant Professor of Education 

Billy W. Carter, Instructor in Physical Education 
*Frances D. Douglas, Instructor in Education 
*Peter N. Mayfield, Instructor in Psychology 
* Caroline R. Pinholster, Instructor in Physical Education 



*Part-time. 

Areas Embraced Within the Division 

Education Psychology 

Physical Education Sociology 



EDUCATION 68 

EDUCATION 

390. Introduction to Education 3 hours 

A study of the historical development, philosophy, organization 
and basic issues underlying the American educational system and 
the teaching profession. Interpersonal theory of education is pre- 
sented. 

391, 392. Elementary Curriculum, Methods and 

Materials 6 hours 

The first of a sequence of double courses dealing with the 
curriculum, methods and materials used in the teaching of reading, 
language arts, art, and children's literature in the elementary 
school. Students are required to observe in a regular classroom 
for two hours per week during the semester. Extensive use is made 
of resource people from the public schools, from other departments 
within the College, the community, and other professional people. 

393, 394. Elementary Curriculum, Methods and 

Materials 6 hours 

The second of a sequence of double courses dealing with the 
curriculum, methods and materials used in the teaching of arithme- 
tic, music, science, social studies, health, and physical education 
in the elementary schools. Student observations and use of resource 
people continue as in the first part of the sequence. 

395. Secondary Curriculum 3 hours 

A study of the purposes and objectives of secondary education, 
overall curriculum-planning and development, and organization of 
content within subjects. Various prominent and experimental cur- 
ricular patterns are analyzed. Provision is made for regular class- 
room observation by the student in public high schools of the 
Atlanta area. 

396. Secondary School Methods and Materials 3 hours 

A course designed to help prospective teachers develop varying 
methods and techniques of instruction appropriate to the nature 
of their subject, their own capabilities, and the meeting of the 
demands of various student groups. Problems such as classroom 
control, motivation, and the pacing of instruction are studied. 



69 EDUCATION; PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Regular observation in classrooms of the Atlanta-area public 
schools is continued. Extensive use is made of resource people 
from the public schools, from other departments within the Col- 
lege, the community, and other professional people. 

490. Special Topics in Elementary Education 3 hours 

A course given in connection with the student's active partici- 
pation in student teaching in the public schools. Promising prac- 
tices of elementary education are explored. Special problems such 
as teaching the gifted, the retarded, remedial reading techniques, 
and the uses of audio-visual materials are explored. 

491. Special Topics in Secondary Education 3 hours 

A course given in connection with the student's active partici- 
pation in student teaching in the public schools. Special problems 
such as remedial reading for secondary students, guidance, team- 
teaching techniques, and the use of programmed learning aids are 
studied. 

492. Student Teaching and Seminar 12 hours 

A course requiring full-time participation in a school in the 
Atlanta area under the supervision of a qualified supervising 
teacher. This is designed to promote gradual introduction to 
responsible teaching, including participation in the teachers' usual 
extra-curricular activities. A seminar on the College campus each 
week during the student teaching period is a part of the course. 

493. Educational Psychology 3 hours 

A study of learning theory and its application to such problems 
as classroom control, the organization of learning activities, under- 
standing individual differences, and evaluating teaching and learn- 
ing. Emphasis is given to factors which facilitate and interfere 
with learning. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
142. Health and Recreation 3 hours 

A study of health and recreation in the school and community. 
Observation of health practices and the application of recreational 
skills and techniques are considered. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION; PSYCHOLOGY 70 

143. Administration and Supervision of 

Physical Education 3 hours 

A course concerned with the administration, organization, and 
supervision of elementary, secondary, and college programs in 
physical education. 

144. Skills and Techniques in Physical Education 3 hours 

A course dealing with theory and practical application of all 
games and activities. Involved will be personal performance, along 
with practical teaching and coaching of individual and team sports. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

140. General Psychology 3 hours 

An introduction to the scientific study and interpretation of 
human behavior. Consideration of such topics as learning, motiva- 
tion, emotion, perception, intelligence, personality, and interper- 
sonal relationships will be undertaken. 

240. Introduction to Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 3 hours 

An introductory treatment of quantitative methods in behavioral 
sciences. The nature of measurement, collection, and interpretation 
of data will be studied. Special attention will be given to relations 
between statistical models and experimental controls. 

341. General Experimental Psychology 3 hours 

An introduction to experimental studies in behavior. Classroom 
discussion and laboratory demonstrations will be used in represent- 
ing experimental bases of psychology. 

342. Child and Adolescent Psychology 3 hours 

A study of the child from conception through adolescence. At- 
tention is given to physical, social, emotional, and intellectual 
development of the child, with special emphasis placed on the 
importance of learning. 

343. Theories of Personality 3 hours 

A course studying the ideas of several representative theorists 
who were concerned with personality. A comparison of theories is 



71 PSYCHOLOGY; SOCIOLOGY 

made and a suggested framework for evaluation of each theory 
is presented. 

344. Psychology of Learning 3 hours 

A study of the applications of psychological principles to the 
learning process; extensive discussion of conditioning, generaliza- 
tion, discrimination, reinforcement, serial learning, transfer, the 
role of motivation and emotion in learning, problem-solving, and 
the nature of reasoning. 

440. Abnormal Psychology 3 hours 

An introduction to the psychological aspects of behavior dis- 
orders. Included are descriptive and explanatory studies of a 
variety of mental disorders, psychoneuroses, psychoses, other mal- 
adjustments, their related conditions, and methods of treatment. 

441. Social Psychology 3 hours 

A course concerned with the behavior of individuals in groups, 
including motives, attitudes, group norms, group membership, and 
social roles. 

442. Psychometrics 3 hours 

A study of the selection, evaluation, administration, interpreta- 
tion, and practical uses of tests of intelligence, aptitudes, interest, 
personality, social adjustment, and the tests commonly used in 
industry. 

443. History and Systems of Psychology 3 hours 

A study of the historical development of modern psychology 
with emphasis on major systems and their theoretical differences. 

SOCIOLOGY 

141. Introduction to Sociology 3 hours 

The study of human society, the nature of culture, and its 
organization. Processes of communication, socialization, mobility, 
and population growth are described and analyzed. Emphasis is 
placed upon methods, basic concepts, and principal findings in 
the field. 



SOCIOLOGY 72 

241. Social Problems 3 hours 

A study of the impact of current social forces upon American 
society. Deviation from social norms, conflict concerning social 
goals and values, and social disorganization as these apply to 
family, economic, religious, and other institutional and interper- 
sonal situations are of primary concern. 

345. The FamUy 3 hours 

An analysis of the family institution as a background for the 
study of family interaction, socialization, and the parent-child rela- 
tionship, courtship and marriage interaction, family crises and 
problems. 

346. Criminology 3 hours 

The principles of criminology and penology, with emphasis on 
psychosociological factors; study of historical and contemporary 
theory and practice. 

347. The Field of Social Work 3 hours 

An orientation course based on the description and analysis 
of the historical development of social work and the operation in 
contemporary society of the many social work activities. 

348. Intergroup Relations 3 hours 

The study of the nature of minority and majority group adjust- 
ments, and the positions of different minority groups in the United 
States. Emphasis is given to the status and role of the American 
Negro. 

444. Cultural Anthropology 3 hours 

A study of modern and folk cultures throughout the world. 

445. The Community 3 hours 

The study of the community as an area of interaction with 
particular emphasis on the impact of urbanization upon modem 
man. 



73 SOCIOLOGY 

446. History of Sociological Thought 3 hours 

A study of major social theorists from early times to date, with 
particular emphasis on current sociological thought. 

447. Seminar: Methodology 3 hours 

Introduction to techniques of studying interpersonal and group 
relationships. Students will participate in a research project. The 
seminar is designed to help evaluate sociological reports and to 
develop skills in doing research. 










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STUDENT LIFE 

ORIENTATION 

At the beginning of each semester new students will be 
involved in an orientation program, under the general super- 
vision of the Student Council. Orientation activities are planned 
toward the end of introducing the student to both academic 
and social life at Oglethorpe, thereby enabling him to feel at 
home as soon as possible. Orientation group leaders from 
among the upperclassmen serve as guides and counsellors dur- 
ing the period. Following orientation, the student is then as- 
signed to a faculty advisor who aids him in planning his 
academic program and who seeks to assist him in other ways. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT AND DISCIPLINE 

College life at Oglethorpe is, in a large sense, one of a 
democratic community; government is mainly self-government. 
Regarding students as responsible men and women, the Col- 
lege keeps restrictions to the bare minimum necessary to pro- 
mote self-discipline and sound learning. 

The Student Council, consisting of officers elected by the 
student body and the presidents of the four classes, is the 
guiding and governing organization of student life at Ogle- 
thorpe. Its main purpose is to serve the individual student. 
The time and place of Student Council meetings are posted at 
regular intervals; all students are urged to attend and parti- 
cipate in the affairs of the student government. 

At Oglethorpe the Honor System is an integral part of 
college life. Students are on their honor to respect the regu- 
lations of the College and to meet the requirements of their 
academic work without unauthorized aids. The Honor System 
is supervised by a student Honor Committee, acting with the 
guidance of a faculty advisor and a student Honor Court. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Oglethorpe offers the worthy student many opportunities 
for obtaining assistance in financing his undergraduate educa- 
tion. These opportunities are provided under conditions which 
give a reasonable guarantee to the applicants and the College 

75 



76 STUDENT LIFE 

that they will go to those persons best able to benefit from 
them. 

The many sources of revenue made available to the Schol- 
arship and Loan Committee include the Lowry Memorial 
Scholarship Fund, the National Defense Student Loan Pro- 
gram, the United Student Aid Loan Fund, the Atlas Finance 
Company Scholarship, the Una Rivers Grants-in-Aid Fund, 
and the athletic grants-in-aid program. 

Oglethorpe also has available loans at small interest rates 
through two educational loan institutions: the Tuition Plan, 
Inc., and Educational Funds, Inc. These plans enable parents 
to borrow money for tuition and other academic fees. 

Other funds are made available to the Committee by in- 
terested persons, groups, and business firms from time to time. 

Except in the case of loans, all assistance funds are granted 
by the Committee as outright gifts to the student in the form 
of credits entered on the semester bills of the College. 

In addition, because of our location in the surburbs of the 
second fastest-growing city in America, students can very 
easily obtain part-time work. There are also some oppor- 
tunities on the campus for student employment in various jobs. 

For further information, contact the Financial Aid Office, 
Oglethorpe College. 

ATHLETICS 

In addition to a well-rounded program of intramural sports, 
intercollegiate competition is carried on in soccer, basketball, 
tennis, baseball, and rifle and pistol shooting. Students with 
athletic skills are invited and urged to participate in any of 
these. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 
Intramural Sports 

New students are required to take at least two semesters of 
physical education. A balanced and versatile program of intra- 
mural sports operates the year round; spirited competition 
among the students exists in touch football, volleyball, bad- 
minton, ping-pong, basketball, shuffleboard, softball and tennis. 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 77 

The Interactivity Committee 

A body set up to coordinate the activities of all the student 
organizations on campus and to promote social events, the 
Interactivity Committee is composed of representatives of all 
the campus organizations; its chairman is the Vice President 
of the Student Council. The following student organizations 
presently exist on campus: 

Boar's Head Fraternity: This is an honor society made up of 
junior and senior men who, as superior student representa- 
tives, are invited to join. Acting as a service organization 
when needed, it is responsible for the traditional Boar's 
Head Ceremony held each Christmas. 

Duchess Club: The purpose of this organization is to uphold 
the high standards of the school, to encourage high 
scholastic standards, and to promote a cooperative spirit 
among the students. Its membership consists of superior 
junior and senior women who are invited to join. 

LeConte Society: This society is for those students who have 
attained an average grade of at least 85 in their science 
courses, at least 80 in other courses, and who have shown 
a genuine interest in the progress of science. Any science 
student in his sophomore, junior or senior year is eligible 
for membership. 

Social Committee: Under the direction of this committee, 
three formal dances a year are held; funds for them are 
allotted from the student activity budget. Membership on 
this committee is open to all interested students. 

Cheerleaders: This activity gives women students an oppor- 
tunity to participate in the intercollegiate sports life of 
the College, 

All Faiths Fellowship: This group seeks to promote fellow- 
ship and religious interest within the student body. Stu- 
dents of all faiths are brought together for discussion of 
common interests. Members participate in special events, 
retreats, devotionals, and meetings. 



79 STUDENT LIFE 

Canterbury Club: An organization for Episcopal students, 
this club offers an opportunity for interested students to 
hear speakers and to participate in challenging discus- 
sions throughout the year. 

Newman Club: This club gives all interested Catholic stu- 
dents the opportunity to meet together and discuss topics 
of common interest. Speakers are periodically brought in 
to meet with the members. 

Oglethorpe Players: An organization to promote the interest 
of all the students in theater arts, the Players seeks to 
provide opportunities for all to develop their talents and 
skills. A number of plays selected by the members are 
presented each year. All interested students are urged to 
participate. 

The Chorus: This is an organization to promote interest and 
to provide outlets for students who enjoy music. Programs 
presented cover both classical and popular music. All 
interested students are urged to take part. 

Xingu: An honorary organization for English majors and 
majors in related fields, the organization has as its pur- 
pose the study of literature and the enjoyment of it 
through research, creativity, and discussion. 

Student Union Committee: This is a group composed of those 
students who are interested in promoting better recrea- 
tional facilities for the Oglethorpe community. 

Young Conservatives: This is a political organization in- 
terested in promoting conservative principles in govern- 
ment. Members meet regularly to discuss compelling issues 
and to hear prominent speakers. It is not affiliated with 
any political party; membership is open to all interested 
students. 

Young Democrats: This is a student group formed to par- 
ticipate in Democratic politics at the county, state, and 
national levels. The club also meets occasionally to dis- 
cuss current political topics or to listen to outstanding 
speakers. All students are welcome to membership. 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 80 

Student Publications 

The Stormy Petrel: This is the official newspaper of Ogle- 
thorpe College. An important part of campus life, it is 
dedicated to serving the best interests of the student body. 

The Oglethorpe Literary Magazine: This magazine is pub- 
lished annually by a student staff. Its purpose is to give 
students, faculty members and alumni an opportunity to 
display their literary talents in the fields of poetry, short- 
story writing, and essay-writing. 

The Yamacraw: This is the yearbook of the College. All stu- 
dents, especially those with literary or journalistic ex- 
perience, are encouraged to join the staff. 

The "O" Book: This is the student handbook prepared an- 
nually by the Student Council of Oglethorpe as a service 
to new students. It contains a great variety of helpful in- 
formation designed to acquaint the student with all signifi- 
cant phases of college life at Oglethorpe. 

Fine Arts Festival 

Oglethorpe's annual Fine Arts Festival was expanded this 
year from the traditional week to the month of April. Featured 
were a jazz concert, dramatic and music performances by the 
Oglethorpe Chorus, and art exhibits. 

During the Festival the Sidney Lanier Prizes, commem- 
orating Oglethorpe's famous alumnus poet, are traditionally 
awarded for the best student poems of the year. 

AWARDS 

Each year a number of awards and prizes are given to the 
students. Among them are the following. 

The Faculty Scholarship Award: This is made annually to 
the male student with the highest scholastic average in 
his junior and senior years. 

The Sally Hull Weltner Award for Scholarship: This is pre- 
sented each year by the Oglethorpe College Woman's 
Club to the woman student with the highest scholastic 
record in her junior and senior years. 



81 STUDENT LIFE 

The James Edward Oglethorpe A wards for Merit: Commonly 
called the "Oglethorpe Cups", these are presented an- 
nually to the man and woman in the graduating class 
who have been the leaders in both scholarship and serv- 
ice at Oglethorpe College. 

The David Hesse Memorial Award: This award is made an- 
nually to the outstanding student participating in a var- 
sity sport. 

The Parker Law Prize: This is an annual award made to that 
member of the class in Business Law who has shown the 
greatest progress. 

The LeConte Society Award: This award is made by the 
LeConte Society to the outstanding graduating senior in 
the field of science on that basis of the student's scholastic 
achievement and contribution to the College and to the 
Science Division, 

The Duchess Club and the Boar's Head Awards for Freshmen: 
These are awards made by these honorary societies to 
that young man and woman in the freshman class who 
most fully exemplify the ideals of those organizations. 

ALUMNI 

When a student terminates his study after a minimum at- 
tendance of one semester, he is considered an alumnus of the 
College. As such, he and his fellow alumni comprise what 
is known as the National Alumni Association of Oglethorpe 
College. 

The objectives of this organization are to promote the 
interests of the College and to establish mutually beneficial 
relations between it and its alumni. 

The College maintains an alumni office to serve and to keep 
contact with all of its alumni throughout the country and the 
world. Four times a year this office sends a bulletin of affairs to 
all alumni. Additionally, it keeps records and addresses of 
alumni; organizes special alumni events; arranges the annual 
Alumni Day; and performs many other services which help 
to provide a liaison between the alumni and the College. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

The College recognizes attendance at classes as the respon- 
sibility of the student. Students are held accountable for all 
work missed. The exact nature of absence regulations is de- 
termined by each instructor for his own courses. 

GRADES 

At Oglethorpe a numerical system of grading is used. The 
range of 70-100 represents passing work; any grade below 70 
is regarded as a failure (though in most instances students 
who receive between 60 and 69 in the first course of a two- 
course sequence are allowed to continue in the second course 
of the sequence). Students withdrawing from a course before 
the end of the semester are given a "W" or a "WF", depending 
upon the circumstances of the withdrawal. Students who do 
not meet all the requirements of a given course are given an 
"I" for incomplete at the end of the semester; if the require- 
ments are met during the following semester, the "I" is re- 
placed by a regular grade; if they are not met within this time, 
the grade automatically becomes an "F". 

MINIMUM ACADEMIC AVERAGE 

Though the grade of 70 is regarded as passing, nevertheless 
a student, in order to graduate from Oglethorpe, must compile 
an over-all minimum average of 78. No student will be allowed 
to graduate unless this minimum is met. 

For the student's own welfare, a graduated system of mini- 
mum averages has been established. Freshmen are required 
to maintain cumulative averages of at least 76 in their course 
work; sophomores, at least 77; juniors and seniors, at least 78. 

PROBATION 

Freshmen who fail to maintain a cumulative average of at 
least 76, sophomores of at least 77, juniors and seniors of at 
least 78 are put on warning for the following semester. If dur- 
ing that semester they do not substantially improve their 

82 



83 ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

scholastic average, they will be excluded from the College. 
Those who do achieve the required minimum will be removed 
from warning. 

NORMAL ACADEMIC LOAD 

A normal academic program at Oglethorpe consists of five 
courses each semester, giving the student generally a total of 
fifteen to eighteen semester hours each term. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Minimum requirements for graduation consists of the fol- 
lowing: forty courses totaling at least 122 hours; a cumulative 
grade average of at least 78; at least two semesters of physical 
education; and the last four semesters to be spent as a reg- 
istered student at Oglethorpe. 

DEGREES 

Oglethorpe offers three degrees to those meeting the neces- 
sary requirements: Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Science; and 
Bachelor of Science in Education. 

DEGREES WITH HONORS 

Degrees with honors are awarded with the designation cum 
laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude in accord- 
ance with the academic standards established by the College. 



INDEX 



Academic Regulations 82 

Academic Vice President 14 

Administration 14 

Admission 27 

Admission, Application For 27 

Advanced Placement Program . . 27 

Alumni 81 

Application Fees 28 

Application Procedure 28 

Athletics 76 

Awards 80,81 

Boar's Head 81 

David Hesse 81 

Duchess Club 81 

Faculty Scholarship 80 

James Edw^ard Oglethorpe . 81 

Le Conte Society 81 

Parker Law Prize 81 

Sally Hull Weltner 80 

Biology Major 33 

Board 28 

Business Administration Major 33 

Calendar 3 

Chemistry Major 34 

Class Attendance 82 

Course Descriptions 43 

Art 45 

Biology 61-62 

Business Administration 53-54 

Chemistry 62-63 

Economics 54-56 

Education 68-69 

English 45-47 

French 47-49 

German 49 

History 56-57 

Mathematics 63-64 

Music 49-50 

Philosophy 50-51 

Physical Education 69-70 

Physics 65-66 

Political Studies 58-59 

Pre-Dental 66 

Pre-Medical 66 

Principles of Science 61 

Psychology 70-71 

Sociology 71-73 

Spanish 49 

Curriculum, Description 23 

Curriculum, Organization 30 



Dean of the College 14 

Degrees 83 

Degrees With Honors 83 

Director of Development 15 

Division of Education and 

Behavioral Sciences 67 

Division of Humanities 44 

Division of Science 60 

Division of Social Studies 52 

Economics Major 34 

Education, Elementary Major 35 
Education, Secondary Major 35-38 

English Major 38 

Evening Program 25 

Expenses 28 

Extra-Curricular Activities 76-79 

Faculty 13 

Fees and Costs 28 

Financial Assistance 75-76 

Fine Arts Festival 80 

Foreign Languages 47-49 

French Major 39 

General College 

Requirements 30-3 1 

General Information 23 

Grading System 82 

Graduation Requirements 83 

History Major 39 

History of Oglethorpe 17-19 

Interactivity Committee 77 

Intramural Sports 76 

Library Staff 15 

Majors Programs 32 

Mathematics Major 40 

Minimum Academic Average 82 

Normal Academic Load 83 

Oglethorpe Idea 20-22 

Orientation 75 



IN^EX (Continued) 



Philosophy Major 40 

Physics Major 41 

Political Studies Major 41 

Presidential Office 14 

Probation 82-83 

Psychology Major 42 

Purposes 20-22 

Room and Board 28 

Science 61 

Sociology Major 42 

Student Financial Assistance . 75-76 



Student Government 75 

Student Life 75 

Student Organizations 77-79 

Student Publications 80 

Transfer Students 27 

Trimester System 23 

Trustees 7-8 

Tuition 28 

Vice President for Business 

Affairs 14 

Visitors 1 




Informal Student 
Group 




V