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Full text of "Oglethorpe College Bulletin, 1968-1969"

OGLETHORPE 
COLLEGE 



BULLETIN / 



>68-1969 

S AND SCIENCES 




VISITORS 

We welcome visitors to the campus throughout the year. Those 
without appointments will find an administrative office open from 
9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on weekdays and from 9 to 12 on Satur- 
days. Student guides will be available at these times, and also 
on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. 

To be sure of seeing a particular officer, visitors are urged to 
make an appointment in advance. All of the offices of the College 
may be reached by calling Atlanta (Area Code 404), 231-1441. 




CORRESPONDENCE 

Letters of inquiry concerning the operation of the College 
should be addressed to Dr. Paul K. Vonk, President, Oglethorpe 
College, Atlanta, Georgia 30319. 



Oglethorpe is a fully accredited, four-year college of arts and 
sciences under the standards of the Southern Association of Col- 
leges and Schools, and is a member of the Association of Ameri- 
can Colleges. It is also fully approved for teacher education by 
the Georgia State Department of Education. 



Vol. 51 February, 1968 No. 1 

Published four times a year in September, October, November, 
December, by Oglethorpe College, 4484 Peachtree Road, N.E., 
Atlanta, Georgia 30319. 
Second Class postage paid at Atlanta, Georgia 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

College Calendar 6 

The Oglethorpe Idea — 9 

History of Oglethorpe 11 

Admission to the College - 15 

1. Application Information 15 

2. Advanced Placement Program... 16 

3. College Level Testing Program... 16 

4. Transfer Students 18 

5. Special and Transient Students 18 

6. Application Procedure 18 

7. Financial Assistance to Students 18 

Academic Regulations 20 

Student Life . 25 

College Residence Requirements 28 

Financing — - 29 

Withdrawals and Refunds 30 

Placement Service 35 

General Information _ 37 

Semester System 37 

Evening Program 37 

Curriculum 38 

General College Requirements 39 

Majors Programs and Courses of Study 39 

Behavioral Sciences 40 

Business Administration and Economics 45 

Education 52 

Humanities 67 

Science _ 76 

Social Studies 89 

The Faculty _ 95 

The Administration 99 

Board of Trustees 101 

Index 104 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 
1968 Summer Term 

May 6-May 10 Early Registration for Summer 

May 27-June 1 Final Examinations 

June 2 Commencement 

June 7-8 Final Registration for 1st Summer Term 

June 10 First Summer Term — classes begin 

July 4-7 Holiday Period (classes close 4:00 p.m. July 3) 

July 8 Classes resume — 8:00 a.m. 

July 12 First Summer Session ends 

July 15-16 Registration for Second Summer Session 

July 17 Second Summer Session begins 

August 23 Second Summer Session ends 
(Evening Division Term — One Session — June 10-August 23) 



FALL SEMESTER 1968-69 



September, 1968 



September 18 Dormitories open (8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) 

September 19-20 Orientation and Testing 

September 20 Registration for Returning Students 

September 21 Registration for New Students 

September 23 Classes begin 

September 26 Drop-and-Add Day 

November 28 Thanksgiving (One day only — all classes meet 

through November 27, day and evening) 
November 29 Classes resume 

December 10-19 Students meet with Advisors for Spring 

scheduling 
December 20 Christmas Holidays begin (All classes through 

December 19, Day and Evening, will meet 

as scheduled). ALL DORMITORIES CLOSED 

(10:00 a.m.) 
January, 1969 

January 6 Classes Resume, 8:00 a.m. 

January 6-10 Early Registration for Spring term 

January 24 Free Day 

January 27-31 Final Examination Period 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



February 6 

February 7 
February 10 
February 11 
February 14 
March 29-April 6 



April 7 




April 7-20 




April 21-26 




May 22 




May 23 




May 26-30 




June 1 




June 5 




June 6-7 




June 9 




July 3-6 




July 7 




July 11 




July 14 




July 16 




August 22 




September, 


1969 


September 


8 


September 


9-10 


September 


9 


September 


10 


September 


11 


December : 


22 



SPRING SEMESTER 1969 

Dormitories Open for New Students (9:00 a.m. 
-5:00 p.m.) 

Registration for New Students 

Classes begin 

Oglethorps Day (11:00 a.m.) 

Drop and Add Day 

Spring Holidays (All classes through March 
28, Day and Evening, will meet as 
scheduled). Dormitories closed during this 
period beginning 10:00 a.m. 

Classes resume 

Students meet with Advisors for Summer and 
Fall scheduling 

Early Registration for Summer and Fall se- 
mester 1969 

Last Day Semester Classes 

Free Day 

Final Examination Period 

Commencement 

FIRST SUMMER TERM 1969 

Dormitories open (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Holidays, Classes end 5:00 p.m., July 3 

Classes resume 8:00 a.m. 

Session closes 

SECOND SUMMER TERM 1969 

Registration 

Classes begin 8:00 a.m. 

Session closes 

FALL SEMESTER 1969 

Dormitories open (9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) 

Orientation 

Registration for Returning Students 

Registration for New Students 

Classes begin 

Semester ends. Dormitories 10:00 a.m. 







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THE OGLETHORPE IDEA 

The Oglethorpe idea is to forge the strongest possible link 
between the "academic" and "practical," between "human un- 
derstanding" and "know-how," between "culture" and "profici- 
ency," between past and present. We are persuaded that there 
is ultimately no contradiction between the concepts represented 
in each of these usually divorced pairs. 

There can be no basic disagreement among educators and 
laymen about the common elements of the student's real needs 
and interests. They are to learn as much as possible about the 
principles, forces, and laws influencing or governing Nature, 
including human nature and human associations; to learn to take 
account of these not only for their own sake but for growth, 
guidance and direction for himself and others; to express his 
deepest individuality in the work or calling most appropriate to 
his talents; and to discover his proper place, role, and function 
in the complex relationships of modern living. 

Living should not be an escape from work. Education should 
therefore encompass the twin aims of making a life and making 
a living. But inescapably he is part and parcel of society. He 
fulfills himself by the measure in which he contributes to the 
happiness and progress of his fellows. Education, as an institu- 
tion of society, has a social obligation. It cannot neglect either 
the individual or the community without damage to both. The 
social order at its best is best for the individual; the individual 
at his best is best for society. The business of education is to 
strive for this optimum. 

What difference should an education make? There are people, 
deficient in formal schooling, who are happy and useful. They 
understand and get along well with their neighbors. They are an 
influence for good in their community and earn a living by honest 
effort. Any truly educated man displays the same traits. The 
difference is in degree rather than kind. 

Whereas it is usual for people to understand their fellows, how 
much wider should be the sympathies of the educated man! 
His contacts go beyond the living and embrace the seers of all 
the ages, who as his companions should inform his mind and 
enlarge his vision. 



10 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Never before have people been so alive to the necessity of 
mastering rather than being mastered by the economic and scien- 
tific forces at work in our world. Creative brains and individual in- 
itiative, tempered by a strong sense of social responsibility, are the 
only sources of payrolls compatible with a free society, and im- 
proving living standard, and a better way of life. Where else can 
we look for this creative urge other than to adequate education 
of qualified talent! 

We make no claim that formal education inevitably bestows 
these benefits. We insist that it can. If that be true, how may 
the mark be reached? We shall always have to remind ourselves 
as teachers that education is a difficult art. The pitfalls we would 
shun are hard to escape. Of all people, the teacher must remain 
the most teachable. The quest for wisdom is never-ending. We, 
too, must continually grow in order to stimulate growth in those 
who come to us to learn. We shall also have to remind ourselves 
that subjects are merely the means; the objects of instruction 
are the persons taught. We must be forever mindful that edu- 
cation, in order to be true to itself, must be a progressive experi- 
ence for the learner, in which interest gives rise to inquiry, inquiry 
is pursued to mastery, and mastery at one point occasions new 
interests in others. The cycle is never closed, but is a spiral 
which always returns upon itself at some higher level of insight. 
Growth in everything which is human must remain the dominant 
objective for the individual and for society. 

We therefore stand for a program of studies which makes sense 
from first to last, which hangs together, and which promotes this 
desired result. Not only in vocational training but also in the 
education of the human personality, the materials of instruction 
must have a beginning, point in a definite direction, and prepare 
for all that ensues. We necessarily make provision for and give 
scope to diversified talents in preparation for varied careers. 
But this much we all have in common: each man has to live with 
himself and all have to live with their fellows. Living in commun- 
ity, with human understanding, involves arts in which we are all 
equally concerned. 



HISTORY OF OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Oglethorpe's history dates back to 1835 when a group of 
Georgia Presbyterians, influenced by the example of Princeton 
University, secured a charter for the operation of a church-sup- 
ported university in the academic pattern of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. Actual operations commenced in 1838 at Midway, a small 
community near Milledgeville, at that time the capitol of the state. 

For nearly three decades after its founding, the university 
steadily grew in stature and influence. Its president during most 
of that time, Samuel K. Talmage, provided gifted leadership and, 
at the same time, gathered about him a faculty of unusual ability, 
at least two of whom would achieve real distinction: James Wood- 
row, an uncie of Woodrow Wilson and the first teacher in Georgia 
to hold the Ph.D., and Joseph LeConte, destined to world fame 
for his work in the field of geology. 

Oglethorpe alumni went forth in those years to play roles of 
importance in various fields. Perhaps the best-known of her grad- 
uates was the poet Sidney Lanier, a member of the Class of 1860, 
who remarked shortly before his death that the greatest intellect- 
ual impulse of his life had come to him during his college days 
at Oglethorpe. 

But the life and service of the school were suddenly cut short 
in the 1860's as Oglethorpe became a casualty of war. Her stu- 
dents marched away to become Confederate soldiers; her endow- 
ment at length was lost in Confederate bonds; her buildings were 
converted to military use as a barracks and hospital. In a sense, 
her fate became bound up with that of the Lost Cause. 

After the close of the conflict an effort was made to revive the 
institution, first at Midway and then by re-location in Atlanta. 
However, the ravages of war, together with the dislocations of 
Reconstruction, posed obstacles too great to overcome, and in 
1872 Oglethorpe closed its doors for a second, and seemingly 
final, time. 

But three decades later, thanks largely to the determined 
energy and vision of Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, the school was revived, 
chartered in 1913, and moved to its present location on the north- 
ern edge of metropolitan Atlanta. The cornerstone of the first 



12 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

building was laid in 1915 in a ceremony witnessed by members 
of the classes of 1860 and 1861; symbolically, thus, the old and 
the new were linked. 

From then until his resignation in 1944, President Jacobs 
became and remained the guiding spirit of the endeavor. He de- 
veloped a number of ideas and enterprises which brought nation- 
al, and even international, recognition to the school. Most notable 
among these were the establishment of a campus radio station 
as early as 1931, and the completion in 1940 of the Crypt of 
Civilization to preserve for posterity a cross-section of twentieth- 
century life. 

Still a new era opened in the history of Oglethorpe in 1944 
when Dr. Philip Weltner assumed the presidency and, with a 
group of faculty associates, initiated a new and exciting approach 
to undergraduate education called the "Oglethorpe Idea." As 
described more fully in the preceding section, the new departure 
was founded on the conviction that education should encompass 
the twin aims of making a life and making a living, and that to- 
ward these ends a program of studies should be developed which 
made sense from first to last and which meaningfully hung to- 
gether. 

The last twenty years of Oglethorpe's history have revolved 
around the central issue of finding more effective means of 
answering the challenge posed by these fundamental purposes. 
At the same time, though the College remains sympathetic to- 
ward all religions and encourages its students to affiliate with a 
local church of their own choosing or synagogue, all formal sup- 
port from church bodies was discontinued. Today Oglethorpe 
stands as a wholly private and non-sectarian institution of higher 
learning. 

In 1965 began still another chapter in the history of the school. 
As part of its steadfast aim to become "a small college, super- 
latively good," the institution formally changed its name from 
Oglethorpe University to Oglethorpe College — a change more pre- 
cisely reflecting its nature as well as its purposes. 

The College has also developed a program of physical expan- 
sion to keep pace with its academic growth. Construction of new 
dormitories and a new student union building will open in the 
spring of 1968. The new complex is designed not only to add 
additional space to campus facilities but also to blend architect- 
urally with the existing pattern of buildings on the campus. 



HISTORY OF OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



13 



To all of this, it may be finally added, Oglethorpe enjoys the 
great asset of location in Atlanta — one of the great metropolitan 
centers of the South and one of the most rapidly developing in 
the nation. A city blending the graciousness of the Old South 
with the social progress of the New, Atlanta is a key center of 
transportation for the entire Southeast, with excellent service by 
air, rail, and bus; it is also a hub of the modern highway system 
being built through the region. With a metropolitan population 
of well over a million, an ideal location in the foothills of the Blue 
Ridge Mountains, and a temperate climate throughout the year, 
the city offers many attractions and cultural opportunities to the 
Oglethorpe undergraduate as a part of his whole development. 




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ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 
APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

Throughout its history, Oglethorpe has welcomed students from 
all sections of this country as well as from abroad as candidates 
for degrees. It is the policy of the Admissions Committee to select 
for admission to the College those applicants who present the 
strongest evidence of purpose, maturity, scholastic ability, and 
potential for the caliber of college work expected at Oglethorpe. 
In making its judgments, the Committee considers the nature of 
the student's high school program, his grades, the recommenda- 
tions of his counsellors and teachers, and his scores on aptitude 
tests. 

The candidate for admission as a freshman must present a 
satisfactory high-school program which includes as a minimum 
four units in English, three in mathematics and/or science, and 
three in social studies (except that a fourth unit in mathematics 
and/or science may be substituted for one in social studies). In 
addition, he must submit satisfactory scores on the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. (Scores 
of the Florida and Iowa State Tests will be acceptable if the ap- 
plicant has taken one of these as a result of statewide policy; 
also, scores of the American College Testing Program may be 
used by those unable to present scores on the SAT.) 

It is to the applicant's advantage to take the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test as early as possible during his senior year in high school. 
Details concerning the program can be obtained from high school 
counsellors, or by writing the College Entrance Examination Board, 
Box 592, Princeton. N. J. 08540. 

The Oglethorpe application form contains a list of the materials 
which must be submitted by the applicant. No application can 
be considered and acted upon until all the items indicated have 
been received. Applications will be considered in order of com- 
pletion, and the applicant will be notified of the decision of the 
Committee on Admissions as soon as action has been taken. 

Though the exact date will vary from semester to semester, 
generally the deadline by which admissions will be closed will be 
announced by the College. 



16 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

The College invites and urges those students who have taken 
the Advanced Placement examinations of the College Entrance 
Examination Board to submit their scores for possible considera- 
tion toward college credit. The general policy of Oglethorpe to- 
ward such scores is the following: academic credit will be given 
in the appropriate area to students presenting Advanced Place- 
ment grades of 4 or 5; exemption but not credit will be given 
in the appropriate area from basic courses for students present- 
ing a grade of 3; neither credit nor exemption will be given for 
grades of 1 or 2; maximum credit to be allowed to any student 
for Advanced Placement scores will be thirty semester hours. 

COLLEGE LEVEL TESTING PROGRAM 

The tests are administered by centers across the nation under 
the control of the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, 
Princeton, New Jersey, 08540. At present, examinations are 
given in: 

General Examinations Subject Examinations 

English Composition American Government 

Humanities Analysis of Literature 

Mathematics English Composition 

Natural Sciences General Chemistry 

Social Sciences Introductory Calculus 

Introductory Economics 
Introductory Sociology 
Tests and Measurements 
Western Civilization 
Educational Psychology* 
History of American Education 
Marketing 

Money and Banking 
Statistics 

Examinations scores above the norms established will benefit 
the student in two ways: 1. Credit to the number of hours normal- 
ly granted in the course will be given, and 2. Course requirements 
where they exist for these courses will be fulfilled. 



*Available April, 1968. 



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18 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Applicants for transfer from other recognized institutions of 
higher learning are welcomed at Oglethorpe, provided they are 
in good standing at the institution last attended. They are 
expected to follow regular admissions procedures and will be 
notified of the decision of the Admissions Committee in the reg- 
ular way. 

SPECIAL AND TRANSIENT STUDENTS 

In addition to regular students, a limited number of special 
and transient students will be accepted. 

Special students are defined by the College as those not work- 
ing toward an Oglethorpe degree; they are limited to a maximum 
of five semester courses, after which they must apply for a change 
of status to that of regular student or be requested to withdraw 
from the College. 

Transient students may take a maximum of two semesters of 
work here, provided that they secure a letter from the dean of 
their original institution certifying that they are in good standing 
there and that the original institution will accept for transfer 
credit the academic work done by the student at Oglethorpe. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

All correspondence concerning admissions should be ad- 
dressed to the Director of Admissions, Oglethorpe College, At- 
lanta, Georgia. After receiving the application form, the appli- 
cant should fill it out and return it with an application fee of 
$20; this fee is not refundable. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO STUDENTS 

Oglethorpe offers the worthy student many opportunities for 
obtaining assistance in financing his undergraduate education. 
These opportunities are provided under conditions which give a 
reasonable guarantee to the applicants and the College that they 
will go to those persons best able to benefit from them. 

The many sources of revenue made available to the Scholar- 
ship and Loan Committee include the Lowry Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund, the National Defense Student Loan Program, the 
United Student Aid Loan Fund, the Educational Opportunity 
Grants, the Una Rivers Grants-in-Aid Fund, the L. "Pop" Crowe 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 



19 



Memorial Loan Fund, and the Athletic Grants-in-Aid Program. 
Additionally, Oglethorpe participates in the Federal College Work 
Study Program. 

Beginning July 1, Oglethorpe will participate in the Educational 
Opportunities Grant up to one-half of cost for those in extreme 
need. 

Oglethorpe also has available loans at small interest rates 
through two educational loan institutions: the Tuition Plan, Inc., 
and Educational Funds, Inc. These plans enable parents to pay 
for tuition and other academic fees on a monthly basis. 

Other funds are made available to the Committee by interested 
persons, groups, and business firms from time to time. 

Except in the case of loans, all assistance funds are granted 
by the Committee as outright gifts to the student in the form of 
credits entered on the semester bills of the College. 

For further information, contact Audray Heath, Director, Stu- 
dent Aid and Placement Office, Oglethorpe College. 




ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

The College recognizes attendance at classes as the responsi- 
bility of the student. Students are held accountable for all work 
missed. The exact nature of absence regulations is determined 
by each instructor for his own courses. Such regulations are 
published and distributed by course professor at the beginning 
of each term. 

GRADES 

At Oglethorpe, the letter grade system of grading is used. The 
range of A-D represents passing work; any grade below D is re- 
garded as a failure. Students withdrawing from a course before 
the end of the semester are given a "W" or a "WF", depending 
upon the circumstances of the withdrawal. Students who do not 
meet all the requirements of a given course are given an "I" for 
incomplete at the end of the semester; if the requirements are 
met within 10 weeks of the next enrolled term, the "I" is replaced 
by a regular grade; if they are not met within this time, the grade 
automatically becomes an "F". Grade structure and quality points 
are as follows: 

A Superior 4.0 

B Good 3.0 

C Satisfactory 2.0 

D Passing 1.0 

F Failure 0.0 

FA Failure: Excessive absences 0.0 

W Withdrawn 0.0 

WF Withdrawn Failing 0.0 

I Incomplete 0.0 
P Passing (used in Physical Education and student 
teaching.) 

MINIMUM ACADEMIC AVERAGE 

Though the grade of D is regarded as passing, the College 
believes that students, in order to graduate, must exhibit more 
ability than that required by the lowest passing mark. Therefore, 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 21 

a student, in order to graduate from Oglethorpe, must compile 
an over-all minimum average of 2.0. No student will be allowed 
to graduate unless this minimum is met. 

For the student's own welfare, a graduated system of minimum 
averages has been established. Freshmen are required to main- 
tain a cumulative average of at least 1.7 in their course work; 
sophomores of at least 1.9, and juniors and seniors of at least 2.0. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Minimum requirements for graduation consist of the following: 
forty semester courses (or their equivalent for transfer students) 
totaling at least 123 hours; a cumulative grade average of at least 
2.0, at least two semesters of physical education (unless ex- 
empted by the Academic Dean); and the last four semesters to 
be spent as a registered student at Oglethorpe. Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) must also be completed in all three sections 
prior to graduation. All graduating Seniors must file application 
for diploma with the College Registrar. 

DEGREES 

Oglethorpe offers three degrees to those meeting the necessary 
requirements: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bach- 
elor of Science in Medical Technology. Under the Bachelor of 
Arts, majors programs are offered in the following areas: Busi- 
ness Administration, Economics, Elementary Education, Second- 
ary Education (with concentrations available in English, French, 
General Studies, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies), Eng- 
lish, French, History, Philosophy, Political Studies, Psychology, 
and Sociology. 

Under the Bachelor of Science, majors programs are offered 
in the following areas: Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and 
Physics. 

Under certain conditions, it is also possible for a student to 
receive a degree from Oglethorpe under "professional option." 
Through this arrangement and in accord with regulations of the 
College, the student may transfer to a recognized professional 
instiution — such as law school, dental school, or medical school 
— at the end of his junior year and then, after one year in the 
professional school, receive his degree from Oglethorpe. Stu- 
dents interested in this possibility should consult closely with 
their advisors to make certain that all conditions are met. 



22 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

Freshmen who fail to maintain a cumulative average of at least 
1.7, sophomores of at least 1.9, and juniors and seniors of at 
least 2.0 are placed on probation for the following term. If during 
that term they do not substantially improve their scholastic aver- 
age, they will be dismissed from the College. 

First semester freshmen receiving grades of less than D in all 
subjects will be dismissed, as will students in the sophomore, 
junior, and senior classes who fail to maintain at least a 1.0 
cumulative average. 

All students on Academic Probation at the end of the spring 
semester must attend at least one session of summer school un- 
less exempted for cause by the Dean of the College. 

STUDENTS CLASSIFICATION 

For administrative and other official and extra-official purposes, 
students are classified according to the number of semester hours 
successfully completed. Classification is as follows: 

— 30 hours — Freshman 61-90 — Junior 

31 — 60 hours — Sophomore 91 above — Senior 

NORMAL ACADEMIC LOAD 

A normal academic program at Oglethorpe consists of no less 
than four courses each semester, giving the student generally a 
total of ten to seventeen semester hours each term. Regular 
students in the day classes are expected to carry a normal load 
and to pay for a full schedule of courses. No provisions exist in 
the college for payment of reduced load except transient and night 
students. 

THE DEAN'S LIST 

Students who earn a minimum average of 3.3 or better in any 
given semester for an academic load of at least five courses are 
given the distinction of being placed on the Dean's List. 

DEGREES WITH HONORS 

Degrees with honors are awarded as follows: for a cumulative 
average of 3.50, the degree cum laude; for a cumulative average 
3.75, the degree magna cum laude; for a cumulative average of 
4.0, the degree summa cum laude. No grade in any course can 
be lower than 2.0. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



23 




HONORS ORGANIZATIONS 

Phi Society: The Phi Society is a Freshman Honor Society rec- 
ognizing those Freshmen who have achieved high academic per- 
formance during their first year of study. 

Membership selection is made in the third week of October 
each year. Any full-time student who has earned a 3.25 accum- 
ulative average in his freshman year and having no more than 
three courses with a grade of "C" is eligible for membership. 



STUDENT LIFE 
ORIENTATION 

At the beginning of each semester new students will be in- 
volved in an orientation program, under the general supervision 
of the Dean of Students. Orientation activities are planned to 
introduce the student to both academic and social life at Ogle- 
thorpe. Orientation group leaders from among the upperclass- 
men serve as guides and counsellors during the period. Follow- 
ing orientation, the student is then assigned to a faculty advisor 
who aids him in planning his academic program. 

STANDARDS OF PERSONAL DRESS AND GROOMING 

Each individual has the freedom to dress and groom as he 
chooses, and to select the school of his choice; however, these 
freedoms are not without their responsibilities and consequences. 

Institutions of higher education have their own personalities; 
hence, they have the freedom to select the standards they want 
for students who voluntarily elect to attend. When a student 
voluntarily elects to attend Oglethorpe College, a private institu- 
tion, he represents not only himself but also the student body, 
the College, and in some measure, the community in which the 
College has such deep roots. 

The College takes the position that all students are expected 
to dress and groom as mature, responsible adults, as ladies and 
gentlemen. Dress and grooming are expected to be appropriate 
to the occasion and in keeping with the positions of leadership 
and responsibility in society. 

Individuals who are unwilling to meet high standards of dress 
and grooming should not apply to Oglethorpe College for admis- 
sion. 

Students who avoid these high standards or who deliberately 
ignore them, either directly or indirectly, shall be terminated 
from the College immediately. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

All full-time day students are required to subscribe to the 
Student Health and Insurance Plan provided by the College, un- 
less married or residing with parents. 



26 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

The College maintains a small campus infirmary staffed by a 
registered nurse. The infirmary operates on a regular schedule, 
and provides basic first aid service and limited medical assistance 
for students covered by the student insurance plan. 

A physician visits the infirmary periodically to make general 
diagnosis and treatment. In the event additional or major medi- 
cal care is required, the student patient will be referred to medi- 
cal specialists and hospitals in the area with which the health 
service maintains a working relationship. 

When it is determined that a student's physical or emotional 
health is detrimental to his academic studies, group-living situa- 
tion, or other relationships at the College or in the community, 
he will be requested to withdraw. Re-admission to the College 
will be contingent upon acceptable verification that the student 
is ready to return. The final decision will rest with the College. 

STANDARDS OF PERSONAL CONDUCT AND RESPONSIBILITY: 
THE ROLE OF THE COLLEGE AND THE STUDENT 

Oglethorpe College takes the position that it is deeply con- 
cerned with the total development of the individual as a com- 
petent student and as a highly responsible citizen both on the 
campus and in the community. The College's high standards of 
personal conduct and responsibility are an expression of its con- 
fidence in each student's potential as a human being; however, 
each student must be as willing to accept adult consequences 
as he is insistent upon being granted adult freedom of decision 
and action. 

Unfortunately, neither knowledge and wisdom nor knowledge 
and integrity are synonomous; therefore, a firm grasp of acad- 
emic studies will not in itself be an assurance that a student 
is profiting fully from his college experience. 

Individuals who do not desire to accept either this view of the 
College's responsibility or its high standards should not apply to 
the College for admission. Accepted students who demonstrate 
their unwillingness to meet high standards will be terminated 
from the College. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

Valuable educational experiences may be gained through active 
participation in approved campus activities and organizations. 
All students are encouraged to participate in one or more organi- 



28 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

zations and to the extent that such involvement does not deter 
them from high academic achievement. Majors are especially 
encouraged to join professional organizations associated with 
their interests and goals. 

Information concerning College activities and organizations is 
contained in the Oglethorpe College Student Handbook. 

HONOR SYSTEM 

At Oglethorpe the Honor System is an integral part of college 
life. Students are on their honor to respect the regulations of 
the College and to abide by the provisions of the Honor Code. 
The Honor System is supervised by a student Honor Council, 
acting with the counsel of a faculty advisor. 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

College social fraternities and sororities were reinstituted in 
the College in 1967. At present, seven local chapters exist with 
several of them in colony status with national social fraternities. 
These social organizations contribute substantially to the spiritual 
and social betterment of the member and develop college into a 
richer, fuller experience. Membership in these organizations is 
voluntary and subject to regulations imposed by the groups, by 
the College Interfraternity Council, or by the Student Government 
Association. 

ATHLETICS 

In addition to a well-rounded program of intramural sports, 
intercollegiate competition is carried on in soccer, basketball, 
tennis, baseball, and rifle and pistol shooting. Students with 
athletic skills are invited and urged to participate in any of these. 

COLLEGE RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Ability and willingness to room and board in College-operated 
facilities are conditions of acceptance and/or continued attend- 
ance. Freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors, in that order, 
are required to room and board to the extent that spaces are 
available. 

Exceptions: 

1. Married students 

2. Students residing with parents in Atlanta and the surround- 
ing area. 



STUDENT LIFE 29 

RECALL OF STUDENTS EXCUSED TO RESIDE OFF CAMPUS 

When spaces are insufficient to house all students, seniors and 
juniors, in that order, will be eligible to reside off campus under 
one of the following provisions: 

1. Subject to recall to the campus as soon as a vacancy oc- 
curs. 

2. Subject to recall at the end of the off-campus rental period 
or within 15 days, whichever is sooner. 

3. Subject to recall at the end of the semester. 

BOARDING REQUIREMENTS 

All resident students are required to board whether initially 
assigned to the residence halls or recalled to the campus. Ex- 
ceptions or adjustments will not be granted for personal, relig- 
ious, medical, or employment reasons. 

The semester boarding charge covers the period from the day 
following regular registration through lunch of the day following 
the last day of final examinations. The boarding charge includes 
Thanksgiving vacation, but does not include Christmas vacation 
and Spring recess. Resident seniors whose names appear on 
the Registrar's official June graduation list are entitled to board 
through lunch of the day following graduation. 

During periods not covered by the boarding fee, students may 
use the cafeteria on a cash basis. Students are urged to review 
the College Calendar in order to anticipate their food and other 
expenses during interim periods. 

FINANCING 

Students and parents desiring to pay expenses in installments 
are advised to investigate the Educational Funds, Inc., plan, 10 
Dorrance Street, Providence, Rhode Island; United Student Aid 
Funds, Inc.; National Defense Education Act Loan Funds; private 
banking or other sources. Information may be secured by writ- 
ing to the Student Financial Aids Officer, Oglethorpe College. 
Continuing students should complete all arrangements for meet- 
ing College requirements well in advance of registration so that 
they will not be delayed. 

All balances and new charges are payable at registration. Fail- 
ure to make the necessary payments at registration may cause 



30 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 




the student to lose his place in the College. Students employing 
Educational Funds, Inc., or any other source of funds, are not 
exempted from paying deposits by the deadline dates specified 
in the College Bulletin. 

Continuing students are not permitted to register until all previ- 
ous debts have been cleared with the Business Office. Grades, 
transcripts, and diplomas are withheld until all accounts, includ- 
ing institutional damages and fines, are paid in full. 

Students should have sufficient funds to purchase books and 
supplies directly from the bookstore. 



WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 

Students who find it necessary to drop courses or change 
courses must secure an approved drop slip from the Registrar 
and present it to the Business Office for appropriate action. 



STUDENT LIFE 31 

Boarding students suspended from the cafeteria, College Cen- 
ter, or other facilities or activities, are not entitled to refunds or 
credits for the period of such suspension. Refunds on all involun- 
tary and voluntary withdrawals will be made, of course, subject 
to the conditions of the voluntary tuition insurance plan which 
the student may elect to take. 

Refunds under the Tuition Refund Plan may be withheld until 
the student identification card is surrendered to the Business 
Office. Keys and other College property must also be returned 
prior to the issuance of refunds. 

FINANCING 

The applicant upon receipt of notice of acceptance, should 
forward an advance deposit of $200 by the date specified in the 
acceptance letter. This deposit will apply against the total charges 
at the time the student registers for classes. It is not refundable. 
Continuing students are required to pay $200 advance deposit 
at the time of early registration for the fall term. If not done at 
this time, payment is required prior to registration in the Fall 
Semester. Registration is therefore contingent upon the deposit 
being paid. 

FEES AND COSTS 

To affect the economy of efficiency and to avoid inconvenience 
to both parents and students by assessing and collecting num- 
erous separate fees, Oglethorpe has adopted the policy of charg- 
ing one comprehensive fee to include in so far as possible the 
entire cost of attending Oglethorpe College for a full academic 
year (two semesters). The Comprehensive Fee is as follows: 
Resident Students $2,352 

Non-resident Students $1,702 

Non-residents Metro-Atlanta Students* $1,302 

For students living on campus, the comprehensive fee covers 
the cost of tuition, laboratory fees, room, board, activities, in- 
stitutional fees, personal evaluation and placement, and testing 
and counselling. These same items, with the exception of room 
and board, are also included in the comprehensive fee for stu- 
dents not residing on campus. The cost of books, however, is 
not included in the comprehensive fee. 



^Metro-Atlanta includes the five counties of Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and 
Gwinnett. 



32 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

The only standard charges not included in the Comprehensive 
Fee are the following: 

1. Student Health Insurance: Health insurance is handled 
separately since it is deductible on personal income tax 
returns. The cost is approximately $28.00 per year. 

2. Tuition Refund Insurance: Tuition Refund Insurance is 
optional. With it, the student or parent is assured the con- 
tracted amount of refund of charges whether a student 
withdraws voluntarily or involuntarily. Evening, part time, 
and transient students are not eligible for coverage under 
this plan. No other provision for refunds exists. 

The first payment of the Comprehensive Fee, after the $200 
deposit has been credited, is due when the student registers for 
the Fall Semester. The second payment is due when the student 
registers for the Spring Semester. The payment schedule is as 
follows: 

Resident Student Non-Resident Non-Resident Metro- 

Student Atlanta Student 

Advance Deposit ....$ 200 $200 $200 

Payment 1 1,176* 851* 595* 

Payment 2 976 651 507 

$2,352 $1,702 $1,302 

Newly constructed residence halls and single rooms will result in slight increases in 
comprehensive fees for residents. 

EVENING AND PART-TIME STUDENT CHARGES 

Students who are enrolled as evening, part-time, or other than 
full-time students will be charged on a credit hour basis as follows: 

CREDIT HOURS COST 

3 ___._ .$110 

4 ______ __ 148 

5 __.__ 185 

6 220 

7 _ 258 

8 __ 295 

9 _ 330 

THE "0" BOOK 

This is the student handbook prepared annually by the Student 
Council of Oglethorpe as a service to new students. It contains 
a great variety of helpful information designed to acquaint the 
student with all significant phases of college life at Oglethorpe. 



*Also applicable to students who enter in Spring Semester. 



STUDENT LIFE 



33 



FINE ARTS FESTIVAL 

Oglethorpe's Fine Arts Series brings to the campus a varied 
and balanced program which stresses human enjoyment of artistic 
excellence. This variety includes music, drama, literature, the 
film, and the dance, as well as the graphic arts. The programs 
are designed to acquaint the student with the range of the arts 
as well as with the individual forms. The movies, for example, 
are chosen from among those film classics which are not cur- 
rently available in the commercial theatre, and they reveal not 
only the high points of the film art but also its range and variety. 
In dance, music, and literature, the program brings to the campus 
individuals and groups chosen from outstanding living artists. 
There is no admission charge to any of these programs. 

In addition to the Fine Arts Series itself, the Faculty and Stu- 
dent Fine Arts Committee offers $250 in prizes to encourage the 




34 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

student himself to explore the arts and to reward student achieve- 
ment in this area. For music, $100 in cash prizes is given an- 
nually; for poetry, $50; for short fiction, $50; and for painting, 
$50. The prize poems and short stories, and when possible prize 
paintings, are published in Prospect, the Oglethorpe literary mag- 
azine. 

AWARDS 

Each year a number of awards and prizes are given to the stu- 
dents. Among them are the following. 

The Faculty Scholarship Award: This is made annually to the male 
student with the highest scholastic average in his junior and 
senior years. 

The Sally Hull Weltner Award for Scholarship: This is presented 
each year by the Oglethorpe College Woman's Club to the 
woman student with the highest scholastic record in her 
junior and senior years. 

The James Edward Oglethorpe Awards for Merit: Commonly 
called the "Oglethorpe Cups", these are presented annually 
to the man and woman in the graduating class who have 
been the leaders in both scholarship and service at Ogle- 
thorpe College. 

The David Hesse Memorial Award: This award is made annually 
to the outstanding student participating in a varsity sport. 

The Parker Law Prize: This is an annual award made to that mem- 
ber of the class in Business Law who has shown the greatest 
progress. 

The LeConte Society Award: This award is made by the LeConte 
Society to the outstanding graduating senior in the field of 
science on that basis of the student's scholastic achieve- 
ment and contribution to the College and to the Science 
Division. 

The Duchess Club and the Boar's Head Awards for Freshmen: 
These are awards made by these honorary societies to that 
young man and woman in the freshman class who most fully 
exemplify the ideals of those organizations. 

The Brinker Award: This award is presented by Reverend Albert 
J. Brinker in memory of his son and daughter, Albert Jan 
Brinker, Jr. and Sally Stone Brinker, to the student having 
the highest achievement in the courses in philosophy and 
religion. 



STUDENT LIFE 35 

The Yamacraw Awards: These are designed to recognize those 
students who are outstanding members of the Oglethorpe 
community; eight of these awards are given on the basis of 
spirit, participation, academic achievement, and fulfillment 
of the ideals of an Oglethorpe education. 

Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities: This honor is 
given in recognition of the merit and accomplishments of 
students who are formally recommended by the Student 
Government and the Faculty Council, and who meet the re- 
quirements of the publication Who's Who in American Col- 
leges and Universities. 

The MacConnell Award: This award is presented by the sopho- 
more class to the senior who, in the judgment of the class, 
has participated in many phases of campus life without 
having received full recognition. 

The Chemical Rubber Publishing Company Awards: These are 
given each year to those students who demonstrate out- 
standing achievements in the various freshman science 
courses. 

The Players' Awards: These awards are presented to those mem- 
bers of the student body who show excellence in the field 
of drama. 

The Brown Award: This award is presented to the individual who 
is not a member of the Players but who has done the most 
for the Players during the year. 

THE OGLETHORPE SCHOLAR 

Each year, the College, through competitive examinations, 
awards ten $1,000.00 scholarships to students who have demon- 
strated high academic achievement in secondary or preparatory 
schools. Applications for admission to the test must be made 
prior to April 1, each year. The test will be scheduled on or about 
April 20 of each year. For further information, please write the 
Dean of the College, Oglethorpe College, Atlanta, Georgia 30319. 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The College maintains a Placement Office to provide help to 
students in securing jobs during their college career. Because 
of Oglethorpe's location in the suburbs of the second fastest- 
growing city in America, students can easily obtain part-time 



36 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 




work. There are also some opportunities on campus for employ- 
ment in various jobs. Another function of this office is to aid our 
students in getting positions upon graduation. A register is kept 
of firms seeking our graduates, and every effort is made by the 
College to place students in areas and firms of their preference. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 
SEMESTER SYSTEM 

Oglethorpe College operates under the semester system during 
the academic year. Two summer sessions of five weeks each 
make up the summer schedule. Beginning with the Fall semester 
1969, and continuing thereafter, the College will initiate an inter- 
term of four weeks between the regular semesters. The inter- 
term will occur during the month of January, separating the first 
and second semesters by a six-week period. 

EVENING PROGRAM 

As a service to the community, the College offers an evening 
program covering three terms per year: one during each semester 
and one during the summer. Classes meet two nights each week 
(Monday and Wednesday; Tuesday and Thursday) with two class 
periods each night. 

A special single meeting on Friday evening is available upon 
sufficient enrollment. 

Effective in the Fall 1968, all night students (those completing 
50 or more percent of their Oglethorpe work in the night pro- 
gram) will be required to major in the General Studies Major 
Program. This program requires completion of the courses in- 
dicated elsewhere in this bulletin and a sufficient number of 
additional course hours up to the number prescribed for a degree. 
The degree granted will be the Bachelor of Arts-General Studies. 

The General Studies program, because of its flexibility, enables 
the student to concentrate in any selected program offered by 
the College. 

The General Studies Major is opened to day division students 
who may wish to pursue the program. 



THE CURRICULUM 
ORGANIZATION 

Oglethorpe's curriculum is arranged into six general divisions: 
Humanities, Social Studies, Science, Education, Economic Busi- 
ness, and Behavioral Sciences. Academic areas included within 
each are the following: 

Division I: The Humanities 

English Literature 

Foreign Languages Philosophy 

Division II: Social Studies 

History Political Studies 

Division III: Science 

Biology Mathematics 

Chemistry Physics 

Division IV: Education 

Education Physical Education 

Division V: Business and Economics 

Accounting Economics 

Business Administration 

Division VI: Behavioral Sciences 

Psychology Sociology 

Under the semester system, the curriculum offers courses of 
three and four hours credit. A full-time student carries a normal 
academic load of five courses during each term. 

One hundred twenty-three semester hours (or their equivalent 
for transfer students) are necessary for graduation. In these are 
included fifty-five credit hours of core courses according to the 
following schedule required of all four-year students. 



GENERAL COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS 

CORE PROGRAM 

The following is the core program required of all four-year 

Oglethorpe students. 

Communications 12 hours Social Studies 15 hours 

*Speech 3 hours *West. Civilization 6 hours 

*Writing 3 hours *Government 3 hours 

*Foreign Language „ „6 hours *Psychology or Sociology 3 hours 

* Economics 3 hours 

Natural Science 15 hours 

One science sequence 

plus one course 12 hours 

(Principles of Science, 
Biology, Chemistry, 
Physics) 

* Mathematics 3 hours 



Humanities 






12 hours 


Humanities Sequence 




__9 


hours 


or 


I 






Foreign Language 






Literature 




9 


hours** 


Music or Philosophy 


1 






*Philosophy 




3 


hours 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION hours 

Two semesters of physical education are required, except for 
those excused on medical grounds. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

In the following section, the courses are listed alphabetically 
by area within their respective Divisions. Numbers from 100 to 
199 designate courses especially for freshmen; those from 200 
to 299, courses especially for sophomores; 300 to 399, courses 
especially for juniors; and those from 400 to 499, courses espec- 
ially for seniors. Each level of offerings assumes the earlier com- 
pletion of necessary prerequisites. The number of hours refers 
to the semester hours credit per term allowed for the course; 
the designation "3 + 3" or "4 + 4" indicates that the course 
carries 6 or 8 semester hours of credit, respectively, for two se- 
mesters of work. 

MAJORS PROGRAMS 

In addition to completing the core program, students normally 
are expected, no later than the beginning of their junior year, to 



*College level examination may be substituted for requirement if examination is 
passed at established norms. Credit for completion of the course will be also 
granted. 
**No more than six (6) hours may be taken in any single area in this category. 



40 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



choose a majors program and to fulfill the departmental regula- 
tions for the program. With some variation according to profes- 
sional departmental requirements, most students will take the 
core program during their freshman and sophomore years, and 
a majors program during their junior and senior years. 

The following are suggested programs of majors. In addition 
to the required core program, most of them include three levels 
of other courses: those prescribed for the major, directed elec- 
tives recommended as immediately related to the major, and free 
electives allowed to enable the student to widen his intellectual 
interests. Variations of each program are possible, according to 
the particular needs of the student and the regulations of each 
department. Majors programs are offered in the following: 



Biology 

Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Economics 

Education-Elementary 

Education-Secondary 

English 

Foreign Languages 

General Studies 

Health Physics 



History 

Mathematics 

Medical Technology 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Studies 

Pre-Law 

Pre-Medicine 

Pre-Nursing 

Psychology 

Sociology 






DIVISION OF THE 
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

To ensure the orderly completion of the program, the major 
should consult with the appropriate faculty member in the depart- 
ment or division at the time of his first registration. It is impor- 
tant that each major have his program fully planned from the 
outset so that he may be aware of departmental and divisional 
requirements and allowable substitutions and alternatives. Each 
major must complete the core requirements within the scope of 
their interpretation by responsible departmental or divisional ad- 
visors. In addition, each major must complete those departmental 
and divisional requirements as may apply to the specific degree. 

PSYCHOLOGY (PS) 

Freshman 

CO 110 Intro, to Writing __ .. 3 HY 121 History West. Civil. _ 3 

French or German 3 French or German .... 3 

MA 137 Mathematics 3 MA 138 Mathematics . 3 

Bl 132 Biology 3 Bl 133 Biology _ _ 3 

HY 120 History West. Civil. ______ _ 3 PS 140 Psychology _ .. 3 

Physical Education Physical Education 

15 15 

Sophomore 

PS 240 Psychology 3 PS 341 Psychology .. ._ 3 

PO 123 Government of U.S. 3 PH 226 Philosophy ._ 3 

SH 110 Intro, to Speech ._ 3 EC 220 Economics .. 3 

SO 141 Sociology .. 3 EH English Elective . ._ 3 

Science Elective 3 Psychology 3 

15 15 

Junior 

PS 344 Psychology 3 Bl 341 Biology ... _ 3 

PH 364(5) Philosophy ._ 3 PS 343 Psychology .. 3 

EH 211 English 3 HU 310 Humanities ... ._ 3 

Directed Elective 3 Psychology Elective 3 

Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

15 15 



42 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Senior 

Psychology Elective 3 Psychology Elective 3 

HU 311 Humanities 3 Directed Elective 3 

Directed Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

15 15 

PSYCHOLOGY CURRICULUM 

PS 140. General Psychology 3 hours 

An introduction to the scientific study and description of the behavioral 
of living organisms. Consideration of such topics as learning, motivation, 
emotion, sensation and perception, intelligence measurement, personality 
and social behavior will be undertaken. Students may be required to serve 
as subjects in one or more experiments. Prerequisite: None. 

PS 240. Introduction to Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 3 hours 

An introduction treatment of quantitative methods in behavioral sciences. 
The nature of measurement, collection and interpretation of data will be 
studied. Special attention will be given to relations between statistical models 
and experimental controls. Prerequisite: 137-138, 140. 

PS 341. Experimental Psychology I: Sensation, Perception, Motor Skills 

4 hours 

An introduction to the laboratory method in psychology. Lectures will 
include a survey of the research in sensory processes, perceptual organiza- 
tion, and the acquisition of motor skills. Students will conduct representa- 
tive laboratory exercises in psycho-physics and motor learning. Prerequisite: 
140, 240. 

PS 342. Child and Adolescent Psychology 3 hours 

A study of the child from conception through adolescence. Attention is 
given to physical, social, emotional and intellectual development of the child, 
with special emphasis placed on the importance of learning. Prerequisite: 
140. 

PS 343. Theories of Personality 3 hours 

A course studying the ideas of several representative theories which were 
concerned with personality. A comparision of theories is made and a sug- 
gested framework for evaluation of each theory is presented. Prerequisite: 
140 plus one other course in psychology. 

PS 344. Experimental Psychology II: Learning and Motivation 4 hours 

A survey of empirical findings concerning simple and complex learning, 
including in depth examination of the data in certain areas of controversy. 
Students will conduct representative laboratory exercises on human verbal 
learning and on operant conditioning of the albino rat. Prerequisite: 140, 
240, 341. 

PS 440. Abnormal Psychology 3 hours 

An introduction to the psychological aspects of behavior disorders. In- 
cluded are descriptive and explanatory studies of a variety of mental dis- 
orders, psychoneuroses, psychoses, other maladjustments, their related con- 



DIVISION OF THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 43 

ditions and methods of treatment. Prerequisite: 140 plus one other course 
in psychology. 

PS 441. Social Psychology 3 hours 

A course concerned with the behavior of individuals in groups, including 
motives, attitudes, group norms, group membership and social roles. Pre- 
requisite.- 140, 141. 

PS 442. Tests and Measurements 3 hours 

A study of the selection, evaluation, administration, interpretation and 
practical uses of tests of intelligence, aptitudes, interest, personality, social 
adjustment and the tests commonly used in industry. Laboratory work may 
be required. Prerequisite: 140, 240, plus one other course in psychology. 

PS 448. Directed Research in Psychology 2 + 2 hours 

Original investigations and detailed literature studies of selected problems 
in some area of psychology. Prerequisite: 140, 240, 341, 344, permission 
of instructor. 

PS 499. Senior Seminar 3 hours 

A seminar providing examination and discussion of various topics of con- 
temporary interest. Prerequisite: 140, 240, 341, 344, Senior standing. 

SOCIOLOGY (SO) 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

CO 110 Intro. Writing 3 SH 110 Intro, to Speech ______ .. 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I ______ 3 HY 121 Western Civilization II __ _ 3 

Bl 132 Biology I 4 Bl 133 Biology II ._ 4 

Mathematics 3 PO 123 Government of the U.S...- 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Physical Education Physical Education ..... 

Sophomore 

HU 310 The Classical World 3 HU 311 The Western World . ____ 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics I 3 EC 221 Principles of Economics II 3 
PO 223 Comparative Government 3 PS 140 General Psychology .... 3 
SO 141 Introduction to Sociolocy__ 3 SO 241 Social Problems _ ____ 3 
PH 266 Introduction to Philosophy 3 PH 267 Ethics __ __ 3 

Junior 

PS 342 Child & Adolescent SO 240 Introduction to Statistics 

Psychology 3 for the Behavioral Sciences 3 

SO 345 The Family 3 SO 326 International Relating 3 

SO 444 Cultural Anthropology 3 SO 348 Intergroup Relations __ __ 3 

Elective 3 PS 441 Social Psychology _ .____ 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Senior 
PS 343 Theories of Personality ____ 3 SO 446 History of Sociological 

Thought 3 

SO 346 Criminology 3 SO 447 Seminar: Methodology ___. 3 

SO 445 The Community 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



44 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

SOCIOLOGY (SO) 

SO 141. Introduction to Sociology 3 hours 

The study of human society, the nature of culture, and its organization. 
Processes of communication, socialization, mobility, and population growth 
are described and analyzed. Emphas's is placed upon methods, basic con- 
cepts, and principal findings in the field. Prerequisite: None. 

SO 241. Social Problems 3 hours 

A study of the impact of current social forces upon American society. 
Deviation from social norms, conflict concerning social goals and values, 
and social disorganization as these apply to family, economic, religious, and 
other institutional and interpersonal situations are of primary concern. Pre- 
requisite: 141. 

SO 345. The Family 3 hours 

An analysis of the family institution as a background for the study of 
family interaction, socialization, and the parent-child relationship, courtship 
and marriage interaction, family crises and problems. Prerequisite: 141. 

SO 346. Criminology 3 hours 

The principles of criminology and penology, with emphasis on psychosocio- 
logical factors; study of historical and contemporary theory and practice. 
Prerequisite: 141. 

SO 347. The Field of Social Work 3 hours 

An orientation course based on the description and analysis of the his- 
torical development of social work and the operation in contemporary society 
of the many social work activities. Prerequisite: 141. 

SO 348. Intergroup Relations 3 hours 

The study of the nature of minority and majority group adjustments, and 
the positions of different minority groups in the United States. Emphasis is 
given to the status and role of the American Negro. Prerequisite: 345. 

SO 444. Cultural Anthropology 3 hours 

An introduction to the study of man and his culture, using material from 
modern and folk cultures throughout the world. Emphasis is given to devel- 
opment of understanding of culture (its purpose, meaning, and function). 
Prerequisite: 141. 

SO 445. The Community 3 hours 

The study of the community as an area of interaction with particular 
emphasis on the impact of urbanization upon modern man. Prerequisite: 
141. 

SO 44S. History of Sociological Thought 3 hours 

A study of major social theorists from early times to date, with particular 
emphasis on current sociological thought. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

SO 447. Seminar: Methodology 3 hours 

Introduction to techniques of studying interpersonal and group relation- 
ships. Students will participate in a research project. The seminar is de- 
signed to help evaluate sociological reports and to develop skills in doing 
research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



DIVISION OF 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BA) 

To insure an orderly completion of his program, the prospective 
business major should consult with a faculty member of the 
Division at the time of his first registration. It is important that 
he plan his program correctly from the outset. 

In addition to the Bachelor of Arts degree, a Certificate is 
given, upon successful completion of the Core Program and de- 
partmental requirements, to those students taking a year of 
mathematics and a year of physics. These elections would also 
satisfy the mathematics requirements and apply toward sc'ence 
requirements of the Core Program. 

Directed Electives for the business major include a second year 
in Economics. A course in the use of computers is recommended 
as a free elective. 

Freshman 

CO 110 Intro, to Writing 3 SH 110 Intro, to Speech ||_ _ 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I .... 3 HY 121 Western Civilization II 3 

MA 137 Mathematics I 3 MA 138 Mathematics II _ 3 

Sociology or Psychology 3 Sociology or Psychology 3 

BA 101 Business Law I 3 BA 102 Insurance 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

Sophomore 

EC 220 Economics 1 ..... 3 EC 221 Economics II _ _ 3 

Science I 4 Science II 4 

BA 201 Accounting I 3 BA 202 Accounting II . .... 3 

PO 123 U. S. Government 3 BA 203 Conceptual Foundations.. 4 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

16 17 

Junior 

Science III 4 BA 302 Preface to Econometrics 3 

BA 301 Statistics 3 BA 312 Human Relations 3 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy 3 PH 267 Philosophy (Ethics) . ._ 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language II . 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

16 15 



46 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Senior 

BA 401 Prin. of Management 3 BA 402 Econometrics 3 

BA 411 Marketing Principles 3 BA 412 Finance 3 

Economic Elective 3 Economics Elective .... 3 

Foreign Language*, or Music, Foreign Language*, or Music, 

or Literature 3 or Literature 3 

BA 410 Technical Writing 3 Elective 3 

15 15 



COURSES OF STUDY 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BA) 

BA 101. Business Law 3 hours 

A course designed to give the student an awareness of a limited area 
of those aspects of the law which he will most likely need in his day-to-day 
dealings with the problems of business. Special emphasis is placed upon 
the law of contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, and business associa- 
tions. Prerequisite: None. 

BA 102. Insurance 3 hours 

A study of the principles and practices pertaining to personal and property 
insurance. Emphasis is upon the formation of the insurance relation; conceal- 
ment, warranties, waiver, and estoppel; incontestability; the respective in- 
terests of the beneficiary insured, insurer, assignee, and creditor. Prerequi- 
site-. BA 101. 

BA 201. Principles of Accounting I 3 hours 

An introduction to basic bookkeeping procedures related to the journal, 
ledger, financial statements, and the uses of accounting data. Prerequisite: 
None. 

BA 202. Principles of Accounting II 3 hours 

A continuation of the study of basic procedures with the emphasis upon 
partnership and corporate forms of accounting, and the analysis of financial 
statements. Prerequisite: BA 201. 

BA 203. Conceptual Foundations and Government 

Regulation of Business 4 hours 

A course giving the student some of the historical background that has 
influenced present business life. It deals with the subjects of authority and 
power, constitutionalism, pluralism, and the proper use of time, and the 
reasons for government regulation. The last half of the course acquaints the 
student with the field of labor law, including wages and hours, the Taft- 
Hartley Act, and the Civil Rights Acts. Prerequisite: None. 

BA 301. Statistics 3 hours 

A course dealing with the methods of gathering data through polling, 
sampling, the questionnaire, and the professional interview; the evaluating 



*lf contemplating graduate studies. 



DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 47 

and summarizing of the data; and the presentation through reports, charts, 
and studies. Only an elementary basic knowledge of the statistical method 
is encompassed. However, factors of error, percentage of accuracy, and 
the place of statistics in the scheme of management receive attention. An 
actual survey is chosen and run by the class. Prerequisite: MA 137 and 
MA 138. 

BA 302. Preface to Econometrics 3 hours 

An introduction to quantitative methods in Economics and Business, it 
presents methods of handling data, quantiative empirical estimates, and 
tests of economic theory in forms that are used in actual research by eco- 
nomists. This course does not require mathematics nor statistics beyond 
elementary algebra and elementary statistics. Prerequisite: BA 301. 

BA 312. Human Relations in Business 3 hours 

A course designed to emphasize the importance of people in business, 
and the psychological understandings that are necessary for successful 
management. Detailed teaching and discussion are directed toward motiva- 
tion, leadership, delegation, management development, creativity, and the 
direction of people. Prerequisite: None. 

BA 401. Principles of Management 3 hours 

A course concerned with the art of managing people. It applies principles 
of human relations to the various functions which form the basic body of 
knowledge essential for professional management. Emphasis is placed on 
planning, policy formulation, direction, leadership and decision-making. 
Prerequisite: BA 312. 

BA 402. Econometrics 3 hours 

A course concerned with the science of managing things. It introduces 
the student to the importance of quantification and examines the scientific 
approach to the management process. Various methods of systems mechani- 
zation are explained up to and including fully automated computerization. 
Emphasis is placed on systems design, data flow diagramming and computer 
programming. Prerequisite: BA 302. 

BA 410. Business and Technical Writing 3 hours 

An emphasis on the disciplines of letter writing, technical and business 
oriented essays and reports, speeches and articles on business or technical 
subjects. Additional emphasis placed on collection, interpretation, and pres- 
entation of data dealing with business or technical subjects. 

BA 411. Marketing Principles 3 hours 

A course concerned with the policies and problems involved in the 
operation of market institutions. Emphasis is upon the functions, commodi- 
ties, and middlemen involved in the marketing of goods and services. 
Prerequisite: Economics 220 and 221. 

BA 412. Business Finance 3 hours 

An investigation into the nature of business finance and its relation to 
economics, accounting and law; capital, capitalization, and financial plan; 
initial financing; refinancing; working capital; expansion; internal and exter- 
nal financial relationships of the firm. Prerequisite: BA 202, or permission 
of instructor. 






.:&'■■•' 





50 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



ECONOMICS (EC) 



Freshman Year 



CO 110 Intro, to Writing I 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I 3 

MA 137 Mathematics .... 3 

Psychology or Sociology 3 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 



15 



SH 110 Intro, to Speech 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II ______ 3 

MA 138 Mathematics 3 

PO 123 Government of the 

United States _ 3 

Elective . 3 

Physical Education 



15 



Sophomore Year 



EC 220 Economics .. ._ 3 

Foreign Language I 3 

Science I 4 

Philosophy 3 

Elective 3 



EC 221 Economics 

Foreign Language II 

Science II 

BA 203 Conceptual Foundations 
Elective 



16 



17 



Junior Year 



EC 320 Microeconomics 3 

EC 377 Money and Banking ._ 3 

Laboratory Science III 4 

Humanities I 3 

Directed Elective* 3 



EC 321 Macroeconomics 

Economics Elective __ ___. 

BA 372 Business Administration 

Humanities II 



3 
3 
3 
3 
Directed Elective* 3 



15 



15 



Senior Year 



EC 420 History of 

Economic Thought 3 

Economics Elective 3 

Business Administration Elective _ 3 

Humanities III ... 3 

Elective 3 



15 



EC 499 Economics Seminar 3 

Economics Elective 3 

Business Administration Elective __ 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



ECONOMICS (EC) 

EC 220. Principles of Economics I 3 hours 

An introductory survey of aggregate economic principles: the scope and 
method of Economics; business organizations; basic Supply and Demand 



*Students contemplating graduate work in Economics wil 
or Business Administration 302-402. 



elect Mathematics 234-235, 



DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 51 

theory; money and prices; national income theory; economic stabilization. 
Prerequisites: None. 

EC 221. Principles of Economics II 3 hours 

Applications of economic principles to economic problems: the theory 
of production; income distribution; agriculture; government regulation of 
business; labor organizations; international trade. Prerequisite: EC 220. 

EC 320. Intermediate Theory: Microeconomics 3 hours 

An intensive study of the behavior of the consumer and the firm, problems 
of production and distribution, and the structure of markets. Prerequisites: 
EC 220-221, MA 137-138. 

EC 321. Intermediate Theory: Macroeconomics 3 hours 

A comprehensive survey of aggregate economic analysis: the theory and 
measurement of national income and employment; price levels; business 
fluctuations; economic growth. Prerequisites: EC 220-221, MA 137-138. 

EC 377. Money and Banking 3 hours 

The nature and development of the money and credit systems of the 
United States: the functions and activities of financial institutions; com- 
mercial banking; the Federal Reserve System; monetary theory and practice. 
Prerequisites: EC 220-221. 

EC 378. Labor Economics 3 hours 

The history, theory, and practices of the American labor movement. A 
study of labor organizations as economic and social institutions including a 
survey of the principles and problems of union-management relationships 
encountered in collective bargaining and in public policies toward labor. Pre- 
requisite: EC 220. 

EC 379. Public Finance 3 hours 

An analysis of the impact of Federal, state and local government expendi- 
tures, revenues, debt management and budgeting on the allocation of re- 
sources, the distribution of income, and the stabilization of national income 
and employment. Prerequisites: EC 220-221. 

EC 420. History of Economic Thought 3 hours 

A study of the major writers and schools of economic thought, related 
to the economic, political, and social institutions of their times: the medieval, 
Mercantilist, Physiocrat, Classical, Marxist, Historical, Neoclassical, Institu- 
tionalise Keynesian, and post-Keynesian schools. Prerequisite: EC 220. 

EC 421. International Economics 3 hours 

A study of international trade and finance: regional specialization; national 
commercial policies; international investments; balance of payments; foreign 
exchange; foreign aid policies; international agreements on tariffs and trade. 
Prerequisites: EC 220-221. 

EC 422. Comparative Economic Systems 3 hours 

A comparative study of alternative economic systems, including capital- 
ism, fascism, socialism, and communism, with particular emphasis on the 
United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union. Prerequisite: EC 220. 
site: EC 220. 



52 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

EC 499. Seminar in Contemporary Economic Issues 3 hours 

A senior seminar preparing Economics majors for professional roles and 
graduate study: research methods and materials; written and oral presenta- 
tion of current economic issues. Prerequisites: Senior standing and either 
twelve semester hours of advanced Economics courses or permission of the 
instructor. 



GENERAL STUDIES 

The General Studies Major is required as the major field for 
all students in the night program but may be elected as a major 
for students in the day program. 

The General Studies Major consists of the following: 

1. Completion of the basic core requirements. 

2. Completion of a sufficient number of course hours to com- 
plete the 123 semester hours prescribed for an Oglethorpe de- 
gree. Courses are selected through the cooperative action of the 
student and his assigned advisor. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

EDUCATION (ED) 

The Division of Education provides courses leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education and Secondary Educa- 
tion (with concentrations available in English, French, Mathe- 
matics, Science, and Social Studies.) The teacher preparation 
curricula of Oglethorpe fulfill certification requirements in Geor- 
gia. Students desiring certification in other states should secure 
information for such states concerning requirements. 

ADMISSION TO AND RETENTION IN TEACHER 
EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Admission to Oglethorpe College does not automatically admit 
a student to the Teacher Education Program. A person meeting 
college entrance requirements and approved by a member of the 
Division of Education through personal interview is admitted. 
Once admitted, the student's progress and his record are subject 
to regular review by his advisor, other professors, and the Teacher 
Education Committee. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 53 

Admission to and retention in the Teacher Education Program 
are based in general upon the following characteristics and 
achievements: 

(a) Evidence of good moral character and personality. 

(b) Evidence of emotional stability and physical stamina. 

(c) A desire to work with children and/or youth. 

(d) Demonstration of proficiency in oral and written English. 

(e) A cumulative average of 2.0 and an average of 2.0 in pro- 
fessional courses. 

(f) Evidence of responsibility in student endeavors. 

(g) Interpretation of results of Minnesota Multiphasic test. 
Application for admission to the Teacher Education Program 

may be made at any time in the Division of Education Office. In- 
troduction to Education is the only professional course which may 
be taken prior to formal admission to the Program. 

Application for student teaching must be filed by April 15 prior 
to the academic year in which it is desired. Application forms are 
available in the Division of Education. Based on successful com- 
pletion of the Program and recommendation of the Division of 
Education a student will then be eligible for professional certifi- 
cation in Georgia. Students are eligible for the teacher's profes- 
sional four-year (T-4) certificate in Georgia when they have met 
the following general requirements: 

(a) The Bachelor's Degree from an accredited four-year col- 
lege. 

(b) Approximately 36 semester hours (12 courses) in general 
education* 

(c) All requirements for a teaching field,** and 

(d) Approximately 18 semester hours in required professional 
education courses.*** 



*"General Education" refers to the freshman and sophomore courses in English, 
science, social sciences, mathematics, and related subjects basic to the general 
needs of all students regardless of vocational or professional objectives. 

""Teaching Field" refers to the subject-matter and technical courses which meet the 
requirements for the field in which the certificate is to be issued. 

""Professional Education" refers to the required education courses which develop 
professional understanding and abilities. 



54 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



Requirements for the Teacher's Professional Four-Year (T-4) 
certificate for Elementary Grades (1-8)* 

A. Teaching Field: 

18 semester hours selected from the following areas with a 
maximum of 6 semester hours in any one area: 



AREAS 

Language Arts 

Social Studies 

Science/ Math 

Creative Arts 

Health and Physical 
Education 



SUGGESTED COURSES 

Children's Literature, Speech, and Lan- 
guage Arts in the Grades. 
Geography, American History, State His- 
tory, and Social Studies in the Grades. 
Science in the Grades and Mathematics in 
the Grades. 

Public School Art and Music, Art and 
Music Appreciation, and Crafts. 
Health and Safety Education, Nutrition, 
Recreation and Games. 



B. Professional Education: 

18 semester hours which must include courses dealing with 

each of the following areas: 

Human Growth and (Educational Psychology, Child Psychol- 
ogy, etc.) 

(Elementary Curriculum and Methods, 
Principles of Elementary Education, etc.) 



Development Cur- 
riculum and 
Methods 



Elementary Student 
Teaching or an ap- 
proved substitute 



(With at least one but less than five years 

of acceptable teaching experience, the 

only approved substitute is an elementary 

workshop designed for this purpose; with 

five or more years of acceptable teaching 

experience, the approved substitutes are 

the elementary workshop of 6 semester 

hours in education courses approved by 

the certification office.) 

If the applicant is eligible for the T-4 certificate in another field, 

the field of Elementary Grades may be added by establishing 

credit for 18 semester hours in the teaching field and 3 semester 

hours in Elementary Methods. 



*At the present time, the holder of certification for Elementary Grades is permitted 
to teach in kindergarten, also. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 55 

Requirements for the Teacher's Professional Four-year (T-4) 
Certificate in Secondary Teaching Fields for Grades 7-12. 

A. Secondary Teaching Fields: 

1. English: 27 semester hours including grammar and com- 
position, and English and American literature, with a maxi- 
mum of 9 semester hours in such courses as speech, jour- 
nalism, reading, drama, and radio/TV. (3 semester hours 
in literature in the original or translation of a foreign lan- 
guage may be applied.) 

2. Foreign Languages: 

(a) Modern Languages — 24 semester hours for each lan- 
guage including grammar and composition, pronun- 
ciation and conversation, and literature. A maximum 
of 6 semester hours credit may be allowed for courses 
in history and culture or for competency acquired in 
high school or through residence in a foreign country. 

(b) A Second Foreign Language may be added on 18 se- 
mester hours of credit. 

NOTE: At Oglethorpe we are approved for certifica- 
tion in French only by the State Department of Educa- 
tion. 

3. Social Sciences: 30 semester hours including a minimum 
of 6 semester hours in American history and 6 semester 
hours in European history. The remaining 18 semester 
hours are to be selected from the following areas: govern- 
ment, political science, economics, sociology, anthropology 
and geography. 

4. Mathematics: 27 semester hours which may include a 
maximum of 6 semester hours in physics and which must 
include a minimum of 3 semester hours each in algebra, 
geometry and calculus. 

5. Science: 27 semester hours with a minimum of 6 semes- 
ter hours each in biology, chimestry and physics. 

B. Professional Education: 

18 semester hours which must include courses dealing with 
each of the following areas. 
Human Growth and (Educational Psychology, Adolescent Psy- 

Development Cur- chology, etc.) 

riculum and (Secondary Curriculum and Methods, Prin- 

Methods ciples of Secondary Education, etc.) 



56 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

(With at least one year of acceptable teach- 
Secondary Student ing experience, the approved substitutes 

Teaching or an ap- are the secondary workshop or 6 semester 

proved substitute hours in education courses approved by 
the certification office.) 

If the applicant is eligible for the T-4 certificate in another field, 
any secondary field for which the certification office evaluates 
may be added by establishing all requirements for the secondary 
teaching field. 

To ensure the orderly completion of the program, the major 
should consult with the appropriate faculty member in the depart- 
ment or division at the time of his first registration. It is important 
that each major have his program fully planned from the outset 
so that he may be aware of departmental and divisional require- 
ments and allowable substitutions and alternatives. Each major 
must complete the core requirements within the scope of their 
interpretation by responsible departmental or divisional advisors. 
In addition, each major must complete those departmental and 
divisional requirements as may apply to the specific degree. 

EDUCATION (ED) 

ED 390. Introduction to Education 3 hours 

A study of the historical development, philosophy, organization and basic 
issues underlying the American Educational System and the teaching pro- 
fession. Interpersonal theory of education is presented. Prerequisite: PS 140. 

ED 391. Elementary Curriculum 3 hours 

A course designed to assist elementary teachers in the construction of a 
curriculum for an individual school, or for a given grade or group of grades 
in that school. Prerequisite: ED 390, PS 342. 

ED 392. Materials and Methods of Teaching Reading, Language 

Arts and Social Studies 3 hours 

A course of methods and materials used in the language arts and social 
studies in the elementary grades. Prerequisite: ED 390, PS 342. 

ED 393. Materials and Methods of Teaching Elementary Science 

and Mathematics 3 hours 

A study of methods and materials used in teaching science and arithmetic 
in the elementary school. Prerequisite: ED 390, PS 342. 

ED 395. Secondary Curriculum 3 hours 

A study of the purposes and objectives of secondary education, overall 
curriculum-planning and development, and organization of content within 
subjects. Various prominent and experimental curricular patterns are ana- 
lyzed. Provision is made for regular classroom observation by the student 
in public high schools of the Atlanta area. Prerequisite: PS 342, ED 390. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 57 

ED 396. Secondary School Methods and Materials 3 hours 

A course designed to help prospective teachers develop varying methods 
and techniques of instruction appropriate to the nature of their subject, 
their own capabilities, and the meeting of the demands of various student 
groups. Problems such as classroom control, motivation, and the pacing of 
instruction are studies. Regular observation in classrooms of the Atlanta- 
area public schools is continued. Extensive use is made of resource people 
from the public schools, from other departments within the College, the 
community, and other professional people. Prerequisite: Ed 395. 

ED 397. Elementary School Art 3 hours 

A course designed to study the fundamentals of art in the elementary 
school. Included is an extensive exploration of the various media and tech- 
niques appropriate for the elementary school teacher, as well as methods 
developing art appreciation in the classroom. Prerequisite: None. 

ED 398. Public School Music 3 hours 

A study of the fundamentals of music education, including methods and 
materials appropriate for teaching music in public school. Prerequisite: None. 

ED 339. Modern Arithmetic for Public Schools 3 hours 

(See the Mathematics Section, P. — , for a description of this course). 

ED 490. Special Topics in Elementary Education 3 hours 

A course given in connection with the student's active participation in 
student teaching in the public schools. Promising practices of elementary 
education are explored. Special problems such as teaching the gifted, the 
retarded, remedial reading techniques, and the uses of audio-visual materials 
are explored. Prerequisite: ED 391, ED 392, ED 393. 

ED 491. Special Topics in Secondary Education 3 hours 

A course given in connection with the student's active participation in 
student teaching in the public schools. Special problems such as remedial 
reading for secondary students, guidance, team-teaching techniques, and 
the use of programmed learning aids are studied. Prerequisite: ED 396. 

ED 492. Student Teaching and Seminar 12 hours 

A course requiring full-time participation in a school in the Atlanta area 
under the supervision of a qualified supervising teacher. This is designed to 
promote gradual introduction to responsible teaching, including participa- 
tion in the teacher's usual extra-curricular activities. A seminar on the Col- 
lege campus each week during the student teaching period is a part of the 
course. Prerequisite: ED 391, ED 392, ED 393 or ED 396. 

ED 493. Educational Psychology 3 hours 

A study of learning theory and its application to such problems as class- 
room control, the organization of learning activities, understanding individ- 
ual differences, and evaluating teaching and learning. Emphasis is given 
to factors which facilitate and interfere with learning. Prerequisite: ED 391, 
ED 392, ED 393 or ED 396. 

ED 394. Seminar in Problems of Education 3 hours 

A consideration of the basic concerns in education; the aims of the public 
schools, problems of curriculum-building, teaching methods, classroom 



58 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

organization, and professional problems of teachers. The specific area of 
credit to be offered in any given term will be announced in advance. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

ED 495-S. Teachers' Workshop (Elementary and Secondary Teachers 

in Service) 6 hours 

A workshop for teachers in service providing experience in theory and 
practice in elementary and secondary education. It is designed to meet the 
immediate and the projected needs of the participants, Laboratory experi- 
ence and research are provided in general areas (for example, art, music, 
modern mathematics, recent publications in the field, creativity in teaching, 
and the like). This course may fulfill requirements of the Georgia State 
Department of Education for renewal of teaching certificates or be used for 
6 semester hours of credit in lieu of student teaching. It can also be recog- 
nized for local increment purposes. Prerequisite: One year of teaching ex- 
perience in a public or private school. 

ED 499. Special Studies in Education Hours to be determined 

This is a special course in education. The specific topic will be announced 
later. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PE 140. Physical Education for Women 

This is a required course in physical education for women. This course 
has as its objective (a) groundwork of physical abilities and knowledge and 
(b) need of activity and knowledge of skills so that there is some carry-over. 
This course provides women with an opportunity to develop skill and under- 
standing in a variety of sports activities that will serve her throughout life. 
This course is for two (2) semesters. 

PE 141. Physical Education for Men 

This is a required course in physical education for men. This course has 
as its objective (a) groundwork of physical abilities and knowledge and (b) 
need of activity and knowledge of skills so that there is some carry-over. 
This course provides men with an opportunity to develop skill and under- 
standing in a variety of sports activities that will serve him throughout life. 
This course is for two semesters. 

PE 142. Health, Recreation and Physical Education 3 hours 

A study of health and recreation in the school and community. Health 
practices and the application of skills and techniques of physical education 
are considered. 

PE 143. Administration and Supervision of Physical Education 3 hours 

A course concerned with the administration, organization and supervision 
of elementary, secondary, and college programs in physical education. 

PE 144. Skills and Techniques in Physical Education 3 hours 

A course dealing with theory and practical application of all games and 
activities. Involved will be personal performance, along with practical teach- 
ing and coaching of individual and team sports. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

EDUCATION— ELEMENTARY 



59 



Freshman 



1st Semester 

SH 110 Speech ..... .... 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization .. 3 
MA 136 General Mathematics .___ 

or 
MA 137 Elementary Mathematics 3 

GS 130 Principles of Science 4 

Elementary Language Elective 3 

PE 140 PE— Women .. 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



2nd Semester 

CO 110 Writing 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization _ _ 3 

GS 131 Principles of Science 4 

PO 123 Government in the U.S.._. 3 
Elementary Language Elective 3 

PE 140 PE— Women .. 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



Sophomore 



LI 210 Intro, to Lit I ..3 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy __ __ 3 

Elective in Science 4 

Elective in Humanities 3 

PS 140 General Psychology 3 



16 



LI 211 Intro, to Lit II .. _ 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics . 3 

ED 390 Intro, to Education 3 

SO 141 Intro, to Sociology .. _ 3 

Directed Elective .. 3 



15 



Junior 



ED 391 Elem. Curr. Development 3 
ED 392 Materials & Methods of 

Teaching Elem. Reading , Lang. 

Arts and Soc. Studies 3 

PS 342 Child & Adolescent Psy. ... 3 

PE 142 Health, Recreation & PE_ 3 

HY 324 American History I _... . 3 



ED 393 Materials & Methods of 

Teaching Elem. Science & Math. 3 

HY 325 American History II _ 3 

ED 397 Elementary School Art ..... 3 

Electives 6 



15 



Senior 



ED 492 Student Teaching 
& Seminar 

ED 490 Special Topics in 
Elementary Education ._ 



12 



15 



ED 493 Educational Psychology _ 3 

Directed Electives 3 

Electives 9 



15 



60 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 
EDUCATION— SECONDARY 



MATHEMATICS 



Freshman 



1st Semester 

SH 110 Speech __ . 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I 3 

*MA 137 Elementary Math I .___ 3 
PS 140 General Psychology _ 3 

Foreign Language ._ 3 

iPE 140 PE — Women 
or 
+PE 141 PE— Men 



15 



2nd Semesier 

CO 110 Writing ___ _ 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II ._ 3 

*MA 138 Elementary Math II 3 

PO 123 Government in the U.S. _ 3 

Foreign Language 3 

tPE 140 PE — Women 

or 
+PE 141 PE— Men 



15 



Sophomore 



LI 210 Intro, to Lit I _ _ 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics __ 3 

MA 234 Mathematical Analysis I __ 3 

PY 280 Physics I _ 4 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy 3 



16 



LI 211 Intro, to Lit II .. .. 3 

MA 235 Mathematical Analysis II 3 

ED 390 Intro, to Education 3 

PY 281 Physics II _ _ 4 
SO 141 Intro, to Sociology 3 



16 



Junior 



MA 236 Intro, to College Geometry 3 
PS 342 Child & Adolescent Psy__ 3 
MA 337 Differential Equations _ _ 3 

ED 395 Secondary Curriculum 3 

Elective in Humanities 3 



15 



MA 483 Mathematical Probability 3 
ED 396 Secondary Math. & Mat. 3 

MA 338 Vector Analysis _ 3 

Elective in Science _ 4 

Elective 3 



16 



Senior 



ED 493 Educational Psychology . . 3 
MA 480 Advanced Algebra I _ _ 3 
MA 485 Mathematics Seminar 1 
Electives 9 



16 



ED 492 Student Teaching 
& Seminar 

ED 491 Special Topics in 
Sec. Education 



.12 

3 
15 



tTwo semesters of PE are required during student's college career. 
*First semester of Math may be Math 234 or 235 depending upon previous courses 
and preparation in mathematics. Additional courses will follow sequentially. 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

EDUCATION— SECONDARY 



61 



SCIENCE 
(Chemistry Concentration) 



Freshman 



1st Semester 

SH 110 Speech 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I 3 

CH 134 General Chemistry I __ 4 
MA 137 Elementary Math I 3 

Foreign Language _. 3 

PE 140 PE— Women 
or 
PE 141— PE— Men 



16 



2nd Semester 

CO 110 Writing .. .. 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization ll_. 3 
CH 135 General Chemistry II _. __ 4 
MA 138 Elementary Math II _. _ 3 
Foreign Language _ .. 3 

PE 140 PE— Women 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



Sophomore 



LI 210 Intro, to Lit I . ..3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics I 3 
CH 387 Organic Chemistry I _ _ 4 
PS 140 General Psychology .. . 3 
MA 234 Mathematical Analysis „.. 3 



16 



LI 211 Intro, to Lit II _ _.. 3 

CH 388 Organic Chemistry II 4 

PO 123 Government in the U.S. _ 3 
ED 390 Intro, to Education _ _ 3 
Elective 3 



16 



Junior 



PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy _ _ 3 
PS 342 Child & Adolescent Psy„ 3 

Bl 132 Biology I _ 4 

ED 395 Secondary Curriculum 3 

Elective in Humanities 3 



16 



SO 141 Intro, to Sociology __ _ 3 

Bl 133 Biology II .. .. 4 

ED 396 Secondary Meth. & Mat. __ 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



16 



Senior 



ED 493 Educational Psychology ____ 3 

CH 232 Elem. Quantitative Analysis 4 

PY 280 Physics I _ 4 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



17 



ED 492 Student Teaching 
& Seminar 

ED 491 Special Topics in 
Sec. Education 



12 
3 

15 



62 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 
EDUCATION— SECONDARY 



SCIENCE 
(Physics Concentration) 



Freshman 



1st Semester 

SH 110 Speech 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization ! ___. 3 

CH 134 General Chemistry I 4 

MA 137 Elementary Math I 3 

Foreign Language 3 

PE 140 PE— Women 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



15 



2nd Semester 

CO 110 Writing 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II __ 3 

CH 135 General Chemistry II 4 

MA 138 Elementary Math II _ _ 3 
Foreign Language 3 

*PE 140 PE— Women 
or 
*PE 14 PE— Men 



16 



Sophomore 



LI 210 Intro, to Lit I _ .... 3 

PY 280 Physics I 4 

MA 234 Mathematical Analysis I 3 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy 3 

PS 140 General Psychology 3 



15 



LI 211 Intro, to Lit II __ .. 3 

PY 281 Physics II _ .4 

MA 235 Mathematical Analysis I! 3 

PO 123 Government in the U.S 3 

ED 390 Intro, to Education 3 



16 



Junior 



EC 220 Principles of Economics __ 3 
ED 395 Secondary Curriculum ___- 3 
PS 342 Child & Adolescent Psy. _ 3 
PY 282 Electricity & Magnetism _ 3 

PY 381A Junior Physics Lab 1 

Elective in Humanities 3 



16 



ED 396 Secondary Meth. & Mat. I 3 

SO 141 Intro, to Sociology _ _ 3 

PY 380 Light and Optics _ 3 

PY 381B Junior Physics Lab _ . 1 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



16 



Senior 



ED 493 Educational Psy _ 3 

Bl 132 Biology I _. __ 4 

Elective in Physics 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



16 



ED 492 Student Teaching 
and Seminar 

ED 491 Special Topics in 
Sec. Education 



12 
. 3 
15 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

EDUCATION— SECONDARY 



63 



SCIENCE 
(Biology Concentration) 



Freshman 



1st Semester 

SH 110 Speech .. 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization __ _ 3 
Bl 132 Biology I _ ..4 
Foreign Language 3 

MA 137 Elem. Math . 3 

PE 140 PE— Women 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



2nd Semester 

CO 110 Writing .. 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II .. 3 
Bl 133 Biology II .. .. 4 

Foreign Language 3 

MA 138 Elem. Math _ 3 

PE 140 PE— Women 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



Sophomore 



LI 210 Intro, to Lit I 3 

CH 134 General Chemistry I _ _ 4 

Bl 385 Adv. Topics in Biology 4 

PS 140 General Psychology _. _ 3 
PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy _ __ 3 



17 



LI 211 Intro, to Lit II __ 3 

CH 135 General Chemistry II .. 4 

Bl 336 Adv. Topics in Biology II _ 4 

ED 390 Intro, to Education . 3 

PO 123 Gov. in the U.S. .. 3 



17 



Junior 



EC 220 Principles of Economics I 3 
PS 342 Child & Adolescent Psy .___ 3 
ED 395 Secondary Curriculum __ 3 

CH 387 Organic Chemistry 4 

PY 280 Physics I 4 



17 



Bl 433 Ecology _ _ 4 

SO 141 Intro, to Sociology 3 

ED 396 Secondary Meth. & Mat. __ 3 
CH 383 Organic Chemistry __ .. 4 
Elective in Humanities 3 



17 



ED 492 Student Teaching 
and Seminar 

ED 491 Special Topics in 
Sec. Education 



Senior 

ED 493 Educational Psychology _ 3 

12 Bl 430 General Physiology _ _ 4 

Elective 3 

3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



16 



64 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 
EDUCATION— SECONDARY 



SOCIAL STUDIES 



Freshman 



1st Semester 

SH 110 Speech ___. _ 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I .... 3 
MA 137 Elementary Math . . 3 

GS 130 Principles of Science 4 

Foreign Language ._ 3 

PE 140 PE— Women 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



2nd Semester 

CO 110 Writing _ 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II __ 3 

PO 123 Government in the U.S 3 

GS 131 Principles of Science 4 

Foreign Language 3 

PE 140 PE— Women 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



Sophomore 

LI 210 Intro, to Lit I _ 3 LI 211 Intro, to Lit II _ _ 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics I 3 SO 141 Intro, to Sociology 3 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy _ _ 3 ED 390 Intro, to Education __._. .. 3 

PS 140 General Psychology 3 Elective in Science 4 

PO 223 Comparative Government 3 Elective 3 



15 



16 



ED 395 Secondary Curriculum .. 
HY 324 American History I _ 
PS 342 Child & Adolescent Psy. 
European History Elective __. 
Political Studies Elective 



Junior 

3 ED 396 Secondary Meth. & Mat. _ 3 

3 HY 320 American History II ..3 

3 PO 326 International Relations __ 3 

_ 3 European History Elective 3 

3 Political Studies Elective .. 3 

15 15 



Senior 



ED 493 Educational Psychology .... 3 

Elective in Humanities 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



ED 492 Student Teaching 

and Seminar 12 

ED 491 Special Topics in 

Sec. Ed. 3 



15 



15 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

EDUCATION— SECONDARY 



65 



ENGLISH 



Freshman 



1st Semester 

SH 110 Speech 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I 3 

MA 136 General Mathematics 

or 

MA 137 Elem. Math. ._ _ 3 

GS 130 Principles of Science ... .. 4 

Foreign Language 3 

PE 140 PE— Women 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



2nd Semester 

CO 110 Writing __ _ 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II .. 3 
GS 131 Principles of Science _ . 4 
PO 123 Government in the U.S. ... . 3 
Foreign Language _. .. 3 

PE 140 PE— Women 
or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



Sophomore 



LI 210 Intro, to Lit I _ 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics ._ 3 

PS 140 Gen. Psychology 3 

LI 231 American Literature I 3 

Elective in Science 4 



16 



LI 211 Intro, to Lit II .. .. 3 

LI 214 American Literature II 3 

ED 390 Introduction to Education 3 

SO 141 Intro, to Sociology 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Junior 



PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy __ _ 3 

ED 395 Secondary Curriculum _. 3 

LI 212 Advanced Grammar 3 

PS 342 Child & Adolescent Psy. „ 3 

HU 310 Greek Adjustment 3 



15 



ED 396 Secondary Meth. & Mat..... 3 

LI 316 History of the Eng. Lang 3 

LI 414 Twentieth Century Prose _ 3 
Elective 3 

HU 311 Medieval Synthesis 3 



15 



Senior 



ED 492 Student Teaching 
and Seminar 

ED 491 Special Topics in 
Sec. Ed. 



.12 



15 



ED 493 Educational Psychology .___ 3 

LI 411 Shakespeare _____ _ 3 

Elective 3 

HU 312 Modern Temper __ _ 3 

Elective 3 



15 



66 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



EDUCATION— SECONDARY 



FRENCH 



Freshman 



1st Semester 



SH 110 Speech _. 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I _ 3 

*FR 215 Int. French I _ 3 

MA 136 General Math _ 3 

or 
MA 137 Elementary Math 

GS 130 Principles of Science 4 

PE 140 PE— Women 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



2nd Semester 



CO 110 Writing 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II __ 3 

*FR 216 Int. French II _ 3 

PO 123 Government of the U.S. _ 3 

GS 131 Principles of Science 4 

PE 140 PE— Women 

or 
PE 141 PE— Men 



16 



16 

Sophomore 

LI 210 Int. to Lit I 3 LI 211 Int. to Lit II 3 

FR 317 French Culture & Civil 3 FR 318 History of the French Lang. 3 

PS 140 Gen. Psychology 3 SO 141 Int. to Sociology 3 

Bl 131 Biology I 4 ED 390 Int, to Education __ _ 3 

or GE 115 Elementary German II .___ 3 

CH 134 Chemistry I or 

GE 114 Elementary German I 3 SP 117 Elementary Spanish II 

or - — 

SP 116 Elementary Spanish I 15 

16 



Junior 

EC 220 Principles of Economics ._ 3 ED 396 Secondary Meth. & Mat. . 3 

ED 395 Secondary Curriculum 3 FR 361 Survey of French Lit. II _ 3 

FR 360 Survey of French Lit. I ___ 3 PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy .. . 3 

PS 342 Child & Adolescent Psy. ._. 3 Elective .. 3 

Elective in Humanities 3 Elective 3 



15 



15 



Senior 

ED 493 Educational Psychology .... 3 ED 492 Student Teaching 

Directed Elective (French*) 3 and Seminar __ 12 

Directed Elective (French*) .... 3 FR 419 Applied Linguistics and 

Elective 3 Methods of Language Teaching 3 

Elective 3 — 

— 15 

15 

*First semester of French may be French 112, 113, 215, 217 or 317. depending upon 
acceptable language compentency acquired through previous training or residence in 
a country where French is spoken. Additional courses in the language will follow 
sequentially. 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

To ensure the orderly completion of the program, the major 
should consult with the appropriate faculty member in the depart- 
ment or division at the time of his first registration. It is impor- 
tant that each major have his program fully planned from the 
outset so that he may be aware of departmental and divisional 
requirements and allowable substitutions and alternatives. Each 
major must complete the core requirements within the scope of 
their interpretation by responsible departmental or divisional ad- 
visors. In addition, each major must complete those department- 
al and divisional requirements as may apply to the specific degree. 

MAJOR IN ENGLISH & AMERICAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



Freshman 



1st Semester 



2nd Semester 



CO 110 Intro, to Writing __ _ 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I 3 

Principles of Science I 4 

General Math 3 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 



16 



* Principles of Science II .. 4 

Foreign Language II 3 

LI 214 American Literature II .. __ 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



16 



Sophomore 
Science Elective 4 SH 110 Intro, to Speech 



Foreign Language I 3 

**LI 213 American Literature I ____ 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



16 



HY 121 Western Civilization II 3 

PO 123 Government of the U.S. _ 3 

*PS 140 Intro, to Psychology 3 

Elective 3 

Physical Education ___ 



15 



Junior 



*EC 220 Principles of Economics 4 

Greek Adjustment 3 

LI 212 Advanced Grammar 3 

Elective in Literature .____ 3 

Elective 3 



16 



Principles of Philosophy .. 3 

Medieval Synthesis _ 3 

LI 316 History of the English 

Language 3 

Elective in Literature 3 

Elective 3 



15 



*For other choices see the core program. 
**The courses in italic are required for majors in this field. 



68 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Senior 

Modern Temper 3 LI 412 Shakespeare 3 

LI 413 Twentieth Century Prose .... 3 LI 414 Twentieth Century Poetry _. 3 

Elective in Literature 3 Elective in Literature 3 

Elective in Literature 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

15 15 

COURSES IN ENGLISH AND HUMANITIES 

CO 110. Introduction to Writing 3 hours 

A course providing exercise in the collection, organization, and written 
presentation of academic material. No prerequisite. 

SH 110. Introduction to Speech 3 hours 

A course of study dealing with practical exercise in applied speech. Stu- 
dents are required to organize, research and present speeches of various 
lengths. No prerequisite. 

LI 210-211. Introduction to Literature I, II 3+ hours 

A study of the major English writers and of certain ancient and modern 
writers who have influenced them. 

LI 212. Advanced Grammar 3 hours 

A course using both the classical and linguistic approaches to English 
grammar. Prerequisite, CO 110. 

LI 213. American Literature I 3 hours 

An examination of the shape of our national literature from its begin- 
nings to the 1850's, with special emphasis on Hawthorne and Melville. Pre- 
requisite, CO 110. 

LI 214. American Literature II 3 hours 

Principally a study of Whitman, Dickinson, James, Howells. and Crane. 
Prerequisite, CO 110. 

HU 310. The Greek Adjustment 3 hours 

A study of the human and social balance as found in the Greek myths, in 
Homer and in Sophocles, in the architecture and sculpture of such temples 
as the Parthenon. Prerequisite, CO 110. 

HU 311. The Medieval Synthesis 3 hours 

A study of the unity seen in great works of the Middle Ages — Dante. 
Aquinas, the great cathedrals — a unity disturbed by the new forces of the 
Renaissance ushering in our own day. Prerequisite, HU 310. 

HU 312. The Modern Temper 3 hours 

An inquiry into the direction of modern man, toward unity or chaos, 
through a study of his art and literature. Prerequisite, HU 311. 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 69 

LI 311. Romantic Literature 3 hours 

A course dealing with prose and poetry of the early 19th century as in- 
spired by nature and man's inmost feelings. 

LI 312. Victorian Literature 3 hours 

A study concerned with the fact that the writers of the 19th century after 
1832 first faced the problem of our day — a world confused by the dominat- 
ing surge of science and industry. The literature shows all from the cry of 
despair to unbounded hope. 

LI 316. History of the English Language 3 hours 

A course showing the development of our most expressive art from the 
early Old English period to the present as affected by historical and linguistic 
forces. Prerequisite, LI 212. 

LI 368. Seventeenth Century Literature 3 hours 

A study of the literature of the 1600's, with emphasis on John Donne and 
John Milton. 

LI 369. Eighteenth Century Literature 3 hours 

A study of the literature from 1660-1800 with emphasis on Swift, Pope, 

Thomson, Burns, and Blake and on the key ideas that found translation in 
the comptemporary world. 

LI 410. Medieval Literature 3 hours 

A study of the major writers in Middle English, with emphasis on Chaucer. 

LI 411. Renaissance Literature 3 hours 

A survey of English Renaissance literature (excluding Shakespeare's plays), 
with reference to Continental influences. 

LI 412. Shakespeare 3 hours 

Shakespeare's major plays examined as literary and theatrical documents, 
with an emphasis on historical criticism. 

LI 413. Twentieth Century Prose 3 hours 

Designed for senior English majors, this course emphasizes the work of 
Joyce, Lawrence, Faulkner and Hemingway and examines a few of the more 
recent novelists such as Powell and Malamud. 

LI 414. Twentieth Century Poetry 3 hours 

A study of key figures in the poetic revolution of the early twentieth cen- 
tury — such as Yeats, Stevens, Pound, and Eliot — against the more tradi- 
tional techniques of Hardy, Frost, and Graves, with an attempt to observe 
influences on and new departures by poets at mid-century — including Hart 
Crane, Auden, Roethke, Thomas, Lowell, and selected new poets. 



A major in English and American Literature consists of the completion of 
courses LI 212, 213, 214, 316, 412; either 413 or 414; and five other 
literature courses. 

In order to satisfy the Humanities requirement of the core program, a 
student majoring in English should take HU 310, 311, 312. 



-■M'jMm 








A 




72 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



FRENCH (FR) 

Freshman 



1st Semester 

SH 110 Intro, to Speech .. 3 

FR 112 Elementary French I .. 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I _ .3 

Psychology or Sociology 3 

Science 4 



16 



2nd Semester 

CO 110 Intro, to Writing _ _ 3 

FR 113 Elementary French II 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II 3 

Mathematics 3 

Science 4 



16 



Sophomore 



FR 215 Intermediate French I ____ 3 
Humanities Sequence I or 

English Literature 3 

PO 123 Government of the 

United States .. 3 

Science 4 

Elective 3 



16 



FR 216 Intermediate French II 3 

Humanities Sequence II 

or English Literature _ 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics _ 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Junior 



*FR 317 French Culture and 

Civilization . 3 

*FR 360 Survey of French 

Literature I 3 

FR 419 Applied Linguistics .. 3 

Humanities Sequence III 

or Music 3 

Elective 3 



15 



*FR 318 History of the French 

Language 3 

*FR 361 Survey of French 

Literature II 3 

Philosophy 3 

English Literature or Language ..__ 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Senior 



*FR 416 17th Century French 

Literature 3 

*FR 319 Advanced French 

Grammar 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



*FR 417 18th Century French 

Literature 3 

*FR 418 19th Century French 

Literature 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



^Asterisks indicate courses whose only prerequisite is 216 Intermediate French II 
which can be taken in any order. 



and 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 73 

FRENCH (FR) 

FR 112, 113 Elementary French I, II 

A course in beginning college French designed to present a sound founda- 
tion in understanding, speaking, reading and writing contemporary French. 
The student spends three hours in the classroom and a minimum of one 
hour in the laboratory. Prerequisite, none for 112; 112 required for 113. 

FR 215, 216 Intermediate French I, II 

A short review of grammar and usage accompanied by readings in 20th 
century literature. Opportunity for aural-oral training is furnished in the 
classroom and laboratory. The students spend a minimum of one hour in 
the laboratory and three hours in the classroom per week. Prerequisite, 
113 or equivalent for 215; 215 required for 216. 

FR 317 French Culture and Civilization 

A study of the geographical, historical, economic, social, and cultural 
factors that make an understanding of France and its civilization possible. 
Carefully selected topics will serve as a basis of classroom discussion. 
Prerequisite, FR 216. 

FR 318 A Short History of the French Language 

A course consisting of lectures and discussion periods acquainting the 
student with the development of the French language from its pre-Latin 
origins to modern form. Prerequisite, FR 216. 

FR 319 Advanced French Grammar and Composition 

A thorough review of grammar and usage from the point of view of French 
linguists. Written as well as oral work will be stressed. Prerequisite, FR 216. 

FR 360, 361 Survey of French Literature I, II 

A study of French literature from the 17th century to the present. Read- 
ings from representative authors are analyzed in the context of their re- 
spective literary and historical periods with special emphasis on the 20th 
century. Prerequisite, FR 216. 

FR 416 Seventeenth Century Literature 

A study of the classical period with special emphasis on the plays of 
Corneille, Racine, and Moliere. Prerequisite, FR 216. 

FR 417 Eighteenth Century Literature 

A study of the Age of the Enlightenment, with special emphasis on Mon- 
tesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Marivaux. Prerequisite, FR 216. 

FR 418 Nineteenth Century Literature 

A course consisting of a series of lectures and discussions stressing the 
works of Stendhal, Flaubert, and Balzac against the background of the 
major literary movements of the century. Prerequisite, FR 216. 

FR 419 Applied linguistics and Methods of Language Teaching 

A brief study of the morphology, phonology, and syntax of the French 
language and of the application of the linguistic principles to language 
teaching. Instruction is provided in the use of the laboratory and in the 
preparation of materials. Prerequisite, FR 216. 

(This course, open to all students with a thorough preparation in French, 
is designed mainly for those who want to go into language teaching. It will 



74 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

be given under the joint auspices of the language and education depart- 
ments.) 

GERMAN (GE) 

GE 114, 115 Elementary German 1, II 

A course in beginning college German designed to develop the ability to 
understand, speak, read, and write contemporary German. The student 
spends three hours in the classroom and a minimum of one hour in the 
laboratory. Prerequisite, none for GE 114; GE 114 for GE 115. 

GE 217, 218 Intermediate German I, II 

A thorough review of the basic principles of German coupled with an 
introduction to 20th century literature. Student expression in the foreign 
language will be stressed in writing and reading. Prerequisite, GE 115 or 
equivalent for 217; 217 for 218. 

SPANISH (SP) 

SP 116, 117 Elementary Spanish I, II 

An elementary course in understanding, reading, writing and speaking 
contemporary Spanish, with emphasis on Latin American pronunciation and 
usage. Prerequisite, none for 116; 116 for 117. 

SP 260, 261 Intermediate Spanish I, II 

A short review of grammar and usage accompanied by selected readings 
in Spanish literature. Aural-oral training is emphasized. Prerequisite, SP 
117 or equivalent for 260; 260 for 261. 

PHILOSOPHY (PH) 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

SH 110 Intro, to Speech 3 CO 110 Intro, to Writing 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I ______ 3 HY 121 Western Civilization ll______ 3 

PS 140 Intro, to Psychology 3 PO 123 Government of the U. S.____ 3 

Mathematics 3 EC 220 Principles of Economics.— 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

Physical Education Physical Education 

16 16 

Sophomore 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy _ 3 PH 267 Ethics _ ._ 3 

Science 4 PH 365 Formal Logic 3 

*HU 310 Greek Adjustment 3 *HU 311 Medieval Synthesis __. _3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

16 15 



*For other choices, see core program. 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 75 

Junior 

*HU 312 Modern Temper 3 PH 363 History of Philosophy IL_ 3 

PH 362 History of Philosophy 13 PH 463 Existentialism _. _ 3 

PH 364 Philosophy of Science 3 Directed Elective 3 

Directed Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

15 15 

Senior 

PH 460 Philosophy of Religion __ 3 PH 461 Philosophy of History 3 

PH 464 Epistemology 3 PH 462 Metaphysics _ 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

15 15 



PHILOSOPHY (PH) 

PH 266 Introduction to Philosophy 

Introduces the student to the most basic terms, concepts, and methods 
of the philosophical enterprise. Especial emphasis is placed on the incon- 
sistent character of most "common sense" belief systems. Prerequisite, none. 

PH 267 Ethics 

A systematic treatment of the more important ethical systems of the past 
and an attempt to provide the student with a framework for attacking the 
pressing ethical questions of our time. 

PH 362, 363 History of Philosophy I, II 

A study of the major philosophical systems of the Western world, from 
the pre-Socratics to Russell and Whitehead. Prerequisite, PH 266. 

PH 364 Philosophy of Science 

An attempt to delineate the major problems of scientific methodology 
and an examination of the presuppositions of scientific inquiry. Prerequisite, 
266. 

PH 365 Formal Logic 

Provides the student with the basic methods of differentiating between 
valid and invalid forms of argument. Both the traditional techniques and the 
newer "symbolic" methods are introduced. Prerequisite, none. 

PH 460 Philosophy of Religion 

An inquiry into the general subject of religion from the philosophical point 
of view. The course will seek to analyze concepts such as God, holy, sal- 
vation, worship, creation, sacrifice, eternal life, etc., and to determine the 
nature of religious utterances in comparison with those of everyday life, 
scientific discovery, morality, and the imaginative expression of the arts. 
Prerequisite, PH 266. 



*For other choices, see core program. 



76 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

PH 461 Philosophy of History 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the concepts and prob- 
lems of the understanding of historical events. Classical systems will be 
reviewed, and the student will be encouraged to develop his own method 
of approach. Prerequisite, 120, 121, PH 266. 

PH 462 Metaphysics 

A survey of the major metaphysical systems and the root problems which 
give rise to each. Prerequisite, PH 266. 

PH 463 Existentialism 

An interpretative and critical analysis of the philosophy of "Existenz." The 
reading of writings by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger and others is ac- 
companied by interpretive discussion and the consideration of related philoso- 
phical questions. Prerequisite, PH 266. 

PH 464 Epistemology 

A study of the origins, structure, and validity of knowledge, and an at- 
tempt to clarify the relationship of epistemology to logic, metaphysics, and 
psychology. Prerequisite, PH 266. 

RELIGION (RE) 

The program in the Department of Religion is designed to acquaint the 
student with the major religious movements of the world and to enable him 
to appreciate and evaluate critically and meaningfully these traditions in 
the light of the scholarship of both the past and the present. No Major is 
offered in Religion. 

RE 110. Old Testament Literature and History 3 hours 

Patterns of religious thought and organization, social customs, political 
and cultural influences as reflected in the literature of ancient Israel. 

RE 111. New Testament Literature and History 3 hours 

Patterns of religious thought and organization, political and cultural influ- 
ences reflected in the literature of the early Christian movement. 

RE 210. Religions of Mankind (World Religion) 3 hours 

History, doctrines, and interpretation of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, 
Confucianism, Shinto, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. 

RE 310 Patterns of Contemporary Religious Thought 3 hours 

Current religious trends, methodologies, faith-reason relationships, and 
concepts of culture in such writers as Barth, Ti Mich, Bonhoeffer and Neibuhr. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 

To ensure the orderly completion of the program, the major 
should consult with the appropriate faculty member in the depart- 
ment or division at the time of his first registration. It is important 
that each major have his program fully planned from the outset 
so that he may be aware of departmental and divisional require- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



77 



merits and allowable substitutions and alternatives. Each major 
must complete the core requirements within the scope of their 
interpretation by responsible departmental or divisional advisors. 
In addition, each major must complete those departmental and 
divisional requirements as may apply to the specific degree. 

BIOLOGY (Bl) 



Freshman 



First Semester 

CO 110 Intro, to Writing _ 3 

HY 120 Western Civ. I 3 

Bl 132 Biology or 230 Botany 4 

MA 137 Mathematics 3 

PS 140 Gen. Psychology 3 

Physical Education 



16 



Second Semester 

SH 110 Introd. to Speech ... .. 3 

HY 121 Western Civ. II _ _ 3 

Bl 133 Biology or 231 Botany 4 

MA 138 Mathematics __ ._ 3 

SO 141 Intro, to Sociology 3 

Physical Education 



16 



Sophomore 



LI 210 Intro, to Literature __ .. 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics L 3 

CH 134 General Chemistry I 4 

Directed Biology Elective 4 

Directed Biology Elective 4 



18 



LI 211 Intro, to Literature .. 
Literature or Music 

CH 135 General Chemistry II _ 
Directed Biology Elective ____ . 
PO 123 Government of the U. S. 



. 3 

3 
. 4 
. 4 

3 

17 



Junior 



PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy __. __ 3 

PY 280 Physics I 4 

CH 387 Organic Chemistry I 4 

General Elective 3 

Directed Biology Elective 4 



18 



PY 281 Physics II _ _ 4 

CH 388 Organic Chemistry ll_ .. 4 

General Elective 3 

General Elective 3 

Directed Biology Elective _ 4 

18 



Senior 



Directed Biology Elective 4 

Quant. Analysis or Biochem. 4 

Directed Biology Elective 4 

General Elective 3 

Foreign Language 3 



Directed Biology Elective 4 

Directed Biology Elective 4 

General Elective 3 

General Elective 3 

Foreign Language 3 



18 



17 



78 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

BIOLOGY (Bl) 

Bl 132, 133. Biology I, II 4-4 hours 

An introduction to the plant and animal kingdom. The course includes 
the basic principles of biology with an emphasis on structure function, and 
the relationships of plants and of animals to one another and to their en- 
vironments. Laboratory and lecture. Prerequisite: None for 132; 132 re- 
quired for 133. 

Bl 230, 231. Botany 4 + 4 hours 

An introduction to the plant kingdom, with an emphasis on structure, 
function, phylogenetic relationships and classification. Lectures and labora- 
tory. No prerequisite for 230; 230 required for 231. 

Bl 330. Genetics 4 hours 

An introduction to the study of inheritance. The classical patterns of 
Mendelian inheritance are related to the control of metabolism and develop- 
ment. Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite: Biology I, II or Botany 1,11. 

Bl 331. Developmental Anatomy 4 hours 

An intensive study of the embryonic development of selected vertebrate 
types. Also, a study of vertebrate structure and organ functions in relation 
to evolution and development. The laboratory compromises the study of 
developmental anatomy of selected vertebrate types. Prerequisite: Biology 
132, 133. 

Bl 430. Advanced Biology Seminar 3 hours 

An introduction to biological literature. Through reading and reporting 
original papers, the student is led through the development of ideas basic to 
biology. Lecture-discussion only. Prerequisite: Botany 230, 231 or Biology 
132, 133 and one additional biology course. Permission of instructor re- 
quired. 

Bl 433. Ecology 4 hours 

A course dealing with the relationships between individual organisms 
and their environments. The emphasis is on the development of populations 
and interactions between populations and their physical environments. Lec- 
tures and laboratory. Prerequisite: 132, 133. 

Bl 431. Animal Physiology 4 hours 

A detailed analysis of animal functions that deals primarily with the inter- 
actions involved in the operation of complex animal systems. Lectures and 
laboratory. Prerequisite: 132, 133. 

Bl 332. Microbiology 4 hours 

An introduction to the biology of viruses, bacteria, algae, and fungi. Con- 
sideration is given to phylogenetic relationships, taxonomy, physiology, and 
economic or pathogenic significance of each group. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Botany 230, 231 or Biology 132, 133. 

Bl 385, 386. Advanced Topics in Biology 4-^4 hours 

Advanced course and laboratory work in selected areas of biology. Lab- 
oratory and lectures. Prerequisite: Biology 132, 133 or Botany 230, 231. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



79 



CHEMISTRY (CH) 



Freshman 



CO 110 Intro, to Writing „ __ 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I 3 

CH 134 General Chemistry I .. _ 4 

MA 137 Elementary Math I _ _ 3 

PS 140 General Psychology 3 

Physical Education 

16 



SH 110 Intro, to Speech 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II 3 

CH 135 General Chemistry II 4 

MA 138 Elementary Math II 3 

PO 123 Government of the U. S. .... 3 
Physical Education 



16 



Sophomore 



LI 210 Intro, to Literature 3 

CH 387 Organic I 4 

PY 280 Physics I 4 

MA 234 Math Analysis I 3 



14 



CH 388 Organic II .... .... 4 

PY 281 Physics II .. 4 

MA 235 Math Analysis II 3 

Elective 3 



14 



Junior 



CH 232 Elem. Quant. Analysis 4 

EC 220 Principles of Economics I 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



CH 235 Physical Chemistry I 4 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy 3 

Foreign Language 3 

CH 434 Advanced Topics I 4 

Elective 3 



16 



17 



Senior 



Foreign Language 3 

CH 437-A Senior Research 2 

CH 336 Physical Chemistry II 4 

Ethics or Music Literature 3 

Elective 3 



CH 333 Anal. Chemistry 4 

CH 437-B Senior Research 2 

Foreign Language 3 

CH 435 Advanced Topics II 4 

Elective 3 



15 



16 



CHEMISTRY (CH) 

CH 134, 135. General Chemistry I, II 4 + 4 hours 

A study of the basic principles and theories of chemistry and the properties 
of elements and their compounds. In the second semester, part of the 
lecture time and all of the laboratory time is spent on qualitative analysis. 
Prerequisite: None. 

CH 232. Elementary Quantitative Analysis 4 hours 

A study of reactions and equilibia in acid-base and redox systems with 
emphasis on their applications in chemical analysis. Prerequisite: 134, 135. 



80 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

CH 333. Analytical Chemistry 4 hours 

A continuation of course 232 on a more advanced level. The use of com- 
plexes, ion exchange resins, spectrophotometry, electrolysis, and polarog- 
raphy are considered in some detail. Prerequisite: 232, 335. 

CH 335, 336. Physical Chemistry I, II 4 — 4 hours 

A comprehensive study of the physico-chemical properties of matter. The 
course includes a critical examination of the laws of thermodynamics, kinet- 
ics, and electrochemistry as applied to chemical reaction. Prerequisite: 134, 
135, 137, 234. 

CH 387, 388. Organic Chemistry I, II 4-4 hours 

An introductory course in the principles and theories of organic chemistry. 
Laboratory work involves the preparation of simple compounds and the 
identification of functional groups. Prerequisite: 134, 135. 

CH 434, 435. Advanced Topics in Chemistry I, II 4-4 hours 

Advanced topics will be offered in the fields listed below. ADVANCED 
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Selected topics in organic chemistry are discussed 
including resonance and molecular orbital concepts, reaction mechanisms, 
and conformational analysis. Prerequisite: 335, 336, 387, 388. 

ORGANIC QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. The study of the characterization and 
systematic identification of organic compounds including the application of 
ultraviolet, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prere- 
quisite.- 387, 388. 

BIOCHEMISTRY. The study of biochemical systems and the nature of the 
reactions which take place in living tissues. The functions of enzymes, 
vitamins, and hormones in controlling these reactions are discussed. Pre- 
requisite: 335, 336, 387, 388. 

THEORETICAL CHEMISTRY. A continuation of courses 335, 336 in breadth 
and depth. Emphasis is placed on quantum chemistry, statistical thermo- 
dynamics and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: 333, 335, 336. 

ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Selected topics in inorganic chem- 
istry, including structure, bonding, reaction mechanisms, reaction kinetics, 
and properties of groups of elements in the periodic table. Prerequisite: 
134, 135, 335, 336. 

CH 437. Senior Research in Chemistry I, II 2 + 2 hours 

Original investigations and detailed literature studies of selected problems 
in some branch of chemistry. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MATHEMATICS (MA) 

Freshman 

First Semester Second Semester 

MA 137 Elem. Mathematics I 3 MA 138 Elem. Mathematics II. _ 3 

CO 110 Intro, to Writing .. _____ 3 Sp 110 Intro, to Speech .. _ 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I 3 HY 121 Western Civilization ll_ _ 3 

CH 134 General Chemistry I ... .___. 4 CH 135 General Chemistry II.... 4 

Language Elective 3 Language Elective 3 

P. E. 140-P. E. 141 P. E. 140-P. E. 141 

16 16 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 81 

Sophomore 

PY 201 Physics I _. _ 4 PY 202 Physics II _ 4 

MA 234 Mathematical Analysis I 3 MA 235 Mathematical Analysis II 3 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy 3 PO 123 Government of U. S 3 

Humanities Elective 3 Humanities Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

16 16 

Junior 

PH 283 Mechanics I _ 3 PH 284 Mechanics II _ .... 3 

MA 337 Diff. Equations ..... 3 MA 338 Vector Analysis ... .. 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics ... 3 PS 140 General Psychology ... .. 3 

PH 365 Formal Logic 3 Elective 3 

MA 480 Advanced Algebra I or MA 481 Advanced Algebra II or 

MA 438 Mathematical Anal. Ill 3 MA 439 Math. Analysis III _ 3 

15 15 

Senior 

MA 480 Advanced Algebra I or MA 481 Advanced Algebra II or 

MA 438 Mathematical Anal. Ill 3 MA 439 Math. Analysis III .. 3 

MA 483 Prob. and Statistics 3 MA 484 Elem. Computers ..... .. 3 

MA 485 Mathematical Seminar _. 1 BU 392 Statistics .. 3 

MA 236 College Geometry 3 Elective 3 

Directed Elective 3 Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 

16 



15 



MATHEMATICS (MA) 

MA 136. General Mathematics 3 hours 

A study of the basic ideas of mathematics. Emphasis is placed on the 
origin, logical structure, and meaning of mathematics, as well as on the 
development of modern technical skills. Prerequisite: None. 

MA 137, MA 138. Elementary Mathematics I, II 3 + 3 hours 

An intensive review of elementary mathematics, together with an intro- 
duction to the basic content, methods, and applications of the most impor- 
tant classical and modern branches of mathematics. Included are the basic 
algebraic structure of the real number system; functions; and theory of solu- 
tions of equations. Prerequisite: None for MA 137; MA 137 required for 
MA 138. 

MA 234, MA 235. Mathematical Aanalysis I, II 3 + 3 hours 

A course studying the basic ideas of analytical geometry, differential and 
integral calculus of functions, including the ideas of function, limit, con- 
tinuity, the derivative, and the integral. Prerequisite: MA 138 or equivalent 
for MA 234; MA 234 or equivalent required for MA 235. 

MA 236. Introduction to College Geometry 3 hours 

Foundations of Euclidian Geometry and introduction to non-Euclidian 
Geometries. Prerequisite: MA 136, MA 137, or MA 138. 



82 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

MA 337. Differential Equations 3 hours 

Theory, methods of solution, and application of ordinary differential equa- 
tions, along with an introduction to partial differential equations. Prerequi- 
site: MA 235. 

MA 338. Vector Analysis 3 hours 

Theory, methods of solution, and applications of Vector Analysis. Included 
is an introduction to vector differential geometry. Prerequisite: MA 235 or 
MA 337. 

MA 339. Modern Arithmetic for Public Schools 3 hours 

A study of the basic ideas of mathematics. Special emphasis is placed 
on the origin, logical structure, and meaning of mathematics, as well as on 
newer techniques of teaching arithmetic. Prerequisite: None. 

MA 438, MA 439. Mathematical Analysis III and IV 3 + 3 hours 

A rigorous treatment of the foundations of differential and integral cal- 
culus, using modern notations. Included are multiple, line surface integrals, 
infinite series and sequences, and improper integrals. Prerequisite: MA 337 
or equivalent required for MA 438; MA 438 required for MA 439. 

MA 480, MA 481. Advanced Algebra I, II 3 + 3 hours 

A course with emphasis on algebraic structure, including groups, rings, 
fields, integral domains, matrices, and linear transformations. Prerequisite: 
MA 235 required for MA 480; MA 480 required for MA 481. 

MA 301. Mathematical Probability and Statistics 3 hours 

A basic study of the mathematical theory of probability and statistics. 
Prerequisite: MA 235. 

MA 302. Elementary Computers 3 hours 

An elementary study of the theory of computers and their application in 
the solving of problems. Prerequisite: MA 137, MA 138, MA 234, MA 235. 

MA 485. Mathematics Seminar 1 hour 

A seminar providing the opportunity to practice preparing and delivering 
talks on mathematical subjects. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

MA 499. Special Studies in Mathematics 3 hours 

To be offered in the short semester. 

PHYSICS (PY) 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

MA 137 Elementary Math I 3 MA 138 Elementary Math II 3 

CO 110 Intro, to Writing 3 SP 110 Intro, to Speech 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I 3 HY 121 Western Civilization II 3 

CH 134 General Chemistry I 4 CH 135 General Chemistry II ______ 4 

GE 114 Elementary German I GE 115 Elementary German II 

or or 

FR 112 Elementary French I 3 FR 113 Elementary French II 3 

PE Physical Education — Women PE Physical Education — Women 

PE Physical Education — Men PE Physical Education — Men 

16 16 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



83 



Sophomore 

HU 310 Greek Adjustment 3 HU 311 Medieval Synthesis 3 

GE 217 Intermediate German I GE 218 Intermediate German II 

or or 

FR 215 Intermediate French I 3 FR 216 Intermediate French ||_ 3 

PY 280 Physics I 4 PY 281 Physics II ..4 

MA 234 Math Analysis I .. 3 MA 235 Math Analysis II .. .. 3 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy .. .. 3 PO 123 Government of the U.S. ._ 3 

Elective Elective 



16 



16 



Junior 



PY 283 Mechanics I 3 

PY 282 Electricity & Magnetism _. 3 

MA 337 Differential Equations 3 

PYA 381 Junior Physics Lab 1 

HU 312 Modern Temper .. 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics __ 3 



PY 284 Mechanics II 3 

PY 380 Light and Optics _ 3 

MA 338 Vector Analysis 3 

PYB 381 Junior Physics Lab 1 

PS 140 General Psychology 3 

Elective 3 



16 



16 



Senior 



PY 382 Heat & Thermodynamics .. 3 

PY 383 Atomic and Nuclear 3 

MA 438 Advanced Calculus I 3 

PY 487 Senior Physics Lab I 2 

MA 483 Mathematical Probability 

and Statistics 3 

PY 489 Senior Physics Seminar 



Elective 3 

PY 384 Atomic and Nuclear 3 

MA 439 Advanced Calculuc II 3 

PY 486 Classical Topics 2 

PY 488 Senior Physics Lab 3 

Py 489 Physics Seminar 



14 



14 



PHYSICS (PY) 



PY 200, PY 201. Physics I, II 4 + 4 hours 

An introductory course in physics concentrating on the fundamental 
aspects of mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity, and modern physics. 
Prerequisite: MA 137, MA 138 or equivalent required for PY 200; PY 200 or 
equivalent required for PY 201. 

PY 301. Electricity and Magnetism 3 hours 

An intermediate level course dealing with electric charge, fields, potential, 
D.C. and A.C. circuits, magnetic phenomena, and electromagnetic effects. 
Prerequisite: MA 234, MA 235, PY 200, PY 201. 

PY 304, PY 305. Mechanics I, II 3 + 3 hours 

An intermediate level course developing the fundamental concepts and 
principles of mechanics using calculus and vector notation. Prerequisite: 
MA 234, MA 235, MA 337 required for PY 304; PY 304 required for PY 305. 

PY 302. Light and Optics 3 hours 

A descriptive and mathematical study comprising fundamental principles 
of physical and geometrical optics. Prerequisite: PY 200, PY 201, PY 301. 



86 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

PY 300. Junior Physics Laboratory 1 + 1 hour 

Selected experiments from Physics. Prerequisite: PY 200, PY 201. 

PY 303. Heat and Thermodynamics 3 hours 

A descriptive and mathematical treatment of the fundamental heat con- 
cepts, gas laws, and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MA 234, MA 235, MA 
337, PY 200, PY 201. 

PY 400, PY 401. Atomic and Nuclear Physics I, II 3 + 3 hours 

An intermediate level study of atomic and nuclear structure and the be- 
havior of atomic and nuclear particles. Prerequisite.- PY 200, PY 201, MA 
234, MA 235, MA 337 required for PY 400; PY 400 required for PY 401. 

PY 402. Classical Topics in Theoretical Physics 3 hours 

Selected topics in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian concepts, quantum me- 
chanics, etc. Prerequisite: PY 304, PY 305, MA 337. 

PY 403, PY 404. Senior Physics Laboratory I, II 2 + 2 hours 

Selected experiments from modern physics. Prerequisite: PY 200, PY 201, 
MA 134, MA 135, MA 234, MA 235. 

PY 405. Senior Physics Seminar 1 + 1 hour 

A seminar providing the opportunity to practice preparing and delivering 
talks on scientific subjects. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

PY 499. Special Studies in Physics 3 hours 

To be offered in the short semester. 

PRE- AND POST-NURSING* (PN) 

First Year 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

CO 110 Writing Introduction 3 SH 110 Speech 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization 3 HY 121 Western Civilization 3 

MA 135 Mathematics 3 Philosophy Elective 3 

Social Studies Elective 3 Major-Directed Elective 3 

Science Elective 4 Science Elective 4 

16 16 

Second Year 

Literature Elective 3 Major-Directed Electives 9 

Major-Directed Courses 12 General Electives 6 

15 15 

GENERAL SCIENCE (GS) 

The course level is appropriate for students with a good background in 
algebra but minimal one in other sciences. Students with excellent prepara- 
tion in all the sciences should elect one of the regular sequences in science. 



*Upon completion of these courses, student will be eligible for the Bachelor of Science 
(B.S.) degree. Diploma from an accredited nursing school is also required. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 87 

GS 130. Principles of Science I 4 hours 

A laboratory course in physical science for non-science majors stressing 
the significant ideas common to all of the sciences. The first semester is 
concerned with the investigation of the properties of matter. Much of the 
learning process is accomplished through experiments carried out by the 
students. Considerable attention is given to interpretation of experimental 
observation and data. Laboratory, lecture and recitation. Prerequisie: None. 

GS 131. Principles of Science II 4 hours 

A continuation of Principles of Science I. The laboratory experiments are 
designed to illustrate available experimental evidence for the atomic structure 
of matter. Laboratory, lecture and recitation. Prerequisite: GS 130 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

GS 132. Enviromental Science 4 hours 

Enviromental physical science — a study of the physical situation in which 
man finds himself i.e. geology, astronomy, geophysics, space physics, etc. 
Laboratory or field trips will be included. Prerequisite: None. 



PRE-MEDICINE (PM) 

Freshman 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

CO 110 Intro, to Writing 3 SH 110 Intro, to Speech 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I _ 3 HY 121 Western Civilization II __._ 3 

MA 137 Elementary Math I 3 MA 138 Elementary Math II 3 

CH 134 General Chemistry I 4 CH 135 General Chemistry II 4 

General Psychology or Sociology __ 3 PO 123 Government of the U.S. ._ 3 

16 16 

Sophomore 

Bl 132 General Biology I 4 Bl 133 General Biology II 4 

CH 387 Organic Chemistry I 4 CH 388 Organic Chemistry 4 

Foreign Language I 3 Foreign Language II 3 

MA 438 Calculus I* or elective _ 3 MA 439 Calculus II* or elective.— 3 

14 14 

Junior 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy 3 

CH 232 Quantitative Analysis I _. 4 233 Quantitative Analysis II 4 

Elective 3 Music or Foreign Language 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Biology elective** 4 Biology elective** 4 

17 14 



♦Calculus is required by 10 of 96 medical colleges. 
**Embryology required by 11 schools of medicine, Genetics required by 5, and com- 
parative anatomy required by 4. 



88 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



Senior 



PY 280 Physics I _ 4 

LI 213 Americal Literature I 

__._(or other Lit. courses) 3 

Biology or general elective 4 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



17 



PY 281 Physics II .. 4 

LI 214 American Literature II 

(or other Lit. course) 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics.— 3 



16 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (MT) 



Freshman 



1st Semester 



CO 110 Intro, to Writing 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization I ______ 3 

CH 134 General Chemistry I 4 

PS 140 General Psychology 3 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 



16 



2nd Semester 



SH 110 Intro, to Speech 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II 3 

CH 135 General Chemistry II 4 

EC 220 Principles of Economics ___ 3 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 



16 



Sophomore 



LI 210 Intro, to Literature 3 

Bl 132 Biology I 4 

CH 387 Organic Chemistry I 4 

PY 280 Physics I 4 



15 



LI 211 Intro, to Literature 3 

Bl 133 Biology II 4 

CH 388 Organic Chemistry II 4 

PY 281 Physics II 4 



15 



Junior 



PH 266 Intor. to Philosophy _ _ 3 
CH 232 Elem. Quantitative Analysis 4 
Bl 430 General Physiology _____ _ 4 

PO 123 Government of the U.S. ____ 3 

Foreign Language 3 



17 



PH 267 Ethics 3 

Elective 3 

Bl 431 Animal Physiology 4 

Elective 3 

Foreign Language 3 



16 



Senior 

The following subjects are taken at a cooperating hospital during the senior 
year: 

Biochemistry Bacteriology Mycology 

Hematology Cytology Parasitology 

Serology Urinalysis Electrocardiology 

Histology Basal Metabolism 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

To ensure the orderly completion of the program, the major 
should consult with the appropriate faculty member in the de- 
partment or division at the time of his first registration. It is im- 
portant that each major have his program fully planned from the 
outset so that he may be aware of departmental and divisional 
requirements and allowable substitutions and alternatives. Each 
major must complete the core requirements within the scope of 
their interpretation by responsible departmental or divisional ad- 
visors. In addition, each major must complete those departmental 
and divisional requirements as may apply to the specific degree. 

HISTORY (HY) 



1st Semester 



Freshman 



CO 110 Intro, to Writing 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization 3 

PO 123 American Government ___. 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 3 



2nd Semester 



SH 110 Intro, to Speech .___ 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization 3 

Sociology or Psychology 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Elective 3 



15 



15 



Sophomore 



Science 4 

Philosophy 3 

HU 310 Humanities Sequence 3 

HY 324 American History 3 

EC 220 Principles of Economics ._ 3 



Science 4 

Political Science Elective 3 

HU 311 Humanities Sequence ___. 3 

HY 325 American History _ 3 

Elective 3 



16 



16 



Junior 



Science 4 

HU 312 Humanities Sequence ___. 3 
HY 320 Renaissance and 

Reformation 3 

PO 428 American Diplomatic 

History 3 

Elective 3 



16 



Elective 3 

Political Science Elective 3 

HY 321 Europe 1650-1815 _. .. 3 
HY 426 20th Century American 

History 3 

Elective 3 



15 



90 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Senior 

HY 322 Europe in the 19th Century 3 HY 323 Europe Since 1918 3 

HY 424 Civil War 3 HY 425 American Character 3 

Political Science Elective 3 Political Science Elective 3 

Political Science Elective 3 Elective 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

15 15 



HISTORY (HY) 

HY 120, 121. Western Civilization I, II 3 + 3 hours 

A course tracing the political, social, economic, and cultural developments 
of Western Civilization from its Graeco-Roman origins to the present. The 
first semester deals with the story from the beginnings to 1715; the second, 
from 1715 to the present. Prerequisite: None for 120; 120 required for 121. 

HY 320. The Renaissance and Reformation 3 hours 

A study of the significant changes in European art, thought, and institu- 
tions during the period from about 1300 to about 1600. Prerequisite: 120, 
121. 

HY 321. Europe 1650-1815 3 hours 

A course examining European society between the Reformation and the 
Napoleonic era. It will concern itself with the rise of the modern state, the 
economic revolution, constitutional monarchy, the Enlightenment, the Era 
of Revolution, and the Age of Napoleon. Prerequisite: 120, 121. 

HY 322. Europe in the Nineteenth Century 3 hours 

A study observing and analyzing the domestic and foreign policies of the 
major European powers in the period between the Congress of Vienna and 
the Paris Peace Conference following World War I. Prerequisite: 120, 121. 

HY 323. Europe since 1918 3 hours 

An examination of European history since World War I, giving particular 
attention to the rise of the Communist, Fascist, and National Socialist move- 
ments in Russia, Italy, and Germany. It will also treat of World War II and 
its aftermath. Prerequisite: 120, 121. 

HY 324. American History to 1865 3 hours 

A survey from colonial times to 1865, concerned mainly with the major 
domestic developments of a growing nation. Prerequisite: 120, 121. 

HY 325. American History Since 1865 3 hours 

A survey from 1865 to the present, concerned with the chief events which 
explain the growth of the United States to a position of world power. Pre- 
requisite: 324. 

HY 424. The Civil War and Reconstruction 3 hours 

A course for advanced history students giving detailed attention to the 
chief features of the wartime period and the major changes ushered in by 
it. Prerequisite: 324, 325. 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL STUDIES 



91 



HY 425. The American Character 3 hours 

An undergraduate seminar designed to explore the major questions relat- 
ing to how the national mind and character came to be formed. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

HY 426. Twentieth Century American History 3 hours 

The course deals with American history from the end of the nineteenth 
century until the present, emphasizing significant trends in economics, 
politics and social developments. Prerequisites: 123, 324, 325. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE (PO) 

Freshman 



1st Semester 

CO 110 Intro, to Writing 3 

HY 120 Western Civilization 3 

PO 123 American Government ___. 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 3 



2nd Semester 

SH 110 Intro, to Speech 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization __ .. 3 

Sociology or Psychology 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Elective 3 



15 



15 



Sophomore 



Science 4 



Philosophy 

HU 310 Humanities Sequence ____ 
PO 223 Comparative Government 
EC 220 Principles of Economics — 



3 
3 
3 
3 

16 



Science 4 

History elective 3 



HU 311 Humanities Sequence 
PO 326 International Relations 
PO 224 State and Local Gov. _ 



3 
3 

3 

16 



Junior 



Science 4 

HU 312 Humanities Sequence 3 

PO 328 European Political Thought 3 

HY 324 American History I 3 

Elective 3 



EC 221 Economics II 3 

Elective 3 

PO 328 American Political Thought 3 

HY 325 American History II 3 

Elective 3 



16 



15 



Senior 



HU 322 19th Century European 

History 3 

PO 474 Constitutional Law 3 

History Elective 3 

Elective 3 

PO 428 American Diplomatic 

History 3 



HY 323 20th Century European 

History 3 

PO 476 Public Administration 3 

PO 327 American Political 

Parties 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



15 



92 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

POLITICAL STUDIES (PO) 

PO 123. Government of the United States 3 hours 

A study of the characteristics and functions of the American political 
process, including a brief examination of American political posture in the 
world community. Prerequisite: 120, 121. 

PO 223. Comparative Government 3 hours 

An analytical study of the political traditions and the modern institu- 
tions of selected foreign countries, following logically a similar study of 
the government of the United States. The governments of Britain, France, 
and the Soviet Union will be given special emphasis. Prerequisite: 120, 121, 
123. 

PO 224. State and Local Government 3 hours 

A survey of the origin, development, and continuing problems of state and 
local government, with specific focus on the politics of the metropolis. Pre- 
requisite: 123. 

PO 326. International Relations 3 hours 

An examination of the major elements and persistent problems of world 
affairs, as well as the influences that bear upon them, within both the his- 
torical and contemporary setting. Prerequisite: 120, 121, 123, 223. 

PO 327. American Political Parties 3 hours 

A study in depth of the development of party alignments in the United 
States, together with an analysis of their sources of power, including political 
opinion. Prerequisite: 123. 

PO 328. European Political Thought 3 hours 

An examination of the continuing development of political theory from 
the time of Machiavelli to that of Jeremy Bentham, based on the writings of 
major political thinkers during that period. Prerequisite: 120, 121. 

PO 329. American Political Thought 3 hours 

A descriptive analysis of American political development from its roots in 
Europe to the present, drawing substantially from primary sources of political 
theorists and leaders, the great documents, laws, and judicial decisions. 
Prerequisite: 123, 324, 325. 

PO 428. Diplomacy of the United States 3 hours 

A study of the growth of the United States as a major factor in world 
affairs, beginning with the Spanish-American War. Significant developments 
in earlier related American policies will be covered. Prerequisite: 120, 121, 
123. 

PO 474. Constitutional Law 3 hours 

A study of the circuitious development of our organic law through an 
examination of the Supreme Court and its leading decisions. Prerequisite: 
123. 

PO 476. Public Administration 3 hours 

A survey of the basic principles and practices of public administration at 
the national, state, and local levels of government, with emphasis on per- 
sonnel management, financial administration, administrative law and regula- 
tions, and administrative responsibility. Prerequisite: 123. 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

PRELAW CURRICULUM (PL) 



93 



Freshman 



1st Semester 



CO 110 Intro, to Writing _ _ 3 
HY 120 Western Civilization I 3 

MA 136 Mathematics „ 3 

Science I 4 

SO 141 Sociology, Intro, to __ 3 
Physical Education 



16 



2nd Semester 



SH 110 Intro, to Speech _ _ 3 

HY 121 Western Civilization II.. 3 

PO 123 U.S. Government .. .. 3 

Science II .. 4 

SO 241 Social Problems _. _ 3 

Physical Education ... „ 



16 



Sophomore 



Foreign Language I 3 

Science III 4 

PH 266 Intro, to Philosophy .. _ 3 
PO 223 Comparative Government 3 
PS 140 General Psychology 3 



16 



Foreign Language II _ ..3 

EC 220 Economics _ 3 

PH 267 Ethics _ 3 

PO 224 State & Local Gov. .. .. 3 

BA 301 Statistics _ 3 



15 



Junior 



HU 310 Humanities I 3 

BA 203 Conceptual Foundations __ 4 

Foreign Language III 3 

343 Theories of Personality 3 

Elective 3 



16 



HU 311 Humanities II _ 3 

BA 101 Business Law .. 3 

Foreign Language IV 3 

PS 330 Abnormal Psychology 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Senior 



HU 312 Humanities III ..... 3 

HY 324 American History I 3 

SO 346 Criminology 3 

Directed Elective 3 

Elective 3 



PO 474 Const'l Law .. .. 3 

HY 325 American History II _ .. 3 

PH 365 Formal Logic . 3 

Directed Elective .. 3 

Elective 3 



15 



15 



THE FACULTY 
(As of Academic Year 1967-8.) 

Martin Abbott 

Professor of History 

A.B., Presbyterian College; A.M., Ph.D., Emory University 

Lucile Q. Agnew 

Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Furman University; A.M., Duke University 

Arthur Bieler 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A.B., New York University; A.M., Middleburg College; Docteur de I'Uni- 

versite (Paris) 

Leo Bilancio 

Associate Professor of History 

A.B., Knox College; A.M., University of North Carolina 

Patricia Bonner 

Instructor in Music 

A.B., Wesleyan College; M.Mus., New England Conservatory of Music 

Sandra T. Bowden 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Georgia Southern College; A.M., University of North Carolina 

Vandall K. Brock 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Emory University; A.M., M.F.A., State University of Iowa 

Wendell H. Brown 

Professor of Humanities 

B.S., University of Puget Sound; A.M., Columbia University 

Billy W. Carter 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Basketball Coach 

and Director of Athletics 
A.B., Oglethorpe College; A.M., George Peabody College for Teachers 

Elaine G. Dancy 

Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., A.M., University of South Carolina 



96 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Harry M. Dobson 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Institute of Musical Arts, N. Y.; Study in Berlin, Fontainebleau, London 

William A. Egerton 

Professor of Business Administration 

Lloyd J. Elliott 

Associate Professor of Economics 

B.S., St. Mary's University; M.B.A., University of Houston; Ph.D., 

University of Texas 

Robert J. Fusillo 

Associate Professor of English 

A.B., M.S., Fort Hays Kansas State College; Ph.D., The Shakespeare 

Institute (Stratford-Upon-Avon), University of Birmingham (England) 

Ida L. Garrett 

Instructor in History and Government 

A.B., Agnes Scott College; A.M., Columbia University 

Roy N. Goslin 

Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; A.M., University of Wyoming 

Bobbie M. Hall 

Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Winthrop College; M.Ed., University of Toledo 

Bernice R. Hilliard 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., M.Ed., Oglethorpe College 

J. Kennedy Hodges 

Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Wofford College; A.M., Duke University; Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina 

Diane P. Jennings 

Instructor in International Relations 

B.A., Westminster College; M.A., Tulane University (Graduate School) 

Eugenia Davis Kelley 

Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., University of Georgia; M.Ed., University of Chattanooga 

Evan L. Kelley 

Associate Professor of Education 
B.S.A., M.Ed., University of Georgia 



THE FACULTY 97 

Jack Brien Key 

Associate Professor of History 

A.B., Birmingham Southern College; A.M., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., 

The Johns Hopkins University 

Greg Lanier 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Duke University; M.A., Kent State University; Ph.D., Emory Uni- 
versity 

Nancy S. Leach 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Marquette University 

Ruth E. Lewis 

Instructor in Chemistry 

A.B., Agnes Scott; M.S., University of Michigan 

Robert W. Loftin 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Oglethorpe College; A.M., Florida State University 

Elgin F. MacConnell 

Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., Allegheny College; A.M., New York University 

Jorge A. Marban 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 

A.B., Instituto Vibora; LL.D., M.Soc.Sci., Universidad de la Habana 

James R. Miles 

Professor of Business Administration 

A.B., B.S., University of Alabama; M.B.A., Ohio State University 

Ken Nishimura 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Pasadena College; B.D., Asbury Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 

Emory University 

Philip F. Palmer 

Associate Professor of Government 
A.B., A.M., University of New Hampshire 

Joanna W. Parrish 

Instructor in Biology 

A.B., Woman's College — University of North Carolina; M.A., Duke Uni- 
versity 

James F. Smith 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Birmingham Southern; M.S., University of Georgia 



98 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

Robert M. Speights, Jr. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
B.S., M.S., Georgia Tech 

Martha H. Vardeman 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.S., M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of Alabama 

George F. Wheeler 

Professor of Physics 

A.B., Ohio State University; A.M., California Institute of Technology 

Lois F. Williamson 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
A.B., M.Ed., Oglethorpe College 

Vera B. Zalkow 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Michigan; A.M., Smith College; Ph.D., Wayne State 

University 



THE ADMINISTRATION 

Paul Kenneth Vonk ....President 

B.A., Calvin College; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Duke University 

William Robert Hauser.... Dean of the College 

B.A., Denison University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL 

Tim Marx Admissions Counselor 

B.A., Oglethorpe College 

Robert J. Mohan Director of Admissions 

B.A., Oglethorpe College 

William L. Camp, IV Associate Director 

B.A., Parsons College of Admissions 

Thomas W. Chandler, Jr Librarian 

A.B., M.Lib., Emory University 

Robert I. Doyal Registrar 

B.A., Oglethorpe College; M.Ed., University of Georgia 

Sewell P. Edwards Campus Security Officer 

Audray Heath Director of Student Aid and 

Placement 

Ruth F. Lovell ..Manager of Post Office 



100 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

STUDENT SERVICES 

Michael Decarlo .....Dean of Students 

B.A., M.A., University of Miami (Fla). 

Majorie M. MacConnell___ Registrar Emeritus 

Tom Norwood Staff Instructor, Men's Physical Education 

B.A., Oglethorpe College 

Jean Pope _._ __ Manager of Book Store 

C. A. N. Rankine College Physician 

M.D., New York University (Bellevue Medical School) 

Dorothy G. Richardson Assistant Librarian 

A.B., University of Tennessee; B.S. in L.S., University of Illinois 

Susan K. Sholar Dean of Women 

A. B., University of South Carolina 

Elgin F. MacConnell Dean of Men 

A.B., Allegheny College; A.M., New York University 

Paul Doody Director of Central Duplicating Services 

Lenora T. Baldwin College Nurse 

R.N., Woodlawn Infirmary, Birmingham, Alabama 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS 

Robert L. Foreman, Chairman 
J. Arch Avary, Jr., Vice-Chair man 
Howard G. Axelberg, Secretary 
John I. Thompson, Treasurer 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

*l. M. Aiken, Jr., President 

Trust Company of Georgia Bank of DeKalb, Atlanta 

Norman J. Arnold, President 

The Ben Arnold Company, Columbia, South Carolina 

*J. Arch Avary, Jr., Executive Vice President 
Trust Company of Georgia Associates, Atlanta 

*Howard G. Axelberg, Executive Vice President 
Liller, Neal, Battle, and Lindsay, Inc., Atlanta 

William C. Bartholomay, Chairman of the Board 
Atlanta Braves, Inc. 

C. H. Bartlett, Vice President 

Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Atlanta 

Christopher Brandon, Commercial Officer 
Trust Company of Georgia, Buckhead Branch 

Mitchell C. Bishop, former Vice Pres. and General Manager 
Tri-State Tractor Company, Atlanta 

Thomas L. Camp, Judge 
Civil Court of Fulton County 

Allen Chappell, Vice Chairman Emeritus 
Georgia Public Service Commission 

Rev. John J. Cotter, Principal 
St. Pius X High School, Atlanta 



''Executive Committee 



102 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

*R. E. Dorough, Owner 

R. E. Dorough Real Estate, Atlanta 

* Robert L. Foreman, former General Agent 

Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company 

*George E. Goodwin, Senior Vice President 
Bell and Stanton, Inc., Atlanta 

Arthur Howell, Partner 

Jones, Bird & Howell, Atlanta 

Rev. Fitzhugh M. Legerton, Pastor 
Oglethorpe Presbyterian Church 

Harold R. Lilley, Vice President 
Frito-Lay, Inc., Dallas, Texas 

J. Clyde Loftis, Retired President 
Kraft Foods 

R. E. Loughborough, Vice President and Trust Officer 
The Fulton National Bank of Atlanta 

Albert I. Love, Chairman of the Board 
Foote & Davies, Doraville 

Virgil W. Milton, former Gen. Mgr. Atlanta Retail Stores 
Sears-Robuck & Company 

* Louis A. Montag, Partner 

Montag & Caldwell, Atlanta 

Eugene W. O'Brien, Consulting Engineer 
Atlanta 

William C. Perkins, Vice President 
Atlanta Brush Company 

Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild, D.D. 
The Temple, Atlanta 

*Stephen J. Schmidt, President 

Dixie Seal & Stamp Company, Atlanta 

*James M. Sibley, Partner 
King & Spalding, Atlanta 

Rankin M. Smith 

President — Atlanta Falcons Football Team, Inc. 

Executive Vice President — Life Insurance Company of Georgia 



'Executive Committee. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 103 

COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 

Robert R. Snodgrass, President 

Atlas Finance Company, Inc., Atlanta 

John I. Thompson, President 

John I. Thompson & Company, Washington, D. C. 

Charles L. Towers, Vice President 
Shell Oil Company, Atlanta 

Morton L. Weiss, President 
Montag, Inc., Atlanta 



104 OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 

INDEX 

Academic Regulations 20 Pre-Nursing 86 

Psychology 41 

Admission 15 

Sociology 43 

Advanced Placement Program __15 Spanish 74 

Application Procedure __ _18 Curriculum, Organization . _38 

Athletics - - 28 Dean's List 22 

Awards -- .-34-35 D e gr ees 21 

Class Attendance .. ... 20 Deg rees With Honors... _.22 

College Calendar _ ._ 6 Even ing Program .. _37 

Core Program ... _39 Expe nses _29, 31, 32 

Course Descriptions: Extra-Curricular Activities _ ... 26 

Biology 77 

„ . AJ . . x x . Ar Faculty 95 

Business Administration 45 

Chemistry 79 Fees and Costs 31-32 

Economics 50 

Financial Assistance 18 

Education 52 

English 58 Fine Arts Festival 33 

French - - 72 Grading System 20 

General Science 86 

Graduation Requirements 21 

German 74 

History 89 History ot Oglethorpe 11-13 

Mathematics 80 

Minimum Academic Average... 20-22 

Philosophy 74 

Physical Education ... 58 Normal Academic Load 

Ph y sics - 82 Oglethorpe Idea 9-10 

Political Studies 91 

Orientation 25 

Pre-Law . 93 

Pre-Medical 87 Placement Service 35 






OGLETHORPE COLLEGE BULLETIN 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 
OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 
ATLANTA • GEORGIA 
1968-1969 




OGLETHORPE COLLEGE • ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30319