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Full text of "Oglethorpe University Bulletin, 2004-2006"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/oglethorpeuniver0406ogle 




OGLETHORPE . 

UNIVERSITY 



Make a Life. Make a Living. Make a Difference. 

2004-2006 BULLETIN 

for the 

Traditional Undergraduate Program 

and 

Master of Arts in Teaching — Early Childhood Education 



For evening undergraduate and MBA programs for working adults, please see 
the University College Bulletin. 



Oglethorpe Universit}' is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; 
telephone (404) 679-4500) to award bachelor's degrees and master's degrees. The graduate 
teacher education program is approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. 



Oglethorpe makes no disdnction in its admission policies or procedures on grounds ot age, race, gender, 
religious belief, color, sexual orientation, national origin, or disabilit)'. This Bulletin is published by the 
Office of the Provost and Senior Vice President, Oglethorpe University'. The information included in it is 
accurate for the 2004-2006 academic years as of the date of publication, August 2004; however, the 
programs, policies, requirements, and regulations are subject to change as circumstances may require. The 
listing of a course or program in this Bulletin does not constitute a guarantee or contract that it will be 
offered during the 2004-2006 academic years. Final responsibilit}^ for selecting and scheduling courses and 
satisfactorily completing curriculum requirements rests with the student. 



1 



Directory of Correspondence 



Oglethorpe University, 4484 Peachtree Road, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30319-2797 

(404) 261-1441 
www. Oglethorpe, edu 



General College Policy 
Academic Policy 



Larry D. Large 
President 

Christopher Ames 

Provost and Senior I ^ice President 



Adult Education Karen S. Carter 

(Evening Classes / MBA Program, MAT Program) Director of University College 



Alumni Reladons 

Business Affairs / Financial Planning 

Campus Safety 

Enrollment / Admission 
Fundraising and Gifts 

Public Information / Public Relations 

Student Financial Aid / Scholarships 
Student Records / Transcripts 



Student Services (Residence Life, 

Food, Health, Counseling, Career Services) 



Student Tuidon/Fees 

Visitors 



Barbara Bessmer Henry '85 
Director of A^lumni Relations 

John A. Boland III 

Interim T 7rf President for Business and Finance 

Rus Drew 

Director of CanTptis Safety / Assistant 

Dean of Student Affairs 

David J. Rhodes 

Vice President for Enrollment 

Peter A. Rooney 

I ^ice President for Development and 
Alumni Relations 

Rebecca A. \XTiicker 

Executive Director of Marketing and 

Public Relations 

Patrick N. Bonones 
Director of Financial Aid 

Susan A. Bacher 
Registrar 

Timothy Doyle 

T 7rf President for Student Affairs and 

Dean of Students 

Georgann Billetdeaux 
Director of Finance 



Oglethorpe Universit}' welcomes visitors to the campus throughout the year. To be sure of 
seeing a particular staff or faculty member, visitors are urged to make an appointment in advance. 
Administrative offices are open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays. In addition, appointments are 
available on Saturday. AH of the offices of the L^niversit)' can be reached by calling Adanta (404) 261- 
1441 (switchboard). The Public Relations Office (404) 364-8446 is available for assistance. The 
Admission Office can be reached directiy by calling (800) 428-4484 or (404) 364-830'' in the Adanta 
calling area. 



Table of Contents 



Academic Calendar 4 

Mission 7 

History 11 

Campus Facilities 17 

Admission 25 

Financial Assistance 35 

Tuition and Costs 51 

Student Affairs 57 

Academic Regulations and Policies 69 

Educational Enrichment 81 

The Core Curriculum 93 

Programs of Study 99 

Board of Trustees 205 

President's Advisory Council 208 

National Alumni Association Board of Directors 210 

The Faculty 212 

University Officers 217 

Index 226 

Map 228 



Academic Calendar 



FaU Semester, 2004 



Sa-M 


August 21-23 


Sun 


August 22 


Mon 


August 23 


Tu 


August 24 


Tu 


August 31 


Mon 


September 6 


Mon 


October 11 


Fri 


October 15 


Fri 


October 29 


M-F 


November 8-12 


Fri 


November 12 


W-Sun 


November 24-28 


Mon 


November 29 


Mon 


December 6 


Tu 


December 7 


W-F 


December 8-10 


M-Tu 


December 13-14 



Orientation for New Students 

Opening of Residence HaUs for Returning Students 

Registration for All Students 

First Day of Classes 

Last Day to Drop or Add a Course; 

End of Late Registration 
Labor Day Holiday 
Columbus Day Holiday 
Mid-Term 

Last Day to Withdraw from a Course with a "^)("' Grade 
Pre-Registration for Spring Semester, 2005 
Withdrawal from a Course with a "WF" After This Date 
Thanksgiving Holidays 
Classes Resume 
Last Day of Classes 
Reading/Preparation Day 
Final Examinations 
Final Examinations . 



Spring Semester, 2005 



Mon 


January 10 


Tu 


January 1 1 


Wed 


January 12 


Mon 


January 17 


Wed 


January 19 


Wed 


February 9 


Fri 


March 4 


Sat-Sun 


March 12-20 


Mon 


March 21 


Fri 


March 25 


M-F 


April 4-8 


Fri 


Aprils 


Wed 


April 13 


Tu 


April 26 


Wed 


April 27 


Th-F 


April 28-29 


M-W 


May 2-4 


Sat 


May 7 



Opening of Residence Halls and Orientation 

Orientation and Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday 

Last Day to Drop or Add a Course; 

End of Late Registration 
Oglethorpe Day Convocation 
Mid-Term 
Spring Holidays 
Classes Resume 

Last Day to Withdraw from a Course with a "W" Grade 
Pre-Registration for Summer and FaU Semesters, 2005 
Withdrawal from a Course with a "WF" After This Date 
Symposium in the Liberal Arts 
Last Day of Classes 
Reading/Preparation Day 
Final Examinations 
Final Examinations 
Commencement 



FaU Semester, 2005 



Sa-M August 27-29 Orientation for New Students 

Sun August 28 Opening of Residence Halls for Returning Students 

Mon August 29 Registration for All Students 

Tu August 30 First Day of Classes 

Mon September 5 Labor Day Holiday 

Wed September 7 Last Day to Drop or Add a Course; 

End of Late Registration 

Mon October 10 Columbus Day Holiday 

Fri October 21 Mid -Term 

Fri November 4 Last Day to Withdraw from a Course with a "^X"' Grade 

M-F November 14-18 Pre-Registration for Spring Semester, 2006 

Fri November 18 Withdrawal from a Course with a "WT" After This Date 

W-Su November 23-27 Thanksgiving Holidays 

Mon November 28 Classes Resume 

Mon December 12 Last Day of Classes 

Tu December 13 Reading/Preparation Day 

W-F December 14-16 Final Examinations 

M-T December 19-20 Final Examinations 



Spring Semester, 2006 



Mon January 16 



Tu 


January 17 


Wed 


January 18 


Wed 


January 25 


Wed 


February 8 


Fri 


March 10 


Sat-Sun 


March 18-26 


Mon 


March 27 


Fri 


March 31 


M-F 


April 10-14 


Fri 


April 14 


Wed 


April 19 


Tu 


May 2 


Wed 


May 3 


Th-F 


May 4-5 


M-W 


May 8-10 


Sat 


May 13 



Opening of Residence Halls and Orientation; 

Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday 

Orientation and Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Last Day to Drop or Add a Course; 

End of Late Registration 
Oglethorpe Day Convocation 
Mid-Term 
Spring Holidays 
Classes Resume 

Last Day to Withdraw from a Course with a "XX"' Grade 
Pre-Registration for Summer and FaU Semesters, 2006 
Withdrawal from a Course with a "WT" After This Date 
Symposium in the Liberal Arts 
Last Day of Classes 
Reading/ Preparation Day 
Final Examinations 
Final Examinations 
Commencement 



Courses also are offered during several summer sessions. For dates and course offerings, 
contact the Registrar's Office. 



July 2004 

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OGIFTHORi 



Mission 




Oglethorpe derives its institutional purpose from an awareness and appreciation of 
the Universit)''s heritage and from an analysis of the needs of contemporary societ}'. The 
goals of the educational program and of other component parts of the University,' are based 
on this sense of institutional purpose. 

The Oglethorpe Tradition 

Oglethorpe University was established in 1 835 and named after General James Edward 
Oglethorpe, the founder of Georgia. The Universit}' was patterned on Corpus Christi College, 
Oxford, General Oglethorpe's alma mater. Although influenced by other conceptions of higher 
education, Oglethorpe Universit}' has been shaped principally by the English tradition of 
collegiate education, which many observers believe is the finest t}'pe produced by Western 
civilization. 

Briefly stated, four characteristics have made this kind of college widely admired: 

1. Colleges in the English tradition emphasize broad education for intelligent leadership. 
They recognize that this is a more useful undergraduate education for the able voung 
person than technical training for a specific job. 

2. Colleges such as Oglethorpe stress the basic academic competencies — reading, writing, 
speaking, and reasoning — and the fundamental fields of knowledge — the arts and 
sciences. These are essential tools of the educated person. 

3. Close relationships between teacher and student are indispensable to this t\-pe of 
education. A teacher is not merely a conveyor of information — the invention of the 
printing press and advances in information technology have made that notion of 
education obsolete. Rather, the most irnportant function of the teacher is to stimulate 
intellectual activity' in the student and to promote his or her development as a mamre 
person. 

4. A collegiate education is far more than a collection of academic courses. It is a process 
of development in which campus leadership opportunities, residential life, athletics, 
formal and informal social functions, aesthetic experiences, and contact with smdents 
from other culmres, in addition to classroom exercises, all play important roles. 
Versatilit}^ and abilit)' to lead are important goals of this t^-pe of undergraduate 
education. 

Another aspect of Oglethorpe's tradition was contributed by Philip Welmer, President 
of the University from 1944 to 1953. Oglethorpe, he said, should be a coUege that was 
"superlatively good." Only at a college with carefully selected students and facult}; he believed, 
could young persons achieve their fiallest intellectual development through an intense dialogue 
with extraordinary teachers. Thus, a commitment to superior performance is an important 
element of the Oglethorpe tradition. 

Purpose: Education for a Changing Society 

While an institution may take pride in a distinguished heritage, it is also essential that its 
educational program prepare young people to function effectively in a complex and rapidly 
developing societ}^, which places a premium on adaptabUit}'. People in positions of leadersliip must 
be able to function effectively in changing circumstances. The broadly educated person, schooled 
in fundamental principles, is best equipped to exercise leadership in a world that is being 
transformed by high technology and new information. Oglethorpe emphasizes the preparation of 
the humane generalist - the kind of leader needed by a complex and changing societv'. 



The location of the University in the dynamic cit}' of Atlanta offers unique 
opportunities for students to experience first-hand the relevance of their education to the exciting 
changes that are a part of modern development. Students are encouraged to explore the 
connections between their educational experiences on campus and the challenges that face a cit\' 
today. Atianta offers a multitude of opportunities for students to see the process and result of 
change and innovation in areas such as government, business, education, cultural affairs, artistic 
endeavors, international exchanges, transportation, recreation, medical services, science, and 
technology. 

Oglethorpe University provides a superior education in the liberal arts and sciences and 
selected professional disciplines in a coeducational, largely residential, small-college environment 
within a dynamic urban setting. Oglethorpe's academically rigorous programs emphasize 
intellectual curiosiU', individual attention and encouragement, close collaboration among facult)' 
and students, and active learning in relevant field experiences. Oglethorpe is committed to 
supporting the success of all students in a diverse communit}' characterized by civilit}', caring, 
inquiry, and tolerance. Oglethorpe's talented, self-reliant, and motivated graduates are prepared to 
make a life and to make a living, to grow as life-long learners, and to be energetic and intelligent 
contributors in a rapidly changing world. 

Goals 

Educators at Oglethorpe expect their graduates to display abilities, skills, intellectual 
attitudes, and sensitivities that are related to the University's purpose. The curriculum and 
extracurricular life are designed to develop the following: 

1 . The abiUt}^ to read critically - to evaluate arguments and the evidence, and to draw 
appropriate conclusions. 

2. The ability to convey ideas in writing and in speech - accuratel)', grammatically, and 
persuasively. 

3. Skill in reasoning logically and thinking analytically and objectively about important 
matters. 

4. An understanding of the most thoughtful reflections on right and wrong and an 
allegiance to principles of right conduct, as reflected by Oglethorpe's Honor Code. 

5. The willingness and abilit}' to assume the responsibilities of leadership in public and 
private life, including skill in organizing the efforts of other persons on behalf of 
worthy causes. 

6. An inclination to continue one's learning after graduation from college and skill in 
the use of books, information technology, and other intellectual tools for that 
purpose. 

7. A considered commitment to a set of career and life goals. 

8. An awareness of the increasingly international character of contemporary life and 
skill in interacting with persons of diverse cultural backgrounds. 



In its dedication to a broad, comprehensive liberal education for each student, 
Oglethorpe has created a common set of core courses that invites students to be thoughtful, 
inquisitive, and reflective about the human condition and the world surrounding them. These core 
courses work together with students' experiences in advanced courses in their chosen disciplines 
to encourage the lifelong "habit of mind" that is extolled in John Henry Newman's "The Idea of 
a University." Students are thus urged to consider carefuUy what they see, hear, and read, to 
examine questions from more than one point of view, and to avoid leaping quickly to conclusions. 

AH undergraduate programs also require the student to develop a deeper grasp of one 
or more fields of knowledge organized coherentiy as a major. The smdent's major may be pursued 
in a single field, such as biology, economics, or English, or it may cut across two or more 
traditional fields (as an interdisciplinary or individually planned major). 

The success of Oglethorpe alumni and students in their subsequent education, a wide 
variety of careers, and community life attests to the soundness of this approach to education. 

Oglethorpe University Vision 

Oglethorpe University is a liberal arts institution with a 170-year tradition of excellence 
in teaching and learning. The University's location in Atianta offers world-class oppormnities in 
business, government, and the arts and provides a powerful complement to Oglethorpe's small- 
college environment. 

The University's promise to smdents that they will learn to "make a life, make a li^'ing, 
and make a difference" continues to be confirmed by the significant accomplishments of our 
graduates. 

Our vision is to be known as the leading Uberal arts institution in the Southeast. 

We will achieve this vision by building on our tradition of academic excellence both 
inside and outside of the classroom, energizing the campus experience, and connecting and 
contributing to the community. 

Oglethorpe University Promise 

Oglethorpe promises a classic education in a contemporarv cit}\ Oglethorpe students 
learn to "make a Life, make a living, and make a difference." Our graduates become community- 
leaders who are distinctive in their abilit}' to think, communicate, and contribute. 



10 



History 




Chartered in 1835 

Old Oglethorpe University began in the early 1800s with a movement by Georgia 
Presbyterians to establish in their state an institution for the training of ministers. For generations, 
southern Presbyterian families had sent their sons to Princeton College in New Jersey, and the long 
distance traveled by stage or horseback suggested the building of a similar institution in the South. 

Oglethorpe University was chartered by the state of Georgia in 1835, shortiy after the 
centennial observance of the state. The college was named after James Edward Oglethorpe, the 
founder of Georgia. Oglethorpe University, which commenced actual operations in 1838, was thus 
one of the earliest denominational institutions in the South located below the Virginia line. The 
antebellum college, which began with four faculty members and about 25 students, was located at 
Midway, a small community near MiUedgeviUe, then the capital of Georgia. 

Distinguished Alumni and Faculty 

Throughout its antebellum existence, the Oglethorpe curriculum consisted primarily of 
courses in Greek, Latin, classical literature, theology, and a surprising variety of natural sciences. 
Oglethorpe's president during much of this period was Samuel Kennedy Taknage, an eminent 
minister and educator. Other notable Oglethorpe faculty members were Nathaniel M. Crawford, 
professor of mathematics and a son of Georgia statesman William H. Crawford; Joseph LeConte, 
destined to earn world fame for his work in geology and optics; and James Woodrow, an uncle of 
Woodrow Wilson and the first professor in Georgia to hold the Ph.D. degree. Oglethorpe's most 
distinguished alumnus from the antebellum era was the poet, critic, and musician Sidney Lanier, 
who graduated in 1860. Lanier remained as a tutor in 1861 until he, with other Oglethorpe cadets, 
marched away to war. Shortly before his death, Lanier remarked to a friend that his greatest 
intellectual impulse was during his college days at Oglethorpe University. 

Periods of Challenge 

Old Oglethorpe in effect "died at Gettysburg." During the Civil War its students were 
soldiers, its endowment was lost in Confederate bonds, and its buildings were used for barracks 
and hospitals. The school closed in 1862 and afterward conducted classes irregularly at the Midway 
location. In 1 870 the instimtion was briefly relocated in Georgia's postbellum capital of Atlanta, 
at the site of the present City Hall. Oglethorpe at this time produced several educational 
innovations, expanding its curriculum to business and law courses and offering the first evening 
college classes in Georgia. The dislocation of the Reconstruction era proved insurmountable, 
however, and in 1872 Oglethorpe closed its doors for a second time. 

Relocation to North Atlanta 

Oglethorpe University was rechartered in 1913, and in 1915 the cornerstone to die new 
campus was laid at its present location on Peachtree Road in north Atianta. Present to witness the 
occasion were members of the classes of 1860 and 1861, thus linking the old and the new 
Oglethorpe University. The driving force behind the LIniversity's revival was Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, 
whose grandfather. Professor Ferdinand Jacobs, had served on the faculrv of Old Oglethorpe. 
Thornwell Jacobs, who became the Oglethorpe president for nearly three decades, intended for 
the new campus to be a "living memorial" to James Oglethorpe. The distinctive Gothic re\nval 
architecture of the campus was inspired by the honorary alma mater of James Oglethorpe, Corpus 
Christi College, Oxford. The coUegiate coat-of-arms, emblazoned with three boar's heads and the 
inscription Nescit Cedere ("He does not know how to give up"), replicated die Oglethorpe family 
standard. For the college athletic teams, Jacobs chose an unusual mascot - a small, persistent 
seabird, which according to legend, had inspired James Oglethorpe while on board ship to Georgia 
in 1732. The Oglethorpe University nickname "Stormy Petrels" is unique in intercollegiate 
athletics. 

12 



Periods of Expansion 

Although Presbyterian congregations throughout the South contributed to the revival of 
Oglethorpe University, the school never re-established a denominational affiliation. Since the early 
1920s Oglethorpe has been an independent nonsectarian co-educational higher educational 
institution. Its curricular emphasis continued in the liberal arts and sciences and expanded into 
professional programs in business administration and education. From the 1920s through the 
1940s, the institudon received major contributions from several individuals. Some of the most 
prominent benefactors were: John Thomas Lupton, Coca-Cola bottler from Chattanooga, 
Tennessee; Atlanta business communit)' members Harry Hermance and Mrs. Robert J. Lowry; and 
publisher William Randolph Hearst. The latter gave to Oglethorpe a sizable donation of land. In 
the early 1930s the Oglethorpe campus covered approximately 600 acres, including 30-acre Silver 
Lake, which was renamed Lake Phoebe after the publisher's mother, Phoebe Apperson Hearst. 

During Thornwell Jacobs' tenure he launched several projects which brought national 
and even international repute to Oglethorpe Universit}'. In 1923 Jacobs discovered the tomb of 
James and Elizabeth Oglethorpe in Cranham, England. For about a decade Oglethorpe Universin' 
was involved in major college athletics, and the Stormy Petrels fielded football teams that defeated 
both Georgia Tech and the University of Georgia. Perhaps Oglethorpe's most famous athlete was 
Luke Appling, enshrined in the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame. Dr. Jacobs in the 1930s 
became, however, one of the earliest and most articulate critics of misplaced priorities in 
intercollegiate athletics, and Oglethorpe curtailed development in this area. In the early 1930s 
Oglethorpe attracted widespread attention witii its campus radio station, WJTL, named after 
benefactor John Thomas Lupton. Oglethorpe's Universit}' of the Air was a notable experiment, 
which lasted about five years, that broadcast college credit courses on the air waves. Oglethorpe 
Universit)' was one of the first institutions to confer honorary doctorates on national figures in 
order to recognize superior civic and scientific achievement. Among Oglethorpe's earlv honorarv 
alumni were Woodrow Wilson, Walter Lippman, Franldin Roosevelt, Bernard Baruch, Amelia 
Earhart, and David Sarnoff 

The Crypt of Civilization 

Perhaps the best known of all of Jacobs' innovations was the Oglethorpe Crx-pt of 
Civilization, which he proposed in the November 1936 issue of Scientific American. This prototype 
for the modern time capsule was an effort to provide, for posterit)-, an encvclopedic inventorv of 
life and customs from ancient times through the middle of the 20"^^^ century. The CrNpt, sealed in 
the foundation of Phoebe Hearst Hall in 1940, is not to be opened untU 8113 A.D. It has been 
hailed by the Guinness hook of World Records as "the first successful attempt to bury a record for 
future inhabitants or visitors to the planet Earth." 



13 



The Oglethorpe Idea 

In 1944 Oglethorpe University began a new era under Philip Weltner, a noted attorney 
and educator. With a group of faculty associates, Dr. Weltner initiated an exciting approach to 
undergraduate education called the "Oglethorpe Idea." It involved one of the earliest efforts to 
develop a core curriculum, with the twin aims to "make a life and to make a living." The 
Oglethorpe core, which was applauded by The New York Times, aimed at a common learning 
experience for students with about one-half of every student's academic program consisting of 
courses in "Citizenship" and "Human Understanding." After World War II, Oglethorpe University- 
emphasized characteristics it had always cultivated, notably close personal relationships, in order 
to be, in Dr. Welmer's words, "a small college superlatively good." From 1965 through part of 
1972 the institution was called Oglethorpe College. But the historical identity' of Oglethorpe 
University was so strong that in 1972 the original chartered name was re-established. Oglethorpe 
continued toward its goals and in the late 1960s began a facilities expansion program, which 
created a new part of the campus, including a modern student center and residential complex. 

A Selective Liberal Arts College 

By the 1980s, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching had classified 
Oglethorpe in the category of Liberal Arts I (after referred to as Baccalaureate Colleges - Liberal 
Arts). These highly selective undergraduate institutions award more than half of their degrees in 
the arts and sciences. By the 1990s, the University' was listed favorably in the Fiske Guide to Colleges, 
The Princeton Rei'iew Student Access Guide, Barron's 300 Best Buys in College Education, National Kemw 
College Guide — America's Top Uheral Arts Schools and many other guides to selective colleges. 
Oglethorpe is currentiy a member of the Annapolis Group, an organization of the 100 most 
selective liberal arts colleges. 

The student body, while primarily from the South, has become increasinglv 
cosmopolitan; in a typical semester, Oglethorpe draws students from about 30 states and 30 
foreign countries. The University has established outreach through its evening-weekend degree 
programs: a graduate program in education and teacher certification; a graduate program in 
business administration; and the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art. The Universit\' is also 
home to the Georgia Shakespeare Festival. 

Entering the 21** Century 

As Oglethorpe University enters the 21*' century, it has demonstrated continued 
leadership in the development and revision of its core curriculum, with efforts funded bv the 
National Endowment for the Humanities. The historic district of the 100-acre campus has been 
designated in the National Register of Historic Places. Enrollment is about 1 ,200 with the plans 
for controlled growth to about 1,500. Oglethorpe remains on the forefront of educational 
innovation, with a curriculum that features interactive learning. The University' uses a variety- of 
effective pedagogical techniques: perhaps most notable are the peer tutoring program, classroom 
learning that is actively connected to contemporary experience through internships and other 
opportunities for experiential education, and a unique program in urban leadership that in\-ites 
students to consider ways in which they can become communir\' leaders for the future. Reflecting 
the contemporary growth of the cit}' of Atianta, Oglediorpe has recentiv developed a distinctive 
international dimension. Students at the Universit}' may complement their campus programs with 
foreign studies at sister institutions in Argentina, China, Ecuador, France, Germanv, japan, 
Mexico, Monaco, the Netherlands, and Russia. As Oglethorpe University- continues to grow, 
academically and materially, it is ever mindful of its distinguished heritage and will still remain, in 
the affectionate words of poet and alumnus Sidnev Lanier, a "college of the heart." 



14 



J 



Presidents of the University 



Carlyle PoUock Beman, 1836-1840 
Samuel Kennedy Talmage, 1841-1865 
WiUiam M. Cunningham, 1869-1870 
David WiUs, 1870-1872 
ThornweU Jacobs, 1915-1943 
Philip Welmer, 1944-1953 
James Whitney Bunting, 1953-1955 
Donald Wilson, 1956-1957 



Donald Charles Agnew, 1958-1964 
George Seward, Acting, 1964-1965 
Paul Rensselaer Beall, 1965-1967 
Paul Kenneth Vonk, 1967-1975 
Manning Mason Pattillo Jr., 1975-1988 
Donald Sheldon Stanton, 1988-1999 
Larry Denton Large, 1999- 



15 



Campus Facilities 




Oglethorpe University's facilities are generally accessible to physically impaired students. 
All buildings on campus are equipped with either ramps or ground-floor entry. With the exception 
of Lupton Hall, the primary classroom and office buildings have elevators to all floors. 
Appointments with faculty members or administrators with inaccessible offices are scheduled in 
accessible areas. Only three classrooms are not accessible to those physically impaired. \XTien 
appropriate, classes are reassigned so all classes are available to all students. All residence halls 
include accessible housing space. 

Smoking is prohibited in all campus buildings at Oglethorpe Universit}'. This includes 
classrooms, offices, laboratories, meeting rooms, lounge areas, restrooms, corridors, stairu'eUs, the 
Library, the Field House, the Schmidt Center, the Student Center, and any other interior spaces in 
buildings. An exception to the rule is provided for residents in the privacy of their residence haU 
rooms. 

Conant Performing Arts Center 

This new performing arts center, completed in 1997, is a four-story facilit\' located 
adjacent to the Philip Weltner Library. It provides a permanent home for the Georgia Shakespeare 
Festival and for classes in theatre and music for Oglethorpe's undergraduate liberal arts students. 
It houses a mainstage theatre with seating for 500, a lobby, rehearsal and dressing rooms, an area 
for receptions, offices, and shipping and receiving facilities. 

Dorough Field House 

The Dorough Field House is the site of intercollegiate basketball and vollevbaU and 
large campus gatherings such as concerts and commencement exercises. Built in 1960, the 
structure underwent major renovation in 1979. The building is named for the late R. E. Dorough, 
a former Trustee of the University. 

Emerson Student Center 

The Emerson Student Center is named in honor of William A. and jane S. Emerson, 
benefactors of the University. As the hub of campus life, the Emerson Smdent Center houses the 
dining hall, the student association office, the student newspaper and yearbook offices, the student 
post office, a lounge, television area, and a snack bar/game room. The administrative offices of 
the Vice President for Student Affairs, the Director of Residence Life, the Director of Campus 
Safety, the Center for Counseling and Health Services, and the Director of Musical Activities are 
also located here. An outdoor swimming pool is adjacent to the building. 



Goodman Hall 



Goodman HaU was built in 1956 and renovated in 1970, when it was transformed from 
a men's into a women's residence hall. In 1997 it was again renovated to pro^^de support ser\ices 
for students such as the Academic Resource Center, Career Ser\aces, the Oglethorpe Cafe, and a 
computer laboratory. Also located in the building are the Universir\-'s Information Technologv 
Services, the administrative offices of the program in Certified Financial Planning, and the 
administrative offices of Universit}^ College, which offers programs for adult students: accelerated 
undergraduate, MBA, and MAT degrees. 



18 



Goslin Hall 



Goslin Hall, named in honor of Dr. Roy N. Goslin, the late Professor Emeritus of 
Physics, was completed in 1971 and houses the Division of Natural Sciences. Lecture halls and 
laboratories for biology, chemistry, and physics are located in the building. A new physics 
laboratory, made possible by a grant from the Olin Foundadon, was opened in 1979. All 
laboratories were renovated in 1985 and again in 2001 when major reconstruction was completed 
in the interior of the building with the assistance of the Robert W. Woodruff Foundadon and 
other major foundations, as well as a bequest from Eugene W. Ivy '49. A computer laboratory is 
also available for student use. 



Hearst Hall 



Phoebe Hearst Hall was built in 1915 in the handsome neo-Gothic architecture that 
dominates the Oglethorpe campus. The building is named in honor of Phoebe Apperson Hearst, 
the mother of William Randolph Hearst Sr. 

It was renovated in the fall of 1972 as a classroom and facult}' office building. Most 
classes, with the exception of science and mathematics, are held in this building, which is located 
directiy across from Lupton Hall. Newly equipped multi-media classrooms include the Georgia 
Power Model Classroom. 

The dominant feature of the building is the beautiful Great Hall, the site of many 
traditional and historic events at Oglethorpe. Located on the lower level of the building is the 
Universit}^ Bookstore and the much-publicized Cr^^pt of Civilization. The capsule was sealed on 
May 28, 1940, and is not to be opened until May 28, 8113. 



Lupton Hall 



Lupton Hall, built in 1920 and named in honor of John Thomas Lupton, was one of 
the three original buildings on the present Oglethorpe Universit}' campus. Renovated in 1973 and 
1996, it contains primarily administrative offices, facult}' offices, classrooms, and an auditorium for 
300 persons. Administrative offices located in Lupton HaU include the President, Vice President 
for Business and Finance, Provost and Senior Vice President, Vice President for Enrollment, Vice 
President for Development and Alumni Relations, Director of Admission, Director of Financial 
Aid, and the Registrar. The cast-bell carillon in the Lupton tower has 42 bells, which chime the 
quarter hours. 



Oglethorpe University Museum of Art 



Oglethorpe University Museum of Art, occupying the entire third floor of die Philip 
Weltoer Library, opened in the spring of 1993 after extensive renovations of the previous 
Oglethorpe University Art Galler}^ The museum, covering 7,000 square feet, has a comfortable, 
intimate environment that includes two spacious galleries, the Museum Gift Shop, and offices. It 
is considered an important cultural addition to Atianta's growing art scene, drawing thousands of 
visitors each year. 



19 



In addition to the permanent collection, three exhibitions are held each year, which 
feature artwork that is international, representational, often figurative and spiritual in nature. 
Recent exhibitions such as "The Mystical Arts of Tibet: Featuring Personal Sacred Objects of 
the Dalai Lama" and "The Grand Tour: Landscape and Veduta Paintings, Venice and Rome in 
the 18'^'^ Century" have garnered national media attention and brought international art experts 
from around the world to lecture on campus. For museum hours and exhibit information, call 
(404) 364-8555. 

J. Mack Robinson Hall 

Newly renovated in 2001, J. Mack Robinson HaU is a state-of-the-art classroom and 
facult}' office building, which also houses art studios, a darkroom, video editing facilities, a slide 
library and a resource center for study abroad. 

Steve Schmidt Sport and Recreation Center 

Dedicated in 1995, the Schmidt Center is a 22,000 square-foot addition to Dorough 
Field House. The Center has basketball. and volleyball courts, a running track, seven offices, a 
conference room, locker rooms, a weight room, racketbaU courts, a training room, and an entrance 
lobby. The facility is used primarily for recreation and intramural sports. The Center is named for 
Stephen J. Schmidt, Oglethorpe University alumnus of the class of 1940 and long-time member 
of the Board of Trustees, who personally led the fund-raising effort for the addition. 

Sheffield Alumni Suite 

The Sheffield Alumni Suite, adjacent to the Great HaU in Hearst HaU, is named in honor of 
O.K. Sheffield, a graduate of the class of 1953, a loyal supporter, and member of the Board of 
Trustees. Over the years this suite of rooms has served as a parlor, office of the provost, 
classroom, and meeting room. Today it provides an inviting space in which alumni, smdents, and 
facult}? gather. Memorabilia is on display in the anteroom along with a portrait of its namesake. 

Philip Weltner Library (Lowry Hall) 

Located in Lowry Hall, the Ubrary functions as a gateway to research information and 
services in support of the LIniversity's academic programs. The Ubrarv also serves as the 
University Archives and supports the extracurricular interests of Oglethorpe's communitw 

The Ubrary houses over 1 50,000 volumes consisting of books, reference materials, print 
periodicals, audio-visual materials, and microfilm. Two areas of note include a coUection of more 
than 1,600 DVDs and a juvenile Uterature coUection. In addition, the Ubrarv pro\-ides campus- 
wide computer access to the catalog, research databases and resources, GALILEO (Georgia's 
Virtual Library), and more than 13,000 fuU-text periodical titles. Many of the Ubrarv's onUne 
resources are also available off campus. Ser\'ices available to students include reference and 
instruction, circulation, course reserves, interlibrarv-loan, and borrowing pri\nleges at other 
consortium (Atlanta Regional Consortium for Higher Education) Ubraries. A formal reading 
atrium, private rooms, individual carrels, and a 24-hour lounge offer ample oppormnities for both 
quiet study and group work. Other equipment and facilities include computer workstations for 
Ubrary research, an Information Technology Services computer laboratory, two small media 
viewing rooms, the larger Earl DoUve Theatre, a photocopier, and a microfilm/ fiche reader. More 
information about PhiUp Weltner Library and its ser^^ces can be found at the Ubrarv's Web site: 

20 



hftp:l I library. Oglethorpe, edu. 

Lowry Hall was built in 1927 and is on the National Register c;f Historic Places. The 
library moved to its present location in 1972. A renovation in 1992 combined the building's 
original neo-Gothic exterior with a contemporary and gready expanded interior. y\t that dme, the 
library was named after Philip Weltner, who served as Universit)' President fnjm 1944 to 1953. 
The Oglethorpe Museum of Art and the Learning Resources Center are also located in Lowry 
Hall. 

Traer Residence Hall 

Built in 1969, Traer Hall is a three-story freshmen residence that houses 168 students. 
Construction of the building was made possible thfough the generosit}' of the late Wayne S. Traer, 
Oglethorpe Universit\' alumnus of the class of 1928. The double occupancy rooms arranged in 
suites, open onto a central plaza court}'ard. 

Upper Residence Quadrangle 

Constructed in 1968, these residences house both men and women. All rooms on the 
first and second floors are suites with private entrances and baths. Rooms on the third floor are 
traditional residence hall floors with a common bathroom. 

New Residence Hall 

Opened in the spring of 1996, the new residence hall is coed, non-smoking, and 
accommodates 73 students. It is designed as a more traditional facility with a central entrance. The 
rooms consist of two-, three-, and four-person suites off central hallways. 



Greek Row 



Greek Row consists of six houses devoted to two sororities — Chi Omega and Sigma 
Sigma Sigma - and four fraternities — Chi Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha Order, and Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. Each house feamres one-bedroom doubles with a shared bathroom and kitchen 
facilities. The houses on Greek Row were constructed in 1994. 



21 



Computer Facilities and Services 



Every residence hall room, faculty office, and appropriate staff office has a connection 
to the Oglethorpe computer network and through that intranet, to the greater world of the 
Internet with all its resources. Access is also available to students through computers located in 
the library, GosUn, and Goodman Halls. Through the OUNet users can also connect to the 
Voyager Library System, which provides access to the library's catalog and to Galileo, the Georgia 
Library Learning Online services of the University System of Georgia. The G7\LILEO system 
provides access to databases containing bibliographical information, summaries, and in manv 
cases, access to full text of articles and abstracts. 

E-mail and Computer Use Policy 

A policy has been established to ensure the proper use of Oglethorpe Universit\-'s 
computer, network and telecommunication resources and services by its smdents, employees, 
independent contractors, and other computer users. All individuals have the responsibilit}' to use 
computer resources in an efficient, effective, ethical, and lawful manner. The policy, rules, and 
conditions apply to all users of computer, network and telecommunication resources and services, 
wherever the users are located. Violations of this policy may result in suspension without notice 
of privileges to use the resources and services, disciplinary action, including possible termination, 
and/or legal action. 

Oglethorpe Universit}' has the right, but not the dut)', to monitor any and all aspects of 
the computer and network systems, including employee and smdent e-mail, to ensure compliance 
with this policy. The University has the right to use information gained in this way in disciplinarv 
or criminal proceedings. The computers and computer accounts in use by employees and smdents 
are to assist them in the performance of their jobs and in attaining their educational goals. 
Employees and students should not have an expectation of privacy in anything they create, send, 
or receive on their network-attached computers. The computer, netu'ork and telecommunication 
systems belonging to Oglethorpe University are for University' business and educational purposes. 
Any other use in conflict with these purposes is not permitted. 

Computer users are governed by the following provisions, which applv to all use of 
computer and telecommunication resources and services. Computer and telecommunication 
resources and services include, but are not limited to, the following: host computers, file servers, 
workstations, standalone computers, laptops, software, and internal or external communications 
networks (Internet, commercial online services, bulletin board systems, and e-mail systems) that 
are accessed directiy or indirectiy from Oglethorpe University's computer facilities. This policy 
may be amended or revised periodically as the need arises. 

The term "users," as used in this policy, refers to all employees, smdents, independent 
contractors, and other persons or entities accessing or using Oglethorpe Universit\-'s computer, 
network and telecommunication resources and services. 

1. Users must comply with all copyrights laws and fair use provisions, software licenses, 
and all other state and federal laws governing intellecmal propert\'. Inappropriate 
reproduction and/or distribution of copyright music, movies, computer software, text, 
images, etc. is strictiy prohibited. 

2. The electronic mail system shall not be used for "broadcasting" of unsolicited mail 
(unless authorized by the department chair or unit head) or for sending chain letters. 
Fraudulent, harassing, obscene, or other unlawful material may not be sent by e-mail 
or other form of electronic communication or displayed on or stored in Oglethorpe 
University's computers. 



22 



3. Users should use the same care in drafting e-mail and other electronic documents as they 
would for any other written communication. Anything created on the computer may, 
and likely will, be reviewed by others. 

4. Users may not install software onto their individual computers (facult)' and staff), lab 
computers or the network without first receiving express authorizadon to do so from 
Information Technology Services. 

5. Users shall not forward e-mail to any other person or endt)- without the express 
permission of the sender. 

6. Users should not alter or copy a file belonging to another user without first obtaining 
permission from the owner of the file. The ability to read, alter or copy a file belonging 
to another user does not imply permission to read, alter or copy that file. 

7. The computer, network and telecommunication resources and services of Oglethorpe 
University may not be used for the transmission, creation or storage of commercial 
activity, personal advertisements, solicitations, promotions, destructive programs 
(viruses and/or self replicating code), political material, or any other unauthorized or 
personal use. 

8. Users are responsible for safeguarding their passwords for the system. Individual 
passwords should not be printed, stored online, or given to others. Users are responsible 
for all transactions made using their passwords. 

9. A user's abilit}' to connect to other computer systems through the network does not 
imply a right to connect to those systems or to make use of those systems unless 
specifically authorized by the operators of those systems. 

10. Entry into a system, including the network system, by individuals not specifically 
authorized or attempts to circumvent the protective mechanisms of any Universit}' 
system are prohibited. Deliberate attempts to degrade system performance or capabHitA', 
or attempts to damage systems, software or Intellectual propert}^ of others are 
prohibited. 

11. Any network activity that impedes the flow of network traffic or diminishes the 
avaHabHit}^ of resources to other users is stricdy prohibited. 

12. Oglethorpe University' is not responsible for the actions of individual users. 

Antivirus Policy 

In order to prevent virus problems from impacting the Oglethorpe Universit}- 
computing network, all computers which attach to the network must have up-to-date anti\irus 
software installed. Oglethorpe Universit}' currentiy uses the Symantec Anti-Virus product for 
facult}' and staff, and any universit}^ personal computer which connects to the network is required 
to have this software installed. 

Beginning in the Fall Semester 2004, smdents who connect computers to the University- 
netv\'ork must have the Universit)''s managed antivirus software installed. The Universit}' wiU 
provide this managed antivirus software at no additional cost to the student, and the student may 
use this software as long as they are attending Oglethorpe Universit}'. Any exceptions to this policy 
must be approved by the Information Technology Services. Students can install this software by 
following the instructions in the Installing Symantec Antivirus section of the student handbook - 
The O Book. 



23 



While having antivirus software is important, the protection it affords is only as good as 
the virus definitions which are loaded into it. New viruses are written and released daUv, and 
keeping the definitions up-to-date is essential in protecting against new, rapidl^'-spreading viruses. 

Any computer which is found not to have antivirus software installed or which is not 
kept up-to-date will be disconnected from the network until the situation has been resolved. The 
potentially disruptive nature of certain viruses on a shared network can create problems for all 
users on the network. Please refer to the Acceptable Use PoUcy in The O Book for additional 
background information about proper usage and stewardship of Oglethorpe computing and 
communication resources. 

Use of Oglethorpe's computer, network and telecommunication resources and services 
constitutes acceptance of this E-mail and Computer Use Policy. 



24 



Admission 




I 




The admission policy of Oglethorpe University is based on an individual selection 
process. Throughout its history, Oglethorpe has welcomed students from all sections of the 
country, as well as from abroad, as candidates for degrees. It is the polic}' of the Admission 
Committee to select for admission to the University applicants who present strong evidence of 
purpose, maturity, scholastic ability, and probable success at Oglethorpe. Applicants wishing to 
enroU in the evening credit program may refer to a brief description of Universit}' College in the 
Programs of Study section of this Bulletin or consult the University College Undergraduate and Graduate 
Bulletin available from the University College Office (404) 364-8383. 

Freshman Applicants 

Admission to the undergraduate division of the Universm^ may be gained by presenting 
evidence of successful completion of secondary school work in the form of results from the 
College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) or the results from the 
American College Testing Program Assessment (ACT); and, by submitting a letter of 
recommendation, and completing an application essay. 

Arrangements to take the SAT or ACT may be made through a secondar}- school 
guidance counselor or by writing directiy to one of the testing agencies. For SAT write to College 
Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, or Box 1025, Berkele)^, CaHfornia 90701. For ACT 
write to American College Testing Program, P.O. Box 451, Iowa Cit\', Iowa 52240. It is to the 
applicant's advantage to take one of the tests in the junior year of high school. 

Applicants should normally have or be in the process of completing a secondary school 
program including appropriate courses in English, social smdies, mathematics, and science. While 
an admission decision is typically based on a partial secondary school transcript, a final transcript 
must be sent to the Admission Office by the candidate's school, showing exidence of academic 
work completed and official graduation. 

The Oglethorpe application contains a recommendation form and a list of other 
materials, which must be submitted by the applicant. No application wiU be considered and acted 
upon until the items indicated have been received. 

Students may choose from either Early Action or Regular Decision admission. 

Application Procedure 

All correspondence concerning admission should be addressed to the Admission Office, 
Oglethorpe Universit)?, 4484 Peachtree Road N.E., Atianta, Georgia 30319-2797 or \na e-mail at 
admission@oglethorpe.edu. Comprehensive admission information can also be found at 
www.oglethorpe.edu/admission. After receiving an application form, the applicant should complete and 
return it with an application fee of $35. Students may also apply online. Links to application 
procedures and the online application may be found at www.oglethorpe.edu I admission. 

Entering freshmen must submit the following: an application essay, official liigh school 
transcripts, standardized test scores (SAT/ ACT), and a recommendation form completed by a 
high school counselor or teacher. Achievement tests, portfolios, or \ideos are not required for 
admission purposes but will be considered if submitted. Home Schooled applicants should 
contact the Home School Advisor for portfolio requirements. Interviews and campus visits are 
strongly recommended. If, upon review of an applicant's file, it is felt that further information 
would be helpful (i.e. mid-year grades), die student wiU be notified. 



26 



Transfer students must submit the cc^mpleted application form, essay and 
recommendation form with the $35 application fee, official transcripts from each college attended, 
and certification of good academic standing at the most recent or present college. High school 
transcript and test scores are also required if less than 24 semester hours of college credit have 
been completed. 

When a student has completed the application process, the Admission Committee will 
review the application. If accepted, the student will be required to submit an enroUment deposit 
to reserve accommodations for the appropriate semester. Residence haU students submit a deposit 
of $300; commuters submit a deposit of $100. The deposit is refundable through May 1. 

Early Action 

Early Action allows students who have a strong interest in the University' to apply 
early and receive a quick response. Completed applications with supporting materials must be 
postmarked by December 5. Notification letters will be mailed no later than December 20 
unless the Admission Committee requires additional information. Early Action students who 
are admitted and indicate an interest in scholarships will be considered prior to Regular 
Decision candidates. (Please note that early action is non-binding). The deposit is 
refundable through May 1. 

Regular Decision 

Regular Decision enables students to apply at any time. Applications will be reviewed on 
a rolling basis beginning immediately after Early Action reviews (late December) and continuing 
as long as space in the class is available. Notification letters will typically be mailed within two 
weeks of completion unless additional information is needed. The deposit is refundable through 
May 1. 

Campus Visit 

While not a requirement of the admission process, the candidate is urged to visit the 
campus and explore the academic and leadership opportunities that encompass the Oglethorpe 
tradition of a collegiate education. Additional information may be obtained by contacting the 
Admission Office (404) 364-8307 in the Atlanta caUing area or (800) 428-4484 from other 
locations. Comprehensive campus visit information can be found at wiinv.oglethorpe.edu I admission. 



Transfer Students and Transfer Policies 



Students who wish to transfer to Oglethorpe from other regionally accredited colleges 
are welcome to apply, provided they are in good standing at the last institution attended. They are 
expected to follow regular admission procedures and will be notified of the decision of the 
Admission Committee in the same manner that freshmen are notified. 

Most financial aid awards and scholarships are available to transfer students as well as 
first-time freshmen. 



27 



The same application information is required of the transfer student as for the entering 
freshman, although high school records and test scores are not required of students having at least 
24 semester hours of transferable credit. 

Transfer students must submit transcripts of all current and previous college work. A 
separate official transcript from each college attended must be received before any action will be 
taken on the application. 

Oglethorpe University will accept as transfer credit courses comparable to Universit}- 
courses that are applicable to a degree program offered at Oglethorpe. Acceptable work must be 
shown on an official transcript and must be completed with a grade of "C" or better. Oglethorpe 
does not accept a "D" grade as transfer credit, unless a student has graduated from an accredited 
junior college, or a "D" grade is followed by a "C" grade or better in a normal sequence course 
(for example. General Biology I and II). 

For transfer credit that may apply toward fulfillment of core curriculum requirements, 
please see the Core Curriculum section of this Bulletin. 

Transfer students on probation or exclusion from another institution will not be 
accepted. 

Transfer students must have a minimum grade-point average of 2.8 (on a 4.0 scale) to 
be considered for admission. 

Transfer students who have earned an associate degree at a regionally accredited junior 
college will be awarded two years of credit. Junior college graduates with strong academic records 
are encouraged to apply for admission. 

Oglethorpe University wiU accept as many as 30 hours of United States Armed Forces 
Institute (USAFI) credit. 

Students who hold the R.N. credential from an appropriately accredited institution are 
awarded credit for their arts and sciences courses. To earn a bachelor's degree, the student must 
complete the core curriculum, a major, and other applicable requirements. 

Residency Requirement: Effective Fall Semester 2003, the maximum total number of 
semester hours that may be transferred into Oglethorpe is 64. A minimum of 64 semester hours 
must be earned through course work at Oglethorpe in order for an Oglethorpe degree to be 
awarded, with 52 of the last 64 hours earned in residence. 

Credits earned at post-secondary institutions accredited by the six regional accrediting 
bodies (for example. Southern, Middle States, New England, etc., Associations) will be accepted. 

Courses taken at schools accredited by national crediting bodies (for example, 
Association of Independent Schools and Colleges, American Association of Bible Colleges, etc.) 
may be credited. In these cases, student transcripts will be evaluated on an indi\idual basis. Actual 
catalog course descriptions and relevant course syllabi should be pro\aded bv the student. The 
Registrar will determine whether or not courses are to receive transfer credit. 

Courses recognized by the American Council on Education (ACE) mav be credited bv 
the Registrar. Programs not recognized by ACE wiU not be given credit. 

A maximum of 32 semester hours may be earned through College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) tests. Maximum credit for Advanced Placement tests (AP testing) is also 32 
semester hours. Please consult the section. Credit by Examination, on the following pages. 

In all cases, only 64 semester hours earned outside of Oglethorpe through any oi tlie 
means described above may be applied toward an Oglethorpe degree. At least 64 semester hours 
must be earned in course work taken at Oglethorpe, and at least half of the semester hours 
required for a major must be in course work taken at Oglethorpe. (Courses taken at Adanta 
Regional Consortium for Higher Education (ARCHE) institutions on a cross-registration basis 
and courses in an approved study abroad program also count as Oglethorpe courses.) 



28 



Transfer students should note that only work completed at Oglethorpe is reflected in the 
Oglethorpe grade-point average, and transfer work is not included in determination for Latin 
academic honors. To be eligible for academic honors, the student must complete 68 or mtjre hours 
at Oglethorpe. 

International Students 

Admission to Oglethorpe is open to qualified students from all countries. Students who 
are able to provide evidence of suitable academic background, adequate financial resources, and 
seriousness of purpose are eligible to apply. 

All students from countries where English is not the native language must meet 
one of the following requirements to be considered for admission: 

1. Complete level 109 from an ELS, Inc. language center. 

2. Score a minimum of 550 on the TOEFL - or 213 on the computer-based test (Test of 
English as a Foreign Language). 

3. Score 480 or more on the verbal section of the Internafional Scholasdc Assessment 
Test. 

4. Have a combined 2.8 grade-point average with no grade below a "C" in two English 
composition courses from an AACRAO (American Association of Collegiate Registrars 
and Admissions Officers) accredited college or universit}'. 

5. Earn a grade of "C" or better in G.C.E. or G.S.C.E. examinations or their equivalent. 

6. All secondary transcripts must have a "Document-by-Document" evaluation and 
"Grade-Point Average Equivalent." Post-secondary transcripts must have the same; or, 
if a student wishes to receive transfer credit for his or her previous course work, a 
"Course-by-Course" evaluation is required. Applications for evaluation are available in 
the Office of Admission or by calling Joseph Silny and Associate, Inc. at (305) 666-0233. 

An international student's secondary school credentials are subject to the acceptance 
criteria stated for his or her country in the AACRAO world education series, governed by the 
National Council on the Evaluation of Foreign Educational Credentials, 1717 Massachusetts 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. 

AH students from nations where EngUsh is the native language must have one of the 
following to be considered for admission: 

1. A combined SAT score of 1000, with at least 500 on the verbal section. 

2. An ACT score of at least 21. 

3. Above-average scores on the "A" and/or "O" level examinations in British system 
schools or their equivalent in Northern Ireland or Scotiand. 

Joint Enrollment Students 

Students who have attained junior or higher standing in their secondarv schools mav 
apply for enrollment in suitable courses offered at the Universit}^ Admission to the joint 
enrollment program will depend upon an assessment by appropriate personnel of the smdent's 
secondary school and by Oglethorpe admission personnel. 

In general, the candidate must have the social maturit}' to benefit from a collegiate 
experience and possess a "B" or liigher grade-point average along with a combined score of 1 140 
or higher on the Scholastic Assessment Test or its equivalent. A student seeking admission should 
write or call the Joint Enrollment Counselor in the Admission Office at Oglethorpe to receive an 
application. Normally no more than five courses mav be taken as a joint enrollment student. 

29 



Early Admission (Early Entrance) 



A gifted student of unusual maturit}' whose high school record shows excellent 
academic performance through the junior year in a college preparatory program, and whose score 
on a standardized assessment test is high, may submit his or her application for admission to the 
University for enrollment after the junior year in high school. The candidate should have the 
support of his or her parents in writing submitted with the application. A strong recommendation 
from the high school is expected, and the candidate must come to campus for a personal inter^dew 
with a senior admission officer. 



Transient Students 



Transient students may take any course offered by the Universit}', pro\'ided that thev 
secure permission from their current institution certifying that the institution will accept for 
transfer credit the academic work done by the student at Oglethorpe. This permission is the 
responsibility of the transient student. 

A letter of good standing or a current transcript must be sent to the Admission Office 
before a transient student can be accepted. 



Special Status Admission 



Special Status Admission is designed for students who wish to take a limited number of 
post-baccalaureate classes at Oglethorpe, or for non-traditional students who desire to begin 
college course work prior to being admitted to a degree-seeking program. 

Students may be admitted to Oglethorpe's undergraduate day program as a special stams 
candidate if they meet one of the following criteria: 

1. They are at least 25 years of age and at least five years removed from their last 
educational experience. 

2. They have graduated from another accredited college or university; 

Under the program, students may enroll for a maximum of 16 semester hours. 
Individuals desiring to enroll for additional courses must apply as regular, degree-seeking 
candidates. 

To apply for Special Status Admission, students must submit a completed application 
form, a $35 non-refundable application fee, and proof of their last educational experience or a 
copy of their college diploma. 

Special status students are not eligible for financial assistance. 



30 



Home-Schooled Students 



Students who have completed high school graduation requirements in a home school 
may be considered for admission if the following information is provided: 

1 . SAT or ACT scores. 

2. A portfolio recording all high school work completed (including courses studied, 
textbooks, assignments, and extracurricular achievements). 

3. A personal interview with a senior admission officer. 

4. Two recommendations. 

5. A home school transcript (if applicable). 

More information can be found at http:l I ivnnv.oglethorpe.edu, key word "home school." 

Re-admission 

Students in good academic standing who leave the Universit}' and return after a year's 
absence or more should notify the Admission Office of intent to re-enroll. Students who apply 
for re-activation or re-admission whether in good academic standing or not, are governed by the 
current graduation requirements. Any exceptions are granted at the discretion of the Provost and 
Senior Vice President. 



Credit by Examination 



There are three testing programs through which students may earn credit for required 
or elective courses. Any student who has questions about these examinations should consult the 
Registrar. No more than 32 semester hours of credit will be accepted from each of the programs 
described below. 

College Level Examination Program - CLEP 

Within the CLEP testing program are two categories. The General Examinations cover 
the areas of English Composition, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Science, and Social Science 
and History. Oglethorpe Universitv does not award credit for the General Examinations in 
English Composition, Natural Science, Mathematics, or Social Science and History. Minimum 
acceptable scores are 500 for each general area and 50 in each sub-total category. The Subject 
Examinations are designed to measure knowledge in a particular course. A minimum acceptable 
score of 50 on a Subject Examination is required for credit. The Oglethorpe Registrar should be 
contacted concerning which Subject Examinations may lead to credit at Oglethorpe. 

CLEP examinations normally are taken before the student matriculates at Oglethorpe. 
Only under special circumstances will credit be awarded for an examination taken after the smdent 
completes his or her first semester at Oglethorpe University'. A maximum of four semester hours 
will be awarded for each examination. A maximum of 32 semester hours may be earned with 
acceptable CLEP scores. 

All students are required to take placement examinations in mathematics and foreign 
languages (if they plan to take a course in these areas or subjects) and are placed accordingly. 



31 



Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Programs 

The University encourages students who have completed Advanced Placement 
examinations of the College Entrance Examination Board to submit their scores prior to 
enrollment for evaluation for college credit. Please contact the Office of Admission or the 
Registrar's Office for the appropriate course of action to be taken in order to receive credit for 
AP exams. The general policy of Oglethorpe toward such scores is the following: Academic credit 
will be given in the appropriate area to students presenting Advanced Placement grades of 3, 4, 
or 5; neither credit nor exemption will be given for a grade of 2; maximum credit allowed to any 
student for Advanced Placement tests will be 32 semester hours. Specific policies are indicated in 
the chart which follows. These are subject to change at any time. 

Students who have studied in an approved International Baccalaureate Program (IB) are 
also encouraged to apply for credit based on scores earned, and should contact the Office of 
Admission or the Registrar's Office to learn how to receive credit for IB exams. Scores must be 5, 
6, or 7 on the Higher Level Exam to be considered for college credit. Sophomore standing may 
be awarded to smdents who complete the IB diploma and obtain a total of 33 points or better for 
the full program, assuming all examination scores are 4 or better, and no Higher Level Exam score 
is below 5. 

All smdents are required to take placement examinations in mathematics and foreign 
languages (if they plan to take a course in these areas or subjects) and are placed accordingly. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT and INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE 

CREDIT CHART 

Accepted Examination Grades (unless stated otherwise) 
AP: 3, 4, 5 / IB (Higher Level Exam): 5, 6, 7 



AP Exam 



Semester 

Hours 

Awarded 



Course Equivalents 



Art 






Studio 


4 


Elective Credit 


Histor}' 


4 


Elective Credit 



Biology 

Grade 4 or 5 AP 

Grade 3 AP 



GEN 102 Natural Science: The Biological Sciences and 
(subject to placement) BIO 102 General Biolog\- II 
GEN 102 Natural Science: The Biological Sciences 



Chemistry 

Grade 4 or 5 AP 

Grade 3 AP 



CHM 101 General Chemistn' I (subject to placement exani) 
GEN 101 Natural Science: The Physical Sciences 



Computer Science' 



CSC 243 Principles of Computer Programming in C+ + 



Economics 

Microeconomics 
Macroeconomics 



ECO 121 Introduction to Economics 
Elective Credit 



32 



English 

Language and Composition 
Grade 4 or 5 AP, 6 or 7 IB 4 
Grade 3 AP or 5 IB 4 

Literature and Composition 
Grade 4 or 5 AP, 6 or 7 IB 4 
Grade 3 AP or 5 IB 4 



Elective Credit 

Essay wUl be evaluated by English facult)^ 

Elective Credit 

Essay will be evaluated by English tacult\' 



French 

Language 
Literature 



ERE 101, FRE 102 Elementan,- French I and II 
General credit in French 



German 

Language 
Literature 



GER 101, GER 102 Elementan,- German I and II 
General credit in German 



Government' 



POL 101 Introduction to American Politics 



History 

American 
European 



Elective Credit 
Elective Credit 



Japanese 



JPN 101, JPN 102 Elementar)- Japanese 1 and II 



Latin 



LAT 101, LAT 102 Elementan- Latin I and II 



Mathematics* 

Calculus AB 
Calculus BC 
Statistics 



MAT 131 Calculus I 

MAT 131, MAT 132 Calculus I and II 

MAT 1 1 1 Statistics 



Music' 

Theory 
Appreciation 



Content will be evaluated by music faculty- 
COR 103 Music and Culture 



Physics' 

Physics B 
Physics C 



10 

4 



PHY 101, PHY 102 General Physics I and II 
PHY 201, PHY 202 CoUege Physics I and II 
GEN 101 Natural Science: The Physical Sciences 



Psychology' 



PSY 101 Psychological Inquiry- 



Spanish 

Language 
Literature 



SPN 101, SPN 102 Elementan,- Spanish I and II 
General credit in Spanish 



1 . - . 

Credit for the IB exam will be determined through discussion with the faculr\- within the 

appropriate academic field. Any exams not included in this chart should be brought to the attention 

of the Registrar, and the appropriate faculty members will determine credit. 



33 



34 



Financial Assistance 




Programs 

Oglethorpe University offers a variety of strategies and resources to keep the net cost 
of an Oglethorpe education affordable. Both need-based aid and awards based on academic 
achievement are available. Students interested in financial aid should complete the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). FAFSA is the approved needs-analysis form bv 
which students may apply for the following need-based programs: Federal Pell Grant, Federal 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study, Federal 
Stafford Loan, Leveraging Educational Assistance Program, and the Oglethorpe Need-based 
Grant. After a student submits the FAFSA to the federal processor, the school will receive from 
the processor an Institutional Student Information Record (ISIR). Upon acceptance to the 
University and receipt of the student's ISIR, Oglethorpe's financial aid professionals will prepare 
a comprehensive financial aid package, which may include assistance from any one or more of the 
following sources: 

James Edward Oglethorpe Scholarships provide tuition, room and board for four 
years of undergraduate study, if scholarship criteria continue to be met. Recipients are selected on 
the basis of an academic competition held on campus in the spring of each year. Smdents must 
have a combined SAT score of at least 1360 (ACT 31), a 3.75 or higher cumulative grade-point 
average, and a superior record of leadership in extracurricular activities either in school or in the 
communit}'. For application procedures and deadlines, contact the Admission Office. 

Oglethorpe Scholars Awards (OS A) (including Presidential Scholarships, Oxford 
Scholarships, Universit}' Scholarships, and Lanier Scholarships) are based on achievement and 
available to entering students with superior academic abilit}'. A fundamental aim of Oglethorpe 
Universit}' is to prepare students for leadership roles in societ}'. One way of promoting this 
purpose is to give special recognition to students who demonstrate superior academic abilities as 
undergraduates. Scholarships range from $4,000 to $11,000. 

Recipients of funds from this program are expected to maintain specified levels of 
academic achievement and make a significant contribution to the Oglethorpe communit}". Each 
award is for one year but can be renewed on the basis of an annual evaluation of academic and 
other performance factors. 

Oglethorpe Christian Scholarships are awarded to freshmen who are residents of 
Georgia and who demonstrate active participation in their churches. Academic qualifications for 
consideration include SAT scores of 1100 or higher and a senior class rank in the upper 25 
percent. Awards range up to $1,500 per academic year. Recipients are required to maintain a 3.0 
cumulative grade-point average and engage in a service project during the academic year. For 
application procedures and deadlines, contact the Admission Office or the Office of Financial 
Aid. 

Georgia Tuition Equalization Grants (GTEG) are available for Georgia residents 
who are full-time, degree-seeking students at Oglethorpe. The program was established by an act 
ot the 1971 Georgia General Assembly. The GTEG program helps to "promote the private 
segment of higher education in Georgia by providing non-repayable grant aid to Georgia residents 
who attend eligible independent colleges and universities in Georgia." All students must complete 
an application and verify their eligibility for the grant. In the 2004-05 academic school year, this 
grant is $900. Financial need is not a factor in determining eligibilit\'. A separate application and 
proof of residency is required. 



36 



HOPE Scholarships of $1,5UU per semester are available U) Gec^rgia residents who 
have graduated from an eligible high school in 1996 or later, with at least a 3.0 grade-point average 
in specific core curriculum classes. Georgia residents who do not qualify under these guidelines 
but have now attempted 30 or more semester hours with a 3.0 grade-pcjint average or higher may 
also be eligible. The applicant must be a Georgia resident for one year prior to attendance at any 
college or universit}' in Georgia. Applicants must be registered as full-time, degree-seeking 
students at a participadng Georgia private college or university. Students entering the HOPE 
Scholarship program for the first time after attempting 30 or 60 semester hours should be aware 
that their grade-point average is calculated to include all attempted hours taken after high school 
graduation. Recipients of the Scholarship are required to maintain a 3.0 or higher cumulative 
grade-point average for reinstatement. For more informadon, contact the HOPE Scholarship 
Program (770) 724-9000 or (800) 505-GSFC, or the Office of Financial Aid at (Oglethorpe 
Universit}'. 

The Leveraging Educational Assistance Program (LEAP) is one of the need-based 
grants for qualified Georgia residents to enable them to attend eligible post-secondary institutions 
of their choice in the state. The grant awards are designed to provide only a portion of the 
student's resources in financing the total cost of a coUege education. A student should complete 
the FAFSA for consideration. 

The Federal PeU Grant is a federal aid program that provides non-repavable funds to 
eligible students. Flligibilitv is based upon the results from the FAFSA. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are awarded to 
undergraduate students with exceptional financial need. Priorit\' is given to Federal Pell Grant 
recipients and does not require repayment. 

Oglethorpe Need-based Grants are available to full-time dav undergraduate students 
who demonstrate financial need by completing the FAFSA. Oglethorpe Need-based Grants in 
conjunction with federal, state, private, or institutional assistance cannot exceed the student's 
financial need. 

Federal Work-Study Program (FWSP) permits a student to earn part of his or her 
educational expenses. The earnings from this program and other financial aid cannot exceed the 
student's financial need. Students eligible for this program work part time primarily on the 
Oglethorpe campus. A Limited number of communit}' service positions are available at locations 
near the campus. 

Federal Perkins Loans are long-term, low-cost educational loans to students who have 
demonstrated need for such assistance. Priorit}- is given first to sophomore, junior, or senior 
students. Interest is charged at a five percent annual rate beginning nine months after the borrower 
ceases to be at least a half-time student (a minimum course load of six semester hours). 
Information regarding repayment terms, deferment and cancellation options is available in the 
Office of Financial Aid. 

Federal Stafford (Subsidized and Unsubsidized) Loans are long-term loans 
available through banks and other lending institutions. Students must submit the FAFSA and be 
attending at least half time to receive consideration. A separate Master Promissory Note (MPN) 
is also required. Information regarding repayment terms, deferment and cancellation options are 
available in the Office of Financial Aid. 

Federal PLUS Loans are relatively long-term loans available through banks and other 
lending institutions. Parents desiring to seek a loan from this program should consult the various 
lenders indicated on the Oglethorpe Universit}^ Lender List for additional information. This Ust 
may be found in the current "Financial Aid Info Guide" available in the Office of Financial .Aid. 



37 



Choral Music Scholarships (Performance) are awarded annually to incoming students 
pursuing any degree offered at Oglethorpe who demonstrate exceptional achievement in choral 
singing or kej'board accompanying. Candidates must be nominated with a letter of 
recommendation by the conductor of their choral ensemble on a special form obtainable from 
the Director of Musical Activities at Oglethorpe. 

Playmakers Scholarships (Performance) are awarded annually to current students who 
have demonstrated exceptional ability in the area of dramatic performance and a strong 
commitment to Oglethorpe's theatre program. Awards are based on abiUt}', not financial need. 

Note: Dual-degree students in art and engineering may not use Oglethorpe assistance 
to attend other institutions. 



38 



Academic Policies Governing Student Financial Aid 

Applicants for federal aid, state grants, or institutional need-based programs must be 
making sadsfactorv progress toward the completion of their degree requirements and be in good 
academic standing with the Universit)' in order to receive financial aid consideration. Students 
must meet at least the following requirements: 

1. Satisfactory Completion Ratio — Students must satisfactorily complete at least 75 
percent of the cumulative course work attempted at Oglethorpe Universit}'. 
Unsatisfactorv grades that count against the student's progress are: 

D — If a "C-" or better is required for the major 

F — Failure 

FA — Failure bv Absence 

NG - No Grade 

W - Withdrew Passing 

WF - Withdrew Failing 

WX — Grade Withdrawn/ Freshman Forgiveness Policy 

I — Incomplete 

U — Unsatisfactory 

AU - Audit 

2. Repeated Courses — Courses that are being repeated will not be considered when 
determining financial aid eligibiUt}' unless a grade of at least a "C" is required to fulfill 
the degree requirements. The student must notify the Office of Financial Aid if a course 
is being repeated. 

3. Good Academic Standing and Maximum Time Frames — Students must remain in 
good academic standing by achieving the minimum cumulative grade-point average and 
bv completing their degree requirements within the maximum time frames Listed below: 



Number of Hours 


Minimum Cumulative 


Maximum Years to 


Earned 


Grade-Point Average 


Complete Program * 


0-24 


1.50 




1 


25-35 


1.50 




2 


36-48 


1.75 




2 


49-64 


1.75 




3 


65-72 


2.00 




3 


73-96 


2.00 




4 


97-120 


2.00 




5 


121-144 


2.00 




5 



* Based upon full-time enrollment. The maximum time frame for students enrolled part 
time will be pro-rated. Students who earn over 144 hours will not be eligible for financial 
aid unless approved through the appeal process. 

4. Academic Standing Consistent with Graduation Requirements - Students who 
have completed their second academic year (measured as a period of time, not grade 
level) must maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average in order to be 
academically consistent with Oglethorpe Universit}'s graduation requirements. 



39 



5. Annual Review - The satisfactory progress requirements will be reviewed at the 
completion of each spring semester. If the student is not meeting these requirements, 
written notificadon will be sent to the student placing him or her on "Financial ^-Vid 
Probation" for the fall semester. The student may continue to receive aid during this 
probationary period but will be encouraged to enroll in summer session courses at 
Oglethorpe Universit}' in order to make up the deficiency. Any student who is not in 
compliance with the requirements by the end of the fall probationar}' period will not be 
eligible for financial aid for the spring or subsequent sessions until the requirements are 
met or a written appeal is submitted and approved. 

6. Appeal Process - If significant mitigating circumstances have hindered a student's 
academic performance and the student is unable to make up the deficiencies bv the end 
of the financial aid probationary period, the student may present those circumstances in 
a written appeal to the Admission and Financial Aid Committee. Documentation to 
support the appeal, such as medical statements, should also be presented. The appeal 
should be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid at least two weeks prior to the start 
of the semester for which the student wishes to receive consideration. The student will 
be notified in writing if the appeal has been approved or denied. 

Application Procedure 

Students applying for the Georgia Tuition Equalization Grant and HOPE Scholarship 
programs for the first time must submit a Georgia Tuition Equalization Grant Application which 
may be obtained from the Georgia Student Finance Commission Web site at irmi'.gsfc.org. The 
application may also be completed online at that site. 

Smdents meeting the requirements for an Oglethorpe Scholars Award (OSA) are 
considered for such based on their admission application. Students applying for an Oglethorpe 
Christian Scholarship must complete the appropriate scholarship application, which mav be 
obtained from the Admission Office. 

The application procedures for the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Oglethorpe Need-based Grant, Federal 
Stafford Loan, Federal Work-Study Program, and Leveraging Educational Assistance Program are 
as follows: 

1. Apply and be admitted as a regular degree-seeking student. 

2. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after January 1 , but no 
later than May 1 . Students should keep a copy of the FAFSA before submitting it to the 
federal processor. The original FAFSA may be filed electronically at 
http: 1 1 mmv.fafsa.ed.gov or mailed to the processor using the paper form. Oglethorpe's 
Federal Code is 001586. 

3. Once the FAFSA has been received and processed by the federal processor, an 
Institutional Student Information Record (ISIR) will be sent to the Office of Financial 
Aid. 

4. Keep copies of all federal income tax returns, etc. as these documents may be required 
in order to verify the information provided on the FAFSA. 

5. Complete Oglethorpe's Financial Aid Application, which is available from the Office of 
Financial Aid. 



40 



6. New students who are offered employment through the Federal Work-Study Program 
must complete the Student Employment Application form. This form will be sent as 
needed. 

7. If eligible for a Federal Stafford Loan or Federal PLUS Loan, a Master Promissory Note 
(MPN) must be completed. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for more information. 

Federal Aid Eligibility Requirements 

1. Demonstrate financial need (exception: Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan and Federal 
PLUS Loan programs). 

2. Have a high school diploma or a General Education Development (GED) certificate or 
pass an independendy administered test approved by the U.S. Department of Education. 

3. Be enrolled as a regular degree-seeking student in an eligible program. 

4. Be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen. 

5. Generally, have a social security number. 

6. Register with Selective Service, if required. 

7. Must not owe a refund on any grant or loan; not be in default on any loan or have made 
satisfactory arrangements to repay any defaulted loan; and not have borrowed in excess 
of the loan limits, under Tide IV programs, at any institution. 

8. Make satisfactory academic progress. Refer to the Academic Policies Governing Student 
Financial Aid. 

9. May not be a member of a religious community', societ}', or order who by direction of 
his or her community, societ}' or order is pursuing a course of study at Oglethorpe, and 
who receives support and maintenance from his or her community, societ}', or order. 

Payment of Awards 

All awards, except Federal Work-Study earnings, and some Federal Stafford Loans, and 
Federal PLUS Loans, are disbursed to students by means of a direct credit to their account. 
Financial aid disbursements are made on a semester-by-semester basis only; disbursement of all 
awards is dependent upon final approval by the Director of Financial Aid. Only when a student's 
fde is complete can aid be credited to the account. 

Renewal of Awards 

Renewal FAFSA information is provided to students by the U.S. Department of 
Education. Students must meet the eligibilit}' requirements indicated above and file the 
appropriate applications for each program. The preferred deadline for receipt of a completed 
financial aid file is May 1. Applicants whose files become complete after this time will be 
considered based upon availability' of funds. 

For renewal of the Oglethorpe Scholars Award, all smdents must maintain a cumulative 
grade-point average consistent with good academic standing. A 3.2 or higher grade-point average 
is required for renewal of a James Edward Oglethorpe scholarship. 



41 



Students who fail to meet the cumulative grade-point average requirement may attend 
Oglethorpe's summer school program in order to make up deficiencies. Courses taken elsewhere 
will not affect the cumulative grade-point average at Oglethorpe. 

In addition to the cumulative grade-point average requirement, students must earn at 
least 24 semester hours during the current academic year. Students who are deficient in the 
number of hours required might attend summer school at Oglethorpe. Students also have the 
opfion of submitting a written appeal to the Admission and Financial Aid Committee. 

Students who meet the scholarship renewal criteria will have their awards automatically 
renewed for the next academic year. 

Endowed Scholarships 

Oglethorpe Scholars may receive special recognition of their outstanding achievement 
by being named as an endowed or annual scholar. Selection of this honoran,' designation is based 
upon the criteria outlined below: 

The Ivan Allen Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by a grant from The 
Allen Foundation, Inc., of Atianta, in memory of Ivan Allen Sr., who was a Trustee of the 
University for many years and General Chairman of the first major fundraising campaign. The 
Ivan AUen family and Foundation are long-time benefactors of the Universit}-. Ivan Allen 
Scholars must be from the Southeast, have at least a 3.2 grade-point average, leadership ability 
and demonstrated financial need. 

The Marshall A. and Mary Bishop Asher Endowed Scholar: Funding was 
established by the Asher family in 1988. The late Mr. and Mrs. Asher were both alumni (classes of 
1941 and 1943 respectively) and both served for many years as Trustees of the Universit\; The 
scholarship is awarded to a superior student in science. 

The Keith Baker Endowed Scholarship: Funding was established by former smdents 
in honor of Professor Keith Baker, a valued member of the Oglethorpe accounting facult\- from 
1983 to 1999. This scholarship is awarded annually to a junior majoring in accounting. The smdent 
must demonstrate a strong academic record, active campus and communit\' involvement, relevant 
work experience, and aspirations for a career in the field of accounting. 

The Bank of America Scholars Program: This endowed scholarship program was 
established in 1999 by Bank of America, formerly NationsBank, and is awarded to students 
majoring in business or computer science. 

The Earl Blackwell Endowed Scholar: Earl Blackwell, distinguished publisher, 
playwright, author, and founder of Celebrit}' Services, Inc., headquartered in New York, 
established this scholarship for deserving students with special interest in English, journalism, or 
the performing arts. Mr. Blackwell was a 1 929 graduate of the University. 

The Class of 1963 Endowed Scholar: Funding was established through the efforts of 
the class of 1963. The intention of this scholarship is "to give to others, so thev too can be 
enriched by an Oglethorpe education." 

The Miriam H. and John A. Conant Endowed Scholar: Funding was established bv 
Mrs. Miriam H. "Bimby" and Mr. John A. Conant, long-time benefactors of Oglethorpe and both 
recipients of Oglethorpe Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees. Mrs. Conant served as a 
Trustee of the Universit)' from 1981 until her death in January 2003. Scholarsliips are awarded 
annually to superior students with leadership abilit}'. 



42 



The Michael A. Corvasce Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by 
Dr. and Mrs. Michael Corvasce of Hauppauge, New York, and friends in memory of Michael 
Archangel Corvasce, class of 1979. The scholarship recipient is selected from the three pre- 
medical students who have the highest cumulative grade-point average through their junior years 
and plan to attend an American medical school. This scholarship, which perpetuates Michael 
Archangel Corvasce's interest in Oglethorpe and medicine, takes into consideration the moral 
character of the candidates as well as their academic qualifications. 

The Estelle Anderson Crouch Endowed Scholar: This funding is the first of three 
scholarships given by Mr. John W. Crouch, class of 1929 and a former Trustee of the Universit}' and 
was established in memory of Mrs. Estelle Anderson Crouch, the mother of John Thomas Crouch, 
class of 1965. Mrs. Crouch died in 1960. It is awarded annually without regard to financial need to 
students who have demonstrated high academic standards. 

The Katherine Shepard Crouch Endowed Scholar: Funding was given in memorv of 
Mrs. Katherine Shepard Crouch by Mr. John W. Crouch and is awarded annually based upon 
academic achievement. 

The Cammie Lee Stow Kendrick Crouch Endowed Scholar: This is the third 
scholarship endowed by Mr. Crouch and is awarded annually based upon academic achievement 
in memory of Mrs. Cammie Lee Stow Kendrick Crouch. Mr. and Mrs. Crouch were classmates at 
Oglethorpe and graduates in the class of 1929. 

The Karen S. Dillingham Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was provided by 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Dillingham in loving memory of their daughter. Mr. Dillingham is a former 
Trustee and served for several years as a senior administrator of the Universit}-. The scholarship 
is awarded each year to an able and deserving student. 

The R. E. Dorough Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by a gift from Mr. 
Dorough's estate. Scholarships from this fund are awarded to able and deserving students based 
on the criteria outlined in his will. Mr. Dorough was a former Trustee of the Universit\^. 

The William A. Egerton Memorial Endowed Scholar: Initial funding was 
established in 1988 by alumni Franklin L. Burke '66, Robert B. Currey '66, and Gary C. Harden 
'69 who encouraged other alumni and friends to assist in establishing this endowed scholarship 
fund in memory of Professor Egerton, a highly respected member of the facult}' from 1956 to 
1978. The scholarship is awarded to a smdent with strong academic record and demonstrated 
leadership skills who is majoring in business administration. 

The Ernst & Young Endowed Scholar (formerly Ernst & Whinney): Funding was 
established in 1981 through the efforts of Murray D. Wood, a former vice chairman at Ernst & 
Whinney and by a gift from the accounting firm of Ernst & Whinney of Cleveland, Ohio. 
Scholarship preference will be given to superior students who are majoring in accounting. 

The Henry R. "Hank" Frieman Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Mr. 
Frieman, class of 1936. An outstanding athlete during his days at Oglethorpe, Mr. Frieman spent 
a career in coaching. He is a member of the Oglethorpe Athletic Hall of Fame. This scholarship 
is awarded annually based on academic achievement, leadership qualities, demonstrated need, and 
a special interest in sports. 

The Charles A. Frueauff Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by grants from 
the Charles A. Frueauff Foundation of Littie Rock, Arkansas. Scholarship preference is given to 
able and deserving smdents from middle-income families who do not quaUfi,' for governmental 
assistance. The criteria for selection also include academic abiHt}' and leadership potential. 

The Lu Thomasson Garrett Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in honor of 
Lu Thomasson Garrett, class of 1952, a former Trustee of the University', and a recipient of an 
Oglethorpe Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. Preference for awarding scholarships 
from this fund is given to students who meet the criteria for an Oglethorpe Scholars Award and 
are majoring in education or business administration. 

43 



The Georgia Power Company Endowed Scholar: Funding was established bv a grant 
from the Georgia Power Company of Atlanta. The fund will provide scholarship support for able 
and deserving students from Georgia. Georgia Power Scholars must have at least a 3.2 grade-point 
average, leadership abiUt}' and must demonstrate financial need. 

The Goizueta Endowed Scholar: Established by grants from the Goizueta 
Foundation, this endowment provides need-based scholarships for Hispanic smdents who reside 
in the United States. Participation in high school extracurricular activities and an evaluation of the 
smdent's potential to succeed at Oglethorpe is considered. 

The Walter F. Gordy Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1994 
with a bequest from the Estate of William L. Gordy, class of 1925. Walter Gordy was also an 
alumnus of Oglethorpe, class of 1924. The scholarship fund was increased in 1995 with a bequest 
from the Estate of Mrs. William L. (Helene) Gordy. Scholarships from this fund are awarded at 
the discretion of the University. 

The Bert L. and Emory B. Hammack Memorial Scholar: This is one of three 
scholarships established by gifts from Mr. Francis R. Hammack, a member of the class of 1927 
and brother of Bert L. and Emory B. Hammack. This scholarship, established in 1984, is awarded 
annually to a senior student majoring in science or mathematics, who is a native of Georgia and 
who had the highest academic grade-point average of all such students who attended Oglethorpe 
University in his/her previous undergraduate years. 

The Francis R. Hammack Scholar: Established in 1990, this fund is the second 
endowed financial assistance program created by Mr. Hammack, a member of the class of 1927. 
It is to be awarded annually to a needy but worthy student who is a native of Georgia, a junior 
class member majoring in English, and has attended Oglethorpe University' in his/her prexious 
undergraduate years. 

The Leslie U. and Ola Ryle Hammack Memorial Scholar: Funding of this third 
gift was established in 1985 by Francis R. Hammack, class of 1927, in memory of his parents. It 
is awarded annually to a junior class student working toward the Bachelor of Business 
Administration degree, who is a native of Georgia and who had the highest academic grade-point 
average of all such students who attended Oglethorpe Universit\' in his/her previous 
undergraduate years. 

The Harold Hirsch Foundation Endowed Scholarship: Established in 1981 by the 
Harold Hirsch Foundation with the intent of assisting non-traditional age smdents, this scholarship 
is awarded annually to students enrolled in the Universit\? College program. 

The Ira Jarrell Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1975 to honor the late 
Dr. Jarrell, former Superintendent of Atianta Schools and a 1928 graduate of Oglethorpe. It is 
awarded annually in the fall to a new student who is a graduate ot an Atianta public high school 
studying teacher education. Should there be no eligible applicant, the award may be made to an 
Atianta high school graduate in any field, or the Universit}' may award the scholarship to any 
worthy high school graduate requiring assistance while working in the field of teacher education. 

The Nancy H. Kerr Endowed Scholarship: Funding was established by Margaret 
O.Y. Chin, class of 1987, in honor of former Oglethorpe Universit}' Professor of Psychology and 
Provost Nancy H. Kerr. Scholarships are awarded annually to student(s) who demonstrate 
superior academic achievement, leadership potential, and active communit}^ involvement. 

The Mary Jane Stuart Kohler Memorial Scholarship Fund: The Fund was 
established by family and friends in memory of Mrs. Kohler, a 1990 graduate. The scholarship is 
awarded to a junior or senior female student who demonstrates strong involvement in campus life, 
a positive outiook coupled with diligence and commitment to all she undertakes, and at least a 3.0 
grade-point average. 



44 



The Lowry Memorial Scholar: Established by a bequest from Emma Markham Lowry 
in 1923, awards are made to students who "desire an education but are unable to secure the same 
because of a lack of funds." 

The Vera A. Milner Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Belle Turner 
Lynch, class of 1961 and a Trustee of Oglethorpe, and her sisters, Virginia T Rezetko and Vera 
T. Wells, in memory of their aunt, Vera A. Milner. The scholarship is awarded annually to a fuU- 
time student planning to study at Oglethorpe for the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching in 
Early Childhood Education. Eligibility may begin in the undergraduate junior year at Oglethorpe. 
Qualifications include a grade-point average of at least 3.25, a Scholastic Assessment Test or 
Graduate Record Examinadon score of 1100, and a commitment to teaching. 

The Virgil W. and Virginia C. MUton Endowed Scholar: Funding was established 
through the gifts of their five children. Mr. Milton was a 1929 graduate of Oglethorpe Universit}' 
and a former chairman of the Board of Trustees. He received an Honorary Doctor of Commerce 
degree from Oglethorpe in 1975. This scholarship is awarded based on the applicant's financial 
need, academic achievement, and leadership ability. 

The Dr. Keiichi Nishimura Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by his 
family in memory of Dr. Keiichi Nishimura, a Methodist minister who served in the poor areas 
of Tokyo for over 50 years. The scholarship is awarded to able and deserving international 
students and is based on financial need, academic achievement, and leadership potential. 

The Oglethorpe Christian Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by a grant 
from an Adanta foundation which wishes to remain anonymous. The fund also has received grants 
from the Akers Foundation, Inc., of Gastonia, North CaroUna; the Clark and Ruby Baker 
Foundation of Adanta; and the Mary and E. P. Rogers Foundation of Atlanta. Recipients must be 
legal residents of Georgia and have graduated from Georgia high schools. High school applicants 
must rank in the top quarter of their high school classes and have Scholastic Assessment Test 
scores of 1100 or more; upperclassmen must have a grade-point average of 3.0. Applicants must 
submit a statement from a local minister attesting to their religious commitment, active 
involvement in a local church. Christian character, and promise of Christian leadership and 
service. The Oglethorpe Christian Scholarship Committee interviews applicants. 

The Oglethorpe Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1994 by 
combining several existing scholarship funds created over the previous tu'o decades. This fund 
also allows persons to establish memorials with amounts smaller than would otherwise be 
possible. The following are honored in the Oglethorpe Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund: 

Allen A. and Mamie B. Chappell 

Dondi Cobb Memorial 

Lenora and Alfred Glancy Foundation 

Golden Petrel Memorial 

Diane K. Gray 

P D. M. Harris 

William Randolph Hearst 

Anna Rebecca Harwell HUl and Frances Grace Harwell 

George A. HoUoway Sr. 

Elliece Johnson Memorial 

Ray M. and Mary Elizabeth Lee Foundation 



45 



The Manning M. Pattillo Jr. Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1988 by 
the Oglethorpe Nadonal Alumni Associadon from gifts received from many alumni and friends. 
Dr. Pattillo was Oglethorpe's 13* president, serving from 1975 until his retirement in 1988. In 
recognition of his exemplary leadership in building an academically strong student body and a 
gifted faculty, the scholarship is awarded to an academically superior smdent with demonstrated 
leadership skills. 

The E. Rivers and Una Rivers Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by the 
late Mrs. Una S. Rivers to provide for deserving students who qualify for the Oglethorpe 
Scholars Award. 

The Fred C. Robey Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Fred C. Robey, a 
1997 graduate of Oglethorpe University. This scholarship is awarded based upon financial need 
to students enrolled in University College. 

The J. Mack Robinson Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Adanta 
businessman J. Mack Robinson. It is awarded to a deserving student who meets the general 
qualifications of the Oglethorpe Scholars Award. Preference is given to students majoring in 
business administration. 

The John P. Salamone Endowed Scholar: This scholarship was established bv Ben 
Salamone in honor of his son, John P. Salamone, a graduate of the class of 1986 who died in the 
World Trade Center attack on September 11, 2001. The scholarship is awarded annuallv to a 
student leader from New Jersey, New York, or Connecticut who is involved, or demonstrates the 
potential to be involved, in campus activities such as the intramural program, the athletic program, 
etc. Preference is given to a male student from New Jersey. 

The Steve and Jeanne Schmidt Endowed Scholar: Funding was established bv jVIr. 
and Mrs. Schmidt to support an outstanding student based upon high academic achievement and 
leadership in student affairs. Mr. Schmidt, class of 1940, is a former Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees and a recipient of an Oglethorpe Honorary Doctor of Laws degree. Mrs. Schmidt is a 
member of the class of 1942. 

The Timothy P. Tassopoulos Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1983 by 
S. Truett Cathy, founder of Chick-fil-A Inc., in honor of Timothy P. Tassopoulos, a 1981 graduate 
of Oglethorpe University. This scholarship is awarded to individuals who demonstrate academic 
achievement and leadership abilit}'. 

The Dr. Heyl G. and Ruth D. Tebo Endowed Scholar: Funding was established bv 
Dr. and Mrs. Tebo in 1994 to support Georgia residents majoring in chemistry, biology or other 
sciences. Preference is given to students who plan to do graduate smdy in medicine, dentistry or 
other specialties in the health sciences field. Dr. Tebo is an alumnus of Oglethorpe, class of 1937. 

The J. M. TuU Scholar: Funding was established by a gift from the |. M. Tull 
Foundation in 1 984. Scholarships are awarded annually to superior smdents with leadership abilit}- 
as weU as financial need. 

The United Technologies Corporation Endowed Scholar: Funding was established 
by a grant from the United Technologies Corporation, Hartford, Connecticut. The fund proxides 
scholarship support for able and deserving students who are majoring in science or pursuing a pre- 
engineering program. United Technologies Scholars must have at least a 3.2 grade-point average 
and leadership ability, as well as financial need. 



46 



The Charles Longstreet Weltner Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was 
established in 1993 by former United States Senator Wychc Fowler Jr., his longtime friend and 
colleague. An alumnus of the class of 1948 and trustee of Oglethorpe Universit}', Charles 
Weltner was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia at the time of his death in 1 993. He 
was the recipient of the "Profile in Courage" award in 1991 and a recipient of an Oglethorpe 
Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. He was a tireless advocate for equal rights for 
minorities and, while serving in the United States House of Representatives, was the only 
congressman from the Deep South to vote for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Weltner Scholarships 
are awarded annually to selected Oglethorpe students who are residents of the State of Georgia 
with financial need, satisfactory academic records, and, to the extent allowed by law, of African- 
American descent. At the donor's request, the amount of the scholarship award to any recipient 
is to be no more than one-half of fuU tuition in order to encourage student recipients to work 
to provide required additional funds. 

The L. W. "Lefty" and Frances E. Willis Endowed Scholar: Funding was 
established by the family of the late L. W. "Lefty" Willis, class of 1925. Preference will be given 
to outstanding students who are pursuing a pre-engineering program. This award is based on 
academic achievement, leadership abiUt}', and financial need. 

The Vivian P. and Murray D. Wood Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by 
gifts from Mr. and Mrs. Murray D. Wood. Mr. Wood is a former vice chairman of the Board of 
Trustees and former chairman of Oglethorpe University's Campaign for Excellence. Scholarship 
preference is given to superior students who are majoring in accounting. 

The David, Helen, and Marian Woodward Endowed Scholar: Funding was 
established by grants from the David, Helen, and Marian Woodward Fund of Atianta to provide 
assistance to students who meet the criteria for an Oglethorpe Scholars Award. The award is based 
upon superior academic achievement, leadership potential, and financial need. 

The Louise H. Woodbury Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by the late 
Mrs. Louise H. Woodbury. Scholarship preference is given to a worthy student in need. 

Annual Scholarships 

The BCES Foundation Urban Leadership Scholar: Funding is provided annuaUv 
for a sophomore, junior, or senior who is enrolled in the Rich Foundation Urban Leadership 
Program. 

First Families of Georgia (1733 to 1797) Annual Scholar: Funding is awarded to an 
academically superior senior majoring in history. First Families of Georgia is a society- whose 
members are able to document their descent from early settiers of the State of Georgia. 

The Wilson P. Franklin Annual Scholar: Funding is awarded to a deser\'ing student. 
Mr. Franklin, class of 1939, established this scholarship with a gift in 1995. 

The Mack A. Rikard Annual Scholar: Funds were established in 1990 by Mr. Mack 
A. Rikard, class of 1937 and a former Trustee of the University. He received an honorary Doctor 
of Commerce degree from Oglethorpe in 1 992. Funds are awarded to able and deserving students 
who meet certain criteria. The criteria are flexible, with consideration being given to a number of 
factors, including without limitation academic achievement, leadership skills, potential for success, 
evidence of propensity for hard work, and a conscientious application of abilities. Recipients must 
be individuals born in the United States of America and are encouraged, at such time in their 
business or professional careers when financial circumstances permit, to pro\ide from their own 
funds one or more additional scholarships to worthy Oglethorpe students. 

The Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation Scholar: Grants have been made annually 
for a number of years to Christian women from the Southeastern states who are deser\ing and in 
need of financial assistance. 

47 



Endowed Professorships and Lecture Series 



Frances I. Eeraerts Professor of Foreign Language: This professorship was 
established in 1 997 by a bequest from the estate of Miss Eeraerts, a non-traditional student who 
graduated in 1976. 

Milner Professor of Education: The Milner Professorship was established in 1988 by 
the Vera A. Milner Charitable Trust. The trustees of the Milner Trust, Belle Turner Lynch, class 
of 1961, Virginia Turner Rezetko, and Vera Turner Wells, created the professorship in honor of 
their aunt. Vera A. Milner. The holder of the professorship is a scholar in early childhood 
education. 

Manning M. Pattillo Jr. Professor of Liberal Arts: This professorship was 
established in 1991 through the generosit}' of Miriam H. and John A. Conant and the John H. and 
Wilheknina D. Harland Charitable Foundation in honor of Dr. Pattillo, the 13* president of 
Oglethorpe from 1975 to 1988. The professorship honors the work of an outstanding faculty- 
member. A new Pattillo Professor is chosen every two years. 

The Mack A. Rikard Chair in Business Administration and Economics and 
Lecture Series: The Mack A. Rikard Chair supports a scholar in business administration or 
economics, advancing Mr. Rikard's own interest in the free enterprise system. The chair also 
coordinates the Rikard Lecture Series, aimed at helping college students understand current issues 
in business. Established in 1991 by Mr. Rikard, a 1937 alumnus and an honorary degree recipient, 
the lectures bring to campus guest speakers who are recognized leaders in their professions. The 
series is intended to foster in students a particular appreciation of economics. 



Endowed Prize Funds 



The Lu Thomasson Garrett Annual Award for Meritorious Teaching: This prize 
was created in 1994 through the generosit}' of Mr. and Mrs. David (Lu La Thomasson) Garrett. 
The late Mrs. Garrett was a 1952 graduate, an Oglethorpe honorary degree recipient, and member 
emerita of the Board of Trustees. The prize is awarded annually to an outstanding faculr\' member 
selected by a committee of his or her peers. 

The Anne Rivers Siddons Award: This fund was endowed by Anne Rivers Siddons, 
the celebrated novelist, former member of the Board of Trustees, Oglethorpe honorarv degree 
recipient, and daughter of L. Marvin Rivers, a 1928 graduate. The prize is awarded annuaUv to a 
graduating senior majoring in English who has submitted the best work of short fiction. 



Special Purpose Named Endowed Funds 



The Herman Daughtry Fund: This fund was established in 1980 by a gift from the 
Daughtry Foundation. It provides support for professional travel and scholarship bv the President 
and for special projects relating to the Office of the President. 

The Grenwald Faculty Salary Endowment: This fund was established in 1991 bv a 
bequest from Edward S. Grenwald. Mr. Grenwald was a law professor before coming to Adanta 
to engage in the private practice of law. He served as a member of the Oglethorpe Universin' 
Board of Visitors and of the Board of Trustees. The fund is part of the Universirv s permanent 
endowment and, at Mr. Grenwald's request, used primarily for the enhancement of facult\- salaries. 

The Eugene W. Ivy Endowment Fund: Established bv planned gifts from Mr. l\-\\ a 
1949 graduate of Oglethorpe, the Fund provides unrestricted income to the Universin". 



48 



The National Endowment for the Humanities Core Curriculum Endowment: In 

1996, Oglethorpe Universit}' was awarded a challenge grant in the amount of 5300,000, which 
enabled the University to raise a total of $1.1 million for an endowment to support the Core 
Curriculum and library purchases for the Core. 

The Cemal and Armagan Ozgorkey Entrepreneurial Endowment Fund: Created 
in 2001 by Cemal, class of 1984, and Armagan, class of 1985, Ozgorkey, the fund supports 
entrepreneurial acdvities in the Division of Economics and Business Administradon. Such 
acdvities include residencies by guest entrepreneurs and business plan competidons. 

The Pattillo Faculty Lounge Endowment Fund: Created in 2000 by the PatdUo 
Family Foundation in honor of Manning M. PatdUo Jr., the 13"^^ president of Oglethorpe, this 
fund provides a permanent source of funds to maintain and improve the Facult}' Lounge on the 
third floor of Hearst Hall. 

The Garland Pinholster Fund for Academic and Athletic Excellence: The fund 
was established in 1995 by friends and admirers in honor of Mr. Pinholster, who served as Athletic 
Director and Head Basketball Coach from 1956 to 1966. Mr. Pinholster received an honorary 
Doctor of Humane Letters from Oglethorpe in 2004. The fund provides incremental funding 
beyond the Athletic Department's normal operating budget. 

The Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program Endowment: Established in 
1996 by the Rich Foundation, this endowment provides funding for the Rich Foundation Urban 
Leadership Program, a certificate program that challenges its participants to pursue their 
leadership potential while utilizing the cit}' of Atianta as a living laboratory. 

The Philip Weltner Endowment: This fund was created in 1981 by memorials to Dr. 
Philip Weltner, the sixth president of Oglethorpe. Earnings from the fund support instruction in 
"human understanding, citizenship, and communit}' service," three of the pillars of the 
Oglethorpe curriculum during the Weltoer years, 1944 to 1953. 

Student Emergency Loan Funds 

The Olivia Luck King Student Loan Fund provides short-term loans to enrolled 
smdents from Georgia. Her husband, Mr. C. H. King of Marietta, Georgia, established the fund 
in memory of Mrs. King. Mrs. King was a member of the class of 1942, and Mr. King received 
his master's degree from Oglethorpe in 1936. 

The David N. and Lutie P. Landers Revolving Loan Fund pro\ades short-term 
loans for needy and deserving students. The fund was established by a bequest from the estates 
of Mr. and Mrs. Landers of Atianta. 

The Steve Najjar Student Loan Fund provides short-term loans and financial 
assistance to deserving Oglethorpe smdents. The fund was established in memory of Mr. Najjar, 
who, with his aunt "Miss Sadie" Mansour, operated the Five Paces Inn, a family business in the 
Buckhead section of Atianta. The Five Paces Inn was a popular establishment for Oglethorpe 
smdents for many years. A number of Oglethorpe alumni, especially students in the late 1950s and 
early 1960s, established this fund in Mr. Najjar's memory. 



49 



50 



Tuition and Costs 




Fees and Costs 



The fees, costs, and dates listed below are for 2004-05. Financial information for 2005- 
06 will be available in early 2005. 

The tuition charged by Oglethorpe University represents only 63 percent of the actual 
expense of educating each student, the balance coming from endowment income, gifts, and other 
sources. Thus, every Oglethorpe undergraduate is the beneficiary of a hidden scholarship. At the 
same time, 90 percent of the students are awarded additional financial assistance in the form of 
scholarships, grants, and loans from private, governmental, or institutional sources. 

The tuition is $10,450 per semester. Room and board (subject to size and location) is 
$3,550 per semester. Students who desire single rooms are assessed $4,455 for room and board. 

The tuition of $10,450 is applicable to all students taking 12-17 semester hours. These 
are classified as full-time smdents. Students taking less than 12 semester hours are referred to the 
section on Part-Time Fees. Students taking more than 17 hours during a semester are charged 
$410 for each additional hour. Payment of tuition and fees is due three weeks prior to registration 
each semester. Failure to make the necessary payments will result in the cancellation of the 
student's registration. Students receiving financial aid are required to pay the difference between 
the amount of their aid and the amount due by the deadline. Students and parents desiring 
information about various payment options should request the pamphlet "Payment Plans." New 
students who require on-campus housing for the fall semester are required to submit an advance 
deposit of $300 of which $200 is a damage deposit for the room and $100 is an advance deposit 
applied to student fees. New commuting students are required to submit an advance deposit of 
$100. Such deposits are not refundable. However, the deposit is credited to the student's account 
for the faU semester. 

Upon payment of the room and board fees, each student is covered by a Student 
Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan. Coverage begins on the day of registration. Full-time 
students residing off campus may purchase this insurance for $139 per year. International 
students, students participating in any intercollegiate sport and students participating in intramural 
football or basketball are required to have this medical coverage or its equivalent. (Insurance rates 
are subject to change.) 

In addition to tuition and room and board charges, students mav be required to 
subscribe to the following: 

1. Damage Deposit: A $200 damage deposit is required of all resident students. The 
damage deposit is refundable at the end of the academic year after any charge for 
damages is deducted. Room keys and other University propert^" must be returned and 
the required checkout procedure completed prior to issuance of damage deposit 
refunds. Smdents who begin in the spring semester also must pav the $200 damage 
deposit. 

2. Graduating Senior: Degree completion fee of $95. 

3. Science Laboratory Fee: An $85 fee is assessed for each laboratorv course taken. 

4. Art Fee: A $65 fee is assessed on certain art courses. Courses requiring a fee will be 
noted in the semester class schedule. 



52 



FuU-Time Fees - 2004-05 



Full-time on-campus student: 
FaU, 2004 

Tuition $10,450 

Room & Board 3,550 

Damage Deposit 200 

Activity Fee 50 

Advance Deposit 100 

Full-time commuting student: 
FaU, 2004 

Tuition $10,450 

Activity Fee 50 

Advance Deposit 100 



Spring, 2005 

Tuition $10,450 

Room & Board 3,550 

Damage Deposit — 

Acdvity Fee 50 

Advance Deposit — 



Spring 2005 

Tuition $10,450 

Activity Fee 50 

Advance Deposit - 



These schedules do not include the extra cost of single rooms, books and supplies 
(approximately $700 per year), or travel and personal expense. All fees are subject to change. 
Please inquire with the Business Office for a complete Fee Schedule and for 2004-2005 fees. 

Part-Time Fees - 2004-2005 

Students enrolled part-time in day classes during the fall or spring semesters will be 
charged $855 per credit hour. This rate is applicable to those students taking 11 semester hours or 
less. Students taking 12 to 17 hours are classified full-time. Please inquire with the Business 
Office for a complete Fee Schedule. 

Institutional Refund Policy 

The establishment of a refund policy is based on the Universit}''s commitment to a fair 
and equitable refund of tuition and other charges assessed. VCTiile the Universit}' advances this 
policy, it should not be interpreted as a policy of convenience for students to take Ughtiy their 
responsibilit}' and their commitment to the Universit}'. The UniversiU' has demonstrated a 
commitment by admitting and providing the necessary programs and expects students to 
reciprocate that commitment. 

If a student must withdraw from a course or from the Universit}^, an official withdrawal 
form must be obtained from the Registrar's Office and correct procedures followed. The date that 
wiU be used for calculation of a refund for withdrawal or Drop/Add will be the date on which the 
Registrar receives the official form signed by aU required personnel. AH students must follow the 
procedures for withdrawal and Drop/Add in order to receive a refund. Students are reminded that 
aU changes in their academic programs must be cleared through the Registrar; an arrangement 
with an instructor will not be recognized as an official change of schedule. 

This policy has direct implications for students recei\'ing benefits from the \'^eterans 
Administration and other federal agencies as these agencies must be notified when a student 
withdraws or otherwise ceases to attend class. This may result in a decrease in payments to the 
student. See Drop and Add and Withdrawal from the Universit)' in the Academic Regulations and 
Policies section of this B////eti/i. 



53 



Since the University does not retain the premium for insurance coverage, it will not be 
refunded after registration day. Since room and board services are consumed on a daily basis, 
during the period when tuition is to be refunded on a 100 percent basis, the room and board 
refund wiU be prorated on a daily basis. After the 100 percent tuition refund period, room and 
board refunds revert to the same schedule as tuition refunds. All other fees except the advanced 
deposit are subject to the refund schedule as established by the Business Office. 

Return of Title IV Funds Policy 

If a smdent completely withdraws from Oglethorpe Universit}' during the first 60 
percent of the payment period and has received federal student financial assistance, the school 
must calculate the amount of federal funds the student "did not earn." This process is required 
to determine if the school and/or the student must return funds to the federal programs. 

The percentage "not earned" is the complement of the percentage of federal funds 
"earned." If a student withdraws completely before completing 60 percent of the payment period, 
the percentage "earned" is equal to the percentage of the payment period that was completed. If 
the smdent withdraws after completing 60 percent of the payment period, the percentage earned 
is 100 percent. If the smdent has received more federal assistance than the calculated amount 
"earned," the school, or the student, or both, must remrn the unearned funds to the appropriate 
federal programs. 

The school must remrn the lesser of: the amount of federal funds that the smdent does 
not earn; or, the amount of instimtional costs that the student incurred for the payment period 
multiplied by the percentage of funds "not earned." The smdent must remrn (or repay, as 
appropriate) the remaining unearned federal funds. An exception is that smdents are not required 
to remrn 50 percent of the grant assistance received that is their responsibilitjf to repay. 

It should be noted that the Institutional Refund Policy and the federal Return of 
Title IV Funds Policy (R2T4) are separate and distinct. Smdents who completely withdraw after 
Oglethorpe's refund period has passed and before the 60 percent point of the payment period mav 
owe a balance to the University previously covered by federal aid. The withdrawal date used in the 
R2T4 calculation varies depending on the individual smdent's simation. Smdents receiving federal 
assistance are advised to consult the Office of Financial Aid before initiating the withdrawal 
process to see how these new regulations will affect their eligibilit}^ 

Smdent financial aid refunds must be distributed in the following order by federal 
regulation: 

1 . Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loans 

2. Federal Subsidized Stafford Loans 

3. Federal Perkins Loan Program 

4. Federal PLUS loans 

5. Federal Pell Grant Program 

6. Federal SEOG Program 

7. Other federal aid programs 



54 



Financial Obligations 



A student who has not met all financial obligations to the Universit)' will not be aUowed 
to register for courses in subsequent academic sessions; he or she will not be allowed to receive a 
degree from the Universit}^; and requests for transcripts will not be honored. 

Oglethorpe University retains the right to assess finance charges and /or late fees when 
a student's account is past due. In the event a student defaults on pavment of his or her account, 
Oglethorpe retains the right to turn the account over to a third-part}' collection agency. Any cost 
of collections will be the responsibilit}' of the student. 



55 



56 



Student Affairs 




Orientation 



Oglethorpe University provides entering students with the opportunit}' to make a 
successful adjustment to college. The University community's tradition of close personal 
relationships results in an orientation program that fosters the development of these relationships 
and provides much needed information about the University. 

Throughout orientation information is disseminated which acquaints smdents with the 
academic program and the extracurricular life of the campus communit}-. To supplement the 
student's orientation experience, the course Fresh Focus is required for all entering first vear 
students during the first semester. For a description of Fresh Focus, please see the Educational 
Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 

Beginning in Summer 2004, Oglethorpe University will schedule one-day sessions to 
familiarize smdents with the Oglethorpe campus and facilitate the transition to college life. The 
Office of Student Affairs, in collaboration with the Office of Admission and the Provost and 
Senior Vice President, organizes both the summer orientation sessions and fall orientation to 
celebrate the induction of students into the Oglethorpe community. 



International Student Services 



The Office of Admission in Lupton Hall and the Office of Smdent Affairs, which is 
located in the Emerson Student Center, work together to meet the needs of international smdents. 
Through a specially designed orientation program and ongoing contacts, the new international 
smdent is assisted in the process of adjustment to life at an American college. Special tours, host 
family programs, and social occasions are available to ensure that smdents can benefit fuUv from 
cross-culmral experiences. The International Smdent Advisor helps smdents with questions related 
to their immigration stams. 



Housing and Meals 



The residence halls are available to all full-time day smdents. There are single gender and 
co-ed residence halls. A housing staff of Resident Assistants and housing professionals supervise 
each residential area. All freshmen not living at home with a parent or legal guardian are required 
to live on campus. Beginning in the Fall 2005 Semester, all sophomores not li^^ng at home with 
a parent or legal guardian are required to live on campus. 

All smdents living in the residence halls are required to participate in a Universit\' meal 
plan. Meals are served in the Emerson Smdent Center. Nineteen meals are served each week and 
three different meal plan options are available. Two of these options include flex dollars which 
may be used at the Oglethorpe Cafe in Goodman Hall. No breakfast is served on Samrdav, 
Sunday, or holidays. Instead, a brunch is served from mid-morning until early afternoon. An 
evening meal is also served on these days. 

In addition to the residence halls, there are six Greek houses that accommodate some 
members of four fraternities and two sororities. 



Health Services 



The Center for Counseling and Health Services is staffed by a registered nurse, a part- 
time clinic physician, and a licensed psychologist. The center operates on a regular schedule 
during weekdays when classes are in session and provides basic first aid and limited medical 
assistance for students. 

58 



In the event additional or major medical care is required, or for emergencies, the 
student-patient will be referred to medical specialists and hospitals in the area with which the 
health service maintains a working relationship. 

When it is determined that a student's physical or emodonal health is detrimental to his 
or her academic smdies, group-Living situation, or other reladonships at the Universit}' or in the 
community, the student will be required to withdraw. Re-admission to the Universit}' will be 
contingent upon acceptable verification that the student is ready to return. The final decision will 
rest with the University. 

All resident students subscribe to a Student Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan 
provided through the Universit)'. Full-time students Living off campus may purchase this 
insurance. International smdents and students participating in aU intercollegiate sports and 
intramural football are required to enroll in the Insurance Plan or have equivalent coverage. A 
brochure is available at the Center for Counseling and Health Services that describes the coverage 
provided by the plan. 

Counseling and Personal Development 

Counseling and referrals for professional services are available to students experiencing 
a variet)' of personal or social problems. The Center for Counseling and Health Services, staffed 
by a licensed psychologist and assistants, offers individual and group therapy. Special outreach and 
consultation programs are conducted on campus to provide information and promote 
development in leadership skills, interpersonal relationships, sexual abuse, eating disorders, and 
substance use, among others. The center also offers assistance to students encountering academic 
difficulties. Time management, test anxiety and stress reduction, and study skills are programs 
designed to tackle such issues. 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 

Among the enumerated rights of Oglethorpe Universit}' students are freedom of 
expression and peacefiil assembly, the presumption of innocence and procedural fairness in the 
administration of discipline, and access to personal records. 

As members of the Oglethorpe communit}?, students are responsible for maintaining 
high standards of conduct and respecting the privacy and feelings of others and the propert}- of 
both smdents and the Universit}'. Smdents are expected to display behavior that is not disruptive 
of campus life or the surrounding communit}'. They represent the Universit}' off campus and are 
expected to act in a law-abiding and mature fasliion. Those whose actions show that thev have not 
accepted this responsibility may be subject to disciplinary action as set fordi in the Universit}''s 
smdent handbook. The O Book. 

The O Book 

The O Book is the smdent's guide to Oglethorpe Universit}'. It contains thorough 
information on the history, customs, traditional events, and ser^'ices of the Universit}; as well as 
University regulations. It also contains the full texts of the Oglethorpe Universit}' Honor Code, 
the E-mail and Computer Use Policy and the Constimtion of the Oglethorpe Smdent Association. 
This handbook outlines the policies for recognition, membership eligibUit\', and leadership 
positions for campus student organizations and publications. 



59 



Student Role in Institutional Decision Making 



Student opinions and views play a significant role in institutional decisions affecting their 
interests and welfare. A comprehensive standardized student opinion survey is administered to 
students annually. In addition there is the Core Survey administered in core courses, as well as the 
Course Assessment in all courses and the Advising Assessment which all students are asked to 
complete. Students serve on key academic committees such as the Commencement Committee, 
the Core Curriculum Committee, the Experiential Education Committee, the Round Tables 
Committee, and the Teacher Education Council. 

Particularly important is the role of elected student government representatives in this 
process. The president along with selected other officers of the Oglethorpe Student Association 
meet regularly each semester with the University's senior staff to discuss smdent body concerns. 
At least twice each year student government representatives meet with the Campus Life 
Committee of the Board of Trustees. In addition, the Oglethorpe Student Association 
collaborates with the President of the University and the senior staff in sponsoring periodic "town 
meetings" to which all students are invited. 



Oglethorpe Student Association 



The Oglethorpe Student Association is the guiding body for student life at Oglethorpe 
University. The O.S.A. consists of three elected bodies: an executive council, composed of a 
president, two vice presidents, parliamentarian, secretary, treasurer, and presidents of the four 
classes; the senate, chaired by a vice president, and composed of four senators from each class; 
and, the programming board, chaired by a vice president and composed of the freshman class 
president, one senator from each class, and three elected representatives from each class. All three 
bodies meet regularly and the meetings are open to the public. The O.S.A. administers a student 
activity fee that is assessed to all full-time day students. Additional information can be obtained 
from the O.S.A. Office or the Student Center Office located on the lower level of the Emerson 
Student Center. The address is Oglethorpe Student Association, 3000 Woodrow \Xav, N.E., 
Adanta, GA 30319-2797. 



Student Organizations 



Valuable educational experience may be gained through active participation in approved 
campus activities and organizations. All students are encouraged to participate in one or more 
organizations to the extent that such involvement does not deter them from high academic 
achievement. Smdents are encouraged especially to join professional organizations associated \nth 
their interests and goals. 

Eligibility for membership in student organizations is limited to currendv enrolled 
students. To serve as an officer of an organization, a student must be enrolled full time and mav 
not be on academic or disciplinary probation. 



60 



Recognized Student Organizations 



Alpha Chi — National Academic Honorary 
Alpha Phi Omega - National (Coed) 

Service Fraternity 
Alpha Psi Omega — Drama Honorary 
Amnesty International 
Atlanta YAD: Jewish Student Union 
Beta Omicron Sigma - Business Honorary 
Black Student Caucus 
Le Cercle Fran^ais — French Club 
Chi Alpha Sigma - National CoUege Athlete 

Honor Society 
Circle K 

CoUege Democrats 
College Republicans 
ECOS — Environmentally Concerned 

Oglethorpe Smdents 
Fellowship of Christian Athletes 
Feminist Majority Alliance 
Film Club 
International Club 
Interfraternity Council 
Oglethorpe Ambassadors 
Oglethorpe Dancers 
Oglethorpe YAD —Jewish Student 

Organization 
Omicron Delta Kappa — National 

Leadership Honorary 
Order of Omega — Greek Honor Society" 
OU Cheerleaders 
OU Dancers 
OUTlet - Smdents Against Homophobia 



Panhellenic Council 

Phi Alpha Theta - National History 

Honorary 
Phi Beta Delta — Honor Society for 

International Scholars 
Phi Delta Epsilon — International Medical 

Society 
Phi Eta Sigma — Freshman Academic 

Honorary 
The Playmakers — Oglethorpe University 

Theatre 
Psi Chi - National Psychology Honorary 
Psychology and Sociology Club 
Rho Delta 

Rho Lambda — Panhellenic Honorary 
Sigma Pi Sigma — National Physics 

Honorary 
Sigma Tau Delta — National English 

Honorary 
Sigma Zeta — National Science Honorary 
Society of Physics Smdents (SPS) 
ThaUan Society — Philosophical Discussion 

Group 
The Stormy Petrel— Smdent Newspaper 
The Tower — Literary Magazine 
The Yamacraiv — Yearbook 
Ultimate Frisbee 
University Accounting Society 
University Chorale 
University Singers 



61 



Fraternities and Sororities 



The Greek community at Oglethorpe is made up of four fraternities and three 
sororities. The fraternities are Chi Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha Order, and Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. The sororities are Alpha Sigma Tau, Chi Omega, and Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

These organi2ations contribute positively to campus life by providing a variet}' of 
leadership, service, and social opportunities for students. Membership in these organizations is 
voluntary and subject to guidelines established by the Interfraternity Council, the Panhellenic Council, 
and the Assistant Director for Residential Services and Greek Affairs. The fraternit\' and sorority 
recruitment process takes place early in the fall semester. 



Athletics 



At Oglethorpe University the students who participate in intercollegiate athletic 
competition are considered to be smdents first and athletes second. The Universit}' is an active 
member of the Southern CoUegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) and Division III of the National 
CoUegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Members of Division III may not award financial aid 
(other than academic honor awards) to any student-athlete, except upon a showing of financial 
need by the recipient. Oglethorpe provides a program of Oglethorpe Scholars Awards, which is 
described in the Financial Assistance section of this bulletin. Many students who are interested in 
sports and are superior academically do qualify for this form of assistance. 

The University offers intercollegiate competition in basketball, basebaU, soccer, cross- 
country, tennis, golf, and track and field for men; and in soccer, basketball, volleyball, cross- 
country, tennis, golf, and track and field for women. The Stormy Petrels compete against other 
SCAC schools, including Trinity University, MiUsaps College, Rhodes College, The University' of 
the South, Southwestern University, Hendrix CoUege, Centre College, DePauw University', and 
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. The Petrels also challenge teams from schools outside the 
SCAC, such as Emory University and Washington and Lee University. 



Intramural and Recreational Sports 



In addition to intercollegiate competition, an array of intramural and recreational sports 
is offered. There are opportunities for aU students to participate in physically and inteUecmaUv 
stimulating activities. Four competitive team sport seasons are offered in which men and women 
can compete in flag football, volleyball, basketball, wiffle ball, and ultimate frisbee. There are also 
several short seasons or tournaments in soccer, softball, field hockey, lacrosse, bocce, chess, and 
sand volleyball. In addition, aerobics, weight training, dance and fencing classes are also offered at 
the Steve Schmidt Sport and Recreation Center. 



Cultural Opportunities on Campus 



There are numerous cultural opportunities for students outside die classroom, such as 
concerts, theatrical productions, and lectures by visiting scholars. The Mack A. Rikard lect\ires 
expose students to leaders in business and other professions. The University Singers perform 
several times during the year, including seasonal events, often featuring guest artists. The 
Oglethorpe Universit}' Museum of Art, on the third floor of Philip Welmer Library, sponsors 
exhibitions as well as lectures on associated subjects and occasional concerts in the museum. The 
Playmakers, Oglethorpe University Theatre, also stage four productions each year in die Conant 
Performing Arts Center. Two annual events, the Oglethorpe Night of the Arts and International 



62 



Night, provide a showcase for campus talent. The former presents student literary, musical, and 
visual arts talent. The latter features international cuisine and entertainment. The Georgia 
Shakespeare Festival, located permanently on the Oglethorpe campus, has a summer and fall 
schedule of performances that is also a valuable cultural asset to the Oglethorpe communit}'. 

Opportunities in Atlanta 

Oglethorpe is located eight miles from downtown Adanta and just two miles from the 
city's largest shopping center. A nearby rapid transit station makes transportation quick and 
efficient. This proximity to the Southeast's most vibrant cit}' offers students a great variet\' of 
cultural and entertainment oppormnities. There are numerous excellent restaurants and clubs in 
nearby Buckhead. Downtown Adanta offers major league professional baseball, football, ice 
hockey, and basketball to sports fans as well as frequent popular concerts. The Adanta Symphony 
Orchestra performs from September through May in the Woodruff Arts Center. The Adanta 
Ballet and the Adanta Opera perform periodically at the Fox Theater which also presents musical 
theater and various concerts. The Alliance Theatre Company and many smaller companies present 
productions of contemporary and classical plays. The High Museum of Art hosts major traveling 
exhibitions in addition to its permanent collection. The Office of Student Affairs sponsors a series 
of field trips called AdantOUrs to museums, theater and dance programs, and places of cultural 
and historical interest in the metropolitan Adanta area. 

Policy on Discriminatory and Sexual Harassment 

Oglethorpe Universit)- values the dignit}' of the individual, human diversity-, and an 
appropriate decorum for members of the campus communit}'. Harassing behavior interferes with 
the work or smdy performance of the individual to whom it is addressed. It is indefensible when 
it makes the work, study or living environment hostile, intimidating, injurious or demeaning. 

It is the policy of the Universit}' that smdents and employees be able to work, smdv, 
participate in activities and live in a campus community free of unwarranted harassment in the 
form of oral, written, graphic or physical conduct which personally frightens, intimidates, injures 
or demeans another individual. Discriminatory harassment directed against an individual or group 
that is based on race, gender, religious belief, color, sexual orientation, national origin, disabilit}' or 
age is prohibited. Discriminatory harassment is defined as unwelcome oral, written, or physical 
conduct directed at the characteristics of a person or group such as negative name calling and 
imitating mannerisms, slurs, graffiti, or the physical act of aggression or assault upon another 
which interferes with the individual's employment or education, or creates an intimidating, hostile 
or offensive employment or educational environment. 

In addition, sexual harassment of a student bv another student, of a smdent by an 
employee, of an employee by a smdent, or of an employee by another employee will not be 
tolerated and is prohibited. Any unwelcome sexual advance, requests for sexual favors, ^'erbal or 
physical conduct of a sexual nature, or any verbal conduct that might be construed as a sexual slur 
that: 1) interferes with performance or creates a hostile, offensive, or intimidating en^^ronment 
and/or 2) is an expressed or implied condition imposed bv a faculty' member for evaluation or 
grading a student, or by an employee for evaluating job performance or advancement of a 
subordinate or colleague, wiU be viewed as misconduct. 



63 



Grievance Procedures 

Oglethorpe University has adopted an internal grievance procedure providing for the 
prompt and equitable resolution of complaints alleging any action prohibited by regulations under 
Tide VI, Tide VII, Tide IX, Section 504, the Age Discrimination Act, and the Americans with 
Disabilities Act. The following Universit}' officials have been designated to respond to allegations 
regarding violation of any of these regulations: the Vice President for Student Affairs (Mr. 
Timothy Doyle, Emerson Student Center, (404) 364-8336), the Provost and Senior Vice President 
(Dr. Christopher Ames, Lupton Hall, (404) 364-8317), the Director of Human Resources (Ms. 
Carol E. Carter, Lupton Hall, (404) 364-8325), or the University Psychologist and Director of the 
Counseling Center (Dr. Bonnie L. Kessler, Emerson Student Center, (404) 364-8456). 

Complaints alleging misconduct as defined in this poHcy on discriminatorv and sexual 
harassment should be reported within 90 days of the alleged offense. Complainants may seek 
informal or formal resolution. All complainants must complete a written Discriminator}' 
Harassment Incident Report which may be obtained from any of the aforementioned officials. 

Complainants are encouraged to explore informal resolution before fULng a formal 
complaint. Informal resolution focuses on communication, education, and resolution while 
formal procedures focus on investigation and discipline. Informal complaints will be resolved 
within 15 working days with a written resolution given to each of the parties involved. If the 
situation results in an impasse, the complainant will be given a notice of impasse within 15 
working days from the fiHng of the incident. If a notice of impasse is given and the complainant 
wishes to file a formal written complaint, the complainant must do so within 30 working days of 
the date of notice of impasse unless a waiver in filing time is requested. 

WTien a formal complaint is filed an investigation will be initiated. The alleged harasser 
will be given 10 days to provide a signed response to the requesting official. A copy wlU be 
provided to the complainant. If the alleged harasser falls to respond, the presumption wUl be 
made that the allegation(s) in the complaint are true. A written determination will be issued to the 
complainant within 60 working days of the receipt of the formal written complaint. If the 
procedure requires an extension of time, the complainant wiU be informed in writing of the 
reasons, the status of the investigation, and the probable date of completion. 

If the complainant disputes the findings or is dissatisfied with the recommendations, the 
complainant may request reconsideration of the case to the president, Larry D. Large, in writing 
within 45 working days of receipt of the written determination. Complainants also have the right 
to fde with the appropriate state or federal authorities under Tide VI, Tide VII, Tide IX, Section 
504, the Age Discrimination Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

Cases that may require disciplinary action wiU be handled according to the established 
discipline procedures of the Universit}'. Smdent organizations in \'iolation of this policy may be 
subject to the loss of Universit}' recognition. Complainants shall be protected from unfair 
retribution. 

Nothing in this policy statement is intended to infringe on the indi\Tidual rights, freedom 
of speech, or academic freedom provided to members of the Oglethorpe communitv The 
scholarly, educational, or artistic content of any written or oral presentation or inquiry shall not 
be limited by this policy. Accordingly, this provision wiU be liberally construed but should not be 
used as a pretext for violation of the policy. 



64 



Honors and Awards 



These awards are presented at Commencement or at the Honors and Awards 
Convocation: 

Donald C. Agnew Award for Distinguished Service: This award is presented 
annually by members of the Oglethorpe Student Associadon and is chosen by that body to honor 
the person who, in their opinion, has given disdnguished service to the Universit}'. Dr. Agnew 
served as President of Oglethorpe University? from 1 957 to 1 964. 

Alpha Chi Award: This is an annual award made to the member of the sophomore 
class who best exemplifies the ideals of Alpha Chi in scholarship, leadership, character, and 
service. 

Alpha Phi Omega Service Award: This award is presented by Alpha Phi Omega 
fraternit}' to the student, faculty; or staff member who best exemplifies the organization's three- 
fold purposes of leadership, friendship, and service. 

Alpha Psi Omega Rookie Award: This award is presented annuaUv to the outstanding 
new member of The Playmakers. 

Art Awards of Merit: These are presented to students who have displayed excellence 
in photography, sculpture, painting and drawing. 

Leo BUancio Award: This award, created in memory of Professor Leo Bilancio, a 
member of the Oglethorpe history facult}' from 1958 to 1989, was established by the Oglethorpe 
Student Association and is presented to a graduating senior who has been an outstanding student 
of history. 

Mary Whiton Calkins and Margaret Floy Washburn Awards: Outstanding seniors 
majoring in psychology are honored with these awards. 

Chiaroscuro Juried Art Show Awards: These awards are presented to the artists who 
submit the best drawings, sculpture, photographs, and paintings to the annual student art show 
sponsored by Chiaroscuro, a club that supports the arts on campus. 

The Chanda Creasy Music Prize (University Singers of the Year): Given annually 
to one male and one female member who, in the opinion of the conductor, has made invaluable 
contributions to the organization and whose musical achievements and commitment has been of 
the highest order. The award is a cash prize, a personal plaque, plus their names listed on a master 
plaque in the University Singers rehearsal room. 

Deans' Award for Outstanding Achievement: This award is presented annually to a 
campus club, organization, or society which, in the opinion of the Vice President for Student 
Affairs and the Provost and Senior Vice President, has contributed most to Universit)' life. 

Financial Executives Institute Award: This award is presented annually by the 
Adanta Chapter of The Financial Executives Institute to students who have demonstrated 
leadership, superior academic performance, and potential for success in business administration. 

Georgia Society of Certified PubUc Accountants Certificate of Academic 
Excellence: This award is presented annually to the accounting major who has the highest overall 
grade-point average. 

Intramural Sports Awards: These awards are presented to the leading teams and 
individual athletes in men's and women's intramural competition. 

Sidney Lanier Prize: This award is given yearly to the student, or students, submitting 
excellent poetry to campus publications. 



65 



LeConte Award: The most outstanding student graduating with a major in one of the 
natural sciences or mathematics, as determined by the faculty in the Division of Natural Sciences, 
is recognized with this award. 

Leader in Action Award: The Leader in Action Award is presented to the student who 
best exemplifies the ideals of the Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program. 

Charles M. MacConnell Award: This award honors a former member of the faculty 
and is presented by the sophomore class to the senior who, in the judgment of the class, has 
participated in many phases of campus life without having received full recognition. 

Metropolitan Atlanta Phi Beta Kappa Alumni Association Award: This award is 
given to the outstanding graduating senior in the Honors Program. 

The James Edward Oglethorpe Awards: Commonly called the "Oglethorpe Cups," 
these are presented annually to the man and woman in the graduating class who, in the opinion of 
the faculty, have excelled in both scholarship and service. 

Oglethorpe Poet Laureate: This award was first instituted by Mrs. Idalee Vonk, wife 
of former President Paul Vonk, and is an honor that is bestowed upon a freshman, sophomore, 
or junior who presents the best written work to The Tower for competition. 

Omicron Delta Kappa Emerging Leader Award: This award is made by Omicron 
Delta Kappa to the student in the freshman class who most fully exemplifies the ideals of this 
organization. 

Order of Omega Outstanding Sophomore Award: This award is presented by the 
Order of Omega, a national Greek honor society', to the sophomore who best exemplifies the 
principles of Greek life. 

Outstanding Male and Female Varsity Athletes of the Year Award: These awards 
are made annually to the outstanding male and female students participating in varsit}' sports. 

Outstanding Improvement in French Studies: This award honors the student who 
demonstrates excellence and dedication in French studies. 

Outstanding Mathematics/Computer Science Senior Award: This award 
recognizes the most exceptional senior majoring in either mathematics or mathematics and 
computer science. 

Outstanding Politics Senior Award: This award is given annually to die graduating 
senior who, in the judgment of the facult}', does the most sophisticated work in upper-level classes 
within the discipline. 

Outstanding Sociology Senior Aw^ard: The outstanding senior majoring in sociologv 
is honored with this award. 

Pattillo Leadership Award: The President of the Universirv presents this prize to a 
graduating student who has excelled in leadership accomplishments. The award is named for the 
13* President of Oglethorpe Universit}', Manning M. Pattillo Jr. 

Phi Beta Kappa Faculty Group Award: This award is presented by the faculty- and 
staff members of Phi Beta Kappa to the graduating student who, in their judgment, has 
demonstrated outstanding scholarly qualities. 

Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Scholarship Award: This award is presented annually to die 
full-time freshman student with the highest grade-point average by Phi Eta Sigma, a national 
scholastic honor societ}' for freshmen. 

Publications Awards: Notable contributors to The Tower, The Stormy Petrel and The 
Yamacraw are recognized with these awards. 



66 



Resident Assistant of the Year: This award is presented annually to an exemplary 
student who organizes outstanding educational and social programs for dormitory residents and 
builds a sense of community in the residence halls. 

Anne Rivers Siddons Award: This award is given each year to the graduating senior 
majoring in English who is judged to have written the best piece of short tlction. 

The Warren Valine Music Prize (University Singers Most Valuable Member): 
Given annually to the student who is considered by the members of the Singers to be their most 
valuable member, the award is a cash prize, a personal plaque, plus the winner's name listed on a 
master plaque in the Universit}- Singers rehearsal room. 

Charles Longstreet Weltner Award: Sponsored by the -Stormy Petrel Bar Association 
in honor of Chief Justice Charles L. Weltner, class of 1948, this award is presented annuaUy to a 
student who demonstrates analytical and persuasive skills and an appreciation for the elements of 
civic leadership, as determined through a competitive essay and interview process. 

Sally Hull Weltner Award for Scholarship: This award is presented to the smdent in 
the graduating class who has the highest grade-point average on work completed at Oglethorpe 
among the students graduating with academic honors. 

Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities: This honor is given in 
recognition of the merit and accomplishments of smdents who are formally recommended by a 
committee of students, facult\', and administrators, and who meet the requirements of the 
publication IVho 's Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities. 



67 



68 



Academic Regulations 
and Policies 




Academic Advising 



Each student consults with a member of the faculty' in preparing course schedules, 
discussing completion of degree requirements and post-graduation plans, and inquiring about any 
other academic matter. The student's advisor in the first year is the instructor of the Fresh Focus 
section, which the student has selected prior to initial enrollment. The facult}' advisor is each 
student's primary point of contact with the University. 

To change advisors a student must complete the following procedural steps: 

1. Ask the proposed "new" facult}' advisor for permission to be added to the facult}' 
member's advisee list. 

2. Ask the current advisor to send the student file to the facult}' member who has agreed 
to be the smdent's new advisor. 

3. Ascertain that the new advisor has received the file and has sent an Advisor Change 
notice to the Registrar's Office. 

This is the only method for changing academic advisors. 

When the smdent decides or changes a major field, he or she should change ad\isors, if 
necessary, to a facult}' member who has teaching responsibilities in that major field. 



Preregistration and Registration 



Schedule planning and course selection for all students is done online in consultation 
with each student's academic advisor. New students select courses with their facult}- ad\'isor during 
summer orientation or the official registration period that precedes the first day of classes of each 
semester. Returning students should make appointments to consult with their academic ad^-isors 
for course selection during preregistration week — in November for the following spring semester 
and in April for the following summer sessions and fall semester. 

Full-time students wishing to participate in the Atlanta Regional Consortium for Higher 
Education (ARCHE) Cross Registration program (see Cross Registration below) also should select 
courses during the preregistration weeks. 



Cross Registration 



Oglethorpe Universit}' is a member of the Adanta Regional Consortium for Higher 
Education (ARCHE), a consortium of the 19 instimtions of higher education in the greater 
Adanta area. Through the Consortium, full-time Oglethorpe students may enroll on a space- 
available basis in courses at any other member institution. The student need not be admitted to 
the other institution and completes all procedures, including payment of tuition, at Oglethorpe. 
Because of instimtional deadlines, students should complete forms for cross registration during 
Oglethorpe's designated preregistration week. 

Courses taken at Consortium institutions on a cross-registration basis count as 
Oglethorpe courses for residence requirements. While grades earned through Consortium courses 
are not tabulated in grade-point averages, courses with grades of "C" or higher count toward 
graduation requirements. 

Interested students should consult the Registrar for program details. 



70 



Drop and Add 

Students who find it necessary to change their schedule bv dropping or adding 
courses must do so by completing a Drop/Add form from the Registrar's Office. This form 
must be returned to the Registrar's Office during the Drop/Add period as printed in the 
semester's Schedule of Classes. 

Withdrawal from a Course 

From the conclusion of the Drop/Add period through mid-semester or the middle of 
a summer session, changes in schedule constitute a withdrawal. The academic advisor, the 
instructor, and the Office of Financial Aid must approve withdrawals on the appropriate form 
from the Registrar's Office. 

Smdents withdrawing from a course may do so through the 9* week, or two weeks after 
the published mid-semester date with a "W" For two weeks between the 9* and 11''"' weeks, the 
grade "W" or "WF" may be given at the discretion of the instructor. Students withdrawing after 
the Friday that falls on the 11* week will receive a grade of "WF." Only m the case of medical 
emergency or hardship may students appeal a grade of "WF": a physician's letter should be 
submitted to the Provost and Senior Vice President. 

Students should note that any change of academic schedule is not official until it is filed 
in the Registrar's Office. The date the change is received in the Registrar's Office will be the official 
date for the change. 

If a student misses six consecutive class days in any course, the instructor wiU notify the 
Registrar's Office and it will be assumed that the student has unofficially withdrawn from the 
course. This does not eliminate the student's responsibiHt}' stated above concerning official 
procedure for withdrawal. 

Please see Institutional Refund Policy in the Tuition and Costs section of this Btil/etin. 

Withdrawal from the University 

Smdents who must withdraw from the University during a semester are required to 
complete the appropriate withdrawal form, which is available in the Registrar's Office. The Office 
of Financial Aid must also sign approval. The date the completed withdrawal form is submitted 
to the Registrar will be the official date for withdrawal. 

In the case of an emergency deparmre from the campus for which withdrawal forms 
have not been executed, the Registrar's Office may verify that the student has left campus as a 
result of an emergency and notify instructors. 

For absences of a year or more, see Re-admission in the Admission section of this 
Bulletin. 

Class Attendance 

Regular attendance at class sessions, laboratories, examinations, and official University- 
convocations is an obligation which all students are expected to fulfill. 
Facult}' members set attendance policies in their course syllabi. 



71 



Grading 

Faculty members submit mid-semester reports to the Registrar's Office on class rolls 
indicating Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory ("S" or "U"). These mid-semester reports are not part of 
the student's permanent record. 

Faculty members submit letter grades at the end of each semester. These grades become 
part of the student's official record. Once entered, a grade may not be changed except by means 
of an officially executed Change of Grade form. 

A smdent's cumulative grade-point average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the number 
of semester hours of work the smdent has attempted at Oglethorpe into the total number of 
quality points earned. 

The letter grades used at Oglethorpe are defined as follows: 



Grade 

A 
A- 


Meaning 

Superior 


Quality Points Numerical Equivalent 
4.0 93-100 
3.7 90-92 


B+ 




3.3 87-89 


B 


Good 


3.0 83-86 


B- 




2.7 80-82 


C+ 




2.3 77-79 


c 

C- 


Satisfactory 


2.0 73-76 
1.7 70-72 


D+ 




1.3 67-69 


D 


Passing 


1.0 60-66 


F 


Failure 


0.0 59 and below 


FA 


Failure: Excessive Absences* 


W 
WF 

wx 


Withdrew Passing** 
Withdrew FaUing* 
Grade Withdrawn/ 






I 
IP 


Freshman Forgiveness 
(see below) 
Incomplete*** 
In Progress 


Policy 






S 

u 

AU 


Satisfactory**** 
Unsatisfactory* 
Audit (no credit) 


70 or liigher 






Notes: 


* _ 


Grade has same effect as an "F" on the GPx\. 




** _ 


Grade has no effect on the GPA; no credit awarded. 




*** _ 


Grcidp has 'sflmp pffpct as an "F" nr\ the GPA Tf a stnidenf 



is unable to complete the work for a course on time for 
reasons of healdi, family tragedy, or other circumstances 
the instructor deems appropriate, the grade "I" may be 
assigned. If the student completes the work within 30 days 
of the last day of fmal examinations (of the semester in 
question), die instructor will evaluate the work and turn in 



72 



a revised grade. Any "I" not changed by the professor 
within 45 days of the last day of final examinations will 
automatically be changed to a grade of "F." 
**** — Grade has no effect on the GPA; credit is awarded. 

Only work completed at Oglethorpe is reflected in the Oglethorpe grade-point average. 

Good Academic Standing, Probation, and Academic Dismissal 

To be in good academic standing students must achieve the cumulative grade-point 
averages specified below in relation to the number of semester hours they have completed. 

Cumulative GPA Required 
Semester Hours Completed for Good Standing 

0-35 1.50 

36-64 1.75 

65 and above 2.00 

Students who fail to achieve good standing are placed on probation. 

Smdents who do not achieve good standing for two consecutive semesters (poor 
performance in summer sessions excluded) are subject to dismissal from the Universit}' for 
academic reasons. However, successful completion of summer classes taken at Oglethorpe may 
be used to achieve good academic standing. 

New students, freshmen, or transfer students who fail all courses during their first 
semester at Oglethorpe are subject to dismissal, unless the student received a "W" in all courses 
or had to withdraw from all courses for medical reasons. 

Students who have been dismissed for academic reasons may be readmitted after an 
absence of one spring or fall semester upon petition to the Provost. Students readmitted by petition 
must achieve good standing by the end of their second semester as readmitted students or be 
subject to permanent dismissal. (See also Re-activation Policy below.) 

Re-activation Policy 

Students in good academic standing who leave the Universit}' and return after a year's 
absence or more should notify the Admission Office of intent to re-enroU. Smdents who apply 
for re-activation or re-admission whether in good academic standing or not, are governed by the 
current graduation requirements. Any exceptions are granted at the discretion of the Provost and 
Senior Vice President. 

Repetition of Courses 

Courses may be repeated only if an unsatisfactory grade ("D," "F," "FA," or "\XT") was 
received in the course. When a course is repeated, both grades are calculated into the smdent's 
grade-point average, but no additional semester hours of credit are earned. 



73 



Freshman Forgiveness Policy 



Beginning in Fall Semester 2001, during a student's freshman and sophomore years at 
Oglethorpe, a single "F" per semester will be removed from the student's transcript if in the 
following semester the student earns a 2.0 grade-point average. For purposes of this policy, a 
semester is defined as 12 or more semester hours at Oglethorpe. A form requesting removal of 
the "F" may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. It must be signed and approved by the 
student's academic advisor and returned to the Registrar. 



Course Substitutions 



Requests for course substitutions for students with documented disabilities are handled 
on a case-by-case basis. The Learning Resources Director will present the student's request to the 
Academic Program Committee. The petition should state the specific accommodation requested 
and a rationale. The petition must be presented to the Committee no later than the last regular 
meeting of the semester prior to when the course would be taken. See the Learning Resources 
Center in the Educational Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 



Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option 



After 32 semester hours are earned at Oglethorpe a student in good academic standing 
may register to take two courses (in addition to internships and Science Seminar) on a 
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. These courses cannot be taken in the same semester and cannot 
be used to satisfy proficiency requirements, core requirements, or the student's major or minor. 
The student must register for the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory designation by the end of the 
Drop/Add period after which the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory designation cannot be changed. 
Satisfactory is defined as a "C-" or better. 



Final Examinations 



Final examinations, up to four hours in length, generally are given in courses at the end 
of each semester or session. The Final Examination Schedule is made up in the Registrar's Office 
and is printed in each semester's Schedule of Classes. (Final examinations in the summer are held 
on the last day of each session.) Final examinations must be given at the assigned date and time. 

No final examinations may be administered during the last scheduled class meeting of 
the semester or during the reading period prior to the first day of scheduled final examinations. If 
special arrangements are needed for individual students, facult}- members must inform their 
Division Chair. (Regular course tests may not be given on the last day of classes or be scheduled 
on the reading day.) 

No student help is to be used for t}'ping or grading examinations. 



74 



Grade Appeal Policy 



If a student believes that a course grade has been assigned in a capricious or prejudicial 
manner, he or she may appeal the grade through the following steps: 

1. The student submits a written appeal to the instructor clearly stating the reasons for 
believing that the grade was assigned in a capricious or prejudicial manner. 

2. The instructor changes the grade or replies in writing, explaining why the extant grade 
is appropriate. 

3. If the student is not satisfied with the explanation, he or she may submit the written 
appeal and response to the appropriate Division Chair, "who asks two faculd,' members 
with suitable experience in appropriate disciplines to serve with the Division Chair as a 
ruling committee. If the instructor is a Division Chair, the senior facultv member in the 
Division will serve in place of the Chair. The ruling committee receives aU written 
materials relevant to the case and may request additional information. If the ruling 
committee rules in favor of the instructor, written notification is given both to the 
instructor and to the student and there is no further appeal. If the committee rules in 
favor of the student, the Chair advises the instructor to reconsider the grade. If the 
instructor refuses to change the grade, the ruling committee may submit a written 
recommendation for a grade change to the Provost and Senior Vice President, whose 
final decision wiU be based on a review of the materials that have been submitted and 
the process that has been followed. 

The entire process must be initiated within 30 days of the first day of classes in the 
semester immediately following the assignment of the grade and must be completed by the end 
of that semester. 



Auditing Courses 



Regularly admitted Oglethorpe students may register for courses on an "audit" basis. A 
student who audits a course may attend it for enrichment but is not required to take course 
examinations or complete other course requirements. In order to audit a course, an admitted 
student must request an Audit form from the Registrar's Office and submit it to the instructor of 
the course he or she intends to audit. If the class is not closed, the instructor may accept the 
student as an audit by returning the signed form to the Registrar's Office. The grade awarded for 
a class taken on an audit basis is "AU," and no credits or quaUtv points are earned. 

Students may register to take courses on an audit basis only during the Drop/Add 
period as printed in the semester Schedule of Classes. The fees for auditing courses are published 
by the Business Office. 



Dean's List 



Smdents who earn a semester grade-point average of 3.5 or higher carrying 12 semester 
hours or more during the fall or spring semester, or during the summer sessions, are placed on the 
Dean's Academic Honors List. 



75 



Graduation Requirements 



To earn a baccalaureate degree from the University the following requirements 
must be met: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 128 semester hours and a cumulative grade-point average 
of 2.0 or higher on Oglethorpe course work. No more than four semester hours earned 
in Seminar for Student Tutors or Team Teaching for Critical Thinking are permitted to 
count toward the 128-semester hour requirement. (Students who entered prior to fall 
1998 must have completed a minimum of 120 semester hours.) 

2. Completion at Oglethorpe of 52 of the last 64 semester hours of course credit 
immediately preceding graduation. Courses taken at Atlanta Regional Consortium for 
Higher Education institutions on a cross-registration basis (with prior approval of the 
faculty advisor) and courses in an approved study abroad program (with prior approval 
of the Director of Study Abroad) also count as Oglethorpe courses for the purpose of 
meeting this residency requirement. 

3. Satisfaction of core requirements and major field or dual degree requirements (see 
appropriate disciplinary headings for descriptions). Completion at Oglethorpe of at least 
half the semester hours for each major. 

4. Submission of an application for graduation to the Registrar's Office by mid-October 
prior to completion of degree requirements the following December, May, or August. 

5. Satisfaction of all financial and other obligations to the Universit}' and pavment of a 
degree completion fee. 

6. Participation in assessments of competencies gained and curricular effectiveness bv 
completing standardized or other tests and surveys. 

7. Formal facult}' and Board of Trustees approval for graduation. 



Graduation Exercises 



Graduation exercises are held once a year at the close of the spring semester in Ma}'. 
Diplomas are awarded at the close of the spring semester during commencement and at the close 
of the summer and fall semesters. Students must have completed all graduation requirements in 
order to participate in graduation exercises. An exception wiU be allowed for a student who has 
completed all graduation requirements except for a maximum of tw^o courses totaling no more 
than 12 semester hours. Students completing requirements at the end of summer or fall are 
encouraged to participate in the following spring graduation exercises. 



Degrees with Latin Academic Honors 



Undergraduate degrees with Latin academic honors are awarded as follows: cum laude for 
a cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 or higher; magna cum laude for 3.7 or higher; and summa cum 
laude for 3.9 or higher. To be eligible for Latin academic honors, students entering fall 1998 or 
thereafter must have completed 68 or more semester hours in residence at Oglethorpe. Students 
entering prior to faU 1998 must have completed 65 semester hours in residence at Oglethorpe to 
be considered for Latin academic honors. 

Transfer work is not included in the determination for Latin academic honors. 



76 



Degrees with Honors Thesis 



Please see the Honors Program in the Educational Enrichment section of this 
Bulletin. 



Double Major Policy 



A student may earn a double major subject to the following conditions: 

1 . The student must meet all requirements of both majors. 

2. The student may count no more than three of the courses taken to meet the major 
requirements of one of the fields toward meeting the major requirements of the 
other field. 

3. The transcript wiU List both majors. In case both majors result in the same degree, that 
degree wUl be awarded. 

4. In case the two majors result in different degrees, the student will receive only one 
degree, that being the student's choice of the two degree designations. 



Earning a Second Add-On Major 



Students who have been awarded an Oglethorpe baccalaureate degree may return to 
earn a second major within that degree at the University. Upon completion of the requirements, 
the second major wLU be entered on the student's record and transcript. No diploma will be 
awarded when the second major is within the degree already awarded. The requirements are: 

1. Completion of an additional 32 semester hours of which a minimum of 16 must be 
completed at Oglethorpe. 

2. Maintenance of a 2.0 or higher cumulative grade-point average. 

3. Completion of a major other than the major(s) completed at the time the first degree 
was awarded, subject to the first two conditions listed above under the Double Major 
Policy. 



Earning a Second Baccalaureate Degree 



Students who have completed a baccalaureate degree may be awarded a second and 
different baccalaureate degree. Upon completion of the requirements, the student's record and 
transcript will reflect the conferring of a second degree and a diploma will be awarded. 

For students who earned their first baccalaureate degree at Oglethorpe, the same 
requirements listed above under Earning a Second Add-On Major apply. 

For students who have earned their first baccalaureate degree at another institution, this 
degree is treated as transfer credit. Up to a maximum of 80 semester hours may be accepted at 
Oglethorpe. The requirements for the second degree are: 

1. Satisfaction of Oglethorpe core requirements. 

2. Completion of a minimum of 48 semester hours at Oglethorpe. 

3. Maintenance of a 2.0 or higher cumulative grade-point average. 

4. Completion of a major other than the major(s) completed at the time the first degree 
was awarded. 

All transfer policies stated in the section of this Bulletin entitied Transfer Students and 
Transfer Policies apply. 

77 



Student Classification 



For administrative and other official and extra-official purposes, undergraduate students 
are classified according to the number of semester hours successfully completed. Classification is 
as follows: to 32 hours — freshman; 33 to 64 hours — sophomore; 65 to 96 hours — junior; 97 
hours and above — senior. 



Normal Academic Load 



Two semesters — fall and spring — constitute the regular academic year, and two sessions 
are offered in the summer. 

While courses of one to five semester hours credit are offered each semester, a full-time 
academic program at Oglethorpe consists of no less than three regular 4-semester hour courses 
each semester or a minimum of 12 semester hours. Generally four courses are taken, giving the 
student a total of 16-18 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours allowed as part of the 
regular fuU-time program. This includes any cross-registered courses. 

Students may take up to four academic courses and one additional 1 -hour course as part 
of a regular load without special permission, even if the total hours exceed 18. An academic 
course is defined for these purposes as a 4-hour course, a 5-hour laboratory science, or a 4-hour 
science lecture with accompanying 1 -hour laboratory. 

A smdent whose academic load exceeds 18 hours as a result of taking five academic 
courses, an internship, or multiple additional 1-hour courses must obtain overload permission. 
Such overloads are allowed for students with 1) junior standing and 2) a minimum grade-point 
average of 3.5, unless the overload is due to internship hours, otherudse a 3.0 grade-point average. 
A request form may be obtained from the Registrar's Office and requires signed approval bv the 
student's advisor and the Provost and Senior Vice President. 

During the summer a student wiU be permitted to take no more than eight hours in any 
5-week session (nine hours if one of the courses is a 5-hour laboratory science course). Thus, a 
student will be limited to a maximum of two 4-hour courses, plus one hour of Applied Instruction 
in Music, in a 5-week session or to a load of one 4-hour course and one 5-hour combination of 
course and accompanying laboratory. Or, to a maximum of one 4-hour course in a 5-week session 
while simultaneously enrolled in a maximum of two 3-hour courses in an 8-week session. The 
student should be cautioned that these maximum limits represent course loads that are 
approximately 50 percent greater than the ceUing of 18 hours during the regular academic year. 
Successful completion of such a load will require a correspondingly greater effort on the part of 
the smdent. 



Course Level 



In the Programs of Study section of this bulletin, disciplines and majors are listed 
alphabetically. Respective courses under each are designated by a prefix that identities the 
discipline and a three-digit number. The first digit indicates the level of the course: 1 = freshman 
level, 2 = sophomore level, 3 = junior level, and 4 = senior level. (A 5 or 6 t\-picallv denotes a 
graduate-level course.) Higher-level courses in a discipline are t\picallv designed to bmld upon die 
content of lower-level courses in that discipline and other specified prerequisite courses. 

The number of hours refers to the semester hours of college credit per semester, which 
are earned by the successful completion of the course. 



78 



Access to Student Records 



To comph' with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, 
commonly called the Buckley Amendment, Oglethorpe Universit}' informs students of their rights 
under this act in the student handbook, The O Book. Three basic rights are covered by this act: 1) 
the student's right to have access to personal records, 2) the right of a hearing to challenge the 
content of a record, and 3) the right to withhold or give consent for the release of idendf}'ing 
directory data. Additional information may be obtained from The O Book and from the Registrar. 



Oglethorpe Honor Code 



Persons who come to Oglethorpe Universit}' for work and smdy join a communit}' that 
is committed to high standards of academic honest}^ The Honor Code contains the 
responsibilides we accept by becoming members of the community. 

The students and faculty of Oglethorpe University expect each other to be truthful in 
the academic endeavor they share. Faculty assume students complete work honesdy and act 
toward them in ways consistent with that assumption. 

Oglethorpe welcomes all who accept our principles of honest behavior. We believe that 
this Code will enrich our years at the University and allow us to begin practicing the honorable, 
self-governed lives expected of societ}''s leaders. 

Students pledge that they have completed assignments honesdy by attaching the 
following statement to each test, paper, overnight work, in-class essay, or other work designated 
by the professor: 

I pledge that I have neither given nor received any unauthorized aid on this assignment. 
Signed 

It will be the responsibility of the smdent to provide these pledges bv either attaching 
them on a separate sheet or typing them as part of the assignment. The instructor also should 
remind the class to sign the pledge. The pledge serves as an affirmation of the student's and the 
instructor's belief in the principles .of the Honor Code. Assigned work should not be considered 
complete without the pledge. 

Since it is assumed that students act according to their pledge, facult}' abstain from any 
practices whose purpose is to ascertain that students have been dishonest unless tiiere is a 
compelling reason to believe that cheating has taken place. Instructors should invite their own 
smdents to discuss with them actions or policies that appear to be at variance with the assumption 
of honest}'. 

AH credit courses offered by the Universit}- are covered by the Honor Code, and all cases 
of suspected academic dishonesty will be handled in accordance with its provisions. It is the 
responsibiUt}' of facult}' members to make clear how the Code applies to specific courses and to 
follow its procedures. Alternative ways of dealing with cases are not to be used. The Judicial 
Review Board is the final arbiter in all disputes concerning the Honor Code. For a complete text 
of the Honor Code, please see The O Book, the student handbook. 



79 



80 



Educational 
Enrichment 




First- Year Experience 



Oglethorpe University's faculty and student affairs staff work together to coordinate 
academic offerings and student services in order to create a first-year experience that is 
welcoming, suppordve, and challenging. This integrated program is committed to encouraging 
first-year students to succeed. 

Major features of this first-year experience include the course Fresh Focus, the freshman 
advising program, a two-semester core course in humanities, programs in the residence halls, the 
tutoring services of the Academic Resource Center, disability services in the Learning Resource 
Center, and a coordinated intervention process for assisting students in trouble. 

FOG 101. Fresh Focus 1 hour 

This class, required for all entering first-year students, is a group-oriented course 
involving upper-class students and faculty. Students select a class from among numerous topics 
with experiential and interactive as well as academic features. The faculty instructor serves as the 
student's academic advisor during his or her first semester. The first meeting of each group of 
students is during fall orientation, and continues thereafter twice weekly for the first half of the 
semester to pursue their chosen topic and share related experiences. During the same period new 
students will also attend occasional workshops on aspects of leadership, health and wellness, 
careers, skills for academic success, and open houses in the academic divisions. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 

FOC 201. Team Teaching for Critical Thinking 1 hour 

Upper-class student mentors assist faculty instructors in planning and teaching the 
special topics sessions of Fresh Focus or other freshman-level courses. They participate in training 
meetings prior to the beginning of the course, communicate with entering freshmen over the 
summer, attend all classes in their Fresh Focus section, and assist with the ad\'ising of freshmen 
throughout their first year. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 



Sophomore Choices 



Smdents in their second, third, and fourth semesters of college are encouraged to 
participate in Sophomore Choices. This seminar is designed to introduce students to a model for 
career decision making that is useful throughout Ufe. Informational interviewing and \'isits to 
Adanta workplaces allow students to learn about particular occupations or career fields of interest 
and to begin to make career connections in the community. These experiences mav help students 
as they select courses, majors and minors, and internships. 

CHO 101. Sophomore Choices 1 hour 

During this six-week career exploration seminar, students complete interest and 
personality assessments, learn how to find information about different careers, and develop 
interviewing, networking, and resume-writing skills. Students then conduct informational 
interviews with professionals in their fields of interest. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. 



82 



Making a Life and Making a Living 



In the liberal arts environment, students gain a broad education with essential 
communicadon and critical thinking skills. Students do not learn generally how to communicate 
those skills to potential employers or graduate schools. Oglethorpe, however, makes a 
commitment to helping students reap the life-long benefits of their education. Sophomore 
Choices is a career decision-making class designed to help students begin planning their careers 
and includes resume writing and informational interviewing. Senior Transitions picks up where 
Sophomore Choices leaves off and teaches the skills necessary to implement the career decision. 

SEN 401. Senior Transitions 1 hour 

Tliis course is designed to prepare students for a successful transition to life after 
college. A successful career requires effective, informed planning. Topics will include industry and 
employer research, job searching, interviewing, networking, salary negotiation and more. A special 
focus will be designed for students considering graduate school. Students will leave the course 
with a spotiess resume, cover letter samples, fine-tuned interview skills, and a plan for landing a 
job or graduate school acceptance. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 

SEN 402. Personal Financial Education 2 hours 

This course is designed to prepare students for a successful transition to life after 
college. The course will focus on fmancial planning and education. It will cover topics such as 
employer benefits, money management, debt reduction, tax return preparation, insurance, large 
asset purchases, and investing. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 



Academic Resource Center — Tutoring 



The Academic Resource Center provides group and individual tutoring and other 
academic activities for all students, free of charge. The ARC services include helping smdents to 
prepare for papers and examinations, as well as arranging enriching group smdy and research for 
students who are already doing well in core classes and other courses. The student tutors often 
work closely with the facult}' teaching the classes in which they are tutoring, meeting regularly to 
plan and provide individual and small-group help for students who need it, and to increase 
interactive and collaborative educational experiences both in and outside Oglethorpe's classrooms. 

ARC 201. Seminar for Student Tutors 1 hour 

Peer tutors at the Academic Resource Center spend two hours per week assisting other 
students, individually or in groups, with course material, papers, and preparation for examinations. 
In addition, they occasionally participate in support and training meetings with the ARC director 
and with instructors of the courses in which thev tutor. They discuss how to work with texts in 
different disciplines, encourage study group members to help each other learn, and foster student 
engagement with and assimilation of course content. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Associate Provost for Smdent Achievement. 



83 



Disability Programs and Services 



It is the policy of Oglethorpe to ensure that all universit}^ goods, services, facilities, 
privileges, advantages and accommodations are meaningfully accessible to qualified persons with 
disabilities in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, Section 504 of 
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and other pertinent federal, state and local disability anti- 
discrimination laws. 

Oglethorpe will provide persons with disabilities an equal opportunit}' to participate in and 
benefit from programs and services as afforded to other individuals. This is done in the most integrated 
setting appropriate to the needs of the individual with a disabilit}'^. 

Where readily achievable, architectural and communication barriers will be removed. 
New structures will comply fully with all accessibility requirements. Alterations will comply to the 
maximum extent feasible. Oglethorpe will make available auxiliary aids and services, as appropriate 
to the individual and required by the ADA, at no cost to the individual, provided that such 
auxiliary aids and services do not require significant difficulty or expense. 

Oglethorpe does not discriminate against any person who is related to or associated with 
a person with a disability. Oglethorpe wiU comply with any federal, state or local laws that provide 
individuals with disabilities greater protection, and take other actions necessary to ensure equal 
oppormnity for persons with disabilities. 

This policy applies to the goods, services, privileges, advantages and accommodations 
offered by Oglethorpe either directiy or through contractual, licensing or other arrangements. This 
policy is neither exhaustive nor exclusive. 

Reasonable accommodations will be made on an individualized basis. It is the 
responsibility of persons with disabilities, however, to seek available assistance, register for 
services and establish their needs. 



Learning Resources Center 



The Learning Resources Center (LRC) provides individualized services at no additional 
cost for students with learning disabilities and attention deficit disorders. This program ensures 
that these students have an opportunity to participate fully in the Oglethorpe experience. Students 
must meet established University' admission requirements and program technical standards. 
Qualified students must submit comprehensive professional documentation that meets the 
established criteria for accepting evaluations. Students approved for ser\'ices are pro^^ded 
appropriate accommodations and academic adjustments. Students without documented 
disabilities who are experiencing learning difficulties may participate in LRC skills-building 
courses, workshops, and seminars as appropriate. 

The LRC is located in the Weltner Library 24-Hour Room. The Learning Resources 
Director acts as Uaison and referral between the student with a disabilit)' and faculty members. 
Academic Resource Center tutors, and other campus programs. For additional information \'isit 
the LRC Web site at www.oglethorpe.edu, key word: "Ire." 



84 



Experiential Education 



Oglethorpe University strives to provide valuable learning experiences outside of the 
traditional classroom setting. Experiential Education, under the support of Career Services, offers 
three primary programs: Exploration Atianta, Exploration Week, and Internships. A variety of 
additional services, including volunteer opportunities, service learning, and career-related 
programs are also available. 

Exploration Atlanta utilizes local resources to enhance Oglethorpe's traditional 
academic courses. Students select topics from a series of one-day programs providing indepth 
examination of various career fields and industries. This non-credit program occurs each year 
during spring semester. In small seminars, students discuss topics of interest, meet- industry 
professionals and visit related organizations. Exploration Atianta allows students to work closely 
with faculty and colleagues and provides an outiet for continued research in a particular discipline. 
Students can choose one or several topics of interest from the mini-courses which change each 
year. 

Exploration Week provides students with a concentrated look at an individual area of 
smdv that is enriched by first-hand experience. This week involves chaperoned travel to locations 
outside Atianta to visit sites, meet professionals, learn about careers and take part in educational 
activities. Activities may be enhanced by assignments, readings and pre-trip preparations for 
students designed by the educator leading the group. 

Internships provide practical experience to complement the academic program, as well 
as give students the opportunity to solidif\" career decisions, gain work experience, and provide a 
ser\'ice to the community in their fields of interest. More than half of college students nationwide 
complete internships, making the experience an essential credential for competition in the current 
job market. 

Internships are available in a large variety of local businesses and organizations 
representing most academic majors and potential career fields. Oglethorpe students have recendy 
completed internships at The Carter Center, CNN, Georgia Pacific, Atlanta Magatiiue, Zoo Atianta, 
the Atianta History Center, and the Georgia State Legislature, to name only a few. In addition to 
these Atianta-based internships, Oglethorpe maintains resources and affiliations for nationwide 
oppormnities, such as the Washington Center in D.C. 

Internships are available in most majors for students who: 1) demonstrate a clear 
understanding of goals they wish to accomplish in the experience and 2) possess the necessary 
academic and personal background to accomplish these goals. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
with a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 qualify to apply for internships. Transfer students 
must complete one semester at Oglethorpe prior to participation. Every internship requires a 
statement of objectives and academic requirements, in addition to related academic assignments, 
developed in consultation with the student's internship faculty supervisor. Upon successfial 
completion of the internship, the student is awarded academic credit (graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis) in recognition of the learning value of the experience. Students 
may apply for 1-16 semester hours of internship credit toward their degree, with approval from 
their academic advisor and the Experiential Education Committee. Students seeking more than 
four semester hours must submit an appeal form to the Career Services Office indicating why the 
internship exceeds the normal number of hours and outlining additional projects in which the 



I 



85 



student will participate. Students desiring academic credit must register for the internship before 
the end of the Drop/Add period of the semester in question. Students who wish to engage in 
internships on a voluntary basis do not need to apply for academic credit; however, they should 
follow the same basic internship guidelines. 

Students who are interested in an internship should first consult with their facult}^ 
advisor and then visit the Career Services Office in Goodman Hall. 

Career Services 

The Career Services Office provides resources to assist students in making responsible 
decisions and strategies regarding career options and job search plans. These resources include a 
Career Library with information available from books, a computer, and videotapes on 
occupations, the job search, and prospective employers. The Myers Briggs Tj.-pe Indicator and 
Strong Interest Inventory personality and career assessment tests are also available to students in 
an easily accessible online version. Both tests provide suggestions about environment and work 
style preferences as well as industries and job titles for further exploration. Other job search 
programs are available to explore options and employers that match individual career interests. 
Workshops on resume writing, interviewing and job search techniques are presented each 
semester to prepare smdents for the workplace. 

In addition, a number of prospective employers send recruiters to the campus each vear 
for the purpose of conducting on-campus interviews. Current information on permanent, 
summer, and part-time job opportunities is made available to students and alumni in the Career 
Library. Resume referrals to employers are made for those students who register for the serA-ice 
through ivmv.PetrelTfL4K.com. 

Honors Program 

AH students at Oglethorpe Universit}' are encouraged to attain academic and personal 
excellence through an active investment in their education. The Universit}' offers an Honors 
Program for those students who demonstrate the potential and desire to further challenge 
themselves intellectually, both within and beyond the classroom setting. Students in the Honors 
Program wiU develop their own independent project, while learning how their interests relate to 
relevant disciplinary discourse, other academic disciplines, and the world beyond academia. The 
Honors Program allows smdents to forge closer relations with peers and faculty- from various 
disciplines who have different interests, but share a common enthusiasm for learning, while 
developing their own interests and initiative. 

The seven-semester program is organized in two phases, the first consisting of 
interdisciplinary seminars led by rwo facult}' members from disparate academic disciplines. These 
seminars are built around the interests of the students, who are equal parmers in directing die 
content of the seminars and the central questions which inform them. The second phase focuses 
on developing an original independent research project under the close supervision of a faculty- 
mentor. This phase culminates in the production of an honors thesis (or project), which is 
presented in the spring semester of the senior year at the annual Oglethorpe Symposium in the 
Liberal Arts. 

Academic honors earned through the Honors Program are recognized at 
commencement exercises, on the student's diploma, and on the student's transcript of grades. 



86 



SCHEDULE FOR HONORS PROGRAM 



YEAR 



FALL SEMESTER 



SPRING SEMESTER 



Recruitment/ Application. 
Freshman Social activities. 

Informational activities. 



Seminar led by tvvTj facult}- frcjm 
disparate disciplines. Graded A-F. 
HON 201. Honors Seminar. 1 hour 



Seminar led by two faculty 
Sophomore from disparate disciplines. 
Graded A-F 
HON 201. Honors Seminar.. 1 hour 



Seminar led by tu'o facult)' from 
disparate disciplines. Graded A-F. 

HON 201. Honors Seminar. 1 hour 



Development of Honors Project 
Junior prospecms and reading Ust. 

Initial reading. Attend research 

skills sessions. Graded S/U 

HON 301. Honors 1 1 hour 



Refinement of prospectus. 

Honors Project Research. Prospectus 

must be approved by select facult\' to 

continue. Graded S/U. 

HON 302. Honors II 1 hour 



Project research and preparation 
Senior of initial draft of thesis. Critique 
by reading committee. 
Graded A-R 
HON 401. Honors III 4 hours 



Preparation of final draft of thesis. 
Defense. Presentadon of Honors 
work. 

HON 402. Honors IV. hours 



Each fall semester informational programs are held to acquaint prospective participants 
with the feamres and requirements of the Honors Program. Interested students should then apply 
for admission to the program. A grade-point average of 3.3 is required to participate in the first 
seminar. A grade-point average of 3.3 must be maintained to continue in the Honors Program. 
Students may apply for admission to the program at any time prior to the fall semester of the 
junior year. 

The first phase of the program, intended to be taken in the freshman and sophomore 
years, consists of a minimum of two 1 -semester hour seminars (HON 201). Smdents are 
expected, encouraged, and enabled to take the lead in the seminars. Students carry out research 
relevant to the topic, write extensivelv in connection with the seminar, and make frequent 
presentations of their findings to the seminar. This phase focuses on scholarship in breadth and 
communication to persons whose interests may be outside one's own area of interest and 
expertise. Students practice and refine many of the skills and techniques necessary for the second 
phase of the Honors Program. Note that students who elect to enter the Honors Program later 
in their careers must still take these two seminars at some point. 

The second phase of the Honors Program, in the junior and senior vears, focuses on 
scholarship in depth and the effective communication of the results of that scholarship to persons 
in the field of study, as weU as those outside it. During the fall semester of the junior vear, the 
smdent secures a thesis supervisor and enrolls in HON 301. Honors I. Honors I carries credit of 
1 -semester hour graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, with the grade to be determined by 
the Honors Program Director in consultation with the facult}' super\'isor. Satisfactory completion 
of Honors I is required to continue the program. 



87 



In the spring of the junior year the student enrolls in HON 302. Honors II, a 1 -semester 
hour credit course, graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, in which the honors project is 
further refined and researched. Upon successfiil completion of Honors II, the student enrolls in 
HON 401. Honors III during the fall semester of the senior year. This is a 4-semester hour credit 
course in which research of the thesis topic is to be completed. A first draft of the thesis must be 
submitted to the student's reading committee by the end of this semester. The reading committee 
provides the student with feedback, including recommended revisions. 

After successful completion of Honors III, the student enrolls in HON 402. Honors IV, 
a required course which carries no academic credit, during the spring semester of the senior year. 
Students are encouraged to submit their theses to appropriate competitions or for publication. The 
final draft of the thesis is presented to the reading committee at least one week prior to the end of 
classes. At the reading committee's discretion the student may be asked to make a formal defense of 
the thesis. The faculty supervisor, in consultation with the reading committee and the Honors 
Program Director, determines whether Honors is to be awarded by the first day of the final 
examination period. 

HON 201. Honors Seminar 1 hour 

This seminar, led by faculty members from two disparate disciplines, will consider a 
question, problem, proposition, text, period of time, project, etc. The focus of the seminar wUl 
be student research, writing, and presentation. An interdisciplinary approach will be emphasized. 
Seminars have included: Self Reference — Artificial Intelligence, Literature and Societs', Science 
and Postmodernism, Moderns Confront the Classics: Hobbes and Thucydides, Evolutionan,' 
Psychology, Creativity, Politics and Theatre, An Intimate History of Humanit}', and Gender and 
Discourse. Graded with a letter grade "A-F." Prerequisite: Application and admission into the 
Honors Program. 

HON 301. Honors I 1 hour 

In this course, with the aid of a facult)' supervisor, the student selects and begins to 
research a thesis topic. A preliminary prospectus is developed along with a reading Ust. The 
student attends a series of research skills sessions. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the Honors Program Director, permission of the facult\' super\asor, 
a 3.3 overall grade-point average, and a 3.5 grade-point average in the field in which the honors 
research is to be done. 

HON 302. Honors 1 1 hour 

In this course the student continues to research in order to refine the prospectus of the 
honors project. The prospectus and related materials are submitted to a select group of facults^ 
who must approve the student's preparedness to continue the program. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in HON 301. 

HON 401. Honors III 4 hours 

Under continued direction of the facult}^ supervisor, research of the thesis topic is 
completed in this course. Preparation of a first draft is submitted to the student's reading 
committee. Graded with a letter grade "A-F." Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in HON 302. 

HON 402. Honors IV hours 

Revisions are made and a final draft of the thesis is submitted to the smdent's reading 
committee. A formal defense of the thesis may be scheduled. An appropriate oral presentation of 
the honors work also wiU be required in an academic setting. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C" 
in HON 401. Grade of "I" for HON 401 is not acceptable. 



Oglethorpe University Students Abroad (OUSA) 

Oglethorpe University fosters and supports the concept that international study, travel, and 
global explorations remain a vital part of a rigorous academic education. Through a growing global 
network of partnerships, agreements, and for-credit, short-term trips sponsored by the university, 
Oglethorpe offers an exciting array of opportunities for international education. Oglethorpe University 
Students Abroad (OUSA) consists of four divisions: 

International Exchange Partnerships 

Oglethorpe University offers unique opportunities to students for one semester or one 
year of study at partnership colleges and universities in Latin America, China, France, Germany, 
Japan, the Netherlands, and Russia. Most of the student exchanges at these institutions will cost 
the student what he or she pays for tuition at Oglethorpe. 

Independent Study Abroad 

Numerous oppormnities exist for any qualified smdents to study at other, non- 
partnership universities of the student's choice throughout the world, in science, economics, social 
sciences, languages, art, communications, the liberal arts, and business. The OUSA Director will 
help advise and direct each student in selecting the appropriate university abroad. Financial 
resources and stipends are available for academic study in some countries. 

Students Abroad 

This division of OUSA creates, organizes, and directs short-term, for-credit academic 
study trips abroad during the months of December, March, May, and the summer. Oglethorpe 
professors develop these trips as intensive explorations of culture, cuisine, music, historical and 
political institutions, art, archaeology, and business. Standard destinations include Ital\', France, 
Spain, Switzerland, Austria, England, Greece, Turkey, Central and Latin America, China, and 
Russia. Students who elect to do so receive credit for their participation, which includes note- 
taking, photographing, field documentation, journaUng, and a research project to be completed 
after returning from the trips as independent work with the professor. 

Associate Student Programs for Special Study Abroad 

This division of OUSA manages special links to prominent universities and institutions 
abroad with whom Oglethorpe has developed a special relationship. At present, Oglethorpe has 
created the following special programs at these universities: 

Oxford University, Oxford, England: Through the Washington International Studies 
Council, students who wish to study at Oxford University for a semester or a year may do so as 
registered visiting smdents with university privileges, and live with British smdents in the center of 
Oxford. Applications and eligibility requirements can be obtained in the Office of the OUSA 
Director. 

Umbra Institute, Perugia, Italy: Smdents who wish to smdv in Italy for a semester or 
a year may do so at this English-speaking, liberal arts instimte, where they can take courses in 
Italian language, history, and politics. Applications and materials may be obtained in the Office of 
the OUSA Director. 



89 



Students who desire to explore a culture, examine archaeological ruins, witness political 
decisionmaking firsthand, research museums throughout the world, document ecological 
problems, study in an internadonal setting, or sharpen language skills should seriousty investigate 
participating in any of the four divisions of OUSA. 

Oglethorpe academic advisors and the OUSA Director serve as primary consultants for 
students who seek any study abroad experience. Students who wish to apply for financial 
assistance should contact the Director of Financial Aid early in the pursuit of a study abroad 
program to determine what available funds exist. Specific deadlines and itineraries for short-term 
trips appear throughout the year in student e-mail, the student newspaper, and fliers throughout 
the campus. 

Note: Every student attending an Oglethorpe approved semester or year abroad will receive 
credit for one semester of the junior year core — either Historical Perspectives on the 
Social Order I or II — the smdent may choose. 

Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program 

Oglethorpe University's Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program challenges 
students to develop their leadership abilit)' throughout their college years, and awards the 
Certificate of Urban Leadership at graduation. Through a balance of academic courses, 
workshops, and various on- and off-campus experiences, it prepares graduates to meet the 
challenges of responsible citizenship in local, national and international communities. Students 
gain a broad understanding of leadership concepts, theories, and applications. They are 
encouraged to consider their education in light of the demands of leadership in their own lives as 
well as in their communities. 

The program takes fuU advantage of the extraordinary resources of the Atianta 
metropolitan area. A major economic force in the Southeast, Atianta is rich with exceptional 
learning opportunities in the realms of politics, business, the arts, information technologv, 
entertainment, and community service. Few selective universities are able to combine a rigorous 
liberal arts education with the resources and opportunities of a world-class citv'. 

The following curriculum encompasses the four required courses designed specitlcaUv 
for the Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program 

POL 350. Special Topics in Politics: Moral and Political Leadership 4 hours 

In tliis course, the Uves of a number of leaders are examined and a series of questions 
are addressed. In what did or does their greatness consist? With what issues or moral dilemmas 
did they wrestie? What challenges did they face? How did they understand and perhaps overcome 
the constraints of their situation? Upon what moral, intellectual, and "characterological" resources 
could they rely? What were their strengths? What were their weaknesses? Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

ULP 303. The New American City 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and 
policymaking in the new American city and its environs. Consideration will be given to the 
political and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new 
development, including extremes of wealth and poverty, the mix of racial and ethnic groups, 
and the opportunities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and technologv. 
Offered annually. 



90 



ULP 304. Community Issues Forum: Principles into Practice 4 hours 

This course is taught as a weekly seminar focusing on a particular community issue and 
accompanied by an issue-related, off-campus internship. Together with facult)-, students analyze 
issues confronting stakeholders, collaborate on solutions, and present findings derived from their 
internship assignments. Students have interned with the state legislature, local and state chambers 
of commerce, community' food banks, arts organizations, corporations, non-profit organizations, 
and a number of other communit}' groups. Topics covered in previous years include: communit}^ 
development, education, transportation, health care, and the environment. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

Urban Leadership Elective 4 hours 

With the approval of the Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program Director and the 
academic advisor, the student selects an appropriate course to satisfy the fourth course 
requirement of the program. Ideally, the elective course will be part of the student's major or 
minor, or in an area of vocational interest. The principal objective of the elective requirement is 
to look for intellectual or applied leadership in the student's chosen field or profession. 

In addition to the required academic course work, students demonstrate leadership on 
and off campus by their participation in University, civic, and communit}' endeavors in Atianta. 
Smdents organize and participate in conferences, workshops, and symposia on and off campus. 
At the end of each semester, smdents submit a brief memo to the director detailing their 
leadership challenges and opportunities that semester. In the final semester, students prepare a 
paper reflecting on their leadership experiences during college. The final portfolio contains written 
work drawn from the student's leadership courses and experiences. 

Admission to the Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program is competitive. 
Students may apply in the freshman, sophomore, or junior year. The director and a selection 
committee evaluate candidates on the basis of commitment to leadership-related study, the 
desire for leadership understanding and application, extracurricular participation, academic 
record, and other experience. 



91 



92 



The Core Curriculum 



X 




History of the Core Curriculum 



Oglethorpe initiated its "core curriculum," in the academic year 1944-45, making it one 
of the first core programs in the United States. In his explanatory brochure about the program, 
Oglethorpe President Philip Weltner presented a new liberal arts curriculum with the twin aims 
of equipping students to "make a Ufe and make a living." Each student would devote one half of 
his or her college course work to the common intellectual experience of the core, while the 
student would devote the other half to his or her major area of study. In outlining his new plan 
and his philosophy of education. President Weltner anticipated some of the ideas featured in 
General Education in a Free Society, Harvard University's 1945 statement stressing an emphasis 
on liberal arts and a core curriculum. 

The idea of a core curriculum was at that time so revolutionary in higher education that 
news of the Oglethorpe Plan appeared in The New York Times in the spring of 1945. Dr. Weltner 
told The Times: "We are trying to develop keen.. .appreciation and understanding. Instead of 
dividing our courses into separate schools, we are giving the students a good liberal and general 
education which can become the basis of hundreds of vocations." 

Dr. Weltner's core curriculum for the Oglethorpe students of the 1940s reflected the 
concerns of the war era: the core consisted of a series of courses under the headings 
"Citizenship" and "Human Understanding." As the concerns of the war era receded and the post- 
war information explosion ensued, the Oglethorpe core underwent extensive revision in the 
1960s, with its required courses coming to resemble much more closely traditional courses in the 
disciplines. Gradually this core came to focus on those courses representing competencies that a 
well-educated generaUst ought to have upon graduating from coUege. 

With the support of a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, 
the Oglethorpe core curriculum underwent substantial revision in the early 1990s to reflect a new 
idea about core curriculum and its purpose. Rather than an attempt to define what every student 
should know or a list of basic competencies every student should have, the new Oglethorpe core 
aimed at providing a common learning experience for all students. Since the early 1990s the core 
curriculum has undergone further scrutiny and refinement. Beginning in 1998, Oglethorpe 
implemented a sequence of new interdisciplinary year-long courses. These sequences, which 
extend over all four years of a student's collegiate career, feature the reading of a number of 
primary texts common to all sections of the courses and frequent writing assignments. Each 
course in the sequence builds upon the body of knowledge studied in the pre\ious covirse. 
Courses in the fine arts and in mathematics complement these sequences. The program explicidv 
invites students to integrate their core learning and to consider knowledge gained from smdv in 
the core as they approach study in their majors. In developing this curriculum, the facults' has 
renewed its commitment to the spirit of Dr. Weltner's original core: "We must never for an instant 
forget that education to be true to itself must be a progressive experience for the learner, in which 
interest gives rise to inquiry, inquiry is pursued to mastery, and mastery here occasions new 
interests there." 

As every student's second major, the core continues to urge students to pursue links 
among the various areas of study and to appreciate the value of intellectual inquiry. A National 
Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant, wWch Oglethorpe received in 1996, helped to 
create an endowment for the core curriculum, guaranteeing that faculty have the resources to keep 
the core vital and central to learning at Oglethorpe. As facult)' work together through frequent 
conversation about the content and goals of their core courses to pro\dde an integrated approach 
to learning, one is reminded of the pledge Dr. Weltner made over half a century ago in outlining 
the core: "Oglethorpe University insists that die object is not to pass a subject; the object is to take 
and keep it." 



94 



Liberal Education and the Core Curriculum 



Oglethorpe University is committed to providing a comprehensive liberal arts education 
for all of its students. We aim to produce graduates who are broadly educated in the fundamental 
fields of knowledge and who know how to integrate knowledge in meaningful ways. The 
University's core curriculum is the clearest expression of this commitment. As an interdiscipUnarv 
and common learning experience, the core curriculum provides for students throughout their 
academic careers a model for integrating information and gaining knowledge. The sequencing of 
the core courses means that all Oglethorpe students take the same core courses at the same point 
in their college careers, thereby providing an opportunity for students to discuss important ideas 
and texts both inside and outside the classroom. In this way, the core curriculum aims to create a 
communit)' of learners at Oglethorpe University. 

Staffed by facult)^ from a wide variet}' of disciplines, the program seeks to teach students 
the following aptimdes and skills: 

1 . The abiUt}' to reason, read, and speak effectively, instilled through frequent and rigorous 
writing assignments and the reading and discussion of primary texts. 

2. An understanding as well as a critical appreciation of how knowledge is generated and 
challenged. 

3. The ability to reflect upon and discuss matters fundamental to understanding who we 
are and what we ought to be. This includes how we understand ourselves as individuals 
(Core I) and as members of societ}' (Core 11), how the study of our past informs our 
sense of who we are as human beings (Core III), and the ways in which the practice of 
science informs our understanding of ourselves and the world (Core I\^. 

In addition to the seven integrated and sequenced core courses, Oglethorpe University 
students take two additional courses that have been designed to help them develop an appreciation 
and understanding of fine arts and mathematics. Students earning a Bachelor of Arts degree also 
study a foreign language. 

The core curriculum provides only a beginning for the investigation of significant 
questions and issues. The program is designed to foster in students a love of learning and a desire 
to learn, to think, and to act as reflective, responsible beings throughout their lives. 

Freshman Year - Core I 

COR 101. Narratives of the Self I 
COR 102. Narratives of die Self II 

Sophomore Year - Core II 

COR 201. Human Namre and the Social Order I 
COR 202. Human Namre and the Social Order II 

Junior Year - Core III 

COR 301. Historical Perspectives on the Social Order I 
COR 302. Historical Perspectives on the Social Order II 

Senior Year - Core IV - One of the following: 

COR 401. Science and Human Namre: Biological Sciences 
COR 402. Science and Human Namre: Physical Sciences 



95 



Fine Arts Requirement - One of the following: 
COR 103. Music and Culture 
COR 104. Art and Culture 

Mathematics Requirement 

COR 203. Great Ideas of Modern Mathematics 

Foreign Language Requirement 

AH students undertaking and earning a Bachelor of Arts degree will be required to take 
at least one semester of a foreign language at the second-semester elementary-level or higher. 
Students who graduated from a secondary school where the language instruction was not English 
have satisfied the foreign language requirement. 

COR 101, COR 102. Narratives of the Self I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

The first-year course sequence investigates narratives of the self vVmong the topics that 
students wiU consider are a variety of fictional and philosophical constructions of the self, the 
relationships of memory to personal identity, and the disjunction or harmony between public and 
private selves. The authors considered in the courses may include Homer, Socrates, St. Augustine, 
Montaigne, Shakespeare, Descartes, Cervantes, Lao Tsu, Nietzsche, and Toni Morrison. 

COR 103. Music and Culture 4 hours 

The appreciadon of music begins with an understanding of the creative process as a 
means of self-expression and the artist's relationship to the world. Using primary sources, guest 
lecturers, and artists, this course examines the st\4es, trends, and developments of Western and 
international music from early civilizations through the 20* century. Study and discussion begin 
to develop an understanding of how music and the cultural arts reflect and affect societal trends 
and values. 

COR 104. Art and Culture 4 hours 

Through the study of art this course will help students understand the basic chronology 
of Western culture, lay the groundwork for broad cultural Uteracv, and look at how art retlects the 
human condition. The course explores content, formal elements, and historical context of the art 
of Western and non-Western cultures from ancient to modern times. Four basic themes wUl 
prevail: Art and Religion, Art and Power, Art and Nature, and Art and the Personal. 

COR 201, COR 202. Human Nature and the Social Order I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

The sophomore course sequence focuses on the relationship between individuals and 
communities, examining the extent to which the "good Ufe" can be pursued within die confmes 
of any social order. These courses investigate issues such as the nature of human excellence and 
virtue, the character of justice, the origins and sources of social order, and the stams and 
legitimacy of political power. How can we obtain an accurate description of humans as social 
beings? What is the good societ}?, and how may it be realized? Students in this course are in\'ited 
to become more thoughtful, self-conscious, and self-critical members and citizens of the society- 
and polity in which they live. Authors such as Aristotie, Locke, Smith, Tocquevdlle, Marx, and 
Weber are read. 

COR 203. Great Ideas of Modern Mathematics 4 hours 

This course explores several major modern matiiematical developments and helps 
students to understand and appreciate the unique approach to knowledge wliich characterizes 
mathematics. The mode of inquiry employed is reason. This is not to be confused widi the 
approach used, for example, in the natural or social sciences. It is, rather, reason divorced from 

96 



anything empirical. As T. H. Huxley remarked, "Mathematics is that study which knows nothing 
of observation, nothing of experiment, nothing of induction, nothing of causation." The course 
will be organized around three or four major mathematical ideas that have emerged since the time 
of Newton. These ideas will be drawn from such fields as calculus, set theory, number theory, 
probabilit)' theory, modern algebra, logic, topology, and non-Euclidean geometry. 

COR 301, COR 302. Historical Perspectives on the Social Order I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

The junior year sequence constitutes an historical examination of human experience in 
response to some of the themes and issues raised in the first two years of the core. Drawing on 
a variety of perspectives from both the humanities and the social sciences, the course strives to 
reconstruct the histories of significant periods in human history. The first semester focuses on 
the rise and fall of civilizations from antiquit}' through the Renaissance. The second semester 
concentrates on the problems of modernity, such as the rise of the modern state, nationalism, 
revolution, and globalization. Both courses examine the ways in which significant moments have 
become essential parts of our historical consciousness, enshrined in myth, and religion, tradition, 
culture, and institutions. Through careful analysis of current scholarship and original sources, 
students are invited to consider the complex relationship between history, cultural traditions, and 
the social and political institutions derived from them. 

COR 401. Science and Human Nature: Biological Sciences 4 hours 

The senior year course deals with the way scientific methodologies inform current 
thinking on the nature of the human organism. Starting from basic genetic and psychological 
understandings, it emphasizes how evolutionary mechanisms may be seen as contributing to the 
origins of uniquely human behaviors. Elements of DNA structure as it applies to information 
storage and transmission, the regulation of gene expression and the mechanics of protein 
synthesis, mutation and its centralit^' in producing variation, sexual reproduction and how the laws 
of probabUit}' apply to biological systems, sex determination, "altruistic" behavior, and kin 
selection are among the topics explored. 

COR 402. Science and Human Nature: Physical Sciences 4 hours 

Modern western society is largely science-dominated, and the consideration of science 
and its role in society is essential for any educated person. This core course investigates the 
practice of science by focusing specifically on scientific revolutions. It is during such periods of 
upheaval that we can most clearlv see how science is actually practiced. WTiat causes a new idea to 
challenge the scientific status quo? What determines whether the new idea will be accepted, or 
not? When seeking new explanations for natural events, what guides the scientist's search? The 
goal of this course is to equip the student with the necessary tools and background to seek 
answers to these questions, and others, for such questions are increasingly a part of each of our 
lives if we live those lives reflectively. 



97 



Core Equivalencies for Transfer Students 

Core credits for transfer students are determined by two things: a student's specific 
course work and the total semester hours transferred in by the student. No core credit is given for 
Advanced Placement or College Level Examination Program course work. Other credit is often 
given, however for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate course work; please see 
Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Programs in the Admission section of this 
Bulletin. 



Transfer Hours 


Course Credits 

from Previous Colleges 


Core 
Equivalents 


1-14 


Music Appreciation or Music History 
Art Appreciation or Art History 


COR 103 
COR 104 


1 5 and over 


Writing Course 

Literature or philosophy course 


COR 101 
COR 102 


Over 30 


Course in history, politics, sociology, 
anthropology, philosophy* or economics. 


COR 201 


Over 45 


Two courses in history, politics, sociology, 
anthropology, philosophy* or economics. 


COR 201 and 
COR 202 



* Note: If a philosophy course is used to exempt COR 102, the same course cannot be applied 
to COR 201 or 202. 

Great Ideas of Mathematics, Historical Perspectives on the Social Order I, II, Science 
and Human Nature: Biological Sciences, and Science and Human Namre: Physical Sciences cannot 
be fulfilled by transfer credit. 

Core Credits Through Study Abroad or as a Transient Student 

Every student attending an Oglethorpe approved semester or year abroad wall receive 
credit for one semester of the junior year core — either Historical Perspectives on the Social Order 
I or II — the smdent may choose. 

Once a student enrolls at Oglethorpe, core credit may not be earned through study as a 
transient student at other institutions; for example, no summer school credit from another 
university. 



98 



Programs of Study 




Degrees 

Oglethorpe University offers six degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, 
Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies, Bachelor of Business Administration, Master of Arts in 
Teaching - Early Childhood Education, and Master of Business Administration. The Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Arts in Teaching — Early Childhood Education degrees 
are offered in the traditional program and described in this publication. (For a discussion of the 
other three degrees, please see University College at the end of this section or refer to the University 
College Bulletin, available from the University College Office.) Under certain conditions it is also 
possible for a student to receive a dual degree in art, a dual degree in engineering, a dual degree in 
environmental studies, or a degree under the Professional Option. See the Index for the sections 
where these degrees are discussed. 

Undergraduate Major Programs and Requirements 

Completion of a major program is required for all baccalaureate degrees. The student's 
academic advisor assists with the student's selection of a major. The student declares the major 
selected on the course registration form completed each semester. Students must have declared a 
major by the end of the second semester of the sophomore year. 

A major is an orderly sequence of courses in: 1) a particular discipline, 2) a combination 
of two disciplines, or 3) a defined interdisciplinary field. A major must include a minimum of 32 
and a maximum of 64 semester hours of required course work, exclusive of all hours used to 
satisfy core requirements. Exceptions may be granted in special circumstances by a vote of the 
appropriate faculty committee. At least half of the semester hours required for the major must be 
in course work taken at Oglethorpe University. Each major includes a substantial component of 
advanced courses which have specified prerequisites. A major may require for successful 
completion a cumulative grade-point average in the major field which is higher than the 2.0 
cumulative grade-point average required for graduation. Alternativel}', the requirements for the 
major may state that only courses in which a "C-" or higher grade is received mav be used in 
satisfaction of the major's requirements. The student is responsible for ensuring the fulfillment of 
the requirements of the major selected. Specific requirements for each of the majors may be 
found listed below in alphabetical order. Please note that no course that is counted to fulfill a 
major requirement for one degree may be used toward the requirements of another degree. 
For the Bachelor of Arts degree the following majors are offered: 

American Studies 

Art - Dual Degree 

Art History 

Business Administration and Behavioral Science 

Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

Economics 

Engineering — Dual Degree 

English 

Environmental Studies — Dual Degree 

French 

History 

Individually Planned Major 

International Studies 

International Studies with Asia Concentration 



100 



Philosophy 
Politics 

Psychology 
Sociology 

Sociology with Social Work Concentration 
Spanish 
Studio Art 
Theatre 
For the Bachelor of Science degree the following majors are offered: 
Accounting 
Biology 
Biopsychology 
Business Administration 

Business Administration and Computer Science 
Chemistry 
Economics 
Mathematics 

Mathematics and Computer Science 
Physics 

Undergraduate Minor Programs and Requirements 

A minor consists of at least 16 semester hours of course work beyond any core 
requirements in that discipline. A minimum of 12 semester hours of a minor must be in course 
work taken at Oglethorpe. Minor programs are available in the fields Usted below. Specific 
requirements for each minor may be found in the respective disciplines, that follow in 
alphabetical order: 



Accounting 

American Studies 

Art History 

Biology 

Business Administration 

Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Economics 

English 

French 

History 

Individually Planned Minor 

Japanese 



Mathematics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Politics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Studio Art 

Theatre 

Women's and Gender Studies 

Wanting 



101 



Academic Departments 



Organizadon of Oglethorpe's disciplines is by division, each with its own division chair. 
The nine divisions are as follows: 

Division I Philosophy, Communication and Rhetoric Studies, and the Fine Arts 

Division II History, Politics, and International Studies 

Division III Natural Sciences 

Division IV Behavioral Sciences 

Division V Economics and Business Administration 

Division VI Education — Undergraduate and Graduate 

Division VII English Language and Comparative Literature 

Division VIII Foreign Languages 

Division IX Mathematics and Computer Science 



Accounting 



Accounting is the language of business. Accounting provides quantitative information, 
primarily financial in nature, about economic entities that is intended to be useful in making 
economic decisions. Accounting students become acquainted with the sources and uses of 
financial information and develop the analytical ability necessary to produce and interpret such 
information. The students learn to observe economic activity; to select from that acti\4t\' the 
events which are relevant to a particular decision; to measure the economic consequences of those 
events in quantitative terms; to record, classify, and summarize the resulting data and to 
communicate the information in various reports and statements to the appropriate 
decisionmakers. 

Accounting students gain the conceptual foundation and basic skills to begin a career in 
accounting. There are many attractive career fields including public accounting, industry, 
government, and non-profit organizations. Accounting provides an excellent educational 
background for anyone going into business. With the skills gained from accounting, the student 
wiU have an appropriate background for such related careers as financial ser\aces, computer 
science, management, industrial engineering, law and others, or the abiUt}' to pursue graduate 
education. Internships are available to give preparation to students for careers after graduation. 
The major in accounting wiU assist the student to prepare for several qualifying examinations in 
accounting and finance such as Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Certified Management 
Accountant (CMA), and Certified Financial Analyst (CFA). 

Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must complete the following 
requirements with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 230 Financial Accounting 

ACC 231 Managerial Accounting 

ACC 332 Intermediate Accounting I 

ACC 333 Intermediate Accounting II 

ACC 334 Cost and Managerial Accounting 

ACC 335 Income Tax Accounting: Individuals 

ACC 435 Advanced Accounting 

ACC 437 Auditing 

BUS 110 Business Law I 

BUS 260 Principles of Management 
102 



BUS 310 Corporate Finance 

BUS 350 Marketing 

BUS 469 Strategic Management 

ECO 121 Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221 Intermediate Microeconomics 

MAT 111 Statistics 

MAT 121 AppUed Calculus 

Note: All upper— level (300 and 400) accounting courses must be taken at Oglethorpe unless 
special permission is given by a member of the accounting facult\'. 

In addition, the student must satisfy the Computer Applications Proficiency 
Requirement. This can be done in one of three ways: 1) by assessment of skills with the student's 
academic advisor, 2) by successful completion of Introduction to Computer Applications 
Software, or 3) by successful performance on the computer proficiency examination. 

Beginning in 1998, new eligibility requirements adopted by the Georgia State Board of 
Accountancy require at least 150 semester hours of college study to qualifv' to take the CPA 
examination. Included within the content of this minimum education standard is the requirement 
to complete at least 30 semester hours of accounting courses beyond Financial Accounting and 
Managerial Accounting and at least 24 semester hours of education in business administration. 
For those students whose objective is to qualif}' to take the CPA examination, it is recommended 
that the following courses be included in these additional required semester hours: 

ACC 336 Income Tax Accounting: Corporations, Partnerships, Estates, 
and Trusts 

ACC 436 Accounting Control Systems 

ACC 438 Accounting Theory 

BUS 111 Business Law II 

Minor 

Students desiring to minor in accounting must complete five courses: Financial 
Accounting and Managerial Accounting, and three of any of the following with a grade of 
"C-" or higher: 

ACC 332 Intermediate Accounting I 

ACC 333 Intermediate Accounting II 

ACC 334 Cost and Managerial Accounting 

ACC 335 Income Tax Accounting: Individuals 

ACC 435 Advanced Accounting 

ACC 230. Financial Accounting 4 hours 

This course is a study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and other 
accounting concepts with emphasis on their application in the financial statements of business 
enterprises. The measurement and reporting of assets, liabilities, and owners' equit\' is stressed, 
along with the related measurement and reporting of revenue, expense, and cash flow. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above or approval by the Director of Accounting Studies. 



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ACC 231. Managerial Accounting 4 hours 

This course is a study of the use of accounting information by managers and decision 
makers within an economic enterprise. Cost analysis for purposes of planning and control is 
emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 230. 

ACC 332. Intermediate Accounting I 4 hours 

This course covers financial accounting topics at an intermediate level. The topics 
covered are similar to Financial Accounting, but in greater depth. The standards promulgated by 
the Financial Accounting Standards Board are considered and evaluated. The theoretical 
foundations of accounting are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 231. 

ACC 333. Intermediate Accounting II 4 hours 

This is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I with emphasis on advanced topics 
such as capitalized leases, pension costs, inter-period income tax allocation and accounting 
changes. Prerequisite: ACC 332. 

ACC 334. Cost and Managerial Accounting 4 hours 

This course provides an introduction to the financial information required for the 
managerial activities of planning, directing operational activities, control, and decision making. 
The course includes the study of the analytical techniques and methodologies used to generate 
accounting information and the managerial use of accounting information. The topics include 
cost behavior and estimation, costing of products and services, cost-volume-profit analysis, 
budgeting, relevant cost analysis, performance evaluation, and pricing decisions. Prerequisite: 
ACC 231. 

ACC 335. Income Tax Accounting: Individuals 4 hours 

This course provides an overview of the federal income tax system primarily as it relates 
to individuals. The study of the federal tax law provides the necessary tax background for a variet}' 
of accounting, financial, and managerial careers. Prerequisite: ACC 231. 

ACC 336. Income Tax Accounting: Corporations, Partnerships, 

Estates, and Trusts 4 hours 

This course is a study of the federal income tax laws and related accounting problems 
of corporations and parmerships, with some consideration of estates and trusts. Consideration 
will be given to the role of taxation in business planning and decision making and the 
interrelationships and differences between financial accounting and tax accounting. Prerequisite: 
ACC 335. 

ACC 430. Personal Financial Education 2 hours 

This course is designed to prepare students for a successftil transition to life after college. 
The course wiU focus on financial planning and education. It wiU cover topics such as emplo^•er 
benefits, money management, debt reduction, tax remrn preparation, insurance, large asset 
purchases, and investing. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 

ACC 433. Independent Study in Accounting 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved bv the instructor, die 
division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 



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I 



ACC 434. Internship in Accounting 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunit)^ to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at 
PricewaterhouseCoopers, Ernst and Young, Deloitte and Touche, Georgia Pacific, and Miller, Ray, 
and Houser. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the 
faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program. 

ACC 435. Advanced Accounting 4 hours 

This course is a study of business combinations and the related problems of 
consolidating the financial statements of affiliated corporations. The accounting problems related 
to international business are also covered and governmental accounting is introduced. 
Prerequisite: ACC 333. 

ACC 436. Accounting Control Systems 4 hours 

This course is an in-depth study of the application of information systems concepts to 
the accounting environment. Emphasis is on the processing of data in a computerized 
environment as well as the controls that are necessary to assure accuracy and reUabiUt}' of the data 
processed by an accounting system. Practical implications of accounting information system 
design and implementation will be investigated through the use of cases and projects. 
Prerequisites: ACC 231 and CSC 240. 

ACC 437. Auditing 4 hours 

This course is a study of auditing standards and procedures, including the use of 
statistical and other quantitative techniques, and preparation of audit working papers, reports, and 
financial statements. Emphasis is placed upon the criteria for the establishment of internal 
controls and the effect of these controls on examinations and reports. Prerequisites: ACC 333 and 
MAT 111. 

ACC 438. Accounting Theory 4 hours 

This course covers the principles and concepts of accounting at an advanced theoretical 
level. The emphasis is on critical analysis of the ideas on which accounting practice is based along 
with an appreciation for the intellectual foundations for those ideas. Prerequisite: ACC 333. 

ACC 439. Special Topics in Accounting 4 hours 

An intense study of diverse accounting topics under the direct super\'ision of an 
accounting faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



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Allied Health Studies 



Students who plan to attend schools of nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, 
medical technology, or other allied health fields should plan their programs at Oglethorpe with the 
assistance of the faculty member serving as the Allied Health Advisor. The name of this advisor 
can be obtained at the Registrar's Office. 

Preparation for admission to an allied health education program typically follows one of 
two models. In the first model, students are admitted to an allied health program after completing 
a group of required courses in specific academic areas during two years of college study. For 
students pursuing this option, a minimum of 64 semester hours credit earned at Oglethorpe and 
successful completion of the allied health education program in an accredited professional school 
are required to earn the Bachelor of Arts degree with an individually planned major. (See the 
description of the individually planned major below.) The second model, which has become 
common practice in fields such as physical therapy, requires students to earn a bachelor's degree 
before being admitted to the allied health program. The degree awarded upon completion of the 
allied health program is t}^ically a master's or doctoral degree. Students interested in this option 
may find that one of the majors regularly offered at Oglethorpe fulfills the admission 
requirements for the allied health program. In other cases, an individually planned major can be 
designed to meet the admission requirements of the allied health program. 

Students who are exploring careers in allied health fields can find additional information 
about them at "Health Professions Links" at http://wipw.naahp.org and at "Careers in Allied 
Health" at http:/ / wiviv. ama-assn. org/ ama/pub/ category/ 2322. html. 



American Studies 



The interdisciplinary major in American studies is designed to provide students with the 
opportunity to develop a systematic and in-depth understanding of American culture. Bv 
combining American studies courses and courses from relevant disciplines (history, literature, the 
arts, economics, and the social sciences), students may explore the relationships of diverse aspects 
of American life. Students also are able to pursue their special interests within American culture 
by developing an "area of concentration" that provides a specific focus for much of the work 
completed in fulfillment of major requirements. 

In addition to introducing students to the field of American studies, the major is 
designed to help students refine their fundamental intellectual skills, especially their writing and 
speaking skills. Skills of this sort wUl serve the student well long after many specific facts, 
postulates, and theories have been forgotten. In short, as is consistent with Oglethorpe's stated 
institutional purpose, the American studies program seeks to prepare humane generalists - 
individuals who possess those basic qualities so necessary for leadership in a rapidly changing 
world. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Major 

Requirements of the major include completion of the following seven courses: 
ECO 223 United States Economic History 
ENG 303 American Poetry 
HIS 130 United States History to 1865 
HIS 330 Between Worid Wars: The United States, 1 920- 1 945 
HIS 331 The Age of Affluence: The United States Since 1945 



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SOC 202 The American Experience (to be taken in the freshman or 

sophomore year) 
One semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary- 
level or higher 
Completion of five of the following courses also is required: 
CRS 340 Writing for Business and the Professions 
ECO 421 Money and Banking 
ECO 424 Labor Economics 
ECO 425 Public Finance 
EDU 101 Introduction to Education 

ENG 312 Special Topics in Literamre and Culture: Literature in the 1920s 
ENG 314 Special Topics in Major British and American Authors 
HIS 430 The American Civil War and Reconstruction 
HIS 431 History of United States Foreign Relations 
POL 201 Constitutional Law 
POL 302 American Political Parties 
POL 303 Congress and the Presidency 
POL 304 African- American Politics 
POL 311 United States Foreign Policy 
SOC 201 The Family 
ULP 303 The New American City 

Minor 

Requirements for the minor include completion of The American Experience (to be 
taken in the freshman or sophomore year) and three of the following five courses: 
ECO 223 United States Economic History 
ENG 303 American Poetry 
HIS 130 United States History to 1865 
HIS 330 Between World Wars: The United States, 1920-1945 
HIS 331 The Age of Affluence: The United States Since 1945 

Art 

The Art Department at Oglethorpe Universit\' offers a stimulating and rigorous 
program of study in studio and art history. The curriculum is designed to be an integral part of 
the liberal arts experience for majors and non-majors alike. Students may choose from a -wide 
range of studio courses offered at the introductory through the advanced level, including dra\\ing, 
painting, figure drawing, photography (both traditional darkroom and digital), printmaking, two- 
dimensional design, color theory, anatomy, and figure sculpture. Art history courses cover a wide 
array of time periods and culmres from ancient to modern art, with an interdisciplinary approach 
which stresses aesthetic and historical context. The Art Department curriculum prepares students 
for a wide array of options, including graduate school and careers in a variet}' of art-related fields. 

In keeping with the concept of the liberal arts education, the Art Department's 
curriculum is designed to give smdents the tools needed to express themselves, think clearly, and 
help find their places in the world. The curriculum is unique in the Southeast for its emphasis on 
mastering the concepts and skills necessary to draw, paint, and sculpt the human figure. Color 
theor}^, perspective, anatomy, and art history are integrated to this goal. In addition, students are 
exposed to a wide range of mediums, including drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpmre, and 
photography. 

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The wide range of courses, as mentioned above, is open at the introductory' level to all 
students regardless of major or minor. Introductory-level courses emphasize the development of 
perception (learning to see); cognitive skills (application of theories to visual phenomena); a sense 
of aesthetics (organization of the parts for the larger whole); and technical skills (facilit}' in 
manipulating tools). 

Many courses are offered at the intermediate and advanced levels as well, in some cases 
under the "Special Topics" heading. Intermediate-level courses build upon introductor}'-level 
course material, undertaking more complex thought processes and approaches, while advanced- 
level courses emphasize individual inquiry and original thinking. 

Studio Art Major 

Studio courses are designed to provide students with a rigorous and stimulating 
foundation in visual language and thinking. Courses emphasize the development of perception 
and visual acuity, cognitive skills, a sense of aesthetics, and facility in manipulating a variet}- of 
artistic approaches and media. The curriculum prepares students to go on to graduate school in 
studio or other fields such as education, art therapy, graphic design or medical illustration. 

Students majoring in studio art must complete eight studio courses, two upper-level art 
history courses, and one foreign language course at the second semester elementary-level or 
higher, for a total of 11 courses and 44 semester hours. Requirements for the studio major include 
two drawing courses; three painting courses; Anatomy For the Artist and Figure Drawing; 
Introduction to Photography; Modern Art History; either Introduction to Figure Sculpture, 
Introduction to Printmaking, or Ways of Seeing; and one other upper-level art history course. The 
degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

The Scientific Illustration Track with Biological Science Emphasis and the Scientific 
Illustration Track with Physical Science Emphasis are two programs which enable the student to 
combine art major requirements and specific science courses. These programs fulfill admission 
requirements for graduate school programs in medical and scientific illustration. The degree 
awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Art History Major 

The art history major provides students with an intellecmal, aesthetic, and historical 
foundation for the study of all visual arts, including architecture, sculpture, painting, photography, 
and nascent media. The courses which make up the art history major have been designed to be 
integrally related to the liberal arts experience, complementing other courses and majors wliich are 
already offered at Oglethorpe by providing comparative historical, cultural, and philosophical 
reference points, while at the same time functioning as a rigorous, free-standing discipline. The 
curriculum prepares students to go on to graduate school in art history and for careers such as 
museum work, education, and art consulting. 

Students majoring in art history must complete a minimum of six art liistory courses 
(one of which must be Modern Art History), two smdio courses (in any tVk'o different media), up 
to two courses from the list below, and one foreign language course at the second semester 
elementary-level or higher, for a total of 1 1 courses and 44 semester hours. i\ll art history courses 
have COR 104 Art and Culture as a prerequisite. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 



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Completion of two or more of the following courses is required (others may be added 
at the discretion of the Art Department): 

CRS 101 Theories of Communication and Rhetoric 

CRS 390 Special Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies: Media, 
Culture and Societ}'* 

ENG 101 Ancient Literature 

ENG 102 Medieval and Renaissance Literature 

PHI 301 Philosophy of Art (Aesthetics) 

PHI 321 Special Topics in Philosophy: Japanese Aesthetics* 

SOC 305 Film and Societ\' 

WGS 301 Introduction to Women's Studies— Theory 

WGS 302 Introduction to Women's Studies-History 

Two semesters of foreign language (in addition to the foreign language 

requirement for the Bachelor of Arts degree) 
* contingent on these Special Topics courses being offered again. 

Minor 

For a minor in art, students may have a concentration in studio or art history. For both 
areas of concentration students must complete a total of five courses and 20 semester hours. 
Students with a concentration in studio must take four studio courses and one upper-level art 
history course. Students may take up to three of these studio courses in one discipline (for 
example, photography, drawing, painting, etc.) or in four different disciplines. At least two of these 
studio courses must be in separate disciplines. 

For a concentration in art history, students must take four upper-level art history courses 
and one studio course. 

ART 101. Introduction to Drawing 4 hours 

This course is an introductory-level studio course which will focus on mastering the 
fundamentals of drawing. Working from observation in line and value, students will develop an 
understanding of form and shape; volume and flatness; spatial relationships; the basics of 
perspective and composition, and the materials and techniques of drawing. 

ART 102. Introduction to Painting 4 hours 

This course is an introductory-level studio course which will focus on understanding and 
mastering the fundamentals of painting. Working from observation, this includes developing an 
understanding of color and color relationship; form and shape; volume and flatness; the basics of 
composition, and the materials and techniques of oil painting. 

ART 103. Introduction to Figure Sculpture 4 hours 

Working from the life model, students will convey their understanding of the 
human form in clay. Planar structure, volume, proportion, and major anatomical landmarks 
will be covered. 

ART 109. Introduction to Photography 4 hours 

Laboratory exercises, in-class lecmres, critiques and assignments are designed to develop 
an understanding of all aspects of photography, including composition and self expression. 
Emphasis will be on development of technical skills and a personal direction in photography. 
Prerequisite: A fuUy manual camera - to be brought to the first class meeting. 



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ART 110. Ways of Seeing 4 hours 

This course systematically breaks down the vocabularies of art to their component 
elements, studying how these elements work together to form visual language. Problems in color 
and composition will be undertaken in a variety of media, including ink, acrylic, and photography. 

ART 111. Anatomy For the Artist and Figure Drawing 4 hours 

This course focuses on both the scientific and the aesthetic exploration of the human 
body. Drawing from the life model, students will study form and function of the skeletal and 
muscular systems, along with proportion and surface landmarks. A variet}' of approaches to 
drawing and drawing materials will be covered. 

ART 201. Intermediate Drawing 4 hours 

This course explores drawing as a tool for perception and a means of self-expression. 
Students will undertake advanced problems in drawing which build upon concepts and techniques 
covered in Introduction to Drawing. These include problems involving the surface of the picture 
plane and the ground plane, arrangements of elements in static and dynamic compositions and 
value pattern. Prerequisite: ART 101 or ART 111. 

ART 202. Intermediate Painting 4 hours 

Students will build upon experiences in Introduction to Painting and undertake more 
complex formal and personal issues in their work. They will be expected to master a wide range 
of visual vocabularies and approach painting from a variety of aesthetic points of view. Imager}', 
realism, abstraction, expressionism, and narration will be explored as smdents begin to develop 
individual direction in their own work. Prerequisite: ART 102. 

ART 203. Intermediate Figure Sculpture 4 hours 

Working from the Life model, this level of sculpture builds upon conceptual and 
percepmal skills honed in Introduction to Figure Sculpmre. Students are expected to approach 
sculpting the human form from a variety of aesthetic points of view, including realism, 
abstraction, and expressionism. Prerequisite: ART 103. 

ART 205. Special Topics in Studio 4 hours 

Smdio exercises, in-studio lecmres, outside assignments, and critiques are designed to 
develop a basic understanding of various media, including printmaking and various specialties of 
artists-in-residence. 

ART 250. Special Topics in Art History 4 hours 

An in-depth analysis of specific historical art periods will stress how major artists and 
trends were influenced by their times. Discussion of important events and ideas of significant 
individuals of the period will serve to provide the necessary background for a thorough 
comprehension of social and inteUecmal sources of art. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 260. Ancient Art History 4 hours 

This course wiU cover the art and archaeology of the area around the Mediterranean Sea 
before the fall of Rome, commonly called the "ancient world." The course will examine the 
mythology and religion of each culmre, using primary sources such as artifacts and ancient 
literature. Cultures covered will include Mesopotamia, Eg^.'pt, Bronze Age Crete, Greece, and 
Rome. Prerequisite: COR 104. 



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ART 300. Italian Renaissance Art History 4 hours 

This course explores the paintings, sculpture, and architecture of Italy from 1300 to 
1650 C.E. Chronological in format, this course enables students to analyze and understand the 
principle styles, methods, and contexts of Italian art and its intrinsic value in the study of 
European art. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 302. Advanced Painting 4 hours 

Students wiU build upon prior experiences in Intermediate Painting and be guided to set 
parameters for individual inquiry in their work. Emphasis will be on personal imagery and control 
of formal issues to express the students' ideas. Each student will be expected to develop ideas and 
themes in a cohesive body of work. Prerequisite: ART 202. 

ART 305. Advanced Special Topics in Studio 4 hours 

This is an advanced level of Special Topics in Studio such as sculpture, photography, 
drawing, printmaking, etc. Prerequisite: ART 205. 

ART 310. Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art History 4 hours 

This course will cover the art of Northern Europe from the late Gothic through the 
Baroque period (the late 14* to the end of the 17* century). A range of media and styles will be 
explored such as illuminated manuscripts, architecture, printmaking, and painting, including the 
work of Durer, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 320. 18* and 19* Century European Art History 4 hours 

This course focuses on the major artists and movements of the 18* and 19* centuries 
in Europe, beginning with the late Baroque and progressing through the Rococo, the 
Neoclassical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist, and the Pre-Raphaelite, as well as Expressionism, 
and Art Nouveau Movements. Students will analyze the major paintings, architecture, and 
sculpture of each period as reflections of the political, social, and religious realities of the time. 
Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 330. Far Eastern Art History - India, China, Tibet, and Japan 4 hours 

This course wiU explore the paintings, sculpture, and architecture of India, Cliina, 
Tibet, Japan, and other Eastern cultures. Chronological in format, this course will enable students 
to analyze and understand principle st}des, methods, and cultural contexts of Eastern art. This 
course will compare and contrast Eastern and Western approaches and attitudes toward art. 
Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 340. The Art of the Americas, Africa, Oceania, and Others 4 hours 

This course will look at how non-western and often pre-technological people around the 
world use visual arts. How does their art express what is important to them? What does it share 
with Western art? Some anthropology findings and the idea of "the primitive" will be explored. 
Both living and extinct cultures will be studied. Prerequisite: COR 104. 



Ill 



ART 350. Modern Art History 4 hours 

An in-depth analysis of the art of the 19* and 20* centuries, stressing how major 
trends and major artists were influenced by their dmes, this course wiU begin with the advent of 
the Industrial Revolution and continue to the present. It will focus on the art and ideas of 
Ingres, Manet, Monet, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, Picasso, Matisse, DaU, and Warhol. 
Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 400. Independent Study in Art History 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic in art history. Prerequisite: Submission of a 
proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the 
instructor, the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

ART 405. Independent Study in Studio 1-4 hours 

Supervised studio art on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed 
outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

ART 410. Internship in Art 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opporttinit\^ to 
qualified smdents. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult}' supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at the High 
Museum of Art, Nexus Contemporary Art Center, Atianta International Museum, and 
Vespermann Gallery. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of 
the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program. 

Art — Dual Degree 

Smdents seeking a broadly based educational experience invoking the t\pes of 
programs generally found at a college of arts and sciences as well as the specialized training 
offered by a professional college may wish to consider the dual degree program in art. Oglethorpe 
University and The Atianta College of Art offer a joint program for students interested in a career 
in the visual arts. The dual degree program requires enrollment at Oglethorpe for two vears 
followed by enrollment at The Atianta College of Art for another two years and one summer. 

The student is required to complete Fresh Focus, all of the core curriculum at 
Oglethorpe (including Art and Culture), a foreign language course at the second semester 
elementary-level or higher, and three courses in studio electives. Upon successful completion of 
these courses, the smdent enrolls at The Atianta College of Art and completes 75 credit hours in 
studio and art history courses. Placement in studio courses is dependent on a portfolio re\-iew. 



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Upon compledon of the joint program, the student receives the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts from Oglethorpe and the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts from The Atlanta College of Art. 
Students participating in the dual degree program must meet the entrance requirements of both 
institutions. Dual degree smdents are advised at Oglethorpe by a facult}' member in the field of 
visual arts. 

Note: Dual-degree students in art may not use Oglethorpe financial aid assistance to attend 
other institutions. 

Biology 

The curriculum in biology provides a foundation in both classical and contemporary 
biological concepts and prepares the student for continuing intellectual growth and professional 
development in the life sciences. These goals are achieved through completion of a set of courses 
that provide a comprehensive background in basic scientific concepts through lectures, 
discussions, writing, and laboratory work. The program supplies the appropriate background for 
employment in research institutions, industry, and government; the curriculum also prepares 
smdents for graduate school and for professional schools of medicine, dentistry, veterinary 
medicine, and the like. Students planning to attend graduate or professional schools should 
recognize that admission to such schools is often highly competitive. Completion of a biology 
major does not ensure admission to these schools. 

A grade of "C-" or higher must be obtained in each freshman- and sophomore-level 
science or mathematics course that is required for this major or minor; these courses are 
numbered 100 through 300 in each discipline. A grade-point average of 2.0 or higher is required 
in all courses required for the major. 

Students who are interested in medical Hlustration are encouraged to consider the 
Scientific Illustration Tracks that are offered within the art major. 

Major 

The requirements for a major in biology are as follows beginning with these four courses 
in sequence: General Biology I and" II, Genetics, and Microbiology. 

One set of paired courses chosen from the following three sets must be completed: 
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Biotechnology or 
Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and Human Physiology or 
Ecology and Special Topics in Biology: Conservation Ecology 
Three upper-level courses chosen from Cell Biology, Embryology, Evolution, Animal 
Behavior, and Vascular Plants; or, any of the paired courses above not used to fulfill the paired 
course requirement must be completed. 

Additionally, Biology Seminar I: Oral Presentations, Biology Seminar II: Biological 
Literamre, General Chemistry I and II (with laboratories). Organic Chemistry I (with laborator}-); 
either Organic Chemistry II (with laboratory) or Elementary Quantitative Analysis (with 
laboratory); General Physics I and II (with laboratories); and Statistics must be completed. The 
degree awarded is the Bachelor of Science. 



113 



All introductory level science courses (General Biology I, General Chemistr}^ I (with 
laboratory). General Physics I (with laboratory), College Physics I (with laboratory) have the same 
mathematics prerequisite. There are three ways that students can fulfill this mathematics 
requirement: 1) by completing Precalculus at Oglethorpe with a grade of "C-" or higher; 2) by 
successfully completing the precalculus mathematics placement examination (Placement 
Examination Two at http: 1 1 petrelnet.oglethorpe.edu I dmsion9 1) [a graphing calculator is required for 
the placement test]); or 3) by achieving a score of 3, 4, or 5 on the Advanced Placement Calculus 
AB or BC Examination. 

Minor 

The requirements for a minor in biology are General Biology I and II, Genetics, and 
Microbiology. Students minoring in biology are not exempt from the prerequisites for the biology 
courses and thus also wiU complete General Chemistry I and II (with laboratories) and Organic 
Chemistry I (with laboratory and either Organic Chemistry II (with laboratory) or Elementan,- 
Quantitative Analysis (with laboratory). 

BIO 101, BIO 102. General Biology I, II 5 plus 5 hours 

An introduction to modern biology, these courses include the basic principles of plant 
and animal biology, with emphasis on structure, function, evolutionary relationships, ecology, and 
behavior. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: Precalculus in high school or MAT 103, BIO 101 
must precede BIO 102 and it is recommended that the courses be completed in consecutive 
semesters. Smdents who are majoring in biology must earn a grade of "C-" or higher in BIO 101 
before taking BIO 102. 

BIO 201. Genetics 5 hours 

An introduction to the study of inheritance. The classical patterns of MendeUan 
inheritance are related to modern molecular genetics and to the control of metabolism and 
development. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites or corequisites: BIO 102, CHM 102, CHM 
201, and CHM 201L. A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite 
courses. 

BIO 202. Microbiology 5 hours 

An introduction to the biology of viruses, bacteria, algae, and fungi. Consideration is 
given to phylogenetic relationships, taxonomy, physiology, and economic or pathogenic 
significance of each group. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 201, CHM 201, and CHM 
201L with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. 

BIO 251. Biology Seminar I: Oral Presentations 1 hour 

This course is offered in the faU as a component in a two-semester "capstone" sequence 
for biology majors. The two-part experience is designed to introduce students to the mechanics 
and inteUecmal components of the practice of being a scientist. This course will cultivate the 
skills of the framing, researcliing, preparation and presentation of a public address on a topic of 
biological interest. Recommended for smdents with junior or senior standing. 



114 



BIO 252. Biology Seminar II: Biological Literature 1 hour 

This course is offered in the spring as a component in a two-semester "capstone" 
sequence for biology majors. The two-part experience is designed to introduce students to the 
mechanics and intellectual components of the practice of being a scientist. This course serves as 
an introduction to researching, locating, interpreting and presenting information from the 
professional scientific literature. Recommended for students with sophomore or junior standing. 

BIO 301. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 5 hours 

An intensive study of the structural aspects of selected vertebrate t}'pes. These 
organisms are smdied in relation to their evolution and development. The laboratory involves 
detailed examination of representative vertebrate specimens . Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 201, 
CHM 201, and CHM 201L. Completion of BIO 201 or CHM 201 and coregistration in the other 
may be acceptable with the permission of the instructor. A grade of "C-" or higher must be 
earned in each of the prerequisite courses. 

BIO 302. Human Physiology 5 hours 

A detailed analysis of human functions that deals primarily with the interactions 
involved in the operation of complex human systems. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 
201, CHM 201, and CHM 201L. A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each of the 
prerequisite courses. 

BIO 310. Special Topics in Biology 1-5 hours 

Advanced course and laboratory work, including independent studies, in various areas 
of biology. Approval by the student's facult}' advisor and the chairperson of the department is 
required for off-campus activities. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

BIO 313. Embryology 5 hours 

A course dealing with the developmental biology of animals. Classical observations are 
considered along with more recent experimental embryology in the framework of an analysis of 
development. In the laboratory, living and prepared examples of developing systems in 
representative invertebrates and vertebrates are considered. Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHM 201, 
and CHM 201L. A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite courses. 

BIO 315. Animal Behavior 5 hours 

This course considers the function, development, and evolution of animal behavior, 
including the physical and physiological bases of behaxdor, behavioral genetics, social beha\aor and 
behavioral ecology. The laboratory component applies the issues addressed in lecmre in a hands- 
on interactive and field-oriented setting. An integrated speakers series is part of the interactive 
intellectual environment cultivated by the course. Lecmre and laboratory. Offered biennially. 
Prerequisites: BIO 102 and PSY 101. A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each of the 
prerequisite courses. 



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BIO 316. CeU Biology 5 hours 

An in-depth consideration of cell ultrastructure and the molecular mechanisms of cell 
physiology. Techniques involving the culturing and preparation of cells and tissues for 
experimental examination are carried out in the laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHM 201, and 
CHM 201 L. A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite courses. 

BIO 326. Vascular Plants 5 hours 

The biology of vascular plants is considered at levels of organization ranging from the 
molecular through the ecological. Studies of anatomy and morphology are pursued in the 
laboratory, and an independent project concerning plant hormones is required. Offered spring 
semester of even-numbered years. Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHM 201, and CHM 201L. A grade of 
"C-" or higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite courses. 

BIO 413. Biochemistry 5 hours 

7\n introduction to the chemistry of Hving systems, this course will investigate the 
synthesis, degradation, and functions of various molecules within living organisms. Central 
metabolic pathways and enzyme reaction mechanisms also will be studied. Lecttire and laboratory. 
Prerequisites: BIO 102, CHM 201, and CHM 201 L with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course; 
recommended Prerequisite: CHM 310. 

BIO 414. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology 5 hours 

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of molecular bioscience. Topics 
covered include the principles and processes of molecular biology, DNA isolation and 
characterization, restriction enzyme analysis, cloning, construction and selection of recombinants 
made in vitro and preparation and analysis of gene libraries. Lecture and Laboratory. Prerequisites: 
BIO 202, CHM 201, CHM 201 L, and BIO 413 with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. 

BIO 416. Evolution 4 hours 

A course dealing with the various biological disciplines and their meaning in an 
evolutionary context. Also, a consideration of evolutionary mechanisms and the various theories 
concerning them. Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHM 201, and CHM 201L. A grade of "C-" or higher 
must be earned in each of the prerequisite courses. 

BIO 423. Ecology 5 hours 

This course investigates the features of the environment that dictate where an organism 
lives and what densit}' its population can achieve. The course takes a quantitative approach to these 
topics and uses both laboratory and field-based examples to Ulustrate concepts. Laboratory 
sections involve several off-campus field trips. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor or a 
grade of "C-" or higher in BIO 202, CHM 201, and CHM 201L. 

Biopsychology 

Biopsychology is the study of the biological bases of behavior, including the molecular 
and cellular basis of neural functioning and how systems of neurons relate to beha\ior. By its 
nature, the field of biopsychology is an interdisciplinary field of smdy that encompasses biology, 
chemistry, and psychology. The field is broad and researchers may find themselves smd\ing the 
brain from a chemical, cellular, genetic, developmental, behavioral, cognitive, or social behavioral 
perspective. A graduate with a Bachelor of Science in biopsychology could pursue entry-level 



116 



positions in academic or private research settings, sales positions in the biotechnology industry, or 
explore alternative careers such as policy development or science writing. In addition, the major 
provides the training necessary to be competitive when applying to various graduate programs in 
neuroscience and related disciplines. 

The major consists of 1 1 required courses (some with associated laboratories) and four 
electives. There is no minor in biopsychology. Courses taken to complete this major may not be 
used to fulfill the requirements of a minor in a related field. Due to the breadth of electives 
offered students should consult with their advisor to create a coherent program of study that is 
best suited to each student's goals. Pre-medical students should consult with the pre-medical 
advisor concerning additional course work required to apply to medical school. 

General Biology I and II, General Chemistry I and II, and General Chemistry 
Laboratory I and II have as prerequisites fulfillment of one of the following with a grade of 
"C-" or better: 1) high school calculus, 2) AP calculus, or 3) precalculus taken at the college level. 
A grade of "C-" or higher must be obtained in each freshman- and sophomore-level required 
course (100-level and 200-level). A grade-point average of 2.0 or higher is required in all required 
courses and electives for the major. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Science. 

Major 

Requirements of the major include completion of the following courses: 

BIO 101 General Biology I 

BIO 102 General Biology II 

BIO 201 Genetics 

BIO 202 Microbiology 

CHM 101, lOlL General Chemistry I with laboratory 

CHM 102, 102L General Chemistry II with laboratory 

CHM 201, 201 L Organic Chemistry I with laboratory 

MAT 1 1 1 Statistics 

PSY 101 Psychological Inquiry 

PSY 301 Research Methods 

PSY 309 Behavioral Neuroscience 
Each student must also complete four electives from the following options. At least one 
elective must be a biology course or Organic Chemistry II with laboratory. 

BIO 301 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 

BIO 302 Human Physiology 

BIO 315 Animal Beha\aor * 

BIO 316 CeU Biology 

BIO 413 Biochemistry 

BIO 414 Molecular Biology and Biotechnology 

CHM 202, 202L Organic Chemistry II with laboratory 

PSY 201 Developmental Psychology 

PSY 203 Learning and Conditioning 

PSY 302 Advanced Experimental Psychology 

PSY 306 Abnormal Psychology 

PSY 307 Cognitive Psychology 

PSY 308 Sensation and Perception 

PSY 403 Drugs, the Brain, and Behavior 

*Note: This course will not serve as the one biology elective by itself. 



117 



Business Administration 



Business Administration prepares stxidents for careers in the business world. Business 
teaches not only knowledge and use of business terminology but introduces all the major 
disciplines of a business entity. Throughout the curriculum there is a major emphasis on critical 
thinking, strategic thinking, leadership, problem solving, managerial skills, and communication 
skills. Business students study all functional areas of business to enable them to have an appropriate 
foundation for related careers in advertising, financial services, banking or securities trading, 
marketing, management, or to pursue graduate education. Internships are available to prepare 
students for careers after graduation. 

In addition to preparing students for business careers and graduate school, the program 
in business administration is a good alternative for other careers. Students gain administrative skills 
and methods of kiquiry that are applicable in governmental and non-profit organizations. Since 
much legal practice involves business and a knowledge of business terminology and institutions, 
this major is an excellent background for the smdy and practice of law. 

Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must complete the following 
requirements with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 230 Financial Accounting 

ACC 231 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 219 Management Science 

BUS 260 Principles of Management 

BUS 310 Corporate Finance 

BUS 350 Marketing 

BUS 469 Strategic Management 

ECO 121 Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221 Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

MAT 1 1 1 Statistics 

MAT 121 AppUed Calculus 
In addition, the student must satisfy the Computer Applications Proficiency 
Requirement. This can be done in one of three ways: 1) by assessment of skills with the student's 
academic advisor, 2) by successful completion of Introduction to Computer Applications 
Software, or 3) by successful performance on the computer proficiency examination. 

Finally, three additional advanced-level courses must be successfully completed at 
the 300 or 400 level in accounting, business administration, economics, and/or computer 
science. These courses may be taken in a specific functional area as a concentration or taken 
in different areas. 

A concentration may be earned in the areas of finance, international business smdies, 
management, or marketing. Each concentration requires that the student take at least nine credit 
hours of course work at the 300, 400, or MBA level in that area. For a course to be included as 
part of a student's concentration, it must be approved by the smdent's advisor. 

Students who wish to take MBA-level courses as part of their concentration must have 
1) at least junior standing, 2) a cumulative grade-point average of 2.8, and 3) written permission 
from the MBA director. In addition, there must be sufficient space availabilit}' for undergraduate 
students. A student may take no more than six credit hours of the concentration at the MBA level. 



118 



Minor 

A minor in business administration is designed to provide the student with an 
elementary foundation in the major disciplines within business administration. It is a useful minor 
for students who wish to prepare for an entry-level position in business while pursuing another 
major outside of business administradon. It is also useful for those who wish to continue work 
after graduation toward a Master of Business Administration degree at Oglethorpe or elsewhere. 
The requirements for a minor are the successful completion with a grade of "C-" or higher in each 
of the following courses: 

ACC 230 Financial Accounting 

ACC 231 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 260 Principles of Management 

BUS 310 Corporate Finance 

BUS 350 Marketing 

ECO 121 Introduction to Economics 

BUS 110. Business Law 1 4 hours 

This course is designed to give the student an awareness of a Limited area of those 
aspects of the law which will be needed in day-to-day dealings with the problems of business. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the law of contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, and a study 
of the Uniform Commercial Code as it applies. 

BUS 111. Business Law II 4 hours 

This course is a study of partnerships, corporations, sales, bailments, securit}' devices, 
propert}', bankruptcy, and trade infringements. Prerequisite: BUS 110. 

BUS 219. Management Science 4 hours 

An introduction to operations research, model building, optimization, linear 
programming, inventory models, and simulation. Major techniques and models of quantitative 
analysis as appUed to business are studied. Prerequisites: CSC 240, MAT 111, and MAT 121. 

BUS 260. Principles of Management 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to the principles of management and administration. It 
includes the study of leadership, conflict resolution, decision making, and the general functions of 
management in large and small organizations. Students wiU use computers extensively to do active 
research, and wiU learn spreadsheet and graphical tools to aid in the development of their 
decision-making skills. 

BUS 310. Corporate Finance 4 hours 

This course is a study of the basic principles of organizational finance and its relation 
to other aspects of business management and to the economic environment within which the firm 
operates. Attention is given to basic financial concepts, techniques of financial analysis, sources of 
fiinding, asset management, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, time value of 
money, and financial decision making under conditions of uncertainty Prerequisites: ACC 231, 
ECO 121, and MAT 111. 

BUS 350. Marketing 4 hours 

This course is concerned with the policies and problems involved in the operation of 

market institutions. It will examine broad principles and concepts involved in the operation of 

market planning, market segmentation, consumer behavior, and product management, pricing, 

distribution, and promotion of goods and services. Aspects of global marketing, current 

marketing topics, and ethical and social responsibUit)' issues in marketing are addressed. 

Prerequisites: ACC 231 and ECO 121. 

^ 119 



BUS 351. Retailing 4 hours 

This course is designed to acquaint tlie student with one aspect of the marketing 
activity of distribution known as retailing. The course will involve looking at all the activities 
necessary to sell goods and services to the final consumer. This will include an examination of 
such retail topics as consumer markets and behavior, retail site location, retail store operations 
and management, pricing and communication decisions, merchandising, decision analysis and 
evaluation, and the regulatory, technological and ethical environments in which retailing operates. 
Prerequisite: BUS 350. 

BUS 352. Marketing Communications 4 hours 

Principles, concepts, and practices relating to the various kinds of communications 
employed to disseminate information about products and services to potential buyers are topics 
in this course. Communication methods to be studied include advertising, personal seUing, sales 
promotion, and pubUc relations. The behavioral aspects of both messages and media will be 
explored. Prerequisite: BUS 350. 

BUS 362. Human Resources Management 4 hours 

In this course students will explore the perspectives and challenges of Human 
Resources Management within the context of the emerging global economy. The class will look 
at traditional HRM topics such as selection and compensation and also at how students can 
manage their own human resource potential. Prerequisite: BUS 260. 

BUS 370. International Business 4 hours 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the problems encountered in 
conducting business outside one's own country and to provide a basis for evaluating the impact 
on business activities of changing economic, political, and cultural factors. Cases will be used 
throughout the course to give the student experience with the problems and advantages of doing 
business across national frontiers. A cultural diversit)' simulation game also will be used. 
Prerequisite: BUS 260. 

BUS 410. Advanced Corporate Finance 4 hours 

As a continuation of Corporate Finance, topics in this course will include capital 
budgeting, intermediate and long-term funding, current asset management, working capital 
management, and dividend policy. Case studies will be used to emphasize actual business 
situations and to focus on the comprehensive financial management of the firm. Prerequisite: 
BUS 310. 

BUS 411. Investments 4 hours 

An introduction to tlie environment in which investment decisions are made. Topics 
explored wiU include efficient markets, the capital asset pricing model, term structure of interest rates, 
risk versus return, and performance measures. Although the emphasis will be on stocks and bonds, 
other investments will be discussed. Prerequisite: BUS 310. 

BUS 450. Consumer Behavior 4 hours 

This course is designed to develop and enhance an understanding of how and why 
individuals, groups, and organizations select, secure, use, and dispose of products and die impact 
this has on consumers and society. The course is interdisciplinarv, drawing upon the fields of 
economics, marketing, psychology, and sociology. Ethical and legal as well as international aspects 
of consumer behavior are explored in the course. Prerequisite: BUS 350. 

120 



BUS 451. Direct Marketing 4 hours 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the specialized field of interactive 
marketing which uses all media to effect a measurable consumer response. Topics to be explored 
include direct marketing planning, mailing lists and databases, selecting the appropriate media for 
the message, techniques for creating and producing direct response campaigns, and managing the 
direct marketing operation. Prerequisite: BUS 350. 

BUS 456. Marketing Research 4 hours 

This course is designed to explore topics such as the t\pes of research, the research 
process, research design, sampling procedures, data collection methods, data analysis, and 
preparation and presentation of research findings. A research project and presentation of findings 
is usually required in the course. Prerequisites: BUS 350, CSC 240 or equivalent, and MAT 111. 

BUS 461. Total Quality Management 4 hours 

This course will explore major systematic approaches to Total Qualit\' Management. 
Students will examine quality management from a "profound knowledge" perspective (Deming, 
Pirsig, Goldratt), and will learn how to understand qualit}' as a concept for achieving effective 
management within a firm, and in one's own life. Prerequisites: BUS 260 and MAT 111. 

BUS 469. Strategic Management 4 hours 

This course is the capstone integration course for the business program. Students learn 
integrative thinking skills and strategic management tools through both the reading of conceptual 
work and the extensive use of the case studies. This course must be taken in residence in order to 
fulfill the requirements for a degree in this major. Prerequisites: BUS 260, BUS 310, and BUS 350. 

BUS 490. Internship in Business Administration 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity' to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult}' supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
facult}' supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at Office Depot, 
the Metro Adanta Chamber of Commerce, SunTrust Bank and the Atianta Thrashers. Graded on 
a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and 
qualification for the internship program. 

BUS 494. Independent Study in Business Administration 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic in business administration. Prerequisite: 
Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and 
assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair, and the Provost and Senior \^ice 
President prior to registration. 

BUS 495. Special Topics in Business Administration 4 hours 

An intense study of diverse business topics under the direct supervision of a business 
administration faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



121 



Business Administration and Behavioral Science 

Business administration and behavioral science provides students with the knowledge 
and skills of the behavioral sciences as they may apply to the business world. Students majoring 
in business and behavioral science will be prepared for careers in human resources or institutional 
administration such as hospitals. The major also prepares students to pursue graduate studies in 
business, applied psychology, or organizational behavior. 

Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the following requirements 
with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 230 Financial Accounting 

ACC 231 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 260 Principles of Management 

BUS 350 Marketing 

MAT 1 1 1 Statistics 

PSY 204 Social Psychology 

PSY 303 Psychological Testing 

SOC 302 The Sociology of Work and Occupations 

One semester of a foreign language at the second semester 

elementary-level or higher 
Two of the following behavioral science courses: 

PSY 202 Organizational Psychology 

PSY 203 Learning and Conditioning 

PSY 205 Theories of Personality 

PSY 301 Research Methods 

SOC 308 Culture and Society 
Two of the following business administration courses: 

BUS 110 Business Law I 

BUS 219 Management Science 

BUS 310 Corporate Finance 

BUS 352 Marketing Communications 

BUS 362 Human Resources Management 

BUS 456 Marketing Research 

BUS 461 Total Quality Management 

BUS 495 Special Topics in Business Administration: Entrepreneursliip 
and Innovation 

ECO 221 Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

ECO 424 Labor Economics 
In addition, the student must satisfy the Computer Applications Proficiency 
Requirement. This can be done in one of three ways: 1) by assessment of skills with the student s 
academic advisor, 2) by successful completion of Introduction to Computer Applications 
Software, or 3) by successful performance on the computer proficiencv examination. 



122 



Business Administration and Computer Science 

Business involves the collection, storage, analysis, and reporting of large volumes of 
data. By combining business and computer science courses, students learn ways in which 
computer systems can assist in carrying out the accounting, finance, marketing, and management 
functions of business. Business administration and computer science majors learn innovative 
approaches to administration that would be impractical without the computational capacity of the 
computer. 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must complete the following 
requirements with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 230 Financial Accounting 

ACC 231 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 260 Principles of Management 

BUS 310 Corporate Finance 

BUS 350 Marketing 

BUS 469 Strategic Management 

CSC 243 Principles of Computer Programming in C++ or 

CSC 244 Principles of Computer Programming in Java 
CSC 344 Principles of File Processing in COBOL 
ECO 121 Introduction to Economics 
MAT 1 1 1 Statistics 
MAT 121 AppUed Calculus 
Completion of three of the following courses also is required: 

CSC 240 Introduction to Computer Applications Software or 

CSC 243 Principles of Computer Programming in C++ or 
CSC 244 Principles of Computer Programming in Java 
CSC 342 Introduction to Data Structures in Ada 
CSC 440 Principles of Object-Oriented Programming Using C++ 
CSC 441 Assembly Language and Computer Architecture 
CSC 442 Special Topics in Computer Science 
In addition, the student must satisfy the Computer AppUcations Proficiency 
Requirement. This can be done in one of three ways: 1) by assessment of skills with the student's 
academic advisor, 2) by successful completion of Introduction to Computer Applications 
Software, or 3) by successful performance on the computer proficiencv examination. 



123 



Chemistry 

The chemistry program covers four general areas of chemistry: inorganic, organic, 
physical, and analytical. The first half of a student's chemistry curriculum involves courses which 
present the fundamentals of the various areas. The second half of the curriculum consists of 
advanced courses which cover specialized topics in chemistry. In addition to factual knowledge 
about chemistry, the student gains an understanding about the scientific method and a systematic 
approach to research. A large portion of the chemistry curriculum includes laboratory courses. 
These courses teach the techniques and skills used in chemical experimentation. 

A student who has completed the Bachelor of Science program in chemistry has several 
career options. These options include technical or analytical work in a chemical laboratory and 
non-research positions in the chemical industry such as sales or marketing. Another option is to 
enter a graduate or professional school. Graduates interested in doing chemical research should 
pursue the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees. Those interested in professions such as medicine or dentistn,-, 
would enter the appropriate professional school after receiving the Bachelor of Science degree. 
Lastiy, the chemistry major is an excellent preparation for careers as diversified as patent law and 
teaching. 

A grade of "C-" or higher must be obtained in each freshman- and sophomore -level 
science course that is required for this major or minor; these courses are numbered 100 through 
300 in each discipline. A grade-point average of 2.0 or higher is required in all courses required 
for the major. 

Smdents who are interested in scientific illustration are encouraged to consider the 
Scientific Illustration Tracks that are offered within the art major. 

Major 

The requirements for a major in chemistry are as follows: General Chemistry I and II, 
Organic Chemistry I and II, Elementary Quantitative Analysis, Instrumental Methods of 
Chemical Analysis, Physical Chemistry I and II, Inorganic Chemistry, Advanced Organic 
Chemistry, and Organic Spectroscopy. Each requirement has a respective laboratory which must 
be taken concurrentiy with the course. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Science. 

Minor 

The requirements for a minor in chemistry are as follows: General Chemistry I and II 
(with laboratories). Organic Chemistry I and II (with laboratories). Elementary Quantitative 
Analysis (with laboratory), and one additional lecture course in chemistry. 

CHM 101, CHM 102. General Chemistry I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including a smdv of the 
theories of the structure of atoms and molecules and the nature of the chemical bond; the 
properties of gases, liquids, and solids; the rates and energetics of chemical reactions; the 
properties of solutions; chemical equilibria; electro-chemistry, and the chemical beha\'ior of 
representative elements. Prerequisites: MAT 102 and MAT 103 with a grade of "C-" or higher in 
each course. Corequisites: CHM lOlL and CHM 102L. A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned 
in CHM 101 before taking CHM 102. 



124 



CHM lOlL, CHM 102L. General Chemistry Laboratory I, II 1 plus 1 hour 

The laboratory course is designed to complement CHM 101 and CHM 102. Various 
laboratory techniques will be introduced. Experiments wiU demonstrate concepts covered in the 
lecture material. Corequisites: CHM 101 and CHM 102. 

CHM 201, CHM 202. Organic Chemistry I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

An introductory course in the principles and theories of organic chemistry. The 
structure, preparation, and reactions of various functional groups wiU be investigated. Emphasis 
will be on synthesis and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: CHM 101 and CHM 102 with a grade 
of "C-" or higher in each course. Corequisites: CHM 201L and CHM 202L. A grade of "C-" or 
higher must be earned in CHM 201 before taking CHM 202. 

CHM 201L, CHM 202L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I, II 1 plus 1 hour 

The laboratory course is designed to complement CHM 201 and CHM 202. Various 
techniques, such as distillation, extraction, and purification, are smdied in the first semester. The 
second semester involves synthesis and identification of a variet}' of organic compounds. 
Corequisites: CHM 201 and CHM 202. 

CHM 301, CHM 302. Physical Chemistry I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

A systematic study of the foundations of chemistry. Particular attention is paid to 
thermodynamics, including characterization of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions of electrolytes 
and nonelectrolytes; the First, Second, and Third Laws; spontaneity and equilibrium; phase 
diagrams and one- and two-component systems; electrochemistry; and an introduction to the 
kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Additionally, both phenomenological and mechanistic 
kinetics are presented, as is a brief introduction to quantvim mechanics. Prerequisites: MAT 233, 
CHM 202, and PHY 102 with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. 

CHM 301L, CHM 302L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory I, II 1 plus 1 hour 

Intended to complement the physical chemistry lecture courses, these courses provide 
the smdent with an introduction to physico-chemical experimentation. Corequisite: CHM 301, 
302. 

CHM 310. Elementary Quantitative Analysis 4 hours 

An introduction to elementary analytical chemistry, including gravimetric and volumetric 
methods. Emphasis is on the theory of analytical separations, solubility, complex, acid-base, and 
redox equilibria. Intended for both chemistry majors and those enrolled in pre-professional 
programs in other physical sciences and in the health sciences. Prerequisite: CHM 201 with a 
grade of "C-" or higher. 

CHM 310L. Elementary Quantitative Analysis Laboratory 1 hour 

Analyses are carried out in this course which illustrate the methods discussed in CHM 
310. Corequisite: CHM 310. 



125 



CHM 422. Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis 4 hours 

A discussion of the principles and applications of modern instrumentation used in 
analytical chemistry. Methods discussed are primarily non-optical, including an overview of 
electrochemistry; potentiometric methods, including use of pH and other ion meters; 
electrogravimetry; coulometry; polarography; amperometry; and gas- and liquid-chromatography. 
Course is offered on alternate years. Prerequisite: CHM 310 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

CHM 422L. Instrumental Methods Laboratory 1 hour 

This laboratory accompanies CHM 422 and will consider the practical applications of 
modern instrumentation in analytical chemistry. Corequisite CHM 422. 

CHM 424. Advanced Organic Chemistry 4 hours 

A discussion of selected reactions and theories in organic chemistry. Emphasis is placed 
on reaction mechanisms and reactive intermediates encountered in organic synthesis. Prerequisite: 
CHM 202 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

CHM 424L. Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 hour 

Intended to complement Advanced Organic Chemistry, this course will investigate 
general reactions and mechanistic principles in organic synthesis. The study will require the multi- 
step synthesis of various organic molecules. Corequisite: CHM 424 

CHM 432. Inorganic Chemistry 4 hours 

A study of the principles of modern inorganic chemistry, including atomic structure; 
molecular structure; ionic bonding; crystal structures of ionic solids, a systematic study of the 
behavior of inorganic anions; coordination chemistry, including structure and mechanisms of 
aqueous reactions; and acids and bases. Course is offered on alternate years. Prerequisite or 
corequisite: CHM 302. 

CHM 432L. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 1 hour 

Intended to complement Inorganic Chemistry, this course provides experience in the 
methods of preparation and characterization of inorganic compounds. Corequisite: CHM 432 

CHM 434. Organic Spectroscopy 4 hours 

A course dealing with several spectroscopic methods as applied to organic molecules. 
The principles and interpretation of ultra-violet, visible, infrared, mass, and nuclear magnetic 
resonance spectra wiU be studied. Course is offered on alternate years. Prerequisite: CHM 202 
with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

CHM 434L. Organic Spectroscopy Laboratory 1 hour 

Students enrolled in this course use various spectrometers for qualitative and 
quantitative analysis. Corequisite: CHM 434 

CHM 490. Special Topics in Chemistry 1-5 hours 

Advanced topics wiU be offered in the following fields: Organic Chemistry, Organic 
Qualitative Analysis, Biochemistry, Theoretical Chemistr)', and Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



126 



CHM 499. Independent Study in Chemistry 1-5 hours 

This course is intended for students of senior standing who wish to do independent 
laboratory and/or theoretical investigations in chemistry. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed 
outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

The program in communication and rhetoric studies prepares students to become 
critically reflective citizens and practitioners in professions, including journalism, public relations, 
law, politics, broadcasting, advertising, public service, corporate communications, and publishing. 
Students learn to perform effectively as ethical communicators — as speakers, writers, readers, and 
researchers who know how to examine and engage audiences, from local to global situations. 
Majors acquire theories, research methods, and practices for producing as well as judging 
communication of all kinds — written, spoken, visual, and multi-media. The program encourages 
students to understand messages, audiences, and media as shaped by social, historical, political, 
economic, and cultural conditions. Smdents have the opportunity to receive hands-on experience 
in a communication field of their choice through an internship. A leading center for the 
communications industry, Adanta provides excellent opportunities for students to explore career 
options and apply their skills. 

The major in communication and rhetoric studies consists of at least nine courses (36 
semester hours) in the discipline. All majors must complete a minor course of study to connect 
their field to a related body of knowledge and to enhance career possibilities. Smdents are 
encouraged to broaden their knowledge and skills through this required minor in such areas as art, 
philosophy, psychology, business administration, politics, and international smdies. The degree 
awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Major 

The following courses are required: 

CRS 101 Theories of Communication and Rhetoric 

CRSllO Public Speaking I 

CRS 390 Advanced Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

One year of a foreign language at the first-year college level (or the 

equivalent determined through testing) 
Two courses selected from the following: 

CRS 221 Persuasive Writing 

CRS 240 Journalism 

CRS 340 Writing for Business and the Professions 
Four courses selected from the following list with at least three of them bearing the 
CRS designation. Advanced Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies may be taken more 
than once. 

CRS 1 1 1 PubHc Speaking II 

CRS 220 Investigative Writing 

CRS 250 Broadcasting and the New Electronic Media 

CRS 380 Independent Study in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

CRS 390 Advanced Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

CRS 401 Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 
, ENG 230 Creative Writing 

ENG 231 Biography and Autobiography 

ENG 331 Writing Prose, Fiction, and Nonfiction 

127 



WRI 381 Independent Study in Writing 

WRI 391 Special Topics in Writing 
Minor 

A student may take a communication and rhetoric studies minor or writing minor, but 
not both. The minor consists of 20 semester hours. (For the requirements of the writing minor, 
please see the description of the writing minor in alphabetical order below.) 
The following course is required: 

CRS 101 Theories of Communication and Rhetoric 1 

One course selected from the following: 

CRS 221 Persuasive Writing 

CRS 240 Journalism 

CRS 340 Writing for Business and the Professions 
Three courses selected from the following. Advanced Topics in Communication and 
Rhetoric Studies may be taken more than once. 

CRS 110 PubHc Speaking I 

CRS 111 PubUc Speaking II 

CRS 220 Investigative Writing 

CRS 240 Journalism 

CRS 250 Broadcasting and the New Electronic Media 

CRS 340 Writing for Business and the Professions 

CRS 390 Advanced Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Smdies 

CRS 401 Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

WRI 391 Special Topics in Writing 

CRS 101. Theories of Communication and Rhetoric 4 hours 

This gateway course to the major is designed to establish a broad understanding of 
various theories used in communication and rhetoric studies. Students wiU learn theories about 
messages themselves as well as the various contexts in which they occur: interpersonal 
communication, public communication, mass communication, intercultural and gendered 
communication, and organizational communication. The ethical implications of these theories wiH 
also be considered. 

CRS 110. Public Speaking 1 4 hours 

This course is designed to develop and enhance students' abiLit\' to communicate 
effectively to any audience. Students wiU deliver both prepared and impromptu speeches. Thev will 
give humorous and inspirational speeches as well as informational speeches focusing on 
organization and the use of visual aids. Students develop all the tools necessary to effectively 
communicate — their voice, their gestures, their body language, and their eye contact. They will 
receive timely written and oral feedback from the instructor. Speeches wiU be videotaped and 
critiqued. The goal is to become a more polished and confident speaker. 

CRS 111. PubUc Speaking II 4 hours 

This course develops communication skills gained in Public Speaking I. Smdents will 
learn to convey their messages directiy, confidendy, and persuasively. Students will practice 
delivering persuasive speeches for a varietv of occasions from the classroom to the boardroom. 
They will learn to make the closing argument to the jury, to tleld the difficult interN-iew question, 
to close the sale, to give the congratulatory toast, and to deliver the inspirational speech. Speeches 
wUl be videotaped and critiqued. Prerequisite: CRS 1 10. 



128 



ARC 201. Seminar for Student Tutors 1 hour 

Peer tutors at the Academic Resource Center spend two hours per week assisting other 
students, individually or in groups, with course material, papers, and preparation for examinations. 
In addition, they participate in support and training meetings with the ARC directors and with 
instructors of the courses in which they tutor. They discuss how to work with texts in different 
disciplines, encourage study group members to help each other learn, and foster student 
engagement with and assimilation of course content. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Associate Provost for Student Achievement. 

CRS 220. Investigative Writing 4 hours 

This expository writing course is designed to develop research and writing skills. 
Emphasis will be on learning a wide range of library and Internet-based research techniques and 
purposefully presenting information to a variety of audiences in appropriate format and style. 
Students wiU be asked to define their own investigative projects and to analyze and revise their 
own writing. This course is recommended for freshmen and sophomores. Prerequisite: COR 101. 

CRS 221. Persuasive Writing 4 hours 

This course is designed to develop sophisticated strategies of persuasion for analyzing 
and generating arguments responsive to targeted audiences in a variety of contexts, including civic, 
professional, and academic. Students will learn both classical and contemporary strategies of 
persuasion. Emphasis will be on presenting clear, coherent, and logical arguments. Students wiU 
be asked to define their own projects within assigned contexts. Students will evaluate their own 
and others' writing to enable the revision process. This course is open to sophomores, juniors, 
and seniors only. It is offered in the fall semester. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

CRS 240. Journalism 4 hours 

This course teaches the fundamentals of journalistic news writing and reporting. From 
interviews to the Internet, students will learn how to gather information from a variet\' of sources 
and write stories using different t\"pes of leads, endings, and structures. Thev wiU also engage in a 
critique of today's journalistic practices. This course is offered in the fall semester. Prerequisites: 
COR 101 and COR 102. 

CRS 250. Broadcasting and the New Electronic Media 4 hours 

This course is designed to introduce students to the economic, regulatory, and creative 
forces that affect the broadcast industry. The course will raise theoretical questions and practical 
concerns about the different t}"pes of media (TV, radio, and the Internet) that deal with the 
electronic transmission of information. The focus wiU be on industry trends and on current issues 
facing these media industries. This course is offered in the fall semester. 

CRS 340. Writing for Business and the Professions 4 hours 

This course is for students who have mastered the basic skills and insights of writing 
and who wish to improve their abilit}' to write clear, concise, persuasive prose designed for 
audiences in business and the professions. Students are required to write a variety of texts, such 
as proposals, progress reports, recommendation reports, and manuals. Other elements of the 
course may include oral presentations. Prerequisite: CRS 220, CRS 221, or permission of the 
instructor. 



129 



CRS 380. Independent Study in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 1-4 hours 

Supervised independent communications project. Prerequisites: Submission of a 
proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the 
instructor, the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. The 
student must be pursuing a major in communication and rhetoric studies. 

WRI 381. Independent Study in Writing 1-4 hours 

Supervised independent writing project. Prerequisites: Submission of a proposed 
outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. The student 
must be pursuing a minor in writing or a major in communication and rhetoric smdies. 

CRS 390. Advanced Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 4 hours 

This advanced course will examine selected topics in rhetoric, communication, or media 
smdies, such as Global Media, Civic Literacy, Global Culmre and Rhetoric, Rhetoric of Human 
Rights, Gendered Communication and Rhetoric, Media Culture and Societ}', Political Rhetoric, and 
Mass Media Effects. Prerequisite: CRS 101 or permission of the instructor. This course may be 
taken more than once. 

WRI 391. Special Topics in Writing 4 hours 

Smdy of a selected topic in the field of writing, such as Public Relations Writing, 
Scientific and Technical Writing, Oral History, and The Art of the Essay. The topic will varv from 
year to year and may be offered by communication and rhetoric studies facult}' or English facult\\ 
Prerequisite for special topics taken with communication and rhetoric smdies facult}': CRS 101 or 
permission of the instructor. 

CRS 401. Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning oppormnirv to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult\' supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. An 
internship for the writing minor must be writing intensive. Written work should total five pages of 
academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained bv the 
Career Services Office, including oppormnities at CNN, Fox 5, WSB-TS-^, Green Olive Media, and 
The A.tlanta journal Constitution. Students are strongly encouraged to do multiple internships, but 
only 4— semester hours can be applied as elective credits to the major. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the facult\' supervisor and 
qualification for the internship program. 



130 



Computer Science 



Minor 

A minor in computer science consists of five computer science courses, one of which 
must be Principles of Computer Programming in Java or Principles of Computer Programming 
in C++, and no more than two of which may be below the 300 level. Internship in Computer 
Science may not be used as one of the five courses in a computer science minor. 

CSC 240. Introduction to Computer Applications Software 4 hours 

This course introduces the student to the major t}pes of computer applications 
software, including word processing, electronic spreadsheets, database management, graphics, and 
presentation software. A predominant emphasis is on the construction of significant applications 
systems, including integrating various applications, transferring data among applications, and 
custom programming. The student wUl use microcomputer software such as Microsoft Office 
Professional, which includes Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, and Visual BASIC. 

CSC 243. Principles of Computer Programming in C++ 4 hours 

This course introduces the student to the fundamental techniques of problem solving 
and algorithm construction within the context of the C++ programming language. The student 
will design and complete several substantial programming projects, most having significant 
mathematical content. Topics include data types, control structures, file manipulation, functions, 
parameters, structures, unions, classes, arrays, dynamic data structures, abstract data t)fpes, 
object-oriented programming, and separate compilation units. Prerequisite: MAT 102 or bv 
examination. 

CSC 244. Principles of Computer Programming in Java 4 hours 

This course introduces the student to the fundamental techniques of problem solving 
and algorithm construction within the context of the Java programming language. The student 
will design and implement several substantial programming projects, most having signitlcant 
mathematical content. Topics include data types, control structures, file manipulation, functions, 
parameters, classes, arrays, dynamic data structures, object-oriented programming, separate 
compilation units, HTML, and World Wide Web programming. Prerequisite: MAT 102 or by 
examination. 

CSC 342. Introduction to Data Structures in Ada 4 hours 

This courses uses Ada language constructs to introduce the student to the important 
concepts of static and dynamic data representation, which, along with effective algorithm 
development, are essential components of successful computer program development. Topics 
include arrays, records, files, pointers, linked Usts, stacks, queues, priority queues, sets, trees, b- 
trees, strings, abstract data types, sorting and searching techniques, and implementation 
procedures. Prerequisite: CSC 243 or CSC 244. 



131 



CSC 344. Principles of File Processing in COBOL 4 hours 

This course provides an accelerated introduction to the COBOL language and to 
standard techniques for managing data in computer files. Students will use COBOL to program 
solutions to problems which arise predominandy, though not exclusively, in business environments. 
Topics include file creadon and updating, merging and searching, report generation, subprograms, 
separate compilation units, interactive programming, sequential, indexed, and relative files, and 
elementary concepts of database management. Prerequisite: CSC 243 or CSC 244. 

CSC 440. Principles of Object-Oriented Programming Using C++ 4 hours 

This course includes a comprehensive treatment of the C++ programming language, 
using the object-oriented methodology. Fundamental C++ programming constructs will be 
discussed, including native types, control structures, functions, parameters, pointers, structures, 
unions, classes, file manipulation, arrays, dynamic data structures, and separate compilation units. 
In addition, the student will study such important object-oriented notions as objects, constructors, 
parametric polymorphim, and exceptions. Prerequisite: CSC 243 or CSC 244. 

CSC 44L Assembly Language and Computer Architecture 4 hours 

This course provides a concentrated introduction to assembly language programming 
for the 8086/8088 family of microprocessors and to the architecture embodied in those 
processors. Special attention wtU be given to implementing the familiar control structures of a 
high-level language using assembly language's much more restricted instruction set, and to the 
problems of decimal and floating point numeric representation, conversions, and computations. 
Topics include structured programming, control structures, object library maintenance, macro 
programming, interrupts, registers, buses, bit manipulation, memory management, input/output 
file manipulation, strings, and interfacing with high-level languages. Prerequisite: CSC 243 or CSC 
244. 

CSC 442. Special Topics in Computer Science 4 hours 

This course focuses on a variet}' of timely concepts and useful language emdronments. 
Current topics include artificial intelligence, machine simulators, compiler and assembler 
construction, computer-aided instruction, graphics, database management, computer architecture, 
operating systems, and systems programming. These topics may be examined in the context of 
languages such as Ada, assembly language, COBOL, C++, Forth, LISP, Logo, Pascal, Scheme, 
Visual BASIC, and applications software. Prerequisite: CSC 342 or CSC 344. 

CSC 443. Independent Study in Computer Science 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic in computer science. Prerequisite: Submission 
of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved bv 
the instructor, the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

CSC 446. Internship in Computer Science 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportimin" to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty' supervisor in the 
relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for ever\- hour of academic credit, 
keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the facult\' 
supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written work 
should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships 
is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at Array Computer Technologies, 
the Nwoko Group, and the Catapult Group. Graded on a satisfactor\'/unsatisfactorv basis. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the facult}' supervisor and qualification for the internship program. 

132 



Economics 

Economics is the study of decision making. Economics is used to examine individual 
behavior, interactions, and the resulting social order. Basic economic principles govern all action. 
It is valuable to go into negotiations in markets, as well as the voting booth, prepared with a clear 
understanding of the business strategies, government policies and decision outcomes that will 
affect society. Knowledge of how markets function is helpful to both business people and voters 
who will make decisions about such market-related economic matters as taxes, interest ceilings, 
minimum wages, and public utility rates. A student majoring in economics will evaluate propert}' 
rights assessments, the incentives created, and resulting social order, replacing uninformed 
opinions about complex situations with disciplined thought. 

Smdents majoring in economics will be prepared to analyze complex problems and 
communicate their findings. The student will be introduced to the technical terminology of 
business, analytical tools for problem solving, and communication methods, including business 
writing and presentation. Internships are available to provide preparation for careers after 
graduation. 

The major provides an excellent foundation for careers in business, law, politics, as well 
as government and other not-for-profit entifies, or to pursue graduate studies in economics or 
business administration. 

Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must complete the following 
requirements with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 230 Financial Accounting 

ACC 231 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 219 Management Science 

BUS 260 Principles of Management 

BUS 310 Corporate Finance 

BUS 350 Marketing 

BUS 469 Strategic Management 

ECO 121 Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221 Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

MAT 1 1 1 Statistics 

MAT 121 AppUed Calculus 
In addition, the student must also complete three additional electives in economics and 
satisfy the Computer Applications Proficiency Requirement. This can be done in one of three 
ways: 1) by assessment of skills with the student's academic advisor, 2) by successful completion 
of Introduction to Computer Applications Software, or 3) by successful performance on the 
computer proficiency examination. 



133 



Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the following requirements 
with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

BUS 219 Management Science 

ECO 121 Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221 Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

MAT 111 Statistics 

MAT 121 AppUed Calculus 

One semester of a foreign language at the second semester 

elementary-level or higher 
In addition the student must also complete four additional electives in economics and 
satisfy the computer applications proficiency requirement. This can be done in one of three wa3's: 
1) by assessment of skills with the student's academic advisor, 2) by successful completion of 
Introduction to Computer Applications Software, or 3) by successful performance on the 
computer proficiency examination. 

Minor 

Students desiring to minor in economics must complete the following courses with a 
grade of "C-" or higher: 

ECO 121 Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221 Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222 Intermediate Macroeconomics 
In addition the smdent must complete two additional electives in economics. 

ECO 121. Introduction to Economics 4 hours 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with basic economic principles and 
concepts. The student wiU be introduced to a few key economic principles that can be used in 
analyzing various economic events. The materials will include a history of economic thought, 
monetary and financial economics, and supply and demand analysis. 

ECO 221. Intermediate Microeconomics 4 hours 

This course develops the economic principles necessary to analyze and interpret the 
decisions of individuals and firms with respect to consumption, investment, production, pricing, 
and hiring. The principles are used to understand the beha\dor of business firms and public policy- 
making institutions. Prerequisites: ECO 121 and MAT 121. 

ECO 222, Intermediate Macroeconomics 4 hours 

This course examines the goals of economic policy and the poUcv instruments available 
to achieve those goals. Attention is given to both monetary and fiscal policy along widi the theory 
and measurement of national income, employment, and price levels, and the international 
implications of economic policy. Prerequisite: ECO 121. 

ECO 223. United States Economic History 4 hours 

This course will study the origin and growth of the American economic system from 
pre-colonial through the 20* cenmry. The course traces the development of the evolution of 
American agricultural, commercial, manufacturing, financial, labor, regulatory, and technological 
sectors. Prerequisite: ECO 121. 



134 



ECO 323. International Economics 4 hours 

This course is a study of international trade and finance. The microfoundations of the 
course will address why countries trade, why special interest groups fight international trade, 
regional specialization, international agreements on tariffs and trade, and national commercial 
policies. The macrofoundations of the course will focus on exchange rates, balance of payments, 
international investments, and coordination and cooperation of international monetary and fiscal 
policies. Prerequisite: ECO 121. 

ECO 324. History of Economic Thought 4 hours 

Tliis course is a study of the major writers and schools of economic thought, related to 
the economic, political, and social instimtions of their times: the Medieval, Mercantilist, 
Physiocrat, Classical, Marxist, Historical, Neoclassical, Institutionalist, Keynesian, and post- 
Keynesian schools. Prerequisite: ECO 121. 

ECO 420. Economic Development 4 hours 

This course is a study of the economic, social, and political factors that account for the 
contrast between the economic stagnation in much of the world and the steadily rising incomes in 
the United States, Europe, and Japan. General principles are applied to the development experience 
of selected countries in the historically less-developed world and the formerly centrally-planned 
economies of Eastern and Central Europe. Prerequisites: ECO 221 and ECO 222. 

ECO 421. Money and Banking 4 hours 

This course will study the role of private financial institutions and the Federal Reserve 
System in the creation of the nation's money supply and the theory that links the money supply 
to the nation's inflation rate and output level. Additional topics are the international payments 
mechanism, capital flows, the determination of exchange rates, and the use of a common currency 
by several countries. Prerequisites: ECO 221, ECO 222, and proficiency in the use of spreadsheet 
software. 

ECO 423. Business Structure and Antitrust Law 4 hours 

This course is a study of the structure of firms within a given industry, the corresponding 
strategic decisions and conduct, and the United States' antitrust policy that is intended to facilitate 
competitive market goals across the economy. Topics will include competition, dominant firm and 
cartel theory, measurement of industry structure and performance, strategic behavior in pricing, 
advertising and information, vertical integration, regulation, and law and international markets. 
Prerequisite: ECO 221 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

ECO 424. Labor Economics 4 hours 

This course will be a comprehensive study of the cause and effect relationship between 
work and income. It will examine labor market strucmres, human capital theory, union- 
management relations, labor history, economic policy, and earning profiles by gender and race. 
Prerequisites: ECO 221 and ECO 222. 

ECO 425. PubUc Finance 4 hours 

An analysis of the impact of federal, state, and local government expenditures, 
revenues, debt management, and budgeting on the allocation of resources, the distribution of 
income, the stabilization of national income and employment, and economic growth. Topics 
will include expenditure patterns, tax structure, benetlt-cost analysis, policy analysis, and 
microeconomic and macroeconomic theories of public expenditures and taxation. 
Prerequisites: ECO 221 and ECO 222. 

135 



ECO 426. Internship in Economics 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunit}- to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult\' super\'isor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including oppormnities at the Federal 
Reserve Bank and Prudential Securities. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program. 

ECO 427. Independent Study in Economics 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the 
division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

ECO 428. Special Topics in Economics 4 hours 

An intense study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of an economics facult}' 
member. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Education 

Grounded in the Liberal arts tradition, the education program emphasizes strong 
academic preparation of teachers who are lifelong learners. Teacher education at Oglethorpe 
University is designed to challenge students to think critically about issues in education, to be 
informed decision makers, and to become change agents in their schools. The program also has 
strong connections to the Atianta community, both urban and suburban. Oglethorpe is committed 
to preparing teachers for the variety of settings and diverse populations of metropolitan schools. 

The following courses are offered as corequisites to the Master of Arts in Teaching 
program. 

EDU 101. Introduction to Education 4 hours 

A study of the historical development, the philosophy, and the political and social issues 
underlying the American educational system and the teaching profession. Pro\asion is made for 
classroom observation in public schools in the Atianta area. 

EDU 201. Educational Psychology 4 hours 

A study of learning theory and its application to such problems as classroom 
management, the organization of learning activities, understanding individual differences, and 
evaluating teaching and learning. Emphasis is given to factors which facilitate and interfere with 
learning. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C" or higher. 

EDU 401. The Exceptional Child 4 hours 

This course is designed to assist regular classroom teachers in the identification and 
education of children who have special needs. In addition to characteristics of special learners, 
students will study topics such as the referral process, educational approaches for use with special 
learners, methods of diagnostic teaching, mainstreaming, and inclusion. Prerequisites: EDU 201 
and admission to the Teacher Education Program. 



136 



Education — Master of Arts in Teaching — Early Childhood Education 

The Master of Arts in Teaching — Early Childhood Education (grades P-5) Program at 
Oglethorpe University' is based on a commitment to a broad Liberal arts background as the best 
content preparation for teaching and to preparing teachers for the diverse schools of the 21 ^^ 
century. The program offers both the Master of Arts in teaching degree and initial certification 
for earlv childhood educators. Successful completion of the program is necessary to obtain 
recommendation for a teaching certificate. 

Admission 

Application forms may be obtained from the Division of Education. To be admitted to 
the graduate program, applicants must meet the following admission criteria: 

1. Completion of a bachelor's degree at a regionally accredited institution. Oglethorpe 
undergraduate students may be able to "bridge" into the Master of Arts in Teaching — 
Early Childhood Education Program in the final semester of their senior year. 

2. A minimum undergraduate grade-point average of 2.8 from all college work. 

3. Prerequisites as follows: 

• two courses in humanities (including English composition) 

• two courses in social studies 

• two courses in mathematics 

• two courses in laboratory science 

• two courses in the arts 

• EDU 101 Introduction to Education, or equivalent 

• EDU 201 Educational Psychology, or equivalent 

• EDU 401 The Exceptional Child, or equivalent 

• PSY 201 Child and Adolescent Psychology, or equivalent 

4. A passing score on all sections (reading, writing, and mathematics) of the Praxis I Pre- 
Professional Skills Test (PPST) developed and administered by Educational Testing 
Service. Applicants are exempt from this requirement if they have earned qualifying 
scores on any of these tests: 

• SAT total score 1 000, with at least 480 verbal and 520 mathematical 

• ACT total score 22, with at least 21 verbal and 22 mathematical 

• GRE total score 1030, with at least 490 verbal and 540 quantitative 

5. A combined score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE, with a 
minimum of 500 on the verbal section. 

6. A 500- to 1000-word written statement describing experiences in working with children 
or youth as, for example, a tutor, camp counselor, day care worker, church school 
teacher, substitute teacher, or volunteer working with children. 

7. Three letters of recommendation, including one from a facult}' advisor, one from another 
universit}' professor, and one from a supervisor in a work or volunteer setting. 

Note: Admission to the graduate program does not imply acceptance as a candidate for the 
master's degree. See Admission to Candidacy below. 



137 



i 

Program Completion Requirements 

Candidates for the degree and initial certification must meet the following requirements: 

1. Maintain a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or higher for aU work taken at 
Oglethorpe. 

2. Complete all courses in the Master of Arts in Teaching — Early Childhood Education 
Program (48 semester hours) with a grade of "C" or higher. 

3. Complete 50 hours of field experience during fall and spring enrollment in the program 
and a semester-long student teaching experience — EDU 619 Student Teaching and 
Capstone Seminar. 

4. Pass the appropriate Praxis II tests prior to enrolling for EDU 619 Student Teaching and 
Capstone Seminar. 

5. Complete EDU 619 Student Teaching and Capstone Seminar successfully. In order to 
enroll, students must show proof of liabHit}' insurance and sign the "Personal 
Affirmation," affirming their legal status and giving the Georgia Professional Standards 
Commission the right to perform a background check, if required. Smdent teaching 
placement in some school districts may also require a background check and/or 
fingerprinting. 

6. Compile and successfully present an electronic professional portfolio. In this portfolio, 
candidates must demonstrate their knowledge base for each of the 10 INTASC 
standards. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Graduate students must be admitted to candidacy before enrolling for EDU 619 Smdent 
Teaching and Capstone Seminar. The candidacy application must be filed with the Chair of the 
Division of Education. Admission to candidacy may be given or denied following a careful re^'iew 
of all work of the smdent, including participation in field experience. Notice of action taken on 
the candidacy application wUl be given in writing to the smdent. 

Residency Requirement 

At least 30 semester hours of graduate work must be completed at Oglethorpe 

Universit}'. 

Transfer Credit 

The Master of Arts in Teaching — Early Childhood Education Program at Oglethorpe 
is unique in both conception and implementation. For this reason, only Limited transfer credit is 
possible. A maximum of six semester hours of credit may be transferred from another accredited 
graduate instimtion subject to the following conditions: 

1 . Transfer credit may be awarded for courses that are comparable to Culmral Psychology 
and Assessing Teaching and Learning. Transfer credit cannot be accepted for other 
courses. 

2. Determination of transfer credit is made by the Chair of the Division of Education in 
consultation with the smdent's advisor and the facult\' member who teaches tiiat course. 
The smdent must present a catalog course description for the requested course. Work 
already applied toward another degree cannot be accepted. 

3. Work must have been completed unthin the pre\nous six \'ears and must have been 
applicable toward a graduate degree at the instimtion where die credit was earned. 



138 



4. Acceptance of transfer credit does not reduce the residency requirement. 

5. An official transcript showing the credits to be transferred must be on file in the 
Registrar's Office. A copy of the transcript should be attached to the request. 

6. Under no circumstances may credit earned through correspondence or online courses 
be applied toward satisfaction of graduate degree requirements. 

Advisement and Registration 

Upon admission to the graduate program, each student is assigned to a member of the 
facultv' of the Division of Education who serves as advisor to guide the student in planning the 
program of study. Registration dates for each semester are listed in the Academic Calendar in this 
Bulletin. Preregistration occurs in November for the spring semester and in April for the summer 
and fall semesters. Students must meet with their advisors to plan for registration for courses. 

Course Load 

A full-time course load for graduate smdents is 12 semester hours or three courses. 

Tuition and Fees 

An application fee (non-refundable) of $35 must accompany the application. Tuition is 
charged on a per-course basis. AH fees are subject to change. Please direct inquiries regarding 
current fees to the Business Office. An application for degree must be made by mid-October in 
the Registrar's Office prior to completion of degree requirements the following December, May, 
or August, at which time a $95 degree completion fee is due. 

Academic Standards 

Candidates for the master's degree must meet the following academic standards: 

1. The student's overall grade-point average for work in the graduate program must be 3.0 
or higher. 

2. If in any case the candidate fails to maintain satisfactory academic and professional 
standards, a review by the Teacher Education CouncU will determine the student's 
continuation in the program. 

3. Any smdent who falls below a 3.0 grade-point average or has a total of two course 
grades of "C" or below will be placed on academic probation. A student who received 
a third grade of "C" or less or who does not achieve a 3.0 grade-point average upon 
completion of three additional graduate courses will be dismissed from the program. 

EDU 601. Exploring Constructivist Teaching and Learning 4 hours 

The purposes of this course, the first in the Master of Arts in Teaching program 
sequence, are to explore the historical and philosophical foundations of constructivist teaching 
and learning and to provide learners with pedagogical skills to plan, implement, and assess inquiry- 
based instruction. Students will engage in regular and systematic reflection on their developing 
knowledge and then apply their knowledge in field-based classroom experiences in diverse 
settings. 

EDU 602. Cultural Psychology 4 hours 

Culmral psychology is an interdisciplinary field benveen psychology and anthropology. 
It focuses on the ways in which culmre and mind, and more specifically, culture and self, mutually 
constitute each other. Therefore, cultural psychology primarily addresses how the mumal 
constimtion of culture and self has implications for cross-culturaUv divergent psvchological 
patterns in cognition, emotion, motivation, moral reasoning, and psychopathologies. 

139 



EDU 603. Assessing Teaching and Learning 4 hours 

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and skills needed to develop 
paper-and-pencil and performance assessments for formative and summative classroom 
evaluation. Planning student evaluations, coordinating evaluations with objectives, item 
development, item analysis, relating evaluation to instruction, grading, and reporting achievement 
outcomes to smdents, parents, and school personnel are discussed. 

EDU 604. Technology of Teaching 4 hours 

The purposes of this course are two: 1) to prepare prospective teachers to meet the 
Georgia technology standards for educators, and 2) for these prospective teachers to learn to 
integrate technology into meaningful learning experiences for the students they will teach. To 
accomplish these goals, students in the course will learn to use technology as a tool for designing 
and conducting learning projects in which inquiry is the means of investigation. 

EDU 611. Arts of Diverse Peoples 4 hours 

This course provides future teachers with an appreciation and understanding of the arts 
disciplines of music, visual art, dance, and theatre as a means to understand self, others, and the 
human condition. It also offers students an opportunity for personal inquiry experiences and skill 
development in the arts so that they feel prepared to incorporate study of the arts into their 
classrooms. Students wUl engage in regular and systematic reflection on their developing 
knowledge base. Students will also apply their knowledge in field-based classroom experiences in 
diverse settings. 

EDU 612. Literacy and Literature 4 hours 

This course prepares students to be literacy teachers in diverse early childhood 
classrooms. The course includes methods of literacy instruction and explorations in Uteramre 
from various cultural perspectives. Students will engage in regular and systematic reflection on 
their developing knowledge base and apply their knowledge in field-based classroom experiences 
in diverse settings. 

EDU 613. Studies of Diverse Cultures 4 hours 

This course includes exploration of social studies content and methods for teacliing 
social studies in early childhood education. From a variet}- of perspectives, students will examine 
the types of questions social scientists ask about human experience, institutions, and interactions. 
In the course, prospective teachers will use appropriate methods of inquiry to investigate some of 
those questions. They will engage in regular and systematic reflection on their developing 
knowledge base and then apply that knowledge in field-based classroom experiences in diverse 
settings. 

EDU 614. Mathematical Inquiry 4 hours 

The foundation for this course is that knowing mathematics is doing mathematics; 
thereby, students will be prepared to teach mathematics well. The focus is mathematics content: 
number systems, geometry, and an additional unit (from probabiIit\V statistics, graph theory, or 
another appropriate area). Methods, assessment, technology, and historical perspective are integral 
to this course. 



140 



EDU 615. Inquiring Into Science 4 hours 

In this course, stxidents will explore namre, content, and processes of science while 
examining current best practices and issues in teaching science to children. Students will 
understand the role that inquiry plays in the development of scientific knowledge. Students will 
explore relationships between science, technology, and other curriculum areas in a community of 
diverse elementary learners. 

EDU 619. Student Teaching and Capstone Seminar 12 hours 

Student teaching, a supervised internship semester in a diverse elementary public school 
classroom, is the capstone experience in teacher preparation, the point at which theory and 
practice converge. The course includes 14 weeks of full-time participation and teaching in a public 
school classroom with weekly seminar meetings for professional development. 

EDU 629. Advanced Special Topics in Education 1-12 hours 

Advanced courses are offered to respond to topical needs of the curriculum. 

Engineering — Dual Degree 

Oglethorpe is associated with the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Universit}' of 
Florida, Auburn Universit}', Mercer University', and the Universit}' of Southern California in 
combined programs of liberal arts and engineering. The programs require the student to complete 
three years at Oglethorpe Universit}' and the final two years at one of these engineering schools. 
The three years at Oglethorpe include core curriculum courses. General Chemistry I and II, 
College Physics I and II, Calculus I-III, a choice of Differential Equations or Linear Algebra and 
a foreign language course at the second semester elementary-level or higher. The two years of 
technical education require the completion of courses in one of the branches of engineering. 

In this combined plan, the two degrees which are awarded upon the successful 
completion of the program are the degree of Bachelor of Arts by Oglethorpe Universit\' and the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering by the engineering school. Because the required pre- 
engineering curricula of the five affiliated schools are slightiy different, the student is advised to 
consult frequentiy with the facult\' member serving as dual degree engineering program ad\isor. 

Engineering is a difficult subject. Students can maximize their chances for success by 
starting at Oglethorpe where the facult}''s primary concern is effective teaching and working 
closely with students. Classes are small, and laboratories offer the opportunity for hands-on 
experience with sophisticated equipment. This strong foundation gives the student an excellent 
preparation for professional school, resulting in more effective learning in advanced engineering 
courses. As a liberal arts and sciences university, Oglethorpe stresses broad education for 
intelligent leadership. Here, the student will explore the fundamental fields of knowledge, further 
his or her understanding of science and mathematics, and refine the abilities to read, write, speak, 
and reason with clarit}-. This preparation will serve the student well in any career but particularly 
so in the engineering field. With strong preparation in engineering plus a liberal arts education, the 
student will be ready for a variet}' of career positions. The dual degree engineering program 
provides an education that is both broad and deep — a combination that ■uiU serve the graduate 
well as career responsibilities increase. 

Note: Dual-degree students in engineering may not use Oglethorpe financial aid assistance to 
attend other instimtions. 



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English 

In literature courses, students examine written works to determine their meaning, to 
reach judgments about their value, to explore their relation to Ufe, and to derive pleasure. To these 
ends, students make written and oral analyses, supporting their conclusions with close examination 
of specific passages firom the works of literature being studied. In both literature and writing 
courses, students learn to compose their generalizations and supporting details into a coherent 
structure of thought and language. 

An English major at Oglethorpe is excellent preparation for law school or anv other 
professional training that requires students to interpret written material and support their 
assertions with specific evidence. Given the expressed need in the business communit}- for people 
who can communicate weU orally and on paper, the combination of an English major and courses 
in business administration or an accounting minor may be very attractive to prospective 
employers. The course Writing for Business and the Professions focuses on the kinds of speaking 
and writing abilities graduates wUl need to get and keep jobs in personnel, sales, and management. 
Oglethorpe graduates also work in public relations and editing, where they use their skill with 
words - a major emphasis of every English course. They go into teaching, and sometimes work 
for publishers, television stations, film-making companies, or computer firms. Thev write press 
releases, training manuals, in-house newspapers, and news copy. 

To help smdents bridge the gap between academic life and work experience, Oglethorpe 
places English majors in internships with area newspapers, publishing companies, public relations 
firms, cultural associations, and radio and television stations. Such experiences enhance students' 
chances of finding the jobs they want after graduation. 

Major 

Students who major in English are required to take four period courses: Ancient Literamre, 
Medieval and Renaissance Literature, 18* and 19* Century Literature, and Modern and Contemporary- 
Literature. Students also are required to take one writing course; Shakespeare or Chaucer; four electi\'es 
from the upper-level (300) literature courses, and one semester of a foreign language at the second 
semester elementary-level or higher. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

Students who minor in EngUsh are required to take a minimum of five literature courses. 
At least three of these must be upper-level (300) courses. 

ENG 100. Independent Study in Literature and Composition 1-4 hours 

Supervised study in specified genres or periods. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed 
outiine of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

ENG 101. Ancient Literature 4 hours 

This course will examine the literature of the ancient world. Although the primary focus 
will be on Greek, Roman, and Hebrew culmre, non-Western materials may also be smdied. Wbrks 
and authors might include: Gilgamesh, Homer, Job, and Virgil. 

ENG 102. Medieval and Renaissance Literature 4 hours 

This course will examine the transition of the cultural world of Dante to that of 
Shakespeare and Milton. Although the primary focus will be Western, non- Western works may 
also be studied. Texts and authors might include: Chretien, Dante, The Tale of Genji, Chaucer, 
Montaigne, Shakespeare, Cervantes, and Milton. 
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ENG 103. 18'*^ and 19*'^ Century Literature 4 hours 

Authors in this course might include: Defoe, Pope, Basho, Austen, Emerson, Twain, and 
George Eliot. 

ENG 104. Modern and Contemporary Literature 4 hours 

This course will investigate the literature of the 20'^ century. Authors might include: T. 
S. EUot, Woolf, Lawrence, Frost, Morrison, and Marquez. 

ENG 201. Chaucer 4 hours 

Students wiU learn to read and appreciate the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, the first great 
English poet, in his original language; to enjoy the rich and varied nature of his works; and to 
appreciate why he is called "the Father of English." Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 
100-level English course. 

ENG 202. Shakespeare 4 hours 

The plays and theatre of William Shakespeare. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: 
COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level EngUsh course. 

ENG. 230. Creative Writing 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to writing poetry and prose fiction. The smdent wiU be 
asked to submit substantial written work each week, keep a journal, and read published writers. 
Much class time will be spent discussing student and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101 and 
COR 102. 

ENG 231. Biography and Autobiography 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to biographical and autobiographical writing with practice 
in the personal narrative as well as other forms such as the profile and the interview. Students wdU 
submit substantial written work each week and keep a journal. The class will foUow a workshop 
format, discussing the smdents' and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

ENG 300. The Bible as Literature 4 hours 

This course will examine the Bible as a literary artifact and within an historical context. 
Students will be particularly interested in the varied ways in which the Bible generates meaning. 
These include archet\pal repetition, the weaving together of historicaUv disparate texts, parable, 
and allegory. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 301. Russian Literature 4 hours 

This course will consist of Russian literature in translation, mostiy fiction, mostiv from 
the 19* cenmry. Central to the course is Anna Karenina. In addition to Tolstoy, authors might 
include: Gogol, Dostoevski, and Chekhov. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level 
English course. 

ENG 302. The Child in Literature 4 hours 

This course will involve a wide-ranging studv of works which employ innocence, 
particularly in childhood, in order to deepen the understanding of experience. Authors might 
include: Sophocles, Blake, Carroll, James, and Kat"ka. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 
100-level English course. 



143 



ENG 303. American Poetry 4 hours 

This course will consider the work of major American poets such as XXTiitman, 
Dickinson, Frost, Eliot, and Williams. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level 
English course. 

ENG 304. Images of Women in Literature 4 hours 

An exploration of various stereotypical, archetypal, and reaUsdc images of women in 
Uteramre. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course. 

WGS 304. Women Poets 4 hours 

This course is a survey of poetry by women, from ancient Chinese, Persian, and others 
in translation, to medieval Irish and Renaissance English, to 19* and 20* century Americans, as 
well as Eastern Europeans and Ladn Americans in translation. Included will be several recent 
poets such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich, and Mary Oliver in order to discover what 
themes, images, and attitudes seem to emerge from the works. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 
102. 

ENG 305. Chivabric Romance 4 hours 

This course will explore the chivalric tales of "knights and ladies' gentie deeds," paving 
particular attention to models of heroism and temptation; tensions between holy and secular 
quests; dichotomies of masculine and feminine identity; and canons of moral and ethical beha\tior. 
Authors might include Marie de France, Chretien de Troyes, Arisoto, and Spenser. Prerequisites: 
COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level EngUsh course. 

ENG 306. Special Topics in Drama 4 hours 

Drama as literature and genre, through survey and period studies. Prerequisites: COR 
101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 307. Milton 4 hours 

This course will examine the major prose and poetry of John Milton and their place in 
1 7* century English culture. Works studied wiU include Areopagitica, Ij^ddas, Samson Agonistes, and 
Paradise Lost Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 308. Special Topics in Poetry 4 hours 

This course will focus on particular poets, movements, styles, or periods. Prerequisites: 
COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level EngUsh course. 

ENG 309. The Literature of the City and the Country 4 hours 

This course wiU concentrate on 1 9* and 20* century English and American literature in 
order to deepen the student's understanding and test the conceptions of the natural and the urban. 
Authors might include Wordsworth, Dickens, Thoreau, Woolf, and Frost. Prerequisites: COR 101, 
COR 102, and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 310. Special Topics in Fiction 4 hours 

English, American, and continental narrative prose will be examined in the context of 
theme, period, or genre. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course. 



144 



ENG311. Ulysses 4 hours 

This course will focus on a thorough reading of Ulysses but might also examine other 
works by James Joyce, such as Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and selecdons from 
Finnegans Wake. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 312. Special Topics in Literature and Culture 4 hours 

Courses relating literamre with aspects of social and inteUecmal history or a particular 
issue or theme. Possible offerings may include women in literature, American civ^ilization, African- 
American (or other ethnic) literature, popular culture, the literature of a single decade, children's 
literature, and myth and folklore in literature. Usually offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: COR 
101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 313. African-American Literary Traditions 4 hours 

This course surveys African-American literature and literary history. It begins with a 
close examination of the slave narrative and the African-American sentimental novel of the 19* 
century. An exploration is made of the literamre of the Harlem Renaissance, followed by works 
like Ralph EUison's Invisible Man and Richard Wright's Native Son. Finally, civil rights era literature 
and works by authors such as Gloria Naylor and Alice Walker will be examined. Prerequisites: 
COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level English course, preferably Modern and Contemporary 
Literamre. 

ENG 314. Special Topics in Major British and American Authors 4 hours 

An intensive study of between one and five British or American authors. Prerequisite: 
COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level EngUsh course. 

ENG 315. Vision, Violence, and Community in Milton, Blake, 

Whitman, and Yeats 4 hours 

This course will examine works by four major visionary poets. In the historical context 
of English civil war, the French Revolution, the American Civil War, and World War I and the 
Irish rebellions, they tried to envision for their culmres a restoration of communit}' between the 
temporal and the eternal, the human and the divine. In times of fragmentation and crisis, each re- 
invented a traditional mythology. A smdy will be made of their individual visions to those 
collective myths and to personal struggles. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102, and one 100-level 
English course. 

ENG 330. Writing Poetry 4 hours 

In weekly assignments students will try free verse and various forms in the effort to 
discover and to embody more and more truly what they have to say. Much time wiU be spent 
reading published poets, responding to student work in class, and tr\ing to generate language that 
reveals rather than explains intangible "meanings." Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 



145 



ENG 331. Writing Prose, Fiction, and Nonfiction 4 hours 

Students will get instruction and substantial practice in writing fictional and nonfictional 
prose which aims at getting what Henry James called "a sense of felt life" onto the page. The class 
will follow a workshop format with weeldy assignments, journal writing, extensive discussion of 
student work, and reading of published examples. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

ENG 401. Internship in English 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunit\' to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings vAth the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at Atlanta 
Magaf(ine, The Knight Agency, and Peachtree Publishers. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactorv 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship 
program. 

Environmental Studies - Dual Degree 

The Cooperative College Program coordinates the education of students at Oglethorpe 
University with graduate programs in environmental studies and natural resources offered bv the 
Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke Universit}'. This program pro^ades a unique 
combination of liberal and professional education well suited for those desiring to enter the fields 
of environmental studies or natural resources. Participating Oglethorpe smdents are accepted into 
either of two degree programs at Duke: the Master of Environmental Management (MEM) or the 
Master of Forestry (MF). The degree awarded is determined by the student's area of 
concentration at Duke. The program accommodates a wide range of undergraduate backgrounds, 
and experience indicates that students majoring in one of the natural or social sciences, pre- 
engineering, economics, or business administration are best suited for it. Although some smdents 
may prefer to complete the baccalaureate degree before undertaking graduate smdv at Duke, 
highly qualified students can reach a satisfactory level of preparation with three vears of 
coordinated undergraduate study at Oglethorpe; all final admission decisions rest with the 
Nicholas School of the Environment. A Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded by Oglethorpe 
Universit}' upon successful completion of one year of study at Duke; after four semesters at Duke, 
in which at least 48 semester units of credit are earned, these smdents may qualifi,' for one of the 
professional master's degrees. 

There are six areas of concentration for the professional master's degree programs 
offered by the Nicholas School of the Environment: Coastal Environmental Management; 
Environmental Toxicology, Chemistry, and Risk Assessment; Resource Ecology; Resource 
Economics and Policy; Water and Air Resources; and Forest Resource Management. The 
undergraduate course requirements are highly flexible for some areas of concentration; others are 
more stringent. All of the programs have the following requirements: 



146 



1. Completion of the Oglethorpe University core courses, including one semester of a 
foreign language at the second semester elementary-level or higher. 

2. Training in the natural sciences or social sciences related to the student's area of interest 
in namral resources and environmental science. 

3. Completion of at least one introductory course in calculus - either Applied Calculus or 
Calcvilus I. 

4. Completion of a statistics course that includes descriptive statistics, probability 
distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlation, simple linear 
regression and simple ANOVAs. Statistics at Oglethorpe fulfills this requirement. 

5. A working knowledge of microcomputers for word processing and data analysis. 
Introduction to Computer Applications Software fulfills this requirement, although 
students with extensive experience with computers may have other options. 

Qualified students who have interests outside of the structured programs of the 
Nicholas School of the Environment are permitted to design individual programs of study; all 
such individual programs are subject to approval by the Education Committee of the Nicholas 
School of the Environment. 

Note: Dual-degree students in environmental studies and natural resources may not use 
Oglethorpe financial aid assistance to attend Duke University. 

Foreign Languages 

In order to study in any given foreign language, all students with previous study or 
experience in that language must take a language proficiency examination or obtain permission of 
the instructor during summer orientation or prior to fall registration. They will be placed in the 
course sequence according to their competence. Smdents are not eligible to enroU in elementary 
and intermediate courses in their primary language. 

Please refer to specific foreign languages in alphabetical order in this section for 
respective course offerings. 

FOR 201. Intermediate Special Topics in Foreign Language, Literature, 

and Culture 4 hours 

A course in which intermediate conversation or topical aspects of a literature and 
culture is explored. 

FOR 301. Advanced Special Topics in Foreign Language, Literature, 

and Culture 4 hours 

A course in which advanced conversation or topical aspects of a literature and culture 
is explored. 



147 



FOR 425. Internship in Foreign Language 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunit}- to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for even^ hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at the Adanta 
Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Georgia Council for International Visitors, and the Georgia 
Department of Industry, Trade, and Tourism. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program. 

French 

A student who chooses French as a major will gain valuable knowledge, not onlv about 
the language, but also about the many unique and fascinating cultures represented in the French- 
speaking world. Like all languages offered in our foreign language program, the French major is 
informed by "the five C's": Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and 
Communities. These areas represent the defined goals of the National Standards for Foreign 
Language Learning. 

The journey toward a French major begins with a thorough emphasis on reading, 
writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. These essential skills prepare the student with the 
foundations for communicating in diverse contexts in the French language. More advanced studv 
of French wiU enable the student to explore the treasures of French and Francophone prose, 
poetry, drama and cinema, in addition to the smdy of colorful and intriguing civilizations in 
France, Belgium, Switzerland, Africa and Quebec and wider French-speaking Canada. Through 
course offerings in French at Oglethorpe University, students become more informed about 
America's French-speaking neighbors to the north and in the Caribbean to the south, in addition 
to becoming more functional global citizens. 

Once students have reached an adequate level of proficiency in French, thev will be 
ready to complement their classroom smdies with full-immersion smdy abroad oppormnities. As 
an invaluable component of the French major, students are required to study and live in a French- 
speaking country for a semester during the academic year following the completion of an initial 
sequence of courses taken in the program. Most French majors choose to smdy at Oglethorpe's 
partner institution the Catholic University of Lille. In addition, for the adventurous smdent, there 
are many other creative smdy abroad options available, all of which can be discussed with smdent 
advisors. Native speakers of French are invited to complete the 12-semester hour requirements of 
study abroad in courses at Oglethorpe or through cross registration at one of the Atianta Regional 
Consortium for Higher Education (ARCHE) instimtions. 

Many smdents who complete the French major at Oglethorpe go on to carrv out 
graduate programs at other institutions in French and Francophone language and Hteramre, 
linguistics, French culmral smdies, or International Relations. Other graduates from the program 
become French instructors or find oppormnities in corporate or non-profit organizations, where 
they continue to apply their language skiUs and global experiences. Smdents are also in\-ited to 
combine a double major in French with other disciplines, a combination which greativ enhances 
smdent marketabUit}' after graduation. . 



148 



All students with previous study or experience in French must take a language placement 
examination. They will be placed in the course sequence according to their competence. Under no 
circumstance should students with past experience in French place themselves in courses, 
especially at the elementary level. Students are not eligible to enroll in elementary and intermediate 
courses in their native languages. 

Major 

Students who major in French must first complete the following requirements: 
FRE 201 Intermediate French 
FRE 301 French Conversation and Composition 
FRE 302 French Lyric and Literary Prose 
Students will then complete a semester in an approved study abroad program, which 
should include a minimum of 12 semester hours. Returning students must complete three upper- 
level (300 or 400) courses in French. 

Elementary Spanish I or equivalent as determined through the Spanish placement test 
is also required. It is recommended that this requirement be completed during the student's first 
two years. 

The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

A minor in French consists of the following requirements: 

FRE 201 Intermediate French 

Three upper-level courses (300 or 400) 
Certain of these requirements may be met through an approved study abroad program. 

FRE 101, FRE 102. Elementary French I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This course is beginning college French, designed to present a sound foundation in 
understanding, speaking, reading and writing contemporary French. Prerequisite: None for FRE 
101; FRE 101 required for FRE 102, or placement by testing. 

FRE 201. Intermediate French". 4 hours 

This course involves further practice in developing oral and written skills. 
Introduction to a variet}? of unedited French texts will be included. Prerequisite: FRE 102 or 
placement by testing. 

FRE 301. French Conversation and Composition 4 hours 

This course focuses on the development of oral skills through practice in group settings 
and individual class presentations combined with weekly writing assignments in French to be 
revised on a regular basis. A study of st\'le and grammatical forms used exclusively in the written 
language completes the course work. Prerequisite: FRE 201 or placement bv testing. 

FRE 302. French Lyric and Literary Prose 4 hours 

Selected texts from French literature are studied as examples of prose, poetrv and 
drama. Students will read original works from the French classical and modern periods. Taught in 
French. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or placement by testing. 



149 



FRE 401. Special Topics in French Language, Literature, and Culture 4 hours 

Topical aspects of the literature and cultural phenomena associated with the French 
language are explored in this course. Offerings will vary according to faculty and student interest. 
Prerequisite: FRE 301. 

FRE 402. The Modern French Republics and Their Institutions 4 hours 

A study of both political and cultural institutions in France from 1870 to the present 
with emphasis on the traditions established by the new republican government in the 1 880s and 
the creation in 1958 of the Fifth Republic under which France is currendy governed. Taught in 
French. Prerequisite: FRE 301. 

FRE 403. Franco-American Relations in Trade and Culture 4 hours 

This course is an orientadon to French business and cultural communides and 
considerations of existing connections with their American counterparts. The course includes 
an introduction to business French. Guest lecturers are invited from the diplomatic and 
business community in the wider Atianta area. Field trips are also organized to consulates, trade 
offices, and businesses. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRE 301. 

FRE 404. Great French Actresses and Their Film Roles 4 hours 

This course will smdy French film actresses and their roles in an attempt to understand 
better the simation of women in France during the last half of the 20* century. Readings from 
The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir, written at the outset of the period in question, pro\ade 
a counterpoint to the cinematic fiction. Actresses studied may include Isabelle Adjani, Arletn; 
Fanny 7\rdant, Brigitte Bardot, Juliette Binoche, Sandrine Bonaire, Catherine Deneuve, IsabeUe 
Huppert, Miou-Miou, Romy Scheider, and Simone Signoret. The course is conducted in English. 
Students may take the course as part of a French major or minor and complete readings, tests, and 
written work in French. Prerequisite: None for work in English, FRE 302 for work in French. 

FRE 405. The 19th-century French Realist Novel 4 hours 

This course studies the 19*-century French realist novel by concentrating on three 
"giants" of the tradition. The course includes Balzac's Pere Goriof, Flaubert's Education Sentimentale 
and Zola's Germinal The smdy of one novel of each of these writers gives an over\dew of the 
major Literary moments in the century following the French Revolution. The principal characters 
in each novel confront the particular challenges of each historical and social moment in 19^*^- 
cenmry France. The course thus allows students to obtain a complex notion of realism in an 
historical context along with greatiy enhanced vocabulary and language skills in French. Taught in 
French. Prerequisite: FRE 302. 

FRE 450. Independent Study in French 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved bv die instructor, 
the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 



150 



General Science 



The physical science and biological science courses are appropriate for students who 
have a good background in algebra but a minimal one in other sciences. Students with excellent 
preparation in the sciences may elect one of the regular lecture-and-laboratorv courses in biology, 
chemistry, or physics. 

GEN 101. Natural Science: The Physical Sciences 4 hours 

This topically-oriented course will examine the many facets of scientific investigation. 
These include the underlying assumptions, the limitations, the provisional nature, and the power 
of the scientific process, as weO as the influences of science on other aspects of human activit}'. 
Experimentation is the hallmark of scientific investigation. As such, laboratory experimentation 
will be a distinguishing feamre of this course. Course time devoted to experimentation in the 
laboratory, as well as inside and outside the classroom, will intertwine with time devoted to 
discussion and lecture. Namral Science: The Physical Sciences will deal with a topic drawn from 
the physical sciences. These will include, but not be limited to: Chemistry, Cosmology, Descriptive 
Astronomy, History of Science, Meteorology, Modern Scientific Perspectives of the Universe, and 
Oceanography. Prerequisite: MAT 103 or bv examination. 

GEN 102. Natural Science: The Biological Sciences 4 hours 

This course is designed to examine the many facets of scientific investigation. 
Laboratory experimentation will be an important feature, with course time devoted to 
experimentation in the laboratory as well as the classroom. Rather than a survey of the entire field 
of biology, this effort will be directed toward specific topics such as, but not limited to: Cancer, 
Cell Biology, Human Biology, Ecology, and Evolution. 

GEN 200. Internship in Science 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunit}' to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult\" supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit n learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
facult\' supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including oppormnities at Piedmont 
Hospital, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Accura Analytical Laboratory. 
Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor 
and qualification for the internship program. 



151 



German 

All students with previous study or experience in German must take a language 
placement examination during summer orientation or immediately prior to fall registration. They 
will be placed in the course sequence according to their competence. Under no circumstances 
should students with past experience in the language place themselves in courses, especially at the 
elementary level. Students are not eligible to enroll in elementary and intermediate courses in their 
primary languages. 

GER 101, GER 102. Elementary German I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This course is beginning college German, designed to develop the abiHt)' to understand, 
speak, read, and write contemporary German. Prerequisite: None for GER 101; GER 101 
required for GER 102, or placement by testing. 

GER 201. Intermediate German 1 4 hours 

This course will focus on practice in speaking and understanding German, accompanied 
by a review of grammar. Reading and discussion of short literary texts. Prerequisite: GER 102 or 
placement by testing. 

GER 202. Intermediate German II 4 hours 

This course is a continuation of Intermediate German I with practice in spoken 
German and added emphasis on writing. Reading materials include both contemporary topics and 
selections from literamre. Prerequisite: GER 201 or placement by testing. 

GER 301, GER 302. Special Topics in German Language, Literature, 

and Culture I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

Topical aspects of the literature and cultural phenomena associated with the German 
language are explored in this two-semester sequence of courses. Prerequisite: GER 202. 

For a listing of foreign instimtions and programs with which Oglethorpe has exchange 
agreements and affiliations, please see Oglethorpe University Smdents Abroad in the Educational 
Enrichment section of this Bulletin. Of particular interest to smdents of German is the 
Oglethorpe exchange agreement with the University of Dortmund. 

Greek 



AJl students with previous study or experience in Attic Greek must take a language 
placement examination during summer orientation or prior to fall registration. They will be placed 
in the course sequence according to their competence. Under no circumstances should smdents 
with past experience in the language place themselves in courses, especiaUv at the elementary level. 

GRE 101, GRE 102. Attic Greek I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

These courses wUl introduce students to the grammatical and syntactical elements of 
the Attic dialect of 5* century Athens. Mastery of these materials will enable students to read 
works written by Thucydides, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotie, and other ancient authors of tliis 
period. Knowledge of Attic Greek will also provide a foundation for those wishing to study 
Homeric epic or The New Testament. Prerequisite: None for GRE 101; GRE 101 for GRE 102, 
or placement by testing. 



152 



History 

History bridges the disciplinary perspectives of the humanities and social sciences. At 
Oglethorpe the causes, experience, and impact of important moments in the past are examined 
in order to explain, analyze, and assign contemporary significance to the movements and events 
that have shaped human experience. History courses at Oglethorpe begin where traditional 
survey courses and textbooks leave off. Rather than simply viewing the parade of events, 
students consider the origins and implications of events, their impact on our values, assumptions, 
social relations, and world views. In this spirit students are invited to enter into dialogue with 
historians past and present. 

Courses are taught in a seminar format designed to promote lively interchange and 
informed debate. Reading assignments draw on a wide range of historical methods and traditions, 
including perspectives from religion, philosophy, art, music, literature, and popular culture as well 
as politics, economics, and geography. These methods and perspectives inform independent 
student research. In their individual projects, students develop their own research agendas and 
learn to master the techniques of historical research. Particular emphasis is placed on presentation 
— both written and oral - of evidence, arguments, and conclusions. 

Oglethorpe's location provides many opportunities for creative research as well as 
internships. The experience and training of Oglethorpe history majors prepares them for post- 
graduate study in a wide variet}' of academic disciplines, including histor)', archaeology, 
anthropology, politics, international studies, and social work, as well as careers in such fields as 
education, law, journalism, public relations, art, theology, diplomacy, and public service. 

Lower-level (100 and 200) courses are especially recommended for freshmen and 
sophomores; upper-level (300 and 400) courses generaUv require a research paper, may have 
prerequisites, and are primarily aimed toward juniors and seniors. 

Major 

Students majoring in history are required to take at least nine history courses. These 
must cover the following geographic areas and time periods (a course can simultaneously satisfy 
both one area and one time-period requirement): European, United States, and Latin American 
history; and ancient or medieval (before 1500), early modern (1500-1789), and modern (since 
1789) history. In addition, the student must also take one course in Asian Smdies, and at least one 
semester of a foreign language beyond the first-year level, or demonstrate the equivalent 
proficiency. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

To complete a minor, four courses must be taken. 

HIS 110. The Vikings and the Anglo-Saxons 4 hours 

This course will examine the meteoric rise of the Scandinavians from obscurity to 
become the terror of Europe in the 8* through the 11* centuries. For purposes of comparison, 
a look also will be taken at the Vikings' more "civilized" cousms, the 7\nglo-Saxons. VCTnile both 
medieval and modern historians have tended to draw a thick line between these two cultures, this 
course will suggest that both represent aspects of a general political, economic, and cultural zone 
in the Northern Seas. 



153 



HIS 130. United States History to 1865 4 hours 

A survey from Colonial times to 1865, concerned mainly with the major domestic 
developments of a growing nation. 

HIS 131. United States History Since 1865 4 hours 

A survey from 1865 to the present, concerned with the chief events which explain the 
growth of the United States to a position of world power. 

HIS 201. Ancient Greece 4 hours 

This course will examine the Greeks from their Minoan and Mycenaean antecedents 
through the rise of Macedonia in the mid-fourth century B.C.E. Students will investigate the 
political, social, economic, and cultural aspects of Greek civilization as well as an appreciation of 
the Hellenic world's legacy. Specific topics include: the collapse of Mycenaean civilization and the 
problem of a "Dark Age;" the rise, development and failure of the polls system; Greek contact 
with eastern cultures; the political significance of hoplite warfare; the roles of women in various 
Greek poleis; and competing models of Greek political organization. 

HIS 202. Roman History 4 hours 

This course wiU trace the history of Rome from its Italian precursors through the 
ascension of Constantine. Topics will include political, religious, social, cultural, and economic 
aspects of Rome's development, focusing on the origins, maturation, decline, and transformation 
of its civilization. 

HIS 210. The Age of Chivaky, 800-1450 4 hours 

This course wiU cover the High and Later Middle Ages, from the later Carolingian 
period through the War of the Roses. The main focus wiU be on the evolution of state and societ\' 
in northern and western Europe during these periods. Special attention wiU be given to such 
events as the rise of feudal monarchies, the Investiture Contest, the Norman Conquests, the 
Crusades, and the Hundred Years' War. 

HIS 211. The Renaissance and Reformation 4 hours 

Students will study the significant changes in European art, thought, and institutions 
during the period from 1300 to 1550. The course will focus on critical readings of primary sources 
from this era. 

HIS 212. Early Modern Europe 4 hours 

This course will examine the development of European societ\' and politics from the 
end of the Reformation to the eve of the French Revolution. Special emphasis \\ill be placed on 
the development of the modern state, the contest between absolutism and constitutionalism, and 
the Enlightenment. 

HIS 213. The Age of Revolution - Europe and the Atlantic World 

1776-1849 4 hours 

The "old regime" (serfdom, rule by monarchs and nobles, and a politically powerful 
church) and an agrarian way of life had prevailed in much of Europe and the New World since 
the Middle Ages. From 1 776 on, however, a series of upheavals, such as the American and French 
revolutions, the Napoleonic Wars, the Latin American Wars of Independence, and the European 
revolutions of 1820-21, 1830-31, and 1848-49 had challenged the old order. This course studies 
the events of this dramatic period, including the Industrial Revolution and the rise of 
romanticism, socialism, nationalism, and liberalism. 

154 



HIS 214. The Age of Empire and Nationalism - Europe 1848-1914 4 hours 

The six decades following the revolutions of 1848 were a period of remarkable power, 
prosperity, and creativity in Europe. New nation-states (Germany and Italy) were formed; old 
multiethnic empires (Russia and Austria-Hungary) seemed rejuvenated; and Europeans acquired 
immense colonial empires. Meanwhile, industrialization and modern science and art 
revolutionized European life and thought. However, this fusion of culmral and economic 
modernity with social and political conservatism concealed grave weaknesses that would lead, 
beginning in 1914, to the upheavals of world war, communism, and fascism. 

HIS 215. The Age of World War - Europe 1914-1945 4 hours 

This course examines the disasters that befell Europe in the three decades after 1914: 
World War I; the Russian Revolution; the lU-fated Treat}' of Versailles; the rise of Mussolini; the 
Great Depression; the dictatorships of Hider and StaHn; the spread of fascism in the 1930s; and 
World War II. The course discusses the reasons for the failure of the international order to 
prevent two horrific military conflicts, and for the failure of moderate forces in many European 
countries - including Russia, Germany, Italy, and Spain - to block the rise to power of violent and 
millenarian political forces. 

HIS 216. Rise and Fall of the Third Reich 4 hours 

The course examines the roots of National Socialism in Germany before World War I; 
the reasons for the failure of the Weimar Republic in the 1920s, which ended in Hitier's coming 
to power; and the nature of Hitier's dictatorship, with its policies of totalitarian rule, world war, 
and genocide. 

HIS 240. Latin America to Independence 4 hours 

Latin American history from the origins of pre-Columbian civilizations to independence 
win be examined by exploring: the origins and development of indigenous societies in 
Mesoamerica and the Andes; the conquest and colonization of (what became) Spanish and 
Pormguese America; the nature of colonial control; the response of indigenous populations to 
colonial societ)'^, administration, and religion; and the developing tensions between Spaniards and 
Creole elites. The movement for independence, which arose from a variet\' of issues, created bv 
contrasting views and concerns of distant European authorit}' and local culmral identit\', wiH be 
studied. Finally, the major challenges that faced the newly emergent Latin American nations will 
be considered. 

HIS 301. History of Christianity 4 hours 

This course will examine the origins and development of Christianit}' through the 
modern era. Special areas of interest include the structure and organization of the church, the 
development of liturgy and doctrine, and the counterpoint between orthodoxy and heresy. A 
central question will be the relationship between the "three pillars" of doctrine — revelation, 
reason, and tradition — and social pressures in the history of the church and doctrine. 

HIS 311. The Old Reich: German History to 1800 4 hours 

The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation has been derided by Voltaire as being 
none of the above. At the same time, the Empire provided the primary political organization of 
pre-Modern Germany, from the Middle Ages to the Napoleonic Wars. This course will survey the 
general history of the Empire from the Renaissance to the end of the 18* cenmry. Special 
emphasis will be paid to questions of social, cultural and constitution history, in particular, the 
development of German identit}' and political culture in the Early Modern era. Prerequisite: HIS 
211, HIS 212, or HIS 213, or permission of the instructor. 

155 



HIS 312. German History Since 1800 4 hours 

This course is a survey of German history in the 19* and 20* centuries, focusing on 
the unification of Germany in the 19* century, the Bismarckian state, the two world wars, the 
Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and the division and subsequent reunification of Germanv 
after World War II. 

HIS 320. Russia under the Tsars 4 hours 

This course studies the thousand years from the formation of the Kievan state until the 
abolition of serfdom. It covers the Mongol invasion, the rise of Muscov}', the reign of Ivan the 
Terrible and the Time of Troubles, Imperial Russia's Westernization under Peter the Great, and 
its apogee under Catherine the Great and her grandsons. 

HIS 321. Russian History Since 1861 4 hours 

This course studies Russian history from the abolition of serfdom, which began 
Imperial Russia's last attempt to reform itself and stave off revolution, until the present. It also 
covers the 1905 and 1917 revolutions, the rise of communism, the era of Lenin and Stalin, and 
the fall of the communist system. 

HIS 330. Between World Wars: The United States, 1920-1945 4 hours 

During this period of war, prosperit}', and depression, the United States underwent 
dramatic economic, political, social, and cultural changes. The interwar years witoessed the 
emergence of the United States as a world power, an increasingly sophisticated women's 
movement, the rise of mass production and mass consumption, and a variet}' of new challenges 
to social and economic policies. The Great Depression and the New Deal brought further 
challenges to traditional liberal political and economic assumptions as the federal government 
intervened in nearly every aspect of American Ufe. World War II, then, again transformed the 
nation as it ushered in the "age of affluence" and cold wars in the international and domestic 
realms. Prerequisites: HIS 130 and HIS 131 or permission of the instructor. 

HIS 331. The Age of Affluence: The United States Since 1945 4 hours 

An interdisciplinary study of American life since World War II, this course will 
emphasize political, economic, and social developments. Foreign policy is considered principally 
with respect to its impact on domestic affairs. 

HIS 335. Georgia History 4 hours 

This course is a chronological examination of the history of Georgia from the Colonial 
period to the 20* century. Emphasis is given to Old and New South themes, higher education 
development with attention to the history of Oglethorpe, the transition from rural to urban life, 
and Georgia's role in contemporary American life. Prerequisites: HIS 130, HIS 131, or permission 
of the instructor. 

HIS 340. Dictatorship and Democracy in Latin America 4 hours 

This course will examine the roots, character, and impact of authoritarian rule — and 
resulting resistance movements — in Latin America. Included will be a look at the caudillos who 
competed for power after independence, the Liberal dictatorships of the late 19* century, the 
Depression Dictators of the 1930s and Populist dictators of the 1940s and 1950s, and the rise 
of miHtary-bureaucratic dictatorships in the 1960s and 1970s. An understanding will be sought 
for why almost all political orientations (Republicanism, Liberalism, nationalism. Populism, 
and Communism) offered up a dictator as their champion at some point in Latin American 
history and how Latin American nations have been able to make a transition to democracy. 

156 



Finally, consideration will be given to how dictatorships affect the everyday lives and 
perceptions of the people living under them and in their aftermath. Prerequisite: HIS 240 or 
permission of the instructor. 

HIS 350. Special Topics in History 4 hours 

Courses offered to respond to topical needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

FRE 402. The Modern French Republics and Their Institutions 4 hours 

A study of both political and cultural institutions in France from 1870 to the present 
with emphasis on the traditions established by the new republican government in the 1880s and 
the creation in 1958 of the Fifth Republic under which France is currendy governed. Taught in 
French. Prerequisite: FRE 301. 

HIS 410. Ancient History and Ancient Historians 4 hours 

In this course, the history of Greek and Roman civilizations will be studied through the 
writings of several ancient historians. The methods used by ancient authors, their literary st\'le, and 
the relation of their works to the specific historical context in which they were written will be 
examined. The course will focus on detailed analysis of specific historical events such as the 5*- 
cenmry Athens, the rise of the Roman Empire, and the Roman civil wars. Since the thematic focus 
and selection of readings will not always be the same, the course may be repeated for credit with 
the permission of the instructor. 

HIS 411. The Fall of Rome and the Barbarians 4 hours 

This course will examine the "fall" of the Roman Empire in late antiquit}' and the 
subsequent rise of barbarian kingdoms in Europe. The primary issue will be to determine whether 
the Roman Empire did in fact "fall" during this time, or whether the period actually marks a 
transition, the birth of Europe. The role of Christianity in the transformation of Europe 
will be a major focus of discussion, as well as other social, political, and economic issues. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. 

HIS 412. Radical Religion and Revolution 4 hours 

This course will examine the role of radical theologies in shaping a series of rebeUions 
and revolutions in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern era. Some of the conflicts studied wlU 
include the Hussite Revolution, The German Reformation, and the EngUsh Civil War. In addition, 
some modern examples illustrating the connections between religion and revolutionary thought, 
in particular, liberation theology in Latin America and the current crisis in the Middle East will be 
considered. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

HIS 430. The American Civil War and Reconstruction 4 hours 

A course for advanced history students emphasizing the causes of conflict, the wartime 
period, and major changes that occurred. Prerequisites: HIS 130 and HIS 131. 

HIS 431. History of United States Foreign Relations 4 hours 

This course is a study of major developments in American diplomacy from the end of 
the Revolution until 1945. Prerequisite: at least one prior United States history course, or 
permission of the instructor. 



157 



HIS 450. Independent Study in History 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the 
division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

HIS 451. Internship in History 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunit}- to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at the Adanta 
History Center, the Atlanta Preservation Center, the Holocaust Center, and the Coosawattee 
Foundation archeological dig. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: 
Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program. 

Individually Planned Major 

A student who wishes to pursue a course of study not included in one of the 
available majors may petition to receive permission to complete an individually planned 
major. 

Such a major must include at least nine courses beyond core requirements (excluding 
courses with three or fewer semester hours) and including at least one semester of a foreign 
language at the second semester elementary-level or higher. At least four courses of the major 
must be completed in courses above the introductory level in one particular discipline. This 
discipline will be defined as the major's concentration. Graded course work in the major must have 
a grade-point average of at least 2.0. Course work that is included in the individuallv planned 
major may not be counted toward a second major or a minor. 

To apply for an individually planned major, the student, in consultation with his or her 
academic advisor, must complete an application, available at the Registrar's Office, to be approved 
by the chairperson of the division in which the proposed major's concentration is included and 
the Provost and Senior Vice President. This application should be submitted by the end of the 
second semester of the smdent's sophomore year. The application must specify the following: 

1. The major's coverage and definition. 

2. The observed or expected conceptual linkages among the concentration and the other 
subject(s) included in the major. 

3. The expected outcomes of the completion of the major in terms of the student's 
intellectual growth and plans for graduate study or career. 

After the student has secured written approval from his or her academic ad^^sor, the 
chairperson of the division, and the Provost and Senior Vice President, the Provost and Senior 
Vice President will fde the application in the Registrar's office. The Registrar will notih' the student 
and the student's advisor of the acceptance of the proposal. 

The degree awarded upon successful completion of an approved individuallv planned 
major is Bachelor of Arts. 



158 



Individually Planned Minor 



A smdent who wishes to pursue a course of study not included in one of the available 
minors may petition to receive permission to complete an individually planned minor. 

Such a minor must include five courses (excluding courses with three or fewer semester 
hours), of which at least two courses are in one discipline, which is the minor's concentration, and 
must be at the 300 or 400 level. Of the other three courses included in the minor, another two 
must also be at the 300 or 400 level. Graded work in the minor must have a grade-point average 
of at least 2.0. Course work that is included in the individually planned minor may not be counted 
toward a major or another minor. 

To apply for an individually planned minor, the student, in consultation with his or her 
academic advisor, must complete an application, available at the Registrar's Office, to be approved 
by the chairperson of the division in which the proposed minor's concentration is included and 
the Provost. This application should be submitted by the end of the second semester of the 
student's junior year. The application must specify the following: 

1. The minor's coverage and definition. 

2. The observed or expected conceptual linkages among the concentration and the other 
subject(s) included in the minor. 

3. The expected outcomes of the completion of the minor in terms of the student's 
intellectual growth and plans for graduate study or career. 

After the student has secured written approval from his or her academic advisor, the 
chairperson of the division, and the Provost and Senior Vice President, the Provost and Senior 
Vice President will file the application in the Registrar's Office. The Registrar will notify the 
student and the smdent's advisor of the acceptance of the proposal. 



Interdisciplinary Studies 



INT 301. Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: 4 hours 

These courses will focus on materials and topics that transcend the boundaries of 
specific academic disciplines and are not offered on a regular basis. Such courses have included 
Bioethics and Environmental Science. 

ULP 303. The New American City 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and 
policymaking in the new American city and its environs. Consideration will be given to the political 
and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new development, 
including: the extremes of wealth and povert}^, the mix of racial and ethnic groups, and the 
opportunities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and technology. Offered 
annually. 

ULP 304. Community Issues Forum: Principles into Practice 4 hours 

This course is taught as a weekly evening seininar focusing on a particular communit}' 
issue and accompanied by an issue-related, off-campus internship. Together with communit}' 
leaders and facult}; students analyze issues confronting stakeholders, collaborate on solutions, and 
present findings derived from their internship assignments. Students have interned with the state 
legislature, local and state chambers of commerce, community food banks, arts organizations, 
corporations, non-profit organizations, and a number of other communit^' groups. Topics covered 
in previous years include: education, transportation, health care, and the environment. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

159 



INT 401. Internship in Interdisciplinary Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity' to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for ever}' hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office. Graded on a satisfactorv/unsatisfacton' 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship 
program. 

International Studies 

International Studies is an interdisciplinary major that seeks to develop the skills and 
understanding essential for effective participation in the emerging global business, social and 
political environment. The major helps to prepare students for careers in government serxice, 
international commerce, banking and finance, the travel and convention businesses, poHtics and 
teaching. It also provides appropriate preparation for the professional study of business, law and 
international affairs. Students interested in masters programs in international affairs mav find it 
advantageous to take additional courses in economics. Interested students should ask the Registrar 
to refer them to a faculty advisor who specializes in this major. The degree awarded is the Bachelor 
of Arts. 

Requirements of the major include successful completion of 11 courses, three of which 
must be International Relations, United States Foreign Policy, and International Economics. 
Completion of five courses selected from the following also is required: 

BUS 370 International Business 

ECO 323 International Economics 

ECO 420 Economic Development 

PRE 402 The Modern French Republics and Their Institutions 

FRE 403 Franco- American Relations in Trade and Culture 

HIS 215 The Age of World War - Europe 1914-1945 

HIS 240 Latin America to Independence 

HIS 312 German History Since 1800 

HIS 321 Russian History Since 1861 

HIS 340 Dictatorship and Democracy in Latin America 

HIS 350 Special Topics in History * 

HIS 431 History of United States Foreign Relations 

HIS 450 Independent Study in History * 



160 



INS 400 Independent Study in International Studies 

INS 401 Internship in International Studies 

POL 211 War 

POL 231 Asian Politics 

POL 321 Political Development 

POL 331 Comparative Politics of China and Japan 

POL 350 Special Topics in Politics * 

POL 361 European Politics 

POL 411 War, Peace, and Security 

POL 422 Seminar in Chinese Politics 

POL 431 Seminar in Politics and Culture * 

POL 450 Independent Study in Politics * 

SPN 305 Spanish for International Relations and Business 

SPN 410 The Development of Latin American Cultures 

*Note: Special topics and independent study courses fulfill the requirements of the major only 
when they have a substantial international component. This implies that the course deals 
with the modern history, current situation or culture in a geographical area outside the 
United States or concerns some substantive issue that is international in scope, t}'pically 
regarding economics or securit}'. 

Smdents must complete two years of foreign language study or demonstrate the 
equivalent competence by examination. Students must also take one additional language course in 
which the foreign language is required for research, reading, or discussion. 

A study abroad experience is required. Note that no more than two courses may be 
counted toward major requirements from a study abroad program. Foreign students may count 
their residence at Oglethorpe as their study-abroad experience. Please see Oglethorpe Universit}' 
Smdents Abroad in the Educational Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 

Students who receive financial aid at Oglethorpe should contact the Director of 
Financial Aid early in the pursuit of this major to determine available funding for the study 
abroad experience. 

Note: Students who graduated from a secondary school located abroad at which the language 
of instruction was not English have satisfied the foreign language requirement. They 
may satisfy the smdy abroad requirement via their residency in the United States. 



161 



International Studies with Asia Concentration 



Like the general international studies major, this is a major designed to develop skills 
useful in cross-culturaUy oriented careers. Students achieve an Asia concentration by taking at least 
four courses that focus on the culture, politics, history or literature of nations in Asia in addition 
to a selection of more general courses that cover fundamental issues of international studies. The 
specialized knowledge that students gain through Asia-related course work helps to prepare them 
for careers in fields such as government, finance, and travel in this economically growing and 
culturally rich area of the globe. Combined with the other components of the international studies 
major, the Asia concentration will assist students with the necessary background for entry into 
graduate or professional schools in an Asian studies field. Students might go on to study in such 
areas as anthropology, politics, and international law or business. The degree awarded is the 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Requirements of the major include successful completion of the following five courses: 

ECO 323 International Economics or 

ECO 420 Economic Development 

POL 111 International Relations 

POL 231 Asian PoUtics 

POL 331 Comparative Politics of China and Japan 

POL 431 Seminar in Politics and Culture (Japan/ Asian concentration) 
Students must also take two of the following courses: 

JPN 301 Special Topics in Japanese Language, Literature, and Culmre I 

POL 311 United States Foreign Policy 

Another Asian studies course at Oglethorpe or at another institution 

pre-approved by the smdent's advisor 
Students must also take one of the following courses: 

BUS 370 International Business 

PRE 403 Franco-American Relations in Trade and Culture 

HIS 350 Special Topics in History * 

HIS 450 Independent Study in History * 

INS 400 Independent Study in International Studies 

INS 401 Internship in International Studies 

POL 350 Special Topics in Politics * 

POL 361 European Politics 

POL 411 War, Peace, and Securit}' 

POL 431 Seminar in Politics and Culture (with a different focus than 
the one above) 

POL 450 Independent Study in Politics * 
^ SOC 308 Culture and Societ}- 

Any course in 20*-centurv European history 

*Note: Special topics and independent study courses fulfill the requirements of the major onlv 
when they have a substantial international component. 



162 



Students must take at least one 400-level course. Students must demonstrate at least a 
second-3'ear competence in an Asian language or be able to use an Asian language for research and 
writing in a class. A study abroad for one semester in an Asian nadon is strongly urged. Please see 
Oglethorpe University Students Abroad in the Educational Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 
Note that no more than two courses may be counted toward major requirements from a study 
abroad program. Foreign students whose native language is Asian may consider their residence at 
Oglethorpe as their study-abroad experience and their foreign language requirement satisfied. 

INS 400. Independent Study in International Studies 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the 
division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

INS 401. Internship in International Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunit}' to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at the Southern 
Center for International Smdies, the Georgia Department of Industry, Trade, and Tourism, 
Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and the United States Department of State. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and 
qualification for the internship program. 

Japanese 

The study of modern Japanese broadens the mind and provides insight into one of the 
world's richest cultures. Oglethorpe's Japanese program embraces the "five C's" of foreign 
language education outiined in the National Standards in Foreign Language Education: 
communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. 

Oglethorpe's four-course Japanese sequence assumes no initial knowledge of the 
language. The courses lead the student step by step toward communicative competence in the four 
basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. These skills are taught by means of 
model conversations, role plays, listening activities, and readings. Elementary classes present the 
fundamentals of the language through a sequence of units that focus on daily Ufe. A t\pical 
conversation at the beginning level might be about making plans for the weekend or describing 
one's family. Students are initially trained in the two phonetic kana scripts so that they are able to 
write in Japanese from the very beginning. Training in kanji characters begins in the second 
semester. At the intermediate level students master more advanced vocabulary and grammatical 
patterns. The smdent also learns how to use the language appropriately in different social contexts. 
A conversation at this level might be about the student's career plans, while a tj'pical reading might 
deal with changing attitudes toward marriage in japan. By the end of the four-course sequence, 
the student will be able to express a broad range of ideas with confidence, will be capable of 
writing short essays, and wUl know about 240 kanji characters. 

Students who seek further training in Japanese can take advanced Japanese through 
cross registration at one of the Atianta Regional Consortium for Higher Education (ARCHE) 
institutions. FuU-immersion study abroad opportunities are available at Oglethorpe's sister schools 
in Japan, Seigakuin Universit}' and Otaru Universit}- of Commerce. 

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General interest courses taught in English on premodern and modern Japanese literature 
supplement the language curriculum. These and other eligible courses can be taken in conjunction 
with the language sequence toward fulfillment of the requirements for a minor in Japanese. The 
combination of a Japanese minor with a major in any of the traditional liberal arts disciplines can 
greatly enhance marketability following graduation, and can lead to career opportunities in fields 
as diverse as education, foreign service, and international commerce. 

Students with previous study experience should take the Japanese placement 
examination prior to registration. 

Minor 

A minor in Japanese consists of successful completion of Intermediate Japanese II and 
two culture courses, totaling 24 semester hours. At least one of the two years of language study 
must be taken at Oglethorpe. The student may select two culture courses from the follo\\ing: 

JPN 301 JPN 302 Special Topics in Japanese Language, Literature, and 

Culture I, II 
PHI 321 Special Topics in Philosophy: Philosophical Issues and 

Problems — Philosophy of the Kyoto School 
PHI 321 Special Topics in Philosophy: Philosophical Issues and 
Problems —Japanese Aesthetics 
Other courses offered at Oglethorpe as special topics courses, as well as certain courses 
offered at other colleges and through study abroad programs, may also qualif}'. 

Study Abroad and Internships 

Although it is expected that at least half of the courses counted toward the minor must 
be taken at Oglethorpe, all students of Japanese language and culture are strongly encouraged to 
spend at least one semester in Japan. Guidance in finding an appropriate program is provided bv 
the Japanese department or the Oglethorpe University Students Abroad (OUSA) Director. Of 
particular interest to students of Japanese is the Oglethorpe exchange agreement with Seigakuin 
Universit)' in Tokyo and Otaru Universit}' of Commerce in Hokkaido. See also Oglethorpe 
Universit}' Students Abroad in the Educational Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 

A student can also gain practical experience by pursuing internship opportunities in 
Japanese organizations and firms in and around Atianta. Credit for these activities is given when 
the internship is completed in accordance with the objectives agreed upon with the facult\' 
supervisor. Credit is given toward the minor upon approval by the student's facult}^ ad\dsor. The 
Career Services Office has an extensive list of available internships. 

JPN 101, JPN 102. Elementary Japanese I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This is a one-year course sequence in beginning Japanese aimed at developing basic skills 
in speaking, reading, writing, and aural comprehension. The kaiia and kanji writing systems are 
introduced. Prerequisite: None for JPN 101; JPN 101 for JPN 102, or placement bv testing. 

JPN 201. Intermediate Japanese 1 4 hours 

A continuation of elementary Japanese, the first semester of the second-year sequence 
focuses on conversational skills and vocabulary building, and extends the student's proficiency in 
reading and writing. Aspects of the Japanese culture and society are also explored. Prerequisite: 
JPN 102 or permission of the instructor. 



164 



JPN 202. Intermediate Japanese II 4 hours 

This course consolidates and integrates the student's knowledge of basic grammatical 
patterns, and introduces advanced grammatical structures. Further practice in reading and writing 
prepares the student to pursue further study in areas related to his or her major. Audio-visual 
materials are used more extensively to supplement the main text. Prerequisite: JPN 201 or 
permission of the instructor. 

JPN 250. Introduction to Japanese Literature 4 hours 

This course is designed to provide students with a survey of Japanese literature from 
classical to modern times. Readings include selections from creation myths, court romances and 
poetic diaries, Buddhist folk tales, the haiku and travel writings of Basho, Saikaku's Five W^omen 
Who Loi'e^I Loi'e, the puppet drama Ta/e of the 47 Samurai, and modern works by Mori Ogai, Soseki 
Natsume, and Tanizaki Jun'ichiro. All readings are in English translation. 

JPN 301, JPN 302. Special Topics in Japanese Language, Literature, 

and Culture I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

Topical aspects of the literature and cultural phenomena associated with the Japanese 
language are explored through readings in English in this course. 

JPN 350. Modern Japanese Literature 4 hours 

This course is a survey of Japanese literature from 1890 to the present. The 
development of modern literature will be examined beginning with the early decades of 
modernization, through militarization and defeat and ending with a consideration of 
postmodernist writing. Readings will include novels and short stories by Mori Ogai, Higuchi 
Ichiyo, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Dazai Osamu, Oe Kenzaburo, and Murakami Haruki. Class discussions 
will be supplemented by lectures on history and culture. All- readings will be in English translation. 

Latin 

AH students with previous study or experience in Latin must take a language placement 
examination during summer orientation or prior to fall registration. They will be placed in the 
course sequence according to their competence. Under no circumstances should students with 
past experience in the language place themselves in courses, especially at the elementary level. 

LAT 101, LAT 102. Elementary Latin I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This course is beginning Latin, designed to present a foundation in classical Latin 
grammar and syntax and to introduce students to Roman literature and histor}-. Prerequisite: 
None for LAT 101; LAT 101 required for LAT 102, or placement bv testing. 

LAT 201, LAT 202. Special Topics in Latin Language, Literature, 

and Culture I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

Aspects of the literature and cultural phenomena associated with the Latin language are 
explored in this two-semester sequence of courses. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



165 



Mathematics 



During their course of study at Oglethorpe, mathematics majors move from a concrete, 
algorithmic mode of reasoning in early courses to a more abstract, formal mode of reasoning in 
the later capstone courses. The successful mathematics major will: 

• Appreciate the inherent beauty and utilit}' of mathemadcs; 

• Appreciate the interconnectedness of the various mathematical fields to one another 
and to outside disciplines; 

• Communicate mathematical results in written, oral, formal, and informal fashions; 

• Discern patterns; 

• Read and create mathematical results in a self-directed fashion; 

• Sharpen his or her problem-solving skills; and 

• Understand the power and limitations of using technology to create mathematics. 
Through tutoring, volunteer, and internship opportunities, mathematics majors can 

further strengthen their own understanding of mathematics and help others to do the same. 

Upon graduation, mathematics majors are ready to pursue graduate study, teacher 
preparation, or employment in industry. Oglethorpe graduates are especially well prepared to work 
in actuarial science, applied mathematics, operations research, statistical consulting, or a variet\' of 
careers in computing. 

Major 

In order to major in mathematics, a student must successfully complete the follo\vdng 
mathematics courses with a grade of "C-" or higher: Calculus I, Calculus II, Calculus III, 
Differential Equations, Discrete Mathematics, ProbabiUt}', Complex Analysis, Linear Algebra, 
Abstract Algebra, and Special Topics in Mathematics. Mathematics majors graduate with a 
Bachelor of Science degree. 

Minor 

In order to minor in mathematics, a student must successfully complete the following 
mathematics courses with a grade of "C-" or higher: Calculus I, Calculus II, Calculus III, and t\x'0 
additional courses chosen from the list required for the major. 

Note: No student will be permitted to register for a mathematics course that is a prerequisite 
to a mathematics course for which the student has already received academic credit. 

MAT 102. College Algebra 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to equip students with the algebra skills needed for 
Statistics and Applied Calculus. Topics include algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities, basic 
functions (polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic) and their graphs, die algebra of 
functions, inverse functions, and systems of equations and inequalities. 

MAT 103. Precalculus 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to equip students with the skills needed for 
Calculus I. Topics include basic analytic geometr}', trigonometry (functions, equations, and 
identities), complex numbers, polar coordinates, vectors in the plane, parametric equations, 
and transformation of coordinates. Prerequisite: MAT 102 with a grade of "C-" or higher 
or by examination. 



166 



MAT 111. Statistics 4 hours 

This course includes descriptive and inferential statistics with particular emphasis upon 
parametric statistics, rules of probability, interval estimation, and h}^othesis testing. Distributions 
that will be discussed include the normal, chi-square, and t-distribution. Additional topics include 
analysis of variance, regression and correlation analysis, goodness-of-fit, and tests for 
independence. Prerequisite: MAT 102 with a grade of "C-" or higher or by examination. 

MAT 121. Applied Calculus 4 hours 

This is the recommended calculus course for students in business, economics, and the 
social sciences. The goal of this course is to present calculus in an intuitive yet intellectually 
satisfying way and to illustrate the many applications of calculus to the management sciences, 
business, economics, and the social sciences. Topics include functions, the derivative, techniques 
of differentiation, applications of the derivative, the exponential and natural logarithm functions, 
applications of the exponential and natural logarithm functions, the definite integral, and 
functions of several variables. Prerequisite: MAT 102 with a grade of "C-" or higher or by 
examination. 

MAT 131, MAT 132, MAT 233. Calculus I, II, III 4 plus 4 plus 4 hours 

This is the recommended calculus sequence for students in mathematics, the phvsical 
sciences, and computer science. The objective of these courses is to introduce the fundamental 
ideas of the differential and integral calculus of functions of one and several variables. Topics 
include limits, continuit}; rates of change, derivatives, the Mean Value Theorem, applications of 
the derivative, curve sketching, related rates, maximization/minimization problems, area, 
integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, inverse functions, logarithmic functions, 
exponential functions, techniques of integration, applications of integration to volumes and 
surface area, conic sections, sequences, series, vectors, lines, planes, vector-valued functions, 
curves, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector fields. Prerequisite for MAT 131: MAT 
103 with a grade of "C-" or higher or by examination. Prerequisite for MAT 132: MAT 131 with 
a grade of "C-" or higher or by examination. Prerequisite for MAT 233: MAT 132 with a grade 
of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 241. Differential Equations 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental ideas of the theory of 
ordinary differential equations and to consider some of the applications of this theory to the 
physical sciences. Topics include equations of order one, applications of equations of order one, 
linear differential equations, linear equations with constant coefficients, nonhomogenous 
equations, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, applications of equations of order 
two, and power series solutions. Prerequisite: MAT 233 with a grade of "C-" or fiigher. 

MAT 261. Discrete Mathematics 4 hours 

This course may be considered a general introduction to advanced mathematics. As 
such, it will consider various methods and techniques of mathematical proof Topics are drawn 
from logic, set theory, functions, relations, combinatorics, graph theory, and boolean algebra. 
Prerequisite: MAT 132 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 



167 



MAT 341. Probability 4 hours 

This course provides a calculus-based stxidy of probability theory. Topics include set- 
theoretic, axiomatic and combinatorial foundations, basic rules, conditional probabiHt}^, 
independence, random variable theory, special discrete and continuous models, probabiHt}' plots, 
and joint distributions. Prerequisite: MAT 233 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 351. Complex Analysis 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental ideas of the theorv of 
functions of a complex variable. Topics include complex numbers, analytic functions, elementzTj 
functions, conformal mapping, complex integration, and infinite series. Prerequisite: MAT 233 
with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 362. Linear Algebra 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental ideas of linear algebra. Topics 
include Hnear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, inner products, linear transformation, 
eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MAT 132 with a grade of "C-" or higher. It is 
recommended that students take MAT 261 before taking this course. 

MAT 463. Abstract Algebra 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental ideas of modern algebra. 
Topics include sets, mappings, the integers, groups, rings, and fields. Prerequisite: MAT 362 with 
a grade of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 471. Special Topics in Mathematics 4 hours 

Selected topics in advanced mathematics are offered such as Real Analysis, Topology, Set 
Theory, Number Theory, Mathematical Statistics, Abstract vVlgebra II, and Differential Geometry. 
Prerequisites will depend on the topic but will include a minimum of MAT 233 with a grade of 
"C-" or higher and permission of the instructor. 

MAT 481. Independent Study in Mathematics 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved bv the instructor, 
the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

MAT 491. Internship in Mathematics 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity- to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty' super\'isor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for everv hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularlv scheduled meetings widi the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at the Lvnwood 
Park Community Center Education Program, Internal Revenue Ser\ace, and various actuarial and 
consulting firms. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the 
faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program. 



168 



Mathematics and Computer Science 



Since its inception as an academic discipline, computer science has been closely 
associated with mathematics. Many of the field's pioneers are mathematicians by training. Indeed, 
modern computer science would not be possible without the existence of a number of 
mathematical developments once thought to be entirely theoretical in namre. 

The interdisciplinary major in mathematics and computer science is designed to acquaint 
students with the various linkages between computer science and mathematics and to enable 
students to understand more thoroughly their primary discipline, whether it is mathematics or 
computer science. Rigorous training in mathematical thinking will provide the computer science 
student with essential analytical tools and mental discipline, while the problem-solving skills that 
will be sharpened in the process of developing algorithms for computer applications will prove to 
be beneficial to students in mathematics. Students will become familiar with ways in which 
modern computational tools have made possible work in mathematics that would otherwise be 
prohibitively laborious. Understanding of the many mathematical structures that are essential to 
effective development and utilization of processes in computer science will be enhanced. The 
degree awarded is the Bachelor of Science. 

Requirements of the major include completion of the following courses, all with a grade 
of "C-" or higher: 

MAT 131 Calculus I 

MAT 132 Calculus II 

MAT 233 Calculus III 

MAT 241 Differential Equations 

MAT 261 Discrete Mathematics 

MAT 341 ProbabiHt)' 

CSC 244 Principles of Computer Programming in Java or 

CSC 243 Principles of Computer Programming in C+ + 

MAT 362 Linear Algebra 

MAT 463 Abstract Algebra 

CSC 342 Introduction to Data Structures in Ada 
Completion of three of the following courses also is required: 

CSC 240 Introduction to Computer Applications Software or 

CSC 243 Principles of Computer Programming in C++ or 
CSC 244 Principles of Computer Programming in Java 

CSC 344 Principles of File Processing in COBOL 

CSC 440 Principles of Object-Oriented Programming in C++ 

CSC 441 Assembly Language and Computer Architecmre 

CSC 442 Special Topics in Computer Science 



169 



Music 

The music curriculum includes courses in music history and theory, ensemble 
performance, and applied lessons. 

Minor 

To complete a minor in music a student must successfully complete the following: 

MUS 331 History and Theory of Music I 

MUS 332 History and Theory of Music II 

MUS 333 History and Theory of Music III 

MUS 334 History and Theory of Music IV 
A total of four semester hours of University Singers and/or Applied Instruction in 
Music also must be taken and the completion of four hours of independent study in music. 

MUS 134. University Singers 1 hour 

This is an auditioned, mixed-voice concert choir, which is the primary musical ensemble 
for the study and performance of sacred and secular choral music. The Universit}- Chorale, an 
auditioned chamber choir, is chosen from members of the University Singers. Prerequisites: An 
audition and permission of the instructor. 

MUS 135. Beginning Class Voice 1 hour 

This course is an introduction to the basics of singing which includes posture, breath 
pressure, phonation, diction, tone, and intonation. A variety of easy vocal Literature will be studied 
and performed. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUS 136. Applied Instruction in Music 1 hour 

The study and practice of techniques and literature on an individual basis. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MUS 331. History and Theory of Music I 4 hours 

History and Theory of Music I examines music from the early beginnings to 1600 with 
analysis of representative works. This course uses primary sources — listening and stud\ing the 
music with the aid of selected scores and outlines, and reading and discussing comments by 
composers, performers, theorists, and other. The required Listening assignments are created to 
supplement and enhance the classroom experience. Prerequisite: COR 103 or permission of the 
instructor. 

MUS 332. History and Theory of Music II 4 hours 

History and Theory of Music II examines music from 1600 to 1800 with analysis of 
representative works. This course uses primary sources — listening and stud)ing the music with the 
aid of selected scores and outiines, and reading and discussing comments by composers, 
performers, theorists, and other. The required listening assignments are created to supplement and 
enhance the classroom experience. Prerequisite: COR 103, MUS 331 or permission of the 
instructor. 



170 



MUS 333. History and Theory of Music III 4 hours 

History and Theory of Music III examines music from 1800 to 1900 with analysis of 
representative works. This course uses primary sources — listening and studying the music with the 
aid of selected scores and outUnes, and reading and discussing comments by composers, 
performers, theorists, and other. The required listening assignments are created to supplement and 
enhance the classroom experience. Prerequisite: COR 103 or permission of the instructor. 

MUS 334. History and Theory of Music IV 4 hours 

History and Theory of Music IV examines music from 1900 to the present with analysis 
of representative works. This course uses primary sources — listening and studying the music with 
the aid of selected scores and outlines, and reading and discussing comments by composers, 
performers, theorists, and other. The required listening assignments are created to supplement and 
enhance the classroom experience. Prerequisite: COR 103, MUS 333, or permission of the 
instructor. 

MUS 430. Special Topics in Music 4 hours 

This course will be a study of a selected topic in music, such as African-American 
Composers, Basic Techniques of Conducting, Fundamentals of Music, Masterpieces of Choral 
Literature, Music, Television, Films and Their Impact on Culture, Musics of Multicultural 
America, Women in Music, and World Music. Prerequisite: COR 103 or permission of the 
instructor. 

MUS 431. Independent Study in Music 1-4 hours 

This course is supervised research on a selected project or paper. It provides students 
an opportunit}^ to study and analyze in depth a specific musical style, composer, work, etc. 
Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and 
assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice 
President prior to registration. 

Philosophy 

Philosophy, in the broadest meaning of this term, is the attempt to think clearly about 
the world and the place of human beings in it. This activit}' is a response to questions which arise 
because the various areas of human life, such as science, art, moralit}^, and religion, often do not 
seem to be intelligible in themselves or to fit with one another. A philosophical world \aew, such 
as the philosophy of Plato or the philosophy of Descartes, represents an attempt to think through 
these difficulties and to arrive at a single, coherent vision of how reaHt)' is and how human beings 
should relate to it. 

The study of philosophy is a noble and worthwhile activity in its own right for the 
enlightenment which it can provide about questions which should be of interest to everyone. It is 
important, however, that the philosophy major also be effective at imparting those general skills 
which are crucial for most professions. 

The mission statement of Oglethorpe Universit}' states that Oglethorpe graduates should 
be "humane generaUsts" with the intellectual adaptability which is needed to function successfully 
in changing and often unpredictable job situations. The plailosophy program at Oglethorpe 
accomplishes this goal by fostering those abilities of critical thinking and intellectual tlexibiUt}- 
required in virtually any professional career. Philosophy students learn how to read and understand 
abstract and often very difficult arguments. They also learn to think critically and independentiy, to 
develop their own views, and to express their insights in clear, articulate spoken and written prose. 
Such skills are important for almost any profession and are especially useful for business and law. 

171 



Philosophy courses need not be taken in a rigid sequence. Any philosophy course should 
improve a student's overall philosophical abilities and thereby strengthen the student's 
performance in any subsequent philosophy course. The courses are, however, classified by the 
difficulty of the reading involved and the amount of philosophical training and background which 
is advisable. 

Major 

The philosophy major consists of 10 courses in philosophy which must include the 
following courses: Logic; Plato; Aristotle; Nietzsche; either Knowledge and Scepticism 
(Epistemology) or Philosophy of Mind; one course in non-Western phUosophv; and four 
additional courses in philosophy. 

Students majoring in philosophy are also required to take at least one semester of a 
foreign language at the second semester elementary-level or higher. Students who have attained 
some proficiency in a foreign language may make use of this abiHt}^ by adding one semester hour 
of foreign language credit to certain philosophy courses. For example, a student might add one 
semester hour of credit to the Nietzsche course by reading some parts of Nietzsche's writings in 
the original German, or add one semester hour of credit to the Plato course by reading portions 
of Plato's dialogues in Greek. Most philosophy courses at Oglethorpe are suitable for such foreign 
language supplementation. Credit for such extra sttidy will be arranged between the student and 
the instructor. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

The philosophy minor consists of any five courses in philosophy, which must include 
Logic; either Plato or Aristotie; and three additional courses in philosoph}'. 

Level I courses are suitable for students who have no background in philosophy and may serve 
as an introduction to the study of philosophy. 

PHI 101. Significance of Human Life — Western Responses 4 hours 

This course introduces the student to Western philosophy through the question of 
whether human life as a whole has any ultimate meaning or significance outside of indi^ndual 
desires. This question will be considered by studying Eccksiastes, The Book of Job, the phUosophv of 
Socrates in Plato's Euthjphro, Apolog)/, and Crito, Lucretius,' On the Nature of Things, and Hume's 
Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. 

PHI 102. Significance of Human Life — Eastern Responses 4 hours 

Here the student is introduced to non-Western philosophy through a study of some 
Asian responses to the question of human significance. Students will study four thinkers who are 
different from one another but who are all important in the Asian intellectual tradition. By 
studying these four in some depth, students wiU be able to contrast their own Western 
philosophical background with something quite different from it. Students are encouraged but not 
required to take PHI 101 and PHI 102 as a two-semester sequence. 



172 



PHI 103. Logic 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to both logical thinking and thinking about logic. It is 
divided into three parts: informal logic (a study of logical fallacies in thinking), formal logic (a 
primer to develop Uterac}' in symbolic logic), and the philosophy of logic (exactly what is logic?). 

Level II courses are for students who have some philosophical background, to the extent of at 
least one Level I course. 

PHI 202. Contemporary Ethical Theory 4 hours 

In this course, smdents wiU read several contemporary works concerning the namre of 
the ethical. Works will be drawn from both the analytic and the Continental traditions and an 
effort will be made to put the two traditions into dialogues with each other. 

PHI 204. Plato 4 hours 

This course is a study of the philosophy of Plato through a reading of his major 
dialogues. In addition to the "Socratic" dialogues, readings will include the Phaedo, Phaedrus, 
Symposium, Republic, and Timaeus. 

PHI 205. Aristotle 4 hours 

This course is a study of the philosophy of Aristotie through a reading of his major 
works. Readings wiU include portions of the Ljjgic, Physics, DeAnima, Metaphysics, and Nicomachean 
Ethics. 

PHI 301. Philosophy of Art (Aesthetics) 4 hours 

This course will attempt to trace the philosophic underpinnings of the movement within 
art toward non-representational art. The course begins with Kant's third Critique and includes 
readings by Hegel, Heidegger, Derrida, and several others. Students will also read several works by 
artists themselves, including Kandinsky, Francis Bacon, and Anselm Kiefer. 

PHI 302. Knowledge and Scepticism (Epistemology) 4 hours 

This course wiU cover various issues concerned with the namre and validit)' of human 
knowledge. The topics smdied will include the distinction between knowledge and belief, 
arguments for and against scepticism, perception and our knowledge of the physical world, and 
the namre of truth. 

PHI 303. Space, Time, and God 4 hours 

This course examines our conception of the universe as a totality, both in its own namre 
and in relation to an external cause. We will consider whether space and time are "absolute" 
realities or only systems of relations among objects, whether they are finite or infinite, and 
whether or not there logically could exist space-time universes in addition to our own. The course 
wiU conclude with the question of whether our space-time universe is self-sufficient or requires 
an ultimate cause or explanation (God) outside of itself 



173 



PHI 304. Philosophy of Mind 4 hours 

This course involves the study of philosophical questions about the nature of human 
persons. Students will examine: 1) The mind-body problem — the nature of the mind and 
consciousness, and the relation of consciousness to physical processes within the body; 2) 
Personal identity — what makes a person one mind or subject both at a single moment and over 
time; and 3) Free will — the status of a person as a free agent and the relation of this freedom to 
the causally determined processes in the person's body. 

PHI 305. Nietzsche 4 hours 

In this course students wiU study the philosophy of Nietzsche through a reading of his 
major works, including The Birth of Tragedy, The Uses and Abuses of History for Ufe, Thus Spake 
Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, Twilight of the Idols, and The Anti-Christ. Students will also study 
some contemporary and influential readings of Nietzsche. 

PHI 306. African Philosophy 4 hours 

Taking African philosophy as a case study of post-colonial thought, students will study 
the African critique of traditional modes of philosophizing. The authors read will include Cesaire, 
Senghor, Sartre, Mudimbe, Appiah, Achebe, Soyinka, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, and Victor Turner. 

PHI 320. Special Topics in Philosophy: Pliilosophers 4 hours 

Intensive study of the thought of a single important philosopher or group of 
philosophers. 

PHI 321. Special Topics in Philosophy: Philosophical Issues and 

Problems 4 hours 

Smdies of selected philosophical questions usually of special relevance to the present 
day have included courses such as Philosophy of History, War and Its justification, and 
Philosophical Issues in Women's Rights. 

PHI 322. Independent Study in Philosophy 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved bv the instructor, the 
division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

PHI 323. Internship in Philosophy 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opporrunit\- to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult\' supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internsliip. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at the American 
Civil Liberties Union, the Georgia Attorney General's Office, and Georgia justice Project. Graded 
on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty- super\-isor and 
qualification for the internship program. 



174 



POL 341. Political Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval 4 hours 

This is an examinadon of the origins of philosophical reflection on the fundamental 
issues of politics, which is designed to lead to the critical consideradon of the polidcal views of 
our dme. Among the topics discussed are the reladonship between knowledge and polidcal power 
and the character of polidcal jusdce. Pordons of the works of Aristophanes, Plato, Aristode, 
Aquinas, and Alfarabi are examined. Prerequisite: COR 201 or permission of the instructor. 

POL 342. Political Philosophy II: Modern 4 hours 

This is a cridcal examinadon of the peculiarly modern political and philosophical stance 
beginning where Political Philosophy I concludes. Among the authors discussed are Machiavelli, 
Hobbes, Rousseau, Kant, and Kojeve. Prerequisite: POL 341 or permission of the instructor. 

Level III courses are the most difficult and challenging and are for students who have significant 
philosophical background, to the extent of at least one or two Level II courses. 

PHI 401. The Philosophical Response to the Scientific Revolution 4 hours 

This course is a study of the philosophical systems of Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza and 
Leibniz. Each of these philosophies is an attempt to come to terms with the scientific picture of 
the world which had been given to the West by Copernicus and Galileo. The course begins with 
the materialist philosophy of Hobbes, followed by Descartes' dualistic (between mind and matter) 
view of the created world, and then considers Spinoza's pantheistic monism and Leibniz's 
idealistic atomism as responses to the difficulties in the Cartesian philosophy. 

PHI 402. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason 4 hours 

A smdy of Kant's theoretical philosophy, his "metaphysics of experience," through a 
reading and analysis of his major work. An attempt will be made to discover which portions of 
Kant's philosophy can be accepted as valid and true in the light of present-day philosophy and 



PHI 403. Heidegger's Being and Time 4 hours 

This course involves a close and patient reading of one of the most important and 
difficult works of Continental philosophy. An effort will be made to avoid speaking 
"heideggerianese" and to translate the dense language of the text into a wav of speaking accessible 
to students. 

PHI 404. Contemporary French Philosophy 4 hours 

It has been argued that the most provocative developments in the current development 
of German philosophy have been the French readings of now classic German writers such as 
Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and Heidegger, to name a few. Smdents will attempt to test 
this thesis by reading some representative and challenging texts. The authors studied may include 
BataiUe, Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida, Althusser, Blanchot, and others. 



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Physics 

The physics curriculum is designed to provide well-rounded preparation in classical and 
modern physics. The successful completion of this program will prepare the graduate to gain 
admission to one of the better graduate programs in physics or a related scientific field, or to 
secure employment in a technical, scientific, or engineering setting. 

A grade of "C-" or higher must be obtained in each freshman- and sophomore-level 
science course that is required for this major or minor; these courses are numbered 100 through 
300 in each discipline. A grade-point average of 2.0 or higher is required in all courses required 
for the major. 

Students who are interested in scientific illustration are encouraged to consider the 
Scientific Illustration Tracks that are offered within the art major. 

Major 

The requirements for a major in physics are as follows: College Physics I and II taken 
after or concurrentiy with Calculus I and II (preferably in the freshman year); Classical Mechanics 
I and II taken after or concurrentiy with Calculus III (suggested for the sophomore year); Thermal 
and Statistical Physics; Modern Optics; Modern Physics I and II; Electricit}' and Magnetism I and 
II; Mathematical Physics; and Special Topics in Theoretical Physics or Special Topics in 
Experimental Physics. Examination is generally required to transfer credit for anv of these 
courses. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Science. 

Minor 

A minor in physics is offered to provide students with an opportunit}' to strengthen and 
broaden their educational credentials either as an end in itself or as an enhancement of future 
employment prospects. The requirement for the physics minor is three lecture courses numbered 
FHY 202 or higher plus at least one physics laboratory course at the 300 level or above. 

PHY 101, PHY 102. General Physics I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

An introductory course without calculus. Fundamental aspects of mechanics, heat, Ught, 
sound, and electricity are included. The text will be on the level of Serway and Faughn, College 
Physics. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MAT 103; PHY 101 
must precede PHY 102. Corequisites: PHY lOlL and PHY 102L. 

PHY 201, PHY 202. CoUege Physics I, II 5 plus 5 hours 

Introductory physics with calculus. Subject matter is the same as in general physics but 
on a level more suited to physics majors, engineering majors, etc. One year of calculus as a 
prerequisite is preferred, otherwise calculus must be taken concurrentiy. The text will be on the 
level of Halliday, Resnick, and Walker, Fundamentals of Physics. Prerequisite: PH\' 201 with a 
grade of "C-" or higher must precede PHY 202. Corequisites: PHY lOlL and PHY 102L. 

PHY lOlL, PHY 102L. Introductory Physics Laboratory I, II 1 plus 1 hour 

Introductory physics laboratories to accompany PHY 101, 102, 201 and 202. 



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PHY 211, PHY 212. Classical Mechanics I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This is the student's first introduction to theoretical physics. Lagrangian and 
Hamiltonian methods are developed with Newton's laws of motion and applied to a variet\' of 
contemporary problems. Emphasis is placed on problem work, the object being to develop 
physical intuition and facilit}' for translating physical problems into mathematical terms. The text 
will be on the level of Analytical Mechanics by Fowles. Prerequisites: MAT 132 and PHY 202 with 
a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in PHY 21 1 
before taking PHY 212. 

PHY 232. Fundamentals of Electronics 4 hours 

This course is designed primarily for science majors and dual degree engineering 
students. Coverage includes DC and AC circuits, semi-conductor devices, amplifiers, oscillators, 
and digital devices. The intent is to provide a working understanding of common instrumentation 
in science and technology. Prerequisite: PHY 102 or FHY 212 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PHY 232L. Fundamentals of Electronics Laboratory 1 hour 

The laboratory component of PHY 232. 

PHY 331, PHY 332. Electricity and Magnetism I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

A thorough introduction to one of the two fundamental disciplines of classical physics, 
using vector calculus methods. After a brief review of vector analysis, the first semester will treat 
electrostatic and magnetic fields and provide an introduction to the special theory of relativit)'. 
The second semester wiU develop electrodynamics, including Maxwell's equations, the propagation 
of electromagnetic waves, radiation, and the electromagnetic theory of light. The treatment will 
be on the level of the text of Reitz, Milford, and Christ}'^. It is recommended that MAT 241 be 
taken concurrentiv. Prerequisites: MAT 233 and PHY 202 with a grade of "C-" or higher in each 
course; PHY 331 must precede PHY 332. 

PHY 333. Thermal and Statistical Physics 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to provide physics, engineering, and chemistry majors with 
a fundamental understanding of heat and the equilibrium behavior of complex systems. Topics 
wUl include the zeroth, first and second laws of thermodynamics with applications to closed and 
open systems; microcanonical and canonical ensembles for classical and quantum systems, with 
applications to ideal gases, specific heats, blackbody radiation, etc.; the kinetic description of 
equilibrium properties. Text will be on the level of Kestin and Dorfman or Zemansky 
Prerequisites: MAT 132 and PHY 202 with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. 

PHY 333L. Thermal and Statistical Physics Laboratory 1 hour 

Laboratory work will emphasize classic experiments such as the ballistic pendulum, hard 
sphere scattering, the Millikan oil drop experiment, the Michelson interferometer, etc. Emphasis 
also will be placed on measuring fundamental constants such as the speed of light, h, G, e and 
e/m. Corequisite: PHY 333. 

PHY 335. Introduction to Modern Optics 4 hours 

A standard intermediate-level optics course which will treat the basics of wave theory 
and the electromagnetic origin of optical phenomena, geometrical optics, physical optics including 
Fourier optics, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, and dispersion. The course will conclude with 
some consideration of current topics such as holography, quantum optics, and non-linear optics. 
Text will be on the level of Jenkins and White or Hecht. Prerequisites: AL\T 241 and PHY 202 
with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. 

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PHY335L. Modern Optics Laboratory 1 hour 

This laboratory accompanies course PHY 335. 

PHY 421, PHY 422. Introduction to Modern Physics I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

For physics, engineering, and chemistry majors, this is a one-year sequence that discusses 
the most important developments in 20*-century physics. The first semester will review special 
relativity and treat the foundations of quantum physics from a historical perspective; the quantum 
theory of one-electron atoms will be developed. In the second semester, there will be a treatment 
of many-electron atoms, molecules, and solids, with an introduction to nuclear and elementan- 
particle physics. The text wiU be on the level of Eisberg and Resnick, Quanmm Physics. 
Prerequisites: PHY 202 and PHY 332; PHY 421 must precede PHY 422. 

PHY 421L, PHY 422L. Modern Physics Laboratory I, II 1 plus 1 hour 

Laboratory work will emphasize modern physics in areas such as microwave optics, 
superconductivity, measurements of magnetic fields, electron spin resonance, the Franck-Hertz 
experiment, laser optics, etc. Corequisites: PHY 421 and PHY 422. 

PHY 423. Mathematical Physics 4 hours 

This course will examine a variety of mathematical ideas and methods used in phvsical 
sciences. Topics may include: vector calculus; solutions of partial differential equations, including 
the wave and heat equations; special functions; eigenvalue problems; Fourier analysis and 
mathematical modeling, particularly numerical computer methods. Text will be on the level of 
Arfken or Mathews and Walker. Prerequisite: MAT 241 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PHY 431. Special Topics in Theoretical Physics 1-5 hours 

Topics to be chosen in accordance with the student's interest include Laser Phvsics, 
Plasma Physics, Theory of the Solid State, Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics, and 
Cosmology. 

PHY 441. Special Topics in Experimental Physics 1-5 hours 

Topics to be chosen in accordance with the student's interest in experimental phvsics. 

PHY 499. Independent Study in Physics 1-5 hours 

Supervised study of a topic of interest to the student, which is not treated in the 
regularly scheduled course offerings. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of smdv that 
includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved bv the instructor, the di\ision chair, 
and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 



178 



Politics 

As Aristode observed some 2000 years ago, "Man is by nature a polidcal animal." 
Polidcs shapes who we are and how we live; it animates human nature, forges idenddes, drives 
social movements, structures national politics and institudons, molds internadonal reladons. At 
Oglethorpe, students of polidcs encounter a wide range of opinions, beliefs, and scholarly analysis 
as to the nature of polidcs and what constitutes the legitimate aims of polidcal action. Differences 
and disagreements abound, providing a rich environment for students to develop their own 
informed opinions honed through healthy debate with their colleagues. In addition, politics majors 
gain both substantive knowledge and analytic skills. Introductory classes in American politics, 
comparative politics, international relations, and political philosophy provide the foundation for 
subsequent pursuit of more specialized study undertaken in higher-level courses. Skills acquired 
include: close critical reading of texts; inductive, deductive, and analogical reasoning; 
substantiating arguments; comparing across cases; and making generalizations. 

Oglethorpe's location provides numerous opportunities to study and engage with real 
world politics, be they local, national, or international. Adanta is home to the Georgia state 
government. The Carter Center, and the Martin Luther Iving Jr. Center. Smdents have taken 
advantage of the Georgia's Legislative Intern and Governor's Intern Programs, as well as worked 
with the Georgia State Legislature, the Department of Industry, Trade and Tourism, and the 
League of Women Voters, participated in The Carter Center Internship Program, and worked 
with a variety of governmental and grassroots programs. 

Resources at Oglethorpe serve to help students engage actively in politics. Through the 
Universit}''s Career Services Office, students can identify and create other internships. 
Oglethorpe's affiliations with The Washington Center for Internships and the Washington 
Semester Program of American Universit)' allow students to study politics and intern in the 
nation's capital. Students can also use internship credit towards their major requirements. In an 
increasingly globalized world, Oglethorpe study abroad programs provide the opportunit^' to gain 
in-depth experience of the politics and culture of another country for periods ranging from a 
week, to a semester, to a year. Please see Oglethorpe Universit}' Students Abroad in the 
Educational Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 

Politics majors contemplate and analyze the different forms of power shaping today's 
world, be they individuals, ideas, institutions, or coercive force. This knowledge prepares them well 
for a variet}' of careers, including law, journalism, government, international organizations, 
NGO's, education, business, and poHtics. 

Major 

The requirements for a major in politics are satisfactory completion of at least 10 
courses in the discipline, of which the following four are required: 

POL 101 Introduction to American Politics 
POL 111 International Relations 
POL 121 Introduction to Comparative Politics 
POL 341 Political Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval or 
POL 342 PoUtical Philosophy II: Modern 

In addition, students must take two courses at the 300 level and one at the 400 level, and 
complete at least one semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary-level or 
higher. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 



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Minor 

To receive a minor, students must take four courses distributed among three of the four 
subfields of the discipline (American politics, comparative poUtics, international relations, and 
political philosophy). 

POL 101. Introduction to American Politics 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to the fundamental questions of politics through an 
examination of the American founding and political institutions. 

POL 111. International Relations 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to the conduct of politics in a condition of anarchy. The 
central issues will be how and whether independent states can establish and preserve international 
order and cooperate for the achievement of their common interests in an anarchic environment. 
These questions will be explored through a reading of relevant history and theoretical writings and 
an examination of present and future trends influencing world politics. 

POL 121. Introduction to Comparative Politics 4 hours 

This course traces the evolution of major theories and methodologies of comparative 
politics from the 1960s to present, analyzing both their distinguishing characteristics and how 
these theories respond to the prominent political issues and intellectual debates of their times. 
Topics to be covered include: political behavior, political culture, revolutions, modernization, 
political economy, rational choice, instimtions, and the state, with democratization serving as an 
overarching theme. 

POL 201. Constitutional Law 4 hours 

In this course, we will examine the Constitution and the efforts of the United States 
Supreme Court to expound and interpret it. In addition to reading and briefing manv Supreme 
Court decisions, we will examine some leading contemporary works in constitutional and legal 
theory. Prerequisite: POL 101. 

POL 202. State and Local Government 4 hours 

This course is a survey of the origin, development, and characteristic problems of state 
and local government in the United States. Prerequisite: POL 101. 

POL21L War 4 hours 

What is war? How and to what extent has it changed through the ages? Whx are wars 
won or lost? When is war just? How will war be fought in the future, with what results? 

POL 231. Asian Politics 4 hours 

This course is a general introduction to the varietv' of political systems in Asia, 
concentrating particularly on the nations of East Asia. It wiU emphasize the methods of 
comparative political study and will focus on understanding the factors that determine different 
political outcomes in nations that share a geographical region and many similar cultural and 
historical influences. 

POL 302. American Political Parties 4 hours 

An in-depth smdy of the development of part}' organizations in the United States and 
an analysis of their bases of power. Prerequisite: POL 101. 



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POL 303. Congress and the Presidency 4 hours 

An examination of the original arguments for the current American governmental 
structure and the problems now faced by these institutions. Prerequisite: POL 101. 

ULP 303. The New American City 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and 
policymaking in the new American cit}' and its environs. Consideration wUl be given to the political 
and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new development, 
including the extremes of wealth and poverty, the mix of racial and ethnic groups, and the 
opportunities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and technology. Offered 
annually. 

POL 304. African- American Politics 4 hours 

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the various strategies 
and tactics used by African-Americans to advance their economic, social, and political agendas. As 
such, the course will provide a detailed examination of the successes and failures of the 
interaction between the United States political system and African-Americans from both an 
historic and present-day perspective. Prerequisite: POL 101. 

POL 311. United States Foreign Policy 4 hours 

A history of American foreign policy since 1945, emphasis in this course will be on 
the description, explanation, and evaluation of events and policies, not the study of policy- 
making as such. 

POL 321. PoUtical Development 4 hours 

This course surveys substantive themes and theoretical debates in the study of 
political development including: what is meant by 'political development,' cultural versus 
structural explanations for change, whether development is driven by domestic or international 
influences, political transitions, and the relative significance of particular groups or 
institutions. Readings build from theoretical touchstones HNSO II (Smith, Marx, Weber) to 
address contemporary cases in developing and developed countries. Prerequisite: POL 121, 
COR 202, or permission of the instructor. 

POL 331. Comparative Politics of China and Japan 4 hours 

While Japan and China have both become prominent nation-states with increasing 
international influence, each country has achieved this feat through very different means. This 
course seeks to ascertain the sources and strength of their respective development paths as well 
as the prognosis for their political and economic futures. Topics to be covered include: state 
formation, ideology and political order, political and economic institutions, economic 
development strategies, Asian values,' state-society relations, regional and international relations. 
Prerequisite: POL 121, POL 231, or permission of the instructor. 

POL 341. PoUtical Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval 4 hours 

This is an examination of the origins of philosophical reflection on the fundamental 
issues of politics, which is designed to lead to the critical consideration of the political views of 
our time. Among the topics discussed are the relationship between knowledge and political power 
and the character of political justice. Portions of the works of Aristophanes, Plato, Cicero, and 
Alfarabi are examined. Prerequisite: COR 201 or permission of the instructor. 



181 



POL 342. Political Philosophy II: Modern 4 hours 

This is a critical examination of the peculiarly modern political and philosophical 
stance beginning where Political Philosophy I concludes. Among the authors discussed are 
Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, and Kojeve. Prerequisite: POL 341 or permission 
of the instructor. 

POL 350. Special Topics in Politics 4 hours 

A variet}' of courses will be offered to respond to topical needs of the curriculum. 
Recent courses include Moral and Political Leadership, Dealing with Diversit^; Criminal Law, and 
Citizenship in Theory and Practice. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

POL 361. European PoUtics 4 hours 

This course is a factual, conceptual and historical introduction to poHtics on the 
European continent, including (but not necessarily limited to) Britain, France, German}', Italy 
Russia, and the European Union. These regimes will be smdied through a comparison of their 
social structures, party systems, institutions and constitutions, political cultures and (if possible) 
their domestic policies. Prerequisite: POL lOL 

POL 411. War, Peace, and Security 4 hours 

An in-depth treatment of one or more of the issues introduced in International 
Relations. The course will be conducted as a seminar, with the emphasis on reading, discussion 
and research. It wiU address the following questions: When and why do statesmen resort to force 
to resolve international conflicts? WTien does the threat of force succeed or fail and when and 
how ought one to employ it? When and why do states make peace? What are the causes of conflict 
in the present and future? What are the prospects for peace? Topics vary from year to vear. 
Prerequisite: POL 111 or POL 311. 

POL 422. Seminar in Chinese PoUtics 4 hours 

This course explores the ongoing political, social, and economic transformations in 
Communist China, with emphasis on the post-Mao era (1978 to the present). General themes 
include Maoist versus Dengist politics, revolution versus reform, market reform in a communist 
state, factionalism, central-local relations, state-society relations, China in the international order. 
The course also examines current political and social issues. Prerequisite: POL 121, POL 231, or 
permission of the instructor. 

POL 431. Seminar in PoUtics and Culture 4 hours 

This will be an upper-level seminar in the study of the relationship of politics and 
culture. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the namre and difficulties of cultural study 
with particular attention to ethnographic or participant observer research methods. Focus of the 
seminar changes yearly but has included such topics as Judaism and Jewishness, Women and 
Politics, and Language and Politics. Prerequisite: POL 101 or junior standing. 

POL 441. Seminar in PoUtical Philosophy 4 hours 

An intensive examination of a text or theme introduced in the Political Philosophv 
sequence. Among the topics have been Rousseau's Emile, Spinoza, and The German 
Enlightenment. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



182 



POL 450. Independent Study in Politics 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the 
division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

POL 451. Internship in Politics 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunit}- to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult}' supervisor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at the Georgia 
State Legislature, the United States Department of State, The Carter Center, and the Superior 
Court of Fulton Count}'. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission 
of the facult\' supervisor and qualification for the internship program. 

Pre-law Studies 

Students planning to enter law school after graduation from Oglethorpe should realize 
that neither the American Bar Association nor leading law schools endorse a particular pre-law 
major. The student is advised, however, to take courses that enhance the basic skills of a UberaUv 
educated person: reading with comprehension, writing, speaking, and reasoning. The student is 
encouraged to become more familiar with political, economic, and social institutions as thev have 
developed historically and as they function in contemporary societ}'. 

Students interested in pursuing a legal career should ask the Registrar for the names of 
facult}' members serving as pre-law advisors. 

Pre-medical Studies 

A student who plans to attend a professional school of medicine, dentistry, optometry, 
pharmacy or veterinary medicine should plan a program of studies at Oglethorpe in consultation 
with a facult}' member who is a designated pre-medical advisor. It is desirable for the pre-medical 
student to have a pre-medical advisor from the outset of the planning of his or her undergraduate 
program. It is essential that the student establish contact with a pre-medical advisor by the second 
semester of the student's freshman year. 

Professional schools of health science require for admission successful completion of a 
specified sequence of courses in the natural sciences, courses in the humanities and social sciences, 
as well as the submission of acceptable scores on appropriate standardized tests. However, pre- 
medical smdents have wide latitude of choice with regard to the major selected. Smdents should 
familiarize themselves with the particular admission requirements of the t}^e of professional 
school they plan to enter prior to deciding on the course of study to be pursued at Oglethorpe. 
An excellent starting point for this preliminary study is "Health Professions Links" at 
http:/ / mm: naahp. org. 



183 



Some schools of medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine will admit highly qualified 
applicants who have completed all admission requirements for the professional school during 
three years of study at an undergraduate institution. (Four years of undergraduate work and a 
bachelor's degree are standard requirements; admission after three years is highly at}-pical and is 
not available at aU schools.) It is possible for students to enter an allopathic, osteopathic or 
pediatric medical school, dental school or veterinary school (no other health professions schools 
are eligible) after three years of study at Oglethorpe and to complete their bachelor's degree under 
the Professional Option. By specific arrangement between the professional school and 
Oglethorpe University, and in accordance with regulations of both institutions, after successful 
completion of all academic requirements of the first year in the professional school, the student 
receives a degree from Oglethorpe University when certified to be in good standing at the 
professional school. Students interested in this possibility should consult with their ad\'isors to 
make certain that all conditions are met; simultaneous enrollment in several science courses each 
semester during the three years at Oglethorpe likely wiU be required to meet minimum 
expectations for taking professional school admissions tests and to meet admission requirements 
for the professional school. All Oglethorpe core courses must be completed before the student 
enrolls in the professional school. 

An important note for international smdents: It is extremely difficult for international 
applicants who are not citizens or permanent residents of the United States to gain admission to 
American medical schools. State-supported medical schools rarely consider international 
applicants; private medical schools that accept international applicants generally require them to 
place in escrow the equivalent of one to four years tuition and fees (U.S. $40,000 to $200,000). 
There are very few scholarships available to support any students at American medical schools; in 
order to qualify for loans that are sponsored by the United States government, the applicant must 
be a citizen or permanent resident. International students who plan to become medical doctors 
by completing their education at an American medical school should consider these issues verv 
carefuUy before enrolling in an undergraduate pre-medical program in the United States. 

Psychology 

The Department of Psychology endorses a view of psychology as the use of scientific 
methods to study a broad range of factors that often interact to produce human behavior, 
including cognitive, developmental, personality, physiological, and social variables. Therefore, 
students who major in psychology are expected to: 

1 . Learn to apply empirical methods to understand human and animal beha^^or. Smdents 
should be able to use and critique a variety of research methods, ranging from controlled 
laboratory experiments to naturalistic observations. Specific skills to be acquired include 
the ability to operationally define concepts for empirical study; to collect, analyze, and 
interpret empirical data; and to clearl}' communicate findings to larger audiences through 
oral and written presentations (for example, APA st^de research papers, posters, and 
presentations). 

2. Learn major theoretical and empirical advances in a variet)' of disciplines uitliin the field 
of psychology (for example, clinical, cognitive, developmental, motivational, 
organizational, personality, physiological, social). This objective should include the 
abiUt)' to compare and contrast explanations offered by different schools of thought 
within each discipline (for example, behavioral, biological, cognitive, dispositional, 
psychoanalytic, social learning). It also should include an understanding of both current 
and historically prominent developments in the various disciplines. 



184 



3. Learn ways in which psychological concepts can be applied for the benefit of oneself 
and society. Students will learn about clinical, educational and organizational 
applications of psychological research and will consider ways in which psychological 
principles may be relevant to personal life and civic participation. In addition, students 
are expected to become more precise and tolerant observers of human behavior and 
individual differences. 

The Department of Psychology at Oglethorpe Universit}' has a strong tradition of 
student achievement in research and internships. Many students collaborate with facult)' on 
research projects or develop and complete their own research projects with the help of faculty 
mentors. Each year, Oglethorpe is represented at regional and national psychology conferences by 
psychology students presenting their original work. Psychology students have completed 
internships in a variet}" of settings including: private clinical practices, adoption agencies, law 
enforcement agencies, law firms, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Partnership 
Against Domestic Violence, Georgia State Universit}- Language Research Center, Zoo Adanta, 
Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center, and the Georgia Psychological Association. 

Major 

To complete a major in psychology, the student must complete nine psychology courses 
(36 semester hours) beyond Psychological Inquiry. These nine courses must include Statistics, 
Research Methods, Advanced Experimental Psychology, and History and Systems of Psychology. 
Psychology majors also are required to complete General Biologv I and II as directed electives and 
at least one semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary-level or higher. The 
degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. Transfer courses may satisfy major requirements if 
approved by psychology facult)', if shown on an official transcript and if the work was completed 
with a grade of "C" or higher. Any course taken outside of the undergraduate day program to 
satisfy degree requirements must be approved by the psychology department. 

Minor 

A minor in psychology consists of any four psychology courses (20 semester hours) 
beyond Psychological Inquiry. No course can be used to satisfy- both major and minor 
requirements. 

PSY 101. Psychological Inquiry 4 hours 

This course presents a unique way of understanding ourselves: the use of the empirical 
method to obtain information about human and animal beha\aor. Psychological experimentation 
win be shown to contribute to human self-understanding through its production of interesting, 
reliable, and often counter-intuitive results. Topics to be considered may include obedience to 
authority, memory, alcohoHsm, persuasion, intelligence, and dreaming. These topics will be 
examined from a variety of potentially conflicting perspectives: behavioral, cognitive, 
developmental, biological, and psychoanalytic. 

PSY 201. Developmental Psychology 4 hours 

The ways in which individuals understand the world and each other change dramatically 
from birth to adolescence. This course will trace these developments, particularly those of 
cognition, social behavior, and self-concept. The factors influencing development, such as 
heredity and the social/cultural environment, will be emphasized. Prerequisite: PSY 101 uith a 
grade of "C-" or higher. 



185 



EDU 201. Educational Psychology 4 hours 

A study of learning theory and its application to such problems as classroom 
management, the organization of learning activities, understanding individual differences, and 
evaluating teaching and learning. Emphasis is given to factors which facilitate and interfere with 
learning. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C" or higher. 

PSY 202. Organizational Psychology 4 hours 

Organizations and the individuals who function within them will be examined from the 
perspective of psychological theory and research. Consideration will be given both to broad topics 
relevant to all organizations, such as communications, groups, and leadership, and to topics 
specific to the work environment, such as employee selection, training, and evaluation. 
Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 203. Learning and Conditioning 4 hours 

This course examines the empirical and theoretical issues surrounding learned behavior. 
Most of the data discussed come from studies in animal learning but special emphasis will be 
placed on how learning principles explain everyday human behavior and are used in the treatment 
of abnormal behavior patterns. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 204. Social Psychology 4 hours 

Social psychology is the study of human beings in interaction with each other or under 
the pressure of forces of social influence. The course will include a consideration of conformity, 
persuasion, attraction, aggression, self-presentation, and other relevant aspects of the social life. 
Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 205. Theories of Personality 4 hours 

The goal of this course is to acquaint the student with the major theories of personality" 
and with approaches to the scientific evaluation of them. Students will be encouraged to engage 
in critical analysis and theoretical comparisons of the ideas presented from diverse, and often 
contradictory, perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 301. Research Methods 4 hours 

Through a combination of class discussion and hands-on research activit\', this course 
provides students with exposure to a variet}' of research approaches. The course begins with an 
examination of descriptive methods, such as naturalistic observation, surveys, and archival 
research, and concludes with an analysis of controlled experimental methods. Quasi-experimental 
designs and applications of research methods are also explored. Prerequisites: PSY 101 with a 
grade of "C-" or higher and MAT HI. 

PSY 302. Advanced Experimental Psychology 4 hours 

This sequel to the introductory research methods course provides an in-depth 
analysis of controlled experimentation in a laboratory setting. Each student will design and 
conduct an individual research project to fulfill the laboratory component of the course. 
Prerequisite: PSY 301. 



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PSY 303. Psychological Testing 4 hours 

This course covers the selecdon, interpretation, and applications of psychological tests, 
including tests of intellectual ability, vocational and academic apdtudes, and personality. The 
most common uses of test results in educational institutions, clinical settings, business, 
government, and the military will be considered. The history of psychological testing and the 
interpretation of test results also will be considered from both traditional and cridcal 
perspectives. Although students will have the opportunity to see many psychological tests, this 
course is not intended to train students actually to administer tests. Prerequisites: PSY 101 with 
a grade of "C-" or higher and MAT 111. 

PSY 306. Abnormal Psychology 4 hours 

There are three main goals in this course. The first is to enhance the student's 
understanding of psychopathology and major treatment approaches. The second is to help the 
student learn to evaluate critically the research evidence regarding therapeutic interventions. The 
third is to encourage a self-examination of the student's attitudes and those of our society 
regarding mental illness and the full range of human individual differences. Prerequisites: PSY 101 
with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 307. Cognitive Psychology 4 hours 

This course explores the nature and function of human thought processes. Topics to 
be considered include perception, attention, remembering and forgetting, mental imagery, 
psycholinguistics, problem solving, and reasoning. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" 
or higher. 

PSY 308. Sensation and Perception 4 hours 

This course explores how the brain and body transduce, organize, and interpret 
information from the environment. Topics covered will include psychophysical methods, signal 
detection theory, and the neural mechanisms underlying vision, hearing, taste, smell, and touch. 
Prerequisites: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher and BIO 102. (Biologv majors only need 
BIO 102.) 

PSY 309. Behavioral Neuroscience 4 hours 

This course focuses on the neural and hormonal correlates of behavior including sleep, 
feeding, sexual behavior, learning and memory, language, movement, and psvchopathology 
including mood disorders and schizophrenia. Other topics include methods used in the brain 
sciences, the connection between stress and Ulness, and how the brain recovers from injury. 
Prerequisites: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher and BIO 102. (Biology majors only need 
BIO 102.) 

PSY 401. Special Topics in Psychology 4 hours 

The seminar will provide examination and discussion of various topics of contemporary 
interest in psjxhology. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 



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PSY402. Topics in Clinical Psychology 4 hours 

The focus of the course is on the examination and discussion of topics of 
contemporary interest in clinical psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 306. 

PSY 403. Drugs, the Brain, and Behavior 4 hours 

This course examines the effects of psychoactive drugs on the central nervous system 
and behavior. Both recreational and illicit drugs (opiods, stimulants, sedatives, hallucinogens) and 
those used to treat mental disorders (antianxiety' agents, antidepressants, antipsychotics) will be 
covered. Drug action at the synaptic level, dose-response functions, tolerance and sensitization, 
and toxicity will be discussed. Prerequisites: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher and BIO 102. 
(Biology majors only need BIO 102.) 

PSY 405. History and Systems of Psychology 4 hours 

A study of the historic development of modern psychology, this course covers its 
philosophical and scientific ancestry, the major schools of thought, the contemporary systems of 
psychology, and their theoretical and empirical differences. Recommended for the senior year. 
Prerequisites: Two or more psychology courses and senior status or permission of the instructor. 

PSY 406. Directed Research in Psychology 4 hours 

Original investigations and detailed studies of the literature in selected areas of 
psychology will be supervised by a faculty member. Emphasis will be on original research. 
Prerequisites: PSY 301 and permission of the instructor. 

PSY 407. Internship in Psychology 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning oppormnit}' to 
qualified students. The internship generaUy requires the student to obtain a faculty' super\'isor in 
the relevant field of smdy, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities mentioned in the 
major overview. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the 
faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program. 

PSY 408. Independent Study in Psychology 1-4 hours 

This course provides the opportunit}' for an intense study of diverse topics under tlie 
direct supervision of the instructor. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of smdy that 
includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the di\-ision chair, 
and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

Sociology 

Sociology is the study of human society culture, and conduct from a variets' of 
perspectives that include interpersonal, instimtional, and aggregate levels of analyses. At the 
interpersonal level, sociologists may study personalit\' formation in social contexts or how the 
individual responds to social opportunities and constraints. At the institutional level, sociologists 
attempt to analyze social institutions (such as the family, religion, and the state) and social structures 



188 



(such as social classes and racial and ethnic stratification) that shape human conduct. And at the 
aggregate level, sociology focuses on the study of large-scale influences ranging from 
demograpliics to social movements to cultural systems. 

The mission of the sociology facult}' at Oglethorpe is to introduce students to such 
studies within a liberal arts setting by developing each student's analytical, writing, speaking, and 
methodological skills, as well as his or her ability to comprehend and explicate difficult texts. 
Sociology majors should be able, through written and oral analyses, to make arguments whose 
conclusions follow from evidence carefully and logically presented. They should be able to 
distinguish between informed and uninformed opinion. In addition, each sociology student at 
Oglethorpe will be expected to master essential knowledge within the areas of sociological 
theory, research methodology, and statistics, and within at least three content areas. In order to 
encourage a practical understanding of social problems and institutions, students, where 
appropriate, are urged to seek internships. Students bound for graduate school are encouraged 
to master a foreign language. 

Major 

The sociology major consists of a minimum of nine sociology courses (36 semester 
hours) beyond Human Nature and the Social Order I and II. These nine courses must include 
Introduction to Sociology, Statistics, Research Methods, Sociological Theory, and five additional 
sociology courses selected by the student. Of the nine courses, at least six must be completed at 
Oglethorpe for a major in sociology. Human Namre and the Social Order I and II must be 
completed by all majors who enter Oglethorpe below the junior level. In addition, at least one 
semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary-level or higher is required. The 
degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

A minor in sociology consists of Introduction to Sociology and any other three sociology 
courses (16 semester hours) beyond Human Nature and the Social Order I and II. No course can 
be used to satisfy both major and minor requirements. Of the four sociology courses, at least three 
must be completed at Oglethorpe for a minor in sociology. 

Sociology with Social Work Concentration 

Major 

A major in sociology with a concentration in social work consists of seven courses (28 
semester hours) beyond Human Nature and the Social Order I and II, in addition to a semester 
of field placement (16 semester hours). Required courses include Introduction to Sociologv, Field 
of Social Work, and Methods of Social Work, in addition to four sociologv electives. Successful 
completion of at least one semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementarv-level 
or higher also is required. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology 4 hours 

This course offers an introduction to topics central to the study of human societ}', 
culture, and conduct. Selected fields of study frequentiy include culture, formation of the self, 
social classes, power structures, social movements, criminal beha\ior, and a variet}' of social 
institutions. Emphasis is placed upon basic concepts and principal findings of the field. Offered 
annually. 



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SOC 201. The Family 4 hours 

This course focuses primarily on the 20*-centxiry American family. The topics discussed 
include trends in marriage, the age of marriage, fertility, illegitimacy, divorce, remarriage, and 
domestic abuse. The possible social and economic causes and consequences of these trends are 
also discussed. Offered annually. 

SOC 202. The American Experience 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with basic aspects of the American 
experience. Special attention is paid to the individual's relationship to the community'. Specific 
topics of discussion include Populism, Federalism, the role of advertising in folk culture, the 
relationship of technology and democracy, and America's exploring spirit. Offered bienniall)-. 

SOC 204. Social Problems 4 hours 

This course studies the impact of current social forces upon American societ\'. 
Deviation from social norms, conflict concerning social goals and values, and social 
disorganization as these apply to family, economic, religious, and other insdtutional and 
interpersonal situations are of primary concern. Offered biennially. 

SOC 205. Crime and Deviance 4 hours 

This course will examine behaviors that do not conform to moral and legal codes and 
the ways in which sociedes control such behaviors. Particular emphasis will be given to 
American society. Readings will include classic and current analyses of deviance and crime. 
Offered biennially. 

SOC 302. The Sociology of Work and Occupations 4 hours 

This course has three purposes: first, to analyze the means by which non-economic 
institutions, especially the family, schools, and religious institutions influence the formation of 
"human capital;" second, to smdy the history and contemporary nature of the professions; and 
third, to analyze the relationship between the external control of workers and their internal 
motivation. A cross-cultural approach is employed in the course. Offered bienniallv. 

SOC 303. Field of Social Work 4 hours 

This course wiU study and analyze the historical development of social work and social 
work activities in contemporary societ}'. Offered biennially. 

ULP 303. The New American City 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and 
policymaking in the new American cit}' and its environs. Consideration will be given to the political 
and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new development, 
including the extremes of wealth and povert\', the mix of racial and ethnic groups, and die 
oppormnities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and technology. Offered 
biennially. 



190 



SOC 304. Methods of Social Work 4 hours 

This course is a study of the methods used in contemporary social work. Offered 
biennially. Prerequisite: SOC 303. 

SOC 305. Film and Society 4 hours 

This course is designed to help students analyze and interpret films from the 
perspectives of social theory. Emphasis will be placed upon exploring visions of the self and 
society in a variety of film genres, including mysteries, comedies, film noir, westerns, musicals, etc. 
Films studied in recent classes include Citizen Kane, \-^ertigo, The Maltese Falcon, R£d River, Cabaret, 
and others. Offered biennially. 

SOC 306. Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration 4 hours 

This course treats contemporary ethnic relations and the history of immigration in the 
United States. It considers the role of markets, government policy, and culture in the formation 
of ethnic identity' and the well being of ethnic groups. 7\lthough the chief concern is with the 
United States, a comparative approach is taken. Offered biennially. 

SOC 307. EUtes and Inequality 4 hours 

An examination is made in this course of the social stratification of privileges and 
deprivations in contemporary societies, focusing on the distribution of wealth, status, and power. 
The course studies social stratification historically and comparatively, the American upper, middle, 
and lower classes, institutionalized power elites, race and gender stratification, status systems, and 
economic inequalit}^. Offered biennially. 

SOC 308. Culture and Society 4 hours 

A study of the dynamics of traditional, modern, and postmodern cultures that focuses 
on the analysis of symbolic forms and boundaries, social memory, ceremonies and rituals, bodily 
habits, cultural elites, and cultural revolutions. Special attention is given to "culture wars," the 
impact of mass media, and postmodernism in contemporary societies. The course is comparative 
in approach. Offered bienniallv 

SOC 309. Religion and Society 4 hours 

This course will examine religion as a social institution, its internal development, 
relationship to other institutions, and its cultural and social significance in modern and traditional 
societies. Special attention will be given to the conflict between spirit and institution in 
Christianit)'; the rise and decline of denominationalism; contemporary forms of spiritualit}-; the 
modern psychologization of religion, and the comparative study of religions. Offered biennially. 

SOC 401. Nations and NationaUsm 4 hours 

This course examines the rise and persistence of nation-states and nationalism in the 
modern world. Theories of nationalism, nationalist visions, and case studies of particular nations, 
including France, Germany, and Russia will be covered. Topics to be addressed include radical 
nationalism (for example, Nazism and Fascism), problems of national "self-determination," 
Zionism, and the fall of Communism. 



191 



SOC 402. Field Experience in Social Work 16 hours 

Students concentrating in social work spend a semester in social work agencies in the 
Adanta area for on-the-job practicum experience. Successful field placements have been made in 
a variety of settings in recent years, including Wesley Woods Health Center, West Paces Ferry 
Hospital, and Adanta shelters for the homeless. Prerequisites: SOC 303, permission of the 
academic advisor and faculty supervisor, and signature of the Director of Career Services. 

SOC 403. Sociological Theory 4 hours 

This course will study classical and contemporary theory with an emphasis upon the 
latter. Contemporary theories covered usually include utilitarian individualism (sociobiology, 
exchange theory, and rational-choice theory), communitarianism, civil societ}^ theor}'^, critical 
theory, and post-modernism. Offered biennially. 

SOC 404. Special Topics in Sociology 4 hours 

A seminar providing examination and discussion of various topics on contemporary' and 
historical interest in sociology. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

SOC 405. Internship in Sociology 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity,' to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult}' super\asor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. \X ritten 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive Hst of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including opportunities at the 
Gainesville/Hall Senior Center, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, and the Parmership Against 
Domestic Violence. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of 
the facult}' supervisor and qualitlcation for the internship program. 

SOC 406. Independent Study in Sociology 1-4 hours 

An intense study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of the instructor. 
Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and 
assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair, and the Provost and Senior Mce 
President prior to registration. 

SOC 407. Internship in American Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity' to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facuIt^' super\'isor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings u'ith die 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. \Xritten 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. \n extensive Hst of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactorv 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the facult)' superx-isor and qualification for the internship 
program. 



192 



Spanish 

A student who chooses Spanish as a major uill gain valuable knowledge, not only about 
the language, but also about the many unique and fascinating cultures represented in the Spanish- 
speaking world. Like all languages offered at Oglethorpe, the Spanish major is informed by "the 
five C's": communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. These areas 
represent the defined goals of the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. 

The journey toward a Spanish major begins with a thorough emphasis on reading, 
writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. These essential skills prepare the student with the 
foundations for communicating in diverse contexts in the Spanish language. More advanced smdv 
of Spanish will enable the student to explore the treasures of Hispanic prose, poetry, drama and 
cinema, in addition to the study of colorful and intriguing Hispanic civilizations in Spain, Africa 
and Latin America. Through the course offerings in Spanish, students become more informed 
about America's Latino and fiispanic neighbors, in addition to becoming more functional global 
citizens. 

Once students have reached an adequate level of proficiency in Spanish and have 
become familiar with Spanish-speaking populations and societies, they will be ready to 
complement their classroom studies with full-immersion study abroad opportunities. As an 
invaluable component of the Spanish major, students are required to study and live in a Spanish- 
speaking country for a semester during the academic year following the completion of an initial 
sequence of courses taken in the program. Most majors choose to study at one of a number of 
parmer institutions such as the Universidad de Belgrano (Argentina), the Universidad de San 
Francisco de Quito (Ecuador) or at the Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de 
Occidente (Mexico). In addition, for the adventurous student, there are many other creative study 
abroad options available, all of which can be discussed with student advisors. Native speakers of 
Spanish are in\'ited to complete the 12-semester hour requirements of studv abroad in courses at 
Oglethorpe or through cross registration at one of the Adanta Regional Consortium for Pligher 
Education (ARCHE) institutions. 

Many students who complete the Spanish major at Oglethorpe go on to carry out 
graduate programs at other institutions in Spanish language and literature, linguistics, Hispanic 
cultural studies, or International Relations. Other graduates from the program become Spanish 
instructors or find opportunities in corporate or non-profit organizations, where thev continue to 
apply their language skills and global experiences. Students are also in\nted to combine a double 
major in Spanish with other disciplines, a combination which greatiy enhances student 
marketabUit}' after graduation. 

Ail smdents with pre\ious study or experience in Spanish must take a language 
placement examination. Thev will be placed in the course sequence according to their competence. 
Under no circumstance should students with past experience in Spanish place themselves in 
courses, especially at the elementary level. Students are not eligible to enroll in elementary and 
intermediate courses in their native languages. 



193 



Major 

Students who major in Spanish must first complete the following requirements: 
SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish 
SPN 301 Advanced Spanish 
SPN 302 Introducdon to Hispanic Literature 

Students will then complete a semester in an approved study abroad program, which 
should include a minimum of 12 semester hours. Returning students must complete three upper- 
level (300 or 400) courses in Spanish. 

Elementary French I or equivalent as determined through the French placement test is 
also required. It is recommended that this requirement be completed during the student's first tu'o 
years. 

The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 
Minor 

A minor in Spanish consists of the following requirements: 
SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish 
Three upper-level courses (300 or 400) 

Certain of these requirements may be met through an approved study abroad program. 

SPN 101, SPN 102. Elementary Spanish I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

These courses are an introduction to understanding, speaking, reading, and writing 
Spanish. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring a foundation in basic grammar as well as on 
listening comprehension and spoken Spanish through class activities, tapes, and videos. 
Prerequisite: None for SPN 101; SPN 101 required for SPN 102, or placement by testing. 

SPN 201. Intermediate Spanish , 4 hours 

This course is intended to review basic grammar and develop more complex patterns of 
written and spoken Spanish. Short compositions, readings from Spanish and Spanish-American 
literature and class discussions require active use of students' acquired knowledge of Spanish and 
form the basis for the expansion of vocabulary and oral expression. Prerequisite: SPN 102 or 
placement by testing. 

SPN 301. Advanced Spanish 4 hours 

TWs course is designed to improve students' skiUs to a sophisticated level at which they 
are able to discuss and express opinions in both oral and written form. Readings of essays and 
short-stories as well as film viewing in Spanish are used as the basis for discussion, introduction 
to cultural issues, and written expression. Frequent writing assignments. Prerequisite: SPN 20 lor 
placement by testing. 

SPN 302. Introduction to Hispanic Literature 4 hours 

This course offers an introduction to literary analysis based on a rigorous program, of 
readings from Spanish and Spanish American Literatures. It is a skills-building course that 
familiarizes students with the lexicon of literary criticism in Spanish and trains diem to be active 
readers of Hispanic literature. Students read and analyze (orally and in writing) representative 
works of the four fundamental genres of literature: Narrative, Poetry, Drama, and Essay. Taught 
in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 301 or placement by testing. 



194 



SPN 305. Spanish for International Relations and Business 4 hours 

In this course students will learn vocabulary appropriate to the world of international 
relations and business in order to understand both oral and written material on relevant issues. 
Students will read and discuss articles and newspapers in Spanish and explore common cross- 
cultural clashes and misunderstandings in order to improve intercultural communications as a 
means of succeeding in the global marketplace. When possible, there will be Spanish-speaking 
guests from the diplomatic and business communides of Adanta. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 
SPN 301 or placement by testing. 

SPN 401. Special Topics in Hispanic Languages, Literatures, 

and Cultures 4 hours 

This course provides the opportunit}^ to study particular aspects of the languages, 
literatures and cultures of Spain, Spanish America or United States Hispanic communities not 
covered in the other courses. This course may be repeated for credit as course content changes. 
Prerequisite: SPN 301. 

SPN 403. Political Issues in Spanish American Literature and Film 4 hours 

The social and political upheavals that took place in several Spanish American countries 
during the 20* century spawned the development of a rich literary and cinematic corpus. This 
course wiU examine part of that corpus in its historical and cultural context and how political 
issues are aesthetically elaborated in fiction, poetry, essay and film. Among the topics to be 
studied are revolution, testimony, exile, and the Other as a figure of resistance. Taught in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: SPN 302. 

SPN 404. Discourse of Golden-age Spain 4 hours 

In this course, students will analyze Golden-age Spanish societ}' through the literature 
produced during the 16* and 17* centuries, the two epochs that encompass the Spanish Siglos de 
Oro. Studied texts will reveal a young Spain altogether confident about its present, at times 
insecure about its future, and frequ.endy ambivalent about its diverse past. Prerequisite: SPN 302. 

SPN 405. 20*-Century Spanish American Literature 4 hours 

This is a study of Spanish American literature from the 1930s to the present, focusing 
on its departure from the Realist tradition and its adoption of experimentation, self-reflection, 
parod}; magical realism or the fantastic. Modern and post-modern trends will be examined. 
Readings include fiction by Borges, Fuentes, Cortazar, Garcia Marquez, and Puig. Taught in 
Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 302. 

SPN 410. The Development of Latin American Cultures 4 hours 

This course introduces students to the diverse cultural heritage of Latin America pajdng 
special attention to the impact and consequences of the encounter between European, Native and 
African cultures in art, politics, and religion. Ivlanifestations of culmral syncretism and diversit}' 
from the times of the Spanish conquest and colonization to the post-colonial polemics of cultural 
identit}' will be examined. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 302. 



195 



Theatre 

Students majoring in theatre concentrate their efforts in the areas of performance and 
directing. Additional courses in theatre history and stagecraft, combined with Oglethorpe's 
internship program, offer a study in theatre that is interactive in approach and broad in scope. The 
department's unique relationship with the Georgia Shakespeare Festival also provides qualified 
students with performance oppormnities unparalleled by any school in the region. Those entering 
Oglethorpe with a background in theatre, as well as students with an interest but no experience, 
wiU find ample opportunities in the theatre program to develop their skills and expertise. 

The Oglethorpe University theatre program is dedicated to presenting stimulating and 
enjoyable theatre for audiences of all types and ages, and integrating theatre into Oglethorpe 
University's academic curriculum. Mounting five fuU productions per school year, the program 
pursues an artistic poHcy that celebrates the diversity of its dramatic heritage by engaging texts of 
diverse periods, cultures, and st}'les. Through The Playmakers (the theatre program's official 
performance company), laboratory opportunities are provided as students and facult^' come 
together to create live performance events for the campus communit}' and the city of Atianta. 

Major 

Smdents pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree are required to complete the following 
courses: 

THE 105 Beginning Characterization 

THE 205 Intermediate Characterization 

THE 210 Theatre History I: Greeks to Restoration 

THE 220 Theatre History II: Renaissance to 20* Century 

THE 305 Advanced Characterization 

THE 310 Stagecraft 

THE 330 Directing for the Stage I 

THE 340 Directing for the Stage II 

THE 407 Internship in Theatre 
In addition, students must choose two from among the following: 

ENG 202 Shakespeare 

ENG 306 Special Topics in Drama 

THE 320 Special Topics in Theatre 

THE 408 Independent Study in Theatre 

Minor 

A theatre minor serves as an appropriate complement to a varietA' of majors in 
communications and the humanities. Smdents are required to take the following courses: 

THE 105 Beginning Characterization 

THE 205 Intermediate Characterization 

THE 310 Stagecraft 
Students must complete one of the follouing: 

THE 210 Theatre History I: Greeks to Restoration 

THE 220 Theatre History II: Renaissance to 20* Cenmry 
Students must complete one from among the following: 

ENG 202 Shakespeare 

ENG 306 Special Topics in Drama 

THE 320 Special Topics in Theatre 

THE 407 Internsliip in Theatre 

196 



THE 105. Beginning Characterization 4 hours 

This course explores the physical and mental foundations necessary for successful stage 
performance. Students will be expected to engage in hands-on exercises, physical and vocal warm- 
ups, and performance work (both individual and partnered) throughout the semester. The basic 
principles of the Stanislavski method will be explored through stage combat, mime, movement, 
vocalization, and contemporary characterization. 

THE 205. Intermediate Characterization 4 hours 

Intermediate Characterization is a studio intensive course that explores the methods of 
20*-century American acting teacher Sanford Meisner. This course is designed to provide 
students with an in-depth understanding of his approach to acting, which builds upon tenets put 
forth by Constandn Stanislavski. Meisner's training approaches will be uncovered through 
immersive studio exercises, in-depth scene study assignments, and review and discussion of 
Meisner's seminal book Sanford Meisner on Acting, as well as other related literature. Prerequisite: 
THE 105. 

THE 210. Theatre History I: Greeks to Restoration 4 hours 

An in-depth study of theatrical history, examining not only the theatrical literature of 
particular periods, but the staging practices, costuming, social customs and performance st}'les as 
well. Periods covered include: Greek, Roman, Medieval, Elizabethan, and Restoration. 

THE 220. Theatre History II: Renaissance to 20'^ Century 4 hours 

An in-depth smdy of theatrical history, examining not only the theatrical literature of 
particular periods, but the staging practices, costuming, social customs and performance sts'les as 
well. Periods and styles covered include: Renaissance, Neo-classic, Sentimental Comedy, Domestic 
Tragedy, Melodrama, and Realism. 

THE 305. Advanced Characterization 4 hours 

This course affords the advanced theatre student an opportunit}' to explore methods 
for rehearsing and performing texts written by William Shakespeare. With a focus on the 
practical demands of Shakespeare's language, the course addresses technical, stylistic, historical 
and interpretive considerations as they relate to the feat of performance. This course builds 
upon the student's understanding of Stanislavkian acting with the assumption that, despite 
formal differences, Shakespearean texts can be approached with psvchological-reaHst tactics. 
Prerequisite: THE 205. 

THE 310. Stagecraft 4 hours 

Stagecraft provides hands-on experience and assignments designed to physically and 
mentally engage the technician and designer. This class will focus on historical perspective as well 
as individual research and design. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a mid-term 
examination, written assignments, the completion of a minimum number of practicum hours and 
a final design project. 

THE 320. Special Topics in Theatre 4 hours 

This course will be a study of a selected topic in theatre and/or film, such as Feminist 
Theatre, Shakespeare in Performance, Gender in Performance, The Hero in American FUm, or 
Holl}'wood's Treatment of Women. Prerequisite: THE 105 or permission of the instructor. 



197 



THE 330. Directing for the Stage I 4 hours 

This course offers the intermediate to advanced theatre student an opportunity' to 
explore the foundations of directing texted material for live theatrical performance. The primary 
focus of this course will be on experiential learning rather than abstract study. The course provides 
practical experience with the three preparatory phases of directing: research, analysis and 
conceptualization. Prerequisite: THE 205. 

THE 340. Directing for the Stage II 4 hours 

This course serves as the studio practicum for Directing for the Stage I, culminating in 
performances staged as part of the Oglethorpe Universit}' theatre season. The work of individual 
students will be scheduled accordingly. All student work will be evaluated by a faculty panel. 
Prerequisite: THE 330. 

THE 407. Internship in Theatre 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunit\' to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult\' super\'isor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. Internships are available 
at most of the 147 Atianta Coalition for Performing Arts member theatres. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the facult}' supervisor and 
qualification for the internship program. 

THE 408. Independent Study in Theatre 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of smdy that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the 
division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

Women's and Gender Studies 

Wcjmens and Gender Studies is intended to introduce the smdent to the liistory of 
women and to the effects of gender on the forms of and approaches to disciplinary study and 
practice. 

Minor 

Five courses must be completed, one of which must be either Introduction to Women's 
Studies — Theory or Introduction to Women's Studies — History. Students must select courses 
from at least three different disciplines in addition to courses identified as W GS courses. Examples 
of other courses applicable to the minor are as follows: 

CRS 390 Advanced Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies: 

Women in the History of Rhetoric 
CRS 390 Advanced Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies: 

Gender and Communication 
ECO 424 Labor Economics 
ENG 304 Images of Women in Literature 
ENG 312 Special Topics in Literature and Culture: Gender and 
Autobiography 



198 



ENG 312 Special Topics in Literature and Culture: Contemporary 

Women Writers 
ENG 314 Special Topics in Major British and American Authors: Jane 

Austen 
PRE 404 Great French Actresses and Their Film Roles 
MUS 430 Special Topics in Music: Women in Music 
PSY 401 Special Topics in Psychology: Gendering (Social 

Constructions of Gender) 
PSY 401 Special Topics in Psychology: Psychology of Women 
SOC201 The Family 
SPN 401 Special Topics in Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and 

Cultures: Contemporary Ladn American Women Writers 
THE 320 Special Topics in Theatre: Feminist Theatre 
THE 320 Special Topics in Theatre: The Good, the Bad, and the 

Beautiful — Holl}^wood's Treatment of Women 

WGS 301. Introduction to Women's Studies — Theory 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to examine the diverse theoretical approaches which have 
evolved as scholars and activists have endeavored to incorporate the concerns and experiences of 
diverse groups of women into dominant world \'iews. The seminar will explore the issues of race, 
class, and gender, paying close attention to how these variables affect the development of women's 
identities and relationships. 

WGS 302. Introduction to Women's Studies — History 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to explore the history of feminism. By examining a wide 
range of texts, this seminar will investigate the development of ideas, which have come to be 
recognized as feminist-womanist and the discipline that has developed into women's studies in the 
context of Western civilization. Included will be Raine Eisler's The Chalice and the Blade, which 
examines the position on women in the beginnings of civilization, Mary Wollstonecrafts's 
Vindication of the Rights of Women (1792), Mary Beard's Women as a Force in History, De Beauvoir's 
The Second Sex, Susan Faludi's Backlash, and Ellen Carol Dubois's Unequal Sisters: A Multi-Cultural 
Reader in U.S. Women's Histo/y. 

WGS 303. The Literature and History of Immigrant and Minority Women 

in America 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to explore the experiences of immigrant and minorit}' 
women in North America from the interdisciplinary perspectives of history, literature, and 
women's studies. Through extensive reading, discussion, and research this seminar will attempt to 
recapture women's sense of their own identities in relation to the dominant ideologies of race, 
class, and gender. 

WGS 304. Women Poets 4 hours 

This course is a survey of poetry by women, from ancient Chinese, Persian, and others 
in translation, to medieval Irish and Renaissance English, to 19*- and 20*-century Americans, as 
well as Eastern Europeans and Latin Americans in translation. Included will be several recent 
poets such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich, and Mary Oliver in order to discover what 
themes, images, and attitudes seem to emerge from the works. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 
102. 



199 



WGS 305. Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies 4 hours 

This course is intended to introduce the student to the study of women and gender. 
Special emphasis is placed on the intersection of gender with the epistemological foundations of 
other disciplines, and on the theory and practice of the study of gender. Courses are not limited 
to, for example, Southern Women's Literature and History, but will often be under the same rubric 
of other disciplines such as are listed under the requirements of the minor. 

WGS 400. Independent Study in Women's and Gender Studies 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the 
division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. 

FRE 404. Great French Actresses and Their Film Roles 4 hours 

This course will study French film actresses and their roles in an attempt to understand 
better the simation of women in France during the last half of the 20* cenmry. Readings from 
The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir, written at the outset of the period in question, provide a 
counterpoint to the cinematic fiction. Actresses smdied may include Isabelle Adjani, Arlett}', 
Fanny Ardant, Brigitte Bardot, Juliette Binoche, Sandrine Bonaire, Catherine Deneuve, Isabelle 
Huppert, Miou-Miou, Romy Scheider, and Simone Signoret. The course is conducted in English. 
Students may take the course as part of a French major or minor and complete readings, tests, and 
written work in French. Prerequisite: None for work in English, FRE 302 for work in French. 

WGS 407. Internship in Women's and Gender Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning oppormnit\' to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a facult}' super\'isor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Written 
work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of 
internships is maintained by the Career Services Office. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the facult}' supervisor and qualification for the internship 
program. 



200 



Writing 

Minor 

The writing minor offers two options: an eclectic selection of writing courses; or, a 
literary writing focus. 

The eclectic option encourages students to learn several kinds of writing according to 
their interests. This option is open to all students except those pursuing a minor or major in 
Communication and Rhetoric Studies. The eclectic option consists of five courses beyond 
Narratives of the Self I and II, one of which may be an internship: 

ARC 201 Seminar for Student Tutors (must be taken four times to 

constitute one writing minor course) 
CRS 220 Investigative Writing 
CRS 221 Persuasive Writing 
CRS 240 Journalism 

CRS 340 Writing for Business and the Professions 
CRS 401 Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Smdies (writing- 
intensive internship supervised by communication and 
rhetoric studies faculty member) 
ENG 230 Creative Writing 
ENG 231 Biography and Autobiography 
ENG 330 Writing Poetry 

ENG 331 Writing Prose, Fiction, and Nonfiction 
ENG 401 Internship in English (writing-intensive internship 

supervised by English faculty member) 
WRI 381 Independent Smdy in Writing 
WRI391 Special Topics in Writing 

A second option is a literary writing focus in which students write poetry, tlction, 
nonfiction, and other genres that may be offered under Special Topics in Writing or Independent 
Study in Writing. Students majoring in communication and rhetoric studies may take only this 
option for the writing minor, provided that no course is used both for the communication and 
rhetoric studies major and the literary writing option. The writing minor with focus on Literary 
writing consists of five of the following courses, one of which may be an internship: 

ENG 230 Creative Writing 

ENG 231 Biography and Autobiography 

ENG 330 Writing Poetry 

ENG 331 Writing Prose, Fiction, and Nonfiction 

ENG 401 Internship in English 

WRI 381 Independent Smdy in Writing 

WRI 391 Special Topics in Writing 

ARC 201. Seminar for Student Tutors 1 hour 

Peer tutors at the Academic Resource Center spend two hours per week assisting other 
smdents, individually or in groups, with course material, papers, and preparation for examinations. 
In addition, they participate in support and training meetings with the ARC directors and with 
instructors of the courses in which they mtor. They discuss how to work with texts in different 
disciplines, encourage smdy group members to help each other learn, and foster smdent 
engagement with and assimilation of course content. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Associate Provost for Smdent Achievement. 



201 



CRS 220. Investigative Writing , 4 hours 

This expository writing course is designed to develop research and writing skills. 
Emphasis will be on learning a wide range of library and Internet-based research techniques and 
purposefully presenting information to a variety of audiences in appropriate format and st}'le. 
Students will be asked to define their own investigative projects, and to analyze and revise their 
own writing. This course is recommended for freshmen and sophomores. Prerequisite: COR 101. 

CRS 221. Persuasive Writing 4 hours 

This course is designed to develop sophisticated strategies of persuasion for analyzing 
and generating arguments responsive to targeted audiences in a variety of contexts, including ci\ic, 
professional, and academic. Students will learn both classical and contemporary strategies of 
persuasion. Emphasis will be on presenting clear, coherent, and logical arguments. Students will 
be asked to define their own projects within assigned contexts. Smdents will evaluate their own 
and others' writing to enable the revision process. This course is open to sophomores, juniors, and 
seniors only. It is offered in the fall semester. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

ENG 230. Creative Writing 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to writing poetry and prose fiction. The smdent will be 
asked to submit substantial written work each week, keep a journal, and read published writers. 
Much class time will be spent discussing student and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101 and 
COR 102. 

ENG 231. Biography and Autobiography 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to biographical and autobiographical writing with practice 
in the personal narrative as well as other forms such as the profile and the interview. Students will 
submit substantial written work each week and keep a journal. The class uiU follow a workshop 
format, discussing the smdents' and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

CRS 240. Journalism 4 hours 

This course teaches the fundamentals of journalistic news writing and reporting. From 
interviews to the Internet, smdents will learn how to gather information from a variet\" of sources 
and write stories using different types of leads, endings, and strucmres. They will also engage in a 
critique of today's journalistic practices. This course is offered in the fall semester. Prerequisites: 
COR 101 and COR 102. 

ENG 330. Writing Poetry 4 hours 

In weekly assignments smdents will try free verse and various forms in the effort to 
discover and to embody more and more truly what they have to say. Much time uiU be spent 
reading published poets, responding to smdent work in class, and trying to generate language that 
reveals rather than explains intangible "meanings." Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

ENG 331. Writing Prose, Fiction, and Nonfiction 4 hours 

Students will get instruction and substantial practice in writing fictional and 
nontlctional prose which aims at getting what Henry James called "a sense of felt life" onto the 
page. The class will follow a workshop format with weekly assignments, journal writing, extensive 
discussion of smdent work, and reading of published examples. Prerequisites: COR 101 and 
COR 102. 



202 



CRS 340. Writing for Business and the Professions ^ 4 hours 

A course for students who have mastered the basic skills and insights of writing and 
who wish to improve their ability to write clear, concise, persuasive prose designed for audiences 
in business and the professions. Students are required to write a variety of texts, such as proposals, 
progress reports, recommendation reports, and manuals. Other elements of the course may 
include oral presentations. Prerequisite: CRS 220, CRS 221, or permission of the instructor. 

WRI 381. Independent Study in Writing 1-4 hours 

Supervised independent writing project. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the 
division chair, and the Provost and Senior Vice President prior to registration. The student must 
be pursuing a minor in writing or a major in communication and rhetoric studies. 

WRI 391. Special Topics in Writing 4 hours 

Study of a selected topic in the field of writing, such as Public Relations Writing, 
Scientific and Technical Writing, Oral History, and The Art of the Essay. The topic will vary from 
year to year and may be offered by communication and rhetoric smdies facult}' or English facult}'. 
Prerequisite for special topics taken with communication and rhetoric smdies faculty: CRS 101 or 
permission of the instructor. 

CRS 401. Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity' to 
qualified smdents. The internship generally requires the smdent to obtain a faculty super\'isor in 
the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic 
credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the 
faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. An 
internship for the writing minor must be writing intensive. Written work should total five pages of 
academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by the 
Career Services Office, including opportunities at CNN, Fox 5, WSB-TV, Green Olive Media, and 
The Atlanta journal Constitution. Smdents are strongly encouraged to do multiple internships, but 
only 4-semester hours can be applied as elective credits to the major. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty' supervisor and 
quaUtlcation for the internship program. 

ENG 401. Internship in English 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty- super\dsor 
in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of 
academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor, and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the 
internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. 
An extensive list of internships is maintained by the Career Services Office, including 
opportunities at Atlanta Magai^ine, The Knight Agency, and Peachtree Publishers. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty' super\'isor and 
qualification for the internship program. 



203 



University College 



Three of Oglethorpe's degrees — Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies, Bachelor of 
Business Administration, and Master of Business Administration — are degrees that ma}' be earned 
in programs of study offered through University CoUege. These distinctive programs are offered 
with the working professional in mind. Information on these programs is provided in the University 
College Bulletin and available from the University College Office, located in Goodman Hall. 

Undergraduate Program 

The undergraduate program within University' College offers a curriculum for the adult 
learner that builds on the foundation of a liberal arts education and aims to enhance the smdent's 
skills in critical thinking, communication, and basic academic competencies. The underlving \'ision 
of the College reflects the two-fold philosophical and institutional mission of Oglethorpe 
University and its commitment to "make a life and make a living." The degree requirements 
include general education requirements designed to assure that each graduate acquires a broad 
comprehensive liberal education. In addition, study in a major field and the integration of theorv 
and practice provides educational experiences that develop the student's chosen career. The total 
experience is designed to be of lasting benefit as a source for personal growth, professional 
renewal, and career advancement. 

Majors offered are: Accounting and Business Administration, leading to a Bachelor of 
Business Administration degree; Communications, History, Organizational Management, and 
Psychology, leading to a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies. 

Traditional undergraduate students may take Universit}' CoUege courses with written 
permission of their advisors and the Universit)^ CoUege administration. Traditional students who 
take University CoUege courses are subject to the rules and regulations set forth in the University 
College Bulletin. 

Graduate Program 

The primary purpose of the Master of Business Administration program is to 
provide graduates with the expertise necessary to become effective, professional leaders and 
managers in business and non-business organizations. The curriculum is designed to help smdents 
acquire an understanding of the context in which modern organizations operate, a knowledge of 
the content of management operations, and an appreciation of the interrelationships involved. 
The smdent wiU have an understanding of the economic, poUtical, and social en\'ironments in 
which organizations operate, domesticaUy and internationaUy, and the behavioral skiUs that are 
essential in the modern organizational environment. 



204 



Board of Trustees 



The University is under the control and direction of the Board of Trustees. Among 
the responsibilities of the Board are establishing broad institutional policies, contributing and 
securing financial resources to support adequately the institutional goals, and selecting the 
President. 



Officers 



Warren Y. Jobe 
Chair 



Harald R. Hansen 

Treasurer 



Belle Turner Lynch 

Vice Chair/ Chair Elect 



Susan M. Soper '69 
Secretary 



Trustees 



G. Douglass Alexander '68 
President 
Alexander Haas Martin and Partners 

Yetty L. Arp '68 
Associate Broker 
Southeast Commercial Properties 

A. Diane Baker '77 (ex-officio) 
Attorney at l^w 
Atianta 

Kenneth S. Chestnut 
Principal 
The Integral Group LLC 

Milton C. Clipper 

President and Chief Executive Officer 
Public Broadcasting Atianta 

Charles G DeNormandie II, CFP '96 
Senior Financial Advisor 
American Express Financial Advisors Inc. 
IDS Life Insurance Company 



William A. Emerson 

Retired Senior l-lce President 
Merrill Lynch Pierce, Fenner 

and Smith 
St. Petersburg, Florida 

Norman P. Findley 

Executive I "ice President, Aiarketing 
Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. 

Lewis J. Glenn '71 

President and Chief Executive Officer 
Harry Norman Realtors 

Joel Goldberg 
President 
The Rich Foundation 

William R. GoodeU 
President 
The Robertson Foundation 

Jack Guynn 

President and Chief Exemtive Officer 
Federal Reserve Bank of Atianta 



205 



James J. Hagelow '69 

Managing Director 
Marsh USA Inc. 



Stephen E. Malone '73 
First Vice President 
Merrill Lynch 



Harald R. Hansen 

Retired Chairman, President, and 

Chief Executive Officer 
First Union Corporation of Georgia 

James V. Hartlage Jr. '65 
President 
Accumetric Inc. 

Trishanda L. Hinton '96 
A-ttornej 
King & Spalding LLP 

W. Jephtha Hogan '72 (ex-officio) 
First Vice President Investments 
Salomon Smith Barney Inc. 

Kenneth K. Hutchinson '78 
Dentist 
Snellville, Georgia 

Warren Y. Jobe 

Retired Executive T Ice President 
Georgia Power Company 

David L. Kolb 

Retired Chairman and Chief 

Executive Officer 
Mohawk Industries Inc. 

Larry D. Large (ex-officio) 
President 
Oglethorpe University 

Roger A. LitteU '68 

Investment Management and Trust Consultant 
Northwestern Mutual Trust Company 

Belle Turner Lynch '61 
Adanta 

Clare (Tia) Magbee '56 
Adanta 



E.R. Mitchell Jr. 

President and Chief Executive Officer 
E.R. Mitchell and Company 

Bob T. Nance '63 
President 
Nance Carpet and Rug Company Inc. 

R. D. Odom 

President 

BellSouth Network Operations 

John J. Scalley 

Retired Executive I'^ice President 
Genuine Parts Company 

Laura Turner Seydel '86 
Trustee 
The Turner Foundation 

O.K. Sheffield '53 
Retired I Ice President 
BankSouth, N.A. 

Arnold B. Sidman 
Of Counsel 

Chamberlain, HrdUcka, VCTiite, 
WiUiams and Martin 

Susan M. Soper '69 

Communications: Editing, Writing, 

Consulting 
Adanta 

Timothy P. Tassopoulos '81 

Senior T Ice President of Operations 
Chick-fd-A Inc. 



206 



Trustees Emeriti 



FrankJin L. Burke '66 

Retired Chairman and Chief 

Executive Officer 
Bank South, N.A. 

Elmo I. Ellis 

Retired l-^ice President 

Cox Broadcasting Corporation 

George E. Goodwin 

Retired Senior Counselor 
Manning, Selvage and Lee 

C. Edward (Ned) Hansell 
Retired Senior Counselor 
Jones, Day, Reavis and Pogue 

Arthur Howell 

Retired Senior Partner 
Alston and Bird 

J. Smith Lanier 

Retired Chairman and Chief 

Executive Officer 
J. Smith Lanier and Company 

James P. McLain 
Attorney 
McLain and Merritt, P.C. 

Stephen J. Schmidt '40 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 
Dixie Seal and Stamp Company 



207 



President's 
Advisory Council 



The President's Advisory Council is composed of business and professional leaders. 
The group provides a means of two-way communication with the community' and serves as an 
advisory group for the President of the University. 



Officers 



William J. Hogan 

Chair 



Raymond S. Willoch 

Vice Chair 



Members 



Joselyn Buder Baker '91 
Public Affairs Consultant 
Dowling, Langley, Ahmann 

Rowland Cocks 

Chief Operating Officer 
Noble Properties Inc. 

Mona Diamond 
Director 
ASLAN, LLL 
Business Development and Trade 

Paul L. Dillingham (ex-officio) 
Ketired Senior Advancement Officer 
Oglethorpe University 

Harry S. Feldman '75 
Chief Executive Officer 
Daycon Products 
Upper Marlboro, Maryland 

Donna C. Findling '96 
Regional District Manager 
Subaru of America 

Kevin D. Fitzpatrick Jr. '78 
Attorney 
Airline Pilots Association 



Marion B. Glover 
President 
Glover Capital Inc. 

Kenneth R Gould '85 
President 
Kenneth P. Gould and Company Inc. 

WiUiam J. (fep) Hogan '72 
First \ "ice President Investment 
Salomon Smith Barney Inc. 

Veronica Holmes '02 
Adanta 

Shane Hornbuckle '92 
Vice President 
Van Winkle General Contractors 

Robert M. Kane '81 

r 'ice President of Finance 
Southwire Company 

Gail Lynn '77 
Vice President 
Bank of America 



208 



Jin Matsumoto '74 

Senior l^ice President/ General 

Manager 
Mitsubishi International Corporation 

John O. MitcheU 
Retired President 
Mitchell Motors Inc. 

WilUam T. MuUaUy '02 

Senior Vice President — Investments 
Synovus Securities 

Samuel H. Pettway 
Founding Director 
BoardWalk Consulting LLC 

Thomas W. Phillips, M.D. '63 

Physician 
Atianta 

Brian Sass '84 

Chief Executive Officer 
BCS Ventures LLC 

Horace E. Shuman '80 
Branch Manager 
1 St Metropolitan Mortgage 

Scott Sloan '76 
President 
National MegaForce LLC 

Cathy Appling Vinson '92 
Immigration Attorney 
Atianta 

Raymond S. Willoch '80 

Senior Vice President Administration 

General Counsel and Secretary 
Interface Inc. 



209 



National Alumni Association 
Board of Directors 

As the primary representatives of Oglethorpe University's alumni body, the National 
Alumni Association Board of Directors works closely with the Alumni Office to achieve the 
Association's goal of establishing and encouraging an active and involved alumni network. The 
purpose of this network is to build mutually beneficial relationships between alumni, students, 
and the University, demonstrating that the student experience is just the beginning of a lifelong 
relationship with Oglethorpe. 

President 

A. Diane Baker '77 

Attorney at Lmw 



Directors 



William C. Aitken '64 
Psychologist 

East Virginia Medical School 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Brooke N. Bourdelat- Parks '95 
FIRST Postdoctoral Fellow 
Emory University 

Michael A. Burke '83 

Interim Chief of Mental Health 
Emory School of Medicine 

Laura K. Fowler '84 
Public Affairs Specialist 
US Environmental Protection Agency 

John E. Harms '58 

Retired Colonel, United States 

Marine Corps 
Retired Educational Counselor 
Kailua, Hawaii 

Antonio V. Lentini '87 
Collections Rjepresentative 
BellSouth Advertising 



Lori Green LeRoy '95 
Media Relations Consultant 
Roche Diagnostic 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Mary Louise MacNeil '51 
Retired Research Chemist 
Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention 

Scott M. McKelvey '91 
Controller 
Dynamix Group Inc. 

J. Anthony Paredes '61 
Cultural Anthropologist 
National Park Service — Soudieast 
Region 

David R. Pass '98 

Director of Fund Development 

and Volunteers 
Bobby Dodd Institute 

Anita Stevenson Patterson '97 

Associate Director of Banking Relations 
BellSouth Corporation 



210 



David M. Ross '93 

Copy Editor 
Ernst & Young 

Eric Scharff '63 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 
Razzi Ground Effects 

Joseph P. Shelton '91 
Eahor Eauyer 
Fisher & Phillips LLP 

Jennifer Sisco '96 

Honors English Teacher 
Linden High School 
Little Falls, New Jersey 

Ex-Officio Members: 

Christopher A. Ballar '93 

President of the Stormy Petrel Bar 

Association 
Attorney at Eaw 
Charles A. Tingle Jr., PC 

Christian Y. Benton 
Faculty V>£presentative 
Director of Accounting Studies 
Oglethorpe University 

John W. Wuichet '90 

Immediate Past President of the OU 

National Alumni Association Board 
Principal 
Army Environmental Policy Institute 

Senior Class President (each year) 



211 



The Faculty 



(Year of appointment in parentheses) 



Keith H. Aufderheide (1980) 
Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Wilmington College 
Ph.D., Miami University 

Charles L. Baube (1996) 
Associate Professor of Biology 
B.A., Alfred University 
M.A., Ph.D., Indiana Universit}' 

Christian Y. Benton (1999) 
Director of Accounting Studies 
B.S., Universit}' of Maryland, 

College Park 
M.A., Webster University 
C.P.A., Maryland, North Carolina, 

South Carolina 

Robert A. Blumenthal (1989) 
Professor of Mathematics 
Associate Provost for Academic Affairs 
B.A., University of Rochester 
Ph.D., Washington University 

James A. Bohart (1972) 
Professor of Music 
B.S., M.M., Northern Illinois University 

William L. Brightman (1975) 
Professor of English 
A.B., Ph.D., University of Washington 

Ronald L.CarUsle (1985) 
Professor of Computer Science 

and Mathematics 
Director of Computer Services 
B.A., Emory University 
M.A., Atianta University 
Ph.D., Emory University 



Johns. Carton (1998) 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Wake Forest University 
M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 

Robert B. Carton (2001) 
Assistant Professor of Business 

Administration 
B.S., Duke University 
M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia 
C.P.A., Georgia 

Mario A. Chandler (2001) 
Assistant Professor of Spanish 
B.A., Iowa State University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Cassandra C. Copeland (1999) 
Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.S., Florida State University 
Ph.D., Auburn University 

John A. Cramer (1980) 
Professor of Physics 
B.S., Wheaton College 
M.A., Ohio State Universit}^ 
Ph.D., Texas AandM University 

Roarke E. DonneUy (2003) 
Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.A., Lawrence University 
M.S., Utah State Universit}' 
Ph.D., Universit}' of Washington 

Judith Lynn Gieger (2002) 
Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., Millsaps College 
M.A., M.A.T., Duke University 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 



212 



Lynn M. Guhde (2004) 

Associate Professor of Business 

Administration 
B.S., B.A., Slippery Rock State College 
M.B.A., Ph.D., Kent State University 

Stephen B. Herschler (2001) 
Assistant Professor of Politics 
B.A., Princeton University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Bruce W. Hetherington (1980) 
Professor of Economics 
B.B.A. Madison College 
M.A., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute 

Robert B. Hornback (2000) 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., University of California, Berkeley 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin 

Rebecca C. Hyman (1998) 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Universit)' of Virginia 

EHzabeth C. Johnson (2000) 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., The Johns Hopkins University 
M.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Kendra A. King (2003) 
Assistant Professor of Politics 
B.A. Colby CoUege 
Ph.D., The Ohio State University 

Joseph M. Knippenberg (1 985) 
Professor of Politics 
Director of Rich Foundation Urban 

Eeadership Program 
Associate Provost for Student 

Achievement 
B.A., James Madison College of 

Michigan State University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Toronto 



Peter J. Kower (2002) 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A., Arizona State Universit}-, Tempe 

M.I.M., American Graduate School of 

International Management, 

Thunderbird 
M.A., University of Colorado, Denver 
Ph.D., Ohio State University, Columbus 

Alan Loehle (2001) 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.F.A., University of Georgia 
M.F.A., Universit}' of Arizona 

Jay Lutz (1988) 
Professor of French 
Frances I. Eeraerts 76 Professor of 

Foreign Eanguage 
B.A. Antioch Universit}^ 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Nicholas B. Maher (1998) 
Associate Professor of Histofy 
Director of Honors Program 
B.A., Universit}' of Michigan 
M.A., Ph.D., Universit}' of Chicago 

Alan E. Marks (2004) 

Visiting Associate Professor of 

Psychology 
B.A., Columbia Universit}' 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Alexander M. Martin (1993) 
Associate Professor of History 
B.A., Cornell Universit}' 
M.A., Columbia Universit}- 
Ph.D., Universit}' of Pennsylvania 

McCarthy, Jeanne H. (2004) 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Universit}- of 
Texas, Austin 



213 



Douglas McFarland (1992) 
Associate Professor of English 
Manning M. Pattillo Professor of 

Uberal Arts 
B.A., Pomona College 
M.A., San Francisco State University 
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Deborah Merola (2004) 
Associate Professor of Theatre 
Director of the Theatre Program 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Universit}^ of 
California, Berkeley 

Holly Middlemis (1999) 
Tecturer in Accounting 
B.B.A., M.B.A., Baylor University 
C.P.A., Georgia 

John C. Nardo (2000) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Wake Forest University 
M.S., Ph.D., Emory University 



W. Irwin Ray (1986) 

Director of Musical Activities 
B.M., Samford University 
M.C.M., D.M.A., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary 

Beth Roberts (2000) 

Vera A. Milner Professor of Education 
Director of Master of Arts in Teaching — Early 

Childhood Education Program 
B.A., M.A.T., Ph.D., Emory Universit}' 

Anne Rosenthal (1997) 

Associate Professor of Communication and 

KJjetoric Studies 
B.A., Bethel CoUege 
M.A., University of St. Thomas 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Michael K. RuHson (1982) 
Professor of Physics 
B.S., University of Illinois 
M.S., Ph.D., Universit)' of Georgia 



PhilipJ. Neu)ahr(1973) 
Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Stanford University 
M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

CaroUne R. Noyes (1995) 

Associate Professor of Education 

and Psychology 
A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's 

College 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia 

JohnD. Orme (1983) 
Professor of Politics 
B.A., University of Oregon 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 



Anne A. Salter (2003) 
Director of the Eibraty 
B.A., MLn., Emory University 

Daniel L. Schadler (1975) 
Professor of Biology 
A.B., Thomas More CoUege 
M.S., Ph.D., Cornell Universit}- 

Seema Shrikhande (2002) 

Assistant Professor of Communication 

and KJjetoric Studies 
B.A., Elphinstone College - India 
M.A., Bombay University' - India 
M.A., University' of Pennsylvania 
Ph.D., Michigan State Universit\' 



Viviana P Plotnik (1994) 
Associate Professor of Spanish 
Licenciatura, Universidad 

de Belgrano - Argentina 
M.A., University of Minnesota 
Ph.D., New York University 



W. Bradford Smith (1993) 
Associate Professor of History 
B.A., Universit}' of Michigan 
Ph.D., Emorv Universit\' 



214 



Robert Steen (1995) 

Associate Professor of Japanese 

B.A., OberHn CoUege 

M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Brad L. Stone (1982) 
Professor of Sociology 

B.S., M.S., Brigham Young University 
Ph.D., Universit}' of lUinois 

William F. Straley (1990) 

Professor of Business Administration 

and Mathematics 
Director of Master of Business 

Administration Program 
B.S., M.S., M.B.A., Georgia State 

Universit}' 
Ph.D., Auburn Universitv^ 



Victoria L. Weiss (1977) 
Professor of English 
Director of Student Success 
B.A., St. Norbert College 
M.A., Ph.D., Lehigh Universit)' 

Ginger Williams (2000) 

lecturer in Education and Director of 

Field Experiences 
B.S.Ed., Georgia Southern University 
M.Ed., Mercer Universit}^ 



Jason M.Wirth (1994) 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., College of the Holy Cross 
M.A., Villanova Universit}- 
Ph.D., State University- of New York 



LindaJ. Taylor (1975) 
Professor of English 
A.B., Cornell University 
Ph.D., Brown Universit}' 



Monte W Wolf (1978) 
Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Universit}' of California 
Ph.D., Universit}' of Southern California 



PhiHp D. Tiu (1995) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Universit}' of San Carlos - 

Philippines 
A.M., Ph.D., Dartmouth College 

J. Dean Tucker (1988) 

Professor and Mack A Rik.ard Chair 
in Economics and Business 
Administration 
B.S., M.A., Ohio State Universit}' 
Ph.D., Michigan State Universit}' 



Alan N. Woolfolk (1989) 
Professor of Sociology 
Director of Core Curriculum 
B.S., M.A., Universit}' of 

Pennsylvania 
M.S., Universit}' of Oregon 
Ph.D., Universit}' of Pennsvlvania 

Philip P. Zinsmeister (1 973) 
Professor of Biology 
B.S., Wittenberg Universit}' 
M.S., Ph.D., Universit\' of Illinois 



James M. Turner (1995) 

Associate Professor of Accounting 
B.B.A., University of Georgia 
Ph.D., Georgia State Universit}' 



215 



Professors Emeriti 



G. Malcolm Amerson (1968) 
James Edward Oglethorpe 

Professor Emeritus of Biology 
B.S., Berry College 
M.S., Ph.D., Clemson University 

Keith E. Baker (1983) 

Director Emeritus of Accounting 

Studies 
B.S., Youngstown State University 
M.A., University of Florida 
C.P.A., Georgia 

Barbara R. Clark (1971) 
Professor Emerita of English 
B.A., Georgia State University 
M.A., University of Kansas 
M.P.A., Georgia State University 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
C.P.A., Georgia 

Charlton H.Jones (1974) 
Professor Emeritus of Business 

Administration 
B.S., Universit}' of Illinois 
M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Nancy H. Kerr (1983) 

Provost and Professor Emerita of 

Psychology 
B.A., Stanford University 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

J. Brien Key (1965) 

Professor Emeritus of History 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College 

M.A., Vanderbilt University 

Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

David K. Mosher (1972) 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 
B.A., Harvard University 
B.S.A.E., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of 
Technology 



Ken Nishimura (1964) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 
A.B., Pasadena College 
M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminar)' 
Ph.D., Emory University 

Philip R Palmer (1964) 

Professor Emeritus of Political Studies 
A.B., M.A., University of 
New Hampshire 

WiUiam O. Shropshire (1979) 
Professor Emeritus of Economics 
B.A., Washington and Lee University 
Ph.D., Duke University 

T. LavonTalley (1968) 

Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.S., M.S., Ed.D, Auburn Universit}' 

David N. Thomas (1968) 
Professor Emeritus of History 
A.B., Coker College 

M.A., Ph.D., Universit}' of North Carolina 
D.H., Francis Marion College 

Louise M. VaUne (1978) 

Professor Emerita of Education 
B.S., Universit}' of Houston 
M.Ed., Universit}' of Georgia 
Ed.D, Auburn Universit\' 

Martha H. Vardeman (1966) 
Professor Emerita of Sociology 
B.S., M.S., Auburn Universit}- 
Ph.D., Universit}' of Alabama 



216 



University Officers 



(Year of appointment in parentheses) 



Larry D. Large (1999) 
President 

B.S., Portland State University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Christopher Ames (2001) 

Provost and Senior Vice President 
B.A., Universit}' of Texas, Austin 
Ph.D., Stanford University 

John A. Boland III (2004) 

Interim Vice President for B/isiness 

and Finance 
B.S., The Citadel 

Timothy Doyle (2003) 

Vice President for Student Affairs and 

Dean of Students 
B.A., Wabash CoUege 
M.A., Emory University 

Manning M. Pattillo Jr. (1975) 
Honorary Chancellor 
B.A., University of the South 
A.M., Ph.D., Universit)' of Chicago 
LL.D., LeMoyne College 
LL.D, St. John's University 
L.H.D., University of Detroit 
L.H.D, College of New Rochelle 
L.H.D., Park College 
Litt.D, St. Norbert College 
D.C.L., The Universit}' of the South 
LL.D, Oglethorpe University' 



David J. Rhodes (2003) 
Vice President for Enrollment 
B.A., Thiel CoUege 
M.B.A., Heidelberg College 

Peter A. Rooney (2004) 

Vice President for Development and 

Alumni Illations 
B.A., Rhodes College 

Donald S. Stanton (1988) 
President Emeritus 
A.B., Western Maryland CoUege 
M.Div, Wesley Seminary 
M.A., The American University 
Ed.D, University of Virginia 
L.H.D, Columbia CoUege 
LL.D, Western Maryland CoUege 
Litt.D, Albion CoUege 
Litt.D, Oglethorpe University 



217 



Academic Affairs 



Christopher Ames 

Provost and Senior T ^ice President 
B.A., University of Texas, Austin 
Ph.D., Stanford University 



Nancy A. Keita 
Assistant Registrar 
B.A., M.A., San Francisco State 
University 



Susan A. Bacher 
Registrar 

B.A., Tift CoUege 
M.S.W, University of Georgia 

Robert A. Blumenthal 

Associate Provost for Academic Affairs 
Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., University of Rochester 
Ph.D., Washington University 

Karen S. Carter 

Director of University College 
B.B.A., Kennesaw State University 
M.P.A., Georgia College and State 
University 

Tricia Clayton 
Reference Librarian 
B.A., University of Virginia 
M.A., M.L.S., Indiana University 

Jeffrey H. Collins 

Director of Oglethorpe University 

Students Abroad 
B.A., Baylor University 
Ph.D., University of Texas, Arlington 

M. Christine Foster-Cates 

Universit)' College Academic Advisor 
B.A., Utica College of Syracuse 

University 
M.Ed., Seattle University 

Holly M. Frey 

Library Assistant — Technical Services 
B.A., Emory University 



Chantae R. King '03 

Media Coordinator and Faculty 

Services Secretary 
B.S., Oglethorpe University' 

Joseph M. Knippenberg 
Associate Provost for Student 



Professor of Politics 

Director of Rich Foundation Urban 

Feadership Program 
B.A., James Madison College of 

Michigan State Universit}' 
M.A., Ph.D., Universit}' of Toronto 

Gina Laney 

Associate Director of University 

College 
B.S.W, Universit}' of Georgia 
M.S., Georgia State Universit}' 

Tonia M. Minor 

Assistant Director of University College 
B.A., M.A., Virginia Pol}technic Institute 
and State Universit}' 

Stephanie L. Phillips '90 

Library Assistant — Circulation and 

Interlibrary Foans 
B.A., Oglethorpe Universit\' 
M.A., Universit\' of Vermont 

Kerry Reid 

University College Operations 
Coordinator 



218 



Penelope M. Rose '65 

Ubraty Assistant — Periodicals/ Serials 
B.A., Oglethorpe University 

Anne A. Salter 

Director of the Ubrary 

B.A., MLn., Emory Universit}^ 

Jo Ann Santoro 

Secretary for Faculty Services 
B.A., WeUesIey CoUege 

David A. Stockton 

Technical Services Ubrarian 

B.A., M.S.L.S., University^ of North 

CaroHna 

Pamela G. Tubesing 

Administrative Assistant to the Provost 

and Senior Vice President 
A.B., Indiana University 

RoseMary Watkins 

Director of Learning Resources Center 
B.A., University of South Alabama 
E.M.R.A., University of San Francisco 

Joanne R. Yendle 

Ubraty Assistant — Circulation and 

Archives Specialist 
A.B., Manhattanville College 

Judy Zahn 

Circulation Manager 

B.S., Dr. Martin Luther College 



219 



Business Affairs 



John A. Boland III 

Interim Vice President for Business 

and Finance 
B.S., The Citadel 

Georgann Billetdeaux 
Director of Finance 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh 
M.A., College of Notre Dame 
of Maryland 

Jewel R. Bolen 

Director of Data Processing 

Kami T. Bush '01 

Help Desk Specialist in Information 

Technology Services 
B.S., Oglethorpe University 

Carol E. Carter 

Director of Human Resources 

B.S., Clayton College and State Universit)' 

M.S., Troy State University 

Thomas J. Couch 

Director of Certification Programs 
B.A., Georgia State University 

Karen G. Davis 
Staff A.ccountant 

Rus Drew 

Director of Campus Safety 
B.S., Bellevue University 

Kate E. Fitzpatrick '01 
University Receptionist 
B.A.L.S., Oglethorpe University 

Renae Glass 

Office Manager for Physical Plant 

Eric Huret 

Internet Services Manager 



Donna F. Johnson 

Assistant Director of the Business Office 
Jim R. Ledbetter 

Director of the Physical Plant 

Betsy Lee 

Business Manager of Certification Programs 
B.A., University of Georgia 
M.A.C.C, Universit}' of Georgia 

Vicki Miller 

Interim Assistant to che Vice President 
of Business and Finance and the 
Director of Human Resources 

B.A., Georgia State Universit}' 

Sheryl D Murphy 

Assistant Bookstore Manager 
B.A., Drake Universit}' 

Kathleen D. Nason '99 

Associate Director of Car?pus Safety 
B.A., Oglethorpe Universit}' 

Marcus Pett}' 

Operations Supervisor of Campus Safety 
B.A., Clark Atlanta Universit}' 

Adrina G. Richard 
Director of Auxiliary 
Services I Purchasing 
B.A., Georgia State Universit}' 

Jennifer Richards '04 

Server Administrator in Information 

Technology Services 
A.S., Gordon College 
B.A., Oglethorpe Universits" 

Valyncia Smith '04 

Business Office Administrator 
B.S., Oglethorpe University' 



220 



Virginia R. Tomlinson '93 

Director of Information Technology 

Services 
B.A., Oglethorpe University 



Charles M. Wingo 
bookstore Manager 
B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 



Development and Alumni Relations 



Peter A. Rooney 

Vice President for Development and 

Alumni Relations 
B.A., Rhodes College 

Aimee Ahmed 

Development Officer for 

Corporations and Foundations 
B.A., Agnes Scott College 

Mary Crosby 

Alumni Relations Coordinator 
B.A., University of Arizona ■ 

Therese D'Agostino 

Assistant to the Yice President for 

Development and Alumni Relations 
B.S., Northern Michigan Universit)'- 

Mark DeLong '03 

Gift Processing and Stewardship 

Manager 
B.A., Oglethorpe University 

William T. Doerr 

Director of Development Services 
A.M., Andrew College 
B.A., High Point University 
M.P.A., Columbus State University 



Barbara Bessmer Henry '85 
Director of Alumni Relations 
B.B.A., Oglethorpe University 

George Kopec 

Research and Records Manager 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 

Lindsey S. Mann 

Coordinator of Annual Fund 
B.A., Hollins University 



221 



Enrollment Management 



David J. Rhodes 

I Ice President for Enrollment 
B.A., Thiel College 
M.B.A., Heidelberg College 

Patrick N. Bonones 

Director of Financial Aid 

B.P.A., Mississippi State University 

Angle Conner 

Financial Aid Coordinator 

B.A., University of North Carolina 

Janet Grant 

Assistant Director of Financial Aid 
A.A., Interboro Institute 

Deborah B. Kirby 
Admission Assistant 
B.A., Southern Adventist University 

Carl Lubbe '03 
Admission Counselor 
B.A., Oglethorpe University 

Ruth Meyer 

Assistant Director of Admission 
B.A., Lynchburg College 
B.S., Liberty University 

Karen Prestage 
Prospect Coordinator 
B.S., Grambling State University 

Tacoma Robinson 

Administrative Assistant to the Vice 
President for Enrollment 

Christopher R. Summers '03 
Admission Counselor 
B.A., Oglethorpe University 



222 



Marketing and Public Relations 



Rebecca A. Whicker 

Executive Director of Marketing and 

Public Relations 
B.S., Kennesaw State University 

J. Heath Coleman '95 

Director of Conference and Event 

Planning 
B.S., M.B.A., Oglethorpe University 

Kathleen C. Guy 

Director of Museum Operations 
A.B., Washington University 

Thomas Namey '02 

Executive Producer and Editor oj 

Digital Media 
B.S., B.A., Oglethorpe University 



Lloyd Nick 

Director of Oglethorpe University 

Museum of Art 
B.F.A., Hunter College 
M.F.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Lisa Reams 

Special Events Coordinator 
B.S., University of Tennessee 



President's Staff 



Larry D. Large 
President 

B.S., Portland State Universit}^ 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Janet H. Maddox 

Director of Institutional Research 
Special Assistant to the President 
B.A., Georgia State Universit}' 

La-Shena K. Tatum '02 
Assistant to the President 
B.B.A., M.B.A., Oglethorpe Universit}^ 



223 



Student Affairs 



Timothy M. Doyle 

I'^ice President for Student Affairs and 

Dean of Students 
A.B., Wabash CoUege 
M.A., Emory University 

Jon Akin 

Head Soccer Coach 

BA., Saint Leo University 

Natalie Dietz '98 

Assistant to the Dean of Students 
B.A., Oglethorpe University 
M.A., University of North Carolina, 
Chapel Hill 

Denise Gilbert 

Director of Dining Services / Bon Appetit 
B.A., Edinboro University 

Daniel Giordano '02 
Head Volleyball Coach 
B.A., Oglethorpe University 

B. Steven Green '92 
Intramurals Coordinator 
B.A., Oglethorpe University 
B.M., Georgia State University 

Adam Grier 
Athletic Trainer 
B.A., Georgia Southern University 

Cathy Grote 

Director of Health Services 

A.A.S., Raymond Walters College 

Peter Howell 

Head Men 's and Women 's Tennis Coach 
B.A.,Vanderbilt Universit}' 



Bonnie L. Kessler 

University Psychologist and Director 

of the Counseling Center 
B.A., Emory University 
M.A., Georgia State University 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Universit}' 

Lisa Litdefield 

Director of Career Services 

B.A., Southern Illinois University, 

EdwardsviUe 
M.A., M.S., Georgia State University 

Joe LoCascio 

Director of Residence Life 

B.A., M.S., Syracuse University 

Candace Maddox 

Residence Ufe Coordinator for Student Actimties 
B.A., M.Ed., Universit\' of Georgia 

James C. Owen 

Head Men's and Women's Golf Coach 

B.S., Berry College 

M.Ed., Georgia State Universit}' 

Philip Ponder " 

Head Men 's Basketball Coach 
B.A., LaGrange CoUege 

Ron Sattele ' 

Head Women's Basketball Coach 
B.S., Villanova Universir\' 



224 



Janelle Smith 

Administrative Coordinator for 

Student Affairs and Freshman Advocate 
A.S., Jackson\'ille State University 

Robert L. Unger 

Head Cross Country and Track Coach 
B.A., Lebanon Valley College 
M.A., Universit}' of Chicago 

Chadwick Yarborough 

Manager / Technical Director for the 

Conant Performing Arts Center 
B.A., University of South Carolina 
M.F.A., Ohio Universit)' 



225 



Index 



Academic Advising 70 

Academic Calendar 4 

Academic Departments 102 

Academic Dismissal 73 

Academic Good Standing 73 

Academic Load 78 

Academic Regulations and Policies 69 

Academic Resource Center 83 

Access to Student Records 79 

Accounting Programs 102 

Administration 217 

Admission 25 

Allied Health Studies 106 

American Smdies Programs 106 

Antivirus Policy 23 

AP (Advanced Placement Credit) 32 

Application for Admission 26 

Application for Financial Assistance 40 

Art Programs 107 

Athletics 62 

Adanta Regional Consortium for 

Higher Education (ARCHE) 20, 70 

Auditing Courses 75 

Biology Programs 113 

Biopsychology Major , 116 

Board of Trustees 205 

Business Administration Programs 118 

Business Administration and 

Behavioral Science Major 122 

Business Administration and 

Computer Science Major 123 

Campus Facilities 17 

Campus Visit 27 

Career Services 86 

Chemistry Programs 124 

Class Attendance 71 

CLEP (College Level Examination 

Program 31 

Commencement Exercises 76 

Communication and Rhetoric Studies Programs.... 127 
Community' Life - See Student Affairs 

Computer Facilities and Services 22 

Computer Science Minor 131 

Computer Use Policy 22 

Conant Performing Arts Center 18 

Core Credits for Study Abroad 98 

Core Curriculum 93 

Core Equivalencies for Transfer Students 98 

Counseling Services 59 

Course Substitutions 74 

Credit by Examination 31 

Cross Registration 70 

Crypt of Civilization 13, 19 

Dean's List 75 

Degrees 100 



Degrees With Honors Thesis 77 

Degrees With Latin Academic Honors 76 

Disability Access 18 

Disability' Programs and Services 84 

Discriminatory and Harassment Policy 63 

Dorough Field House 18 

Double Major Policy 77 

Drop and Add 71 

Dual Degree Programs: 

Art 112 

Engineering 141 

Environmental Studies 146 

Early Admission 30 

Economics Programs 133 

Education Programs 136 

E-mail and Computer Use Policy 22 

Emerson Student Center 18 

Endowed Professorships/Funds 48 

Engineering Program 141 

English Programs 142 

Environmental Studies Program 146 

Experiential Education 85 

Faculty 212 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 

(FERPA) 79 

Fees and Costs 52 

Final Examinations "^4 

Financial Assistance 35 

First- Year Experience 82 

Foreign Language Progi'ams 14"^ 

Foreign Language Requirement 96 

Fraternities 62 

French Programs 148 

Fresh Focus 82 

Freshman Forgiveness Policy 74 

General Science Courses 151 

German Courses 152 

Goodman Hall 18 

GoslinHaU 19 

Grade Appeal Policy 75 

Grading 72 

Graduate Education 137 

Graduation Exercises 76 

Graduation Requirements ^6 

Greek Courses 152 

Greek Organizations 21, 62 

Health Ser\nces 58 

Hearst HaU 19 

History Programs 153 

History of C^glethorpe 1 1 

Home— Schooled Students 31 

Honor Code 79 

Honors and Awards 65 

Honors Program 86 

Housing and Meals 58 



226 



IB (International Baccalaureate Credit) 32 

Individually Planned Major 158 

Individually Planned IVIinor 159 

Interdisciplinary Studies 159 

International Exchange Partnerships 89 

International Students 29, 58 

International Studies Major 160 

International Studies-Asia 

Concentration Major 162 

Internships - See Experiential Education 85 

Intramural and Recreational Sports 62 

Japanese Minor 163 

Joint Enrollment 29 

Latin Academic Honors 76 

Latin Courses 165 

Learning Resources Center 84 

Library (I.owry Hall) 20 

Lupton HaD 19 

Major Programs and Requirements 100 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

Major 169 

Mathematics Programs 166 

Meals 58 

Minor Programs and Requirements 101 

Mission 7 

Museum of Art 19 

Music Minor 170 

Music Performance 170 

National Alumni Association 

Board of Directors 210 

Non-Traditional Students 30 

Normal Academic Load 78 

The O Book. 59 

Oglethorpe Student Association 60 

Oglethorpe LIniversit}' Students Abroad 

(OUSA) 89 

Orientation 58 

Part-Time Fees 53 

Personal Development 59 

Philosophy Programs 171 

Physics Programs 176 

Policies: 

Antivirus 23 

Disability' Programs and Services 84 

Discriminatory and Sexual Harassment 63 

Double Major 77 

E-mail and Computer Use 22 

Freshman Forgiveness 74 

Grade Appeal 75 

Re-activation 73 

Residency Requirement 28, 76, 138 

Tuition Refund 53 

Politics Programs 179 

Pre-law Studies 183 

Pre-medical Studies 183 



Preregistration 70 

President's Advisory Council 208 

Presidents of the Universit)- 15 

Probation and Dismissal 73 

Professional Option 184 

Psychology Programs 184 

Re-activation Policy 73 

Re-admission 31 

Refund PoUcy 53 

Registration 70 

Repetition of Courses 73 

Residence Halls 21 

Residency Requirement 28, 76, 138 

Rich Foundation Urban Leadership 

Program 90 

Robinson Hall 20 

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option 74 

Schmidt Sport and Recreation Center 20 

Scholarships 42 

Second Baccalaureate Degree 77 

Semester System 78 

Senior Transitions 83 

Sexual Harassment PoUcy 63 

Sheffield Alumni Suite 20 

Social Work Program 189 

Sociology Programs 189 

Sophomore Choices 82 

Sororities 62 

Spanish Programs 193 

Special Status Admission 30 

Student Affairs 57 

Student Organizations 60 

Student Re-activation Policy 73 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 59, 60 

Study Abroad 89 

Teacher Education Programs 137 

Theatre Programs 196 

Tradition, Purpose, and Goals 8 

Traer Residence Hall 21 

Transfer Students 27 

Transient Students 30 

Tuition and Costs 51 

Tutoring (ARC) 83 

Universits' College 204 

UniversiU' Officers and Staff. 217 

Urban Leadership Program 90 

Withdrawal from a Course 71 

Withdrawal from the L-niversits' 71 

Women's and Gender Studies Minor 198 

Writing Minor 201 



227 




OGLETHORPE 



4484 Peachtree Road, N.E. 

Atlanta, GA 30319-2797 

(404)261-1441 



UNIVERSITY 



B^AA^.cE°?'yf 




W/NOSOR 




Directions to Campus 

From 1-85 

Take Exit 89, North Druid Hills Road. 
Go north about 2 miles to Peachtree 
Road and turn right (north). Go about 
1 mile on Peachtree. Oglethorpe is 
on the left. 



From 1-285 

Take Exit 31 -A, Peachtree Industrial 
Blvd., and go south about 4 miles. 
The campus is on the right. 
Or, take Exit 29, Ashford-Dunwoody 
Road, and go south to the end. Turn 
right on Peachtree Road. Oglethorpe 
is on the right. 



Legend for Campus Map 



1. MacConnell Gate House 

2. Lupton Hall 

3. Phoebe Hearst Hall 

4. Crypt of Civilization 

5. Goodman Hall 

6. Traer Residence Hall 

7. Philip Weltner Library 

8. Oglethorpe University Museum of Art 

9. J. Mack Robinson Hall 

10. Goslin Hall 

1 1 . Emerson Student Center 



12. Dining Hall 22. 

13. Swimming Pool 23. 

14. Dempsey Residence Hall 24. 

15. Jacobs Residence Hall 25. 

16. Alumni Residence Hall 26. 

17. Residence Hall 27. 

18. Residence Hall 28. 

19. Schmidt Residence Hall 29. 

20. J. P. Salamone Memorial Soccer Field 30. 

21. Lanier House (President's home, 31. 
not pictured) 



Greek Row 

PATH Academy 

Conant Performing Arts Center 

Track 

Tennis Courts 

Dorough Field House 

Schmidt Center 

Anderson Field (Baseball) 

Hermance Stadium 

Maintenance Building