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Full text of "Oglethorpe University Bulletin, 2008-2010"

OGLETHORPE 

UNIVERSITY 

MAKE A LIFE. MAKE A LmNG. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. 



2008-2010 BULLETIN 
for the 

Traditional Undergraduate Program 

and 

Master of Arts in Teaching - Early Childhood Education (Grades P-5) 

Plus a Student's Guide to Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe's evening degree program has a separate bulletin, available upon request. 



Oglethorpe University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033- 
4097; telephone 404-679-4500) to av^ard bachelor's degrees and master's degrees. 
The graduate teacher education program is approved by the Georgia Professional 
Standards Commission. 



Oglethorpe makes no distinction in its admission policies or procedures on grounds of age, race, gen- 
der, religious belief, color, sexual orientation, national origin or disability. This Bulletin is published 
by the Office of the Provost, Oglethorpe University. The information included in it is accurate for the 
2008-2010 academic years as of the date of publication, July 2008; however, the programs, policies, 
requirements and regulations are subject to change as circumstances may require. The listing of a course 
or program in this Bulletin does not constitute a guarantee or contract that it will be offered during the 
2008-2010 academic years. Final responsibflity for selecting and scheduling courses and satisfactorily 
completing curriculum requirements rests with the student. 



«» 



Oglethorpe University • 4484 Peachtree Road NE • Atlanta, Georgia 30319-2797 

404-261-1441 or 1 -800-428-4484 

www.oglethorpe.edu 



General College Policy 

Academic Policy 

Alumni Relations 

Business Affairs, Financial Planning 

Campus Safety 

Enrollment, Financial Aid, Scholarships 

Evening Degree Program 
Fundraising and Gifts 

Public Information, Public Relations 

Student Records, Transcripts 

Student Services (Residence Life, Food, 
Health, Counseling, Career Services) 

Student Tuition, Fees 

Visitors 



Lawrence M. Schall 
President 

Stephen B. Herschler 
Provost 

Barbara B. Henry '85 
Director of Alumni Relations 

Marilyn Fowle 

Vice President for Business and Finance 

Reginald Maddox 

Interim Director of Public Safety 

Lucy Leusch 

Vice President for Enrollment and 

FinancialAid 

John H. Eaves 

Director of Evening Degree Program 

Peter A. Rooney 

Vice President for Development and 

Alumni Relations 

Denise L. Peroune 

Executive Director of Marketing and 

Public Relations 

Tanya Crump 
Registrar 

Timothy Doyle 

Vice President for Student Affairs and 

Dean of Students 

Drue W. Strickland 

Director of Finance/Controller 



Oglethorpe University welcomes visitors to the campus throughout the year. To meet with 
a particular staff or faculty member, visitors are urged to make an appointment in advance. 
Administrative offices are open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays. 

All of the offices of the university can be reached by calling the switchboard at 404-261- 
1441. The public relations office is available for assistance at 404-364-8447. The admission 
office can be reached directly by calling 404-364-8307 or 1-800-428-4484. 






Academic Calendar 4 

Mission 7 

History 11 

Campus Facilities 15 

Admission 23 

Financial Assistance 31 

Tuition and Costs 47 

Student Affairs 51 

Student's Guide to Oglethorpe 63 

Academic Regulations and Policies 93 

Oglethorpe Honor Code 103 

Educational Enrichment 113 

The Core Curriculum 127 

Programs of Study , 133 

Board of Trustees 231 

President s Advisory Council 234 

National Alumni Association Board of Directors 236 

The Faculty 238 

University Officers 242 

Campus Map 244 

Index 246 



Fall Semester 2008 



Thur.-Sun., August 21-24 
Sat., August 23 
Mon., August 25 
Mon., September 1 
Tues., September 2 

Mon.-Tues., October 13-14 

Fri., October 17 

Fri., October 31 

Mon. -Fri., November 10-14 

Fri., November 14 

Wed.-Sat., November 26-30 

Mon., December 1 

Sat., December 6 

Mon., December 8 

Tues. -Mon., December 9-15 



Orientation for 'New Students 

Residence Halls Open for Returning Students 

First Day of Classes/Late Registration 

Labor Day Holiday 

Last Day to Drop/Add a Course; 

Last Day to Receive 100 Percent Refund 

Fall Break 

Midterm 

Last Day to Withdraw from a Course with a "W" Grade 

Registration for Spring Semester 

Withdrawal from a Course wdth a "WF" After This Date 

Thanksgiving Holidays 

Classes Resume 

Boar's Head Celebration 

Last Day of Classes 

Final Examinations 



Spring Semester 2009 

Mon.-Fri., November 10-14, 2008 

Fri., January 9 

Sun., January 11 

Mon., January 12 

Mon., January 19 

Tues., January 20 

Wed., February 11 

Fri., March 6 

Sat.- Sun., March 14-22 

Mon., March 23 

Fri., March 27 

Mon. -Fri., April 6-10 

Fri., April 10 

Tues., April 14 

Tues., April 28 

Wed.-Tues., April 29-May 5 

Sat., May 9 



Registration 

New Student Advising and Registration 

Opening of Residence Halls/Orientation 

First Day of Classes/Late Registration 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday 

Last Day to Drop/Add a Course; 

Last Day to Receive 100 Percent Refund 

Oglethorpe Day Convocation 

Midterm 

Spring Holidays 

Classes Resume 

Last Day to Withdraw from a Course with a "W" Grade 

Registration for Summer and Fall Semesters 

Withdrawal from a Course with a "WF" After This Date 

Symposium in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Last Day of Classes 

Final Examinations 

Commencement 



Fall Semester 2009 



Mon.-Fri., April 6-10 
Thur.-Sun., August 20-23 
Sat., August 22 
Mon., August 24 
Mon., August 31 



Mon., September 7 
Mon.-Tues., October 12-13 
Fri., October 16 
Fri., October 30 
Mon.-Fri., November 9-13 
Fri., November 13 
Wed.-Sun., November 25-29 
Mon., November 30 
Fri., December 4 
Mon., December 7 
Tues.-Mon., December 8-14 

Spring Semester 2010 

Mon.-Fri., November 9-13, 2009 

Fri., January 8 

Sun., January 10 

Mon., January 11 

Mon., January 18 

Tues., January 19 

Wed., February 10 

Fri., March 5 

Fri., March 19 

Sat.- Sun., March 20-28 

Mon., March 29 

Mon. -Fri., April 5-9 

Fri., April 9 

Tues., April 13 

Tues., April 27 

Wed.-Tues., April 28-May 4 

Sat., May 8 



Registration for Summer and Fall 

Orientation for New Students 

Residence Halls Open for Returning Students 

First Day of Classes/Late Registration 

Last Day to Drop/Add a Course; 

Last Day to Receive 100 Percent Refund 

Last Day to Apply for Spring 2010 Graduation 

Labor Day Holiday 

Fall Break 

Midterm 

Last Day to Withdraw from a Course with a "W" Grade 

Registration for Spring Semester 

Withdrawal from a Course with a "WF" After This Date 

Thanksgiving Holidays 

Classes Resume 

Boar's Head Celebration 

Last Day of Classes 

Final Examinations 



Registration 

New Student Advising and Registration 

Opening of Residence Halls/Orientation 

First Day of Classes/Late Registration 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday 

Last Day to Drop/Add a Course; 

Last Day to Receive 100 Percent Refund 

Oglethorpe Day Convocation 

Midterm 

Last Day to Withdraw from a Course with a "W" Grade 

Spring Holidays 

Classes Resume 

Registration for Summer and Fall Semesters 

Withdrawal from a Course with a "WF" After This Date 

Symposium in the Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Last Day of Classes 

Final Examinations 

Commencement 



2008 



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2010 






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SION 




Oglethorpe University Mission 



Oglethorpe University provides a superior education in the hberal arts and sciences and 
selected professional disciplines in a coeducational, largely residential, small-college envi- 
ronment within a dynamic urban setting. Oglethorpe's academically rigorous programs em- 
phasize intellectual curiosity, individual attention and encouragement, close collaboration 
among faculty and students and active learning in relevant field experiences. Oglethorpe is 
committed to supporting the success of all students in a diverse community characterized 
by civility, caring, inquiry and tolerance. Oglethorpe's talented, self-reliant and motivated, 
graduates are prepared to make a life and to make a living, to grow as life-long learners and 
to be energetic and intelligent contributors in a rapidly changing world. 

The Oglethorpe Tradition 

Oglethorpe University was established in 1835 and named after General James Edward 
Oglethorpe, the founder of Georgia. The university was patterned on Corpus Christi Col- 
lege, Oxford, General Oglethorpe's alma mater. Although influenced by other conceptions 
of higher education, Oglethorpe University has been shaped principally by the English 
tradition of collegiate education, which many observers believe is the finest type produced 
by Western civilization. 

Briefly stated, four characteristics have made this kind of college vridely admired: 

1. Colleges in the English tradition emphasize broad education for intelligent leader- 
ship. They recognize that this is a more useful undergraduate education for the able 
young person than technical training for a specific job. 

2. Colleges such as Oglethorpe stress the basic academic competencies - reading, writ- 
ing, speaking and reasoning - and the fundamental fields of knowledge - the arts 
and sciences. These are essential tools of the educated person. 

3. Close relationships between teacher and student are indispensable to this type of 
education. A teacher is not merely a conveyor of information - the invention of the 
printing press and advances in information technology have made that notion of 
education obsolete. Rather, the most important function of the teacher is to stimu- 
late intellectual activity in the student and to promote his or her development as a 
mature person. 

4. A collegiate education is far more than a collection of academic courses. It is a pro- 
cess of development in which campus leadership opportunities, residential life, ath- 
letics, formal and informal social functions, aesthetic experiences and contact with 
students from other cultures, in addition to classroom exercises, all play important 
roles. Versatility and ability to lead are important goals of this type of undergradu- 
ate education. 

Another aspect of Oglethorpe's tradition was contributed by Philip Weltner, president of 
the university from 1944 to 1953. Oglethorpe, he said, should be a college that is "superla- 
tively good." Only at a college wdth carefully selected students and faculty, he believed, could 
young people achieve their frill est intellectual development through an intense dialogue 
with extraordinary teachers. Thus, a commitment to superior performance is an important 
element of the Oglethorpe tradition. 



Purpose: Education for a Changing Society 



While an institution may take pride in a distinguished heritage, it is also essential that its 
educational program prepare young people to function effectively in a complex and rapidly 
developing society, which places a premium on adaptability. People in positions of leader- 
ship must be able to fimction effectively in changing circumstances. The broadly educated 
person, schooled in fundamental principles, is best equipped to exercise leadership in a 
world that is being transformed by technology and new information. Oglethorpe empha- 
sizes the preparation of the humane generalist - the kind of leader needed by a complex and 
changing society. 

The location of the university in the dynamic city of Atlanta offers unique opportunities for 
students to experience firsthand the relevance of their education to the exciting changes 
that are a part of modern development. Students are encouraged to explore the connec- 
tions between their educational experiences on campus and the challenges that face a city 
today. Atlanta offers a multitude of opportunities for students to see the process and result 
of change and innovation in areas such as government, business, education, cultural affairs, 
artistic endeavors, international exchanges, transportation, recreation, medical services, 
science and technology. 

Oglethorpe University Promise 



Oglethorpe University promises a classic education in a contemporary city. Oglethorpe 
students learn to "make a life, make a living and make a difference." Our graduates become 
community leaders who are distinctive in their ability to think, communicate and contrib- 
ute. 



10 



1%. w 




11 



Chartered in 1835 

Old Oglethorpe University began in the early 1800s with a movement by Georgia Presbyte- 
rians to establish in their state an institution for the training of ministers. For generations, 
southern Presbyterian families sent their sons to Princeton College in New Jersey and the 
long distance traveled by stage or horseback suggested the building of a similar institution 
in the South. Oglethorpe University was chartered by the state of Georgia in 1835, shortly 
after the centennial observance of the state. The college was named after James Edward 
Oglethorpe, the founder of Georgia. Oglethorpe University, which commenced actual oper- 
ations in 1838, was thus one of the earliest denominational institutions in the South located 
below the Virginia line. The antebellum college, which began with four faculty members 
and about 25 students, was located at Midway, a small community near Milledgeville, then 
the capital of Georgia. 

Distinguished Alumni and Faculty 

Throughout its antebellum existence, the Oglethorpe curriculum consisted primarily of 
courses in Greek, Latin, classical literature, theology and a surprising variety of natural sci- 
ences. Oglethorpe's president during much of this period was Samuel Kennedy Talmage, an 
eminent minister and educator. Other notable Oglethorpe faculty members were 
Nathaniel M. Crawford, professor of mathematics and a son of Georgia statesman William 
H. Crawford, Joseph LeConte, destined to earn world fame for his work in geology and 
optics, and James Woodrow, an uncle of Woodrow Wilson and the first professor in Georgia 
with a Ph.D. Oglethorpe's most distinguished alumnus from the antebellum era was poet, 
critic and musician Sidney Lanier, who graduated in I860. Lanier remained as a tutor in 
1861 until he, with other Oglethorpe cadets, marched away to war. Shortly before his death, 
Lanier remarked to a friend that his greatest intellectual impulse was during his college 
days at Oglethorpe University. 

Periods of Challenge 

Old Oglethorpe in effect "died at Gettysburg." During the Civil War its students were sol- 
diers, its endowment was lost in Confederate bonds and its buildings were used for barracks 
and hospitals. The school closed in 1862 and afterward conducted classes irregularly at the 
Midway location. In 1870 the institution was briefly relocated in Georgia's postbellum capi- 
tal of Atlanta, at the site of the present City Hall. Oglethorpe at this time produced several 
educational innovations, expanding its curriculum to business and law courses and offer- 
ing the first evening college classes in Georgia. The dislocation of the Reconstruction era 
proved insurmountable, however, and in 1872 Oglethorpe closed its doors for a second time. 

Relocation to North Atlanta 

Oglethorpe University was rechartered in 1913, and in 1915 the cornerstone to the new 
campus was laid at its present location on Peachtree Road in Atlanta. Present to witness the 
occasion were members of the classes of I860 and 1861, thus linking the old and the new 
Oglethorpe University. The driving force behind the university's revival was Dr. Thornwell 
Jacobs, whose grandfather, Professor Ferdinand Jacobs, had served on the faculty of Old 
Oglethorpe. Thornwell Jacobs, who served as president for nearly three decades, intended 
for the new campus to be a 'living memorial" to James Oglethorpe. The distinctive Gothic 
revival architecture of the campus was inspired by the honorary alma mater of James 
Oglethorpe, Corpus Christi College, Oxford. The collegiate coat-of-arms, emblazoned with 
three boar's heads and the inscription Nescit Cedere ("He does not know how to give up"), 
replicated the Oglethorpe family standard. For the college athletic teams, Jacobs chose 
an unusual mascot - a small, persistent seabird, which according to legend, had inspired 
James Oglethorpe while on board ship to Georgia in 1732. The Oglethorpe University nick- 
name "Stormy Petrels" is unique in intercollegiate athletics. 



12 



Periods of Expansion 

Although Presbyterian congregations throughout the South contributed to the revival of 
Oglethorpe University, the school never re-established a denominational affiliation. Since 
the early 1920s Oglethorpe has been an independent, nonsectarian, co-educational institu- 
tion of higher education. Its curricular emphasis continued in the liberal arts and sciences 
and expanded into professional programs in business administration and education. From 
the 1920s through the 1940s, the institution received major contributions from several 
individuals. Some of the most prominent benefactors were John Thomas Lupton, a Coca- 
Cola bottler from Chattanooga, Tennessee; Atlanta business community members Harry 
Hermance and Mrs. Robert J. Lovvry; and newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst. 
The latter gave to Oglethorpe a sizable donation of land. In the early 1930s the Ogletho- 
rpe campus covered approximately 600 acres, including 30-acre Silver Lake, w^hich was 
renamed Lake Phoebe after the publisher's mother, Phoebe Apperson Hearst. 

Thornwell Jacobs launched several projects which brought national and international re- 
pute to Oglethorpe University. In 1923 Jacobs discovered the tomb of James and Elizabeth 
Oglethorpe in Cranham, England. For about a decade Oglethorpe University was involved 
in major college athletics and the Stormy Petrels fielded football teams that defeated both 
Georgia Tech and the University of Georgia. Perhaps Oglethorpe's most famous athlete 
was Luke Appling, enshrined in the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame. Dr. Jacobs in 
the 1930s became, however, one of the earliest and most articulate critics of misplaced 
priorities in intercollegiate athletics and Oglethorpe curtailed development in this area. In 
the early 1930s Oglethorpe attracted widespread attention with its campus radio station, 
WJTL, named after benefactor John Thomas Lupton. Oglethorpe's University of the Air 
was a notable experiment that broadcast college credit courses on the air waves for about 
five years. Oglethorpe University was one of the first institutions to confer honorary doc- 
torates on national figures to recognize superior civic and scientific achievement. Among 
Oglethorpe's early honorary alumni were Woodrow Wilson, Walter Lippman, Franklin 
Roosevelt, Bernard Baruch, Amelia Earhart and David Sarnoff. 

The Crypt of Civilization 

Perhaps the best known of all of Jacobs' innovations was the Oglethorpe Crypt of Civiliza- 
tion, which he proposed in the November 1936 issue oi Scientific American. This prototype 
for the modern time capsule was an effort to provide, for posterity, an encyclopedic inven- 
tory of life and customs from ancient times through the middle of the 20th century. The 
Crypt, sealed in the foundation of Phoebe Hearst Hall in 1940, is not to be opened until 
8113 A.D. It has been hailed by the Guinness Book of World Records as "the first successftil 
attempt to bury a record for future inhabitants or visitors to the planet Earth." 

The Oglethorpe Idea 

In 1944 Oglethorpe University began a new era under Dr. Philip Weltner, a noted attorney 
and educator. With a group of faculty associates Weltner initiated an exciting approach 
to undergraduate education called the "Oglethorpe Idea." It involved one of the earliest 
efforts to develop the Core Curriculum, with the twin aims to "make a life and to make 
a living." The Oglethorpe core, which was applauded by The New York Times, aimed at a 
common learning experience for students with roughly half of every student's academic 
program consisting of courses in "Citizenship" and "Human Understanding." After World 
War II, Oglethorpe University emphasized characteristics it had always cultivated, notably 
close personal relationships, in order to be "a small college superlatively good," in Weltner's 
words. From 1965 through part of 1972 the institution was called Oglethorpe College, but 
the historical identity of Oglethorpe University was so strong that in 1972 the original char- 
tered name was re-established. Oglethorpe continued toward its goals and in the late 1960s 
began a facilities expansion program, which created a new part of the campus, including a 
student center and residential complex. 



13 



A Selective Liberal Arts College 

By the 1980s, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching had classified 
Oglethorpe in the category of Liberal Arts I (later referred to as Baccalaureate Colleges 
- Liberal Arts). These highly selective undergraduate institutions award more than half of 
their degrees in the arts and sciences. By the 1990s the university was listed favorably in the 
Fiske Guide to Colleges, The Princeton Review Student Access Guide, Barron's 300 Best Buys 
in College Education, National Review College Guide -America's Top Liberal Arts Schools 
and many other guides to selective colleges. Oglethorpe is currently a member of the An- 
napolis Group, an organization of the 100 most selective liberal arts colleges. 

The student body, while primarily from the South, has become increasingly cosmopoli- 
tan; in a typical semester, Oglethorpe draws students from about 37 states and 32 foreign 
countries. The university has established outreach through its evening degree program; a 
graduate program in education; a Certified Financial Planner program; and the Oglethorpe 
University Museum of Art. The university is also home to Georgia Shakespeare, a profes- 
sional theatre company. 



Entering the 21st Century 

As Oglethorpe University enters the 21st century, it has demonstrated continued leader- 
ship in the development and revision of its Core Curriculum, with efforts funded by the 
National Endowment for the Humanities. The historic district of the 100-acre campus has 
been designated in the National Register of Historic Places. Enrollment is about 1,100 with 
plans for controlled growth to about 1,500. Oglethorpe remains on the forefront of educa- 
tional innovation, with a curriculum that features interactive learning. The university uses 
a variety of effective pedagogical techniques - perhaps most notable are the peer tutoring 
program, classroom learning that is actively connected to contemporary experience through 
internships and other opportunities for experiential education and a unique program in ur- 
ban leadership that invites students to consider ways in which they can become community 
leaders for the future. Reflecting the contemporary growth of the city of Atlanta, Ogletho- 
rpe has recently developed a distinctive international dimension. Students at the univer- 
sity may complement their campus programs with foreign studies at sister institutions in 
Argentina, China, Ecuador, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Monaco, the Netherlands, 
Russia and Spain. As Oglethorpe University continues to grow, academically and materially, 
it is ever mindful of its distinguished heritage and will still remain, in the affectionate words 
of poet and alumnus Sidney Lanier, a "college of the heart." 



Presidents of the University 

Carlyle Pollock Beman, 1836-1840 
Samuel Kennedy Talmage, 1841-1865 
William M. Cunningham, 1869-1870 
David Wills, 1870-1872 
Thornwell Jacobs, 1915-1943 
Philip Weltner, 1944-1953 
James Whitney Bunting, 1953-1955 
Donald Wilson, 1956-1957 



Donald Charles Agnew, 1958-1964 
George Seward, Acting, 1964-1965 
Paul Rensselaer Beall, 1965-1967 
Paul Kenneth Vonk, 1967-1975 
Manning Mason Pattillo, Jr., 1975-1988 
Donald Sheldon Stanton, 1988-1999 
Larry Denton Large, 1999-2005 
Lawrence Miller Schall, 2005- 



14 






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15 



Oglethorpe University's facilities are generally accessible to physically impaired students. 
All buildings on campus are equipped with either ramps or ground-floor entry. With the 
exception of Lupton Hall, the primary classroom and office buildings have elevators to all 
floors. Appointments with faculty members or administrators with inaccessible offices are 
scheduled in accessible areas. Only three classrooms are not accessible to those physically 
impaired. When appropriate, classes are reassigned so all classes are available to all stu- 
dents. All residence halls include accessible housing space. 

Smoking is prohibited in all campus buildings at Oglethorpe University. This includes 
classrooms, residence halls, offices, laboratories, meeting rooms, lounge areas, restrooms, 
corridors, stairwells, Weltner Library, Dorough Field House, the Schmidt Center, Emerson 
Student Center and any other interior spaces. 

Conant Performing Arts Center 



The Conant Center, completed in 1997, is a four-story facility located behind the Philip 
Weltner Library. It provides a permanent home for Georgia Shakespeare and for classes in 
theatre and music for Oglethorpe's undergraduate liberal arts students. It houses a main 
stage theatre with seating for 500, a lobby, rehearsal and dressing rooms, an area for recep- 
tions, offices and shipping and receiving facilities. 

Dorough Field House 

The Dorough Field House, renovated in 2005, is the site of intercollegiate basketball and 
volleyball and large campus gatherings such as concerts and commencement exercises. 
Built in i960 and first renovated in 1979, the building is named for the late R. E. Dorough, 
a former trustee of the university. 

Emerson Student Center 



The Emerson Student Center is named in honor of William A. and Jane S. Emerson, bene- 
factors of the university. As the hub of campus life, the Emerson Student Center houses the 
dining hall, the student government office, the student newspaper and yearbook offices, the 
student post office, a lounge, television area and a game room. The student center houses 
the Division of Student Affairs, including the vice president, residence life, counseling cen- 
ter, career services, Greek Affairs, health services, the Center for Civic Engagement and the 
director of musical activities. 

Goodman Hail 

Goodman Hall is home to Information Technology Services, a computer laboratory and 
the administrative offices of Oglethorpe's evening degree and Financial Planner programs. 
It was built in 1956 and renovated in 1970, when it was transformed from a men's into a 
women's residence hall, and 1997, when it became an administrative building. 

Goslin HoM 

Goslin Hall, named in honor of Dr. Roy N. Goslin, the late Professor Emeritus of Physics, 
was completed in 1971 and houses the Division of Natural Sciences. Lecture halls and labo- 
ratories for biology, chemistry and physics are located in the building. In 1979 an additional 
physics laboratory, made possible by a grant from the Olin Foundation, opened. All labora- 
tories were renovated in 1985 and again in 2001 when major reconstruction was completed 
in the interior of the building with the assistance of the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation 
and other major foundations, as well as a bequest from Eugene W. Ivy '49. A computer labo- 
ratory is also available for student use. 



16 



Hearst^HaM 

Phoebe Hearst Hall was built in 1915 in the neo-Gothic architectural style that dominates 
the Oglethorpe campus. The building is named in honor of Phoebe Apperson Hearst, the 
mother of William Randolph Hearst, Sr. 

It was renovated in the fall of 1972 as a classroom and faculty office building. Most classes, 
with the exception of science, communication, business and mathematics, are held in this 
building, which is located directly across from Lupton Hall. Newly equipped multi-media 
classrooms include the Georgia Power Model Classroom. 

The dominant feature of the building is the beautiful Great Hall, the site of many tradi- 
tional and historic events at Oglethorpe. The university bookstore and the much-publicized 
Crypt of Civilization are located on the lower level of the building. The capsule was sealed 
on May 28, 1940 and is not to be opened until May 28, 8113. 

Sheffield Alumni Suite 

The Sheffield Alumni Suite, adjacent to the Great Hall in Hearst Hall, is named in honor of 
O.K. Sheffield '53, a loyal supporter and member emeritus of the Board of Trustees. Over 
the years this suite of rooms has served as a parlor, office of the provost, classroom and 
meeting room. Today it provides an inviting space in which alumni, students and faculty 
gather. Memorabilia is on display in the anteroom along with a portrait of its namesake. 

Lupton Hall 

Lupton Hall, built in 1920 and named in honor of John Thomas Lupton, was one of the 
three original buildings on the present Oglethorpe University campus. Renovated in 1973 
and 1996, it contains primarily administrative offices, faculty offices, classrooms and a 300- 
seat auditorium. Administrative offices located in Lupton Hall include the president, vice 
president for business and finance, provost, public relations, vice president for development 
and alumni relations, vice president for enrollment and financial aid and the registrar. The 
cast-bell carillon in the Lupton tower has 42 bells, which chime the quarter hours. 

J. Mack Ro^ji^onJHIall 

Renovated in 2001, J. Mack Robinson Hall is a state-of-the-art classroom and faculty office 
building, which also houses art studios, a darkroom, video editing facilities, a slide library 
and a resource center for study abroad. The building is named in honor of Atlanta business- 
man and philanthropist J. Mack Robinson, who received an honorary doctorate in philoso- 
phy from Oglethorpe in 1995. 

Steve Schmidt Sport and Recreation Center 

Dedicated in 1995 and renovated in 2005, the Schmidt Center is a 22,000-square-foot ad- 
dition to Dorough Field House. The center has basketball and volleyball courts, a running 
track, seven offices, a conference room, locker rooms, a weight room, racquetball courts, a 
training room and an entrance lobby. The facility is used primarily for recreation and intra- 
mural sports. The center is named for the late Stephen J. Schmidt '40, a former member of 
the Board of Trustees who personally led the ftindraising effijrt for the addition. 



17 



Philip Weltner Library 



Located in Lowry Hall the library functions as a gateway to research information and ser- 
vices in support of the university's academic programs. The library also houses the univer- 
sity archives and supports the extracurricular interests of Oglethorpe's community. 

The library contains over 150,000 volumes of books, reference materials, print periodicals, 
audio-visual materials and microfilm. Two areas of note include a collection of more than 
3,000 DVDs and a juvenile literature collection. In addition, the library provides campus- 
wide computer access to the catalog, research databases and resources, GALILEO (Geor- 
gia's Virtual Library) and more than 13,000 full-text periodical titles. Many of the library's 
virtual resources are also available online. Services available to students include reference 
and instruction, circulation, course reserves, interlibrary-loan and borrowing privileges at 
libraries in the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education. A formal reading atrium, 
private rooms, individual carrels and a 24-hour lounge offer ample opportunities for both 
quiet study and group work. Other equipment and facilities include computer workstations 
for library research, two small media viewing rooms, the larger Earl Dolive Theatre, a pho- 
tocopier and a microfilm/fiche reader. For more information about Philip Weltner Library 
visit www.oglethorpe.edu (keyword: library). 

Lowry Hall was built in 1927 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The library 
moved to its present location in 1972. A renovation in 1992 combined the building's original 
neo-Gothic exterior with a contemporary and greatly expanded interior. At that time, the 
library was named after Philip Weltner, who served as university president from 1944 to 
1953. The Oglethorpe Museum of Art and the Learning Resources Center are also located 
in Lowry Hall. 

Oglethorpe University Museum of Art 

Oglethorpe University Museum of Art, occupying the entire third floor of the Philip 
Weltner Library, opened in the spring of 1993 after extensive renovations of the previous 
Oglethorpe University Art Gallery. The museum, covering 7,000 square feet, has a comfort- 
able, intimate environment that includes three spacious galleries, a gift shop and offices. 
It is considered an important cultural addition to Atlanta's growing art scene, drawdng 
thousands of visitors each year. 

In addition to the permanent collection, three exhibitions are held each year, which feature 
artwork that is international, representational, often figurative and spiritual in nature. 
Recent exhibitions such as "Masterpieces from European Artist Colonies, 1830-1930" and 
"The Mystical Arts of Tibet: Featuring Personal Sacred Objects of the Dalai Lama" have 
garnered national media attention and brought international art experts from around the 
world to lecture on campus. For museum hours and exhibit information, call 404-364-8555 
or visit www.oglethorpe.edu (keyword: museum). 

Traer Residence Hall 



Built in 1969, Traer Hall is a three-story freshmen residence that houses I68 students. 
Construction of the building was made possible through the generosity of the late Wayne 
S. Traer '28. The double occupancy rooms arranged in suites open onto a central plaza 
courtyard. 

Phase 11 Residence Hall 



The Phase II Residence Hall opened in the fall of 2007- The building is coed and 
accommodates 148 upper-class students. All rooms are suite-style with four single bed- 



18 



rooms and two bathrooms per suite. Amenities in the building include laundry rooms, 
game room, kitchen and the J. Frederick Agel, Sr. '52 conference room. 

Dempsey Residence Hall 



Opened in the spring of 1996, Dempsey Hall is coed, non-smoking and accommodates 69 
students. It is designed as a more traditional facility with a central entrance. The rooms 
consist of two-, three- and four-person suites off central hallways. Dempsey Hall has been 
reserved for freshmen students. 

Clare Findley ''TIa" Magbee Residence Hall 



Magbee Hall opened in the fall of 2005 and was officially named in the fall of 2008. The 
building is coed and accommodates 80 upper-class students. All rooms are suite-style 
with four single bedrooms and two bathrooms per suite. Amenities in the building include 
laundry rooms, game room, kitchen, conference room and theater. The residence hall is 
connected to and serves as an entrance to North Hall. Tia Magbee '56 served as a member 
of the Board of the Oglethorpe National Alumni Association and was a valued and enthusi- 
astic member of the Oglethorpe University Board of Trustees from 1991 until her death on 
November 28, 2005. 

North Residence Hall 



The North Hall opened in the fall of 2005. The building is coed and accommodates 80 up- 
per-class students. All rooms are suite-style with four single bedrooms and two bathrooms 
per suite. Amenities in the building include laundry rooms, game room, kitchen, conference 
room and theater. 

Greek Row 

Greek Row consists of six houses devoted to two sororities - Chi Omega and Sigma Sigma 
Sigma - and four fraternities - Chi Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha Order and Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. Each house features one-bedroom doubles with a shared bathroom and 
kitchen facilities. The houses on Greek Row were constructed in 1994 and renovated in 
2006. 



19 



Computer Facilities and Services 

Every residence hall room, faculty office and appropriate staff office has a connection to the 
Oglethorpe computer network and through that intranet, to the greater world of the Inter- 
net with all its resources. Access is also available to students through computers located in 
the library, Goslin and Goodman Halls. Through the PetrelNet users can also connect to 
the Voyager Library System, which provides access to the library's catalog and to GALILEO. . 
The GALILEO system provides access to databases containing bibliographical information, 
summaries and in many cases access to full text of articles and abstracts. 

Statement of Computing Ethics 

All users of Oglethorpe University electronic resources have the responsibility to use infor- 
mation technology in an effective, efficient, ethical and lawful manner. The ethical and legal 
standards that must be maintained are derived directly from standards of common sense 
and common decency that apply to the use of any public resource. Violations of any condi- 
tions will be considered to be unethical and may possibly be unlawful. In accordance with 
established university practices, violations may result in disciplinary review which could 
result in legal action. The following list, though not comprehensive, specifies some respon- 
sibilities that accompany computer use, be it on centralized computing hardware or any 
other Oglethorpe electronic resource. 

General Responsibilities 

1. Use of resources must be employed only for the purpose in which they are intended. 
University-supported computing includes: authorized research, instructional and 
administrative activities. Our personnel and computing resources cannot be used 
for commercial purposes, monetary gain or unauthorized research. 

2. Computer users must not search for, access or copy directories, programs, files, 
disks or data not belonging to them unless they have specific authorization to do so. 
Programs, subroutines and data provided on Oglethorpe's central computers can- 
not be downloaded or taken to other computer sites without permission. Programs 
obtained from commercial sources or other computer installations may not be used 
unless written authority to use them has been obtained. Oglethorpe equipment or 
software may not be used to violate the terms of any license agreement. 

3. Individuals should not encroach on others' use of the computer. This includes: 

Using electronic resources for non-academic activities or other trivial applica- 
tions such that it prevents others from using these resources for their primary 
intended purpose; 

- Sending frivolous or excessive messages or mail either locally or over the net- 
works; 

- Using excessive amounts of storage; printing excessive copies of programs, files 
or data; 

- Running grossly inefficient programs when efficient ones are available. 

4. Individuals must not attempt to modify system facilities or attempt to crash the 
system. Nor should individuals attempt to subvert the restrictions associated with 
computer accounts, networks or computer software protections. 

Email and Computer Use Policy 

Oglethorpe University provides a wide variety of computing, networking and other technol- 
ogy facilities in order to promote and support academic pursuits. Information Technology 
Services (IT Services) maintains and supports computing and networking services as well 
as other technologies in support of the university mission. 

20 



By using university technology resources, all users agree to abide by all university rules and 
policies, as well as any and all local, state and federal laws. All users have the responsibility 
to use computing technology resources in an effective, efficient, ethical and lawful manner. 
Violations of this policy may result in suspension, without notice, of privileges to use the re- 
sources and services, disciplinary action, including possible termination and/or legal action. 
Any questions regarding this and other policies should be addressed to the director of IT 
Services. Policies are updated from time to time. The most current versions can be found at 
www.oglethorpe.edu (keyword: technology). 

General Responsibilities 

1. Individual use: Network and computing accounts are for individual use and should 
only be used by the person to whom it has been issued. Users are responsible for all 
actions originating through their account or network connection. Users must not 
impersonate others or attempt to misrepresent or conceal their identity in electron- 
ic messages and actions. Users must not use university resources for any purpose 
inconsistent with Oglethorpe's status as a non-profit entity. 

2. Email use: Oglethorpe University encourages the appropriate use of email. All users 
are expected to adhere to the bounds of decency, law, ethics, common sense and 
good taste in email communications. Confidentiality of email is not guaranteed. 
Users should not assum.e that messages they send or receive are absolutely private. 
Views expressed by individual users are not necessarily the views of Oglethorpe 
University. 

3. Intellectual property: Users must comply with all copyright laws and fair use provi- 
sions, software licenses and all other state and federal laws governing intellectual 
property. Inappropriate reproduction or distribution of copyright music, movies, 
computer software, text, images, etc., is strictly prohibited. 

Privacy 

Oglethorpe University will take reasonable efforts to ensure that user files and email mes- 
sages remain private. Further, the university does not routinely monitor the contents of 
user files and/or messages. However, given the nature of computers and electronic com- 
munications, the university cannot in any way guarantee, unless legal requirements dictate 
otherwise, the absolute privacy of files and information. Users must take reasonable pre- 
cautions and understand that there is a risk that in some circumstances others can, either 
intentionally or unintentionally, gain access to files and/or messages. Where it appears that 
the integrity, security or functionality of the university's computer or network resources are 
at risk, Oglethorpe University reserves the right to take whatever actions it deems neces- 
sary (including, but not limited to, monitoring activity and viewing files) to investigate and 
resolve the situation. 

The university will treat personal files and communications as confidential and will only 
examine or disclose their contents when authorized by the owner or under the following 
circumstances: 

1. Criminal investigation: IT Services will comply with any criminal or civil legal 
proceedings and provide any and all data requested in a legal subpoena in a timely 
fashion. The user will be informed of this action unless IT Services is legally bound 
to secrecy. 

2. Termination of employment: IT Services will, upon written request of a department 
head and/or vice president and after verification that a user has left the university, 
change that user's password and provide the new password to the user's former 
department head or director. 

3. Internal administrative request (e.g., harassment allegation, discrimination, job 
performance, etc.): Any request of an internal nature to examine a user's email or 
electronic data must be made in writing to the director of IT Services. Once this re- 
quest is received, the combined authorization of the Chief Information Officer and 

21 



the appropriate provost and/or vice president is necessary to approve the request 
and outUne the scope and method of the search, who will be provided the results of 
the search and decide whether the affected user will be notified and if so, if it will 
be before or after the search is completed. In general, users vidll be notified of the 
search unless the circumstances of the request dictate otherwise. 

Use of Oglethorpe's computer, network and telecommunication resources and services con- 
stitutes acceptance of this Email and Computer Use Policy. 

All professional staff members of the IT Services department are required to sign a confi- 
dentiality agreement regarding any and all user information they may come across in the 
performance of their duties. 



22 




23 



The admission policy of Oglethorpe University is based on an individual selection process. 
Throughout its history, Oglethorpe has welcomed students from all areas of the country, as 
well as from abroad, as candidates for degrees. The admission staff selects for admission 
to the university applicants who present strong evidence of purpose, maturity, scholastic 
ability and the potential for success at Oglethorpe. Should there be any question that these 
qualities exist in an applicant, the student will be required to participate in an on-campus 
interview with the vice president for enrollment. 

Traditional undergraduate application procedures and admission policies are detailed in 
the following paragraphs. 

Application Requirements and Procedures 



All documents gathered by the university for admission purposes concerning applicants 
become the property of the university upon receipt. Documents for applicants are retained 
by the university for a period of two years and are not under any circumstances returned to 
the applicant. Applicants may apply under one of the following plans: 

• Early Action Admission (Non-Binding): Students with a strong interest in at- 
tending the university are encouraged to consider Early Action Admission. Com- 
pleted applications and all required credentials must be postmarked by December 
5. Notification letters of the admission decision are sent no later than December 20 
unless the admission committee requires additional information. Admitted Early 
Action students who indicate an interest in scholarships receive priority consider- 
ation. The required deposit is refundable until May 1, provided the student informs 
the university in writing of the decision not to enroll. 

• Regular Decision Admission: Students may apply at any time. Applications are 
reviewed on a rolling basis as long as space in the class is available. Notification 
letters are mailed within two weeks of completion unless the admission committee 
requires additional information. The required deposit is refundable until May 1, 
provided the student informs the university in writing of the decision not to enroll. 

All applicants must submit the following credentials: 

• A completed application for admission. Students may submit a paper version of the 
application or apply online at www.oglethorpe.edu (keyword: admission). 

• A $35.00 application fee. The fee may be paid by credit card, check or money order. 
Please make the check or money order payable to Oglethorpe University. 

• A typed 250-word application essay. 

• A completed Oglethorpe recommendation form or a letter from a high school 
teacher or guidance counselor who can attest to the applicant's academic ability. 

Achievement tests, portfolios or videos are not required for admission, but will be consid- 
ered if submitted. Interviews and campus visits are strongly recommended. 

Beginning Freshman Applicants 



To be considered for admission as a freshman, applicants should normally have or be in 
the process of completing a secondary school program including appropriate courses in 
English, social studies, mathematics and science. While an admission decision is typically 
based on a partial secondary school transcript, a final transcript showing evidence of aca- 
demic work completed and official graduation must be sent to the admission office by the 
candidate's school. 



24 



Eligible students must submit the following additional credentials: 

• An official copy of the secondary school transcript or the General Educational De- 
velopment (GED) test certificate. 

• Official copy of either the ACT or SAT scores. If the ACT or SAT scores do not ap- 
pear on the applicant's high school transcript, the applicant must request that the 
testing agency forward a score report to Oglethorpe University. Our college code 
number for ACT is 0850 and our college code number for SAT is 5521. 

• If an applicant has earned college credit while in high school (including pre-college 
summer programs), he or she must request that the college or Advanced Placement 
service which granted the credit forward an official record to Oglethorpe University. 

Home Schoo|edjPLpplicants 

To be considered for admission upon completion of secondary school requirements in a 
home school, applicants must submit the following additional credentials: 

• A portfolio recording all high school work completed including courses studied, 
textbooks, assignments and extracurricular achievements. 

• A personal on-campus interview with an admission officer. 

• An additional letter of recommendation. 

• Ahome school transcript, if applicable. 

Transfer Applicants 

To be considered for admission as a transfer student, applicants must have earned a mini- 
mum of 24 semester hours or 36 quarter hours of acceptable college credit with a mini- 
mum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (on a 4.0 scale) after completing high school 
or the GED. Applicants who have earned less than the minimum must submit the college 
transcript(s) and follow the instructions above for Beginning Freshman Applicants. Trans- 
fer applicants on probation or exclusion from another institution will not be considered for 
admission. 

In addition to the standard requirements, eligible transfer applicants must submit an of- 
ficial transcript from each and every college or university the applicant has attended and 
certification of good academic standing at the most recent or present college. 

Oglethorpe University accepts as transfer credit courses that are comparable to university 
courses and that are applicable to a degree program offered at Oglethorpe. Acceptable work 
must be reflected on an official transcript and must be completed with a grade of "C-" or 
better. Oglethorpe does not accept a "D" grade as transfer credit. For transfer credit that 
may apply toward fulfillment of Core Curriculum requirements, please see the Core Cur- 
riculum section of this Bulletin. 

Transfer Work under Articulation Agreements 

Oglethorpe offers the opportunity to transfer work through collaborative effiirts with other 
institutions by way of Ari;iculation Agreements. Formal agreements have been made with 
the following schools: 

• Teach for America in early childhood education at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, 
Georgia 

• Traditional program and honors program at Georgia Perimeter College in Atlanta, 
Georgia 

• The Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences and the Arts in Hot Springs, Ar- 
kansas 



25 



• The Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts in Natchitoches, Louisiana 

• The Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science in Columbus, Mississippi 

Additional Transfer Credit Policies and Residency 
Requirements 



The university accepts a maximum of 64 hours of credit in transfer. A minimum of 64 se- 
mester hours must be completed at Oglethorpe as well as at least half of the semester hours 
required for a major to earn an Oglethorpe degree, with 52 of the last 64 hours earned 
in residence. Credit earned at Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education (ARCHE) 
institutions on a cross-registration basis and credit earned in an approved study abroad 
program are considered Oglethorpe credit. Credit may be transferred in from the following: 

• A maximum of 30 semester hours of credit earned through the United States 
Armed Forces Institute (USAFI) 

• A maximum of 32 semester hours of credit earned through a combination of the 
following programs: 

1. The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests 

2. The Advanced Placement (AP) tests 

3. The International Baccalaureate Program (IB) 

For more information on these areas, please see the Credit by Examination section 
of this Bulletin. 

• Students who hold the R.N. credential from an appropriately accredited institution 
are awarded credit for their arts and sciences courses. To earn a bachelor's degree, 
the student must complete the Core Curriculum, a major and other applicable 
requirements. 

• Credits earned at post-secondary institutions accredited by the six regional accred- 
iting bodies (e.g., Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on 
Colleges, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Higher 
Education, etc.) 

• Credits earned at post-secondary institutions accredited by national crediting bod- 
ies (e.g., Association of Independent Schools and Colleges, American Association 
of Bible Colleges, etc.) may be accepted. Student transcripts are evaluated on an 
individual basis. Actual catalog course descriptions and relevant course syllabi must 
be provided by the student. Oglethorpe's registrar determines transfer credit. 

• Courses recognized by the American Council on Education (ACE) may be accepted 
by the registrar. Programs not recognized by ACE are not accepted. 

International Applicants 



Admission to Oglethorpe is open to qualified students from all countries. Applicants who 
are able to provide evidence of suitable academic background, adequate financial resources 
and seriousness of purpose are encouraged to apply. 

Eligible students must submit the following additional credentials: 

• Original, official academic credentials including secondary school, college and uni- 
versity documents, certificates or diplomas from the institution issuing the docu- 
ments. An English translation and "course-by-course" evaluation is required for 
all transcripts in languages other than English. Evaluations must include semester 
credit hours, grades and detailed course descriptions. Applications for evaluation 
are available in the Office of Admission or by calling Josef Silny and Associates, 



26 



Inc., at 305-273-1616. Students who wish to transfer in college or university credit 
must also supply a course description in English for each course completed. 

• A completed Financial Statement of Support and bank statement. 

All students whose first language is not English must also submit one of the following to be 
considered for admission: 

• An official transcript from an ELS, Inc., language center indicating completion of 
level 109. 

• Official scores of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Oglethorpe 
University requires a minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-administered test 
and a minimum of 213 on the computer-based TOEFL. Our college code number 
for the TOEFL is 5521. 

• Official copy of the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) with a minimum score of 500 
on the critical reading section of the examination. Our college code number for the 
SAT is 5521. 

• Official transcript from a regionally accredited United States college or university 
with a combined cumulative grade point average of 2.8 with no grade below a "C" in 
two English composition courses. 

All students whose first language is English must also submit one of the following to be 
considered for admission: 

• Official copy of the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) with a minimum score of 500 
in the critical reading section of the examination. Our college code number for the 
SAT is 5521. 

• Official copy of the American College Test (ACT) with a minimum composite score 
of 21. Our college code number for the ACT is 0850. 

• Official copy of the "A" or "O" level examinations with above average scores. 

All international students' secondary and post-secondary school credentials are subject to 
the acceptance criteria stated for his or her country in the American Association of Colle- 
giate Registrars and Admission Officers (AACROA) world education series, governed by the 
National Council on the Evaluation of Foreign Educational Credentials, 1717 Massachusetts 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. 

Admission Appeal 

A student who has been refused admission may appeal for reconsideration in writing to the 
vice president for enrollment. Additional evidence of academic success must be submitted 
with the letter of appeal. The student may be required to schedule a personal interview. 

Joint Enrollment Applicants 



Students who have attained junior standing or higher at their secondary schools may apply 
for enrollment in suitable courses offered at the university. Admission to the joint enroll- 
ment program requires that eligible candidates have the social maturity to benefit from a 
collegiate experience, possess a minimum cumulative grade point average of "B" and have 
achieved a combined score on the critical reading and math sections of the Scholastic As- 
sessment Test (SAT) of 1140. Normally no more than five courses may be taken as a joint 
enrollment student. Please contact the admission office for an application. 



27 



Early Admission (Early Entrance) 



A gifted student of unusual maturity whose secondary school record shows excellent aca- 
demic performance through the junior year in a college preparatory program and whose 
score on a standardized assessment test is high may submit his or her application for 
admission to the university for enrollment after the junior year of high school. In addition 
to the required credentials for freshman admission, eligible candidates must submit a letter 
of support from their parents and participate in an on-campus interview with an admission 
officer. 

Transient Students 

Students in transient status are those who are enrolled and pursuing their degree at another 
institution and who wish to take a course at Oglethorpe. To enroll, transient students must 
secure permission from their home institution certifying that the institution will accept the 
course work completed at Oglethorpe as transfer credit. In addition, a letter of good stand- 
ing or a current transcript must be sent to the admission office. 

Special Status Admission 

Special status admission is designed for students who wish to take a limited number of 
post-baccalaureate classes at Oglethorpe or for non-traditional students who desire to begin 
college course work prior to being admitted to a degree-seeking program. Students may be 
admitted to Oglethorpe's traditional undergraduate program as a special status candidate if 
they meet one of the following criteria: 

• They are at least 25 years of age and at least five years removed from their last edu- 
cational experience. 

• They have graduated from another accredited college or university. 

Special status students may enroll for a maximum of 16 semester hours. Individuals desir- 
ing to enroll for additional courses must apply as regular, degree-seeking candidates. 

To apply for special status admission, students must submit: 

• A completed application form. 

• A $35 nonrefundable application fee. The fee may be paid by credit card, check or 
money order. Please make the check or money order payable to Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity. 

• An official copy of the transcript from the last institution attended or a copy of a 
college diploma. 

Special status students are not eligible for financial assistance. 

Re-admission 

Students who leave the university whether in good academic standing or not and who wish 
to return after an absence of a year or more should contact the admission office to request 
an application for re-admission. The completed application and official transcripts fi-om all 
colleges and universities attended must be submitted for re-admission consideration. Stu- 
dents not in good academic standing will be re-admitted to the university with the approval 
of the provost. All students re-admitted to the university are governed by current gradua- 
tion requirements. Any exceptions are granted at the discretion of the provost. 



28 



Placement Examinations 



Any student with previous study in a foreign language planning to continue study in that 
language is required to take a placement examination. Students pursuing a Bachelor of 
Arts degree must complete a minimum of one semester of a foreign language at the second 
semester elementary-level or higher. 

Placement for Introductory Science Courses 



All 100-level introductory science courses (BIO 101 General Biology I, CHM 101 General 
Chemistry I, CHM lOlL General Chemistry Laboratory I, PHY 101 General Physics I and 
PHY lOlL Introductory Physics Laboratory I) have the same mathematics prerequisite. 
There are three ways that students can fulfill this mathematics requirement: (1) by achiev- 
ing a score of 2, 3, 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB or BC Examination; (2) 
by achieving a score of 550 or higher on the Mathematics Section of the SAT (the College 
Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Assessment Test) or a score of 22 or higher on the 
Mathematics Section of the ACT (the American College Testing Program Assessment); or 
(3) by completing MAT 103 Precalculus at Oglethorpe University (or the equivalent course 
at a college or university; high school Precalculus alone does NOT fulfill the prerequisite) 
vdth a grade of "C-" or higher. PHY 201 College Physics I has MAT 131 Calculus I as a pre- 
or co-requisite, meaning that MAT 131 must be taken simultaneously with PHY 201 if MAT 
131 has not been completed earlier. 

Credit by Examination 

There are three testing programs through which students may earn credit for required or 
elective courses. Any student who has questions about these examinations should consult 
the registrar. No more than 32 semester hours of credit will be accepted from a combina- 
tion of the programs described below. 

College Level Examination Program - CLEP 

Oglethorpe awards credit for CLEP to students who achieve a minimum score of 50 on a 
Subject Examination. Please contact the Oglethorpe registrar to learn which CLEP ex- 
aminations are granted credit. CLEP examinations normally are taken before the student 
matriculates at Oglethorpe. Only under special circumstances wdll credit be awarded for an 
examination taken after the student completes his or her first semester at the university. 

Advanced Placement Program 

The university encourages students who have completed Advanced Placement (AP) exami- 
nations of the College Entrance Examination Board to submit their scores prior to enroll- 
ment for evaluation for college credit. Please contact the admission office or the registrar for 
the procedures to receive credit for AP exams. Academic credit will be given in the appro- 
priate area to students presenting Advanced Placement grades of 3, 4 or 5; neither credit 
nor exemption will be given for a grade of 2. Specific policies are indicated in the chart that 
follows. These are subject to change at any time. 

International Baccalaureate Program 

Students who have studied in an approved International Baccalaureate (IB) program are 
encouraged to apply for credit based on scores earned. Please contact the admission office 
or the registrar for the procedures to receive credit for IB exams. Scores must be 5, 6 or 7 
on the Higher Level Exam to be considered for college credit. Sophomore standing may be 
awarded to students who complete the IB diploma and obtain a total of 33 points or better 
for the full program, assuming all examination scores are 4 or better and no Higher Level 
Exam score is below 5. Specific policies are indicated in the chart that follows. 



29 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT and INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUPIEATE CREDIT CHART 

Accepted Examination Grades (unless stated otherwise) 

AP: 3, 4, 5 / IB (Higher Level Exam): 5, 6, 7 



AP/IB Exam 



Hours Awarded Course Equivalents 



Art 

Studio 
History 



Elective Credit 
Elective Credit 



Biology 

Grade 4 or 5 AP 

Grade 3 AP 



English 

Language and Composition 
Grade 4 or 5 AP, 6 or 7 IB 
Grade 3 AP or 5 IB 
Literature and Composition 
Grade 4 or 5 AP, 6 or 7 IB 
Grade 3 AP or 5 IB 



Mathematics' 

Calculus AB 
Calculus BC 
Statistics 



Physics' 

Physics B 
Physics C 



10 

4 



GEN 102 Natural Science: The Biological Sciences and 
(subject to placement) BIO 102 General Biology II 
GEN 102 Natural Science: The Biological Sciences 



Chemistry 






Grade 4 or 5 AP 


4 


CHM 101 General Chemistry I (subject to placement exam) 


Grade 3 AP 


4 


GEN 101 Natural Science: The Physical Sciences 


Computer Science' 


4 


CSC 243 Principles of Computer Programming in C++ 


Economics 






Microeconomics 


4 


ECO 121 Introduction to Economics 


Macroeconomics 


4 


Elective Credit 



Elective Credit 

Essay will be evaluated by English faculty upon request. 

Elective Credit 

Essay will be evaluated by English faculty upon request. 



French 

Language 
Literature 


8 
8 


PRE 101, PRE 102 Elementary French I and II 
General credit in French 


German 

Language 
Literature 


8 
8 


GER 101, GER 102 Elementary German I and II 
General credit in German 


Government' 


4 


POL 101 Introduction to American Politics 


History 

American 
European 


4 
4 


Elective Credit 
Elective Credit 


Japanese 


8 


JPN 101, JPN 102 Elementary Japanese 1 and II 


Latin 


8 


LAT 101, LAT 102 Elementary Latin I and II 



MAT 131 Calculus I 

MAT 131, MAT 132 Calculus I and II 

MAT 111 Statistics 



Music' 






Theory 


4 


Content wdll be evaluated by music faculty 


Appreciation 


4 


COR 103 Music and Culture 



PHY 101, PHY 102 General Physics I and II 
PHY 201, PHY 202 College Physics I and II 
GEN 101 Natural Science: The Physical Sciences 



Psychology' 



PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 



Spanish 

Language 
Literature 



SPN 101, SPN 102 Elementary Spanish I and II 
General credit in Spanish 



' Credit for the IB exam will be determined through discussion with the faculty within the appropriate academic 
field. Any exams not included in this chart should be brought to the attention of the registrar and the appropriate 
faculty members will determine credit. 



30 



FINANCIAL 



.^^ 




31 



Programs 

Oglethorpe University offers a variety of strategies and resources to keep the net cost of 
an Oglethorpe education affordable. Both need-based aid and awards based on academic 
achievement are available. Students interested in financial aid should complete the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). FAFSA is the approved needs-analysis form 
by which students may apply for the following need-based programs: Federal Pell Grant, 
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal 
Work-Study, Federal Stafford Loan, Leveraging Educational Assistance Program and the 
Oglethorpe Need-Based Grant. After a student submits the FAFSA to the federal proces- 
sor, the school will receive from the processor an Institutional Student Information Record 
(ISIR). Upon acceptance to the university and receipt of the students ISIR, Oglethorpe's 
financial aid professionals will prepare a comprehensive financial aid package, which may 
include assistance from any one or more of the following sources: 

James Edward Oglethorpe Scholarships provide full tuition for four years of undergradu- 
ate study, if scholarship criteria continue to be met. Recipients are selected on the basis of 
an academic competition held on campus in the spring of each year. Students must achieve 
a minimum SAT/ACT score and earn a minimum cumulative grade point average in a com- 
petitive high school curriculum and demonstrate a superior record of leadership in extra- 
curricular activities either in school or in the community. This scholarship is renewable for 
a total of 4 years provided recipients maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average 
of 3.2 and complete a minimum of 12 semester hours each fall and spring semester. For ap- 
plication procedures and deadlines, contact the admission office. 

Civic Engagement Scholarships provide full tuition for four years of undergraduate study 
if scholarship criteria continue to be met. Candidates must demonstrate a deep commit- 
ment to service and leadership in their community and the promise of continued exemplary 
service while a student at Oglethorpe. Applicants are expected to participate in a competi- 
tion on campus and to submit an essay detailing their history of service. Eligible candidates 
must achieve a minimum SAT or ACT score and earn a minimum cumulative grade point 
average in a competitive high school curriculum. This scholarship is renewable for a total of 
four years provided recipients maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.2 
and complete a minimum of 12 semester hours each fall and spring semester. For applica- 
tion procedures, deadlines and requirements, contact the admission office. 

Georgia Shakespeare Scholarships provide full tuition for four years of undergraduate 
study if scholarship criteria continue to be met. Candidates must demonstrate a commit- 
ment to performing and understanding Shakespeare. Applicants are expected to participate 
in a competition on campus by performing a prepared monologue, participating in a semi- 
nar on Shakespeare and writing an essay based on the seminar discussion. This scholarship 
is renewable for a total of four years provided recipients maintain a minimum cumulative 
grade point average of 3.2 and complete a minimum of 12 semester hours each fall and 
spring semester. Continued dedication to theater and to Oglethorpe's professional theater 
company in residence, Georgia Shakespeare, is expected. For application procedures, dead- 
lines and requirements, contact the admission office. 

Oglethorpe Scholars Awards (OSA) (including Presidential Scholarships, Oxford 
Scholarships, University Scholarships and Lanier Scholarships) are based on achievement 
and available to entering students with superior academic ability. A fundamental aim of 
Oglethorpe University is to prepare students for leadership roles in society. One way of 
promoting this purpose is to give special recognition to students who demonstrate superior 
academic abilities as undergraduates. Scholarships range from $4,000 to $15,000. 



32 



Recipients of funds from this program are expected to maintain specified levels of academic 
achievement and make a significant contribution to the Oglethorpe community. Each 
avv^ard is for one year but can be renewed on the basis of an annual evaluation of academic 
and other performance factors. 

Oglethorpe Christian Scholarships are awarded to freshmen who are residents of Georgia 
and who demonstrate active participation in their churches. Academic qualifications for 
consideration include SAT scores of 1100 or higher and a senior class rank in the upper 25 
percent. Awards range up to $1,500 per academic year. Recipients are required to maintain 
a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and engage in a service project during the academic 
year. For application procedures and deadlines, contact the Office of Financial Aid. 

Georgia Tuition Equalization Grants (GTEG) are available to Georgia residents who are 
full-time, degree-seeking students at Oglethorpe. The program was established by an act 
of the 1971 Georgia General Assembly. The GTEG program helps to "promote the private 
segment of higher education in Georgia by providing non-repayable grant aid to Georgia 
residents who attend eligible independent colleges and universities in Georgia." All students 
must complete an application and verify their eligibility for the grant. In the 2008-2009 
academic school year, this grant is $1,100. Financial need is not a factor in determining 
eligibility. A separate application and proof of residency is required. 

HOPE Scholarships of $1,500 (12 credit hours or more) and $750 (6-11 credit hours) per 
semester are available to Georgia residents who have graduated from an eligible high school 
in 1996 or later, with at least a 3.0 grade point average in specific Core Curriculum classes. 
Georgia residents who do not qualify under these guidelines but have now attempted 30 
or more semester hours with a 3.0 grade point average or higher may also be eligible. The 
applicant must be a Georgia resident for one year prior to attendance at any college or 
university in Georgia. Students entering the HOPE Scholarship program for the first time 
after attempting 30 or 60 semester hours should be aware that their grade point average is 
calculated to include all attempted hours taken after high school graduation. Recipients of 
the scholarship are required to maintain a 3.0 or higher cumulative grade point average for 
reinstatement. For more information, contact the HOPE Scholarship Program at 770-724- 
9000 or 1-800-505-GSFC or Oglethorpe's Office of Financial Aid. 

The Leveraging Educational Assistance Program (LEAP) is one of the need-based grants 
for qualified Georgia residents to enable them to attend eligible post-secondary institutions 
of their choice in the state. The grant awards are designed to provide only a portion of the 
student's resources in financing the total cost of a college education. A student should com- 
plete the FAFSA for consideration. 

The Federal Pell Grant is a federal aid program that provides non-repayable funds to 
eligible students. Eligibility is based upon the results from the FAFSA. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are awarded to un- 
dergraduate students with exceptional financial need. Priority is given to Federal Pell Grant 
recipients and does not require repayment. 

Oglethorpe Need-Based Grants are available to full-time day undergraduate students 
who demonstrate financial need by completing the FAFSA. Oglethorpe Need-Based Grants 
in conjunction with federal, state, private or institutional assistance cannot exceed the 
student's financial need. 

Federal Work-Study Program (FWSP) permits a student to earn part of his or her edu- 
cational expenses. The earnings from this program and other financial aid cannot exceed 



33 



the student's financial need. Students eligible for this program work part time primarily on 
the Oglethorpe campus. A limited number of community service positions are available at 
locations near the campus. 

Federal Perkins Loans are long-term, low-cost educational loans to students who have 
demonstrated need for such assistance. Priority is given first to sophomore, junior or senior 
students. Interest is charged at a five percent annual rate beginning nine months after the 
borrower ceases to be at least a half-time student (a minimum course load of six semester 
hours). Information regarding repayment terms, deferment and cancellation options is 
available in the business office. 

Federal Stafford (Subsidized and Unsubsidized) Loans are long-term loans available 
through banks and other lending institutions. Students must submit the FAFSA and be 
attending at least half time to receive consideration. A separate Master Promissory Note 
(MPN) is also required. Information regarding repayment terms, deferment and cancella- 
tion options are available in the Office of Financial Aid. 

Federal PLUS Loans are long-term loans available to parents through banks and other 
lending institutions. Parents desiring to seek a loan from this program should consult the 
various lenders indicated on the Oglethorpe University Lender List for additional informa- 
tion. 

Choral Music Scholarships (Performance) are awarded annually to incoming students 
pursuing any degree offered at Oglethorpe who demonstrate exceptional achievement in 
choral singing or keyboard accompanying. Candidates must be nominated with a letter of 
recommendation by the conductor of their choral ensemble on a special form obtainable 
from the Director of Musical Activities at Oglethorpe. 

Playmakers Scholarships (Performance) are awarded annually to current students who 
have demonstrated exceptional ability in the area of dramatic performance and a strong 
commitment to Oglethorpe's theatre program. Awards are based on ability, not financial 
need. 

Note: Dual-degree students in art and engineering may not use Oglethorpe assistance to 
attend other institutions. 

Academic Policies Governing Student Financial Aid 



Applicants for federal aid, state grants or institutional aid must be making Satisfactory 
Academic Progress (SAP) toward the completion of degree requirements and be in good 
academic standing wdth the university in order to receive financial aid. 

Students must satisfactorily complete at least 67 percent of the cumulative course work 
attempted at Oglethorpe University. Unsatisfactory grades that count against a student's 
progress are: 



D 


If a "C-" or better is required for the major 


F 


Failure 


FA 


Failure by Absence 


NG 


No Grade 


W 


Withdrew 


WF 


Withdrew Failing 


I 


Incomplete 


U 


Unsatisfactory 


AU 


Audit 



34 



Courses that are being repeated will not be considered when determining financial aid 
eligibility unless a grade of at least a "C-" is required to fulfill the degree requirements. The 
student must notify the Office of Financial Aid if a course is being repeated. 

In addition to completing at least 67 percent of all course work attempted, students must 
also achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 by the end of their first aca- 
demic year at Oglethorpe. SAP requirements will be reviewed at the completion of each 
spring semester. Students not meeting SAP standards, due either to the failure to complete 
67 percent of the courses attempted or the failure to meet and maintain the required cu- 
mulative grade point average will be placed in a financial aid warning status. Students will 
be notified in vmting of this warning and of any required actions necessary to meet SAP. 
Students placed in warning status due to failure to complete 67 percent of their courses 
must attempt a normal course load and successfully complete at least 67 percent of the 
classes attempted. Students placed in warning status due to their grade point averages will 
be required to achieve a minimum 2.00 for each subsequent semester of enrollment until a 
minimum 2.00 cumulative average is achieved. 

Any student not performing as required during his or her warning semester will be placed 
on financial aid suspension. During this probation period, all aid will be denied for at least 
one semester, or until evidence is provided to document that any required credit has been 
received or that the minimum grade point average has been achieved. Students placed in 
suspension who feel they have significant mitigating circumstances hindering their academ- 
ic performance may appeal in vmting to the director of financial aid. No verbal appeals can 
be accepted. Appeals should specify exactly how or why the student did not meet the stan- 
dards prescribed in the warning notification. Additional documentation may be required to 
support the request for appeal (i.e. doctor's verification of illness, etc.) The appeal should be 
submitted to the director of financial aid at least two weeks prior to the start of the semes- 
ter. Students will be notified in vmting of the appeal decision. If the appeal is successful and 
aid was wdthheld, then it may be disbursed if the student meets all other eligibility require- 
ments. 

Students who earn over 144 hours wall not be eligible for financial aid. Students wishing to 
appeal this policy must submit their request in vmting to the director of financial aid for 
consideration. 

Students are encouraged to seek academic counseling through their academic adviser and 
to see a financial aid officer at the first signs of academic difficulty. 

Application Procedure 

Students applying for the Georgia Tbition Equalization Grant and HOPE Scholarship pro- 
grams for the first time must submit a Greorgia Tuition Equalization Grant Application from 
the Georgia Student Finance Commission Web site at www.gacollege411.org. 

Students meeting the requirements for an Oglethorpe Scholars Award (OSA) are consid- 
ered based on their admission application. Students applying for an Oglethorpe Christian 
Scholarship must complete the appropriate scholarship application, which may be obtained 
from the Office of Financial Aid. 

The application procedures for the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Oglethorpe Need-Based Grant, Federal Stafford 
Loan, Federal Work-Study Program and Leveraging Educational Assistance Program are as 
follows: 

1. Apply and be admitted as a regular degree-seeking student. 

2. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after January 1, 



35 



but no later than April 1. Students should keep a copy of the FAFSA before submit- 
ting it to the federal processor. The original FAFSA may be filed electronically at 
www.fafsa.ed.gov. Oglethorpe's Federal Code is 001586. 

3. Once the FAFSA has been received and processed by the federal processor, an Insti- 
tutional Student Information Record (ISIR) will be sent to the Office of Financial 
Aid. 

4. Keep copies of all federal income tax returns, etc., as these documents may be re- 
quired in order to verify the information provided on the FAFSA. 

5. New students who are offered employment through the Federal Work-Study Pro- 
gram must complete the Student Employment Application form. This form will be 
sent as needed. 

6. If eligible for a Federal Stafford Loan or Federal PLUS Loan, a Master Promissory 
Note (MPN) must be completed. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for more infor- 
mation. 

Federal and State Aid Eligibility Requirements 



1. Demonstrate financial need (exception: HOPE Scholarship, Georgia Tuition 
Equalization Grant, Federal Unsubsidized Staffi)rd Loan and Federal PLUS Loan 
programs). 

2. Have a high school diploma or a General Education Development (GED) certificate 
or pass an independently administered test approved by the U.S. Department of 
Education. 

3. Be enrolled as a regular degree-seeking student in an eligible program. 

4. Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen. 

5. Generally, have a social security number. 

6. Register with Selective Service, if required. 

7. Must not owe a refund on any grant or loan; not be in default on any loan or have 
made satisfactory arrangements to repay any defaulted loan; and not have bor- 
rowed in excess of the loan limits, under Title IV programs, at any institution. 

8. Make satisfactory academic progress. Refer to the Academic Policies Governing 
Student Financial Aid. 

9. May not be a member of a religious community, society or order who by direction of 
his or her community, society or order is pursuing a course of study at Oglethorpe 
and who receives support and maintenance from his or her community, society or 
order. 

10. Students must be enrolled at least six hours for the semester after the drop/add 
period to receive federal and state aid, with the exception of the Georgia Tuition 
Equalization Grant for which students must be enrolled full-time for the semester. 

Payment of Awards 

All awards, except Federal Work-Study earnings. Federal PLUS Loans and some Federal 
Stafford Loans, are disbursed to students by means of a direct credit to their account. 
Financial aid disbursements are made on a semester-by-semester basis only; disbursement 
of all awards is dependent upon final approval by the director of financial aid. Only when a 
student's file is complete can aid be credited to the account. 



36 



Renewal of Awards 



Renewal FAFSA information is provided to students by the U.S. Department of Education. 
Students must meet the eUgibiUty requirements indicated above and file the appropriate 
applications for each program. The preferred deadline for receipt of a completed financial 
aid file is April 1. Applicants whose files become complete after this time will be considered 
based upon availability of funds. 

For renewal of the Oglethorpe Scholars Award, all students must maintain a cumulative 
grade point average consistent with good academic standing. A 3.2 or higher grade point 
average is required for renewal of a James Edward Oglethorpe scholarship. 

In addition to the cumulative grade point average requirement, students must earn at least 
24 semester hours during the current academic year. Students who are deficient in the 
number of hours required might attend summer school at Oglethorpe. Students also have 
the option of submitting a vmtten appeal to the director of financial aid. 

Students who meet the scholarship renewal criteria will have their awards automatically 
renewed for the next academic year. 



Endowed Scholarships 



Oglethorpe Scholars may receive special recognition of their outstanding achievement by 
being named as an endowed or annual scholar. Selection of this honorary designation is 
based upon the criteria outlined below: 

The J. Frederick Agel, Sr., '52 Endowed Scholarship: Awarded to a junior student (rising 
senior) with a grade point average that qualifies him or her for Latin honors and who also 
contributes significantly to student life as determined by the Office of Student Affairs. The 
scholarship will support the student during his or her senior year at Oglethorpe University. 

The John A. Aldrich Memorial Scholarship Fund: Endowment funding was established 
in 2008 by a gift from Lyman C. Aldrich, class of 1938, in honor of his father, John A. 
Aldrich, former Dean of the School of Science at Oglethorpe. Scholarship preference is 
given to a worthy student in need. 

The Ivan Allen Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by a grant from The Allen 
Foundation, Inc., of Atlanta, in memory of Ivan Allen, Sr., who was a trustee of the univer- 
sity for many years and general chairman of the first major fundraising campaign. The Ivan 
Allen family and foundation are long-time benefactors of the university. Ivan Allen Scholars 
must be from the Southeast, have at least a 3.2 grade point average, leadership ability and 
demonstrated financial need. 

The Marshall A. and Mary Bishop Asher Endowed Scholar: Funding was established 
by the Asher family in 1988. The late Mr. and Mrs. Asher were both alumni (classes of 1941 
and 1943 respectively) and both served for many years as trustees of the university. The 
scholarship is awarded to a superior student in science. 

The Keith Baker Endowed Scholarship: Funding was established by former students 
in honor of Professor Keith Baker, a valued member of the Oglethorpe accounting faculty 
from 1983 to 1999. This scholarship is awarded annually to a junior majoring in accounting. 
The student must demonstrate a strong academic record, active campus and community in- 
volvement, relevant work experience and aspirations for a career in the field of accounting. 



37 



The Bank of America Scholars Program: This endowed scholarship program was es- 
tablished in 1999 by Bank of America, formerly NationsBank, and is awarded to students 
majoring in business or computer science. 

The Earl Blackwell Endowed Scholar: Earl Blackwell, distinguished publisher, play- 
wright, author and founder of Celebrity Services, Inc., headquartered in New York, estab- 
lished this scholarship for deserving students with special interest in English, journalism or 
the performing arts. Mr. Blackwell was a 1929 graduate of the university. 

The Lauren Ashley Burk Memorial Scholarship Fund: Endowment funding was estab- 
lished by gifts from family friends, colleagues and community members in 2008 in memory 
of Lauren Ashley Burk, daughter of James Burk, class of 1983, and Viviane Guerchon. This 
scholarship is awarded to a student with an interest in art. 

The Class of 1963 Endowed Scholar: Funding was established through the efforts of the 
class of 1963. The intention of this scholarship is "to give to others, so they too can be en- 
riched by an Oglethorpe education." 

The Miriam H. and John A. Conant Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Mrs. 
Miriam H. "Bimby" and Mr. John A. Conant, long-time benefactors of Oglethorpe and both 
recipients of Oglethorpe Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees. Mrs. Conant served 
as a trustee of the university from 1981 until her death in January 2003. Scholarships are 
awarded annually to superior students with leadership ability. 

The Michael A. Corvasce Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Dr. 
and Mrs. Michael Corvasce of Hauppauge, New York, and friends in memory of Michael 
Archangel Corvasce, class of 1979. The scholarship recipient is selected from the three pre- 
medical students who have the highest cumulative grade point average through their junior 
years and plan to attend an American medical school. This scholarship, which perpetuates 
Michael Archangel Corvasce's interest in Oglethorpe and medicine, takes into consideration 
the moral character of the candidates as well as their academic qualifications. 

The Estelle Anderson Crouch Endowed Scholar: Mr. John W. Crouch, class of 1929 and 
a former trustee of the university, provided funding for this scholarship in memory of Mrs. 
Estelle Anderson Crouch, mother of John Thomas Crouch, class of 1965. Mrs. Crouch died 
in i960. The scholarship is awarded annually without regard to financial need to students 
who have demonstrated high academic standards. 

The Katherine Shepard Crouch Endowed Scholar: Funding was given in memory of 
Mrs. Katherine Shepard Crouch by Mr. John W. Crouch and is awarded annually based 
upon academic achievement. 

The Cammie Lee Stow Kendrick Crouch Endowed Scholar: This scholarship was 
endowed by Mr. John W. Crouch in memory of Mrs. Cammie Lee Stow Kendrick Crouch. 
Mr. and Mrs. Crouch were classmates at Oglethorpe and graduates in the class of 1929. It is 
awarded annually based upon academic achievement. 

The Karen S. Dillingham Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was provided by Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul L. Dillingham in loving memory of their daughter. Mr. Dillingham is a 
former trustee and served for several years as a senior administrator of the university. The 
scholarship is awarded each year to an able and deserving student. 

The R. E. Borough Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by a gift from Mr. Dor- 
ough's estate. Scholarships from this fund are awarded to able and deserving students based 
on the criteria outlined in his will. Mr. Dorough was a former trustee of the university. 



38 



The William A. Egerton Memorial Endowed Scholar: Initial funding was established in 
1988 by Franklin L. Burke '66, Robert B. Currey '66 and Gary C. Harden '69 who encour- 
aged other alumni and friends to assist in establishing this fund in memory of Professor 
Egerton, a highly respected member of the faculty from 1956 to 1978. The scholarship is 
awarded to a student with a strong academic record and demonstrated leadership skills 
who is majoring in business administration. 

The Ernst & Young Endowed Scholar (formerly Ernst & Whinney): Funding was 
established in 1981 through the efforts of Murray D. Wood, a former vice chairman at Ernst 
& Whinney and by a gift from the accounting firm of Ernst & Whinney of Cleveland, Ohio. 
Scholarship preference will be given to superior students who are majoring in accounting. 

The Henry R. "Hank" Frieman Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Mr. Frie- 
man, class of 1936. An outstanding athlete during his days at Oglethorpe, Frieman spent a 
career in coaching, earning a spot in the Oglethorpe Athletic Hall of Fame. This scholarship 
is awarded annually based on academic achievement, leadership qualities, demonstrated 
need and a special interest in sports. 

The Charles A. FnieauflF Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by grants from the 
Charles A. Frueauff Foundation of Little Rock, Arkansas. Scholarship preference is given to 
able and deserving students from middle-income families who do not qualify for govern- 
mental assistance. The criteria for selection also include academic ability and leadership 
potential. ■ 

The Lu Thomasson Garrett Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in honor of Lu 
Thomasson Garrett, class of 1952, a former trustee of the university and a recipient of an 
Oglethorpe Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. Preference for awarding scholar- 
ships from this fund is given to students who meet the criteria for an Oglethorpe Scholars 
Award and are majoring in education or business administration. 

The Georgia Power Company Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by a grant 
from the Georgia Power Company of Atlanta. The fund v^dll provide scholarship support for 
able and deserving students from Georgia. Georgia Power Scholars must have at least a 3.2 
grade point average, leadership ability and financial need. 

The Goizueta Endowed Scholar: Established by grants from the Goizueta Foundation, 
this endowment provides need-based scholarships for Hispanic students who reside in the 
United States. Participation in high school extracurricular activities and an evaluation of 
the student's potential to succeed at Oglethorpe are considered. 

The Walter F. Gordy Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1994 wdth 
a bequest from the Estate of William L. Gordy, class of 1925. Walter Gordy was also an 
alumnus of Oglethorpe, class of 1924. The scholarship fund was increased in 1995 vdth a 
bequest from the Estate of Mrs. William L. (Helene) Gordy. Scholarships from this fund are 
awarded at the discretion of the university. 

The Bert L. and Emory B. Hammack Memorial Scholar: Established in 1984 by Mr. 
Francis R. Hammack, a member of the class of 1927 and brother of Bert L. and Emory B. 
Hammack, this scholarship is awarded annually to a senior student majoring in science 
or mathematics, who is a native of Georgia and who had the highest academic grade point 
average of all such students who attended Oglethorpe University in his or her previous 
undergraduate years. 

The Francis R. Hammack Scholar: Established in 1990 by Mr. Francis R. Hammack, 
a member of the class of 1927, this scholarship is to be awarded annually to a needy but 



39 



worthy junior class English major who is a native of Georgia and has attended Oglethorpe 
University in his or her previous undergraduate years. 

The Leslie U. and Ola Ryle Hammack Memorial Scholar: Funding of this third gift 
was established in 1985 by Francis R. Hammack, class of 1927, in memory of his parents. 
It is awarded annually to a junior class student working toward the Bachelor of Business 
Administration degree, who is a native of Georgia and who had the highest academic grade 
point average of all such students who attended Oglethorpe University in his or her previ- 
ous undergraduate years. 

The William Randolph Hearst Scholarship: This is an endowed scholarship awarded 
annually to a deserving student who has attained exceptional academic achievement. The 
William Randolph Hearst Foundation, New York, established the endowment to provide 
this scholarship in honor of Mr. Hearst, one of the benefactors of Oglethorpe University. 

The Harold Hirsch Foundation Endowed Scholarship: Established in 1981 by the Har- 
old Hirsch Foundation with the intent of assisting non-traditional age students, this schol- 
arship is awarded annually to students enrolled in Oglethorpe's evening degree program. 

The Ira Jarrell Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1975 to honor the late Dr. 
Jarrell, former Superintendent of Atlanta Schools and a 1928 graduate of Oglethorpe. It is 
awarded annually in the fall to a new student who is a graduate of an Atlanta public high 
school studying teacher education. Should there be no eligible applicant, the award may 
be made to an Atlanta high school graduate in any field, or the university may award the 
scholarship to any worthy high school graduate requiring assistance while working in the 
field of teacher education. 

The Nancy H. Kerr Endowed Scholarship: Funding was established by Margaret O. 
Y. Chin, class of 1987, in honor of former Professor of Psychology and Provost Nancy H. 
Kerr. Scholarships are awarded annually to students who demonstrate superior academic 
achievement, leadership potential and active community involvement. 

The Mary Jane Stuart Kohler Memorial Scholarship Fund: The fund was established by 
family and friends in memory of Mrs. Kohler, a 1990 graduate. The scholarship is awarded 
to a junior or senior female student who demonstrates strong involvement in campus life, a 
positive outlook coupled with diligence and commitment to all she undertakes and at least 
a 3.0 grade point average. 

The Ray M. and Mary Elizabeth Lee Foundation Endowed Scholarship: Funding was 
established by the Lee Foundation of Atlanta. Scholarships are awarded to able and deserv- 
ing students. 

The Lowry Memorial Scholar: Established by a bequest from Emma Markham Lowry in 
1923, awards are made to students who "desire an education but are unable to secure the 
same because of a lack of funds." 

The Vera A. Milner Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Belle Turner Lynch, 
class of 1961 and a trustee of the university, and her sisters, Virginia T. Rezetko and Vera T. 
Wells, in memory of their aunt. Vera A. Milner. The scholarship is awarded annually to a 
full-time student planning to study at Oglethorpe for the degree of Master of Arts in Teach- 
ing Early Childhood Education (Grades P-5). Eligibility may begin in the undergraduate 
junior year at Oglethorpe. Qualifications include a grade point average of at least 3.25, a 
Scholastic Assessment Test or Graduate Record Examination score of 1100 and a commit- 
ment to teaching. 



40 



The Virgil W. and Virginia C. Milton Endowed Scholar: Funding was established 
through the gifts of their five children. Mr. Milton was a 1929 graduate of Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity and a former chairman of the Board of Trustees. He received an Honorary Doctor 
of Commerce degree from Oglethorpe in 1975. The scholarship is awarded based on the 
applicant's financial need, academic achievement and leadership ability. 

The Dr. Keiichi Nishimura Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by his family in 
memory of Dr. Keiichi Nishimura, a Methodist minister who served in the poor areas of 
Tokyo for over 50 years. The scholarship is awarded to able and deserving international 
students based on financial need, academic achievement and leadership potential. 

The Oglethorpe Christian Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by a grant from an 
Atlanta foundation which wishes to remain anonymous. The fund also has received grants 
from the Akers Foundation, Inc., of Gastonia, North Carolina; the Clark and Ruby Baker 
Foundation of Atlanta; the Mary and E. P. Rogers Foundation of Atlanta. Recipients must 
be legal residents of Georgia and have graduated from a Georgia high school. High school 
applicants must rank in the top quarter of their high school classes and have Scholastic 
Assessment Test scores of 1100 or more; upperclassmen must have a grade point average 
of 3.0. Applicants must submit a statement from a local minister attesting to their religious 
commitment, active involvement in a local church. Christian character and promise of 
Christian leadership and service. The Oglethorpe Christian Scholarship Committee inter- 
views applicants. 

The Oglethorpe Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1994 by 
combining several existing scholarship funds created over the previous two decades. This 
fund also allows people to establish memorials with amounts smaller than would otherwise 
be possible. The following are honored in the Oglethorpe Memorial Endowed Scholarship 
Fund: 

Allen A. and Mamie B. Chappell 

Dondi Cobb Memorial 

Lenora and Alfred Glancy Foundation 

Golden Petrel Memorial 

Diane K. Gray 

P. D. M. Harris 

Anna Rebecca Harwell Hill and Frances Grace Harwell 

George A. HoUoway Sr. 

Elliece Johnson Memorial 

Tony and Louise Palma 

The Manning M. Pattillo, Jr., Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1988 by the 
Oglethorpe National Alumni Association from gifts received from many alumni and friends. 
Dr. Pattillo was Oglethorpe's 13th president, serving from 1975 until his retirement in 1988. 
In recognition of his exemplary leadership in building an academically strong student body 
and a gifted faculty, the scholarship is awarded to an academically superior student with 
demonstrated leadership skills. 

The E. Rivers and Una Rivers Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by the late 
Mrs. Una S. Rivers to provide for deserving students who qualify for the Oglethorpe Schol- 
ars Award. 

The Fred C. Robey Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Fred C. Robey, class of 
1997- This scholarship is awarded based upon financial need to students enrolled in Ogle- 
thorpe's evening degree program. 



41 



The J. Mack Robinson Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Atlanta busi- 
nessman J. Mack Robinson. It is awarded to a deserving student who meets the general 
qualifications of the Oglethorpe Scholars Award. Preference is given to students majoring in 
business administration. 

The John P. Salamone Endowed Scholar: This scholarship was established by Ben Sal- 
amone in honor of his son, John P. Salamone, a graduate of the class of 1986 who died in 
the World Trade Center attack on September 11, 2001. The scholarship is awarded annually 
to a student leader from New Jersey, New York or Connecticut who is involved or demon- 
strates the potential to be involved in campus activities such as the intramural program, the 
athletic program, etc. Preference is given to a male student from New Jersey. 

The Steve and Jeanne Schmidt Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Mr. and 
Mrs. Schmidt to support an outstanding student based upon high academic achievement 
and leadership in student affairs. The late Mr. Schmidt, class of 1940, was a former Chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees and a recipient of an Oglethorpe Honorary Doctor of Laws 
degree. Mrs. Schmidt is a member of the class of 1942. 

The Timothy P. Tassopoulos Endowed Scholar: Funding was established in 1983 by S. 
Truett Cathy, founder of Chick-fil-A, Inc., in honor of Timothy P. Tassopoulos, a 1981 gradu- 
ate of Oglethorpe University. This scholarship is awarded to individuals who demonstrate 
academic achievement and leadership ability. 

The Dr. Heyl G. and Ruth D. Tebo Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by Dr. 
and Mrs. Tebo in 1994 to support Georgia residents majoring in chemistry, biology or other 
sciences. Preference is given to students who plan to do graduate study in medicine, den- 
tistry or other specialties in the health sciences field. Dr. Tebo is an alumnus of Oglethorpe, 
class of 1937- 

The J. M. Tull Scholar: Funding was established by a gift from the J. M. TuU Foundation in 
1984. Scholarships are awarded annually to superior students with leadership ability as well 
as financial need. 

The United Technologies Corporation Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by a 
grant from the United Technologies Corporation, Hartford, Connecticut. The fund provides 
scholarship support for able and deserving students who are majoring in science or pursu- 
ing a pre-engineering program. United Technologies Scholars must have at least a 3.2 grade 
point average and leadership ability, as well as financial need. 

The Charles Longstreet Weltner Memorial Endowed Scholar: Funding was estab- 
lished in 1993 by former U.S. Senator Wyche Fowler, Jr., a longtime friend and colleague 
of Weltner. An alumnus of the class of 1948 and trustee of Oglethorpe University, Charles 
Weltner was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia at the time of his death in 1993. 
He was the recipient of the 1991 Profile in Courage award and a recipient of an Oglethorpe 
Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. He was a tireless advocate for equal rights for 
minorities and, while serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, was the only congress- 
man from the Deep South to vote for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Weltner Scholarships are 
awarded annually to selected Oglethorpe students who are residents of Georgia with finan- 
cial need, satisfactory academic records and, to the extent allowed by law, of African- Ameri- 
can descent. At the donor's request, the amount of the scholarship award to any recipient is 
to be no more than one-half of fiill tuition in order to encourage student recipients to work 
to provide required additional funds. 

The L. W. "Lefty" and Frances E. Willis Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by 
the family of the late L. W. "Lefty" Willis, class of 1925. Preference wall be given to outstand- 



42 



ing students who are pursuing a pre-engineering program. This award is based on academic 
achievement, leadership abiUty and financial need. 

The Vivian P. and Murray D. Wood Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by gifts 
from Mr. and Mrs. Murray D. Wood. Mr. Wood is a former vice chairman of the Board of 
Trustees and former chairman of Oglethorpe University's Campaign for Excellence. Schol- 
arship preference is given to superior students who are majoring in accounting. 

The David, Helen and Marian Woodward Endowed Scholar: Funding was established 
by grants from the David, Helen and Marian Woodward Fund of Atlanta to provide as- 
sistance to students who meet the criteria for an Oglethorpe Scholars Award. The award is 
based upon superior academic achievement, leadership potential and financial need. 

The Louise H. Woodbury Endowed Scholar: Funding was established by the late Mrs. 
Louise H. Woodbury. Scholarship preference is given to a worthy student in need. 

Annual Scholarships 

The Yolanda A. Baker Scholar: Funding for this scholarship is provided by Oglethorpe 
University Trustee William MuUally, class of 2003, and is named in honor of Mr. Mullally's 
mother. .. 

The BCES Foundation Urban Leadership Scholar: Funding is provided annually for 
a sophomore, junior or senior who is enrolled in the Rich Foundation Urban Leadership 
Program. 

The Pat Conroy Annual Scholarship: Funding is awarded to a deserving student. This 
scholarship is named in honor of the author Pat Conroy, who spoke on campus on 
Oglethorpe Day, 2008. 

First Families of Georgia (1733 to 1797) Annual Scholar: Funding is awarded to an aca- 
demically superior senior majoring in history. First Families of Georgia is a society whose 
members are able to document their descent from early settlers of the State of Georgia. 

The Wilson P. Franklin Annual Scholar: Funding is awarded to a deserving student. Mr. 
Franklin, class of 1939, established this scholarship with a gift in 1995. 

The Beverly L. Hall Annual Scholar: This four-year scholarship, benefiting a highly 
deserving student, was established in honor of Dr. Hall, Superintendent of Atlanta Public 
Schools. Dr. Hall received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Oglethorpe 
University in 2008. 

The Harald R. Hansen Annual Scholar: This four-year scholarship, benefiting a highly 
deserving student, was established in honor of Dr. Hansen, long-time Oglethorpe trustee. 
Chair of the Finance Committee, and retired Chairman, President and CEO of First Union 
Corporation. Dr. Hansen received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Oglethorpe 
University in 2008. 

The Muhtar Kent Annual Scholar: This four-year scholarship, benefiting a highly deserv- 
ing student, was established in honor of Dr. Kent, Chairman and CEO of The Coca-Cola 
Company. Dr. Kent received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity in 2008. 

The Mack A. Rikard Annual Scholar: Funds were established in 1990 by Mr. Mack A. 
Rikard, class of 1937 and a former trustee of the university. He received an honorary Doctor 



43 



of Commerce degree from Oglethorpe in 1992. Funds are awarded to able and deserving 
students who meet certain criteria. The criteria are flexible, with consideration being given 
to a number of factors, including wdthout limitation academic achievement, leadership 
skills, potential for success, evidence of propensity for hard work and a conscientious ap- 
plication of abilities. Recipients must be individuals born in the United States of America 
and are encouraged, at such time in their business or professional careers when financial 
circumstances permit, to provide from their ovvti funds one or more additional scholarships 
to worthy Oglethorpe students. 

The Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation Scholar: Grants have been made annually for a 
number of years to Christian women from the Southeastern states who are deserving and in 
need of financial assistance. 



Endowed Professorships and Lecture Series 



Frances I. Eeraerts Professor of Foreign Language: This professorship was established 
in 1997 by a bequest from the estate of Miss Eeraerts, a non-traditional student who gradu- 
ated in 1976. 

Milner Professor of Education: The Milner Professorship was established in 1988 by the 
Vera A. Milner Charitable Trust. The trustees of the Milner Trust, Belle Turner Lynch, class 
of 1961, Virginia Turner Rezetko and Vera Turner Wells, created the professorship in honor 
of their aunt, Vera A. Milner. The holder of the professorship is a scholar in early childhood 
education. 

Manning M. Pattillo, Jr., Professor of Liberal Arts: This professorship was established 
in 1991 through the generosity of Miriam H. and John A. Conant and the John H. and Wil- 
helmina D. Harland Charitable Foundation in honor of Dr. Pattillo, the 13th president of 
Oglethorpe from 1975 to 1988. The professorship honors the work of an outstanding faculty 
member. A new Pattillo Professor is chosen every two years. 

The Mack A. Rikard Chair in Business Administration and Economics and Lecture 
Series: The Mack A. Rikard Chair supports a scholar in business administration or eco- 
nomics, advancing Mr. Rikard's own interest in the free enterprise system. The chair also 
coordinates the Rikard Lecture Series, aimed at helping college students understand cur- 
rent issues in business. Established in 1991 by Mr. Ilikard, a 1937 alumnus and an honorary 
degree recipient, the lectures bring to campus guest speakers who are recognized leaders 
in their professions. The series is intended to foster in students a particular appreciation of 
economics. 

Endowed Prize Funds 

The Lu Thomasson Garrett Annual Award for Meritorious Teaching: This prize was 
created in 1994 through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. David (Lu La Thomasson) Garrett. 
The late Mrs. Garrett was a 1952 graduate, an Oglethorpe honorary degree recipient and 
member emeritus of the Board of Trustees. The prize is awarded annually to an outstanding 
faculty member selected by a committee of his or her peers. 

The Anne Rivers Siddons Award: This fund was endowed by Anne Rivers Siddons, the 
celebrated novelist, former member of the Board of Trustees, Oglethorpe honorary degree 
recipient and daughter of L. Marvin Rivers, a 1928 graduate. The prize is awarded annually 
to a graduating senior majoring in English who has submitted the best work of short fiction. 



44 



Special Purpose Named Endowed Funds 



The Herman Daughtry Fund: This fund was established in 1980 by a gift from the Daugh- 
try Foundation. It provides support for professional travel and scholarship by the president 
and for special projects relating to the Office of the President. 

The Grenwald Faculty Salary Endowment: This fiind was established in 1991 by a 
bequest from Edward S. Grenwald. Mr. Grenwald was a law professor before coming to 
Atlanta to engage in the private practice of law. He served as a member of the Oglethorpe 
University Board of Visitors and of the Board of Trustees. The fund is part of the university's 
permanent endowment and, at Mr. Grenwald's request, used primarily for the enhancement 
of faculty salaries. 

The Eugene W. Ivy Endowment Fund: Established by planned gifts from Mr. Ivy, a 1949 
graduate of Oglethorpe, the fund provides unrestricted income to the university. 

The National Endowment for the Humanities Core Curriculum Endowment: In 1996, 
Oglethorpe University was awarded a challenge grant in the amount of $300,000, which 
enabled the university to raise a total of $1.1 million for an endowment to support the Core 
Curriculum and library purchases for the Core. 

The Pattillo Faculty Lounge Endowment Fund: Created in 2000 by the Pattillo Family 
Foundation in honor of Manning M. Pattillo, Jr., the 13th president of Oglethorpe, this ftind 
provides a permanent source of ftinds to maintain and improve the faculty lounge on the 
third floor of Hearst Hall. 

The Garland Pinholster Fund for Academic and Athletic Excellence: This fund was es- 
tablished in 1995 by friends and admirers in honor of Mr. Pinholster, who served as athletic 
director and head basketball coach from 1956 to 1966. Mr. Pinholster received an honorary 
Doctor of Humane Letters from Oglethorpe in 2004. The fimd provides incremental fiind- 
ing beyond the Athletic Department's normal budget. 

The Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program Endowment: Established in 1996 by 
the Rich Foundation, this endovraient provides funding for the Rich Foundation Urban 
Leadership Program, a certificate program that challenges its participants to pursue their 
leadership potential while utilizing the city of Atlanta as a living laboratory. 

The William O. Shropshire Endowed Fund: This endowed fiind was established in 2008 
through the generosity of Cemal Ozgorkey, class of 1984, and Armagan Ozgorkey, class of 
1985, in honor of Dr. Shropshire, Professor Emeritus of Economics. 

The Philip Weltner Endowment: This fund was created in 1981 by memorials to Dr. Philip 
Weltner, the sixth president of Oglethorpe. Earnings from the fund support instruction in 
"human understanding, citizenship and community service," three of the pillars of the Ogle- 
thorpe curriculum during the Weltner years, 1944 to 1953. 



45 



46 



TUITION 
AND COSTS 




47 



Fees for Academic Year 2008-09 



Tuition and fees are subject to change each academic year. 

Tuition 

Summer tuition per semester hour $373 

Traditional undergraduate full-time tuition per semester (12-19 hours) $12,690 

Part-time enrollment per semester hour (11 hours or less) $1,030 

Master of Arts in Teaching per semester hour $292.50 

Additional per semester hour in excess of 19 hours $500 

Audit charge per course $525 

Fees 

Activity fee (freshman, sophomore or transfer students) $100 

Activity fee (continuing students - juniors and seniors) $50 

Science lab fee $95 

Art material fee $75 

Transcript fee $10 

Application fee $35 

Degree completion fee $100 

Tuition deposit $100 

Housing deposit $200 

Payment plan (per semester) $100 

Health insurance (mandatory without proof of insurance) $ 200 

Room and Board 

Traer/Dempsey $4,750 

Phase II $4,995 

North/Magbee $4,995 

Greek housing - single $4,885 

Greek housing - double ■ $2,830 

Board only , $2,000 

Institutional Drop and Withdrawal Refund Policy 

The date that will be used for calculation of a refund for drop/add or withdrawal will be the 
date on which the registrar's office receives the official form signed by all required person- 
nel. Students are reminded that an arrangement with a professor will not be recognized as 
an official change. Anyone who has registered and decides not to attend must officially drop 
or withdraw. 

A student who officially withdraws from the university prior to the last day of the drop/add 
period for any term of enrollment will be entitled to 100 percent refund of tuition and fees 
charged for that current term. A student who officially withdraws fi-om the university after 
this date may be entitled to a prorated refund of tuition only. (Fees are refundable only dur- 
ing the drop/add period.) The following calculation will be used to determine the prorated 
amount of tuition to be credited to the student's account: 

The total number of calendar days attended by the student = Percentage of retained tuition 
The total number of calendar days in the term of enrollment 

The total number of calendar days includes all days beginning with the first day of classes 
and ending with the last day of classes, excluding final examination days. When the per- 
centage of retained tuition is equal to or greater than 60 percent, no tuition credit will 
be given. 

48 



Additionally, a student is not eligible for any refund if (1) the student fails to formally with- 
draw; (2) the student is suspended for disciplinary reasons; (3) the student withdraws when 
a disciplinary action or honor code violation is pending; or (4) the student withdraws from 
a class or classes, but does not totally withdraw from all classes for the semester. 

Issuance of credit for room and board is governed by the contract signed by the student 
with residence life. Any credits or refunds to be issued to a student's account will be deter- 
mined by the director of residence life. The advance deposit is nonrefundable if a student 
withdraws from the university. 

Monthly Statement of Account 



Each student will receive a monthly account statement from the university if a balance is 
due. Statements include, but are not limited to tuition, room and board charges, parking 
fines, library fines and meal plan fees. 

Health Insurance 

Oglethorpe requires all full- time, traditional undergraduate students to have health insur- 
ance. The fee is charged and payable when tuition, room and board and fee charges are due. 

Degree Completion Fee 

A nonrefundable graduation fee is required of all students who expect to graduate. This fee 
will be charged to the student account and is due prior to participation in graduation. 

Payment Options 



Oglethorpe University accepts cash, check. Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Ex- 
press. Any credit card transactions taken over the phone must have a signed credit card au- 
thorization form on file with the business office. All payments (excluding cash) made after 
the close of business can be placed in the payment drop box located at the business office. 

Note: If a check made in payment for student fees is not valid upon presentation to 
Oglethorpe's banking institution, a hold is placed on the student's account and 
Oglethorpe University reserves the right to cancel the student's registration and 
assess any necessary fees. 



Financial Obligations 



All tuition and fees must be paid by the dates published in each semester's course schedule. 
It is the responsibility of the student to be informed of, and to observe, all policies and pro- 
cedures regarding tuition, fees, payments and refunds. In no case will a policy be waived or 
an exception granted because a student pleads unawareness of the policy or asserts that he 
or she was not informed of it by an adviser or other authority. Verbal misinformation is not 
grounds for a waiver of a policy. 

Oglethorpe University reserves the right at any time during the semester to drop any stu- 
dent from classes for failure to pay tuition and fees. Until all financial obligations are met, 
a hold is placed on the student's account, no records are released, no future registration is 
allowed and the faculty considers no student as a candidate for graduation until all indebt- 
edness to the university has been settled. Students with outstanding indebtedness may 
be subject to late penalties. Unpaid student accounts that are deemed delinquent may be 
placed with a collection agency. If such action is required, the student will be liable for any 
cost associated with such an action. 



49 



50 



STUDENT 
AFFAIRS 





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51 



Orientation 



Oglethorpe University provides entering students vdth the opportunity to make a successful 
adjustment to college. The university community's tradition of close personal relationships 
results in an orientation program that fosters the development of these relationships and 
provides much needed information about the university. 

All entering Oglethorpe students must attend scheduled orientation activities in August or 
January. Throughout this process, students will learn about the academic program, sup- 
port services and the life of the campus community. To facilitate the student's transition to 
college life, he or she must enroll in a section of Fresh Focus. For a fiiU description of Fresh 
Focus, please see the Educational Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 

Additionally, Oglethorpe expects students entering in the fall to attend one-day Passport 
sessions to become familiar with the campus and curriculum. Students may select one 
of two possible dates over the summer. Typically, students select their course schedules, 
receive IDs and meet faculty, staff and other incoming students. The Office of Admission, 
in collaboration with the Office of Student Affairs and the provost, coordinates the Passport 
program; the Office of Student Affairs, in collaboration with the Office of Admission and 
the provost, organizes the August and January orientations. 



Housing and Meals 



Campus housing is provided to full-time students enrolled in the traditional undergraduate 
program on a space-available basis. All residence halls are coed, non-smoking facilities. A 
staff of resident assistants and housing professionals supervises each residential area. All 
freshmen and sophomores not living at home vrith a parent or legal guardian are required 
to live on campus. The residence halls close during the winter break at which time all resi- 
dents must leave campus. 

All students living on campus must participate in the university meal plan. Twenty-four 
meals are served each week in the Emerson Student Center. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are 
served Monday through Friday. Brunch and dinner are served on Saturdays, Sundays and 
holidays. Sunday through Thursday nights, the dining hall will be open with late-evening 
choices from 9:00 until 11:00 p.m. Three different meal plan options are available; two of 
these options include flex dollars. 

Commuting and off-campiis students are eligible to purchase a "commuter meal plan" that 
includes 25 meals. Unused commuter meals do not carry over from one academic year to 
the next. Meals are only provided when school is in session and are not provided during 
Thanksgiving, winter and spring breaks. Lunch vrill be the last meal served on the day prior 
to the start of the aforementioned breaks. The last meal served as part of the plan during 
the academic year will be lunch on the last day of final exams during the spring semester. 
There is no meal plan during the summer. 

In addition to the residence halls, there are six Greek houses that accommodate some mem- 
bers of four fraternities and two sororities. Greek students living in a fraternity or sorority 
house receive a seven meal a week plan with no flex dollars. 

Health Services 

Health services functions as an ambulatory acute care facility managed by a registered 
nurse. A part-time physician assists in the office on a weekly basis. The center operates on a 
regular posted schedule during weekdays when classes and finals are in session, providing 



52 



basic first aid and limited medical assistance for students. This ofifice is closed over the sum- 
mer. Special services such as exams, vaccinations and tests occur as publicized. 

In the event additional or major medical care is required, or for emergencies, the student- 
patient will be referred to medical specialists and hospitals in the area with which the 
health center maintains a working relationship. Students are responsible for providing his 
or her own transportation to the hospital or other off-campus doctors and medical special- 
ists. University personnel are not permitted to transport students for such purposes. 

All full-time day students are required to have health insurance coverage and are automati- 
cally enrolled and charged for the university-sponsored student health insurance plan. A 
brochure is mailed to all registered students and available online describing the current 
semester coverage, fee and limits of plan. Students may only be exempt from the school- 
sponsored insurance plan by showing evidence of personal health insurance by returning 
the waiver card that is attached to the brochure or completing the online waiver at 
www.collegiaterisk.com to the insurance company by the deadline. Waiver cards will not be 
accepted by health services and the business office. If a student does not submit a waiver, 
the cost of the insurance will be added to his or her student statement. It is required that 
international and exchange students show proof of or purchase Repatriation and Evacua- 
tion coverage while attending Oglethorpe University. See the Tuition and Costs section of 
this Bulletin for more details. As required by Georgia law, residential students must sign a 
form stating that they have either received a vaccination against meningococcal disease or 
that they have received information about meningitis and the vaccine. 

Career Services 

The career services office provides resources to assist students in making responsible deci- 
sions and planning strategies regarding job search and career options. These resources 
include: one-on-one sessions with qualified career counselors, half-semester courses for 
sophomores and seniors, access to job and internship databases, a career library, mock 
interviews, resume writing, career fairs, workshops and on-campus recruitments. The de- 
partment also supports students interested in continuing their education by assisting with 
graduate school exploration and planning, application strategies and review of personal 
statements. 

Career services offers three career assessments which are the Myers-Briggs Type Indica- 
tor, Strong Interest Inventory and StrengthsQuest. These tests provide information about 
environmental and work style preferences, industries and job titles for further exploration 
and examine personal strengths from which students can gain career success and satisfac- 
tion. Workshops on resume writing, interviewing, dressing professionally, workplace/social 
etiquette and job search techniques are presented each semester to prepare students for life 
after college. 

Students also have the option of pursing internships for academic credit. The department 
assists students in identifying opportunities and completing appropriate paperwork. Each 
year a number of prospective employers visit the campus for the purpose of providing 
information on careers, interviev^dng candidates and making hires. Current information on 
permanent, summer and part-time job opportunities is made available to both students and 
alumni. The career services office conducts a number of career fairs throughout the year for 
positions at nonprofit organizations, within the financial industry, teacher recruitment and 
a spring event that covers a variety of fields and industries. More information about services 
offered through the department can be accessed online at www.oglethorpe.edu (keyword: 
career services). 



53 



Counseling and Personal Development 



Counseling and referrals for professional psychiatric and psychological services are avail- 
able to all Oglethorpe students experiencing a variety of personal or social problems or have 
related concerns. A professional counselor directs the counseling and coordinates all other 
services, which are confidential. The other therapists are at various stages of completing 
graduate degrees in psychology or licensure as a therapist. 

Counseling at Oglethorpe is a collaborative process that involves the development of a 
unique, confidential helping relationship. In these relationships, therapists are facilitators 
who help their clients understand themselves and their environments more accurately. In- 
dividuals are encouraged to understand their feelings and behaviors, relationships with oth- 
ers and life circumstances. Discussion of issues enables growth in making healthier choices 
and taking responsible action with themselves, relationships, family and academics. 

Services offered include: 

• Group Counseling: Counseling in groups offers a broad range of insight and 
support fi-om peers and professional therapists. Some groups deal with general 
concerns and personal growth, others have a more specific focus such as eating 
disorders, women's issues and sexual abuse or assault. 

• Individual Counseling: This treatment modality is offered on a weekly basis to 
work through personal concerns. Individual therapy is generally time-limited. 

• Couples Counseling: Couples counseling is geared to help partners negotiate dif- 
ficult times in a relationship 

Students come to the counseling center for a wdde array of concerns. Among the most 
common topics include academic difficulties and career indecision; adjustment to college; 
controlling the use of alcohol and other drugs; depression and anxiety; eating disorders; 
low self-confidence; personal grovv1;h; and relationship issues. Students may utilize counsel- 
ing services for a limited number of sessions or be referred out to a specialist as determined 
in collaboration between the student and the counseling center staff. 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 



Among the enumerated rights of Oglethorpe University students are freedom of expression 
and peaceful assembly, the presumption of innocence and procedural fairness in the admin- 
istration of discipline and access to personal records. 

As members of the Oglethorpe community, students are responsible for maintaining high 
standards of conduct and respecting the privacy and feelings of others and the property 
of both students and the university. Students are expected to display behavior that is not 
disruptive of campus life or the surrounding community. They represent the university off- 
campus and are expected to act in a law-abiding and mature fashion. Those whose actions 
show that they have not accepted this responsibility may be subject to disciplinary action as 
set forth in the Code of Student Conduct, found in this Bulletin. 

Student Role in Institutional Decision Making 

Student opinions and views play a significant role in institutional decisions affecting their 
interests and welfare. Students are asked to complete the following annually: a compre- 
hensive standardized student opinion survey, the Core Survey, Course Assessments and the 
Advising Assessment. Students serve on key academic committees such as the Commence- 
ment Committee, the Core Curriculum Committee, the Experiential Education Committee, 
the Teacher Education Council and several Board of Trustees standing committees. 



54 



Particularly important is the role of elected student government representatives in this pro- 
cess. The president along vdth selected other officers of the Oglethorpe Student Association 
meet regularly with the vice president for student affairs to discuss student body concerns. 
At least once each year student government representatives meet with the Campus Life 
Committee of the Board of Trustees. In addition, the Oglethorpe Student Association col- 
laborates vidth the president of the university and the cabinet in sponsoring periodic "town 
meetings" to which all students are invited. 

Fraternities and Sororities 



The Greek community at Oglethorpe is made up of four fraternities and three sororities. 
The fraternities are Chi Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha Order and Sigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon. The sororities are Alpha Sigma Tau, Chi Omega and Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

These organizations contribute positively to campus life by providing a variety of leader- 
ship, service and social opportunities for students. Membership in these organizations is 
voluntary and subject to guidelines established by the Interfraternity Council, the Panhel- 
lenic Council and the Greek affairs coordinator. The fraternity and sorority recruitment 
process takes place early in the fall semester. 

Athletics ^^^ 

Oglethorpe takes the term "student-athlete" seriously. Please see Good Academic Stand- 
ing and Probation for Athletes in the Academic Regulations and Policies section of this 
Bulletin. Oglethorpe's teams excel in the competitive arena and in the classroom. The 
university is an active member of the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) and 
Division III of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Members of Division 
III may not award financial aid (other than academic honor awards) to any student-athlete, 
except upon a showing of financial need by the recipient. Oglethorpe provides a program 
of Oglethorpe Scholars Awards, which is described in the Financial Assistance section of 
this Bulletin. Many students who are interested in sports and are superior academically do 
qualify for this form of assistance. 

The university offers intercollegiate competition in baseball, basketball, cross-country, golf, 
soccer, tennis and track and field for men and in basketball, cross-country, golf, soccer, 
tennis, track and field and volleyball for women. The Stormy Petrels compete against other 
SCAC schools, including Austin College, Birmingham-Southern College, Centre College, 
Colorado College, DePauw University, Hendrix College, Millsaps College, Rhodes College, 
Southwestern University and Trinity University. 

Intramural and Recreational Sports 

The athletic department offers an array of intramural sports and recreational activities in 
addition to intercollegiate competition. All students may participate in these physically and 
intellectually stimulating activities. Men and women can compete in basketball, dodgeball, 
flag football, ultimate frisbee, volleyball and wiffle ball programs, among others, throughout 
team sport seasons. In addition, aerobics, weight training and dance are also offered at the 
Steve Schmidt Sport and Recreation Center. Various recreational activities such as camping, 
hiking and rafting occur throughout the year at various sites in the greater Atlanta area. 

Cultural Opportunities on Campus 



There are numerous cultural opportunities for students outside the classroom, such as con- 
certs, theatrical productions and lectures by visiting scholars. The Mack A. Rikard lectures 
expose students to leaders in business and other professions. The University Singers per- 
form once every semester and sponsor seasonal events vdth guest artists. The Oglethorpe 



55 



University Museum of Art, on the third floor of Phihp Weltner Library, sponsors exhibi- 
tions as well as lectures on associated subjects and occasional concerts in the museum. The 
Playmakers and theatre department stage various productions each year in the Conant 
Performing Arts Center. Two annual events, Night of the Arts and International Night, 
provide a showcase for campus talent. The former presents student literary, musical and 
visual arts talent while the latter features international cuisine and entertainment. Georgia 
Shakespeare, a professional theatre company located on campus, offers summer and fall 
performances that are a valuable cultural asset to the Oglethorpe community. 

Opportunities in Atlanta 



Oglethorpe is located eight miles from downtown Atlanta and just two miles from the city's 
largest shopping center. A nearby rapid transit station makes transportation quick and 
efficient. This proximity to the Southeast's most vibrant city offers students a great variety 
of cultural and entertainment opportunities. There are numerous excellent restaurants and 
clubs in nearby Buckhead. Downtown Atlanta offers major league professional baseball, 
football, ice hockey and basketball to sports fans as well as frequent popular concerts. The 
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra performs from September through May in the Woodruff Arts 
Center. The Atlanta Ballet and the Atlanta Opera perform periodically at the Fox Theater 
which also presents musical theater and various concerts. The Alliance Theatre Company 
and many smaller companies present productions of contemporary and classical plays. 
The High Museum of Art hosts major traveling exhibitions in addition to its permanent 
collection. The Center for Civic Engagement sponsors a series of field trips through the OUr 
Atlanta Cultural Excursion program to museums, theatre and dance programs and places of 
cultural, political and historical interest in the metropolitan Atlanta area. 

Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation 

Oglethorpe University values the dignity of the individual, human diversity and an ap- 
propriate decorum for members of the campus community. Discriminatory or harassing 
behavior is in opposition with these principles and will not be tolerated as such conduct 
interferes with the work, study or performance of the individual to whom it is addressed. It 
is indefensible when it makes the work, study or living environment hostile, intimidating, 
injurious or demeaning. 

It is the policy of the university that all members of the Oglethorpe community be able to 
work, study, participate in activities and live on a campus free of unwarranted harassment 
in the form of oral, written, graphic or physical conduct which personally frightens, intimi- 
dates, injures or demeans another individual. Harassment directed against an individual or 
group that is based on race, gender, religious belief, color, sexual orientation, national ori- 
gin, disability, age or any other category protected by federal, state or local law is prohibited. 
At a minimum, the term harassment as used in this policy includes: 

• Offensive remarks, comments, jokes, slurs or verbal conduct pertaining to an 
individual's personal characteristics. 

• Offensive pictures, drawings, photographs, figurines or other graphic images, 
conduct or communications including email, faxes and copies pertaining to an 
individual's personal characteristics. 

• Offensive sexual remarks, sexual advances or requests for sexual favors regardless of 
the gender of the individuals involved. 

• Offensive physical conduct including touching and gestures, regardless of the gen- 
der of the individuals involved. 

Retaliation, which includes threatening an individual or taking any adverse action against 
an individual for reporting a possible violation of this policy or participating in an investiga- 
tion conducted under this policy, is absolutely prohibited. 



56 



Members of the faculty are also covered by this policy and are prohibited from engaging in 
any form of harassing, discriminatory or retaliatory conduct. No member of the faculty has 
the authority to suggest to any student that the student's evaluation or grading would be 
affected by the student entering into (or refusing to enter into) a personal relationship with 
the faculty member or for tolerating (or refusing to tolerate) conduct or communication 
that might violate this policy. Such behavior is a direct violation of this policy. 

Grievance Procedures for Students 



Oglethorpe University has adopted an internal grievance procedure providing for the 
prompt and equitable resolution of complaints alleging any action prohibited by this policy 
and/or conduct in violation of Title VI, Title VII, Title IX, Section 504, the Age Discrimi- 
nation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The following university officials have 
been designated to respond to allegations regarding any such violation: the vice president 
for student affairs (Timothy Doyle, Emerson Student Center, 404-364-8335), the provost 
(Stephen B. Herschler, Lupton Hall, 404-364-8317), the manager of human resources 
(Wayne Phipps, Lupton Hall, 404-364-8325) or the university psychologist and director of 
the counseling center (Leanne Henry-Miller, Emerson Student Center, 404-364-8456). 

Complaints alleging misconduct as defined in this policy should be reported within 90 days 
of the alleged offense. Complainants may seek informal or formal resolution. All complain- 
ants must complete a written Discriminatory Harassment Incident Report which may be 
obtained from any of the aforementioned officials. 

Complainants are encouraged to explore informal resolution before filing a formal com- 
plaint. Informal resolution focuses on communication, education and resolution while for- 
mal procedures focus on investigation and discipline. Informal complaints will be resolved 
within 15 working days with a written resolution given to each of the parties involved. If the 
situation results in an impasse, the complainant will be given a notice of impasse within 15 
working days from the filing of the incident. If a notice of impasse is given and the com- 
plainant wishes to file a formal written complaint, the complainant must do so within 30 
working days of the date of notice of impasse unless a waiver in filing time is requested. 

When a formal complaint is filed an investigation vdll be initiated. The person alleged of 
misconduct wall be given 10 days to provide a signed response to the requesting official. A 
copy will be provided to the complainant. If the alleged harasser fails to respond, the pre- 
sumption will be made that the allegation(s) in the complaint are true. A written determi- 
nation will be issued to the complainant within 60 working days of the receipt of the formal 
written complaint. If the procedure requires an extension of time, the complainant will be 
informed in writing of the reasons, the status of the investigation and the probable date of 
completion. 

If the complainant disputes the findings or is dissatisfied with the recommendations, the 
complainant may request reconsideration of the case to the president, Lawrence M. Schall, 
in writing within 45 working days of receipt of the written determination. Complainants 
also have the right to file with the appropriate state or federal authorities as set forth in the 
applicable statutes. 

Cases that may require disciplinary action will be handled according to the established 
discipline procedures of the university. Student organizations in violation of this policy may 
be subject to the loss of university recognition. Complainants shall be protected from unfair 
retribution. 

Nothing in this policy statement is intended to infringe on the individual rights, freedom 
of speech or academic freedom provided to members of the Oglethorpe community. The 
scholarly, educational or artistic content of any written or oral presentation or inquiry shall 



57 



not be limited by this policy. Accordingly, this provision will be liberally construed but 
should not be used as a pretext for violation of the policy. 

Honors and Awards 



These awards are presented at Commencement, at the Honors and Awards Convocation 
during the Symposium in the Liberal Arts and Sciences or during a special program held by 
the sponsoring organization: 

Donald C. Agnew Award for Distinguished Service: This award is presented annually by 
members of the Oglethorpe Student Association and is chosen by that body to honor the 
person who, in their opinion, has given distinguished service to the university. Dr. Agnew 
served as president of Oglethorpe University from 1957 to 1964. 

Alpha Chi Award: This is an annual award made to the member of the sophomore class 
who best exemplifies the ideals of Alpha Chi in scholarship, leadership, character and ser- 



Alpha Phi Omega Service Award: This award is presented by Alpha Phi Omega fraternity 
to the student, faculty or staff member who best exemplifies the organization's three-fold 
purposes of leadership, friendship and service. 

Art Awards of Merit: These are presented to students who have displayed excellence in 
photography, sculpture, painting and drawing. 

Leo BUancio Award: This award, created in memory of Professor Leo Bilancio, a member 
of the Oglethorpe history faculty from 1958 to 1989, was established by the Oglethorpe 
Student Association and is presented to a graduating senior who has been an outstanding 
student of history. 

Mary Whiton Calkins and Margaret Floy Washburn Awards: Outstanding seniors ma- 
joring in psychology are honored with these awards. 

Chiaroscuro Juried Art Show Awards: These awards are presented to the artists who 
submit the best drawings, sculpture, photographs and paintings to the annual student art 
show sponsored by Chiaroscuro, a club that supports the arts on campus. 

The Chanda Creasy Music Prize (University Singers of the Year): Given annually to one 
male and one female member who, in the opinion of the conductor, have each made invalu- 
able contributions to the organization and whose musical achievements and commitment 
have been of the highest order. The award is a cash prize with a personal plaque and their 
names will be on a master plaque in the University Singers rehearsal room. 

Deans' Award for Outstanding Achievement: This award is presented annually to a 
campus club, organization or society which, in the opinion of the vice president for student 
affairs and the provost, has contributed most to university life. 

Financial Executives Institute Award: This award is presented annually by the Atlanta 
Chapter of The Financial Executives Institute to students who have demonstrated leader- . 
ship, superior academic performance and potential for success in business administration. 

Georgia Society of Certified Public Accountants Certificate of Academic Excellence: 

This award is presented annually to the accounting major who has the highest overall grade 
point average. 



58 



Sidney Lanier Prize: This award is given yearly to the student(s) submitting excellent 
poetry to campus publications. 

LeConte Award: The most outstanding student graduating with a major in one of the 
natural sciences or mathematics, as determined by the faculty in the Division of Natural 
Sciences, is recognized with this award. 

Leader in Action Award: This award is presented to the student who best exemplifies the 
ideals of the Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program. 

Charles M. MacConnell Award: This award honors a former member of the faculty and 
is presented by the sophomore class to the senior who, in the judgment of the class, has 
participated in many phases of campus life without having received full recognition. 

Metropolitan Atlanta Phi Beta Kappa Alumni Association Award: This award is given 
to the outstanding graduating senior in the Honors Program. 

The James Edward Oglethorpe Awards: Commonly called the "Oglethorpe Cups," these 
are presented annually to the man and woman in the graduating class who, in the opinion 
of the faculty, have excelled in both scholarship and service. 

Oglethorpe Poet Laureate: This award was first instituted by Mrs. Idalee Vonk, wife of 
former President Paul Vonk, and is an honor that is bestowed upon a freshman, sophomore 
or junior who presents the best written work to The Tower for competition. 

Omicron Delta Kappa Emerging Leader Award: This award is made by Omicron Delta 
Kappa to the student in the freshman class who most fiiUy exemplifies the ideals of this 
organization. 

Order of Omega Outstanding Sophomore Award: This award is presented by the Order 
of Omega, a national Greek honor society, to the sophomore who best exemplifies the prin- 
ciples of Greek life. 

Outstanding Male and Female Varsity Athletes of the Year Award: These awards are 
made annually to the outstanding male and female students participating in varsity sports. 

Outstanding Improvement in French Studies: This award honors the student who dem- 
onstrates excellence and dedication in French studies. 

Outstanding Mathematics/Computer Science Senior Award: This award recognizes 
the most exceptional senior majoring in either mathematics or mathematics and computer 
science. 

Outstanding Politics Senior Award: This award is given annually to the graduating senior 
who, in the judgment of the faculty, does the most sophisticated work in upper-level classes 
within the discipline. 

Outstanding Sociology Senior Award: The outstanding senior majoring in sociology is 
honored with this award. 

Pattillo Leadership Award: The president of the university presents this prize to a gradu- 
ating student who has excelled in leadership accomplishments. The award is named for 
Oglethorpe's 13th president. Manning M. Pattillo, Jr. 



59 



Phi Beta Kappa Faculty Group Award: This award is presented by the faculty and staff 
members of Phi Beta Kappa to the graduating student who, in their judgment, has demon- 
strated outstanding scholarly qualities. 

Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Scholarship Award: This award is presented annually to the 
full-time freshman with the highest grade point average by Phi Eta Sigma, a national scho- 
lastic honor society for freshmen. 

President's Citizenship Award: This award is given annually to the senior the president 
deems most worthy for his or her accomplishments in community service and civic engage- 
ment while at Oglethorpe. 

Publications Awards: Notable contributors to The Tower, The Stormy Petrel and The Yam- 
acraw are recognized with these awards. 

Resident Assistant of the Year: This award is presented annually to an exemplary student 
who organizes outstanding educational and social programs for residential students and 
builds a sense of community in the residence halls. 

Anne Rivers Siddons Award: This award is given each year to the graduating senior ma- 
joring in English who is judged to have written the best piece of short fiction. 

The Warren Valine Music Prize (University Singers Most Valuable Member): Given 
annually to the student who is considered by the members of the Singers to be their most 
valuable member, the award is a cash prize with a personal plaque, plus the v^dnner's name 
wdll be on a master plaque in the University Singers rehearsal room. 

Charles Longstreet Weltner Award: Sponsored by the Stormy Petrel Bar Association in 
honor of Chief Justice Charles L. Weltner, class of 1948, this award is presented annually to 
a student who demonstrates analytical and persuasive skills and an appreciation for the ele- 
ments of civic leadership, as determined through a competitive essay and interview process. 

Sally Hull Weltner Award for Scholarship: This award is presented to the summa cum 
laude student in the graduating class who has attained the highest level of scholastic 
achievement at Oglethorpe with the greatest number of hours of course work completed at 
Oglethorpe. 



60 



Civility Statement 



Oglethorpe University is a place dedicated to vigorous discussion, exchange of ideas and 
debate. Such discussion always runs the risk of becoming acrimonious, thus it is particular- 
ly important for all members of the Oglethorpe community to maintain a climate marked 
by mutual respect. We must be committed to the highest standards of civility and decency 
and to promoting a community where all people can work and learn together in an atmo- 
sphere free of demeaning behavior or hostility. 

The need to maintain civility and mutual respect extends throughout the different venues 
of debate and discussion - from informal exchanges in the dining hall, the residence halls or 
the quad to formal discussions in classrooms and meetings. 

Students and faculty have a responsibility to foster a healthy climate for the exchange of 
ideas in the classroom. To that end, students and faculty should specifically avoid behavior 
that disrupts classroom activities or creates a hostile or intimidating atmosphere. 

Consensual Relationship Policy 

The educational mission of Oglethorpe University is promoted by the professionalism 
of its faculty-student relationships, staff-student relationships, supervisor-employee rela- 
tionships and employee-employee relationships. These professional relationships must not 
be compromised by romantic or sexual attachments. 

Consenting relationships that are of concern to Oglethorpe are those intimate, romantic 
or sexual relationships where there is a reporting or evaluation relationship between the 
two parties. In the case of faculty member and student, the respect and trust accorded 
the instructor by the student and the instructor's power in assigning grades, evaluations, 
recomijiendations for further study and future employment may diminish the student's 
ability to consent genuinely to an amorous or sexual relationship. Supervisors assign and 
evaluate their subordinates' work, and senior colleagues often provide advice and support 
to junior colleagues and are involved in decisions concerning promotion and tenure, course 
and committee assignments, and salary increases. The power disparity inherent in such 
relationships poses serious moral, ethical, and legal concerns. Further, such a relationship 
could make it very difficult to defend a subsequent charge of sexual harassment on grounds 
of mutual consent. The faculty member, camp counselor, supervisor or senior colleague, by 
virtue of his or her position, will bear a special burden of accountability if charges of sexual 
harassment arise. 

It is the responsibility of the faculty member, supervisor or other staff member who 
becomes involved in a personal relationship vrith a student or employee to avoid any con- 
ffict of interest, real or perceived, between personal and professional concerns. A faculty or 
staff member may not participate in the evaluation of a student, colleague or staff member 
with whom a romantic or sexual relationship exists or has existed. When a supervisory rela- 
tionship exists, it is the responsibility of the parties involved to take appropriate actions to 
change the work and reporting relationship to remove the possibility of a conflict of inter- 
est. Failure to do so is a violation of professional ethics and may result in disciplinary action. 



61 



62 



>?:-? ''5955 r*: k^ 




63 



University Communication Policy 



The Oglethorpe University email system is the university's official mode of electronic com- 
munication to and among faculty, staff and students. The university and its faculty, staff and 
students will use Oglethorpe email accounts (those labeled 7zame@oglethorpe.edu) to send 
university news, essential information, classroom communications and official notices. Such 
communications will not be sent to personal email accounts such as "hotmail," "aol," "gmail," 
etc. 

Students are required to maintain current home addresses, local addresses, phone num- 
bers and emergency contacts with the registrar's office. In addition, both permanent home 
addresses and local addresses will be used for official written communications and students 
are responsible for information mailed to these addresses of record. Such communications 
may include mid-semester and final grade reports, financial aid awards, library notices and 
student account statements. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that his or her 
information of record is correct and to make all changes to such information directly v^dth 
the registrar's office. Faculty or other staff offices may collect such student information for 
their own purposes, but this does not constitute an official notification of change. Students 
must go in person to the registrar's office to make official changes or corrections to their 
information of record. 

Faculty and staff are required to maintain current home address, phone numbers, emer- 
gency contacts and beneficiaries on file with the human resources office. 

Student Conduct Policies 



General Campus Rules and Regulations 

Oglethorpe students should abide by federal, state and local laws. Behavior anywhere on 
or off-campus in violation of such laws may subject an individual to university disciplinary 
procedures and sanctions as outlined in the Code of Student Conduct. 

The foUowdng policies are specific campus rules which students must know and heed. 

Alcohol and Drug Policy 

1. Oglethorpe University expects students to comply with federal, state and local laws 
concerning the possession and use of alcoholic beverages and drugs. The consump- 
tion of alcoholic beverages by persons under the age of 21 and the furnishing of 
alcohol to an individual under 21 are violations of state law. The possession, use or 
distribution of illegal drugs or substances used for illicit purposes on campus will 
be subject to disciplinary action by the university and may constitute a violation of 
law that can result in fines or imprisonment by federal, state or local authorities. 
Any use of alcoholic beverages or drugs on campus that results in a violation of the 
"General Campus Rules and Regulations" may subject the student to sanctions ap- 
plying to these infractions as well as to sanctions for violating the alcohol and drug 
policy. 

2. The use of alcoholic beverages on campus by students of legal age is permitted only 
in the privacy of their living quarters or at events or in locations specifically autho- 
rized by the dean of students. If all members of a room or suite are under the legal 
drinking age, no alcohol can be present in that room at any time. Residents cannot 
host open invitation or large private parties with alcoholic beverages. This policy 
specifically prohibits large quantities of alcohol and beer kegs on the campus. Open 
containers of alcoholic beverages are not permitted outdoors in public areas of the 
residence halls or elsewhere in campus buildings or on campus grounds, except 
where specifically authorized. Public areas include lounges, lobbies, study rooms, 



64 



hallways, laundry/utility rooms and all courtyards, patios, grounds, sidewalks and 
parking lots. 

3. University guidelines that apply whenever alcoholic beverages are available at 
off-campus functions sponsored by student organizations include the following: 
the alcohol, which is available to those of legal drinking age who vdsh to drink, is 
provided only by or through the management of the establishment rented for the 
function, served only by licensed bartenders and sold at a reasonable price; alterna- 
tive non-alcoholic beverages must be available in adequate supply; food or snacks 
should be served; a reasonable time limit to end the party should be set; sober and 
safe transportation should be provided to avoid anyone driving while intoxicated; 
any other effort or provision should be made by the host organization to control 
the function, encourage responsible conduct and monitor problems of intoxication 
to better ensure a safe, enjoyable party. Valid complaints of disruptive or unruly 
behavior, personal injury or damage to property arising from the use of alcohol may 
subject the organization and the individuals involved to disciplinary action. 

4. Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs on campus is a severe disciplinary 
matter. Students found driving under the influence will have their driving privileges 
suspended on campus; local police may be called to investigate alleged cases of driv- 
ing under the influence. Campus safety reserves the right to question individuals 
driving on campus when there is cause to believe the driver to be under the influ- 
ence. Campus safety has the right to ask those drivers entering campus to park their 
cars and walk if there is cause to believe that they are under the influence. 

5. Paraphernalia, equipment and other devices designed to increase the rate of 
consumption or intake of alcohol or illegal drugs such as bongs, funnels and kegs 
are prohibited from campus. Hookahs and other like devices designed for smoking 
tobacco are also prohibited. 

6. In addition to these policies, the university expects fraternities and sororities to fol- 
low the alcohol risk management policies outlined by their national offices. 

Policy on Student Demonstrations 

Oglethorpe University fully supports freedom of expression and peaceful assembly for 
students. Having the opportunity to assemble peacefully and to discuss issues is essential to 
the student's education. However to prevent bodily harm, to protect property and to avoid 
disruption of the educational process, participants in a demonstration must conduct them- 
selves in a responsible manner. The following standards of conduct apply to all campus 
assemblies, meetings, parties or other gatherings of students: 

No person may push, strike, physically assault or threaten any member of the faculty, staff 
or student body or any visitor to the university. 

The person(s) mainly responsible for organizing a demonstration must meet with the direc- 
tor of campus safety prior to announcing the event to agree on procedures for maintaining 
order. 

All other campus policies on conduct, as well as all county, state and federal laws, apply to 
student demonstrations on the Oglethorpe campus. 

Policy on Hazing 

Oglethorpe University does not permit the hazing of a student as a requirement for mem- 
bership or participation in any student organization, athletic team, Greek chapter, colony, 
club or group. Hazing is not consistent with the mission of the university and is in opposi- 
tion to the founding principles of fraternal organizations. The university wdll not tolerate 
hazing in any form. 



65 



Hazing activities are defined as: 

An action taken or situation created intentionally by an individual or group, 
whether on or off-campus, to produce mental or physical discomfort, embarrass- 
ment, harassment or ridicule in another person or group, regardless of the consent 
of the participants. Any act that interferes with regularly scheduled classes or 
academic pursuits of a student may also be defined as hazing. Such activities may 
include but are not limited to the following: use of alcohol; paddling in any form; 
creation of excess fatigue; physical and psychological shocks; quests, treasure hunts, 
scavenger hunts, road trips or any other such activities carried on or off-campus; 
the wearing of public apparel which is conspicuous and not normally in good taste; 
engaging in public stunts and buffoonery; morally degrading or humiliating games 
and activities; forced servitude; other such activities that are not consistent with 
academic achievement, ritual or policy, the regulations or policies of the university 
or applicable state law. 

Complaints or information concerning an alleged violation of the hazing policy should be 
reported to the dean of students or the director of residence life. Staff will investigate all 
complaints and take appropriate action upon confirmation of a violation. 

University Noise Policy 

In order to promote a supportive learning environment on campus, excessive noise during 
any hour will be considered an infraction of the rules. Specific quiet hours in the residence 
halls are posted as applicable. 

Policy on Smoking 

Smoking is prohibited in all campus buildings. This includes classrooms, offices, meeting 
rooms, lounge areas, rest rooms, corridors, stairwells, the library, all residence halls (includ- 
ing the Traer courtyard), the field house, the student center and any other interior spaces in 
buildings. Each fraternity and sorority chapter determines the smoking policy in its Greek 
house. Smoking is only permitted in designated areas, at least 25 feet from the entrance to 
a building. All smokers should dispose of cigarette butts in the proper receptacles. Hookahs 
are not permitted on campus. 

Restricted Areas 

Students are not permitted to enter the electrical sendee rooms, boiler rooms, maintenance 
closets and air conditioning tower or to be on roofs of campus buildings. 

Appearance 

The university expects students to maintain a neat appearance when attending class or 
campus events. Shoes and shirts are to be worn in all buildings except campus residence 
halls. 

Suicidal Gestures 

It is the policy of the university to treat all attempted suicides and suicidal gestures with 
seriousness regardless of the degree of lethality involved in the attempt. A student who has 
made such an attempt must receive clearance from the counseling center to continue to live 
on campus and to participate in co-curricular activities. 

Gatehouse Security Arm Procedures 

The security arm at the Peachtree Road entrance is in operation between the hours of 11:00 
p.m. and 6:00 a.m. daily, unless directed otherwise by the director of campus safety. The 
gate will be down and operating during this period and around the clock on holidays. 



66 



If a vehicle has a valid parking tag, the vehicle will be freely admitted onto campus at any 
time. 

Between 11:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m., if a vehicle has no permit or if the permit is out of date, 
the vehicle may not be allowed onto campus unless the following is done: 

• Occupants of any vehicle unaccompanied by a student or staff member must show a 
valid photo ID. The name, license number and state, time and a reason for the visit 
will be recorded in the vehicle registration log. In addition, the student the visitor 
wishes to see must be called in advance to verify that he or she is a welcomed guest. 
If confirmation is not made after two attempts, the guest will be informed and visi- 
tation declined. 

• If a student is in the vehicle, he or she can confirm the occupants. Students must 
sign-in their guests on the registration log along with their name (printed clearly), 
residence hall room, phone number and time. 

After 2:00 a.m., a visitor will not be allowed to proceed onto campus unless their intended 
host or hostess comes to the gatehouse to meet them. 

Guest List - Occasionally members of Greek Row may provide a guest list of off-campus 
visitors for a social function. Individuals on the list are allowed onto campus after showing 
identification and being checked off the list. The fraternities and sororities will be informed 
that their invited guests are not allowed to bring other individuals not on the list. 

Student Concern and Complaint Policies 

This policy provides a process for students to raise concerns and file complaints when they 
are dissatisfied with a university service or policy or an action by a university employee. The 
process aims to be constructive and positive in resolving differences and working toward a 
better community at Oglethorpe University. 

This policy covers academic and non-academic matters except in areas where other formal 
policies and procedures take precedence. These other policies include the Grade Appeal 
Policy, the Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation, the Student 
Code of Conduct and the Honor Code. 

General Principles 

• Whenever possible and in a timely fashion, students should raise concerns infor- 
mally with the faculty member, staff member or other student involved. 

• The appropriate division chair or vice president will handle student complaints as 
quickly and fairly as possible. 

• As a measure of good faith, students should be prepared to make their identities 
known when they raise concerns or complaints. Matters raised anonymously will 
not be addressed formally. 

• There will be no adverse effect on or retaliation against a student raising a concern 
or complaint in good faith or against any person who in good faith provides infor- 
mation regarding a concern or complaint. 

• Written complaints will receive written responses within 30 days and will be kept 
on file. 

Procedures 

• Academic matters: If a student has a complaint or concern about a course or faculty 
member it should be directed to the appropriate division chair or the provost and 



67 



senior vice president. If a student has a complaint about an academic policy or its 
enforcement, it should be addressed to the associate provost for academic affairs. 

• Non-academic matters: If a student has a complaint or concern about a non-aca- 
demic matter it should be addressed to the vice president of student affairs. 

Parking and Driving Regulations 



These regulations are intended to make the parking facilities of the university available to 
its members, to promote pedestrian and vehicular safety and to ensure access at all times 
for emergency vehicles. 

Traffic and Parking Regulations 

All vehicle operators are subject to university parking and traffic regulations while on uni- 
versity property and are responsible for knowledge of these regulations. 

• Parking regulations are in effect from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. Traffic regulations are in effect 24 hours a day, year-round. 

• The director of campus safety has the authority to enforce or suspend the traffic and 
parking regulations at any time. 

• State of Georgia statutes are in effect, and reference to Georgia Code, Chapters 
40-6-221 through 225 will apply for spaces designated for generally disabled person 
parking. 

• Pedestrians will be given the right-of-way at all times. 

• The maximum speed limit on campus is 15 mph. 

• All traffic and parking spaces (including painted curbs, spaces and hatchings) must 
be obeyed. It is not possible to mark with signs or yellow paint all areas of university 
property where parking is prohibited. However, parking is prohibited in driveways, 
in spaces designated for disabled persons and on pedestrian paths, crosswalks, side- 
walks, grassy areas, construction areas, fire lanes, service areas or any place where 
parking or driving would create a safety hazard, obstruct traffic or interfere with the 
use of university facilities. 

• The person registering the vehicle is responsible for all parking violations by that 
vehicle. If the vehicle is loaned to another person, proper observance of these 
regulations shall remain the responsibility of the registrant, except in the case of a 
moving violation for which the driver is responsible. 

• Vehicles already in the traffic circle have the right-of-way. 

• All drivers must follow the immediate direction of public safety and police person- 
nel. 

• All traffic devices including but not limited to signs, traffic cones and barricades 
must not be removed and all traffic direction they are designed to enforce must be 
obeyed. 

• Reckless driving, loud music or noise audible more than 20 feet from any vehicle, 
riding outside the passenger compartment of any vehicle, failure to yield to traffic in 
the traffic circle and failure to register a vehicle are violations of the university park- 
ing and traffic regulations. 

Parking Areas 

• Special visitor parking is designated to the keyhole parking area. 

• Regular visitor parking is limited to the Maintenance Drive parking area and the 
designated visitor parking spaces in the Peachtree Gate parking area. 



68 



• Resident student parking is limited to the Greek Row; Upper Quad; North and 
Magbee; Maintenance Drive; Emerson and Dempsey parking areas. 

• Commuter student parking is hmited to the Goshn and Goodman parking areas. 

• Faculty/staff parking is hmited to the Peachtree Gate, Schmidt/ Dorough, Hearst, 
Woodrow Way fence hne and Library parking areas. 

• Reserved parking, including buses and large vehicles, is designated to the Conant 
Center parking area with the assistance and direction of campus safety. 

Registration 

Any member of the university faculty, student body or staff using university roadways or 
parking spaces at any time on campus property must register his or her vehicle with campus 
safety. 

• Faculty and staff will register annually between August 19 and September 1. Stu- 
dents will register at the time of registration for classes. Any vehicle brought on 
campus after that date must be registered immediately (no later than four business 
days after arriving on campus). 

• An individual may register only a vehicle belonging to the registrant or a member of 
his or her immediate family. Proof of ownership may be any official document that 
identifies the owner of the vehicle, including title, bill of sale or license tax receipt. 
Requests for exceptions to this requirement may be granted under special circum- 
stances. ^ 

• Permit fees must be paid at the time of registration. 

$40.00 Annual student fee 

$20.00 Annual student fee (Maintenance Drive; limited to 20 spots) 

$40.00 Annual faculty/staff fee 

$35.00 Semester fee 

$20.00 Part-time faculty/staff 

• Proof of registration is a permit in the form of a hang-tag provided to the registrant 
at the time of registration. 

• Official hang-tags may be used on a vehicle other than the registered vehicle for 
three days provided the registrant informs campus safety of the hang-tag's use on a 
non-registered vehicle. 

Violations 

• Disability parking zone $50.00 

• Fire lane, driveways and reserved spaces $30.00 

• Parking zone violations, first offense $10.00 

• Parking zone violations, second offense $25.00 

• Other parking violations, first offense $10.00 

• Other parking violations, second offense $25.00 

A third violation of any kind will result in immohilization (hooting) of the offending ve- 
hicle. 

Vehicle Immobilization Charges 

In order to have the immobilization device (boot) removed from the offending vehicle, 
a $50.00 charge must be paid to campus safety prior to the removal of the immobiliza- 
tion device (boot). Students may pay this fee in the form of cash, check or debit from their 



69 



student account after signing a voucher form. Non-students must pay the removal fee in the 
form of cash only. 

Towing 

If a boot remains on an offending vehicle for more than 48 hours without payment of the 
removal fee, the vehicle will be towed prior to the beginning of the next business day. 

The university reserves the right to immobilize, remove and impound vehicles on campus 
property: 

Found in violation of parking regulation 

Without a current and valid hang-tag 

Displaying an unauthorized, revoked or altered permit 

Parked in fire lanes, driveways, disability spaces, walkways or on lawns 

Blocking a dumpster 

Posing a health or safety hazard 

If notice has been made informing the owner that the vehicle will be removed 

Campus safety will have record of the removal of any vehicle and its location will be pro- 
vided to the registered owner. 

University Liability 

The university assumes no liability by the granting of vehicle parking or operating privi- 
leges. The university assumes no responsibility for the care or protection of vehicles or 
contents while operated or parked on university property. 

Visitor Parking 

• Temporary hang-tags will be issued by campus safety to campus visitors for up to 
five days at no charge. The driver of the vehicle must obtain a temporary hang-tag 
that will show the expiration date of the temporary hang-tag. The driver of the 
vehicle must show a driver's license, registration and proof of insurance to obtain a 
temporary hang-tag. The driver must also provide the name, campus address and 
telephone number of the person he or she is visiting on campus in addition to his or 
her own contact telephone number. Temporary parking is allowed in the Mainte- 
nance Drive and Peachtree Gate parking areas. 

• Short-term (four hours or less) visitor parking for the academic buildings is allowed 
in the Keyhole parking area. 

• Short-term (four hours or less) visitor parking for athletic events or events at the 
Conant Center for the Performing Arts is allowed in the Goslin, Robinson and 
Schmidt/Dorough areas. 

• Bus and large vehicle parking is designated to the Conant parking area, with the 
direction and assistance of campus safety. 

Appeal Procedures 

Appeals must be made via email within five days of the violation date. The first appeal for 
any traffic or parking violation fine is to the director of campus safety. 

The final appeal for any traffic or parking violation fine is to the vice president for business 
and finance. The offender has five additional days from the decision of the director of cam- 
pus safety to request a final appeal. 



70 



Records: Retention, Access and Protection 



Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (ITERPA) 

To comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, commonly called 
the Buckley Amendment, the administration of Oglethorpe University informs the stu- 
dents of their rights under this act. The law affords students rights of access to educational 
records and partially protects students from the release and disclosure of those records to 
third parties. Educational records are those records, files and other materials that contain 
information directly related to a student's academic progress, financial status, medical con- 
dition, etc., and are maintained by the university or a party acting on behalf of the univer- 
sity. 

Educational Records 

Educational records are defined as those records created to assist the offices of academic 
divisions, admission, business, evening degree program, financial aid, president, provost, 
registrar, student affairs and institutional research in their support of basic institutional 
objectives and any records identified by student name that contain personally identifiable 
information in any medium. 

Educational records, with the exception of those designated as directory information (de- 
scribed below), may not be released without the written consent of the student to any indi- 
vidual, agency or organization other than the following authorized personnel or situations: 

1) Parents, if student is a dependent as defined by Section 152 of the Internal Revenue 
Code of 1954. 

2) Oglethorpe University faculty and staff" who have an educational interest in the 
student, including but not limited to advisers, instructors and coaches. 

3) Officials of other schools in which the student seeks to enroll (transcripts). 

4) Certain government agencies specified in the legislation. 

5) An accrediting agency in carrying out its function. 

6) In emergency situations where the health or safety of the student or others is in- 
volved. 

7) Educational surveys where individual identification is withheld. 

8) In response to a judicial order. 

9) In a campus directory after the student has deletion options. 

10) In connection with financial aid. 

11) Parents of a student if regarding the student's use or possession of alcohol or con- 
trolled substances in limited circumstances. 

A student may request, in writing, an opportunity to review the official educational records 
maintained by the university. Educational records excluded from student access are: 

1) Confidential letters and statements of recommendation which were placed in the 
record before January 1, 1975. 

2) Medical and psychological information. 

3) Private notes and procedural matters retained by the maker or substitutes. 

4) Financial records of parents or guardian. 

Students may challenge any data in their educational record that is considered to be inac- 
curate or misleading. The student must submit the challenge in writing as stated below. 



71 



For more information about educational records maintained by the university, please con- 
tact the registrar. 

Directory Information 

The university may release directory information to parties having a legitimate interest in 
the information. Directory information consists of the following: student name, address, 
telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially 
recognized activities and sports, weight and height of athletes, dates of attendance, enroll- 
ment status, degrees and awards received and most recent previous educational agency or 
institution attended by the student. Mailing lists of Oglethorpe University students will not 
be provided outside the university community, except to the U. S. Department of Defense 
for military recruiting purposes as required by the Solomon Amendment. 

Students who wish to exercise their rights under the law to refuse to permit release of any or 
all of the categories of personally identifiable information with respect to themselves must 
notify the registrar in writing, preferably before completion of registration for the first term 
of enrollment for that academic year. 

Student Review of Records 

To review their student record, a student must submit a written request to the registrar. 
Request forms for such a hearing and information about the procedures to be followed are 
available in the registrar's office. Access will be made available within 45 days of receipt of 
the written request. Certified transcripts may be withheld if a student has not met all obli- 
gations to the university. 

After inspection of a record, the student has the right to challenge any material which may 
be inaccurate or misleading or which violates the student's privacy. The student may do so 
by requesting the correction or deletion of such information in writing on the above listed 
form. 

This appeal may be handled in an informal meeting with the party or parties concerned or 
through a formal hearing procedure. Formal hearing procedures are as follows: 

a. The hearing shall be conducted and decided within a reasonable period of time fol- 
lowing the request for a hearing. 

b. The hearing shall be conducted and the decision rendered by an institutional offi- 
cial or other party who does not have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing. 

c. The student shall be offered a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant 
to the issues raised. 

d. The decision shall be rendered in writing within a reasonable period of time after 
the conclusion of the hearing. 

Please Note: A hearing may not be convened to contest grades. The grade appeal proce- 
dures are listed in the Grade Appeal policy of this Bulletin. 

Student's Written Consent to Release Educational Records 

Written consent by the student to release educational records to a third party must specify 
the records to be released and the recipient of such records. Request forms for the release of 
appropriate records are available in each office containing educational records. 

Notification of Parents 

Parents may obtain non-directory information (grades, GPA, etc.) only at the discretion of 
the institution and after it has been determined that their child is legally their dependent. 
Oglethorpe University recognizes the importance of support and interest of parents and 



72 



families of students in all areas of the college program. Students are encouraged to share 
information about their experience and programs with their families. In keeping with that 
philosophy, it is not Oglethorpe University's policy to disclose non-directory information 
based solely on dependent status. Parents may also acquire non-directory information by 
obtaining and presenting a signed consent from their child. The university may choose to 
provide non-directory information to parents if it is regarding the student's use or posses- 
sion of alcohol or controlled substances. 

Maintenance and Disposal of Student Records 

Oglethorpe University maintains records on different student groups. The types of records, 
methods for maintaining and access to those records are summarized below. Unless other- 
wise stated, all records are maintained for five years after a student withdraws or graduates. 
The records are then shredded and discarded. Records are retained longer if there are any 
outstanding requests to inspect and review them. 

The registrar's office keeps folders on each student; the folders originate in the admis- 
sion or evening degree program office (whichever is the appropriate entrance office for a 
given student). The folders contain the admission application, high school and/or college 
transcripts and other documents that the admission or evening degree program office may 
collect. Folders remain in the registrar's active files while students are enrolled and any cor- 
respondence or any other documents with the exception of registration and drop/add forms 
are filed there. When students graduate or withdraw, folders are moved to the inactive files, 
where they remain for five years. Both the active and inactive files are housed in a locked 
room. All registration and drop/add forms are stored together by semester in a separate 
locked cabinet and are destroyed after five years. 

In addition to these paper files, transcripts are stored electronically and permanently by 
the registrar's office. Electronic records are accessed through password-protected screens. 
Electronic records are accessible to most administrative offices and the chief administrator 
of each area approves access levels to the data. Information Technology services backs up 
electronic files nightly. Backups representing the previous month are stored in a bank vault 
two miles from the campus, so that the backups would be secure in the event of a fire or 
other disaster. 

The financial aid office maintains student financial aid records in a locked, secured storage 
room. Some financial aid data is maintained electronically also; this data is backed up as 
described above. 

The career services center maintains credential files for Master of Arts in Teaching Early 
Childhood Education graduates and any other students who request this service. These files 
include the student's resume, reference letters and forms and signed release forms. The 
center also maintains files for students who participate in internships and social work field 
placements. These include contracts and other information pertinent to the experience. 
Records are kept in a locked filing cabinet in a locked storage room within the office suite. 

All clients of the counseling center have the right to expect complete confidentiality of their 
records and sessions. Counselors are legally bound to maintain rights to privacy and will not 
disclose information of any kind without the client's expressed written permission. Student 
records housed in the counseling center are maintained in a locked area of the counseling 
center with access being limited to the staff of the center authorized for individual cases. 

The residence life office keeps files on students living on campus. The files, which contain 
residential hall agreements, are stored in cabinets in the residence life office. The office is 
locked at the end of each business day. The residence life director and coordinators have 
access to the records. The director secures all student discipline records including Code of 
Conduct violations in a locked storage closet in the director's locked office. 

73 



The Secretary of the Honor Council secures all Honor Code violation information in a stor- 
age cabinet. If an Honor Code violation becomes part of a student's academic record, copies 
are hand delivered to the registrar's office. 

Student health services houses the medical and health history records for current and 
former students. The current student records are located in the student health services 
clinic. They are stored in a locked file cabinet in the director of health services office, which 
is locked at the end of each business day. This file cabinet is unlocked during the day and 
locked whenever the director leaves the clinic. Former students' medical and health history 
records are stored in a locked file cabinet in the locked storage room in the student health 
services office, which is across from the director's office. The director has the key to all 
locked doors and file cabinets. Everyone who accesses a student's file signs a form stating 
their name, position, date, name of student record accessing and purpose of inquiry. 

Code of Student Conduct ____ 

A. Preamble 

Oglethorpe University expects students to conduct themselves in a manner supportive of 
the educational mission of the institution. Integrity, respect for the person and property of 
others and a commitment to intellectual and personal grovd;h in a diverse population are 
values deemed fundamental to membership in this university community. 

B. Code of Conduct 

Oglethorpe University considers the following behavior or attempts thereof by any student 
or student organization, whether acting alone or with any other persons, in violation of the 
Code of Student Conduct: 

1. Physical harm or threat of physical harm to any person(s) or oneself including but 
not limited to: assault, sexual abuse or other forms of physical abuse. 

2. Harassment, whether physical or verbal, oral or written, which is beyond the 
bounds of protected free speech, directed at a specific individual(s), easily construed 
as "fighting words" and likely to cause an immediate breach of the peace. 

3. Conduct which threatens the mental health, physical health or safety of any person 
or persons including hazing, drug or alcohol abuse and other forms of destructive 
behavior. 

4. Intentional disruption or obstruction of lawful activities of the university or its 
members including their exercise of the right to assemble and to peaceful protest. 

5. Theft of or damage to personal or university property or services or illegal posses- 
sion or use of the same. 

6. Forgery, alteration, fabrication or misuse of identification cards, keys, records, 
grades, diplomas, university documents or misrepresentation of any kind to a uni- 
versity office or official. 

7- Unauthorized entry, use or occupation of university facilities that are locked, closed 
or otherwise restricted as to use. 

8. Disorderly conduct including, but not limited to, public intoxication, excessive 
noise, lewd, indecent or obscene behavior, libel, slander or illegal gambling. 

9. Illegal manufacture, purchase, sale, use, possession or distribution of alcohol, drugs 
or controlled substances, or any other violation of the Oglethorpe University Policy 
on Alcohol and Other Drugs. 

10. Failure to comply wdth the lawful directives of university officials, including but not 
limited to, faculty, staff, resident assistants and campus safety, who are performing 
the duties of their office, especially as they are related to the maintenance of safety 
or security or during the investigation thereof 



74 



11. Unauthorized possession or use of any weapon, including, but not limited to: 
knives, firearms, BB-guns, paint ball guns, air rifles, explosive devices, fireworks or 
any other dangerous, illegal or hazardous object or material and improper use as a 
weapon of any otherwise permitted object or material. 

12. Interference with or misuse of fire alarms, smoke detectors, elevators or other safety 
and security equipment or programs. 

13. Violation of any federal, state or local law, on or ofF-campus, which has a negative 
impact on the well-being of Oglethorpe University or its individual members. 

14. Violation of university policies, rules or regulations that are published herein or in 
other official university publications or agreements and on the university website. 

Cases involving alleged Honor Code violations are handled according to procedures out- 
lined in the Academic Regulations section. 

C. Culpability 

Culpability is not diminished for acts in violation of this code that are committed in igno- 
rance of the code or under the influence of alcohol, illegal drugs or improper use of con- 
trolled substances. 

D. Jurisdiction 

1. The University Conduct System has jurisdiction over alleged violations of the 
Code of Conduct by any student or student organization at Oglethorpe University. 
The Conduct System has jurisdiction over any alleged misconduct that occurs on 
property owned or controlled by or adjacent to the university, at events sponsored 
by the university and its members and at off'-campus locations where the alleged 
Xnisconduct is significant enough to impact the well-being of the university and/or 
its students. 

2. University judicial proceedings are administrative in nature and operate indepen- 
dently of criminal and/or civil proceedings. While some alleged violations of the 
Code of Conduct are also violations of federal, state and local law, the university 
reserves the right to address these issues through its ovra. Conduct System. It will 
be up to the university to decide whether or not these alleged violations will be re- 
ported to external authorities. In cases where a criminal case is likely, the university 
may delay the conduct process pending the outcome of the criminal proceedings. 

3. The term "student" includes all persons taking courses at Oglethorpe University, 
either full- or part-time, pursuing undergraduate, graduate or professional studies. 
The term also includes persons taking courses in either the traditional or evening 
degree programs. Persons who vdthdraw from the university after allegedly violat- 
ing the Code of Student Conduct, who are not officially enrolled for a particular 
term but who have a continuing relationship with the university or who have been 
notified of their acceptance for admission are considered "students" as are persons 
who are living in campus residence halls, although not enrolled at this institution. 

4. Students are expected to follow the Code of Student Conduct and the procedures 
used to enforce the Code of Student Conduct as a condition of their enrollment at 
Oglethorpe University. 

5. Students or student organizations may be placed on interim suspension by the dean 
of students prior to the commencement of and during official conduct proceedings. 
This decision will be made by the dean on determination that the safety and well- 
being of the university community is at risk. Students on interim suspension are 
prohibited from being on campus. 

6. A student may be placed on interim suspension fi-om the residence halls by the 
director of residence life prior to the commencement of and during official conduct 



75 



proceedings. The decision will be made on determination that the safety and well- 
being of the student and/or university community is at risk. 

E. Hearings 

1. A student who is accused of allegedly violating the Code of Student Conduct may 
have his or her case heard administratively. This hearing vvdll be conducted by the 
chief conduct officer or a designee, depending on the nature of the alleged violation. 

2. While most alleged violations will be handled informally, the chief conduct officer 
may choose to forward the alleged violation directly to a conduct board for formal 
resolution. 

3. The purpose of the hearing vdll be to determine and/or verify the facts surround- 
ing the act(s) or incident(s) that led to the alleged violation, to determine whether 
or not the respondent is responsible and to decide on an appropriate resolution. 
The respondent (accused student or organization) will have the right to hear the 
evidence presented and to present evidence on their own behalf. 

4. During the administrative hearing the respondent v^dll hear the charges and a rea- 
sonable sanction if the allegations were proven to be true. If the respondent accepts 
responsibility and all parties agree to the sanction, the resolution wdll be confirmed 
in an official letter. 

5. If the respondent denies the allegations or does not accept the proposed sanction 
the matter wall then be forwarded to the conduct board for a formal resolution. 

6. If the respondent fails to attend a scheduled hearing, the proceedings wdll take 
place and a decision wdll be rendered without his or her input. 

7. All hearings wdll take place in private and the proceedings will be limited to those 
persons permitted in these procedures. 

8. During a hearing, the respondent may have a member of the university commu- 
nity present as an adviser. The respondent is responsible for presenting his or her 
own information and therefore advisers are not permitted to speak or participate 
directly in the proceedings. 

9. During a hearing, witnesses for both parties may be called to present testimony in 
person or they may submit testimony in writing. Witnesses may only present infor- 
mation in response to questions posed by the conduct board or chief conduct officer 
during a hearing. Names of witnesses must be presented to the chief conduct officer 
at least two business days prior to the hearing. 

10. Complainants (and other witnesses) should be present during a formal conduct 
board hearing to present information and answer questions from the conduct 
board. The chief conduct officer may make accommodations for the complainant to 
present testimony to the conduct board apart from the respondent, if concerns exist 
for the safety, well-being and/or fears for confrontation of the complainant. The 
decision to provide such accommodations will be made at the sole discretion of the 
chief conduct officer. 

11. The proceedings of hearings may not be recorded electronically or by other means 
by the respondent. 

F. Hearing Boards 

1. The University Conduct Board (UCB) is comprised of five members selected from 
a pool of qualified faculty, staff and student applicants. The chief conduct officer 
and dean of students will select the board. At least three students will serve on each 
board. 

2. The UCB vdll hear cases for the following conditions: 



76 



a. The respondent has not accepted responsibility for the alleged violation. 

b. The chief conduct officer decides that he or she cannot determine an outcome 
during an administrative hearing. 

3 . The UCB may hear any case of alleged violation of the Code of Student Conduct 
filed against a student or student organization, except for alleged violations of the 
Honor Code. The UCB may impose sanctions up to and including expulsion from 
the university. The dean of students must review any expulsion recommendations. 
The UCB also has the ability to design sanctions that are educational in nature and 
related to the facts of the case. 

Conduct Procedures 

1. Any member of the university community may file charges against a student or or- 
ganization for violations of the Code of Student Conduct. The charge shall be made 
in vmting and directed to the chief conduct officer. 

2. The chief conduct officer will determine whether or not enough information exists 
to pursue the matter through the university conduct process. 

3. If the matter is to be pursued, v^itten notification vdll be sent to the accused 
student or president of the organization notifying him or her of the complaint, the 
charges alleged and a brief outline of the alleged facts which support the complaint. 

4. The notification will also include the date, time and location of the administrative 
hearing which will be held to discuss the complaint and to determine an outcome. 

5. During the administrative hearing the student or president vdll have the following 
options: 

a. Accepting responsibility and agreeing to a sanction via an informal resolution; 

]b. Not accepting responsibility or agreeing to an informal resolution and a conduct 
hearing is scheduled; 

c. Disciplinary withdrawal, wherein a student withdraws fi'om Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity rather than face further disciplinary action. In order to be re-admitted, the 
student must face the charges. 

6. If an informal resolution is agreed to by the respondent and the conduct officer, the 
student is notified in writing of the outcome which will include the details of any 
sanctions that have been assigned. 

7. If a hearing is warranted, v^ritten notification vdll be sent to the involved parties 
wdth date, time and location of the hearing as well as the charges and a brief state- 
ment of the facts upon which the charges are based. 

8. Written confirmation of the hearing board's decision is available for the appropriate 
persons with five business days of the hearing. 

9. Either party may appeal the decision of the hearing board to the dean of students, 
in writing, within 24 hours of the decision. There are no appeals for informal reso- 
lutions. 

10. University conduct procedures are administrative rather than criminal in nature. 
Rule of evidence and the criminal standard of proof do not apply. Hearsay is per- 
missible. The burden of proof vdll rest with the complainant and determination of 
responsibility wdll be based on the preponderance of the evidence. 

H. Sanctions 

Sanctions imposed in response to a conduct hearing are considered official actions of 
Oglethorpe University. Failure to comply with the sanctions that are imposed as part of 
the conduct process may result in the immediate suspension fi-om the university wdthout 



77 



benefit of further consultation. The following sanctions or any combination thereof may be 
applied to any individual student, group of students or student organization for violations 
of the Code of Student Conduct and related university policies: 

Verbal Warning - The student shall be warned verbally by the chief conduct officer 
or a designee that he or she has violated the Code of Student Conduct and that 
subsequent misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary action. No further 
action is taken at this point and no entry is made in the student's disciplinary file. 

Formal Reprimand/Warning - The student receives a formal reprimand in vmt- 
ing that he or she has violated the Code of Student Conduct and that subsequent 
misconduct may lead to a more serious disciplinary action. A formal reprimand 
will remain active in a student's or student organization's disciplinary file for one 
calendar year. 

Probation - A student or student organization placed on probation is no longer 
considered in "good standing" with the university. Probationary status signifies 
that the student's or organization's behavior has been deemed unacceptable by the 
university community. The primary purpose of probation is to restrict privileges 
and to determine whether or not the student or organization is suitable to remain a 
member of the campus community. Students or organizations on probation may be 
subjected to certain conditions which may include but are not limited to fines, resti- 
tution, community service, revocation of privileges and other educational sanctions. 
Students placed on probation shall remain on probation for a time period set by the 
conduct board or chief conduct officer. The types of probation are as follows: 

1. Social - This status is applied as a result of a breach of specific social regula- 
tions. Its primary effect is to suspend a privilege related to the nature of the 
offense and/or restrict access to specific campus facilities or programs. 

2. Residential - This status indicates that a student is no longer in good standing 
within the university residential living program and is at risk of being suspend- 
ed from the residence halls on campus. 

3. Disciplinary - This action signifies a serious violation of the community stan- 
dards of Oglethorpe University and that the student or student organization 
is at serious risk for suspension or expulsion from the university. The student 
or organization is permitted to remain enrolled or to remain recognized at the 
university but under certain conditions. 

Residential Suspension/Expulsion - This status indicates that a student is not 
eligible to live in or visit the residential facilities on campus. It may be permanent 
or for a specific amount of time and may be applied generally or to specific facilities. 

Interim Suspension - This action, initiated by the dean of students, is a temporary 
suspension of certain rights and privileges while a conduct case is pending. Interim 
suspension may be broad and all inclusive or may be restricted to a specific location 
and/or function and is based on the determination that the safety and well-being 
of the campus community or specific persons are at risk. A student who is facing 
criminal charges in an external judicial system may also be placed on interim sus- 
pension pending the outcome. 

Suspension - This action results in the involuntary withdrawal of the student from 
the university or loss of recognition for a student organization for a specific amount 



78 



of time or until specific conditions have been met. A suspended student or student 
organization is prohibited from any presence or activity on university owned or 
controlled property. 

Expulsion - This action results in the permanent separation of the student or stu- 
dent organization from the university, its programs and facilities. This is the most 
severe form of disciplinary action the university conduct system can impose. 

I. Appeals 

1. Decisions of the University Conduct Board may be appealed in writing, to the dean 
of students, within 24 hours of the receipt of the written decision. 

2. There are no appeals granted for decisions made during an administrative hearing. 

3. Appeals must be based on one or more of the following: 

a. Procedural error that can be shown to have had a detrimental impact on the 
outcome of the hearing. 

b. Excessive or inappropriate sanctions that have no reasonable relationship to the 
charges. 

c. New evidence not reasonably available at the time of the original hearing, the 
absence of which can be shown to have a detrimental impact of the outcome of 
the hearing. 

Student Activities 

The mission of student activities at Oglethorpe University is to enhance the collegiate expe- 
rience through supporting the academic, social and personal enrichment within the student 
community by offering intentional programming, promoting campus engagement and 
developing student leaders. The office enacts this mission through three primary functions: 
offering an intentional programming calendar; acting as a resource for campus clubs/orga- 
nizations; advising the Oglethorpe Student Association's Programming Board. 

Oglethorpe's student activities office provides an extensive programming calendar for the 
student population, including a diverse range of programs in developmental areas such as 
cultural, educational, social, recreational and community service. 

Campus organizations are an integral part of Oglethorpe University campus life. All stu- 
dent programming must be registered with the student activities office seven business 
days prior to the event. Once the event has been confirmed, students may take advantage 
of the information provided in the student activities event planning brochure, which pro- 
vides necessary contact information and an event registration form. The planning brochure 
is available from student affairs in the Emerson Student Center. 

Policy Statement on Student Organizations 

Campus student organizations include activities and clubs recognized through the Ogle- 
thorpe Student Association, student publications organized under the Publications Council, 
co-curricular groups and honorary societies chartered at the university and fraternities and 
sororities coordinated by the Interfraternity Council or the Panhellenic Council. Student 
organizations are subject to the authority and regulations of the university. Recognition and 
continuation of a campus student organization requires that the philosophy and purpose 
of the group's activities be consistent with the philosophy and purpose of the university. 
National affiliation of student organizations is subject to approval of the university. 

Eligibility for membership or active participation in student organizations is limited to 



79 



currently enrolled students at Oglethorpe University. Eligibility to serve as an officer or in 
an official capacity in a student organization is restricted to full time, currently registered 
students in the traditional day program who are not on academic or disciplinary probation. 
Any questions concerning eligibility for membership or holding office in a student organi- 
zation are subject to final determination by the vice president for student affairs. Students 
enrolled in the evening degree program are eligible for general membership only and may 
not hold an officer position in a registered student organization. Evening degree students 
who maintain membership in a student organization will be charged a student activity fee 
on a semester basis. 

All student organizations must have a university faculty or staff adviser. Each group must 
renew its status annually by reporting any changes in its name or purpose, as well as the 
names of its members, officers and adviser to the student affairs office at the beginning of 
each fall semester. Failure to comply with these provisions may result in the organization 
being declared inactive. An organization declared inactive or determined to be defunct 
must reapply for recognition to be re-activated. 

Policy on Insurance for Fraternities and Sororities 

All registered social fraternities and sororities must maintain comprehensive general 
liability insurance in the minimum amount of $1,000,000 per occurrence with at least 
a $2,000,000 total general aggregate coverage. Such liability insurance shall include 
Oglethorpe University, its officers, employees and agents as an additional named insured 
and shall be written with a carrier acceptable to the university. A certificate of such insur- 
ance shall be forwarded to the university as evidence of such coverage and the university 
must receive notice of any change, cancellation or renewal of the policy. The insurance shall 
be considered primary over any and all collectable insurance that the university may have 
available. 

Policy on Advertising for Activities and Events 

The student affairs office can assist student groups in publicizing events by including 
information in student echimes, emailed to all students each Thursday during the fall and 
spring semesters. As a student's Oglethorpe email account is the official university vehicle 
of communication, echimes is the most effective means of communication. To include an 
announcement in echimes, notices must be submitted in paragraph form to the assistant to 
the dean by Wednesday at noon. 

The following regulations regarding the use of campus bulletin boards and kiosks exist to 
improve communication about campus events while preserving the beauty of the buildings 
and grounds: 

1. Posters should not exceed 8.5" x 14". 

2. There should not be more than one announcement for each event on any bulletin 
board. 

3. All posters must clearly identify the producing organization and the date and time 
of the event. Posters that do not meet this requirement will be removed. 

4. Posters should be put up only on existing bulletin boards. Interior and exterior 
doors and windows of buildings should be left clear as a matter of safety. 

5. Posters and advertisements may not be posted on the walls in the student center or 
on any campus building, including residence halls. 

6. Individuals and groups may not post on the doors of residence hall rooms without 
the expressed consent of the residents. 

7. Bulletin boards assigned to specific organizations or for specific purposes should be 
respected. 



80 



8. Individuals and groups must get permission from the RA. to post on bulletin boards 
in the residence halls. 

9. No one should remove a current poster to replace it with his or her own or cover 
another poster. 

10. Exceptions to the regulations concerning the size and location of posters or banners 
must have advance approval from the student affairs office. 

11. Off-campus organizations must obtain prior permission from the student affairs 
office before putting up posters, advertisements, banners or flyers. 

12. Individuals or groups putting up posters are responsible for their removal with 24 
hours after a publicized event has taken place. 

13. Posters and advertisements are only permitted for the purpose of promoting events 
or activities. Personal statements, with the exception of campaign materials related 
to an Oglethorpe Student Association or otherwise sponsored election, are prohib- 
ited. 

14. Advertisements for off-campus housing are not permitted. 

Discipline of Student Organizations 

Student organizations exist in a special relationship to the university. In the event that a 
student organization is accused of violating university rules and regulations, the organiza- 
tion will undergo a judicial process similar to that for individual students and will be ac- 
corded the rights of fundamental fairness and presumption of innocence. However, during 
the time prior to the judicial review process, the dean of students may suspend the activities 
of the organization. The right of privacy guaranteed to individuals by FERPA does not apply 
to organizations. 

A judici&,l officer may hear the case informally or appoint a judicial panel composed of 
students, staff and faculty members to hear the case. If the organization is found guilty of 
violating a university rule or regulation the judicial officer will impose a sanction. The orga- 
nization has the right to appeal the sanction in writing to the dean of students. The appeal 
must be made in writing within five business days of the imposition of the sanction. 

Oglethorpe Student Association (OSA) 

The Oglethorpe Student Association (OSA) is the guiding body for student life at Ogletho- 
rpe University. OSA consists of three elected bodies: an executive council, composed of a 
president, two vice presidents, parliamentarian, secretary, treasurer and presidents of the 
four classes; the senate, chaired by a vice president and composed of four senators from 
each class; the programming board, chaired by a vice president and composed of the fresh- 
man class president, one senator from each class and three elected representatives from 
each class. All three bodies meet regularly and the meetings are open to the public. OSA 
administers a student activity fee that is assessed to all full-time traditional students. Ad- 
ditional information can be obtained from the OSA office or student affairs, both located in 
the Emerson Student Center. The Oglethorpe Student Association can be reached at 404- 
364-8541 or 3000 Woodrow Way NE, Atlanta, GA 30319-2797- 

OSA Constitution: The full text of the OSA constitution is available at www.oglethorpe.edu 
(keyword: OSA). Please reference this document for information on the policies and pro- 
cedures of Oglethorpe's student government. Of particular interest to other organizations 
is the process on becoming a chartered university organization and petitioning for funding 
from the OSA Senate. 

Policy on Student Publications 

Oglethorpe University supports the publication of the student newspaper. The Stormy 



81 



Petrel; the campus yearbook, The Yamacraw; the Hterary magazine, The Tower. Since 
revenues collected by the university fund these publications, the ultimate responsibility for 
these publications lies with the university. Each publication has at least one faculty or staff 
adviser. 

The publications council is composed of one faculty or staff adviser from each publica- 
tion, the dean of students, two members of the OSA executive council and three additional 
students selected by OSA. The council makes the final selection of publication editors, 
establishes and reviews policies related to the publications, hears complaints or grievances 
directed against a member of a publication staff and makes the final decision about the 
removal from office of an editor. 

Recognition of Campus Organizations 

Groups desiring to form a campus student organization must follow the appropriate pro- 
cess prescribed by the Oglethorpe Student Association, the Publications Council, the Inter- 
fraternity Council, the Panhellenic Council or the university. Generally, recognition of a new 
student organization requires a proposed constitution that contains a statement of purpose 
along with a list of members, officers and an adviser. The student recognition body and 
subsequently the university must approve the charters of new organizations. Currently, only 
students enrolled in the traditional undergraduate day program may initiate the formation 
of a new organization. Information and advice on the procedures and process are available 
from the residence life coordinator for student activities. 

A great variety of organizations are open to Oglethorpe students, alumni and friends of the 
university. For information on the policies of these organizations, contact the student affairs 
office. 

Recognized Student Organizations, as of publication: 



Academic/Honorary 

Phi Delta Epsilon, Pre-Medical Society 

University Accounting Society 

Alpha Chi, academic honorary 

Alpha Psi Omega, drama honorary 

Chi Alpha Sigma, national college athlete 

honor society 

Omicron Delta Kappa, national leadership 

honor society 

Order of Omega, Greek honor society 

Phi Alpha Theta, history honorary 

Phi Beta Delta, international honorary 

Phi Eta Sigma, freshman honor society 

Psi Chi, psychology honor society 

Rho Delta, 

Sigma Pi Sigma, physics honor society 

Sigma Tau Delta, English honor society 

Sigma Zeta, science honorary 

Advocacy 

Amnesty International Club 

College Democrats 

College Republicans 

ECOS: Environmentally Concerned 

Oglethorpe Students 

Feminist Majority Leadership Alliance 

OU Students for Barak Obama 



Ethic/ International 

Black Student Caucus (BSC) 

International Club 

Japanese Culture Club 

Oglethorpe Caribbean Student Association 

Governance/Advisory 

Interfraternity Council 

Oglethorpe Student Association (OSA) 

Panhellenic Council 

Greek 

Fraternities: 

Chi Phi 

Delta Sigma Phi 

Kappa Alpha Order 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Sororities: 
Alpha Sigma Tau 
Chi Omega 
Sigma Sigma Sigma 



82 



Performing Arts 

Ballroom Dance Club 

Gospel Choir 

OU Plajonakers 

Oglethorpe University Singers & Chorale 

Rehearsal Room C 

Publications 

Stormy Petrel 
The Tower 
Yamacraw 

Recreational 

Oglethorpe Spirit Coalition 

Dorough Delinquents 

OU Cheerleaders 

Oglethorpe University Dancers 

Khayos 



Religious 

Interfaith Council 
Jewish Student Union 
Muslim Student Association 
Oglethorpe Christian Fellowship 

Special Interest 

Chess Club 

Economic Empowerment Initiative 

Open Mic Club 

OUTlet, Students Against Homophobia 

Volunteer 

Alpha Phi Omega (APO) 
Circle K International 



For more information on student organizations, visit www.oglethorpe.edu (keyword: orga- 
nizations). 

Residence Life 



Membership in the Community 

As members of the Oglethorpe campus community, residential students have a specific set 
of rights and responsibilities. Problems develop when one person fulfills his or her respon- 
sibilities and another does not. Residence life policies and regulations are designed to give 
a clear understanding of what is expected of you as an Oglethorpe University resident. It is 
important to recognize that a large number of individuals live together in a residence hall. 
This density of people creates a special need for being aware of how one's individual actions 
can have a direct effect on others and easily influence the environment of the entire hall. 
With these ideas in mind, the residence life office has established a number of guidelines 
intended to give students a standard by which to live and learn together. 

Responsibilities of Community Living 

As an important member of this residential community you have the responsibility to: 

1. Verbally express your views to the person(s) involved, should you feel your rights 
have been violated. 

2. Treat other residents with respect and consideration and grant them their individu- 
al rights. 

3. Understand all policies and regulations necessary for the hall and university com- 
munity to function. 

4. Respond to all reasonable requests from fellow residents. 

5. Respond to and cooperate with all Oglethorpe University and residence hall staff" 
members at all times. 

6. Take responsibility for personal and community safety, i.e. do not misuse safety 
equipment, do not prop open security doors and do not lose, loan or forget room 
keys. 

7. Accept responsibility for your behavior and that of your guests at all times. 

8. Recognize that public areas and their furnishings belong to everyone and that abuse 
of those areas violates the rights of all community members. 



83 



Residence Life Staff 

Resident Assistants (RAs) are students that live and work in the residence halls. They are 
hired by the Office of Residence Life to help students who live in the residence halls and 
are the most visible members of the residence life staff. Since the RA lives directly in the 
building, he or she is attuned to residents' particular needs and problems. RAs go through 
an extensive selection and training process and are, therefore, helpful in dealing with all 
types of problems and situations. RAs also plan programs and activities, hold hall meetings, 
enforce policies and refer maintenance/housekeeping work orders to the physical plant. 

Residence Life Coordinators (RLCs) are student affairs professionals who work and live on 
campus. They are trained and experienced in residence hall operations, supervise the RAs 
and provide guidance in RA programming. RLCs live in a campus apartment and oversee 
the activities of their assigned area of campus. They are the residence life office's spokesper- 
son in any situation that may arise in the residence halls and enforce university and resi- 
dence hall policies. Feel free to speak with your RLC about problems, ideas and suggestions. 

Room Assignment Policies and Regulations 



Residence Hall Agreement 

Housing is provided on a space-available basis to foil-time day students only. The avail- 
ability of on-campus housing is not guaranteed. Each resident student is required to pay a 
nonrefondable deposit and sign a residence hall agreement before he or she may reserve a 
room. The agreement is binding for an entire academic year. Students thinking about mov- 
ing off-campus should speak with the director of residence life before making plans. 

Residency Requirements 

Freshmen and sophomore students are required to live on campus unless they are commut- 
ing from the home of a parent or guardian. Home is defined as the primary residence of the 
parent or guardian. 

Room Assignment and Reservations 

All residence halls at Oglethorpe are coed, with each suite designated for a single gender. 
Students entering Oglethorpe for the first time will be assigned to a residence hall by the 
residence life staff. Students may request a specific roommate prior to being assigned, 
however, all requests must be mutual and submitted in writing to the residence life office. 
Returning students will select his or her residence hall space in early April, according to 
procedures established by the residence life office. 

Summer Housing 

Requests for summer housing will be taken during the spring semester in April, after the 
room selection process is complete for the upcoming fall semester. Residence life will an- 
nounce dates, times and procedures. 

Room Changes 

Students wishing to change rooms must submit a Room Change Request form. Forms may 
be obtained and submitted in the student affairs office. The student will then be contacted 
(usually within seven to ten business days) as to whether or not his or her request has 
been approved. Moving without prior approval of the residence life office will result in a 
minimum $100 fine. Room changes may only be made after the first two weeks of school 
through midterm during the first semester and during the first two weeks of school during 
the second semester. When the residence halls are filled to capacity, room change options 
diminish. Communication is the key to effective roommate relationships. 



84 



Holidays 

All residents are expected to vacate the residence halls by the time posted by the residence 
life staff on the last day of classes before a scheduled break or at the completion of their fi- 
nal examinations. Special requests for delayed departure must be submitted to the director 
of residence life two weeks prior to the upcoming break. The director of residence life may 
grant permission if the request is justified. Students granted special permission to remain 
in the halls over scheduled breaks will be charged $100 per day. Anyone who returns to the 
residence halls during the break or who stays late without receiving prior permission may 
face the daily charge and additional sanctions, fines and further disciplinary action. The 
residence halls will reopen after scheduled vacation periods at 9:00 a.m. on the day before 
registration or when classes resume. 

Check- In/Check-out Procedures 

All resident students must complete a room inventory card (RIC) upon arrival. Completed 
RICs should be turned into your RA or RLC. By signing the RIC the resident is accepting 
the condition of the room at check-in. When residents vacate their assigned rooms, a check- 
out procedure must be followed. It is the responsibility of the resident to know the check- 
out procedure and to ensure that it is followed. 

1. Arrange a time for a check-out appointment with your RA well in advance of your 
planned departure date. Each resident is responsible for scheduling his or her ap- 
pointment. All your belongings, including those on walls, in closets, in drawers, etc., 
must be removed before the appointment 

2. Sweep out room and remove all trash. As a courtesy to other students, please do not 
leave trash in hallways or outside your door. If your room or suite is not cleaned, 
you will be charged accordingly for improper checkout. 

3. Meet with your RA for a check-out appointment. The RA will inspect the room for 
damages, missing furniture and cleanliness. 

4. Return your keys to your RA and sign your RIC after any damages have been noted. 

5. Your RLC or other professional staff will determine final damage assessments. 

Note: Moving without prior approval from your RLC will result in a $50.00 fine. 

Damages 

Communal Property: If hallways, baths, lounges or other public areas in the residence halls 
receive undue abuse, we expect the assistance of the residents of that area to identify the 
responsible individual(s). When the individual(s) cannot be identified, all residents will be 
required to pay a prorated share of repairing such damages. 

Room: You are responsible for any damages that occur in your room during your occu- 
pancy. If damages are accidental, you must still pay repair costs. In the case where damages 
are the result of vandalism, the individual responsible must not only pay for repairs but may 
also face disciplinary action. 

Students who maliciously damage their rooms and/or common areas of the residence halls 
will be subject to restitution, disciplinary action and/or fines and possible expulsion from 
the residence halls. 

Deposits, Reftinds and Breaking your Contract 

A room reservation/damage deposit of $200 must be paid prior to reserving a room. This 
deposit may be applicable to residence hall damages. Students who currently live on cam- 



85 



pus will not have to pay an additional deposit to reserve a room. In this case, the deposit 
will be rolled over. The deposit will be refunded after the student leaves the residence hall at 
the end of the contract period or for other reasons as stated in the Residence Hall Agree- 
ment, provided that the student has no outstanding financial obligations to the university 
and does not intend to live on campus the following year. If the student fails to turn in keys 
and sign the proper check out forms at the end of the occupancy period or if keys are lost 
during the contract period, a lock change fee may be charged against the damage deposit. 
The damage deposit is not applicable to room and board charges. Damage deposits will 
be processed at the end of each semester. Students who are graduating or not returning 
to campus housing should expect a check mailed to their permanent address by the end 
of June. Deposits are not refunded to students who withdraw from the university or who 
otherwise leave housing prior to the end of their contract period. 

Students are obligated to live on campus throughout their contractual agreement, typically 
the entire academic year. Students may apply to break their contract prior to the end of the 
academic year as outlined in the Residence Hall Agreement. A breakage fee is charged and 
the deposit is forfeited for students who break the contract early. Freshmen and sopho- 
mores may only break the contract to commute from the home of a parent or guardian. 
Students suspended from the residence halls are not entitled to a refund. 

Keys 

Report lost keys at once to your RLC. For your security, it is necessary that we change locks 
and make a charge against your damage deposit. The charge for a lost key is $140. 

Lockouts 

Students needing to be let into their rooms should contact the RA on duty. If that person is 
temporarily unavailable, they should look for another member of the residence life staffer 
call campus safety as a last resort. Students who have more than two lockouts per year will 
be charged $10.00 per lockout. 

Snack Machines 

There is a snack and soft drink machine located in close proximity to each residence hall 
area. Please report any problems with the machines to your RLC. Note: Vandalism to vend- 
ing machines may result in the loss of those machines for the remainder of the academic 
year. 

Cable TV 

Basic cable TV service is provided in each suite in the residence halls. Students may pur- 
chase premium television channels for an additional fee directly through our cable provider. 

Housekeeping 

The housekeeping staff is responsible for cleaning all public areas. These areas include the 
lounges, common restrooms, halls and stairwells. Individual student bathrooms are cleaned 
on average, once every 2 weeks. Housekeeping requests should be sent via email to the help- 
desk. Remember, housekeeping can only clean bathrooms that are free of undue clutter on 
the sinks and floor area. 

Laundry Facilities 

Coin-operated washers and dryers are located on the first floor of Traer Hall, in the base- 
ment of Dempsey Hall and on each floor of the Phase II, North and Magbee HaUs. Please 
report malfunctioning machines to your RA or online via the PetrelNet. 

Maintenance 

Routine maintenance needs should be reported by sending a request online to 

86 



help@oglethorpe.edu. Please be specific in describing your problem and date the 
request; this will expedite repairs. All regular maintenance requests must be submitted in 
writing by email. Emergency concerns and after hours maintenance requests should be 
reported to the RA on duty, the RLC or campus safety immediately. 

Pest Control 

If you are having problems with insects of any kind in your room, please inform your RA or 
RLC so the appropriate measures may be taken to rid your quarters of such pests. Gener- 
ally the exterminator comes on campus on the first Friday of each month to take care of any 
problems. It is important for students to keep their rooms neat and free of debris and open 
food sources. 

Safety and Security 

Always lock your door and take your key with you, even if you are leaving for just a short 
period of time. Do not lend your key to others. Do not keep large amounts of cash in your 
room. Protect the safety of your fellow residents by respecting all visitation policies. Keep 
outside doors locked even if it causes you an inconvenience. Propping outside doors for 
easier re-entry or giving out access codes to buildings compromises the safety of the entire 
building and is considered a very serious violation of policy. 

The outside doors of Traer are monitored by an alarm between the hours of midnight and 
7:00 a.m. During these hours, if a door remains open for more than 45 seconds an alarm 
wdll sound until the door is closed. 

Internet Services 

All student rooms are wired for internet accessibility. Oglethorpe provides internet access 
and an email account for each student. For additional information on the network, visit 
virvvw.oglethorpe.edu (keyword: ITS) or visit the IT Services office in Goodman Hall. Check 
out the residence life web page for information on what's going on in the community. It is 
very important for students who use an alternate email address to forward all mail from 
their campus network account. Important information regarding university operation 
and communication, including closings or cancellations, is transmitted via the university 
network. 

Bikes 

Bicycles may not be parked in exit corridors, stairways, beside doors, on patio areas or 
hung from the ceiling. Gasoline-powered bikes (mopeds) and motorcycles are not permit- 
ted inside buildings. All bikes may be impounded if left in an inappropriate area. Staff v^U 
remove bikes remaining on campus after graduation and donate or discard them. 

Cooking 

Residents may not cook in their rooms. Because of the fire hazard, sanitation problems 
and power consumption involved in food preparation, cooking is restricted to the kitchens 
provided in each area of campus. Coffee makers and small microwave ovens are the only ap- 
pliances permitted in your room. No open coil-heating units are allowed. Refrigerators are 
permitted as long as they are apartment-size (less than five cubic feet). > 

Decorating 

The residence life staff encourages you to make your room comfortable and representative 
of your personality. We ask that you please follow these guidelines as you plan your decorat- 
ing style: 

• No nails, tape, white "plastic tack" or stick-ums, please. You may use the "easy re- 
lease" mounting devices designed to be removed vvdthout causing wall damage. 

• Do not hang items from your ceiling or ceiling tiles. 

87 



• Lofts are not permitted. 

• Rooms may not be painted. 

• If you have any questions about what is allowable, please ask first to avoid any un- 
necessary damage charges. 

Fire Safety 

Evacuation routes are posted in each residence hall and it is each student's responsibility 
to become familiar wdth such routes. All students must evacuate a building if an alarm is 
sounding. Do not re-enter the building until a staff member indicates it is safe to do so. Fire 
drills are conducted once per semester and failure to comply during a drill may result in 
disciplinary action and a fine. For the safety of all residents, candles and incense will not be 
allowed in the residence halls at any time. Open fires are not permitted anywhere on cam- 
pus. Any student who willfully compromises the safety of fellow students by tampering with 
fire safety equipment or sounding false alarms will be subject to fines up to $1000, suspen- 
sion from the residence halls and/or criminal prosecution. 

Fireworks, Firearms and Explosives 

No firearms or weapons (including air, pellet and paintball guns), ammunition, illegal 
knives, flammable liquids, fireworks or explosives of any kind shall be permitted in any 
building or any student's vehicle on campus. Such items will be confiscated and the student 
will be subject to strict disciplinary action. Possession or the discharging of fireworks on 
campus is in violation of the laws of Georgia and is prohibited. Students discharging fire- 
works or other types of explosives on campus are subject to expulsion from the residence 
halls. 

Furniture 

You may not remove, store or trade furnishings from your room. Each student is held 
accountable for the furniture in his or her room and v^U be assessed charges if an item is 
missing or damaged. Furniture may not be lofted. Lounge furniture must remain where it 
was intended. Personal furniture remaining on campus after the residence halls close for 
the summer will be throwTi away. 

Heating/Air-Conditioning Units 

In order to keep the unit working, do not block the heating/air-conditioning unit with 
furniture, beds or debris. Heating/AC filters will be changed each semester; a fine wdll be 
assessed to occupants of rooms wdth blocked units as outlined above. Residents are not 
permitted to use wdndow air-conditioning units or portable heaters in the residence halls. 

Hall Meetings 

Your RA will call meetings from time to time on your hall or in your building. These meet- 
ings are never lengthy and are only called when the RA has something important to share 
or certain issues to discuss. You are expected to make every effort to attend. If you are un- 
able to be there, check with your RA to learn what you missed. 

Insurance, Personal Property 

The university shall not be responsible for the theft, loss or damage to any student's per- 
sonal property. Students are encouraged to carry adequate personal property insurance. 
Your parent's insurance may cover your belongings while you are away at school. It would 
be wise to check their policy. 

Obscene or Harassing Calls 

It is against the law to make obscene or harassing phone calls. Conviction through the jus- 
tice system is punishable by a fine and/or prison. If you receive such calls: 

88 



Hang up immediately. 

Do not give out any information (names, location, etc.). 

If calls persist, call your RA or RLC, the residence life office, campus safety or the 
local police department. 

Keep a record of calls (especially dates and times). 

Attempt to determine a pattern. 

If calls persist, the university will contact the BellSouth Annoyance Call Center to 
put a trace on the phone(s). 

Pets 

With the exception of small, harmless fish, no pets are allowed in the residence halls due to 
health and sanitation regulations. Residents found to be keeping pets will have 24 hours to 
remove them from campus. Further disciplinary action and a $100 cleaning fee may also be 
imposed. 

Quiet Hours 

Courtesy quiet hours are in effect at all times in the residence halls. Mandatory quiet hours 
are from 10:00 p.m. until 8:00 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and 2:00 a.m. until 10:00 
a.m. on the weekends. On the third and fourth floor of Dempsey Hall extended quiet hours 
are from 8:00 p.m. until 8:00 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and 10:00 p.m. until 10:00 
a.m. on the weekends. During final exam week, strict quiet hours are in effect 24 hours a 
day. During quiet hours, noise should not be heard outside your door or one door down 
from you. 

Restricted Areas 

Students are not allowed in the electrical service rooms, maintenance closets, boiler rooms 
or on the roofs of campus buildings. 

Room Entry 

The university reserves the right to enter a student's room for inspection or repair, disciplin- 
ary purposes or whenever there is a reasonable cause to suspect violations of university and 
residence life policies. University personnel will enter a student's room if there is a strong 
suspicion of illegal drug activity. 

Room Inspections 

Room inspections by the student affairs staff may be held periodically to insure compliance 
with community living standards and/or health and fire safety guidelines. Advance notice of 
these inspections will normally be given. Students whose rooms are deemed "unsanitary or 
a health hazard" will be given 24 hours to correct the situation or be subject to disciplinary 
action. 

Roommate Rights 

In this community, as in any other, everyone has rights and responsibilities. Problems 
develop when one person fulfills his or her responsibilities and another does not. Please 
respect the following: 

The right to read, to study and to sleep in the room with as little disturbance as pos- 
sible within reason. 

The right to have personal belongings that are used by no one else. 

The right to live in a clean and orderly room. 

The right to have guests, provided they respect the rights of the roommate. 



89 



• The right to enter the room whenever one wants to, unless other provisions are 
made and agreed upon by both parties. 

• The right to be free of physical or emotional harassment. 

• The right to speak out openly. 

• The right to be treated with consideration and thoughtfulness. 

These rights and responsibilities apply not only to roommates but also to suitemates and 
others living in the building or residence halls. 

Solicitation 

No solicitation is permitted in the residence halls. Please report any solicitors to a member 
of the residence life staff or campus safety at extension 1998. 

Sports in the Residence Hall Areas 

Due to the potential for damage to residence hall facilities and the risk of personal injury, 
frisbees and basketball in the designated area will be the only activities allowed in these 
outside areas unless approved by the residence life coordinator. See your RA or RLC for 
specific details. 

Storage Rooms 

The university does not have the space to provide any on-campus storage. For those who 
need storage there are numerous storage facilities in the Atlanta area. Personal property left 
or abandoned on campus after the residence halls close will be thrown away. Furthermore, 
storage companies may only leave storage sheds/containers on campus in pre-approved 
areas for 48 hours. 

Storms, Inclement Weather 

In case of strong winds or in the possibility of a tornado, students are asked to open their 
windows and move to the interior walls of their building or to the lower floor interior walls 
if time permits. Should damage occur, a residence life staff member will be on hand for 
directions and to contact the proper authorities. 

Theft 

The university does not assume responsibility for articles lost or stolen from rooms. 
Residents need to take precautions to insure, to the best of their ability, that theft does not 
occur. Remember to lock your door whenever you leave your room; do not loan or duplicate 
your keys; report lost room keys as soon as possible; take valuables home with you over 
breaks. Any theft or loss should be reported to your RA or RLC and campus safety upon 
discovering the loss. 

Trash Disposal 

Please keep our campus looking attractive by placing all trash in appropriate outside con- 
tainers. Residents of North and Magbee Halls and Phase H should use the trash chutes. All 
trash placed in the chutes must be bagged. Large items that do not fit in the chute must be 
carried to the dumpster in the upper parking lot. Students discarding their trash outside 
their rooms or littering in the Quad may face the following sanctions: community service 
and fines of $50.00 per bag of trash. Students who continue to disregard this policy may 
lose their privilege to live on campus. 

Visitation Hours 

Oglethorpe University permits visitation in the residence halls by members of the opposite 
sex 24 hours per day, seven days a week with the consent of the host or hostess and his or 
her roommates/suitemates. Cohabitation between students and/or non-students, regardless 



90 



of gender, is not permitted. Cohabitation exists when a person who is not assigned to a par- 
ticular residence hall room or suite uses that room or suite as if he or she were living there. 

Guests 

Residents may have overnight visitors of the same sex for a maximum of three consecutive 
nights with consent of the roommate. Prior notification and registration of that guest must 
be made with the RA. Registration of an overnight guest is necessary in the event of an 
emergency. We encourage you to be considerate of and to discuss any such plans with your 
roommate. Please remember, as a host or hostess, you are responsible for the behavior of 
your guests. Residents are allowed a maximum of three guests at any given time. 

Escort Policy 

Hosts must escort all guests at all times while on campus. All residents have responsibility 
for informing guests of all Oglethorpe policies and procedures and specifically community 
living standards. Residents are responsible for the actions of their guests. 



91 



c 

c 

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92 




93 



Academic Advising 



Each student consults with a faculty adviser in preparing course schedules, discussing 
completion of degree requirements, post-graduation plans and inquiring about any other 
academic matter. The faculty adviser is each student's primary point of contact with the 
university. 

To change advisers a student must complete the steps below; this is the only method for 
changing academic advisers. 

1. Ask the proposed "new" faculty adviser for permission to be added to the faculty 
member's advisee list. 

2. Ask the current adviser to send the student file to the faculty member who has 
agreed to be the student's new adviser. 

3. Ascertain that the new adviser has received the file and has sent an adviser change 
notice to the registrar. 

When the student decides or changes a major field, he or she should change advisers, if 
necessary, to a faculty member who has teaching responsibilities in that major field. 

Registration 



Schedule planning and course selection for all students is done in consultation with each 
student's academic adviser. New students select courses with their faculty adviser dur- 
ing summer orientation or registration. Returning students should make appointments 
to consult with their academic advisers for course selection during registration week, in 
November for the following spring semester and in April for the following summer sessions 
and fall semester. 

Full-time students wishing to participate in the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Educa- 
tion (ARCHE) Cross Registration program (see Cross Registration below) also should select 
courses during the registration weeks. 

Cross Registration 



Oglethorpe University is a member of the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education 
(ARCHE), a consortium of the 19 institutions of higher education in the greater Atlanta 
area. Through the consortium, full-time Oglethorpe students may enroll on a space-avail- 
able basis in courses at any other member institution. The student need not be admitted 
to the other institution and completes all procedures, including payment of tuition, at 
Oglethorpe. Because of institutional deadlines, students should complete forms for cross 
registration during Oglethorpe's designated registration week. 

Courses taken at consortium institutions on a cross-registration basis will count as Ogletho- 
rpe courses for residence requirements. While grades earned through cross registration are 
not tabulated in grade point averages, courses with grades of "C-" or higher count toward 
graduation requirements. Interested students should consult the registrar for program 
details. 

Georgia Institute of Technology Air Force R.O.T.C. 



Students may participate in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps through cross 
registration by attending classes and training at Georgia Institute of Technology'. Students 
earn a college degree and an officer's commission in the United States Air Force at the same 
time. A student who completes the Air Force R.O.T.C. program qualifies as a commissioned 
officer and will be allowed to enter active duty in the United States Air Force. Air Force 



94 



il.O.T.C offers competitive and non-competitive scholarships to quahfied college students 
)ased on merit and major including foreign languages. Stipends and book allowances are 
dso available. 

3glethorpe Students Seeking Transient Status 

Dglethorpe students may pursue classes at another accredited institution with the approval 
)f his or her adviser and the registrar. Failure to obtain this approval may result in the 
lenial of credit. Students must be in good academic and financial standing with Oglethorpe 
Jniversity. Transient request forms are available in the registrar's office. At the conclusion 
)f the semester, the student has the responsibility to have an official transcript mailed to the 
•egistrar's office. If the transcript is not received, the student will not be eligible to register 
"or future classes or get a copy of his or her transcript. 

5rop and Add 

students who find it necessary to change their schedule by dropping or adding courses must 
lo so by completing a drop/add form from the registrar's office. This form must be returned 
;o the registrar during the drop/add period as set in the academic calendar. 

Withdrawal from a Course 

^rom the conclusion of the drop/add period through mid-semester or the middle of a 
summer session, changes in schedule constitute a withdrawal. The academic adviser, the 
nstructor and the Office of Financial Aid must approve withdrawals on the appropriate 
brm from the registrar's office. 

Students withdrawing from a course may do so approximately through the ninth week or 
wo weeks after the published mid-semester date with a "W." Between the ninth and 11th 
veeks, the grade "W" or "WF" may be given at the discretion of the instructor. Students 
vithdrawing after the Friday that falls on the 11th week will receive a grade of "WF." Only in 
he case of medical emergency, requiring a physician's letter to be submitted to the provost, 
)r hardship may students appeal a grade of "WP." Withdrawal due to medical reasons may 
change a student's grades, but it has no effect on the return of tuition or room and board 
;osts. Please see Institutional Drop and Withdrawal Refund Policy in the Tuition and Costs 
ection of this Bulletin. 

students should note that any change of academic schedule is not official until it is filed in 
he registrar's office. The date the change is received in the registrar's office will be the of- 
icial date for the change. 

Withdrawal from the University 

tudents who must withdraw from the university during a semester are required to 
omplete the appropriate withdrawal form, which is available in the registrar's office. The 
)ffice of Financial Aid must also sign approval. The date the completed withdrawal form is 
ubmitted to the registrar will be the official date for withdrawal. 

n the case of an emergency departure from the campus for which withdrawal forms have 
LOt been executed, the registrar's office may verify that the student has left campus as a 
esult of an emergency and notify instructors. 

'or absences of a year or more, see Re-admission in the Admission section of this Bulletin. 
'or absences of less than 12 months, see Re-activation below. 



95 



Obligations to tlie University 



A student who has not met all obligations to the university, which include but are not lim- 
ited to official transcripts, immunization records and financial obligations, may be dropped 
from all courses; may not be allowed to register for courses in subsequent academic semes- 
ters or sessions; may not be allowed to receive a degree from the university or participate in 
commencement; and requests for Oglethorpe transcripts will not be honored. 

Re-activation 



Students who leave the university whether in good academic standing or not and wish 
to return after an absence of less than 12 months should contact the admission office to 
request a re-activation form. The completed form and official transcripts from all colleges 
or universities attended must be submitted to be re-activated. Students who are not in good 
academic standing will be re-activated with approval of the provost. 

Class Attenckmce 

Regular attendance at class sessions, laboratories, examinations and official university 
convocations is an obligation which all students are expected to fulfill. Faculty members set 
attendance policies in their course syllabi. 

Grading 

Faculty members submit mid-semester reports to the registrar's office on class rolls indicat- 
ing Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory ("S" or "U"). These mid-semester reports are not part of 
the student's permanent record. 

Faculty members submit letter grades at the end of each semester. These grades become 
part of the student's official record. Once entered, a grade may not be changed except by 
means of an officially executed Change of Grade form. 

A student's grade point average (GPA) is calculated in this way: It is the sum of the quality 
points per semester hour times the semester hours earned per grade, divided by the total 
number of semester hours attempted. (Attempted hours would exclude any grades of "W," 
"WF" or "S.") 

The letter grades used at Oglethorpe are defined as follows: 



Grade 


Meaning 


Quality Points 
Per Semester Hour 


Numerical Equivalent 


A 


Superior 


4.0 


93-100 


A- 




3.7 


90-92 


B+ 




3.3 


87-89 


B 


Good 


3.0 


83-86 


B- 




2.7 


80-82 


C+ 




2.3 


77-79 


c 


Satisfactory 


2.0 


73-76 


c- 




1.7 


70-72 


D+ 




1.3 


67-69 


D 


Passing 


1.0 


60-66 


F 


Failure 


0.0 


59 and below 



96 



FA 


Failure: Excessive Absences* 





W 


Withdrew Passing** 





WF 


Withdrew Faihng* 





I 


Incomplete*** 





NS 


No Show 





S 


Satisfactory**** 





u 


Unsatisfactory* 





AU 


Audit (no credit) 






70 or higher 



Notes: * Grade has same effect as an "F" on the GPA. 

** Grade hais no effect on the GPA; no credit awarded. 

*** Grade has same effect as an "F" on the GPA. If a student is unable to 

complete the work for a course on time for reasons of health, family 
tragedy or other circumstances the instructor deems appropriate, 
the grade "I" may be assigned. If the student completes the work 
within 30 days of the last day of final examinations of the semes- 
ter in question, the instructor will evaluate the work and turn in a 
revised grade. Any "I" not changed by the professor within 45 days of 
the last day of final examinations will automatically be changed to a 
grade of "F." 

**** Grade has no effect on the GPA; credit is awarded. 

Only work completed at Oglethorpe is reflected in the Oglethorpe grade point average. 

Good Academic Standing, Probation and Academic Dismissal 

To be in good academic standing students must achieve the cumulative grade point aver- 
ages specified below in relation to the number of semester hours they have completed. 

Semester Hours Completed Cumulative GPA Required 

0-35 1.50 

36-64 1.75 

65 and above 2.00 

Students who fail to achieve good standing are placed on probation. 

Students who do not achieve good standing for two consecutive semesters (poor perfor- 
mance in summer sessions excluded) are subject to dismissal from the university for aca- 
demic reasons. However, successful completion of summer classes taken at Oglethorpe may 
be used to achieve good academic standing. 

New students, freshmen or transfer students who fail all courses during their first semester 
at Oglethorpe are subject to dismissal, unless the student received a "W in all courses or - 
had to vidthdraw from all courses for medical reasons. 

Students who have been dismissed for academic reasons may be re-admitted after an 
absence of one spring or fall semester upon petition to the provost. The written petition 
should reference specific evidence of prospects for improved academic performance such as 
an outstanding employment experience or a substantial change in personal circumstances. 
Students re-admitted by petition must achieve good standing by the end of their second 
semester as re-admitted students or be subject to permanent dismissal. (See also Re-activa- 
tion or Re-admission.) 



97 



Good Academic Standing and Probation for Athletes 



A student athlete loses eligibility to participate if his or her cumulative grade point average 
is below 1.00. A student with a cumulative grade point average below 1.00 may not practice, 
dress, play or travel vdth the team. A student on academic probation for the second con- 
secutive semester may practice but may not dress, play or travel with the team. The student 
is eligible to play the foUov^ng semester if good academic standing is attained. 

If a student is placed on academic probation for three consecutive semesters, he or she loses 
athletic eligibility at Oglethorpe University permanently and may not practice, dress, play 
or travel with the team. 

In the case of extenuating circumstances, the student may appeal the loss of eligibility to 
the provost. The burden of proof to demonstrate that acceptable academic progress is being 
made resides solely with the student. 

Repetition of Courses 



Courses may be repeated only if an unsatisfactory grade ("D," "F," "FA" or "WF") was 
received in the course. When a course is repeated, both grades are calculated into the 
student's grade point average, but no additional semester hours of credit are earned. 

Independent Study Policy 



An independent study requires submission of a proposed and detailed outline of study that 
includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division 
chair and either the associate provost or the provost. Junior standing (at least 64 semester 
hours earned) and a grade point average of 3.0 or better are required. A student may take 
no more than two independent studies at Oglethorpe and no request should duplicate a 
course that exists in the curriculum. The instructor who agrees to direct the independent 
study should be a full-time member of the faculty; directing more than one independent 
study in any given semester requires approval by the provost. A request form may be 
obtained from the registrar's office. That, along wdth the required signatures should be 
submitted to the registrar's office no later than the second day of classes of the semester 
of study. 

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option 



After 32 semester hours are earned at Oglethorpe a student in good academic standing may 
register to take two courses (in addition to internships) on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. These courses cannot be taken in the same semester and cannot be used to satisfy 
proficiency requirements, core requirements or the student's major or minor. The student 
must register for the satisfactory/unsatisfactory designation by the end of the drop/add 
period after which the satisfactory/unsatisfactory designation cannot be changed. Satisfac- 
tory is defined as a "C-" or better. 

Final Examinations 



Final examinations, up to four hours in length, generally are given in courses at the end of 
each semester or session. The final examination schedule is compiled in the registrar's office 
and is printed in each semester's course schedule. (Final examinations in the summer are 
held on the last day of each session.) Final examinations must be given at the assigned date 
and time. 

No final examinations may be administered during the last scheduled class meeting of the 
semester or during the reading period prior to the first day of scheduled final examinations. 



98 



If special arrangements are needed for individual students, faculty members must inform 
their division chair. (Regular course tests may not be given on the last day of classes or be 
scheduled on the reading day.) 

No student help is to be used for typing or grading examinations. 

Grade Appeal Policy 



If a student believes that a course grade has been assigned in a capricious or prejudicial 
manner, he or she may appeal the grade through the following steps: 

1. The student submits a written appeal to the instructor clearly stating the reasons 
for believing that the grade was assigned in a capricious or prejudicial manner. 

2. The instructor changes the grade or replies in writing explaining why the extant 
grade is appropriate. 

3. If the student is not satisfied with the explanation, he or she may submit the writ- 
ten appeal and response to the appropriate division chair, who asks two faculty 
members with suitable experience in appropriate disciplines to serve wdth the 
division chair as a ruling committee. If the instructor is a division chair, the senior 
faculty member in the division wdll serve in place of the chair. The ruling commit- 
tee receives all written materials relevant to the case and may request additional 
information. If the committee rules in favor of the instructor, written notification is 
given both to the instructor and to the student and there is no further appeal. If the 
committee rules in favor of the student, the chair advises the instructor to reconsid- 
er the grade. If the instructor refuses to change the grade, the ruling committee may 
submit a vmtten recommendation for a grade change to the provost, whose final 
decision v^U be based on a review of the materials that have been submitted and the 
process that has been followed. 

The entire process must be initiated within 30 days of the first day of classes in the semester 
immediately follovdng the assignment of the grade and must be completed by the end of 
that semester. 

Auditing Courses 

Regularly admitted Oglethorpe students may register for courses on an "audit" basis. 
A. student who audits a course may attend it for enrichment but is not required to take 
course examinations or complete other course requirements. In order to audit a course, an 
admitted student must request an audit form from the registrar's office and submit it to the 
instructor of the course he or she intends to audit. If the class is not closed, the instructor 
may accept the student as an audit by returning the signed form to the registrar's office. The 
grade awarded for a class taken on an audit basis is "AU," and no credits or quality points 
are earned. 

Students may register to take courses on an audit basis only during the drop/add period as 
printed in the course schedule. The fees for auditing courses are published by the business 
Dffice. 

>ean's List 

Itudents who earn a semester grade point average of 3.5 or higher while carrying 12 se- 
nester hours or more during the fall or spring semester or during the summer sessions are 
)laced on the Dean's Academic Honors List. 



99 



Graduation Requirements 



To earn a baccalaureate degree from the university the following requirements must be met: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 128 semester hours and a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 or higher on Oglethorpe course work. No more than four semester 
hours earned in Team Teaching for Critical Thinking, or two semester hours earned 
in Success Development Seminar, or two independent studies are permitted to 
count toward the 128 semester hour requirement. 

2. A minimum of 64 semester hours must be completed at Oglethorpe to earn an 
Oglethorpe degree with 52 of the last 64 hours earned in residence. Courses taken 
at Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education institutions on a cross-registra- 
tion basis and courses in an approved study abroad program (with prior approval of 
the director of study abroad) count as Oglethorpe courses for the purpose of meet- 
ing this residency requirement. 

3. Satisfaction of core requirements and major field or dual degree requirements (see 
appropriate disciplinary headings for descriptions). Completion at Oglethorpe of at 
least half the semester hours for each major. 

4. Completion of 12 co-curricular "Petrel Points" 

5. Submission of an application for graduation to the registrar's office by the last day 
of drop/add in the fall prior to completion of degree requirements the following De- 
cember, May or August. If a student does not graduate as anticipated, the applica- 
tion for graduation must be completed again. 

6. Satisfaction of all financial and other obligations to the university and payment of a 
degree completion fee. 

7. Participation in assessments of competencies gained and curricular effectiveness by 
completing standardized or other tests and surveys. 

8. Formal faculty and Board of Trustees approval for graduation. 



Graduation Exercises 



Graduation exercises are held once a year at the close of the spring semester in May. 
Diplomas are awarded at the close of the spring semester during commencement and at 
the close of the summer and fall semesters. Students must have completed all graduation 
requirements in order to participate in graduation exercises. The only exception allowed is 
for a student who has completed all graduation requirements except for a maximum of two 
courses totaling no more than 12 semester hours. Students completing requirements at the 
end of summer or fall participate in the following spring graduation exercises. 

Degrees with Latin Academic Honors 



Undergraduate degrees with Latin academic honors are awarded as follows: cum laude 
for a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher; magna cum laude for 3.7 or higher; 
summa cum laude for 3.9 or higher. To be eligible for Latin academic honors, students must 
have completed 64 or more semester hours in residence at Oglethorpe. 

Transfer work is not included in the determination for Latin academic honors. 

Degrees with Honors Thesis 



Please see the Honors Program in the Educational Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 



100 



Double Major Policy 



A student may earn a double major subject to the following conditions: 

1. The student must meet all requirements of both majors. 

2. The student may count no more than three of the courses taken to meet the major 
requirements of one of the fields toward meeting the major requirements of the 
other field. 

3. The transcript will list both majors. In case both majors result in the same degree, 
that degree will be awarded. 

4. In case the two majors result in different degrees, the student will receive only one 
degree, that being the student's choice of the two degree designations. 



Earning a Second Add-On Major 



Students who have been awarded an Oglethorpe baccalaureate degree may return to earn 
a second major within that degree at the university. Upon completion of the requirements, 
the second major will be entered on the student's record and transcript. No diploma will be 
awarded when the second major is within the degree already awarded. The requirements 
are: 

1. Completion of an additional 32 semester hours of which a minimum of 16 must be 
completed at Oglethorpe. 

2. Maintenance of a 2.0 or higher cumulative grade point average. 

3. Completion of a major other than the major(s) completed at the time the first de- 
gree was awarded, subject to the first two conditions listed above under the Double 
Major Policy. 

Earning a Second Baccalaureate Degree _ 

Students who have completed a baccalaureate degree may be awarded a second and differ- 
ent baccalaureate degree. Upon completion of the requirements, the student's record and 
transcript Mali reflect the conferring of a second degree and a diploma will be awarded. 

For students who earned their first baccalaureate degree at Oglethorpe, the same require- 
ments listed above under Earning a Second Add-On Major apply. 

For students who have earned their first baccalaureate degree at another institution, this 
degree is treated as transfer credit. Up to a maximum of 80 semester hours may be accepted 
at Oglethorpe. The requirements for the second degree are: 

1. Satisfaction of Oglethorpe core requirements. 

2. Completion of a minimum of 48 semester hours at Oglethorpe. 

3. Maintenance of a 2.0 or higher cumulative grade point average. 

4. Completion of a major other than the major(s) completed at the time the first de- 
gree was awarded. 

\11 transfer policies stated in the Transfer Students and Transfer Policies sections of this 
Bulletin apply. 



101 



Student Classification 



For administrative and other official and extra-official purposes, undergraduate students 
are classified according to the number of semester hours successfully completed. Classifica- 
tion is as follows: to 32 hours - freshman; 33 to 64 hours - sophomore; 65 to 96 hours 
- junior; 97 hours and above - senior. 

Normal Academic Load 



Two semesters — fall and spring — constitute the regular academic year and two sessions 
are offered in the summer. 

While courses of one to five semester hours are offered each semester, a full-time academic 
program at Oglethorpe consists of no less than three regular four semester hour courses 
each semester or a minimum of 12 semester hours. Generally four courses are taken, giving 
the student a total of 16-18 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours allowed as part of 
the regular full-time program. This includes any cross-registered courses. 

Students may take up to four academic courses and one additional one-hour course as part 
of a regular load without special permission, even if the total hours exceed 18. An academic 
course is defined for these purposes as a four-hour course, a five-hour laboratory science or 
a four-hour science lecture with accompanjdng one-hour laboratory. 

A student whose academic load exceeds 18 hours as a result of taking five academic courses, 
an internship or multiple additional one-hour courses must obtain overload permis- 
sion. Such overloads are allowed for students with junior standing and a minimum grade 
point average of 3.5, unless the overload is due to internship hours, otherwise a 3.0 grade 
point average. Overloads resulting from University Singers and Team Teaching for Criti- 
cal Thinking do not require provost approval and are exempt from additional charges. A 
request form may be obtained from the registrar's office and requires signed approval by the 
student's adviser and the provost. 

During the summer a student will be permitted to take no more than eight hours in any 
five-week session (nine hours if one of the courses is a five-hour laboratory science course). 
Thus, a student will be limited to a maximum of two four-hour courses, plus one hour of 
Applied Instruction in Music, in a five-week session or to a load of one four-hour course 
and one five-hour combination of course and accompanying laboratory. Or, to a maximum 
of one four-hour course in a five- week session while simultaneously enrolled in a maximum 
of two three-hour courses in an eight- week session. The student should be cautioned that 
these maximum limits represent course loads that are approximately 50 percent greater 
than the ceiling of 18 hours during the regular academic year. Successful completion of such 
a load will require a correspondingly greater effort on the part of the student. 

Course Level 

In the Programs of Study section of this Bulletin, disciplines and majors are listed alpha- 
betically. Respective courses under each major are designated by a prefix that identifies 
the discipline and a three-digit number. The first digit indicates the level of the course: 1 = 
freshman level, 2 = sophomore level, 3 = junior level and 4 = senior level. (A 5 or 6 typically 
denotes a graduate-level course.) Higher-level courses in a discipline are typically designed 
to build upon the content of lower-level courses in that discipline and other specified pre- 
requisite courses. 

The number of hours refers to the semester hours of college credit per semester, which are 
earned by the successful completion of the course. 



102 



I, J f% p, 




103 



1. Preamble 

Persons who come to Oglethorpe University for work and study join a community that is 
committed to high standards of academic honesty. The Honor Code contains the respon- 
sibiHties we accept by becoming members of the community and the procedures we will 
follow should our commitment to honesty be broken. 

The students and faculty of Oglethorpe University expect each other to be truthful in the 
academic endeavor they share. Members of the faculty assume that students complete work 
honestly and act toward them in ways consistent with that assumption. Students are ex- 
pected to behave honorably in their academic work and are required to insist on honest be- 
havior from their peers. Students who suspect that dishonorable conduct has occurred must 
report any suspected violations to the Honor Council. Failure to report a suspected Honor 
Code violation falls under the jurisdiction of the Code of Student Conduct, Section B.14. 

Oglethorpe welcomes all who accept our principles of honest behavior. We believe that this 
Code will enrich our years at the university and allow us to begin practicing the honorable, 
self-governed lives expected of society's leaders. 

2. Pledge 

Students pledge that they have completed assignments honestly by attaching the following 
statement to each test, quiz, paper, overnight assignment, in-class essay or other work: 

I pledge that I have neither given nor received any unauthorized aid on this assignment. 

(Signed) 

It will be the responsibility of the student to provide these pledges by either attaching them 
on a separate sheet of paper or typing them as part of the assignment. In the case of work 
submitted electronically, either an electronic signature or a pledge on a separate sheet 
should be provided by the student. The instructor should also remind the class to sign the 
pledge. The pledge serves as an affirmation of the students' and instructors' belief in the 
principles of the Honor Code. Students should not consider their work to be complete with- 
out the pledge. 

Instructors should include a statement concerning the Honor Code in their syllabi indicat- 
ing that all work in the course is subject to the terms of the Honor Code. Failure to sign the 
pledge or failure of an instructor to remind students to sign the pledge in no way relieves 
either students or faculty members of their responsibilities under the Code. 

3. Faculty 

Since it is assumed that students act according to their pledge, faculty abstain from any 
practices whose purpose is to ascertain that students have been dishonest unless there is a 
compelling reason to believe that cheating has taken place. Instructors should invite their 
students to discuss any of the instructor's actions or policies that appear to be at variance 
with the assumption of honesty. 

4. Jurisdiction 

All courses offered by the university for academic credit are covered by the Honor Code and 
all cases of suspected academic dishonesty will be handled in accordance to its provisions. 
The Honor Council has sole jurisdiction in matters of suspected academic dishonesty. It is 
the responsibility of faculty members to make clear how the Honor Code applies in specific 
courses and to follow appropriate procedures. Alternative ways of dealing with cases are 
not to be used. In cases of academic dishonesty on the part of students, the Honor Council 
is the final arbiter. In cases where a faculty member engages in practices that seem to be 



104 



contrary to the Honor Code, the Honor Council will refer such cases to the provost. The 
jurisdiction of the Honor Council does not extend to matters of either faculty discipline or 
non-academic student conduct. 

5. Definitions 

rhe following definitions shall be considered as authoritative for the framing of charges. 
Faculty members should include these definitions in their syllabi and provide students with 
:lear explanations of what does and does not constitute "authorized" aid. Students are like- 
ivise obligated to ensure that their work is free from suspicion of cheating or plagiarism as 
these terms are defined below. The absence of the definitions or of explanatory discussion in 
syllabi in no way relieves students of their responsibilities under the Code. 

5.1. Cheating 

Cheating is defined as: 

a. The unauthorized possession or use of notes, texts or other such materials dur- 
ing an examination. 

b. Copying another person's work or participation in such an effort. 

c. An attempt or participation in an attempt to fulfill the requirements of a course 
with work other than one's original work for that course. 

Students have the responsibility of avoiding participation in cheating incidents 
by doing their own work, taking precautions against others copying their work 
and in general not giving or receiving aid beyond what is authorized by the 
instructor. 

5.2. Plagiarism 

Plagiarism includes representing someone else's words, ideas, data or original 
research as one's own and in general failing to footnote or otherwise acknowledge 
the source of such work. One has the responsibility of avoiding plagiarism by taking 
adequate notes on reference materials, including material taken off the internet or 
other electronic sources, used in the preparation of reports, papers and other course 
work. 

Honor Council 

6.1 Composition 

At the beginning of each academic year, day and evening students and fuUtime 
faculty members will be selected to serve on the Honor Council. The secretary of 
the Council vrill convene the new Honor Council as soon as is convenient after the 
selection process is complete. At the first meeting, new members will be instructed 
in procedure. When a case comes forward, the secretary vrill form an investigatory 
panel to carry out a preliminary investigation in accordance vrith the provision in 
section 7-2. If the investigatory panel determines that the case should proceed to a 
full Honor Council for the purpose of either a hearing and possible imposition of 
penalty or simply imposition of a penalty, the secretary vrill constitute an Honor 
Council made up of five students (either day or evening) and two faculty members, 
called from the pool of students and faculty members selected according to the 
provisions in section 6.4. The composition of the Council shall be five students, two 
faculty members (one of whom must be in the second year of his or her term) and 
one secretary of the Council (associate provost or designated senior faculty mem- 
ber). Day students will serve on investigatory panels and honor councils for day 
students suspected of violations and evening students shall serve on investigatory 
panels and honor councils for evening students suspected of violations. 



105 



Any students or faculty members who have not sat on a particular case will be eli- 
gible to hear appeals of that case (cf. Section 8 below). 

At the end of each academic year, the Council will meet and, after review of the 
cases heard in the previous year, make recommendations for changes in procedure 
or possible amendments to the code. The secretary of the Council will make a for- 
mal report along with any recommendations at the April faculty meeting. 

6.2. Quorum 

Five members constitute a quorum. 

6.3. Officers 

The officers of the Council will be a presiding officer, a student, preferably a senior, 
and a secretary, associate provost or designated senior faculty member. In the case 
of evening students, the presiding officer will also be an evening student. 

6.3.1. Presiding officer 

The presiding officer will read the charge and direct the questioning of the 
suspect and witnesses and generally maintain order during the hearing. 

6.3.2. Secretary of the Council 

The secretary will have responsibility for calling the Honor Council, sched- 
uling the hearing, contacting the suspect and witnesses and maintaining 
and written record of the hearings. After the hearing is completed, the 
secretary will inform the suspect of the outcome and make the appropriate 
reports to the faculty member involved, the provost, the student's advisor 
and, if appropriate, the registrar and the dean of students. 

The secretary will present a report to the faculty at the April faculty meet- 
ing, discussing the cases that have come forward in the previous 12 months 
and indicating any suggested revisions to the code, to be voted on by the 
faculty. 

6.4. Selection 

6.4.1. Student Members 

Twelve student members of the Council from the day program will be 
elected by their peers in a general election held at the beginning of each 
school year. A nominating committee made up of the dean of students, the 
associate provost, the president of the Pan-Hellenic Council, the president 
of the Oglethorpe Students Association, former student Honor Council 
members and class presidents shall solicit and make nominations. In ad- 
dition, a student may nominate another student or submit his or her name 
for candidacy. All full-time traditional students are eligible for election, 
with the exception of students convicted of honor violations. Elections will 
be held no later than September 15. Throughout the course of the year, any 
day student who has been elected may be called by the secretary to hear 
cases or appeals, which involves day students. 

Six student members of the Council from the evening program will be 
selected by the director of the evening degree program, the evening degree 
program council and current evening students designated by the director of 
the evening degree program for the purposes of carrying out investigations 
and hearing cases involving evening degree students. 



106 



Outgoing student members will help to orient incoming students in the 
principles and practice of the Honor Code during freshman orientation. 
Current members will assist in the orientation of new and transfer students 
in the spring. 

6.4.2. Faculty Members 

Each year the director of institutional research will select three faculty 
members at random for two-year terms. All full-time tenure-track or ten- 
ured faculty members are eligible for selection. Only faculty members who 
have completed their second year review will be eligible to serve. 

The faculty members on the council will help with the orientation of new 
faculty in explaining the principles and practice of the Honor Code. 

6.4.3. Ser\dce Mandatory Except under Special Circiunstances 

As members of the Oglethorpe University community, all students and 
faculty members are obligated to serve on the Honor Council. Exemptions 
will be granted only under special circumstances at the discretion of the 
secretary. On any given case, Honor Council members may decline to serve 
when they believe that personal interests might interfere with their impar- 
tiality in deciding the case. 

Refusal on the part of students to serve will be considered a violation of the 
Code of Student Conduct. Refusal of faculty members to serve will be dealt 
with by the provost. 

6.5 Fall and Spring Terms 

Formation of the Council will be completed in the fall by September 15. The terms 
are for fall and spring semesters. If a Council member does not return for spring 
semester the provost may select a student or faculty member to fill any unexpired 
term. 

6.6 Summer Term 

The Honor Council will continue to perform its duties through the summer term. 
Its student members will be randomly selected from those students who served 
during the regular academic year and who attend summer term. Additional stu- 
dents may be appointed for the summer term as needed by the associate provost in 
consultation with the dean of students or director of the evening program. Any ap- 
peals of Honor Council actions will be deferred until the beginning of the fall term, 
following the procedures in Section 8. 

The terms of faculty members extend through the summer. The provost will fill any 
vacancies with selections from the full-time faculty teaching in the summer session. 

Procedures 

7.1 Reporting 

It is the responsibility of all students and faculty to report suspected violations of 
the Honor Code. Students may report either to the professor of the class in which 
the suspected violation occurred, to the associate provost, the office of the provost 
or the office of student affairs. Forms for reported violations will be included in 
orientation materials and The Faculty Handbook and will also be available online 
and at the registrar's office. A signed form in the hands of the secretary constitutes a 
report of a suspected violation. 



107 



In the case of suspected honor violations reported by a faculty member, the form for 
reporting violations shall include a detailed description of the suspected violation, 
with a description of the assignment and a syllabus for the course attached. Cases of 
suspected plagiarism should also include photocopies of the student w^ork in ques- 
tion vdth the problematic passages or work clearly marked, in addition to copies of 
source materials which document the plagiarism. 

Failure to report a case of suspected cheating either to the professor or to the sec- 
retary is considered to constitute a breach of the Code of Student Conduct under 
Section B. Such cases should be referred to the chief conduct officer. 

7.2 Preliminary Investigation 

Upon receiving a report of a suspected violation, the secretary shall form an in- 
vestigatory panel made up of one student, one faculty member and the secretary. 
If deemed necessary by the secretary, the investigatory panel v^U first conduct a 
preliminary investigation to ascertain whether or not there is sufficient evidence 
to warrant a preliminary hearing. If the investigatory panel does not think there is 
sufficient evidence to warrant a preliminary hearing, the professor has the right to 
request a review of the evidence by a full Council. If a full Council determines the 
evidence to be sufficiently compelling, the hearing may proceed. 

If either the secretary or the panel decides that the evidence does warrant a prelimi- 
nary hearing, the suspected offender vvdll be asked to meet with the members of the 
investigatory panel. At that time, the panel vdll present the evidence to the sus- 
pected offender and ask the latter to enter a plea in writing. Should the suspected 
offender choose to plead guilty, he or she will thereby waive any right to a subse- 
quent hearing by a full Council and acknowledges his or her wdllingness to accept 
whatever sanctions the Council should decide to impose. 

In cases where the student has admitted to violating the Honor Code, the professor 
is still required to submit a written report with documentation to the secretary. In 
all cases, regardless of the plea entered, the investigatory panel wdll decide whether 
or not to convene a hearing. A fiill honor Council will assess the appropriate pen- 
alty, whether a hearing is held or not. 

All official notifications shall be sent to the student's official Oglethorpe email ad- 
dress. Should the suspected offender fail to answer the summons of the investiga- 
tory panel wdthin five business days, the members of the panel may recommend a 
hearing In Absentia. 

Anyone reporting a suspected violation remains anonymous to all except the inves- 
tigatory panel until it is determined that a full hearing v^dll be held. Then the person 
reporting the violation will appear at the hearing in the presence of the alleged 
offender. 

7.3. Hearing 

7.3.1. Rights of the Accused 

a. The right to be notified of having been charged with violating the 
Honor Code as expeditiously as possible (and, in any event, wdthin 
three business days) once the investigatory panel has determined that 
a hearing should occur. 

b. Upon being charged by the investigatory panel, the right to a hearing 
within the following 10 business days, whenever possible. 

c. The right to be accompanied by two advisers from the university com- 



108 



munity. In cases where English is not the first language of the accused, 
the following exception to this rule may be made. The accused may 
request in writing to be allowed to bring a translator or interpreter to 
the hearing. The translator or interpreter must meet all other stipula- 
tions in the Honor Code procedures. The advisers may act on behalf 
of the accused in all matters of procedure, such as cross-examination, 
calling witnesses, etc. 

d. The right to enter a plea. 

e. The right during the hearing to offer opening and closing statements, 
cross-examine witnesses, call material witnesses and no more than two 
non-material (character) witnesses. 

f. The right to be present, together with advisers, during the entirety 
of the hearing. Disruptive behavior may result in expulsion from the 
hearing, at the discretion of the presiding officer. 

g. The right to challenge the impartiality of any specific member of the 
Council providing that such charges can be substantiated. 

h. The right to a copy of the minutes of the proceedings. 

i. In the event of a not-guilty verdict, the right to be free from being 
charged twice for the same incident. 

j. The right to attend any and all university classes, events and functions 
prior to a verdict. 

k. The right to separate hearings for joint alleged offenses. 

1. Under certain circumstances, the right to appeal an adverse decision. 
Procedures and criteria relating to appeals are specified in section 8. 

m. The right to absolute confidentiality of all participants. 

7.3.2. Rights listed not exhaustive 

The rights listed in Section 7-3.1 shall not be construed as exhaustive. 

7.3.3. Rights not accorded 

a. Formal niles of evidence shall not be in effect. All pertinent matters 
shall be admitted into evidence, including circumstantial evidence and 
hearsay, the value of which shall be weighted accordingly. 

b. The defendant does not have the right to be represented by profes- 
sional legal counsel during the hearing. Outside experts may also not 
be used. 

c. Affidavits are not admissible under any circumstances. 

d. Any evidence that the accused or any party acting on his or her behalf 
has threatened, accosted or otherwise intimidate his or her accuser or 
any adverse vidtness prior to the hearing shall be admissible evidence 
and shall be construed as a most serious breach of conduct, punishable 
according to section B of the Oglethorpe Code of Student Conduct. 

e. While the Honor Council should, under section 7-3.1.a, inform the 
accused of any suspected violations, the Council reserves the right to 
investigate any additional violations that may come to light during 
the hearing. These would include, but not be limited to, evidence of 
continuing subversion and multiple infractions. 

f The Honor Council reserves the right not to grant extensions on hear- 
ing dates beyond the 10 business days indicated in section 7-3.1.b. 



109 



7.3.4. Evidence and witnesses 

a. Upon receipt of a call for a full honor council hearing by the investiga- 
tory panel, the secretary shall summon any and all witnesses. 

b. It will be the responsibility of the accused to summon witnesses to 
testify on his or her behalf. 

c. Non-material (character) witnesses shall by limited to two. 

d. The accused may have two advisers from the university community, 
either students, staff or faculty members. 

e. The accused or his or her advisers may question witnesses and have the 
right to cross-examination. 

f. A witness shall not be present during the testimony of other witnesses. 

7.3.5. Failure to appear 

Should a student who has been charged with a violation of the Honor Code 
according to section 7-2 fail to appear for the hearing at the scheduled day 
and time, the Honor Council may decide to continue with the hearing and 
issue a verdict In Absentia. Such verdict will be binding as if the accused 
were present. 

Any student summoned as a witness who fails to attend the hearing may be 
subject to prosecution under Section B of the Oglethorpe Code of Student 
Conduct. Should a faculty or staff member fail to answer a summons from 
the Honor Council, such cases should be referred to the provost. 

7.3.6. Specification of offense 

By the end of the hearing, the Council will have found the accused to be 
either innocent or guilty of one of the following offenses: 

1. Academic Dishonesty, including willful cheating on a single assign- 
ment. This would include: 

a: Cop5dng answers from another student 

b: Using unauthorized sources, such as notes or books 

c: Plagiarism 

d: Providing unauthorized aid to a student in the same course 

2. A continuing pattern of subversion of the system. This would include: 

a: Multiple acts of academic dishonesty by a single individual 

b: Providing aid to another student while not enrolled in the class in 
which the act of dishonesty occurs 

Where the Honor Council is unable to assign an appropriate penalty, 
following the limits of its jurisdiction, such cases should immediately be 
referred to the provost or chief conduct officer as appropriate. 

7.3.7. Voting 

Voting of a full Honor Council shall be by secret ballot. Ballots will be 
counted by the presiding officer. 

7.4. Penalties 

If the Council determines that a student has committed one of the offenses 



no 



listed in Section 7-3.6, it may assess one of the following penalties accord- 
ing to the severity of the offense; however, the exact penalty shall be left 
to the discretion of the Council. The Council shall also have the option of 
consulting with the instructor for purposes of clarification before assessing 
a penalty. 

1. A "zero" on the assignment 

2. F in the course 

3. Suspension for the next full semester 

4. Expulsion with the right to reapply after one academic year 

5. Permanent expulsion from Oglethorpe University 

The first three penalties are recommended in cases of academic dishon- 
esty. The first penalty is recommended in cases where the scale of cheating 
or plagiarism is minimal. This would include copying some, but not all, 
answers from another student or a paper where plagiarized material con- 
stitutes no more than one-fifth of the total word count. The second would 
apply where a student has copied or plagiarized extensively or where the 
incident required a degree of preparation before hand, such as download- 
ing entire papers or preparing cheat sheets before an exam. The third is 
recommended in cases where a student has given aid while not enrolled. 
In all cases, the Honor Council is free to apply whichever of the penalties 
listed above seems fit, except where a student has been found guilty of a 
second offense. The penalty for a second offense shall be expulsion, which 
shall become effective in the semester in which the infraction occurred. The 
student will receive no credit for that semester. 

7.5 Reporting of verdict 

If the Honor Council determines that a student has violated the Honor Code, the 
student will be informed immediately. The secretary shall also inform the provost, 
the professor, the chair of the division in which the violation occurred, the student's 
academic adviser and the registrar of the Council's decision including any penalties 
within the next two business days. 

Faculty members are expected to abide by the decision of the Honor Council 
regarding penalties assessed. If a case has not been resolved by the time that final 
grades are due, the instructor should issue a grade of I (incomplete) indicating on 
the grade roll that the case is pending before the Honor Council. Under no circum- 
stances should instructors impose any grading penalties prior to notification of the 
results of the hearing or at variance with the decision of the Council. 

7.6 Records 

The secretary shall keep minutes of all meetings of the investigatory panel, pre- 
liminary hearings and final hearings. Minutes and material evidence from previous 
cases will be available to the members of the Honor Council for review in consider- 
ing future cases. 

7.7 Meeting Time and Place 

The regular meeting time for all preliminary investigations and full honor council 
hearings shall be Thursdays at 11:30 am in the Hansel Room of Lupton Hall, unless 
the secretary in consultation with the Council determines that another time and 
place is best. 



Ill 



Appeals 

8.1. Grounds for appeal 

A student who has been found guilty of violating the Honor Code by the Honor 
Council has the right to appeal the decision to the provost. The appeal must be 
made in v^riting wdthin three business days of notification of the Honor Council's 
decision. Appeals may be granted under the following circumstances: 

a: If the Honor Council deviated substantially from the rules and procedures laid 
out in the Honor Code in determining the case. 

b: If there is additional evidence that could have a bearing on the outcome of the 
case. 

8.2 Jurisdiction 

Following submission of an appeal, the provost wdll summon a review board which 
will examine the appeal and decide whether a new hearing is warranted. 

8.3 Review Board 

The review board will be made up of two faculty members who have most recently 
completed terms on the Honor Council. 

8.4. Procedures 

If the review board determines that a new hearing is warranted according to the 
stipulations in section 8.1, the secretary will convene an appeal hearing. The appeal 
will be heard by a special appeals council made up of the members of the review 
board along wdth five students (one sophomore, two juniors and two seniors) cho- 
sen from the existing pool who had not heard the original case. The secretary shall 
record the proceedings of the hearings. Procedures for the appeals hearing shall be 
the same as those in section 7-3. 

8.5. Results of Appeal 

The appeals council may decide either to uphold or overturn the decision of the 
Honor Council. If the verdict is overturned, the secretary should inform the pro- 
vost, professor and registrar of the results of the appeal. Any person acquitted on 
appeal may not be charged a second time for the same offense. If the appeals coun- 
cil decides to uphold the original ruling, no further appeals may be granted. 



112 







113 



First-Year Experience 



Oglethorpe University's faculty and student affairs staff work together to coordinate 
academic offerings and student services in order to create a first-year experience that is 
welcoming, supportive and challenging. This integrated program is committed to encourag- 
ing first-year students to succeed. 

Major features of the first-year experience include the course Fresh Focus, optional learn- 
ing communities with accompanying first-year seminars, the freshman advising program, 
a two-semester core course in humanities, programs in the residence halls, the tutoring 
services of the Writing Center, disability services in the Learning Resources Center and a 
coordinated intervention process for assisting students in trouble. 

FOC 101. Fresh Focus 1 hour 

This class, required for all entering students, is a group-oriented course involving up- 
per-class students and faculty. Students select a class from among numerous topics with 
experiential and interactive as well as academic features. The faculty instructor serves as the 
student's academic adviser during his or her first semester. The first meeting of each group 
of students is during fall orientation and continues thereafter twice weekly for the first half 
of the semester to pursue their chosen topic and share related experiences. During the same 
period new students will also attend occasional workshops on aspects of leadership, health 
and wellness, careers, skills for academic success and open houses in the academic divi- 
sions. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 

FOC 201. Team Teaching for Critical Thinking 1 hour 

Upper-class student mentors assist faculty instructors in planning and teaching the special 
topics sessions of Fresh Focus or other freshman-level courses. They participate in train- 
ing meetings prior to the beginning of the course, communicate with entering freshmen 
over the summer, attend all classes in their Fresh Focus section and assist with the advising 
of freshmen throughout their first year. No more than four semester hours earned in this 
course are permitted to count toward graduation. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

Learning Communities 

Students may choose to participate in learning communities, a special opportunity for pro- 
fessors and students to work together closely inside and outside of class. A learning com- 
munity consists of the same students taking a Fresh Focus: First-Year Seminar linked to a 
particular section of the required core curriculum course Narratives of the Self L By sharing 
the same students, learning community professors can better coordinate discussions and 
material studied and students thereby receive additional support in succeeding in their first 
year of college. They also benefit from special extracurricular activities and social events 
organized specifically for the learning communities. Some of the communities are discipline 
focused and aimed, for instance, at students in science, economics or other fields. In this 
case, a third course forms an additional link in constituting the community. 

Co-Curricular "Petrel Points" Initiative 

Effective fall 2008, all students who enter in fall semester, with the exception of transfer 
students with more than 31 credit hours, are required to participate in a campus-wide 
co-curricular program which involves accruing a total of 12 "Petrel Points" (6-4-2 plan) 
distributed across the following categories during their first academic year: 
1. Arts and Ideas (6 points) 

Arts and Ideas includes all events listed on the university "Arts and Ideas Calendar" 
and nearly all other cultural and academic events on campus, such as lectures, film 
series, concerts, events at the art museum and the like. 



114 



2. Civic Engagement (4 points) 

Civic Engagement includes all events sponsored by the Oglethorpe Center for Civic 
Engagement both on and oif-campus, such as service days, OUr Atlanta trips, 
Hands On Atlanta day and alternative winter and spring breaks. Participation in 
OUr Atlanta trips with a Fresh Focus class, for example, will count toward this 
category. Some events, such as the alternative winter and spring breaks, will count 
as 4 points. 

3. Campus Leadership and Citizenship (2 points) 

Campus Leadership and Citizenship encompasses a broad range of activities, 
including holding a student government office, starting a student club, planning 
campus events, membership on an athletic team, active participation in campus 
organizations (for example, Greek organizations), fine arts participation (acting in a 
play) and participation in Student Affairs activities in the residence halls. Sub- 
missions to the Yamacraw (Oglethorpe yearbook) and Stormy Petrel (Oglethorpe 
newspaper) will also count (4 submissions will count as 1 point). 

Any student who enters in the spring as a freshman with 31 hours or less must complete 6 
"Petrel Points" - a 3-2-1 plan. 

Students will find the requirements of the 6-4-2 or 3-2-1 plan not difficult to meet. Up- * 
dates on progress toward meeting this requirement will be available through each student's 
individual OASIS account. Students who meet this requirement by the end of their first 
year, or first semester in the case of freshmen entering in the spring, receive the privilege of 
registration for the fall of their sophomore year on the assigned day of their entering class. 
With the exception of transfer students who enter with more than 31 semester hours, no 
student yvdll be permitted to graduate until this requirement is met. 

Honors Program 

All students at Oglethorpe University are encouraged to attain academic and personal 
excellence through active engagement with and initiative in their education. The university 
offers an honors program for those students who demonstrate the potential and desire to 
further challenge themselves intellectually, both within and beyond the classroom setting. 
Students in the Honors Program will develop their own independent project, while learning 
how their interests relate to relevant disciplinary discourse, other academic disciplines and 
the world beyond academia. The Honors Program allows students to forge closer relations 
with peers and faculty from various disciplines who have different interests, but share a 
common enthusiasm for learning, while developing their own interests and initiative. 

Students are invited to learn about the features and requirements of the Honors Program 
through the first-year, first-semester seminars as well as through other informational pro- 
grams. Interested students should then apply for admission to the program as early as the 
end of their first year and no later than the end of their second semester sophomore year. A 
grade point average of 3.3 is required to participate in the second phase (HON 201) semi- 
nars. For 300- and 400-level honors courses, students must maintain a grade point average 
of 3.3, with a 3.5 grade point average required in the academic field in which the honors 
research is to be conducted. 

Students enrolled in the Honors Program receive priority registration as well as the possi- 
bility of applying for funds to facilitate thesis research the summer prior to their senior year. 
Academic honors earned through the Honors Program are recognized at commencement 
exercises, on the student's diploma and on the student's transcript of grades. 



115 



Honors Program Components and Timeline 



The eight-semester program is organized in three phases, the first consisting of one-semes- 
ter hour seminars (HON 101), graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, for first year 
students introducing them to the Honors Program and the practice of collaborative learn- 
ing. 

The second phase focuses on scholarship in breadth and communication with people whose 
interests may be outside one's own area of interest and expertise. Students formally enrolled 
in the Honors Program participate in two one-semester hour seminars (HON 201), each 
overseen by two faculty members from substantively and conceptually different academic 
disciplines. These seminars are built around the interests of the students, who are equal 
partners in directing the content of the seminars and the central questions which inform 
them. Students carry out research relevant to the topic, writing and presenting thoughts, 
analysis and findings related to the seminar. Students practice and refine many of the skills 
and techniques necessary for the third phase of the Honors Program. Note that students 
who elect to enter the Honors Program later in their scholastic careers must still take these 
two seminars at some point. 

The third phase focuses on in-depth scholarship and effective communication of the results 
of that scholarship to people in the field of study, as well as those outside it, through honors 
students pursuing an original independent research project under the close supervision of a 
faculty mentor. This phase begins with the drafting of a research prospectus in the student's 
third year and culminates in the production of an honors thesis (or project) in their final 
year. 

During the fall semester of the junior year, the student secures a thesis supervisor and 
enrolls in Honors I. Honors I carries one-semester hour graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfac- 
tory basis, with the grade to be determined by the Honors Program director in consultation 
with the faculty supervisor. Satisfactory completion of Honors I is required to continue the 
program. In the spring of the junior year the student enrolls in Honors II, a one-semester 
hour course, graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, in which the honors project is 
further refined and researched, culminating in an honors thesis prospectus approved by one 
primary and two secondary faculty readers. 

Upon successful completion of Honors II, the student enrolls in Honors III during the fall 
semester of the senior year. This is a four-semester hour course enabling intensive research 
of the thesis topic. A first draft of the thesis must be submitted to the student's reading 
committee by the end of this semester. The reading committee provides the student with 
feedback, including recommended revisions. After successful completion of Honors III, the 
student enrolls in Honors IV, a required course which carries no academic credit, during 
the spring semester of the senior year. Students are encouraged to submit their theses to ap- 
propriate competitions or for publication. Students are also required to present their thesis 
research/project at the annual Symposium in the Liberal Arts. The final draft of the thesis 
is presented to the reading committee at least one week prior to the end of classes. At the 
reading committee's discretion the student may be asked to make a formal defense of the 
thesis. The faculty supervisor, in consultation with the reading committee and the program 
director, determines whether honors is to be awarded by the first day of the final examina- 
tion period. 



116 



Schedule for Honors Program 



Year Fall Semester 

Freshman Recruitment/Application. 

Social activities and informational 
activities. Graded S/U. 
HON 101. Introduction to 
Honors 1 hour 



Sopho- 
more 



Junior 



Senior 



Seminar led by two faculty from 
disparate disciplines. Graded A-F. 
HON 201. Honors 
Seminar ihour 

Development of Honors Project 
prospectus and reading list. Initial 
reading. Attend research skills ses- 
sions. Graded S/U. 
HON 301. Honors 1 1 hour 

Project research and preparation 
of initial draft of thesis. Critique by 
reading committee. Graded A-F. 
HON 401. Honors III 1 hour 



Spring Semester 

Seminar led by two faculty from 
disparate disciplines. Graded A-F. 
Prerequisite: permission of honors 
program director. 
HON 201. Honors Seminar... 1 hour 

Seminar led by two faculty ft-om 
disparate disciplines. Graded A-F. 
HON 201. Honors 
Seminar 1 hour 

Refinement of prospectus. Honors 
project research. Prospectus must 
be approved by select faculty to 
continue. Graded S/U. 
HON 302. Honors II 1 hour 

Preparation of final draft of thesis. 

Defense. Presentation of Honors 

work. 

HON 402. Honors IV. 1 hour 



HON 101. Introduction to Honors 1 hour 

This seminar introduces first-year prospective honors students to the Honors Program by 
combining the features of the HON 201 seminars with a general introduction and overview 
to the aims and features of the program. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 

HON 201. Honors Seminar 1 hour 

This seminar, led by faculty members from two substantively and conceptually different 
disciplines, considers a question, problem, proposition, text, period of time, project, etc. The 
seminar focuses on student research, writing and presentations and emphasizes an interdis- 
ciplinary approach. Seminars have included: Self Reference - Artificial Intelligence, Litera- 
ture and Society, Science and Postmodernism, Moderns Confront the Classics: Hobbes and 
Thucydides, Evolutionary Psychology, Creativity, Politics and Theatre, An Intimate History 
of Humanity and Gender and Discourse. Two semesters of Honors Seminar are required. 
Graded with a letter grade "A-F." Prerequisite: Application and admission into the Honors 
Program. 

HON 301. Honors I 1 horn- 
In this course, vidth the aid of a faculty supervisor, the student selects and begins to research 
a thesis topic. A preliminary prospectus is developed along with a reading list. The student 
attends a series of research skills sessions. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the Honors Program director and the faculty supervisor, a 3.3 
overall grade point average and a 3.5 grade point average in the field in which the honors 
research is to be conducted. 

HON 302. Honors H 1 hour 

In this course the student continues to research in order to refine the prospectus of the 
honors project. The prospectus and related materials are submitted to a select group of 
faculty who must approve the student's preparedness to continue the program. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in HON 301. 



117 



HON 401. Honors HI 4 hours 

Under continued direction of the faculty supervisor, intensive research of the thesis topic is 
undertaken in this course. Preparation of a first draft is submitted to the student's reading 
committee. Graded with a letter grade "A-F." Prerequisite: Satisfactory grade in HON 302. 

HON 402. Honors IV O hours 

Revisions are made and a final draft of the thesis is submitted to the student's reading com- 
mittee. A formal defense of the thesis may be scheduled. An appropriate oral presentation 
of the honors work also will be required in an academic setting. Prerequisite: Minimum 
grade of "C" in HON 401. Grade of "I" for HON 401 is not acceptable. 

Sophomore Opportunities 



Students in their second, third and fourth semesters of college are encouraged to participate 
in Sophomore Choices. This seminar is designed to introduce students to a model for career 
decision making that is useful throughout life. Informational interviewdng and visits to 
Atlanta workplaces allow students to learn about particular occupations or career fields of 
interest and to begin to make career connections in the community. These experiences may 
help students as they select courses, majors and minors and internships. 

CHO 101. Sophomore Choices 1 hour 

During this eight-week career exploration seminar, students complete interest and per- 
sonality assessments, learn how to find information about different careers and develop 
interviewing, networking and resume writing skills. Students then conduct informational 
interviews wdth professionals in their fields of interest. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfac- 
tory basis. 

SDS 201. Success Development Seminar 1 hoiu* 

Designed for students who are academically at risk, this course focuses on the relationship 
between leadership as a concept and a practice. Students are required to develop and evalu- 
ate their goals, both personal and academic, and work to improve their academic perfor- 
mance at Oglethorpe. No more than two semester hours earned in this course are permitted 
to count toward gradation. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 

Senior Transitions 

In the liberal arts environment, students gain a broad education wdth essential communica- 
tion and critical thinking skills. Students do not learn generally how to communicate those 
skills to potential employers or graduate schools. Oglethorpe, however, makes a commit- 
ment to helping students reap the life-long benefits of their education. Sophomore Choices 
is a career decision-making class designed to help students begin planning their careers and 
includes resume writing and informational interviewing. Senior Transitions picks up where 
Sophomore Choices leaves off and teaches the skills necessary to implement the career deci- 
sion. 

SEN 401. Senior Transitions 1 hour 

This course is designed to prepare students for a successful transition to life after college. 
A successful career requires effective, informed planning. Topics will include industry and 
employer research, job searching, interviewdng, networking, salary negotiation and more. A 
special focus v^dll be designed for students considering graduate school. Students vdll leave 
the course with a spotless resume, cover letter samples, fine-tuned interview skills and a 
plan for landing a job or graduate school acceptance. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfac- 
tory basis. 



118 



Center for Civic Engagement and Courses _^ 

Oglethorpe's Center for Civic Engagement is an initiative to integrate classroom learning 
with experiences throughout Atlanta, supporting the community while strengthening the 
university's offerings. The center works with faculty and students to coordinate service 
learning, internships, partnerships and meetings with some of the city's most influential 
leaders. Two different kinds of courses are designed for this purpose and included in each 
semester's course schedule. 

Service learning courses integrate the concepts of the course vdth service in the commu- 
nity. Service learning activities may consist of direct services to clients of organizations that 
provide public service, research, policy analysis, education or outreach. These courses have 
a reflective component in which students use journals and projects to ensure that they syn- 
thesize their community experiences v^dth their academic material. This typically involves 
approximately 25 hours of service over the semester. 

Atlanta in the Classroom courses have a component that involves the city of Atlanta in 
some way. Visiting speakers may talk about leadership, politics, the environment or busi- 
ness, or, the class may take a trip off-campus to visit a cultural center, a nature preserve, a 
historic site, corporate headquarters, a museum or a session of the state legislature. 

The Writing Center 



The Oglethorpe University Writing Center provides Oglethorpe students with confidential 
and personal assistance with any written assignment for their courses or their professional 
development at no additional cost. Peer tutors are trained to be responsive to a student's 
particular needs, to help him or her identify strengths and weaknesses in his or her writing 
and to help build his or her confidence in academic and creative writing as they adjust to 
Oglethorpe's academic culture. The goal of the center is to help students become better, 
more confident and more effective writers and students. The Writing Center can also assist 
students wdth study skills and tutoring in other subject areas. 

The Writing Center, operated on a drop-in basis, is located on the second floor of the Welt- 
ner Library in the Gabbard Room. It is open Monday through Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 
8:00 p.m. Writing consultations can be from five to 30 minutes long and students can come 
in wdth a specific request or focus, or they can simply ask for feedback. 

DisobiHty Programs and Services 

As policy, Oglethorpe attempts to ensure that all university goods, services, facilities, privi- 
leges, advantages and accommodations are meaningfully accessible to qualified persons 
wdth disabilities in accordance with the Americans wdth Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, 
Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and other pertinent federal, state 
and local disability anti-discrimination laws. 

Oglethorpe will attempt to provide persons wdth disabilities an equal opportunity to partici- 
pate in and benefit from programs and services as afforded to other individuals. This is ac- 
complished in the most integrated setting appropriate based on the needs of the individual 
wdth a disability. 

Where readily achievable, architectural and communication barriers wdll be removed. New 
structures will comply fully wdth all accessibility requirements. Alterations wdll comply wdth 
the maximum extent feasible. Oglethorpe wdll make available auxiliary aids and services, as 
appropriate and as required at no cost to the individual, provided that such auxiliary aids 
and services do not require significant difficulty or expense. 



119 



Oglethorpe does not discriminate against any person with a disability or any person who 
is related to or associated with a person with a disability. Oglethorpe will comply with any 
federal, state or local laws that provide individuals with disabilities greater protection and 
take other actions necessary to ensure equal opportunity for persons with disabilities. 
This policy applies to the goods, services, privileges, advantages and accommodations of- 
fered by Oglethorpe either directly or through contractual, licensing or other arrangements. 
This policy is neither exhaustive nor exclusive. 

Reasonable accommodations will be made on an individualized basis. It is the responsibility 
of persons with disabilities, however, to seek available assistance, register for services and 
establish their needs. 

Learning Resources Center 



The Learning Resources Center (LRC) provides individualized services at no additional 
cost for students vrith documented disabilities. The LRC program ensures that these stu- 
dents have an opportunity to participate as fully as possible in the Oglethorpe experience. 
Students must meet established university admission requirements and program technical 
standards. Qualified students must submit comprehensive professional documentation that 
meets the established criteria for accepting evaluations. Students approved for LRC services 
are provided appropriate accommodations and academic adjustments. Students wdthout 
documented disabilities who are experiencing learning difficulties may contact the LRC 
for assistance in skill acquisition, skill building, workshops and seminars as offered and as 
appropriate. 

The LRC is located in the Weltner Library 24-Hour Room. The director of the LRC acts as 
liaison and referral agent between the student with a disability and faculty or staff mem- 
bers and other appropriate campus programs and services. For additional information visit 
www.oglethorpe.edu (keyword: LRC). 

Course Substitutions 

Requests for course substitutions for students vrith documented disabilities are handled 
on a case-by-case basis. The director of the LRC will present the student's written request 
and rationale to the Academic Program Committee. The petition should state the specific 
accommodation requested and a rationale for it. The petition must be presented to the 
committee no later than the last regular meeting of the semester prior to when the course 
would be taken. 

Experiential Education 

Oglethorpe University provides valuable learning experiences outside of the traditional 
classroom setting, including volunteer opportunities, service learning and career-related 
programs. 

Internships provide practical experience to complement the academic program, as well as 
give students the opportunity to solidify career decisions, gain work experience and provide 
service to the community in their fields of interest. More than half of college students na- 
tionwide complete internships, making the experience an essential credential for competi- 
tion in the current job market. 

Internships are available in a large variety of local businesses and organizations represent- 
ing most academic majors and potential career fields. Oglethorpe students have recently 
completed internships at The Carter Center, CNN, Georgia-Pacific, yl^Zanta Magazine, Zoo 
Atlanta, the Atlanta History Center and the Georgia State Legislature, to name a few. In ad- 
dition to these Atlanta-based internships, Oglethorpe maintains resources and affiliations 
for nationwide opportunities, such as The Washington (D.C.) Center. 

120 



Internships are available in most majors for students who demonstrate a clear understand- 
ing of goals they wish to accomplish in the experience and possess the necessary academic 
and personal background to accomplish these goals. Sophomores, juniors and seniors with 
a minimum grade point average of 2.0 qualify to apply for internships. Transfer students 
must complete one semester at Oglethorpe prior to participation. Every internship requires 
a statement of objectives and academic requirements, in addition to related academic as- 
signments, developed in consultation with the student's internship faculty supervisor. Upon 
successful completion of the internship, the student is awarded academic credit (graded on 
a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis) in recognition of the learning value of the experience. 

Students may apply for a maximum of 16 semester hours of internship credit toward their 
degree, with approval from their academic adviser and the Experiential Education Com- 
mittee. Students seeking more than four semester hours must submit an appeal form to the 
career services office indicating why the internship exceeds the normal number of hours 
and outlining additional projects in which the student will participate. Students desiring 
academic credit must register for the internship before the end of the drop/add period 
of the semester in question. Students who wish to engage in internships on a voluntary 
basis do not need to apply for academic credit; however, they should follow the same basic 
internship guidelines. 

Students who are interested in an internship should first consult with their faculty adviser 
and then visit the career services office in the Emerson Student Center. 

Dua! Degree Programs 

Oglethoipe University has established agreements with several universities whereby an 
undergraduate student will attend Oglethorpe for approximately three academic years, the 
partner School for approximately two academic years and after successfully completing the 
academic requirements of the two cooperating institutions, the student will be awarded a 
bachelor's degree from Oglethorpe and a bachelor's degree from the partner school. Such 
dual degrees are offered in engineering, environmental studies and an international partner 
program. Details for each of these may be found under the respective headings in the Pro- 
grams of Study section of this Bulletin. 

In addition to meeting program-specific requirements, a student in a dual degree program 
who is attending a partner school is required to verify his or her enrollment status each se- 
mester and submit an official transcript at the end of each semester to Oglethorpe to ensure 
good academic standing and satisfactory progression toward graduation. All work will be 
placed on the student's transcript and the appropriate courses and grades will be accepted 
toward meeting Oglethorpe's graduation requirements. 

Oglejiiorpe University Students Abroad (OUSA) 

Oglethorpe University fosters and supports the concept that international study, travel and 
global explorations remain a vital part of a rigorous academic education. Through a grow- 
ing global network of partnerships, agreements and university-sponsored for-credit, short- 
term trips, Oglethorpe offers an exciting array of opportunities for international education. 
Students who desire to explore a culture, examine archaeological ruins, witness political 
decision making firsthand, research museums throughout the world, document ecologi- 
cal problems, study in an international setting or sharpen language skills should seriously 
investigate participating in any of the four divisions of OUSA. 

Oglethorpe academic advisers and the OUSA director serve as primary consultants for 
students who seek any study abroad experience. Students who wish to apply for financial 
assistance should contact the director of financial aid early in the pursuit of a study abroad 
program to determine what available funds exist. Specific deadlines and itineraries for 



121 



short-term trips appear throughout the year in student email, the student newspaper and 
fliers throughout the campus. 

Oglethorpe University Students Abroad consists of four divisions: 

International Exchange Partnerships 

Oglethorpe offers unique opportunities for students to study for one semester or one year 
at the partnership colleges and universities listed below. Most of the student exchanges at 
these institutions v^dll cost the student what he or she pays for tuition at Oglethorpe. 

Universidad del Belgrano 

Universidad del Salvador 

Dongbei University of Finance and Economics 

Universidad San Francisco de Quito 

Oxford University (WISC Program) 

Lycee J.A. Margueritte (TRB) 

Universite Catholique de Lille (TRB) 

Universitat Dortmund 

Otaru University of Commerce YOUC Program 

Seigakuin University 

Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores 

de Occidente 

Universidad Anahuac del Sur, S.C. 

International University of Monaco 

Haagse Hogeschool 

Moscow State Linguistics: University of Russia 

Universidad Franscico De Vitoria 

Independent Study Abroad 

Numerous opportunities exist for any qualified students to study at other, non-partner- 
ship universities of the student's choice throughout the world, in science, economics, social 
sciences, languages, art, communications, the liberal arts and business. The OUSA direc- 
tor wdll help advise and direct each student in selecting the appropriate university abroad. 
Financial resources and stipends are available for academic study in some countries. 

Students Abroad 

This division of OUSA creates, organizes and directs short-term, for-credit academic study 
trips abroad during the months of December, March, May and the summer. Oglethorpe 
professors develop these trips as intensive explorations of culture, cuisine, music, history, 
politics, art, archaeology and business. Standard destinations include Italy, France, Spain, 
Switzerland, Austria, England, Greece, Turkey, Central and Latin America, China and Rus- 
sia. Students may choose to receive credit for their participation, which includes note-tak- 
ing, photographing, field documentation, journaling and a research project to be completed 
after returning from the trips as independent work vrith the professor. 

Associate Student Programs for Special Study Abroad 

This division of OUSA manages special links to prominent universities and institutions 
abroad that Oglethorpe has developed a special relationship. At present, Oglethorpe has 
created the following special programs: 

Oxford University, Oxford, England: Through the Washington International Studies Coun- 
cil, students who wish to study at Oxford University for a semester or a year may do so as 
registered visiting students with university privileges and live wdth British students in the 



Argentina 


Buenos Aires 




Buenos Aires 


China 


Dalian 


Ecuador 


Quito 


England 


Oxford 


France 


Verdun 




Lille 


Germany 


Dortmund 


Japan 


Hokkaido 




Tokyo 


Mexico 


Guadalajara 




Alvaro Obregon 


Monaco 




Netherlands 


The Hague 


Russia 


Moscow 


Spain 


Madrid 



122 



center of Oxford. Applications and eligibility requirements can be obtained from the OUSA 
director. 

Umbra Institute, Perugia, Italy: Students who wish to study in Italy for a semester or a year 
may do so at this English-speaking, liberal arts institute, where they can take courses in 
Italian language, history and politics. Applications and materials may be obtained from the 
OUSA director. 

Note: Every student attending an Oglethorpe-approved semester or year abroad will re- 
ceive credit for one semester of the junior year core - either Historical Perspectives 
on the Social Order I or II - the student may choose. 

Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program 

Oglethorpe's Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program challenges students to develop 
their leadership ability throughout their college years and awards the Certificate of Urban 
Leadership at graduation. Through a balance of academic courses, workshops and various 
on- and off-campus experiences, it prepares graduates to meet the challenges of responsible 
citizenship in local, national and international communities. Students gain a broad under- 
standing of leadership concepts, theories and applications. They are encouraged to consider 
their education in light of the demands of leadership in their own lives as well as in their 
communities. 

The program takes full advantage of the extraordinary resources of the Atlanta metropoli- 
tan area. A major economic force in the Southeast, Atlanta is rich with exceptional learning 
opportunities in the realms of politics, business, the arts, information technology, enter- 
tainment and community service. Few selective universities are able to combine a rigorous 
liberal aits education with the resources and opportunities of a world-class city. 

A.dmission to the Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program is competitive. Students 
may apply in the freshman, sophomore or junior year. The director and a selection commit- 
tee evaluate candidates on the basis of commitment to leadership-related study, the desire 
For leadership understanding and application, extracurricular participation, academic 
record and other experience. 

The following curriculum encompasses the four required courses designed specifically for 
;he Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program 

POL 490. Advanced Special Topics in Politics: 

Moral and Political Leadership 4 hours 

rhe purpose of this course is to provide students with a variety of models, skill sets and 
;ools to become effective leaders on the both a personal and global level. As such, the course 
employs a host of leaders as well as leadership theories as a means of providing practical, 
'eal world, examples of the benefits, responsibilities and challenges of moral and political 
eadership. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

[JLP 303. The New American City 4 hours 

rhe purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and poli- 
cymaking in the new American city and its environs. Consideration will be given to the 
political and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new 
ievelopment, including extremes of wealth and poverty, the mix of racial and ethnic groups 
md the opportunities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and technol- 
)gy. Offered annually. 



123 



ULP 304. Community Issues Forum: Principles into Practice 4 hours 

This course is taught as a weekly seminar focusing on a particular community issue and ac- 
companied by an issue-related, oflF-campus internship. Together with faculty, students ana- 
lyze issues confronting stakeholders, collaborate on solutions and present findings derived 
from their internship assignments. Students have interned wdth the state legislature, local 
and state chambers of commerce, community food banks, arts organizations, corporations, 
non-profit organizations and a number of other community groups. Topics covered in previ- 
ous years include: community development, education, transportation, health care and the 
environment. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Urban Leadership Elective 4 hours 

With the approval of the program director and the academic adviser, the student selects 
an appropriate course to satisfy the fourth course requirement of the program. Ideally, the 
elective course will be part of the student's major or minor or in an area of vocational inter- 
est. The principal objective of the elective requirement is to look for intellectual or applied 
leadership in the student's chosen field or profession. 

In addition to the required academic course work, students demonstrate leadership on and 
off-campus by their participation in university, civic and community endeavors in Atlanta. 
Students organize and participate in conferences, workshops and symposia on and off-cam- 
pus. At the end of each semester, students submit a brief memo to the director detailing 
their leadership challenges and opportunities that semester. In the final semester, students 
prepare a paper reflecting on their leadership experiences during college. The final portfolio 
contains written work drawn from the student's leadership courses and experiences. 

Urban Ecology Program 

Cities in the United States and abroad are growing in population size and spatial extent. 
This growth often degrades natural resources, degrades public health and creates inequi- 
ties in standards of living, quality of education and allocation of taxes. Grovrth management 
can eliminate or reduce these impacts, but only if it is based on the interacting facets of 
natural and social systems that drive urban expansion. To produce scientists and managers 
that will effectively manage urban growth, schools must offer educational programs that 
integrate natural and social sciences. Oglethorpe University's Urban Ecology Program offers 
this interdisciplinary experience in the city of Atlanta, where outdoor experiments, guest 
speakers and internship opportunities abound. Students completing the program receive a 
Certificate in Urban Ecology at graduation. 

To earn a certificate upon graduation, a student must successfully complete the four re- 
quirements below. All course work other than Urban Ecology and The New American City 
must be approved by the program director. Participating students must earn a grade of "C-" 
or higher in Urban Ecology, The New American City and the elective course. 

1. UEP/BIO 320. Urban Ecology 

2. ULP 303. The New American City (above) 

3. A 4-semester hour, off-campus internship supervised by the program director 
or an independent study approved by the program director. The independent 
study would require original research, would be similar to a written honors thesis 
(although would not require enrollment in the Honors Program) and would be 
supervised by a faculty member. 

4. One elective such as, but not limited to, the follovring: 

BIO 490. Advanced Special Topics in Biology: Conservation Biology 
ECO 325. Environmental Economics 



124 



ENG 393. Special Topics in Literature and Culture: Nature, God and Community in 

19th Century Literature 

HIS 331. The Age of Affluence: The United States Since 1945 

HEP 320. Urban Ecology 5 hours 

Urban are£is are growing worldwide and negatively affecting natural and social resources. 
Effective management of these impacts requires the integration of natural and social sci- 
ence into a new discipline called urban ecology. This course describes the state of urban 
ecological knowledge and best management practices in urban planning using lecture, 
discussion, lab, regional field trips and guest speakers. This course is also cross listed as BIO 
320. Prerequisite: COR 102 or permission of the instructor. 



125 



126 



•Mi* 



1^ 




127 



History of the Core Curriculum 



Oglethorpe initiated its "Core Curriculum," in the academic year 1944-45, making it one of 
the first core programs in the United States. In his explanatory brochure about the pro- 
gram, Oglethorpe President Philip Weltner presented a new liberal arts curriculum with 
the twin aims of equipping students to "make a life and make a living." Each student would 
devote half of his or her college course work to the common intellectual experience of the 
Core, while the student would devote the other half to his or her major area of study. In 
outlining his new plan and his philosophy of education, Dr. Weltner anticipated some of the 
ideas featured in General Education in a Free Society, Harvard University's 1945 statement 
stressing an emphasis on liberal arts and a core curriculum. 

The idea of a core curriculum was at that time so revolutionary in higher education that 
news of the Oglethorpe plan appeared in The New York Times in the spring of 1945. Weltner 
told The Times: "We are trying to develop keen... appreciation and understanding. Instead 
of dividing our courses into separate schools, we are giving the students a good liberal and 
general education which can become the basis of hundreds of vocations." 

Weltner's 1940s Core Curriculum for Oglethorpe students reflected the concerns of the war 
era; the core consisted of a series of courses under the headings "Citizenship" and "Hu- 
man Understanding." As the concerns of the war era receded and the post-war information 
explosion ensued, the Oglethorpe Core underwent extensive revision in the 1960s, with its 
required courses more closely resembling traditional courses in the disciplines. Gradually 
this Core came to focus on those courses representing competencies that a well-educated 
generalist ought to have upon graduating from college. 

With the support of a major grant from the National EndowTnent for the Humanities, the 
Oglethorpe Core Curriculum underwent substantial revision in the early 1990s to reflect a 
new idea about core curriculum and its purpose. Rather than an attempt to define what ev- 
ery student should know or a list of basic competencies every student should have, the new 
Oglethorpe Core aimed at providing a common learning experience for all students. Since 
the early 1990s the Core Curriculum has undergone further scrutiny and refinement. 

Beginning in 1998, Oglethorpe implemented a sequence of new interdisciplinary year-long 
courses. These sequences, which extend over all four years of a student's collegiate career, 
feature the reading of a number of primary texts common to all sections of the courses 
and frequent writing assignments. Each course in the sequence builds upon the body of 
knowledge studied in the previous course. Courses in the fine arts and in mathematics 
complement these sequences. The program explicitly invites students to integrate their core 
learning and to consider knowledge gained from study in the Core as they approach study 
in their majors. In developing this curriculum, the faculty has renewed its commitment to 
the spirit of Weltner's original Core: "We must never for an instant forget that education, to 
be true to itself, must be a progressive experience for the learner, in which interest gives rise 
to inquiry, inquiry is pursued to mastery and mastery here occasions new interests there." 

As every student's second major, the Core continues to urge students to pursue links among 
the various areas of study and to appreciate the value of intellectual inquiry. A 1996 Na- 
tional Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant helped to create an endowTnent for 
the Core Curriculum, guaranteeing faculty the resources to keep the Core vital and central 
to learning at Oglethorpe. As faculty work together through frequent conversation about 
the content and goals of their Core courses to provide an integrated approach to learning, 
one is reminded of the pledge Weltner made over half a century ago in outlining the Core: 
"Oglethorpe University insists that the object is not to pass a subject; the object is to take 
and keep it." 



128 



Liberal Education and the Core Curriculum 

Oglethorpe University is committed to providing a comprehensive Uberal arts education for 
all of its students. The university aims to produce graduates who are broadly educated in 
the fundamental fields of knowledge and who know how to integrate knowledge in mean- 
ingful ways. The Core Curriculum is the clearest expression of this commitment. As an 
interdisciplinary and common learning experience, the Core Curriculum provides for stu- 
dents throughout their academic careers a model for integrating information and gaining 
knowledge. The sequencing of the core courses means that all Oglethorpe students take the 
same core courses at the same point in their college careers, thereby providing an opportu- 
nity for students to discuss important ideas and texts both inside and outside the classroom. 
In this way, the Core Curriculum aims to create a community of learners at Oglethorpe 
University. 

Staffed by faculty from a wide variety of disciplines, the program seeks to teach students the 
following aptitudes and skills: 

1. The ability to reason, read and speak effectively, instilled through frequent and 
rigorous writing assignments and the reading and discussion of primary texts. 

2. An understanding as well as a critical appreciation of how knowledge is generated 
and challenged. 

3. The ability to reflect upon and discuss matters fundamental to understanding who 
we are and what we ought to be. This includes how we understand ourselves as 
individuals (Core I) and as members of society (Core II), how the study of our past 
informs our sense of who we are as human beings (Core III) and the ways in which 
the practice of science informs our understanding of ourselves and the world (Core 
IV). 

In addition to the seven integrated and sequenced core courses, Oglethorpe students take 
two additional courses that have been designed to help them develop an appreciation and 
understanding of fine arts and mathematics. Students earning a Bachelor of Arts degree 
also study a foreign language. 

The Core Curriculum provides only a beginning for the investigation of significant ques- 
tions and issues. The program is designed to foster in students a love of learning and a 
desire to learn, think and act as reflective, responsible beings throughout their lives. 

Freshman Year - Core I 

COR 101. Narratives of the Self I 

COR 102. Narratives of the Self II 

Sophomore Year - Core II (sophomore standing required) 
COR 201. Human Nature and the Social Order I 

COR 202. Human Nature and the Social Order II 

Junior Year - Core III (junior standing required) 

COR 301. Historical Perspectives on the Social Order I 

COR 302. Historical Perspectives on the Social Order II 

Senior Year - Core IV (senior standing required) - One of the following: 
COR 401. Science and Human Nature: Biological Sciences 

COR 402. Science and Human Nature: Physical Sciences 

Fine Arts Requirement - One of the following: 
COR 103. Music and Culture 

COR 104. Art and Culture 

Mathematics Requirement 

COR 203. Great Ideas of Modern Mathematics 

129 



Foreign Language Requirement 

All students undertaking and earning a Bachelor of Arts degree will be required to take at 
least one semester of a foreign language at the second-semester elementary-level or higher. 
(Students undertaking the dual degree in engineering and the dual degree in environmen- 
tal studies are exempt from this requirement.) Students who graduated from a secondary 
school where the language instruction was not English have satisfied the foreign language 
requirement. 

COR 101, COR 102. Narratives of the Self I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

The first-year course sequence investigates narratives of the self Among the topics that 
students will consider are a variety of fictional and philosophical constructions of the self, 
the relationships of memory to personal identity and the disjunction or harmony between 
public and private selves. The authors considered in the courses may include Homer, 
Socrates, St. Augustine, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Descartes, Cervantes, Lao Tsu, Nietzsche 
and Toni Morrison. 

COR 103. Music and Culture 4 hours 

The appreciation of music begins with an understanding of the creative process as a means 
of self-expression and the artist's relationship to the world. Using primary sources, guest 
lecturers and artists, this course examines the styles, trends and developments of West- 
ern and international music from early civilizations through the 20th century. Study and 
discussion begin to develop an understanding of how music and the cultural arts reflect and 
affect societal trends and values. 

COR 104. Art and Culture 4 hours 

Through the study of art this course will help students understand the basic chronology of 
Western culture, lay the groundwork for broad cultural literacy and look at how art reflects 
the human condition. The course explores content, formal elements and historical context 
of the art of Western and non-Western cultures from ancient to modern times. Four basic 
themes will prevail: Art and Religion, Art and Power, Art and Nature and Art and the Per- 
sonal. 

COR 201, COR 202. Human Nature and the Social Order I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

The sophomore course sequence focuses on the relationship between individuals and com- 
munities, examining the extent to which the "good life" can be pursued within the confines 
of any social order. These courses investigate issues such as the nature of human exceUence 
and virtue, the character of justice, the origins and sources of social order and the status 
and legitimacy of political power. How can we obtain an accurate description of humans 
as social beings? What is the good society and how may it be realized? Students in this 
course are invited to become more thoughtful, self-conscious and self-critical members and 
citizens of the society and polity in which they live. Authors such as Aristotle, Locke, Smith, 
Tocqueville, Marx and Weber are read. 

COR 203. Great Ideas of Modern Mathematics 4 hours 

This course explores several major modern mathematical developments and helps stu- 
dents to understand and appreciate the unique approach to knowledge which characterizes 
mathematics. The mode of inquiry employed is reason. This is not to be confused with the 
approach used, for example, in the natural or social sciences. It is, rather, reason divorced 
from anything empirical. As T. H. Huxley remarked, "Mathematics is that study which 
knows nothing of observation, nothing of experiment, nothing of induction, nothing of cau- 
sation." The course is organized around three or four major mathematical ideas that have 
emerged since the time of Newton. These ideas will be drawn from such fields as calculus, 
set theory, number theory, probability theory, modern algebra, logic, topology and non-Eu- 
clidean geometry. 



130 



COR 301, COR 302. Historical Perspectives on the Social Order I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

rhe junior year sequence constitutes an historical examination of human experience in 
response to some of the themes and issues raised in the first two years of the Core. Drawing 
3n a variety of perspectives from both the humanities and the social sciences, the course 
strives to reconstruct the histories of significant periods in human history. The first semes- 
ter focuses on the rise and fall of civilizations from antiquity through the Renaissance. The 
second semester concentrates on the problems of modernity, such as the rise of the modern 
state, nationalism, revolution and globalization. Both courses examine the ways in which 
significant moments have become essential parts of our historical consciousness, enshrined 
n myth and religion, tradition, culture and institutions. Through careful analysis of current 
scholarship and original sources, students are invited to consider the complex relationship 
setween history, cultural traditions and the social and political institutions derived from 
;hem. 

COR 401. Science and Human Nature: Biological Sciences 4 hours 

rhe senior year course deals with the way scientific methodologies inform current think- 
ng on the nature of the human organism. Starting from basic genetic and psychological 
inderstandings, it emphasizes how evolutionary mechanisms may be seen as contributing 
;o the origins of uniquely human behaviors. Elements of DNA structure as it applies to 
nformation storage and transmission, the regulation of gene expression and the mechanics 
jf protein synthesis, mutation and its centrality in producing variation, sexual reproduction 
ind how the laws of probability apply to biological systems, sex determination, "altruistic" 
jehavior and kin selection are among the topics explored. 

[!OR 402. Science and Human Nature: Physical Sciences 4 hours 

Modern .western society is largely science-dominated and the consideration of science and 
ts role in society is essential for any educated person. This core course investigates the 
practice of science by focusing specifically on scientific revolutions. It is during such periods 
)f upheaval that we can most clearly see how science is actually practiced. What causes a 
lew idea to challenge the scientific status quo? What determines whether the new idea 
vill be accepted or not? When seeking new explanations for natural events, what guides 
he scientist's search? The goal of this course is to equip the student with the necessary 
;ools and background to seek answers to these questions and others, for such questions are 
ncreasingly a part of each of our lives if we live those lives reflectively. 

I!ore Equivalencies for Transfer Students 

I!ore credits and transfer equivalencies for transfer students are reviewed by the Core Cur- 
iculum Committee and the core director and determined by two things: a student's specific 
•ourse work and the total semester hours transferred in by the student. The acceptance 
)f specific transfer credits based on total semester hours transferred is designed to assure 
hat students transferring credit are not placed at a disadvantage with respect to the aims, 
;ontent or skill development emphasized in the Core Curriculum. This guideline will be 
ised by the registrar to evaluate and award equivalency for core classes where appropriate, 
f questions of equivalencies arise, the registrar will seek advice from the core director and 
acuity members of the appropriate disciplines. No core equivalency is allowed for Ad- 
'^anced Placement or College Level Examination Program course work. When core equiva- 
ency is denied, an appropriately transferred course is awarded Oglethorpe credit in accord 
vith standard practices in the general policy on awarding transfer credit. 



131 



Transfer Course Credits from Previous Colleges Core 

Hours Equivalents 



1-14 


Music Appreciation or Music History 
Art Appreciation or Art History 


COR 103 
COR 104 


15 and over 


Writing Course 

Literature or philosophy* course 


COR 101 
COR 102 


Over 30 


Course in history, politics, sociology, anthropology, 
philosophy* or economics 


COR 201 


Over 45 


Two courses in history, politics, sociology, anthropol- 
ogy, philosophy* or economics 


COR 201 and 
COR 202 



* Note: If a philosophy course is used to exempt COR 102, the same course cannot be ap- 
pHed to COR 201 or 202. 

Great Ideas of Mathematics, Historical Perspectives on the Social Order I and II, Science 
and Human Nature: Biological Sciences or Physical Sciences cannot be fulfilled by transfer 
credit. 

Core Credits Through Study Abroad or as a Transient Student 

Every student attending an Oglethorpe approved semester or year abroad will receive credit 
for one semester of the junior year core - either Historical Perspectives on the Social Order 
I or II - the student may choose. 

Once a student enrolls at Oglethorpe, core credit may not be earned through study as a 
transient student at other institutions; for example, no summer school credit from another 
university. 



132 




133 



Deg rees 

Oglethorpe University offers five degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of 
Arts in Liberal Studies, Bachelor of Business Administration and Master of Arts in Teach- 
ing Early Childhood Education (Grades P-5). The Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science and 
Master of Arts in Teaching Early Childhood Education (Grades P-5) degrees are offered in 
the traditional program and described in detail in this publication. The Bachelor of Arts in 
Liberal Studies and Bachelor of Business Administration degrees are offered in Oglethorpe's 
evening degree program. For a brief discussion of the two latter degrees, please see Evening 
Degree Program at the end of this section or refer to the Oglethorpe University Evening 
Degree Program Bulletin. Under certain conditions it is also possible for a student to receive 
a dual degree in engineering, a dual degree in environmental studies or a degree under the 
Professional Option. See the Index for the sections where these degrees are discussed. 

Undergraduate Major Programs and Requirements 

Completion of a major program is required for all baccalaureate degrees. The student's 
academic adviser assists with the student's selection of a major. The student declares the 
major selected on the course registration form completed each semester. Students must 
have declared a major by the end of the second semester of the sophomore year. 

A major is an orderly sequence of courses in: l) a particular discipline, 2) a combination 
of two disciplines or 3) a defined interdisciplinary field. A major wall include a range of 32 
to 72 semester hours of required course work, exclusive of all hours used to satisfy core re- 
quirements. Exceptions may be granted in special circumstances by a vote of the appropri- 
ate faculty committee. At least half of the semester hours required for the major must be in 
course work taken at Oglethorpe University. Each major includes a substantial component 
of advanced courses which have specified prerequisites. A major may require for successful 
completion a cumulative grade point average in the major field which is higher than the 2.0 
cumulative grade point average required for graduation. Alternatively, the requirements 
for the major may state that only courses in which a "C-" or higher grade is received may 
be used in satisfaction of the major's requirements. The student is responsible for ensuring 
the fulfillment of the requirements of the major selected. Specific requirements for each 
of the majors may be found listed below in alphabetical order. Please note that no course 
counted to fulfill a major requirement for one degree may be used toward the requirements 
of another degree. 

For the Bachelor of Arts degree the following majors are offered: 
American Studies 
Art History 

Behavioral Science and Human Resource Management 
Communication and Rhetoric Studies 
Economics 

Engineering - Dual Degree 
English 

Environmental Studies - Dual Degree 
French 
History 

Individually Planned Major 
International Studies 
Philosophy 
Politics 
Psychology 
Sociology 

Sociology with Social Work Concentration 
Spanish 



134 



Studio Art 
Theatre 

For the Bachelor of Science degree the following majors are offered: 
Accounting 
Biology 
Biopsychology 
Business Administration 
Chemistry 
Economics 
Mathematics 
Physics 

Undergraduate Minor Programs and Requirements 



A minor consists of at least 16 semester hours of course work beyond any core require- 
ments in that discipline. A minimum of 12 semester hours of a minor must be in course 
work taken at Oglethorpe. Minor programs are available in the fields listed below. Specific 
requirements for each minor may be found in the respective disciplines, which follow in 
alphabetical order: 



Accounting 

American Studies 

Art History 

Biology 

Business Administration 

Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Economics 

English 

French 

History 

Individually Planned Minor 

Japanese 

Academic Departments 



Mathematics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Politics 

Psychology 

Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Studio Art 

Theatre 

Women's and Gender Studies 

Writing 



Organization of Oglethorpe's disciplines is by division, each vdth its own division chair. The 
nine divisions are as follows: 



Division I 

Division II 
Division III 
Division IV 
Division V 
Division VI 
Division VII 
Division VIII 
Division IX 



Philosophy, Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

and the Fine Arts 

History, Politics and International Studies 

Natural Sciences 

Behavioral Sciences 

Economics and Business Administration 

Education - Undergraduate and Graduate 

English Language and Comparative Literature 

Foreign Languages 

Mathematics and Computer Science 



Accounting 



Accounting is the language of business. Accounting provides quantitative information, 
primarily financial in nature, about economic entities that is intended to be useful in mak- 



135 



ing economic decisions. Accounting students become acquainted with the sources and 
uses of financial information and develop the analytical ability necessary to produce and 
interpret such information. The students learn to observe economic activity; to select from 
that activity the events w^hich are relevant to a particular decision; to measure the economic 
consequences of those events in quantitative terms; to record, classify and summarize the 
resulting data and to communicate the information in various reports and statements to the 
appropriate decision makers. 

Accounting students gain the conceptual foundation and basic skills to begin a career in 
accounting. There are many attractive career fields including public accounting, industry, 
government and non-profit organizations. Accounting provides an excellent educational 
background for anyone going into business. With the skills gained from accounting, the 
student v^dll have an appropriate background for such related careers as financial services, 
computer science, management, industrial engineering, law and others or the ability to 
pursue graduate education. Internships are available to give preparation to students for 
careers after graduation. The major in accounting wall assist the student to prepare for sev- 
eral qualifying examinations in accounting and finance such as Certified Public Accountant 
(CPA), Certified Management Accountant (CMA) and Certified Financial Analyst (CFA). 

Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must complete the foUowdng requirements 
wdth a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 230. Financial Accounting 

ACC 231. Managerial Accounting 

ACC 332. Intermediate Accounting I 

ACC 333. Intermediate Accounting II 

ACC 334. Cost and Managerial Accounting 

ACC 335. Income Tax Accounting: Individuals 

ACC 435. Advanced Accounting 

ACC 437. Auditing 

BUS 110. Business Law I 

BUS 260. Principles of Management 

BUS 310. Corporate Finance 

BUS 350. Marketing 

BUS 469. Strategic Management 

CSC 140. Data Manipulation Software 

ECO 121. Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221. Intermediate Microeconomics 

MAT 111. Statistics 

MAT 121. Applied Calculus 

Note: All upper-level (300 and 400) accounting courses must be taken at Oglethorpe 
unless special permission is given by a member of the accounting faculty. 

Eligibility requirements adopted by the Georgia State Board of Accountancy require at least 
150 semester hours of college study to qualify to take the CPA examination. Included wdthin 
the content of this minimum education standard is the requirement to complete at least 
30 semester hours of accounting courses beyond Financial Accounting and Managerial Ac- 
counting and at least 24 semester hours of education in business administration. For those 
students whose objective is to qualify to take the CPA examination, it is recommended that 
the following courses be included in these additional required semester hours: 

ACC 336. Income Tax Accounting: Corporations, Partnerships, Estates 

and Trusts 
ACC 436. Accounting Control Systems 
ACC 438. Accounting Theory 
BUS 111. Business Law II 

136 



Minor 

Students desiring to minor in accounting must complete five courses: Financial Account- 
ing, Managerial Accounting and three of any of the following with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 332. Intermediate Accounting I 

ACC 333. Intermediate Accounting II 

ACC 334. Cost and Managerial Accounting 

ACC 335. Income Tax Accounting: Individuals 

ACC 435. Advanced Accounting 

ACC 230. Financial Accounting 4 hours 

This course is a study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and other ac- 
counting concepts with emphasis on their application in the financial statements of busi- 
ness enterprises. The measurement and reporting of assets, liabilities and owners' equity is 
stressed, along with the related measurement and reporting of revenue, expense and cash 
flow. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above or approval by the director of accounting 
studies. 

ACC 231. Managerial Accounting 4 hours 

This course is a study of the use of accounting information by managers and decision mak- 
ers within an economic enterprise. Cost analysis for purposes of planning and control is 
emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 230. 

ACC 290. Special Topics in Accounting 4 hours 

An intense study of diverse accounting topics under the direct supervision of an account- 
ing faculty member. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class 
schedule. 

ACC 332. Intermediate Accounting I 4 hours 

This course covers financial accounting topics at an intermediate level. The topics covered 
are similar to Financial Accounting but in greater depth. The standards promulgated by 
the Financial Accounting Standards Board are considered and evaluated. The theoretical 
foundations of accounting are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 231. 

ACC 333. Intermediate Accounting II 4 hours 

This is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I with emphasis on advanced topics 
such as capitalized leases, pension costs, inter-period income tax allocation and accounting 
changes. Prerequisite: ACC 332. 

ACC 334. Cost and Managerial Accounting 4 hours 

This course provides an introduction to the financial information required for the manage- 
rial activities of planning, directing operational activities, control and decision making. The 
course includes the study of the analytical techniques and methodologies used to gener- 
ate accounting information and the managerial use of accounting information. The topics 
include cost behavior and estimation, costing of products and services, cost- volume-profit 
analysis, budgeting, relevant cost analysis, performance evaluation and pricing decisions. 
Prerequisite: ACC 231. 

ACC 335. Income Tax Accounting: Individuals 4 hours 

This course provides an overview of the federal income tax system primarily as it relates to 
individuals. The study of the federal tax law provides the necessary tax background for a 
variety of accounting, financial and managerial careers. Prerequisite: ACC 231. 

ACC 336. Income Tax Accounting: Corporations, Partnerships, 

Estates and Trusts 4 hours 

This course is a study of the federal income tax laws and related accounting problems of 
corporations and partnerships, with some consideration of estates and trusts. Consideration 

137 



will be given to the role of taxation in business planning and decision making and the inter- 
relationships and differences between financial accounting and tax accounting. Prerequi- 
site: ACC 335. 

ACC 433. Independent Study in Accounting 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

ACC 434. Internship in Accounting 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportu- 
nities at PricewaterhouseCoopers, Ernst and Young, Deloitte and Touche, Georgia-Pacific 
and Miller, Ray and Houser. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: 
Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program, permis- 
sion of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the 
Experiential Education Committee. 

ACC 435. Advanced Accounting 4 hours 

This course is a study of business combinations and the related problems of consolidating 
the financial statements of affiliated corporations. The accounting problems related to in- 
ternational business are also covered and governmental accounting is introduced. Prerequi- 
site: ACC 333. 

ACC 436. Accounting Control Systems 4 hours 

This course is an in-depth study of the application of information systems concepts to the 
accounting environment. Emphasis is on the processing of data in a computerized environ- 
ment as well as the controls that are necessary to assure accuracy and reliability of the data 
processed by an accounting system. Practical implications of accounting information sys- 
tem design and implementation will be investigated through the use of cases and projects. 
Prerequisites: ACC 231 and CSC 140. 

ACC 437. Auditing 4 hours 

This course is a study of auditing standards and procedures, including the use of statistical 
and other quantitative techniques and preparation of audit working papers, reports and 
financial statements. Emphasis is placed upon the criteria for the establishment of internal 
controls and the effect of these controls on examinations and reports. Prerequisites: ACC 
333 and MAT 111. 

ACC 438. Accounting Theory 4 hoiu's 

This course covers the principles and concepts of accounting at an advanced theoretical 
level. The emphasis is on critical analysis of the ideas on which accounting practice is based 
along with an appreciation for the intellectual foundations for those ideas. Prerequisite: 
ACC 333. 

ACC 490. Advanced Special Topics in Accounting 4 hours 

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as de- 
termined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the 
current semester class schedule. 

138 



American Studies 



The interdisciplinary major in American studies is designed to provide students with the 
opportunity to develop a systematic and in-depth understanding of American culture. By 
combining American studies courses and courses from relevant disciplines (history, litera- 
ture, the arts, economics and the social sciences), students may explore the relationships 
of diverse aspects of American life. Students also are able to pursue their special interests 
within American culture by developing an "area of concentration" that provides a specific 
focus for much of the work completed in fulfillment of major requirements. 

In addition to introducing students to the field of American studies, the major is designed 
to help students refine their fundamental intellectual skills, especially their writing and 
speaking skills. Skills of this sort will serve the student well long after many specific facts, 
postulates and theories have been forgotten. In short, as is consistent with Oglethorpe's 
stated institutional purpose, the American studies program seeks to prepare humane gener- 
alists - individuals who possess those basic qualities so necessary for leadership in a rapidly 
changing world. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Major 

Requirements of the major include completion of the following seven courses: 
ECO 223. United States Economic History 
ENG303. American Poetry 
HIS 130. United States History to 1865 

HIS 330. Between World Wars: The United States, 1920-1945 , 
HIS 331. The Age of Affluence: The United States Since 1945 
SOC 202. The American Experience (to be taken in the freshman or 

sophomore year) 
One semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary- 
level or higher 

Completion of five of the following courses also is required: 

CRS 260. Writing for Business and the Professions 

ECO 421. Money and Banking 

ECO 424. Labor Economics 

ECO 425. Public Finance 

EDU 101. Introduction to Education 

ENG 393. Special Topics in Literature and Culture: Literature in the 1920s 

ENG 394. Special Topics in Major British and American Authors 

HIS 430. The American Civil War and Reconstruction 

HIS 431. History of United States Foreign Relations 

POL 201. Constitutional Law 

POL 302. American Political Parties 

POL 303. Congress and the Presidency 

POL 304. African-American Politics 

POL 311. United States Foreign Policy 

SOC 201. The Family 

ULP 303. The New American City 
Minor 

Requirements for the minor include completion of The American Experience (to be taken 
in the freshman or sophomore year) and three of the following five courses: 
ECO 223. United States Economic History 
ENG 303. American Poetry 
HIS 130. United States History to 1865 

HIS 330. Between World Wars: The United States, 1920-1945 
HIS 331. The Age of Affluence: The United States Since 1945 



139 



Art 

Oglethorpe offers a stimulating and rigorous program of study in studio and art history. 
The curriculum is designed to be an integral part of the liberal arts experience for majors 
and non-majors alike. Students may choose from a range of studio courses offered at the 
introductory through the advanced level, including drawing, painting, figure drawing, pho- 
tography (both traditional darkroom and digital), printmaking, two-dimensional design, 
color theory, anatomy and figure sculpture. Art history courses cover diverse time periods 
and cultures from ancient to modern art, with an interdisciplinary approach which stresses 
aesthetic and historical context. The art curriculum prepares students for a wide array of 
options, including graduate school and careers in a variety of art- related fields. 

Studio Art Major 

Studio courses are designed to provide students with a rigorous and stimulating founda- 
tion in visual language and thinking. Courses emphasize the development of perception 
and visual acuity, cognitive skills, a sense of aesthetics and facility in manipulating a variety 
of artistic approaches and media. The curriculum prepares students to go on to graduate 
school in studio or other fields such as education, art therapy, graphic design or medical 
illustration. 

Students majoring in studio art must complete eight studio courses, two upper-level art 
history courses and one foreign language course at the second semester elementary-level or 
higher, for a total of 11 courses and 44 semester hours. Requirements for the studio major 
include two drawing courses; three painting courses; Anatomy For the Artist and Figure 
Drawing; Introduction to Photography; Modern Art History; either Introduction to Figure 
Sculpture, Introduction to Printmaking or Ways of Seeing; one other upper-level art history 
course. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

The Scientific Illustration Track with Biological Science Emphasis and the Scientific Illus- 
tration Track with Physical Science Emphasis are two programs which enable the student to 
combine art major requirements and specific science courses. These programs fulfill admis- 
sion requirements for graduate school programs in medical and scientific illustration. The 
degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Art History Major 

The art history major provides students wdth an intellectual, aesthetic and historical foun- 
dation for the study of all visual arts, including architecture, sculpture, painting, photog- 
raphy and nascent media. The courses which make up the art history major have been 
designed to be integrally related to the liberal arts experience, complementing other courses 
and majors which are already offered at Oglethorpe by providing comparative historical, 
cultural and philosophical reference points, while at the same time functioning as a rigor- 
ous, free-standing discipline. The curriculum prepares students to go on to graduate school 
in art history and for careers such as museum work, education and art consulting. 

Students majoring in art history must complete a minimum of eight art history courses, one 
of which must be Modern Art History, two studio courses in any two different media and 
one foreign language course at the second semester elementary-level or higher, for a total of 
11 courses and 44 semester hours. All art history courses have COR 104 Art and Culture as a 
prerequisite. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

As part of the requirement for the art history major, a maximum of two courses from the 
list of electives below may be taken. Other courses may be added to the elective list at the 
discretion of the art department. 

ART 105. Video Production 

ART 205. Documentary Filmmaking 

CRS 101. Theories of Communication and Rhetoric 

140 



CRS 420. Media, Culture and Society 

ENG 101. Ancient Literature 

ENG 102. Medieval and Renaissance Literature 

HIS 201. Ancient Greece 

HIS 301. History of Christianity 

INT 290. Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Sex and Gender in 

Cinema* 
INT 290. Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Art of the Film I, II* 
PHI SOL Philosophy of Art (Aesthetics) ., .; 

SOC305. Film and Society 

WGS 301. Introduction to Women's Studies - Theory . ■ > 

WGS 302. Introduction to Women's Studies - History 
Two semesters of foreign language (in addition to the foreign language 
requirement for the Bachelor of Arts degree) 

contingent on these Special Topics courses being offered again. 

Minor 

For a minor in art, students may have a concentration in studio or art history. For both 
areas of concentration students must complete a total of five courses or 20 semester hours. 
Students with a concentration in studio must take four studio courses and one upper-level 
art history course. Students may take up to three of these studio courses in one discipline 
(for example, photography, drawing, painting, etc.) or in four different disciplines. At least 
two of these studio courses must be in separate disciplines. 

For a concentration in art history, students must take four upper-level art history courses 
and one studio course. 

ART 101. Introduction to Drawing 4 hours 

This course is an introductory-level studio course which will focus on mastering the funda- 
mentals of drawing. Working from observation in line and value, students will develop an 
understanding of form and shape; volume and flatness; spatial relationships; the basics of 
perspective and composition; the materials and techniques of dravdng. 

ART 102. Introduction to Painting 4 hours 

This course is an introductory-level studio course which will focus on understanding and 
mastering the fundamentals of painting. Working from observation, this includes develop- 
ing an understanding of color and color relationship; form and shape; volume and flatness; 
the basics of composition; the materials and techniques of oil painting. 

ART 103. Introduction to Figure Sculpture 4 hours 

Working from the life model, students will convey their understanding of the human form 
in clay. Planar structure, volume, proportion and major anatomical landmarks will be 
covered. 

ART 105. Video Production 4 hours 

This course will introduce students to the techniques and tools of basic video production. 
Students will learn to think visually and consider lighting, color, composition and move- 
ment as they relate to production. The importance of sound and how the audible and the 
visual components support and complement each other will be considered. Students will 
have the opportunity to work with video editing software. This course is also cross listed as 
CRS 115. 

ART 109. Introduction to Photography 4 hours 

Laboratory exercises, in-class lectures, critiques and assignments are designed to develop 
an understanding of all aspects of traditional black and white photography, including 

141 



composition and self expression. Emphasis will be on development of technical skills and 
aesthetic direction in photography. Prerequisite: A fully manual camera - to be brought to 
the first class meeting. 

ART 110. Ways of Seeing 4 hours 

This course systematically breaks down the vocabularies of art to their component ele- 
ments, studying how these elements work together to form visual language. Problems in 
color and composition will be undertaken in a variety of media, including ink, acrylic and 
photography. 

ART 111. Anatomy For the Artist and Figure Drawing 4 hours 

This course focuses on both the scientific and the aesthetic exploration of the human body. 
Drawing from the life model, students will study form and function of the skeletal and 
muscular systems, along with proportion and surface landmarks. A variety of approaches to 
drawing and drawing materials will be covered. 

ART 201. Intermediate Drawing 4 hours 

This course explores drawing as a tool for perception and a means of self-expression. Stu- 
dents will undertake advanced problems in drawing which build upon concepts and tech- 
niques covered in Introduction to Drawing. These include problems involving the surface 
of the picture plane and the ground plane, arrangements of elements in static and djmamic 
compositions and value pattern. Prerequisite: ART 101 or ART 111. 

ART 202. Intermediate Painting 4 hours 

Students will build upon experiences in Introduction to Painting and undertake more com- 
plex formal and personal issues in their work. They will be expected to master a wide range 
of visual vocabularies and approach painting from a variety of aesthetic points of view. Im- 
agery, realism, abstraction, expressionism and narration will be explored as students begin 
to develop individual direction in their owti work. Prerequisite: ART 102. 

ART 203. Intermediate Figure Sculpture 4 hours 

Working from the life model, this level of sculpture builds upon conceptual and perceptual 
skills honed in Introduction to Figure Sculpture. Students are expected to approach sculpt- 
ing the human form from a variety of aesthetic points of view, including realism, abstrac- 
tion and expressionism. Prerequisite: ART 103. 

ART 205. Documentary Filmmaking 4 hours 

This course covers the theory and practice of planning and executing public affairs, 
informational and cultural documentary programs. Students will be introduced to short- 
form and long-form documentaries, emphasizing the technical and aesthetic aspects of 
documentary filmmaking using video production techniques. Production projects will be 
geared toward the development of proficiency in documentary planning, writing, produc- 
tion and post-production. Students will produce short documentaries using a combination 
of personal cameras and broadcast quality cameras and digital editing equipment. This 
course is also cross listed as CRS 215. Prerequisite: CRS 115 or ART 105, or permission of 
the instructor. 

ART 260. Ancient Art History 4 hours 

This course will cover the art and archaeology of the area around the Mediterranean Sea 
before the fall of Rome, commonly called the "ancient world." The course will examine the 
mythology and religion of each culture, using primary sources such as artifacts and ancient 
literature. Cultures covered will include Mesc potamia, Egypt, Bronze Age Crete, Greece and 
Rome. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 290. Special Topics in Studio 4 hours 

Studio exercises, in-studio lectures, outside assignments and critiques are designed to 

142 



develop a basic understanding of various media, including printmaking and various 
specialties of artists-in-residence. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current 
semester class schedule. 

ART 291. Special Topics in Art History 4 hours 

An in-depth analysis of specific historical art periods will stress how major artists and 
trends were influenced by their times. Discussion of important events and ideas of signifi- 
cant individuals of the period will serve to provide the necessary background for a thorough 
comprehension of social and intellectual sources of art. A recent course was What Counts 
As Art? that included a trip to New York City. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 300. Italian Renaissance Art History 4 hours 

This course explores the paintings, sculpture and architecture of Italy from 1300 to 1650. 
Chronological in format, this course enables students to analyze and understand the 
principle styles, methods and contexts of Italian art and its intrinsic value in the study of 
European art. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 302. Advanced Painting 4 hours 

Students will build upon prior experiences in Intermediate Painting and be guided to set 
parameters for individual inquiry in their work. Emphasis will be on personal imagery and 
control of formal issues to express the students' ideas. Each student will be expected to 
develop ideas and themes in a cohesive body of work. Prerequisite: ART 202. 

ART 310. Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art History 4 hours 

This course will cover the art of Northern Europe from the late Gothic through the Baroque 
period (the late 14th to the end of the 17th century). A range of media and styles will be ex- 
plored such as illuminated manuscripts, architecture, printmaking and painting, including 
the work of Durer, Rembrandt and Vermeer. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 320. 18th and 19th Century European Art History 4 hours 

This course focuses on the major artists and movements of the 18th and 19th centuries in 
Europe, beginning with the late Baroque and progressing through the Rococo, the Neoclas- 
sical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist and the Pre-Raphaelite, as well as Expressionism 
and Art Nouveau Movements. Students will analyze the major paintings, architecture and 
sculpture of each period as reflections of the political, social and religious realities of the 
time. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 330. Far Eastern Art History - India, China, Tibet and Japan 4 hours 

This course will explore the paintings, sculpture and architecture of India, China, Tibet, Ja- 
pan and other Eastern cultures. Chronological in format, this course will enable students to 
analyze and understand principle styles, methods and cultural contexts of Eastern art. This 
course will compare and contrast Eastern and Western approaches and attitudes toward 
art. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 340. The Art of the Americas, Africa, Oceania and Others 4 hours 

This course will look at how non-western and often pre-technological people around the 
world use visual arts. How does their art express what is important to them? What does it 
share with Western art? Some anthropology findings and the idea of "the primitive" will be 
explored. Both living and extinct cultures will be studied. Prerequisite: COR 104. 

ART 350. Modern Art History 4 hours 

This course wiU examine major movements in the visual arts fi-om the end of the 19th 
century to the present, focusing primarily on Europe and America. The student will be 
expected to explore connections between visual culture and broader historical trends and 
be able to recognize, understand and discuss the important works of art of the 20th century. 
Prerequisite: COR 104. 

143 



ART 400. Independent Study in Art History 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic in art history. Prerequisite: Submission of a pro- 
posed outhne of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by 
the instructor, the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of 
the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic 
Regulations and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

ART 405. Independent Study in Studio 1-4 hours 

Supervised studio art on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline 
of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

ART 410. Internship in Art 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, v^^ork 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour 
of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including op- 
portunities at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta Inter- 
national Museum and Vespermann Gallery. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualification for the internship program, 
permission of an internship siste supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal 
by Experiential Education Committee. 

ART 490. Advanced Special Topics in Studio 4 hours 

This is an advanced level of Special Topics in Studio such as sculpture, photography, draw- 
ing, printmaking, etc. Prerequisite: ART 290. 

ART 491. Advanced Special Topics in Art History 4 hours 

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as de- 
termined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the 
current semester class schedule. 

Behavioral Science and Human Resource Management 



Human resource management builds communities through the study of people and the 
workplace. The focus of the major is the connection between theory and application as it 
applies to meeting the needs of both the employee and employer. Students majoring in be- 
havioral science and human resource management will study related topics beginning wdth 
the theory behind those topics through further development and ultimately the application 
of these theories in organizations. 

All of this is accomplished through an interdisciplinary program relying on courses in psy- 
chology, sociology, management, economics and other related business courses. Topics can 
be categorized into three broad areas: 1) personnel issues such as job analysis, selection and 
training and development; 2) worker issues such as motivation, job satisfaction and leader- 
ship; 3) group issues including group processes, power and organizational structure. 

With skills gained through this major students will have a foundation for careers in human 
resource management or general management or to pursue graduate studies in indus- 
trial-organizational psychology, industrial relations, business, as well as human resource 
management. 

144 



Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the following requirements 
with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 230. Financial Accounting 

ACC 231. Managerial Accounting 

BUS 260. Principles of Management 

BUS 362. Human Resources Management 

BUS 382. Management-Labor Relations 

BUS 462. Recruitment and Selection 

CSC 140. Data Manipulation Software 

ECO 121. Introduction to Economics 

MAT 111. Statistics 

PSY 202. Organizational Psychology 

PSY204. Social Psychology 

PSY 303. Psychological Testing 

One semester of a foreign language at the second semester 

elementary-level or higher 
Two of the following behavioral science courses: 

PSY 203. Learning and Conditioning 

PSY 205. Theories of Personality 

PSY 301. Research Methods 

SOC 302. The Sociology of Work and Occupations 
Two of the following business administration courses: 

BUS 110. Business Law I 

BUS 310. Corporate Finance 

BUS 350. Marketing 

BUS 370. International Business 

BUS 461. Total Quality Management 

ECO 221. Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222. Intermediate Macroeconomics 

ECO 424. Labor Economics 

Biology ______ ^____ 

The curriculum in biology provides a foundation in both classical and contemporary bio- 
ogical concepts and prepares the student for continuing intellectual growth and profes- 
ional development in the life sciences. These goals are achieved through completion of a 
et of courses that provide a comprehensive background in basic scientific concepts through 
ectures, discussions, writing and laboratory work. The program supplies the appropriate 
background for employment in research institutions, industry and government; the cur- 
:iculum also prepares students for graduate school and for professional schools of medicine, 
ientistry, veterinary medicine and the like. Students planning to attend graduate or profes- 
ional schools should recognize that admission to such schools is often highly competitive. 
Completion of a biology major does not ensure admission to these schools. 

\ grade of "C-" or higher must be obtained in each freshman- and sophomore-level science 
)r mathematics course that is required for this major or minor; these courses are numbered 
00 through 300 in each discipline. A grade point average of 2.0 or higher is required in all 
courses required for the major. 

tudents who are interested in medical illustration are encouraged to consider the Scientific 
Uustration Tracks that are offered v^dthin the art major. 

^ajor 

he requirements for a major in biology are as follows beginning with these four courses in 
lequence: General Biology I and II, Genetics and Microbiology. 

145 



One set of paired courses chosen from the following three sets: 

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Biotechnology or 
Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and Human Physiology or 
Any two of Ecology, Urban Ecology or Advanced Special Topics in Biology: 
Conservation Ecology 

Three upper-level courses chosen from Cell Biology, Embryology, Evolution, Animal Be- 
havior and Vascular Plants; or any of the paired courses above not used to fulfill the paired 
course requirement must be completed. 

Additionally, Biology Seminar I: Oral Presentations; Biology Seminar II: Biological Lit- 
erature; General Chemistry I and II (with laboratories); Organic Chemistry I (with labora- 
tory); either Organic Chemistry II (with laboratory) or Elementary Quantitative Analysis 
(with laboratory) [Students following the ecology paired course track may substitute a field 
course in ecology for the Organic Chemistry II/Elementary Quantitative Analysis require- 
ment.]; General Physics I and II (with laboratories) [Students foUowdng the ecology paired 
course track may substitute a third ecology course that is not used to fulfill the paired 
course requirement for General Physics II]; and Statistics must be completed. The degree 
awarded is the Bachelor of Science. 

All 100-level science courses (General Biology I, General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I 
Laboratory, General Physics I and General Physics I Laboratory) have the same mathemat- 
ics prerequisite. There are three ways that students can fulfill this mathematics require- 
ment: 1) by achieving a score of 2, 3, 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB or BC 
examination; 2) by achieving a score of 550 or higher on the Mathematics Section of the 
SAT or a score of 22 or higher on the Mathematics Section of the ACT; 3) by completing 
Precalculus at Oglethorpe with a grade of "C-" or higher. (An equivalent precalculus course 
at another college or university fulfills the requirement but high school precalculus alone 
does not.) 

Minor 

The requirements for a minor in biology are General Biology I and II, Genetics and Micro- 
biology. Students minoring in biology are not exempt from the prerequisites for the biology 
courses and thus also will complete General Chemistry I and II (with laboratories) and 
Organic Chemistry I (with laboratory and either Organic Chemistry II (with laboratory) or 
Elementary Quantitative Analysis (with laboratory). 

BIO 101. General Biology I 5 hours 

General Biology I, along with General Biology II, is an introduction to modern biology and 
considers the principles of the biological sciences from an integrated viewpoint. The general 
orientation of this course is toward the molecular and cellular basis of life. The specific top- 
ics covered are biochemistry, cell biology, genetics and evolution. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisites: Completion of the mathematics requirement as described above; BIO 101 
must precede BIO 102 and it is recommended that the courses be completed in consecutive 
semesters. Students who are majoring in biology must earn a grade of "C-" or higher in BIO 
101 before enrolling in BIO 102 or any other biology course. 

BIO 102. General Biology II 5 hours 

General Biology II, along with General Biology I, is an introduction to modern biology and 
considers the principles of the biological sciences from an integrated viewpoint. The general 
orientation of this course is toward the anatomy and physiology of higher organisms, both 
animals and plants and their behavioral and ecological interactions. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisites: Completion of the mathematics requirement as described above; BIO 101 
must precede BIO 102 and it is recommended that the courses be completed in consecutive 
semesters. Students who are majoring in biology must earn a grade of "C-" or higher in BIO 



146 



101 before taking BIO 102 and must earn a grade of "C-" or higher in BIO 102 before enroll- 
ing in any other biology courses. 

BIO 201. Genetics 5 hours 

An introduction to the study of inheritance. The classical patterns of Mendelian inheritance 
are related to modern molecular genetics and to the control of metabolism and develop- 
ment. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 102 and CHM 102; prerequisites or 
corequisites: CHM 201 (with laboratory). A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each 
of the prerequisite courses. 

BIO 202. Microbiology 5 hours 

An introduction to the biology of viruses, archea,bacteria, algae and fungi. Consideration 
is given to phylogenetic relationships, taxonomy, physiology and economic or pathogenic 
significance of each group. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 201, CHM 201 (with 
laboratory) with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. 

BIO 251. Biology Seminar I: Oral Presentations 1 hour 

This course is offered in the fall as a component in a two-semester "capstone" sequence for 
biology majors. The two-part experience is designed to introduce students to the mechanics 
and intellectual components of the practice of being a scientist. This course will cultivate 
the skills of the framing, researching, preparation and presentation of a public address on 
atopic of biological interest. Prerequisites: BIO 102, CHM 102 (with laboratory); recom- 
mended for students with junior or senior standing. , 

BIO 252. Biology Seminar II: Biological Literature 1 hour 

This course is offered in the spring as a component in a two-semester "capstone" sequence 
for biology majors. The two-part experience is designed to introduce students to the me- 
chanics, and intellectual components of the practice of being a scientist. This course serves 
as an introduction to researching, locating, interpreting and presenting information from 
the professional scientific literature. Prerequisites: BIO 102, CHM 102 (with laboratory); 
recommended for students with sophomore or junior standing. 

BIO 290. Special Topics in Biology 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

BIO 301. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 5 hours 

An intensive study of the structural aspects of selected vertebrate types. These organisms 
are studied in relation to their evolution and development. The laboratory involves detailed 
examination of representative vertebrate specimens. Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 201, 
CHM 201 (with laboratory). Completion of BIO 201 or CHM 201 and coregistration in the 
other may be acceptable with the permission of the instructor. A grade of "C-" or higher 
must be earned in each of the prerequisite courses. 

BIO 302. Human Physiology 5 hours 

A detailed analysis of human functions that deals primarily with the interactions involved 
in the operation of complex human systems. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 
201, CHM 201 (with laboratory). A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each of the 
prerequisite courses. 

BIO 313. Embryology 5 hours 

A course dealing with the developmental biology of animals. Classical observations are con- 
sidered along with more recent experimental embryology in the framework of an analysis 
of development. In the laboratory, living and prepared examples of developing systems in 



147 



representative invertebrates and vertebrates are considered. Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHM 
201 (with laboratory). A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite 
courses. 

BIO 315. Animal Behavior Shours 

This course considers the function, development and evolution of animal behavior, includ- 
ing the physical and physiological bases of behavior, behavioral genetics, social behavior 
and behavioral ecology. The laboratory component applies the issues addressed in lecture 
in a hands-on interactive and field-oriented setting. An integrated speakers series is part of 
the interactive intellectual environment cultivated by the course. Lecture and laboratory. 
Offered biennially. Prerequisites: BIO 102 and PSY 101. A grade of "C-" or higher must be 
earned in each of the prerequisite courses. 

BIO 316. Cell Biology 5 hours 

An in-depth consideration of cell ultrastructure and the molecular mechanisms of cell 
physiology. Techniques involving the culturing and preparation of cells and tissues for 
experimental examination are carried out in the laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHM 
201 (with laboratory). A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite 
courses. 

BIO 320. Urban Ecology 5 hours 

Urban areas are growing worldwide and negatively affecting natural and social resources. 
Effective management of these impacts requires the integration of natural and social sci- 
ence into a new discipline called urban ecology. This course describes the state of urban 
ecological knowledge and best management practices in urban planning using lecture, dis- 
cussion, lab, regional field trips and guest speakers. This course is also cross listed as UEP 
320. Prerequisite: COR 102 or permission of the instructor. 

BIO 326. Vascular Plants 5 hours 

The biology of vascular plants is considered at levels of organization ranging from the mo- 
lecular through the ecological. Studies of anatomy and morphology are pursued in the labo- 
ratory and an independent project concerning plant hormones is required. Offered spring 
semester of even-numbered years. Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHM 201 (with laboratory). A 
grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite courses. 

BIO 413. Biochemistry 5 hours 

As an introduction to the chemistry of living systems, this course will investigate the struc- 
tures and functions of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Central metabolic pathways and 
enzyme reaction mechanisms also will be studied. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: 
BIO 102, CHM 201 (with laboratory) with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course; recom- 
mended prerequisite: CHM 310. 

BIO 414. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology 5 hours 

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of molecular bioscience. Topics 
covered include the principles and processes of molecular biology, DNA isolation and char- 
acterization, restriction enzyme analysis, cloning, construction and selection of recombi- 
nants made in vitro and preparation and analysis of gene libraries. Lecture and laboratory. 
Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHM 201, CHM 201L and BIO 413 with a grade of "C-" or higher 
in each course. 

BIO 416. Evolution 4 hours 

A course dealing with the various biological disciplines and their meaning in an evolution- 
ary context. Also, a consideration of evolutionary mechanisms and the various theories 
concerning them. Prerequisites: BIO 202, CHM 201 (with laboratory). A grade of "C-" or 
higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite courses. 



148 



BIO 423. Ecology 5 hours 

This course investigates the features of the environment that dictate where an organism 
hves and v^hat density its population can achieve. The course takes a quantitative approach 
to these topics and uses both laboratory and field-based examples to illustrate concepts. 
Laboratory sections involve several off-campus field trips. Prerequisites: Permission of the 
instructor or a grade of "C-" or higher in BIO 202, CHM 201 (with laboratory). 

BIO 490. Advanced Special Topics in Biology 4 hours 

Course and laboratory work will be covered, including independent studies, in various areas 
of biology such as Conservation Biology and Conservation of Hawaiian Biodiversity that 
recently included a trip to Hawaii. Approval by the student's faculty adviser and the chair- 
person of the department is required for off-campus activities. Offered generally for juniors 
or seniors. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

BIO 495. Internship in Biology 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a v^itten journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour 
of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including op- 
portunities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Zoo Atlanta, Yerkes Primate 
Center, local hospitals and health care facilities, veterinary clinics, etc. Graded on a satisfac- 
tory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualification 
for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of 
learning agreement proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

Biomedical Sciences and Allied Health Studies 



The abundance of jobs in the health care industry attracts many students who seek fulfill- 
ing careers. Students who plan to attend schools of nursing, physical therapy, occupational 
therapy, medical technology or other such fields will enjoy both the satisfaction of helping 
people and the excitement of scientific advances in diagnosing and treating disease. The 
allied health adviser will assist such students in planning their programs at Oglethorpe 
University. 

Preparation for admission to biomedical science and allied health education programs 
typically follows one of three models. In the first model, students are admitted to a health 
science program after completing a set of required courses in specific academic disciplines 
during two or three years of college study. For students pursuing this option, a minimum 
of 64 semester hours earned at Oglethorpe and successful completion of the allied health 
education program in an accredited professional school are required to earn the Bachelor 
of Arts degree with an individually planned major. (See the description of the Individually 
Planned Major below.) The second model, which has become the standard in fields such 
as physical therapy and occupational therapy, requires students to earn a bachelor's degree 
before being admitted to programs that lead to initial professional certification through 
master's or clinical doctoral degrees. Students interested in this option may find that one 
of the majors regularly offered at Oglethorpe (such as biology or biopsychology) fulfills 
the admission requirements for the health science program; alternatively, an individually 
planned major can be designed to meet the admission requirements. The third model, 
as exemplified at some colleges of nursing, allows students who already have a bachelor's 
degree to accelerate the completion of a second bachelor's degree (typically a Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing, B.S.N.) provided that certain specific courses are completed as part of 
the first degree. 



149 



An excellent source of information about the biomedical sciences and allied health fields is 
at the www.explorehealthcareers.org website. 

Biopsychology 



Biopsychology is the study of the biological bases of behavior, including the molecular and 
cellular basis of neural functioning and how systems of neurons relate to behavior. By its 
nature, biopsychology is an interdisciplinary field of study that encompasses biology, chem- 
istry and psychology. The field is broad and researchers may find themselves studying the 
brain from a chemical, cellular, genetic, developmental, behavioral, cognitive or social be- 
havioral perspective. A graduate with a Bachelor of Science in biopsychology could pursue 
entry-level positions in academic or private research settings, the biotechnology industry 
or explore alternative careers such as policy development or science writing. In addition, 
the major provides the preparation necessary to be competitive when applying to gradu- 
ate programs in neuroscience and related disciplines and is particularly suited to students 
interested in careers in physical therapy and other allied health fields. 

The major consists of 11 required courses (some with associated laboratories) and four elec- 
tives. There is no minor in biopsychology. Courses taken to complete this major may not be 
used to fiilfill the requirements of a minor in a related field. Due to the breadth of electives 
offered, students should consult with their adviser to create a coherent program of study 
that is best suited to each student's goals. Pre-medical students should consult with the pre- 
medical adviser concerning additional course work required to apply to medical school. 

General Biology I, General Chemistry I and General Chemistry Laboratory I have the same 
mathematics prerequisite. There are three ways students can fulfill this prerequisite: l) by 
achieving a score of 2, 3, 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB or BC examina- 
tion; 2) by achieving a score of 550 or higher on the Mathematics Section of the SAT or a 
score of 22 or higher on the Mathematics Section of the ACT; 3) by completing Precalculus 
at Oglethorpe with a grade of "C-" or higher. (An equivalent precalculus course at another 
college or university fulfills the requirement but high school precalculus alone does not.) 
A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned in each freshman- and sophomore-level required 
course (lOO-level and 200-level). A grade point average of 2.0 or higher is required in all 
required courses and electives for the major. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Science. 

Major 

Requirements of the major include completion of the following courses: 

BIO 101. General Biology I 

BIO 102. General Biology II 

BIO 201. Genetics 

BIO 413. Biochemistry 

CHM 101, lOlL. General Chemistry I with laboratory 

CHM 102, 102L. General Chemistry II v^dth laboratory 

CHM 201, 201L. Organic Chemistry I with laboratory 

MAT 111. Statistics 

PSY 101. Introduction to Psychology 

PSY 301. Research Methods 

PSY 309. Behavioral Neuroscience 

Each student must also complete four electives from the following options. At least one 
elective must be a biology course or Organic Chemistry II with laboratory. 

BIO 202. Microbiology 

BIO 301. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 

BIO 302. Human Physiology 

BIO 315. Animal Behavior * 

BIO 316. Cell Biology 



150 



BIO 414. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology 

CHM 202, 202L. Organic Chemistry II with laboratory 

PSY 201. Developmental Psychology 

PSY 203. Learning and Conditioning 

PSY 206. Abnormal Psychology 

PSY 302. Advanced Experimental Psychology 

PSY 307- Cognitive Psychology 

PSY 308. Sensation and Perception 

PSY 310. Drugs, the Brain and Behavior 

*Note: This course will not serve as the one biology elective by itself. 

Business Administration 

Business Administration prepares students for careers in the business world. Business 
teaches not only knowledge and use of business terminology but introduces all the major 
disciplines of a business entity. Throughout the curriculum there is a major emphasis on 
critical thinking, strategic thinking, leadership, problem solving, managerial skills and 
communication skills. Business students study all functional areas of business to enable 
them to have an appropriate foundation for related careers in advertising, financial services, 
banking or securities trading, marketing, management or to pursue graduate education. 
Internships are available to prepare students for careers after graduation. 

In addition to preparing students for business careers and graduate school, the program in 
business administration is a good alternative for other careers. Students gain administrative 
skills and methods of inquiry that are applicable in governmental and non-profit organiza- 
tions. Since much legal practice involves business and a knowledge of business terminology 
and institutions, this major is an excellent background for the study and practice of law. 

Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must complete the following requirements 
with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 230. Financial Accounting 

ACC 231. Managerial Accounting 

BUS 260. Principles of Management 

BUS 310. Corporate Finance 

BUS 350. Marketing 

BUS 419. Management Science 

BUS 469. Strategic Management 

CSC 140. Data Manipulation Software 

ECO 121. Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221. Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222. Intermediate Macroeconomics 

MAT 111. Statistics 

MAT 121. Applied Calculus 

Finally, three additional advanced-level courses must be successfully completed at the 300 
Dr 400 level in accounting, business administration, economics and/or computer science. 
These courses may be taken in different areas or in a specific functional area as a concentra- 
ion. 

\. concentration may be earned in the areas of finance, international business studies, man- 
igement or marketing. For a course to be included as part of a student's concentration, it 
nust be approved by the student's adviser. 



151 



Minor 

A minor in business administration is designed to provide the student with an elementary 
foundation in the major disciphnes within business administration. It is a useful minor for 
students who wish to prepare for an entry-level position in business while pursuing another 
major outside of business administration. It is also useful for those who wish to continue 
work after graduation toward a Master of Business Administration degree. The require- 
ments for a minor are the successful completion with a grade of "C-" or higher in each of the 
following courses: 

ACC 230. Financial Accounting 

ACC 231. Managerial Accounting 

BUS 260. Principles of Management 

BUS 310. Corporate Finance 

BUS 350. Marketing 

ECO 121. Introduction to Economics 

BUS 110. Business Law 1 4 hours 

This course is designed to give the student an awareness of a limited area of those aspects of 
the law which will be needed in day-to-day dealings with the problems of business. Special 
emphasis is placed upon the law of contracts, negotiable instruments, agency and a study of 
the Uniform Commercial Code as it applies. 

BUS 111. Business Law II 4 hours 

This course is a study of partnerships, corporations, sales, bailments, security devices, prop- 
erty, bankruptcy and trade infringements. Prerequisite: BUS 110. 

BUS 260. Principles of Management 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to the principles of management and administration. It 
includes the study of leadership, conflict resolution, decision making and the general 
functions of management in large and small organizations. Students will use computers 
extensively to do active research and will learn spreadsheet and graphical tools to aid in the 
development of their decision-making skills. 

BUS 290. Special Topics in Business Administration 4 hours 

An intense study of diverse business topics under the direct supervision of a business 
administration faculty member. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current 
semester class schedule. 

BUS 310. Corporate Finance 4 hours 

This course is a study of the basic principles of organizational finance and its relation to 
other aspects of business management and to the economic environment within which the 
firm operates. Attention is given to basic financial concepts, techniques of financial analysis, 
sources of funding, asset management, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, 
time value of money and financial decision making under conditions of uncertainty. Prereq- 
uisites: ACC 231, ECO 121 and MAT 111. 

BUS 350. Marketing 4 hours 

This course is concerned wdth the policies and problems involved in the operation of market 
institutions. It will examine broad principles and concepts involved in the operation of 
market planning, market segmentation, consumer behavior, product management and pric- 
ing, distribution and promotion of goods and services. Aspects of global marketing, current 
marketing topics and ethical and social responsibility issues in marketing are addressed. 
Prerequisites: ACC 231 and ECO 121. 

BUS 351. Retailing 4 hours 

This course is designed to acquaint the student v^th one aspect of the marketing activity of 

152 



distribution known as retailing. The course will involve looking at all the activities neces- 
sary to sell goods and services to the final consumer. This will include an examination of 
such retail topics as consumer markets and behavior, retail site location, retail store opera- 
tions and management, pricing and communication decisions, merchandising, decision 
analysis and evaluation and the regulatory, technological and ethical environments in which 
retailing operates. Prerequisite: BUS 350. 

BUS 352. Marketing Communications 4 hours 

Principles, concepts and practices relating to the various kinds of communications em- 
ployed to disseminate information about products and services to potential buyers are 
topics in this course. Communication methods to be studied include advertising, personal 
selling, sales promotion and public relations. The behavioral aspects of both messages and 
media will be explored. Prerequisite: BUS 350. 

BUS 362. Human Resources Management 4 hours 

In this course students will explore the perspectives and challenges of Human Resources 
Management (HRM) within the context of the emerging global economy. The class will look 
at traditional HRM topics such as selection and compensation and also at how students can 
manage their own human resource potential. Prerequisite: BUS 260. 

BUS 370. International Business 4 hours 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the problems encountered in conduct- 
ing business outside one's own country and to provide a basis for evaluating the impact on 
business activities of changing economic, political and cultural factors. Cases will be used 
throughout the course to give the student experience with the problems and advantages of 
doing business across national frontiers. A cultural diversity simulation game also will be 
used. Prerequisite: BUS 260. 

BUS 382. Management-Labor Relations 4 hours 

This course will explore the dynamic relationship between management and organized 
labor. The major topics to be covered include the history of the American labor movement, 
labor legislation, collective bargaining, grievance procedures, arbitration and unionization 
in the public sector. Prerequisite: BUS 260. 

BUS 410. Advanced Corporate Finance 4 hours 

As a continuation of Corporate Finance, topics in this course will include capital budgeting, 
intermediate and long-term funding, current asset management, working capital manage- 
ment and dividend policy. Case studies will be used to emphasize actual business situations 
and to focus on the comprehensive financial management of the firm. Prerequisite: BUS 
310. 

BUS 411. Investments 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to the environment in which investment decisions are made. 
Topics explored will include efficient markets, the capital asset pricing model, term struc- 
ture of interest rates, risk versus return and performance measures. Although the emphasis 
will be on stocks and bonds, other investments will be discussed. Prerequisite: BUS 310. 

BUS 419. Management Science 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to operations research, model building, optimization, linear 
programming, inventory models and simulation. Major techniques and models of quantita- 
tive analysis as applied to business are studied. Prerequisites: CSC 140, MAT 111 and MAT 
121. 

BUS 450. Consumer Behavior 4 hours 

This course is designed to develop and enhance an understanding of how and why individu- 



153 



als, groups and organizations select, secure, use and dispose of products and the impact this 
has on consumers and society. The course is interdisciphnary, drawing upon the fields of 
economics, marketing, psychology and sociology. Ethical, legal and international aspects of 
consumer behavior are explored in the course. Prerequisite: BUS 350. 

BUS 451. Direct and Interactive Marketing 4 hours 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the specialized field of interactive 
marketing which uses all media to effect a measurable consumer response. Topics to be 
explored include direct marketing planning, mailing lists and databases, media selection, 
techniques for creating and producing direct response campaigns, internet marketing and 
managing the interactive marketing operation. Prerequisite: BUS 350. 

BUS 456. Marketing Research 4 hours 

This course is designed to explore topics such as the types of research, the research process, 
research design, sampling procedures, data collection methods, data analysis and prepara- 
tion and presentation of research findings. A research project and presentation of findings 
is usually required in the course. Prerequisites: BUS 350, CSC 140 or equivalent and MAT 
111. 

BUS 461. Total Quality Management 4 hours 

This course will explore major systematic approaches to Total Quality Management. Stu- 
dents will examine quality management from a "profound knowledge" perspective (Deming, 
Pirsig, Goldratt) and will learn how to understand quality as a concept for achieving effec- 
tive management within a firm and in one's own life. Prerequisites: BUS 260 and MAT 111. 

BUS 462. Recruitment and Selection 4 hours 

This course will present the information needed to develop and implement an effective 
employee selection program. Topics include selection measures such as predictors G^ack- 
ground information, interviews and tests), criteria (work sample data, personnel data, 
etc.), validity and reliability of measures, job analysis techniques and selection instruments 
including weighted application blanks, interviews, ability tests, personality assessment and 
the performance tests. Legal and ethical issues are discussed throughout. Prerequisite: BUS 
362. 

BUS 469. Strategic Management 4 hours 

This course is the capstone integration course for the business program. Students learn 
integrative thinking skills and strategic management tools through both the reading of 
conceptual work and the extensive use of the case studies. This course must be taken in 
residence in order to fulfill the requirements for a degree in this major. Prerequisites: BUS 
260, BUS 310 and BUS 350. 

BUS 490. Advanced Special Topics in Business Administration 4 hours 

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as de- 
termined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the 
current semester class schedule. 

BUS 494. Independent Study in Business Administration 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic in business administration. Prerequisite: Submis- 
sion of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments 
approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost no later than the second day 
of classes of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in 
the Academic Regulations and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

BUS 495. Internship in Business Administration 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 

154 



qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, u^ork 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a v^itten journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings vvith the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing wdth some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportu- 
nities at Office Depot, the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, SunTrust Bank and the 
Atlanta Thrashers. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission 
of the faculty supervisor, qualification for the internship program, permission of an intern- 
ship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experiential 
Education Committee. 

Chemistry 



The chemistry program covers four general areas of chemistry: inorganic, organic, physi- 
cal and analytical. The first half of a student's chemistry curriculum involves courses which 
present the fundamentals of the various areas. The second half of the curriculum consists of 
advanced courses which cover specialized topics in chemistry. In addition to factual knowl- 
edge about chemistry, the student gains an understanding about the scientific method and 
a systematic approach to research. A large portion of the chemistry curriculum includes 
laboratory courses. These courses teach the techniques and skills used in chemical experi- 
mentation. 

A student who has completed the Bachelor of Science program in chemistry has several 
career options. These options include technical or analytical work in a chemical laboratory 
and non-research positions in the chemical industry such as sales or marketing. Another 
option is to enter a graduate or professional school. Graduates interested in doing chemi- 
cal research should pursue the Master of Science or Doctoral degrees. Those interested in 
professions such as medicine or dentistry would enter the appropriate professional school 
after receiving the Bachelor of Science degree. Lastly, the chemistry major is an excellent 
preparation for careers as diversified as patent law and teaching. 

A grade of "C-" or higher must be obtained in each freshman- and sophomore-level science 
course that is required for this major or minor; these courses are numbered 100 through 
300 in each discipline. A grade point average of 2.0 or higher is required in all courses 
required for the major. 

All 100-level science courses (General Biology I, General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I 
Laboratory, General Physics I and General Physics I Laboratory) have the same mathemat- 
ics prerequisite. There are three ways that students can fulfill this mathematics require- 
ment: 1) by achieving a score of 2, 3, 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB or BC 
examination; 2) by achieving a score of 550 or higher on the Mathematics Section of the 
SAT or a score of 22 or higher on the Mathematics Section of the ACT; 3) by completing 
Precalculus at Oglethorpe with a grade of "C-" or higher. (An equivalent precalculus course 
at another college or university fulfills the requirement but high school precalculus alone 
does not.) 

Students who are interested in scientific illustration are encouraged to consider the Scien- 
tific Illustration Tracks that are offered within the art major. 

Major 

The requirements for a major in chemistry are as follows: General Chemistry I and II, 
Organic Chemistry I and II, Elementary Quantitative Analysis, Instrumental Methods of 
Chemical Analysis, Physical Chemistry I and II, Inorganic Chemistry, Advanced Organic 
Chemistry and Organic Spectroscopy. Each requirement has a respective laboratory which 
must be taken concurrently vrith the course. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Science. 



155 



Minor 

The requirements for a minor in chemistry are as follows: General Chemistry I and II (with 
laboratories), Organic Chemistry I and II (with laboratories), Elementary Quantitative 
Analysis (with laboratory) and one additional lecture course in chemistry. 

CHM 101. General Chemistry 1 4 hours 

General Chemistry I is the first semester of a two-semester course sequence. This two- 
semester sequence is an introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including 
a study of the theories of the structure of atoms and molecules and the nature of the chemi- 
cal bond; the properties of gases, liquids and solids; the rates and energetics of chemical re- 
actions; the properties of solutions; chemical equilibria; electro-chemistry and the chemical 
behavior of representative elements. Prerequisite: Completion of the mathematics require- 
ment as described above. Corequisite: CHM lOlL. A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned 
in CHM 101 before taking CHM 102. 

CHM lOlL. General Chemistry Laboratory 1 1 hour 

The laboratory course is designed to complement General Chemistry I. Various labora- 
tory techniques will be introduced. Experiments will demonstrate concepts covered in the 
lecture material. Corequisite: CHM 101. 

CHM 102. General Chemistry H 4 hours 

General Chemistry II is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence. This two- 
semester sequence is an introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry, including 
a study of the theories of the structure of atoms and molecules and the nature of the chemi- 
cal bond; the properties of gases, liquids and solids; the rates and energetics of chemical re- 
actions; the properties of solutions; chemical equilibria; electro-chemistry and the chemical 
behavior of representative elements. Prerequisites: Completion of the mathematics require- 
ment as described above; CHM 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. Corequisite: CHM 102L. 

CHM 102L. General Chemistry Laboratory II ; 1 hour 

The laboratory course is designed to complement General Chemistry II. Various labora- 
tory techniques will be introduced. Experiments will demonstrate concepts covered in the 
lecture material. Corequisite: CHM 102. , ;. 

CHM 201. Organic Chemistry I 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry I is the first semester of a two-semester course sequence. This two- 
semester sequence is an introductory course in the principles and theories of organic chem- 
istry. The structure, preparation and reactions of various functional groups will be inves- 
tigated. Emphasis will be on synthesis and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: CHM 102 
with a grade of "C-" or higher course. Corequisite: CHM 201L. A grade of 
"C-" or higher must be earned in CHM 201 before taking CHM 202. 

CHM 201L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 1 hour 

The laboratory course is designed to complement Organic Chemistry I. Various techniques, 
such as distillation, extraction and purification, are studied in the first semester. The second 
semester involves synthesis and identification of a variety of organic compounds. Corequi- 
site: CHM 201. 

CHM 202. Organic Chemistry II 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry II is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence. This 
two-semester sequence is an introductory course in the principles and theories of organic 
chemistry. The structure, preparation and reactions of various functional groups will be 
investigated. Emphasis will be on synthesis and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: CHM 
201 with a grade of "C-" or higher. Corequisite: CHM 202L. 



156 



CHM 202L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 1 hour 

The laboratory course is designed to complement Organic Chemistry II. Various tech- 
niques, such as distillation, extraction and purification, are studied in the first semester. The 
second semester involves synthesis and identification of a variety of organic compounds. 
Corequisite: CHM 202. 

CHM 290. Special Topics in Chemistry 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

CHM 301, CHM 302. Physical Chemistry I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

A systematic study of the foundations of chemistry. Particular attention is paid to thermo- 
dynamics, including characterization of gases, liquids, solids and solutions of electrolytes 
and nonelectrolytes; the First, Second and Third Laws; spontaneity and equilibrium; phase 
diagrams and one- and two-component systems; electrochemistry; an introduction to the 
kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Additionally, both phenomenological and mecha- 
nistic kinetics are presented, as is a brief introduction to quantum mechanics. Prerequi- 
sites: MAT 233, CHM 202 and PHY 102 with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. 

CHM 301L, CHM 302L. Physical Chemistry Laboratory I, II 1 plus 1 hour 

Intended to complement the physical chemistry lecture courses, these courses provide the 
student with an introduction to physico-chemical experimentation. Corequisites: CHM 301, 
302. 

CHM 310. Elementary Quantitative Analysis 4 hours 

An introduction to elementary analytical chemistry, including gravimetric and volumetric 
methods. Emphasis is on the theory of analytical separations, solubility, complex, acid-base 
and redox equilibria. Intended for both chemistry majors and those enrolled in pre-profes- 
sional programs in other physical sciences and in the health sciences. Prerequisite: CHM 
201 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

CHM 310L. Elementary Quantitative Analysis Laboratory 1 hour 

Analyses are carried out in this course which illustrate the methods discussed in CHM 
310. Corequisite: CHM 310. 

CHM 422. Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis 4 hours 

A discussion of the principles and applications of modern instrumentation used in ana- 
lytical chemistry. Methods discussed are primarily non-optical, including an overview of 
electrochemistry; potentiometric methods, including use of pH and other ion meters; elec- 
trogravimetry; coulometry; polarography; amperometry; gas- and liquid-chromatography. 
Course is offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: CHM 310 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

CHM 422L. Instrumental Methods Laboratory 1 hour 

This laboratory accompanies CHM 422 and will consider the practical applications of mod- 
ern instrumentation in analytical chemistry. Corequisite CHM 422. 

CHM 424. Advanced Organic Chemistry 4 hours 

A discussion of selected reactions and theories in organic chemistry. Emphasis is placed on 
reaction mechanisms and reactive intermediates encountered in organic synthesis. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM 202 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

CHM 424L. Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1 hour 

Intended to complement Advanced Organic Chemistry, this course will investigate general 
reactions and mechanistic principles in organic synthesis. The study will require the multi- 
step synthesis of various organic molecules. Corequisite: CHM 424. 



157 



CHM 432. Inorganic Chemistry 4 hours 

A study of the principles of modern inorganic chemistry, including atomic structure; mo- 
lecular structure; ionic bonding; crystal structures of ionic solids, a systematic study of the 
behavior of inorganic anions; coordination chemistry, including structure and mechanisms 
of aqueous reactions; acids and bases. Course is offered in alternate years. Prerequisite or 
corequisite: CHM 302. 

CHM 432L. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 1 hour 

Intended to complement Inorganic Chemistry, this course provides experience in the meth- 
ods of preparation and characterization of inorganic compounds. Corequisite: CHM 432. 

CHM 434. Organic Spectroscopy 4 hours 

A course dealing with several spectroscopic methods as applied to organic molecules. The 
principles and interpretation of ultra-violet, visible, infrared, mass and nuclear magnetic 
resonance spectra will be studied. Course is offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: CHM 
202 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

CHM 434L. Organic Spectroscopy Laboratory 1 hour 

Students enrolled in this course use various spectrometers for qualitative and quantitative 
analysis. Corequisite: CHM 434. 

CHM 480. Internship in Chemistry 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing vrith some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour 
of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services. Graded on a sat- 
isfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualifica- 
tion for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance 
of learning agreement proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

CHM 490. Advanced Special Topics in Chemistry 1-5 hours 

Advanced topics will be offered generally for juniors and seniors in the following fields: 
Organic Chemistry, Organic Qualitative Analysis, Biochemistry, Theoretical Chemistry and 
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current 
semester course schedule. 

CHM 499. Independent Study in Chemistry 1-5 hours 

This course is intended for students of senior standing who wish to do independent labora- 
tory and/or theoretical investigations in chemistry. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed 
outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the 
instructor, the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the 
semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic 
Regulations and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

Communication and Rhetoric Studies " 

The program in communication and rhetoric studies prepares students to become critically 
reflective citizens and practitioners in professions, including journalism, public relations, 
law, politics, broadcasting, advertising, public service, corporate communications and pub- 
lishing. Students learn to perform effectively as ethical communicators - as speakers, writ- 
ers, readers and researchers who know how to examine and engage audiences, from local to 
global situations. Majors acquire theories, research methods and practices for producing as 
well as judging communication of all kinds - written, spoken, visual and multi-media. The 

158 



program encourages students to understand messages, audiences and media as shaped by 
social, historical, political, economic and cultural conditions. Students have the opportunity 
to receive hands-on experience in a communication field of their choice through an intern- 
ship. A leading center for the communications industry, Atlanta provides excellent opportu- 
nities for students to explore career options and apply their skills. 

The major in communication and rhetoric studies consists of at least nine courses (36 
semester hours) in the discipline, only one of which may be an internship. All majors must 
complete a minor course of study to connect their field to a related body of knowledge and 
to enhance career possibilities. Students are encouraged to broaden their knowledge and 
skills through this required minor in such areas as art, philosophy, psychology, business 
administration, politics and international studies. Students completing courses toward a 
major or minor in communication and rhetoric studies must earn a grade of "C-" or higher. 
The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Major 

The following courses are required: 

CRS 101. Theories of Communication and Rhetoric 

CRS 110. Public Speaking I 

One course at the 400 level 

One semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary-level 

or higher (or the equivalent determined through testing) 

Two courses selected from the following: 
CRS 240. Journalism 

CRS 260. Writing for Business and the Professions 
CRS 320. Persuasive Writing 

Four courses selected from the foUowdng list with at least three of them bearing the CRS 
designation. Advanced Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies may be taken more 
than once. 

CRS 111. Public Speaking II 

CRS 115. Video Production 

CRS 215. Documentary Filmmaking 

CRS 250. Introduction to the Electronic Media 

CRS 290. Special Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies: Gen- 
dered Communication and Rhetoric 

CRS 340. Mass Media Effects 

CRS 380. Independent Study in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

CRS 401. Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 

CRS 415. Survey of Research Methods 

CRS 420. Media, Culture and Society 

CRS 470. Globalization and the Media 

CRS 480. Rhetoric of Human Rights 

CRS 490. Advanced Special Topics in Communication 
and Rhetoric Studies 

ENG 230. Creative Writing 

ENG 23l Biography and Autobiography 

ENG 331. Writing Prose, Fiction and Nonfiction 

WRI 290. Special Topics in Writing 

WRI 381. Independent Study in Writing 

Minor 

A student may take a communication and rhetoric studies minor or writing minor, but not 
both. The minor consists of 20 semester hours. (For the requirements of the waiting minor, 
please see the description of the writing minor in alphabetical order below). 

159 



The following course is required: 

CRS 101. Theories of Communication and Rhetoric 

One course selected from the following: 
CRS 240. Journalism 

CRS 260. Writing for Business and the Professions 
CRS 320. Persuasive Writing 

Three courses selected from the following. Advanced Topics in Communication and Rheto- 
ric Studies may be taken more than once. 



CRS 110. 
CRS 111. 
CRS 220. 
CRS 240. 


Public Speaking I 
Public Speaking II 
Investigative Writing 
Journalism 


CRS 250. 


Introduction to the Electronic Media 


CRS 260. 
CRS 490. 


Writing for Business and the Professions 
Advanced Special Topics in Communication 
and Rhetoric Studies 


WRI290. 


Special Topics in Writing 



CRS 101. Theories of Communication and Rhetoric 4 hours 

This gateway course to the major is designed to establish a broad understanding of various 
theories used in communication and rhetoric studies. Students will learn theories about 
messages themselves as well as the various contexts in which they occur: interpersonal com- 
munication, public communication, mass communication, intercultural and gendered com- 
munication and organizational communication. The ethical implications of these theories 
will also be considered. 

CRS 110. Public Speaking 1 4 hours 

This course is designed to develop and enhance students' ability to commuuicate effectively 
to any audience. Students Mali deliver both prepared and impromptu speeches. They vrill 
give humorous and inspirational speeches as well as informational speeches focusing on 
organization and the use of visual aids. Students develop all the tools necessary to effec- 
tively communicate - their voice, their gestures, their body language and their eye contact. 
They vrill receive timely Mritten and oral feedback from the instructor. Speeches will be 
videotaped and critiqued. The goal is to become a more polished and confident speaker. 
Prerequisite: Students who speak English as a second language must have permission of the 
instructor. 

CRS 111. Public Speaking II 4 hours 

This course develops communication skills gained in Public Speaking I. Students will learn 
to convey their messages directly, confidently and persuasively. Students will practice deliv- 
ering persuasive speeches for a variety of occasions from the classroom to the boardroom. 
They will learn to make the closing argument to the jury, to field the difficult interview 
question, to close the sale, to give the congratulatory toast and to deliver the inspirational 
speech. Speeches will be videotaped and critiqued. Prerequisites: CRS 110 and students 
who speak English as a second language must have permission of the instructor. 

CRS 115. Video Production 4 hours 

This course will introduce students to the techniques and tools of basic video production. 
Students will learn to think visually and consider lighting, color, composition and move- 
ment as they relate to production. The importance of sound and how audible and visual 
components support and complement each other will be considered. Students will have the 
opportunity to work wdth video editing software. This course is also cross listed as ART 105. 



160 



CRS 215. Documentary Filmmaking 4 hours 

This course covers the theory and practice of planning and executing pubhc affairs, 
informational and cultural documentary programs. Students will be introduced to short- 
form and long-form documentaries, emphasizing the technical and aesthetic aspects of 
documentary filmmaking using video production techniques. Production projects will be 
geared toward the development of proficiency in documentary planning, writing, produc- 
tion and post-production. Students will produce short documentaries using a combination 
of personal cameras and broadcast quality cameras and digital editing equipment. This 
course is also cross listed as ART 205. Prerequisite: CRS 115 or ART 105, or permission of 
the instructor. 

CRS 220. Investigative Writing 4 hoiu^s 

This expository writing course is designed to develop research and writing skills. Emphasis 
vidll be on learning a wide range of library and internet-based research techniques and pur- 
posefully presenting information to a variety of audiences in appropriate format and style. 
Students will be asked to define their own investigative projects and to analyze and revise 
their own writing. This course is recommended for freshmen and sophomores. Prerequisite: 
COR 101. 

CRS 240. Journalism 4 hours 

This course teaches the fundamentals of journalistic news writing and reporting. From 
interviews to the internet, students will learn how to gather information from a variety of 
sources and write stories using different types of leads, endings and structures. They will 
also engage in a critique of today's journalistic practices. This course is offered in the fall 
semester. 

CRS 250. Introduction to the Electronic Media 4 hours 

This course is designed to introduce students to the economic, regulatory and creative 
forces that shape the broadcast industry. The course will raise theoretical questions and 
practical concerns about the different types of media (TV, radio and the internet) that deal 
with the electronic transmission of information. The focus will be on industry trends and on 
current issues facing these media industries. Offered in the spring. 

CRS 260. Writing for Business and the Professions 4 hours 

This course is for students who have mastered the basic skills and insights of writing and 
who wish to improve their ability to write clear, concise, persuasive prose designed for audi- 
ences in business and the professions. Students are required to write a variety of texts, such 
as proposals, progress reports, recommendation reports and manuals. Other elements of 
the course may include oral presentations. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

CRS 290. Special Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

CRS 320. Persuasive Writing 4 hours 

This course is designed to develop sophisticated strategies of persuasion for analyzing and 
generating arguments responsive to targeted audiences in a variety of contexts, including 
civic, professional and academic. Students will learn both classical and contemporary strat- 
egies of persuasion. Emphasis will be on presenting clear, coherent and logical arguments. 
Students will be asked to define their own projects within assigned contexts. Students will 
evaluate their own and others' writing to enable the revision process. This course is open to 
sophomores, juniors and seniors only. It is offered in the fall semester. Prerequisites: COR 
101 and COR 102. 



161 



CRS 340. Mass Media EflFects 4 hours 

This course examines how various media influence individuals and society. The focus will 
be on the influence of news, entertainment programming, advertising and public commu- 
nication campaigns. Students will become more aware of media influence and develop an 
understanding of the role of media effects research in public policy. Prerequisites: COR 101 
and CRS 101. 

CRS 380. Independent Study in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 1-4 hours 

Supervised independent communications project. Prerequisites: The student must l) have 
junior standing, 2) have a grade point average of 3.0, 3) be pursuing a major in communica- 
tion and rhetoric studies and 4) submit a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule 
of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost 
no later than the second day of classes of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see 
Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

WRI 381. Independent Study in Writing 1-4 hours 

Supervised independent writing project. Prerequisites: The student must l) have junior 
standing, 2) have a grade point average of 3.0, 3) be pursuing a minor in writing or a major 
in communication and rhetoric studies and 4) submit a proposed outline of study that 
includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division 
chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of study. For 
additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations and Policies 
section of this Bulletin. 

CRS 401. Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. An internship for the writing minor must be writing intensive. The in- 
ternship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of 
study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep 
a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings with the faculty 
supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Writ- 
ten work should total five pages of academic vmting for every hour of credit. An extensive 
list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportunities at CNN, Fox 5, 
WSB-TV, Green Olive Media and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Students are strongly 
encouraged to do multiple internships, but only 4 semester hours can be applied as elective 
credits to the major. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permis- 
sion of the faculty supervisor, qualification for the internship program permission of an 
internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experien- 
tial Education Committee. 

CRS 415. Survey of Research Methods 4 hours 

This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative methods such as surveys, ex- 
periments, archival research, hermeneutical research, case studies and causal analysis. The 
class will examine these research methods from several different angles including research 
techniques specific to each method, skills to critically evaluate such research, the epistemo- 
logical considerations and practical consequences of undertaking such research. Students 
considering graduate school or careers that require them to sue and assess research may 
find this course particularly valuable. This course is also cross listed as POL 371 and SOC 
310. Prerequisite: Students with junior standing or permission of the instructor. 

CRS 420. Media, Culture and Society 4 hours 

Using various approaches from cultural studies to political economy, students examine how 
meaning is created by the media. This course focuses on media texts, media institutions and 
media audiences and the way they intersect to shape culture. Topics covered include media 
representations of gender, race and class. Offered alternate fall semesters. Prerequisites: 
COR 101, COR 102 and CRS 101. 

162 



CRS 470. Globalization and the Media 4 hours 

The rapid evolution of communication technologies has increased the ability of global me- 
dia corporations to reach audiences around the world. This course examines the political, 
economic and cultural dimensions of media globalization. Topics covered include cultural 
imperialism, global media corporations, international trade organizations and regulatory 
bodies, global advertising and cultural protectionism. Offered alternate fall semesters. Pre- 
requisite: CRS 101 or permission of the instructor. 

CRS 480. Rhetoric of Human Rights 4 hours 

This course investigates the theories and rhetorical strategies used to practice human rights 
as "universal" and the critical challenges of this universality. The rhetoric of universal hu- 
man rights as it is actually used in texts by competing interests in an increasingly global- 
ized and culturally diverse world communally will be evaluated. Prerequisite: CRS 101 or 
permission of the instructor. 

CRS 490. Advanced Special Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 4 hours 

This advanced course will examine selected topics in rhetoric, communications or media 
studies, such as Civic Literacy; Global Culture and Rhetoric; Gendered Communication and 
Rhetoric; Political Rhetoric. This course may be taken more than once. Prerequisite: See 
individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

WRI 490. Advanced Special Topics in Writing 4 hours 

Study of a selected topic in the field of writing, such as Public Relations Writing, Scientific 
and Technical Writing, Oral History and The Art of the Essay. The topic will vary from year 
to year and may be offered by communication and rhetoric studies faculty or English fac- 
ulty. Prerequisites for special topics taken with communication and rhetoric studies faculty: 
See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

??ii[pyi^L^?!'i??_^ _.^ _^1 _^ ^^_„ 

Minor 

The minor in computer science is currently under review. In light of this, new students will 
not be accepted to this program until further notice. However, the following computer sci- 
ence courses will continue to be offered pending the outcome of the review process. 

CSC 140. Data Manipulation Software 2 hours 

This course introduces the use of spreadsheet and database software to organize, manage, 
present and make calculations from data. The course is designed for business and science 
majors; however, other students are welcome. Integrating spreadsheets and databases, 
transferring data are emphasized. The course uses Microsoft Office. 

CSC 243. Introduction to Programming in C++ 4 hours 

This course introduces the student to the fundamental techniques of problem solving and 
algorithm construction within the context of the C++ programming language. The student 
will design and complete several substantial programming projects, most having signifi- 
cant mathematical content. Topics include data types, control structures, file manipulation, 
functions, parameters, structures, unions, classes, arrays, djoiamic data structures, abstract 
datatypes, object-oriented programming and separate compilation units. Prerequisite: 
MAT 102 or permission of the instructor. 

CSC 244. Introduction to Programming in Java 4 hours 

This course introduces the student to the fundamental techniques of problem solving and 
algorithm construction within the context of the Java programming language. The student 
vdll design and implement several substantial programming projects, most having signifi- 
cant mathematical content. Topics include data types, control structures, file manipulation, 
functions, parameters, classes, arrays, dynamic data structures, object-oriented program- 

163 



ming, separate compilation units, HTML and world wide web programming. Prerequisite: 
MAT 102 or permission of the instructor. 

CSC 290. Special Topics in Computer Science 4 hours 

This course provides an introductory examination of a contemporary topic in computing 
and/or emerging technologies. The topic will vary from offering to offering. Possible topics 
include Ethics and Computing, Information Systems and Web Design. This course may 
be taken more than once provided that the topic is different. Prerequisite: See individual 
course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

CSC 490. Advanced Special Topics in Computer Science 4 hours 

This course provides an advanced examination of a contemporary topic in computing 
and/or emerging technologies. The topic will vary from offering to offering. Possible topics 
include discipline-specific computing and technology, internet programming and manage- 
ment of information systems. This course may be taken more than once provided that the 
topic is different. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class 
schedule. 

Economics 

Economics is the study of decision making. Economics is used to examine individual behav- 
ior, interactions and the resulting social order. Basic economic principles govern all action. 
It is valuable to go into negotiations in markets, as well as the voting booth, prepared with a 
clear understanding of the business strategies, government policies and decision outcomes 
that will affect society. Knowledge of how markets function is helpful to both business 
people and voters who v^dll make decisions about such market-related economic matters as 
taxes, interest ceilings, minimum wages and public utility rates. A student majoring in eco- 
nomics will evaluate property rights assessments, the incentives created and resulting social 
order, replacing uninformed opinions about complex situations with disciplined thought. 

Students majoring in economics wdll be prepared to analyze complex problems and com- 
municate their findings. The student wdll be introduced to the technical terminology of 
business, analytical tools for problem solving and communication methods, including busi- 
ness writing and presentation. Internships are available to provide preparation for careers 
after graduation. 

The major provides an excellent foundation for careers in business, law, politics, as well as 
government and other not-for-profit entities or to pursue graduate studies in economics or 
business administration. 

Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must complete the following requirements 
with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

ACC 230. Financial Accounting 

ACC 231. Managerial Accounting 

BUS 260. Principles of Management 

BUS 310. Corporate Finance 

BUS 350. Marketing 

BUS 419. Management Science 

BUS 469. Strategic Management 

CSC 140. Data Manipulation Software 

ECO 121. Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221. Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222. Intermediate Macroeconomics 

MAT 111. Statistics 

MAT 121. Applied Calculus 

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Major 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the following requirements 
with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

BUS 419. Management Science 

CSC 140. Data Manipulation Software 

ECO 121. Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221. Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222. Intermediate Macroeconomics 

MAT 111. Statistics 

MAT 121. AppUed Calculus 

One semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary-level 

or higher 
Minor 

Students desiring to minor in economics must complete the following courses with a grade 
of'C-" or higher: 

ECO 121. Introduction to Economics 

ECO 221. Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO 222. Intermediate Macroeconomics 

The student must also complete two additional electives in economics. 

ECO 121. Introduction to Economics 4 hours 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with basic economic principles and 
concepts. The student will be introduced to a few key economic principles that can be used 
in analyzing various economic events. The materials will include a history of economic 
thought, monetary and financial economics and supply and demand analysis. 

ECO 221. Intermediate Microeconomics 4 hours 

This course develops the economic principles necessary to analyze and interpret the deci- 
sions of individuals and firms with respect to consumption, investment, production, pricing 
and hiring. The principles are used to understand the behavior of business firms and public 
policy-making institutions. Prerequisites: ECO 121 and MAT 121. 

ECO 222. Intermediate Macroeconomics 4 hours 

This course examines the goals of economic policy and the policy instruments available to 
achieve those goals. Attention is given to both monetary and fiscal policy along with the 
theory and measurement of national income, employment and price levels and the interna- 
tional implications of economic policy. Prerequisite: ECO 121. 

ECO 223. United States Economic History 4 hours 

This course will study the origin and growth of the American economic system from pre- 
colonial through the 20th century. The course traces the development of the evolution of 
American agricultural, commercial, manufacturing, financial, labor, regulatory and techno- 
logical sectors. Prerequisite: ECO 121. 

ECO 290. Special Topics in Economics 4 hoiu-s 

An intense study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of an economics faculty 
member. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

ECO 323. International Economics 4 hours 

This course is a study of international trade and finance. The microfoundations of the 
course will address why countries trade, why special interest groups fight international 
trade, regional specialization, international agreements on tariffs and trade and national 
commercial policies. The macrofoundations of the course vdll focus on exchange rates, bal- 
ance of payments, international investments and coordination and cooperation of interna- 
tional monetary and fiscal policies. Prerequisite: ECO 121. 

165 



ECO 324. History of Economic Thought 4 hours 

This course is a study of the major writers and schools of economic thought related to 
the economic, political and social institutions of their times: the Medieval, Mercantilist, 
Physiocrat, Classical, Marxist, Historical, Neoclassical, Institutionalist, Keynesian and post- 
Keynesian schools. Prerequisite: ECO 121. 

ECO 325. Environmental Economics 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to economic methods that will allow the student to under- 
stand the economic causes of environmental problems and to evaluate the economic impact 
of environmental polices. It will introduce the student to a wide range of current environ- 
mental problems and issues such as hazardous and municipal solid waste, water and air 
quality concerns, biodiversity, global warming and sustainable development. Topics will 
include externalities, benefit-cost analysis, alternative policy instruments as solutions to 
environmental problems, market failures, policy decision process and risk analysis. Prereq- 
uisites: ECO 121 and junior or senior standing. 

ECO 420. Economic Development 4 hours 

This course is a study of the economic, social and political factors that account for the con- 
trast between the economic stagnation in much of the world and the steadily rising incomes 
in the United States, Europe and Japan. General principles are applied to the development 
experience of selected countries in the historically less-developed world and the formerly 
centrally-planned economies of Eastern and Central Europe. Prerequisites: ECO 221 and 
ECO 222. 

ECO 421. Money and Banking 4 hours 

This course will study the role of private financial institutions and the Federal Reserve 
System in the creation of the nation's money supply and the theory that links the money 
supply to the nation's inflation rate and output level. Additional topics are the international 
payments mechanism, capital flows, the determination of exchange rates and the use of a 
common currency by several countries. Prerequisites: CSC 140, ECO 221 and ECO 222. 

ECO 423. Business Structure and Antitrust Law 4 hours 

This course is a study of the structure of firms within a given industry, the corresponding 
strategic decisions and conduct and the United States' antitrust policy that is intended to 
facilitate competitive market goals across the economy. Topics will include competition, 
dominant firm and cartel theory, measurement of industry structure and performance, stra- 
tegic behavior in pricing, advertising and information, vertical integration, regulation and 
law and international markets. Prerequisite: ECO 221 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

ECO 424. Labor Economics 4 hours 

This course will be a comprehensive study of the cause and effect relationship between 
work and income. It will examine labor market structures, human capital theory, union- 
management relations, labor history, economic policy and earning profiles by gender and 
race. Prerequisites: ECO 221 and ECO 222. 

ECO 425. Public Finance 4 hours 

An analysis of the impact of federal, state and local government expenditures, revenues, 
debt management and budgeting on the allocation of resources, the distribution of income, 
the stabilization of national income and employment and economic growth. Topics will 
include expenditure patterns, tax structure, benefit-cost analysis, policy analysis and micro- 
economic and macroeconomic theories of public expenditures and taxation. Prerequisites: 
ECO 221 and ECO 222. 

ECO 426. Internship in Economics 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 

166 



sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportu- 
nities at the Federal Reserve Bank and Prudential Securities. Graded on a satisfactory/un- 
satisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualification for the 
internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning 
agreement proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

ECO 427. Independent Study in Economics l-^ hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

ECO 490. Advanced Special Topics in Economics 4 hours 

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as de- 
termined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the 
current semester class schedule. 

Education _^ ^^ 

Grounded in the liberal arts tradition, the education program emphasizes strong academic 
preparation of teachers who are lifelong learners. Teacher education at Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity is designed to challenge students to think critically about issues in education, to be 
informed decision makers and to become change agents in their schools. 

The three courses listed below are offered as electives for undergraduates and certification 
co-requisites to the Master of Arts in Teaching Program. 

EDU 101. Foundations of American Education 4 hours 

This course is an overview of the historical, philosophical, ethical and legal issues in Ameri- 
can education. Issues of equity will be examined. A variety of teaching strategies and assess- 
ment will be implemented. Twenty-five field-experience hours outside of class meetings are 
necessary in order to meet the service-learning requirements of this course. 

EDU 201. Educational Psychology 4 hours 

This course will encompass learning theory and its application to such problems as class- 
room management, the organization of learning activities, understanding individual dif- 
ferences and evaluating teaching and learning. Emphasis is given to factors which facilitate 
and interfere with learning. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C" or higher. 

EDU 401. The Exceptional Child 4 hours 

This course is designed to assist regular classroom teachers in the identification and educa- 
tion of children who have special needs. In addition to characteristics of special learners, 
students will study topics such as the referral process, educational approaches for use with 
special learners, methods of diagnostic teaching, mainstreaming and inclusion. 

Master of Arts in Teaching Early Childhood Education 

(Grades P-5) 

The Master of Arts in Teaching Early Childhood Education (Grades P-5) program at 
Oglethorpe University is based on a commitment to a broad liberal arts background as the 
best content preparation for teaching and preparing teachers for the diverse populations of 

167 



metropolitan schools. The program emphasizes strong academic preparation and the role of 
teacher as learner. The teacher education program at Oglethorpe has strong connections to 
the Atlanta community - both urban and suburban. The program offers both the Master of 
Arts in Teaching degree and initial certification for Early Childhood educators upon recom- 
mendation to the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. Successful completion of all 
program requirements is necessary to be recommended for a teaching certificate. 

Admission to the Graduate Program 

Application forms may be obtained from the admission office. To be admitted to the gradu- 
ate program, applicants must meet the following admission criteria: 

1. Completion of a bachelor's degree at a regionally accredited institution. Ogletho- 
rpe undergraduate students are eligible to apply to the program and iDridge" into 
the Master of Arts in Teaching Program, which allows them to take graduate-level 
courses in the MAT program, in the final semester of their senior year. Only stu- 
dents who have satisfactorily met all undergraduate major and Core requirements 
are eligible for this early program entry option. To prepare for this option, those 
undergraduate students who are interested should see a faculty member in the 
Division of Education early in their Oglethorpe tenure. 

2. A minimum undergraduate grade point average of 2.8 from all college work. 

3. Satisfactory progress at the undergraduate level on the following certification 
corequisites: 

two courses in humanities (including English composition) 

two courses in history and the social sciences 

two courses in mathematics 

two courses in laboratory science 

two courses in the arts 

EDU 101 Foundation of American Education, or equivalent 

EDU 201 Educational Psychology, or equivalent 

EDU 401 The Exceptional Child, or equivalent 

PSY 201 Developmental Psychology, or equivalent 

Note: Any certification corequisites not completed at the time of admission will be incor- 
porated into the student's overall program requirements. 

4. A passing score on three GACE Basic Skills exams (reading, writing and mathemat- 
ics) or SAT, GRE or ACT scores that allow for exemption of GACE Basic Skills. 
Exempting scores are as follows: 

• SAT total score 1000, with at least 480 verbal and 520 mathematical 

• ACT total score 22, with at least 21 verbal and 22 mathematical 

• GRE total score 1030, with at least 490 verbal and 540 quantitative 

5. A combined score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE 

6. A 500- to 1000-word written "Experience Statement" that describes experiences 
working with children as, for example, a tutor, camp counselor, day care worker, 
church school teacher, substitute teacher or volunteer working vvdth children. 

7. Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which must be from a faculty 
adviser or university professor who can speak to the applicant's academic readi- 
ness for graduate study and at least one from a supervisor in a work or volunteer 
setting who can speak to the applicant's dispositions for leadership and productive 
exchange. 

Note: Admission to the graduate program does not indicate ultimate acceptance as a 
candidate for the master's degree. See Admission to Candidacy below. 



168 



Program Completion Requirements 

Candidates for the degree and initial certification must meet the following requirements: 

1. Maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher for all work taken at 
Oglethorpe. 

2. Complete all graduate courses successfully in the Master of Arts in Teaching Early 
Childhood Education program (48 semester hours) with a grade of "C" or higher. 

3. Complete 100 hours of field experience prior to student teaching and a semes- 
ter-long student teaching experience - EDU 619 Student Teaching and Capstone 
Seminar. 

4. Pass both GACE Early Childhood Education Tests (Test I and Test II) and success- 
fully complete any remaining certification corequisites prior to enrolling for EDU 
619 Student Teaching and Capstone Seminar. (Any exceptions to this provision 
must be approved by the student's adviser.) 

5. Complete EDU 619 Student Teaching and Capstone Seminar successfully in a full- 
day K-5 program, with no more than two attempts to successfully complete this 
course. In order to enroll in the course, students must show proof of liability insur- 
ance and sign the "Personal Affirmation," affirming their legal status and giving the 
Georgia Professional Standards Commission the right to perform a background 
check, if required. 

6. Compile and successfully present an electronic professional portfolio. In this port- 
folio, candidates must demonstrate their knowledge base for each of the 10 INTASC 
standards. 

7. Submit an application for graduation to the registrar's office by the last day of drop/ 
add in the semester in which degree requirements will be completed. 

8. Satisfy all financial and other obligations to the university and submit payment for 
• the degree completion fee. 

9. Participate in assessments of competencies gained and curricular effectiveness by 
completing standardized or other test and surveys. 

10. Receive formal faculty and Board of Trustees approval for graduation. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Graduate students must be admitted to candidacy before enrolling for EDU 619 Student 
Teaching and Capstone Seminar. The candidacy application must be filed with the chair 
of the Division of Education. Admission to candidacy may be given or denied following a 
careful review of all work of the student, including disposition for teaching as demonstrated 
in the field experience. Notice of action taken on the candidacy application will be given in 
writing to the student. 

Residency Requirements 

At least 30 semester hours of graduate work must be completed at Oglethorpe University. 

Transfer Credit 

The Master of Arts in Teaching Early Childhood Education program at Oglethorpe is 
unique in both conception and implementation. For this reason, only limited transfer credit 
is possible. A maximum of eight semester hours of credit may be transferred from another 
accredited graduate institution subject to the following conditions: 

1. Transfer credit may be awarded for courses that are comparable to EDU 606 
Culture and Learning and/or EDU 603 Assessing Teaching and Learning. Transfer 
credit cannot be accepted for other courses. 

2. Determination of transfer credit is made by the chair of the Division of Education 
in consultation with the student's adviser and the faculty member who teaches that 
course. The student must present a catalog course description for the requested 

169 



course. Work already applied toward another degree cannot be accepted. 

3. Work must have been completed within the previous six years and must have been 
applicable toward a graduate degree at the institution where the credit was earned. 

4. Acceptance of transfer credit does not reduce the residency requirement. 

5. An official transcript showing the credits to be transferred must be on file in the 
registrar's office. A copy of the transcript should be attached to the request. 

6. Under no circumstances may credit earned through correspondence or online 
courses be applied toward satisfaction of graduate degree requirements. 

Advisement and Registration 

Upon admission to the graduate program, each student is assigned to a member of the fac- 
ulty of the Division of Education who serves as adviser to guide the student in planning the 
program of study. Registration dates for each semester are listed in the Academic Calendar 
in this Bulletin. Registration occurs in November for the spring semester and in April for 
the summer and fall semesters. Students must meet with their advisers to plan for registra- 
tion for courses. 

Course Load 

A full-time course load for graduate students is 12 semester hours or three courses. 

Tuition and Fees 

A nonrefundable application fee must accompany the application. Tuition is charged on 
a per-credit basis. Upon completion of course requirements a degree completion fee is 
charged. All fees are subject to change. Please direct inquiries regarding current fees to the 
business office. 

Academic Standards 

Candidates for the master's degree must meet the following academic standards: 

1. The student's overall grade point average for work in the graduate program must be 
3.0 or higher. 

2. If in any case the candidate fails to maintain satisfactory academic and professional 
standards, a review by the Teacher Education Council will determine the student's 
continuation in the program. 

3. Any student who falls below a 3.0 grade point average or has a total of two course 
grades of "C" or below v^U be placed on academic probation. A student who re- 
ceives a third grade of "C" or less or who does not achieve a 3.0 grade point average 
upon completion of three additional graduate courses will be dismissed from the 
program. A student will also be dismissed from the program following two unsuc- 
cessftil attempts to complete EDU 619 Student Teaching and Capstone Seminar, 
regardless of the grade point average in prior graduate course work. 

EDU 601. Exploring Constructivist Teaching and Learning 4 hours 

The purposes of this course, the first in the Master of Arts in Teaching program sequence, 
are to explore the historical and philosophical foundations of constructivist teaching and 
learning and to provide learners with pedagogical skills to plan, implement and assess 
inquiry-based instruction. Students will engage in regular and systematic reflection on their 
developing knowledge and then apply their knowledge in field-based classroom experiences 
in diverse settings. 

EDU 603. Assessing Teaching and Learning 4 hours 

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and skills needed to develop paper- 



170 



and-pencil and performance assessments for formative and summative classroom evalua- 
tion. Planning student evaluations, coordinating evaluations with objectives, item develop- 
ment, item analysis, relating evaluation to instruction, grading and reporting achievement 
outcomes to students, parents and school personnel are discussed. 

EDU 605. Literacies Workshop 4- hours 

This course is an introduction to tools for developing literacy in the broadest sense of 
the word. While focusing on writing, the course encourages discussion and development 
of literacy in other areas such as mathematics, visual arts and technology. The course is 
workshop based, involving students in developing their own literacies as they learn ways to 
support children's literacy development. 

EDU 606. Culture and Learning 4 hours 

This course represents an interdisciplinary study between educational psychology and an- 
thropology. It focuses on the ways in which culture and mind, and more specifically, culture 
and self, mutually constitute each other. Through reflections, readings and inquiry, students 
will develop teaching strategies that can effectively respond to a diverse educational system 
in which class, race, culture and family influence development and learning. This course has 
a theory into practice orientation. 

EDU 611. Arts of Diverse Peoples 4 hours 

This course provides future teachers with an appreciation and understanding of the arts 
disciplines of music, visual art, dance and theatre as a means to understand self, others and 
the human condition. It also offers students an opportunity for personal inquiry experi- 
ences and skill development in the arts so that they feel prepared to incorporate study of 
the arts into their classrooms. Students will engage in regular and systematic reflection on 
their developing knowledge base. Students will also apply their knowledge in field-based 
classroom experiences in diverse settings. 

EDU 612. Literacy and Literature 4 hours 

This course prepares students to be literacy teachers in diverse early childhood classrooms. 
The course includes methods of literacy instruction and explorations in literature from vari- 
ous cultural perspectives. Students will engage in regular and systematic reflection on their 
developing knowledge base and apply their knowledge in field-based classroom experiences 
in diverse settings. 

EDU 613. Studies of Diverse Cultures 4 hoiu-s 

This course includes exploration of social studies content and methods for teaching social 
studies in early childhood education. From a variety of perspectives, students will exam- 
ine the types of questions social scientists ask about human experience, institutions and 
interactions. In the course, prospective teachers will use appropriate methods of inquiry to 
investigate some of those questions. They will engage in regular and systematic reflection 
on their developing knowledge base and then apply that knowledge in field-based class- 
room experiences in diverse settings. 

EDU 614. Mathematical Inquiry 4 hours 

The foundation for this course is that knowing mathematics is doing mathematics; thereby, 
students will be prepared to teach mathematics well. The focus is mathematics content: 
number systems, geometry and an additional unit (from probability/statistics, graph theory 
or another appropriate area). Methods, assessment, technology and historical perspective 
are integral to this course. 

EDU 615. Inquiring Into Science 4 hours 

In this course, students will explore nature, content and processes of science while examin- 
ing current best practices and issues in teaching science to children. Students will under- 



171 



stand the role that inquiry plays in the development of scientific knowledge. Students will 
explore relationships between science, technology and other curriculum areas in a commu- 
nity of diverse elementary learners. 

EDU 619. Student Teaching and Capstone Seminar 12 hours 

Student teaching, a supervised internship semester in a diverse elementary public school 
classroom, is the capstone experience in teacher preparation, the point at which theory and 
practice converge. The course includes 14 weeks of full-time participation and teaching in a 
public school classroom with weekly seminar meetings for professional development. 

EDU 629. Advanced Special Topics in Education 1-12 hours 

Advanced courses are offered to respond to topical needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite; 
See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

Engineering - Dual Degree 

Oglethorpe is associated wdth the Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of 
Florida, Auburn University, Mercer University and the University of Southern California 
in combined programs of liberal arts and engineering. The programs require the student 
to complete three years at Oglethorpe University and the final two years at one of these 
engineering schools. The three years at Oglethorpe include Core Curriculum courses. 
General Chemistry I and II, College Physics I and II, Calculus I-III, a choice of Differential 
Equations or Linear Algebra and other courses chosen based upon the student's intended 
engineering area of specialization. The two years of technical education require the comple- 
tion of courses in one of the branches of engineering. 

In this combined plan, the two degrees which are awarded upon the successful completion 
of the program are the degree of Bachelor of Arts by Oglethorpe University and the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Engineering by the engineering school. Because the required 
pre-engineering curricula of the five affiliated schools are slightly different, the student is 
advised to consult frequently vdth the faculty member serving as dual degree engineering 
program adviser. 

Engineering is a difficult subject. Students can maximize their chances for success by start- 
ing at Oglethorpe where the faculty's primary concern is effective teaching and working 
closely with students. Classes are small and laboratories offer the opportunity for hands-on 
experience with sophisticated equipment. This strong foundation gives the student an ex- 
cellent preparation for professional school, resulting in more effective learning in advanced 
engineering courses. As a liberal arts and sciences university, Oglethorpe stresses broad 
education for intelligent leadership. Here, the student will explore the fiindamental fields 
of knowledge, further his or her understanding of science and mathematics and refine the 
abilities to read, write, speak and reason with clarity. This preparation will serve the student 
well in any career but particularly so in the engineering field. With strong preparation in 
engineering plus a liberal arts education, the student will be ready for a variety of career po- 
sitions. The dual degree engineering program provides an education that is both broad and 
deep - a combination that will serve the graduate well as career responsibilities increase. 

Note: Dual-degree students in engineering may not use Oglethorpe financial aid assis- 
tance to attend other institutions. 

English 

In literature courses, students examine written works to determine their meaning, to reach 
judgments about their value, to explore their relation to life and to derive pleasure. To these 
ends, students make written and oral analyses, supporting their conclusions with close ex- 



172 



amination of specific passages from the works of literature being studied. In both hterature 
and writing courses, students learn to compose their generalizations and supporting details 
into a coherent structure of thought and language. Students in literary writing classes learn 
about poetry, fiction and nonfiction by working to develop the insight, imagination and 
discipline required to create them and by studying instructive examples of these genres. 

An English major at Oglethorpe is excellent preparation for law school or any other pro- 
fessional training that requires students to interpret written material and support their 
assertions with specific evidence. Given the expressed need in the business community for 
people who can communicate well orally and on paper, the combination of an English ma- 
jor and courses in business administration or an accounting minor may be very attractive to 
prospective employers. The course Writing for Business and the Professions focuses on the 
kinds of speaking and writing abilities graduates will need to get and keep jobs in person- 
nel, sales and management. Oglethorpe graduates also work in public relations and editing, 
where they use their skill with words - a major emphasis of every English course. They go 
into teaching and sometimes work for publishers, television stations, film-making compa- 
nies or computer firms. They write press releases, training manuals, in-house newspapers 
and news copy. 

To help students bridge the gap between academic life and work experience, Oglethorpe 
places English majors in internships with area newspapers, publishing companies, public 
relations firms, cultural associations and radio and television stations. Such experiences 
enhance students' chances of finding the jobs they want after graduation. 

Major 

Students who major in English are required to take four period courses: Ancient Literature, 
Medieval and Renaissance Literature, 18th and 19th Century Literature and Modern and 
Contemporary Literature. Students also are required to take one writing course; Shake- 
speare or Chaucer; four electives from the upper-level (200 and 300) literature courses and 
one semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary-level or higher. The 
degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

Students who minor in English are required to take a minimum of five literature courses. At 
least three of these must be upper-level (300) courses. 

ENG 101. Ancient Literature 4 hours 

This course will examine the literature of the ancient world. Although the primary focus 
will be on Greek, Roman and Hebrew culture, non- Western materials may also be studied. 
Works and authors might include: Gilgamesh, Homer, Job and Virgil. 

ENG 102. Medieval and Renaissance Literature 4 hours 

This course will examine the transition of the cultural world of Dante to that of Shake- 
speare and Milton. Although the primary focus will be Western, non-Western works may 
also be studied. Texts and authors might include: Chretien, Dante, The Tale ofGenji, Chau- 
cer, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Cervantes and Milton. 

ENG 103. 18th and 19th Century Literature 4 hours 

Authors in this course might include: Defoe, Pope, Basho, Austen, Emerson, Twain and 
George Eliot. 

ENG 104. Modern and Contemporary Literature 4 hours 

This course will investigate the literature of the 20th century. Authors might include: T. 
S. Eliot, Woolf, Lawrence, Frost, Morrison and Marquez. 



173 



ENG 201. Chaucer 4 hours 

Students will learn to read and appreciate the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, the first great 
English poet, in his original language; to enjoy the rich and varied nature of his works; to 
appreciate why he is called "the Father of English." Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and 
one 100-level English course. 

ENG 202. Shakespeare 4 hours 

The plays and theatre of William Shakespeare. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: 
COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course. 

ENG. 230. Creative Writing 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to writing poetry and prose fiction. The student will be asked 
to submit substantial written work each week, keep a journal and read published writers. 
Much class time will be spent discussing student and published work. Prerequisites: COR 
101 and COR 102. 

ENG 231. Biography and Autobiography 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to biographical and autobiographical writing with practice in 
the personal narrative as well as other forms such as the profile and the interview. Students 
will submit substantial vmtten work each week and keep a journal. The class will follow a 
workshop format, discussing the students' and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101 and 
COR 102. 

ENG 300. The Bible as Literature 4 hours 

This course wall examine the Bible as a literary artifact and wdthin an historical context. 
Students will be particularly interested in the varied ways in which the Bible generates 
meaning. These include archetypal repetition, the weaving together of historically disparate 
texts, parable and allegory. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English 



ENG 301. Russian Literature 4 hours 

This course wdll consist of Russian literature in translation, mostly fiction, mostly from the 
19th century. Central to the course is Anna Karenina. In addition to Tolstoy, authors might 
include: Gogol, Dostoevski and Chekhov. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100- 
level English course. 

ENG 302. The Child in Literature 4 hours 

This course will involve a wide-ranging study of works which employ innocence, particu- 
larly in childhood, in order to deepen the understanding of experience. Authors might 
include: Sophocles, Blake, Carroll, James and Kafka. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and 
one 100-level English course. 

ENG 303. American Poetry 4 hours 

This course will consider the work of major American poets such as Whitman, Dickinson, 
Frost, Eliot and Wilhams. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English 
course. 

WGS 304. Women Poets 4 hours 

This course is a survey of poetry by women, from ancient Chinese, Persian and others in 
translation, to medieval Irish and Renaissance English, to 19th and 20th century Ameri- 
cans, as well as Eastern Europeans and Latin Americans in translation. Included will be 
several recent poets such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich and Mary Oliver in order to 
discover what themes, images and attitudes seem to emerge from the works. Prerequisites: 
COR 101 and COR 102. 



174 



ENG 305. The Literature of King Arthur and Camelot 4 hours 

This course examines the major stories associated with King Arthur and his knights from 
the eariiest recorded mention of them to the present. The course pays particular attention 
to those medieval texts that formed the popular literature of the Middle Ages and the vari- 
ous ways in which medieval authors adapted the legend to their purpose, whether that was 
to promote a political agenda, explore an idea, instruct or amuse. Of particular interest are 
the ways in which this legend is peculiarly able to accommodate a wide array of themes and 
ideas - a malleability that allows us to explore the nature of honor, goodness, love, holiness, 
chivalry', the relationship between the sexes, the promise of heaven and a host of other ideas 
that continue to animate our imaginations. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100- 
level English course. 

ENG 307. Milton 4 hours 

This course will examine the major prose and poetry of John Milton and their place in 
17th century English culture. Works studied will include Areopagitica, Lycidas, Samson 
Agonistes and Paradise Lost. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English 



ENG 309. The Literature of the City and the Country 4 hours 

This course will concentrate on 19th and 20th century English and American literature in 
order to deepen the student's understanding and test the conceptions of the natural and the 
urban. Authors might include Wordsworth, Dickens, Thoreau, Woolf and Frost. Prerequi- 
sites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 311. Ulysses 4 hours 

This course will focus on a thorough reading of Ulysses but might also examine other works 
by James Joyce, such as Duhliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and selections 
from Finnegans Wake. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 313. African-American Literary Traditions 4 hours 

This course surveys African-American literature and literary history. It begins with a close 
examination of the slave narrative and the African-American sentimental novel of the 19th 
century. An exploration is made of the literature of the Harlem Renaissance, followed by 
works like Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man and Richard Wright's Native Son. Finally, civil 
rights era literature and works by authors such as Gloria Naylor and Alice Walker will be 
examined. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course, preferably 
ENG 104. 

ENG 315. Vision, Violence and Community in Milton, Blake, Whitman 

and Yeats 4 hours 

This course will examine works by four major visionary poets. In the historical context of 
English civil war, the French Revolution, the American Civil War and World War I and the 
Irish rebellions, they tried to envision for their cultures a restoration of community between 
the temporal and the eternal, the human and the divine. In times of fragmentation and 
crisis, each re-invented a traditional mythology. A study will be made of their individual vi- 
sions to those collective myths and to personal struggles. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 
and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 330. Writing Poetry 4 hours 

In weekly assignments students will try free verse and various forms in the effort to discover 
and to embody more and more truly what they have to say. Much time will be spent reading 
published poets, responding to student work in class and trying to generate language that 
reveals rather than explains intangible "meanings." Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 



175 



ENG 331. Writing Prose, Fiction and Nonfiction 4 hours 

Students will get instruction and substantial practice in writing fictional and nonfictional 
prose which aims at getting what Henry James called "a sense of felt life" onto the page. 
The class will follow a workshop format with weekly assignments, journal writing, extensive 
discussion of student work and reading of published examples. Prerequisites: COR 101 and 
COR 102. 

ENG 350. Independent Study in Literature and Composition 1-4 hours 

Supervised study in specified genres or periods. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 
100-level English course; submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule 
of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost 
no later than the second day of classes of the semester of study. For additional criteria see 
Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

ENG 390. Special Topics in Drama 4 hours 

Drama as literature and genre, through survey and period studies. Prerequisites: COR 101, 
COR 102 and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 391. Special Topics in Poetry 4 hours 

This course will focus on particular poets, movements, styles or periods. Prerequisites: COR 
101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 392. Special Topics in Fiction 4 hours 

English, American and continental narrative prose will be examined in the context of 
theme, period or genre. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 393. Special Topics in Literature and Culture 4 hours 

Courses relating literature with aspects of social and intellectual history or a particular issue 
or theme. Possible offerings may include women in literature, American civilization, Afri- 
can-American (or other ethnic) literature, popular culture, the literature of a single decade, 
children's literature and myth and folklore in literature. Usually offered in alternate years. 
Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 394. Special Topics in Major British and American Authors 4 hours 

An intensive study of between one and five British or American authors. Prerequisites: COR 
101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course. 

ENG 401. Internship in English 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportu- 
nities diX. Atlanta Magazine, The Knight Agency and Peachtree Publishers. Graded on a sat- 
isfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualifica- 
tion for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance 
of learning agreement proposal by Experiential Education Committee. 

Environmental Studies - Dual Degree 



The Cooperative College Program coordinates the education of students at Oglethorpe 
University with graduate programs in environmental studies and natural resources offered 



176 



by the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. This program provides a 
unique combination of liberal and professional education well suited for those desiring to 
enter the fields of environmental studies or natural resources. Participating Oglethorpe stu- 
dents are accepted into either of two degree programs at Duke: the Master of Environmen- 
tal Management (MEM) or the Master of Forestry (MF). The degree awarded is determined 
by the student's area of concentration at Duke. The program accommodates a wide range of 
undergraduate backgrounds and experience indicates that students majoring in one of the 
natural or social sciences, pre-engineering, economics or business administration are best 
suited for it. Although some students may prefer to complete the baccalaureate degree be- 
fore undertaking graduate study at Duke, highly qualified students can reach a satisfactory 
level of preparation wdth three years of coordinated undergraduate study at Oglethorpe; all 
final admission decisions rest with the Nicholas School of the Environment. A Bachelor of 
Arts degree is awarded by Oglethorpe University upon successful completion of one year of 
study at Duke; after four semesters at Duke, in which at least 48 semester units of credit are 
earned, these students may qualify for one of the professional master's degrees. 

There are six areas of concentration for the professional master's degree programs offered 
by the Nicholas School of the Environment: Coastal Environmental Management; Environ- 
mental Toxicology, Chemistry and Risk Assessment; Resource Ecology; Resource Econom- 
ics and Policy; Water and Air Resources; and Forest Resource Management. The under- 
graduate course requirements are highly flexible for some areas of concentration; others are 
more stringent. All of the programs have the following requirements: 

1. Completion of the Oglethorpe University core courses. 

2. Training in the natural sciences or social sciences related to the student's area of 
interest in natural resources and environmental science. 

3. Completion of at least one introductory course in calculus - either Applied Calculus 
or Calculus I. 

4. ' Completion of a statistics course that includes descriptive statistics, probability 

distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlation, simple linear 
regression and simple ANOVAs. Statistics at Oglethorpe fulfills this requirement. 

5. A working knowledge of microcomputers for word processing and data analysis. 
Data Manipulation Software fulfills this requirement, although students with 
extensive experience with computers may have other options. Introduction to 
Computer Applications Software fulfills this requirement, although students with 
extensive experience with computers may have other options. 

Qualified students who have interests outside of the structured programs of the Nicholas 
School of the Environment are permitted to design individual programs of study; all such 
individual programs are subject to approval by the Education Committee of the Nicholas 
School of the Environment. 

Note: Dual-degree students in environmental studies and natural resources may not use 
Oglethorpe financial aid assistance to attend Duke University. 

Foreign Languages 

In order to study in any given foreign language, all students with previous study or experi- 
ence in that language must take a language proficiency examination or obtain permission 
of the instructor during summer orientation or prior to fall registration. They will be placed 
in the course sequence according to their competence. Students are not eligible to enroll in 
elementary and intermediate courses in their primary language. 

Please refer to specific foreign languages in alphabetical order in this section for respective 
course offerings. 



177 



FOR 290. Special Topics in Foreign Language, Literature and Culture 4 hours 

A course in which intermediate conversation or topical aspects of Uterature and culture are 
explored. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

FOR 425. Internship in Foreign Language 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including oppor- 
tunities at the Atlanta Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Georgia Council for International 
Visitors and the Georgia Department of Industry, Trade and Tourism. Graded on a satisfac- 
tory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualification 
for the internship program permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of 
learning agreement proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

FOR 490. Advanced Special Topics in Foreign Language, Literature 

and Culture 4 hours 

A course in which advanced conversation or topical aspects of literature and culture are 
explored. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

French 

A student who chooses French as a major will gain valuable knowledge, not only about 
the language, but also about the many unique and fascinating cultures represented in the 
French-speaking world. Like all languages offered in our foreign language program, the 
French major is informed by "the five C's:" communication, cultures, connections, compari- 
sons and communities. These areas represent the defined goals of National Sta.ndards for 
Foreign Language Learning. 

The journey toward a French major begins with a thorough emphasis on reading, writing, 
listening comprehension and speaking. These essential skills prepare the student with the 
foundations for communicating in diverse contexts in the French language. More advanced 
study of French will enable the student to explore the treasures of French and Franco- 
phone prose, poetry, drama and cinema, in addition to the study of colorful and intriguing 
civilizations in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Africa and Quebec and wider French-speak- 
ing Canada. Through course offerings in French at Oglethorpe University, students become 
more informed about America's French-speaking neighbors to the north and in the Carib- 
bean to the south in addition to becoming more functional global citizens. 

Once students have reached an adequate level of proficiency in French, they will be ready 
to complement their classroom studies with full-immersion study abroad opportunities. As 
an invaluable component of the French major, students are required to study and live in a 
French-speaking country for a semester during the academic year following the comple- 
tion of an initial sequence of courses taken in the program. Most French majors choose to 
study at Oglethorpe's partner institution, the Catholic University of Lille. In addition, for 
the adventurous student, there are many other creative study abroad options available, all 
of which can be discussed with student advisers. Native speakers of French are invited to 
complete the 12-semester hour requirements of study abroad in courses at Oglethorpe or 
through cross registration at one of the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education 
(ARCHE) institutions. 

Many students who complete the French major at Oglethorpe go on to carry out graduate 
programs at other institutions in French and Francophone language and literature, linguis- 

178 



tics, French cultural studies or International Relations. Other graduates from the program 
become French instructors or find opportunities in corporate or non-profit organizations, 
where they continue to apply their language skills and global experiences. Students are also 
invited to combine a double major in French with other disciplines, a combination which 
greatly enhances student marketability after graduation. 

All students with previous study or experience in French must take a language placement 
examination. They will be placed in the course sequence according to their competence. 
Under no circumstance should students with past experience in French place themselves in 
courses, especially at the elementary level. Students are not eligible to enroll in elementary 
and intermediate courses in their native languages. 

Major 

Students who major in French must first complete the follovsdng requirements: 
FRE 201. Intermediate French 
FRE 301. French Conversation and Composition 
FRE 302. French Lyric and Literary Prose 

Students vAW then complete a semester in an approved study abroad program, which 
should include a minimum of 12 semester hours. Returning students must complete three 
upper-level (300 or 400) courses in French. 

Elementary Spanish I or equivalent as determined through the Spanish placement test is 
also required. It is recommended that this requirement be completed during the student's 
first two years. 

A minimum of "C+" must be earned in all course work required for the major. The degree 
awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

A minor in French consists of the following requirements: 
FRE 201. Intermediate French 
Three upper-level courses (300 or 400) 

Certain of these requirements may be met through an approved study abroad program. 

FRE 101, FRE 102. Elementary French I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This course is beginning college French, designed to present a sound foundation in under- 
standing, speaking, reading and vmting contemporary French. Prerequisite: None for FRE 
101; FRE 101 required for FRE 102 or placement by testing. 

FRE 201. Intermiediate French 4 hours 

This course involves further practice in developing oral and written skills. Introduction to 
a variety of unedited French texts will be included. Prerequisite: FRE 102 or placement by 
testing. 

FRE 290. Special Topics in French Language, Literature and Culture 4 hours 

Topical aspects of the literature and cultural phenomena associated with the French 
language are explored in this course. A recent course was French and Spanish Studies on 
Hispaniola - Full Immersion Travel Course in the Dominican Republic. Offerings will vary 
according to faculty and student interest. Prerequisite: FRE 301. 

FRE 301. French Conversation and Composition 4 hours 

This course focuses on the development of oral skills through practice in group settings and 
individual class presentations combined with weekly writing assignments in French to be 



179 



revised on a regular basis. A study of style and grammatical forms used exclusively in the 
written language completes the course v^^ork. Prerequisite: FRE 201 or placement by test- 
ing. 

FRE 302. French Lyric and literary Prose 4 hours 

Selected texts from French literature are studied as examples of prose, poetry and drama. 
Students will read original works from the French classical and modern periods. Taught in 
French. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or placement by testing. 

FRE 402. The Modern French Republics and Their Institutions 4 hours 

A study of both political and cultural institutions in France from 1870 to the present with 
emphasis on the traditions established by the new republican government in the 1880s and 
the creation in 1958 of the Fifth Republic under which France is currently governed. Taught 
in French. Prerequisite: FRE 301. 

FRE 403. Franco-American Relations in Trade and Culture 4 hours 

This course is an orientation to French business and cultural communities and consider- 
ations of existing connections with their American counterparts. The course includes an 
introduction to business French. Guest lecturers are invited from the diplomatic and busi- 
ness community in the wider Atlanta area. Field trips are also organized to consulates, trade 
offices and businesses. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRE 301. 

FRE 404. Great French Actresses and Their Film Roles 4 hours 

This course will study French film actresses and their roles in an attempt to understand the 
situation of women in France during the last half of the 20th century. Readings from The 
Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir, written at the outset of the period in question, provide 
a counterpoint to the cinematic fiction. Actresses studied may include Isabelle Adjani, Ar- 
letty, Fanny Ardant, Brigitte Bardot, Juliette Binoche, Sandrine Bonaire, Marion Cotillard, 
Catherine Deneuve, Isabelle Huppert, Miou-Miou, Romy Scheider and Simone Signoret. 
The course is conducted in English. Students may take the course as part of a French major 
or minor and complete readings, tests and written work in French. Prerequisite: None for 
work in English, FRE 302 for work in French. 

FRE 405. The 19th Century French Realist Novel 4 hours 

This course studies the 19th-century French realist novel by concentrating on three "giants" 
of the tradition. The course includes Balzac's Pere Goriot, Flaubert's Education Sentimentale 
and Zola's Germinal. The study of one novel of each of these writers gives an overview of 
the major literary moments in the century following the French Revolution. The principal 
characters in each novel confront the particular challenges of each historical and social mo- 
ment in 19th century France. The course thus allows students to obtain a complex notion of 
realism in a historical context along with greatly enhanced vocabulary and language skills 
in French. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRE 302. 

FRE 406. French and Spanish Crossroads in the Caribbean and Africa 4 hours 

This course uses Spanish- and French-speaking countries in proximity to each other in the 
Caribbean or Africa as a point of departure for literary, cultural, social and service learning 
exploration. Offerings may focus upon Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Martinique and 
Cuba, Equatorial Guinea in relation to Senegal or other appropriate pairings. The course is 
taught in English and students without advanced skills in French or Spanish may register. 
This course is also cross listed as SPN 406. Prerequisite: FRE 301 for French major or mi- 
nor credit; SPN 301 for Spanish major or minor credit. 

FRE 450. Independent Study in French 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 

180 



study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

FRE 490. Advanced Special Topics in French Language, Literature 

and Culture 4 hours 

This course will be an advanced study of topical aspects of the literature and cultural phe- 
nomena associated with the French language. Offerings will vary according to faculty and 
student interest. Prerequisite: FRE 302. 

General Science 

The physical science and biological science courses are appropriate for students who have 
a good background in algebra but a minimal one in other sciences. Students with excellent 
preparation in the sciences may elect one of the regular lecture-and-laboratory courses in 
biology, chemistry or physics. 

GEN 101. Natural Science: The Physical Sciences 4 hours 

This topically-oriented course will examine the many facets of scientific investigation. 
These include the underlying assumptions, limitations, provisional nature and power of 
the scientific process, as well as the influences of science on other aspects of human activity. 
Experimentation is the hallmark of scientific investigation. As such, laboratory experimen- 
tation will be a distinguishing feature of this course. Course time devoted to experimenta- 
tion in the laboratory, as well as inside and outside the classroom, will intertwine with time 
devoted to discussion and lecture. Natural Science: The Physical Sciences will deal with a 
topic drawn from the physical sciences. These will include, but not be limited to: Chemis- 
try, Cosmology, Descriptive Astronomy, History of Science, Meteorology, Modern Scientific 
Perspectives of the Universe and Oceanography. Prerequisite: MAT 103 or by examination. 

GEN 102. Natural Science: The Biological Sciences 4 hours 

This course is designed to examine the many facets of scientific investigation. Laboratory 
experimentation will be an important feature with course time devoted to experimentation 
in the laboratory as well as the classroom. Rather than a survey of the entire field of biology, 
this effort will be directed toward specific topics such as, but not limited to: Cancer, Cell 
Biology, Human Biology, Ecology and Evolution. 

GEN 200. Internship in Science 1-4 hours 

\n internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
ijualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
3f academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
Df the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportu- 
lities at Piedmont Hospital, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Accura 
Analytical Laboratory. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permis- 
sion of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program, permission of an 
nternship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experien- 
ial Education Committee. 

Serman 

\11 students with previous study or experience in German must take a language placement 
examination during summer orientation or immediately prior to fall registration. They will 
5e placed in the course sequence according to their competence. Under no circumstances 
should students with past experience in the language place themselves in courses, especially 
It the elementary level. Students are not eligible to enroll in elementary and intermediate 
courses in their primary languages. 

181 



GER 101, GER 102. Elementary German I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This course is beginning college German, designed to develop the ability to understand, 
speak, read and write contemporary German. Prerequisite: None for GER 101; GER 101 
required for GER 102 or placement by testing. 

GER 201. Intermediate German 1 4 hours 

This course will focus on practice in speaking and understanding German, accompanied by 
a review of grammar. Reading and discussion of short literary texts. Prerequisite: GER 102 
or placement by testing. 

GER 202. Intermediate German II 4 hours 

This course is a continuation of Intermediate German I with practice in spoken German 
and added emphasis on writing. Reading materials include both contemporary topics and 
selections from literature. Prerequisite: GER 201 or placement by testing. 

GER 290, GER 291. Special Topics in German Language, Literature 

and Culture I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

Topical aspects of the literature and cultural phenomena associated with the German lan- 
guage are explored in this two-semester sequence of courses. Prerequisite: GER 202. 

GER 490, GER 491. Advanced Special Topics in German Language, 

Literature and Culture I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as de- 
termined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the 
current semester class schedule. 

For a listing of foreign institutions and programs with which Oglethorpe has exchange 
agreements and affiliations, please see Oglethorpe University Students Abroad in the Edu- 
cational Enrichment section of this Bulletin. Of particular interest to students of German is 
the Oglethorpe exchange agreement with the University of Dortmund. 

Greek 



All students with previous study or experience in Attic Greek must take a language place- 
ment examination during summer orientation or prior to fall registration. They will be 
placed in the course sequence according to their competence. Under no circumstances 
should students with past experience in the language place themselves in courses, especially 
at the elementary level. 

GRE 101, GRE 102. Attic Greek I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

These courses will introduce students to the grammatical and syntactical elements of the 
Attic dialect of fifth century Athens. Mastery of these materials will enable students to read 
works written by Thucydides, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle and other ancient authors of this 
period. Knowledge of Attic Greek will also provide a foundation for those wishing to study 
Homeric epic or The New Testament. Prerequisite: None for GRE 101; GRE 101 for GRE 
102 or placement by testing. 

History 



History bridges the disciplinary perspectives of the humanities and social sciences. At 
Oglethorpe the causes, experience and impact of important moments in the past are exam- 
ined in order to explain, analyze and assign contemporary significance to the movements 
and events that have shaped human experience. History courses at Oglethorpe begin where 
traditional survey courses and textbooks leave off. Rather than simply viewing the parade of 
events, students consider the origins and implications of events, their impact on our values. 



182 



assumptions, social relations and world views. In this spirit students are invited to enter 
into dialogue with historians past and present. 

Courses are taught in a seminar format designed to promote lively interchange and 
informed debate. Reading assignments draw on a wdde range of historical methods and 
traditions, including perspectives from religion, philosophy, art, music, literature and popu- 
lar culture as well as politics, economics and geography. These methods and perspectives 
inform independent student research. In their individual projects, students develop their 
own research agendas and learn to master the techniques of historical research. Particular 
emphasis is placed on presentation - both written and oral - of evidence, arguments and 
conclusions. 

Oglethorpe's location provides many opportunities for creative research as well as intern- 
ships. The experience and training of Oglethorpe history majors prepares them for post- 
graduate study in a wide variety of academic disciplines, including history, archaeology, 
anthropology, politics, international studies and social work, as well as careers in such fields 
as education, law, journalism, public relations, art, theology, diplomacy and public service. 

Lower-level (100 and 200) courses are especially recommended for freshmen and sopho- 
mores; upper-level (300 and 400) courses generally require a research paper, may have 
prerequisites and are primarily aimed toward juniors and seniors. 

Major 

Students majoring in history are required to take at least nine history courses. These must 
cover the following geographic areas and time periods (a course can simultaneously satisfy 
both one area and one time-period requirement): European, United States and Latin Amer- 
ican history; ancient or medieval (before 1500), early modem (1500-1789) and modern 
(since 1789) history. In addition, the student must also take one course in Asian Studies and 
at least One semester of a foreign language beyond the first-year level or demonstrate the 
equivalent proficiency. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

To complete a minor, four courses must be taken. 

HIS 110. The Vildngs and the Anglo-Saxons 4 hours 

This course examines the meteoric rise of the Scandinavians from obscurity to become the 
terror of Europe in the eighth through the 11th centuries. For purposes of comparison, a 
look also will be taken at the Vikings' more "civilized" cousins, the Anglo-Saxons. While 
both medieval and modern historians have tended to draw a thick line between these two 
cultures, this course vrill suggest that both represent aspects of a general political, economic 
and cultural zone in the Northern Seas. -; 

HIS 130. United States History to 1865 4 hours 

A survey from Colonial times to 1865, concerned mainly with the major domestic develop- 
ments of a growing nation. 

HIS 131. United States History Since 1865 4 hours 

A survey fi-om 1865 to the present, concerned vsdth the chief events which explain the 
growth of the United States to a position of world power. 

HIS 201. Ancient Greece 4 hours 

This course vrill examine the Greeks from their Minoan and Mycenaean antecedents 
through the rise of Macedonia in the mid-fourth century B.C.E. Students vrill investigate 
the political, social, economic and cultural aspects of Greek civilization as well as an ap- 
preciation of the Hellenic world's legacy. Specific topics include: the collapse of Mycenaean 



183 



civilization and the problem of a "Dark Age;" the rise, development and failure of the polls 
system; Greek contact vdth eastern cultures; the political significance of hoplite w^arfare; 
the roles of women in various Greek poleis; competing models of Greek political organiza- 
tion. 

HIS 202. Roman History , 4 hours 

This course will trace the history of Rome from its Italian precursors through the ascension 
of Constantine. Topics will include political, religious, social, cultural and economic aspects 
of Rome's development, focusing on the origins, maturation, decline and transformation of 
its civilization. 

HIS 210. The Age of Chivalry, 800-1450 4 hours 

This course will cover the High and Later Middle Ages, from the later Carolingian period 
through the War of the Roses. The main focus will be on the evolution of state and society 
in northern and western Europe during these periods. Special attention will be given to 
such events as the rise of feudal monarchies, the Investiture Contest, the Norman Con- 
quests, the Crusades and the Hundred Years' War. 

HIS 211. The Renaissance and Reformation 4 hours 

Students will study the significant changes in European art, thought and institutions during 
the period from 1300 to 1550. The course will focus on critical readings of primary sources 
from this era. 

HIS 212. Early Modern Europe 4 hours 

This course will examine the development of European society and politics from the end of 
the Reformation to the eve of the French Revolution. Special emphasis will be placed on the 
development of the modern state, the contest between absolutism and constitutionalism 
and the Enlightenment. 

HIS 213. The Age of Revolution - Europe and the Atlantic World 1776-1849 4 hours 

The "old regime" (serfdom, rule by monarchs and nobles and a politically powerful church) 
and an agrarian way of life had prevailed in much of Europe and the New World since 
the Middle Ages. From 1776 on, however, a series of upheavals, such as the American and 
French revolutions, the Napoleonic Wars, the Latin American Wars of Independence and 
the European revolutions of 1820-21, 1830-31 and 1848-49 had challenged the old order. 
This course studies the events of this dramatic period, including the Industrial Revolution 
and the rise of romanticism, socialism, nationalism and liberalism. 

HIS 214. The Age of Empire and Nationalism - Europe 1848-1914 4 hours 

The six decades follovring the revolutions of 1848 were a period of remarkable power, pros- 
perity and creativity in Europe. New nation-states (Germany and Italy) were formed; old 
multiethnic empires (Russia and Austria-Hungary) seemed rejuvenated; and Europeans ac- 
quired immense colonial empires. Meanwhile, industrialization and modern science and art 
revolutionized European life and thought. However, this fusion of cultural and economic 
modernity with social and political conservatism concealed grave weaknesses that would 
lead, beginning in 1914, to the upheavals of world war, communism and fascism. 

HIS 215. The Age of World War - Europe 1914-1945 4 hours 

This course examines the disasters that befell Europe in the three decades after 1914: World 
War I; the Russian Revolution; the ill-fated Treaty of Versailles; the rise of Mussolini; the 
Great Depression; the dictatorships of Hitler and Stalin; the spread of fascism in the 1930s; 
World War II. The course discusses the reasons for the failure of the international order to 
prevent two horrific military conflicts and for the failure of moderate forces in many Euro- 
pean countries - including Russia, Germany, Italy and Spain - to block the rise to power of 
violent and millenarian political forces. 



184 



HIS 216. Rise and Fall of the Third Reich 4 hours 

The course examines the roots of National Socialism in Germany before World War I; the 
reasons for the failure of the Weimar Republic in the 1920s, which ended in Hitler's coming 
to power; and the nature of Hitler's dictatorship, with its policies of totalitarian rule, world 
war and genocide. 

HIS 240. Latin America to Independence 4 hours 

Latin American history from the origins of pre-Columbian civilizations to independence 
will be examined by exploring the origins and development of indigenous societies in 
Mesoamerica and the Andes; the conquest and colonization of (what became) Spanish and 
Portuguese America; the nature of colonial control; the response of indigenous populations 
to colonial society, administration and religion; the developing tensions between Spaniards 
and Creole elites. The movement for independence, which arose from a variety of issues, 
created by contrasting views and concerns of distant European authority and local cultural 
identity, will be studied. Finally, the major challenges that faced the newly emergent Latin 
American nations will be considered. 

HIS 290. Special Topics in History 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

HIS 301. History of Christianity 4 hours 

This course will examine the origins and development of Christianity through the mod- 
ern era. Special areas of interest include the structure and organization of the church, the 
development of liturgy and doctrine and the counterpoint between orthodoxy and heresy. A 
central question will be the relationship between the "three pillars" of doctrine - revelation, 
reason and tradition - and social pressures in the history of the church and doctrine. 

HIS 311. The Old Reich: German History to 1800 ...4 hoiu-s 

The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation has been derided by Voltaire as being none 
of the above. At the same time, the Empire provided the primary political organization of 
pre-Modern Germany, from the Middle Ages to the Napoleonic Wars. This course will sur- 
vey the general history of the Empire from the Renaissance to the end of the 18th century. 
Special emphasis will be paid to questions of social, cultural and constitution history, in 
particular, the development of German identity and political culture in the Early Modern 
era. Prerequisite: HIS 211, HIS 212, HIS 213 or permission of the instructor. 

HIS 312. German History Since 1800 4 hours 

This course is a survey of German history in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing on the 
unification of Germany in the 19th century, the Bismarckian state, the two world wars, the 
Weimar Republic, the Third Reich and the division and subsequent reunification of Ger- 
many after World War II. 

HIS 320. Russia under the Tsars 4 hours 

This course studies the thousand years from the formation of the Kievan state until the abo- 
lition of serfdom. It covers the Mongol invasion, the rise of Muscovy, the reign of Ivan the 
Terrible and the Time of Troubles, Imperial Russia's Westernization under Peter the Great 
and its apogee under Catherine the Great and her grandsons. 

HIS 321. Russian History Since 1861 4 hours 

This course studies Russian history from the abolition of serfdom, which began Imperial 
Russia's last attempt to reform itself and stave off revolution, until the present. It also covers 
the 1905 and 1917 revolutions, the rise of communism, the era of Lenin and Stalin and the 
fall of the communist system. 



185 



HIS 330. Between World Wars: The United States, 1920-1945 4 hours 

During this period of war, prosperity and depression, the United States underwent dramatic 
economic, pohtical, social and cultural changes. The interwar years witnessed the emer- 
gence of the United States as a world power, an increasingly sophisticated women's move- 
ment, the rise of mass production and mass consumption and a variety of new challenges 
to social and economic policies. The Great Depression and the New Deal brought further 
challenges to traditional liberal political and economic assumptions as the federal govern- 
ment intervened in nearly every aspect of American life. World War II again transformed 
the nation as it ushered in the "age of affluence" and cold wars in the international and 
domestic realms. Prerequisites: HIS 130 and HIS 131 or permission of the instructor. 

HIS 331. The Age of Affluence: The United States Since 1945 4 hours 

An interdisciplinary study of American life since World War II, this course v^U emphasize 
political, economic and social developments. Foreign policy is considered principally with 
respect to its impact on domestic affairs. 

HIS 335. Georgia History 4 hours 

This course is a chronological examination of the history of Georgia from the Colonial pe- 
riod to the 20th century. Emphasis is given to Old and New South themes, higher education 
development with attention to the history of Oglethorpe, the transition from rural to urban 
life and Georgia's role in contemporary American life. Prerequisites: HIS 130, HIS 131 or 
permission of the instructor. 

HIS 340. Dictatorship and Democracy in Latin America 4 hours 

This course will examine the roots, character and impact of authoritarian rule - and result- 
ing resistance movements - in Latin America. Included will be a look at the caudillos who 
competed for power after independence, the Liberal dictatorships of the late 19th century, 
the Depression Dictators of the 1930s, Populist dictators of the 1940s and 1950s and the 
rise of military-bureaucratic dictatorships in the 1960s and 1970s. An understanding vdll 
be sought for why almost all political orientations (Republicanism, Liberalism, nationalism. 
Populism and Communism) offered up a dictator as their champion at some point in Latin 
American history and how Latin American nations have been able to make a transition to 
democracy. Finally, consideration will be given to how dictatorships affect the everyday lives 
and perceptions of the people living under them and in their aftermath. Prerequisite: HIS 
240 or permission of the instructor. 

FRE 402. The Modern French Republics and Their Institutions 4 hours 

A study of both political and cultural institutions in France from 1870 to the present wdth 
emphasis on the traditions established by the new republican government in the 1880s and 
the creation in 1958 of the Fifth Republic under which France is currently governed. Taught 
in French. Prerequisite: FRE 301. 

HIS 410. Ancient History and Ancient Historians 4 hours 

In this course, the history of Greek and Roman civilizations will be studied through the 
vmtings of several ancient historians. The methods used by ancient authors, their literary 
style and the relation of their works to the specific historical context in which they were 
written will be examined. The course vrill focus on detailed analysis of specific historical 
events such as the fifth century Athens, the rise of the Roman Empire and the Roman civil 
wars. Since the thematic focus and selection of readings will not always be the same, the 
course may be repeated for credit vrith the permission of the instructor. 

HIS 411. The Fall of Rome and the Barbarians 4 hours 

This course v^dll examine the "fall" of the Roman Empire in late antiquity and the sub- 
sequent rise of barbarian kingdoms in Europe. The primary issue will be to determine 



186 



whether the Roman Empire did in fact "fall" during this time or whether the period actually 
marks a transition, the birth of Europe. The role of Christianity in the transformation of 
Europe will be a major focus of discussion, as well as other social, political and economic 
issues. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor. 

HIS 412. Radical Religion and Revolution 4 hours 

This course will examine the role of radical theologies in shaping a series of rebellions and 
revolutions in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern era. Some of the conflicts studied will 
include the Hussite Revolution, The German Reformation and the English Civil War. In 
addition, some modern examples illustrating the connections between religion and revolu- 
tionary thought, in particular, liberation theology in Latin America and the current crisis in 
the Middle East will be considered. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

HIS 430. The American Civil War and Reconstruction 4 hours 

A course for advanced history students emphasizing the causes of conflict, the wartime 
period and major changes that occurred. Prerequisites: HIS 130 and HIS 131. 

HIS 431. History of United States Foreign Relations 4 hours 

This course is a study of major developments in American diplomacy from the end of the 
Revolution until 1945. Prerequisite: at least one prior United States history course, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

HIS 450. Independent Study in History 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

HIS 451. Internship in History 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportu- 
nities at the Atlanta History Center, the Atlanta Preservation Center, the Holocaust Center 
and the Coosawattee Foundation archeological dig. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship 
program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement 
proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

HIS 490. Advanced Special Topics in History 4 hours 

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as de- 
termined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the 
current semester class schedule. 

Individually Planned Major 



A student who wishes to pursue a course of study not included in one of the available ma- 
jors may petition to receive permission to complete an individually planned major. 

Such a major must include at least nine courses beyond core requirements (excluding 
courses with three or fewer semester hours) and including at least one semester of a foreign 



187 



language at the second semester elementary-level or higher. At least four courses of the ma- 
jor must be completed in courses above the introductory level in one particular discipline. 
This discipline will be defined as the major's concentration. Graded course work in the 
major must have a grade point average of at least 2.0. Course work that is included in the 
individually planned major may not be counted toward a second major or a minor. 

To apply for an individually planned major, the student, in consultation with his or her 
academic adviser, must complete an application, available at the registrar's office, to be 
approved by the provost and the chairperson of the division in which the proposed major's 
concentration is included. This application should be submitted by the end of the second 
semester of the student's sophomore year. The application must specify the following: 

1. The major's coverage and definition. 

2. The observed or expected conceptual linkages among the concentration and the 
other subject(s) included in the major. 

3. The expected outcomes of the completion of the major in terms of the student's 
intellectual growth and plans for graduate study or career. 

After the student has secured written approval from his or her academic adviser, the chair- 
person of the division and the provost, the provost will file the application in the registrar's 
office. The registrar will notify the student and the student's adviser of the acceptance of the 
proposal. 

The degree awarded upon successful completion of an approved individually planned major 
is Bachelor of Arts. 

Individually Planned Minor 



A student who wishes to pursue a course of study not included in one of the available mi- 
nors may petition to receive permission to complete an individually planned minor. 

Such a minor must include five courses (excluding courses with three or fewer semester 
hours), of which at least two courses are in one discipline, which is the minor's concentra- 
tion, and must be at the 300 or 400 level. Of the other three courses included in the minor, 
another two must also be at the 300 or 400 level. Graded work in the minor must have a 
grade point average of at least 2.0. Courses included in the individually planned minor may 
not be counted toward a major or another minor. 

To apply for an individually planned minor, the student, in consultation with his or her 
academic adviser, must complete an application, available at the registrar's office, to be 
approved by the provost and the chairperson of the division in which the proposed minor's 
concentration is included. This application should be submitted by the end of the second 
semester of the student's junior year. The application must specify the following: 

1. The minor's coverage and definition. 

2. The observed or expected conceptual linkages among the concentration and the 
other subject(s) included in the minor. 

3. The expected outcomes of the completion of the minor in terms of the student's 
intellectual growth and plans for graduate study or career. 

After the student has secured written approval from his or her academic adviser, the chair- 
person of the division and the provost, the provost will file the application in the registrar's 
office. The registrar will notify the student and the student's adviser of the acceptance of the 
proposal. 



188 



Interdisciplinary Studies 

INT 290. Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies 4 hours 

These courses will focus on materials and topics that transcend the boundaries of specific 
academic disciplines and are not offered on a regular basis. Such courses have included 
Bioethics; Environmental Science; Art of the Film I and II; Film Adaptations of Novels; 
and What Counts As Art? that included a trip to New York City. Prerequisite: See individual 
course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

UEP 320. Urban Ecology 5 hours 

Urban areas are growing worldwide and negatively affecting natural and social resources. 
Effective management of these impacts requires the integration of natural and social sci- 
ence into a new discipline called urban ecology. This course describes the state of urban 
ecological knowledge and best management practices in urban planning using guest speak- 
ers, discussion, lecture and exercises at field sites around metropolitan Atlanta. This course 
is also cross listed as BIO 320. Prerequisite: COR 102 or permission of the instructor. 

ULP 303. The New American City 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and poli- 
cymaking in the new American city and its environs. Consideration will be given to the 
political and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new 
development, including the extremes of wealth and poverty, the mix of racial and ethnic 
groups and the opportunities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and 
technology. Offered annually. 

ULP 304. Community Issues Forum: Principles into Practice 4 hours 

This course is taught as a weekly evening seminar focusing on a particular community 
issue and accompanied by an issue-related, off-campus internship. Together with commu- 
nity leaders and faculty, students analyze issues confronting stakeholders, collaborate on 
solutions and present findings derived from their internship assignments. Students have 
interned with the state legislature, local and state chambers of commerce, community food 
banks, arts organizations, corporations, non-profit organizations and a number of other 
community groups. Topics covered in previous years include: education, transportation, 
healthcare and the environment. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

INT 401. Internship in Interdisciplinary Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic viriting for every hour 
of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and 
qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and 
acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

INT 490. Advanced Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies 4 hours 

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as de- 
termined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the 
current semester class schedule. 



189 



Internationa^ Partner Degree Program - Dual Degree 

Under special circumstances it is possible for a student to receive a dual degree from both 
Oglethorpe University and Universite Catholique de Lille. Such a student has typically com- 
pleted three years of study at the home institution at the time of application and approval 
to this program. Upon completion of one full year of academic study (a fourth year) at the 
partner school, the student returns to the home institution to complete the fifth year of his 
or her program. An exchange and translation of transcripts finalizes the two degrees. 

Internation^l^tudies 

International Studies is an interdisciplinary major that seeks to develop the skills and 
understanding essential for effective participation in the emerging global business, social 
and political environment. The major helps to prepare students for careers in government 
service, international commerce, banking and finance, the travel and convention businesses, 
politics and teaching. It also provides appropriate preparation for the professional study of 
business, law and international affairs. Students interested in master's programs in interna- 
tional affairs may find it advantageous to take additional courses in economics. Interested 
students should ask the registrar to refer them to a faculty adviser who specializes in this 
major. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Requirements of the major include successful completion of 11 courses, two of which must 
be International Relations and International Economics. 

Completion of six courses selected from the list below also is required. At least one of the 

courses must be a subject that involves a non-Western society. 

BUS 370. International Business 

ECO 420. Economic Development 

FRE 402. The Modern French Republics and Their Institutions 

FRE 403. Franco-American Relations in Trade and Culture 

HIS 215. The Age ofWorld War -Europe 1914-1945 

HIS 240. Latin America to Independence 

HIS 290. Special Topics in History * 

HIS 312. German History Since 1800 

HIS 321. Russian History Since 1861 

HIS 340. Dictatorship and Democracy in Latin America 

HIS 431. History of United States Foreign Relations 

HIS 450. Independent Study in History * 

HIS 490. Advanced Special Topics in History * 

INS 400. Independent Study in International Studies 

INS 401. Internship in International Studies 

POL 131. Introduction to Comparative Politics 

POL 211. War 

POL 231. Asian Politics 

POL 290. Special Topics in Politics * 

POL 311. United States Foreign Policy 

POL 321. Political Development 

POL 331. Comparative Politics of China and Japan 

POL 361. European Politics 

POL 411. War, Peace and Security 

POL 422. Seminar in Chinese Politics 

POL 431. Seminar in Politics and Culture * 

POL 450. Independent Study in Politics * 

POL 490. Advanced Special Topics in Politics * 

SPN 305. Spanish for International Relations 

SPN 410. The Development of Latin American Cultures 



190 



*Note: Special topics and independent study courses fulfill the requirements of the major 
only when they have a substantial international component. This implies that the 
course deals with the modern history, current situation or culture in a geographi- 
cal area outside the United States or concerns some substantive issue that is inter- 
national in scope, typically regarding economics or security. 

Students must complete two years of foreign language study or demonstrate the equivalent 
competence by examination. Students must also take one additional language course in 
which the foreign language is required for research, reading or discussion. In the case of 
Japanese, the language requirement may be satisfied by completing Intermediate Japanese 
II and either JPN 150 or 151. 

A study abroad experience is required. Note that no more than two courses may be counted 
toward major requirements from a study abroad program. Foreign students may count their 
residence at Oglethorpe as their study-abroad experience. Please see Oglethorpe University 
Students Abroad in the Educational Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 

Students who receive financial aid at Oglethorpe should contact the director of financial 
aid early in the pursuit of this major to determine available funding for the study abroad 
experience. 

Note: Students who graduated from a secondary school located abroad at which the lan- 
guage of instruction was not English have satisfied the foreign language require- 
ment. They may satisfy the study abroad requirement via their residency in the 
United States. 

INS 400. Independent Study in International Studies 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

INS 401. Internship in International Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic vmting for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportu- 
nities at the Southern Center for International Studies, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 
the United States Department of State and the Georgia Department of Industry, Trade and 
Tourism. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the 
faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship 
site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experiential Educa- 
tion Committee. 

Japanese 

The study of modern Japanese broadens the mind and provides insight into one of the 
world's richest cultures. Oglethorpe's Japanese program embraces the "five C's" of foreign 
language education outlined in National Standards in Foreign Language Education: com- 
munication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities. 



191 



Oglethorpe's four-course Japanese sequence assumes no initial knowledge of the language. 
The courses lead the student step by step toward communicative competence in the four 
basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. These skills are taught by 
means of model conversations, role plays, listening activities and readings. Elementary 
classes present the fundamentals of the language through a sequence of units that focus 
on daily life. A typical conversation at the beginning level might be about making plans for 
the weekend or describing one's family. Students are initially trained in the two phonetic 
kana scripts so that they are able to write in Japanese from the very beginning. Training in 
kanji characters begins in the second semester. At the intermediate level students master 
more advanced vocabulary and grammatical patterns. The student also learns how to use 
the language appropriately in different social contexts. A conversation at this level might be 
about the student's career plans, while a typical reading might deal with changing attitudes 
toward marriage in Japan. By the end of the four-course sequence, the student will be able 
to express a broad range of ideas with confidence, vdll be capable of writing short essays 
and will know about 240 kanji characters. 

Students who seek further training in Japanese can take advanced Japanese through 
cross registration at one of the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education (ARCHE) 
institutions. Full-immersion study abroad opportunities are available at Oglethorpe's sister 
schools in Japan, Seigakuin University and Otaru University of Commerce. 

General interest courses taught in English on premodern and modern Japanese literature 
supplement the language curriculum. These and other eligible courses can be taken in 
conjunction with the language sequence toward fulfillment of the requirements for a minor 
in Japanese. The combination of a Japanese minor with a major in any of the traditional 
liberal arts disciplines can greatly enhance marketability following graduation and can lead 
to career opportunities in fields as diverse as education, foreign service and international 
commerce. 

Students with previous study experience should take the Japanese placement examination 
prior to registration. 

Minor 

A minor in Japanese consists of successfiil completion of Intermediate Japanese II and two 
culture courses, totaling 24 semester hours. At least one of the two years of language study 
must be taken at Oglethorpe. The student may select two culture courses from the follow- 
ing: 

ART 330. Far Eastern Art History - India, China, Tibet and 

Japan 
JPN 150. Introduction to Japanese Literature in Translation 

JPN 151 Modern Japanese Literature in Translation 

JPN 290., JPN 291. Special Topics in Japanese Language, Literature and 

Culture I, II 
POL 331. Comparative Politics of China and Japan 

Other special topics courses offered at Oglethorpe as well as certain courses offered at other 
colleges and through study abroad programs may also qualify. 

Study Abroad and Internships 

Although it is expected that at least half of the courses counted toward the minor must be 
taken at Oglethorpe, all students of Japanese language and culture are strongly encouraged 
to spend at least one semester in Japan. Guidance in finding an appropriate program is pro- 
vided by the Japanese department or the Oglethorpe University Students Abroad (OUSA) 
director. Of particular interest to students of Japanese is the Oglethorpe exchange agree- 
ment with Seigakuin University in Tokyo and Otaru University of Commerce in Hokkaido. 



192 



See also Oglethorpe University Students Abroad in the Educational Enrichment section of 
this Bulletin. 

A student can also gain practical experience by pursuing internship opportunities in Japa- 
nese organizations and firms in and around Atlanta. Credit for these activities is given when 
the internship is completed in accordance with the objectives agreed upon with the faculty 
supervisor. Credit is given toward the minor upon approval by the student's faculty adviser. 
Career services has an extensive list of available internships. 

JPN 101, JPN 102. Elementary Japanese I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This is a one-year course sequence in beginning Japanese aimed at developing basic skills in 
speaking, reading, writing and aural comprehension. The kana and kanji writing systems 
are introduced. Prerequisite: None for JPN 101; JPN 101 for JPN 102 or placement by test- 
ing. 

JPN 150. Introduction to Japanese Literature in Translation 4 hours 

This course is a survey of Japanese literature from the classical to the early modern period. 
Students will read and analyze selections from the creation myths, court romances, poetry 
collections, noh drama, puppet theater and vernacular literature. The relation between 
literature and its historical and cultural context will also be explored. All readings are in 
English translation. 

JPN 151. Modern Japanese Literature in Translation 4 hours 

The development of Japan's modern literary tradition will be examined beginning in the 
early decades of modernization through the interwar years and the postwar period. Read- 
ings will include the fiction of Mori Ogai, Higuchi Ichiyo, Tanizaki Junichiro, Dazai Osamu, 
Oe Kenzaburo and Murakami Haruki. Class discussions will be supplemented by lectures 
on history and culture. All readings are in English translation. 

JPN 201. Intermediate Japanese 1 4 hours 

A continuation of elementary Japanese, the first semester of the second-year sequence 
focuses on conversational skills and vocabulary building and extends the student's profi- 
ciency in reading and writing. Aspects of the Japanese culture and society are also explored. 
Prerequisite: JPN 102 or permission of the instructor. 

JPN 202. Intermediate Japanese II 4 hours 

This course consolidates and integrates the student's knowledge of basic grammatical pat- 
terns and introduces advanced grammatical structures. Further practice in reading and 
writing prepares the student to pursue further study in areas related to his or her major. 
Audio-visual materials are used more extensively to supplement the main text. Prerequisite: 
JPN 201 or permission of the instructor. 

JPN 290, JPN 291. Special Topics in Japanese Language, Literature 

and Culture I, II , 4 plus 4 hours 

Topical aspects of the literature and cultural phenomena associated with the Japanese lan- 
guage are explored through readings in English in this course. Prerequisite: See individual 
course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

JPN 450. Independent Study in Japanese 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 



193 



JPN 490, JPN 491. Advanced Special Topics in Japanese Language, 

Literature and Culture I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as de- 
termined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the 
current semester class schedule. 

Latin 

All students with previous study or experience in Latin must take a language placement 
examination during summer orientation or prior to fall registration. They will be placed 
in the course sequence according to their competence. Under no circumstances should 
students with past experience in the language place themselves in courses, especially at the 
elementary level. 

LAT 101, LAT 102. Elementary Latin I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This course is beginning Latin, designed to present a foundation in classical Latin grammar 
and syntax and to introduce students to Roman literature and history. Prerequisite: None 
for LAT 101; LAT 101 required for LAT 102 or placement by testing. 

LAT 201, LAT 202. Special Topics in Latin Language, Literature 

and Culture I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

Aspects of the literature and cultural phenomena associated with the Latin language are ex- 
plored in this two-semester sequence of courses. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Mathematics 

During the course of study in mathematics at Oglethorpe University, students move from a 
concrete, algorithmic mode of reasoning in early courses to a more abstract, formal mode of 
reasoning in the later capstone courses. The successful mathematics major will: 
Appreciate the inherent beauty and utility of mathematics; 

Appreciate the interconnectedness of the various mathematical fields to one an- 
other and to outside disciplines; 

Communicate mathematical results in written, oral, formal and informal fashions; 

Discern patterns; 

Read and create mathematical results in a self-directed fashion; 

Sharpen his or her problem-solving skills; 

Understand the power and limitations of using technology to create mathematics. 

Through tutoring, volunteer and internship opportunities, mathematics majors can further 
strengthen their own understanding of mathematics and help others to do the same. 

Upon graduation, mathematics majors are ready to pursue graduate study, teacher prepara- 
tion or employment in industry. Oglethorpe graduates are especially well prepared to work 
in actuarial science, applied mathematics, operations research, statistical consulting or a 
variety of careers in computing. 

Major 

In order to major in mathematics, a student must successfully complete the following math- 
ematics courses with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

MAT 131. Calculus I 

MAT 132. Calculus II 

MAT 233. Calculus III 



194 



MAT 241. Differential Equations 

MAT 261. Proof and Logic: An Introduction to Post- Calculus 

Mathematics 

MAT 341. Probability 

MAT 351. Complex Analysis 

MAT 362. Linear Algebra r 

MAT 463. Abstract Algebra : 

MAT 490. Advanced Special Topics in Mathematics 

Mathematics majors graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree. 

Minor 

In order to minor in mathematics, a student must successfully complete the following 
mathematics courses with a grade of "C-" or higher: 

MAT 131. Calculus I 

MAT 132. Calculus II 

MAT 233. Calculus III 

Two additional courses chosen from the list required for the major 

Note: No student will be permitted to register for a mathematics course that is a prereq- 
uisite to a mathematics course for which the student has already received academ- 
ic credit. 

MAT 102. College Algebra with Modeling 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to equip students with the algebraic reasoning and skills for 
Applied Calculus or Precalculus. The function concept is developed in algebraic, graphical 
and numerical form, with attention to rates of change, domain, range and inverses. Cat- 
egories, of functions (linear, other polynomials, rational, exponential and logarithmic) are 
discussed in terms of their properties, using equations, systems of equations and inequali- 
ties. The course includes modeling of the real-world data wdth these functions. 

MAT 103. Precalculus 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to equip students with the skills needed for Calculus I. Topics 
include basic analytic geometry, trigonometry (functions, equations and identities), com- 
plex numbers, polar coordinates, vectors in the plane, parametric equations and transfor- 
mation of coordinates. For students who would like a refresher or more preparation for 
Precalculus, MAT 102 is recommended. 

MAT 111. Statistics 4 hours 

This course includes descriptive and inferential statistics with particular emphasis upon 
parametric statistics, rules of probability, interval estimation and hypothesis testing. Distri- 
butions that will be discussed include the normal, chi-square and t-distribution. Additional 
topics include analysis of variance, regression and correlation analysis, goodness-of-fit and 
tests for independence. 

MAT 121. Applied Calculus 4 hours 

This is the recommended calculus course for students in business, economics and the 
social sciences. The goal of this course is to present calculus in an intuitive yet intellectually 
satisfying way and to illustrate the many applications of calculus to the management sci- 
ences, business, economics and the social sciences. Topics include functions, the derivative, 
techniques of differentiation, applications of the derivative, the exponential and natural 
logarithm functions, applications of the exponential and natural logarithm functions, the 
definite integral and functions of several variables. For students who would like a refresher 
or more preparation for Applied Calculus, MAT 102 is recommended. 



195 



MAT 131. Calculus 1 4 hours 

Calculus I, II and III form the sequence for students in mathematics, physics or chemistry. 
The objective of these three courses is to introduce the fiindamental ideas of the differential 
and integral calculus as they pertain to functions of both one and several variables. Top- 
ics for Calculus I include limits, continuity, rates of change, derivatives, the Mean Value 
Theorem, applications of the derivative, curve sketching, related rates, optimization prob- 
lems and introduction to area and integration. Prerequisite: MAT 103 is recommended for 
students who would like a refresher in precalculus and/or trigonometry. 

MAT 132. Calculus II 4 hours 

This course is a continuation of Calculus I. Topics include the Fundamental Theorem of 
Calculus, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, techniques of integra- 
tion, applications of integration to volumes and surface areas, conic sections, sequences and 
series. Prerequisite: MAT 131 with a grade of "C-" or higher. Alternate prerequisites: MAT 
121 with a grade of "B" or higher and permission of the instructor. 

MAT 233. Calculus III 4 hours 

This course is a continuation of Calculus II. Topics include vectors, lines, planes, vector- 
valued functions of single and vector variables, curves, partial derivatives, multiple integrals 
and vector fields. Prerequisite: MAT 132 with a grade of "C-" or higher." 

MAT 241. Differential Equations 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental ideas of the theory of ordinary 
differential equations and to consider some of the applications of this theory to the physi- 
cal sciences. Topics include equations of order one, applications of equations of order one, 
linear differential equations, linear equations with constant coefficients, nonhomogenous 
equations, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, applications of equations of 
order two and power series solutions. Prerequisite: MAT 233 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 251. Classical and Modern Geometries 4 hours 

This course provides a rigorous survey of classical and modern geometries. The intel- 
lectual and historical impact that geometry has had over the millennia is an underlying 
theme. Topics include: axiomatic and topological foundations; Euclidean geometry and its 
constructions; hyperbolic geometry; spherical geometry; projective geometry; and finite 
geometries. The primary audience consists of students interested in secondary mathemat- 
ics teaching; however, mathematics majors with other career paths and science majors are 
welcome. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: MAT 132 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 261. Proof and Logic: An Introduction to Post-Calculus Mathematics 4 hours 

This course may be considered a general introduction to advanced mathematics. As such, 
it will consider various methods and techniques of mathematical proof. Topics are drawn 
from logic, set theory, functions, relations, combinatorics, graph theory and boolean alge- 
bra. Prerequisite: MAT 132 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 290. Special Topics in Mathematics 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

MAT 341. Probability 4 hours 

This course provides a calculus-based study of probability theory. Topics include set-theo- 
retic, axiomatic and combinatorial foundations, basic rules, conditional probability, inde- 
pendence, random variable theory, special discrete and continuous models, probability plots 
and joint distributions. Prerequisite: MAT 233 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 351. Complex Analysis 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental ideas of the theory of functions 

196 



of a complex variable. Topics include complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary 
functions, conformal mapping, complex integration and infinite series. Prerequisite: MAT 
233 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 362. Linear Algebra 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental ideas of linear algebra. Top- 
ics include linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, inner products, linear 
transformation, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MAT 132 with a grade of "C-" or 
higher. It is recommended that students take MAT 261 before taking this course. 

MAT 463. Abstract Algebra 4 hours 

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental ideas of modern algebra. Topics 
include sets, mappings, the integers, groups, rings and fields. Prerequisite: MAT 362 with a 
grade of "C-" or higher. 

MAT 481. Independent Study in Mathematics 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this 5wZZe^m. 

MAT 490. Advanced Special Topics in Mathematics 4 hours 

Selected topics in advanced mathematics are offered such as Real Analysis, Topology, Set 
Theory, Number Theory, Mathematical Statistics, Abstract Algebra II and Differential 
Geometry. Prerequisites will depend on the topic but will include a minimum of MAT 233 
with a grade of "C-" or higher and permission of the instructor. 

MAT 491. Internship in Mathematics 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including oppor- 
tunities at the Lynwood Park Community Center Education Program, Internal Revenue 
Service and various actuarial and consulting firms. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship 
program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement 
proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

Music 



The music curriculum includes courses in music history and theory, ensemble performance 
and applied lessons. 

Minor 

To complete a minor in music a student must successfully complete the following: 
MUS 331. History and Theory of Music I 
MUS 332. History and Theory of Music II 
MUS 333. History and Theory of Music III 
MUS 334. History and Theory of Music IV 

A total of four semester hours of University Singers and/or Applied Instruction in Music 
also must be taken and the completion of four hours of independent study in music. 

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MUS 134. University Singers 1 hour 

This is an auditioned, mixed-voice concert choir, which is the primary musical ensemble for 
the study and performance of sacred and secular choral music. The University Chorale, an 
auditioned chamber choir, is chosen from members of the University Singers. Prerequisites: 
An audition and permission of the instructor. 

MUS 135. Beginning Class Voice 1 hour 

This course is an introduction to the basics of singing which includes posture, breath 
pressure, phonation, diction, tone and intonation. A variety of easy vocal literature will be 
studied and performed. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUS 136. Applied Instruction in Music 1 hour 

The study and practice of techniques and literature on an individual basis. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MUS 290. Special Topics in Music 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

MUS 331. History and Theory of Music 1 4 hours 

History and Theory of Music I examines music from the early beginnings to 1600 with 
analysis of representative works. This course uses primary sources - listening and studying 
the music with the aid of selected scores and outlines and reading and discussing comments 
by composers, performers, theorists and others. The required listening assignments are 
created to supplement and enhance the classroom experience. Prerequisite: COR 103 or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUS 332. History and Theory of Music II 4 hours 

History and Theory of Music H examines music from 1600 to 1800 with analysis of repre- 
sentative works. This course uses primary sources - listening and studying the music with 
the aid of selected scores and outlines and reading and discussing comments by composers, 
performers, theorists and others. The required listening assignments are created to supple- 
ment and enhance the classroom experience. Prerequisite: COR 103, MUS 331 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

MUS 333. History and Theory of Music III 4 hours 

History and Theory of Music HI examines music from 1800 to 1900 with analysis of repre- 
sentative works. This course uses primary sources - listening and studying the music with 
the aid of selected scores and outlines and reading and discussing comments by composers, 
performers, theorists and others. The required listening assignments are created to supple- 
ment and enhance the classroom experience. Prerequisite: COR 103 or permission of the 
instructor 

MUS 334. History and Theory of Music IV 4 hours 

History and Theory of Music IV examines music from 1900 to the present with analysis of 
representative works. This course uses primary sources - listening and studying the music 
with the aid of selected scores and outlines and reading and discussing comments by com- 
posers, performers, theorists and others. The required listening assignments are created to 
supplement and enhance the classroom experience. Prerequisite: COR 103, MUS 333, or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUS 431. Independent Study in Music 1-4 hours 

This course is supervised research on a selected project or paper. It provides students an 
opportunity to study and analyze in depth a specific musical style, composer, work, etc. Pre- 



198 



requisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings 
and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost no later than 
the second day of classes of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent 
Study Policy in the Academic Regulations and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

MUS 490. Advanced Special Topics in Music 4 hours 

This course will be a study of a selected topic in music, such as African-American Com- 
posers; Basic Techniques of Conducting; Fundamentals of Music; Masterpieces of Choral 
Literature; Music, Television, Films and Their Impact on Culture; Musics of Multicultural 
America; Women in Music; and World Music. Prerequisite: COR 103 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Philosophy 

Philosophy, in the broadest meaning of this term, is the attempt to think clearly about the 
v^orld and the place of human beings in it. This activity is a response to questions which 
arise because the various areas of human life, such as science, art, morality and religion, 
often do not seem to be intelligible in themselves or to fit with one another. A philosophical 
world view, such as the philosophy of Plato or the philosophy of Descartes, represents an 
attempt to think through these difficulties and to arrive at a single, coherent vision of how 
reality is and how human beings should relate to it. 

The study of philosophy is a noble and worthwhile activity in its own right for the enlight- 
enment which it can provide about questions which should be of interest to everyone. It is 
important, however, that the philosophy major also be effective at imparting those general 
skills which are crucial for most professions. 

The mission statement of Oglethorpe University states that Oglethorpe graduates should be 
"humane generalists" wdth the intellectual adaptability which is needed to function suc- 
cessfully in changing and often unpredictable job situations. The philosophy program at 
Oglethorpe accomplishes this goal by fostering those abilities of critical thinking and intel- 
lectual flexibility required in virtually any professional career. Philosophy students learn 
how to read and understand abstract and often very difficult arguments. They also learn to 
think critically and independently, to develop their own views and to express their insights 
in clear, articulate spoken and written prose. Such skills are important for almost any pro- 
fession and are especially useful for business and law. 

Philosophy courses need not be taken in a rigid sequence. Any philosophy course should 
improve a student's overall philosophical abilities and thereby strengthen the student's per- 
formance in any subsequent philosophy course. The courses are, however, classified by the 
difficulty of the reading involved and the amount of philosophical training and background 
which is advisable. 

Major 

The philosophy major consists of 10 courses in philosophy which must include the follow- 
ing courses: Logic; Plato; Aristotle; Nietzsche; either Knowledge and Scepticism (Episte- 
mology) or Philosophy of Mind; one course in non- Western philosophy; and four additional 
courses in philosophy. 

Students majoring in philosophy are also required to take at least one semester of a foreign 
language at the second semester elementary-level or higher. Students who have attained 
some proficiency in a foreign language may make use of this ability by adding one semes- 
ter hour of foreign language credit to certain philosophy courses. For example, a student 
might add one semester hour of credit to the Nietzsche course by reading some parts 
of Nietzsche's vmtings in the original German or add one semester hour of credit to the 



199 



Plato course by reading portions of Plato's dialogues in Greek. Most philosophy courses at 
Oglethorpe are suitable for such foreign language supplementation. Credit for such extra 
study will be arranged between the student and the instructor. The degree awarded is the 
Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

The philosophy minor consists of any five courses in philosophy, which must include Logic; 
either Plato or Aristotle; three additional courses in philosophy. 

Level I courses are suitable for students who have no background in philosophy and may 
serve as an introduction to the study of philosophy. 

PHI 101. Significance of Human Life - Western Responses 4 hours 

This course introduces the student to Western philosophy through the question of whether 
human life as a whole has any ultimate meaning or significance outside of individual de- 
sires. This question will be considered by studying Ecclesiastes, The Book of Job, the philoso- 
phy of Socrates in Plato's Euthyphro, Apology and Crito, Lucretius' On the Nature of Things 
and Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. 

PHI 103. Logic 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to both logical thinking and thinking about logic. It is di- 
vided into three parts: informal logic (a study of logical fallacies in thinking), formal logic 
(a primer to develop literacy in symbolic logic) and the philosophy of logic (exactly what is 
logic?). 

Level II courses are for students who have some philosophical background, to the extent of 
at least one Level I course. 

PHI 202. Contemporary Ethical Theory 4 hours 

In this course, students will read several contemporary works concerning the nature of the 
ethical. Works will be drawn from both the analytic and the Continental traditions and an 
effort will be made to put the two traditions into dialogues with each other. 

PHI 204. Plato 4 hours 

This course is a study of the philosophy of Plato through a reading of his major dialogues. 
In addition to the "Socratic" dialogues, readings wdll include the Phaedo, Phaedrus, Sympo- 
sium, Republic and Timaeus. 

PHI 205. Aristotle 4 hours 

This course is a study of the philosophy of Aristotle through a reading of his major works. 
Readings will include portions of the Logic, Physics, DeAnima, Metaphysics and Nicoma- 
chean Ethics. 

PHI 290. Special Topics in Philosophy 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

PHI 301. Philosophy of Art (Aesthetics) 4 hours 

This course vdll attempt to trace the philosophic underpinnings of the movement within art 
toward non-representational art. The course begins with Kant's third Critique and includes 
readings by Hegel, Heidegger, Derrida and several others. Students wdll also read several 
works by artists themselves, including Kandinsl^, Francis Bacon and Anselm Kiefer. 

PHI 302. Knowledge and Scepticism (Epistemology) 4 hours 

This course will cover various issues concerned with the nature and validity of human 
knowledge. The topics studied wdll include the distinction between knowledge and belief, 

200 



arguments for and against scepticism, perception and our knowledge of the physical world 
and the nature of truth. 

PHI 303. Space, Time and God 4 hours 

This course examines our conception of the universe as a totality, both in its own nature 
and in relation to an external cause. We will consider whether space and time are "absolute" 
realities or only systems of relations among objects, whether they are finite or infinite and 
whether or not there logically could exist space-time universes in addition to our own. The 
course vdll conclude with the question of whether our space-time universe is self-sufficient 
or requires an ultimate cause or explanation (God) outside of itself. 

PHI 304. PhOosophy of Mind 4 hours 

This course involves the study of philosophical questions about the nature of human 
persons. Students vvdll examine 1) the mind-body problem - the nature of the mind and 
consciousness and the relation of consciousness to physical processes within the body; 2) 
personal identity - what makes a person one mind or subject both at a single moment and 
over time; 3) free wall - the status of a person as a free agent and the relation of this free- 
dom to the causally determined processes in the person's body. 

PHI 305. Nietzsche 4 hours 

In this course students v^U study the philosophy of Nietzsche through a reading of his 
major works, including The Birth of Tragedy, The Uses and Abuses of History for Life, Thus 
Spake Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, Twilight of the Idols and The Anti-Christ. Stu- 
dents will also study some contemporary and influential readings of Nietzsche. 

PHI 322. Independent Study in Philosophy 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

PHI 323. Internship in Philosophy 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings wdth the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing vvdth some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour 
of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including op- 
portunities at the American Civil Liberties Union, the Georgia Attorney General's Office 
and Georgia Justice Project. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: 
Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program, permis- 
sion of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the 
Experiential Education Committee. 

POL 341. Political Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval 4 hours 

This is an examination of the origins of philosophical reflection on the fundamental issues 
of politics, which is designed to lead to the critical consideration of the political views of 
our time. Among the topics discussed are the relationship between knowledge and political 
power and the character of political justice. Portions of the works of Aristophanes, Plato, 
Aristotle, Aquinas and Alfarabi are examined. Prerequisite: COR 201 or permission of the 
instructor. 

POL 342. Political Philosophy II: Modern 4 hours 

This is a critical examination of the peculiarly modern political and philosophical stance 

201 



beginning where Political Philosophy I concludes. Among the authors discussed are Ma- 
chiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Kant and Kojeve. Prerequisite: POL 341 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Level III courses are the most difficult and challenging and are for students who have sig- 
nificant philosophical background, to the extent of at least one or two Level II courses. 

PHI 401. The Philosophical Response to the Scientific Revolution 4 hours 

This course is a study of the philosophical systems of Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza and Leib- 
niz. Each of these philosophies is an attempt to come to terms with the scientific picture of 
the world which had been given to the West by Copernicus and Galileo. The course begins 
with the materialist philosophy of Hobbes, followed by Descartes' dualistic (between mind 
and matter) view of the created world and then considers Spinoza's pantheistic monism and 
Leibniz's idealistic atomism as responses to the difficulties in the Cartesian philosophy. 

PHI 402. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason 4 hours 

A study of Kant's theoretical philosophy, his "metaphysics of experience," through a read- 
ing and analysis of his major work. An attempt will be made to discover which portions of 
Kant's philosophy can be accepted as valid and true in the light of present-day philosophy 
and science. 

PHI 403. Heidegger's Being and Time 4 hours 

This course involves a close and patient reading of one of the most important and difficult 
works of Continental philosophy. An effort will be made to avoid speaking "heideggeri- 
anese" and to translate the dense language of the text into a way of speaking accessible to 
students. 

PHI 404. Contemporary French Philosophy 4 hours 

It has been argued that the most provocative developments in the current development of 
German philosophy have been the French readings of now classic German writers such as 
Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud and Heidegger, to name a few. Students will attempt 
to test this thesis by reading some representative and challenging texts. The authors studied 
may include Bataille, Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida, Althusser, Blanchot and others. 

PHI 490. Advanced Special Topics in Philosophy: Philosophers 4 hours 

Intensive study of the thought of a single important philosopher or group of philosophers 
will be covered in this course. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current 
semester class schedule. 

PHI 491, Special Topics in Philosophy: Philosophical Issues and Problems 4 hours 

Studies of selected philosophical questions usually of special relevance to the present day 
have included courses such as Philosophy of History, War and Its Justification and Philo- 
sophical Issues in Women's Rights; and What Counts As Art? that included a trip to New 
York City. 

Physics • 



The physics curriculum is designed to provide well-rounded preparation in classical and 
modern physics. The successful completion of this program will prepare the graduate to 
gain admission to one of the better graduate programs in physics or a related scientific field 
or to secure employment in a technical, scientific or engineering setting. 

A grade of "C-" or higher must be obtained in each freshman- and sophomore-level science 
course that is required for this major or minor; these courses are numbered 100 through 
300 in each discipline. A grade point average of 2.0 or higher is required in all courses 
required for the major. 

202 



All 100-level science courses (General Biology I, General Chemistry I, General Chemistry I 
Laboratory, General Physics I and General Physics I Laboratory) have the same mathemat- 
ics prerequisite. There are three ways that students can fulfill this mathematics require- 
ment: 1) by achieving a score of 2, 3, 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Calculus AB or EC 
examination; 2) by achieving a score of 550 or higher on the Mathematics Section of the 
SAT or a score of 22 or higher on the Mathematics Section of the ACT; or 3) by complet- 
ing Precalculus at Oglethorpe vdth a grade of "C-" or higher. (An equivalent precalculus 
course at another college or university fulfills the requirement but high school precalculus 
alone does not.) College Physics I has Calculus I as a prerequisite or corequisite, meaning 
Calculus I must be taken simultaneously wdth College Physics I if Calculus I has not been 
completed earlier. 

Students who are interested in scientific illustration are encouraged to consider the Scien- 
tific Illustration Tracks that are offered within the art major. 

Major 

The requirements for a major in physics are as follows: College Physics I and II taken after 
or concurrently with Calculus I and II (preferably in the freshman year); Classical Mechan- 
ics I and II taken after or concurrently with Calculus III (suggested for the sophomore 
year); Thermal and Statistical Physics; Modern Optics; Modern Physics I and II; Electricity 
and Magnetism I and II; Mathematical Physics; and Special Topics in Theoretical Physics 
or Special Topics in Experimental Physics. Examination is generally required to transfer 
credit for any of these courses. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Science. 

Minor 

A minor in physics is offered to provide students with an opportunity to strengthen and 
broaden their educational credentials either as an end in itself or as an enhancement of fu- 
ture employment prospects. The requirement for the physics minor is three lecture courses 
numbered PHY 202 or higher plus at least one physics laboratory course at the 300 level or 
above. 

PHY 101, PHY 102. General Physics I, H 4 plus 4 hours 

An introductory course without calculus. Fundamental aspects of mechanics, fluids, waves, 
thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics. The text will be on 
the level of Cutnell and Johnson, College Physics. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: 
MAT 103; PHY 101 must precede PHY 102. Corequisites: PHY lOlL and PHY 102L. 

PHY 201, PHY 202. College Physics I, II 5 plus 5 hours 

Introductory physics with calculus. Subject matter is the same as in general physics but 
on a level more suited to physics majors, engineering majors, etc. One year of calculus as a 
prerequisite is preferred, otherwise calculus must be taken concurrently. The text wdll be on 
the level of Halliday, Resnick and Walker, Fundamentals of Physics. Prerequisite: PHY 201 
wdth a grade of "C-" or higher must precede PHY 202. Corequisites: PHY lOlL and PHY 
102L. 

PHY lOlL, PHY 102L. Introductory Physics Laboratory I, II 1 plus 1 hour 

Introductory physics laboratories to accompany PHY 101, 102, 201 and 202. 

PHY 211, PHY 212. Classical Mechanics I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

This is the student's first introduction to theoretical physics. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian 
methods are developed with Nevv1;ons laws of motion and applied to a variety of contempo- 
rary problems. Emphasis is placed on problem work, the object being to develop physical 
intuition and facility for translating physical problems into mathematical terms. The text 
will be on the level of Analytical Mechanics by Fowles. Prerequisites: MAT 132 and PHY 
202 wdth a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. A grade of "C-" or higher must be earned 
in PHY 211 before taking PHY 212. 

203 



PHY 232. Fundamentals of Electronics 4 hours 

This course is designed primarily for science majors and dual degree engineering students. 
Coverage includes DC and AC circuits, semi-conductor devices, amplifiers, oscillators and 
digital devices. The intent is to provide a working understanding of common instrumenta- 
tion in science and technology. Text will be on the level of Simpson, Electronics for Scientists 
and Engineers. Prerequisite: PHY 102 or PHY 212 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PHY 232L. Fundamentals of Electronics Laboratory 1 hour 

Laboratory work will involve design, construction, troubleshooting and analysis of standard 
analog and digital circuits. Corequisite: PHY 232. 

PHY 290. Special Topics in Physics 1-4 hours 

Topics are drawn from areas of theoretical or experimental physics, or closely related fields 
such as astronomy and cosmology, which are not treated in detail in standard courses of- 
fered in the physics department. This course is appropriate for students at the intermediate 
level of preparation. 

PHY 331, PHY 332. Electricity and Magnetism I, H 4 plus 4 hours 

This course is a thorough introduction to one of the two fundamental disciplines of classical 
physics, using vector calculus methods. After a brief review of vector analysis, the first se- 
mester will treat electrostatic and magnetic fields and provide an introduction to the special 
theory of relativity. The second semester will develop electrodjoiamics, including Maxwell's 
equations, the propagation of electromagnetic waves, radiation and the electromagnetic 
theory of light. The treatment will be on the level of the text of Reitz, Milford and Christy. 
It is recommended that MAT 241 be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: MAT 233 and PHY 
202 with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course; PHY 331 must precede PHY 332. 

PHY 333. Thermal and Statistical Physics 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to provide physics, engineering and chemistry majors with 
a fundamental understanding of heat and the equilibrium behavior of complex systems 
including statistical mechanics. Topics will include the zeroth, first and second laws of 
thermodynamics with applications to closed and open systems; microcanonical and canoni- 
cal ensembles for classical and quantum systems, with applications to ideal gases, specific 
heats, blackbody radiation, etc.; the kinetic description of equilibrium properties. Text will 
be on the level of Kestin and Dorfrnan or Zemansky. Prerequisites: MAT 132 and PHY 202 
with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. 

PHY 333L. Thermal and Statistical Physics Laboratory 1 hour 

Laboratory work will include experiments involving thermal expansion, behavior of ideal 
and real gases, determination of adiabatic constants for gases, measurement of the density 
anomaly of water, diffusion in gases, liquids and solids, superconductivity and the critical 
temperature. Corequisite: PHY 333. 

PHY 335. Introduction to Modern Optics 4 hours 

A standard intermediate-level optics course which will treat the basics of wave theory 
and the electromagnetic origin of optical phenomena, geometrical optics, physical optics 
including Fourier optics, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction and dispersion. The course will 
conclude with some consideration of current topics such as holography, quantum optics and 
non-linear optics. Text will be on the level of Jenkins and White or Hecht. Prerequisites: 
MAT 241 and PHY 202 with a grade of "C-" or higher in each course. 

PHY 335L. Modern Optics Laboratory 1 hour 

A non-introductory optics laboratory, this course encompasses both geometric and wave 
optics including measurements of the speed of light, refractive indices, polarization of light, 
spectroscopy, lasers, holography and interference phenomena and instruments. Prerequi- 
site or corequisite: PHY 335. 

204 



PHY 421, PHY 422. Introduction to Modern Physics I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

For physics, engineering and chemistry majors, this is a one-year sequence that discusses 
the most important developments in 20th century physics. The first semester will review 
special relativity and treat the foundations of quantum physics from a historical perspec- 
tive; the quantum theory of one-electron atoms will be developed. In the second semester, 
there vdll be a treatment of many-electron atoms, molecules and solids, with an introduc- 
tion to nuclear and elementary particle physics. The text will be on the level of Eisberg and 
Resnick, Quantum Physics. Prerequisites: PHY 202 and PHY 332; PHY 421 must precede 
PHY 422. 

PHY421L, PHY422L. Modern Physics Laboratory I, II 1 plus 1 hour 

Laboratory work vdll include experimental determination of fiindamental constants such as 
h, e and e/m as well as standard experiments such as Franck-Hertz, Rutherford scattering, 
electronic spin resonance, Millikan oil-drop, Bragg diffraction, etc. Corequisites: PHY 421 
and PHY 422. 

PHY 423. Mathematical Physics 4 hours 

This course vdll examine a variety of mathematical ideas and methods used in physical 
sciences. Topics may include: vector calculus; solutions of partial differential equations, 
including the wave and heat equations; special functions; eigenvalue problems; Fourier 
analysis and mathematical modeling, particularly numerical computer methods. Text will 
be on the level of Arfken or Mathews and Walker. Prerequisite: MAT 241 wdth a grade of 
"C-" or higher. 

PHY 490. Advanced Special Topics in Theoretical Physics 1-5 hours 

Topics are drawoi from areas of theoretical physics, or closely related fields such as astrono- 
my and cosmology, which are not treated in detail in standard courses offered in the physics 
department. This course is appropriate for students at the advanced level of preparation. 

PHY 491. Advanced Special Topics in Experimental Physics 1-5 hours 

Topics are drawn from areas of experimental physics, or closely related fields such as astron- 
omy and cosmology, which are not treated in detail in standard courses offered in the phys- 
ics department. This course is appropriate for students at the advanced level of preparation. 

PHY 495. Internship in Physics 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a vmtten journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic wo-iting for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportu- 
nities at a number of local engineering firms and technically-based corporations and labs. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor, qualification for the internship program, 
permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal 
by the Experiential Education Committee. 

PHY 499. Independent Study in Physics 1-5 hours 

Supervised study of a topic of interest to the student, which is not treated in the regularly 
scheduled course offerings. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that 
includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division 
chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of study. For 
additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations and Policies 
section of this Bulletin. 



205 



Politics 

As Aristotle observed some 2000 years ago, "Man is by nature a political animal." Politics 
shapes who we are and how we live; it animates human nature, forges identities, drives 
social movements, structures national politics and institutions and molds international 
relations. At Oglethorpe, students of politics encounter a wdde range of opinions, beliefs 
and scholarly analysis as to the nature of politics and what constitutes the legitimate aims 
of political action. Differences and disagreements abound, providing a rich environment for 
students to develop their own informed opinions honed through healthy debate with their 
colleagues. In addition, politics majors gain both substantive knowledge and analytic skills. 
Introductory classes in American politics, comparative politics, international relations and 
political philosophy provide the foundation for subsequent pursuit of more specialized 
study undertaken in higher-level courses. Skills acquired include: close critical reading of 
texts; inductive, deductive and analogical reasoning; substantiating arguments; comparing 
across cases; and making generalizations. 

Oglethorpe's location provides numerous opportunities to study and engage with real world 
politics, be they local, national or international. Atlanta is home to the Georgia state gov- 
ernment. The Carter Center and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center. Students have taken 
advantage of the Georgia's Legislative Intern and Governor's Intern Programs, as well as 
worked with the Georgia State Legislature, the Department of Industry, Trade and Tourism 
and the League of Women Voters, participated in The Carter Center Internship Program 
and worked with a variety of governmental and grassroots programs. 

Resources at Oglethorpe serve to help students engage actively in politics. Through career 
services, students can identify and create other internships. Oglethorpe's affiliations with 
The Washington Center for Internships and the Washington Semester Program of Ameri- 
can University allow students to study politics and intern in the nation's capital. Students 
can also use internship credit towards their major requirements. In an increasingly global- 
ized world, Oglethorpe's study abroad programs provide the opportunity to gain in-depth 
experience of the politics and culture of another country for periods ranging from a week to 
a semester to a year. Please see Oglethorpe University Students Abroad in the Educational 
Enrichment section of this Bulletin. 

Politics majors contemplate and analyze the different forms of power shaping today's world, 
be they individuals, ideas, institutions or coercive force. This knowledge prepares them well 
for a variety of careers, including law, journalism, government, international organizations, 
NGO's, education, business and politics. 

Major 

The requirements for a major in politics are satisfactory completion of at least 10 courses in 
the discipline, of which the following four are required: 

POL 101. Introduction to American Politics 

POL 111. International Relations 

POL 121. Introduction to Comparative Politics 

POL 341. Political Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval or 

POL 342. Political Philosophy II: Modern 

In addition, students must take two courses at the 300 level and one at the 400 level and 
complete at least one semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary- 
level or higher. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

To receive a minor, students must take four courses distributed among three of the four 
subfields of the discipline (American politics, comparative politics, international relations 
and political philosophy). 

206 



POL 101. Introduction to American Politics 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to the fundamental questions of pohtics through an examina- 
tion of the American founding and poUtical institutions. 

POL 111. International Relations 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to the conduct of pohtics in a condition of anarchy. The 
central issues will be how and whether independent states can establish and preserve inter- 
national order and cooperate for the achievement of their common interests in an anarchic 
environment. These questions will be explored through a reading of relevant history and 
theoretical writings and an examination of present and future trends influencing world 
politics. 

POL 121. Introduction to Comparative Politics 4 hours 

This course traces the evolution of major theories and methodologies of comparative 
politics from the 1960s to present, analyzing both their distinguishing characteristics and 
how these theories respond to the prominent political issues and intellectual debates of 
their times. Topics to be covered include: political behavior, political culture, revolutions, 
modernization, political economy, rational choice, institutions and the state with democra- 
tization serving as an overarching theme. 

POL 201. Constitutional Law 4 hours 

In this course, we will examine the Constitution and the efforts of the United States 
Supreme Court to expound and interpret it. In addition to reading and briefing many 
Supreme Court decisions, students will examine some leading contemporary works in con- 
stitutional and legal theory. Prerequisite: POL 101. 

POL 202. State and Local Government 4 hours 

This course is a survey of the origin, development and characteristic problems of state and 
local government in the United States. Prerequisite: POL 101. 

POL 211. War 4 hours 

What is war? How and to what extent has it changed through the ages? Why are wars won 
or lost? When is war just? How will war be fought in the future, with what results? 

POL 231. Asian Politics 4 hours 

This course is a general introduction to the variety of political systems in Asia, concentrat- 
ing particularly on the nations of East Asia. It will emphasize the methods of comparative 
political study and will focus on understanding the factors that determine different political 
outcomes in nations that share a geographical region and many similar cultural and histori- 
cal influences. 

POL 290. Special Topics in Politics 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

POL 302. American Political Parties 4 hours 

An in-depth study of the development of party organizations in the United States and an 
analysis of their bases of power. Prerequisite: POL 101. 

POL 303. Congress and the Presidency 4 hours 

An examination of the original arguments for the current American governmental structure 
and the problems now faced by these institutions. Prerequisite: POL 101. 

ULP 303. The New American City 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and poli- 
cymaking in the new American city and its environs. Consideration will be given to the 

207 



political and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new 
development, including the extremes of wealth and poverty, the mix of racial and ethnic 
groups and the opportunities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and 
technology. Offered annually. 

POL 304. African-American Politics 4 hours 

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the various strategies and 
tactics used by African-Americans to advance their economic, social and political agendas. 
As such, the course will provide a detailed examination of the successes and failures of the 
interaction between the United States political system and African-Americans from both an 
historic and present-day perspective. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

POL 311. United States Foreign Policy 4 hours 

A history of American foreign policy since 1945, emphasis in this course vrill be on the de- 
scription, explanation and evaluation of events and policies, not the study of policy-making 
as such. 

POL 321. Political Development 4 hours 

This course surveys substantive themes and theoretical debates in the study of political 
development including: what is meant by 'political development,' cultural versus structural 
explanations for change, whether development is driven by domestic or international influ- 
ences, political transitions and the relative significance of particular groups or institutions. 
Readings build from theoretical touchstones HNSO II (Smith, Marx, Weber) to address 
contemporary cases in developing and developed countries. Prerequisite: POL 121, COR 
202 or permission of the instructor. 

POL 331. Comparative Politics of China and Japan 4 hours 

While Japan and China have both become prominent nation-states with increasing inter- 
national influence, each country has achieved this feat through very different means. This 
course seeks to ascertain the sources and strength of their respective development paths as 
well as the prognosis for their political and economic futures. Topics to be covered include: 
state formation, ideology and political order, political and economic institutions, economic 
development strategies, A^sian values,' state-society relations, regional and international 
relations. Prerequisite: POL 121, POL 231 or permission of the instructor. 

POL 341. Political Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval 4 hours 

This is an examination of the origins of philosophical reflection on the fundamental issues 
of politics, which is designed to lead to the critical consideration of the political views of 
our time. Among the topics discussed are the relationship between knowledge and political 
power and the character of political justice. Portions of the works of Aristophanes, Plato, 
Cicero and Alfarabi are examined. Prerequisite: COR 201 or permission of the instructor. 

POL 342. Political Philosophy II: Modern 4 hours 

This is a critical examination of the peculiarly modern political and philosophical stance 
beginning where Political Philosophy I concludes. Among the authors discussed are Ma- 
chiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant and Kojeve. Prerequisite: POL 341 or permission 
of the instructor. 

POL 361. European Politics 4 hours 

This course is a factual, conceptual and historical introduction to politics on the European 
continent, including (but not necessarily limited to) Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Rus- 
sia and the European Union. These regimes will be studied through a comparison of their 
social structures, party systems, institutions and constitutions, political cultures and (if 
possible) their domestic policies. Prerequisite: POL 101. 



208 



POL 371. Survey of Research Methods 4 hours 

This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative methods such as surveys, ex- 
periments, archival research, hermeneutical research, case studies and causal analysis. The 
class will examine these research methods from several different angles including research 
techniques specific to each method, skills to critically evaluate such research, the epistemo- 
logical considerations and practical consequences of undertaking such research. Students 
considering graduate school or careers that require them to sue and assess research may 
find this course particularly valuable. This course is also cross listed as CRS 415 and SOC 
310. Prerequisite: Students with junior standing or permission of the instructor. 

POL 411. War, Peace and Security 4 hours 

An in-depth treatment of one or more of the issues introduced in International Relations. 
The course will be conducted as a seminar, with the emphasis on reading, discussion and 
research. It will address the following questions: When and why do statesmen resort to 
force to resolve international conflicts? When does the threat of force succeed or fail and 
when and how ought one to employ it? When and why do states make peace? What are the 
causes of conflict in the present and future? What are the prospects for peace? Topics vary 
from year to year. Prerequisite: POL 111 or POL 311. 

POL 422. Seminar in Chinese Politics 4 hours 

This course explores the ongoing political, social and economic transformations in Com- 
munist China, with emphasis on the post-Mao era (1978 to the present). General themes 
include Maoist versus Dengist politics, revolution versus reform, market reform in a com- 
munist state, factionalism, central-local relations, state-society relations and China in the 
international order. The course also examines current political and social issues. Prerequi- 
site: POL 121, POL 231 or permission of the instructor. 

POL 431. Seminar in Politics and Culture 4 hours 

This will be an upper-level seminar in the study of the relationship of politics and culture. 
Emphasis will be placed on understanding the nature and difficulties of cultural study, with 
particular attention to ethnographic or participant observer research methods. Focus of the 
seminar changes yearly but has included such topics as Judaism and Jewishness, Women 
and Politics and Language and Politics. Prerequisite: POL 101 or junior standing. 

POL 441. Seminar in Political Philosophy 4 hours 

An intensive examination of a text or theme introduced in the Political Philosophy se- 
quence. Among the topics have been Rousseau's Emile, Spinoza and The German Enlight- 
enment. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

POL 450. Independent Study in Politics 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

POL 451. Internship in Politics 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
Df academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
3f the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
;redit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportu- 
lities at the Georgia State Legislature, the United States Department of State, The Carter 



209 



Center and the Superior Court of Fulton County. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship 
program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement 
proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

POL 490. Advanced Special Topics in Politics 4 hours 

A variety of courses will be offered to respond to topical needs of the curriculum. Recent 
courses include Moral and Political Leadership, Dealing with Diversity, Criminal Law and 
Citizenship in Theory and Practice. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Pre-lavv Studies 

Students planning to enter law school after graduation from Oglethorpe should realize that 
neither the American Bar Association nor leading law schools endorse a particular pre-law 
major. The student is advised, however, to take courses that enhance the basic skills of a lib- 
erally educated person: reading with comprehension, vvriting, speaking and reasoning. The 
student is encouraged to become more familiar with political, economic and social institu- 
tions as they have developed historically and as they function in contemporary society. 
Students interested in pursuing a legal career should ask the registrar for the names of 
faculty members serving as pre-law advisers. 

Pre-medical Studies 



Students who plan to attend a professional school of medicine, dentistry, optometry, phar- 
macy or veterinary medicine should develop a program of studies at Oglethorpe in consul- 
tation with a faculty member who is a designated pre-medical adviser. It is desirable for 
pre-medical students to have a pre-medical adviser from the outset of the planning of their 
undergraduate program. It is essential that the students establish contact with a pre-medi- 
cal adviser by the second semester of their freshman year. 

Admission to professional schools of health science require successful completion of a 
specified sequence of courses in the natural sciences, courses in the humanities and social 
sciences, submission of acceptable scores on appropriate standardized tests as well as other 
requirements that are specific for particular schools. However, pre-medical students have 
latitude of choice vrith regard to the major selected. Students should familiarize themselves 
with the particular admission requirements for the type of professional school they plan 
to enter prior to deciding on the course of study to be pursued at Oglethorpe. An excellent 
starting point for this preliminary study is the website at wvv^w.explorehealthcareers.com. 

Some schools of medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine vrill admit highly qualified ap- 
plicants who have completed all admission requirements for the professional school during 
three years of study at an undergraduate institution. (Four years of undergraduate work and 
a bachelor's degree are standard requirements; admission after three years is highly atypical 
and is not available at all schools.) It is possible for students to enter an allopathic, osteo- 
pathic or podiatric medical school, dental school or veterinary school (no other health pro- 
fession schools are eligible) after three years of study at Oglethorpe and to complete their 
bachelors degree under the Professional Option. By specific arrangement between the 
professional school and Oglethorpe University and in accordance with regulations of both 
institutions, after successful completion of all academic requirements of the first year in the 
professional school, the student receives a degree ft^om Oglethorpe University when certi- 
fied to be in good standing at the professional school. Students interested in this possibility 
should consult with their advisers to make certain that all conditions are met; simultaneous 
enrollment in several science courses each semester during the three years at Oglethorpe 
likely vrill be required to meet minimum expectations for taking professional school admis- 
sion tests and to meet admission requirements for the professional school. All Oglethorpe 
core courses must be completed before the student enrolls in the professional school. 



210 



An important note for international students: It is extremely difficult and very unlikely for 
international applicants who are not citizens or permanent residents of the United States 
to gain admission to American medical schools. State-supported medical schools rarely 
consider international applicants; private medical schools that accept international ap- 
plicants generally require them to place in escrow the equivalent of one to four years tuition 
and fees (U.S. $50,000 to $300,000). There are very few scholarships available to support 
any students at American medical schools; in order to qualify for loans that are sponsored 
by the United States government, the applicant must be a citizen or permanent resident. 
International students who plan to become medical doctors by completing their education 
at an American medical school should consider these issues very carefully before enrolling 
in an undergraduate pre-medical program in the United States. 

Psychology 



The Department of Psychology endorses a view of psychology as the use of scientific meth- 
ods to study a broad range of factors that often interact to produce human behavior, includ- 
ing cognitive, developmental, personality, physiological and social variables. Therefore, 
students who major in psychology are expected to: 

1. Learn to apply empirical methods to understand human and animal behavior. Stu- 
dents should be able to use and critique a variety of research methods, ranging from 
controlled laboratory experiments to naturalistic observations. Specific skills to be 
acquired include the ability to operationally define concepts for empirical study; 

to collect, analyze and interpret empirical data; to clearly communicate findings 
to larger audiences through oral and written presentations (for example, APA style 
research papers, posters and presentations). 

2. Learn major theoretical and empirical advances in a variety of disciplines within 
the field of psychology (for example, clinical, cognitive, developmental, motivation- 

,al, organizational, personality, physiological, social). This objective should include 
the ability to compare and contrast explanations offered by different schools of 
thought within each discipline (for example, behavioral, biological, cognitive, dispo- 
sitional, psychoanalytic, social learning). It also should include an understanding of 
both current and historically prominent developments in the various disciplines. 

3. Learn ways in which psychological concepts can be applied for the benefit of oneself 
and society. Students will learn about clinical, educational and organizational 
applications of psychological research and will consider ways in which psychologi- 
cal principles may be relevant to personal life and civic participation. In addition, 
students are expected to become more precise and tolerant observers of human 
behavior and individual differences. 

The Department of Psychology at Oglethorpe University has a strong tradition of student 
achievement in research and internships. Many students collaborate with faculty on re- 
search projects or develop and complete their own research projects with the help of faculty 
mentors. Each year, Oglethorpe is represented at regional and national psychology confer- 
ences by psychology students presenting their original work. Psychology students have 
completed internships in a variety of settings including: private clinical practices, adoption 
agencies, law enforcement agencies, law firms, the Centers for Disease Control and Preven- 
tion, Partnership Against Domestic Violence, Georgia State University Language Research 
Center, Zoo Atlanta, Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center and the Georgia Psychologi- 
cal Association. 

Major 

To complete a major in psychology, students must complete seven required foundation 
courses and five elective courses, where at least one course is taken from each discipline 
area. The degree awarded is the Bachelor or Arts; thus, in addition to the courses required 



211 



for the major, students must complete at least one semester of a foreign language at the 
second semester elementary-level or higher. Any course taken outside of the traditional 
undergraduate program to satisfy degree requirements must be approved by the depart- 
ment. Transfer courses may satisfy major requirements if shown on an official transcript 
and approved by psychology faculty. 

Minor 

A minor in psychology consists of Introduction to Psychology and any four additional 
courses in psychology. No course can be used to satisfy both major and minor requirements. 

Required Foundation Courses 

PSY 101. Introduction to Psychology 

BIO 101. General Biology I 

BIO 102. General Biology II 

MAT 111. Statistics 

PSY 301. Research Methods 

PSY 302. Advanced Experimental Psychology 

PSY 405. History and Systems 

Clinical Psychology Discipline Area 

PSY 205. Theories of Personality 

PSY 206. Abnormal Psychology 

PSY 303. Psychological Testing 

PSY 490. Advanced Special Topics in Clinical Psychology 

Cognitive/Developmental Psychology Discipline Area 

EDU 201. Educational Psyhcology 

PSY 201. Developmental Psychology ' 

PSY 307- Cognitive Psychology 

■ PSY 490. Advanced Special Topics in Psychology ( 

Psychology/Biology Discipline Area ' 

PSY 203. Learning and Conditioning ( 

PSY 308. Sensation and Perception 

PSY 309. Behavioral Neuroscience ( 

PSY 310. Drugs, Brain and Behavior 

PSY 490. Advanced Special Topics in Psychology ' 

Social Psychology Discipline Area 

PSY 202. Organizational Psychology \ 

PSY 204. Social Psychology , 

PSY 490. Advanced Special Topics in Psychology ' 

PSY 101. Introduction to Psychology 4 hours 

This course provides a general introduction to psychology, with an emphasis on helping ( 

students appreciate how psychologists attempt to answer questions using the scientific 
method. Topics within neuropsychology, learning, memory, development, clinical and social ' 
psychology are considered from an empirical point of view. Offered every semester. . 

PSY 201. Developmental Psychology 4 hoiu"S ^ 

The ways in which individuals understand the world and each other change dramatically 
from birth to adolescence. This course will trace these developments, particularly those of ^ 

cognition, social behavior and self-concept. The factors influencing development, such as 
heredity and the social/cultural environment will be emphasized. Offered annually in the , 

spring. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

212 



£DU 201. Educational Psychology 4 hours 

A study of learning theory and its application to such problems as classroom management, 
the organization of learning activities, understanding individual differences and evaluat- 
ing teaching and learning. Emphasis is given to factors which facilitate and interfere with 
learning. Offered annually in the spring. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C" or higher. 

PSY 202. Organizational Psychology 4 hours 

Organizations and the individuals who function within them will be examined from the 
perspective of psychological theory and research. Consideration will be given both to broad 
topics relevant to all organizations, such as communications, groups and leadership, and to 
topics specific to the work environment, such as employee selection, training and evalua- 
tion. Offered odd years in the spring. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 203. Learning and Conditioning 4 hours 

This course examines the empirical and theoretical issues surrounding learned behavior. 
Most of the data discussed come from studies in animal learning but special emphasis will 
be placed on how learning principles explain everyday human behavior and are used in the 
treatment of abnormal behavior patterns. Offered annually in the fall. Prerequisite: PSY 101 
with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 204. Social Psychology 4 hours 

Social psychology is the study of human beings in interaction with each other or under the 
pressure of forces of social influence. The course will include a consideration of conformity, 
persuasion, attraction, aggression, self-presentation and other relevant aspects of the social 
life. Offered annually in the fall. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 205. Theories of Personality 4 hours 

The goal of this course is to acquaint the student with the major theories of personality and 
with approaches to the scientific evaluation of them. Students will be encouraged to engage 
in critical analysis and theoretical comparisons of the ideas presented from diverse and 
often contradictory, perspectives. Offered annually in the fall. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a 
grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 206. Abnormal Psychology 4 hours 

There are three main goals in this course. The first is to enhance the student's understand- 
ing of psychopathology and major treatment approaches. The second is to help the student 
learn to evaluate critically the research evidence regarding therapeutic interventions. The 
third is to encourage a self-examination of the student's attitudes and those of our society 
regarding mental illness and the full range of human individual differences. Offered annu- 
ally in the spring. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 290. Special Topics in Psychology 4 hours 

bourses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
-iculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

PSY 291. Special Topics in Clinical Psychology 4 hours 

I^ourses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
iculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

'SY 301. Research Methods 4 hours 

'hrough a combination of class discussion and hands-on research activity, this course pro- 
ides students with exposure to a variety of research approaches. The course begins with an 
xamination of descriptive methods, such as naturalistic observation, surveys and archival 
esearch and concludes with an analysis of controlled experimental methods. Quasi-experi- 
nental designs and applications of research methods are also explored. Offered annually in 
he fall. Prerequisites: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher and MAT 111. 

213 



PSY 302. Advanced Experimental Psychology ...4 hours 

This sequel to the introductory research methods course provides an in-depth analysis of 
controlled experimentation in a laboratory setting. Each student will design and conduct an 
individual research project to fulfill the laboratory component of the course. Offered annu- 
ally in the spring. Prerequisite: PSY 301. 

PSY 303. Psychological Testing 4 hours 

This course covers the selection, interpretation and applications of psychological tests, 
including tests of intellectual ability, vocational and academic aptitudes and personality. 
The most common uses of test results in educational institutions, clinical settings, business, 
government and the military will be considered. The history of psychological testing and 
the interpretation of test results also will be considered from both traditional and critical 
perspectives. Although students will have the opportunity to see many psychological tests, 
this course is not intended to train students actually to administer tests. Offered odd years 
in the spring. Prerequisites: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher and MAT 111. 

PSY 307. Cognitive Psychology 4 hours 

This course explores the nature and function of human thought processes. Topics to be 
considered include perception, attention, remembering and forgetting, mental imagery, 
psycholinguistics, problem solving and reasoning. Offered even years in the fall. Prerequi- 
site: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 308. Sensation and Perception 4 hours 

This course explores how the brain and body transduce, organize and interpret information 
from the environment. Topics covered will include psychophysical methods, signal detec- 
tion theory and the neural mechanisms underlying vision, hearing, taste, smell and touch. 
Offered even years in the spring. Prerequisites: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher and 
BIO 102. (Biology majors only need BIO 102.) 

PSY 309. Behavioral Neuroscience 4 hours 

This course focuses on the neural and hormonal correlation of behavior including sleep, 
feeding, sexual behavior, learning and memory, language, movement and psychopathology 
including mood disorders and schizophrenia. Other topics include methods used in the 
brain sciences, the connection between stress and illness and how the brain recovers from 
injury. Offered annually in the fall. Prerequisites: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher and 
BIO 102. (Biology majors only need BIO 102.) 

PSY 310. Drugs, the Brain and Behavior 4 hours 

This course examines the effects of psychoactive drugs on the central nervous system and 
behavior. Both recreational and illicit drugs (opiods, stimulants, sedatives, hallucinogens) 
and those used to treat mental disorders (antianxiety agents, antidepressants, antipsychot- 
ics) will be covered. Drug action at the synaptic level, dose-response functions, tolerance 
and sensitization and toxicity will be discussed. Offered odd years in the spring. Prerequi- 
sites: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher and BIO 102. (Biology majors only need BIO 
102.) 

PSY 405. History and Systems of Psychology 4 hours 

A study of the historic development of modern psychology, this course covers its philosophi- 
cal and scientific ancestry, the major schools of thought, the contemporary systems of psy- 
chology and their theoretical and empirical differences. Recommended for the senior year. 
Offered annually in the spring. Prerequisites: Two or more psychology courses and senior 
standing or permission of the instructor. 

PSY 406. Directed Research in Psychology 4 hours 

Original investigations and detailed studies of the literature in selected areas of psychology 



214 



will be supervised by a faculty member. Emphasis will be on original research. Prerequi- 
sites: PSY 301 and permission of the instructor. 

PSY 407. Internship in Psychology 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including oppor- 
tunities mentioned in the major overview. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship 
program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement 
proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

PSY 408. Independent Study in Psychology 1-4 hours 

This course provides the opportunity for an intense study of diverse topics under the direct 
supervision of the instructor. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that 
includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division 
chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of study. For 
additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations and Policies 
section of this Bulletin. 

PSY 490. Advanced Special Topics in Psychology 4 hours 

The seminar will provide examination and discussion of various topics of contemporary 
interest in psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of "C-" or higher. 

PSY 491. Advanced Special Topics in Clinical Psychology. 4 hours 

The focus of the course is on the examination and discussion of topics of contemporary 
interest in clinical psychology. Offered even years in the spring. Prerequisite: PSY 306. 

Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies 



The Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies minor at Oglethorpe is intended to provide 
students wdth not only an in-depth understanding and appreciation of the works of William 
Shakespeare but also an understanding of the time and culture in which he lived, thereby 
providing a context for appreciating his achievement. This program wall also capitalize on 
the special relationship Oglethorpe University enjoys with Georgia Shakespeare, the profes- 
sional theatre company in residence. 

Minor 

Six courses must be completed from the three categories below as indicated. At least four of 
these must be in addition to other courses taken to fulfill requirements for a major or other 
minor. 

Two courses with an emphasis on Shakespeare, such as: 

ENG 202. Shakespeare 

ENG 393. Special Topics in Literature and Culture: Shakespeare in Perfor- 
mance, In Context and in England (Oglethorpe at Oxford OUSA 
summer course) 

THE 305. Shakespearean Performance 

Two courses with an historical component, at least one of which must be either: 
HIS 211. The Renaissance and Reformation or 
HIS 212. Early Modern Europe 

215 



One other course with an historical component such as: 

ART 300. Itahan Renaissance Art History 

ART 310. Northern Renaissance and Baroque Art History 

GEN 101. Natural Sciences - The Physical Sciences: Renaissance Science 

HIS 490. Advanced Special Topics in History: The Witch Craze 

HIS 490. Advanced Special Topics in History: The Age of Elizabeth 

Two courses with a Renaissance emphasis (in addition to the option of further courses 
selected from above) such as: 

ENG 307. Milton 

ENG 391. Special Topics in Poetry: Poetics of Desire - Petrarch, 

Shakespeare and Donne 
ENG 393. Special Topics in Literature and Culture: Baroque Form in the 

English Renaissance 
ENG 393. Special Topics in Literature and Culture: 5th-Century Athens 

and Tudor-Stuart England 
HIS 490. Advanced Special Topics in History 

POL 441. Seminar in Political Philosophy: Shakespeare and Politics 
THE 407. Internship in Theatre 
THE 490. Advanced Special Topics in Theatre 

Sociology 



Sociology is the study of human society, culture and conduct from a variety of perspec- 
tives that include interpersonal, institutional and aggregate levels of analyses. At the 
interpersonal level, sociologists may study personality formation in social contexts or how 
the individual responds to social opportunities and constraints. At the institutional level, 
sociologists attempt to analyze social institutions (such as the family, religion and the state) 
and social structures (such £is social classes and racial and ethnic stratification) that shape 
human conduct. And at the aggregate level, sociology focuses on the study of large-scale 
influences ranging from demographics to social movements to cultural systems. 

The mission of the sociology faculty at Oglethorpe is to introduce students to such stud- 
ies within a liberal arts setting by developing each student's analytical, writing, speaking 
and methodological skills, as well as his or her ability to comprehend and explicate dif- 
ficult texts. Sociology majors should be able, through vmtten and oral analyses, to make 
arguments whose conclusions follow from evidence carefully and logically presented. They 
should be able to distinguish between informed and uninformed opinion. In addition, each 
sociology student at Oglethorpe will be expected to master essential knowledge within the 
areas of sociological theory, research methodology and statistics and within at least three 
content areas. In order to encourage a practical understanding of social problems and 
institutions, students, where appropriate, are urged to seek internships. Students bound for 
graduate school are encouraged to master a foreign language. 

Major 

The sociology major consists of a minimum of nine sociology courses (36 semester hours) 
beyond Human Nature and the Social Order I and II. These nine courses must include 
Introduction to Sociology, Statistics, Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods, So- 
ciological Theory and five additional sociology courses selected by the student. Of the nine 
courses, at least six must be completed at Oglethorpe for a major in sociology. Human Na- 
ture and the Social Order I and II must be completed by all majors who enter Oglethorpe 
below the junior level. In addition, at least one semester of a foreign language at the second 
semester elementary-level or higher is required. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 



216 



Minor 

A minor in sociology consists of Introduction to Sociology and any other three sociol- 
ogy courses (16 semester hours) beyond Human Nature and the Social Order I and II. No 
course can be used to satisfy both major and minor requirements. Of the four sociology 
courses, at least three must be completed at Oglethorpe for a minor in sociology. 

Sociology with Social Work Concentration 

Major 

A major in sociology with a concentration in social work consists of seven courses (28 
semester hours) beyond Human Nature and the Social Order I and II, in addition to a 
semester of field placement (16 semester hours). Required courses include Introduction to 
Sociology, Field of Social Work and Methods of Social Work, in addition to four sociology 
electives. Successful completion of at least one semester of a foreign language at the second 
semester elementary-level or higher also is required. The degree awarded is the Bachelor of 
Arts. 

SOC 101. Introduction to Sociology 4 hours 

This course offers an introduction to topics central to the study of human society, culture 
and conduct. Selected fields of study frequently include culture, formation of the self, social 
classes, power structures, social movements, criminal behavior and a variety of social insti- 
tutions. Emphasis is placed upon basic concepts and principal findings of the field. Offered 
annually. 

SOC 201. The Family 4 hours 

This course focuses primarily on the changes in the American family since 1945. The topics 
discussed include trends in marriage, the age of marriage, fertility, illegitimacy, divorce, 
remarriage and domestic abuse. The possible social and economic causes and consequences 
of these trends are also discussed. Offered annually. 

SOC 202. The American Experience 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to consider the ways the American experience has shaped a 
distinct American character and identity. The course blends both historical and social scien- 
tific analysis and considers how political, economic and social institutions have contributed 
to American manners and morals. Particular attention is paid to immigration and assimila- 
tion, folk culture, the relationship between the individual and community, religious plural- 
ism, ethnic identity, political liberalism and free markets. Offered biennially. 

SOC 204. Social Problems 4 hours 

This course studies the impact of current social forces upon American society. Deviation 
from social norms, conflict concerning social goals and values and social disorganization as 
these apply to family, economic, religious and other institutional and interpersonal situa- 
tions are of primary concern. Offered biennially. 

SOC 205. Crime and Deviance 4 hours 

This course will examine behaviors that do not conform to moral and legal codes and 
the ways in which societies control such behaviors. Particular emphasis will be given to 
American society. Readings will include classic and current analyses of deviance and crime. 
Offered biennially. 

SOC 290. Special Topics in Sociology 4 hours 

A seminar providing examination and discussion of various topics on contemporary and 
historical interest in sociology. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



217 



SOC 302. The Sociology of Work and Occupations 4 hours 

This course has three purposes: 1) to analyze the means by which non-economic institu- 
tions, especially the family, schools and religious institutions influence the formation of "hu- 
man capital"; 2) to study the history and contemporary nature of the professions; and 3) to 
analyze the relationship between the external control of workers and their internal motiva- 
tion. A cross-cultural approach is employed in the course. Offered biennially. 

SOC 303. Field of Social Work 4 hours 

This course will study and analyze the historical development of social work and social work 
activities in contemporary society. Offered biennially. 

ULP 303. The New American City 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to examine the problems and prospects of politics and poli- 
cymaking in the new American city and its environs. Consideration will be given to the 
political and sociological significance of a number of the factors that characterize this new 
development, including the extremes of wealth and poverty, the mix of racial and ethnic 
groups and the opportunities and challenges provided by progress in transportation and 
technology. Offered biennially. 

SOC 304. Methods of Social Work 4 hours 

This course is a study of the methods used in contemporary social work. Offered biennially. 
Prerequisite: SOC 303. 

SOC 305. Film and Society 4 hours 

This course is designed to help students analyze and interpret films from the perspectives 
of social theory. Emphasis will be placed upon exploring visions of the self and society in 
a variety of film genres, including mysteries, comedies, film noir, westerns, musicals, etc. 
Films studied in recent classes include Citizen Kane, Vertigo, The Maltese Falcon, Red River, 
Cabaret and others. Offered biennially. 

SOC 306. Race, Ethnicity and Immigration 4 hours 

This course treats contemporary ethnic relations and the history of immigration in the 
United States. It considers the role of markets, government policy and culture in the forma- 
tion of ethnic identity and the well being of ethnic groups. Although the chief concern is 
with the United States, a comparative approach is taken. Offered biennially. 

SOC 307. Elites and Inequality 4 hours 

An examination is made in this course of the social stratification of privileges and depriva- 
tions in contemporary societies, focusing on the distribution of wealth, status and power. 
The course studies social stratification historically and comparatively, the American upper, 
middle and lower classes, institutionalized power elites, race and gender stratification, 
status systems and economic inequality. Offered biennially. 

SOC 308. Culture and Society 4 hours 

A study of the dynamics of traditional, modern and postmodern cultures that focuses on the 
analysis of symbolic forms and boundaries, social memory, ceremonies and rituals, bodily 
habits, cultural elites and cultural revolutions. Special attention is given to "culture wars," 
the impact of mass media and postmodernism in contemporary societies. The course is 
comparative in approach. Offered biennially. 

SOC 309. Religion and Society 4 hours 

This course will examine religion as a social institution, its internal development, relation- 
ship to other institutions and its cultural and social significance in modern and traditional 
societies. Special attention will be given to the conflict between spirit and institution in 



218 



Christianity; the rise and dechne of denominationahsm; contemporary forms of spirituaUty; 
the modern psychologization of reUgion; and the comparative study of religions. Offered 
biennially. 

SOC 310. Survey of Research Methods 4 hours 

This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative methods such as surveys, ex- 
periments, archival research, hermeneutical research, case studies and causal analysis. The 
class will examine these research methods from several different angles including research 
techniques specific to each method, skills to critically evaluate such research, the epistemo- 
logical considerations and practical consequences of undertaking such research. Students 
considering graduate school or careers that require them to sue and assess research may 
find this course particularly valuable. This course is also cross listed as CRS 415 and POL 
371. Prerequisite: Students with junior standing or permission of the instructor. 

SOC 402. Field Experience in Social Work 16 hours 

Students concentrating in social work spend a semester in social work agencies in the At- 
lanta area for on-the-job practicum experience. Successful field placements have been made 
in a variety of settings in recent years, including Wesley Woods Health Center, West Paces 
Ferry Hospital and Atlanta shelters for the homeless. Prerequisites: SOC 303, permission of 
the academic adviser and faculty supervisor and signature of the director of career services. 

SOC 403. Sociological Theory 4 hours 

This course will study classical and contemporary theory with an emphasis upon the latter. 
Contemporary theories covered usually include utilitarian individualism (sociobiology, ex- 
change theory and rational-choice theory), communitarianism, civil society theory, critical 
theory and post-modernism. Offered biennially. 

SOC 405. Internship in Sociology 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and v^ite a research paper dealing vdth some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of 
credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including oppor- 
tunities at the Gainesville/Hall County Senior Center, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation 
and the Partnership Against Domestic Violence. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory ba- 
sis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship 
program, permission of an internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement 
proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

SOC 406. Independent Study in Sociology 1-4 hours 

An intense study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of the instructor. Prerequi- 
site: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and 
assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost no later than 
the second day of classes of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent 
Study Policy in the Academic Regulations and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

SOC 407. Internship in American Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings vrith the faculty supervisor and vmte a research paper dealing vrith some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic v^riting for every hour 



219 



of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and 
qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and 
acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

SOC 490. Advanced Special Topics in Sociology 4 hours 

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered generally for juniors or seniors as de- 
termined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the 
current semester class schedule. 

Spanish 



A student who chooses Spanish £is a major will gain valuable knowledge, not only about the 
language, but also about the many unique and fascinating cultures represented in the Span- 
ish-speaking world. Like all languages offered at Oglethorpe, the Spanish major is informed 
by "the five C's:" communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities. 
These areas represent the defined goals of National Standards for Foreign Language Learn- 
ing. 

The journey toward a Spanish major begins with a thorough emphasis on reading, writing, 
listening comprehension and speaking. These essential skills prepare the student with the 
foundations for communicating in diverse contexts in the Spanish language. More ad- 
vanced study of Spanish will enable the student to explore the treasures of Hispanic prose, 
poetry, drama and cinema, in addition to the study of colorful and intriguing Hispanic 
civilizations in Spain, Africa and Latin America. Through the course offerings in Spanish, 
students become more informed about America's Latino and Hispanic neighbors, in addi- 
tion to becoming more functional global citizens. 

Once students have reached an adequate level of proficiency in Spanish and have become 
familiar with Spanish-speaking populations and societies, they will be ready to complement 
their classroom studies with full-immersion study abroad opportunities. As an invaluable 
component of the Spanish major, students are required to study and live in a Spanish- 
speaking country for a semester during the academic year following the completion of an 
initial sequence of courses taken in the program. Most majors choose to study at one of a 
number of partner institutions such as the Universidad de Belgrano (Argentina), the Uni- 
versidad de San Francisco de Quito (Ecuador), the Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Su- 
periores de Occidente (Mexico) or at Universidad Francisco de Vitoria (Spain). In addition, 
for the adventurous student, there are many other creative study abroad options available, 
all of which can be discussed with student advisers. Native speakers of Spanish are invited 
to complete the 12-semester hour requirements of study abroad in courses at Oglethorpe 
or through cross registration at one of the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education 
(ARCHE) institutions. 

Many students who complete the Spanish major at Oglethorpe go on to carry out gradu- 
ate programs at other institutions in Spanish language and literature, linguistics, Hispanic 
cultural studies or International Relations. Other graduates from the program become 
Spanish instructors or find opportunities in corporate or non-profit organizations, where 
they continue to apply their language skills and global experiences. Students are also invited 
to combine a double major in Spanish with other disciplines, a combination which greatly 
enhances student marketability after graduation. 

All students with previous study or experience in Spanish must take a language placement 
examination. They will be placed in the course sequence according to their competence. 
Under no circumstance should students with past experience in Spanish place themselves 
in courses, especially at the elementary level. Students are not eligible to enroll in elemen- 
tary and intermediate courses in their native languages. 



220 



Major 

Students who major in Spanish must first complete the following requirements: 
SPN 201. Intermediate Spanish 
SPN 301. Advanced Spanish 
SPN 302. Introduction to Hispanic Literature 

Students will then complete a semester in an approved study abroad program, which 
should include a minimum of 12 semester hours. Returning students must complete three 
upper-level (300 or 400) courses in Spanish. 

Elementary French I or equivalent as determined through the French placement test is also 
required. It is recommended that this requirement be completed during the student's first 
two years. 

A minimum of "C+" must be earned in all course work required for the major. The degree 
awarded is the Bachelor of Arts. 

Minor 

A minor in Spanish consists of the following requirements: 
SPN 201. Intermediate Spanish 
Three upper-level courses (300 or 400) 

Certain of these requirements may be met through an approved study abroad program. 

SPN 101, SPN 102. Elementary Spanish I, II 4 plus 4 hours 

These courses are an introduction to understanding, speaking, reading and writing Spanish. 
Emphasis will be placed on acquiring a foundation in basic grammar as well as on listening 
comprehension and spoken Spanish through class activities, tapes and videos. Prerequisite: 
None for SPN 101; SPN 101 required for SPN 102 or placement by testing. 

SPN 201. Intermediate Spanish 4 hours 

This course is intended to review basic grammar and develop more complex patterns of 
written and spoken Spanish. Short compositions, readings from Spanish and Spanish- 
American literature and class discussions require active use of students' acquired knowl- 
edge of Spanish and form the basis for the expansion of vocabulary and oral expression. 
Prerequisite: SPN 102 or placement by testing. 

SPN 290. Special Topics in Hispanic Languages, Literatures and 

Cultures..., 4 hours 

This course provides the opportunity to study particular aspects of the languages, litera- 
tures and cultures of Spain, Spanish America or United States Hispanic communities not 
covered in the other courses. A recent course was French and Spanish Studies on Hispanio- 
la - Full Immersion Travel Course in the Dominican Republic. This course may be repeated 
for credit as course content changes. Prerequisite: SPN 301. 

SPN 301. Advanced Spanish 4 hours 

This course is designed to improve students' skills to a sophisticated level at which they are 
able to discuss and express opinions in both oral and written form. Readings of essays and 
short-stories as well as film viewing in Spanish are used as the basis for discussion, intro- 
duction to cultural issues and vmtten expression. Frequent writing assignments. Prerequi- 
site: SPN 201 or placement by testing. 

SPN 302. Introduction to Hispanic Literature 4 hours 

This course offers an introduction to literary analysis based on a rigorous program of 
readings from Spanish and Spanish American literatures. It is a skills-building course that 

221 



familiarizes students with the lexicon of literary criticism in Spanish and trains them to 
be active readers of Hispanic literature. Students read and analyze (orally and in writing) 
representative works of the four fundamental genres of literature: Narrative, Poetry, Drama 
and Essay. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 301 or placement by testing. 

SPN 305. Spanish for International Relations 4 hours 

This course considers current events in the world of international relations from a Hispanic 
perspective. Students will read and discuss academic as well as journalistic articles in Span- 
ish and will learn vocabulary appropriate to the world of international politics, diplomacy 
or business. In addition, they will explore common cross-cultural clashes and misunder- 
standings to improve intercultural communication in Hispanic contexts as a means to suc- 
ceeding more effectively in a global environment. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 301. 

SPN 403. Political Issues in Spanish-American Literature and Film 4 hours 

The social and political upheavals that took place in several Spanish-American countries 
during the 20th century spav^ied the development of a rich literary and cinematic corpus. 
This course will examine part of that corpus in its historical and cultural context and how 
political issues are aesthetically elaborated in fiction, poetry, essay and film. Among the 
topics to be studied are revolution, testimony, exile and the Other as a figure of resistance. 
Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 302. 

SPN 404. Discourse of Golden-age Spain 4 hours 

In this course, students will analyze Golden-age Spanish society through the literature 
produced during the l6th and 17th centuries, the two epochs that encompass the Spanish 
Siglos de Oro. Studied texts will reveal a young Spain altogether confident about its present, 
at times insecure about its future and frequently ambivalent about its diverse past. Prereq- 
uisite: SPN 302. 

SPN 405. 20th Century Spanish American Literature 4 hours 

This is a study of Spanish American literature from the 1930s to the present, focusing on 
its departure from the Realist tradition and its adoption of experimentation, self- reflection, 
parody, magical realism or the fantastic. Modern and post-modern trends will be examined. 
Readings include fiction by Borges, Fuentes, Cortazar, Garcia Marquez and Puig. Taught in 
Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 302. 

SPN 406. French and Spanish Crossroads in the Caribbean and Africa 4 hours 

This course uses Spanish- and French-speaking countries in proximity to each other in the 
Caribbean or Africa as a point of departure for literary, cultural, social and service learning 
exploration. Offerings may focus upon Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Martinique and 
Cuba, Equatorial Guinea in relation to Senegal or other appropriate pairings. The course is 
taught in English and students without advanced skills in French or Spanish may register. 
This course is also cross listed as FRE 406. Prerequisite: SPN 301 for Spanish major or 
minor credit; FRE 301 for French major or minor credit. 

SPN 410. The Development of Latin American Cultures 4 hours 

This course introduces students to the diverse cultural heritage of Latin America paying 
special attention to the impact and consequences of the encounter between European, Na- 
tive and African cultures in art, politics and religion. Manifestations of cultural syncretism 
and diversity from the times of the Spanish conquest and colonization to the post-colonial 
polemics of cultural identity will be examined. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 302. 

SPN 450. Independent Study in Spanish 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 



222 



study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

SPN 490. Advanced Special Topics in Hispanic Languages, Literatures 

and Cultures 4 hours 

This course provides advanced study of particular aspects of the languages, literatures and 
cultures of Spain, Spanish America or United States Hispanic communities not covered 
in the other courses. A recent course was Spain As Text - Iberian Contacts, Contrasts and 
Connections that included a trip to Spain. This course may be repeated for credit as course 
content changes. Prerequisite: SPN 302. 

Theatre 

Students majoring in theatre concentrate their efforts in the areas of performance and 
directing. Additional courses in theatre history and stagecraft, combined with Oglethorpe's 
internship program, offer a study in theatre that is interactive in approach and broad in 
scope. The department's unique relationship with Georgia Shakespeare also provides quali- 
fied students with performance opportunities unparalleled by any school in the region. 
Those entering Oglethorpe with a background in theatre, as well as students with an inter- 
est but no experience, wdll find ample opportunities in the theatre program to develop their 
skills and expertise. 

The Oglethorpe University theatre program is dedicated to presenting stimulating and en- 
joyable theatre for audiences of all types and ages and integrating theatre into Oglethorpe 
University's academic curriculum. Mounting five full productions per school year, the 
program pursues an artistic policy that celebrates the diversity of its dramatic heritage by 
engaging texts of diverse periods, cultures and styles. Through The Playmakers (the theatre 
program's official performance company), laboratory opportunities are provided as students 
and faculty come together to create live performance events for the campus community and 
the city of Atlanta. 

Major 

The degree awarded is the Bachelor of Arts and students are required to complete the fol- 
lowing courses: 

THE 105. Beginning Characterization 

THE 205. Intermediate Characterization 

THE 210. Theatre History I: Greeks to Restoration 

THE 220. Theatre History II: Renaissance to 20th Century 

THE 305. Shakespearean Performance 

THE 310. Stagecraft 

THE 330. Directing for the Stage I 

THE 340. Directing for the Stage II 

THE 407. Internship in Theatre 

One semester of a foreign language at the second semester elementary-level 
or higher 

In addition, students must choose two from among the following: 
ENG 202. Shakespeare 
ENG 390. Special Topics in Drama 
THE 408. Independent Study in Theatre 
THE 490. Advanced Special Topics in Theatre 

Minor 

A theatre minor serves as an appropriate complement to a variety of majors in communica- 
tions and the humanities. Students are required to take the following courses: 



223 



THE 105. Beginning Characterization 
THE 205. Intermediate Characterization 
THE 310. Stagecraft 

Students must complete one of the following: 

THE 210. Theatre History I: Greeks to Restoration 

THE 220. Theatre History H: Renaissance to 20th Century 

Students must complete one from among the following: 
ENG 202. Shakespeare 
ENG 390. Special Topics in Drama 
THE 407- Internship in Theatre 
THE 490. Advanced Special Topics in Theatre 

THE 105. Beginning Characterization 4 hours 

This course explores the physical and mental foundations necessary for successful stage 
performance. Students will be expected to engage in hands-on exercises, physical and vocal 
warm-ups and performance work (both individual and partnered) throughout the semes- 
ter. The basic principles of the Stanislavski method will be explored through stage combat, 
mime, movement, vocalization and contemporary characterization. 

THE 205. Intermediate Characterization 4 hours 

Intermediate Characterization is a studio intensive course that explores the methods of 
20th century American acting teacher Sanford Meisner. This course is designed to provide 
students with an in-depth understanding of his approach to acting, which builds upon 
tenets put forth by Constantin Stanislavski. Meisner's training approaches will be uncov- 
ered through immersive studio exercises, in-depth scene study assignments and review and 
discussion of Meisner's seminal book Sanford Meisner on Acting, as well as other related 
literature. Prerequisite: THE 105. 

THE 210. Theatre History I: Greeks to Restoration 4 hours 

An in-depth study of theatrical history, examining not only the theatrical literature of par- 
ticular periods, but the staging practices, costuming, social customs and performance styles 
as well. Periods covered include: Greek, Roman, Medieval, Elizabethan and Restoration. 

THE 220. Theatre History H: Renaissance to 20th Century 4 hours 

An in-depth study of theatrical history, examining not only the theatrical literature of par- 
ticular periods, but the staging practices, costuming, social customs and performance styles 
as well. Periods and styles covered include: Renaissance, Neo-cl£issic, Sentimental Comedy, 
Domestic Tragedy, Melodrama and Realism. 

THE 290. Special Topics in Theatre 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

THE 305. Shakespearean Performance 4 hours 

This course affords the advanced theatre student an opportunity to explore methods for 
rehearsing and performing texts written by William Shakespeare. With a focus on the prac- 
tical demands of Shakespeare's language, the course addresses technical, stylistic, historical 
and interpretive considerations as they relate to the feat of performance. This course builds 
upon the student's understanding of Stanislavkian acting approaches with the assumption 
that, despite formal differences, Shakespearean texts can be approached with psychological- 
realist tactics. Prerequisite: THE 105 or permission of the instructor. 

THE 310. Stagecraft 4 hours 

Stagecraft provides hands-on experience and assignments designed to physically and 

224 



mentally engage the technician and designer. This class will focus on historical perspective 
as well as individual research and design. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a mid- 
term examination, written assignments, the completion of a minimum number of practi- 
cum hours and a final design project. 

THE 330. Directing for the Stage 1 4 hours 

This course offers the intermediate to advanced theatre student an opportunity to explore 
the foundations of directing texted material for live theatrical performance. The primary fo- 
cus of this course is on experiential learning rather than abstract study. The course provides 
practical experience with the three preparatory phases of directing: research, analysis and 
conceptualization. Prerequisite: THE 205. 

THE 340. Directing for the Stage H 4 hours 

This course serves as the studio practicum for Directing for the Stage I, culminating in 
performances staged as part of the Oglethorpe University theatre season. The work of 
individual students will be scheduled accordingly. All student work will be evaluated by a 
faculty panel. Prerequisite: THE 330. 

THE 407. Internship in Theatre • 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour 
of credit. Internships are available at most of the 147 Atlanta Coalition for Performing Arts 
member theatres. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission 
of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program, permission of an in- 
ternship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experiential 
Education Committee. 

THE 408. Independent Study in Theatre 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic, such as The Drama of Eugene OTSfeill and Theatri- 
cal Lighting Design. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes 
a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and 
the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of study. For additional 
criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations and Policies section of 
this Bulletin. 

THE 490. Advanced Special Topics in Theatre 4 hours 

This course will be a study of a selected topic in theatre and/or film, such as Feminist 
Theatre, Gender in Performance, The Hero in American Film or Hollywood's Treatment of 
Women. Recent topics have focused on dramatic literature, ensemble creating and playwrit- 
ing. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

Women's and Gender Studies 



Women's and Gender Studies is intended to introduce the student to the history of women 
and to the effects of gender on the forms of and approaches to disciplinary study and prac- 
tice. 

Minor 

Five courses must be completed, one of which must be either Introduction to Women's 
Studies - Theory or Introduction to Women's Studies - History. Students must select 
courses from at least three different disciplines in addition to courses identified as WGS 
courses. Examples of other courses applicable to the minor are as follows: 



225 



CRS 490. Advanced Special Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Stud- 
ies: Women in the History of Rhetoric 

CRS 490. Advanced Special Topics in Communication and Rhetoric Stud- 
ies: Gender and Communication 

ECO 424. Labor Economics 

ENG 393. Special Topics in Literature and Culture: Gender and 
Autobiography 

ENG 393. Special Topics in Literature and Culture: Contemporary 
Women Writers 

ENG 394. Special Topics in Major British and American Authors: Jane 
Austen 

PRE 404. Great French Actresses and Their Film Roles 

MUS 490. Advanced Special Topics in Music: Women in Music 

PSY 490. Advanced Special Topics in Psychology: Gendering (Social 
Constructions of Gender) 

PSY 490. Advanced Special Topics in Psychology: Psychology of Women 

SOC201. The Family 

SPN490. Advanced Special Topics in Hispanic Languages, Literatures 

and Cultures: Contemporary Latin American Women Writers 
THE 490. Advanced Special Topics in Theatre: Feminist Theatre 
THE 490. Advanced Special Topics in Theatre: The Good, the Bad and the 
Beautiful - Hollywood's Treatment of Women 

WGS 290. Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
nculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

WGS 301. Introduction to Women's Studies - Theory 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to examine the diverse theoretical approaches which have 
evolved as scholars and activists have endeavored to incorporate the concerns and experi- 
ences of diverse groups of women into dominant worid views. The seminar will explore 
the issues of race, class and gender, paying close attention to how these variables affect the 
development of women's identities and relationships. 

WGS 302. Introduction to Women's Studies - History 4 hours 

The purpose of this course is to explore the history of feminism. By examining a"^de range 
of texts, this seminar will investigate the development of ideas which have come to be 
recognized as feminist-womanist and the discipline that has developed into women's stud- 
ies in the context of Western civilization. Included will be Raine Eisler's The Chalice and 
the Blade, which examines the position on women in the beginnings of civilization, Mary 
Wollstonecrafl's Vindication of the Rights of Women (1792), Mary Beard's Women as a Force 
in History, De Beauvoir's The Second Sex, Susan Faludi's Backlash and Ellen Carol Dubois's 
Unequal Sisters: A Multi-Cultural Reader in U.S. Women's History. 

WGS 303. The Literature and History of Immigrant and Minority Women 

in America . u 

, 4 hours 

^^ puqjose of this course is to explore the experiences of immigrant and minority women 
in North Amenca from the interdisciplinary perspectives of history, literature and women's 
studies. Through extensive reading, discussion and research this seminar will attempt to 
recapture women's sense of their own identities in relation to the dominant ideologies of 
race, class and gender. 

WGS 304. Women Poets 4 ^^^^^ 

This course is a survey of poetry by women, from ancient Chinese, Persian and others in 
translation, to medieval Irish and Renaissance English, to 19th and 20th century Ameri- 

226 



cans, as well as Eastern Europeans and Latin Americans in translation. Included will be 
several recent poets such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Adrienne Rich and Mary Oliver in order to 
discover what themes, images and attitudes seem to emerge from the works. Prerequisites: 
COR 101 and COR 102. 

WGS 400. Independent Study in Women's and Gender Studies 1-4 hours 

Supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of 
study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, 
the division chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of 
study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations 
and Policies section of this Bulletin. 

FRE 404. Great French Actresses and Their Film Roles 4 hours 

This course will study French film actresses and their roles in an attempt to understand the 
situation of women in France during the last half of the 20th century. Readings from The 
Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir, v^ritten at the outset of the period in question, provide 
a counterpoint to the cinematic fiction. Actresses studied may include Isabelle Adjani, Ar- 
letty, Fanny Ardant, Brigitte Bardot, Juliette Binoche, Sandrine Bonaire, Marion Cotillard, 
Catherine Deneuve, Isabelle Huppert, Miou-Miou, Romy Scheider and Simone Signoret. 
The course is conducted in English. Students may take the course as part of a French major 
or minor and complete readings, tests and written work in French. Prerequisite: None for 
work in English; FRE 302 for work in French. 

WGS 407. Internship in Women's and Gender Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
, sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour 
of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services. Graded on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and 
qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and 
acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

WGS 490. Advanced Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies 4 hours 

This course is intended to introduce the student to the study of women and gender. Special 
emphasis is placed on the intersection of gender with the epistemological foundations of 
other disciplines and on the theory and practice of the study of gender. Courses are not lim- 
ited to, for example. Southern Women's Literature and Histor}', but will often be under the 
same rubric of other disciplines such as are listed under the requirements of the minor. 

Writing 

Minor 

The writing minor offers two options: an eclectic selection of writing courses or a literary 
writing focus. 

The eclectic option encourages students to learn several kinds of writing according to their 
interests. This option is open to all students except those pursuing a minor or major in 
communication and rhetoric studies. The eclectic option consists of five courses beyond 
Narratives of the Self I and II, one of which maybe an internship: 

CRS 220. Investigative Writing 

CRS 240. Journalism 

CRS 260. Writing for Business and the Professions 

CRS 320. Persuasive Writing 

227 



CRS 401. Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Studies (writing- 
intensive internship supervised by communication and rhetoric 
studies faculty member) 

ENG 230. Creative Writing 

ENG 231. Biography and Autobiography 

ENG 330. Writing Poetry 

ENG 331. Writing Prose, Fiction and Nonfiction 

ENG 401. Internship in Enghsh (writing-intensive internship supervised 
by EngUsh faculty member) 

WRI381. Independent Study in Writing 

WRI 490. Advanced Special Topics in Writing 

A second option is a literary writing focus in which students write poetry, fiction, nonfiction 
and other genres that may be offered under Special Topics in Writing or Independent Study 
in Writing. Students majoring in communication and rhetoric studies may take only this 
option for the writing minor, provided that no course is used both for the communication 
and rhetoric studies major and the literary writing option. The writing minor with focus on 
literary writing consists of five of the following courses, one of which may be an internship: 

ENG 230. Creative Writing 

ENG 231. Biography and Autobiography 

ENG 330. Writing Poetry 

ENG 331. Writing Prose, Fiction and Nonfiction 

ENG 401. Internship in English 

WRI 381. Independent Study in Writing 

WRI 490. Advanced Special Topics in Writing 

WRI 101. Core Writing Workshop 4 hours 

This course is designed to assist students in the writing-intensive COR 101 course. Empha- 
sis in the course will be on preparing drafts or series of short writing assignments that will 
allow an approach to required papers in incremental ways. The goal of the course will be to 
improve students' understanding of core texts, reading and note taking skills and written 
responses to these texts. The course does not meet any requirements for the writing minor. 

CRS 220. Investigative Writing 4 hours 

This expository writing course is designed to develop research and writing skills. Emphasis 
will be on learning a wide range of library and internet-based research techniques and pur- 
posefully presenting information to a variety of audiences in appropriate format and style. 
Students will be asked to define their own investigative projects and to analyze and revise 
their own writing. This course is recommended for freshmen and sophomores. Prerequisite: 
COR 101. 

ENG 230. Creative Writing 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to writing poetry and prose fiction. The student wdll be asked 
to submit substantial written work each week, keep a journal and read published writers. 
Much class time will be spent discussing student and published work. Prerequisites: COR 
101 and COR 102. 

ENG 231. Biography and Autobiography 4 hours 

This course is an introduction to biographical and autobiographical writing with practice in 
the personal narrative as well as other forms such as the profile and the interview. Students 
will submit substantial written work each week and keep a journal. The class will follow a 
workshop format, discussing the students' and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101 and 
COR 102. 

CRS 240. Journalism 4 hours 

This course teaches the fundamentals of journalistic news writing and reporting. From 

228 



interviews to the internet, students will learn how to gather information from a variety of 
sources and write stories using different types of leads, endings and structures. They will 
also engage in a critique of today's journalistic practices. This course is offered in the fall 
semester. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

CRS 260. Writing for Business and the Professions 4 hours 

A course for students who have mastered the basic skills and insights of writing and who 
wish to improve their ability to write clear, concise, persuasive prose designed for audiences 
in business and the professions. Students are required to write a variety of texts, such as 
proposals, progress reports, recommendation reports and manuals. Other elements of the 
course may include oral presentations. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

WRI 290. Special Topics in Writing 4 hours 

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the cur- 
riculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

CRS 320. Persuasive Writing 4 hours 

This course is designed to develop sophisticated strategies of persuasion for analyzing and 
generating arguments responsive to targeted audiences in a variety of contexts, including 
civic, professional and academic. Students will learn both classical and contemporary strat- 
egies of persuasion. Emphasis will be on presenting clear, coherent and logical arguments. 
Students will be asked to define their own projects vrithin assigned contexts. Students will 
evaluate their own and others' writing to enable the revision process. This course is open to 
sophomores, juniors and seniors only. It is offered in the fall semester. Prerequisites: COR 
101 and COR 102. 

ENG 330. Writing Poetry 4 hours 

In weekly assignments students will try free verse and various forms in the effort to discover 
and to embody more and more truly what they have to say. Much time wall be spent reading 
published poets, responding to student work in class and trying to generate language that 
reveals rather than explains intangible "meanings." Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102. 

ENG 331. Writing Prose, Fiction and Nonfiction 4 hours 

Students will get instruction and substantial practice in vmting fictional and nonfictional 
prose which aims at getting what Henry James called "a sense of felt life" onto the page. 
The class will follow a workshop format with weekly assignments, journal vmting, extensive 
discussion of student work and reading of published examples. Prerequisites: COR 101 and 
COR 102. 

WRI 381. Independent Study in Writing 1-4 hours 

Supervised independent writing project. Prerequisites: The student must 1) have junior 
standing, 2) have a grade point average of 3.0, 3) be pursuing a minor in writing or a major 
in communication and rhetoric studies and 4) submit a proposed outline of study that 
includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division 
chair and the provost no later than the second day of classes of the semester of study. For 
additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy in the Academic Regulations and Policies 
section of this Bulletin. 

CRS 401. Internship in Communication and Rhetoric Studies 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. An internship for the writing minor must be vmting intensive. The in- 
ternship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of 
study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour of academic credit, keep 
a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled meetings wdth the faculty 
supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect of the internship. Writ- 
ten work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour of credit. An extensive 

229 



list of internships is maintained by career services, including opportunities at CNN, Fox 5, 
WSB-TV, Green Olive Media and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Students are strongly 
encouraged to do multiple internships, but only 4 semester hours can be applied as elective 
credits to the major. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permis- 
sion of the faculty supervisor and qualification for the internship program, permission of an 
internship site supervisor and acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experien- 
tial Education Committee. 

ENG 401. Internship in English 1-4 hours 

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to 
qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to obtain a faculty supervi- 
sor in the relevant field of study, submit a learning agreement, work 30 hours for every hour 
of academic credit, keep a written journal of the work experience, have regularly scheduled 
meetings with the faculty supervisor and write a research paper dealing with some aspect 
of the internship. Written work should total five pages of academic writing for every hour 
of credit. An extensive list of internships is maintained by career services, including op- 
portunities at Atlanta Magazine, The Knight Agency and Peachtree Publishers. Graded on 
a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and 
qualification for the internship program, permission of an internship site supervisor and 
acceptance of learning agreement proposal by the Experiential Education Committee. 

WRI 490. Advanced Special Topics in Writing 4 hours 

Study of a selected topic in the field of writing, such as Public Relations Writing, Scientific 
and Technical Writing, Oral History and The Art of the Essay. The topic will vary from year 
to year and may be offered by communication and rhetoric studies faculty or English fac- 
ulty. Prerequisites for special topics taken with communication and rhetoric studies faculty: 
See individual course listing in the current semester class schedule. 

Oglethorpe University Evening Degree Program 

Two of Oglethorpe's degrees - Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies and the Bachelor of Busi- 
ness Administration - may be earned through the evening degree program. These distinc- 
tive programs are offered with the working professional in mind. Complete information on 
these programs is provided in the Oglethorpe University Evening Degree Bulletin. 

The evening undergraduate program offers a curriculum for the adult learner that builds 
on the foundation of a liberal arts education and aims to enhance the student's skills in 
critical thinking, communication and basic academic competencies. The underlying vision 
of the program reflects the mission of Oglethorpe University and its commitment to "make 
a life and make a living." The degree requirements include general education requirements 
designed to assure that each graduate acquires a broad, comprehensive liberal education. In 
addition, study in a major field and the integration of theory and practice provides educa- 
tional experiences that develop the student's chosen career. The total experience is designed 
to be of lasting benefit as a source for personal growth, professional renewal and career 
advancement. 

Six majors offered are: Accounting and Business Administration, leading to a Bachelor of 
Business Administration degree; Communication and Rhetoric Studies, History, Organiza- 
tional Management and Psychology, leading to a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies. 

Traditional undergraduate students may take courses in the evening program with written 
permission from their adviser and the administration of the evening program. Traditional 
students who take evening courses are subjec . to the rules and regulations set forth in the 
Oglethorpe University Evening Degree Bulletin. 



230 



BOARD 

OF TRUSTEES 



The university is under the control and direction of the Board of Trustees. Among the 
responsibihties of the board are establishing broad institutional policies, contributing and 
securing financial resources to support adequately the institutional goals and selecting the 
president. 

Officers 



Jack Guynn, Board Chair 
Retired President 
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta 

Norman P. Findley, III, Vice Chair 
Retired Executive Vice President, 

Marketing 
Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. 



Harald R. Hansen, Treasurer 

Retired Chairman, President and CEO 
First Union Corporation of Georgia 

Susan M. Soper '69, Secretary 
Freelance Writer and Editor 



Trustees 



J. Frederick Agel, Sr. '52 
Retired Sales Agent 
Bowman Distribution 

G. Douglass Alexander '68 
Chairman 
Alexander Haas Martin & Partners 

Yetty L. Arp '68 

Vice President Easlan Capital 

of Atlanta 
Southeast Commercial Properties 

Robert E. Bowden '66 
CEO 
Robert Bov^^den, Inc. 

Martha Laird Bowen '61 

Milton C. Clipper 

President and CEO 

Public Broadcasting Atlanta 

William A. Emerson 

Retired Senior Vice President 
Merrill Lynch Pierce, Fenner 
and Smith 



Kevin D. Fitzpatrick, Jr. '78 
Attorney at Law 

J. Levris Glenn '71 

President and CEO 
Harry Norman Realtors 

James J. Hagelow '69 
Managing Director 
Marsh USA Inc. 

James V. Hartlage, Jr. '65 
Chairman and CEO 
Accumetric, LLC 

Kenneth K. Hutchinson '78 
Dentist 

Warren Y. Jobe 

Retired Executive Vice President 
Georgia Power Company 

Belle Turner Lynch '61 

Robert Andrew Milford '99 (ex-officio) 
CEO and Chief Software Architect 
Dorian Software Creations, Inc. 



231 



Bob T. Nance '63 
President 
Nance Carpet & Rug Company, Inc. 

Thomas P. O'Connor '67 
Executive VP and 

President of Sales and Marketing 
Springs Global 

R. D. Odom, Jr. 

Retired Chief Executive Officer and 

President 

AT&T Southeast 

Cemal Ozgorkey '84 
President 
Etap Endustri VE Yatirim Holding A.S. 

Anita Stevenson Patterson '97 
(ex-officio) 

Director, Treasury Operations 
Manheim 

S. Tammy Pearson '86 (ex-officio) 

Director Associate General Counsel 
Chick-fil-A, Inc. 

Robert E. Reiser, Jr. 

Chief Investment Officer 
Wilmington Trust 

Lawrence M. Schall, J.D., Ed.D. (ex-officio) 
President 
Oglethorpe University 

Laura Turner Seydel '86 
Trustee 
Turner Foundation, Inc. 

Joseph P. Shelton '91 
Partner 
Fisher & Phillips, LLP 



Arnold B. Sidman 
Of Counsel 

Chamberlain, Hrdlicka, White, 
Williams & Martin 

Timothy P. Tassopoulos '81 

Senior Vice President of Operations 
Chick-fil-A, Inc. 

Trishanda Treadwell '96 
Attorney at Law 
Parker, Hudson, Rainer & Dobbs LLP 

Pamela L. Tremayne 
Attorney at Law 
Law Offices of Pamela L. Tremayne 

Patricia Upshaw-Monteith 
Executive Director 
Leadership Atlanta 

G. Gilman Watson '68 
Senior Minister 
Northside United Methodist Church 

Terry White 

Retired President, Remanufacturing 

Division 
Genuine Parts 

Ken Yarbrough 

Senior Vice President and 

Director of Retirement Strategies 
SunTrust Banks, Inc. 



232 



Trustees Emeriti 



Franklin L. Burke '66 

Retired Chairman and CEO 
BankSouth, NA. 

Kenneth S. Chestnut 

President/Chief Operating Officer 
Integral Building Group, LLC 

Joel Goldberg '00 Honorary 
President 
The Rich Foundation 

William Goodell 
President 
The Robertson Foundation 

George E. Goodwin 

Retired Senior Counselor 
Manning, Selvage & Lee 

C. Edward Hansell 

Retired Senior Counselor 
Jones, Day, Reavis and Pogue 



Arthur Howell 

Retired Senior Partner 
Alston & Bird 

J. Smith Lanier 

Retired Chairman and CEO 
J. Smith Lanier and Company 

James R McLain 

Attorney at Law 
McLain and Merritt, P.C. 

John J. Scalley 

Retired Executive Vice President 
Genuine Parts Company 

O.K. Sheffield, Jr. '53 

Retired Vice President 
BankSouth, NA. 



233 



The President's Advisory Council, composed of business and professional leaders, provides 
a means of two-v^ay communication with the community and serves as an advisory group 
for the president of the university. Members are listed as of June 2008. 

Officers 2008-2009 

S. Tammy Pearson '86, Chair 

Director, Associate General Counsel 
Chick-fil-A, Inc. 



Members 2008-2009 



A. Diane Baker '77 
Attorney At Law 
Baker and Stalzer , LLC 

Robert Bovv^en 

Retired Executive VP, 
Human Resources 
SunTrust Bank 

James H. Burk '83 

Senior Vice President 
Morgan Stanley 

Kelly R. CaffareUi 
President 
The Home Depot Foundation 

Roger Couch '61 
President 
CRS Insurance 

John Cunningham 
Director 
BCES Foundation 

Cindy M. Darland 

Parent of Jason Darland '07 

Brian A. Davis '94 
Consultant 
Bridgewater Associates 

Mona Tekin Diamond 

Honorary Consul General to Turkey 



Paul L. Dillingham 

Retired Vice President 
The Coca-Cola Company 

F. Wayne Dobbs '61 
President 
Franklin Enterprises 

Harry S. Feldman '75 

Chief Executive Officer 
Daycon Products 

Donna Findling '96 

Community Volunteer 

Donna J. Gainer '93 

Business Development Manager 
Nodarse & Associates 

David Golden 

Chairman Emeritus and CoFounder 
Museum of Contemporary Art of 
Georgia 

Kenneth P. Gould '85 
President 
Kenneth P. Gould & Co., Inc. 

Robert Hall 

Consultant 

HRH Consulting Inc. 

William J. Hogan, Jr. '72, 

First Vice President - Investments 
Smith Barney Inc. 



234 



B. Shane Hornbuckle '92 Horace E. Shuman '80 

Vice President for Business Branch Manager 

Development 1st Metropolitan Mortgage 

Van Winkle & Company 

Scott M. Sloan '76 
Nancy Juneau President 

CEO National MegaForce, LLC 

Juneau Construction 

Dean DuBose Smith '70 
Robert M. Kane '81 Community Volunteer 

Vice President and Corporate Treasurer 
WP Home Linda Spock 

President 
Will E. Lukow '95 Spock Solutions 

Personal Financial Representative 

Allstate Financial Services Bernard Vanderlande '76 

Managing Consultant 
Gail Lynn '77 Harvard Group International 

Retired Vice President 

Bank of America Stephen J. Walden 

President 
Jin Matsumoto '74 Walden Associates 

Retired 

Mitsubishi International Corp. Elizabeth Watts '93 

President 
J. Kevin Meaders '93 EW and Company, Inc. 

Attorney; Partner 

Magellan Legal, LLC Dorothea Pickett Westin, '89 

President 
Thomas P. O'Connor '67 Capital Special Risks, Inc. 

Exec. VP & President, 

Marketing Group Mark A. Williams '94 

Springs Industries, Inc. Vice President 

Sunbelt Structures 
Thomas W. Phillips '63 

Physician Melvyn J. Williams, Jr. 

CEO 
J. Bruce Richardson '69 Infinite Sports Performance 

Attorney 
James Bruce Richardson, P.C. Raymond S. Willoch '80, 

Senior VP & General Counsel 
Cliff Robinson '89 Interface, Inc. 

Senior Director, Marketing 
Chick-fil-A, Inc. J. Blake Young, Jr. 

American Cancer Society 
Brian C. Sass '84 

CEO Karen J. Young '80 

BSC Ventures Attorney 

The Jordan Firm 
Larry C. Shattles '67 
Retired 
BioProgress Tech 



235 



^,lg; 









■'44 



As the primary representatives of Oglethorpe University's alumni body, the National 
Alumni Association Board of Directors works closely with the alumni office to achieve the 
association's goal of establishing and encouraging an active and involved alumni network. 
The purpose of this network is to build mutually beneficial relationships between alumni, 
students and the university, demonstrating that the student experience is just the beginning 
of a life-long relationship with Oglethorpe. 

National Alumni Association President 

Anita Stevenson Patterson '79 

Public Service Commissioner 
State of Georgia 



Directors 



Bobby Baker '79 

Public Service Commissioner 
State of Georgia 

Joselyn Butler Baker '91 

Director of Communications 
MARTA . 

Chris Ballar '93 
Attorney 
Tingle and Ballar 

Harry Frazer '89 

Chief Financial Officer 
Hillside Hospital 

Jeremy Greenup '99 
Research Analyst 
Culpepper and Associates 

Deesi Thurston Phillips '76 
Realtor 
Harry Norman Realty 



Dave Pass '98 

Director of Stakeholder Relations 
Bobby Dodd Institute 

Jennifer Fairchild Pierce '92 

Associate Secretary to the Board 

of Regents 
University System of Georgia 

Randy Roberson '97 

Office of External Relations and 

Alumni Affairs, 
Robert H. Smith School of Business 
University of Maryland 

David Ross '93 
Writer 
United Way of Metro Atlanta 

EricScharff'63 
President 
Razzi, Inc. 



236 



Bambi Klein Stewart '64 
Retired 

Ashish Thakur '99 

Private Wealth Advisor 
Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. 

Matthew Thompson '65 
High School Teacher 
Forsyth County 

Vivian Gray Trabue '65 
Paralegal 
AT&T Corporation 

Trish Hinton Treadwell '96 
Attorney 
Parker, Hudson, Rainer & Dobbs 

Jay Williams '99 

Cheif Financial Officer 
Commodity Marketing Company 



Ex-Officio Members 

Chris Benton 

Faculty Representative 
Director of Accounting Studies 
Oglethorpe University 

Penelope Anderson '02 

Co-President of Young Alumni Club 
Director of Development 
Oakland Cemetery 

Heather Staniszewski '02 

Co-President of Young Alumni Club 
Assistant Director of Civic Engagement 
Oglethorpe University 



237 



(Year of appointment in parentheses) 



Keith H. Aufderheide (1980) 
Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Wilmington College 
Ph.D., Miami University 

Charles L. Baube (1996) 

Associate Professor of Biology 
Manning M. Pattillo Professor of 

Liberal Arts 
B.A., Alfred University 
M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Devon Belcher (2008) 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Reed College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Christian Y. Benton (1999) 

Director of Accounting Studies 
B.S., University of Maryland, 

College Park 
M.A., Webster University 
C.PA., Maryland, North Carolina, 

South Carolina 

Robert A. Blumenthal (1989) 
Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., University of Rochester 
Ph.D., Washington University 

Ronald R Bobrofr(2008) 

Assistant Professor of History 
B.A.., University of Pennsylvania 
M.Sc, London School of Economics 

and Political Science - England 
M.A., Ph.D. Duke University 

John S. Carton (1998) 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Wake Forest University 
M.A., Ph.D., Emory University 

Mario A. Chandler (2001) 

Associate Professor of Spanish 

B.A., Iowa State University 

M.A., Ph.D., The University of Georgia 



Cassandra C. Copeland (2000) 

Associate Professor of Economics 
B.S., Florida State University 
Ph.D., Auburn University 

John A. Cramer (1980) 
Professor of Physics 
B.S., Wheaton College 
M.A., Ohio State University 
Ph.D., Texas A and M University 

Roarke E. Donnelly (2003) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Director of the Urban Ecology Program 
B.A., Lav^rence University 
M.S., Utah State University 
Ph.D., University of Washington 

Judith Lynn Gieger (2002) 

Associate Professor of Education 
B.S., Millsaps College 
M.A., M.A.T., Duke University 
Ph.D., The University of Georgia 

Lynn M. Guhde (2004) 

Associate Professor of Business 

Administration 

B.S., B.A., Slippery Rock State College 

M.B.A., Ph.D., Kent State University 

Nancy A. Herring (2006) 

Associate Professor of Accounting 
B.A., Southern Illinois University 
MA., Georgia Southern University 
C.PA., Georgia ^^ 

Ph.D., Georgia State University, 

Bruce W Hetherington (1980) 
Professor of Economics 
B.B.A. Madison College 
MA., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute 

Veronica M. Holmes (2008) 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Core 

B A., Oglethorpe University 

M.A., A.B.D., Georgia State University 



238 



Robert B. Hornback (2000) 

Associate Professor of English 

BA., University of California, Berkeley 

MA., Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin 

Kendra A. King (2003) 

Associate Professor of Politics 
Director of Rich Foundation Urban 

Leadership Program 
B A. Colby College 
Ph.D., The Ohio State University 

Joseph M. Knippenberg (1985) 
Professor of Politics 
B A., James Madison College of 

Michigan State University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Peter J. Kower (2002) 

Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A., Arizona State University, Tempe 
M.I.M., American Graduate School of 

International Management, 

Thunderbird 
MA., University of Colorado, Denver 
Ph.D., The Ohio State University 

Alan Loehle (2001) 

Associate Professor of Art 
Director of the Art Program 
B.FA., The University of Georgia 
M.F.A., University of Arizona 

Jay Lutz (1988) 

Professor of French 

Frances I. Eeraerts '76 Professor of 

Foreign Language 
B A. Antioch University 
MA., Ph.D., Yale University 

Nicholas B. Maher (1998) 

Associate Professor of History 
BA., University of Michigan 
MA., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Jeanne H. McCarthy (2004) 

Assistant Professor of Freshman Core 
Director of The Writing Center 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Texas, Austin 



Douglas McFarland (1992) 
Professor of English 
Director of Core Curriculum 
B.A., Pomona College 
M.A., San Francisco State University 
Ph.D., University of California, 
Berkeley 

Deborah Merola (2004) 

Associate Professor of Theatre 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley 

John C. Nardo (2000) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Wake Forest University 
M.S., Ph.D., Emory University 

John D. Orme (1983) 
Professor of Politics 
B.A., University of Oregon 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Viviana P. Plotnik (1994) 
Professor of Spanish 
Licenciatura, Universidad 

de Belgrano - Argentina 
M.A., University of Minnesota 
Ph.D., New York University 

W. Irwin Ray (1986) 

Director of Musical Activities 
B.M., Samford University 
M.C.M., D.MA., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary 

Beth Roberts (2000) 

Vera A. Milner Professor of Education 
Director of Master of Arts in Teaching 

Early Childhood Education Program 
B A., MA.T., Ph.D., Emory University 

Anne Rosenthal (1997) 

Associate Professor of Communication 

and Rhetoric Studies 
B.A., Bethel College 
M.A., University of St. Thomas 
Ph.D., Purdue University 



239 



Michael K. Rulison (1982) 
Professor of Physics 
B.S., University of Illinois 
M.S., Ph.D., The University of Georgia 

Anne A. Salter (2003) 

Director of the Library 

B.A., MLn., Emory University 

Daniel L. Schadler (1975) 
Professor of Biology 
A.B., Thomas More College 
M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Karen L. Schmeichel (2006) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.A., Middlebury College 
Ph.D., University of Utah, Salt Lake 
City 

Seema Shrikhande (2002) 

Associate Professor of Communication 

and Rhetoric Studies 
B.A., Elphinstone College - India 
M.A., Bombay University - India 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

W. Bradford Smith (1993) 
Professor of History 
B.A., University of Michigan 
Ph.D., Emory University 

Simon R. Sparks (2006) 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., University of Salford Manchester 
M.A., University of Sussex 
Ph.D., University of Warwick 

Robert Steen (1995) 

Associate Professor of Japanese 

B.A., Oberlin College 

M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Brad L. Stone (1982) 

Professor of Sociology 

B.S., M.S., Brigham Young University 

Ph.D., University of Illinois 

William F. Straley (1990) 

Professor of Business Administration 

and Mathematics 
B.S., M.S., M.B A., Georgia State 

University 
Ph.D., Auburn University 



Linda J. Taylor (1975) 
Professor of English 
A.B., Cornell University 
Ph.D., Brown University 

Philip D. Tiu (1995) 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of San Carlos - 

Philippines 
A.M., Ph.D., Dartmouth College 

J. Dean Tucker (1988) 

Professor and Mack A. Rikard Chair 

in Economics and Business 

Administration 
B.S., M.A., The Ohio State University 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Victoria L. Weiss (1977) 
Professor of English 
Acting Director of the Theatre Program 
B.A., St. Norbert College 
MA., Ph.D., Lehigh University 

Ginger Williams (2000) 

Lecturer in Education and Director of 

Field Experiences 
B.S.Ed., Greorgia Southern University 
M.Ed., Mercer University 

Monte W Wolf (1978) 

Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., University of California 
Ph.D., University of Southern 
California 

Leah R. Zinner (2008) 

Assistant Professor of Social Psychology 
B A., Emory University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 
Madison 



240 



Professors Emeriti 



G. Malcolm Amerson (1968) 
James Edward Oglethorpe 

Professor Emeritus of Biology 
B.S., Berry College 
M.S., Ph.D., Clemson University 

Keith E. Baker (1983) 

Director Emeritus of Accounting 

Studies 
B.S., Youngstown State University 
MA., University of Florida 
C.P.A., Georgia 

James A. Bohart (1972) 

Professor Emeritus of Music 
B.S., M.M., Northern Illinois 
University 



William L. Brightman (1975) 

Professor Emeritus of English 

A.B., Ph.D., University of Washington 

Barbara R. Clark (1971) 

Professor Emerita of English 
B.A., Georgia State University 
. M.A., University of Kansas 
M.P.A., Georgia State University 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
C.P.A., Georgia 

Charlton H. Jones (1974) 

Professor Emeritus of Business 

Administration 
B.S., University of Illinois 
M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Nancy H. Kerr (1983) 

Provost and Professor Emerita of 

Psychology 
B.A., Stanford University 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

J. Brien Key (1965) 

Professor Emeritus of History 
A.B., Birmingham-Southern College 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

David K. Mosher (1972) 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 
B.A., Harvard University 
B.S.A.E., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of 
Technology 



Philip J. Neujahr (1973) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 
B.A., Stanford University 
M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Ken Nishimura (1964) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 
A.B., Pasadena College 
M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminary 
Ph.D., Emory University 

John A. Ryland (1985) 
Librarian Emeritus 
B.A., M.A., Florida State University 
Bibliotekarseksamen, Royal School 
of Librarianship - Denmark 

William O. Shropshire (1979) 

Provost and Professor Emeritus of 

Economics 
B A., Washington and Lee University 
Ph.D., Duke University 

T. Lavon Talley (1968) 

Professor Emeritus of Education 
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Auburn University 

David N. Thomas (1968) 

Professor Emeritus of History 

A.B., Coker College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina 
D.H., Francis Marion College 

Louise M. Valine (1978) 

Professor Emerita of Education 
B.S., University of Houston 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
Ed.D., Auburn University 

Martha H. Vardeman (1966) 

Professor Emerita of Sociology 
B.S., M.S., Auburn University 
Ph.D., University of Alabama 

Philip P. Zinsmeister (1973) 

Professor Emeritus of Biology 
B.S., Wittenberg University 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 



241 



^i i%#E ^%C g wmjr 



(Year of appointment in parentheses) 



Lawrence M. Schall (2005) 
President 

B.S., Swarthmore College 
J.D., Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Timothy Doyle (2003) 

Vice President for Student Affairs 

and Dean of Students 
B.A., Wabash College 
M.A., Emory University 

Marilyn Fowle (2005) 

Vice President for Business 

and Finance 
B.B.A., University of Houston-Clear 
Lake 

MBA, Rice University 
Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Stephen B. Herscheler (2008) 
Provost 

B.A., Princeton University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Larry D. Large (1999) 
President Emeritus 
B.S., Portland State University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Lucy Leusch (2006) 

Vice President for Enrollment 

and Financial Aid 
B.A., Saint Mary-of-the- Woods 



Manning M. Pattillo Jr. (1975) 
Honorary Chancellor 
BA., University of the South 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 
LL.D., LeMoyne College 
LL.D., St. John's University 
L.H.D., University of Detroit 
L.H.D., College of New Rochelle 
L.H.D., Park College 
Litt.D., St. Norbert College 
D.C.L., The University of the South 
LL.D., Oglethorpe University 

Peter A. Rooney (2004) 

Vice President for Development 

and Alumni Relations 
B A., Rhodes College 

Donald S. Stanton (1988) 
President Emeritus 
A.B., Western Maryland College 
M.Div., Wesley Seminary 
M,A., The American University 
Ed.D., University of Virginia 
L.H.D., Columbia College 
LL.D., Western Maryland College 
Litt.D., Albion College 
Litt.D., Oglethorpe University 



242 



243 




OGLETHORPE 

UNIVERSITY 



4484 Peachtree Road, N.E. 
Atlanta, GA 30319-2797 
404-261-1441 
www.oglethorpe.edu 




DIRECTIONS 
TO CAMPUS 

From 1-85 

Take North Druid Hills Road {Exit 
89). Head west approximately 2 
miles to Peachtree Road and turn 
right (north). Oglethorpe is 1 mile 
ahead on the left. 

From 1-285 

Take Peachtree Industrial Boule- 
vard (Exit 31 -A) south. Continue on 
Peachtree about 4 miles. Ogletho- 
rpe is on the right. 

OR: Take Ashford Dunwoody Road 
(Exit 29) and go south to Peachtree 
Road and turn right. Oglethorpe is 
on the right. 



LEGEND FOR CAMPUS MAP 


1. 


MacConnell Gate House 


16. 


North Residence Hall 


2. 


Lupton Hall 


17. 


Alumni Residence Hall 


3. 


Phoebe Hearst Hall 


18. 


Jacobs Residence Hall 


4. 


Crypt of Civilization 


19. 


Residence Halls (Phase II) 


5. 


Goodman Hall 


20. 


Salamone Memorial Soccer Field 


6. 


Traer Residence Hall 


21. 


Maintenance Building 


7. 


Philip Weltner Library 


22. 


Greek Row 


8. 


Museum of Art 


23. 


PATH Academy 


9. 


J. Mack Robinson Hall 


24. 


Conant Performing Arts Center 


10. 


Goslin Hall 


25. 


Track 


11. 


Emerson Student Center 


26. 


Howell Tennis Courts 


12. 


Dining Hall 


27. 


Dorough Field House 


13. 


Dempsey Residence Hall 


28. 


Schmidt Recreation Center 


14, 


Schmidt Residence Hall 


29. 


Anderson Field 


15. 


Magbee Residence Hall 


30. 


Hermance Stadium 




Hermance Drive 



Academic Advising 94 

Academic Calendar 6 

Academic Departments 135 

Academic Dismissal 97 

Academic Good Standing and Probation for Athletes 98 

Academic Load 102 

Academic Policies for Financial Aid 34 

Academic Probation 97 

Accounting Programs 135 

Admission Appeal 27 

Admission to Graduate Program - see Master of Arts 

in Teaching 168 

Admission to Undergraduate Program 23 

Alcohol and Drug Policy 64 

Allied Health Studies - see Biomedical Sciences and 

Allied Health Studies 149 

American Studies Programs 139 

Annual Scholarships 43 

AP (Advanced Placement) Program 30 

Academic Regulations and PoHcies 93 

Application for Degree 100, 169 

Application Procedure for Financial Assistance 35 

Applied Instruction in Music 198 

Art Programs 140 

Athletics 55 

Atlanta Regional Council for Higher 

Education (ARCHE) 26, 94, 179, 192, 220 

Auditing Courses 99 

Behavioral Science and Human Resource 

Management Major 144 

Biology Programs 145 

Biomedical Sciences and Allied Health Studies 149 

Biopsychology Major 150 

Board of Trustees 231 

Business Administration Programs 151 

Campus Facilities 15 

Campus Map/Driving Directions 244 

Campus Rules and Regulations 64 

Career Services 53 

Center for Civic Engagement and Courses 115, 119 

Chemistry Programs 155 

Civic Engagement Courses 115, 119 

Civility Statement 61 

Class Attendance 96 

CLEP (College Level Examination Program) 29 

Co-Curricular Initiative 114 

Code of Student Conduct 74 

Communication and Rhetoric Studies Programs 158 

Communication Policy 64 

Community Life - See Student Affairs 51 

Computer Facilities and Services 20 

Computer Science Minor 163 



Computer Use Policy 20 

Computing Ethics 20 

Conant Performing Arts Center 16 

Consensual Relationship Policy 61 

Core Credits for Study Abroad 132 

Core Curriculum 127 

Core Equivalencies for Transfer Students 131 

Counseling and Personal Development 54 

Course Substitutions 120 

Credit by Examination 29 

Cross Registration 94 

Crypt of Civilization 13, 17 

Dean's List 99 

Degrees 134 

Degrees With Honors Thesis 100 

Degrees With Latin Academic Honors 100 

Dempsey Residence Hall 19 

Disability Access 16, 119 

Disability Programs and Services 119 

Discipline of Student Organizations 81 

Discriminatory and Hareissment Policy 56 

Dorough Field House 16 

Double Major Policy. 101 

Drop and Add 95 

Dual Degree Programs: 121 

Engineering 172 

Environmental Studies 177 

International Partner Degree Program 190 

Early Admission 28 

Ecology Program 124 

Economics Programs 164 

Education Programs 167 

Email and Computer Use Policy 20 

Emerson Student Center 16 

Endowed Scholarships 37 

Engineering Programs 172 

English Programs 172 

Environmental Studies Program 176 

Evening Degree Program 230 

Experiential Education 138 

Faculty 240 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy 

Act(FERPA) 71 

Fees 48 

Find Examinations 98 

Financial Assistance 31 

Financial Obligations 49, 96 

First-Year Experience 114 

Foreign Language Programs 177 

Foreign Language P.equirement 130 

Fraternities 55 

French Programs 178 



246 



Fresh Focus 114 

Gatehouse Security Arm Procedures 66 

General Science Courses 181 

German Courses 181 

Goodman Hall 16 

GoslinHall 16 

Grade Appeal Policy 99 

Grading 96 

Graduation Exercises 100 

Graduation Requirements 100 

Greek Courses 182 

Greek Organizations 57, 82 

Greek Row 19 

Grievance Procedures for 

Discrimination and Harrassment 59 

Hazing 65 

Health Services 54 

HccJth Insurance 49 

Hearst Hall 17 

History of Oglethorpe 11 

History Programs 182 

Home Schooled Applicants 25 

Honor Code 103 

Honors and Aw^ards 58 

Honors Program and Courses 115 

Housing 52 

IB (International Baccalaureate) Program 29 

Independent Study Policy 98 

Individually Planned Major 187 

Individually Planned Minor 188 

Interdisciplinary Studies 189 

International Applicants 26 

International Exchange Partnerships 122 

International Partner Degree Program 190 

International Studies Major 190 

Internships - See Experiential Education 120 

Intramural and Recreational Sports 55 

Japanese Minor 191 

Joint Enrollment 27 

Latin Academic Honors 100 

Latin Courses 194 

Leadership Program 123 

Learning Communities 114 

Learning Resources Center 120 

Library 18 

Lupton Hall 17 

Magbee Residence Hall 19 

Major Programs and Requirements 134 

Master of Arts in Teaching 167 

Mathematics Programs 194 

Meals 52 

Minor Programs and Requirements 135 

Mission 7 

Museum of Art 18 

Music Minor 197 



National Alumni Association 

Board of Directors 236 

Noise Policy 66 

Non-Traditional Students - 

see Special Status Admission 28 

Normal Academic Load 102 

North Residence Hall 19 

Obligations to the University 49, 96 

Oglethorpe Student Association (OSA) 81 

Oglethorpe University Students Abroad (OUSA) 121 

Orientation 52 

Parking and Driving Regulations 68 

Petrel Points 114 

Phase II Residence Hall 18 

Philosophy Programs 199 

Physics Programs 202 

Placement Examinations 29 

Placement for Introductory Science Courses 29 

Politics Programs 206 

Pre-law Studies Program 210 

Pre-medical Studies Program 210 

President's Advisory Council 234 

Presidents of the University 14 

Professional Option 210 

Psychology Programs 211 

Re-activation 96 

Re-admission 28 

Recognition of Campus Organizations 82 

Records: Retention, Access and Protection 71 

Refund Policy 48 

Registration 94 

Repetition of Courses 98 

Residence Halls 18-19 

Residence Life 83 

Residency Requirement 26, 84 

Rich Foundation Urban Leadership Program 123 

Room and Board 48 

Room Assignment Policies and Regulations 84 

Robinson Hall 17 

R.O.T.C. at Georgia Institute of Technology 94 

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option 98 

Schmidt Sport and Recreation Center 17 

Scholarships 37 

Second Baccalaureate Degree 101 

Second Major 101 

Semester System - 

see Normal Academic Load 102 

Senior Transitions 118 

Sexual Harassment Policy 56 

Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies Minor 215 

Sheffield Alumni Suite 17 

Smoking 16, 66 

Sociology Programs 216 

Sociology with Social Work Concentration 217 

Sophomore Choices 118 

Sororities 55 



247 



Spanish Programs 2210 

Special Status Admission 28 

Student Activities 79 

Student Affairs 51 

Student Classification 101 

Student Concern and Complaint Policies 67 

Student Conduct Policies 64 

Student Demonstrations 65 

Student Guide to Oglethorpe 63 

Student Organizations 82 

Student Publications 83 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 54 

Study Abroad 121 

Teacher Education Programs 168 

Theatre Programs 223 

TVadition and Purpose 8, 9 

TYaer Residence Hall 18 

Ttansfer Applicants for Undergraduate Programs 25 

TVansfer Credit for Graduate Program 169 

TVansient Students 28 

Tuition and Costs 47 

TYiition Refund Policy 48 

University Officers 242 

Urban Ecology Program 124 

Urban Leadership Program 123 

Weltner Library 18 

Withdrawal from a Course 95 

Withdrawal from the University 95 

Women's and Gender Studies Minor 225 

Writing Center 119 

Writing Minor 227 



248 




OGLETHORPE 



UNIVERSITY 




BKSaittfSIWHii 




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