(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Oglethorpe University Bulletin, February 1916 - October 1919"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/oglethorpeuniver14ogle 



13 



& 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSI TY BULL ETIN 

VOL. I. Februa ry, 1916. No. 4 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 



Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Atlanta, Ga. 



OGLETHORPE 

ADOPTS ASSEMBLY'S 

DEFINITION OF A 

SOUTHERN 

PRESBYTERIAN UNIVERSITY 

In accordance with an official notification sent to Dr. H. H. Sweets, Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee of Christian Education of the Southern 
Presbyterian Church, on October 22, 1915, and in accordance with statements 
made to various Synods of our Assembly during the fall of 1915, and in ac- 
cordance with statements published in the religious press of our Church, 
during the fall and winter of 1915. Oglethorpe University on February 1, 1916, 
adopted the following resolutions : 

RESOLVED (1) That the definition of a Southern Presbyterian University 
adopted by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States. -(See Minutes page 31, 1915), be adopted by us as follows: 

Those schools, colleges and universities whose charters or constitu- 
tions require that at least two-thirds of their trustees shall be elected, nomi- 
nated or ratified by some court or courts of the Presbyterian Church in the 
U. S.; whose presidents or principals are members of the said Church; all 
the members of whose faculties are members of some evangelical Church, a 
majority being members of some Presbyterian Church, and which require 
a course in the Bible, shall be classed as Southern Presbyterian institu- 
tions." 

(2) That in accordance therewith, "two-thirds of the members of our 
Board of Directors" upon their election by this Board must be ratified by 
the session of the Presbyterian Church in the United States to which the 
particular member belongs. 

(3) That this action be referred to our Legal Committee with instructions 
to take the necessary steps to conform our charter and by-laws thereto. 

(4) Resolved that by thus adopting and conforming to the definition of 
a Southern Presbyterian University as laid down by our highest court, we 
again express our loyalty to all the great educational ideals of our denomi- 
nation, and our desire to have the love, support and confidence of the whole 
Assembly. 

The Church court which will have the control of the ratification of the 
members of our Board of Directors will be the sessions of the Southern 
Presbyterian Church, who wi 1 thereby control Oglethorpe University. This 
method of control is ideal for the following reasons : 

1. The Church Sessions have built Oglethorpe University and have a right 
to control it. 

2. They are specially charged by the Constitution of the Presbyterian 
Church with the control of Church benevolences. 

3. They are best informed of all our Church courts as to the qualifications 
of the appointees. 

4. They are nearest to the Presbyterian ne anl e whose sacrifices built and 
whose sons will attend Oglethorpe. 



5. They are freest from Ecclesiastical wrangling which, more than any- 
other one thing, has hitherto kept our Church from having a university. 

6. In them alone of all our courts the private affairs of the university 
may be discussed without every newspaper hackwriter publishing them to 
the world. 

The movement to refound Oglethorpe University was begun and its charter 
obtained before this definition was either proposed or adopted, and the change 
in the government of Oglethorpe University is made in order to conform 
strictly and loyally to the definition of the Assembly. 

Oglethorpe, our Southern Presbyterian University, will therefore be owned 
and controlled by a Board of Directors, each of whom, forever, must be a 
member in good snd regular standing of a Presbyterian Church, and two- 
thirds of whom must be ratified by the session of the particular Southern 
Presbyterian Church to which the member belongs. One or more members 
of this board will be secured from each strong church in the Southern 
Assembly and this General Board of Directors will meet once each year, 
commencement time, on the university grounds in Atlanta, to inspect their 
institution, to review all matters of large importance in the life of the 
university and to give directions to the Executive Committee which will be 
elected by them, and from their number, and which will look after the 
details of management of the institution between the meetings of the Board 
of Directors. 

Nothing more ideal has ever been proposed in the management of an 
institution. Excepting only the Sessional ratification of the directorate it 
; ^ already in operation and its perfect practicability is largely responsible 
for the marvelous success of the institution. 




Birdseye view of Oglethorpe, the great Southern Preshyterian university that is 
being built in Atlanta by the loving sacrifices of thousands of devoted Presbyterians all 
over the South. It is strictly Class A in every respect. It is first of all our Southern 
Presbyterian institutions to formally and officially adopt the strict definition of a 
Southern Presbyterian I'niversity as laid down by our Assembly. Its destinies rest 
in the hands of the most loyal and devoted of our Southern Presbyterian ministers, 
officers and laymen. Dr. J. I. Vance, pastor of our largest Southern Presbyterian 
church, is president of the Board of Directors. Dr. I. S. McElroy, pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Columbus, Ga., is chairman of our Church Relations Committee. 
Dr. Dunbar H. Ogden, pastor of the Central Presbyterian Church, Atlanta, Ga., is 
chairman of our Faculty Committee. 

Among other prominent members of our Executive Committee are Dr. J. W. Bachman. 
pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Chattanooga, Tenn., and Dr. Melton Clark, pastor 
of the First Presbyterian Church, •'Greensboro, N, C. The first vice-president of the Board 
of Directors is Mr. J. T. Fupton, well known and well loved Presbyterian layman of 
Chattanooga, Tenn. The second vice-president of the Board of Directors is Mr. Geo. 
W. Watts, whose name is a synonym of devoted Preshyterianism all over our Assembly. 
The third vice-president of the Board of Directors is Mr. L,. C. Mandeville, an elder in 
the Preshy terian church at Carrollton, Ga., whose many generosities have endeared him 
to thousands. The fourth vice-president is Mr. D. I. Mclntyre, a loyal member of the 
West Fnd Presbyterian Church of Atlanta. 

Of the Board of Directors itself about twenty-five' per cent are pastors of the 
Southern Presbyterian Church, about twenty-five per cent are elders of the Southern 
Presbyterian Church, about twenty-five per cent are deacons of the Southern Presby- 
terian Church and about twenty-five per cent belong to the cream of the laymanship of 
the Southern Presbyterian Church. 



0gletf)orpe Untoersrttp bulletin 



Vol. I. 



EXTRA EDITION JlJNE 1916 EXTRA EDITION 



No. 8 



Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Atlanta, Georgia 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE AT 
OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 




I 



EDWARD CHARLES GRUEN, 

Recently elected head of the School of 

Commerce, Oglethorpe University 



N establishing her School 
of Commerce, Oglethorpe 
University has taken a 
splendid forward step in 
supplying the needs and perfect- 
ing the ideals of the Southern edu- 
cational world. 

The great mass of American 
colleges were originally founded 
by church organizations whose 
principal purpose as frequently 
expressed was, "in order to supply 
our church with an educated min- 
istry." 

These were the first colleges in 
America and their curricula were 
planned for students for the min- 
istry, for the preacher and the 
dominie. Slight cnanges were 
made in them to accommodate the 
lawyer and the literary man, but 
otherwise they held rigidly to a 
certain formal type ot education 
represented today by the strict 
Bachelor of Arts course in our 
American colleges. 



Since these schools would not broaden themselves, other institu- 
tions supplying new needs sprang up outside. Such were the tech- 
nical, the agricultural schools, and the various scientific schools. 

But while courses have thus been shaped in various institutions 
for the mail who may wish to be a minister, or a teacher, or an engi- 
neer, or a mechanic, or a farmer, it is only recently that some of our 
leading American universities have offered courses designed for the 
student who expects to be a business man. 

One reason for the failure of so many schools to take care of this 
tremendous body of students lies in the fact that it is practically im- 
possible to operate successfully such a series of courses without the 
use of a great city as a laboratory of instruction. 



The location of Oglethorpe University in the suburbs of Atlanta, 
Georgia, supplied this fine opportunity which the management of 
the institution has been quick to grasp. 

The School of Commerce at Oglethorpe, which will open with a 
Freshman class in the fall of 1916, consists of a full four years' course 
in studies relating to practical business administration and indus- 
trial life. Upon its successful completion the degree of Bachelor of 
Commerce is conferred upon students pursuing it. 

The courses in the School of Commerce, as outlined below, are 
equivalent in dignity and importance to the courses offered in the 
Schools of Arts, Science and Literature. It is no longer necessary 
for a young man who expects to spend his life in the business world 
to pursue a course of study specially adapted to a student for the 
ministry, nor to waste his time in studies that are of no value what- 
soever to him in the years of his after life. 

Parents who wish their sons to come home from college inter- 
ested in the business lives which they are to lead, and equipped to 
lead them, will note that commercial history, commercial law and 
practical accounting, with such languages as Spanish and German, 
necessary nowadays to all well educated business men, have taken 
the place of Latin and Greek in the School of Commerce and that a 
student who expects to be a merchant or a banker, or a business 
man of any good type will be thoroughly drilled, through his studies 
and lectures, in the facts and principles of the world in which he is to 
live. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES OFFERED IN THE SCHOOL OF 

COMMERCE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF 

BACHELOR OF COMMERCE. 

Freshman. Sophomore. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

Bible (1) 2 Bible (2) 2 

English (1) 3 English (2) 3 

Higher Commercial Practical Accounting 3 

Arithmetic (1) 3 Chemistry (1) 3 

Stenography ) Political Economy 2 

Typewriting (1) 5 German (2) 2 

Bookkeeping ! French (2) or (and) 2 

Any two of the following: Spanish (2) 2 

Spanish (1) 2. 



apamsn u) <s \ 

French (1) 2 ( 4 

German (1) 2 > or 

Economic History (1) 3 ^ 5 



17 to 19 



Required hours: 17 or 18 

Junior Senior 

Hrs. Hrs. 

Psychology and Theism, Ethics, 

Moral Philosophy 3 Evidences of 

Four Electives 12 Christianity 3 

— Four Electives 12 

15 — 

15 



The electives in the Junior and Senior years in the Schools of 
Commerce must be chosen from courses offered in the History of 
Commerce, Commercial Law, Commercial Geography, Economics, 
Political Science, Sociology, Printing, Publishing and Advertising, 
Business Statistics, Mining, Manufacturing, Transportation, Finance 
and Accounting, Banking and Insurance, Forestry and Agriculture, 
History, Science and Modern Languages. 

In addition to the courses in the regular departments above indi- 
cated, the business life of the city of Atlanta will be used as a labor- 
atory for the instruction of our students in every phase of modern 
business world. Prominent business men of the city will be used 
as lecturers in various phases of the commercial life of our country, 
in which they are expert. Actual inspection and work in some of 
the greatest business concerns of Atlanta will be given to those 
students in the higher classes who desire especially to acquaint 
themselves at first hand with the workings of great commercial 
enterprises. 

The courses in the School of Commerce are designed and offered 
specially for those young men who expect to give their lives to busi- 
ness affairs and who desire to devote their entire time while in col- 
lege to the study of those subjects which will be of the greatest 
practical use to them in their business careers. 

Oglethorpe thus takes a position of leadership in recognizing 
Business as a profession of equal dignity and depth with the so- 
called "learned" professions. 



•»- 



WHAT 18 THE USE OF A UNIVERSITY 
EDUCATION? 

(From the Westminster Magazine) 

Our friend, Mr. Holmes, of the real estate firm of Holmes & 
Luckie of this city, tells us an interesting story which deserves 
wide circulation. 

Fifteen years ago he left his home in Mississippi to try his for- 
tune in Atlanta. Shortly after his arrival in Atlanta he was met on 
the street by a friend who learned that he was looking for a posi- 
tion. The friend told of an opening in the Fulton Bag & Cotton 
Mill, and offered to introduce him personally to the manager. 
Mr. Holmes gladly accepted the offer. The manager of the mill 
asked him what college he had attended. Mr. Holmes explained 
that he had only a high school education, but expressed his willing- 
ness to undertake anything and to prepare himself by any work 
necessary. The manager took his references and a week or so later 
when Mr. Holmes called to learn what disposition had been made 
of the matter, the manager told him that of all the references that 
had come to their desk, his had been answered with the words of 
highest praise, but that the position demanded a college-bred man 



and consequently they felt that it would be unwise to employ him. 
The salary attached to the job was $125.00 per month. Within a 
short while a college graduate was enjoying it. Mr. Holmes later 
began his career in Atlanta on $50.00 per month with a mercantile 
concern. The advantage of an education is not the equipping of a 
man to make money, but the development and stimulation of his 
every power for the enjoying of life and making the most of his op- 
portunities. Yet a college education is a magnificent financial asset. 
Mr. Holmes began with a handicap of $75.00 per month because he 
had not gone to college. 

In telling us the story, Mr. Holmes said he thought this chapter 
from his own experience might be useful to us in impressing upon 
some young man or his parents the importance of a first-class col- 
lege education. 

It will be. 




$s. 



AGE /6 17 18 I? ZO 2/ 2Z S3 <?■? ZS 16 ?J ZB 29 30 3/ 3Z 33 39 3S 3b 37 3b 39 



The above design shows come facts not generally known. It will be noted 
that the earnings of the graduates of various schools vary surprisingly. The 
common school graduate begins low down in the scale and at the age of 20*reaches 
his maximum of about $15.00 per week. The apprentice rarely gets higher than 
$50.00. The technical school graduate begins below $15.00 and goes something 
higher than $30.00 on an average. But the University trained man, beginning at 
the highest figure of them all, keeps steadily above them all. 

This diagram is of the greatest significance to young men who are now choos- 
ing the institution which they expect to attend during the coming years and 
whose imprint and influence will determine the value of their lives, both to 
themselves and to society. 



<%letf)orpe Umbersittp bulletin 



Vol. I. 



August, 1916 



No. 10 



Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Atlanta, Georgia 

ATLANTA MINISTERS AT OGLETHORPE 




On Monday, June 19th, the Presbyterian Ministers' Association of Atlanta met in 
the first building of Oglethorpe University and took occasion to inspect thoroughly the 
new structure. 

From the very beginning of the movement to build a great Southern Presbyterian 
University in Atlanta, this magnificent body of men have been solidly back of the plan. 
By resolutions, encouragements of every kind, and by a subscription of over a thou- 
sand dollars, the Presbyterian ministers of the city have done their part in giving 
Oglethorpe to the nation. Dr. Dunbar H. Ogden, pastor of the Central Presbyterian 
Church is their personal representative on the Board of Directors, where he stands at 
the head of the Faculty Committee. 

By unanimous resolution the ministers of the Association have decided that every 
Presbyterian Church of the community unite in the great Oglethorpe Jubilee which is 
to be held in the auditorium Sunday morning, September 24th at 11 o'clock, in cele- 
bration of the opening of the Institution. 

Practically every member of the Association was present to inspect the first build- 
ing of the University. Reading from right to left of the picture their names are as 
follows: J. S. Lyons, S. W. Reed, Carl Barth, A. R. Holderby, Robert Ivey, A. A. Little. 
R. E. Carson, D. N. Mclver, Thornwell Jacobs, L. B. Davis, J. C. Patton, R. O. Flinn. 
G. R. Buford, D. H. Ogden, Arnold Hall, Linton Johnson, W. E. Hill. 

The photograph was taken immediately before the entrance of the Administration 
Building. 

The work at the University is proceeding steadily and will be complete by the first 
of September. 

The prospect for the opening of the Institution with a full class on September 20th 
is promising. Matriculations are being received steadily and the Board of Directors 
and the Faculty are greatly encouraged at the prospect. 



<®gleti)orpe Untoersittp bulletin 



Vol. I. 



September, 1916 



No. 11 



Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Atlanta, Georgia 




To the Founders of Oglethorpe University 

ANNOUNCEMENT and INVITATION 

We are at last able to send to you the glad news of the opening 
of Oglethorpe University. 

The day which will thus signal the consummation of the hopes 
and prayers of so many thousands of her Founders is September 
20, 1916, at which time the fall term begins. 

On Friday, September 22nd, the Board of Directors will meet 
in the first great building of the University at 2 45 p. m. 

On Saturday evening eight to ten p. m., September 23rd, the 
building will be thrown open to the visitors and friends in our first 
house-warming and reception to the Board of Directors, on the 
university campus. 

On Sunday morning, September 24th at 11 o'clock in the Audi- 
torium of the city the great Oglethorpe Jubilee will be held. 
Every Presbyterian Church in the citv of Atlanta will unite in 



thus celebrating the opening of the University. A most interest- 
ing program for this event is in preparation, including some beau- 
tiful musical numbers rendered by Mr. Chas. A. Sheldon, Jr., mu- 
nicipal organist on the great city organ ; the singing of "Fair Alma 
Mater Oglethorpe" by Miss Edith McCool ; five minute addresses 
by Dr. Thornton Whaling, President of the Columbia Theological 
Seminary ; Mr. Asa G. Candler, Mayor of Atlanta, Hon. Hoke 
Smith, Senator from Georgia ; the singing of the first Oglethorpe 
hymn : "God Bless Our Alma Mater" by the Oglethorpe students 
and an appropriate sermon by Dr. J. S. Lyons, pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Atlanta. 

All the friends of Oglethorpe University are invited to the 
Jubilee, not only, but to the house-warming and reception as well. 



MAGNIFICENT FIRST BUILDING at OGLETHORPE 

Presbyterians everywhere will be interested in a description of 
the first magnificent building of Oglethorpe University which is 
nearing completion on Peachtree Road, Atlanta, and which will be 
ready for occupancy for the first class of the University on Sep- 
tember 20th next. 

To begin with, the building is constructed of beautiful blue 
granite, brought one hundred miles from near Elberton, Ga., and 
practically given to the institution by friends in Atlanta who own 
the quarry. The building is trimmed with Indiana limestone and 
covered with heavy variegated Vermont slate of the same sort 
used on the newer buildings at Princeton. The building is as fire- 
proof as human skill can make it, being constructed entirely of 
stone, with brick and hollow tile partitions, of steel, concrete and 
slate. The slate roof, for example, is laid in a bed of concrete 
which rests upon steel plates and this in turn is supported by steel 
rafters, there being no wood of any sort on the roof. The floors 
are of similar construction. The plastering is on steel meshing, 
above which is a five-inch air cushion, then comes a layer of steel 
plates over which some four inches of concrete and stone is poured. 
Above this comes three inches of cinder concrete through which 
the pipes of the institution run, and on top of this the wooden or 
tile floor is laid. Every electric wire in the building is run through 
an iron conduit. The heating plant is in the sub-basement, where 
also the garbage incinerator is located. The dining-hall. kitchen 
and pantries are large and commodious, being capable of accom- 
modating approximately four hundred (400) students. The refrig- 



erator, which is being built by the McCray people is said by them 
to be the finest college refrigerator in the United States. In the 
building is located the college store, selling the students all the 
necessaries of their school life. In fact, the institution will be a 
complete little city in itself, having its own store, bank, postoffice, 
express office and railway station. 

The dormitory facilities of the institution are absolutely un- 
equalled in the South, if anywhere in the Nation. One entire dor- 
mitory section of thirty rooms is arranged en suite, consisting of 
bed room, private bath and study. The bath rooms are all trimmed 
in white tile and the rooms are all handsomely furnished. The 
lighting is on the direct-indirect system, Mazda bulbs throughout. 

The Great Hall is particularly attractive. All of the offices, 
administration rooms and the Great Hall are trimmed in quartered 
oak with beautiful gothic carvings. The architecture of the entire 
institution is collegiate gothic. The thought underlying this build- 
ing is that the men and women back of Oglethorpe are not trying 
to build another college. They are building a different "kind" of a 
school from any that has hitherto been constructed in the South- 
ern States. It is not going a bit too far to say that there are not 
offered on the American continent any facilities superior in com- 
fort, elegance or efficiency to those that Oglethorpe offers. The 
President of the institution frequently refers to this first building 
as the Dean of the faculty. It will be perpetually a teacher, every 
principle of dignity, solidity and genuineness, beauty, honesty, 
durability, and efficiency is to be found in both its interior and 
exterior. Each room is an instructor in personal conduct. Yet all 
of the splendid conveniences and facilities of this building are of- 
fered at practically the same cost of inferior accommodations, with 
which the reader is so familiar. The building could be set down 
on the campus of any institution on this earth and the President 
of the institution would point to it with pride as one of his hand- 
somest, best planned buildings. The building is valued at an even 
$200,000. The actual money going into it is about $160,000. It was 
constructed during the worst days of the panic following the decla- 
ration of war in Europe, at which time most of the contracts were 
made effecting a saving variously estimated from $25,000 to $40,000. 
This would also include contributions of material, such as stone, 
and brick, making a total value of approximately $200,000. 

It will be noticed that Oglethorpe is building for the centuries 
and not for decades. The terrible danger feared by so many pa- 
rents and common to so many students that the personal habits of 
the young men at college degenerate for lack of the proper esthetic 
surroundings has been obviated there. Not a dollar has been wast- 
ed, but not a dollar has been spared in building an institution, every 
niche and corner of which will eternally teach the good, the true 
and the beautiful. 



OGLETHORPE JUBILEE 

(From Atlanta Journal, August 27, 1916) 

Presbyterians and their friends will unite Sunday morning, 
September 24th, in what will be one of the biggest educational 
jubilees ever held in the United States, celebrating the opening, 
September 20th at Silver Lake, of the revivified Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity, which suspended during the Civil War at Milledgeville. 
The Jubilee will be held at the Auditorium at 11 o'clock, with a 
score of city churches taking part by sending their entire congre- 
gations. The public is invited, and it is believed the great struc- 
ture will be filled. 

Charles A. Sheldon, municipal organist, will have charge of the 
music, which will iti elude some numbers of special interest. Among 
these will be a solo by Miss Edith McCool, "Fair Alma Mater 
Oglethorpe," and a chorus by the Oglethorpe students under the 
direction of Custis N. Anderson, entitled "God Bless Our Alma 
Mater." 

James R. Gray, chairman of the executive committee of the 
Board of Directors of the University, will preside over the exercises, 
and the opening sermon will be preached by Dr. J. S. Lyons, pas- 
tor of the First Presbyterian Church. 

Preceding the sermon will be five-minute messages delivered 
by distinguished guests — Asa G. Candler, representing the City of 
Atlanta ; Senator Hoke Smith, representing the State of Georgia, 
and Dr. Thornton Whaling, President of Columbia Theological 
Seminary, Columbia, S. C. 

A feature of the occasion will be the academic procession from 
Taft Hall to the platform of the Auditorium, composed of the mem- 
bers of the Board of Directors, the faculty and the students of the 
University, representatives of the various educational interests of 
the community, venerable alumni, and others. 

Contemporaneous with this event will be the meeting of the 
Board of Directors, and many distinguished educators from all over 
the South are expected to be present. The University will have 
opened on the preceding Wednesday. Advance matriculations 
already have guaranteed a brilliant beginning. 

The first great building of the University is now practically fin- 
ished and furniture is being placed in the various rooms, both dor- 
mitory and administrative. It is conceded that there is no hand- 
somer college structure in the country than this first building of 
Oglethorpe. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. I. October, 1916 No. 12 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Atlanta, Ga. 



Enrolled to Capacity, Oglethorpe University, 

Future Oxford of the South, 

Begins First Year 

WARD GREEN, IN THE ATLANTA JOURNAL. 



Single Building Near Silver Lake Is Model of Classic Perfection 
From Parapets to Basement. 



One of America's greatest universities opened Wednesday morning 
in a single building on the outskirts of Atlanta, near Silver Lake, 
six miles from the city. 

This is the university's first year, but already it possesses a spirit, 
ideals and legends. The university has but one building, but it is a 
marvel of style and construction and in it are incorporated the quali- 
ties of another Oxford. It, the building, is the personification of all 
the university stands for. 

To realize this fact to the full, you yourself will have to visit 
Oglethorpe university — the housewarming Saturday night will be a 
good time — and walk through it from top to bottom. Enter the boy's 
rooms, which are more like hotel suits than ramshakle college dormi- 
tories. Step along the noiseless corridors floored in heavy tile. Touch 
the solid oak, the walls of lasting stone. Go into the basement to the 
perfectly appointed kitchen, where a gleaming refrigerator in white 
tile and German silver stands. And stop for a while in the lofty 
lobby and look up at the coat-or-arms of Oglethorpe bedded into 
the wall like the heraldic emblem of some English house of ancient 
lineage. 

Then only will you understand that in Oglethorpe, the South has 
not the nucleus, but the already realized dream of southern educators 
for years — the ideal scholastic institution. 



There are seventy-five students enrolled in the Freshman class at 
Oglethorpe. That is the present capacity of the institution. 

One of them arrived in Atlanta for the first time Tuesday. He 
was met at the train by a committee from the Atlanta Club of Ogle- 
thorpe. Seventeen Atlanta boys enrolled in the Freshman class have 
organized themselves into a voluntary committee of welcome. 

"We will meet you at the train," they wrote all prospective stu- 
dents, "We'll take you to the university. Wear the college colors — 
Old Gold and Black — that's all that's necessary." 

That was the spirit of Oglehorpe already acting. At other colleges 
they meet freshman with "pie checks" and "keys to the campus." 

The new boy motored to Oglethorpe out Peachtree road, past the 
end of the Brookhaven car line, past sunny lawns and pillared man- 
sions and stretches of brown fields and woods burnt with the first 
flame of autumn. 

At the top of the grade near Cross Keys his companions pointed 
northwest. "There's Oglethorpe," they said. 

In the distance a bulwark of gray stone, a roof of gray-green tiles 
girdled with a parapet of gray, reared itself from a raw, red eartli 
around it against a woody background of green and gold. The sun- 
light glanced from many windows and a line of Tennyson flashed 
across the new boy's brain, "The splendor falls on castle walls and 
snowy summits old in story." 

They stopped him for a moment before the vaulted entrance. 

"This step," somebody told him, "is nine-inch granite, set in con- 
crete. You'll find that's true of everything in Oglethorpe — permanent, 
lasting. It was built to stand forever." 

Built to Stand. 

The new boy looked up. High above a bronze sun dial cast a 
shadowed line across the hour. A little lower, his eye fell on the 
coat-of-arms of Oglethorpe — three boar's heads on a field argent, 
slashed with a black chevron. And still lower an inscription was 
carved, just above the entrance, into the solid rock : 

"A search is the thing He hath taught you, 
For Height and for Depth and for Wideness." 

That, too, is the spirit of Oglethorpe, they told him- — here he would 
be taught to search for a man's wideness. 

"This is the loafing room, the college lobby,' 'they said, just inside, 
as he entered a lofty reception hall, the registrar's desk to the right 
and in front of him a spreading fireplace. 

They are proud of that fireplace at Oglethorpe. They see a future 



in which it will always burn warm in the memories of generations 
of Oglethorpe students. 

It is built of limestone, flanked by settles of solid oak, the mantel 
of oak hand-carved, the coat-of-arms above the mantel of oak, the 
walls inlaid with oak, all of that same solidity, all carved by hand. 
There is a Dickensonian touch to it that conjures up pictures of 
winter nights and smoking back-logs and flames roaring up the yawn- 
ing chimney. Somehow, too, it brings back fragments of "Tom 
Brown at Oxford." 

The entire first floor at Oglethorpe is taken up with class rooms 
and office rooms and corridors and laboratories. Even in these — 
though they are trim and business-like — there has been carried out 
that Gothic style of architecture which stamps itself on everything 
in the building, even to the electric lights. The files of student's 
chairs, the blackboards, the professor's rostrums, all are expensively 
new, yet there is an indescribable touch of dignified age about them. 
Mission furniture has given you the same feeling, no doubt. This 
is because money has not been spared at Oglethorpe. Only the best 
was bought, and the best is always free from the flimsy and the 
gaudy. 

The Best of Everything 

"We could have built six college buildings of a kind, instead of this 
one with the same money," Dr. Thorawell Jacobs said. "People have 
asked us, for instance, why did we not buy a cheaper refrigerator, 
instead of putting all that money in one that is as good as you can 
find in any hotel in the country. But we wanted to do this thing well 
if we did it at all. Why spare a little money when it meant a little 
less thought toward a man's stomach? We are teaching our students 
to do the best thing; shall we not show them we are doing the best 
for them? 

This was the ideal of construction which has been carried on out 
at Oglethorpe even to the plastering. It is like no other plastering 
in Atlanta, but is old English, made with great outlay of time and 
money here in Atlanta. And ceilings and walls gleam like the polished 
floor of a skating rink. 

Oglethorpe is fire-proof. When you traverse its corridors, you 
step on solid tiles set in concrete ; when you go through swinging 
dors, they are of steel ; when you ascend the stairs — unless you want 
to take the electric trunk elevator — your feet rest on steel and con- 
crete. 

There are three floors and two basements. The top floor is dormi- 
tories. The cost of the smallest room among them is $25 a year, the 



price for a month in an ordinary hotel. Yet few hotels in the country 
have better facilities. 

Here is one room that is typical, planned for two students : It is 
a big room, with wide, deep-set windows. It is steam-heated of course 
and a wash-stand in the corner provides running- water, hot and cold. 
Electric lights are set in the ceiling. Like all the lights in the build- 
ing, they do not shine in the eyes, but are indirect. There is not a 
double bed in the building. Two students in a room are given their 
either two single beds or one "double-decker." The latter are spe- 
cially constructed, one a single bed on top of another, like upper and 
lower berth. The beds are massive and the mattresses are five 
inches thick. Two bureaus — solid oak again — are in the room for 
two students ; there are solid oak chairs ; and in the center a big 
double desk of solid oak. 

Just outside, in the corridor, a door leads to a bathroom that would 
do credit to any country club in the land. The showers are modern, 
the floors tiled, the place is spick and span as the shower at the 
Y. M. C. A. 

"Our idea is to give a man respect for his body," said Dr. Jacobs. 
"I have seen boys straighten their shoulders when they came in here. 
No rich man's son ever had a better shower room than this. It will 
not lower him. No poor boy could have a greater spur to physical 
ambition. And the room is for the rich and poor alike." 

Private Suites Too. 

On the second floor — 'besides a library already well equipped with 
valuable and necessary volumes — are private suites which students 
may have if they wish to pay the price. 

The suites comprises a study on one side, a bed-room on the other, 
with private bath between. The walls are 12 inches thick, shutting 
out all sound, the transom is made of heavy ground glass, invisible. 
Suites are well equipped with showers or tubs, the low, deep kind 
set against the wall and in the floor such as you find in up-to-date 
hotels. 

"That is not a luxury," said Dr. Jacobs, "it has simply demon- 
strated that tubs like this are better than any other kind of tubs." 

Not six colleges in America, he said, have private suites such as 
these at Oglethorpe. There are a few in eastern universities, but if 
you are looking for them, you had better go to the Knickerbocker 
and not college. 

The first basement is planned for four dining rooms. The kitchen 
would rejoice a housewife's heart. The refrigerating system is the 
last word in sanitation, cooled with a continual flow of iced air, elec- 



trie lighted, tiled with white tiles. Even the room for the servants 
on this floor is perfectly fitted. 

The second basement has a furnace and a steam heating and an 
incinerator in which to burn garbage. 

There is no back entrance to Oglethorpe university. So said Dr. 
Jacobs when he had stood where the back entrance should have been. 
There was the same vaulted roof as at the front, opening on a sort 
of bridge of red drit that led to the woods of Silver Lake. 

"See that dirt bridge?" said Dr. Jacobs "It has been built to lead 

'to the site where our next building will go. We don't know where 

our next building is coming from, but we have faith and trust. That's 

the reason there isn't any back door, and no back yard. Everything 

here leads forward, not backward." 



Thousands of Atlantans Attend Opening Re- 
ception at Oglethorpe University 

(From the Atlanta Constitution). 

With a crowd present that fully realized the hopes of the officers 
of the institution, Oglethorpe university was thrown open to the peo- 
ple of Atlanta last night at a house-warming and reception held in 
one building of the college. 

All Atlanta had been invited and it appeared that all Atlanta had 
accepted the invitation. A conservative estimate of the crowd that 
visited the college between the hours of 8 and 10 o'clock places the 
number at between 3,000 and 4,000 persons. At one time the four 
floors of the building were all filled with a waving mass of people. 
Rooms and halls were crowded to their capacity. 

Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, president of the college, was very enthusi- 
satic in talking of the keen interest shown by the people of this city 
in the opening of the university. 

Great Demonstration. 

. "It is a great demonstration for a great university by a great peo- 
ple," he said in talking of the visitors during the evening'. "It shows 
the interest taken by Atlantans in what might almost be termed an 
Atlanta institution. It is that in construction, for every piece of 
material used in this building has been purchased in Atlanta or through 
Atlanta people. 

"But we are not through yet. This is only the barest beginning 
of what is planned for the future. In starting this university we have 



acted as if we had been building every one of the different units of 
the college at the same time. 

"We have in this one building everything that the university stands 
for and everything that it plans to inculcate into the minds of the 
students. We have no idea other than to teach our students the 
best, and we have given them the best in the construction of this 
building, believing that in it they will find nothing to lower their 
thoughts from the high standards they will be taught in their class 
rooms. 

"Every line of the building is expressive of the highest qualities to 
be found in a man's life. It expresses honesty, sincere purpose, sta- 
bility and durability in its every detail. In this way it parallels what 
the college will teach to its students. 

"Like the beginning of a noble character in manhood, it has been 
started with only the best of principles and the firmest of foundations. 
It is lasting and will be here for generations. 

Emblematic of the Best. 

"There is no university in this country that can surpass it in con- 
struction of its buildings. The building is truly emblematic of the 
best that can be found in the manhood of the human race. 

"I have seen the boys entering the doorway and have watched 
them as they get into the main hallway and lounging room and their 
eyes first catch the homelike and comfortable appearance of every 
detail. They brighten and brace up their shoulders as if they had 
just been shown the true inspiration and were placed on the straight 
path. That is the kind of thing that we have sought in the construc- 
tion of this building. 

"If you will go through the dormitories carefully and look closely 
at the rooms you will not find any evidence of other than a pride in 
their appearance. Each room has its pictures, pennants, and its 
posters, but there is no evidence of any disfiguration of the walls. 
That is the way our students feel toward their institution. We have 
taken a pride in giving them our best and they have seen, and 
appreciate. 

"The college is young in resources, but we will grow. We have 
faith in our constituents and in the people who have helped. We 
have gone ahead with our work as if we already had the university 
completed and all the money that will be needed in hand. We feel 
that the pride of the people in what we have accomplished thus far 
will assure that in the very near future the name of Oglethorpe uni- 
versity will stand for the best college in the south, if not in the coun- 
try. It is truly coming and the time for the realization of this 



hope is not far distant. In three short years I expect to see other 
buildings, how many I can't say, just as fine and just as stable, with 
the same air of durability, on these grounds. And all will be expres- 
sive of the best that can be obtained." 

Rejoicing for Good Work. 

The crowd last night was cosmopolitan in every respect. There 
were women and men in evening dress and the latest fashions, girls 
in evening gowns that dazzled, and along with them, joining in the 
spirit of the evening, were people dressed in the attire of business 
life. The evening was one of general rejoicing for the great good 
work. People forgot their personal appearances to talk of the 
wonderful thing they had seen. 

The building is expressive of permanence in every feature. Opening 
into the main hall is the office of the registrar and the president. 
The walls are of hard white plaster specially prepared. Every piece 
of wood in the structure is oak, finished in mission style and without 
a high luster it has the appearance of having been built for 
years instead of months. 

Directly in front of the main doorway is located the lounging room 
for the students. This is the first room entered. There is a huge 
old-fashioned fireplace built of brick. Over this is found the follow- 
ing inscription cut into the rock. 

"Square round and let us closer be, we'lMvarm our wintry spirit, 
The good we each in other see, the more that we sit near it." 

Goodfellowship, companionship and comradeship are found in that 
inscription. It is expressive of all that the college stands for to the 
students and all that it hopes to instill in them for each other. 

On the main floor are found the class rooms. Each is fitted with 
the best of furniture. Going up to the second and third and fourth 
floors are found stairs built of concrete with iron balustrades and 
handrails of oak. Every door leading to a stair is of steel with steel 
frames. The other doors are of solid oak. 

Dormitories a Feature. 

The dormitories are one of the features of the- building. They are 
situated on the third and fourth floors. No detail for the comfort 
of the students has been overlooked. Everything is there that can 
make for a home-like air and for comfort. There are no double beds. 
Each room is equipped with two single beds of iron, white enameled. 
Lavatories and baths are of white tile. The students are given their 
choice of showers or tubs. In every room is a large students' table, 
capable of holding all the books necessary for its two occupants. 




in Atlanta to Celebrate the 




versity Gathered in the Auditorium 
ening of the Institution 



There are several suites of rooms in the dormitories. They consist of 
a study and bedroom with a bath between. In every particular the 
rooms for the students are fully the equal of anything to be found in 
any college in the country. 

The college has begun this year's work with an enrollment of 
about seventy-five students. The building is now holding sixty-one 
students and is about at capacity. This is the freshman class, and 
is considered a remarkable enrollment for the first year of a 
university. 

The main floor and the large lounging room were beautifully deco- 
rated with flowers and plants last night. The stairway was almost 
hidden in a mass of bamboo and vines. Roses and ferns, palms and 
evergreens were on every hand. An orchestra of five pieces rendered 
selections during the evening. 

Great interest was displayed by the visitors in the pictures of 
General James Edward Oglethorpe hung in the office of the president 
just off the lounging room. 

Picture of Oglethorpe. 

A large painting by Mrs. J. R. Gregory, the Atlanta artist, is hung 
over the old-fashioned brick fireplace. This was the gift to the col- 
lege of Mrs. J. M. High. It shows General Oglethorpe in the dress 
of an officer. 

On the wall close by are two small pictures. One is a framed 
copy of the coat of arms of the house of Oglethorpe. Just below it 
hangs a photograph of the famous painting by William Hogarth, pre- 
sented to the college by Judge E. C. Kontz, who obtained it on a 
recent trip to England. 

The original of this picture is a painting made in 1729 and shows 
the meeting of the committee of the house of commons at Fleet 
prison at the trial of Bambridge. In this painting General Oglethorpe 
is shown as the chairman of the committee. It is highly prized by 
the officers of the college. 

Dr. Jacobs has framed a diploma given Sidney C. Lanier, the famed 
Georgia poet, by the university in 1860. It is signed by Samuel K. 
Talmage for the college. This attracted a great deal of attention. 

The visitors were met last night by a reception committee com- 
posed of the members of the executive committee and the faculty 
and their wives. Among those receiving the visitors was, Mrs. James 
Woodrow, aunt of President Wilson. Mrs Woodrow and her hus- 
band were both great friends of Sidney Lanier. She came all the 
way from Columbia, S. C., to be present at the reception last night. 

Despite the fact that the college is located about a mile and a half 



from the end of the car line on Silver Lake, there was no difficulty- 
experienced about getting to and from the grounds. Through the 
kindness of a large number of friends of the university, there were 
sufficient privately owned automobiles to more than take care of 
:he people both to and from the reception. This detail was handled 
excellently. 

This morning at 11 o'clock the final chapter in the opening of the 
great university will be written when all the Presbyterian churches 
of the city will gather at the auditorium in an Oglethorpe university 
jubilee. And again all Atlanta is invited to be present. Dr. Jacobs 
hopes that the building will be filled to capacity and with the interest 
displayed last night there is every prospect of his hope being fulfilled. 



Thousands Rejoice Over the Opening of the 
New University 

Leading Presbyterians of South Address a Great Throng at 
Jubilee Exercises Held at Auditorium. 



LETTER FROM PRESIDENT READ TO BIG AUDIENCE. 



Mayor-Elect Candler, Senator Hoke Smith, Rev. J. S. Lyons and 
Rev. Thorton Whaling Made Addresses. 



Four thousand Presbyterians and friends of Oglethorpe university 
of all denominations attending the jubilee exercises at the Auditorium 
yesterday morning bore witness to the joy of Atlanta and the whole 
south that a great institution of learning that was dead has at last 
risen from the tomb with the promise of a vast and significant future. 

It was indeed an auspicious occasion, an occasion looked forward to 
with eagerness by those who for the past five years had labored so 
faithfully for the new birth of a grand old institution that had gone 
down in the wreck of a great war, an occasion that will linger in the 
minds of all who participated in it as one of their most cherished 
memories. Most splendidly did every detail of the scheduled program 
measure up to the requirements of the hour. 

It was a perfect day, such a day as comes even to Atlanta only in 
the fall of the year; the music was carefully planned and magnifi- 
cently rendered to impress the audience with the solemnity of the 
event, and the speakers were of the leaders of the Presbyterian 
denomination and the south. 



Cheering Messages Read. 

Messages of encouragement and good cheer were read from the 
president of the United States and the president of the board of 
trustees of the university, both of whom, regretting their inability 
to be present, expressed an abiding personal interest in the welfare 
of the institution and the purposes it was founded to foster. 

It was shortly after 11 o'clock that the board of directors, faculty 
and students of the university and the guests of honor, all robed in 
the scholastic cap and gown, walked down the middle aisle of the 
Auditoruim to the music of a march specially composed for the occa- 
tion by the city organist, Charles A. Sheldon, and took their seats 
on the platform. A large crowd had been for sometime already 
assembled awaiting the opening of the exercises and listening to a 
medley of old hymns from the big organ. 

Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, in his speech introducing James R. Gray. 
chairman of the executive committee of the board of directors, as the 
presiding officer of the occasion, gave a brief resume of the history 
of the old Oglethorpe. He said that at the opening of the nineteenth 
century there was not a Christian institution of learning in all of 
the southland below the Virginia line. The idea that fruited in 
Oglethorpe and several other Georgia colleges had its birth in organi- 
zation of the presbytery of Hopewell, in 1796, an act the significance 
of which had almost been lost sight of and forgotten in the wreck 
of time. 

This meeting led to the organization of the Georgia Educational 
society in 1823, out of which the three great ante-bellum denomina- 
tional institutions of the State — Oglethorpe, Mercer and Emory — - 
later grew. Oglethorpe was first in the field and for a time excelled 
both of the others in wealth and influence. As first in origin, she 
had the choice of name and location. Her founders selected the 
name of the father of the commonwealth, James Edward Oglethorpe, 
and located the college at Milledgeville, the capital of the state. He 
referred to Sidney Lanier, Joseph Le Conte, Dr. Talmage and others 
of world-wide reputation who were connected with Oglethorpe, either 
as students or professors. 

Address of Dr. Whaling. 

The first speaker presented by Mr. Gray was the Rev. Thornton 
Whaling, president of Columbia Theological seminary, at Columbia, 
S. C. Dr. Whaling laid great stress on the cordial relations formerly 
existing between old Oglethorpe and the seminar)-, relations which 
he expected to see now resumed under auspices more fruitful than 
ever before. The seminary of the Southern Presbvterian church, he 



said, had been founded in Georgia along with Oglethorpe college 
and later transferred to its present location. 

It had drawn largely on old Oglethorpe, both for its students and 
its faculty. Among others he cited the names of Thornwell and Dr. 
James Woodrow, uncle of President Wilson, who had gone to the 
seminary and accomplished memorable work there after Oglethorpe 
had gone down. He cited a number of leaders in the Presbyterian 
ministry who had been benefited by its training among others, Dr. 
Axson, father-in-law of the president. 

Columbia was now in a position financially and otherwise to do 
greater work for the denomination than it had ever accomplished in 
the past, and it welcomed the advent of the new Oglethorpe as its 
greatest ally and scource of strength. He expected to see all of the 
graduates of Oglethorpewvho were ambitious to enter the Presbyte- 
rian ministry flock to Columbia for training for their professional 
training, and thereby both institutions would be of inestimable assis- 
ance to each other and the cause of Presbyterianism throughout the 
south. 

Mayor- Elect Candler Speaks. 

The second speaker on the program was Mayor-elect, Asa G. 
Candler. He said that he spoke as the representative of another 
denomination, a denomination that had five times the numerical 
strength of the Presbyterians, but was lacking, he was sorry to 
say, in some of the qualities which had given the Presbyterians a 
moral and spiritual strength out of all proportion to their numbers. 

Mr. Candler alluded facetiously to the black gown he had been 
persuaded to don for the occasion, declaring that he, whose educa- 
tional advantages had been, indeed, limited, felt very much out of 
place in the garb of a scholar. Educational advantages were not in 
the lot of the pioneers of the city, he said, and many of the cultured 
of the present day would be amazed and somewhat mortified at the 
ignorance and uncouth manners of some of their immediate ancestors. 

The speaker was an ardent believer in Christian education. When 
it came to that he was a Presbyterian and a Baptist, as well as a 
Methodist. The foundamentals of Christian birth held by all the 
denominations must be made the foundation stone of the education 
of our boys and girls, he said. There was plenty of room in Atlanta 
he declared for both Oglethorpe and Emory. The city welcomed 
the new institution and would open to it its hands, its heart and — 
the speaker lowered his voice for humorous effect — its pocket too. 

At this point Mr. Gray reead a message which had been addressed 
to him by the president of the United States, and one to Dr. Jacobs 



by the Rev. Dr. James I. Vance, of Nashville, president of the board 
of the board of trustees of the university. 

President Wilson's Wire 

President Wilson wrote as follows : 

"Shadow Lawn, September 14, 1916. 
"My Dear Colonel Gray: I wish with all my heart, that it were 
possible for me to attend the reopening of Og-lethorpe. Some of 
the most interesting memories of my life are connected with what 
my father and my uncle, Dr. James Woodrow, who was a professor 
at Oglethorpe, have told me of the former days of the university, 
and I feel almost a personal affection for it. Its work in the past 
was very distinguished and I hope and believe that its work in the 
future will be. I sincerely regret that I cannot be present to express 
my deep interest and my sincerest wishes for its immediate and 
continuing prosperity. 

"Cordially and sincerely yours, 

(Signed) "Woodrow Wilson." 

Dr. Vance's Letter. 

Following is the letter of Dr. Vance, full of enthusiasm and good 
hope for the great task undertaken by the founders of the university: 
Rev Thornwell Jacobs, D. D., Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Ga. 

My Dear Dr. Jacobs : The friends of Oglethorpe university have 
every reason for rejoicing. 

The past is precious, the present is marvelous, and the future is 
glorious. 

Considering the indifference which faced the movement at the 
beginning, the hostility which has been encountered from some who 
we had every reason to suppose, would be its staunchest friends, and 
the substantial progress which has been made despite this indifference 
and hostility, Oglethorpe as it greets us today is little short of a 
miracle. 

There is but one explanation. It is the hand of God. We may 
face the future with a quiet conscience. The movement has passed 
the experimental stage. It remains for us to satisfy the church as 
to the relations which are to be maintained between it and the uni- 
versity, to conduct the work in such a way as to deserve the confi- 
dence of all right thinking people, and to press upon the generous 
hearts of the friends of Christian education the meritorious appeal 
of Oglethorpe. 

God being our Hope, we will do this, and doing this, we shall see 
our university making its way into a realization of the plans and 
hopes of its founders and friends. 



Deeply regretting that imperative duties elsewhere make it impos- 
sible for me to. be present and participate in the jubilee exercises, 
I remain, 

Faithfully yours, 
(Signed) James I. Vance. 
Nashville, Tenn., September 18, 1916. 

Senator Hoke Smith Speaks. 

After the singing of a hymn by the congregation and the taking of 
the morning offering, Mr. Gray presented Senator Hoke Smith as the 
next speaker. Senator Smith said that in his younger days he had 
not been very enthusiastic for denominational education. As he had 
grown older and wiser, he said, he realized that he had been in error 
and that Christian education filled a want that could not be satisfied 
by mere secular training. He had seen so many young men of bril- 
liant natural parts and great attainments fall by the wayside before 
the fearful temptations of life, he said, that he had reached the con- 
clusion that success must be based upon something else than mere 
intellect. It must be grounded in character. The training of the 
mind alone will not save the young man from the temptations of 
the hour. 

The speaker said that he had been away from home so much of 
the time during the last five years that he could scarcely realize the 
great work that had been done when he was taken Saturday over the 
grounds of the new universities and shown just what had been going 
on. He paid a high tribute to the Methodist and Presbyterian denom- 
inations, lauding the former for its enthusiasm and the latter for its 
stability. In conclusion he said : 

"Atlanta needs both of these great institutions. The boys and girls 
of the south need them. We congratulate you for Emory and Ogle- 
thorpe ; we rejoice with you in Oglethorpe and Emory. Under the 
hand of God, we expect that both of these great institutions will be 
source of strength to the young of our section, training them in the 
service of the people and of Him." 

A short sermon was preached by the Rev. J. S. Lyons, pastor of 
the First Presbyterian church. 

Dr. Lyons' Sermon. 

He read a brief passage from John's gospel wherein Christ showed 
that it was necessary that He die in order that the fruit of His life 
might be made manifest, as the grain of wheat must perish in the 
soil before it can bear fruit. He said that this was a Christian para- 
dox, one of those super-truths which are hard to believe, but which 
are the most vital of the truths we have. He said that the insistence 



on the importance of these super-truths was the explanation of Ogle- 
thorpe's reappearance, the sole excuse for its existence. The truths 
taught by the mathematical and physical science are essential and our 
youth must be instructed in them ; but the super-truths of Christian 
doctrine are more vital still, he claimed. They must not be lost sight 
of if our young men are to be trained to lives of highest service and 
usefulness to themselves and their kind, he said. 

Beautiful Music Feature. 

The musical features of the exercises were the subject of much 
praise. A magnificent humn, entitled "Fair Alma Mater, Oglethorpe," 
composed by President Jacobs, was beautifully rendered by Miss 
Edith McCool. Another hymn also composed by Dr. Jacobs, entitled 
"God Bless Our Alma Mater," and set to the tune "Adeste Fidelis," 
was sung by the Oglethorpe students on the platform under the direc- 
tion of Custis N. Anderson. 

Two New Gifts. 

Two new gifts to the university were announced by Mr. Gray. 
One was a gift of $5,000 by Dr. and Mrs. W. S. Kendrick, of Atlanta, 
the interest on which is to be used to assist worthy young men 
through college. Dr. Kendrick is the medical director of the Southern 
States Life Insurance company. The other gift was one of $10,000, 
the name of the benefactor reserved, to be used for a hospital to be 
connected with the institution along with other gifts that may be 
made for the same purpose. 

Mrs. James Woodrow. 

A venerable visitor who was present and to whom allusion was 
made by several of the speakers, was Mrs. James Woodrow, widow 
of Dr. James Woodrow, of old Oglethorpe, and aunt by marriage 
of President Wilson. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. II. November, 1916 No. 1 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Atlanta, Ga. 



Let All the Nation Join In Giving 

Oglethorpe University a 

Library ! 

(From The Atlanta Journal.) 



A great university on the threshold of its life should have a 
library befitting its high character, its splendid ideals, the great 
benefit it brings to the south, and its place in the rearing of com- 
ing generations of southern men. 

It is in the power of the South and her people to give Oglethorpe 
university such a library, or at least, the foundations of a library 
which may one day become the peer of any in the United States. 
And it can be done with such small cost to anybody that the plan 
proposed today should enlist the help of every man and woman in 
the state. 

A BOOK SHOWER FOR OGLETHORPE. 

That is the plan. It is very simple, but its possibilities have no 
limit. Let every man and woman in the south who can do so give 
one book or one set of books or as many books as he pleases to 

the library of Oglethorpe university. It is a little thing for anybodv 
to give, but with many giving, it will scarcely be a matter of days 
before the shelves of the university's fireproof library room will 
bristle with the books which the south's own people have given for 
the education of the south's own sons. 



ANY KIND OF* STANDARD BOOK IS WELCOME. On the 

shelves of your own library there are books which you know and 
love, but which you would hardly miss if /they were gone. Give them 
to Oglethorpe. The university has no library at all now, so that 
no matter what books you give, they will be welcome. But let them 
be good books! The gift should be worthy the giver. Standard 
novels are not out of place in a college library, but the need is for 
SOLID books, the old classics, reference works, books which have 
stood the test of time. For instance, a set of Dickens or a set of 
Thackeray would make a fine gift. So would Dr. Eliot's famous 
rive-foot shelf. 

SOUTHERN LITERATURE PARTICULARLY IS WANTED. It 

is the purpose of Oglethorpe, a southern institution to the core, to 
gather in its library the works of southern authors, books about the 
south and southern men and women. A selection of this kind from 
your library meets the university's ideals exactly. 

There was a day when Oglethorpe university had a library. But 
it was scattered far and wide when the old university succumbed in 
the dark hours of the south. In that library were books of priceless 
value, gems o>f the old south, books which cannot today be duplicat- 
ed HUNDREDS OF THOSE BOOKS ARE IN ATLANTA. When 
that library was scattered, the books stayed right here. Today some 
of them are submerged in old trunks, dust-gathering on shelves in 
forgotten attics and storerooms. They may be in your own home. 
What a fine thing it would be to restore them to their rightful 
place ! Look for them today and give them to Oglethorpe. 

Every man and woman who gives a 'book to Oglethorpe may in- 
scribe in it his name, so that he will be known to Oglethorpe stud- 
ents of the future for his part in founding the university library. 
Decide today what books you will give. If it is a single volume, 
mail it to the LIBRARIAN OF OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY or 
bring it to THE JOURNAL OFFICE. Sets of books or many books 
will be called for b& the university authorities if the donor does not 
wish to send them himself, or bring them in person to the university. 
If such is your gift, write THE BOOK SHOWER EDITOR of The 
Journal, describing the books and giving your name and address. 

LET'S MAKE THIS BOOK SHOWER A CLOUDBURST! 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. II. December, 1916 No. 2 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Atlanta, Ga. 



TO THE FRIENDS OF OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 

At the request of the management of Oglethorpe University, 
Mr. Henry E. Harman, the well-known poet and writer, has con- 
sented to lead our efforts in- the collection of a really wonderful 
library of Southern literature. He outlines the plans below. 

Can you not help him and us to effect this great thing, 
not only for the University, but also for the "Land we Love?" 



I have undertaken the work of collecting a library of South- 
ern literature for Oglethorpe University for two reasons ; one is 
to assist Oglethorpe and the other is from the love of this kind 
of work. I feel that there is a splendid opportunity to put into 
this University a collection of books, bearing directly on South- 
ern literature, which will have the greatest practical value on 
literary productions in future years. I do not know of any insti- 
tution in the South which has made a specialty of getting to- 
gether a complete collection of all Southern books, and I believe 
that we would be able to put such a collection in the library 
at Oglethorpe, provided the friends of the institution, throughout 
the South, will assist us in this undertaking. 

That such a collection of books is an absolute necessity at 
this time, goes without saying. What we want at Oglethorpe is 
a collection of books by Southern writers which will be invalua- 
ble to coming generations. We want to make this collection 
so complete in the way of Southern literature and Southern his- 
tory that the future historian can come to Oglethorpe to write 
any phase of Southern history he may wish, and find within its 
walls the necessary data from which to work. 



In order to give you a clear idea of what we want in this 
collection of books, it is necessary to go somewhat into details. 
For instance ; we would like to have and will have, if they can 
be secured, all of the histories which have been written of the 
several Southern states, also biographies of Southerners, both 
local and otherwise. We also want descriptions of local history, 
scenery, land marks, etc., in fact, we want everything that can 
possibly be secured of a historical nature which bears upon any 
part of the Southern states. 

Another collection of old literature which will be necessary 
and which we shall seek, will be literary magazines, published in 
the South prior to the war. Among these I will mention the fol- 
lowing: DeBow's Review, Niles Register, The Land We Love, 
Southern Magazine, The Southern Review, Russell's Magazine, 
The Palmetto, Southern Bivouac, and others. I have already 
collccted a complete edition of the Southern Literary Messenger, 
edited for a number of years Try Edgar Allen Poe, in Richmond, 
which was one of the leading literary publications in the South 
from 1830 to 1863. 

Prior to 1840 the South perhaps led all other sections of the 
country in literary magazine publications. In addition to the 
papers mentioned above, there were a number of other literary 
publications in the South during the early part of the last cen- 
tury, which we shall also endeavor to secure. There are many 
families which have odd copies of the above magazines, and we 
are going to ask that they send these to us, to assist us in 
making up complete files of these various publications. There 
will doubtless be some individual who would be very glad to con- 
tribute complete sets of some of these magazines for use in the 
University. As these early publications contain some of the fin- 
est literature produced in tin's country during the first half of 
the last century, it is easy to see how necessary and valuable a 
complete collection of these magazines will be to Oglethorpe. 
We want specially to impress upon the friends of the University 
to make as liberal contributions of this kind of literature a* they 
possibly can. 



Aside from the above contributions, we wish to secure 
copies of all books published by Southerners upon whatever 

subject, which people may have and be willing to contribute. 

In many of the larger towns and cities, historical handbooks 
have been issued from time to time describing the early history 
of such place, together with descriptive articles of historical 
scenes, etc., and we would like to have a complete collection of 
books of this character. Also in some cases these books are 
practically out of print and we have to depend upon the friends 
of the University to send us copies from their private collec- 
tions. 

I have only given in the albove a brief outline of the work 
we have in mind, but this is enough to show the collection of 
books we have undertaken. We appeal to all individuals through- 
out the South, who wish to see our section develop a literary 
future. There is no better way to help this cause than to con- 
tribute to this collection of books on Southern literature. Al- 
though it may only be a single issue of a magazine or a singly 
copy of some unknown book, the gift will be very much appre- 
ciated, and by everybody taking an interest in this collection, it 
can, in a few years, be made one of the most valuable in this 
country. 

Mark all items you send with your name and address, so 
your name will appear in our catalogue, as a contributor. Ad- 
dress all books to me, Atlanta, Ga., and a receipt will be sent you 
for each item. 

Yours very truly, 
Atlanta, Ga., Nov. 1, 1916. HENRY E. HARMAN. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. II. January, 1917 No. 3 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the PostofEce at Atlanta, Ga. 



GOOD NEWS FROM OGLETHORPE. 

During recent weeks two happenings of large interest to all the 

friends of Oglethorpe University have added much to the spiritual 
and material power back of this great movement. 

One of them is the organization of the Woman's Board of the Uni- 
versity in Atlanta, and the pledging of between one and two hun- 
dred of the, leading women of the city to devote their earnest en- 
ergies to the development of their school. 

The other is the magnificent backing of the Synod of Georgia at 
their last meeting, including the gift to the institution of between 
three and four thousand dollars. 

The Story of the Organization of the Woman's Board. 

One of the most remarkable gatherings, even in this city of re- 
markable gatherings, was the assembling of approximately one hun- 
dred of the representative women of the city of Atlanta, at the home 
of Mrs. Thornwell Jacobs, Saturday afternoon, November 25th, to 
organize a Women's Board for Oglethorpe University. 

The purpose of the Board is to aid the University in every wise 
and efficient way, with counsel of and guidance by the proper au- 
thorities of the institution. Already more than one hundred of the 
finest workers and most representative women o'f the city have 
tendered their services and joined the organization. Their activi- 
ties will be directed toward the support and development of Ogle- 
thorpe in every phase of its growth and activities. Each of the la- 
dies will be assigned to the committee on which she feels hest able 
to serve. These committees cover the various departments of the 
University, and among them are — Ways and Means, Finance, 
Grounds, Press, Entertainment, Hospital, Music, Library and Art,. 
Refreshments, Transportation, and such other committees as it may 
seem wise to the Board from time to time to appoint. 

The authorities of the University welcome the formation of this; 
organization with the greatest joy. The mere fact that they have 
promised a devoted allegiance to the enterprise alone has its own 
genuine value, but those who know the women of Atlanta, with their 



marvelous capacity for earnest and consecrated work directed by a 
swift, and accurate intelligence, will realize best what must be the 
results of the efficient aid which they will give to this great enter- 
prise. 

What the Synod of Georgia Thinks of Oglethorpe. 

The fine friendship of the Synod of Georgia, and her interest in 
the great undertaking of the founding of a Southern Presbyterian 
University, was never more fully illustrated than at the recent meet- 
ing of the Synod, held in Dalton, November 14-18. 

At this meeting, three separate resolutions of encouragement and 
approval were passed by the Synod, and one fine deed in the form 
of a gift of cash was recorded on her minutes. This latter consists 
of instructions given to the commission of the Donald Fraser High 
School, authorizing them to turn over to Oglethorpe University a 
fund of something like $3,000.00. The Commission on Donald Fraser 
High School reported that they found it to be the opinion of the 
stockholders of that institution, including the Synod's trustees, that 
their corporation should be dissolved and its business settled in a 
legal way. In their report they recommended J:he following resolu- 
tions, which the Synod adopted : 

1st. That the Synod's trustees, S. L. Morris and I. S. McElroy. 
he and they are hereby instructed to unite with the other commit- 
tee of the Donald Fraser High School in securing a dissolution of 
.this corporation and the settlement of its business according to the 
provisions of the law of the State of Georgia. 

2nd. That the aforesaid S. L. Morris and I. S. McElroy, be and 
they are hereby instructed to receive a receipt for all funds due to 
this Synod as a result of the dissolution and settlement of this 
business of the Donald Fraser High School, and said trustees are 
also instructed to deliver all such funds to the Board of Directors 
of Oglethorpe University as a foundation for an endowment fund in 
said Oglethorpe University, to be known as the Georgia Professor- 
ship. 

In the report of the Permanent Committee on Christian Education 
and Ministerial Relief are to be found these good words: 

"Especially do we note with gratitude the auspicious opening of 
Oglethorpe, a new Southern Presbyterian University, and pray that 
this may yet be the earnest of a long and uninterrupted career of 
increasing service to the church and world of this institution now 
by the grace of God made alive again." 

And then, after the President of the University, by invitation of 



the Synod,' had made an address outlining the history and ideals 
of Oglethorpe, the Synod, by a unanimous rising vote, adopted the 
following resolutions: 

"The Synod of Georgia has heard with pleasure the admirable 
address of Thornwcll Jacobs and take this occasion to assure him 
again of our sympathy with the great work of refounding Ogle- 
thorpe University for our Southern Presbyterian Church to the 
glory of God. We assure him our great pleasure in the remark- 
able success that has attended his efforts in securing subscriptions 
that already aggregate more than $700,000.00, and in building one 
of the largest and finest fire-proof college buildings in the South, 
and in selecting a faculty conspicuous for scholarship and Christian 
character, and in attracting that remarkably large Freshman class 
of choice young men with which the University began its first ses- 
sion in September, 1916. We commend most cordially to the liber- 
ality of our people the claims of Oglethorpe University, with the 
hope tbat the endowment fund of the Georgia Professorship may 
soon be completed and tbat other Synods may follow the example 
of this Synod in the endowment of Synodical Professorships in 
this great Presbyterian University. 



6 



e>\ % 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. II. February, 1917 No. 4 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Oglethorpe, University, Ga. 

GOOD NEWS AND THANKS. 

We wish to thank all of the many hundreds of founders of Ogle- 
thorpe University who have sent their checks, fulfilling- their 
pledges to aid, during the month of January. 

As a result we are able to report that the collections for the 
month have reached approximately $11,000.00. These checks have 
come from literally all over the United States, but chiefly from the 
South, of course. They have -come from big folks and little folks, 
from old folks and young folks, from rich folks and poor folks, from 
Church societies, Ladies Aid societies, Missionary societies, Sunday 
Schools and Sunday School classes, and indeed from everv sort and 
condition of men. 

The largest amount that we have received during the month from 
one source was $500.00 from an Atlanta corporation, the next 
largest was $425.00 from an Atlanta Presbyterian, the next largest 
was $400.00 from a friend in New York. 

Yet, perhaps the largest of all would be found among the $1.00 
and $2.00 checks, many of which have come to us from generous 
hearted 'little boys and girls, and men and women. 

Accompanying them have been many dear and lovely letters from 
hearts warmed to aid this great enterprise. We take the liberty of 
printing one of these, without giving the name of the dear little girl 
who wrote it : 

Murfreesboro, Tenn., January Sth, litlT 
Dear Dr. Jacobs : 

I thank you warmly for the nice letter von sent to me I will 
always try to prove a friend to Oglethorpe University. I always was 
happy to think that some time I will own $50.00 iu that great Univer- 
sity. I am only ten years of age but am trying hard to earn the 
money I pay you with. * * * * I know it seems crazy to be (for 
me to be) writing- to a man I do not know very much but you write 
me so many nice letters that I could not help from writing to tell 
you what I think about Oglethorpe. I have joined the church and I 
want to be a missionary some time. 

Yours truly. 

You dear little girl, no gift has come to our office which is ap- 
preciated more than yours. May you have all your heart's wishes 
fulfilled and may God bless and keep you and all of your sort forever. 

*■ * * 

We are reminded in this connection of a verv beautiful stanza in 
the poem read by one of the distinguished galaxy of Southern poets 
on the occasion of the laying of the cornerstone of the first building of 
Oglethorpe. It is by Samuel Minturn Peck, author of "Swinging in 
the Grape-vine Swing," and it reads thus : 



"God bless the men benevolent, 

Who give this structure to the skies 

For them no grander monument 

In carven grace can ever rise. 

No need of marble or of brass 

Have they to keep their memory bright 

Time cannot dim 

The fame of him 

Who writes his name with light." 

The new year thus opens promising beautiful things for our en- 
terprise. Just two years ago we laid the cornerstone, and these are 
the things that the Oglethorpe founders have done since that time. 
They have enlarged the subscription list until now it is. about $700.- 
000.00. They have completed the first great building of the institu- 
tion, which is universally conceded to be the highest class academic 
building in the Southern states, and worthy to be compared with any 
college or university building in the world. They have secured for 
that institution the following public utilities: A United States Post- 
office, a Southern Express office, a Telephone and Telegraph office, 
written assurance of an extension of the Atlanta Trolley line system 
and actual extension of bus service in the meantime, a Railway Sta- 
tion immediately opposite the campus, and the extension of the City 
Water System to serve the institution. 

And perhaps best of all, they have organized a brilliant and godly 
f acuity, and have assembled the largest first class that any similar 
institution ever assembled in the history of this section. 

For all of which we return, thanks to Him from whom cometh 

every good and perfect gift. 

* * * 

Read also this final word, which is an appeal: The finishing 
touches have just been put on our first building. The closing bills 
for the payment of it have accumulated. It is a wonderful building 
and we have received $1.25 worth for every $1.00 that we have spent 
on it and in it. It is all we can do to pay for it because our pledges 
are annual pledges and do not mature immediately. 

So, will you not send us your check, if you have not paid all that 
is due on your pledge, and thus gladden our hearts and aid the insti- 
tution of which you are one of the founders? 

If you have paid in full, and can do so without great inconve- 
nience, send us an extra check to be credited as advance payment on 
your promise. Some time when you are able, come out and see your 
school, for it is yours and will ever be. 

Heartily yours. 

THORNWELL JACOBS. 

President. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. II. March, 1917 No. 5 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 



Entered as seeond-elass mail matter at the Postofflce at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



WE ARE IN THE MIDST OF A GREAT FIGHT FOR A SPLEN- 
DID ENTERPRISE. 

In January and February we made an appeal to all of our patrons 
to send a substantial payment on their subscriptions, and wherever 
possible to pay in advance. 

# # * 

During these months we "received many encouraging letters. 
Here, for example, is one from a little friend in Memphis, Tennessee, 
that lies the right ring in it: 

Memphis, Term., Feb. 9th, 1917. 
"Dear Dr. Jacobs : 

I am so pleased to be able to hand you $10.00 herewith, on my 
subscription of $50.00 toward the Founding of Oglethorpe University, 
where I hope to go some day for my education. I am just nine years 
old now. I shall try and pay all of my subscription before a very 
long time. 

"Wishing you every success, I am, 

"Yours sincerely," 
We like to publish these letters from the boys and girls because 
they mean so much. Who knows but what this little man may be a 
student or a professor or a giver of a building to Oglethorpe in the 
davs to come? 



And here is a letter from a man who is out now bearing part of 

the burden of life. He also is doing his part, and it is a good part, 

and his check for $10.00 was very much appreciated: 

Pensacola, Florida, Feb. 7th, 1917. 
"Dear Friends : 

"I am enclosing herewith my check for $10.00 to be applied on the 
$20.00 balance now due by me to the University. I am sorry that I 
cannot pay it all at this time, but will remit the remaining $10.00 on 
March 31st. 
"With best wishes, I am, 

"Yours very truly," 

* -vp ^ 

And here is a short note from Brownsville, Tenn., which is typical 

of very many that we receive. It does our heart good for a letter to 

enclose the money not only, 'but the good wishes and high hopes and 

earnest prayers of the sender : 

Brownsville, Tenn., Feb. 14, 1917. 
"Gentlemen : 

"Enclosed is a money order for $3.00, covering the balance of my 
subscription. I am also sending sincerest wishes for the fullest suc- 
cess of the University, 

"Yours truly," 



And now March has come and we are in the midst of settling the 
last hills on the first great building of the University. It is said to 
be the highest class academic structure in the Southeast and one of 
the finest in the nation. 

For every $1.00 that has gone into it, we believe that we 
have secured $1.25 worth of result. All of our contracts were made 
at the time of low prices, and this building, built and equipped today, 
would cost us over $200,000.00. 

We need every cent we can get to meet these bills. We have, 
daily, reason to know that the friends of Oglethorpe University are 
the best friends in the world. Among these you are one. Please let 
this paragraph be a personal appeal from all of the men who have 
been, intrusted in the work of administration of your institution, pray- 
ing of you to send a check for every cent that you can on your sub- 
scription NOW. 

The work of the University is progressing happily. Between sixty 
and seventy boys are in the first class, the Freshman class, in the 
academic department. Next year there will be two classes, and the 
following year three, and so on until both the under-graduate and the 
graduate schools are filled. 

We have also become the happy recipient of a magnificent six- 
inch refracting telescope, valued at approximately $2,000.00, but 
priceless on account of its intimate association with the history of 
Old Oglethorpe. 

Dr. James Stacy, who was rn alumnus of the University of the 
class of 1849, and who was noted as a lover of astronomy during all 
of the many years of his ministry at Newnan, possessed a telescope 
which was famous all over Georgia for its clearness and size, it being 
generally esteemed as the finest telescope in the state. 

Dr. Stacy was one of the last living members of the board of 
directors of the Old Oglethorpe, and when he died, leaving the tele- 
scope to his nephew, Mr. Thomas Stacy Capers, now studying at 
Princeton University, it seemed to Mr. Capers the fitting thing that 
this telescope should be given to the New Oglethorpe as a memorial 
gift from the old alumnus and director. 

The authorities of the University in accepting the instrument 
have named it the "Stacy-Capers" telescope, uniting both the mem- 
ories of the uncle and, the generosity of the nephew. 

The telescope has arrived safely and is being set up for the use 
of the classes in astronomy. 

# # # 

But the main thing that we wish to say in this bulletin is : " Please 
do all that you can to help us pay these bills. ' ' 



<®gletf)orpe Entoersfttp bulletin 

Vol. II extra edition APRIL, 1917 extra edition No. 6 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Georgia 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 

The School of Commerce at 
Oglethorpe University 



^ r"* 



pjN ESTABLISHING her School of Commerce, Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity has taken a splendid forward step in supplying the 
needs and perfecting the ideals of the Southern educational 
world. The great mass of American colleges were originally 
founded by church organizations whose principal purpose as frequently 
expressed was, "in order to supply our church ivith an educated ministry" . 
These were the first colleges in America and their curricula were 
planned for students for the ministry, for the preacher and the dominie. 
Slight changes were made in them to accommodate the lawyer and the 
literary man, but otherwise they held rigidly to a certain formal type of 
education represented today by the strict Bachelor of Arts course in our 
American colleges. 

Since these schools would not broaden themselves, other institutions 
supplying new needs sprang up outside. Such were the technical, the 
agricultural schools, and the various scientific schools. 

But while courses have thus been shaped in various institutions for 
the man who may wish to be a minister, or a teacher, or an engineer, or 
a mechanic, or a farmer, it is only recently that some of our leading 
American universities have offered courses designed for the student who 
expects to be a business man. 

One reason for the failure of so many schools to take care of this 
tremendous body of students lies in the fact that it is practically impos- 
sible to operate successfully such a series of courses without the use of a 
great city as a laboratory of instruction. 

The location of Oglethorpe University in the suburbs of Atlanta, 
Georgia, supplied this fine opportunity which the management of the 
institution has been quick to grasp. 

The School of Commerce at Oglethorpe, which opened with a Fresh- 
man class in the fall of 1916, consists of a full four years' course in 



studies relating to practical business administration and industrial life. 
. Upon its successful completion the degree of Bachelor of Commerce is 
conferred upon students pursuing it. 

The courses in the School of Commerce, as outlined below, are equi- 
valent in dignity and importance to the courses offered in the Schools of 
Arts, Science and Literature. It is no longer necessary for a young man 
who expects to spend his life in the business world to pursue a course of 
study specially adapted to a student for the ministry, nor to waste his time 
in studies that are of no value whatsoever to him in the years of his after 
life. 

Parents who wish their sons to come home from college interested in 
the business lives which they are to lead, and equipped to lead them, will 
note that commercial history, commercial law and practical accounting, 
with such languages as Spanish and German, necessary nowadays to all 
well educated business men, have taken the place of Latin and Greek in 
the School of Commerce and that a student who expects to be a merchant 
or a banker, or a business man of any good type will be thoroughly 
drilled, through his studies and lectures, in the facts and principles of 
the world in which he is to live. 



Courses of Study 1917-18 

The School of Commerce with its allied departments has as its central 
idea the presenting of a course of study designed to give an adequate and 
thorough preparation for a business career. 

It should not be confounded with the well known "Business College," 
as the Manual Training School is often confounded with the Engineering 
College of a University. 

A School of Commerce does not turn out stenographers, typists and 
book-keepers; it produces accountants, managers and executives. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES 
Accounting 
1. Elementary Accounting. — A thorough study of the basic theory of 
accounting debits and credits, and the obtaining of a knowledge of the 
methods and forms used in the recording of transactions; and the com- 
pilation and interpretation of statements based thereon. Lectures and 
practical work. Six hours a week. Required of all Freshmen in B. Com. 
course. 

2. Practical Accounting. — A continuation of (1), developing from 
the basic principles and methods to the methods, forms and statements 



used in the different types of business enterprises, including also accounts 
of executors, trustees, receivers, etc. Six hours a week. Required of all 
Sophomores in B. Com. course. 

3. Accounting Problems and Theory of Accounts. — A development 
of (2), taking up problems bearing on the special cases studied, and from 
the solution of these problems, developing the various points of theory 
there illustrated. C. P. A. problems form a large part of the material used. 
Six hours a week. Required of all Juniors in B. Com. course. 

3. Cost Accounting. — A study of the principles and practices in this 
particular branch of accounting. A budget set is used in order to illus- 
trate the detail of this type of work. Six hours a week. Elective in Junior 
and Senior years. 

3. Accounting Mathematics and Statistical Presentation. — A study of 
the higher mathematics used in the higher branches of accounting — Alge- 
bra, Analytic Geometry and the Calculus — in so far as they are of value 
in accounting work. Also study and practice in the graphical represen- 
tation of statistics and tables in reports and publications. Six hours a 
week. Elective in Junior or Senior year. 

4. Auditing Practice and Procedure. — The principles and practice of 
auditing are studied, examples of actual business and audit reports being 
used. Considerable laboratory and practical work is incorporated. Six 
hours a week. Required of Seniors in B. Com. course. 

4. History of Accounting. — A study of the history and development 
of accounting principles to the present date, and a discussion of the pos- 
sibilities of the future. Three hours a week. Fall Term. Elective in 
Senior year. 

English 

1. English. — Three hours a week. Required of all Freshmen. See 
announcement of Department of English. 

2. Commercial English.- — Three hours a week. Required of all 
Sophomores. See announcement of Department of English. 

Bible 

1. Bible. — Two hours a week. Required of all Freshmen. See an- 
nouncement of that department. 

2. Bible. — Two hours a week. Required of all Sophomores. See 
announcement of that department. 

Languages 

Two years' work taken in Freshman and Sophomore years in either 
French, Spanish or German is required. See the announcements of those 
departments for details. 



Commercial Law 

1. Commercial Law. — Contracts, agency and partnership, corpora- 
tions. Personal and real property, guaranty and suretyship. Three hours 
a week. Required of all Freshmen in B. Com. course. 

2. Commercial Law. — Insurance law, negotiable paper, banks, bank- 
ruptcy and receivers, income and inheritance tax. Three hours a week. 
Required of all Sophomores in B. Com. course. 

Economics and Allied Branches 

1. Economic Theory. — A study of the basic theory of economics, 
particularly in those phases bearing most closely on activities of the busi- 
ness world. Three hours a week. Required of all Juniors in B. Com. 
course. 

1. History and Geography of Commerce. — A study of the economic 
history of the world up to the present day, and a development from it to 
the present geography of commerce. Three hours a week. Required of 
all Freshmen in B. Com. course. 

3. Corporation Finance. — A study of the methods of promoting, 
underwriting and floating of a corporation, covering issuance and sale of 
securities, underwriting, kinds of stocks and bonds, holding companies, 
receiverships, re-organizations, etc., of such concerns. Three times a week. 
Required of all Juniors in B. Com. course. 

3. Advertising. — A study of the basic principle of advertising, its 
theory, psychology and technique; the preparation of copy, comparison 
and study of advertising mediums. Six hours a week Elective in Junior 
or Senior year. 

3. Insurance. — A study of life, fire and other forms of insurance, 
developing the fundamental theories of each, the principles of rates and 
rate making, mortality tables, agents and agencies, etc. Three hours a 
week. Elective in Junior or Senior year. 

3. Selling and Credits. — Covering selling principles and methods, 
analysis of markets, opening new territory, records, canvassing, selling, 
campaigns, credit agencies, other sources of credit information, credit 
records. Three hours a week. Elective in Junior or Senior year. 

3. Buying. — A study of markets and other sources of supply, prices 
and discounts, records and reports, turnovers, customs and practices in 
various fields. Three times a week. Elective in Junior or Senior years. 

3. Transportation. — A study of traffic conditions, including the va- 
rious lines of railroads, their locations and extent, policy, sources and 
character of traffic, also usual methods of handling and tracing freight, 
dealing with claims, etc.; also conditions as existing in other countries in 



comparison with the United States, and the possibilities of the future. 
Three hours a week. Elective in Junior or Senior year. 

3. Money and Banking. — A study of the essential features of a circu- 
lating medium to be used as money. The Uni- and Bi-metallic Theory — 
Gresham's Law. The theory, principles and practice of banking. The 
regional and bond banks. Domestic and foreign exchange and the bank- 
ing principles of other countries. Three hours a week. Elective in Junior 
or Senior year. 

3. Principles and Economics of Engineering. — A study of engineer- 
ing operations, particularly as regards factory operation, mass produc- 
tion, etc., touching wages and wage systems, principles of manufacturing, 
factory location and construction, etc. Three hours a week. Elective in 
Junior or Senior year. 

3. Labor Problems. — A study of organized and individual labor, 
sources of labor, unemployment, labor unrest, profit-sharing and similar 
plans, welfare work, etc. Three hours a week. Elective in Junior or 
Senior year. 

3. Personal Efficiency. — One's efficiency in his daily life, routine and 
relation to others is the main topic here. Methods of developing this 
efficiency, development of memory, systems and schedules, etc., are con- 
sidered. Three hours a week. Elective in Junior or Senior year. 

MISCELLANEOUS COURSES 

1. Stenography and Typewriting. — A thorough training in these im- 
portant branches, using a standard system in each case, with a sufficient 
amount of laboratory and dictation work. Six hours a week. Elective in 
any year. 

2. Chemistry. — Elementary Chemistry. See announcement of that 
department. Three hours a week. Required of all Sophomores in B. Com. 
course. 

3. Psychology. — A study of the principles and theories of this sub- 
ject, particularly in its application to business life. Three hours a week. 
Required of all Juniors in B. Com. course. 

4. Vocational Training. — A study of the known methods of analysis 
and vocationalization of mankind. The methods of Blackford and others 
are explained and discussed, also psychological tests, and other similar 
material. Three hours a week. Elective in Junior or Senior year. 

In addition to the above listed subjects, other electives will be offered 
as the demand arises. Also, the students in the B. Com. course may choose 
electives from other departments, provided the subject and amount of such 
electives meet with the approval of the head of the School of Commerce 

For further information, catalog, entrance blanks, etc.. address the 
President, Oglethorpe Universitv, Ga. 



EDUCATION AND CAREER5- 




The facts are drawn from the United States Bureau of Education and interpreted 
by Mr. N. C. Schaeffer, the efficient state superintendent of public instruction for 
Pennsylvania. The proportion of students in various kinds of educational training, as 
well as of no education, is shown to scale. Similarly, but on a different scale, the 
shaded area shows the educational training received by the 10,000 men whose careers 
have been such that their names were selected for "Who's Who in America." The 
value of educational training in the successful lives of prominent men is clearly shown 
in that 77 per cent of such men in "Who's Who" are those with college and university 
training, while less than 14 per cent of them had only a common school training and 
no man without some kind of education was found to have had a sufficient successful 
career to be counted worthy of a place in the list. In other words, if young men aspire 
to serve their country and this generation to the best advantage, they stand no chance 
whatever of so doing if they have no education, only one chance in 9,000 of such 
relative success if they have only a common school training, but from the above diagram 
they seem to have at least one chance in 40 of reaching such success if they have 
obtained a college or university training or its equivalent. 

What Is the Use of a University 
Education? 

(From the Westminster Magazine) 

Our friend, Mr. Holmes, of the real estate firm of Holmes & Luckie 
of this city, tells us an interesting story which deserves wide circulation. 

Fifteen years ago he left his home in Mississippi to try his fortune in 
Atlanta. Shortly after his arrival in Atlanta he was met on the street by 
a friend who learned that he was looking for a position. The friend told 
of an opening in the Fulton Bag & Cotton Mill, and offered to introduce 
him personally to the manager. Mr. Holmes gladly accepted the offer. 
The manager of the mill asked him what college he had attended. Mr. 
Holmes explained that he had only a high school education, but expressed 
his willingness to undertake anything and to prepare himself by any work 
necessary. The manager took his references and a week or so later when 
Mr. Holmes called to learn what disposition had been made of the matter, 



the manager told him that of all the references that had come to their 
desk, his had been answered with the words of highest praise, but that 
the position demanded a college-bred man and consequently they felt that 
it would be unwise to employ him. The salary attached to the job was 
$125.00 per month. Within a short while a college graduate was enjoying 
it. Mr. Holmes later began his career in Atlanta on $50.00 per month 
with a mercantile concern. The advantage of an education is not the 
equipping of a man to make money, but the development and stimulation 
of his every power for the enjoying of life and making the most of his 
opportunities. Yet a college education is a magnificent financial asset. 
Mr. Holmes began with a handicap of $75.00 per month because he had 
not gone to college. 

In telling us the story, Mr. Holmes said he thought this chapter from 
his own experience might be useful to us in impressing upon some young 
man or his parents the importance of a first-class college education. 

It will be. 



r PtK 


Wf 


r H 




i 


o 








s 


5 








p a 




a 


Hi 


:y 


} 


vAlU^c 


IF 
























llfl 


















Et 


)L 


T 


R/ 


UWIM6, 


























r 






























■\ 


\y 






























$PLD 
















\ 






7 


//( \S 


e. / 


ne 






































\ 


r 






ke* 


p f 


/SI 


"'/ 




































y 
















































A 




























































\ 


A 
























#25 














7 










■4 
















































iL' 
















































,/ 


/ 










































ti 


V 














































\ 


ny 
































fpn 










































































Ik 


c . 




- J 






































fir 


(£' 


CjX 














































ill 


•P 














































s 














o/» 


t-r 


5Z 


/f/S 


f A 


BOI 


£ 7 


///t> 


/-// 


/£ 


f.f« 














s 




— 











Jt 




3„ 


f % /?£/ 


1»i 


v sreAor l^/v> 


Tr 












/ 


/ 


*, 








" 










' dC 


»% 


O/ft 


->r l 


orpri 


l)t/Y 


//a 


9/fO 










/ 
























<?0 


% 


4 m 


- D 


<SM 


/A5 


f° 














/ 


A 


/ 














































/ 


$ 






At 


UH 


tal 


Ir 


<co 


fflt 


'*5 






















f/Q 








/,. 


$ 






















3 '.. 


J 


'Zt>< 


o 




















y 


i 


6 


(c 


mr 


'h?/ 


5 


ho 


0/ 


$6 


OO. 


- 1 




























A> 
























s% 


en 


lb 


?o 


















<? 


\ 




a. 


rt 


opr 


en 


ice 






a 


w, 


r | 
























((' 


w- 








~fc 


















■>•".■ 


en 


?0, 1 


OO 












4 5 


•* 




























f% 


on 


■40 t 


QQ 
































r 








M 






























— 










































































1 s ' 


f*" 












AGE/ 


t 1 


t i 


9 /: 


» g 


7 ? 


' e 


l 2 


J -• 


i a 


5 <- 


6 H 


7 £ 


f -? 


1 3 


O 3 


3 


2 3 


3 3 


■9 3 


1 3 


6 3 


7 3 


s 3 


9 



The above design shows some facts not generally known. It will be noted that 
the earnings of the graduates of various schools vary surprisingly. The common 
school graduate begins low down in the scale and at the age of 29 reaches his maximum 
of about $15.00 per week. The apprentice rarely gets higher than $20.00. The 
technical school graduate begins below $15.00 and goes something higher than $30.00 
on an average. But the University trained man, beginning at the highest figure of 
them all, keeps steadily above them all. 

This diagram is of the greatest significance to young men, who are now choosing 
the institution which they expect to attend during the coming years aud whose iuru-int 
and influence will determine the value of their lives, both to themselves and to 
society. 

These findings on the "Money Value of Educational Training" are the result of 
much investigation by Mr. James Dodge when president of the Societv of American 
Mechanical Engineers. It is worthy of careful study. 



<®gletf)orpe linujersitp bulletin 



Vol. II 








MAY, 


1917 








No. 


7 


Publ 


ish 


ed 


monthly by 


Oglethorpe University, 
Edited by Thornwell 


Oglethorpe Universi 
Jacobs 


ty, 


Georgia 




Entered 


as 


second-class mail matter at the 


Postr 


iffice at 


Oglethorpe 


u 


niversity, G 


a. 



Make May a Great Monti 



When the shock of the great war came we wondered 
what would be the effect upon the collections of pledges 
made by the many friends of Oglethorpe. 

The effect was less than was to be expected. Even so 
great a cataclysm could not separate our friends from us. 

And as we look forward to May we are hoping for splen- 
did receipts. 

Will you not help us to make this month one of great 
and good results. 

If you owe anything on your pledge send it in at once. 

If you do not — oh, how much an advance payment would 
be appreciated. 

And if you have paid in full help us with another check. 

It is a great fight for a great school in which we are 
engaged — your school, for you are one of the founders of it. 

And the picture on the other page shows you how well 
the money has been used with which you have already en- 
trusted us. 

We are hoping and praying for a great month in Mav. 
Help us to make it so. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. II June, 1917 No. 8 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postofflce at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



OGLETHORPE AND THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



In view of the recent action of our General Assembly as quoted 
below, the Board of Directors of Oglethorpe University, in regular 
annual meeting assembled May 29, 1917, appointed the under- 
signed committee to draft and send out to our friends and to all 
concerned the following statements : 

It was and is the aim of the founders of Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity to establish a really great Institution, loyal to the ideals and 
faith of Presbyterianism and owned and controlled by Presbyte- 
rian men. To this end the charter, by-laws and subscription lists 
of our Institution were so shaped as to guarantee perpetually such 
loyalty as well as such ownership and control. As our work pro- 
gressed, we found among our friends and supporters as well as 
among those who were not so much interested in the movement, 
some who felt that the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States should be offered the ownership and 
control of the Institution under the proper legal terms and guar- 
antees. Having this in mind, we appointed a committee to con- 
fer with a committee that had been appointed by the General 
Assembly to see whether some such plan might not be worked 
out to the satisfaction of the University and the Church. These 
committees met in Atlanta February 13-14 and after conference, 
our committee understood that the following would be reported 
to the General Assembly as satisfactory : 

1. The title to the property of Oglethorpe University shall be made so that its 
ownership shall be vested in the Presbyterian Church in the United States and so 
made that it can never be alienated from the ownership and control of the Presbyte- 
rian Church in the United States except by the direction of the General Assembly of 
the said Church. The best way to accomplish this under the laws of Georgia will 
have to be determined by competent legal advice. 

2. Every member of ithe Board of Directors of Oglethorpe University shall be a 
member of the Presbyterian Church in good and regular standing. 

3. The members of the Board of Directors shall be elected for life by the Board 
of Directors, but the selection of two-thirds of the members of the Board of Direc- 
tors shall be ratified by the sessions of the respective churches to which they belong 
before their election shall be counted valid. 

4. The members of the Executive Committee, which is the real governing body 



of the institution, shall be elected by the Board of Directors, but the election of no 
member of the Executive Committee shall be valid until it has been ratified by the 
General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States. 

5. The Executive Committee shall consist of twenty-one (21) members and each 
m?mber shall be elected for a term of three years. In order that this may be carried 
out in a practical manner, the twenty-one (21) members of the Executive Committee 
shall be divided into three classes with seven members in each class, and at the inau- 
guration of this plan the seven members in the first class shall be elected for a term 
of one year, the seven members in the second class for a term of two years, and the 
seven members of the third class for a term of three years, and at the expiration of 
these first terms the seven members in each class shall thereafter be elected for a term 
nf three years. In this way one class of seven members of the Executive Committee 
will be elected each year for a term of three years, when the plan has come into full 
operation. 

6. All the above articles shall be incorporated into the Charter of Oglethorpe 
University, and shall never be eliminated from the Charter without the consent of 
the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States. 

7. The General Assembly, recognizing that the session is the court to which is 
committed the ordering of collections, commends Oglethorpe University to the ses- 
sion cxf the churches within its bounds, at the same time calling the attention of 
these sessions to the importance of so guidiug the people in their giving that the 
interests of Congregational, Presbyterial and Synodical Educational institutions shall 
be conserved. 

This commendation is given on two conditions, namely: (1) that hereafter all 
moneys raised by Oglethorpe University within the bounds of Synods of our Church, 
other than the Synod of Georgia, shall be devoted to the building, equipment, endow- 
ment and support of post-graduate and university schools other than those now 
found in the undergraduate work of our Presbyterian Colleges, unless the donor shall 
specifically designate otherwise, and (2) that this commendation shall become opera- 
tive only after the Board of Directors of Oglethorpe University have incorporated the 
first five articles of this report into their Charter and have arranged the title to the 
property of Oglethorpe University as the General Assembly may direct under the first 
article of this report. 

When the Assembly's Ad Interim Committee made their re- 
port to the General Assembly in Birmingham, the Assembly took 
the following action : 

(1) That the Assembly records its appreciation of Dr. W. L. Lingle and his 
associates in the arduous work they were called upon to perform. 

(2) That the Assembly commend the zeal and energy of the managers of Ogle- 
thorpe University, and wish them great success in building up an Institution in 
Georgia, which we trust will be a blessing to generations. 

(3) That the Assembly decline to adopt Oglethorpe University and decline to 
commend it to the churches for their contributions. 

(4) That the Assembly urge our Presbyteries and Synods to increased diligence 
in building up and maintaining their schools and colleges. 

This action of the Assembly we accept cheerfully and we 
appreciate fully the cordial good will expressed by the Assembly 
for our continued growth and greater prosperity. The Board of 
Directors having offered the ownership and control of the Univer- 
sity to the General Assembly feel that all has been done in that 
direction that could be expected of us and that we are now in a 
position to go forward with united and earnest effort for the attain- 
ment of our great ideal. 

Oglethorpe will continue its growth as a great Southern Pres- 
byterian University, not under the control of any ecclesiastical 
court, but strictly and completely under Presbyterian control. We 
will proceed with our work as heretofore and we hereby invite all 
forward-looking Presbyterians, ministers and laymen, men and 
women, to aid us in this great enterprise to which more than five 
thousand men, women and children have already pledged their 
money, their prayers, and their devotion. And to our Presbyte- 



Tian ministers and their sessions all over our country, we make 
this special appeal, that when their local Presbyterial and Synodi- 
cal Institutions shall have had ample opportunity to present their 
causes to the members of their churches they may give us an oppor- 
tunity of telling the "Oglethorpe Story" in their pulpits, upon the 
basis of the above statement. 

We look forward to a bright future with hope and faith, as 
we look back upon a past rich in the blessings of God. With char- 
ity toward all, with rivalry toward none, and with a love to our 
"beloved church which is only equalled by our devotion to our 
friends and helpers, we now begin an aggressive campaign to win 
more friends, more money, and more students. 

I. S. McELROY, Pastor First Pres. Church, Columbus, Ga. 

J. I. VANCE, Pastor First Pres. Church, Nashville, Term. 

D. H. OGDEN. Pastor Central Pres. Church, Atlanta, Ga. 

E. M. GREEN, Pastor First Pres; Church, Danville, Ky. 

G. L. PETRIE, Pastor First Pres. Church, Charlottesville, Va. 
JAS. R. GRAY, Editor Atlanta Journal, Atlanta, Ga. 
THORNWELL JACOBS, Pres. Oglethorpe University, 

Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
— Committee. 

The Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors of Oglethorpe 
University was held Tuesday afternoon at 3 :00 o'clock in the office 
of Mr. Jas. R. Gray. At this meeting, the following officers were 
elected : 

Dr. Jas. I. Vance, Pastor First Presbyterian Church, Nashville, 
Tenn., President. 

J. T. Lupton, Chattanooga, Tenn., First Vice-President. 

Geo. W. Watts, Durham, N. C, Second Vice-President. 

L. C. Mandeville, Carrollton, Ga., Third Vice-President. 

W. R. Hearst, New York City, Fourth Vice-President. 

Jno. K. Ottley, Atlanta, Ga., Treasurer. 

J. Cheston King, Atlanta, Ga., Secretary. 

The three members of the Executive Committee whose terms 
expired at this meeting were re-elected: 

Messrs. Frank M. Inman, D. I. Maclntyre, Dr. E. G. Jones. 

Reports of Committees were received and read, showing prog- 
ress in the work along all lines'. A matter of special interest was 
the report of the Chairman of the Executive Committee, Jas. R. 
Gray, which, among other items of progress, announced the imme- 
diate construction of a beautiful stone railway station for the use 
of the University community. 

The financial affairs of the Institution were shown to be in 
excellent condition, and work in all the departments of the school 
was approved. 



OGLETHORPE'S FIRST COMMENCEMENT. 



The first Commencement Exercises of Oglethorpe University began 
with the Baccalaureate sermon which was preached by Dr. D. H. Rolston, 
pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Charlotte, N. C, in the audito- 
rium of the Central Presbyterian Church of this city at 11 :00 o'clock 
Sunday morning, May 27th. 

Dr. Rolston is widely known as one of the most prominent ministers 
of the denomination not only, but also as a man of exceptional power 
both of personality and ministry. He is the pastor of one of the strongest 
and largest churches of the denomination in the whole South, and is 
widely admired as a most eloquent and fascinating speaker. 

On Monday afternoon there was a meeting of the Board of Directors 
of the University in the chapel of the Administration Building, at 3:00 
o'clock, at which many prominent men from all over the South were 
present. 

On Monday night there was a gathering of the students to meet with 
the Alumni in the chapel of the University. Dr. Geo. L. Petrie addressed 
the student body, bearing particularly in mind their desire to know 
something of the ante-bellum days of the old Oglethorpe at Milledgeville. 

Dr. E. M. Green, of Danville, Ky., class of '59, made a delightful 
address, as also Mr. A. Pope and Mr. Lane, former alumni. 

On Tuesday evening there was held the first public debate ever pre- 
sented by the University, given in the auditorium of the First Presbyterian 
Church, corner 17th and Peachtree Streets, at 8:00 o'clock, to which the 
public generally was invited. This debate compared the relative merits 
of the American and British forms of government, and was participated 
in by four of the best thinkers and speakers in the first class of Ogle- 
thorpe. Messrs. J. W. Faulkner and Clifford Sims presented the case in 
favor of America, and Messrs. Stokely Northcutt and Claude C. Mason, 
Jr., in favor of Great Britain. Mr. W. R. Carlisle presided. 

The University is closing a most auspicious first year, and is looking 
forward to an even more successful one for 1917-18. 

Do you know of a young man ready for college whom you would like 
to see educated in a strong Christian institution? Tell him about Ogle- 
thorpe and send us his name. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



VOL. II 



July, 1917 



No. 9 



Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 



Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Oglethorpe University. 6a. 




Part of the First Class at Oglethorpe University, which totalled sixty-seven 
enthusiastic Freshmen. A large percentage of these men 
will be back next year. 



A LANIER PROFESSORSHIP AT OGLETHORPE. 

Dr. Jas. H. Dillard, President of the Jeanes Fund, and one of the 
most distinguished educators in our country, has given an interview to 
the papers that will prove of large interest to Georgians and South- 
erners, and especially to the friends of Oglethorpe University. 

"I had the pleasure," says Dr. Dillard, "of visiting Oglethorpe 
three weeks ago and was much impressed with what had been accom- 



plishcd in so short a time at the new site, about nine miles from the 
center of Atlanta. The large building already erected is beautiful 
from an architectural point of view and most satisfactory in its prac- 
tical uses. The best of judgment has been shown in every respect 

"Over the desk of President Thornwell Jacobs hangs a framed 
document which is the most interesting possession of the University. 
It is the diploma of Sidney Lanier, our greatest of Southern men of 
letters. Oglethorpe was Lanier's college, and it may be of interest 
to state that a movement is to be started for the erection of a memo- 
rial to Lanier in the revived University. 

''Many admirers of Lanier, North and South, are interested in the 
movement. Albert Shaw, of the Review of Reviews; Lawrence F. 
Abbott, of the Outlook; Clark Howell, of the Atlanta Constittuion ; 
Oswald Garrison Villard, of the Nation; Henry S. Pritchett, George 
Foster Peabody and others have expressed their willingness to aid in 
securing funds for the memorial. This memorial will probably take 
the form of an endowment for a chair of English Literature. Mr. 
Peabody, who is a native of Georgia, has consented to be treasurer 
of the committee which is to be formed for the purpose of securing the 
necessary funds. 

"There should be no doubt of the success of the effort. I am sure 
that all the school children in the South will be glad to join in honor- 
ing the author of 'The Song of the Chattahoochee' and 'The Marshes 
of Glynn.' The fame of Lanier has been constantly growing, and we, 
of the South, will do well to honor his memory by a memorial at the 
college which will always he associated with his name." 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY. 

Many people in our city are interested in Oglethorpe University, 
a Presbyterian Institution located in Atlanta, Georgia. A few years 
ago Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, the President of Oglethorpe, visited Char- 
lottesville, and told the story of old Oglethorpe University, how that 
institution, at one time so prosperous, had been ruined in the fall of 
the Confederate States. With thrilling eloquence he told of the en- 
deavor to re-establish the University in Atlanta. The people who heard 
the address were so moved by it that they made spontaneous and hand- 
some contribution to the cause, amounting to more than a thousand 
dollars. 



The Institution was opened last Fall. It was my privilege recently 
to attend the first commencement of the New Oglethorpe University, 
and to take part in the Alumni exercises. Of course, there are very 
few living alumni of Oglethorpe, as for more than fifty years it had no 
existence. Of the class of 1859, of which I was a member, there are 
four living members, all ministers. Two of these were present at the 
recent meeting : Rev. Dr. E. M. Green, of Danville, Kentucky, and my- 
self. There were two other Alumni present : Mr. A. Pope, of Macon, 
G-a., and Mr. R. L. Lane ,of Washington, Ga. On the evening devoted 
to the Alumni the chapel was filled with a sympathetic audience con- 
sisting of students, faculty, and ladies and gentlemen of Atlanta. 
The four old Alumni who were present made reminiscent addresses, 
told college stories, and indulged in humorous references to the old 
times. It was a delightful re-union in which the old men renewed 
their youth, and all had a good time. 

Oglethorpe has begun its new career very auspiciously. The build- 
ing now completed and occupied is a gem of architecture. I have 
never seen a building better adapted to college purposes. The plan 
includes other buildings of the character. 

The official relation of Oglethorpe University to the Presbyterian 
church was very earnestly discussed by the recent General Assembly 
in Birmingham, Alabama. Diverse views were entertained and ex- 
pressed by members of the assembly. The final action of the General 
Assembly was eminently satisfactory to the many warm friends of 
Oglethorpe. In that action the Assembly commended the energy and 
zeal of the managers of the Oglethorpe enterprise and wished for the 
further success of the University. The friends of Oglethorpe regard 
this as better than direct church ownership and control. The Institu- 
tion is owned and controlled by Presbyterians, and is designed to 
afford opportunity for liberal education, safeguarded by the mainte- 
nance of high ideals and Christian principles. 

Difficult and trying as are these times, the success of Oglethorpe 
seems assured. With an honorable past in the old Oglethorpe, the 
new Oglethorpe looks into the future with bright hopes of expanding 
usefulness and great achievement.— George L. Petrie, in the Char- 
lottesville Progress. 

GEORGE L. PETRIE. 



APPLICATION BLANK 

OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 

ATLANTA, GA. 



Students applying for admission to the University should fill out 
and mail to the President the following form: 



I hereby apply for matriculation in Oglethorpe University. 
I last attended 

School (or College,) from which I received an honorable dismissal. 

I am prepared to enter the Class in Oglethorpe 

University. Please reserve room and boarding accommodations for 

me. I shall reach Atlanta on the day of 

Signed: 



Address 



Age. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. II August, 1917 No. 10 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the rostoffice at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



INTERESTING NEWS FROM OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY. 

The management and student body of Oglethorpe University are 
much pleased with the many improvements made necessary along 
Peach tree Road by the locating of rthe military cantonment of Camp 
Gordon at Chamblee, Ga., something like two miles northeast of the 
institution. 

Workmen are busy laying a 16-inch water main on the east side of 
Peachtree Roaid, and the Georgia Railway & Power Co. is preparing 
to build their trolley line out Peachtree Road directly in front of 
the University. The visitors and students of the University will 
especially appreciate this improvement. It is understood, also, that 
gas pipes will be laid out Peachtree Road to Camp Gordon connecting 
the city gas supply with the cantonment. 

Announcement has also been made that all parties concerned have 
reached an agreement whereby Peachtree Road is to be paved all the 
way from Chamblee to the present end of the car line, at which point 
the eighty foot avenue, recently paved, begins. 

The contract to build the beautiful new railway station of the Uni- 
versity was let to Louis C. Kalb. The station will be built of granite 
and covered with variegated slates and will be known as Oglethorpe 
University, GJa. It will cost, including the approaches and sewerage 
connections, in the neighborhood of $10,000.00'. It will contain, be- 
sides the customary waiting rooms and ticket offices, the express 
office and freight depot for the University. An umbrella shed ex- 
tends to the northeast and the port cochere to the north. Work on 
the station will begin immediately. 

i 

Peachtree Road presents a busy sceaie, and will be even busier 
within the next ten days when all of this work will be in full blast. 
While Camp Gordon is a mile and one-half or two miles away, yet 



its location in the neighborhood 'should make it possible to use the 
cantonment in a sense as a great laboratory for the establishment of 
a school of military science at Oglethorpe. Military training will be 
given at the institution, should the government desire it, during tho 
coming year. 

The University is looking for ward to an excellent opening on Sep- 
tember 19th next. The great mass of old students will return for the 
coming year, and. many new ones are expected to enter the Fresh- 
man class in September. 

The locating of the cantonment for the National Army at Chamblee, 
Ga., has created a great deal of interest on the part of our students 
and friends. Buildings are now being erected with the greatest 
speed, roads are being graded, railway spur tracks being built, and 
all the conveniences of a modern city of fifty thousand people are 
being provided for the camp, which is to be known as Camp Gordon, 
in honor of General John B. Gordon. The government will spend be- 
tween three and four million dollars in making it perfect and effi- 
cient, and sanitary and attractive. 

A 16-inch water main, a trolley line, and many beautiful roadways 
will be constructed, connecting Atlanta with the camp. Camp Gor- 
don is located at Chamblee, Ga., about one and one-half miles from 
the University, and will prove an interesting and educational show 
place to our students not only, but also to the whole city of Atlanta. 
A military zone will be declared around the camp and the health 
and morals of the soldiers will be protected as carefully as law and 
religion and the United States Secret Service can do so. 

Camp Gordon with the other fifteen cantonments will be a little 
world within itself. 

Esch camp will have a mammoth theater. 

Caruso, Farrar, John McCormick, Fritz Kreisler, the violinist: Pad- 
e.rewsiki and other world famous artists will appear. 

Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks. Francis X. 
Bushman and kindred movie stars will appear in person. 

^Veil-known theatrical men will organize home talent shows, famous 
•playwrights framing the plots. 

To teach wrestling and boxing will be Frank Gotch, Mike Gibbons, 
Johnny Kilbane, Tom Gibbons, Johnny Dundee, Frank Moran. Fred 



Fulton, Jack Dillon, Kid McCoy, Packy McFarland, Jess Willard, Sam 

Langfor'd and others,. Boxing is fine bayonet training, the war de- 
partment has learned. 

A great Young Men's Christian association building and another 
of equal size for the Knights of Columbus is being erected at each 
camp. 

Branch libraries will be established in all <by the American library 
commission. The government will install college professors to teach 
French, Italian and other languages. 



THE BIG CHURCHES AND OGLETHORPE. 

From the last minutes of the General Assembly of the Southern 
Presbyterian Church, we discover the names and memberships of. 
the fifteen largest churches in the Southern Assembly, comprising all 
whose membership have reached one thousand or more. 

It is both interesting and significant to note that nine of the fifteen 
have heard the Oglethorpe Story and have made generous contribu- 
tions to the building up of a great Southern Presbyterian University. 
This is most encouraging to the management of the University, and 
shows the deep interest taken in the movement by our largest as well 
as our smaller churches. 

The list follows: Membership. 

Houston First, W. States Jacobs D. D 2,242 

Nashville First, James I. Vance, D. D _ 1,625 

Dallas First, Wm. M. Anderson, D. D 1,536 

Atlanta Central, Dunbar H. Ogden, D. D _ 1,531 

Houston Second, F. E. Fincher, 1,378 

Charleston First, Ernest Thompson, D. D 1,250 

Montgomery First, Robert H. MJciGaslin, D. D , 1,242 

Charlotte Second, A. C. McGeaehy, D. D 1,221 

Atlanta North Ave., R. 0. Flynn, D. D 1,110 

San Antonio First, Arthur G. Jones, D. D 1,095 

Knoxville First, W. T. Thompson, Jr 1,070 

Charleston Bream, S. M. Glasgow, 1,050 

Greensboro First, Chas. F. Myers, _ 1,034 

Memphis Second, A. B. Curry, D. D 1,020 

Jacksonville First, J. B. French, D. D * 1,007 

Those printed in black type are the churches that have aided 
Oglethorpe. We 'hope to add the others later. 



THE LANIER PROFESSORSHIP. 

A great deal of interest has been aroused by the announcement made 
in our last Bulletin and in the daily papers of the plan to found a 
Lanier Professorship of English at Oglethorope. We are in receipt 
of a letter from & good friend in Georgia who sends us a cheek on his 
subscription to the founding of the University, -and writes : 

"Should the proposed memorial to Lanier be put into effect, it 
will be my pleasure to contribute yearly to same. 

"My mother, now dead, was a pupil of the one you propose to 
honor and this together with my love for his verse, prompts the 
above." 

It has occurred to us that perhaps there are others who would 
like to do the same thing. Lanier's diploma hangs over the desk 
of the President of the University and is one of the treasures that the 
institution has. Hie was a student at Oglethorpe not only, but one of 
the teachers there. For decades his name has brought honor to the 
whole nation, and now at length the nation is to found this perpetual 
memorial to him. 



The students of the University will be interested in the following, 
which was found in the last issue of "Our Monthly." It tells a little 
story of as fine a set of young men as ever constituted a baseball 
nine, and it is gratifying to the authorities of the university to know 
thus from eye witnesses the quality of behavior that our young men 
are in the habit of exhibiting : 

A lady in speaking to us recently of the visit of the Oglethorpe Base Ball 
team to Clemson, expressed pleasure and gratification at the fine character 
and appearance of the Oglethorpe boys. We knew that they had a fine 
set of boys over there. The reopening of the college in September will add 
a Sophomore class to the student body. A very large Freshman class is 
expected. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

VOL. II September, 1917 No 11 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 



Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoflice at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



OGLETHORPE SONGS, VERSE AND YELLS. 

Our Bulletin for this month consists largely of a little clus- 
ter of verses often sung by our students, and already consti- 
tuting a small collection of college songs, embodying the Ogle- 
thorpe spirit. 

The first of them is the Oglethorpe Hymn, written by the 
President of the University, the hymn that was sung at the 
laying of the corner stone at the opening of the Institution, and 
at the great Oglethorpe Jubilee of last fall. 

The second, from the same pen, is the college song, "Old 
Oglethorpe Forever," sung to the tune of "Dixie," and no one 
remains unthrilled when the Oglethorpe boys sing it. 

Following this is a series of Freshmen yells, which enliv- 
ened the college term last year. 

The motto of the University, "Manu dei resurrexit" ("By 
the hand of God she has risen from the dead") furnishes the 
occasion for the last poem by the President. 



It is hoped that these will prove interesting to the many 
friends of the Universitv. 



FAIR ALMA MATER, OGLETHORPE. 

Tune : "Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes." 
Fair Alma Mater, Oglethorpe, 

Thou didst for others die, 
And now, above thy broken tomb, 

Thy God doth lift thee, high! 
For He doth live in every stone 

We worthily have brought. 
And He doth move in every deed 

We r'ghteously have wrought. 

We give to thee our lives to mold 

And thou to us dost give 
Thy life, whose pulse-beat is the truth, 

Wherein we ever live. 
And as the times pass o'er our heads. 

In this we shall rejoice: 
That we may never drift beyond 

The memory of thy voice. 

Fair Alma Mater, Oglethorpe, 

Thou didst for others die. 
So, now, above thy broken tomb, 

Thy Lord uplifts thee, h'gh ! 
To all thy past of pain and toil, 

Thy future's brilliant goal 
We promise loyalty and love ; 

We pledge thee heart and soul. 



OLD OGLETHORPE FOREVER, 

Tune: Dixie. 
Oh, come along boys, let's give a cheer 
From every man-together-hear ! 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe. 
While hoary Time shall sift his sands 
She holds our hearts she holds our hands 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe! 

Chorus 
Old Oglethorpe forever ! 

Hooray, Hooray! 
Our Oglethorpe shall never lack 
Defenders of the Gold and Black, 

Hooray, Hooray! 
Old Oglethorpe forever ! 

On the football field, on the track, on the lake, 
The Petrels ride the storm's wild wake. 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe. 
We've got the will, we've got the verve. 
We've got the men, we've got the nerve. 
Hooray. Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe ! 

Chorus 
And when our college days are done 
And all our hard-fought battles won 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe! 
, We'll treasure every happy hour 
We spent beneath her kindly power. 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe! 



SOME FRESHMAN (1916) YELLS. 
Dazzle 

Dazzle ! Dazzle ! Never Frazzle. 

Not a thread, but wool. 
Altogether! Altogether! 

That's the way we pull. 
OGLETHORPE. 

RAILROAD 
Rah!! Rah!! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Rah ! ! Rah ! ! Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 
Rah!! Rah!! Rah! Rah! Rah! 

O-G-L-E-T-H-O-R-P-E. 

SHANTY 
Rah Rah! Rah Rah! 
Team Rah ! Team Rah ! 
Whole Team, Team Rah ! 
Rah Rah! Rah Rah! 

OGLETHORPE. 

TEAM 
Gold and Black 
Gold and Black. 
Oglethorpe's a Cracker Jack 
TEAM! TEAM! TEAM! 

RAH! RAH! 
Rah! Rah! 
OGLETHORPE 
Ray! Rah! 
OGLETHORPE 
Ray! Rah! 
OGLETHORPE. 

MANU DEI RESURREXIT. 

(By the Hand of God she has risen from the dead.) 

My quartz has met me from her age of fire. 

My feldspar, blackened with the smoke of Hell, 
My clear-eyed mica lucent with desire. 
Engraven is the story they would tell 

In clay and flame — the'r very strength reflects it! 
'Tis granite ! Maim Dei Resurrexit ! 

So dost Thou come from out thy molten tomb. 
My Oglethorpe, as one whose heart is tr"ed 
And fused and fixed for what thou wouldst assume! 
My ashlar, born of that wherein she died! 
Lost stone (a dying nation's life-blood flecks, it), 
Rise Empire! Manu Dei Resurrexit! 

There is a place for her who passed as thee. 
There is a seat beneath the throne of God 
For those whose robes have known such molten sea 

As that through which thou, comradeless, hast trod. 
Such death — though every human eye neglects it — 
Must live for Manu De ; Resurrexit ! 



Take thou thy place beside thy friends who went 
With thee unto the wars and thence returned 
In safety home and left thee bleeding, spent, 
Alone, where immortality is earned. 

Maimed stone, — each new-come builder sees, rejects it — 
Chief stone, lo, Manu Dei Resurrexit ! 

Was Princeton not thy mate when thou wast born 

And Yale thy little teacher at the games 
And Harvard. Georgia, Washington, — wast torn 

From these familiar childhood's comrade-names? 
Possess thy heart, my stone, this shall not vex it. 
They call thee I Manu Dei Resurrexit! 

And Emory, who went with thee to war, 

And Davidson, who played upon thy knee. 
And little Mercer, — Hark, their voices are 
Commingled in amazement at the ease 

With which such stone doth rise to Such, Who becks it. 
Cry out, stone; Manu Dei Resurrexit I 

From school of molten lava thou art come; 

Now to the Time's strange winds dost bare thy breast. 
The self-op'nioned rain, the frost's white tome 

Will test thy temper toward that which is best. 

But thou dost know earth's heart from all that decks it. 
Remember: Manu Dei Resurrex : t! 

As thou didst die at Gettysburg and neath 

The ashen gray of fratricidal strife, 
Sleep on, beyond the hour of heated breath : 
Awake ! Thy nation calls thee back to life, 
A sobered nat : on — wise thy soul connects it 
With days passed, — Manu Dei Resurrexit! 

I heard thy blood keep calling from the ground; 

I did what thou commandedst me to do ; 

I scattered century's sands that gathered round 

Thy head, and lo, a Ion sprang to view! 

Of royal breed — thy very name reflects it, — 
Undazzled, Manu Dei Resurrexit ! 

And yet I know (and thou art witness, too). 

There was an Eye that kept my vision clear; 
There was a Step that kept my pathway true ; 

There was a Pulse that kept my heart from fear; 
A Faith, a Hand unswerving, that directs it. 
Ah. doubly Manu Dei Resurrexit. 

Let him who now would learn to live or die 

For Home, for God for Country for Ideals. — 
To I've? Lairer. LeConte and Woodrow ; 

D'e? The Oglethorpe Cadets! (The Nation Kneels!) — 
March neath thv pennant. Holy Heaven protects it 
Forever Manu Dei Resurrexit ! 



J^/Cc C^Uy^^ — &* sTc^y Sc£&oc*-y\_ 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



VOL. II 


October, 1917 No 12 


Published monthly 


by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 


Entered as second-class 


mail matter at the Postofflce at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 




mum iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iimiiillilii Iilllliiiiiiiill mini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 




Bird's-eye view of Oglethorpe University as it will appear when com- 
pleted. The building on the right of the entrance is already finished 
and now occupied by a splendid body of young men. The Railway 
Station is to stand at the head of the entrance driveway, at the 
extreme right of the picture, and is now under construction. 



It is understood that the United States Government is about to 
undertake the building of a beautiful boulevard, connecting Camp Gordon, 
which is some two miles beyond the University, with the City of Atlanta. 

A double track trolley line is also in process of construction and will 
be in operation by October 15th, thus giving the University all the City 
public utilities that are needed in her life. 

In this way Oglethorpe will have all the advantages of country life 
on the one hand and proximity of a great City and yet be free from the 
disadvantages of either. 



A FINE OPENING FOR OGLETHORPE. 

Friends of Oglethorpe University all over the country 
will be pleased to hear of the unusually successful opening 

of her second year, which took place on September 19th last. 

While dispatches from all over the country told of a 
serious falling off in attendance at all male classical colleges, 
Oglethorpe is happy to report a good increase in the number 
of students attending the institution, and is particularly 
pleased with the high class of boys and the fine quality of 
work which they give evidence of their ability to do. 

m 

All of the faculty has returned and are now going busily 
about their duties. 

Oglethorpe is confronted with the same problem that 
meets all growing institutions — the dormitories are full and 
there is immediate need for increase in facilities. 

Work on the beautiful new railway station is being 
pushed rapidly to completion. The contractors promise to 
deliver it finished on January 1, 1918. It is being built by 
the co-operation of the Southern Railway, the University 
and interested neighbors and property owners. It will cost, 
with approaches and sewerage connections, approximately 
$10,000.00 and will be a fitting gateway for the entrance to 
the institution. 

We have every reason to be grateful to our many friends 
for their promptness and generosity in sending their gifts 
to Oglethorpe. We believe that the proportionate collections 
on our subscription list is far above what we had any right 
to expect under the circumstances. For this we are thankful, 
and to you, gentle reader, we do return our thanks now. 

But to carry on our work in this war period we need 
the help of all our friends. We do not wish even to stand 
still but are determined to go forward in spite of the world 
calamities and we feel certain that we may rely upon our 
patrons to see that the way is open for us to do this. 

The faculty is particularly pleased with the many evi- 
dences of earnest desires and high scholastic ability of the 
new men who have matriculated during the last few weeks 
and we are looking forward to a happy and successful season 
for 1917-18. 



NOTES FROM OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY. 

By WILLIAM R. CARLISLE. 

Oglethorpe University, the future Oxford of the South, opened 
its doors Wednesday, September 19th, for its second year of work 
with an enrollment that exceeded that of last year by 50 per cent. 
A great many of the old boys are back and a splendid freshman class 
drawn from all over the South has been added, thus making two full 
classes. One of the things of which Oglethorpe is especially proud 
is her class of students. After the thorough winnowing process of 
the freshman year we feel that the wheat has been completely sepa- 
rated from the tares so far as the sophomore class is concerned. 
The freshman class, coming from the best homes in the Sovith. is 
almost a paragon of excellence. 

Our present enrollment is about sixty-five and boys are still 
continuing to matriculate*. To some this enrollment may seem 
very small, but there has been a development which to us seems 
almost ideal. We realize that whenever and wherever rapid devel- 
opment takes place there is ample opportunity for morbid alterations. 
Where there is rapid growth there is a tendency to overgrowth and 
overdevelopment just as overexercise destroys a function by injur- 
ing its structure. Hence we feel that while our growth has been 
slow, it is permanent. 

Students are noting with pride the new railway station which 
is rapidly rising in front of the university site. This handsome stone 
structure, which is of the same architecture as that of our building, 
is being erected by the Southern Railway at a csot of $10,000. This 
station will be completed by the first of the year and then no college 
or university in the South will have a more beautiful railway station. 

Despite the fact that many old and established universities have 
seen fit to repress the athletic side of their college life, Oglethorpe, 
complying with the wishes of Secretary Baker. General Wood, Presi- 
dent Wilson and others, will especially encourage athletics. The uni- 
versity has been extremely fortunate in securing the services of Mr. 
Frank Anderson, one of the finest all-around coaches of the state. 
Air. Anderson's experience has been wide and many are the teams 
that have attested his ability. He has been Athletic Director, Uni- 
versity School for Boys ; Athletic Director, R. E. Lee Institute ; Ath- 
letic Director, Gordon Institute ; Coach, University of Georgia, and 
Athletic Director, Riverside Militarv Academv. The first football 



practice was held Tuesday, September 25th, and Coach Anderson is 
planning to develop a team that will long resound to the credit of 
"Old Oglethorpe." 

Because of the inability of most of the day students to reach 
the university for chapel before classes, it was demed wise by the 
faculty to make a change in order that all students might be present 
at this time. As this is the only time when announcements affecting 
the whole student body can be made, it is therefore very necessary 
• to have a time when all can be present, hence the chapel hour has 
been changed from 8:30 a. m. to 12:45 p. m. 

Everyone is noting with special delight the new Camp Gordon 
trolley line, which now extends far beyond the university site and 
over which we are already enjoying trolley service to Atlanta. We 
are deriving more good from this improvement than any other made 
in or around the university this year. We are now enabled to re- 
main in town during the evening and return to the school without 
experiencing the discomfort of a long, hard walk in the dark. The 
day students are also materially helped in that they are able to come 
and go with greater facility. 



(Dglrtljnrpe ItttwrHtiy llulbttn 



Vol. Ill 



NOVEMBER, 1917 



No. 1 



Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 




Beautifying the Oglethorpe Campus 



THE Annual Business Meeting of the Woman's Board of Ogle- 
thorpe University was held in the First Presbyterian Church, 
corner of Sixteenth and Peachtree, Friday afternoon at three 
o'clock, and resulted in a splendid forward step being taken by the 
ladies in connection with their work for the University. Between 
one hundred and fifty and two hundred ladies were present, good 
workers, prominent in the social and philanthropic life of the city, 
including many of the mothers and friends of students at the 
Institution. 

It was announced that two of the objects to which the Board 
had considered devoting their energies, namely, the creation of 



a Students' Loan Fund and the erection of a Hospital were 
both in process of accomplishment by other means and it 
was unanimously resolved that the immediate work of the 
Woman's Board for the coming year should be the beau- 
tification of the Campus of the Institution, under the advice 
and plans of the architects, Messrs. Morgan & Dillon and 
W. T. Downing of Atlanta, and Mr. Chas. W. Leavitt of Xew 
York. 

It was then proposed that a beginning should be made at 
once on this task. The Executive Council had considered the 
possibility of giving a public entertainment of some sort un- 
favorably, owing to present conditions, and it was then sug- 
gested that voluntary offering should be made for the work. 

The generosity of the ladies was both spontaneous and 
remarkable. Between four and five hundred dollars was im- 
mediately pledged in sums varying from one to fifty dollars. 
It was believed also that many members of the Board not 
present would be glad to aid in the enterprise. 

The Board gladly welcomed two new Chairmen of import- 
ant committees, Mrs. H. P. Hermance, who has accepted the 
Chairmanship of the Grounds Committee and Mrs. Laura 
Weddell, who becomes Chairman of the Art Committee. Mrs. 
Buelow Campbell and Mrs. Lee Ashcraft were added to the 
Advisory Board. 

One of the most remarkable features of the meeting was 
the reading of nearly five hundred names of ladies who had 
joined the Board and pledged their loyalty to the Institution. 

The full list of subscribers made will be published when 
completed. 



We are drawing near the close of another year, a year 
fraught with many problems, especially for educational insti- 
tutions. We are happy to report a splendid opening in spite 
of all the upsetting conditions consequent upon the world war. 
We have more students than we had last year, which the 
great Father of us all has made it possible for very few uni 
versities to sav this vear. 



And our friends, the men and women and boys and girl> 
who have founded Oglethorpe by their gifts and prayers, have 
been good to us also. Thev have paid their subscriptions well, 
when all things are considered, and while we have a right to 
expect a tremendous slump in receipts the falling off is not so 
great but that we may yet, during the months of November 
and December, catch up with last year. 

This we are hoping to do, praying that all of our friends 
who are behind in their pledges may see that Oglethorpe does 
not suffer. 



Here is a letter that we have recently received from one of 
the finest fellows in the world. It is self-explanatory and 
breeds the constructive spirit of those whose lives really help 
the world. 

"Dear Dr. Jacobs: I have just read the October Bulletin 
and am rejoicing with you that the Street Railway has built 
an extension beyond the University, and that you are pleased 
with the second opening of Oglethorpe. I rejoice with you 
in all the good things that have happened to Oglethorpe. In 
spite of the greatest war in history, and the peculiar burdens 
placed upon the South in the past three years, we have gone 
forward, and, with God's help, we have established an institu- 
tion that will reflect the highest Christian manhood. T am 
saving four hundred dollars for a gift in the spring of 1918. 
and hope to be able to send it promptly when you most 
need it. 

Remember me to your wife and to the members of the 
Faculty. 

Trusting that I may have the pleasure of visiting the Uni- 
versity this winter and with best wishes, I am, 

Verv sincerely vours," 



The President of the University paid a most delightful 
visit to the Synod of Tennessee in session at Murfreesboro in 
the week of October 16th. By their generous courtesy he was 



permitted to speak to them of Oglethorpe, of her past, her 
present and her future; of her, ideals and hopes and of such 
help as they might be able to give her when their duties to 
their local institutions should have first been fulfilled. 

The Synod of Tennessee remains, after the loss of the 
eastern section of the State, a strong and noble body of men. 
Their hearts are true and loyal to all that is best and open to 
every good plan that promises aid in the work of the Church. 



One of the most beautiful services rendered the Institution 
was effected at the home of Mrs. Thos. Brumby, in Marietta, 
Ga., a week ago. At the instance of this devoted friend of 
Oglethorpe, some twenty-five ladies met to organize the Ma- 
rietta Chapter of the Oglethorpe Woman's Board, pledging 
their loyalty to the Institution and preparing to lay plans to 
aid therein in all phases of its work. 

Mrs. Brumby is a daughter of Mr. J. R. Gray, the great 
and good man who was Chairman of our Executive Commit- 
tee. The Board of Directors of the University welcomed the 
organization of this new force and hope that it will be of 
much service to our Institution. 



Here Is Another Lovely Letter 

"Dear Dr. Jacobs: My pledge of one hundred dollars to 
Oglethorpe University lacks thirty dollars of being paid in 
full, and I am enclosing you my check for that amount. 

My pledge was to run through ten years, but I have found 
I could shorten the time, and not knowing what might occur 
before that time is up I preferred making my payments more 
promptly. 

In closing let me wish the University a long and increas- 
ingly successful existence, and may you be its honored Presi- 
dent for many years to come." 



(igletljnrp? limuerattg lulUtin 



VOL. Ill 



December, 1917 



No 2 



Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



LAURINBURG— A PRAYER— AND GOD. 
By Thornwell Jacobs. 

May T tell to you a story that to me is very -marvelous ? 
In the State of Noth Carolina is a little city called Laurinburg, 
wherein is a Presbvterian Church of some three hundred and hftv 




Bird's-eye view of Oglethorpe University as it will appear when com- 
pleted. The building on the right of the entrance is already finished 
and now occupied by a splendid body of young men. The Railway 
Station is to stand at the head of the entrance driveway, at the 
extreme right of the picture, and is now under construction. 

memhers, and by the gracious courtesy of their Session 1 was re- 
cently permitted to tell the Oglethorpe Story to their people. No 
canvas was to be made nor any personal appeal to individuals for 
subscriptions ; ju^t the story of our hope and praver and plan to 
build a Southern Presbyterian University. It was the one hundred 
and first time that I have had such a privilege and each church had 



given one thousand dollars o_r more to ; the enterprise when asked. 
Amid the utter turmoil of a gigantic world-stiruggle, with all the 
usual and many unusual difficulties surrounding the presentation: 
with all the usual means of success barred; with only the Father 
to depend on I faced the congregation. 

One prayer had been in my heart, that God would start the 
second hundred presentations wiith the same lovely benediction with 
which he began the fiirst, giving us two thousand dollars for what 
we believe to be His University. No means was available but prayer. 
No Pastor was there to help, no canvas with its powerful personal 
appeal was to be made. If the Father would not answer the record 
would be broken and the first failure recorded. If the people did 
not voluntarily come forward by His urging all human means was 
estopped from persuading them. 

Now, see how good He was to us and how very swift in coming 
to our help. 

Scarcely was the presentation over before a generous-hearted 
woman came forward offering fifty dollars as her gift. Another 
followed and anotheir, and then a man gave two hundred and fifty. 
A generous lady pledged a hundred dollars for her society which 
was later raised by them to two hundred and fifty dollars. 
After the night service a woman added twenty-five and a man one 
hundred dollars. And there it stopped until Monday. Then one by 
one they came to mie, those generous, great-hearted people — first. 
a gentleman who wanted to give us a hundred dollars. Then I was 
invited to the other Church Society and they added two hundred and 
fifty dollars. A fine-spirited man hunted me up at the hotel to hand 
me a check for one hundred dollars, and one man and woman with a 
marvelous liberality added a whole thousand to the list. Then, to 
make it a good measure, pressed down and running over, another 
woman, having heard that the gifts had reached two thousand, two 
hundred and twenty-five dollars telephoned twenty-five more to 
make it two thousand two hundred and fifty even. 

All this God did for us because we needed Him so. and another 
piraver was answered. 

To me it is all very wonderful, for 1 am not thinking of the 
marvelous generosity only, so spontaneous and voluntary, nor of the 
amount, so large and liberal, nor of how this big-hearred church 
in North Carolina has again demonstrated that the Southern Presbv- 
terian people want a truly great University and are willing to pav 
for it ; but I am thinking most of Unurinhnrg — A Prayer — and God. 



VOL. Ill January, 1918 No. 3 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter nt 'the Postof'fice at Oglethorpe University, 6a. 

THE GOODNESS OF GOD IN 1917. 

It is well, as the old year gives place to the new, to make men- 
tion of the mercies of God. 

In the midst of the vast tumult of war so great as to cause the 
joints of the earth to gape, he has been with us in everything : 

Our old friends have been liberal and loyal and He has added 
many new ones to their number. 

The receipts of the University have been larger than last year 

in spite of the world-wide cataclysm. 

A beautiful new stone Railway Station has been given us cost- 
ing nearly Ten Thousand Dollars, and is to bear our name — Ogle- 
thorpe University. 

The Georgia Railway & Power Company has built a trolley line 
past our doors and established a satisfactory schedule to and from 
Atlanta. 

The United States Government has appropriated $100,000.00 to 
build a splendid boulevard past the doors of the University, connect- 
ing, by way of Peachtree Road, the City of Atlanta with Camp Gor- 
don, two miles east of the institution. 

The ladies of Atlanta (and Marietta) have organized the "Wom- 
an's Board of Oglethorpe University" with some five hundred mem- 
bers and have raised over eight hundred dollars to be used in beauti- 
fying the Oglethorpe Campus. No sooner had they pledged their 
loyalty than they showed their power. There is no way to measure 
the value of this fine addition to the resources of our School. 

In spite of the unusual shortage in attendance at Male Colleges 
and Universities we have more students this year than last and the 
quality of both conduct and class-room work is superior to last year. 

And many other such-like blessings we gratefully record, not 



the least of which is loyal, devoted aid and endorsement of the 
Synod of Georgia, the kind words of the Southern General Assembly, 
the generosity of Presbyterians all over the nation and of liberal 
Atlantans of all faiths. 

And now, facing the possibilities of the New Year, we ask for 
only two things: the love of God and the continued loyalty of our 
founders. Do not forget your University. Do not forsake it. Re- 
member during these days of stress to aid in taking care of your 
institution which will remain to bless you and yours after the great 
conflict is over. 

A prayer will help. 

But add a check to it if you possibly can just to make sure of 
its being answered. 



HELP FROM THE FRONT. 

Here is an interesting letter from one of our soldier boys who 
has not forgotten Oglethorpe : 

Section 526, U. S. A. A. C, 

Allentown, Pa., December 12, 1917. 
Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, Prest., 
Oglethorpe University, 
Atlanta, Ga. 

My dear Dr. : 

Guess I had better send you my "tenth" right away and before Christmas 
begins to perplex me, or I am afraid you will not get it. 

All the boys in our section (from South Carolina) are thinking, talking, 
singing, dreaming nothing but their contemplated ten-day furlough "home 
for Christmas." As I can not go back to Georgia I'm going to remain in 
camp. 

Snowing here today — all is covered with snow and ice, making it look 
very Christmas-like. 

This is to wish you a very Merry Christmas and to ask you to put to 
my credit on my donation to Oglethorpe the enclosed $3.30, receipt and 
oblige. Yours truly, 

(Signed) RODERICK D. McALPINE. 




This monument to Sidney Lanier, Oglethorpe's former Poet-graduate, 
stands in Piedmont Park, Atlanta. The bust was recently stolen 
but was found and replaced. Lanier's Oglethorpe diploma and a 
crayon picture of him at the age of fifteen hangs just above our 
President's desk. 



OGLETHORPE AT SYNOD. 

Here is a kindly resolution about Oglethorpe adopted at the 
last meeting of the Synod of Georgia at Savannah : 

The Synod of Georgia has heard, with pleasure, the addresses 
of Drs. I. S. McElroy, D. H. Ogden, A. A. Little and Thornwell 
Jacobs in the interest of Oglethorpe University, and notes with satis- 
faction the stead}' progress made by that institution. 

We re-affirm our action taken at the last meeting of the Synod 
in Dalton, and especially that section thereof that commends the 
institution most cordially to the liberality of our people and express 
the hope that the endowment fund of the Georgia Professorship of 
the Bible, may soon be completed and that other Synods may follow 
the example of this Synod in the endowment of Sy nodical Profes- 
sorships in this great Presbyterian University. 

In all that has been done for Oglethorpe we acknowledge the 
good hand of our God and upon all that will be done we pray His 
blessing-. 



Kind words will help. They also are prayers. But remember 
"Words are the daughters of men but deeds are the sons of God!" 

A student will help. Put us in touch with him. 

Anything that you can think or feel or do for us out of your 
good and gracious heart will by just that much set us forward toward 
our goal, a great Christian University under the auspices of the 
Presbyterian Church, loyal to Jesus Christ and devoted to Almighty 
God. 




(©ivlctltarpe Hmtrcrstty bulletin 

VOL. Ill FEBRUARY, 1918 No. 4 

Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postomce at Oglethorpe University, Georgia 

Does The Southern Presbyterian Church 
Need A University? 

By A. A. Little, D. D., in the Presbyterian of the South 

Amid the maelstrom of discussion in educational matters we sur- 
mise this is the real question to ask and answer. It is not, whether 
our present colleges and high schools are numerous enough and en- 
dowed sufficiently. Nor is it the question of educational units. These 
are very minor questions and only trifling with the matter. The one 
thing to decide is, does the cause of God and of truth demand that 
we have a university under the direct or indirect control of our 
Church, of whose orthodox Presbyterianism there can never be any 
doubt, world without end? 

When we have decided this there is but one thing to do, to arise 
and in the fear of God, build. 

We rise to remark that the fathers of our Church saw that the 
time would come when we would need imperatively, a university. 
In the stressful years of the generation after the Civil War it was as 
much as a man could do to get a sort of college education. Money 
was scarce. The institutions were poorly equipped and hard to reach. 
But such men as Dr. Palmer, of New Orleans; Dr. Thornwell, of 
South Carolina; Dr. Dabney, of Virginia, and Dr. Shearer, of David- 
son, felt the coming need of our Church. 

With this end in view, Dr. Palmer put his splendid energies into 
th*-Southwestern Presbyterian University, hoping it would become 
the apex of our educational system. We remember the risibles that 
were excited by the prospectus of the South Atlantic University, At- 
lanta, which only show our ignorance and the far-seeing vision of the 
prophet of things educational — Dr. Shearer. Dr. Dabney, despairing 
of such a university, turned his powers of teaching philosophy to the 
secular institution of Texas. 

These men saw far and knew much. Smaller men had to get 
nearer to our times to see what they saw. Some even now, purblind 
by looking at little things, can see no need for the university. These 
leaders of thought realized that colleges were not enough. These 
colleges might be good, but the very idea of a college failed to give 




CO +* 

£2. 

9 c 

2 c^ 

S =8 g. 

C— U 

°J3.2 
■5 u'S 

c ~S 
s £•£ 

3! £ c 

^ C 3 

§*« 

.2 cpH 









-S £ 



I) 



0) -a 1 " 






'Sd 



- (8*3 " 



5S a o 



o;5 C; 

^ a« 

01 



.2 *£ E 

.2f «"£ 
jc st > 2 
H.S« § 

■a ito 

>i g p, 0) 

•- t xi 

»j: c 
> x ai 



>.'"j 






Or**- 



_g a. !5 



the special teachings necessary to the full development of the mind 
of man. 

These men were not antagonistic to colleges; they knew their 
value, but they also knew their limitations. 

Then the question of the hour is, has the time come for the in- 
stitution that Drs. Palmer, Shearer, Dabney and Thornwell and 
other leaders of the past saw to be necessary? 

We submit that the hour has struck. 

One of the patent objections in days gone by was the poverty of 
the Southern people. It takes an immense amount of money to found 
a university. Where was it to come from? Not from a section ex- 
hausted by war and dislocated in all its economic life by the results 
of war. 

What is the condition of the South now? It is rolling in wealth. 
It has so much money that it is dazed. The men have not learned to 
let it go as yet, but we are learning rapidly. It is no more trouble to 
raise millions for a university now than it was to establish a high 
school a generation ago. 

Another reason for the failure of these men to materialize their 
vision was the fact that very few men from the South wanted or 
could afford a university course. 

Only here and there did a man go off to the Northern univer- 
sities or to Germany. 

How is it now? Thousands of our men and hundreds of our wo- 
men are going away to the North for their special training. There 
is a large and growing clientage in the South. Our colleges have 
awakened a desire for more and higher learning. Brilliant young 
men and women are answering the call and receiving splendid intel- 
lectual training in other universities. 

The larger reason for a university, anchored to our type of relig- 
ious thought, lies in the fact that nearly if not quite all the Northern 
universities have swung away from what we hold most dear. 

In the year 1909 there appeared an article by Harold Bolce, which 
asserted that there was a radical conflict between college teaching 
and orthodox authority. He mentioned these universities where the 
truths of historic Christianity were boldly flung overboard. He was 
never answered. He could not be, because he was giving the facts. 

In a recent article he has boldly challenged the teaching of the 
higher colleges for women, and asserts that they are teaching the 
seventy thousand women in them to discard the teachings of the 
word of God and of His Church. In other words the college class 
room is engaged in open conflict with the teachings of the Church of 
God. 

In a striking article in the Biblical Review for October quotation 
after quotation from approved professors, at whose feet our men and 
women are sitting, is given, showing that they are denying the very 
fundamentals of religion. The existence of a personal God, the im- 



mortality of the soul, the binding forca of mortality and the necessary 
union of religion with it. 

We know that the horrid philosophy of Nietsche is taught in 
many of these schools. This is the infidel philosophy that has pro- 
duced the horrors of the war; has made Germany a scourge to hu- 
manity; has produced more barbarians under Christian guises and 
is threatening the world with another Dark Age. 

If these things are so, then it is time we were setting up a uni- 
versity that will reverently tea«h the truth, that will give our men 
and women the best without undermining their faith in God, which 
will be a munition plant in which to forge weapons against this hid- 
eous power of darkness that is threatening the world with destruc- 
tion. 

God grant us the vision to see our need, and the courage and 
perseverance to carry it to a triumphant conclusion. 



Beautification of Oglethorpe Campus Begins. 

At a meeting of the Campus Committee of the Woman's Board of Ogle- 
thorpe University, of which Mrs. H. P. Hermance is Chairman, held Tuesday 
morning, Mr. Reuben Harman was authorized to proceed at once with the land- 
scape work and planting which the ladies are having done on the University cam- 
pus. Mr. Harman, whose work in Atlanta and on some of the greatest estates in 
the whole country has eminently qualified him for this task, will begin work on 
February 5th next. 

An interesting feature of the work is the request made by the Committee 
that all the friends of the institution who can spare any shrubs and flowering 
trees would notify either Mrs. H. P. Hermance, Chairman, Telephone Hemlock 
1495, or Mrs. Thornwell Jacobs, Telephone Hemlock 788-L, or the University, 
Telephone Hemlock 168. If the donor cannot have the shrubs lifted and delivered 
at the University, Mr. Harman will have it done where the gift is of sufficient 
quantity to warrant the expense of time and labor. It is the wish of the Commit- 
tee that each member of the Woman's Board should have some shrubbery on the 
Oglethorpe Campus from her own yard and gifts from any friends of Oglethorpe 
not members will be appreciated. Shrubbery of every kind is desired as there is 
a great deal of planting to be done, among other things an old-fashioned hedge- 
row of flowering shrubs and trees a thousand feet long. Gifts from all over the 
South are hoped for. They should be expressed to Oglethorpe University, at 
Oglethorpe University, Ga. , and sent so as to arrive between Feb. 4th and 20th. 

The Georgia Professorship o£ Bible. 

Dr. B. M. Shive, who has recently returned from a most successful trip to 
Florida made in the interest of the University, will shortly begin work on the 
completion of the Georgia Professorship of the English Bible which will be raised 
in the State of Georgia under the authorization of a special resolution passed by 
the Synod of Georgia at both its last and preceding meetings. 

Something like $4,000 has already been contributed out of the $50,000 that is 
needed. 

Dr. Shive is well known as both an able and enthusiastic speaker and preach- 
er and his work among the churches of Georgia will have the double advantage of 
being helpful to the University and to the churches themselves. 

Meeting, The Fuel Famine. 

Oglethorpe University has been most fortunate during the desperately ser- 
ious days of fuel famine through which our country has been passing. The Uni- 
versity is located in the suburbs of Atlanta but of her large campus of fifty acres 
between thirty and forty are heavily wooded. In these woods are many old, de- 
formed trees the removal of which, by proper methods of forestry, not only fur- 
nishes fuel for the steam plant of the University but incidentally adds beauty to 
the forest. As a consequence, all during the snowy and sleety weather wood- 
choppers have been busy cutting and cording, and our big steam plant which 
has to heat approximately 40,000 square feet of floor space has been burning wood 
almost entirely. In this way the amount of coal used by the institution has been 
very greatly reduced and the University has done her bit to aid in relieving the 
coal famine. 



(igletljnrjip Inturratty HitUrtitt 



vol. in 



March, 1918 



No 5 



Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postot'fiee at Oglethorpe University, <;.• 




Thomas Harvey Hubbard, one of the 
younger founders of Oglethorpe University, 
lives in Ft. Worth, Texas, where one Sabbath 
morning be heard of bow the Southern Pres- 
byterians were refounding their ante-bellum 
I niversity — old Oglethorpe. After the service 
be subscribed $100.00, every payment of which 
be has met regularly. God bless the lad 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT TO OUR FOUNDERS. 

Thinking that all the men and women, boys and girls, who have founded 
Oglethorpe University will be interested in an exact statement of the amounts 
subscribed to Oglethorpe University by states, show ng also amounts paid 
up to date and balances due. we are printing such report in this bulletin 
and sending a copy of it to our founders. 

These figures tell a wonderful story of generosity, faith, and devotion 
on the part of nearly five thousand people scattered throughout the whole 
United States, but principally in the South. 

Some interesting facts appear from a study of the subscriptions. It 
will be noted that every Southern State from Virginia to Texas, from Mis- 
souri to Florida is represented. The proportions pad by the various states 
show Tennessee leading all others, one-half of the amount subscribed hav- 
ing already been paid. This is a very wonderful record and one of wlr'ch 
any state should be proud. 



It will be noted also that the State of Georgia, including Atlanta, has 
subscribed somewhat over half of the total amount pledged; that Tennessee 
is next to Georgia; that Florida follows Tennessee and that the two Caro- 
iinas and Louisiana are almost evenly matched for the fourth, fifth and 
.sixth places. Then come Arkansas, Texas and Alabama in the order named, 
with Kentucky, Mississippi, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Missouri and Connecticut, 
and scattering gifts from New York, Massachusetts and Washington. 

The totals are splendid. $735,000.00 subscribed and $328,000.00 collected, 
with over $400,000.00 still in process of collection. 

We are trying our best to reach the million mark by January, 1921. If 
v/e do this there is a cash gift of $25,000.00 coming to us. Iff we fa<il. we 
lose it. That means that the founders of Oglethorpe will see to it that 
this fine sum which will do so much good for Christian education shall not 
be los't. 

Statement of Subscriptions to January 31, 1918. 

State Subscribed 

Alabama $13,259.12 

Arkansas 17,689.00 

Florida 36.916.49 

Georgia (except Atlanta) 93.95800 

Kentucky 10,615.50 

Louisiana 22.996.00 

Mississippi 9,145.00 

Missouri 1.04500 

North Carolina 23.109.00 

South Carolina 23.850.00 

Tennessee 42,553.50 

Texas 14,685.25 

Virgin ; a 4.110.00 

Connecticut 1.000.00 

New York 210.00 

Washington 100.00 

District of Columbia 50.00 

Massachusetts 100.00 

Atlanta Directors 115 250.00 

Atlanta Popular Cash 127.316.31 

Pennsylvania 1505 00 

Real Estate 122.500.00 

Material 28.052.32 

Library 5.000.00 

Scholarship Fund 5.000.00 

Georgia Professorship 3 600.00 

Equipment 2 00000 

Railway Station Subs 7.500.00 

Special- Oper. Subs 1.10000 

Scholarship Loan Fund 350.00 

Woman's Board for Campus 533 00 

Athletic Subs. 19200 

Total $731 200.40 



Paid 


Balance 


$ 4.017.97 


$ 9.241. 1 . 5 


3.070.60 


14.618 40 


5.027.99 


31,888.50 


23.549.13 


70.40887 


2 755.20 


7.860.30 


5.733.15 


17.262 85 


2.837.60 


6.257.40 


434.00 


611.00 


6 297.00 


16.812.0l! 


6.249.00 


17.601.00 


21,157.40 


21.396.10 


3.798.35 


10.886 90 


1,363.00 


2.747.00 


1.000.00 




210.00 






100.00 


30.00 


20 00 




100.00 


39.51085 


75,739 15 


79.777.86 


47.538.45 


545 00 


960.00 


107.000 00 


15.500.00 


2.100 65 


25.951.67 


5.000.00 






5.000 00 


25.00 


3.575.00 


2 000.00 




3.316.62 


4.183 38 


200.00 


900.00 


350.00 




553.00 




57.00 


155.00 


$527,006 37 


$407294 12 



u * * * 



\ 



GDgbtijarpf HmurrHttg HulUttn 



vol. m 



May, 1918 



No. 6 



Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thorn well Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the I'ostotfice at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 




A large amount of construction work has for some time been going on 
just in front of Oglethorpe University. The story of it is told in this Bulletin. 
The Government and City of Atlanta are spending hundreds of thousands 
of dollars on Peachtree Road. The Woman's Board of the University has 
done a very much needed and very much appreciated work in beautifying 
the front campus of their institution. 



SOME LATE HAPPENINGS AT OGLETHORPE. 

We present in this bulletin a couple of views of Peachtree Road 
just in front of Oglethorpe University that will give our friends an 
idea of some of the work that has been going steadily forward at 
their school. 

The street car in the upper picture tells the story of an expendi- 
ture of some $125,000.00 to connect up Oglethorpe with the City of 
Atlanta by trolley. 

The railway station in the lower picture is a $10,000.00 structure, 
built of granite, covered with variegated slates, and is probably the 
most beautiful little station on the line of the Southern Railway, 
when the volume of traffic is considered. 

The steam roller and laborers in both pictures tell of the con- 
struction of a beautiful boulevard connecting the University with 
Atlanta. This work is still in process and will doubtless be com- 
pleted this summer. 

The workmen on the left in the lower picture are the laborers of 
Mr. Reuben Harman, expert landscapist, who by the generosity of 
our Woman's Board was engaged to beautify the campus of the Uni- 
versity. This has just been completed and when the gifts of shrub- 
bery, plants, fertilizer, and other materials are added to the actual 
cash outlay it represents an expenditure and value of over $1,500.00 
or $2,000.00. 

All these are absolutely essential tasks and combined they have 
been of large importance in setting forward the progress of your 
school. 



SOME BEAUTIFUL LETTERS. 

We have received recently one or two letters of unusual interest 
in connection with our Oglethorpe work. These letters speak for 
themselves better than any description of them could possibly do. 

"I am enclosing, herewith, New York draft payable to your or- 
der to cover balance due on my subscription to the University fund. 



"I reo-ret that it has been impossible for me to meet this indebt- 
edness sooner but it is unnecessary to waste words to explain why 
it has been so, and even now I could not do it except by the assist- 
ance of my good wife, who feels the same interest in the success of 
the University that I do. It is really through her self denial and 
determination that I am able to send you this draft. 

"I want to say also that we may have to be as long making the 
next payment as we have been making this, but you can rest assured 
that if life lasts long enough I will make it sometime." 

The above letter comes from the South, and here is one of equal 
spirit from the East. 

"I have read with interest the March bulletin that you enclosed. 
I feel that I would like to do something for Oglethorpe; and, as I 
can give but little money, it occurred to me that I might be of some 
service in soliciting subscriptions from others in our church. I have, 
therefore, drafted a letter which I enclose. What do you think about 
me sending this letter to people in our church, together with a copy 
of your bulletin and a subscription blank? If you feel that this 
would be worth while, and you will have the letters written or printed, 
1 will be glad to mail them out to our people. You, of course, would 
also furnish your regular subscription blanks. I would suggest about 
a hundred, as we have that many members who could make a con- 
tribution if so inclined. 

"I shall be glad to know what you think of this proposition. 

"With best wishes for yourself and the continued progress and 
success of Oglethorpe University, I am — " 

The letter which our friend proposed to send to the members of 
his Church is as follows: 

"I enclose a copy of Oglethorpe University Bulletin which will 
doubtless interest you. I should like very much to see South Caro- 
lina, and especially the First Presbyterian Church of Greenville, do 
more for Oglethorpe. 

"You will note from this bulletin that a cash gift of $25,000.00 
is offered, provided they reach the million dollar mark by January 
1921. Let's do our bit toward raising this million dollars. 

"Enclosed you will find a subscription blank, which please fill 
out and return to me, enclosing your check for your initial or cash 
payment. Please make check payable to Oglethorpe University. 



"Perhaps you have already made a subscription. If so, would 
you not like to increase it? 

"Thanking you for your prompt and careful consideration, 
I am" 

It is just such fine and generous aid as this that has made the 
work of Oglethorpe University possible. It is a great thing to know 
that there are such people in the world, men and women loyal to the 
highest ideals, ready to sacrifice their own interests for those ideals 
standing loyal and true to the school that they are founding and thus 
setting forward the progress of a great intellectual and spiritual en- 
terprise. 

Such letters as these brighten a hard day's work and furnish 
inspiration for many more to come. 

Probably nothing makes one feel so deeply a keen sense of re- 
sponsibility for the use of money as the receipt of a letter like the 
following from a young girl, as her letter shows, who has been bend- 
ing every effort and making every sacrifice in order to help us build 
a really great institution. 

Oglethorpe is in the truest sense her University and with such a 
spirit woven into it must, of necessity, be truly great. 

"I am sorry the enclosed check is not $5.00, the amount I have 
heretofore been able to send. I have no excuse to offer except prov- 
idential reasons. The only way I have of making money is by form 
modeling and dress making. The war has long ago knocked the 
bottom out of the form business and I am not able, on account of my 
health, to sew any. Have made 80 cents in five months. Have been 
under Doctor's care since December. 

I sold old clothing enough and made $3.00. Two of this I am 
sending to Oglethorpe and One to the Assembly's Home Missions. 

Pardon all this explanation, etc. I only wish you to know that 
though the spirit is willing the pocket book is extremely weak just 
now. 

If I am ever able to resume my sewing, will send the remaining 
$3.00 before this year is out." 



(igleiljflrjre ltuti?ratt£ HitlUtttt 

VOL. Ill June, 1918 No. 6 

Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Postoffice at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 

Oglethorpe University has just closed the second year of its academic life 
with Commencement exercises of the week beginnig May 26th. 

The Commencement sermon was preached by Dr. Samuel Charles Black, 

Chaplain at Camp Gordon, in the First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta. 

Dr. Black is Pastor of the Collingwood Avenue Presbyterian Church, Toledo, 
Ohio. The Collingwood Avenue Church has a membership of fourteen hundred, 
and is the largest but one of the Presbyterian Churches in the Synod of Ohio. 
Dr. Black has been Pastor there eight years. 

He is the author of numerous books, among them "Building a Working 
Church"; "Plain Answers to Religious Questions Modern Men Are Asking"; 
"Progress in Christian Culture," and others. 

Dr. Black is also a contributor on religious subjects to numerous periodicals. 

Pie has been released for six months by his congregation for military serv- 
ice in the training camps, and has been assigned by the Presbyterian National 
Service Commission to Camp Gordon. By the military authorities at Camp 
Gordon he has been made Chaplain-at-Large of the Camp, and has entered ac- 
tively upon his duties. 

On Monday afternoon the Board of Directors met in the office of Mr. Wil- 
mer L. Moore, Vice Chairman, harmoniously handling many important matters 
associated with the further progress of the University, details of which will be 
announced later. 

On Tuesday night the President's reception to the faculty and students took 
place and Wednesday afternoon and evening were devoted largely to athletic 
contests and the athletic banquet. 

The morale of the school is most excellent. The attendance of the past year 
has been better than the preceding year in spite of the turmoil of war and the 
heavy drain on the student body made on account of enlistment and draft. 

There will be a number of improvements and additions to the work next 
year, among others the adding of three new instructors with additional equip- 
ment. 

Plans are being laid to get that $25,009 offered by Mr. Inman in cash when 
the University shall have received a total of $1,000,000 in solvent subscriptions, 
provided that this is done before midnight of December 31, 1920. 

The University is now the happy possessor of a dairy of four cows, giving 
something like nine gallons of milk which at Atlanta prices sell at between 80c 
to $1.00 per gallon. Food for the cattle comes largely from the campus and 
farm. 

By the generosity of certain friends the University has been made the recip- 
ient of approximately 1,000 loads of fertilizer, which applied to the farm will turn 
an old worn-out acreage into a garden spot. 

Following the conservation policy of our country, Oglethorpe is endeavoring 
to raise as far as possible its own food supplies and to save as far as possible 
all waste. With the garbage from the kitchen we are feeding something like 
18 to 20 pigs, enough to largely keep the family in pork products. A hundred 
cords of wood cut from our forest will supplement the coal supply during the 
coming winter. Instead of sheep on the White House lawn, we will have cows 
on our campus. 



4tt 



Dear Friend: 

You must have thought often of us 
during the past months and wondered how your 
University was coming along with the whole 
world in turmoil and the great war enterprises 
calling upon every energy of every person in 
America, affecting particularly Universities 
for Men. 

Thanks to the generosity of our 
friends and the goodness of God, the year 1918 
has not been a calamitous one. We have pro- 
ceeded steadily on our way with a larger attend- 
ance than last year and even better quality of 
work being done. 

The beautiful $10,000.00 Railway Sta- 
tion, called Oglethorpe University, and archi- 
tecturally a part of our campus, is now being 
completed, and by the generosity of our Woman's 
Board our campus has been beautified to a 
gratifying extent. 

But for our support and development 
we need every cent possible and our Executive 
Committee has asked me to write all of our 
friends who have not paid in advance and ask 
them to make every effort to send us a good 
liberal check on their subscription this month. 

Can you not do this for us? 

Heartily yours, 



President. 



(B^btltcrpe Huitrersitir JluUettn 



VOL. Ill JULY, 1918 No 


7 


Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 


Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 




■ Bird's eye view of Oglethorpe University as it will appear when, by the loyalty 
and love of thousands of her friends, she shall stand complete on her beautiful 
campus out Peachtree Road in the suburbs of Atlanta, Ga. 

The first building on the right, as you enter has already been completed and 
occupied and is valued, equipped, at over $200,000.00. 

A beautiful little stone Railway station, named Oglethorpe University, valued at 
approximately $10,000.00, stands at the head of the entrance driveway in the fore- 
ground. 

The building with the tower on the left as you enter, which is really a group 
of three structures, will be the next to be erected and will contain a Library with 
space for 50,000 volumes, the founders' memorial room, museum, lecture rooms, 
beautiful gothic chapel seating 400 with stage arranged for college plays and stere- 
opticon lectures, a section equipped for chemical laboratory, twenty dormitory rooms 
for students, a great clock with electric bell system, an open air observatory and a 
lecture roof garden. It will also contain a complete gymnasium with about 250 
lockers, swimming pool, indoor basketball court, etc., and a small college printing 
plant. 

When it is finished Oglethorpe University will be one of the best equipped in- 
stitutions for academic work in this country and will be a school on which every one 
of its founders may look with satisfaction and gratitude to God. 



A Critical Hour for Oglethorpe 

Oglethorpe University faces today her most critical hour. 

By the generosity of Mr. Samuel M. Inman the sum of $25,- 
000.00 cash will be paid to the University provided the institution 
shall have secured total assets and solvent subscriptions amounting 
to $1,000,000.00 by midnight of December 31, 1920. 

Approximately $750,000.00 of such assets and subscriptions 
have already been secured, leaving $250,000.00 more to be raised 
to which should be added approximately 10% for providential 
loss, making a total of some $350,000.00 needed to secure this 
gift and to complete the $1,000,000.00. 

While the tumult of the times and the necessity of bending 
every effort to win the war operate against a successful prosecution 
of a campaign to secure this fund, there are nevertheless some 
compensating encouragements, the most important of which is the 
statement by the Administration through Mr. P. P. Claxton, Com- 
missioner of Education, that "this is an opportune time for those 
who are willing and able to do so to endow institutions of learning 
ivith the safest and most reliable of all securities, United States 
Bonds." 

The Government also most considerately allows 15% of the 
super-tax on all incomes and excess profits to be deducted there- 
from if given to such institutions. 

The necessity of obtaining this $350,000.00 by the hour speci- 
fied is absolute. With it the University is founded and without it 
she is sadly handicapped. No one would be willing for her to 
suffer the loss of Mr. Inman's cash offer. The three-quarters of a 
million dollars in assets which the University now has, has come 
to her in comparatively small gifts, the largest gift that has ever 
been received up to this time being $10,000.00. 



In the extremity of our great need, which is also our great 
opportunity, we appeal to all readers of these lines to help us in 
every way possible to secure this sum. An ideal way to have your 
help count heavily is to make a monthly subscription for the period 
of ten years, and this may be paid in War Saving Stamps, Thrift 
Stamps, Liberty Bonds or cash, as may be most convenient to you. 

Our first great building is already too small and we need others 
and with them will come the need for more equipment. We need 
endowment also and this completion of our first million dollars 
will give you an assured foundation for your University that will 
guarantee its future success and progress and enable it to do the 
great work that it so earnestly desires to do for the youth of our 
country, for the people who have built it and for the God who has 
blessed it. 

Please help us. Fill out the subscription blank below and 
forward at once. 



Oglethorpe University, 

Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Dear Sirs: 

As a friend and founder of Oglethorpe University, I hereby 

promise to send you the sum of $ monthly for ten 

years as part of the fund necessary to complete the first million 
dollars of assets of the University and thus secure the $25,000.00 
cash offered by Mr. S. M. Inman. 

Name 

Address 



The Great Task to Date 

All of our friends will be interested in the following statement 
of subscriptions made to the University with amounts paid and 
balances due up to June 30, 1918. Five or Six Thousand Dollars 
have since been added as a start toward the completion of the new 
fund of $350,000.00. 

Note what your State has done and add your subscription to 
set forward its part in this great enterprise. 

STATEMENT OF SUBSCRIPTIONS TO JUNE 30th, 1918. 

State Subscribed Paid Balance 

Atlanta Directors 115,250.00 

Atlanta Popular Cash 127,316.31 

£&UAu**A&**<g* ". $13,259.12 

Arkansas 17,689.00 

Florida 36,916.49 

Georgia 94,158.00 

Kentucky 10,615.50 

Louisiana 22,996.00 

Mississippi 9,145.00 

Missouri 1,045.00 

North Carolina 23,109.00 

South Carolina 23,850.00 

Tennessee 42,553.50 

Texas 14,685.25 

Virginia 4,110.00 

Connecticut 1,000.00 

New York 210.00 

Washington 100.00 

District of Columbia 50.00 

Massachusetts 100.00 

Pennsylvania 1,505.00 

Real Estate 123,500.00 

Material 28,052.32 

Library 5,000.00 

Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Georgia Professorship 9,325.05 

Equipment 2,000.00 

Railway Sta. Subs 7,500.00 

Special Oper. Acct 1,100.00 

Scholarship Loan Fund 350.00 

Athletic Subs 192.00 



Totals $741,682.54 



40,860.85 


74.389.15 


83,579.24 


43.737.07 


$4,666.22 


$8,592.90 


3,336.10 


14.352.90 


6,691.47 


30,225.02 


25,363.93 


68,794.07 


3,060.90 


7,554.60 


6,411.65 


16,584.35 


3,257.60 


5,887.40 


864.00 


181.00 


6,607.00 


16.502.00 


6,945.88 


16.903.12 


21,978.40 


20.575.10 


4,105.35 


10.579.90 


1,428.00 


2.682.00 


1,000.00 




210.00 




100.00 




30.00 


20.00 




100.00 


655.00 


850.00 


108,000.00 


15,500.00 


2,100.65 


25,951.67 


5,000.00 




100.00 


4,900.00 


765.80 


8,559.25 


2,000.00 




4,482.78 


3.017.22 


200.00 


900.00 


350.00 




192.00 




$344,213.82 


$397,468.72 



©glctlforne Hnitrersit^ bulletin 

VOL. Ill AUGUST, 1918 No. 8 

Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 

Edited by Thornwell Jacobs ^^^^^^ 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Ofel ethorpe University, Ga. 

Beautiful Memorials 
at Oglethorpe University 

How early even a young institution of learning begins to weave 
about itself a mantle of beautiful memories! Oglethorpe is just 
ready to open her third academic session yet see how many lives 
are already memorialized in her life and with how many tender 
hands she is being founded : 

William Bensel, first Chairman of the Building Committee, left 
$5,000.00 in his will to Oglethorpe which, according to the Consti- 
tution of the Board will be used as an endowment memorial to him. 
This was Oglethorpe's first legacy. 

Relatives of James R. Gray, First Chairman of our Executive 
Committee, Editor of the Atlanta Journal, one of the founders of 
Atlanta, are creating a Student's Loan Fund to aid needy students 
in prosecuting their studies. 

A Professorship, bearing the name of James Woodrow, is being 
founded, about half of the necessary amount having been already 
subscribed to keep the memory of this learned and faithful former 
professor of the Old Oglethorpe ever green on the new Campus. 

A Professorship in memory of Sidney Lanier, student and 
teacher of the Old Oglethorpe, is also being founded and as soon as 
the war is over will be pushed to completion under the Secretarial 
leadership of Dr. James H. Dillard. 

Funds for A Memorial of a fitting type to Dr. William Plumer 
Jacobs, son of a former professor at Old Oglethorpe, father of the 
present president and himself a member of her Board of Directors, 
are being collected as also to his father, Dr. Ferdinand Jacobs, who 
taught in the old school at Milledgeville. 

A Beautiful Little Hospital, given largely by one of the men 
who have made Oglethorpe possible, serving as a memorial to names 
not yet announced, is one of the next buildings to be erected on our 
Campus. 

A Loan Fund, bearing the name of Dr. and Mrs. W. S. Ken- 
drick, is provided for in the will of this good friend and founder of 
Oglethorpe. 

A Thirty-five Thousand Dollar Memorial to Mr. S. M. Inman 
will be the result of the successful termination of the million dollar 
campaign now under way. 

A Young Attorney of Atlanta is giving the institution $300.00 
per year, which may later be increased as God prospers him, in 



order to found a loan fund to aid young men who want to pay their 
own way through college and yet have not the money to do so. 
These loan funds are a particularly happy form of gift. Any live 
and growing institution can use thousands upon thousands of dol- 
lars annually in that way and every dollar will do good. There is 
no chance of any institution having too many or too large loan 
funds. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Forbis, of Smithville, Ga., whose son, De- 
Witt Forbis, was one of our best loved boys in the first year of life 
of the institution, are planning a gift in memory of their boy, who 
is ours also. 

Mrs. Sidney Lanier has given us the original diploma of Sidney 
Lanier, which now hangs over the office desk of the President. 
Lanier received this diploma in the first year of the war between 
the states from the old Oglethorpe at Milledgeville. 

Mrs. Clifford Anderson, of Macon, has also presented the Uni- 
versity with a crayon portrait of Lanier which hangs side by side 
with his diploma. 

Mrs. J. M. High, of Atlanta, has presented the University with 
a handsome portrait of General Oglethorpe, which, beautifully 
framed, hangs in the Secretary's office. 

And only this morning Miss Olive E. Faw sent us a number 
of interesting additions to our Museum, among others an old Con- 
federate pistol with holster still loaded with the cartridges used 
in the old days. 

And we must not forget the beautiful gift of the little child of 
Grenada, Miss., a one hundred dollar memorial which constituted 
all of his savings before he went into the "Great Beyond" and pre- 
sented to the University by his father and mother, who wanted to 
put his whole little life into Oglethorpe. 

In addition to these there are numerous small gifts associating 
individual lives with the life of the University, our Library alone 
numbering scores of them. 

Since writing the above Miss Louise Lathrop has presented the 
University with a valuable collection of Indian relics and bird eggs 
gathered by her brother Dwight Lathrop during his brief life of 
twenty-three years. 

These much appreciated gifts will form a memorial to him 
in the museum of the University. 

We know also of a man who has written a ten-thousand-dollar 
legacy into his will in order to build a memorial to his mother at 
Oglethorpe. 

These are beautiful gifts. Will you not let us add your name 
or that of your loved one? 

So when one is at all discouraged and wonders when that mil- 
lion dollar fund is going to be complete, because it comes so slowly 
and after such hard work, it is well to recount these mercies which 
show how generously God has dealt with Oglethorpe. Surely he 
has not yet finished his work for the institution that has engraven 
on its cornerstone for its motto. "Manu Dei Resurrexit" (By the 
Hand of God She Has Risen from the Dead) . 



(i%lctlinrpe Itmfrerstig bulletin 

VOL. Ill SEPTEMBER, 1918 No. 9 

Published Monthly by Ofelethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-jlass mail matter at th? Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



Military Training at Oglethorpe 
Under Government Supervision 

We have just received the following TELEGRAM: 

"To the President, Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
— Your institution having satisfied conditions prescribed in circular 
letter of June 29th, upon basis of your figures steps will be taken at 
once to establish unit of S. A. T. C. Only students Collegiate Depart- 
ment eligible. If enrollment falls short of expectation it may be nec- 
essary to combine with neighboring institutions. An officer United 
States Army will be detailed and upon arrival proceed with organiza- 
tion of unit. Rifles, uniforms, overcoats and other equipment will be 
shipped at early elate. Advise by wire date of opening. (Signed) 
Harris, Acting Adjutant General." 

The above news will be of great interest to all students and friends 
of Oglethorpe Univers'ty. Notice particularly that there is no need 
of providing outside winter clothing as all this will be furnished by 
the Government. 

For your further information in this connection, read carefully tht 
following paragraphs from official Government announcements: 

THE PLAN OF THE WAR DEPARTMENT. 

The War Department authorizes the following announcement: 

The details of the plan prepared by the War Department to offer 
to able-bodied college students over the age of 18 the opportunity to 
enlist in the military forces of the United States and to obtain train- 
ing in the colleges which will prepare them for the more exacting 
forms of military service have now been completed. * * * 

The purpose of the plan is to provide for the very important needs 
of the army for highly trained men as officers, engineers, doctors, 
chemists and administrators of every kind. The importance of this 



need cannot be too strongly emphasized. The plan is an attempt to 
mobilize and develop the brain power of the young men of the coun- 
try for these services which demand special training. Its object is to 
prevent the premature enlistment for active service of these men 
who could, by extending the period of their college training, multiply 
manifold their value to the country. * * * 

This is a war in which soldiers are not only marksmen, but also 
engineers, chemists, physicists, geologists, doctors, and specialists in 
many other lines. Scientific training is indispensable. Engineering 
skill is needed by the officers who direct every important military 
operation and who control our lines of transport and communica- 
tion. In the same way chemical and physical knowledge are in 
constant demand at the front as well as behind the lines, while the 
task of saving the lives and restoring the health of hundreds of 
thousands of wounded calls for the services of regiments of military 
physicians. The scientific training which prepares a man to fulfill 
one of these highly specialized duties and the more liberal training 
which helps to develop the qualities of leadership needed by the offi- 
cer or administrator are essential elements of military efficiency. 

For the purpose of developing men who shall have this combination 
of military and intellectual training a new corps has been created in 
the army, to k be called the Students' Army Training Corps. Voluntary 
enlistment in this Corps is open to all able-bodied students in the 
institutions of collegiate grade who are not under 18 years of age. 
Students under 18 can not be legally enlisted, but they may enroll and 
thus receive military training until they reach the age when they can 
legally enlist. 

The boy who enlists in the Students' Army Training Corps will be 
a member of the army of the United States. He will be provided by 
the War Department with uniform and equpment, but will be on 
furlough status and will not receive pay. He will undergo regular 
military training as a part of his course during the college year, will 
attend a six weeks' camp for rigid and intensive military instructions 
with private's pay, and will be subject to the call of the President for 
active service at any time, should the exigencies of the military sit- 
uation demand it. The policy of the Government, however, will be to 
keep members of this Corps in college until their draft age is reached, 
and the War Department will have the power to order such men to 
continue in college even after their draft age is reached whenever 
their work is such that the needs of the service, e. g., for doctors, 
engineers, chemists and the like, are such as to make that course 

advisable. 

***** 

The importance of this plan for combined military and collegiate 
training, if we are to meet in the future the urgent needs of the army 
for highly trained men, is so great that the War Department earnestly 
requests the colleges, Councils of Defense, and other patriotic socie- 
ties to co-operate in bringing it to the attention of the young men of 
the country and in urging them to do their part to make it a success. 



STATUS OF A STUDENT ENLISTED IN THE STUDENTS' 
ARMY TRAINING CORPS. 

(A Statement from the War Department, Washington, D. C.) 

A student enlisted in the Students' Army Training Corps is in mili- 
tary service of the United States. Because he does not receive pay, 
he is classed on inactive service but in a national emergency the 
President may call him at any time to active service. He is called 
to active service each summer when he attends camp for six weeks 
and receives the pay of a private. 

His relation to the draft is as follows : 

Any student so enlisted, though in the military service of the 
United States, is technically on inactive duty, and therefore must 
register after he has reached draft age and upon notice by the Presi- 
dent. Upon stating on his questionnaire that he is already in the 
military service of the United States, he will be placed automatically 
by his local Draft Board in Class Y-D, as provided by the Selective 
Service regulations. The Draft Board will not call him for induction 
as long as he remains a member of the Students' Army Training 
Corps. 

In order that the college student may not even appear to enjoy 
special privileges, it is agreed, however, that when the day arrives on 
which according to his order number he would have been drafted, had 
he not already volunteered, the fact is reported to the President of 
the college, and to the Commanding officer at the college, who in turn 
reports it to the Adjutant General. This is the day of reckoning for 
the college man. The President of the college and the Commanding 
Officer will then report to the Chairman of the Committee on Educa- 
tion and Special Training: of the War Department, for what form of 
military service the individual is in their judgment best qualified. 
They will recommend either that the student should continue his 
studies to prepare for work in medicine, engineering, chemistry, psy- 
chology, economics, etc., or that he should go at once to an Officers' 
Training Camp to prepare for an officers' commission in the infantry, 
artillery, etc., or that he should be assigned to work in the ordnance, 
quartermaster or other Staff Corps, or sent unmediately to a division 
at one of the camps. Lieut. Col. Rees, commander of the entire Stu- 
dents' Corps, has authority f o dispose his men in the way best suited 
to meet the emergencies of the military and national situation at the 
time. The presumption is that, for the next year, the largest propor- 
tion of the student body reaching twentv-one vears will be required 
to supply a large part of the officers needed for the national army. 
It is understood that at least four or five times as many officers will 
be required as the total number of students who will graduate from 
all American colleges and universities. Enlistment in the Students' 
Army Training Corps, therefore, while it does not hold out any prom- 



ise of an officer's commission, is at the present t.me the plainest road 
leading in that direction. 

The student who shows no ability for special service in his college 
and military work, will be ordered into active service as a private 
when his day of reckoning comes. Enlistment is for the duration of 
the Avar. If, however, the student fails to improve his college oppor- 
tunities, he may be dismissed from college by action of the college 
authorities and discharged from the military service by the military 
authorities. He would then be subject to the operation of the draft. 
His enlistment may be cancelled for other sufficient causes such as 
sickness, lack of funds, etc., upon recommendation of the President of 
the college and the military officer in command at the college. 

Opportunity will be given for the enlisted student, who so elects, to 
transfer from army to navy, and vice versa, and to be assigned to 
active service in one of the various corps of the army upon recom- 
mendation of the college president and the proper military authority. 

Regular uniforms, including hats, shoes and overcoats, will be fur- 
nished all members of the Students' Army Training Corps by the 
Government. 

Should the date on which all American citizens between eighteen 
and forty-five must register be set before the opening of school on 
September 18th, be sure to write on your questionnaire "Enlisted in 
the Students' Army Training Corps of Oglethorpe Univers'ty, Ga." 

If you wish any further information in this connection write us 
at once. 

We have just received a telegram from Washington advising us 
that Major E. T. Winston has been detailed to Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity as commanding officer of the Oglethorpe unit of the Students' 
Army Training Corps. The University is particularly gratified over 
this selection. Major Winston is a West Pointer ('89) and comes 
to us from the Alabama Polytechnic Institute at Auburn, Alabama. 
He is well and favorably known in Atlanta, as indeed throughout the 
South, having had charge of much important Government work, not- 
ably, the recent construction work at Fort McPherson. He will be 
an ideal commanding officer and Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. The University is to be congratulated upon his appoint- 
ment. 



(Drjlpttjnrpe limuprHttg HitUrtm 



VOL. Ill 



October, 1918 



No. 8 



Published monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at tlie Postoffice at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 




Oglethorpe University is rejoicing in what is perhaps the most 
astonishing proportionate increase in student body enjoyed by any 
institution in America. Its dining hall, with a capacity of three 
hundred men, is full, and work on barracks housing something like 
two hundred men. will begin. 

Ogletborpe opened her doors two years ago with sixty-seven 
students. Today she has over two hundred and sixty seven. Military 
drill, football practice and academic exercises are under full headway 
and the institution is happy knowing that she is to play a genuinely 
important part in the war work of her country. 

Dr. T. S. Ussery, of Decatur. Ga., is assisting Maj. E. T. Winston, 
Commanding Officer, in the work preliminary to inducting student* 
into the Students' Army Training Corps. 



Lieutenants Goldsby and Potter have reported for personnel and 
drill work. 

Mr. Frsnk Anderson, the well known coach, is whipping his 

football eleven into shape and promises that they will give a good 
account of themselves on the gridiron this year. Games are being 
arranged in accordance with requirements of the War Department. 

A great deal of work is being done on the athletic field, enlarging 
it and preparing it for military drill and for athletics, and by the 
time this paragraph has been printed, the barracks necessary for the 
accommodation of some two hundred students will be practically 
completed. 

Another development of interest is the tremendous amount of 
work that is being done on the building of high class roadways in 
and around the University. Since the building of Camp Gordon, 
which is located about one and a half mile beyond Oglethorpe, fully 
a million dollars has been spent on road work connecting the camp 
with the city of Atlanta, most of this being applied to Peachtree 
Road, which has been widened and paved and at places regraded and 
made into a beautiful boulevard passing directly in front of Ogle- 
thorpe University. 

An idea of the enormous amount of work done at Camp Gordon 
itself in road building may be gained by the fact ihat an equal 
amount of one million dollars has been spent in the budding of road- 
ways in and around the camp. 

All of this will be of permanent benefit to Oglethorpe University 

ind to them is added the value of the trolley line and the beautiful 
new Southern Railway Station known as Oglethorpe University and 
built in accordance with the plans and specifications of our architect. 

The friends of this institution may well be grateful for the cir- 
cumstances which have added so much for the possibilities of use- 
fulness to their school. 



Presbyterians, particularly all over the South will be delighted 
co learn of the magnificent opening of Oglethorpe University on 
September 18th last. This young institution, which has rapidly 
won its way into the hearts of so many thousands in our church, 
began its academic work two years ago with 67 men m attendance. 
' )n last Wednesday it began its third year of work and the indications 
are that the institution will be tilled to its present capacity, which is 
300. In is interesting- to note in this connection, that several years 
ago when the Building Committee were planning the beautiful Dining 
Mall of the University some of the men objected to giving it a seating 
capacity of 300, saying that it would be so many years before it 
could ever possibly be tilled, that it would be a needless expense to 
•onstruct it now. Faith ruled the day, however, and a modern kitchen 
with refrigerating service to match and this handsome dining hall, 
-eating 300 students and capable of expansion, by the use of adjoining 
rooms, to 400 students. It is a remarkable sight to see the dining 
hall now lull of young men, largely members of the S. A. T. C, win. 
have come to Oglethorpe all the way from Cape Cod to southern 
Texas. 



VOL. Ill NOVEMBER, 1918 No. 10 

Published Monthly by Ofelethorpe University, Ofelethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



TEAM SONG 

Tune — Triumphal March in Aida. 

O-G-L-E-T-H-O-R-P-E, 

Spells Oglethorpe, 

Old Oglethorpe, 

Spells dear old Oglethorpe. 

We'll win today, We'll win today 

For Oglethorpe, 

Old Oglethorpe, 

For dear old Oglethorpe. 

A touchdown now, a touchdown now 

For Oglethorpe, 

Old Oglethorpe, 

For dear old Oglethorpe. 

All together boys, all together boys: 

Yell Oglethorpe, 

Yell Oglethorpe, 

Yell, Yell, Yell Oglethorpe. 

For Baseball. 

A single now, a single now 

For Oglethorpe, 

Old Oglethorpe, 

For dear old Oglethorpe. 

A home run now, a home run now 

For Oglethorpe, 

Old Oglethorpe, 

For dear old Oglethorpe. 



OGLETHORPE 

Tune— "Over There." 

Oglethorpe, Oglethorpe, O-G-L-E-T-H-O-R-P-E, 
That's the way we spell it, 

The way we yell it. 
We're out to win today you see 

So look out, when we shout 

Strike 'em out, Strike 'em out, 

Strike 'em out. 
We're going to beat you, 
But we won't cheat you, 
And we'll stand behind 
Our boys until the end. 



GOOD OLD TEAM 

Tune — "Long, Long Trail." 

It's a good old team and trusty 

That wears the Old Gold and Black. 

They're clean and fair, that's why they bear 

The laurels back; 

And so whether victory's easy, 

Or sad defeat mars the score, 

They'll play the game and win the same. 

Pep-rep for the Petrels once more. 

OLD OGLETHORPE 

Tune— "My Little Girl." 

Old Oglethorpe we're all behind you, 

And we're going to win today; 

Old Oglethorpe we're pulling for you 

As you go into the fray; 

Now get right in and fight, you Petrels, 

Fight with all your might and main; 

And when we lick them we'll go triumphant, 

Back to Oglethorpe again. 



GOD BLESS OUR ALMA MATER 

Tune — Adeste Fideles. 

Jehovah of Students, Source of all our searching, 

O Door to all wisdom and Guide of the way, 

We would draw from Thee a spirit pure and masterful 

To bless our Alma Mater, to bless our Alma Mater, 

To bless our Alma Mater, Oglethorpe. 

Wherever we worship, now or long hereafter, 
In temple, on campus, at desk or afield, 
We would commune with Thy spirit vast and glorious, 
Thus bless our Alma Mater, thus bless our Alma Mater. 
Thus bless our Alma Mater, Oglethorpe. 

O Lord of all learning, Master of all knowledge, 
O Love of the lovely and Strength of the strong, 
Comrades, we hail thee, Goal of high achievement. 

God bless our Alma Mater, God bless our Alma Mater, 

God bless our Alma Mater, Oglethorpe. 



OLD GOLD AND BLACK 
Tune — Aloha Oe. 

O come every voice, Let all hearts come 
From village, city and from dorp; 

Let us join to praise our College home 
Once again, Hip, Hooray for Oglethorpe. 

Chorus. 

For Oglethorpe, For Oglethorpe, 
Her sons lift their voices in praise; 

For Oglethorpe, For Oglethorpe, 
And good old happy college days. 

O the days were good, the days were fair 
Which we spent beneath the gold and black. 

There we banished every pain and care. 
Once again, Hip, Hooray for Oglethorpe. 



FAIR ALMA MATER, OGLETHORPE 
Tune:— "Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes. 

Fair Alma Mater, Oglethorpe, 

Thou didn't for others die, 
And now, above thy broken tomb, 

Thy God doth lift thee high! 
For He doth live in every stone 

We worthily have brought, 
And He doth move in every deed 

We righteously have wrought. 

We give to thee our lives to mold 

And thou to us dost give 
Thy life, whose pulse-beat is the truth, 

Wherein we ever live. 
And as the times pass o'er our heads 

In this we shall rejoice: 
That we may never drift beyond 

The memory of thy voice. 

Fair Alma Mater, Qglethorpe, 

Thou didst for others die, 
So now above thy broken tomb 

Thy Lord uplifts thee high! 
To all thy past of pain and toil, 

Thy future's brilliant goal 
We promise loyalty and love; 

We pledge thee heart and soul. 



OLD OGLETHORPE FOREVER 

Tune — Dixie. 

Oh, come along boys, let's give a cheer 
From every man-together-hear ! 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe! 
While hoary Time shall sift his sands 
She holds our hearts, she holds our hands, 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe ! 

Chorus. 

Old Oglethorpe forever! 

Hooray, Hooray ! 
Our Oglethorpe shall never lack 
Defenders of the Gold and Black, 

Hooray, Hooray! 
Old Oglethorpe forever! 

On the football field, on the track, on the lake, 
The Petrels ride the storm's wild wake, 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe! 
We've got the will, we've got the verve, 
We've got the men, we've got the nerve, 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe ! 

Chorus. 

And when our college days are done 
And all our hard-fought battles won, 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe ! 
We'll treasure every happy hour 
We spent beneath her kindly power, 
Hooray, Hooray, Hooray, Oglethorpe ! 



YELLS 

Dazzle 

Dazzle ! Dazzle ! Never Frazzle 1 
Not a thread but wool. 

Altogether! Altogether! 
That's the way we pull. 
OGLETHORPE. 

Railroad 

Rahl! Rah!! Rahl Rah! Rah! 
Rah!! Rah!! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Rah!! Rah!! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
O-G-L-E-T-H-O-R-P-E. 

Shanty 

Rah Rah! Rah Rah! 
Team Rah! Team Rah ! 
Whole Team, Team Rah! 
Rah Rah! Rah Rah! 
OGLETHORPE. 

Team 

Gold and Black, 
Gold and Black, 
Oglethorpe's a Cracker Jack 
TEAM! TEAM! TEAM! 
OGLETHORPE. 

RAH! RAH! 
Rah! Rah! 
OGLETHORPE. 
Ray! Rah! 
OGLETHORPE. 
Ray! Rah! 
OGLETHORPE. 



VOL. Ill DECEMBER, 1918 No. 11 

Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



Academic Courses, Terms, and 
Expense for 1919 

On account of the demobilization of the Students' Army Training Corps 
the regular academic exercises and standard academic courses of the Univer- 
sity ivill be immediately instituted. 

Beginning at once the university year ivill be divided into four terms of 
approximately twelve weeks each. The Fall, Winter and Spring terms will 
continue in operation as heretofore. The Summer term will offer intensive 
courses in standard college subjects and is designed: 

1. To enable students to shorten their college course from four to three 
years ; 

2. To enable any deficient students to make up their deficiencies ; 

3. To furnish teachers with a means of utilizing their summers in intensive 
study of selected subjects, thus obtaining college credits leading to aca- 
demic degrees. 

The Winter and Spring terms 1918-19 will be conducted as advertised 
in catalog. The Summer term will begin July 8th, 1919, and close the fol- 
lowing September 19th. The Fall term will cover September 24th to December 
20th. The Winter term from January 2, 1920, to March 27th, and the Spring 
term from April 1st to June 11th. 

For purposes of convenience in reference, the following outlines are 
issued showing departments and courses offered for the succeeding terms. 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) 

The figures in parentheses designate courses. Those under "hours" desig- 
nate number of recitations per week. 



FRESHMAN 

Hrs. 

Bible (1) 2 

English (1) 3 

Mathematics (1) 3 

Latin (1) or (2) 3 

Physics (1) 3 

Laboratory, 4 hours, credit 2 

Any one of the following: 

Greek (1) 3 \ _ 

German (1) 3 ( 

French (1) 3 °r 

Spanish (1) 2 , ) 3 

18 or 19 



SOPHOMORE 

Hrs. 

Bible (2) 2 

English (2) 3 

Mathematics (2) 3 

Chemistry (1) 3 

Laboratory, 4 hours, credit 2 

Latin (3) or 

History (1) or (2) or 3 

Biology (1) 

Laboratory, 4 hours, credit 2 

Any one of the following: 

Greek (2) 3 -v 

German (2) 3 

French (2) 3 f °* 

Spanish (2) 2 J 3 

20 or 21 



JUNIOR 

Hrs. 
Psychology and Moral Philosophy.. 3 
Four Electives 12 



SENIOR 

Hrs. 
Theism, Ethics, Evidences of Chris- 
tianity 3 

Four Electives 12 



15 



SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 



Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B. S.) 



FRESHMAN 

Hrs. 

Bible (1) 2 

English (1) 3 

Mathematics (1) 3 

Physics (1) 3 

Laboratory, 4 hours, credit 2 

Any two of following: 

Spanish (1) 2 \ 

French (1) 3 ( 5 

German (1) 3 °* 

Latin (2) 3 / 6 

18 or 19 



SOPHOMORE 

Hrs. 

Bible (2) 2 

English (2) 3 

Mathematics (2) 3 

Chemistry (1) 3 

Laboratory, 4 hours, credit 2 

Biology (1) 3 

Laboratory, 4 hours, credit 2 

German (2) 3 or ) 

French (2) 3 or 1 ... 3 

Spanish (2) 3 I 

21 



JUNIOR 



Hrs. 
Psychology and Moral Philosophy.. 3 
Four Electives 12 



SENIOR 

Hrs. 
Theism, Ethics, Evidences of Chris- 
tianity 3 

Four Electives 12 



IS 



IS 



SCHOOL OF LITERATURE AND JOURNALISM 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Literature (B. Litt.) 



FRESHMAN 

Hrs. 

Bible (1) 2 

English (1) 3 

Mathematics (1) 3 

Physics (1) 3 

Laboratory, 4 hours, credit 2 

Any two of following: 

Greek (1) 3 \ 

German (1) 3 I 5 

French (1) 3 / or 

Spanish (1) 2 6 

Latin (2) 3 I 



18 or 19 



SOPHOMORE 

Hrs. 

Bible (2) 2 

English (2) 3 

Chemistry (1) 3 

Laboratory, 4 hours, credit 2 

Historv (1) or (2) or 3 

Biology (1) 3 

Laboratory, 4 hours, credit 2 

Any two of following: 

Greek (2) \ 

German (2) 3 I 5 

French (2) 3 ) or 

Spanish (2) 2 | 6 

Latin (3) 3 ' 



20 oi l\ 



JUNIOR 

Hrs. 
Psychology and Moral Philosophy.. 3 
Four Electives 12 



SENIOR 

Hrs. 
Theism, Ethics, Evidences of Chris- 
tianity 3 

Four Electives 12 



15 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Commerce (B. Com.) 



FRESHMAN 

Elementary Accounting 

English, Rhetoric and Themes 

Principles of Economics 

U. S. Resources and Industries 

Mathematics 

Spanish, French or German 

Bible (1) 

JUNIOR 

Cost Accounting 

Psychology 

Corporation Finance 

Commercial Law 

Advertising 

Statistics 

Labor Problems 



SOPHOMORE 

Economic History 
Money and Banking 
Practical Accounting 
Commercial English 
Bible (2) 

Spanish, French or German 
Science (either Chemistry or Physics 
or Biology) 

SENIOR 

American Government 

Auditing 

Insurance 

Office Administration 

Business Organization 

U. S. Transportation 

Foreign Trade 



ENGLISH 



The work in English is designed to give students a mastery of their own 
tongue for speaking and writing, and to familiarize them with the best English 
literature. Required courses in composition and in literature are given for 
Fre?hman and Sophomores respectively, electives in both branches of work 
for Juniors and Seniors. For graduate students special work is arranged to 
meet the needs of the class. 

English 1. Composition. Practice in speaking and writing, with collat- 
eral study of masterpieces of modern prose. The chief object of the course 
is to teach the student to arrange his thoughts clearly and present them with 
force. He is also encouraged to enlarge his vocabulary and his stock of ideas 
by the reading of good essays. All Freshmen. 3 hours. 

Text -books: Lomer and Ashmun, The Writing of English; Bryan and 



Crane, The Familiar English Essay; Macaula/s Essays, Everyman Ed., Vol. 
II ; Johnson, English Words. 

English 2. General English Literature. A study of the best English 
poetry and prose, with special attention to style and philosophic content and 
to the historical development of literature. The course is designed to com- 
plete the student's general study of literature and at the same time to intro- 
duce him to the specialized Junior and Senior courses. All Sophomores. 
3 hours. 

Text-books: Snyder and Martin, A Book of English Literature; any 
good edition of Shakespeare. 

English 3. Shakespeare. A study of the life of Shakespeare, with in- 
tensive study of selected plays, which will be chosen after the class meets. 
Attention will also be given to the technique of the drama. Juniors and 
Seniors. 2 hours. Omitted in 1918-19. 

Text-books : Sir Sidney Lee's Life of Shakespeare, New Ed. ; any good 
text of Shakespeare; collateral reading on the technique of the drama. 

English 4. Nineteenth Century Poetry, including the poetry of America. 
The new romanticism of Coleridge and Wordsworth, with its later develop- 
ments in English and American poetry. Juniors and Seniors. 2 hours. 

Text-book: Page, English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. 

English 5. Argumentation and Logic, together with their practical ap- 
plication in debate. This course is designed for general training in reason- 
ing and in the style of presenting argumentative matter. It is especially 
recommended to students who expect to become ministers of the Gospel or 
lawyers. Practice in collegiate and intercollegiate debating will be had in 
connection with the course. Juniors and Seniors. 2 hours. 

English 6. Journalism. The course covers the collecting and writing of 
news. It teaches the student what is news, how it is collected, and how 
presented. It also provides special training in the rapid writing of forcible 
English that does not need revision. Juniors and Seniors, and such Sopho- 
mores as have shown special ability in writing. 3 hours. 

Text-books: Ross, The Writing of News; Cunliffe and Lomer, Writing 
of To-Day. 

Graduate English. The basis of graduate work is Anglo-Saxon, but other 
special courses in Chaucer, in the theory of literary criticism, or in other subjects, 
will be arranged according to the needs of the classes. 2 hours. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology and Moral Philosophy. An elementary course in theoretical 
psychology, followed by a study of the systems of ethics treated historically, 
with special emphasis upon Christian ethics. 

Text-books: Pillsbury, Essentials of Psychology; special reading in ethics. 

PRESIDENT'S COURSE 

A course of lectures by the President on scientific, historical and literary 
subjects designed to orientate the student ethically and philosophically, aiding 
him in the coordination of the knowledge matter obtained in other courses. 
Required of all students 1918-19. 

FRENCH 

1. French Grammar and Conversation. 4 hours. 

2. Selected Readings and Oral Composition. 3 hours. 

3. Selections from the Dramatists. 3 hours. 

4. An Outlined Study of French Literature. 3 hours. 



SPANISH 

1. Spanish Grammar and Conversation. 

2. Selected readings in Spanish Literature. 

GERMAN 

1. Conversational work and Elementary German, including reading of 
3 or 4 easy novelettes. 

2. Thorough study of a standard Grammar and the reading of 10 to IS 
short books, comprising drama and short stories. 

3. Three to five standard dramas from Schiller, Lessing, Goethe, etc. 

4. Some history of German Literature, such as Priest's, etc. 

5. Graduate courses to be arranged. 

LATIN 

Latin 3 — Plautus. 

Latin 1 — Livy (4 units of High School Latin required). 

GREEK 

Greek 1— Xenophon's Hellenica. 
Elementary Greek — Beginners' Class. 

Students who lack one or two units of Latin may substitute the same 
number of units of Greek, beginning with the Elementary Class. 

BIBLE 

Bible I— Old Testament. 
Bible II — New Testament. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. (a) Plane Trigonometry, 
(b) Higher Algebra. 

2. (a) Analytical Geometry, 
(b) Differential Calculus. 

3. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

4. Higher courses in any of the previous subjects. 

5. Surveying as an elective. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 1. — General Chemistry. 

General Chemical Laboratory. 
Qualitative Analysis. 

(This course, having been given intensively during the 
first term, will not be continued during the remainder of 
this session). 
Chemistry 2. — Organic Chemistry. 

Quantitative Analysis. 

(This course will be begun Jan. 2nd). 
Chemistry 3. — Physical Chemistry. 

Advance Quantitative Analysis. 

(This course, having been given intensively during the 
first term, will not be continued during the remainder of 



this session). 



PHYSICS 



Physics 1. — General Physics. 

Physics Laboratory. 

(This course will begin Jan. 2nd.) 
Physics 2. — Mathematical Physics. 

(This course will not be given this session). 



BIOLOGY 

Biology 1. — General Biology. 

(This course will begin Jan. 2nd.) 

Biology 2. — A course in advanced Biology may possibly be offered if a suf- 
ficient number apply. 

HISTORY 

Studies in the forms of modern government, with special reference to 
the conditions growing out of the great war. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bookkeeping — Freshmen 6 hours 

(2 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory) 

For those students who have not had bookkeeping in high school. 

Elementary Accounting — Freshmen 6 hours 

(2 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory) 

A study of the principles of accounting, and practice in various sys- 
tems for several representative industries. 

Advanced Accounting — Sophomore 6 hours 

(2 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory) 

A continuation of elementary accounting with emphasis on the adap- 
tation of standard systems to meet the needs of particular concerns on 
the basis of accounting principles. 

Cost Accounting — Junior 4 hours 

(2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory) 

For those students who have completed advanced accounting. 
Cost systems and underlying principles. 

U. S. Resources and Industries — Freshmen 4 hours 

(2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory) 

A study of local and national resources and industries — including 
library reference, and problems of local manufacturing plants and mer- 
cantile houses. 

Principles of Economics — Freshmen (1st Term) 3 hours 

A course involving the laws and principles of economics, emphasis 
being placed on the commercial rather than the social phase. 

Principles of Economics — Freshmen (2nd Term) 3 hours 

Continuation of first term involving numerous commercial, industrial 
and social problems. 

Economic History — Sophomore 3 hours 

Modern European and United States History. The fundamental eco- 
nomic movements closely related to our present day commercial and in- 
dustrial life. 

Prerequisite — Principles of Economics. 

Labor Problems — Junior or Senior 4 hours 

A study of actual problems in national and local industries with 
some time given to the history of labor since, and just preceding, the 
Industrial Revolution. 

Money and Banking — Freshmen and Sophomore 3 hours 

A study of the theory of money and credit, and of the principles and 
practice of banking. Banking is studied as a present day institution with 
some time given to the more important events in the history of banking. 
Prerequisite — Principles of Economics. 

Statistics — Juniors or Seniors 4 hours 

(2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory) 



A study of the methods of collecting, analyzing, and comparing data. 
Both social and industrial problems are used in practice work and in 
illustration of the laws of statistics. The students are taught actual 
constructive statistical work with proper emphasis on the common errors. 

American Government — Junior or Senior 2 hours 

A course designed to give the student a better general knowledge of 
the national and state governments, and especially to give some impor- 
tant technical knowledge as to the relation of the government to com- 
merce and industry. 

Business Management — Elective 2 hours 

Types of management, modern office and factory organization (includ- 
ing various systems and devices) are studied intensively. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition, including matriculation, library, medical, hospital contingent and all 

other College fees except laboratory charges $ 45.00 per term 

Board and Room Rent x/ o^^*^«^r-^-t— ' ', 

New Building $108.00 per term 

Administration Building, 3rd floor (two to room) . . $126.00 per term 

Administration Building, 2nd floor (two to room) . . $148.00 per term 

Physics Fee $2.00 per term 

Biology Fee $3.00 per term 

Chemistry Fee $4.00 per term 

Arrangements will be made to provide examinations after Christmas for 
those who wish credit for the work of the Fall term. 



(jDiUctlinqje Hnttm'stttr Jftitlletin 

VOL. IV JANUARY, 1919 No. 1 

Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



It is with a happy and grateful heart that your University 
send* you this New Year greeting. Last year was a wonder 
ful year for us in spite of all the difficulties that surrounded 
educational work. 

As we have already reported, your institution was full to 
overflowing with students, there being at one time as many 
as 312 men on the Campus. To teach these men properly, 
it was necessary to enlarge the faculty, to add to the Library, 
to increase the laboratory equipment and, for their health, to 
institute a modern little hospital service. It was also neces- 
sary to put up another building, which has been done largely 
at Government expense, consisting of a modern barracks and 
latrine, well appointed, prettily painted and steam heated. 

Now that the exciting days of the S. A. T. C. are over, 
these barracks will be used for various college purposes. The 
lower floor will contain our Library, athletic room, and va- 
rious work rooms and class rooms. The upper floor will be 
used for dormitory purposes. 

During the year we were compelled to erect a well ap- 
pointed servants' building which will prove of inestimable 
value in solving the labor problem at the college. 

We face the New Year with hope in our hearts that it will 
be the best year we have ever had. This will be partly ac- 
complished if those of our friends whose pledges are now 
due would do all that they can for us immediately, for many 
of these expenditures are waiting payment from moneys that 
we hope to come in response to this bulletin. 



VOL. IV FEBRUARY, 1919 No. 2 

Published Monthly by Ofelethorpe University, Ofelethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 



Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Ogle thorpe University, Ga, 

OGLETHORPE NEWS 

Oglethorpe University opened on January 2nd with the largest enroll- 
ment in its history, excepting only that of S. A. T. C. days. In spite of the 
fact that this is only the third year of the academic life of your institution 
and that, therefore, there is not yet a Senior Class, and in spite of all the 
losses incident to war times, the enrollment at Oglethorpe will easily go 
over a hundred for the Spring term. 

The student body is devoting some of its spare time to the organization 
of the different student activities. Through the efforts of Secretary Hean, 
the Y. M. C. A. has been organized and officers elected for the coming year. 
One of the predominating features of this organization and one which de- 
serves special mention is the formation of a number of circles among the 
students for the purpose of studying together the every day problems of 
character building. 

A long felt want of the student body has been a well trained Orchestra. 
The indications are that within a very short time, under the leadership of 
Mr. T. Morrison, Oglethorpe University is to have an orchestra of which any 
institution should be proud. New instruments have been ordered and are 
expected for use on the evening of the 31st instant, at which time the boys 
will hold their first official rehearsal. Weekly rehearsals will be held there- 
after. 

Coach Anderson's baseball schedule for this season is being rapidly per- 
fected. Already a number of games has been scheduled with various col- 
leges in the Carolinas and plans are now being made for the team to take 
a trip through Alabama and Mississippi. There is a strong likelihood of 
Oglethorpe joining the S I. A. A. The candidates for the 1919 baseball team 
are going at their practice in real earnest and judging from the material in 
hand Oglethorpe should have a winning team. 

The dramatic club of the University, the Oglethorpe Players, is also mak- 
ing its plans for the coming year. The members of this club, under the able 
direction of Miss Carolyn Cobb, who has a wonderful reputation as a dra- 
matic director, will in aU probability stage a p^ay in Atlanta in the early 
Spring. 'The success of the Oglethorpe Players in their last play, "The Melt- 
ing Pot," and previous successes, was marked, and the friends of the Uni- 
versity have a real treat in store for them in the coming production. 

A BEAUTIFUL REMEMBRANCE 

There came to us through the mails the other day a gift so generous 
and made in a spirit so beautiful that we must share it with our readers. 
It was a check from a gentleman in North Carolina in amount of over $200.00, 
enclosed in a letter that read as follows: 

"Enclosed find my check for $228.00 to pay the balance of a subscription 
due you by my wife, who departed this life on the 4th day of October, 1918. 
She called me to her bedside a few days before her death and during a sweet 
conservation she remembered that this gift to you had not been paid and re- 
quested that I should pay it. and I now fulfill her request. With grateful 
heart I thank God that I am able to meet her promised donation to Ogle- 
thorpe University." 

It is in this spirit that Oglethorpe University is being founded, and by 
such generosity and affection that she is being blessed. 



(%UHtI)m*pe Htm* erstttr lUtllctitt 



VOL. IV 



march, 1919 



No. 3 



Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



The Story of a Beautiful Gift 



By THORNWELL JACOBS 




The building which Mr. Lupton has given to Oglethorpe is the one with the 
tower on the left as you enter the quadrangle nearest to Peachtree Road. It 
will contain a beautiful Library, about which the literary life of the college will 
center, with the balance of the building devoted to other aeademic purposes 

The announcement of the gift was received with most grateful enthusiasm 
on the part of the faculty and students not only, but of all of Oglethorpe's 
friends everywhere 

It came at a most needed and opportune time when the University needs 
space and added facilities for instruction. 

Part of the work on the building will be done by our own students, thus 
increasing the value of the gift. 

It will be built of granite, fire proof construction, and work will be started 
at once 



THE STORY OF A WONDERFUL GIFT 

For several years Oglethorpe University has been making a 
brave fight for her beautiful ideal of life. She has appealed to those 
who love the good, the true, the excellent. She has insisted that her 
buildings, her halls, her rooms and equipment should outline in them- 
selves all that her teachers put into their lectures. So the one lone 
building has stood superb and majestic on Peachtree Road since nine- 
teen-fifteen, the most beautiful, the most efficient, and the most ex- 
pressive academic structure in the South ; the massiveness of her 
walls, the elegance of her adornment and the honesty of her con- 
struction bearing witness to the quality of soul that is within her. 

And in her dignified silence there was hope ; hope that she would 
draw likeminded spirits to herself ; that some day a man or woman 
would come and seeing how she had breathed her soul into her chil- 
dren would say, "I also want to take part in this great spiritual adven- 
ture. I will build a mate for yon." 

Five years had passed since a memorable morning in Chattanooga 
when the now President of the institution was telling the Oglethorpe 
Story to the congregation of the First Presbyterian Church of that 
city. It was the sixty-sixth pulpit in which this had been done and he 
was praying that, like all the others, they would give not less than 
one thousand dollars to the enterprise. But the Great War was on, 
the times were perilous, many new needs and calls were insistent in 
their cries. Then after the service a man with iron gray hair and 
kindly eyes came forward : 

"How much do you want me to give?" he asked. 

"From a penny up," was the answer. 

"Well, I think I will give you about ten thousand," he said. 

Now for years the Oglethorpe representative had been raising 
and receiving gifts, but always in small sums ; a few dollars, a few 
cents, never more than two hundred dollars in cash at one time, and 
so the joke of the remark was all he saw. 

"Put it there," he said, laughing. 

"How shall I pay it?" the man asked. 

"Cash on demand," laughed the 0°,'!ethorpe man, carry'ug on the 
joke. 

The man wrote it down and handed back the paper. 
"It is some kindly weak-minded fellow," thought the Oglethorpe 
Pleader as he showed it to Dr. Bachman, the Pastor. 



But the Doctor's face was lighting up and he had taken the man 
with the iron gray hair and the kindly eyes by the hand and was say- 
ing: 

"Splendid, Lupton, splendid !" 

That was the first large gift Oglethorpe University ever received 
and the spirit of its giving was greater even than the amount. It was 
the spontaneous generosity of a fine soul that saw an ideal and put 
his power back of it. It was as if God said : "I will let this dream live 
in stone and steel. See, I have touched a heart for you, one that can 
help, now go and set your torch aglow." 

When the news of it reached Atlanta it gave new power and faith 
to all the backers of Oglethorpe. It put a new joy in their hearts and 
a new will into their efforts. They added their checks to it, larger 
checks, and by the hand of God the great building rose to her tasks. 

And at those tasks she has labored for nearly three years. She 
has breathed into the souls of her boys the breath of the one beautiful 
ideal that the world holds. As she was unsurpassed in elegance so 
she would have her sons unsurpassed in character. Her honesty of 
construction, her beauty of design, her dignity of posture, her refine- 
ment of sentiment, her openness of welcome, her loyalty to the truth, 
her reverence of her Maker, all these, as a mother, she kept giving 
to her boys, and the man in Chattanooga kept watching her. 

And one day — February 6th was the happy date — he saw the Ogle- 
thorpe Pleader again. The thing that Faith knew would some day 
happen was come. The Beautiful Answer to the Prayer that would 
not end was ready. The Founder of all that is Good and True and 
Beautiful was about to speak a word to all those who see Him and 
trudge unceasingly onward in search for His glory. 

For it was on that day that Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Lupton gave to 
Oglethorpe University, in memory of Mr. Lupton's mother, a mate 
for the beautiful structure that had so long waited its coming. 

And the news of this generous gift to set forward the ideal that is 
building Oglethorpe will, as before, put a new zest and a deepened 
faith into the hearts of her thousands of friends in Atlanta, not only, 
but throughout the whole nation as well. Others will follow their 
leadership in the future as in the past. Out of the shadows of that 
future (which belong to God) other hands will be stretched forward 
to help ; but of the big-hearted man in Chattanooga and of his lovely, 
generous wife it will ever be said: "Their faith did not follow others 
and therefore our love shall forever follow them." 



JOHN THOMAS LUPTON 
CHATTANOOGA.TENNESSEE 

February 6, 1919, 



Dr.. Thornwell Jacobs, 
President Oglethorpe University 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Dear Dr. Jacobs: 

I have watched the progress of 
Oglethorpe University with the greatest 
interest and note the present need for 
increased dormitory and academic facilities 
I also want to take part in the campaign 
that is now on for increasing the 
subscriptions to the University to the 
sum of One Million Dollars. 

I believe that now is an 
especially opportune time in which to 
undertake forward movements of this kind, 
and our duty to our returning soldiers, 
not only, but to our country as well, 
calls upon us to keep the constructive 
forces of the nation busily at work, fur- 
nishing employment and opportunity and 
thus discouraging unrest and economic 
dangers. 

I take pleasure, therefore, in 
giving to Oglethorpe University the sum 
of Fifty Thousand Dollars to construct a 
memorial building, which I understand I 
shall have the privilege later of naming, 
and you are authorized to proceed with 
the construction of this building at once. 

Very truly your friend, 
L FK "^ 



(!%letlitfq)£ Hnitojersfitg bulletin 

VOL. IV APRIL, 1919 No. 4 

Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, O&lethorp; University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered a; second- :lass mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 

Another Beautiful Gift To Oglethorpe 

University 

When the new building given by Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Lupton to 
Oglethorpe University is erected there will be in the great tower, 
that will dominate the Oglethorpe campus, a handsome clock and 
chimes. 

This has been made possible by the gracious generosity of Mrs. 
H. Frederick Lesh of Newton Center, Mass. It was the happy 
thought of Mrs. Lesh that both the architectural and aesthetic ideals 
of Oglethorpe called for such an equipment, and to that was added 
the practical use of the tower clock in governing the schedules of 
daily recitations and hourly life, thus justifying the thousands of 
dollars which will be spent in their installation. 

The uniqueness of this gift adds to its interest. These are the 
only college chimes in the South and among the few in America. 
Atlanta will welcome the gift as adding a pleasant feature to her 
life as this will be the only tower clock in the city. 

Mrs. Lesh is a sister of Mrs. Thornwell Jacobs, who was Miss 
Maude Lesh of Newton Center, Mass. She has many friends in 
Atlanta where she has on more than one occasion visited Mrs. 
Jacobs. 

There is, therefore, a delicacy of sentiment about this gift 
which adds a special beauty to it, for to these features of the gift is 
added the thought that it is an intimate indorsement from one of 
the families associated with others in the accomplishment of this 
great task of all that has been done and the plans that are to be 
fulfilled. The many hours of the long hereafter will be, in the truest 
sense, filled with the music of this gracious contribution to the hap- 
piness and order of our University life. 




*j >■ ja 



Oh bD 



js « S £ 



i«=; as "- 1 



O bD 3 



£ .S 
- -a 

- § 

3 co 

►— 1 cd 

05 

-a -a 



tr> 05 43 

• — u 

o Ph .2 



4= rs 3 



"3 


13 

"3 


c 
o 


O 


IH 


05 


CO 






43 


s 




05 

d 

05 






a? 


- 


A 


05 


cd 
05 


>> 

43 




-2 


05 


hJ 


f 


05 


g 


>. 




^ 


nr! 


fcij 


~ 


43 


o 






id 
o 


05 


CO 


CJJ 
CO 

-a 


O 
cd 


s 
o 


> 

'S 

p 


bX) 














0) 




s 

M 
















3 
05 


S=Ei 


05 


-c 


> 

05 





cd 


43 
T) 

73 


R 
cd 

if. 

O 


o 


CO 


05 


CO 

05 


c 

05 

> 


— 

05 


05 


>* 


bjj 


03 
G 


.2 


05 


bjj 


a 



-• 3 » Oh 13 



-- ~ Cv 



-a 5 c ~ _ 

u>H C cd T3 

05 — 3 

w „ 05 43 -i= 



£ -5 

05 

S 3 



o -a -a 

3 O 3 

_. 43 cd 

S " ' 

- C 7J 

05 05 

bD "O o 



43 « rS 



73 o 
bD *- 

£ a 

05 cd 
05 ,_! 



.2 S 



1C * 1) *j 

i5 5 5 "S 



.3 - ft 



to _ .-. 



05 43 



a 43 

S bD 



-3 "3 
(h 73 
ed s 



-5, 05 43 



S 43 



~ E- 



£ £ 



.= •33 O 



? u 

5 * 



S H g 
ft 

^ • "3 

i— I bD 05 

. s a 
H =3 5 



« „ a 



cd ■£ „ 



j_; *g co 



43 < 

3 



- C 3 

> D ; 

•-< CO r , 

SD 05 U 

bC ft 3 
3 

3 K 



3 O 



05 © 



2 « « * 

2 -3 £ _ 



05 =3 £ 

'5 •£ 



"o 


05 

_£ 


o 


05 

43 


CO 
05 


O 
05 


43 

CO 

05 


05 

B 


05 

= 
— 


05 

3 




o 

43 

CO 


05 

O 


cd 
05 

bfi 


o 


T 


T3 

05 
CO 

'3 


£ 


43 


— 


CO 


r= 


E 
o 

05 


05 

— 


45 

43 


4i5 


05 


"5 

05 


43 

05 

-a 
H 


> 
cd 


05 

43 


cd 
43 

< 


a 

cd 
43 

05 


T3 
V 

05 
05 

i-c 

05 


C 
05 


cd 

05 

43 

05 

— 


E 


O 

05 

> 


3 

c 


"sh 
05 

-a 

05 


CO 

— 


43 

'5 



bC -3 CS 



VOL. IV MAY, 1919 No. 5 

Published Monthly by Ofelethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY OPEN ALL 
THE YEAR. 



Beginning- July 8th next, Oglethorpe University will become an 
all the year round school. Its academic year will be divided into four 
terms of approximately twelve weeks each. The summer term will 
be devoted to intensive university work. Standard college courses will 
be offered leading to degrees and affording full college credit. These 
courses will be taught by the regular faculty of the university in all 
departments. 

By intensification it will then be possible for students to do as 
much work during the summer term in any one course as they would 
be able to do during the ordinary college year of nine months, and it 
would also be possible for them to take as many as two studies in 
that way, and, in some exceptional cases, three. 

All of these courses will be open to women and proper dormitory 
facilities will be afforded them at the university. The regular tuition 
and boarding charges will be in effect during the summer term 
as during the other terms. 

This change in the policy of the university has been brought 
about by the demand on the part of many students that they should 
have facilities for the shortening of the period of their education from 
four years to three, which will thus be made, possible. Others will 
be enabled to make up deficiencies during the summer term. It will 
also enable many teachers of graded schools and smaller colleges to 
take advantage of the summer months by pursuing standard college 
courses taught by the regular faculty of the university along the lines 
of their particular interests, these studies to afford them full college 
credit leading toward college degrees. 

Oglethorpe University thus becomes the first institution in the 
Southern States to hold its doors open all the year round for regular 
university work, the courses offered during the summer term consist- 
ing of standard university subjects. 



Another Handsome Gift. 



Oglethorpe University is again made the recipient of a handsome 
donation which will set forward tremendously the great campaign 
our institution is now quietly waging to win the $35,000.00 offered 
by Mr. S. M. Inman provided that a total of $1,000,000.00 is raised by 
the institution on or before December 31st, 1920. 

The gift is made by Mr. John K. Ottley, one of the men whose 
name is most closely associated with the founding of the University 
and whose work and counsel have been of greatest use in the fine 
progress which the institution has made. Mr. Ottley is the first and 
only Treasurer of the University. He is also a member of the Execu- 
tive Committee, of the Finance Committee and of the Board of 
Directors. He was one of the first dozen men to make the original 
founders' subscription launching the campaign for Oglethorpe, and 
he is one of the best loved of all its many benefactors. 

The letter from Mr. Ottley announcing his intention of making 
this gift follows : 

"April 2, 1919. 

"Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, President, 

"Oglethorpe University, Ga. 

"Dear Dr. Jacobs : 

"For several years now I have been watching your work in the organi- 
zation and financing of Oglethorpe University. In my relation to the work 
as Treasurer and Trustee I have had ample opportunity to know the diffi- 
culties under which you have labored and your quality of persistent, pains- 
taking faith has impressed me very deeply. You have given brain and 
heart and strength to the work in unstinted measure and your efforts have 
been crowned with a two-fold success. That is to say, your work has, in 
addition to securing funds and subscriptions made a lasting impression upon 
the hearts of the people — not Presbyterians alone, but the entire community. 

"It has been in my thought for some time to make a subscription to 
Oglethorpe and I hereby promise to give Five Thousand Dollars, which I 
will pay in installments covering a period of five years. 

"You have my sincere wishes for the continued success of your work. 
I hope that you yourself may long be spared to carry on your efforts to 
provide a great school whose object is the development of our boys and 
young men into staunch and cultured Christian citizens. 

"With very cordial interest, I am 

"Yours sincerely, 

John K. Ottley. 



VOL. IV JUNE, 1919 No. 6 

Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



MY IMPRESSIONS OF OGLETHORPE 
UNIVERSITY 

BY JAMES ROUTH, Ph.D. 
Professor of Englsh in Oglethorpe University. 

The newcomer generally has more accurate impressions of an 
institution or of a city than an old-timer. With real information 
it may be the other way around. But- with impressions the old- 
timer is at a disadvantage. He takes everything for granted. 

At the same time the mere newness of an impression is not a 
guarantee of its correctness. It may be colored by contrasts, like 
the impression of an American returning from abroad to whom 
everything is good simply and entirely because it is home. Im- 
pressions may also be colored by purely accidental and transient 
circumstances. 

When I arrived at Oglethorpe from New Orleans, I came as an 
American from a city half European, and I found myself plunged 
at once into the strict discipline of one of the strictest and most 
efficient units of the Students' Army Training Corps, an organiza- 
tion with which I had barely made acquaintance before, due to the 
suspension of work in New Orleans during the worst of the in- 
fluenza epidemic. 

My first impressions of Oglethrpe were clear and sharp. One 
was a distinct sense of the compelling, almost uncanny beauty of 
the first of its buildings, so far superior to any other Southern 
piece of architecture I know, unless one of the Spanish missions 
near San Antonio in Texas might be compared with it in absolute 
quality of charm and strength. 



Buildings, however, do not make a college. And impressions of 
a more lively sort began to press forward, impressions of the stu- 
dent body. And let me say at the outset that a huskier, more prom- 
ising set I have never seen in North or South. Some may be rough. 
Nineteen is not a gentle age. But their seriousness of purpose, 
their frank expression of their religious sentiments, and their sense 
of corps spirit, or to put it in better English their clan loyalty, were 
at once inspiring and refreshing. This, I believe, was the strongest 
of my early impressions of Oglethorpe, and the disbandment of the 
Army Training Corps has by no means diminished it. The straight 
soldier, with his crisp military manner has relapsed into the easy- 
going civilian with a more languid manner, but under it all the 
spirit is the same. Though the Major and the lieutenants are gone, 
the shades they invoked are still with us, showing that they were 
at home, and on congenial ground. 

Of the faculty I might write at length, if I were not now one 
of them. One admires and cherishes friends of his own age, but can 
not quite regard them as "impressions." One thing though I may 
say without flattering a body of which I am a member. The amount 
of work they contrive to do is a standing tribute to their pluck and 
their stamina, and the amount is only equalled by the enthusiasm 
with which it is undertaken. 



(%Ictl)oqi£ Hmitirstiv fBuUetht 



VOL. IV 



JULY, 1919 



No. 7 



Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 




Dr. J. F. SELLERS 



Recent Additions to the Faculty 
of Oglethorpe University 

We take pleasure in announcing the acceptance by Dr. J. F. Sellers of 
the headship of the Department of Science at the University. Dr. Sellers is 
one of the best known scientists in the Southeast, having been for a number 
of years head of the same department at Mercer University, where also he 
was the Dean of the University and at times acting President. His academic 
record is of the highest, his degrees of A.B. and A. M. coming from the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi with special courses in science at the University of 
Virginia and the University of Chicago where he was Teaching Fellow in 
analytical chemistry from 1896-1898. The degree of LL.D. was conferred 
upon him by Mississippi College in 1916 for distinguished attainment in 
scientific work. He has been Professor of Chemistry in Mississippi College 
and Mercer University. Dr. Sellers was elected President of the Georgia 
Chemical Socity in 1908 and Fellow of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science in 1907. Since 1918 he has been Educational Sec- 
retary, A. E. F., stationed in England, and Professor of Chemistry in the 
University of Beaune, in France. He will arrive in this country in time to 
take up his work for the summer term, which opens on July 8th next. 

The University is receiving many congratulations upon the acceptance 
of this position by Dr. Sellers, many other institutions having endeavored 
to secure his services upon his return to America. His many friends 
throughout Georgia also rejoice in knowing that he is to remain in this 
state where his splendid labors have won him such distinction and success. 

Announcement is also made of the acceptance of Dr. Arthur Stephen 
Libby of the headship of the School of Commerce at the University. No 
position in the University has demanded greater care in the selection of its 
incumbent than that which Prof. Libby will occupy. 

The School of Commerce at Oglethorpe is the full equal in curriculum 
and faculty of the other great divisions of the academic work and in the 
selection of a head of this department the greatest care has been exercised. 

Dr. Libby comes to Atlanta with a remarkable record of attainments 
and ability. His degrees come to him from Bowdoin College Ph.B., from the 
University of Maine A.B. and A.M., from the Sorbonne, Paris, A.M., from 
Brown University A.M., from the University of Paris Ph.D. 

Dr. Libby has also pursued special studies in Law at the University of 
Maine and Columbia and his academic experience runs from the beginning 
of his career as High School principal in Maine to Professorial work in Con- 
verse College, Wofford College and Brown University. 

Dr. Libby has distinguished himself as a lecturer for the Department of 
Education at the San Francisco Exposition, as Lyceum lecturer on travel 
and history and as special lecturer for the Government during the recent 
war. His record shows him particularly capable in the departments of 
Political Science, International Law and International Commerce and 
History. 

Dr. Libby speaks five languages fluently and comes to Oglethorpe with 
the highest of recommendations as a great teacher not only but as a cultured 
gentleman and civic leader. 




Dr. ARTHUR STEPHEN LIBBY 



At Ogjethorpe Next Year 

We will have a splendid new huilding given by Mr. and Mrs.. 
Lupton in process of erection where many of our boys will be earn- 
ing part of their way through college by aiding in its construction.. 

We will have our dairy enlarged and better equipped, furnish- 
ing the same quality of good milk and butter that the boys enjoyed 
during 1918-19. 

We will have our campus rendered even more attractive by 

work now being done on it under the direction of Mr. Jos. R. 
Murphy, 

We will have our Railway Station, Oglethorpe University, in 
operation, this station costing over $10,000.00 and constituting to 
all intents and purposes a University building, constructed of 
granite and harmonious in architectural design with the other 
buildings of the campus. 

We will have the same commodious and comfortable rooms un- 
equalled anywhere in the South and unsurpassed in the nation, occu- 
pied by boys who appreciate a beautiful building, with added em- 
phasis upon the care of the rooms. 

The University store, with increased capital, furnishing a larger 
assortment of college goods at reasonable prices. 

We will have the largest student body in our history, consti- 
tuting four full college classes, and the year will close with the first 
Commencement season with many interesting features to make it 
a most memorable occasion. 

We will have an enlarged faculty of experts coming in personal 
contact with the students, including the Freshmen as well as the 
Seniors, and thus offering the most unusual opportunity for those 
students who go to college for study and improvement as well as 
for enjoyment. 

And most important of all, we will have a loyal and enthusiastic 
student body whose successes in academic matters as well as ath- 
letics have already made Oglethorpe a synonym of high standards 
and unusual attainments. 



#0letljaqje fctu^rsttjr BitUetin 

VOL. IV AUGUST, 1919 No. 8 

Published Monthly by Ofelethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at O&lethorpe University, Ga. 



Working, Ones Way Through. 
Oglethorpe University 

Among the many attractive features of life at Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity is the way in which a great many of the students work their 
way through college. Approximately twenty-live per cent of the 
men in attendance are engaged in some task whereby they earn a 
greater or less amount of their expenses. There are jobs indoors, 
such as the Post Office, the Co operative store, the Express and 
Freight offices, the Bookkeeping department, etc. Waiting on the 
tables is also a way in which some of the boys may earn something 
more than their pin money and firing the furnace and janitor's work 
will be added this year to the list of self-help jobs. 

Then there are the campus and farm, on both of which a number 
of boys are employed. Our own students keep the shrubbery clean 
of grass, mow the lawn, look after the hedge, attend to the hauling, 
and on the farm and dairy they milk the cows, feed the stock, plow 
the fields, raise the crops, attend to the ditches, and, in general, 
do practically all that is to be done. 

We find the labor of these boys for the most part efficient and 
satisfactory. Taken all in all they are honest, industrious workers 
and they are paid well for their labors, the standard of pay being 30 
cents per hour. 

And in addition to all the above jobs, during the coming year there 
will be constructed on the campus of the University a beautiful new 



building and it is planned to employ students whenever possible in 
this work. This is a splendid new building given by Mr. and Mrs. 
J. T. Lupton and it is believed by builders that a big proportion of 
the common labor needed for it can be furnished by the students. 

Oglethorpe University has found that there is another great ad- 
vantage in this self-help work. It eliminates all traces of mendi- 
cancy. Nothing tends to destroy character in a young man more 
quickly than for him to be given free tuition and other bonuses that 
set him apart as an object of charity. We believe at Oglethorpe 
that the very first thing a university should teach is self reliance 
and individual initiative. We, therefore, arranged the administra- 
tion of the University in such a way that any student that is intell- 
igent and industrious can supplement his funds, no matter how 
limited they may be, by his own labors. 

We find that the boys who work their way through Oglethorpe are 
among the best students at the institution and their records compare 
favorably with the very best of those young men who, having suffi- 
cient funds, do not find it necessary to devote any of their time to 
self support. 

Parents of students interested in this subject can obtain further 
information by writing directly to the President. 



(i%letlim*pc litnhicrsity Bulletin 

VOL. IV SEPTEMBER, 1919 No. 9 

Published Monthly by Oglethorpe University, Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 

Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post-Office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. 




PROF E. S. HEATH 

Oglethorpe University takes pleasure in announcing that Mr. 
Eugene Scofield Heath has been added to the scientific faculty in the 
department of Biology and will undertake his work on September 
24th, 1919. 

Mr. Heath has had broad training and experience. He is ac- 
quainted with educational conditions both as a student and as a 
teacher in the south, the middle west, and the far west. 

Though born in Ohio, he received most of his elementary school- 
ing in the state of Nebraska, returning to Ohio for the completion 
of his high school course. Between this schooling and the time he 
entered Ohio Wesleyan University in 1901, he studied for a time in 
the Ohio Northern University. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan 
in 1906, with the A. B. degree, with biology as one of his major 
subjects. Here he had work under L. G. Westgate and Edward L. 
Rice. Mr. Heath's next studying was done at the University of 
Nebraska, under the direction of the eminent botanist, Charles E. 
Bessey. At the conclusion of this course of study, he received the 
master's degree in June, 1912, his master's thesis being the result 
of original investigation of The Effect of Wind Upon the Develop- 
ment of Mechanical Elements in Plant Stems. Since this time spent 
at the University of Nebraska, Mr. Heath has had several semester's 
work in the University of California, where he has completed resi- 
dence requirements for the degree of doctor of philosophy. In Cali- 
fornia, in addition to coming under the direction of the regular 
staff of the botany department, Mr. Heath had work under John 



Campbell Merriam, the v/idely known palaeontologist of the Uni- 
versity of California, besides courses under John Merle Coulter of 
the University of Chicago, and Vernon Lyman Kellogg, professor 
of bionomics in Leland Stanford, Junior, University, both visiting 
professors in special sessions. 

Along with these varied opportunities for advanced study, Mr. 
Heath's practical experience in teaching has kept apace. He began 
his career in the rural school system of Ohio, following his gradua- 
tion from high school. While at Ohio Wesleyan, he was an assistant 
in the registrar's office in the earlier part of his college course, and 
during the latter half, he was an assistant in the biological labora- 
tory. After receiving the bachelor's degree, he held a position of 
teacher of sciences in the Bowling Green, Ohio, High School. From 
here, he returned for another year's teaching at Ohio Wesleyan. 
From this position he went directly for advanced study to the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, where he held a teaching fellowship during 
three of the four semesters he spent in this institution. Interrupt- 
ing his master's course, during the year 1910-1911, he took charge 
of the work in botany at the Peru State Normal, Peru, Nebraska, 
during the regular session, and conducted the general zoology, also, 
during the summer session. As a result of the superior quality of 
his work as a student, as a laboratory instructor at the University 
of Nebraska, and as head of the botany at the State Normal, Mr. 
Heath won the lasting friendship and esteem of the late Dr. Bessey 
under whom he had taken his master's degree. From the University 
of Nebraska, Mr. Heath went to Pomona College, California, as 
head of the department of botany. He completed two years of suc- 
cessful teaching in this institution, conducting in addition, the sum- 
mer session work in marine botany at the Laguna Beach Marine 
Biological Laboratory. In connection with his department work, 
Mr. Heath edited The Pomona College Journal of Economic Botany, 
a publication at that time, of no little significance. From Pomona, 
he went to the Fresno, California Junior College, as head of the 
department of biology, a department which he had the good fortune 
to initiate and to equip. A number of his students from Fresno 
went up to the state university at Berkeley, for advanced study in 
biological subjects, as did several from Pomona, in addition to a 
few who have made enviable records in Harvard and Cornell, on 
the basis of the under-graduate study under Mr. Heath's direction. 
Leaving Fresno in 1916, Mr. Heath went to the University of Cali- 
fornia as a member of the teaching force of the botany department. 
While here he did graduate study in botany and paleobotany. The 
fall of 1917, he filled the post of assistant-professor during the ab- 
sence of Professor Gardner on leave. During this time, he delivered 
the lectures and managed the laboratory sections for a class in 
general botany numbering nearly three hundred. In 1918, Mr. 
Heath came to Georgia where he conducted the department of 
biology in the summer session of the University of Georgia. 

With the record which Mr. Heath has back of him, both as a re- 
search student and as a teacher, Georgia is fortunate to acquire him 
as one of her university professors. He comes with the training and 
capacity to do important work in a field until recent years practic- 
ally negelcted in this state. 



illctliorpc Mmticrstty Bulletin 



VOL. IV 



OCTOBER, 1919 



No. 10 



Published Monthly by O&lethorp:? University, Ofelethorpe University, Ga 
Edited by Thornwell Jacobs 



Entered as seeond-2lass mail mattsr at th? Post-Offiee at O&lethorp? University, Ga 




Birdseye view of Oglethorpe University as il will appear when, by the loyalty and 
love of thousands of her friends, she shall stand complete on her beautiful campus out 
Peachtree Road in the suburbs of Atlanta, Ga. 

The first building on the right as you enter has already been completed and occu- 
pied, and is valued, equipped, at over $200,000.00. 

A beautiful little stone railway station, named Oglethorpe University, valued at ap- 
proximately $12,500.00, stands at the head of the entrance driveway in the foreground. 

The structure with the tower on the left as you enter is reallv a group of three 
buildings, which will contain a Library, with space for 50,000 volumes, the Founders' 
memorial room, museum, lecture rooms, beautiful Gothic chapel seating 4O0, with stage 
arranged for college plays, moving pictures and stereopticon lectures, a section equipped 
for chemical laboratory, twenty dormitory rooms for students, a great clock and chimes, 
with electric bell system, an open-air observatory and a lecture roof garden. They will 
also contain a complete gymnasium with about 250 lockers, swimming pool. etc.. and a 
small college printing plant. 

The first of these three buildings, the one containing the tower in the foreground 
is under construction, by the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Lupton When it is 
finished Oglethorpe University will be one of the best equipped institutions for academic 
work in this country, and will be a school on which every one of its founders may look 
with satisfaction and gratitude to God. 



A Critical Hour for Oglethorpe 

Oglethorpe University faces today her most critical hour. 

By the generosity of Mr. Samuel M. Inman the sum of $25,000 
cash will be paid to the University, provided the institution shall have 
secured total assets and solvent subscriptions amounting to $1,000,- 
000 by midnight of December 31, 1920. 

Of this sum the Committee appointed by Mr. Inman has already 
approved $500,000 of subscriptions and has before it for further ap- 
proval $280,787.94. This leaves a balance of $219,212.06 to be 
raised. 

Included in the above figures are some recent figures not yet 
made public, as follows: 

Anderson, Jas. T $1,200.00 

Armstrong, Dr. M. N 1,200.00 

Cohen, John S 1,200.00 

Hinman, Dr. Thos. P 1,200.00 

Jacobs, Dr. Dillard 1,200.00 

Jacobs, Dr. Thornwell 1,200.00 

King, Dr. J. Cheston 1,200.00 

Moore, Wilmer L 1,200.00 

Ottley, JohnK 5,000.00 

Porter, J. Russell 1,000.00 

Steele, W. 1,000.00 

Winship, C. R 1,200.00 

Watkins, Edgar 1,200.00 



$19,000.00 



The above subscriptions included all subscriptions made to the 
University up to and including June 30, 1919, since which date 
the, following subscriptions have been added: 

McFadden, Havnes $1,000.00 

La Fayette, Ga." 203.50 

Cedartown, Ga 101.60 

Atlanta, Ga. (Georgia Avenue Church) 170.00 

Atlanta, Ga. (Pryor Street Church) 417.00 

Lyerly, Ga. (Walnut Grove Church) 173.00 

Lyerlv, Ga. (Rome Church) 100.00 

Holland, Ga. (Alpine Church) 1.00 



Holland, Ga. (Summerville Church) 25.00 

Holland, Ga. (Sardis Chruch) 5.00 

Marietta, Ga. (Marietta Church) 70.00 

Summerville, Ga. (Bethel Church) 252.50 



$2,518.60 

The necessity of obtaining this $219,212.06 by the hour speci- 
fied is absolute. With it the University is founded and without it 
she is sadly handicapped. No one would be willing for her to suffer 
the loss of Mr. Inman's cash offer. 

In the extremity of our great need, which is also our great 
opportunity, we appeal to all readers of these lines to help us in every- 
way possible to secure this sum. An ideal way to have your help 
count heavily is to make a monthly subscription for the period of ten 
years, and this may be paid in War Savings Stamps, Thrift Stamps, 
Liberty Bonds or cash, as may be most convenient to you. 

Our first buildings are already too small and we need others and 
with them will come the need for more equipment. We need endow- 
ment also, and this completion of our first million dollars will give 
you an assured foundation for your University that will guarantee its 
future success and progress and enable it to do the great work that 
it so earnestly desires to do for the youth of our country, for the 
people who have built it, and for the God who has blessed it. 

Please help us. Fill out the subscription blank below and for- 
ward at once. 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY, 

Oglethorpe University, Ga. 
Dear Sirs: 

As a friend and founder of Oglethorpe University. I hereby 

promise to send you the sum of $ monthly 

for ten years as part of the fund necessary to complete the first million 
dollars of asssets of the University, and thus secure the $25,000.00 
cash offered by Mr. S. M. Inman. 

Name 

Address