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Full text of "O'Hare Field--Chicago International Airport"

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O'HARE FIELD 
VOLUME I 



CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 
AIR AND SURFACE TRAFFIC STUDIES 



City of Chicago 

Richard J. Daley - Mayor 

George L. DeMent - Commissioner of Public Works 

William E. Dowries, Jr. - Director of Aviation 



TRANSPORTATION LIBRARY 



SEP 1994 



NORTHWESTERN UNlVtMi I 



Naess & Mu r phy 
Architects - Engineers 

Landrum & Brown 
Airport Consultants 

James P. O'Donnell 
Fuel System Consultant 



tiaa> 

H E 

03k> 



NAESS &, MURPHY • ARCHITECTS • ENGINEERS 

CHARLES F. MURPHY S I G U R D E . N AE S S CHARLES F. MURPHY JR. C H A R L E S G . R U M M E L C A RT E R H . M A N N Y J R . T H O M AS J . M U LI G 



October 21, 1958 



Mr. George L. DeMent, 
Commissioner of Public Works 
City of Chicago 
City Hall 
Chicago, Illinois 



Dear Commissioner DeMent: 



O'Hare Field 

Chicago International Airport 

Volume I "Air and Surface Traffic 1 



We submit herewith Volume I of a proposed series of reports which will deal 
with various aspects of O'Hare Field planning. 

This volume, prepared by Landrum and Brown, airport consultants, discusses 
expected future passenger, aircraft, freight and automobile traffic at O'Hare 
as well as other related matters, and has served as the basis for planning 
future facilities for the development of the airport. 



Very truly yours, 
NAESS & MURPHY 




224 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHiCAGO 4. ILLINOIS 



HARRISON 7-3456 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SPECIAL REFERENCES 

PART A PREFACE 

PART B AIR TRAFFIC STUDIES AND FORECASTS 

Chapter I - Air Passengers 

Chapter II - Aircraft 

Chapter III - Air Cargo 

Chapter IV - Air Mail 
PART C TERMINAL UTILIZATION ANALYSIS AND FORECASTS 

Chapter V - Population 

Chapter VI - Automotive Vehicles 
PART D CON CESSION REVENUE STUDIES AND FORECASTS 

Chapter VII ->. Annual Gross Revenues 
APPENDICES 

Appendix A ■+ Air Traffic 

Appendix B - Termianl Utilization 

Appendix C - Concession Revenues 



SPECIAL REFERENCES 



Page 
Number 



Air Passenger Forecasts 24 

Aircraft Forecasts 34 

Air Cargo Forecasts 40 

Air Mail Forecasts 43 

Terminal Population Forecasts 50 

Automotive Vehicle Forecasts 64 

Concession Revenue Forecasts 67 



PART A - PREFACE 
Objectives 
Scope 
Methods 
Contents 



PREFACE 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the airport air and surface traffic studies and 
forecasts presented in this volume are: 

1 . Determine the distribution of air traffic potential in the Chicago 
area between O'Hare Field, Chicago International Airport and 
Midway Airport, and 

2. Determine the terminal building and area utilization and criteria. 

SCOPE 

The studies and analyses included herein are limited in type and 
scope to those directly related to the first stage space and facility planning requirements 
of Naess and Murphy, the architects and engineers retained by the City of Chicago. 

Air Passengers 

Studies and forecasts are presented which clearly show historical traffic 
volumes as well as forecasted volumes for the City of Chicago and that portion of the City 
of Chicago traffic which should be realized at O'Hare Field. 

Potential volumes of the different types of air passengers locally and 
non-locally, originating and terminating, connecting and through passengers are presented. 

Analyses of actual and forecasted future passenger volumes in peak 
periods are presented. 

Aircraft 

Forecasts of the volumes of annual and peak period aircraft 

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movements expected at O'Hare Field in 1965 are presented. The anticipated distribution 
of these aircraft movements by type of user, Air Carrier, General Aviation and Military 
is also presented. 

Air Mail 

The growth of past volumes of Air Mail for the total Chicago area is 
shown and reasonable volumes to plan on at O'Hare Field in 1965 are indicated . 

Air Cargo 

Studies of the growth of past air cargo traffic for the totai Chicago area 
are presented and forecasts of reasonable volumes which may be expected at O'Hare Field 
are shown . 

Population 

Studies are presented which define the present and forecasted 
distribution of terminal population by functional area in 1965. The areas studies were: 
ticket counters, lobby, general merchandise, food and drink areas, claim baggage and 
ground transportation areas. 

Forecasts are shown of the distribution of terminal population according 
to the following types of people: originating and terminating air passengers, visitors and 
spectators and employees. 

Automotive Vehicles 

Studies and forecasts of vehicle inventories which can be expected are 

shown by type of vehicle. Anticipated inventories for taxis, limousines, and rental cars 

are presented. 

The volume of vehicular traffic in and out of O'Hare Field to plan 

~2- 



on for 1965 by type of vehicle is presented. The proportion of private autos, taxis, airport 
limousines and trucks in this traffic flow is shown. 

Concession Revenue 

Studies and analyses were made to establish reasonable levels of 
concession revenue to plan on at O'Hare Field in 1965 for those concessions whose 
revenues are an integral part in the determination of their space requirements. 

METHODS 

Original data was used wherever possible. Where secondary data 
was used, it was first closely verified. Major sources of data were special surveys 
conducted at O'Hare Field, records of the Bureau of Aviation, records of the airlines 
serving Chicago, and special surveys made by the Civil Aeronautics Board of connecting 
passenger volumes in Chicago. 

Present data and relationships were compared to historical data wherever 
possible to evaluate the effect of any trends or shifts in pattern which may have occurred. 

The inter-relationship of air traffic, terminal population and 
vehicular traffic and revenue was defined and utilized to establish consistent bases 
for forecasts. Past and present experience at other major airports was reviewed to confirm 
the reasonableness of the relationships of traffic volumes and planning ratios for O'Hare Field 
when it is a more fully utilized airport. Particular attention was given to data and 
experience at Midway Airport. On the basis of these methods, forecasts were developed 
for the median peak air traffic period in 1965 rather than the absolute peak. 



-3- 



Other reputable forecasts, both for the Chicago area and for the 
United States, were reviewed to substantiate the reasonableness of the forecasts and 
the forecast methods utilized. 

CONTENTS 

Part "A" is the Preface of the report and considers the Objectives, 
Scope, Methods and Contents of this Volume I . 

Part "B" consists of air traffic studies and forecasts and deals with 
the following elements of air traffic: 

Chapter I - Air Passengers 
Chapter II - Aircraft 
Chapter III - Air Cargo 
Chapter IV -Air Mali 
Part "C" of this Volume I considers Terminal Utilization , In this 
Part the following subjects are examined: 

Chapter V - Terminal Population 
Chapter VI - Terminal Area Vehicles 
Part "D" presents Concession Revenue Forecasts. 

Chapter VII - Annual Gross Revenue 

Appendix "A" contains data and detailed analyses substantiating 
the Forecasts. Presented is data pointing out historic traffic trends, detailed analyses 
of air passengers by type, technical considerations employed in determining the distribution 
of air passengers between airports and studies substantiating forecast bases employed. 

-4- 



Appendix "B" presents detailed data applicable to the Terminal Utilization 
Studies and Forecasts, Among these items shown are forms employed in the special surveys 
at O'Hare Field, special studies substantiating forecast methods, supporting studies of 
the survey period/median peak air traffic period relationship, detailed data determined 
through the terminal surveys and studies of terminal. 

Appendix "C" presents detailed data applicable to the Concession 
Revenue Studies and Forecasts. This appendix contains pertinent concession revenue data 
from Midway Airport and O'Hare Field and a description of the bases utilized in the 
development of concession revenue forecasts. 



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PART B -AIR "TRAFFIC STUDIES AND FORECASTS 
Chapter I - Air Passengers 
Chapter I! - Aircraft 
Chapter II! - A?r Cargo 
Chapter IV - Air Mail 



AIR PASSENGERS 
CHAPTER I 



INTRODUCTORY 

This chapter considers the past, present and future domestic and 
international and overseas air passenger traffic of the Chicago area,, Its purpose is to 
discjjss in detail the steps leading up to a forecast of air passenger traffic which can 
reasonably be expected at 0"Hare Field in 1965* 

In the development of this forecast a review is made of the economic 
profile of the Chicago area, the adequacy of air service and the historical air traffic 
developments These factors were then considered together and used to develop the 
forecasts of domestic and international and overseas air passenger traffic that the Chicago 
area could be expected to generate in 1965» 

The entire Chicago area was examined through a market analysis 
study to determine the distribution of the potential air passenger traffic to be realized at 
O "Hare Field and Midway Airport in 1965c 

AREA ECONOMIC PROFILE 
Introduction 

The economic profile of a community is of primary importance in 
analyzing and determining its potential development of air traffic . Accordingly, the 
following economic factors in the Chicago area cwere studied and their effect on the 
development of air traffic considered: 



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1 . Size of the Chicago air traffic market, 

2. Quality of this market, and 

3. The particular economic character of the Chicago airea as it 
relates to air traffic development. 



Market Size 



Population in the Chicago area has increased by 22% from 1940 to 
1950 as compared to an increase of only 15% for the United States as a whole . Population 
survey data, indicates that the Chicago area Is continuing to grow at a more rapid rate 
than the rest of the United States . In the period 1948 to 1957, while the United States 
population increased 17%, the Chicago population Increased 26%. A pattern of substantial 
population growth indicates a growth market for air transportation. This is shown in Table I 
of Appendix A. 

Market Quality 

The quality of the Chicago area as a market of air transportation is 
indicated by the distribution of its population compared to that of the United States, the State of 
Illinois and the entire United States,, The larger proportion of consumer spending units 
having higher incomes indicates a market which can better afford air transportation. This 
comparative Income distribution is shown in Table If of Appendix A. 

Market Character 

The economic character of the Chicago area is of considerable importance 
In Its development of air traffic. Chicago by nature is a marketing community and 
marketings communities generate air passenger traffic more relative to their population size 
than do Industrial or balanced economy communities. This marketing character is shown 
by the volume of wholesale sales per capita in Chicago . Chicago is second only 

-7- 



to New York in the volume of wholesale sales per capita of the five largest metropolitan 
areas in population in the United States and ranks substantially above the United 
States average. This is shown in Table 3 of Appendix A. 

The geographical location of the Chicago area is another important 
factor in its economic character. Its proximity to the Mid-West farm belt has promoted 
its substantial sales of agricultural equipment and supplies while making it a center point 
for the collection and distribution of agricultural products. Chicago is an important 
port for vast quantities of goods shipped on the Great Lakes, a factor which is expected 
to increase in importance when the full effect of the St. Lawrence Seaway on Great Lakes 
shipping is realized. The location of the Chicago area contributes to its position as the 
major distribution and marketing center in the broad central portion of the United States. 

The relationship between the Chicago area and the air transportation 
system of the United States is indicated by the numbers of connecting passengers at 
Chicago airports. Chicago is a "gateway" type city and serves as an important con- 
necting point for air travelers in two different respects: 

1 . Chicago serves as an important connecting point in linking 
trunk operations that are primarily of an East-West character with those whose routes 
extend primarily in a North-South direction. In this case also the large number of 
schedules provided by the trunk carriers at Chicago give added convenience to the air 
traveler in planning connecting flights. 

2. Chicago is an important connecting point between passengers 
using local service airlines and those using trunk line carriers. |n this respect, 
passengers from the large areas extensively covered by the local service airlines, are 
channeled in and out of Chicago. In Chicago the trunk carriers provide a high level of air 
service to numerous more distant points. 

-8- 



Historical ASr Traffic Development 

Air passenger traffic in the United States over the past ten years has 
grown at an extremely rapid rate. During this period^ air traffic of the Chicago area 
has grown at an even faster rate. 

In terms of airline departures, the Chicago area has undergone a growth 
substantially greater than that of the United States. While scheduled domestic 
airline departures in the United States increased from 1 ,861 ,199 to 3,318,282 from 
1948 to 1957, scheduled domestic airline departures for the Chicago area increased 
from 65,943 to 166,242 in the same period. This represents a growth of almost 180% 
for the United States and a growth of about 250% for the Chicago area. This growth 
pattern is shown in Table 8 of Appendix A. 

Even more important is the growth in air passengers for the Chicago area 
relative to that of the United States. During the period 1948 to 1957 enplaned 
passengers for the entire United States increased about three times while enplaned 
passengers for the Chicago area increased over four times. The growth is shown in 
Table 5 of Appendix A. 

The growth of air passenger traffic in the Chicago area was examined in 
further detail by separating total air passenger traffic into the following component 
parts: 

1 . Originating and Terminating - This class of air passenger traffic 
consists of those travelers who begin or end their trip in Chicago. 

2. Enplaning and Deplaning - This class of air passenger traffic includes 
originating and terminating passengers as well as those passengers connecting from 
one flight to another in Chicago as part of a trip that does not include Chicago 

as either the origination or the termination point. 



-9- 



A rough and general determination was made of the adequacy of 
air service authorizations today and for the forecast period. These studies indicate 
that the City of Chicago will need to give attention to expanding and improving the 
scheduled airline services to the community. Obtaining air service is a competitive 
function of a city and one which must be attended to regularly to insure the proper 
growth of traffic and service. 
Forecast of Domestic Air Passenge rs - 1965 

Prior to 1955 scheduled airline service at Chicago was provided 
only through Midway Airport. During the last several months of 1955 through 1956 and 
1957, limited airline service has also been provided at O'Hare Field. Since service 
has been provided only on a limited basis at O'Hare Field, the historical study of total 
Chicago air passengers must, therefore, be based on a service pattern consisting primarily 
of air service at Midway Airport. 

Since a forecast of total Chicago air passenger traffic in 1965 with 
the operation of both O'Hare Field and Midway Airport must be based on the historical 
growth trend of Chicago air passenger traffic as well as an improvement in quality of 
service through the operation of two airports rather than one, the first step in this study 
was the development of a forecast of air passenger traffic in 1965 based upon a con- 
tinuance of the present service pattern. This forecast is shown below in Table I : 



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HISTORICAL AND FORECASTED VOLUME OF 



TABLE I 



DOMESTIC AIR PASSENGERS 

PRESENT CHICAGO SERVICE PATTERN * 

1953-1956 - 1965 

1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 



Enplaning 
Passengers 

2,650,415 

3,045,165 

3,603,278 

3,963,789 



1965 7,881,000 

* Service at Midway Airport with limited service provided at O'Hare Field 

Since the purpose of developing O'Hare Field was in part to improve 
the service to the air travellers of Chicago it was necessary to prepare a second estimate 
of air passenger traffic based on the provision of adequate service at two airports. Studies 
were made of the effect of the location of 0°Hare Field on the realization of air passenger 
potential. These studies were based upon similar studies at other cities which demonstrate 
conclusively that the convenience of the airport to the air travelling public has an 
effect on the actual amount of the potential volumes that will be realized . 

With the addition of a second airport to the service pattern of the 
Chicago area # the increased convenience to the travelling public can result in an increase 
in the amount of air traffic that the Chicago area will generate if adequate service is 
provided at both airports. In order to measure the increase in air traffic due to the operation 
of O'Hare Field in addition to Midway Airport, it was necessary to measure the increase 
in convenience to the air travelling public. 

-11 - 



With the provision of air service at two airports, the airport 
distance is reduced for a substantial part of the Chicago area., When this distance is 
reduced for these people they have a higher propensity to use air transportation since 
the service is offered much closer to the prospective buyer and it is more convenient 
for him to take advantage of it. This results in a higher realization of air passenger 
potential in the Chicago area with adequate air service provided at two airports than 
if adequate service were provided only at one. Because this potential and its develop- 
ment according to airport distance had been defined for each of the small Census Tracts 
in relation to both Midway Airport and O'Hare Field, it was possible to measure the 
increase in air passenger potential realization that would result from the addition of 
O'Hare Field to the service pattern of the Chicago area* 

This increase in air passenger potential realization was used to 
establish the increase in total air passenger traffic at both airports that would result 
from the addition of O'Hare Field. This increase was applied to the basic growth 
trend previously determined to obtain the volume of air passenger traffic for the entire 
Chicago area. Forecasts of air passenger traffic in the Chicago area in 1965 with the 
provision of adequate air service at both Midway Airport and O'Hare Field is shown below 
in Table II: 

FORECAST OF AIR PASSENGER TRAFFIC TABLE II 

TOTAL CHICAGO AREA* 
1965 Air Passengers 

Local Originating 3,208,200 

Non-local Originating 2,175,200 

Connecting 3,370,700 

Total Enplaning 8,754,100 

*With complete service offered at both Midway Airport and O'Hare Field. 

-12- 



Technical notes of the mathematical technique utilized to develop this 
market analysis forecast of air passenger traffic is presented in Appendix A. A more 
complete description of the techniques utilized are described in a subsequent section 
of this chapter. 
Forecast of international and Overseas Air Passengers A 965 

Studies were conducted to develop forecasts of the number of international 
and Overseas air passengers at O s Hare Field in 1965. These forecasts were developed 
by two separate steps: first, present International and Overseas air passenger market 
potential was established for the Chicago area and, second, the future growth of this 
potential and the extent to which it would be realized in terms of actual enplaning 
passengers by 1 965 was forecasted . 

In order to establish the present International and Overseas air passenger 
potential in the Chicago area studies and analyses were carried out to develop three 
independent estimates of this market potential. To obtain a conservative final estimate , 
the median of these three estimates was adopted as most representative of present Inter- 
national and Overseas air passenger potential of the Chicago area. The technical notes 
concerning the development of the three forecast bases utilized are presented in Appendix A 

This International and Overseas air passenger potential as thus developed 
was representative only of the potential traffic at Chicago of U.S. Flag Air Carriers. 
In order to make provision for the potential volume of traffic that would be carried by 
Foreign Flag Air Carriers, the following adjustment was made. It was considered that 
at O'Hare Field in 1965 Foreign Flag Air Carriers would account for the same proportion 
of total International and Overseas air passenger traffic as they presently account for of 
total United States International and Overseas air passenger traffic. 

The future growth of this potential was forecasted as increasing at the 

same rate of growth as the expected growth in total International and Overseas air 

-13- 



passenger traffic enplaned at stations in the Continental United States from the present 
to 1965. Forecast s of International and Overseas enplaning passengers at O'Hare Field 
in 1965 are shown below in Table III: 



FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL AND OVERSEAS AIR 
PASSENGERS - O'HARE FIELD 



TABLE 



1965 



1956 
1960 
1965 



International and Overseas 
Enplaning Passengers 



Potential 



Actual 



128,000 5,719 

190,000 38,000 

267,000 134,000 



Percent 
of Potential 
Realized 



4% 
20% 
50% 



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FORECAST OF DOMESTIC AIR TRAFFIC DISTRIBUTION BETWEEN CHICAGO AIRPORTS 

Having established the forecasted total Chicago air traffic during the 
forecast period, as discussed in a previous section, it was necessary to determine 
what distribution of this traffic between Midway Airport and O'Hare Field would 
occur during the forecast period,, This problem actually broke down into two related but 
distinct parts: 

1. How would passenger potential (air service, demand) be distributed 
geographically in, the Chicago area in 1965? 

2. How much of this potential would be realized at O'Hare Field and how 
much ait Midway Airport? 

Since the answer to question *1 supplied the basic data needed to answer 
question "2, it is appropriate to consider them here individually and in that order. 

1. Geographic*. Distribution of Air Passenger Potential - 1965 

To establish the relative degree of air passenger generation by geographic 

location, a study was made of each of the approximately 1,200 Census Tracts in the 

Chicago area. Three main factors were considered: 

1. Population - how many families are there in each Census Tract? 

2. Income - what is the income distribution of the families in each particular 
tract? 

3. Airport location -how far do these families have to travel to an airport? 
These three factors were used to determine the relative air passenger 

potential of each Census Tract in the Chicago area. It was considered that (1) the 
number of families in a particular area, (2) their ability to pay or their need for air 



- 15 - 



transportation ( since air travel for business purposes is related to higher income occupation), 
as well as ( 3 ) the relative convenience in traveling to an airport determine the number of 
air trips which a particular area will generate. The Census Tract division of the Chicago 
area was used in this study because of their great number and because of the availability 
of detailed, current and historical information for these Census Tracts. 

The first step was to use the current and historical data to make a 
forecast of the number of families of each income group in each Census Tract in 1965. This 
was accomplished by taking a straight-line projection to 1965 of the population growth rates 
which existed between 1950 and 1955, a. technique which was sufficient for the purpose to 
which the results were puto 

Each income group was then assigned a relative index of air passenger 

generation reflecting the number of trips by air per year, on the aver, which a family 

whose income fell within that group could be expected to make 

AIR TRAVEL POTENTIAL BY INCOME GROUP TABLE IV 

Index of Number 
of Annual Air 
Income Group Trips per Family 

$10,000 and over 7.14 

$ 6,000 to $9,999 1.79 

$ 3,000 to $5,999 .66 

$ to $2,999 .14 

In each Census Tract, the number of families in each income group was 
multiplied by the corresponding index of annual air trips to determine the total 
air passenger potential for all families in that income group., Then: the air 

- 16 - 



passenger potential for all income groups were added together to determine the total air 

passenger potential for each group. This was done for each of the Census Tracts in the 

Chicago area. 

Having thus determined the relative air passenger potential for each 

tract, it was then necessary to adjust this potential to take into account the distance from 

each tract to Midway Airport and O'Hare Field . Numerous studies have shown clearly that 

the farther an area is from an airport, the smaller will be the share of air passenger potential 

which will be realized in terms of actual air trips made. After a study of various measures 

of this effect, it was considered reasonable to apply the reductions shown in the following 

table to air passenger potential according to the distance between the tract and the airports: 

EFFECT OF AIRPORT DISTANCE ON AIR PASSENGER POTENTIAL TABLE V 

Distance Per Cent of Locally 

in Miles Generated Passenger Potential 

to Ai rport Realized Lost 

100% 0% 

75 25 

50 50 

30 70 

25 75 

20 80 

15 85 

10 90 

5 95 

Several features of this table should be noted. According to the scale 

of reductions, to realize 100% of the locally generated passenger potential, the airport 




-17- 



must be no more than two miles distant from all passengers. It is, of course, impossible in 
any large city for the airport to be within two miles of every home. Therefore, it will 
always be impossible to realize 100% of the locally generated air passenger potential. 

Since some Census Tracts, however, may be within two miles of an airport, 
in order to give these tracts the proper measure of their realized potential all others that 
are a greater distance away must receive a reduced realization. The effect of this is to 
have an apparent low realization of total locally generated air passenger potential 
for the entire city. 

At first glance, the reductions for some of the distance bands beyond 
ten miles seem v.ery severe. It should be considered in this respect, however, that the 
average distance from all sections of the city to an airport might as well be such that the 
average realization of potential would also be considerably reduced from 100%. Thus 
when considered in relation to the average for the entire city, unusually high reductions 
are not assigned to any mileage band. 

The scale of reductions was applied to the total air passenger potential 
of each tract according to the distance between the tract and each airport. This established 
the portion of air passenger potential for each tract which could be realized by each airport. 

At this stage, the relative air passenger potential which would be real ized 
from each of the approximately 1,200 Census Tracts in the Chicago area had been determined, 
It now became possible to go on to the second, and more important question: how will these 
passengers distribute between O'Hare Field and Midway Airport? 



- 18 - 



2 „ Distribution of Passengers Between O'Hare and Midway 

The distribution of total Chicago air traffic was accomplished by considering 
separately the following four classes of air passengers: 
A. Jet Traffic 

1. Locally generated 

2. Non - locally generated 
Bo Non - Jet Traffic 

1. Locally generated 
2. Non - Locally generated 

In this study it was considered that all jet traffic would by necessity use 
O'Hare Field. An analysis of this type of air passenger traffic expected to occur at 
Chicago during the forecase period indicated that in 1965, 20% of all Chicago traffic would 
utilize jet-powered aircraft,, This proportion then was assigned to O'Hare Field because only 
O'Hare, of the two airports, would have the ability to handle this type of aircraft., 

Of the remaining 80% of total Chicago air passenger traffic which would use 
non-jet aircraft, the locally generated air passengers would be the more strongly influenced 
by the distance which these air passengers had to travel to use either Midway Airport 
or O'Hare Field. The geographic distribution of such passengers had, as discussed above, 
already had been worked out for approximately 1,200 Chicago area Census Tracts. 

There is no doubt that, given a choice between airports offering comparable 
service, locally generated passengers would prefer to use that airport which served their area 
best; i. e. the airport closest to their particular tract. Accordingly, the portion of total air 
passengers potential for each tract which would be realized by the closest airport was assigned 



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to this closest airport. When this had been done, for all tracts, the air passenger 
potential of the Chicago area had been distributed into three groups: ( 1 ) those 
preferring, because of distance, to use Midway Airport, or ( 2 ) O'Hare Field, and 
( 3 ) those potential passengers whose homes were an equal distance from both airports 
and who were presumed, on this consideration to have no preference for either airport. 

In addition to this small group of non-jet locally generated passengers 
who live at equal distance from both airports, there is the group of non-jet non-locally 
generated passengers who have not yet been distributed. This latter group will also 
have relatively little preference as a result of distance, since ( 1 ) most of them will be 
traveling between the airports and downtown Chicago and neither airport has a really 
marked advantage for this trip, ( 2 ) they will be traveling by limousine , with consequent 
reduction in their concern for the length of the trip, and ( 3 ) as individuals they will 
use the Chicago airports infrequently relative to the locally generated passengers, with 
still further reduction in their concern for the length of the trip. 

Accordingly, these two classes of potential air passengers were distributed 
between Midway and O'Hare Field according to the proportion of total schedules which 
each airport would offer; these schedules in turn, being distributed on the basis of the 
preference distribution of non-jet locally generated air passengers with the jet generated 
air passengers assigned to O s Hare Field. 

To summarize this distribution procedure: 

1 . All jet aircraft is assigned to O'Hare Field. 

2. Locally generated non-jet air passengers are assigned to Midway Airport, 
and O'Hare Field, according to whichever airport is closest to the passenger's homes. 



-20- 



3, The distribution of these fet and non-jet locally generated passengers 
is expected to determine the distribution of non-jet airline schedules 
between Midway Airport and O 'Hare Fieldo 

4, All non -jet locally generated passengers whose homes are an equal 
distance from Midway Airport and O'Hare Field are expected to be 
distributed between the two airports on the basis of the distribution 
of the airline schedules, 

5, All non-jet non-local ly generated air passengers are expected to be 
distributed between Midway Airport and O'Hare Field on the basis 
of the distribution, of the airline schedules between the two airports 
alsOo 

60 All connecting airline passengers are expected to be distributed 
between Midway and O'Hare Field on the basis of airline jet and 
non-jet schedules. 

This study, when completed, indicated that in 1965, 59% of total Chicago 
air passenger traffic would use O'Hare Field while the remainining 41% would use Midway 
Airport. 

This distribution is partially the result of a shift in the population and 
personal income of the Chicago Area which, during the forecast period, tends to increase 
the number of potential air passengers who have have a preference, based on distance, for 
air service at O 'HareField rather than at Midway Airport, However, far more important 
than this shift in determining the distribution are the basic passenger generating factors 
themselves of number of families, income, distance from the aifports, preference for 



21 - 



closer rather than more distant service, and , of course, the ability of O'Hare to handle 

jet equipment., The 59 - 41 split, thus, would be a stable one except as a consequence 

of major changes in one or more of these basic .factors. 

TOTAL CHICAGO AIR PASSENGER TRAFFIC TABLE VI 

BY AIRPORT - BY TYPE OF PASSENGER 

1965 1965 



Local and Non -Local 


Midway 
(0 


O c Hare 


Total 
Chicago 
(3) 


Originating 


2,425,100 


2,958,300 


5,383,400 


Connecting 


1,186,500 


2,184,200 


3,370,700 


Tofal Enplaning 


3,611,600 


5,142,500 


8,754,100 



Local and Non-Loca l 

Terminating 2,425,100 2,958,300 5,383,400 

Connecting 1,186,500 2,184,200 3,370,700 

Tofal Deplaning 3,611,600 5,142,500 8,754,100 

Tofal All Passengers 7,223,200 10,285,000 17,508,200 

Percentage 41.3% 58.7% 100.0% 



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3.5 



Forecast of Distribution of Domestic Air Passengers 
between Midway Airport and O'Hare Field 
1965 




Local <& Non-locsil 



Connecting 



Local & Non-local 



Connecting 



DVnid-WELy- 



O'Hare 



Exhibit I 



JET AND NON -JET ENPLANING AIR PASSENGERS TABLE VII 

O'HARE FIELD 

1965 



Jet Traffic 




Locally Generated 
Non-Local ly Generated 
Connecting 

Total Jet 



Non -Jet Traffic 

Locally Generated 1,053,700 

N on-Local ly Generated 827,900 

Connecting 1,510,100 

Total Non -Jet 3,391,700 

Total Enplaning Passengers c 140 cnn 



-23- 



Forecast of Distribution of Enplaning Domestic Air Passengers 
by type and between jet and non-jet traffic at O'Hare Field 
1965 



1.5 



M 

2 l.o 

J 
J 



U 
0) 

05 
M 



•H 






.5 



Locally 
generated 



Non-locally 
generated 

Jet Traffic 



Connecting 




Looally 
generated 



Non-locally 
generated 



Connecting 



Non-jet Traffic 



Exhibit II 



SUMMARY OF AIR PASSENGER FORECASTS TABLE VIII 

O' HARE FIELD 



1965 



Enplaning 
Passengers 
1965 

Scheduled Domestic 5,142,500 

Scheduled International 

and Overseas 134,000 

Total 5.276.5QQ 



CONNECTING PASSENGER ANALYSIS 

Previous analyses had indicated that a stable relationship existed 
between connecting passengers and total air passenger traffic at Chicago in past years. 
Further studies were necessary to determine the distribution of interline connecting 
passengers by airlines. These studies were made necessary by the large volumes of 
connecting passengers at Chicago and the resulting impact that this traffic exerts on 
space and facility planning. 

Accordingly, a study was conducted which examined the interline connecting 
passenger distribution at Chicago from the data available through the Civil Aeronautics 
Board airline revenue passenger surveys for 1954, 1955 and 1956. Thus not only could 
the distribution of the total interline connecting passenger traffic be determined but the 
effect of any trends or changing patterns could be noted and appraised. A special 
machine tabulation was carried out to provide information on interline connecting 
passengers in the most useful form. All survey data was then expanded to be representative 
of traffic for an entire year» 

In the first analysis the interline connecting passengers exchanged between 
each airline pair were ranked for each of the three years studied, 1954, 1955 and 1956. 

-24- 



This analysis thus provides detailed information and the relative importance of airline 
pairs in terms of interline connecting passengers exchanged. Since the data studied covers 
a three year period, the effect of trends or changing patterns can be quickly noted. 
An additional study was then conducted to determine for each of the 
airlines studies the following Information: 

1 . Total connecting passengers received 

2. Percent of connecting passengers received from each other airline 

3. What percent interline connecting passengers were of enplaning 
passengers 

Through this study additional information regarding not only the total 
volume of interline connecting passengers exchanged between pairs was determined but 
also the directional flow of this traffic. Jn addition, the relative importance of connecting 
passengers as a percent of total enplaning passengers can be readily determined for each 
airline. The findings of these studies are shown in Tables 6 and 7 of Appendix A. The 
fifteen airline pairs exchanging the most connecting passengers are shown in table IX 
on the following page. 



-25- 



PATTERN OF [NTt'R-LINE CONNECTING TRAFFIC TABLE IX 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



1956 



Airline Pairs 



Inter-line Connecting Passengers Exchanged 
Number Rank 



AA-UA 106,848 1 

UA-TW 75,216 2 

UA-EA 64,518 3 

AA - NO 62,226 4 

AA-TW 60,990 5 

EA - NW 50,580 6 

UA-NO 53,160 7 

UA-DL 52,362 8 

EA-NO 48,252 9 

UA-CL 45,696 10 

AA-NW 43,806 11 

NW-TW 41,394 12 

NO-TW 40,884 13 

DL - NW 40,620 14 

DL-NO 36,402 15 



-26 - 




Exhibit III 




xhibit III 



AIRCRAFT 
CHAPTER II 



INTRODUCTORY 

This chapter contains a discussion of the forecasts of the annual and peak hour 
aircraft movements for Scheduled Domestic Air Carriers at O'Hare Field in 1965. Forecasts 
of aircraft operations for International and Overseas Air Carriers, Non-Scheduled Air 
Carriers, Military and General Aviation are also developed and presented for a complete 
space planning basis. 

Also considered is the expected distribution of air carrier aircraft movements 
at O'Hare Field in 1965 by type of aircraft; jet, turbo-prop, reciprocating engine and 
helicopter. 
Historical Development 

As a basic step in the studies conducted, it was necessary to secure sound 
historic data upon which the forecast could be based. The historic volumes of aircraft 
movements for each of the respective categories of aircraft users operating at O'Hare Field 
were obtained. The limited present operations at O'Hare Fieldare not felt to be 
representative of future conditions. Therefore, historic data of Midway Airport was obtained 
as typical of a fully developed airport. The historic number of aircraft movements for the 
United States as a whole were also obtained and studied. 

The development of scheduled airline aircraft operations was studied from the 
point of view of average seats per aircraft, load factors and number of departures. The growth 
of scheduled domestic departures in the Chicago area relative to the growth of the United 
States is shown in Table 8 in Appendix A. 

During the period 1948 to 1957, these airline departures have increased at a 
rate slightly higher than that of the United States, indicating that the growth of airline 
departures has been comparable to the growth in air passengers. 

-27- 



The growth of civil aviation at 0°Hare Field was studied as compared to the 
total Chicago growth and to that of an average United States tower operation. It was 
found that General Aviation movements at O a Hare Field are increasing at a rate 
substantially greater than the rate of growth in Chicdgo or at the average United States 
Civil Aeronautics Administration Tower. 

Particular attention was given to the distribution of hourly aircraft activity per 
scheduled airline operation recorded in the past for both O'Hare Field and Midway 
Airport, 
FORECASTED AIRCRAFT MOVEMENTS AT O HARE FIELD - 1965 

Forecasts of annual aircraft movements Chicago 0°Hare Field in 1965 were 
developed for the following categories of aircraft users: 

Scheduled Domestic Airline 

Scheduled International and Overseas Airline 

Non-Scheduled Airline 

Military 

Civil-Local and Itinerant 

Helicopter Air Taxi 
A. Scheduled Domestic Airline Operations 

The forecast of annual aircraft operations for scheduled airlines was based upon 
the forecasted volumes of enplaning air passengers, the average aircraft seating capacity 
and the enplaning passenger load factor. 

Studies were made of historical enplaning load factors for the United States. As 
may be seen in Table 9 of Appendix A, Chicago enplaning load factors have been 
typically 50% in recent years. This level was considered reasonable for operations at 
O'Hare Field in 1965. 

-28- 



Forecasts of the average number of seats per aircraft were then 
developed for both jet and non-jet aircraft. These forecasts were based on the expected 
size composition of the United States airline fleet and the average seating capacities 
of both jet and non-jet aircraft in this fleet. Average seats per aircraft are expected 
to be 1 17 for jet aircraft and 61 for non-jet aircraft y as shown in Table 10 of Appendix A. 

The expected distribution of air passengers according to jet and 
non-jet traffic had been forecasted previously as shown in Table VII of Chapter I of 
this report. 

To develop forecasts of the number of air carrier operations 
which would Tesult from these forecasted volumes of air passengers, the enplaned 
passenger load-factor was applied to the average seats per aircraft for jet and non-jet 
aircraft to determine the numbers of enplaned passengers per departure for jet and non-jet 
aircraft. The numbers of jet and non-jet air passengers were divided by the numbers of 
jet and non-jet enplaning passengers per departure to obtain jet and non-jet departures 
in 1965. These numbers of departures were then doubled to reflect the number of 
domestic scheduled airline operations at O'Hare Field in 1965. The development 
of these forecasts is shown in detail In Tabid 1 1 cf Appendix A. 

!t should be noted in connection with this forecast method that the 
enplaning passenger load-fbctor represents the percent of departing aircraft seats 
filled by enplaning passengers at a particular station. The departing load factor represents 
the percent of departing aircraft seats filled by enplaning and through passengers and is 
higher than the enplaning load factor. The route load-factor is in turn higher than either 
the enplaning or departing load-factors normally experienced. 



-29- 



FORECAST OF DOMESTIC SCHEDULED AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS TABLE I 

O'HARE FIELD 

1965 

Scheduled Domestic 
Air Carrier Operations 

1965 282,300 

B. Scheduled International Airline Operations 

The forecast of the number of scheduled international airline aircraft movements 
at O a Hare Field in 1965 was developed by a study similar to that carried out to forecast 
aircraft movements of the scheduled domestic airlines. Since only limited service is 
presently available for these forecasts must be for general planning purposes only. The 
realization of these forecasts is dependent on additional international and overseas air 
service being obtained by the City of Chicago. 

It was considered that, by 1965, jet equipment would be used almost exclusively 
in international air transportation, due principally to the advantages of this type of 
equipment on longer hauls. Accordingly, it was considered that the average seating 
capacity of international airline equipment would be 1 17 seats per aircraft. 

Since the international and overseas air passenger forecasts for O'Hare Field 
in 1965 are volumes typical of a fairly well developed international airport today, load 
factor of 45% was forecasted to correspond more closely with load-factors experienced by 
all United States Flag carriers today. 

As forecasted on this basis, expected scheduled international airline aircraft 

movements are 5,000 at O Hare Field in 1965, as shown in Table II below. 

-30- 



FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL AND OVERSEAS 
AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS 
O'HARE FIELD 



TABLE XI 



1965 



1965 



International and Overseas 
Air Carrier Operations 

5,000 



Co Scheduled Airline Aircraft 

A study was made of the expected distribution of scheduled airline 
aircraft at O'Hare Field in 1965 according to the following types of equipment: jet, 
turbo-prop, and reciprocating engine aircraft. 

The studies of scheduled airline movements, discussed previously 
in this section, provided a distribution according to jet and non-jet aircraft. It was 
therefore necessary in this study to determine the distribution between turbo-prop and 
reciprocating engine types of the volume of non-jet aircraft operations. 

This distribution was made on the basis of the expected distribution 
of the total United States non-jet airline aircraft fleet in 1965. Based upon this study 
the following distribution of scheduled airline operations by type of aircraft at O'Hare 
Field in 1965 was developed. 

FORECAST OF SCHEDULED AIRLINE AIRCRAFT TABLE III 

O'HARE FIELD 
1965 





Scheduled Airline 


Operations 




Number 


1965 


Percent 


Jet 

Turbo-prop 
Reciprocating 
Total 


97,400 
127,000 

65,500 
289,900 




33% 
44 
23 
100% 



-31 - 



D. Non-Scheduled Airline Aircraft 

Forecasts were developed of the volume of non-scheduled airline aircraft 
operations at O'Hare Field in 1965. This type of operation is of minor importance at the 
present time and the possibility exists that it may be eliminated by the Civil Aeronautics 
Board during the forecast period. For a complete space and facility planning basis however, 
a conservative forecast of this type of aircraft operation was developed „ Limited studies 
indicated a relationship between the growth of scheduled air carrier operations and the 
growth of non-scheduled operations. The following forecast of non -scheduled airline 
aircraft operations at O'Hare Field in 1965 was developed on the basis of this relationship. 
FORECAST OF NON-SCHEDULED AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS TABLE IV 

O'HARE FIELD 



1965 



Non -Scheduled 
Air Carrier Operations 



1965 30,800 

E. General Aviation Operations 

Forecasts of General Aviation operations were developed for completeness 
in space and facility planning criteria. The volume of General Aviation operations which 
can be reasonably expected to occur at O'Hare Field in 1965 if airport management allows 
a rate of growth comparable to that expected for this traffic in the United States is shown 
below in Table V. 

-32- 



FORECAST OF GENERAL AVIATION OPERATIONS TABLE V 

O'HARE FJELD 



1965 



Number of Operations 
1965 



Local 24,800 

Itinerant 66,000 

Total 90,J300 

F. Military Operations 

A forecast of military operations was developed for completeness 
of space and facility planning criteria. The forecast of annual military aircraft move- 
ments for 1965 was based on the median annual volume experienced from 1953 through 
1956 at Chicago O'Hare Field. The forecast of a volume for 1965 equal to the present 
volume of military aircraft movements is considered reasonable because the volume of 
aircraft movements by military aircraft for the total United States is anticipated to 
remain relatively constant for the next decade. The actual volumes will, however, 
be influenced by military policy and the defense requirements of the United States. 
For a given airport, the volume may vary from year to year throughout the period 
depending on the decisions by the military and airport authorities. The volutne of 
Military aircraft operations expected at O'Hare Field in 1965 is shown in Table VI, below. 
FORECAST OF MILITARY OPERATIONS TABLE VI 

O'HARE FIELD 
1965 

Number of Operations 

1965 81,000 

-33 - 



350 — 



300- 



250 



200- 



09 

a 









Forecast of Distribution of 
Total Annual Aircraft Movements 
by Type of Operator at O'Hare Field 
1965 



ISO- 




-A_ir Carrier 



lyEilitary- 



Ci-vil 



Exhibit IV 



125 



loo 



u 
o 
u 



0) 

•H 
•H 

<1 




Turbo-jet Turbo-prop R,eoip>roosLting 

Forecast of Distribution of Total Scheduled Airline Aircraft 
Movements by Type of Aircraft used at O'Hare Field 
1965 



Exhibit V 



F. Summary 

The volume of air carrier aircraft operations expected at O'Hare 

Field in 1965 is summarized below by type of carrier in Table VII. 

FORECAST OF TOTAL AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS TABLE VI! 

O'HARE FIELD 

1965 

Number of Operations 

Scheduled Domestic 282,300 

Scheduled International and Overseas 5,000 

Non -S chedu I ed 30 , 800 



Total Air Carrier 318,100 



G . Peak Hour Aircraft Operations 

Studies were conducted to develop forecasts of median peak hour aircraft 
operations at O'Hare Field in 1965. These forecasts were developed for air carrier and 
total operations in the median peak hour. 

Forecasts of air carrier median peak hour operations were made through studies 
of the relationship between peak hour and total daily operations for air carriers. 
Because of the limited air carrier activity at O'Hare Field at the present, Midway 
Airport operations were considered more typical of air carrier activity at O'Hare 
Field in 1965 and were used in this study. 

Analysis of air carrier activity at Midway Airport indicated that the median 
peak hour operations were typically 8.4% of total daily air carrier operations. 
Examination of air carrier activity at other major airports indicated that this relation- 
ship was reasonable for space and facility planning purposes . This relationship was 



34- 



c 



L 



I 



L 
C 

L 
C 
C 
C 

L 

C 

c 



then applied to average day air carrier operations to develop forecasts of median 
peak hour air carrier operations at CHare Field in 1965. This method is presented 
in more detail in Table 12 of Appendix A. 

A forecast of median peak hour total aircraft operations was then de- 
veloped for completeness in space and facility planning criteria. In this forecast, 
since air carrier operations in 1965 at O'Hare Field are expected to be 65%of total 
aircraft operations, it was considered reasonable to expect that air carrier operations 
would represent 65% of total aircraft operations in the median peak hour in 1965 
while General Aviation and Military operations would account for the other 35%. 
As discussed previously in this Chapter, the volume of General Aviation and Military 
activity that will occur at O'Hare Field will depend on the policy of airport management 
concerning these types of aircraft operations. 

Forecasts of air carrier and total aircraft operations in the median peak 
hour at CHare Field in 1965 are shown below in Table VIII . 
FORECAST OF PEAK HOUR AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS TABLE VIII 

O'HARE FIELD 



1965 



Median Peak Hour 
Aircraft Operations 
1965 



Air Carrier 74 

Total 114 



-35- 



125 



loo 







Total 





n 



03 
u 



75 



So 



25 






.A_ir Carrier" 



Forecast of Distribution of Peak Hour Aircraft 

Movements by Type of Aircraft used at O'Hare Field 
1965 

Exhibit VI 



H. Helicopter Air Taxi Movements 

The forecasted volume of helicopter air taxi movements is based 
on the forecasted volume of helicopter air taxi passengers as shown in Table 3 of Appendix 
B. Jn the developement of these forecasts, certain factors which are expected to 
affect the growth of helicopter air taxi operations in the Chicago area were considered. 

One important factor affecting the future growth of this type of 
air traffic will be the Introduction of larger and more economical equipment. Present 
developments, particularly that of the Vertoi 44 turbine-powered helicopter, shows 
promise of placing this type of operation on a more economical and competitive basis. 
The forecasts as developed reflect the introduction of this larger equipment in the 
future. 

Jt should be noted that the volume of helicopter air taxi traffic 
In 1965 will be dependent upon its ability to compete with ground transportation. 
While it presently has a substantial advantage over means of ground transportation in 
its relatively greater speed, it is thought that the cost of operation represents the 
major deterrent to the full realization of its potential traffic. 

Other factors affecting the expected growth of helicopter air taxi 
traffic are the institution of all-weather operations through improved navigational 
equipment and the geographical expansion of the Metropolitan Chicago Area in the 
forecast period . 



36 - 



In developing forecasts of the volume of helicopter air taxi 
passengers, it was anticipated that the average seating capacity of these 
helicopters used would be approximately that of the Vertol 44 and that the load 
factor will be in line with present experience. The technique used in the develop- 
ment of these forecasts are shown in Table 13 and 14, Appendix A. Forecasted 
volumes of helicopter air taxi movements are shown In Table IX below: 
FORECAST OF ANNUAL AND PEAK TABLE IX 

HOUR AIR TAXI HELICOPTER OPERATIONS 
O'HARE FIELD 
1965 

1965 

Annual Operations 41,100 

Peak Hour 10 



-37 



AIR CARGO 
CHAPTER HI 
INTRODUCTORY 

Forecasts were developed of the volume of air cargo which can reasonably 
be expected at O'Hare Field in 1965. These forecasts were developed through studies which 
considered past rates of growth of air cargo traffic for the Chicago area and for the United 
States as well as the expected future growth pattern for the United States. The scope of these 
studies as well as the projections of future O'Hare Field air cargo traffic are subject to certain 
limitations. Specifically, no exhaustive study has been made of the air cargo market potential 
of the Chicago area as it is related to past traffic or its expected growth pattern in the 
future. Similarly, the future quality and quantity of air cargo service to be provided by the 
airlines serving Chicago has not been analyzed in detail. These limitations are considered 
appropriate since the volume of air cargo traffic and the amount of air cargo space requested 
is an airline planning function and will ultimately depend on airline policy. It is felt that 
the forecasts as developed represent sound and reasonable levels of air cargo traffic upon 
which to evaluate air cargo space requests. 
HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT 

The growth of air cargo traffic in the United States during the post war 
period has been very rapid. In the period from 1948 to 1957 the volume of air cargo traffic 
in the United States increased 156%. During this same period air cargo traffic in Chicago has 
also increased to a considerable exten t, although at a slightly lower rate than that of the 
United States. From 1948 to 1957 air cargo traffic at Chicago increased 131%. This pattern of 
growth is shown in Table 15 of Appendix A. 

The development of air cargo traffic to the present time has been brought 
about by a growing awareness on the part of shippers of the many advantages of moving goods 

-38- 



L 
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C 
[ 

c 



L 



by air. Shipment by air emphasizes speed, flexibility and dependability from which many 

indirect advantages also accrue. These indirect advantages include inventory control, wider 

market coverage, distribution development and the reduction of distribution costs as well as 

a shipping service more closely geared to changes in the shipper's market conditions . 

Forecasts of volumes of air cargo traffic expected to be enplaned in 

Chicago in 1965 were developed through an examination of past growth of this traffic 

relative to the growth of the United States. Since, during the period from 1948 to 1957 

the volume of air cargo traffic enplaned in Chicago tended to maintain a stable relationship 

to the total volume enplaned in the United States, conservative forecasts of future Chicago 

air cargo traffic were forecasted as increasing at the same rate of growth as that forecasted 

for the United States. Volumes of air cargo traffic enplaned in Chicago expected in 1965 

are shown below in Table I . 

FORECAST OF AIR CARGO TRAFFJC TABLE I 

CHICAGO AREA 

1965 

Tons Air Cargo Enplaned Chicago as a 

Percent of the 
Chicago United States United States 

1965 201,000 1,433,000 14.0% 

At the present time the distribution of air cargo traffic between the 
certificated air carriers and the all-cargo air carriers is heavily in favor of the former. 
Factors such as the increased cargo capacity of the coming jet equipment of the certificated 
air carriers favor a distribution of air cargo traffic in their favor. Accordingly, it was con- 
sidered reasonable to consider that for space planning purposes ffie distribution of total 
Chicago air cargo traffic between Midway Airport and O'Hare Field would be in accordance 

with the previously forecasted distribution of air passenger traffic and scheduled airline 

-39- 



aircraft departures between the two airports as shown in Table VI in Chapter I. This 
is felt to be a reasonable basis for forecasting air cargo traffic distribution since it is 
related directly to the cargo-carrying capacity of the airlines serving Chicago. The 
forecasted distribution of total Chicago air cargo traffic between Midway Airport and 
O'Hare Field is described below in Table II. 

FORECAST OF DISTRIBUTION OF AIR CARGO TRAFFIC TABLE II 

BETWEEN CHICAGO AIRPORTS 
1965 

Tons Air Cargo Enplaned 









Amount 


Percent 


O'Hare Field 






118,600 


59.0% 


Midway Airport 






82,400 


41.0 


Total Chi 


icago 


Area 


201,000 


100.0% 



Future air cargo potentials in the Chicago area will be influenced by several 
factors. Among the more important of these factors are the development of more efficient 
aircraft for cargo traffic, advantages to shippers in the Chicago area of having a choice 
between two airports at which to ship their products with a resulting increase in 
convenience, the level and the pattern of business activity in the Chicago area 
particularly as it concerns those industries whose products are most efficiently shipped 
by air and the growing awareness of the many advantages of air transportation of goods by 
the shipping public. 



-40- 



AIR MAIL 
CHAPTER IV 

INTRODUCTORY 

Studies were conducted todevedop forecasts of the volume of Air Mail 
which can reasonably be expected at D Hare Field in 1965» The studies upon 
which these forecasts were based considered past rates of growth of air mail traffic 
for the Chicago area and for the United States as well as the expected future growth 
pattern for the United States., 

The scope of these studies and consequently the projections based 
upon them waslimited to a certain degree/ that is, the studies and projections 
were based primarily upon past rates of growth relative to the United States rather 
than upon a detailed and exhaustive study of the factors which may influence the 
future volumes of airmail traffic in Chicago, The limitations have been introduced 
because air mail space and facilities at O Hare Field will be a planning perogative 
of the United States Post Office Department „ Considering these limitations, 
however, it is felt that the forecasts as developed represent sound and reasonable 
volumes of airmail traffic upon which to evaluate space requests of the Post Office 
Department , 

HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT 

The volume of air mail in the United States has increased substantially 
from 1948 to 1957, The actual increase during this period has been 163%. During 
this same period air mail traffic at Chicago has increased at an even greater rate. 

This historical growth pattern Is shown in Table 16 of Appendix A. 

-41 - 



From 1948 to 1957 air mail traffic at Chicago increased 250%. 

The growth in air mail traffic at Chicago and for the entire United States is 
in part influenced by the mailing customs of the general public and by the policies of the 
Post Office Department Air mail traffic volumes also are strongly influenced by the 
population of the particular area considered. Thus a portion of the substantial increase 
in air mail traffic for the Chicago Area can be attributed to the higher than average 
growth of population in the Chicago Metropolitan Area. Table 17 in Appendix A 
indicates that the higher rate of growth in air mail traffic in Chicago as compared to the 
United States is associated with a higher rate of population growth, 
FORECAST OF FUTURE AIR MAIL VOLUMES - 1965 

Forecasts of total air mail traffic for the entire Chicdgo Area were developed 
through studies which considered the past growth rate of air mail traffic in Chicago in 
relation to the rate of growth of this traffic for the United States. Based upon this 
examination it was considered reasonable to develop estimates of total Chicago air mail 
traffic by forecasting the growth of this traffic in Chicago. at the same rate as that forecasted 
for air mail traffic for the United States. It is felt that these forecasts, while conservative 
in not extending the past differential between the rates of growth for the Chicago and the 
United States, represent reasonable estimates of future air mail traffic in the Chicago Area , 
since, in tfie past, air mail traffic in Chicago has increased at a rate comparable to that of 
United States air mail traffic. These forecasts are shown in Table I on tne following page. 



-42- 



FORECAST OF AIR MAIL TRAFFIC TABLE I 

CHICAGO AREA 

1965 

Chicago as a 
Tons Air Mail Enplaned Per Cent of the 

Chicago United States United States 

1965 40,000 250,000 1600% 

Forecasts of the distribution of total Air Mail Traffic for the Chicago Area 
between Midway Airport and O Hare Field were based on the previously forecasted 
distribution of air passenger traffic between the two airports as shown in Table VI of 
Chapter I. The distribution of air passengers and aircraft operations between Midway and 
O'Hare Field is felt to be an approximate, but reasonable index of the distribution of air 
mail capacity of the airlines between the two airports. It is felt that, for the planning of 
space and facility requirements, this method of distribution is sound and reasonable. Forecasts 
of the distribution of air mail traffic between Midway Airport and O'Hare Field are shown 
in Table II below. 

FORECAST OF DISTRIBUTION OF AIR MAIL TRAFFIC TABLE II 

BETWEEN CHICAGO AIRPORTS 
1965 

Tons Air Mail Enplaned 









Amount 


Per Cent 


O'Hare Field 






23,600 


59.0% 


Midway Airport 






16,400 


41.0 


Total Chi 


cago 


Area 


40,000 


100.0% 



-43- 



PART C - TERMINAL UTILIZATION ANALYSIS 
AND FORECASTS 

Chapter V - Population 

Chapter VI - Automotive Vehicles 



POPULATION 
CHAPTER V 

INTRODUCTION 

This chapter considers the expected volumes of terminal population at 
O'Hare Field in 1965 in order to provide pertinent space and facility planning data. 

Forecasts of terminal population are presented in this chapter in the 
following detail: 

TRAFFIC PERIOD 

Peak Air Passenger Traffic Day 

Peak Visitor and Spectator Day 
COMPOSITION 

Air Passengers 

Visitors and Spectators 

Employees 
FUNCTIONAL AREA 

Ticket Counters 

Lobby 

Coffee Shop 

Dining Room 

Cocktail Lounge 

General Merchandise 

Baggage Claim 
The first part of this chapter consists of a discussion of the methods used in 



-44- 



L 



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€ 



i: 
r: 









developing the terminal population forecasts,, This is followed by a detailed presentation of 

the forecasts. 

SURVEY AND ANALYSIS METHODS 

A. Introduction 

The technique used to develop forecasts of future terminal population at 
O'Hare Field consisted of the following major steps: 

1. The determination of present median peak population of various 
terminal functional areas by means of special surveys conducted at 
O'Hare Field in 1957, 
2„ A relation of nruedian peak population to the volume of daily air 
passenger traffic during the survey period to establish, for each 
functional area, a ratio of peak population per 100 daily enplaning 
passengers, and 
3, the application of these ratios to forecasts of air passenger traffic 
to develop forecasts of median peak population at O'Hare Field in 
1965. 
This basic method has been employed in developing terminal population 
forecasts at other major air terminals with sound and reasonable results. 
Bo Terminal Population Surveys 

In order to determine the relationship of terminal population to air 
passenger traffic, it was necessary to conduct detailed and concurrent surveys of both 
terminal population and air passenger traffic at O'Hare Field. These surveys were 
conducted during a three week period in October and November in I957„ No employees 
were counted in this survey of terminal population „ Forecasts of terminal population by 
functional area, therefore, reflect volumes of air passengers and visitors and spectators 

-45» 



only. Forecasts of employee population were developed through a separate study which is 
described later in this Chapter. 

Since the data obtained from these surveys would be utilized in forecasts 
of terminal population volumes representative of the peak air passenger and the peak visitor 
and spectator days of the week, the surveys were conducted on Fridays as the peak air 
passenger day and on Sunday as the peak visitor and spectator day of the week. Surveys 
were also conducted on Wednesdays, a more average day of the week, as a statistical 
control for the survey. 

To obtain data ^applicable to population by functional area of the terminal, 
selected functional areas were surveyed independently. The functional areas considered may 
be seen in the specimen copy of the form used in this survey, Exhibit I in Appendix B. 
Physical counts of terminal population in each area were made every half-hour from 8:00 A.M. 
to 12:00 Midnight on each survey day. 

Air passenger traffic for each survey day was obtained through the 
assistance of the airlines operating at O'Hare Field. Each airline recorded each flight 
arriving or departing O'Hare Field by flight number, together with the exact arrival or 
departure time and the number of enplaning, deplaning and through air passengers for each 
flight. This information was recorded on a form such as that shown in Exhibit 2 in 
Appendix B. 

A special survey of employee population was conducted, determining the 
total number of employees for each employer as well as peak and minimum shift population 
and the number of employee cars driven to work. 

Finally, gross daily revenues were obtained from the coffee shop and 

dining room, cocktail lounge and general merchandise concessions at O'Hare Field for 

each of the survey days. 

-46- 



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C. Studies and Analyses 

The initial study conducted was designed to provide forecasts of terminal 
population (excluding employees who are considered in a separate study) by functional area 
in the terminal on the peak air traffic and the peak visitor and spectator day of the week. 
Based on an examination of historical air traffic activity at CHare Field and Midway 
Airport, Friday was selected as the peak air passenger day and Sunday as the peak visitor 
and spectator day of the week. 

Si(ice the survey period consisted of three weeks and provided data for 
three Fridays and three Sundays, the median half-hourly population was determined for each 
functional area for the median Friday and the median Sunday of the survey period, as well as 
the median Wednesday for a control period. This technique reduced the possibility of chance 
atypical survey data being introduced into the analyses. These median hourly population 
volumes were used in all future analyses. 

The concept of peak period terminal population selected for the purposes 
of these studies was the median of the four highest hours of each median day. This level of 
population is a reasonable volume for space and facility planning since it may be expected 
to occur approximately four times during the day rather than at a single isolated peak moment. 

Then, using the data provided by the surveys, the median peak hour 
population for the median Friday was related to daily enplaned passengers for the median 
Friday and median peak hour population for the median Sunday related to daily enplaned 
passengers for the median Sunday. This provided, for each functional area considered, 
ratios of median peak hour population per 100 daily enplaning passengers for both Friday 
and Sunday. 

These ratios, considered in connection with forecasts of air passenger . 

-47- 



traffic at O'Hare Field in 1965, would provide forecasts of terminal population in 1965. In 
order that the forecasts, however, should be as useful as possible for space and facility 
planning purposes, it was considered that they should relate to a traffic period higher than 
the average period of the year. 

This has the effect of providing a planning basis representative of traffic 
periods which will be attained a number of times during the year. Extensive periods of 
over-crowding of terminal facilities associated with the use of an average annual period for 
a planning basis and periods of terminal under-utilization associated with absolute peak 
period planning are thus avoided. 

The levels of traffic selected for this planning basis were the median 
Friday and the median Sunday of the peak air passenger traffic month of the year. The 
median Friday traffic volume can reasonably be expected on most Fridays of the higher 
air traffic months and on many Thursdays of these months. This level can also be expected 
during high travel periods before and after holidays throughout the year. The median 
Sunday traffic volume is typical of most Sundays during the summer months and may also be 
expected during holidays and certain Saturdays during the summer months. 

Through the study of historic seasonal and weekly fluctuations in air 
passenger traffic it was possible to develop ratios which applied to forecasts of average 
annual air passenger traffic, would expand this traffic to a level typical of the median 
Friday and median Sunday of the peak air passenger traffic month. It was then possible 
to relate this volume of traffic to the terminal population-air traffic relationships determined 
by means of the surveys to establish reasonable and sound forecasts of terminal population. 

The validity of this survey technique was verified through examination of 

the results it has produced at other major airports in the United States. In addition, the 

findings of the survey conducted at O 'Hare Field were compared to the findings of similar 

-48- 



surveys conducted at these other airports. These studies indicated that the survey "technique 
could be expected to produce sound and reasonable results at O'Hare Fi eld. The other 
major airports studied were: 

N ew York International 

N ew York LaGuardia 

N ew York Newark 

Boston Logan 

Detroit Willow Run 

St. Louis Lambert 
FORECAST OF TERMINAL POPULATION - 1965 
A. Peak Hour Functional Area Population 

In developing forecasts of terminal population at O'Hare Field in 1965, it 
was first necessary to take from Chapter I forecasts of air passenger traffic at O'Hare Field 
in l965o From these annual forecasts the average annual traffic was determined and 
expanded to levels typical of the median Friday and median Sunday of the peak air 
passenger traffic month. 

2 Having thus established the expected levels of air passenger traffic in 1965 

for the median peak traffic period of the year for which traffic forecasts would be made, the 
relationships between terminal population and air passenger traffic developed through the 
1957 surveys at O'Hare Field were applied to this median peak period air passenger traffic 
in 1965 to establish forecasts of terminal population for each functional area in 1965. 

Forecasts were, therefore, developed for both the median peak air 

passenger traffic day and the median peak visitor and spectator day in 1965. Thus the 

forecasts developed for both days can reasonably be expected to reflect the median peak 

hour occupancy of each functional area considered. Forecasts of population in each of the 

„49„ 



functional areas considered is shown below in Table I: 

FORECAST OF MEDIAN PEAK TERMINAL BUILDING TABLE I 

AND AREA POPULATION 

CHARE FIELD 

1965 

Terminal Population 



Ticket Counters 
People Seated - Lobby 
People Standing - Lobby 
General Merchandise 
Total Lobby 

Coffee Shop 
Dining Room 
Cocktail Lounge 

Total Food and Drink 

People Unloading 
People Loading 

Total Front of Terminal 160 270 

Claim Baggage 250 340 

Total Terminal 3,520 4,310 



Median Friday 


Median Sunday 


360 




410 


760 




770 


430 




770 


120 




200 


1,670 




2,150 


560 




620 


530 




570 


350 




360 


1,440 




1,550 


80 




150 


.80 




120 



Bo Employees - 

As discussed previously in this section, a survey was made in 1957 of the 
number of terminal building and area employees at 0"Hare Field by shift and location. 



-50- 



25 



Forecast of Distribution of O'Hare Field Median Peak Hour 
Terminal Population by Area for Median Friday and Median 

Sunday of Peak Air Passenger Month 

1965 



M 

a 
u 

K 

Z 
3 
X 



•H 

eg 

i-H 

3 

a 
o 




TOta.1 LoloToy 



Tiolcet Counters 
People Seated --Lioo'by 
People Standing- Lobby 
General Merchandise 



Totctl Food. <& DrinX 

Coffee Shop 

Dining Room 
Cocktail Lounge 
Claim Baggage 



VII 



This present number of employees was fhen related to thenumber of annual enplaning 
passengers at O'Hare Field in 1957 to develop a ratio of employees per 100 annual 
enplaning passengerso Studies at other major air terminals indicated that as the number 
of annual enplaning passengers increased, the number of employees increased also but at a 
slower rate- That is, as the volume of air passenger traffic increases the ratio of employees 
per 100 annual enplaning passengers declines , Drawing on the experience of these other 
air terminals, with particular emphasis given to Chicago Midway Airport, a decline in » ' 
employees per 100 annual enplaning passengers from 1957 to 1965 was forecasted for 
Chicago O'Hare Field . 

By relating this forecasted ratio of employees per 100 enplaning passengers 
in 1965 to the 1965 forecasts of enplaning passengers at Chicago O'Hare Field, forecasts 
of total 1965 terminal building and area employees were developed. In the 1957 survey 
of employees at O'Hare Field it was found that approximately 50% of the total employees 
presently work on the peak shift* Accordingly, for space! planning purposes, approximately 
50% of the forecasted 1965 employees were considered to be representative of the peak shift 
in 1965. 

The forecasts of terminal building and area employee population at O'Hare 
Field in 1965 are shown below in Table II. 

FORECAST OF DAILY TERMINAL BUILDING AND TABLE II 

AREA EMPLOYEE POPULATION 
O'HARE FIELD 
1965 

Total Employees 5,700 

Peak Shift Employees 2,700 

-51 - 



AUTOMOTIVE VEHICLES 
CHAPTER VI 

INTRODUCTION 

This chapter considers the expected traffic flow of automotive vehicles 
and the median peak inventories of vehicles by types at O'Hare Field in 19(55. The 
daily flow of traffic on the median Friday and the median Sunday of the peak air 
passenger traffic month is considered according to the following types of vehicles: 

Private Automobiles 
Taxis 

Airport Limousines 
Trucks 
The median peak hour inventories of the following types of vehicles for 
which parking areas will be required are forecasted for the median Friday and the median 
Sunday of the peak air passenger traffic month in 1965. 

Private Automobiles 

General Public 
Employees 
Taxis 

Airport Limousines 
Rental Automobiles 
As was discussed in connection with forecasts of terminal building population, 
the median peak hour used in automotive vehicles forecast consists of the median of the 
four highest hours of the day. The planning basis employed, the median Friday and the 
median Sunday is the same as that employed in the development of terminal population 
forecasts and discussed in detail in Chapter V. 

-52- 



.: 



C 



t 



[ 



„ 



The first stage of this chapter presents the survey and analysis methods 
used in these automotive vehicle studies. This is followed by a discussion of the development 
of automotive vehicle traffic flow and inventory forecasts for O'Hare Field in 1965. 

SURVEY AND ANALYSIS METHODS 
A. Automotive Traffic Flow 

Studies were conducted to establish forecasts of the reasonable level of 
automotive traffic which could be expected at O'Hare Field ?n 1965. These studies consisted 
of the following major steps: 

1 . A determination of the number of air passengers, visitors and 
spectators and employees at O'Hare Field on the median peak Friday and 
median Sunday of the peak air passenger month in 1965., 

2. Establishing for each class of terminal population, the average number of 
people who will utilize each of the different types of ground transportation 
facilities. 

3. Establishing for each type of ground transportation facility, the average 
number of people per vehicle. 

In the first major step of this study, the terminal population for the median 
Friday and median Sunday of the peak air passenger month in 1965 was established by type of 
population as follows: 

1 . Air Passengers - forecasts of air passengers at O'Hare Field have been 
developed previously in Chapter 1 of this report and were used in 
this study. Originating and terminating passengers 

-53 - 



were considered separately. 

2. Visitors and Spectators - the number of visitors and spectators expected 
at CHare Field was determined through the relationship of this type 
of terminal population to air passenger traffic based on studies of other 
major air terminals in the United States. These studies indicated a stable 
relationship between air passenger traffic and the volume of visitors 

and spectators. 

3. Employees - employee population at CHare Field in 1965 has been 
developed previously as discussed in Chapter V of this report. 

These forecasts of average terminal population in 1965 were then expanded to 
levels corresponding to the median Friday and median Sunday of the peak air passenger month in 
1965. This expansion was based on the historic relationship between these peak month median 
traffic periods and average annual periods as was considered in detail in connection with 
forecasts of terminal population in Chapter V. Forecasts of employee population is not 
expected to vary seasonally with variations in the volume of air passenger traffic. 

It was then necessary to distribute the total terminal population according 
to the type of ground transportation that would be used,, This was done for each of the 
different types of terminal population. 

Air Passengers - based on a study of ground transportation facilities used by 
originating and terminating air passengers at Chicago Midway Airport in 1955 and analysis 
of present trends in ground transportation use, effect of geographic location of O'Hare 
Field and other factors, estimates were made of the expected use of various ground 
transportation facilities by originating and terminating air passengers at CHare Field in 1965. 

-54- 



L 
I 

r 



c 



c 

[ 
: 
r 



These estimates are shown in Table 3, Appendix B. 

Visitors and Spectators - studies conducted at other major air terminals 
indicate that, almost without exception, visitors and spectators use private automobiles 
as ground transportation to and from the terminal . Accordingly, this pattern was 
considered to be representative of O'Hare Field in 1965. 

Employees - similar studies have indicated that employees also use private 
automobiles almost exclusively. These findings are particularly applicable to Chicago 
O'Hare because of its location away from the hub of mass transit facilities. 

Having established the type of ground transportation that would be used by 
each element of terminal population, it was necessary to determine the number of people 
per vehicle for each type of vehicle in order to determine the expected number of 
vehicle movements. Since each class of terminal population has different characteristics 
in their use of ground transportation, each was considered separately. 

Air Passengers - for those air passengers using private automobiles as ground 
transportation, studies of ground transportation at other United States terminals indicates 
that a loading of 1 .25 passengers per automobile is reasonble for planning purposes. In 
the use of taxi cabs , a loading of 1 .00 passengers per vehicle was adopted on the same 
basis. Studies of limousine load factors developed at Chicago O'Hare, Chicago Midway 
and other major United States air terminals, as well as an appraisal of a trend toward the 
use of larger and more efficient equipment as it is developed, indicate that for 1965, an 
estimated loading of 18 persons per vehicle is reasonable for planning purposes. This 
loading stakes into account the peak air traffic period to which these estimates correspond 



-55- 



Visitors and Spectators - as discussed above, this segment of terminal 
population is expected to use private automobiles exclusively o Separate loadings were 
developed for the median Friday and the median Sunday of the peak month because of the 
family characteristics of the weekend visitor and spectator . For Friday a loading of 2.4 
persons per auto was used while that of 3.0 persons per auto was used for Sunday. 

Employees - also as discussed previously, employees are expected to use 
private automobiles exclusively. Corresponding to the experience of other major air 
terminals, in the United States a loading of 1 .0 persons per auto was considered reasonable for 
planning purposes for this element of terminal population „ 

The number of air passengers, visitors and spectators and employees was 
divided by the number of persons per vehicle to develop forecasts of the number of vehicles. 
For private automobiles, this figure was doubled to reflect two-way movements. In the case 
of taxicabs and limousines, the figure was not doubled since these vehicles are expected to 
carry passengers in both directions. 

Estimated truck traffic at Chicago CHare in 1965 was developed through 
the study of the present truck movements related to air traffic both at CHare and Midway 
Airport. The experience of other major terminals was also examined to confirm the 
reasonableness of forecasts. 

B. Automotive Vehicle Inventories 

The first step in the studies of future automotive traffic at J Hare Field 
in 1965 was detailed study of present automotive traffic as is related to the present 



-56- 



volume of air passenger traffic af O'Hare Field. At the same time the surveys of daily 
air passenger traffic were being conducted in October and November of 1957, surveys of 
the automotive inventories were made. Forms such as those used in these surveys are 
shown in Exhibits 3, 4 and 5 in Appendix B. 

Based upon these surveys, the relationship between the median peak hour 
inventory of each type of vehicle studied and the volume of daily air passenger traffic 
was determined for the median Friday and the median Sunday of the survey period. The 
median peak hour, as discussed in connection with forecasts of terminal population in 
Chapter V, consisted of the median of the four highest hours of the day. Also similar to 
the technique employed in Chapter V, the hourly inventory for each of the three Fridayi 
and three Sundays of the survey period were combined to establish a median hourly 
i nventory for a median Friday and a median Sunday. The median peak vehicle inventories 
determined by this survey and the ratios of median peak vehicle inventories per 100 
enplaning passengers are shown In Table 4 and 5 of Appendix B. 
FORECAST OF VEHICULAR TRAFFIC VOLUMES - 1965 
A. Automotive Traffic Flow 

Having determined the terminal population by type for the median Friday and 
median Sunday of the peak air passenger traffic month in 1965, the distribution of this 
terminal population according to the type of vehicle they could be expected to use, 
and the number of persons per vehicle for each type of vehicle and each type of terminal 
population, it was possible to develop forecasts of the number of daily vehicle movements 
expected at O'Hare Field in 1965. These forecasts are shown below in Table II. 



-57 - 



FORECAST OF VEHICULAR TRAFFIC MOVEMENTS 



TABLE 



O'HARE FIELD 



1965 



Daily Vehicle Movements 



Median Fr 


day 


Median Sunday 


45,380 




50,520 


6,500 




6,350 


160 




140 


990 




990 


53,030 




64,560 



Private Automobile 

Taxi 

Airport Limousine 

Truck 

Total 

In order to confirm the reasonableness of these forecasts of daily 
vehicular traffic movements at O'Hare Field, they were compared with traffic movements 
at other major air terminals, specifically the following: 

Detroit Willow Run 
Boston Logan International 
New York International 
New York LaGuardia 
New York Newark 
It was found that the forecasts as developed represented sound and reason- 
able levels of vehicular traffic, giving consideration to the expected level of air passenger 
traffic at O'Hare Field in 1965. 
B. Automotive Vehicle Inventories 

Forecasts of median peak hour inventories were developed for the 
following types of vehicles: 

-58- 



Private Automobiles 

General Public 
Employees 
Taxis 

Airport Limousines 
Rental Automobiles 
General Public Parking - Forecasts of the volume of general public parking at O'Hare Field 
in 1965 were developed through a study which consisted of the following major steps: 

1 . The level of present daily vehicle movements at O'Hare 
Field was related to the present daily volume of air 
passenger traffic to establish a ratio of movements per 
100 daily enplaning passengers. A comparison of this 
ratio with similar ratfos experienced at such major airports 
as Detroit Willow Run, Boston Logan International, and 
New York International, LaGuardia and Newark indicated 
that it was of a reasonable level . This ratio was then 
applied to forecasts of enplaning passengers for the 
median Friday and median Sunday in 1965 to establish 
the number of expected vehicle movements at O'Hare 
Field in 1965 for the median Friday and Sunday. 



-59 



2. Detailed studies mdple at these other major air terminals 
indicated that stable relationships existed between the number 
of daily vehicle movements and the number of automobiles 
entering the general public parking lot daily. Based upon 
these studies, a median ratio of 10 vehicles entering the parking 
lot per 100 daily vehicle movements was established. This 
ratio was then applied to forecasts of vehicle movements 

at O'Hare Field to develop forecasts of the number of 
vehicles entering the paid parking lot. 

3. These studies of other major air terminals discussed above 
also indicated a stable relationship between the number 
of vehicles entering the paid parking lot and the peak 
inventory of vehicles that the lot experienced. A ratio 
typical of these other terminals was applied to the number 
of vehicles entering the parking lot at O'Hare Field, as 
forecasted above, to obtain estimates of the median peak 
inventory of vehicles for the median Friday and Sunday of 
the peak air passenger traffic month in 1965. 

Employee Parking - Forecasts of parking facilities necessary to accommodate terminal building 
and area employees at O'Hare Field in 1965 were based on the forecasts of employee popu- 
lation developed in a previous section of this report and the employee parking experience of 

other major airports. 

-60- 



Data gathered from the 1957 surveys of employee population at O'Hare 
Field indicated that at the present time very nearly all employees drive to work. These 
survey findings are not considered unreasonable in view of the location of O'Hare Field 
relative to population concentrations and mass transit hubs in the Chicago area, Thus for 
space planning purposes it was considered reasonable to expect that the number of employees 
on the peak shift in 1965 would be representative of the peak employee parking space 
requirements in 1965 at O'Hare Field. 

Taxi Inventory - Forecasts of the median peak inventory of taxi cabs at O'Hare Field in 
1965 were developed through an analysis of expected air passenger traffic flow in and out 
of the terminal during the median Friday and Sunday of the peak month in 1957. In this 
study the number of deplaning passengers expected to use taxicabs was subtracted from the 
number of enplaning passengers who are expected to arrive at the terminal in taxicabs to 
determine the expected inventory of taxicabs at the terminal building. For an appropriate 
forecast of the taxicab inventory at O'Hare Field in 1965 the median of the four peak inven- 
tories was selected as the final forecast . 

Umousfne Inventory *• Forecasts of the median peak limousine inventory at O'Hare Field in 
1965 were developed through the following analysis: 

1 . Present inventory of limousine was related to 
present air passenger traffic, both as determined 
through the 1957 surveys at O'Hare Field. 

2. This relationship was applied to forecasts of air 
passenger traffic in 1965 to develop initial estimates 
of limousine inventory in 1965. 



-61 



3. The changed pattern of limousine operations 

expected by 1965, a result of an increase in 
average vehicle size, is expected to result in a 
higher number of passengers per vehicle. This 
trend was considered in the development of 
limousine inventory forecasts. 

These forecasts also consider the possible effect of the following factors 
on limousine operations at CHare Field in 1965: 

1 . Limousine operations have tended to decrease 

relative to other means of transportation for air 
passengers and may be expected to continue this 



2. International and Overseas air passenger traffic 

on the other hand will tend to increase the use of 
limousines by air passengers. 
Rental Car inventory - Forecasts of the peak number of rental cars expected at O'Hare Field in 
1965 were established by a study which considered the present experienced volumes of rental 
cars as they related to the volume of air passenger traffic at O'Hare Field. Having thus de- 
termined a relationship between rental car inventory and air passenger traffic, this relation- 
ship was applied to forecasts of air passenger traffic for the median peak Friday and Sunday 
of the peak air passenger month in 1965 to establish forecasts of rental car inventory at O'Hare 
Field typical of this same period of the year. These forecasts of rental car inventory as thus 
developed were then compared to estimates made by the rental car organization now operating 
at O'Hare Field and were found to be essentially similar. The extremely rapid rate of growth 

of rental car usage in past years was considered in the development of these forecasts. 

- 62 - 



: 

: 



: 



: 



Vehicles In Loading and Unloading Area 

Forecast of the vehicle Inventories that can be expected in loading and 
unloading areas of the terminal at O'Hare Field in 1965 were developed through the following 
study: 

1 . The median peak volumes of vehicles in both the loading and 
unloading areas were determined through the 1957surveys at O'Hare 
Field;, 

2. These median peak volumes were related to the volume of air passenger 
traffic during the survey period to establish ratios of peak vehicle 
Inventories per 100 daily enplaning passengers; 

3o These ratios were applied to forecasts of daily enplaning passengers for 
the median peak Friday and Sunday at O'Haire Field in 1965 to develop 
forecasts of median peak vehicle inventory in both loading and unloading 
areas of the CHatre Field terminal In 1965 . 

Forecasts of median peak ground transportation inventories at O'Hare Field 
in 1965 are shown for the median peak Friday and Sunday in Table 1 below. 



-63 



FORECASTS OF PEAK GROUND TRANSPORTATION INVENTORIES TABLE 

O'HARE FIELD 

1965 





ng 


Area 


Ground Transportation 


Inventories 




Median 


Friday 


Median Sunday 


Vehicles in Unload! 


40 




30 


Vehicles in Loading 


Ai 


rea 


40 




45 


Paid Parking 






5,300 




5,800 


Employee Parking 






2,700 




- 


Taxi cabs 






110 




60 


Limousines 






20 




20 


Rental Cars 






310 




250 



-64- 



sooo 



Forecast 

of Automotive Vehicle Inventories at O'Hare Field 
by Type of Vehicle for Median Friday and Median 
Sunday of Peak Air Passenger Month in 1965 



3750 



itl 

t 


§2SOO- 
► 

M 

o 

i-H 

o 

•H 

Q 
> 



tzso 

938 
625 
312 



ID 



Paid. Parking 



Employee 
Parking 



Taxioaos 



I_iim.oiasin.es Rental Cars 



-Fridsi-y- 



J Siancla-y 



Exhibit Mm 



" 



" 

(I 

: 






- 






50 



45 



40 



35 



30 



a 





15 



IO 



:Fricla.y- 

Sunday 




Private 
Automobiles 



Taxicabs 



Limousines 



Tnaolc 



Forecast of Automotive Traffic Movements at O'Hare Field 
by Type of Vehicle for Median Friday and Median 
Sunday of Peak Air Passenger Month in 1965 



Exhibit IX 



PART D - CONCESSION REVENUE STUDIES AND 
FORECASTS 

Chapter VI I - Annual Gross Revenues 



ANNUAL GROSS REVENUE 
CHAPTER VII 



INTRODUCTION 

Forecasts of annual gross revenue were developed for those concessions at 
O'Hare Field in 1965 whose space requirements could be expected to be a function of 
the amount of gross revenue available. The following concessions were studied: 

Coffee Shop and Dining Room 

Cocktail Lounge 

General Merchandise 

Game Room 

Toilets 
Forecasts of annua! gross revenue for these concessions were developed 
through a study consisting of these major steps: 

1 . the determination of reasonable levels of gross concession revenue per 
enplaning passenger, and 

2. the application of these levels of gross revenue per enplaning passenger 
to forecasts of air passenger traffic at O'Hare Field in 1965, 

The first section of this chapter consists of a discussion of the determination 
of reasonable levels of gross revenue per enplaning passenger for the concessions studied. 
A later section will describe the forecast methods and present forecasts of annual gross 
revenue of the concessions studied at O'Hare Field in 1965. 



-65 - 



FORECAST CONSIDERATIONS 

In the development of reasonable levels of annual gross revenues for the 
concessions considered, the following factors were evaluated: 

1 . Concession revenue at O Hare Field - gross concession revenue at 
O fi Hare Field in 1956 was studied in relation to the volume of air 
passenger traffic. Present space and facility limitations as well as the 
effect of a limited pattern of air passenger traffic at O'Hare Field 
were considered in studying this data. Detail of this gross concession 
revenue experience at O ff Hare Field in 1956 is presented in Appendix C 

2. Concession revenue at Midway Airport - the revenue experience of 
comparable concessions at Midway Airport was examined. The effect 
on revenues of factors such as the over-crowded conditions existing at 
Midway Airport were appraised. 

3 Concession revenue at Other Major Airports - gross concession revenue 
related to air passenger traffic at other major airports for concessions 
comparable to those studied for 0°Hare Field in 1965 was examined , 
Typical ratios of gross concession revenue per enplaning passenger were 
determined. 

4. Local market factors - the location of O'Hare Field relative to high 
population or income areas of Chicago, its proximity to blighted or 
marginal economic areas, and the present and future possibilities of 
competition from other business activities was considered. 

-66 - 



FORECASTS OF ANNUAL GROSS REVENUES 

Based on an evaluation of forecast criteria outlined above, ratios of 
concession revenue per enplaning passenger for the concessions studied were developed, 
Forecasts of annual gross revenue for these concessions were developed by applying 
the ratios of gross revenue per enplaning passenger to forecasts of enplaning passenger 
to forecasts of enplaning passengers developed in Chapter I of this report. The detail 
of this method is shown in Table 1 of Appendix Co These forecasts are considered 
reasonable for space and facility planning purposes since they are based on ratios of 
gross revenue per enplaning passenger typical of major airports in the United States. 
Forecasts of annual gross revenue expected to be available to the concessions studied 
are shown in Table I below. 



FORECASTS OF ANNUAL GROSS REVENUE 

O'HARE FIELD 

1965 

Concession 

Dining Room and Coffee Shop 

Cocktail Lounge 

General Merchandise 

Game Room 

Toilets 



TABLE I 



1965 
Annual Gross Revenue 

$5,142,500 

3,085,500 

2,571,300 

154,300 

102,900 



As a check of the reliability of these forecasts, the following study was 



-67 



+ 



_ 



. 



- 



conducted: 

1 . During the 1957 surveys at CVHare Field, the median peak hour 
population of the dining room and coffee shop, cocktail lounge and 
general merchandise area was related to daily gross revenues of each 
concession » 
2o Estimates of daily gross revenue corresponding to the median Friday were 
developed from the forecasts of annual gross revenue for each concession 
as described in this Chapter . 
3. The ratio of daily gross revenue per median peak hour population 

established in * 1 above was applied to estimates of daily gross revenues 
as developed in * 2 above to obtain independent estimates of median peak 
hour population in the concessions studied. 
By the comparison of these population estimates with the forecasts developed 
as described in Chapter V of this report, an evaluation of concession annual gross revenue 
forecasts could be made. As shown in Table II below, the two independent estimates of 
median peak hour population are closely comparable . The development of these concession 
estimates of median peak hour population is described in Table 2 of Appendix C. 



-68- 



c 

c 

c 



1 



: 



FORECASTS COMPARED TO REVENUE ESTIMATES TABLE II 

OF PEAK HOUR CONCESSION OCCUPANCY 

O'HARE FIELD 

1965 

1965 



Median Peak Concession Occupancy 
Forecasts Revenue Estimates 


Dining Room and 

Coffee Shop 970 




1,010 


Cocktail Lounge 350 




380 


General Merchandise Area 120 




140 



-69 



APPENDIX A - AIR TRAFFIC 



POPULATION GROWTH APPENDIX A 

CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA AND THE UNITED STATES TABLE I 
194 7-1957 





United States 




Chicago Metr 
Number 


opolitan Area 




Number 








(000) 


Index 


(000) 


Index 


1948 


143,796.4 


100 


4,920.9 


100 


1949 


146,496.3 


102 


5 f ]46J 


105 


1950 


149,105.5 


104 


5,261.3 


107 


1951 


152,311.4 


106 


5,545.1 


113 


1952 


154,926.6 


108 


5,630.7 


114 


1953 


157,161.3 


109 


5,664.5 


115 


1954 


160,019.7 


111 


5,760.6 


117 


1955 


162,566.4 


113 


5,850.5 


119 


1956 


165,811.5 


115 


6,150.9 


125 


1957 


168,805.3 


117 


6,183.0 


126 



Source; Sales Management 

Survey of Buying Power 
1948-1957 



-70 - 



c 



£ 

c 

c 

L 

c 



F 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 2 



COMPARATIVE INCOME DISTRIBUTION 

CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA, ILLINOIS AND THE UNITED STATES 

1956 

Per Cent of Spending Units 



Income Group 


Chicago 
Metropolitian Area 


Illinois 


United States 


$10,000 and over 


9.5% 


7.8% 


5.6% 


$ 7,000 to $9,999 


14 o 8% 


12.5% 


9.5% 


$ 4,000 to $6,999 


37.8% 


35.6% 


31.4% 


$ 2,500 to $3,999 


20.2% 


22.5% 


25.4% 


$0 to $2,499 


17.7% 


21.6% 


28.1% 


Total 


100.0% 


100% 


100% 



Source : Column ( 1 ) Sales Management Survey of Buying Power, 

May 10, 1956 

( 2 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 

( 3 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 



- 71 - 



i: 
C 

: 

I 

d 
c 



c 

c 

L 

c 



WHOLESALE SALES RELATED TO POPULATION APPENDIX A 

TABLE 3 
CHICAGO AND FOUR SELECTED CITIES * 

1954 





Metropolitan 


Wholesale 


Wholesale 


Sales 




Area 


Sales 


Per Capita 






Population 
1954 


1954 


1954 




City 


000 


Number 
(3) 


Rank 




(1) 


(2) 


(4) 


New York 


13,680,000 


$48,459,041 


«p O, 0*K/ 


1 


CHICAGO 


5,760,600 


17,052,173 


2,960 


2 


Los Angeles 


4,990,800 


5,519,331 


1,180 


5 


Philadelphia 


3,909,000 


7,095,067 


1,810 


4 


Detroit 


3,336,100 


7,409,930 


2,220 


3 



''Cities which, with Chicago, are the four largest metropolitan areas in population 



Source: Column (1) Sales Management, Survey of Buying Power. 

(2) U. S. Dept. of Commerce. Census of Business, 1954, Vol. IV 

(3) Col (2) -r Col (1) 

(4) Rank order of Col (3) 



-72- 



APPENDIX A 

TECHNICAL NOTES - FORECASTS OF AIR PASSENGER TRAFFIC 

As was discussed in Chapter I of this report in connection .with 
the distribution! of air passengers between airports, air passenger potential 
was measured and distributed geographically in the Chicago area. The 
effect of airport location on the realization of this potential was also discussed. 

These notes are concerned with the measurement of the 
increased realization of air passenger potential and consequently the 
increased air passenger traffic that would result from the addition of O" Hare to 
the Chicago airport system as a fully developed airport. 

Through the measurement of air passenger potential of the Chicago 
area in relation to Midway Airport, the percent of total air passenger potential 
in 1965 that would be realized by Midway Airport alone was determined. 
This percent of potential was related to forecasted 1965 air passenger traffic 
for only Midway Airport. This was done for both locally and non^ locally 
generated air traffic. 

The 1965 air passenger potential was then studied in connection 
with both Midway and O "Hare. Field, assigning the air passenger potential realized 
for each Census Tract to the nearest airport. Since two airports result in a reduction 
in airport distance for part of the Chicago area population, an increase in the 
percent of air passenger potential realized results. 

This percentage increase in the volume of air passenger potential 
realized was then applied to forecasts of Chicago air passenger traffic in 
1965 based on adequate air service at Midway alone. 



The resulting increased volume of air passenger traffic represents forecasts 
of Chicago air passenger traffic expected to result from the provision of adequate air 
service at both Midway Airport and O'Hare Field in 1965. 



-74- 



1 

I 

1 

] 

1 



I 

> 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

I 

1 



HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF CIVIL AND MILITARY 



AIRCRAFT TRAFFIC 



1954 - 1957 



1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 4 



Military 




Civil 




Local and Itinerant 


Local 


Itinerant 


Total 


73,038 


16,176 


21,847 


38,023 


85,333 


19,748 


27,301 


47,049 


71,966 


17,684 


33,068 


50,752 


88,555 


21 , 348 


42,359 


63,707 



Source: CAA Control Tower Records, Chicago O'Hare Field 



-75- 



CHICAGO AND THE UNITED STATES 




TABLE 5 


1948-1957 


Enplaned Domestic 
Chicago 
(O 


Air Passengers 
United States 
(2) 


Chicago as a 
Per Cent of 
the United States 
(3) 


1948 


991,857* 


13,060,372 


7.59% 


1949 


1,168,294 


14,732,687 


7.93 


1950 


1,437,416 


16,937,018 


8.49 


1951 


1,848,065 


21,895,612 


8.44 


1952 


2,112,595* 


24,350,307 


8.68 


1953 


2,650,415 


28,004,269 


9.46 


1954 


3,045,167 


31,657,852 


9.62 


1955 


3,603,278 


37,226,432 


9.68 


1956 


3,963,789 


40,752,563 


9.73 


1957 


4,031,234 


44,017,548 


9,16 



* Gotch and Crawford, Airline Station Analyses 

Source: Column (1 ) U. S. Department of Commerce, Air Commerce Traffic Pattern 
( 2 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 
( 3 ) Column ( 1 ) -rCoIumn ( 2 ) 



-76- 



L 



: 
- 



TECHNICAL NOTES - FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL APPENDIX A 

AND OVERSEAS AIR PASSENGER TRAFFIC 

These notes describe in detail the three methods used to develop independent 
estimates of international and overseas air passenger potential in the Chicago area. 

In the first method the proportion of total United States domestic air 
passenger traffic that is developed in the Chicago area was examined. To establish an 
estimate of international and overseas air passenger potential in the Chicago area it was 
considered that Chicago would develop the same proportion of total United States 
international and overseas air passenger traffic as it has historically developed in relation 
to total United States domestic air passenger traffic. This detailed analysis is presented 
below: 

ESTIMATE OF INTERNATIONAL AND OVERSEAS AIR PASSENGER POTENTIAL 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 
1956 

A. Domestic Enplaned Passengers 

United States 1956 40,752,563 

B. Chicago Enplaned Domestic 

Air Passengers 1956 3,963,789 

C. Chicago Enplaned Passengers 

as % of United States 1956 9.73% 

D. International and Overseas Air Passengers 
Enplaned by United States Flag C rriers at 

Continental and United Station Station, 1956 1,167,272 

E. Estimated Chicago Enplaned International 

and Overseas Passengers 1956 113,600 

Source: Line A - United Spates Department of Commerce - Air Commerce Traffic Pattern, 1956 

B - Same as Line A 

C - Line B - Line A 

D - Same as Line A 

E - Line D x Line C 

-77 - 



In the second method through surveys conducted by the Civil Aeronautics Board, 
the number of international and overseas air passengers who begin or end air trips in the 
Chicago area was established „ The median relationship for these other communities was 
applied to the historic volume of international and overseas air passengers originating or 
terminating in Chicago to develop an estimate of international and overseas air passenger 
potential in the Chicago area. The detailed steps of this study are shown below: 
ESTIMATES OF INTERNATIONAL AND OVERSEAS AIR PASSENGER POTENTIAL 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 
1956 





Intl & O seas 


Int's & O'seas 


lnt'1 & O'seas 


O & D Pass . as 




Q&D 


Enpl . 


Enpl . & Depl . 


% of Enpl. & 




Air Passengers 


Air Passengers 


Air Passengers 


Depl . Pass. 




1956 
(1) 


1956 
(2) 


1956 


1956 




(3) 


(4) 


Los Angeles 


140,448 


64,404 


128,808 


109% 


San Francisco 


131,448 


71,092 


142,184 


92 


Miami 


380,814 


314,383 


628,766 


61 


New Orleans 


32,250 


26,206 


52,412 


62 


Boston 


101,226 


15,992 


31,984 


316 


New York 


979,902 


431,511 


863,022 


114 


Houston 


31,860 


27,250 


54,500 


58 


Seattle 


143,832 


98,848 


197,696 


73 



Medi 



an 



62% 



Chicago 



122,332 



98,700 



197,300 



62% 



Source: Column ( 1 ) 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 



Chicago 
Column ( 



2.) 

3) 

4) 



CAB Airline Revenue Passenger Survey, International 1956 as 

expanded on AppendixSheet * 1 

U. S. Department of Commerce, Air Commerce Traffic Pattern, 1956 

Column ( 2 ) x 2 

Column ( 1 ) f Column ( 3 ) 

Same as Column ( 1 ) above 
Column ( 3 ) r 2 
Column ( 1 ) -j Column ( 4 ) 
Median of Column ( 4 ) above 



78>- 



Finally in the third method, an extensive survey of international and overseas air 
passengers at New York International Airport conducted by the Port of New York 
Authority, was examined „ Through this survey the number of international and overseas 
air passengers residing in both the immediate Chicago area and the surrounding region 
in the United States which international air service at Chicago could be reasonably 
expected to serve was determined. 8t was found that this represented 8% of all 
international and overseas air passengers at New York International Airport. It was then 
considered that if the Chicago area and surrounding region would develop 8% of 
international and overseas air passengers departing through New York International Airport, 
it was not unreasonable to consider that a similar proportion of traffic departing from other 
International Airports would also be residents of the Chicago area and surrounding region. 
Accordingly, 8% of total United States international and overseas air passenger traffic was 
considered to be a reasonable estimate of Jne international and overseas air traffic potential 
in the Chicago area. The techniques involved in the development of this estimate are 
shown on the following page. 



-79- 



ESTIMATE OF INTERNATIONAL AND OVERSEAS AIR PASSENGER POTENTIAL 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

1956 

1 . Total Port of New York Authority Survey Trans- 
Atlantic Air Passengers 1956 218,700 

2. Port of New York Authority Survey Trans-Atlantic 

Air Passengers who began trip in Chicago 13,800 

3. One-half of Port of New York Authority Trans- 
Atlantic Air Passengers who began trip in 

E. North Central United States , 6,700 

4. Total Port of New York Authority Survey Bermuda and 

Latin America Air Passengers 1956 106,600 

5. Port of New York Authority Survey Bermuda and Latin 
American Air Passengers who began trip in Chicago 2,600 

6. One-half of Port of New York Authority Survey 
Bermuda and Latin American Air Passengers who began 

trip in E„ North Central United States 2,000 



7. Total Port of New York Authority Survey Air 

Passengers, Trans-Atlantic and Bermuda 325,300 

8. Port of New York Authority Survey *ASr Passengers 

who began trip in E. North Central United States 25,100 

9. Chicago and one-half E. North Central as a per cent 

of total Port of New York Authority Passengers 8% 

1 0. Total United States International and Oversea^ 1,167,272 

Enplaning Air Passengers 1956 

1 1 . Estimate of Chicago International and Overseas 

Enplaning Air Passengers 1956 93,400 



-80- 



AIRLINE PAIRS - INTERLINE CONNECTING PASSENGERS APPENDIX A 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS TABLE 6 



1954, 1955 and 1956 



Interline Connecting Passengers Exchanged 





1956 




1955 




1954 




Airline Pair 


Number 


Rank 


Number 


Rank 


Number 


Rank 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


(6) 


(7) 


AA UA 


106,848 


1 


87,102 


1 


83,868 


1 


UA TW 


75,216 


2 


75,306 


2 


73,638 


2 


UA EA 


64,518 


3 


42,756 


6 


41,970 


4 


AA NO 


62,226 


4 


38,808 


7 


31,980 


9 


AA TW 


60,990 


5 


59,748 


3 


61,806 


3 


EA NW 


59,580 


6 


46,254 


5 


33,480 


7 


UA NO 


53,160 


7 


32,754 


10 


27,312 


12 


UA DL 


52,362 


8 


46,878 


4 


41,442 


5 


EA NO 


48,252 


9 


25,128 


15 


15,936 


21 


UA CL 


45,696 


10 


29,268 


12 


35,928 


6 


AA NW 


43,806 


11 


36,060_ 


8 


31,296 


10 


NW TW 


41,394 


12 


28,584 


13 


26,202 


13 


NO TW 


40,884 


13 


26,724 


14 


24,306 


15 


DL NW 


40,620 


14 


35,712 


9 


31,986 


8 


DL NO 


36,402 


15 


23,604 


16 


18,822 


19 


AA CL 


34,242 


16 


22,488 


17 


23,850 


16 


UA NW 


33,648 


17* 


30,15Q 


11 


23,628 


17 


AA OZ 


33,648 


17* 


18,312 


21 


6,900 


30 


CL TW 


31,440 


19 


20,190 


18 


29,880 


11 


UA OZ 


23,106 


20 


13,050 


27 


5,814 


31 


CL NW 


22,116 


21 


10,992 


31 


9,072 


29 


AA DL 


21,810 


22 


19,464 


20 


14,868 


25 


UA BN 


21,102 


23 


17,304 


22 


20,274 


18 


AA BN 


20,364 


24 


19,548 


19 


26,160 


14 


BN CL 


19,386 


25 


11,100 


30 


15,738 


22 


EA TW 


18,750 


26 


14,346 


26 


15,282 


23 


DL TW 


18,702 


27 


17,238 


23 


14,964 


24 


CL NO 


17,964 


28 


6,084 


33 


3,630 


35 


CL EA 


17,556 


29 


12,198 


29 


9,636 


28 


CL DL 


17,040 


30 


14,706 


25 


13,896 


26 


CL OZ 


16,374 


31 


5,094 


35 


2,760 


37 


AA EA 


15,898 


32 


12,438 


28 


9,804 


27 


BN TW 


15,228 


33 


15,486 


24 


17,190 


20 


OZ TW 


14,622 


34 


8,682 


32 


3,636 


34 


BN NO 


13,410 


35 


5,604 


34 


4,614 


32 



-81 - 



AIRLINE PAIRS - INTERLINE CONNECTING PASSENGERS 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

1954, 1955 and 1956 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 6 





ine Pair 




Infer! 


ine Connecting 


Passengers Exch 


anged 






1956 


1955 






1954 


Air! 


Number 
(2) 


Rank 

13T 


Number 


Rank 
(5) 


Number 
(6) 


Rank 


""TO 7 


(7) 


EA 


oz 


8,616 


36 


3,498 


40 


708 


44 


UA 


LC 


6,258 


37 


4,638 


37 


2,064 


40 


NO 


oz 


5,874 


38 


2,022 


45 


858 


43 


AA 


LC 


5,694 


39 


4,800 


36 


1,734 


41 


DL 


oz 


5,466 


40 


2,760 


42 


474 


47 


NW 


OZ 


5,448 


41 


3,834 


39 


2,262 


39 


NO 


NW 


4,716 


42 


1,644 


48 


438 


48 


LC 


TW 


4,074 


43 


2,598 


43 


1,308 


42 


BN 


EA 


3,324 


U 


4,320 


38 


4,218 


33 


LC 


NO 


3,234 


45 


1,692 


47 


510 


46 


BN 


NW 


3,144 


46 


2,364 


44 


2,712 


38 


CL 


LC 


2,838 


47 


960 


50 


246 


52 


BN 


DL 


2,514 


48 


2,832 


41 


3,600 


36 


LC 


NW 


2,166 


49 


2,004 


46 


612 


45 


BN 


OZ 


1,938 


50 


1,026 


49 


324 


49 


LC 


OZ 


1,170 


51 


258 


iJ*r 


24 


55 


BN 


LC 


780 


52 


522 


51 


300 


51 


EA 


LC 


666 


53 


240 


55 


168 


54 


DL 


EA 


402 


54 


294 


52 


312 


50 


DL 


LC 


342 


55 


282 


53 


198 


53 



*More than one pair share this rank. 

Source: Columns 1 , 2, 4, 6, Special Civil Aeronautics Board Tabulation of 
Chicago Interline Connecting Passengers 
March and September, 1954, 1 955 and 1956 

Columns 3, 5, 7, Rank Order of Columns 2, 4 and 6 



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-84- 



HISTORICAL GROWTH OF SCHEDULED DOMESTIC AIRLINE 

AIRCRAFT DEPARTURES 

CHICAGO AND THE UNITED STATES 

1948- 1956 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 8 



1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 

195a 

1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 



Scheduled Domestic Departures 


Chicago as 


Chicago 

0) 


United States 
(2) 


a % of the 
United States 
(3) 


65,943* 


1,861,199 


3.54% 


74,226 


2,023,702 


3.67 


76,695 


2,137,294 


3.59 


86,451 


2,319,143 


373 


97,883 * 


2,431,633 


4.03 


116,299 


2,612,767 


4.45 


121,301 


2,660,579 


4.56 


140,943 


2,901,758 


4.86 


155,129 


3,094,075 


5.01 


166,242 


3,318,282 


5.00 



*Gotch and Crawford, Airline Station Analyses 



Source: Column (1) U* S. Dept. of Commerce, Air Commerce Traffic 

(2) Same as Col (1) 

(3) Col (l) + CoI (2) 



-85- 



HISTORICAL PATTERN OF ENPLANING LOAD FACTORS 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 
1948- 1956 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 9 





Scheduled 

Airline 

Departure 

(1) 


Average 
Seats per 
Aircraft 
(2) 


Total 
Departing 
Seats 
(3) 


Enplaning 
Passengers 
(4) 


Enplaning 
Passenger 
Load Factor 
(5) 


1948* 


65,943* 


32.37 


2,134,575 


991,857 


46.47 


1949 


74,336 


35.03 


2,600,137 


1,168,294 


44.93 


1950 


76,695 


37.47 


2,873,762 


1,437,416 


50.02 


1951 


86,451 


39.55 


3,419,137 


1,848,065 


54.05 


1952 


97,883* 


42.71 


4,180,583 


2,112,595 


50.53 


1953 


116,299 


46.07 


5,357,895 


2,650,415 


49.47 


1954 


121,301 


50.07 


6,073,541 


3,045,167 


50.14 


1955 


140,943 


51.60 


7,272,659 


3,603,278 


49.55 


1956 


155,129 


52.43 


8,133,413 


3,963,789 


48.73 



* Gotch and Crawford, Airline Station Analyses 

Source: Column (1 ) U. S. Department of Commerce, Air Passengers Traffic Pattern 

( 2 ) CAA Statistical Handbook of Civil Aviation, 1957 

( 3 ) Column ( 1 ) x Column ( 2 ) 

( 4 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 

( 5 ) Column ( 4 ) - Column ( 3 ) 



-86- 



SEATING CAPACITIES OF AIRLINES AIRCRAFT FLEET 



UNITED STATES 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 10 



1965 





Percent of 
Total Aircraft 
Fleet 
(1) 


Percent 
Aircraft 
Size Grot 

(2) 


Average Seats 
per Aircraft 


Weighted 
Composite 


Aircraft Size 
Small and Medium 


jp Range 
(3) 


Median 
(4) 


Seating 
(5) 


Small - Piston 

Turb-prop . 
Jet 
Total 


20% 
21 
-0- 
41% 


23.5% 
24.7 
-0- 
48.2% 


25-52 
40 


38.5 
40.0 

39.3 


9.05 
9.88 

18.93 


Medium- Piston 9% 
Turbo -prop24 
Jet 1 1 
Total 44% 


10.6% 
28.2 
13.0 
51.8% 


58-94 
66-85 
80-113 


76.00 
75.50 
96.50 
80.89 


8.06 
21.29 
12.55 
41.90 


Total Small and 
Medium 


85% 


100.0% 




60.83 


60.83 


Large 








Jet 
Total 
Large 


15% 
15% 


100% 
100% 


109-125 


117 
117 


117 
117 



Note: Representative Aircraft - Small- Piston: DC-3, CV-340, M-404 

Turbo-prop: Visct, F-27 
Medium - Piston: DC -6, DC -7, L-1049, B-377 

Turbo-prop: Electra, Vanguard, Brittania 
Jet: Caravel le, Comet IV , CV-880, DC -9 
Large - Jet: B-707, DC -8 

Source: Column (1) National Requirements for Aviation Facilities, Volume I, Table 7, 

Page 12. 

(2) Distribution as a percent of each size group. 

(3) National Requirements for Aviation Facilities, Volume III, 
pp. 2, 3 and 4. 

(4) Median of Col (3) 

(5) Col (2) x Col (4) 



-87- 



FORECAST OF ANNUAL DOMESTIC SCHEDULED AIRCRAFT 

MOVEMENTS - O' HARE FIELD 

1965 

Annual Passenger Annual Average 

Enplaning Load Departing Seats per 

Passengers Factor Seats Aircraft 

Jet Market 1,750,800 50.00% 3,501,600 117 

Non -Jet Market 3,391,700 50.00 6,783,400 61 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 11 



Annual 


Annual 


Scheduled 


Scheduled 


Departures 


Movements 


29,928 


59,856 


111,203 


222,406 



Total O'Hare 5,142,500 50,00 10,285,000 72 



141,131 



282,262 



- 88 



FORECAST OF PEAK HOUR AIR CARRIER AIRCRAFT MOVEMENTS APPENDIX A 

O'HARE FIELD TABLE 12 

1965 



Type of Air Carrier 


Annual 
Aircraft 
Movements 
(1) 


Average Day 
Ai rcraf t 
Movement 
(2) 


Peak Hour as 
Percent of 
Average Day 
(3) 


Peak Hour 
Aircraft 
Movement 
(4) 


Scheduled Airlines, Domestic 


282,300 


773 




8.44% 


66 


Scheduled Airlines, International 


5,000 


14 




8.44 


1 


Other Air Carriers 


30,800 


84 




8.44 


7 


Total 


380,900 1 


,043 




8.44 


74 



Source: Column ( 1 ) Chapter JI, Table VII 
( 2 ) Column ( 1 ) r 365 
( 3 ) Relationship determined from examination of Midway air carrier 

operations. 
( 4 ) Column ( 2 ) x Column ( 3 ) 



-89- 



FORECAST OF HELICOPTER OPERATIONS 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 13 



O 'HARE FIELD 












1965 












Enplaning 

Helicopter 

Passengers 

0) 


Enplaning 
Load 
Factor 
(2) 


Departing 
Helicopter 
Seats 


Average 
Seats per 
Helicopter 


Annual 
Helicopter 
Departure 
(5) 


Annual 
Helicopter 
Movements 
' (6) 


1965 147,915 


40% 


369,788 


18 * 


20,544 


41,088 



*Estimated seating based on Vertol 44. 



-90 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 14 



FORECAST OF MEDIAN PEAK HOUR HELICOPTER OPERATIONS 
O'HARE FIELD 



1965 



Annual Average Day Median PeakMedian Peak 

Helicopter Helicopter Hours as % Hour Helicopter 

Operations O perations of Daily Operations 

(1) (2) (3) (4) 



1965 41,088 113 8,44% 10 



Source Column ( 1 ) L & B Forecast of Annual Helicopter Operations 

( 2 ) Column ( 1 ) i 365 

( 3 ) Ratio of median peak hour air carriers operations to daily 
air carrier operations, Midway Airport, 1957 

( 4 ) Column ( 2 ) x Column ( 3 ) 



-91 - 



HISTORICAL AIR CARGO TRAFFIC DEVELOPMENT 



CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA AND THE UNITED STATES 



1948-1957 



1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

* Gotch and Crawford, Airline Station Analyses 



Chicago 
(0 


United States 
(2) 


24,620 * 


165,366 


30,046 


211,472 


42,514 


289,491 


38,027 


286,836 


36,760* 


296,469 


45,090 


316,580 


44,399 


310,894 


53,556 


389,308 


56,947 


422,517 


56,783 


434,788 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 15 

Chicago as a 
Per Cent of the 
United States 

m 

14.9% 

14.2 

14.7 

13.3 

12,4 

14.2 

14.3 

13.8 

13.5 
13.1 



Source: Column (1 ) U. S. Department of Commerce, Air Commerce Traffic Pattern 
( 2 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 
( 3 ) Column ( 1 ) f Column ( 2 ) 



-92- 



HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF AIR MAIL TRAFFIC 
CHICAGO METROPOLITAN AREA AND THE UNITED STATES 



1948-1957 



1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 



Tons Air Mail Enplaned 



Chicago 

TTT~ 

6,718.0* 
7,793.7 
9,410.5 
12,048.4 
12,773.0 
13,022.9 
18,676.6 
19,386.0 
21,361.1 
23,458.5 



United States 

~w — - 

53,986.5 

65,301.4 

69,672.5 

90,056.6 

98,052.0 
100,341.3 
113,607.6 
124,263.2 
132,112.7 
142,052.3 



* Gotch and Crawford, Airline Station Analyses 



APPENDIX A 
TABLE 16 



Chicago as a 
Per Cent of the 
United States 

~m 



12.44% 

11.93 

13.51 

13.38 

13.03 

12.98 

16.44 

15.60 

16.17 

16.50 



Source: Column ( 1 ) U. So Department of Commerce, Air Commerce Traffic Pattern 
( 2 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 
( 3 ) Column ( 1 ) f Column ( 2 ) 



-93- 



HISTORICAL GROWTH OF AIR MAIL TRAFFIC AND POPULATION 



APPENDIX A 



CHICAGO AN0 TttE UNITED STATES 
1948-1957 Chicago 



TABLE 17 



United States 





Tons Air 1 
Enplan 
Number 
(PPP) 
(1) 


Vlail 

ed 

Index 
(2) 


Metro. , 

Populati 

Number 

(000) 

(3) 


Area 
on 

Index 

(4) 


Tons Air Mail 
Enplaned 


Population 




Number 

(PPP) 

(5) 


Index 


Number 

(000) 

(7) 


Index 
(8) 


1948 


6,719. P* 


100 


4,921 


100 


53,968.5 


100 


143,796 


100 


1949 


7,793.7 


116 


5,147 


105 


65,3P1.4 


121 


146,496 


102 


195P 


9,410.5 


140 


5,261 


107 


69,672.5 


129 


149,106 


104 


1951 


12,048.4 


179 


5,545 


113 


9P,P56.6 


167 


152,311 


106 


1952 


12,773.0* 


190 


5,631 


114 


98, 952. P 


182 


154,927 


108 


1953 


13,022.9 


194 


5,665 


115 


100,341 .3 


186 


157,161 


109 


1954 


18,676.6 


278 


5,761 


117 


113,607.6 


210 


160,020 


111 


1955 


19,386.0 


289 


5,851 


119 


124,263.2 


230 


162,566 


113 


1956 


21,361.1 


318 


6,151 


125 


132,112.7 


245 


165,812 


115 


1957 


23,458.5 


349 


6,183 


1# 


142,052.3 


263 


168,805 


117 



* Gotch and Crawford, Airline Station Analyses 

Source: Column ( 1 ) U. S. Department of Commerce, Air Commerce Traffic Pattern 
( 2 ) Index of Column ( 1 ) , 1948 = 100 

( 3 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 

( 4 ) Index of Column ( 3 ), 1948 = 100 

( 5 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 

( 6 ) Index of Column ( 6 ), 1948 = 100 

( 7 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 

( 8 ) Index of Column ( 8 ), 1948 * 100 

-94- 



APPENDIX B - TERMINAL UTILIZATION 



APPENDIX B 
EXHIBIT I 



TERMINAL POPULATION SURVEY 
CHICAGO O'HARE FIELD 
TERMINAL POPULATION COUNT 



DATE 



- 


(X) 


CHECKER 

WEATHER Clear 
Rain 


Warm 
Cold 


Area Hour 


Count 


Half-Hour 


Count 


Ground Transportation, 
Unloading, 

1. People 

2. Vehicles 









Northside ticket counter 

People Seated 

General Merchandise 

Southside Ticket Counter 

Coffee Shop 

Dining . Room 

Cocktail Lounge 

Miscellaneous People 
Standing (in lobby area) 

.Claim Baggage 

Ground Transportation, 
Loading, 

1. People 

2. Vehicles 



-95 



APPENDIX B 
EXHIBIT 2 



AIRLINE PASSENGER SURVEY 

Airport 
Airline 
Date 



Time Passengers 

FLIGHT NUMBER Arrival Depar ture Boarded Off Through 



-96 



APPENDIX B 
TABLE 1 



MEDIAN PEAK HOUR FUNCTIONAL .AREA POPULATION 



0"HARE FIELD 



1957 



Friday 







Four Pea 


Functional Area 




Hours 
(1) 


Ticket Counters 




30 
32 
24 
20 


People Sedated - 


Lobby 


60 
59 
55 
55 


People Standing 


- Lobby 


35 
33 
31 
30 


General Merchandise 


12 






9 






8 






8 


Coffee Shop 




46 
45 
38 
38 


Dining Room 




44 
42 
37 
37 


Cocktail Lounge 




27 
26 
26 
25 



Termina l Building and Area Population 

Sunday 

Median Four Peak Median 

Peak Hours Hours Peak Hours 



28 



57 



32 



42 



40 



26 



-97- 



m 



30 
28 
27 
22 

54 
53 
53 
46 

58 
56 
51 
45 

14 
13 
12 
11 

47 
43 
42 
36 

45 
40 
40 
26 

28 
26 
24 
23 



(4) 



28 



53 



53 



13 



43 



40 



25 



Functional Area 



People in Unloading Area 



Frida 




Sunday 
Four Peak Median 
Hours Peak Hour 



(3) 



13 
11 
11 
10 



W 



n 



People in Loading Area 



6 
6 
6 
5 



16 
9 
9 
8 



Claim Baggage 



24 
22 
16 
10 



19 



53 
26 
22 
11 



24 



Source Column ( 1 ) Special Terminal Population Survey, O'Hare Field, 1957 

( 2 ) Median of four peak hours shown for each area in Column ( 1 ) 

( 3 ) Same as Column ( 1 ) 

( 4 ) Median of four peak hours shown for each area in Column ( 3 ) 



-98 



APPENDIX B 
TABLE 2 

MEDIAN PEAK POPULATION RELATED TO AIR PASSENGER TRAFFIC 

O'HARE FIELD 



1957 



Ticket Counters 
People Seated - Lobby 
People Standing - Lobby 
General Merchandise 
Coffee Shop 
Dining Room 
Cocktail Lounge 
People in Unloading Area 
People in Loading Area 
Claim Baggage 



Median Peak Population Per 
100 Daily Enplaning Passengers 



M edian 


Median 


Friday 


Sunday 


2.2 


2.5 


4.6 


AJ., 


2jS 


4.7 


0.7 


1.2 


3.4 


3.8 


3.2 


3.5 


2,1 


2.2 


0.5 


1.0 


0.5 


.0.8 


1.5 


2/1 



Source: Special Terminal Population Survey, O'Hare Field, 1957 



-99- 



APPENDIX B 
EXHIBIT 3 



TERMINAL POPULATION SURVEY 



CHICAGO O'HARE FIELD 



GROUND TRANSPORTATION - PAID PARKING 



DATE 



0800 - OPENING INVENTORY 





CHECKER 






(X) 


WEATHER 


Clear 
Rain 


Warm 
Cold 





PLUS TOTAL ENTERING 






LESS TOTAL EXITING 












Hour Ending 


Number of Cars 
Entering Leaving 


0900 






1000 




1100 




1200 




1300 




1400 




1500 




1600 




1700 




1800 




1900 




2000 




2100 




2200 




2300 




2400 





- 100- 



TERMINAL POPULATION SURVEY 



CHICAGO O'HARE FIELD 



GROUND TRANSPORTATION - LIMOUSINES 



( Arriving and Departing Passengers ) 



APPENDIX B 
EXHIBIT 4 



DATE 



COMPLETED BY 



( X ) WEATHER Clear 



Rain 



Warm 



Cold 



Time of Arrival 



Number of Passengers 



Time of Departure Number of Passengers 



- 101 - 



APPENDIX B 



EXHIBIT 5 



TERMINAL POPULATION SURVEY 



CHICAGO O'HARE FIELD 



GROUND TRANSPORTATION -TAXI INVENTORY 



DATE 



CHECKER 



Hour of Inventory 

0800 
0900 
1000 
1100 
1200 
1300 
1400 
1500 
1600 
;140Q 
1500 
1600 
1700 
1800 
1900 
2000 
2100 
2200 
2300 
2400 



( X ) WEATHE R C lea r W orm 

Rain Cold 

Number of Taxbs in Waiting Line 



102 



APPENDIX. B 
TABLE 3 

USE OF GROUND TRANSPORTATION BY AIR PASSENGERS 

O'HARE FIELD 

1965 

Air Passengers 
1965 ~~ 
Mode of Transporfation Org ! noting Terminating 

. Number Per Cent N umber Per Cent 

Private Automobile 1,479,200 50% 1,183,300 40% 

Taxi 1,035,400 35% 1,035,400 35% 



Airport Limousine 295,800 10% 591,700 20% 



'o 



Helicopters 147,900 5% 147,900 5% 

Total 2,958,300 100% 2,958,300 100% 



104- 



APPENDIX B 
TABLE 4 

MEDIAN PEAK VEHICLE INVENTORIES 

O'HARE FIELD 

1957 







Vehicle 


Inventory 






Fr 


iday 


irs 


Sunday 






Four Peak 
Hours 

-an 


Median 
Peak Hot 
(2) 


Four Peak 
Hours 
(3) 


Median 
Peak Hours 
(4) 


Vehicles in Unloading 


Area 3 
3 
2 
2 


3 




3 
2 
2 
2 


2 


Vehicles in Loading 
Area 


4 
3 
2 
2 


3 




3 
3 
2 
2 


3 


Paid Parking 


374 
367 
358 
348 


363 




345 
324 
286 
280 


305 


Taxi cabs 


25 
24 
22 
22 


23 




22 
21 
19 
17 


20 



Source: Column ( 1 ) Special Terminal Ground Transportation Survey, 

O'Hare Field, 1957 
( 2 ) Median of four peak hours shown for each type of 

vehicle inventory in Column (1) 
( 3 ) Same as Column (1) 
( 4 ) Median of four peak hours shown for each type of 

vehicle inventory in Column (3) 



- 105 - 



APPENDIX B 



TABLE 5 



MEDIAN PEAK VEHICLES INVENTORIES RELATED TO AIR PASSENGER TRAFFIC 

O'HARE FIELD 

1957 



Peak Vehicle Inventories Per 
100 Daily Enplaning Passengers 

Median, j Median 

Friday Sunday 



Vehicles in Unloading Area 

Vehicles in Loading Area 

Paid Parking 

Taxi cabs 

Limousines 

Rental Cars 



0.24 


0.18 


0.24 


0.27 


29.35 


27.02 


1.86 


1.77 


0.32 


0,37 


L86 


1.64 



Source; Special Terminal Ground Transportation Survey, O'Hare Field, 1957 



106 - 



APPENDIX C - CONCESSION REVENUES 



APPENDIX C - 
CONCESSION REVENUE 

INTRODUCTION 

This appendix consists of detailed data used in the development 
of estimates of gross concession revenue for those concessions at O'Hare Field 
in 1965 whose space requirements are expected to be a function of the amount 
of gross revenue available - 

In the development of these forecasts, the revenue experience 
of the concessions at Midway Airport and O'Hare Field, as well as other major 
airports in the United States, was considered. Consideration was also given to the 
present level of air passenger traffic at O'Hare Field as it related to the development 
of concession revenue.. Similarly, the effect of over-crowded conditions at 
Midway Airport on concession revenue was also considered „ 
FORECAST CRITERIA 
Ao Public Food 

The public food concession, which may include such separate 
concessions as Dining Room, Coffee Shop and Snack Bar, is expected to gross 
$1.00 per enplaning passenger at O'Hare Field in 1965 . This estimate is 
felt to be conservative in view of the present experience at O'Hare Field and 
at other major airports in the United States. In 1956, gross public food revenue 
was equal to $1.09 per enplaning passenger at O'Hare Field. 
B. Cocktail Lounge 

Gross revenues derived from the operation of a cocktail lounge 

concession at O'Hare Field in 1965 are expected to equal $ .50 per enplaning 

passenger. This is comparable to the experience of other major airports in the 

- 107- 



United States where similar cocktail lounge concessions are in operation . In 
1956/ the gross revenue from the cocktail lounge was equal to $ =26 per 
enplaning passenger. |t is felt that with the development of a more complete air 
traffic pattern at O "Hare Field, particularly during the daily periods associated 
with peak cockfail lounge activity, revenues per enplaning passenger can be 
expected to increase to the level forecasted* 

C. General Merchandise 

The general merchandise concession, including news-stands, gift and 
novelty shops, is expected to gross $ ,50 per enplaning passenger at ! Hare 
Field in 1965. In 1956, revenues of the general merchandise confession at 
O 'Hare Field were equal to $.32 per enplaning passenger. It is felt that a 
more fully developed air traffic and terminal population pattern at O'Hare 
Field will allow revenues equal to the forecasfybasis to be developed, since 
this level is comparable to levels presently experienced by major airports 
in the United States. 

D. Game Room 

Gross revenue estimates for the game room concession at 
O "Hare Field in 1965 were forecasted as equal to $ „ 03 per enplaning 
passenger. In the development of this forecast the experience of other major 
airports in the United States was considered., It is felt that this level of 
concession revenue, since it is comparable to levels developed at other 
major airports, represents a forecast basis that is reasonable for sprite and 
facility planning. 



- 108 



E. Toilets 

This concession is expected to develop gross revenues equal to 
$o02 per enplaning passenger at CHare Field in 1965 . This level is comparable 
to levels at other major airports in the United States and is felt to be a 
reasonable basis for developing revenue forecasts for space and facility planning 
purposes . 



- 109 



APPENDIX C 
TABLE 1 



FORECAST OF GROSS CONCESSION REVENUE 

O'HARE FIELD 

1965 





Enplaning 

Passengers 

1965 


Gross Concession 
Revenue Per 
Enplaning Passenger 


Gross Concession 
Revenue 
1965 


Dining Room and Coffee Shop 5 ]42 500 




$1.00 


$5, 142,500 


Cocktail Lounge 






.60 


3,085,500 


General Merchandise 






.50 


2,571,300 


Game Room 






.03 


154,300 


Toilets 






.02 


102,900 



no- 



GROSS REVENUE AND PEAK OCCUPANCY OF CONCESSIONS 
AVERAGE DAY 
O'HARE FIELD 
1965 



Dining Room 
and 
Coffee Shop 

A Annual Grcss Revenue $5,142,500 

B Average Day Gross Revenue $ 14,090 



C Gross Revenue per Peak 
Occupancy 

D Peak Occupancy Estimates 
Based on Revenue 

E Peak Occupancy Forecasts 



$ 



14.00 



1,010 
970 



Cockfal 1 
lounge 

$3,085,500 

$ 8,450 



APPENDIX C 
TABLE 2 



General 
Merchandise 

$2,571,300 

$ 7,040 



22.00 $ 

380 
350 



50.90 

140 
120 



Source: Line A * Table I, Chapter Vlll 

B - Line A 7 365 

C - Estimated, based on present O'Hare Held experience 

D - Line B 7 Line C 

E - Forecasted on basis of air passenger traffic growth 



- Ill -